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s the Inlander team put together this year’s HOLIDAY GUIDE (page 19), it was clear there’s a lot more year-end fun in store in 2021 than there was last year. The gift of the COVID vaccine is the most obvious reason we can at least see some semblance of normalcy in the community’s Yuletide activities and traditions, and in this issue you’ll find several guides to help you celebrate the season with your friends and families. Be sure to browse the calendar and our suggestions, and catch up with some holiday tales from our staff writers reminiscing on particularly memorable gifts from their pasts. Also this week, Daniel Walters takes a look at what the end of the pandemic might look like when, and if, it finally arrives (page 8), Food Editor Chey Scott delves into how supply-chain issues are adding to restaurants’ pandemic headaches (page 63), and Madison Pearson introduces Joey Clift, an indigenous comedian and WSU alum making noise in Hollywood (page 14). — DAN NAILEN, editor

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Every week, we ask our followers on social media to share their thoughts.

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CHARMAINE RAE: An R2-D2 coffee press. Still have no idea who sent it. MATTHEW WEAVER: Shoutout to the Ghostbusters firehouse when I was a kid! #whoyagonnacall MAGGIE FISHER: A garbage can. My husband gave me a garbage can to throw my birth control in, Christmas 2018, so we could start our family. Our little girl is 2 now! RACHELE NICHOLS: Given = Photo album filled with old, some forgotten memories all labeled and organized. WENDY CARROLL: My son. The birth mother chose us to adopt her baby the week before Christmas. That was the best gift ever.

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Picturing Peace From Quakers to campus radicals to holiday greeting cards, a short history of the season’s most ubiquitous phrase BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

“P

eace on Earth” is a nice, seemingly vanilla sentiment for a greeting card, but not too long ago it was a radical notion. In fact, the idea was treasonous a few centuries ago, and only became a “movement” these past 100 years. One turning point was the creation of that little symbol you see on all those bumper stickers. That icon has a story, traced to England in 1653, when a religious leader faced death; to Spain, on May 3, 1808, when thousands of innocents were murdered by Napoleon’s troops; and to 1958, in the middle of the Pacific Ocean. The story starts in 1648, when an odd young man named George Fox could be found preaching peace around London, but not in churches. He preached in markets, or in open fields. Europe’s devastating 30 Years War was ending, and England’s own civil wars were underway. Fox’s preachings caught the attention of the authorities, and he was imprisoned repeatedly. One judge got a laugh by saying Fox would “tremble at the word of the lord.” Thus the name “Quakers” was coined, for the religious movement properly known as the Society of Friends. By 1653, Fox and his challenge to English war-making was viewed as a real threat. Oliver Cromwell had Fox arrested and brought to London. Speculation was rampant that Fox would soon be found swinging from a hangman’s noose. The two men met, and, to everyone’s surprise, Fox was set free. Apparently, Fox “spoke truth to power.” In his recollection of the meeting, Fox wrote that Cromwell was taken by his brand of Christian worship, and “with tears in his eyes said, ‘Come again to my house; for if thou and I were but an hour of a day together, we should be nearer one to the other’; adding that he wished me no more ill than he did to his own soul.”

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s we all know, war persisted. Although the 30 Years War was the last religious war fought on European soil, the nation states that rose up in its aftermath quickly found plenty of reasons to kill each other. It was just 150 years later that Europe would be torn asunder again, via the Napoleonic Wars. One of the campaigns in those wars was the Peninsula War (1808-14), fought in Spain and Portugal. This marked another deadly twist, as it was named a guerilla war at the time — and is still considered the first such war by historians.

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The painter Francisco Goya fills a unique niche in art history; he’s considered perhaps the last of the old masters and also among the very first of the modernists. While beauty was aesthetic enough for the old masters, Goya added truth to his art. In the final years of the Peninsula War, Goya turned his eye to war. In The Disasters of War, he documented the atrocities being visited on his country with a photographer’s honesty. Goya’s conscience and skill allowed him to become the first modern anti-war artist.

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espite the atrocities of the Napoleonic Wars, humanity didn’t learn much. After the 20th century dawned, the world was soon launched into another major war — World War I. Then a failed peace led to an even wider conflict — World War II. Serving in that conflict was one U.S. Navy Commander, Albert Bigelow. While steaming back into Pearl Harbor on Aug. 6, 1945, he heard the news of a devastating new weapon dropped on Japan. All these centuries of war and suffering were punctuated by these apocalyptic moments. Humanity had so perfected the art of war that it could now kill a city in a single moment. Wasn’t this finally proof that war had to end? Deeply troubled, Bigelow searched for ways to protest. Ultimately he found comfort with a religious group — none other than George Fox’s Society of Friends. Through those con-


nections, Bigelow and his wife Sylvia put up two women from Hiroshima who were in the United States to get plastic surgery, badly disfigured from the atomic blast. Bigelow’s faith and experience in war dictated action. In 1958, Bigelow and four others sailed his 30-foot boat The Golden Rule from California to Hawaii, with an ultimate destination of the Marshall Islands, where the United States would test another nuclear bomb. Bigelow was arrested and jailed in Hawaii, but not before his mission gained widespread notoriety. Another Quaker, Dorothy Stowe of Vancouver, B.C., was so impressed by Bigelow that she borrowed his tactics for a little group she formed in 1971 called the Don’t Make a Wave Committee. Now we call that outfit Greenpeace.

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s Bigelow sailed to oblivion, the people of the world saw for the very first time an odd symbol waving on a banner above The Golden Rule. The freshly designed nuclear disarmament symbol made its debut. Now we just call it the peace symbol. Around the time Bigelow was out hunting Japanese subs around the Solomon Islands, an Englishman of fighting age was spending the war years working on a farm in Norfolk. Gerald Holtom, you see, was a conscientious objector. In World War I, some 2,000 Americans who refused to participate in the war were locked up. Others with religious or moral misgivings have been allowed to serve off the frontlines, or as medics. In World War II, some 12,000 draftees who refused to participate were put to work in work camps. In England, there were 60,000 conscientious objectors during World War II, and they, like Holtom, were put to work at home. Holtom was also horrified by the atom bomb, and he joined the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament. An artist by trade, Holtom created a symbol for the CND to use for an upcoming protest. Basically, the design is intended to mimic the semaphore signals for the letters “N” and “D” (“N”uclear “D”isarmament), but when Holtom thought about it, the simple little symbol had deeper meanings, too. As he wrote to Peace News, Holtom said: “I was in despair. Deep despair. I drew myself: the representative of an individual in despair, with hands palm outstretched outwards and downwards in the manner of Goya’s peasant before the firing squad [Actually, The Third of May, 1808: The Execution of the Defenders of Madrid]. I formalised the drawing into a line and put a circle round it.” Holtom finished the symbol on Feb. 21, 1958, and immediately donated it to the public domain. Bigelow wasn’t the only one to latch onto the symbol. The United States’ student peace movement was afoot on college campuses at the same time. University of Chicago student and peace activist Philip Altbach visited London in 1960, and brought back to campus with him a bag of buttons with the logo on them. Who cares if they were designed for nuclear disarmament? It would do as a banner to fight against the Vietnam War, too. Or it could even be used to articulate solidarity over the Civil Rights Movement, as Bayard Rustin, an early adopter of the peace symbol, believed. In the 1960s, Altbach’s Student Peace Union reproduced and sold thousands of the buttons on college campuses.

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oday, millions of items are covered with Holtom’s powerful little symbol, just as the phrase “Peace on Earth” has been stamped onto the modern holiday season. It’s almost become rote. But in the weeks ahead, as you see those words, hear those words or say those words, realize that the phrase did not reach the public domain by accident. Across the centuries, George Fox, Francisco Goya, Gerald Holcom, Albert Bigelow and others took a radical idea and turned it into perhaps humanity’s most profound statement of purpose. n

Adapted from an Inlander Holiday Guide essay first published November 23, 2006.

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NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 7


HEALTH

The Missing Goalposts Gov. Jay Inslee says he wants to eventually get rid of his COVID mandates, but even he doesn’t yet know when

In a September press conference, Gov. Jay Inslee wears a mask bearing the logo of the university where is vaccine mandate would eventually get the coach fired. OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR PHOTO

BY DANIEL WALTERS

O

n Sunday, Washington got rid of its indoor mask mandate for the vast majority of circumstances. That’s Washington, D.C., to be clear. Washington state however? It remains one of only four states to have a mask mandate in all public indoor locations. At a press conference last week, one reporter pointed to how few other states had mandates, and asked Washington state Gov. Jay Inslee what threshold the state had to meet to unmask again. “Other states have taken other courses, I recognize that. We call those second-class states,” Inslee says. “Because Washington state is a first-class state, we’re a state that believes that we outta save lives.” While Inslee quickly retracted the dig at “secondclass states,” he stood by the substance of his comparison. After all, Washington still has the seventh-lowest percapita COVID death toll in the country. And two of the states with an even lower death rate, Hawaii and Oregon, also still have universal mask mandates. “Some of these other states that are going the course you suggested, they have fatality rates two and three times higher than ours,” Inslee said. Inslee plans to eventually, hopefully, lift the restrictions — not just the mask mandate, but possibly his vaccine

8 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021

mandates as well. But that depends on a lot of factors. “If — and I hope that we will reach this date — the infection rate is low enough, and the vaccination rate is high enough, and the hospital capacity is high enough, and the medical therapeutic situation is good enough, the mandates are not necessary,” Inslee says. “Every time somebody gets vaccinated, that day gets closer.” But by now, Inslee’s critics point out, he’s been operating with special powers under his self-declared state of emergency for more than 630 days. “There’s been a deliberate decision not to set a bunch of goalposts out there,” says Jon Snyder, Inslee’s outdoor recreation adviser, “based on how unpredictable the virus has been.” So for now, to extend that Inslee-style sports metaphor, we’ve been stuck in a kind of indefinite overtime, with no game clock or clear touchdown line telling us when it’s going to end. Neither the crowd stuck in the stands nor the players on the field know what’s going to happen next.

S

tanding with Spokane Mayor Nadine Woodward in the Spokane Pavilion on June 30, Inslee was ready to celebrate. For nearly a year, Inslee had tied his COVID restric-

tions to one reopening metric after another, laying out detailed thresholds of hospital admission rates, test positivity rates, case counts and, eventually, vaccination levels that counties needed to meet. And finally, he set out June 30 as the date for a fullstate reopening: Washington state was on the “two-yard line,” he’d determined, so the state was going to open “no matter what.” In Spokane, the governor cheered the return of Hoopfest, the region’s beloved 3-on-3 basketball tournament, referring to it as the highest peak of “human civilization.” At first, Inslee allowed himself some swagger. In July, when asked if there needed to be reform to his emergency powers, he responded, “I’m not sure I want to reform a system that won the Super Bowl.” Republicans were furious, accusing him of “spiking the football.” But then Washington state, like the rest of the country, was hit with the full force of the delta variant, a far more contagious mutation of COVID. Hospitals in Spokane and North Idaho were overwhelmed. The daily COVID death toll in Washington state reached a record high in September. Hoopfest was canceled for the second year in a row. ...continued on page 10


NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 9


NEWS | HEALTH “THE MISSING GOALPOSTS,” CONTINUED... “We thought we were in one spot in June, and then by August we were in another spot,” Snyder says. That experience — loosening restrictions only to have to crack down again two months later — looms over current debates. Snyder stresses that the governor didn’t reimpose some of the toughest restrictions — no capacity limits or business shutdowns. Instead, Inslee reimposed mask mandates regardless of vaccination status, applying it to not just schools and indoor businesses, but to large outdoor events. And he told health care workers, teachers and state employees — even Washington State University’s football coach — to get vaccinated or be fired. Some asked for exemptions. Many didn’t get them. Still, Washington has largely avoided the delta death toll that mandate-averse states like Idaho have suffered. While over 9,100 people have died in Washington state of COVID, if it had Idaho’s death rate at least 7,200 more — over 16,300 — Washingtonians would be dead today. As cases have soared and deaths have stacked up in Colorado, public health officials have pleaded with the state’s Democratic governor to reimpose a statewide mask mandate. “Where we are in November of 2021 is actually very similar to where we were in November of 2020,” says Umair Shah, Inslee’s health secretary. “What we do not want to see is this lead into an uptick into a sixth wave.” At this moment, the bad news and the good news have all intersected to make predictions particularly difficult. Some of Inslee’s new mandates — like showing proof of vaccination or a negative COVID test to attend large events — only officially took effect this month, Snyder points out.

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“Where we are in November of 2021 is actually very similar to where we were in November of 2020.” At the same time, three new weapons are arriving to fight off the delta variant. First: The Pfizer vaccine was approved for children ages 5 to 12 at the end of October — crucial to allowing schools to return to normal without as many worries about outbreaks and quarantines. Second: Just last week, the FDA approved vaccine booster shots for all adults — allowing thousands to refresh their immunity, a lifesaver for the older Americans who can still be imperiled as their immunity wanes over time. Third: Anti-COVID pills are almost here. A recent Pfizer study of the company’s new antiviral pills found that the drug could reduce the rate of COVID hospitalizations and deaths for even unvaccinated people by nearly 90 percent. The pills are not quite as miraculous as the vaccine: They don’t reduce infection rates, and they need to be taken within three to five days of the first symptoms. By the time a patient is sick enough to be hospitalized — say, the sort of patient who dismisses COVID as nothing worse than the flu — it may be too late. Still, the Biden administration has already ordered enough pills for 10 million patients. “We’re at a very tenuous place. Our hospitals are at 90 percent occupancy,” says Lacy Fehrenbach, Washington state’s deputy secretary for COVID response. “Antivirals will help us bring that down.” But it adds a whole host of new variables for public health officials to weigh: How soon will the antivirals be approved by the FDA? How readily available will they be distributed? Will the pills be politicized as deeply as the vaccines? “We understand the desire for certainty of the future. It would help us a lot if we had certainty about the future,” says Mike Faulk, a spokesman for Inslee. “I don’t think anybody really imagined or wanted to imagine this point in 2021.”


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he desire to end the mandates is bipartisan. The question is when and how. “If we get a sustained plateau at a low level, absolutely the restrictions should come off,” says state Senate Majority Leader Andy Billig, a Democrat from Spokane. “The signs are encouraging.” He suggests that the vaccine mandates should allow a rigorous testing option as an alternative, a little like President Joe Biden’s proposed vaccine requirements would. Meanwhile, Washington state House Minority Leader J.T. Wilcox, a Republican from Yelm, argues that Inslee should leave the mandates to local governments. “One of the realities is it’s already become regionalized,” Wilcox says. “There’s their state mandates, but big parts of the state aren’t observing it. Large parts of every county are kind of making their own rules.” That’s true, as anyone who walks into a bar in Stevens County or a coffee shop in Seattle can tell you. The trouble is, it’s the places most likely to be enthusiastic about the mandates that appear to need them the least. The New York Times pointed out this month that daily COVID hospitalization numbers for those who’ve been vaccinated in Seattle have been half the typical rate of flu hospitalizations in most years. About 90 percent of those in King County over age 12 have received their first vaccine dose. The counties that voted most heavily against Inslee have, on average, suffered the worst COVID death tolls — a correlation that has become much clearer in the last six months. Stevens County and Spokane County, for example, have suffered more than twice the rate of COVID deaths as King County. But Wilcox argues that you have to look at the costs of the mandates too: Take the vaccine mandates on Washington state employees: They’ve been extremely successful at driving vaccinations — 92 percent of Washington state employees have been vaccinated as of Nov. 8. Yet over 1,800 decided they’d rather quit or be fired than get vaccinated — and that doesn’t include health care employees and those in schools and universities. Those losses can exacerbate existing staffing shortages. “A lot of the resignations and forced firings were concentrated in the Department of Transportation,” Wilcox says. “So what is going to happen during winter weather closures?” And Wilcox has another, more long-term, concern: He wants to change the law to require a governor to ask the Legislature every 30 or 60 days for permission to continue operating in a state of emergency. “In a well-functioning government, there’s no one that doesn’t have handcuffs,” Wilcox says. Billig notes that Inslee still has had to get approval from legislative leaders in both parties before passing emergency executive orders that suspend the law, but Billig says he agrees that some kind of reform to the governor’s emergency powers are necessary, “I don’t think anybody had a pandemic in mind when these emergency powers were created,” Billig says. LETTERS The state Senate DemoSend comments to crats, however, rejected a numeditor@inlander.com. ber of Republican proposals to constrain Inslee’s proposals during last year’s legislative session, and Billig doesn’t detail exactly which reforms he has in mind. For Inslee advisers like Snyder, the end of the days when they’re the ones making choices between lives and livelihoods couldn’t come sooner. “I am so ready to give up my power on this,” Snyder says, with a weary chuckle. It’s just that the pandemic needs to end first. It’s not like this is some sort of game to Inslee, where he’s imposing restrictions just for kicks. “This isn’t fun,” Inslee said at last week’s press conference. “We don’t do this for frivolous recreational pursuits. We do it because it’s saving lives.” n danielw@inlander.com

KNOCK OUT THE FLU WITH ONE SHOT It’s more important than ever to get vaccinated against the flu. The flu vaccine can keep you from getting the flu and spreading it to others. This is critical during the COVID-19 pandemic to help keep our hospitals from being overwhelmed.

DID YOU KNOW? The Department of Health recommends a flu vaccine for everyone aged six-months and older every year, including pregnant and nursing women. Most insurance plans, including CHIP and Medicaid, cover the cost of flu vaccine for children and adults. Children aged 18 and under can get recommended vaccines at no cost.

CONTACT US TODAY! (509) 340-9008 healthykids@betterhealthtogether.org www.BetterHealthTogether/HealthyKids This printed material is supported by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $250,000. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by CMS, HHS or the U.S. Government.

NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 11


NEWS | CRIME

Cold Case Solved Spokane Police solve murder of 9-year-old girl after six decades searching for answers BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

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‘A Fair Sentence’ Native woman who killed her alleged rapist gets more than 6 years in prison BY WILSON CRISCIONE

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Native American woman who shot and killed her alleged rapist, and who initially claimed she did so in self-defense, was sentenced to more than six years in prison last week. The sentencing comes after Maddesyn George, a member of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, pleaded guilty to manslaughter and possession of methamphetamine. The case has drawn national attention and sparked local protests against her prosecution. As the Inlander first detailed earlier this year, George says she was raped by Kristopher Graber in July 2020. That night, after the assault, she stole his gun, money and cash. The next day, Graber confronted George, who was inside a car. After a scuffle, George shot Graber through the window, killing him with his own gun. Last week, U.S. District Judge Rosanna Malouf Peterson said before the sentencing that she found George’s sexual assault allegation — told to tribal police shortly after the shooting — to be credible. Prosecutors were seeking a 17-year sentence. Peterson sentenced the 27-year-old to 6½ years, and George will receive credit for the time she’s already served in jail.

12 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021

Maddesyn George and her mother, Jody. George’s mother, Jody George, tells the Inlander she was overcome with relief when she heard the sentence. “It made me cry when I heard it,” Jody George says. “We’re thinking she should be home by Christmas of 2025.” In her plea agreement, George agreed that the shooting was “not legally justified because she exerted more force than was lawful under the circumstances.” “The facts that Ms. George admitted led to one inescapable conclusion: She chose to shoot and kill an unarmed man through a locked car door so she could keep the methamphetamine and money she had stolen from him,” says U.S. Attorney Vanessa Waldref in a statement. “Whatever else can be said about this tragedy, neither violence nor vigilantism are the answers.” George and Graber both had criminal histories related to drugs, and Graber also had arrests related to domestic violence. George’s attorney, Steve Graham, says she pleaded guilty because she felt sorrow for ending another person’s life and she wanted to take ownership of her drug dealing. “She was waist-deep in the drug underworld up there, and she messed up. And we didn’t minimize any of that. She owned her mistake, and she just wants to move on,” Graham says. Activists and other community members have said the case represents the legal system punishing a Native woman standing up for herself even as it ignores violence and murder of Indigenous women. Waldref, in her statement, says just because violent crimes against Indigenous women have gone unsolved doesn’t mean the office will ignore other violent crimes and that “both injustices must be addressed.” Graham says it meant a lot for the George family that the judge found Maddesyn’s account of being sexually assaulted credible. “We were all delighted that there was not only a fair sentence but that finally, after a year and a half of mischaracterizations and gaslighting, a representative of the federal government for the first time looked at her and said that she was believed,” Graham says. n

andy Rogers was a fourth-grader at Holmes Elementary School when she went out one March afternoon in 1959 to sell Camp Fire Girls mints and never came home. A multiweek search for Rogers rocked the community. Three Fairchild Air Force Base airmen died during the early part of the search process when their helicopter crashed into the Spokane River. Later, the community grappled with the heinous nature of what they would ultimately learn about Rogers’ abduction, rape and murder. Now, more than 60 years after her death, Spokane Police were able to give her remaining family the closure of finally knowing who took her life. In a press conference Friday, Nov. 19, Spokane Police Sgt. Zac Storment was able to say with confidence that Rogers was killed by John Reigh Hoff, who died by suicide in 1970 at 31 years old. The case had haunted generations of detectives in the Spokane area, Storment said, as leads continued to pour in over the years but did little to explain what happened that day in 1959. The big break came this year when a Washington State Patrol lab forensic scientist told Storment about a Texas-based company called Othram. The company uses state-of-the-art methods to test very small amounts of DNA or DNA that’s degraded. Othram CEO David Mittelman told reporters that DNA sequencing that has become a game-changer in medicine is likely to do the same for forensics. “We’ve taken on a number of cases where the DNA isn’t good enough,” Mittelman said. “All that was needed to push this case over the barrier to the finish line was just a little bit of extra detail, a few extra clues that we were grateful to be able to deliver.” After Othram worked on a semen sample found on Rogers’ clothing, the company told Storment to look into three brothers who had lived in Spokane. Hoff was the only one who had children, and his daughter offered police her DNA for testing. After a paternity test showed the sample was extremely likely to be Hoff’s, Storment got permission to exhume his body for a direct comparison to be absolutely sure. It was a match. Storment was emotional about the break in the case, noting that while the answer provides some relief to Rogers’ remaining family, it has created pain for Hoff’s family. “That family is feeling some stress relief, but the Hoff family is almost absorbing it,” Storment said. “What they believed about their father growing up has been forever changed.” Hoff’s daughter Cathie later provided an emailed statement expressing her grief. She was not alive when the crime happened, and her dad died when she was 9. “The sorrow and gravity of this injustice has weighed heavy on me,” she says. “I pray for healing for Candy’s loved ones, for myself, for every person affected by this crime.” n


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NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 13


You might say Joey Clift is a cat person.

STAND-UP GUY COMEDY

Joey Clift, a Cowlitz tribal member and WSU alum, is making sure Native voices are heard in Hollywood BY MADISON PEARSON

A

young Joey Clift watched late-night talk shows and The Simpsons almost religiously while living on the Tulalip reservation just north of Everett, and he never saw anyone like himself or his peers on the screen. Since moving from Pullman to Los Angeles in 2010 to pursue a comedy career, he’s felt driven to help push Native American voices into the mainstream and showcase the rich history of Native people through comedy. Most recently, Clift got some national publicity for a Comedy Central animated short he made called How to Cope with Your Team Changing Its Native American Mascot, in which Clift and an all-Native voice cast satirize the complaints of people being told their Tomahawk Chop chants or offensive mascots have to go. The Inlander talked to Clift about his start in comedy, and what’s next for the WSU grad. INLANDER: When did you know comedy was the route for you? CLIFT: Growing up, I didn’t feel like I could work in comedy. I never saw anyone like me on late shows, so I didn’t pursue it right out of the gate. I went to a college fair at Everett Community College, and a recruiter from WSU told me that Murrow [College of Communications] had a college TV station, and I was sold from that moment on. So, I transferred to WSU to become a

14 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021


weather guy. I figured, “Hey, these guys can be funny sometimes — they crack jokes.” I knew I could make people laugh. I worked on the radio station there, Cable 8 Productions, did stand-up around Pullman, and hosted a bunch of on-campus events. After I graduated, Glenn Johnson [current mayor of Pullman and former professor at Murrow College] pulled me aside and said, “You know you can just do comedy, right?” I had multiple professors tell me that I should just focus on comedy. That’s about when I realized I could do this comedy thing.

Live Lounge Entertainment Live Music is back at Coeur d’Alene Casino!

How did growing up on the Tulalip reservation shape your comedy? Growing up on the res and going to res schools, again, I didn’t see any Native comedians. I didn’t even have a sense of what Native comedy was outside of the jokes that funny res folks cracked. Once I was in LA, I didn’t start off writing Native-specific comedy because I didn’t know how to do it in a way that was funny to me — it just made me sad mostly. I’m a White-passing Native, so I didn’t even know if it was my place to write Native comedy, but all of my friends started nudging me toward pursuing it. Along with them urging me to do it, I realized I was one of the only Native comedians getting big opportunities in LA, so I was like, “If I don’t write these jokes in these spaces, who else can?” That’s when I started to be really vocal about my identity as a member of the Cowlitz tribe.

Every weekend, you’ll find live music at the Nighthawk Lounge with local bands playing past midnight. For a more relaxed vibe earlier in the evening, choose the option of live acoustic music in the Chinook Lounge.

Pastiche

Once you started being vocal about being Native, what are some of the first projects you worked on? I worked on a book called The American Indian Ready to Wear Catalog 2018, which was illustrated by my mom and nominated for a book award, and after that I started dreaming up an all-Native comedy show. I pushed the UCB [Upright Citizens Brigade] Theatre to put on a showcase of Native comedians, but I was told by the then-executive director that there was no room for that on the calendar; however there was space for seven nights of some Star Wars show. Once the leadership changed in 2018, I pushed for it again, and we did it. It was a huge moment of me owning my Native identity in comedy. I called it The Ghost of Christopher Columbus Theater Smudging Spectacular, and of course we held it on Columbus Day. It was just 20 hilarious Native comedians who had been fighting for these spots for years. And when that show sold out, it proved that there was a demand for Native comedy. One of the proudest moments of my life. Happy feels like a lower emotion than what I felt in that moment. I never thought it was possible, and it happened. Ultimate wish fulfillment come true.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26TH & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27 TH NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE 8:30 PM – 12:30 AM Get ready to get your groove on with this pop, rock, funky cover band playing hits from the 70s to present day.

Echo Elysium FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26TH & SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 27 TH CHINOOK LOUNGE 6 PM – 9:30 PM

What about your film My First Native American Boyfriend? Where did the inspiration for that come from? It’s my first live-action short film, and it’s currently going through the festival circuit. It’s all about the microaggressions that Native people encounter while dating in 2021. The inspiration is that I was dating a non-Native girl, and one night she shook me awake at like 3 am and confessed to me that her mother dressed her up as Pocahontas when she was 5, and she wanted to apologize to me. I just said, “OK? Go back to sleep.” She woke me up just for that? I found out that a lot of my Native friends have had similar experiences in interracial dating. Are there any projects you’re working on now that we can start anticipating and get excited for? Yes! I’m currently working on a Netflix original cartoon show called Spirit Rangers. It’s about a Native American family and features an all-Native writers room. That comes to Netflix in 2022. Other than that, I’m just focusing on creating things that help marginalized people feel like they can do what I was afraid to do. n For more information about Joey Clift and his latest projects, visit joeyclift.com.

Echo Elysium will be playing a soothing blend of soul, blues, hip hop, rock and acoustic music at the Chinook Lounge.

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NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 15


CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS

Artists and Activists A new EWU exhibit blends mediums to deliver one potent message: It’s time to act on climate change BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

A

spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down, as Mary Poppins used to sing. Sometimes we need to experience something uplifting to better absorb bad news, like the perpetual buzzkill of humans’ negative impact on earth and its inhabitants (aka climate change). That’s the gist of EWU’s art exhibition On the Edge: Living the Anthropocene, which opened in mid-November and runs through Jan. 13. The show, which includes 16 of Natalie Niblack’s oil paintings and drawings and a dozen of Ann Chadwick Reid’s cut paper artworks, offers aesthetically compelling visions — you might even call their art beautiful — of climate change. But the content is definitely not sugarcoated, and the artists’ shared goal is to promote awareness, discussion and, hopefully, action. “Natalie and I are both interested in visual seduction as a means of conveying our message,” says Reid, who met Niblack when both taught at Skagit Community College. The westside artists reconnected while serving on the board of Anchor Art Space in Anacortes and have collaborated frequently since. This is the third iteration of the show, which addresses the Anthropocene, defined as “the current geological age, viewed as the period during which human activity has been the dominant influence on climate and the environment.” Reid’s medium is paper cutting — shapes in the paper are cut away to create the image, much like a stencil — an artform tied to numerous cultures. In China, the country credited with inventing paper, papercuts were ornamental, their elaborate images created to convey “hopes for prosperity and happiness and to prevent disaster,” Reid says. “Jewish papercuts have often conveyed biblical or

16 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021

liturgical messages and are used to document weddings and other important cultural occasions.” Similarly, Reid’s papercuts draw the viewer in because of their familiar format, intricacy and strong graphic quality — mostly black images against a white background. The content, however, is ominous. Reid highlights the absence of two birds against a tangle of black lines that remind of barbed wire in Bird Gone, and a similar work entitled Bee Gone. At nearly five feet across, Seagrass Besieged suggests a web — seashells, surrounded by delicate grasses and thrush-like birds — being infiltrated by menacing, prickly shapes. Paper is impermanent, so one message of this work is that nothing lasts forever, says Reid, who also has several artworks using layers of papercuts to achieve a 3D effect. Reid’s papercuts also underscore the fragility of the Samish Island ecosystem she has experienced over the past 25 years. Although the region is renowned for salmon, crab, oysters and other sea creatures, biological threats are numerous and complex. Marine traffic has escalated — oil tankers, fishermen, recreational boaters, cargo vessels. There are pesticides from farms, which are themselves being pushed out for housing, as well as light, noise and other forms of pollution. “Both Ann and I believe very strongly that this [climate emergency] is the most crucial thing to be addressing in our artwork, both to relieve our feelings, and to get conversations going about climate change,” Niblack says. Niblack’s paintings grab viewers’ attention through “rich, clean color,” she says, as well as high contrast — for example, in the way the candied orange values in

Ann Chadwick Reid’s Dome and Migrations: Oystercatcher by Natalie Niblack Migrations: Tree Swallow amplify the blueness of the birds’ feathers. Two columns of black and gray smoke lure your eye upward, while the ground and zigzag of fire atop the mountains in the distance move your eye horizontally, creating two distinct and familiar visual rhythms. There is also discord, however: The birds’ flight pattern and the angle of their wings seems awkward. Unnatural. That and the smoke create an undercurrent of dread, pushing against things we are drawn to, like the familiarity of landscape, a dramatic sunset, even fire. Niblack’s work is unsettling by design: oceans full of trash, birds ensnared in plastic or dead, laid out on a numbered grid in Harbingers. “The ugliness of the content is why I paint it,” Niblack says of her socio-political oeuvre. “It needs to be looked at, it needs to be discussed.” Indeed, Oregon’s Chehalem Cultural Arts Center hosted On the Edge in 2020 while fires raged nearby, making the show especially timely, Reid says. “We drove through smoke that month to hang the show and were pretty much sequestered in our hotel room while we were there,” says Reid, who reports that Niblack’s painting Candle — a burning evergreen silhouetted against a faint grid — prompted a lot of discussion among visitors. Niblack concedes “the inevitability of participation in the dissolution of the biosphere if you live in this society,” she says. “Driving, using plastics, buying goods from the opposite end of the world are necessities for most of us unless we reject the whole of society.” And although she does what she can — protesting, writing legislators, not consuming animals, driving an electric car — she knows the efforts she and others are making are not enough to pull us back from the edge. “All the protests and volunteering will not take gigatons of carbon out of the atmosphere by 2030,” she says. “That takes leadership and consensus at the highest level, which is not happening fast enough.” n On the Edge: Living in the Anthropocene • Through Jan. 13, 2022 • Mon-Fri, 9 am-5 pm • Free • Eastern Washington University • 140 Art Building, Cheney • 509-359-2494


Our brand-new gaming floor features twice as room with over 400 new machines including industry favorites like The Walking Dead by Aristocrat and South Park by Everi. We’ve also added a larger non smoking section, expanded table games, additional dining option, sports book and poker room coming soon. Visit our website for the latest in expansion news!

NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 17


CULTURE | DIGEST

THE BUZZ BIN

How to use THIS

PULL-OUT SECTION

All indications point to a Cougs win. And yet...

ROTTEN APPLES

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Is this the year the Cougs break through in the Apple Cup? Don’t bet on it BY DAN NAILEN

T

he Apple Cup rivalry took a weird turn this year, thanks to both UW and WSU firing their coaches midseason. Neither the Cougs’ former coach Nick Rolovich nor the Huskies’ Jimmy Lake ever got a chance to strut the sideline during the annual Thanksgiving weekend throwdown before being canned by their respective universities. The duo were slated to face off with their teams as brand-new Pac-12 head coaches in 2020, but COVID scotched those plans. Then Rolovich was fired thanks to his anti-vax buffoonery, followed by Lake being fired a few weeks later for more mundane reasons like losing games and moneyed alumni support. Shoving a player on the sideline on national television didn’t help. So now football fans in Pullman, Seattle and points in between are left with two programs in some disarray. We have two interim coaches in WSU’s Jake Dickert and UW’s Bob Gregory (a Spokane native, and Coug alum!), and an Apple Cup Friday that isn’t anything like what fans thought it would look like at season’s start. And yet, you can bet the state’s TVs will be focused on the game come 5 pm Friday. That’s because rivalries in sports aren’t necessarily based on a history of competitive games. One need look no further than the Apple Cup for proof. The games? Rarely competitive, at least lately. Since 2000, the Huskies have won 15 of the Apple Cups to Washington State’s five. Historically, UW holds a 7432 edge. The teams have tied six times as well, which the Cougs should probably just consider wins given how things have been going on their side of the rivalry. The Huskies and Cougs remain true rivals, though, thanks to being the

18 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021

two major state-run universities. The urban/rural differences of the respective campuses are delicious to contemplate. And as any hack sports writer (ahem) will note each year when the Apple Cup comes around, “Anything can happen in a rivalry game!” I’m not so sure that’s true. I moved to Spokane in 2014, and UW has won every Apple Cup since I’ve been here. The games haven’t been particularly close. UW has a seven-game Apple Cup winning streak, and a 10-point win in 2013 was the closest game in that run. The only thing as consistent as the Huskies throttling the Cougs has been the feeling leading up to the game in recent years that maybe, just maybe, THIS year is when WSU flips the script. During WSU’s Mike Leach era, the Cougs would often be riding high, only to be ground into dust by UW under former Husky coach Chris Peterson. Peterson was 6-0 in Apple Cups in his tenure, Leach 1-7. Once again, circumstances are conspiring to make it seem like the Cougs might win. UW has lost to anyone decent they’ve played. WSU, on the other hand, has turned a poor start to the season into a solid run toward bowl eligibility and potential Pac-12 North crown under Dickert’s guidance (if WSU wins and Oregon State beats Oregon Saturday). If I were a betting man (and I totally am), I’d look seriously at taking the Cougs Friday. But then I remember I’m also a man who does his research, and that seven-game Huskies winning streak speaks volumes. So rather than throwing away money, I’ll wait ’til next year, when both teams will have new coaches, and see if recent history changes course. n Apple Cup 2021 will be played at 5 pm Friday, Nov. 26, on Fox Sports 1.

HO-HO-OH NO What “brilliant” Disney+ executive said: “You know what we need? Another unnecessary Home Alone movie, but one where the only likeable characters are the ‘robbers’ who are getting royally screwed over by capitalism, so every time the little brat hurts them with a ‘comedic’ trap, you actually feel really bad.” Home Sweet Home Alone is a tonal mess because the lead kid who’s left home alone — Max (Archie Yates) — is a pure menace with none of that Macaulay Culkin charming naivete. Meanwhile the robbers (Rob Delaney and Ellie Kemper, both doing the absolute most with what little the script gives them) are just parents trying to save their home for their kids after job loss. They only try to break into Max’s house to retrieve a priceless doll that they think Max stole. Instead of a series of comedic pratfulls, Home Sweet Home Alone essentially becomes kid-friendly torture porn, because this monsterous child is brutalizing the people you want to see win. (SETH SOMMERFELD) GRAINS OF TRUTH What if the world truly were run by a shadow government? What if lizard people, clone replacement programs, mole people and more were all real and orchestrated (or covered up) by a secret corporation? Netflix animated series Inside Job takes a humorous look at what that world might look like, while poking fun at some of the more ludicrous conspiracy theories that linger today. Follow scientist Reagan as she tries to step into leadership while keeping her major snafus along the way out of the news. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL) ALRIGHT ALREADY Dazed and Confused bombed at the box office before becoming a cult fave flick for its depiction of one night in the lives of late-’70s teenagers in small-town Texas. I don’t know that I’d call it a “classic,” but the book Alright Alright Alright: The Oral History of Richard Linklater’s Dazed and Confused makes a pretty good case for that label. Even better, author Melissa Maerz uses her extensive interviews with everyone involved — cast members, studio execs, Linklater himself — to create a revealing look at how the film industry functioned in the early ’90s, especially for a buzzed-about young auteur like Linklater with only one feature to his credit (Slacker). If you’re a Dazed fan, this book is worth a read or listen to its audio version. (DAN NAILEN) n

Pull down then out NOT eggnog.

NOT your new snowboard. YES a resource you keep and share with friends.

Now you know how!

PULL-OUT & KEEP! HOLIDAY GUIDE

2021



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20 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021


THE GIVING

SEASON

W

e all have one: a gift so memorable, we’ll never forget it, whether due to the buildup of childlike anticipation, an accidental — or intentionally devised — discovery before the big day, or a reveal so unexpected you still relive the surprise and elation. For as many amazing gifts as we’ve all given or received, there are also plenty of bad gifts. Useless stuff. Utter duds. Sometimes, an item so completely wrong for you that you may question the true intent of the gifter. Yes, even socks. For this year’s Inlander Holiday Guide, in addition to previews of dozens of local, holidaythemed (plus a few totally not Christmas-related) events — they’re back! — we share stories about the most memorable gifts we’ve ever given or received. From Pokémon games to basketball hoops, John Lennon pants to Legos, we hope you enjoy our silly and sometimes serious reminiscing, and that it sparks a fun trip down memory lane as the holiday giving season arrives. — CHEY SCOTT, Holiday Guide editor

COMMUNITY

HOME OF THE S P O K A N E SYM P H O N Y

THE FOX THEATER Spokane Symphony with State Street Ballet

THE NUTCRACKER BALLET

Morihiko Nakahara, conductor Thurs, Dec. 2 , 7:30pm • Fri, Dec. 3, 7:30pm Sat, Dec. 4, 2pm & 7:30pm • Sun, Dec. 5, 2pm Whitworth University Symphony Orchestra Presents

IMPRESARIO

Tues, Dec. 7, 7pm Whitworth University Christmas Festival Concert

A BRAND NEW MORN

Sat, Dec. 11, 8pm •Sun, Dec 12, 3pm Spokane Symphony

HOLIDAY POPS WITH THE SWEEPLINGS Morihiko Nakahara, conductor Sat, Dec. 18, 8pm • Sun, Dec. 19, 2pm Spokane Symphony

NEW YEAR’S EVE: BEETHOVEN’S NINTH James Lowe, conductor Fri Dec. 31, 7:30pm

T H E

H O L I DAY

C L ASS I C

R E T U R N S

with State Street Ballet THURS, DEC. 2 7:30PM • FRI, DEC. 3 7:30PM SAT, DEC. 4 2PM & 7:30PM • SUN, DEC. 5 2PM

PAGE 22

JAMES LOWE, MUSIC DIRECTOR

SHOPPING

SAT, DEC. 18 8PM

THEATER

SUN, DEC. 19 2PM

PAGE 26

PAGE 30

MUSIC PAGE 34

WITH

THE SWEEPLINGS

Cami Bradley & Whitney Dean

OTHER EVENTS

PAGE 38

COVER ILLUSTRATION BY JOHN MUJICA

JAMES LOWE, MUSIC DIRECTOR

BEETHOVEN’S NINTH

JAMES LOWE, MUSIC DIRECTOR

FRI, DEC. 31 7:30PM

Box Office 624-1200 SpokaneSymphony.org • FoxTheaterSpokane.org NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 21


ITY

N COMMU

G N I K A M S T I R I P S T H G I R B FAVORITE HOLIDAY EVENTS AND LOCAL TRADITIONS MAKE A TRIUMPHANT RETURN AFTER 2020’S YEAR OFF BY CHEY SCOTT

W

hen it gets dark at 4:30 pm and the temperatures drop below freezing, finding the energy and motivation to leave the comfort of home can be rough (and honestly, that’s OK). To ease those winter blues, holiday cheer is here in the form of twinkling lights, elegantly decorated evergreens and much more. Fortunately, the season is looking a lot brighter and more “normal” in 2021, with many local events considered Inland Northwest traditions back on the calendar.

Glide across the lake at night on a “Journey to the North Pole.” COEUR D’ALENE RESORT PHOTO

22 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021


THROUGH JAN. 1

SAT, NOV. 27

The child inside most of us will never tire of the wonderful, fuzzy feeling that comes when viewing bright, colorful holiday lights. There’s just something about the warmth, the nostalgia, the hopefulness of those shining beacons on a long, dark winter night. Recapture this feeling with a nighttime trek around Liberty Lake’s Orchard Park, all from the comfort of a heated car, once again during the Winter Glow Spectacular holiday lights display. Started back in 2014, and originally staged in downtown Spokane, Winter Glow has quickly become a new holiday tradition bringing joy to the community, thanks to donations and dedicated volunteers. Orchard Park, 20298 E. Indiana Ave., free, winterglowspectacular.com

While Santa set up shop under River Park Square’s 50foot tree last weekend, and retailers have been promoting holiday deals for weeks, Riverfront Park’s official holiday kickoff happens after Thanksgiving, as many still feel it surely should. A festive evening of all-ages fun begins at 4 pm with local food trucks and live entertainment from local performance groups — Spokane Children’s Theatre, Natanam School of Dance, Spokane Shakespeare Society and others — near the Numerica Skate Ribbon, plus free Starbucks hot chocolate to ward off the chill. In addition to holiday-themed fun, this year’s event includes booths from community-centered nonprofits sharing what they do and how to help with that mission. Gather around the towering evergreen tree near the skate ribbon just before 6 pm for a countdown to flip the switch on thousands of twinkling lights. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St., free, 4-7 pm, riverfrontspokane.com

WINTER GLOW SPECTACULAR

NOV. 25-JAN. 2

JOURNEY TO THE NORTH POLE

See the lights sparkle and shine across the water while floating across the icy cold lake during the Coeur d’Alene Resort’s annual holiday lights cruises. These nightly excursions are made even more special for all the children on board — when the boat docks at Santa’s workshop, they’ll each be greeted by name. Overnight packages at the resort are also offered this season, and some even include milk and cookies delivered to your room, and a fireside storytime for kids. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second St., $11.50-$26.50 (ages 5 and under free), departs daily at 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 pm, cdaresort.com

NUMERICA TREE LIGHTING

NOV. 30-DEC. 12

CHRISTMAS TREE ELEGANCE

After being forced to take 2020 off, the Spokane Symphony Associates’ big holiday-themed fundraiser is back. Not only is the 13-day event a vital channel for the nonprofit to raise money that supports the Spokane Symphony Orchestra’s musicians, it’s also a holiday tradition drawing thousands of attendees each year to view the elaborately decorated trees and prizes that come with each. As always, raffle tickets to win an entire lot, tree and all, are still just $1 each, with all proceeds going to the symphony, thanks to individuals and businesses underwriting the trees and items on them. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. and Historic Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post; free to view; $1/raffle ticket, spokanesymphonyassoc.org

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For the second year in a row, Manito Park’s annual holiday lights display, usually held inside the pleasantly warm and steamy Gaiser Conservatory, is again spreading out across the park for a drive-thru format. (For those who miss the traditional indoor experience, let’s hope for 2022!) The outdoor setting is intended to keep everyone safely distanced, and is also car-friendly. Entrance to the half-mile, driveable route through the park is on 25th Avenue, either from Grand or Bernard. Keep in mind that because last year’s version was so popular, there were some massive traffic backups. To avoid that, consider going during a non-peak time, like a weekday or earlier in the evening. Manito Park, 1702 S. Grand Blvd., free, event times TBA, thefriendsofmanito.org/holiday n

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Something for Everyone on your Holiday Gift Giving List!

SIXTIES FASHION FEVER

DRESSING LIKE JOHN LENNON WAS MY STYLE GOAL IN THE EARLY 2000s BY CHEY SCOTT

I

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24 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021

n sixth grade, my sister and I “discovered” the Beatles. One fateful day, we checked out Magical Mystery Tour on cassette from the Spokane Public Library, launching us into a magical phase of complete obsession with the legendary band. It also happens that back then — the early 2000s — bell bottom jeans had just come back in vogue. Naturally, we applied our newfound appreciation of 1960s music and pop culture to our evolving youth fashion sense (later both becoming avid vintage clothing collectors). Traditional shopping malls were still thriving, too, and Saturdays with friends often meant trips to NorthTown, home to Claire’s, Hot Topic, Wet Seal and Limited Too. At the latter, we tried to stretch our tiny allowance budgets as far as possible. Limited Too was a massively popular girls and tween clothing brand, and regularly mailed out catalogs filled with overpriced “angel”-printed graphic tees, butterfly hair clips, platform sneakers and oversized cargo pants. While the brand was a favorite, the only time we ever afforded Limited Too duds was on clearance. My middle school best friend Angela, meanwhile, had a closet fully stocked with Limited Too’s colorful, cute and perfectly coordinated outfits. She let me borrow her clothes often, which my mom would wash, and I’d bring them back to school the next day. My favorite Limited Too piece from Angela was a pair of lime-green, satin-finished, flare-leg pants, because they were nearly identical to the ones John Lennon — my favorite Beatle — wore with a matching jacket on the cover of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band. Oh, how I pined for my own pair! Sadly, the brand discontinued the pants before I could find some on sale. But, wait! A new Limited Too holiday catalog soon arrived in our post office box. Inside it were those satin pants like John Lennon’s, this time in new, holiday-themed tones: emerald, royal purple, ruby red and silver. It didn’t matter anymore that the green pants were gone, because I’d since spotted the bespectacled Beatle wearing a similar pair of shiny, burgundy-colored bell bottoms in the 1967 music video for “I Am the Walrus,” one of my favorite songs. I needed them, desperately. Gramma, never one to disappoint her grandkids, was the one to ask for these fancy, overpriced (back then in the range of $40-$50) pants for Christmas. I circled the exact style, color and size and brought her the catalog so the mail-order process (this was very early ecommerce days, mind you) was easy as possible. Come Christmas Day, my dreams of dressing like John Lennon were finally fulfilled. I wore my new pants, often accessorized with round-lens sunglasses, to school — and always in defiance of classmates’ taunts at my love of the Beatles — with pride. n

Who wouldn’t want to wear green satin pants like John’s?


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HOOP DREAMS WHY THE TINY FISHER-PRICE BASKETBALL HOOP I GOT AS A TODDLER WAS THE BEST GIFT EVER BY WILSON CRISCIONE

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f I’m being honest, no gift I’ve received, or will ever receive, could top the Fisher-Price basketball hoop I got when I was 2 years old. It’s not because I actually remember receiving the gift as a 2-year-old. I was a toddler. My brain was mush. But it’s absolutely the gift that shaped my life more than any other. I got it for Christmas back in 1993, and my mom tells me that I made a beeline toward the hoop as soon as I saw it, fixated on it like no other gift I’d ever had in my very short life. There are pictures of me elated next to the hoop, with wrapping paper strewn across the carpet. I did what basically any toddler would do in that situation: dunked the crap out of the ball, over and over. And in between dunks, of course, I’d look up at my parents for approval and applause. Once I was satisfied with the cheers, I’d go and dunk it again. It didn’t take long for me to graduate to a bigger plastic basketball hoop. This was another Christmas gift, and we put it outside on the patio for me to bang around on when it was warm enough. I vividly remember playing 1-on-1 against my brother, who was 14 years older than me, and destroying him. To this day, a part of me maintains that I actually beat him fair and square and he wasn’t just letting me win. Other years, I got those mini hoops you

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could attach to a door. I must have driven my parents crazy jumping up and down in my room and calling out “Criscione for 3!” while shooting around in my bedroom. Finally, when I was around 10 years old, I got the real thing for my birthday — a real basketball hoop. We put it out on the street, and I’d spend hours out there practicing my shot, taking out my frustrations, trying to get better. But it’s that first one that was so special. It all started decades ago in my parent’s living room with that one tiny hoop. It planted something inside of my brain. When I was older, shooting around outside, I’d still look back to the window to see if my parents saw me make that 3-pointer. I imagined them applauding, just like they did all those years ago. n

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NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 25


C I T S I T AR UITS S R U P ING

SHOPP

KEEP IT LOCAL AND CREATIVE THIS YEAR WITH BOTH INDOOR AND OUTDOOR ARTISAN MARKETS BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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y now you’ve surely seen the memes about how “local art” is not stuck on a cargo ship somewhere. True fact. If you’re into local art, or just art, look no further than these events to get your holiday shopping done and support a local creative at the same time. Some of them are new, others a welcome recurrence — no small feat after the year we’ve had.

NOV. 27, DEC. 4, 11, 18

WINTER WONDERLAND MARKET

Organizers hope you’ll have a wonderful time at the first-ever Wonder Building winter market featuring local artisan vendors, lots of good eats and plenty to keep the kids amused, like ping pong and big-screen movies. Get in on the gingerbread competition and groove to local, live music, as you enjoy a sweet deal: free hot cocoa and Italian zeppole (fried dough doused with powdered sugar — so good!) from Bosco Pasta & Panini. Should you want something a little more substantial to nosh on at Bosco, your bites also benefit Wishing Star Foundation. Wonder Building, 835 N. Post St., free, 10 am-2 pm, wonderspokane.com DEC. 1, 8, 15, 22

RIVERFRONT WINTER MARKET

Let’s hope outdoor markets are an unintended upside of our pandemic experiences, and a trend that sticks around. This year, check out the return of Riverfront Park’s Winter Market, with more than 40 vendors signed on (and more likely added throughout the market’s four-week run). Grab a cup of Swell Coffee or something a little stronger from Mountain Lakes Brewing, and a snack from Skewers’ food truck. Meet local artisans like Bryan Correll from Lake Time Photography or Modern Vintage home décor’s McKensey Richmond Domas. Grab a treat for the dog from Fetch Barkery or groovy jewelry from Seven Moons. You get it — shop, eat, drink, and be merry. Riverfront Park Pavilion, 574 N. Howard St., 3-7 pm, free, riverfrontspokane.org DEC. 3-4

OUTDOOR EUROPEAN CHRISTMAS MARKET

Hayden is heading to Germany and Austria for inspiration this holiday season with its first-ever open-air Christkindlmarkt, or Christmas market. The

26 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021

two-day, family-friendly event features outdoor booths from local creatives, as well as tasty eats like brats and pastries. There will be live music, twinkly lights, warming fires and a visit by St. Nick. The market coincides with the city’s holiday parade, which starts at 5 pm Friday on Government Way, heading south to Honeysuckle. The parade — a 14-year Hayden tradition — concludes with a tree lighting in McIntire Family Park, where the market will be ready for its debut. McIntire Family Park, $7/two-day entry, $5/Sat only; Fri 4-8 pm; Sat 10 am-6 pm, haydenchamber.org DEC. 4

DAHMEN BARN HOLIDAY MARKET

The Dahmen Barn is an hour-and-a-half scenic drive south from downtown Spokane, so a suggested itinerary might include a nice meal before or after your trek. The barn itself is a historic treasure as are the guest and resident artists with work representing textiles, photography, ceramics, jewelry, glass, basketry and more. 419 N. Park Way, Uniontown, free, 10 am-4 pm, artisanbarn.org DEC. 18

BRRRZAAR

Last year was a buzzkill for BrrrZAAR organizers, when COVID forced the cancellation of this popular pop-up throughout all three floors of River Park Square by 72 local and regional artists and artisans. For one day only, get your fill of funky, fresh and eclectic, enjoy live music and activities for the kids from Mobius Discovery Center (10 am-5 pm). And reconnect with your community before we all take the winter plunge. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave., free, 10 am-8 pm, terrainspokane.com


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BrrrZAAR is back after a year off.

BRANDON VASQUEZ PHOTO

The Circling Raven Pro Shop is closed December 24TH and 25TH.

THROUGH DEC. 23

Spa Ssakwa’q’n Boutique

Ornaments made by artists are just as likely to look cool hanging on your wall as on your tree. Find plenty for both (or for other people’s walls or trees) at this year’s Ornament and Small Works show at Spokane Art School. Also find fun things like fingerless hand warmers by Jenifer LeMontagne, illuminated manuscript paintings by Hannah Charlton, and colorful pottery by Angelika Wilson-Wipp. Spokane Art School, free; Mon-Fri from 10 am-5 pm; Sat from 10 am-4 pm, spokaneartschool.net

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THROUGH DEC. 31

The spa closes at 4 PM on December 24TH and is closed on December 25TH.

UNWRAP THE CREATIVE: SMALL WORKS EXHIBITION

One month is not nearly long enough to explore all the goodies under the Art Spirit Gallery’s proverbial tree this year. In honor of its 25th anniversary, the North Idaho gallery has extended the time frame for its popular Small Works exhibition. And they’ve packed even more into the main floor, mezzanine and newly renovated lower level with 2- and 3-D works of all sizes and media by 100 artists, many of them new this year, but plenty from the vault like the late Harold Balazs, Morse Clary and Terry Gieber. The Art Spirit Gallery, free, open Wed-Sun from 11 am-6 pm, theartspiritgallery.com n

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NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 27


DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER ALL I WANT FOR CHRISTMAS IS TO BECOME A POKÉMON MASTER

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laying a game of four-square in the street of my neighborhood, arranging my Barbies on the floor of my living room and scribbling on my Nintendo DS screen with a stylus on PictoChat. Those are my most visceral memories from childhood. My Nintendo DS never left my grip from the ages of 8 to 12. (Though I lost one too many of the slender styluses that accompany the device.) I can’t even count how many nights I spent hiding my DS under my pillow only to sneakily take care of my digital dogs once I was sure my mom was asleep. When summer 2006 rolled around and I caught wind of a new Pokémon game set to be released, I immediately decided it was time to start a Christmas list. So, I set out convincing my mother that the only gift I needed that year was Pokémon Diamond. “It can count as both my birthday and my Christmas gift!” My birthday is in mid-November, so this is a tactic I used often as a child, and one that I still utilize from time to time as an adult. Success rate is about 85 percent. “When you battle other people, their Pokémon don’t die, they just faint!” Looking back at this tactic, I’m impressed with my 9-year-old self for bringing up the tough philosophical stuff right away.

28 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021

BY MADISON PEARSON

“I would only play it once I finish all of my homework.” A blatant lie. After months of skillful tactics, annoying commentary and dropping some not-so-subtle hints, it was the day I had been waiting for practically my whole life: Christmas Eve. About three presents into the night I was handed a distinctly Nintendo DS game-shapedgift — complete with a gold ribbon on top. I took a deep breath because as far as I was concerned, my life was about to change forever. By the end of this, I could be well on my way to becoming a Pokémon Master. Of course the red wrapping paper was torn off to reveal a copy of Pokémon Diamond with Dialga sitting proudly on the cover. I don’t remember any other gift I received that night because I immediately popped the game cartridge into my DS and didn’t take it out until I had collected every Pokémon gym badge in the Sinnoh region. My mother breathed a sigh of relief as silence overtook our home for the first time in four months. n

Bloomsday_HolidayGuide_112521_10H_AH_NEW2.pdf

Dialga for the win!


GOOD NEWS AND BAD NEWS SECRET STASHES, SWEARING KIDS AND A LOSS OF YULETIDE INNOCENCE

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he original Bad News Bears movie in 1976 was such a phenomenon that it not only inspired two (pretty terrible) sequels in 1977 (The Bad News Bears in Breaking Training) and 1978 (The Bad News Bears Go to Japan), it also inspired Little League teams across the country to name themselves after the collection of ne’er-do-well, foul-mouthed preteen fictional baseball players. I was too young to see the original in theaters — my parents weren’t going to expose me to the casual racism and a drunk head coach at 5 years old! — and still I became obsessed with the Bad News Bears. That might have been because my under-8 soccer team inexplicably took on the name Bad News Bears. But more likely it was because when I did my annual perusal of the Sears catalog to make my wish list to mail to the North Pole, I came across the cutest little Bad News Bears teddy bear. How a movie featuring swearing, beer-drinking, brawling preteens inspired a cuddly little critter like this I do not know. I just knew I had to have it. I was almost old enough to be out of the stuffed-animal game, but this little guy wearing a Bad News Bears jersey, baseball glove, yellow cap and wide smile entranced me to the point where I told my parents

BY DAN NAILEN

that it was all I wanted for Christmas. Forget the Legos, nevermind the ventriloquist dummy, no model airplanes needed for this guy. I just wanted a new teddy bear to join my menagerie of Winnie The Pooh, Eeyore and Tigger toys. I nagged my folks, and nagged some more, and hoped they’d get the message. Then one day as I poked around casually under my parents’ bed and in their closet, just minding my own business (and snooping for their secret stash of presents for my sisters and I), I found it. There was my Bad News Bear, yet to be wrapped. I was thrilled of course. At least at first. But I almost immediately felt an entirely new emotion for my 6- or 7-yearold self: regret. Now that I knew I was getting my cherished bear, that was one less surprise for Christmas morning! And not only that, I’d have to fake my excitement when I opened it a week later, lest my parents know I was trespassing for presents! Be careful what you wish for, am I right? The ruined surprise didn’t make me love my bear any less, and it lasted several years. But I never sneaked a peek under my parents’ bed again before Christmas morning. n

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The Nutcraker returns Dec. 2-5. DAVID BAZEMORE PHOTO

30 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021


Spokane’s Beloved Diner Open Once Again!

L A N O S SEA T IN I R I SP N O I T C A ER

THEAT

FROM CLASSIC PLAYS TO CHEERFUL COMEDY, PERFORMANCES TO EMBRACE THE YULETIDE SPIRIT BY MADISON PEARSON AND E.J. IANNELLI

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hether you’re carrying on a family tradition at a performance of The Nutcracker or just looking for a good laugh to keep you warm, there’s truly something for everyone this holiday season. Seasonal offerings are back onstage and in-person — so go on, get out there and see some holiday cheer in action! NOV. 26-DEC. 19

ELLEN TRAVOLTA PRESENTS: SAVING CHRISTMAS

Ellen Travolta and family are returning to the Coeur d’Alene Resort for their annual Christmas show, with only one thing in mind: Save Christmas. Last year, our feeling of togetherness was disrupted, but Ellen is here to remind us how it feels to gather with the ones we love. Travolta and company tell stories, sing holiday songs and bring some general brightness to the holiday season this year. Ticket-inclusive overnight resort accommodations are available. Coeur d’Alene Resort, $30, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm and Sun at 5 pm, cdaresort.com/play/events (MADISON PEARSON) NOV. 26- DEC. 19

BABES IN TOYLAND

Whether you’re a fan of the classic Disney Christmas movie or the original 1903 operetta, Spokane Children’s Theatre’s performance of Babes in Toyland is launching audiences into wicked Uncle Barnaby’s toy shop for a night and bringing them along on a holiday adventure. Notable characters such as Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary; Jack and Jill; and others are portrayed by more than 30 young actors from across the Spokane area in this production directed by JoAnne Emery. Spokane Children’s Theatre, $12-$16, opening night (Fri, Nov. 26) at 4 pm, then Fri at 7 pm and Sat-Sun at 2 pm; spokanechildrenstheatre.org (MP) DEC. 2-5

THE NUTCRACKER

This December the Spokane Symphony resumes its cherished holiday tradition of performing Tchaikovsky’s timeless ballet The Nutcracker for a live audience. And the orchestra is joined once again this year by the State Street Ballet of Santa Barbara, California, marking a full decade of collaboration between the two organizations. Over 70

young dancers from across the Spokane area are scheduled to take part in this production, conducted by Morihiko Nakahara. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, $32-$96, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm; spokanesymphony. org (E.J. IANNELLI)

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DEC. 3, 10, 17

HA!MARK HOLIDAY SPECIAL

The Blue Door Theatre players are staying on their toes, and keeping you on yours, with three nights of holidayinspired improvisation. The Blue Door Theatre has been bringing improvised comedy shows to Spokane since 1996, and this holiday season the BDT players are improvising an entire holiday movie full of exciting twists, unexpected turns and — if you’re lucky — a little romance on Friday nights in December. Blue Door Theatre, $8, 7:30 pm, bluedoortheatre.com (MP) DEC. 3-5, 11-12

A CHRISTMAS CAROL

Take a trip to the past, present and future alongside the world’s favorite Scrooge at the University of Idaho’s production of A Christmas Carol. This Charles Dickens classic has been adapted for stage and modern audiences by Kendra Phillips for its world premier and stars U of I’s own professor of performance David Lee-Painter as the infamous Ebenezer Scrooge as he reflects on his life and his personal journey from wretched misery to merry redemption in Victorian-era England. This performance is free for U of I students. Hartung Theatre, $8-$20, Dec. 3-4, 11 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 4-5, 12 at 2 pm, uidaho.edu/class/theatre (MP)

Artist: Linnea Tobias

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TRADITIONS OF CHRISTMAS

It’s a long way from the Inland Northwest to New York’s Radio City Music Hall, which is why Traditions of Christmas brings the spirit of Radio City Music Hall to the Inland Northwest. The annual show is an extravaganza of seasonal songs and dancing, replete with intricately choreographed kickline numbers, a wardrobe of more than 300 costumes and a huge showcase of holiday-themed set pieces spanning everything from the armed forces to the Nativity. Kroc Center, Coeur d’Alene; $23-$36, showtimes vary, traditionsofchristmasnw.com (EJI) n

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THE MAGNETIC DRAW OF LEGOS THE GREATEST GIFT OF ALL IS LOVE, BUT MAGNETIC SPACE LEGOS ARE A CLOSE SECOND

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ven before it was unwrapped, the present built its own hype. Some boxes would feel soft, (A dress shirt from Lamonts, I’d think, as my heart would sink) or solid but pliable. (A paperback book, of course, but which book? There are several out there.) But this box, with the slightest bit of shake, you could hear an iconic rattle. LEGOS! It was unmistakable. I can fondly remember sitting on my Grandma’s couch one Christmas Eve — I was probably about 6 years old — excitedly unwrapping the “Forestmen’s Crossing” Lego set. I spent hours methodically piecing together the Robin Hoodinspired set, following the instructions without wavering. For a kid with a hyperactive imagination, it was soothing. Brick clicks into brick. It just works. It’s the same sort of meditative satisfaction I would find cooking years later. And by the end of it, I had not one, but two treehouse fortresses — connected by a rope bridge spanning a Lego river — to show for it. And soon, I learned, over future Christmases, that there were even cooler Legos out there. There were space Legos, with space men wearing space helmets and space cars and even, as The Lego Movie would later accurately document, spaceships. But once you were done with building the set, you’d dump them all in the big

32 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021

BY DANIEL WALTERS

space-Lego bin, and then combine them. You think your spaceship looked cool with two lasers? Well, buddy, mine has six lasers, and a swivelly satellite dish, and a medieval rope bridge so what do you think about that? Lego officially reached its zenith with the “M-Tron” spaceLego series. Each of the M-Tron Legos came with a real live Lego magnet piece, for better connecting spaceship parts They just let kids have powerful toys like these without a permit. My science teacher dad explained that magnets were a key part of the second strongest force in the universe, stronger even than gravity. And I believed it. I could stick it to the fridge. Pick up paper clips. Stick it to my computer monitor and make the monitor do super weird things. Nearly three decades later, I went Christmas shopping for my niece. And so Christmas afternoon, I sat next to my little niece as she, peering through her glasses, began snapping together a Frozen 2 “Enchanted Treehouse” set. The color scheme was different — green and black were out, pink pastels were in — but it was not so different from “Forestmen’s Crossing.” Legos, when snapped together, were powerful enough to link entire generations. And that, I figure, makes them the first strongest force in the universe. n

Legos meet the power of magnets in the M-Tron series.


Joy is found when you make art.

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MEET YOUR MAKER REDISCOVERING THE JOY OF CREATING ARTFUL GIFTS

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fter my mother died, in the winter of my senior year in college, I discovered report cards she’d squirreled away. My elementary teachers had consistently noted I “showed initiative” but didn’t “play well with others.” True enough. I’m an introvert in a world that favors extroverts. I lucked out, however, with good college roommates who included me in their family events; their friends also became my friends. By the time I’d dropped out of school and moved to my mother’s home to care for her, that safety net and the prospect of one day returning to school kept me from utter freefall. Christmas loomed, eclipsing any joy I might find in being with my mother in her

w

BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

final days. I smoked cigarettes and drank without end, and then for some reason, I decided to make Christmas stockings for my inner circle. I remembered making oversized, personalized cookies for a group of high school friends years before — Raggedy Ann and Andy, Tweety Bird, Snoopy — and it made me smile. I put the bottle down. The stockings were similarly elaborate, sometimes three-dimensional, hand stitched. Some were elegant, others campy, like the Santa bowling a strike, but all of them personalized. I kept expanding my gift list. Making things felt good. And as an art student, I wasn’t focused on “making art” for once; I was just focused. Creation was a welcome distraction, a way to refashion my current

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reality into something else — something recognizable, controllable, that would also bring joy (I hoped). Art as a vehicle for expressing complex things — loss, fear, anger — is powerful. Art history, especially contemporary art history, is full of examples. But art as a way of simply celebrating the act of creation is vital, too. I can’t remember the names I stitched onto any of those stockings. And I’ve not spoken to any of the recipients in decades. Maybe they still have them. Maybe not. What I have is the memory of that time, the recognition of joy that comes from creating something and being purposeful. And I learned a valuable lesson about giving and receiving. n

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Does your spirit need a lift this holiday season? If so, consider joining us in meaningful gift giving by adopting a house or an individual for the 3rd Annual Giving Tree event supporting youth and adults with developmental disabilities in residential services in our community. Last year was a huge success and NAC is committed to this project for years to come! Information to the Giving Tree website is below where you can choose a house to support in 2021! We couldn’t do this without you!!

go to www.nwautism.org and follow the Giving Tree link a gift under We are reaching out to you – our community of partners and friends – for help in getting December by Center every tree. All items are to be unwrapped and dropped off at Northwest Autism (s) through purchase 10th so they can be wrapped and delivered in time for Christmas. If you order your the correct to Amazon, you may ship the gift(s) directly to our address and we will see that it is delivered WA 99202. , house and individual: Northwest Autism Center, 528 E. Spokane Falls Blvd., Suite 14, Spokane ly for this Consider making a cash donation if you don’t have time to shop—the money is used exclusive ticket large project and the funds are used to purchase gifts that may not have been adopted or are items. Remember your donations are tax deductible. s please Please feel free to share this with your friends and family. For additional information or question contact givingtree@nwautism.org or call 509-328-1582

202 W 2ND AVE, SPOKANE, WA • (509) 455-9596 WILDWALLS.COM

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NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 33


MUSIC

S G N SO E H T FOR ON S A E S AFTER A YEAR WITHOUT PUBLIC CAROLS, IT’S TIME TO GET YOUR HOLIDAY MUSIC FIX AT THESE CONCERTS BY SETH SOMMERFELD

34 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021

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ho’s ready to hear some fresh new Christmas songs? Just kidding! It’s holiday concert season, sillies. Here are some opportunities to hear all the familiar faves. NOV. 26

TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA: CHRISTMAS EVE AND OTHER STORIES

Long before the kiddos are shredding wrapping paper on Christmas morning, Trans-Siberian Orchestra kicks off the holiday concert season with the group’s typical arena rock holiday shredding. The tour serves as a celebration marking the 25th anniversary of the symphonic metal band’s debut LP, Christmas Eve and Other Stories, which doubles as the act’s best-selling album at over 3 million units sold. Trans-Siberian Orchestra also doesn’t skimp on the eyepopping visuals, so there’s sure to be plenty of reason to headbang beyond staying warm in the winter cold. Spokane Arena, $50-$90, 7:30 pm, spokanearena.com

DEC. 4

COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY HOLIDAY POPS

Coeur d’Alene Symphony’s principal horn player Casey Traver takes the spotlight in this collection of holiday works that doesn’t dwell too much on the expected standards. Selections for the night, titled “Sounding the Horn: Illuminated Carols,” include music from The Polar Express, Holst’s “In the Bleak Midwinter” and Windel’s “A Chanukah Overture.” But fear not, traditionalists, there’s also a holiday sing-a-long. Schuler Performing Arts Center, $20, 7:30 pm, cdasymphony.org DEC. 4

WASHINGTON IDAHO SYMPHONY JAZZ BAND: HOLIDAY BRASS & A JAZZY NUTCRACKER

Part of the appeal of holiday music is how easy it is for everyone to grasp and sing, so the complexity and unpredictability of jazz always feels like giving the standards a fresh coat of paint. Some of the area’s best jazz musicians unite for border-crossing concerts featuring big band renditions of the timeless tunes, accompaniment from vocalists Kate Skinner and Horace Alexander Young, and selections from Duke Ellington’s take on Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker. Pullman High School, $25, 7:30 pm, waidsymphony.org


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While pandemic times were awful for 99 percent of musicians, they were actually a boon for the father-daughter vocal duo of Mat and Savanna Shaw. The Utah-based Mormon familial group became YouTube stars during the quarantine era based on “daddy daughter duets” of famous songs sung with an air of serious discipline. The group’s studio album debut Picture This debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s Emerging Artists Chart, and they’ve followed it up recently with the release of The Joy of Christmas, which balances religious Christmas hymns with tunes like “Mr. Grinch.” Expect a mix of the silly and the stoic when the pair’s tour of the album arrives in Spokane. Knitting Factory, $28-$55, 8 pm, sp.knittingfactory.com

It’s always a festive time when the Spokane Symphony busts out the standards for its annual holiday pops concert, giving those beloved faves a lush, room-filling sound. This year’s special guest is the folk-pop duo the Sweeplings. The concert is something of a hometown spotlight for the Sweeplings’ Cami Bradley, the Spokanite singer who was a 2013 finalist on America Got Talent. It should be a treat to see how the group’s minimalist harmonizing blends with the symphonic power. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, $43-$92, Sat at 8 pm and Sun at 2 pm, spokanesymphony.org

MAT AND SAVANNA SHAW: THE JOY OF CHRISTMAS

DEC. 10 & 11

CHORALE COEUR D’ALENE: A CHRISTMAS TO REMEMBER

There’s something about a chorus of voices echoing throughout a massive space that screams Christmastime. After a year away, Chorale Coeur d’Alene reinvigorates the holiday season with a program featuring chants, Finnish folk tunes, “Gloria,” and — of course — a family carol singa-long. Trinity Lutheran Church, $30, Fri at 7 pm; Sat at 2 pm and 7 pm, choralecda.com

SPOKANE SYMPHONY: HOLIDAY POPS WITH THE SWEEPLINGS

DEC. 31

SPOKANE SYMPHONY: BEETHOVEN’S NINTH

A Spokane tradition, the Symphony always rings in each new year with this Beethoven epic masterwork. Well, almost every year. Because of 2020’s pandemic postponement, this will be music director James Lowe’s first time conducting at the year-end bash. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, $18$62, 7:30 pm, spokanesymphony.org n

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THE GIFT OF GAMING

The gift that keeps on gaming.

HOW A VIDEO GAME CONSOLE UNDER THE TREE CAN SPARK MEMORIES FOR DECADES BY SETH SOMMERFELD

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hen I think of GOAT Christmas gifts, the three Ms come instantly to mind: Mario, Mickey Mouse. In the early 1990s, Santa brought a Super Nintendo Entertainment System down the chimney (or perhaps green warp pipe). The console bundle included the seminal classic Super Mario World, and I also received (the wildly underrated) The Magical Quest Starring Mickey Mouse as a secondary gift from my parents. I remember rushing downstairs to hook up the system in our basement to set up the console on a TV so small that Gen-Z kids would think it was a comedic prop. But for me it was pure low-def, 16-bit gaming bliss. It turns out the SNES would amass one of the greatest libraries in video gaming history, and it was a joy to grow up smashing goombas with Mario, mountain climbing with Mickey, beating up Foot Soldiers in Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Turtles in Time, exploring the epic RPG worlds of Chrono Trigger, Earthbound, Super Mario RPG,

and The Legend of Zelda: A Link to the Past, powering up in Mega Man X games, smashing barrels in the Donkey Kong Country franchise, or even just swatting flies in the Mario Paint minigames. That cold December morning, this wonderful gift opened the world of video gaming to me. Growing up, the stereotypes about video games were often isolationist. Gaming was for shut-ins who didn’t go outside, a solitary aspect that stunted social interaction and development. But I never found that to be the case, even in the age before online multiplayer gaming was the norm. Loads of cherished memories revolve around social video gaming: grinding away entering roster names in NCAA Football games (pre-Name, Image, Likeness) so that we could spend even more hours building schools into

digital powerhouses, wildly celebrating finally defeating IG-88 in Shadows of the Empire with “Eve of Destruction” blaring on the stereo after hours of failure in a friend’s bedroom, dorm room Super Smash Brothers fracases, etc. Even last year, there was a sense of communal peace among some friends despite the anxious pandemic world swirling around us because we were able to escape to our digital islands in Animal Crossing: New Horizons. I also got to spend time hanging out in Animal Crossing land with celebrities like Blink-182’s Mark Hoppus, Alison Wonderland, Xavier Woods and T-Pain as part of a story series for Launcher. It helped me stay sane in insane times. All of those things grew from the seed of the SNES that showed up one Christmas morning. It was the gift that keeps on giving (and gaming). n

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MOVIE MARATHON LAZY COUCH TIME WITH FAMILY IS THE BEST GIFT OF THE HOLIDAYS

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s someone with a December birthday, many of my richest memories of holiday gifts are crisscrossed with memories of favorite birthday gifts. I vividly remember my parents surprising me with an electric guitar one year for my birthday when I was in high school. They supported my small town indie rockstar dreams as I spent afternoons writing and covering songs with my friend Katie, eventually recording an EP we’ll generously call our one and only album to date. Maybe someday there will be a R.A.W.K. (our band) reunion show in Pullman. Another year around that time I was absolutely stoked to get an iPod nano for Christmas. Hundreds of songs on a device that small? Incredible! I spent hours sharing music (an earbud each) with my friend Justina as we traveled the Palouse on yellow school buses to and from our basketball games. Snow Patrol and The Fray formed a mellow soundtrack on those dark winter nights in early high school. But ask me what was my most memorable Christmas gift? For me, it’s really not a single item. For years, our family tradition was to wake up on Christmas morning, enjoy a lazy breakfast, then roll into the living room to open stockings and presents. Santa would often buy the family new games and DVDs for us all to enjoy, and throughout the morning it was fun to rip the pretty paper off and see which new

BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

movies we’d be enjoying later. Because that was the best part: spending the entire day in our pajamas, watching movies, munching on candy and filling up on “snack out,” which was just cheese, sausage and crackers. Maybe a carrot or piece of broccoli would sneak in there. If we felt we needed a stretch, we’d move back into the kitchen where one of the new board games would come out for a spin before we settled back onto the couch for the evening. Having stayed in Washington for college and my career, I’ve been lucky enough to largely keep that holiday tradition alive with my parents. But now we spend a short time on Christmas morning hopping on Zoom with my little brother, who is married and lives in Kentucky with his wife and mother-in-law. We catch up with them and participate in a secret Santa exchange, enjoying the smiles as we open gifts together virtually. Of course, it’s not really The Lord of the Rings extended edition set, or the transforming Transformers DVD case that stand out in my mind as incredible gifts, though they were. The act of movie watching translated into spending quality, cozy time with my loved ones. And though a few thousand more miles may separate us, we can be thankful that technology still helps us bring a bit of that Christmas cheer to one another no matter where we’re celebrating from. n

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SOMETIMES YOU NEED TO GET AWAY FROM THE CAROLS AND EGGNOG DURING THIS TIME OF YEAR BY INLANDER STAFF

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t’s easy to love most aspects of the holiday season. Great food, reunions with family members and plenty of quality TV movies on the Hallmark Channel if you’re into that sort of thing. But even the jolliest among us needs to step away from the roasting chestnuts and mistletoe once in a while and have a good time completely devoid of holiday cheer. Here are a few suggestions on how to do just that this year.


Jo Koy offers a welcome reprieve from Christmas everything. ANY TIME

DEC. 18

Braving the cold (and maybe also snow) for a quiet afternoon at the museum is a great way to beat cabin fever, and to keep kids entertained during winter break. Currently, the MAC offers five exhibits to explore at your leisure, from a retrospective on legendary glass artist Louis Comfort Tiffany to a display of historic and contemporary dugout canoes made by the United Tribes of the Upper Columbia. Visitors can also view American Indian art from the personal collection of Omak artist Joe Fedderson, plus a selection of recently acquired pieces from the Pacific Northwest-focused Safeco Art Collection. “What We Make: Nature as Inspiration,” meanwhile, is an interactive exhibit designed with families in mind that explores the role nature plays in handcrafted objects. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave., open Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm, $7-$12, northwestmuseum.org (CHEY SCOTT)

Spend a cozy Saturday afternoon at home with the family testing your memories on all things Disney with the latest installment of the Spokane County Library District’s online trivia series. Specifically, you’ll want to brush up on your knowledge of winter-adjacent (not all holiday-themed) Disney-made movies, although make sure to look beyond the mega-hit Frozen franchise. According to the library, anything set during winter, about winter sports or with characters who thrive in the cold is fair game. They’ve even name-dropped some titles you might want to rewatch if your team is uber-competitive, including the Narnia series, Anastasia and even live-action films like Cool Runnings and Eight Below. Online, free, all ages, 2-3 pm, scld.org (CS)

VISIT THE MAC

DEC. 3-5

JURASSIC QUEST

Aspiring fossil hunters and dinosaur lovers get an early holiday treat at this immersive, three-day experience that’s all things dinos. The touring event boasts more than 100 photorealistic, animatronic dinosaur replicas, plus live shows, interactive science and art activities, rides, and more. Tickets to the self-guided, walk-through event are sold for timed entry slots, so don’t wait until the last minute if you and the family plan to go. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd., $19-$33, all ages, jurassicquest.com (CS) DEC. 17

JO KOY

This long-delayed Spokane appearance by stand-up comic Jo Koy could be the perfect antidote to when you hit holiday overload. Since starting at open mics at coffee shops in his hometown of Las Vegas, Koy has built one of the more impressive resumes in modern comedy. After establishing himself in Vegas, he made his way to LA and became a regular panelist on Chelsea Lately, started a couple of podcasts including the ongoing The Koy Pond, and has recorded standup specials for Comedy Central and Netflix, full of material touching on his family and American-Filipino heritage. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd., $40-$80, 8 pm, firstinterstatecenter.org (DAN NAILEN)

TRIVIA: DISNEY IN THE WINTER

DEC. 18

BRUCE COCKBURN

Bruce Cockburn is serious songwriting royalty in some circles, thanks to a career that spans a whopping 50 years now. The artists who’ve covered his tunes through the years are a diverse lot, including k.d. lang, Barenaked Ladies, Jerry Garcia, Anne Murray and Jimmy Buffett. In 2020 the Canadian was set to tour for the 50th anniversary of his debut album, but of course COVID put the kibosh on that. So now he’s back on the road giving it a go again, just as a double-album of his greatest hits arrives in stores in December, an expansive look at his topical folk and jazz-influenced rock sure to make up much of the setlist when he drops by Spokane a week before Christmas. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague, $35-$45, 8 pm, bingcrosbytheater.com (DN) DEC. 28-JAN. 2

ANASTASIA

Anastasia is a Broadway musical based on the legend of a young Russian duchess who may have been spared the cruel fate suffered by the Romanov family in the wake of the Bolshevik revolution of 1917. Its whirlwind story of an amnesiac orphan who bears a striking resemblance to the missing duchess has already been adapted at least twice for the big screen, and this fairly recent stage adaptation draws on the acclaimed 1997 animated film with music and lyrics by the prolific duo Lynn Ahrens and Stephen Flaherty. Expect plenty of romance, surprise and adventure. First Interstate Center for the Performing Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd., $42-$100, showtimes vary (E.J. IANNELLI) n

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Shop, dine, and stay in Downtown Coeur d’Alene. You could win a Figpickels shopping experience, a Traeger grill, gift cards, and more, just by spotting a scout elf! Join the festive scavenger hunt, every weekend leading up to Christmas. Visit cdadowntown.com/elf to learn more.

NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 39


Downtown Spokane for the Holidays DowntownSpokane.org

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New Flavors Across Downtown

ungry for something different to make this holiday season something special? Start your culinary adventure with these recent additions to downtown Spokane’s ever-growing food scene. Is it a cozy waffle house serving from-scratch breakfast dishes like waffles and gravy or waffles with lemon and blueberry? Or is it a European-inspired café serving artisan coffee and tea, French champagne, crafted cocktails, and delightful desserts? It’s both! Recently opened by three friends who had a unique vision for downtown dining, PEOPLE’S WAFFLE (15 S. Howard St., peopleswaffle. com) and its connected neighbor, EMMA RUE’S (15 S. Howard St., emmarues.com), are both located in the historic Symons Block on Howard Street, just east of the Bank of America building. Over in the Crescent Court’s skywalk level, chef Cory Johnson and business partner Brad Frey are elevating fast food to a gourmet level with their two new quick food options. How about an Italian-inspired porchetta sandwich or a yummy grilled cheese and tomato soup made from scratch with local ingredients? That’s SPOKANEWICH (707 W.

40 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021

Main Ave., spokanewich.com). For Johnson’s take on Latin American and Mexican cooking, try TIO’S TAQUERIA (707 W. Main Ave., tios-tacos.com), with savory carne asada tacos, or chicken and mole burritos. Don’t forget dessert: chocolate pudding, better than mom’s. The two longtime friends adapted concepts they saw in Portland’s food truck scene and feature dishes from Johnson’s 20-plus years of cooking, from Dubai fine dining to Nicaraguan surf camps. When the news hit that Washington’s west-side restaurateur Ethan Stowell was bringing his popular Italian restaurant, Tavolata, to Spokane, diners were all a-twitter. And the celebratory chirping continued when Stowell opened BOSCO PASTA & PANINI (835 N. Post St., ethanstowellrestaurants.com), a counter-service sampling of his award-winning food inside the popular Wonder Building, just west of the Flour Mill. “You can get a bowl of pasta, a panini, a salad,” says Stowell. Try the potato gnocchi with mushrooms and basil pesto or the pork and beef meatball panini, perfect with a pint of local craft beer. 


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mall businesses need the support of their communities as much as ever. And supporting them has never been so fun — or potentially so rewarding! This holiday season sees the return of Small Business Bingo, which will run every day in downtown Spokane between the nationwide SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY on Nov. 27 and Monday, Dec. 20. To play, all you have to do is pick up a bingo sheet at River Park Square. Then just visit the participating businesses featured on the card and be sure to get a stamp or signature while you’re there. Once you’ve collected five stamps in a row, column or diagonal, simply return the card to the River Park Square concierge. Your card will be automatically entered into the weekly sweepstakes drawings for $250 held on Nov. 29 and Dec. 6, 13 and 20. A total of $1,000 in cash will be given away during the promotion. 

NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 41


Downtown Spokane for the Holidays

Riverfront Park: The Center of It All

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ll season long, Riverfront Park is NUMERICA the spot for fun holiday activiTREE LIGHTING CELEBRATION ties. Everything starts at 4 pm on Nov. 27 with the NUMERICA TREE LIGHTING CELEBRATION. Before the official lighting at 6 pm, you can enjoy food trucks, live entertainment and info booths at the plaza next to the Numerica Skate Ribbon. The ribbon will be open, too, so you can don your skates and head out on the ice, warmed by a free cup of hot cocoa courtesy of Starbucks. That celebration also marks the start of LIGHT UP THE NIGHT. Part of this event is the Trail of Lights, a self-guided tour that wends through existing features like the Balazs Fountain, all illuminated for the holidays. In addition, the Community Tree Display showcases about 40 trees around the park that local nonprofits have decorated. Over at the Pavilion, you’ll be able to catch a spectacular LED LIGHT SHOW every evening from sunset to 10 pm through Jan. 3. And don’t forget the downtown Business Improvement District’s FREE CARRIAGE RIDES sponsored by Wheatland Bank, as well as the RIVERFRONT PARK WINTER MARKET (Nov. 17, Dec. 1, 8, 15 and 22) featuring farmers, artisans and crafters from around the region inside the Pavilion lobby. 

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ocated in what was previously Stella’s restaurant, TELEPORT VINTAGE + CO. (917 W. Broadway Ave., facebook.com/teleportvintageandco) is a departure from your everyday antique mall. Rather than having individual consignment spaces, Teleport integrates all of its vendors’ wares for a more unified feel. Along with its curated selection of vintage clothing, décor and upcycled items, you’ll also find products from the natural skin care line Kani Botanicals and the leather goods brand Westward Leather, both locally based. Another local brand that’s making waves is BIRDS IN THE COAST (709 N. Monroe St., birdsinthecoast.com). Their new appointment-only storefront just north of the Monroe Street Bridge is the best place to get a firsthand look at their one-of-a-kind bags — messenger, duffel, backpack, crossbody, you name it — made from carefully sourced materials. For the latest in exclusive fashion that also happens to celebrate our fair city, check out the all-new matching Spokane

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jacket and bag pairings they’ve recently released with local designer City Chapters, dubbed the Kinship Collection. Birds in the Coast has also got an eye-catching 2021 winter lineup that incorporates bright splashes of color and classic textures using sustainable vegan leather. “For the most part, you will never see your bag anywhere else,” says owner and lead designer Jaiz Boyd. “If that’s something that people are looking for in a gift, they can do so knowing they’re also supporting a small, local business whose larger mission is to empower others.” Expressions of style come in many forms. A MODERN PLANTSMAN (110 S. Madison St., amodernplantsman.com) lets you tap into the green power of classic and exotic houseplants for an inspired, space-enhancing gift for the home or office. And don’t worry about presentation: They’ve got pots and planters, too. You’ll find their brand-new Spokane digs opening soon at the sidewalk level of Hotel Indigo; now you can find their plants at Boulevard Mercantile. 

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owntown, year-round. That’s Spokane. Winter markets mean lots of places to peruse artisanal goods, while events abound, from concerts and comedy, to theater performances and art shows. Celebrate the year’s end with these downtown dining options guaranteed to make for a memorable holiday meal. Making people feel good and providing good food is the goal at WILEY’S DOWNTOWN BISTRO (115 N. Washington St., wileysbistro.com), where chef/owner Michael Wiley has put his heart into the fouryear-old restaurant. Look for

comfort foods with an upscale emphasis on ingredients, presentation and unusual elements like a delicate baked Brie puff pastry with fresh fruit or the juicy huckleberry barbecue burger with pickled cabbage. Pop in for lunch or make reservations for dinner where entrees like crab-topped salmon and duck confit await. Everything about GANDER AND RYEGRASS (404 W. Main, ganderandryegrass. com) feels special: the historic building, full-length wooden bar and artful décor. The menu features locally sourced delights like artisan cheese from nearby Wanderlust Delicato and handcrafted dishes like chef Peter


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Froese’s melt-in-your-mouth pasta. Gourmet dining, yes, but the vibe is very welcoming. Whether that’s lunch, a light bite and cocktails during apertivo hour, or a full-on dinner expertly paired with wine, Froese wants everyone to relax and enjoy the experience. “You’re here to eat,” Froese says, “and we’re going to have as much fun as we can in the kitchen.” Have a French-inspired meal at MAGNOLIA AMERICAN BRASSERIE, located inside the Hotel Indigo (110 S. Madison, Facebook: magnolia-american-brasserie). Come here for a cocktail, craft beer or glass of wine and appetizers like Cajun crab and shrimp cakes or grilled Brie sandwiches. For dinner, try their chicken piquant — a house favorite — or a cooked-to-order ribeye with wild mushrooms. Magnolia has lots of gluten-free and vegetarian meals, plus daily specials Tuesdays through Saturdays. 

NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 47


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Downtown Holiday Events

Santa Express

This locally organized holiday retail store is for kids ages 4-12, many of whom make this shopping experience part of their holiday tradition. With the assistance of an “elf,” kids shop for everyone on their list from a wide selection of gifts priced between $1 and $10. For those who prefer to shop from home, an online shopping experience is also available at santaexpress.org. Proceeds of this event benefit Vanessa Behan. Through Dec. 23, open daily: Mon-Fri from 11 am-7 pm, Sat from 10 am-7 pm and Sun from 11 am-5 pm. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. santaexpress.org, (509-415-3506)

Trans-Siberian Orchestra

This year’s long-awaited tour celebrates the 25th anniversary of the group’s landmark album Christmas Eve and Other Stories, the three-time certified platinum album that launched the group to superstardom and spawned the bring-thewhole-family rock holiday tradition that has now played to more than 17 million fans all across the nation. Fri, Nov. 26 at 7:30 pm. $39.50-$89.50. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave., spokanearena.com, (509-297-7000)

Numerica Ice Ribbon

“Cheap Skate Tuesdays” includes a free skate rental with each paid, one-hour admission, every Tuesday through Feb. 22, during regular skating hours, from 11 am-8 pm. On Fridays from 6-9 pm (Dec. 3-Jan. 28, excluding Christmas Eve), enjoy music from a live DJ while gliding around the ribbon. One-hour skating admission: $7.95/ages 13+ and $5.95/ages 3-12. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.org (509-6256600)

Crescent Holiday Window Displays

Enjoy a holiday stroll down west Main Avenue and step back in time with five classic window scenes featuring vintage holiday decor rescued from the basement of the former Crescent Department Store. Each of the windows were designed by local artists Stephanie Bogue, Melanie Lieb, Derrick Freeland and Jazmin Ely under the creative direction of Tiffany Patterson and windows painted by Mallory Battista. Nov. 27-Jan. 2; scenes are lit Fri-Sat from 12-10 pm and Sun-Thu from 3-8 pm. Free. Davenport Grand Hotel, 333 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. davenporthotelcollection. com, (800-918-9344)


Winter Wonderland Market

To celebrate the holidays, the Wonder Building hosts an inaugural, festive winter market offering activities for the family including live music, movies, art and gifts, decorated Christmas trees, complimentary hot cocoa and more. Saturdays from 10 am-2 pm through Dec. 18. Wonder Building, 835 N. Post St. wonderspokane.com (509-606-8900)

Jurassic Quest

Walk through the Cretaceous, Jurassic and Triassic periods to see the dinos that ruled on land, and “deep dive” into the Ancient Oceans exhibit to come face-to-face with the largest apex predator that ever existed: a moving, life-size, 50-foot-long megalodon. Fri, Dec. 3 from 1-8 pm, Sat, Dec. 4 and Sun, Dec. 5 from 9 am-8 pm. $19-$36. All ages. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. jurassicquest.com/events/spokane-wa

MAC Holiday Artist Studio Tour Visit five local artists in their studios to see where they create and how they work, plus a local couple’s personal art collection. This year’s featured artists are Melissa Cole, Neicy Frey, Louise Kodis, Nicholas Sironka, Reinaldo Gil Zambrano and the contemporary art collection of Jim Kolva and Pat Sullivan (proof of vaccination required here). End the day at Ella’s Supper Club to mingle with the artists, enjoy live music from Ron Kieper jazz and more. Dec. 4, tour from 10 am-4 pm, reception from 4-6 pm. Tickets ($15-$20) at northwestmuseum.org

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The Spokane Symphony welcomes back State Street Ballet of Santa Barbara, California, for their 10th year of exquisite dancing with us to Tchaikovsky’s memorable score. More than 70 local young dancers complete the cast. Thu-Fri, Dec. 2-3 at 7:30 pm, Sat, Dec. 4 at 2 pm and 7:30 pm, Sun, Dec. 5 at 2 pm. $32-$96. All ages. Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox, 1001 W. Riverside Ave. spokanesymphony.org (509-624-1200)

West Central Coloring Book Party

On First Friday in December, join Spark Central and Eastern Washington University’s Social Aesthetics class for a night of coloring pages created by community members. There will be large pages for community participation and solo pages for continued fun. Fri, Dec. 3 from 5:30-7 pm. Free. All ages. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy., spark-central.org (509-279-0299) HOLIDAY EVENTS CONTINUE ON NEXT PAGE 

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of this suite will be donated to Spokane nonprofit, Big Table.

To reserve Santa's Suite, please call 509-744-2327 or email spcc_res@hilton.com NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 49


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A free community fireworks show hosted by the Kendall Yards Business District, held in conjunction with the district’s annual Winter Festival, featuring an array of local vendors in the Kendall Yards Welcome Center, and amongst Kendall Yard’s resident businesses. Fri, Dec. 3 at 6:30 pm. Kendall Yards, West Summit Parkway. facebook. com/kendallyardsbusinessdistrict

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This rising TikTok star has over 700k followers and 100 million video views. Thornton built a loyal following by posting hilarious, heartfelt and occasionally cringey moments of self reflection that are relatable to audiences young and old alike (with a splash of autotune). Sat, Dec. 4 at 4:30 pm. $30-$40. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague Ave. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998)

This annual luncheon is held as part of Christmas Tree Elegance — on display through Dec. 12 at River Park Square and the Historic Davenport Hotel — the annual raffle fundraiser of decorated trees to support the Spokane Symphony. In addition to a menu created by Davenport Hotel chefs, Spokane Symphony Music Director James Lowe directs a group of Spokane Symphony musicians playing holiday favorites. Tue, Dec. 7 and Wed, Dec. 8 at 11 am. $55. Historic Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. spokanesymphonyassoc.org (509-458-8733)

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Festa Italiana

A festive holiday event co-hosted by the Spokane Cagli Sister City Association with food, fun, fashion, film, games, raffles, wine tasting and the launch of a new sister city microbrew collaboration between Spokane and Cagli, Italy. Sun, Dec. 5 from 12:30-5 pm. Free admission. All ages. David’s Pizza, 803 W. Mallon Ave. Details on Facebook: Spokane Cagli Sister City Project page.

SJO Holiday Concert

The annual Spokane Jazz Orchestra holiday concert features the cherished Christmas music of Nat King Cole, as well as other holiday classics, played by a 17-piece ensemble of some of the best jazz musicians in the Northwest. Also featuring guest vocalist Horace Alexander Young, a WSU professor of Jazz Studies who’s played alongside music luminaries such as B.B. King, The Temptations, Anita Baker, The Four Tops and Bill Withers. Sat, Dec. 11 at 7:30 pm. $17-$30. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. spokanejazz.org (509-227-7404) 

I

f you need assistance, the Downtown Ambassadors are always happy to be of service. You’ll find this unique hospitality crew out and about throughout the downtown core during the holiday season. Easily identifiable by their bright blue jackets, they can offer valuable advice on where to find the perfect gift for that friend or family member who’s hard to shop for. Or, if you’re looking for something tasty to eat while you’re out shopping, they love giving directions to their favorite local restaurants. And sometimes they really go the extra mile. The Downtown Ambassadors have been known to help heavily laden shoppers carry their bags or even to refill an expired parking meter. 

CORN IS YELLOW THIS TURKEY IS BROWN WE HAVE COOL GIFTS, THAT WON’T LET YOU DOWN. BOO ATTICUS RADLEY’S COFFEE & GIFTS DOWNTOWN SPOKANE • HOWARD ST.

NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 51


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hen you’ve got friends or family visiting for design from a lineup that includes everything from piggy the holidays, or you’re just looking for some banks and cookie jars to snowman mugs, then paint using fun indoor entertainment when the air a glaze of your choice. There are even glittery and textured turns chilly, there’s no shortage of options in glaze options. downtown Spokane. Unleash your inner Viking at JUMPING “A lot of families make Polka Dot Pottery part of their JACKALOPE AXE THROWING (226 W. Riverside Ave., jumpholiday celebration,” says manager Sally Dashiell. “They’ll ingjackalopeaxeco.com), where you’ll come in every year and paint ornahave the chance to throw sharp obments as a family tradition, then go jects at a target in a safe environment. and enjoy the other events downWhether you’re a complete newbie or town and make a day of it. And if a seasoned member of the World Axe they want to share the experience Check out the latest in Downtown Spokane Throwing League, Jumping Jackalope with others, we also have gift cards in next week’s edition of CITY SIDEWALKS can help you hone your technique and to-go kits.” inside the Inlander. Find out about the while having a great time. It’s a memoMiniature golf moves indoors at hottest Happy Hours, cool shopping microrable pick for an office holiday party, a FLATSTICK PUB (618 W. Main Ave., districts and, yep, it’s back, The Nutcracker. family outing or even a date night. flatstickpub.com), which features a For the risk-averse, there’s POLKA nine-hole course through kegs, basDOT POTTERY (River Park Square, polketball hoops and even some local kadotpottery.com), where the excitement stems from taking landmarks. There’s also Duffleboard, a tabletop mix between an unadorned piece of pottery and turning it into a personmini golf and shuffleboard. Play with a date or a group while alized artistic creation. Simply pick your preferred premade enjoying a selection of 28 tap beers and ciders. 

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52 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021


Fish and Waves Lamp from Tiffany Glass & Decorating Company on display at the Museum of Arts & Culture through Feb. 13.

BENEFIT 13TH ANNUAL “THANKS FOR THE WALK” DOG WALK Join the community for the 13th annual Thanksgiving Day dog walk to benefit the operation of the SpokAnimal Dog Park at High Bridge. Bring your well-behaved dog, enjoy coffee and goodies with fellow dog-lovers and head out on a beautiful one- or twomile morning stroll with your four-legged friend. T-shirts available for purchase. Nov. 25, 9-11 am. $10 suggested donation. High Bridge Park, Riverside Ave. and A St. spokanimal.org (509-534-8133) PALOUSE TURKEY LEG FUNDRAISER Support the Palouse Library at this annual event that funds new books and programming. Enjoy a free coffee and donut and spend a crisp morning with loved ones and neighbors. Donations can also be mailed directly to the Palouse Library (PO BOX 168, Palouse, WA 99161) or dropped in the book drop out front. Nov. 25, 8 am. By donation. Palouse, Wash. whitcolib.org (509-878-1513) BRRC TURKEY TROT The annual Bloomsday Road Runners Club’s Turkey Trot collects food and cash for Second Harvest Food Bank. Runners/walkers have the option of 2-, 3- or 5-mile routes. No registration or entry fee, but participants must sign waiver. Please no pets on the course. Includes prizes, cider and a pre-feast opportunity to burn calories. Nov. 25, 9-10:30 am. Free. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. (206-290-1100) NORTHWEST AUTISM CENTER GIVING TREE PROJECT Visit nwautism.org to find out how you can “adopt a home,”

contribute an item or make a financial donation for gift purchases that benefit youth and adults with developmental disabilities living in residential care homes. Financial donations always welcome and appreciated. Gifts should be dropped off by Dec. 10. nwautism.org SANTA EXPRESS This locally organized holiday retail store is for kids ages 4-12 (encouraged), many of whom make this shopping experience part of their holiday tradition. With the assistance of an elf, kids shop for everyone on their list from a wide selection of gifts priced from $1 to $10. For those who prefer to shop from home, an online shopping experience is also available at santaexpress.org. Proceeds benefit Vanessa Behan. Open Nov. 23-Dec. 23, Mon-Fri 11 am-7 pm, Sat 10 am-7 pm, Sun 11 am-5 pm. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. santaexpress. org (509-415-3506) CHRISTMAS TREE ELEGANCE Spokane Symphony Associates host this annual 13-day event that attracts more than 100,000 attendees, featuring themed, beautifully decorated trees for a raffle displayed at the Historic Davenport Hotel (10 S. Post) and River Park Square (808 W. Main). Nov. 30-Dec. 12. Raffle tickets $1/each. spokanesymphonyassoc.org CHRISTMAS TREE ELEGANCE HOLIDAY LUNCHEONS An annual luncheon is held as part of Christmas Tree Elegance. In addition to a menu created by Davenport Hotel chefs, Spokane Symphony Music Director James Lowe conducts a group Spokane Symphony musicians playing holiday favorites. Dec. 7 and 8 at 11 am. $55. Historic Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. spokanesymphonyassoc.org

COMMUNITY DROP IN & PLAY Join staff, volunteers and other members of the creative community to play board and card games together in a relaxing, positive environment. A variety of games are available, including card games and board games. Or, bring your own game and teach it to others. Thursdays from 12-2 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (509-279-0299) JOURNEY TO THE NORTH POLE A festive lake cruise across the sparkling waters of Lake Coeur d’Alene while viewing more than 1.5 million twinkling holiday lights, and a visit with Santa Claus and his elves at the North Pole waterfront toy workshop. Daily departure times are 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 pm, through Jan. 2 from the Resort Plaza Shops. $10.50$26.50. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdacruises.com LOUIS COMFORT TIFFANY: TREASURES FROM THE DRIEHAUS COLLECTION A celebration of the artistry and craftsmanship of the Tiffany artworks from Chicago’s distinguished Richard H. Driehaus Collection, highlighting masterworks never before presented in a comprehensive exhibition. Open Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm through Feb. 13. $7-$12. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org RESALE TRAIL Visit local vintage and consignment boutiques across Spokane for a chance to win prizes. Fifteen local shops are participating; grab a passport and get a stamp when you visit through Nov. 27. instagram.com/garland_resale

WILD THINGS This showcase inside the Campbell House explores the personal histories behind period clothing made from leather, fur and feathers to interpret the social fabric of the Campbell family’s era. Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm through Nov. 30. $7-$12. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org (509-456-3931) KENDALL YARDS WINTER FESTIVAL Shop local during this two-weekend festival hosting makers of jewelry, art and crafts and more. Hosted in the Kendall Yards Welcome Center, and throughout business district. Sat, Nov. 27 and Sat, Dec. 3 from 10 am-7 pm; Sun, Nov. 27 and Sun, Dec. 4 from 10 am-3 pm. facebook. com/KendallYards NORTHWEST WINTERFEST A holiday lantern display and cultural celebration featuring dozens of authentically-crafted, lighted holiday lantern displays and immersive experiences in holiday cultures of the world. Nov. 26-Jan. 2, daily from 5-9 pm. $12-$18. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. northwestwinterfest.com CRESCENT HOLIDAY WINDOWS Enjoy a holiday stroll down Main Avenue and step back in time with five classic window scenes featuring vintage holiday decor rescued from the basement of the former Crescent Department Store. Each of the windows were designed and installed by local artists Stephanie Bogue, Melanie Lieb, Derrick Freeland and Jazmin Ely under the creative direction of Tiffany Patterson. Nov. 27-Jan. 2; lights are on Fri-Sat from 12-10 pm and Sun-Thu from 3-8 pm. Free. Davenport Grand Hotel, 333 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. davenporthotelcollection.com

JOHN FAIER/THE RICHARD H. DRIEHAUS MUSEUM

HOLLY JOLLY CRAFT MARKET Kick off the holiday shopping season at this second annual event featuring more than 25 crafters, vendors and small artisans. Bring a new, un-wrapped toy to donate to a local toy drive. Nov. 27, 10 am-5 pm. Free. Rathdrum Senior Center, 8037 Montana St., Rathdrum. fb.me/e/1bbQL2SsD LEARN TO PLAY POKEMON Learn how to play the family-fun Pokemon card game. Great for kids and parents alike, get your very own deck that you get to keep and learn how to play, step-by-step from staff trainers. Best for ages 8+. $5. Saturdays from 1-2 pm at the Comic Book Shop Valley, 11510 E. Sprague Ave. and Sundays from 1-2 pm at the Comic Book Shop NorthTown, 4750 N. Division. thecomicbookshop.net NUMERICA TREE LIGHTING Festivities kick off at the plaza adjacent to the Numerica Skate Ribbon with food trucks and live entertainment. Grab your ice skates, a cup of free hot chocolate provided by Starbucks and join Numerica and Spokane Parks and Recreation to count down to light the community tree at 6 pm. Nov. 27, 4-7 pm. Free. Numerica Skate Ribbon, 720 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. riverfrontspokane.com (509-625-6600) WINTER WONDERLAND To celebrate the holidays, the Wonder Building hosts an inaugural winter market with activities for the family including live music, movies, arts and gifts, Christmas trees, complimentary hot cocoa and more. Saturdays from 10 am-2 pm through Dec. 18. Free. The Wonder Building, 835 N. Post St. fb.me/e/1T4pVlbVM (509606-8900)

NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 53


The Spokane County Library District hosts a fun gingerbread house building challenge on Dec. 11.

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54 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021

WINTER MARKET AT THE PAVILION Riverfront’s second annual winter market hosts 35 local vendors and artisans offering a variety of goods, including handmade items, prepared food, gifts and more. Wednesdays from 3-7 pm through Dec. 22. Free. Pavilion at Riverfront, 574 N. Howard. riverfrontspokane.com

of the Millwood community Christmas tree at the IEP’s front lawn, with hot chocolate, cookies, music, and Santa. The WinterFest Christmas Market also happens on Dalton at Argonne, along with a Friends of Argonne Library craft giveaway. Dec. 3, 4-7 pm. Free. Bottles, 3223 N. Argonne Rd. millwoodnow.org (509-939-1083)

DECK THE FALLS The weekend begins with the “Red Neck Parade” on Friday and the craft faire on Saturday, ending with a community Christmas concert on Sunday. Dec. 3-5. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St., Metaline Falls. cuttertheatre. com (509-446-4108)

OUTDOOR EUROPEAN CHRISTMAS MARKET A two-day family event by the Hayden Chamber, coinciding with the city parade and tree lighting on Saturday. This market is based on traditional open-air Christkindlmarkts in Germany, Austria and other countries during Advent season. Enjoy warming fires, twinkly lights and shopping for antique and vintage items, homemade crafts and gifts, food trucks, warm beverages and more. Fri, Dec. 3 from 4-8 pm and Sat, Dec. 4 from 10 am-6 pm. $5-$7. McIntire Family Park, 8930 N. Government Way. haydenchamber.org (208-762-1185)

HOLIDAY BALL A semi-formal event by USA Dance Sandpoint. Come at 7 pm for a beginners rumba lesson, followed by general dancing to a DJ, refreshments, door prizes and mixers. Singles or couples, as well as all levels of dancers, are welcome. Bring a nonperishable food item to donate. Dec. 3, 7-10 pm. $5-$9. Ponderay Events Center, 401 Bonner Mall Way. (208-699-0421) HOLIDAY FIREWORKS CELEBRATION A community fireworks show hosted by the Kendall Yards Business District, held in conjunction with its annual Winter Festival featuring local vendors in the Kendall Yards Welcome Center and throughout Kendall Yard’s businesses. Dec. 3, 6:30 pm. Free. facebook.com/ KendallYards JURASSIC QUEST Walk through the Cretaceous, Jurassic and Triassic periods to see the dinos that ruled on land, and dive into the “Ancient Oceans” exhibit to come face to face with the largest apex predator that ever existed – a moving, life-size, 50-foot-long megalodon. Dec. 3 from 1-8 pm, Dec. 4-5 from 9 am-8 pm. $19-$36. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. jurassicquest.com/events/spokane-wa MILLWOOD COMMUNITY TREE LIGHTING & WINTERFEST CHRISTMAS MARKET Inland Empire Paper Company, the City of Millwood and Millwood community host a lighting

COLFAX WINTERFEST The Colfax Chamber of Commerce and Colfax Downtown host a traditional lighted parade down Main Street, followed by a fireworks show. Events also include the Perkins House Victorian Christmas from 10 am-2 pm and Santa Selfies at the library from 1-3 pm. The parade starts at 5:30 pm. Shop and enjoy vendors and popups around town. Dec. 4, 12-6:30 pm. Free. explorecolfax.com (509-6109028) ATHOL CHRISTMAS MARKET Local farms, artisans and vendors from the summer Athol Farmers Market are on site offering goods from specialty foods to locally made goat soaps, blended herbal teas, Christmas ornaments, wood crafts and more. Dec. 4, 10 am-4 pm and Dec. 5, 12-4 pm. Athol Community Hall, 30355 Third St. facebook.com/ events/456613122396643 CRAZY CHRISTMAS CATASTROPHE: A FAMILY FRIENDLY MURDER MYSTERY In Christmas Village, preparations for happen 364 days a year. Each year, the coveted Christmas Icon award is bestowed upon the hardest working

and most effective holiday helper. Most of the time, the award is granted to a toy shop elf. This year, it is rumored to be between none other than Icy the Snowman and the Gingerbread Man. This is a family-friendly event, however, it does involve murder, but there’s no gore. Dec. 4, 6-9 pm. $29. Crime Scene Entertainment, 1701 N. Fourth St., Coeur d’Alene facebook.com/ events/929991814594919 DAHMEN BARN HOLIDAY MARKET Visiting artists and craftspeople from throughout the region join the barn’s resident artists to sell their one-ofa-kind products. Interested vendors should contact the Barn for more information. Dec. 4, 10 am-4 pm. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way., Uniontown. artisanbarn.org SVAS CRAFT FAIR Several local vendors offer handmade items, holiday decor and more. Dec. 5, 10 am-4 pm. Free admission. Spokane Valley Adventist School, 1603 S. Sullivan Rd. tinyurl. com/svas2021 ENCHANTED GARDEN DRIVE-THRU This event transformed the decadeslong Spokane tradition of holiday lights in the Gaiser Conservatory into a more COVID-friendly experience by moving outdoors to become a drive-thru format. Dec. 10-19, details TBA. Donation accepted. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. thefriendsofmanito.org/holiday (509-456-8038) HO HO HOMICIDE With the Christmas season well on its way, everyone at the North Pole is working hard to make this a holiday to remember. Despite the efforts of arctic inhabitants, productivity is at an all-time low, upsetting many and putting Santa’s legacy at stake. Desperate for a change, there are many willing to do almost anything to increase efficiency and restore peace at the North Pole. But only one who will go too far and commit an act of murder in this mystical place. Dec. 11, 6-9 pm. $29-$79. Crime Scene Entertainment, 1701 N. Fourth St. facebook.com/ events/564646284612923


REGULAR

FRI | SAT | MON* SUN

Admissions opens Session begins

4 PM 6 PM

11 AM 1 PM

December 2021 December 3RD – 6TH

December 17TH – 20TH

December 31ST

FRI

FRI

FRI

$5 Buy-in

SAT

Matinee Regular Bingo

Matinee

SUN

Regular Bingo

MON Monday Night Bingo

MON Monday Night Bingo

December 10TH – 13TH

December 24TH – 27TH

FRI

FRI

$5 Buy-in Regular games pay $1,000 (minimum electronic buy-in $25)

SAT

Matinee Regular Bingo

SUN

$1,199 Blowout Special Regular games pay $1,199 ($39 paper buy-in. $49 electronic buy-in)

The brand new Ford Ranger MUST GO (if not won prior). Plus, enjoy double winners on regular games. Sales start at 2 pm, session starts at 6 pm.

Regular Bingo

Regular Bingo SUN

$60,000 Keep On Truckin’ New Year’s Eve Bash

Regular games pay $1,000 (minimum electronic buy-in $25)

Regular games pay $1,000 (minimum electronic buy-in $25) SAT

$5 Buy-in

Christmas Eve NO BINGO

SAT

Christmas Day

Keep On Truckin’

NO BINGO SUN

Play the Keep On Truckin’ game this November and December during Regular Bingo sessions. If you get a blackout in 48 numbers or less, you’ll win a brand new Ford Ranger!

Regular Bingo

MON Monday Night Bingo

The truck is guaranteed to go on New Year’s Eve if not won prior. Once the truck is won, the promotion is over.

MON Monday Night Bingo

See the Bingo Venue for more details. *Monday Night Bingo is matinee-style.

W E LC O M E H O M E .

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HOTEL

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DINING

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Sign up now at Inlander.com/newsletters NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 55


MUDGY & MILLIE BOOK GIVEAWAY Join the fun from the lower parking lot on the McEuen Park side of the Coeur d’Alene Public Library for a new Mudgy and Millie book launch and free giveaway. During a drive-thru giveaway of the new Mudgy & Millie Adventures: Africa book, participants remain in their vehicles and Mudgy and Millie, author Susan Nipp, Santa and library helpers will hand each child a paperback copy of the new adventure. Dec. 11, 9:30-11 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org PARADE OF LIGHTS An event coordinated by Elizabeth Ophardt, a sophomore at University High School, as part of her Girl Scouts Gold Award. Holiday lights and decorations can have a positive psychological impact, help boost moods and fend off seasonal depression. At Pines and 32nd in Spokane Valley. Dec. 11, 4:305:30 pm. facebook.com/paradeoflights. net A CONTEMPLATIVE CHRISTMAS... THROUGH TREES Walk through an indoor forest of thoughtfully and beautifully decorated live Christmas trees that tell the story of mankind and God, leading up to Christmas day and beyond. Includes Christmas music, hot cocoa and cookies, and a welcoming ambiance at the Undercliff mansion on Spokane’s South Hill. Dec. 15-19 from 4-8 pm. Free. Undercliff House, 703 W. Seventh Ave. contemplativechristmas.com (509-994-6305) SILENT NIGHT: A FAMILY MYSTERY EVENT Citizens of Holly Hills: Save the date, mark your calendars and set your alarms, the annual Snowflake Manor Tacky Sweater party held in honor of the Holly Hills Christmas Queen is just around the corner. Dress to impress in your Christmas tacky sweater best. Dec. 15, 6-8:30 pm. $19. Crime Scene Entertainment, 1701 N. Fourth St., CdA facebook. com/events/399328111870137 T’WAS THE NIGHT BEFORE MURDER It’s time for the annual pre-Christmas meeting at Mr. and Mrs. Santa Claus’s home in the North Pole. This is the bustling time of the year when the Christmas workers stop working for a moment and come together to discuss how Christmas is unraveling. To everyone’s shock... a murder occurs. Dec. 18, 6-9 pm. $29-$79. Crime Scene Entertainment, 1701 N. Fourth St. facebook.com/events/248354114013228 TRIVIA: DISNEY IN THE WINTER A snow-filled celebration of wintery Disney movies. Trivia includes questions about Disney films that take place in winter,

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are about winter sports and have characters who thrive in the chilly frost, like the Narnia films, Anastasia, The Rescuers, Cool Runnings, Ice Princess, Eight Below, Brother Bear, and Frozen. Registration required. Dec. 18, 2-3 pm. Free. scld.org TURMOIL IN SANTA’S WORKSHOP: A FAMILY MYSTERY EVENT It’s time for the annual pre-Christmas toy production meeting in Christmas Village. Mrs. Santa sent announcements to those most involved in the big delivery on Christmas Eve. The day of the meeting arrived and Christmas Village quickly became deserted as the worker elves – who were given the afternoon off – went to have a blast at a holiday-themed amusement park. As expected, Dank the Elf staged an enormous protest about the elves having a break, but Santa had the final say. Dec. 22, 6-9 pm. $19. Crime Scene Entertainment, 1701 N. Fourth St., CdA facebook. com/events/243049457792963 VIRTUAL WINTER CAMP READ-ARAMA Have some winter fun reading books and doing camp activities, including crafts, music, games and more. When you make reading part of your winter break, you set yourself up for success for the rest of the school year. Grades 2-5. Dec. 27-30. scld.org NEW YEAR’S EVE COMMUNITY FIREWORKS Riverfront Park’s annual NYE fireworks display. Details TBA. Dec. 31. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. spokaneriverfrontpark.com

FILM UNITED BY WATER In conjunction with the MAC’s exhibit “Awakenings,” are regular public screenings of the documentary “United by Water” created by the Upper Columbia Unified Tribes (UCUT). The film follows the first tribal canoe journey and gathering at Kettle Falls, Washington, since the Ceremony of Tears in 1943. Saturdays at 1 pm; first and third Wednesdays at noon through Jan. 31. Included with admission. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org SILVER VALLEY FILM COMMUNITY PREMIERE Across Bank Street hosts the opening of the new Silver Valley Film community movie, “Dimensions.” The red carpet movie at the Wallace Elks Lodge is formal or casual, with dinner and no-host cocktails. Tickets available from Nancy Hanks, request on the Across Bank Street

rate gingerbread houses ever. Compete by yourself or recruit members of your household to form a team and find out. SCLD provides a challenge at the start of the event. Then, use the graham crackers or gingerbread, frosting and whatever you have on hand to assemble and decorate your most elaborate and festive gingerbread house. Registration required. Dec. 11, 2-3 pm. Free. scld.org

Cami Bradley leads a songwriting master class at the Fox Theater on Dec. 6. Facebook page, email at acrossbankstreet@gmail.com or call 208-215-7888. Dec. 5, 5-8 pm. $20. Wallace Elks Lodge, 419 Cedar Street. wallace.idahoelks.org (208-215-7888) A MATCH MADE AT CHRISTMAS The locally-made holiday film comes to Hayden. Romantic, small-town girl Holly and realistic, career-driven Chris aren’t a likely pair, but when “matched” together by Holly’s all-knowing great-aunt, they don’t seem to have much of a choice. “A Match Made at Christmas” is a heartfelt, feelgood, romantic comedy about two people who find real love where they least expect it. The film was made in Coeur d’Alene, written, directed and produced locally with Coeur d’Alene’s Abundant House Films and Micah Lynn Hanson. Dec. 8, 7-9 pm. $8. Hayden Discount Cinema, 300 W. Centa Ave. hdcmovies.com

FOOD & DRINK ROCKET WINE CLASS Rocket Market hosts weekly wine classes; sign up in advance for the week’s selections. Fridays at 7 pm. Call to reserve a seat, or register online. Price varies. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com (509-343-2253)

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fordable, professional photos before you leave. Breakfast includes pancakes, eggs, sausage, juice, hot chocolate, applesauce, milk and coffee and tea. Also includes activities and gifts for children, and live Christmas music by Taylor Belote on steel drums. Free parking. Dec. 4, 11 and 18 from 9 am-noon. Prices vary. Southside Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. soutsidescc.org (509-535-0803) SUDS & SCIENCE SEMINAR SERIES Dr. Andrew M. Oster, PhD Associate Professor of Applied Mathematics at EWU presents “Development of the Primary Visual Cortex.” Dr. Oster gives a survey of critical experiments that shaped our understanding of the organization and development of the primary visual cortex. Dec. 4, 7-8 pm. Free. The Golden Handle Project, 111 S. Cedar St. goldenhandle. org/suds-and-science FESTA ITALIANA A festive event hosted by the Spokane Cagli Sister City Association with food, fun, fashion, film, games, raffles, wine tasting and the launch of a new sister city microbrew collab between Spokane and Cagli, Italy. Dec. 5, 12:30-5 pm. Free admission, all ages. David’s Pizza, 803 W. Mallon Ave. facebook. com/Spokane-Cagli-Sister-City-Project-932422270167080

ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT PANCAKE BREAKFAST Green Bluff Grange hosts its regular pancake breakfast served with eggs, sausage, OJ and, of course, pancakes. Kids 5 and under are free with paid adult. Nov. 28, 8-11 am. $4-$8. Green Bluff Grange, 9809 Green Bluff Rd. greenbluffgrowers.com

PERFECT APPETIZERS FOR ANY PARTY Make Christmas canapes, including perfect stuffed mushrooms; pear, cambozola and bacon bruschetta; baby potato canapes and a sundried tomato and goat cheese bruschetta. Dec. 9, 6-8 pm. $69. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. campusce.net/spokane/ course/course.aspx?c=1096 (509-2796144)

BREAKFAST & PHOTOS WITH SANTA See Santa before he returns to the North Pole. Have breakfast with him and get af-

NAILED IT! GINGERBREAD HOUSE EDITION It’s time for a culinary engineering challenge: Build one of the most elabo-

PANETTONE: ITALIAN CHRISTMAS BREAD Learn to make panettone, an Italian bread that, according to legend, originated in 15th century Milan. All ingredients provided, including a recycled coffee can to bake the bread in so that it is upright. Instructor Margaret Ritsch has been baking panettone for more than 20 years. Dec. 12, 1-3 pm. $40. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way., Uniontown. artisanbarn.org MIDNIGHT MASQUERADE Celebrate NYE with a grand dinner buffet, live music, two fireworks shows and a hosted champagne toast at midnight. Dress is formal cocktail attire. Dec. 31, 6 pm. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdaresort.com

MUSIC PIANIST DANEK BLACK Pianist Danek Black plays live holiday music from the Davenport lobby’s grand piano. Grab a drink from the lobby Starbucks and settle into comfortable lounge seating, or enjoy from a table at the Palm Court Grill (reservations accepted). Nov. 25-Dec. 23, daily from 3:30-6:30 pm. Free. Historic Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. davenporthotelcollection.com DICKENS CAROLERS Dressed for the occasion with top hats and bow ties, the Coeur d’Alene Dickens Carolers sing warming holiday melodies in and around the resort. Nov. 26-Dec. 23, Wed-Sat from 6-9 pm, Sun from 11 am-2 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdaresort.com MUSIC AT THE WINERY Doors open at 5 pm; reservations required. Guests can bring a picnic dinner or order food from Beacon Hill Catering (orders must be placed by noon the day prior before). Find updates on who’s playing each week on the winery’s Facebook page. Music happens Wednesdays and Fridays from 7-9 pm. Free. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. facebook.com/BarristerWinery (509-465-3591)


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TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA: CHRISTMAS EVE & OTHER STORIES The long-awaited tour celebrates the 25th anniversary of the group’s album “Christmas Eve and Other Stories,” the three-time certified platinum album that launched the group to superstardom Nov. 26, 7:30 pm. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com

tion: Let It Glow” in the fully-decorated and glowing Bryan Hall Theatre on the WSU Pullman campus. This concert is family-friendly and includes a silent auction. All proceeds benefit WSU School of Music scholarships. Dec. 4, 2-4 pm. Free. Bryan Hall Theatre (WSU), 605 Veterans Way. events.wsu.edu/event/holiday-concert-8/ (509-335-7696)

MT. DEW BOYS The local bluegrass band presents a Thanksgiving concert. Snacks and refreshments available for purchase. Nov. 27, 6:30 pm. Green Bluff Grange, 9809 Green Bluff Rd. greenbluffgrowers. com (509-979-2607)

PETER RIVERA The former lead singer and drummer of Rare Earth comes to the Bing Theater with his fabulous Celebrate orchestra complete with horn section, back-up singers and accomplished side players. Dec. 4, 7:30 pm. $25. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (509-227-7404)

WEDNESDAY EVENING CONTRA DANCE Join the Spokane Folklore Society for weekly contra dancing. First-time dancers get a coupon for a free dance night. Contra is danced to a variety of musical styles: Celtic, Quebecois, Old Time, New England, or Southern Appalachian music from live bands. Come 15 min. early for a lesson. Proof of Covid-19 vaccination required. Wednesdays from 7:30-9:30 pm. $7/members; $10/general (18 and under free). Women’s Club, 1428 W. Ninth Ave. (509-869-5997) GONZAGA JAZZ CHRISTMAS CONCERT A concert by the Gonzaga Jazz Ensemble, including Ella Fitzgerald’s “Winter Wonderland” and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas;” Diana Krall’s “Jingle Bells” plus other holiday favorites. Dec. 2, 7-8:30 pm. Free; donations accepted. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 211 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga.edu/music (509-313-6733) SPOKANE SYMPHONY: THE NUTCRACKER WITH STATE STREET BALLET The Symphony welcomes State Street Ballet of Santa Barbara for their 10th year dancing to Tchaikovsky’s memorable score. More than 70 local young dancers complete the cast. Dec, 2-3 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 4 at 2 and 7:30 pm, Dec. 5 at 2 pm. $32+. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org DJ NIGHT ON THE ICE Get your ‘skate’ on with DJ A1 for themed nights, music, lights, contests and more every Friday (except 12/24) in December and January, from 6-9 pm. Numerica Skate Ribbon, 720 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. riverfrontspokane.com (509-625-6600) COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY: HOLIDAY POPS The holiday program “Sounding the Horn: Illuminated Carols” includes Franck’s Symphony in D minor; Mozart’s Horn Concerto no. 4, ft. Casey Traver on French horn; Selections from the Polar Express; Herbert’s “March of the Toys” and a Christmas Carol sing-a-long. Dec. 4, 7:30 pm. $10-$20. Schuler Performing Arts Center, 1000 W. Garden Ave. cdasymphony.org (208-769-7780) GONZAGA WIND ENSEMBLE CONCERT: ARISE The Gonzaga Wind Ensemble conducted by Peter J. Hamlin performs their concert “Arise,” with music by Kevin Day, Ryan George, Gustav Holst, Omar Thomas, James David and Robert Spittal. Dec. 4, 3-4:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Donations accepted. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 211 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga.edu/music (509-313-6733) HOLIDAY CELEBRATION: LET IT GLOW Music lovers across the Palouse can usher in the holiday season with WSU School of Music’s inaugural “Holiday Celebra-

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RUSTY JACKSON’S WHITE CHRISTMAS “White Christmas” with Danny Kaye, Bing Crosby and Rosemary Clooney is retold by Rusty Jackson in his own inimitable way by performing the music from the show and narrating to fill in the rest of the story, alongside special guest Mel Dalton. Dec. 4, 6-8 pm. $20. Lake City Center, 1916 N. Lakewood Dr. facebook. com/events/293815345948448 WASHINGTON IDAHO SYMPHONY: HOLIDAY BRASS The concert program includes Duke Ellington’s jazzy take on the Nutcracker Suite and holiday selections performed by the brass and string nonet. Dec. 4, 7:30 pm. $10-$25. Pullman High School, 510 NW Greyhound Way. wa-idsymphony.org/concert3 CAMI BRADLEY SONGWRITING MASTER CLASS Singer/songwriter Cami Bradley, also a member of the duo, The Sweeplings, with Whitney Dean, leads a master class on songwriting for four students who previously auditioned. The public is welcome to attend and observe this master class where Cami talks with each student about their songwriting/ music writing techniques, and areas of strength and improvement. Audience observers and students learn how songs are crafted, and get tips from Cami, as well as insight into the business of professional music-making. The Sweeplings are special guests in the Spokane Symphony’s Holiday Pops, Dec. 18-19 at the Fox Theater. Dec. 6, 3-5 pm. Free. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org GONZAGA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA FT CONCERTO/ARIA COMPETITION WINNERS This winter program features Rimsky-Korsakov’s epic showpiece “Scheherazade” and the three winners of the Concerto/Aria Competition. Karlee Ludwig (soprano), Sam Hendricks (marimba) and Carrie Samsen (violin) join the orchestra, conducted by GU music director Kevin Hekmatpanah, in performing works by Mozart, Rosauro and Sarasate. Dec. 6, 7:30-9 pm. $14-$17; GU students & employees free. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 211 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga.edu/gonzaga-symphonyorchestra/performance-calendar

The Spokane Chiefs have several home games in December. by Coeur d’Alene’s classical chorale, performing music both sacred and secular old and new. Dec. 10-11 at 7 pm, Dec. 11 at 2 pm. $15-$30. Trinity Lutheran Church, 812 N. Fifth. trinitylutherancda.org

MAT & SAVANNA SHAW The group’s studio album debut “Picture This” debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s Emerging Artists Chart, followed up recently with “The Joy of Christmas,” which balances religious Christmas hymns with tunes like “Mr. Grinch.” Dec. 7, 8 pm. $27.50$55. Knitting Factory, 919 W. Sprague Ave. sp.knittingfactory.com (509-2443279)

NORTHWEST BACHFEST WINTER CONCERT BachFest’s opening concert on Dec. 11 represents a time in the 19th and early 20th century when it became popular to hear musical masterpieces with piano accompaniment. Complete orchestras were not available in smaller communities, but pianos in homes were becoming increasingly present, and parlor concerts became popular. The second concert, Dec. 12, features rare musical gems, familiar and unfamiliar, presented by exciting, virtuosic soloists. Dec. 11 at 7 pm, Dec. 12 at 3 pm. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. nwbachfest.com

CHORALE COEUR D’ALENE: A CHRISTMAS TO REMEMBER A Christmas concert

GLORY, HALLELUJAH! The Palouse Chorale and Chamber Choir present Handel’s

Messiah and other season favorites, conducted by guest conductor Dr. David Klement. Dec. 11 at 7:30 pm and Dec. 12 at 4 pm. $8-$20. St. Boniface Catholic Church, 207 S. St. Boniface St. palousechoralsociety.org/2021-2022-season GONZAGA CANDLELIGHT CHRISTMAS CONCERT Gonzaga’s annual Candlelight Christmas concerts rejoice in the season of light and the ringing of hope. Performances feature Gonzaga Concert Choir, Discantus Treble Chorus and Glee Club with pianists Annie Flood and Garrett Heathman conducted by Drs. Amy Porter and Jadrian Tarver. Dec. 11 at 7 pm, Dec. 12 at 3 pm. $11-$17. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 211 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga.edu (509-313-6733) SPOKANE FOLKLORE SOCIETY’S 41ST CHRISTMAS DANCE The group hosts its 41st annual Christmas Dance. All dances are taught, newcomers are welcome and

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no partner is necessary. Dance includes live music by Banna Damhsa, a Scottish/Irish band; dances will be called by Nora Scott. The evening includes a fourdecade tradition of an opening grand march and ornament exchange. Festive attire encouraged. Dec. 11, 7-10 pm. $8$11. East Spokane Grange, 1621 N. Park Rd. (509-928-0692) SPOKANE JAZZ ORCHESTRA HOLIDAY CONCERT The annual holiday concert features the cherished Christmas music of Nat King Cole, as well as other holiday classics, played by a 17-piece ensemble of some of the best jazz musicians in the Northwest. Featuring guest vocalist Horace Alexander Young, a WSU professor of Jazz Studies who’s played alongside music luminaries such as B.B. King, The Temptations, Anita Baker, The Four Tops and Bill Withers. Dec. 11, 7:30 pm. $17-$30. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. spokanejazz.org


WHITWORTH CHRISTMAS FESTIVAL CONCERT Details TBA. Dec. 11, 8 pm and Dec. 12, 3 pm. $15-$20. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. foxtheaterspokane.com (509-624-1200) GORDON MOTE CHRISTMAS CONCERT A holiday concert featuring Gordon Mote, a blind Christian country/ southern gospel singer, piano virtuoso and worship leader. Mote toured with music legend, Lee Greenwood and has shared the stage with many popular entertainers such as Trisha Yearwood, Tanya Tucker and Bill & Gloria Gaither. He’s released 11 studio albums, including one that hit the Billboard charts. Dec. 12, 6 am-7:30 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Assembly Church, 15618 E. Broadway Ave. valleyassembly.org/ events (509-924-0466) HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS: A BIG BAND CHRISTMAS Sixteen of the region’s top performers join a 16-piece orchestra for a 1940s/50s-style Christmas cabaret featuring favorite holiday songs. Presented by Spokane Valley Summer Theatre. Dec. 17-18 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 18-19 at 2 pm. $22-$39. Central Valley High School, 821 S. Sullivan Rd. svsummertheatre.com AN EVENING WITH BRUCE COCKBURN Since his self-titled debut in 1970, the Canadian singer-songwriter has issued a steady stream of acclaimed albums. Dec. 18, 8 pm. $35$45. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com SPOKANE SYMPHONY HOLIDAY POPS WITH THE SWEEPLINGS Holiday Pops is an annual favorite with Christmas music, carol singing and a visit from Santa. This year’s special guests are Spokane’s Cami Bradley and her musical partner, Whitney Dean. Together, they’re the acclaimed pop-folk duo, The Sweeplings. Dec. 18 at 8 pm and Dec. 19 at 2 pm. $43-$73. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org SPOKANE SYMPHONY NEW YEAR’S EVE: BEETHOVEN’S NINTH Symphony Music Director James Lowe conducts his first New Year’s Eve concert of Beethoven’s Ninth. Dec. 31, 7:30 pm. $18-$62. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org

SPORTS & OUTDOORS EAGLE & WILDLIFE PRIVATE CHARTERED LAKE CRUISES Book a private, chartered tour along the shorelines of Lake Pend Oreille. Eagle season is here, get up close from a heated yacht with 360 degree views. Other opportunities for wildlife viewing include mountain goats. Bring a camera and friends (max of 6 passengers). Bookings open daily through Dec. 19. $450. Bayview, Idaho. (208-682-0770) HUFFIN’ FOR THE STUFFIN’ A 5K starting and finishing at U District PT in Spokane; the course follows pathways in downtown and Riverfront Park. Includes virtual and in-person options. Proceeds benefit Active 4 Youth. Nov. 25. $35. U-District PT, 730 N. Hamilton St. runsignup.com/Race/WA/Spokane/TheTrot

RELENTLESS WRESTLING: V Live, premier professional wrestling in Eastern Washington. $5 from each ticket is being donated to Wishing Star Foundation. Nov. 27, 6:30 pm. $21.94$32.44. Trailbreaker Cider, 2204 N. Madison St. trailbreakercider.com

Ch stmas at Westwood Gardens

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CHEAP SKATE TUESDAY Free skate rentals are included with each paid admission, every Tuesday from Nov. 23-Feb. 22 during regular hours. Masks required. $5.95-$7.95. Numerica Skate Ribbon, 720 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontspokane SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. VICTORIA ROYALS Regular season match. Face coverings required for all guests ages 5+. Special: TicketsWest player magnet giveaway. Nov. 30, 7 pm. $17-$37. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com (279-7000)

Purchase of $25 or more Not valid on workshops, Expires 12/22/21

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15825 N. Westwood Drive Behind Super 1 Foods • Rathdrum, ID 208-687-5952 • WestwoodGardensID.com

SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. PRINCE GEORGE COUGARS Regular season match. Dec. 3, 7 pm. $17-$37. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com (279-7000) EAGLE WATCHING CRUISES A twohour cruise on Lake Coeur d’Alene to view some of the hundreds of American Bald Eagles that visit the lake on their annual migration each winter to feed on lake-bound salmon. Cruises offered Sat-Sun from 12-2 pm between Dec. 4-19, and daily from 12-2 pm Dec. 26-Jan. 2. $16.50-$22.50. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdacruises.com (208-765-4000) MT. SPOKANE WINTER SEASON OPENING DAY The anticipated opening day for the 2021-22 season, dependent upon snowpack and conditions. Dec. 4, 9 am-4 pm. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com

Spice up your holiday season! Find what you need in spices and seasonings at our Spokane store, or find us online at spokanespice.com

SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. SEATTLE THUNDERBIRDS Regular season match. Face coverings required for all guests ages 5+. Special: Teddy Bear Toss. Dec. 4, 7 pm. $17-$37. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com (279-7000) CROSS COUNTRY SKI LESSON Learn the basics of cross-country skiing at Mt. Spokane. Lessons are taught by Spokane Nordic Ski Association’s certified instructors. Fee includes a daylong ski equipment rental and 2 hours of instruction. Sno-Park Permit required. Meet at the Mt. Spokane Selkirk Nordic Area. Dec. 11, 12, 18, 19, 30 and 31 from 10 am-2 pm. $34/$59. spokanerec.org RUN RUN RUDOLPH 5K Join Colfax’s the Friends of the Parks for a holiday fun run at Schmuck Park. Entry includes a long-sleeved T-shirt. Open to runners, joggers, walkers and strollers with prizes for first through third place in men, women and kids. Dec. 11, 10 am-noon. $25. facebook. com/Friends-of-the-Parks-ColfaxWA-456617518165176 SANTA’S SACK STUFFER RUN Run to as many “Elf stations” as you can in 45 minutes. Each station is roughly .5-miles apart, at each you’ll need to complete a task to get a raffle ticket to enter a swag drawing for race shirts, nutrition, hats and other Christmas goodies. Hosted by Negative Split. Dec. 11. $35. Plantes Ferry Sports Complex, 12308 E. Upriver Dr. nsplit.com

One block west of Altamont, Two blocks north of Sprague

130 N. Stone St., Spokane, WA • 509-624-1490 • spokanespice.com

FEATURING: Dennis Smith Alexandria O. Donna Kulibert Ruthie Franks Karen Simmons Tami Leitz Jeanie Wolen Michelle Schneider Steve Baird

Scan with smartphone camera to open a tour map

NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 59


FIRST NIGHT SKI Night skiing at Mt. Spokane opens for the season. All-day lift tickets included; night only tickets available from 3 pm onward. Dec. 17, 9 am-9 pm. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com HOLIDAYS AT SCHWEITZER Enjoy all the holiday season has to offer on the mountain and in Schweitzer Village. Special events and promotions for the holidays offered Dec. 17-Jan. 2. See website for details. Schweitzer, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer.com/event/ christmasholidays-2021 SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. PORTLAND WINTERHAWKS Regular season match. Special: Avista “Way to Save” poster (Dec. 17) and Fred Meyer wall calendar (Dec. 18) giveaways. Dec. 17 and 18, 7 pm. $17-$37. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanechiefs.com MT. SPOKANE SNOWSHOE TOUR Learn the basics of snowshoeing during this guided hike on snowshoe trails around Mount Spokane. Pre-trip information emailed after registration. Fee includes snowshoes, instruction, walking poles, trail fees, guides and transportation. Meet at Yoke’s Fresh Market in Mead. Ages 13+. Offered Dec. 18, Dec. 19, Dec. 26, Jan. 1, Jan. 8, Jan. 22, Feb. 6, Feb. 13, Feb. 19 and March 5 from 9 am-1 pm. $25/$29. spokanerec.org (509-755-2489) YOUTH WINTER ADVENTURES Spokane parks hosts this winter break camp where kids can learn how to cross-country ski and snowshoe at Mt. Spokane State Park, plus partake in other outdoor winter activities. Transportation, trail fees and equipment provided. Ages 9-12. Sessions are Dec. 21-22 and 28-29 from 9 am-4 pm each day. $99. Departs/arrives at Northeast Community Center, 4001 N. Cook St. spokanerec.org (509-755-2489) SKI WITH SANTA Santa is skiing around Schweitzer before he begins his travels around the world. Catch him on the slopes with Mrs. Claus, cruising around several beginner and intermediate runs. Dec. 23-24 from 1-3:30 pm. Schweitzer, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer.com/event/ski-with-santa/ SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. SEATTLE THUNDERBIRDS Regular season match. Dec. 30, 7 pm. $17-$37. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com NEW YEAR’S EVE AT SCHWEITZER Celebrate New Year’s Eve at Taps with live music, specials and more. 21+. Tickets and other details TBA. Dec. 31. Schweitzer, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555)

THEATER BABES IN TOYLAND Wicked Uncle Barnaby runs the toy shop with his comicruffian assistants and turns children into dolls and sells them for gold. Enjoy the characters of Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary; Tom-Tom, the Piper’s Son; Jack and Jill; Little Miss Muffet in this Christmas classic. Nov. 26-Dec. 19; shows are Fri-Sun (times vary). $12-$16. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia. spokanechildrenstheatre.org (509-328-4886) ELLEN TRAVOLTA PRESENTS: SAVING CHRISTMAS For the last nine

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years, Ellen Travolta and her ensemble of performers have shared stories of Christmas miracles, meaningful gifts and more. Last year, so many holiday rituals, anchored in togetherness, were disrupted and we were reminded of how special it is to gather with those we love. Ellen Travolta, Molly Allen and Abbey Crawford read and tell stories, sing songs, and bring a little brightness to the holiday. Nov. 26-Dec. 19; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 5 pm. $30. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdachristmas.com A CHRISTMAS CAROL ‘Tis the season as the UI Department of Theatre Arts presents the Dickens classic. Journey back in time to Victorian England for a theatrical event that’s family-friendly and nostalgically new, in a world premier stage adaptation by Kendra Phillips (MFA Playwriting ‘21). Dec. 3-4 and Dec. 11 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 4-5 and Dec. 12 at 2 pm. $6-$22. Hartung Theater, 875 Perimeter Dr. uidaho.edu/theatre AN ILIAD Directed by Susan Hardie and starring Robert Tombari, this production first streamed online in January 2021 makes its in-person debut as a fundraiser show. Meet staff, crew and the Board of Directors. Show is limited to 60 tickets. Also includes a silent auction. Dec. 3-5 at 7 pm. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third. stagelefttheater.org THE MYSTERIOUS MISSING LAWN ORNAMENT -OR- WHO STOLE THE BLOW MOLD SANTA? Sixth Street’s holiday family melodrama show. Dec. 3-12; FriSat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10-$15. Sixth Street Theater and Melodrama, 212 Sixth St., Wallace. sixthstreetmelodrama.com MET LIVE IN HD: EURYDICE The ancient Greek myth of Orpheus, who attempts to harness the power of music to rescue his beloved Eurydice from the underworld, has inspired composers since opera’s earliest days. Dec. 4, 9:55 am and Dec. 6, 6 pm. $15/$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208882-4127) STAGE LEFT HOLIDAY PATRON GALA Hosted by radio personality Molly Allen with live jazz music by the Mardi Gras Growlers, this evening of music and festivities offers a glimpse into changes coming to Stage Left in 2022 and beyond. Tickets capped at 50 guests; must show proof of vaccination. Dec. 8, 7-10 pm. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. stagelefttheater.org/tickets TRADITIONS OF CHRISTMAS A Radio City Music Hall-style show for all ages. Favorite Christmas classics are brought to life with song and dance, including choreographed kick line tap numbers and a cast who don over 300 costumes. The show concludes with a grand Nativity. Dec. 10-22; shows are Friday-Sunday (times vary). Special Wednesday shows on Dec. 22 at 3, 5 and 7 pm. $23-$36. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. traditionsofchristmasnw.com ANASTASIA From the Tony Awardwinning creators of the Broadway classic Ragtime, this dazzling show transports us from the twilight of the Russian Empire to the euphoria of Paris in the 1920s, as a brave young woman sets out to discover the mystery of her past. Dec. 28-Jan. 2 at 7:30 pm; also Jan. 1 at 2 pm and Jan. 2 at 1 and 6:30 pm. $42-$100. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. broadwayspokane.com

The Last Podcast on the Left head to the Bing Crosby Theater on Dec. 12.

VISUAL ARTS ON THE EDGE: LIVING THE ANTHROPOCENE The artwork of Northwest artists Ann Chadwick Reid and Natalie Niblack recognizes the impact of climate change on marine and forest environments of the Pacific Northwest. Mon-Fri from 9 am-5 pm through Jan. 13. Free. EWU Gallery of Art, 140 Art Building. ewu.edu/cale/ programs/art ORNAMENT & SMALL WORKS SHOW This annual show features small works and ornaments made by over 35 local artists; most pieces are under $50 each. Nov. 5-Dec. 23, open Mon-Fri from 10 am-5 pm and Sat from 10 am-4 pm. Free. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland Ave. spokaneartschool.net (509-325-1500) RECENT ACQUISITIONS: SELECTIONS FROM THE SAFECO ART COLLECTION Seattle-based Safeco Insurance began collecting art in the 1970s and sought to build a collection that reflected “the creativity and diversity of the communities it served.” Recognized nationally as a model for corporate collecting, the collection evolved to capture a uniquely Pacific Northwest aesthetic. Eventually, it was distributed amongst several Washington state institutions, including the MAC. Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm through Feb. 7. $7-$12. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org SCULPTED SPACES, WILD LIVES A showcase of art depicting intentionallyshaped spaces and the wild lives that inhabit them. This juried exhibition includes artwork by 18 artists from the Palouse re-

gion and across the U.S. Mon-Fri from 8 am-5 pm, through Jan. 7 (closed for holidays). Free. Third Street Gallery, 206 E. Third St., Moscow. ci.moscow.id.us/230/ Third-Street-Gallery THE GREAT OUTDOORS Featured artists LR Montgomery, Leslie Lambert, Megan Perkins, Kay West, T Kurtz, Pierr Morgan and Isaac Mann capture the connection we have to these outdoor spaces with works in oil, watercolor, acrylic and pastel. Open daily, 10 am-7 pm, through Dec. 26. Free. Liberty Building, 402 N. Washington St.. spokanelibertybuilding.com UNWRAP THE CREATIVE: 25TH SMALL WORKS SHOW This two-month-long, yearly exhibit features more than 100 new artists, consisting of approximately 1,500 pieces total, all by local artists. Through Dec. 24, open daily 11 am-6 pm. Free. The Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com WHAT WE MAKE: NATURE AS INSPIRATION Delve into the vital relationship between makers and nature. Discover how the landscape inspires art-making through the works and relationship of Northwest artists Wesley Wehr and Joseph Goldberg. Explore the natural motifs, tradition and importance of beaded bags in the plateau cultures. Through Jan. 9; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm. $5-$12. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org BLACK FRIDAY @ EMERGE Save up to 50 percent on locally-made goods while supporting local artists. Spend $50 or more and get a free Emerge CDA T-shirt; spend $25 or more and get a free Emerge

sticker pack. Other activities include a Poppy James Vintage clothing pop-up, a Bullstitch Sewing booth with handmade lingerie, and holiday portraits from photographer Keely Brennan (book online). Nov. 26, 12-6 pm. Emerge, 119 N. Second. emergecda.com SPOKRAMPUS ART SHOW Spokane celebrates Krampus; the demon of St. Nick’s Day! The artist reception includes hors d’oeuvres and features more than 17 local artists: Bauer, Chaput, Froese, Griffin, Harrington, King, Lott, Ransom, Sammons, Schisler, Scheres, Soles, Sommer, Thomas, Tinsley, Vollmer, Wessels, plus special guests. Nov. 26, 5-8 pm. Free. Giant Nerd Books, 607 W. Garland Ave. facebook.com/giant.nerd.books SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY Save up to 50 percent on locally-made goods and works while supporting local artists. Spend $50 or more and get a free Emerge CDA T-shirt; spend $25 or more and get a free Emerge sticker pack. Other activities include a Poppy James Vintage clothing pop-up and holiday portraits with photographer Keely Brennan. Nov. 27, 10 am-6 pm. Free. Emerge, 119 N. Second St. emergecda.com DROP IN & DRAW Join a creative community for this weekly free-form drawing program. Explore different artistic mediums, develop skills and ideas and cultivate imaginative thinking through art. All skill levels welcome. Hosted by local cartoonist Nanette Cloud. Wednesdays, 5:30-7 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org GNOME HOLIDAY ORNAMENTS Create


your own festive gnome ornament with a pointy hat to celebrate the holidays. This program is available as a self-paced, at-home craft for families and all ages. Registration: Dec. 1–13. Bag pickup: Dec. 16–22. Free. scld.org CUP OF JOY Trackside’s 8th annual group invitational of drinking vessels features over 150 ceramic cups in many forms, colors and treatments. Forty invited artists participate alongside 13 new artists from across the U.S. Opening reception Dec. 3 from 5-8 pm, Online sales open Dec. 4 at 8 am. Gallery open Wed-Fri, 11 am-5 pm through Jan. 7. Trackside Studio, 115 S. Adams St. tracksidestudio.net THE MAIN STORY ART GALLERY SHOW Pilgrim Slavic Baptist Church hosts this collection. Explore a collection of 15 world-famous art pieces painted by Rembrandt, Dore, Bruegel, Kramskoy, Ivanov and others. Art narrators are onsite presenting historical information about each piece on Saturday. Dec. 3, 7 am-3 pm and Dec. 4, 8 am-2 pm. Free. The Gathering House, 733 W. Garland. mainstorygallery.art WEST CENTRAL COLORING BOOK PARTY Join Spark Central and EWU’s Social Aesthetics class for a night of coloring pages created by community members. Dec. 3, 5:30-7 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org/events/coloringbook-party (509-279-0299) WINNER TAKES ALL OPENING GALA The Emerge gallery is filled with an eclectic mix of artwork from local artists. Guests can take in the art, mingle with the artists while enjoying snacks, drinks and live music. Raffle tickets available through Sun, Dec. 5 at 6 pm and the winner takes the WHOLE show. Dec. 3, 7-9 pm. Emerge, 119 N. Second St. emergecda.com HOLIDAY ARTIST STUDIO TOUR Visit five local artists in their studios to see where they create and how they work, plus a local couple’s personal art collection. Featured artists are Melissa Cole, Neicy Frey, Louise Kodis, Nicholas Sironka, Reinaldo Gil Zambrano and the contemporary art collection of Jim Kolva and Pat Sullivan (proof of vaccination required here). End your day at Ella’s Supper Club to mingle with artists, enjoy live music from Ron Kieper jazz and more. Dec. 4, tour from 10 am-4 pm, reception 4-6 pm. $15-$20. northwestmuseum.org SECOND FRIDAY ARTWALK Join the community to stroll the streets of downtown Coeur d’Alene and enjoy locally and nationally acclaimed artists, along with local shops, restaurants and businesses. Dec. 10 from 5-8 pm. Free. artsandculturecda.org STAN MILLER: HOME ART EXHIBITION Stan Miller is exhibiting his new watercolor and egg tempera paintings at his home studio on Spokane’s South Hill. Miller is an internationally recognized artist having won numerous awards, nationally and internationally. Dec. 10 from 5-9 pm, Dec. 11 from 12-6 pm, Dec. 12 from 12-4 pm. Free. Stan Miller Gallery, 3138 E. 17th Ave. stanmiller.net (509-768-9354) HOLIDAY MAKERS MARKET Emerge hosts its annual market in person this year, featuring makers from Spokane

and CdA offering pottery, jewelry, knit goods, apparel, art and more. Dec. 11, 11 am-6 pm. Free. Emerge, 119 N. Second. emergecda.com BRRRZAAR Terrain’s winter arts marketplace showcases locally handmade goods and artwork for holiday shopping. Dec. 18, 10 am-8 pm. Free. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. terrainspokane.com

WORDS AUNTIE’S BOOK CLUB: SCI-FI & FANTASY Host Ness (they/them) provides an inclusive space for people of all identities to discuss fiction that represents them, with a focus on fantasy and science fiction. Meets on the fourth Saturday of the month at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com DROP IN & WRITE Bring works in progress to share, get inspired with creative prompts and spend some focused time writing. Hosted by Jenny Davis and Hannah Engel. Tuesdays, 5:30-7 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org BROKEN MIC Spokane’s longestrunning weekly poetry open mic. All ages, however, this is a free speech event. Wednesdays from 6:30-9 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (509-847-1234) 3 MINUTE MIC Spokane’s long-running first Friday poetry open mic, returns to Auntie’s live and in-person. Readers can share up to three minutes’ worth of poetry. Dec. 3, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com BOOK LAUNCH PARTY: ONE-BLOCK REVOLUTION Celebrate the publication of One-Block Revolution and 20+ years of Community Building history. Festivities include appetizers from Main Market, live music by Big Red Barn, a no-host bar, tours of the Community Building campus and conversation with neighbors and book contributors. Dec. 3, 5-8 pm. Free-$20. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. (509-394-4740) AUNTIE’S BOOK CLUB: NEW FICTION Auntie’s employee and host of this monthly book club Claire (she/ her) was a secret under-the-covers reader as a child and a secret betweenrehearsals readers as a grown up ballet dancer. Meets second Thursdays at 6 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com BOOK CLUB WITH A BEVERAGE. Participants read the book of the month on their own, then gather for a discussion led by local writer Jenny Davis. Complimentary glass of wine (21+) or water included. Each month’s title is announced a month in advance online. Dec. 12, 1-3 pm. $18/$20. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum. org (456-3931) LAST PODCAST ON THE LEFT Hosts Ben Kissel, Marcus Parks and Henry Zebrowski cover dark subjects spanning Jeffrey Dahmer, werewolves, Jonestown, iconic hauntings, the history of war crimes and more. Dec. 12, 8 pm. $35-$55. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com n

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62 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021


Breaüxdoo Bakery owner Gage Lang’s supply costs have nearly doubled.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

SOURCING

Food Chain Challenges After lockdown, labor shortages and more, local restaurants now must navigate an unstable supply chain BY CHEY SCOTT

C

ardboard shortages, backlogged ports, skyrocketing food prices — all of these factors and more have compounded at every stage of distribution to create one of the most widespread global supply chain disruptions in modern history. These pandemic-caused woes impact businesses and consumers alike, but restaurants — an industry that’s taken punch after punch the past two years — are once again dealing with major challenges. Not being able to reliably source essential ingredients and supplies has gotten so bad for one local restaurant, MadLo’s Ramen House in Nine Mile Falls, that its owners decided to temporarily close last week. “We run out of things very frequently, and we’re last on the chain as far as who gets what when we place our orders [from suppliers],” says Megan Corns, who owns MadLo’s with husband Jeremy. “We ran out of fresh, never-dried ramen noodles, and had to switch to an udon noodle,” she continues, “which made our community upset, but we couldn’t do anything about it.” Eggrolls, chicken, bao buns, to-go containers and numerous other supplies have been nearly impossible to find from the restaurant’s regular suppliers, so the Corns have instead spent hours each week driving around to restaurant supply outlets to try to find what they can’t get delivered. “That takes up most of our time, hunting for to-go containers, boba straws, cups, chopsticks and the sauces

we buy,” Corns says. She doesn’t know how long MadLo’s will be closed but says it’ll likely last until supply issues improve.

F

or other local food purveyors, these sourcing woes haven’t been as hard hitting, but the increased cost of goods has been universally felt. At Breaüxdoo Bakery in Spokane Valley, owner Gage Lang says getting packaging the bakery needs to sell its cookies and cake slices via delivery and wholesale to grocers like My Fresh Basket has been difficult, due to higher prices and scarcity. “We order our cake-slice containers from New Jersey, and typically it’s a two-week lead time, but now it’s a month and a half,” Lang says. “We have to order them in bulk now, but with raised prices and that longer lead. Last week, we couldn’t get pizza boxes anywhere, and I drove to six stores.” Lang says a typical weekly order of ingredients and supplies for the bakery was once in the $1,400 to $1,600 range. “Yesterday’s was $2,400, so it’s crazy, and they’re projecting the next few months to be even worse,” he says. Even though his business’s costs have nearly doubled, Lang hasn’t yet passed those increases on to customers. “There is zero percent profit — no money at all — and that is just to stay open and pay every supplier,” he says. “I don’t want to sell a cookie for $4, but we’re left with no choice if we want to remain in business. This is just to

stay afloat, it’s not like someone is laughing their way to the bank.” At Hogwash Whiskey Den in downtown Spokane, Executive Chef CJ Callahan says the first big cost increase due to the pandemic was for gloves, which went from roughly 8 cents per glove to 50 cents at peak. Then garbage bags went up. Next was fry oil, going from $20 per 35-pound unit to $49. Short ribs went from $6 to $13 per pound. “Dealing with people to try to explain why they have to pay an extra $1.50 for chicken wings — it’s not fun,” Callahan says. “Very few people give us trouble, but sometimes you get that one guy who’s like ‘I don’t want to pay this, it’s bullshit,’ but it’s not our fault, it’s just how we operate and have to do so to stay open.” To balance exponential cost increases for some items, like the aforementioned chicken wings and short ribs, Callahan’s tried to spread price hikes across the bar’s entire menu. “We do just eat the cost every so often, but we’ll also increase the price of something that happens to be lower to balance it out, because you want people to come out still, but also don’t want to gouge them.” Higher costs and scarcity has also forced Callahan and his team to get more creative with what they’re serving. “For the short ribs, I pulled the meat and put it in empanadas to spread out the cost,” he says. “So for stuff like that, you look on the bright side.” ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 63


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FOOD | SOURCING “FOOD CHAIN CHALLENGES,” CONTINUED... Restaurants have also been teaming up to help each other find hard-to-get ingredients. Callahan recently needed fancy anchovies for a Caesar salad-inspired hamburger special at Hogwash, but the bar’s supplier couldn’t get them. Instead, he asked fellow chef Peter Froese of Gander & Ryegrass to order the anchovies, which Hogwash bought from Froese at cost. Froese, meanwhile, says his restaurant’s regularly rotating menu format has somewhat eased the stress of not being able to consistently find certain ingredients. “There’s not anything major we’ve had to take off the menu,” Froese says. “There are hard-to-get things, but you can eventually get them. You have to shuffle and stay on your toes.” Some imported wines and specialty spirits from Europe, however, have been entirely unavailable. “We’ve been dealing with that for a long time now,” he says. “If you get three cases and can keep it on the menu, that’s great, and if you can order more, that’s better, but you don’t get stuck on certain things.”

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ne rung on the supply chain above restaurants, local food service companies are trying to ease shortages for their clients as much as possible. For URM of Spokane, that’s meant encouraging its customers to also source from its two major competitors, US Foods and Sysco. “Whereas we used to be able to service 100 percent of customers’ needs and be their only broadline distributor for the most part, that is now challenged,” says Paul Steele, director of food service for URM. “We understand customers need to do what they need to do.” The reason for such severe shortages in food-based supplies, Steele says, boils down to labor. “For most of the processors, it was COVID-related to begin with, and now it’s a labor situation,” he says. “They just can’t get labor, or they have people six feet apart on a production line that used to be shoulder to shoulder. And the transportation costs have increased two- to three-fold to get a load up here from California to Spokane.” Those transportation setbacks have also impacted Charlie’s Produce, which services all of the West Coast, including Spokane. “Produce is a little different than other suppliers, because we’re dealing with something that dies from the second it’s harvested, so the turnaround time has to be quick,” says Bo Bos, food service manager for Charlie’s Spokane warehouse. While logistics have challenged the produce supplier, Bos says slowdowns for nonperishable and frozen items has also led to more fresh produce orders from some customers. “I think just being able to have product, where a lot of [suppliers] are struggling and can’t get certain things because a truck is full — we don’t have to prioritize like that,” he says. “We might pick up at two to three locations, but it’s all on the same truck.” n cheys@inlander.com


REVIEW

ITALIAN CRIME STORY House of Gucci lacks the extravagance and flair of its real-life inspirations BY JOSH BELL

A

s is customary for movies inspired by true stories, Ridley Scott’s House of Gucci ends with a series of title cards detailing what happened to its real-life subjects following the events depicted in the film. These title cards note, with a sense of irony and regret, that no one from the storied Gucci family is currently involved in the fashion house that still bears their name. But even after nearly three hours of watching various Guccis make and break business deals and personal alliances, the movie has given no sense of why it might be a tragedy for the Gucci family to have exited the fashion industry. There is exactly one moment that demonstrates a Gucci family member’s contribution to fashion, and it’s an offhand remark from Rodolfo Gucci (Jeremy Irons) about his design of an iconic Gucci scarf. Rodolfo is a relatively minor character in House of Gucci, which is primarily about the volatile relationship between Rodolfo’s son Maurizio Gucci (Adam Driver) and his wife, Patrizia Reggiani (Lady Gaga). The movie opens with Maurizio’s 1995 murder, although director Ridley Scott obscures the incident enough that anyone coming to the movie without knowledge of the actual events might be confused about what exactly the story is building toward. Scott and screenwriter Becky Johnston (working from Sara Gay Forden’s nonfiction book with the same title) then flash back to 1978, when Maurizio and Patrizia first meet at a party. Despite being the scion of a wealthy and influential family, Maurizio is bookish and unassuming, immersed in his studies to become a lawyer and disdainful of his family’s extravagance. He’s drawn to Patrizia in part because of her own unassuming circumstances, but the widening of her eyes when he first mentions his last name makes it clear that she aims higher than to be a lawyer’s wife. Driver plays Maurizio as so reserved and accommodating that it’s tough to tell what his true feelings are, both about Patrizia and

about the Gucci empire that she quickly thrusts him back into. Maurizio’s flamboyant uncle Aldo Gucci (Al Pacino) is the one who really runs the business, and he has no time for his idiot son Paolo (Jared Leto), instead focusing on Maurizio as the heir to the company, always under Patrizia’s guidance. As the opening indicates, things are going to fall apart for Maurizio and Patrizia, but the movie takes its time getting there, playing out as a shapeless series of incidents with little connective tissue. Patrizia pushes Maurizio to make underhanded maneuvers that cut out his family members, and he goes along HOUSE OF GUCCI with her until he doesn’t, but Rated R neither decision carries much Directed by Ridley Scott Starring Lady Gaga, Adam Driver, Al Pacino clear motivation. They appear to be genuinely in love, to a degree that their eventual animosity comes off as abrupt. Even the chronology is opaque, making it tough to gauge how much time has passed between scenes, except by Patrizia’s changing hairstyles. Those hairstyles all look fabulous, as do the costumes (the Gucci company cooperated fully with the production) and the locations. Scott is a consummate craftsman who can create brilliant work with the right script, but no amount of professional polish can compensate for the meandering narrative, which feels like a secondrate streaming miniseries condensed into an unwieldy feature film. The performers throw themselves into their roles, for better and worse, and their Italian-ish accents range from nearly nonexistent (Irons) to Super Mario (Leto, picking a seemingly random set of words to bafflingly mispronounce). A version of House of Gucci that embraced campy ridiculousness would have been more entertaining, but camp is not within Scott’s skill set. He treats this lurid story with detached competence, thus largely missing the point. n

The Guccis living the lifestyles of the rich and ruthless.

ALSO OPENING THE HUMANS

An adaptation of the Tony- and Pultizerwinning play with a loaded cast (Richard Jenkins, Steven Yeun, June Squibb, etc.), this drama finds a family gathered in a run-down Manhattan apartment for Thanksgiving as it wrestles with economic, aging and interpersonal struggles. At the Magic Lantern. (SS) Rated R

JULIA

The documentary directors behind RBG return to hail the life of game-changing celebrity chef Julia Child, employing all the colorful flavor one would expect from one of her French dishes. (SS) Rated PG13

POWER OF THE DOG

Writer/director Jane Campion crafts an ominous, slow-burning western focused on hardline masculinity on the range with standout performances from Benedict Cumberbatch and Kirsten Dunst. At the Magic Lantern. (SS) Rated R

RESIDENT EVIL: WELCOME TO RACOON CITY

After six Milla Jovovich-led entries based on the horror video games, the Resident Evil franchise reboots with a new origin story centered on the sinister Umbrella Corporation turning a town into zombies and monsters. (SS) Rated R

NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 65


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Mirabel’s Magic Disney’s Encanto reveals a family’s intricate layers through vivid animation and one curious little girl BY CHASE HUTCHINSON

PRODUCED BY LAURA LITTLE THEATRICALS • Broadway Co-Producer of • COME FROM AWAY • PETER & THE STARCATCHER • Off-Broadway Producer of ALL IS CALM, PBS Holiday Special • CO-PRODUCED BY MARIE HUNT, RED BIRD THEATER

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Disney film that is big on magic if occasionally light on character development, Encanto still shines as a lovingly told and animated story that delves deeper into a Colombian family than the studio ever has before. Overflowing with humor and heart, the film is set in a fictional town hidden deep in the mountains of Colombia where the magical Madrigal family lives a seemingly serene life. The magic, which came following a great loss when the Madrigals were fleeing violence, has bestowed members of the family with their own special gifts so they can be protected. These range from abilities such as being able to control the weather to having extreme strength or precise hearing. However, one member of the family did not get such a gift. Mirabel (Stephanie Beatriz) is the only member of the Madrigal lineage who did not get blessed with a magical ability on the day each child is supposed to. Feeling like an outcast within her own family, it falls to her to figure out why the magic is mysteriously fading. The best part of Encanto is how the story and the world itself unravels before you. Taking place almost entirely within the Madrigal house, which is itself magical and boasts a glorious mind of its own, the film looks inward to find adventure as opposed to outward. Many Disney films have

Me gusto Encanto. followed a more standard storyline, as characters go on some sort of quest to find some sort of object and discover themselves along the way. Even when well-executed, these stories can begin to feel formulaic. As the 60th film produced by the studio, Encanto avoids the pitfalls of those familiar patterns by forging its own path. It goes far in uncovering the darkness looming underneath the bright exterior of the house. This is both a literal and metaphorical point as Mirabel must go deep within the recesses of the structure itself for answers about why the family’s magic is waning. She will discover deceptively vast landscapes beautifully brought to life in awe-inspiring animation that fully captures their scope. What isn’t fully captured are many of the characters. Initially, Mirabel seems like she has a close relationship with her younger cousin Antonio (Ravi-Cabot Conyers), though that quickly gets forgotten. It is replaced by a cycling of introductions to key members of her family. They all get a hit-or-miss Lin-Manuel Miranda song that spells out how their ability relates to their character. Even as the animation is enthralling, it only develops a fleeting connection to many of the characters. Thankfully, even though it doesn’t always put in the work to fully flesh out its characters, the rest of the film makes up for it. The concluENCANTO sion even goes in some Rated PG Directed by Jared Bush, Byron bold narrative direcHoward, Charise Castro Smith tions, complicating and deepening the story. It does ever so slightly blink in the brightness of the more vibrant ideas at play, though not in a manner that dulls the film’s reflective quality. It is in its overall focus that Encanto grasps at richer themes about how the family’s magic is only part of what defines them. In revealing how supposed outcasts like Mirabel are also central to keeping a family whole, the film manages to create enough magic of its own to win over your heart. n


A THANKSGIVING SPREAD

of Local Music Free the Jester’s Thanksgiving Throwdown returns for another year of spotlighting Spokane talent BY SETH SOMMERFELD

T

he thing people really love about a traditional Thanksgiving dinner is the scope of the offerings. There’s something for a diverse set of palates. Want something hearty? The turkey’s right there. How about something sweet? Pumpkin pie. Tart? Cranberries. Creamy? Mashed potatoes and gravy. On and on. And being able to share that with the people you care about? It makes for a wonderful celebration. Thanksgiving Throwdown is the musical equivalent of the holiday feast. For seven years, the pre-Thanksgiving treat has allowed Spokanites to gorge themselves on local music. Organized by Spokane band Free the Jester, the free concert — taking place Wednesday, Nov. 24 — has been part of the band’s mission just about as long as the band has existed. The first time FtJ played the Knitting Factory was for Thanksgiving Throwdown’s predecessor, the Butterball Bash (a local pre-Thanksgiving show put on for years by promoter Terry “Big T” Swan). But when Swan decided to end Butterball Bash, FtJ decided to pick up the torch, rebrand and start Thanksgiving Throwdown. Apart from Throwdown’s first year, when the short-lived Palomino Club hosted it, the concert tradition has taken place each year at the Knitting Factory. It has grown from around 300 attendees in its first year to over 1,000 people at its last two editions. For Free the Jester singer and guitarist Camerxn Scott Moore, part of Thanksgiving Throwdown’s appeal is its ideal timing.

“It’s a perfect time to do a show,” says Moore. “It’s the night before Thanksgiving — everyone has the next day off. There’s lots of kids that come back in town from colleges, people are visiting families, and everyone has the weekend planned out. But that night before, usually people want to go hang out with friends before all the family traditions.” Free the Jester has always been a band centered on the live experience. Despite having a discography of less than 20 recorded songs, they’ve become a fixture in the local scene. Mixing a blend of pop punk, shredding and screams with a motto of “Thanks4partyn,” the band brings high energy to their performances, including their nights headlining Throwdown. “I know lots of friends that have bands where they’ve been working on music for three years and haven’t played one show,” says Moore. “And, in my mind, the reason why we started playing music is because we just wanted to have fun playing music with people [live].”

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hanksgiving Throwdown’s free admission is a way to thank scene regulars while opening up the local music world to the entire Spokane community. “We’re doing it because we have fun doing this, and we want to put on one really big fun show a year,” says Moore. “Money is not a driving force when it comes to this show. This show is all about community and bringing people together.”

Thanksgiving Throwdown VII’s intergalactic poster art. RICKY DESCHAMP ILLUSTRATION

“I love highlighting new up-and-coming artists in the town, as well as bringing together veterans of the Spokane music scene, and even crossing over genres and breaking down barriers,” he adds. “Especially this year, we have an even genre of three rock bands to three, like, hip-hop/pop acts. It’s just going to be a nice blend of different genres, and every artist, I believe, has a completely unique sound.” While past Throwdown editions have seen Free the Jester invite a few bands from outside the city, the 2021 edition features a 100 percent local lineup, which might also be its most diverse show yet. Of course, Free the Jester headlines, but veteran Spokane band the Nixon Rodeo also brings the intensity of its hard rock, which will surely lead to some mosh pits. But the hip-hop on the bill is also headline-worthy, with Spokane’s hottest rapper, Jango, delivering some of his smooth, never-rushed flow, and Eazz (of CCB Krew) stepping out to prove his voice resonates on a solo level. Rising pop-rock quartet Paloma — who built up enough buzz to sell out their very first show in October — will surely try to get some dancing going with its chill grooves. Kaleb J. opens the proceedings with his melodicminded rapping. Throwdown’s scope has also expanded to include a pre-show acoustic dinner (featuring Stubborn Will, Jimmy Nuge, Ian Smith and Jacob Vanknowe) and an all hip-hop afterparty (featuring Nathan Chartrey, All Day Trey, 1800 YoungSmoke, Ju, Tr3ezy, BBD Yella and Royal T) with both events taking place at The District Bar, essentially making for one big Warped Tour-esque local music festival under one roof. Free the Jester has laid out a lovely spread for Thanksgiving Throwdown VII, so there’s no reason to go musically hungry this holiday. Get stuffed. n Thanksgiving Throwdown VII • Wed, Nov. 24 at 6:30 pm • Free • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague Ave. • sp.knittingfactory.com • 509-244-3279

NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 67


YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

OUTDOORS FREE PARKING

Go ahead and have that extra slice of pie (or two) this Thanksgiving because the day after, you can get a jumpstart on your New Year’s fitness resolution. Let the hordes go shopping; if you want to do something good for your body (and save money), enjoy a free day exploring any of Washington’s 148 state parks. Locally, that’s Curlew Lake, Crawford (Gardner Cave), Mount Spokane (pictured), Riverside/Nine Mile Recreation Area and Steptoe Butte. Nov. 26 is the last free access day in 2021, but not to worry if you miss it; more free days are planned in 2022, or invest in an annual Discovery Pass for just $30. Hint: Passes make for a great gift, too. — CARRIE SCOZZARO Autumn Free State Parks Day • Fri, Nov. 26 • parks.state. wa.us/281/find-a-park

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68 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021

SPORTS POST-TURKEY THROWDOWN

WORDS UNDERSTAND HUMANITY

If Thanksgiving with the family has you suppressing your anger at times, feel free to release that aggression when Relentless Wrestling returns. The promotion’s fifth card features high-flying indie tag-team legend Alex Shelly of the Motor City Machine Guns; rising up-and-comer Warhorse (who showed up on TV challenging Cody Rhodes for All Elite Wrestling’s TNT Championship last year); Northwest wrestling scene mainstays “The Devil Himself” Drexel and Verified Steve Migs; Spokane’s own Chase James; and many more. The brawls will emanate from Trailbreaker Cider, so there should be some good seasonal beverages to get you warmed up and loose for some chanting and heckling. — SETH SOMMERFELD

Bestselling author and University of Houston research professor Brené Brown has previously written about being courageous and leading with your mind, but she tackles life in a different manner in her new book, Atlas of the Heart. In it, Brown explores 87 of the emotions that make us who we are — human — while providing framework, language and tools to gain access to new choices and second chances for all. During her virtual book release hosted by Auntie’s Bookstore, Brown takes attendees on a journey about learning what it takes to form meaningful connections during our lives on Earth. All tickets to this virtual event include admission as well as a hardcover copy of Atlas of the Heart. — MADISON PEARSON

Relentless Wrestling 5 • Sat, Nov. 27 at 6 pm • $15 • 21+ • Trailbreaker Cider • 2209 N. Madson Rd., Liberty Lake • facebook. com/RelentlessPNW

Virtual Book Launch: Atlas of the Heart by Brené Brown • Thu, Dec. 2 at 5 pm • $30 • Online; register at auntiesbooks.com • 509-838-0206


VISUAL ARTS NOT ALL JOLLY

For those of us who get overwhelmed by all the treacly holiday action that arrives with Thanksgiving and never relents until New Year’s Day, a little weirdness is a welcome respite. And Giant Nerd Books knows how to make weirdness fun, like with its SpoKrampus Art Show opening party Friday night. It’s not their first celebration of “the demon of St. Nick’s Day,” but it’s the first one at their killer new location in the Garland District. Some 17 artists are taking part, offering a wide array of images of ol’ Krampus (according to some, the son of the Norse god of the underworld). Meet the artists, delve into some hors d’oeuvres, and maybe have a pop at Garland Brew Werks next door, as long as you’re in the neighborhood. — DAN NAILEN SpoKrampus Art Show • Fri, Nov. 26 from 5-8 pm • Free • Giant Nerd Books • 607 W. Garland Ave. • facebook.com/giant.nerd.books • 509-868-0420

YOUR FINANCIAL SUCCESS FAN CLUB At Idaho Central Credit Union, the most important thing to us is helping our members succeed. We’re here to help you with a full range of both personal and business financial services like checking, loans, mobile banking, and more. Come visit your local ICCU branch and see for yourself how we can help you achieve your financial success.

COMMUNITY LET IT GLOW

The antidote to long, dark days? Light, of course. You’ll find lots of it at Northwest Winterfest, back and bigger than ever in 2021, having moved to the Spokane County fairgrounds, plus expanding to host a second event in the Tri-Cities. The holiday-themed international cultural celebration boasts brightly illuminated lantern displays representing nearly two dozen cultures around the globe, from China to Norway, Cuba to Pakistan. In addition to learning more about each of these represented cultures by heading to the nightly showcase, Northwest Winterfest’s website offers a comprehensive introduction to the holiday traditions and local connections of each group partaking in the festive event. — CHEY SCOTT Northwest Winterfest • Fri, Nov. 26 through Sun, Jan. 2; open daily from 5-9 pm • $11-$49 • Spokane County Fair & Expo Center • 404 N. Havana St. • northwestwinterfest.com

• Ranked #1 in the Northwest for member giveback* • 1 in 5 Idahoans are ICCU members • Helping members achieve financial success for over 80 years • Over 40 branches throughout Idaho to serve you • 24/7 access with eBranch Mobile and Online Banking

Become a member today.

*Callahan & Associates’ Return of the Member value.

WE BELIEVE being rich has little to do with wealth.

NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 69


I SAW YOU MEOW KAPOW! You were in the produce section of the Super 1 on 29th singing to the ’80s hits, and occasionally dancing. You wore a sweatshirt featuring a kitten throwing a grenade. I liked the silver in your hair. I complimented your dancing skill and your shirt. You made me laugh. Want to meet up and dance to ’80s songs? I have a kitten shirt I can wear too. STILL THINKING ABOUT OUR BRIEF ENCOUNTER I saw you at Wal-Mart the one on Sprague. We both comment on our good-looking appearance. You were looking marvelous in the dress or the dress was looking marvelous on you, but I am still thinking about that moment. I was so taken away by your total beauty (I wish I could have seen your eyes hiding behind stylish sunglasses) that I paid your bill. I hope you see this and respond; I want to continue our encounter.

YOU SAW ME FOR JASON After you kissed me, I couldn’t look you in the eye. Mine shut tight, without me asking them to. They closed themselves, stubbornly, and would not budge. But how does one sit

like that across from this man who has kissed you well, whose gently insistent hands never stop gliding, telling you your own needs, watching you hide in plain view? One can’t. Anyone can see that. Even this stumbling version of me, unrecognizable, but with my same sane thoughts saying, “This is just stupid,” behind my closed eyes that stay closed, no matter what true unkind things my thoughts say about them. My eyes would not behave… refused to be windows to anything. Left you where you were, watching, eyes waiting. I didn’t need to look to know that. And yet… I found them looking back, amused, but not unkindly. And then my seen unclosed eyes were adrift, looking everywhere for anything to settle on but yours. Hand. Knee. Denim. Nothing to help me, to save us both from this embarrassing loss of ability to look, to be seen. You waiting, witnessing, wanting. Unable to give you my eyes, I offered something else. Created a diversion of skin. Your eyes fed, I watched you see me. Now all I see is you. Yours, Maggie COMING OUT Hi! I was a trainwreck of a comedian, a mediocre improviser with jokes about hooking up with dragons and being a polite schoolgirl. I podcasted, I tried to be undeniable and above all I loved the Spokane comedy scene. But I couldn’t get anything to work, no matter what. When my mother passed, madness claimed me. I was trying like hell to burn all bridges and upset the right people enough to get hate crimed by local fascists. None of it worked. When I started playing nonbinary or cross-gender characters, I was facing the idea that I didn’t really identify with masculinity. When I started playing the one I’m known for as “agender,” I didn’t realize I was testing the people around me for amenability to that sort of thing, and I was scared of all the people failing that test. So I went back to the weird edgelord routine until my mother passed and my family disowned me, and I just let insanity

claim me. I didn’t see any road back, nor a place I wanted to return to, and I genuinely thought my obit would include the words “senseless tragedy.” But I’m here now, and I can’t just keep sitting in the shadows waiting for old friends to notice me, so here I am with a message: I, the voice of Doctor Donut,

GOOD NEIGHBORS Cheers to the folks at Barrister Winery and the Meals on Wheels for spending time, energy and supplies to pick up trash and abate the rampant graffiti along the alley outside their doors! Downtown’s a neighborhood, too — let’s support businesses that treat it that way!

JEERS RE: TRASH AND RECYCLING Wow. It’s one thing to be upset with someone, and an entirel different thing to add the garbage attitude to the hate you spew. Hopefully you got the initials correct,

After you kissed me, I couldn’t look you in the eye. Mine shut tight, without me asking them to. They closed themselves, stubbornly, and would not budge.

the absent technical improviser, the embodiment of mania themselves... they are a trans she/her, and now I no longer have to lie about it, and whatever that does to my reputation, so be it. I’m not afraid anymore, and I have nothing to lose. If you know me... come say hi!

CHEERS CHEERS TO THE BRUNCHEONETTE Cheers to the Bruncheonette staff for enforcing masks. Such a simple act! While eating we witnessed an angry Idahoan attempt to provoke an altercation with the very kind staff who simply stated they were following guidelines and state mandates to ensure and support public health measures. That angry man retorted that he “would not be coming back.” Well, kudos to you, Bruncheonette staff, because for that exact reason, we will gladly continue to support your local business! Our waitress was also awesome! Give this place your money! Warm regards, prudent and considerate HCW Spokanites

FEMALE RESPONSE TO MAN WHO WAVED To the succinct lady making very clear why women recreate outdoors. THANK YOU!!! Most of us worry about unwanted male interactions when we are doing what we’re doing. Women being outside IS NOT AN INVITATION... to anything. I LOVED how you focused on exactly what is going through your mind and body when you (we) work out outside. It’s NOBLE AND HEALTHY AND STRONG and has absolutely nothing to do with passing males. There was something transcendent about your wording. Almost like... women have a whole myriad of reasons for fitness, working out and adventure... just like men. Hmmm! Anyway just wanted to send a huge thanks!!!! THANKS FOR MAKING ME HAPPY!! Mr Bill, I’ve been in love with you since the day we met. You’ve made me so happy, and I’m looking forward to spending the rest of my life with you. I love you very much, and I hope you never forget that.

but acting salty is probably not a way to get the engagement you OBVIOUSLY are trying to provoke. DELIVERY Just an FYI for delivery recipients. There are not many delivery drivers out here that will accept an order to deliver for no to little tip. Gas is so expensive right now, so if you don’t want to go out, please respect the drivers that bring your order and give them at least a nominal tip. We want to get your order to you, but if it doesn’t even pay our gas, let alone our time, chances are we won’t accept your order to deliver. n

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70 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021

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EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

SANTA EXPRESS This locally organized holiday retail store is for kids ages 4-12 (encouraged), many of whom make this shopping experience part of their holiday tradition. With the assistance of an elf, kids shop for everyone on their list from a wide selection of gifts priced from $1 to $10. For those who prefer to shop from home, an online shopping experience is also available at santaexpress.org. Proceeds benefit Vanessa Behan. Nov. 23-Dec. 23, Mon-Fri 11 am-7 pm, Sat 10 am-7 pm, Sun 11 am-5 pm. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. santaexpress.org (509-415-3506) 13TH ANNUAL “THANKS FOR THE WALK” Join the community for the 13th Annual Thanksgiving Day Dog Walk to benefit the operation of the SpokAnimal Dog Park at High Bridge. Bring your well-behaved dog, enjoy coffee and goodies with fellow dog-lovers and head out on one- or two-mile morning stroll. T-shirts available for purchase. Nov. 25, 9-11 am. $10 suggested donation. High Bridge Park, Riverside Ave. and A St. spokanimal.org ANNUAL PALOUSE TURKEY LEG FUNDRAISER Support the Palouse Library at this annual event that funds new books and programming. Donations can also be mailed directly to the Palouse Library (PO BOX 168, Palouse, WA 99161) or dropped in the book drop out front. Nov. 25, 8 am. By donation. Palouse, Wash. whitcolib.org BRRC TURKEY TROT The annual Bloomsday Road Runners Club event collects food and cash for Second Harvest Food Bank. Runners/walkers have the option of 2-, 3- or 5-mile routes. Nov. 25, 9-10:30 am. Free. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. (206-290-1100) FREE THANKSGIVING YOGA CLASS The Moscow Yoga Center invites the public to a free, virtual give-thanks donation class Thanksgiving morning. Class attendees are encouraged to take a nonperishable food or monetary donations a local food banks or give to a favorite charity. Nov. 25, 9:30-10:45 am. By donation. moscowyogacenter.com CHRISTMAS TREE ELEGANCE Spokane Symphony Associates hosts this annual 13-day event that attracts more than 100,000 attendees around the PNW and features the raffle of 15 themed, decorated trees on display at the Historic Davenport Hotel and River Park Square. Nov. 30-Dec. 12. Raffle tickets $1 each. spokanesymphonyassoc.org

COMEDY

COMING SOON... Go behind the scenes as the BDT players improvise the making of a movie based on audience suggestions. Nov. 26 at 7:30 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com/coming-soon SAFARI Blue Door’s version of “Whose Line,” a fast-paced improv show with a few twists and turns added. Saturdays from 7:30-9 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com JP SEARS The YouTuber, comedian, emotional healing coach, author, speaker, world traveler and curious student of life empowers people to live more meaningful lives. Nov. 26-27 at 7:30 and 10:30 pm, Nov. 28 at 7:30 pm. $25-$74. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com

COMMUNITY

JOURNEY TO THE NORTH POLE A festive lake cruise across the sparkling waters of Lake Coeur d’Alene while viewing more than 1.5 million twinkling holiday lights, and a visit with Santa Claus and his elves at the North Pole waterfront toy workshop. Daily departure times are 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 pm, through Jan. 2 from the Resort Plaza Shops. $10.50$26.50. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdacruises.com LOUIS COMFORT TIFFANY: TREASURES FROM THE DRIEHAUS COLLECTION A celebration of the artistry and craftsmanship of the Tiffany artworks from Chicago’s distinguished Richard H. Driehaus Collection, highlighting masterworks never before presented in a comprehensive exhibition. Open Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm through Feb. 13. $7-$12. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (509-456-3931) LGBTQ+ SENIORS OF THE INW All LGBTQ+ seniors are invited to join weekly Zoom meetings, Fridays at 4 pm. “Senior” is roughly ages 50+. If interested, email NancyTAvery@comcast.net. Free. facebook.com/SpokaneLGBTSeniors WINTER WONDERLAND An inaugural winter market with activities including live music, movies, arts and gifts, Christmas trees, complimentary hot cocoa and more. Saturdays from 10 am-2 pm through Dec. 18. Free. The Wonder Building, 835 N. Post St. fb.me/ e/1T4pVlbVM (509-606-8900) WINTER MARKET AT THE PAVILION: Riverfront’s second annual Winter Market hosts 35 local vendors and artisans offering handmade items, prepared food, gifts and more. Wednesdays from 3-7 pm through Dec. 22. Free. Pavilion at Riverfront, 574 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.com (509-625-6000) THANKSGIVING DAY MEAL Those who don’t have a place to enjoy a nice hot Thanksgiving meal are welcomed to spend part of the holiday with The Salvation Army. Nov. 25, 11:30 am-1:30 pm. Free. The Salvation Army Spokane, 222 E. Indiana. salvationarmyspokane.org KENDALL YARDS WINTER FESTIVAL Shop local during this festival hosting handcrafted jewelry, art and crafts and more. Hosted in the Kendall Yards Welcome Center, and throughout Kendall Yard’s business district. Sat, Nov. 27 and Sat, Dec. 3 from 10 am-7 pm; Sun, Nov. 27 and Sun, Dec. 4 from 10 am-3 pm. Free. facebook.com/KendallYards NORTHWEST WINTERFEST A holiday lantern display and cultural celebration featuring dozens of lighted holiday lantern displays and holiday cultures of the world. Nov. 26-Jan. 2, daily from 5-9 pm. $12-$18. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. northwestwinterfest.com CRESCENT HOLIDAY WINDOWS Enjoy a holiday stroll down Main Avenue and step back in time with five classic window scenes featuring vintage holiday decor rescued from the basement of the former Crescent Department Store. Nov. 27-Jan. 2; Fri-Sat from 12-10 pm and Sun-Thu from 3-8 pm. 1Davenport Grand Hotel, 333 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. davenporthotelcollection.com HOLLY JOLLY CRAFT MARKET Kick off your holiday shopping at this second annual event featuring more than 25 crafters, vendors and small artisans. Bring a new, un-wrapped toy to donate to a local toy drive. Nov. 27, 10 am-5 pm.

Free. Rathdrum Senior Center, 8037 Montana St. fb.me/e/1bbQL2SsD (208415-8007) NUMERICA TREE LIGHTING Festivities kick off at the plaza adjacent to the Numerica Skate Ribbon with food trucks and live entertainment. Grab your ice skates, a cup of free hot chocolate from Starbucks and join Numerica and Spokane Parks & Rec to count down to light the community tree at 6 pm. Nov. 27, 4-7 pm. Free. Numerica Skate Ribbon, 720 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. riverfrontspokane.com (509-625-6600) BLOOD DRIVE The Red Cross hosts a blood drive, with a critical need for donors. Appointment needed; use code WOMANSCLUB when scheduling online at redcrossblood.org or 1-800-RED CROSS. Nov. 30, 10 am-3 pm. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. womansclubspokane.org (509-838-5667) DECK THE FALLS The weekend begins with the “Red Neck Parade” on Friday and the craft fair on Saturday, ending with a community Christmas concert on Sunday. Dec. 3-5. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St., Metalline Falls. cuttertheatre. com (509-446-4108) HOLIDAY BALL A semi-formal event by USA Dance Sandpoint. Come at 7 pm for a beginners rumba lesson, followed by general dancing to a DJ, refreshments, door prizes and mixers. Singles or couples, as well as all levels of dancers, are welcome. Bring a non-perishable food item to donate. Dec. 3, 7-10 pm. $5-$9. Ponderay Events Center, 401 Bonner Mall Way. (208-699-0421) HOLIDAY FIREWORKS CELEBRATION A community fireworks show hosted by the Kendall Yards Business District, held in conjunction with the Annual Winter Festival featuring an array of local vendors in the Kendall Yards Welcome Center and throughout Kendall Yard’s businesses. Dec. 3, 6:30 pm. facebook. com/KendallYards JURASSIC QUEST Walk through the Cretaceous, Jurassic and Triassic periods to see the dinos that ruled on land, and deep dive into the “Ancient Oceans” exhibit to come face to face with the largest apex predator that ever existed: a moving, life-size, 50-foot-long megalodon. Dec. 3 from 1-8 pm, Dec. 4-5 from 9 am-8 pm. $19-$36. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. jurassicquest.com/events/spokane-wa MILLWOOD COMMUNITY TREE LIGHTING & CHRISTMAS MARKET Inland Empire Paper Company, the City of Millwood and Millwood community host a traditional lighting of the community Christmas tree on IEP’s front lawn, with hot chocolate, cookies, music, and Santa. The WinterFest Christmas Market also runs from 4-7 pm on Dalton at Argonne, along with a Friends of Argonne Library craft giveaway. Dec. 3, 4-6:30 pm. Free. Bottles, 3223 N. Argonne Rd. millwoodnow.org (509-939-1083) OUTDOOR EUROPEAN CHRISTMAS MARKET A two-day family event hosted by the Hayden Chamber, coinciding with the city parade and tree lighting on Saturday. Enjoy warming fires, twinkly lights and shopping for antique and vintage items, homemade crafts and gifts, food trucks, warm beverages and more. Fri, Dec. 3 from 4-8 pm; Sat, Dec. 4 from 10 am-6 pm. $5-$7. McIntire Family Park, 8930 N. Government Way. haydenchamber.org (208-762-1185) ATHOL CHRISTMAS MARKET Local farms, artisans and vendors from the

summer market are offering goods from specialty foods to locally made goat soaps, blended herbal teas, Christmas ornaments, wood crafts and so much more. Dec. 4, 10 am-4 pm and Dec. 5, 12-4 pm. Athol Community Hall, 30355 Third St. facebook.com/ events/456613122396643/ HOLIDAY EXTRAVAGANZA CRAFT FAIR The annual craft and holiday extravaganza at Cheney High School offers gift ideas, home decor, jewelry, bath and body items, candles, lavender, smoked salmon, cotton candy and much more from over 80 local vendors. Santa pictures offered as well. Dec. 4, 10 am-4 pm. Free. Cheney High School, 460 N. 6th St. (509-559-4001)

FOOD

ROCKET WINE CLASS Wekly wine classes; sign up in advance. Fridays at 7 pm. Call to reserve a seat, or register online. Price varies. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT PANCAKE BREAKFAST Green Bluff Grange hosts its regular pancake breakfast served with eggs, sausage, OJ and of course pancakes. Kids 5 and under free with paid adult. Nov. 28, 8-11 am. $4-$8. Green Bluff Grange, 9809 Green Bluff Rd. greenbluffgrowers.com BREAKFAST & PHOTOS WITH SANTA See Santa before he returns to the North Pole. Have breakfast with him and get affordable, professional photos, available before you leave. Breakfast includes pancakes, eggs, sausage, juice, hot chocolate, applesauce, milk and coffee and tea. Also includes activities and gifts for children, and live Christmas music by Taylor Belote on steel drums. Free parking. Dec. 4, 11 and 18 from 9 am-noon. Prices vary. Southside Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. soutsidescc.org (509-535-0803)

MUSIC

PIANIST DANEK BLACK Pianist Danek Black plays live holiday music from the Davenport lobby’s grand piano. Nov. 25-Dec. 23, 3:30-6:30 pm. Free. Historic Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. davenporthotelcollection.com DICKENS CAROLERS Dressed for the occasion with top hats and bow ties, the Coeur d’Alene Dickens Carolers sing warming holiday melodies in and around the resort, adding charm and spirited tidings to the season. Nov. 26-Dec. 23, Wed-Sat from 6-9 pm, Sun from 11 am-2 pm. Free. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdaresort. com/play/events/holiday-light-show TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA: CHRISTMAS EVE & OTHER STORIES The long-awaited tour celebrates the 25th anniversary of the group’s landmark album “Christmas Eve and Other Stories,” the three-time certified platinum album that launched the group to superstardom and spawned the bringthe-whole-family rock holiday tradition that has now played to more than 17 million fans all across the nation. Nov. 26, 7:30 pm. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com MT. DEW BOYS The local bluegrass band presents a Thanksgiving concert. Snacks and refreshments available for purchase. Nov. 27, 6:30 pm. Green Bluff Grange, 9809 Green Bluff Rd. greenbluffgrowers.com (509-979-2607)

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EVENTS | CALENDAR GONZAGA JAZZ CHRISTMAS CONCERT A concert of Christmas favorites performed by the Gonzaga Jazz Ensemble, including Ella Fitzgerald’s “Winter Wonderland” and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas,” Diana Krall’s “Jingle Bells” plus other holiday favorites. Dec. 2, 7-8:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Donations accepted. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 211 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga.edu/ music (509-313-6733) SPOKANE SYMPHONY: THE NUTCRACKER WITH STATE STREET BALLET The Spokane Symphony welcomes back State Street Ballet of Santa Barbara for their 10th year of exquisite dancing with us to Tchaikovsky’s memorable score. More than 70 local young dancers complete the cast. Dec, 2-3 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 4 at 2 and 7:30 pm, Dec. 5 at 2 pm. $32+. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org (509-624-1200) DJ NIGHT ON THE ICE Get your skate on with DJ A1 for themed nights, music, lights, contests and more every Friday from 6-9 pm (excluding 12/24) in December and January. Numerica Skate Ribbon, 720 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. riverfrontspokane.com (509-625-6600) COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY: HOLIDAY POPS The holiday program “Sounding the Horn: Illuminated Carols” includes Franck’s Symphony in D minor; Mozart’s Horn Concerto no. 4, ft. Casey Traver on French horn; Selections from the Polar Express; Herbert’s “March of the Toys” and a Christmas Carol sing-a-long. Dec. 4, 7:30 pm. $10$20. Schuler Performing Arts Center, 1000 W. Garden Ave. cdasymphony. org/events (208-769-7780) GONZAGA WIND ENSEMBLE: ARISE The Gonzaga Wind Ensemble conducted by Peter J. Hamlin performs their concert, Arise, with music by Kevin Day, Ryan George, Gustav Holst, Omar Thomas, James David and Robert Spittal. Dec. 4, 3-4:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Donations accepted. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 211 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga.edu/music HOLIDAY CELEBRATION: LET IT GLOW Music lovers across the Palouse can usher in the holiday season with WSU School of Music’s inaugural Holiday Celebration: Let It Glow in the fullydecorated and glowing Bryan Hall Theatre on the WSU-Pullman Campus. This family-friendly concert includes a silent auction to benefit WSU School of Music student scholarships. Dec. 4, 2-4 pm. Free. Bryan Hall Theatre (WSU), 605 Veterans Way. events.wsu.edu/event/ holiday-concert-8 (509-335-7696) PETER RIVERA The former lead singer and drummer of Rare Earth comes to the Bing Theater with his fabulous Celebrate orchestra complete with horn section, back-up singers and accomplished side players. Dec. 4, 7:30 pm. $25. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com RUSTY JACKSON’S WHITE CHRISTMAS “White Christmas” with Danny Kaye, Bing Crosby and Rosemary Clooney is retold by Rusty Jackson in his own inimitable way by performing the music from the show and narrating to fill in the rest of the story, alongside special guest Mel Dalton. Dec. 4, 6-8 pm. $20. Lake City Center, 1916 N. Lakewood Dr. (208-262-1655) WASHINGTON IDAHO SYMPHONY: HOLIDAY BRASS Program includes

72 INLANDER NOVEMBER 25, 2021

Duke Ellington’s jazzy take on the Nutcracker Suite and holiday selections performed by the brass and string nonet. Dec. 4, 7:30 pm. $10-$25. Pullman High School, 510 NW Greyhound Way. wa-idsymphony.org/concert3

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

CHEAP SKATE TUESDAY Free skate rentals are included with each paid admission, every Tuesday from Nov. 23-Feb. 22 during regular hours. Masks required. $5.95-$7.95. Numerica Skate Ribbon, 720 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontspokane HUFFIN’ FOR THE STUFFIN’ A 5K starting and finishing at U District PT, with virtual and in-person options. Proceeds benefit Active 4 Youth. Nov. 25. $35. U-District PT, 730 N. Hamilton St. runsignup.com/Race/WA/Spokane/ TheTrot (509-458-7686) SCHWEITZER OPENING DAY Tentative 2021-22 season opening day, conditions permitting. Nov. 26, 9 am-3:30 pm. Schweitzer, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer.com SILVER OPENING DAY Dependent on snow levels, Silver aims to be open for skiing, snowboarding and tubing the day after Thanksgiving. Check website for updates. Nov. 26. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. silvermt.com STATE PARKS FREE DAY Visit Washington State Parks without a required Discover Pass ($10/day or $30/year). Includes day access locally to Riverside, Mt. Spokane and Palouse Falls state parks and more. Nov. 26. parks.state. wa.us/281/Parks RELENTLESS WRESTLING: V Live, premier professional wrestling in Eastern Washington. $5 from each ticket is donated to Wishing Star Foundation. Nov. 27, 6:30 pm. $21.94-$32.44. Trailbreaker Cider, 2204 N. Madison St., Liberty Lake. trailbreakercider.com SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. VANCOUVER GIANTS Regular season match. Nov. 27, 7 pm. $17-$37. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. VICTORIA ROYALS Regular season match. Special: TicketsWest player magnet giveaway. Nov. 30, 7 pm. $17-$37. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. PRINCE GEORGE COUGARS Regular season match. Dec. 3, 7 pm. $17-$37. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com (279-7000) EAGLE WATCHING CRUISES A twohour cruise on Lake Coeur d’Alene to view some of the 100s of American Bald Eagles that visit the lake on their annual migration each winter to feed on lake-bound salmon. Cruises offered Sat-Sun from 12-2 pm between Dec. 4-19, and daily from 12-2 pm Dec. 26Jan. 2. $16.50-$22.50. Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdacruises.com

THEATER

MEAN GIRLS Direct from Broadway is this hit musical from an award-winning creative team, including book writer Tina Fey, composer Jeff Richmond (“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”), lyricist Nell Benjamin (Legally Blonde) and director Casey Nicholaw (The Book of Mormon). Through Nov. 28, show times

RELATIONSHIPS

vary. $39-$100. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. broadwayspokane.com BABES IN TOYLAND Enjoy the wonderful characters of Mary, Mary, Quite Contrary; Tom-Tom, the Piper’s Son; Jack and Jill; Little Miss Muffet in this Christmas classic. Nov. 26-Dec. 19; times vary. $12-$16. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia. spokanechildrenstheatre.org ELLEN TRAVOLTA PRESENTS: SAVING CHRISTMAS Ellen Travolta, Molly Allen and Abbey Crawford read and tell stories, sing songs, and bring a little brightness to your holiday. Nov. 26-Dec. 19; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 5 pm. $30. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdachristmas.com A CHRISTMAS CAROL Journey back in time to Victorian England for a holiday theatrical event that’s family-friendly and nostalgically new, in a world premier stage adaptation by Kendra Phillips (MFA Playwriting ‘21). Dec. 3-4 and Dec. 11 at 7:30 pm, Dec. 4-5 and Dec. 12 at 2 pm. $6-$22. Hartung Theater, 875 Perimeter Dr. uidaho.edu/theatre AN ILIAD Stage Left comes full-circle, bringing An Iliad live to the stage. Directed by Susan Hardie and starring Robert Tombari, this first streamed production back in January 2021 makes its in-person debut as a fundraiser show. Meet staff, crew and the Board of Directors ahead of the theater’s most explosive season yet. Dec. 3-5 at 7 pm. $30. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. stagelefttheater.org

VISUAL ARTS

ORNAMENT & SMALL WORKS SHOW This annual show features small works and ornaments made by over 35 local artists; most pieces are under $50. Mon-Fri 10 am-5 pm, Sat 10 am-4 pm through Dec. 23. Free. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland. spokaneartschool.net UNWRAP THE CREATIVE: 25TH SMALL WORKS SHOW This twomonth-long, yearly exhibit is displayed up until Christmas, and features more than 100 new artists, consisting of approximately 1,500 pieces total, all by local artists. Through Dec. 24, open daily from 11 am-6 pm. Free. The Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com (208-765-6006) BLACK FRIDAY @ EMERGE Save up to 50 percent on locally-made goods and works while supporting local artists. Spend $50 or more and get a free Emerge CDA T-shirt; spend $25 or more and get a free Emerge sticker pack. Other activities include a Poppy James Vintage clothing pop-up, a Bullstitch Sewing booth with handmade lingerie, and holiday portraits from photographer Keely Brennan (book at emergecda.com). Nov. 26, 12-6 pm. Emerge, 119 N. Second St. (208-930-1876) FAST TRASH The final Chase Gallery exhibit of 2021 invites viewers to look in a new way at something that participating artist Thom Caraway describes as having become “so ubiquitous as to be invisible.” Namely: trash. Featuring new work by three local artists —Tiffany Patterson, Katie Creyts and Caraway — who all work in a variety of disciplines, for this exhibit their shared medium is garbage. Nov. 29-Dec. 30; open MonFri 8 am-5 pm. Free. Chase Gallery, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. chasegallery.org

Advice Goddess LEAPING SICKNESS

AMY ALKON

I thought I was happily married. Recently, I found a cherry Chapstick in my husband’s coat pocket — a kind he’d never buy. He claimed he randomly grabbed it at the drugstore checkout. Last week, he said he’d be visiting his mother at the nursing home, but I later learned he never showed. I asked him about it, and he said work ran over. Additionally, our sex life has picked up, and he’s been extra thoughtful lately. Doesn’t all of this, put together, scream that he’s cheating? How do I confront him? —Nightmares

You don’t expect marrying the man of your dreams to turn your actual dream content into all-night notifications of impending disaster: dozens of inch-high coal miners in tiny hardhats and goggles scaling you and repeatedly jabbing you with cupcake toothpicks topped with little red flags. Are you right to pile these infobits into the verdict your husband’s cheating? Maybe — but maybe not. Evolutionary psychologist Martie Haselton explains that we evolved to be protectively wrong: to err on the safe side, meaning make the least evolutionarily costly error. Suspecting cheating where none actually exists is less genetically costly than shrugging off signs that seem to point to it — and then possibly losing your man and/or having him funnel his resources away from your kids to those he’d make with some hussypants he’s seeing on the side. Confronting your husband — accusing him of cheating — is a risky tactic. If he is cheating, he’s likely to deny it. If he isn’t, your accusation could destroy your relationship. A possibly less risky tactic is evoking his empathy: telling him that, collectively, these infobits triggered fears of losing him. The subject becomes your seeking reassurance (which, P.S., may or may not be truth-backed). If he has been straying, he might be inspired to reevaluate and stop. Might. Over the next few months, observe your husband’s behavior — including that which suggests he loves you and is faithful. Your observations are likely to be inconclusive (compared with finding him in bed with somebody), but if you amass enough information over time, it should begin to point you to some sort of understanding. I personally make peace with the freakouts of life that way; for example, a new mole that (apologies to Judy Blume) seemed to scream: “Are You There, Alkon? It’s Me, Malignant Melanoma.” One dermatologist visit later: “Hello, drama queen. I’d like to introduce you to your spider bite.”

JUNK MALE

Do men even read online dating profiles? Mine says I’m a “sober divorced writer.” Inevitably, guys message me: “What do you do? Ever been married? Wanna go for a drink?” Um, hello? I’m flattered I apparently get picked on looks alone, but even men who aren’t into hookups do this. —Mystified There’s a case to be made for a guy being a rushed or generally careless reader and sliding right past “sober divorced writer.” However, men are likely to blow past an even more standout description, such as: “I enjoy fine dining, walks on the beach, and dismembering my date and feeding bits of him to the squirrels.” Though men seem more likely to hit on hot women on their pictures alone, they probably do this even when women are, shall we say, lukewarmor even room temperature. Because birth control used to be “Cross your legs, honey!” women evolved to be “the choosier sex,” wary about getting it on with a man until they vet him for his willingness and ability to “provide” for any resulting kids. Because men don’t get pregnant, it’s evolutionarily optimal for them -- best for passing on Ye Old Genes — to have vastly lower standards. (Vastly. Like: “So...she has a pulse?”) This sex difference makes a strong showing on dating apps. Computational social scientist Taha Yasseri, with three students, analyzed piles of data from online dating studies. “Men are much less selective in who they communicate with,” they report. In fact, it’s “optimal for men to use the ‘shotgun method’”: blasting out “likes” like buckshot from some backwoods Cletus’ hunting rifle. The strategy is not finding a really great match (true love with a woman much like them -- or a man if they’re gay) but messaging “a large number of people, irrespective of their potentially low fit” and hoping some of them bite. Basically, many men on dating apps are like 2-year-olds. They only look at the pictures. Take it super slowly with any guy you meet via app, meaning keep him on secret probation until you see ample evidence you might be well-matched (and that “Conor” is not long for “Con”). If you’re awakened one lazy Saturday morning by the man in your bed, the part of your body he’s most interested in should not be your thumb — which he got a little clumsy with while trying to unlock your banking app. n

©2021, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)


Germany is embracing legal cannabis.

GOING GLOBAL

Continental Cannabis Germany and (perhaps) Mexico are getting set to join the legalization club BY WILL MAUPIN

F

or the third time this year, a country has taken a major step toward cannabis legalization. Once it assumes power, the coalition of parties expected to form Germany’s next government intends to legalize and regulate cannabis in the country. In September’s federal election, the Social Democratic Party came in first with 25.7 percent of the vote and has formed a majority coalition with the third-place Greens and fourthplace Free Democratic Party. The latter two parties have long included cannabis legalization and regulation in their platforms. It is now a priority for all three. “We are introducing the controlled supply of can-

nabis to adults for consumption purposes in licensed shops,” the coalition’s working group on health care stated in a paper obtained by German newspaper Der Tagesspiegel last week. With a population over 83 million, Germany is the largest country by population in the European Union. It became the second EU member nation to announce plans to legalize cannabis this year, after tiny Luxembourg did so last month. Unlike Luxembourg’s plan, which will not allow for a regulated legal market with dispensaries, Germany’s plan includes regulations for licensing retail stores. Neither country has set a formal time frame for their

NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a five-year sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

legalization plans. Whichever one crosses the finish line soonest will be the first to legalize cannabis in Europe. However, a country much closer to our part of the world might beat them both to become the third country on earth, after Canada and Uruguay, to fully legalize recreational cannabis. In a series of rulings dating back to 2015, the supreme court of Mexico has been pushing the country toward legalization. In 2018, the court essentially ruled that cannabis prohibition was a violation of human rights that are constitutionally protected in the country. Mexico’s Congress, however, has been slow to respond to these rulings. So slow, in fact, that this past June the supreme court got involved once again and effectively legalized cannabis itself. It is now up to the Mexico Congress to bring the country’s laws into alignment with the court’s dictates. Until then, cannabis is simultaneously legal and illegal in Mexico. High Times reported that definitive action from the Mexico Senate is expected to come in December. As of now, the number of countries that have outright legalized cannabis sits at two. Soon, perhaps even by the end of the year, that number could more than double if Luxembourg, Germany and Mexico lawmakers act swiftly. n

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ACROSS 1. “Lowdown” singer Scaggs 4. “Ruh-____!” (Scooby-Doo interjection) 7. Wisdom teeth, e.g. 13. Prefix with meter 14. PlayStation maker 15. They may be humble 16. Responded to a busy signal, perhaps 18. “Why, you little ...” 19. *Seeking an Olympic victory 21. Lead-in to much 22. Evidence of surgery 23. Until 27. *Not just chilly 30. Goal 31. Women’s rights advocate Lucretia 34. Coming out of one’s skin 36. *Fictional character whose name is French for “flight of death” 38. Scott Joplin’s music 40. Fall associated with winter

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1. Noble Italian house that produced two popes 36 37 2. Some classic theaters 38 3. Collection of signs 4. Gives deep massage therapy 41 42 5. Old sandlot game 6. Many-headed serpents 47 48 7. Outstanding Comedy Series Emmy nominee every year 52 53 54 from 1973 to 1983 8. Clarinet cousin 56 57 58 9. Feature of “butte” but not “but” 10. Kerfuffle 60 11. Soccer official 63 12. Govt. agency that’s assbackwards? 14. Succumb to gravity 17. They can get you a job brothers 20. Remove, as excess 29. Muppet who testified before 24. It beats a high card Congress 25. Window darkener 31. Clubber Lang’s portrayer in “Rocky 26. “Srsly?!” III” 28. Either of two filmmaking

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THIS WEEK ANSWERS O’S N I SAW YOUS

38. They’re parked at national parks 39. Largest fencing sword 40. Smokes at a poker game 43. Where to emulate the 39 40 locals, it’s said 43 44 45 46 44. Eight-time Oscar nominee for Best Actor 49 50 51 45. Like lava 46. Says “You and I are 55 done,” e.g. 48. Conspicuous aardvark 59 feature 50. 2014 film in which David 61 62 Oyelowo plays Martin Luther 64 65 King Jr. 51. Symbol of royalty in “NEVER GETS OLD” ancient Egypt 53. “What ____ is new?” 32. Horatian or Keatsian 54. People calling the shots at the zoo? 33. Rating for “South Park” 55. General with a Chinese dish named for him 35. Drag behind 56. Clear, financially 36. Nightgown fabric 57. “Barefoot Contessa” host Garten 37. Folklore fiend 58. ‘90s music holders 34

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NOVEMBER 25, 2021 INLANDER 79


Play where the big winners play.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 18 TH 5 PM – 7 PM | 30 WINNERS OF CASH, EXTRA PLAY CASH & PREQUALIFY INTO THE 7:30 PM DRAWING 7:30 PM | F-150 4X4 XLT SUPERCREW & CASH WINNER We’re revving up the winnings by giving away a brand new F-150 Truck during the Keep on Truckin’ Giveaway at Coeur d’Alene Casino! Join us on Saturday, December 18TH, and you could win one of 30 cash and Extra Play Cash prizes valued between $1,000 and $12,000. Plus, one of the lucky winners in the 5 pm to 7 pm giveaway will also win a truck and cash grand prize package valued at $58,000.

Keep On Truckin’ Bingo

ALL NOVEMBER & DECEMBER WIN A NEW FORD RANGER! Play the Keep On Truckin’ game this November and December during Regular Bingo sessions. If you get a blackout in 48 numbers or less, you’ll win a brand new Ford Ranger! Once the truck is won, the promotion is over. Please see Bingo Venue for full promotion rules.

Play your favorite video gaming machines starting November 1ST to earn entries into the giveaway. Get one entry for every 500 points earned with your Coeur Rewards card.

10 PlayStation® PS5 Winners Each Week! FRIDAYS IN NOVEMBER | 7 PM

It’s like Black Friday every Friday in November! We’re giving away ten PlayStation® PS5 consoles on each Friday in November at Coeur d’Alene Casino. Earn entries by playing your favorite gaming machines with your Coeur Rewards card starting November 1ST. Get one entry for every 500 points earned. Must be present to win. Must be a Coeur Rewards member to participate. Joining Coeur Rewards is free and easy - just be 18 years or older and have a valid ID. Promotion rules available at cdacasino.com.

See the Coeur Rewards booth, CDA Casino app or cdacasino.com for promotional rules.

W E LC O M E H O M E .

CASINO

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HOTEL

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DINING

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SPA

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CHAMPIONSHIP

GOLF

3 7 9 1 4 S O U T H N U K WA LQ W • W O R L E Y, I D A H O 8 3 8 76 • 1 8 0 0 - 5 2 3 - 2 4 6 4 • C D A C A S I N O . C O M