Issuu on Google+

W ER

OCT.

3

2 V. 6, 1- N O

0 13

AK | S PE

I NG

TRU

O PO TH T

INSIDE

WHEN COPS DON’T CARE

13

| GUNS AT SCHOOL

20

| THE PUMPKIN SPICE CRAZE

40

| LIFE’S SURPRISES AT AGE 92

66

2 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

INSIDE

Your Downtown Full-Service Grocery Store & Deli

Local gifts, local food

No

Downtown’s full time Membership full service grocery store Required

OCTOBER 31 - NOVEMBER 6, 2013 | VOL. 21, NO. 2

COMMENT NEWS COVER CULTURE FOOD FILM

5 13 24 33 40 46

MUSIC EVENTS BULLETIN BOARD WELLNESS I SAW YOU LAST WORD

51 56 62 63 64 66

• • • •

• • Fair trade wool clothing • and goods • Local greenery • Poinsettias and bouquets • Locally made jewelry

Locally made soap Great gifts for foodies Sustainable wood earrings Sustainable kitchenware Gluten free baking supplies Local, vegetarian, and gluten free foods for your holiday meal

44 W. Main Ave 509-458-2667 www.MainMarket.coop Mon~Sat 8am – 8pm Sun 10am – 6pm Free Parking

! E L A S Y R O S S E C C A A SP TO 30% OFF

ON THE COVER | CHRIS BOVEY ILLUSTRATION

POLICE

UP

A year into the city’s new panhandling ordinance, things fall apart: few guilty verdicts and concerns about entrapment

ICALS, FILTERS, CHEM

& ACCESSORIES

HARD COVERS ON SALE NOW!

350 W. Bosanko Ave, Cd’A 720 N. Fancher, Spokane Valley 7808 N. Division St., Spokane

PAGE 18

apollospas.com

MUSIC

A deeper look at the local scene, with one venue closing and another opening PAGE 51

INLANDER THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, SPOKANE, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 | EMAIL: INFO@INLANDER.COM Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, RSS and at Inlander.com

THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. Printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x213 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email trevorr@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2013, Inland Publications, Inc.

SPOK ANE | EA S TERN WA SHINGTON | NORTH IDAHO

FREE Teeth Whitening or

$100

Credit Towards Services

Botox Cosmetic Mondays 20 units only

$ 150 $180

with New Patient Exam, X-rays & Cleaning Call for your appointment today! (509) 487.9000 15 E. Central Ave, Spokane (509) 235.8451 1841 First St. , Cheney Melissa Sousley, MD, & Debbie Migliore, LE, are pleased to offer:

• Botox • Dermal Fillers • Cosmetic Skin Lesion Removal • Spider Vein Injections

Call our office for specials!

Have A Problem Area? Let Us Help. BEFORE

AFTER

20% OFF

VASERShape!™ TREATMENTS $100 SAVINGS PER TREATMENT. OFFER EXPIRES 11/14/13.

Our newest addition is VASERShape™, which is an Ultrasound Heat Technology to decrease regions of stubborn fat, without surgery! As Seen on Dr. Oz. Best results are seen in 3 to 5 short treatments.

Now Accepting Care Credit

Melissa Sousley, MD | Spokane Enhanced Health | (509) 466-1188

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 3

Thank you!

2013 Sponsors, Supporters & Volunteers

Join us October 25, 2014, for the 11th annual Pumpkin Ball!

Presenting Sponsor: Major Sponsors:

THE TENTH ANNIVERSARY OF

The Pumpkin Ball

Featured Sponsors:

Your support raised over

$200,000 after expenses for

4 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

Corporate Table Sponsors: Avista Bradley DeCounter, DDS Cenex Zip Trip Coffman Engineers Columbia Bank Franz Bakery Ian and Angela Johnstone Incyte Diagnostics Kiemle & Hagood Company Leone & Keeble: In Honor of Kayleigh Keeble Lukins & Annis Mahlum McKinstry Moss Adams MW Consulting Engineers NAC Architecture Pediatrix Medical Group Providence Health Care Foundation Providence Northwest Heart and Lung Surgical Associates Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital Sisters of Providence, Mother Joseph Province Spokane Oral & Maxillofacial Surgery URM Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery Witherspoon Kelley Workland & Witherspoon, PLLC

Donor Honor Roll: Finders Keepers Numerica Credit Union Tuxedo Gallery

Steering Committee: Sara Hale, Director Jenni Adams Mikayla Brickner Marilyn Carman Srae Christensen Beth Duke Elizabeth Fleming Denise Garceau Cheryl Johnston Margreta Kilgore Stephanie Klees Kathy Maurer Keith O’Brien Mary Savage

Master of Ceremonies: Derek Deis Robyn Nance

Pumpkin Carving MC: Kris Crocker

COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE FALL FOOD?

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

Mike Bookey (x279) CULTURE EDITOR Chris Bovey (x248) ART DIRECTOR

MICHAEL COOK Pumpkin pie. When is it acceptable to start eating it? I would have to say September … For me it’s acceptable to eat it all the time, but I usually start seeing it around September.

Lisa Waananen (x239) Laura Johnson (x250) Chey Scott (x225)

LASER HAIR REMOVAL SPECIALS All $600 packages $199 Upper Lip -

$149 reg. $400

Men’s Back or Chest

50% off

OTHER SPECIALS Tattoo Removal starting at $99 Facial Skin Tightening, Brown Pigment Removal, or Spider Vein Removal

$199

reg. $399

ALL OTHER PACKAGES

Buy one get one FREE!* *free package is equal or lesser value Laser packages include 8 treatments. Must be booked by 11/30/13.

Start your Christmas shopping now!

WEB EDITOR

MUSIC EDITOR

Get your GLOW ON for the Holidays!

SYMETRIA GONGYIN

Gift Cards available!

D GIFT CAR

GIFT CAR D

LISTINGS EDITOR

Michael Mahoney COPY EDITOR

Heidi Groover (x249) Jacob Jones (x237), Deanna Pan (x282), Daniel Walters (x263) STAFF WRITERS

Spaghetti squash. My mom recently just made it for the first time. Where do you get the squash? I believe she got it from a friend’s garden.

Young Kwak

PHOTOGRAPHER

Amy Alkon, Andy Borowitz, Kate Conger, Jim Hightower, E.J. Iannelli, Jo Miller, Mary Lou Reed, Scott Renshaw, Carrie Scozzaro, Leah Sottile CONTRIBUTORS

Emera L. Riley, Katelyn Smith, Sarah Wurtz INTERNS

ADVERTISING Kristi Gotzian (x215) ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER Bruce Deming (x217), Carolyn Padgham-Walker (x214)

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

KATIE THOMAS Butternut squash soup. Is that just a fall thing for you? It’s fall and winter. Do you make it yourself? Yeah, I put a little apple in it. You roast the squash, and then blend it. I roast it with onion, carrot, celery, and apple and garlic.

Autumn Adrian (x251), Jamie Albertini (x247), Bonnie Amstutz (x212), Gail Golden (x236), Janet Pier (x235), Emily Walden (x260) ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Kristina Elverum (x223) DIRECTOR OF MARKETING Raevyn West (x222) EVENTS COORDINATOR Rebecca Rison (x216) ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Aaron Willrich

JEREMIAH TAYLOR Eggnog, by far, is the best drink in all of fall, even though it can sometimes be considered a Christmas drink. When is it acceptable to start buying it? Mid-October, I’d say.

SALES & MARKETING INTERN

OPERATIONS Dee Ann Cook (x211) BUSINESS MANAGER Kristin Wagner (x210) ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE Angela Rendall (x213) OPERATIONS ASSISTANT Trevor Rendall (x226) DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

PRODUCTION

BRIAN PICHETT I like pumpkin-flavored anything. Like, roasted pumpkin seeds are really good, and pumpkin pie is really good, and, like, pumpkin brownies? Cookies? Just pumpkin in anything! Do you make any of it yourself? No, I don’t, but I have sisters.

Wayne Hunt (x232) PRODUCTION MANAGER Alissia Blackwood Mead (x238), Derrick King (x238), Jessie Spaccia (x205), Tom Stover (x265) GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

INTERVIEWS BY KATELYN SMITH, 10/23/13 EASTERN WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY, CHENEY

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 5

MASON LAW

COMMENT | WILDLIFE

FAMILY LAW

Critter Crunch

• Divorce • Spousal Maintenance / Alimony • Child Support Modifications • Parenting Plans

BY MARY LOU REED

As wilderness and predators lose ground, deer, turkeys and skunks are becoming a normal feature of our suburban landscapes

AUTO INJURY • CIVIL LITIGATION

Craig Mason W. 1707 BROADWAY, SPOKANE, WA | 509443-3681

CA$H REWARD TOP PRICE$

PAID!

E. 911 Marietta (East of Hamilton)

Mon-Fri 8-5 • Sat 8-4

Aluminum Stainless Steel Brass Copper Gold Silver

483-4094

www.actionrecycling.com

2013

20 CRAFT BREWS & CIDERS $1,000’S IN PRIZES ONLY AT THE SNOWLANDER EXPO

SNOWLANDEREXPO.COM

6 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

W

ild critters pay no respect to the invisible line that marks the boundary between Washington and Idaho. Such animals live, multiply and die wherever food and habitat are friendly. Householders in both states, and around the nation, are finding more and more critters sharing their urban and suburban lives. Many animals are choosing different predators — traffic, traps and dogs — over the hardscrabble life of the wild. Our lawns and gardens are helping deer numbers triple every five years. Moderate winters and global warming help the fertile does produce twins. We are living in the midst of a deer population explosion.

T

his conundrum has emerged in fairly recent times. Lewis and Clark and the rest of their Corps of Discovery almost starved to death while wandering through the wilderness of what is now the Dakotas and Montana. According to their journals, the Lewis and Clark expedition had plenty of guns and powder, but the wild game they needed to feast on was scarce. On December 1, 1805, a scouting party “had seen the track of one deer only and a few small grey squirrels.” Fifty years ago, spotting a deer in our neighborhood was an eye-popping event. Now it’s a rare day when I see “one deer only.” They cover the landscape. Estimates of deer damage across the country must be part science and part by guess and by gosh. The Wireless Deer Fence Co., hardly an objective source, estimates there are 20 million deer in the country causing $3.8 billion in insurance claims. As I understand it, $1 billion of that sum is to cover damage to cars and trucks. It is clear that the automobile is the deer population’s No. 1 predator. Not to be outdone by deer, wild turkeys are finding their way around suburban neighborhoods. A strange, prehistoric-looking bird, it travels in herds of 20 or so on a meandering path only wild turkeys can follow. Folks have been known to shoot and cook them. Probably only once, since wild turkey meat has the reputation of being too much chew, too little flavor. And then there’s the moose, once described as a creature so laughable it must have been designed by a committee. Recently the Coeur d’Alene Press ran a picture of a moose strolling down the ramp at the Coeur d’Alene Resort, so at ease it might climb on board the Mishanock for a tour of the lake. Checking in with our local Fish and Game staff, I learned that squirrels and skunks are the most annoying invaders and best candidates for relocation. Traps at Fish and Game are available to rent for $20 a cage. A neighbor once spent a

summer trapping a den of baby skunks that tangled with his pet dogs too many times, with the unfortunate result one would expect from a skunk. He patiently made 14 trips into the forest before he got rid of the unwelcome litter. Not everyone borrows the traps for relocation, and Fish and Game ask no questions.

C

learly there are many birds and animals thriving on civilization as a safe source of food and a refuge from predators. Their increasing numbers frequently trigger a love-hate relationship with those of us who are their hosts. Some think that we should defer to the critters because we are building houses on habitat belonging to the world of wild creatures. Others find that the creatures’ increasing numbers (wasps, too) trigger a fight-not-flight response. As with children, the young animals touch the heart. They are just so darn cute. A spotted fawn, looking new and delicate, still gives us pause. Once the fawn is a teenager with coarse hair and a taste for flowers, not so much. Baby skunks are fun to watch frolic — their stripes are

People’s affection for deer — the Bambi factor — is a real roadblock. so white they glow in the dark — yet an adult skunk is hard to love. At the end of each summer, the year’s crop of young turkeys has a certain charm. But they’ll never acquire the Hollywood appeal Walt Disney gave to Bambi. Controlling undesirable wild visitors is best done by limiting food — some communities even have laws against feeding deer. Pet food left out overnight provides a smorgasbord for wild creatures. People’s affection for deer — the Bambi factor — is a real roadblock to passing ordinances that address deer overpopulation. Evidently chemical birth control is wildly expensive and not very effective. Guns or bows and arrows are the recommended weapons of control. Ugh. Everyone has a tale or two about encounters with wild creatures, be they big as a bear or small as a spider. Any one of you could have filled this column with your stories. “Live and let live” works most of the time, with both people and wild animals. But when it comes to deer — where, oh where, is the big bad wolf? 

COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

The Old School BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

O

f the remembrances of Tom Foley, Robert Michel’s in the Washington Post stood out. Michel was the Republican Minority Leader in the House while Foley was Speaker of the House. It might surprise you, but they worked together beautifully. One line from Michel’s piece has stayed with me: “We,” Michel wrote of his old rival and friend, “were pupils of the old school.” There are Shakespearean moments in American political history, and Foley’s last stand is among them. On the day he was defeated in 1994, you could say the old school Michel mentioned — that place where people from different backgrounds actually liked each other, worked together and solved problems — was burned to the ground. To take down the sitting Speaker, the NRA hired Charlton Heston to film an attack ad. Reagan’s campaign manager Ed Rollins worked his dark magic, and Rush Limbaugh was pumping up the anger with his Clinton-hating. Together, they created the blueprint for the modern political hit job. Eastern Washington played its role, too. When the New York Times dropped in, a farmer told them, yes, removing the sitting Speaker of the House would be like shooting your own foot off. Then in the next breath, he said he didn’t know why, but he was going to go ahead and shoot it off anyway. Meanwhile, Foley defended himself simply, reminding everyone of his 30-year record of helping the nation and his district. The contest between those two forces reminds me of the scene in The Lord of the Flies when Piggy holds up the conch shell and says, “Which is better — to have rules and agree, or to hunt and kill?” Our answer, given that day in Spokane in 1994, still rules our politics: to hunt and kill. Michel did not seek reelection in 1994, and after he and Foley left Congress, Newt Gingrich became Speaker, lobbyists started writing legislation, campaign season became never-ending and petty political disputes trumped all. Now, nearly 20 years later, America’s political system has ground to a halt, leaving major problems unsolved and casting into doubt our place as the leading nation on the planet. Choosing our Newt Gingrichs over our Tom Foleys has been a disaster. Foley was at peace with his 1994 loss. All through his life, he personified traditional Spokane values of humility and service. History, however, demands that he be remembered across America as a martyr to the cause of old school American politics. If there is a movement to rebuild on those ruins, reformers should start by studying the lives of leaders like Tom Foley.  JEN SORENSON CARTOON

PROFESSIONAL REPRESENTATION FOR MEDICAL CLAIMS AND PERSONAL INJURY

SPECIALIZING IN PERSONAL INJURY AND MEDICAL LAWSUITS S INVOLVING: DePuy & Stryker (Hip Implant Cases) Yaz & Yazmine • Depakote

Richard E. Lewis ATTORNEY AT LAW

2208 W. 2ND AVE. SPOKANE | 509-413-1278 | RICHARDLEWISLAW.COM

E A S T E R N W A S H I N G T O N U N I V E R S I T Y A N D T H E D A N I E L A N D M A R G A R E T C A R P E R F O U N D AT I O N P R E S E N T

AN EVENING WITH STEVEN PINKER T H U R S D AY, N O V E M B E R 1 4 , 7 P. M . INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, SPOKANE Faced with the ceaseless stream of news about war, crime and terrorism, one could easily think we live in the most violent age ever seen. In this startling and engaging talk, New York Times bestselling author Steven Pinker argues just the opposite is true. TICKETS: $7 GENERAL ADMISSION, AT WWW.TICKETSWEST.COM OR 1.800.325.SEAT FOR MORE INFO, CONTACT LAURA THAYER 509.359.4860 OR LTHAYER3@EWU.EDU A BRIEF BOOK SIGNING WILL FOLLOW IN THE LOBBY.

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 7

COMMENT | DIGEST ON OUR FACEBOOK

Which ballot issue or political race is most important to you this election? AMY COWIN: Spokane City Council elections! MEAGHAN LEE: GMO labeling for sure.

JACK OHMAN CARTOON

REALLY,

THAT’S ALL

WE ASK.

It was fun reading “Behind Closed Doors” (10/17/13). I often wish that someone would write a book (with photos) of all this interesting Spokane history, including where all the speakeasy bars were. Someone should get some photos of Dutch’s basement murals from the 1920s before the building changes hands. I think there might be murals in the basement of the old Huppin’s building downtown, too. LUPITO FLORES Spokane, Wash.

rivercityred. blogspot.com

ANGELA ALLEN: GMO labeling, and the rest of you commenting about it just gave me hope.

LETTERS

SUBTERRANEAN SPOKANE

TUNNEL BUILDER

vard. We found no sign of any underground tunneling in that portion of Lincoln Street, nor were we advised to be on the lookout for such an item. I do remember that in those years several department stores in the downtown area had basements that extended under the sidewalks, with freight elevators accessible directly from the sidewalks outside the stores. I can’t be more specific other than that I remember seeing steel doors in the sidewalks outside of several buildings. Thanks for the memories! DICK WAITT Spokane, Wash.

Regarding Stephen Schlange’s article (“Behind Closed Doors,” 10/17/13), I have been behind that door in the basement of the Steam Plant. In 1973, when Avista “I mope around each summer when Gonzaga students (then Washington Water Power) was operating the go home and KAGU-FM — the only city-wide source Steam Plant, I was a WWP engineer working with a available for 300 miles goes off the air.” (Quoted from construction contractor on a project to extend high “Welcome to Loserville,” by Nick Heil, 10/24/13). pressure steam service to several areas in and around I hope that all your readers were aware that Heil the Expo ’74 site. One of these new lines started on Post was writing in the past (1995) and not Street, at the alley immediately south of the today, when KAGU-FM is non-commersteam plant. cialized classical music, very welcome The actual connection of our new line to Send comments to indeed, but not alternative radio at all then-existing steam facilities was inside the editor@inlander.com. in the light of the present, when KYRS tunnel behind the door in your photo. Past the certainly is that, and not just city-wide door, the tunnel extended to the left to the but region-wide. approximate center of Post Street. There was also an Mr. Heil’s story, like all the others in this great extension to the right (toward Lincoln Street); I didn’t 20-year issue, takes on the difficult reality of things have need to go that way and don’t know where (or lost and things gained. It would be interesting to see how far) it went. what people think specifically about the growth of the Our new line was insulated, encased in concrete, region’s population in the last 20 years and its effects, and directly buried under Post Street. The tunnel ended for good or ill. at that point and we did not extend it further. I do know that I was involved in a later construction project there, HENRY-YORK STEINER an underground electric duct bank extending from the Spokane, Wash. vicinity of the railroad viaduct to Spokane Falls Boule-

CHANGE IS CONSTANT

LETTERS

OPEN ENROLLMENT POTTERY CLASSES All Skill Levels & Ages Morning/Evening Classes Fun & Friendly Atmosphere Learn at Your Own Pace Supplies Included

clayconnection.net

714 E. Sprague Spokane | 509-747-6171

8 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

MARY WISSINK: Fire District 9. We have had the majority of the Judy Personett signs stolen from all around the district. It is both frustrating and disappointing to see our hard work being taking from us.

SALLY KONEN MCKEN: Although 522 is important — local city council is vastly more important. I can seek out GMO-free certified food, I cannot keep Spokane on the right path without Jon Snyder. The far right has big money and the mayor — we need Jon. We need him to continue fighting for our neighborhoods, our river, our parks, our city’s vitality, and everything that enhances civic life — all the while keeping our infrastructure secure. HARRY CRASE: City council. MUMM!! JOHN WAITE: Yes on 522. We must have the right to know what is in what we are eating, and how it is produced. SHANE MAGGART: Making sure we elect Candace Mumm and re-elect Jon Snyder to Spokane City Council! DICK WAITT: NO on 517!! If Tim Eyman is for it, I’m against it!! CASEY BYERS: I want to know that our government is still useful. So much is broken and will have to be built back up in new sustainable ways. It would be a real drag if we had to fight the government to disempower the oligarchs and nationalize the currency production *sigh* ...the GMO labeling thing is gonna pass, probably. That’s good. 

 GET IN ON THE CONVERSATION AT THE NEW INLANDER.COM.

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 9

ok, so my subs really aren't gourmet and we're not french either. my subs just taste a little better, that's all! I wanted to call it jimmy john's tasty sandwiches, but my mom told me to stick with gourmet. Regardless of what she thinks, freaky fast is where it's at. I hope you love 'em as much as i do! peace!

Established in Charleston, IL in 1983 to add to students GPA and general dating ability.

8" SUB SANDWICHES

GIANT club sandwiches

All of my sandwiches are 8 inches of homemade French bread, fresh veggies and the finest meats & cheese I can buy! We slice everything fresh daily in this store! It tastes better that way!

#1

PEPE®

SLIMS™ Any Sub minus the veggies and sauce

Real wood smoked ham and provolone cheese, lettuce, tomato & mayo. (The original)

#3 TOTALLY TUNA®

slim slim slim slim slim slim

#4 TURKEY TOM®

Low Carb Lettuce Wrap ®

#5 VITO®

Same ingredients and price of the sub or club without the bread.

#2 BIG JOHN®

Medium rare choice roast beef, mayo, lettuce & tomato. Fresh housemade tuna, mixed with celery, onions, and our tasty sauce, sliced cucumber, lettuce & tomato. (My tuna rocks!) Fresh sliced turkey breast, lettuce, tomato & mayo. The original (Sliced cucumber optional)

1 2 3 4 5 6

Ham & cheese Roast beef Tuna salad Turkey breast Salami, capicola, cheese Double provolone

JJ UNWICH

The original Italian sub with genoa salami, provolone, capicola, onion, lettuce, tomato, & a real tasty Italian vinaigrette. (Hot peppers by request)

#6 THE VEGGIE

Layers of provolone cheese separated by real avocado spread, sliced cucumber, lettuce, tomato & mayo. (Truly a gourmet sub not for vegetarians only) Bacon, lettuce, tomato & mayo! (My B.L.T. rocks)

TW YM NL J // NSF ¹8 Q

J.J.B.L.T.®

★ sides ★

U N C H ES ★ ★ BOX LPLATTERS ★ ★ PARTYTY SU BS ★ ★ PAR OUR NOTICE, WHAT ER 24 H WE PREF CALL , WE’LL DOPEN! U AP O BUT IF YN TO MAKE IT H WE CA DELIVERY ORDERS will include a delivery charge per item.

★ Chocolate chip or oatmeal raisin cookie ★ Extra load of meat ★ Extra cheese or extra avocado spread

ORDER ONLINE @ JIMMYJOHNS.COM

freebies (subs & clubs only) Onion, lettuce, tomato, mayo, sliced cucumber, hot peppers, Dijon mustard, yellow mustard, oil & vinegar, oregano.

#7 SMOKED HAM CLUB 1/4 pound of real wood smoked ham, provolone cheese, lettuce, tomato & mayo!

#8 BILLY CLUB®

Choice roast beef, smoked ham, provolone cheese, Dijon mustard, lettuce, tomato & mayo.

#9 ITALIAN NIGHT CLUB®

Genoa salami, Italian capicola, smoked ham, and provolone cheese all topped with lettuce, tomato, onion, mayo & our homemade Italian vinaigrette. (Order it with hot peppers)

#10 HUNTER’S CLUB®

A full 1/4 pound of medium rare roast beef, provolone, lettuce, tomato & mayo.

#11 COUNTRY CLUB®

Sliced turkey breast, real wood smoked ham, provolone, and tons of lettuce, tomato & mayo! (A very traditional, yet always exceptional classic!)

★ Soda Pop ★ Real potato chips or jumbo kosher dill pickle

My club sandwiches have twice the meat or cheese, try it on my fresh baked thick sliced 7-grain bread or my famous homemade French bread! Tell us when you order!

#12 BEACH CLUB®

Fresh baked turkey breast, provolone cheese, avocado spread, sliced cucumber, lettuce, tomato and mayo!

#13 GOURMET VEGGIE CLUB® Double provolone, real avocado spread, sliced cucumber, lettuce, tomato & mayo. (Try it on my 7-grain whole wheat bread. This veggie sandwich is really yummy!)

#14 BOOTLEGGER CLUB®

Roast beef, turkey breast, lettuce, tomato & mayo. An American classic!

#15 CLUB TUNA®

THE J.J. GARGANTUAN® The original gutbuhstuh! Genoa salami, sliced smoked ham, capicola, roast beef, turkey & provolone, jammed into one of our homemade French buns, then smothered with onions, mayo, lettuce, tomato & our homemade Italian vinaigrette.

The same as our #3 Totally Tuna except this one has a lot more. Housemade tuna salad, provolone, sliced cucumber, lettuce & tomato.

#16 CLUB LULU®

Sliced turkey breast, bacon, lettuce, tomato & mayo. (JJ's original turkey & bacon club)

#17 ULTIMATE PORKER™ Real wood smoked ham and bacon with lettuce, tomato & mayo! (This one rocks!)

WE DELIVER! 7 DAYS A WEEK TO FIND THE LOCATION NEAREST YOU VISIT JIMMYJOHNS.COM

"YOUR MOM WANTS YOU TO EAT AT JIMMY JOHN'S!" ® © 1 9 8 5 , 2 0 0 2 , 2 0 0 3 , 2 0 0 4 , 2 0 0 7 , 2 0 0 8 , 2 0 13 J I M M Y J O H N ’ S F R A N C H I S E , L L C A L L R I G H T S R E S E RV E D . We R e s e r ve T h e R i g h t To M a k e A n y M e n u C h a n g e s .

10 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

COMMENT | SATIRE

Sorry They Got Caught BY ANDY BOROWITZ

R

esponding to the firestorm of controversy over its spying on European allies, the head of the National Security Agency said this week that the agency would do everything in its power to avoid being caught doing it in the future. “There are two important jobs for every spy agency: spying on people and avoiding detection,” said NSA director General Keith Alexander. “Unfortunately, at the NSA we have only done the first job well.” “We have abused the trust of some of our closest allies,” he said. “And none of this would have happened if they hadn’t found out.” General Alexander said that the agency was instituting strict new practices that amounted to “a zerotolerance policy on getting caught.” “I had a meeting with my top people today and said, ‘I want you to put the same energy you put into

spying on Germany, France and Spain into keeping them from figuring out what we’re up to. Anything less than that will be unacceptable.’” General Alexander also offered a heartfelt apology to German Chancellor Angela Merkel, a prime target of the agency’s eavesdropping. “I know how upsetting it must be for you to know that your closest ally has been listening in on your phone conversations for the past 11 years,” he said. “I give you my solemn promise that in the future you won’t know.” n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | CONGRESS

Look In The Mirror BY JIM HIGHTOWER

W

hat a show the goofily fanatical Tea Party Republicans are putting on in Washington! First, they threw a group hissy fit, forcing a costly, embarrassing and entirely unwarranted shutdown of the national government of our U. S. of A. That was strange enough, but then a gaggle of goofballs cranked their shtick all the way up to code-red bizarre, throwing a series of staged tantrums when they learned that the government they had shut down was, in fact, shut down. I know you don’t have to be smart or logical to be in Congress, but surely a lawmaker ought to be more tightly wrapped than this bunch. One thing that really worked them into a shrieking frenzy was that national parks and monuments were closed. This led to the spectacle of a House committee hauling in the director of national parks to berate him mercilessly for five hours, demanding to know why the parks were closed. He should’ve just held up a mirror, but — like the good career park ranger he is — Director Jon Jarvis patiently tried to explain

the obvious to the Congress critters in front of him: They had voted to shutter the federal government; national parks are a part of the government; Congress took away the money to staff the nation’s 401 parks and monuments; so they were closed. But the rabid representatives effectively shouted at him: “Stop making sense!” Washington’s own Doc Hastings even invented his own facts, blathering that in the government shutdown back in the mid-’90s, parks stayed open. Sorry, Doc, but no — the Lincoln Memorial, Statue of Liberty, Grand Canyon and others all across the country were closed then. By the way, guess who has been steadily whacking funding for park service staff and maintenance of those national treasures? Right — the same loony-tunes ideologues running this absurd circus. n For more from America’s populist, check out jimhightower.com.

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 11

12 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

Gregg Sowder has struggled to get investigators on his case after his garage was burglarized in July. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

POLICE

converted cash. The store’s security cameras captured the whole transaction. Even armed with those strong leads, Sowder says he has had a hard time getting follow-up action from Spokane investigators. He says it took multiple calls to get his case assigned to a detective. He then had the store send over the security footage. He also took the jewelry box in for fingerprinting. But he hasn’t heard back about the case in weeks. Sowder joins dozens of other frustrated citizens who have watched their cases fall by the wayside amid the city’s flood of property crime reports. Some have collected evidence themselves to give police. Some have filed tips and never heard any response. Others say officers responded, but explained there was nothing that could be done. his property, he found a jewelry box discarded in his Police officials say they value all information from backyard. So he did what he was supposed to do — he the public and strive to make sure investigators follow reported the burglary to the Spokane Police Department. through on as many cases as possible. Citizen reports But then he went a little further. also help investigators track citywide crime trends, so “What would a bunch of lowlifes they can implement more preventative enforcement do?” he thought. Soon, he had gone Send comments to strategies. around to all the local grocery stores “I realize that the police department is swamped with Coinstar change-sorting machines, editor@inlander.com. with property crimes,” Sowder says. “I’ve been patient asking about large deposits. and tried not to be too much of a pest, but at the same As it happens, the Albertsons time not just let it slide.” on 57th Avenue told him two people had hauled in a ...continued on next page white bucket of change on July 5. They left with $824 in

Justice Delayed

Citizens voice frustrations over Spokane Police responses to victim reports, crime tips and other complaints BY JACOB JONES

A

long the short walk from his garage to his South Hill home, Gregg Sowder performed a simple daily ritual for more than a decade. Each evening, he emptied his pocket change into a white, five-gallon plastic bucket by the door as he passed, watching his collection slowly grow year by year. Sowder, 60, with a trim goatee and glasses, never bothered to count the coins. But at more than half full, he estimates the bucket weighed more than 100 pounds. So he put off taking it to the bank, and put it off, and put it off, until July 5, when it disappeared. A chainsaw had also been stolen. When he searched

LETTERS

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 13

The William D. Ruckelshaus Center presents

NEWS | POLICE

Washington State Governance Series Hear from local legislators, past and present, on how to improve our state legislative process.

Featuring: Rep. Susan Fagan (R-District 9)

Rep. Marcus Riccelli (D-District 3) Frank Straub has acknowledged frustration with officers going from call to call. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“JUSTICE DELAYED,” CONTINUED... • Sen. John Smith (R-District 7) • Rep. Timm Ormsby (D-District 3) • Former Rep. Don Cox (R) • Former Rep. Jeff Gombosky (D) • Former Rep. David Buri (R)

Hosted By Secretary of State

Kim Wyman & David Schumacher

of the Office of the Governor

Wed., Nov. 13 | Noon WSU-Spokane, South Campus Facility 412 E. Spokane Falls Blvd. (next to the Bookie; parking located behind building) Lunch provided; must preregister at eventbrite.com/event/8544560009 Questions? Email Francis Benjamin at benjamin@wsu.edu

sponsored by: The WSU Division of Governmental Studies & Services

R ighting WRongs • R ebuilding l ives

James R. Sweetser ATTORNEY AT L AW | since 1984 Former Elected Spokane Prosecutor

seRious PeRsonAl inJuRY Call:

509-328-0678

sweetserlawoffice.com

1020 N Washington, Spokane, WA 99201

14 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

S

pokane Police Department records show more than 15,644 property crimes reported so far this year, including 415 just last week. Police Chief Frank Straub and top commanders have acknowledged frustrations with the city’s increased property crime rates, as well as staffing shortages that can leave street officers hustling from one call to the next. Stretched between those two challenges, police officials say they cannot always respond to every call for service. Officers have to prioritize life-threatening, high-risk and in-progress calls. Sometimes the department does not have people to spare for non-emergency incidents. Often, a complaint does not require the immediate presence of an officer. More than half of the citizen complaints filed with the city’s Office of the Police Ombudsman fall under the broad category of “inadequate response.” At least 53 of the 90 complaints filed from January through September of this year accuse officers of not responding or not conducting a thorough enough investigation. Ombudsman Tim Burns says response complaints spiked in 2011 when the SPD announced they had closed the Property Crimes Unit and cut investigations. Officials have since retracted that decision, but resources still limit investigators to a small percentage of the total reported cases. “Typically, the police response is, ‘It doesn’t meet our threshold,’” Burns says. “If you’re the victim, that’s not what you want to hear, and that’s understandable.” The ombudsman also noted a sharp increase in the number of police calls being categorized as “non-response,” which either do not require an officer immediately or where officers are not available. In the first six months of 2013, nearly 5,180 calls fell into this category, up from 3,595 during the first half of 2012. When Sowder first contacted the department, investigators were quite courteous. But he says they also made it clear his case had “zero” chance of much follow-up. (“I got a lot of ‘No’s’ down there.”) So he started his own case file, posted reward fliers and made persistent calls to get his case assigned to a detective. “You have to be your own advocate and bring them all the stuff that you have,” he says, flipping through a folder of case records and handwritten notes. “Just be real respectful, but at

the same time expect some help. … Most people just give up. They make the report and then nothing happens and they just say, ‘To hell with it.’ I’m sure that’s what happens.”

S

itting in the recently established downtown substation, SPD Capt. Judi Carl says the department has worked hard to make investigators more accessible while taking advantage of new technology to improve the timely sharing of crime tips and other community intelligence. With more than 16,800 overall crimes reported this year and more than 3,410 tips submitted to Crime Check, inadequate response complaints reflect just a small percentage of all SPD calls. Carl says department supervisors work quickly to sort phone calls, emails, in-person tips and other reports to make sure information from the public gets to the officers who need it. “We have multiple ways they come in,” she says. “We have multiple ways they’re triaged.” Police spokeswoman Monique Cotton says citizens now have more ways than ever to contact police and share information. The department works closely with 911 and Crime Check. It also revamped its tip line in February, adding an email

“Typically, the police response is, ‘It doesn’t meet our threshold.’” program so citizens can attach photos or video with their tips. “We rely on the public a lot,” she says, adding, “We need them to know that we’re accessible.” Carl says citizens should not hesitate to contact officers with information on crimes, suspects, community problems or other issues. Even if they don’t hear back from investigators, their information could help break open big cases. “We don’t call back each individual person,” Carl says. “We use some of it. We don’t use all of it. … [But] they are not ignored. They are not disregarded.”

W

ith new advances in security technology, citizens have found it easier to collect their own evidence to give police. Some might install surveillance cameras. Some might use an app to track their stolen cellphone. Many scour online sales hubs like eBay or Craigslist, searching for their missing property. Earlier this month, KREM 2 featured a story on Spokane used car dealer Rick Harter, who had nearly $4,000 in furniture and appliances stolen out of a house he was renovating on East Lyons Avenue. With a little luck, Harter managed to find some of his property through a Craigslist post and lead police to the sellers. Harter tells the Inlander he regularly searches Craigslist for new appliances for some of his home remodeling. When he called a couple of weeks ago about a refrigerator, the seller explained they had sold that model, but sent him a photo of another unit — the missing fridge from his house on Lyons. “It’s quite the scam,” he says of the “bait and switch” between what they posted and what they actually wanted to sell. Harter had previously reported his burglary to police and while he says officers were helpful and empathetic, he had not heard anything back. So he went to check out the fridge himself, finding some of his other stolen property stored alongside the fridge. When he called police with the specific location, he says he was told officers u For in-progress emergencies and would not be available for immediate help: Call 911. at least three hours. He u To report previously occurred crimes: says he stalled the seller Call Crime Check at (509) 456-2233. and tried getting officers to u To submit an anonymous tip for help him recover his propan ongoing investigation: Call Crime erty again the following Stoppers at (800) 222-TIPS or (509) day, waiting another four 327-5111. hours before they arrived u To report a quality of life issue or with a search warrant. complaint: Call the SPD Tip Line at (509) “I never would have 242-TIPS (8477) or email at spdtipline@ gotten any of that stuff spokanepolice.org. back [otherwise],” he says u To file a complaint against an SPD now. “They prioritize their officer or employee: Call the police calls. My thing wasn’t a ombudsman at (509) 625-6748. priority. … I was about u For general Spokane Police ready to take the law into questions: Call the SPD Help Line at my own hands.” (509) 477-5980. Investigators have since reassured him arrests are pending in the case. While it’s not the first time he has faced frustrations over a case with local police, Harter acknowledges officers provide an important and difficult service. But, he adds, they get paid well to do their best. “You expect a high amount of service,” he says. “You expect that when you call, you’re going to get a response.”

FILING REPORTS

P

olice officials say they understand and share some citizens’ frustrations. While Carl acknowledges people who feel ignored might be tempted to take the law into their own hands, she says that has never been acceptable. Even if technology makes it easier to track down criminals, citizens still need to leave police work to the police. “You’re responsible for your own behavior,” she says. “Don’t cross those lines.” Burns says Chief Straub, the mayor and city council seem to understand they need to find the resources to improve how the department responds to calls. They can’t continue blaming the issue on insufficient staffing. “The community no longer has a willingness to accept that as an explanation,” Burns says. Sowder says he would still like to know what has delayed his case so long, but he’s heard enough similar stories by now to not take it personally. He just keeps filing his notes away in his case folder. He has tried to make his home a harder target for criminals. And he has ended his long ritual of collecting loose change. “I lock everything up now and put up bars,” he says. “I’m not going to have any more buckets full of change just sitting around.” n jacobj@inlander.com

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 15

NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

REEFER ARE WE THERE YET? A

year after Washington voters’ approval of Initiative 502 — a historic move to legalize marijuana in the state — we’re still months from seeing legal pot shops open, and medical marijuana is caught in the crossfire. Here’s a look at where we are.

RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA

The state Liquor Control Board approved its final rules for the recreational market, setting the framework in which hopeful entrepreneurs must craft business plans to apply for licenses. The rules detail how to do things like label and track products and how to measure the 1,000-foot buffer that must be kept between marijuana businesses and places like schools and parks. The board is placing no limit on the number of growers or processors they’ll allow in the state, but they are limiting the number of stores each county is allowed. Spokane County will have as many as 18, eight within city limits. The city of Spokane has created its own set of zoning rules for both recreational and medical marijuana businesses, which will allow them in most industrial areas of town but keep them out of residential and some commercial areas, like Garland near Monroe. (Find the full map on Inlander. com.) The liquor board will take applications for 30 days beginning Nov. 18 and expects to issue the first licenses to growers, processors and sellers by December or January. Expect to start shopping next summer.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA

Meanwhile, the board has joined the state departments of health and revenue in crafting a list of recommendations for taking on the medical market. Long unregulated and untaxed, medical marijuana in the state has been blamed for an increase in recreational users. The board and others worry that allowing the medical market to continue as is could threaten the new, taxed recreational market’s success. And despite promises during the I-502 campaign that the recreational push wouldn’t affect the medical market, the recommendations are dramatic. The group suggests ridding the state of medical dispensaries and home grows, opting instead to let qualified patients buy from state-licensed stores. On those purchases, patients would still pay the 25 percent tax (per stage of the process: production, processing and sale) imposed on the recreational market, but would be exempt from state and local sales and use taxes. A statewide patient registry would determine who gets tax exemptions. The potential changes have raised the ire of medical marijuana advocates, with concerns ranging from privacy to questions of access. (Many point to prescription drugs, arguing taxing one form of medicine and not others is unfair.) The board is taking public input on the recommendations before submitting them to the Legislature Jan. 1. Read the full recommendations on Inlander.com. Send input to medicalmarijuana@liq.wa.gov before Nov. 8. — HEIDI GROOVER

The Big News of the Past Week

1.

A report from the Spokane County Medical Examiner states 34-year-old Will Berger died from oxygen deprivation to the brain after being put in a chokehold by a Spokane sheriff’s deputy during a confrontation outside Oz Fitness in June. The case remains under investigation.

2.

The “No on 522” campaign against the proposed Washington initiative requiring companies to label genetically modified foods has broken the state’s fundraising record for initiatives by collecting more than $21.5 million.

3.

The United States has faced intense international criticism over revelations that the National Security Agency has conducted extensive eavesdropping operations targeting allies and foreign citizens, including tracking national leaders.

4.

A $3.2 million jury verdict in favor of a fired Coeur d’Alene Police Department officer will stand, according to a recent appeal decision by the 9th U.S. Circuit Court. Former officer Dan Dixon was filed over a dispute with a subordinate officer. In 2011, a jury found the termination arbitrary and irrational.

5.

DIGITS

94

$

Amount of money dueling campaigns have spent per voter in the city of Seatac, south of Seattle, over an initiative to raise the city’s required minimum wage to $15 an hour. Both sides have spent a combined $1.1 million on the city’s 12,100 registered voters.

60

Obamacare administrator Marilyn Tavenner apologized Tuesday for the technical issues hobbling the rollout of the new HealthCare.gov website, but promised improvements. The lowest percentage of Americans in favor of the death penalty in 40 years, according to a new Gallup poll. The percentage reflects the lowest level of support for capital punishment since a poll in 1972 recorded 57 percent support.

. . COMING 11 1 12 2 13 16 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

ON INLANDER.com What’s Creating Buzz

ELECTION: The deadline to return your ballot is less than a week away, so get excited about democracy! But first, be sure to catch up on the candidates and issues at Inlander.com.

NEWS | BRIEFS

A Legend Passes A memorial service this Friday for Tom Foley; plus, an agreement on climate change A COMMUNITY FAREWELL

Gonzaga University is expecting an overflow crowd at the 800-seat St. Aloysius Church Friday for a memorial service honoring Spokane native and former U.S. Speaker of the House TOM FOLEY, who died earlier this month. Having attended both Gonzaga Prep and GU before graduating from the University of Washington, Foley represented Eastern Washington’s 5th District from 1965-95 and served as U.S. ambassador to Japan under President Clinton. Despite being voted out in a historic Republican takeover, Foley has been remembered for his efforts to bridge the gap between the parties. Doors open at 10 am for the service, which runs from 11 am to 12:30 pm and will also be streamed live to Gonzaga’s Charlotte Y. Martin Centre and on tvw.org. In a statement announcing the memorial and calling it a “community farewell,” Gonzaga President Thayne M. McCulloh said, “Everyone is welcome.” — HEIDI GROOVER

HISTORIC DEVELOPMENT

There’s no question that the RIDPATH HOTEL, the ancient Spokane hotel that once hosted Elvis and Evel Knievel, is an historic piece of Spokane. But making that

official means millions of dollars for Ron Wells’ rehab and revitalization of the Ridpath complex. About a year ago, Wells says, the hotel was determined eligible for the National Register of Historic Places. That made last week’s process, where the Washington State Advisory Council on Historic Preservation recommended the hotel for the national registry, a formality. “If it’s a certified historic rehabilitation project, and it’s listed on the National Register of Historical Places, you can qualify for a tax credit,” Wells says. “It’s a big addition to the equity puzzle.” With more equity plugged into the project through promised tax credits, it means Wells can get more enviable interest rates. Wells is the local king of historic rehabilitation, having worked on 43 different projects that were certified historic locations. “I’m a junkie on that,” he says. The $781,000 in tax credits he got for the Lofts at Joel, the location of a 2008 fire, allowed Wells to turn the building back into apartments. He’s certain he’ll get the tax credits; all that’s left is to determine how much they’re worth. Wells estimates he’ll receive credits worth about $3 million to $5 million. Wells says one recent development complicates the

financial piece of the long-complicated project: interest rates. “If rates in the next two or three months drop another 0.3 or so, we’ll be in great shape,” Wells says. If the rates stay where they are, he says the project will move forward, but it will become much more of a financial struggle. — DANIEL WALTERS

COORDINATING ON CLIMATE CHANGE

Convening in San Francisco, Govs. Jay Inslee of Washington, Jerry Brown of California, John Kitzhaber of Oregon and Mary Polak, the environmental minister of British Columbia, made a pact Monday affirming their commitment to coordinate their GREENHOUSE GAS POLICIES in an effort to fight global

warming. According to the agreement — signed by all three governors and British Columbia Premier Christy Clark — Washington and Oregon, on their end, “will set binding limits on carbon emissions and deploy market mechanisms to meet those limits” and adopt low-carbon fuel standards. California and British Columbia, meanwhile, would maintain their existing carbon-pricing programs and clean fuel standards. Although the pact isn’t legally binding, Inslee (pictured) has voiced his support for a statewide “capand-trade” system that would incentivize companies to reduce their carbon emissions below an industry limit. At a Climate Legislative and Executive Workgroup meeting earlier this month, Inslee warned that Washington will fail to meet its goals, set in 2008, of reducing greenhouse gas emissions if the Legislature doesn’t take action. — DEANNA PAN

Snap, Send, Cha-Ching! Mobile Check Deposit

*

101 00-00/000

YOUR NAME SS 123 YOUR ADDRE U.S.A. 12345 ANYWHERE, Pay to the Order of

20

$ Dollars

Security features details on back.

PO Box 4000 WA 99037 Spokane Valley,

For

1:0000000000:

Download the App.

123456 789:

numericacu.com • 800.433.1837 Here’s the legal stuff. *You need a Numerica Checking Account with Online Banking. Standard text message and data rates from your carrier may apply. We have a $20 membership fee for new members. Federally insured by NCUA.

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 17

NEWS | POLICE

PICK UP SERVICE Available Call: 509.535.9517

Boo Radley’s Uncommon Gifts

232 N. Howard . 456-7479 Donations Accepted:

across from the carousel

Mon-Sat | 9am-5pm

3808 N. Sullivan | Bldg. 10A

Good for the environment, Good for the community.

10% OFF YOUR NEXT PURCHASE expires 11/30/13

A panhandler in downtown Spokane in summer 2012. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Catch and Release A year into Spokane’s new panhandling ordinance, guilty verdicts are rare BY HEIDI GROOVER

O

n a cold February Saturday, just after 5 crossing the street or interfering with pedestrian pm, a Spokane police officer gazes across traffic on sidewalks.) a downtown corner to see a panhandler he ordinance, which applies only to the step into the street and take something from the downtown core, and its enforcement driver’s side window of a small silver car. Thanks since have come in response to downto an ordinance passed late last summer, the man town concerns about panhandlers. Police have has now committed a misdemeanor, and the ofacknowledged it can be difficult to catch someone ficer confronts him. in the act of panhandling if they know officers “I clearly observed the male enter the roadare nearby, and at least one effort to do so has way by crossing the vertical plane of the edge backfired. On May 22, an officer in an unmarked of the roadway with his hand/arm. I clearly obvehicle patrolled freeway entrances and exits in a served the male solicit from the occupant of the short sting aimed at citing panhandlers. In some described vehicle,” the officer later writes in his cases that day, according to SPD spokeswoman report. “He admitted to reaching into traffic and Monique Cotton, the officer showed taking a $1 dollar bill from the driver money from his window. He wrote five of the vehicle I observed.” tickets between 5 pm and 6:09 pm at But when the case reaches the prosSend comments to intersections like Third and Division ecutor’s office, it’s dismissed. A box is checked next to “Lack of evidence.” In editor@inlander.com. and Fifth and Walnut that day, according to court documents, but each was the year between last October, when dismissed for lack of evidence, lack of probable the law took effect, and this month, officers iscause or “prosecutorial discretion.” Among the sued 154 citations for pedestrian and vehicular prosecutors’ concerns was that the process of interference; more than a third of them have ticketing could have been interpreted as entrapbeen dismissed. ment, tricking someone into committing a crime Of citations written in the past year, just 17 — in order to prosecute them for that crime. or 11 percent — have resulted in guilty convic“It’s not intentional. It’s a group of officers tions. Many remain open because the person trying to address a problem that is very prevalent cited hasn’t shown up in court, and 58 were here in Spokane that people find to be unacdismissed for things like lack of evidence, lack ceptable,” says Judi Carl, commander of the of probable cause or the catch-all term “interests downtown substation, which was created in June. of justice.” (Pedestrian and vehicle interference “Officers are trying to find a way to combat that citations are grouped together in municipal court issue because the law is continually broken by records, meaning that while many of these citaindividuals who have no respect for the law. In tions were given to panhandlers for stepping into doing so, perhaps it was not as clear what was the street, some are given to people for illegally

T

LETTERS

18 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

acceptable and what is not.” Carl says confusion about how to interpret the law has since been clarified, a similar operation hasn’t been done again, and the department is in “close communications” with the prosecutor’s office to prevent similar concerns in the future. Cotton says the officer involved has since received extra training. “It’s a non-issue for us, to tell you the truth,” Carl says. City prosecutor Ellen O’Hara acknowledged through city spokesman Brian Coddington that “the entrapment issue arose” in cases “on or about May 22.” In an email to the Inlander, O’Hara says it’s “not unusual” for some cases to be dismissed, and that “It is the duty of every prosecutor to seek justice, not to simply get as many convictions as possible.” However, O’Hara refused to answer further questions about entrapment concerns or the vehicle interference ordinance in general.

I

ndeed, the citations dropped in part because of entrapment concerns are few, but some say concerns about the ordinance — including the low conviction rate — have bigger repercussions. “It speaks to some of our concerns with things like the proposed [extension of the city’s] sit and lie ordinance,” says Rick Eichstaedt, executive director of the Center for Justice. “What sort of tactics are going to be used to make enforcement of some of these laws easier?” In recent months, as city lawmakers have looked to curb issues including panhandling in downtown, passing ordinances about bus plaza conduct and skateboarding on sidewalks, constitutional and financial tensions has come up. A potential extension to the city’s sit-lie law would outlaw sitting or lying on downtown sidewalks except between the hours of 3 am and 6 am. The ordinance has since been postponed, but some councilmembers still hope to see it passed. Breean Beggs, a local civil rights attorney who’s been outspoken in favor of police reform and a set of criminal justice reforms known as “Smart Justice,” says the question is one of dollars and cents. “We don’t want to see these types of crimes processed through the criminal justice system. It’s very expensive. You have to give [the defendant] a public defender, you have to have a judge and a jury. You have to pay for probation or you put them in jail. You’re spending thousands of dollars on a problem panhandler,” Beggs says. “One reason I would imagine they’re dismissing so many is [they] don’t want to spend the resources to actually follow the law.” When Councilman Mike Allen, who sponsored the vehicle interference ordinance, heard about the number of dismissals earlier this year, he convened a meeting of police, municipal court judges and social service providers looking for answers. Today, he refuses to discuss the details of the meeting, but in an August meeting of the council’s public safety committee, he said the judges expressed concerns about who was being targeted by the law. “In our conversation with the judges,” Allen told the committee, “one of the things they shared is they want to make sure that we’re not just targeting somebody who may need help, along the lines of can we show that we’re also trying to get them into our human services system?” Mark Richard, president of the Downtown Spokane Partnership, says he also heard concerns that the law wasn’t being enforced and sought answers from Municipal Court Judge Mary Logan. “She was very passionate about making sure we’re not making it so cumbersome for an individual who doesn’t have access to a car, or maybe has mental health challenges, or maybe has addiction issues, or is maybe living on the street, and you’re expecting them to show up for a court date on the third Wednesday of next month,” Richard says. Logan declined to talk with the Inlander about the vehicle interference ordinance or potential entrapment, but said in an email, “The Court applies the law, regardless of concerns or no concerns.” Allen says he has no second thoughts about the vehicle interference ordinance, calling it a “great tool.” With fewer convictions than he’d hoped for, Allen says he’s looking to a different approach to curb panhandling: The council will kick in $7,000 toward a $25,000 downtown PR campaign aimed at discouraging people from giving money to panhandlers. n

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 19

NEWS | EDUCATION

Bullets and Bookbags Will arming adults in schools make students safer? BY DANIEL WALTERS

T

he production assistant from ABC’s 20/20 team thought he’d found a story in Coeur d’Alene. Supposedly, school district teachers there had begun carrying concealed handguns to protect against school shooters. It was only when he called the district that he learned he’d been duped. The story was completely made up — his source turned out to be a satirical online newspaper similar to The Onion. But the truth wasn’t so far off. After the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary last December, two different camps demanded solutions. Gun control advocates said it was finally time for new legislation to rein in the availability and power of assault weapons. The NRA called for schools Send comments to to add more armed personnel, reasoning that editor@inlander.com. only a “good guy with a gun” could stop a “bad guy with a gun.” As gun control attempts fizzled nationwide, many schools have pursued the NRA’s option. The Coeur d’Alene school district added additional police officers in the schools and spent $3,390 to install six gun safes in school offices, giving officers powerful rifles that can shoot accurately down long hallways. Spokane Public Schools plans to arm its security officers for the first time. And in Sandpoint, a school board member’s proposal to use armed volunteers — or even gun-toting teachers — has triggered contentious school board meetings and a recall campaign.

LETTERS

509-868-9181

11107 E. 21st Ave Ext. 2309 South 2324 E. 6th Ave Ext. 2109 2508 S. Rebecca St Ext. 2409 20 W. Sumner Ave #406 Ext. 2439 508 W. 24th Ave Ext. 2449 1722 S. Stevens St Ext. 2239 2527 E. 5th Ave Ext. 2289 3027 S. Winthrop Ln. Unit D Ext. 2389 North 3509 E. Courtland Ave Ext. 2299 2817 W. Houston Ave Ext. 2399 1622 W. Kedlin Ln Ext. 2189 2127 E. South Crescent Ave Ext. 2999 Nine Mile Falls 13509 W. Meadowview Ln Ext. 2369 Chattaroy 7621 E. Hamilton Rd Ext. 2339 7623 E. Hamilton Rd Ext. 2349 Lake 12515 S. Clear Lake Rd Ext. 2229 Spokane Valley 2011 N. Center Rd Ext. 2379 8120 E. 1st Ave #54 Ext. 2429 11107 E. 21st Ave Ext. 2309 11016 E. Alki Ave Ext. 2419 Airway Heights 12617 W. Tower Ave Ext. 2259 Deer Park 5270 Scotts Valley Rd Ext. 2359

“I don't work 9-5, I work start to finish.” Scan to view all listings

E

ver since the Sandy Hook tragedy, Lake Pend Oreille school board chair Steve Youngdahl keeps coming back to one big question: In the event of a mass shooting, how long would it take the cops to reach the sprawling district’s rural schools? He says it could take up to 20 minutes for them to arrive at Clark Fork Junior/Senior High School. Every victim killed at Columbine was shot within the first 16 minutes of the siege. That same concern arose at Spokane Public Schools. In 2003, it took about five minutes for the police to arrive after Lewis and Clark junior Sean Fitzpatrick fired a bullet into a cabinet. And that was a school in the middle of downtown. In a security audit commissioned after Sandy Hook, the district noted that an armed school security staff in the high schools “will clearly be more capable of responding to a threat at their site [than the police] as they are already there and could respond imme-

NEARLY EXTINCT:

CITIZEN INITIATIVE POWER VOTE YES ON I-517 Citizen Initiative: A 100- year-old Washington constitutional right of the people to propose new laws directly to voters without interference from government and corporations.

PROBLEM

CORPORATE POWERBROKERS ARE ATTACKING CITIZEN INITIATIVES THEY DON’T LIKE BY KNOCKING THEM OFF THE BALLOT. YOUR RIGHT TO VOTE: DENIED!

SOLUTION

TO ACCESS EXTENSIONS, CALL

1-800-720-6008 www.SpokanePillar.com

20 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

PROTECT CITIZEN INITIATIVE POWER. VOTE YES ON I-517! P a i d f o r b y : E n v i s i o n S p o k a n e P o l i t i c a l C o m m i t t e e | 1 0 2 8 E . 1 3 t h A v e . S p o k a n e , WA 9 9 2 0 2

diately.” Youngdahl, however, says the Lake Pend Oreille district doesn’t have the money to pay school resource officers to patrol every school. Instead he floated a different proposal: Allow properly trained teachers to carry firearms. He says Idaho’s Garden Valley, Midvale, Camas County and Boundary County districts have all looked at doing the same thing.

B

ut no matter who carries them, some people don’t want guns in schools. In Spokane, the plan to arm school security officers raised objections from the Peace and Justice Action League of Spokane, whose members argue arming security staff would cause an “increase in militarization of our society.” In Sandpoint, Youngdahl’s proposal drew skepticism from teachers, the district superintendent and a crowd of vehement critics in the community. “I think putting guns into schools actually puts our children into considerably more risk,” parent Tom Bokowy says. He was so peeved with the proposal, and the arguments underpinning it, he launched a recall effort against Youngdahl. Bokowy started a group called Families for Safe Schools, which has passed out handouts at school board meetings stressing the rarity of school shootings and detailing a litany of accidents involving guns at school. A Michigan security officer made headlines after he forgot

YOUR PHONE. SMARTER. est The region’s b nts, source for eve usic & restaurants, m movies.

his gun in a school bathroom. After a Texas district approved teachers carrying concealed weapons on campus, one teacher accidentally shot himself in the leg during gun training. Bokowy argues the slow emergency services response time concern cuts both ways. “If there’s an accidental shooting at Clark Fork, then it’s going to take [up to] 40 minutes to get them and take them back to the hospital,” he says. Youngdahl has fought back, quoting a Washington Times op-ed arguing that Victoria Soto, a teacher shot at Sandy Hook after helping hide her children in a closet, might still be alive if she’d been armed. He dismisses the gun accident issues as stemming from a lack of proper training. Experts tend to be skeptical of arming teachers. Kenneth Trump, president of National School Safety and Security Services, says that even with training, most teachers would be ill-equipped to shoot an attacker. Mo Canady, executive director of the National Association of School Resource Officers, supports placing armed professional police officers in schools, but says that responding law enforcement may have trouble distinguishing armed teachers from a school shooter. Some insurance companies balk at the notion of insuring armed security personnel. Spokane Public Schools’ insurer, the Washington Schools Risk Management Pool, won’t cover armed security officers, citing the rarity of districts using private armed security and the inherent risk of adding firearms to the academic environment. “Most school districts are no-gun zones,” says

Deborah Callahan, interim executive director for the WSRMP. “If you’re introducing a gun into an area, there could be a fumble, someone else could pick it up.” As a result, Spokane Public Schools will have pay about $20,000 a year for an insurance policy from a separate provider.

T

he focus shifted last week in Sandpoint, as the school board chose to examine a slightly different proposal: Instead of arming teachers, use retired law-enforcement volunteers to patrol schools. Youngdahl hoped the unit would be run out of the Sheriff’s Office and is estimated to cost around $10,000 to $15,000 a year. But Superintendent Shawn Woodward says the Sheriff’s Office hasn’t been interested and would prefer a more traditional resource officer model. The recall campaign against Youngdahl has continued. He says no matter what precautions the district takes, Bokowy’s group will oppose anything to do with guns. “They are just vehemently anti-gun and are willing to use intimidation tactics to stop the discussion,” Youngdahl says. Bokowy suggests that paying to add more guns takes money away from the first and most effective line of defense: counselors who help students struggling with mental health. A 2002 Secret Service study of school shootings focused not on the effectiveness of armed responders, but on identifying students at risk, stopping shootings long before they happen. “There’s no risk of anybody dying if you add two counselors to the high school,” Bokowy says. 

Bank on the go Manage your account, pay bills, even deposit checks on the go with Mobile Banking. Learn more at BankWithSterling. com. Or talk to a hard working Sterling banker at one of 11 Spokane area locations.

www.BankWithSterling.com Nobody works harder for you.

Always in reach

Mobile Banking is available to customers currently enrolled in Personal Online Banking.

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 21

NEWS | HEALTH CARE

“System Error” Washington’s online insurance exchange’s latest glitch mars the website’s performance streak BY DEANNA PAN

H

eralded nationally as a model for state-run health insurance exchanges, Washington Healthplanfinder now has a blemish on an otherwise impressive performance record after boasting high enrollment numbers and a smoothly running website in its first three weeks. Washington is one of 14 states running its own insurance exchange. Its online marketplace, Washington Healthplanfinder, has performed remarkably well, in stark contrast to the botched launch of the federal government’s HealthCare. gov. Despite several opening-day glitches that forced exchange officials to take down the site shortly after it debuted Oct. 1, Washington Healthplanfinder has since reported the highest enrollment figures in the country, prompting an effusive evaluation from the Washington Post’s Sarah Kliff, who concluded the site “is what it looks like when Obamacare works.” But on Friday, officials announced that a “system error” caused some 8,000 people who applied for private insurance plans through the exchange website to receive overestimated tax credit amounts. The glitch means affected applicants will have to pay between pennies and hundreds of dollars a month more for their premiums than they’d thought.

Reached over the phone, Michael Marchand, communications director at the Washington Health Benefit Exchange, was audibly frustrated with the website’s most recent setback. “We’re really disappointed because we expect more of ourselves, and we expect to deliver more for the consumers here in the state, and we want to ensure they all have access to quality health plans,” Marchand says. “It’s unacceptable that this has happened, but we’re really glad we were able to fix it.” The “system error” causing the website to inaccurately compute tax subsidies came to down a missing multiplier of 12. Complex health insurance exchange sites, such as Washington’s, pull data from the central Federal Data Services Hub, which in turn transmits information from multiple different federal agencies to help determine coverage eligibility and financial assistance. When Washington consumers entered their monthly income into the Healthplanfinder website, the federal hub was expecting an annual amount, and as result, miscalculated the subsidy. The glitch, which Marchand says was originally reported within the first 10 days of the marketplace’s operation and identified definitively last week, was corrected within 24 hours. Marchand says the exchange “is not taking the time to

AHEAD OF THE PACK

How do Washington’s enrollment numbers stack up against those from other states? WASHINGTON: 48,995 enrolled through Oct. 25. Uninsured and eligible population: 835,271 NEW YORK: 37,030 enrolled through Oct. 23. Uninsured and eligible population: 1,915,217 KENTUCKY: 26,174 enrolled through Oct. 24. Uninsured and eligible population: 622,054 CONNECTICUT: 3,847 enrolled through Oct. 15. Uninsured and eligible population: 242,738 MARYLAND: 3,186 enrolled through Oct. 23. Uninsured and eligible population: 480,528 RHODE ISLAND: approx. 2,000 enrolled in first two weeks. Uninsured and eligible population: 100,952 VERMONT: approx.1,400 enrolled through Oct. 24. Uninsured and eligible population: 44,104

Unlimited, My Way

SM

Unlimited while on the Sprint network. Excludes price and phone selection. Account must remain in good standing. Prohibited network rules and restrictions apply.

sprint.com/unlimited

22 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

drill down to see who’s at fault,” be it site developer Deloitte, the feds or the exchange. Exchange officials haven’t decided what kind of fix they’ll implement for the 8,000 affected applicants, but they’ll contact them by mail or phone soon. “Ultimately, at the end of the day we’re going to be graded on how well the website works, and we’re still improving that,” Marchand concedes. In Washington, more people have enrolled in exchange-based health plans than in any other state currently reporting enrollment figures. As of Oct. 25, nearly 50,000 people have purchased health insurance through Washington Healthplanfinder since the first of the month — 6,390 of whom have enrolled in private plans, the rest in Medicaid. Another 52,000 have completed applications for enrollment, but have yet to submit their first payment, due in late December. DJ Wilson, president of Wilson Strategic Communications and host of the State of Reform Health Policy Conference, says he expects applications will spike in December as people’s insurance policies expire at the end of the month. “HIT [health information technology] implementations are always ugly and painful and difficult, so this is no exception,” Wilson says. He points to the 2003 error-ridden rollout of the Medicare Part D prescription drug program under President George W. Bush, which current House Speaker After two years of debate, John Boehner called “horrendous” Idaho lawmakers voted to seven years ago. build their own state-run While the problems plaguing exchange in March, but, HealthCare.gov risk consumer rejecfacing time constraints, tion, Wilson doesn’t think Washinghave allowed the federal ton’s glitch will depress future enrollgovernment to run its IT ment numbers. “It is a really big deal,” platform. he says, “but for most people who are trying to determine whether or not they’ll have health insurance for the first time ever, it’s not going to get in the way of their enrollment.” By another measure, interest in Washington Healthplanfinder is obviously strong. One of biggest complaints Marchand currently hears involves wait times to the exchange’s call center, where customer service representatives are overwhelmed with calls, receiving on average 6,000 a day, sometimes up to 10,000. The exchange is hiring an additional 145 people to handle the call volume. It’s this sustained interest that Marchand says has allowed the exchange to identify problems with the website early. Washington has data from tens of thousands of applicants seeking affordable healthcare coverage; other states with far fewer enrollment numbers just don’t. “If you don’t have enrollment and you can’t see patterns, you may not know this is an issue,” he says. “The silver lining is because of our volume, we were at least able to get in front of it, solve it and fix it within the first three weeks.”  deannap@inlander.com

20th Anniversary

Spokane Cork & Keg Festival A Wine and Microbrew Tasting

Saturday, November 9th • 7:00 - 10:00 pm • Mirabeau Park Hotel $45 per person ($50 at the Door) • Must be 21 to attend. Taste hundreds of great wines and microbrews! Enjoy incredible hors d’oeuvres prepared by the Inland Northwest Culinary Academy. Live music by the Martini Brothers!

Tickets and more information available online: SpokaneCorkandKeg.com

IN IDAHO

DID YOU KNOW... If your pet has:

 Cancer  Pain  Arthritis  Allergies

 Seizures  Metabolic  Skin Problems Disease  Paralysis  Behavior  Organ Failure Problems

Or any other incurable or recurring disease

There are gentler, equally effective means of treatment than harsh drugs. www.DrDennisThomas.com

Never miss an issue

All of our issues, online, all the time, in a tablet-friendly format.

HOLISTIC HEALTH CARE FOR PETS Dr. Dennis Thomas, D.V.M.  1707 E. 11th Ave.  Spokane

509-214-2676

Dr. Thomas has been a licensed, practicing veterinarian for over 30 years. For more than a decade he has focused on alternative modalities to address pet health care.

Always in reach OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 23

The media misdirected its focus when it told Pfc. Bradley Manning’s story, say Project Censored authors.

T

his year’s annual Project Censored list of the most underreported news stories includes the widening wealth gap, the trial of Pfc. Bradley Manning for leaking classified documents, and President Obama’s war on whistleblowers — all stories that actually received considerable news coverage. So how exactly were they “censored” and what does that say of this media watchdog project? Project Censored isn’t only about stories that were deliberately buried or ignored. It’s about stories the media has covered poorly through a sort of false objectivity that skews the truth. Journalists do cry out against injustice on occasion, but they don’t

Brooke Gladstone, host of the radio program On the Media and writer of the graphic novel-cum-news media critique, The Influencing Machine, says the story of Manning (who now goes by the first name Chelsea) was the perfect example of the media trying to cover a story right, but getting it mostly wrong. “The Bradley Manning case is for far too long centered on his personality rather than the nature of his revelations,” Gladstone tells us. Manning’s career was sacrificed for sending 700,000 classified documents, including battlefield documents from U.S. wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and diplomatic cables, to WikiLeaks. But the media coverage focused largely on Manning’s trial and subse-

any point in its 20-year history.) Still, in 2012, the number of reporters in the U.S. dipped to its lowest level since 1978, with fewer than 40,000 reporters nationally. This creates a sense of desperation in the newsroom, and in the end, it’s the public that loses. “What won out is something much more palpable to the advertisers,” says Robert McChesney, an author, longtime media reform advocate, professor at University of Illinois, and host of Media Matters from 2000-2012. Blandness beat out fearless truth-telling. Even worse than kowtowing to advertisers is the false objectivity the media tries to achieve, McChesney says, neutering its news to stay “neu-

Truth to Power always do it well. That’s why Project Censored was started back in 1976: to highlight stories the mainstream media missed or gave scant attention to. Although the project initially started at Sonoma State University in California, now academics and students from 18 universities and community colleges across the country pore through hundreds of submissions of overlooked and underreported stories annually. A panel of academics and journalists then picks the top 25 stories and curates them into themed clusters. This year’s book, Censored 2014: Fearless Speech in Fearful Times, hit bookstores this month. What causes the media to stumble? There are as many reasons as there are failures.

quent change in gender identity. Gladstone says that this is part of the mainstream media’s inability to deal with vast quantities of information which, she adds, “is not what most of our standard media does all that well.” The media mangling of Manning is No. 1 on the Project Censored list, but the shallow coverage this story received is not unique. The news media is in crisis, particularly in the U.S., and it’s getting worse. The Project for Excellence in Journalism, which conducts an annual analysis of trends in news, found that as revenue in journalism declined, newsrooms have shed 30 percent of their staff in the past decade. (The Inlander stands out as an exception, with a larger staff than at

says. Unable to tell the story of a trend and unable to talk about rising inequality for fear of appearing partisan, reporters often fail to connect the dots for their readers. “So much of media criticism is really political commentary squeezed through a media squeezer,” Gladstone says, “and it comes out mediashaped.” Indeed, the failures of mainstream media are clear in Project Censored’s top nine stories of the year:

1. 

MANNING AND THE FAILURE OF CORPORATE MEDIA

Untold stories of Iraqi civilian deaths by American soldiers, U.S.

Important stories that received short shrift in the mainstream media

tral” on a topic. This handcuffs journalists into not drawing conclusions, even when they are well-supported by the facts. In order to report a story, they rely on the words of others to make claims, limiting what they can report. “You allow people in power to set the range of legitimate debate, and you report on it,” McChesney says. Project Censored stories reflect that dynamic. For example, reporting on the increasing gulf between the rich and the poor is easy, but talking about why the rich are getting richer is where journalists begin to worry about their objectivity, says Gladstone. “I think that there is a desire to stay away from stories that will inspire rhetoric of class warfare,” she

BY KATE CONGER

diplomats pushing aircraft sales on foreign royalty, uninvestigated abuse by Iraqi allies, the perils of the rise in private war contractors — this is what Manning exposed. They were stories that challenge the U.S. political elite, and they were only made possible by a sacrifice. Manning received a 35-year prison sentence for revealing state secrets to WikiLeaks, a story told countless times in corporate media. But as Project Censored posits, the failure of our media was not in the lack of coverage of Manning, but in its focus. Though the New York Times partnered with WikiLeaks to release stories based on the documents, many published in 2010 through 2011, news from the leaks has since slowed ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 25

Spokane Public Radio Presents

COVER STORY | PROJECT CENSORED “TRUTH TO POWER,” CONTINUED...

C=0, M=80, Y=90, K=0 C=100, M=38, Y=0, K=100 C=91, M=51, Y=0, K=0

NPR CMYK color logo for dark background, uncoated stocks Use at any scale Downsize the “®” when the using logo on oversized applications such outdoor advertising and large exhibit displays

to a trickle — a waste of more than 700,000 pieces of classified intelligence giving unparalleled, ground-level views of America’s costly wars. The media quickly took a scathing indictment of U.S. military policy and spun it into a story about Manning’s politics and patriotism. As Rolling Stone pointed out (“Did the Media Fail Bradley Manning?”), Manning initially took the trove of leaks to the Washington Post and the New York Times, only to be turned away. Alexa O’Brien, a former Occupy activist, scooped most of the media by actually attending Manning’s trial. She produced tens of thousands of words in transcriptions of the court hearings as one of the only reporters on the beat.

2. 

RICHEST GLOBAL 1 PERCENT HIDE BILLIONS IN TAX HAVENS

$25 General $18 Student

OUTLETS / 800.325.SEAT Event Donors Design Spike; Dodson’s Jewelers; Sam Rodell, Architect; Sayre & Sayre, Attorneys at Law

Fall Folk

Festival Broadcast

Join the KPBX live audience!

Saturday, Nov. 9 11 a.m. - 1p.m. SCC Lair Auditorium

Mission & Greene www.SpokanePublicRadio.org

Global corporate fat cats hold $21 trillion to $32 trillion in offshore havens, money hidden from government taxation that would benefit people around the world, according to findings by James S. Henry, the former chief economist of the global management firm McKinsey & Company. The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists obtained a leak in April 2013, revealing how widespread the buy-in was to these tax havens. The findings were damning: government officials in Canada, Russia, and other countries have embraced offshore accounts, the world’s top banks (including Deutsche Bank) have worked to maintain them, and the tax

answer a higher calling with

higher learning.

Joe Wittwer

LEAD PASTOR OKANE LIFE CENTER, SP

Apply now. Visit whitworth.edu/theologyMA or call 509.777.3222.

26 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

The Whitworth M.A. in Theology Program prepares you to serve the church and to serve the world. The program focuses on classical theological education, practical application, and spiritual formation to help you build a solid foundation for your future. And the convenient schedule lets you earn your degree at your own pace, with limited time on campus. Answer the call — contact us today!

havens are used in Ponzi schemes. Moving money offshore has implications that ripple through the world economy. Part of Greece’s economic collapse was due to these tax havens, ICIJ reporter Gerard Ryle told Gladstone on her radio show. “It’s because people don’t want to pay taxes,” he said. “You avoid taxes by going offshore and playing by different rules.” U.S. Senator Carl Levin, D-Michigan, introduced legislation — SB1533, The Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act — to combat the practice, but so far the bill has received little play in the media. Henry says the hidden wealth was a “huge black hole” in the world economy that has never been measured, which could generate income tax revenues between $190 billion and $280 billion a year.

3. 

TRANS-PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP

Take 600 corporate advisors, mix in officials from 11 international governments, let it bake for about two years, and out pops international partnerships that threaten to cripple progressive movements worldwide. The Trans-Pacific Partnership is a trade agreement, but leaked texts show it may allow foreign investors to use “investor-state” tribunals to extract extravagant extra damages for “expected future profits,” according to Public Citizen’s Global Trade Watch. The trade watch group investigated the TPP and is the main advocate opposing its policies.

Injured in an Accident? WE CAN HELP! Deissner Law Office 509.462.0827 www.deissnerlaw.com 1707 W. Broadway Spokane WA 99201

Licensed in Washington and Idaho

Sunday, Nov 3rd The Care and Feeding of Monsters The Trans-Pacific Partnership, says Project Censored, threatens to tip the balance in favor of corporate over public interests. GOBIERNO DE CHILE PHOTO The AFL-CIO, Sierra Club, and other organizations have also had growing concerns about the level of access granted to corporations in these agreements. With extra powers granted to foreign firms, the possibility that companies would continue moving offshore could grow. But even with the risks of outsized corporate influence, the U.S. has a strong interest in the TPP in order to maintain trade agreements with Asia. The balancing act between corporate and public interests is

Rev. Dr. Todd F. Eklof, UUCS Minister

at stake, but until the U.S. releases more documents from negotiations, the American people will remain in the dark.

Unitarian Universalist

OBAMA’S WAR ON WHISTLEBLOWERS

4340 W. Ft. Wright Drive 509-325-6383 www.uuspokane.org

4. 

President Obama has invoked the Espionage Act of 1917 more than every other president combined. Seven times, Obama has pursued leakers with the act, acting against Thomas Drake, Shamai Leibowitz, Bradley Manning, ...continued on next page

Case sale

w i n e  c e l l a r s

Monday, October 28 – Monday, November 11

Save 30 to 50% or more on Mix-&-Match Cases!

Church of Spokane

Sunday Services

Religious Ed & Childcare

9:15 & 11am

LOVE

the rts?

A

We’ve got you covered.

Call or visit the Tasting Rooms EARLY in the sale for best selection — quantities are limited Phone in your order (Visa or MasterCard only) Pick up at the Cliff House (AGES 21+ ONLY)

CALL (509) 927-9463 9am–5pm M–F • Noon–5pm Weekends and stock up for the Holidays!

For the list of sale wines, order forms and more:

arborcrest.com

Visit us for First Friday Artwalk! 35 W. Main, Spokane 509-464-7677

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 27

COVER STORY | PROJECT CENSORED “TRUTH TO POWER,” CONTINUED... Stephen Kim, Jeffrey Sterling, John Kiriakou and most recently Edward Snowden. All had ties to the State Department, FBI, CIA or NSA, and all of them leaked to journalists. “Neither party is raising hell over this. This is the sort of story that sort of slips through the cracks,” McChesney says. And when the politicians don’t raise a fuss, neither does the media. ProPublica covered the issue, constructing timelines and mapping out the various arrests and indictments. But where Project Censored points out the lack of coverage is in Obama’s hypocrisy — only a year before, he signed the Whistleblower Protection Act. Later, he said he wouldn’t follow every letter of the law in the bill he had just signed. “Certain provisions in the Act threaten to interfere with my constitutional duty to supervise the executive branch,” Obama said. “As my Administration previously informed the Congress, I will interpret those sections consistent with my authority.”

“The number of Patriot groups, including armed militias, has grown 813 percent since Obama was elected — from 149 in 2008 to 1,360 in 2012.”

5. 

HATE GROUPS AND ANTIGOVERNMENT GROUPS ON RISE ACROSS U.S.

Hate groups in the U.S. are on the rise, according to a report by the Southern Poverty Law Center. There are 1,007 known hate groups operating across the country, it wrote, including neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan, white nationalists, neo-Confederates, racist skinheads, black separatists, border vigilantes and others. Since 2000, those groups have grown by more than half, and there was a “powerful resurgence” of Patriot groups, the likes of which were involved in the Oklahoma City bombing in 1995. Worst of all, the huge growth in armed militias seems to have unmistakable timing with Obama’s election. “The number of Patriot groups, including armed militias, has grown 813 percent since Obama was elected — from 149 in 2008 to 1,360 in 2012,” the SPLC reported. Though traditionally those groups were race-motivated, the report noted that now they are gunning for government. There was a smattering of news coverage when the SPLC released its report, but not much since.

OKANE

SP 2013 PREMIERE

TGR’S

WAY OF LE:IF7PEM

OR: SAT | $10 | DO

WWW.SNOWLANDEREXPO.COM 28 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

/SNOWLANDER

6PM | MOVI

An Occupy rally in Washington, D.C. CHRIS WIELAND PHOTO

6. 

BILLIONAIRES’ RISING WEALTH INTENSIFIES POVERTY AND INEQUALITY

The world’s billionaires added $241 billion to their collective net worth in 2012. That’s an economic recovery, right? That gain, coupled with the world’s richest people’s new total worth of $1.9 trillion (more than the GDP of Canada), wasn’t reported by some kooky socialist group, but by Bloomberg News. But few journalists are asking the important

question: Why? Project Censored points to journalist George Monbiot, who highlights a reduction of taxes and tax enforcement, the privatization of public assets and the weakening of labor unions. His conclusions are backed up by the United Nations’ Trade and Development Report from 2012, which noted how the trend hurts everyone: “Recent empirical and analytical work reviewed here mostly shows a negative correlation between inequality and growth.” ...continued on next page

VISIT ANY PIZZA PIPELINE LOCATION TO GET

2 OFF

$

YOUR EXPO TICKET Downtown: (509)326-6412 North: (509)466-8080 Valley: (509)921-0000

South Hill: (509)534-2222 Shadle: (509)328-1111 Millwood: (509)893-4444

SPIN PRIHZEEEL W

THE

2013

Visit THE

PHOTO BOOTH

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 29 VISIT ANY PIZZA PIPELINE LOCATION TO GET

COVER STORY | PROJECT CENSORED

A surveillance tower seen from the Mexican side of a wall on the border. JONATHAN McINTOSH PHOTO

“TRUTH TO POWER,” CONTINUED...

with a splash

One-hour Symphony concert includes: Vieuxtemps Yankee Doodle and Copland’s Appalachian Spring

"Currently burning up the Inland Empire and buzzing the world of bluegrass” -Victory Music

Friday, November 1 Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox Band, Bar & Banter 5-6:45pm Hear Big Red Barn in the lobby Orchestra Performance 7-8pm in the auditorium

30 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

Tickets/Info 509-624-1200

spokanesymphony.org

7. 

MERCHANT OF DEATH AND NUCLEAR WEAPONS

The report highlighted by Project Censored on the threat of nuclear war is an example not of censorship, strictly, but a desire for media reform. Project Censored highlighted a study from Physicians for Social Responsibility that said one billion people could starve in the decade after a nuclear detonation. Corn production in the U.S. would decline by an average of 10 percent for an entire decade and food prices would make food inaccessible to millions of the world’s poorest. This is not journalism in the classic sense, Gladstone says. In traditional journalism, as it has played out since the early 20th century, news requires an element of something new in order to be reported — not a looming threat or danger. So in this case, what Project Censored identified was the need for a new kind of journalism, what it calls “solutions journalism.” “Solutions journalism,” Sarah van Gelder wrote in the foreword to Censored 2014, “must investigate not only the individual innovations, but also the larger pattern of change — the emerging ethics, institutions, and ways of life that are coming into existence.”

8. 

BANK INTEREST INFLATES GLOBAL PRICES BY 35 TO 40 PERCENT

Does 35 percent of everything bought in the U.S. go to interest? Professor Margrit Kennedy of the University of Hanover thinks so, and she says it’s a major funnel of money from the 99 percent to the rich. In her 2012 book, Occupy Money, Kennedy wrote that tradespeople, suppliers, wholesalers and retailers along the chain of production rely on credit. Her figures were initially drawn from the German economy, but Ellen Brown of the Web of Debt and Global Research says she found similar patterns in the U.S. This “hidden interest” has sapped the growth of other indusSend comments to editor@inlander.com. tries, she says, lining the pockets of the financial sector. So if interest is causing so many industries to stagnate, why would journalists avoid the topic? Few economists have echoed her views, and few experts emerged to back up her assertions. Notably, she’s a professor in an architectural school, with no formal credentials in economics.

LETTERS

From her own website, she says she became an “expert” in economics “through her continuous research and scrutiny.” Without people in power pushing the topic, McChesney, of Media Matters, says that a mainstream journalist would be seen as going out on a limb. “The reporters raise an issue the elites are not raising themselves, then you’re ideological, have an axe to grind, sort of a hack,” he says. “It makes journalism worthless on pretty important issues.”

9. 

BORDER

A “CULTURE OF CRUELTY” ALONG THE MEXICO-U.S.

The plight of Mexican border crossings usually involves three types of stories in the U.S. press: deaths in the stretch of desert beyond the border, the horrors of drug cartels, and heroic journeys across border crossings by sympathetic workers. But a report released a year ago by the organization No More Deaths snags a spot for overlooked stories in Project Censored. The report asserts that people arrested by the U.S. Border Patrol while crossing were denied water and told to let their sick die. No More Deaths conducted more than 12,000 interviews to form the basis of its study in three Mexican cities: Naco, Nogales and Agua Prieta. The report cites grossly ineffective oversight from the Department of Homeland Security. This has received some coverage, from Salon showcasing video of Border Patrol agents destroying jugs of water meant for crossers to a recent New York Times piece citing a lack of oversight for the Border Patrol’s excessive force. The ACLU lobbied the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to call international attention to the plight of these border crossers at the hands of U.S. law enforcement. If ever an issue flew under the radar, this is it.  Comments? Send them to editor@inlander.com. A version of this article first appeared in the San Francisco Bay Guardian.

Less pain. More life.

If joint pain is keeping you from enjoying life the way you used to, turn to The Joint Restoration Centers at Deaconess and Valley Hospitals. We are the only hospitals in the Inland Northwest to earn The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® for Hip and Knee Replacement,* demonstrating our commitment to the highest level of care for our patients. Hip & Knee Pain Causes and Treatments November 6, 6 p.m. • Deaconess Hospital Join us for this FREE orthopedic seminar. RSVP at RockwoodHealthSystem.com or call 509-473-5755.

THE JOINT RESTORATION CENTERS AT

Deaconess Hospital & Valley Hospital

*As of October 2013

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 31 72432_3_DMC_ORTH6Nov_7_4x11c.indd 1

10/25/13 4:07 PM

THE SPOKANE SYMPHONY PRESENTS Symphony SuperPops

BIG BAND

FREE WINE & BEER TASTING

Saturday, November 9 - 8pm

350 Fine Wines Available • Over 40 Microbrews 6 Beers On Tap • Free WiFi

The Spokane Symphony ignites with the Big Band era and special guest Matt Catingub. Songs include: “It Had To Be You,” “All of Me” and “Take the A Train”

Limited Menu • Happy Hour 5PM-7PM • NFL Ticket on 13 HDTVs

MON-THUR 4 PM-10 PM • FRI-SAT 1PM-10 PM • SUN 10 AM-8 PM

sponsored by

Classics

Abbey Craw

DAZZLING BRILLIANCE

ford, Vocalis

t

Saturday, November 16 - 8pm Sunday, November 17 - 3pm atsu, Piano

Jon Nakam

509.624.1200

Featuring Hindemith’s Symphonic Metamorphosis and Rachmaninov’s Piano Concerto No. 3 sponsored by the Johnston Fix Foundation Harriet and Bill Fix

SPOKANESYMPHONY.ORG ALL CONCERTS AT MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX

32 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

LOW IDAHO PRICES ON FUEL & TOBACCO! Huge Inventory of Premium Cigars, Chew, E Cigs and Cigarettes - Cartons as Low as $27.99

DRIVE THROUGH WINDOW! MON- SAT 5:30AM-11PM • SUN 6:30AM-11PM

7200 W. Seltice Way (I-90 Exit 299, next to Cabela’s)

(208) 777-7778 • (877)390-5778 www.StateLinePlaza.com

Picturing Normal “Bordering the Surreal” explores American culture at SFCC BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

Just a taste of the quirkiness found in Jim Stone’s photography.

A

bit outside the norm. Not quite bizarre or fantastical, but definitely unusual. That’s the gist of what you’ll see in “Bordering the Surreal,” a new photography exhibit at Spokane Falls Community College featuring three distinct bodies of work. Jim Stone captures the essential quirkiness of American culture in a series entitled Idiom Savant. There’s diminutive Pete, described as “America’s smallest fire-

man,” who stands with muscled arms crossed, not quite eye-level with the bumper sticker on a black Chevrolet truck, proclaiming his love for machine guns and dislike of liberals. Jo Ann perches on a shabby swinging bench outside her extraordinary Benoit, Miss., home: a 727 airplane she refurbished to replace her former home, destroyed by storms. Remnants of natural disasters are also prominent in many of David Graham’s photographs, including post-

Katrina New Orleans. In the tradition of photographer Robert Frank, whose 1958 book The Americans chronicled Frank’s cross-country exploration of a nation in transition, Graham embarked on his own road trip to produce An Itinerant Life. Many of these photos demonstrate Graham’s serendipitous vision: a row of port-a-potties outside an official-looking, neoclassical building in Omaha, Neb., or the trompe-l’œil double take of a real tree emerging ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 33

CULTURE | PHOTOGRAPHY

For your special family day on Easter Sunday.

Textured Acrylic

“Up and Away”

by Melissa Cole

November 9, 2013 Gala Dinner and Juried Auction at the Historic Davenport Hotel $100 per person includes complimentary wine and beautiful art catalogue

Preview auction artwork at the MAC

October 4 - November 8, 2013

A look at Spokane native Eva Kaiser’s fantastical photography.

“PICTURING NORMAL” CONTINUED... behind a building on which a tree is painted. Combined, Graham and Stone offer a contemporary spin on the narrative traditions of photographers like Diane Arbus and Lee Friedlander, who since the 1950s gave us humans at their most interesting — just being human. By contrast, EVA, a volume of images of and by Spokane native Eva Kaiser, offers images never intended to present themselves as art, according to exhibition organizer Tom O’Day. EVA documents Kaiser’s self-transformation through makeup, clothing, and hairstyle. “There were times I’d see her and not even recognize her,” says O’Day of Kaiser. EVA represents a generational shift in attitudes towards photography, from comparatively modest numbers of printed objects to a virtual,

image-saturated world. And by juxtaposing the large-format images by nationally known photographers Graham and Stone against the mostly snapshot-sized EVA images, O’Day adds another layer of complexity to the exhibit. He notes that Kaiser’s impulse to document comes from the same place as that of Stone and Graham. “At what point do people decide they’re artists?” asks O’Day, who views the exhibition as a valuable teaching tool, not only for SFCC students but the community at large.  “Bordering the Surreal” • Oct. 24-Nov. 22 • SFCC Art Gallery • Fine Arts Building #6, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. • Reception, Oct. 24, 12:30-1:30 pm • sfccfinearts.org/gallery • 533-3710

ARE YOU

PRESEASON 10 OFF READY? $100 OR MORE WINTER WINTER READY & SNOW $ 25 OFF PACKAGE $ 200 OR MORE TIRE $ 95 $ SALE

WINTER

NOW! TWO LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU! 16010 E. Sprague 509-924-1681 17204 E. Sprague 509-863-9918 WE’LL MEET OR BEAT COMPETITOR PRICES, WE WON’T BE UNDERSOLD!

34 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

89

PLUS TAX

Includes Coolant Flush, Oil Change, Brake Inspection, Charging System, Tire Rotation, 52 Point Inspection on most vehicles.

Not valid with other offers. Coupon required. Most cars and light trucks. Expires 11/30/13

$

50 OFF 500 OR MORE

$

ON ANY SERVICE

Save Now & Be Ready CALL US FIRST FOR YOUR TIRE NEEDS!

Not valid with other offers. Coupon required. Most cars and light trucks. Expires 11/30/13

CULTURE | DIGEST

THEATER CST RETURNS L

aura Little finds herself in a familiar spot — in the executive director’s seat of the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre, the same position she held from 2010-12. When CST’s board contacted her about the possibility of coming back to the theater, there wasn’t much of a theater left for her to direct. At the end of CST’s season in August, the organization’s board announced that, following a summer of underwhelming ticket sales, it had laid off its staff and voted to disband the theater after 46 years of producing professionally acted plays and musicals. But then about three weeks ago, Little got a call from the board of directors to take a look at CST’s books and see what could be done to right the ship. Now it looks like CST, with Little at the helm, has risen from the ashes. Little has spent the past two years co-producing Broadway shows and heading up her own production company. She’ll be assisted by Post Falls native Jadd Davis, who has done casting for the Village Theatre in the Seattle suburb of Issaquah for the past three years. Despite a rocky off-season, Little says that CST will continue to provide the sort of high-quality productions on which it built its reputation over the years. “I think you’re going to see an even slightly higher quality because of the bar that Jadd has set for these actors,” says Little. While she says the quality will remain, several other facets of CST will look a lot different to theatergoers this

901 W E S T S P R A G U E A V E , S P O K A N E | 5 09. 227 . 7 638 Fri, Nov 1 • 7pm Sat, Nov 2 • 3pm & 7pm Fri, Nov 8 • 7pm Sat, Nov 9 • 3pm & 7pm Sun, Nov 10 • 3pm Tickets: Adults $14

PRESENTS

Children (12 & Under) $13 Seniors (65+) $13

Group Discount (10+ Tickets) $10

Laura Little returns to Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre. summer. Most noticeably, there are plans for only two productions: My Fair Lady and another to be named later. Also, CST is set to leave its longtime home at North Idaho College for the 400-seat Kroc Center. Little says the move will save the organization as much as $40,000 for the season. CST has primarily relied on ticket sales to stay afloat, but Little plans to institute fundraising efforts (including concerts and readings) to bolster the nonprofit organization’s financial standing. There’s still plenty to be settled, says Little, but she can guarantee that CST will survive to see a 2014 season. — MIKE BOOKEY

PROFESSOR SERIES

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

WED NOV 6 | 7PM

An Evening with

Grammy nominated pianist

Judy Carmichael “One of the world’s leading interpreters of stride piano and swing...”

For Your Consideration

Thursday, November 7 7:30pm

BY HEIDI GROOVER

MOSCOW BALLET’S

ALBUM | Canadian rock outfit Arcade Fire’s latest album REFLEKTOR is all the things fans have come to expect from the band: mysterious, pretentious, dystopian, at times a little overly referential/nonsensical. After all, it’s the weirdness that keeps us coming back. Produced by LCD Soundsystem heavyweight James Murphy, with a cameo from David Bowie, its 13 tracks feature dancy funk beats, reggae sounds and clear influences from the group’s recent trips to Haiti and Jamaica. “I’m not trying to tell other people’s stories,” lead singer Win Butler told Rolling Stone. “We’re just trying to allow an experience to change you.” I know. Ambitious. But while it may not change you, I’m sure it’ll make you dance.

COMEDY | I won’t use this space to swoon over NBC’s Parks and Recreation — If you know the show, I’ll trust that you love it. But one of its darlings, Aziz Ansari, has seen his career outside Parks and Rec explode. Ansari’s new stand-up album BURIED ALIVE debuts on Netflix this week (Friday, Nov. 1, to be exact) and based on his track record and sneak peeks of the set online, it’s going to be fantastic. After outgrowing his bits about R. Kelly and Kanye West, Ansari is moving into new territory: relationships — divorce, marriage, having kids. It promises to be refreshing, grown-up and, most of all, hilarious. Find details and a clip at azizansari.com.

APP | Sure, none of us love the idea of big-box stores, but to actually avoid them altogether is an expensive prospect. So admit to yourself that you’re still shopping at Target, despite knowing it’s nearly as corporately irresponsible as Walmart, and save some money doing it with the store’s TARGET CARTWHEEL app. It works as a customizable coupon book you save to your smartphone or via their desktop site at cartwheel.target. com. Browse deals, pick the ones you want and show the barcode at checkout. (Be aware: Cartwheel requires a Facebook login to save, and this likely means another way for Zuckerberg to track you. Refer back to that corporate responsibility I mentioned and take appropriate precautions.)

Wed Nov 13 - 7:30pm | Thur Nov 14 - 7:30pm

Frank Vigola, Vinny Raniolo and Peppino D’Agostino

Wed November 20 | 7:30pm To benefit PBS Television

Stay at

Drink at For Reservations Call: 509.747.1041 or visit www.hotelrubyspokane.com

*A $2 RESTORATION FEE IS ADDED TO EACH TICKET COST.

BINGCROSBYTHEATER.COM

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 35

FIND ART and more this Friday, Venues open 5 - 8 pm PATIT CREEK CELLARS TASTING ROOM

ADAMS STREET AREA BARRISTER WINERY

1213 W. RAILROAD AVE. Presenting Jeannine Marx Fruci’s exhibit: “Feelings of Home.” Artists’ reception at 5 pm with Beacon Hill’s Bistro Buffet 6-8pm. “Lonesome” Lyle Morse plays acoustic blues, 6:30-10 pm. Reserve a table 465-3591.

KOLVA SULLIVAN GALLERY

115 S. ADAMS ST., SUITE A Featuring Julia Galloway’s exhibit: “Function = Beauty.” Professor of ceramics and Director of the School of Art at the University of Montana, Julia works with functional forms. Artist reception.

TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY

115 S. ADAMS ST. Artists, Gina Freuen, Chris Kelsey and Mark Moore, are creating for November a fun show for holiday shopping “Under 13 Inches for Under $130.” Wood, soda and gas fired ceramics.

CARNEGIE SQUARE AREA ANDY’S BAR & GRILL

1401 W. 1ST AVE. Featuring local photographer Robert Heagy. Robert’s photos capture the beauty of the inland northwest and highlight some of Spokane’s hidden treasures.

DAVENPORT HOTEL AND STEAM PLANT AREA * BABY BAR

827 W. 1ST AVE. (behind Neato Burrito) Join us for First Friday. We have Encaustic paintings by Ara Lyman & live music at 9pm by BBBBBandits, Rice Queen, Camaros.

GRANDE RONDE CELLARS

822 W. SPRAGUE AVE. (across from the Davenport) Featuring fiber artist Helen Parsons. Also featuring pottery by Mike Buck. Guitar by Maxie Ray Mills. Happy Hour/Artists Reception 5-7pm, Live Music 6-9pm.

SAPPHIRE LOUNGE

901 W. 1ST AVE. Come in and join us at the Sapphire Lounge. Get an artistic, handcrafted cocktail, fresh-squeezed juices & delicious flatbreads. Relax & be surrounded by stained-glass art, amazing chandeliers, great music & warm, romantic vibes!

STEAM PLANT

159 S. LINCOLN ST. The Art of Wood - A collection of artisans’ work: wine racks, vessels, musical instruments and treasure chests made of unique and rare woods with techniques that are truly sculptural. Plus sample Steam Plant’s own brews while you enjoy the work.

DOWNTOWN CORE AREA ARBOR CREST TASTING ROOM 808 W. MAIN AVE. (River Park Square, third level) Award-winning “Americana” artist Patti Simpson Ward shares her warm, colorful artwork of winter and holiday scenes of Spokane and the Northwest.

AVENUE WEST GALLERY

707 W. MAIN AVE. (Crescent Court skywalk level) Featuring Ray Loff redo for November. His mission is to make utilitarian wares that are artistic and functional. The title of his show is “Porcelain Stoneware, Raku Functional and Decorative Ceramics”. Artist reception. Refreshments and music.

BOZZI COLLECTION GALLERY

211 N. WALL ST. Bozzi Collection is proud to feature new works from artist Ildikó Kalapács. Kalapács’s work examines the relationship between the physical and the psychological.

BRICK WALL GALLERY

BENNETT BLOCK, MAIN & HOWARD (2nd floor skywalk level) The Brickwall Photographic Gallery is featuring Rebecca Tifft for November. Rebecca is a wildlife photographer from the Northwest. Open until 8:30 pm

DODSONS JEWELERS

516 W. RIVERSIDE AVE. “A World Beyond,” the works of photographer LuAnn Ostergaard & her son sculptor Joseph Rastovich. Both artists are inspired by the imperfect world of metal, whether forming it or photographing it.

DOWNTOWN SPOKANE LIBRARY

906 W. MAIN AVE. Come and see beautiful abstract artwork from Penny Cannon of Penny’s Palette! Holiday gift ideas also for sale!

KRESS GALLERY/RIVER PARK SQUARE

808 W. MAIN AVE. (3rd floor) Kress Gallery, 3rd Floor River Park Square (Behind Food Court): “Come Play With Me”Whimsical & colorfully designed artwork by local artist, Debbie McCulley in oil, acrylic, giclees & mixed media on canvas.

unless otherwise noted.

Toreson will be featuring a collection of Fine Art Photography titled, “Journey Through”. Music by Karrie O’Neill and a visit from micro boutique winery, Anelare. Open until 10pm. 5 Wineries, 50 Wines, 1 Location.

POTTERY BARN

331 W. MAIN AVE. Nikai Birchler will feature his recent artistic endeavors. Ranging from his “Protest Song Series”, inspired by Zuccotti Park during the Occupy Wall Street protests, to his “Soul Maps Series”

718 W. MAIN AVE. Tree Trimming! 5-7pm. Learn tips to decorating you tree for the holiday season, from our Design Specialist Ann-Jeannette!

HERBAL ESSENCE CAFÉ

STEELHEAD BAR & GRILLE

HISTORIC LIBERTY BUILDING

218 N. HOWARD ST. Please join us for First Friday and view the wide range of photos by Jenny Lange; large black and whites vinyls, scenes from an antique auto ranch and colorful graffiti from Spain.

WHITESTONE WINERY

8 N. POST ST, SUITE 8 Stop by Whitestone Winery, on your art tour, and see works by local artist Irene Dahl. We will also be featuring live music by Todd and Ellicia Milne from 6-9pm.

EAST DOWNTOWN AREA AUNTIES BOOKSTORE

402 W. MAIN (Liberty Building) 3 Minute Mic - Open Mic Poetry 7-9pm (sign up starts at 6:30). Read an original poem or maybe even just read a personal favorite. Feel free to just come and listen. All ages are welcome!

River Park Square, 3rd floor, Food Court, Chase Middle School Orchestra, 7th & 8th grade large string orchestra, will be performing a variety of pieces representing different times, cultures and styles. IMAX at Riverfront Park, 6-8pm - “Singing in the New Year” a karaoke style competition. Open to ages 10 and above. For more info and to sign up go to www. firstnightspokane.org. Winner will receive $1,000 grand prize.

EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS

906 W. 2ND AVE. BISTANGO MARTINI LOUNGE (across from the Steam Plant) 108 N. POST ST. Carrie Vielle showing her “Sirens: Live music by Dirk Swartz a study of the human body” series. singer/songwriter and guitarist Music by Ghanian Musician Ataa at Big Hair revolution. A fi rst Friday Favorite! Happy Hour Adjiri, 6-7:30pm and Eugene 4-6pm, Half price Eats menu Jablonsky Jazz Trio with Eugene, NECTAR TASTING ROOM 5-8pm and Spokane’s BEST Rick Westrick and Barry Aiken, 120 N. STEVEN ST. Cocktails! Photographer/artist Crystal 7:45-9:30pm. downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org | Brought to you by Downtown Spokane Partnership and Spokane Arts Commission

115 N. WASHINGTON ST. Please join us this Friday for the whimsical one-of-a-kind cityscapes by artist Jami Lord. 402 W. MAIN AVE. River Ridge Fine Arts Association on our 2nd floor & Art by Rachel Dolezal & others on our Mezzanine. Mixed media showing by multiple artists.

HILLS’ RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

401 W. MAIN AVE. Please join us for First Friday. Gretchen & The Wolf playing fun & happy music! 6-9pm

LEFTBANK WINE BAR

108 N. WASHINGTON, SUITE 105 Featuring a wide variety of art styles by Maren Wands: paintings, ceramics, jewelry, and more! Vin Du Lac from Lake Chelan pouring a tasting that will cover a spectrum of their amazingly balanced and palate pleasing wines. Music by Carey Brazil & Jay Condiotti, 7pm.

November 1st! POTTERY PLACE PLUS

203 N. WASHINGTON ST. (main floor of Auntie’s) MARRIAGE (of industrial and organic design). Works by artist Randi Harris. She marries urban sights like powerlines with natural objects like birds and trees creating a truly interesting composition.

SANTÉ RESTAURANT & CHARCUTERIE

404 W. MAIN AVE. Please join us for the November First Friday. We are featuring artist Chef Jeremy L. Hansen’s black & white captures of food.

FIRST AVENUE AREA EAST END

CONCEPT HOMES

401 W. 1ST AVE. “The Art of Interior Design and Architecture,” area architects and interior designers will be showing renderings, models and personal works of art for November’s First Friday.

nYne BAR & BISTRO

232 W. SPRAGUE AVE. Featuring surreal impressionism paintings of the night sky by Serge. Ask about our drink specials.

PRIME REAL ESTATE GROUP

417 W. 1ST AVE. Please join us for the November First Friday from 6-7pm to show our appreciation for the Spokane community. We have photo booth style photos taken by Ryan Lindberg along with refreshments.

FIRST AVENUE AREA WEST END

ARTEMIS

1021 W. 1ST AVE Featuring Joanne Wissink’s hand made leather jewelry creations. Come meet the artist and find out more about what goes into making her amazing jewelry!

SPOKANE LAW ENFORCEMENT MUSEUM 1201 W. 1ST AVE. We are opening our doors for First Friday in appreciation to those in law enforcement who keep our communities safe. Come and see an amazing collection of artifacts and memorabilia. Refreshments. Donations appreciated.

NORTH BANK AREA CHOCOLATE APOTHECARY

621 W. MALLON AVE. (in the Flour Mill) Featuring new works by artist Steven A. Scroggins. Scroggins employs a variety of techniques and media in his work, ranging from found objects, sculpture, and collaged poetry incorporated on the canvas, to more traditional oil and acrylic painting.

HO HO TERIYAKI CHICKEN

621 W. MALLON AVE., (in the Flour Mill) Featuring the beautiful watercolor paintings of owner Ho Lan. Don’t forget to try our fabulous menu! 4-7pm.

RIVERFRONT PARK

The Ice Palace is open! Come enjoy this fun winter activity in Riverfront Park.

SOUTH DOWNTOWN AREA

ROCKET BAKERY

157 S. HOWARD ST. (across from Interplayers) Please join us for November. We have artist Aimee Skaer showing her work. Ask about out drink specials!

SECOND SPACE GALLERY

BARILI CELLARS

608 W. 2ND AVE. Join Barili Cellars on First Friday from 4-9pm and enjoy current wine releases and fun art. For November, artist Jim Dhillon will bring his colorful and interesting paintings to Barili.

ECHO BOUTIQUE

176 S. HOWARD ST., SUITE A Featuring artist Meredith DeMent and her colorful acrylic abstracts along with Peyton Taylor’s masterful, award winning feline digital art. See offerings by local jewelers as well.

INTERPLAYERS THEATRE

174 S. HOWARD ST. Featuring internationally acclaimed photographer, artist and adventurer Anthony Boccaccio. Anthony began his photographic career with National Geographic Magazine in 1971.

RED DRAGON DOWNTOWN

1406 W. 3RD AVE. Museum quality, historical lifesized portraits of my family cira 1920 China. Belly dancing in the Red Lantern Lounge starting at 5pm.

610 W. 2ND AVE. Artist James Mulvania’s paintings and illustrations are peaceful, fresh, surreal, wild, weird and even musical. Skiers and snowboarders, fantasy and sci-fi lovers should not miss this. Wine tasting is available next door at Barili’s Cellars!

ROBERT KARL CELLARS

115 W. PACIFIC AVE., Historic Warehouse District (aka SODO) Jennifer DeBarros, photography student at EWU and artist featured in Terrain 6, showcases her ever developing artistic curiosity in her photography exhibit. We will be tasting the newly released 2009 Cabernet Sauvignon.

VINTAGE HILL CELLARS

319 W. 2ND AVE. “Wine-spiration” by wine barrel artist, John Dunning, will be on exhibit. Come enjoy the hand crafted furniture and home décor that John has created for the holiday season. Artist reception.

UNIVERSITY DISTRICT ELIXIR SALON

728 E. SPRAGUE AVE. We are featuring local artist Christopher Defeo who will have

a permanent small gallery in our salon.

MARKETPLACE WINERY

39 W. 2ND AVE. We have artist Emily Travis displaying for the November First Friday. Music by Rob Bryceson! Featuring EMVY & BridgePress Cellars/ 2012 Award Winning Wines

SARANAC ART PROJECTS

25 W. MAIN AVE. “Implement” an exhibit of new works by SAP members Mariah Boyle and Kurt Madison. Mariah and Kurt will be inter-mixing their work to build a single exhibition experience.

SPOKANE PUBLIC MARKET

24 W. 2ND AVE. Please join us for the November First Friday we are featuring pottery by Lea Larson. Music by Steve Crecia.

FIRST FRIDAY BIKE RIDE!

Starts at the Spokane Public Market, Marketplace Cork & Keg from 6-7ish and then pedaling through the city to enjoy the newly incorporated bike lanes! Purchase a “SPOKE” card and receive sweet BOGO deals at participating venues (SPOKE card funds go to support Spokane Oasis Market Garden project and the Spokane Public Market).

* Located in the Davenport District – DavenportDistrict.org

Blue Moon® Mountain Abbey Ale Pot Roast INGREDIENTS 1 3–4 lb. chuck roast Salt & Pepper Flour for roast 4–5 tbsp. olive oil 2 large onions, quartered 2 large carrots, chopped 3 cloves of garlic 2 bottles of Blue Moon® Mountain Abbey Ale 1/3 cup Worcestershire sauce 1 14.5-oz. can diced tomatoes 3 cups beef stock 2 sprigs fresh thyme 2 bay leaves 1 tbsp. paprika Butter

downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org

|

SERVES: 8 | PREP TIME: 15 - 20 min | COOK TIME: 3 - 3.5hrs | DIFFICULTY: Easy INSTRUCTIONS Season chuck roast with salt and pepper on all sides. Roll in and cover with flour, including ends. In a large Dutch oven, heat two to three tablespoons olive oil over medium heat. Add the roast to the pot and sear all sides, about 4–5 minutes per side; then remove and set aside. Add a little more olive oil to the Dutch oven along with onions, carrots, garlic, and a pinch of salt. Cook until onions become soft, about 10 minutes. Add beer and Worcestershire sauce and bring to a boil. Then add the tomatoes, stock, thyme, bay leaves, paprika, and a bit more salt, mixing well. Put the seared pot roast back into the pot, and bring it to a boil. Cover the pot and place in conventional oven for 3–3.5 hours at 325°F, until the meat is fork-tender. Remove meat and place the Dutch oven back onto the stovetop. Either with a stick blender or food processor, blend the cooking liquid. Bring it to a simmer for 3 minutes. Add 2 tbsp. of butter to the liquid; this is now your gravy.

Brought to you by Downtown Spokane Partnership and Spokane Arts Commission

CULTURE | THEATER

Spokane Jingle Bell Run/Walk Saturday,

November 16, 2013

Riverfront Park

• • • • • •

5K Chip-timed Run, Fun Run or Walk 1K Children’s Run with the Elves Holiday Festivities Costume Contest Holiday Cheer Garden Pets Welcome

SpokaneJingleBellRun.org (509) 315-9862

The Doors Lend Me a Tenor’s life lesson: Every time a door slams shut, another one opens BY E.J. IANNELLI

L

ake City Playhouse’s Lend Me a Tenor holds out the promise of action before anyone steps onstage. Although the set itself — a two-room hotel suite in Cleveland, Ohio — is static, along the back wall stands a row of five doors, not counting a sixth that’s situated perpendicularly to the audience on a partial wall dividing the bedroom from the lounge. That array of a half-dozen doors clearly wouldn’t be there without good reason, and for audiences unfamiliar with this hyperactive farce, part of its fun lies in seeing who among the eight-person cast will use which door for what purpose over the course of its one dramatic evening. Fittingly, everything is set in motion by the opening of a door. Maggie Saunders (Alyssa Herzinger) is swooning over a radio broadcast of famed opera tenor Tito Merelli (Ricardo Rivera) as her high-strung, would-be fiancé Max (Steven M. Anderson) enters the suite, explaining that Merelli, due to arrive for a performance later that evening, wasn’t where he was expected to be. Much agitation and hand-wringing, made all the more acute by Maggie’s irascible father Henry (Dave Rideout), who’s gone to great lengths to arrange Merelli’s performance this evening as the lead in Otello. “Il Stupendo” finally arrives in the company of his wife Maria (Trigger Weddle). He’s not feeling well due to overeating, and she’s still stewing over his flirtations with a waitress — not his first, we’re told. A few spats and misunderstandings later, people have already begun hiding in bathrooms and closets, and Maria has slammed the door on her way out, leaving an irate Dear John letter for Tito. That letter will propel him into fits of remorse and self-pity, and also be misinterpreted by his minders, who mistake him for dead after he passes out from too much wine and pills. This leaves Max and Henry in a bind. They’ve got to ensure that Tito’s comatose body remains undiscovered by autograph hunters like the camp bellhop (Brandon Montag), arts patron Julia (Monica Thomas), and even Tito’s seductive operatic co-star, Diana (Hannah Paton) while passing off Max, now dressed in a wig and blackface, as a suitable proxy for the international star. To help them pull this off, those six doors will offer some means to escape, stall or hide. Every one of them will be put to good use, over and over. Most of these actors aren’t regulars on the Lake City Playhouse stage, which might make their reliability harder to predict beforehand, but the casting is definitely sound. Rivera is fantastic as Tito,

Brandon Montag and Alyssa Herzinger star in Lake City Playhouse’s Lend Me a Tenor. PHOTO COURTESY OF LAKE CITY PLAYHOUSE capturing all the spontaneous passion, bewilderment and histrionic woe that the role calls for; his impeccable accent never falters. Weddle, despite the overall brevity of her stage time, is fiery Maria through and through. Montag’s exuberant bellhop is the screwball in an already screwball company, reminiscent of Stephen Stucker as Johnny in Airplane! Both Rideout and Herzinger are adequate in what are relatively straight-faced roles by comparison. As Max, however, Anderson comes across as a bit too whiny and ineffectual. There’s no doubt that his newfound confidence as “Tito” has to contrast with his earlier behavior, but neither should the transformation be quite so night-and-day. Costumes deserve as much attention for being inconspicuous as when they stand out. Here, Jamie Russell’s very contemporary (c. 1930s) choices are a seamless part of a production in which so many of them end up on the floor. But perhaps the highest credit should go Lake City’s team of technicians and designers for building a set that can withstand so much routine and necessary abuse.  Lend Me a Tenor • Thu-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm; through Nov. 10 • $11-$17 • Lake City Playhouse • 1320 E. Garden Ave., Coeur d’Alene • lakecityplayhouse.org • (208) 667-1323

1727 E Sprague Ave • 509-535-1111 Monday - Saturday 10am - 6pm Sunday 11am - 4pm INTERIOR DESIGN ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE In your home or in the showroom.

Special Factory Discounts!

ALL SIMPLY AMISH® 30% OFF MSRP THRU OCTOBER!

www.TheHanleyCollection.com

38 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013 47423-10 Oct 24-Fall Gathering-5H.indd 1

10/22/13 7:25 AM

SUPPORT THE EWU ALUMNI ASSOCIATION WITH EVERY PURCHASE!

Now, you can earn reward points each time you make a purchase with your Washington Trust Bank Visa Signature® credit card featuring the EWU Eagle. Get rewarded and help support the EWU Alumni Association each time you use your card. Apply for your official EWU Alumni Association credit and debit card today only at Washington Trust Bank.* For more information visit a local branch or find us online at watrust.com/ewuaa. *Subject to credit approval.

The New

INLANDER.COM Daily updates

Blogs, breaking news & cat videos.

More powerful!

The region’s best source for events, restaurants, music & movies.

We’re everywhere!

We’re on your computer, phone & tablet.

Always in reach OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 39

Latte Love

The Pumpkin Spice Latte craze is bigger than Starbucks BY LISA WAANANEN AND CHEY SCOTT

Coeur Coffeehouse gets in on the obsession with their own pumpkin spice latte. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

40 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

A

sk certain people, and they will tell you autumn is defined in three words: Pumpkin. Spice. Latte. This year marks the 10th anniversary of the famous Starbucks beverage — now affectionately branded as “PSL” — and more than 200 million have been sold since its debut a decade ago. Starbucks executives who were part of the development team revealed this year that the beverage almost never happened — initial market testing placed it far below other seasonal concepts like cinnamon spice and chocolate caramel. But that tepid response was overwhelmed almost immediately with consumer love once the drink hit stores, and the craze hasn’t faded. It’s a corporate dream — a product that not only gained a loyal following, but became synonymous with an entire season. It’s become such a phenomenon that even local non-Starbucks coffee shops have given in to customer demand. (And they’ve made some great concoctions — more on that in a minute.) “We hear from our customers yearround that drinking their first Pumpkin Spice Latte is when they know fall has arrived,” Starbucks executive Cliff Burrows said in a press release heralding the drink as the “most popular seasonal beverage of all time.” Last year, aficionados panicked when it was reported that some Starbucks locations were running short of the coveted seasonal syrup. This year, Starbucks’ pumpkin spice empire has been threatened in another way, with McDonald’s and Dunkin’ Donuts rolling out their own versions. But Starbucks needn’t worry about loyalty — when the company released 600 limited-edition commemorative mugs decked out in pumpkincolored Swarovski crystals this year for $150 apiece, the mugs sold out in less than two hours. The drink is like a personal pumpkin pie in a cup — silky and golden-colored, topped with a dollop of whipped cream and sprinkled with spice. Take a sip, and it’s hard to imagine a pumpkin spice latte any other way. But Starbucks isn’t the only place to get a pumpkin spice latte in this town, and we visited a handful of local shops that craft their own pumpkin spice lattes for the fall season.

$17.Salad9Entrée5 Dessert

NEW 3-Course Dinner Menu 5-9 pm daily

Coeur’s pumpkin spice mix. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

WHAT’S IN PUMPKIN SPICE? It would be hard to perfectly rep-

At Coeur Coffeehouse (701 N. Monroe), the pumpkin spice latte makes Starbucks’ polished version seem a little too perfect. The blend of local licate any locally created PSLs, yet whole milk and housemade you might already have the ingredisauce tastes like a homemade ents in your spice rack to make your pumpkin pie — the type with a own pumpkin pie spice. Sprinkle a thick, hand-rolled crust, toasty bit into your coffee with some sugar around the edges. It caused a and cream to create a simple (nonminor scandal when Starbucks latte) pumpkin spice coffee. confirmed its pumpkin spice 2 tbsp. ground cinnamon latte contains no actual pump1 tbsp. ground ginger kin, but you can rest assured 2 tsp. ground nutmeg that Coeur’s version does. ½ tsp. allspice The version at Boots ½ tsp. ground cloves Bakery & Lounge (24 W. Whisk together all spices and Main) also includes pumpkin, store in an airtight container. along with molasses, maple Recipe from Parade.com syrup and pumpkin pie spices. Lightly sweet, it’s also available in a chai or a steamer for those who want their PS sans L. Owner Alison Collins says they didn’t have any ready when Starbucks rolled out its pumpkin spice latte earlier than usual this year, but people immediately started asking about it. “So of course we made it, and we’ve been making it ever since,” she says. Up on the North Side of Spokane, custom syrups are becoming a signature touch at the Maple Street Bistro (5520 N. Maple) where the pumpkin spice lattes aren’t too sweet, but carefully balanced between a warm spice mix and bitter espresso. (For those who gag at the idea of a sickly sweet coffee drink, try this). Though its syrup contains pumpkin purée, that flavor is mostly masked by the accompanying spices. Still, that cozy, rich taste the PSL has become known for definitely is present. Maple Street Bistro co-owner DeAnna Woodard says the café’s growing list of housemade coffee syrups debuted about six months ago, including non-seasonal flavors like agave cinnamon and brown sugar. Since Maple Street’s pumpkin spice showed up on the café board several weeks ago, it’s been noticeably popular, and Woodard says the flavor should stay on the menu until early spring. Handmade syrups play a big role in Revel 77’s (3223 E. 57th) stripped-down coffee philosophy. Even though the young South Hill coffee shop is making a name for itself by shying away from major corporate-chain fads, owners Mike and Deb Nelson still realize there are some trends customers just won’t let go of. Yet Revel 77’s pumpkin spice latte syrup sticks to the basics, too. It’s low in sugar and incorporates real pumpkin purée alongside the collection of signature spices. In yet another twist on the classic, Atticus Coffee & Gifts’ (222 N. Howard) version of the fall drink doesn’t contain any pumpkin, instead getting its flavor from a combination of vanilla syrup and several good shakes of dry pumpkin spice stirred in. Despite the absence of actual pumpkin, the spices create those ideal flavor notes that make this fall beverage so… well, fall. n

SALADS Green salad or Caesar salad ENTRÉES Baby back ribs Safari Room gumbo Braised short ribs Creole chicken pot pie Herb grilled wild salmon MINI DESSERTS German Chocolate Cake • Chocolate Peanut Butter Pie Crème Brûlée • Chocolate Mousse • Key Lime Pie • Cheesecake

Baby Back Ribs

509 789 6800 • Davenport Tower 111 S. Post St., Downtown Spokane • davenporthotelcollection.com

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 41

FOOD | CAFE

HAPPY HOUR

Mon-Thurs 3-6 & 9-Close Fri 3-6 | Sat 11-5 | Sun All Day

1 Bottle Beer 2 Domestic Pints $ 4 Micro Pints & House Wines $ 5 Jagermeister & Fireball $ 5 Appetizers $ 50

IT’S FOR THE BIRDS Written and Directed by Joy Persoon

$

Oct 18th - Nov 3rd Oct. 18, 19, 25, 26, Nov. 1, 2 at 7pm Oct. 20, 26, 27, Nov. 3 at 2pm Adults: $15 Students/Seniors $13

1-877-SIXTHST (208) 752-8871

sixthstreetmelodrama.com

21 West Main Ave 509-473-9455

SaranacPublicHouse.com

Judah Meek preparing coffee at Service Station. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

Beyond Coff ee WANTED INLANDER DELIVERY DRIVER

Service Station has spent eight years doing more than just filling cups of joe

AIRWAY HEIGHTS & FAIRCHILD AFB

BY JO MILLER

F

interested?

EMAIL:

trevor@inlander.com or CALL: 509-325-0634

ext 226

BEST F’N BURGER IN TOWN Come on out for some great food.

Live Music Saturday & Home of the Blues Jam Every Sunday

509.535.9309 • 6412 E. Trent • Spokane Valley

rom the road, one might see the broad, two-story Service Station building and wonder why a coffeehouse would need so much space. The tables and couches inside the roomy, European-style café are constantly filled with families, students, couples and friends sipping on coffee and snacking on goodies, but that’s just one room. The Service Station runs the rest of the building as an event center. Four rooms can be rented out for various occasions, including business meetings, conferences, Christmas parties, baby showers, weddings and wedding receptions. There’s the Green Room (set up like a living room), a boardroom, conference room and an auditorium. Christian concerts are one thing the Service Station has been known for since it first opened in 2005, says owner Anita Genova. The artists sometimes break the Christian-genre bounds, but for the most part the bands who perform tend to be on the mellow side. You probably wouldn’t catch a band like AC/DC playing here, Genova jokes. Among recent performances was a show by Switchfoot frontman Jon Foreman. In addition to providing event space and selling coffee, the Service Station seeks to give back

to the community. “The reason why [it’s called] ‘Service Station’ is because we serve the city of Spokane,” she says. “We are an organization that supports good causes in town.” For example, nonprofits that rent rooms receive 10 percent off their booking cost. The Service Station also sells food from Christ Kitchen, as well as hats and backpacks from Krochet Kids, a nonprofit that sells handmade products made by women in Uganda and Peru. Even in their coffee choices, Genova says she wants to help third-world countries. Their coffee comes from Dominion Trading Coffee in Ethiopia. “We buy a little bit more expensive coffee to keep people in Africa employed,” she says. Right now the Service Station has seasonal drinks — a pumpkin latte (med. $4.76) and pumpkin chai (med. $4.22) — along with seasonal pastries like pumpkin bars and cool mint brownies ($2.95). They also have beer and wine, plus a whole host of lunch and breakfast items, including breakfast burritos ($4.25), kale salad ($4, $5.50) and paninis ($6.95).  Service Station • 9315 N. Nevada St.• Open Mon-Fri, 6 am to 9 pm; Sat-Sun, 7 am to 9 pm • servicestationcoffee.com • 466-1696

WHITESTONE

FallWine Tasting Vineyard to Barrel

Learn, Taste & Discover How Wine is Made

Nov 2nd 10am-4pm | $10 tickets (mention the INLANDER for 50% off) Located on the shores of Lake Roosevelt, 1hr west of Spokane, North of Hwy 2.

42 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

8

Cabernet Franc won “Gold” at the

2013 San Francisco International Wine Competition

8

100% Local, Estate Wine

42399 Jump Canyon | Creston, WA 99117 | 509.981.6479

pre-orders welcome! 509.216.2554

ON THE CORNER OF FIRST & WASHINGTON | DOWNTOWN SPOKANE TUE-thur 11AM-7PM | FRI 11am-3am | SAT 10pM-3AM

FOOD | DESSERT

Chilly Choices This Valley ice cream shop makes it hard to pick just one BY JO MILLER

C

ustomers lean over the glass, examining the 48 flavors of ice cream with the scrutiny of diamond cutters. An employee hands over a sample and says with a laugh that they definitely don’t brag about being a low-fat ice cream shop. That’s because at Pete and Belle’s Ice Cream Shop, the ice cream is super-premium, meaning the dessert contains a low percentage of air and high butterfat content. When ice cream is made, air is whipped into the mixture to keep it from being a frozen block. The amount of air — called the overrun — determines the ice cream’s density. With a maximum 20-percent overrun and a minimum 14-percent butterfat, Pete and Belle’s ice cream is quite dense. “That combined makes it smooth and creamy in your mouth,” says Aaron Blackmer, who owns the shop and the adjacent Rocky Mountain Chocolate Factory with his wife Rachelle. The couple named the shop after their children, Peter and Annabelle, who can never agree on a favorite ice cream. Beyond the 48 flavors on display, there are more than 130 flavors that can be rotated in. The Snap-O-Lantern — a spicy pumpkin flavor with gingersnap cookies — and the Caramel Apple Pie are a couple of the seasonal choices. Eggnog is on its way. We tried the Zanzibar chocolate ice cream, made with three kinds of cocoa, giving it a fudge-brownie flavor. The taste was deep, dark and definitely smooth, and the ice cream was substantial even without any customary fillings like chocolate chips or peanut butter cups. One scoop of three caffeinated chocolate flavors — Iced LattéDa, Heaps of Gold and Peanut Butta — equals the amount of caffeine in a 16-ounce Red Bull, Blackmer says. There’s even a flavor for beer drinkers. The Scotch Ale Caramel Crunch is made with Stone of Scone ale, caramel ripple and Heath pieces. Kids also have a lot to choose from, including a red, yellow and blue Superman flavor and the bright Blue Moon flavor that tastes just like the milk left behind from a bowl of Fruit Loops. Sizes come in bowls or cones with a kid’s scoop ($1.99), single scoop ($2.40) or double scoop ($3.85). The menu goes on from there, with shakes, malts, floats, sundaes, even ice cream cakes.  Pete and Belle’s Ice Cream Shop • 1330 N. Argonne Road, Suite C, Spokane Valley • Open Mon-Sat, 10 am to 8 pm; Sun, 11 am to 6 pm • petebelles.com • 924-4718

An email for food lovers

Spokane’s BIGGEST Halloween Party!

now1057fm.com

BITE NITE

at

THE BOOGEY MAN’S BALL

Friday, Nov 1st

$3,000 G R A N D P R I Z E

COSTUME CONTEST Featuring DJ One and DJ Q

The Knitting Factory (919 W Sprague) Purchase tickets online at sp.knittingfactory.com

Sign up at inlander.com/newsletter

$10 in advance / $15 at the door / 21+ OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 43

ACROBATIC DANCE, SPECTACULAR PUPPETRY, A MAGICAL NIGHT FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY!

FOOD | UPDATE

momix BOTANICA

Wednesday, November 6 - 7:30 pm Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

Tickets/Info 509-624-1200

martinwoldsontheater.com

STUDENT T IC K E T S JU S T $20

Jeri Schaffner, visiting from Coeur d’Alene, drove out of her way to enjoy a meal at Ferrante’s. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

FERRANTE’S MARKETPLACE CAFE

4516 S. Regal St. | 443-6304

W

hen Tony Ferrante opened his café, he figured it would be a pizza place, albeit an upscale one. Still, he would keep things simple. You’d order at the counter and pick up your own food when a chef said it was ready. Nine years later, this simplicity — coupled with reliably tasty Italian food — hasn’t changed at Ferrante’s Marketplace Cafe. What has changed is the variety of items on the menu. “We were thinking more of a pizza place when we started, but it’s evolved,” says Ferrante, whose restaurant

Fit a degree into your life.

is also home to a boutique gift shop and busy catering business. Nearly everything is made in-house, including their delectable salad dressing, and they’ve expanded to include pastas, panini, calzones and other dishes, like the super-popular five-layer baked lasagna. Ferrante’s also serves wine and now offers four beer taps. Wednesdays feature local acoustic musicians, adding more of a vibe to the already comfortable dining room.

Proud Participant

CCSonline.spokane.edu

— MIKE BOOKEY

Friday Evening, November 8, 2013

Join us and buy your tickets today! Thank you to our Sponsors and Underwriters:

Winter quarter starts January 6.

Enroll today!

Spokane Community College Spokane Falls Community College Community Colleges of Spokane provides equal opportunity in education and employment. 13-0325 S

44 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

Grand Participating Partner AmericanWest Bank Blood Systems, Inc. Camp BMW Davenport Hotel & Tower Fidelity Associates Insurance & Financial Services Gritman Medical Center InCyte Diagnostics Kalispel Tribe/Northen Quest Resort & Casino Kootenai Health KREM2 Moloney + O’Neill Benefits Moss Adams LLP The Pacific Northwest Inlander Physicians Insurance A Mutual Company

Premera Blue Cross Providence Holy Family Hospital & Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center & Children’s Hospital Ramey Construction Contractors Randall & Hurley Spokane Ear, Nose & Throat Spokane Produce, Inc. Sterling Bank Surgical Specialists Terumo BCT URM Food Service Washington Dental Washington Trust Bank

Epicurean Delight, the most fun black-tie event in Spokane features the most exquisite cuisine in the Northwest! www.epicureandelight.org or 509-232-4567 Proceeds from Epicurean Delight 2013 will be used to advance INBC’s life-saving mission with a portion of the funds designated to providing superior technologies and blood center education and training.

FOOD | SAMPLER

PIZZA BABS’ PIZZERIA 1319 Highway 2 | Sandpoint 208-265-7992 Head over to Sandpoint when you need more than just another cheese pizza. New York-style, thin-crust pizza is the name of the game at this pizzeria, which offers specialties like the Village (pesto, sun-dried tomatoes, artichokes, crumbled feta), the Little Italy (marinara, sweet sausage, green peppers, red onions) and the Hell’s Kitchen (spinach, roasted red peppers, mushrooms and chicken), which blend flavors that demand another visit. BENNIDITO’S 1426 S. Lincoln St. | 455-7411 Each of the 24 pizzas on the menu features thick, hand-tossed crust that’s soft and “bready” around the rim with a thin and crisp center, making it a “best of both worlds” type of pie. Choices go way beyond just plain cheese pizza — like the Maui Wowie, the Saxon, Boogie Fever, or numerous “primo” options to enjoy. They also serve hot sandwiches, salads and a bevy of

craft brews and wine, making this a popular mid-South Hill hangout. FIRE ARTISAN PIZZA 816 W. Sprague Ave. | 413-1856 With a classy, welcoming ambience, the Spokane installment of Fire Artisan Pizza serves the same fresh pizza as its sister restaurant in Coeur d’Alene. There’s a range of pizzas, from margherita to one loaded with sausage, pepperoni, salami and bacon. The artisan pizzas are all cooked in a brick oven and toppings range from the simple to the gourmet. MACKENZIE RIVER PIZZA 9225 N. Nevada St. | 413-1043 With a northern Rockies lodge feel, eating pizza sounds much more cozy in this Montana-based chain. Nearly two dozen pizzas are on the menu, with toppings like pine nuts, crumbled bleu cheese and mandarin oranges. Creative toppings rest on sourdough, natural grain, and thick or thin crust, including one that’s gluten free. All three Spokane locations (upper South Hill, the north end of Nevada Street and the new

downtown location) are spacious and work well for large groups and date nights alike. PACIFIC AVENUE PIZZA 2001 W. Pacific Ave. | 624-0236 Sit out on the patio in Browne’s Addition in the evening sun. Leaf through the Transformers comic book the menus come in. And then order a pizza — yeah, sandwiches are on the menu, but this place is about pizza — with names like the Gladiator (meat, mushrooms, sausage, pepperoni) or the MAC (white and red sauce, chicken, artichoke, bacon). Or go with our favorite: the gourmet barbecue chicken. Vegetarians, try the Leonilda. 

FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS 9pm to Close

The Best usic Country M & Drinks in Town. LIVE MUSIC & DJ!

ENTRÉE

Get the scoop on the local food scene with our Entrée newsletter. Visit Inlander.com/newsletter to sign up.

$

10ets

Buck lets l of Bu

825 W. RIVERSIDE | SPOKANE | 509.747.2085

1414 N H amilton S 509-368 t, Spokane -9087

Now open in the GONZAGA UNIVERSITY DISTRICT.

TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES Check out specials and full menus at: www.wedonthaveone.com Find us on Facebook

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 45

The Book is Better

his manipulative education has inculcated in him. This is far more science fiction of ideas than of action, and it demands discussion of its ideas — but it doesn’t want you to question them too much. Another problem with Ender’s Game: Ender’s aboutface is possible because, we’re told, he has a special sort of empathy with his enemies that helps him to understand and even love them. But we never see how this is possible, given the numerous bullies he faces in his various schools, and certainly see nothing that would explain the empathy he comes to have with the Formics. A certain connection between Ender and the aliens jumps will win the war decisively. Andrew “Ender” Wiggin out at the end as an almost mystical thing, entirely at (Asa Butterfield) is plucked from his regular school to odds with the film’s hard-science-based approach up to attend the orbiting Battle School, because Colonel Graff that point. (Harrison Ford) and Major Anderson (Viola Davis), Why is this version of Ender’s Game probably best who run the place, think he could be the military genius suited to kids? For one, the tactics and strategies that they’re looking for. amaze Ender’s elders don’t seem terribly ingeWhat makes Ender stand out? He accidentally stumbled upon the strategy ENDER’S GAME nious. All the adults are stunned by how Ender utilizes a new weapon in a battle scenario. Earth’s leaders believe is needed to defeat Rated PG-13 How can the weapon’s designers not have had the Formics: preemptive assholery on a Directed by Gavin Hood this in mind? personal level and preemptive war on a Starring Harrison Ford, Asa And while it’s commendable for the film societal one. It’s prison rules as a cultural Butterfield to play around with zero-gravity ideas — philosophy: beat up the biggest badass in there’s no up or down in space — and smart the yard, so no one else even thinks about of Ender to have figured this out on his first trip off the beating you up in the future. planet, it’s ridiculous that the Formics haven’t realized it. Ender’s Game is all might-makes-right and justification Adult sci-fi fans will find much of what goes on here to be for violence. Ender himself articulates it neatly at one rather simplistic. point: “Follow the rules, you lose; choose violence, you Watch Ender’s Game with a kid... and talk about it win.” What just barely saves the movie as worth a look afterward. Unless you’re cool with an endorsement of for kids (and probably only kids; more on that in a mopreemptive violence as a life philosophy.  ment) is that Ender eventually rebels against the attitudes

Ender’s Game proves overly simplistic on the big screen BY MARYANN JOHANSON

I

haven’t even read the book. I know this must be the case, because there’s little here that can account for how highly fans rate Orson Scott Card’s 1985 novel. For the book and its hero Ender Wiggin to be as beloved as they are, there’s gotta be some heart lurking in there somewhere. My soul, alas, was never stirred by this film adaptation. My spirit did not soar. However, my intellect twitched a bit in ways that made my heart ache disagreeably. This Ender’s Game — from writer-director Gavin Hood (X-Men Origins: Wolverine, Rendition) — engages the mind, in some ways that are uncomfortable yet never intriguingly so, but does not engage the heart. That odd omission could be intentional, because the big ideas of this strange mashup of Starship Troopers and Harry Potter — gifted kids go to fascist military school! — seem positive only if your heart is made of stone. Decades after Earth repelled an invasion by insect-like aliens that killed tens of millions of humans, the planet is preparing for another potential invasion by the Formics by training all kids in tactics and strategy, in the hopes of finding a new “Julius Caesar or a Napoleon” who

46 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS Rocky Braat, while traveling through India, discovers a slum orphanage filled with children who are suffering from HIV. Abandoned by their parents and ostracized because of their disease, Braat finds himself connecting with these suffering kids. Unable to adopt all of them, idealist Braat instead moves to India, and director Steve Hoover films Braat’s interactions with children who suffer, but still know how to smile in this heartwrenching documentary about friendship. Unrated (ER)

DESERT RUNNERS

Some people are bonkers, as evidenced by the four runners featured in this gorgeously produced documentary. They are each running in four different races, each entailing a five-day, 155-mile trek through some of the planet’s most brutal deserts. At first the film seems like a simple, “look-at-these-weirdos” type story, but soon things turn much, much more serious. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

ENDER’S GAME

Decades after Earth repelled an invasion by  insect-like aliens who killed tens of millions of humans, the planet is preparing for another invasion by the “Formics” that may or may not come by training all kids in tactics and strategy in the hopes of finding a new “Julius Caesar or a Napoleon” who will win the war decisively. Andrew “Ender” Wiggin (Asa Butterfield) is plucked from his regular school to attend the orbiting Battle School, because Colonel Graff (Harrison Ford) and Major Anderson (Viola Davis), who run the place, think he could be the legendary-scale genius they’re looking for. (MJ) PG-13

FREE BIRD

As Thanksgiving approaches, so does, apparently, the turkey buddy films. When two turkeys from opposite sides of the track team up to stop the Thanksgiving slaughter, they travel back in time to the very first Thanksgiving to take turkey off the menu, permanently. What ensues is a bunch of silliness and a lot of turkey jokes, just in time for the holiday season.

Starring the voices of Owen Wilson and Woody Harrelson. PG (ER)

LAST VEGAS

When Billy decides to finally tie the knot to a much younger woman, he calls out his senior friends for one last hurrah, which of course means a bachelor party in Las Vegas. What ensues is typical “I’m old” jokes — from not knowing who rapper Fifty-Cent is to the always hilarious complaints about medication and bad hips — this flick covers age by laughing at it.  With an all-star cast of actors including Michael Douglas, Robert De Niro, Morgan Freeman and Kevin Kline, this comedy once again revisits the notion that although people may age, they don’t actually mature. (ER) PG-13

ALL IS LOST

DWAY musical A O R B g n ki a re b d n u the gro

MAN OF TAI CHI

Tiger Chen plays himself as a Tai Chi student with great potential but little respect for the philosophical teachings of his martial arts form. When recruited by Donaka Mark, portrayed by Keanu Reeves, to fight in an underground fighting ring, at first Chen refuses. But with the potential shutdown of his temple, the money offered becomes too great a temptation. The fights grow steadily until Chen himself finds lost in sheer brutality and unable to discern why he started fighting in the first place. Reeves also directs. (ER) Rated R

WHEN I WALK

In 2006, Jason DaSilva fell down. He was 25 years old, and a few months earlier his doctors had diagnosed him with multiple sclerosis. The fall was the beginning of the loss of his legs, and the start of his mother’s firm “no whining” policy. Instead of giving up, DaSilva instead begins to film his illness, the frustration and the triumphs as he travels the world on a journey of self-discovery and healing. As DaSilva falls in love Alice Cook and comes to term with an illness that is consuming him, he finds himself more determined to live than ever. At Magic Lantern. (ER) Unrated

NOW PLAYING We never learn the name (or anything else) of the grizzled yachtsman (Robert Redford) whose eight-day fight to survive on the open sea is chronicled in J.C. Chandor’s magnificently primal All Is Lost. After all, how in the world are we supposed to sympathize with our soggy protagonist if we don’t know details about a rift with his daughter, or a childhood trauma he needs to overcome, or even why he’s sailing alone in the middle of nowhere? Chandor refuses to waste time on such frills, allowing Redford’s status as iconic figure to do much of the heavy lifting. The result is a kind of pure visual cinema that tramples the listlessness of other films that call themselves “action movies.” (SR) Rated PG-13

- Boston Globe

BAD GRANDPA

The Jackass crew makes its triumphant return as Johnny Knoxville takes on 86-year-old Irving Zisman, while he and his grandson, Billy, played by Jackson Nicoll, travel across country. Apparently the fake old people doing bad things trope hasn’t been beaten to death with a stick just yet, as Zisman performs prank after obnoxious prank on unsuspecting victims, who can’t believe this “grandpa’s” behavior. (But, of course, they attempt to help him through his illegal or just plain stupid predicaments.) Some of the highlights include, in typical Jackass fashion, thievery, crashing into giant penguins and putting a child stripper routine into a beauty pageant. (ER) Rated R ...continued on next page

(Photos by Turner Rouse, Jr., John Daughtry, Litwin)

BLOOD BROTHER

“FLAT-OUT FLAT-OUT ELECTRIFYING! ELECTRIFYING!”

Contains adult Content and strong language

- 23 November 22 Center IN B Perfor min g Ar ts

Best of Broadway Spokan

e.com

800.325.SEAT Groups of 10 or more SAVE! 509.777.6253 AmericanIdiotTheMusical.com #WCEAmericanIdiot

@WCEBroadway

/WestCoastEntertainmentSpokane

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 47

FILM FILM||SHORTS SHORTS

INCREDIBLE NEW SCREEN & SURROUND SOUND!

PROFESSOR SERIES

FRI, NOVEMBER 1 ST TO THURS, NOVEMBER 7TH

PLANES FRI 5:00 SAT-SUN 12:45 5:00 WED-THURS 5:00

Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind NOV 6 7PM $1 OF EACH TICKET SALE GOES TO RESTORATION

despicable me 2 FRI 7:10 SAT-SUN 2:50 7:10 MON-TUES 5:00 WED-THURS 7:10

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

AT THE BING 901 W. SPRAGUE AVE, SPOKANE | 509.227.7638

THE MAGIC LANTERN FRI NOV 1ST - THUR NOV 7TH

The Wolverine FRI-MON 9:30PM TUES 9:45PM WED-THURS 9:30PM

DESERT RUNNERS (95 NR)

Fri/Sat: 2:15, 4:30, 8:15 Sun: 1:00, 3:45 Tue-Thu: 7:30

INEQUALITY FOR ALL (90 MIN - PG)

Fri/Sat: 2:45, 6:30 Sun: 3:00, 5:45 Tue-Thu: 3:15, 5:00

WHEN I WALK (84 MIN NR)

Fri/Sat: 6:15 Sun: 2:00 Tue-Thu: 3:45

MUSCLE SHOALS (110 MIN- PG 13) Fri/Sat: 8:00 Sun: 7:30 Tue-Thu: 5:30

v for vendetta TUES 7:10PM

FRI 9:30AM

924 W. GARLAND, SPOKANE

509-327-1050

GARLANDTHEATRE.COM

BLUE JASMINE (96 MIN PG 13)

Fri/Sat: 4:15 Sun: 12:15 (pm)

GIRL RISING (90 MIN) one night only!

Sun: 5:00

BLOOD BROTHER (92 MIN) one night only! Wed: 7:00 OUR NIXON (84 MIN) one night only! Thu: 7:00 25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $7 www.magiclanternspokane.com

NOW PLAYING BLUE JASMINE

New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) is down on her luck. Her marriage to a wealthy husband (Alec Baldwin) fell apart after he lost all their money in a Wall Street scam, forcing Jasmine to move to San Francisco to live with her sister, Ginger, a grocery store clerk. To Jasmine, it seems like there’s not much left in her life to look forward to, as she struggles to cope with her downfall from a life of luxury to one where she’s forced to decide whether she should become a dental receptionist or a nurse. Writer/director Woody Allen presents us a modern yet familiar character study of how the haves and the havenots perceive themselves. (CS) PG-13

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

The true story of the Vermont cargo ship captain who delivers food and water to Africa, and whose ship is hijacked by Somali pirates is both a nail-biter and a fascinating character study, mostly centering on the relationship between the cool, calm captain (Tom Hanks) and the determined but unsure pirate leader Muse (newcomer Barkhad Abdi). The adventure parts are thrilling, the attack and takeover is unnerving, the lifeboat sequences are claustrophobic. Another great film from director Paul Greengrass (United 93, the first two Bourne entries). (ES) Rated PG-13

CARRIE

Chloe Grace Moretz revives Carrie White, a shy, lonely girl who craves love and attention from the very group that viscously bullies her. Her overly religious mom, portrayed by Julianne Moore, isn’t much help either, as her solution to Carrie’s woes is corporal punishment. When she’s invited to prom (yeah, we know how this is going to end) and is pushed too far, she goes on a telekinetic rampage with a body count in this retelling of Stephen King’s classic novel. (ER) Rated R

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS TWO

SANDPOINT, ID | FRI. NOV. 8 SPOKANE, WA | SAT. NOV. 9 PANIDA THEATRE - DOORS 7PM SHOW 8PM

SPOKANE CONVENTION CENTER - DOORS 6PM SHOW 7PM

Tickets $10 at MickDuff’s, 7B, Alpine Shop, or Tickets.Tetongravity.com

Tickets $10 at TicketsWest.com, Sports Creel or Spokane Alpine Haus.

ENTER TO WIN AMAZING SWAG FROM OUR PARTNERS, SCORE LIFT TICKETS, AND GET STOKED FOR WINTER! BEER FROM MICKDUFF’S ALL NIGHT!

ENTER TO WIN AMAZING SWAG, SCORE LIFT TICKETS, AND GET STOKED FOR WINTER! PLUS, TGR/NORTH FACE ATHLETE GRIFFIN POST WILL BE IN ATTENDANCE!

Flint Lockwood (voice of Bill Hader,) the lovable inventor, has achieved his dreams and is now working for his idol, Chester V, creating things to benefit society. But when he learns that the food machine he thought he had destroyed is still up and running this time producing scary humanoid food hybrids including melonheads, mosquitoasts,  and shrimpanzees he and his team, including love interest and weather girl Sam Sparks (voice of Anna Faris,) must get rid of the machine once and for all in this animated flick. PG (ER)

THE COUNSELOR

With an all-star cast, director Ridley Scott shines light on the extravagant nature of greed. When a lawyer (Michael Fassbender) wants to make himself a quick buck, he decides to involve himself in the world of drug trafficking. All does not go as planned, of course, and the fallout affects everyone in his life, including beautiful fiancée (Penelope Cruz), seedy middleman (Brad Pitt) and mysterious power couple (Cameron Diaz and Javier Bardem). (ER) Rated R

DON JON

Joseph Gordon-Levitt (The Dark Knight

48 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

Rises) stars in and makes his writingdirecting feature debut as Jon, a nightclub hopper who likes and regularly scores with the ladies, but gets more satisfaction watching porn at home on his laptop. There aren’t too many sex-porn-addiction comedies out there, but this one kind of shines. A great supporting cast: Scarlett Johansson and Julianne Moore as possible love interests, Tony Danza and Glenne Headley as Jon’s parents, only make things better. (ES) Rated R

ENOUGH SAID

Eva (Julia Louis-Dreyfus), a divorcee, is facing the possibility of an empty nest, as her daughter goes off to college. As she bonds with similarly situated Albert (James Gandolfini) and the two click, it seems like the perfect romance. Eva also befriends Marianne (Catherine Keener), whose only flaw is her tendency to rag on and on about her ex-husband. When this friend’s exhusband turns out to be her new boyfriend, Eva suddenly finds herself looking at Albert through Marianne’s eyes. (ER) Rated R

ESCAPE PLAN

Ray Breslin (Sylvester Stallone) breaks out of prisons for a living. But when his last job goes wrong and he is effectively buried in a high-tech security facility so far off the map his own team can’t find him, he knows he’s been set up. Recruiting fellow inmate Emil Rottmayer (Arnold Schwarzenegger) to make one last escape from the most fortified prison in the world might seem a little cheesy, but the big explosions and promises of punishment make up for it in this action-oozing flick. (ER) Rated R

THE FIFTH ESTATE

This film, about Julian Assange, the mysterious fellow who founded WikiLeaks, should have been an exciting and informative trip through the world of whistleblowing. Unfortunately, the whole affair is kinda flat, dull and repetitive, making sure to present Assange (Benedict Cumberbatch) as a pretty darn unlikable fellow. He may be passionate about helping to right the world’s wrongs, but he’s so full of himself and lacking in social graces, he’s no one you want to spend time with, even if he stays up on the movie screen. WikiLeaks’ revelations about America’s dealings in Afghanistan shook things up. The movie about the organization doesn’t. (ES) Rated R

GRAVITY

Astronauts Matt Kowalski (George Clooney) and Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock) perform extra-vehicular repairs on the Hubble space telescope and then all hell breaks loose when pieces of a destroyed satellite come their way. Thus begins a series of domino effect crises: Will they have enough air and/or jetpack life to make it to the station alive? Director Alfonso Cuarón (Children of Men) uses crazy effects that dazzle, while also sometimes distracting from the story. (SR) Rated PG-13

INEQUALITY FOR ALL

This film takes a look at the ever widening economic gap, following former U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich as he attempts to shed light on the shrinking middle class. The 2007 Occupy Wall Street brought attention to the economic disparity that has emerged in American society today, but Reich takes it further, tracing the very origins of the gap, and discusses what can be done to improve an economy where the majority of the wealth is held in the hands of a very few. At Magic Lantern. (ER) Rated PG

MUSCLE SHOALS

The laid-back documentary Muscle Shoals celebrates this little-known chapter in American music history with equal measures of affection and respect. Talking heads like Keith Richards and Bono speak about the place almost reverently (a little odd in the latter’s case, given that U2 has never recorded there), while others give their props to the humble studios’ formative influence on their careers. Also features some excellent interviews with the queen herself, Aretha Franklin. At Magic Lantern (SD) Rated PG

RUSH

The action begins with a crucial race in 1976, before flashing back to the early years of the rivalry between Formula 1 race car drivers James Hunt and Niki Lauda on the minor leagues of the European racing circuit. Director Ron Howard and screenwriter Peter Morgan — who collaborated on Frost/Nixon — effectively set up the initial parallel between the two men as children of privilege who rebel against the expectations of their families, before focusing on the clash of styles that differentiated them. (SR) Rated R. 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Gravity

96

Rush

75

Muscle Shoals

75

Prisoners

74

Don Jon

59

Ender’s Game

57

The Fifth Estate

49

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

FILM | REVIEW

Adv. Tix on Sale THOR: THE DARK WORLD ENDER'S GAME [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sat.(1230 245 345) 620 700 900 945 Sun.(1230 300 345) 540 620 840 910 LAST VEGAS [CC] (PG-13) Fri. - Sat.(1200 240 325) 505 645 730 915 1000 Sun.(1200 240 325) 600 650 835 915 FREE BIRDS IN REALD 3D [CC] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1245 PM 350 PM) FREE BIRDS [CC] (PG) Fri. - Sat.(1215 245) 500 715 930 Sun.(1215 245) 645 900 JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(110 335) 735 955 Sun.(110 335) 700 915 THE COUNSELOR [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(105 355) 640 925 CARRIE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(115) 405 720 950 Sun.(115) 405 630 855 ESCAPE PLAN [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.655 PM 935 PM Sun.635 PM 930 PM CAPTAIN PHILLIPS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sat.(1235 330) 630 925 Sun.(1235 330) 625 920 GRAVITY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sat.(1220) 450 705 940 Sun.(1220) 450 705 930 GRAVITY [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(235 PM) CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sat.(1255 320) 635 855 Sun.(1255 320) 610 830

Desert Runners succeeds in explaining why someone would run 155 miles in five days

FREE BIRDS

T

WE'RE THE MILLERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1205 PM)

ENDER’S GAME

PG-13 Daily (2:10) (4:40) 7:10 9:40 Sat-Sun (11:40)

Adv. Tix on Sale THOR: THE DARK WORLD

PG-13 Daily (2:00) (4:20) 6:40 9:10 Sat-Sun (11:45)

ENDER'S GAME [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sat.(100 320 350) 615 645 915 945 Sun.(100 320 350) 615 800 900

LAST VEGAS

BAD GRANDPA

R Daily (3:20) (5:30) 7:40 9:40 Sat-Sun (11:00) (1:15)

THE COUNSELOR

R Daily (4:20) 6:50 9:25 Sat-Sun (11:20) (1:50)

CARRIE

R Daily (5:00) 7:10 9:20 Sat-Sun (12:30) (2:45)

ESCAPE PLAN

BY MIKE BOOKEY hese people are bonkers, right? literally may be. You also might find yourself There’s no other way to describe an parched, as screen titles give continual updates individual who willingly runs 155 miles on temperatures that often top 100 degrees. (250 km) through some of the hottest deserts on Then someone dies on the course, and the Earth over the course of five days. It seems like film’s tone shifts. It’s not drastic, but gradual, an inordinately stupid thing to do. Even more taking us from “Oh wow, look at these nutsos” to stupid? To do it four times in one year. realizing that this is serious stuff, that these charBut in her documentary Desert Runners, direcacters are putting themselves in life-threatening tor Jennifer Steinman tries to get into danger. Again, we’re left wonderthe minds of four people who have DESERT RUNNERS ing why they’re doing it; those set out to run 155-mile races in the previously mentioned reasons Not Rated Atacama, Sahara and Gobi deserts, suddenly feel insufficient. Directed by Jennifer Steinman topping it off with an equal number The film is gorgeously shot, At Magic Lantern of miles down in Antarctica. She profull of beautiful yet terrifying looks files a 56-year-old Irishman testing at these unforgiving landscapes the limits of his age, a spunky young Australian through which the four main characters and a woman, a former pro baseball player who’s now host of other runners drag their weary boda businessman, and a former British special ies. Some long silences echo the isolation these forces soldier who recently lost his wife to cancer. runners must feel, plodding for 12 hours or Throughout, Steinman points out that maybe more through some of the loneliest places on the these people aren’t bonkers after all. Or at least planet. they seem less bonkers, because they all have a The true mastery of the film is its pacing. By reason to be chasing this seemingly superhuman the time it takes us to Antarctica, the runners — goal. previously peppy, confident, at times arrogant — You’re left shaking your head in amazement. take on a dead-faced stare, like wayward Walking You might get jealous watching these physical Dead extras. When they cross the final finish line, specimens make your three-day-a-week jogging you might actually feel their strain, like you’ve regimen look like a walk in the park, which it been running alongside them. 

INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1250 PM)

PG Daily (2:40) 6:45 8:50 Sat-Sun (10:30) In 2D Daily (3:15) (5:20) 7:25 9:30 Sat-Sun (11:10) (1:10)

Intended Publication Date(s): Friday, November 01, 2013. Saturday, November 02, 2013. Sunday, November 03, 2013. Published WA, Inlander [I_Directory_Update to Publish or Proof] 1.7" X 11" Produced: 7:00 PM ET, 10/29/2013 102913070029 Regal 865-925-9554

Runnin’ Fools

They just keep running.

Airway Heights 10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444

R Daily 9:10

LAST VEGAS [CC] (PG-13) Fri. - Sat.(130 350) 415 640 700 925 935 Sun.(130 350) 415 640 700 925 930 FREE BIRDS [CC] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1230 300) 630 900

PG-13 Daily (4:10) 6:50 9:35 Sat-Sun (10:45) (1:35)

FREE BIRDS IN REALD 3D [CC] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sat.(100 PM 330 PM) 710 PM Sun.(100 PM 330 PM) 700 PM

PG-13 Daily (3:10) (3:40) (5:15) 9:25 Sat-Sun (10:45) (1:00) In 2D Daily (4:45) 7:20 Sat-Sun (12:30)

JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(115 355) 715 940 Sun.(115 355) 715 935

PG Daily (3:00) (5:10) 7:15 Sat-Sun (10:50) (12:50)

GRAVITY [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1245 PM 345 PM)

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS GRAVITY

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2

Wandermere

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

FREE BIRDS

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(110 PM) 430 PM 750 PM

ENDER’S GAME

ESCAPE PLAN [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(335 PM) 650 PM

LAST VEGAS

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1235 315) 650 920

PG Daily (2:40) 6:45 8:50 Fri-Sun (10:30) In 2D Daily (1:10) (3:15) (5:20) 7:25 9:30 Fri-Sun (11:10) PG-13 Daily (1:30) (2:10) (4:00) (4:40) 6:30 7:10 9:00 9:40 Fri-Sun (11:00) (11:40) PG-13 Daily (2:00) (4:20) 6:40 9:10 9:40 Fri-Sun (11:45)

THE WIZARD OF OZ

PG

GRAVITY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.635 PM 910 PM

Daily (12:30) (3:15)

BAD GRANDPA

R Daily (1:15) (3:20) (5:30) 7:40 9:45 Fri-Sun (11:00)

THE COUNSELOR

R Daily (1:50) (4:20) 6:50 9:20 Fri-Sun (11:20)

THE COUNSELOR [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(1235 320) 620 925 Sun.(1235 PM 320 PM) 755 PM CARRIE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(1255 PM) 935 PM Sun.(1255 PM) 930 PM

CARRIE

PRISONERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1230 PM)

ESCAPE PLAN

INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1240 PM)

R Daily (12:30) (2:45) (5:00) 7:10 9:20 R Daily (2:00) (4:30) 7:00 9:25 Fri-Sun (11:30)

ENOUGH SAID

PG-13 Daily (1:10) (3:15) (5:20) 7:25 Fri-Sun (11:00)

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

WE'RE THE MILLERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.950 PM Sun.925 PM

PG-13 Daily (1:35) (4:10) 6:50 9:35 Fri-Sun (10:40)

GRAVITY

PG-13 Daily (1:00) (3:10) (5:15) (5:45) 7:20 7:50 9:25 9:50 Fri-Sun (10:30) (11:00) In 2D Daily (4:45) Fri-Sun (12:30)

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 PG Daily (12:50) (3:00) (5:10) 7:10 9:10 Fri-Sun (10:50) Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 11/1/13-11/7/13

Adv. Tix on Sale THOR: THE DARK WORLD Big Screen: ENDER'S GAME [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri.700 PM Times For 11/01 - 11/03

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 49

OCT 31st - Nov 6th

SAT & FRI

THURS

412 W. Sprague Ave. 509.747.2302

October 31st

HALLOWEEN

Open till 2am! NO COVER!

HALLOWEEN RISES AGAIN Fireball Friday $3

PARTY ALL WEEKEND AT

412 + SHOTS

Dueling DJ’s

WED TUES MON

SUN

2 Dance Floors/4 Bars SEASIDE BAR CHURCH at 3 Live music 5-10pm -Cocktails & Food NFL Football Shots - Hospitality Night Industry Specials All Night Long - DJ ONE

MARTINI MADNESS $5 Doubles NFL FOOTBALL

TWINTINI TUESDAY

$5 Doubles

TRIVIA

Starts at 7

THE RETURN OF LIVE MUSIC Nov 21st - HELMET 50 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

Circle of Life The Center closes, the Bartlett to open: The all-ages music scene soldiers on BY LAURA JOHNSON

N

Quinn Tanzer at the Center YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

ot many were astonished by its closing. The Center, the North Side all-ages music venue, seemed almost doomed from the beginning. Even the Center’s talent promoter, Quinn Tanzer, told the Inlander he had concerns about it being so far away from downtown shortly before its opening. “People don’t want to drive up north … because it’s up north,” he said. “… But I give it six months and this place will be awesome.” Opening in January, the Center would not make it a full year. Tanzer is upset with how things turned out. But he’s moving on, as most Spokane promoters must learn to do; he says he will continue to book shows in the area, just not at one particular venue. “This is a very hard market to have a mid-level concert venue survive,” Tanzer says. “The best thing we can do is bring the types of acts the customers want to see.” The final decision to pull the plug on The Center came down to owner KC Crawford. “I wasn’t able to make enough money to make it worth my while,” he says. Crawford wasn’t the first club owner to experience financial woes this year. The A Club went away in January (becoming Club 412 shortly thereafter). In July, the Blue Spark shuttered its space after 12 years downtown. The remaining shows booked by Tanzer have either been canceled or moved. The Hop!, an all-ages venue that packs out at 200, has generously taken on a few of those (Red Fang, Black Dahlia Murder). Tom “TC” Chavez, owner of the Hop!, says he’s not surprised the Center went under, and that in general it’s hard to do anything in the music business these days. “We’re a small market,” he says. “The place that falls in between the underground scene and Knitting Factory, the medium-sized event center, it’s hard to consistently bring enough people to fill it.” Even though the Hop! has found its niche as a smaller music venue, it (along with the Knitting Factory) has seen problems of a different kind. Two months ago, a man was shot and killed outside the Hop!’s doors. “I never thought that would ever happen,” Chavez admits. ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 51

MUSIC | LOCAL SCENE “CIRCLE OF LIFE,” CONTINUED... Although it was an isolated incident, Chavez has cut back on hip-hop shows to let the dust settle. He says that since then his business has continued to be successful and that except for the media, people don’t talk about it anymore. Downtown’s 1,500-person Knitting Factory had its own set of worries in February when shootings caused the Spokane Police Department to temporarily shut down the venue. “We were completely exonerated of all misdoings and we had no drop-off in business,” says Mark Dinerstein, the Knitting Factory’s senior talent buyer, of the incident. “We’ve never had a violence issue before or since.” Still, with all of this tumult in the past year involving all-ages venues,the Bartlett is forging ahead.

L

ast week, on an unusually warm autumn day, Karli Ingersoll is at her soon-to-open downtown business, the Bartlett, overseeing the ongoing project. Today, it’s about getting as much paint on the renovated building’s walls as possible. She and her husband Caleb hope that by paying attention to the details, their venue can persevere where others have not. The focus is to make everything — the stage, aesthetics, sound system — the best they can afford, Karli explains. “I think there’s not as much quality when it comes to local venues, so the bar is low,” she says. “It seems some places just open to open.” While she didn’t see the Center as direct competition because of its location, Karli sees its closure as a loss, as the venue was booking genres that the Bartlett isn’t necessarily going to cater to. “Our philosophy is there has to be several places working hard for the scene to be strong,” she says. As Spokane is a smaller city with fewer bands and people paying attention to the music, all venues have to work that much harder to get their piece of the pie. This is an issue local music promoter Patrick Kendrick, who helps book the Inlander’s Volume music festival, has been dealing with for nearly a decade. “I’ve learned over the years you have to adapt to your environment, try and have your finger on the pulse,” says Kendrick. “It’s a constant battle, but you can’t dwell on it if it doesn’t turn out well, you have to keep going.” Kendrick says he’s hopeful about how the Bartlett is going to be managed. “The truth is, venues just don’t last forever,” Kendrick says. “But that doesn’t mean we can’t have venues that have a good multiyear run.” Currently, the Knitting Factory is the big man on campus, hosting in a few all-ages show a week. But as Dinerstein says, he still needs the other venues to bring in the acts not large enough to fill his venue in order to develop momentum for the scene. “Small clubs come in and out all over the country,” he says. “It’s a little bit of luck and a lot of hard work.” n lauraj@inlander.com

52 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

MUSIC | ROCK

Sun Nov 3rd

1 YR. Anniversary

Live Music

1. Affogato

$ 00

Drawings All day

225 E. 3rd Ave., Spokane, WA

South Spokane

3223 E. 57th Suite k

REVEL77.com // 509.280.0518

“FLAT-OUT FLAT-OUT ELECTRIFYING!” ELECTRIFYING! - Boston Globe

the groundbreaking

WAYY musical BROADWA

The Seattle-based group, Chastity Belt, may sing about vaginas, but they take music seriously.

Say Everything

(Photos by Turner Rouse, Jr., John Daughtry, Litwin)

Nothing is off limits for Chastity Belt BY LEAH SOTTILE

J

ulia Shapiro admits: she was just trying to get a reaction. When she and her friends got bored as students at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Wash., they picked up guitars and learned how to play them in front of audiences at on-campus music festivals and weekend parties. They were a party band who called themselves Chastity Belt and played songs called “Giant Vagina,” “Nip Slip” and “Pussy Weed Beer.” Flash forward a couple of years, and Chastity Belt is the talk of the Seattle music scene, an edgy, all-girl, lo-fi rock band admired by Pitchfork and NPR, being touted as some kind of feminist superheroes. The Seattle Times told the city that “Nobody in Seattle sings about sex more honestly,” and CMJ said “Chastity Belt filter feminist theory, cultural commentary and general intellectual bad-assery.” When asked about that, Shapiro giggles over the phone from the band’s tour van. “I don’t even think about how other people will receive [our music]. I sing what I think is funny,” she says. Shapiro says Chastity Belt, in its earliest days, was all about making dick jokes that would make people laugh. Like “James Dean,” a song in which Shapiro yells “You’re a slut! I’m a whore! We’ve f---ed everyone before!” “I feel like our more sexual songs are our

older ones that I wrote when we were seniors in college and playing songs to frat parties,” Shapiro says. “I don’t even think of us as super sexual. “I mean, we have songs about nipples and vaginas. But um…, ” she laughs, her bandmates snickering in the background. “I think part of it is probably because we’re girls. Because guys sings about their dicks all the time.” The band — Shapiro, bassist Annie Truscott, guitarist Lydia Lund and drummer Gretchen Grimm — might not see themselves as sexual revolutionaries, but they certainly have a catchy way of getting another kind of message across. It might be this: women like to be irreverent and silly and kind of gross, too. Occasionally, the band takes itself seriously. “Black Sail” shows Chastity Belt at its best: thudding bass and reverb-y guitars back Shapiro’s Neko-esque vocals as she sings about sinking ships and schools of fish. So, yeah, there’s talent behind Chastity Belt. And they choose to interlace that talent with songs where the singer yells “vagina!” That might be a little gimmicky for some, but who doesn’t like a good dick or fart joke?  leahs@inlander.com Chastity Belt with Pony Time, Bloody Gloves and Bad Mood • Mon, Nov. 4 at 9:30 pm • Baby Bar • 827 W. 1st • Free • 21+ • 847-1234

Contains adult Content and strong language

November 22-23 |

INB Performing Arts Center

BestofBroadway Spokan

e.com

Enter to WIN TICKETS at Inlander.com! @WCEBroadway

/WestCoastEntertainmentSpokane

FRIENDLY SERVICE & C LA SS IC C O C K TA IL S

HAPPY HOUR

MON-SAT 5-8 | ALL DAY SUNDAY

926 W. GARLAND AVE

SUN-THURS 4pm-MI D NI G HT | FRI - SAT 4pm-2am OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 53

MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

PUNK MARTHA’S REVENGE

I

f you like Northwest punk or metal, you probably like the Accüsed. They came out of the Seattle area in the early 1980s, keeping one foot firmly grounded in punk rock, the other in heavy metal. With just one original member, the band is still plugging along. But the rest of the guys still wanted to play their old songs. So what did they do? Formed Martha’s Revenge, “the Northwest’s premier Accüsed tribute band.” You read that right: the rest of the original band formed an impersonation act of their own band. That’s just genius. — LEAH SOTTILE Martha’s Revenge with Toe Tag, Rutah, American Wrecking Company and Rasputin • Sat, Nov. 2 at 9 pm • Carr’s Corner • 230 S. Washington • $6 • 21+ • 474-1731 J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW

PSYCHEDELIC MAGIC CASTLES

T

o the neo-psychedelic rock movement, Anton Newcombe of the Brian Jonestown Massacre is like a god. So when Magic Castles, a Minneapolis-bred band, were picked up by Newcombe’s own record label, in some ways it was like being blessed by the psychedelic Pope himself. Magic Castles make simple, deliberate rock music — never too technical or reliant on effects to make their point. Left to their own devices, they construct a timeless, hypnotizing sound, both sweet and completely drugged-out all at once. Newcombe’s guiding hand is apparent on their faster songs, and they show their Velvet Underground fandom on the slower ones. But they’re hardly derivative. Hell, we kind of wish all rock music sounded like this. — LEAH SOTTILE Magic Castles with Mirror Mirror • Fri, Nov. 1 at 9 pm • Jones Radiator • 120 E. Sprague • Free • 21+ • 747-6005

J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 10/31

GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, All Hallows Eve feat. Clvsterfu*k, Blvck Ceiling, Twin Towers, Video Destroyer BUCKHORN INN, Texas Twister CARR’S CORNER, Measures, Widower, I Hate This City, Thunder and Lightning THE CELLAR, Robbie French THE CHECKERBOARD BAR, Halloween Jam feat. Mojave Wizard and Wicked Obsession COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Strictly Business, PJ Destiny THE COUNTRY CLUB, The Ryan Larsen Band DOWNTOWN CROSSING (208-6108820), Flying Mammals GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos J THE HOP!, Pest, Spindle, Daniel Stickney, Epik, Vibe, Cruz, Mack Menace, Lil Buddha, DJ Deane, DJ Killmore JOHN’S ALLEY, Eclectic Approach J JONES RADIATOR, Jones Halloween Show feat. Cuss Jar, The Wreckers, Rice Queen J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Jackie Lantern J THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE (3159531), Tyler Aker, Liz Rognes LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow, The Smoking Breeze

54 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dirk Lind NYNE, Halloween Party feat. The Divine Jewels O’SHAY’S, Open mic J THE PHAT HOUSE, Halloween Party feat. The Tone Collaborative, Bodhi Drip, Moksha RED ROOM LOUNGE, The Fail Safe Project Halloween Bash feat. Seven Cycles, Coming Alive, Moms Rocket RICO’S, Palouse Subterranean Blues Band ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Sammy Eubanks THE SHOP, Guitarist Paul Abner SPLASH, Steve Denny SWAXX (703-7474), Swaxx Halloween Part feat. DJ Freaky Fred THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB, DJ Seli ZOLA, Troubador

Friday, 11/1

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, Truck Mills BABY BAR, BBBBandits, The Camaros, Rice Queen BAG O’ NAILS (242-3360), Chris Rieser & The Sugar Skulls BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOLO’S, Slow Burn BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Dragonfly THE CELLAR, Bakin’ Phat COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh, Strictly Business

COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, Bill Bozly CURLEY’S, Bad Monkey THE FALLS CLUB (208-457-1402), Shiner FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Bob Sletner FIRST STREET BAR & GRILL, Johnny Qlueless FIZZIE MULLIGANS, YESTERDAYSCAKE GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Eugene Jablonsky Jazz Trio, Ataa Adjiri HILLS’ RESTAURANT & LOUNGE (7473946), Gretchen & The Wolf J THE HOP!, The Ongoing Concept, Prestige, Fallstar, Cold Blooded, Skinwalker, Fueling the Heathen, Symptoms of Insanity IRV’S, DJ Prophesy JOHN’S ALLEY, Scott Pemberton Superband J JONES RADIATOR, Magic Castles (See story above), Mirror Mirror KNITTING FACTORY, Boogieman’s Ball feat. DJs One and Q J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Diane Copeland THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE (3159531), Moon Talk, Scott Ryan LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls MAX AT MIRABEAU, Bobby Bremer Band MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Ron Criscione J NYNE, ssssnake, Half Zodiac, Hey!

is for Horses PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, A Touch of Jazz J THE PHAT HOUSE, DJ Poncho ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Doolin Run THE ROCK BAR AND GRILL (4433796), DJ JWC SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE (6648008), Dan Mills TWELVE STRING BREWING COMPANY (241-3697), Pamela Benton THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Big Mumbo Blues Band ZOLA, The Fat Tones

Saturday, 11/2

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOLO’S, Slow Burn BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Dragonfly J BULLET PROOF TATTOO, Rock Against ALS feat. Moral Crux, Deadones USA, Lobster Jaw, The Sissies J CARR’S CORNER, Toe Tag, Martha’s Revenge (See story above), Rutah, American Wrecking Co., Rasputin THE CELLAR, Bakin’ Phat J CHAPS, Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston THE CHECKERBOARD BAR, Abode for the Dead, MautaM, Morlok, Wicked Obsession COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh

COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, Bill Bozly, Eric Neuhausser COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR, Truck Mills CURLEY’S, Bad Monkey FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Bob Sletner FIRST STREET BAR & GRILL, Johnny Qlueless FIZZIE MULLIGANS, YESTERDAYSCAKE J THE HOP!, 5 Times Over, Zach HVAL, The Camorra, Diotla, Waggy Plank GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos IRV’S, DJ Prophesy JOHN’S ALLEY, Scott Pemberton Superband JONES RADIATOR, Jaeda + Half Zodiac KNITTING FACTORY, Trapt LA ROSA CLUB, Angela Marie Project THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE (3159531), The Wreckers THE LARIAT (466-9918), The Ricks Brothers Band LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Tommy G. LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls MAX AT MIRABEAU, Bobby Bremer Band NYNE, DJ C-Mad J THE PHAT HOUSE, Open Jam Night RED LION HOTEL RIVER INN, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Ranger and the Re-Arrangers

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Tuesday

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. Night Jam with Truck Mills  THE HOP!, Fall Barter Circle JOHN’S ALLEY, Grant Farm KELLY’S IRISH PUB, The Powell Brothers  RED ROOSTER COFFEE CO. (3217935), Open mic RICO’S, WSU School of Music Jazz Band  UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO (208-8856111), Noah Guthrie THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB, DJ Q THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, The Winter War

JONES RADIATOR, Seth Walser, Nov. 7 LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow, Nov. 7 THE PHAT HOUSE, DIONVOX, The Tone Collaborative, Bodhi Drip, Moksha, Nov. 7 THE BARTLETT, The Bartlett Grand Opening Weekend feat. Blouse, Psychic Rites, Dead Serious Lovers, Nov. 7 JOHN’S ALLEY, Down North, Nov. 7-8 KNITTING FACTORY, Too Broke to Rock feat. Bobaflex, Nov. 8 THE BARTLETT, The Bartlett Grand Opening Weekend feat. The Cave Singers, Radiation City, Kaylee Cole, Nov. 8  BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, Fabio Undulata, Nov. 8 MOOTSY’S, & Yet, Strangled Darlings, Cloud Person, Tyler Aker, Nov. 8 JONES RADIATOR, The Bettys, Good Night Venus, Nov. 9 LA ROSA CLUB, Cedar and Boyer, Nov. 9 MERLYN’S, “I’m With the Banned” aftershow feat. 66beat, Rice Queen,

AP RwaSp.oW TE WIN rg www.winters FIFTEENTH ANNUAL

untain Ski Patrols Sponsored by Lookout Pass and Silver Mo

ROUNDS KOOTENAI COUNTY FAIRG nd SATURDAY, NOV. 2 2013

TO SELL: Register items for sale Friday Nov. 1st | 3-8pm

TO BUY: Shop Sat. Nov. 2nd 9am-3pm Admission $5 (12 & Under FREE)

TO CLAIM:

d merMoney for items sold, and any unsol rounds chandise must be claimedrdat the Fairg Sunday, November 3 9AM-Noon

Patrols are non-profit organizations. Lookout Pass and Silver Mountain Volunteer Ski

CUSS JAR’s Halloween Show THE WRECKERS & RICE QUEEN

Friday Nov 1st Art by: CODY RODENBOUGH

MAGIC CASTLES & MIRROR MIRROR

Saturday Nov 2nd

HALF ZODIAC w/ JAEDA

Sunday Nov 3rd

MOVIE NIGHT and

HAPPY TIME PRICES ALL DAY!

Monday Nov 4th

TRIVIA NIGHT Tuesday Nov 5th

TONE DEAF TUESDAY Wednesday Nov 6th

SALLY BOP JAZZ and WHISKEY WEDNESDAY

25 Craft Beers & Craft Cocktails 120 E. Sprague Ave.

OCT 31st - Nov 6TH THUR

Tuesday, 11/5

Coming Up ...

Thursday Oct 31th

HALLOWEEN @ CLUB RED

NO COVER KARAOKE W/ LIVE WIRE

at Irv’s 8pm-2am

HALLOWEEN PARTY SAT & FRI

 BABY BAR, Pony Time, Chastity Belt (See story on page 53), Bloody Gloves BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Open mic  CALYPSOS (208-665-059), Open mic EICHARDT’S, Blues Jam hosted by Truck Mills PJ’S BAR & GRILL, Acoustic Jam with One Man Train Wreck  RICO’S, Open mic

MUSIC | VENUES

LIVES ON @ CLUB RED

Party till 4am all weekend!

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

at Club Red 6pm-10pm

SUN

Monday, 11/4

Bloody Gloves, Nov. 9 SPOKANE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, Fall Folk Festival feat. Juliana & Pava, Musha Marimba, Chutzpah, Sidhe, Bridges Home, Arvid Lundin, Moksha, Floating Crowbar and more, Nov. 9 REPUBLIC BREWING CO., The Lowest Pair, Nov. 9 THE BARTLETT, The Bartlett Grand Opening Weekend feat. Typhoon, Silver Torches, Le Wrens, Nov. 9, 8 pm MOOTSY’S, Moral Crux, The Blowouts, Gorilla Rabbit Chicken, Nov. 9  BABY BAR, The Bad Lovers, BBBBandits, Nov. 9 SPOKANE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, Fall Folk Festival feat. Plaid Cat Trio, Dead Man’s Pants, Truck Mills, Amy Bleu, Starlite Motel, Sea Giant and more, Nov. 10 THE BARTLETT, The Bartlett Grand Opening Weekend feat. Terrible Buttons, Mirror Mirror, Scott Ryan, Nov. 10 JOHN’S ALLEY, Casey Donahew Band, Nov. 10 KNITTING FACTORY, Rittz, Snow Tha Project, Jarren Benton, Wildcard, Nov. 12 THE HOP!, The Black Dahlia Murder with Skeletonwitch, Nov. 12 KNITTING FACTORY, Soja, Common Kings, Nov. 13 CARR’S CORNER, Quality Control Tour feat. OverTime, Illest Uminati, Whiteboy Lingle and more Nov. 14 MOOTSY’S, Brothers Ov Midnite, B. Durazzo, Fresh Kils, Mad Dukez, JB Nimble, Nov. 14 RED ROOM LOUNGE, Grayskul, Graves33, Jaeda, Nov. 14 KNITTING FACTORY, The Clumsy Lovers, Nov. 15 JONES RADIATOR, The Flannel Attractions, Nov. 15 KNITTING FACTORY, Morgan Page, Beltek, Topher Jones, Nov. 16 SWAXX, Grade A CD Release Party, Nov. 16 THE BARTLETT, Marshall McLean Album Release Show with Mama Doll, Bart Budwig, Nov. 16 CARR’S CORNER, Carson Allen, Ashtree, Raze the City, John Michaelson, Rylei Franks, Nov. 16 KNITTING FACTORY, Gramatik, Nov. 17

KARAOKE W/ LIVE WIRE

MON

 BABY BAR, Scatter Gather DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church  REVEL 77 (280-0518), Revel77 One Year Anniversary feat. Hannah Siglin, Disconnect the Parachute

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard IRON HORSE BAR, Open mic IRV’S, DJ Prophesy JOHN’S ALLEY, Yabba Griffiths JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop  LATAH BISTRO, Haley Lillemon  LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dario Re MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Evan Denlinger  THE PHAT HOUSE, Be Open Mic  RED ROOM LOUNGE, Josh Martinez, Jaeda + Half Zodiac, DJs Wax 808 and Sake One RICO’S, WSU School of Music Jazz Band SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic SUKI YAKI INN (624-0022), One Man Train Wreck THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB, DJs Freaky Fred and MC Squared THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Shaiden Hutchman ZOLA, The Bucket List

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

TUES

Sunday, 11/3

Wednesday, 11/6

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

WED

THE ROAD HOUSE (208-448-1408), Flying Mammals ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Doolin Run SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE (6648008), Pat Coast THE WAVE, Likes Girls ZOLA, The Fat Tones

LE GIRLS

at Irv’s 9pm-2am

at Irv’s 8pm-2am

at Irv’s 8pm-2am

FEMALE IMPERSONATOR

at Club Red @ 10pm 415 W. Sprague Ave.

509.624.4450

315 MARTINIS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208667-9660 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington St. • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208664-9463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 311 N. 1st Ave., Sandpoint • 208-263-6971 THE COUNTRY CLUB • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIRST STREET BAR • 122 E. First St., Deer Park • 276-2320 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROS. • 718 W. Riverside • 315-8765 THE GRAIL • 4720 E. Seltice Way, CdA • 208665-5882 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KELLY’S IRISH PUB • 726 N. Fourth St., CdA • 208-667-1717 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PACIFIC AVENUE PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 220 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RICO’S PUB • 200 E. Main, Pullman • 332-6566 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 STUDIO K• 2810 E. 29th Ave. • 534-9317 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 THE VAULT • 120 N. Wall St. • 863-9597 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 THE WAVE • 525 W. First Ave. • 747-2023 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 55

MATT VIELLE/HAMILTON STUDIO PHOTOS

THEATER THE PERFECT CRIME

Interplayers’ 33rd season rolls on with a production of John Logan’s 1988 play Never The Sinner, the true story of two law school students, Richard Loeb and Nathan Leopold, who in 1924 killed a teenager in Chicago just to see if they could get away with it. Directed by Ken Urso, Interplayers’ production brings to life the savagery of the crime in a courtroom drama that also examines the love story between the two accused killers. Jackson Marchant plays Loeb and Nich Witham takes on the role of Leopold, while veteran Michael Weaver plays Clarence Darrow, the legendary attorney hired to keep the boys from being put to death. — MIKE BOOKEY Never The Sinner • Through Nov. 9 • Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm; matinees on Sat and Sun; 6:30 pm on Fri, Nov. 1 • $12-$28 • 174 S. Howard • interplayerstheatre.org

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

56 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

FILM NIXON REVISITED

FILM OUT AND ABOUT

Our Nixon • Thu, Nov. 7 at 7 pm • $7 • Magic Lantern Theater • 25 W. Main • magiclanternspokane.com • 209-2383

15th Annual GLBT Film Festival • Nov. 1-3, showtimes vary • $5$8/film, $12/festival pass • Riverpoint EWU Auditorium, Phase I Classroom Bldg. • 668 N. Riverpoint • spokanefilmfest.org • 216-0366

For one night only, the Magic Lantern offers a rare look inside the most controversial president ever to occupy the White House. An award-winning documentary, Our Nixon includes more than 500 hours of film taken by H.R. Haldeman, John Ehrlichman and Dwight Chapin, Richard Nixon’s closest advisors and Watergate co-conspirators. Leading up to the Watergate scandal that was his ultimate downfall, the film is an intimate look at President Nixon, candidly presenting him through home movies that had not been seen in more than 40 years. — EMERA L. RILEY

You probably won’t be able to see the films at this year’s GLBT Film Festival anywhere else. As usual, the festival features movies for all types: elders, youths, hopeless romantics, music lovers, foreign film junkies, couples, singles; everyone. There are some great documentary-style shorts, like What I LOVE about being QUEER — an honest and intimate look at what it’s like to be gay, candidly shot inside the director’s apartment. Comedies like Yeah Kowalski!, about a late bloomer’s yearning for armpit hair, are also featured. — KATELYN SMITH

THEATER DON’T FEED THE PLANTS

Before Rick Moranis could make the character of nerdy florist’s assistant Seymour Krelborn famous in the cult classic film Little Shop of Horrors, the musical, based on Roger Corman’s low-budget 1960 film of the same name, was being staged off-Broadway. Sweeney Todd had come out a few years earlier, and along those same bloody lines, Howard Ashman and Alan Menken wrote the 1982 musical about a man who must resort to murder in order to feed his oh-so-carnivorous plant, Audrey II. Spokane Valley’s Ignite! Community Theatre takes on the production this weekend and next. The show is directed by Troy Nickerson (his first collaboration with the company) and Heather McHenry-Kroetch. — LAURA JOHNSON Little Shop of Horrors • Through Nov. 3 • Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $16-$20 • Ignite! Community Theatre • 10814 E. Broadway • ignitetheatre. org • 795-0004

NORTHSIDE

SPOKANE VALLEY

9719 N. Division St. 509-455-8290

15110 E. Indiana Ave. 509-924-8187

THE AREA’S BIGGEST HARDWOOD SELECTION!

INVENTORY INVENTORY BLOWOUT SALE! Save on the on the latest flooring during the Inventory Blowout Sale at Carpet One Floor & Home and pay nothing for one full year!*

DANCE NATURAL SPECTACULAR

The fluid movements of the dancers’ bodies are mesmerizing and poetic, at times appearing wild and animal-like. As they twist their bodies into unimaginable shapes, bending like circus performers whose stage is a venue of nature, the audience might feel like they’ve slipped into a dream-like trance. Momix, an internationally touring company of “dancer-illusionists,” stops in Spokane for one night next Wednesday to perform its nature-inspired show Botanica. The stop here is also a homecoming of sorts for troupe member Amanda Diehl-Hulen, who left Spokane at age 16 to pursue a career in professional dance. Now a member of Momix alongside her husband Morgan, the couple take the stage together at the Fox for her first professional performance in her hometown since leaving. — CHEY SCOTT Momix: Botanica • Wed, Nov. 6 at 7:30 pm • $20-$38 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • foxtheaterspokane.com • 624-1200

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

CELEBRITY FASHION SHOW Fashion show featuring local celebrities, luncheon, wine tasting, a silent auction and more to benefit Volunteers of America’s Hope House. Nov. 1, 11 am. $45. Doubletree Hotel, 322 N. Spokane Falls Ct. voaspokane.org (624-2378) LINKING FAMILIES FOR LIFE 4th annual dinner supporting Catholic Charities of Spokane’s CAPA (Childbirth and Parenting Assistance) program. Nov. 1 at 5:30 pm. $50. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside Ave. catholiccharitiesspokane.org (455-4986) IMPACT NW ANNUAL FUNDRAISER The 12th annual fundraiser for Northwest Christian Schools features keynote speaker Janet Parshall, host of the radio show “In the Market.” Nov.

2, 7 pm. Free admission, donations requested. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. nwcs.org (238-4005) NAACP FREEDOM FUND BANQUET Event theme: “Justice of Just Us: A Call to Action to End the School to Prison Pipeline” featuring keynote speaker Judge Joe Brown. Proceeds benefit local scholarship funds. Nov. 2, 7-9 pm. $75. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. naacp.ticketbud.com (325-3722) SNOW DANCE The 15th annual blacktie affair benefits the 49 Degrees North Winter Sports Foundation and the Forty-Nine Alpine Ski Team (FAST), and features live music, dancing and an auction. Nov. 2, 6 pm-12:30 am. $110$135. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside Ave. ski49n.com (838-2310)

Come shop the latest styles and the best brands in hardwood, laminate, carpet, tile & more. It’s easy to make the perfect choice with our SelectAFloor system & all of our flooring comes with a lifetime guarantee – our Beautiful Guarantee.

NO PAYMENTS FOR ONE YEAR* Don’t miss our Inventory Blowout Sale, where you can save on select styles of carpet, hardwood, laminate, vinyl or tile for every room in your home. Enjoy your new floor for one full year with no payments and no interest.

GET EXCLUSIVE PRIVATE SAVINGS OF $100 Take an extra $100 of all your flooring purchases when you bring in this letter to Carpet One Floor & Home. That’s in addition to the 10-25% savings currently offered to the general public. Offer ends 10/31/13. We hope to see you soon.

SAVE

50

%

UP TO

STOREWIDE PLUS

SPECIAL

FINANCING AVAILABLE*

Sincerely,

Store Owner At participating stores only, not all products at all locations. Photos for illustrative purposes only. Not responsible for typographical errors. Offers cannot be combined with other discounts or promotional offers and are not valid on previous purchases. ©Carpet One Floor & Home®. *See store for details. Subject to credit approval. †See actual warranty at store for complete details.

100

$

OFF

Now available with

See store for details.

Any Purchase of $1,499 or More!

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 57

EVENTS | CALENDAR BREASTSTROKE FOR HOPE The U of I swim team and Greek community host a fundraiser charity race for breast cancer awareness and research through the Women’s Breast Health Initiative. Nov. 3, 10-11 am. University of Idaho, 709 S Deakin St. uidaho.edu (208-885-6111) EPICUREAN DELIGHT The 32nd annual black-tie gala event features 30 local wineries and breweries and more than 30 local restaurants, with proceeds benefiting the Inland NW Blood Center. Nov. 8 from 6 pm to midnight. Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. epicureandelight.org (232-4567)

COMEDY

9pm - midnight

8901 E. Trent

GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open-mic comedy, including stand-up, sketch, improv or anything weird. Five minutes max per performer. Every other Thursday at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (847-1234) STAND-UP COMEDY Local comedians. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy, 2721 N. Market St. (483-7300) OPEN MIC COMEDY Live stand-up comedy. Fridays, 8 pm. Free. Chan’s Dragon Inn, 1406 W. Third Ave. (838-6688) SHORT STACKS Live improvised comedy show. Nov. 1 at 10 pm. $5. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) SAFARI Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Allages. Saturdays, 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) LIVE COMEDY Live stand-up comedy shows. Sundays, 9 pm. Goodtymes, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070)

COMMUNITY

MEDICARE BENEFIT WORKSHOP Community workshop on choosing a Medicare plan and more. Oct. 31, Nov. 6, 7, 18, 26 and Dec. 3 at 1 pm; also Nov. 5 at 1:30 and 5:30 pm. Free. Bell-Anderson Financial, 12309 E. Mirabeau Parkway. bellandersenfinancial.com (993-1816) MYSTERY BOOK SALE Crime, murder mystery, spy and other gently-used novels for sale in a fundraiser to support library programs. Oct. 31, 10 am-4 pm. Coeur d’Alene Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org (208-769-2315) CASH FOR CANDY Kids can bring in their unwanted or excess Halloween candy to sell it for $1 per lb., with candy being used to send to U.S. troops overseas in care packages. Nov. 1 from 4-8 pm. KiDDS Dental, 1327 N. Stanford Lane, Liberty Lake. (891-7070) FUNDRAISING BOOK SALE Proceeds benefit the nonprofit Northwest Autism Center. Event held at a private residence at 8501 N. Whitehouse Dr. Spokane, 99208. Nov. 1-2 from 9 am-2 pm. nwautism.org/ (217-7936) HELP THE HUNGRY FOOD SORTING Join other volunteers to sort and pack produce and other bulk food items for delivery to local food outlets. Ages 14+. Fri-Sat, 9 am; Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat at 1 pm; Nov. 14, 18 and 20 at 5:30 pm. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. 2-harvest.org (252-6267) TOM FOLEY MEMORIAL SERVICE Public memorial for the former House Speaker, Gonzaga University alumnus and Spokane native, who passed away on Oct. 18 in Washington, D.C. Services

will be streamed to the Charlotte Y. Martin Centre on the GU campus when the church’s capacity (800) is reached. Nov. 1, 11 am-12:30 pm. Free. St. Aloysius Church, 330 E. Boone Ave. (313-3572) GERMAN-AMERICAN SOCIETY PIONEER DAY Annual event honoring the German-speaking immigrants who have settled here over the last two centuries, featuring traditional choirs music, dinner and more. Nov. 2, 6 pm. $15. Deutsches Haus, W. 3rd Ave. germanamericansociety-spokane.org (747-0004) MILITARY FINANCIAL WORKSHOP Financial workshops for military members and their families with dinner provided. Nov. 2, 5-8 pm. Free. American Red Cross, 315 W. Nora Ave. (389-6305) NAACP COMMUNITY FORUM Panel discussion and community forum, featuring Judge Joe Brown, on eliminating the “school to prison pipeline” for youth of color. Nov. 2, 1 pm. Free. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. redlion.rdln.com (325-3772) SPOKANE GHOST TOURS Walking tours of haunted or possibly haunted areas throughout the downtown Spokane area. Saturdays through Nov. 29 at 8 pm. Tours depart from Luxe Coffeehouse, 1017 W. First Ave. (624-5514) SQUARE DANCE PARTY The community is invited to participate in a variety of dance styles. Nov. 2, 8 pm. Free. Western Dance Center, 1901 N. Sullivan Rd. squaredancespokane.org (979-2607) TEA DANCE Sunday evening tea and dance, featuring live music by Variety Pak, appetizers and more. Nov. 3, 6:309:30 pm. $9-$10. Southside Senior &

Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac.org (535-0803) HUMANITIES-BASED EDUCATION Three public forums on the basic tenets and roles of a humanities-based education and critical thinking in society. Free and open to the public, hosted by KYRS. Nov. 6, 6:30-8 pm and Nov. 10, 4-5:30 pm. Free. Community Building, 35 W. Main. kyrs.org (844-4288) HONORING OUR VETERANS DINNER Three-course dinner, keynote presentations, music by the Fairchild AFB Base Honor Guard, the Masterclass Orchestra and more. Nov. 7 from 5:30-8:30 pm. Free to veterans, $15 public. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac.org (535-0803) KYRS 10TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY Celebration events include a silent auction, raffle, dancing, live music by Son Dulce, food and drinks with all proceeds benefiting the station. Nov. 8, 7 pm. $15$20. Silver Auctions, 2020 N. Monroe St. kyrs.org (747-3012)

CRAFTS

BLANCHARD HOLIDAY BAZAAR Arts and crafts, holiday decorations, concessions and more. Nov. 2, 9 am-4 pm and Nov. 3, 11 am-4 pm. Blanchard Community Center, 685 Rusho Ln., Idaho. (208437-0426) CHENEY BAZAAR DAY Community craft bazaars at three locations. Nov. 2. Includes: Emmanuel Lutheran, (639 Elm St., 9 am-3 pm), United Church of Christ (423 N. Sixth, 9 am-2 pm) and United Methodist Church (4th and G Street, 9 am-3 pm). Free admission. (951-1355)

HALLOWEEN at the MARKET

• Spokane: 210 W Cataldo Ave. • Coeur d’Alene: 405 W Neider Ave. • Spokane Valley: Halloween Valley Hospital st ONLY • Lewiston: 1213 21 St. Get a SPOOK-tacular t-shirt (limited supply) for helping to save lives.

58 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

Thurs., Oct. 31 Special Hours: 9 am - 6 pm

COSTUME CONTEST PUMPKIN CARVING LIVE MUSIC 3-6PM GREAT FOOD TRICK OR TREATING & A FISH TANK FOR THE KIDS THE MARKET IS OPEN ALL YEAR LONG DOWNTOWN AT 2ND & BROWNE (24 W. 2ND AVE) THUR-SAT, 10AM -6PM, SUN 11AM-5PM SPOKANEPUBLICMARKET.ORG

FOWLER METHODIST ANNUAL BAZAAR Antiques, handcrafted items, toys, baked goods and more. Breakfast and lunch also served. Nov. 2, 9 am-3 pm. Olive Branch Community Church, 3928 N. Howard. olivebranchcommunity.com (327-5837) PRIEST RIVER CRAFT FAIR Hosted by the Priest River Lioness Club. Nov. 2, 9 am-4 pm. Free admission. Priest River Jr. High School, 1020 West Albeni Hwy. (208-448-1118) SCRAPBOOK BOOTCAMP Bring your own supplies to work on projects in a group and learn new techniques, includes lunch and dinner. Nov. 2, 9 am-9 pm. $20. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org (208-8199281) ST. MARK’S BAZAAR & BAKE SALE Handmade items, baked goods, gently-used goods and furniture and refreshments served through the day. Nov. 2, 9 am-2 pm. St. Mark’s Lutheran Church, 316 E. 24th Ave. (747-6677)

ETC.

SPOCODE HACKATHON Local programmers collaborate for 24 hours to create team projects. Nov. 1-2. $5-$20. Spokane Fire Center, 1608 N. Rebecca St. spocode.org BEGINNING BEEKEEPERS CLASS Class for beginning beekeepers, including information needed to pass the Wash. State Beekeeping Assoc. test. Sat from 10 am-2 pm through Nov. 16 $30-$40. Pizza Factory, 123 S. Broad St. wpbeekeepers.org (8635666)

BUDDHIST NUNS PRESENTATION “Red Robes and Shaved Heads: What We Can Learn from Buddhist Nuns” by nuns of the Sravasti Abbey. Nov. 2, 1-5 pm. Free. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. uuspokane.org (447-5549) E. WASH. GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY Presentation by John Richards on his ancestor Patsy Clark. Nov. 2, 1-3 pm. Free. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. ewgsi.org (328-0786) NATIONAL COLLEGE FAIR Representatives from colleges and universities answer questions; informational workshops also offered. Nov. 5, 9 am-8 pm Free. Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (279-7000) SPOKANE COMPASS CLUB Annual auction and luncheon, catered by Christ Kitchen Spokane. Reservations requested. Nov. 5, 11 am. $13. St. Thomas Moore Catholic Church, 505 W. St. Thomas More Way. (455-7789) SPOKANE MOVES TO AMEND THE CONSTITUTION The local activist group meets on the first Tuesdays (Nov. 5) of the month at 6:30 pm. Donations accepted. Liberty Park Methodist Church, 1526 E. 11th. (844-1776) STCU FINANCIAL WORKSHOP “Become Debt Free” workshop. Pre-registration required. Nov. 5, 6-7 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St. spokanelibrary.org (755-3980) GREEN SCENE SOCIAL Networking social event hosted by the Cascadia Inland Brand Collective, Spokane’s local green building group. Nov. 7, 5:30-7:30 pm. Free. The Blind Buck, 204 N. Division. (208-660-4361)

THE BENEFITS OF SERVICE.

THE FREEDOM OF PART-TIME. Serve part-time in the Air National Guard and get everything you want out of your civilian life. Do it all while receiving military benefits.

Talk to a recruiter today to learn more.

13220 ANG WA MDPL Inlander_5.5x5.4in.indd 1

9/5/13 4:14 PM

Internationally acclaimed and Grammy-winning jazz saxophonist

FICTION CONTEST

Submit original, previously unshared stories of less than 2,000 words. Stories should reflect or reference the theme “BRIDGES,” however the writer wishes to interpret it.

Send your stories to jacobj@inlander.com by Nov. 22. Put “Fiction Contest Entry” in the subject line. We will publish the best stories in our Dec. 26 issue.

Whitworth Jazz

THE INLANDER’S 2013

with the award-winning

Whitworth University Jazz Ensemble Dan Keberle, director

SATURDAY NOV. 2, 8 p.m. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

Admission: $17; $12 student/senior (62+). Tickets available through TicketsWest (www.ticketswest.com) and The Fox Box Office (509.624.1200 or www.martinwoldsontheater.com). Info: 509.777.3280.

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 59

RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess MOUSE ADO ABOUT NOTHING

I’ve tried to be open-minded, but I’ve decided that men are givers and women are takers. I study at my local coffeehouse. I am interested in this woman who comes in and often unplug my computer and offer to let her use the outlet. Two weeks ago, I decided to make my interest clearer by buying her coffee. She said, ”Oh! Thanks!” Then she put her nose back in her books. The next time she came in, I offered her my large table AMY ALKON because she had tons of books. She blushed as girls do, asking, “Are you sure?” I said, “Of course!” I then worked at a small, cramped table next to her. She made no effort to talk, except when she asked me to watch her computer while she went to the restroom. Finally, I decided to be really clear and asked if she’d like to grab a bite sometime. She smiled and said she’d just see me here, but thanks. Yeah, she’ll see me there and expect me to give her my big table. I’m sick of this take, take, take. A woman needs to tell a man right away if she’s not interested and not let him sit there like an idiot, planning to make her life easier. —Irate I guess when you ask a woman whether she’d like to use the power outlet, she should just come right out and say, “I would, but I don’t find you very attractive.” Why go after what you want when you can dance around it, do it favors, and hope it figures out that you’ve made a secret agreement with it in your head? There are girls who would respond in a way you’d consider honorable —who would not only show appreciation when you provide them with complimentary food and beverages but even follow you home. Unfortunately, they’re the sort of girls who catch a Frisbee in their teeth. Like the sign spinner on the corner in the Statue of Liberty suit, you think you need to lure women with a special offer, except instead of “Cash for gold!” it’s “Snake your drain for a date!” You’re apparently convinced that no woman would want you for you. This probably isn’t entirely off base, since the “you” you currently are is a guy who thinks instilling a sense of obligation in a woman for favors rendered is your best hope of having sex again before you forget where the parts go. Stop grumbling that women are conniving takers, and work on accepting yourself, flaws and all. Once your self-respect is no longer trailer-hitched to whether women want you, you can be direct — just talk to a woman, let her see who you are, and ask her out. She may turn you down, but if you feel okay about yourself, you’ll see her rejection as your cue — simply to find the next girl to hit on, not to storm out behind the coffeehouse, shake your fist at the sky, and yell, “Hey, weren’t the meek supposed to inherit the earth? Where’s mine?!”

WAIT PROBLEMS

A friend of a year has a pattern of raving about people she meets and then completely cooling on them. Last week, she met a man online. On their first date, he took her shopping, buying her a gold ring and a key ring he had engraved with both their names and “Thinking of you always.” She describes him as perfect, brilliant, etc., and said she loves him and would marry him. I said things like “Take some time to get to know him,” but I don’t think she really heard me. —Concerned A first date like theirs raises some questions for the second date, such as, “Who should pay the invoice for the side-by-side burial plots?” Be prepared to wear out your face trying to talk sense into your friend. The problem is “confirmation bias” — our tendency to seek information that supports what we already believe and toss information that does not. In other words, your time would be better spent painting a wall and speaking meaningful thoughts to the paint as it dries. Another productive use of your time would be adding up how much of it you’re spending worrying about this woman’s problems. It isn’t mercenary or ugly to expect a friendship to be mutual and to influence you in positive ways. If how she lives is dragging you down, you may want to give her a little less prominence in your life. Then, when you do see her, you can just admire her ring and share in her happiness at reaching that milestone golden anniversary — celebrating 50 joyous minutes of knowing a man. n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

60 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

EVENTS | CALENDAR

FILM

GLBT FILM FESTIVAL 15th annual film festival highlighting issues faced by the gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender communities. See the organization’s website for full schedule of events. Nov. 11-3. $8-$25. Riverpoint Campus, 668 N. Riverpoint Blvd. spokanefilmfest.org (216-0366) HOMEGROWN HORROR FILM FESTIVAL Screening of horror movies made by local filmmakers. Individual and weekend passes available; film titles and summaries online. Nov. 1-3, screening times vary. $5-$20. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org SANDPOINT FILM FESTIVAL Screening of the winning short films submitted for the annual festival. Nov. 2 at 1 pm, 3 pm and 7 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. sandpointfilmfestival.com (208290-0597) GIRL RISING Documentary screening and post-film discussion hosted by EWU Libraries and the Women’s and Gender Studies Dept. Nov. 3, 5-7 pm .Free. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main Ave. magiclanternspokane.com (359-4262) A FIERCE GREEN FIRE Documentary screening and post-film discussion with director Mark Kitchell, hosted by GU’s environmental studies department. Nov. 4, 5:30-8 pm. Free. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone. (313-5951) BLACKFISH Screening of the independent documentary on orca whales in captivity. Nov. 6, 7-9 pm. Free. University of Idaho, 709 S Deakin St. uidaho. edu (208-885-6111) BLOOD BROTHER Documentary on Rocky Braat, an American graphic designer who visited an HIV orphanage in India and left everything behind to create a family with the kids. Nov. 6, 7 pm $11. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main Ave. (209-2383) DIRTY WARS Documentary following investigative journalist Jeremy Scahill through remote areas occupied by U.S. military in the Middle East and Africa. Nov. 6, 7 pm. Free. Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre, 508 S. Main St. dirtywars.org (872-3025) SPIFF PROFESSOR FILM SERIES Screening of “Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind” with Pete Porter of EWU, and SpIFF director. Nov. 6 at 7 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. spokanefilm.org (227-7638) OUR NIXON One-night screening of the film featuring home movies filmed by Richard Nixon’s closest aides. Nov. 7, 7 pm. $7. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main Ave. (209-2383)

FOOD

FIFTEEN DOLLAR WINES Wine tasting featuring red, white, and sparkling wines all priced under $15. Reservations required. Nov. 1, 7 pm. $20. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) WINE TASTING Friday tasting features Wine of the Month Club selections, Saturday hosts Brian Carter Cellars. Nov. 1, 3-6:30 pm and Nov. 2, 2-4:30 pm. $10$15. vinowine.com (509-838-1229) COFFEE BREW CLASS Class offering demos of different brew methods and more. Nov. 2, 10 am. Free. Revel 77, 3223 E. 57th Ave. revel77.com (280-0518) SCANDINAVIAN LUTEFISK DINNER Benefit dinner featuring traditional

dishes including lutefisk and meatballs with proceeds benefiting the Family Promise program. Nov. 2. $10-$22. Trinity Lutheran Church (Pullman), 1300 NE Lyebecker Rd. (425-652-6618) SOUP, CHEESE AND SWING Semiannual soup, cheese and beer pairing event featuring music by Ranger & The Re-Arrangers. Nov. 2, 4-10 pm. Republic Brewing Co., N. Clark Ave. (509-7752700) AKI MATSURI JAPANESE FOOD FESTIVAL The 23rd annual festival features traditional Japanese dishes, including Bento Boxes, senbei, inari sushi and more, offering eat-in or take-out ordering and tours of the temple. Nov. 3, 12-4 pm. $4-$12. Spokane Buddhist Temple, 927 S. Perry St. SpokaneBuddhistTemple.org (534-7954) REVEL 77 ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY The South Hill specialty coffee shop celebrates its first birthday, offering door prizes, live music and specialty espressos. Nov. 3, 8 am Free. Revel 77, 3223 E. 57th Ave. revel77.com (280-0518) PLATING FOOD PROFESSIONALLY Local Chef Adam Hegsted teaches how to present food in a professional and appealing way. Nov. 6, 6-8 pm. $50. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141)

WEEKEND COUNTDOWN

Get the scoop on this weekend’s events with our newsletter. Visit Inlander.com/newsletter to sign up.

EXPERIENCE SUSHI Chef Jim Wolters leads a class on set up, rice prep, ingredient selection and sushi-making techniques. Nov. 7, 6-8 pm. $50. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) POWDERKEG INLANDER BREW FESTIVAL The first annual winter beer festival features Inland Northwest craft beer and cider makers, focusing on seasonal winter styles, and runs in conjunction with the Snowlander Expo. (Entry included in expo admission) Nov. 8, 4-9 pm and Nov. 9, 10 am-6 pm. $7. Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlander.com/expo (2797000)

MUSIC

TUBAWEEN Annual Halloween concert featuring the University’s famed tuba players, wearing creative costumes. Oct. 31, 7:30-9:30 pm. Free, donations accepted. University of Idaho, 709 S. Deakin St. (208-885-6111) SPOKANE SYMPHONY Symphony With a Splash: Band, Bar and Banter before the concert. Nov. 1 at 5 pm, performance at 7 pm. $25. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) TOM CATMULL & THE CLERICS Concert by the four-piece ensemble. Nov. 1, 7:30 pm. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St. cuttertheatre.com (446-4108) ALL THAT JAZZ The four-member ensemble includes 92-year-old piano player Pearl Harwood. Nov. 2, 7 pm. $5$15. Empire Theatre, 126 S. Crosby St., Tekoa. (284-2000) PAGES OF HARMONY “Vaudeville Tonight” concert featuring songs performed at the District Convention and Contest. Nov. 2 at 2 pm and 7 pm. $10. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410

W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls. edu (443-1503) PAUL ABNER GUITAR SERIES Concerts by the local Grammy-hopeful soloist Paul Abner. Saturdays, 2 pm. Free. Rocket Bakery, 157 S. Howard St. rocketspokane.com (838-3887) A TASTE OF VIENNA European-style fundraiser dinner accompanied by music by the CdA Symphony and soprano Dawn Wolski. Nov. 2, 6 pm. $100. The JACC, 405 N. William St. cdasymphony. org (208-765-3833) WHITWORTH JAZZ ENSEMBLE Concert featuring the Grammy Awardwinning jazz saxophonist Chris Potter. Nov. 2, 8-10 pm. $12-$17. The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) CLASSICAL GUITAR CONCERT Gonzaga Music Dept. faculty Dr. Paul Grove performs. Nov. 3, 3 pm. Free, donations accepted. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. (313-6733) SPIRIT OF SPOKANE CHORUS Local women’s chorus specializing in fourpart a capella harmony in a barbershop style. Tuesdays, 6:45 pm. Opportunity Presbyterian Church, 202 N. Pines Rd. (218-4799) JUDY CARMICHAEL Concert by the Grammy-nominated jazz pianist. Nov. 7, 7:30 pm. $10-$20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater. com (227-7638) SPOKANE NEW MUSIC ENSEMBLE “Music for a Modern Ear” concert by the newly-formed ensemble, featuring original music written by the its members. Nov. 8, 7 pm. Music City, 1322 N. Monroe St. (625-6200)

PERFORMANCE

MOMIX: BOTANICA Nature-inspired dance performance, featuring elaborate costumes, puppets and props. Nov. 6, 7:30 pm. $20-$38. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200) DISNEY ON ICE: ROCKIN’ EVER AFTER Disney characters take to the ice in a spectacle of song and dance. Nov. 7-10, show times vary. $18-$57. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena. com (279-7000) MOSCOW BALLET’S GREAT RUSSIAN NUTCRACKER Performance of the classic holiday ballet. Nov. 13, 7:30 pm and Nov. 14, 7:30 pm $30-$177. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. nutcracker.com (509-227-7404)

SPORTS

WINTER SWAP 2013 Annual winter gear swap offering new and used items sold by individuals and winter sports stores, benefiting the Lookout Pass and Silver Mountain volunteer ski patrols. Nov. 1, 3-8 pm, Nov. 2, 9 am-3 pm and Nov. 3, 9 am-noon. $5. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. winterswap.org (208-765-4969) FREE KIDS HOCKEY LESSON Opportunity for kids ages 4-9 to try the sport, with some equipment and instruction provided. Space limited. Nov. 2, 2-3 pm. Free. Frontier Ice Arena, 3525 W. Seltice Way. tryhockeyforfree.com (208-7654423) QUALCHAN 12K Cross-country race sponsored by the Bloomsday Road Runners Club. Meet at High Drive and Manito Blvd. Nov. 3, 10 am $3-$4. Bloomsday Road Runners Club, High

Dr. & Manito Blvd. brrc.net (448-2616) SKI & SNOWBOARD WAXING BASICS REI’s in-house technician leads a class on how and why waxes work. Nov. 6, 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/spokane (328-9900) SNOWLANDER EXPO 2013 The Inlander-hosted, annual event features local vendors offering discounted prices on winter sports gear, season pass photos from local mountains, factory reps on site and more. Nov. 8, 4-9 pm and Nov. 9, 10 am-6 pm. $7. Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlander.com/expo (279-7000)

THEATER

THE BOYFRIEND 1920s-era musical comedy, presented by the CdA High School Theatre Dept. Oct. 24-Nov. 2, Thurs-Sat at 7 pm. $6-$9. CdA High School, 5530 N. 4th. chstheater.org (208-769-2999) THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK Drama featuring former 1993 cast member Tracey Vaughan (playing Anne) as director. Oct. 24-Nov. 2, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm. Post-show discussions Oct. 25 and 31. Free. North Idaho College, Schuler Auditorium, 1000 W. Garden Ave. (208-676-1667) LEND ME A TENOR Musical comedy. Oct. 25-Nov. 10, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Thursdays-Sundays. through Nov. 10 $11-$17. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. lakecityplayhouse.org (208-667-1323) NEVER THE SINNER Thriller based on the 1924 trial of Leopold and Loeb. Oct. 24-Nov. 9. Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Wed at 7:30 pm on Oct. 30 and Nov. 6. Sat at 2 pm on Nov. 2 and 9. $12-$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. interplayers.com (4557529) SECOND SAMUEL Comedy. Through Nov. 24, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $22. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. (325-2507) GUYS & DOLLS Muiscal performance by members of the Moscow Community Theatre. Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm, through Nov. 10. $12-$15. Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre, 508 S. Main. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS Musical comedy directed by Troy Nickerson. Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm through Nov. 3. $16-$20. Ignite Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway Ave. (795-0004) SHREK THE MUSICAL Performance based on the DreamWorks film, featuring actors from Christian Youth Theater-Spokane. Nov. 1-2 and Nov. 8-9 at 7 pm, Nov. 2 and 9-10 at 3 pm. $10-$12. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. cytspokane.com (509-227-7404) TARZAN THE MUSICAL Musical performance by members of CYT North Idaho, based on the Disney animated film. Nov. 1-2 and 8-9 at 7 pm, Nov. 3 and 10 at 3 pm, Nov. 6-7 at 9:30 am and noon. Special needs show on Nov. 3 at 1 pm. $8-$14. The Kroc, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. (208-765-8600) GREASE Musical performance by members of the Regional Theatre of the Palouse. Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm; also Nov. 9 and 16-17 at 1:30 pm. $17-20. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N. Grand, Pullman. rtoptheatre.org (3340750) FIDDLER ON THE ROOF Musical performed by local children ages 12-17.

Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. FridaysSundays. through Nov. 17 $5-$12. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave. pendoreilleplayers.org (447-9900) NORA Play adapted from the 1879 script for “A Doll’s House,” covering women’s emancipation issues. Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm; Sun at 2 pm through Nov. 24. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. (276-2775)

VISUAL ARTS

PLEASE DO NOT TOUCH The fall EWU faculty exhibition explores society’s disconnect with art objects due to the virtual access to art through modern technology. Gallery hours Mon-Fri, 9 am-5 pm. Runs through Jan. 17. Free. Eastern Washington University, 526 Fifth St., Cheney (359-7858) FIRST FRIDAY Local galleries display new works for the month of November, some featuring live music and refreshments during the opening reception. Nov. 1 from 5-9 pm. Free. Galleries throughout downtown Spokane and beyond. Visit inlander.com for a map of events or see page 36. POETICS & PUBLIC PROJECTION: ROSE BOND “Layered History — Redrawn Memory” exhibition featuring the work of the award-winning animator and media artist Rose Bond. Artist reception and lecture Nov. 12 from 5-6 pm. Exhibit runs Nov. 12-Feb. 7. Free. Bryan Oliver Gallery, Whitworth, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-4513)

Thank You Clearwater and Wittkopf for making our home in Kendall Yards beautiful!

WORDS

DANIEL TAYLOR LECTURE “Telling Stories to your Inner Atheist: Faith and Skepticism in a Postmodern World” by the author and founder of The Legacy Center. Nov. 1, 7 pm. Free. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-4424) THREE MINUTE MIC Monthly openmic poetry night, featuring a showcase by the 2013 Spokane Poetry Slam Champion Lauren Gilmore. Nov. 1 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (8380206) CAN WE AFFORD THE DEATH PENALTY? Five panelists present perspectives on the topic, followed by an open Q&A. Nov. 2, 6:30 pm. Free, donations accepted. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. (230-3017) MICHAEL KOEP The author discusses and signs copies of his new novel “The Invasion of Heaven.” Nov. 3, 1 pm. Free. Hastings, 101 E. Best Ave., CdA. michaelbkoep.com (208-664-0335) W. SCOTT OLSEN The essayist, hurricane-chaser and editor of the literary magazine “Ascent” reads from his work. Nov. 7 at 5 pm. Free. WSU Museum of Art, Pullman. libarts.wsu.edu I’M WITH THE BANNED A discussion of censorship and punk rock in conjunction with the release of the 2013 Comic Book Legal Defense Fund’s Liberty Annual, hosted by Leah Sottile, Sheri Boggs, Brian VanderVeen and John Waite. Music by local bands to follow. Nov. 9, 7 pm Free. Merlyn’s, 19 W. Main Ave. (624-0957) n

MORE EVENTS

Looking for something else? Don’t see your own event here? Visit Inlander.com for a whole lot more.

303 Spokane Ave. | CDA 208 664-2131 rungefurniture.com

tresst t a M QueenStarting a Sets

$399

Sim

mon s Clos Beaut $69 eouts yrest 9

-Q 9 - ueen Kin g

$99

FREE local delivery FREE Setup and FREE haul away of old set.

MATTRESS SALE SLEEP SLeep LIKE LIke THE The DEAD Dead OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 61

The Travel Studio *************************

Tours - Cruises - Group Travel City & Hotel Packages - Rail ------------------------------------------Debbie Cooper (509) 747-2969 624 W. Hastings Rd #7 Spokane

Green Team Residential & Commercial Cleaning - Free Estimate 509-230-9081

Drive Auto & Truck Sales

14211 E Sprague 509-928-6048 www.driveautospokane.com

0pm] 3 : 5 m a . [8:30 Mon. - Fr(i509) 444-7355 nlander.com PHONE: BulletinBoard@I it Parkway E-MAIL: 1227 West Summ 1 : 20 IN PERSON Spokane, WA 99 INDOOR GARAGE SALE & FLEA MARKET Christian Science Healing

Theodora Sallee, Practitioner 509-481-8585 or 509-723-4671

Fowler Church Bazzar - brkfst & lunch Nov 2nd 9am-3pm 3928 N Howard. 327-5837

&

Hello there! I’m Parker 3993; and I came into the Spokane county animal shelter (SCRAPS) 10-12-13. I’m an adult NEUTERED male pointer mix around 2 years old. I just LOVE toys! I’m very playful and energetic and love to go for walks. I’m smart, eager to please and scored very well on my temperament evaluation. I tested well with dogs! Introductions to cats should be on leash. So if you’re active and full of life like me please come meet me!

Smokers Wanting to Quit Needed

Greyhound Park & Event Center 5100 Riverbend Ave. Post Falls, ID

November 8 & 9 // 9am - 4pm

The WSU Spokane Sleep Cen ter smokers 22-40 willing to quit needs turkey. Earn up to $285. 509 cold -358 7756 for more info. IRB#1317 7

Admission $200 12 yrs & Under FREE Great Variety - Easy Access Free Parking Lots of Food, Drinks & Fun!! Vendor Space Available // For more info call 208-773-0545 ext 203

SCRAPS, 2521 N. Flora. (509) 477-2532 • spokanecounty.org/animal

INLANDER DELIVERY DRIVER

WANTED

Lawn & Garden • Pets • Fish • Ponds • Gifts

SAVE 10%

Bring in your adoption papers from SCRAPS, Spokanimal or the Humane Society and receive EVERY 15% OFF on food andWEDNESDAY supplies for your new pet. Must be within 30 days of pet adoption.

AIRWAY HEIGHTS & FAIRCHILD AFB

interested?

EMAIL:

trevor@inlander.com or CALL: 509-325-0634

ext 226

ND A B S K C U R T I H C S E D TE with special guests THE LONDON SOULS TICKETS TO

Spokan Locally e’s Own Pet Sto ed r Since 1 e 944

www.nwseed.com

GO TO  inlander.com/tedeschitrucks

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

2422 E. Sprague 534-0694 • 7302 N. Division 484-7387

8

9

17

18

23

62 62 INLANDER INLANDER OCTOBER OCTOBER 31, 31, 2013 2013

32

33

39

THIS ANSW WEEK’S E PAGE RS ON 65

26 29

30 35

37

40

41

42

46

45 48

25

34

36

54

24

28

31

38

13

19

27

DOWN 1. Medical tool used as the 53-Down in the logo of the TV show “Nip/Tuck” 2. Ring of light 3. Largest African country 4. Say without thinking 5. ____ Millan, TV’s “dog whisperer” 6. “Round and Round” heavy metal band 7. Mich. rival in the Big Ten 8. ____ browser 9. Tip for a writer? 10. “The Dukes of Hazzard” deputy 11. Takes off the bench 12. Action in a snowball fight 13. Not just yours or mine 18. Suffix with Brooklyn 19. Bollywood actress Aishwarya often called “the most beautiful

12

21

22

45. ____-lacto vegetarian 46. Like a bubble bath 47. Sch. with a 60-foot “Praying Hands” sculpture 48. “Woo-hoo!” 50. “The Tell-Tale Heart” writer’s monogram 51. Certain meter reader 54. Like Robin Williams, typically 56. Qualifying rounds, informaly 57. It can be found in 17-, 31- and 38-Across 61. Wide shoe spec 62. Some rental trucks 63. Relief for a commuter 64. Geometric figs. 65. Abates 66. Like one of a certain pair of watches

11 16

20

ACROSS 1. Carmaker created in 1949 5. “Larry ____” (2011 Tom Hanks title character) 11. Steamy place 14. Gather selectively 15. Enter gingerly 16. Nightfall, in poetry 17. Refuse to back down in a debate 20. Eyes up and down 21. “____ say ...” 22. “Anything Goes” composer 23. Enzyme suffix 26. “The check ____ the mail” 27. Peyton’s brother on the gridiron 28. Ghana’s capital 30. Suffix with labyrinth 31. Sports page listing 36. Victories 37. Filmdom’s Long and Vardalos 38. Comments that are hardly to the point

10

15

14

49

50

51

55

57

43

47 52

53

56 58

59

60

61

62

63

64

65

66

“GUEST”

woman in the world” 23. Malfunction, with “up” 24. Hardly abundant 25. “Rubber Duckie” singer 28. “Law & Order” figure: Abbr.

29. Maroon 5 frontman Levine 32. D.C. campus 33. 180s 34. Happen next 35. Suffix with expert

44

38. Trips 39. 2004 Best Musical Tony winner 40. Facial features for Sigmund Freud and Colonel Sanders 41. Menace in “Raiders of the Lost Ark” 42. Primary figure 43. Vehicle in “Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom” 44. They’re always on the horizon 49. Like one of a certain pair of watches 51. Comprehend 52. ____ Lingus 53. See 1-Down 55. ____-Alt-Del 56. “The Motorcycle Diaries” locale 58. Mate’s approval 59. San Francisco summer hrs. 60. Foot, to a zoologist

Psychic Parties FREE

SQUARE DANCE

Sat. Nov 2 at 8pm nd

Looking for a different and unique theme for your next party? Individual or group readings

Western Dance Center 1901 N. Sullivan

Your guests will be talking about your party for years

EVERYONE WELCOME! Have fun & Stay in shape!

509.721.1109 talk2vicki@yahoo.com

BAZAAR DAY - NOVEMBER 2ND

Cindy Gardner Mentoring Coaching Counseling Psychic Readings

509-468-9001

the Spokane Holistic Chamber of Commerce presents

509.979.2607

squaredancespokane.org

PHONE: (509) 444-SELL EMAIL: sales@inlander.com

at THREE Cheney Churches start your day at Cheney United Methodist Church 4th & G Street 9am-3pm ******************************

Year Round Skinny Dipping (208) 686-8686

Fall Clean Up - Leaf Raking, Weed whacking, shrub pruning, snow removal, hauling 999-1545

Mind, Body, Spirit Fair

GRAND OPENING! Collectibles, Furniture, Bikes!

GREAT FINDS AT GREAT PRICES! 703A N. Monroe | Spokane WA Parking in Back

Turning Point :

Cold LASER Therapy Detox Foot Baths Nutrition Quantum Neurology

Choices and Outcomes

Sat, Nov 9th

10am - 5pm

CDA MASSAGE SCHOOL

STUDENT MASSAGES 1 HR Swedish - $25 1 HR Deep Tissue - $35

509-475-0005

1625 N. 4TH ST. CDA

208.765.1075 Food and Coffee available.

ity Univers ol ho High Sc ir F Craft a 10 Nov 9 &

Meet Gay & Bi Locals

BUYING Estate contents / household goods. See abesdiscount.com or 509-939-9996

Send Messages FREE! 206-877-0877, Use Code 7973

ç Grooming ç K9 Hydrotherapy Pool ç K9 Fitness Classes ç K9 Fitness Gym ç Animal Massage ç Human Massage 1620 E Houston #100 | 509.703.7781

AnimalWellnessConnection.com

Presentations at the Fair Govinda Miller - Radical Times / Enlightened Choices Carla Reed - Released Energy - Better Choices Using Sound Therapy Linda Christine - Spiritual Law & Recognizing a Turning Point Doug Cristafir / Brandon Johns - The Art of Free Fall Flying: Creating Paradigms

Charles Lightwalker / Pat Dougherty - Practical Application of Holistic Therapy in Making Choices

Nancy Newman - Balance Energy & Decode Your Choices w/ Toe Reading Lenore Costello - Turning Points & How to Master Change in Your Life

FREE PARKING & FREE ADMISSION Unity Church on the South Hill | 2900 S Bernard St. Charles Lightwalker 509-389-7290 | Linda Christine 509-496-8138

S Hill Apts:1Bd $525,Hrdwd Flrs,1311 W 9th.Studio $485 heat incl 1827 W 9th Lndry/pet ok 509-924-0059

sales@inlander.com

Equal Housing Opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Law which makes it illegal to advertise any preference to, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for our real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain on discrimination call HUD free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Lee Apartments

Browne's Addition 2 Blks from Cd'A Park/Art Museum, Quiet Ngbrhd, groomed front/back yrds,clean, well maint & managed 1940's bldg. Gar/parking/strg avail.,lndry rm onsite,cats ok! 1br $535 Studio $485 747-1414

cdamassageschool.com

35 VENDORS INFORMATION AND DEMONSTRATIONS

Share our home, NW Spokane $400/ month includes utilities. No pets 328-3829

Landlords:

3004 E FAIRVIEW

1 bdrm 1 bth apt, close to SCC, water/ sewer/trash paid, on-site laundry, smoking ok outside, but not in apt. No pets, $425, + $350 dep., application fee $35.

Call 509-534-4147

to advertise:

444-SELL

Not already a member? call (509) 535-1018 or visit our website.

“Serving Landlords for over 40 years” www.landlordassoc.org

OFFERING SERVICES FOR: • D.O.T. Physicals • Sports Physicals • Weight Loss • Alternative Herbal Medical Treatment Options CALL TODAy TO SeT uP yOur APPOinTMenT WiTH Our CLiniC.

509-467-1990 bmcmmj.com

624 W. Hastings #18 • Spokane, WA Roosevelt Apts

We’re Here To Help.

BEST MEDICAL CONSULTATION

Spacious 2br w City View & Super Closet Space $835. Large 1br w City View $685, 1br w Park View $640-$650

Call 747-1414

Shiloh Hills 3BR 2BA 4 Level home w/d no smoking or pets. $1,050 + Dep. 484-2086

JOE’S

420

Agricultural Medical Cannabis Collective Mon-Sat 10am-6pm

HOURS Sun 10am-2pm

9317 E. Trent 509.534.1222

Need to Unwind? Specializing in Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy Deep Tissue :: Hot Rock :: Sports :: Relaxation Online Scheduling :: Located Near Huckleberry’s

50/HR

$

Specializing in: • Deep Tissue • Swedish • Sports • Trigger Point Therapy

Roger Vasquez LMP 1414 W. Garland #102 509.280.2161 Lic #602890076

Dezana Aman, LMP

509.998.0255 ArtOfMassage-Spokane.com

MA 60016914

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 63

“Spokane’s Original Gourmet Cupcake Shop”

Check out our fall inspired flavors!

Like us for Daily Specials!

50% Off

your next purchase*

Purchase limited to 1 dozen.

*Must present coupon. Limited availability. Not valid with other offers, special or pre-orders, promotions, discounts or punch cards. Offer expires 11/07/13.

713 W. Garland Ave. Spokane • 509-327-3471 • CelebrationsSweetBoutique.com

MOISTURE IN YOUR WINDOWS? Don’t Replace. RESTORE for Less!!

FREE ESTIMATES

CALL TODAY! 509-284-4427 TheGlassGuruofSpokaneValley.com

Inland Fireplace Ser vice & Repair

99

Starting at

$

Seasonal tune-up & cleaning service of your gas or pellet appliances.

I Saw You

I Saw You

Cheers

Cheers

Conoco You: VERY handsome! VERY tattoed! VERY well built gentlman putting gas in black Kia Sunday morning at Conoco across from grocery outlet. Me: short blonde in blue business suit in the gray Mercedes behind you. I was going in to pay and you opened the door for me. I thanked you and wanted to say more but didn’t know what to say. I stayed a bit to see you walk out . Again wanting to say hi .....but to chicken. If you remember me and are interested please respond. Something about you is driving me crazy and I can’t get you out of my mind!

remember you gazing at me from across your fire. I gave you my business card to call me but that was at the beginning of the buzz so I’m not sure if you even still have it. I would sure like to get to know you. You seemed like a real nice man. Please contact me so I can tell you I am so interested. Thanks for checking this out. I hope this works!

draw nearer to the lord, and trust in his timing. You are my light-barer, my bridegroom, my 2nd coming.

sometime, you know where I’ll be!

Twigs Saturday night you were sitting at the bar with your mom. I was attracted to you at first sight! You brought up a conversation about traveling and we talked for a minute before you had to leave. I’m kicking myself for not asking for your number. You told me you were studying Philosophy at GU. If you are interested in grabbing a drink, you know what to do!

End Of The Line You asked me where the end of the line was at Atticus in downtown Spokane a few weeks ago. I noticed your accent and asked you about it. You told me you were from England. I go to Gonzaga. We talked about England, France, what I was studying, and where you worked. I think it was for an IT company. I was a bit nervous and didn’t want to look you in the Put a non-identifying email eye, so I looked at your smile. I address in your message, like go there to read sometimes, and I “petals327@yahoo.com” — not always hope to see you.

TO CONNECT

“j.smith@comcast.net.”

CALL TODAY

509.251.0044 Quality, professional ser vice at an afforable price!

james@inlandfireplace.com

2013

20 CRAFT BREWS & CIDERS $1,000’S IN PRIZES ONLY AT THE SNOWLANDER EXPO

SNOWLANDEREXPO.COM

ARLAND Gtattoo and piercing • LASER TATTOO REMOVAL • TATTOO & BODY PIERCING • BRANDING HOSPITAL GRADE STERILIZATION CALL 509-327-2333

602 w. garland • www.garlandtattoo.com

64 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

IT’S FREE

1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

Irv’s Halloween Party October 26th, close to midnight, it was late and I was behind on time to meet my friends, the weather outside was freezing and dropping quick, I was rushing to avoid any more of the chilling cold and as I was closing in to open the door when, I saw you. You advanced out through the opposite door followed out by another person I assumed was your friend walking only inches behind. You were shorter than your friend wearing all black. You were wearing a leather jacket but what stuck out was the prominent rainbow necklace you were wearing. Hopefully against odds you’ll be out at IRV’s for Halloween and get the chance of meeting you along with maybe playing a few rounds of pool. Mission Park Tuesday evening, October 22. You were running past Witter Pool into the Park. I was running toward you with a friend (in bright green shirt). Our eyes met. And held. You: tall, extremely handsome in black running gear and hat. Me: tall, blonde triathlete in running shorts and white hat. Care to hit the trail together sometime? Indigogirl47@yahoo.com. Barter Faire 2013 I know this is a long shot, but I want to try anyway. Hopefully you or someone who knows you will show you this. I got up to the Barter Faire late Saturday. We were on the farthest outer ring-blue flags. You were helping your best friend sell stuff. I wish we would’ve hung out and got to know each other. I have thought about you several times since then. I still

Cheers My Polka Dotted Hero I am the luckiest woman in the world to have such a great man! Never in my life have I ever had someone take such good care of me, you are my rock, the one person in this world I can count on no matter what. Thank you so much for proving to me every day that you love me, you are a great friend to those around you and the best step father a boy could ask for. You remind me of the good in people even when its hard to see and that my friend is so rare in this dark world we live in. I cant believe such a wonderful man could love a woman like me but I am so very happy that you do. I know not all days in the future will be this good and some will even be bad but I am devoted to us and I promise to never stop finding ways to show you how madly in love with you I am, you changed my world and for that I am eternally grateful. Dottie Moo You Lift Me Up “Much like a cairn that requires a delicate balance to stand strong...warding off destruction, yet marking a path; beholding beauty. You Are My Light The love that we bare stands naked and without shame, as we have returned back to the garden to do it the right way this time, ready to break the cycle of life after life, age after age. Let us continue to sing our final redemption song as we patiently

My Hero To my homecoming hero, who told me, “I always win!” : I believed you, and saved my last dance for you. Thank you for making my dreams come true. I know we are both young but I believe that anything is possible! Even though the night is over, my heart still dances for you. To The Cutie At Sublime Cheers to the crew at Sublime Vapor! I’d been kinda hesitant to make the switch, but they made it easy and painless, letting me try the different juices before I bought them. Special thanks to the cute store manager with the big brown eyes and the blue-flamed bowling shirt. You’ve got my business! Manito/Grand Neighbors To those who live on Grand near Manito Park -- cheers to you for not raking up the leaves in your yards! It makes me so happy to drive through an area totally blanketed in beautiful autumn leaves. Keep it up! Suit and Tie The other day I witnessed a man getting out of his Audi and entering one of the banks on Riverside. I would just like to say that this young man was looking quite dapper in his suit and tie and I would like to encourage the other motivated young men of Spokane to follow suit (pun intended). Thank you so much for your glowing smile, you are certainly on my mind. Cheers to the bright and motivated yuppies of Spokane! Thank You! My Pinterest Pallet lightup Bedframe! Thank you! Thank you! Thank you to the guys at Allied Building Products, Ella VADAR, and Rick for helping me complete my project to make a pallet bedframe with lights. I get excited everyday jumping into it! This is one happy Montana girl!

To The Man Of My Dreams I think my heart stopped when I saw you standing by the time clock . I wish we could find our way back to one another . I love forever !!! You Are The Best You Are The Best Thing That Ever Happened To Me. Roses are red. Violets are blue. My world would suck, If I didn’t share it with you. Happy 20th Anniversary Baby, thanks for being my girl. I thank God for you. With all our aches and pains we really are a matched pair. Truth be told, I really did marry you for your money, so if you would just tell me where you buried it, I wouldn’t have to moonlight anymore Happy Birthday Babe! You are the greatest man, lover, father and friend! And the only person I want to spend the rest of my life with! You have all of my heart and soul! Happy Birthday My Love! Sacred Heart Medical staff. Recently a family member had surgery at your hospital. Big, big cheers to all your medical staff. From the receptions to the surgeons, every person we met was cheerful, friendly, and helpful. You have our continuous thanks for making us feel at ease and comfortable as possible! I Love You I can’t tell you how much I appreciate your love and support. You are the strong, intelligent woman that makes it possible for me to achieve everything my heart desires. You are my most beautiful, prized asset and I thank the heavens daily that you were brought into my life. I will love you always and forever. Mad For You

Jeers Off-Leash Dog Jeers, with an apology, to the woman walking her black dog “Rocket” above Pettet Hill on Friday, Oct. 25. I was out for

Hello Batman Love you with all my heart. Every call brings a smile to my lips and hope that our future can be full of laughs and total enjoyment of each other. Always looking forward to the next time we meet with anticipation. If ever the ambient temperature rises above your tolerance level get into your batmobile and venture Joshua H. is this week’s winner North. I love you! Batgirl

WINNER!!

Downtown Sunglass Hut Dalton! It’s the short blonde girl that also works at the downtown mall. I know you don’t work at Sunglass Hut anymore but I miss you! I’m hoping you’re doing ok though and hope you get that internship. Stop by and say hi

of the “Say it Sweet” promotion! Send in your CHEERS so you too can be entered to win 1 dozen “Cheers” cupcakes at Celebrations Sweet Boutique.

“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

I SAW YOU: You have such style SEXY, MODERN, LONG & LEAN. Older yet so DESIRABLE. I knew then and there you were the midcentury sofa for me. I can’t wait to get you home. -Smitten MID CENTURY - INDUSTRIAL - SHABBY - WESTERN - FARM

Jeers

Jeers

Jeers

a run and saw you a block away, with your dog off the leash. You called to it, but it started running toward me. I was attacked last spring by an off-leash dog, and I’m still touchy about loose dogs. I yelled at your dog, who finally stopped, and then yelled at you, “Please keep your dog on a leash!” to which you replied, “F*** you!” to which I replied, “F*** you!” The apology is because I admit I overreacted and I’m not happy with how I responded to you. But this is still a jeers is because you should keep your dog on a leash --- it’s a county ordinance for a reason. If you want your dog to run freely, take it to a dog park.

turning it in to the hotel staff, and so far no response to my frantic “Lost” ads in the SR and on line. This ring is virtually the only thing I have from my grandma Esther, given to me by my dad two years ago (who is now 92 years old and in severe dementia). It is so very special to me, I feel like I have lost a part of myself. Please, please have a change of heart and turn it in to the desk. Feel free to leave a message, no questions asked. I am offering a $200 reward (way more than you will get at the pawn shop - it looks more valuable than it is. Those white stones are semiprecious, NOT diamonds!). Thanks in advance.

signaling. Also my turn signal may have been on for the last few miles, but I’m not clueless. I’m trying to patiently change lanes, which gives you no right to speed up to close the gap. That whippersnapper Jack will be nipping at your ass soon. I can’t wait to see you drive like the idiot you are now and get your pretty little vehicle munched. Then, oh what fun it will be when I get to town! - Old Man Winter

Failed Communication Jeers to me and you. This could be an “I saw you”, but since I don’t really read those... You: female, wearing art deco earings, driving the silver Pontiac Vibe mid-afternoon the 24th East on Second. Me: the maroon Tauras. I saw that your car was not functioning correctly. I pull up next to you and wave in the hopes that you’d roll down your window to listen to me quickly explain why I am wanting to talk to you. You turn and acknowlege me. You are talking into your phone while we are holding pace at 27 mph. The smile you hold as you assumingly talk to your friend quickly turns to horror as a random stanger attempts to contact you. I signal for you to lower your passenger side window. You let off the accelerator, slowing your vehicle as mine glides on. An intersection stops traffic. Your vehicle slowly stops next to mine. I wave again. And again. Your eyes determinedly diverted as you continue to speak into the phone against your ear. I can only assume the fear and shock you must have felt. The light changes. You’re free now. My message? Your drivers side brake light is out.

Pet Owners Jeers to you self absorbent, boastful self proclaimed “Pet Lovers” you spend an enormous amount on the best pet food, pet clothing and the best medical care. Yes, you do all these thing because you claim to be a responsible pet owner, HOWEVER you fail miserably in your civic responsibility. Too many of you intentionally fail to pick up your pet’s waste. You don’t have any intentions on picking up, You don’t bother to bring a plastic bag. Everyday I walk my 4 month old SpokeAnimal puppy along S Van Marter Rd, EVERYDAY I come across new piles of animal waste. Please keep our Pondarosa a nice place to live, retrieve your animal’s waste. Car Burglar To the creep that stole my wallet out of my Jeep parked in my driveway. Hey it’s bad enough that you came on my property and took my wallet, money and credit cards, but did you have to take my Garth Brook CDs. I sure hope you are not a fan, as I would hate to think I had any similarities to a such despicable person.

Slow Down Whether you’re a prick in a Prius or a hick in a Dodge You Stole My Ring So evidently Durango, you need to slow down it was not obvious that the ring and stop driving like you’re from you took from the ladies room at Seattle. I may drive a bit slower and the Mirabeau Park Hotel last Friday leave room for a car in front of me, night BELONGED TO SOMEONE but this doesn’t mean you need cut ELSE. There was no record of you me off without A P S E C R O W N S A A B E E N E A S E I N C U L L N L Y R U B B O A R G U E S T D T O A S L E E R S A T I S I N E S A R P O R T E I N E A C C R A E L I ’S N G S I D N A T S THIS WEEK! L E A G U E S R S E A N I ANSW W I N S S A T E M E N T V A G U E S T O R U S U D S Y O V O M A N S A G E A P Y E A H L I M S E R P C A N T I E P E A R A N C G U E S T A P S E A T S R E D Y R E E E H E R S L E T S U P S Q S GUEST

Play That Horn I’ve seen it happen so many times. Two vehicles are stopped at a traffic light, one behind the other. The light turns green and the first car doesn’t notice and so doesn’t move. The vehicle behind gives the car a quick honk to inform the car on the light change, and in turn gets flipped off for doing so. A horn is not just a rude gesture people! They were put in cars in the first place as a form of communication. You were the one not paying attention, and yet the person honking is the ***hole. Grow up! Bike Thief To the scumbag that stole my son’s bike from the Shadle Park High School, bike rack. What comes around goes around.

Furniture to Clothing - We have it all!

509-325-2607 • 2607 N. Monroe Street, Spokane

OFFICE SPACE AVAILABLE 1106 N Washington, Suite D 6 Suite Office Space Available - 1,260 SF @ $12/ SF • Across the Street from the Spokane Arena • Free Parking • Outside Signage with Thousands of Daily Views • Conference Room with Flat Screen TV • Onsite Management • Recently Remodeled

Contact Cody George 509-755-7529 cody.george@khco.com

friends

with benefits

I have a friend!

when you become The Inlander’s friend, you get special treatment! chances to win free tickets exclusive deals • news alerts we’re also willing to twitter you... if that’s your thing.

Love Cats?

Follow Chey Scott’s

Cat Friday Blog for your weekly

feline fix!

Booey's Sauce puts a kick to every meal! Now Available at:

Kitchen Engine Main Market Sonnenberg’s

Pool World River Ridge Hardware

A great finishing sauce for beef, pork, poultry, and seafood. INLANDER.COM/BLOGS

Created in Spokane, Washington BooeysGourmet.com

OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 65

M

y grandfather Everett is 92. It doesn’t take a lot to please him. A cup of coffee with cream. A phone call from his daughters. Cold beer. Soup. Bingo. We sit at the kitchen table in the cold, old house. It’s a place he doesn’t visit much anymore, and when he does it brings back memories. Fireworks on Fourth of July. The way it used to shake when the Air Force planes would fly over to the nearby base. As a baby, I smeared cake on my face at this very table. And now we’re sitting here, the pressure of the family on us, trying to figure out what thing about being him I should write about. At his age, people are always telling him how amazing he is. That being 92 is a miracle. An inspiration. He doesn’t see it that way. He sees this old, wrinkled, balding version of himself in the mirror, but inside he doesn’t feel so old. But life, now, has lost so many of its little miracles and wonders and surprises. Most everyone he knows has passed on to the other side. His five brothers. His three sisters. His wife of 64 years — my grandmother — passed away two years ago, but the person she was had been gone for four or five. When family comes to visit, he asks them for a ride to the dollar store. He buys razors and aftershave, and bags of M&Ms and Hershey’s Kisses that he squirrels away in his bedside table. He asks to go to three, four, five different cemeteries, where he yanks weeds from around the headstones of the people he once knew. He shakes his head at the miniature rose bush that yellowed and withered in the summer heat next to my grandma’s grave. It’s his grave too, really. Already etched next to her name is his: “EVERETT HALL 1921 — ”

What it takes to amaze the man who has seen it all BY LEAH SOTTILE

Everett Hall, looking back at his 92 years. LEAH SOTTILE PHOTO

66 INLANDER OCTOBER 31, 2013

H

e’s too old and too alone to live in his house. But once a week he gets a ride up to the tiny green cottage to shake his head at the crumbling chimney. To sit in his old chair. To see how the rhubarb is coming. To putter in that basement he dug with a pickaxe and a shovel. Sometimes he asks his daughters to let him come back here. “Dad… ” they sigh. He knows. He keeps a routine every day at the luxe assisted living facility where he lives — a place he calls

“prison” or “the camp”; the smiling nurses are “guards.” He walks in a mile loop, pausing to water tomatoes. He avoids the sniveling old-timers parked in a line of wheelchairs out in front. He clicks off his hearing aid, smiles when they try to get his attention, and keeps on walking. In this world where everyone around him is shriveling, he tries to find miracles. His room is plastered with photos of his great-grandchildren. He scours the newspaper with a magnifying glass. It’s funny that the word “miraculous” doesn’t come to mind when he thinks about his own life. The way he left home as a teenager to earn money on nearby farms was just survival. When he pulled his own hand out of a factory machine, that was just a high pain tolerance. The record-breaking trout he yanked out of a freezing lake was just luck. When it took him two years to dig a basement underneath his house — well, that was just hardheadedness.

H

is eyes light up when he talks about something that just happened. Something that, in 92 years, he never dreamt he’d see. At the old green house one day, he puttered about as usual: pulling weeds, petting the big wolf dog over the fence next door, laying out mousetraps around the garage. A week later, he came back to make his rounds. He dropped the skeleton key into the chipped garage door, and when he pushed it open, there it was: something he’d never seen. Something that seemed to amaze him more than the giant fish or his nearly severed hand. More than a black president or cellphone cameras. More than outliving everyone he’s ever known. Something so unlikely that he smiles ear to ear when he even thinks about it. Right there in front of him, in one of those cheap mousetraps, lay not one, but two dead mice. Two mice that went for that Jif peanut butter bait at the exact same moment, at the exact same speed, and then — SNAP! Two mice, one trap. He claps his hands sitting at the old kitchen table as he tells it, an Old Milwaukee cracked open in front of him, and lets out a roar of laughter, his eyes wide. “Now that’s something you should write about.” 

NEW FROM PREMERA BLUE CROSS! From

0

$

*

a month!

Don’t Shout like everyone else.

Medicare Advantage plans that

fit your life.

Call toll free for more information: 855-339-5207 (TTY: 711) 7 days a week, 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. (Pacific Time)

Connect

with customers.

OR JOIN US AT A FREE SEMINAR** NEAR YOU: Spokane Quality Inn Oakwood Cascade B Room 7919 N Division Street November 2 at 10 a.m. Spokane West Central Community Development Association Newton Room 1603 N Belt November 8 at 10 a.m.

Advertise on the new

INLANDER.COM Rise above the noise

Spokane Southside Senior Center 3151 E 27th Avenue November 5 at 10 a.m. November 14 at 10 a.m. November 18 at 10 a.m.

Spokane Rosauers Family Restaurant 9414 N Division Street November 7 at 1 p.m.

Deer Park Deer Park Senior Center 316 E Crawford November 13 at 2 p.m.

*You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. **A sales person will be present with information and applications. For accommodation of persons with special needs at sales meetings call 855-339-5207 (TTY: 711). Plans are available in King, Pierce, Snohomish, Spokane and Thurston counties. Premera Blue Cross is an HMO and HMO-POS plan with a Medicare contract. Enrollment in Premera Blue Cross depends on contract renewal. H7245_PBC0052_Accepted

028571 (06-2013) OCTOBER 31, 2013 INLANDER 67

Nov 14 • 7 pm th

G $15 R $25 Purchase tickets at the casino or any TicketsWest outlet.

1 800 523-2464 | CDAC A SI N O . COM |

/CDAC A SI N O R E S O RT

25 miles south of Coeur d’Alene at the junction of US-95 and Hwy-58


Inlander 10/31/2013