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R

acism is America’s original sin. Or as Hal Holbrook, the 90-year-old stage and film actor, tells culture writer Dan Nailen: “We are living in a racist country. Anyone who says it isn’t is lying. But nobody wants to talk about it.” Holbrook, who’s returning to Spokane on Saturday for his one-man show Mark Twain Tonight! (page 28), says Twain’s social criticism is as relevant as ever: “The political statements and chicanery and lies are the same as 100 years ago.” In a coincidental twist of scheduling, another conversation centered on RACE and history is also scheduled for Saturday night: Leonard Pitts, Jr., the Pulitzer-winning columnist, will be in town promoting his latest novel, Grant Park, which features as characters President Barack Obama and Martin Luther King, Jr. (page 26). Also this week: staff writer Mitch Ryals examines why more kids are being tossed into the juvenile justice system under Spokane County Prosecutor Larry Haskell (page 13). — JACOB H. FRIES, editor

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1995-2015

CELEBRATING 20 YEARS ARENA PEOPLE

20-Year Team Members There are six members of the Spokane Arena team who have been with the building at least since it was built 20 years ago: CEO Kevin Twohig, Operations Manager Dave Gebhardt, HR and Contract Services Administrator Stephanie Huff, Operations Supervisor Shardell Shrum and Tech Specialists Casey Booey and Mike Tucker. “Working at the Arena makes me proud,” says Huff of her 20-year tenure. “I’m proud of Stephanie Huff our first-class facility and our talented, closeknit team.” What stands out most? “Both our Walking With Dinosaurs events were phenomenal, but my favorite memory is watching the sea of fans at the first Elton John concert. The Arena was electric!” Shrum concurs about the team atmosphere: “We have fun as a working family, and [I love] being part of the crazy fun of the really big events — the type of events I never dreamed I might be a part of, like the NCAAs and U.S. Figure Skating.” Twohig’s tenure working on events and facilities in Spokane goes back all the way to Expo ’74, but as a player himself, he’s always had a special place in his heart for volleyball. “When we were successful in attracting the 1997 NCAA Women’s Volleyball Finals, that touched a lot of bases for me. The world’s most famous volleyball player, Kerri Walsh Jennings (now a three-time Olympic gold medalist), was on the court for Stanford. That will be one of my favorite memories of working at the Arena.”

.

The Arena’s 20-foot video wall is the most visible piece of audio-visual gear that powers the facility; it’ll be replaced by a 53-foot screen in January.

The Arena’s Tech Specs It’s cramped here in the audio-visual booth, just above Section 122 of the Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena. Resident tech specialists Casey Booey, Monte Koch and Mike Sackville-West politely make room for one another among control panels, blinking racks of servers and flat-screen TVs. Years ago, when analog equipment was larger and they shared the space with a video production crew, it was even tighter. “It gets pretty hectic on game days,” says Koch, explaining how their team edits video on the fly. “You’ve got a replay guy who’s spinning replays for Casey, while at the same time on the second output, he’s spinning replays for television broadcast. He does replays for the WHL officials, too.” Booey notes that the Arena was one of the first venues anywhere with dual in-house broadcasting capabilities. One crew can be magnifying still images and editing clips for the huge video wall, while another is drawing live video for national broadcast from the same feed. “We’re using the same cameras,” he says, “but you’ve got two directors calling the shots.” And it all happens in real time. Sackville-West proudly points out the more than 100,000-watt bank of computer-controlled lights on the far side. Then he shows off the Yamaha M7CL mixer. “Nowadays you can monitor or control anything using smartphone apps,” he says. Later, the trio prowls the catwalk high above, showing off the massive ring of speakers that make up the Meyer sound system. Far below, riggers and technicians are setting up for tonight’s Slipknot concert. Surprisingly, the team’s involvement with concerts is minimal, as the tours generally bring their own equipment. Instead, they’re tasked with ensuring that the Arena’s advanced communication backbone runs smoothly for their celebrity guests. Booey steps aside to let a pair of riggers pass, then turns back to the gargantuan cluster of speakers. “We’ve got 6.2 million cubic feet to energize and fill with sound,” he says, adding that the energy spills into the control booth, too: “It’s exhilarating. It’s just awesome.” NEXT TIME: What does the future hold for the Spokane Arena?

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t’s easy to play Monday morning quarterback, substituting our sideline judgment for that of pros on the field. Many analysts have second-guessed Jeb Bush’s performance at the Oct. 28 CNBC debate, some even counting him out of the 2016 presidential sweepstakes. The Irish have a saying: “Once down is not a fight.” Jeb Bush, if he is the best Republican nominee, must show Americans that he can get up after being knocked down and earn the nomination. Ohio Gov. John Kasich took the fight to the frontrunners at the debate in Boulder, Colorado, questioning their “sound good” proposals, but pointing out that they’re unrealistic. He helped his cause by doing so. Many who support Jeb Bush were waiting for similar pronouncements, giving supporters hope that Jeb would show viewers why he has the best private/public sector experience to be president. He didn’t seem ready. If he was to criticize Marco Rubio (likely a fool’s errand), he should have known that Rubio would respond by using as examples the voting records of other senators who ran for president. Good debate prep would have readied him for Rubio’s response, so Bush would have been armed with an effective retort. Bush seemed unprepared for the parry by the articulate Sen. Rubio and missed an opportunity to stand out. Voting is an emotional act — we vote for people we like. Marco Rubio earned voters’ approval with that single dustup, and Jeb Bush did not. Bush should have treated Rubio in a grandfatherly way, complimenting the young senator, confirming that he has a bright future, instead of treating Rubio as a political equal. Bush’s attention, like Kasich’s, should have been directed at the frontrunners.

first Senate term. Better to get the negatives out now, but Jeb Bush shouldn’t do so — that task is better left to others. Campaigns for president have changed. Now they’re dependent on a good social media strategy, an effective ground game and getting out the vote. As recently as 2004, when George W. Bush ran for a second term, campaigns were mostly television media-focused and money-driven, particularly by political action committees. Those close to Jeb Bush tell me he has all three components of a modern campaign. It was also expected that he would have a “breakout” moment during the most recent debate. Voters also want to see how candidates perform under pressure — can they take and deliver a political punch? Debate performances, even with small viewership, are important for

“Voters want to see how candidates perform under pressure — can they take and deliver a political punch?”

B

ut all is not lost for Bush, even though the modern media is writing his epitaph. Perhaps that’s because Hillary Clinton, the likely Democratic Party nominee, would have an easier time against Trump, Carson or a young Rubio in 2016 than against the formidable record and experience of Jeb Bush. While others may be enamored with the current frontrunners, all well intended, Hillary Clinton is a professional politician who doesn’t miss a political beat. The national press may not love her, but will surely endorse her candidacy. National media will ridicule any Republican presidential candidate with conservative ideas, especially a neophyte. Marco Rubio is talented and loquacious, a fine politician. But he’s lacking experience and must realize that Hillary Clinton is a street fighter who will be armed with every negative about Rubio, be they financial improprieties, lack of experience or voting lapses while serving his

candidates because the media reports its opinions on winners and losers. A candidate wants to win these contests, because being declared a loser cements that image in the mind of voters who learn about the debate performance not by watching, but by hearing about the event. That’s what happened to Jeb Bush. The postmortem on the debate was that Bush lost it and his campaign is struggling. All campaigns, especially when things don’t go well, need a shake-up. New experts must be summoned to help a candidate with better debate preparation, better messaging and better fundraising. Jeb Bush’s campaign needs a shake-up. He’s too qualified and experienced to perform poorly as a presidential candidate.

N

ational columnist Kathleen Parker, a Bush family admirer, recently wrote an opinion piece in the Washington Post questioning Jeb Bush’s garbled syntax, his messaging and his clarity of thought. Jeb Bush, if he is to be the Republican nominee, must pay attention to such criticisms, recognizing that he has a wealth of resources at his disposal, and use them to reignite his campaign. Jeb Bush has said he must “earn” the Republican nomination. Now he must get up off the canvas and do so. 


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Scaring Up Votes BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

S

andra Bullock has a new movie, Our Brand Is Crisis — a title that seems to describe America today. It’s about political operatives who help candidates scare people into voting for them. We do a lot of scaring. No, 5 percent unemployment is not good, says Wall Street; a rate hike is coming! To the panic room! Politicians also thrive on crisis. Even though millions have recently protected themselves against a health catastrophe, Ben Carson says, “Obamacare is really, I think, the worst thing that has happened in this nation since slavery.” And the media amplifies it all, rarely finding the glass full since you get noticed more if the glass is not only empty, but also shattered into a million pieces. I only met Tom Foley a couple of times, but I’ll always remember his advice. The America he knew through its people, he said, was nothing like the America he saw on the TV news. He thought the media was, at times, too cynical to help the nation grapple with its problems. Since our brand is crisis, let’s see how that’s playing out in the economy. The mood may best be captured in the immortal words of Larry David channeling Bernie Sanders: “We’re doomed!” Donald Trump adds that “China’s ripping us… every country that we do business with is taking our base, they’re taking our jobs… ” Are they? Unemployment is down to 5 percent here, a figure pegged close to “full employment.” There have been 2.8 million new jobs created in the past year; we’ve been adding jobs for 61 straight months. John Kasich seems to be a straight shooter, but even he seems stuck in 2009: “We have so many regulations that are choking… businesses, and I think combined with corporate incentives, balancing budgets, deregulation, I think that the American economy will begin to grow again.” Is he aware that it’s been growing for years now? GDP has grown in 15 of the past 16 quarters. The U.S. dollar is crushing it. Health care inflation costs are at a 50-year low. Gas is cheap, and energy independence is looking doable. Facts can be pesky when you’re manufacturing crisis. Yes, there are problems. The quality of those new jobs is in question, and we need to better share our nation’s success with members of all socioeconomic groups, genders and races. Still, the glass is more than half full. You won’t hear it from the crisis peddlers, but America can afford to work on progressive reforms — stimulus packages, a higher minimum wage, free or subsidized college tuition, clean energy. We could focus on all that and more if people would quit trying to scare the votes out of us. n

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COMMENT | BULLYING

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

It’s About Decency “Political correctness” have become dirty words in modern society, but we should always strive to honor and respect others BY TARA DOWD

L

et’s talk about political correctness. It’s defined by Merriam-Webster as “agreeing with the idea that people should be careful to not use language or behave in a way that could offend a particular group of people.” But lots of people would say they’re now considered dirty words among those who are from the majority culture. The “It’s just political correctness” trope is used to minimize, deflect and ignore the needs and honor of a group of a

SNORING?

SLEEP APNEA?

marginalized people. In short, it’s just adult bullying. We ask our kids not to bully, which includes calling people names, social exclusion and physical violence, along with the ultimate form of minimization: “We were just joking.” There’s even a nationwide campaign to end bullying, because schools know that bullying and hostility breeds bad outcomes for our kids. Our children are sometimes even dying because of name calling, being socially ostracized, not being included in the social convergence of the school hallways. The political correctness postulation is the adult

version of the schoolyard bully’s elementary “I was just joking” rationalization. Here’s an example: let’s say that there’s a group of kids on the playground. They just learned about American history, including a little snippet about how there were bounties for the skins of murdered indigenous people, called redskins. Well, of course, at the first opportunity several classmates call their Native American classmate a “redskin,” making the whole class laugh, because you know that’s what kids do. What’s so different about this example from a National Football League team and schools across this nation using words like Redskins, Savages, and Squaws as nicknames and mascots? In the playground situation, we would tell the children that it’s not OK to say things that others find hurtful, inappropriate, mean or racist. We would educate them on why it’s not OK to use a derogatory term like “redskin” under any circumstances, because it’s morally wrong and against our values. But for some reason, a lot of people think it’s morally acceptable to call a football team by a word that most Native Americans find offensive and hurtful. Some proponents claim that many Native Americans like the mascots. The opposite is true; the majority of Native people in America do not believe the name “Washington Redskins” honors them or their ancestry. As a very talented, intelligent adjunct professor at Whitworth University recently said: Words lead to beliefs that lead to actions. That’s why we want our children to understand that words hurt and bullying is not OK. We know that if we don’t teach our children ethical and moral boundaries related to how we treat others, they likely will grow up saying and doing things that would be morally reprehensible and harmful to our greater societal good. They might even end up being the people who claim that groups of people demanding respect and honor in an authentic, genuine way are just being weak, because political correctness is for wussies. Every time someone says, “That’s just political correctness,” a social justice unicorn dies. No, really: Ask any member of a marginalized group, and they can relate stories of when they have been told that to keep them quiet, to keep them from changing the conversation to authentic dialogue about the inequities in this world. Let’s start an adult anti-bullying campaign to end Native American mascots, name calling, blackfacing and other bullying behaviors. That would save the social justice unicorns, and it might create a space where authentic and courageous conversations can happen in our community and nation. n Tara Dowd, an enrolled Inupiaq Eskimo, was born into poverty and now owns a diversity consulting business. She is an advocate for systemic equity and sees justice as a force that makes communities better.

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COMMENT | FROM READERS ZACH HOLLAND: Apparently the police are your judge and jury on the street now. Screw the legal process. If they think you did something wrong they just shoot you. Going back to the Wild West days, I guess. JENNIFER VINCENT: My aunt was walking in that area and he confronted her with a knife, then demanded her car keys. When she said she didn’t have her keys with her, he shoved her up against a car. After she pulled pepper spray on him, he ran into traffic and the rest went down. Thank God he didn’t seriously hurt someone. TONY DINARO: Some people just boggle my mind — the guy attacked and threatened people with a knife. What the hell do you want the cops to do, ask him politely to stop? RYAN BODDY: So the cops are waiting to see what video footage comes out before they make statements? That doesn’t sound fishy at all... JAY GREENE: Usually I don’t miss an opportunity to bash the SPD, but in this rare case I will say thank you SPD! Although your solution was a bit harsh, I appreciate the effort. 

Readers react to last week’s election coverage announcing that Mayor David Condon won a second term, as did City Council President Ben Stuckart:

BENJAMEN PATRICK SHEPPARD: It really breaks my heart that so many people live in our city and are registered to vote and did not vote. This time they’re going to really regret it, and it really makes me upset that so many people complain and do nothing about it. ROBERT FAIRFAX: Fair assessment. Lichty was her own worst enemy. JENNIFER JAMISON: Shoot... I didn’t vote for him. How frustrating that he was re-elected, since he doesn’t give a hoot about anyone except those with money. People need to start voting again. CHAR BOVENT: I guess the crime in this city will continue to skyrocket. And the streets will never get fixed, while our leader gets richer and richer. Yeah, sounds about right.

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Kids’ Court Local defense attorneys have noticed a change in Prosecutor Larry Haskell’s juvenile justice system BY MITCH RYALS

Veteran public defender Krista Elliott says juvenile justice is moving away from a rehabilitative philosophy. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

hen Spokane County Prosecutor Larry Haskell took office in January, he found a drawer with more than 370 unresolved juvenile cases from the previous county prosecutor, Steve Tucker. Under Tucker, certain cases were kept out of the courtroom, allowing prosecutors and defense attorneys to find reasonable compromises without necessarily tossing every kid into the juvenile justice system. Under Haskell, that’s changed. “Sometimes you can get kids the necessary treatment without throwing them into the system and having constant contact with the court,” says Krista Elliott, a Spokane County public defender who’s been handling juvenile cases for more than 10 years. “There are other ways to help kids that don’t require convictions.” For county prosecutors, clearing the backlogged cases represents a commitment to bythe-book prosecution. Haskell, who denies that his office is moving away from a rehabilitative bent, points out that there is nothing in Washington state law explicitly saying that the juvenile justice system is supposed to be rehabilitative. “We’re here to protect community safety and due process,” he says. “Accountability is very important, but rehabilitation is not a statutory requirement.” The new tactics have bumped up the number of cases in the juvenile justice system so far this year compared to last. From January through October of 2015, there were 92 more cases filed in juvenile court compared to the same time in 2014, a 15 percent increase. That rise has nearly maxed-out public defenders’ caseloads and prompted director Tom Krzyminski of the Public Defender’s Office to enlist two other attorneys to pitch in. But the increase in filings is just one example that defense attorneys give for the change they’re seeing under Haskell’s leadership. Others include:  A new requirement that juvenile defendants attend all pretrial court dates;  An increase in cases resulting in a felony conviction or plea;  The demise of alternative case resolutions, where attorneys construct solutions without filing charges;  The state’s persistence in moving forward with charges ...continued on next page

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“KIDS’ COURT,” CONTINUED... even if victims aren’t willing to cooperate. “The standard prosecutorial approach for adults here in Spokane is bleeding into juvenile court,” says Bryan Whitaker, a local defense attorney who has worked in juvenile court since 1997. “That’s my true perception of what’s happened. They want uniformity in their charging, but that’s not outcome-based. That’s chargebased.”

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hitaker says one particular case exemplifies the change he’s seen in the Prosecutor’s Office. In May, Jason Timm’s 17-year-old daughter, Megan, agreed to get drug and alcohol treatment at Daybreak Youth Services in Spokane. While in treatment, Megan and two other girls broke a window. When a staff member responded to the commotion, the girls “pushed and slapped” him, Whitaker says. Unable to get control of the girls, employees called police, which resulted in felony assault and malicious mischief charges for all three. Annette Klinefelter, executive director of Daybreak Youth Services in Spokane, sent a letter to Haskell and senior deputy prosecutor Steve Garvin saying the treatment center did not wish to press charges against Megan. Robert Larson, the employee who took the brunt of the girls’ physical aggression, also sent an email to prosecutors requesting that the charges be dropped. Prosecutors refused. Although he said he wouldn’t speak about specific cases, Garvin, who supervises the Spokane County Prosecutor’s juvenile division, says: “It’s important that victims have an opportunity to meet with a prosecutor and express their wishes, but it’s also important to understand that they are not and cannot be given the final say on what happens with a case. My job is not to follow the whims of whatever victim I happen to be dealing with. My job is to treat people fairly.” Megan had no other criminal history. She eventually pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor assault charge, but the felony malicious mischief charge stuck. “I’m not going to say Megan should get off

scot-free,” Timm says. “She made bad choices and should pay for that, but I think the felony charge goes too far for breaking a window.” After petitioning the Prosecutor’s Office to drop the charges to no avail, Klinefelter says she now thinks twice before calling the police to deescalate confrontations at Daybreak. “As an agency, we would like to be able to call law enforcement when we have a problem. However the fear is that the consequences for the kids [are] going to be permanent,” she says. “We’ve done a lot of reflection on policy, and what we can do to avoid calling law enforcement.” Whitaker, Megan’s defense attorney, says he believes the charges were harsh for a girl with no previous criminal history who is making an effort to get her life back together, but he recognizes that prosecutors have a difficult job. “If prosecutors charge everything as a felony and plead out as a misdemeanor, it looks like they’re making a mistake on one end or the other,” he says. “They’re either overcharging or they have no grit.”

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ithin the past 10 years, courts have recognized the science explaining the difference between a juvenile brain and an adult brain. Three U.S. Supreme Court cases since 2005 have ruled in light of that research. In 2005, the Supreme Court abolished the death penalty for juveniles. A 2010 decision struck down mandatory minimum life sentences for non-homicide crimes committed by juveniles. And in Miller v. Alabama, the court ruled in 2012 that mandatory life sentences without the possibility of parole for juveniles are unconstitutional. In the court’s opinion in Miller, Justice Elena Kagan writes, “our decisions rested not only on common sense — on what ‘any parent knows’ — but on science and social science as well.” She points to scientific research in psychology and brain science showing “fundamental differences between juvenile and adult minds” including “transient rashness, proclivity for risk and inability to assess consequences.”


Granted, all three of those decisions dealt with capital offenses and punishment for juveniles. But new Washington state case law and state law follows the trend. Earlier this year, the state legislature passed a bill that presumptively seals nonviolent juvenile records when offenders turn 18, as long as they’ve paid all victim restitution. The new state law, known as the Youth Equality and Reintegration Act, also abolishes almost all types of legal financial obligations, helping youth get out from under court-imposed debt. A recent state Supreme Court decision also addressed juvenile criminal records. In State v. SJC, the court excluded juvenile records from a standard used for adult records, making it easier for juveniles to seal their criminal history. In the majority opinion, Justice Mary Yu wrote that the ruling was an important step in helping young offenders move past their mistakes by clearing roadblocks to housing, employment and education.

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n 2013, the Blueprint for Reform, a report with suggestions to improve criminal justice in Spokane County, called out the juvenile justice system as a “pocket of excellence.” Elliott, the juvenile public defender, says that is no longer the case. She points to the now-defunct alternative resolutions system, where prosecutors and defenders would agree on a way for kids to pay for their crimes through treatment, community service or counseling. The lawyers acted like social workers, Elliott says, fitting the resolution to the offender and the offense without filing the case. As soon as a case is filed, that creates a record, Elliott says, which is the first step in keeping kids from getting a job, an apartment or an education by sticking a felony charge or conviction next to their name. Garvin says his division no longer agrees to alternative resolutions, because they’re not specifically spelled out in state law. He points to nine ways juvenile cases can be resolved after they’ve been filed. A suspended disposition, for example, is where a kid will give up the right to trial and is put on probation. If he or she completes the terms, the case is dismissed. If not, the court enters a guilty conviction based on the police report. George Yeannakis, a Seattle attorney who has worked in juvenile justice for nearly 35 years, says although individual alternative resolutions are not the standard in King County, the prosecutor’s office sponsors a similar program on an even larger scale. The 180 Program in King County sends kids charged with misdemeanors to a weekend workshop, where they hear from people who’ve been through the criminal justice system and talk as a group about how to turn their lives around. A 2014 evaluation by the King County Office of Performance, Strategy and Budget said the program showed promise, but more time was needed to evaluate its effectiveness in reducing recidivism. Local civil attorney Breean Beggs, who ran against Haskell last year, says the point of the juvenile justice system, and one of the goals of the Smart Justice Spokane initiative, is moving toward diversion and rehabilitation. “Prosecutors have the most power in the criminal justice system because they have discretion,” Beggs says. “They’re supposed to look at each individual case and do what’s right overall.” As for the new requirement that kids attend all pretrial court hearings — which typically last only a few minutes — Garvin says he recently suggested a policy that all juvenile pretrial hearings be scheduled after 3 pm, so kids don’t miss school. “But it is my position that even if it meant missing a couple days of school, appearing in court is more important,” he says. Bob Jalovi, a former senior deputy prosecutor who tried juvenile cases for almost 18 years in Spokane County, says the cases sitting in the drawer were a result of prosecutorial discretion. In some ways, it was a quasi-diversionary tactic, he says, adding that prosecutors would often consider a kid’s criminal history before deciding to file, rather than only looking at the charges. “One of the areas in looking at how we want to approach juvenile cases was how to prevent them from graduating to adult criminal stuff,” he says. “The philosophy within the statute talks about retributive, but we also thought about rehabilitation.” n mitchr@inlander.com

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BURNT OUT The Spokane City Council passed an ordinance on Monday allowing people with misdemeanor MARIJUANA convictions on their records to apply to the municipal court to have their charges retroactively dismissed beginning Jan. 1. Council President Ben Stuckart, the sponsor of the ordinance, explained that individuals with these convictions aren’t eligible for federal financial aid, nor are they eligible for federal housing dollars. These past convictions, he said, can also be an impediment to obtaining jobs. According to Stuckart’s research, of the 1,800 people convicted of misdemeanor marijuana possession in Spokane, half are either African American or Native American. (JAKE THOMAS)

SHOOTING IN QUESTION An Idaho rancher was KILLED by Adams County deputies last week after he was called to take care of his injured bull, which had been hit by a station wagon. The original announcement from the Idaho State Police indicated that Jack Yantis, 62, showed up, rifle in hand, and exchanged gunfire with two deputies. But family members, who witnessed the shooting, tell a different story, saying that deputies instigated a confrontation as Yantis took aim at the bull, intending to put it down. Yantis was declared dead at the scene and one of the two deputies who fired suffered a minor injury. (MITCH RYALS)


NEWS | BRIEFS

Math War Spokane officials fight over calculations of future growth; plus, moving a little closer to a police ombudsman FORESEEING THE FUTURE

Spokane County’s POPULATION PROJECTION is more than a prediction. It’s also a figure used to determine how Spokane County plans for its future, including which properties are opened up for development. The Planning Technical Advisory Committee, a group of planners from local municipalities, came up with a population projection for Spokane County, predicting that the county would grow to 583,409 people by 2037. So when the Growth Management Steering Committee of Elected Officials endorsed the advisory committee’s projections last week, the vote was unanimous, with three exceptions: All three Spokane County Commissioners. The commissioners, however, are the ones who will ultimately make the decision on which number to adopt. County Commissioner Todd Mielke says they had a few objections to the projection: First, the numbers are significantly lower than the previous numbers the county commissioners had adopted. Why not just freeze the numbers, Mielke asks, instead of reducing them? Second, he says he wanted more time to consider other projection models that took into account more of the history of growth in the county. But other members

of the steering committee scoffed at the idea that more time was necessary. “I don’t have the time and energy to sit through a series of meetings so you can get the numbers you want,” City Councilman Jon Snyder says. “The county commissioners can decide on whatever numbers they want. If they want to do that, great, but don’t drag us into it.” The “population projection” question has been particularly salient for Spokane County. In June, a state appellate court panel confirmed that the county had erred by increasing its population projections in 2013 without enough public participation. (DANIEL WALTERS)

DIRTY LAUNDRY

Both Washington and Idaho have problems with GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY AND TRANSPARENCY, according to a new report from the Center for Public Integrity, a nonprofit investigative reporting organization, that grades how effective each state is in deterring and uncovering corruption. The report gave Washington a grade of D+ and singled out executive accountability and public access to information as being particularly poor. Specifically, the report raises concerns over the growing number of exemptions to the state’s public record law and lack of scrutiny to the asset disclosure of state executives. However, the report pointed to the accessibility of auditing services as a bright spot in Washington state government. Idaho fared worse, earning a grade of D-. The low points, the report found, include a lack of accountability across each branch of government. Idaho also doesn’t require lawmakers to disclose financial interests, nor does it have an ethics commission. The report did praise Idaho for the openness of its budgeting process, which it described as the second best in the nation.

In the report’s ranking, Washington and Idaho were 12th and 26th, respectively. The states that ranked the highest included Alaska, California and Connecticut, none of which received a grade higher than C. (JAKE THOMAS)

INCHING CLOSER TO OVERSIGHT

As the city works out the details of an offer to Raheel Humayun to become Spokane’s next POLICE OMBUDSMAN, a new selection committee is taking shape to vet applicants for an interim ombudsman position. During its Nov. 2 meeting, the ombudsman commission voted unanimously to offer Humayun the permanent job as long as he can get a visa within 75 days. Local attorney Breean Beggs, who provides legal advice to the commission, says the city is currently negotiating Humayun’s salary, which could range from $82,634 to $101,375. If Humayun agrees to the offer, the next step would be to apply for a special visa that allows Canadian citizens with certain jobs to work in the U.S. The issue is that “police ombudsman” is not specifically listed as one of the jobs. If things go smoothly, Beggs expects to have an answer within 60 days. If not, Humayun could apply for a work visa in April 2016, but in that case he wouldn’t be able to start until October. That’s something the commission would have to revisit if the situation arose, Beggs says. As a backup, at its Oct. 14 meeting, the commission voted to ask the city to form another selection committee to come up with a list of three qualified candidates for an interim position. According to the minutes from that meeting, the commission intends to use the interim ombudsman to fill in until Humayun makes a decision and address the backlog of complaints. (MITCH RYALS)

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North Central Assistant Principal Wendy Bromley (left) and Community in Schools Support Coordinator Shamerica Daniels help homeless students with clothing. JEFF FERGUSON PHOTO

Homeless School

As the number of homeless students in Spokane County keeps climbing, schools unite with nonprofits to seek solutions BY DANIEL WALTERS

I

t’s hard for a teacher to get a student to care about multiplying fractions, or the causes of the French and Indian War, or the themes of The Scarlet Letter. It’s even harder when there are other worries occupying their minds, concerns that easily crowd out homework and tests and worksheets. Consider the 14-year-old student who was abandoned by her mother in their apartment, says North Central assistant principal Wendy Bromley. When the landlord came to evict her, they called Child Protective Services, she says, but CPS just gave the girl the address to Crosswalk, a teen homeless shelter. “Here’s a girl that’s basically abandoned,” Bromley says. “A 14-year-old girl is going to walk through the streets through downtown Spokane?” As of this month, 59 students at North Central are considered homeless. That’s just a sample of a broader crisis. In past years, Priority Spokane, an alliance of community organizations, had succeeded in its goal of reducing the number of high school dropouts. But this fall, the organization set its sights on a problem far thornier, but more fundamental: student homelessness. Four percent of the students — 2,896 — in Spokane County were homeless last year, according to a recent Eastern Washington University study. The number was a third higher than the state average, and in the past five years, it had climbed 60 percent. Ryan Oelrich, executive director of Priority Spokane, says homeless students name more serious worries than grades and tests when surveyed: “Where am I going to sleep tonight?

What if other students find out I’m homeless?” Oelrich says. “What am I going to eat?” Sarah Miller, who works with homeless students as Spokane Public Schools’ liaison for the federal McKinney-Vento Act, ticks off additional worries for homeless students. “Where do I do my homework? And where do I do my learning? Do I have access to the online systems that teachers provide for support? Do I have access even to a table to bring my paper and pen?” she says. “Am I going to have to share a bed with my brother and sister?”

WHY ARE MORE STUDENTS HOMELESS?

For Priority Spokane, the numbers were shocking. With the recession receding, the group expected to see student homelessness decreasing. After all, many of the other economic indicators for Spokane County were encouraging. Median household income has increased. The unemployment rate has tumbled. But other seemingly positive economic factors have been working against low-income families. “Housing prices have gone up,” Oelrich says. “The new housing that is being built is not affordable housing.” Many of these homeless families, he explains, actually do have jobs. But the paychecks aren’t enough to pay for rent. In some cases, a criminal record, an eviction history, or a bad credit score makes the less expensive options unavailable. For some, being a homeless student means weathering the cold. “We have a fair number of kids who literally sleep in cars and under bridges,” says Chuck Teegarden, executive director of Communities in Schools, an organization that connects students with social services. “They’re just living hand to mouth, basically.” Priority Spokane relies on a broader definition of homelessness. The McKinney-Vento Act considers any student who lacks “a fixed, regular, and adequate nighttime residence” as homeless. In the majority of cases of student homelessness in Spokane, one family is doubled up with another family under one roof. “We ran into a situation where children are sleeping in tents in their grandparents’ backyard because there’s no room in the house for them,” says Teegarden. Oelrich says some skeptics have dismissed the concern over student homelessness, because the majority of students considered homeless still technically have a roof over their heads. But doubling up in a single house still produces the sort of chaos and trauma that can wreak havoc on a student’s ability to learn. And doubling up, Oelrich argues, often means a family is on the


precipice of losing their shelter entirely. It’s the last stop before the streets. Beyond the economy, there’s another possible factor for the increase: Spokane Public Schools, at least, has become better at figuring out which students are homeless. “The child may or may not disclose that they’re homeless,” says Teegarden. “They’ll tell you they need stuff, but they’ll not say that they’re homeless.” After all, there’s a stigma to being homeless. Students fear that if they’re identified as homeless, they’ll be tossed into the machinery of the child welfare system. Families have the same fear. “Families aren’t the squeaky wheel,” says Oelrich. “Families are many times staying quiet. They’re not making a lot of noise, because they’re worried about CPS. They’re worried about their kids being taken away.” In the past few years, as the district fought to improve its graduation rates, it introduced an early-warning system for students at risk at dropping out. It honed in on data points like attendance records and grades. And as administrators examined the specific circumstances — why they weren’t showing up for class; why they weren’t passing geometry — they discovered the depths of students’ struggles. When a new student arrives at Spokane Public Schools, they’re asked specifically about their housing situation. Community truancy boards ask similar questions. When the Salvation Army takes in a homeless family, it pushes them to call the school district to let them know about their child’s living situation. “Come to us any way you can,” Miller says. “We really want to keep your kids stable in school.”

WHAT CAN SPOKANE COUNTY DO ABOUT IT?

Priority Spokane’s report outlines two methods to address student homelessness: First, the report says, the community should expand its analysis wider to identify more families teetering on the edge of homelessness. Then it should rush to stabilize them while they still have housing. It’s a lot simpler — and less expensive — to prevent an eviction than to find a new home for a family after an eviction. Second, the report says, the community needs to channel local resources to meet homeless students’ academic and mental health needs. Some of that is already happening. “We have a food pantry here on site,” says Bromley at North Central. “We have a clothing bank on site. For families, we’re able to continue to assist to get them connected to shelters.” Tutors from Whitworth and Gonzaga universities, trained in working with students suffering from trauma, provide additional academic assistance. Some students with particular challenges get customized “student success plans.” While homelessness is a hurdle for students, it’s not an impassable one. “We have kids that not only graduate from high school, but manage to go on to college,” Teegarden says. He recalls a homeless Rogers High School student who had to do his homework with a flashlight for four years, yet went to college — on a scholarship — at Whitworth. In many ways, teachers are the ultimate social workers, teaching grit and perseverance alongside math and English. They see children day after day, establishing personal relationships that can pay off with trust. “You might come from a really bad situation. What is your future life going to look like?” Bromley says, paraphrasing teachers’ messages to homeless kids. “Education is the key to that.” As Communities in Schools connects homeless students to local resources, the organization monitors the results: Are their grades improving? Are they going to school? “The community is pulling together right now,” says Teegarden. “[But] the number of families and children that are in need of assistance is growing faster than the resources that are out there.” The community needs jobs, he says. It needs reliable, fulltime, high-paying jobs. Yet trying to address the root of the problem is difficult, because the immediate needs are so daunting. “Your creative insights sometimes get overwhelmed by the fact that there’s a bunch of hungry kids,” says Teegarden.  danielw@inlander.com

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NEWS | ELECTIONS

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What last week’s elections mean for Spokane and Coeur d’Alene

BY JAKE THOMAS, DANIEL WALTERS, QUINN WESTERN AND MITCH RYALS

S

o much changed and so much stayed the same. On Tuesday, the big day came and workers at the Spokane County Elections Office began counting 120,000 ballots to determine who would control the levers of power at City Hall and on the school board. Across the state line in Kootenai County, election workers did the same, tallying up more than 9,000 ballots. In some ways, the election results aren’t surprising, with many well-funded and established candidates winning their races. But in other races, voters handed victories to challengers, causing power dynamics to shift. In Spokane, a mayor made history and strained relationships, an ambitious politician saw his clout expanded, a councilman saw his influence diminished, voters said “no” to a local progressive group for the third time and a 20-year school board veteran lost his seat. In Coeur d’Alene, urban renewal received a vote of confidence.

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On election night, a jubilant Mayor David Condon stood before supporters at Barrister Winery to tell them that voters had just disproved two myths about Spokane. “The [myth of the] one-term mayor is over,” he said to boisterous applause before turning to the second myth. “The myth that Spokane is stuck in a rut is over.” Last week, Condon prevailed over challenger Shar Lichty, a progressive political organizer, with nearly 63 percent of the vote, becoming the first mayor to win re-election since David Rodgers in 1973. The win came despite recent dustups. Former Police Chief Frank Straub has filed a claim against the city for $4 million after suddenly being ousted, and Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich recently accused City Administrator Theresa Sanders of trying to downplay allegations that a police officer sexually assaulted another officer at a party, a charge she fervently

denies. But Condon had amassed a $390,000 war chest and faced an opponent with little name recognition or money, who had never held political office and had aligned herself with the controversial Worker Bill of Rights initiative, which voters decisively rejected. “I started this campaign four years ago, and it was about engaging our citizens,” Condon told the Inlander on election night. “And we didn’t let up until today.” As for the next four years, Condon said he would continue to work on economic growth, public safety and innovations in city government.

STUCKART GAINS MORE POWER; CITY COUNCIL MOVES FURTHER TO THE LEFT

Since Karen Stratton was appointed to Spokane City Council last year to fill out the term of Steve Salvatori, Council President Ben Stuckart has had a 5-2, veto-proof voting bloc that’s enabled him to pass his progressive legislative agenda over the objections of Mayor Condon. Now, that bloc has grown to 6-1. Condon, seeking to shift the council’s balance, endorsed and campaigned for LaVerne Biel and Evan Verduin, two business owners with misgivings about the direction of the city’s legislative body. But Condon lost his gamble. Voters gave Stratton a full term and elected Lori Kinnear to the council. Both candidates aligned themselves with Stuckart, who last week won a second term by beating former state Rep. John Ahern with almost 63 percent of the vote. Both Stratton and Kinnear call the mayor’s involvement in their council races “unprecedented” and say it has damaged their relationships with him. “I think Karen Stratton and I felt like we had two opponents instead of one in the general election,” says Kinnear. “We need to do some mending.” Condon shrugs off any fallout from his


candidates losing. “Both Lori Kinnear and Karen Stratton are committed to our community also, and also Ben Stuckart,” he says. “And we’ve come together in the past and we will continue to come together.” Councilman Mike Fagan was re-elected, defeating Randy Ramos, a former recruiter for the Spokane Tribal College. Fagan is now the council’s sole conservative, which he’s fine with. “If both sides have an opportunity to present their opinions, then that’s called healthy,” says Fagan. “It’s all about having the debate, period. I don’t mind being in a severe minority at all. That just means I’m going to have to be in the newspaper a lot.”

ENVISION LOST, BUT IT’LL BE BACK

The letdown came in over tacos at a Peaceful Valley home, where the campaign for Spokane’s Worker Bill of Rights initiative learned it had been rejected by 64 percent of voters. The Worker Bill of Rights is the fourth far-reaching initiative from Envision Spokane to qualify for the ballot. In 2009 and 2011, Envision’s Community Bill of Rights was voted down. In 2013, opponents sued to keep another incarnation of the measure off the ballot; its fate will be decided by the Washington Supreme Court. While waiting for the court, Envision formed an offshoot political committee and sponsored the Worker Bill of Rights, which would have required businesses of 150 or more employees to pay an undetermined family wage, estimated to be between $17 and $23 an hour, while giving workers new rights and restricting the power of corporations. Opponents of the measure, which included local politicians spanning the political spectrum, argued that it would stifle the local economy, bring lawsuits and cost jobs. They also argued that it was being driven by the Community Environmental Legal Defense Fund, a Pennsylvania-based nonprofit law firm that has pushed for similar measures elsewhere. Michael Cathcart, who headed the Alliance to Protect Local Jobs campaign against the measure, said in an email that the results were a vindication. But Kai Huschke, Envision campaign coordinator, was undeterred on election night. “You take a little time off and then regroup,” said Huschke. “But this isn’t going away.”

THE EDUCATION UNION WON

This year, a question hung over the Spokane Public Schools school board race: Would voters seek to punish the Spokane Education Association for its more aggressive strategy? In the spring, the union had voted for a one-day walkout to protest underfunding of education by the legislature. In the fall, it had threatened a strike during negotiations with the district. Rocky Treppiedi, a school board member since 1996, believed that the public opposed these actions. “The union leadership believes that [strikes] are a strategy, believes that it’s a good thing, that it’s an appropriate thing to do,” Treppiedi said in a recent school board meeting. “The public doesn’t… They’re not in favor of strikes.

They’re not in favor of disrupting the school year. They’re not in favor of disrupting their family life.” But the election didn’t turn out that way. Treppiedi saw his tiny initial lead disappear as the final ballots were counted. Jerrall Haynes, a young, union-endorsed aircraft maintenance craftsman who hasn’t finished college, beat Treppiedi with 50.7 percent of the vote. It was the first time Treppiedi had been up for re-election since 2012, when he was fired by Mayor David Condon as a Spokane assistant city attorney for his controversial role in a highprofile police brutality case. In the other school board race, Central Valley teacher Paul Schneider easily bested nonprofit leader Patricia Kienholz by 10 points. Both were victories for the union. “All the candidates we endorsed won,” says Jenny Rose, president of the Spokane Education Association. “This is the most active in a school board race [the union has been]. … It finally clicked on: We’ve got to get involved if we want to make changes.” Here’s the thing about school board races in off-year elections: The low turnout rewards active organization, and unions are particularly good at organizing their members. This year, slightly less than 42 percent of eligible voters in Spokane County cast a ballot. And of those who did vote in the Spokane Public Schools boundaries, over 20 percent chose not to vote in the Treppiedi-Haynes race, while over 22 percent chose not to vote in the Schneider-Kienholz race. Going forward, Rose says, she’s looking to restart regular meetings between the school board, the district and the union. It’s not just the loss of Treppiedi’s two decades of experience that will change the flavor of the board. Both Schneider and Haynes say they oppose charter schools, creating a new dynamic on a board that has, uniquely, been in favor of them.

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COEUR D’ALENE WANTS URBAN RENEWAL

With victories by Ron Edinger and Dan English, Coeur d’Alene’s urban renewal district may have just gotten a boost. Edinger, a 41-year veteran of city council who also served one term as mayor, straddled the line when it came to questions about ignite cda (formerly the Lake City Development Corporation), the city’s independent urban development agency. Edinger said he disagreed with some of the renewal projects, but agreed with others. Edinger’s challenger, conservative business owner Toby Schindelbeck, expressed his frustration with the fact that ignite cda was given control of public money without public input. During his campaign, Edinger promised to advocate for full funding of the police and fire departments. In the only other contested race, former Kootenai County Clerk Dan English unseated incumbent Steve Adams, a fiscal conservative, with 56 percent of the vote to Adams’ 38 percent. Bruce MacNeil, the third candidate, received less than 6 percent of the vote. Of the three, English was the only one to come out in support of ignite cda. n

NOVEMBER 12, 2015 INLANDER 21


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ARTS

LARGER THAN LIFE The MAC hosts massive sculptures made from an iconic toy of modern childhood — Legos BY CHEY SCOTT

S

ean Kenney vividly recalls sneaking a long-coveted Lego set — an early birthday present — into bed on the night before he turned 5 and putting pieces together by moonlight. “Soon, my parents heard ‘Lego noises,’ and started coming back to my room,” Kenney recalls. “Convinced I could keep [playing], I turned the light on and kept building… but there was no fooling Dad.” Other kids who grew up during Lego’s early heyday get nostalgic over the fantastic Lego kits of the 1980s and ’90s — like “Deep Freeze Defender,” No. 6971, or “Secret Space Voyager,” No. 6862 — just like Kenneys still does for his old favorite: “Exxon Gas Station,” No. 6375. But the lasting influence of Legos goes a little deeper with Kenney, now 39. He currently works as professional Lego artist in New York City, building ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 12, 2015 INLANDER 23


CULTURE | ARTS “LARGER THAN LIFE,” CONTINUED...

Alex Boyé In concert

Monday November 30th 7:00 pm at the INB

Performing Arts Center Reserved Tickets on sale now at The Arena box office and Ticketswest locations. Charge-by-phone at 800-325-7328 or online at Ticketswest.com

larger-than-life sculptures from the tiny interlocking bricks. In 2005, he became the first “Lego Certified Professional,” a title bestowed upon only 12 other people around the world who are recognized by the brickmaker for their professional work using its products. The title is not tied to a job or even a sponsorship with Lego, but it does allow Kenney to buy bricks in bulk directly from Lego’s factory. He often places orders that weigh a ton or more. More than two dozen of the renowned artist’s pieces are being unveiled at the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture this weekend as part of his nationally touring sculpture exhibit, Nature Connects. The exhibit’s stop here runs through Feb. 7, 2016, with local children’s Lego sculptures being displayed alongside Kenney’s art as part of a community contest. The MAC’s director of museum experience John Muredo-Burich, who joined its staff just under a year ago, has already seen how mesmerizing Nature Connects can be to visitors of all ages when the show came to the museum where he previously worked. His goals for the exhibit’s run in Spokane are twofold — to host a community-oriented exhibit, hence the contest, and to use the playfulness of the toy-based sculptures to teach kids about the importance of protecting and preserving the environment. A week before Nature Connects opens, about 40 contest entry forms have been turned in. The museum is awarding cash prizes to three winners in each age group, with an overall “best in show” award to be voted upon by visitors to the exhibit. To promote the exhibit and bring out that fuzzy feeling of Lego nostalgia, Moredo-Burich and museum staff took on a project to create three, 7-foot-tall Lego minifigs — short for minifigure, Lego’s word for its revered humanoid characters that go with the bricks. Using a 3D scan of an actual minifig (about an inch and a half tall) and a computer-controlled cutting machine, the pieces were cut out of a foam material. The three ironically massive minifigs are displayed outside the MAC’s main entrance. “They’re exactly like Lego makes them,

The MAC created three 7-foot-tall Lego minifigures to promote Nature Connects. just giant in size,” Muredo-Burich says. “We were thinking they might be pretty unique on the planet,” he adds, aside from massive reproductions at the Legoland theme parks.

S

ome of the surviving pieces from Kenney’s memorable fifth birthday present are displayed in a place of prominence inside his 4,000-square-foot Brooklyn studio. This memento of what would eventually become his unlikely career are now part of the artist’s 5 million piece Lego collection. These millions of plastic bricks and specialty pieces are carefully sorted into a 35-foot by 12-foot wall of clear bins, waiting to become a part of something greater, like the centerpieces of Nature Connects: a life-size bison made from 45,143 pieces, a five-footwide swallowtail butterfly using 37,481 pieces and a six-foot-long orange fox, made from 17,547 Legos. About 20 employees — painters, sculptors, animators, architects, fabricators and other creatives — collaborate with Kenney to bring his artistic visions to life. “I am the kind of person who needs to make things, so I’ve structured the business aspects of my studio such that I can devote the majority of my time designing and building sculptures,” Kenney says. Though the 5-year-old Sean Kenney never would have imagined he’d eventu-

30 Gif t Col lection Showcase

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YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

ally build with Legos as a job, the adult Kenney didn’t knowingly seek out what he does now, either. It just sort of happened, as many creative endeavors do. Tired of being tethered to a desk, Kenney left an unfulfilling tech career in the early aughts. Not long after, he caught the attention of the Lego Group for his hobby builds posted online. Having completed Lego sculptures of animals, buildings, people, plants, insects, functional pieces of furniture and countless other objects — bikes, books, xylophones, cars, baseball stadiums — is there anything Kenney can’t build with Legos? “Nothing tasty, at least,” he jokes. Yet as an art form, Legos are no different than any other medium, he believes. “There’s something simple and basic about the way two pieces just pop together. It can literally be understood by a baby yet can stay relevant for a lifetime,” Kenney explains. “Just because you have a pencil doesn’t mean you’ve ever reached the limits of what can be drawn, and we’ve been drawing since the cavemen. I don’t think Lego bricks are any different.” n cheys@inlander.com Nature Connects: LEGO Brick Sculptures • Sat, Nov. 14 through Feb. 7, 2016 • $5-$10 admission • Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture • 2316 W. First • northwestmuseum.org • 456-3931

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CULTURE | DIGEST

CLASSICAL GUITAR HOUR

A

Leon Atkinson is bringing big-time guitarists to the Bing.

classical guitar series curated by Leon Atkinson is back at the Bing Crosby Theater after more than seven years, this time under the Friends of the Guitar Hour moniker. And it nearly didn’t happen.

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION BY FRANNY WRIGHT

BOOK Irish author Paul Murray creates characters with incredibly specific interests, educating readers on topics that are interesting, though probably not relatable. In the end, larger themes become apparent. Murray’s newest release continues this pattern. In his last and most well-known novel — Skippy Dies — a Catholic boarding school boy named Skippy dies in a donut shop right at the beginning. Five years after Skippy Dies, THE MARK AND THE VOID tells the story of a French analyst named Claude being followed by an author named Paul wanting to know more about banking for his novel. But Paul actually wants to rob the bank. And it’s an investment bank, so there’s no money to steal. This Irish novel will keep you laughing your way through learning about the European financial crisis — and life.

Atkinson is a world-renowned classical guitarist out of Sandpoint who co-hosts the weekly Guitar Hour on Spokane Public Radio with KPBX program director Verne Windham. He was diagnosed with kidney failure a decade ago and was on dialysis — nine hours a day, seven days a week at home — for years until he received a kidney transplant three years ago. “I’m now back at 100 percent,” Atkinson says. “I’m travelling and doing concerts all over the world again and still doing my radio show. It’s amazing what one little organ can do.” Originally from Long Island, New York, Atkinson grew up in a musical family and eventually found work on Broadway, wrote songs for commercials and even studied with Andrés Segovia, commonly regarded as the best classical guitarist of all time. But Atkinson always pined for the outdoors, which brought him to buy a 100-acre property in Sandpoint in 1973. Since then, he’s taught at nearly all the universities and colleges in the area. He currently runs a private studio at his home. The guitar series kicks off this weekend with the San Francisco-based Jon Mendle, who has toured with Yo Yo Ma’s Silk Road Ensemble. It continues March 24 with steel-string player Alex de Grassi and Andrew York, formerly of the Los Angeles Guitar Quartet. On May 12, the series wraps up with Atkinson performing along with Larry Jess, principal trumpet with the Spokane Symphony, and his brass ensemble. — LAURA JOHNSON

ALBUM Vulfpeck’s first full-length album THRILL OF THE ARTS comes after a unique rise to fame. This Ann Arbor, Michigan-based funk group’s first song was uploaded to Youtube, followed by a few EPs and Sleepify, a literally silent album Vulfpeck released on Spotify. Sleepify consisted of 10 silent tracks they asked fans to play on repeat while they slept, raising enough royalties for the group to go on a tour without needing to charge fans for tickets. This newest toe-tapping album is filled with raw, funky bass lines and wacky lyrics, plus a “Christmas in L.A.” track just in time for the holiday season. Just try listening to this album without dancing.

Jon Mendle • Thu, Nov. 19, at 7:30 pm • $25/$60 for concert series, contact Leon Atkinson (208-660-4983) • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638

BEER Based off of an Old Fashioned cocktail, Orlison Brewing’s latest release is well-balanced and easydrinking. Orlison has found a loyal following far beyond their Airways Heights headquarters with a commitment to creating clean, clear and tasty lagers. TWO FINGER POUR is brewed with sweet orange peel and two small batch, custom-made bitters. It’s then aged in whiskey barrels to add some darker, smoky notes, perfect to sip on during these cooler fall nights. Head to the Orlison taproom in Spokane to try it on tap or grab a 22-ounce bottle to enjoy it at home. 

FOOTBALL EWU’S TOUGH ROAD AHEAD The precarious spot the Eastern Washington Eagles find themselves in is also a big reason many fans prefer Football Championship Subdivision football. A week ago, the Eags were soaring atop the Big Sky, ranked No. 5 in the nation and heading into November, a month in which the team had a 19-game win streak. One loss to Northern Arizona later, and the team’s in second place in the Big Sky, with huge games coming against fellow contenders Montana and Portland State that will decide if they earn a fourth straight Big Sky title, and whether they make the FCS playoffs.

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www.anthonys.com NOVEMBER 12, 2015 INLANDER 25


CULTURE | WORDS

Leonard Pitts just released his third novel, Grant Park.

Making the Historic Human

Columnist Leonard Pitts feels right at home writing historical fiction BY DAN NAILEN

I

n Grant Park, Pulitzer Prize-winning columnist Leonard Pitts, Jr. has created a vivid exploration of American race relations in a story that bounces between Chicago in 2008, on the eve of Barack Obama’s election, and Memphis in 1968, when Martin Luther King, Jr. was leading a fitful campaign for the city’s garbage collectors. But it didn’t come easy for a man known for his own distinctive writing voice to put words in the mouth of one of his idols. The narrative unfolds through the parallel stories of two Chicago newspapermen, one a decorated black columnist with roots in that era in Memphis, the other his white editor with his own surprising background in the civil rights movement. Unlike Pitts’ very public columns,

26 INLANDER NOVEMBER 12, 2015

though, this work of fiction, his third published novel, was created in quiet, alone at home. “The thing about writing a novel is that it’s very solitary,” Pitts says. “If you write a column, you get feedback within a day or two. I wrote a column yesterday, it’s going to appear in the paper Sunday, and by Sunday afternoon I’ll be getting calls. I’ll know what people feel about it. I just finished my latest book this morning, but no one’s going to see it for three years.” In Grant Park, Pitts’ columnist Malcolm Toussaint and his editor Bob Carson are fictional, but their stories take them through real scenes like Obama’s election night celebration in Chicago’s Grant Park, and the 1968 riots that broke out between the Memphis garbagemen, police and


charged-up agitators. “This book doesn’t go further back than 1968, and even though I was only a child, I was alive in 1968, so in terms of how people talk and the social mores of the time, I felt pretty confident about that,” Pitts says, noting that historical fiction is his favorite genre to read and write. While that might mean considerable research at times, for Grant Park he mostly had to study “the minutiae of Dr. King’s campaign in Memphis,” which he managed to recreate — strikingly so — using old newspaper accounts, the only two books on the subject he could find, and interviews he did for a newspaper column in 2008 on the 40th anniversary of the tumultuous garbage strike and campaign that occurred just weeks before King was assassinated in the same city. One of the 1968 scenes proved to be a difficult one for Pitts, as the teenage Malcolm finds himself having a private conversation with King. Most of the parts featuring the civil rights leader were public events and speeches, where Pitts could simply find copies of King’s words. For the private side of King, though, Pitts tried to find video of “off-duty” King and found it extremely difficult to learn how the man spoke in private. “We have no conception of Dr. King except at a podium, the soaring cadences and rhetoric,” Pitts says. “But he wasn’t that guy 24 hours a day. I was only able to find a couple of things [where] he was just sort of chatting with people without doing a formal interview, and those were very valuable.” Even with those rare clips to work with, Pitts still had to put words in the mouth of one of America’s most revered figures for the sake of his own story. That, he says, was “exceedingly daunting.” “I’ve written a lot of historical fiction, but I’ve never had a historical character play a more significant role,” Pitts says. “The first pass I did of that scene, it was really stiff, because everything he said was something I could footnote to a speech or a book or an interview. I was really scared to walk off that path for a little bit, and the result was really didactic. I had to give myself permission to say, ‘OK, I’ve been studying this guy for years. I think I can kind of know how he thinks, and guess what he’d say in a certain situation.’ I had to give myself permission and prod myself to make him a human being.” He certainly succeeds, while entertaining and educating the reader in the process, but that’s nothing new for the man best known for his Miami Herald columns — syndicated nationally and consistently excellent, particularly when it comes to addressing race in America. Even so, Pitts says he’s been writing fiction “since I got out of college 150 years ago.” It just took the 58-yearold a while to figure out how to write “fiction that somebody would be willing to publish.” “I finally unlocked that trick,” Pitts says. “Fiction was what I always wanted to do, before I was writing as a music critic, before I was writing the column.”  Grant Park reading and signing with Leonard Pitts, Jr. • Sat, Nov. 14, at 7 pm • Free • Auntie’s Books • 402 W. Main • auntiesbooks.com • 838-0206

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NOVEMBER 12, 2015 INLANDER 27


CULTURE | THEATER

How to use

Hal Holbrook sees Mark Twain as relevant as ever in 2015.

Twain Reanimated

Hal Holbrook found the role of a lifetime more than 60 years ago BY DAN NAILEN

A

ctor Hal Holbrook’s résumé is a long and mighty impressive one, a list of parts that’s garnered him Oscar nominations, Emmy Awards and a reputation as a go-to character actor who can shine in roles spanning drama (All the President’s Men), suspense (The Firm) and comedy (TV’s Evening Shade).

28 INLANDER NOVEMBER 12, 2015

But one name is associated with the 90-year-old more than any other — that of Mark Twain. Holbrook first started portraying the American literary legend (real name: Samuel Clemens) in a sketch that was part of a two-person show he and his first wife did in the 1950s. When they had a child and he had to find a way to support

the family, Holbrook turned his portrayal into a one-man show that eventually made its way to Broadway in 1966, earning him a Tony Award. He’s continued playing Twain ever since, touring and talking to American audiences who quickly realize times haven’t changed much since Twain was illuminating American hypocrisy in the 1800s. “He is talking about exactly the same things, things that happened 100 and more years ago that are happening today,” Holbrook says from a tour stop in Olympia. “The political statements and chicanery and lies are the same as 100 years ago.” Holbrook’s concern for the current state of the country compels him to keep mining Twain’s MORE EVENTS work and Visit Inlander.com for performcomplete listings of ing a local events. show he hopes sparks conversation in the audience. He’s particularly worried about the divide between rich and poor — a disparity Twain saw in stark relief as America became an industrialized nation full of haves (the owners like Rockefeller, Carnegie and Vanderbilt) and have nots (the immigrant populations barely paid to work the factories). “The situation today, it’s a replay of the millionaire cadre that took over the country,” Holbrook says. “They did a great job creating new industries, no question about it, but they looked upon themselves as princes. That’s exactly where we’re standing today, and it’s very dangerous for American democracy.” Twain’s insistence on truthfulness from America’s leaders, and mockery of those who fell short, serve the show well, as does Twain’s willingness to push Americans to discuss uncomfortable topics, Holbrook says, like his insistence on using the “nword” more than 200 times in Huckleberry Finn. “People who want to cut it out of the book don’t know what the book is about!” Holbrook says. “It’s about racism — yours and mine. We are living in a racist country. Anyone who says it isn’t is lying. But nobody wants to talk about it.” Holbrook would never have found this compelling character to play if he hadn’t done a little research way back in 1954 when he first conceived the one-man show. He went to a bookstore and found a tome called Mark Twain: Social Critic, by a professor named P.S. Foner. “I didn’t really know anything about Mark Twain at all when I started. I was playing him, but I was just playing an old man” — until he discovered that book, Holbrook says. “I thought to myself, ‘Social critic?’ Mark Twain isn’t a social critic. He writes books for kids. But he didn’t write books for kids at all. He wrote about our country.” n Hal Holbrook: Mark Twain Tonight! • Sat, Nov. 14, at 7:30 pm • $37.50-$102.50 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • inbpac.com • 2797000

THIS

PULL-OUT SECTION

Pull down then out

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NOT ski poles. YES a resource you keep and share with friends.

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PULL-OUT & KEEP! SNOWLANDER

2015


Let it snow

november in this issue

mountain resorts winter events skiing lingo

SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER


DREAMING OF A NEW WINTER RIDE?

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EDITOR’S NOTE N

ow the excitement starts. Social media is starting to fill up with pictures of the first dusting of snow at regional mountains. Lawn mowers, leaf blowers and BBQs are being swapped out for snow blowers. Summer apparel is quickly transitioning to cold weather gear. There’s always a bittersweet feeling when the temperatures start to drop, and I’m not quite used to wearing anything else on my feet but flip-flops. It’s usually a harsh but short transition to finding my boots and sweaters, and making sure to bring a coat for that “out of nowhere” storm. Knowing that ski season and opening day announcements are right around the corner makes the transition easier. With the sudden drop in the temperatures and our region’s mountains starting to make snow, it’s finally starting to feel like winter is at our

t s r Fi ks c a trBegin here

Gary Peterson

WITH SNOWLANDER EXPO NEARLY HERE, SNOW CAN’T BE FAR BEHIND

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SNOWLANDERNW

SNOWLANDER.COM 49 DEGREES NORTH 4 LOO KO UT PA S S

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SCHWEITZER M O U N TA I N 8 S I LV E R M O U N TA I N 1 0 MOUNT SPOKANE

14

REGIONAL RESORTS 16 EVENTS

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LAST RUN

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doorsteps! With ski swaps and movie premieres in full swing, the Snowlander Expo, PowderKeg Inlander Brew Festival and Washington Trust Rail Jam just days away, it’s only a matter of time before we’ll be testing out our new gear on the slopes. After last season’s bust, area resorts are ready to get back to the forecasted average season; in this area, average can be epic. This year’s Snowlander Expo promises to be bigger and better, with a ton of prizes to give away on our prize wheel. We’ve loaded the schedule with educational seminars from our vendors, including safe backcountry travel, getting and staying fit for the ski and boarding season, waxing and tuning demos and much more. The first thousand people through the door will receive a lift ticket to 49 Degrees North; the second thousand will receive a buy one, get one free ticket to Whitefish Mountain Resort in Montana. We hope to see you at the Spokane Convention Center on Nov. 20 & 21 for a fun-filled Snowlander Expo weekend! Think snow! — JEN FORSYTH Snowlander Editor jen@snowlander.com

Visit mtspokane.com/WLL for details.

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The wait is finally over for the Sunrise Basin expansion. While plans have been in progress for some time now, dirt has started to move. 49 Degrees North General Manager Eric Bakken explains: “We are looking forward to a huge season! The Sunrise Basin continues to grow and expand. We are starting to build a new road, installing utilities and building two new yurts for this season. This is just the beginning of the construction of an entirely new base area. “For this season, specifically, you will find two new runs in the Sunrise Basin, and until a permanent lodge is completed, a pair of cozy yurts connected by a deck at the base of the Sunrise Quad. In addition, we are constructing a new parking lot adjacent to the yurts with a capacity for 50 additional cars, and an additional 2.5-acre parking lot is also being constructed in the Calispell Creek base area.” Back over on the front side, infrastructure work has been completed which will allow for expanded snowmaking. “New for the 201516 season are two new snowmaking guns and 10 acres of snowmaking, which will provide coverage at the base area, beginner slopes and teaching area,” Bakken says. “We will make snow as soon as temperatures drop, and this will result in improved coverage for those areas that tend to start out a bit thin.” Future snowmaking infrastructure is planned

for the 2016-17 season, with an additional 30 acres of snowmaking on three major runs, made possible by the addition of a new well system and a 500,000-gallon, mid-mountain reservoir.

MAKING THE MOST OF IT

In addition to many great deals through local partners (check them out at ski49n.com), 49 Degrees North offers Six Packs as a great incentive to ski when you want with whomever you want. Adult and Youth Six Packs have no blackout dates and no other restrictions. They’re completely transferable, and there’s no limit to how many can be used in a single visit. Just show up and present your Six Pack voucher to redeem your lift ticket. Youth Six Packs are $219; Adult Six Packs are $279.

SPECIAL DEALS

Be one of the first thousand people through the door at the Snowlander Expo each day, Nov. 20 and 21 at the Spokane Convention Center, to receive a free lift ticket to 49 Degrees North. Only one ticket per person; some restrictions apply. — JEN FORSYTH


LIFT TICKETS Adult (18-69) Unlimited $55 Limited $49 Half Day $39 Youth (7-17) Unlimited $46 Limited $43 Half Day $33

College/Military/ Master (70 & up) Unlimited $49 Limited $46 Half Day $36 Chair 3 only Unlimited $43 Limited $39 Half Day $32 6 & under Free

NOVEMBER 2015 SNOWLANDER 5 TriStateOutfitters_Snowlander_111215_6H_CPR.pdf


MOUNTAIN PROFILE

KINJA

JA PA N E S E

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6 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2015


LOOKOUT PASS WHAT’S NEW The big news out of Lookout Pass this season comes from their Snow Sports School. “We have increased the lesson times from an hour to an hour and a half,” says Jason Bergman, the ski area’s director of sales and marketing. “We have also added additional time slots; there will now be four times throughout the day to take lessons. And we will now have lessons every day that we are open.” Lessons will now be available at 9 and 10:30 am and 12:30 and 2 pm. Lookout also has added more incentive in their Learn to Ski or Ride in 3 Program, designed for the beginner who’s looking for an affordable way to get into the sports of skiing and snowboarding. The $99 price tag comes with three lessons, rentals and lift tickets for the days spent learning on the mountain. Upon successful completion of the program, graduates are given a free season pass to Lookout for the remainder of the season. This season, Lookout teams up with Tri-State Outfitters to offer an additional perk of graduating. “Graduates will be given a graduation certificate for a further discount, a big bonus, to be used at Tri-State at the completion of the program, so that you can get gear for a good deal,” Bergman says. In addition to developing their ski and snowboard programs for beginners, Lookout also completed a lot of brush cutting, so when the snow starts to fall, the slopes will be ready even sooner.

MAKING THE MOST OF IT

Back again for the 2015-16 season is Powder Wednesdays. During January and February, to capitalize fully on the amount of snow that falls on the Idaho/Montana border, Lookout will be open six days a week (Wednesday through Monday).

SPECIAL DEALS

Being a passholder at Lookout Pass has never been so beneficial. The mountain has teamed up with several area businesses to offer Lookout season pass-holders more bang for their buck. The Benefits Partners Program includes $5 off lift tickets at all Idaho ski resorts, half-day ticket rates at Montana ski resorts, two days free at Bluewood, 25 percent off at Red Mountain and Whitewater in British Columbia and 50 percent off day ticket rates at Eaglecrest Ski Area in Alaska. Other perks include lodging discounts at participating Silver Valley and Montana hotels, discounted meals restaurants in the area and deeply discounted waxing services at area retailers in Spokane, Coeur d’Alene and Hayden. Check out skilookout.com for a full listing of pass-holder benefits and further details. — JEN FORSYTH

LIFT TICKETS Adult (18-61) Full Day Weekend/Holidays $42 Full Day Weekday $39 Half Day Weekend/Holiday $37 Half Day Weekday $34

College/Military Full Day Weekend/Holiday $40 Full Day Weekday $36 Half Day Weekend/Holiday $35 Half Day Weekday $31

Junior (7-17) Full Day Weekend/Holiday $30 Full Day Weekday $28 Half Day Weekend/Holiday $26 Half Day Weekday $24

Senior (62+) Full Day Weekend/Holiday $30 Full Day Weekday $28 Half Day Weekend/Holiday $26 Half Day Weekday $24 Child (6 & under) Free

NOVEMBER 2015 SNOWLANDER 7


MOUNTAIN PROFILE

SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT WHAT’S NEW

LIFT TICKETS Adult (18-64) Full Day $73 Half Day $63 Junior (7-17) Full Day $50 Half Day $40 College Student/Seniors (65-79)/Military 10% Discount

Child (6 & Under with adult) & Super Senior (80+) Free Beginner Chair only $20 Musical Carpet only Free

In a continued effort to make the overall guest experience a memorable one, Schweitzer Mountain Resort has been busy since closing in the spring. In July, they broke ground on the long-anticipated summit lodge. The 13,000-square-foot, three-story lodge will offer guests a unique venue to dine and relax. The new facility will be equipped with a full-service restaurant and bar, cafeteria, lodging accommodations, group function space and a new home for patrol dispatch. The location, as Dig Chrismer, Schweitzer’s marketing manager, explains, is ideal: “The lodge is perfectly located between the top of the Great Escape Quad and the Snow Ghost chair.” The new lodge will offer expansive views and be a new focal point for the summit. “This is a huge investment for our winter season, although it will be offered as a summer amenity as well,” says Chrismer. As for a completion date? “Idagon is a great group to be working with on the project, and the time frame is (currently) good for a fall of 2016 completion.” Other noticeable changes for resort guests will be the significantly updated wireless Internet system. Schweitzer invested $80,000 with Frontier Communications, switching their system from copper to fiber-optic lines and installing new antennas that will increase bandwidth resort-wide. Other notable improvements include adding another grooming machine to the fleet. “Schweitzer is committed to keeping their grooming and equipment top of the line,” says Chrismer. Ongoing brush-cutting efforts have seen work done on G3, Lakeside Chutes runout, lower Snow Ghost and Quicksilver. On the lift-ticket side of improvements, Chrismer adds that “for our skiing guests 80 years of age and older, we are now offering free lift tickets. That’s a great incentive to ski until I am 80!” Chrismer also is excited about the new apprentice instructors program for skiers and riders from 13 to 17: “There are a lot of kids that age who are looking for ways to be a part of the mountain, and this program will allow for that.” This program will last four weeks, including shadow days with an instructor team. Participants will receive an unlimited junior season pass as part of the program. “This is going to be an awesome program,” says Chrismer.

MAKING THE MOST OF IT

For the last couple of seasons, Schweitzer has been a part of the Powder Alliance. The basics of this program: Pass holders at each of the participating mountains within the Powder Alliance are offered three free lift tickets to the partner resorts. With the addition of Whitewater Ski Resort in British Columbia, the total number of resorts offering the pass benefit is at 14 across Idaho, Washington, Oregon, Montana, Utah, Colorado, California, Arizona, New Mexico and British Columbia.

SPECIAL DEALS

The Snowsports School has added two new programs for this winter season. The Winter Break Ski Camp, a four-day program, will be offered during the holiday break over two sessions, Dec. 21-24 and/or Dec. 28-31. The camp is $175 per session, which does not include lift passes. — JEN FORSYTH

8 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2015


Ski & Just $49 pp Stay

Free Up Your Winter With The New

69

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208.783.1111 NOVEMBER 2015 SNOWLANDER 9


MOUNTAIN PROFILE LIFT TICKETS Adult (18-61) Full Day $54 Half Day $45 Holiday Full Day $58 Holiday Half Day $48 Youth (7-17) Full Day $39 Half Day $34 Holiday Full Day $43 Holiday Half Day $37 College Student/Military/EMT/Fire Full Day $49 Half Day $42 Holiday Full Day $53 Holiday Half Day $45

Senior (62+) Full Day $44 Half Day $37 Holiday Full Day $48 Holiday Half Day $41 Child (6 and under) Free Scenic Gondola Ride Only Adult (18-62) $18 Youth (4-17) & Senior (62+) $14 Child (3 and under) Free

SILVER MOUNTAIN RESORT

Yuletide

at the Library

FINE ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR TO BENEFIT SPOKANE ART SCHOOL EDUCATIONAL PROGRAMS

Yuletide Preview Party Thursday November 12th • 5 pm - 8 pm

$

25

LIMITED EDITION ORNAMENTS BY KEN SPIERING MUSIC BY COMMUNITY CHOIR

A PERSON

info: 509-325-3001 • SpokaneArtSchool.net

Yuletide Show Friday Nov 13th & Saturday Nov 14th 10 am - 5:30 pm

FREE ADMISSION PARTICIPATING ARTISTS:

Don Barron • Autumn Bunton • Karen Ciaffa & Linda Malcolm Melissa Cole • Sheila Evans • Ken Frybarger • Anthony Gallaher Jeff Harris • Juaquette Holcomb • Kris Howell • Sayuri Kelch Wendy McElroy • Sandy Mooney • Patti Osebold & Ron Vaughan Sharon Ronning • Shannon Haight • Bonnie Speigle

SPOKANE PUBLIC LIBRARY DOWNTOWN BRANCH

906 W MAIN AVE.

10 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2015

WHAT’S NEW

The biggest announcement for Silver Mountain Resort this season, according to Neal Scholey, director of sales and marketing: “We are returning to seven days per week for operations.” So now, in addition to offering two mountains, 73 trails, 1,600 acres and 2,200 vertical feet with an average annual snowfall of 300 inches, Silver will be open every day for the winter season.

MAKING THE MOST OF IT

Scholey also is excited to announce a new lodging packages available this season: “We are offering a killer ski-and-stay package starting at just $49 per person. That is for quad occupancy in a family studio, and gets you a lift ticket, lodging and access to Silver Rapids Waterpark.” The package, valid Sundays through Thursdays, must be booked by Nov. 25. Check out silvermt. com for double occupancy and rates for larger condominiums. “Our biggest emphasis for this season is to get the word out that we will be operating every day,” says Scholey, “so adding our deeply discounted ski-and-stay package offer for the midweek getaway is huge.” This deal allows guests to take full advantage of all of Silver Mountain’s amenities like the Morning Star Lodge, located in the heart of Gondola Village.

SPECIAL DEALS

Silver Mountain is rolling out a brand-new product this fall: the Silver Card. “I think this will be a great alternative for people who were hesitant to buy a season pass or like to ski at different resorts,” Scholey says. The card, which is only $69 and must be purchased before Nov. 30, enables skiers and boarders to ski or ride for free up to 14 different days at Silver Mountain. Ski free days are Nov. 27-29, Dec. 4-6 and April 4-10. You also can choose one additional free day (non-holiday) of your choice. Additionally, cardholders receive a 35 percent discount on midweek lift tickets — that’s just $35 for adult and $25 for youth tickets — and a 20 percent discount on weekend tickets. — JEN FORSYTH


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NOVEMBER 2015 SNOWLANDER 11


FRIDAY

SATURDAY

NOV 20TH

NOV 21ST 10AM-7PM

4PM-9PM Ski . snowboard . mega sale 2015

SPOKANE CONVENTION CENTER first 1,000 attendees each day receive second 1,000 attendees each day receive

* buy one get one free*

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Latest gear from Factory reps

SEASON PASS Regional SPECIALS & PHOTOS From

resorts

Fr ee bumpers play game zone

and tesla board area

Snowlander Seminars Conditioning and injury pervention Summit Rehabilitation • Friday 4:30pm | Saturday 2:30pm

Heated performance gear Cabela’s • Saturday 10:30am

Ski and snowboard waxing Swix • Friday 6:30pm | Saturday 11:30am

Winter camping Washington State Parks • Saturday 4:30pm

12 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2015

Backcountry safety Panhandle Backcountry & Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center Friday 5:30pm | Saturday 3:30pm


FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SNOWLANDER EXPO

NOV 20TH

NOV 21ST

4PM-9PM

11AM-7PM

TICKETS ON SALE NOW! $

8

Local & Regional

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Craft Beer and Cider

WINTERSPORT 3220 N. DIVISION ST.

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NOVEMBER 21

SPOKANE CONVENTION CENTER

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railjam competition 10:00-12:00 Open Jam Session 12:00-12:45 Ski Preliminaries 1:00-1:45 Snowboard Preliminaries 5:00-5:30 Ski Finals 5:45-6:15 Snowboard Finals 6:30 Awards

$

2

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COUPONS AVAILABLE AT LOCAL

NOVEMBER 2015 SNOWLANDER 13


MOUNTAIN PROFILE

MT. SPOKANE SKI & SNOWBOARD PARK WHAT’S NEW

LIFT TICKETS Weekend and Holidays Adult (18-61) Day Ticket $52 PM Ticket $41 Night Ticket $20 Sunday PM Ticket $38

The biggest improvement that skiers and boarders will find at Mt. Spokane Ski and Snowboard Park this winter is a complete overhaul of Lodge 1. “There has been a complete remodel from top to bottom, interior and exterior to Lodge 1,” says Brad McQuarrie, the ski area’s general manager. This lodge is open to the public on holidays and weekends, and new entrances allow for improved access from the parking lot. New restrooms are located on the lower level, new flooring, energy-efficient windows and many other improvements give the lodge a modernized feel. “There has been significant improvement to Lodge 2 as well,” adds McQuarrie. Design is underway for the new Guest Services building; construction is planned to start next summer. This new building will be located near the main parking area. McQuarrie explains, “so instead of having to hike up the hill to the existing building, there will be a central staircase, giving the main lodge area a more user-friendly experience.” This new facility will house Tickets, the Snow Sports Center, Ski School programs, daycare and an expanded Rental Shop; the goal for completion is 2017. Terrain expansion is moving forward on the proposed Chair 6 area; the final hearing will be heard in the Supreme Court on Nov. 20. If Mt. Spokane gets the green light, McQuarrie says, “we are ready to go and will start cutting runs this winter.” This terrain will include 80 new acres of groomed trails, seven new runs and the addition of the Red Chair, purchased from Bridger Bowl.

College/Military Day Ticket $45 PM Ticket $34 Night Ticket $20 Sunday PM Ticket $28 Youth (7-17) Day Ticket $42 PM Ticket $31 Night Ticket $20 Sunday PM Ticket $25 Senior (62-69) Day Ticket $42 PM Ticket $34 Night Ticket $20 Sunday PM Ticket $25 Super Senior (ages 70+) Day Ticket $29 PM Ticket $24 Night Ticket $20 Sunday PM Ticket $23 Chair 5 only Day Ticket $31 PM Ticket $24 Night Ticket $20 Sunday PM Ticket $23 Child (6 & under) Free

MAKING THE MOST OF IT

MIDWEEK AND NON-HOLIDAY Adult (18-61) Day Ticket $39 PM Ticket $35 Night Ticket $20

Download the Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard app through the Apple app store. This app, launched last season, allows skiers and snowboarders to track their runs with the GPS Run Tracker and measure themselves against other Mt. Spokane skiers and riders on the leaderboard. There is also a function that integrates with Facebook, allowing you to track where your friends are — so when they try ditching you to ski their favorite secret stash on a powder day, the tracking function will lead you right to them. Additionally, the app features the Mt. Spokane trail map and live webcams, as well as events and deals.

College/Military Day Ticket $35 PM Ticket $31 Night Ticket $20 Youth (7-17) Day Ticket $32 PM Ticket $27 Night Ticket $20

SPECIAL DEALS

Senior (62-69) Day Ticket $32 PM Ticket $27 Night Ticket $20

The Stocking Stuffers are back! It’s a great way to get on the slopes for a discounted price. Before Dec. 31, the price is $99; it goes to $129 thereafter. This deal provides Youths ages 7-17 with five lift tickets, Adults 18 and older with three lift tickets and College Students with four tickets, and the vouchers can be used any time. The non-transferable punch card must be presented with identification at the ticket window to receive a lift ticket. Check out the Mt. Spokane website for more details on this offer and other discount programs. — JEN FORSYTH

Super Senior (ages 70+) Day Ticket $24 PM Ticket $24 Night Ticket $20 Chair 5 only Day Ticket $24 PM Ticket $24 Night Ticket $20 Child (6 & under) Free

14 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2015

BOB LEGASA PHOTS


er_SkiAndStay75_111215_3V_CPW.pdfCorbinArtCenter_WinterActivity_101515_12H_JP.pdf MEET CONNECT CELEBRATE

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SPFD_Convention_111215_5H_KE.pdf

NOVEMBER 2015 SNOWLANDER 15


REGIONAL RESORTS Sunshine Village Lake Louise Kicking Horse

Mount Norquay 1

Cal gary

1

Nakiska

Revelstoke

Ka m loop s

Panorama Silver Star 6

Whistler/ Blackcomb

Fairmont

6

97

5

93

B R I T I S H

Ke low na

A L B E

C O L U M B I A

Big White 33

Kimberley

6

Apex

3

3

Mount Baldy

Salmo

Phoenix Red Mountain

Fernie

3

Whitewater

95

395

Mount Baker

2

Sitzmark

Turner

Schweitzer

5

Loup Loup

49 North

2 95

Mount Spokane We na tc he e

90

Ya k im a

5

195

395 12

White Pass

84 Mount Hood Meadows

Snowbowl Mi ssou l a

Wa lla Wa lla

P o r t l a nd

Lookout

95

WA S H I N G T O N

Crystal

5

90

Silver Mtn

Snoqualmie

M O N T A N A 93

90

Oly m pi a

Blacktail

Coeu r d’Al en e

Spokane

2

Mission Ridge

Whitefish

o

Stevens Pass Se a ttl e

Leth bri dge

3

N e lson

Mount Hood Ski Bowl

Timberline

Bluewood

I D A H O

84

Lost Trail

Disco

95

15 15

O R E G O N

Brundage Sun Valley

Mount Bachelor

Tamarack

Anthony Lakes

SNOWLANDER’S 2015 GUIDE TO REGIONAL RESORTS BY JEN FORSYTH

95

49° North

and Angel Peak.

Chewelah, Washington • ski49n.com 1,850 vertical feet • 82 runs At 49 Degrees North, there’s something for the entire family. The resort also offers pristine groomers, perfectly gladed tree skiing runs (lots of them) and a friendly base area lodge, complete with lunch-tray-sized nachos and a full array of adult libations in the Boomtown Bar. The ski area is one of the largest in the state of Washington, with 2,325 acres of skiable, lift-served, patrolled terrain over Chewelah Peak 95

84

Anthony Lakes North Powder, Oregon • anthonylakes.com 900 vertical feet • 21 runs Located in Oregon’s northeastern corner near the town of La Grande, Anthony Lakes receives an average of 300 inches of light, dry, powdery snow known to blanket the area during the winter months. The ski area operates more than 1,100 acres with three lifts. In addition to downhill skiing and 84

Twin Falls

16 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2015

93

86

84


elcome to the 2015 Snowlander Inland Northwest Winter Map! From Spokane to Coeur d’Alene and from Sandpoint to Pullman — even from Yakima and Tri Cities to Missoula — we all live right here in the middle of some of the most epic winter terrain in all of North America. Just look over this map, and you’ll see just how many

mountains. In Kimberley, all of our activities —

W

LOOKOUT PASS

IDAHO/MONTANA: Located on the Idaho/

Montana state line on Interstate 90, Lookout has a little bit of something for everyone. Historically known for the best and deepest powder in the region — an annual average of 400 inches — Lookout’s village features an historic lodge, the second oldest in the Northwest, offering an international food court, a lively ski bar, the Loft Pub & Grill and a retail shop. This family-friendly resort truly is a Northwest gem. INSIDER TIP: Jason Stegmann, terrain park manager, has been skiing at Lookout since he was a kid. He’s 29 now. A day for him at the mountain usually involves riding the park between powder days: “On a powder day, you can find me in the Lucky Friday glades. It usually goes untouched as most people pass by it as they are skiing down the Golden Eagle run.” He describes the area as

Saddle Up For Snow!

MT. SPOKANE

WASHINGTON: Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard

Park, located in the heart of Mt. Spokane State Park, Washington’s largest, is a quick 28-mile drive from downtown Spokane. The mountain was recently inducted into the Inlander’s Hall of Fame after being voted the region’s Best Place to Snowboard for 10 years running. Mt. Spokane proudly offers night skiing, the Northwest’s largest ski school and a tubing hill for the entire family.

REGIONAL MAP & RESORT GUIDE

DON’T MISS IT: WINTER CARNIVAL, JAN. 17

Fun to watch and more fun to participate in, Lookout Pass hosts the most unique event in the region, the Pacific Northwest National Wife Carrying Contest. which headlines their Winter Carnival celebration.

New to tree skiing? Whitaker describes the trees to the skier’s right of Chair 4; they’re gladedout and a great place to start. If you like more wide-open treed areas, “visit Big 200 off of Chair 2, featuring large pines and open skiing.” Another great locals’ spot is skiing off the backside of the mountain. “You must grab a local to go with,” she warns. “They’ll show you the best areas, plus you never want to go alone.”

Resort lives by the motto “Pure, Simple and Real… Deep,” and easily backs it up. Champagne powder falls at an average of 40 feet per year, the lodge boasts the best, healthiest and most eloquently prepared cafeteria food — they’ve even published three cookbooks with their delicious recipes — and the resort is surrounded by some of the most beautiful mountain peaks around. Combine that with its close proximity to the lively town of Nelson, and a trip to Whitewater is a must for an eclectic, powder-filled adventure. INSIDER TIP: Trace Cooke has been skiing at Whitewater since he was 2. His days on the mountain have prepared him for his crazy, new adventure as the only male Canadian athlete to be invited on the Freeride World Tour — a journey that will take him all over Europe and to Alaska to compete against some of the best skiers in the world. He owes his successes to his roots at

Fernie Alpine Resort (250) 423-4655

Kimberley Alpine Resort (250) 427-4881

Loup Loup Ski Bowl

skitheloup.com

Mission Ridge Ski & Board Resort (509) 663-6543 or (509) 663-3200

E-4

SPOKANE CONVENTION CENTER

K-11

Mount Baldy Ski Resort

(250) 498-4086 or (866) 754-2253

SKI & SNOWBOARD MEGA SALE

-16 T WINTER MAP 2015 INLAND NORTHWES

re

Red Mountain Resort

Schweitzer Mountain Resort

R T A

E-6

POWDERKEG INLANDER BREW FESTIVAL

O-8

Sample selections from over 20 Inland Northwest breweries and cideries.

WASHINGTON TRUST BANK RAIL JAM

Saturday November 21st, in the Spokane Convention Center Breezeway.

Silver Mountain Resort (866) 344-2675

The kick off to the winter season – featuring the lowest prices of the year on new gear from Inland Northwest retailers.

Sitzmark Ski Area

(509)485-3323 or (509)-486-2700

Turner Mountain Ski Resort (406) 293-2468

S-8

Whitefish Mountain Resort on Big Mountain (406) 862-2900 or (800) 858-4152

K-4

skibaldy.com Osoyoos, BC

skiphoenix.com

(208) 263-9555 or (877) 487-4623 N-14

Wenatchee, WA

Phoenix Mountain (250) 362-7384 or (800) 663-0105

L-8

Okanogan, WA

missionridge.com

Mount Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park (250) 444-6565

H-5

Wallace, ID

mtspokane.com

(509) 443-1397 or (509) 238-2220 G-6

Fernie, BC Kimberley, BC

skilookout.com

(866) 699-5334 or (509) 557-3401 A-14

NOVEMBER 20TH & 21ST, 2015

skifernie.com skikimberley.com

Lookout Pass Ski Area (208) 744-1301

C-8

Dayton, WA

Whitewater Ski Resort

(250) 354-4944 or (800) 666-9420

Mead, WA Grand Forks, BC

redresort.com Rossland, BC

schweitzer.com Sandpoint, ID

silvermt.com Kellogg, ID

gositzmark.org Tonasket, WA

skiturner.com Libby, MT

skiwhitefish.com Whitefish, MT

skiwhitewater.com Nelson, BC

301

3,923

5,774

1,851

2,325

7

0

82

5%

25% 40% 30% X X

225

N 49˚23'24.89" W 119˚54'15.39"

236

5,187

7,197

2,000

1,112

4

1

75

14%

32%

245

N 49˚43'20.90" W 118˚55'35.67"

295

4,950

7,606

2,550

2,765

15

5

118

225 140

250

5,250

6,780

1,440

1,000

4

0

25

15%

15%

70%

300

4,450

5,670

1,125

400

3

0

24

10%

20% 45%

25%

248

N 48˚00.122 W 114˚30.0689 N 46˚4’ 55.2” W 117˚51’ 3.6” N 49˚27’47.02” W 115˚05’08.74”

3,450

7,000

3,550

2,500

10

2

142 10%

210

N 49˚41’22.22” W 116˚00’19.52”

150

4,035

6,500

2,465

1,800

5

1

80

0%

38%

93

N 47˚27.2139 W 115˚41.5022

400

4,500

5,650

1,150

540

4

0

34

10%

20% 50% 20%

X

163

N 48.427821 W 119.475274

--

4,000

5,260

1,240

300

3

1

10

0%

50% 35%

X X

2,250

2,000

30% 60%

182

N 47˚21’40” W 120˚29’43”

Novice Runs

P-3 N-3

O-14

Kalispell, MT

bluewood.com

N 48˚18.153 W 117˚33.93114

Village Lodging Cat or Heli Skiing Snow Tubing XC Skiing Night Skiing

Kelowna, BC

blacktailmountain.com

Advanced Runs

(406) 844-0999

58

Intermediate Runs

bigwhite.com

(250) 765-3101 or (888) 663-6882

Blacktail Mountain

Total Lifts

Big White Ski Resort

Bluewood

(509) 382-4725

Expert Runs

Penticton, BC

Total # of Runs

apexresort.com

Total Acres

F-2

I-19

presented by

Celebrate the culture of the Kootenays and its passion for powder. This three-day festival offers more than 30 various clinics from industry professionals, including Alison Gannett and Eric Pahota, a variety of competitions, including King and Queen of Coldsmoke, and evening socials.

High Speed Lifts

Apex Mountain Resort

RETURNING FOR

DON’T MISS IT: 10TH ANNUAL KOOTENAY COLDSMOKE POWDER FEST, FEB. 19- 21

Vertical Drop

ski49n.com

Chewelah, WA

(250) 292-8222 or (877) 777-2739

KPND

SKI & BOARD PART2015IE/16SSEASON KPND

RESORT STATISTICS

49º North Mountain Resort (509) 935-6649 or (866) 376-4949

250.444.6565 • www.skiphoenix.com /PhoenixMountainBC

Whitewater: “This is a great small-town vibe at a really great resort. Really, everyone feeds off each other. Skiing with my friends, who have such great talent. Whitewater has also brought in some amazing coaches.” While skiing competitions will see him dropping off steeps around the globe, he says that Whitewater has something for everyone, and he enjoys everything — the intermediate runs and exploring new terrain that has recently been added. His favorite? Skiing the lift line right under the old Summit chairlift. He’s still exploring the Glory Ridge chair and the new gladed runs.

BRITISH COLUMBIA: Whitewater Mountain

Celebrate the closing of the season with the seventh annual Slush Cup pond-skimming contest. It’s also Hawaiian Day, so bring out the grass skirts, coconut bras and your best Hawaiian shirt for a luau on the mountain. It’s also Military Ski Free Day; past and present members of the military can bring their ID and receive a free lift ticket.

Best Kept Secret in the Boundary!

Celebrate Silver Mountain’s history with $12 lift tickets to honor the original name of the mountain, Jackass Ski Bowl.

WHITEWATER

DON’T MISS IT: POND SKIM, MARCH 26

LOCAL FRIENDLY RELAXED

DON’T MISS IT: JACKASS DAY, JAN. 8

Top Elevation

October 15, 2015 November 12, 2015 December 17, 2015 January 14, 2016 February 11, 2016

mining history of the Silver Valley with a wellbalanced menu of activities for the entire family. Gondola Village, conveniently located right off Interstate 90 in Kellogg, offers Idaho’s largest indoor waterpark, Silver Rapids, and luxurious condominium-style accommodations. An easy jump on the gondola will whisk you to the mountaintop village, where you’ll start to explore the 1,600 acres of glades and groomers over two mountain peaks. Both villages have multiple dining and retail offerings. INSIDER TIP: Marketing Coordinator Willy Bartlett has skied Silver Mountain for 12 years. His recommendation for those new to Silver is “to watch the wind direction and the way the wind is loading the snow the night before. There are three three bowls on the mountain over a large area.

Base Elevation

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IDAHO: Silver Mountain Resort blends the

Annual Snowfall (inches)

Available at more than 1200 distribution points throughout the greater Spokane/Coeur d’Alene region, and online at Inlander.com.

Head to the areas of the leeward (downwind) slope from the winds. Pay attention on your first run down and the first chairlift back up. Typically, you will find untouched snow.” Bartlett’s favorite areas to ski change from year to year, as certain areas become popular over the course of a season and other areas are ignored. He suggests not following the crowd, as he likes to rediscover parts of the mountain and makes it a point to find new zones to ski. He finds it interesting how certain areas will get hammered, and then the next season those same areas will be ignored. “But you can’t go wrong with the North Face Glades,” he adds.

SILVER MOUNTAIN

GPS Coordinates

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be found for days ... Due to the type of snow we

“nothing but powder. You can just float through it.” The area is off of Chair 1 and is a must-ski or -snowboard. Another aspect at Lookout that Stegmann says is unique to the area is the friendliest base area, where everyone knows everyone. “Lookout is a family-oriented mountain,” he says. “There is a personal touch, from the person selling you your lift ticket to the person in the cafeteria. It is a close-knit group of people where everyone knows everyone’s name.”

Miles from Downtown Spokane

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Snowlander magazine is published monthly and inserted into the Inlander weekly newspaper.

2015-16 SNOWLANDER SERIES M-10

Find It On the Map At

NEED MORE SNOWLANDER?

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INSIDER TIP: Looking for fresh powder during your visit to Mt. Spokane? Kristin Whitaker, the mountain’s marketing manager, loves dropping into the trees to the left of the Half Hitch Terrain Park on a powder day. “This area is not often visited, has a great fall line and holds the snow very well,” she says. ”Specifically, check out Lu’s Lane.” This is Mt. Spokane’s newest gladed run, named after legendary Ski Patrol alumna Lu Cairns.

EASTERN WASHINGTON | NORTH IDAHO | WESTERN MONTANA | SOUTHEASTERN BRITISH COLUMBIA

downhill, Super-G, and GS races.

tune in or find us on facebook for details MOUN

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Interested in advertising? Call us at (509) 325-0634

The Inlander has published its annual fold-out map of the Northwest’s ski and snowboard resorts. Get your free map at select Inlander rack sites, area winter sports retailers and at Inlander HQ, 1227 West Summit Parkway.

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Big White

Great Fa lls

Big Sky Mountain

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boarding terrain, the resort has 30 km of groomed, track-set Nordic trails that vary in difficulty. Finish off your day warming up by the fireplace in the base-area lodge.

Apex Mountain Resort

Pocatello

Penticton, British Columbia • apexresort.com 2,000 vertical feet • 73 runs Apex has the recipe for epic conditions. Combine an average winter temperature of 23 degrees Fahrenheit, annual snowfall of 20 feet and a prime 189

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western Canada, with 38 acres. The resort also offers plenty of activities for kids of all ages back in the village, including snowmobiling, ice climbing, horse-drawn sleigh tours and ice skating, to name a few.

Big Sky

Blacktail

Big Sky, Montana • bigskyresort.com 4,350 vertical feet • 300 runs Aptly named Big Sky Resort is the biggest skiing in North America, with 5,800 acres of skiable terrain over four connected mountains. Big Sky also boasts big snowfall, with an average of 400 inches annually. With an average daytime winter temperature of 25°, you’re sure to experience the epitome of Montana snow: Cold Smoke. Big Sky is all about amenities, with 23 chairlifts, 11 surface lifts and seven terrain parks. The village is well equipped, with numerous lodging, dining and retail options.

Helena

overy

location in the heart of Okanogan Valley with 1,112 acres of groomers and steep chutes and top it with champagne powder, and it’s no wonder why Apex is one of the greatest hidden gems in Canadian skiing.

Big White Ski Resort

Kelowna, British Columbia • bigwhite.com 2,550 vertical feet • 118 runs Adding to Big White’s already full assortment of village amenities, new for this season is the Black Forest Day Lodge, scheduled to open in December. On the slopes, skiers and snowboarders will find 900 acres of groomed runs and 1,500 acres of glades, with a total of 2,765 acres of skiable terrain to explore. Big White offers the most night skiing terrain in

Lakeside, Montana • blacktailmountain.com 1,440 vertical feet • 24 runs Perched above the town of Lakeside on the western shores of beautiful Flathead Lake, Blacktail offers that quaint Montana vibe in a unique setting. Skiers and snowboarders will experience a top-to-bottom run of varied terrain before ever riding the chairlift, as this mountain is upside down, with the base area village at the top of the mountain. The mountaintop village offers a couple of dining options and expansive views of Glacier National Park in the distance.

Bridger Bowl

Bozeman, Montana • bridgerbowl.com 2,700 vertical feet • 75 runs Located 20 minutes from the vibrant college and mountain town of Bozeman down Bridger Canyon, Bridger Bowl boasts a friendly local vibe with a big-mountain skiing experience. The mountain’s layout is a large, V-shaped funnel, making it very user-friendly. It’s approximately two miles wide on the ridge-lined summit, while near the base, it’s only about 200 yards across. As the mountain rises, so does the skill

Brundage level, making the progression process obvious — the higher you go on a chairlift, the more difficult the terrain.

Brundage Mountain Resort

McCall, Idaho • brundage.com 1,800 vertical feet • 46 runs Located only 8 miles from the charming mountain and lake town of McCall, Brundage Mountain boasts the “Best Snow in Idaho” with an average of 320 inches of annual snowfall. The resort itself offers 1,500 acres of skiable terrain, and another 19,000 acres through their backcountry snowcat operation. There are plenty of food and beverage options on the

mountain. Utilize the Brundage Express Shuttle, with daily routes to and from McCall, to make the most of your holiday in the hills of central Idaho.

Crystal Mountain

Crystal Mountain, Washington • skicrystal.com 3,100 vertical feet • 57 runs Conveniently located southeast of Seattle in the foothills of Mt. Rainier, Crystal Mountain feels a million miles away from the hustle and bustle of the city. The resort offers plenty of terrain — of 2,600 total acres, 2,300 are lift-served – in the northeast corner of Mt. Rainier National Park. There’s ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 2015 SNOWLANDER 17


REGIONAL RESORTS a little bit of everything: groomers, steeps, bumps, glades and chutes, and sweeping views of the region’s volcanoes. There are many on-mountain dining facilities, as well as multiple options in the village area. For the full mountain experience, take advantage of one of several lodging options.

Discovery Anaconda, Montana • skidiscovery.com 2,388 vertical feet • 67 runs The three faces of Discovery Ski Area blend a perfect balance of gently sloping runs, more advanced groomers, steep mogul skiing and terrain similar to what’s found in Alaska, without having to take a helicopter to get there. “Disco” is located off the beaten path, near the towns of Anaconda, Georgetown and Phillipsburg. The summit elevation is 8,158 feet, so the average annual snowfall of 215 inches comes in the form of light, fluffy powder. With 2,200 acres, there’s plenty of terrain to discover at Discovery.

Fairmont Fairmont, British Columbia • fairmont.com 1,000 vertical feet • 13 runs What pairs with a long day on the slopes for the entire family? Soaking in hot springs in a world-class setting. Fairmont, located in southeastern British Columbia, offers options for the entire family looking for an active vacation. Downhill and Nordic skiing, snowshoeing, tubing and multiple lodging options are offered. Every lift ticket comes with access to the oversized hot springs.

Fernie Alpine Resort Fernie, British Columbia • skifernie.com 3,550 vertical feet • 142 runs plus 5 alpine bowls Consistently voted one of the best ski towns around, Fernie Alpine Resort backs it up with 2,500 acres of skiable terrain, five alpine bowls that offer a little something different for everyone, 37-plus feet of annual snowfall and one of the coolest little mountain towns near the village. In addition to skiing and boarding, Fernie offers up many activities like snowshoe fondue tours and Nordic skiing, as well as many in-town activities, including art openings and live music.

Kicking Horse Golden, British Columbia • kickinghorseresort.com 4,130 vertical feet • 120 runs With the fourth-highest vertical drop in North America, Kicking Horse is one to add to the bucket list. In addition to 120 runs, the mountain boasts 85-plus inbounds chutes over 2,500 skiable

18 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2015

acres, with deep champagne powder and lots of it. Off the mountain, the surrounding area boasts many activities, lodging options and places to eat

Kimberley Alpine Resort Kimberley, British Columbia • skikimberley.com 2,465 vertical feet • 80 runs What do you get when you mix perfect Purcell powder, an infinite amount of sunshine and a Bavarianthemed town? Kimberley Alpine Resort. Located in the Purcell Range in the Canadian Rockies, the resort offers breathtaking views and a laid-back, relaxed atmosphere. There are 1,800 acres of varying terrain, from wideopen immaculate groomers on the front side to challenging bumps and glades on the backside.

Lake Louise Lake Louise, Alberta • skilouise.com 3,250 vertical feet • 145 runs Lake Louise Ski Resort boasts everything you need for your next Canadian ski adventure, with endless chutes, glades and gullies, gentle slopes,

cruising runs and remote bowls over a massive 4,200 skiable acres in the heart of scenic and historic Banff National Park. In addition to the vast amount of terrain for skiing and snowboarding, Lake Louise offers many other activities to engage in while off your skis.

Lookout Pass Ski Area Mullan, Idaho • skilookout.com 1,150 vertical feet • 34 runs Lookout Pass is a genuine, familyfriendly atmosphere with world-class grooming and untouched powder. Lookout receives an average of 400 inches of annual snowfall, the region’s lightest and driest. Conveniently located off Interstate 90 on the IdahoMontana border at the crest of the Bitterroot Range, Lookout’s terrain is mostly north- and northeast-facing, keeping the snow in pristine condition. At the base, you’ll find the Northwest’s second-oldest ski lodge.

Lost Trail Powder Mountain Sula, Montana • losttrail.com 1,800 vertical feet • 50 runs

When you visit Lost Trail Powder Mountain, you’ll certainly enjoy the beauty and uncrowded slopes of the Rocky Mountains’ hidden jewel. Located about 90 miles south of Missoula at the junction of Highways 93 and 43 — at the top of the Continental Divide in the Bitterroot Mountains — Lost Trail boasts 1,800 skiable acres over two mountains. Expect to be surprised by the unbelievable powder, the low prices and the great vibe of this locals-only type of mountain.

Loup Loup Ski Bowl Okanogan, Washington • skitheloup.com 1,240 vertical feet • 10 runs Loup Loup Ski Bowl is located in the beautiful north-central Cascade Mountains, off scenic Highway 20. The area is operated by a nonprofit foundation, with the mission of “Promoting lifelong passion for outdoor winter recreation through education for the surrounding community.” The ski area offers about 300 acres of skiable terrain for downhill adventure, and another 23 km of Nordic trails to explore.

Mission Ridge Wenatchee, Washington • missionridge.com 2,250 vertical feet • 36 runs Located on the sunny side of the Cascade Mountains near Wenatchee, Mission Ridge offers terrain for the entire family — whether cruising wide-open groomers past one of the many enormous rock features scattered throughout the mountain or dropping into one of the many secret narrow chutes, there are over 2,000 skiable acres to explore. The resort also boasts light powder, tons of sun and amazing views, with plenty of lodging and dining options located 12 miles down the road in Wenatchee.

Mount Bachelor Bend, Oregon • mtbachelor.com 3,365 vertical feet • 88 runs Located on the eastern flanks of Oregon’s Central Cascades near the quintessential mountain town of Bend, Mount Bachelor is known for its light, dry snow, diverse terrain, family-friendliness and long seasons. The mountain also boasts 3,700


Red Mountain downtown Spokane, in the heart of Washington’s largest state park, Mt. Spokane Ski and Snowboard Park offers 1,425 acres of skiable terrain over 45 runs, consisting of heart-pounding glades and fast groomers. The mountain also offers the most acreage of night skiing terrain and hours in the Inland Northwest, with 16 night skiing runs open Wednesday through Saturday evenings until 9:30 pm.

Nakiska

Nakiska acres of lift-accessible terrain and a summit that guests can ski or ride off of in all directions. It’s the highest skiable elevation in all of Oregon and Washington.

Mount Baker

Glacier, Washington • mtbaker.us 1,500 vertical feet • 32 runs Mt. Baker Ski Area is located in the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest in the shadows of one of the Northwest’s many active volcanoes, the ski area’s namesake. Skiers and snowboarders flock to Baker, as the mountain’s average annual snowfall is 700 inches. Mount Baker is not for the faint of heart — more for adventure seekers with the desire to experience some of the most amazing conditions and the steepest and craggiest terrain in the Northwest.

Mount Baldy

Oliver, British Columbia • skibaldy.com 1,300 vertical feet • 35 runs Located in sunny southern British Columbia and overlooking the Okanagan Valley, Mount Baldy offers

plenty of sunshine, tree skiing and untracked powder, with an average of 250 inches of light, dry snow over 500 skiable acres. Combine your skiing adventure with a visit to one of the area’s many wineries for a unique skiing experience.

Mount Hood Meadows

Parkdale, Oregon • skihood.com 2,780 vertical feet • 85 runs Mount Hood Meadows offers a big-mountain experience and some of the Northwest’s most diverse and playful terrain. Located on the sunny, wind-protected side of Oregon’s most iconic mountain, it receives an average of 430 inches of annual snowfall that blankets 2,150 acres of skiable terrain. The mountain also offers a large amount of terrain for night skiing adventures.

Mount Hood Skibowl

Government Camp, Oregon • skibowl.com 1,500 vertical feet • 65 runs Mount Hood Skibowl offers up many options for the adventuring family’s

time on the mountain. In addition to a full menu of options for skiing and snowboarding, including a massive amount of night skiing terrain – one of the country’s largest operations — Skibowl offers an Adventure Park just for kids. Activities include day and night-time Cosmic Tubing and Frosty’s Playland. There are several dining options at the ski resort, with many lodging options available nearby.

Mount Norquay

Banff, Alberta • banffnorquay.com 1,680 vertical feet • 60 runs Located above scenic Banff National Park, Mount Norquay offers a unique Canadian skiing adventure in a quaint atmosphere. The mountain features 190 skiable acres, with the summit reaching an elevation of 8,040 feet. Daily bus service is available from Banff, only 4 miles away.

Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park

Mead, Washington • mtspokane.com 2,000 vertical feet • 45 runs Conveniently located 28 miles from

Kananaskis, Alberta • skinakiska.com 2,412 vertical feet • 71 runs The closest ski area to the bustling metropolis of Calgary, only 45 miles away, Nakiska was the home to the Alpine events for the 1988 Winter Olympics. The ski area offers 1,021 skiable acres and boasts immaculate, wide-open groomers. In addition to on-mountain amenities, you’ll find world-class dining, accommodations and spas nearby in the Kananaskis Village.

Panorama Mountain

Panorama, British Columbia • panoramaresort.com 4,000 vertical feet • 120 runs Boasting one of North America’s top verticals, Panorama offers the perfect Canadian getaway for the thrill-seeking family. With 2,847 acres of skiable terrain, ranging from wideopen groomers to powder-filled trees and steeps, 75 percent of the terrain is suitable for beginners and intermediates, although challenge awaits those adventurous enough to head in to Taynton Bowl with 700 acres of black-diamond runs. Finish your big day on the mountain, enjoying the world-class hot pools back in the village area.

Phoenix

Grand Forks, British Columbia • skiphoenix.com 800 vertical feet • 18 runs Nestled in the mountains between Greenwood and Grand Forks, Phoenix Mountain is a charming destination for

those skiers and snowboarders looking for an adventure. The mountain offers a “locals only” feel, with plenty of fresh powder and expansive views of the southern Monashee Mountains. There are 18 runs, all accessible by the T-bar, which provides terrain for skill levels ranging from beginner to advanced. The unique community atmosphere is always welcoming and has been deemed “The Best Little Mountain in B.C.”

Red Mountain

Rossland, British Columbia • redresort.com 2,920 vertical feet • 110 runs With a quick trip across the U.S.Canadian border, you’ll discover a great, unspoiled resort. Just outside the town of Rossland and right over the border, Red Mountain delivers 4,200 acres of pristine skiing over four peaks, an epic amount of vertical, inbounds cat skiing on some of its newly expanded terrain, and lots of steeps with deep snow — an average of 300 inches falls annually. Lodging is available right in the village, with many off-mountain activities to enjoy in the community, rounding out the perfect Canadian ski adventure.

Revelstoke Mountain

Revelstoke, British Columbia • revelstokemountainresort.com 5,620 vertical feet • 65 runs The title for the biggest vertical in North America goes to Revelstoke Mountain Resort, located on Mt. Mackenzie in B.C’s Selkirk Mountains. In addition to the huge amount of vertical, the resort also offers 3,121 acres of fall-line skiing, high alpine bowls, renowned gladed terrain and endless groomers, as well as activities for the entire family in the Turtle Creek Tube Park. Revelstoke also has a beginner area, featuring skiing all day and night, right in the center of the village. It’s the only resort to offer cat-skiing, heli-skiing and lift-assisted skiing from one base area. ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 2015 SNOWLANDER 19


REGIONAL RESORTS

Stevens Pass

Schweitzer Mountain Resort Sandpoint, Idaho • schweitzer.com 2,400 vertical feet • 92 runs Looking for destination amenities without the crowds that usually go along with them? Discover Schweitzer Mountain Resort, located above the beautiful town of Sandpoint, with sweeping views of Lake Pend Oreille below. Schweitzer offers 2,900 acres of lift-served terrain, ranking it as one of the largest resorts in North America. The terrain includes incredible bowls, chutes, groomers and more than 1,200 acres of tree skiing. Back in the village, you’ll find plenty of lodging, dining options and après-ski activities.

Silver Mountain

lage offering true ski-in, ski-out access to the slopes. There are four distinct mountain faces and a progressive terrain park perfect for learning. Those seeking adventure should head to the backside, where 1,900 acres of steep, black and double-black diamond terrain awaits.

Sitzmark Ski Area Havillah, Washington • gositzmark.org 660 vertical feet • 10 runs Located in the North Cascades, 20 minutes northeast of Tonasket, Sitzmark Ski Area offers dry, powder snow, lots of sunshine, great views, small lift lines and low ticket prices, with 80 acres to explore. Back in the village, Sitzmark offers Wi-Fi and a friendly lodge.

Kellogg, Idaho • silvermt.com 2,200 vertical feet • 73 runs Located right off Interstate 90 in Kellogg, it’s all about ease at Silver Mountain Resort. Once you arrive into the Gondola Village, jump on the scenic, 3-mile long gondola with your morning coffee and get whisked to the top to start your day of exploration. The resort, spread over two mountain peaks, offers a nice variety of terrain, with glades and groomers and more than 1,600 acres of skiable terrain. After you’ve made your way back down to the Gondola Village, it’s time to explore the Silver Rapids Waterpark, Idaho’s largest indoor waterpark.

Ski Bluewood

Silver Star Mountain

Snoqualmie Pass, Washington • summitatsnoqualmie.com 2,280 vertical feet • 25 runs Snoqualmie Pass, located 54 miles east of Seattle on Interstate 90, consists of four unique areas totaling 1,981 acres of skiable terrain, all offering something a little different for skiers and boarders looking for easy and quick access to the mountains. In

Vernon, British Columbia • skisilverstar.com 2,500 vertical feet • 130 runs Silver Star is home to champagne powder and 3,282 acres of varied terrain for all abilities and adventure levels. B.C’s third-largest ski area is home to a colorful mid-mountain vil-

20 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2015

Dayton, Washington • bluewood.com 1,125 vertical feet • 24 runs Bluewood is located 54 miles northeast of Walla Walla in the Blue Mountain Range of southeast Washington. The mountains rise out of the high desert, providing clear skies and cold temperatures, resulting in light, dry powder. The mountain boasts the second-highest base elevation in the state at 4,450 feet, giving it the reputation of the best snow in Washington — an average of 300 inches of snowfall — with some of the most memorable tree skiing offered in the region.

Snoqualmie Pass

Whitefish Mountain Resort addition to amazing terrain parks at Summit Central, the steeps of Alpental and extensive night skiing at Summit West, the Pass also offers Nordic skiing and snow-tubing adventures.

Snowbowl Ski Missoula, Montana • montanasnowbowl.com 2,600 vertical feet • 42 runs Located in the Lolo National Forest, only 12 miles above the vibrant town of Missoula, Snowbowl offers an exciting mix of steep terrain, glades and wide-open cruisers. In addition to being known for having some of the most challenging terrain around, Snowbowl is also renowned for terrific food and beverage offerings, with a great base-area atmosphere. Stay slopeside at Gelandesprung, a European-style lodge, or chose to stay in Missoula, with a wide array of lodging and dining options available in the earthy college town.

Stevens Pass Skykomish, Washington • stevenspass.com 1,800 vertical feet • 37 runs Stevens Pass is located on the crest of the Cascade Range in two national forests, the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie

National Forest on the west side of the crest and the Wenatchee National Forest on the east side. There are 1,125 acres of skiable terrain to explore over the 37 major runs and countless bowls, glades and faces. Getting to Stevens is easy from either side — it’s 90 miles from Seattle and 35 miles from the quaint, Bavarian-themed town of Leavenworth on scenic and well-maintained Highway 2. You’ll find epic conditions at Stevens, with an average annual snowfall of 460 inches and an average snowpack of 105 inches. Night skiing is available five nights a week, Wednesday through Sunday, with up to six lifts lit up for night operations.

Sun Valley Resort Ketchum, Idaho • sunvalley.com 3,400 vertical feet • 100 runs Sun Valley consists of two very distinct areas, split by the lively town of Ketchum. At Baldy, you’ll find perfect-pitched vertical from the peak to the base. There are no flats; it’s all vertical. The lift infrastructure ensures minimal lift lines, and the terrain ranges from expert to beginner, with immaculate groomed and open bowls. Dollar Mountain, the learning ski hill for the area, is home to the very first

chairlift. In addition, Dollar includes rails, a super pipe and a terrain-based learning environment.

Sunshine Village Banff, Alberta • skibanff.com 3,520 vertical feet • 115 runs Sunshine Village sits high on the Continental Divide in the heart of Banff National Park. A quick 15-minute drive from the historic mountain town of Banff, it boasts three sprawling mountains. The resort features 3,300 acres of skiable terrain, and you can even ski two provinces — British Columbia and Alberta — in one run. Because of the large amount of average snowfall (approximately 360 inches), the village’s high altitude (7,082 feet) and the cold temperatures, Sunshine’s operating season stretches from early November through late May, the longest non-glacial season in Canada.

Tamarack Tamarack, Idaho • tamarackidaho.com 2,800 vertical feet • 42 runs Located in the heart of Idaho’s beautiful west-central mountains and overlooking Lake Cascade, Tamarack Resort features a blend of mountain, meadow and lakeside amenities. With 1,000 acres of lift-accessible


WINTER EVENTS and diverse terrain ranging from groomers and glades to cornices and steeps, the mountain is eastfacing, offering minimum wind and maximum snow retention. The village’s multiple lodging and dining options make Tamarack a perfect family adventure.

Timberline Timberline Lodge, Oregon • timberlinelodge.com 3,690 vertical feet • 41 runs Located only 60 miles from Portland, atop the south side of iconic Mt. Hood, sits the historic Timberline Lodge, the base area for Timberline. The ski area offers 1,415 acres of skiable terrain and is the only resort in North America that operates 12 months a year, snow permitting. Lodging is available at the Lodge or just 6 miles away in Government Camp.

Turner Mountain Libby, Montana • skiturner.com 2,110 vertical feet • 22 runs A must for those looking to explore the mountains of western Montana is Turner, located in the Kootenai National Forest above the town of Libby. The area boasts a true top-to-bottom, 2,100 vertical feet with some of the best fall-line skiing in the Northwest. The mountain is user friendly; there’s one chairlift, and all runs lead back to the base area. This is the quintessential “mom and pop” operation in Montana; when it’s closed, Turner even rents out the mountain for private functions.

Whistler/Blackcomb Whistler, British Columbia • whistlerblackcomb.com 5,280 vertical feet • 200 runs Ranked as the #1 Overall Resort by Ski magazine, Whistler and Blackcomb are two side-by-side mountains; when combined, they make for one huge skiing adventure. Included in the 8,171 acres of terrain are 16 alpine bowls, 200 marked runs and three glaciers to explore. This world-class ski area doesn’t just stop at the skiing — when you add more than 200 retail shops, restaurants, endless nightlife and a full range of activities for the entire family, a trip to Whistler/Blackcomb will satiate your thirst for adventure.

ONLINE Keep up on snow-related news at Inlander.com/ snowlander.

White Pass Naches, Washington • skiwhitepass.com 2,050 vertical feet • 45 runs Located in the shadows of Mt. Adams with majestic views of Mt. Rainier, White Pass provides terrain for skiers and boarders of all abilities. Located on Highway 12, about an hour west of Yakima, White Pass offers a perfect escape from the city in a relaxed, family-friendly atmosphere. The area features slopeside lodging and amenities you’d expect to find at larger resorts. In addition to a range of skiing and boarding terrain ranging from rolling groomers to challenging glades, there are 18 km of track-set Nordic trails available to explore.

Whitefish Mountain Resort Whitefish, Montana • skiwhitefish.com 2,350 vertical feet • 105 runs Located above the cute mountain town of Whitefish on Big Mountain, Whitefish Mountain Resort offers the perfect ski and snowboard adventure in a picturesque setting. There are 3,000 acres to discover, whether ripping down fast groomers, exploring endless glades or taking in the view in the newly renovated Summit House lodge, now offering a true 360-degree view of the surrounding vistas, including Whitefish Lake and Glacier National Park. In the village, there are plenty of lodging options to rest your tired legs at the end of your day, or stay in town to explore Whitefish’s vibrant nightlife.

Whitewater Ski Resort Nelson, British Columbia • skiwhitewater.com 2,050 vertical feet • 81 runs Located about 20 minutes away from the eclectic and funky town of Nelson, Whitewater Ski Resort has a well-deserved reputation for epic snowfall, with an average of 480 inches falling annually. The mountain is easy to get around, with endless terrain adventures available, from groomed runs and open bowls to glades and steep chutes. For those with the knowledge and the right tools for the adventure, Whitewater offers amazing access to the backcountry, and even offers a single- and double-ride lift ticket for those wanting to explore that terrain outside of the rope lines. You’ll want to dine on the mountain and experience some of the best cafeteria food at any ski resort. Lodging can be found in Nelson, with many options to choose from. n

SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

Snowlander Expo & Powderkeg Brew Fest The Inlander’s annual expo hosts local winter sports vendors offering season-low sale prices. It also features the Washington Trust Rail Jam in the Convention Center breezeway and informational seminars throughout Saturday on avalanche safety and other topics. Nov. 20-21, Fri from 4-9 pm, Sat from 10 am-7 pm. Expo admission $8 (good both days; kids under 12 free). The Powderkeg Brew Fest showcases 24 local and regional breweries, cideries and one meadery. Tasting packages from $15-$25. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlanderexpo.com

NOVEMBER FADE TO WINTER The latest film from Matchstick Productions muses on the changing of the seasons and the return of the winter sports peak, and captures the personalities of nine skiers who go to great lengths to get out into the powder. Nov. 12, at 7:30 pm. Price TBA. Gonzaga University, Hemmingson Center, 702 E. Desmet. skimovie.com (313-6924) SARS SKI SWAP The Schweitzer Alpine Racing School hosts its annual ski swap, offering thousands of pieces of new and used equipment for sale, and professionals on site for buying assistance. Also sign up for your Schweitzer Mountain Resort season pass at the event. Sellers can

register Friday, Nov. 13, from noon-7 pm. Sale on Nov. 14, from 9 am-2 pm. $2/person; $5/family. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Ave., Sandpoint, Idaho. sars.net (208-263-1081) SNOW DANCE 2015 The 17th annual black-tie affair benefits the 49 Degrees North Winter Sports Foundation and the Forty-Nine Alpine Ski Team (FAST). Nov. 14, starting at 6 pm. $135/couple; men’s tux rental included. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside. ski49n.com BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL WORLD TOUR The annual nine-day festival kicks off in Banff, Alberta, at the beginning of November; the year’s featured mountain films then tour the U.S. and the world. Spokane screenings Nov. 20-22,

at 7 pm, and Nov. 22, at 6 pm. $20/ screening. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. mountaingear.com/webstore BIG WHITE OPENING DAY The B.C. resort kicks of its winter season this Thanksgiving weekend, with runs opening at 8:45 am. Nov. 26. Big White Ski Resort, 5315 Big White Rd., Kelowna, B.C. bigwhite.com (250-765-3101) FADE TO WINTER The latest film from Matchstick Productions muses on the changing of the seasons and the return of the winter sports peak, and captures the personalities of nine skiers who go to great lengths to get out into the powder. Nov. 27, at 7 pm. Price TBA. Panida Theater, 300 N. First, Sandpoint. panida.org (208-255-7801)

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NOVEMBER 2015 SNOWLANDER 21


WINTER EVENTS WARREN MILLER’S CHASING SHADOWS Silver hosts a screening of this year’s 66th winter film in Noah’s Loft. Doors open at 6 pm for a happy hour, with the film starting at 7 pm. Afterward, hit up the Pray for Snow party at 9 pm. Nov. 25. $12-$15. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866-344-2675)

CHRISTMAS ON THE MOUNTAIN An evening of holiday-themed festivities for the family; details TBA. Dec. 19. Mission Ridge Resort, 7500 Mission Ridge Rd., Wenatchee, Wash. missionridge. com/events AVALANCHE AWARENESS COURSE Know the indicators of an avalanche and learn survival and digging methods in this one-day introductory classroom course. Dec. 19, at 9 am. Whitewater Ski Resort, 602 Lake St., Nelson, B.C. skiwhitewater.com (250-354-4944)

TRI-CITIES GEAR SWAP Snow sport lovers in the southeastern region of Washington shouldn’t miss this annual outdoor gear and clothing sale. Nov. 27-29, Fri 5-9 pm, Sat 9 am-5 pm, Sun 11 am-3 pm. Free admission. Holiday Inn at TRAC, 4525 Convention Pl. Pasco, Wash. facebook.com/tricitiesskiswap (522-1443)

RENEGADES AND HANDRAILS PT. 1 / LOCAL BREWFEST Part one of the 49º rail jam trilogy, with contests and more. Also taking place on the mountain that day is a winter brew fest, with local breweries featured. Dec. 19. 49 Degrees North Mountain Resort, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n. com (935-6649)

WHITE FRIDAY Stay tuned to local ski reports to see if there’s enough white stuff on the top of Mt. Spokane for the season to kick off along with the holidays. (The season’s scheduled opening day is Dec. 5) Nov. 27. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220)

BREAKFAST WITH SANTA Santa starts his day before heading out to his sleigh with breakfast at Big White’s Happy Valley Lodge, of course enjoying pancakes with maple syrup. Dec. 22 and 23, from 8-10 am. Big White Ski Resort, 5315 Big White Rd., Kelowna, B.C. bigwhite.com (250-765-3101)

SKI INSTRUCTOR CLINIC Lookout Pass hosts its annual preseason professional clinic for aspiring ski instructors. Nov. 27-29. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208744-1301)

SKI WITH SANTA The Big Man in Red takes a break before the big day to fit in a few runs, with a Balloon Parade on Christmas Eve and carolers in the Village. Dec. 23-24. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555)

SILVER MOUNTAIN PLANNED OPENING Pending some white stuff on the ground, Silver has set aside this day as its scheduled opening for the 2015-16 season. Nov. 27. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866344-2675)

CHRISTMAS AT MT. SPOKANE The mountain runs are open on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day from 9 am-4 pm, along with two tube hill sessions on Dec. 24, from 11:30 am-1 pm and 1-2:30 pm. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220)

KELLOGG CHRISTMAS LIGHTING FESTIVAL The city of Kellogg hosts its annual kickoff to the holidays, with a fireworks show, night parade, craft show, tree lighting, Santa photos and more. Nov. 28, events from 10 am-7 pm throughout the town. Downtown Kellogg, Idaho; details at silvervalleychamber.com

Compete in the Ugly Sweater Contest at Lookout Pass on Dec. 27.

DECEMBER BONFIRE & HOT CHOCOLATE Close out a day on the slopes with some warmth on the inside and outside, sipping hot chocolate by the fire outside the skating rink in Happy Valley. Wednesdays, Dec. 2-March 20, from 5-6:30 pm. Big White Ski Resort, 5315 Big White Rd., Kelowna, B.C. bigwhite.com (250-7653101) CROSS-COUNTRY SKIING BASICS Learn how to get started with crosscountry skiing, and learn about the differences between backcountry, telemarking and touring ski styles. Dec. 3, from 7-8:30 pm. Free; register to save spot. REI Spokane. 1125 N. Monroe. (328-9900) WSU UNIVERSITY RECREATION GEAR SWAP The 41st annual gear swap hosts vendors of new and used gear from across the Northwest. Dec. 4 from 6-9 pm and Dec. 5, from 9 am-noon. $3 Friday admission; $1 on Saturday. WSU Hollingbery Fieldhouse, Pullman, Wash. skiswap.wsu.edu (335-7856)

22 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2015

MT. SPOKANE SCHEDULED OPENING DAY Stay tuned to the snow report to see if this Saturday will mark the opening of the mountain’s 2015-16 season. Dec. 5. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220) SILVER STAR CHRISTMAS LIGHT-UP The mountain hosts its official kickoff event of the holiday season, offering family craft activities and games, sleigh rides and fireside snacks. Also includes the “Trail of Lights” snowshoe tour at 6 pm. Dec. 5, from 5-8 pm. Silver Star Mountain Resort, 123 Shortt St., Silver Star Mountain, B.C. skisilverstar.com (800-663-4431) SCHWEITZER COMMUNITY DAY A special fundraising event offering $10 lift tickets to the community, to support the efforts of the Community Cancer Services and the Bonner Partners in Care Clinic. All revenue from the ticket sales supports these organizations. Dec. 10, lifts open from 9 am-3:30 pm. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer

Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555) WOMEN’S SNOWSHOE DAY The mountain offers two-for-one trail passes and snowshoe rentals; bring a friend or meet one in the parking lot. Dec. 12. 49 Degrees North Mountain Resort, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n. com (935-6649) COLLEGE DEAL DAYS Area college students who show their ID can get super-discounted lift tickets during winter break, Dec. 12-13. $19 ticket with valid ID. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt. com (866-344-2675) FAMILY CROSS-COUNTRY WEEKEND Test out the cross-country trails at 49°, with kids (under age 18) getting a free trail pass and equipment rental when accompanied by a parent/guardian. Dec. 12-13. 49 Degrees North Mountain Resort, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n. com (935-6649)

NIGHT SKIING KICKOFF PARTY The first night skiing event of the season starts with a bang, as the snowy runs will glow under the night lights. Also includes the first live band performance of the season in the Lodge. Dec. 18, from 3:30-9:30 pm. $20 lift tickets. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220) LIVE MUSIC FRIDAYS KICKOFF The season’s first night of live music in Noah’s Loft begins this weekend. Stay tuned for musician/band line up. Fridays, from 9 pm-midnight, through the season. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866344-2675) WHITEOUT PARTY The mountain hosts its “pray for snow” event — wear white and send out good thoughts that this year won’t be a repeat of last year! Dec. 19. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301)

NIGHT SKIING CANNED FOOD DRIVE Right the mountain at night for just $4 if you bring two nonperishable food items; otherwise, lift tickets are $15. Dec. 26, from 4-8 pm. 49 Degrees North Mountain Resort, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n.com (935-6649) UGLY SWEATER CONTEST Don the most terrible piece of clothing in your winter wardrobe on this day for a chance to win prizes, and of course, for the impress factor. Dec. 27. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout. com (208-744-1301) NYE AT SILVER Celebrate the departure of 2015 with a day of skiing and snowboarding, with the tubing hill open until 6 pm. Then hit up Noah’s to welcome in 2016, or hit up the Silver Rapids Indoor Waterpark for kid-friendly countdown events. Dec. 31. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (866-3442675) NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTIES Ring in 2016 with music and entertainment for the whole family, with a big celebration party in Taps. Dec. 31; tickets go on sale for activities on Dec. 1 Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, ID. schweitzer. com (208-263-9555) n


THE LAST RUN FROZEN PHRASES Demystifying the ski industry’s ever-growing vocabulary and terminology BY JEN FORSYTH Learn the lingo before hitting the slopes.

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ears ago, I was sharing some photos with my cousins and said, “This is me waiting for first chair on a late spring, bluebird powder day.” Her response: “You just said so many things that don’t make any sense to me.” I then realized that I had been isolated for years, surrounded only by those who spoke my own language. All subcultures have their lingo, and skiers and snowboarders are no different. FIRST CHAIR: Technically, if you’re in the first grouping of people on the first chair after the bell rings at the day’s opening, you get “first chair” bragging rights. Although generally, everyone in the lift line before the bell rings is in line for first chair. LATE SPRING: Really any day in March or April. BLUEBIRD: In the Inland Northwest, if you can see your shadow, or a patch of blue in the sky, it’s considered a bluebird day.

POWDER DAY: This term is relative to the season. Last year, a powder day might have consisted of 3 new inches of snow overnight. In a big year, we might get a little more particular about the amount of snow that qualifies the day as a powder day. APRÈS: My favorite among the ski lingo, après is the post-skiing or snowboarding celebration, even if all you did was put on skis and rode one chairlift — even it was from the parking lot to the village. SHREDDING THE GNAR: Skiing or snowboarding to your fullest extent possible, in the most gnarly conditions, even if that consists of battling for your placement on the cat track during a holiday weekend. PARABOLIC SKIS: This term no longer exists to describe new skis. The term has changed and now refers to the side cut. All skis are shaped, so to differentiate between

old-school skis that are straight and the variety you can buy today, terms like “early rise,” “rocker” and “twin tip” are current words and phrases to describe shaped skis. LOCAL: Usually self-proclaimed, once you’ve gotten vocal about all of the tourists shredding your line on a powder day during the holidays. HOT LAPPING: Usually only occurs midweek, where no lift lines exist and you can make fast laps, without stopping, on your favorite runs. Every day, I find myself having a conversation with someone who doesn’t ski or snowboard. I know I’ve used one of the terms from the skiing and boarding subculture when their eyes start to glaze over and they’re trying to translate what I’m talking about into “normal” terms. n jen@snowlander.com

NOVEMBER 2015 SNOWLANDER 23


24 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2015


FROM LEFT: Barrister Winery’s Michael White, Greg Lipsker and Tyler Walters at the winery’s new tasting room.

Next Step

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Years after a lucky accident brought them into winemaking, Barrister Winery’s founders celebrate their success BY MIKE BOOKEY

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reg Lipsker and Michael White like to say that they started Barrister Winery by accident. The two, Inland Northwest attorneys who became fast friends after meeting through work, were on a family trip through Nelson, British Columbia, when they realized that they didn’t have any wine. “I thought he’d bring the wine and he thought I’d bring in it,” recalls Lipsker. So they pulled over at a store with a sign proclaiming “Wine Shop,” but once inside, they realized the place didn’t sell bottles of

wine at all, but rather winemaking equipment. “We’d always thought it would be fun to make wine,” says White, so the pair left the store with a 5-gallon Zinfandel kit. Very few impulse purchases lead to a new career, but that’s basically what happened on that afternoon in Canada in 1997. “Who knows if we’d even be sitting here if we hadn’t made that stop,” says White. He’s sitting with Lipsker and longtime Barrister employee and new equity partner Tyler Walters at the winery’s just-opened tasting room in the Liberty Building, just across

Washington Street from the Davenport Grand Hotel. This year, Barrister is on pace to produce 5,000 cases of wine, more than doubling the production the company’s original business plan foresaw when it was written almost 15 years ago. Back then, Lipsker and White had transitioned from making wine as a hobby — at one point crushing a ton and a half of grapes in a garage — to forming the actual Barrister Winery (named after their shared profession) in 2001. A few years later, they purchased a ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 12, 2015 INLANDER 29


FOOD | WINE

At The Davenport Grand

Barrister’s new tasting room on Washington Street in downtown Spokane. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“NEXT STEP,” CONTINUED...

Now open and serving highly addictive small plates from $6.50-$13 each Dinner and Whiskey Bar Tuesday - Saturday 5 PM - Close Open Table Online reservations — table13spokane.com

davenporthotel.com • 509.598.4300

30 INLANDER NOVEMBER 12, 2015

historic building in the Union Pacific Railroad alley where they’ve since made and aged their wine. It’s also become a popular spot for wine tourists, as well as an events space. “I don’t think we ever set out to have this be our life’s work. It was something we both enjoyed, but I don’t think we had a vision of what it’s become,” says Lipsker. The new tasting room allows Barrister, for the first time, to have a visible storefront location in the heart of downtown. Though not far off the beaten path, the winery takes a little Google-mapping or sign-spotting to find on your first visit. Barrister has managed to transcend that by building a loyal customer base, one they say has come by word of mouth and handshake by handshake. Visitors to Barrister often encounter Lipsker, White or Walters, and can readily inquire about the wine or take a look at their barrel storage. “It’s important for us to have a connection with everyone who walks in. We want someone to walk away knowing that the wines are really wonderful, and also the experience is really wonderful,” says White. Barrister also has found success with a wine club they formed in their early days, hoping for maybe 125 members. Today, the group includes more than 1,100 Barrister devotees, as much ambassadors for the Spokane winery as they are fans. “We’ll have a wine club member in Florida who will share wine with their neighbor, and then that neighbor will become a member,” says Walters, who has worked his way up the ranks at Barrister, learning the wine industry along the way. Most of Barrister’s business remains in Spokane, and they have no plans to distribute much out of the area, saying they’re comfortable with their size and proud to identify as a Spokane brand, part of which is being an urban-style winery without a vineyard. Operating out of a city center means that Barrister can source its grapes from 10 vineyards in three wine regions throughout the state. This way, they remain a Washington winery, but benefit from being able to pick and choose their fruit. Having both their winery and tasting room in downtown Spokane also means they can benefit from the boom in wine tourism the city is experiencing, which Barrister has helped engender over the course of their decade and a half in operation. “It’s been wonderful to have the explosion of wineries in Spokane because it speaks to the quality of Washington wines,” says Lipsker. “It’s also given us a critical mass for tourism.” While the tasting room likely will bring in new customers, Barrister has no plans to change things at the winery. They’ll continue hosting art shows, as well as the 100 or so events annually, including weddings, that have been a hallmark of the winery. They say to think of the tasting room as a gateway to their original location, and their brand as a whole. And for a place that’s taken some research just to find, they don’t mind the exposure. “Our building has been hidden for years and it’s been word of mouth, but now we’re out in the open,” says Walters. n Barrister Winery Tasting Room • 203 N. Washington St. • Open Mon-Sat, 10 am to 6 pm; Sun 11 am to 6 pm • Barristerwinery.com


FOOD | OPENING AWARDS

EPICUREAN DELIGHT WINNERS

A

s is tradition in early November, more than 1,100 hungry and curious fans of the Inland Northwest’s culinary scene gathered at the Spokane Convention Center on Nov. 6 for the annual Epicurean Delight. The event is a chance to sample haute cuisine from the region’s best chefs and imbibe local wine and craft beer. Epicurean Delight is also a judged event; here’s who took home awards this year. (MIKE BOOKEY) BEST HORS D’OEUVRES: Williams Seafood Market and Wines Wild Smoked Salmon Dip

Gawain Tea House in Coeur d’Alene features 70 different teas.

Drinking to Health Gaiwan Tea House takes tea to the next level BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

I

t’s not a misspelling or mispronunciation when Matt and Snowy Kaufmann pronounce it la-TEA, instead of latte. And their Gaiwan Tea House might have you rethinking your morning routine of drivethrough java jitters, with their tea house intended to nourish mind, body and spirit. Try spicy chai ($4) in a glazed earthenware mug or hearty matcha, a healthful drink of ground green tea leaves rich in antioxidants ($3.75-$4). The London Fog is Earl Grey tea with steamed milk and vanilla ($3.75), or try their tea of the day in a 12-ounce cup ($3) or 20-ounce pot ($20).

Located in a restored turn-of-thecentury house, Gaiwan is a place to, as the Kaufmanns say, reflect, relax and reconnect. Partitioned seating areas, such as the tearoom with floor cushions and low tables, promote privacy. Abundant windows offer a view to a quiet yard. And while background music plays, there’s no Wi-Fi; just room to breathe, says Snowy, whose tea research has been copious. Gaiwan has more than 70 teas available, each with its own history. There’s earthy pu-erh tea, a uniquely fermented tea dating to imperialist China, touted for its ability to

KATYA HIGGINS PHOTO

lower cholesterol. Rooibos tea, which hails from South Africa, is caffeine-free but high in anti-inflammatory polyphenols. Blooming or flowering teas are actually stitched-together tea leaves that release their fragrance upon steeping in a specially designed teapot. Sweetwater Bakery provides an assortment of baked goods, while a local chocolatier is working with Gaiwan to infuse their teas into decadent treats. In addition to teas, Gaiwan has various vessels for brewing and drinking tea, all of them carefully sourced. One example is the gaiwan, for which the tea house is named. Consisting of a lidded bowl and saucer, it allows one to brew and drink from the same container. Don’t throw out your coffeemaking materials, though; Gaiwan’s loose teas are perfect for use in your French press coffeemaker. n Gaiwan Tea House • 901 N. 4th St., Coeur d’Alene • Open Mon-Sat, 10 am-6 pm • facebook.com/gaiwanteahouse • 208-7555385

BEST FIRST COURSE: Centerplate Seared Sea Scallops BEST ENTRÉE: (TIE) Deaconess Hospital Bacon Wrapped Elk Meatloaf Timber Gastropub Guilty Ravioli BEST DESSERT: Northern Quest Resort and Casino Bakery Washington Apple Cake Confit PEOPLE’S CHOICE BEST RESTAURANT: Masselow’s Steakhouse Seared Superior Farms Lamb Tenderloin PEOPLE’S CHOICE BEST LIBATION: Walla Walla Vintners 2013 Columbia Valley Sangiovese 2013 Walla Walla Valley Merlot

Better than most things. 1931 W. Pacific Ave. 363-1973  wedonthaveone.com

NOVEMBER 12, 2015 INLANDER 31


Spokane Folklore Society Presents

20

th

RY A S R E V I ANN

FALL 2015 Celebrating Spokane’s Cultural Diversity

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 14

THE UNDERGROUND

LAIR AUDITORIUM 11:00-1:00

1:30 2:30 3:30 4:30 5:45-7:00

KPBX FM 91.1 Live Radio Show – Audience Welcome Los Vigiles, Blue Night, Daniel Hall, 2 Bit Jugband, Nathaneal Sherman, Liz Rognes, Afterthoughts Legacy Musha Marimba – joyful marimba music from Zimbabwe Western Reunion – cowboy songs and western swing Los Vigiles – Latino family band Grant Elementary Drummers & Dancers – traditional African Haran Irish Dancers and Floating Crowbar traditional and contemporary Irish step dance with high-energy Irish music

11:00-11:30 Laddie Ray Melvin – singer songwriter/ folksinger 11:45-12:15 Chuck ‘n Gail – folk, cowboy, originals 12:30-1:00 Carter Junction - folk, cowboy, Celtic 1:15-1:45 Poor Boy’s Delight – Americana and bluegrass 2:00-2:30 Frank & Maddy Delaney - Americana 2:45-3:15 Campbell River – mostly Celtic 3:30-4:00 Scotia Road – all original music – Americana 4:15-4:45 Daniel Hall – singer songwriter folk/rock 5:00-5:30 Koyasuyo – music from the Andes 5:45-6:15 Michael & Keleren Milham – fusion folk 6:30-7:00 Starlite Motel – acoustic harmony pop

12:30-1:00 1:15-1:45 2:00-2:30 2:30-3:15 3:15-3:30 3:30-4:15 4:15-4:30 4:30-5:30 5:45-6:15 6:30-7:15 7:15-7:30 7:30-8:00 8:00-10:00

SASQUATCH ROOM 11:30-Noon Gefilte Trout – klezmer songs in Yiddish and Ladino 12:15-12:45 Alma Brasileira – Brazilian choro 1:00-1:30 Back Adit Band - swing and jazz 1:45-2:15 Free Whiskey – Celtic and folk rock 2:30-3:00 Portatos Accordion Band - modern accordion 3:15-3:45 Humphrey, Hartman & Cameron – awardwinning songwriting 4:00-4:30 Arvid Lundin and Deep Roots - Celtic 4:45-5:15 Dave McRae & Michael Robinson – folkabilly 5:30-6:00 Lokomaikai – traditional and contemporary Hawaiian music 6:15-6:45 Brett & Janet Dodd - acoustic folk duo

LITTLEFOOT ROOM 11:00-11:30 Zach Hval – original singer songwriter 11:45-12:15 Tropical Breeze – Tommy Borges – Hawaiian song 12:30-1:00 Tim Platt – fingerstyle guitar 1:15-1:45 Chasing Velvet – American roots 2:00-2:30 Allen Surdez – singer/songwriter original tunes 2:45-3:15 N. Sherman – singer songwriter Americana 3:30-4:00 Liz Rognes – indie-folk, Americana 4:15-4:45 Carl Allen – 60 years of folk music 5:00-5:30 Dan & Ryan Burt – historical drinking songs 5:45-6:15 Gary A. Edwards – original folk & country 6:30-7:00 Maxie Ray Mills – blues

Merry Missives of Moscow – youth Morris and English countrydance Spokane Argentine Tango - demo of various styles Silver Spurs Youth Folk Dancers – multicultural dance Family Dance – old fashioned barn dance Bollywood Demo with Sapna Basy East Indian Folk Dance with Sree Nandagopal Bollywood Demo with Sapna Basy International Folk Dance with Karen Wilson-Bell - easy folk Nah’Joom Dancers - American belly dance Sidetrack – Dance Party! Come Dance stage reset Contra Dance Introductory Workshop with Nora Scott Contra Dance with Out of Nowhere and callers Nora Scott, Emily Faulkner and Ray Polhemus

CONFERENCE ROOM (1ST FLOOR-ROOM 126)

Silver Spurs Youth Folk Dancers

BLUEGRASS N’MORE (BISTRO) 11:30-Noon Rye River – bluegrass featuring fiddle and guitar champions 12:15-12:45 Blue Water Strangers – old country and bluegrass 1:00-1:30 King Trouble and the Cherrypickers – youth string band 1:45-2:15 Sweet Grass – teens play old-time, swing and jazz 2:30-3:00 Kevin Pace & the Early Edition – bluegrass and gospel 3:15-3:45 Blue Night - folky, bluesy, grassy 4:00-4:30 Panhandle Cowboys – original western music & cowboy poetry 4:45-5:15 Crawdad Run – old-time 5:30-6:00 Sondahl & Hawkins – old-time blues and originals

CAFETERIA STAGE

Storytelling and Music Workshop 11:30-1:30 Spokane Storytelling League - stories for young and old at heart 1:45-2:15 Lara Messersmith-Glavin – storyteller and fisher-poet 2:30-3:15 Lucy D. Ford – fantasy and children’s writer 3:30-4:00 Lara Messersmith-Glavin – storyteller and fisher-poet 4:15-5:30 Music Workshop: Washtub Bass with Michael Gifford

SMALL GYM (BUILDING 5) 11:30-Noon Tribe Zaghareet – American Tribal style belly dance 12:15-1:15 Scottish Pipers, Highland and Country Dancers 1:30-2:00 Northwest Hula Company - traditional Hawaiian and Polynesian dances 2:15-3 Baharat! Dance Company – authentic dance of the Middle East and North Africa 3:00-3:30 Coeur d’Alene Youth Marimbas – southern African-style 3:45-4:15 Spokane Hula – Polynesian dance 4:30-5:00 Moorea – belly dance from around the globe 5:15-5:45 Coeurimba – southern African marimba

11:00-11:30 Nine-Pint Coggies – Scottish fiddle music 11:45-12:15 Stevens County Stompers - clogging

Schedules Subject to Change - 15 minute break between acts


Two Days of Amazing, Inspiring Performances - for FREE! SATURDAY, NOV. 14TH • 11 AM - 10 PM | SUNDAY, NOV. 15TH • 11 AM - 5 PM

8 Stages • Over 100 Performance Groups • Activities & Crafts for kids Food • Ethnic Arts & Crafts for sale • Two Contra Dances Live KPBX Radio Show 11am - 1pm Saturday MAGIC SHOW - BUILDING 5 CLASSROOM 2

CONFERENCE ROOM (1ST FLOOR-ROOM 126)

2:00-4:00

Storytelling and Music Workshop Noon –2:00 Spokane Storytelling League - stories for young and old at heart 2:15-3:15 Jenny Edgren - songs for kids of all ages 3:30-4:30 Music Workshop: Fun Fiddle Tunes for Mountain Dulcimer with Heidi Muller from Enterprise, OR

Dick Frost – magic show for all ages

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 15 LAIR AUDITORIUM 11:00 12:00 1:00

2:00 3:00 4:00

Todd Milne & Moksha – world fusion Malidoma! World Dance – American Tribal belly dance Heidi Muller & Bob Webb – Northwest songs/traditional Appalachian from Enterprise, OR Broken Whistle – traditional Celtic band Spokane Taiko – Japanese drumming and movement Sesitshaya Marimba – African sounds of Zimbabwe

SASQUATCH ROOM 11:30-Noon Thaddeus Spae – award winning songwriter 12:15-12:45 Hubbardston Nonesuch - Renaissance madrigals 1:00-1:30 Blue Ribbon Tea Company – songwriters folk and blues 1:45-2:15 Meshugga Daddies – Spokane’s newest klezmer band 2:30-3:00 Dan Maher - host of Inland Folk 3:15-3:45 2 Bit Jug band – love, food and hilarity 4:15-4:45 Howling Gaels – Celtic

Heidi Muller & Bob Webb

• Rita G. Frey THE UNDERGROUND

• Avista Foundation

12:15-12:45 Monarch Band – original music Neo-soul 1:00-1:30 Sharp/Brownhawk – Native American flute and song 1:45-2:15 Spokane Community Choir – songs from many cultures 2:30-3:00 Rising Tide – new age acoustic guitar 3:15-3:45 Cursive Wires – original songs – Americana 4:00-4:30 Robinsong – Celtic music

• Eyes For Life - Dr. Heavin Maier

BLUEGRASS N’MORE (BISTRO) 11:30-Noon Jackie Fox & the Hounds – a “howling” goodtime 12:15-12:45 Crab Creek Wranglers – songs of the old West 1:00-1:30 Brown’s Mountain Boys – bluegrass with a flair 1:45-2:15 Brad Keeler Trio – bluegrass and old-time 2:30-3:00 Afterthoughts Legacy – mixed aged alumni 3:15-3:45 Sing-a-long: The Willows – Peter, Paul and Mary tribute 4:00-4:30 Sing-a-long : Peggy & Kelly – songs with a social conscience

CAFETERIA STAGE Howling Gaels

LITTLEFOOT ROOM 11:45-12:15 12:30-1:00 1:15-1:45 2:00-2:30 2:45-3:15 3:30-4:00 4:15-4:45

The Way Home – father/daughter duo Truck Mills – world influenced blues Patrice Webb - songwriter Americana Bob Rice – original contemporary folk rock James Funke-Loubigniac – music on the hurdy gurdy “Lonesome” Lyle Morse – traditional and original blues Steve Schennum – songs you never hear on the radio

SPONSORED BY:

11:00-11:30 Fife & Drum – Civil War 11:45-12:45 Spokane English - contra dance of merry old England with live music 1:00-2:00 Spokane Area Square Dancers with caller Doug Davis 2:15-2:45 Mele Polinahe & Kiakahi O’Hula - music and dance of Hawaii 3:00-3:30 Bella Courbe – fusion belly dance 3:30-3:45 Contra Dance Intro Workshop with Mitchell Frey 3:45-5:00 Contra Dance with Northern Shore and caller Mitchell Frey

• The Inlander • Washington State Arts Commission • National Endowment for the Arts • Humanities Washington • Spokane Community College

FREE EVENT!

SPOKANE COMMUNITY COLLEGE LAIR STUDENT CENTER 1810 N. Greene St FREE PARKING

For More Information, Call (509) 828-3683 www.spokanefolkfestival.org

Schedules Subject to Change - 15 minute break between acts


Miner Disaster

more potential in dealing with the surface goings-on — between the technical challenges, political wrangling and the tent city/media circus that surrounds the mine site like something out of Ace in the Hole — director Patricia Riggen (Under the Same Moon) and the screenwriting team still waste time on comic-relief nonsense like the wife and mistress of one miner (The Office’s Oscar Nuñez) fighting over which one he loves best. Then again, that example represents the broad some degree of skill. And The 33 is a case study in poor strokes with which Riggen paints virtually everything execution. in The 33 — including the performances. There’s little It probably doesn’t help that it appears so soon after sense of the danger or claustrophobia facing these men, The Martian, employing a structure that’s virtually identibecause nearly every moment spent with them involves cal, except that the seemingly impossible rescue is here on shouting matches or inspirational speeches; the actors Earth. Half of the narrative focuses on events under— including Banderas and Lou Diamond Phillips — play ground, where Mario becomes the de facto leader of the those moments for all the bombast that isn’t already 33 miners, figuring out how to ration their meager food underscored by the music (a sadly supplies and dealing with interpersonal underwhelming final credit for the tensions. The other half follows the THE 33 late James Horner). And it’s not much efforts aboveground to get to them, Rated PG-13 better on the surface, where Binoche as the Chilean government’s head of Directed by Patricia Riggen mining (Rodrigo Santoro) and a noStarring Antonio Banderas, Rodrigo Santoro, offers up line readings that would be embarrassing even if she weren’t a nonsense engineer (Gabriel Byrne) try Lou Diamond Phillips French woman playing a Latina. to maneuver the massive drills around There’s one wonderfully atypipockets of impenetrable bedrock. cal scene in which the miners — facing what they believe The 33, unlike The Martian, doesn’t commit itself might be their last supper — imagine a lavish feast of all to being fundamentally about problem-solving, but it their favorite foods. It’s a terrific example of what The 33 also doesn’t succeed at being an emotional, charactercould have accomplished if it were interested in anything based drama. It wants to grasp the sad dilemma of men resembling psychological realism, rather than ticking off separated from their loving, concerned families, even if a checklist of events on the way to generic uplift. There’s that means setting up those connections in the mannothing wrong with a survival-against-all-odds story that ner described above — entirely in movie shorthand, too aims for the heart instead of the head, but this one keeps concerned with giving a handful of characters at least blasting indiscriminately away at the heart, destroying all one identifiable relationship and/or conflict to give any the other vital organs along the way.  individual a character that feels real. While there’s much

The 33 goes horribly wrong in turning real-life tragedy to generic uplift BY SCOTT RENSHAW

L

et’s assume — just for the sake of argument — that you bought a ticket for The 33 without knowing anything about the story behind it. Let’s say you were just introduced to several characters who worked at a mine in Chile in the summer of 2010: Mario (Antonio Banderas), who wasn’t scheduled to work on this particular day, but asked to take an extra shift to earn some extra money; Alex (Mario Casas), who is blissfully happy, as his wife is pregnant with their first baby; Darío (Juan Pablo Raba), an alcoholic who is estranged from his sister, María (Juliette Binoche); and even a grey-bearded veteran who is just about to retire. And then let’s say the plot showed them all heading off to work. Now tell me that there’s any other possible development, except that something terrible is going to happen to those people. The 33 is, of course, based on the real-life incident in which 33 workers at a gold and copper mine in Chile’s Atacama Desert were trapped after a massive rock fell and blocked the only exit, inspiring rescue efforts that drew international attention. The improbable circumstances behind their (historical spoiler alert) survival is a natural for cinematic treatment, one that could be inspirational both as an example of resilient faith and as a case study in institutional determination. But a movie needs more than a concept. It needs to be executed with

34 INLANDER NOVEMBER 12, 2015


FILM | SHORTS

Love the Coopers

OPENING FILMS THE 33

It’s based on the real-life incident in which 33 workers at a gold-andcopper mine in Chile’s Atacama Desert were trapped after a massive rock fell and blocked the only exit, inspiring rescue efforts that drew international attention. The improbable circumstances behind their (historical spoiler alert) survival is a natural for cinematic treatment, one that could be inspirational both as an example of resilient faith and as a case study in institutional determination. (SR) Rated PG-13

LOVE THE COOPERS

The first family comedy of the holiday season comes sledding in hot with this extremely creative Christmas story about a dysfunctional family’s holiday reunion. If that scintillating plot isn’t enough to get you interested, Love the Coopers is complete with sassy little children, the classic dinner table scene that results in food being thrown on somebody, and the cutest old couple of all time in Diane Keaton and John Goodman. Despite a solid cast including Olivia Wilde, Amanda Seyfried and Ed Helms, the laughs and good times aren’t enough to pull this film out of the igloo full of stale holiday movies. (MC) Rated PG-13

MY ALL AMERICAN

My All American chronicles the journey of Freddie Steinmark, an undersized defensive back who played his way onto the University of Texas football team in 1969. Already considered an

underdog, Freddie was diagnosed with bone cancer above his knee following his legendary effort against the University of Arkansas in what was known the “Game of the Century.” Steinmark’s fight with cancer spurred the passing of the National Cancer Act of 1971, contributing greatly to the beginning of the modern fight against cancer. (MC) Rated PG

THE ASSASSIN

BLACK MASS

Black Mass tells the story of notori-

RETURNING FOR 2015/16 SEASON PRESENTED BY

SUFFRAGETTE

Carey Mulligan stars as Maud Watts, a Londoner who was born and raised in a laundry, in 1912 London as the fight for women’s right began to take hold. As a group of women campaign for voting privileges in a movement led by Emmeline Pankhurst (Meryl Streep), a detective tries to undermine and dismantle their efforts. (PC) Rated PG-13

WE COME AS FRIENDS

In 2011, South Sudan claimed independence from North Sudan and malicious president Omar al-Bashir. At that time, a small prop plane, handmade by director Hubert Sauper, landed in the region with the purpose of recording the events that were about to unfold. The result is We Come As Friends, an eye-opening, breathtaking look into the lives of Sudanese people. Through intense images and a haunting soundtrack, Sauper calls viewers to take action against the industrialization and colonization of Africa. At Magic Lantern (MC) Unrated

NOW PLAYING The tale revolves around a young woman, Yinniang (Shu Qi), who is abducted as a child and sent to study martial arts under a strict nun. Years later, now a lethal assassin, she’s sent back to her homeland to murder her cousin and the man she was supposed to marry, Tian Ji’an (Chang Chen). He, in turn, is in the process of dealing with all kinds of palace intrigue, trying to protect his region from imperial invaders and an enemy master of the dark arts, and backstabbing members of his inner circle. At Magic Lantern (DN) Not Rated

KPND SKI & BOARD PARTIES

ous Boston gangster Whitey Bulger, played here by Johnny Depp. The cast struggles with their Boston accents and Depp’s performance is lacking in energy, even if there are some menacingly exciting scenes. As a gangster flick it’s OK, but doesn’t do justice to the insanity that was Bulger’s life. (MB) Rated R

BRIDGE OF SPIES

Set in 1957, it’s the fact-based story of how Jim Donovan (Tom Hanks) came to be assigned as the public defender for Rudolf Abel (Mark Rylance), a Russian spy facing possible execution for espionage. The prosecution and judge ...continued on next page

TUNE TUNE IN IN OR OR FIND FIND US US ON ON FACEBOOK FACEBOOK FOR FOR DETAILS DETAILS MOUN

Your Adventure Starts Her e

IN GEAR

NNUAL th 4 A

i t i d o a n r T of s

CHRISTMAS A MUSICAL SPECTACULAR DECEMBER 10-23, 2015 KROC CENTER, COEUR D’ALENE LAURA LITTLE THEATRICALS PRODUCTION COURTESY OF CCT

ORDER TICKETS ONLINE TraditionsOfChristmasNW.com 208-391-2867

NOVEMBER 12, 2015 INLANDER 35


FILM | SHORTS E N R I C H E D L I V I N G . L A STI N G VA LU E.

THE

lifestyle TH E

THE

YO U WA N T

want the appearance of a fair trial that holds up America’s ideals during the peak of the Cold War, but they don’t really care about whether it’s actually fair. (SR) Rated PG-13

quality

community

NOW PLAYING BURNT

YO U D ESER V E

YO U L O V E

What do you get when Bradley Cooper plays a successful, party-boy chef who blows his career on drugs and alcohol? You get a lot of yelling, overplayed drama and close-ups of Cooper’s glistening eyes. When Cooper’s Adam Jones is offered a head chef job in London by his former maitre d’ Tony, he finds himself with another chance at stardom in the restaurant business. (Max Carter) Rated R

THE GREEN INFERNO

N e w h o m e s i n S p o ka n e , S po ka n e Va l l ey, L i b e rt y L ake, P o s t F a l l s & C o e u r d ’ A l e ne. gree n st o n e h o m e s.c o m

This thriller follows a group of college students who travel to Peru in an attempt to stop the destruction of the Amazon. Upon their arrival, the wide eyed activists are shocked to find the native people they intended to protect have other plans for them instead. Director Eli Roth will make you think twice about wanting to save the rainforest in this suspenseful horror. (MW) Rated R

HE NAMED ME MALALA

R E D N O W R E EV

This documentary, directed by Davis Guggenheim (An Inconvenient Truth), tells the story of young Malala Yousafzai, who many know as the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize for her work with girls’ education in the Middle East. The film is inspiring, as it should be, considering its subject matter, but doesn’t offer much insight into Malala’s life or add a new perspective to her accomplishments. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated PG-13

TA WHERE SADNEAS? GETS HIS I We know his secret...

HITMAN AGENT 47

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On Stands 12

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36 INLANDER NOVEMBER 12, 2015

Gamers will recognize Hitman Agent 47 for the video game series it is based on. Action film fans will see it as the reboot of the 2007 film Hitman, which has a similar structure — a bald white man is a genetically modified killer with superhuman abilities and, in the next 90ish minutes, there’s lots of action and conspiracy. However, the 2015 reboot is more about that main character, known as Agent 47. (MS) Rated R

THE LAST WITCH HUNTER

Let’s see, who is best suited to play Kaulder, a witch hunter who centuries ago destroyed the Queen Witch with his enormous sword, rock hard abs and overall bad-assery? Duh, Vin Diesel. When the Queen Witch is resurrected in the modern world, Kaulder must take up his sword again alongside a brave priest Dolan 37th (Elijah Wood) to defeat the evil spirits. (MC) Rated PG-13

THE MARTIAN

From the director of epics like Alien, Gladiator and most recently Prometheus comes this chilling, definitive

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

METACRITIC.COM

(LOS ANGELES)

(OUT OF 100)

The Assassin

82

Sicario

82

The Martian

81

Bridge of Spies

81

Steve Jobs

81

Suffragette

67 60

Spectre DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

film about survival and the ongoing mission of life on Mars. When a devastating storm forces a NASA crew on Mars to head home, Mark Watney (Matt Damon) is lost in the chaos and presumed dead. But when Watney wakes up, alone and 140 million miles from home, he is faced with a decision; live or die. (MC) Rated PG-13

MISS YOU ALREADY

Childhood friends Jess (Drew Barrymore) and Milly (Toni Collette) think they have been through it all, but when Milly is diagnosed with breast cancer, they find themselves running the gamut of friendship. Filled with emotion and relevant discussion on the very real effects that cancer has on so many lives and relationships, Barrymore and Collette paint a picture of love and resiliency in the face of fear. In the same way that a brain-damaged Barrymore made you laugh and cry in 50 First Dates, the spunky, energetic duo of Jess and Milly bring the feeling throughout. (MC) Rated PG-13

THE PEANUTS MOVIE

The Little Red-Haired Girl has just moved into town, and Charlie Brown is simultaneously desperate to impress her, and terrified of actually interacting with her. So he embarks on a series of likely doomed endeavors to prove his worth: entering the school talent show; learning to dance so he can dazzle at a school event; binge-reading War and Peace so he can write the most erudite book report in third-grade history. (SR) Rated G

SICARIO

FBI agent Kate Macer (Emily Blunt) is the lead on a hostage-finding and -rescuing team, and as the film begins, we see just how brutal this work can be. And yet, Kate’s experience here is nothing compared to what she will encounter when she joins an interagency task force with a much larger purview. She’s not sure why the task force needs her, and she’s not even sure she’s gotten a clear answer as to who these guys are: Is flip-flop- and Hawaiian-shirt-wearing badass Matt (Josh Brolin) DEA? CIA? It’s all a brutal look at the war on drugs. (MJ) Rated R

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

SPECTRE

In the immediate aftermath of the events of Skyfall, Bond (Daniel Craig) has gone rogue, chasing hints of a big bad guy around the globe, while back in London, the new M (Ralph Fiennes) is battling with C (Andrew Scott), who is about to launch a new blanket electronic surveillance scheme that will replace the 00 program: something about drone warfare being more efficient than spies with a license to kill. (MJ) Rated PG-13

STEVE JOBS

Steve Jobs, written by Aaron Sorkin and directed by Danny Boyle, touches on all these aspects of Jobs’ legacy. Framed as three distinct scenes, it follows Jobs in the minutes before three major product launches: the Macintosh announcement in 1984 that led to his firing from Apple; the introduction of Jobs’s first and only post-Apple project, the NeXT Computer, in 1988; and his triumphant return to Apple with the announcement of the first iMac. (PC) Rated R

THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING

Based on Naomi Klein’s book of the same title, this documentary goes around the world to take a look at the different faces of climate change, and also some of the factors causing it. Directed by Avi Lewis, This Changes Everything features the personal stories of four different subjects in different spots on the globe who illustrate the filmmaker and authors idea “that we can seize the existential crisis of climate change to transform our failed economic system into something radically better.” At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

TRUTH

In 2004, CBS anchor Dan Rather (Robert Redford) and producer Mary Mapes (Cate Blanchett) found out when they lost their jobs and their careers due to a 60 Minutes story regarding President George W. Bush’s military service. Citing documents detailing Bush’s absence from service and his AWOL status, Rather and Mapes faced a sea of criticism and doubt that they never foresaw. At Magic Lantern (MC) Rated R 


FILM | REVIEW

“CURTAIN CALL: A VAUDEVILLE REVUE” A variety show featuring the most memorable songs, quips and skits from the first 32 years.

Nov. 6, 7, 13, 14, 20, 21 at 7 p.m. Nov. 8, 15, 22 at 2 p.m. Tickets: $15 Adult $13 Student/Senior 1-877-SIXTHST (208) 752-8871

sixthstreetmelodrama.com

THE MAGIC LANTERN

FRI NOV 13TH - THUR NOV 19TH GRANDMA (75 MIN)

Fri-Sun: 5:30, Tues-Thurs: 4:30

TRUTH (115 MIN)

Fri/Sat: 7:15, Sun: 1:00, Tues-Thurs: 6:00

SICARIO (120 MIN)

Carey Mulligan (right) in Suffragette.

Ready for a Close-up Carey Mulligan spices up a meat-and-potatoes historical drama in Suffragette BY PAUL CONSTANT

I

n Suffragette, director Sarah Gavron keeps her into a visceral response — first tears, then symcamera tight on the faces of her cast. For real pathy, and finally a sense of triumph. Mulligan — a lot of this movie is shot in serious closeis bolstered by a few other strong performances up, to the point where people who suffer from — Gleeson as the detective assigned to dismantle personal space issues might start to feel a little the suffragette movement, Streep in a glorified uncomfortable. Gavron probably had multiple cameo as Emmeline Pankhurst, the leader of reasons for making this directorial choice: first of the movement — but she never once cedes the all, with a cast like this (Carey Mulligan, Helena spotlight; this is her journey, and even though Bonham Carter, Brendan Gleeson, Meryl Streep) she’s sharing screen time with some of the biggest you want to watch them work as closely as you talents in the movies today, she carries the film can. And second, it’s probably much cheaper to on her back, every step of the way. shoot a historical drama revolvBut Suffragette is haunted by a ing around the suffragette movesense that the definitive film about SUFFRAGETTE women’s suffrage still has yet to be ment in 1912 London if you Rated PG-13 keep the camera trained closely made. Mulligan’s protagonist is a Directed by Sarah Gavron on your actors and not on, say, fictional construct, and she swirls Starring Carey Mulligan, Helena sweeping panoramic shots of around a stew of half-real and halfBonham Carter, Meryl Streep busy streets. made-up characters, a decision that These dueling reasons demgives the film a little less urgency onstrate everything that’s good and bad about than, say, a biopic about Pankhurst might have Suffragette. On the one hand, it’s built around a earned. As wonderful an actor as Mulligan is, handful of stunning performances, but on the the scenes with her domestic drama — a husband other hand it’s frustratingly small in scope. It has who doesn’t understand or appreciate Watts’ the heart of a grandiose historical epic, but the drive to protest the status quo — at times feel wallet of a minor-league Jane Austen adaptation. perfunctory. Mulligan stars as Maud Watts, a Londoner Nevertheless, Suffragette is solidly crafted and who was born and raised in a laundry. Setting focuses on a moment in history that already has aside the fact that Mulligan’s skin, hair and teeth receded from our popular memory. In a time are way too perfect for the role, she does marvelwhen it’s way too easy for young women to label ous work holding the film together. Mulligan themselves “not a feminist,” Suffragette is a welnever fails to put her best work on screen, and in come reminder of how far we’ve come and how at least three scenes in Suffragette she’ll push you much women have had to sacrifice to get here. n

Sat/Sun: 3:15

WE COME AS FRIENDS

Fri-Sun: 5:00, Tues-Thurs: 4:15

THE ASSASSIN

Fri/Sat: 7:00, Sun: 3:00, Tues-Thurs: 6:15

THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING

Sat: 3:30, Sun: 1:15

*last weekend!

25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $8 www.magiclanternspokane.com

AIRWAY HEIGHTS

10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444

THE 33

PG-13 Daily (3:50) 6:30 9:10 Sat-Sun (10:40) (1:10)

LOVE THE COOPERS

PG-13 Daily (2:40) (5:00) 7:15 9:40 Sat-Sun (12:20)

SPECTRE

PG-13 Daily (3:15) (4:00) 6:15 7:00 9:15 9:50 Sat-Sun (10:00) (12:15) (1:00) G

THE PEANUTS MOVIE

Daily (2:40) 6:40 9:00 Sat-Sun (10:30) In 2D Daily (3:10) (4:40) (5:10) 7:10 9:10 Sat-Sun (11:15) (12:00) (12:30) (1:15)

GOOSEBUMPS

PG Daily (4:30) 6:50 9:00 Sat-Sun (11:30) (2:00)

BRIDGE OF SPIES

PG-13 Daily (3:40) 6:40 9:40 Sat-Sun (12:40)

THE MARTIAN

PG-13 Daily (3:30) 6:30 9:30 Sat-Sun (12:30)

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 2

PG Daily (3:00) (5:00) 6:50 Sat-Sun (11:00) (1:00)

THE LAST WITCH HUNTER PG-13 Daily 8:50

WANDERMERE

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

THE 33

PG-13 Daily (1:10) (3:50) 6:30 9:10 Fri-Sun (10:40)

MY ALL AMERICAN

PG Daily (2:00) (4:30) 7:00 9:30 Fri-Sun (11:30)

LOVE THE COOPERS

PG-13 Daily (12:20) (2:40) (5:00) 7:15 9:40

SPECTRE

PG-13 Daily (12:15) (1:00) (2:30) (3:15) (4:00) (5:30) 6:15 7:00 8:30 9:15 9:50 Fri-Sun (10:00)

THE PEANUTS MOVIE

G Daily 7:10 9:10 Fri-Sun (10:00) In 2D Daily (12:00) (12:30) (1:15) (2:40) (3:10) (4:40) (5:10) 6:40 8:40 Fri-Sun (10:30) (11:15)

OUR BRAND IS CRISIS R Daily 8:50

BRIDGE OF SPIES

PG-13 Daily (12:40) (3:40) 6:40 9:40

GOOSEBUMPS

PG Daily (2:00) (4:30) 6:50 9:10 Fri-Sun (11:30)

WOODLAWN

PG Daily (1:20) (4:00) 6:45 9:20 Fri-Sun (10:40)

THE MARTIAN

PG-13 Daily (12:30) (3:30) 6:30 9:30

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 2

PG Daily (1:00) (3:00) (5:00) 6:50 Fri-Sun (11:00)

MAZE RUNNER: THE SCORCH TRAILS PG-13 Daily (4:15) 9:35

THE INTERN

PG-13 Daily (1:30) 7:00 Fri-Sun (11:00) Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 11/13/15-11/19/15

NOVEMBER 12, 2015 INLANDER 37


With GARRISON KEILLOR

UNIQUE TO SPOKANE

New calendars from local artist Chris Bovey

Downtown Spokane on Howard St.

38 INLANDER NOVEMBER 12, 2015


Local rockers Buffalo Jones, clockwise from top right, Jason Johnson, Glenn Case, Brandon Humphreys and Joshua Martin at Hogan’s Diner.

KRISTEN BLACK PHOTO

Playing the Game Buffalo Jones has taken the slow path with their career, but that doesn’t mean it hasn’t been fun BY LAURA JOHNSON

T

he local rock band Buffalo Jones is constantly trying to forget about the Game. “I just remembered, I’m playing the Game,” bassist Glenn Case says to guitarist Brandon Humphreys, whose face is beamed into Jones Radiator last week via a propped-up iPhone. “Oh no,” says drummer Joshua Martin from the other side of the table. “You don’t want to know what that is.” The band has met at one of their favorite Spokane

hangouts tonight to eat a pile of greasy nachos and throw back some beers. This is the music venue they say they’ve played more than any other in town. Yet the guys don’t get together a whole lot, because Humphreys now lives about two hours away in Bridgeport, Washington, hence the FaceTiming. But back to the Game. As the four-piece describes it, the purpose is to not think about the Game. If you think about it at all, you must announce to the group that you lost. That’s all there is to the Game, a mind-

cramping exercise that’s made its way through creative circles since the early 1990s. When the band goes on tour, as they did in September to Seattle and Portland opening for Roger Clyne & the Peacemakers, they play this and many other mentally challenging games in the van. Even tonight, they’re like talking musical encyclopedias, either guessing what’s playing over the bar speakers or quoting famous musicians. Shows aren’t too different. ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 12, 2015 INLANDER 39


MUSIC | ROCK

Happy Hour OPEN TO CLOSE TUES-SAT. $3 wells, $3.50 micro pints (12 to choose from)

Growlers, Wine, & Bottled beer to go. Open Mic 7pm

7pm

Geeks Who Drink Trivia Tue-Sat 11am-Close

Late Night Menu

509-835-4177 • 122 S Monroe St brooklyndelispokane.com DELI HOURS: Mon-Sat 11am-8pm

Buffalo Jones also plays at 4000 Holes Record Store Saturday at 3 pm.

“PLAYING THE GAME,” CONTINUED... On stage these guys, ranging from 34 to 41, play from their catalogue of about 23 original songs, but then they like to take suggestions from the audience. They make it into a game to try and play everything. “Usually if I say ‘I don’t want to play that, I don’t know it.’ That’s when they say ‘Let’s roll with it,’” says Martin, who would have no trouble if someone suggested a Phish song — he’s seen the seminal jam band 61 times. Buffalo Jones’ next show is Saturday night at the Big Dipper. It’ll be a celebration of the band’s new album This is Not the End of the World, which is finally dropping despite being recorded in July 2013. Joe Varela, a former Spokane musician who produced the band’s first record, came up from Los Angeles to help record the album. Until now, the album, their second in a decade, was sitting in limbo. “We’re kind of the band that won’t die,” says the band’s songwriter and frontman, Jason Johnson. “I don’t think anyone expected this to be something that would happen for 10 years.” Buffalo Jones began as Johnson’s solo moniker, but he soon added musicians. Band members rotated through. Case left during the recording of the first album, only to come back. Martin, the newest member,

wasn’t even featured on the new release. The band has noted that the two former drummers left for Hawaii and Alaska, the last two states to join the union, so they bet Martin will most likely move to Arizona, the 48th state. “I have no plans to move,” says Martin, who teaches culinary arts at Spokane Community College. There’s another more practical game the band is trying to win at: getting their music out there. They know that not everyone is interested in purchasing their album. They even found their first record, still wrapped in plastic, in a Goodwill CD bin. “Listen, only 1 percent of our listeners may buy the record online, and we’re OK with that,” Johnson says. Instead, their full album can be heard on their website for free. Buffalo Jones’ recent Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign wasn’t to help pay for recording or pressing CDs, which was already done, they say; rather, it was a way to promote the album and get pre-sale funds rolling in. This new album highlights what the band has become known for — tasty guitar solos from Humphreys and three-part vocal harmonies — but it’s definitely a step forward. It’s pop rock, with classic stuff and

NOV 20 - DEC 19

’90s punk mixed in. All of the members listen to different types of music, but they say this record is rooted in the present. “We’ve hit a common ground in our music,” Johnson says. “We make songs that we’d actually listen to.” Johnson writes lyrics about relationships, all kinds of them, but at their heart, they’re all about love, he says. Sharing that love at Saturday’s album release show are the openers — the Glenn Case Band, which is mostly Buffalo Jones members anyway, and singer-songwriter Liz Rognes, Johnson’s partner, with whom he has an 18-month-old son — but also the friends and family who have waited so long for the new record. “For me personally, I wrote these songs in my boxer shorts, and now we’re playing them for people, and that’s amazing,” Johnson says. “We’re not the coolest band in the world, but we’re good at what we do.”  lauraj@inlander.com Buffalo Jones album release show feat. the Glenn Case Band and Liz Rognes • Sat, Nov. 14, at 8 pm • $5/$10 with CD • All-ages • The Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • bigdipperevents.com • 863-8098

30

$

Individual Ticket Price

SPONSORED BY

SEASON SPONSOR

spokanecivictheatre.com

40 INLANDER NOVEMBER 12, 2015

KRISTEN BLACK PHOTO


MUSIC | INDIE

Slightly Lower Energy

No, the Dallas-based Polyphonic Spree is not a cult.

LAUREN LOGAN PHOTO

The Polyphonic Spree tones it down to celebrate its career and debut album BY AZARIA PODPLESKY

T

he Polyphonic Spree has always been difficult to ignore. For one thing, the choral rock band is almost comically large. Though the numbers have fluctuated over the years, Spree members have always numbered in the double digits (there are currently 18), which necessitates that the band tour in a bus meant for a hockey team. Then there’s their onstage attire, matching ensembles, often choir robes, featuring a variety of colors and psychedelic designs. Most notably, though, is the Dallas-based band’s boisterous energy during live performances, energy that has both gained them fans around the world and, ironically, determined the intention of the band’s current 15th anniversary tour: playing 2002’s The Beginning Stages of… the mellow way it was written. “It’s a beautiful, melancholy record, but you wouldn’t know it back in the day when we went crazy,” founder/

band leader Tim DeLaughter says before a show in Pennsylvania last week. The album, which DeLaughter recorded in two days, was only meant to be a demo to give promoters a sense of the massive, robe-wearing band he envisioned. But the demo’s popularity quickly grew, and the band decided to release it as its debut full-length. For many fans, the album’s pensive sound didn’t match with the nonstop energy of the band’s live show. “It wasn’t like the record,” DeLaughter says of the Spree’s lively sets. “People that heard the record, maybe came to see us live, would be like ‘Holy cow! These guys are going crazy, and they’re all freakin’ jacked up and happy.’” Now with 15 years of playing the “jacked up” versions of singles like “Soldier Girl” and “Light & Day/ Reach for the Sun” under its belt, the Spree is celebrating by touring behind the record that started it all, just in a more subdued way.

“When we started playing these songs, the band was so amped up energy-wise that the energy took over, and the songs basically became punk-rock-tempo songs,” DeLaughter says. “It completely abandoned the tone of the record… This time, we’re playing it exactly like the record, and it’s so beautiful.” Along with a more true-to-the-original performance of The Beginning Stages of…, the Spree will also play fan favorites and covers during what DeLaughter calls a rare opportunity to see a more restrained version of the band, a band he thinks easily has another 15 years ahead of it. “As long as we can keep doing it, then I want to keep doing it,” he says. “I’m at my best when I’m doing the Spree, and who doesn’t want to always be at their best?” n The Polyphonic Spree 15th anniversary tour • Fri, Nov. 13, at 8 pm • $35/$40 day of • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

NOVEMBER 12, 2015 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCK PAUL RODGERS

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 11/12

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Fireside Music Series: Ron Greene J BABY BAR, Mars and the Massacre, Von the Baptist, Loomer J THE BIG DIPPER, 1 Tribe, Monarch BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Randy Campbell acoustic show BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen BUCKHORN INN, The Spokane River Band J CHAPS, Spare Parts CHECKERBOARD BAR, Iamchelseaiam, Mother Crone, Armed for the Apocalypse COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny CRAVE, DoobieBros THE JACKSON ST., Acoustic Jam with Cary Fly JOHN’S ALLEY, Steel Toed Slippers THE PALOMINO CLUB, DJ Funk RED ROOM LOUNGE, Latin Tursdays feat. DJ Wax808 THE VIKING BAR & GRILL, Marco Polo Collective ZOLA, Boomshack

Friday, 11/13

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Fireside Music Series: Just Plain Darin J THE BARTLETT, The Polyphonic Spree 15th Anniversary (See story on page 41) BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Friday the 13th Dance Party BOLO’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Way Home, Particlehead and Erin J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Dr. Collin Wilson Group

42 INLANDER NOVEMBER 12, 2015

H

e has one of the most rock recognizable voices of the past 50 years, but you’ll be forgiven for not recognizing Paul Rodgers’ name right away. Chances are, though, that if you turn on a classic-rock station and hear his distinct, bluesy howl on one of the many hits he created leading Bad Company (“Shooting Star,” “Feel Like Makin’ Love”) and Free (“All Right Now”), you’ll quickly remember you’ve been hearing Rodgers’ voice for most of your life. Even after those bands split, he was the first call when Jimmy Page wanted to start a band post-Led Zeppelin (The Firm), and when the surviving members of Queen wanted to tour 10 years ago, they recruited Rodgers to fill in for Freddie Mercury. Now gigging under his own name, expect a non-stop run of hits as Rodgers rolls through all eras of his 40-year career. —DAN NAILEN Paul Rodgers • Sunday, Nov. 15, at 7:30 pm • $65/$85/$105 • All-ages • Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com • 242-7000

INDIE ROCK MOON TAXI

I

n a scene too often populated by snare drums and catchy hooks, Moon Taxi injects a refreshing breath of air into the indie music scene. Driven by energetic acoustic guitar riffs complemented by twangy, high-pitched overtones, the group out of Nashville maintains essential indie elements while simultaneously pushing the envelope. Moon Taxi is currently touring — including a repeat stop at the Hive in Sandpoint — in support of their Oct. 2 release Daybreaker, the band’s fourth studio album. With a distinctly laid-back vibe, the ambient, pulsating sounds of Daybreaker carry listeners through the purple sky on a smooth magic carpet ride. — MAX CARTER Moon Taxi with Miah Kohal Band • Tue, Nov. 17, at 9 pm • $10 • 21+ • The Hive • 207 N. First Ave. Sandpoint, Idaho • livefromthehive.com

BULLHEAD SALOON, Six-Strings n’ Pearls J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Craig Swanby THE CELLAR, Kosh and the Jazz Cats COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Cris Lucas, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve CRAVE, Stoney Hawk CURLEY’S, Phoenix FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Wyatt Wood FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Uppercut HANDLEBARS, Jordan Cole IRON HORSE BAR, Dragonfly THE JACKSON ST., The Usual Suspects JOHN’S ALLEY, Entice the Mice J KNITTING FACTORY, [Canceled] Jeff Daniels and the Ben Daniels Band MAX AT MIRABEAU, Mojo Box NASHVILLE NORTH, Luke Jaxon with DJ Tom NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Ramsin

J O’SHAYS IRISH PUB & EATERY, Common Ground feat. Michelle Stafford THE PALOMINO CLUB, Hip-hop Showcase feat. Demon Assassin, Skandoe, Mista Snipe & Cordell Drake, Ivy Team, Mr. Dalo, KC, King Skelle the Great PATIT CREEK CELLARS (868-4045), Ken Davis In Transit PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, The Flying Mammals J PINNACLE NORTHWEST, Coma Regalia, Deformer, Griffey, [Late show] Walking Corpse Syndrome, Concrete Grip, Thunder Knife, 37 Street Signs, Project Kings RED LION HOTEL RIVER INN, Gladhammer Classic Rock Band THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler SWAXX, Ghastly

THE ROADHOUSE, Down South THE VIKING BAR & GRILL, Stepbrothers ZOLA, Tell the Boys

Saturday, 11/14

J 4000 HOLES (325-1914), Buffalo Jones in-store performance BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE (9241446), Jan Harrison BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Buffalo Jones album release show with the Glenn Case Band, Liz Rognes (See story on page 39) BOLO’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Bad Apples BULLHEAD SALOON, The Usual Suspects THE CELLAR, Kosh and the Jazz Cats J CHAPS, Just Plain Darin CHECKERBOARD BAR, Sweet Rebel D,

The Fingerguns COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Cris Lucas, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, GRE3NE/ Ron Greene CRAVE, Stoney Hawk CURLEY’S, Phoenix DI LUNA’S CAFE, KRFY 88.5 Community Radio Benefit Concert feat. Kathy Colton an the Reluctants FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Uppercut HANDLEBARS, Jordan Cole THE HIVE, The Polyrhythmics IRON HORSE BAR, Dragonfly THE JACKSON ST., Voodoo Church JOHN’S ALLEY, Smoking Bill J KNITTING FACTORY, Invasive, Drone Epidemic, Broken Thumbs, Children of Atom LA ROSA CLUB, Open Jam THE LARIAT INN, Ricks Brothers LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Mary Chavez


& Friends MAX AT MIRABEAU, Mojo Box NASHVILLE NORTH, Luke Jaxon with DJ Tom NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Ramsin THE PALOMINO CLUB, DJ Funk PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Rylei Franks J PINNACLE NORTHWEST, Safe And Sound, Times Change, Crooked Cross, Keep In Check, East Sherman, [Late show] Spice 1, Champagne James, State of Krisis, Demon Assassin, Pest, Manwitnoname, Jay Savv, KC, Mad Money, Kosh

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

RED LION HOTEL RIVER INN, Gladhammer Classic Rock Band REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Coyote Willow THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler J THE SHOP, The Tone Collaborative, Mike Miller J SPOKANE COMMUNITY COLLEGE (533-8129), Fall Folk Festival feat. Liz Rognes, Wstern Reunion, Free Whistkey, Maxie Ray Mills, Sweet-

grass, Sidetrack and more THE ROADHOUSE, Bobby Bremer Band THE VIKING BAR & GRILL, Dammit Jim ZOLA, Tell the Boys

Sunday, 11/15

J THE BARTLETT, Paper Bird, Planes on Paper DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church J KNITTING FACTORY, Like A Storm, From Ashes to New, Stitched Up Heart, Failure Anthem J NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Paul Rodgers (See story on facing page) J THE PALOMINO CLUB, Mary Chavez & Pink Tango (A Higher Ground Animal Sanctuary Fundraiser) J SPOKANE ARENA, Winter Jam 2015 Tour feat. Skillet, For King & Country, Jamie Grace, Lincoln Brewster, Family Force 5, NewSong, Love & the Outcome J SPOKANE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, Fall Folk Festival feat. Broken Whistle, Todd Milne & Moksha, Truck Mills, The Way Home, Cursive Wires, Brad Keeler Trio and more ZOLA, Soulful Max Trio

Monday, 11/16

J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Monday Night Spotlight feat. Carey Brazil

J PINNACLE NORTHWEST, Justinsyane, n8v, T.H.C. RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with MJ The In-Human Beatbox ZOLA, Fusbol

Tuesday, 11/17

315 MARTINIS & TAPAS, The Rub BROOKLYN DELI & LOUNGE, Open Mic FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills J THE HIVE, Moon Taxi (See story on facing page), Miah Kohal Band THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Open-ness KELLY’S IRISH PUB (208-667-1717), Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots J MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP, Lynnsean Young J PINNACLE NORTHWEST, Counterparts, Fit For An Autopsy, Kublai Khan, Gutterlife SWAXX, T.A.S.T.Y with DJs Freaky Fred, Beauflexx ZOLA, The Bucket List

Wednesday, 11/18

J THE BARTLETT, Mother Falcon and Ben Sollee BING CROSBY THEATER, Dave Mason’s Traffic Jam EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard THE FLAME, DJ WesOne GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES (368-9087), Open Mic with T & T THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave J KNITTING FACTORY, GA’s Too Broke to Rock Series feat. Red

Sun Rising, Art of Dying, Flying Mammals THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, DJ Lydell LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 OFF REGAL LOUNGE (473-9401), Donnie Emerson & Nancy Sophia J PANIDA THEATER (208-263-9191), Head for the Hills and Trout Steak Revival J PINNACLE NORTHWEST, DJ Freaky Fred THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Jam with Steve Ridler SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open mic WOMAN’S CLUB OF SPOKANE, Spokane Folklore Contra Dance ZOLA, The Bossame

Coming Up ...

PINNACLE NORTHWEST, Brian Marquis, Onward Etc, The Bight, Kevin & the Spokes, the Colourflies, Cutback Davis, Nov. 19 THE BIG DIPPER, The Smokes album release show with Phlegm Fatale, Gorilla Chicken & Rabbit and comedian Matt Dargen, Nov. 19 THE BARTLETT, Robert Delong, Coleman Hell, Nov. 19 THE VIKING BAR & GRILL, Industrial Revelation, Cattywomp, Dan Conrad, Nov. 19 CHECKERBOARD BAR, Hip Hop for Hunger feat. Phil in the Blank, Rod Mac, Pest, Dookie Trackshoes., Nov. 20 KROC CENTER, Son of Brad Quartet CD Release with Flying Mammals and Sammie White, Nov. 21

Thank You!

Thank you to our amazing partners and guests who made the 34th annual Epicurean Delight possible! We are honored to have your support. You truly help the Inland Northwest Blood Center and Blood Center Foundation of the Inland Northwest save lives. Mark your calendar for Epicurean Delight 2016

Friday, November 11, 2016!

To contribute to INBC’s Build Your Bloodmobile Campaign, please visit www.bloodcenterfoundation.org

BloodCenterFoundation(ThankYou)_111215_8H_WT.pdf

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BIG BARN BREWING • 16004 N. Applewood Ln, Mead • 238-2489 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CALYPSOS • 116 E Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208665-0591 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • (208) 773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 THE FOXHOLE• 829 E. Boone • 315-5327 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 HANDLEBARS • 12005 E. Trent, Spokane Valley • 309-3715 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 THE JACKSON ST. • 2436 N. Astor • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N Market St, Mead • 4669918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR• 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN RAIL PUB • 5209 N. Market • 487-4269 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO • 6425 N Lidgerwood St • 443-5213 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 PINNACLE NORTHWEST • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside . • 822-7938 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SULLIVAN SCOREBOARD • 205 N Sullivan Rd • 891-0880 SWAXX • 23 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 TAMARACK • 912 W Sprague • 315-4846 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

NOVEMBER 12, 2015 INLANDER 43


THEATER A CHRISTMAS CLASSIC

Now that Halloween is past, it’s socially acceptable to bundle up in favorite holiday sweaters, treat ourselves to daily peppermint lattes and indulge in annual Christmas traditions. Before we retire to the couch completely for ABC Family’s “25 Days of Christmas,” some old stop-motion character favorites hit the stage to usher us into the wintry season. The beloved characters from the 1964 film Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer present a heartwarming musical for the entire family. Join Santa, the Abominable Snow Monster, and all the Misfit Toys on Rudolph’s adventure to find where he belongs. — MAKAYLA WAMBOLDT Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer: The Musical • Tue, Nov. 17, at 7 pm • $31.50-$51.50 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • wcebroadway.com

CLASSICAL AFTERNOON DELIGHT

Sunday afternoons are often associated with rituals — naps, football games or late lunches with family. This Sunday afternoon, break out of that mold and join the Spokane String Quartet for a repertoire of classical and modern music. The program features Mozart’s String Quartet No. 18, and works from two modern composers: Ian Krouse’s “Tientos” for flute and strings, and Bohuslav Martinu’s “Trio for Flute, Cello and Piano.” Flutist and Eastern Washington University instructor Alaina Bercilla and pianist Roger McVey, a professor at the University of Idaho, join the regular players for the event. There’s clearly nothing to fall asleep to here. — LAURA JOHNSON Spokane String Quartet: Mozart & Krouse • Sun, Nov. 15, at 3 pm • $12-$20 • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanestringquartet.org

44 INLANDER NOVEMBER 12, 2015


CULTURE THAT’S ALL FOLK

Since beginning in 1996, the Spokane Folk Festival has grown to host around 5,000 people per year. For its 20th anniversary celebration, the festival boasts eight stages, with music ranging from Celtic, bluegrass and blues to African, Asian, jazz and more. Characterized by diversity in music, art and culture, the festival has become a fantastic celebration of cultural diversity in Spokane. On Saturday, festival sponsor KPBX will broadcast live from the festival. — MAX CARTER Spokane Fall Folk Festival • Sat, Nov. 14, from 11 am-10 pm; Sun, Nov. 15, from 11 am-5 pm • Free; donations accepted • Spokane Community College • 1810 N. Greene • spokanefolkfestival.org

BEER TASTE ’EM ALL

Yelp’s Spokane promoters are teaming up with the savvy folks behind the Inland Northwest Ale Trail to host a fall beer-tasting bonanza on a chilly, midweek evening. Breaking from the standard lineup of tried-and-true local favorites, the event highlights several up-and-coming beer makers from across the Northwest, including Moses Lake’s Ten Pin Brewing and St. Brigid’s Brewery. From farther south, Kennewick’s Ice Harbor Brewery also has a handle. The rest of the lineup are all closer to home: Cheney’s New Boundary Brewing and Mead’s 238 Brewing, joined by Spokane Valley-based Badass Backyard Brewing and English Setter Brewing, along with the newly founded Bellwether Brewing and Bennedito’s Brewpub. — CHEY SCOTT Yelp’s Beertopia with the Inland Northwest Ale Trail • Wed, Nov. 18, from 6-9 pm • $5 • The Black Diamond • 9614 E. Sprague • bit.ly/1MD0Tn7

WORDS GREAT MINDS

As much as it helps develops great writers who are bringing much-deserved recognition to our local writing community, Eastern Washington University’s Inland Northwest Center for Writers MFA Program is also bringing great storytellers to Spokane. This weekend kicks off the first event in the 2015-16 Visiting Writer Series, hosted by the center’s Get Lit! Programs, as it welcomes renowned Seattle poet Linda Bierds for a reading, Q&A and book signing. The year’s lineup boasts many notable names, including Pulitzer winners, New Yorker staffers and word artists pushing social and creative boundaries with their work. All events are free and open to all. — CHEY SCOTT EWU Visiting Writer Series feat. Linda Bierds • Fri, Nov. 13, at 7 pm • Free • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main • getlitfestival.org/visiting-writers • getlit@ewu.edu

volume 2 coming this month inlander.com/books

CAMERA READY

NOVEMBER 12, 2015 INLANDER 45


W I SAW YOU

S S

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU MR. PENSKE MAN We have met a few times in morning getting that coffee at the Mobile station. I know you have flirted and I sent a wrong message. I would love to have a coffee with you sometime. You know where to find me in the morning. Hope you read this. IRONHORSE SATURDAY NOV. 7, 2015 To Kelly, we danced a dance at the Ironhorse on Saturday Nov. 7th. You asked me if I knew how to Swing Dance. I told you I just started taking lessons.. Me.....wishing I had asked for your number, but did not have the nerve. No, he is not my boyfriend or husband. If you see this and are interested, send email to Itsaspookyday@yahoo.com. Jan THE CHILE PHARMACEUTICAL GUY THE CHILE PHARMACEUTICAL GUY Willy who spent time in South America: You and your friend were outside the Bartlett and nYne on Friday 10/9. My friend and I ran across your path and I thought I recognized you as one of the band members from a photo in the Inlander. You have a sharp mind, great smile, and the best hands! I would love to have a REPEAT, ON THE ROCKS, WITH A TWIST! I wish I would have taken the Lyft after letting my dog out. jj677223@gmail.com

CHEERS ACKNOWLEDGEMENT A grocery store in Cheney had an employee who was consistently berating people of color

and/or of less financial means. This behavior was observed for the last two years. indicative of racism and prejudice, thus this letter. After writing a letter of complaint to upper management, dictating events that have occurred by this man's wanton disregard for respect and professionalism, he was fired. Cheers for this action of zero tolerance, going outside the 'norm,' as now we can go into the store and not be scared. MY BABY DOLL, THOMAS So.... We've just crossed the 15 1/2 year mark. I freak out because I still can't believe that I could love someone (even like) this long and you look at me with all your sexyness, laugh and tell me its "just a drop in the bucket". I seriously don't know how you have put up with some of my poor decision making skills, my dorky humor and my accident prone clumsy ways that you seem to find entertaining. I do love you with all my everything and I do appreciate you. We have raised some pretty awesome kids together and we are now grandparents to a little boy that has us wrapped around his finger like no other. I love you, I love our past and our future. We have done pretty dang good!!! I'm just sayin......♥ Forever, Jennifer STANDING BEHIND STUDENT VETERANS Cheers to the veterans out there who have proudly served their country and are now focusing on their education. To those who fight the daily battle to "integrate" with their fellow classmates. To those who stand strong and buckle down to get their education but are not buckled down by education. I see you every day on campuses across Spokane and understand your woes. We are student veterans who have served like you have, experienced the same as you, and have fought the same battles in class and outside of class. We stand behind you, support you, and understand you. Know that you are never alone and we salute your drive to better yourself and get your education. THANK YOU! I can't say this to your face, so I'll say it here. Thanks for cheating on me (yet again) with someone I considered a friend. I regret every second of the 4 and a half years we spent together. I never realized how suffocating you were until we were apart. So thanks for freeing me from you. CLEAN UP AISLE 5 I was shopping at

the Downtown Goodwill the Friday afternoon before Halloween when all of the sudden my one year old begins puking... Everywhere. On to himself, me the floor. It was awful. I was kinda freaking out with what to do next and three or four employees rushed over to help us. They put my one year old in a clean shirt brought me a wet towel and cleaned up

46 INLANDER NOVEMBER 12, 2015

WHAT'S HAPPENING TO US? Unless you are disabled, elderly, or ill it would be very nice if you could at least make an effort to cross the street in a timely manner when there are people waiting to turn. To the skinny jean wearing punks

— STANDING BEHIND STUDENT VETERANS

CW Will miss that dynamite smile, wicked sense of humor and take no crap attitude that made that place bearable. Really going to miss you. JR. To my 1st concert ever, Buddy Rich. Shoulda known! To Harry O's an' Joey, no? To cantilever floors and sleepless nights in swank hotels. Strolling cappuccino, anyone? To stacked decks and overdressing. You cheated! Good for us! To loving onion rings more than diamond rings. To Moms who encourage musical ones and offer those gifts to the world. Raise your glass to them! To a lifetime of perfect timing in a richly crowded world, each day pushing the clock, never missing a beat. More wood! To Gab'i'., Matt, and Bench. To Bob and Betty. To mink and pearls. To jeans and dirt. Never forget you are greatly loved by all. Polish your shoes, check your zipper, straighten your tie. The show must go on! You made it past July...Happy, happy, Birthday. May your wish on the candle on the Girljumpin'-outta-yer-cake come true.

JEERS

TOYS IN THE HOOD What is more annoying than having a neighbor who insists on parking his truck on the front lawn? A

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

#wtbevents

PRANKS CAN BE CRUEL Thanks to the person who thought it would be funny to pour honey all over my car hood. I work nights and go to school during the day and am just trying to get by. After being

abound with predators — coyotes, owls, hawks, etc.

Cheers to the veterans out there who have proudly served their country and are now focusing on their education.

after my baby. They could've reacted a hundred different ways and I am grateful for their kindness towards us. It really means a lot to me, Thank You!

-G.

neighbor who gets another "fixer-upper" and parks it on the lawn too. Thanks for classing up our neighborhood.

sick and having a really bad day, walking out to find a puddle of frozen honey on my hood really was the icing on the cake. I wish maybe next time you would think about how mean your little prank can actually be. HAIR RAISING I had heard nothing but good things. So I decided to give your salon a whirl, and was very let down. My hairdresser was a friendly short haired red head, although she was either hungover or high. When she shampooed my hair I had water all down my back and in my ears. The cut was not what I had wanted and my color is super patchy. So much so, that I can not wear it up. I went on their website to write a review, but no option for that. She is known on there as the "assassin of hair", well I am now having to let my hair re-gain life from your assassination! Hope you were having fun murdering my hair, or at least the night before! :( CAT ABUSER Jeers to whoever dumped a nice gray tiger stripe cat in our neighborhood that ended up at our house, so now we need to find him a good home. After we treated his injuries from being thrown out and from anther cat defending his territory. He loves being held and petted — obviously belonged to someone. Double jeers if you took ""YOU STOLE MY CAT"" and took him for ride before abandoning him. To those of you that think a rural area is a good place to dispose of pets, THINK — those places

who were too busy texting and visiting with each other to make it across the street before the light went from green to red (seriously?!) where are your manners?! If you had walked any slower, you'd have just been standing still. I'm sure whoever you were texting that had your undivided attention, could've possibly waited another ten seconds while you crossed the street. There are other people waiting on you, and you couldn't give a crap. I'm not asking you to break into a full sprint, just walking at a normal pace would suffice. To the three different people who I held the door for (on three separate occasions at three separate locations) and they couldn't even acknowledge my existence (not a smile, nod, thank you) It's just common courtesy people. Manners. What the hell is happening to this world?! Even the little things that can make people decent are gone. 

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

SONGS OF HOPE WITH MELODY BIEHL An evening of music with Melody as she shares from her heart about Because There Is Hope, a local nonprofit organization and the new Hospitality House project. Nov. 13, 7-9 pm. Free. The Gathering House, 733 W. Garland. (939-9672) CRAFT FAIR FUNDRAISER Various Native American and non-Native American vendors from the Spokane area gather and sell their handmade wares to benefit the American Indian Community Center. Nov. 14, 9 am-6 pm. American Indian Community Center, 610 E. North Foothills Dr. on.fb.me/1Lm8I32 (822-9071) GONZAGA PREP FLEA MARKET The Bullpup Band hosts a flea market; come to buy or to sell. Vendor spaces for $15, and all arts/crafts artisans and home business are welcome. Nov. 14, 10 am-3 pm. Gonzaga Prep, 1224 E. Euclid Ave. (850-7026) HOLIDAY ARTISAN & CRAFT SHOW The first event invites local artisans and handcrafters to showcase their creations in an event benefiting the Spokane Woman’s Club. Nov. 14, 9 am-4 pm. Free admission. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. on.fb.me/1j1twTA (838-5667) HIGHER GROUND ANIMAL SANCTUARY FUNDRAISER Three bands join forces to support Higher Ground. Guest artists include: Schauer with Friends, Kari Marguerite and the Seventy-Six and Pink Tango, presenting an evening of upbeat jazz and big band arrangments. Nov. 15, 5-10 pm. The Palomino, 6425 N. Lidgerwood. on.fb.me/1GTXLHx (242-8907) THE RESILIENCY PROJECT Local youth involved with the nonprofit Youth for Christ have prepared an artistic production that invites the community to walk alongside them as they tell their story. Proceeds benefit YFC programs. Nov. 17, 7 pm. $17-$23. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. spokaneyfc.org (227-7404)

COMEDY

STAND-UP OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. bluznews.com BEFORE IT’S IN THEATERS The Blue Door players get creative with a themed improv show. Fridays in November, at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Not rated.) Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) IMPROV JAM SESSIONS Blue Door Theatre players lead sessions on improv comedy performance, every first and third Monday (Nov. 16) of the month, from 7-9 pm. $5/session; ages 18+. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045)

COMMUNITY

HOMEWORK HELP WITH THE ZAGS Need help with your writing homework, or homework in general? Stop by Spark Center from 3:30-5:30 pm on Wednesdays and Thursdays to get guidance from Gonzaga students. Program runs through Dec. 17. Free. Spark Center, 1214 W. Summit Parkway. sparkwestcentral.org PUBLIC INPUT ON SPOKANE VALLEY MARIJUANA REGULATIONS A meeting for the public to express concerns and ask questions about the Spokane Valley’s plans to regulate the legal marijuana in-

dustry. Nov. 12, 6 pm. Spokane Valley City Hall, 11707 E. Sprague. (720-5333) SPOKANE CONSERVATION DISTRICT ANNUAL MEETING Enjoy a light breakfast and learn about what the Spokane Conservation District has accomplished this year, including the creation of the new Vets on the Farm program. Also includes awards and the recognition of Champions of Conservation. Nov. 13, 8-9 am. Donations accepted. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (535-7274) STARTUP WEEKEND SPOKANE NO. 8 Learn how to create a startup company in 54 hours as you meet, network with fellow entrepreneurs. Receive mentoring and learn the “Lean Methodology.” All meals provided. Nov. 13-15. $25-$85. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. spokane.startupweekend.org FALL BAZAAR Offering crafts, a bake shop, white elephant store, books, raffle, soup lunch, and apple dumplings. Nov. 14, 9 am-3 pm. Free. Audubon Park United Methodist Church, 3908 N. Driscoll Blvd. audubonparkumc.org (325-4541) FAMILY GAME DAY Play and test out a variety of board games provided by Uncle’s Games. Games are also for sale so you can purchase one if you like it. Children under 6 must bring an adult. Nov. 14, 11 am-4 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. (893-8350) WINTER MARKET The annual market features 30+ local artisans and vendors; hosted by Heart of the Arts, Inc. Nov. 14, Dec. 5 and Dec. 12, from 10 am-2 pm. 1912 Center, 412 E. Third St. 1912center.org INTERNATIONAL DAY OF TOLERANCE Gonzaga invites the public to join in solidarity to support social justice in this annual event recognized around the world. President Thayne McCulloh offers remarks followed by comments from the community and a students’ call to action. Nov. 16, 12-12:45 pm. Free. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. (313-5836) WEE MAC EXPLORATION SESSIONS The MAC revives its pre-K museum educational exploration sessions, with activities to foster exploration and social development in prep for Kindergarten. Tuesdays, 9:3011:30 am. For ages 4-5. $5/two people. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org A CANTASTIC SOCIAL Team up with AAF Spokane, Northwest Harvest, and Black Label Brewing to fight hunger in the community. Bring canned foods to this beer and networking event. Includes a no-host bar with beer specials and food for purchase from Commons’ vendors. Nov. 18, 5-7 pm. Free. Saranac Commons, 19 W. Main. aafspokane.com/78/a-cantastic-socialSPOKANE FOLKLORE CONTRA DANCE The weekly Wednesday night dance with the Spokane Mini-Mega Band and caller Nancy Staub. Beginner workshop at 7:15 pm. Nov. 18, 7-9:30 pm. $5-$7. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. spokanefolklore.org (747-2640) COMMUNITY FLU VACCINE CLINIC Open to the public; no appointment necessary. All insurances accepted, or $25/person. Offering adult and youth flu shots and nasal flu vaccine available for ages 2-18. Nov. 18, 12:30-4:30 pm. NATIVE Project, 1830 W. Maxwell Ave. nativeproject.org PAJAMA STORYTIME Hear local authors Kris Dinnison, Cindy Hval, Stephanie Oakes, Sharma Shields and Ellen Welcker read their favorite picture books at a special pajama storytime. Includes 30 minutes of stories, fingerplays, and songs followed by a 30-minute play and learn

session. Pajamas are encouraged but not required. All ages welcome. Ages 6 and under must bring an adult. Nov. 18, 7-8 pm. Free. Moran Prairie Library, 6004 S. Regal St. (893-8340)

FESTIVAL

WASHINGTON STATE CHINESE LANTERN FESTIVAL The inaugural event features 30 displays of more than 3,000 pieces of lit, Chinese Lanterns, built and installed by Chinese artisans throughout an expanse of Riverfront Park. Other events include Chinese cuisine by awardwinning Chef Jeremy Hansen and live performances by Chinese artists nightly at 6 and 8 pm. The festival runs through Nov. 15 (now extended), and is open daily: Sun-Thu, 5-10 pm, Fri-Sat 5-11 pm. $12-$60. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard. spokanelanternfestival.com SPOKANE FALL FOLK FESTIVAL The 20th annual festival features eight stages of traditional and ethnic dance and music along with workshops, special entertainment, crafts for children and jamming. Also featured are sales of traditional crafts and meals. Nov. 14, 11 am-10 pm, Nov. 15, 11 am-5 pm. Free and open to the public. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene. spokanefolkfestival.org

FILM

FADE TO WINTER The latest film from Matchstick Productions muses on the changing of the seasons and the return of the winter sports peak, and captures the personalities of nine skiers who go to great lengths to get out into the powder. In the GU Hemmingson Center. Nov. 12, 7:30 pm. TBA. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. gonzaga.edu (313-6924) LAURA, OR SCENES FROM A COMMON LIFE An interdisciplinary film project premier hosted by GU Theatre & Dance in conjunction with Square Top Theatre and Whitworth University. Laura features performer Alexandra Kazazou and is directed by Gonzaga’s Charlie Pepiton. Nov. 12, 7:30 pm. Free. Gonzaga Magnuson Theatre, 502 E. Boone Ave. gonzaga. edu/theatreanddance (313-6553) MISTRESS AMERICA Tracy is a lonely college freshman in New York, but when she is taken in by her soon-to-be stepsister, Brooke she is rescued from her disappointment and seduced by Brooke’s alluringly mad schemes. Rated R. Nov. 12-15, show times vary. $6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. (208-882-4127) GROUND OPERATIONS: FROM BATTLEFIELDS TO FARMFIELDS Join Spokane Conservation District for a film screening and directors discussion. Attendees may be inspired by the film and testimony from local veterans, and discover further opportunities to get involved with SCCD’s Vets on the Farm program. RSVP online before Nov. 9; seating is limited. Nov. 13, 2-4 pm. Donations accepted. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main Ave. sccd.org (535-7274) MAX After U.S. Marine Kyle Wincott is killed in Afghanistan, Max, his highly trained service dog, is too traumatized to remain in service. Back in the U.S., Kyle’s family adopts the dog. Nov. 11 and 14; show times vary. $4-$7. Panida Theater, 300 N. First. panida.org (208-255-7801) INTERNATIONAL FILM SERIES: LEVIATHAN On the outskirts of a small coastal town in the Barents Sea, where whales sometimes come to its bay, lives an ordinary family. The family is haunted by a local corrupted mayor. Together they decide

to fight back and collect dirt on the mayor. Rated: R. Nov. 17, 7-10 pm. $5. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org LAST CALL AT THE OASIS While water is arguably one of the world’s most important natural resources, surprisingly little is being done to preserve the global water supply. Evidence suggests the amount of potable water is diminishing at an alarming rate. Presented by the Moscow Food Co-op. Nov. 18, 7-9 pm. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127)

Gourmet Way, 8222 N. Government Way. gourmetwayhayden.com POWDERKEG INLANDER BREW FEST Snowlander’s winter beer festival returns for its third year, featuring 24 local and regional breweries, cideries and one meadery. Nov. 20-21, Fri from 4-9 pm, Sat from 11 am-7 pm. $8 expo admission; tasting packages from $15-$25. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlanderexpo.com

FOOD & DRINK

A USO SALUTE A concert featuring the North Idaho Cardinal Vocal Jazz and the North Idaho College Jazz Ensemble with special guest Nicole Lewis. Nov. 12, 7:30 pm. Free and open to the public. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic. edu (208-769-3424) COCOON: A SOUND SANCTUARY Cocoon is inspired by the ancient Greek Asclepeion healing temples, where individuals would go for rest and renewal, hoping to be visited by dreams that would aid in their journey to wellness. Nov. 13, 7-8 pm. By donation. Coil Yoga + Bellydance, 304 W. Pacific. on.fb. me/1GupXAm FRIDAY NIGHT DANCES FEAT. VARIETY PAK The local dance band plays live music for a community dance, with beverages and snacks. Nov. 13 and Dec. 18, from 7-9:30 pm. $8-$10. Southside Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. (535-0803) MARK SALMAN PIANO CONCERT Salman is a graduate of The Julliard School, whose performances have taken him to Europe, Asia, Canada and throughout the U.S. Nov. 13, 7 pm. Free and open to the public. Steinway Piano Gallery, 13418 E. Nora Ave. (327-4266) NORTHWEST SACRED MUSIC CHORALE The chorale’s fall concert program, titled “A Grateful Nation,” features a program of music celebrating the freedom of the United States. Nov. 13 at 7 pm and Nov. 14 at 4 pm. $16-$22. Trinity Lutheran Church, 812 N. Fifth. (208-664-5743) BUILDING SOUND: A TONAL DIALOG A live experimental arch-aural collaboration performance, during which artists create a tonal dialog through the manipulation and amplification of sounds generated by the building itself. Moving through the performance the listener can experience an ever changing tonal dialog. Nov. 14, 8 pm. Free. Prichard Art Gallery, 414 S. Main St., Moscow. on.fb.me/1GIpTgu (208-885-3586) SPOKANE SYMPHONY SUPERPOPS 2: TRIBUTE TO THE BOSTON POPS The Spokane Symphony brings the Boston Pops tradition to life, playing a crowdpleasing program of light classics, popular tunes and Broadway hits. Nov. 14, 8 pm. $28-$62. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) SPOKANE MELODY SINGERS The group celebrates its 90th season singing praises. A free-will offering will be taken. Nov. 15, 6 pm. The Gathering House, 733 W. Garland. (747-2818) SPOKANE STRING QUARTET: MOZART & KRAUSE Spokane Symphony flutist Alaina Bercilla joins the quartet for “Tientos” for flute and strings by contemporary composer Ian Krouse. Nov. 15, 3 pm. $12-$20. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200) WHITWORTH WIND SYMPHONY The symphony’s fall concert. Nov. 15, 3 pm. $5. Whitworth Cowles Auditorium, 300 W. Hawthorne Ave. (777-3280)

TASTYTHURSDAYS Wine tastings are hosted every Thursday evening, from 5-7, sampling something new each week. $5/ person; fee waived if you find a bottle you love and buy. Live music and light appetizers offered. Uva Trattoria, 2605 N. Fourth. uvacda.com (208-930-0573) PRAY FOR SNOW PARTY The second annual event hosted by PSB, Out There Monthly and Mountain Gear benefits T.E.A.M. Grant and features classic ski movies playing, costume contests, raffles, giveaways and beer specials. Nov. 12, 5 pm. Perry Street Brewing, 1025 S. Perry St. on.fb.me/1XNiBMF (279-2820) YAKISOBA COOKING CLASS Chef Janet Campbell from the Hayden Lake country club teaches how to prepare Chasu, a pork loin marinated overnight and then baked, sliced and served with a mustard dipping sauce. The main course is be Yakisoba noodles. Nov. 12, 6-8 pm. $40. Gourmet Way, 8222 N. Government Way. gourmetwayhayden.com (208-762-1333) VINO WINE TASTING Friday, Nov. 14 is a tasting with Dusted Valley and Saturday is a tasting featuring Saviah Cellars of Walla Walla. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington St. vinowine.com (838-1229) DOWNDRAFT BREWING 1-YEAR CELEBRATION A celebration of the brewery’s first year includes live music, new beer launches, giveaways and more. Nov. 14. Downdraft Brewing, 418 W. Seltice Way. facebook.com/downdraftbrewingco MEET THE FARMER SAMPLING DAY Sample items from local food artisans Somkit Thai and Ramstead Ranch, including Thai green curry chicken, Massaman butternut squash curry, Lotus Flower pastries and Sparking German Reisling. Nov. 14, 12-4 pm. $5. Petunia’s Marketplace, 2010 N. Madison. (328-4257) TWELVE STRING BARREL FEST The brewery’s second barrel-aged beer fest, with no less than 12 barrel-aged beers on tap including some new and rare brews. Nov. 15, 12-5 pm. Twelve String Brewing Co., 11616 E. Montgomery Dr., Ste. 26. 12stringbrewingco.com/events JEWISH FOOD: AN INTRODUCTION Jewish culture and faith are both focused on food, from weekly Shabbat (Sabbath) dinners to the elaborate, symbolic Passover meal and the breaking of the Yom Kippur fast. Presenter, Patti Barber has studied the differences in Jewish food around the world. Nov. 17, 6-7 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry. (747-7394) YELP’S BEERTOPIA WITH THE NORTHWEST ALE TRAIL Unwind midweek with 10+ of the region’s newest breweries. Admission includes five, 2oz tasters and light appetizers. RSVP requested. Nov. 18, 6-9 pm. $5. Black Diamond, 9614 E. Sprague. bit.ly/1kZ3DVI THE VERY VERSATILE CREPE Chef Jean-Pierre shows the many ways crepes can be used for appetizers, savory suppers, and deserts. Nov. 19, 6-8 pm. $40.

MUSIC

NOVEMBER 12, 2015 INLANDER 47


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess FAWn JuAn

I’m a 31-year-old single guy with a problematic pattern. Women I ask out seem to love how I’m open and very complimentary from the start, but then, suddenly, they get cold feet. It seems that once women know they’re desired, they’re done with you. My guy friends tell me I should “play it cool,” but then I’m not being authentic. —True Man

AMY ALKON

Gushing over a woman right out of the gate — “Wow… you have skin!” — tends to give a man all the rough-hewn sex appeal of a Care Bear. The problem here comes out of what evolutionary psychologists David Buss and David Schmitt explain as men’s and women’s conflicting sexual strategies. For an ancestral woman, there was the possibility of high back-end costs from any sex act (children to dig grubs for and drag around). So, women evolved to be the commitment-seekers of our species, and men, the commitment-free sex seekers. Men still had a good chance of passing on their genes, even if they chose to “fun and run.” (Of course, this worked better in the days before state-ordered child support.) Though it’s the tail end of 2015, evolutionary psychologists Leda Cosmides and John Tooby explain that “our modern skulls house a stone age mind” with “stone age priorities.” So, women expect to work to get a man to commit just as men expect to work to get a woman into bed. And just as women get devalued by men for being sexually “easy,” men get devalued by women if they seem emotionally “easy” -- like by immediately throwing around compliments like glitter at a gay pride parade. This sort of thing doesn’t say you find the woman beautiful or whatever; it says you find it a miracle that she went out with you at all. Try something new -- keeping a lid on the word drool. In other words, shut up and listen. Ask a woman about herself -- where she’s been, what she thinks, what matters to her -- and engage with what she’s saying. That’s the sincere way to compliment a woman -- showing that you’re interested in her as a human being instead of slobbering all over her like a dog that’s been left home all day. The safe time to compliment a woman on her hotitude is after you’ve slept together. Women are often insecure about their bodies, and post-sex compliments will be appreciated (instead of depreciating you). All in all, keep in mind that the dating realm is like many other endeavors. Too much enthusiasm too soon typically makes you seem desperate…for something…anything…anybody. Picture yourself wandering into a bank and having a bunch of execs dash over: “We’d like to make YOU the president of Wells Fargo!” And you’re like, “Umm…I was just coming in to get quarters for the laundromat.”

StAre WArS

My girlfriend of a year has a really hard time looking into my eyes when we have sex. Eye contact is a big turn-on for me because it’s so intense and intimate. She says she feels scared and vulnerable: “I don’t want you to see how much I care.” I also think she feels insecure about how she looks during sex. How can I reassure her? --Not Going Anywhere Okay, so your girlfriend’s idea of something sexy to wear in bed is a Richard Nixon mask with the eyeholes taped over. (On a positive note, this isn’t because keeping her eyes closed makes it easier to pretend you’re Channing Tatum.) Your girlfriend’s likely to let go a little if you grab on to her a little tighter. This advice comes out of “the dependency paradox,” a finding by social psychologist Brooke C. Feeney that the more you show a romantic partner that they can rely on you, the less they feel the need to cling. This would seem to apply to emotional risks, too, like not just having sex while blindfolded. In pitch darkness. In a cave. In the middle of the earth. To help your girlfriend understand that, in you, she has what Feeney calls a “secure base,” warn her that you’re going to start bombarding her with how much you love her and how beautiful you find her. And don’t just do it in bed. Hug her, kiss her, love on her in while in line at the DMV. (Keep at it until strangers coo — or yell, “Get a room!”) Ask her to try eye contact while clothed — at first for three seconds, and then for five — and then try the same in bed. Eventually, she should feel more secure about your loving her and finding her beautiful — even in bed, when she’s making a face like Mao Tse-tung straining on the john. n ©2015, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

48 INLANDER NOVEMBER 12, 2015

EVENTS | CALENDAR EWU VOCAL JAZZ SOLO NIGHT Be entertained by the EWU Vocal Jazz Program in a Cabaret-style concert. on Nov. 16, from 7:30-9 pm. Free. Lindaman’s, 1235 S. Grand Blvd. facebook. com/ewumusic (838-3000) THE GATHERING OF BANDS Featuring the North Idaho College Wind Symphony and area middle school bands. Nov. 18-19 at 7 pm. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. (208-769-3300) NORTHWEST SACRED MUSIC CHORALE The chorale’s fall concert program, titled “A Grateful Nation,” features a program of music celebrating the freedom of the United States for Spokane Audiences Nov. 18, 7 pm. $16$22. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. nwsmc.org (838-4277) JON MENDLE The musician has toured with Yo-Yo Ma and the Silk Road Ensemble, and made his Carnegie Hall debut while still a student at the age of 19. Nov. 19, 7:30 pm. $25. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

U OF IDAHO OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT SALE & SWAP The annual gear swap offers new and used gear for sale, or bring yours to sell or barter ($5 fee). In the student Recreation Center MultiActivity Court, Moscow campus. Nov. 12, 7:30 pm. Free. (208-885-6810) SARS SKI SWAP The Schweitzer Alpine Racing School hosts its annual ski swap, offering thousands of pieces of new and used equipment for sale, and professionals on site for buying assistance. Sellers can register Friday, Nov. 13, from noon-7 pm. Sale on Nov. 14, from 9 am-2 pm. $2/person; $5/family. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Ave. sars.net (208-263-1081) NATIONAL VETERANS DAY RUN The 3rd annual run starts/finishes at the Clock Tower Meadow. Choose from three distances: 11K, 5K and a 1-mile family and supporter walk/run. Nov. 14, 8-10:30 am. Free-$35. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard St. veteransdayrun. com/register/spokane (817-944-3573) PROVING GROUNDS AMATEUR CAGE FIGHTING Warrior Camp MMA presents live fights, featuring regional athletes. Nov. 14, 6:30-10 pm. $20/$30. At PROTO Technologies, 22808 E Appleway. warriorcampfitness.com (754-444-CAGE) SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. KELOWNA ROCKETS Regular season hockey match. It’s also Native American Night, featuring a special pre-game ceremony with representatives from regional tribes. Nov. 14, 7:05 pm. $10-$22. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. (279-7000) TRI RUN CLINIC A clinic for the beginner to intermediate athlete who wants to participate in a triathlon during the 2016 season. Nov. 14, 9 am-noon. $25. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. (208-667-1865) KING OF THE CAGE: UNTAMED Mixed martial arts event. Nov. 19, 7-10 pm. $25/$45/$60. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S Hwy 95. (800-523-2464) SNOWLANDER EXPO The Inlander’s annual expo hosts local winter sports vendors offering season-low sale prices. Also includes the Washington Trust Rail Jam in the Convention Center breezeway and informational seminars throughout Saturday on avalanche

safety and other topics. Nov. 20-21, Fri from 4-9 pm, Sat from 10 am-7 pm. Expo admission $8 (good both days; kids under 12 free) Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlanderexpo.com (279-7000)

THEATER

EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL Based on Sam Raimi’s ‘80s cult classic films. Through Nov. 15, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $27. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. (325-2507) THE MADWOMAN OF CHAILLOT SFCC drama students perform the play written by Jean Giraudoux, a mid-20th century French Impressionist fantasy where those on the fringes of life try to save the world. Nov. 12-21, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $1 admission with food donation. $1/$10. Spartan Theater at SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu/drama (533-3222) SHREK THE MUSICAL The FHS Performing Arts Departments presents a staged version of the Oscar-winning animated film. Nov. 12-14 and Nov. 1921, at 7 pm. Ferris High School, 3020 E. 37th Ave. (354-6067) SWEENEY TODD: THE DEMON BARBER OF FLEET STREET A performance of the dark, Steven Sondheim musical. Nov. 5-8 and 11-15 at 7:30 pm; also Nov. 7-8 and 14-15 at 1:30 pm. $12-$20. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N Grand Ave, Pulman. (509-334-0750) THE WILD PARTY Based on Joseph Moncure March’s 1928 narrative poem of the same name, Queenie and Burrs decide to throw the party to end all parties. Through Nov. 29, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $23-$27. The Modern Theater Spokane, 174 S. Howard. themoderntheater.org (509-455-7529) ALADDIN, JR. A young actors’ performance of the story based on the Disney classic film. Nov. 13-22, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. $6-$12. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 236 S. Union Ave. pendorielleplayers.org (447-9900) A CHRISTMAS CAROL: THE MUSICAL CYT North Idaho performs the classic holiday tale in a musical adaptation from Broadway. Through Nov. 15; Fri at 7 pm, Sat at 3 pm and 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. *Free Veteran’s Day showing on Nov. 11 at noon, free to veterans, active duty military and their families or retired military. Reservations requested; must show ID. $11-$15. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cytnorthidaho.org CURTAIN CALL: A VAUDEVILLE REVIEW A variety show featuring the most memorable songs, quips and skits from the first 32 years of the Sixth Street Theater’s “Kelly’s Alley Revues.” Nov. 6-22, Fri-Sat, 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $13-$15. Sixth Street Theater, Wallace, Idaho. sixthstreetmelodrama.com EWU THEATRE: POCATELLO Against the harsh backdrop of Samuel D. Hunter’s Idaho, this heartbreaking comedy is a cry for connection in an increasingly lonely American landscape. Rated R. Nov. 13-14 and 20-21, at 7:30 pm; Nov. 15 at 2 pm and Nov. 19 at 5 pm. EWU, 526 Fifth St., Cheney. (359-2459) RUMPLESTILTSKIN A play that dramatizes the traditional Grimm story, enhancing it with humor and a group of likable characters. Performed in a reader’s theatre format. Nov. 13-14 at 7 pm, Nov. 20 at 7 pm and Nov. 14 and 21 at 2 pm. $7. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway Ave. libertylaketheatre.com

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD A reader’s theatre production, adapted from the classic novel by Harper Lee. Nov. 13-14 at 7:30 pm, Nov. 15 at 2 pm. Ignite Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway. ignitetheatre.org (795-0004) THE WIZARD OF OZ CYT Spokane performs a stage adaptation of the classic Frank L. Baum story-turned film. Nov. 10, 12-15; show times vary. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. cytspokane.org PUPPETEER GABRIEL PONTI The internationally-renowned puppeteer gives a special benefit performance for Idaho Repertory Theatre. Ponti has performed and presented seminars throughout Europe. Seating is limited to 200 people. Nov. 14, 7:30-9 pm. $7.50; free/UI students. U. of Idaho Hartung Theater, 6th & Stadium Way. bit. ly/1PCLxV7 (208-885-6465) MAN WITHOUT A SADDLE / FOXGLOVES The second weekend of the expanded Hit & Run Play Festival includes a second weekend of readings of two longer pieces by local writers, Ron Ford’s “Man Without A Saddle” and Sandra Hosking’s “Foxgloves.” Nov. 14 at 7:30 pm and Nov. 15 at 2 pm. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org HAL HOLBROOK: MARK TWAIN TONIGHT Fifty years ago, a young actor took the stage in a tiny off-Broadway theater and introduced the world to a man they would never forget. The actor was Hal Holbrook and the man was Mark Twain. Nov. 14, 7:30 pm. $37.50$102.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER: THE MUSICAL The beloved stop-motion classic film comes to life on stage in a live musical show. Nov. 17, 7 pm. $29-$49. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (509-279-7000)

VISUAL ARTS

NATURE IS STILL: WORKS BY PAULINE HAAS Whitworth University presents a memorial exhibition for professor emeritus Pauline Haas, who passed away this summer. It features Pauline’s paintings and drawings from Whitworth’s permanent collection and highlights her impact on students over the past 50 years. Nov. 10-Jan. 29. Gallery open Mon-Sat, 10 am-6 pm; closes at 2 pm on Saturdays. Free. Cowles Auditorium, 300 W. Hawthorne. (777-3258) YULETIDE Spokane Art School’s annual holiday arts show, featuring limited edition enamel ornaments by Ken Spiering. Opening party (ticketed event, $25) Nov. 12, 5-8 pm. Free and open to the public on Nov. 13-14, 10 am-5:30 pm. Proceeds benefit the Spokane Art School programs. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main. spokaneartschool.net (305-3001) KAY O’ROURKE & GERIT GRIMM Longtime Spokane artist Kay O’Rourke exhibits her expressive oil paintings alongside figurative sculptor Gerit Grimm, who sculpts historic figurines derived from fables and myths. Nov. 13-28; opening reception Nov. 13, from 5-8 pm. Artist talk/demo Nov. 14, at 1 pm. Gallery hours Tue-Sat, 11 am-6 pm. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com NATURE CONNECTS: LEGO BRICK SCULPTURES The MAC displays 27 giant sculptures created from nearly 500,000


LEGO bricks by award-winning artist Sean Kenney. Nov. 14 through Feb. 7, 2016. Gallery hours Wed-Sun, 10 am-5 pm. Museum admission applies. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931)

WORDS

DAVID SEDARIS Tweaking the familiar until it warps, Sedaris mines poignant comedy from his peculiar childhood in North Carolina, his bizarre career path, and his move with his lover to France. Nov. 12, 7:30 pm. $45-$50. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404) EVERYBODY READS: ANTHONY DOERR Pulitzer Prize winning author Doerr and his bestselling novel “All the Light We Cannot See” are the featured book and speaker for Idaho’s Everybody Reads 15th annual community reading program. Nov. 13, noon. Free; RSVP required. Colfax Library, 102 S. Main St. (509-397-4366) EWU VISITING WRITERS: LINDA BIERDS Bierds is the award-winning author of nine books of poetry, and her work has appeared in the New Yorker since 1984. Nov. 13, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. getlitfestival.org/visiting-writers LEONARD PITTS JR. Pitts’ comes to Spokane to share from his new novel, “Grant Park,” which follows a pair of veteran journalists from the days of Martin Luther King, Jr. Nov. 14, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) POETRY FOR NON-POETS Former Spokane Poet Laureat Thom Caraway provides attendees with an empowering introduction to poetry designed to help anyone feel comfortable talking about poems and possibly writing their own. Nov. 14, 4-6 pm. Spark Center, 1214 W. Summit Parkway. sparkwestcentral.org NIKI BREESER TSCHIRGI: GROWING UP ALASKA The local author shares stories from her book, a look into her childhood in her hometown of Tok, in interior Alaska. Nov. 16, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St. spokanelibrary.org ALEX KUO The award-winning writer visits the University of Idaho as part of the English Department’s Visiting Writer series. He gives a reading followed by a book signing. Nov. 17, 7:30 pm. Free and open to the public. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. (208-882-2669)

ETC.

HOLIDAY FLOWER ARRANGING WSU Master Gardener Steven Nokes presents a class on how to make natural floral arrangements for the holidays with flowers and evergreens. Free; registration requested. Nov. 14, 10 am. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. (456-8038) MILLIANA JEWELRY HOLIDAY SALE The locally-based, handmade jewelry company opens its Spokane office and showroom to the public for a friends and family shopping event, offering its locally-crafted pieces at wholesale prices. Meet the designers and enjoy refreshments. No cost to attend. Nov. 19, 3-7 pm. 905 W. Riverside, Ste. 608. milliana.com POEMA DE ANDALUCÍA A journey through the cultures and traditions of the Andalusian provinces that form the cradle of flamenco. Nov. 13, 7:30 pm. $16$22. Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, WSU Pullman. performingarts.wsu.edu 

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or most people in the state of Washington, it’s simple: You’re either a Husky or a Coug. And as if the rivalry between the University of Washington and Washington State University wasn’t fierce enough already, two strains named after the schools are fanning the flames. The strain named after the Seattle university has a storied past. It’s rumored that a clone plant was, shall we say, liberated from one of UW’s research labs in the early ’90s by a grad student. Despite its iffy origins, UW Purple’s relaxing high and pain-relieving qualities (it also helps with insomnia) make it a popular strain. Local retailer Satori buys its UW Purple from Seattle-based grower Dawg Star Cannabis. “It is an indica, usually with nice, dew-like trichomes and thick streaks of lavender-shaded purple throughout the bud,” says Joshua Martin, lead budtender at Satori. Varying temperatures during the growing process encourage the purple hue, taking the bud’s Husky homage one step further. Martin notes, however, that the purple color doesn’t appear in all strains. An eighth of UW Purple from Satori costs between $40 and $45.

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A little closer to home is WSU, an indica in the same lineage as Chemo, a bud used to treat negative effects of chemotherapy by suppressing nausea and stimulating appetite. Despite its medicinal origins, WSU has become more recreational in recent years, which Martin says depends on the grower. “I have several different strains in the shop that have the same name and come from a shared parentage, but depending on the methods the grower uses — their nutrients, the way that they flush their plants — those are the things that are going to significantly affect the quality of the strain,” he says. The ode to Pullman’s crimson and gray has a soft spot in Martin’s heart. “It’s a deeply relaxing, sedative stone that is perfect for chilling out, watching movies,” he says. “It’s excellent to help with sleep... I’m of the school that weed definitely makes food taste better, so if you’re looking to veg out and eat some snacks, it’s totally the way to go.” An eighth of the WSU that Satori buys from Spokane-based GrowState costs $30. No matter who you root for during the Apple Cup, both of these strains should smooth over any hard feelings between rival fans — at least until next year’s game. n

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70. 1053, on a cornerstone 71. Code for Latin America’s busiest airport 72. Smart ____ 73. Washington, but not Lincoln DOWN 1. Ram’s horn used on Jewish holidays 2. Home fit for a king 3. Skips over in pronunciation 4. Greets from afar 5. Iditarod vehicle 6. “Strangers and Brothers” novelist 7. Singer with the hit 2014 song “Chandelier” 8. Diplomatic goal 9. Egyptian crosses 10. Brown-____ 11. “The Odd Couple” director

12. “The Rachel Papers” novelist Martin 13. “Chop-chop!” 18. Grammy-winning singer from Barbados 22. “The ____ see it ...”

36. Negotiate with success 37. Trio before HI 38. Bride of a Beatle who attended elementary school with Emperor Akihito 39. Finish (up) 40. Second baseman who was 1982’s National League Rookie of the Year 42. 2008 TARP recipient 45. Levine of “The Voice” 47. Natural seasoning 50. Batting next 52. Sister of Julie Nixon Eisenhower 53. Like some wonders 54. Cryptozoology figure 56. Opera with the aria “Recondita armonia” 57. Quagmire “SACKS” 60. Paella ingredient, perhaps 61. “____ is the answer, but while you’re 25. Knew about waiting for the answer, sex raises some 29. Clunker pretty interesting questions”: Woody Allen 31. Fashion show disaster 62. Captain Hook henchman 32. Org. named in WikiLeaks documents 64. Ideologies 34. Mannequin topper 67. Pac-12 member

NOVEMBER 12, 2015 INLANDER 53


The Mind of an Addict A local man self-published a book about his crack addiction in order to help others BY MITCH RYALS

R

od Harvey breaks a chunk of feta cheese into little square pieces and lays them out on a black bar napkin at a table at Zola. The 48-year-old, a senior chef at the downtown bar and restaurant, works with the off-white cheese almost every day. He laughs at the irony. “This is what crack looks like,” he says, pointing to the six pieces of cheese slightly smaller than dice. “This woulda been a good $100 back in the day.” Harvey’s crack addiction started in Tacoma in 1989. He was on his way home, he says, when he spotted a young woman walking in the pouring rain. He offered her a ride, and she introduced him to a small, dirty rock that changed his life forever. For the next 20 years, his addiction dragged him up and down the country. It destroyed his relationships with family and friends — some beyond repair — ended his seven-year Navy career, landed in him in jail, sucked up entire paychecks and controlled every decision he made. Since he can remember, Harvey has carried a pen and pad with him. Even with his mind clouded by the drugs, he recorded everything: the break-ins and robberies, the women in sleazy motels, the court hearings, running from the police and his time in jail. For 10 years he worked to organize those notes into what is now his self-published book, “Crack, Love, N Pain,” a brutally honest 280-page glimpse into the mind of an addict. Harvey says he started the book in 2000, 11 years after that first hit. It took another decade to finish, and after several rejections from publishing companies, he decided to do it himself. The stream-of-consciousness style takes readers through Harvey’s life and how he eventually beat the “monster” that ruled his thoughts.

54 INLANDER NOVEMBER 12, 2015

“There are usually two ways out of crack addiction: prison or death,” Harvey says. “Once you do it that one time, you give the addiction the control. Most people don’t know they can cut it loose.” He hopes his book will show others how.

T

hat first time didn’t take much convincing. The woman told him to try it once, and if he didn’t like it, he wouldn’t have to do it again. She showed him how to pull the smoke from the makeshift aluminum foil pipe. The sensation was instant. They smoked a “twenty” and went to buy some more. Although he claims he didn’t use again after that night for almost a year, he says he was hooked. Harvey’s narrative tells of nights spent going back and forth from crack houses to rooms he’d rent by the hour. By morning, an entire week’s wages would be gone. There were times he’d drive around high for hours with his young son in the backseat. He didn’t want to go home to face his wife. He tells of building a cave in the woods to hide from police who suspected him of rape, and of the time he was shot trying to cheat a dealer out of some money. But rock bottom was when he started stealing from his mother. Swiping $20 or $30 at first soon turned into writing himself $500 checks from her account. “The thing is, it wasn’t even painful at the time,” Harvey says. “It was soulless.”

N

ot until 2005, during a nine-month stint in a Mississippi jail, did Harvey shake loose from his “monster.” He was serving time for burglary and attempted assault when his ex-wife, Sharron Myers, sent him Joyce Meyer’s Battlefield of the Mind.

“That book made me realize I had a problem with thinking,” he says. “It taught me how to change the channel in my head.” He claims to have been clean ever since he got out. Although the addiction destroyed Myers’ relationship with Harvey, she recognizes the huge transformation he’s been through. She remembers that Harvey used to disappear for days, sometimes taking their children with him. He was always asking for money and neglected his kids, she says. “Every time he would come back, it was a different story,” Myers says. “Car broke down, or something. Typical drug addict stories.” The biggest change Myers has seen is in the relationship with his children. Chelsea Harvey, their daughter, has developed a great relationship with her dad. “I think he’s trying to right a lot of his wrongs,” Chelsea says. “He’s a good dad and a good granddad.” Harvey, who has sold about 800 copies of “Crack, Love, N Pain,” hopes that one day it will end up in prison libraries throughout the country. You can order his book from Amazon, or from his website, sowministries. webs.com. He also self-published two other books and is working on a few more, including a children’s book. He hopes to tell his story in schools and prisons throughout the country. Along with his 22-year-old son, D’Angelo, Harvey also hopes to open a nonprofit to help addicts in Spokane. “These past five years have been the hardest of my life because I’m in reality now, and I wasn’t then,” he says. “Our goal is to change someone’s world. Maybe not the world, but someone’s world.” n mitchr@inlander.com

Local author Rod Harvey hopes his book about crack addiction will help others escape the drug’s death grip. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO


DECEMBER 3-6 INB Performing Arts Center

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