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his week staff reporter Daniel Walters straps on some hip waders and slogs into the murk of the 2020 ELECTION. Donald Trump, despite losing by more than 5 million votes, still hasn’t conceded the race to Joe Biden (as of press time), and he’s shown little interest in loosening his grip on Republicans or his friends at Fox News. Regardless, his impact on American life will reverberate for years. As Idaho Congressman Russ Fulcher — a big booster of the president — tells us, “Trump has stirred the pot so much that a bunch of crap is coming up from the bottom. And we’re finally seeing it.” Democrats, meanwhile, are doing some soul searching of their own, having underperformed in down-ballot races across the country. Walters sorts it all out beginning on page 14. Also this week: Staff reporter Wilson Criscione reports on a family’s search for answers after a gay teen in the small town of Newport was found beaten, tied and buried in a shallow grave (page 8). — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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MICHAEL MENTZER: How has it affected me? It has ruined a couple of friendships with people who are cognitively dissonant, and alienated me from some Trumpster family members. RENEI YARROW: Having spent three years in an intensely emotionally abusive relationship with a narcissist, it feels as though the leader of our country and way too much of the population keep perpetuating that trauma. And I’m a white straight person with plenty of privilege. I cannot even imagine how people of color, LGBTQ+, or any of the other groups this admin has marginalized have felt for the last 1,411 days. SHELBY KELLER: As much as I detest the man, I will give him credit where credit’s due: His presidency has been the reason I started researching the history of fascists more. ANDREW DRESDEN: He’s the reason I can’t celebrate Thanksgiving with friends and family. He is fighting to take away rights and endanger the health and safety of people I care about. He’s a white supremacist, which emboldens his white supremacist base. He’s put my and my daughter’s health insurance in jeopardy. He’s destroying the environment. His lies and cons have duped millions into blindly supporting him and use that support as an excuse for violence and murder. CHAMBERLAIN TORI: It has ruined my faith in people and shown me how so many are able to be brainwashed into believing fake news and stupid conspiracies. MATTHEW DAVID BOWERS: Taxes were lowered. I can once again get materials with American made steel rather than China’s garbage. I can see a local doctor rather than travel 80 miles for a full day wait even with an appointment. My friends who are still in the military don’t have consistent family-ending deployments to worry about anymore in support of never-ending war. n

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urely the convergence of COVID, the cold and lack of in-person contact partially accounted for America’s cantankerousness this past election cycle. Disenfranchisement, disillusion and a multitude of systemic issues undoubtedly contributed as well. Personally, I observed a rather unsettling side of myself this season, a subtle slide further into entrenchment, the hardening of an us vs. them mentality. As someone who has studied human conflict and reconciliation, this felt disconcerting. History has shown us the moral imperative of rejecting claims of categorical exclusion, as most atrocities arise from “othering.” Dehumanization creates derision, which erodes societal connections and causes unhealthy fracturing of the self. Yet, knowing this did not inoculate me from falling prey to polarization. Even more distressing, I put safeguards in place after 2016 and our country’s ostensible stratification. I diversified my news feeds, hoping to gain more insight. What I have seen since that election is disturbing —

massive dissonance and an ever-widening divide, threatening to fray the threads of our shared reality. America is being sold radically different stories. Some in Silicon Valley have stepped up to take responsibility. I do not relish joining this chorus because it feels a bit like proclaiming a “get off my lawn” refrain, but their algorithms are alarming. Of course, we also must acknowledge the complexity of our current situation. Technology produces innumerable contributions and like any tool, it is neutral. But industries aren’t. They, like the rest of us, are motivated by a range of incentives — some healthy, some not — although profit frequently rises to the top. Since our society has assented to operating under models that encourage maximizing revenue, it makes sense that a parallel path has been set for AI’s programming. Though our time has always been valuable, our attention is now monetizable, making us the product. Catching our eye — for even a moment


— is a commodity, bid on, bought and sold in increments. This is both new and not new. Tobacco, food, alcohol and beauty companies have long used experts to create the salacious quotient, designed to hook. AI is just exponentially better. Its ability to collect immense amounts of personal data and then create individualized experiences to extract our attention is improving by the second. Its processing power exposes our very human vulnerabilities, leaving us open to addiction, misinformation and manipulation. Even though I deliberately diversified my news intake, I was rarely shown opposing viewpoints because the algorithm had discerned my implicit interests by paying attention to what actually held mine. Arguably, this type of curation is convenient, but it also creates “perception gaps” with others. We cannot connect or coordinate if we receive fundamentally different information. Surprisingly, the fix is fairly simple, though as with any form of compulsion, it’s the application that’s difficult — honest acknowledgment, consistent intentionality with our choices and exposure. So, while conventional wisdom conveys that winning an election requires securing an adequate number of votes, I’m now positing that as a country we reset, widening our parameters of success. Toward the end of this election, I decided to choose a definition of victory beyond the binary win/lose: Talking to neighbors, getting to the root of our values instead of mere persuasions. Connection and sincerity. More earnest emotion, less cynicism and snark.

“Toward the end of this election, I decided to choose a definition of victory beyond the binary win/lose.” Deleting apps and declaring liberation. Less Instagram, more imparare l’italiano. Escaping the curated world and entering the real one, slithering around in all those corporeal senses — inhaling steamy peppermint tea, being tightly wrapped in a straight-fromthe-dryer, slightly static-y blankie. Letting fingers and face get all saucy while snacking on a sandwich from Stella’s. Feeling the silkiness of chalk seeping into fingertips while drawing a hopscotch board on bumpy pavement. Admiring the natural splendor of this region, its sunrises and sets or when crystalized snow rests atop the still lush, verdant branches below. Listening. Slowing on a Sunday morning to hear a sermon from some of this land’s longtime caretakers, the Kalispel Tribe, about their abiding connection. Taking the long way home and driving down into those valleys just to be swallowed up whole — in body and soul — by the river’s perpetual beauty. (Choose, if you like, to augment this virtuous reality through a reading. Under the Riverfront Park Pavilion’s halo you will find Alex Sherwood’s quote: “Sometimes I stand and shout ‘River do you remember us?’”) Snuggling up with Jess Walter (his new book, not the person) and discovering truths only fiction can deliver. Using the library’s convenient curbside pickup to procure Barbara Kingsolver’s new book of poetry. Then, letting words hit deep within marrow — “How to stay at this desk when the sun is barefooting cartwheels over the grass— [...] How to resist the kiss, the body forbidden that plucks the long vibrating string of want—/How to drink water when there is wine—/Once I knew all these brick-shaped things, took them for the currency of survival./Now I have lived long and I know better.” So, my fellow Americans, hopefully you’ll join me and consider: How do you define winning? How do you pledge allegiance to much higher callings — those far above any profit or party? How do you choose to nurture your time, connections and your one sacred body? n Inga N. Laurent is a local legal educator and a Fulbright scholar. She is deeply curious about the world and its constructs and delights in uncovering common points of connection that unite our shared but unique human experiences.

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The walls of Pepper Fox’s motel room in Newport are lined with pictures of her son.

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CRIME

PIECING IT TOGETHER A family searches for answers after a gay teen in a small town is beaten and buried in a shallow grave BY WILSON CRISCIONE

I

n the hours before authorities say he was brutally murdered, Jason Fox felt something familiar to him as a gay kid growing up in a small town: the fear of being unwelcome. That night on Sept. 14, Jason — a 19-year-old counting down the last days of summer before college began — planned to meet up with some people at Timber River Ranch, located a short drive from his hometown of Newport, about 50 miles north of Spokane. He was worried, however, about a man who lived there named Riley Hillestad. Before Jason agreed to go, he checked to make sure Hillestad wouldn’t be there, using “fr” as a shorthand for “for real.” “Where’s ur place and is it fr not Riley?” Jason asked on social media, court records say. “Like I fr wanna kick it, I just ain’t down for drama.”

8 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020

“Bro that’s why I’m at where I’m at because I don’t like that shit around me,” replied the person encouraging Jason to go, Claude Merritt. Jason agreed but remained uneasy. He sent the address to his cousin. “22 Yergens Rd,” Jason wrote, according to a screenshot of the conversation. “Just in [case] anything happens to me.” It was the last time anyone from Jason’s family would hear from him. Weeks later, Jason’s body was found buried at the ranch with his hands tied behind his back, police say. Four people have been charged with murder in connection with his death: Matthew Raddatz-Freeman, 28, Kevin Belding, 24, Claude Merritt, 25, and Riley Hillestad, 26. As investigators in Pend Oreille County search for a motive, his death has reverberated across the LGBTQ

community. Details of the alleged murder sound eerily similar to that of Matthew Shepard, a gay college student tortured in a Wyoming field and left to die in 1998 — a murder that eventually led Congress to expand the federal hate-crime law to include crimes motivated by gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or disability. Jason’s mom, Pepper Fox, is convinced that Jason’s death was because of his sexual orientation. Pend Oreille County Sheriff Glenn Blakeslee says that right now there is no evidence for a hate crime, though “it has not been completely ruled out.” But while Jason’s family continues to search for answers about his death, it’s what they remember about his life that reveals the challenges Jason faced as a kid grappling with his own sexuality and yearning for acceptance, wherever he could find it. ...continued on page 10


NOVEMBER 19, 2020 INLANDER 9


NEWS | CRIME “PIECING IT TOGETHER,” CONTINUED... “He was a great kid,” says his dad, Michael Fox. “He always made people smile.”

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hose close to Jason portray him as a magnetic, caring person with an infectious smile. He could light up a room one minute, and talk his way out of a bad situation in another. But at home, life wasn’t always easy. Jason’s mom, Pepper, moved to Seattle when he was young after she and Michael split up. Jason went long periods of his childhood without seeing her at all. Susan Fox, Michael’s wife, raised Jason and his older brother, Robby, as a mother from a young age, but it took awhile for the kids to open up to her. Susan says she and Jason had a “rough relationship” at times, but she says they loved each other like a mother and son. Meanwhile, Jason and Robby, less than a year apart, had contrasting personalities. Jason liked the theater, and Robby liked sports. Jason was drawn to art, and Robby liked working on cars. Jason had a good group of friends in school. In high school, Jason was a DJ for the high school’s radio station. He joined the wrestling team, and tried other activities as he was “trying to find his way,” Michael says. It was more difficult for him to fit in compared to his older brother, who effortlessly joined the popular kids. Robby and Jason were close as young kids, but as they got older, Robby says even he picked on Jason and his friends Jason Fox wanted to be a nurse. “He cared tremendously about others,” recalls a teacher. — something he says he now deeply regrets. easiest place for a kid to come out as LGBTQ. There are “In Newport, if you don’t do sports, or if you don’t a lot of “simpletons here that have raised their children do certain things, you’re not popular,” Robby says. to be simpletons,” he says. But Jason wasn’t just the kid in school who everyone “A lot of young people got a real problem with anysingled out. If someone said something to him, he’d go one that has a different sexual orientation than they think back at them. He never came home crying because kids picked on him, his family says. He would, however, come is correct,” Michael says. home roughed up after being in a fight. Maybe a more accepting culture in Seattle would help Jason, his parents thought. In some ways, Pepper thinks it did help. Initially, she saw how happy he was at first to “finally experience being accepted just the way he was.” He made friends easily and went to parties with kids his age. One day, he confessed to Pepper that he told people in Newport he was bisexual instead of gay, only because he thought that Jason didn’t come out until he was 18. When he did, was more acceptable in Newport. In Seattle, he started it wasn’t exactly a shock. Robby always knew Jason was to push the limits more, and Pepper grew concerned begay, he says. Michael says he and Susan knew early on, cause Jason was using gay dating apps to meet strangers. too. His fear of acceptance, however, never went away. At one “It was like, ‘OK, I’m glad you’re telling us,” Michael point she scoured his phone and found that Jason was says. “But we’ve known forever.” looking up instances of violence against LGBTQ people, Before his senior year of high school, Jason decided or he was searching for which areas of the country are he wanted to live with Pepper in Seattle. It was partly beLGBTQ-friendly. cause he wanted to reconnect with her, and partly to get Before long, his grades started to drop. Pepper says out of Newport. Michael doesn’t want to generalize about he also missed his friends in Newport, and he didn’t have the people of Newport — a town of just over 2,000 people enough credits to graduate. Michael was adamant that he right by the Idaho border — but he admits it is not the graduate, so Jason went back to Newport in June to finish

“In Newport, if you don’t do sports, or if you don’t do certain things, you’re not popular.”

10 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020

the last of his credits at an alternative high school. His teacher, Peg Waterman, remembers what Jason wrote in an assignment about his plans after high school. “He’d written that he wanted to become a nurse to save lives,” Waterman says. “He cared tremendously about others.”

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ithin weeks of coming back home, Jason started going down a dangerous road. At some point, Jason tried meth, admitting he did so to his dad. Michael says he wouldn’t let that happen in his house, so Jason was couch-surfing through the summer. Meth use has ravaged small towns across America, and Newport is no exception. “It’s definitely part of our community,” and it has been for the decades, Sheriff Blakeslee says. Over the summer, not long before his death, Pepper says Jason called her and told her that a man raped him. She asked him to come back to the west side with her, but he said he didn’t have any real friends there. When she told him to report the sexual assault, he said he would. Blakeslee, however, says that as far as he knows, it was not reported to anyone. Looking back now, Pepper is overcome with regret that she let Jason return to Newport. “I hold myself responsible for it,” she says. “I shouldn’t have let him come back.” Still couch-surfing, Jason someCOURTESY OF PEPPER FOX times stayed with Matt Raddatz-Freeman, one of the people accused in his murder, Pepper says. Jason also mentioned hanging out with Claude Merritt, she says. His dad didn’t know exactly what was going on, but he had an idea. “I’m a realist. I figured he was doing some drugs and whatever,” Michael says. “But I never imagined anything like this was going to happen.” Susan worried about Jason. He had reached a crossroads. A bright future was ahead of him, but he needed some support getting there. In August, his family suggested that Jason go visit Robby in Pullman. Robby says he bought a new bed and a TV, setting up a room to make his brother comfortable. The plan was for Jason to stay there until he started college at Spokane Falls Community College. Robby tears up when he remembers Jason visiting in August. They had their issues in high school, but that last time Jason visited Pullman their relationship was “the best it’s ever been,” Robby says. Robby jokes that Jason “stole” his friends. For the first time, Robby saw Jason really fit in. Robby thought it could help him stay away from drugs. “I think he used because he was worried about what everybody else would think,” Robby says. “So he never accepted himself.” After a week, Jason told Robby he didn’t want to intrude, so he went back to Newport. Jason said he would


visit his brother again in Pullman the next month. But just three days before Jason planned to go to Pullman, Merritt encouraged Jason to pick him up and head to Timber River Ranch. The ranch, an 11-minute drive from Newport, is actually a wedding venue where couples can have a ceremony in front of the Pend Oreille River. The drive would have taken Jason along a highway surrounded by forests, hills and a Trump flag about every other mile. Then, he would travel past the gate into a dirt road, deeper into the trees until he reached the ranch. There, authorities say, he’d meet Raddatz-Freeman, Belding and Hillestad.

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n Nov. 7, nearly two months after Jason’s murder, sheriff’s deputies brought in Riley Hillestad for an interview. Hillestad showed up “wearing a ballistic vest, pepper spray, hand cuffs, knives, an AR 15 and a handgun,” court documents say. All of the suspects told a different story. Hillestad, RaddatzFreeman and Merritt each deflected blame and said that the other two beat up Jason in a shop at the ranch, records say. They all said Belding, the fourth man charged, was in the shop at the time. Witness statements and social media records indicate that Hillestad operated a “skid steer,” a type of excavator, that night which authorities believe was used to bury Jason. Blakeslee says Jason was not buried alive and that the cause of death was blunt force trauma to the head.

“I’m a realist. I figured he was doing some drugs and whatever. But I never imagined anything like this was going to happen.” Before the arrests, Michael thought his son was a victim of a hate crime for being gay. Now, he and Susan say they’re just glad to see arrests made, trusting the sheriff if he says there’s no evidence for a hate crime. The four men remain in jail and have not made any public comments since their arrest. “The thing that I think has helped us most is knowing that these assholes have been arrested,” Susan says. The sheriff declined to answer Inlander questions about whether homophobic slurs were used by any of the suspects during the alleged murder, or whether Jason was lured to the property under false pretenses. He says Jason was “familiar” with the individuals at the property but wouldn’t specify what the nature of the relationship was. Pepper says she read parts of Jason’s diary describing his being raped this summer, but Blakeslee says the diary — which they’ve investigated — “does not provide a level of detail” that would indicate Jason was sexually assaulted. However, Blakeslee tells the Inlander that a rumor of a sexual assault is “something we’re looking into” in trying to determine motive. He says Jason never reported a sexual assault to police and, as he understands it, the incident would have occurred outside his jurisdiction. Even if they can’t prove it’s a hate crime, Pepper remains convinced that Jason’s murder had to do with sexuality — either Jason’s, or that of his murderers. “I have that, in my book, as a hate crime,” Pepper says. One day, she says she wants to build a house in Newport that would be safe for anyone who identifies as LGBTQ. For Robby, what helps him cope with his brother’s death isn’t the arrests. It’s Jason’s memory. At home, he keeps a bag of Jason’s clothes next to a hope chest full of Jason’s belongings. He leaves a spot open for Jason on the couch. When he thinks of Jason, he takes out some items — stuffed animals, clothes, a blanket — and sets them next to him where his brother is supposed to be. “Sometimes I just put my head down and fall asleep there on the couch,” Robby says. “That’s what helps me.” n wilsonc@inlander.com

What can you give this week? VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Sorting and Sanitizing Volunteers -

PROJECT BEAUTY SHARE

Project Beauty Share needs volunteers to collect, clean, sort, and distribute beauty and personal hygiene items that are donated to local charities. To allow for social distancing, only four volunteers are allowed in the warehouse at a time. Volunteer opportunities are available Mon-Thu 9 am-2 pm. To volunteer, call 455-3537 or apply online. projectbeautyshare.org/contact

Store Volunteers - HABITAT FOR HUMANITY The Habitat Store depends on enthusiastic volunteers for everything from helping customers to arranging merchandise. Whether you prefer interacting with the public or working behind the scenes, we have a volunteer opportunity for you. All proceeds from the store serve Habitat’s work of building strength, stability and self-reliance through shelter. Available shifts are from 9 am-1 pm or 1-5 pm Mon-Sat year-round. Sign up for the entire day or just one shift. Please contact the volunteer coordinator at 509-720-6714 or at volunteercoordinator@habitat-spokane.org or sign up online. habitat-spokane.volunteerhub.com

EVENTS/BENEFITS Celebrate the Season Virtual Party - SALVATION ARMY New statewide COVID restrictions are limiting the Salvation Army’s annual corporate kettle kickoff and this year, your support is especially needed as community demand has dramatically increased. Join the Salvation Army for a virtual holiday kickoff on Friday, Nov. 20 at 5:30 pm. Celebrate the season, and learn more about how the Salvation Army serves Spokane. There will be awards and prizes as well as a chance to donate. Register online. give-nw.salvationarmy.org/event/2020-cts/e284853

Faux Furr Ball 2020 - SPOKANE HUMANE SOCIETY The Spokane Humane Society’s Board of Directors requests the absence of your presence at their non-event. This event will never take place, and you do not have to go anywhere or do anything. The animals still need your help, but not in person. This year, SHS presents Faux FurrBall 2020: Stay home for the animals of the Spokane Humane Society. Please make a donation for what you’d normally spend to help the animals while keeping fellow lovers of the furrkids safe. SHS is keeping the tradition of commemorative FurrBall wine glasses alive; all donations should be received by Nov. 21. spokanehumanesociety.org/faux-furr-ball

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his week, Washington joined several states in reinstating sweeping restrictions on indoor activities as COVID-19 cases started to spread like wildfire and hospitalizations began to increase. At the start of the month, Washington was seeing about 1,000 new COVID-19 cases each day. By Nov. 15, more than 2,200 cases a day were being reported. On Saturday, Sunday and Monday alone (Nov. 14-16), Spokane County saw 942 cases, a total the county didn’t even reach after the initial outbreak until June 20. The Idaho Panhandle saw a similar spike, with 345 cases over those three days. Put more starkly: The region racked up three months’ worth of cases in just three days. “We are extremely concerned at how quickly COVID-19 is spreading through our state,” Washington’s State Health Officer Dr. Kathy Lofy says during a Sunday morning press conference. “If that doubling time continues, in two more weeks we’ll be seeing over 4,000 cases per day.” To prevent that, Gov. Jay Inslee again banned indoor social gatherings, indoor dining, working out in gyms and other indoor activities that are most likely to contribute to spread of the virus, with most restrictions taking effect by Wednesday of this week. Officials are largely worried about hospitals getting too full. Even with only a small percentage of cases needing hospitalization, health care systems around the country are starting to feel the pressure as their Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds fill with COVID patients and staffing levels grow strained. “We will eventually exceed the capacity in our hospitals to adequately care for all patients, including patients with and without COVID, and ultimately will lead to more deaths,” Lofy says. While area hospitals are currently managing the load, some patients seeking other services have already been diverted from their closest hospital as they seek care and COVID patients take up staffing time and resources.

HOSPITALS STRETCHED THIN

For eight months, nurses and doctors at the hospitals have been working long hours under trying conditions, restricting the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) when necessary to contend with shortages, and sometimes comforting dying patients on behalf of family members who aren’t allowed inside to visit for their final breath. “We are exhausted,” says Clint Wallace, an ICU nurse at Providence Sacred Heart, during the Sunday press conference. “Hospital preparedness is more [than] having adequate beds and ventilators; it’s about having adequate staffing.” COVID patients take much more staff time

than normal patients, as PPE must be donned before entering those patient rooms, and taken off when leaving. It adds time to those visits that can’t be spent with other patients, and restricts the number of beds hospitals can truly fill with patients in need of round-the-clock care. As of Sunday, the Sacred Heart ICU was effectively over 100 percent capacity, Wallace says, due to those staffing limitations. “I’ve been an ICU nurse for close to 20 years now, and this is as busy as I’ve seen it,” Wallace says. On Nov. 9, Shana Fogerty, who works in the COVID unit at Kootenai Health, wrote a public Facebook post that went somewhat viral with more than 2,500 shares, as she responded to those who argue it’s not a big deal because there’s a survival rate of “96/97/98.8% (depending on who is quoting which source).”

Kootenai Health has had to divert patients.

KOOTENAI HEALTH PHOTO

“It’s easy to be removed from the situation and quote nebulous statistics about how ‘few’ people die from this virus. It’s much harder to look them in the eye and tell them they’re dying. They matter,” Fogerty writes, noting she’s been working 13-hour days. “Thank your healthcare workers who are working so hard in these units across the country. They spend hours not drinking, not peeing so they can take care of their patients while wearing continuous PPE [because] it’s a lot of work to properly ‘don and doff’ the protective gear.” Kootenai Health hit 92 percent capacity for its surgical/medical beds by Nov. 6, and has had to divert more patients than normal due to those COVID patients requiring more staff attention. Last year, during all of the fourth quarter, Kootenai only had to turn away nine patients. This year, in just the first six weeks of the quarter, the hospital has had to turn away 62 patients. Capacity as of Nov. 16 was at 86 percent, according to Kim Anderson, a hospital spokeswoman. “Our current COVID-19 unit has been filled to capacity, so we are making plans to expand this unit, however, this will require additional resources that we don’t have today,” Anderson says


by email. “We are working together with all the area hospitals to balance capacity.” Providence, which owns and operates Sacred Heart and Holy Family, and MultiCare, which owns and operates Deaconess and Valley Hospital, did not provide their capacity numbers but noted they’re working with Kootenai and other health care providers to ensure capacity remains. Providence Sacred Heart is not diverting patients due to COVID and is “the region’s only Trauma Level II facility, so we will care for people who are injured in serious accidents, have significant heart and stroke issues and more,” spokeswoman Jennifer Semenza tells the Inlander by email. On Monday, Spokane as a region had 106 hospitalized COVID-19 patients, 81 of them from Spokane County. MultiCare has seen an increase of COVID patients and is close to the numbers that were seen in spring when the first shutdown was put in place, notes MultiCare spokesman Kevin Maloney. “We have reopened our COVID units and are preparing for a surge as people gather for the holidays,” Maloney writes by email. “While our hospitals have capacity to take care of our community, we are concerned about increasing transmission of this virus. It’s important that everyone wear a mask, stay physically distant and wash hands often. We also encourage people to avoid gathering with friends and family who are not members of their household to prevent transmission.” Should the current wave of cases lead to an even bigger surge in hospitalizations, there are plans in place to make room.

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Back at the end of April, Spokane Regional Health District epidemiologist Susan Sjoberg outlined what the region’s surge plan looked like, should hospitals become overwhelmed. At the time, the health district was operating an alternate care campus with drive-thru screening and testing available at the Spokane County Fairgrounds, and had plans for isolation bed space for people who couldn’t safely isolate at home. Emergency planners at the time had also outlined plans for an alternate care facility at that location should one be needed to take patients from the hospitals. “An alternate care facility is something that we would open at the end of many other phases of the health care system being able to surge with an influx of patients due to COVID-19,” Sjoberg notes during the April 24 public update from the district. Planning for surges in patients is something regional hospitals have collaborated on for years, she notes. In the second phase of the plan, hospitals will surge into areas that aren’t always used for acute care, but have beds that could be staffed for those needs. Conserving protective equipment and stopping some elective surgeries would keep more space open during this phase, as was done earlier this year. In a third phase, when expanded beds within an existing hospital are full, pressure on such hospitals could be eased by transferring people recovering from emergency situations (including COVID) to facilities that don’t typically serve as public acute-care hospitals, such as Shriners and Mann-Grandstaff, Sjoberg says in the April update. At that point, the district would look at training more staff with the health care systems to potentially work at an alternate care facility. “If we ever got to the point where those additional locations were full, then the fourth phase is when we would be prepared to open an alternate care facility,” Sjoberg says. At that point, ethics teams have been preparing regionally to help systems make decisions on who receives what type of care, should resources become so limited that some people can’t receive the full treatment they would normally get. Officials and hospital workers alike hope the new restrictions on activity will prevent the region from getting there. “We are needing the community to pull together. We are needing everyone to put aside their political and financial motives and follow the directions of our health experts,” Wallace, the Sacred Heart ICU nurse, says. “We need everybody’s help.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

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REPUBLICANS WON’T RUN AWAY FROM DONALD TRUMP — BECAUSE HE TAUGHT THEM THEY CAN’T TRUST ANYONE ELSE BY DANIEL WALTERS

“I WON THE ELECTION,” Trump insisted in an all-caps tweet Sunday night. In fact, he did not win the election, but Trump has lambasted the few Republicans or conservative news outlets who admit that. GAGE SKIDMORE PHOTO

14 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020


I

t was a fitting end to the realityshow presidency that the final firing had

been engineered — as if by producers of The Apprentice — into what felt like a climactic nail-biter of a series finale. Credit executive producer Donald Trump. It was Trump and his Republican allies who falsely decried vote-by-mail as a fraud-prone scam, ensuring that the votes counted later in swing states like Pennsylvania would trend dramatically Democratic. He set up the drama perfectly: On election night, Trump appeared to be triumphant, boasting early leads in many of the same states where he’d vanquished Hillary Clinton in 2016. But then, bit by bit, ballot by ballot, Trump watched his lead crumble into dust. By Saturday, Nov. 7, every major news organization — even Trump-boosting Fox News — called it for Joe Biden. After four seasons, the President Donald Trump Show had been canceled. Trump not only lost by a whopping 5 million votes, he had also been defeated by the exact same number of electoral votes he’d dubiously characterized as a “landslide” in 2016. But Trump isn’t one to go quietly. Instead, he’s been rage-tweeting against the dying of the light. He clings to his belief that he can’t possibly be a sucker or a loser. He screams in-all caps, “I WON THE ELECTION, GOT 71,000,000 LEGAL VOTES.” He tweets about “hundreds of thousands of votes that should not be allowed to count,” that Philadelphia elections were a “mountain of corruption & dishonesty,” that “Nevada is turning out to be a cesspool of Fake Votes” and — commenting on a tweet about Democrats had brainwashing from the guy who a disappointing draws the Dilbert comic — that down-ballot “people will not accept this performance. Rigged Election!” Trump shattered one Who’s to blame? presidential norm after another PAGE 20 — norms about releasing tax returns or profiting from the presidency or threatening world leaders armed with nukes over Twitter or bragging about penis size from a debate stage. But now, he’s demanding that Republicans join him in shattering one last norm, for old time’s sake, insisting that they challenge the integrity of an entire presidential election. Many of them have fallen in line. Because Trump hadn’t just won the trust of the Republican base. He’s accomplished something far deeper and more long lasting: He’s stripped away their trust in practically everything else, in media companies, in doctors, in Facebook and Twitter, even in elections themselves. There’s one premise that Republicans and Democrats can agree on: Trump has exposed something deep and dark about America’s institutions. “Trump has stirred the pot so much that a bunch of crap is coming up from the bottom,” U.S. Rep. Russ Fulcher (R-Idaho) tells the Inlander. “And we’re finally seeing it.”

ALL HIS BASE BELONGS TO HIM

There was a fantasy among some Trump critics that as soon as Trump was defeated, he’d disappear into the mists and everything could return to normal. ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 19, 2020 INLANDER 15


“THERE IS NO ESCAPE,” CONTINUED... Tim Miller, political director of Republican Voters Against Trump and a veteran of the presidential campaigns of Jeb Bush, John Huntsman and John McCain, scoffed at the notion. “He’s not going anywhere,” Miller told the Inlander before the election. “He has this massive base of support.” Back in 2016, Trump used his white-knuckled grip on that base to rip the party away from stodgy establishment politicians. Trump snapped his fingers, and Republicans switched their position on free trade. Suddenly, they were cheering on tariffs — taxes on American businesses — as part of getting tough on China. Suddenly, after the investiU.S. Rep. Russ Fulcher (R-Idaho) gation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, it was the Republicans who were deeply distrustful of the CIA and the FBI. Fulcher describes his horror at witnessing how much power and little accountability intelligence agencies had. To Fulcher, all the pushback from government officials against the president was proof of how successful Trump had been at spooking the status quo. “What happens when a parasite is threatened with losing its host? It does incredible things to try to keep the host alive,” Fulcher says. “That means ‘get rid of Trump.’” Trump convinced his base to trust him, not his generals. When a beloved conservative icon like former Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis accused Trump of making a “mockery of our Constitution,” they sided with Trump. Trump convinced his base to trust him, not doctors. Tommy Ahlquist, a former emergency room doctor who ran for Idaho

governor in 2018, describes sitting at lunch with a Trump-loving friend, pleading with him to start wearing a mask, only to be met with a bunch of stuff about how it’s a “politicized hoax” and “Trump this and Trump that.” “[Trump] comes out and completely pooh-poohed masks and all this public safety stuff,” Ahlquist says. “Of course, that emboldens people. It became about, ‘I’m not wearing a mask because he’s not wearing it.’” (If there was anyone who could have convinced his supporters to sport a new accessory on their heads, it was the guy who sold his followers over a million red Make America Great Again hats.) And now, with the coronavirus surging to neverbefore-seen levels, Trump’s comments in the next few months could determine whether millions of people in his base wear masks, accept restrictions or even take the vaccine that his administration has been championing. To be clear, many in the GOP aren’t die-hard members of Trump’s base. If anything, generic Republicans seem to be more popular. This election proved that, as millions of the voters who couldn’t accept Trump were still willing to vote for down-ballot Republicans. But Trump’s pull with his base is still so strong that those Republican leaders don’t want to risk running afoul of his supporters. Former Washington state Attorney General Rob McKenna says that tension regularly put some of his Republican friends like Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R-Washington) — who did not respond to an interview request — in a tough position. “She doesn’t want to alienate her base,” McKenna says. “Some of them love Trump. But she personally finds it difficult to defend some of what he has said.” Trump losing, McKenna believes, makes things easier for her. But Trump’s defeat doesn’t

“She doesn’t want to alienate her base. Some of them love Trump. But she personally finds it difficult to defend some of what he has said.”

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necessarily mean Republican leaders won’t keep living in fear of an angry Trump tweet. “Trump is going to save all of his attacks for the media and for any of the Republicans who try to distance themselves from him,” Miller says.

THE ONLY POL THAT COUNTS

Miller predicted before the election that Trump’s base wasn’t going to believe he’d lost, no matter how large the margin. “These people are gonna think it was stolen from them,” he said. “They’re going to think it’s unfair. It was the media. It was the Chinese. It was the ballots.” And sure enough, that’s what happened. “Do not listen to the MSM,” the Spokane County Republican Party wrote on its Facebook page on Nov. 7, using a derisive term for “mainstream media” after the election was called for Biden. “It is not over!” Though Republicans had done much better in the election than polls had predicted, a Nov. 9 Morning Consult polling firm survey found that Republicans’ trust that the election was “free and fair” plunged from 68 percent before the election to 34 percent. The Trump era had supercharged Republican animosity toward journalists. It wasn’t just that he’d yell “fake news” at every critical story. It was that Trump lied so much — about everything from crowd sizes, cheering Muslims, hurricane routes to voter fraud — that calling them out made news outlets seem vehemently anti-Trump. In the past five years, according to a Gallup poll, Republican trust in the media plunged from 32 percent to 10 percent. Fox News wasn’t immune. After Fox called the election for Biden, Trump turned on his longtime media booster, retweeting attacks on the network, charging that the reason their ratings were plunging was that they “forgot the Golden Goose.” ...continued on next page

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Even as the New York Times reported that election officials in all 50 states didn’t find any evidence suggesting significant voter fraud, few Republicans were willing to congratulate Biden on his victory last week. Fulcher accused media outlets in a statement of being “more interested in declaring a Biden victory than identifying all the facts.” McMorris Rodgers told KXLY that there were stories “concerning enough” to her that she supported Trump’s lawsuits challenging the process. The few Republicans willing to dispute Trump’s dubious voter-fraud claims became targets not just of Trump but of their fellow Republicans. Last week, Washington state gubernatorial candidate Loren Culp condemned Kim Wyman, Washington’s secretary of state, for “badmouthing the president of the United States” after she criticized Trump’s fraud allegations. Culp had been beaten worse than any Republican in the last 20 years — trounced by more than 550,000 votes, or more than the populations of Spokane, Spokane Valley and Tacoma combined. But he, too, refused to surrender, claiming there were “hinky things” going on with the vote, and that with mail-in voting, “Who knows who’s tampering with the ballots?” “No, I’m not conceding,” Culp says. “Not doing it. Not a quitter. Don’t give in. Don’t back down.” Even if Trump goes away, his imitators will remain.

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But so far, nothing suggests Trump is going away. Even if Fox News abandons him, even if he never holds a single rally, he can still taunt and troll from the internet’s sidelines — elevating or destroying Republican fortunes according to his whims. He doesn’t need the bully pulpit of the Oval Office. He still has the megaphone of Twitter and Facebook. Trump gamed social-media algorithms

with an uncanny ability to go viral with wild claims or outrageous provocation. But Trump’s greatest potential source of ongoing sway over Republicans is also his Achilles heel. Twitter built up the modern incarnation of Donald Trump. It could extinguish him just as easily, and observers have already speculated that Twitter might pull the plug on Trump’s account once Biden takes office. Indeed, the Trump era has already dramatically changed social media sites’ approach to moderation. As Trump made one wild claim after another in the days after the election, tweet after tweet of his was obscured behind warning labels flagging his claims as “disputed” or “misleading.” This year, Facebook, Twitter and YouTube have dramatically cracked down on what’s allowed on their platforms, deleting pro-Trump QAnon conspiracy theory pages, flagging misinformation about the pandemic and banning accounts of figures like former Trump strategist Steve Bannon (after he suggested Dr. Anthony Fauci’s head should be on a pike). Twitter even briefly banned users from sharing a controversial New York Post article about Biden’s son Hunter. Republicans are furious: They see all this censorship as a reaction to Trump — imagining a world where social media sites not only ban the president, but ban them as well. The Spokane County Republican Party charged on Facebook that the social media’s censorship is a “violation of our Constitutional Rights” and that it’s “just what the Nazis did.” Yet in reality, the First Amendment is the thing that prevents the government from ordering Facebook to allow comments on their website. Fulcher says that congressional members have been meeting to figure out their strategy. “Do we attack it from an antitrust perspective? Do we attack it from a transparency perspective?” says Fulcher, a former tech company executive himself. “None of us want to eliminate the First Amendment side of it, but how do you


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The Republicans didn’t write a platform at their convention this year, just a proclamation that they “will continue to enthusiastically support the President’s America-first agenda.” So what happens next? Miller, the Republican Voters Against Trump strategist, predicts the party will continue on a “pretty Trumpy route” of populist white grievance. “They’ll continue to focus on the bad guys being the immigrants and big tech and the Chinese, and I think trans[gender] Americans will get thrown into that,” Miller says. Fulcher envisions a return to the Tea Party era’s focus on debt and deficits, which both skyrocketed under Trump. He even believes that Republicans should risk “political suicide” by confronting “the big elephant in the room, no pun intended” — Social Security and Medicare. Former Washington state AG McKenna, meanwhile, calls on Republicans to double down on their surprising recent gains with Black and Latino voters by seeking out racially diverse leaders like Black Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina or Cuban-American Sen. Marco Rubio from Florida. “This country is becoming less white decade by decade,” he says. Indeed, there was a time that it looked like Rubio was going to be the future of the party. There was a time Rubio called Trump a lying “con artist” who instigates violence and couldn’t be trusted with the nuclear codes. But that Rubio is gone. Like the rest of the party, he long ago bent the knee. He knows who the king of the GOP is and knows who will likely still be the king in the future. “If [Trump] runs in 2024,” Rubio told reporters last week, “he’ll certainly be the front-runner and will probably be the nominee.” n

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deal with this? It’s clearly not right.” Republicans may be powerless to stop it. Come January, they won’t control the presidency and Democrats want tech companies to crack down even harder on alleged misinformation. In other words, when Trump leaves office, the extent of his influence depends on his ability to remain in the good graces of Silicon Valleys’ kingmakers in hoodies. They, not the GOP, are the ones with the true power over Trump. With just a snap of their fingers, they could do what Joe Biden couldn’t: Make him shut up, man.

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N O WAV E,

JUST FINGER-POINTING

Most Democrats, from Joe Biden on down, celebrated Black Lives Matter activism while distancing themselves from the “Defund the Police” slogan seen at Spokane protests and across the country. But Republicans tried to tie even moderate Democrats to that slogan anyway. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

20 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020

WHO’S TO BLAME FOR DEMOCRATS’ DOWN-BALLOT WOES? RADICAL SOCIALISTS OR BORING CENTRISTS?

T

BY DANIEL WALTERS

his was supposed to be the year that Republicans finally got their comeuppance. Sure,

their partnership with Donald Trump might have won conservatives a tax cut and one or two — OK, three — Supreme Court justices. But as the 2020 election approached, the polls predicted that a blue wave was a-comin’ and when it hit, Trump was going to sink the Republicans like concrete shoes. Dave Wilson was counting on it. Wilson, a centrist Democrat who came within a few hundred votes of winning a state representative race in 2018, hoped the wave would be so big it would float him over Eastern Washington’s longtime congresswoman, Cathy McMorris Rodgers. That’s not what happened. Joe Biden caught a wave. But a lot of Democrats ended up drowning. While Biden racked up a national lead of more than 5 million votes against Trump, millions of those voters refused to support Democrats down the ticket. The party had hoped to gain as many as 15 seats in the U.S. House. Instead, as ballots are still being tallied, they have lost a net of seven. “I’m keenly aware,” Wilson says, letting out a weary chuckle. He got shellacked this year by 22 points. Yet more than 23,000 voters in McMorris Rodgers’ Eastern Washington district voted for Biden, but not Wilson. Before he called back the Inlander, he took a folded sheet of printer paper and scribbled down on his thoughts on why many Democratic candidates suffered this year: “DEFUND THE POLICE” and “SOCIALISM.” “In that order,” he says. And he wasn’t the only one who felt that way. A few days earlier, on a private conference call among House Democrats, there were more tears than cheers. They hadn’t taken back the Senate, meaning Biden’s ambitious agenda could be dead on arrival. (Two runoff races in Georgia in January could potentially tie the Senate in favor of the Democrats.) “It was a failure,” Rep. Abigail Spanberger, a moderate Democrat who barely survived in Virginia, said of congressional election results, according to the recording published by the Washington Post. “We lost members that shouldn’t have lost.” The truce between the two wings of the Democratic Party is over, and some moderate members are ready to cast blame squarely on the vocal activist left: claiming the explosion of high-profile activism from places like Portland and Seattle had backfired. “We need to not ever use the words ‘socialist’ or ‘socialism’ ever again,” Spanberger said on the House Democrats’ post-election conference call. “We have lost good members because of that.” ...continued on page 22


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“NO WAVE, JUST FINGER-POINTING,” CONTINUED...

T

ear gas hissed through the Seattle apartment windows of Kamau Chege this summer — a reaction to the racial justice demonstrations that the cops called “riots,” but Chege calls “uprisings.” Through those same windows on the morning of Nov. 7, it was music that floated inside — Black Eyed Peas, Kendrick Lamar, Lizzo — mingling with a chorus of cheers and honking cars. From 9 am until midnight — 15 straight hours — a block party outside raged in honor of Biden’s victory. It wasn’t just in Seattle: All across the country, the sort of street celebrations normally reserved for winning a Super Bowl or blowing up a Death Star were seen. Even Chege’s mom, a conservative Kenyan evangelical who didn’t care much for politics, was overjoyed. “We got it,” she texted her son. “Praise God. After all, for Chege, Trump’s election could have literally cost him America. He’s an undocumented immigrant from Kenya. And considering Trump’s attacks on the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and habit of targeting activists like him, he was “aware of just how disastrous a second Trump term would have been.” Chege celebrates Trump’s defeat as an “outright rejection of white grievance,” a blow to Trump’s “concerted effort to ethnically cleanse our democracy” through deportations and litigation. In short: “a huge relief,” Chege says. A leftist activist who’d moved from Spokane to Seattle in 2018, he saw the energy of a thriving left-wing movement in cities like Seattle as crucial in rallying infrequent voters to show up and vote to overthrow Trump. And yes, the surge of protests in the wake of the death of George Floyd had invigorated the Democratic Party — sending Democratic voter registration in swing states like Georgia soaring.

22 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020

A DACA recipient, a Whitworth University grad and an immigrant rights activist, Kamau Chege embodies the passion among young leftists. Since support for Biden didn’t translate to down-ballot success, he says, Democrats need a “movement candidate” who can “rally people” in the future. HANNA SABIO-HOWELL PHOTO But it also handed Republicans an arsenal of new weapons. Activists chanted provocative slogans like “defund the police” and “all cops are bastards.” Protests in Portland and Wisconsin sometimes descended into rioting. “This is not a Black Lives Matter issue,” Wilson says. “This is ‘looters and rioters that needed to be dealt with.’ They weren’t dealt with. That did not help us. It allowed irresponsible right-wing media to blame it on Black Lives Matter.” In Seattle, a few blocks away from Chege’s apartment, police abandoned a precinct and, for three weeks, activists turned the surrounding area into a cop-free “Capitol Hill Organized Protest” zone. Chege had given speeches there. But CHOP wasn’t exactly paradise. Armed vigilantes provided security. People died. Trump demanded that Seattle “take back your city NOW” from “ugly anarchists,” while Gov. Jay Inslee downplayed the situation. Fox News added fuel to the fire, deceptively illustrating a story about CHOP in Seattle with a picture of a building ablaze at a Minnesota protest. Seattle shut down CHOP, but the clashes between the cops and protesters across the country continued. While polls initially seemed to indicate this unrest wasn’t hurting Democrats, those same polls also wrongly predicted Democrats would destroy Republicans. When Wilson told voters he was a Democrat, they threw “Defund the Police,” CHOP and the violence in Portland back in his face. “You get lumped in,” Wilson says. “You’re guilty by association.” Wilson celebrates that “Democrats came to their senses and nominated Joe Biden.” After all, Biden repeatedly and publicly distanced himself from parts of the left. He condemned protest violence. He repeatedly stressed he didn’t support “de-

funding the police.” He scoffed at the idea that he was a socialist, noting that he beat the socialist in the Democratic primary. He convinced Republicans and independents who’d voted for Trump that he wasn’t some wild-eyed extremist. But Biden wasn’t the only Democrat Republicans were singling out. In an interview with the Inlander, U.S. Rep. Russ Fulcher (R-Idaho) repeatedly steered the conversation toward the squad of left-wing Democratic House members that includes self-proclaimed democratic socialist Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-New York). “From what I can see, they don’t have a tremendous amount of pull with other members,” Fulcher says. “However, as soon as they step off the floor, there’s a long line of national media that want to put them on the camera.” With the sort of savvy for dominating social media conversation that rivaled Trump, Ocasio-Cortez not only publicly sympathized with “defund the police” rhetoric, she also chided Democrats for undercutting the activist leaders. Most Democratic politicians don’t support socialism or defunding the police. But all the voters Wilson was trying to reach had to do was to look east to New York to see a socialist Democrat talking about revolution or west to Seattle to see a left-wing City Council — including another socialist — voting to cut police funding. Wilson says he struggled to convince local voters he wasn’t like that. “Quite frankly, you had a very short window to have a conversation before those people just went off: ‘Are you crazy? You’re a Democrat. Are you people nuts?!’” Wilson says. “We need to be a party of more incremental change, not radical change. Americans don’t like radical change.” ...continued on page 24


keep washing your hands. (it's icky not to!)

NOVEMBER 19, 2020 INLANDER 23


gelical Black guy who never felt the GOP cared about you, but then you lost your job because of COVID, and the president sends you a check, Chege says. Not only that, but you’re making more money on unemployment than you had working. Heck, many of the same Floridians who voted to re-elect Trump also voted to support a $15 minimum wage in the state. Both Chege and Ocasio-Cortez blame mismanagement from the Democratic Central Campaign Committee and other establishment politicians for the Democrats’ trouble this year, pointing to some swing-district races where progressive Democrats did better than the centrists. Too much triangulation, Chege argues, and your authenticity gets smothered in a pile of politician-speak mush. “People are really looking for someone to fight for them, especially in a pandemic,” he says. “That kind of clarity of purpose.”

“Nobody’s ever gonna forget that the Republicans stood with Trump for four years. They have a reckoning at this point.” Podlodowski continues to see turnout — not persuasion — as secret to winning elections. The trouble is, this year, Republican turnout soared, too (though a lot of those Republican and independent voters were apparently persuaded to vote for Biden). “There’s a lot of noise and nonsense around ‘socialism,’” Podlodowski says. “That’s being used to scare people in the way that McCarthy used the word ‘Communism’ to scare people in the ’50s.” She prefers to talk about the Democrats’ winning policy platform around things like health care access, the minimum wage, education. Still, as Podlodowski begins to explain how there are nuanced differences between the Democratic Socialism touted by Bernie Sanders and the Socialist Alternative brand of Seattle City Councilwoman Kshama Sawant, it’s clear why the “socialism” attack is still effective in some communities. As the Miami Herald reported, in places like South Florida, with massive Cuban and Venezuelan populations, the phrase “socialism” reminds some Latinos of the tyranny and brutality of regimes they or their relatives fled. It’s one reason why, despite Trump’s infamous racist rhetoric, the president actually did better among groups of Latino voters, particularly in Texas and Florida, than Republicans have done in a long time. He did a bit better this time with Black voters, too. “This was a year where I saw a few of my Black friends who were supporting Trump,” Chege says. But Chege doesn’t think that was necessarily because of Trump’s attacks on the left. Instead, he looks at how Trump had done the sort of thing that Republicans would have called socialism in another context: Congress passed a stimulus that sent $1,200 stimulus checks to voters. But Trump, showcasing the branding instincts that had made him a fortune, insisted that his signature be at the bottom. Imagine you’re a conservative evan-

24 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020

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he coronavirus hurt Democrats in another way, Podlodowski says. “The pandemic took away one of our great superpowers,” she says. They had an army of 14,000 volunteers who, in another year, would have been sent out to knock on millions of doors, having those crucial face-to-face conversations. Instead, they relied on less effective phone calls. That was the story across the country. Republican volunteers gleefully knocked on doors, while Democrats like Dave Wilson, committed to being the party that took the virus seriously, mostly stayed home. “It’s the right thing to do,” Podlodowski says. “It was absolutely, positively the right thing to do.” Pursuing leftist policies can have an initial political cost, too, Chege acknowledges. “It might mean that you’re winning by smaller margins but doing more good,” Chege says. You can look at Obamacare — a huge policy victory for Democrats in 2010, one that Trump couldn’t reverse. Eight years later, and even Idaho of all places, voted to take advantage of Obamacare’s Medicaid expansion. And because of that victory, Chege says, support for things like universal health care seem a lot more acceptable. Yet there was a huge cost. In 2010, the opposition to Obamacare was so strong that the Tea Party wave took back the House and boosted Republican performances in state legislatures across the country. That put Republican legislators in control during the once-every-decade process of redrawing congressional district boundaries — and Republicans redrew them in a way to make it a lot harder for Democrats to win seats in the future. And now, a decade later, Democrats have lost the chance to undo many of those changes.

But then again, after losing the presidency, Republicans don’t necessarily feel like they won either. “Nobody really advanced the ball that much for their cause,” Fulcher says. But the game continues. “There’s no finish line,” he says. “This isn’t like a football game, where you cross the endzone and you score and it’s game over. No. It is ongoing.” And so for Podlodowski, there remains the hope that Republicans will, eventually, suffer for their support of Trump. “Nobody’s ever gonna forget that the Republicans stood with Trump for four years,” Podlodowski says. “They have a reckoning at this point.” Podlodowski starts naming names like Republican Senators Mitch McConnell and Lindsey Graham and Washington state House Minority Leader J.T. Wilcox and state Senate Majority Mark Schoessler. “They stood with these Trumpians and Trump,” Podlodowski says. “And that’s something on the Democratic side we’re never going to let anybody forget.” But all those names have something in common: This year, all those Trump supporters won easily. Once again, the reckoning that has been prophesied hasn’t arrived. Still, “just wait and see,” she says. There’s still a chance that Democrats might take control of the Senate, if they manage to take both runoff races in Georgia. (Republicans are already trying to link one Georgia Democratic candidate to Fidel Castro.) And after that, there’s the fight for 2022. Some Democrats are more optimistic for that fight than others. “If we are classifying Tuesday as a success from a congressional standpoint,” Virginia Democrat Spanberger said on the House conference phone call, “we will get f---ing torn apart in 2022.” n

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Daniel Walters, born and raised in Spokane, has been writing for the Inlander since 2008. In that time, he’s written about violent vigilantes, Facebook’s poisonous impact, Idaho’s failing COVID strategy and the internal battles that have consumed both the Republican and the Democratic party organizations in Spokane County. Like President Trump, he has so far not been banned from Twitter. He can be reached at danielw@inlander.com.

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ina Podlodowski, chair of the Washington State Democratic Party, notes that Democrats actually did comparatively well in Washington state, making significant improvements in areas like southeast Washington. She deflects a question about whether Democrats should have taken a stronger stand against CHOP — though she acknowledges “it stimulated the Republican base.”

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INSIDE Retail,Reimagined.........................6 A Very Covid Christmas.............10 Grooming for Zoom.................... 14 Make it Pop!...............................18 The Power of Buying Local......... 22 Dig In..........................................26 2020 Vision............................... 30 Look Sharp!................................34 Workin’ It................................... 38 Closer to Home.......................... 42 Baby Talk................................... 46

On The Cover Simply Northwest in Spokane Valley

The Spirit of the Season Halloween is in the rearview mirror, a

chill is in the air, and we’re all staring down the holidays in the strangest year most of us will ever experience. Let’s hope that’s true. Spokane County’s retailers have faced significant challenges throughout the pandemic, and that’s not going to be any different during the frenzied days leading up to Christmas. And while stores are still functioning under dramatic limitations to their capacity, they’ve persevered so far through ingenuity, creativity and love for the community they serve. That love comes through in the stories you’ll read in this Back To Business guide, the fifth in a series spotlighting the region’s business community. Stores are jump-starting their holiday sales early to keep shoppers safely distanced while they browse, and some have embraced virtual shopping with a personal touch, serving customers via private online meetings and curbside pickups. Speaking of online meetings, with so many of us working online during the pandemic, it’s im-

portant to look good for the camera. In this guide, you’ll discover places that will help you groom for Zoom, get tips on building the perfect home gym, peruse eyeglass shops that can help your eyes really pop on screen, and so much more. Back to Business is a local marketing effort developed by the Inlander and a variety of community institutions, including STCU and Washington Trust Bank. (See page 5 for more details.) These groups recognize the importance of Spokane County’s retailers to the economic wellbeing of the entire area. When we keep our small, family-owned businesses healthy, it’s good for all of us in the Inland Northwest. Readers will discover a call to action throughout the guide: We all need to do what we can to ensure these vital businesses continue to thrive. Thankfully, a day out safely loading up on presents for your loved ones, or yourself, in Spokane County is just the thing to do get yourself in the holiday spirit, and support the local economy at the same time. ◆

PLAY TIME! Grab the next Back to Business Guide on Dec. 10 when Volume 6 will be inserted in the Inlander. Find resources and details about this ongoing project at BTB.Inlander.com.

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INTRO

How to Do... Everything

THE COMIC BOOK SHOP

The Back to Business marketing campaign is all about helping our local community successfully and safely navigate the pandemic. Here’s how you can get involved.

How to...

...Support Local Retailers: Our retail stores are critical to the Inland Northwest, and we all need to do our part to help them succeed right now. Fortunately, there are a lot of attractive reasons to shop local. Spending your hard-earned cash in local shops helps the local economy, keeps your neighbors employed and generates much-needed revenue for our local governments. So go buy some flowers, grab a new book, hit a record store or remodel your out-of-date kitchen or family room. While you’re at it, buy a gift card from a local shop to give to someone else. Also, help spread the word about what our local shops are doing well, and what great buys you’ve found. Finally, tell your friends and family to pick up this guide!

...Use this Guide: Inside you’ll

find lots of inviting stories about how Spokane County businesses are figuring out ways to thrive in these difficult times. But importantly, you’ll also see over 150 ads promoting area businesses. Each one

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includes all you need to know about your favorite local retailers. Spend a moment with each of these, and remember that each individual business represents something so much bigger: These are our friends and

Over 100 Businesses WHO WE ARE

pump money back into our local communities as a whole.

...Keep Up on the Latest Developments: This Back to Business

is the fifth in a series that will be published in the coming weeks and months. In the meantime, find Back to Business pages in the Inlander every week through the end of the year; these pages feature our Fresh Sheet with the latest news, deals and specials being offered by area businesses. Find more at BTB.Inlander.com.

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lines about social distancing and mask-wearing. Here’s an easy way to remember what to do: Spread Kindness Not COVID-19. (Find out more about that countywide awareness effort at kindnessnotcovid.org.) As a business owner, there are a lot of resources available to help you, starting with Back to Business and all of its partners. Additionally, visit inlandbizstrong.org for other resources. ◆


WELCOME

About Back to Business This guide is part of a local marketing effort in support of

BEYOND RECOVERY

If you’re looking for a phrase that sums up 2020, here’s a worthy contender: You know what I miss? We’ve all said it. We’ve all heard it. And there’s no shortage of answers, from summer camp to salad bars. It’s easy to start feeling like this has been a lost year. Especially if, say, you are a high school senior or college freshman, had organized a family reunion, or bought tickets to the Joe Bonamassa concert. There’s no minimizing the deeper struggles of those suffering with illness, grief, or unemployment. Yet it’s been amazing to see the creative ways that our community has adapted. Like the 22,000 of us who participated in virtual Bloomsday. The schools that organized drive-up graduation ceremonies. Non-profit groups like Spokane Food Fighters, which has delivered more than 120,000 meals. Businesses have gotten creative, as well. Distilleries created alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Auntie’s Bookstore is among the stores offering curbside pick-up. Veda Lux Boutique added made-to-order face-mask chains to its selection of locally crafted jewelry. We’ve all grown used to ordering online. But let’s not forget the merchants who live here, pay taxes here, and employ our neighbors. By supporting them now, we can ensure they’re still here in 2021 and beyond. That’s what “Back to Business” is all about – looking beyond the recovery to a time when we don’t have to be quite so careful. When 2020 is just a fading memory, we want to be sure our local businesses are still standing – including your favorite local shop, store or boutique. You know, the one you’re missing right now.

the hospitality sector developed by leading local institutions and community-minded businesses to help promote our region’s recovery. The project was unanimously approved for support by Spokane’s County Commissioners through the CARES Act with the express goal of supporting affected businesses. It should be noted that the Inlander’s editorial coverage remains separate and independent from this marketing effort.

Volume FIVE is focused on retail and local shopping around Spokane County. Through the end of the year, watch the Inlander for more special Back To Business guides focused on businesses in our community, along with special features, sharing even more recovery stories.

BUsinesses are working hard to serve customers and stay safe. Finding ways for everyone to connect with area businesses is critical in keeping our community moving forward during this challenging time.

Ezra Eckhardt President/CEO

Find deals, specials and business updates from area businesses at BTB.Inlander.com

... and in the weekly Back to Business pages in the Inlander Support provided from Spokane County through the CARES act

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Retail, Reimagined

Local boutiques cater to customers with on-camera product updates, personalized styling and private shopping sessions When Washington state went on lockdown in mid-March, local boutique owner Victoria Zvoncheck-Ferro thought she might be telling her customers goodbye forever. She shared a heartfelt message of gratitude to supporters of AUDREY'S BOUTIQUE in a Facebook Live video recorded inside the shop, quickly racking up more than 1,000 views. “I was scared,” Zvoncheck-Ferro recalls. “As a small business owner, my whole financial life is in this store. It was like, ‘What am I going to do?’” What she did was get back to work. Unable to open the doors for shoppers, ZvoncheckFerro started by repainting display windows at the boutique which has been operating in Spokane for more than 50 years and is centrally located at 3131 N. Division St. Next, she brought home piles of store merchandise and a credit card reader and began selling directly to customers from her dining room table. “I was doing live videos from home. It was like Audrey’s home shopping network,” Zvoncheck-Ferro says, noting the boutique doesn’t yet have an online presence outside of its Facebook business page. An online store is something she’s now planning to add. “I was mailing items to clients, and a few would do curbside pickup,” she says of those initial selling sessions. “I’d have two to three dozen packages the next day waiting to go out. It wasn’t paying all the bills, but it was at least keeping us in front of people. That was the best way to describe it.” Eventually, Audrey’s was allowed to reopen for limited in-person shopping under the governor’s essential business classification, since the boutique sells prosthetics for women who’ve had mastectomies, in addition to bras, formal wear and casual women’s clothing. Today, months later, the boutique is open with slightly limited hours, and Zvoncheck-Ferro is still logging on for twice-weekly Facebook Live updates to show off the store’s newest inventory arrivals and latest markdowns. She says after each video is shared, several customers usually call to place holds for items shown on camera. While in-store shopping is still Audrey’s focus, especially for personalized bra fittings (Zvoncheck-

Ferro has, however, done a few virtual fittings this year), its owner plans to continue sharing live inventory updates even after the pandemic’s threat has waned.

The dedicated support of local shoppers, paired with creative marketing on social media and selling directly to clients, is also what’s kept CUES boutique going since the pandemic arrived. The contemporary women’s shop, a fixture of downtown Spokane for 14 years, located at 108 N. Washington St., focuses its inventory on higher end denim brands and other more casual pieces — sweaters, blouses, jackets and more — that owner Trish Thoen says shoppers can’t find anywhere else in town. “Just like everyone else, March 17 was our last day open so we had to quickly figure out what we were going to do,” Thoen recalls. “I went into the store by myself Monday through Friday and I did Instagram outfit posts, and texted my customers and offered curbside pickup and home delivery.” “We did that for two and a half months,” she continues. “I was so grateful because I have a lot of loyal customers, and they were loyal through all that difficult time.” Cues continues to offer curbside pickup and delivery since reopening for in-person shopping. Thoen and her team are also focusing more on putting together personalized recommendations for clients whose style preferences they’re familiar with, texting photos of new items directly to those women. Instagram remains a vital marketing tool to share in-store promotions and new inventory via styling posts, too, Thoen says, but she’s also since launched an online storefront for Cues (cuesclothing.com). “Instagram was definitely an integral part of our business and it’s continuing to be because people are reaching for it and are really relying on it for shopping,” she says.

While shopping for everyday clothing easily transitions to an online format, one category of boutique retail that can’t make as seamless a leap to the virtual sphere is picking out the perfect wedding gown. While the wedding industry has been beset with numerous challenges due to COVID-19, business during the pandemic hasn’t been so bad for one Spokane

wedding gown boutique. HONEST IN IVORY owner Cassie Cleary says her shop, which opened in east Spokane at 1003 E. Trent Ave. back in 2018, initially tried virtual styling sessions with brides-to-be, but quickly realized those online appointments weren’t a good fit for her customers. “Brides want to see a dress on,” Cleary says. “Our brides were willing to wait until we could reopen because they want to see the dress on their body and feel the fabric and look at the lace in person.” Fortunately, Honest in Ivory was able to hold out until Phase 2 allowed nonessential retailers to reopen. And even though there are limitations on how many people can be in the store at once, Cleary says a variety of options, including private, after-hours shopping sessions, have worked well to meet customers’ needs. For brides who shop during regular store hours, only two additional guests are allowed to accompany them. Honest in Ivory offers two private shopping options for larger groups, one that allows up to five guests of the bride for a $100 fee, and another that allows up to 10 guests for $200. Virtual appointments with a stylist also continue to be a popular option for out-of-town customers who want to see what’s available in the store before committing to making the trip to try on dresses in person, Cleary says. And since so many of her brides aren’t able to bring along as many friends or family members for in-person gown fittings, Cleary purchased four iPads for the store so women can video chat with, say, an out-of-town grandmother who wasn’t able to be there for the occasion. Another unexpectedly positive note Cleary didn’t expect during a global pandemic has been the booming success of her newly opened consignment bridal shop, Dearly. She says it’s been popular among women who, perhaps with their large-scale wedding plans on hold, have decided to elope instead and are thus seeking a more budget-friendly or less formal gown. “Women look forward to their wedding day and don’t want to compromise, even during a pandemic,” Cleary reflects. “They might want to push it out or do it on a small scale in a unique way, and that’s how wedding dress shopping has been able to sustain through this.” ◆

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VOICES

A Very Covid Christmas How local businesses are trying to adapt for a pandemic-restricted holiday shopping season Some businesses live or die based on Christmas shopping. That’s true any year. But this year — which isn’t any year — that’s especially true. “I think it’s fair to say the stakes are certainly higher,” says Downtown Spokane Partnership President Mark Richard. Sales last month were only slightly down for the city of Spokane and were actually up for Spokane County. But when you zero in on downtown Spokane, the pandemic has been a comparative disaster, sending sales in the city’s core plummeting by 24 percent, Richard says. He cites two reasons: First, the dearth of major events — sporting competitions, business conventions, Arena shows — meant a lot of lost customers. Second, the fact that so many of the 20,000 to 30,000 downtown employees are working from home has deprived a lot of those businesses of a customer base. “My hope and goal is to have people in our entire region understand the magnitude of that and encourage them to go out of their way to support the downtown businesses, so we make sure they’re around when we come out of the COVID crisis,” Richard says. But then Richard shifts to a more optimistic gear. “We’ve got some terrific hope for the city and the county,” Richard says. “We’ve got some great things and some fun things going on.” The DSP is using CARES Act funding to sponsor a bunch of health district-approved activities in the convention center, with games like cornhole and two-ontwo basketball, and offer $20 gift cards to downtown

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businesses. And to make it easier to park and shop, DSP will be offsetting the cost of at least 250 Shuttle Park passes for downtown workers. They’ll be able to park at the Arena and hitch a free ride to their workplace downtown. Even in the pandemic, Christmas will survive. There will still be Christmas lights and decked halls. There will still be a (scaled down) Christmas tree ceremony. And there will still be live performers (solo in these cases) bringing in the festive spirit downtown. With a huge COVID case spike being driven by risky unmasked home gatherings, visiting events downtown where businesses are taking plenty of pandemic precautions might actually be safer than, say, holding a big Thanksgiving dinner for extended family at your house. You’ll even be able to visit Santa Claus, promises Bryn West, general manager for the River Park Square shopping mall. “Santa is coming back in a socially distant, safe way,” she promises. West says businesses in the mall are getting creative with curbside pickup options to reduce crowd sizes. Murray Huppin, owner of HUPPIN'S, a local electronics store, says the company has redesigned both its sales space and sales calendar to adapt to the pandemic. Instead of aiming for a few crowds all at once, it’s aiming for a steady stream of customers. “The promotions and all the sales and things in the consumer electronic industry, they’re basically running SPONSORED CONTENT

HUPPIN'S now until the end of the year,” Huppin says. “You don’t have to focus just on a Black Friday weekend to get the deal.” SIMPLY NORTHWEST manager Samantha Smith says holidays are where the Spokane Valley gift store makes all its money. So this year, it’s taking into consideration that a lot of people won’t be able to see their friends and relatives in person to deliver gift baskets. The solution? Gift boxes that can be easily and cheaply mailed. Particularly popular, she says, are the huckleberry boxes that include Northwest-flavored goodies like huckleberry popcorn, huckleberry chocolate bars, huckleberry jam, huckleberry bark, and huckleberry pancake and muffin mix. Kris Dinnison, co-owner of ATTICUS and BOO RADLEY'S — two particularly popular gift shops in downtown Spokane — says that because they missed their second quarter goals due to the lockdown in the spring, racking up sales in the last part of the year is more crucial than ever. But lately, their challenge has actually been too many customers. The state requires that retail stores operate at only 30 percent of capacity, meaning that customers have to be turned away if they come during a time that’s too crowded. “Our biggest message that we want to get out there is shop now, shop early,” Dinnison says. “Shop in the morning when nobody else is here. Shop on the weekdays, not just Saturdays.” And anything they can do to make things go more smoothly the better. “We’re definitely going to have some masks available,” Dinnison says. “We’re tired of having fights about it if someone forgets.” Inevitably, these last two months of 2020 will require a lot of innovation and improvisation. But that’s been the case since March. By now, businesses are used to it, Dinnison says. “We were talking about what do we need to tell new people about Christmas season, and one of our managers said, ‘Here’s the reality: None of us have been through Christmas season [like this.] None of us has been through what this Christmas is going to be.’” ◆


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221 N WALL ST

509-496-1859

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12019 E SPRAGUE

509.768.5449 Call or Text for Appointment SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] BROWNE’S ADDITION

VOLUME 5

1719 W. RIVERSIDE AVE

11


This holiday season,

Shop Early, Shop Safe, Shop Local Boo�Radley’s Uncommon�Gifts

232�N.�Howard�.�456-7479

or more information about Back To Business

across�from�the�carousel

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

Visit BTB.Inlander.com

232 N HOWARD

Fashion, Accessories & Gifts

To inquire about being included in future Back To Business editions

mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com

509.473.9341 • SPOKANE VALLEY MILLWOOD

3223 N ARGONNE

• HOURS: Mon - Sat 10am-6pm • Boutiquebleuonline.com

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Discount Code: INLANDER • Valid in-store & online • Expires: 12-31-20 808 W MAIN AVE

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] • SPOKANE VALLEY

SPONSORED CONTENT


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tinctures, topicals, edibles, flower,

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SPOKANE VALLEY

CANNABIS STORE 9405 E SPRAGUE AVE, STE D

Shopping Local FOR THE HOLIDAYS

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817 W GARLAND AVE

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follow us for the latest offers and updates! SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

621 W MALLON AVE #303

(509) 919-8107 • CHENEY

/cheneyshoebarn 223 1ST ST

Spread Kindness. It's Contagious! VOLUME 5

13


LOOKS

BRICKYARD BARBERSHOP

Grooming for Zoom Lifted restrictions mean there’s no excuse for not looking your best online or in person With a switch to working from home for many employees throughout the region this year, personal grooming habits have, well, changed a bit. For some, it’s been freeing to take a more natural approach, ditching the makeup routine for a little extra sleep since the office is just a few steps away. For others, it was hard to take a break from favorite stylists while pandemic restrictions kept many spas and salons temporarily shuttered earlier this year. Meanwhile, Zoom video conferencing calls have become an integral part of that work-from-home routine for many. Thankfully, we’re now at a point in reopening procedures where those roots don’t have to keep growing out if you don’t want them to, and you can even get long-lasting permanent makeup treatments to continue savoring those extra ZZZs. After being shut down for about nine weeks early on in the pandemic, LUXE SALON & SPA was able to reopen and tackle a wave of backlogged hair appointments, as people who’d waited for months were able to again get their highlights and color treatments from the pros.

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It’s not just your hairdo that can be treated now, either. Recently, Luxe and other medical spas got the go-ahead to offer close-up face-to-face services like facials. That’s on top of the other haircut, waxing and styling services that were already available. “We currently just got the clearance to be able to offer all of our services,” says Luxe business manager Brooklyn Hubert. “We offer laser skin rejuvenation, laser hair removal, injectables such as Botox, filler, vitamin shots, and some medical facials.” Those services aren’t just for women, either. Men are increasingly taking advantage of laser hair removal, injectables, facials and hair services, Hubert says. “Sometimes it’s looked at as not super usual that men come to get services done, but it’s important for them to take care of themselves,” Hubert says. “They deserve to be pampered as well.” There still may be restrictions at medspas, spas and salons, so it’s a great idea to call ahead for appointments and double check what the current restrictions are. Other medspas in the county include places like SPONSORED CONTENT

SPA PARADISO, SARAH HAMILTON FACE, WERSCHLER AESTHETICS, CRAFTED BEAUTY, ODARA MEDICAL SPA and more. Popular hair salons have also joined the efforts to keep clients safe with socially distanced stations, face shields, face masks, gloves and more, while offering the pampering that makes a hairstyling appointment so nice. Clients have been happy to return to places like HOUSE OF POP, LAVISH SALON, BRICKYARD BARBERSHOP, OASIS HAIR and more. And, don’t forget about the newest trends in personal grooming: lash extensions that make mascara unnecessary, and microblading, which offers a permanent makeup fix to fill in brows for men and women alike. Lash extensions are offered by many estheticians around the area at places such as THE LASH & WAX BAR, THE LEMON ROOM and STARS SALON AND SPA. Meanwhile, find microblading from pros such as ALICIA SEYHANLI PERMANENT COSMETICS, BEAUTY BY MEREDITH and WILDFLOWERS PERMANENT COSMETICS. ◆


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1814 2ND ST

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SPOKANE VALLEY

7125 E TRENT AVE

MUSIC • EVENTS • LESSONS • REPAIRS • RENTALS • SALES

WHERE JOYFUL SOUND IS FOUND RETAIL • REPAIRS RENT • SELL Brass, Woodwinds, Percussion & Strings

Where customers become family. Changing lives one note at a time.

Everything you need to raise a musician ClearwaterMusicServes.com • 509-892-3809

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

9107 N COUNTRY HOMES BLVD STE 9

509-413-1137

SPOKANE VALLEY

321 N. PINES

Frozen Dessert and Concessions Equipment Sales

Supply Restoration & Repair of Vintage Instruments Offering our own line of handmade guitars, effects pedals and pickups

Colemusic.co • 509-244-3001 SPOKANE [ NORTH ] GARLAND DISTRICT

816 W GARLAND AVE

Main (509) 535-0644 Toll-Free (800) 223-4190

Service 1727 E. Springfield Ave. Spokane, WA 99202 office@concessionssupply.com

SPOKANE [ EAST ]

Open to the Public! Monday—Friday 8:00 AM—4:30 PM 1727 E SPRINGFIELD

VOLUME 5

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509-288-2311 cottonwoodcreekclothing.com

or more information about Back To Business

CHENEY

Visit BTB.Inlander.com

317 1ST ST

Spokane Valley 509-924-9999 7225 E Sprague Ave Spokane Valley, WA

Coeur d'Alene

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208-765-4444 254 W Kathleen Ave Coeur d’Alene, ID

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Also available from Custom Truck: Tonneau Covers Mud Flaps Floor Mats

mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com

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SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

108 N WASHINGTON ST

SPOKANE VALLEY • CDA

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7225 E SPRAGUE AVE

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16

Dabbling in refinished furniture, home decor and bringing a touch of life to your space with a selection of locally grown plants and succulents SPOKANE VALLEY

VOLUME 5

SPONSORED CONTENT

509-496-1859 12019 E SPRAGUE AVE


Hand crafted small batch soy candles Dandles Candles, sold at retailers throughout the inland northwest and on DandlesCandles.com. Made in Spokane

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SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

319 W RIVERSIDE AVE

Partner

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509-789-7300 • davenporthotel.com

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

It’s all about our community and creating a vibrant region that is connected, inspired and driven to succeed. We can’t do this work alone. We work with local businesses, our community, non-profits, and the surrounding region to build a robust regional economy. It’s this partnership that helps create the place where organization come together to advocate for the region, drive strategic growth, and champion a talented workforce.

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10 S POST ST

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125 S STEVENS FLOOR 2

VOLUME 5

17


PARTY

POP! BALLOON BAR

Make it Pop! Local event planner launches a custom balloon business to make celebrations happen during the pandemic When it became clear early this year that large-scale events, from fundraisers to weddings, were going on a months-long hiatus as the coronavirus’s threat remains high, local event planner Hayley Lydig needed to be even more creative than usual. “It became very apparent very quickly that those [events] wouldn’t be an option for a while, and now we’re nine months in and it’s still not on the table,” Lydig says. “So I pivoted to what was bringing me joy.” Her solution? Balloons. “I’ve been building balloon structures for clients for a few years now,” she says. “As COVID morphed into summer and people ventured outside, they asked if I could do a balloon structure for them for drive-by or outside events.” POP! BALLOON BAR launched in May, and business has been picking up steadily since. Lydig estimates she’s already undertaken more than 80 large-scale, balloon-based installations. Balloon installations, as Lydig calls them, are large arrangements of air-filled (as opposed to helium) balloons into archways, photo backdrops, garlands

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and other formations that feature dozens of connected balloons of various sizes and colors. Pop! offers its arrangements ($15 per linear foot) for commercial clients, like grocery stores or car lots, as well as private individuals for birthdays, weddings, anniversaries, bridal and baby showers, and more. “They are completely flexible for whatever you envision them for,” Lydig says. “The great thing about balloons is they’re so eye-catching. They are a real bang for your buck in terms of making a statement.” The balloon boutique, which operates a storefront in east Spokane at 1003 E. Trent Ave., also offers traditional helium balloon bundles ($20+) and confetti-filled gender reveal kits ($60). Custom orders are gladly welcomed for any type of balloon arrangement or installation a client envisions. Local delivery is also offered. Pop! stocks more than 100 different shapes, sizes and colors of high-quality and biodegradable latex balloons, along with shiny mylar shapes and letters. If a client requests something not currently stocked, Lydig and her team will seek it out. “We’re not your standard balloon shop, where you SPONSORED CONTENT

look at a wall and pick out what you want,” she says. “We strive to make sure your look is unique and no one else will have the same look as you.” Besides being bright and eye-catching, Pop!’s air-filled balloon structures also have staying power, lasting for up to eight weeks, Lydig says. “We’re seeing people think of balloons more as decor instead of for a singular event, and that comes back to getting a lot of bang for your buck,” she says. Pop!’s focus on balloons — a traditionally cheerful and celebratory object — and helping locals celebrate while group gatherings aren’t a safe option are key elements of its success as a business established during what’s been an incredibly challenging year. “Pop! has helped me stay motivated and positive through all of this, and I’m a people pleaser so I love being able to help and create these events and make those special for people,” Lydig says. “I feel very lucky that people in Spokane have welcomed us.” ◆ More at popballoonbar.com and instagram.com/ pop.balloonbar.


Haircuts • Color • Lash Extensions Permanent Makeup • Nails • Massage

509.559.2373 Tue-Fri 10-5 Sat 9-4 Closed Sun & Mon

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CHENEY

1332 1ST ST

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] U DISTRICT

1003 E TRENT #200

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(509) 828-0828 SPOKANE VALLEY

M” INTO U H O H “ N TUR

16314 E INDIANA AVE

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] SPRAGUEUNION DISTRICT

okane’s p S Bratwurst

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-2PM • SATURDAY 8AM

(509) 328-7701

902 WEST ROSEWOOD AVE

• SU

RIND & WHEAT PASTRIES NEW SEASONAL DRINK SPECIALS WONDER FARMER’S MARKET EVERY SATURDAY (8-2) THRU DECEMBER

Curbside Pick-up Available SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

1802 E SPRAGUE AVE

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

835 N POST ST

VOLUME 5

19


Bring The Outdoors In! Shop our wide selection of floral arrangements or have one custom made to order!

Use the Face a Face image with the guy, and can you move the brand logo inside the image. Keep the text about bringing world class eye care, and thanks for shopping local. keep website and phone #

Available for pick up in-store/curbside or delivery in Spokane and Spokane Valley

509-326-6888 EvergreenFloralShop.com

or more information about Back To Business

LOCALLY OWNED AND OPERATED

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

Visit BTB.Inlander.com

Politically Correct & Incorrect Eyewear

To inquire about being included in future Back To Business editions

1602 N MONROE

Bringing World-Class Eye Care to Downtown Spokane Thank you for shopping local, we appreciate your support

mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com EVERYTHING IN SIGHT OPTICAL BOUTIQUE Designer Eyewear & Contact Lenses | Eye Examinations

Debbie Cozza, L.D.O.

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1314 S GRAND BLVD

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

126 N WASHINGTON

THE

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EYEGUYSOPTICAL.COM

SPOKANE VALLEY • HAYDEN,ID

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EYE CARE

CALL FOR APPOINTMENT  509-850-2017 SPOKANE [ NORTH ] EMERSON/GARFIELD

SPONSORED CONTENT

1318 W. KNOX


Your One Stop Shop For The Holiday Shopping Season!

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Christmas BULK Candy Limit one (1) coupon per purchase • expires 12/23/2020

SPOKANE VALLEY

9126 E SPRAGUE AVE

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

9502 N NEWPORT HWY SUITE 4B

We provide a casual, fun & professional space Women and Men’s haircutting, coloring, eyebrow waxing & lash extensions. Amazing metal art, garden signs and seasonal metal works custom made by Kyndal at Wynd Metal Works. appointment recommend 509.326.5123

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] KENDALL YARDS

1170 W SUMMIT PKWY

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

1111 NORTH NORMANDIE ST

FRESH DESIGN GALLERY & RENTAL, LLC GIFT SHOP • FLORIST WEDDING RENTALS AQUATIC RENTAL local holiday gifts in Spokane

SUN, MON & TUES BY APPOINTMENT • WED, THU & FRI 10a-5p • SAT 10a-4p

FRESHDESIGNGALLERY.COM

509.991.7577 • HOLLY@FRESHDESIGNGALLERY.COM MEDICAL LAKE

116 N. LEFEVRE ST.

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] RIVER PARK SQUARE

VOLUME 5

808 W MAIN AVE

21


ESSAY

The Power of Buying Local

THE BIKE HUB DOWNTOWN MANAGER TIM DUNN (RIGHT) AND CUSTOMER SCOTT ANDERSON

How to safely support local businesses this holiday season By Mariah McKay and Janice Miller With an uncertain future ahead of us, all nonessential work, schools and many public services were required to temporarily shut down in March. People flocked to e-commerce for its remote convenience as local businesses quickly adapted behind the scenes. Now with delivery, customer circulation control and curbside pickup options available, local businesses are again poised to safely serve their customers. The Live Local INW campaign But the damage is a community-driven efhas been done, fort to build a thriving culture and the default of supporting locally owned Amazon Prime commerce for the benefit of our competition factor communities. Visit its directory still remains. and virtual marketplace for participating locally owned While locally businesses at livelocalinw.com. owned small businesses watched revenues plummet and pivoted to the new normal, Amazon doubled its yearly profit — raking in $5.2 billion. In the words of the newly placed billboard outside Powell’s Books in Portland, “Amazon is going to be fine, folks.”  So what will it take to make our Main Streets thrive again? We are poised to turn this disaster into a wholesale revival for our locally owned business sector. Aside from the real and heartwarming anecdotes about how buying a local piece of art makes a real person do a happy dance, hiring from a local service company pays someone’s tuition, and shopping local helps put food on your neighbor’s table; local spend-

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ing is vital to the survival of communities now more than ever. When major chain stores ran out of essentials, the same items could often be found at locally owned businesses with alternative supply chains. Local small businesses rose to the response effort immediately, helping to feed school children in need and contributing products and services to local charities they had long-standing relationships with. Spokane was built on small business ingenuity, tight-knit community support and the unofficial city motto “We don’t want to be Seattle.” When it comes to the economic recovery of Spokane, the only way to get through the pandemic and maintain the unique charm and diversity of our small-business community is to each do our part where possible.  A 2011 study from the Maine Center for Economic Policy found that every $100 spent at locally owned businesses results in $58 reinvested into the local economy. When spent at a chain store, only $33 of that same $100 is reinvested. Even less than that recirculates locally when shopping on large e-commerce sites. If even a fraction of the Amazon orders that have been delivered to Spokane doorsteps in the last several months came from locally owned businesses, we’d be seeing fewer empty storefronts in our neighborhoods. Amazon is going to be just fine, folks.  Can individual choices add up to making a difference? According to a 2014 study by the Institute for Local Self Reliance, businesses reported sales increases between 5.3 percent and 7 percent in communities where a “buy local” campaign is implemented. Nationwide, communities have begun to establish local marketplaces alongside buy-local campaigns to promote SPONSORED CONTENT

locally owned businesses and services, and to provide a one-stop-shop for consumers to find everything their communities have to offer and an easy, accessible way for consumers to shop online locally. In addition to your personal purchases, you can influence others to join you in the buy-local movement so that individual efforts create the momentum for a systemic response. Thanks to funding from the city of Spokane through the CARES Act, a coalition of community partners formally launched Live Local INW, a community-driven buy-local education campaign, online directory and virtual marketplace for locally owned businesses in Spokane. Each listing is free for the business owner, and consumers can browse Spokane’s small businesses any time of day, anywhere in the world, no masks required.  This shared effort helps smaller businesses overcome the obscurity they often face because they don’t have the gigantic marketing budgets that larger corporations ultimately make you pay for. Local businesses have time-honored expertise and impeccable customer service, and they will continue to be here for you if we show up for them. This holiday season, let’s be thoughtful about investing in our neighbors and circulating more wealth into our regional economy, and let’s make someone do a happy dance. This winter, shop local, hire local, eat local: Live Local. ◆   Mariah McKay of the Spokane Independent Metro Business Alliance and Janice Miller of Inland Northwest Business Alliance are directors of the Live Local INW campaign.


Catering to people with unique style. Shop our wide selection, there’s something for everyone.

EN FREE LOCAL DELIVERY WH RE MO OR 99 YOU SPEND $9 NOVEMBER SPECIAL 20% off for Veterans all month SPOKANE [ NORTH ] MONROE DISTRICT

BUY ANY SOFA AND GET THE LOVESEAT 20%

OFF

MENTION INLANDER TO REC EIVE ADDITIONAL SAVINGS

509-315-8511 thefurnitureoutpost.com 2801 N MONROE ST

Garland Mercantile is a specialty store located in the heart of the Garland District and is now under new ownership! We carry many items you would find at your local farmers market and more. We source our products and produce from the Pacific Northwest, while keeping quality and freshness in mind. When you support us, you support local farmers and artisans. So come on in to try a few samples, find a unique gift, pickup some Greenbluff produce, and say hello. We can’t wait to meet you!

509-315-4937 SPOKANE [ NORTH ] GARLAND DISTRICT

823 W GARLAND AVE

Upscale resale clothing, accessories and gift items.

Garland Resale Boutique • Tues - Sat 11am-6pm // Closed Sun & Mon. • garlandresale.com

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

11 S HOWARD

SPECIALIZING IN BIRACIAL HAIR

BRAIDS • COLOR CUT • DREADS EXTENSIONS RELAXERS

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

2424 N DIVISION ST

DON’T FORGET TO PREORDER YOUR

Thanksgiving Bouquets

Personalizing the perfect hair style for you. Children are welcome.

(509) 482-6745 GiftedHandsSalon.net SPOKANE VALLEY

(509) 326-4511 • gildedlilyspokane.com 9405 E SPRAGUE

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

2218 N MONROE ST

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Vinyl records, CDs, cassette tapes, turntables, amplifiers, speakers, and musical equipment

(509) 443-3184 or more information about Back To Business

SPOKANE [ NORTH ] GARLAND DISTRICT

Visit BTB.Inlander.com To inquire about being included in future Back To Business editions

Wed-Sat 12-6pm 635 W GARLAND AVE,

Custom Framing | Jersey Framing | Mirror Framing | Shadowbox Framing | Fine Art Prints

Donate & Save!

10% OFF For each can donation item, up to 60% off the custom frame.

mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com

Offer valid on multiple orders, 1 order 6 dry canned goods, 2 orders, 12 itesm, etc. Expired food donations not accepted. Not valid on previous orders, current orders or value packages. Offer valid through 12/31/2020.

8701 N. Division Street | Spokane, WA 99218 509-468-4665 | spokane.thegreatframeup.com SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN, NORTH, SOUTH ] • SPOKANE VALLEY • CDA • POST FALLS

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

8701 N DIVISION ST

Hammer & Stain is a Do it Yourself Studio specializing in Home Decor. Attend a Public Workshop, Book a Private Party, or just spend time crafting during the day with us. Wall Signs, Porch Decor, Chunky Knit Blankets, Take Home Kits and Functional Decor. Now Booking Holiday Parties • (509) 474-9702 • hammerandstainspokanevalley.com

Open Mon - Sat 9am-5pm • Sunday by appointment • Parties after 5pm by appointment SPOKANE [ EAST ]

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1805 E TRENT AVE

VOLUME 5

SPOKANE VALLEY

SPONSORED CONTENT

121 S SULLIVAN RD


WE CUT ALL TYPES OF HAIR IN ANY STYLE YOU CAN THINK OF

From in-person and virtual tastings to glass pours and curbside pick-up, our amazing team is here for you.

24/7 Appointment Booking through the app theCut

VISIT US Sunday - Thursday | 1 pm - 6 pm Friday - Saturday | 1 pm - 7 pm

book.thecut.co/ BigMikeheadhunter SPOKANE [ NORTH ] NORTHTOWN MALL

4750 N DIVISION SUITE 2022

TASTING ROOM • SPOKANE

HELIXWINE.COM

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

824 W. SPRAGUE AVE

Comfort All Day Long

HELPING MUSICIANS Since 1913

509.444.4140 • 1.800.769.3949 • HOFFMANMUSIC.COM SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

509-482-4515

1430 N MONROE

SPOKANE [ NORTH ] NORTHTOWN MALL

4750 N DIVISION #260

FOR NOW, NOT FOREVER Keep Wearing a Mask

Keep Washing UP

Keep DISTANCING

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GREENERY

PARRISH & GROVE

Dig In Embrace your green thumb at these local shops The pandemic has taken away plenty of hobbies: Team sports, singing and basically anything involving other people indoors. One thing it can’t take away? Your love of plants. Whether you have a robust garden, or you simply want a nice plant to look at while working from home, these local shops should have what you’re looking for.

LIBERTY PARK FLORIST & GREENHOUSE

Located in the Perry District, Liberty Park Florist & Greenhouse is an Inlander favorite — readers voted it as their favorite florist for 10 years. They specialize in European gardens, sympathy pieces, green and blooming plants and fruit and gourmet baskets. COVID-19 has impacted the availability of some flowers, but they still are offering fresh flower arrangements. They make it easy to do by letting you order ahead online for curbside pickup. 1401 E. Newark Ave., libertyparkflorist.com, 535-5924

PARRISH & GROVE

Head downtown to the Saranac Commons for custom flower arrangements, exotic house plants, and even

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a chance to build your own miniature ecosystem at the terrarium bar. You can bring your own container or purchase one at the shop. At Parrish & Grove, it’s about the experience of visiting the shop, discovering the plants for yourself and arranging them the way you see fit. Then, you can take that little experience back home with you. Saranac Commons, 19 W. Main St., parrishandgrove.com, 838-7784

Moon has a selection of healthy plants — shrubs, roses, trees, perennials — that won’t break the bank. They try to focus on plants that are adaptable to the range of weather conditions we see here in the Inland Northwest, meaning they always have a good stock of native plants. 1732 S. Inland Empire Way, bluemoonplants.com, 747-4255

THE PLANT FARM

With two Spokane locations — downtown and Browne’s Addition — you have double the opportunity to find your new favorite plant or pot. And Fern will transplant it for free. You can also check out their selection online. 1516 W. Riverside Ave., fernplantshop. com, 991-8255

Here, in Spokane Valley, you’ll find one of the largest selections of houseplants in the Inland Northwest. They grow all kinds of plants, including tropical plants, indoor plants, outdoor plants, even plants to keep mosquitos away. That also makes them a great place to go for advice on what to do with the plants you already bought. In time for the holidays, choose from their assortment of gift boxes — foliage, succulent and cactus, to name a few — and order them online. 14208 E. Fourth Ave., Spokane Valley, spokaneplantfarm.com, 926-9397

BLUE MOON GARDEN & NURSERY Located just southwest of downtown Spokane, Blue SPONSORED CONTENT

FERN PLANT SHOP

JUDY'S ENCHANTED GARDEN

The name of this plant shop on Northwest Boulevard doesn’t lie. When walking through it, you truly do feel like you’re in an enchanted garden — and the best part is you can buy the plants in the garden. Find perennials, trees, annuals, gifts and — for the holidays — Christmas trees and wreaths. 2628 W. Northwest Blvd., 325-1081 ◆


509-496-1859 • Located in The Bohemian

Honey and Hubby sign making duo...loving life and doing what we LOVE ...making signs and other creative adventures! SPOKANE VALLEY

12019 E SPRAGUE AVE

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

421 W RIVERSIDE AVE. SUITE 115

Tis the Season

WE’RE WORTH

THE DRIVE!

OVER 8,000 SQ FT OF SHOPPING (509) 291-4077  OPEN DAILY 11AM-4PM  ROCKFORD

30 S FIRST ST

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] KENDALL YARDS, WEST CENTRAL

We want to be your jeweler for life.

We carry all the supplies to make beer and wine.

We also carry beer & wine ready to drink!

Tri-cities

JewelryDesignCenter.com

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

2 195 Since Spokane

821 N DIVISION ST

jimshomebrew.com

509 328 4850 • TUE-FRI 10am-6pm SAT 10am-4pm SUN-MON Closed SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

2619 N DIVISION

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Christmas trees will arrive in time for Thanksgiving weekend

Jud y’s Enchanted Garden 325-1081

or more information about Back To Business

Open Thanksgiving Weekend!

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

Visit BTB.Inlander.com

2628 W. NORTHWEST BLVD

helping local businesses run smoothly

Unique clothing andin To inquire about being included future Back To Businessaccessories editions with an mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com artistic flair WEARABLE ART • HANDMADE • VINTAGE • UPCYCLED open Tues-Sat 10a-5p

for 120 years!

Mention this ad for 10% off exp 11/30/20 (509) 838-5724 • www.katzeboutique.com

SPOKANE [ EAST ]

1816 E SPRAGUE

Office Supplies  Office Furniture  Local Delivery kershaws-spokane.com SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

FAIR TRADE • HANDMADE • LOCAL

119 S. HOWARD

Party Supplies & Decorations

Dine In & Take Out & Catering Services

GIFTS • CLOTHING • ACCESSORIES • HOME GOODS

Mon – Sat: 9AM – 10PM Sunday: 9AM – 10PM

509-926-8251

LaMichoacanaNW.com

Open 12-5:30pm or by appointment (509) 464-7677 • kizurispokane.com SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

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35 W. MAIN

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SPOKANE VALLEY

SPONSORED CONTENT

9907 E SPRAGUE AVE


92 YEARS OF HOLIDAY CHEER!

Bring Home Wonder

spokanelibertybuilding.com FLORIST AND GREENHOUSE, INC. BEST FLORIST

(509) 534-9381 • libertyparkflorist.com SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

203 N WASHINGTON ST

SPOKANE [ SOUTH ]

HALL OF FAME

8TH & PERRY ST

M A D E I N S P O K A N E • A S S E E N I N N E W YO R K FA S H I O N W E E K

Designing & Delivering High Quality Garments at an Affordable Price (509) 290-6041 All products are Original www.loboutique.net

Curbside Pick-up | Home Delivery | Online Ordering | Private Appointment | Shipping Available 2602 N HAMILTON ST #2738

BUY 10 SESSIONS GET 10 SESSIONS

FREE!

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

11921 N DIVISION ST SUITE 300

ANY BED!

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

The Loft Tanning Studio offers a wide variety of high pressure UV bronzing tanning beds, customizable airbrush spray tans, a large selection of professional skin care specifically for tanners of all kinds, as well as chic modern boho home decor items and live potted plants!

Now Open Mon-Fri at 10am By Appointment Only • (509) 928-0705 LIBERTY LAKE

23801 E APPLEWAY AVE #120

lolospokane.com • (509) 747.2867 SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

319 W SECOND AVE

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SPECKS

2020 Vision Local eye clinics are providing clarity during the pandemic After the pandemic hit Spokane, GARLAND VISION SOURCE was closed for two months. But Brett Hagen, eye doctor and owner of the eye clinic, says that once they officially opened their doors back up, business started booming. It wasn’t just that they had a backlog of appointments to get through. Hagen says the number of people who ended their appointment wanting to buy glasses after their exam had increased, too. “I don’t know if there’s a need out there, or if people are wanting something that’s functional for them but also a bit fashionable,” Hagen says. Maybe it’s that, with so many of our social interactions consigned to faces over video chat, the traditional ways we show off our flair for fashion has been effectively cropped out of the picture. But glasses remain an exception — the front and center fashion accessory in every Zoom chat. In fact, with people spending so much time staring at the screen, Hagen says, they’re “being a lot more specific about their vision demands.” They’re seeking specific computer glasses, or lenses that filter out blue light. Staring at a screen for a long time, he says, can cause eye strain, a symptom of looking at the same distance without mixing it up. “Every 20 minutes, you should look up and look 20 feet away for 20 seconds,” Hagen says. The clinic has taken a wide variety of measures to ensure patient safety. Masks are required for everybody. They ask that friends and family of patients wait in the car, and that only one guardian accompanies any minor. Every pair of display glasses that are tried on are cleaned with UV sterilizers designed to zap the virus. Even visiting to browse the specs in the retail space now requires an appointment, which customers have had mixed reactions to. “Some people really like a time reserved,” Hagen says. “It’s been frustrating for others who want to pop in and shop.” Not every glasses retailer has been as lucky during the pandemic. Longtime family-owned downtown business COZZA OPTICAL is shutting down and is currently in the process of liquidating its inventory. Swing by now and you may be able to get a good deal on their remaining stock. And check out some of the local eyeglass shops. BLINK EYECARE, on the South Hill, boasts over 800 pairs of frames. And EVERYTHING IN SIGHT OPTICAL BOUTIQUE promises personalized style advice as well as some tres chic European brands. ◆

GARLAND VISION SOURCE

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SPONSORED CONTENT


MAKE YOUR HOLIDAYS BRIGHT

Member-owned Locally driven grocery store Spokane’s only local food co-op

SHOP IN STORE, ONLINE, OR BY APPOINTMENT. (509) 701-2711 | LORRAINEFINEJEWELRY.COM

LIBERTY LAKE

21950 E COUNTRY VISTA DR STE 600

Main Market Cooperative exists to nourish the greater Spokane community. We do this by contributing to a healthier & more resilient Inland Northwest, one bite at a time.

509-458-2667 • mainmarket.coop • SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

44 W MAIN AVE

'

509-325-8353 We Sell and Service Vintage and Cool Player Grade used Guitars, Basses and Amps SPOKANE [ NORTH ] GARLAND DISTRICT

918 W GARLAND AVE

Arcte p S a o

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] KENDALL YARDS

1202 W SUMMIT PKWY

VOTED #1 BEST WINE TASTING ROOM AND #3 BEST LOCAL WINERY

Elevated Experience coupled with a staycation like atmosphere! Our skilled professionals pride themselves with keeping you looking and feeling your BEST!

509-315-4651

VISIT MARYHILLWINERY.COM SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] KENDALL YARDS

1303 W SUMMIT PARKWAY

M A K I N G B E A U T Y, B E A U T I F U L A G A I N SPOKANE VALLEY PONDEROSA VILLAGE

11205 E DISHMANMICA FRONTAGE RD

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Make the holidays Gravelicious!

or more information about Back To Business (509) 443-4218 SPOKANE VALLEY

Visit BTB.Inlander.com Buy 1-lb Chocolates get

Buy 2-lbs Chocolates get

1405 N ARGONNE RD

Art in All Forms

20% off 25% off To inquire about being included in future Back To Business editions

mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com expires 12/30/2020 Not valid with other discounts

expires 12/30/2020 Not valid with other discounts

Hours: Thu-Sun 12-5p | (509) 413-9101 | | newmoonartgallery.com

(509) 321-7450 − mrscavanaughs.com SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

513 E HASTINGS RD

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] SPRAGUEUNION DISTRICT

1326 E SPRAGUE AVE

largest selection of bikes and accessories in one location. Mon-Fri 9:30-6:00 Sat 9-5 Sun Gone Riding | 509-467-2453 | northdivision.com SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

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828 W MAIN AVE

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SPOKANE [NORTH ]

SPONSORED CONTENT

10503 N DIVISION ST


For unique holiday gifts, visit the museum store. Gift cards also on sale.

OPEN

Tues-Sun

10 am-5 pm FREE PARKING

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

714 W MAIN STE 121

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] BROWNE’S ADDITION

2316 W 1ST AVE

Browse Thousands of Unique Items (509) 868-0864

while supporting local business!

Mon-Sat 10-6pm Sunday 12-5pm

Matchbox 1953-1969 Lesney & 1990s Collectibles Hot Wheel & Johhny Lightning Diecast Vintage Tube Radios • Record Albums M&M Character Collectibles (509) 998-7660

SPOKANE VALLEY

18309 E APPLEWAY AVE

SPOKANE [ NORTH ] GARLAND DISTRICT

604 W GARLAND AVE

h quality Let us be your local resource for hig and organic pet food and supplies! we carry everything you need for a happy, healthy pet! Including holistic remedies.

NEW EVENT OPTIONS: In-Studio Events • LIVE Virtual Events via Zoom Twist at Home Kits with Pre-recorded Video In-Home or Office Events with our Artist

509-927-8890 www.pawpularcompanions.biz

509-413-9892 • PAINTINGWITHATWIST.COM SPOKANE VALLEY

11703 E SPRAGUE AVE STE B3

LIBERTY LAKE

21801 E COUNTRY VISTA DR STE 111

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DUDES

ANDERSON & CO.

Look Sharp! Where to shop for the well-dressed man It's no secret that the social norms of 2020 are a lot more lenient than in past years, but just because we’re in the middle of a pandemic doesn’t mean we’ve suddenly lost the urge to occasionally dress up. Sure, we’re leaning toward more casualwear these days, and a lot of us have formed a closer relationship with our comfiest sweatpants, but sometimes a guy just needs to put on a dress shirt and tie for a Zoom meeting. Perhaps you’re looking to finally fill out your closet, or your wardrobe just needs a little TLC. Either way, these Spokane shops and boutiques will suit the style of any fashion-forward guy.

KINGSLEY & SCOUT

Maybe you’re looking for a T-shirt emblazoned with the local Great PNW clothing label’s logo. Maybe you want a slick hat to go with your favorite blazer. Or maybe you need a new blazer to start with. Regardless, Kingsley & Scout has got you covered, literally and figuratively. Its Monroe Street storefront has become a go-to for the fashionable man, the place where you can deck yourself out from head to toe in a

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single shopping spree. They also serve cold beers in the store, so you can imbibe while you browse. 2810 N. Monroe, kingsleyandscout.com, 251-7781

ANDERSON & CO.

Anyone who has stepped foot inside River Park Square has passed this haven of fancy duds, as it’s one of the most recognizable and long-standing storefronts in the mall. The locally owned clothier will have all of your bases covered, whether you need to dress up for your new corporate job or merely need a business casual outfit that’s fit for the golf course. Not only can you pick up a crisp new suit, but they can get it tailored for you, and you can purchase the ties, cufflinks and pocket squares to go along with it. 814 W. Main, andersonandco.co, 838-1652

ATOMIC THREADS

If you consider yourself a hep cat, if you’re a regular at every local rockabilly concert, and if you’d do anything to time travel back to the early 1960s, then Atomic Threads is your kind of place. It specializes SPONSORED CONTENT

in dresses and lingerie, but they have their fair share of casual men’s fashion, from retro bowling shirts to creeper-style shoes to lounge-friendly shirts with bold, colorful designs. You can even stock up on pomade and holding spray to keep your pompadour looking high and tight. 1925 N. Monroe, Ste. A, atomicthreadsclothingboutique.com, 598-8755

WHITE'S BOOTS

Once you’ve got a snazzy new outfit put together, the pièce de résistance is the fancy footwear you slip your socks into. For more than a century, White’s Boot Shop has sold the sort of sturdy boots that are durable enough for the outdoors but sleek enough for the office, whether they be leather or suede. Their boots are meant to last, but they’ll also repair and rebuild your favorite boots if you happen to wear them out. A notable fan of the business is comedian Marc Maron, who stopped in during his stay in Spokane and raved about it on his popular podcast. Celebrity endorsed — doesn’t get more impressive than that. 4002 E. Ferry, whitesboots.com, (800) 541-3786 ◆


PETERS & SONS S AY I T W I T H F L OW E R S

Flowers For Every Occasion

Monday-Friday 7am-3pm 509-624-4151 • petersandsons.com SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] RIVERPARK SQUARE

808 W MAIN AVE SUITE 218

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

314 E SPRAGUE AVE

Locally Grown Plants & Flowers

We have it or we’ll get it.

Largest Selection of Poinsettias.

Accessories & Gifts

Curbside Pick-up Available PETERSHARDWARESPOKANE.COM • 509 926 3646 ...because life is better in the garden SPOKANE VALLEY

12118 E SPRAGUE AVE

509.926.9397 • spokaneplantfarm.com

SPOKANE VALLEY

14208 E. 4TH AVENUE

Pop is Spokane’s only boutique balloon shop!

Specializing in balloon installations that get people talking and taking photos, Pop can create the perfect look for any celebration! Offering both helium bouquets and large installations, every reason is a reason for balloons! Stop by the shop to browse our small batch party supplies, cards, and laugh out loud worthy gifts. Walk in, give us a call, or let us deliver some balloon cheer.

WE BUY. ALL DAY. EVERY DAY. (509) 484-3700 • PLATOSCLOSET.COM MON-SAT 10AM-9PM / SUNDAY NOON- 6PM SPOKANE [ NORTH ] • SPOKANE VALLEY

509- 315-9663 • popballoonbar.com Hours: Wed-Sat 10am- 6pm • Sun-Tues By Appointment or delivery SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

1003 E TRENT AVE, SUITE 150

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or more information about Back To Business

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN, SOUTH ]

Visit BTB.Inlander.com To inquire about being included in future Back To Business editions

mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com Don’t wait for your furniture. MANY items in stock! Spokane’s Favorite Furniture Store

Thurs–Sat 10am to 5pm railcreekfurniture.com

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] SPRAGUEUNION DISTRICT

Wed-Fri 11am - 3pm | Sat 10am – 4pm | 509-863-5762 1801 E SPRAGUE AVE

RARE COIN CO.

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

Spokane’s Home for ALL Musical Tastes CDs • DVDs • LPs • Tapes • 45s • Memorabilia

Always Buying

Intend to re

op Phase 3 en

U.S. Coins and Currency Foreign Coins and Currency Gold and Silver Jewelry Loans on Coins and Jewelry Silver, Gold and Platinum Bullion M-F 9:30am-5:15pm • Sat 10am-4pm • (509) 327-6241

HAMILTON & INDIANA • 483-4753

We exchange your Canadian & Foreign Coins! SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

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3190 N. DIVISION ST

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27 W INDIANA AVE

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

SPONSORED CONTENT

1902 N HAMILTON


THE LARGEST SELECTION OF MOTORCYCLE APPAREL & ACCESSORIES IN THE INLAND NORTHWEST

Open

daily

11am-5pm

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

3221 N MONROE ST

509-724-3114 • Open 11am-5pm Tue-Fri • 9a-3p Sat • Closed Sun-Mon • DEER PARK

106 E CRAWFORD ST.

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

4725 N MARKET ST

Huge Selection of Garden & Plants Amazing Holiday Decor Unique Gifts SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

509-467-5258 110120 N DIVISION

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OFFICE

Workin' It

TWO WOMEN VINTAGE GOODS

Where to outfit your home office Alright, so you've likely already been working from home for most of the year if you’re new to the work-from-home routine due to the pandemic. But have you really taken the time to set up a proper home office yet? Sitting at the kitchen table is OK… but a desk would be better, right? Luckily, there are many stores in Spokane County ready to help you find everything you need to make that home office feel like a workspace, whether that’s by dedicating a corner in your living room for a desk or decorating an entirely separate room. From bookshelves and filing cabinets to desks, office chairs and yes, decorations, keep an eye out for unique finds at these local stores. It might just make that commute from the breakfast table to the home office a little more enjoyable.

THE TIN ROOF

This third-generation, Spokane family-owned business has evolved over the years to become a very modern, exciting furniture store. With staff who are ready to help you work within your budget and find what you need, from a desk to the decor you want around it, their interior designers and stylists can help you find just the right thing. You can make an appointment online and even start designing your room on their website. 1727 E. Sprague Ave., tinrooffurniture.com, 535-1111

O'BRIEN USED FURNITURE

Providing a variety of used furniture in good shape,

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with deals changing regularly, O’Brien Used Furniture might not have the exact model you found online, but you could fall in love with something you wouldn’t find anywhere else. From desks and office chairs to filing cabinets and random knickknacks to decorate with, the store regularly cycles in new pieces. 4924 N. Market St., obrienusedfurniture.com, 489-3397

TWO WOMEN VINTAGE GOODS

Now, when it comes to decorating your home office, what better way to find your personal aesthetic than by checking out local thrift stores for one-of-a-kind artwork, paper crafts, decorations, bookends and more? Looking to create an old-school Sherlock Holmes-style darker home office? You might find some mounted animal heads or antlers here. Looking for bright, holiday decorations to keep your desk from getting boring? They’ve got that, too. 2012 E. Sprague Ave., twowomenvintagegoods.com, 624-4322

SPOKANE FURNITURE CO.

Whether you’d like a modern aesthetic, farmhouse, minimalistic or classic, you can find bookshelves, desks, side tables and more to outfit your home office at one of the two locations in Spokane and Spokane Valley. The stores are open and ready for you to come look at items, or you can order online. 1901 N. Division St., spokanefurniture.com, 328-1229 • 16413 E. Sprague Ave., 474-9904 SPONSORED CONTENT

WALLAROO'S FURNITURE AND MATTRESSES

First opened by an enterprising Gonzaga student who was flipping Craigslist furniture, this store has evolved into a full-service furniture store providing customers with a variety of styles and options for their home furniture needs. In particular, if you want to make a little cozy seating area with a loveseat or sectional in your home office, this shop may have just what you’re looking for. 1001 N. Division St., wallaroosfurnitureandmattresses.com, 241-3212

COMPLETE SUITE FURNITURE AND MATTRESS

For rugs and wall art, look at the selection at Complete Suite’s Spokane Valley location, or on the regional company’s website. They offer affordable rug options, from geometric patterns to that warm faux sheep/animal skin rug you maybe always dreamed of having in front of your home office fireplace (you clearly have a dark, massive home library in this daydream). Or, for the windowless home office, try finding a nice ocean or forest view from the store’s wall art collection to keep the winter blues at bay. 11410 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley, completesuitefurniture.com, 822-7049 • 1219 N. Division St., 326-5390 • 7410 N. Division St., 868-0235 • 3014 N. Flora Rd., Spokane Valley, 381-5618 ◆


Rustic, Refurbished and Handmade Treasures A Full Service Hair Salon

stic Treasures u DESIGNS BY R Stacy and Joanie LOCATED IN THE BOHEMIAN

open 7 days a week by appointment only • 509-924-3099 • SPOKANE VALLEY

1515 N PINES RD

(509) 496-1859 | Rustictreasures73@gmail.com SPOKANE VALLEY

12019 E SPRAGUE AVE

Discover the Magical Revival of Second Hand Treasures

Oldies & oddities from every era Multiple vendors, all with a passion for vintage Old-fashioned candy & coming soon, an espresso bar, to make your shopping experience sweet and cozy!

2020 N Division 509-325-6805

(509) 309-3805 SPOKANE [ EAST ]

1916 E SPRAGUE AVE

spokanethriftstore.salvationarmy.org

11211 E Sprague Ave 509-928-9970

SPOKANE [ NORTH ] • SPOKANE VALLEY

SANTA EXPRESS will be returning for 2020 as an online store allowing kids ages 4 - 12 (encouraged) to experience the joy of holiday giving safely from their home. Kids will submit a wish list with gift ideas for their loved ones, and a special Santa Express Elf will prepare the surprise gifts for pick up before Christmas.

Shop or donate at santaexpress.org ONLINE STORE DATES: Nov. 23 - Dec. 23 100% OF PROCEEDS BENEFIT

PICK UP LOCATION: 5004 E. Sprague Ave. (Across from Walmart) GIFT WRAP SPONSOR

BOUTIQUE SPONSOR

A DECOR AND LIFESTYLE BOUTIQUE SILVER SPONSOR

10-4 pm Wed-Sat // 509.598.8581

Columbia Bank, George Gee, Kaiser Permanente, Yoke’s Fresh Market

SPOKANE VALLEY

www.savvyhomespokane.com

5004 E SPRAGUE AVE

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

1407 W 1ST AVE SPOKANE

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Home Decor, Gifts & Gift Baskets

509-927-8206 • simplynorthwest.com Hours: M-F 9-5:30pm Sat 10-4pm 3rd: Mon-Sat 9-6 & Sun 10-4 Holiday Hours: Nov 27th - Dec 23rd:

or more information about Back To Business

SPOKANE VALLEY

Visit BTB.Inlander.com

11806 E SPRAGUE AVE

SONNENBERG’S MARKET & DELI

To inquire about being included in future Back To Business editions

Meat Market, Deli, Catering, Grocery

mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com ITʻS TIME TO ORDER:

Fresh or Smoked Turkeys • Bone-in Hams • Prime Rib Roasts Ducks • Geese • Capons • Crab • Prawns • Pork Crown Roasts Party Trays and Other Holiday Items

Call: 509-535-4932 • sonnenbergsmarket.com SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

5924 N DIVISION

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] SPRAGUEUNION DISTRICT

1528 E. SPRAGUE AVE

Inspired by Nature; Infused by The Source

We’ll match a system to you and your budget! — FINANCING AVAILABLE — CARS • UTVS • TRUCK ACCESSORIES • CUSTOM FABRICATION

MON-FRI 9am - 6pm / SAT 10am - 5pm 509.893.9578 • soundsonwheelsus.com

SPOKANE VALLEY

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12410 E INDIANA AVE

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1.800.223.7612 • 10-6pm Mon-Sat SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

SPONSORED CONTENT

953 E 3RD AVE


Locally Owned Since 1976

Rentals Snowshoes

Skis Season Lease Apparel

Snowboards

Full Service Ski & Board Shop

Fastest Turn Around in the Inland Northwest (509) 534 - 4554 2925 S. Regal St. - Spokane, Wa SPOKANE [ SOUTH ]

2925 S REGAL ST

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

1303 N MONROE ST

Shop Local for the Holidays Partner

FOLLOW US

DOWNTOWN SPOKANE PARTNERSHIP

is dedicated to the creation of a dynamic, safe, vital, livable, and sustainable downtown as the basis of an economically healthy region.

he photo put the line that is is red A hours and the bottom contact info

DowntownSpokane.org

SPOKANE [ NORTH ] • SPOKANE VALLEY

A Timely Step Back to Childhood • Open: Tues - fri 12-6pm • Sat 12-5pm SPOKANE [ NORTH ] GARLAND DISTRICT

600 W GARLAND AVE

Tuesday-Saturday 11am-5pm & Sunday 12pm-5pm SPOKANE [ SOUTH ] PERRY DISTRICT

928 S PERRY ST

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HEALTH

Closer to Home You can buy equipment to bring your gym into your home — without the crowd For weeks this spring, local gyms closed and left fitness fanatics without a regular place to go stay in shape. And while many gyms have reopened with safety measures, your sweaty, muggy gym may not be the cleanest place to go. One could forgive you for staying away in the middle of a pandemic. But that doesn’t mean you must give up on your body and physical health. If you have some extra stimulus cash laying around, it shouldn’t be too hard to clear out some space in the living room and fill it with your own little home gym. Maybe get some weights, some resistance bands and an exercise bike. Look up some activities on the internet. The point is, it’s possible to maintain your fitness from the comfort of your own home. That way, you don’t have to worry about wiping down the machine before you use it. You don’t need to pray that the last person on the bench press wasn’t spraying COVID in the air with each hard-fought breath. Here’s where to start if you’re looking for some gym equipment to use at home:

SPOKANE EXERCISE EQUIPMENT

It can be hard to pick out an expensive piece of equipment for home exercise, like a rower or a treadmill, without feeling like you’re wasting your money. What if the equipment is low-quality and causes you to injure yourself, and you never use it again? What if it’s not the exercise that will help you meet your fitness goals? Instead of spending hours researching the right equipment online, talk to an expert at Spokane Exercise Equipment. Their sales staff is there to help you make these decisions so that you can feel comfortable, knowing your money will actually help you meet your goals. Get a free consultation at their showroom. 511 W. Main Ave, spokaneexercise.com, 624-8726

BETTER BODY FITNESS

From medicine balls to stairmasters, Better Body Fitness can bring the equipment you might see at the gym right into your home. It’s unlikely that Better Body won’t have the machine you’re looking for, and if they don’t, they will find it. They offer installation, delivery and service. Or, you can simply walk in and chat with the friendly staff — they even offer you a Tootsie Pop just for showing up. 165 S. Pine St., bbfitness.com, 252-9986

FORZA FITNESS NW

Forza Fitness NW will give you everything you need to set up a home or garage gym. The bench press here is particularly popular among serious weightlifters, and you can take your pick of free weights. But it’s not only strength training equipment that they sell. They also have plenty of cardio equipment, including treadmills and ellipticals. 8401 E. Sprague Ave, forzafitnessnw.net, 927-7587 ◆

BRING THE GYM HOME WITH THE HELP OF THESE STORES 42

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KIDS

Baby Talk

FRENCH TOAST MAMA & MINI

Blankets and onesies and bibs, oh my! First, real talk: Babies grow fast. Just when you feel like you’ve finally caught up on their wardrobe, their toes reach the end of their sleeper, and you’re back where you started. Truly, keeping a child dressed through all the stages of their growth can feel like a never-ending quest. Luckily, Spokane County is well equipped with stores ranging from consignment to boutique to support you in your caretaking efforts. Below you’ll find a list of options for baby apparel and other children’s items.

OTHER MOTHERS

It really does take a village to raise (and dress) a child. Other Mothers takes this community obligation seriously, offering affordable maternity, infant and children’s clothes, as well as other secondhand necessities like swings and play chairs. Plus, as your baby grows out of clothes, you can bring them back in for in-store credit toward the next size. Other Mothers is famous for their

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VOLUME 5

periodic Quarter Sales, where select items are marked way down to only 25 cents. Look out for these days on their Facebook page. 8701 N. Division St., 465-9499

ONCE UPON A CHILD

Another great option for gently used children’s clothes, Once Upon A Child carries newborn through size 16/18 youth. Brand selection rotates, and often includes discounted items from recognizable names like GAP, Old Navy and Justice. They also have furniture, shoes, books and games. Once Upon A Child offers cash on the spot in exchange for your unneeded children’s products. The North Division location is temporarily closed, but doors are open in the Valley. 14401 E. Sprague Ave., 927-3001

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CARTER'S

Carter’s has really stepped up to the plate on adapting its services for COVID shopping. The process is incredibly streamlined. All you have to do is go to their website, pick out the clothes that you want, and then choose between curbside pickup and delivery. Since they’re offering free shipping on orders over $35, this is a great option if you need several pieces for the coming months, or go in on an order with another family. Carter’s has a wide selection, organized into different age groups for infants, toddlers, and children. If you do choose to pick up your items, there’s a location in the Valley Mall. 14700 E Indiana Ave, 891-0473; NorthTown Mall, 4727 N Division St. Suite 101 B., 489-6822 ◆


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Dear 157 members who shopped at Veda Lux Boutique during COVID-19, you’re bringing business back with every pair of gemstone earrings. STCU and The Inlander are teaming up to support local businesses during COVID-19. To learn more about helping and finding great deals at local shops, go to btb.inlander.com.


VISUAL ARTS

Western Frontier Discover local community of Western artists working in and around Coeur d’Alene BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

T Abigail Gutting’s Best of the West

hink Western art and you think cowboys on horseback amidst landscapes of big sky, endless grasslands and the grandest of mountain ranges. Native Americans as they were, pre-westward expansion and conquest. And hardscrabble scenes from cattle ranching and prospecting of humans — mostly men — braving the elements. “The [Western] genre focuses on the history of the United States and its movement west from Lewis & Clark to the construction of the railroads and the overall migration of Americans seeking hope, opportunity and a better life created by their own hard work,” says Buddy Le, who owns Coeur d’Alene Galleries with wife Shawny Le, and husband-and-wife team Ron and Tori Nicklas. Located amid several decidedly non-Western galleries downtown, Coeur d’Alene Galleries dates to the mid-80s when Bob Drummond, art dealer and co-founder of the highly successful Coeur d’Alene Art Auction, established the gallery inside the Coeur d’Alene Resort. Now on Sherman Avenue, Coeur d’Alene Galleries represents more than 180 historical and contemporary Western artists, including a small, tight-knit community who call North Idaho home. “It’s like a little family,” says artist Tobias E. Sauer, who goes by Toby. Locals include Bob Krogle, Terry Lee, C. Michael Dudash, Kyle Paliotto, Abigail Gutting, Joe Kronenberg, and George Carlson, some of them less well known locally than elsewhere in Montana, Wyoming, Colorado and other states that support a vast network of Western artists, galleries, museums, art shows and enthusiastic Western art collectors. For example, Kronenberg, whom Sauer credits with mentoring him, and Dudash are two of the 22 artists inducted into the prestigious Russell Skull Society, named for famed Western artist Charles M. Russell. On the other hand, George Carlson, who lives in Harrison, is internationally recognized, including a rare one-man show at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History and accolades from every heavy hitter in the world of Western art. ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 19, 2020 INLANDER 25


CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS “WESTERN FRONTIER,” CONTINUED... The sense of community among Western artists, says Gutting, “ties into an overarching philosophy that is one of the hallmarks of the American West.” They’re neighborly, she says, not just locally, but nationally. Gutting, who has been featured in both Southwest Art and Western Art and Architecture magazine, began her art career early alongside her mother, artist Susan Gutting. Her work reflects an affinity for wildlife, especially horses.

L

ike Gutting, Sauer also learned about art from his mother, and also has an affinity for animals, as well as the outdoors. A fifth-generation Montanan, he grew up hunting and hiking alongside his father. When it came time for college, Sauer initially pursued art. The emphasis on modernism and experimental painting techniques didn’t appeal to him, however, so with his degree in environmental science, he worked as a ranger in Yellowstone. And then the unexpected happened, inadvertently turning his attention back towards art. “In a nutshell, we had a [cattle] sale back home and a bull threw me in the air three or four times, stomped on me, broke my back and my leg so I had to have 4 surgeries over several years,” Sauer says. He had issues managing the pain, he adds, yet worked his way out of the dark place he’d gotten into by focusing on painting again. Some of what he’s been through puts recent setbacks due to COVID-19 in perspective. The C.M. Russell auction in March is his biggest show, Sauer says of the multimillion-dollar exhibition held for the past 52 years in Great Falls, Montana, as part of Western Art Week. “I work for months getting ready for that and when

26 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020

that canceled — I mean, it canceled the week before — it was very scary and very disheartening.” Besides losing a large portion of the $1,000 entry fee, Sauer laments missed opportunities to network during dozens of simultaneous events held during Western Art Week, which was first rescheduled for September, then scuttled until 2021. Working out of his Hayden studio, Sauer is optimistic about next year and is looking to online sales as a potential bright spot.

L

e, whose gallery hosted its annual Miniatures by the Lake Show this fall, agrees. “Like many industries, the Western art market is in unprecedented waters,” Le says. “Overall, there’s still a high demand for quality collectible works by historical artists (deceased), and contemporary (living) artists who are priced fairly.” And although the market is driven by premier galleries and big shows like the Russell — as the Montana auction is known — and the Prix de West at the National Cowboy Hall of Fame, online platforms are a large part of the business, Le says, including social media and gallery websites as well as online bidding platforms. Le’s current optimism is driven by online sales elsewhere. “Coeur d’Alene Art Auction and Scottsdale Art Auction both posted over $10 million in sales, and

Formidable by Tobias Sauer Christie’s, Bonhams and Heritage have all had successful American Western auctions this year,” Le says. “Collectors are more confident than ever to purchase artwork online, and we’ve built a strong reputation of integrity, value and quality art, so people don’t hesitate to buy from us online.” That bodes well for artists like Sauer and Gutting, who despite feeling connected to the larger community of Western artists recognize that in the end, what they do is a solitary endeavor. “I just keep plugging away,” says Sauer. “Just keep painting.” n


CULTURE | DIGEST

BURIED IN TIME If you even casually follow the latest discoveries being made at ancient Egyptian archaeological sites, including big ones this month, some revelations of Netflix’s new documentary Secrets of the Saqqara Tomb won’t be totally new. Even so, the film showcasing an Egyptian team working at the Saqqara necropolis outside Cairo has plenty to offer. Cameras closely follow as the experts decrypt fragmented hieroglyphs and bones inside one family’s tomb, giving an up-close look each time something new emerges from the sand. Where the film truly shines, however, is through the raw, emotional connections made by the archaeologists as they work to uncover the life stories of their ancestors, lying untouched and unknown for thousands of years. (CHEY SCOTT)

Five Stages of Cats Adjusting To Work From Home

F

BY WILSON CRISCIONE

irst came denial. My two cats, Walter and Lola, couldn’t believe I kept staying home all week. I’ve been home before on weekdays, but because I’m sick and in bed or on the couch. That’s not so different from a weekend, as far as my cats can tell. This was different. Every day, I got out of bed, took a shower, sat at the dinner table and stared at a screen. My cats didn’t understand. They didn’t want to. So they ignored me. They curled up in their favorite spots and pretended I wasn’t there. This went on for weeks. Then they got angry. I was always there, and wouldn’t stop doing stuff that annoyed them, like my constant pacing while talk-

THE BUZZ BIN

THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music hits online and in stores Nov. 20. To wit: JIMMY BUFFETT, Songs You Don’t Know By Heart. A live home-recorded set of fan requests. NICK CAVE, Idiot Prayer: Nick Cave Alone at Alexandra Palace. Cave, solo at the piano, and mesmerizing. THE DIRTY KNOBS, Wreckless Abandon. Can’t wait to hear this new quartet led by guitar ace Mike Campbell of Tom Petty’s Heartbreakers. Campbell is a monster musician. (DAN NAILEN)

ing into that thing in my ear. I could feel their irritation: Won’t I just shut up? Who am I talking to all day? And wait — why wasn’t I giving them attention? The cats rebelled, a two-pronged attack. Lola would puke on the rug as much as possible. Walter would jump onto my computer table, knock over whatever was in his way, and start rubbing his face against the edge of the screen until I’d finally acknowledge his existence. Then they had another realization, and it was a game changer. If I’m going to be home at all hours, why don’t I feed them more? Thus the third stage: Begging. For what felt like hours, they sat next to their food bowls, stared at me and waited. If I made any motion, they’d scream a warning that all hell would break loose if they weren’t fed. (Keep in mind, these cats are, uh, heavy.) If I went into another room, they’d follow me, scream again, and then run back to their food bowls in a desperate attempt to lure me back. Eventually, an automatic feeder relieved some pressure because it meant that if they’re hungry, they don’t blame me. They blame the robot feeder. At this stage, decompression, all of us took a deep breath and thought, you know what? Maybe this can be something like normal. And there it was. Acceptance. More than six months in, my cats figured this is probably going to last awhile. And they enjoyed the perks — taking turns on my lap when they feel like cuddling, bringing their toy over and convincing me to play with them. It’s not a bad life! And I guess I like having them around, too. After all — in the midst of a deadly pandemic forcing me to work from home and avoid friends and family — I do enjoy the company. n

A TIMELY FASHION You’ve probably run across Sarah Cooper in the past few months on your social media. Her TikTok videos lip-syncing to Donald Trump speeches and rants have made her a pandemic star, so much so that the comedian landed a Netflix special dotted by guest appearances from the likes of Helen Mirren, Megan Thee Stallion and (arguably funniest of them all) Jon Hamm doing his version of the My Pillow guy. Sarah Cooper: Everything’s Fine is a sketch show fully formed and produced in the COVID age. It’s worth an hour of your time for sure, and while some of the jokes (hopefully) won’t still resonate in a few years, Cooper’s talent just might. (DAN NAILEN)

MOVIN’ ON UP Circling Raven Golf Club made the ranks of the country’s best casino golf courses, rising to No. 19 this year, the third straight season the folks at GolfWeek have recognized the course owned by the Coeur d’Alene Tribe in Worley, Idaho. The Kalispel Tribe’s Kalispel Golf & Country Club course in North Spokane also made the list, landing at No. 31. (DAN NAILEN)

APOCALYPSE WHEN I tore through Rumaan Alam’s new novel Leave the World Behind in just a couple sittings, getting sucked into its beautifully written domestic drama as it’s gradually overwhelmed by an unshakeable sense of foreboding. It begins simply, with an upper-middle class family heading to an isolated country home for a week of relaxation. But then there’s a knock on the door in the middle of night: It’s the house’s owners, fleeing from a freak blackout that seems to have blanketed the East Coast, and their home has inexplicably avoided the power outage. Things get weirder from there, and Alam’s chamber piece develops into an allegory about race and class in America, and of human nature cracking under the pressure of impending calamity. (NATHAN WEINBENDER)

NOVEMBER 19, 2020 INLANDER 27


PROFILE

INDIAN IMMERSION As Inland Curry’s new owner, India native Noreen Hiskey hopes to introduce diners to the rich diversity of her culture and cuisine BY CHEY SCOTT

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hen Noreen Hiskey moved to the Spokane area from India nearly a decade ago, she remembers being perplexed by two details of the food culture in her new home city. First, she noticed the lack of regional diversity in the Inland Northwest’s Indian restaurants, which mostly serve northern Indian cuisine. She also realized that many Americans share a culturally homogenized idea of the sauce-based Indian dishes commonly referred to as curries. “When people would say ‘I love curry,’ I would say, ‘Oh, which one?’” Hiskey says. “Because to me there are, like, thousands of curries and different flavors. It’s not just one flavor, but they were talking about what is

Inland Curry’s beef kofta with cumin rice. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

28 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020

sold here as curry powder. It’s confusing, because we never use curry powder in India. I came to realize that people referred to curry very differently than we would in India.” Hiskey is from Pune, India, near the country’s western coast, a few hours southeast of Mumbai. She emigrated to the U.S. after marrying her husband, who’s from the Pacific Northwest. This summer, Hiskey took over ownership of the takeout-based restaurant Inland Curry after its founder Daniel Todd left the area. Hiskey learned to cook mostly from her mother, who regularly prepared a diverse array of food from around the world for

the family’s meals. “We were always in the kitchen helping out all the time,” Hiskey recalls. “We literally ate Chinese food one day, Indian food the next, and Middle Eastern and Greek — a ton of different cuisines. That was our everyday life. We were exposed to a lot of different cuisines, and I still eat that way.” More recently, Hiskey has shared her food with the community via pop-up dinners hosted at other local restaurants. As the new owner and chef of Inland Curry, which cooks to fill pre-orders for pickup each Thursday at Feast World Kitchen in downtown Spokane, Hiskey has made it her mis-


sion to introduce more local diners to the diverse and flavorful food of her heritage. She also seeks to educate residents of the region about India’s rich culinary traditions, and to that end writes detailed descriptions of each dish for her weekly menus, released each Monday. She’s also happy to have a conversation with anyone curious about Indian cuisine. “I’ve noticed the Indian restaurants here are very stagnant and have generic menus, so what I’m trying to do is represent more regional Indian cuisines, because there is so much diversity,” Hiskey says. “Every state you go, they speak a different language, eat different food — the cuisines are so drastically different. Which is why every week I try to pick one area and do a menu based on that area.” Northern India, for example, is the origin of several dishes more familiar to Western diners like butter chicken, chicken tikka masala and naan bread, Hiskey explains. Southern Indian dishes, meanwhile, have more coconut oil in them and are lightly spiced at the end of cooking. “So South Indian is more rice based and more vegetable based, and they use different vegetables that are available and grown there. It’s also more seafood based,” she says. Earlier this month, Hiskey put together a menu of dishes from the state of Tamil Nadu, located at the southern tip of India. Options include chicken salna, a popular street food consisting of tender chicken pieces in a curry-like sauce of coconut and fennel seed masala (masala means a blend of spices). The other featured entree that week was channa kurma, a chickpea and potato spiced stew, or kurma, that’s finished with a fresh coconut and cashew paste. She also prepared sides of lemon rice, seasoned with spices, curry leaves and lemon juice, and a vegetarian lentil-based stew called sambhar, featuring a tangy, tamarind broth. To go with the curry and stews, Hiskey made a layered flat bread called kerala parotta “that’s flaky and perfect for scooping up curries.” “A lot of customers who’ve been to India or have friends in the south [of India] and they’ve experienced those dishes not available in Spokane, they really enjoy those dishes,” she says. In her home state of Maharashtra in westcentral India, the cuisine is often much spicier than other regions.

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here most non-Indian diners get hung up on the widely varied regional and cultural history of India’s food is, as Hiskey noticed, the use of the word “curry” to describe all sauce or gravy-based dishes, usually richly spiced and often served with rice or bread to soak up the sauce. The chef recently took to Inland Curry’s Instagram feed to explain the historical context of how curry became the common term for a style of dish that is actually quite distinct depending on the region, and even between separate households. One reason these sauces and stews

are so common in Indian cuisine, Hiskey says, is because people historically cooked over open fires, where temperature was harder to control compared to modern gas stoves. “Curry was the term coined by colonizers — in the case of India, the British — derived from the Tamil word kari, which means sauce, frankly because they were too lazy to learn the real names of dishes of a cuisine that was foreign to them,” she explains. “It’s essentially a madeup word that reduces the complexity of Indian cuisine.” Despite this, Hiskey says she decided to keep the name Inland Curry because of the synonymous use of the word curry to refer to so many traditional Indian dishes, and so that she can continue to educate diners.

Inland Curry owner Noreen Hiskey.

NOVEMBER 13TH - 28TH

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“By introducing people to the food, and when they fall in love with it, they learn more about the culture and ask questions,” she notes. “You tend to open up a lot more through food.” Some of her most loyal customers order every week, no matter what’s on the menu. Hiskey typically prepares two meat-based entrees and at least one vegan or vegetarian dish, along with a couple of sides and one dessert. Customers can order the main dishes a la carte, or in individually portioned combo meals. For now, Hiskey says cooking once a week is a good fit for her schedule; she has a 2-year-old daughter and also runs a successful food photography business and cooking blog called Picture the Recipe. Eventually she’d like to transition to operating a restaurant full time. “I would really like to be doing cooking classes and more educational-based stuff and also invite other chefs and people who have expertise to do that,” she says. Inland Curry hosted its first guest chef under Hiskey last week, when Filipino and vegan chef Jamie Aquino offered a meal of all plant-based foods. “One of the things I really liked about what Dan was doing was the international dinner series, and one of the things he made me promise him was to keep doing those to introduce more people and culture and cuisine to Spokane,” she says. “I want to do that more.” n cheys@inlander.com More at inlandcurry.com, noreenhiskey.com and picturetherecipe.com.

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NOVEMBER 19, 2020 INLANDER 29


FOOD | TO GO BOX

Lockdown, Round 2 Restaurants, bars in Washington state can now only serve takeout or seat small parties outdoors BY CHEY SCOTT

30 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020

Takeout and outdoor dining are the only options until Dec. 14.

D

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

uring a rare Sunday morning press conference, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee announced a new set of restrictions set to last for the next four weeks in an attempt to slow alarming recent increases in COVID-19 cases statewide. The measures include stricter prohibitions on public gatherings in restaurants and bars. Starting Wednesday, Nov. 18, and lasting through at least Dec. 14, establishments can only serve food or drinks via takeout, or can only seat parties of five or less from the same household at outdoor dining areas.


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The rules come at an already uncertain time for restaurants, as cold weather has curtailed the outdoor dining that helped sustain business under Washington’s previous limits, including seating capacity reduced to 50 percent and an 11 pm alcohol service cutoff. Inslee noted Sunday that statewide spikes in COVID-19 cases — more than 2,000 a day recently, far surpassing numbers at the pandemic’s onset — are mostly linked to people hosting social gatherings in their homes or other private spaces. “And it means, unfortunately, the time has come to reinstate restrictions on activities statewide to preserve the public’s well-being, and to save lives,” Inslee said. “These were very difficult decisions that have very real consequences to people’s livelihoods. I recognize that and don’t take those impacts lightly, but we must act now and act quickly to slow the spread of this disease.” Details on financial relief packages for restaurants and other industries most affected by the new restrictions were still forthcoming early in the week. Inslee noted that $50 million in state funds were being set aside for those efforts, and that there is no risk of state unemployment benefits running out.

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When planning your year-end giving, please consider a donation to Providence Health Care Foundation. Your gift is an investment in the health of our community. As we continue to battle the COVID-19 pandemic, frontline caregivers face incredible strains as they assist patients who are already struggling with poverty, homelessness and mental illness. Your support will help our local Providence hospitals sustain the communitywide response needed to fight the virus and continue our legacy of compassionate service. Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center | Providence Holy Family Hospital | Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital Providence Mount Carmel Hospital | St. Luke’s Rehabilitation Institute | Providence St. Joseph’s Hospital

NOVEMBER 19, 2020 INLANDER 31


dining • shopping • culture Businesses are working hard to serve customers and stay safe: Support them and you support our region’s recovery.

limiting large orders, Lewis says Appleway’s delivery service is staying busy, especially around major holidays. Mother’s Day orders exceeded his “cautious” estimates to the point that Appleway had difficulty keeping pace with demand. In addition, many customers have come to think of sending flowers as an everyday gesture of consideration. They’re ordering bouquets for their friends, family and workmates just as a simple but much-needed pick-me-up. “Right now, a lot of people are feeling shut in,” he says. “It’s been shown that flowers elevate your mood, so it’s a nice way to brighten their space with something different and lift someone’s spirits.” And because Appleway has been operating for almost as long as Sunset Florist (since 1952, if you’re counting), they’ve felt the support of their longtime regular clientele throughout this uncertain period. As the holiday season approaches, Lewis is hopeful that new or occasional customers will rediscover the joy of sending and receiving flowers, too. “So far, I’ve been able to get some really beautiful fall-colored flowers, so we should be able to create lots of

SUNSET FLORIST & GREENHOUSE FLORAL MANAGER TAMMY GILL, LEFT, AND OFFICE MANAGER ASTRID ZARAZUA

New Arrangements Flowers are one of the most universal ways for us to commemorate special occasions. It’s hard to imagine birthdays, weddings or graduations without a festive tabletop bouquet or a stunning floral arrangement. But as COVID-19 has limited our ability to gather as often or in such numbers as we used to, our reasons for sending flowers — and the ways they’re sent — have changed, too. Area businesses like Sunset Florist and Greenhouse on top of Sunset Hill have been mindful of those changes and worked hard to accommodate them. “Our biggest adaptation has really been our deliveries,” says Astrid Zarazua, office manager at Sunset Florist. “We make sure to wipe down all our vases when they go out. Our driver obviously wears her mask and it’s no-contact, so we have to drop the arrangement off, then take a few steps back to see if someone comes to the door.” As much as customers have appreciated those precautions, she also notes that they can be difficult for a local business that has prided itself on personalized service since 1945. “We’re really a face-to-face kind of company, and be-

cause of COVID, we’ve had to really put a distance on that.” The flip side of pandemic-oriented practices like social distancing and touchless payments is that they’ve encouraged small businesses to experiment with new technologies. Sunset Florist has been using a specialized third-party ordering platform called Lovingly for quite a while, but different modes of doing business gave rise to new and useful features on that platform. “There’s now a QR code that we scan, and it sends a message to the recipient and the sender that the order was delivered and is waiting,” Zarazua says. “I’ve actually enjoyed that because it helps speed up some of the process, and the senders know exactly when their arrangement was dropped off.” In Spokane Valley, Appleway Florist and Greenhouse has had similar experiences. Like most florists, they’ve used online ordering systems for a long time, but now they’re doing more contactless payments. Owner Monty Lewis also plans to use Facebook Live to showcase their autumn and Christmas gift items. Although high-attendance formal events are on hold,

BACK TO BUSINESS PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS

32 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020

SPONSORED CONTENT

beautiful centerpieces for those that would like them,” he says. Besides creative, eye-catching centerpieces, there are plenty of other arrangement options to suit every budget. “I always say that flowers are like vitamin F. It’s not something you ingest, but it is something that elevates your mood. I think a little vitamin F would be good for everyone right about now.” ◆ You can visit Sunset Florist and Greenhouse at 1606 S. Assembly St. or online at sunsetflorist.net. You can also call them at 747-2101 with inquiries and orders. Appleway Florist is located at 11006 E. Sprague Ave. They can be reached online at applewayflorist.com or by calling 924-5050.


ACCENT FIREPLACE + SPAS HOME | NORTH SPOKANE Accent is a leisure products company specializing in fireplaces, hot tubs and grills. Accent provides elegant, high-quality products that help people relax, step away from work, come closer to friends and family, and enjoy life. Our goal is to provide customers with the highest quality in heating and spa solutions. With over 30 years of experience, we understand the importance of customer service. We guarantee our products and services, and we offer one-of-a-kind leisure options tailored to fit our customers’ needs and desires. 1622 N. Division St., 3258800, accentspokane.com

HOMESTEAD BIRKENSTOCK APPAREL | NORTHTOWN MALL Whether you have tired, achy feet or you just want comfortable, healthy footwear, Homestead Birkenstock is the place to shop. Let our expert sales team guide you to the correct size, fit and style to meet your footwear and fashion needs. In addition to Birkenstock, you will be pleased with our selection of Blundstone, Dansko, Taos, Klog, Haflinger, Keen and Merrell. We have been locally owned for 30 years, and we have new owners as of July, Vic and Twilla Ford, who own the Finan McDonald store in CDA. While following state reopening guidelines, we are only allowed five customers in our store at a time. You will need to bring your own socks, but we have nylon footies if you forget. 4750 N. Division St., 482-4515, instagram.com/ homesteadbirkenstock

NICKS HANDMADE BOOTS APPAREL | SPOKANE VALLEY In 1964, Nicks Boots began the tradition of expertly making the best handmade boots on the market. After 50 years, Nicks is still located in Spokane, continuing on that same tradition. Nicks is offering local shipping to limit exposure and store traffic. 6510 E. Sprague Ave., 800-824-2685, nicksboots. com

REYNOLDS CUSTOM KREATIONS ANTIQUE/VINTAGE | DEER PARK Reynolds Custom Kreations is unique as we offer custom, “one of kind” home decor. We take old thrown-out furniture, using it as a blank canvas, and painting something unique and tasteful, using all sorts of different

design styles that will be the showstopper and conversation-starter piece in any home! We also offer Clay Base Chalk Paint by “Debi’s Design Diary DIY Paint” for those people who like to paint themselves as a hobby. And we also offer an amazing paint brush line from Paint Pixie, all natural brushes made in Italy, and transfers from “Hokus Pokus” to apply to your projects. We are a brand-new small business, and our goal is to become a “DIY Headquarters.” 106 E. Crawford St., 724-3114, reynoldscustomkreations.com

SARAH HAMILTON FACE MED SPA | LIBERTY LAKE Sarah Hamilton FACE is in the top 1% of cosmetic injectable practices in the nation and has been voted the #1 Med Spa by the Inlander Readers Poll three years in a row. Sarah Hamilton FACE specializes in cosmetic injectables, laser treatments, microneedling, PRP and PRF, facials, and medical-grade sk-

incare. Here’s what you can expect with our enhanced safety measures: already-stringent sanitation protocol; patient appointments will be thoughtfully spaced; providers and staff will be wearing masks; screening of all patients and staff who enter our office. (We ask that you do not bring additional people, including family and children.) 1334 N. Whitman Ln., Suite #210, 210-0228, sarahhamiltonface.com

WINDFALL HOME/APPAREL | AIRWAY HEIGHTS A one-of-a-kind retail experience you’ll only find at Northern Quest. Shop all of your favorite home, outdoor and jewelry brands in a uniquely modern space. And use your Camas Rewards card to redeem points and comps for merchandise or earn points for a windfall of future fun. 100 N. Hayford Rd. (inside Northern Quest Resort & Casino), 481-4900, windfallnq.com

BE PART OF THE SOLUTION With the news over the weekend of new restrictions in the state of Washington, many businesses in Spokane County are struggling to adjust to the changes that will be in place through Dec. 14. For restaurants, the biggest one is no indoor dining, meaning they will have to rely in large part on takeout sales. Many local restaurants have spent the past eight months dialing in their takeout chops, so they are ready. But they need you, Spokane-area diner, to step up even more than before. Here are some ways you can pitch in: • Buy takeout meals regularly. • Buy gift cards now for use after the restrictions end. • Bundle up and, if offered by the restaurant, eat outdoors.

Local shops will be challenged, too, as their in-store capacity will be limited to 25 percent of normal. Again, our local entrepreneurs and our region’s economic future are counting on you to come through. This will take some effort, but it’s vital; here are some tips: • Don’t wait until the last minute — shop early. • Plan your visits for less busy times of

day or days of the week. • When possible, take advantage of local shops’ online options; some even offer curbside pickup.

Fresh sheet deals • specials • updates BEYOND BEADS NORTH SPOKANE [ NORTH ] We Have 14 different Grab Bags for $25 each (a $65-$75 value) until they’re gone. 7452 North Division Street

WILLIAM GRANT GALLERY AND FRAMING SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] Taking orders now for the holiday season. 1188 West Summit Parkway

TEDDI JOELLE SPOKANE [ SOUTH ] Sign up for our newsletter via our website to receive 10% off your first order. 4122 East Pratt Avenue

THE ARC OF SPOKANE THRIFT STORE SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] Senior/Military get 50% off 3 tag colors with ID every Monday. One tag color is only $0.99 every Monday. Saturdays 4 tag colors are 50% off. 808 North Ruby Street

ROSE & BLOSSOM SPOKANE VALLEY Receive $12 off delivery on orders over $75. Use code: Inlander 219 N. Pines Rd

Wear a mask. Stay six feet apart. Don’t gather indoors. It’s the same advice as ever, but following it is more urgent today as COVID caseloads are spiking and our health care system is struggling to keep up. The best way to get stores back open is for all of us to be a part of flattening the curve. “This is not forever, but for now,” write Alisha Benson, CEO of Greater Spokane Incorporated, and Michelle Hege, GSI’s Board Chair. “The current spike in Covid-19 cases is largely the result of private social gatherings, and our businesses are paying the price. The fastest path back to having more businesses open is for us to work together to reduce the spread.” ◆

ABOUT Back to business • These weekly pages are part of a local marketing effort in support of the hospitality

sector brought to you by leading institutions and businesses to help promote the Spokane County economy, supported in part by Cares Act funding. With the goal of balancing commerce and public safety, you can follow along here in the Inlander, and via the links below, as local restaurants, shops and more share their stories and invite your support.

BEYOUTIFUL BATH BOMBS & MORE SPOKANE [ NORTH ] Purchase any 4 Beyoutiful brand items and get 1 free (in-store only). Use code “2020” on our website and receive 20% off (online only). 4750 North Division Street

LOCALS CULTURE HOUSE SPOKANE VALLEY Our Dank Glass Deals section offers weekly rotating products at a great discounted price. 20% off everything in store after 4:20 pm on Fridays! 9616 East Sprague Avenue

FRESH SHEET CONTINUES ON THE NEXT PAGE

more to come • Through the end of the year, watch

the Inlander for special Back To Business guides, along with special editorial sections, sharing more recovery stories and community business features.

Safe business practice resources KindnessNotCovid.org • Financial resources for businesses InlandBizStrong.org

NOVEMBER 19, 2020 INLANDER 33


Fresh sheet deals • specials • updates DAVENPORT HOME STORE

BLOSSOM'S ANTIQUES

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] Open and ready to serve you. 10 South Post Street

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] 10% all fall decor and jewelry. 2415 N monroe

HONEST IN IVORY BRIDAL SHOP

BELIEVE BRIDE

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] Honest in Ivory now has multiple shopping appointment options, including private appointments, after-hours appointments and virtual shopping. 1003 East Trent Ave

SPOKANE VALLEY “Believe in Love” Yearly Sale Event: Coming in November 306 South Pines Road

APPLEWAY FLORIST & GREENHOUSE SPOKANE VALLEY Help us celebrate 68 years as a local family business. 15% all gift decor and ornaments thru Dec. 6. 11006 EAST SPRAGUE

RAIL CREEK FURNITURE CO. SPOKANE [ EAST ] Annual Autumn sale going on now. Many items in stock and ready to go. 1801 East Sprague Avenue

THE GREAT PNW SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] Get a limited edition tee delivered right to your door every month for only $14.99 with our Upper Left Club membership. thegreatpnw.com

CBDIFFERENT SPOKANE VALLEY Daily deals 25% off select items. 9405 East Sprague Avenue

CLIFF CANNON FOODS SPOKANE [ SOUTH ] Automatic 25% off on all products on hendersondip.com. Quantity pricing. Free shipping on orders over $35. 3 Flavor Variety Pack available online. hendersondip.com

ADAM & EVE SPOKANE [ NORTH ] 15% off any one regularly priced item in our Spokane or Coeur d’Alene Adam & Eve locations. 3609 N Division St A

OVER THE MOON RELICS LLC SPOKANE [ NORTH ] We just received the latest and greatest issued series of M2, Greenlight, and M2 Mijo Exclusive. Stop in and check out the new releases. 604 W Garland Ave

ADELAIDE CO. FLORAL SPOKANE [ SOUTH ] Beautiful fall colored Thanksgiving blooms available now for pre-order. Enjoy free delivery to the greater Spokane/CDA area. 3016 East 5th Avenue

PAINTING WITH A TWIST SPOKANE VALLEY “LIVE” Virtual Events, via ZOOM, for groups. Twist at Home kits for “me-time,” family night or party. 11703 East Sprague Avenue

AMEND MUSIC CENTER SPOKANE [ SOUTH ] Now offering great prices on ukuleles as well as a huge selection of holiday music, music books and gift items. 1305 W. 14th Ave.

THE SALVATION ARMY THRIFT STORE SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] Week tag sale color: Mon-Wed 50% off, Thurs-Sat 75% off. Military: 20% daily with ID. Seniors: 20% Wed. Students: 20% Sat. 2020 N Divsion

THE SOURCE CBD SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] We are offering phone consultations, no appointment needed. All questions, any question. 953 East 3rd Avenue

OUTDOORS, BUT STILL DOWNTOWN

Downtown Spokane is the region’s biggest holiday destination, and along with its winning collection of shops and restaurants, there are plenty of activities to keep everyone in the family engaged. There are health accommodations being made all over downtown, but many of the activities are happening outside. “We’re doing everything we can to offer a traditional holiday experience,” says Liz Hooker, marketing and programming director for the Downtown Spokane Partnership. “There will be lots to see.” The vintage Crescent holiday displays in the windows of the Davenport Grand Hotel are back, starting Nov. 28. Years ago, these displays were the highlight of every Christmas season, showing up in the windows of the old Crescent department store. The Downtown Spokane Partnership brought them back, allowing new generations to see what their parents and grandparents enjoyed when they were kids. The traditional horse-drawn carriage rides will also continue, sponsored by Wheatland Bank, but by reservation this year. The rides start Nov. 27 and run through Christmas Eve, with safety precautions like plexiglass dividers and capacity limits. (Visit downtownspokane.org for details.) Riverfront Park is a great place to get outside that’s exactly in the middle of it all. The beloved annual Christmas tree will be lit up at the park’s entrance, but with no big kickoff event to keep the crowds down. “We’re going to replace that large gathering with a holiday tree walk,” says Amy Lindsey, programming and marketing manager for Riverfront Park. “We will have approximately 40 fresh-cut trees, and they’ll be located throughout the park along a pathway that folks can self-navigate on their own. We’ll be partnering with local businesses in the community that each decorate their own tree.” Throughout December, the park will also be incorporating a special holiday light show into the Pavilion’s beautiful light blades. “The dynamic lights that we typically have on Friday, Saturday and Sunday will be available during the week,” says Lindsey. “We’re also planning on lighting up other areas of the park as well, like the Clock Tower and the Rotary Fountain.” The popular Numerica Ice Ribbon is opening soon, although the number of skaters will be limited to keep within current safety guidelines. And bring your mask. “We’re really trying to find creative ways to welcome people to the park safely and to continue offering the community these important activations that they love,” Lindsey says. “Luckily, we have 100 acres to work with.” ◆

MORE FRESH SHEET follow up-to-date info at btb.inlander.com 34 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020

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FOOD | OPENING

House Party A celebration of authentic Indian flavors await at the newly opened India House in Post Falls BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

I

f heaven had an aroma, it might be fenugreek: Warm, almost buttery, but also a little smoky and definitely sweet, a lot like maple syrup. It’s found in culinary regions from southern Europe across the Fertile Crescent to include parts of Asia, especially India, where the herbaceous and fragrant legume is both produced and consumed in high volume. And it’s just one of the many alluring spices featured in dishes at the new India House restaurant in Post Falls. Both methi malai ($15-$16) and its vegetarian counterpart, methi matar malai ($14) highlight the warmth of fenugreek, or methi in Hindi. Traditionally made with peas and a creamy sauce, these comforting dishes are based on home recipes highlighting the cuisine of northern India, according to India House chef-owner Deepika Dhawan. Dhawan opened India House with her husband, Manoj Kumar, this past summer serving both dine-in service and takeout. The couple have two other similar establishments in Moscow (Karma Indian Cuisine) and Wenatchee (India House), and originally hail from Port Townsend, Washington.

Post Falls’ new India House boasts an array of flavors. Start with an appetizer of paneer pakora ($6), traditional Indian fried cheese — they make theirs from scratch — or their version of vegetarian spring rolls ($7). Entrees are divided into several categories. Tandoor dishes like lamb boti kabob ($17) are typically marinated in yogurt, then cooked in a special clay oven utilizing very hot coals. India House also serves traditional dishes like tikka masala ($14-$16, depending on meat protein) and vegetarian alternatives like a veggie curry ($14), saag aloo with potatoes and spinach ($14), and tangy, curry-based tofu vindaloo ($14). Rice dishes are a meal unto themselves, from the hearty chicken biryani ($15) to tomato pulao, ($9) a Mumbai street food. “You can modify the curry and spices on your own demands,” says Dhawan, or even sub in coconut milk for

COURTESY OF INDIA HOUSE

a modest upcharge. Some of the restaurant’s entrees are the couple’s own recipes, says Dhawan, including the dish titled “nirvana” with a coconut-infused masala sauce ($14-$15). They also bake all of their breads ($2.50-$5.25) in house, from the aromatic naan flatbread cooked inside the tandoor oven to a leavened bread called bhatura, and paratha, cooked in a pan. The kashmiri naan stuffed with raisins and nuts could easily make you rethink your morning muffin, and is also a sweet way to end a meal that may have you adding India House to your go-to list for excellent takeout. n India House • 704 Cecil Road, Post Falls • Open TueSun 11 am-9 pm • indiahouse.us • 208-981-0064

NOVEMBER 19, 2020 INLANDER 35


TRIBUTE

Premium Bond A look back at the late Sean Connery’s pioneering take on James Bond BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

Sean Connery was never more dapper than in From Russia With Love.

36 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020


W

hen Sir Sean Connery died recently at 90, most obituaries led with a single immutable fact: He was James Bond. Of course, were you to erase the Bond series from Connery’s filmography, he’d still have a pretty sterling résumé. He worked with legendary directors like Alfred Hitchcock (1964’s Marnie) and John Huston (1975’s The Man Who Would Be King), and was the stoic, steady hand in action hits like The Hunt for Red October (1990) and The Rock (1996). He appeared in cult favorites like Time Bandits (1981), Highlander (1986) and the truly batshit Zardoz (1974). He won an Oscar for his work as a renegade cop in Brian De Palma’s The Untouchables (1987). Oh, and he was Indiana Jones’ dad. But he may not have secured those roles if it weren’t for Bond, and to many, he is the James Bond: He originated the role and laid the groundwork that all subsequent 007s either followed or deliberately deviated from. Here’s a rundown of Connery’s seven appearances as 007, from the iconic to the forgettable.

DR. NO (1962)

THE MISSION: We’re introduced to cinema’s greatest secret agent, created by novelist Ian Fleming, as he travels to Jamaica to hunt for a fellow agent gone missing. Bond ends up in the metal hands of the devious Dr. No, a supervillain hoping to spark a war between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. at the behest of criminal enterprise S.P.E.C.T.R.E. (that’s Special Executive for Counterintelligence, Terrorism, Revenge and Extortion, in case you were wondering). THE THEME SONG: The Bond credits song hadn’t become a custom yet, but Monty Norman’s supercool Bond theme and its distinctive, surf-y guitar debuts. IS IT ANY GOOD? It’s a bit too talky and leisurely paced, and takes way too long to get to Dr. No himself. But what’s most fascinating nearly 60 years later is witnessing the origins of so many of the series’ signposts: the stylish opening credits, the gun barrel sequence, the exotic locales and the Bond girls. It’s rare enough for a franchise to last this long, but even rarer that scenes and images from the very first entry would still be traditions after all these decades.

FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE (1963)

THE MISSION: S.P.E.C.T.R.E. is back, and this time they’re trying to stop Bond from intercepting a Russian encryption device they want for themselves. THE THEME SONG: Here is the first true Bond opening titles sequence, with the oft-imitated imagery of the credits being projected on the bodies of gyrating dancers. IS IT ANY GOOD? A lot of Bond fans consider this the true peak of the series, and it’s certainly one of the best of the Connery joints. The great Robert Shaw is an imposing presence as the assassin Donald “Red” Grant — his famous fight with Bond aboard a train was even heavily referenced in 2015’s Spectre. Watching Russia 20-some Bond films later, it’s pretty clear why so many people would be swept up in this series.

GOLDFINGER (1964)

THE MISSION: The eccentric billionaire Auric Goldfinger has a plan to infiltrate Fort Knox and obliterate most of the world’s economy, thereby making him the world’s richest man by default. James Bond will have none of that.

Goldfinger is considered one of the best Bond flicks by fans, with good reason. THE THEME SONG: “Goldfinger” is one of the all-time great Bond songs, with Shirley Bassey’s powerhouse vocals and John Barry’s sultry horn section setting the bombastic standard for all title tunes to come. IS IT ANY GOOD? Here’s where the Bond formula as we know it really takes off. Goldfinger is tightly paced and filled with inventive action filmmaking, and it features a number of its most famous signposts — the gold-painted woman, the laser beam torture device, Pussy Galore, the killer bowler hat. It’s arguably the best of the Connery outings, and certainly in the upper echelon of the entire series.

THUNDERBALL (1965)

THE MISSION: Those pesky S.P.E.C.T.R.E. guys are at it again, and this time they’re holding some stolen nuclear warheads for a ransom. It ends with a fight to the death off the coast of the Bahamas, on a boat called the Disco Volante — so exotic! THE THEME SONG: Featuring Tom Jones at his Tom Jones-iest, “Thunderball” sums up the glorious excess and cornball machismo of its era. IS IT ANY GOOD? The quality takes a noticeable dip, as even apologists would admit. It’s also where the series’ campiness really takes hold, from Bond zipping about with a jetpack to having a showdown with a shark, a development that would inspire some of the sillier (and worst) Bond entries.

YOU ONLY LIVE TWICE (1967)

THE MISSION: American and Soviet astronauts have gone missing on separate intergalactic missions. So Bond goes to Japan to figure out what’s up, at one point trying to blend in by having his skin and hair dyed to look more Japanese. Yikes! We’re also officially introduced to legendary, cat-stroking Bond supervillain Ernst Blofeld, the mastermind behind S.P.E.C.T.R.E. THE THEME SONG: This features one of the better tunes from this era, sung by Nancy Sinatra. IS IT ANY GOOD? If this had been Connery’s Bond swan song as originally intended, it would have been an OK one (save for all the casual racism). It’s

worth a look for an aerial fight scene that’s equal parts silly and exciting, and all its martial arts, and for all the scenes and images that would be directly parodied in the first Austin Powers film. Weird fact: The screenplay was written by noted childrens’ novelist (and known racist) Roald Dahl.

DIAMONDS ARE FOREVER (1971)

THE MISSION: Bond gets groovy in Las Vegas on the hunt for some smuggled African diamonds, a plotline that’s pretty much forgotten when he discovers a selfcloning Blofeld is building a civilization-destroying laser beam. THE THEME SONG: The theme song attempts to recapture former glory as Shirley Bassey returns, and though it’s a perfectly good song, it’s second-tier compared to her work on Goldfinger. IS IT ANY GOOD? One of Connery’s worst Bond films. Save for a decent car chase on the Vegas Strip, this has almost none of the memorable action set pieces or outrageous villains (Blofeld’s henchmen look like they wandered over from an Allman Brothers show) we expect.

NEVER SAY NEVER AGAIN (1983)

THE MISSION: Connery’s return to the 007 game is a loose reworking of Thunderball, with S.P.E.C.T.R.E. back at it and playing around with nuclear warheads. Signs that it was made in the ’80s: Bond plays an arcade game and Bond girl Kim Basinger does aerobics. THE THEME SONG: Performed by Lani Hall, best known for her collaborations with Sergio Mendes and husband Herb Alpert, it’s a totally forgettable, syrupy ballad. IS IT ANY GOOD? Connery returned to his most definitive character after a 12-year hiatus in a film produced outside the auspices of original production company Eon. The movie is actually the result of a lawsuit between former Bond co-producers, and it’s still kinda fun, a winking throwback that’s also clearly throwing a side eye at the arthritic stylings of then-Bond Roger Moore. It’s a solid 20 minutes too long, but worth a look. n

NOVEMBER 19, 2020 INLANDER 37


LIVE, LOCAL AND TELEVISED

Liz Rognes enjoying a rare chance to perform thanks to Inland Sessions.

New KSPS series Inland Sessions showcases the region’s musicians through in-studio performances, conversations BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

A

s Washington heads into its ninth month of bans on live entertainment, musicians have had to find some workarounds. Livestreams and online concerts have become the norm for artists and audiences since spring, and a new series on the local public television station KSPS is adding to the ever-growing catalog of live local music that you can experience from your living room. Inland Sessions was designed as a showcase for local musical artists, and a standard episode features live instudio performances and interjections from the performers, talking about their backgrounds and telling stories in between songs. The series has been airing Monday nights since early October and is essentially a Spokane version of MTV Unplugged. “We were re-examining our role in the community and how to make public TV a more integral part of the community,” says Jim Zimmer, Inland Sessions’ executive producer. “We’ve done a lot of productions on visual artists, on craftspeople, on painters and sculptors. But musi-

38 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020

cians especially haven’t really gotten very much attention from us, [and] we knew that they needed this exposure and the support.” KSPS has partnered with the nonprofit Spokane Arts to launch Inland Sessions, which not only led Zimmer and his fellow producers to artists but supplied them with a budget so that performers can be paid. “This is an opportunity for us to support and encourage local artistic talent at a time when they are not able to perform in public,” Zimmer says. “There’s so much talent in this community, and unless you’re going out to events, you really don’t get a chance to be exposed to it.” The series has thus far been recorded in a large studio space so that social distancing measures could be put into place, and the crew has been limited to just a handful of people. Five half-hour episodes have aired, featuring the likes of blues guitarist Sammy Eubanks and folk-influenced singer-songwriters like Dario Ré and Karli Ingersoll, as well as a dual performance by violinist Mateusz Wolski and pianist Archie Chen.

The first Inland Sessions episode centered on the music of Nic Vigil, who is perhaps best known as the frontman of the popular Latin fusion band Milonga. Vigil performed by himself with just an accordion and an acoustic guitar, and in between he discussed his own musical journey, explaining why he gravitates toward genres and instruments he loves. When he left the studio after a threehour recording session, Vigil admits that he had no idea what the finished product would look like. “I ended up leaving and thinking, ‘Man, I didn’t do so good.’ I just was thinking I’d probably bombed,” he tells the Inlander. “But they did such a tremendous job of editing it, and I was really tickled when I saw it.” Liz Rognes, a singer-songwriter who also co-founded the program Girls Rock Lab, has also filmed an episode of Inland Sessions, and the production was the first time she had played for (albeit a small) group of people in ages. “I was so excited when I got the email from them, because I hadn’t had a chance to perform in months,” Rognes says. “I felt really honored to be asked to partici-


pate. It seemed like a great way to get to perform a little bit, and a good reason to practice some songs that I hadn’t really been getting to play.” Vigil, meanwhile, had had a bit more practice before his session, having played a handful of concerts over the summer in Idaho, where there are fewer restrictions on in-person gatherings. But even so, he says that there was something special about the exclusivity of the Inland Sessions roster, and he felt honored to be included. “I was blown away that I got to be included with such great talent,” Vigil says. “Once I started watching the series and saw Karli Ingersoll and Sammy Eubanks, and I was like, ‘Holy shit, I’m on the same ticket as these cats.’” Rognes hasn’t seen her episode yet — it’s scheduled to air Mon, Nov. 23 — but she has been watching the series for the last few weeks. “I have two kids who are extremely excited about the idea that their mom is going to be on TV,” Rognes says. “My six-year-old and I have been watching them pretty regularly on Monday night. So we do have a plan to watch it together.” It’s still unclear when in-person performances will become a reality again, with some experts estimating that stages could remain empty deep into 2021. In the meantime, Rognes sees series like Inland Sessions as the next best thing to actual gigs, not only because they’re pointing audiences in the direction of great art but because they can provide a platform for a diverse array of voices and styles. “Right now, we are so isolated,” Rognes says. “This is a time to be creating more opportunities like this, where we’re able to see performers and learn about what they do. This is an important moment where we can look at where we ought to be thinking about how to support local artists and local venues and local arts organizations.” n To see past episodes of Inland Sessions, visit video. ksps.org/show/inlandsessions.

+

Now on Inlander.com: National and international stories from the New York Times to go with the fresh, local news we deliver every day NOVEMBER 19, 2020 INLANDER 39


MATT HARDY PHOTO

OUTDOORS CATCHING VIRTUAL AIR

For a significant number of skihounds, winter kicks off with the arrival of a new Warren Miller movie full of stunning jumps, insanely beautiful landscapes and oh-so-much deep powder. Miller’s catalog is enough to get even non-skiers psyched for winter, and his company has continued making eye-popping ski films since his 2018 death. Typically, Spokanites could hit the Bing to catch the latest Warren Miller flick on tour. But this is 2020, so the new Future Retro film is premiering right in your home instead. Join the rest of the West Coast ski scene for the film’s live premiere Saturday night, a 2.5-hour broadcast that includes a pre-show and intermission. And you can watch it again for 48 hours after the live premiere, so you can take in enough snowy fun to really get revved for the season. — DAN NAILEN Warren Miller’s Future Retro • Sat, Nov. 21 at 7 pm • $30 • Online; details at warrenmiller.com/virtual-tour/west-coast

MORE EVENTS Visit Inlander.com for complete listings of local events.

40 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020

BENEFIT A RARE TREAT

Nothing’s been normal for the Spokane Symphony this year, and the most obvious sign is that the entire season was postponed until 2021. But our local orchestra is still up for a good time, including Thursday night as it hosts its annual gala as an hourlong virtual fundraiser to help make sure Spokane has a symphony on the other side of the pandemic. The 2020 gala includes several performances from symphony members as well as special guests Pink Martini. There are both silent and live auctions, and Music Director James Lowe will log in to fill in guests on what he thinks 2021 will look like for live performances. — DAN NAILEN Spokane Symphony Gala 2020 • Thu, Nov. 19 at 7 pm • $75-$150/ household • Online; details at event.gives/sso

VISUAL ART POCKET-SIZED GEMS

Gifts are going to be tough this year. Maybe you still want to support local businesses and creators, but you’re struggling with the prospect of spending an entire day (or three) combing small stores with your mask on and your hand sanitizer on constant standby. The Spokane Art School has the perfect solution. Like every year, they’re hosting their annual Ornament and Small Work Show. The gallery is open for limited, in-person viewing, and all of the pieces are available for purchase online. The collection features household Spokane names like Megan Perkins, known for her local landmark watercolors, and artisan tree ornaments from Alice Nelson and Kris Howell, among many other local treasures. — LAUREN GILMORE 2020 Ornament and Small Work Show • Through Dec. 19, open for in-person viewing Fri-Sat from 10 am-5 pm • Spokane Art School • 811 W. Garland Ave. • spokaneartschool.net


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The newest exhibit at the University of Idaho’s Prichard Art Gallery is a timely, and even eerie, examination of humans’ role in the age of machines. Exercises in Passivity by Seattle artist James Coupe explores the “shifting divide between human and computer tasks, and the consequent effects on what it means to be a human today.” Specifically, Coupe’s work homes in on the gig economy and the menial tasks performed by “micro-laborers” for Amazon’s Mechanical Turk, a remote crowdsourcing tool that pays workers mere cents for completing tasks that computers can’t accomplish (yet). Perhaps one of the most visually and philosophically striking elements is a large metal cage, titled “I am Not a Robot,” based on an Amazon patent to protect human workers from robots. The Prichard is open for in-person viewing with social distancing and face-covering requirements. — CHEY SCOTT

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I don’t think it’s a stretch to say we local music fans have missed going to shows, but one of the most uniquely Spokane experiences that’s been put on hold is stumbling into Baby Bar on a random night and catching a concert that you end up loving. You can sort of relive that experience with the beloved downtown bar’s ongoing series of virtual concerts, which continues this weekend with a performance by Eliza Johnson, better known as Eliza Catastrophe. Johnson’s brand of pop is distinctly witty and wry, filled with wordplay and jokes and disarming sentiment, and they’ll be bouncing around in your head for days. Check out her viral audition on American Idol and you’ll see for yourself. Check out more upcoming streams at the website below. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Eliza Catastrophe virtual concert • Sat, Nov. 21 at 8 pm • $5 • Online; details at babybarneatoburrito.veeps.com

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NOVEMBER 19, 2020 INLANDER 41


IN THE MIRROR I saw the glimmer of hope in you’re tear filled eyes hoping one last time you’d matter today. Hoping for one hand to offer you a life preserver as you drown. I saw that glimmer fade out as the day wore on and you’re worth to the world dissipated. I saw the cracks of you’re broken soul as you realize the day is over and you still don’t matter. I see you Empty and numb now a shell of someone that once cared. In the mirror I see the reflection of a broken woman wishing to matter.

I SAW YOU BARNES AND NOBLE CUTIE 11/10/20 i held the door for you and called you cute. now I’m kicking myself for not asking for your number. i may be a youngster but give me a chance. I dont go to the northtown mall often so, if you see this, write back? FOR ALL THE UNICORNS Re: ginger beard. Despite everything that’s happening right now I find myself, an outsider, ruminating on your post about the Unicorn. So much to unpack. Heaven forbid the Unicorn cyclist seek solace in the outdoors and endure an inane car side conversation only to be met with a mediocre published diatribe. One that attempts to whittle down her being to that of an ‘adorable, sweet, songbird Unicorn with a glistening, spiraling horn.’ I don’t blame you for feeling threatened as the modern Unicorn gains advanced education, independence, the vice presidency... I acknowledge your neolithic impulse to belittle the Unicorn, to peacock with faux flattery in a misguided attempt to make the Unicorn ‘sweet, adorable.’ Controllable. Small. If only the women and gender studies programs in the area would dissect your post. My god. (Please do). In truth Unicorns are strong, albeit mythical, capable creatures -- like the 2020 woman... SMILE Down by the Spokane River. Throwing rocks in the water. You smiled. Waded in. You turned to me and our eyes met. Something special happened that day. I hope you return to that spot again. I’ll wade in with you next time.

SOUND OFF

RIVER TRAIL HOTTIE I saw you on a trail by the river. We laughed about what I thought was something besides a rock. You watched me splash in to prove I was right; I was not. We shared a good laugh and you made me forget where I was going. I hope to see you there again someday, river trail hottie.

CHEERS BICYCLE CRASH ANGEL Thank you to Jeff for giving me a ride home on Halloween after I crashed my bicycle. I ended up with a broken clavicle, but it could have been a lot worse. Your assistance was greatly appreciated! MASK WEARERS Cheers to all of the people wearing masks because it’s a “rule.” Despite nearly everyone in public wearing a mask while out and about, there still seem to be some people that just don’t agree with the policy and so don’t wear one. While I doubt the efficacy of them myself due to the surge of cases across the area and others that have imposed the measure, I do so because some people think it’s a good idea, and it seems to make the public feel safer. To those who don’t want to abide by the temporary rule, why don’t you stay home instead? ... YOU WONDERFUL GROUP OF HUMANS To the staff at Spokane Resource Center; Thank you for all that you do. Each of you have your own daily challenges and your own struggles in this new pandemic world but you still show up every day, setting your own lives aside and setting out to help people and make a difference in as many lives as you can. You are appreciated, you are noticed, and above all you are valued. Without you our community would be a much dimmer place.

PERFECTION - OR PRETTY CLOSE TO IT! 4 years ago we met in the waiting room of Perfection Tires while we got our snow tires put on for the pending winter. You, tall gentleman - me, short lady. And regardless of what you tell all your friends, (and mine as well, now that I think of it,) YOU asked me for my phone number!! (Not vice versa.) That was the BEST thing that

is Amelia Clark (SRHD). She’s been in our community for a year and is facing multiple lawsuits, YIKES! The disinformation these women spread is as deadly as Covid-19. Please wear a mask, stay safe Spokane!

Spokane County. He was a self-important, egotistical, pampas ass! He was a “NONESSENTIAL” employee who deserved to get his sorry, loser self tossed to the curb! Glad you’re gone Booby Putz! ...

YES! PLEASE TAKE INSLEE WOW! I almost spit my coffee through my nose when I heard that Biden is thinking of Inslee for

“DON’T BE A KAREN” To the lady in my neighborhood below Franklin School. You made friends with my neighbor next door.

Let’s be More like Bellevue and LESS like Seattle before it’s too late!

could have ever happened to us, and now we’re celebrating our first year of marriage! (COVID-19 and double knee replacements be damned!) I love you so much, and I love being loved by you! We are blessed!

JEERS DEAR MADAM MAYOR Nadine -- You’ve made a grave mistake: Your recent statements supporting the firing of our County Health Director, Dr. Lutz, provide massive proof that his dismissal was nothing more than a sneaky, right-wing Republican political move. Is this coincidental with Trump’s election loss? No, this was planned and executed quite carefully. And as such, the upcoming Amelia Clark investigation is, by all means, a welcome and necessary procedure. ... Ms. Clark not only vilified a great man, but has also placed herself into a dark spotlight alongside your position. ... ENOUGH RIBBON CUTTINGS, BRONZER AND BS Spokane has the worst COVID-19 numbers in Washington State. Nadine, our feckless, ribbon cutting mayor, was caught lying (again) this week. For months, we’ve listened to her hollow support of beating Covid-19 in our community, while undermining our health care professionals. CMR made a rare after election appearance on KHQ- sporting an odd orange skin color, attempting to cast doubt on our election... yet she was re-elected. ICYMI- Cathy was found GUILTY OF CAMPAIGN FINANCE VIOLATIONS. The cherry on top of this mess

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

a job in Washington DC! If there is a God in Heaven and Trump doesn’t prevail THAT would single handily be the BEST news of this election! Sadly because of the Very left leaning Inlander the likelihood of this actually being printed is truly the snow ball in Hell chance. Another sad point is that Anyone that points out the fact (Please see the voting map) that other than Whitman county EVERY county east of the Cascades is RED! Of course one is Immediately painted as a Matt Shea supporter and Banished. That is because Spokane is changing with all the people FLEEING Utopia (SeattlePortland-California) to move here. WHY is that? How could you Possibly move to a place that you’ve Bad Mouthed for years? ... Let’s be More like Bellevue and LESS like Seattle before it’s too late! SPOKANE CAN’T PAY BILLS! WOW! Welcome to the club! The difference is the private individual can’t just raise someone else’s taxes to make up for their shortfall! With Covid cutting income for the City the do as I say NOT as we do City officials just raised property taxes by 1%. Well that isn’t exactly true. My property taxes assessment for next year went up 47%!!! My small company business revenue has gone down by at least 50%. And No I haven’t taken ANY City or Government hand outs! I’ve just struggled to make ends meet. Of course that would be Completely Lost on the tax and spend crowd at City Hall! ... GOOD RIDDANCE BOB LUTZ I don’t understand what the big love affair was with “Doctor” Bob Lutz by the people in

YOU TOO, LINDSEY. Jeers to 48% of the US electorate. Why is it the obstinate fervor one feels for a political candidate is directly related to the candidate’s incompetence and venality? n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS P D A A O L T H E G A O B I S F A S H A T T H O W S O W I E M O L E T S S E E W A T R A S A I N

A G O G

S H O E

I O T R D A M I S H I T

N O L A N S

T I N S O S T C D H U M O D P A R A L I N N S E N S O Y R E Y O U O O P O T D O N N I A N A I P T I D I D N O L I S T E A

H A R D E E

A M M O

L I A N A

I D E S I R S I E Y E E S S A T H E E G M O

O L N E Y

M A I D S

W I L L T I S U R E I N D D

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

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42 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020

He loaned you his pressure washer. He helped you trim your trees. You asked the neighborhood girl that is friends with him if he would go out on a date with you. He told her the only dates he goes out on are with his dog. And then he put out his Trump signs and his anti BLM signs saying All Lives Matter. You turned into a Karen. You even wrote a letter to this publication bashing him for his beliefs. .. He is the type of person that would do anything for anyone. I’m pretty sure you burned that bridge. ...

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HOLIDAY

Prep Work Before you make your edibles, you need to do this first BY WILL MAUPIN

T

hanksgiving is upon us and it’s time to bring out the home chef inside of you. Spice up your holiday dinner by spiking a side dish or two with a cannabis infusion. Regardless of what you choose to infuse, the first step in the recipe is the same: decarboxylation. Simply put, decarboxylation is the process that uses heat to convert THCA, which is not psychoactive, into the THC we all know and love. If you don’t decarboxylate, your edibles won’t get you high. Here are three easy ways to decarboxylate your cannabis for the big meal.

TRADITIONAL OVEN METHOD

Spread ground flower on a parchment paper-lined baking sheet and pop it in the oven at 225 degrees for 40-50 minutes. Simple as that. If you’ve got a kitchen, you’ve got all the tools you

Once you decarb your weed, then you can make some delicious cannabis-infused treats — like these bacon banana muffins. need. However, there are downsides to this method. There’s risk of burning, rather than baking, your bud due to temperature variations. It’s also wasteful, as terpenes will break down in hot oven air. Oh yeah, and it will absolutely stink up your whole home.

ADVANCED OVEN METHOD

For apartment-dwellers, the stinky oven method might be off the table. That doesn’t mean the oven is out of the question, though, as long as you grab a canning-grade mason jar and lid. Follow the same steps as the oven method, except instead of putting the flower on a baking sheet, you put it in a mason jar and then on a baking sheet. The jar seals in the smell — and the terpenes! The only other difference is that you’ll need to give the jar a shake a few times during the decarboxylation

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

process to ensure every piece of flower reaches the proper temperature. This part can be a bit dangerous as glass can shatter if the temperature changes too quickly.

‘SOUS WEED’

French for “under vacuum,” sous vide cooking uses a water bath and airtight bag to cook food at a precise, constant temperature. It used to be the domain of only the fanciest restaurants, but nowadays countertop immersion circulators run less than 100 bucks. Place finely ground flower into a vacuum-sealed or ziplock bag, suspend it in the water bath with your immersion circulator set to 202 degrees and let it go for an hour. The bag seals in the terpenes and the smell. This method requires a bit of an investment, but it’s easily the cleanest and most precise way to decarboxylate at home. n

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BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

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NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a fiveyear sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

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46 INLANDER NOVEMBER 19, 2020

Advice Goddess APT. 201B OR NOT TO BE

My boyfriend and I have been together for two years, and my lease is up in a few months. I was thinking about asking him if he wants to live together. When is the right time to move in with someone, and how do you know whether that’s even a good idea? —Housing Crisis There are people you can share a home with who do not do a slew of annoying things, and they’re those who are continuing their tenure on our planet in an urn. AMY ALKON As a failed romantic (aka human-nature realist), I think there’s a right time to move in with another person, such as my boyfriend of 18 years, and it’s never. That said, in my financial dream world, I’d be into our buying houses next door to each other. Of course, this sort of thing is less practical for a couple with kids because a substantial part of parenting involves finding your children so annoying in the moment that you take steps to civilize them. And let’s be honest, all children are irritating (loud, sticky, and often unbelievably tedious), save for those frozen in mute adorableness in photographs, my favorite kind. There’s often financial pressure to live together, especially in urban elitevilles where a grim little closet pretending to be an apartment rents for the price of a gleaming penthouse in any city in the Midwest. Unfortunately, though sharing an apartment saves big on rent, it can cost a couple their relationship if they end up going at each other like rats in an undersized cage. As for what makes a relationship work, cohabitational or otherwise, there’s this notion that couples who have happy, lasting partnerships love each other more than those who break up. Sorry, romantics! Sure, when a relationship is brand-new, affection and lust make for a big heart-shaped airbag against annoyance and resentment. However, in “The Power of Bad,” science journalist John Tierney and social psychologist Roy Baumeister explain that, over time, the sweet, tender things each partner says and does matter far less than how a couple deals with “the negative stuff — their doubts, their frustrations, their problems.” Their book centers on what researchers call the “negativity bias”: how we pay far more attention to negative information, emotions, and experiences than positive and give the negative stuff far more weight. The negativity bias is especially toxic in heterosexual relationships, due to some general sex differences in personality and emotional orientation, summed up by researchers as “female demand/male withdrawal.” “Female demand” is driven by how women tend to be higher in the personality trait of “neuroticism,” which involves a tendency to react with negative emotions. People high in neuroticism see the world through mud-covered glasses: They’re anxious, moody, easily irritated, and perceive intentional slights in incidents others shrug off as the small frustrations of life. Basically, high neuroticism is the personality trait of picky complainers: “You loaded the dishwasher all wrong!” “You’re feeding the baby all wrong!” And then the inevitable, “You’re climbing out the window and running down the street screaming all wrong!” Regarding “male withdrawal” (lest you dudes start feeling all smugly superior), men tend to respond to relationship conflicts by going emotionally comatose, experiencing an emotional systems overload that clinical psychologist Robert Levenson and other researchers call “flooding.” In short, men are more likely to get overwhelmed by emotion and simply shut down. Not surprisingly, same-sex couples are less predisposed to plunge into a negativity spiral. Tierney and Baumeister explain, “If it’s two men, they’re less likely to initiate a complaint; if it’s two women, they’re less likely to withdraw after being criticized.” That said, simply being human — in a job, a friendship, or a relationship — makes us prone to go negative. That’s important to understand in light of research by psychologist John Gottman surveying couples who’d just gotten married and looking at which couples were divorced six years later. What mattered were not the positive, loving sentiments couples expressed but how they responded to conflict. Citing this research, Tierney and Baumeister explain: “Being able to hold your tongue rather than say something nasty or spiteful will do much more for your relationship than a good word or deed.” (Love is not blind, but love can choose to throw on a blindfold.) When I got together with my boyfriend, I made a pact with myself to never speak to him like I’ve forgotten I love him. This has helped me avoid going ugly over the years, but I have to give living apart a good bit of the credit. Psychologist Erich Fromm wrote, “Mature love says: ‘I need you because I love you.’” Cohabiting love says: “I need you to take out the trash because I’ll get 20-to-life for electrocuting you in the bathtub.” n ©2020, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)


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45. [head slap] 46. Ailing 48. “Excuse me, mythical beast, still talking here ...”? 54. Gloomy rock genre 57. Ancient region ruled by Alexander the Great 58. “Mi casa ____ casa” 59. Accidentally reveals 61. Apollo 11 org. 64. Comment a punster might use after delivering a groaner ... or a hint to this puzzle’s theme 69. Way to get to Harlem, per Duke Ellington 70. “Honest!” 71. ____ rummy 72. They have a glow about them 73. Cook, as dim sum 74. Curious DOWN 1. Bit of butter

2. “What was I thinking?!” 3. It’s often brown or amber 4. Wide-eyed in wonder 5. Foot-long item? 6. “Meet the Press” host Chuck 7. “Kinda sorta” 8. Math set with an unspecified number of elements 9. Looks down on 10. Wilber who founded a fast-food chain 11. Rifle filler 12. Tropical vine 13. Sportswriter whose Twitter handle is @Buster_ESPN 14. Some “Downton Abbey” figures 19. Deep cut 20. Primary 23. “Diary ____ Wimpy Kid” 24. Things often drawn at night 25. Childish comeback 26. “... so long ____ both shall live?” 29. “____ be my pleasure!”

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THIS WEEK ANSWERS ’S O I SAW YOU N S

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64 69 72

30. Pop singer Rita 31. Neither’s partner 32. Dictator played by Forest 36. Early people of the Great Lakes 37. Languishes 39. The U.S. joined it in 1917

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47. Lucy of “Elementary” 49. Pop-up or foul ball, say 50. “A Tree Grows in 45 46 47 Brooklyn” family 52 53 51. Doing the job 52. Some easy baskets 58 53. “You got that right!” 54. Many “Frozen”61 62 63 inspired Halloween costumes 65 66 67 68 55. “You Will ____ Tall Dark Stranger” (2010 70 71 film) 56. “SNL” alum Cheri 73 74 60. Equine : horse :: cygnine : ____ “FASHION SENSEI” 61. River near the Sphinx 62. 1998 Sarah McLachlan hit 40. “Judge me by my size, do you?” 63. Derive (from) speaker 65. Preceder of com, org or edu 41. Tic-tac-toe win 42. Bygone channel that aired “Veronica 66. Swelled head 67. Free (of) Mars” 68. Fitting last word in a crossword grid 43. NNW’s opposite 40

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ACROSS 1. Kissing in a restaurant, for short 4. Sean of “Stranger Things” 9. Mideast peace? 15. Internet company that helped launch TMZ 16. House haunter 17. “Havana” singer Cabello 18. Spa treatment that involves getting your fingernails done by a jokester? 21. Like fine wines 22. Let off 23. Kimono sashes 26. Draw ____ in the sand 27. Sorrowful cries 28. Moniker one might give to Anna Wintour or Tim Gunn? 33. One who’s passed the bar: Abbr. 34. Movie in which Brad Pitt plays Achilles 35. Drops on the ground? 38. Sharp reprimand of a voiceactivated assistant? 44. Plant, as seeds

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