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Earmark Evolution Committee tenure and pet projects kept Congress in line for years; it’s time to bring them back

AUTO INJURY • CIVIL LITIGATION

CA$H REWARD

COMMENT | CONGRESS

W

hen two distinguished octogenarians, Rep. Bill Young (R-Fla.) and former House Speaker Tom Foley (D-Wash.), passed away on Oct. 18, it reminded us of a bygone era where dignity, seniority and orderly Congressional operations were largely standard. In 1995, when Congress changed to a Republican majority, it imposed term limits on committee chairmen. Then in 2010, Congress outlawed earmarks on appropriations bills. Congress had “democratized” itself, in response to public demand, but the unintended consequence was that members could become purist legislators who largely disdained compromise, resisted seniority and refused Congressional earmarks. In the aftermath of the recent 16-day shutdown and with Congressional and Presidential approval ratings at new lows, it’s time to return to a measured, responsible earmark policy. At recent meetings in Amsterdam, a European official offered me this comment about the government shutdown melodrama: “America embarrassed itself in the eyes of the world. That spectacle was beneath what is expected of the United States.” I couldn’t disagree.

W

hen former President Ronald Reagan and former House Speaker Tip O’Neill famously debated policy during the day and drank Irish whiskey together after hours, they reached policy agreements because Speaker O’Neill could go back to his House Democratic majority and demand “yes” votes on compromises reached to move America forward. O’Neill could threaten recalcitrant Democrats with losing the earmarks they sponsored and treasured. He could also control members’ committee assignments, a powerful incentive for members to support reasoned leadership decisions. President Reagan gladly accepted 80-percent victories — he didn’t need 100 percent, with the Democrats receiving nothing. Tom Foley and Bill Young matured and flourished in their Congressional careers under that system. Today, new Representatives and Senators come to office dismissive of compromise and critical of earmarks, blaming both for America’s dire economic condition. I agree that past earmark policy sometimes offended the senses and resulted in wasteful spending in spite of oversight, but it’s Congress’ job to eliminate such waste. Without oversight hearings, Appropriations Committee markups, conference committees or a federal budget, uncontrolled spending adds to the deficit and debt. Citizens Against Government Waste calculated in 2010 that earmarks accounted for less than one half of one percent of the federal budget. The federal Office of Management and Budget calculated that earmarks amounted to a

measly one-third of one percent. When I served Washington’s 5th District as a member of the House Appropriations Committee, I defended earmarks as a legitimate way of returning some federal taxes to the district from which they came. That was much better than having the federal government decide what was best for Eastern Washington. When I ran against Mr. Foley in 1994, I criticized earmarks that saw taxpayers paying for “midnight basketball” or other clearly non-federal responsibilities. After being elected, I sponsored an earmark for valuable research to help farmers in my district combat “Karnal bunt” wheat disease. That made Senator John McCain’s “pork” list, probably because of the earmark’s funny name.

S

tandard and Poor’s recently calculated that this year’s 16-day government shutdown cost the U.S. economy $24 billion. If true, that’s much more than the total cost of all earmarks in 2010. Having supported the government shutdowns in 1995 and ’95-96, I can testify that they rarely work. Tea Party-supported Representatives and Senators who led this year’s shutdown didn’t secure a lower federal deficit or Congressional reform. Returning to a responsible earmarking policy and respecting the wisdom that often accompanies seniority and adherence to committee jurisdictions and regular legislative actions could bring order to the strife and underperformance that now exist. New members wouldn’t like it, but it might avoid the self-serving mentality that some elected officials employ and that destroys public confidence in the federal government. Today, some in government want the opposition to be winless. If they don’t get100 percent of what they or their supporters want, they’re fearful of primary opposition at home or damage to their historical legacy. Elected officials must have the courage to move America forward. Often that means compromise victories are required. Some proudly take the “no-earmark” pledge, fight to the death on issues for which they don’t have the votes, and as with the recent shutdown, cost their loyal constituents even more. Charismatic but inexperienced leaders should always think of America first. If they don’t, taxpayers and important institutions of government suffer. Tom Foley and Bill Young were giants in their time. Their wisdom, dignity and sense of fairness made them special. And they supported earmarks. 


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Learning for Life M

Doors Open November 1st

BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

aybe my fascination with history started up at old Cataldo School, where I’d devour every book on World War II they held in that tiny library. The sinking of the Bismarck, the Battle of Britain — all that excitement sitting on the shelf, waiting just for me. Careful readers know I frequently write about history in this space. History is the story of humanity — the failings, the triumphs, the wars, the advances of science. History is wisdom. At the University of Washington, I took the year-long Survey of European History courses from legendary lecturer Jon Bridgman. With his tenure, he secured a beautiful lecture hall looking out on the quad and performed daily miracles: He brought the dead and dusty back to life. As I finished Bill Bryson’s new book, One Summer: America, 1927, I realized this has become quite a habit. One Summer was irresistible — I love it when many threads are woven around one loose topic, in this case the summer of ’27. It was a year of turning points — the Great Depression was just two years away, the first talkie, The Jazz Singer, changed movies forever, Prohibition was on its last legs, and air travel, thanks to Charles Lindbergh, was about to take off. It’s a really fun book. Sean, a friend from college, used to love it when he heard a word he didn’t know. He’d run to the dictionary, look it up and immediately start throwing it into conversation. I was at his house the other day when his son showed me a Key & Peele YouTube clip, ending with the word “churlish.” “We all looked that up,” Sean told me. “Now ‘churlish’ is our favorite word!” Love it — Sean’s passing that enthusiasm on to his kids. Sometimes when I think of reading another history, I think of Sean flipping madly through the dictionary, with that smile of his. It’s that joy you can get from being a lifelong learner. And history has a lot for us to learn. 

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | DIGEST ON OUR FACEBOOK

Readers react to “Are We There Yet?” (10/31) about state marijuana plans: DEAN LAMBSON: We are about to watch hundreds of thousands of medicinal users suffer due to the greed of this state and its desire to squeeze every last tax dollar from the use of this amazing healing plant. That’s where we are at!

GUEST EDITORIAL

JACK OHMAN CARTOON

The Pendulum Swings Investment and optimism has returned to downtown Spokane BY MIKE ALLEN, MIKE FAGAN, NANCY MCLAUGHLIN, STEVE SALVATORI, JON SNYDER, BEN STUCKART AND AMBER WALDREF

M

REALLY,

THAT’S ALL

WE ASK. rivercityred. blogspot.com

8 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013

ost of us are aware of the Convention Center expansion. It’s also hard to miss the foundation work on the new Walt Worthy convention hotel project across the street. We are all looking forward to the long-awaited opening of the Health Sciences building on the Riverpoint Campus next month that will house the UW Medical School and the WSU School of Pharmacy, bringing hundreds of new students and faculty downtown. These projects will have large, long-term positive impacts on our city, and particularly the downtown core. But there are many others that might be even more significant when taken together. Here is just a partial list of the positive developments that are under construction, recently completed or ready to break ground: Pyrotek is nearing completion of its remodel of the old EWU Building on First Avenue, bringing the incremental energy of more than 100 employees, clients and customers downtown. STCU has begun the rehabilitation of the Hutton Building on Washington, investing significant dollars to restore this landmark building to its former glory. Avista is nearing completion on the new Huntington Park project, which celebrates its 125th anniversary and adds a beautiful expansion to the west for Riverfront Park, with dramatic river views for our citizens and visitors. Wells and Company has consolidated ownership and is moving forward with its plans to transform the shuttered Ridpath Hotel into a luxury condo/micro apartment/retail complex, which has the potential to attract hundreds of young adults to downtown as permanent residents. Developers including Steve Schmautz, Dan Spalding, Bobby Brett and Chris Batten have completed purchases and started construction,

bringing new life to historic structures such as the Alger, National, Richmond, Sherwood, Dutch’s, Hale, Bickett, Michael and Forester buildings. McKinstry’s purchase and rehabilitation of the Spokane Inland Empire Railroad building, and creation of its Innovation Center to accelerate the success of early-stage companies, is already paying benefits to our community and providing jobs and greater prosperity for all of us. The opening of ShareSpace Spokane’s coworking space in the Seehorn Building, and rehabilitation of the Buchanan Building into the third location for the Spokane Entrepreneurial Center will add further momentum to job creation. The City Ramp parking garage was restored just last year, Kendall Yards continues its remarkable development, and the recent purchase announcements of the Masonic Temple and Civic buildings lend further credence to the incredible momentum swing of the past 12 months. We are also seeing exciting opportunities as the Cork District concept takes hold, combining art, entertainment and wine. The promise of a future Central City Line will help improve mobility and connectivity from the University District to Browne’s Addition. We will always have challenges in managing our downtown urban environment. Our Downtown Livability Initiative calls attention to many of these, and we will continue to reassess our progress on these efforts in the months to come. But the days of recession and foreclosure seem to be behind us, and bright days and brighter times lay ahead.  Mike Allen, Mike Fagan, Nancy McLaughlin, Steve Salvatori, Jon Snyder, Ben Stuckart and Amber Waldref are the members of the Spokane City Council.

SUE TILLIE: A 25% tax is an unfair tax for medicinal purposes. The WA sales tax should be the norm for medicinal purposes. C ELIZABETH CLARK: Medical cannabis should not be taxed! DAVID EIDY: Damned if we do and damned if we don’t. I really didn’t think I’d see the day it would be legal. Now everyone is bitching about making some productive sense out of it. HAROLD BLACKWOLF: Who’s to know if the state will care about stocking medicinal strains and keeping a variety that treats different ailments? Looks to me like the state only cares about one thing and that is MONEY. CASEY BYERS: If it goes up that much, there won’t be much business to tax because the black market will expand, with even higher prices, but still low enough to easily outcompete the legal market. … I expect the business will be very bumpy for the first few years. KONNIE AAGARD: Sad that they strip away what the voters have worked so hard and long for, to have that right to use it for a medical reason. They need to leave med patients alone. TREVOR LEWIS: Unless they have continuous on-site monitoring during harvest, there will be absolutely no way WA regulators can control how much goes to legal channels and how much does not. Also, given the views of many who would grow marijuana, I would see a lot of low-cost or free pot going to those patients who get screwed by greedy legislators. 


NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 9


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COMMENT | SATIRE

New Study Says… A BY ANDY BOROWITZ

new study released this week indicates that Americans are safe from the threat of gun violence except in schools, malls, airports, movie theaters, workplaces, streets and their own homes. Also: highways, turnpikes, libraries, places of worship, parks, universities, restaurants, post offices and cars. Plus: driveways, garages, gyms, stores, military bases — and a host of other buildings, structures and sites. National Rifle Association CEO Wayne LaPierre applauded the study, saying that it reinforced his organization’s long-held position that the United States does not need additional gun laws. “This study makes it abundantly clear that Americans are in no danger of gun violence except in these isolated 413 places,” he said. He added that he hoped the study would spark a conversation “about the root cause of mass shootings: people who recklessly

show up at places where they could be shot at.” Elsewhere, in an explosive accusation, House Oversight Committee chairman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) charged President Obama with “using all the resources at his disposal to make the Affordable Care Act work.” Rep. Issa told reporters that, “behind closed doors, the President has quietly assembled a high-tech brain trust that is working around the clock to fix the HealthCare.gov website — at government expense.” “This is a conspiracy, if you will, that goes all the way to the top,” Issa added. “If there is a plan to fix Obamacare, what did the President know about that plan and when did he know it?” n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | BANKS

Written Off Again S BY JIM HIGHTOWER

ometimes a news story can be so crammed with irony that it boggles the mind. Consider just the headline on one such story that ran recently in my town’s daily paper: “Man gets 10 years for defrauding banks.” That just screams for a rewrite, doesn’t it? I yearn for a story with a headline in boldface type that, at long last, would trumpet this joyous news: “Banker get 10 years for defrauding man.” Alas, while the FBI, IRS and judicial establishment went all out to nail the bank defrauder, they allow Wall Street crooks who defraud us to escape prosecution, much less jail. High-flying bankers systematically commit serial acts of blatant fraud, bilking millions of people out of billions of dollars, but they keep their positions, paychecks, perks and prestige — free to bilk again. The latest marquee Wall Streeter to admit to grand-scale larceny, yet pay no personal penalty, is Jamie Dimon, honcho of JPMorgan Chase. Shareholders in Dimon’s felonious operation have been socked with a record $13 billion in penalties,

but not a penny comes from Dimon’s pocket. Still, popping the bank for 13 big ones shows that the Justice Department is finally getting tough on corporate crime, right? Not exactly. JPMorgan’s punishment will be softened significantly by this unannounced outrage: A corporation — unlike a person — can deduct criminal fines from its income taxes. That means we taxpayers will, in effect, cough up some $4 billion to help America’s richest bank pay for its wrongdoing. This corporate tax scam puts the “con” in unconscionable. But We The People can shame Dimon and his bank’s shareholders into paying the full price for their criminal acts. To help a grassroots coalition of citizen groups that are demanding just that, go to campaignforfairsettlement.org. n

For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 11


12 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013


Getting Flipped

A traveling house-flipping seminar promises to give you the tools to wealth — but then come all the strings BY DANIEL WALTERS

B

efore a sleepy Saturday morning crowd of about 50 in a Davenport Hotel ballroom, speaker Tony Natoli rattles off quips, jokes and axioms, delivering a sort of sermon in his Georgia drawl. He asks the crowd if they want honesty. When they respond tepidly, Natoli asks them to count to three, then shout “We want the truth!” They do. Soon Natoli’s clicking through slides — a smiling photo of his family; sailboats gliding on a glassy blue lake — reeling off a long list of what the audience could do if they just had more money: spend more time with their family, give more to their church, spend more on their cars, housing, restaurants, traveling, fishing, hunting. “As I say this, some people say, ‘Wow, I don’t need all of that,’” Natoli says. “But I’m telling you, deep down inside, you want it. And also I’m going to tell you you deserve it, if you’re willing to do what you need to do to get it.” For weeks, a deluge of advertisements for these FortuneBuilders seminars flooded Spokane radio stations. Call now, said the voice of Than Merrill (FortuneBuilders founder, ex-NFL player, former Flip This House star) and get two free tickets to learn how to rake in profit with very little risk. Spokane is

the perfect market, he said, for house flipping — the practice of buying homes, fixing them up and selling them quickly for tidy profits. Natoli — once Merrill’s disciple, now one of his evangelists — speaks at FortuneBuilders seminars across the country, dangling the promise of big wealth through savvy real estate transactions. “There’s those people that say money’s not everything, money’s the root of all evil, money won’t buy you happiness. Why would they say that?” Natoli says. The crowd murmurs their response. “Don’t have any, right. Listen, guys: I’ve tried it without money. I’m here to tell you that sometimes having a lot of money makes things a lot easier.” Yet wherever this sort of seminar arrives, it’s accompanied by warnings from local consumer advocates, cautioning that the big promises come with some serious caveats.

RECESSION-PROOF

Even back in 2005, when shows like Flip This House and Flip That House debuted amid skyrocketing home prices, media outlets warned that house flipping made for a very risky investment. After the economy crashed, a Federal Reserve Bank of New York study confirmed house flippers had played a ...continued on next page

A FortuneBuilders seminar at the Davenport Hotel YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 13


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Tony Natoli: “How many people ... think that this old south Georgia boy is here to sell you something?” YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

major role in driving the housing bubble up to its dangerous, dizzying heights. But the recession didn’t stop house flipping; it just slowed it down and changed the strategy. A glut of foreclosures meant a glut of investment opportunities as foreclosed properties hit the auction blocks. Merrill had only been investing for about three years when the housing market began to teeter. But that didn’t stop Merrill, in his late 20s, from launching his housing seminar business and starring on the third, fourth and fifth seasons of A&E’s Flip This House. His business has thrived amid the recession, growing more than 800 percent over a three-year span. In 2010, Inc. magazine called FortuneBuilders the fastest growing education company in America. “The last thing you want is people speculating in real estate without an education,” Merrill says. That education, however, has a big price tag.

THE CATCH

“How many people out there today here think that this old south Georgia boy is here to sell you something?” Natoli asks. “Well, I will not let you down.” The crowd laughs. Briefly, Natoli gives specific advice, listing basic tips for rehabbing homes, introducing concepts like “wholesaling” and “hidden markets.” But a major chunk of the seminar’s two hours focuses on selling the crowd on the next event, a three-day training session at the Spokane Con-

vention Center in December. That one isn’t free. At retail, the training session costs about $1,200, Natoli says. But for seminar attendees, he says, he’ll knock off $1,000 from the asking price if they purchase today. The fee is there, he says, to “separate the serious from the curious.” A sizable number of attendees trickle to the back tables and write a check for the next event. Rich Curtis, an associate broker from Sandpoint, is one of them. He’s been to plenty of similar seminars, and always finds something useful. “I continue to find new things, new bits and pieces and add them to the repertoire,” Curtis says. Not everyone bites. Ed Osinski, a contractor who specializes in concrete curbing, suspects that at the three-day training, FortuneBuilders would try to sell him on even more events and products. He’s right. Attendees at the three-day training, Natoli confirms, are pitched even more extras. Those may include Merrill’s $3,000, four-day boot camps or more intensive “mastery” programs that can climb as high as $25,000. Even the “Marketing for Deals Home Study Course,” a set of two audio CDs, two manuals, and a computer CD full of forms, scripts and templates, runs a steep $1,197. But Merrill suggests thinking about all the money that could be saved — or earned. “You could lose a lot more money not knowing what you’re doing versus having an education,” Merrill says. There are plenty of caveats. Natoli and


Merrill both warn that only those willing to put in a lot of work may achieve success. Asterisks with fine-print disclaimers abound, warning that “all income or earnings statements are only estimates of what could be earned, there is no assurance that your earnings or income will match the figures we present.” While the FortuneBuilders website has dozens of testimonials from satisfied customers, anonymous comments on the scam-spotting website Ripoff Reports were split: Some claimed Merrill’s three-day training sessions were useful, while others say it amounted to a $200 infomercial for his pricey mastery program. In market after market, the Better Business Bureau has issued warnings against such seminars, including Merrill’s. In particular, the entire Flip This House brand has come under fire. One star, Sam Leccima, was hit by major fraud allegations in 2007. A FOX Atlanta news investigation found what he portrayed on the show was almost entirely fictional: Leccima didn’t have a real estate license, didn’t own the home he was renovating, renovated only part of it and lied about selling the home at all. Another star, Armando Montelongo Jr., has also topped Inc.’s fastest growing education companies with his own brand of seminars. But Montelongo’s seminars have been branded with a Better Business Bureau “F,” and earned him a Forbes profile headlined “Meet Armando Montelongo: The Home-Flipping Huckster Who’ll Make $50M This Year.” Merrill takes pains to separate himself from Montelongo. As in any industry, he says, some people do it right and some do it wrong. “The [Better Business Bureau] is always cautious,” Merrill says. “Any time they feel you’re teaching people how to make money, you’re going to get that.” He says consumer advocates often haven’t even attended his seminars before issuing warnings. But at the Better Business Bureau in Cincinnati, Jason McGlone has. His verdict was that some people might learn a thing or two, but he doubts forking over thousands of dollars is worth it. “The longer we were there, the more it leaned toward, ‘If you give us money and enroll in this program, your potential earnings will increase,’” McGlone says. “It’s a big group sales pitch. It’s not that different than buying a car, in a lot of ways. The difference is you actually leave a car lot with a car. You don’t leave these seminars with a whole lot.”

IMPERFECT MARKET

In the radio ads, Merrill claims Spokane is the perfect market for his system. He explains that the region’s low price point — plenty of homes under $250,000 — make it ideal for flipping. It’s an iffy claim. In October, listing service RealtyTrac named the high-priced home-flipping markets as the hottest, with the low-end market having decreased significantly. The pricey Seattle, Portland and Las Vegas markets all made RealtyTrac’s recent list of the top 15 house-flipping markets. Spokane County ranked in the high 70s. Marianne Guenther Bornhoft, president of the Spokane Association of Realtors, says Spokane sale prices have been stagnant. “Prices are up 3.7 percent,” Bornhoft says. “If you’re a house flipper, you need to have increases that are way higher than 3.7 percent.” Merrill argues his system relies on solid home improvements, not appreciation. “If you’re relying on home appreciation, I think you’re gambling,” Merrill says. But Bornhoft names another massive catch, one Natoli never discusses in the seminar: Washington state law. In Washington, a 2007 law made it illegal for anyone who isn’t a registered contractor to buy a home, put more than $500 into refurbishing it and then sell it in under a year. “How many of you are brand new to real estate investing and are looking to get started?” Natoli asks. Nearly the entire class. “Good, that means we don’t we don’t have to break any bad habits.” When he asks how many are contractors, however, only a few raise their hands. “Just because you go to a seminar doesn’t make you an expert in real estate,” Bornhoft says. “It’s a very scary business if you don’t know what you’re doing.” n danielw@inlander.com

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

The Big News of the Past Week

1.

PHOTO EYE PAYING RESPECT

In a rebuke to both Mayor David Condon and the Spokane Police Guild, the City Council unanimously voted against the tentative agreement between the city and the police guild. The council felt the agreement failed to clearly establish the independent investigative authority for the police ombudsman that Spokane voted for.

2.

Super Typhoon Haiyan, one of the most powerful storms on record, struck the Philippines last Friday. The final death toll is still unclear, but officials estimate tens of thousands may have died.

3.

The FBI raided the Spokane offices of Blu-ray manufacturer BlueStar Technologies. The owner is accused of defrauding investors and using the money to pay for gambling debts and a variety of personal expenses, including $1,500 in lingerie.

4.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Monday at the Washington State Veterans Cemetery in Medical Lake, John McGarrigle, right, places flowers on the grave of his uncle, John Minnihan, while Erica Johnson and her 9-year-old daughter, Jamie, look on. A little over 45 years ago, Minnihan enlisted in the Air Force and soon ended up in Vietnam. For 30 years, he served in bases in Germany and the U.S., finally retiring from Fairchild Air Force base in 1998, having attained the highest possible enlisted rank of Chief Master Sergeant. Minnihan died last year of cancer at 64.

DIGITS

39,000

$

Amount it cost annually for Visit Spokane to operate the little-attended Spokane Visitors Center. The center has been closed down and will be replaced by kiosks in the mall.

2

Number of inches increase, from 3 to 5, in the thickness of the mattresses in Valley Hospital’s emergency department.

The story of two Gonzaga students, who’d been threatened with suspension for brandishing a gun at an intruder at their offcampus, university-owned apartment, spread across national media outlets last week. On Sunday, the students were informed they would be punished with permanent probation.

5.

Spokane County filed a labor practice relations complaint against the Spokane County Deputy Sheriff’s Association. The deputies, the county said, changed their position on salary increases at the last minute before going into arbitration.

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Do-Over Spokane City Council kills the tentative agreement with the police guild; plus, more election results BACK TO BARGAINING In a pushback against Mayor David Condon and the SPOKANE POLICE GUILD, the City Council suspended rules Monday and voted unanimously to reject a tentative contract agreement reached by the city and guild, arguing it didn’t sufficiently empower the ombudsman. The vote sends the city back to closed-door negotiations with the guild. The administration and council (joined by citizen groups like the Center for Justice) disagree about how to empower the ombudsman to comply with a voter-approved charter change calling for a “totally independent” ombudsman. The agreement would have maintained the current system allowing the ombudsman to ask questions during internal affairs investigations and would have given a citizen commission (instead of the mayor) the final say on investigations with which the ombudsman was unsatisfied. The mayor has called the commission an important step toward independent oversight; others have demanded that the ombudsman be able to open his own investigations, which wouldn’t affect officer discipline. “The question becomes: What do you want the outcome to be?” asks the mayor’s spokesman Brian Cod-

dington. “Do you want to be able to impact discipline? It seems like that’s what the community wants to be able to do.” Council members say voters wanted an ombudsman who can open separate investigations to be truly independent from the department. Council members had drafted an ordinance allowing for those investigations, which they planned to pass alongside the TA. But the guild’s attorney argued such authorities must be bargained for and refused to promise the guild wouldn’t object. “It came down like the Tenth Commandment in granite: ‘We won’t be signing off on this,’” says Councilman Steve Salvatori. “That left nothing else to talk about.” — HEIDI GROOVER

ALTERNATIVE IMPACTS

While U.S. Air Force officials in May voiced a preference for a Kansas airbase to house its new fleet of KC-46A refueling tankers, FAIRCHILD AIR FORCE BASE remains one of the top alternatives and a recently released draft Environmental Impact Statement outlines the scale of the project.

With a 70-page summary, the more than 1,000-page draft statement examines all four bases under consideration for new tanker operations. A public hearing on the proposed project and EIS is scheduled for 5:30 pm Wednesday, Nov. 20 at the Lincoln Center in Spokane. If new tanker operations moved to Fairchild, the draft statement indicates the base’s 30 KC-135s would be replaced with 36 KC-46As, resulting in a 62 percent increase in flight activity. The base’s population would also increase by nearly 1,100 people, including 417 full-time military personnel and their dependents. The draft statement estimates the project would result in about $292 million in construction spending to build new facilities, creating approximately 3,020 jobs. The report found no significant impacts to the local environment, safety risks, air quality or infrastructure. The entire summary and draft Environmental Impact Statement can be found online at: www.KC-46A-beddown.com. — JACOB JONES

NO CONCESSIONS (YET)

A week after the general election, the campaign to label GENETICALLY ENGINEERED FOOD in Washington state has yet to officially concede as supporters wait for more mail-in ballots. Initiative 522, a statewide ballot measure that would mandate labeling of genetically modified food, has made some headway since Nov. 5, but by Tuesday afternoon, it was still failing, 48 to 52 percent, by a margin of more than 65,000 votes. Meanwhile, state Sen. John Smith, R-Colville, also hasn’t officially conceded his legislative seat. In the 7th District Senate race, Ferry County commissioner Brian Dansel is maintaining his lead over the incumbent with 53 percent of the vote. Kelly Lotze, Smith’s campaign manager, says the Smith campaign is waiting on returns from Spokane and Stevens counties. — DEANNA PAN

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NEWS | HUMAN TRAFFICKING

Shop Local A Hidden Crime Inland Northwest Shopping Guide

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Very little is known about the prevalence of child sex trafficking in Washington state, let alone Spokane County, but that soon may change

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T

hey were just children, whose drugcommercially sexually exploited youth in addled parents sold them to predators to Washington. And until now, there’s never been pay back a debt. They were girls who fell a systematic way of collecting it. CCYJ has for dangerous, older men online. Foreign brides contracted with the Washington State Center for who met their husbands overseas. And they were Court Research to develop an expansive data boys, too. They were victims as young as 11 collection plan in conjunction with regional task and as old as 40. All forced into prostitution or force members. servitude. All contacted Mabel Elsom and a team Starting this month, the Center for Court of advocates at Lutheran Community Services in Research will begin training regional coalitions in downtown Spokane in the past year, looking for data gathering and review. By this spring, Kimhelp. ball says the center will have preliminary figures In a six-week period near the end of this representing the magnitude of child sex trafficksummer, LCS worked with seven children who ing in Washington. were victims of local commercial sex exploitation. “Without having numbers and knowing For LCS, this was an unusually high caseload, more about these kids and where they’re being involving what advocates say is the state’s most trafficked to and from and what they need, we’re underserved and unrecognized population. The just somewhat shooting blind,” Kimball says. “It’s referrals and crisis calls LCS receives have slowed critical for everything we do, all resource develdown, but it’s only mid-November. opment, planning, resource deployment, “The last few months have been you really have to have the information.” very, very busy for us,” Elsom says. In 2003, Washington became the first Send comments to In March, the Seattle-based state in the country to criminalize human editor@inlander.com. trafficking, making it a serious felony to Center for Children & Youth Justice finalized a first-of-its-kind coordirecruit, harbor, transport or obtain a pernated response protocol to help law son for sex or labor using force, fraud or enforcement and social service providers identify coercion. But the first conviction under the state’s child sex trafficking victims in Washington state human trafficking law didn’t occur until six years and provide them with any services they need, later, when a Seattle teenager named DeShawn and Spokane County was chosen as one of five “Cashmoney” Clark was found guilty of pimping pilot sites to implement it. underage girls. In Spokane, Elsom is leading a countywide Last year, state lawmakers passed a dozen task force of local and federal law enforcement bills aimed at penalizing traffickers and protecting agencies, prosecuting and defense attorneys, their victims. But convictions in Washington state court services, and social service providers that are rare. In Spokane County, no one has ever CCYJ is training to identify victims and research been prosecuted for sex trafficking under the a problem about which so little is known: Who slew of state laws. are the victims of child sex trafficking in WashIn fact, Spokane sheriff’s Det. Dave Skogen ington and how many are there? says in his 17 years as a sex crimes detective, he’s “There’s absolutely no data,” says CCYJ’s received only two reports of adult human trafTerri Kimball on the dearth of statistics on ficking and not a single report involving a child.

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In one case last year, there wasn’t enough evidence to prosecute the alleged perpetrators. In the other, the victim suddenly refused to speak to investigators. “That doesn’t mean that we’re not still looking and we’re not still aware,” he says. “One of the unfortunate parts of police work is, though we try our best to be proactive and see crime and crush it, if you will, the fact of the matter is, the kind of child human trafficking we’re typically talking about is sex trade. That’s not something people talk about.” In the past three years, the Washington Anti-Trafficking Response Network’s six community partners around the state (one of which is Lutheran Community Services) identified 250 victims of human trafficking, according to Kathleen Morris, the network’s program manager. “But I strongly, strongly feel that that does not even scratch the surface,” Morris says. “Whether they’re immigrants or vulnerable adults or children engaged in commercial sex work, there’s a distrust of law enforcement, a distrust of systems in general, if there even is a way to access those things that can help protect them.” Victims of trafficking often face language barriers that prevent them from seeking help, or their traffickers threaten them and their families to keep them from speaking out. They’re isolated, unaware of their rights and afraid that their actions will result in further abuse.

“People hear ‘human trafficking,’ they think of slavery, immigration, undocumented people who are coming in.” “It is very hidden,” says Bridget Cannon, who runs Crosswalk, Voice of America’s emergency teen shelter. The kids she meets are often too ashamed to talk about it until much later, when they’re older and have moved on. “People hear ‘human trafficking,’ they think of slavery, immigration, undocumented people who are coming in,” Cannon says. “It looks a lot different for this population.” Cannon prefers the phrase “survival sex.” Without a place to stay, food to eat, or clean clothes to wear, young people — often homeless or runaways — will exchange sex for basic necessities. Young girls and boys are recruited, or “groomed” as Cannon puts it, to develop trusting relationships with predators who later exploit them. “They just want to feel loved and feel like they have a place to belong, and these guys know how to do that, take them in, give them a sense of belonging, a sense of worth, and then turn around and pimp them out and use them for themselves,” she says. “I think this is a lot more prevalent than what is ever reported, that’s for darn sure.” 

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t’s 2 am on the West Coast when the news family are serving ... to live this story over and arrives. Italy’s Supreme Court is ordering a over again.” retrial of Amanda Knox, the University of It’s a situation that, in a broad sense, Washington student accused of killing her British Hampikian faces daily. Along with his work roommate in Italy in 2007, convicted of the crime analyzing DNA evidence for Knox’s defense in 2009, then acquitted in 2011. attorneys, Hampikian contributes DNA analysis Global media explodes. and testimony in cases of potential wrongful conHalfway around the world, a professor at viction from Idaho to Georgia to Maine. Now, Boise State University sits up in bed to watch an his primary job as a professor at Boise State and online feed of Italian TV news and feels sick to director of the Idaho Innocence Project is getting his stomach. more difficult. With the recent loss of a two-year, “To create this elaborate myth that Raf$220,000 federal grant, the already small Idaho faele and Amanda are involved without any Innocence Project will revert to skeletal staffing substantial evidence is a stretch. I didn’t think and capability, with Hampikian as its only fullit would be revisited, but apparently it will be,” time staffer. the professor and DNA expert, Greg “We can do the science, but we Hampikian, tells a public radio reporter can’t do the law on new cases,” says solemnly. In a case that gripped the Hampikian, who’s been featured in Send comments to world, Knox and her then-boyfriend editor@inlander.com. national media, including a Dateline Raffaele Sollecito were convicted and NBC special about convicted Idaho later acquitted of killing British student murderer Christopher Tapp. HampikiMeredith Kercher. “To tell people … that you are an and others, including the victim’s mother, under suspicion for murder and that you could believe Tapp is innocent because his DNA does be returned to the prison where you spent four not match that found at the scene. Tapp, who’s years in Italy is extremely frightening, and it is been in jail since 1998, says he was coerced into part of a continuing sentence that she and her confessing.

LETTERS


Staffed by Hampikian, a full-time attorney and student interns, the project has reviewed cases of inmates who claim they’ve been wrongfully convicted and done DNA analysis in such cases. Like most Innocence Projects nationwide, it depends on grant money and private donors, and without the Department of Justice’s Wrongful Conviction Review grant, it will not be able to take on any new cases. Cases of potential wrongful conviction can take decades of complicated legal maneuvering and appeals, requiring tedious legal work and long-term commitment. The cash crunch facing the Idaho Innocence Project highlights not only the vulnerability of similar projects nationwide, but some shortcomings in the Idaho legal system, Hampikian says. One potential source of funding for the project — the Kirk Bloodsworth Post-Conviction DNA Testing Grant, named after the first death row prisoner to be exonerated on DNA evidence — isn’t available to the Idaho project because the state doesn’t have a DNA preservation law, setting universal rules for how long law enforcement agencies must keep biological evidence. The state also lacks a compensation bill to pay the exonerated for the time they spent in prison. (The University of Washington-based Innocence Project Northwest successfully lobbied the Washington State Legislature for a compensation law this year.) “It’s a damn shame,” says Boise defense lawyer Dennis Benjamin of the funding loss. Benjamin worked with the Idaho Innocence Project to get DNA evidence retested in the case of Sarah Johnson, who was convicted in 2005 of killing her parents and who Benjamin and Hampikian believe is innocent. “Unless there is some place for an inmate to write and say, ‘Please look at my case’ and someone to do an initial screening and look at it, we just won’t know what’s out there,” Benjamin says. “That’ll be the mystery. Who is out there that we don’t know is innocent?” 

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11/7/13 3:22 PM


THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE

Nov. 22 Fans of the bestselling bookturned-movie series have been eagerly waiting for the release of Catching Fire since March 2012, when the credits rolled at the end of the trilogy’s first installment. In the same category as megahit predecessors Harry Potter and Twilight, The Hunger Games started out as a young adult scifi/fantasy series, but a riveting plot and setting in a futuristic, dystopian world swept up readers young and old. Like its printed counterpart, the second film picks up where the first left off, as the victors of the 74th Annual Hunger Games, Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence) and Peeta Mellark (Josh Hutcherson), begin their “Victor’s Tour” of the Districts. Along the way, they sense rebellions are stirring among the people of Panem. By being the first dual winners, thus forever altering the rules of the Games, Peeta and Katniss have become symbols of hope to the masses. Readers of the series know what follows, but we won’t spoil it for the rest. (Chey Scott) Rated PG-13

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THE BEST MAN HOLIDAY

Nov. 15 If you recall the first Best Man movie that came out way back in 1999, well, good memory. The sequel is out now, 14 years later, with virtually the same cast. Since the closing frames of the first movie at Lance and Mia’s wedding, Harper proposed, Murch broke up with Shelby, and the group has yet to see each other again. It all changes when they plan to all meet up for Christmas and learn of all the changes from years past — marriages, kids, divorces. But nothing can get between old friends, until they realize how easy it is for old romances and rivalries to reignite. (Katelyn Smith) Rated R

DELIVERY MAN

Nov. 22 Remember the heartfelt, critically acclaimed 2010 Sundance hit The Kids are All Right, with Mark Ruffalo as the sperm donor father tracked down by his two biological kids, who are being raised by a lesbian couple played by Annette Bening and Julianne Moore? Delivery Man is like a producer saw that movie and said, “Do that, but as a comedy starring Vince Vaughn.” Vaughn is David Wozniak, an unreliable man-child — literally a delivery man for his father’s business — who discovers that by some mistake at a fertility clinic where he donated sperm 20 years earlier, he is the biological father of 533 children. These kids are your typical millennials, both ambitious and bumbling, and Wozniak appoints himself their “guardian angel.” It could be corny, but Vaughn plays the role well and early reviews have called it warm, funny and emotionally resonant. Chris Pratt, resident man-child on Parks and Recreation, gets laughs as the best friend and weary father of four. (Lisa Waananen) Rated PG-13


THE WARM BLANKET OF FAMILIARITY Well-known stories headline this winter’s movie season BY MIKE BOOKEY

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aybe we’ve got enough stress during the holiday months that we need something on-screen that we know. Perhaps we need something familiar, or something that we can wrap our minds around for a couple hours of escape in a warm theater. That seems to be the theme of the past several winter movie seasons. The November-toJanuary blockbuster stretch is largely comprised of sequels, remakes and revivals of well-known stories. Hollywood seems to leave the original stuff for the fall, as evidenced by Gravity and All is Lost making appearances before the holidays. But come this winter, we know what to expect. The Hunger Games franchise returns with Catching Fire, the second installment in Suzanne Collins’ outrageously best-selling young adult fiction trilogy. Hard-core fans know what’s going to happen to Katniss and crew, but they’ll flock to theaters the week before Thanksgiving regardless. Then there’s the reappearance, after nearly a decade’s absence, of the best mustache this side of Cannonball Run, as Anchorman 2 finally materializes on the big screen. And for all the Middle Earth fans out there, the seemingly unnecessary trilogy-ification of The Hobbit continues, as the gang of dwarves continue their journey. And it wouldn’t be Christmas without another one of those Paranormal Activity flicks, right? Even Tyler Perry is getting in on the season of sequels by bringing Madea back for what looks like a disaster of a Christmas movie.

BLACK NATIVITY

Nov. 27 Since it was first performed in New York in December 1961, Langston Hughes’ Black Nativity has become an annual tradition on stages across the U.S. But this is the first time the musical play — part nativity pageant, part gospel service — has been adapted as a full-length film with an all-star cast. A single mom in Baltimore (Jennifer Hudson) is forced to send her teen son, Langston, to spend Christmas in New York City with grandparents (Forest Whitaker and Angela Bassett) he’s never met. There, among the historic brownstones, bright lights and famous churches of Harlem, Langston (played by 17-year-old R&B star Jacob Latimore in his first major film role) clashes with his strict grandfather, Reverend Cornell Cobbs, but ultimately finds his own truth about the holidays with a little divine intervention. The star-studded soundtrack mixes traditional gospel with contemporary R&B, and both Hudson and Latimore shine. (LW) Rated PG

FROZEN

Nov. 27 It’s billed as the first musical masterpiece from Disney since The Lion King. Those are lofty expectations, but Frozen looks cute, fun and family-friendly, and it has a talking snowman named Olaf. The computer-animated film is based on a Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale called “The Snow Queen,” so if you’re one of those types who read the book before seeing the movie, there you go. Since it’s Disney, there are also princesses, and Frozen features two sister princesses, Elsa and Anna (the latter voiced by Kristen Bell). But there’s a slight problem: Elsa has cryokinetic powers (she can turn things to ice). But she can’t figure out how to control them, dooming the picturesque town of Arendelle to a frigid fate. After she runs away in shame, it’s up to heroine sister Anna, a fearless redhead, who goes on a journey with a mountain man named Kristoff and his trusty reindeer sidekick Sven. The talking snowman tags along to help. (CS) Rated PG

Other films hitting screens this winter aren’t sequels, but feature familiar tales or source material. Black Nativity is a cinematic version of Langston Hughes’ iconic musical, itself a retelling of perhaps the New Testament’s most wellknown story. Ben Stiller is bringing to life one of the most beloved American short stories ever written with The Secret Life of Walter Mitty — which was turned into a movie more than 60 years ago. Film die-hards have been waiting for the remake for many years, but again the source material is nothing new, regardless of how visually dazzling the Stiller-directed vehicle proves. American Hustle looks fantastic and is sure to kill at the box office, but part of that will be David O. Russell’s ability to play within the confines of the mafia movie. Some very unfamiliar films are popping up this winter at the fringe of the blockbuster crowd. Most noticeably is Alexander Payne’s Nebraska, a film with a starkly original story starring Bruce Dern and shot exclusively in black and white. Award buzz will likely follow, as it will for Philomena, a British film about love and family that has already wowed the festival audiences. Other audiences are eager to see Inside Llewyn Davis, about the ’60s glory days of the New York folk scene, with a soundtrack produced by T Bone Burnett and Marcus Mumford. It stars Justin Timberlake, which might be reason enough for some to lay down cash for a seat. There’s nothing wrong with familiarity. It keeps you warm on those long winter nights. 

HOMEFRONT

Nov. 27 James Franco has done it all over the past couple of years; now he plays perhaps his most reprehensible character yet. A retired DEA agent (Jason Statham) heads to a small town, only to end up tangling with a redneck meth-head (Franco). Soon that meth-head, and his meth-dealing empire, discovers that Statham’s character is a former agent and try to have him killed. Winona Ryder appears as Franco’s accomplice, in what looks like one of her most solid roles in years. Fun fact: Sylvester Stallone wrote the screenplay, adapted from Chuck Logan’s novel. (Mike Bookey) Rated R

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OLDBOY

Nov. 27 If you’ve seen Park Chan-wook’s rivetting 2003 Korean thriller of the same name, it’s easy understand why fans of the original are skeptical about Spike Lee’s remake. Park’s movie, heralded as one of the best foreign films of all time, has attained cult status in the U.S. and around the world, so why mess with a masterpiece? The creators of Hollywood’s Oldboy promise they’ve honored their source material in addition to bringing something new to the work. The story line is basically the same: A businessman (in Lee’s version, he’s played by Josh Brolin from W. and Men in Black 3) is suddenly kidnapped and held captive for 20 years in a shoddy hotel room for no apparent reason. When he’s released, he vows to exact revenge on his kidnappers and unravel the mystery of his imprisonment. If Lee’s movie is anything like Park’s (the trailer foretells as much), you can expect an emotionally raw, psychologically twisted experience, full of blood, sex, plot pivots and gore, a continuously tracked fighting sequence involving a hammer and an ending that’s so unsettling, you’ll want a shower to cool down. (Deanna Pan) Rated R

PHILOMENA

Nov. 27 Philomena Lee, an elderly British woman, confides in her daughter that she gave birth to a son in Ireland 50 years earlier. Unwed at the time, she was forced to give her son up for adoption, but has never gone through a single day of her life without him in mind. Martin Sixsmith, a former government adviser out of a job, is looking for a story idea to bring to his editor. At a party, he hears of Philomena. Despite his detest for human interest stories, Martin is forced to follow through with the pitch. Together, he and Philomena investigate the life of her lost son and find themselves exploring America looking for answers. Starring Judi Dench and Steve Coogan, who also helped write the movie with Jeff Pope, and directed by Stephen Frears, the film, based on a true story, has received festival-circuit acclaim. (Kara Stermer) Rated R

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NEBRASKA THE ARMSTRONG LIE

Early December Few athletes have accomplished the sort of career faceplant performed by Lance Armstrong over the course of the past decade. The Texan went from winning seven consecutive Tour de Frances, convincing most of America to wear yellow rubber bracelets for a cause they didn’t necessarily understand, to essentially becoming Voldemort on a bicycle. Director Alex Gibney (he won an Oscar for his documentary Taxi to the Darkside and a nomination for the revolutionary Enron: The Smartest Guys in the Room) began following Armstrong in 2008 when he was mounting a comeback and got rare access. Along the way, Armstrong tells lie after lie about his performance-enhancing drug use, fooling a public that — as Gibney points out — may have wanted to be fooled all along. (MB) Rated R

LAST DAYS ON MARS

Early December We need to be a little more optimistic about our space travel if we’re ever going to put a human on another planet. Judging from recent films, it looks like we’re destined to get ourselves killed. If you saw Ridley Scott’s Prometheus, you know the drill. In Last Days on Mars, we have a crew that’s been on Mars for six months and is awaiting a ride home, which is quickly approaching. But the scientists have made headway into discovering life on the planet, and a pair of researchers head out on an unauthorized expedition and discover what they believe to be a massive life form. One little problem, though. It looks like whatever is under Mars’ red soil turns humans into zombie-like beings capable of killing everyone in their crew. The film is getting a limited release, but you can check it out now on video on demand. (MB) Rated PG-13

Early December Remember those Publishers Clearing House envelopes you’d find in the mail? The ones that, in bold lettering, exclaimed that you had just won a million bucks? You know there was always some poor soul out there who saw that mailer and figured, “Holy shit, I’m a millionaire!” without reading the fine print. Woody Grant is one of those poor souls in Alexander Payne’s muchhyped latest, Nebraska. Played with Oscar buzz by 77-year-old Bruce Dern, Woody, a reckless, lonely boozer, heads out from Montana to Nebraska to claim his fortune. He takes along his skeptical son (a post-SNL Will Forte), who’s humoring him, as Woody tells everyone he knows that he’s become a millionaire, gathering clingy new money-hungry friends along the way. Payne (Sideways, The Descendants, Election) shot the film in black and white, adding its already present sense of despair. (MB) Rated R


INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS

Dec. 6 Ahead of its release, much of the buzz around the Coen Brothers’ newest project has been about the soundtrack. Produced by T Bone Burnett (remember the O Brother, Where Art Thou? soundtrack?) and Marcus Mumford (of Mumford & Sons), the record is worth playing on repeat as you wait for December. It’s also a reason to be even more excited for the movie itself. The most haunting, stick-with-you songs come from actor Oscar Isaac, who plays our struggling folk singer hero. Looking for success in the 1960s Greenwich Village folk scene, Llewyn Davis is talented, but watches from the sidelines as his fellow artists, Justin Timberlake’s character “Jim” among them, find success. Throughout, Davis struggles to prove himself, use proper contraception when sleeping with his friend’s lady and travel the subway with a cat. (Heidi Groover) Rated R

OUT OF THE FURNACE

TYLER PERRY’S A MADEA CHRISTMAS

Dec. 13 Tyler Perry does it all — writing, directing, acting — playing Madea as she takes on the Christmas spirit in a slew of oneliners and sass. Madea is asked by her niece Eileen (Anna Maria Horsford) to spend Christmas in her daughter Lacey’s small town. (And by asked, I mean “bribed.”) Lacey (Tika Sumpter) is afraid that her mother will resent her decision to secretly marry a white boy (Eric Connor), and instead of confessing the marriage, tells her that Connor is just a simple farmhand. When the farmhand’s folks come to visit, comedic misunderstandings follow, as Madea attempts to clear things up with advice and threats of violence and advice. After all, nothing says “Christmas” like falling into cow poop and threatening to strangle someone repeatedly. (Emera Riley) Rated PG-13

AMERICAN HUSTLE

Dec. 6 After the years of playing Batman on the big screen, Christian Bale is back in a new American thriller. Out of the Furnace follows the story of Russell and Rodney, two brothers living in an economically depressed town in the Rust Belt. They dream of getting out and finding a better life somewhere else, until a cruel twist of fate lands Russell in prison. During his incarceration, Rodney gets mixed up in a crime ring — one of the Northeast’s most violent and ruthless. He mysteriously disappears, and when Russell gets out of prison, he takes seeking justice for his brother into his own hands. Casey Affleck, Zoe Saldana, and Woody Harrelson also star in this tense thriller. (K. Smith) Rated R

Dec. 18 Coming off the splendid Silver Linings Playbook, director David O. Russell is back, bringing the stars of that film, Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper, along. This time, the subject matter is a little more intense: he takes us back to the glittery 1970s for a crime drama about a group of corrupt politicians living the high life in New Jersey. Soon most of the cast is tangled in the web of the mafia as some become FBI informants. As if Cooper and Lawrence weren’t sufficient, the cast also includes Amy Adams, Christian Bale and Jeremy Renner. It sounds like a lot of other mafia flicks, but take a look at the fabulous costume designs and the fact that Cooper sports a perm, and you’ve got something special here. (MB) Rated R

THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG

ANCHORMAN 2: THE LEGEND CONTINUES

Dec. 13 Last year’s first installment of Peter Jackson’s The Hobbit was too long. But it felt good to once more experience the magnificence and horrors of Middle Earth (aka New Zealand) after a decade away. Working from Tolkien’s children’s book The Hobbit, along with text from the Lord of the Rings Appendices, Jackson and his team have managed to split the 300-page novel into three films (to the delight of New Line Cinema, no doubt). The Desolation of Smaug continues the journey of Bilbo (Martin Freeman), Gandalf (Ian McKellen) and their dwarf compatriots as they traverse mysterious terrain in order to take back the dwarves’ rightful home, the Lonely Mountain, from the evil dragon Smaug (voiced by Benedict Cumberbatch). Based on past trilogies (LOTR, the first Star Wars), this second movie can only be better than the first one, and probably will be the series’ highlight. (Laura Johnson) Rated PG-13

Dec. 20 In his trenchant 2004 masterpiece Anchorman, Adam McKay captivated audiences and critics with his uncompromising cinéma vérité profile of legendary San Diego anchorman Ron Burgundy. He brought his lens to bear not just on the cutthroat atmosphere of internal and external news rivalries, but on the entire 1970s zeitgeist — gender equality, male ego, animal cruelty, and even, through a simple but wise weathercaster, mental illness. In a fashion reminiscent of Before Sunset and Michael Apted’s 7 Up sequels, Anchorman 2 leaps forward into the next decade, where an older, presumably wiser Burgundy must reckon with the dialectical tensions inherent to class, race, sexual ethics, and death itself. Also, scotchy scotch scotch. (Daniel Walters) Not yet rated.

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BELIEVE

Dec. 25 “Truly inspiring to be able to come here. Anne was a great girl,” Justin Bieber, the defining voice of his generation, wrote at the Anne Frank house about the young Holocaust victim back in April. “Hopefully she would have been a Belieber.” Now with the tour documentary “Believe,” Justin Bieber invites all of us, like Anne Frank, to become Beliebers ourselves. “Produced by Scooter Braun,” the trailer says, referring both to the movie and Bieber’s adolescent, teenage, and young adult years. Believe looks past all the vandalism, drugs, sagging pants and mop-bucket urination, and lets Bieber explain how he stays humble and level-headed amid all the adulation. Then it’s back to the high-pitched cooing, from both fans and singer. This time in 3D. (DW) Rated PG.

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THE SECRET LIFE OF WALTER MITTY

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GRUDGE MATCH

26 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Dec. 25 Sylvester Stallone, of course, was Rocky Balboa and Robert De Niro played Jake LaMotta in Raging Bull. So they both know the world of fictitious boxing fairly well. So why not make a movie that features both? That’s essentially the thinking beyond this bizarrely conceived film about two former boxing rivals who come together 30 years after their most recent fight to go at each other one more time. The conceit is ridiculous, but Stallone and De Niro might have the comedic chops to liven it up. They get help from Kevin Hart, Alan Arkin and Kim Basinger in a solid cast that might save this clumsy concept. (MB) Rated PG-13

Dec. 25 Based on 2,000 words written in 1939, this story (also made into a 1947 movie) is the tale of a man who escapes his daily reality to fantasy lands where he’s the hero he can’t seem to be in real life. In this modern version, directed by and starring Ben Stiller, Mitty is on the photo staff of Life magazine as it prepares to publish its final issue. When a photo negative goes missing and the female coworker (Kristen Wiig) that Mitty can’t find the courage to ask out offers to help him find it, the film’s make-believe and real adventures collide. The trailers alone are mesmerizing, promising a beautiful, vibrant comedy punctuated with melancholy. In the end, the story’s staying power comes with tackling that feeling we can all relate to: that we haven’t done enough or seen enough, and that maybe it’s time to start living some of our daydreams. (HG) Rated PG


WALKING WITH DINOSAURS

Dec. 20 More advanced than the animation in Land Before Time but just as heartwarming, Walking with Dinosaurs, set in the Late Cretaceous period more than 70 million years ago, follows three dinos — Patchi, Scowler, and Juniper — as they transition out of childhood into adulthood and lead their herd in migrating. Based on the BBC series of the same name, the film is produced by BBC Earth, responsible for the wildly successful Planet Earth. Directors Neil Nightingale and Barry Cook feature more than 10 different types of computer-animated dinosaurs in liveaction settings similar to the conditions the creatures were exposed to during the period, giving viewers an accurate sense of what the world would have looked like during the time of dinosaurs. Filmed throughout Alaska and on an island off of New Zealand, the movie, set to be released in 3D right before Christmas, is incredibly visually appealing and spectacularly produced. (Kara Stermer) Unrated

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of his eyeballs, and running into a pair of creepy, chanting sisters convinces his friends as well as Jesse that the bite is a mark, and he’s been invaded by dark forces. Written and directed by Christopher Landon, this horror film is shown in traditional Paranormal fashion, as Jesse’s descent is portrayed with shaky camera movements and crappy lighting. (ER) Not yet rated

THE WOLF OF WALL STREET

Dec. 25 It’s a world where Leonardo DiCaprio’s skin is dyed bright orange (but still looks outrageously sexy), Jonah Hill’s veneers overtake his mouth, Matthew McConaughey beats his chest monkey-style to emphasize his conversations, midgets are flung at bull’s-eyes for sport and ladies get wads of Benjamins taped to their bodies, just because. Welcome to the realm of The Wolf of Wall Street, a movie based on the illustrious career of stock trader Jordan Belfort, who, before going to jail for 22 months in the ’90s for illegal brokerage practices, partied harder than Lindsay Lohan could dream of. Directed by Martin Scorsese, teaming here with DiCaprio for the fifth time, this over-the-top material could turn severely annoying in the hands of a lesser talent, but with Scorsese will be one of this year’s highlights. The Wolf of Wall Street is exactly the pretentious film about pretentious assholes that we need at Christmastime. (LJ) Rated R

PARANORMAL ACTIVITY: THE MARKED ONES

Jan. 3 Hinted at in Paranormal Activity Four, this spin-off stars Jesse (Andrew Jacobs), who during a party checks out the mysterious apartment downstairs and discovers what seems to be evidence of black magic. When he wakes up with a bite on his arm, at first he writes it off as nothing but a wild night. Losing time, pulling black, goopy things out

HER

Jan. 10 This is a story of boy meets girl. Boy falls in love with girl. Girl falls in love with boy. The twist? Girl is a self-aware computer operating system that yearns, wonders and emotes like a human being. Imagine a Siri that laughs at your jokes, goes on dinner dates, and finally starts getting your voice-to-text messages right. Spike Jonze’s films stars Joaquin Phoenix as disheveled, sensitive writer Theodore Twombly and Scarlett Johansson’s raspy, seductive contralto as Samantha, Twombly’s sentient digital personal assistant, living in an L.A. in the not-quite-so-distant future. But Her isn’t a satirical take on our increasingly close and dependent relationships with technology. Raise your hand if you sleep with your smartphone! As Jonze told The New York Times, the film “really was about the way we relate to each other and long to connect: our inabilities to connect, fears of intimacy, all the stuff you bring up with any other human being.” (DP) Rated R 

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 27 11/5/13 2:15 PM


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Senior Class After a career in the shadows, Sam Dower is ready to lead Gonzaga BY HOWIE STALWICK

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am Dower Jr. knows he has huge shoes to fill. Literally and figuratively. Dower has been called upon to replace 7-foot Kelly Olynyk. First-team All-American Kelly Olynyk. Firstround NBA draft pick Kelly Olynyk. Dower does not deny that the biggest challenge facing him and his teammates this season is replacing… Mike Hart. Former walk-on Mike Hart. Two-points-per-game Mike Hart. “I feel that’s going to be the biggest thing we’re going to miss, is Mike Hart,” Dower says. “A guy that comes in and just gives his heart and soul every night, brings that effort and energy to the team that really picks us up.” Dower filled in quite nicely for Olynyk and Hart in Gonzaga’s season opener last Saturday. The 6-foot-9, 255-pound Dower played forward and center in the same dominant fashion as Olynyk and displayed Hart’s tremendous energy, leading the Bulldogs ...continued on next page

Sam Dower snagged a career high 17 rebounds against Bryant last week. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 29


CULTURE | COLLEGE HOOPS “SENIOR CLASS,” CONTINUED... with 21 points and a career-high 17 rebounds in a 100-76 rout of Bryant University. “Sam was spectacular,” Gonzaga coach Mark Few said. “He was flying to the rim, getting rebounds in traffic and outside his area. It was the best I’ve ever seen him rebound.” Few also praised Dower for his shutdown defense on Bryant star Alex Francis. Defense and rebounding have been problem areas for Dower, but the fifth-year senior (he redshirted as a freshman) appears ready to blossom as a first-year starter after playing behind current NBA players Robert Sacre, Elias Harris and Olynyk. “It’s my last year,” Dower says. “It’s my turn to be leader of this team rather than in the past, where I was more of a follower.” Dower, who made all seven of his previous college starts last season, has always been gifted offensively. Despite playing just 16 minutes per game last season (seventh on the team), Dower ranked fifth with 6.9 points and was fourth in field-goal shooting percentage at 55.8. He averaged a career-low 2.7 rebounds last season, but teammate Gary Bell Jr. says Dower’s breakout performance against Bryant came as no surprise. “I feel like he’s been able to do this his whole time here,” Bell says. “I’m coming in getting more confident,” Dower says. “There’s more of a sense of urgency as well.” “It’s his time,” Bell says. Dower certainly is making his father proud. At his dad’s request, he asked that Jr. be added to his name for media purposes this season. “He put the basketball in my hands,” Dower recalls. “I remember he said, ‘Whenever you can beat me, you’re going to be good.’ I didn’t beat him until my senior year in high school, or junior year.” Dower, from Brooklyn Park, Minn., did not make his high school varsity

LADY ZAGS

Check back next week for a rundown on the Gonzaga women’s squad. team until midway through his sophomore season. Two years later, he turned down Marquette, Minnesota and Iowa to come to Gonzaga after averaging 23.9 points and 11.5 rebounds as a senior at Osseo High in the Minneapolis suburbs. Dower may be on the verge of a similar breakthrough senior year. The personable young man is enrolled in graduate school after earning a degree in public relations last spring, but plans to pursue a pro basketball career before putting his degree to use. Before heading to the pros, Dower wants to follow the lead of Olynyk, his close friend and former roommate, and help the Zags earn a No. 1 national ranking for the second straight year. “We’re still as confident and hungry as we were last year,” Dower says. “We’re trying to get to that No. 1 spot again.” 

30 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Forward D.J. Shelton will be a key component to WSU’s offense this season

WASHINGTON STATE COUGARS

2012-13 RECORD: 13-19 OVERALL, 4-14 PAC-12 CONFERENCE CONFERENCE FINISH: TIED FOR 11TH (LAST) KEY RETURNING PLAYERS: G ROYCE WOOLRIDGE, G DAVONTÉ LACY, F D.J. SHELTON PRESEASON CONFERENCE POLL PLACING: 12TH (LAST)

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he Washington State basketball team has no established point guard. No established inside scorer. No established defensive scheme. Does that mean the Cougars have no hope? “I think there’s a little bit more than people realize,” head coach Ken Bone says. Bone says he “can understand” why Pac-12 Conference media, voting in their preseason poll, picked WSU — by a wide margin — to finish last. After all, the Cougars finished in the cellar last season with Pac-12 scoring champion Brock Motum, who now plays professionally in Italy. In four years at the helm, Bone has guided the Cougars to a pair of last-place finishes and a pair of deep runs in non-NCAA national tournaments. The Cougars are 26-46 in conference games under Bone (71-65 overall) and have yet to crack the upper half of the league standings. Many fans want Bone gone. The Cougars finished 13-19 (4-14 Pac-12) last year in Bone’s first losing season at WSU. Bone has three years left on the seven-year contract he signed with former athletic director Jim Sterk. His $850,000 annual salary is guaranteed. Current AD Bill Moos, who rarely makes any public comments about WSU coaches that do not radiate with praise, has been sparing in public compliments about Bone. The coach said he was uncertain about his job status at the end of last season, and two weeks passed before Bone and Moos met and it was announced that Bone would return. Bone did himself no favors when, for the second straight season, he suspended a capable point guard prior to the season. Three-year starter Reggie Moore was kicked off the team last season, and junior college

transfer Danny Lawhorn recently quit school. The Cougars have three returning starters in Royce Woolridge, DaVonté Lacy and D.J. Shelton, plus part-time starter Dexter KernichDrew. Bone says all four have improved their overall games. Woolridge, a natural shooting guard who shared point guard duties last season, is back at the point. He will continue to slide over to the wing at times. Last season, Woolridge finished second on the Cougars in scoring (11.0 points per game) and first in assists (2.7), steals (1.0) and 3-point shooting percentage (38.1). He lit up a quality Oregon squad for 36 points. The 6-foot-8 Shelton likes to shoot 3-pointers, but Bone also needs him to score inside on a perimeter-oriented team. Shelton’s rebounding is another key. “Making shots is just a bonus,” Shelton says. “I think if I’m doing things like that (rebounding) good, we’re just a better team and opponents can’t stop us.” The Cougars need help on the glass from 7-foot junior Jordan Railey, an Iowa State transfer. Point guard Ike Iroegbu, wing Que Johnson and forward Josh Hawkinson show promise as freshmen. Bone wants to press more and apply more pressure defense in general. Asked if the Cougars can succeed with that style of play — particularly with officials cracking down on the use of hands and arms on defense this season — Bone said, “That’s a great question.” — HOWIE STALWICK


2ND

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2012-13 RECORD: 12-18 OVERALL, 7-11 WAC CONFERENCE FINISH: 6TH (OUT OF 10 TEAMS) KEY RETURNING PLAYERS: G CONNOR HILL, C JOE KAMMERER, F STEPHEN MADISON PRESEASON CONFERENCE POLL PLACING: 2ND

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1323 Sherman (Corner of 14th & Sherman, CdA) 208-391-2867 www.traditionsofchristmasnw.com

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hings are fresh over in Moscow for the Vandals: the Idaho men’s basketball team features a total of 10 players who didn’t take the floor last year. Five are true freshmen, joining redshirts and transfers for a new-look team that’s most noticeably missing center Kyle Barone, last season’s Western Athletic Conference player of the year now playing professionally in Poland. That’s not the only change. The WAC was dismantled in the offseason and reconstructed to feature six new teams: Cal State Bakersfield, Chicago State, Grand Canyon, MissouriKansas City, Texas-Pan American and Utah Valley. If you’re a Vandal fan and had to Google a few of those schools, you’re forgiven. The change puts Idaho, though very young, in a good spot in not-so-good conference. The Vandals tipped off their season at home Saturday, battling back and forth with Western Illinois and squeaking out a closer-than-comfortable 67-64 win. A positive sign was the play of senior Stephen Madison, who scored 21 points, snagged 14 rebounds and dished five assists in what head coach Don Verlin hopes will be a trend for a team still searching for its identity. They’ll find another positive in Glen Dean, a 24-year-old point guard who spent his first two years at Eastern Washington, then played for Utah last season. He’s transferred to Idaho for his final year of eligibility, joining his half brother Perrion Callandret, a true freshman guard who could earn some minutes this season. They faced a big road test this week, visiting Oklahoma and taking on the Sooners in a Coaches vs. Cancer contest. The rest of their non-conference schedule, including a Nov. 27 game at rival Boise State, looks manageable. — MIKE BOOKEY

Elephants on the Plateau • Beaded Bags • Coyote • A Gathering Place • All Aboard • Aluminum Pot Lines • African American Mayor • Folk Art Storytelling: Pearl • Too Much Politics? • Play Things • Land Patterns • Founding Father • “Jaco Land” • Irrigation Water • The Jesus Corner • Women in Service • Everyone’s Great Fire • Trent Alley • What’s the Use? • Extraordinary Inventor • Community Gatherings • Indian Congress • The Palouse • Outdoor Play • Japanese Brides • Small Town Survival • Art and People • White-out! • Comfort King Combine Cab • Women’s Advocate • City Promotion • Kentucky Derby Champ • Reach for the Ring! • Uranium Fever • Keeping Healthy • Temperance to Micro-brews • Last Log Drive • Tall Tales • Patty Warashina • Floating Worlds • Bank Murals • Silver Valley • Make-believe Roles • The Doll Who Crossed the Sea • Second Wave of Feminism • Lilac Bloomsday Run • Chief Spokane Garry • Expo ‘74 Legacy • All Aboard • Paleobotanist • Stage Coach • Unearthed • Hutterite: A World of Grace • Trapeze Artist • The Libby Studio • Caring for Cannon • Mount Spokane • Campbell House • Combustible Negatives • EWSHS Centennial • The Return of the Four-Leggeds, 2003 • Richard Lewis • Fresh Air for All • Personal Flair • Storytelling Machines • Davenport Hotel • Water Power • Eye Strain • Joey Lavadour • Julyamsh • Dramatic Landscape • Bing & Mildred • Spokane Indians Baseball • Fairchild’s Cold War • Harold Balazs • The Spokane Tribe of Indians • The Kalispel Indian Community • Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation • Coeur d’Alene Tribe • Northern Plateau Cultural Groups • Take Flight • The Magic Mushroom • Turning the Earth • My Father’s Workbench • Breaking Blue • First Museum Collection • Walla Walla • Last Log Drive • Petland • Browne’s Addition • Carriage to Automobile • Folk Art Storytelling: Amos McKee • Colorful Symbols • Grand Coulee Dam • Behind The Scenes • Trent Alley •

OPENING IN 100 DAYS

Senior forward Stephen Madison

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 31


Injured in an Accident?

CULTURE | COLLEGE HOOPS

WHITWORTH PIRATES 2012-13 RECORD: 26-4, 14-2 NORTHWEST CONFERENCE CONFERENCE FINISH: 1ST KEY RETURNING PLAYERS: G DUSTIN MCCONNELL, C TAYLOR FARNSWORTH, G GEORGE VALLE, G COLTON MCCARGAR PRESEASON NATIONAL DIVISION III RANKING: 12

WE CAN HELP! Deissner Law Office 509.462.0827 www.deissnerlaw.com 1707 W. Broadway Spokane WA 99201

T

Licensed in Washington and Idaho

Written by DANIEL J. SULLIVAN An Off tthe Wall Christmas Carol Farce

Last Season’s Big Sky Freshman of the Year Venky Jois.

EASTERN WASHINGTON EAGLES

NOV 14-17 & 21-24 Produced by special arrangement with Samuel French Inc.

Thurs -Sat, 7:30pm Sundays, 2pm SPARTAN THEATRE

Spokane Falls Community College 3410 W Ft George Wright Dr Building 5

www.spokanefalls.edu/drama TICKETS AT DOOR (1/2 hr before show) Suggested Donation: $10 SFCC Students — no charge w/ ID No Reserved Seats

Zulu Wire Baskets Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm 35 W. Main, Spokane 509-464-7677

32 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013

2012-13 RECORD: 10-21 OVERALL, 7-13 BIG SKY CONFERENCE FINISH: 9TH (OUT OF 11 TEAMS) KEY RETURNING PLAYERS: F VENKY JOIS, F MARTIN SEIFERTH PRESEASON CONFERENCE POLL PLACING: 5TH

here’s no sign of a slowdown for the Whitworth University men’s basketball team. They just seem to reload each winter, steadily making a name for themselves in Division IIl. The Pirates are coming off their fourth consecutive Division III Sweet Sixteen appearance, which ended in Spokane last March when Whitworth, then ranked sixth, was knocked off by Mary Hardin-Baylor. The Pirates managed 26 wins, return most of their offensive output and are primed to equal that figure. They enter the season ranked No. 12 in the nation, and third-year head coach Matt Logie will look to sophomore George Valle to continue the scoring that made him a freshman standout, averaging 12.3 points per game. Down low, redshirt junior and former Mead star Taylor Farnsworth provides rebounding and post scoring. For all-around leadership, Logie relies on senior Dustin McConnell, a guard from Clarkston, Wash., who started all 30 games last year and averaged 13.7 points. Whitworth’s cozy gym holds just over 1,600 fans, making for a raucous environment, and tickets are just $10 for adults and $5 for seniors. That’s a deal for a brand of basketball this good. — MIKE BOOKEY

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he Eastern Washington Eagles, coming off a rough 10-21 season, are looking to make waves in a tougherthan-usual Big Sky Conference. But they’re still young — there’s not a single senior on the roster, and only two juniors who have taken the court for the Eagles will suit up this season. “I have always said your team is as good as your seniors are, but we don’t have any seniors. We have sophomores and juniors that have played more than other sophomores and juniors,” says head coach Jim Hayford, entering his third year at the helm in Cheney. “When you look at the amount of playing time and experience sophomores or juniors at other schools in our conference have had, I think we compete very favorably.” Some of that youth will be maturing on the court this year, especially Venky Jois, last season’s Big Sky freshman of the year. The 6-foot-7 sophomore scored 22 points and grabbed 11 rebounds Sunday in Cheney as the Eagles routed Pacific (Ore.) 87-58 in their opener. The Australian is one of seven international players on the Eastern roster. The Eagles will depend upon 6-10 German Martin Seiferth to anchor their defense down low. In the backcourt, Hayford hopes Tyler Harvey and Spokane native Parker Kelly can provide 3-point shooting to help balance Eastern’s scoring attack. The Eagles’ Big Sky schedule will be tough, as will their non-conference slate, which includes a visit to Washington on Sunday. Eastern travels to Northern California to face St. Mary’s on Dec. 8 before jetting off to take on UConn, currently ranked 19th, on Dec. 28. — MIKE BOOKEY

Guard Colton McCargar is part of a strong group of seniors for the Pirates.


CULTURE | DIGEST

THEATER NORA I

n 1981, one year before the release of his epic-length Fanny and Alexander (more than five hours in its televised entirety), Ingmar Bergman picked up A Doll’s House with a view to trimming its fat. The famed director slimmed Henrik Ibsen’s play to its principal quintet and cut dialogue, condensing three acts into two and achieving that severe brevity of form for which the Swedes are renowned. His adaptation focused — to the exclusion of nearly all else — on Nora Helmer and her self-emancipation in the face of her husband Torvald’s complacency and condescension. Nothing speaks to his essentialist approach better than its one-word title. Directed here by Wes Deitrick, Bergman’s pareddown reworking is well suited to Stage Left’s unusual venue, which has no dedicated backstage, curtain or elevated rostrum. Nora (Nicole Petrilli) is in all but one scene; the others wait upstage in statuesque stillness, half-obscured by panels or screens and bathed in light of solid colors. When they do enter, it’s silently and suddenly, like ghosts manifesting in a room. The cast doesn’t seem entirely comfortable with this nontraditional staging. More than once, the terseness of Bergman’s script leads to awkward interplay, and the characters’ existentialism is generally interpreted as impassivity (any talk of “unspeakable emptiness” really ought to have some heft to it). On opening night that took a serious toll on pacing, exacerbated by some actors’ dubious command of their lines. The resentment and despair that culminate in Nora’s leaving are theoretically there on paper, but the lasting image is of an all-too-pathetic

901 W E S T S P R A G U E A V E , S P O K A N E | 5 09. 227 . 7 638

Frank Vigola, Vinny Raniolo and Peppino D’Agostino

Wed November 20 | 7:30pm Torvald (Jason Young) left to weep in self-pity as the lights dim. Unlike the original, it ends not with the bang of a slammed door, but a whimper. A Doll’s House and its still-provocative ending — if not pro-feminist, then at least anti-patriarchal — resulted in scandal and sellout shows when it debuted, and the play clearly resonated enough with audiences to have played a part in theatrical repertoires for more than a century by the time Bergman revised it. Ironically, Bergman had played his own part in four failed marriages when his adaptation first appeared. Maybe Torvald would have been a more fitting title. — E.J. IANNELLI

To benefit PBS Television

Nora • Through Nov. 24: Fri and Sat at 7:30 pm; Sun at 2 pm • $10 • Spokane Stage Left • 108 W. Third • spokanestageleft.org • 838-9727 L ATEST CD

For Your Consideration

“Broken Doll & Odds & Ends”

BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

BOOK | Bill Bryson has always been able to turn a phrase, underline the ironies and keep the pages turning with the best of them. I loved A Short History of Nearly Everything — a near-masterpiece in the great art of nonfiction writing. And his slender volume Shakespeare is another of my all-time faves. Now the Midwest native (who went expat and now lives in England) has turned his eyes back homeward in ONE SUMMER: AMERICA, 1927. Turns out, it was a pretty pivotal season in a pivotal year. America had no idea what lay in store come 1929 and the Crash, and it was enjoying itself immensely — it was the era of Al Capone, Charles Lindbergh and Babe Ruth. Bryson brushes the dust off these — and many other — story lines, painting a picture of a nation rushing forward just before it stumbled.

MUSIC | The Inland Northwest has had some real quality time with the Avett Brothers over the past halfyear. First they played the Festival at Sandpoint, and then last month they rocked a nearly full INB Center. The band kind of defies description — they’re footstompers with bluegrass flourishes for one song, troubadours with a sweet ballad the next and then punk rockers wielding angry axes. This is one tight band. (Oh, and Seth Avett sports a pretty mean beard.) Their latest record, MAGPIE AND THE DANDELION, is filled with songs they cut with superproducer Rick Rubin during The Carpenter sessions back in 2011. They’re all over the map — in a good way — on their ode to Ecclesiastes, “Vanity,” while the banjo/harmonica-infused “Open Ended Life” is the purest form of Avett Brothers — pure awesome.

TV | It was 50 years ago this month — Nov. 22, to be exact — when JOHN F. KENNEDY was killed. The shock waves never really stopped — and neither have the theories. His murder was so fraught with suspicion that Lee Harvey Oswald never felt like the whole story. And if you want to wallow in conspiracy, Oliver Stone’s JFK is still a riveting ride. But our friend television will be filled with new stuff all month. On PBS, NOVA is producing a special Cold Case JFK episode revisiting the evidence with modern CSI techniques (KSPS World, Comcast Ch. 313, 11/19 at 9 pm); American Experience offers its own two-part special (KSPS World, 11/17-18 at 9 pm). And Nat Geo airs The Final Hours, narrated by Bill Paxton (11/15 at 6 pm), who as a kid was there on the parade route in Dallas that terrible day.

DAN CUMMINS LOCAL COMIC ICON FEATURING HIS CEREBRAL OBSERVATIONAL HUMOR

MARC YAFFEY RIGHTFULLLY CONSIDERED ONE OF THE KINGS OF NATIVE AMERICAN COMEDY

HARRY J. RILEY LOCAL RISING STAR & TWO TIME WINNER OF THE VALLEYFEST PG COMEDY CUP

Saturday, November 23 | 8pm

Stay at

Drink at For Reservations Call: 509.747.1041 or visit www.hotelrubyspokane.com

*A $2 RESTORATION FEE IS ADDED TO EACH TICKET COST.

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NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 33


Holiday Pulse Food

Health-conscious holiday shoppers with a sweet tooth will have their faces pressed to the window of BOOTS BAKERY (24 W. Main • bootsbakery.com), where you’ll find treats like Muddy Buddies (for the uninitiated, that’s Chex cereal tossed in melted peanut butter and chocolate), seasonal muffins and cupcakes, and mouth-watering cakes and cookies. Most — if not all — of these delights are vegan and gluten-free, and some are even soy and sugar-free too. “We cater to all kinds of customer requests and do tons of special-order cakes and cupcakes,” says owner Alison Collins. “We

SOMETHING SWEET offer all these options not just because people have a lot of different dietary needs, but because, especially at the holidays, there are more opportunities to indulge. If you eat one of our treats that isn’t laden with dairy and sugar, you’re not going to feel like you’ve overindulged. It’s a chance to have something sweet and naughty without adding to your waistline.” SWEET FROSTINGS (15 S. Washington • sweetfrostingsbakeshop.com) has some

gluten-free options as well, even though the shop itself looks as if it were plucked from your childhood fantasies. This brightly decorated

specialty store bills itself as a “blissful bakeshop” and features row after appetizing row of creative, colorful cupcakes. Flavors, including Chocolate Decadence, Red Velvet, Salted Caramel, Strawberry Champagne and dozens more, rotate regularly for maximum variety. And just because the weather has turned colder, it doesn’t mean that the scrumptious ice-cream cones and cakes from BEN & JERRY’S (River Park Square,

third floor • facebook.com/BenJerrysSpokane) are suddenly

off-limits.

THIS HOLIDAY SEASON, DOWNTOWN SPOKANE IS THE PLACE TO BE. COME VISIT THE INLAND NORTHWEST’S MOST EXCITING DESTINATION.

Events JINGLE ALL THE WAY

Nov.16 at 10am - The best way to kick off the holiday season is to add some jingle to your step, literally. Tie some jingle bells to your running shoes & usher in the most festive season of the year by participating in the annual Jingle Bell Run/Walk for Arthritis. Named one of the “most incredible” as well as one of largest holiday-themed races fighting arthritis, the run/walk highly encourages participants to don fabulous, holiday-themed costumes: Santa hats, reindeer antlers, elf shoes — you name it. The fact that the event raises funds to fight arthritis, the leading cause of disability in the U.S., only adds to the merriment. There’s still time to gather a team & find some costumes, late registration starts at 9am the day of. $10-$40 • Riverfront Park • 507 N. Howard St. spokanejinglebellrun.kintera.org (315-9862)

ICE SKATING

Now Open - Riverfront Park’s Ice Palace is now open through March 2, Tue-Sun from 11am-5pm, & also Tue-Thu from 7-8:30pm & Fri-Sat from 7-10pm. Extended holiday hours TBA. Adults $4.50; kids age 3-12, military & seniors (62+) $3.50. Skate rental $3.50. (Free admission coupons available from participating downtown retailers, good from Nov. 22-Dec. 19, excludes skate rental.) spokaneriverfrontpark.com (625-6601)

YULETIDE

Nov. 15-17 - The 35th annual arts show features prominent local artists displaying their work in a fundraiser event benefiting the Spokane Art School’s educational mission. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. 1st Ave. northwestmuseum.org (325-3001)

BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL

Nov. 15-16 - The touring film festival featuring outdoor winter sports films stops in Spokane for a special series of screening hosted by Mountain Gear. Prices TBA. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638)

SPOKANE SYMPHONY

Nov. 16-17 - As part of its Classics concert series, the Symphony presents “Dazzling Brilliance” featuring pianist Jon Nakamatsu. $15-$45. Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox, 1001 W. Riverside Ave. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200)

MANNHEIM STEAMROLLER

Nov. 20 at 7:30pm - The popular orchestra rock group presents “A Christmas Celebration” concert, featuring holiday favorites performed to a backdrop of multimedia effects. $25-$95. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000)

OUR TOWN

Nov. 21-Dec. 14 - See this classic play telling the story of smalltown America at the turn of the 20th century. Performances held Wed-Sat at 7:30pm; select Sat & Sun matinées at 2pm. $12-$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. interplayerstheatre.org (455-7529)

SWEET FROSTINGS

34 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TRANS-SIBERIAN ORCHESTRA

Nov. 22 at 8 pm - The popular rock opera group celebrates 15 years of touring with a final, encore tour of its multi-platinum record “The Lost Christmas Eve.” $31-$61. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000)


Nightlife

Booking a holiday party? A post-shopping get-together? Then don’t overlook the RIVER PARK SQUARE FAN SUITE (riverparksquare.com/ fan-suite), a 1,060-squarefoot entertainment space on the third floor of River Park Square. “It’s a unique venue with an intimate setting that offers a whole host of possibilities for group entertainment. It’s surrounded by the very best shopping in Spokane, convenient parking, and is situated right in the heart of downtown,” says Elizabeth Mills, marketing director at River Park Square. The upscale venue has all the coziness of your living room but features a trio of highdefinition TVs, a bar, a fridge, and optional catering from in-house restaurants or food court vendors. It can accommodate 25, and basic rental

The City’s parking enforcement PARKING RANGERS staff also serve as parking ambassadors, and they can give you directions and

COMFY HANGOUTS

answer your questions related to parking. Now known as the Parking Services Group, they work closely with the Downtown Spokane Partnership and downtown businesses. Kids 4-12 can find nice, affordable gifts at Santa Express. Proceeds from this annual fundraiser benefit the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery. Santa Express is located in the skywalk level of the Crescent Court and is open seven days a week, Nov. 23 through Dec. 23, Mon-Sat, 10am-8pm, & Sun, 11am-6pm. Call 535-3155 is brought to you by the Downtown Spokane Partnership and the Business Improvement District in conjunction with the Inlander. For more info go to DowntownSpokane.net FOOD - Fine Dining SHOPPING - Eclectic Choices

JUST FOR KIDS

HOLIDAY PULSE

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB

costs just $80 for four hours. ZOLA (22 W. Main • zolainspokane.com) offers a great place to kick back and socialize. Their late happy hour menu starts at just $4 and features the venue’s signature mac ’n’ cheese as well as pork sliders and smokehouse tacos. There’s frequent live entertainment that runs the

NEXT WEEK’S PULSE

10% off for groups of 5 gift cards or more.*

musical gamut: rock, reggae, blues and more. For a bit of international flavor, try LUCKY’S IRISH PUB (408 W. Sprague • facebook. com/luckysirishpubspokane),

where “Irish Thursdays” bring live Irish music and, naturally, plenty of beer specials.

, THEY GROW IT, MAKE IT CATCH IT, & SELL IT!

COME IN TODAY FOR THE NEWEST & FRESHEST YOU CAN BUY! SPOKANE’S YEAR-ROUND FARMERS & ARTISAN’S MARKETPLACE DOWNTOWN AT 2ND & BROWNE (24 W. 2ND AVE) THUR-SAT, 10AM -6PM, SUN 11AM-5PM SPOKANEPUBLICMARKET.ORG SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

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800 899 1482 davenporthotelcollection.com * $100 per card minimum.

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 35


Shopping

UNDER ONE ROOF

The SPOKANE PUBLIC MARKET (24 W. 2nd • spokanepublicmarket.org) often gets confused

from a vendor who calls himself the Scone Ranger, as well as a beer and wine shop that sources with the Main Market Co-op and the Downtown all of its beverages from within a 25-mile radius. Farmers’ Market. It’s neither — but it’s also a little “That’s what surprises people when they bit of both. Inside are around 30 local, independent come in for the first time,” says manager Dennis food and craft vendors with wares ranging from Frederick. “We have everything. You can come horseshoe art to artisanal English toffee. There’s down and eat, relax, and listen to live music wild-caught Alaskan seafood, fresh-roasted coffee, while supporting local farmers.” He notes that, pasture-raised beef, regional fruit and produce, in addition to food, there are fresh-cut flowers, competition-style barbecue sauce, gourmet scones health and beauty products, and one-of-a-kind artwork for sale. That artwork includes traditional handmade pottery, along with dishes fashioned from recycled glass and conversation starters made of reclaimed iron. Whether you’re preparing to entertain for the holidays or on the hunt for A fundraiser to support Mobius Children’s Museum, seasonal gifts with a little something in conjunction with Christmas Tree Elegance extra to them, the Spokane Public Market is ideal for shoppers who want to focus on what’s local and unique. “Come down and enjoy the flair and authenticity of the products,” Frederick says. “There’s something for every budget.” The market is open Thursday Join us at The Davenport Hotel through Sunday. Grand Pennington Ballroom

10th Annual Mobius Kids Santa Breakfast Fundraiser Saturday, December 7, 2013 8:30a.m.-10:30a.m.

SPOKANE PUBLIC MARKET

for a magical morning of holiday festivities!

Tickets

$25 per person

includes breakfast, festive activities & a visit with Santa!

(Children 12 months or younger may attend for free)

Pictures with Santa available for an additional charge. Photos taken by Beautiful Photo Studio.

!

A casual, yet upscale dining option featuring items made from scratch with organic, fresh and local ingredients.

YOUR DESTINATION FOR GREAT COCKTAILS, FOOD, AND MUSIC HOME OF THE RAINDROP MARTINI

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Purchase tickets at Mobius Children’s Museum, mobiusspokane.org, or by calling 509-321-7121. Title Sponsor:

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Supporting Sponsors:

1007 W. 1st Ave • Downtown Spokane (509) 456-5656 501 E. Sherman • Downtown Coeur d’Alene (208) 930-4762 scratchspokane.com

36 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

1009 W. 1st Ave. :: Spokane (next to Scratch Restaurant) 509.456.5656 :: rainspokane.com


The $2 Pint

Drinking beers on the cheap every day of the week BY CHEY SCOTT AND LISA WAANANEN

I

t’s a little before 6 on a Friday evening at Mootsy’s, and it’s dim and warm inside the narrow downtown bar. Somebody put Bob Dylan’s “Don’t Think Twice, It’s All Right” on the jukebox, and the final harmonica strains are cutting through the din of conversation. The floor in back is cleared for a show later on, and the folks hunched along the bar and huddled in booths still wearing their coats might be there early, or they might’ve been there all afternoon. Sidle up to the bar and order two pints of Ninkasi IPA. “Four dollars,” the barkeep says. That’s right, four. Not four apiece — four bucks total for two full pints of craft beer. Such is the magic of the $2 pint. Elusive but not impossible to find, the $2 pint can be found all over town, with all qualities of beer, every night of the week — you just need to know where to look.

MONDAY

Some people think it’s weird to drink on Monday nights, but they’re probably the same people who go around whining about Mondays. For the cheapest deal out there, hit up Brooklyn Deli (or Brooklyn Nights, if you get there late) for $1 pints of PBR on draft. If you want a wider selection, head up north to Poole’s Public House, where Micro Monday means all microbrews are $3 a pint. The Screaming Yak also offers $3 micros, with a rotating selection that typically includes at least a few local options.

TUESDAY

Tuesday can be a slow night for drinking, which makes it a great night for specials. In Browne’s Addition, Pacific Avenue Pizza is frequently packed with people making the most of $2 pint night, which includes a rotating list of microbrews. At The Viking, choose any beer from the famously long tap list for $3 after 7 pm. In the Perry District, the Lantern Tap House does something a little different by letting drinkers pick the pint special. Each week, customers vote on which regional craft beer they want featured — recent choices include Uinta’s Hop Notch IPA and Deschutes’ Jubelale — and the following Tuesday those pints are just $2.50 after 6 pm.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

WEDNESDAY

If hearing the term “Hump Day” makes you want to drink, Spokane’s got you covered. All day and night, the Checkerboard Bar offers domestic pints and the local Budge Brothers’ Spokamber 509 for just $1. If you can round up a few friends — or even just one friend, really — go to South Perry Pizza for $10 pitchers of anything they’ve got on tap. That includes their selection of craft beer from local breweries like Orlison, River City and Twelve String. They’ve got $2 bottles, too.

THURSDAY

Even for the non-college-age population, “Thirsty Thursday” is a steadfastly popular weekday drinking night, and there are plenty of cheap beer options around town to suit one’s mood. Wild Dawgs, the downtown hot-dog joint that’s newly reopened and under new ownership, plans to offer a select domestic draft for $1 from 3 pm until the keg runs dry. Or extend a shopping stop at the South Perry Farmers Market into the evening with a stopover at The Shop, where pint night day sticks to its truest form and a crisp 16 oz. costs a cool $2 until 10 pm. From now until the week before Christmas, the Thursday market (3-6 pm) sets up shop indoors at The Buddhio, across the street from the watering hole/cafe. In the Valley, Boomers Classic Rock Bar & Grill offers $1 domestics and 25 oz. microbrew mugs for $4, starting at 7 pm. ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 37


$17.Salad9Entrée5 Dessert

NEW 3-Course Dinner Menu 3-6 pm daily

NEW MENU SELECTIONS SALAD Caesar or Garden ENTRÉE Braised Short Ribs • Coconut Prawns • Herb Grilled Wild Salmon Creole Chicken Pot Pie • Pan Roasted Chicken Penne Pasta DESSERT Signature Davenport Cheese Cake

Herb Grilled Wild Salmon

FOOD | DRINKING “THE $2 PINT,” CONTINUED...

FRIDAY

As mentioned, Mootsy’s has long been known for its $2 pint night — on a Friday, no less. The special runs from 2-9 pm, so don’t arrive too late. Another early Friday drinking hour that rewards customers is at Fast Eddie’s, the once dive-ish corner bar that’s more recently become a popular college-age hangout. During the bar’s “Power Hour” from 3-4 pm (also MonThu), domestic drafts are a mere Craft beers are $2 at Mootsy’s on Fridays. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO $1 and micros are $2. Double that and get a domestic pitcher for $4. Pitchers are also the way to go at longtime Northside favorite The Screaming Yak. Plan to stay awhile, since pitchers of anything on draft — both micros and domestics — are $8 from 8 pm to midnight.

SATURDAY

While there weren’t any exclusive Saturday pint nights we came across in our search, several establishments offer daily beer specials that also conveniently occur this night. In Spokane Valley, Caruso’s Sandwich Co. offers $2 pints of anything on draft during daily happy hour from 3-6 pm. (This special runs all day on Tuesdays, too.) Way up in North Spokane, the longtime Whitworth favorite Fizzie Mulligans has $2 domestics every day from 11 am-6 pm (and until close on Sunday). Since we don’t expect everyone to park themselves in their own ’hood all afternoon, the new-ish “Power Hour” at downtown’s Monterey Cafe, daily from 8-9 pm, features $1 Coors Lite. Refresh those vocal cords between karaoke runs.

SUNDAY

We already mentioned several daily beer specials, but to end the weekend on a high note, we suggest burgers and beer at the Steam Plant Grill. The downtown brewpub offers $3 pints all day, including its own libations on tap, like the ever-popular Double Stack Stout and Firebox IPA. Make sure not to miss any limited-release seasonal specials, either. The basement pub also offers this special during happy hour, Mon-Thu from 9-10 pm and Fri-Sat from 10-11 pm. n

BEST F’N BURGER IN TOWN Come on out for some great food. 509 789 6848 • palmcourtgrill.com Historic Davenport Hotel 10 S. Post St., Downtown Spokane

Live Music Saturday & Home of the Blues Jam Every Sunday

509.535.9309 • 6412 E. Trent • Spokane Valley

38 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013


FOOD | CASUAL

0 1 2 NEW

$

SPECIALTY

Eat your heart out, Ronald McDonald.

Beach Burgers Idaho burger joint brings Southern California style to a place without surf BY JO MILLER

G

ary Kender talks about food like he’s telling a love story. He links good food with good memories, whether he’s recalling a recent meal at a Spokane restaurant, cooking meals for his five kids or recounting the steak dinner he shared with his wife on their recent honeymoon. He’s also stoked on all the ideas he has for The Surf Shack — his burger place in Coeur d’Alene — to make it into a franchise that serves wholesome burgers and plays up the ’50s surf culture theme. “This is my passion in life, as twisted as it may seem to some people,” he says. As a surfer originally from Long Beach, Calif., Kender moved to Idaho in 1991 and started a place in Hayden called Schoonerville. After 13 years he sold that and opened Longboard Burgers inside an A & D Mini Mart in Coeur d’Alene. For the few years it was open, Longboard was always packed, he says. But then Kender lost the business in a divorce and Longboard closed. “For the four years I didn’t have it, I couldn’t go in a store without someone asking when I’d open another burger place,” he says. After the space went through a few hands, Kender got it back and reopened his burger place in July, this time calling it The Surf Shack because the divorce kept him from using the name Longboard. “As long as there’s a surfboard on the building, they’ll know it’s me,” he says. The burgers at The Surf Shack ($2.49-$4.50) are made Southern Californian-style, as a takeoff of In-N-Out Burger, the famed fast food joint found in California and four other western states. Kender says what makes them California burgers is the freshness. The lettuce is crisp, the tomato is thick and the bun is slathered with Thousand Island dressing. Beyond hamburgers and cheeseburgers, there are 11 other kinds of burgers on the menu, 10 Philly cheesesteak sandwiches ($4.95-$5.79), fresh-cut fries ($1.89) and homemade sauces. “We’re kind of anti-high fructose corn syrup,” Kender says. So he makes his own sauce, including ketchup, huckleberry ketchup, fry sauce and what he calls “love sauce,” which has a bit of bite to it.  The Surf Shack • 356 E. Appleway Ave., Coeur d’Alene • Open Mon-Sat, 10:30 am-2:30 pm • surfshackburgers.com • 208-669-6966

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Explosive Potential Mad Bomber Brewing Company honors vets the best way it knows — with good beer BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

I

f Tom Applegate looks shell-shocked, it’s not combat-induced. After all, the former Army Explosive Ordinance Disposal technician is used to stress.

But after years of planning — including a few setbacks — Mad Bomber Brewing Company welcomed about 500 customers to its soft opening last week.


niscent of The Hurt Locker’s lonely walk scene. Ceramic tiles engraved with names of the EOD fallen line the bar. A chalkboard sign announces that select proceeds go toward EOD’s Wounded Warrior Fund. Support for Mad Bomber has come from unexpected places: $26,000 via Kickstarter funded a walk-in cooler and draft system; a retired EOD technician built the bar’s tables out of ammo crates, and nearby Selkirk Abbey and Trickster breweries have lent advice and equipment. Then there are those who stop by because they feel a connection, says Applegate. Some are fresh-faced, sporting telltale military-issue haircuts, while others are timeworn, offering hearty handshakes, like the group of leather-clad Combat Vet Riders who rolled in during our visit. They order eats from neighboring EnVision Cafe — salads like cranberry almond with grilled “We just posted [the opening] on Facebook,” chicken, brats and sandwiches like the turkey says Applegate, Mad Bomber’s brewmaster, grilled panini — and sample beer made by one of whose initial plans were to open a brewery with their own. his father in their native Montana. However customers are initially Instead, Applegate teamed with drawn to Mad Bomber, the beer will his wife Stephanie and two EOD keep them coming back: six varieties Send comments to buddies, John Taylor and Alan Lonranging from the hearty MK 84 Porter editor@inlander.com. to the Booby Trap Blonde, a “lawnmowgacre, to open Mad Bomber’s modest one-and-a-quarter-barrel operation. er beer… for the days when you’re hard An initial partner in the business, Staff at work and need something cool.” Sergeant Nicholas Reid, died last year at 26 from It’s beer made for people who like to drink injuries he suffered in an enemy explosive attack beer, says Applegate.  during his second tour in Afghanistan. “It’s impossible to do the job and it not have Mad Bomber Brewing Company • 9265 N. an impact,” says Applegate, nodding toward phoGovernment Way, Hayden, Idaho • Open Fritos of on-duty servicemen, including one remiSun 11 am–9 pm • 208-762-7343

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Scream of Consciousness

Chiwetel Ejiofor (left) in full Oscar mode.

12 Years a Slave mixes indelible moments with conventional drama BY SCOTT RENSHAW

N

ear the halfway point in 12 Years a Slave, Solomon Northup (Chiwetel Ejiofor) — a free black man in 1841 upstate New York who was drugged, abducted, stripped of his identity and sold into Southern slavery under the name Platt — makes the mistake of striking back at a white overseer (Paul Dano). While the humiliated white man aims to hang Platt, a more eventempered plantation employee knows killing the valuable slave is unacceptable — but he still thinks the uppity man needs to be taught a lesson. So Solomon/Platt is left with a noose around his neck, standing on his toes in slippery mud to avoid strangulation, for hours — all while the rest of the plantation’s slaves calmly go about their business in the background. It’s a remarkable, indelible moment created by director Steve McQueen, adapting the real-life memoir of Northup — and when McQueen finds impressionistic ways to explore the capricious brutality of life for Southern slaves, 12 Years a Slave is revelatory. But there’s a sizable chunk of the narrative that feels like a checklist of subject headings which need to be addressed, moving episodically through Northup’s life and the key “issues” of 19th-century American slaveholding. The flashes of extraordinary filmmaking become seasoning for something that ultimately seems more interested in being worthy, earnest filmmaking. McQueen delivers a lot more of the former during

42 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013

the film’s brilliant first act, opening with Northup already For every heart-stopping scene like Solomon’s attempt to in captivity cutting sugarcane, before flashing back to convince Epps that he hasn’t tried to send a letter home, his life as a comfortable, accomplished musician with a there are a couple that focus primarily on the hair-trigger wife and two children. We see only a few minutes of this violence of Epps and his wife (Sarah Paulson) without happy life, stirred into the earliest scenes of Northup’s making any effort at digging under their skin. Fassbender captivity so that they take on the quality of something roars and seethes and has self-loathing sex with his fabarely remembered, almost imagined. Then it’s the stark vored slave, Patsey (Lupita Nyong’o), but he becomes an reality of waking up in chains, enduring a vicious beating antagonist who exists merely to emphasize that slavery to break Northup of any sense that his previous identity was horrible, much as Brad Pitt’s role as an itinerant still matters. And then he’s on a riverboat, McQueen’s Canadian handyman exists merely to espouse abolitionist camera shooting through the massive, churning paddle — sentiment. The whippings may be cover-the-eyes physia piece of machinery grinding towards cal, but they’re rarely psychological. Northup’s terrible new life as a piece of 12 Years a Slave has too many unforget12 YEARS A SLAVE machinery. table elements, even in its less effective Rated R Yet even in that first half, there are second half — like Solomon’s slow surrender Directed by Steve McQueen moments that hint at the frustrations to the power of singing a graveside gospel Starring Chiwetel Ejiofor, Michael to come. As disturbing as it is to watch song — to not deliver a visceral impact. We Fassbender, Benedict Cumberbatch newly sold Eliza (Adepero Oduye) wail get to see the McQueen who turned the in despair at being so casually separatfact-based drama Hunger not into a timeline ed from her children, the ensuing conversation between of IRA activist Bobby Sands’ life, but into a stream-ofEliza and Solomon about her emotional reaction feels consciousness exploration of attempting to achieve spiristilted, an unnecessary attempt to underline what already tual freedom in the face of physical captivity. When the was understood without words. conventional melodrama breaks through, we lose sight of Then Solomon is sold by his more kindly owner that filmmaker. There’s a remarkable ability on display to (Benedict Cumberbatch) to sadistic “slave-breaker” Edevoke emotional response — whenever the scenes aren’t win Epps (Michael Fassbender) — and 12 Years a Slave beexplaining to you the emotional response you’re supgins to feel more like an ordeal than an attempt at insight. posed to be having. 


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS THE MOTEL LIFE

Frank and Jerry Lee Flannigan (Emile Hirsch and Stephen Dorff) promised their dying mother they would always stay together. Through a series of accidents and bad luck, the siblings have stayed isolated from the outside world, living from paycheck to paycheck at the various dingy motel rooms they sleep in. Through storytelling, Frank and Jerry Lee create a world where instead of facing their inevitable self-loathing and failures, the brothers are instead heroes. When Jerry Lee gets into an accident killing a teenage bicyclist, Frank has no choice but to save his distraught sibling from himself, and protecting him means running in this drama based off the bestselling novel by Willy Vlautin. At Magic Lantern (ER) Rated R

BEST MAN HOLIDAY

The long awaited sequel to The Best Man (1999), directed by Malcolm D. Lee, has old friends returning for a Christmas reunion in New York. Fifteen years have passed since best man Harper Stewart’s (Taye Diggs) big success as a novelist, and recent hard times have left him with books that just aren’t selling and a strained marriage. His best friend, Lance (Morris Chestnut,) meanwhile is racking in the big bucks as an NFL star. As long forgotten rivalries and romance spark amongst the group, this film revisits the cast that changed the face of the romantic comedy genre. Also stars Regina Hall, Terrence Howard, Sanaa Lathan, Nia Long, Harold Perrineau Jr., Monica Calhoun and Melissa DeSousa. (ER) Rate R

NOW PLAYING 12 YEARS A SLAVE

Based on his autobiography, this film tells the story of Solomon Northup, the free man turned slave in pre-Civil War U.S. It’s a heart wrenchingly amazing story about a man conned into slavery despite being a free citizen and his desperate fight for freedom. Chitewel Ejiofor finally gets center stage, but the film also features an all-star cast including Brad Pitt and Paul Giamatti. Definitely a powerfully artsy take on an old subject. (KS) Rated R

ABOUT TIME

British, redheaded and freckled, Domhnall Gleeson knows how to be awkward, because he already looks the part. Then you add Rachel McAdams and have a dramatic romance. The story follows 21-year-old Tim who finds out he’s inherited his family’s curse: the ability to time travel. Turns out, it’s a great way to get a girlfriend. A moment becomes moments, and his gift allows him to take a little more from each one. (KS) Rated R

ALL IS LOST

We never learn the name (or anything else) of the grizzled yachtsman (Robert Redford) whose eight-day fight to survive on the open sea is chronicled in J.C. Chandor’s magnificently primal All Is Lost. After all, how in the world are we supposed to sympathize with our soggy protagonist if we don’t know details about a rift with his daughter, or a childhood trauma he needs to overcome, or even why he’s sailing alone in the middle of nowhere? Chandor refuses to waste time on such frills, allowing Redford’s status as iconic figure to do much of the heavy lifting. The result is a kind of pure visual cinema that tramples the listlessness of other films that call themselves “action movies.” (SR) Rated PG-13

BAD GRANDPA

The Jackass crew makes its triumphant return as Johnny Knoxville takes on 86-year-old Irving Zisman, while he and his grandson, Billy, played by Jackson

Nicoll, travel across country. Apparently the fake old people doing bad things trope hasn’t been beaten to death with a stick just yet, as Zisman performs prank after obnoxious prank on unsuspecting victims, who can’t believe this “grandpa’s” behavior. (But, of course, they attempt to help him through his illegal or just plain stupid predicaments.) Some of the highlights include, in typical Jackass fashion, thievery, crashing into giant penguins and putting a child stripper routine into a beauty pageant. (ER) Rated R

BLUE JASMINE

New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) is down on her luck. Her marriage to a wealthy husband (Alec Baldwin) fell apart after he lost all their money in a Wall Street scam, forcing Jasmine to move to San Francisco to live with her sister, Ginger, a grocery store clerk. To Jasmine, it seems like there’s not much left in her life to look forward to, as she struggles to cope with her downfall from a life of luxury to one where she’s forced to decide whether she should become a dental receptionist or a nurse. Writer/director Woody Allen presents us a modern yet familiar character study of how the haves and the have-nots perceive themselves. (CS) PG-13

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

The true story of the Vermont cargo ship captain who delivers food and water to Africa, and whose ship is hijacked by Somali pirates is both a nail-biter and a fascinating character study, mostly centering on the relationship between the cool, calm captain (Tom Hanks) and the determined but unsure pirate leader Muse (newcomer Barkhad Abdi). The adventure parts are thrilling, the attack and takeover is unnerving, the lifeboat sequences are claustrophobic. Another great film from director Paul Greengrass (United 93, the first two Bourne entries). (ES) Rated PG-13

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FILM FILM||SHORTS SHORTS

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CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS TWO

Flint Lockwood (voice of Bill Hader,) the lovable inventor, has achieved his dreams and is now working for his idol, Chester V, creating things to benefit society. But when he learns that the food machine he thought he had destroyed is still up and running this time producing scary humanoid food hybrids including melonheads, mosquitoasts,  and shrimpanzees he and his team, including love interest and weather girl Sam Sparks (voice of Anna Faris) must get rid of the machine once and for all in this animated flick. PG (ER)

DESERT RUNNERS

Some people are bonkers, as evidenced by the four runners featured in this gorgeously produced documentary. They are each running in four different races, each entailing a five-day, 155-mile trek through some of the planet’s most brutal deserts. At first the film seems like a simple, “look-at-these-weirdos” type story, but soon things turn much, much more serious. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

DON JON

Joseph Gordon-Levitt (The Dark Knight Rises) stars in and makes his writing-directing feature debut as Jon, a nightclub hopper who likes and regularly scores with the ladies, but gets more satisfaction watching porn at home on his laptop. There aren’t too many sex-porn-addiction comedies out there, but this one kind of shines. A great supporting cast: Scarlett Johansson and Julianne Moore as possible love interests, Tony Danza and Glenne Headley as Jon’s parents, only make things better. (ES) Rated R

ENDER’S GAME

Decades after Earth repelled an invasion by  insect-like aliens who killed tens of millions of humans, the planet is preparing for another invasion by the “Formics” that may or may not come by training  all kids in tactics and strategy in the hopes of  finding a new “Julius Caesar or a Napoleon” who will win the war  decisively. Andrew “Ender” Wiggin (Asa Butterfield) is plucked from his regular school to attend the orbiting Battle School, because Colonel Graff (Harrison Ford) and Major Anderson (Viola Davis), who run the place, think he could be the legendary-scale genius they’re  looking for. (MJ) PG-13

ENOUGH SAID

Eva (Julia Louis-Dreyfus), a divorcee, is facing the possibility of an empty nest, as her daughter goes off to college. As she bonds with similarly situated Albert (James Gandolfini) and the two click, it seems like the perfect romance. Eva also befriends Marianne (Catherine Keener), whose only flaw is her tendency to rag on and on about her ex-husband. When this friend’s ex-husband turns out to be her new boyfriend, Eva suddenly finds herself looking at Albert through Marianne’s eyes. (ER) Rated R

ESCAPE PLAN

44 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013

Ray Breslin (Sylvester Stallone) breaks out of prisons for a living. But when his last job goes wrong and he is effectively

buried in a high-tech security facility so far off the map his own team can’t find him, he knows he’s been set up. Recruiting fellow inmate Emil Rottmayer (Arnold Schwarzenegger) to make one last escape from the most fortified prison in the world might seem a little cheesy, but the big explosions and promises of punishment make up for it in this actionoozing flick. (ER) Rated R

FREE BIRDS

As Thanksgiving approaches, so does, apparently, the turkey buddy films. When two turkeys from opposite sides of the track team up to stop the Thanksgiving slaughter, they travel back in time to the very first Thanksgiving to take turkey off the menu, permanently. What ensues is a bunch of silliness and a lot of turkey jokes, just in time for the holiday season. Starring the voices of Owen Wilson and Woody Harrelson. (ER) Rated PG

GRAVITY

Astronauts Matt Kowalski (George Clooney) and Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock) perform extra-vehicular repairs on the Hubble space telescope and then all hell breaks loose when pieces of a destroyed satellite come their way. Thus begins a series of domino effect crises: Will they have enough air and/or jetpack life to make it to the station alive? Director Alfonso Cuarón (Children of Men) uses crazy effects that dazzle, while also sometimes distracting from the story. (SR) Rated PG-13

INEQUALITY FOR ALL

This film takes a look at the ever widening economic gap, following former U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich as he attempts to shed light on the shrinking middle class. The 2007 Occupy Wall Street brought attention to the economic disparity that has emerged in American society today, but Reich takes it further, tracing the very origins of the gap, and discusses what can be done to improve an economy where the majority of the wealth is held in the hands of a very few. At Magic Lantern. (ER) Rated PG

LAST VEGAS

When Billy decides to finally tie the knot to a much younger woman, he calls out his senior friends for one last hurrah,

which of course means a bachelor party in Las Vegas. What ensues is typical “I’m old” jokes — from not knowing who rapper Fifty-Cent is to the always hilarious complaints about medication and bad hips — this flick covers age by laughing at it.  With an all-star cast of actors including Michael Douglas, Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman and Kevin Kline, this comedy once again revisits the notion that although people may age, they don’t actually mature. (ER) Rated PG-13

MONEY FOR NOTHING: INSIDE THE FEDERAL RESERVE

Director Jim Bruce takes us inside the Federal Reserve, connecting America’s central bank to an ever shifting economic system. Through the tangled web of money lent and spent, economists and senior fed officials are convinced that it all leads back to the Fed itself. Through a myriad of reviews and experts, this documentary cracks open the mystery of the Federal Reserve, an institution that has been regulating America’s economy for more than 100 years. (ER) Unrated

MUSCLE SHOALS

The laid-back documentary Muscle Shoals celebrates this little-known chapter in American music history with equal measures of affection and respect. Talking heads like Keith Richards and Bono speak about the place almost reverently (a little odd in the latter’s case, given that U2 has never recorded there), while others give their props to the humble studios’ formative influence on their careers. Also features some excellent interviews with the queen herself, Aretha Franklin. At Magic Lantern (SD) Rated PG

THOR: THE DARK WORLD

After the events of The Avengers, Thor (Chris Hemsworth) battles and brings peace to the ethereal nine realms. Back on Earth, his love, astrophysicist Jane Foster (Natalie Portman), waits and continues to research with her quip-happy assistant Darcy Lewis (Kat Dennings). Unfortunately, the nine realms are coming into alignment for the first time in millennia, causing invisible interdimensional portals to appear, threatening to destroy the universe. (SS) Rated PG-13 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

12 Years a Slave

97

Gravity

96

All is Lost

88

Muscle Shoals

75

Don Jon

59

Ender’s Game

57

Thor: The Dark World

57

DON’T MISS IT

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FILM | REVIEW

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f you’ve been wondering what Dakota Fancar, Frank shows up at his old haunt. He gets a ning has been up to, the once precocious, Dodge Dart and some sage advice. blonde child star is all grown up, done with “You’re not a loser, kid,” Earl tells Frank. her small role in the Twilight movies, and has “But if you keep acting like one … what I’m veered into indie film territory. The Motel Life saying is, don’t make decisions thinkin’ you’re is the definition of what Hollywood would not a lowlife, make decisions thinkin’ you’re a great make. man, at least a good man. And don’t be a godIt’s the story of the blue-collar Flannigan damn pussy.” brothers, Jerry Lee (Stephen Dorff) and Frank Empowered by these words, Frank decides, Lee (Emile Hirsch). Jerry Lee is definitely more Jerry in tow, to head to Elko in hopes of seeing of a screw-up than Frank Lee, but after a promise his ex-girlfriend (enter Fanning) once more. to their cancer-ridden, dying single mother, their The movie alternates between something paths haven’t diverged since they were teens. like an adaptation of a graphic novel (numerThrough thick and mostly thin, the pair is glued ous animation sequences of explicit, made-up together. stories that Frank tells Jerry; “drawn-out” camera One icy morning in Reno, a boy is killed by angles; Jerry’s own exhibit-worthy sketches that a beat-up station wagon — the work of a drunk cover his hotel walls) and an ultra-dramatic play. Jerry, who didn’t see the kid pedaling on his bike. The Motel Life’s source material is neither; it’s In a panic, he turns to his brother based on Portland musician for support. But when words are Willy Vlautin’s novel of the THE MOTEL LIFE not enough, he shoots himself… same name. Rated R in the leg, a limb that’s already There is more crying by Directed by Alan and Gabe Polsky halfway amputated as the result of men in this film than I’ve seen Starring Emile Hirsch, Stephen Dorff, a train accident. Frank copes with in any other. It’s clear why Kris Kristofferson, Dakota Fanning all this by leaning on his old friend Dorff and Hirsch signed up At Magic Lantern Jim Beam. When the cops begin — they get to act hard, chew to suspect Jerry, an escape plan is the scenery, prove that some hatched. men have feelings. In the end, The Motel Life is Kris Kristofferson (looking like Colonel about the things that keep us together, making Sanders) appears as Earl, Frank’s old mentor us stronger, showing no one is unworthy of love. who gave the 14-year-old a job at a used-car The final product ain’t — as the brothers would lot after his mother died. In need of a getaway say — perfect, but it’s certainly a think piece. 

ENDER’S GAME

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THE RETURN OF LIVE MUSIC Nov 21st - HELMET 46 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013


Mr. Happy Trent Reznor had the anger thing down pat; now he’s trying different emotions on for size BY LEAH SOTTILE

H

e was the guy who said “I want to f--- you like an animal.” Oh, and “Your god is dead, and no one cares.” Trent Reznor — better known by his musical project name Nine Inch Nails — built a career on brashness. Now, with 20-plus years under his belt as one of rock music’s angriest performers, Reznor has started to soften. But Reznor — who drew the ire of censors in the 1990s and scared the crap out of suburban kids watching MTV with his S&M-and-severed-animal-head music videos — has more than just softened. He’s grown up and gotten wiser. “I’m not the same person I was 20 years ago, and I’m happy to not be that person,” he recently told NPR. But he hasn’t changed personally. He’s grown as a musician and a composer. He says those early albums that

made Nine Inch Nails a paragon of angst were reflective of himself at that time, and his public persona as a perpetual grump reinforced what the music attacked head-on: here was a guy who was pissy and felt somehow slighted by the world. Obviously he was going to make angry music. Anger got him far. Nine Inch Nails’ second release, the 1992 EP Broken, earned Reznor two Grammy awards and propelled him into the spotlight as a musician, over-the-top performer and producer with a magic touch. His 1994 album The Downward Spiral fared even better, debuting at No. 2 on the Billboard charts. Reznor brought industrial music — a brand of loud, aggressive music punctuated with explosive guitars, distortion and nagging mechanical noises — into the limelight. ...continued on next page


MUSIC | ROCK “MR. HAPPY,” CONTINUED... Bringing such a fringey type of music into the popular eye was a remarkable phenomenon, though Reznor was hardly the founder or creator of the industrial aesthetic. For nearly a decade before Nine Inch Nails released an album, Ministry — a Chicago industrial outfit headed up by Al Jourgensen in much the same way that Reznor helmed NIN — had cranked out a constant stream of edgy, abrasive, offensive music. But there was something about Reznor and Nine Inch Nails that grabbed people in a way Jourgensen hadn’t been able to. Reznor was kind of sexy and kind of emo, and in between songs about despising God, he’d lament his own pain. He was a pendulum swinging between rage and sorrow. Soon Reznor’s image would deepen. Five years went by before he produced a follow-up to The Downward Spiral, and it was met with a critical “meh.” His addiction problems became public. His songs got less angry and more sad. In some ways, the anger that poured out of Reznor in the early ’90s seemed like a farce — the output of someone who didn’t know who they were quite yet. Fans of that early Reznor felt duped. Where was their patron saint of anger? Today — married with kids, free from the addictions that once plagued him — his art reflects a different man. His latest record Hesitation Marks lacks the omnipresent doom of those early days. There’s no severed heads, no ball gags, no monkeys hanging on crucifixes. The imagery of early Nine Inch Nails days now seems silly and tacked-on. Today, Reznor seems to be motivated by something different. Could it be happiness? “Everything,” the new album’s seventh track, is practically a pre-packaged radio hit, with the same masterful

Nine Inch Nails frontman, Trent Reznor, second from left, may not smile often but after a 20-year career, his music is far more happy than it once was. beats that have long served as Nine Inch Nails’ backbone but a poppy, upbeat, singable chorus. (It’s the first Nine Inch Nails song I could hear my mom listening to.) In the chorus, Reznor is liberated, singing “Wave goodbye/Wish me well/I’ve become/Something else” and then “I am whole/I believe/I am whole/I am free/I am whole/I can see.” It’s like his coming-out proclamation, as if he’s saying, “That guy I used to be? Yeah, forget about him. I like who I am now.” Maybe he’s happy. Maybe he’s still really pissed off. But however he feels, Reznor is more guarded in

his emotions, subversive with his words. His songs are meticulously arranged and full of texture. As much as those early Nine Inch Nails songs were about pushing boundaries, it seems like right now, more than 20 years later, we’re hearing Trent Reznor — the real, grown-up Trent Reznor — for the very first time.  Nine Inch Nails with Explosions in the Sky • Tue, Nov. 19 at 7:30 pm • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon • $30-$70 • All-ages • ticketswest.com • (800) 325SEAT

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48 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013


or more, there’s starting to be a full commitment shown by this community.” He did the Seattle push with his band The Horse Thieves last year, but that quietly imploded. “I don’t want to say we’ll never get back together,” he says of the band. In January, the Marshall McLean Band emerged from that dust. McLean had just finished a solo set in Sandpoint when a random guy who thought they should collaborate approached him.

“Usually when strangers tell me we would make great music together, I’m pretty quick to steer clear of them,” McLean says, laughing. But instead of losing bassist Justin Landis’ number, the next time McLean was driving through North Idaho, he gave him a call and the two hit it off. Next, Jamie Frost on pedal steel and drummer Caleb Ingersoll were invited to the party. Although each musician is a member of other groups, this band has been pushed to the forefront, especially with a

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Nov 14th - Nov 20th THUR

H

e believes in this little corner of the universe. In the people, musicians and creators who make up the Spokane arts scene. That’s why Marshall McLean has chosen to make this place home; raise a family here, even contribute to a genre of music he’s labeled Northwest Americana Rock. “I came here because of my wife,” the Montana-raised singer-songwriter says last week at a local coffeehouse. “Now the climate in Spokane is changing. Whether it be arts, music

THE FLANNEL ATTRACTIONS

Whitey Tight Party 9pm

KARAOKE W/ LIVE WIRE

at Irv’s 8pm-2am

SAT & FRI

BY LAURA JOHNSON

Friday Nov 15th

Dance your ass off until 4am all weekend!

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

at Club Red 6pm-10pm

SUN

Spokane cultivates the music scene that Marshall McLean calls home

SOL SEED

KARAOKE W/ LIVE WIRE

MON

Folkster’s Paradise

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Thursday Nov 14th

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

TUES

The Marshall McLean Band releases their first record this weekend.

brand-new album about to be released on their own record label, Hotel Stella. All those years ago back in Billings, he was a Christian artist. Now McLean is pushing away from that pigeonhole. “I hate when people use the term ‘Christian’ as an adjective,” he says. For his album Glossolalia, Greek for “speaking in tongues,” he explains that the religious aspect of his work has moved from an overtone to an undertone. Like the flurry of language that occurs when one is overcome by the Holy Spirit, McLean says, his songs don’t always make sense chronologically or otherwise, but instead are stitched together by like ideas. “The album’s theme is this: We are products of our history and we’re all just working through it,” he explains. For McLean, the act of writing is the antithesis of most musicians’ approach. It begins with the name of the album, then the song title. Based on how he wants the song to feel, verses flow out next with the help of a guitar; finally, he comes up with the chorus. “It’s really a cerebral approach for me,” McLean says. “Sometimes I feel like I’m not even a musician.” The result is a Kickstarterfunded product to which fans will be proud to have helped contribute. “With this record, I feel I’m on my way to finding my voice,” McLean says. n lauraj@inlander.com Marshall McLean CD release party with Mama Doll, Bart Budwig • Sat, Nov. 16 at 8 pm • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • $10/$12 at the door • All-ages • thebartlettspokane.com

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

WED

MUSIC | AMERICANA

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at Irv’s 9pm-2am

at Irv’s 8pm-2am

at Irv’s 8pm-2am

FEMALE IMPERSONATOR

at Club Red @ 10pm 415 W. Sprague Ave.

509.624.4450 NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCK HELMET

I

t’s not like Page Hamilton has been just sitting around waiting to get the old band back together. After the early ’90s when his group Helmet made waves with its melding of classic guitar work and angular post-hardcore, Hamilton struck out on his own, making soundtracks for big action flicks and even playing guitar for David Bowie. In the mid-oughts, he jump-started Helmet with an all-new lineup. With such a drastic overhaul, Helmet lost some of the raw brutality of its Betty and Meantime days. Its 2010 release Seeing Eye Dog was kind of like low-calorie Helmet: the bones were there, but there was no real flesh to sink your teeth into. But Hamilton remains a guitar legend, totally worth the cash to see live. — LEAH SOTTILE Helmet with Thirion X and Storm Normandy • Thu, Nov. 21 at 8 pm • Club 412 (formerly the A Club) • 412 W. Sprague • $15/$18 day of show • 21+ • sblentertainment.com

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 11/14

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, DJ Yasmine J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen Trio BUCKHORN INN, Texas Twister J CARR’S CORNER, Quality Control Tour feat. OverTime, Illest Uminati, Whiteboy Lingle, EpiK, E The Hustler, Cordell Drake, True Justice THE CELLAR, Isaac Walton COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Shiner FORTY-ONE SOUTH (208-265-2000), Truck Mills GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Carlos Alden J THE HOP!, Neldoreth, Hubris, ProAbortion JONES RADIATOR, Sol Seed J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dirk Lind J MOOTSY’S, Brothers Ov Midnite, NOBE + MJ the HumanBeatbox, B. Durazzo, Fresh Kils, Def-I, JB Nimble J MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP, Bart Budwig O’SHAY’S, Open mic J THE PHAT HOUSE, The Tone Collaborative, Bodhi Drip, Moksha World Fusion RED ROOM LOUNGE, Grayskul, Graves33, Jaeda RICO’S, Palouse Subterranean Blues Band ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, The Roadhouse 1-Year Anniversary feat. Last Chance Band SPLASH, Steve Denny THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB AND EATERY, DJ Seli ZOLA, Fus Bol

50 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013

ELECTRONICA PRETTY LIGHTS

A

fter headlining Sasquatch! last year, Pretty Lights is back to take on the Knitting Factory with the help of Odesza. Towering at nearly 7 feet, Derek Smith is the mixer behind this electronic music moniker. Out of Colorado, Smith has built up enormous popularity with the EDM set over the past few years, combining mixes of buzzy synthesizers and funk and hip-hop samples. Prepare for next Thursday’s show by downloading Pretty Lights’ new album A Color Map of the Sun — the first album where Smith has used all of his own samples to round out his compositions — for free on its website. — LAURA JOHNSON Pretty Lights with Odesza • Thu, Nov. 21 at 8 pm • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • $35 • All-ages • sp.knittingfactory.com

Friday, 11/15

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, Truck Mills BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOLO’S, Phoenix BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Cold Shot J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Vern Sielert Quartet BUCKHORN INN, Oasis Reunion Show THE CELLAR, Roberson, BZ and Flores J CHAIRS COFFEE (340-8787), Open Mic of Open-ness CHATEAU RIVE, Chateau Guitar Masters with Pete Anderson and Sammy Eubanks CHECKERBOARD BAR, Flying Mammals COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kenny Bartilioni, Shiner, Nate Ostrander COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR, Skerpazoid THE COUNTRY CLUB, Coyote Rose Band CURLEY’S, Bruiser

EL PATIO (208-773-2611), Nova FEDORA PUB, Kyle Swaffard FIZZIE MULLIGANS, The Vibe THE FLAME, DJ Wesone GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos J THE HOP!, Saxeus, Knotty Gun Stick, The Camorra IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY (208-2902280), Charley Packard IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Aftermath IRV’S, DJ Prophesy J JONES RADIATOR, The Flannel Attractions J KNITTING FACTORY, The Clumsy Lovers with Carli Osika J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Pamela Benton LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls MAX AT MIRABEAU, The Usual Suspects J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Maxie Ray Mills MICHAEL’S O.P. (447-3355), The Cronkites

MOOSE LOUNGE (208-664-7901), Bad Monkey NYNE, The Divine Jewels PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Seth Walser & Tarrel Cripps J THE PHAT HOUSE, Open Mic ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Luke Jaxon Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (4433796), DJ JWC, Triple Shot SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Pat Coast TWELVE STRING BREWING COMPANY (241-3697), Angela Marie Project THE VIKING, Stepbrothers ZOLA, The Nerve

Saturday, 11/16

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, Robbie French J THE BARTLETT, Marshall McLean Album Release Show (See story on page 49) with Mama Doll, Bart Budwig

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOLO’S, Phoenix BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Cold Shot J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Dan Maher BUCKHORN INN, Oasis Reunion Show CARR’S CORNER, Carson Allen, Ashtree, Raze the City, John Michaelson, Rylei Franks THE CELLAR, Roberson, BZ and Flores CLEARWATER RIVER CASINO (208298-1400), Hell’s Belles COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kenny Bartilioni, Shiner, Nate Ostrander COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, Steve Simisky Jazz COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR, Ray Allen THE COUNTRY CLUB, Coyote Rose Band CURLEY’S, Bruiser EL PATIO (208-773-2611), Nova FEDORA PUB, Kyle Swaffard


FIZZIE MULLIGANS, The Vibe THE FLAME, DJ Wesone GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos HOGFISH (208-667-1896), Flying Mammals  THE HOP!, Headhunter, Crooks to Kings, High Regard, Outlier, Hensley A.D. IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Aftermath IRV’S, DJ Prophesy

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.  JONES RADIATOR, Jones Radiator 3rd Anniversary Party  KNITTING FACTORY, Morgan Page, Beltek, Topher Jones LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls MAX AT MIRABEAU, The Usual Suspects MICHAEL’S O.P. (447-3355), The Cronkites MOOSE LOUNGE (208-664-7901), Bad Monkey NYNE, DJ C-Mad PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Brenden & Nate, The Acoustic Duo  THE PHAT HOUSE, Left Over Soul RED LION HOTEL RIVER INN, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Luke Jaxon Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (443-

3796), DJ Sonny SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Dan Mills  THE SHOP, Laddie Ray Melvin  SWAXX (703-7474), Grade A CD Release Party THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Big Mumbo Blues Band ZOLA, Raggs and Bush Doktor

Sunday, 11/17

THE CELLAR, Pat Coast COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Echo Elysium DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church  KNITTING FACTORY, Gramatik with Herobust, Ex Mag MOOSE LOUNGE (208-664-7901), Michael’s Music Technology Circus ZOLA, TC Tye Reggae

Monday, 11/18

BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Open mic  CALYPSOS, Open Mic PJ’S BAR & GRILL, Acoustic Jam with One Man Train Wreck  RICO’S, Open mic ZOLA, Nate Ostrander and friends

Tuesday, 11/19

 THE BARTLETT, Blitzen Trapper, Heatwarmer, Open Mic BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE CELLAR, Max Daniels  CHECKERBOARD BAR, NiN After Party feat. Black Lodge FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam

with Truck Mills  THE HOP!, The Casualties, Negative Approach, MDC, Revolt, Reason for Existence, Faus KELLY’S IRISH PUB, The Powell Brothers  KNITTING FACTORY, 3OH!3 with The Summer Set, Wallpaper, New Beat Fund  THE PHAT HOUSE, The Todd Michael Band  RED ROOSTER COFFEE CO., Open mic RICO’S, WSU School of Music Jazz Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (4433796), Open mic with Frank Clark SPLASH, Bill Bozly  SPOKANE ARENA, Nine Inch Nails (See story on page 47), Explosions in the Sky THE VAULT, DJ Q THE VIKING, The Winter War, Death By Pirates ZOLA, The Urban Achievers with Dan Conrad

Wednesday, 11/20  BABY BAR, Guantanamo Baywatch, Primal Shakes, Normal Babies BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BISTRO ON SPRUCE (208-664-1774), Truck Mills CAFE BODEGA (208-263-5911), Five Minutes of Fame CARR’S CORNER, DJ Wesone THE CELLAR, Riverboat Dave  CHAPS, Land of Voices with Dirk

Swartz CHATEAU RIVE (795-2030), Keller Williams EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho  THE HOP!, Elektro Grave “Wir Danken Ihnen” IRV’S, DJ Prophesy JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bob Jazz LATAH BISTRO, Eric Neuhausser  LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dario Re  MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Brad Keeler  THE PHAT HOUSE, Be Open Mic with Mike Bethely RICO’S, WSU School of Music Jazz Band SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic SUKI YAKI INN (624-0022), One Man Train Wreck THE VAULT, DJs Freaky Fred and MC Squared THE VIKING, Jordan Collins

Coming Up ...

JONES RADIATOR, Oracles Kitchen, Nov. 21 ZOLA, Cruxie and the Zola Thanksgiving Party, Nov. 21 THE BARTLETT, Tera Melos, Zorch, Nov. 21, 8 pm  CLUB 412, Helmet (See story on facing page) with Thirion X, Storm Normandy, Nov. 21  KNITTING FACTORY, Pretty Lights (See story on facing page) with Odesza, Nov. 21

All things MAN, All in one place, All in one weekend! Spokane Fair & Expo Center Nov 15, 16, 17 Longhorn BBQ Battle of the Pits & Chili Cook-off MMA Action Live Bands Beer Garden

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MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208667-9660 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington St. • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208664-9463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 311 N. 1st Ave., Sandpoint • 208-263-6971 THE COUNTRY CLUB • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIRST STREET BAR • 122 E. First St., Deer Park • 276-2320 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROS. • 718 W. Riverside • 315-8765 THE GRAIL • 4720 E. Seltice Way, CdA • 208665-5882 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KELLY’S IRISH PUB • 726 N. Fourth St., CdA • 208-667-1717 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PACIFIC AVENUE PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 220 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RICO’S PUB • 200 E. Main, Pullman • 332-6566 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 STUDIO K• 2810 E. 29th Ave. • 534-9317 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 THE VAULT • 120 N. Wall St. • 863-9597 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 THE WAVE • 525 W. First Ave. • 747-2023 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 51


MUSIC EARLY CHRISTMAS ROCKS

Moms love Mannheim Steamroller. That’s not a terrible thing for the Chip Davis-led electric orchestra, as this die-hard fan group has helped the band sell 28 million albums in America alone since its inception in 1974. Most famous for their ’80s-sounding take on Christmas songs, Mannheim Steamroller has music for other holidays as well — not that anyone really cares about that. Coming to the Lilac City next Wednesday, the group will delight mothers and their loved ones brought along for the ride, with their almost campy but thoroughly entertaining Christmas tunes. So what if we haven’t even had Thanksgiving yet. — LAURA JOHNSON Mannheim Steamroller • Wed, Nov. 20 at 7:30 pm • $25-$90 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • inbpac.com

52 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013

THEATER LOVE AND MUSIC

VISUAL ARTS FAMILIAR FEATURES

The Fantasticks • Nov. 15-16 and 22-23 at 7:30 pm, Nov. 17 at 2 pm and Nov. 21 at 5 pm • $10 (free for EWU students) • EWU Bldg. 210, Cheney • 359-2459

Rose Bond: “Poetics and Public Projection: Layered History - Redrawn Memory” • Nov. 12-Feb. 7, artist reception Nov. 12 from 5-6 pm • Free • Whitworth’s Bryan Oliver Gallery • 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. • whitworth.edu • 777-4513

This fall, EWU’s theater department produces one of the longestrunning musicals in the world, The Fantasticks, first performed in 1960 and continuing off-Broadway for 42 consecutive years. Its plot is partly based on Romeo and Juliet, but twisted to portray the lovers’ fathers tricking their two offspring to fall in love, rather than forcing them apart. Once this scheme is revealed, the couple separate, only to find that in the end they want to be together. It’s a delightful allegorical tale, told through an untraditional love story. — KATELYN SMITH

Canadian-born Rose Bond’s works explore architectural animation on a large scale. Creating specific installations for places all around the world, including Exeter Castle in England and the Museum at Eldridge Street on New York’s Lower East Side, Bond has won awards from the American Film Institution, Bloomberg L.P., and the National Endowment for the Arts. Bond’s vivid works have an almost dream-like quality to them. — EMERA L. RILEY


Spokane

GET LISTED!

Winery

A S S O C I AT I O N

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

HOLIDAY WINE FESTIVAL

FRIDAY, NOV. 22nd – SUNDAY, NOV. 24TH 12PM to 5PM Start a new holiday tradition when you share wine and friendly conversation with wine enthusiasts at Spokane’s renowned wineries. Find perfect holiday gift ideas and enjoy special “Holiday Wine Fest” discounts at select wineries. Pick up winery tour maps at each location, or visit spokanewineries.net Tasting fees may apply.

VISUAL ARTS COOL YULE

This weekend is a great time to get an early start on your holiday shopping. After all, Thanksgiving is a week later than usual, thus there’s one less week before Christmas. Plus, the type of shopping we’re talking about doesn’t involve a trip to the mall. This weekend, the MAC hosts Yuletide, the 34th annual fine arts and crafts fair hosted by and benefiting the Spokane Art School, the newly reincarnated arts education nonprofit. Items for sale run the gamut from one-of-a-kind ceramics to handmade jewelry and wearable fiber art, all created by artists based right here in the Inland Northwest. It’s a win-win: support local artisans and check people off your gift-buying list. — CHEY SCOTT 2013 Yuletide • Fri, Nov. 15 from 10 am to Sun, Nov. 17 at 4:30 pm • Free admission • Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture • 2316 W. First • spokaneartschool.net • 325-3001

VISUAL ART IN YOUR FACE

This art installation comes in the form of A-frame restaurant boards. But instead of showcasing today’s specials, the boards promote faces — up close and personal portraits of influential Spokane people. The touring exhibit, “Spokane Fifty: Faces Shaping Our City,” was photographed by local artist Marshall E. Peterson Jr. promoting 50 entrepreneurs, artists, businesspeople and the like who make the area an exceptional place. It began showing around town this summer; Peterson will have two exhibits next week. — LAURA JOHNSON Spokane Fifty: Faces Shaping Our City • Tue, Nov. 19 from 7 am-7 pm • Eastern Washington University’s PUB • 526 5th St., Cheney • Wed, Nov. 20 from 5-8 pm • River City Brewing • 121 S. Cedar • Free admission • spokanefifty.com

Make an evening of it with the Corkage Free Program.

spokanewineries.net

Mitsuomi found a perfect place to

When Mitsuomi Nakamara wanted a global perspective, he chose Whitworth’s School of Global Commerce and Management. Whitworth is consistently rated among the best universities in the West by U.S. News, News, World Report and Princeton Review. Small class sizes mean our instructors, who are also business professionals, can guide and mentor. Plus the evening schedule and downtown U-District location provide the flexibility you need. Take a cue from Mits and think globally about your own career; call or go online today to find out more about Whitworth’s MBA.

Mitsuomi Nakamura ‘05 Managing Director at HOTSTART Asia Pacific, Ltd.

Apply now. Visit whitworth.edu/mba or call 509.777.3222.

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 53


YULETIDE Nov. 15, 16, & 17, 2013 34TH ANNUAL FINE ARTS AND CRAFTS FAIR TO BENEFIT SPOKANE ART SCHOOL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

Friday, Saturday, Sunday 10am - 4:30pm FREE ADMISSION TO EVENT & MAC GALLERIES Participating Artists: Leslie Ahrens • Don Barron (FOREST GATE WOODWORKS) Pat Boyd • Karen Ciaffa • Nan Drye • Larry Ellingson Ken Frybarger (ATELIER OF GLASS BY KEN) Anthony Gallaher (FIRED ELEMENTS) • Jeff Harris Juaquetta Holcomb (GARDEN PARTY FIBERS, HANDSPUN YARNS) Kris Howell (MINUTIA) • Kathleen Hubbard Linda Lowry • Linda Malcom & Melinda Melvin Judy Meddaugh • Michele Mokrey & Denise Steen Denise Roberson (LITTLE SISTAHS WIT TUDES) Bonnie Speigle (HANDCRAFTED SOAPS BY BONNIE) Ron Vaughan • Sharon Ronning

The Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture 2316 W. 1st Ave, In Spokane’s Brownes Addition

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS BENEFIT BREAKFAST Learn about the local mentoring program and how it impacts the futures of children in the area at an annual fundraiser event. Nov. 15, 7:308:30 am. Northern Quest, 100 N. Hayford Rd. (328-8310 x. 223) BRING HIM HOME “A Salute to Our Veterans” invites all vets to attend free as honored guests. Nov. 15, 7 pm. $10. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org (208-659-4228) CRAB FEST FUNDRAISER Third annual all-you-can-eat crab fest and auction as a fundraiser for the Shadle-North Lions Club. Nov. 16, 6:30 pm. $35. St. Thomas Moore Catholic Church, 505 W. St. Thomas More Way. (475-1668) HELPING HAND FOR HUTCH BENEFIT Fundraiser night for a community member battling Leukemia, with a silent auction and chili feed. Donated auction items welcomed. Nov. 16, 5 pm. Monterey Cafe, 9 N. Washington St. (868-0284) SPOKANE VALLEY HERITAGE MUSEUM FUNDRAISER 9th annual luncheon fundraiser featuring a living history presentation of the Civil War, a themed meal and a silent auction. Nov. 16, 11:30 am-1:30 pm. $20. Opportunity Presbyterian, 202 N. Pines Rd. (922-4570) WINE TASTING AND AUCTION Featuring 12 area wineries, hor d’oeuvres, and auction items. Proceeds support local and international outreach efforts. Nov. 16, 6:30 pm. $35. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 5720 S. Perry. (448-2255)

COMEDY

GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open-mic comedy, including stand-up, sketch, improv or anything weird. Five minutes per performer. Every other Thursday at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (847-1234) STAND-UP COMEDY Local comedians, see weekly schedule online. Thursdays, 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. uncledscomedy.com (483-7300) COMEDY FUNDRAISER PARTY “Almost Not Quite” fundraiser party hosted by Nova Kaine, featuring comedy by Emily Richman. Nov. 15, 6 pm. Free, donations accepted. nYne, 232 W. Sprague Ave. nynebar.com (944-5774) FAMILY DINNER Live comedy improv show based on audience suggestions about their family members. Fridays at 8 pm through Nov. 29. $7-$9. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) SAFARI Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Allages. Saturdays, 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) SCRAMBLED MCMANUS One-man comedy performance written by Patrick F. McManus, starring Tim Behrens. Nov. 16, 7 pm. $13-$17. Empire Theatre, 126 S. Crosby St., Tekoa. (284-2000) TOTAL BUMMER Stand-up comedy project by Ramsey Troxel. Nov. 16, 7:30 pm. $2. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045)

SPONSORED BY THE TINMAN GALLERY

COMMUNITY

NEXT GENERATION OF LEADERS “Making it Happen” Spokane’s Next Generation of Leaders Discuss the Future” featuring a panel of local young leaders. At the WSU Spokane South Campus Facility, next to the Bookie. Nov. 14, 3-5 pm. Free, RSVP required. Riverpoint Campus, 600 N. Riverpoint Blvd. (509-358-7500) INTERNATIONAL DAY OF TOLERANCE All are invited to stand for justice by linking arms and forming a line of solidarity to support equity and social justice. Event includes speakers, music and more. Nov. 15, noon. Free. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone. (313-5836) RED SHOE DRAW-OFF The annual event benefiting the Toni M. Robideaux Scholarship Fund, hosted by the Spokane Ad Federation Chapter, features a draw-off between two teams and a furniture auction. Nov. 15, 5:30-9 pm. $15. Luxe Coffeehouse, 1017 W. First Ave. aafspokane.com (328-5855) CDA VISION 2030 Those who live/ work/play in the greater CdA area are invited to share their vision and opinions for the future of Coeur d’Alene into the year 2030 at a public summit. Nov. 16, 10 am-2 pm. Free, pre-registration requested. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. (208-415-0122) “CATCHING FIRE” RELEASE PARTY Celebration of the latest film based on the “Hunger Games” book series, featuring obstacle courses, survival training workshops and more. Nov. 16, 7-9 pm. Free. Hayden Library, 8385 N. Government Way. (208-772-5612)

The Music of Tin Pan Alley: 1885-1960 with the Spokane Area Youth Choirs

Sat. Nov. 16 at 1 pm

Bing Crosby Theater, Downtown Spokane FREE for kids of all ages! Event Donors

Not like every other furniture store. Fun, eclectic pieces at guaranteed prices. 2424 N. 4th, Cd’A 208 765-3674 rungefurniture.com

54 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013

CANNED FOOD DRIVE Save an extra 6% on sale prices with a canned food donation!

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Camp Fire Inland Northwest, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, Numerica Credit Union, Rocket Bakery


JINGLE BELL RUN/WALK This festive 5K run/walk is a fundraiser for the Arthritis Foundation and features holidaythemed costumes. Nov. 16, 9 am. $10$40. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard. (315-9862) LIBRARY BOOK SALE Used library books and other items for sale. Nov. 16, 10 am-1 pm. Free. Otis Orchards Library, 22324 E. Wellesley. scld.org (893-8390) TURKEY TROT FUN RUN Hosted by the UI Student-Athlete Advisory Committee, the annual 5K benefits Christmas for Kids. Nov. 16, 8-11 am. $20-$35. University of Idaho, 709 S Deakin St. govandals.com (208-885-6111) MEDICARE BENEFIT WORKSHOP Community workshop on choosing a Medicare plan and more. Nov. 18, 26 and Dec. 3 at 1 pm. Free. Bell-Anderson Financial, 12309 E. Mirabeau Parkway. bellandersenfinancial.com (993-1816) INSURANCE EXCHANGE WORKSHOP Learn about the new Wash. insurance exchange. Nov. 20 from 6-8 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. (893-8350)

CRAFTS

CDA LIBRARY CRAFT FAIR Second annual craft fair, featuring 35+ local vendors, a portion of sales benefit the library. Nov. 16, 10 am-4 pm and Nov. 17, 12-4 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. (208-769-2315) MEAD HIGH SCHOOL CRAFT FAIR Handmade craft and gift items, baked goods, and more. Proceeds support the Mead HS Band and Colorguard. Nov. 16, 9 am-5 pm and Nov. 17, 10 am-4 pm. $1

admission. Mead High School, 302 W. Hastings Rd. (720-6983)

ETC.

THUNDER FROM DOWN UNDER Male revue, rated R. Nov. 14, 7 pm. $25. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S Hwy 95. cdacasino.com (800-523-2464) STARTUP WEEKEND SPOKANE The 54-hour event brings together technical and non-technical entrepreneurs who pitch ideas that are crowd-sourced, then teams are formed to work all weekend to develop the ideas. Nov. 15-17, starting Fri at 5:30 pm. $65-$85. SIERR Building, 850 E. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokane. startupweekend.org PRESERVING HOLIDAY PLANTS Learn how to maintain and preserve Christmas cacti, poinsettias and amaryllis in a presentation hosted by the Friends of Manito. Nov. 16, 10 am. Free. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. (456-8038)

FILM

MONEY FOR NOTHING One-night screening of the documentary on the U.S. Federal Reserve. Nov. 14, 7 pm. $7. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main. (209-2393) TEACH Documentary on the struggles and triumphs of the U.S. education system. Nov. 14, 7 pm. Free. Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. (208-882-4127) BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL Screening of the touring film festival, featuring films on outdoor exploration and adventure, hosted by Mountain Gear. Nov. 15-17, show times TBA. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7638)

A FIERCE GREEN FIRE Documentary screening, also a film about the Scotchman Peaks “Grass Routes: Changing the Conversation.” Nov. 15, 7 pm. $7. Sandpoint Events Center, 515 Pine. idahoconservation.org (208-265-9565) SALINGER Screening hosted by the U of Idaho and WSU English Departments on the reclusive author of “The Catcher in the Rye.” Nov. 15-17, show times vary. $6. Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) POWDER TO THE PEOPLE Snowboard film premier benefiting SOS Outreach, featuring give-aways, a raffle and a signing with pro boarder Jesse Burtner. Nov. 16, 7 pm $5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. (327-1050) QUENTIN TARANTINO FILM FESTIVAL: Screening of “Django Unchained.” Nov. 19, 7 pm. $5. Kenworthy, 508 S. Main, Moscow. (208-882-4127)

Nov 22 – Dec 22 On the Main Stage

FOOD

TASTEFUL THURSDAYS Live music and product samples every Thursday through Dec. 19, featuring local food vendors and musicians. Free. Moscow Food Co-op, 121 E. 5th St. (208-882-8537) WINE TASTING Friday features Spokane’s Barrister Winery; Saturday features Milbrandt Vineyards. Nov. 15, 3-6:30 pm and Nov. 16, 2-4:30 pm. $10. Vino!, 222 S. Washington. (838-1229) WINE TASTING: WASH. STATE VS. SPAIN “Showdown” series with blind tastings of Washington state wines and wines from Spain. Nov. 15, 7 pm. $20. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd. (343-2253)

Crazy for You

The Tempest

The Mousetrap

SUDS

Jan 17 - Feb 9

Feb 28 - Mar16

The

In the Firth J. Chew Studio Theatre

Three Musketeers

April 4 - 19

Jan 31 - Feb 23

March 14 - April 13

Becky’s New Car May 2 - June 1

Gypsy

May 16 - June 15

What will you build?

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Visit whitworth.edu/mit or call 509.777.3222..

NOVEMBER 14, 2013 INLANDER 55


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess CRAPPILY EVER AFTER

My husband of a year is the most selfish, inconsiderate, cold-shouldered man I’ve ever known. He’s 24; I’m 22. He behaved similarly when we were dating, but when he proposed, he made promises to treat me better, and I believed him. Well, we pretty much only do what he wants to do. If it’s an activity for me, he’ll whine and act miserable the whole time. He often cancels our plans to hang out with his friends. On our anniversary, we had AMY ALKON reservations at a fancy restaurant 45 minutes away. I got ready, and he suddenly decided he didn’t want to drive there and took us to some random place nearby. At that point, our evening meant nothing. He is king of the silent treatment and never admits fault or listens to my feelings. We’ve sought out marriage counseling, but when there’s no sex, compromise, communication, or friendship, should I still hold out hope? I’m trying to because I told myself I’d only -Upset get married once. It’s 2013. You tell people you’re divorced and they mumble, “Oh, sorry.” They don’t put you on a scaffold in the town square to be jeered by all the villagers and then make you go around with a big scarlet “D” sewn on all your clothes. Our early 20s should be called the Age of Idiocy. Not for all people but for a whole lot of us, including me. Until we figure out that life’s hobby is kicking us in the teeth, there’s a tendency to just wing it and believe things will turn out okay. Well, there are things — like signing a contract to spend your life with somebody — that just shouldn’t be, uh, wung. Sure, this guy showed promise as a boyfriend; that is, he made empty promises that he’d be completely different after marriage. For future reference, anybody can say he’ll be different. Only after he consistently shows he’s different over time does it makes sense to believe him. Unfortunately, it’s hard to think so sensibly if, like many early 20-somethings, you see marriage as an express elevator to adulthood: Hop in; press the “just married” button; get off at grownupland, where you’ll magically become mature adults and get on with all that happily ever after stuff. Your husband has his merits, like that both of his kidneys seem to work and he has yet to express an interest in drowning squirrels. Couples therapy could help — if you had a guy who just didn’t know how to be married but cared deeply for you and wanted to learn. Your husband’s behavior, however, reflects the lack of empathy common to narcissists. Empathy isn’t something you can train an adult to have — not to any meaningful degree. What you can do is accept that you were naive and amend your “marry only once” pledge to “marry idiotically only once.” You might also take a more positive view of mistakes. They tend to be pretty amazing teachers — providing we admit we’ve made them so we can learn from them instead of sticking around to see if we can’t make a bunch of sociopathic babies with them.

MILD KINGDOM

My girlfriend’s love of animals is causing some tension. She cannot watch any movie in which an animal gets hurt or dies. Telling her to remember that it’s a movie and the animal doesn’t actually die just makes her really mad. She’ll say my knowing animal suffering upsets her should be enough of a reason. -Rational Never mind that “Titanic” is a movie about 1,500 people drowning in the freezing Atlantic Ocean. For some, what matters is “Omigod, did that lady’s goldfish die?” And wouldn’t you know it, there’s a site for these people, doesthedogdie.com, which details whether animals in a movie are depicted getting injured or killed and confirms that no, in “Titanic,” “Old Rose’s dog and goldfish are not harmed.” Phew, huh? Snarking aside, no amount of turning to your girlfriend and saying “Oh, come on, that dog has an agent and headshots!” will change her need to live in a world where Old Yeller never bites it. There’s also a good chance that much of her upset is about what she thinks your reaction means — that you don’t care about her feelings. Try putting on a new you — telling her that you understand how hard it is for her to see animals suffer, that you’ll let her know when she can uncover her eyes when you’re watching TV, and that you’ll go alone to movies in which aliens snack on deer. This should dial back the tension so you two can snuggle on the couch together, watching humans being shot, bludgeoned, and hacked to pieces. (Do the gentlemanly thing and cover her eyes if the camera pulls out to reveal an ant trap.) n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

56 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013

EVENTS | CALENDAR HOLIDAY EATING TIPS Workshop on healthy-eating habits to rely on during the holiday feasting season. Nov. 16, 9:30 am Free. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. carlabrannancoaching.com (951-7574) INLAND NW VEGAN SOCIETY POTLUCK Bring a plant-based (no animal products or honey) dish to share along with an ingredient list and the recipe. Dinner is followed by a guest speaker. Third Sunday (Nov. 17) of every month, 5 pm. Donations accepted. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. (315-2852) FEAST WITH FRIENDS An event to encourage protection of Wash. state’s farmlands, featuring appetizers from host restaurant Sante, local wine and a silent auction. Nov. 18, 6 pm. $25. Community Building, 35 W. Main. (838-1965) THANKSGIVING COOKING CLASS Chef Bob Black teaches a class featuring recipes from six regions across the U.S. Nov. 18, 5:30 pm $50. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. jacklincenter.org (208-457-8950)

MUSIC

JASON FARNHAM Piano concert hosted by the Pend Oreille Arts Council. Nov. 14, 7:30 pm. $10-$16. Panida Theater, 300 N. First. artsinsandpoint.com (208-263-6139) NIC JAZZ ENSEMBLE “Fa la la la la and All That Jazz” concert. Nov. 14, 7:30 pm. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu (208-769-2759) SPOKANE ACCORDION ENSEMBLE The ensemble presents a classical and classics concert, conducted by Beverley Fess, of Calgary, Alberta. Nov. 14, 7 pm $10. Trinity Lutheran Church, 812 N. Fifth St. (208-610-8426) PLAY DATE! FAMILY MUSIC EVENT Greg Attonito of the punk rock band the Bouncing Souls stops in Spokane with his children’s music project, Play Date, featuring games, drawing and family sing-along. Nov. 15, 6 pm. Free. Shamrock Tattoo, 2011 N. Madison St. (325-0330) SPOKANE ACCORDION ENSEMBLE The ensemble presents a “Classical and Classics Concert.” Nov. 15, 7 pm. $10. St. Mark’s Lutheran, 316 E. 24th. (290-6858) KRFY BENEFIT CONCERT Concert featuring blues/folk group Kathy Colton and the Reluctants, with proceeds benefiting KRFY community radio station. Nov. 16, 7:30 pm. $10. Di Luna’s Cafe, 207 Cedar St. (208-263-0846) PIANIST HASKELL SMALL Performance by the world-renowned pianist, who was recently featured on PBS’s “A Celebration of the Piano.” Nov. 16, 7 pm. $8-$10. Unitarian Universalist, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (325-6383) SPOKANE SYMPHONY Classics Series: “Dazzling Brilliance” feat. Jon Nakamatsu on piano. Nov. 16 at 8 pm, Nov. 17 at 3 pm. $15-$54. The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) CLARION BRASS RELEASE PARTY Release Party for the groups new “Reindeer Games” album. Nov. 17, 5-9 pm. Free. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. figarotunes.com (489-4633) GONZAGA JAZZ ENSEMBLE Directed by David Fague, featuring works by contemporary composers. Nov. 19, 5:30 pm. Free. Gonzaga, 502 E. Boone Ave. (313-6733) MANNHEIM STEAMROLLER “A Christmas Celebration” concert. Nov. 20, 7:30 pm. $25-$95. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com

WORLD CLASS GUITARIST CONCERT Featuring guitarists Frank Vigola, Vinny Raniolo and Peppino D’Agostino in a benefit concert for PBS Television. Nov. 20, 7:30 pm. $25. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7404)

PERFORMANCE

MOSCOW BALLET’S GREAT RUSSIAN NUTCRACKER Performance of the classic holiday ballet. Nov. 14, 7:30 pm $30-$177. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. .com (509-227-7404) LETTERS HOME Monologues based on letters from U.S. troops involved in the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, presented by the Griffin Theatre Company. Nov. 1516 at 7:30 pm. $9-$18. Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, WSU Pullman. (325-4328) THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO Performed by the University of Idaho Opera. Nov. 15-16 at 7:30 pm Nov. 17 at 3 pm. $7-$10. University of Idaho Admin. Building, 851 Campus Dr. (888-884-3246) BALLET FOLKLORICO Dance performance featuring traditional music and dance of Mexican Festivals. Nov. 17, 7 pm. $16-$30. Beasley Coliseum, 225 N. Grand. festivaldance.org (208-883-3267)

WEEKEND COUNTDOWN

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SPORTS & OUTDOORS

DODGEBALL TOURNAMENT The fifth annual “Wild Turkey” co-ed adult dodgeball tournament takes place at Mullan Trail and Seltice Elementary Schools. Nov. 15 $80/team. Mullan Trail Elementary School, 300 W. Cherry Ave. postfallsidaho.org (208-773-0539) SPOKANE CHIEFS’ FIRST TEE NIGHT First Tee of the Inland Northwest hosts a night with the Spokane Chiefs, offering select seats for $10, with $4 from each ticket, and silent auction proceeds, benefiting the organization. Nov. 16, 7 pm. $10. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. (328-0450 x318) YOGA WORKSHOP Workshop on vibrational yoga, a meditation focused form of yoga. Pre-register online. Nov. 17, 9 am. $15. Harmony Yoga, 1717 W. Sixth Ave. (747-4430) MMA CONQUEST OF THE CAGE Mixed martial arts fights featuring Spokane natives Lyle Beerbohm and Elizabeth Phillips. Nov. 20, 7 pm. $45-$75. Northern Quest, 100 N. Hayford Rd. (481-6700)

THEATER

GREASE Performance of the musical by members of the Regional Theatre of the Palouse. Through Nov. 17, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, also on Nov. 16-17 at 1:30 pm. $17-20. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N Grand. rtoptheatre.org (334-0750) INSPECTING CAROL Comedy about a theater troupe’s attempt to produce “A Christmas Carol.” Nov. 14-24, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3592) SECOND SAMUEL Comedy. Through Nov. 24, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $22. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. (325-2507)

ALMOST, MAINE Romantic comedy, performed by the SCC Players. Nov. 15-24, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Free. SCC, 1810 N. Greene St. (533-7387) THE FANTASTICKS Performance of the musical by EWU’s Theatre Dept. Nov. 15-16 and 22-23 at 7:30 pm, Nov. 17 at 2 pm, Nov. 21 at 5 pm. $10. EWU, 526 Fifth St. ewu.edu (359-2459) FIDDLER ON THE ROOF Musical performed by local children ages 12-17. FriSat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. $5-$12. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave. pendoreilleplayers.org (447-9900) GREASE THE MUSICAL Produced by the Rogers HS Drama Dept. Nov. 15-23, ThursSat at 7 pm. $5-$7. Rogers High School, 1622 E. Wellesley Ave. (354-6551) NORA Play adapted from the 1879 script for “A Doll’s House.” Through Nov. 24, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org (276-2775)

VISUAL ARTS

VISITING ARTIST LECTURE SERIES NYC-based artist Gelah Penn speaks about her work and career as part of this years VALS, themed “Recasting Traditions.” Lectures held Nov. 14 at The MAC at 6:30 pm, and at noon at EWU. All events are free. (456-3931) SPOKANE POTTERS’ GUILD HOLIDAY SALE The 7th annual holiday sale features handmade mugs, vases, boxes, bowls and much more made by guild members. Nov. 15, 4-7 pm and Nov. 16, 10 am-2 pm. Free admission. Spokane Potters’ Guild, 1404 N. Fiske. (532-8225) YULETIDE The 34th annual fine arts and crafts fair benefits the Spokane Art School’s educational programs. Nov. 1517. Free admission. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. spokaneartschool.net (325-3001) SPOKANE FIFTY Photography project highlighting contributors to the Inland NW arts and culture scene, by photographer Marshall E. Peterson, Jr. Nov. 19 from 7 am-7 pm at EWU PUB, and Nov. 20 from 5-8 pm at River City Brewing, 121 S. Cedar. spokanefifty.com

WORDS

GONZAGA VISITING WRITERS SERIES Presentation by young adult author Matt de la Pena. Nov. 14 at 7:30 pm. Free. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. (313-6681) A HISTORY OF VIOLENCE Talk by the NYT-bestselling author and cognitive

Sunday, Dec 1 The Gift of Being Present Rev. Vincent Lachina, NW Regional Chaplain to Planned Parenthood

Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane

4340 W. Ft. Wright Drive 509-325-6383 www.uuspokane.org

Sunday Services

Religious Ed & Childcare

9:15 & 11am


scientist Steven Pinker. Nov. 14, 7 pm. $7. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (359-6335) JEANNIE OPDYKE SMITH LECTURE “One Person Can Make a Difference” presentation based on the book “In My Hands” by the daughter of Polish rescuer Irene Gut Opdyke. Nov. 14, 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) AUTHOR TED DEKKER The NYT-bestselling author presents as part of a national tour for his latest novel, “Outlaw.” Nov. 15, 6:30 pm. Free. Eastpoint Church, 15303 E. Sprague Ave. (990-8731) POET NANCE VAN WINCKEL The awardwinning author/ poet reads from and discusses her work. Nov. 15, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) CHILDREN’S AUTHOR JOE O’NEILL The author talks about his books in the “Red Hand Adventure Series,” for young readers. Nov. 16, 11 am-1 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) SPOKANE POETRY SLAM Performance poetry competition. Nov.’s featured poet is Gray Thomas. Nov. 17, 9 pm. $5. Lantern Tap House, 1004 S. Perry St. thelanterntavern.com (315-9531) POET PÁDRAIG Ó TUAMA Reading by the Belfast, Ireland-based poet, speaker and conflict mediator. Nov. 18, 7 pm. Free. Whitworth HUB, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. whitworth.edu (777-3253) 

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MORE EVENTS

Visit Inlander.com for complete listings of local events.

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60 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013

IT’S FREE

1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

I Saw You

I Saw You

Cheers

Cheers

Starbucks - Airway Heights Starbucks (Airway Heights, 11/11) -- I saw you on November 11th. You were so handsome sitting at that little table, both eager and nervous. I have loved you every day since. Your blue eyes, that adorable dimple in your chin. With every word we exchanged that evening, I became more and more captivated by you. I have treasured every day that I have spent with you since then. You light up my life and give me the utmost joy. I am forever yours Sharkface. Here’s to many more November 11ths.

plaza. You: maroon coat, purple, pink and maybe blue bedazzled backpack. Usually sitting by the change machine. You always look at me but I was too nervous to come say hi to you at the time, coffee sometime? Whitworth123@ outlook.com

a diabetic needs insulin. I love you like a fat kid loves cake. So I have to ask Celeste Christine Lennartz will you marry me? And make me the luckiest man in the world?

to my 911 call on November 2nd about 5 pm regarding a man laying on the sidewalk on north Pines Road. It was freezing cold and blustery and he wasn’t responding. You arrived promptly, were knowledgeable, efficient, professional, courteous and kind. And, as if that weren’t enough, you were all oh-so-handsome! Thank you for all that you do for our community! You are the best!!

Halloween I saw you, you saw me, then I went trick or treating... I’ve never ever done this before, and I’m sure you won’t be reading this but... I saw you at my neighbor’s bonfire on Halloween. I introduced myself to my neighbor Janelle, and you stood up, smiled and watched as she and I conversed. She offered me a halloween beer which I had to decline and wished I hadn’t. As I walked away, I was kicking myself for not introducing myself to you. If you are single, please feel free to

Krispy Kreme Experimental Milkshake. Sunday. November 10, 2013. You and your friends came in inquiring about a Creamsicle milkshake that we unfortunately do not offer. I was the brave soul who volunteered to try and recreate it for you. Hopefully I did you a good service. Our interaction brightened my day. Hit me up: c a ye n n a e ve l i n a @ g m a i l . co m . Put a non-identifying email Maybe we can talk more short, address in your message, like short stories.

TO CONNECT

“petals327@yahoo.com” — not

Fred Meyer - Wandermere We “j.smith@comcast.net.” were both in the candy aisle. You mentioned that the Chili dark chocolate was a great candy bar. walk across the street and say hello We talked for a few minutes and next time you visit your friends. then went our separate ways. I was behind you in line yet you didn’t see Five Mile Starbucks I saw you on me until I said something to you as Sunday November 10th, around you left. If you are single and want 1:00 pm. We shared glances to meet up in the candy aisle again, several times and also when you please e-mail me at llhlig@yahoo. left. I was the guy with the ski com and in the subject line tell me jacket engrossed in my computer. what I said to you as you left the What an idiot I was, I should have store. Hope you are enjoying those gotten your number and meet up chili dark chocolate candy bars! for coffee. STA Plaza - Upstairs Friday, November 8th. I was sitting on a bench having “breakfast” when you walked by. Our eyes met and I smiled at you and you returned the smile. When you walked back toward the escalator I watched you, you saw me and smiled again. You looked up at me one more time as you went down the escalator and smiled again. I wish I had the nerve to stop you and ask your name or just say hi. If you see this maybe I can buy you coffee and actually say hi. I See You you know who you are. AEC At the AEC on north Monroe Street, Thursday, just after noon: You: (cute with your blonde hair up, holding an espresso) were coming, I (bundled up in thick knitted hooded sweater) was going. We smiled at each other and I was drawn in by your beautiful eyes. What country are you from? Tell me about yourself over coffee... Downtown Plaza Girl every morning at 6:30 at the downtown

Valley Mall Saturday, November 9th. You: redhead with shopping bags, trying to decide what to eat in the lunch court. Me: green jacket. We talked about the choices. You went with tacos, I went for pizza. As you walked away our eyes met and yes, I am intere sted.

Cheers Philippians 4:13 I saw you over 2 years ago, we work at the same retirement living facility and I knew that it was love at first sight. You: a perfect 5’1, dark beautiful hair, gorgeous hazel brown and green eyes, you took my breath away. Me: short brown and chunky, we exchanged some conversation and from then on I was hooked on you like a fish on a line. I could never stop thinking of you. I always wanted to be around you. It came to me very soon after us talking that you’re my one and only, my soul mate, my other half that I have been missing for so many years. We have been through so much together that I couldn’t imagine being on this earth with anyone else. I need you like I need air. Like

Lost Wallet Cheers to whomever found my wallet by the Liberty Lake STCU ATM and turned it in on November 1st. Thank you, thank you, thank you. You saved my life. 12 Months of April I have always been a man of routine. I wake up at the same time everyday. I eat breakfast at the same time everyday. I leave for work at the same time, and catch the same bus to work every day at the same time. A little over 12 months ago, a twist of fate put me on a bus that I never caught before. That’s when I saw her. A goddess. A beautiful young woman with shiny black hair and lips that just screams kiss me. I didn’t talk to her that day nor her to me, but I always imagined what it would be like to hold a conversation with her. I started catching that bus on a regular basis after that. One day she was in a hurry and forgot her homework on the bus. I tried to stop her and tell her that she had left it behind, but she did not hear me. I decided to keep the papers and give them to her the next day, but for some reason she didn’t ride that bus for a few weeks after that. I held on to those papers every day for 3 weeks in hope to see her again and return them to her. When I finally saw her again I returned them to her and that’s when we spoke for the first time. We exchange numbers and shortly after started dating. As days turned into weeks and weeks into months, we both slowly but surely started falling in love with each other. 12 months have passed since the day we first kissed, and each kiss still feels like the first. I can say without a reasonable doubt that I am truly in love, and I hope we spend another 12 months together, and then another 12 after that. Happy anniversary baby. I’m looking forward to the next 12 months…. Of April

Dear Polka Dotted Man The past 6 months have been the happiest months of my life. Never did I think I would ever find someone so kind, gentle, funny, honorable, and just all around amazing as you are. You light up my world each and every day with your genuine smile and that wonderful laugh that dances through the cracks of my broken soul and some how heals my pain. There are few feelings better than knowing someone loves you and wants you just as much as you want and love them. Someone asked me recently why I loved you so much more than I love anyone else, I told them as I will tell you now, it’s because you make me brave enough too, by giving me the security to be myself. You make me see myself and my world in a whole new way, a brave and honest way, you make me want to expand my world by trying the things I have always been afraid of doing, I know you are always going to be there to take care of me and make sure that I am safe. No one has ever taken care of me the way you do, you are there 100% not just when its convenient but when it means staying in the hospital while I’m in and out of consciousness, going and getting my medicine when I’m sick and doing something small just ‘cause you know it will make me happy, it’s the feel of your arms pulling me to you. You are my best friend and I hope that I show you every day how much I love you and appreciate all the things, big and small, that you do for me every day. You are the man every guy should look up too and every girl should be looking for, I’m just glad I was the one lucky enough to get you. I will love you with everything I have until the end my darling, I promise. Dottie Moo

(Good) Grief Two thumbs up to having friends that are able to allow someone to grieve without needing to constantly remind them of why they are mourning. I recently experienced the loss of my dearest friend, and would like to thank one of my co-workers in particular for their support during this Dylan R. is this week’s winner time of grief. It was their of the “Say it Sweet” promotion! occasional smile and kind eyes that assurred me that Send in your CHEERS so I still had a friend on those you too can be enchallenging days when nothing tered to win 1 dozen more than a simple gesture of “Cheers” cupcakes at understanding couldn’t replenish.

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You Are The Best Thing I saw you and see you everyday there. You are about 5’2, beautiful hazel but sometimes green eyes, and you are the best thing that has ever happened to me. You make everyone around you feel better about themselves with the way you laugh and smile. I love every minute I get to spend with you and want to spend even more time with you. I have seen you for over 6 years now and you are more and more beautiful everyday. I have seen you for the last 4 years become the absolute best mom that our child could have ever asked for. I know that I have made mistakes but I want to and need to change for us. I know that I have hurt you and I know I can’t take any of it back, but I wish everyday that I could so I don’t ever have to see you hurt again. Come back to me and let me prove all of this to you. I love you very, very much.

been right beside me through everything. You’re my rock, my strength, and I love you so much. This year has been a blur of tears and heartache but together we made it. You’re my one. I love you. Here’s to the next fifty years. We got this. I love you so much!

YOU KNOW WHAT I HATE? Nothing really. I am not a big fan of some things. Like bugs, they are just kind of gross, but I know they do serve a purpose in the large scheme of things. In general, not a big fan of flip flops, I just don't like smelling peoples feet I guess. I don't really care for turtleneck sweaters because it always feels like I am being choked softly, is that weird? The smell of dog food always kind of makes me queasy, especially when it's warmed up, ugh that will make anyone sick. The creepers at red lights. You know, those people that start inching forward in their cars…slowly…until the light turns green. Being the first one at any party, what I usually like to do if that happens is pretend I left something in my car and then leave for 2 hours and then come back in. When the host asked where I was I just usually say that someone hit my car and it's all cool. When someone leaves their phone number at the end of a long message and they say it so fast you can't understand it and have to listen multiple times to figure it out. When you're wearing a hat, after a while it feels like it's not there. When you take it off, it feels like it's still there, you know what I mean? People who can't seem to understand that " red eyes" are possible to remove in photos. Long lists of someones pet peeves. Not a big fan of kittens in general, yeah I get it you are supposed to be cute but I'm feeling nothing for you, sorry. Having to explain the same thing more than once. Hypocrites (yeah, you know who your are). Men who refer to their wife as ” the wife”- a wife is not an object, at least that is what my wife tells me to say. Wobbly tables. Gluten, don't even know what it is really, I just don't like the word, reminds me of the word glue and thats just a gross visual when it comes to my food. Having to explain the same thing more than once. When I'm having a coversation with someone, & I'm in the middle of telling a story and some rude idiot comes walking up and starts a conversation with the person I'm talking to...as if I'm not even there! When the string on the hood of your sweatshirt goes inside the hood. When a utility sends you a letter about a rate increase that opens with: "In order to serve you better." Chickens. Having to explain the same thing more than once. But you know what I love? I love the stories that are in this I SAW YOU section of the Inlander every week. I love the stories of missed connections that could have been amazing. The people who are bordering stalkers (it's a fine line). Those people who pay it forward! and the people who have nothing better to do than type a huge rant to get your attention! If you have any amazing stories from the I SAW YOU section, send them to ChrisB@ inlander.com because we are going to be doing a story about them. Thanks!

Happy 1st Anniversary My Almond Joy, a year ago you said “I do”... What a year it’s been, our life together has been so much more than I could have expected! You will always be my warm rays of sunshine after the storm. All my love and forever yours, German Chocolate I Miss You! I miss your face. New Year’s will be approaching fast... How about one for ol’ times sake?? I Love You “I will never doubt the way you feel about me. The light of our love will flicker on as time goes by. I will remain patient in knowing my heart will never harden when it comes to you. I need you in my life. Time passes so quickly and to share the love with you is all I long for. You are my hero, my knight and my love.” Happy Anniversary 11-14-12. We made it to our first anniversay. Many people didn’t think we would! It’s been such a crazy hard year. But here we are, on the other side and stronger than ever. I don’t know what I’d have done if you hadn’t

Jeers Night Bikers To the pair of night bikers who cursed at me in front of my kids and smacked my vehicle in their spandex-laden rage: Here are a few tips to prevent another incident. First: don’t ride your bike in the snow on a dark residential sidestreet in the pitch black night. Second: if you absolutely must ride your bike in the snow on a dark residential sidestreet in the pitch black night, don’t dress like a ninja and expect your quarter candlepower pedal powered headlight to give any indication that you exist. Third: if you want to ride in the street, day or night, obey the same traffic rules as everybody else (i.e. left yields on an uncontrolled intersection) or just the basic laws of nature (i.e. you are riding a 15 lb bike and I am in a 2500 lb vehicle- you will lose). Fourth: get over yourself. Seriously. You are not Lance Armstrong. This is not the Tour de France. Take off the stretchy pants, you look ridiculous. RE: Spokane Drivers To the public transportation user, the law is RCW 46.61.235. No pedestrian or bicycle shall leave a curb or other place of safety and walk, run, or otherwise move into the path of a vehicle which is so close that it is impossible for the driver to stop. Also, if there is not pedestrian CONTROL devices, pedestrians need to make sure there is a natural break in traffic prior to entering the roadway. I hope this clears up the crosswalk issue for you- STOP and make sure the road is clear before proceeding you big dummy.

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MATT MIGNANELLI ILLUSTRATION

Road Rage

One time a guy yelled at me while I was running, and I lost my damn mind BY MIKE BOOKEY

I

didn’t stop running when I heard it. “Nice stroller, tubby!” My knuckles whitened and the ample hair on my neck came to attention. I was tubby, and the stroller in question carried my 6-month-old son, who chewed happily on an impossibly overpriced rubber giraffe, innocently shielded from the insult hurled at his father. My wife didn’t say anything, which was probably an appropriate spousal response when a teenager behind the wheel of a fresh-off-the-lot Subaru Outback denigrates the father of your child. I only caught sight of him for a second, but he had dark brown hair, short on the sides and sculpted on top. If you asked a Supercuts trainee for “The Macklemore,” this is how you’d look. A junior in high school, if I had to bet. And he was smiling when he said it. There was a kid in the passenger seat, assumedly the audience for whom this high-minded piece of performance art had been delivered. I let my wife take the stroller and she didn’t break stride. I said I’d catch up, and she just nodded as I darted to a well-manicured front yard and gathered about a half-dozen roundish rocks, the largest the size of a golf ball. I caught up to my wife and placed the rocks in the stroller’s cup holder. I warmed up the rotator cuff on my seldomly used throwing arm.

62 INLANDER NOVEMBER 14, 2013

“They’re going to have to come back this way,” I told my wife, who still had yet to comment. “Why?” she asked. I didn’t know, so I didn’t answer, but they’d come back. They had to at some point, and when they did, I guess that I — an otherwise well-adjusted husband, father, 1993 Presidential Physical Fitness Award winner and affable community member — was going to throw a rock through their rear window. Or side window. Any side window. Just not the windshield. Jesus, I’m not a monster. It all seemed so matter-of-fact in my mind. They deserved it, right? It was the obvious thing to do. Yes, I’m a big guy — 212 pounds at last formal inspection. But I’m out there running most days, hoping to shave a few digits off of that formidable number, and this guy has to point out that I’m kind of fat. Oh, and that I’m pushing a stroller, because to kids whose dads gift them expensive cars, strollers are super-lame, apparently. Running is my sanctuary and this guy had entered without an invitation. It wasn’t a “kids these days” sort of thing. This was savage assholery, the sorts of which can’t be allowed to fester, I justified. There had to be a punishment. Here’s how I saw it going down. That Subaru would come barreling down the road and I’d peg it with a rock. Or better, I’d just jump out into the road and command

the vehicle to stop with one outstretched hand. Then I’d start systematically kicking out the headlights and taillights, maybe a window or two. These two malcontents would likely be out of the vehicle by then, protesting mightily and remarking that their dad was going to kill them. Call your dad, I’d say. Call your buddy’s dad, too. We’ll just be a bunch of dads sharing ideas about raising asshole kids. Then I’d wait for the cops to arrive, because someone would have called the cops by then. I’d sit nonchalantly on a guardrail, I envisioned. When the officers arrived, I’d explain what happened. They’d take a look at these delinquents and figure I’d done society a favor. I might even get a medal, which upon being awarded I’d say, “I just did what anyone would do. I’m no hero.” I’d probably be on the news. “Mike Bookey, Vigilante,” the title below my glowing face would read. They never came back. I kept an eye out, and in the waning mile of the run I regretted not memorizing the license plate, because there’s gotta be something you can do with that. I should have at least yelled back. In my haste I neglected to even flip them the bird. Because of me, there’s probably some other tubby guy pushing his kid for exercise about to fall victim to verbal harassment. My wife never once told me that any of this — at least the part of the planned vengeance I made verbal — was a bad idea. Maybe she was just letting me blow off some steam. More likely, she found the entire affair highly entertaining. We got home and I went to fold up the stroller. The rocks fell out of the cup holder and I was immediately embarrassed. Really, really embarrassed. I picked up the rocks, one by one, and tossed them into the shrubs, realizing that I’m a tubby guy with a stroller, but at least I’m not a tubby guy with a stroller who throws rocks at teenagers in front of his infant son. n


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Inlander 11/14/2013