Inlander 11/10/2022

Page 1

CITY COSTS SPOKANE’S BUDGET IS BROKEN DOWN PAGE 8

VETERANS’ FOOD FROM SERVING AMERICA TO SERVING MEALS PAGE 28

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

TRIBAL MEMBERS RECTIFY HISTORIC MISINFO PAGE 27

NOVEMBER 10-16, 2022 | LIBERTY, EQUALITY AND FREE PAPERS

As the deadline to clear Camp Hope approaches, are we solving the problem or making it worse? BY NATE SANFORD

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ith this week’s snow and the approach of family gatherings and reflections of gratitude, it’s time for the community of Spokane to take a moment to think about the people of Camp Hope. Think about what it would take for you to live there. A lost job or medical emergency or something else unexpected. Think about living in a tent when the snow falls and the temperature drops below freezing. Think about grace and compassion. Now consider how we, as a community, can best deal with what is among the largest homeless encampments not in just the state, but the nation. If the camp is cleared this month as the sheriff, mayor and others seek, do the people living on state-owned land next to an interstate have anywhere to go? Does the city have enough space in its shelter system? Do we, as neighbors, have enough space in our hearts to welcome them to our neighborhoods? Keep all of this in mind as you read this week’s cover story — HOPELESS — by staffer Nate Sanford. As his story details, elected officials, local business owners and advocates have all put a lot of energy — and hand-wringing and vitriol — into the situation. But as Nate’s reporting in the story and over recent months has shown, the people living at the camp have their own expectations and worries, the topmost being whether any of the people making decisions about Camp Hope have their well-being in mind. Nate’s story starts on page 16. — NICHOLAS DESHAIS, editor

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IF YOU COULD RECAST ANY MARVEL SUPERHERO WHO WOULD IT BE? ELISHA MUELLER

Alexander Skarsgård, because I love him. But who would I cast him as? I want to say Loki, because I love a morally gray character, but I also really like the actor who does Loki. Skarsgård was Eric Northman on True Blood. He’s like a Swedish Viking type.

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The Hulk. I’m looking for someone who would look weaker. You know, the Hulk goes from a very weak guy to the Hulk.

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I mean there’s so many layers to that, because historically before Black Panther, every superhero was just cast in this, like, White light. I definitely would like to bring in more representation into someone like Supergirl or Wonder Woman as a strong Black female or Indigenous woman. I think I would go with Wonder Woman as an Indigenous woman, it just kind of fits with her story, being from an island and isolated.

HADYN GOOLER

I guess I maybe wouldn’t recast anybody. Do you have a favorite movie in the Marvel universe? I’m not sure about a specific movie, but I really like Iron Man. I just think it’s really cool because it’s all sciencey and stuff. It’s more science fiction than superpowers.

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You look at them and you’re like eh, I guess that’s a perfect fit, that works. I mean I don’t know about a replacement, but I would’ve been interested in seeing how Edward Norton would handle Hulk in the other movies. But he only got one. He’s a very good actor.

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Last year, Bill Akers died at the age of 98, but the story of his service will live on.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

One Veteran’s Journey Alomst 80 years ago, Bill Akers was assigned to his foxhole on the frontline of the Battle of the Bulge; all he was supposed to do was win the war BY ROBERT HEROLD

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t age 21, on Nov. 10, 1944, William “Bill” Rodney Akers moved into his new place. It was a foxhole on the frontline of the Battle of the Bulge, Hitler’s final, desperate offensive of World War II. The Allies had been on the continent since June, and the last-gasp plan called for the Germans to drive through the allied lines to Antwerp; the attack came on with terrifying suddenness. It would end five weeks later in a total German defeat. American casualties, including captured and missing, would total upward of 80,000. Germany would lose even more and surrendered three months later. As Akers settled in that day, fresh off basic training, the Germans were no more than a mile away, sometimes as close as 500 yards: “We could hear them.” Akers’ division — the 99th — had a lot to do with stopping the German advance on the critical northern flank.

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kers related his story sitting in the clubhouse at the Fairways Golf Course between rounds, at a spry age of 91 back

in 2014. He died at his Spokane home just last year, on Oct. 13, 2021, at the age of 98. Akers and his wife, Jeanne, had 17 grandchildren and, at the time of his passing, 27 great-grandchildren and two great-great grandkids. World War II veterans like Bill Akers are getting harder to find each Veterans Day. Of course, more than 400,000 U.S. service members never came home from the war. And as of Sept. 30, it’s estimated the number of WWII veterans still with us is just above 150,000. Preserving their stories and their spirits is left to all of us. Born on July 22, 1923, in Seattle, Akers graduated from Seattle Prep and went to work in a shipyard; he was drafted in March 1943. Shortly thereafter, he was chosen for the Army Special Training Program. But then came D-Day — replacement troops were needed immediately, and Akers, together with his fellow ASTP students, were called up from their classrooms


at Oklahoma State University. The 99th arrived in Le Havre on Nov. 2, 1944. Akers recalls the French city looked as if “it had been stepped on.” The 99th was taken directly to the front, along a sparsely occupied, 20-mile stretch in the Ardennes Forest in Belgium. On Nov. 10 — the day before the 6-year-old Veterans Day holiday — Akers took his position in a damp, cold foxhole. Five cold and snowy weeks went by without major action. But on the morning of Dec. 16, at 5:30 am, Akers was jolted awake by a German artillery barrage — the opening salvo of the Battle of the Bulge.

T

he young, untested college-age kids of the 99th were the very first Americans to confront the German onslaught. An official report puts their dire situation into perspective: [Field Marshal] Von Rundstedt’s plan was simple: to strike a thinly held line of a green, untried division with an overpowering force. Behind the 99th was the highway to Eupen; paratroopers would drop there in strength. Panzers would follow SS troops, hook up with paratroopers, and strike for Liege before the Americans could shift their forces. “When the barrage ended,” Akers remembered, “the Germans charged from the tree line. We were on a reverse slope, in a low draw — a bad place to be.” I asked how close the Germans were when first seen. “About a hundred yards. I can still see that German sergeant waving his troops forward,” Akers recalled. “What did you do?” I asked. “Well, we held for a short time, then we got the hell out.” Akers’ company was about to be overrun. They retreated to company headquarters. “We made it,” he said, “and now we had the advantage — the Germans had to come up through that draw.” What happened next might be described as a double massacre. Most of the American soldiers who didn’t fall back were killed in their foxholes. But the Germans were the next to be slaughtered. Akers said that after it was over, he counted more than 70 bodies right in front of his line of foxholes. And it got very close, very nasty. “One German officer made it into our line,” Akers recalls. “I saw him machine-gun everyone in the trench, and then… he just dropped his rifle and surrendered. This guy standing next to me had seen enough. He looked at the German, now with his hands raised, and shot him in the head.”

T

he battle raged for three days. The American kids held out. But the U.S. losses were enormous. Akers’ company entered battle with 186 men and six officers. Two days later, “only 36 of us were still alive and not wounded.” The 99th — dubbed the “Battle Babies” — eventually did make contact with the 2nd Division (which had landed on Omaha Beach), and together they held two strategic towns, Rocherath and Krinkelt. All would then fall back to the Elsenborn Ridge, which they held until the battle ended. Shortly before midnight on Dec. 20, the battlefield was declared “all quiet.” The Germans were stopped. On Dec. 18, Akers recalled making contact with a forward observer who told him he was calling in artillery support. Akers said he could still smell the cordite from that incoming barrage; it was that close to the American line. During that dark night, Akers was wounded by friendly fire. “It really wasn’t that serious,” he said. While examining his wound, doctors discovered that those weeks in the foxholes had left him with trench foot; that’s what eventually sent him home. “I’m still getting 10 percent disability,” he joked that day at the Fairways. A final note: Like so many other members of the Greatest Generation, Akers never wanted to be regarded as a hero. Here on Veterans Day especially, I think we all know different. n This story was adapted and updated from our Dec. 4, 2014, story, “From College to Chaos.” Robert Herold, a retired professor at both Eastern Washington University and Gonzaga University, found some of his best stories out on the golf course.

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Mayor Nadine Woodward

CITY HALL

BROKEN DOWN BUDGET T

here are a million stories in a city budget. But in this attention-deficit culture, you start droning on about numbers long enough and everyone’s eyes glaze over. So instead of just writing one long meandering budget narrative, we here at the Inlander decided to tell a ton of little budget stories in a bite-size, easily digestible, not at all boring chunks. On your marks, get set, go:

COUNCIL WANTS A STINGIER BUDGET

Last week, the office of Spokane Mayor Nadine Woodward issued a kind of mission-accomplished press release, declaring “Woodward submits balanced prioritybased budget.” Ehhhh, not really, City Council members countered. To them, the mayor’s budget isn’t really balanced for the long term. Start with the fact that it uses about $2.6 million from reserves — effectively dipping into the city’s savings account — to stay afloat. “I’m really concerned that our unappropriated reserves are so low,” says City Council member Lori Kinnear, using fancy talk for the city’s unspent savings. “It’s like a piggy bank that the administration keeps going into.” Next, add on the fact that the mayor’s budget doesn’t account for the roughly $5 million the city needs to spend on hardware for the fire department, like fire trucks. Then add the $7 million for operating the city’s new homeless shelter. Woodward’s budget appears to plan to

8 INLANDER NOVEMBER 10, 2022

You think the city’s yawning budget gap is a problem? Wait till you hear about what’s happening in the fire, police, human resources, utility and… well, just read the story already BY DANIEL WALTERS

pay for that using money from a council-opposed sales tax that had been reserved for permanent housing. The council has vehemently objected. Grab your adding machine and start crunching totals. Matt Boston, the City Council’s budget guru, sees more like a $15 million gulf separating what the city takes in as revenue and what he anticipates the Woodward administration will actually spend next year. But Tonya Wallace, Woodward’s chief financial officer, says that improving the city’s long-term budget situation should be part of a lengthier process. “We have lost $37 million in revenue” due to the pandemic, Wallace stressed during a meeting with council members last Thursday. She argued the reserve funds used were within the “margin of error” and called upon the council to work with the mayor’s office to “get back to basics” over the next few months and develop a strategy to weather a potential recession together. But council members have demanded more specificity, requesting the mayor cut budget costs by 10 percent and start socking away savings for the long metaphorical fiscal winter ahead. “We are stingy beyond belief with taxpayer dollars,” Kinnear says, proudly.

UNPAID UTILITY BILLS

What about all that extra COVID relief money? Could

that rescue us in these uncertain economic times? Well, there’s only about $13.5 million left. There’s also $8.5 million in unpaid utility bills that citizens racked up during the pandemic. Marlene Feist, the city’s public works director, is requesting $5 million of American Rescue Plan Act dollars to try to “see how we can help the most people” by relieving their utility bills. The City Council sounds willing. “Can you imagine if you owed $2,000 in utilities?” Kinnear says. “How you’d just feel desperate, like ‘I can’t ever pay that back?’ It’s imperative we take that burden off of people.” You know who else got away without fully paying for utilities? Spokane County. Ever since the county’s new wastewater treatment center began operating inside city limits in December 2011, the city was supposed to be collecting taxes from the county, but decided, nah, they wouldn’t enforce it. This little nugget of information was part of a report released last month by the state auditor, which found that the city had foregone millions in revenue by not following their own tax laws. If the city had collected those taxes, the state auditor found, it’d have reaped $5 million from 2017 to 2020. In the city’s response to the audit, it promised the state it would work out a deal with the county on that issue, ...continued on page 10


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NEWS | CITY HALL “BROKEN DOWN BUDGET,” CONTINUED... as part of sprawling discussions over everything from criminal justice to homelessness, by the end of January. Surely, considering history and all, things will work out, right?

ABOUT THAT OVERTIME STUDY…

The council expects to spend the rest of COVID relief funds to pay for yet another big round of budget overruns: $3.7 million for fire overtime and $2.5 million in police overtime. Cue the déjà vu. “Every year, both police and fire blow through their overtime budget,” Kinnear says, comparing it to Peanuts character Lucy yanking the football away from Charlie Brown. “They keep fooling us and we keep falling for it.” Last year, the City Council was frustrated that — despite record levels of police and fire overtime usage — a study on the topic they’d funded in the 2020 budget hadn’t been done. This year, there are still huge overtime overruns, and we still don’t have that overtime study, despite farming it out to Matrix Consulting a year ago. Back then, the city thought it would take a year to conduct a study. And Matrix, still fresh-faced ingenues full of hope and idealism, thought they’d be able to crank it out in just 24 weeks. That, uh, didn’t happen. In August, there was even an indication that Matrix was having trouble getting info from the city at all. “Hey do you mind just doing something odd for me,” Matrix’s Greg Mathews wrote in an email to the City Council’s budget guru in August. “Can you respond to this email please just so I know that my emails to the city of Spokane are still working?”

In a phone conversation with the Inlander, Mathews acknowledged that there were some communications challenges with the city but said the much, much bigger problem was the city’s terrible budgeting software. “Their information technology systems are, frankly, quite antiquated,” Mathews says. And that turned “getting data that is usable and comprehensive” into a Herculean task. When just finding out what’s been happening with overtime is a nightmare, it makes it a lot harder to fix it. While Matrix offered a confidential preview of their initial findings in September to the city, they won’t have the final study until Dec. 1. They say.

…OR THE FIRE SICK-LEAVE AUDIT

A year ago, Woodward also declared that she was kicking off a third-party “forensic audit” to dig into how the fire department uses its sick leave. After all, sick leave use had spiked dramatically in the months leading up to the COVID vaccine mandate deadline for city firefighters. The mayor leapt into the fray, declaring she was taking “immediate action” to probe the issue and gain the kind of insights that could impact “labor contract negotiations, budgeting, and spending.” “The audit is expected to take several weeks to complete once initiated,” the November 2021 news release predicted. Well, like the overtime study, the sick leave audit still isn’t finished. Far from “immediate action,” the city didn’t actually even choose a third-party firm, Preston CPA, to conduct the audit until six months later. Now, results are expected next month. Randy Marler, president of the Spokane Firefighters

Union, says he hasn’t heard anything about the audit, but he shrugs off any speculation about fire department shenanigans. “It’s pretty obvious what’s happened over the last couple years,” Marler says. His theory: Firefighters started using more sick leave because they or their family members — wait for it — got sick.

HUMAN-LESS RESOURCES

But even as some council members have been pushing for cuts and hiring freezes, there’s a problem: Spokane is already bleeding employees. For all the concern over unfilled positions at the city in 2021, the problem’s gotten worse in 2022. Even though the number of vacancies isn’t as bad as it was earlier this year, this October’s 258 vacancies exceeded even the worst month of 2021. And the mayor wants to add an additional 51 new positions next year. In addition to that, the city has seen even more retirements and resignations. From January through September, there were one and a half times more resignations this year than last (that doesn’t include temporary or seasonal employees). We’re talking about City Hall department heads: Engineering Services Director Kyle Twohig; Development Services Director Kris Becker; Neighborhood, Housing and Human Services Director John Hall; and Neighborhood Services Director Carly Cortright all left the city this year. Brandy Cote, who had been Woodward’s chief of staff, had her position straight-up eliminated in August. And if this sounds like maybe something the Human Resources department could fix, well, we’ve got bad news

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there too. The four HR staffers who’ve resigned this year include Director Kris Smith and the former interim director, Meghann Steinolfson. They had to borrow an attorney from the city’s legal department just to have someone in charge. “It’s problematic that we don’t have an HR director,” Kinnear says. Yet the city’s attempt to keep its employees has its own problems. With inflation so high, the city agreed to give big yearly salary increases to unionized employees. But that’s one reason we’re in such a big budget mess in the first place.

TAX ON SHELTERS

Hold on a minute, you might be saying, audibly speaking to the newspaper in your hand. Why is inflation even an issue? Sure, costs go up, but that just means tax revenue goes up just as fast, right? Because of, like, percentages? You would think that. But you’d be wrong. Sure, sales tax revenue skyrockets, but that’s not the case with property taxes, a major source of revenue for the city. Property taxes can only go up by a max of 1 percent a year, no matter how fast the value of homes increase. That led to the value of Spokane properties growing about five times faster in 2021 than the city’s property tax revenues did. Still, one council member, Michael Cathcart, argues that not only should the city cut spending a bunch, it shouldn’t even take that 1 percent increase. “The government is very responsible for a whole lot of things that people are suffering right now,” Cathcart says. “We should just not add to the suffering.” But please, spare a moment also for the suffering city accountants and their 10-key calculators, trying to make the budget balance. n danielw@inlander.com

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NEWS | BRIEFS

What are you waiting for? Wahid Kashify was arrested at a volleyball tournament.

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three-year search for a Spokane man accused of killing his wife and hiding her body in a freezer ended at a volleyball tournament in Europe last month, the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office announced on Monday. Wahid Kashify is expected to stand trial on a first-degree murder charge in the May 2019 killing of his wife, Arezu. By the time authorities found Arezu’s body at the couple’s north Spokane apartment, Kashify had left the country for Afghanistan, where he has family. Detective Marc Melville, with the sheriff’s office, says a video recovered from the alleged killer’s phone showed a clear confession. Over the next three years, the sheriff’s office worked with the FBI, Department of Justice, Interpol and the Department of Defense to find KaTHE shify as he traveled between Afghanistan, Turkey, Iran and Europe. Melville says efforts to communicate with Kashify’s family in Afghanistan were complicated by the collapse of the country’s government in 2021. Last month, authorities ANNUAL REPORT were finally able to locate and arrest Kashify at a volleyball tournament in Europe. (The suspect is passionate about the sport, Melville says.) Kashify is now awaiting extradition in an undisclosed European country. (NATE SANFORD)

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ANNUAL REPORT

LOSING DOLLARS

The county’s rental assistance strategy totally made sense: With all of these different pools of federal rental assistance money floating around with different deadlines, focus on spending the funds with the earlier deadlines first. So while Spokane County already distributed $37 million to help struggling renters, by August it had only spent 6 percent of the second “Emergency Rental Assistance” trove of Department of Treasury funds. That wasn’t unreasonable: Supposedly, the deadline for spending the proposed $7.1 million was way in the future — September 2025. The strategy backfired. The Treasury announced that, because Spokane County hasn’t spent that particular trove of rental assistance funding quickly enough, it’s going to lose out on nearly $1 million in federal funding. “If we had a crystal ball, if we knew that they’re going to move the goalposts on us, yeah, we could have come up with a different strategy,” says Jared Webley, a county spokesman. (DANIEL WALTERS)

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ON STANDS NOW NOVEMBER 10, 2022 INLANDER 13


NEWS | PANDEMIC FUNDING

A request to upgrade Wallace’s senior center has drawn scrutiny.

Forging Upgrades

A Shoshone County commissioner got $20,000 in federal pandemic money in someone else’s name. All that person wanted was a toilet. BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

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he Wallace Senior Drop-in Center needs new flooring, windows, tables, chairs and a television, according to a request for some of Shoshone County’s American Rescue Plan funding submitted by the senior center’s board President Denise Nelson. The thing is, Nelson says she never submitted that request for more than $24,000 of the pandemic-related funding to the Shoshone County Board of Commissioners. In fact, she says the senior citizens who rent the North Idaho drop-in center for bingo nights and pinochle games don’t have any problems with the floor, tables or chairs, and they don’t have issues with the space getting too cold. They’re fine putting some plastic over the windows in the winter, she says, but the heat already works well whenever they need it. Really, the only upgrade Nelson would love to see their landlord make is putting in a taller toilet that doesn’t need the handle jiggled to work. So, who did ask the Shoshone County commissioners for the money? That would be Shoshone County Commissioner John Hansen, whose wife, Sue, owns the 1940s-era building, at 619 Cedar St. in Wallace, where the senior center is located. In May of this year, Hansen was the commissioner who signed the paperwork officially accepting $2.5 million from the American Rescue

MIKE McCALL PHOTO

Plan Act (ARPA) on behalf of the county. In total, the American Rescue Plan, passed by Congress in spring 2021, included $1.9 trillion for a variety of pandemic-related recovery efforts, from rental assistance for people who lost their jobs to the $1,400 checks that went out to individuals making less than $75,000 per year. In the act, $350 billion was directed to states, counties, cities and tribal governments as “local fiscal recovery funds” they can directly spend on “water, sewer and broadband infrastructure” and to help people and businesses impacted by the pandemic. The money must be allocated for projects by the end of 2024, with spending completed by the end of 2026. Shoshone County’s $2.5 million was a fairly small piece of the $347 million pie allocated to individual counties throughout Idaho. Nearby Bonner County received more than $8.8 million and Kootenai County received more than $32 million. The nonprofit senior center was closed for most of the last two-plus years due to the pandemic, and only started hosting public game nights and events again this fall. Nelson says that the organization receives grants to pay utilities and $350 a month to rent the space, which has hosted the senior center for 37 years. Nelson says that Hansen did, in fact, talk to her about the possibility of getting some ARPA grant money for upgrades to the senior center, but she also says he never made it clear that he would apply John Hansen for federal funding in her name. “I didn’t sign anything,” Nelson says. “I didn’t see any paperwork.” By the time Hansen spoke with the senior center’s volunteer board about the possibility for upgrades, Nelson says, he’d already submitted an application to the county. Hansen, who did not respond to multiple requests for comment, recused himself from the Oct. 19 vote on whether the county should provide upgrades at the senior center; but he didn’t


say that he was doing so because he owns the building, according to a recording of the commission meeting. Fellow commissioners Tracy Casady and Jay Huber approved giving the center about $20,000, noting that they didn’t think it was appropriate to pay for new tables, chairs or a TV, but that it would be OK to pay for the building upgrades. As members of the Silver Valley community found out about the vote, they took to social media to question how an ARPA application could have been made in someone else’s name, whether the commissioners should spend taxpayer money on upgrades to a privately owned building, and what other decisions may need more scrutiny. Since the backlash, the funding for the senior center has been put on hold, but it’s unclear why, as the matter was not discussed at a public meeting. “This has nothing to do with politics. It just has to do with the fact that I never even saw the application,” Nelson says. “We never asked for any changes. The only thing we asked for was a high rise toilet.”

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During the Oct. 19 meeting, the three Shoshone commissioners also considered three other ARPA funding requests. A similar request for $56,693 for new windows for Cascadia Healthcare’s Kellogg nursing home was met with some skepticism. “Now, if we say yes to this, are we setting the precedent that every business in the valley that wants new windows we’ve got to say yes to [them]?” Commissioner Huber asked. “It comes up to like $1,300 a window.” Staff said approving the request wouldn’t necessarily set a precedent, noting that the nursing home serves an underserved population and the proposed windows are energy efficient. The commissioners decided to table that request in order to get more information before voting. The three also tabled a request from the Nine Mile Cemetery Association for $45,500 to replace metal plaques with granite grave markers. When it came time to discuss the senior center application, staff asked about the state of the current windows in the building. Hansen, who had recused himself before the discussion, explained that the windows are all single pane and some have broken seals, so the upgrades would help with utility costs. After some more discussion, the three approved a $164,000 request from the Shoshone County Horsemen’s Association to install a new well at a private equestrian park, and then Commissioners Huber and Casady approved the roughly $20,000 for the senior center request made in Nelson’s name. “[Hansen’s] intentions may have been good, all their intentions may be good, but you don’t do that, you don’t use someone else’s name and do that,” says Jennifer Sieg, a 75-year-old retiree in Pinehurst who learned about the senior center funding after the vote. Sieg was also concerned about the large spending approval for the new well. “Everything that they’ve done just does not pass the smell test and the ethical test,” Sieg says. Multiple Shoshone County residents who spoke with the Inlander say they’re concerned about how the county board operates in general. The three commissioners share one office in the courthouse in Wallace, raising questions about whether they have conversations about county business outside of public meetings, in violation of Idaho’s open meeting law. “We have county commissioners that are clearly breaking the rules on them sitting in an office together,” Sieg says. “When you listen to the meetings, they’re not even asking each other questions.” Dawn Wiksten, who ran for Huber’s seat on the commission this year but did not get enough votes to move on after the May primary, says she is also concerned with how the recent ARPA applications were handled. She, too, questions the legality of the commissioners sharing an office. “It’s very concerning because everything gets decided before they’ve ever walked into the meeting room,” Wiksten says. “I’m certain [Hansen] could use some upgrades, but that’s not what this money is for. That should be coming out of his pocket.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

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16 INLANDER NOVEMBER 10, 2022


CAMP

Two divergent, contradictory plans will determine the future of Camp Hope.

Quagmire As a cold winter and the specter of sweeps loom over the camp, its residents wonder what comes next. BY NATE SANFORD

TWO

Nearly 700 people lived at Camp Hope over the summer, but the total population is closer to 450 now. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

things set Camp Hope apart from other encampments in Washington: its size and the politics. The East Central encampment is huge. There were close to 700 people living there during the camp’s peak this summer. The total population is closer to 450 now, but that’s still a staggering number of people squeezed onto a single city block. In July, the camp was added to Wikipedia’s list of notable tent cities in the United States. The camp is the largest in Washington and appears to be one of the biggest unsanctioned encampments in the country. “This is just an unprecedented number of people,” says Tedd Kelleher, managing director of the Housing Assistance Unit at the state Department of Commerce. “I haven’t been able to find other instances like this.” The level of political bickering and tension surrounding the camp is also unique. Homelessness is always a contentious issue, and it’s not uncommon for state and local leaders to clash over the best approach for managing encampments, Kelleher says. But in Spokane, months of fiery letters, leaks, dueling news conferences and lawsuit threats have cranked the conflict to a breaking point. “There’s definitely some unique level of tension in Spokane right now,” Kelleher adds. Camp Hope sits within Spokane city limits, but on land owned by the state. That jurisdictional overlap has led to months of back and forth, and to two divergent, contradictory plans that will determine the future of the people living there. The only thing the parties seem to agree on is that Camp Hope can’t last forever. The city, county and local law enforcement want the camp gone soon — ideally by the end of the month. They associate the camp with a rise in crime in the neighborhood and say local busi-

nesses and neighbors have suffered long enough. In late October, they declared a state of emergency and announced a plan that would see campers moved into the recently opened Trent Resource and Assistance Center and other shelter options available in Spokane. Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich, who along with the Spokane mayor, police chief and Spokane County commissioners is leading the charge to sweep the camp, has given Nov. 15 as a target date for disbanding the camp — forcing campers who don’t accept shelter referrals to leave. On Monday, city spokesperson Brian Coddington said the target date is tied to the city’s nuisance abatement order, which is still in the administrative process and has yet to go to the courts. Nov. 15 isn’t necessarily a hard and fast deadline, he said, adding that the city still has an expectation for the camp to be cleared sooner rather than later. “I can’t speculate as to what’s going to happen between now and the 15th,” Coddington said. The state says they want to see the camp gone as well, but only once the residents have been placed in better housing or shelter that matches their needs. They say offers of congregate shelter referrals do little to improve the situation for campers and that the camp can’t be cleared until every camper has access to better, desirable housing options. Spokane doesn’t have enough of that type of housing and shelter, and it’s unclear how long it will take to stand it up. Much to the frustration of the city and some local businesses, the state hasn’t given a firm estimate for how long that might take.

IT STARTED AS A PROTEST

Advocates trace the roots of Camp Hope to the region’s housing affordability crisis, decades of austerity and the defunding of social programs across the country. ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 10, 2022 INLANDER 17


“CAMP QUAGMIRE,” CONTINUED... “This isn’t a short-term problem,” says Meagan Vincello, program director for the Empire Health Foundation, as she walks through the camp. “This is 60 years of how our society views social services.” As the number of people living unhoused in Spokane has risen, shelter beds and transitional housing options have struggled to keep up. In 2018, a few dozen tents popped up outside Spokane City Hall to protest the city’s lack of action in the face of the growing crisis. They called themselves Camp Hope. The city swept the tents after a few weeks, despite opposition from activists. A few years later, in December 2021, the tents were back, once more in protest of the city’s lack of shelter and housing. After the city pledged to clear the tents, the campers moved that same month to the empty lot on Freya Street and Second Avenue in Spokane’s East Central neighborhood. The lot is owned by the Washington State Department of Transportation — a fact that becomes crucial later. Houses once sat on the vacant land, but they were razed over the past two decades to make room for the

18 INLANDER NOVEMBER 10, 2022

north-south freeway. It’s a low-income neighborhood, already marginalized by the construction of I-90 in the 1960s, which cut the neighborhood in half. Since its inception on WSDOT land, Camp Hope has been managed by Jewels Helping Hands, a nonprofit that has also been involved in running shelters in the city. Julie Garcia, the organization’s executive director, says campers first moved to the WSDOT property out of convenience. The spot is far from neighbors and businesses, and it felt like the safest option in the city, she says.

RIGHT-OF-WAYS

It’s not uncommon for people to camp on right-of-ways owned by WSDOT. The freeway-adjacent parcels of land are generally isolated and tucked away, while still within walking distance of major urban centers. The most famous example is probably the Jungle, a former Seattle encampment on a stretch of land underneath I-5 that had an estimated 400 residents at its peak in the mid-2010s. The Jungle, like Camp Hope, was a never-ending political conflict. Some people cited concerns with crime and

called for it to be shut down as quickly as possible. Others argued that the people there needed more help: services, mental health support and desirable shelter options. The tenor of the debate changed in early 2016, when a shooting at the Jungle killed two people and injured three. Facing mounting pressure, the city and WSDOT spent the next few months working to move the campers, eventually sweeping the whole thing in October 2016. Ron Judd, WSDOT’s external affairs director, says the sweep didn’t go well. Tensions were high, and people wanted it done quickly. Without sufficient housing options, he says, most of the camp’s residents just ended up scattered to other right-of-ways across the city. “All sweeps do is rearrange where people are staying,” Judd says. “It doesn’t get them in housing, it doesn’t provide them the services they need.” Judd says WSDOT learned its lesson and has since moved away from the sweep approach to encampment removals. In response to a significant, pandemic-related increase in the number of people living on spots near freeways, earlier this year Gov. Jay Inslee signed the


Chris Senn, 52, works at Camp Hope as a security guard. He’s lived there for about seven months and is one of three camp residents named as a plaintiffs in a lawsuit seeking to stop the city and county’s plan to clear the camp. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“Rights-of-Way Initiative,” which allocates more than $143 million toward moving people away from highway encampments and into safer housing opportunities. The goal of the initiative isn’t just to clear encampments. The state’s goal is to work with local jurisdictions to identify better housing options and connect unhoused people with services that help them. The initiative, which is still in its pilot phase, identified five counties for assistance: King, Pierce, Snohomish, Thurston and Spokane. The state first began engaging with Spokane leaders in May. By late July, money started flowing in to fund housing projects where Camp Hope residents could eventually be moved. The biggest project underway is the Catalyst Project, which, despite fierce opposition from its West Hills neighbors, aims to bring more than 100 units of supportive housing online in December. Over the summer, as the city and state worked to identify where the money should go, Camp Hope continued to grow. So did tensions, as neighbors and businesses increasingly frustrated with crime attributed to the camp began calling for a quick removal. In July, a heat wave sent temperatures soaring to 104 degrees, and Jewels Helping Hands built a large, unauthorized cooling shelter to protect the camp’s residents from the sweltering heat. The city, in a move that was criticized as inhumane, ordered WSDOT to take it down. “The politicians at the city think because we aren’t paying property tax, rent, water, sewage, garbage … cable, and landline and all that — that we deserve to sit out here and die,” Karen Potter, a Camp Hope resident, said at the time. WSDOT refused to take the shelter down. The tent stayed up. “Ultimately, the safety and well-being of people is our paramount concern,” the agency said in a fiery statement that hinted at the growing rift between the city and state.

THE CAMPERS

The 450 people living at Camp Hope come from a variety of backgrounds. Some lived indoors recently, others have spent nearly their entire lives living outside. Some campers, Garcia says, grew up with parents who never lived in houses either. Many are veterans. Gary, a camp resident who asked that his last name not be included, says trauma from his military service makes it difficult for him to stay in shelters. Many of the campers also have mental illnesses that make it difficult to stay housed and employed. Some residents are addicted to drugs. Not every camper, as Knezovich has suggested, but there is substance use in the camp. Robert Moody, who used to live at Camp Hope and now works there as a security guard, says he regularly snatches foils (used for smoking heroin, mainly) while doing his rounds. Organizers say the camp used to be targeted by drug dealers who didn’t live there, but who knew they could blend in with the residents. A security fence that WSDOT installed around the camp has helped stop that, they say. Many campers have physical disabilities. Potter, who still lives at the camp with her husband and two dogs, has Type II diabetes. In late October, Jewels Helping Hands and Disability Rights Washington filed a federal lawsuit seeking an injunction against the city and county’s plan to sweep the camp. The sweep, the lawsuit says, will “lead to people with disabilities being displaced, traumatized and criminalized disproportionately.” ...continued on next page

“The politicians at the city think because we aren’t paying property tax, rent, water, sewage, garbage … cable, and landline and all that — that we deserve to sit out here and die.

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“CAMP QUAGMIRE,” CONTINUED... SERVICE TENT

Many of the campers have pets. Mostly dogs, but there are a fair amount of cats, too, that run around the camp causing mischief and being cute. Gary, the veteran, has two dogs: Scout and Pretty Mamas. Some campers have criminal records or eviction histories that preclude housing. The campers, many of whom have lived at Camp Hope for almost 10 months now, are like a family, says Earl Anderson, who has lived at the camp for about three months. There’s bickering and arguments, but there’s also joy and community. He says that there have been issues with theft inside the camp, along with tensions between the east and west side of the camp, but that most residents are still able to come together and put aside their differences. Chris Senn, a military veteran and one of three camp residents named as plaintiffs in Jewels’ lawsuit to protect the camp, came to Camp Hope seven months ago. He didn’t know anybody but says people still stepped in to help him out and share what little they had. Within the first night, he says, other campers made sure he had a place to stay, warm clothes and food to eat. “Everybody here, for the most part, will give you the nothing that they have to make sure you have something,” Senn says.

CAMP HOPE

I-90

In September, the state began contracting with the Empire Health Foundation to do outreach work at Camp Hope. A lot of changes began happening quickly. Along with the perimeter fence, the organizers instituted a new nighttime curfew, floodlights, a badging check in-check out system and a list of rules campers have to sign off on if they want to stay. WSDOT hired a private security company to patrol the perimeter. The Empire Health Foundation, with $3.5 million from the state Commerce Department, began serving as the primary service provider at the camp, and is now subcontracting with local organizations to do additional outreach. “What you see here is completely different than what it was about six months ago,” says Zeke Smith, president of the Empire Health Foundation. “It’s a much more organized and stable environment.” The state Department of Licensing is now there on a regular basis to do ID replacement. The state Department of Health, as well as the Department of Social and Human Services, also makes regular visits. The work being done at Camp Hope hasn’t stopped tensions between the city and state from escalating. In early September, the city threatened to declare the camp a nuisance property and ordered the state to take it down by mid-November. The state responded with a scathing letter accusing the city of shifting blame for a problem it created and being unwilling to work with the state to identify housing options that would lead to a humane camp closure. “Acting on the city’s ill-considered demand solves nothing for anyone,” the letter said. Knezovich saw the city’s order as a “call to action.” After the state said they wouldn’t be complying with the order, the sheriff abruptly inserted himself into the fray, declaring his intention to sweep the camp by

FRED MEYER

mid-October. He later moved the deadline back to midNovember at the request of Mayor Nadine Woodward, who likes to refer to the camp as the “WSDOT encampment.” “This is a drug-fueled protest of people who want no barriers, and they want to do whatever they want,” Knezovich said. “This protest is about to end.” During this time, the state was in regular operational meetings with city officials. With threats of lawsuits and sweeps looming, the meetings got heated. Mike Gribner, WSDOT’s Eastern Region administrator, says elected officials were asked not to attend some meetings, and those meetings were slightly more productive. Still, little progress was made. The state is still communicating with the city and county regularly, but Kelleher, from the Com-

“What you see here is completely different than what it was about six months ago. It’s a much more organized and stable environment. 20 INLANDER NOVEMBER 10, 2022

THOR ST.

“A LINE IN THE SAND”

merce Department, says the lawsuit threats have stifled any ability to have productive conversations. On Oct. 25, the county declared an emergency at the sheriff’s request, putting the pieces in place for a plan that would see the camp disbanded by Nov. 15. At a press conference, the mayor, sheriff, police chief and county commissioners detailed their plan to expand the bed capacity at the Trent shelter and convert it into a “navigation center.” The East Spokane Business Association has also thrown its support behind the city and county’s plan. During an Oct. 28 press conference, neighborhood business leaders gathered to share stories of how the crime they associate with the camp has impacted their business over the past year. Jesse Smith, who manages the Fred Meyer near the camp, described drug deals and prostitution in the parking lot, assaults on customers and employees, feces and drug use in the store bathroom, and


CAMP HOPE PLAYERS Two separate plans have emerged that will determine the future of the encampment. One calls for a slow, methodical process through which camp residents would be connected to shelter options that match their needs. The other argues that the camp has gone on long enough and that the city’s current shelter system has adequate capacity to absorb the camp’s residents. Here’s a who’s who behind each approach.

SLOW AND STEADY

Washington State Department of Transportation WSDOT owns the land occupied by Camp Hope and is coordinating with other state agencies to slowly clear the camp and connect residents to services as part of the state’s “Rights-of-Way Initiative.” Washington Department of Commerce As part of the state’s initiative, the state Commerce Department has made $24 million available to move the camp residents into more permanent housing in Spokane. Empire Health Foundation The private health foundation has been tapped by the state to coordinate outreach work at Camp Hope. Jewels Helping Hands Led by Julie Garcia, the nonprofit has been the driving force behind Camp Hope since the camp’s inception. It’s now being subcontracted by the Empire Health Foundation to manage the camp. The Empire Health Foundation is also subcontracting with Revive, Compassionate Addiction Treatment and the Spokane Low Income Housing Consortium. The campers Close to 700 people lived at Camp Hope during the summer, but the total number is now closer to 450. Many campers say they prefer living at Camp Hope over one of the city’s shelters.

FAST REMOVAL

The Sheriff Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich has been a fierce critic of Camp Hope and is leading the charge to sweep it by the end of the month. Spokane County Commission On Oct. 25, the county commissioners passed an emergency proclamation at the sheriff’s request allowing leaders to bypass a competitive bidding process while preparing to clear the camp. The Mayor Spokane Mayor Nadine Woodward is standing behind efforts to clear the camp and proposing a plan that would see the Trent shelter expanded and campers moved out of Camp Hope this month. The Police Chief Spokane Police Chief Craig Meidl has associated the camp with an increase in neighborhood crime and joined the mayor in calling for it to be cleared this month. East Spokane Business Association The group of businesses near Camp Hope has complained about heightened security and property crime issues and called on the city to clear the camp by Thanksgiving. — NATE SANFORD

an unprecedented level of shoplifting. Other business owners had similar stories and called for the camp to be closed before Thanksgiving. The increase in crime near the camp they describe is backed up by police department data, which shows a 114 percent increase in property crime within a quartermile radius of the camp compared to previous years. Ryan Overton, communications manager for WSDOT’s Eastern Region, argues that the fence and other security measures put in place last month will help address some of the concerns about crime. He also notes that it’s impossible to tell how much of the crime is coming from people who actually live inside the camp.

NAVIGATION CENTER

success of the “Rights-of-Way Initiative.” Most of the encampment removals conducted under the initiative have been in King County — a fact that Overton, from WSDOT, attributes to strong cooperation between local leaders and a diverse housing supply. When asked about Camp Hope, Inslee said the state is taking an “assertive, aggressive approach” to find additional housing opportunities for the camp’s residents and that the state wants to see the camp moved “as soon as humanly possible.” If local authorities ultimately try to clear Camp Hope this month, Gribner says there’s not much his agency can do to stop them. “We’re not going to lay in front of the sheriff’s car,” Gribner says. Still, he’s skeptical of the city’s drive to actually follow through on the deadline, and he says he’ll be curious to see how things change after this week’s election.

The state is skeptical of the city and county’s plan, and state officials don’t think the Trent shelter will be able to accommodate all of Camp Hope’s residents. Even if there were space, they argue that most campers would refuse to go. Trent is a congregate shelter, with hundreds of beds all in the same room. Garcia says some camp residents might be more willing to go now that the Salvation Army is operating the shelter, but most will still choose not to. (The city ended its contract with the previous operator, the Guardians Foundation, after a fraud scandal last month.) Kelleher, from the Commerce Department, has previously worked with three different navigation centers in other parts of the state. He notes that “navigation center,” like many phrases in the homeless services world, is a bit of a buzzword that means different things depending on whom you ask. In general, the phrase Julie Garcia (right) with Camp Hope Director of Operations Ken Crary. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO refers to a temporary place where unhoused people can stay while working with various service providers to get connected to more stable housing. WSDOT is preparing for the coming winter by putProgressives like Spokane City Council President ting up warming tents with propane heat in the middle Breean Beggs say the outreach work being done at Camp of Camp Hope. Despite the city and county’s ongoing Hope falls under the definition of “navigation center,” plans with the emergency operations center, Kelleher says and he questions the city and county’s plan to shut down state officials are keeping their heads down and moving Camp Hope and stand up a new navigation center at the forward with the work. Trent shelter. Still, the looming threat is making things difficult. “My sense is we don’t have the money for a second Vincello, with the Empire Health Foundation, says the one, and it’s very disruptive to forcibly move everyone constantly shifting deadlines are making camp residents over there,” Beggs says. “The Trent shelter is not big nervous and interrupting the outreach work. enough to do it.” Sharyl Brown, a peer navigator with Jewels Helping Still, the sheriff wants the state to “come to the table” Hands, says she worries about the prospect of a sweep and work with the city and county on their emergency but tries to block it all out when she’s doing work on the operations plan. The state says they won’t do that. ground at the camp. “If you want to work with us, lift the lawsuit and we’ll “What they’re doing is distracting us from what we’re talk,” says Gribner, from WSDOT. doing,” Brown says. “I’m not going to allow that.” The money supporting the outreach work at Camp Brown used to be homeless. That experience helps Hope is tied to Inslee and the Legislature’s initiative, her relate to what camp residents are going through and which has very specific criteria, Gribner says. If WSDOT builds trust as she helps them work through the byzanand the other agencies got on board with the city’s plan tine process of applying for housing and other services. and tried to sweep the camp, the money would disappear. The work has been going well, she says. The camp is To be clear: The state isn’t opposed to the Trent shelshrinking, and organizers say more than 100 people have ter as a concept. It’s a good option for some residents, and moved out and into better housing options. Gribner says Camp Hope residents are regularly offered Even with everyone gathered in the same place, rides to the shelter if they want to go there. But congreBrown says she still has frequent trouble locating resigate shelters don’t fit the needs of everyone at the camp. dents and helping them get to appointments on time. If “Throwing them all in a congregate shelter assumes the camp is cleared, she worries they’ll be scattered across everybody is the same,” Gribner says. “Nobody here is the city and she won’t be able to find them. the same. No story is the same. It’s a recipe for failure.” “It would ruin everything,” Brown says. n Speaking in Seattle last week, Gov. Inslee touted the nates@inlander.com

HEADS DOWN

NOVEMBER 10, 2022 INLANDER 21


Keiko Hara examines a print in her art studio. AMAHRA LEAMAN PHOTO

VISUAL ARTS

Beyond the Horizon Artist Keiko Hara explores a sense of place, literally and figuratively, in a new WSU exhibit

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ne of artist Keiko Hara’s happy places is her Walla Walla art studio. That’s where she does her painting and printmaking that reflect a “strong love of place,” otherwise known as topophilia. The concept is familiar to fans of Spokane artist Ben Joyce’s map-based paintings, but also Georgia O’Keefe’s New Mexico abstractions and Claude Monet’s gauzily painted haystacks from turn-of-the-century France. Topophilia is not merely landscape, however. As Hara’s current exhibition at Washington State University’s Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art shows, on display through March 2023, a sense of place can include cerebral scapes, including memories. For example, the oldest piece in the exhibition is a mixed media painting titled “Image - Space” from 197778. Using opaque watercolor called gouache and assorted drawing media, “Image - Space” reflects the spontaneous mark making — a kind of scribbling — Hara produced as a child growing up in Japan. “[Keiko] believes we all universally hold particular places of personal meaning close to our hearts,” says Ryan Hardesty, the museum’s executive director and

22 INLANDER NOVEMBER 10, 2022

BY CARRIE SCOZZARO curator of exhibitions and collections. “These bonds to ‘place’ may center us in the present or tug achingly at us from the past.” Another piece, “Verse from Sea,” refers to Hara’s youthful discoveries during frequent explorations of the nearby ocean. In the book WSU produced to accompany the exhibit, Keiko Hara: Four Decades of Painting and Prints, contributing essayist Linda Tesner explains the piece. “Verse from Sea” is “a lyrical, visual prose poem,” writes Tesner, “condensing innumerable impressions and sensations of being at the beach — the tumble of rocks in the waves, the water-on-water of a cloudburst over the sea, the patterns humans and animals make on the wet sand.” “The poet in [Keiko] is quick to remind us that conceptions of place exist in our minds as sets of ephemeral memories, shifting and changing, malleable to new sensory experiences,” Hardesty adds. “At the core of her enterprise is an exploration of environment and human consciousness, a fundamental recipe for a sense of self.” “Verse from Sea” consists of 12 images, which Hara created using mokuhanga, a Japanese woodblock printing

technique dating to the early 1600s and made worldfamous in such works as Katsushika Hokusai’s 1831 “The Great Wave off Kanagawa” (sometimes referred to as “Hokusai’s Wave”).

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ranslating a painting into a print but also printmaking itself has historically appealed to artists and collectors alike. A single artwork can be reproduced in multiples, for example, increasing access to the image and potential sales. But for Hara, who started and ended her career in education, first as an art therapist with disabled children and later as an art professor at Whitman College, her priority is the work itself. “I am not interested in repeating the works to be a socalled successful artist,” says Hara, who has been successful nonetheless. Her works are included in such permanent collections as the Art Institute of Chicago, Tacoma Art Museum and National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and she is a sought-after expert on mokuhanga. Like many Japanese children, Hara was exposed to printmaking in school. After high school, she attended art


colleges in Tokyo, and later in Oita on Kyushu island, paying off her college loans by working at a school for disabled children. She recalls several students specifically, like the nonverbal, nonmobile young boy who literally opened up as he began to draw. Another student drew a tulip from a real flower, including the stem. Hara asked what the stem signified, recalling the child’s answer: “It’s pain.” This and other memories stuck with Hara, who considered becoming an art therapist. Realizing that she’d need to leave Japan to pursue more education, and to pay off her debt for college art supplies, Hara plucked up the courage to sell paintings she’d been doing of nearby Sakurajima volcano. Hara approached several places, including a large department store that had an art gallery inside. No one was interested in her work. Another artist Hara sought advice from suggested she paint the volcano “like a postcard.” “I really had to think what kind of artist I wanted to be,” Hara says of this time in her young adult life. She decided she wanted to forge her own path. She met with an art critic who was drawn to her contemporary style and her story. He wrote a large article and, perhaps coincidentally, the department store called her to show her work when another artist was unable to fill a spot. “I was so lucky,” Hara says, laughing now at the memory. She was so inexperienced, she says, she had to ask people at the art store to help her price her work. Hara not only sold enough to pay her art supply debts, she had enough to travel to America. “I am a big dreamer, and I challenge myself,” she says.

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Reimagining your childhood home

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FOOD A Wild (Sage) Party

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PEOPLE Hello Stranger!

SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

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A nature-minded home is infused with the art of two Spokane legends

color and creativity Artist Diane Holm embraces home • PAGE 22 in her vibrant, ever-changing

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Show & Sale FROM LEFT: “Verse · Imbuing in Space M” (2007) and “Space · Sky and Field” (2020)

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FREE ADMISSION Wine tasting participation available for $10

FRIDAY NOVEMBER 18 2PM - 9PM

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 19 NOON - 6PM

LOCATION

Keiko Hara: Four Decades of Painting and Prints • Through March 4, 2023, Tue-Sat from 10 am-4 pm; book signing event Wed, Nov. 16 from 4-6 pm • Free • Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU • 1535 N.E. Wilson Rd., Pullman • museum.wsu.edu • 509-335-1910

Spokane Handweavers’ Guild is pleased to partner with Barrister Winery during the annual Holiday Wine Fest to display and sell a variety of beautiful handwoven items from our looms in time for holiday shopping.

DATES & HOURS

nd at 80, Hara is still going strong, producing both large volumes of work and very large work. One such piece is “Space - Kirameku,” a diptych with two 7-by-9-foot rectangular canvases. Sitting in front of its total 18-foot length envelops your vision. The darker of the two panels is a galaxy-like field of soothing deep blue values punctuated by countless white spots that might be stars — kirameku loosely translates to glimmer — or could symbolize anything that repeats itself infinitely. The white-on-white panel, meanwhile, conveys subtle variations of white and an underlying pattern of vertical lines that reminds of a snowy forest. Moving closer to “Space - Kirameku,” you become lost in the texture and variations of color, while moving further back shifts your relationship to the painting as your eye is naturally pulled towards the darker panel. As she does with her other work, Hara deftly employs the language of art — color, scale, shape, pattern — to create a sense of place that can be familiar one moment and, when considered differently, offer an entirely new journey for the viewer. n

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SATURDAY, November 12

2:45 - 3:15

Bridges Home - Americana by Tami and David Gunther

12:15 - 12:45 Silver Spurs Youth Folk Dancers Dances from around the world

LAIR AUDITORIUM

3:45 - 4:15

BREAK

1:00 - 1:45

3:45 - 4:15

Crooked Kilt - Traditional Celtic tunes with a twist

Family Dance - Easy line, circle and novelty dances with lve music

2:00 - 2:45

Brittany Jean - Nashville recording artist, songwriter and storyteller

Spokane Bon Odori - Participatory Japanese folk dance

3:00 - 3:45

Hubbardston Nonesuch - Madrigals, 500-year-old pop tunes

Bulgarian Dance Group - Traditional dances from Bulgaria

4:00 - 4:45

To Be Determined

5:15 - 6:00

Sidetrack - Participatory dance party. Come dance to country, western, rock and blues.

6:00 - 6:30

BREAK

6:30 - 7:00

Workshop: Contra Dance Introduction with Nora Scott

7:00 - 8:30

Contra Dance with Arvid Lundin and Deep Roots and caller, Nora Scott

11:00 - 12:00 Floating Crowbar and Haran Irish Dancers - Irish step dance with highenergy music (Auditorium doors open at 10:30) No saving of seats

4:30 - 5:00

12:00 - 12:30 BREAK

5:15 - 5:45

12:30 - 1:15 Angus Scott Pipe Band, Lake City Highland Dancers and Scottish Country Dancers - Traditional Scottish

6:00 - 6:30

1:30 - 2:15

Stevens County Stompers - Clogging

6:30 - 7:00

BREAK

2:30 - 3:15

Grant Elementary Drummers and Dancers - African drum and dance

7:00 - 7:45

Heat Speak - Indie folk and world fusion

3:30 - 4:15

Musha Marimba - Music from Zimbabwe and southern Africa

4:30 - 5:15

Spokane Chinese Dance Group Sharing culture through folk dance

5:30 - 6:15

Spokane Taiko - Community Japanese drumming group

6:30 - 7:15

7:30 - 8:15

Muckle Roe - Traditional music from Scotland and Scandinavia

CONFERENCE ROOM 1:30 - 2:30

Spokane Dulcimer Guild - Performance and brief history

1:30 - 2:00

BREAK

2:00 - 2:45

Jenny Edgren - Songs for kids of all ages

Northwest Belly Dance Academy - Belly dance, fusion and folkloric dance from the Middle East

3:00 - 4:00

Spokane Storytelling League - Folk tales for all ages

4:00 - 4:30

BREAK

Coeurimba - Marimba music from Zimbabwe

4:30 - 6:30

Workshop: Native and Mesoamerican flute with Peter Ali - Fourth grade to adults welcome. Flutes provided.

THE UNDERGROUND

(Hint: It’s downstairs in the Lair.) 12:00 - 12:30 Leslie Rousos and Bill Compher Mandolin and guitar duets though the ages 12:45 - 1:15 Spokane Raging Grannies - Singing for peace and justice

Chris Baron - Original funky folk Americana

2:30 - 3:00

Larry Lotz - Americana country folk

Hunter Koss - Celtic harpist

3:15 - 3:45

4:30 - 5:00

Eyer Family Band - Kids tunes, folk songs and more

Planted By Hands - Compelling and unique sound

4:00 - 4:30

5:15 - 5:45

Ernie Verdugo - Spanish and flamenco guitar

Lyle Morse - Acoustic blues with guitar and harmonica

4:45 - 5:15

High Valley Mountain Boys - Bluegrass quintet

5:30 - 6:00

Maple Ridge Band - Bluegrass with enjoyment guaranteed

LaVona Reeves - Folklorist, linguist and poet

11:00 - 11:30 Celtic Aires - Women’s vocal ensemble folk songs from Celtic lands

3:00 - 3:30

Acoustic Renditions - Guitar and violin

3:45 - 4:15

11:45 - 12:15 Yang Xu - Traditional music on Chinese Guzheng (zither) 12:30 - 1:00 Safar - Classic Arabic and Mediterranean fusion dance music 2 Bit Jug Band - Love, food and hilarity

2:00 - 2:30

Peter Ali - Native and Mesoamerican flute

12:15 - 12:45 Damn Near Departed - Originals from husband-and-wife duo, Nick and Mikayla

1:45 - 2:15

2:15 - 2:45

1:15 - 1:45

11:30 - 12:00 Poor Boy’s Delight - Bluegrass, oldtimey and contemporary

Frankie Ghee - Original songs with guitar, clear lyrics

Steve Schennum - Songs you’ll never hear on the radio

SASQUATCH ROOM

BISTRO STAGE

1:00 - 1:30

1:30 - 2:00

Spokane Chinese Dance Group

Chris Baron

CAFETERIA STAGE 11:00 - 12:00 South Asia Cultural Association - East Indian folk song and dance


— 27 TH ANNUAL EVENT — 2022 SCHEDULE OF PERFORMANCES & EVENTS SATURDAY, NOV. 12TH • 11 AM - 8 PM // SUNDAY, NOV. 13TH • 11 AM - 5 PM * A FIFTEEN MINUTE BREAK IS PROVIDED BETWEEN MOST ACTS The Fall Folk Festival schedule is subject to change. Changes will be posted on the website and at the Festival.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13

2:00 - 2:30

Patrice Webb - Award winning original songwriting

LAIR AUDITORIUM

2:45 - 3:15

11:00 - 11:45 Mele Polinahe and Northwest Hula Hawaiian dance with live music

Ena Wang - Solo guzheng (Chinese zither)

3:30 - 4:15

Free Whiskey - Celtic folk rock

12:00 - 12:45 Meshugga Daddies - Klezmer traditions of the Ashkenazi Jews

CONFERENCE ROOM

1:00 - 1:45

Dan Maher - Inland Folk

2:00 - 2:45

Baharat - Authentic dance from the Middle East and North Africa

3:00 - 3:45

Gefilte Trout - Klezmer tunes and songs

4:00 - 4:45

Filipino-American Northwest Association - Dance group

12:00 - 1:00 Spokane Storytelling League - Folk tales for all ages 1:15 - 2:00

Lucy D. Ford- Original stories for all ages

2:00 - 2:30

BREAK

2:30 - 4:00

Workshop: Washtub Bass Instructional workshop with Michael Gifford (2 Bit Jug Band)

THE UNDERGROUND

(Hint: It’s downstairs in the Lair.) 11:15 - 11:45 Allen Surdez - Vocals, harmonica and guitar 12:00 - 12:30 Robin and John - Multi-talented instrumentalists and singers

11:00 - 11:30 O’Doherty’s Irish Session - Traditional tunes 11:45 - 12:15 Blue Ribbon Tea Company - Originals, Americana roots 12:30 - 1:00 Cheryl Branz - Heartfelt to hilarious songs 1:15 - 1:45

Keeler, Melvin and Morse - Originals and folk

11:30 - 12:15 Monroe Bridge - Traditional bluegrass with originals 12:30 - 1:00 Dennis Glidden - Traditional Irish and other folk songs

12:45 - 1:15 Bill Compher - Instrumental classical guitar

Joe McCarry - Folk songs of the Pacific Northwest

2:00 - 2:30

1:30 - 2:00

Steven King - Finger style guitar champion

2:45 - 3:15

Two Grey Cats - Guitar, bass and vocals

3:30 - 4:00

Due North Band - Fun and variety

Cigar Box Singers - Homemade cigar box and license plate guitars

2:15 - 2:45

Harp, Flute and Whistle - Irish and Scottish folk music

3:00 - 3:30

Amy Bleu - Folk songs, poetry and stories

3:45 - 4:15

Ukestra Spokane - Ukulele community group, all levels welcome

11:00 - 11:30 Mighty PJAMRS - Community marching band

SASQUATCH ROOM

BISTRO STAGE

1:15 - 1:45

CAFETERIA Michael Gifford (Washtub Bass Workshop)

Dennis Glidden

11:45 - 12:15 To Be Determined 12:30 - 1:15 Indian Youth Club of Spokane Celebration of the culture of India 1:30 - 2:30

Spokane Area Square Dancers with caller, Doug Davis, demo and participatory dance

2:30 - 3:00

BREAK

3:00 - 3:30

Workshop: Contra Dance - Learn lively, participatory folk dance

3:30 - 5:00

Contra Dance with The Prestwold Players and caller, Emily Faulkner

FREE EVENT!

SPOKANE COMMUNITY

C O L L E G E LAIR STUDENT CENTER 1810 N. Greene St FREE PARKING For More Information, Call (509) 828-3683 www.spokanefolkfestival.org

NOVEMBER 10, 2022 INLANDER 25


CULTURE | DIGEST

THE BUZZ BIN

Forget your real-world problems with trashy TV!

DISSOCIATING THROUGH DRAMA When things are overwhelming, there’s no better way to tune out than over-the-top drama

TÁR’D & FEATHERED Nobody sane would call TÁR a fun watch, but it’s certainly an engaging slow-burn of a film, especially if you’re a fan of top actors deep-diving into a character study. Cate Blanchett (who’ll almost assuredly be up for an Oscar for this role) stars as the titular Lydia Tár, an extremely serious and stern world-class orchestra conductor who begins to unravel as her world of near absolute power, crafted on the strength of being an artistic force, begins to crumble. The film manages to be a tight psychological thriller for almost two hours without much of anything happening, thanks to writer/director Todd Field instilling a sense of dread at the proverbial shoe inevitably dropping. While the movie might not have the most revelatory take on problematic artists, getting to spend time with a master thespian exploring that manipulative psychology is, at the very least, compelling (even if 2½ hours of that is a bit much). (SETH SOMMERFELD)

BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

I

used to watch Grey’s Anatomy religiously, and when my then-roommate would tease me about the latest wacky plot point, I’d just say I was watching my “soaps.” The more the seasons went on, and the more ludicrous things happened — a shooting in the hospital, a plane crash, and an amputation all within just the first few years — the more it fell into that genre of TV that’s fun to watch despite being wildly unbelievable. Suspending your disbelief can be strangely satisfying when you’re trying to tune out things like budgetcrushing inflation and the impending darkness of winter. Over-the-top shows allow us to focus on the insane mishaps and what-will-they-possibly-do moments of fictional characters rather than the comparably smaller (but perhaps harder to face) drama of our day-to-day lives. Recently, the CW’s reboot of the 1980s soap opera Dynasty (all modern seasons now on Netflix) filled that dramatic void. Who doesn’t love a voyeuristic glimpse into the life of the 1 percent? Private jets and caviar-covered breakfasts are banal to the billionaire Carrington family, whose oil-based wealth faces the modern-day pressures of investors more interested in tech companies and clean energy. And honestly, what family spearheaded by wealthy assholes wouldn’t deal with kidnappings, murder trials, vengeful stalkers and more? SPOILER ALERT: Let’s highlight some absurd plot twists that, although laughable, keep you coming back for more.

SPOUSE SWAPS Throughout five seasons there’s a ridiculous rolling cast of billionaire dad Blake Carrington’s spouses. Blake’s second wife Cristal dies, only to be succeeded by third wife Cristal (the woman whose identity Cristal 1.0 stole). Cristal 2.0 is inexplicably played by two different actresses, which makes it funnier when Cristal’s cartel-involved brother replaces his sister with a lookalike imposter while holding her hostage. Meanwhile, Blake’s conniving ex-wife Alexis is initially played by Nicollette Sheridan. After a face-melting fire incident her character gets “plastic surgery” and is played by a significantly younger woman for a few episodes (literally

26 INLANDER NOVEMBER 10, 2022

the same actress who plays Fallon, Blake and Alexis’ daughter), and after the character AGAIN gets “plastic surgery” she is replaced by Elaine Hendrix.

SECRET SIBLINGS Blake Carrington has a secret half sister, Dominique Deveraux, due to his dad’s affair with his secretary. Blake’s kids, Steven and Fallon, find out they have an older brother, Adam, who was kidnapped as a baby and reappears with a vengeance. Oh, and Steven is actually the son of major-domo Anders and not Blake (making him the half sibling of Anders’ daughter Kirby) and we also learn that Alexis hid a pregnancy and gave up daughter Amanda to cousins in the U.K. Plus, Dominique hides stepdaughter Vanessa from her kids, Jeff and Monica Colby.

WEDDING SHOCKERS Steven marries Sam, the “nephew” of Cristal 1.0 (the actors who play Sam and Cristal are literally two years apart…) but immediately freaks out and goes on a trip to South America. Steven meets a spirit guide he doesn’t know is his long-lost brother Adam, who ultimately traps Steven in a mental hospital by convincing Sam and Fallon that Steven hallucinated the “guide” he keeps talking about in a drug-fueled spiral. At one point, Fallon is set to marry Jeff Colby, but after sleeping with him, she finds out he’s actually her cousin who’s plotting to destroy their dynasty from within. She ensures the wedding is fake by marrying a random guy off the street beforehand so the marriage to Jeff can’t be legal. That random guy, Liam, just so happens to be from another billionaire family and after their divorce from the fake marriage, he evolves into her real love interest. Adam almost kills Liam, who gets amnesia and has to remember his love for Fallon all over again. Then, their real wedding is ruined by the homicidal brother of Fallon’s childhood friend Trixie, whose body is found in the lake on the Carrington Estate. Believe it or not, there are so many more wild plot twists to discover if you, too, want to dissociate through dynastic drama. n

SACAGAWEA GOES TO COLLEGE Sacagawea (also spelled Sacajawea) has found a new home at University of Idaho in the form of a 600-pound bronze sculpture commemorating the life of the young Indigenous woman who led the early-1800s Lewis and Clark Expedition. Depicting Sacagawea and her infant son, “SACAGAWEA AND JEAN BAPTISTE” was designed by Glenna Goodacre, who famously created the 1993 Vietnam Women’s Memorial sculpture for Washington, D.C.’s National Mall. Goodacre based the bronze, as well as her 2000 design for the U.S. Mint’s Sacagawea gold dollar, on the likeness of Randy’L He-dow Teton (pictured), a southeastern Idaho woman from the ShoshoneBannock and Cree tribes. Teton spoke at the September dedication of the sculpture, which was donated by two university alumni, and will be located inside the Pitman Center’s Tribal Lounge until a permanent resting spot can be found. (CARRIE SCOZZARO) THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Noteworthy new music arriving in stores and online Nov. 11: BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN, ONLY THE STRONG SURVIVE. The Boss has long been known to cover a wide range of songs live, and continues his too-famous tribute band schtick with this collection of classic R&B and soul covers. NAS, KING’S DISEASE III. The legendary NYC MC reteams with producer Hit-Boy for a third installment of the duo’s acclaimed hip-hop LP series. LOUIS TOMLINSON, FAITH IN THE FUTURE. Is his post-One Direction solo music as good as fellow 1D member Harry Styles? No. But at least he’s not trying to act. (SETH SOMMERFELD)


CULTURE | ARTS

Acknowledgement Through Art Gonzaga’s downtown gallery features 17 regional Indigenous artists BY CATE WILSON

S

pokane is a city built upon tribal land: the land of the Spokane Tribe of Indians and its people. It may not be a topic in everyday conversation, but it’s important to acknowledge. Despite efforts to erase the past, this fact cannot be altered. Through artistic expression, however, this message can be conveyed to an audience open to learn. Gonzaga University’s Urban Arts Center, also known as the GUUAC, is currently displaying “Land Acknowledgement,” an art exhibition curated by Charlene Teters, a Spokane tribal member. On display through Dec. 3, this contemporary show features art from 17 Native artists representing Indigenous tribes across the Pacific Northwest. The art itself ranges from paintings to sculptures to a 20-footlong canoe by Shawn Brigman that was recently featured in a movie. While a wide variety of media is showcased, all the pieces reflect a deeper meaning. The overarching theme of “Land Acknowledgement” is a sensitive topic, but it is a necessary one, as its participating artists seek to rectify misinformed views fostered by the past. Today, land acknowledgements are becoming commonplace before events, forums and talks that take place upon historically Indigenous land. The recognition of such is meant to be challenging, and fills a void in the American education system. “Land acknowledgements have become a pro-forma act almost required of U.S. Indigenous speakers, whose original intent has been suffocated by the tsunami of historical, feel-good fiction about the origins of European empire building in North America,” Teters said in a statement. Lenora Lopez Schindler, the co-curator of the exhibit, is a faculty member in Gonzaga’s Art Department. Faculty members who collaborate with the GUUAC rotate as exhibit curators throughout the calendar year, and in this instance, Teters and Lopez Schindler worked in tandem to gather the artists and decide on the layout of the gallery. Located in the heart of downtown Spokane, two floors above Berserk bar, the GUUAC space is being leased by Gonzaga for five years. While faculty shows and Gonzaga’s 2021 and 2022 graduating classes were able to be featured in the space during its first two years, this season is the first giving faculty free rein. The downtown space aids in Gonzaga’s community outreach efforts. “The GUUAC is truly significant because Gonzaga’s campus does not have a space to show either student work or for faculty to choose exhibitions to showcase,” says Lopez Schindler. “While the Jundt Art Museum is an amazing collection, they are a separate entity from the art department.” During “Land Acknowledgement’s” opening reception last week during First Friday events, all artists who were able attended to showcase and comment on their displayed artwork. A subsequent panel was held in Gonzaga’s Hemmingson Ballroom on Nov. 8. “We are so grateful to the donors and artists who brought this important exhibit together,” Lopez Schindler says. “Both Charlene and I are excited to share it with a greater community.” n Land Acknowledgement • Through Dec. 3, open Fri 4-7 pm and Sat 10 am-3 pm • Gonzaga University Urban Art Center • 125 S. Stevens St., third floor • gonzaga.edu/gonzaga-university-urban-arts-center

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A painting by Joseph Arnoux of Chief Spokane Garry.

FEATURED ARTISTS Margeaux Abeyta, Taos Pueblo and Diné Joseph Arnoux, Piikani/Sp’q’n’iʔ Shawn Brigman, Spokane, Sinixt, Kalispel, Sanpoil, Shuswap Brianna Bruce, Spokane Tribe Leanne Campbell, Coeur d’Alene, Colville, Nez Perce Diane Covington; Sanpoil Band of the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, Spokane Tribe Olivia Evans, Blackfeet and Cherokee Jeff Ferguson, Spokane Tribe George Hill, Spokane Tribe Ryan! Feddersen; Confederated Tribe of the Colville Reservation, Okanogan and Arrow Lake Band Ric Gendron, Umatilla Wenatchi Sinixt Tiffanie Irizarry, Ihanktonwan Dakota Tribe Roin Morigeau, Flathead Salish Tribe of Montana Sulustu (Barry Moses), Spokane Tribe Annette Peone, Coeur d’Alene Tribe Charlene Teters, Spokane Tribe Chad “Little Coyote” Yellowjohn, Shoshone Bannock/ Spokane ancestral line

NOVEMBER 10, 2022 INLANDER 27


COMMUNITY

ARM IN ARM

Many former service members transition to civilian life through food-related ventures, including these local ones that also help other veterans BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

B

rittany Tyler is on a mission. The former U.S. Navy linguist and petty officer second class wants to get food into the empty hands, mouths and bellies of her Eastern Washington neighbors. She also wants to provide reliable income for area farmers, ranchers and food providers. Since 2021, Tyler has been doing both through Spokane-based Four Roots, a food distribution organization she co-founded. The endeavor reflects Tyler’s military experiences both during active duty and since leaving the Navy in 2010. Four Roots stands at the periphery of typical food coverage, yet addresses a vital aspect of the overall food narrative: where our food comes from. Now run by Tyler and business partner Lisette Walser, the nonprofit Four Roots initially offered retail food boxes and currently focuses on We Feed WA, a Washington State Department of Agriculture program created during the COVID pandemic and subsequent state-ordered shutdowns. “We secured a small We Feed WA contract in November 2021, providing roughly 380 to 450 boxes per week to four to five hunger relief organizations,” Tyler says. By July 2022, they were doing 10 times that. To date, Four Roots has distributed more than 41,000 boxes of

28 INLANDER NOVEMBER 10, 2022

food — roughly 581,000 pounds — since its first state contract, with plans for pushing out 2 million pounds of food between now and June 2023. Tyler knows she’s up to the task, in part because of her military background. “I am no stranger to long hours and hard work,” says Tyler, who graduated from Mt. Spokane High School and, at 17, followed in the footsteps of her father and maternal grandfather to join the Navy. (Her brother is an Army veteran.) After Tyler finished her six-year stint, she earned an associate degree in baking and pastry and a bachelor’s in hospitality management, both in Baltimore. “During that time, and my subsequent employment in the restaurant industry,” says Tyler, “I grew to appreciate not only the preparation of food, but where it had come from and how it came to be in my kitchen and on the plate.” A year and a half ago, Tyler was back in Spokane and working with a local nonprofit coalition of farmers markets in a program similar to We Feed WA. When the program ended, Tyler interned at Vets on the Farm. “Their program is absolutely amazing,” says Tyler, who learned from the organization about market gardening — seeding, planting, harvesting, selling and row

TOP: Four Roots associate Taylor Ferguson packs a box of fresh produce that will go to food banks in Eastern Washington. ABOVE: CEOs Lisette Walser (left) and Brittany Tyler. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS crop maintenance — as well as the ins and outs of Good Agricultural Practices certification, a federal program to ensure safe food handling. Vets on the Farm, says Tyler, “really gives you a comprehensive boots-on-the-ground education.”

L

ocated a couple miles south of Spokane city limits on the Palouse Highway, Vets on the Farm is both a working farm growing produce with a few chickens and ducks — the farmstand is closed for the season — and a support network for veterans transitioning into civilian life. Created in part by the Spokane Conservation District in 2015, Vets on the Farm has worked with more than 200 area veterans, partnering with Washington State University Extension’s Cultivating Success program for sustainable small farms education. ...continued on page 30


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FOOD | COMMUNITY “ARM IN ARM,” CONTINUED... Next year, funded in part by a state Veterans Affairs farms grant, the farm will offer both paid stipends for first-year participants and a farm manager program, for which Vets on the Farm manager Grant Weber sees a definite need. “There’s a lot of people that are getting out of farming,” Weber says. “They don’t want to sell their land, but they don’t want to farm, and they need someone to come help run it.” Weber was thinking about starting his own farm when he retired from the Air Force after 21 years, including several deployments to the Middle East. “I was in a civil engineering squadron,” Weber says. “And we would go and build up tent cities and runways and whatever — or tear stuff down — then we’d go on to the next place.” Weber found that “big agriculture isn’t something you just dive into,” however, and went looking for options. After seeing Spokane Conservation District Director Vicki Carter’s presentation about Vets on the Farm, Weber volunteered, eventually becoming its paid manager. The farm is more than its three-plus acres of well-ordered fields and a growing flock of chickens, however: It also provides outreach. That can include public speaking, teaching, such as at the conservation district, and helping veterans make what is often a challenging transition to civilian life, Weber says. In a 2019 television segment for KSPS-TV’s Northwest Profiles, Weber explains that every branch of the armed forces teaches you how to “do your job, how to be in the military, but they don’t spend one day teaching you how to be a civilian.”

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hris Kieres swapped a Marine Corps uniform for that of a firefighter when he left active duty more than 20 years ago. Since 2014, in addition to working for the Coeur d’Alene Fire Department, Kieres has run Paragon Brewing, which he started with wife Kerry.

THANK YOU, VETS Kieres has remained close with many former military members and makes new connections to the veteran community, too, especially through Paragon’s Warrior’s Ethos brewing project. When they learned that Yakima Chief Hops combines different hop varieties into a “veterans blend” and donates a percentage of sales to a veteran-related charity, the Kieres had an idea. For the past four years, they’ve invited area veterans to come help brew Warrior’s Ethos, aka “the warrior’s code.” The couple also donate a portion of sales to charity, which this year is Shadow Warriors Project supporting veterans through such programs as canine companions. Warrior’s Ethos, an IPA, will be available at Paragon Brewing and potentially on tap elsewhere in North Idaho, Kieres says. So far, Bunker Bar in Post Falls has signed on to serve it, says Army veteran Trace Miller, who co-founded the bar in 2019. The businesses in this article are just a handful of the veteran-owned venues throughout the Inland Northwest, a comprehensive list of which doesn’t exist (we reached out to local, state and federal organizations in search of one). Kieres thinks he knows why veterans might not want to promote themselves that way. “We’re proud of what we did,” he says, “but it’s not the cornerstone of our business.” He feels a little funny about people thanking him for his service, he adds. “You’re thanking me for something I feel privileged to have done.” n

Many area businesses, including those listed below, offer discounts and other perks to veterans with ID on Veteran’s Day, which this year is on a Friday. Some discounts also apply to active-duty and retired military. However, there may be restrictions on availability such as dine-in versus to-go orders, so please verify prior to purchase.

Carrie Scozzaro is the proud daughter of a retired Army major whose military career allowed him to meet his country’s needs while supporting his family. To this day, she gets teary-eyed over “Taps.”

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30 INLANDER NOVEMBER 10, 2022


FOOD | TO-GO BOX

In a New Light Golden Handle Brewing relocates and adds food menu; plus, other tasty tidbits BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

T

alk about a perfect fit! In September, Golden Handle Brewing relocated from its former home about two blocks east to the former Steel Barrel site (154 S. Madison St.), also known as the Luminaria Building. The new location offers more space, including a kitchen facility, which means Golden Handle has also added light bites to its brewing lineup. Try the beet salad with crème fraîche ($10), daily soup ($7) or a grilled sandwich like the South Hill smoked turkey ($16) with thick-cut bacon, turkey, Swiss and dill havarti cheeses, and tomato on Great Harvest bread. The deli veggie sandwich ($12) features zesty tapenade, creamy hummus, crunchy greens and local Grain Shed focaccia bread. If you’re looking to share, try the charcuterie ($25) or soft pretzel ($9) with house mustard and beer “syrup.” Add a pint from one of the guest taps, or try Golden Handle’s craft creations, like the Field Day, a Belgian-style Saison brewed with pink peppercorn, or the German Moon Link with a pleasing toasted bread quality to it. Can’t decide? Try a flight ($10) of five 4-ounce pours. Additional space means more room for events, too, including movie night and the “Suds & Science” series, like the most recent one blending space travel, movies

EVENTS

Speakeasy-type spots and events are definitely trending, including at COMMELLINI ESTATE (14715 N. Dartford Dr.) in the Wandermere area. The event venue is hosting a speakeasy supper club ($85) on Nov. 11 and 12, with Prohibition-era style cocktails, live music by local performer Jona Gallegos and a five-course meal of Tuscan-inspired dishes. Visit commellini.com for reservations. FEAST WORLD KITCHEN (1321 W. Third Ave.) is expanding. In addition to recently signing a lease for a second location at Second and Bernard streets, Feast organizers have added more support for the local refugee and immigrant community with an event called “Table Time” on Wednesdays, from 1-4 pm, and Fridays from 11 am-1 pm. Available support includes help with paperwork and translating, plus a snack provided by Feast Try a grilled sammie from Golden Handle Brewing’s new food menu. CARRIE SCOZZARO PHOTO chefs. Visit feastworldkitchen.org for details. and — of course — beer. On Nov. 17, Golden Handle is For the past 40 years, EPICUREAN DElaunching its “brushes and brews” ($55) series, a paintLIGHT has been the highlight of many a fall fundraising and-sip style event. calendar. This year’s Nov. 18 event at the Spokane ConSuds & Science is a holdover from Golden Handle’s vention Center is elegant and festive, highlighting some early years, when it was called The Golden Handle Projof the best in food and beverage Spokane has to offer. ect. The brewery was co-founded in 2020 by Washington With tickets starting at $200, it’s fine dining for a cause, State University assistant professor in translational medibenefiting the Blood Center Foundation of the Inland cine and physiology Jason Gerstner, and his longtime Northwest and Vitalant. n brewing buddy Tim Stoltz. Golden Handle is now part of the Spokane WorkTo-Go Box is the Inlander’s regular dining news ers Cooperative, meaning it’s employee-owned and run, column, offering tasty tidbits and updates on the including by its head brewer, Rachel Nalley. Visit goldenregion’s food and drink scene. Send tips and handle.org to learn more. updates to food@inlander.com.

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NOVEMBER 10, 2022 INLANDER 31


ALSO OPENING AFTERSUN

A daughter reflects back on her relationship with her father when she was 11 years old in this A24 drama that emotionally explores memory, coming of age and whether we’re ever able to fully know our parents. Rated R At the Magic Lantern

Wright takes center stage in Black Panther: Wakanda Forever.

REVIEW

The Death of a King In Black Panther: Wakanda Forever, quieter moments of profound reflection about an all-too-real loss clash with the chaos of war BY CHASE HUTCHINSON

H

ow can art reckon with a loss as titanic as that of Chadwick Boseman? The acclaimed actor was a gifted performer with an irreplaceable presence that would light up the screen every time he appeared. Though he became most-known for his role as King T’Challa in the original Black Panther film from 2018, he brought the same grace and gravitas to each and every role that was lucky enough to have him. His death at just age 43 — from a cancer he battled privately while continuing to act — remains as painful today as it was when it happened more than two years ago. It is in this overwhelming pain that Black Panther: Wakanda Forever initially places us. Returning writer/director Ryan Coogler begins this story not with an action set piece, but with a desperate attempt to save an ailing T’Challa whose time is now short. We see his younger sister, Letitia Wright’s Shuri, futilely trying to find a cure that will prevent the loss we all know is coming. She is soon informed by her mother, Angela Bassett’s Ramonda, that he has already passed. The film then guides us through a collective celebration of the character’s life that also serves as an honoring of Boseman. It is a sequence that is infused with a sadness that Coogler doesn’t shy away from grappling with. We see it in the mural of the man himself overlooking the procession and hear it in

32 INLANDER NOVEMBER 10, 2022

Shuri’s cries when she rushes to say goodbye one last time. It is a deeply felt opening that ends with the first of many silent cinematic reflections, ones more moving than anything we’ve seen in a Marvel movie. For all the ways this cinematic universe can seem constructed by a corporate machine, these moments feel driven by people tapping into something real. It is in these questions of loss where Black Panther: Wakanda Forever proves to be profound. Unfortunately, there is the rest of the nearly three-hour film that tempers and distracts from this emotionally-driven beatBLACK PANTHER: ing heart. WAKANDA FOREVER A rather busy plot Rated PG-13 becomes the most central Directed by Ryan Coogler focus and pulls us away Starring Letitia Wright, from the moments of Tenoch Huerta, Angela Bassett rumination. Essentially, the nation of Wakanda is now facing down outside governments that want their resources and will do anything to get them. Enter Namor, played by the terrific Tenoch Huerta, an imposing figure with wings on his feet, immense strength and the ability to breathe underwater. He tells a still-grieving Shuri and her mother that he needs Wakanda to go on a mission for him to prevent further

encroachment on his underwater homeland. This sets in motion a growing conflict that will threaten to consume the two civilizations and all they have worked to build. The promise that this story holds ends up being largely squandered on the more scattered cinematic spectacle, which requires jumping around from location to location in a manner that grows tiresome. When the film stops to catch its breath, like when Shuri and Namor candidly discuss their respective worlds, we get a glimpse of a more personal story free of all the narrative trappings. Unfortunately, these moments become lost when we get into largely middling CGI action sequences — a lot of narrative noise that lacks the prevailing emotional spark that was felt in the original Black Panther. Perhaps this is a product of how a Marvel movie must still hit certain notes that audiences come to see. No matter if it drags down this film, there must always be a new character to tie-in, a surprise cameo and some selfaware comedy. The moments when the film steps away from this, including in a closing scene where we are left with just a single character, are bold, though regrettably fleeting. Despite all the often empty bombast and bluster, it is in the moments of silence where the film still manages to strike a chord that serves as an emotional echo of what could have been. n


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SCREEN | REVIEW With its romantic entanglement between police detective and suspect, Decision to Leave recalls Paul Verhoeven’s Basic Instinct, and its eroticism is just as potent even without any graphic sexuality. Park’s approach here is closer to Alfred Hitchcock than Verhoeven, and as the story progresses there are echoes of Vertigo, Suspicion and Rear Window, among other Hitchcock movies. Hae-joon has a devoted wife who puts up with his distractions as he fixates on his cases, and she allows him the distance of staying at an apartment in the city where he works, while she bides her time alone at home. Nearly everyone in Decision to Leave is emotionally reserved, the opposite of the anger-fueled characters of Park’s so-called A deadly investigation leads to erotic tension in Decision to Leave. vengeance trilogy. Is Seo-rae manipulating Hae-joon so she can get away with murder, or is she genuinely drawn to him — or possibly both? Tang (best known to American audiences for her breakout role in Ang Lee’s gloriously sensual Lust, Caution) gives a masterful performance as she navigates that delicate balance, and Seo-rae is as alluring to the audience as she is to Hae-joon. About halfway through, Decision to Leave jumps ahead in time, to another murder investigation involving Hae-joon as the BY JOSH BELL detective and Seo-rae as a potential suspect, iven that it kicks off with a murder poised Seo-rae, who expresses no distress and events in the second half eventually ilinvestigation, viewers might reasonover her husband’s death and has clear, luminate some of the unanswered questions ably expect Park Chan-wook’s precise answers for any questions regarding in the first half. Still, this is a movie that Decision to Leave to resemble the violent, her whereabouts. He spends hours outside relishes its ambiguity and is more focused twisty thrillers the Korean filmmaker is her apartment watching and listening to her on the characters’ responses to the plot than known for, including Oldboy, Sympathy for Mr. mundane activities, and unspoken moments on the plot itself. Park inserts callbacks to Vengeance, and his most recent film, 2016’s between them seem to indicate a shared small details that speak volumes about the The Handmaiden. While it does feature some desire. characters’ shifting relationships, making potentially surprising plot developments Director Park and cinematographer Kim something as simple as a choice of takeout and a multi-part structure that recalls The Ji-yong increase the sense of intimacy by food feel emotionally devastating. Handmaiden, Decision to Leave is surprisingly using visual shorthand that places the actors If Decision to Leave isn’t as viscerally restrained and refined, displaying a remarkin close proximity to each other. Even when powerful as some of Park’s other work, its able level of visual flair, but keeping any it’s clear that there would actually be literal meticulous, stately compositions are still explicit violence offscreen. distance between the two charstunning works of At first, Detective Jang Hae-joon (Park acters, they film the actors in the DECISION TO LEAVE art, and its characters Hae-il) isn’t even sure that his latest case is a same physical space, like when are likely to stick Directed by Park Chan-wook murder, when he and his partner investigate the characters are having phone with viewers even as Starring Park Hae-il, Tang Wei the death of a man who died after falling conversations with each other or certain plot details from a cliff. Signs point to suicide, but the while Hae-joon is making his surveillance refade. Park has always used violence as an police nevertheless put the man’s much cordings. Even the simplest scenes in Decision expression of his characters’ personal anyounger wife, Chinese immigrant Song Seoto Leave are shot with an eye toward enhancguish, and in Decision to Leave, he expresses rae (Tang Wei), under surveillance. Haeing the connection between the pair, who those overwhelming feelings just as effecjoon is immediately drawn to the beautiful, almost never make any physical contact. tively without showing a drop of blood. n

Murder and Romance A detective falls for his sultry suspect in Park Chan-wook’s gorgeous, engrossing Decision to Leave

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SURF ROCK

RIDING THE VIRAL WAVE Surf Curse unexpectedly blew up on TikTok, but the band’s sonic evolution suggests it’s no flash in the pan BY SETH SOMMERFELD 36 INLANDER NOVEMBER 10, 2022

Y

ou may have heard Surf Curse and not even realized it. The song you might’ve heard is “Freaks,” from the group’s 2013 lo-fi surf rock debut album, Buds. No, the tune by the Los Angeles-by-way-of-Reno garage rock band started by drummer/singer Nick Rattigan and guitarist Jacob Rubeck wasn’t placed in the latest season of Stranger Things. It hasn’t been a fixture on rock radio since its release. In fact, it wasn’t even much more than a staple of the band’s live set until a full eight years after its release. So, umm… have y’all ever heard of this little app called TikTok? Seemingly out of nowhere, “Freaks” became a viral hit on TikTok starting in the summer of 2021. And it came as a total surprise to the band,


FROM RIGHT: Surf’s up with Rattigan, Rubeck, Kholl and Henry.

who struggled to process the growing phenomenon. That is… once they became aware of it. “We didn’t even really know it was happening,” says Rattigan. “It was so slow,” adds Rubeck. “People would be like, ‘Oh, I’m hearing your song a lot! Like online.’ And we’re like, ‘OK, yeah, whatever.’ [Laughs.]” Songs blowing up on TikTok isn’t exactly a new trend, but even among hits the app has created, “Freaks” stands out because there’s very little explanation for it. It’s not a new song that people latch on to or even an old song that people use for a specific type of TikTok post (like how even the Mountain Goats went viral last year with a TikTok dance set to “No Children”). While “Freaks” is an undeniably catchy song with a killer riff and relatable outsider lyrics, there seems to be almost zero continuity to the types of TikToks that use it as backing music. And unlike when songs get placed in a movie or TV show, the band had no way of expecting the tune would have this second life. “It kinda would’ve been sick if it happened the other way,” says Rattigan. “If they were like, ‘Hey, your song’s gonna be in Avatar 2: Way of the Water.’ And then we were like, ‘Really?!’ And then it like blew up that way. That’d be pretty cool. But instead, it was just like, ‘Somebody’s put your song over like a home gardening technique.’ [Laughs.] Or like, ‘This 16-year-old kid has like 14 million followers, and he just sang your song online…’” “…as a thirst trap,” Rubeck jokingly interjects. “We had to just stop watching them.” The TikTok frenzy has led “Freaks” to garner over 619 million Spotify plays, taking the song platinum and earning Surf Curse a contract with Atlantic Records. But watching a selection of the well over half a million TikToks that use variations of the tune, there’s truly no rhyme or reason to it. “Freaks” backs people singing along to the tune, kids bemoaning their relationship or parental problems, women celebrating their breast reduction surgery, or people raking sand to find seashells. There’s a whole series of people longing for fictional relationships like those in Corpse Bride or Brooklyn Nine-Nine. Sometimes it underscores lists of someone’s favorite animes or a pornographic actress’s travel logs or a teen’s video game exploits. It transcends language and national borders. If this all seems sort of inexplicable, Surf Curse totally agrees. “They’re so weird!” says Rattigan. “There was no like, ‘Oh, here’s the ‘Freaks’ dance!’ It’s like, ‘Here’s literally the internet.’ It’s everything you could imagine across the board. It’s like the internet incarnate.”

W

hile trying to figure out meaning behind the TikTok fame of “Freaks” might drive you more crazy than Charlie in It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia laying out a string board to find Pepe Silvia, dwelling too much on it belies a very key point. Surf Curse is an excellent band that did not, in fact, cease making music in 2013. In October, the

band released its fourth LP, Magic Hour, which mixes the raw beach punk energy of Buds with a much more professional production style one would expect after hopping on a major label. The easiest data point to highlight regarding Surf Curse’s expanded sound is a doubling in the band’s size. After going on tour with Rattigan and Rubeck pre-pandemic, Surf Curse added bassist Henry Dillon and guitarist Noah Kholl to the band full time. “I think the sort of the connection that me and Jacob felt with each other when we started the band, we also felt with Noah and Henry,” says Rattigan. “This band has always been built on our love for each other and our friendship, and Henry and Noah just fit in really well. And when it came time to write new songs, they were just organically part of the process and made those songs more extravagant in a really nice way. More colorful and more bombastic, and I feel like it comes through on the record.” “It’s just nice to share these special moments with these people that I really love. Everyone has these moments of shining in some sort of way,” adds Rubeck. “The whole time we were making that record, whenever someone was up to bat, you would just watch it, and it’s documented. The magic was captured.” Recorded at the beyond legendary Electric Lady Studios (which has led to iconic albums by Jimi Hendrix, David Bowie, AC/DC, Patti Smith, Stevie Wonder, Weezer, and many more), Magic Hour isn’t the product of some buzzy band striking while the iron is hot, but rather Surf Curse coming into its own. The band has long boasted more lyrical depth than almost all of its contemporaries that came up in the modern LA indie surf rock scene, but the new record also hits the sweet spot between polished production and raw rock energy. The frenzied and catchy chorus of “TVI” or Rattigan’s wild howling on “Sugar” seems just as natural as boosts from string arrangements on “Strange” or “Randall Flagg” (which closes out the album with its own triumphant hollering). “You put some intentions into [making an album], but a lot of the magic comes out of what you don’t intend to make. And I feel like this was an album that we almost didn’t even intend to make. It just came out of sort of this very organic and interesting time in our lives,” Rattigan says. “In a lot of ways, this record does have that aggressiveness and excitement of Buds, because we were just so excited to be making these songs. There’s a lot of screaming, a lot of really heavy parts and heavy lyrics. But it’s on this new color palette. It’s our most colorful record to date.” So while it certainly takes exponentially longer to listen to Magic Hour then scroll through some short video on your phone, it’s worth making the effort. Carve out a little time to more fully ride the Surf Curse wave. Your TikTok thirst traps will still be waiting for you when you return. n Surf Curse, Toner • Fri, Nov. 11 at 8 pm • $20 • All ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague Ave. • sp.knittingfactory.com

O N S A L E F R I D AY 1 1 .1 1 AT 1 0 A M !

Alice in Chain’s Jerry Cantrell rocks The Fox stage with a blend of AIC hits and new cuts. FRIDAY

MARCH 31 2023 8PM

509 624 1200

FOX T H E AT E R S P O K A N E . O R G

NOVEMBER 10, 2022 INLANDER 37


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ELECTRONIC ROCK PHANTOGRAM

S

ometimes a band just comes out of the gate on fire. Phantogram opened its 2010 debut album Eyelid Movies with two absolute banger singles in “Mouthful of Diamonds” and “When I’m Small,” which set a tone. The New York duo of Sarah Barthel and Josh Carter found an intoxicating way to mix electropop and dream rock and trip hop beats. Stark guitar lines, swelling synth throbs and Barthel’s floating vocal lines built them a substantial fanbase and led to collaborations with the likes of Big Boi, Miley Cyrus and the Flaming Lips. The band emerges from its pandemic hibernation to finally play tunes off its fourth LP, 2020’s Ceremony, and to support a new expanded edition of Eyelid Movies. — SETH SOMMERFELD Phantogram, GLU • Sat, Nov. 12 at 8 pm • $30-$35 • All ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague Ave. • sp.knittingfactory.com

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

COUNTRY WALKER HAYES

Thursday, 11/10

J THE BIG DIPPER, Call Me Karizma, FAANGS, Astrus*, Anxxiety BOLO’S BAR & GRILL, Theresa Edwards Band CHAN’S RED DRAGON, Thursday Night Jam CHECKERBOARD TAPROOM, Weathered Shepherds J COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, The Commodores COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, DJ Cruz J HISTORIC DAVENPORT HOTEL, Steven King LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Matt Watson, Ben Beal, Love-sadKID THE MASON JAR, Midnight Sun J QQ SUSHI & KITCHEN, Just Plain Darin J J SPOKANE ARENA, Walker Hayes, Parmalee STEAM PLANT RESTAURANT & BREW PUB, Jonathan Arthur ZOLA, Desperate8s

Friday, 11/11

J THE BIG DIPPER, Odyssey, We Are William, Blighted Eye, Day Shadow BIGFOOT PUB, Bruiser BOLO’S BAR & GRILL, The Happiness CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA & SPIRITS, Mike McCafferty CURLEY’S, Haze J HISTORIC DAVENPORT HOTEL, Steven King IRON HORSE (CDA), Dangerous Type JOHN’S ALLEY, Snacks at Midnight J J KNITTING FACTORY, Surf Curse, Toner LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Bombargo, Mama Llama MOOSE LOUNGE, Dirty Betty NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Karma’s Circle OSPREY RESTAURANT & BAR,

38 INLANDER NOVEMBER 10, 2022

E

ven if you feel like Walker Hayes’ smash hit “Fancy Like” (aka “The Applebee’s Song”)... ummm… feels like the nadir of modern lowest-common denominator, hyper-consumerist country with its advertorial chorus name-checking of Applebee’s menu items, there’s no denying there’s a massive audience for his chainrestaurant quality songwriting. The tune took home this year’s Billboard Music Award for Top Country Song, after all. For Hayes fans, his stop at Spokane Arena is sure to be a country fried party. — SETH SOMMERFELD Walker Hayes, Parmalee • Thu, Nov. 10 at 7 pm • $35-$259 • All ages • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • spokanearena.com Jonathan Arthur J PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, BTP THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Just Plain Darin SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Son of Brad SPOKANE EAGLES LODGE, Ben Klein as Elvis: Red, White & G.I. Blues ZOLA, Justyn Priest Band

Saturday, 11/12

BACKWOODS WHISKEY BAR, Riverboat Dave BIGFOOT PUB, Bruiser BOLO’S BAR & GRILL, The Happiness CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA & SPIRITS, Mike McCafferty CURLEY’S, Haze J DAVENPORT GRAND HOTEL, Steven King INLAND KAVA BAR, Son of Brad IRON HORSE (CDA), Dangerous Type JOHN’S ALLEY, Runaway Symphony J J KNITTING FACTORY, Phantogram, GLU

J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Truehoods, Water Monster, Helmer Noel J LYFE COFFEE ROASTERS & PUBLIC HOUSE, Dave Long MOOSE LOUNGE, Dirty Betty NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Karma’s Circle OSPREY RESTAURANT & BAR, Sam Leyde J PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Kosh ROSE GARAGE BREWING CO., Just Plain Darin ZOLA, Sam Parker

Monday, 11/14

Sunday, 11/13

J HISTORIC DAVENPORT HOTEL, Steven King J HISTORIC DAVENPORT HOTEL, Dr. Don Goodwin LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Midnight North, Justyn Priest J PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Bob Beadling RED ROOM LOUNGE, The Roomates SOUTH PERRY LANTERN, Tod Hornby ZOLA, Brittany’s House

J THE BIG DIPPER, Great American Ghost, 156/Silence, Hazing Over, Warcrime J DAVENPORT GRAND HOTEL, Steven King HOGFISH, Open Mic J J KNITTING FACTORY, The Flaming Lips, Particle Kid

RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic Night

Tuesday, 11/15

J J KNITTING FACTORY, Tai Verdes LITZ’S PUB & EATERY, Shuffle Dawgs LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, The Brothers Comatose, Pixie & the Partygrass Boys J POST STREET ALE HOUSE, Lyle Morse

Wednesday, 11/16

Coming Up ...

J RIVERSIDE PLACE, Champagne Drip, SIPPY, Nov. 17, 8 pm. J J KNITTING FACTORY, Modest Mouse: ‘The Lonesome Crowded West’ 25th Anniversary Tour, Nov. 19, 8 pm. J J KNITTING FACTORY, Thanksgiving Throwdown 8: Of Truth, Free the Jester, Remember Me When, Stubborn Will, Nathan Chartrey, Nov. 23, 6:30 pm. J J BING CROSBY THEATER, Judy Collins, Nov. 29, 8 pm. J J THE BIG DIPPER, Kadabra, Spoon Benders, Itchy Kitty, Dec. 3, 7:30 pm. J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Wild Pink, Trace Mountains, Dario Re, Dec. 4, 8 pm. J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Enumclaw, Milly, Dec. 9, 8 pm.


MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-263-5673 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 509-847-1234 BARRISTER WINERY • 1213 W. Railroad Ave. • 509-465-3591 BEE’S KNEES WHISKY BAR • 1324 W. Lancaster Rd.., Hayden • 208-758-0558 BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens St. • 509-315-5101 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 509-863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 509-467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague Ave. • 509891-8357 BOLO’S BAR & GRILL • 116 S. Best Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-891-8995 BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR • 18219 E. Appleway Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-368-9847 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main St., Moscow • 208-596-0887 THE BULL HEAD • 10211 S. Electric St., Four Lakes • 509-838-9717 CHAN’S RED DRAGON • 1406 W. Third Ave. • 509-838-6688 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw St., Worley • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-2336 CRUISERS BAR & GRILL • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-446-7154 CURLEY’S HAUSER JUNCTION • 26433 W. Hwy. 53, Post Falls • 208-773-5816 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • 509-279-7000 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-624-1200 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-926-8411 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208-883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-244-3279 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington St. • 509-315-8623 LUCKY YOU LOUNGE • 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. • 509-474-0511 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy. • 509-443-3832 THE MASON JAR • 101 F St., Cheney • 509-359-8052 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-922-6252 MILLIE’S • 28441 Hwy 57, Priest Lake • 208-443-0510 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-838-1570 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 877-871-6772 NYNE BAR & BISTRO • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-474-1621 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PODIUM • 511 W. Dean Ave. • 509-279-7000 POST FALLS BREWING CO. • 112 N. Spokane St., Post Falls • 208-773-7301 RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL • 10325 N. Government Way, Hayden • 208-635-5874 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-838-7613 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 509-822-7938 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 208-664-8008 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • 509-279-7000 SOUTH PERRY LANTERN • 12303 E. Trent Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-473-9098 STEAM PLANT • 159 S. Lincoln St. • 509-777-3900 STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON • 12303 E. Trent Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-862-4852 TRANCHE • 705 Berney Dr., Wall Walla • 509-526-3500 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 509-624-2416

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NOVEMBER 10, 2022 INLANDER 39


PERFORMANCE BLUE MAN GROUP

How many other live performances require the issuance of an audience advisory? (Cool, right?) What started as late ’80s performance art on the streets of lower Manhattan by three quirky dudes, Blue Man Group has morphed into an epic stage production involving a complex and fast-paced narrative with sound, lights, fantastical instruments, screen images and occasionally splashing paint. The only constant in their repertoire is the Blue Men themselves. They dress in black with all their visible skin painted blue, emphasizing expressive eyes and the occasional, close-mouthed smile. There’s comedy, drama and plenty of visual stimulation but no words; the Blue Men do not speak. So even if you saw them previously, expect all new fullsensory shenanigans when they come to Spokane. — CARRIE SCOZZARO Blue Man Group • Mon, Nov. 14 and Tue, Nov. 15 at 7:30 pm • $44.50-$89.50 • First Interstate Center for the Arts • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • firstinterstatecenter.org

GET LISTED! Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

40 INLANDER NOVEMBER 10, 2022

MUSIC SIPPY DRIPPY

MUSIC FOLKIN’ AROUND

Champagne Drip, SIPPY • Thu, Nov. 17 at 8 pm • $30-$65 • 18+ • Riverside Place • 1110 W. Main Ave. • eventbrite.com

Fall Folk Festival • Sat, Nov. 12 from 11 am-8 pm and Sun, Nov. 13 from 11 am-5 pm • Free • All ages • Spokane Community College • 1810 N. Greene St. • spokanefolkfestival.org

One of the special things about Spokane’s music scene is that it has an unusually enthusiastic EDM fan base, which not only helps attract major artists, but keeps them coming back year after year. While some of these artists may regularly play for thousands on major festival stages, many enjoy more intimate shows offered at atypical venues like Riverside Place, where Mahalo Promotions regularly brings in dance music during the colder, non-festivalseason months. Following October’s sold-out Bear Grillz show, local EDM fans are looking forward to this month’s stop by Champagne Drip in support of the new Time Warp EP, featuring Australian bass artist SIPPY opening. Champagne Drip’s heavy bass music is filled with headbanger-friendly drops, but he also incorporates elements from techno, drum and bass, lighter synth, and vocals that can just as easily lend to vibing out with your eyes closed. — SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

Folk music might sound unassuming and boring to the unacquainted, but there’s so much more to it than just guitars, violins and mandolins. At the 27th annual Fall Folk Festival, you’ll see performances from classic folk groups, bands that put an indie spin on folk music, Chinese folk performers and even belly dancers. With six stages to choose from, there’s never a dull moment at the festival — step around a corner and hear pan flutes emanating from one room while the sweet sounds of a harpist waft down a stairwell. Aside from the stellar sounds that’ll surround you, the festival also features a hefty amount of vendors who’ll be selling their wares and teaching visitors about the sensational world of folk music and culture. Maybe you’ll even leave with a new appreciation for the genre. — MADISON PEARSON


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If you’ve never seen a Native dance performance before, now’s your chance! Performed by various Native American tribes, the Fancy dance celebrates tribal heritage through movement, elaborate garments and rhythmic drum beats. Sixteen dancers take the stage this year to perform different variations of the dance — the Fancy Shawl and the Fancy Double Bustle — and compete for a cash prize of up to $2,500. This event is part of Northern Quest’s ongoing celebration of Native American Heritage Month throughout November. If you can’t make it to the Fancy dance performance, consider attending Native comedian Tonia Jo Hall’s free stand-up show on Fri, Nov. 11, at 7:30 pm, or one of many Native American-inspired dining specials at various on-site restaurants. Head online for details and a complete schedule of all Native American Heritage Month celebrations. — MADISON PEARSON Northern Quest Dance Championships • Sat, Nov. 12 at noon • Free • Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com/nqdc

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Badass athletes on wheels are heading back to the track for one of Lilac City Roller Derby’s first post-pandemic events, an open scrimmage. What does that mean? If you skate, you’ll need what’s called “rosterable” skills at the B and C level, proof of a COVID vaccine and approved insurance, plus black and white jerseys for the bouts. Don’t skate but want to spectate and learn more about the sport of roller derby? This event is free and open to the public (but donations to support the team, a nonprofit club, are welcome). Lilac City Roller Derby is Spokane’s first flat track roller derby league, founded way back in 2006 as the Lilac City Roller Girls. Today, the nonprofit supports two women’s teams, a men’s team, an open-gender team and opportunities for new skaters to get into the sport of full-contact roller derby. — CHEY SCOTT

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Roller Derby Scrimmage • Sat, Nov. 12 at 10:30 am • Free • All ages • Roller Valley Skate Center • 9415 E. Fourth Ave., Spokane Valley • lilaccityrollerderby.com

NOVEMBER 10, 2022 INLANDER 41


all complainers I promise! Life is not only negative. There are great things happening in our community, we just don’t see it portrayed as often as we do the painful stories. I hope as people read this that we can devote more time to providing positive feedback to our community rather than always letting the negativity take more space in our media, minds and hearts. My hope is that this posts motivates others to submit more “Cheers” because some of us look forward to them.

I SAW YOU LEAD BY EXAMPLE? I saw you traveling south on Highway 2 just north of Colbert Road intersection at 12:26 pm on 11/4/22. It was raining hard, and vehicles were kicking up spray. Visibility was poor. All the other drivers had their headlights on except you; a green and white SUV with SHERIFF boldly printed on the sides. Not a good example of safe driving practices.

CHEERS AZAR’S Cheers to Katy Azar for 42 years of excellent food. What else is there to say but thank you? Your wonderful restaurant will be missed. Good luck in your future endeavors. KUDOS TO RESPONSIBLE PEOPLE Spay, neuter, feed and protect pets and strays! TO THE WRITERS OF “CHEERS” I have noticed throughout the years as I grab the Inlander to read the “Cheers” that they are starting to dwindle. Far more people write in the “Jeers” section just to throw jabs at others and vent their frustrations it seems. Although bringing tough, important issues to light is important, I am missing the “Cheers” being just as prominent as well. The ratio of “Jeers” to “Cheers” appears to be unbalanced. Is this an accurate representation of our community? I would like to give “Cheers” to those who see the negativity come through our society and have to report it out to others through our media. Keep your head up! We are not

MISSING YOU Given that I used to grab you an Inlander every week, I’m guessing that you may read this. It’s me, you can trust me. And I just want you to know that I miss and love you. I’m not looking to go back to where I was before we went our separate ways, but I never thought that you would be entirely out of my life. I’ll just hold on to the small chance that you will be single again one day and until then, please know that I love you, baby. Bye for now. THANK YOU, NATASHA HILL Thank you for running against CMR. I’ve never agreed with CMR’s politics but never totally disliked her till she turned into one of the Trumpanzees. I really thought she was better than that, but it’s politics so I guess not. JUST DOING OUR JOB Cheers to everyone who remembers that you need to turn off your car when you’re getting gas even if it’s cold outside. For everyone else, we are doing our job by telling you to turn it off. VERY HELPFUL POLICE A BIG thanks to the two helpful Spokane police officers who helped a clueless grandmother get the infant car seat installed in her Subaru Forester. I was outside the C.O.P.S. office at Lincoln Heights the week before last when your car pulled up — and you were so pleasant and helpful — the car seat was installed within 15 minutes. THANK YOU AGAIN

JEERS HASKELL’S REASONS Reporters recently caught Spokane County Prosecutor Larry Haskell’s wife using a slur to denigrate a Black person. She also said she was a “proud White nationalist.” After they made the remarks public, Larry stated, “I very much love my wife.” Larry and Mrs. Haskell remain happily married, as far as we know. Larry also voted against a nonbinding principle which called for racial equity in the criminal justice system. He has his reasons for opposing even

symbolic efforts to make the criminal justice less fraught with racism. Larry’s office charges a disproportional number of racial minorities with crimes, and racial minorities receive longer sentences. Larry has his reasons why these racial disparities persist despite solid

the answer they arrive at is to descend to the depths of human depravity. As attorney Joseph Welch profoundly said during the McCarthy hearings in 1954, “Have you no sense of decency?” The answer is quite clearly, “NO!” Does it ever occur to any of

kudos to the author! I wish Spokane would get rid of this garbage, but unfortunately that doesn’t look to happen anytime soon. Asking Spokane people to consider walking (or running or biking)? Unfathomable! We must ride scooters with no physical exertion!

Asking Spokane people to consider walking (or running or biking)? Unfathomable!

studies showing racial minorities commit the same or less crime than non-minorities do. Since Larry took office, violent crime continues to rise. Larry has his reasons for the continual rising crime in our community, even though he has been at the helm of the Spokane County Prosecutor’s Office for the last eight years. If voters choose to send a message that the sort of racist conduct countenanced by Mr. Haskell is unacceptable; if voters say they want equity in the criminal justice system, even if it’s symbolic, because at least that’s a step in the right direction; and if voters decide to say they’ve had enough of Larry’s tired, broken and unfair ways of addressing crime, which have a disproportionate impact on racial minorities and have failed to make our community safe; then, I’m sure they’ll have their reasons. TURN ON YOUR HEADLIGHTS! Turn on your headlights, especially at dawn & dusk, and check to make sure they work! UGLY IS AS UGLY DOES It is disgusting and sickening to read the Republicans’ hate-filled responses to Nancy Pelosi’s 82-year-old husband, Paul, being brutally attacked in his own home by a hammerwielding Trump acolyte. He received a blow to his head that resulted in a skull fracture that may ultimately seriously impact the quality of his last years of life if it doesn’t indeed shorten his life. The Republican responses of mocking him and his lifethreatening injury, dreaming up a defaming and despicable conspiracy accusing him of being responsible for the attack, and making sick and perverted jokes about the attack are truly beyond disgusting and speak to the quality of their character and lack thereof. Is there even an iota of basic human decency in the entire Republican Party? When these God-touting moralists ask themselves, “What would Jesus do?”

SOUND OFF

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

you that the reason you are so despised is because you truly deserve to be? MILLENNIAL MORON To the millennial moron at the Liberty Park Library on Nov. 1 late afternoon. Guess you are real special, eh bud. Felt the need to block the main entrance by parking in the crosswalk. Could be explained if you were waiting on a disabled person. But nope, first you text awhile and then you actually leave your car parked there and go into the library. Why? You are obviously too stupid to read. Common courtesy and common sense both seem to be a foreign concept for people like you. JEERS TO FEARS Why do so many Republicans base their ads on fear? Let’s scare people into voting for me! Why don’t Democrats call them out on the lies? Come on, challenge them on the BS. It will be so nice to get beyond Election Day so the ads go away. No more listening to fearmongering. RE: SCOOTER PLAGUE Kudos to the writer of Scooter Plague in last week’s Jeers section. Brilliant! Many of us in my small group have wondered why Spokane (and other towns) allow this garbage to sit all around the city (and in the lakes and rivers). These should be banned for the sake of health of all citizenry as well as that in the water bodies not readily seen (e.g., poriferans, cnidarians, amphibians, fish, etc). Not only are our children getting fatter, the city of Spokane is getting fatter. We recently had friends visit from California. They remarked that “Spokane sure has a lot of fat people. We don’t see this kind of chronic obesity where we live.” Besides being thrown into the river, the scooters are left all over the sidewalks and other pedestrian (and biking) areas, interfering with the traffic of others. So,

IDIOT NEAR THE AREN Dear lady in that orange car. I was at the crosswalk, the light said I was good to cross. There is no way you didn’t see me. You slowed down for a moment and then just put your foot on the gas. You almost hit me and had the nerve to give me the dirty look. You are in a giant death machine, yet you think that you have no responsibility for other people’s safety on the road? You are going to get someone killed. I’m astonished that people like you can think of themselves as OK to drive. Either you actually didn’t see me, which begs the question if you should be driving at all because it was clear as day and, while it was raining, it had high visibility, or you are just a reckless person who doesn’t really care what their actions do to others. And before you try and tell me I was at fault; I was in a crosswalk and the light to walk was on. I was already crossing before you started, and what seemed like a second of actual reason crossing your mind when you slowed up for a moment; but whatever that was, it stopped and you started again and almost hit me. I wasn’t listening to music, I was aware of my surroundings, I was doing exactly what I was supposed to. Either go back to learn how to drive, or just stop before you hurt someone. n

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EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT BACKING THE BOMBSHELL The Bombshell Revue is taking over the Nightingale Stage with a night of gameshow shenanigans. Also includes a silent auction. Ages 18+. Nov. 12, 7-10 pm. $25. Atomic Threads Boutique, 1905 N. Monroe. atomicthreadsinc.com (509-280-9120) SAVE THE NEWMAN LAKE GRANGE A fundraiser for building renovations with live music from the Kevin Shay Band, games, raffles and a silent auction. Nov. 12, 1-4 pm. $5-$10. Newman Lake Grange, 25025 E. Heather Ln. facebook.com/TriCommunityGrange SOUPORT THE END OF HOMELESSNESS An event featyring 30+ different soups prepared and served by local businesses/ organizations. All proceeds support St. Vincent de Paul Winter programming. Nov. 17, 11 am-1 pm. $15. Silver Lake Mall, 200 W. Hanley Ave. stvincentdepaulcda.org (208-664-3095 ext 315) PARTY FOR A PURPOSE This party benefits Matt’s Place Foundation, which provides hope and housing for families with ALS. Nov. 17, 5:30-7:30 pm. $30-$40. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside Ave. spokaneyp.org (838-2310)

COMEDY JASON MEWES The actor, podcaster and stand-up comedian is best known for playing Jay of the duo Jay and Silent Bob. Nov. 10-11, 7:30 & 10:30 pm. $25-$35. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com BEFORE IT’S IN THEATRES An all-im-

provised version of a movie based off of the promo trailer. Nov. 4-25, Fridays at 7:30 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com BECKY ROBINSON Originally from Portland, Becky is a comedian, writer, actor and voice-over artist. Nov. 12, 7:30 & 10:30 pm and Nov. 13, 7:30 pm. $20-$28. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com OPEN AUDITIONS Try out for the BDT’s improv troupe. Ages 18+. Nov. 12, 12:453:45 pm. Free. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com

COMMUNITY TRIBAL ARTISAN & VENDOR FAIR Support Indigenous-owned businesses and makers by purchasing handmade goods. Nov. 10-12, 11 am-7 pm. Free. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (509-242-7000) REBEL JUNK VINTAGE MARKET The 10th annual traveling market hosts antique and farmhouse vendors from around the U.S.. Enjoy food, cocktails and music while shopping. Nov. 11, 6-9 pm and Nov. 12, 10 am-4 pm. $5-$10. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. kcfairgrounds.com (208-765-4969) 1912 CENTER WINTER MARKET The market hosts dozens of vendors selling wares, food and drinks. Nov. 12, 9 am-1 pm. Free. 1912 Center, 412 E. Third St., Moscow. 1912center.org (208-669-2249) CHRISTMAS FAIR & BAZAAR This 93rd annual craft faire features food, vendors and more. Nov. 12, 9 am-2 pm. Free. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. stjohns-

cathedral.org (509-838-4277) CRANBERRIES, TURKEY & MURDER! Solve this holiday-themed mystery with other attendees. Nov. 12, 6 pm. $57-$114. Coeur d’Alene Fresh, 317 Coeur d’Alene Ave. crimesceneentertainment.com FALL FOLK FESTIVAL The 27th annual festival features eight stages of traditional and ethnic dance, music, workshops, special entertainment and jamming. Nov. 12, 11 am-10 pm and Nov. 13, 11 am-5 pm. Free. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. spokanefolkfestival.org HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE An open house for the new location of the Small Biz Shoppe in River Park Square. Nov. 12, 10 am-6 pm. Free. The Small Biz Shoppe, 808 W. Main, Suite 209. (509-570-4614) PEACE & JUSTICE ACTION CONFERENCE Includes workshops and lectures about activism, educational seminars about the political landscape, and more. Nov. 12, 8 am-5 pm. $15-$60. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. pjals.org/2022conference POINSETTIA HOLIDAY BASKET CLASS Select your own poinsettia and choose from an assortment of other foliage to create a holiday basket Nov. 12, noon. $30. The Plant Farm, 14208 E. Fourth Ave. spokaneplantfarm.com (509-926-9397) COMMUNITY ASSESSMENT: HOUSING The public is invited to participate in a community needs assessment to identifies priorities for shared action in the realm of housing. Nov. 15, 2:30-5 pm. Free. The Hive, 2904 E. Sprague Ave. priorityspokane.org (509-444-5300) SANTA’S SNEAK PEEK WEEK CRUISES

A lake cruise that takes participants to the ‘North Pole’ to visit Santa and his elves before crowds start to form. Nov. 15-23; daily at 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 pm. $9-$21. Coeur d’Alene. cdacruises.com FORGOTTEN HEROES COMMITTAL SERVICE Unclaimed veteran remains are escorted to the cemetery and a final resting place. Includes a full military honor ceremony. Nov. 16, 1 pm. Free. Washington State Veterans Cemetery, 21702 W. Espanola Rd. dva.wa.gov/cemetery FREE LEGAL CLINIC Seek advice about family law, divorce, child support, eviction defense and more. Nov. 16, 6-8 pm. Free. Latinos en Spokane, 1502 N. Monroe St. latinosenspokane.org SPOKANE AUDUBON MEETING The chapter is selling new/used bird-related items and sharing recent news. Nov. 16, 6:15 pm. Free. The Hive, 2904 E. Sprague Ave. audubonspokane.org

FILM BASIC LIGHTING FOR VIDEOS, VLOGS & TIKTOK Learn how lighting can make your videos stand out. Registration required. Nov. 12, 2-4 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. scld.org WARREN MILLER’S DAYMAKER Kick off winter with Warren Miller’s 73rd annual film. Nov. 12, 7 pm. $15-$17. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org BACK TO THE FUTURE A high schooler is accidentally sent 30 years into the past in a time-traveling DeLorean. Nov. 15, 7:15 pm. $5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com (509-327-1050)

HAROLD AND MAUDE Young, rich and obsessed with death, Harold finds himself changed forever when he meets lively septuagenarian Maude. Nov. 16, 7-9 pm. $7. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org CATVIDEOFEST A compilation reel of the latest and best cat videos, plus animations, music videos and classic memes. Nov. 17, 7 pm. $10. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) ALL THE WILD HORSES An event celebrating local equestrian Lena Haug, currently participating in the Mongol Derby, the longest endurance horse race in the world. Nov. 17, 7 pm. $20. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org THIRD THURSDAY MATINEE MOVIE: BOUND FOR GLORY Bound for Glory traces the life of folk singer Woody Guthrie and is based on his 1943 autobiography. Nov. 17, 1 pm. $7. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org

FOOD INLANDER POWDERKEG BREW FEST 40+ varieties of local brews and ciders are available to sample while shopping at the Inlander Winter Party vendor show. Nov. 11, 4-9 pm and Nov. 12, 10 am-7 pm. $10-$12. Spokane Convention Center, 202 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. winterparty. inlander.com (509-279-7000) SPEAKEASY SUPPER CLUB Enjoy dinner, Prohibition-style cocktails and live music by Jona Gallegos. Nov. 11 and 12, 5:30-10 pm. $85. Commellini Estate, 14715 N. Dartford Dr. commellini.com/ jona-supper-club (509-466-0667)

LISTEN TO...

JAY AND KEVIN IN THE MORNING

THE BIG DRIVE WITH JIM DIAMOND AFTERNOONS

NOVEMBER 10, 2022 INLANDER 43


EVENTS | CALENDAR WINE & SWINE DINNER Celebrate the love of the pig with a five-course meal, each paired with a wine that brings out the flavor of the dish. Nov. 11, 7-10 pm. $70. Fête - A Nectar Co, 120 N. Stevens St. bit.ly/wine-swine-dinner FAMILY PIZZA COOKING CLASS Learn how to make pizza with the family in this hands-on class. Nov. 16, 5:30-7:30 pm. $10. Second Harvest, 1234 E. Front Ave. secondharvestkitchen.org LATIN AMERICAN COOKING PARTY Prepare an authentic Latin American dish with help from Melissa Stipek of Mely’s Kitchen. Online; in Spanish with English interpretation. Registration required. Nov. 16, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. scld.org BEVERLY’S THANKSGIVING WINE DINNER Specially selected wines are paired with a six-course, autumn-inspired menu crafted by executive chef Jim Barrett and sous chef Taylor Wolters. Nov. 17, 6-9 pm. $150. Beverly’s, 115 S. Second St. beverlyscda.com (208-765-4000) FRIENDS’ FEAST An evening of community and food in partnership with KSPS PBS Kids. Nov. 17, 4:30-6:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org

MUSIC GATHERING OF THE BANDS This special concert features performances by local middle school musicians, led by director Dr. Gary Ciepluch. Nov. 10, 7 pm. Free. Schuler Performing Arts Center, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu/music VETERANS DAY CELEBRATION Veterans and their families are invited to at-

tend this sing-a-long featuring live music by the CDA Brassx5. Nov. 10, 10-11 am. Free. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org (208-667-1865) SPOKANE SYMPHONY MASTERWORKS 4: FIRE & ICE This Masterworks performace celebrates winter with Grieg’s Piano Concerto in A Minor and Nielsen’s Symphony No. 4. Nov. 12, 7:30 pm and Nov. 13, 3 pm. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org (509-624-1200) WHITWORTH WIND SYMPHONY: SHOUT! The Whitworth Wind Symphony’s fall concert. Nov. 14, 8 pm. $7. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. foxtheatrespokane EWU ORCHESTRA CONCERT The student orchestra performs various compositions. Directed by Dr. John Marshall. Nov. 15, 7:30 pm. $5-$10. EWU Music Building Recital Hall, Music Building 119. ewu.edu/music (509-359-2241) PANHANDLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The orchestra’s fall concert. Donations accepted at the door. Nov. 15, 7 pm. Free. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. panhandlesymphonyorchestra.org

SPORTS & OUTDOORS INLANDER WINTER PARTY Kick off winter with regional resorts, retailers, factory representatives and winter-related vendors at this two-day celebration of the season of snow. The event also features the PowderKeg Brew Festival. One lift ticket per person included for the first

1,500 attendees each day. Nov. 11, 4-9 pm and Nov. 12, 10 am-7 pm. $10-$12. Spokane Convention Center, 202 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. winterparty.inlander.com SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. SEATTLE THUNDERBIRDS Promotional events include Washington’s Lottery Night and coozie giveaway. Nov. 11, 7:05 pm. $12-$30. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com (279-7000) STATE LAND FREE DAYS Visitors are not required to display the Discover Pass for day-use visits to a Washington state park or on lands managed by the DNR or WDFW. Nov. 11, Nov. 25. parks.wa.gov SNOWMOBILE & POWER SPORTS EXPO This show features new and used snowmobiles, ATVs, clothing, a swap meet and more. Nov. 12, 9 am-5 pm. $10. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. winterknights.org SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. TRI-CITY AMERICANS Promotional events include the Avista Team Poster Giveaway and a postgame autograph session. Nov. 12, 7:05 pm. $12-$30. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com

THEATER THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE Montana Shakespeare in the Parks performs Shakespeare’s entire canon: 37 plays in 90 minutes. Nov. 10, 7 pm. Free. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-263-9191) THE LITTLE MERMAID A musical is based on the classic Disney animated film. Nov. 10-12 and 17-18 at 7 pm, Nov. 19 at 2 pm. $10-$12. Ferris High School, 3020 E. 37th

Ave. ferristheatrearts.com A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM The classic Shakespeare comedy is transported to present-day New Orleans. Nov. 1012 at 7:30 pm. $10-$15. Gonzaga Magnuson Theatre, 502 E. Boone Ave. gonzaga. edu/theatreanddance (313-6553) THE NAVIGATOR This tale follows Anne Morrow and Charles Lindbergh as they navigate life’s triumphs and tragedies in the public eye. Nov. 10, 7:30 pm. By donation. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com 26 PEBBLES A heartbreaking docudrama by Eric Ulloa about gun violence in a small town. Nov. 11-19, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Thu at 5 pm and Sun at 2 pm. EWU, 526 Fifth St. ewu.edu/theatre DRACULA Count Dracula and his loyal Draculettes set their sights on London. Nov. 11-13 at 7:30 pm, Sun also at 2 pm. $10-$15. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. moscowcommunitytheatre.org THE LIGHTNING THIEF: THE PERCY JACKSON MUSICAL When a teenager discovers he’s a demigod, he and his friends embark on an epic journey. Nov. 11-20, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sat-Sun at 3 pm. $14-$18. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cytnorthidaho.org (208-660-9870) CRY HAVOC! A one-night, one-man show featuring Stephan Wolfert, who recounts his pre- and post-military service. Nov. 12, 7:30-8:45 pm. $25. Forge Theater, 404 Sweet Ave. uidaho.edu/theatre

VISUAL ARTS 26TH SMALL WORKS INVITATIONAL A

show and sale that features works, by over 100 artists, small enough to give as gifts this holiday season. Open daily 11 am-6 pm through Dec. 25. Free. The Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. artspiritgallery.com (208-765-6006) HEATHER BERNDT: HOUSES OF THE HOLY Mixed media abstract works inspired by the music of Led Zeppelin. Ages 21+. Through Nov. 30. Free. Helix Wines, 824 W. Sprague. helixwine.com ORNAMENT & SMALL WORK SHOW Small pieces of art and ornaments by local artists. Mon-Fri from 10 am-5 pm, Sat from 10 am-4 pm through Dec. 23. Free to shop. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland Ave. spokaneartschool.net SAVAGES & PRINCESSES: THE PERSISTENCE OF NATIVE AMERICAN STEREOTYPES This exhibition brings together 12 contemporary Native artists who reclaim their identities by replacing stereotypical images that fill the pop culture landscape. Nov. 10-Jan. 8; Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm. $10-$15. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org WHITWORTH FACULTY BIENNIAL Art by Whitworth faculty, including Katie Creyts, Robert Fifield, Marissa Lang and more. Nov. 8-Jan. 20; Mon-Fri from 10 am-4:30 pm, Sat from 10 am-2 pm. Free. Bryan Oliver Gallery, 300 W. Hawthorne Ave. whitworth.edu (777-3258) ARBOR CREST HOLIDAY ART SHOW A show featuring local artisans selling wares, plus award-winning wines. Nov. 12-13, 12-5 pm. Free. Arbor Crest Wine Cellars, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. arborcrest. com (509-927-9463) n

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44 INLANDER NOVEMBER 10, 2022


LEGALIZATION

attorney general under President Obama, issued what has become known as the Cole Memorandum. It stated that the Justice Department would not enforce the federal prohibition of cannabis in states that had moved to legalize the drug within a strong regulatory framework. Essentially, as long as Washington’s cannabis industry followed the rules established by I-502, the federal government would let it operate.

A Decade In The five biggest days since cannabis was legalized by voters in 2012

JULY 8, 2014

BY WILL MAUPIN

T

his week marks 10 years since Washingtonians legalized recreational cannabis through a ballot initiative, creating what has become an industry with $1.5 billion in retail sales a year. Take a look back at some of the biggest days for cannabis from the past decade.

NOV. 6, 2012

On Election Day in 2012, Washington voters approved Initiative 502 with 55.7 percent of the vote. That number was slightly lower — 52.15 percent — in Spokane County. And it wasn’t like just a few people voted. Statewide turnout was an impressive 81 percent. The initiative contained a number of provisions legalizing recreational cannabis in the state and establishing a market for legal sales. At the same time, voters in Colorado approved a

Mike Boyer was the first to buy legal cannabis in Spokane.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

similar initiative with 55.3 percent of the vote, making the two states the first in the nation to legalize.

DEC. 6, 2012

The first provisions of I-502 went into effect exactly one month after Election Day. At the stroke of midnight on that early December Thursday, possession of up to 1 ounce of cannabis became legal. Photos of people gathering for a late-night smoke session beneath Seattle’s Space Needle flooded the internet.

AUG. 29, 2013

Clarity about the federal government’s stance on cannabis legalization arrived when James Cole, the deputy

More than a year and a half after voters approved I-502, the state’s legal market opened for the first time. The state’s first batch of dispensaries began selling cannabis in the early morning hours of July 7. That set in motion a mad scramble to stock shelves, while also drawing long lines of patrons looking to be among the first to buy cannabis legally. About 2 pm, Spokane Green Leaf opened its doors as the city’s first legal dispensary. Mike Boyer, who had spent 19 hours waiting in line, made the first legal purchase.

MARCH 23, 2020

As COVID surged and the state began implementing mitigation measures to stop its spread, businesses around Washington were forced to shut their doors. Cannabis businesses, however, were allowed to stay open. In the span of just eight years, cannabis went from being classified as an illegal product in Washington to being deemed an essential one during a global health crisis. n

NOVEMBER 10, 2022 INLANDER 45


BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

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This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a fiveyear sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

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Play where the big winners play.

Celebrate NATIVE AMERIC AN HERITAG E MONTH Little Dragon Eatery

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Experience our all-new dining venue at Coeur d’Alene Casino. Little Dragon Eatery offers great options for quick and easy dining for lunch and dinner. Come enjoy your favorite Asian-inspired dishes like cashew pork, orange chicken, pork fried rice and more.

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Must be age 18 or older to attend. Purchase tickets at cdacasino.com, the Casino Box Office, or through the CDA Casino App. Call 1 800-523-2464 for more details.

25 Winners of up to $2,500! SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19 TH 7 PM Celebrate Native American Heritage Month and win big! You could be one of 25 players to win up to $2,500 in cash or Extra Play Cash. Play your favorite video gaming machines with your Coeur Rewards card to earn entries. Get one entry for every 250 points earned on the day of the drawing between 12 am and 6:45 pm.

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Winter Blessing SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH 2 PM | FREE EVENT | LOCATED UPSTAIRS Join us for an afternoon of traditional storytelling and dance exhibition. Complete with complimentary fry bread and huckleberry jam.

Check out the Discovery Den, our newest gaming area which is the first and only testing room in the Inland Northwest. Featuring an ever-changing variety of video gaming machines from the world’s leading manufacturers, you won’t find these video gaming machines being tested anywhere else in the Inland Northwest—or possibly even in the US. Play them first and help decide which ones stay and which ones go.

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