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NOVEMBER 3-9, 2016 | SNOWLANDEREXPO.COM

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MOUNTAIN SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

PULLOUT GUIDE REGIONAL RESORTS • EVENTS • SNOWLANDER EXPO & POWDERKEG BREWFEST PAGE 28 BRIDGES

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PAGE 20

PAGE 31

PAGE 54

What can be done with all the stuck trucks?

Joe Salatin’s plan for sustainable food

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INSIDE

GYNECOMASTIA If you think it’s hard to say, try living with it.

VOL. 24, NO. 3 | COVER DESIGN: WAYNE HUNT

COMMENT NEWS CULTURE SNOWLANDER

5 13 21 28

FOOD FILM MUSIC EVENTS

31 34 39 44

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new word has entered our lexicon here at Inlander HQ: spiegel. In German, it means “mirror”; in the world of printing, it refers to a two-part publication with a back cover that becomes the “front” when flipped over. You’ll see what I mean with this week’s special pullout section. On one side, we have SNOWLANDER stories, with write-ups on the Inland Northwest’s 48 mountain resorts; on the other, there’s a guide to the Inlander’s Winter Party (half ski show, half beer festival, on Nov. 11-12). In either case, the section as a whole celebrates one of the best (and sometimes arduous) parts about living here: glorious winter. Also this week: Culture writers Laura Johnson and Dan Nailen explore the rise of alt-country music (page 39), and news reporter Daniel Walters examines Spokane’s homeless shelter strategy (page 18). Finally, a note about ELECTION DAY: We’ll be covering the results as they roll in Tuesday night at Inlander.com, and we’ll have complete coverage and analysis in next week’s issue. One way or another, the election promises to be historic. — JACOB H. FRIES, editor

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Donald Trump becoming president. What will you do if your candidate of choice doesn’t win the election? Well, I probably can’t do anything because I live with my parents. I don’t know. Be upset.

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COMMENT | ELECTION 2016

Please Make It Stop What’s been learned in this Bataan Death March of an election? BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

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t’s easy to forget, but there are plenty of important questions before voters next week not named Trump or Clinton. Even now, before the votes have been counted, there have been some remarkable developments that will impact our politics well past 2016. Will lessons of this election cycle be learned or ignored?

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It’s been equal parts amusing and alarming to watch Republicans tie themselves in knots trying to decide which is worse — to un-endorse Donald Trump for his misogyny (and other problems) or to handcuff yourself to him, no matter what kind of crazy he shares at his rallies? In our area, Idaho Sen. Mike Crapo was especially twisted up, having un-endorsed Trump after his creepy predator talk with Billy Bush. He even got a shout-out from Saturday Night Live writers for his act of political bravery. But it didn’t last, as he re-endorsed Trump last week. Cathy McMorris Rodgers has been in a difficult spot too. By association, Trump has insulted her, a woman, and her husband, a Navy veteran. Despite his offenses being so personal, Rodgers’ calculus seems to be that sticking with him is best for her political bottom line. To be fair, her position in leadership complicates her situation. But it wasn’t long ago when a local member of Congress also put national leadership ahead of what’s deemed right for the district. That guy, Tom Foley, was thrown out. Every elected official who sticks with Trump sends a message: “We’re cool with objectifying women — as long as we get to keep our jobs.” There will be a price to pay, and sticking with Trump, instead of women, may cost Republicans down the line. Bigly.

PARTY IN EXILE

Meanwhile, there are two Washington state GOP candidates who managed to run without showing much fealty to Trump. Bill Bryant (governor) and Chris Vance (U.S. Senate) found plenty of ways to argue traditional conservative policies. (Remember those? The ones you could hear back in the days of Ronald Reagan?) They didn’t let Trump undermine their message; they just renounced him. The rebuilding of the GOP is already underway, but does anyone think it can happen inside the Beltway? They’re already doubling down on everything America is fed up with. Witch-hunts that never end? Check — more of those. Stonewalling Supreme Court nominees and undermining the highest authority in the land? Yep — for four or eight more years, depending. Their hole is deep, so the plan is to… keep digging? Bryant, in particular, was a solid voice for a different approach to state government — and it’s an outlook that addresses pressing issues. We should be proud that we had two leading voices

6 INLANDER NOVEMBER 3, 2016

West Coast.

of reason representing the Republican Party here. Whatever your political persuasion, we all need to encourage more of that. Bryant could emerge as an important figure in what comes next. Who knows, maybe the seeds of the future GOP are being planted out here on the

A PROGRESSIVE WAVE

Polling shows that all of the bold ideas about how to run our state better are probably going to be enacted. Public financing of elections (I-1464), the carbon tax (I-732), increasing the minimum wage (I-1433) and even restricting access to firearms in certain cases (I-1491) are all looking good in voters’ eyes. This all sounds great — we’re innovating and creating a more dynamic state, with marriage equality and legalized marijuana two other recent examples. But, um, what do we have a state legislature for again? The devil’s always in the details, and every public initiative is fraught with unintended consequences. Voters beware, and do your research. Meanwhile, the elected officials of Olympia need to get in the game and address some of these items in a more balanced, responsible way. When the statehouse punts, solutions come instead from an army of signature collectors and the sugar daddies who buy the ballot space.

BIG BUCKS ON THE BENCH

We’re seeing more and more interest in judicial races, with three Washington state Supreme Court justices facing challenges (and one more in Idaho), along with two local Superior Court judges. It’s true that no elected position should be a rubber stamp once you get in, but it’s also true that money has a way of polluting the process — and there’s more being spent on these races than ever before. Voters generally know too little about judges, so, again, do your homework.

SHORTER IS SWEETER

One idea that’s getting some traction as America has suffered through this Bataan Death March of an election is making it shorter. This would require the parties to enforce new limits — sorry GOP, but you can’t have 17 candidates. Wouldn’t it be nice to have, say, six months of electoral pain and suffering instead of 18? But if the parties won’t play, perhaps a single, six-year presidential term is worth a look. If we don’t fix it while the nightmare is still fresh, I’m afraid the sequel will get the green light by February: Election 2020: The Do-over. n


COMMENT | TRAIL MIX

Comrade Trump? REDS, WHITE AND BLUE

The bromance between Republican presidential nominee DONALD TRUMP and often-shirtless Russian President Vladimir Putin has remained a curious subplot of this election. Even before allegedly Russian hackers dumped thousands of stolen emails from the Democratic National Committee and Hillary Clinton’s campaign chairman onto WikiLeaks, Trump has gone out of his way to praise Putin’s leadership, even when challenged directly on it. Trump’s team pushed to change the Republican National Committee’s policy on Russia’s Ukrainian invasion to a more Putin-friendly one. Then his campaign manager, Paul Manafort, resigned after reports emerged of his ties to secret off-the-books payments from Ukraine’s pro-Russian former president. In the dying days of the 2016 campaign, media outlets have sought even juicier stories linking Trump and Russia. Slate passed along speculation that a Trump computer server had been secretly communicating with a Russian bank, while Mother Jones claimed that a former intelligence officer had provided the FBI with information that Russia was treating Trump as a possible foreign intelligence asset. Other publications quickly poured cold water on these stories, highlighting the litany of technical flaws in the Slate piece and reporting that the FBI’s scrutiny of direct links between Russia and Trump has turned up nothing thus far. But that’s left the question hanging: Exactly why does Trump love Russia so much? Other than the blini, of course. (DANIEL WALTERS)

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Throughout this presidential election cycle, FBI Director JAMES COMEY has emerged as a central figure. In July, Comey recommended that no criminal charges be filed against Hillary Clinton for her handling of classified information, but called her “extremely careless” in using a private email address and server. Donald Trump denounced Comey as part of the problem, consistent with Trump’s belief that the election has been rigged for Clinton. But 11 days before Election Day, Comey announced that the FBI would review new evidence related to Clinton’s emails. Now, it’s Clinton questioning the motives behind the timing of Comey’s announcement. And now it’s Trump praising Comey. “It took guts for Director Comey to make the move that he made in light of the kind of opposition he had where they’re trying to protect her from criminal prosecution,” Trump said. The FBI reportedly found the emails from Clinton aide Huma Abedin weeks ago while investigating an unrelated case involving Abedin’s estranged husband, former New York congressman Anthony Weiner. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

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COMMENT | ELECTION 2016

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Darkest Before the Dawn This election has brought out the worst in too many Americans, but there’s still an opportunity to deliver overdue justice BY PAUL DILLON

L

ike most Americans, I can’t wait for this election to be over. On the morning after, no matter what, I imagine a sense of peace, but I can’t lie to you: That peace involves Donald Trump and his hate losing; however, the next test waits with an angry constituency in the millions. Worse, many will be convinced of a rigged election, and that the President-elect belongs in prison instead of the Oval Office. Clinging to a rigged result is the easiest explanation for justifying a loss on Nov. 8. It’s a deceitful stance,

especially after reports of Trump supporters intimidating people of color at the ballot box, creating extra hurdles. Voter fraud claims are part and parcel of the myth that Republicans have built up to pass new voting restrictions — another rhetorical flame that has been fanned for years. So if that rhetoric leads to danger, you can’t just blame Trump, even though he’s never one to admit defeat. In addition, the claims are more puzzling when in Washington, Secretary Of State Kim Wyman sent out a Spanish-language voter pamphlet that made it seem that if Spanish-speaking voters had a misdemeanor on their record or even a parking infraction, they could interpret it to mean they don’t get to vote at all.

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Why so scared? We live in a time where there’s a continued transfer of massive power — America has been run almost entirely by white men, and now the future is going to be in the hands of a new majority. The coming backlash will be immense. Jorge Ramos from Univision found that hate groups in the country have grown significantly in the past year. According to data from the Southern Poverty Law Center, the number of organizations linked to the Ku Klux Klan grew from 72 in 2014 to 190 in 2015. It’s called “the Trump Effect.” In the excellent Netflix documentary 13th, Trump’s rallying call of returning to the “good old days” when protesters were carried out on stretchers are heard in a voice-over against archival footage of civil-rights-era news footage of water hoses, attack dogs and beatings. How does the hostility of the campaign stop? So much media oxygen has been sucked up by the next worst thing that most Americans aren’t paying much attention to the warning signs of dangerous confrontations to come. Last week, as a verdict was released in the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge armed occupation trial, protesters against the Dakota Access Pipeline at Standing Rock in North Dakota were violently attacked and arrested. Both situations involve a clash between the United States government and private citizens over land ownership, but the way the government is treating the people involved couldn’t be more different. If we are serious about truth and reconciliation throughout our country as opposed to appeasing parts of it, then both Republicans and Democrats must acknowledge that the frustration and anger in communities are recurring symptoms of our history. We must change this hatred and respectfully deliver justice to those who have been wronged. People directly impacted by injustices must lead the conversation about what that justice looks like to them — and acknowledge that “the Trump Effect” is a side effect of forever treating a certain group of people less fairly and equitably than others. Bryan Stevenson, founder of the Equal Justice Initiative who was in Spokane last year for Whitworth University’s President’s Leadership Forum speaker series, touched on the question of whether this election had any silver lining in the New Yorker. Regarding the transfer of power, he said, “if anything, the moment seems like a moment of light, because things are being illuminated that have been going on for a very long time.” It’s always darkest before the dawn. After waking up, America can’t look the other way if it ever wants to be great again. n Paul Dillon, a Center for Justice board member, manages public affairs for Planned Parenthood of Greater Washington and North Idaho.


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COMMENT | FROM READERS JEREMY KING: At least our overpasses are built well I guess. KITTY KLITZKE: Remove the billboards which practically cover up the 11’9” sign and replace them with a lighted sign that says “warning low clearance 11’9”” or close that stretch to trucks. Also, before the bridge, “trucks must exit here” sign. LUANN HUNDLEY-SURYAN: Grease the overpasses so they don’t get stuck.

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Reactions to the recent spate of semi trucks getting stuck under downtown Spokane overpasses, and what should be done to help prevent it (see page 20):

BARB PROFFITT: I live on the west side of the state, and I am shocked at how low that span is. Just driving a car through is hard enough, if a truck has no warning ahead of time, it’s screwed. There is nowhere to go, and we all know nobody is going to give an inch to let them back up. I love going to Spokane, but that one section is the worst part of the drive. BILL MELLO: Build a sacrificial thingy that they hit first. ELIZABETH PARKER: This entire state has horrible signage. Put the prisoners to work creating better signs. DOUG NICOL: Maybe dig down and by doing so raise the opening to 15’6” or whatever is standard. ROCHELLE COUSINEAU POPE: Could the increase this year have something to do with all the construction and reroutes… perhaps an app or map that identifies safe truck routes. No one wants to do this, I think it’s frustration and getting stuck in traffic and then turning with nowhere to go followed by that oh s#%* moment. Create a truck route that’s clearly labeled. How many of these guys are following their GPS? MATTHIAS MCDOODLES: Leverage large fines. The trucking companies will take care of it themselves if the penalty is large enough. MARC JEFFREY DRIFTMEYER: Lower the road, install a proper arch bridge overpass and share the cost with BNSF. MONICA BERTUCCI: The city transportation department can contact the major online mapping services and have them update their maps with the clearance issues and have them pop up as warnings, just as construction issues do, when a driver is mapping the route and have the alternate routes visible. 

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Roy Jackson feared he wouldn’t be able to build a home on his property near Indian Canyon Golf Course because of a water rights decision.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

SPOKANE COUNTY

Well Wishers A Washington Supreme Court decision will make sure that proposed developments plan for water availability. But is it worth the potential economic impact? BY WILSON CRISCIONE

S

teve Hagen had no idea why the deal was falling through. The potential buyers of a 10-acre parcel south of Deer Park made their offer in cash. A builder was ready to build their dream home on the land. All that was left was approval of the building permit. But Spokane County wouldn’t issue the permit. The buyers rescinded the offer, citing a state Supreme Court decision. Hagen, a real estate agent with Keller Williams Realty, wanted answers. Hagen took to Facebook and asked other realtors what was going on. He had heard that counties on the other side of the state weren’t issuing permits to use water on some new home developments. But not here. Not in Spokane. Right? “I asked, ‘Did anyone know about this?’” Hagen

says. “And it just blew up.” As he quickly found out, the Oct. 6 decision by the Washington Supreme Court — the Hirst decision — would have huge impacts on development throughout the state, including Spokane County. For property owners looking for permission to drill a well, the ruling says it’s no longer enough that water is physically available. Now, you’d have to prove that the well wouldn’t impair anyone else’s ability to use water if they already had the right to it. The court clarified that this applies to so-called “permit-exempt wells,” typically private domestic wells that were exempt from the water permitting process. And it shifts more responsibility from the Department of Ecology to counties to determine if a new well will infringe on someone else’s water rights.

The Hirst decision outraged many realtors, developers and property owners in rural areas. Some people, like Spokesman-Review columnist Sue Lani Madsen, said the decision will block any new development in the state. Some elected officials have said it will come down to a “legislative fix,” and called on voters to help oust the three Supreme Court judges up for re-election. Spokane County officials found a way to let people apply for building permits under the old rules until the last possible second, allowing deals like Hagen’s to finally go through before it was too late. But are they overreacting? Could this be, instead, a solution that will actually protect property owners from having their own wells dry up because there are too many straws in the proverbial cup? According to Futurewise, an anti-sprawl environmental group that filed the lawsuit leading to the court’s decision, it is that simple. “The reaction to this, I think, is a little surprising, considering what it’s requiring,” says Kitty Klitzke, Eastern Washington program director for Futurewise. “What it’s requiring communities to do is plan for water availability when they plan growth. I mean, that’s just absolute common sense.”

“T

hese,” says Spokane County Commissioner Al French, “are our heroes.” In the Spokane County Commissioners’ hearing room on the evening of Oct. 19, a projector screen shows the faces ...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 13


NEWS | SPOKANE COUNTY “WELL WISHERS,” CONTINUED...

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of at least a dozen state legislators in the region, many of whom are in the room as French speaks. He tells the packed room to keep their emotions in check throughout the meeting. “I can tell you that the Board of County Commissioners shares that emotion,” he says. “And we are concerned about the impact that [the Hirst decision] is going to have, not only on the county as an entity, but on individuals within the county. All three [commissioners] are committed to the concept of protecting water rights, as well as property rights. And so we’re going to get through this together.” Mike Hermanson, a water resources project manager for Spokane County, steps up to the podium to explain what the Hirst decision means. When the state’s Growth Management Act passed in 1990, it required that builders must have an adequate source of water to serve a proposed building. County governments, Hermanson says, assumed that meant you need to demonstrate only that there’s sufficient water supply before issuing a building permit. If the Department of Ecology didn’t step in and say that the water would infringe on someone else’s water rights, the county assumed the water was legally available. “So the assumption was no news is good news. If we didn’t hear there was no water available, then water was available,” he says. The Hirst decision turns that assumption on its head. No longer can counties rely on the inaction of the Department of Ecology. Counties, Hermanson says, must determine if a building permit that’s going to be served by a private water supply — mostly used by homes in rural areas — is impairing any water rights. It gets trickier when considering water basins with what’s called an “instream flow” rule. The Little Spokane River watershed in north Spokane county — encompassing the Mead area, Chattaroy and Deer Park, all the way into Pend Oreille County to the north — has such a rule, meaning the river has a minimum flow that cannot be impaired. Coupled with the Hirst decision, that sets an impairment standard that is “almost impossible to meet,” Hermanson says. “So when someone comes to get a building

permit, and we look at the information, and we’re asked, does this new use — does it have legally available water? We have a hard time answering that it does,” Hermanson says. “And if we did answer that it did, we would be de facto saying that you have legally available water, and then we would be on the hook for that decision … so that’s kind of the conundrum we’re in.” As Hermanson speaks during the meeting, the crowd grows angrier. One woman in the back storms out in fury because of what this means. Officials say the county is working on ways to work around the issue. A water bank, for example, in which the county buys up water rights to sell to homeowners, is one solution, but it’s two years out.

“So the assumption was no news is good news. If we didn’t hear there was no water available, then water was available.”

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The only fix, says French, is for the state legislature to change the law so that the Supreme Court can’t interpret it the way it did. State Senators Mike Padden and Michael Baumgartner promise that the legislature is working on it. In the meantime, the county told people they had until Oct. 26 to submit building permit applications under the old rules. Eric Johnson, Spokane Association of Realtors chair of government affairs, tells the Inlander that the Hirst decision could “shut down all industry” and “all rural development.” Property owners will see their land devalued, he says. Contractors could lose work. He blames Futurewise and the Supreme Court for what he sees as an unreasonable decision approached in the wrong way. “This is Machiavellian, as far as how they’ve gone about it. It’s a slash and burn, just, ‘Hey, shut it down,’” Johnson says.

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until spring, but then someone told him that if he wanted a guarantee he could drill a well for water, he’d have to submit the application by Oct. 26. He got the application processed in time after waiting at the county’s building and planning department office for almost five hours. The office was packed with people, all trying to get their applications in before the new rules took effect. The department processed 453 building permit applications from Oct. 20 until the 26th, a 900 percent increase from a typical week this time of year. “It was literally a madhouse down there,” Jackson says. Of those applications, Suzy Dix, a realtor who sells a high number of rural properties, submitted 35. Dix, who calls herself a strong conservationist, says there are other things to consider besides sales. While she waited in the office, she found herself explaining to people how water rights work — how people who have had wells on a property that uses the Little Spokane River watershed have seen their wells dry up because people upstream put in exempt wells. This problem should have been fixed a long time ago, she says. “We’re running out of water. People are using too much water, and the government hasn’t been regulating it,” Dix says. “And now they do, but they do it in a very ferocious way that really affected a lot of people.” Susan McGeorge, manager of the Whitworth Water District, says she is not surprised by the decision, and thinks it’s logical. But she is concerned at how quick of a change it represents. LETTERS The water district has had a Send comments to “large percentage of rural land” editor@inlander.com. where exempt wells have gone dry, but the court didn’t consider the ramifications on the economy when making its ruling. “The rug has been pulled out,” McGeorge says. “I feel like there is an awful amount of people that are in the middle, and haven’t drilled their wells this year, and I don’t think they got their permits in time.” Tim Trohimovich, director of planning and law for Futurewise, says the Hirst decision is designed to protect those senior water rights holders who run out of water. The decision, he says, will have a positive effect on protecting their water rights. “I certainly think there’s an overreaction. The concerns about shutting down development are overblown,” Trohimovich says. Futurewise’s Klitzke thinks people have yet to see the bigger picture. And maybe, she says, development should halt in some areas to protect the water. “I think people are missing that we’re going to have to adapt to climate change and other challenges, and the massive influx of growth,” Klitzke says. “We need to go from having a cavalier attitude about how we plan infrastructure to being more careful about planning for our future.”  wilsonc@inlander.com

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Doppelgängers? LOOK-ALIKES It is a universally acknowledged truth that Gonzaga head basketball coach Mark Few LOOKS EERILY SIMILAR to Kevin Bacon, who himself played a basketball coach in the 1994 comedy The Air Up There. On the blog, the Inlander has done you the service of identifying other doppelgängers in the region. For example, former County Commissioner Todd Mielke looks a bit like an older version of South Park co-creator Trey Parker. We also went the extra mile to identify local celebrities who look like other local celebrities: The rugged good looks of former County Commissioner John Roskelley closely resemble the rugged good looks of former federal prosecutor Jim McDevitt. And give Spokane County Prosecutor Larry Haskell (pictured left) a bow tie and he’s a dead ringer for former Museum of Arts and Culture Director Forrest Rodgers. (DANIEL WALTERS)

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FOOTBALL The Washington State University STUDENT CONDUCT PROCESS is under fire for suspending a football player, Robert Barber, who police and multiple witnesses say is shown on video knocking another student unconscious at a party. The Seattle Times wrote a lengthy story examining the student conduct process as it relates to Barber, quoting advocacy groups who claim the system is unfair and suggest that the school targeted Barber, who is from American Samoa. State Sen. Michael Baumgartner joined in on the criticism of the process, offering Barber a job should his suspension be upheld. Hashtags like #freebarber showed up on social media. Nobody, however, came to the defense of student Pedro Diaz, who is not on the football team and told the Inlander that he, too, will be suspended for his role in the same brawl that got Barber in trouble. Diaz, who was cited by police for disorderly conduct, will be suspended two semesters starting Jan. 1. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

POLICE It might not seem like it, but a national Gallup poll released last month shows that RESPECT FOR LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT is as high as it’s been since the 1960s. According to Gallup, 76 percent of those polled say they have a “great deal” of respect for “police in their area,” a 12 percent jump from last year. Also perhaps surprisingly, considering the disproportionate number of African Americans and Native Americans killed by police, respect for local police is up among both white and nonwhite people. A second poll released earlier this year shows “confidence” in police is up after dipping to a 22-year low last year. The divide between white and nonwhite people was more pronounced regarding the question of confidence in police. (MITCH RYALS)


NEWS | BRIEFS

Hiring Bias? Lawsuit alleges employment discrimination in county PD’s office; plus, the Valley addresses panhandling and the right to petition PUBLIC OFFENDER? An attorney in the Spokane County Public Defender’s Office is suing her boss for employment discrimination. In a lawsuit filed last week, Brooke Hagara alleges that Spokane County Public Defender TOM KRZYMINSKI promoted two less qualified lawyers over Hagara because she was pregnant at the time she applied, and because of an alleged past sexual relationship between the two. The lawsuit names Krzyminski, the director of the office, and Spokane County and asks for $500,000 in damages. Hagara, who has worked as a public defender for the past 10 years, applied for an open senior attorney position in June 2015 after she told Krzyminski she was pregnant. Hagara says she was not interviewed and claims that Krzyminski hired a less experienced female attorney, Jill Gannon-Nagle, instead. Hagara left for maternity leave in December 2015 and applied for senior attorney a second time while on leave. Krzyminski gave the job to a male attorney, Kyle Zeller, who took over one of Hagara’s cases while she was gone. Krzyminski says he can’t comment on active lawsuits. Hagara also points to comments from Deputy Director Karen Lindholdt “repeatedly” telling Hagara “that she

may not want to handle serious cases, remain in felonies, or even remain at the office after she had her baby,” court documents say. Both Krzyminski and Lindholdt have applied for the vacant District Court judge position. Finally, Hagara accuses Krzyminski of discriminating against her because she ended a previous sexual relationship with him, and he “was not happy about it.” The allegations of a sexual relationship were not mentioned in Hagara’s original tort claim, filed ahead of the lawsuit, nor in her complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. (MITCH RYALS)

CAN I ASK YOU SOMETHING?

Spokane Valley has updated its city code to no longer target aggressive begging or PANHANDLING, instead prohibiting all kinds of solicitation. Spokane Valley residents shouldn’t worry this might increase the number of panhandlers, as Valley Councilman Sam Wood initially feared when learning of a proposed change to city code. Spokane Valley has two different municipal codes regulating solicitation. The first, amended in 2014, makes it illegal to solicit from vehicle occupants. Until last week, when the Valley updated the code, the city also prohib-

ited “aggressive begging in any public place in the city.” Yet according to a state Supreme Court case earlier this year, the language of that Valley code would have infringed on the free speech rights of citizens because it restricted speech based on its content, according to a state Supreme Court case earlier this year, City of Lakewood v. Willis. To align with the ruling, Valley city staff proposed changing the language from “aggressive begging” to “aggressive solicitation,” a distinction that would encompass asking for charity, selling or distributing goods or services, and soliciting signatures on a petition or survey. The key is that you can’t engage in those activities aggressively, by intimidating another person. The Spokane Valley City Council’s initial resistance to this change had nothing to do with panhandlers; it had to do with the right to petition. Councilman Michael Munch wanted the word “petition” struck from the new ordinance because he saw it as an important part of keeping the public “involved in government affairs.” Even though Deputy City Attorney Erik Lamb said the ordinance would not infringe on anybody’s right to petition — only that people couldn’t do so aggressively — Munch held firm. “You either have to strike that word from [the] petition out of there, or I can’t support it at this time,” Munch said during the first reading of the ordinance. Ultimately, however, when it came time to approve the ordinance, the council approved it unanimously. “This does not implicate the First Amendment,” said City Attorney Cary Driskell. “Even though it uses the word ‘petition,’ it is not to infringe on anybody’s right to petition, it’s just they can’t do it in a way that’s aggressive.” (WILSON CRISCIONE)

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NEWS | HOMELESSNESS

Crosswalk Guard For more than a year, the city of Spokane has pursued a plan to expand homeless shelters to be open 24/7 — while scrambling to save the services that shelters already have BY DANIEL WALTERS

V

olunteers of America youth services director Bridget Cannon hasn’t yet told the kids. Ideally, she won’t have to. These teens — lugging around backstories that often include abuse, sexual assault, malnourishment, drug addiction and mental illness — have enough uncertainty to deal with. They come here to Crosswalk, a teen drop-in center and homeless shelter in downtown Spokane, because they have few other safe places to go. “We’re trying to present ‘Everything’s normal, everything’s going [fine]’ — just like your parents would,” Cannon says. But in fact, Crosswalk has been hit with a huge blow. Volunteers of America found out last month that they hadn’t received the $200,000 per-year Basic Center Program grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development that had sustained them for the past three years. In a moment, HUD had slashed the budget for Crosswalk by more than a third. And now the region’s longest-running 24/7 shelter for teens is facing a worst-case-scenario possibility of losing its 24/7 status. “When you’re bored, and you have no structure, and you can’t get out of the weather, and you don’t know where you want to go for a meal, what do you do? You find lots of places to get into trouble,” Cannon says. She speaks with a New Jersey accent, her compassion cut with a pragmatic edge. “You’re dumpster-diving for your meals. I’ve had kids come in here sick because the pizza place started pouring bleach over their throwaway pizza.” Here, they can sleep. But this is also the spot where they receive aid from substance abuse counselors and art teachers. They get professional guidance about safe sex and healthy relationships. They get tutoring and job training. “We close during the day?” Cannon says. “A lot of that goes away.” By contrast, at the House of Charity on the other side of downtown, this week brought a moment of celebration. After a year and a half of work, the city of Spokane and a coalition of nonprofits were finally ready to announce their first major victory in pursuit of the region’s 24/7 shelter system: Starting Nov. 1, the House of Charity homeless shelter would be open 24 hours a day, seven days a week during the winter. Cannon worries, however, that cuts to Crosswalk could undercut the progress made expanding homeless shelters for adults. “If you’re not focusing on youth homelessness, all you’re doing is, for every chronically homeless person you house, you’ve got the next person in line,” Cannon says. “You’ve got to stop the pipeline.”

Bridget Cannon, youth services director for Volunteers of America, says Crosswalk weathered a similar funding crisis in 2012. MAC BOOEY PHOTO

SEEKING SHELTER

In the past few years, homeless shelters all across the country have faced crises similar to the one that Crosswalk now faces. It’s mostly a consequence of a major philosophical change in how HUD doles out money. Instead of just giving the homeless a temporary spot to crash every night, the federal government now seeks to give them actual homes. For the permanent-housing side of charities, the shift has brought a time of feast: This year, Catholic Charities opened Buder Haven and Volunteers of America opened the the Marilee — both high-rise apartments aimed to house the homeless. But for the shelter side — the places homeless men and women first land before they can be rehoused — it’s been a time of famine. The first big blow for Volunteers of America came in 2012: They lost their Transitional Living Program grant of 15 years, meaning that Flaherty House, a homeless shelter for young men between ages 18 and 21, had to shut down. It still hasn’t reopened. That same year, Crosswalk also lost its Basic Center Program grant. “Downtown businesses did step up and give us a pretty hefty chunk of money to help us out,” Cannon says. Crosswalk didn’t cut hours, but had to lay off longtime staff and eliminated fun things like YMCA passes. That may seem minor, but Cannon says that giving kids stuff to do is crucial to keeping them out of trouble. Volunteers of America got its Basic Center Program grant the next year, then lost it again three years later. Nonprofits like Volunteers of America are used to riding a roller coaster driven by the whims of grants and foundations. The burden to provide stability has been placed on local communities. In May, Mayor David Condon and City Council President Ben Stuckart announced $200,000 to shore up funding to prevent House of Charity from slashing hours. But their larger goal is far more ambitious.


The coalition has sought almost $1.4 million in order to keep homeless shelters — including House of Charity, Family Promise, the Salvation Army, and Volunteers of America’s Hope House — accessible 24/7. The coalition still needs almost $600,000 more to pull that off. Jonathan Mallahan, the city of Spokane’s neighborhood and business services director, says he’s an optimist. He believes — or at least hopes — that the city and its partners can pull together a plan this month to pay for the rest. Amid the clamor of demand for limited city resources, the strain is acute. “I’m sure the city would like to step up and plug those holes wherever we possibly can, but it’s not going to be the reality,” City Councilman Mike Fagan says. Yet the alternative can be deadly. “Kill me!” a homeless man named Michael Kurtz screams in April. “KILL ME!” He’s outside the House of Charity, holding a knife pointed at his own chest, and refuses to drop it, despite pleas from the police. Two police officers shoot Kurtz, killing him. Later, the local Catholic bishop speculates that, if House of Charity hadn’t have been closed during those hours, Kurtz never would have been on the street, the confrontation never would have occurred, and he’d still be alive. “We want to be a ‘city of choice’ and we have people suffering on our streets without a roof over their heads?” says Mallahan. “That’s crazy.”

THE CONSTANT FUNDRAISER

At a Volunteers of America fundraiser at the DoubleTree Hotel last Friday, a kid dubbed “Charlie” speaks, his head blurred and his voice altered. “If this wasn’t here, I’d honestly be dead,” he says. “It was hard quitting drinking, most of all.” Volunteers of America is still tallying the checks written and raffle tickets sold, but VOA President Fawn Schott estimates that this fundraiser raised as much as $40,000, a crucial piece of solving the funding challenge. “What do we need to do to build a model that is more sustainable?” asks Schott. “And not so reliable on federal dollars.” In the meantime, Volunteers of America will seek other ways to bolster funding for Crosswalk, including reapplying next year for the grant it lost. Mallahan also raises a best-case scenario: The community has applied for a highly competitive $1.5 million Youth Demonstration grant from HUD, one that won’t go away if Spokane can prove it’s effective. The city of Spokane has chipped in $76,000 to fund Crosswalk until the end of the year. Crosswalk also has been meeting with businesses and local foundations, asking for money from many of the same groups that gave to help stop the House of Charity cuts just a few months ago. The Downtown Spokane Partnership has already donated $25,000 to the efforts for the House of Charity, and has promised to match up to $25,000 from local businesses. DSP president Mark Richard says he’d also welcome a call from Schott about funding Crosswalk. “I’d expect we’d find a way to support her and her mission,” Richard says. Other nonprofits, which invariably face their own funding challenges, have already leaped in to help. Last week, Safety Net, a local organization aiding foster youth, set up a GoFundMe page called “Help us Help Spokane’s Kids!” intended to aid Crosswalk. As of Monday night, the page had raised $3,350 from nine donors. The page aims to raise $100,000. Cannon is grateful for this kind of generosity. For her, Crosswalk is so much more than just a warm place for homeless kids to sleep. “Crosswalk has always been a model of what good comes out of having a safe place to sleep. But especially for kids? A safe place to grow up,” Cannon says. “I mean, that’s what we’re talkin’ about: Growing up doesn’t take place when you’re sleeping. Growing up takes place when you’re awake.” n danielw@inlander.com

NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 19


NEWS | TRANSPORTATION

A truck, like several others this year, gets wedged underneath the railway bridge downtown, despite the sign warning of the low height.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Big, Dumb Truck Problem The Inlander asks Spokane’s street guru if there’s anything the city can do to stop trucks from running into bridges

MORE OBVIOUS SIGNAGE?

BY DANIEL WALTERS

T

his time, the truck driver nearly made it through. The gap between the pavement of Stevens Street and the top of the BNSF Railway bridge between First Avenue and Second is about 11½ feet.

That’s two inches shorter than the “can opener,” an 11-foot, 8-inch overpass in Durham, North Carolina, that has achieved international infamy for scalping more than 100 trucks whose drivers mistakenly think their vehicles

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are short enough to slide through. But the Fred’s Appliance truck became stuck under the Stevens Street underpass on Oct. 18, blocking multiple lanes of traffic until it could be extricated. And it’s hardly the first truck to be clotheslined at that underpass this year. Local TV outlets reported that at least three other trucks have been stuck at the same spot this year, despite the bright yellow sign warning drivers exactly how little clearance they had. In total, KHQ reported in September, 13 trucks had hit low Spokane bridges in 2016 alone. Either way, along with harming the truck, it can create huge traffic jams for hours. If the truck hits a railway bridge, trains sometimes have to be stopped and the bridges inspected for damage. “We’ve all done stupid things,” says Mark Serbousek, director of the Spokane streets department. “These are big stupid things. Many of the truck drivers who’ve hit the bridges, Serbousek says, aren’t ignorant out-of-towners. A lot of them are locals. “Which is crazy,” Serbousek says. “The excuse we’ve been getting is they didn’t pay attention.” The Inlander brainstormed with Serbousek, trying to figure out if there was something — anything — that the city could do to stop the bridge bashers without spending millions to raise bridges or lower streets. Serbousek notes that for decades, there have been signs warning drivers of the low heights on the bridges, complete in some cases with yellow flashing lights to make it really clear. He says there’s a limit to what signs can do. “We are reaching a point where we’re saturated by

Take this kiss upon the brow! • And, in parting from you now, • Thus much let me avow • You are not wrong, who deem • That my days have been a dream; • Yet if hope has the flown away • In a night, or in a day, • In a vision, or in none, • Is it therefore the less gone? • All that we see or seem • Is but a dream within a dream. • I stand amid the roar • Of a surf-tormented shore, • And I hold within my hand • Grains of the golden sand • How few! yet how they creep • Through my fingers to the deep, • While I weepwhile I weep! • O God! can I not grasp • Them with a tighter clasp? • O God! can I not save • One from the pitiless wave? • Is all that we see or seem • But a dream within a dream? • I wandered lonely as a cloud • That floats on high o’er vales and hills, • When all at once I saw a crowd, • A host, of golden daffodils; • Beside the lake, • Fluttering dancing The beneath Inlandertheistrees, doing a special and section inin the breeze. • Continuous as the stars that shine • And twinkle a December issue that will feature 10-15 poems line • on the milky way, • They stretched in never-ending Alongby thewriters marginfrom of a around bay: • Ten thousand saw I atlive a glance, the region. If you • Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. • The waves beside in eastern or central Washington, northleaves or centhem danced, but they • Out-did the sparkling in glee; • A poet could not be but gay, • In such a jocund company! • I tral Idaho, western Montana, or NE Oregon, please gazed—and gazed—but little thought • What wealth the show to send your work. Selected writers will be paid $40. me had brought: • For oft, when on my couch I lie • In vacant or in pensive mood, • They flash upon that inward eye • Which is the bliss of solitude; • And then my heart with pleasure fills, Send • And1-3dances withunpublished the daffodils. I held a Jewel in my previously poems• as fingers • And went to sleep • The day was warm, and winds a single attachment to guest editor were prosy • I said “’Twill keep” • I woke and chid my honest Thom Caraway: thomcaraway@gmail.com. Use fingers, • The Gem was gone • And now, an Amethyst remembrance Inlander poetry submission as the subject line. • Is all I own • Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, • And sorry One I could notsubmission travel both be one traveler, long I poem per will •beAnd selected. stood There • And is looked down one as far as I could • To where it no theme or topic that the poems bent in the undergrowth; • Then took the other, as just as must address. fair, • And having perhaps the better claim, • Because it was grassyPlease and include wanted contact wear; •information Though as for that the passing there (name, • Had address, worn them really the same, • And both that phone) and a about two sentence bio in morning equally lay • In leaves no step had the body of your email (not more than 50 words).trodden black. • Oh, I kept the first for another day! • Yet knowing how way leads on to way, • I doubted if I should ever come back. • I SUBMISSION DEADLINE NOVEMBER 20 shall be telling this with a sigh • Somewhere ages and ages hence: • Two roads diverged in a wood, and I • I took the one


signs,” Serbousek says. After a while, drivers, especially those familiar with the area, tend to zone out and ignore many of the signs they see. Part of the trouble is that most of the bridges that trucks get stuck under downtown aren’t actually owned by the city of Spokane. They’re owned by BNSF Railway. Putting anything directly on the bridge requires the railroad’s permission, which in turn requires navigating through the railway’s entire corporate bureaucracy.

the [warning] pole,” Serbousek says. 2) Put the pole closer to the bridge, which might not give truck drivers enough time to realize their mistake before hitting the bridge. “Is it going to stop them?” Serbousek says. “Some of these guys are getting halfway through the bridge before they stop.” Not only that, but it won’t do much to prevent traffic jams created by a truck needing to slowly back up in the middle of a busy intersection.

WARNING POLES?

INFRARED OR RADAR?

Think of the pole sticking out before you try to go up the ramp to the NorthTown parking garage. If you’re too tall, you hit it, hear a loud noise, and feel pretty stupid. But you’re still able to back out without much damage done, beyond some scratched paint and wounded pride. The trouble with LETTERS this idea, Send comments to Serbousek editor@inlander.com. says, is that for this sort of thing to work well, you typically need to give trucks enough time to stop or turn around before they get that far. But since the blocks in downtown Spokane are so close together, that creates a dilemma for street engineers. They have two choices: 1) Put the pole up the street from the bridge, where trucks still have the option to turn down other streets. “Now we have trucks that aren’t going that direction, and they can’t go underneath

In some cities, infrared sensors or radar detect when trucks are too high to pass under a bridge, and then trigger electronic signs that signal drivers of tall trucks to either stop and turn around or take a detour. One clear downside is cost: A New York study of bridge strikes by trucks identified that a lot of places have found these sort of detection systems to be effective. But they come with a hefty price tag, often $10,000 or higher per location. And that, ultimately, is the rub with any solution, Serbousek says. “How much do they cost? Can we afford something like that?” he says. “Is there money, maybe grants, where we can get something like that?” In other words: How much taxpayer money do you spend to try to save truck drivers who are just plain not paying attention?  danielw@inlander.com

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ARTS

Native Passion Jacob Johns is an artist and activist who does a little of everything BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

J

acob Johns has lived multiple lives, many of them wrung to the last drop of bitter and sweet, sometimes in equal measure. As an artist, musician, DJ and hairdresser, he’s also an activist, passionate about Native American issues and environmental concerns. “I don’t have to be confined to one thing,” says Johns, who is of the Hopi and Akimel O’odham nations. In addition to Sierra Club rallies and protests against oil and coal train traffic, Johns has made several supply runs to the Standing Rock Sioux camp since September, where he joined Dakota Access Pipeline protesters and was interviewed by Democracy Now’s Amy Goodman, documenting his scuffle with guards who had unleashed dogs on the protesters. Amidst that ugliness, Johns still found beauty. “Being in that area was such solidarity, such clarity. Everyone was taking care of each other,” he says. This 32-year-old father has learned to find purpose in ...continued on next page

Jacob Johns is an artist, hairstylist and prominent Native American activist. SARAH PHILP PHOTO

NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 23


CULTURE | ARTS “NATIVE PASSION,” CONTINUED... chaos. Upon relocating to Spokane in 2010 from Arizona, where he served a sentence for assault after a rough patch following his brother’s suicide, Johns created Studio 111, originally as a haircutting business. The numbers 111, explains Johns, relate to a dream he had during his time behind bars, and a subsequent conversation with his mother. They discussed Johns’ vision of a little black book — the Bible — and the passage of Isaiah 11:1, which states, “A shoot will come up from the stump of Jesse; from his roots a Branch will bear fruit.” As he did for his haircutting clients — he views altering hair and the body as sacred acts — Johns recognized he could transform himself, not in spite of his pain, but through it. He wanted to help others fill the hole that suicide and other trauma causes, says Johns, because otherwise “people will fill it with drugs and alcohol or some other addiction.” Fully enmeshed in the regional Native American cultural landscape, Johns advocates healing by reconnecting with traditional tribal culture, and is particularly interested in inspiring youth through written and oral language and art. Using spray paint, pencil, marker, acrylic and other two-dimensional media, Johns creates works that often combine facial portraits and sacred geometry with gestural expressions of color and graffiti-like stylings. He often donates his time, work or both, such as designing the logo for the recent One Heart Native Arts and Film Festival and participating in auctions benefiting such organizations as Spokane’s American Indian Community Center.

Johns in front of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe building in North Dakota with a letter from the tribe asking the Spokane City Council to pass a resolution against the DAPL. JEFF FERGUSON PHOTO In addition to hairdressing and art, music is part of Johns’ path. He created a CD of original Hopi music, Unity Consciousness, with songs like “Spirit Calling” and “Morning,” and frequently brings his drum to events, including a recent Spokane gathering in support of the

Dakota Access Pipeline protesters. Sometimes Johns combines art and music, like for his live painting at the inaugural “We Are Still Here” exhibition last year at Hatch: Creative Business Incubator in Spokane Valley. He says he may do a similar perfor-

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— Your neverending story —

HOW TO FIRST FRIDAY. Sure, there are dozens of participating venues for every First Friday. But don’t think of them as individual destinations. Explore First Friday by unique neighborhoods and districts, and relax on the whole GPS mapping thing. After all, great art shouldn’t be rushed. Pick up a detailed flyer at the visitors kiosk at River Park Square or find all participating venues at downtownspokane.org.

EAST DOWNTOWN

Don’t miss the next First Friday: November 4th, 2016

24 INLANDER NOVEMBER 3, 2016

Sprague 1st Ave 2nd Ave 3nd Ave

For event listings visit: www.downtownspokane.org Most venues open 5-8pm

Division St

WEST DOWNTOWN

Spokane Falls Blvd

Howard

PARK DISTRICT

W Summit Pkwy

Monroe

KENDALL YARDS

North River Dr


NATIVE AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH Efforts to recognize the contributions of American Indians and Native Alaskans date back 100 years among individual states, government entities, Native Americans, even the Boy Scouts. Assorted presidential proclamations and Congressional resolutions have set aside as little as a day and as much as a month to recognize native culture, until 1990, when former President George H.W. Bush designated November as Native American Indian Heritage Month.  In Idaho, the Coeur d’Alene Tribe, Human Rights Education Institute and Salvation Army Kroc Center will present nine events at various locations from Nov. 2-19, ranging from a demonstration on tribal canoes to a reading of James Welch’s Fools Crow to a discussion of the economic impact of Idaho’s five tribes. kroccda.org/native.html  In Spokane, the second annual art exhibition, “We Are Still Here,” opens Saturday, Nov. 12, from 5-9 pm at Hatch: Creative Business Incubator. Food and live entertainment will be included on Saturday, Nov. 19, from 5-10 pm. facebook.com/hatchgalleryspokane  “For Our Roots and Our Seeds” is an all-ages open-mic and music benefit for the Standing Rock community, Saturday, Nov. 5, from 7-9 pm at Saranac Community Building. community-building.org.

mance painting at this year’s exhibition, which he’s coordinating with Spokane tribal member Jeff Ferguson. “It feeds a part of my soul,” says Johns. So does activism, says Johns, who remembers the 1992 standoffs with federal authorities raiding Arizona casinos over video gaming machines. Johns serves on the United Native Americans of Spokane Public Development Authority and works with the Alliance for Gun Responsibility, which is backing Initiative 1491 in this election cycle. “I have my hands in a lot of stuff,” he says. n

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CULTURE | FOOTBALL

Cooper Kupp (below) caught two touchdowns, including a 69-yarder, to help Eastern beat Montana for the third time in his career.

Clash of the Rivals EWU rode its winning streak right over Montana in Cheney PHOTOS BY YOUNG KWAK

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very other year, Roos Field on the campus of Eastern Washington University is flooded with a sea of maroon-clad fans who’ve made the trip over from Missoula in the hopes that their beloved Griz will escape with a win over the Eagles. Saturday was no exception, with Montana fans snatching up a fair share of hard-to-get tickets — only to see their squad once again dominated by All-America receiver Cooper Kupp for the third time in four seasons. Having already caught a 69-yard pass for a touchdown in the first quarter, Kupp took a lateral pass from quarterback Gage Gubrud and tossed it 54 yards downfield back to Gubrud to set up a score, putting the Eagles up 14-7 and shifting the game’s momentum. The Eagles would not give up the lead for the rest of the game, with EWU’s defense stepping up in the second half to seal the 3516 win, their sixth in a row, good for 7-1 on the season and 5-0 in Big Sky play. The Eagles now head to No. 14 Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, California, on Saturday for a 6:05 pm kickoff. — MIKE BOOKEY

26 INLANDER NOVEMBER 3, 2016


CULTURE | FOOTBALL

Quite a Run On the ropes back in September, the Cougs are riding their longest winning streak since 2003 BY KELSEY JONES

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he same team that began the season on a two-game losing streak is now the No. 25 team in the country and has not lost a conference game. With the offense firing on all cylinders at just the right moments and the emergence of a much more potent defense and running game, the Washington State Cougars have risen from the ashes of the arrests, suspensions and lackluster play that marked the season’s first weeks. The six-game winning streak WSU is riding is its longest since 2003. Redshirt junior quarterback Luke Falk is at the helm of the recent success. Saturday night’s fourth-quarter comeback at Oregon State was the sixth fourth-quarter victory he’s guided in his career, and his especially focused energy, no matter the score or time left on the clock, earned him the nickname “Cool Hand Luke.” “It’s important. That’s a part of the job description for a quarterback, to be able to lead 10 other guys,” says wide receiver Gabe Marks, a redshirt senior. “He knows when to bring everybody to attention, I guess, calm everybody down.” Falk threw for five touchdowns against the Beavers, bringing his career total to 75 touchdown passes, placing him third in WSU history. He’s completed 72.6 percent of his passes, and in the moments when the Cougars need it the most, Falk and his trusted receiving core of Marks and senior River Cracraft breathe life into the team. During the game against the Beavers, when the Cougars started out in a hole almost as large as the one they appeared to be in at the beginning of the season, Falk connected with Marks on a seemingly impossible attempt to close the gap. Marks came down with the ball despite four defenders around him and ended up back in the end zone on the next drive, hauling in the pass that would give WSU its first lead of the game in the third quarter.

Jamal Morrow and the running game have given WSU’s offense an extra option. WSU ATHLETIC COMMUNICATIONS PHOTO

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The potency of Falk, Marks and Cracraft, especially in tight situations, is the mark of a scrappy team that continues to find new ways of both getting behind and coming from behind. Marks and Cracraft have combined for 1,078 receiving yards, and Marks has hauled in nine touchdown passes. In addition to head coach Mike Leach’s traditional Air Raid offense, the emergence and evolution of a strong run game has been aided by the offensive line’s play. Redshirt junior running back Jamal Morrow and redshirt freshman running back James Williams have each scored four touchdowns and redshirt junior running back Gerard Wicks has racked up eight. The running back trio is averaging 122.8 yards per game. They have combined for more than 100 yards rushing in four games thus far this season. “For us to finally talk about, hey, we had a bad running game, it’s a tribute to Coach [Jim] Mastro and the job he’s done with it since he got here, and it’s a tribute to the three other running backs,” Morrow says. Rumors of a stop in Pullman by ESPN’s College GameDay, the continuation of an undefeated Pac-12 record and a classic, tear-your-heart-out, come-from-behind win sweetened the Cougars’ Halloween weekend. Next, WSU hosts Arizona for the annual Dad’s Weekend game. The Cougars are favored to win by 16 points, and Arizona’s offensive struggles may prove difficult for the Wildcats to overcome. Arizona is the only Pac-12 team yet to score 100 points in conference play and had just five pass completions against Stanford. By comparison, WSU beat then-No. 15 Stanford 42-16 last month in Palo Alto. Arizona’s struggling offense will come up against a Cougar defense that has improved this season, despite losing two players to suspension. The WSU defense gave up 496 and 299 passing yards, respectively, in September losses to Eastern Washington and Boise State, but the unit has since intercepted five passes and recovered seven fumbles. As against the Beavers last Saturday, the defense has come up with key stops when necessary. They forced three consecutive three-andouts at the beginning of the second half, allowing the offense to catch up. “It’s like [Jamal] Morrow said, it’s like putting your foot on their throat. We emphasize that on the sidelines a lot, playing the full 60 minutes,” says junior defensive back Robert Taylor.  Washington State vs. Arizona • Sat, Nov. 5, at 1 pm • Martin Stadium, Pullman • Sold Out • Televised on Pac-12 Networks; radio broadcast on KXLY 920 AM

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NOV. 12/8PM NOV. 13/3PM

SOUNDS OF SCANDINAVIA with guest conductor PAVEL BALEFF & guest pianist FEI-FEI DONG FEATURING THE MUSIC OF

Niels Wilhelm Gade, Edvard Grieg & Carl Nielsen

This concert is sponsored by William C. Fix & the Johnston-Fix Foundation

DECEMBER 1-4, 2016 With LIVE music by the Spokane Symphony!

Cost for youth 17 and under is half of adult price, starting at just $12.50

HOLIDAY POPS

With conductor Morihiko Nakahara and Spokane Symphony Chorale & Spokane Area Youth Choir

DECEMBER 17 at 8PM DECEMBER 18 at 2PM

TICKETS & INFO: 509-624-1200 spokanesymphony.org NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 27


CULTURE | DIGEST

ART FIRST FRIDAY

Kelly Johnson’s show “About the Moms” focuses on refugees in Spokane who happen to be single mothers.

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f the hundreds of refugees who resettle in Spokane each year, many arrive to this foreign culture as single moms with one or multiple children in tow. Through a project titled “About the Moms,” local photographer Kelly Johnson set out to celebrate and connect the community with these refugee mothers, sharing their triumphs and trials while adapting to life in the U.S. Johnson’s powerful series of photographs depict these resilient mothers and their children doing everyday things that were often impossible before they found safety here; grocery shopping, preparing a nutritious meal for the family, and going to work. Thanks to a successful crowdfunding campaign, Johnson is displaying “About the Moms” this Friday, from 5-11 pm, at the Bartlett. — CHEY SCOTT

DOUBLE ISSUE

Pull down then out

FIRST FRIDAY: NOV. 4 FRIDAY, FROM 5-8 PM, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED; MORE EVENTS AT INLANDER.COM/FIRSTFRIDAY Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main 3 Minute Mic feat. Kurt Olson, from 8-9:30 pm. Avenue West Gallery, 907 W. Boone Paintings by Sandy Upchurch-Aronson. Baby Bar, 827 W. First Photography by Tay Sanders and Amia. Barili Cellars, 608 W. Second Spokane photographer Kent Henderson. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Photos by Dean Davis, music by Lyle Morse. Core Pilates and Wellness, 1230 W. Summit Pkwy. A showcase of paintings by Lynn Hanley. Cougar Crest Estate Tasting Room, 8 N. Post Art by Amy Charbonneau, music by Alchemy. Craftsman Cellars, 1194 W. Summit Pkwy. Art by L.R. Montgomery; music by Scott Randle, Kevin Gardner; 6:30-8:30 pm. Dodson’s Jewelers, 516 W. Riverside “Wild Lands” by LuAnn Ostergaard. Express Employment Professionals, 331 W. Main Photography by M.M. Hewitt. Garageland, 230 W. Riverside “La Resistance” group show. Iron Goat Brewing Co., 1302 W. Second Photography by Kevin Montgomery. Keith Powell Studio & Gallery, 123 E. Second Painting and sculpture by Keith Powell.

Kolva-Sullivan Gallery, 115 S. Adams Art by George Metropoulos McCauley. Kress Gallery, 808 W. Main, third floor Paintings by students of artist Stan Miller. LeftBank Wine Bar, 108 N. Washington Spokane artist and musician Tom Norton. Lucky Leaf Co., 1111 W. First “A New Land,” by Kelley Kindred. Marmot Art Space, 1206 W. Summit Pkwy. “Spokane Fifty”, by Marshall Peterson. Missing Piece Tattoo, 410 W. Sprague Ink and oil paintings by Amanda Richards. Mom’s Custom Tattoo, 1226 W. Summit Pkwy. Group art showcase. Nectar Tasting Room, 120 N. Stevens Art by Natalie Hoebing, music by Dan Conrad. The Observatory, 15 S. Howard A surrealistic collection by Jennifer Quick. Pottery Place Plus, 203 N. Washington Art by John Blessent and Hannah Charlton. Overbluff Cellars, 304 W. Pacific Pencil and ink drawings by Michael S. Mihaylov. Patit Creek Cellars, 822 W. Sprague Art by Beth Heart, music by Dave McRae. The Reserve, 120 N. Wall Art by Hank Chiappetta. Richmond Art Collective, 228 W. Sprague

Virtual reality project by Rachel Stuckey. Robert Karl Cellars, 115 W. Pacific Photography by Jennifer DeBarros. Saranac Art Projects, 25 W. Main Dan McCann, Katie Creyts, Austin Stiegemeier. Solace Mead and Cider, 1198 W. Summit Pkwy. Photography by Jesse Swanson. Spokane Art School, 809 W. Garland Art by Joe Guarisco. Spokane Healing Arts, 430 W. Second Mixed media art by Gina Hoefler. Spokane Public Library, 906 W. Main Spokane Art School faculty and student show, Yuletide art show, music by Ragtag Romantics, poetry by Stephen Pitters. Spokane Startup Central, 610 W. Second Art by Collin Muncey, music by Jon Lossing. Spokane Transit, 1230 W. Boone Multimedia art by Penny Cannon. Trackside Studio Ceramic Gallery, 115 S. Adams Art by Chris Kelsey, Mark Moore, Gina Freuen. Two Women Vintage Goods, 112 S. Cedar Art by various local artists. V du V Wines, 12 S. Scott Art by Charlie Schmidt, music by Crushpad. William Grant Gallery, 1188 W. Summit Pkwy. Mixed media art by Christina Rothe.

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION

Then flip it! It’s NOT pancakes.

It IS a double-sided special issue to keep and share with friends!

BY DANIEL WALTERS

TWITTER Elections are boom season for Twitter parody accounts, and few are more necessary than ELI KIRBY (@TheLearningKirb), an account that mocks the dataassisted bloviations of wonky nerd-pundits like Nate Silver and Ezra Klein. “My Uber driver has zero familiarity with The Niomachean Ethics and is voting Trump. This is the problem,” one tweet reads, while another highlights the strengths of his unique polling model: “The latest, massively unstable UltraNow Fast-Twitch calculations show Clinton as a 123% favorite to win.”

28 INLANDER NOVEMBER 3, 2016

TV SHOW In the past few years, TV’s weirdest tendency has been to turn everything into a cop show. The movie Limitless, about a drug that makes Bradley Cooper brilliant? Turned into a cop show. Grimm’s Fairy Tales? Turned into a cop show. But maybe the strangest is iZOMBIE, a comic book-inspired show from the creator of Veronica Mars. A coroner-turned-zombie eats brains, which give her flashes of the memories of the murdered brains she’s consumed. The premise is loony, but the poppy banter and an additional twist — the zombie also adopts the quirks, tics and personality of the victims whose brains she’s snacked on — gives the show the power to pull it off. The second season is now on Netflix.

COMPUTER GAME Don’t Starve gave us a Tim Burton-esque pin on survival games, with your tiny little cartoon avatar scurrying about trying to chop enough wood, pick enough berries and murder enough rabbits to make it through another deadly night. DON’T STARVE: SHIPWRECKED, an expansion to the original game, gives the whole thing an appropriate castaway feel, complete with sailing ships, palm trees and active volcanoes. Once again, it’s the little touches that make the game so compelling amid moments of aggravation. Chop down a coconut tree, and on occasion a coconut will fall from the branches, smacking you on the head and injuring you. n

Now you know how!

FLIP IT OVER!

SNOWLANDER & WINTER PARTY EVENT GUIDE


NOVEMBER 2016

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2 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2016


EDITOR’S NOTE

HENRY GEORGI PHOTO

WAITING GAME

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ain, rain, go away. Come back in the spring, please. This is the toughest part of the ski season — the waiting (and wading through water) game. There’s a direct correlation between a low snow line and a high stoke level. Skiers and boarders are all closely watching weather apps and monitoring the temperature on a regular basis, observing it fluctuate between the rain and snow, all while thinking, “If it was only 10 degrees colder.” Here at Snowlander world headquarters, we’re eagerly getting ready for what has become the premier Winter Party in the Inland Northwest, featuring the Snowlander Expo and PowderKeg Brewfest. This year, we’ve got a lot in store for event-goers, including the return of our popular

Gary Peterson

Fernie Alpine Resort

t s r Fi ks c a r t Begin here

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SNOWLANDERNW

SNOWLANDER.COM REGIONAL RESORTS EVENTS

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seminars on varied subjects that will get you ready and keep you going during the upcoming season. We’ve added live music in the afternoon and evening on Friday and Saturday. And of course, all of your favorite regional resorts will be on hand with information on visiting their mountains, so pick your up passes and spread the stoke on the upcoming season. (Flip over this pullout guide for all the details on Winter Party.) By the next issue of Snowlander, we’ll be skiing. Opening Days will have come and gone, and hopefully, we’ll be enjoying some of those epic December days that we’ve grown so used to in our region. Do your snow dance, burn old skis, pray for snow... and we’ll see you for first chair on Opening Day. — JEN FORSYTH Snowlander editor jen@snowlander.com

11 YEARS

4-week lessons NOW ON SALE!

M T S P O K A N E .CO M

MOUNTAIN MOMENT #001 Everyone remembers their first time sliding on snow. Over 9,000 first-times happen each season at Mt. Spokane, the region’s biggest and most highly certified ski school. Ask your grandfather where he learned to ski – For over 70 years, The ‘Kan has been the place to start.

NOVEMBER 2016 SNOWLANDER 3


REGIONAL RESORTS RESORTS OF THE NORTHWEST BY JEN FORSYTH 49° North

THE SNOW

THE VIBE

THE FOOD

Ski & Stay packages starting at

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Whitewater_SkiStay_110316_4S_CPW.pdf C O U N T Y

L I B R A R Y

D I S T R I C T

Thinking Money is a traveling exhibit designed to teach tweens, teens, and the adults in their lives about financial literacy in an understandable and fun way. TRAVELING EXHIBIT Oct 22–Nov 26, 2016 | SPOKANE VALLEY FINANCIAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS Oct 1–Dec 20, 2016 | DISTRICT-WIDE Visit www.scld.org/thinking-money for details

Thinking Money was developed by the American Library Association Public Programs Office in collaboration with the FINRA Investor Education Foundation, whose support made this exhibition possible.

4 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2016

Anthony Lakes

North Powder, Oregon • anthonylakes.com 900 vertical feet • 21 runs Located in a town called North Powder, this northeastern Oregon resort is a true hidden gem and lives up to the town’s name. The 1,100acre ski area boasts an average of

1.800.666.9420 1.800.666.9420 www.skiwhitewater.com www.skiwhitewater.com S P O K A N E

Chewelah, Wash. • ski49n.com 1,850 vertical feet • 82 runs 49 Degrees North, one of Washington state’s largest ski areas, has a lot to be excited about coming into this season, with the transformation of the Sunrise Basin in full swing. Always regarded as one of the Northwest’s favorite family-friendly resorts, terrain challenges and excitement are waiting for the entire family, with groomers, glades, two base areas, the lively Boomtown Bar and two peaks that tower over 2,325 skiable acres.

www.scld.org

300 inches of light, dry powder with three chairlifts. After a day on the slopes, make sure to warm up by the fireplace overlooking the slopes with huge panoramic views.

Apex Mountain Resort

Penticton, B.C. • apexresort.com 2,000 vertical feet • 73 runs The terrain at Apex Mountain Resort, located outside of Penticton, can only be described as awesome, with smooth cruisers and steep chutes covering 1,112 acres. An average winter temperature of 23 degrees Fahrenheit and annual snowfall of 20 feet results in true champagne powder. The village is intimate and cozy but well-equipped, with five restaurants and multiple lodging options to fit most needs.

Big Sky

Big Sky, Montana • bigskyresort.com 4,350 vertical feet • 300 runs The birthplace of cold smoke, Big

Sky is just that. In fact, it’s the biggest ski resort in North America, with 5,800 skiable acres over four connected mountains. On sunny days, enjoy long laps with dramatic Lone Peak views from most places on the mountain. There’s plenty to like about Big Sky, between its 23 chairlifts, 11 surface lifts and several terrain parks. There are multiple lodging, dining and retail options in the village, with numerous eateries on the mountain.

Big White Ski Resort

Kelowna, B.C. • bigwhite.com 2,550 vertical feet • 118 runs Big White is the perfect big adventure for the entire family, with more than 2,765 acres of skiable terrain to explore and a full assortment of village amenities, including plenty of activities for kids of all ages — from snowmobiling and ice climbing to horse-drawn sleigh rides and an array of dining and après-ski options.


In addition, the mountain boasts the most night skiing in western Canada.

Blacktail

Lakeside, Montana • blacktailmountain.com 1,440 vertical feet • 24 runs Nothing says family-friendly, affordable skiing like Blacktail, located above the beautiful west shore of Flathead Lake in a quaint northwestern Montana setting. Perched above the town of Lakeside, skiers and snowboarders will experience a top-to-bottom run of varied terrain before ever riding the chairlift at this upside-down mountain, with the base area village at the mountaintop. The village offers expansive views of the lake below and Glacier National Park in the distance.

Bridger Bowl

Bozeman, Montana • bridgerbowl.com 2,700 vertical feet • 75 runs Located near the mountain town of Bozeman, Bridger Bowl is a mix of big-mountain skiing and funky

college town ski hill. Bridger boasts a friendly, local vibe with a hip village area, where everyone seems to know everyone. There are 2,000 acres to explore with a vertical drop of 2,700 feet, 2,600 of which are lift-served. Bring your backcountry gear and explore the upper part of the mountain with steeps and glades that will get your heart rate pumping.

Brundage Mountain Resort

NOV. 4

McCall, Idaho • brundage.com 1,920 vertical feet • 46 runs A mountain that boasts “The Best Snow in Idaho” should be on any skier’s or boarder’s bucket list. Brundage Mountain is located only 8 miles from the charming lake town of McCall in central Idaho. There are 1,920 acres of skiable, patrolled, in-bounds terrain, with an additional 420 acres of lift-accessed backcountry terrain, meaning no patrol or control work is done. For those looking to explore what seems to be an infinite amount of ...continued on next page

Crystal Mountain near Mt. Rainer

Featuring the music of

CHOU WEN-CHUNG, ZHOU TIAN, CHEN YI, & MOZART

REID PITMAN PHOTO

Chinese tasting 3-course menu by Chef Jeremy Hansen of Santé. Also featuring a pre-concert performance by The Spokane Chinese Dance Group, a Chinese art exhibit, traditional calligraphers and much more!

CONCERT $25/3-COURSE TASTING $15 6PM ACTIVITIES/8PM CONCERT Tickets & Info: 509-624-1200 spokanesymphony.org Series sponsored by The Heaton Family &

NOVEMBER 2016 SNOWLANDER 5


REGIONAL RESORTS

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backcountry via guided snowcat tours, there are 18,000 acres adjacent to the resort for further adventure.

and in town.

Kicking Horse

Golden, B.C. • kickinghorseresort.com 4,130 vertical feet • 128 runs Kicking Horse not only boasts the fourth highest vertical drop in North America, it also has a huge number of inbounds chutes — more than 85 — over the 2,500 acres of skiable terrain. Its location in the northern Canadian Rockies gives it that perfect champagne powder to test those legs on the steep and deep. Combine the sheer vastness of the terrain and the many non-skiing amenities, and Kicking Horse quickly becomes the perfect location for those seeking an adventurous holiday.

Crystal Mountain

Crystal Mountain, Washington • skicrystal.com 3,100 vertical feet • 57 runs Located in the shadow of Mt. Rainier, Crystal Mountain Resort feels a lot farther away from the hustle and bustle of Seattle, less than two hours away. The resort is the state’s largest, with 2,600 acres of skiable terrain, 2,300 of which are lift-served. The mountain also operates the Mt. Rainier Gondola for summer rides, for beautiful views of iconic Mt. Rainier all year long.

Discovery

Anaconda, Montana • skidiscovery.com 2,388 vertical feet • 67 runs The mountain affectionately known by locals and long-distance fans as “Disco” is located off the beaten path near the Montana towns of Anaconda, Georgetown and Phillipsburg. There are more than 2,200 acres of skiable terrain, with a high summit elevation of 8,158 feet and an average annual snowfall of 215 inches in the form of light, fluffy powder.

6 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2016

Kicking Horse Mountain Resort

Fairmont

Fairmont, B.C. • fairmont.com 1,000 vertical feet • 13 runs It’s like being on a hot-springs vacation with a ski hill smack-dab in the middle of it. Fairmont boasts a world-class setting, with oversized hot springs and a quaint ski hill so you can earn that hot-springs soak. The resort

is located in southeastern British Columbia, with options for a family looking for an adventurous holiday.

Fernie Alpine Resort

Fernie, B.C. • skifernie.com 3,550 vertical feet • 142 runs plus 5 alpine bowls Fernie is the type of ski town that

ANDREW MIRABATO PHOTO

most people dream about when thinking of a mountain vacation. The resort offers dramatic and picturesque panoramic views, with world-class skiing across more than 2,500 acres, five distinct alpine bowls and the coolest little mountain town just below the village. In addition, there are plenty of non-skiing activities on the mountain

Kimberley Alpine Resort

Kimberley, B.C. • skikimberley.com 2,465 vertical feet • 80 runs Kimberley Alpine Resort combines gentle, meticulous groomers on the front side and challenging glades and steeps on the backside under the sunniest skies in Canada. Mix in perfect Purcell powder covering 1,800 acres, a funky Bavarian-themed town, breathtaking views and a laid-back


atmosphere, and you’ve got yourself a unique Canadian ski holiday.

Lake Louise

Lake Louise, Alberta • skilouise.com 3,250 vertical feet • 145 runs Lake Louise is the Canadian Rockies’ biggest ski resort, boasting an incredible amount of varied terrain for all ability levels over 4,200 skiable acres. There are endless chutes, glades and gullies and immaculate groomed runs that go on for what seems like forever, all in the heart of historic and beautiful Banff National Park.

Lookout Pass Ski Area

Mount Bachelor

CHIP PROULX PHOTO

Mullan, Idaho • skilookout.com 1,150 vertical feet • 34 runs The only thing missing from Lookout Pass is... nothing. The mountain, located conveniently off of Interstate 90 on the Idaho/Montana border, is a genuine, family-friendly resort with world-class grooming and an average of 400 inches of annual snowfall, boasting the lightest and driest powder in the region, with the terrain being mostly north- and northeastfacing in the Bitterroot Range. The snow remains pristine long after a snowfall due to the lack of crowds and the sheer amount that falls. In the

base area, you’ll find the secondoldest ski lodge in Idaho, which has undergone modern updates to keep you warm and cozy on all of those snowy days.

located near Twisp off Highway 20, has a lot to offer for both the beginning and advanced skier.

Mission Ridge

Sula, Montana • losttrail.com 1,800 vertical feet • 50 runs A trip to Lost Trail Powder Mountain will have you yearning for another one — uncrowded slopes, challenging terrain, beautiful cold-smoke powder and the most quaint and quintessential Montana “Ma and Pop” ski area of them all. Located at the junction of scenic Highways 93 and 43 at the top of the Continental Divide, the ski area offers up 1,800 skiable acres over two mountains.

Wenatchee, Washington • missionridge.com 2,250 vertical feet • 36 runs Mission Ridge is a hidden gem on the eastern — and sunny — side of the Cascades. It’s an unexpected surprise in the hills above Wenatchee, with dramatic rock features lining the immaculate groomers, steep hidden chutes and spectacular views of the Cascades from the top of the chairlift. Due to its location on the dry side of the mountains, the ski area offers plenty of light powder and tons of sun, with a plethora of lodging and dining options nearby.

Loup Loup Ski Bowl

Mount Bachelor

Lost Trail Powder Mountain

Okanogan, Washington • skitheloup.com 1,240 vertical feet • 10 runs At Loup Loup Ski Bowl, skiers and boarders will experience dry Okanogan powder and perfectly groomed runs with little to no wait time on 300 acres of diverse terrain, with a familyfriendly atmosphere in the beautiful north-central Cascades. The ski area,

Bend, Oregon • mtbachelor.com 3,365 vertical feet • 88 runs Mount Bachelor, located above the mountain town of Bend on the eastern side of Oregon’s Central Cascades, is known for its light, dry snow. The mountain offers more than 4,300 acres of lift-accessible terrain and the highest skiable elevation in all of Or...continued on next page

TOP TEN Ranked #3 for service, #5 for value and #10 for overall satisfaction by SKI Magazine readers. In the ski industry exceptional service and value pricing do not typically go hand-in-hand ...and then there’s Whitefish.

AT THE LIBR ARY Listen to local authors while enjoying complimentary refreshments. Learn about the Friends of the Spokane County Library District, the programs we support, and how to become a member. This event is free and open to the public.

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WHEN

W H I T E F I S H , M O N TA N A Partially Located on National Forest Lands

Photo © GlacierWorld.com

NOVEMBER 2016 SNOWLANDER 7


REGIONAL RESORTS

, CONTINUED

egon and Washington. Round out the trip by toasting the day’s adventures with one of the many outstanding microbrews in downtown Bend for a perfect Oregon ski adventure.

3-mile gondola to take you to the mountain village and explore the 1,600 acres of glades and groomers over two mountain peaks. To make the most of your trip to Silver, plan to stay at one of the Morning Star condos and visit Silver Rapids Waterpark, Idaho’s largest indoor waterpark, located in the heart of Gondola Village.

Mount Baker

Glacier, Washington • mtbaker.us 1,500 vertical feet • 32 runs Internationally recognized for the huge amount of snow that falls annually, Mount Baker is humbled by its surroundings, with dramatic inbounds drops and steeps. The ski area sits in the shadows of its namesake, with exciting terrain scattered throughout its 1,000 acres of skiable terrain. The average annual snowfall is close to 700 inches, making it one of the most amazing ski areas in the Pacific Northwest.

Mount Baldy

Oliver, B.C. • skibaldy.com 1,350 vertical feet • 22 runs Mount Baldy overlooks the Okanagan Valley in southern British Columbia, a 45-minute drive from the town of Oliver. The area offers plenty of sunshine, tree skiing and powder, with an average of 250 inches of snowfall annually on more than 500 acres of skiable terrain. The area is proud of its wine industry, so make sure to carve out some time off the mountain to explore one of the region’s many award-winning wineries.

Mount Hood Meadows

Parkdale, Oregon • skihood.com 2,780 vertical feet • 85 runs Mt. Hood Meadows, located on the protected side of Oregon’s most iconic mountain, offers 2,150 acres of skiable terrain, lots of night skiing over 140 acres, and a huge average annual snowfall of 430 inches. In addition to their huge vertical drop, there’s an additional 1,700 feet of hiking terrain — a big-mountain experience with convenient access.

Mount Hood Skibowl

Government Camp, Oregon • skibowl.com 1,500 vertical feet • 65 runs Mt. Hood Skibowl dates back to 1928, making it one of the country’s oldest ski resorts. The mountain offers options for the entire family: In addition to skiing and snowboarding on the 960 acres, they offer the Winter Adventure Park just for kids. While their parents are away, kids can frolic in the tubing area and playland. Enjoy several dining and lodging options nearby.

Mount Norquay

Banff, Alberta • banffnorquay.com 1,680 vertical feet • 60 runs

8 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2016

Silver Star Mountain

The Silver Star Mountain village. If a visit to Banff is on your list this winter, take the time to visit Mount Norquay, located above Banff National Park, only 4 miles away. The ski area offers a unique adventure, with 190 acres of terrain; 85 percent of the acreage is open for snowmaking. There’s daily bus service to and from Banff, and the mountain’s not far from Calgary, 75 miles away.

Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park

Mead, Washington • mtspokane.com 2,000 vertical feet • 45 runs The most convenient ski area to downtown Spokane — only 28 miles from downtown — Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park has a lot to offer. It’s located in the heart of Washington’s largest state park, with 1,425 acres of skiable terrain, including fast groomers and thrilling glades, and the largest amount of terrain for night skiing — 16 runs — open four nights per week for riding under the stars. Get up there a little early and take in the beautiful sunset, as it makes it way into the western horizon.

4,020 vertical feet • 120 runs Panorama Mountain boasts one of the top 10 verticals in North America, with a drop of 4,020 feet. The 2,847 patrolled acres of skiable terrain ranges from wide-open groomers to steep and deep glades. The family-friendly mountain also offers plenty of non-skiing activities, from snowmobiling and fat-tire biking to glass bead making. Make time to relax in the world-class hot pools back in the village.

Phoenix

Grand Forks, B.C. • skiphoenix.com 800 vertical feet • 18 runs A mountain typically visited by local skiers from surrounding towns, Phoenix Mountain is charming and far enough off the beaten path to make for an unlikely grand adventure. The ski area offers beautiful views of the southern Monashee Mountains and is widely known by those in the know as “The Best Little Mountain in B.C.”

Red Mountain

Kananaskis, Alberta • skinakiska.com 2,412 vertical feet • 79 runs Home to the 1988 Winter Olympics and the closest ski area to Calgary, Nakiska offers 1,021 acres of immaculate, wide-open groomers and is blanketed with man-made snow, with the capacity to make the good stuff on 75 percent of their terrain, enabling them to typically open the slopes as soon as early November. World-class dining, accommodations and spas can be found nearby in the Kananaskis Village.

Rossland, B.C. • redresort.com 2,920 vertical feet • 110 runs In a time of large, mega-resort mergers, Red Mountain is going in the other direction, currently selling shares of the mountain, with the result being a community-owned entity. The future ownership structure pairs well with the vibe that’s existed for years — Red is truly a great, unspoiled resort, located just outside of Rossland. The mountain boasts 4,200 acres of steep and deep skiing, with recent terrain expansions adding more intermediate terrain. There are plenty of lodging and dining options in the village and nearby.

Panorama Mountain

Revelstoke Mountain

Nakiska

Panorama, B.C. • panoramaresort.com

Revelstoke, B.C. •

revelstokemountainresort.com 5,620 vertical feet • 69 runs Revelstoke Mountain Resort is located on Mt. Mackenzie in the Selkirk Mountains of British Columbia, one of the snowiest places in North America. The resort offers the biggest vertical drop on the continent at 5,620 feet, with a massive 3,121 acres of skiable terrain and four alpine bowls. There’s a vast amount of gladed terrain, and endless groomers — the longest being 9½ miles. It’s the only resort to offer heli, cat and lift-assisted skiing from the same base area; a true amenity for groups with different skiing abilities who want a common lodging area for evening activities.

Schweitzer Mountain Resort

Sandpoint, Idaho • schweitzer.com 2,400 vertical feet • 92 runs Being able to take in the panoramic views from the summit just became that much more comfortable. This season, Schweitzer finishes up construction on their well-equipped mountaintop lodge with dining and drinking amenities and floor-to-ceiling windows to admire the view while warming up between runs next to the fireplace. Then, head out to explore the 2,900 acres of glades, groomers and hidden stashes. Back down in the village are multiple dining options to please any palate, and lodging options for any size group.

Silver Mountain

Kellogg, Idaho • silvermt.com 2,200 vertical feet • 73 runs Silver Mountain Resort is all about convenience. Located off of Interstate 90, the Gondola Village is well equipped, with paved parking and a coffee shop to grab your morning cup of joe, before loading the scenic

Vernon, B.C. • skisilverstar.com 2,500 vertical feet • 132 runs Silver Star, which dates back to 1958, has evolved into a world-class winter holiday destination, with four distinct mountain faces and all sorts of progressive terrain for those just learning over 3,282 skiable acres, making this the third largest ski area in British Columbia. The village area is themed on a 1900s mining town and is well equipped, with many food and beverage outlets and lodging options — some even being mid-mountain, offering a true ski in/ski out experience.

Sitzmark Ski Area

Havillah, Washington • gositzmark.org 660 vertical feet • 10 runs A charming ski area located 20 minutes from Tonasket, Sitzmark offers dry powder snow, lots of sunshine, great views, small lift lines and low ticket prices, with 80 acres to explore. Back in the village, the ski area offers Wi-Fi and a friendly lodge.

Ski Bluewood

Dayton, Washington • bluewood.com 1,125 vertical feet • 24 runs The statistics say that Bluewood is small, but this southeastern Washington ski area is anything but. Located in the Blue Mountain Range, rising out of the high desert, Bluewood boasts clear skies, cold temperatures, dry, light powder, the second-highest base area elevation, the most memorable tree skiing offered in the region, 400 skiable acres and the reputation for the best snow in the state.

Snoqualmie Pass

Snoqualmie Pass, Washington • summitatsnoqualmie.com 2,280 vertical feet • 25 runs The easiest resort to get to from the Seattle area, Snoqualmie Pass has four very different ski area options to fit any style. The pass is located 54 miles east of Seattle off Interstate 90, and the four areas total 1,981 acres of skiable terrain. In addition to amazing terrain parks at Summit Central, the steeps of Alpental and extensive night skiing at Summit West, the Pass also offers Nordic skiing and snow tubing adventures. ...continued on page 10


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REGIONAL RESORTS

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Hit the Trail this Winter with a local Craft Brew.

The Inland Northwest Ale Trail is a touring challenge of fortyone Craft breweries. Collect your stamps and receive a 32 oz Ale Trail mini growler after visiting 12 breweries. (while supplies last, one prize per map, one prize per person)

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Whitefish Mountain Resort just outside of Glacier National Park.

Snowbowl Ski

Missoula, Montana • montanasnowbowl.com 2,600 vertical feet • 42 runs Snowbowl is located in the Lolo National Forest, 12 miles above the eclectic college town of Missoula. The area offers an entertaining mix of steep terrain, glades and wide-open cruisers. In addition to being known for having some of the most challenging terrain around, Snowbowl is also renowned for its food and beverage offerings, with a great base area atmosphere. Stay slopeside at Gelandesprung, a European-style lodge, or chose to stay in Missoula, with a wide array of lodging and dining options in the earthy college town.

Stevens Pass

Skykomish, Washington • stevenspass.com 1,800 vertical feet • 37 runs Stevens Pass, conveniently located off Highway 2, is a must for skiers and boarders ready to bring their game up a notch. There are 1,125 acres of skiable terrain, though the way the mountain is laid out, it feels much larger than that, with dramatic steeps and chutes, glades and groomers to get your heart pounding. Stevens receives plenty of snow, with an average of 460 inches, and keeps a great base throughout the season. Back in the village, there are three lodges with eateries and bars to suit many palates. Lodging is available nearby in Leavenworth, a cute Bavarian-themed town on the eastern side of the Cascades.

Sun Valley Resort

Ketchum, Idaho • sunvalley.com 3,400 vertical feet • 100 runs A trip to Sun Valley will keep you

10 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2016 ResortsOfTheCanadianRockies_Chills_110316_4S_CPW.tif

yearning for more, and yearning for the fall line to stop when your quads start burning halfway down one of their famous long, steep groomers. This mountain is all about infrastructure, with more snowmaking than you can imagine, a top-notch grooming fleet and the most extravagant amenities in the West. The skiing consists of two very distinct mountains, split by the town of Ketchum. Baldy is meant for those looking to ski hard, with long, trueto-fall-line runs and mountaintop lodges fit for kings. Dollar Mountain is geared for those who are still learning, with terrain park features.

Sunshine Village

Banff, Alberta • skibanff.com 3,520 vertical feet • 115 runs At Sunshine Village, located in the heart of Banff National Park on the Continental Divide, you can ski two Canadian provinces — Alberta and British Columbia — in one run. The resort features 3,300 acres of skiable terrain, an average annual snowfall of 360 inches and the longest nonglacial season in Canada, from early November through late May. Stay nearby at Sunshine Mountain Lodge.

Tamarack

Tamarack, Idaho • tamarackidaho.com 2,800 vertical feet • 42 runs Tamarack Resort features a blend of mountain, meadow and lakeside amenities. With 1,000 acres of diverse, lift-accessible terrain ranging from glades and steeps to cornices and groomers, the mountain is eastfacing, offering minimum wind and maximum snow retention. The resort is located in the heart of Idaho’s beautiful west-central mountains, overlooking Lake Cascade. The

village offers multiple lodging and dining options to make for a perfect family adventure.

Timberline

Timberline Lodge, Oregon • timberlinelodge.com 3,690 vertical feet • 41 runs Timberline is the only ski area in North America open all 12 months of the year. The mountain is located only 60 miles from Portland, near the summit of iconic Mt. Hood, Oregon’s highest mountain, with historic Timberline Lodge serving as its base area. The resort boasts a vertical drop longer than any other resort in the Pacific Northwest — at least south of the Canadian border.

Turner Mountain

Libby, Montana • skiturner.com 2,110 vertical feet • 22 runs Turner Mountain, outside the old mining town of Libby, is all true fallline skiing from the moment you get off the lift to the time you get to the bottom. One chairlift funnels skiers and boarders through a variety of terrain back to the base area. They rent out the mountain for private functions, and lodging is available nearby in Libby.

Whistler/Blackcomb

Whistler, B.C. • whistlerblackcomb.com 5,280 vertical feet • 200 runs Whistler/Blackcomb is the premier destination for skiers and boarders in the Northwest. Located two hours north of Vancouver, the resort boasts a vast 8,171 acres of skiable terrain, with 16 alpine bowls, 200 marked runs and three glaciers to explore. In addition, there are an endless number of dining options, with myriad nightlife options and a full


Resort living in Chewelah:

YOUR

range of activities for the entire family. After you get home, you may need a vacation from this vacation.

White Pass

Naches, Washington • skiwhitepass.com 2,050 vertical feet • 45 runs White Pass is the hidden gem of Washington resorts. Located off Highway 12, about an hour away from Yakima, the mountain caters to skiers and snowboarders of all abilities with rolling, perfectly pitched groomers and glades that will keep your heart pumping. You’ll find all of the amenities of a larger resort, but with a great local mountain vibe.

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Whitefish Mountain Resort

Whitefish, Montana • skiwhitefish.com 2,350 vertical feet • 105 runs Beautiful views surround Whitefish Mountain Resort, with breathtaking Glacier National Park in one direction and Whitefish Lake and the town of Whitefish in the other. The mountain boasts 3,000 skiable acres, with lots of great glades and hidden stashes to explore, as well as perfectly groomed terrain for ripping some corduroy. Back in the village area, you’ll find a lively atmosphere. Whitefish is a very user-friendly vacation destination, with Amtrak stopping right downtown, a free bus system taking riders from downtown to the mountain and back. It offers numerous options when it comes to lodging, dining and après-ski.

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Whitewater Ski Resort

Nelson, B.C. • skiwhitewater.com 2,050 vertical feet • 81 runs Big snowfall — an average of 40 feet a year — challenging terrain accessible from the chairlift, with easy access to epic backcountry terrain for those properly equipped with the gear and knowledge, a gourmet cafeteria with unique offerings and a cool, eclectic mountain town not too far in the distance? You must be at Whitewater Ski Resort, outside of the lively town of Nelson. The mountain offers 1,184 skiable acres in one of the coolest settings imaginable. Lodging is available nearby in town, about 20 minutes away, and daily shuttles are available from town. n

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NOVEMBER 2016 SNOWLANDER 11


WINTER EVENTS NOVEMBER

pm. $110/person; $135/couple. The Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside. ski49n.com

Outdoor Emergency Basics A session with REI staff experts offering tips on how to make sure you’re prepared for an unexpected emergency when out exploring the wilderness. Sessions offered on Nov. 1 and Dec. 8, at 6 pm. Free; register to save a spot. REI Spokane. 1125 N. Monroe. (328-9900)

Boomer Fridays Kickoff Starting this week, all visitors age 40 or older can come out and enjoy time on the slopes with $30 lift ticket specials. Held every Friday (except Dec. 23 and 30) throughout the season, starting on Nov. 25. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com

U of Idaho Outdoor Equipment Sale & Swap The University of Idaho’s annual gear swap offers new and used gear for sale. Attendees are also welcome to bring their stuff to sell or barter ($5 fee). Nov. 3, from 6-8 pm. Free admission. Student Recreation Center Multi-Activity Court, Moscow campus. (208-885-6810)

Bonfire & Hot Chocolate Close out a day on the slopes with some warmth on the inside and outside, sipping hot chocolate by the fire outside the skating rink in Happy Valley. Wednesdays, Nov. 30-April 12, from 5-6:15 pm. Big White Ski Resort, 5315 Big White Rd., Kelowna, B.C. bigwhite.com

MSP Winter Film A screening of this year’s winter film Ruin and Rose, hosted by the Lookout Pass Ski Team. Tickets also include admission to that weekend’s Winter Swap event in Coeur d’Alene. Nov. 3, at 7 pm. Hayden Cinema 6, 300 W. Centa Dr., Hayden. skimovie.com/tour Mt. Spokane Job Fair Bring your résumé and be prepared to interview on the spot for seasonal positions on the mountain this winter; almost all positions are filled during this annual hiring event. Nov. 5, from 8 am-noon. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220) Winter Swap The Lookout Pass volunteer ski patrols host its 18th annual ski swap event, offering new and used ski/snowboard equipment, accessories and clothing. Nov. 5, from 9 am-3 pm. $5 admission, kids under 12 free. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way, CdA. winterswap.org Champions Among Us The Spokane Nordic Ski Association’s season kickoff event, with a silent auction, trivia and bison for dinner. Guests also hear from Sean Halsted, a two-time Paralympian, current world-ranked U.S. Ski Team Nordic skier, biathlete and former WSU rower. Proceeds support the development of an adaptive ski program at Mt. Spokane State Park. Nov. 5, from 5:30-8:30 pm. $20/person. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. spokanenordic.org/champions (979-6401) Pray for Snow Concert Wenatchee’s Mission Ridge resort hosts its annual preseason party,

12 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2016

DECEMBER Catch a screening of Ruin and Rose on Nov. 3 at Hayden Cinema 6. with live bands, food, a beer garden and more. Nov. 5, from 6-8 pm. $15/ person; ages 21+. Arlberg Sports, 25 N. Wenatchee Ave., Wenatchee, Wash. missionridge.com/events Pray for Snow Preseason Bash Throw on your retro skiwear for an evening of beer, music and prizes from top ski and snowboard brands. Nov. 6, from 5-8 pm. Free; register to save a spot. REI Spokane. 1125 N. Monroe. (328-9900) Perry Street Brewing’s Pray for Snow Party The third annual event co-hosted by Perry Street Brewing Co, Out There Monthly and Mountain Gear and Spokane Alpine Haus offers an evening to celebrate all things skiing, boarding and winter recreation, with ski films, raffles, giveaways, costume contests and more. Thu, Nov. 10, opens at 2 pm, festivities start at 5 pm. Free to attend. Perry Street Brewing Co. 1025 S. Perry. Hands-On Ski and Snowboard Waxing Class Learn how to properly prep and care for your gear to improve your experiences on the slopes. REI technicians walk attendees through the best practices in waxing while using the store’s benches, irons, wax and brushes. Nov. 10, at 6 pm. $35-$55; register to save spot. REI Spokane. 1125 N. Monroe. (328-9900)

WINTER PARTY

Snowlander Expo The Inlander’s annual winter event hosts local vendors offering seasonlow sale prices on clothing, gear and accessories; regional resorts also offer season pass specials. Also includes the PowderKeg beer festival, live music and more. Nov. 11-12; Fri from 4-8 pm, Sat from 10 am-7 pm. $8 admission (good both days; kids under 12 free); Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlanderexpo. com PowderKeg Inlander Brew Fest Snowlander’s winter beer festival returns for its fourth year, featuring more than 50 varieties of regionally made beer and cider on tap, from more than 20 breweries and cideries. Nov. 11-12; Fri from 4-8 pm, Sat from 11 am-7 pm. $8 Expo admission; tasting packages from $15-$25. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlanderexpo.com/ powderkeg SARS Ski Swap The winter recreational equipment and clothing sale benefits the Schweitzer Alpine Racing School’s programs for athletes ages 5 and up, offering new and used items and experts on hand for shopping assistance. Sat, Nov. 12, from 9 am-2 pm. $2/person; $5/family. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Ave., Sandpoint, Idaho. sars.net

Snowshoeing Basics for Women Experienced REI staff share the basics of this popular winter activity, including appropriate gear selection and where to go locally to get started in this special session geared toward women. Nov. 17, at 6 pm. Free; register to save spot. REI Spokane. 1125 N. Monroe. (328-9900) Banff Film Festival The annual winter film festival kicks off in Banff, Alberta, at the beginning of November; the year’s featured mountain films then tour the U.S. and the world. Spokane screenings are Nov. 18-19, at 7 pm, and Nov. 20, at 6 pm. $20/screening; $54/three-day pass. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. Bingcrosbytheater.com Tri-Cities Gear Swap Snow sport lovers in southeastern Washington can get ready for the season at this annual outdoor gear and clothing sale. Nov. 18-20; Fri from 5-9 pm, Sat from 9 am-5 pm, Sun from 11 am-3 pm. Free admission. Holiday Inn at TRAC, 4525 Convention Pl., Pasco, Wash. facebook.com/tricitiesskiswap (509-522-1443) Snow Dance 2016 The 18th annual black-tie affair benefits the 49 Degrees North Winter Sports Foundation and the FortyNine Alpine Ski Team (FAST), with live music by the Rhythm Dawgs and dancing. Ages 21+. Nov. 19, at 6:30

Find Your Park: Mt. Spokane Nordic Ski Area REI staff share their stories and experiences at one of the best spots for winter recreation in the Inland Northwest. Dec. 1, at 6 pm. Free; register to save a spot. REI Spokane. 1125 N. Monroe. (328-9900) WSU University Recreation Gear Swap The 42nd annual gear swap hosts vendors of new and used gear from across the Northwest. Dec. 2 from 6-9 pm and Dec. 3, from 9 am-noon. $3 Friday admission; $1 on Saturday (kids 12 and under free). WSU Hollingbery Fieldhouse, Pullman, Wash. skiswap. wsu.edu (509-335-7856) Ski & Snowboard Instructor Clinic Lookout Pass hosts its annual preseason professional clinic for aspiring ski instructors. Dec. 3-4. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) Schweitzer Community Day A special fundraising event offering $10 lift tickets to the community with proceeds supporting the efforts of two local organizations, Community Cancer Services and the Bonner Partners in Care Clinic. Dec. 9, lifts open from 9 am-3:30 pm. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208263-9555) Map & Compass Navigation Basics Learn how to use a map and compass to find your way, along with how to read a topographic map and how to use these tools in tandem. Dec. 14, at 5:30 pm. $30-$50; register to


save a spot. REI Spokane. 1125 N. Monroe. (328-9900 Night Skiing Kickoff Party The first night skiing event of the season kicks off, with the runs aglow under the night lights. Dec. 16. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220) Whiteout Party The mountain hosts its “pray for snow” event — wear white and come for a chance to win some prizes. More details TBA. Dec. 17. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) Local Brewfest Local craft breweries head to 49 to pour their brews for betweenrun refreshments. Participating breweries include Iron Goat, No-Li, Orlison, Twelve String and more. Sat, Dec. 17. 49 Degrees North Mountain Resort, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n. com (935-6649) Snowshoe Moonlight Hike REI hosts an evening snowshoe tour around the meadows and woods of Mt. Spokane. Guides, transportation, headlamps, walking poles and shoes all included in registration fee. Meets at Yoke’s Fresh Market, 14202 N. Market. $29 ($27 for REI members). Dec. 17, 6-9 pm. Register at spokaneparks.org Christmas on the Mountain An evening of holiday-themed festivities for the family, including gingerbread house decorating, stories, s’mores, face painting, a visit from Santa and more. Dec. 17, from 2-5 pm. Mission Ridge Resort, 7500 Mission Ridge Rd., Wenatchee, Wash. missionridge. com/events Cross Country Skiing Lesson (Mt. Spokane) Certified instructors teach the basics of this winter activity on the Nordic trails in Mt. Spokane State Park. This trip organized through Spokane Parks & Recreation departs from Yoke’s Fresh Market at 14202 N. Market; activity fee includes transportation, equipment rental and instruction. Offered Dec. 17 and 31, from 9 am-3 pm. $45/adults; open to ages 13-17 ($37) with participating adult. Register online at spokaneparks. org 

NOVEMBER 2016 SNOWLANDER 13


14 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2016

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TEN PIN BREWING

WORTHY BREWING

ABV: 5.8% IBU: Mosaic hops brighten this American wheat and rye ale, along with a fresh pineapple squeezed into every case.

25

worthybrewing.com

@WorthyBrewing

WADDELL’S BREWING COMPANY

SPOKANE, WA

Lost Woods Ale

ABV: 8% IBU: This serves as our malty beast. We use healthy amounts of 80L and 120L Crystal Malts with a slight amount of roasted barley. Our winter ale has a nice brown foamy head with Scottish, biscuit, bready flavors and aromas. The hoppiness is forward while the malt gives it a nice backbone.

45

SpoLite- A Really Lite Craft Beer ABV: 4% IBU: 13

There is nothing ordinary and basic about this Lager. Like Spokane, it’s good for ANYone, ANYwhere, at ANYtime!

tenpinbrewing.com

@TenPinBrewing

waddellsbrewery.com

@WaddellsBrewpub

Drink up. Dream on. 495 BELLEVUE DRIVE, BEND OREGON 97701 • worthybrewing.com • 541-647-6970

WINTER PARTY, 2016 INLANDER 11 SteadyFlowGrowlerHouse_StayWarm_110316_6H_CPR.tif


NOVEMBER 2016 SNOWLANDER 15

ORLISON BREWING COMPANY Snowplough Chocolate Stout

SPOKANE, WA

RANTS & RAVES BREWERY

ABV: 8 IBU: 45 Orlison’s decadent Snowplough Imperial Chocolate is Fermented with Dominican cocoa nibs and brewed with a healthy dose of chocolate malt, Snowplough has a smooth, rich, yet robust flavor. S M A L L B ATC H HAN DCRAFTE D B E E R

ABV: 6.3 IBU: This American Porter is a full bodied brew that won’t disappoint. We blended an array of roasted and caramalized malts to create a well balanced treat. A complex backbone of chocolate, coffee, and malt sweetness.

Boulder Garden Brown Ale

ABV: 6.1% IBU: 20 Boulder Garden provides a pleasant blend of caramel and chocolate notes with just enough hop bitterness to balance the maltiness. Boulder Garden is bound to please any palate.

orlisonbrewing.com

PERRY STREET BREWING

rantsravesbrewery.com

SPOKANE, WA

Midnight Marmot Imperial Stout ABV: 9%

IBU: Lots of coco and sweet caramel. Roasted and toasted grains find their way into the finish lending a drying quality. Dark fruity cherry character adds subtle depth. Bitterness is lends to some balance. Very malt forward.

Session IPL

ABV: 4.5% IBU: 45 Our Great American Beer Festival, Gold-Winning Session India Pale Lager is light, bright and intensely hoppy.

78

Huckleberry Ale

ABV: 5% IBU: 10 With the unmistakable and strong aroma of huckleberries, the taste of this not-sweet berry matches perfectly with crispness of the beer. Using very mild hops, this beer really stands out as an original.

rivercityred.blogspot.com

@PerryStreetBrew

EAST WENATCHEE, WA

@RantsRavesBeer

RIVER CITY BREWING

ABV: 7.4% IBU: 20 Our seasonal Scotch Ale is roasty, malty and kissed with house-smoked malts.

SNOWDRIFT CIDER CO.

32

ABV: 8.5% IBU: 98 A very simple, clean body. Made with Cascade, CTZ, and Centennial Northwest hops. Big citrus and grapefruit notes leading into a bitter finish.

Scotch Ale

perrystreetbrewing.com

%

Anonymous IPA

@OrlisonBrewing

SPOKANE, WA

MOSCOW, ID

Cowpoke Porter

%

@RiverCityBrewing

SUMMIT CIDER

COEUR D’ALENE, ID

Semi-dry

ABV: 6.5% Our flagship cider is made with the perfect blend of Washington apples and just a touch of sugar. The white wine yeast enhances fruit flavors and fruity esters. Your every day cider!

Red Cider

ABV: 7.5% This stunning cider is a rare treat! We have been fortunate to get to work with apple varieties from their native ancestors in the hills of Kazakhstan. Their brilliant red flesh yields a crimson red cider with bright acidity.

Uncrushable Apricot

snowdriftcider.com

summitcider.com

ABV: 7.2% We’ve crafted this cider in the New England tradition, with apples of higher acidity and tannin. Vibrant lime-honey brightness holds counterpoint to darker flavors of caramel and toasted marshmallow.

@SnowdriftCider

Corduroy

ABV: 6.5% Uncrushable is a medium dry cider infused with Apricots. A crisp and refreshing cider that is bursting wtih flavor.

@SummitCiderCda

Now Open Washington Beer Awards 2016 Brewery of the Year 10 INLANDER WINTER PARTY, 2016

Advertising Supplement

OPEN: Wednesday - Saturday

2PM - 8PM 1198 W Summit Pkwy IN KENDALL YARDS @solacemeadandcider


16 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2016

LAGUNITAS BREWING COMPANY

NORTHERN ALES, INC.

PETALUMA, CA

IPA

KETTLE FALLS, WA

ABV: 6.2 IBU: 51.5 A well-rounded, highly drinkable IPA. A bit of Caramel Malt barley provides the richness that mellows out the twang of the hops.

Okanagan Highlander

ABV: 6% IBU: Scotch style ale, dark amber, malty sweet and lightly hopped.

20

Lucky 13 Red Ale

ABV: 8.8% IBU: 51 An ultra-mega-mondo red ale first made for our anniversary in 2006 to celebrate thirteen years of brewing ultra-mega-mondo ales.

Smoked NorthPorter

32

lagunitas.com

northernales.com

%

ABV: Robust porter made with peat smoked malt.

@LagunitasBeer

ONE TREE HARD CIDER

POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY

SPOKANE, WA

Lemon Basil

ABV: 6.5% This cider is the perfect complement to some summer fun. Real lemon and fresh basil make this a sassy bouquet of awesome to enjoy year- round.

Big Jilm Imperial Porter

IBU:

POST FALLS, ID

ABV: Big, dark, roasty. It’s a pleasel my weasel.

11%

IBU:

35

Stoney MacGuyver IPA

ABV: 7.5% IBU: 85 Hoppy? Absolutely. A well-balanced India Pale Ale with a strong alpha punch in the front and lasting resinous finish. The over-the-top complex and pungent aroma is the result of copious amounts of Citra and Mosaic hops.

Tipsy Elf

ABV: 6.9% Our newest employee, Buddy the Elf, got a little tipsy and spilled some cranberry cider into a vat of caramel cinnamon... Lucky for him, it was delicious so we decided to share it with all of you. For a limited time only.

onetreehardcider.com

6%

@OneTreeCider

postfallsbrewing.com

@PostFallsBrew

There’s Food At The Winter Party Too… SANDWICHES • Shaved Pastrami and Swiss on a Pretzel Bun • Ale Braised Bratwurst with Grilled Peppers and Onion • Roast Turkey Sandwich with Pesto Aioli SNACKS • Warm Pretzel with Beer Cheese Sauce • Bacon Cheddar Popcorn

3 PINTS ALL NOVEMBER

$

in the taproom

S M A L L B ATC H HAN DCRAFTE D B E E R

16 TAPS INCLUDING LIMITED SEASONALS

1017 W 1ST AVE || ORLISONBREWING.COM 2PM-9PM TUE-THU || 2PM-CLOSE FRI-SAT

Quality Craft Ales

MADE WITH GLACIAL WATER FROM THE TETON MTNS.

FIND US AT YOUR LOCAL GROCER AND BREW PUBS. VICTOR, ID

WINTER PARTY, 2016 INLANDER 9


NOVEMBER 2016 SNOWLANDER 17

BALE BREAKER BREWING COMPANY

YAKIMA, WA

Bottomcutter IIPA

FULL SAIL BREWING COMPANY

ABV: 8.2 IBU: 100 Double dry-hopped with homegrown Yakima hops, Bottomcutter IIPA is packed with citrus and pine hop character. This Imperial IPA is brewed to finish dry, perfect for the combination of Citra, Simcoe, and Equinox hops.

Wreck the Halls Holiday Ale

High Camp Winter Warmer

Wassail Winter Ale

ABV: 84% IBU: Perfect for the season, this winter beer hits first with a malty backbone of spice and chocolate. Hop additions of Simcoe, Centennial, and Mosaic give High Camp a distinctive pine and grapefruit character.

balebreaker.com

7.3

ABV: 7.2% IBU: 56 Each year we carefully select the best hops and malts to brew this special beer. This year’s Wassail is brewed with a range of caramel and dark chocolate malts giving it a deep mahogany color and a full malty body.

@BaleBreaker

GRAND TETON BREWING CO.

VICTOR, ID

fullsailbrewing.com

NO-LI BREWHOUSE

ABV: 6% IBU: 60 Bitch Creek perfectly balances big malt sweetness and robust hop flavor for a full bodied, satisfying mahogany ale. Like the stream for which it is named, our Bitch Creek ESB is full of character... not for the timid.

Red, White & No-Li Pale Ale

ABV: 6.1% IBU: Red, White & No-Li Pale Ale respresents A freedom to choose, independent of labels, nicknames and dogma. American grown Citra hops and a massive dry-hop addition shine through.

@GrandTetonBrew

LEAVENWORTH, WA

nolibrewhouse.com

NORTH IDAHO CIDER

Dark Persuasion

ABV: 6.5% IBU: 22 Delicate dark chocolate with a whisper of coconut.You know you want it, go ahead and indulge. You can finally have German Chocolate Cake and drink it too. There’s no need to be nervous, it’s just wickedly deep and full of flavor.

IBC Pale Ale

ABV: 5 IBU: 38 Brewed with a generous amount of Citra hops, this pale ale packs a ton of citrusy hop flavor. It’s more subtle than an IPA, so you can raise your stein and Prost your friends with this balanced, refreshing, and hoppy ale.

iciclebrewing.com

SPOKANE, WA

ABV: 7% IBU: 85 This big, bold copper colored ale showcases Munich & Crystal malts to create a big supportive body on which we layer our favorite Washington hops. Chinook & Cascade provide citrus and piney flavors.

Bitch Creek ESB

ICICLE BREWING COMPANY

%

@IcicleBrewing

8 INLANDER WINTER PARTY, 2016

@NoLiBrewhouse

HAYDEN, ID

ABV: 6.9% Cinnamon, clove and cardamom inspire thoughts of mulled apple cider while ginger provides a touch of crisp freshness. The finish is dry and clean with subtle notes of vanilla lingering like the warmth from an autumn sun.

North Idaho Wild Cherry

ABV: 6.9% Deep in color, rich in flavor; this hard cider displays how satisfying a cherry can be less the pit! A subtle fruity sweetness is balanced with a tart and refreshing finish.

northidahocider.com

BREW BEER DRINK BEER HAVE FUN DOING IT Advertising Supplement

35

North Idaho Harvest Spice

Fresh beer. Local flavor.

1025 South Perry • 509-279-2820 family friendly taproom • outdoor seating • private event rentals

@FullSailBrewing

Born & Raised IPA

Pursuit of Hoppiness Imperial Red Ale ABV: 8.5% IBU: 100 Brewed with Idaho 2-Row pale malted barley and German specialty malts to provide a rich, slightly caramel flavor and bold reddish color.

grandtetonbrewing.com

HOOD RIVER, OR

ABV: 6.5% IBU: 68 Annual favorite Wreck the Halls Hoppy Holiday Ale is a sublime hybrid of an American-style IPA and a winter warmer. The result is a bold brew that celebrates the holidays with an intriguing blend of Centennial and Cascade hops.

%

10BARREL.COM


18 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2016

Every tasting package comes with different tokens

Choose your own adventure: Sample tokens get you a taste; pints let your enjoy more of your favorite brew.

In addition to pint or sample tokens, you’ll get a token to use on the PK Prize Wheel, and a Golden Token that you can use to cast your vote for your favorite brewery or cidery.

LIVE MUSIC on the POWDERKEG STAGE

Can you imagine a movie without a soundtrack? It would be so… blah. The same can be said for an event without live music. Firmly in the anti-blah camp, the Inlander is pleased to bring live music to this year’s Winter Party. Six different singers and bands will be taking to the stage, sharing their unique sounds and styles, providing the Winter Party with a fabulous soundtrack.

FRIDAY, NOV. 11

CARLI OSIKA [ 4 to 5 pm ] Learning to play the guitar in the third grade provided this North Idaho native and pop-country artist with both an early start and deeply anchored roots in the music industry. Live performances were part of her routine while she was still in high school, as was writing music. PowderKeg’s Prize Wheel is not just any prize wheel – it’s actually pretty good stuff and if you hit the right pie wedge – there’s some really good stuff.

NATE GREENBURG [ 5:30 to 6:30 pm ] Strumming and plucking his guitar with confidence while singing, this self-described “original folk, rock, blues, singer-songwriter with a mix of jazz and old covers” hits all the right notes. He says his musical style is influenced by “absolutely everything,” and the results are well worth the listen.

Get a spin on the prize wheel with every purchase of a PowderKeg package. Every spin wins!

CRUXIE [ 7 to 9 pm ] “We start slow and smooth and end sweaty and grateful,” Cruxie write about themselves, before describing their genre as “chump change.” If that leaves you just as confused about their style as when you first read their name, you’re not alone. If you walk away from their performance liking their music, you won’t be alone either. This band has been a fan favorite over the years at Zola.

Cast your

The brewery or cidery that receives vote for the most golden tokens will win the your favorite. coveted “Best of PowderKeg Award.” Also we keep track of how many pint and sample tokens are used for the “People’s Choice Awards”. This is an Festival winners will election you’ll want to vote in! be announced in the Last year’s overall winners included Icicle Brewing, D’s Wicked Cider, Elysian and One Tree Hard Cider. _____________________________

SATURDAY, NOV. 12

RON GREENE [ 3 to 4 pm ] It was in a church where Coeur d’Alene-based Ron Greene first learned to play guitar, but his music couldn’t be contained within those walls. He went on to perform across the country, in New York and throughout the Pacific Northwest. Described as encompassing “radioready pop-rock hooks, elements of warmly intimate folk, smoldering funk grooves, and emotive and soulful vocals,” his voice pleases in his latest album, In Honor of a Critic.

Nov. 17 Inlander.

HALEY YOUNG [ 4:30 to 5:30 pm ] Haley Young is quickly becoming a local household name. She’s already written songs for television and signed with a music library company in Los Angeles, but this Spokane-based artist is right at home in the Pacific Northwest, belting out tunes and wowing crowds.

And of course, don’t forget to partner with a designated driver, or make plans for a safe ride home.

MARCO POLO COLLECTIVE [ 6 to 7 pm ] Describing themselves, the Marco Polo Collective say they “strive to create music that inspires simultaneous reflective introspection and toe tapping.” Who doesn’t want introspection and toe tapping? Certainly the crowds who have enjoyed this acoustic rock duo, consisting of lead singer and songwriter Caleb Andersen and percussionist Phill Brannan.

BEER FESTIVAL TERMS _______________________________ IBU International Bitterness Unit

It’s the standard scale for measuring the amount of hops in one’s beer. For example, a hoppy beer like an IPA will have a very high IBU rating, like a 75, while a malty beer like a stout will usually (but not always) have a low IBU rating at around a 30.

ABV Alcohol By Volume

2016 PowderKeg Participants

It’s is a standard measure of how much alcohol (ethanol) is contained in a given volume. A beer or cider with 5% ABV would be 10 proof.

10 BARREL BREWING CO.

BADASS BACKYARD BREWING

BEND, OR

Pray For Snow Winter Ale

ABV: 7.5% IBU: 75 English East Coast Golding Hops, Specialty malts, Strong spicy-herbal hop complexity. Seasonal.

Apocalypse IPA

ABV: 6.5% IBU: Balanced Hop - Forward Flavor - Drinkable IPA. Our Flagship IPA.

10barrel.com

70

@10BarrelBrewing

SPOKANE VALLEY, WA

Big Air Black Stout

ABV: 7% IBU: 53 Dark color and dry roasted flavor characteristic of Stouts and Porters. A malt forward rustic like complexity. Smooth finish with a hint of floral earth tones

Daring Diva Raspberry Wheat

ABV: 6% IBU: 24 Neutral malt profile which allows the raspberry flavor to shine through. Sweet and autumnal with a fresh floral finish. This is definitely a Badass Backyard Brewing fan favorite, we can’t brew enough to keep up with demand!

badassbackyardbeer.com WINTER PARTY, 2016 INLANDER 7


NOVEMBER 2016 SNOWLANDER 19 GREAT BEER. GREAT COMMUNITIES.

POURING

AT POWDERKEG:

MIDNIGHT MARMOT IMPERIAL STOUT

at the Winter Party

&

HUCKLEBERRY ALE spokane Tasting Room 121 s cedar st.

Inspired by the adventurous lifestyle and heritage that sets our region apart.

Craft Beer, Craft Cider and You… Half the fun of hitting the slopes for a day of skiing is hitting

Growlers & Grunts available for purchase & fill

or bring your own! Fri 4pm-8:30ish pm • Sat 2pm-8:30ish pm (208) 480-1048 • NorthIdahoCider.com 11100 N Airport Rd, Bays 5&6 • Hayden, ID 83835

the lodge afterward, for a refreshing, ice-cold beer. At PowderKeg you can get that same feeling, although at PowderKeg you can bring your beverage with you throughout all of the Snowlander Expo... think shop and sip. This year’s PowderKeg is shaping up to be one of the best ever, with an outstanding line-up of local and regional breweries and cideries in attendance. There will be dozens of varieties of the finest beers in the Pacific Northwest, along with ten different, delicious ciders to choose from.

• Valid identifcation required. Only attendees wearing a 21+ PowderKeg wristband will be served.

112 N SPOKANE ST, POST FALLS, ID

POSTFALLSBREWING.COM • (208) 773-7301

6 INLANDER WINTER PARTY, 2016

The Yeti

package features a double-wall stainless steel cup. It comes in black or silver, and optional lids are available.

There are three tasting packages available at PowderKeg. • THE POLAR SAMPLER provides a small sample-sized glass, and comes with four sample tokens, and sampling is what PowderKeg is all about. • THE FROST BITE is a customdesigned 16-ounce pint glass. The Frost Bite comes with six sample tokens, or two pint tokens. • THE YETI is for those who aren’t messing around! This stainless steel beauty holds nineteen ounces and, like the Frost Bite, comes with either six sample tokens or two pints.

BEER KYRS GOOD BREWS • Saturday @ noon SEMINAR

Adam, from KYRS’ Home Brews program, will be on hand to discuss the process for home brewing beer, including tools and tricks to create the perfect craft brew.

Advertising Supplement


20 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2016

er nd la er ow rtn Sn a 7 rP /1 te 16 in 20 W

In the all-new 2017 Kia Sportage…

2017 Kia Sportage SX Turbo

…and the all-new 2017 Kia Sorento

2017 Kia Sorento SX Limited

10 years. 100,000 miles. CARS BUILT TO LAST. WARRANTIES TOO. We have a lot of confidence in the quality and durability in every new Kia that rolls off the assembly line. So much confidence, that we offer an industry-leading Kia 10-year or 100,000-mile warranty program. The Kia 10-year/100,000 mile warranty program* consists of: 10-year/100,000 mile limited powertrain warranty. 5-year/60,000 mile limited basic warranty. 5-year/100,000 mile limited anti-perforation warranty. 5-year/60,000 mile roadside assistance plan.

November 11 & 12 Spokane Convention Center

Coeur d’Alene

317 West Dalton Ave.

Liberty Lake

21602 E. George Gee Ave.

Come see us at the Winter Party for your free lift ticket to 49º North* Available to the first 1000 guests each day …after that we have Buy One, Get One coupons to Whitefish Mountain Resort * LIMITED QUANTITIES, AND SOME RESTRICTIONS APPLY


NOVEMBER 2016 SNOWLANDER 21

Shop the Expo!

Activities

Fun for all ages... and prizes.

Whether you want to look just right up on the hill, or you’re out to find great winter deals on soft goods – the shopping at Snowlander Expo can be your one-stop for all of it.

Climbing Wall Test your skills on Wild Walls’ two-story-high wall.

2016

Tri-State Outfitters from Coeur d’Alene joins the Winter Party for the fifth at the year, bringing a variety of their top gear and accessories. “The hottest deals are on Winter Party demo skis and snowboards, which will be 50 to 60 percent off,” says sporting goods department manager Randy Richards. Tri-State Outfitters also carries the Fischer Vacuum boot, which is totally moldable, and they’ll have their vacuum machine on-site to vacuum-mold Fischer boots. They’ll also have last year’s goggles, Richards says: “There will be clothing deals that run across the board from 20 to 70 percent off.” New to the party this year are specialty retailers Sports Outlet and Ski Shack. Sports Outlet will transport new retail pieces directly from their showroom floor to the Winter Party, so you can shop at the event, taking your new treasures with you. With an emphasis on downhill skiing and snowboarding, Sports Outlet has everything you’ll need, from gloves and mitts, to helmets and bags for your gear and more. The Ski Shack will bring a machine and experts to offer custom boot fittings, ensuring that your ski or snowboard boots fit properly. An improperly fitting boot can ruin your day on the mountain, and cause long-lasting foot pain. “So many people are out there in their boots that don’t fit,” says Ski Shack owner Julie Vucinich. “Stop by and get your boots fitted by a professional!” Also, don’t miss out on the deals from Spokane Alpine Haus, Alpine Shop Sandpoint and the Expo’s other premier vendors!

INB Game Zone A variety of free arcade games, pinball and foosball.

Snowball Toss Winter-style cornhole tournaments all weekend long, with prizes from INB for the winners.

Artist’s Corner Watch artists create winter themed art with paint and ink, featuring Zack Grassi on Friday and Jon Deviny on Saturday.

Live Music Local talent Friday & Saturday – full line up on page seven. G RATIN CELEB EARS! 40 Y

VIST

NEW OWN ERS

FOR

2 OFF

$

We Sell Brands You Love

WINTER PARTY

ADMISSION

Get $10 Das Haus Dollars with every $50 purchase at our booth

TICKET GIVEAWAY

FREE LIFT TICKET TO*

Good towards any purchase or service in store

FIRST 1,000 ATTENDEES EACH DAY

After that, attendees receive:

2 FOR 1 TICKETS TO

*

2925 S Regal St. Spokane, Wa 509-534-4554 THESPOKANEALPINEHAUS.COM

* Limit one voucher per person, while supplies last. Some restrictions apply

4 INLANDER WINTER PARTY, 2016

Advertising Supplement


22 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2016

Alpine · Back Country · Cross Country

Ski and Snowboard · SALES · SERVICE · RENTALS

Frozen cheeks, puffs of steamy breath

hanging like mountain fog and then, finally, the first sight of the snow beginning to flutter down from the sky. What better reason to raise a glass and celebrate! Winter is one of the most beloved times of year, as the region is transformed into our own icy wonderland. The season deserves a proper welcome — and there’s no better way to kick it off than the Inlander’s WINTER PARTY, presented by INB.

Ask Us How You Can

Demo A Pair!

This two-pronged event is half ski show (SNOWLANDER EXPO), half beer festival (POWDERKEG), with the two coming together to form one perfect weekend. With Expo you get incredible deals on new winter gear and access to region-wide resorts. With PowderKeg, you can sample from fifty regional beers and ciders while enjoying live music. Also, enjoy INB’s Game Zone with a free arcade, the twostory climbing wall and snowball toss tournament (think bean bag toss, but with a frosty twist). Every good event has its party favors, presented by Gee Automotive, the first 1,000 guests each day will receive free 49 Degree North lift tickets. There will also be giveaways of 2-for-1 tickets to Whitefish Mountain Resort, while quantities last. Some restrictions apply.

Don’t miss out on the fun! Spokane Convention Center Friday, Nov. 11 (4 to 9 pm) & Saturday, Nov. 12 (10 am to 7 pm)

Make Everyday On The Mountain Better Than Before.

Tickets available at the door and TicketsWest.com Tickets are $8, with kids 12 and under free Bring your military ID for 50% off

S NOWLANDER E XPO . COM Now’s the time to get your winter plans set, and you’re in luck: these 13 regional ski resorts are attending the Winter Party, ready to get you revved up for the season: 49º North

Mt. Spokane

Big Sky

Schweitzer

Big White

Silver Mountain

Bluewood

Silver Star

Brundage

Whitefish

Kimberley

Whitewater

2016

at the Winter Party

208-772-0613 6275 Sunshine Street Coeur d’Alene

Open Sunday thru Saturday 8am to 7pm

Lookout Pass

EXPO SEMINARS [ SATURDAY ONLY ] Benefits of Boot Fitting ........ 10am Rick from Sandpoint’s Alpine Shop knows boots and feet. Heal X Physical Therapy ..... 11am Conditioning and injury prevention. Backcountry Basics & More 1pm Panhandle Backcountry/Idaho Panhandle Avalanche Center Swix/Toko ............................ 2pm Join Klaus Pittman to learn the proper technique and tools needed to wax your skis and boards.

WINTER PARTY, 2016 INLANDER 3


NOVEMBER 2016 SNOWLANDER 23

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

events

SCHEDULED OPENING DAYS November 24th 9am - 4pm

SEASONAL EVENTS

Nov. 25th 9am - 3:30pm

INLANDER WINTER PARTY

Snowlander Expo & PowderKeg Brew Festival

December 2nd 9am - 3:30pm

Spokane Convention Center // Spokane November 11 & 12 [ Friday 4 - 9 pm // Saturday 10am - 7pm ]

49º NORTH SNOW DANCE

Annual fun 49º style at the Spokane Club (Georgian Room) // Spokane November 19 [ 6:30 - 12:30pm ] 21 and over

December 3rd 9am - 4pm

KELLOGG CHRISTMAS LIGHTING FESTIVAL … as soon as possible

Tree lighting, fireworks and more in the home town of Silver Mountain // Kellogg November 26 [ 10am - 7pm ]

LOOKOUT PASS BOOMER FRIDAYS Age 40 and over skis for just $30 every Friday Starts November 25

SCHWEITZER COMMUNITY FUNDRAISER $10 Tickets. 100% of ticket sales will be donated to local charities December 9 [ 9am - 3:30pm ]

MT. SPOKANE NIGHT SKIING BEGINS

December 16 [ 4 pm - 9:30pm ]


24 SNOWLANDER NOVEMBER 2016

NOVEMBER 11 FRIDAY & 12 SATURDAY SPOKANE CONVENTION CENTER 4PM-9PM

10AM-7PM

EVENT GUIDE

GET READY TO HIT THE

SLOPES

APPAREL • GEAR • SEASON PASSES

FREE LIFT

TICKET G I V E A W AY

*

PRESENTED BY:

LOCAL AND

FLIP OVER & READ THE NOVEMBER SNOWLANDER TICKET TO

REGIONAL CRAFT BEERS

AND CIDERS FIRST 1,000 ATTENDEES EACH DAY*

After that:

FOR 1 2 TICKETS *

* Limit one voucher per person, while supplies last. Some restrictions apply


CULTURE | MUSICAL

Musical Tapestry

Beautiful: The Carole King Musical celebrates the career of one of pop music’s most legendary songwriters.

A new Broadway musical about Carole King’s rise to stardom and her music’s lasting impact heads to Spokane BY CHEY SCOTT

W

e’re all familiar with Carole King’s music, whether we realize it or not. We recognize her earthy songs on the local oldies station; like “It’s Too Late” and “I Feel the Earth Move,” both tracks from King’s most beloved record, 1971’s Tapestry. We also recognize dozens of other chart-toppers by the gifted composer and lyricist, perhaps without the realization that King wrote them — for some of most popular American music acts of the 1960s. Even before King made a name for herself with her four-time Grammy-winning Tapestry, she was churning out hit after hit. The Chiffons’ peppy “One Fine Day” was hers, written with songwriting partner and first husband Gerry Goffin. Together, they also penned the Drifters’ 1962 hit “Up on the Roof.” The Shirelles’ “Will You Love Me Tomorrow” was theirs, too, notably becoming the first song recorded by an all-woman group to reach No. 1 in the U.S. The popular new show Beautiful: The Carole King Musical — playing concurrently on Broadway, London’s West End and as a North American touring production — shows us how King went from a brilliant 16-year-old

THEATER

THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE ABRIDGED All 37 plays in 97 minutes!

Written by Adam Long, Daniel Singer and Jess Winfield Directed by Edward Warren

songwriter to become one of the most iconic women in music history. The list of King’s contributions to recording history is long. She’s been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and was the first woman to receive the Library of Congress’ Gershwin Prize for Popular Song in 2013. We know that King, now 74, is a legend, and Beautiful shows us how she became one. “It’s a very captivating story about this young woman and the struggles she went through to get where she was when Tapestry happened,” reflects principal cast member Suzanne Grodner, who plays King’s mother, Genie Klein. Beautiful portrays Klein as supportive but realistically wary of her daughter’s aspirations. “There really were no women writers, lyricists or composers at that time. Genie was also a playwright, and knew how difficult it was going to be for Carole going into this male-dominated music world,” Grodner explains. “Yet in the end, she was Carole’s biggest supporter.” Grodner has been with Beautiful’s North American tour — stopping in Spokane from Nov. 9-13 to kick off the

INB Performing Arts Center’s 2016-17 Best of Broadway season — since it began in September 2015, and has seen the story of King’s rise to stardom resonate with all ages. “We have people coming to see the show in their 50s, 60s and 70s who grew up with Carole as the soundtrack of their lives,” Grodner says on the phone from Seattle. “We find that everywhere we go in the country, people respond to this kind of music, and that a lot of people are bringing their younger daughters and sons to the show.” Opening on Broadway in January 2014, original cast member Jessie Mueller notably took home a Tony Award for Best Featured Actress in a Musical for her portrayal of King. Beautiful’s soundtrack also received the 2015 Grammy for Best Musical Theater Album. Even so, critics have called the show a “formulaic bio-musical” that tends to awkwardly bounce from song to song. Criticism aside, Beautiful offers a lesser-known look at King’s maturation from a faceless name in one of the famed pop-song factories of the 1950s and ’60s (she got her start at the 1650 Broadway music offices, near the storied Brill Building) to one of most iconic singer-songwriters of all time. “I think that the early songs that she wrote are really going to surprise the audience who come to see it,” Grodner remarks. “Carole is an icon, and to tell her story to audiences around the country is a real privilege.” n cheys@inlander.com Beautiful: The Carole King Musical • Wed, Nov. 9 to Sun, Nov. 13: Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm; Thu, Sat at 2 pm; Sun at 1 and 6:30 pm • $27.50-$77.50 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • wcebroadway.com • 279-7000

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NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 29


DAVENPORT HOTELS HOLIDAY EVENTS Events Nov 24

Thanksgiving Buffet The Historic Davenport Hotel Reservations 509.455.8888

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Dec 11

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30 INLANDER NOVEMBER 3, 2016


Small-Farm Hero Joel Salatin arrives in Spokane with a plan for sustainable food BY TARYN PHANEUF

D

warfed by mega-corporations and underappreciated by federal regulatory agencies, being a farmer on a small plot of land can be a thankless job. Joel Salatin believes that having the deck stacked against them prevents many small farm owners from seeing the possibilities. “Farmers feel like we’re victims because nobody loves us,” he says with a laugh. “We little farmers get this

inferiority complex.” He says “we,” but it’s hard to believe he wrestles with self-doubt. Salatin, called the most famous farmer in the world, has become known as not only a small-scale farming guide, but also a brazen opponent of industrial food production. He’s a self-proclaimed “lunatic farmer” whose job, second to farming, seems to be ruffling ...continued on next page

Joel Salatin is a both a sustainable farmer and an opponent of industrial farming. RACHEL SALATIN PHOTO

NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 31


FOOD | SUSTAINABILITY

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Your Adventure Starts Here

IN GEAR

feathers. He’s convinced that small farms play a critical role in feeding the world, despite a lack of recognition. Salatin will visit Spokane on Saturday as the keynote speaker at the Spokane Conservation District’s Food & Farm Expo. Part how-to, part pep rally, he’ll spend the day teaching farmers how they can turn their passion into a living. “The main idea here is to empower folks to do more,” Salatin says. The all-day conference at Spokane Community College features courses on everything from choosing animal breeds to brewing and distilling local grains. A special track taught by Salatin is full, but tickets are still available to hear his keynote lecture that evening at Gonzaga University. In the 10 books he’s written since 1995, Salatin indicts Americans’ fast-food culture and explains his life and farming philosophies. His family bought a tired piece of land in Virginia’s Shenandoah Valley in 1961 and turned it into a food-producing ecosystem that now includes beef, pork, poultry and forestry products. Without using chemicals, his Polyface Farm feeds more than 6,000 families and supplies restaurants, retail outlets and a farmers market. He became the poster boy for non-industrial farming a decade ago when Michael Pollan, a national food writer, included Salatin’s farm in his book The Omnivore’s Dilemma, which traces the origin of the American diet to Midwestern corn fields. He was later included in Food, Inc., a documentary that examines industrial farming’s hold on the national food system. Through speaking tours and on his own farm, Salatin makes it a point to train other farmers. In Spokane, he’ll bring practical tips, including how to use natural resources to their full potential and how to get your spouse on the same page. “You can’t Google experience,” he says. “We’re big believers in experiential learning, which means that as you’re learning, you’re experiencing what you’re learning, so it adds gravitas to your learning.” He encourages farmers to find creative ways to overcome a marketplace that’s fitted to larger operations. Collaborating with other farmers, working with customers and taking advantage of technology that has reimagined farm infrastructure are just a few ways of capitalizing on efficiency without sacrificing sustainability.

ADDING SOMETHING NEW With a big name like Joel Salatin headlining this year’s Food & Farm Expo, organizers knew they’d get people through the door. The next question became what to do with a larger audience. “This is our most audacious seminar that we’ve done,” says Heron Pond Farms owner Shannon Meagher, who helped plan the Expo. Beginning at 9 am at Spokane Community College, participants have more than 90 classes to choose from. Overall, organizers aimed for a day that would appeal to just about anybody, with an underlying goal to talk about what works in this region. In a couple of ways, they’re trying to grow support around new ideas: u Pat Munts, small acreage and small farms coordinator at the Spokane Conservation District, will introduce urban farming as a way to combat food insecurity and improve the quality of life in Spokane County. The urban farming ordinance is just a couple of years old, and people are taking advantage in different ways. Munts wants to see the region tap into urban agriculture’s full potential. “It’s ignored — it is scattered, it is small scale,” she says. “In the long run, I think it is an economic driver for the community.” u Grains are prolific in the region, but the idea of using them in craft brewing and distilling is still very new, says Joel Williamson of LINC Foods. He helped organize a set of courses geared toward building the local “grainshed.” With the help of local brewers, including Cameron Johnson of Young Buck Brewing in Spokane, Williamson hopes to build momentum around small-scale grain farming that could bring local beer and spirits to a new level. “The market has dictated to farmers what we want them to grow,” he says. “Breaking away from that is risky. You’re trying to make a new market.” — TARYN PHANEUF After a long career on the public stage, he still sees “the big guys” getting bigger. But he also sees the little guy pushing back. “For every Walmart that opens up, there’s two more farmers markets,” he says. “Culture tends to balance out itself.”  Farm & Food Expo • Sat, Nov. 5, beginning at 8 am • Spokane Community College • 1810 N. Greene • Late registration at sccd.org/departments/small-acreage/farm-food-expo


FOOD | OPENING

Poinsettia Tours Fridays and Saturdays November 11-12 and 18-19 Tour times 11 am , 1 pm, 2 pm, 3 pm

New Classic

Jon Fine at the recently opened Retro Donuts. DAN NAILEN PHOTO

Retro Donuts brings tasty pastries to North Spokane BY DAN NAILEN

S

tep inside the new Retro Donuts shop on the Newport Highway, and your definition of “retro” immediately is challenged. For one, the space is overwhelmingly shiny and new, and very bright thanks to the tall windows, even on a cloudy day. It’s also pristine, thanks to the fact the equipment is all new and the shop just opened in mid-October. Then there’s the music, personally curated by owner Jon Fine; during my visit, I heard ’80s stalwarts INXS and a-ha, and Fine says there’s some modern stuff like Tame Impala in the mix as well. “We have no predetermined definition of ‘retro,’” Fine says, explaining that for some customers, the retro might refer to the classic Old-Fashioneds or cake donuts on the menu, while for others it might be the font of the logo, or the music they hear. Fine’s music fandom reveals

The bacon maple and bluberry donuts.

itself on the menu, too, with sections of donuts labeled as “classics,” “covers” or “New Wave.” On my visit, I mixed up old-school and New Wave with a classic cake donut covered in blueberry frosting ($1.75) alongside a New Wave maple bar delivered with a slice of peppered bacon on top ($2.55). Both were delicious, and definitely a step up from grocery store fare. Add a cup of the shop’s three-bean Four Seasons coffee blend brewed pour-over-style and made specifically for Retro

Donuts, and you have one sweet feast. Elsewhere on the menu, you’ll find an array of teas and juices as well as breakfast staples like oatmeal, desserts like ice cream sandwiches made out of donuts called Arctic Circles, and Gigis — donut dough filled with egg, cheese, Canadian bacon and white gravy, and available only on weekends. Fine came up with the idea for Retro Donuts after years in marketing, and he hopes to expand the Retro Donuts idea throughout the area. “I know how to create markets, I guess,” Fine says, “and be creative.” That creativity came into play abruptly after he was laid off from his job at the Spokane Club in the spring. He decided quickly he wanted to start his own business and started researching. “I didn’t have a job, so I dedicated hundreds, and now thousands, of hours researching, going to the Westside, talking to experts.” He knew he wanted to build a new brand from scratch, not simply open a franchise of an existing business, and he managed to get the doors open less than 100 days after getting his Retro Donuts trademark registered. Judging by how busy his first Retro Donuts has been since opening — selling 10,800 donuts in the first nine days — it’s clear the research is paying off so far. And he has long-term plans for more donut shops and perhaps some other food joints under the “Retro” banner. “It’s been amazing. We expected some interest. We’ve done some billboards, Facebooked like crazy,” Fine says. “I had never made a donut in my life. I know how to make donuts now.” n Retro Donuts • 10925 N. Newport Hwy., Suite 1 • Open Tue-Sat, 6 am-3 pm; Sun, 7 am-1 pm • Facebook: Retro Donuts • 315-9502

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NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 33


Weird Science

Benedict Cumberbatch gets magical in Doctor Strange.

Doctor Strange features a whole lot of CGI but lacks in story BY MARYANN JOHANSON

“F

orget everything you think you know,” Chiwetel Ejiofor intones here, in that amazing voice that commands you heed him. Alas, his planet-protecting wizard, Mordo, just wants you to forget everything you know about superhero origin stories so this one will (hopefully) feel fresh to you. Doctor Strange certainly looks different from all the other Marvel movies, which it exists alongside of, but even its differences are familiar. Worse, the film is busily jam-packed with CGI stuff at the expense of all else: there’s a yawning emptiness where the emotional core should be. All that’s left are the mechanics of getting a man from mere-mortal-hood to demigod-in-a-cape-hood, which are no longer terribly surprising. Stephen Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) is a New York neurosurgeon — Cumberbatch’s American accent is distractingly terrible — and the usual clichéd combination of brilliant, arrogant and single-minded, which makes him very bad at coping when a terrible car accident leaves him with such severe nerve damage in his hands that he can no longer perform surgery. His search for a cure leads him, improbably, to Kathmandu, Nepal, and a sort of spiritual martial-arts retreat called Kamar-Taj. Here, sorcerers the Ancient One (Tilda Swinton) and Mordo, her lieutenant, will teach Stephen all about using magic, though everyone — including Stephen — almost instantly seems to forget that this was supposed to be about Stephen fixing his damaged hands.

34 INLANDER NOVEMBER 3, 2016

onscreen simply stand around marveling at how neat-o Stephen is just hungry for the knowledge, which is everything looks. cool; a smart guy like him would be intrigued, even if he The Marvel movies have been so very good at creatcan’t quite believe in the magic at first. But it’s a much ing deeply personal transformative journeys for their bigger problem if we cannot believe in the personal transformation Stephen supposedly goes through to wield the heroes while telling stories that have real-world relevance. magic. He readily accepts that, just as it took him years of But Doctor Strange cannot come up with either: it’s not study and practice to become a neurosurgeon, so shall it about anything. It feels disconnected from any concerns require years of study and practice to master magic. Yet it we might recognize from our own reality, and it doesn’t seems like only mere months later that he has somehow seem all that interested in tracking what it would really shed his arrogance and become a world-class sorcerer, and mean for a man like Stephen to go through such a radical there was no process to it: someone (lazy screenwriters?) turnaround in his life. As a movie, it’s not enough of just flipped a switch. anything: it’s not scary enough; it’s not bonkers enough; Now Stephen is a member of an organization that, the it’s not funny enough (its few attempts at humor are tonAncient One explains, is kind of like a mystical Avengers: ally jarring). Doctor Strange is clearly itself tired of “the origin story,” Iron Man and Co. protect Earth from physical threats, and and has only been treading water to get to the point when Kamar-Taj protects Earth from more arcane ones. KamarStephen can play the master sorcerer. There is real power Taj is all about “mirror” dimensions and “dark” dimensions and the “infinite multiverse,” and all in the finale, in which Stephen combines their chases and battles ending up looking the intellect he brings to Kamar-Taj with DOCTOR STRANGE the magic it commands to create a unique like Inception dreams in The Matrix, planes Rated PG-13 folding up against one another in gravitysolution to a seemingly unsolvable probDirected by Scott Derrickson lem. The movie sets up an exciting new and logic-defying ways. Starring Benedict Cumberbatch, villain for Strange’s next outing, and the That looks cool, but we’ve seen it before, and it ultimately doesn’t actually have Chiwetel Ejiofor, Tilda Swinton only moment when the film truly comes any real impact on how these people fight roaring to life and engages its audience one another. (The major bad guy here is a rogue member is the sequence that brings Stephen onto the larger Marvel of Kamar-Taj; he’s not much of a villain, despite the best scene. We should have just skipped all this and jumped efforts of Mads Mikkelsen.) Sometimes even the characters right into the next story. n


FILM | SHORTS

Trolls

OPENING FILMS DOCTOR STRANGE

Stephen Strange (Benedict Cumberbatch) is a New York neurosurgeon who is in a terrible car accident that leaves him with such severe nerve damage in his hands that he can no longer perform surgery. His search for a cure leads him to Nepal and a sort of spiritual martial-arts retreat called Kamar-Taj. Here, sorcerers the Ancient One (Tilda Swinton) and Mordo, her lieutenant, teach Stephen all about using magic, which he employs to save the world from bad guys. (SR) Rated PG-13

HACKSAW RIDGE

Desmond Doss (Andrew Garfield) is an earnest young man as America goes to war in 1941. He’s determined to do his duty in service to his country, but, as a devout Seventh-day Adventist, he is adamant in his refusal to take up arms against another human being. So as he leaves behind his fiancée, Dorothy (Teresa Palmer), and parents (Hugo

Weaving and Rachel Griffiths) with the intention of serving as a medic, he believes he can serve by saving lives rather than taking them — until he reaches basic training, and faces a U.S. Army that has no idea what to do with this guy. Directed by Mel Gibson. (MJ) Rated R.

TROLLS

From the creators of Shrek and featuring the voices of celebrities such as Anna Kendrick, Justin Timberlake, Zooey Deschanel, Russell Brand, Gwen Stefani and James Corden, this animated comedy tells a tale of happiness and the lengths we’ll go to grasp it. When happy Troll Village is invaded by the grumpy Bergens and almost all citizens are kidnapped, Poppy, the leader of the trolls, must team up with nononsense, overly cautious troll Branch in order to save the people of Troll Village from ending up in the stomachs of the Bergens. (EG) Rated PG

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NOW PLAYING THE ACCOUNTANT

The man who was Batman is now an accountant... but there’s a twist! Sure, Ben Affleck is a math savant CPA with no people skills, but his clients are super evil criminals from around the world. Didn’t expect that, did you? When a Treasury agent (J.K. Simmons) closes in on him and the CPA takes on a big-time client, people start getting shot all over the place. (MB) Rated R

BOO! A MADEA HALLOWEEN

Tyler Perry has taken his beloved Madea to jail, to witness protection, to Christmas and elsewhere, but now it’s time to celebrate Halloween with the bombastic old lady (also played by Perry, a choice best explained at this point by some sort of deep psychological issue). This time she’s supposed to be watching a group of teens, but encounters poltergeists, ghosts, zombies and other evil entities. (MB) Rated PG-13

DEEPWATER HORIZON

Director Peter Berg’s Deepwater Horizon deals with the April 2010 events on

the offshore oil-drilling rig that made national headlines. The focal point of the story is Mike Williams (Mark Wahlberg), an electronics technician who is just starting a 21-day stint aboard the rig when trouble begins. The site’s supervisor, “Mr. Jimmy” Harrell (Kurt Russell), questions the way that BP executives have taken shortcuts around safety tests as the creation of the well runs over budget and behind schedule. Soon, a massive eruption of oil and gas leads to an explosion that threatens the lives of everyone on board. (SR) Rated PG-13

THE DISAPPOINTMENTS ROOM

Kate Beckingsale plays a young mother who moves into a new, creepy house with her husband. You know where this is going, don’t you? Well, things don’t get better when he discovers a secret room in the basement that isn’t on the home’s floor plans. (MB) Rated R

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THE GIRL ON THE TRAIN

Emily Blunt stars in this mystery/thrill...continued on next page

NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 35


FILM | SHORTS

SAVE THE DATE NOW SMALL BUSINESS

S AT U R D AY

NOV 26!

PLAYING er, playing the role of Rachel Watson, a devastated alcoholic divorcee. Rachel takes the train every day, fantasizing about the life of the strangers whose house she passes by every day. One day, she sees something shocking in those strangers’ backyard. Rachel tells the authorities what she thinks she saw and becomes entangled in a missing persons investigation, resulting in her trying to sort through her memories to discern what happened that day on the train. (EG) Rated R

IN A VALLEY OF VIOLENCE

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Paul (Ethan Hawke) is among the denizens of poverty-stricken frontier town Denton, a place the protagonist, with his dog and horse companions, stumbles upon on his way to Mexico. Paul’s scuffle with a local hothead named Gilly Martin (James Ransone) results in a series of escalating overreactions that build to outright, brutal violence. Also starring John Travolta. (IH) Rated R

INFERNO

Tom Hanks plays Robert Langdon, a symbologist who must follow a complicated series of clues related to medieval poet Dante in order to solve a dastardly worldwide conspiracy plot. Landon wakes up with amnesia in an Italian hospital, and with help from doctor Sienna Brooks (Felicity Jones) he must try to regain his memories before a virus is released that could kill off half of the Earth’s population. Based on the novel written by Dan Brown, this film is directed by Academy Award winner Ron Howard. (EG) Rated PG-13

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Tom Cruise plays investigator Jack Reacher in this sequel to the 2012 original. After learning that his colleague, Army Major Susan Turner (Cobie Smulders) has been arrested on charges of espionage, Reacher sets out to prove her innocence. His adventure forces him to work outside the law as he uncovers a government conspiracy involving the death of U.S. soldiers. (EG) Rated PG-13

KEEPING UP WITH THE JONESES

Suburban couple Karen Gaffney (Isla Fisher) and Jeff Gaffney (Zach Galifianakis) are suspicious of their impossibly perfect new neighbors Natalie Jones (Gal Gadot) and Tim Jones (Jon Hamm), and decide to embark on an investigation of the Joneses. The Gaffneys soon discover that the Joneses are government secret agents and become entangled in an international espionage scheme. (EG) Rated PG-13

SEVEN

THE MAGNIFICENT

In this remake, a town is under siege from a ruthless big shot — in this case, mining boss Bartholomew Bogue (Pe-

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

NEW YORK TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Sully

75

Hacksaw Ridge

67

In a Valley of Violence

66

Middle School

51

The Girl on the Train

48

Inferno

44

Keeping Up With the Joneses

35

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

ter Sarsgaard) — and his personal army of enforcers. Widowed Emma Cullen (Haley Bennett) tries to hire men willing to accept the likely suicidal job of protecting the town, and one man, bounty hunter Sam Chisolm (Denzel Washington), agrees to assist. Then, he has to find six more to make the title of this Western work. (SR) Rated PG-13

MIDDLE SCHOOL: THE WORST YEARS OF MY LIFE

Cool kid Rafe is stoked to finally arrive at middle school. The bad news for Rafe is that his middle school is the absolute worst with mean teachers and a jerk principal who doesn’t like fun, internet memes and other cool stuff that hip middle schoolers are into. So Rafe and his equally victimized classmates hatch a plan to take down this dorky principal and free themselves from a life of tyranny. (MB) Rated PG

MISS PEREGRINE’S HOME FOR PECULIAR CHILDREN

When outcast Florida teen Jacob (Asa Butterfield) goes to check on his beloved grandpa (Terence Stamp) after a distressed phone call, he finds the old man dying and sees monsters nearby. Based on his cryptic dying words, Jacob follows the path of his granddad’s fantastical bedtime stories about his time at Miss Peregrine’s (a wonderfully stern Eva Green) orphanage. After events lead Jacob through a time portal, he discovers that the children (known as peculiars) do exist, possessing powers like super strength and the ability to rapidly grow plants. (MJ) Rated PG-13

NINE LIVES

Let’s start by saying that everything about this film — in which a workaholic dad played by Kevin Spacey gets trapped in the body of his daughter’s cat — is oozing with cheese and slapstick comedy (from a CGI cat, nonetheless). Spacey’s character Tom Brand is too busy building his business empire to pay attention to his wife and daughter, so quirky pet store owner (Christopher Walken) casts a spell on him with the requirement that he reconnect with his family, or be trapped in the cat’s body for the rest of his life. Antics ensue. (CS) Rated PG

OUIJA: ORIGIN OF EVIL

When are folks in movies going to figure out that playing with a Ouija board

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

leads to nothing but trouble? This prequel to 2014’s Ouija is set in 1967 and features a single mom of two daughters procuring a bedeviled board as part of her psychic scam business. But when the youngest daughter tries to contact her late father, a portal opens and things get all messed up, as is wont to happen in these sorts of films. (MB) Rated R

PETE’S DRAGON

Park ranger Grace (Bryce Dallas Howard) discovers Pete (Oakes Fegley) living in the woods where he’s been alone for six years, after an outing with his parents ended in a car wreck that killed them. But then he reveals that he’s had the companionships of a big green dragon named Elliot. (MJ) Rated PG

SULLY

Clint Eastwood’s Sully tells the story of Captain Chesley “Sully” Sullenberger (Tom Hanks) piloting a commercial airliner to a water landing on the Hudson River with zero casualties (dubbed “The Miracle on the Hudson”) in January 2009, and the ensuing investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board to determine if Sullenberger was at fault. (SS) Rated PG-13

THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS

Created by the team behind the Despicable Me films, The Secret Life of Pets tells the story of a dog named Max (voiced by Louis C.K.) suddenly forced to welcome another pet to his apartment in the shaggy, sloppy Duke (Eric Stonestreet). Mayhem naturally ensues, and the two pups get lost in the city and have to find their way home with the help of a pack of Max’s friends. (DN) Rated PG

STORKS

This animated movie reimagines babydelivering storks that are now tasked with delivering retail packages. Top delivery stork Junior (Andy Samberg) is about to become the next leader of the company when he accidentally activates the baby making machine and creates a baby girl. Junior and his human friend Tulip (Katie Crown) must find the baby a home before the boss finds out. Featuring the voices of Jennifer Aniston, Keegan-Michael Key and Jordan Peele. (EG) Rated PG 


FILM | REVIEW

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TROLLS

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JACK REACHER: NEVER GO BACK

Andrew Garfield (far right) stars in Mel Gibson’s war biopic.

him. The narrative eventually focuses on Desmond facing a court-martial for refusing to obey orders, and his strenuous wrestling with his conscience, but for too long, it feels like a weak approximation of Full Metal Jacket’s Parris Island first half — and while Vaughn’s role eventually takes on additional layers, he’s no R. Lee Ermey. Also like Full Metal Jacket, Hacksaw Ridge makes a shift to the battlefield, where it country, but faces a unique challenge: As faces a different set of comparisons. There’s a devout Seventh-day Adventist, he is adamore than a little bit of Saving Private Ryan’s mant in his refusal to take up arms against Omaha Beach sequence in those moments, another human being. So as he leaves bewhich doesn’t necessarily make them any hind his fiancée, Dorothy (Teresa Palmer), less effective in capturing the arbitrary and parents (Hugo Weaving and Rachel suddenness of death, or at showing the Griffiths) with the intention horror facing a man like of serving as a medic, he Desmond, whose only HACKSAW RIDGE believes he can serve by savgoal was helping to keep Rated R ing lives rather than taking other men alive. them — until he reaches basic Directed by Mel Gibson It’s not as though Starring Andrew Garfield, Sam training, and faces a U.S. Gibson isn’t gifted Worthington, Vince Vaughn Army that has no idea what enough a filmmaker to to do with this guy. give his visceral style When Desmond heads to Basic Trainsome distinctive elements, or the story of ing, things get strangely familiar. In the barDesmond Doss isn’t singular enough in racks of his rifle company, a no-nonsense its improbable courage to warrant attendrill instructor, Sgt. Howell (Vince Vaughn), tion. But on a cinematic level, modern moves from soldier to soldier, doling out war movies need to do more than remind insults and colorful nicknames to his new us that war is hell in ever-more-hellish charges. As Desmond’s uncompromising ways, seasoned with foxhole interludes of refusal to pick up a weapon becomes clear, personal reflection. The unique elements of Sgt. Howell not-so-subtly suggests that the this real-life tale deserve better than being other soldiers should adjust the troubledropped into a template for movies you’ve maker’s thinking, which they do by beating already seen. 

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A real-life war story is uncomfortably split in Hacksaw Ridge BY SCOTT RENSHAW

S

ome of the most celebrated movies in history have addressed the experience of war — from All Quiet on the Western Front to Apocalypse Now to Saving Private Ryan — in a way that keeps raising the bar. Are there compelling new stories to tell about the brutality of armies clashing? And are there ways to tell those stories that don’t feel like something we’ve already seen in a much better version? Hacksaw Ridge certainly achieves the former, uncovering a fascinating World War II-era footnote that brings a new perspective to a familiar milieu. But the way director Mel Gibson and screenwriters Andrew Knight and Robert Schenkkan choose to tell that story evokes one of the most distinctive war movies ever made: Stanley Kubrick’s Full Metal Jacket. And the comparison does not work in Hacksaw Ridge’s favor. The story concerns Desmond Doss (Andrew Garfield), an earnest young man living in Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains as America goes to war in 1941. He’s determined to do his duty in service to his

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38 INLANDER NOVEMBER 3, 2016


Country

Rising

A reluctant country music listener and a seasoned old-school country devotee discuss the ascendance of alt-country BY DAN NAILEN AND LAURA JOHNSON

Alt-country, led by the likes of Sturgill Simpson (above) and Jason Isbell, has made a resurgence in recent years.

J

ust last month, Americana/folk albums outsold country records on the Billboard charts. This was unprecedented, and it got us (music editor Laura Johnson and music writer Dan Nailen) thinking about the significance and rise of alt-country in the last few years. First, of course, we needed to define what the genre entails. We decided to classify altcountry as artists who aren’t necessarily affiliated with the Nashville music machine, but play music rooted in tradition. The artists should most likely have a pedal-steel guitar on at least one song. Here are some highlights from our conversation. How did you first get into country music? DAN NAILEN: A natural outgrowth of my musical upbringing. My dad loved old, traditional country like Johnny Cash. My older sister turned an adolescent me on to punk, introducing the likes of the Minutemen, the Replacements and X to my Top 40-fied ears. Both genres’ best artists appealed to me through ways the pop music of my youth couldn’t: Authenticity. Rebelliousness. LAURA JOHNSON: One of my best friends liked country.

In college, we went on this road trip across Texas, her home state, and she swore I’d be a country music fan by the end of it. But by the time we’d gone through the Garth Brooks Greatest Hits box set twice, I still didn’t get the appeal. DN: As I got older and came to appreciate songcraft more — still infused with attitude, but now including some fiddles and pedal-steel — I was hooked. Having folks like Neko Case, Old 97s and Jason Isbell considered “alt-country” doesn’t hurt. LJ: That trip also included spins of my favorites, Johnny Cash and Avett Brothers, but I didn’t see the connection. I was in denial. Growing up, I always knew people who liked country, and I thought the whole thing was awful. Too twangy, too boring. But now years later, I’ve had to admit the truth; I like a lot of country music. Still not that plastic pop stuff, but Garth Brooks’ “That Summer”? Finally, I get it. I’m there. What does alt-country’s rise to the top say about the country genre? LJ: What we’re seeing here is country music starting to appeal ...continued on next page

RETO STERCHI PHOTO

REQUIRED LISTENING

Perhaps you’re new to country music as well. Here are some of our favorite alt-country/ Americana albums that can serve as a gateway to the genre. DAN’S PICKS -Still Feel Gone, Uncle Tupelo (1991) -Heartbreaker, Ryan Adams (2000) -Car Wheels on a Gravel Road, Lucinda Williams (1998) -The Blasters, The Blasters (1981) LAURA’S PICKS -The Second Gleam EP, The Avett Brothers (2008) -The David Mayfield Parade, The David Mayfield Parade (2010) -Big Day in a Small Town, Brandy Clark (2016) -The Complete Trio Collection, Dolly Parton, Emmylou Harris and Linda Ronstadt (2016)

NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 39


MUSIC | COUNTRY “COUNTRY RISING,” CONTINUED... to a new generation of folks who thought they didn’t like country. That Chris Stapleton’s Traveller was a best-selling album, not only on the charts but also iTunes, proves that a wider audience and younger generation is getting into a more old-school style of country. DN: There’s always been some division between country insiders and outsiders. Willie Nelson basically failed when he first went to Nashville, so he scurried to Texas and became a legend of so-called “outlaw country.” Nashville is an industry town, and artists who couldn’t make a lot of money for the industry weren’t readily embraced, so they had to find an alternative means to pursue their art. LJ: I have this theory that fans start to like country music after they’ve exhausted the punk and heavy rock phases of their music life. Perhaps you get older and wiser. You’re OK thinking about husbands and kids and things that country outsiders like Jason Isbell or Sturgill Simpson are singing about. And that these guys aren’t played on Top 40 country radio is especially appealing. DN: It’s true for rock and punk, too — hence the once-thriving indie labels and now the rise of artists who put out music on their own. All these alt-country artists finding success are further proof that there’s an audience for quality, even if some label exec doesn’t hear a hit, or picture them filling arenas. Does the genre have legs? Will country ever fall out of favor? DN: The alt-country artists might never get bigger than they are now, but they’ll never go away. The younger artists can look at people like Lucinda Williams or Dwight Yoakam and see people making great records decades into their careers, playing to enthusiastic crowds. The venues might only seat 500 or 1,000 instead of the 10,000 at Carrie Underwood, but an artist can make a good living playing to 1,000 people every night. And for the fans, obviously the experience of seeing a favorite artist in that size venue is way better. I believe that’s called a “win-win.” LJ: There are real cowboys in the Inland Northwest, the people for whom this music was originally made. Places like the Eagles Clubs and Airway Heights’ Buckhorn Inn feature old-school country acts and dance nights. The local Spokane indie music scene is also a good indicator of what’s going on in the national scene at large. Five years ago, folk music was quite big here; now a lot of the groups are working in the electronic pop genre. But alt-country and Americana are also seeing a push with acts like the popular Marshall McLean Band and Silver Treason. Even if alt-country falls out of favor in the downtown music club scene, this is an area that will always be steeped in country music and its traditions. n

David Ramirez’s upcoming Spokane show will be a live album recording.

DAVID RAMIREZ

It’s easy to be drawn in by David Ramirez’s music, and the attraction is the sense that the characters he sketches out on albums like his excellent 2015 release Fables are quite real. Ramirez wouldn’t be able to write the way he does without first being honest with himself, something he’s come to grips with over the course of putting more than 250,000 miles on his 10-year-old Kia touring as a solo troubadour. “No one’s compelled by half the truth,” Ramirez told website The Bluegrass Situation. “You’re only compelled by the whole truth. Whenever you can put it all out there, that’s when people really change. And not just the audience — that’s when I change, when I’m able to look myself in the mirror.”

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40 INLANDER NOVEMBER 3, 2016

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Fables arrived after years touring with the likes of Gregory Alan Isakov, Shakey Graves and Joe Pug, and Ramirez is represented by Thirty Tigers, the roots-based music-management company that’s helped the likes of Jason Isbell and Sturgill Simpson into the public consciousness. With a little luck, Ramirez will also soon enjoy the high profile his songwriting deserves. His current tour might help; every ticket sold includes a live recording of the show. — DAN NAILEN David Ramirez • Wed, Nov. 9, at 8 pm • $13/$15 day of • Allages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • the bartlettspokane. com • 747-2174

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The 38-year-old Kentuckian doesn’t care what Nashville elites think.

RETO STERCHI PHOTO

STURGILL SIMPSON

With A Sailor’s Guide to Earth, singer-songwriter Sturgill Simpson welcomes his newborn son to planet Earth over nine sweeping tracks. But others found meaning in the songs, too. Not only did the April release, Simpson’s first on a major label (Atlantic), hit No. 1 on the Billboard charts (in the country, folk and rock categories), but the alt-country/Americana sensation has become one of the year’s rising music stars. All of this was achieved with little to no country radio support — in fact, when his hero Merle Haggard died earlier this year, Simpson took to social media to rail against the Nashville establishment exploiting Haggard’s legacy. Now, one year after playing the Knitting Factory, Simpson triumphantly returns, with his weathered voice and lush backing band in tow. With so much going on in one year, Simpson has somehow managed to stay grounded. He told the Nashville Scene last week: “If I never go beyond this phase right here, who gives a shit? I wrote a cliché, sappy record entirely and specifically for my kid, and it went to No. 1. I got no complaints, man.” — LAURA JOHNSON Sturgill Simpson with the London Souls • Wed, Nov. 9, at 8 pm • $29.50 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

WSU_TrevorNoah_102716_9U_EW.pdf

NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

REGGAE DIRTY HEADS

T

his is the kind of positive, beach-vibe music they say we need more of in this world. These Southern California dudes aren’t pretending to offer some enlightened reason for existence; instead, their feel-good reggae/hip-hop/rock tunes are all about having a great time. Started by friends Dustin Bushnell (vocals/guitar) and Jared Watson (vocals) back in 2003, this crew’s new self-titled album expounds upon what they’ve always held dear: Chilling with friends and family, experimenting and experiencing (check out the singles “That’s All I Need” and “Oxygen” for reference). The five-piece often tours with like-minded acts Sublime with Rome and Tribal Seeds, but next week they headline their own Knitting Factory show. — LAURA JOHNSON Dirty Heads with New Beat Fund and RDGLDGRN • Tue, Nov. 8, at 8 pm • $25 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 11/03

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Fireside Music feat. Bill Bozly BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE, Sunny Nights Duo J THE BIG DIPPER, Elephant Gun Riot & guests J BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Randy Campbell acoustic show BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen BUCKHORN INN, The Spokane River Band J CHAPS, Spare Parts COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny CRAVE, DJ Freaky Fred FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Dan Conrad FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho THE JACKSON ST., Ray Vasquez J KNITTING FACTORY, Steel Panther, Future Villians, Invasive J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Jay Condiotti J MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE, Open Mic hosted by Scott Reid O’SHAYS IRISH PUB & EATERY, Open mic with Adrian and Leo THE OBSERVATORY, Vinyl Meltdown J THE PALOMINO, Open Mic THE RESERVE, Bellydancing Performances feat. Safar RIVELLE’S RIVER GRILL, Truck Mills and special guests Jam Night J SPOKANE ARENA, Five Finger Death Punch, Shinedown with special guests SIXX:A.M., As Lions J THE PIN!, The Last Ten Seconds of Life, Traitors, Spite, Zero TIMBER GASTRO PUB, Jacob Cummings

42 INLANDER NOVEMBER 3, 2016

ALT-ROCK ANGWISH

T

his indie group seemingly is always on tour. Right now they’re hustling around the country touting their aptly titled album United States of Angwish to as many people as possible, and they’re booked well into 2017. A local favorite in their hometown of Charlotte, North Carolina, Angwish has been assaulting eardrums since the late 1990s, when they were Bryan Bielanski’s (guitars/vocals) pet project. Now adding drummer Bethany Graham to the mix, the duo employs a thick, grungy sound through the use of various effect pedals and amplifiers. Their new album was produced by Steve Albini (who made albums with Nirvana, the Breeders and Pixies) and of their entire catalog, it’s far and away the most cohesive and solid. One night after this show, Angwish plays the One World Cafe in Moscow. — LAURA JOHNSON Angwish with Incidia and Burning Clean • Thu, Nov. 10, at 7 pm • $5/$8 day of • All-ages • The Palomino • 6425 N. Lidgerwood • spokanepalomino.com • 242-8907 ZOLA, Andy Hackbarth Band

Friday, 11/04

12 TRIBES RESORT CASINO, Fred Bauer Band ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Fireside Music feat. Ron Greene BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Stubborn Son, Bullets or Balloons, Wayward West BIGFOOT PUB, Tracer BOLO’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Michael Thomas THE CELLAR, Eric Neuhausser CLEARWATER RIVER CASINO, Al Stewart, Gary Wright COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Bill Bozly

CURLEY’S, Phoenix FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Tommy G FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Loose Gazoonz IRON HORSE BAR, Gladhammer THE JACKSON ST., The Sidemen JOHN’S ALLEY, Left Coast Country and the Dodgy Mountain Men J KNITTING FACTORY, Aaron Lewis KOOTENAI RIVER BREWING CO., Shiloh Rising J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Pamela Benton LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil MICKDUFF’S BREWING COMPANY, Devon Wade MOOSE LOUNGE, Cary Fly Band MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Rusty Jackson J NECTAR TASTING ROOM, Just Plain

Darin NODLAND CELLARS TASTING ROOM, Jan Harrison, Eugene Jablonsky, Barry Aiken NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Patrick J THE OBSERVATORY, Observatory’s 1st Bday feat. Headwaves, The Magpies, Tiny Plastic Stars PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Ron Keiper PEND OREILLE PLAYHOUSE, Open Mic POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Daniel Mills J PROHIBITION GASTROPUB, Mary Chavez THE RESERVE, Charlie Butts and the Filter Tips THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling

Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler J THE SHOP, DJ Teej SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, First Friday feat. Karrie O’Neill J THE PIN!, Life Lessons, Mariner, Boat Race Weekend, 37 Street Signs, the Drag THE ROADHOUSE, Bobby Patterson Band VICTORY SPORTS HALL, Hannah Rebecca ZOLA, Raggs Gustaffe and Bush Doktor

Saturday, 11/05 12 TRIBES RESORT CASINO, The Company Band


ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Fireside Music feat. Jacob Cummings BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE, Daniel Mills  THE BARTLETT, The South Hill, Feral Anthem, Mikey Zlotkowski BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BIGFOOT PUB, Tracer BOLO’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE  BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Express Yourself THE CELLAR, Eric Neuhausser COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Bill Bozly CRAFTSMAN CELLARS, Nick Grow CURLEY’S, Phoenix FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Carli Osika FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Loose Gazoonz HOGFISH, Bullets or Balloons, Bird Fight, Dead See Squirrels  HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET, Just Plain Darin IRON HORSE BAR, Gladhammer THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave JOHN’S ALLEY, Trio Subtonic aith Michal Angela  KNITTING FACTORY, Fallout Music Festival feat. Cattywomp, Thunder Knife, New Couch party, Nothern Crush, All But Lost, Sins and Sinners, Over Sea, Over Stone, LA ROSA CLUB, Open Jam LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Karrie O’Neill MICKDUFF’S BREWING COMPANY, Bringing It Back to the Blues feat. Kevin Doran and Peter Hicks MOOSE LOUNGE, Cary Fly Band MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Truck Mills NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ

Patrick  THE OBSERVATORY, Observatory’s 1st Bday feat. Cathedral Pearls, Wind Hotel THE PALOMINO, The Veer Union, Days of Heaven (late show) PATIT CREEK CELLARS, Dave McRae  THE PEARL THEATER, Bluestreak THE RESERVE, Hot Club of Spokane RICO’S, Odd Bird Blues THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler  THE SHOP, Dave McRae THE PEARL, RedHead, DJ K-Phi ZOLA, Raggs Gustaffe and Bush Doktor

Sunday, 11/06

COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh COMMUNITY BUILDING, Standing Rock Benefit Show DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open jam NORTHERN ALES, Ty Herndon Unplugged O’DOHERTY’S IRISH GRILLE, Live Irish Music  THE OBSERVATORY, The Appleseed Cast, Ampersand, DEER  THE PIN!, Michale Graves (MISFITS), Deadones USA, Ricky Deschamp ZOLA, Bucket List

Monday, 11/07

 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic

EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with MJ The In-Human Beatbox ZOLA, Kellen Rowe

Tuesday, 11/08

BABY BAR, Open mic THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave KELLY’S IRISH PUB, Arvid Lundin and Deep Roots  KNITTING FACTORY, Dirty Heads (see story on facing page), New Beat Fund, RDGLDGRN LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday MICKDUFF’S BREWING COMPANY, Open mic with Doug Bond MIK’S, DJ Brentano  MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP, Dan Maher  POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE (SOUTH HILL), DJ Charley THE RESERVE, Deschamp’s Artist Showcase THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Jam night with Gil Rivas THE PEARL, T.A.S.T.Y with DJs Freaky Fred, Beauflexx ZOLA, Bucket List

Wednesday, 11/09  THE BARTLETT, David Ramirez live recording (See story on page 39)  THE BIG DIPPER, Roger Clyne and PH Naffah, Buffalo Jones Duo acoustic GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES, Open Mic with T & T THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave

 KNITTING FACTORY, Sturgill Simpson (See story on page 39), The London Souls THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, DJ Lydell LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LITZ’S BAR & GRILL, Nick Grow LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 RED ROOM LOUNGE, Hip Hop Is A Culture THE RESERVE, EDM Wednesdays with DJs Ayzim, Radikill, Gestut THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Piano Bar with Christan Raxter SAPPHIRE LOUNGE, Just Plain Darin THE PIN!, DJ Freaky Fred THE ROADHOUSE, Open mic with Vern Vogel and the Volcanoes ZOLA, The Bossame

Coming Up ...

THE ROADHOUSE, Inland Empire Blues Society Awards feat. Tommy Hogan Band, Eric Rice, Nov. 10  THE PALOMINO, Angwish (See story on facing page), Burning Clean, Incidia, Nov. 10 SPOKANE ARENA, Florida Georgia Line with Granger Smith, Chris Lane, Nov. 10 THE BARTLETT, Tyrone Wells, Tony Lucca, Nov. 11 KNITTING FACTORY, Yelawolf, Bubba Sparxxx, Jelly Roll, Struggle Jennings, Nov. 11 THE HIVE, Polyrhythmics, Nov. 11 THE PALOMINO, Rock For a Cause feat. Helldorado, Dysfunktynal Kaor, Catalyst, Ragtag Romantics, Deschamp and more, Nov. 12

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N Liberty Lake Rd, Liberty Lake • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CALYPSOS • 116 E Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208665-0591 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • (208) 773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 THE JACKSON ST. • 2436 N. Astor • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N Market St, Mead • 4669918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LOON LAKE SALOON • 3996 Hwy. 292 • 233-2738 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S• 312 N First Ave., Sandpoint • (208) 255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • (208) 265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-6647901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • (208) 765-3200 x310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR• 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY• 15 S Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO • 6425 N Lidgerwood St • 242-8907 THE PEARL • 23 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RESERVE • 120 N. Wall • 598-8783 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside . • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S• 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • (208) 930-0381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 43


Mateusz Wolski, principal violinist for the Spokane Symphony, is set to play at the Symphony’s first Intersect performance.

CLASSICAL CHINESE INTERSECTION

Formerly known as Symphony with a Splash, the Spokane Symphony’s new Intersect program works to introduce a new generation to classical music by bringing together a mix of local art forms in one concert. The first of these events kicks off this weekend with the symphony playing multiple modern Chinese and Chinese American composers’ works, including Chen Yi’s “YangKo” from Chinese Folk Dance Suite (movement 2) and Zhou Tian’s A Thousand Years of Good Prayers. To balance that, the concert ends with Mozart’s grandiose Jupiter symphony. Before the symphony’s hour-long performance, concertgoers are invited to sample Chinese cuisine created by local chef Jeremy Hansen. A three-course tasting is $15, or $10 with an Intersect series subscriber. — LAURA JOHNSON Intersect: From China to America, with the Spokane Symphony • Fri, Nov. 4, at 8 pm • $25 • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

44 INLANDER NOVEMBER 3, 2016

COMEDY DAD GETS TOPICAL

FOOD SWEET TOOTH SATISFACTION

Trevor Noah • Fri, Nov. 4, at 7 pm • $56.50 • Beasley Coliseum • 925 N. Fairway Rd. • beasley.wsu.edu • 335-3526

Decadence! Spokane Chocolate Festival • Fri, Nov. 4, from noon-9 pm • $20/$25 day of; $10 “happy hour” from noon-4 pm • Chateau Rive at the Flour Mill • 621 W. Mallon • decadencespokane. com

You have to give Washington State University credit for booking South African stand-up Trevor Noah as the featured performer for Dad’s Weekend in Pullman. It would be easy to just book some classic-rock fixture to please the old dudes in the audience, but the occasionally edgy host of The Daily Show is a great choice, given his undeniable skill as a stand-up comic that helped him land one of the highest-profile gigs on television, and due to the rapidly impending (thank God) Election Day just four days after the show. I imagine that Noah will have a few things to say about this year’s candidates. — DAN NAILEN

The inaugural Decadence! Chocolate festival offers everything even a casual chocolate connoisseur could desire, from tastings to chocolate-themed art to wine-and-chocolate pairing classes and more. The festival admission lets you sample something from every vendor on site, including the Melting Pot, Sweet P Cupcakes, Roast House, Dove Chocolate and the Scoop. A portion of the event proceeds are being donated to Inland NW Baby, an organization that helps local children living in poverty. — EMILY GOODELL


Mind, Body, Spirit Holistic Fair Presents:

“Mindful Living” Sat, Nov 5th • 10am-5pm Free event - Free parking

WORDS RHYME MASTER

Known for his skill at making children chuckle, Kenn Nesbitt is a former U.S. Children’s Poet Laureate and Spokane native whose collections include My Hippo Has the Hiccups and The Armpit of Doom. This Friday night, bring your kids out for a reading from his newest collection, One Minute till Bedtime: 60-Second Poems to Send You off to Sleep, which features new works by beloved children’s authors across the country. Local poet Chris Cook and children’s author Verla Kay plan to join Nesbitt to read their contributions to the book. — HAYLEE MILLIKAN

40 Vendors and 9 Educational Speakers

Unity Spiritual Center ON THE SOUTH HILL (29TH & BERNARD)

Please visit us on Facebook

/MindBodySpiritHolisticFairs

Kenn Nesbitt book launch • Sat, Nov. 5, at 7 pm • Free • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main • auntiesbooks.com • 838-0206

COMMUNITY IT’S ALMOST OVER

No matter who you voted for or who wins, election night is not complete without parties on all sides. This Tuesday evening, the Spokane County GOP hosts a culmination event with Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers at the Davenport Grand Hotel (333 W. Spokane Falls Blvd., starts at 6 pm); meanwhile, the Spokane County Democrats set up shop at the Lincoln Center (1316 N. Lincoln; starts at 4:30 pm). Friends of the Libertarian Party of Spokane County can meet at the Post Street Ale House (1 N. Post; starts at 7 pm). All of the aforementioned events are free to attend, with various snacks and libations available and the important opportunity to socialize/commiserate with like-minded folks as results roll in. Bring your tissues and your party hats — you never know who may win! — HAYLEE MILLIKAN Spokane Democrats info at bit.ly/2et317W • GOP Celebration with Cathy McMorris Rodgers info at bit.ly/2eglBm2 • Libertarians of Spokane County info at bit.ly/2et5q2y

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

DIRTY MARTINIS FOR CLEAN WATER The 10th annual fundraiser for the Spokane Riverkeeper features live entertainment, martinis, beer, wine and appetizers, raffles and the presentation of the Mike Chappell River Hero Award. Nov. 4, 5-8 pm. $45-$50. Hamilton Studio, 1427 W. Dean. cforjustice. org/dirty-martinis-for-clean-water MOBIUS ANNUAL GALA An evening of celebration including food, libations, and a live auction. Also, experience the “Bodies Human” exhibit in the science center’s new location. Nov. 4, 6:30 pm. $75/person. Mobius Science Center, 331 N. Post. mobiusspokane.org 4TH ANNUAL BLACK CAT BUNCO The evening features a potato bar dinner, silent auction, a game of Bunco with

prizes and more. Proceeds benefit Purrs4Life, a cat rescue and sanctuary. Doors at 3:30 pm. Nov. 5, 4-9 pm. $25. Silver Lake Mall, 200 W. Hanley Ave. purrs4life.org/bunco (208-771-4141) EPIC BEARD COMPETITION Spokane Beard & Mustache’s fifth annual event, benefiting River’s Wish Animal Sanctuary. With 11 categories, a raffle and karaoke party to follow. Doors at 4, competition at 5:30 pm. Nov. 5, 5:30 pm-12:30 am. $20/competitors, $10/ spectators. The Pin!, 412 W. Sprague Ave. bit.ly/2d3CMZ8 (768-2071) HELPING CHILDREN FIND ADOPTIVE HOMES A workshop for which 15 percent of the proceeds benefit Northwest Adoption Exchange. Nov. 5, 12-2 and 3-5 pm. $15. Beyond Beads North, 7452 N. Division. (482-0674)

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NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 45


W I SAW U YOU

RS RS

CHEERS JEERS

&

at Huckleberrys while we wait for our laundry next week? Email if you’re interested spokaneman509@gmail.com I SAW WHAT YOU WROTE PLEASE don’t close yourself off to those around you. Loss is never easy; especially when it is unexpected. Betrayal is not easy, either, especially when you put so much trust in that person, but please, don’t let that make you shut your heart. It is okay to guard your heart from anger, bitterness, resentment and callousness, yes. But it is unhealthy to keep chains around it so much that you never allow another person to enter. ou are closing yourself off to new possibilities, opportunities and friendships when you do this. Please open up your heart.

CHEERS

I SAW YOU BEST YEAR EVER Guacamole — thanks for an amazing year full of love, laughter and shenanigans. I couldn’t ask for a better person to spend my days with. Here’s to many more years to come — CHEERS! Love, Cinnamonizy. YOU ARE HANDSOME, BTW To the complimentary gentleman that made my day. You averted a 6 pack on the floor disaster in the beer aisle at Rosauers on 29th. 400ish on 10/26. You ended up behind me in the checkout line... with “ you’re pretty by the way”. I just hoping I answered graciously as I was really caught off guard. I thank you kindly! If you would like to reply-fdm@ dennisuniform.com THE REAL SPOKANE CELEBRITIES Nico and Joey, you often speak of Spokane celebrities on your podcast, but you two are the real Spokane celebrities (Matt too). Your podcast will put Spokane on the map in the podcast world. Even though the sound quality isn’t always the best, your podcast is and will continue to be “Ultra Successful” in our hearts. SOUTH HILL LAUNDRY MAT I saw you at Thompsons Laundry Mat next to Huckleberrys Saturday morning 10/29. You were doing laundry while your daughter waited patiently. I was the long haired guy who sat by your daughter while we were waiting. Anyway you had a really pretty smile and I’d like to buy you a coffee, maybe

IN THE HEADLIGHTS To all my neighbors in Nine Mile Falls: THANK YOU for slowing down, dimming your brights, and giving me wide berth when passing me as I run along Charles Road in the evening. Since there’s no sidewalk or shoulder, I depend upon your courtesy for my safety. And for those who accelerate as you approach, keeping your high-beams on to burn out my eyes, and seeing how close you can get to me without actually hitting me, you must be from out of town — I can’t imagine the locals being so rude!! I always run outside the white line, opposite the flow of traffic, and with my LED light vest on to indicate my presence. Please remember that we all share the road. My family and I appreciate it! HEY THERE, STARFISH You are a shooting star of a girl and have destroyed me with your big blue eyes, roller skates, and intimate knowledge of the Star Wars extended universe. Let’s move into a sailboat and travel the world. I love you! VIGILANT PASSERBY Cheers to an alert passerby for protecting me and warding off a shoplifter in the parking lot of a grocery store at 3rd & Maple. This occurred toward the end of this summer. A tall, shady individual wheeled out a shopping cart containing over $100 worth of merchandise without paying for it. I approached him and he pulled out a billy club and proceeded to lunge at me while screaming manic, violent threats. Just as I was about to be struck by

the club, you swerved into the far right lane on Maple and jumped out of your truck. You confronted him: “if you wanna hit someone, hit me. I’m sick and tired of tweakers in Spokane. If you’re such a (expletive) badass, come on, take a swing. Leave this guy the (expletive) alone.” I thank you for courageously preventing what had the potential to be a brutal assault. I owe you a beer! I mean it. MY LOVE... To my husband of 5+ years who laughs when I tell people we’ve actually

garage to match the key to the correct vehicle. You left them in my door handle along with a brief note. As usual, I was in a huge rush that day and you saved me so much time and grief. Thank you so much kind stranger! HELLO BATMAN So much time passing since last visit to the Batcave. Hoping the Cat woman isn’t scratching too much after overdosing on the catnip. Leaving the light on always. Love you still.

prepared and I have paid to enjoy. Use it for social engagements perhaps, but not on the job. No one else likes it as much as you do. DRUNK AND ENTITLED Jeers to the drunk GU student that was harassing McDonald’s workers on mission and Hamilton who had to close their walk up window due to being understaffed and and harassed by other drunk patrons. If you didn’t look enough like a jackass just by having a Minions onesie on, knocking over the garbage can and

Okay... your jokes are a little weak... and you don’t share my love of yard work... but I can’t imagine my life without you.

been married for 30 years. I mean this in a good way. I would like to think we will have 30+ years but because we found each other later in life that may not be possible. You are my greatest love, my best friend, my pillow sharer, my rock. 5 short years packed with 30 years of experiences. I can honestly say I love you more today than I ever thought posssible. Okay... your jokes are a little weak... and you don’t share my love of yard work... but I can’t imagine my life without you. Plus, you do give me the best foot rubs. As my parents use to say “Grow old (er) with me; the best is yet to be”. MILKSHAKE HERO Cheers to the funny employee at Jack in the Box who took my order in a funny voice and made me laugh. Then when I got to the window to pick up the yay it’s finally Friday chocolate milkshake I was craving and realized my wallet was in my diaper bag he gave me the milkshake anyway and said “see you next time”. I’ll definitely go back — and have my wallet. Thanks for your kindness! GOOD SAMARITAN I am so grateful to the person who took the time to not only pick up my keys from the elevator, but instead of turning them in to security, went one step better and went through the parking

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

LOCAL BUSINESSES’ GOOD GUYS TO THE RESCUE Cheers: to Dan of Superior Towing and to Jeremy of Muffler Mart who rescued me from exhaust fumes. When my car started making noises I stopped by Superior Towing, which was in the area, to ask if I needed a tow. Dan came out determined I had an exhaust leak and needed to get to Muffler Mart for a look see, driving with my windows down in the rain, so I didn’t pass out. Jeremy greeted me with a smile, and said he’d take a look, putting my car on the lift right away. My car had a missing bolt, which came off causing the trouble. After telling me that, he had it fixed in a couple of minutes. I was on my way! Thanks again Dan and Jeremy. You are great examples of skilled and concerned local business owners, looking out for people and representing your businesses and Spokane with class and integrity.

JEERS OVERWHELMING PERFUMES Please.... food servers please stop with the perfume. Perfume was created to cover body odors when daily bathing was unavailable. Your overwhelming use of perfume destroys the taste and smell of the food the kitchen has

walking away sure made you look like one. What you should have done instead was to pop the lid off and jump inside because you are trash. RE: JEERS TO UR CHEATIN MAN Despite your bad, bad grammar I think I know the bald jerk. I have had my suspicions about him. Can you give initials? A clue? There are a lot of a$$holes that work at that restaurant. Is this one a Jr with a 10+year marriage and a daughter? Does McKenzie know? 

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS H O T R A N S A T A U N A O R E S N O M A T P P A T E R Y D Y S E P T S H A M T O R E A N E T L E S S

O R T H

D I S C H Y E N D F A R S T O S E A E R R P O O D U E S D E

S H O O O O M P A L O O M P A

D U J O U R

S P O O O L L S E

H I E R O

I M N T G S Z I T O

E C H O

A M A D

C A L L T O O R D E A R D E S A L L O

D A T E A N D T I M E

I N I A N G

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Brought to you by Craft Show Mavens

Indie Artisan & Craft Show

Vintage Winter Wonderland

Evening with the Artisans FRIDAY NOV 11, 2016 $12 • 5:30pm - 9:00pm Tickets include Saturday

Shopping, Sweet Treats, Cozy Cocktails & Live Music

Show Day

SATURDAY NOV 12, 2016 $4 • 9:00am - 5:30pm

9th & Walnut • Benefitting Spokane Women’s Club

46 INLANDER NOVEMBER 3, 2016

TURNING ONE! ANNIVERSARY WEEKEND

8

S

BAND

C R O S S E D E Y E S

IRON GOART! VE TAP TAKEO

EPIC B MEET & EARD GR FRI 7PMEET

15 S. HOWARD • OPEN 3PM-2AM EVERYDAY • OBSERVATORYSPOKANE.COM


EVENTS | CALENDAR PIECES OF FASHION, WALKING TALL FOR AUSTISM The inaugural evening of fashion benefits The ISAAC Foundation. Nov. 5, 7 pm. $15-$35. The Palomino, 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. bit.ly/2c8vgb3 SPOKANE ARTS AWARDS & COSTUME BALL Come as you are, or dressed as your favorite arts icon, and celebrate local arts heroes as they receive awards. Also includes dancing, poetry performances, music, catering and dancing all night with DX Pryme. Ages 21+. Nov. 5, 6:30-11 pm. $25-$35. Washington Cracker Co. Building, 304 W. Pacific. bit. ly/2eNOyTV (321-9614) STANDING ROCK BENEFIT SHOW An event to collect supplies and raise money for Standing Rock by offering a space where locals can spread awareness, share words, music, voices and emotions in an open mic format. Also features music by Portland band Dogtooth & Nail. Nov. 6, 7-9 pm. $5 suggested donation. Community Building, 35 W. Main. (551-4231) WE ARE LCS This year’s benefit luncheon spotlights Lutheran Community Services SAFeT Advocacy program, with remarks from the organizations leaders. No cost to attend, but guests will be invited to support the nonprofit’s programs with a donation. Nov. 6, 12:30 pm. Mukogawa Institute, 4000 W. Randolph Rd. (343-5020)

COMEDY

TONY HINCHCLIFFE Tony’s first comedy special “ONE SHOT” is due for release January 15 on Netflix. Nov. 2-5, 8 pm; also Nov. 4-5, 10:30 pm. $10-$22. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (318-9998) AFTER DARK An adult-rated version of the Blue Door’s monthly, Friday show; on the first and last Friday of the month, at 10 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com BLACK SHEEP COMEDY NIGHT Hosted by Ken McComb, featuring Steve Johnson, Mika Lahman, Ryan McComb, Jesse Burtt and Michael Evans. Nov. 4, 8 pm. $5/$10. The Palomino, 6425 N. Lidgerwood. spokanepalomino.com COMEDY NIGHT AT THE INN Friday night (Nov. 4) headliners are Rick D’Elia and Sam Norton; Saturday night (Nov. 5) headliner is Alvin Williams, with Scott Losse. Ages 21+. Show at 8 pm, doors open at 7. $15. Best Western CdA, 506 W. Appleway Ave. (208-765-3200) COMEDY NIGHT AT THE PANIDA Michael Glatzmeier’s “Mostly Improvised” is a musical comedy show that takes suggestions from the audience and turns them into songs on the spot. Also features live improv by Phillip Kopczynski. Nov. 4, 8-10:15 pm. $12. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org TREVOR NOAH The Daily Show host performs live for WSU Dad’s Weekend. Nov. 4, 7 pm. $51.50-$56.50. Beasley Coliseum, 925 NE Fairway Rd. beasley. wsu.edu (509-335-3525) SAFARI: Fast-paced, short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Recommended for ages 16+) Saturdays at 8 pm, through Dec. 17. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) COMEDY/IMPROV SHOW Featuring Michael Glatzmaier’s songs based on audience suggestions, with opener Phillip Kopczynski. Nov. 6, 7 pm. $6. Republic Brewing Co., 26 N. Clark Ave.

republicbrew.com (509-775-2700) CORY MICHAELIS A regular in clubs in the Pacific Northwest, Michaelis has headlined clubs, colleges, casinos, and weird bars all over the country. Nov. 6, 8 pm. $10-$16. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998) JAKE “THE SNAKE” ROBERTS The WWE Hall of Fame wrestler presents his UnSpokeN WorD TouR, unleashing his road stories and locker room antics and pranks he played on his opponents. Nov. 7, 8 pm. $22-$28. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998) SPOKANE COMEDY’S STANDUP SHOWDOWN Comedians get a topic and have four minutes to perform; the crowd then votes for a winner. Tuesdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The Observatory, 15 S. Howard. (598-8933)

COMMUNITY

HOLOCAUST SURVIVOR & RESISTANCE FIGHTER Carla P. shares her incredible story of survival and resistance in Holland during the Holocaust. Nov. 3, 7 pm. Free, registration required. Trent Elementary School, 3303 N. Pines Rd. AFTER HOURS AT THE LIBRARY Listen to local authors while enjoying complimentary refreshments and learning more about the Friends of the Spokane County Library District, the programs it supports with the funds we raise, and how to become a member. Nov. 4, 7-9 pm. Free and open to the public. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. FAMILY DANCE & POTLUCK Easy-tolearn folk dances are taught by Susan Dankovich, accompanied by live music. No partners or experience required. Potluck at 6:30 pm with dance starting at 7. First Friday of the month, from 6:30-8 pm. Free, donations accepted. Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist, 127 E. 12th Ave. (533-9955) HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR Featuring regionally-produced handcrafted products. A portion of all sales benefits the Friends of the Coeur d’Alene Public Library. Nov. 4-5. Free admission. CdA Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org (208-769-2315) JUBILEE INTERNATIONAL MARKETPLACE Spokane’s annual sale of fairlytraded handcrafts from around the world, featuring 30+ groups who work directly with the artisans in Guatemala, Nepal, Thailand, Ethiopia, Kenya, Mexico, Peru and Chile. Nov. 4, 10 am-7 pm and Nov. 5, 9 am-4 pm Free admission. First Presbyterian Church, 318 S. Cedar St. spokanefpc.org (981-7143) LEVELUP OPEN HOUSE A celebration of the library’s new, public coworking space. SPL is the second public library in the country to offer this service. Nov. 4, 10 am-6 pm. Free and open to the public. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org ST. JOHN’S LUTHERAN BAZAAR The annual bazaar/rummage sale offers baked goods, German foods, crafts, a raffle and more. Nov. 4, 9 am-8 pm and Nov. 5, 9 am-4 pm. St. John’s Lutheran Church (Medical Lake), 223 S. Hallett Rd. (299-4114) CENTRAL LUTHERAN SCANDINAVIAN BAZAAR Items for sale include Scandinavian food specialties, plus other holiday cookies, meatballs and crafts. Proceeds from this event are given back to the community through local charities. A “Kaffe Stua” (Norwegian coffee hour)

Spokane Valley Heritage Museum is also held from 9-11 am. Nov. 5, 9 am-1 pm. Free. Central Lutheran Church, 512 S. Bernard. clspokane.org (624-9233) EASTERN WASHINGTON GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY Local historian Larry Cebula presents “Spokane History, a New Way to Share Local History.” Social time at 12:30; meeting at 1 pm. Nov. 5, 12:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main. ewgsi.org THE NORTHWEST UNDERGRADUATE CONFERENCE IN THE HUMANITIES The Humanities Division of North Idaho College invites undergraduate students from all two and four year institutions in Idaho, Washington, Montana, and Oregon to present their work in the humanities. Includes a presentation by Spokane author Jess Walter. Nov. 5, 5:30 pm. Free and open to the public. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu (208-769-7750) STARTUP WEEKEND BOOT CAMP Chris Wood of TenX facilitates this 3-hour event and teaches how to pitch your Startup Idea, form a team, create a minimum viable product, and present to judges. Nov. 5, 4-7 pm. Free. Toolbox, 840 E. Spokane Falls Blvd. (981-6446) UNITED METHODIST WOMEN’S BAZAAR Offering crafts, books, “Precious pass-ons,” baked goods, a raffle, lunch and homemade apple dumplings. Nov. 5, 9 am-3 pm. Free. Audubon Park United Methodist Church, 3908 N. Driscoll Blvd. audubonparkumc.org (325-4541) DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD LIVE! The legacy of the beloved “Mister Rogers” lives on with the series from The Fred Rogers Company, airing daily on PBS KIDS. Nov. 10, 6:30 pm. $20$50. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) STARTUP WEEKEND SPOKANE The 54-hour competition invites innovative individuals to create business ideas. Open to developers, designers, marketers, students, attorneys and anyone else. Nov. 11-13. $50 (students/ military) $89 (General Admission). Gonzaga Jepson Center, 502 E. Boone. startupweekendspokane.com

presents the 12th Annual

Heritage Program

Electric Transportation Early 1900s

Presented By Charles Mutschler, EWU History Professor

Festivities include a silent auction, luncheon & music!

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FILM

CHINA ON FILM SERIES A series presented by Lindaman Chair Anthony E. Clark, showcasing films that represent China’s angst and acceptance during decades of transition. Nov. 3, at 6:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Whitworth, 300 W. Hawthorne. (777-4368) SANDPOINT FILM FESTIVAL Presenting short films from countries around the globe in the categories of animation, documentary and narrative. Nov. 5, 11 am-9 pm. $8/$20. Panida Theater, 300 N. First. sandpointfilmfestival.com DISABILITY AWARENESS FILM FEST The festival hosts screenings of a different film(s) each month; see website for titles/descriptions. Nov. 9, Dec. 7, Jan. 18, Feb. 15 at noon. Free. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. bit. ly/1SiBHKi (208-665-4520)

FOOD

FIRST THURSDAY WINE TASTING Chatneuf-du-Pape, Gamay and Marsanne wines are paired with small plates. Nov. 3, 5-7 pm. $20. Petunia’s Marketplace, 2010 N. Madison St. PetuniasMarket.com (328-4257)

...continued on page 51

NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 47


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INTERNATIONAL

Killa in Manila The Philippines cracks down on cannabis and those who use it BY CONNOR DINNISON

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nd you thought things were bad in the United States. Philippine president-cum-dictator Rodrigo Duterte (nicknamed “the Punisher” for allegations that, as the mayor of Davao, he directed “death squads” to kill criminal suspects without due process) has made good on his promise to eradicate

drugs and drug users from his country. “I will not stop until the last pusher on the streets is fully exterminated,” he said last month. “I will kill all the drug lords. Make no bones about it.” Police and vigilantes, with the president’s support (“If you know of any addicts, go ahead and kill them yourself,” he told a

crowd in Manila after his election in May), have committed nearly 3,500 extrajudicial killings of suspected drug traffickers so far. Hundreds of thousands of people, according to a state police report, have also “surrendered voluntarily” rather than risk being murdered for possession of methamphetamine, called shabu, or cannabis (the two most-confiscated substances during arrests). Confusingly, Duterte says he’d endorse medical marijuana if his country’s Food and Drug Administration approved of its use. “Medicinal marijuana — yes, because it is really an ingredient of modern medicine now,” he explained to reporters in May. The president’s “shoot-to-kill” policy, however, is a cornerstone of his anti-crime, peace-and-order agenda, which Filipinos have championed. But many worry, rightfully, that the strongman’s fearmongering campaign of slaughter will prove lethal to the island nation’s fragile democracy. (As recently as 1986 the Philippines was ...continued on page 50

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Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte: “I will kill all the drug lords.”

“KILLA IN MANILA,” CONTINUED... ruled by the despot Ferdinand Marcos, whom Duterte has called “the best president ever.”) “We’re on a slippery slope towards tyranny,” Leila de Lima, a Filipino senator, told TIME magazine in August. She later admitted, “We now have death squads on a national scale, but I’m not seeing public outrage.” Perhaps that is because many fear the repercussions of protest. As one man anonymously revealed to the Huffington Post, “With [Duterte] as president, it’s been a reign of terror, as close as we can get to undeclared martial law. Pretty soon, this war on drugs will become a

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TASTEFUL THURSDAYS The public is invited to come enjoy live music while sampling a variety of wine, beer, and cheese from local vendors. Thursdays, from 5-7 pm, through Dec. 22 (except Nov. 24). Free. Moscow Food Co-op, 121 E. 5th St. moscowfoodcoop.com THURSDAY WINE SOCIAL The weekly complimentary wine tasting event features different themes and samples of the shop’s gourmet goods. Thursdays, from 4-6 pm. Free. Gourmet Way, 8222 N. Government Way. (208-762-1333) NORMANDY STYLE DINNER Chef Jean-Pierre teaches attendees about the Normandy region of France. Nov. 4, 6-9 pm. $40. Gourmet Way, 8222 N. Government Way. (208-762-1333) DEDADENCE! SPOKANE CHOCOLATE FESTIVAL An event featuring chocolatiers, confectioners and chefs with creations both sweet and savory. Admission includes samples from every vendor. Also enjoy local art and live music. Nov. 4, 12-9 pm. $10-$20. Chateau Rive, 621 W. Mallon. (795-2030) IVORY TABLE SUPPER CLUB Chef/ Owner Kristen Ward prepares a rustic, five-course meal that features flavors of the season; each course is specially paired with wine. Nov. 4, 6-8:30 pm. $65/person. The Ivory Table, 1822 E. Sprague. ivorytable.com (202-2901) VINO WINE TASTING Sample November’s selections from the Wine of the Month Club. Tastings include cheese and crackers. Nov. 4, 3-7:30 pm. Vino!, 222 S. Washington. (838-1229) ART AND CHOCOLATE: A chocolate tasting with lunch, alongside the current display of work by artist Jeanne Fulfs. Nov. 5, noon. $18/person. Bank Left Gallery, 100 S. Bridge St. bankleftgallery.com (509-878-8425) FARM & FOOD EXPO The day-long event includes 90+ classes on farm and homestead education tailored for small acreage farmers, garden enthusiasts and foodies. Includes an evening keynote lecture by Joel Salatin. Nov. 5, 8 am-8 pm. $100. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene. (535-7274) AKI MATSURI The 27th annual event features traditional Japanese ramen, pot stickers, various sushi and desserts. Vegetarian items also offered. See full menu and preorder online. Nov. 6, 11 am-2 pm. All food $10 or under. Spokane Buddhist Temple, 927 S. Perry St. spokanebuddhisttemple.org INDIAN CUISINE CULINARY CLASS Chef David dives into the exotic, fragrant flavors of Indian cuisine. Nov. 7, 5:30 pm. $39. Kitchen Engine, 621 W. Mallon. thekitchenengine.com CRIMSON WINE GROUP DINNER A six-course dinner, featuring wine pairings from Crimson Wine Group. Nov. 8, 6:30 pm. $95/person. Clover, 913 E. Sharp. cloverspokane.com (487-2937)

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BRAHMS REQUIEM A Spokane Choral Artists concert featuring guest pianists Carolyn Jess and David Brewster. Nov. 4, 7:30-10 pm. $12-$18. St. Stephen’s Episcopal, 5720 S. Perry. spokanechoralartists.com SPOKANE SYMPHONY INTERSECT: FROM CHINA TO AMERICA Enjoy food (from Sante Restaurant) and cocktails during a happy hour before the show, which features a program by Chinese composers along with Mozart’s Sym-

phony No. 41. Nov. 4, 5 pm. $25. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org BRAHMS REQUIEM Featuring guest pianists Carolyn Jess and David Brewster. Nov. 5, 7:30-10 pm. $12-$18. CdA First Presbyterian Church, 521 Lakeside Ave. spokanechoralartists.com FALL PERFORMATHON A recital celebrating and showcasing musicians at Holy Names Music Center. Nov. 5, 10 am-5 pm. Free. River Park Square, 808 W. Main. (326-9516) IL DIVO A concert by the multinational classical crossover vocal group. Nov. 5, 7 pm. $50-$175. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (509-279-7000) WASHINGTON IDAHO SYMPHONY The orchestra’s second concert of its 2016-17 season features a program of works by Wagner, Mendelsshon and Mozart, also showcasing Angelo Yu on violin. Nov. 5, 7:30 pm. $10-$15. U. of Idaho Admin. Bldg, 851 Campus Dr. washingtonidahosymphony.org WHITWORTH JAZZ ENSEMBLE FEAT. BRANFORD MARSALIS Concert featuring the Grammy-winning and Tonynominated saxophonist and composer. Nov. 5, 8-9:30 pm. $20-$25. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) CONCERT OF REMEMBRANCE A musical and poetic remembrance for the community on All Saints Day. Nov. 6, 3-4:30 pm. Free, donations accepted. Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist, 127 E. 12th Ave. (838-4277) SPOKANE YOUTH SYMPHONY: PRELUDE Young musicians from the Spokane area perform the first of their 2016-17 “Timeless Classics” season’s four concerts. Nov. 6, 4 pm. $12-$16. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200)

OUTDOORS

CHAMPIONS AMONG US Spokane Nordic Ski Association’s season kickoff event, with a silent auction, trivia and bison for dinner. Proceeds support development of an adaptive ski program at Mt. Spokane State Park. Nov. 5, 5:30-8:30 pm. $20. Southside Community Center, 3151 E. 27th. spokanenordic.org PRAY FOR SNOW PRESEASON BASH Throw on your retro skiwear for an evening of beer, music and prizes from top ski and snowboard brands. Free; register to save a spot. Nov. 5, 5-8 pm. REI, 1125 N. Monroe. (328-9900) WINTER SWAP New and used skis, snowboards, winter clothing and more is available at low prices. Organized/ benefiting the Lookout Pass Ski Patrol. Nov. 5, 9 am-3 pm. $5, kids under 12 free. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Gov’t Way. winterswap.org SNOWLANDER EXPO The Inlander’s annual winter sports festival offers some of the best deals of the season gear and winter apparel from local/ regional vendors. Also get season pass specials, sample 60+ beers/ciders at the PowderKeg Brewfest, and hear live music. Nov. 11, 4-8 pm and Nov. 12, 10 am-7 pm. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlanderexpo.com

NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 51


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess THE SHRINING

AMY ALKON

Six months after meeting this amazing woman — I’ll call her Ms. Perfect — I asked her to marry me. A year later, she broke off the engagement, saying, “I shouldn’t be wearing your engagement ring and noticing other men.” That was two years ago. Since then, I’ve dated three women. None came close to the high bar set by Ms. Perfect. Do I lower my standards or live the rest of my life alone? —Don’t Want To Hurt Someone Else As I Was Hurt

Endlessly replaying the memories of how perfect your ex was is a great idea — if you’re looking to grow old with a tube sock and a vat of lotion. Like most of us, you probably have the adorable idea of memory as some faithful servant, dutifully reporting what actually happened — rather than as the sneaky, ego-serving distorter it is. If memory were faithful to reality -- like a videotape -- we could just pull out, oh, “The night of January 12, 2015, with Ms. Perfect” and we’d have an accurate replay of the evening’s events, with maybe a few fuzzy bits where somebody spilled a little sangria on the tape. However, fascinating research on learning and memory by cognitive psychologist Robert Bjork finds that “using one’s memory shapes one’s memory.” Bjork explains that the more you “retrieve” something from your mind — that is, bring up the memory to replay -- the bigger and stronger it grows in your memory. In other words, retrieval is the neon-pink highlighting marker of your mind. So, you retrieve and retrieve — and remember — your ex’s heart-shaped fried eggs and that sweet thing she said while unloading the dishwasher and not being exiled to the couch or her circus-style knife throwing. Not surprisingly, no real woman can compare. And sure, maybe these women you dated weren’t right for you. But the question — with any woman — is whether she meets enough of your standards. You can’t have it all — but do you have enough of it all? You figure that out by coming up with a shortlist of minimums — standards for the stuff you absolutely can’t live without in a partner, in looks, demeanor (especially kindness), intelligence, rationality, and anything else that matters to you. Once you find someone who meets your minimums, remind yourself of the distorto job done on memory by the viewing preferences of your ego and emotions. This should help keep you from damaging your future with this new woman: “Oh…table for three?” she says. “Is somebody joining us?” You: “Just the eternal spectre of my ex.” (Uh, not the sort of threesome anyone is looking for.)

THE EAGER HAS LANDED

I’m a 26-year-old guy. In four years, I’ve taken three dozen women on one or two dates each. Without fail, I get rejected. I’ve tried changing things up — shameless flirting instead of casual small talk, etc. — but the result is always the same. I’m not some loser. I have a cool job and an active social life. But I’m the common denominator in things not working out. What am I doing wrong that I can’t even swing a third date? —Bummed Consider the fine-French-restaurant approach. Before the first course is served, the chef will sometimes send you out a tiny, delectable palate teaser, called an “amuse-bouche” (mouth amuser) — as opposed to sending out two burly waiters to hold you down and force-feed you a vat of stew. (What’s French for “fatten you up for the kill”?) In other words, chances are, your problem is one of presentation — and yours is probably dragging you across the loserhood equator from nice to needy. Granted, you won’t be every woman’s cauldron of bouillabaisse, and maybe some of your prospects were out of your league. But 36 different women? That’s three egg cartons of ladies all saying nuh-uh to a second or third date with you. And if there’s one thing that women have in common, it’s the ability to sniff out Eau Pleeeeeease, Pick Meeee! on a guy. Consider “the scarcity principle,” which, as social psychologist Robert Cialdini explains, describes how we tend to long for what’s out of reach. Try a little test: Make an effort to make much less effort. Ask women about themselves instead of trying to hard-sell them on you (either by singing your own praises or complimenting them senseless). As I often advise, keep your dates cheap, short, and local. Especially short. (Leave them wanting more instead of less.) And sure, text a woman -- once, the afternoon after, not 26 times in the 20 seconds after you drop her off. If you and a woman get into a long-distance thing, it shouldn’t be because you’ll go to jail if you violate the 100-yard rule mandated by the judge. n ©2016, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

52 INLANDER NOVEMBER 3, 2016

EVENTS | CALENDAR

THEATER

‘NIGHT MOTHER A drama that explores the contemplation of choosing one’s own destiny. Through Nov. 6, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $24-$31. Modern Theater Coeur d’Alene, 1320 E. Garden. themoderntheater.org THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW A loving homage to the classic B sci-fi film. Through Nov. 5; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Late shows Fri-Sat at 11 pm. $25. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE Tennessee Williams’ sultry story of passion revolves around faded Southern belle Blanche DuBois’ visit to her sister in a seedy section of New Orleans. Through Nov. 13, Thu-Sat at 7:30, Sun at 2 pm. $18-$27. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com THE ADDAMS FAMILY A new musical based on the single-panel gag cartoons created by Charles Addams. Through Nov. 6; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 1:30 pm. $12-$22. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N Grand. rtoptheatre.org THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE ABRIDGED An irreverent, fast-paced romp through the Bard’s plays; all 37 of them in 97 minutes. Nov. 4-20, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $13-$15. Sixth Street Theater, 212 Sixth St. sixthstreetmelodrama.com CYT SPOKANE: ELF JR. A performance by the students of Christian Youth Theater Spokane. Nov. 4-5, at 7 pm, Nov. 5 and 12-13 at 3 pm; school day performances Nov. 8-9 at 10 am and 12:30 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com HIT & RUN X The 10th and final year of Spokane playwright Sandra Hosking’s popular staged reading of short comedies by playwrights from the region. Nov. 4-6. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org MOSCOW COMMUNITY THEATRE: INSPECTING CAROL A comedic variation on the play “The Inspector General” by Nikolai Gogol. Nov. 4-13, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10-$15. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org A POTPOURRI OF PLAYS The annual production features eight short plays by playwrights from the U.S. and England, performed by a cast of 18 locals. Nov. 4, 2 pm. $10. Corbin Senior Center, 827 W. Cleveland Ave. (327-1584) SPACED OUT! Live improv comedy show performed by the Blue Door Theatre Players. Nov. 4, 11, 18, and 25, at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com STOP KISS A poignant exploration about the ways, both sudden and slow, that lives can change irrevocably. Nov. 4-13, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $15. The Modern Theater Spokane, 174 S. Howard. themoderntheater.org GIRL, AWAKE The play features girls, ages 11-16, presenting monologues and scenes involving some of the challenges that girls face around the world today. Topics include homelessness, bullying, social media, child marriage, and child labor. Nov. 5, 5:30 pm. Free. Hayden Library, 8385 N. Government Way. (208-772-5612 x 121) BEAUTIFUL: THE CAROLE KING MUSICAL The Tony- and Grammy-winning musical tells the inspiring true story of King’s remarkable rise to stardom

to become one of the most successful solo acts in popular music history. Nov. 9-13; show times vary. $32.50-$77.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. wcebroadway.com

VISUAL ARTS

JULIE GAUTIER-DOWNES: SCATTERED REMAINS A selection of photographic images captured in ghost towns across the Western U.S. and France. Through Nov. 30, open for viewing Mon-Fri, 9 am-5 pm.. Free to view. Interiors by Robin, 817 W. Garland. (327-9291) KIM LONG: “VARIOUS CURIOSITIES” Explore the imaginative flora and fauna of Kim’s latest work. Her drawings are evolving, expanding to multimedia pieces. Wonderment and joy are expressed in vivid color and whimsical subject matter. Through Nov. 16; gallery open Tue-Sat, 11 am-5 pm (until 9 pm on Nov. 4). New Moon Art Gallery, 1326 E. Sprague. newmoonartgallery.com PALOUSE WATERCOLOR SOCIUS The group founded in 1974 as a watercolor artists’ support group, and includes award-winning artists accepted into juried shows, those with work displayed in galleries or who have held solo exhibitions. Nov. 3-28; reception Nov. 6, from 1-3 pm. Gallery hours Thu-Sun, 10 am-6 pm. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org (509-229-3414) FIRST FRIDAY Art galleries and businesses across downtown Spokane and beyond host monthly receptions to showcase new displays of art. Receptions are held on the first Friday of the month, from 5-8 pm. For complete event details, the Inlander provides a comprehensive listing of all First Friday events at Inlander.com/FirstFriday. THE WELCOME & WITNESS: A PUBLIC LISTENING Veterans from the Spokane Veteran Healing Retreat, hosted by the volunteer-based nonprofit Warriors Heart to Art, share their truth in stories, songs, poetry, paintings and more. The goal is to help end their isolation by welcoming and listening to their stories. Nov. 5, 7:30 pm. Free, donations welcome. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. warriorshearttoart.org (893-4737) SAGE PAISNER: MY FAMILY IS EVERYTHING / MI FAMILIA ES TODO A solo exhibition of the contemporary artist’s photography. Nov. 8-Jan. 27; gallery open Mon-Fri, 10 am-6 pm; Sat, 10 am-2 pm. Opening reception, Nov. 8, 5-6 pm; artist lecture Nov. 8, 6-7 pm. Bryan Oliver Gallery, Whitworth, 300 W. Hawthorne Ave. (777-3258) RANGE VISITING ARTIST SERIES: JAMES BAILEY A talk by the University of Montana art professor, who founded Matrix Press, the publishing component of the print program, which brings in nationally recognized artists to collaborate in the production of limited edition prints. Artist talks: Nov. 9, 3 pm, EWU Art Auditorium; Nov. 10, 11:30 am, SFCC Bldg. 24. Panel at 6:30 pm, at Terrain (304 W. Pacific). Free. facebook.com/ range.spokane/

WORDS

MARTA MCDOWELL This lecture explores children’s author Beatrix Potter’s botanical art, the flora and horticulture that appears in her books and Potter’s own garden. Marta also shares anec-

dotes from her latest book, “All the Presidents’ Gardens: Madison’s Cabbages to Kennedy’s Roses - How the White House Grounds Have Grown with America.” Nov. 3, 6-9 pm. Free. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. tieg.org (535-8434) THE OTHER SIDE OF THE COIN: SPINNING THE ROMAN HISTORICAL MYTH The accompanying lecture series to the Jundt’s fall exhibit, “Roman Myth and Mythmaking,” examines how the Romans chose to interpret their mythical past and display their religious beliefs through iconographic representation on objects of daily use. Nov. 3, 7 pm. Free and open to the public. Jundt Art Museum, 200 E. Desmet. (313-6843) SPOKANE AUTHORS & SELF-PUBLISHERS Join other local writers on the first Thursday of each month at 2:30 pm. Activities include a featured speaker, lunch, networking with other authors, and a raffle. Members and guests must purchase lunch to enter. Golden Corral Buffet, 7117 N. Division. spokaneauthors.org (863-5536) BOOK LAUNCH: ANDY BROWN The author launches his new book “Warnings Unheeded: Twin Tragedies at Fairchild Air Force Base,” which delivers a revealing look at the events that led to a mass murder and a fatal plane crash at Fairchild in June 1994. Nov. 5, 2-5 pm. Free to attend. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com READING: KENN NESBITT The former U.S. Children’s Poet Laureate reads from his new collection of children’s poems, “One Minute Till Bedtime: 60-Second Poems to Send You Off to Sleep,” that includes new poems by the likes of Nikki Grimes, Lemony Snicket, Jane Yolen and more. Nov. 5, 7-8 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) READING: TOD MARSHALL A reading with the Spokane-based Washington State Poet Laureate and Gonzaga professor. Nov. 7, 6 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley. (444-5390) WASHINGTON ROCKS! With this book as your guide, find limestone caves, billion-year-old gneiss, glacial moraines, petrified forests, fossilized palm leaves, upside-down sandstone beds, and ancient landslides. Nov. 7, 7-9 pm. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) MALCOM BROOKS The award-winning author of this year’s Everybody Reads book, “Painted Horses” presents to the community. Optional lunch available for $12. Nov. 8, noon. Free. Colfax Library, 102 S. Main St. whitco.lib.wa.us (509397-4366) WSU VISITING WRITER SERIES: TARYN FAGERNESS The literary agent from Tacoma, Washington, presents a talk titled “How to Get an Agent/How to Be an Agent.” Nov. 8, noon. Free. Washington State University, 2000 NE Stadium Way. english.wsu.edu/visitingwriters/ (509-335-3564) EXPERTISE, EVERYWHERE Dr. Jessica Maucione (English) and Dr. Tony Osborne (Communication Studies), faculty of Gonzaga University’s College of Arts & Sciences, discuss what inspires their intellectual pursuits and their desire to share them with the people of Washington. Nov. 9, 4:30-5:15 pm. Free. Gonzaga’s Jepson Center, 502 E. Boone Ave. bit.ly/2fgZSfI (313-6661) n


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NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 53


Run, Run Away

If you decide to flee north, prepare for signs to include both English and French.

Election apocalypse got you down? Join your new friends in the Great White North BY DAN NAILEN

C

ome Tuesday and barring any Bush/Gore-style recounts and lawsuits, our long national Election 2016 nightmare will be over. Celebration of that fact might be the only thing the majority of Americans can agree on. Depending on how the presidential race turns out, nearly half the country will see the result as evidence that The End is Nigh for the good ol’ U.S. of A. The Republican and Democratic nominees are seen in such dire, devilish ways by their foes that talk of “rigged” elections, revolution and fleeing the country has become commonplace. Our collective consternation has not gone unnoticed by the world beyond our borders. Monty Python’s John Cleese told me a couple of weeks ago that “Nobody in Europe can begin to understand” the vitriol and stupidity that’s happening in the U.S. election. And a Toronto ad agency created a Twitter hashtag campaign a few weeks back — #TellAmericaItsGreat — to help Americans weather the nastiness by reminding us what makes the States special. Such a magnanimous outpouring of support from our neighbors to the north made me curious what Canadians really think of our election this year — and what I might need to know if a run to the border is indeed required due to an American Civil War come Nov. 9. So I headed

54 INLANDER NOVEMBER 3, 2016

up to British Columbia 10 days before our Judgment Day, er, Election Day, and talked to some friendly Canadians. I may or may not have listened to Neil Young, Rush and the complete works of Bryan Adams on the drive. (I did not, but I did listen to the four-fifths-Canadian rockers The Band.)

O

ne of the stereotypes of Canadians I’ve learned through my repeated viewings of Strange Brew is that they are a friendly folk (who also love hockey and beer), and that proved true as they talked about our election — usually laughing before even hearing my first question. “I’m enjoying the comedy, it’s priceless,” says Tim Naas, who works in the Patagonia store in Nelson, the resort town a little less than four hours north of Spokane. Naas has a Canadian friend living in Montana; he likes to ask if she gets hit on a lot by guys hoping to get Canada’s version of a green card. He thinks any American expats would enjoy the free health care, miss America’s craft beer and need to get used to Canadian manners. “We’re a lot more apologetic up here,” Naas says. “So get used to people saying ‘sorry’ all the time.” Travis Russell at Rossland Beer Company says the U.S. election has been a big topic of discussion in the small town an hour southwest of Nelson. “We’re directly

DAN NAILEN PHOTO

affected, right? We’re a border town,” Russell says. “Anybody who’s willing to hop the fence due to the election process — you’re my kind of person. Go ahead.” Down the block at Clansey’s Cafe, Mike Meloche says Americans should know that marijuana isn’t legal in Canada — yet — but “we’re friendly. Overly friendly.” The U.S. election is impossible to escape; people he talks to are “going crazy. It’s all they’re talking about. They’re shocked and awed, and [talking about] how funny it is that it’s gotten this far.” Cameron McDougall works at Ainsworth Hot Springs, and he thinks Americans who move to Canada might have a hard time acclimating to life north of the border. “You gotta get used to the lifestyle, it’s pretty laid back here,” McDougall says. “I see Americans come up here, they’re like springs. They’re wound-up.”

I

think most of us could probably make that adjustment. In my time in Canada, I found things that would make me feel right at home, from taco joints to Southern BBQ, and things America could use more of, like liquor store delivery cars. The biggest challenges were remembering that kilometers per hour aren’t the same as miles per hour as I drove, realizing that my spelling would take a beating for a while — centre instead of center, etc. — and learning that money that has clear windows and trains and old English women on it is, indeed, real money. And that money goes surprisingly fast when one starts eating poutine and venison chops on the regular. Those friendly Canadian locals would certainly help with the transition, though. Not only are they inherently nice, our ugly election has made them even more so. “I feel sorry for the American people right now,” McDougall says. “It’s a little embarrassing. I’ve seen a couple of elections that were bad, but that one has to be the most controversial election ever, right?” Controversial — that’s one word for it. n


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8202 N. Division St. Just south of the “Y” If you are experiencing an emergency, please call 911 or go to the nearest Emergency Department as soon as possible.

NOVEMBER 3, 2016 INLANDER 55


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