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WHILE POT MAY BE LEGAL IN WASHINGTON STATE, SOME PEOPLE ARE STILL GOING TO JAIL FOR GROWING IT BY HEIDI GROOVER PAGE 24

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

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EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261)

ARE YOU GOING TO DRESS UP FOR HALLOWEEN? IF SO, WHAT ARE YOU GOING TO BE? DANIEL BUNN

Oh, I usually stick to my routine of being a vampire.

EDITOR

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I have a bag of assorted costume items and it sort of depends on what I can make out of all of them. Do you usually make your own costume? Yes.

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ILLUSTRATOR

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I’m deciding between two things. I’m going for cheap because I want to use whatever I have already. I have a Japanese summer kimono… Or, I might just take some shirts that are old and raggedy, rub them in the dirt and make them all messed up, rip them and be a zombie.

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Oh, I’m not sure yet. What was your best Halloween costume in the past? My mom dressed me up in a papier-mâché football helmet when Steve Young was a really good quarterback and we lived in San Francisco. My sister went with me as a cheerleader and we were the 49ers. It was pretty great.

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OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 5


COMMENT | ELECTIONS

Competition is Healthy

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or 20 long years, the Idaho Legislature and Governor’s office have been under one-party rule — Republican. Since 2006, all the statewide elected officials have also been elected under the brand name of the elephant. And the elephant is definitely the oversize gorilla in the voting booth. Idaho voters need to take off their partisan glasses and open their eyes to look just where those Republicans have taken Idaho — to the bottom of the states in dollars spent on public schools, to becoming the state with highest percentage of minimum wage workers, the state that collects fewer taxes than every other state but one, and whose support of higher education has dropped dramatically. Idaho’s embarrassing place at the bottom of the national ratings goes on and on and on. This election year, Idaho Democrats have nominated a powerful team of statewide candidates to give the voters of Idaho a refreshing alternative to the same old, same old. Three state officials — Governor Butch Otter, State Representative Lawerence Denney and State Treasurer Ron Crane — have been in elected office for a combined total of 68 years. Each deserves to be thanked and retired. The trio face at the ballot box fresh, hard-working Democrats who are well qualified to replace them.

T

ake the Governor’s race. Incumbent Otter is challenged by A.J. Balukoff, a successful businessman and passionate public school advocate. Why change governors? Butch Otter has been in elected office for Idaho since 1972 (six years in the Idaho House of Representatives in his early years as a Libertarian, 14 years as Lt. Governor, six years as Idaho’s First Congressional District Representative in the U.S. House of Representatives and eight years as governor.) As an Idaho resident or interested observer, can you think of any action Butch Otter has taken that has improved Idaho for you and your family, or improved Idaho’s standing? Didn’t think so. He has earned his retirement. His Democratic challenger, A.J. Balukoff, part owner of the Grove Hotel, Boise school board member for 17 years, and active nonprofit organization supporter, is running enthusiastically to get the sagging state of Idaho’s public schools back on track. A.J. was recruited to run for governor by a group of Boise business folks who value his proven leadership qualities, his concern for the economy, his high ethical stance and his longstanding passion for public education. Then there is Lawerence Denney, running for Secretary of State, who has served in the Idaho House of Representatives for 18 years.

He was Speaker of the House of Representatives for six years and then was ousted by his own caucus in 2012. Representative Denney has said that he would like to have voters fingerprinted before they can vote. He also suggested that he would like to eliminate primary elections and get rid of same-day registration of voters. After publicly stating these positions, he has attempted to eat his words. Denney’s Democratic opponent, Holli Woodings, a young, one-term representative in the Idaho Legislature, has billboards all over the state introducing her appealing face. Holli, who has brains to go with her beauty, has said she would continue the practices of the highly respected current SecreSend comments to tary of State, Ben Ysursa. editor@inlander.com. Woodings is currently out-campaigning and outspending Denney. The Coeur d’Alene Press reports that Woodings has received donations from two veteran Boise lobbyists, Bill Roden and Jerry Deckard, as well as former Republican legislators Leon Smith and Chuck Coiner — both of whom represented their constituents very ably, but were victims of Denney’s slash-and-burn tactics.

LETTERS

A

nother incumbent who has been tarnished by his actions is Ron Crane, state treasurer for 16 years. He was admonished by the Legislative Audits Division for “inappropriately transferring investments… resulting in a disproportionate share of investment losses incurred by the state.” The suggested loss at the time was $10.2 million, and recent newspaper reports suggest the loss is significantly higher. Treasurer Crane has also been criticized for hiring expensive stretch limousines for his crew to travel around New York City, and for charging gas for his private car to the taxpayers. He says he has discontinued both practices. Treasurer Crane has a questionable understanding of money and banking. He is opposed by experienced public accountant Deborah Silver, who keeps asking her opponent for answers to questions about investments, but has been stonewalled. It appears he has plenty to hide. So in Idaho, the elephant has become a little soft, long on quantity and short on quality. Competition is rejuvenating, in politics as in all sports. I urge Idaho voters to get out and vote for fresh, new faces. That’s the only way they’ll get different — and better — results. n


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Epic Fail on Ebola BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

T

he ebola outbreak in the United States over the past several weeks has not been our finest moment. First, Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas sent Liberian Thomas Duncan home from the ER when he complained of ebola symptoms. Yes, they sent him home. When he returned, gravely ill, the hospital was not prepared or equipped to protect their workers. Later, one of the nurses who cared for him flew commercial — twice. Another took a cruise. Last week, a doctor potentially exposed to ebola went bowling in Brooklyn. Now governors are left to maybe quarantine potential carriers, but maybe not. It’s a mess. Doesn’t it seem like we should have somebody — like a respected doctor — to be our public health official-in-chief? Give it a cool title, and then we could coordinate an actual response plan. Oh yeah, we already have that — the Surgeon General of the United States. And at least one politician agrees: “Why not have the Surgeon General head this up?” asked Rep. Jason Chaffetz (R-Utah) on FOX News last week. “Why aren’t we empowering that person?” Only in D.C. can you be this clueless. Apparently Chaffetz didn’t know that we haven’t had a Surgeon General since July of 2013, but not because one hasn’t been picked. No, Dr. Vivek Murthy is ready to start and has been passed out of committee to the Senate for confirmation. That vote, however, has never been allowed to happen — and this, believe it or not, is really the reason we are, as a nation, playing with fire on ebola by not deploying a coherent public health response — because Murthy once tweeted that guns and the 32,000 deaths they cause every year in America are a public health issue. So the NRA told its Senate thralls to put the kibosh on Murthy, ebola or not. And that, Rep. Chaffetz, is why we aren’t able to empower our Surgeon General to lead a response to this emergency. The failure in D.C. gets worse, as we have learned that NIH funding for scary diseases like ebola was cut as part of the sequester deal agreed to by both parties in case they couldn’t agree on prioritized cuts. (They couldn’t.) Researchers say we’d have a cure in trials today if that funding had stayed. Now, along with blaming everyone else for the sequester, senators of both parties want to throw an extra billion at the problem. The symptoms are debilitating: We are lurching from crisis to crisis, never solving anything, because our political parties are too beholden to special interests and too stubborn to work together. 

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COMMENT | END TIMES films debuted per year set during or after a global collapse. That number doubled to six per year in the first decade of the aughts, and in this decade sits at close to 10 per year so far, on average. This is true even if the genre of Christian fundamentalist propagation of Biblically based end times legend (and the creepily hopeful promise of Rapture) is not included. Here’s a scary story for you horror junkies. In a small, rural town in America, pools of fire rise up from the earth, sending clouds of foul, toxic smoke Send comments to into the air. Lightning strikes often editor@inlander.com. and triggers explosions and minor earthquakes. Industrial accidents are commonplace here and have left workers without limbs and otherwise disfigured. Young women disappear from their towns with little trace, kidnapped and forced into sex trafficking. Gangs of drunken men fight to the death in the streets at night while paramilitary corporations oversee the whole operation. As Laura Gottesdiener describes in her recent stories about North Dakota’s oil boom, these are places that “display all the classic contemporary markers of hell.” You’d never know any of this by reading the fundamentalists’ take on it, though. Not the Christian fundamentalists, but the arguably more dangerous and deluded market fundamentalists who dominate every conversation about the economy. When this group sees North Dakota’s fracking “boom towns,” they see them in numbers. They salivate over a million barrels a day, unemployment rates under 5 percent, two decades more of unprecedented production and profit for oil and natural gas companies. When growth is your religion, the consequences don’t matter and the bottom line is always more. More fracking means more wasted water, more chemical pollution devastating land and human health, more vulnerability to intensifying weather, and more climate change-accelerating emissions. It also means more money. If the reality of civilization in decline and the desperation of the people driving it down were a movie, would we believe it? I can see the trailer now. “In a world … where trillions of gallons of clean water are destroyed to extract the last oil … so it can be used to convert the last oil into the last stuff … one man will represent the thousands who join the project with the belief that caring for his one family … is more important than the survival of the species…” In a world so disconnected from the values that promote life over destruction, who needs horror stories? 

LETTERS

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Truth Scarier than Fiction As our fears become real, will we become the heroes we need? BY TAYLOR WEECH

A

disembodied voice, footsteps in an empty house, inexplicable coincidence, omens of doom and a feeling that something has gone horribly wrong. These hallmarks of the horror genre have likely kept you up at night and kept you coming back for more. This Halloween, the undead mingle with the murdered and the murderers, as we play with our collective ideas about death, the unknown and the taboo. What fears most fascinate us today? Since the beginning of the horror genre, trends reflective of mass culture

have provided an outlet for our suppressed ideas through metaphor. Werewolves and monsters, then vampires, then ghosts, botched science, aliens and zombies have captivated us for centuries and helped explore difficult topics of the day from sexuality to xenophobia to colonialism and consumerism. Some topics are so scary that we avoid direct discussion about them, yet still can’t look away. Today’s dominant scary trope is definitively the apocalypse, whether zombie, climate or prophecy-triggered. While every generation holds some theorists who believe they live in the end times, the modern increase is measurable. Beginning in the 1970s, about three feature

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A consumer food and beverage sampling show November 8 & 9, 2014 Celebrate the delectable tastes of the region.

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COMMENT | GUEST EDITORIAL

The Real Me

ALSO INCLUDES

LAVISH PARKING FOR YOUR CAR.

BY MICHAEL BAUMGARTNER

I

read with bemusement Robert Herold’s acerbic column accusing me of being vague about my background. (“Inferences Left Hanging,” 10/23/14.) Of course, politicians are fair game for personal attacks, but his claims were bizarre. I have my full résumé, including photographs, references and even my commendation for my service in Iraq, on my website. I’m proud of the work I did on behalf of the U.S. State Department in Iraq and Afghanistan. Implying that those efforts were meaningless isn’t only offensive to me — it’s insulting to all Americans who have served in harm’s way overseas. For me personally, it was in Afghanistan where I met my wonderful, smart British wife Eleanor working together on a counter-narcotics team. It’s hard to forget falling in love to a soundtrack of suicide attacks and threats of Taliban kidnapping. I’ll always value my experiences overseas — they’ve helped shape my priorities back here in our great Washington state. In particular, I’ve seen firsthand how a good education system — or a lack of one — can shape a country’s well-being. It’s education that can lift up those born in poverty, as well as moderate and civilize conflicts between different faiths and cultures. We’re fortunate to have that in America — but when I got to Olympia, I discovered that funding education has been a very low priority during the past two decades. As a WSU graduate, I was shocked that tuition had doubled and doubled again since I was a student. So I joined the debate with patience and perseverance. If I could work with Prime Minister Maliki in Iraq and with Afghan tribesmen, I was sure I could work across the aisle in Olympia. In some ways it’s taken just as much diplomacy, but with the help of some great colleagues here’s what we’ve accomplished:  We froze tuition two years in a row at all state colleges and universities — something that had not happened in 30 years.  We formed a bipartisan majority that brought together Democrats and Republicans to find common ground and successfully balance the state budget.  We put $1 billion extra into schools — funding all-day kindergarten in Spokane and throughout the state.  We put extra money in the budget to pay for a medical school in Spokane. These are my priorities — education in our schools, education in our colleges, education in a new medical school. It’s our best hope for the well-educated workforce that will keep our country strong and confident through the challenges of the 21st century. And it’s our best way to break the cycle of poverty that grips many families in the Inland Northwest. But, on a personal level, it’s a debt I owe on one hand to my parents who taught in public schools and colleges, and to my own young children. So first and foremost, let’s fund education and build a future for our children. That’s what the real Michael Baumgartner stands for. 

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EDUCATION

Early and Often What a difference full-day kindergarten makes BY DANIEL WALTERS

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onning an orange zigzag headband, 5-year-old Olivia Allen squirms in her tiny chair, swings her pink shoes back and forth, and unabashedly proclaims her love for kindergarten. “It’s really fun. And I like it. And it’s my favorite. And I love my teacher,” Olivia says. “And she’s my favorite. And she’s nice. And she’s the nicest teacher I’ve ever seen.” That teacher, Bambi Howe, leads the class in a song extolling the virtues of the color orange: “O-R-A-N-G-E… Orange is what that spells.” Stuffed animals of literary heroes — the Cat in the Hat, Clifford and Pete the Cat — sit on the bookshelves of the Madison Elementary class, as clusters of 5-year-olds gather around tables, drawing letters, writing words and coloring in pictures. “I think Walt Disney was wrong,” Howe says. “Kindergarten is the happiest place on Earth.” When Olivia’s big sister, Myah, went to kindergarten, her day only lasted two

and a half hours. Starting last fall, the kindergarteners in every elementary school in the district began receiving double that, a full six hours. Teachers now have half the number of kids, and twice the time to teach them. In a few years, the full-day kindergarten model is supposed to be everywhere in Washington. By 2018, legislation, the state constitution and a state Supreme Court contempt-of-court finding in the McCleary case requires state lawmakers to fully fund full-day kindergarten. Until then, Spokane Public Schools, despite logistical hurdles, has spent $2 million to make up the difference locally. Olivia loves the six-hour kindergarten day. “’Cuz I like learning,” she says. She’s not alone in loving the new model. At the start of the second year of fullday kindergarten, teachers and parents already are beginning to see an impact.

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dministrators caution against drawing too much from a single year-to-year comparison — it’ll take years of data to understand the full impact. Complicating things further, the district reduced kindergarten class sizes at the ...continued on next page

Madison Elementary kindergarten teacher Bambi Howe helps 5-year-olds Olivia Allen, left, and Vanessa Syrros with their writing assignments.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 13


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“EARLY AND OFTEN,” CONTINUED... same time, making it challenging to measure the exact impact. But the results are still remarkable: Every elementary school that moved to full-day kindergarten last year showed improvement in its end-of-the-year Developmental Reading Assessment scores. That matches national studies that, even after controlling for a variety of factors, show kindergartners with better reading and math scores under the full-day model. Rocky Treppiedi, longtime school board member and former Spokane assistant city attorney, has been beating the full-day kindergarten drum for about a decade. “The only surprise to me is that it took so doggone long to get started,” Treppiedi says. “We withheld this program from students for far too long.” There are all these programs, he says, in high school and middle school to help students get caught up. Better to invest early to ensure they never fall behind in the first place. “You spend a lot of money when they get into high school, [and] it’s too late,” Treppiedi says. Since 2007, Spokane Public Schools has had full-day kindergarten in several low-income schools. But Treppiedi wanted it to be extended everywhere. “They were calling it a poverty program. Baloney!” he says. “It’s an education program.” When Shelley Redinger, a former elementary school teacher, became superintendent in 2012, Treppiedi found a supporter. Redinger saw that the district’s elementary school students were struggling with reading. And if they couldn’t read well, they’d soon be floundering in every other subject. To Redinger, full-day kindergarten was a necessity. “We just couldn’t keep waiting,” she says. “I felt we were very far behind.” By 2013, the state legislature’s expanded

education budget contained funding for full-day kindergarten at 23 Spokane elementary schools and other low-income schools statewide. The school board voted to fund the remaining 12 with local levy dollars. That’s a commitment that not every district has been able to make. In the Central Valley School District, for example, six elementary schools have full-day kindergarten, while the other five offer the option, but only for a fee of at least $315 per month. The Central Valley school board has wanted to offer free full-day kindergarten district-wide but lacks the classroom space. Space has been a challenge for Spokane Public Schools as well. Two new portables have popped up at Madison, partly to handle more kindergarten classes. Other things have gone more smoothly than expected. Some parents who fretted that their kindergartners would struggle to adjust to longer days have been pleasantly surprised. “I was concerned for my daughter. She’s going to be overly tired. She’s going to be cranky. We’re going to have all these behavioral issues,” says parent volunteer Jennifer Ehrgood, whose daughter was in full-day kindergarten last year. “I really thought she was going to struggle. And she didn’t. She loved learning.” Jesse Allen, Olivia’s dad, had concerns too. “I thought she would be bored. That’s not the case at all. She’s eating it up. She loves it,” he says. “She loves learning the ABCs, and the letters and the sounds.” Indeed, Olivia rattles them off happily, from A to “next time won’t you sing with me?” The separation anxiety, that flood of tears when parents leave kids in the hands of a stranger, happens either way, Howe says. But now, she says, the kids seem to get over that even faster, as the additional time helps them acclimate. The benefit for parents is obvious: More time


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Teacher Bambi Howe: “If you ask any one of them, they’re a genius. And they’re right.” YOUNG KWAK PHOTO to work, or simply relax, while the kids are learning colors and listening to Dr. Seuss. “For parents, two and half hours of school is a logistical nightmare,” Howe says.

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he benefit for teachers is obvious too. Suddenly, Howe’s not rushing to get through material. She can focus on the students who struggle, and take more time to let the learning sink in. “It’s a so much calmer pace,” Howe says. “I can really honor the fact that they’re 5. We paint and we use colored sand and Play-Doh and explore and build the whole child.” She has more time to teach social skills: listening, sharing, playing well with others, learning not to hit. They’re more confident. “If you ask any one of them, they’re a genius,” Howe says. “And they’re right.” They get a chance to go to music class and have library time. They go to a unique version of gym class that combines aerobics with academics. The kindergartners sing the ABCs while in push-up position, or jump while shouting out vocabulary words. It’s the ultimate example of kinesthetic learning, honed for fidgety 5-year-olds. They go to lunch and attend assemblies. “They’re part of it all,” Howe says. “They like being part of it all.” And when they move up to first grade, they’re readier than ever. Ellen Rush has taught first grade for 36 years. This year, she’s seen a more prepared, confident first-grade crowd. “I see children that are more advanced in reading and writing. They see themselves as readers, they see themselves as writers,” Rush says. “The biggest difference is they love to learn. They’re teachable.” Ehrgood, who had another child come through first grade, is astounded by the difference. “Now my daughter is identifying nouns, verbs and adjectives,” Ehrgood says. “She teaches her little 4-year-old brother these things. Seriously, my 13-year-old, when he was in first grade, they weren’t nearly doing what these kids were doing.” The trick, Treppiedi says, is figuring out a way to prevent those gains from evaporating in later grades. That’s where the next reform comes in. “The next issue is to extend the school day in elementary school,” Treppiedi says. The fact that it hasn’t happened yet, he says, is “another missed opportunity.” n danielw@inlander.com

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NEWS | DIGEST ON INLANDER.COM More Inlander news every day

PHOTO EYE PROACTIVE PLANTING

DEMOCRATIC RULE

Washington is the most BLUE STATE in the nation, according to a new ranking from The Hill newspaper, followed by Minnesota, Oregon and California. In Washington, The Hill points out, voters have chosen a Democratic president in the past seven elections. Washington also has two Democratic senators, six Democratic House representatives (out of 10), three recent Democratic governors and a Democratic-controlled state Legislature. On the opposite end of the political spectrum is Idaho, the third most Republican state in the country. (DEANNA PAN)

SHEA-ISMS YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Lands Council Conservation Programs Director Kat Hall demonstrates how to plant a tree, using a quaking aspen, during the fourth annual Reforest Spokane Day near Hangman Creek on Saturday. During the event, staff members and about 200 volunteers planted 600 trees at five locations throughout the county. Hall said the new trees would help stop erosion, filter pollutants and provide shade and habitat.

EBOLA

“They’re doing God’s work over there, and they’re doing that to keep us safe, and we need to make sure every policy we put in place is supportive of those efforts.” President Barack Obama, referring to aid workers treating Ebola in West Africa, during remarks Tuesday about the federal response to the disease.

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Washington state Rep. MATT SHEA doesn’t like talking with the media. But he has given dozens of speeches to far-right organizations, where he’s said things like “The law in this country is dead” and “We don’t need a majority. We need an irate, tireless minority.” At Inlander.com, we’ve collected 45 Shea quotes guaranteed to make some boo and others cheer. (DANIEL WALTERS)

CORRECTION

Because of an editing error, an article about cutbacks at the Spokesman-Review (“The New Normal,” 10/23/14) incorrectly stated that the paper had closed its North Idaho bureau. The Spokesman has previously laid off staff there and eliminated its Idaho section, but maintains an office in Coeur d’Alene.

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NEWS | BRIEFS

The good news is that the tide is already receding. “We feel like we already saw our peak in hospitals,” Papich says. “The bigger threat to children’s health is the flu.” Fortunately, this year’s flu strain, unlike the enterovirus or Ebola, she says, can be addressed with a cheap, available vaccine. — DANIEL WALTERS

Something in the Water Viruses, discrimination and 2.5 billion gallons of sewage DISCHARGE DISPUTE

A Thurston County judge last week upheld a hearings board decision against the SPOKANE COUNTY WATER RECLAMATION FACILITY invalidating the treatment center’s discharge permit over insufficient safeguards against the release of PCBs, linked to increased cancer risks. Advocates with the Spokane Tribe, the Sierra Club and the Center for Environmental Law & Policy challenged the permit in 2011, accusing the state Department of Ecology of failing to impose clear restrictions on the release of PCBs. The state’s Pollution Control Hearings Board invalidated part of the Spokane County discharge permit last year as a result of those concerns. “We need to restore integrity to the state’s pollution permitting process,” says Rachael Paschal Osborn in a joint statement from the Sierra Club and CELP. County water utility officials argue PCBs come into the treatment facility at close to 15,000 parts per quadrillion before being treated down to about 100 parts per quadrillion, a level so small it becomes difficult to measure. Officials declined to comment Tuesday, indicating they would continue evaluating their options for another potential appeal. The $173 million facility has continued to operate under its existing discharge permit throughout the ap-

NO BIAS HERE

peals process. It opened in late 2011 and treats about 2.5 billion gallons of sewage from the Spokane Valley area each year. — JACOB JONES

VIRUS ALERTS

By now, you probably know not to be too worried about an Ebola epidemic in the United States. The disease poses a huge threat to regions of West Africa, where standards of sanitation and the handling of dead bodies make contagion a genuine danger. But not in America, where transmission via direct contact with body fluids is less likely. Instead, the common cold has been a bigger concern. Specifically, the D68 ENTEROVIRUS strain (one of several viruses that can cause colds) that’s hit kids with asthma and respiratory problems nationwide, sending nearly a thousand to the hospital. “It’s really only of concern for smaller children, with a history of respiratory problems,” says Kim Papich, spokeswoman for the Spokane Regional Health District. Some of those children have been in Spokane. This fall, 32 were hospitalized with respiratory illness, and recent lab results confirmed that at least two of them were infected with the D68 enterovirus strain.

On Monday, Lewiston, Idaho became the ninth city in the state to pass an ordinance barring discrimination in housing, employment and public accommodations based on sexual orientation or gender identity. The NON-DISCRIMINATION ORDINANCE was approved by City Council in a 5-2 vote. Lewiston joins Sandpoint, Coeur d’Alene, Moscow, Boise, Pocatello, Ketchum, Idaho Falls and Victor, which have similar measures on the books. Idaho’s patchwork of citywide non-discrimination laws gained Send comments to national attention earlier this month editor@inlander.com. when the Hitching Post Wedding Chapel in Coeur d’Alene preemptively sued the city over its ordinance. The suit, filed in the wake of same-sex marriage legalization in Idaho, claimed the city law would force the chapel’s owners to wed same-sex couples against their religious beliefs. Coeur d’Alene’s city attorney Mike Gridley said the chapel is exempt from the ordinance because the Hitching Post recently reorganized as a religious corporation. For the past eight years, advocates in Idaho have called on legislators to pass an “Add the Words” bill, amending the state’s Human Rights Act to cover “sexual orientation” and “gender identity.” The bill has yet to receive a hearing. — DEANNA PAN

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NEWS | LAW ENFORCEMENT

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Unseen Enforcement An Eastern Washington viral video renews debate over the use of unmarked patrol vehicles BY JACOB JONES

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n his viral video encounter with a Grant County Sheriff’s deputy, Ephrata resident Gavin Seim plays up the irony in his sudden role reversal as much as possible. Seim, an outspoken conservative activist and self-described “liberty speaker,” flags down a passing unmarked patrol vehicle in order to lecture the deputy on following the law. “Afternoon, sir,” Seim tells the deputy in the video. “The reason I stopped you today is because I saw this car is unmarked.” Seim, 29, “pulled over” the deputy earlier this month, citing a vague Washington law mandating visible markings and identification for all law enforcement vehicles. When he confronts the deputy, Seim asks for ID and registration before issuing the deputy a “warning.” “You’ve admitted that you are in violation of Washington state law,” Seim tells the deputy. “I’m not going to write you up today. What I’m going to encourage you to do is take this car back [and talk to your supervisor].” With the help of conservative news outlets, video of the encounter has racked up more than 3 million views and renewed some regional debate over the use of unmarked police vehicles. Law enforcement officials tend to support broad discretion on vehicle markings, while opponents argue that unmarked cars cause unnecessary confusion or safety risks. Grant County Sheriff Tom Jones has praised his deputy’s “tact and diplomacy” in responding to Seim’s interrogation while also acknowledging

the advantages of maintaining a readily identifiable patrol fleet. He says the vehicle in question was awaiting new decals at the time. “We embrace the value of having our vehicles marked,” Jones writes in a statement. “Marked vehicles are a visible deterrent to crime, and a visible, reassuring presence for our citizens.”

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he proper identification of state-owned vehicles falls under the Revised Code of Washington, with an ambiguously worded exemption for local law enforcement agencies: “This section shall not apply to vehicles of a sheriff’s office, local police department, or any vehicles used by local peace officers under public authority for special undercover or confidential purposes.”

“I’m confident that if that [deputy’s] car was marked, my dad would be alive today.” Police officials often interpret the exemption as including all agency vehicles, while critics contend such exemptions only apply to undercover assignments, not regular patrol duties like traffic enforcement. In Spokane, the issue most recently drew controversy in the wake of the fatal deputy-involved


Critics argue that unmarked patrol vehicles cause unnecessary confusion or safety risks. shooting of Rev. Wayne Scott Creach outside his Spokane Valley home in 2010. The Creach family says the deputy’s unmarked vehicle, parked on private property, caused a tragic misunderstanding. When Creach went out to check the suspicious car, he brought along a handgun and was killed during the resulting interaction with the deputy. “It contributes to a lot of confusion,” Creach’s son Alan says of such vehicles. “I’m confident that if that [deputy’s] car was marked, my dad would be alive today.” The family says the Sheriff’s Office has not responded to requests to change its policies on unmarked vehicles. The department’s posted policy requires a supervisor’s approval to use an unmarked vehicle, but little else.

I

n the wake of the Creach shooting, the now-defunct Freedom Restoration Project lobbied for changes to state law on unmarked vehicles. The director filed a court brief citing 1975 legislative reports reinforcing the more limited interpretation of the exemption. “A vehicle marking exemption for vehicles used by sheriffs, local police, and local peace officers is continued,” the report states, “but is limited to vehicles used for undercover or confidential investigative purposes.” The project also emphasized concerns about how imposters could use unmarked vehicles to pull over unsuspecting victims. The report includes a 2009 photo of an unmarked Seattle police Ford Crown Victoria parked next to an identical Crown Victoria belonging to cop killer Christopher Monfort. State Reps. Matt Shea and Larry Crouse, both R-Spokane Valley, introduced a bill in 2011 to limit law enforcement agency use of unmarked vehicles on private property, but the legislation failed to pass. Officials at the time argued such restrictions created unnecessary obstacles that would only hamstring effective crime fighting. Sheriff Jones likewise argues he felt it was more important to have his new vehicles out on patrol, even if they didn’t have decals yet. Seim has seemingly enjoyed his new online notoriety despite many commenters accusing him of needlessly harassing officers. He has since cornered and confronted a second officer, this time with the Ephrata Police Department, over another unmarked vehicle. “Some people may say, ‘This is petty. Leave the officers alone, Gavin,’” Seim says in his video. “It’s not petty to hold our officers accountable. … We, the people, are the sentinels of our liberty.” n

OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 19


NEWS | MENTAL HEALTH

No End in Sight

eral’s office declined to comment further on the issue, but at last week’s hearing, Assistant AG Sarah Coats denied there were any such people when asked by the judge. Biviano’s suit specifically identifies two patients — “J.T.” and “B.Y.” — who suffered from substance-induced psychosis at the time of their crimes and aren’t considered mentally ill or dangerous by their doctors. Last month, J.T. was permanently discharged from Eastern after the prosecutor and judge in the county where he was tried agreed his commitment was unconstitutional. The irony of this case, Biviano points out, is that these patients are taking up scarce resources in an increasingly stressed mental health system. Washington is grappling with a severe shortage of public mental health Andrew Biviano is leading a lawsuit beds — a crisis that on behalf of patients in Washington’s has triggered two psychiatric hospitals. federal lawsuits. In August, the state Supreme Court ruled that the practice of “boarding” mental health patients in emergency rooms when state hospital beds aren’t available was unconstitu-

Not guilty, not mentally ill, but stuck inside Washington state’s psychiatric hospitals BY DEANNA PAN

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ttorney Andrew Biviano has received a dozen calls from people trapped inside Washington’s psychiatric hospitals, patients whose doctors think they’re neither dangerous nor mentally ill. These are people who were once found not guilty by reason of insanity but have now been stable for years, who are in remission or had a brief and bad reaction to a drug. They’re asymptomatic. They don’t take medication. When they were found not guilty, they expected to get treatment until they got better. Once they did, however, they never realized just how long they’d be waiting to get out. “They’re really back to their normal selves, but they’re being told, ‘You can’t be released because you could become sick again, and you could become dangerous, and we can’t take that risk,’” Biviano says. “But if that’s the reason why they’re being held, that will never stop, that will never change.”

Biviano is the lead attorney representing patients found not guilty by reason of insanity, or NGRI, in a federal civil rights lawsuit against Washington state and the Department of Social and Health Services. The suit, filed in May, alleges that current state law violates NGRI patients’ civil and constitutional rights to adequate mental health treatment and release. Last week, Biviano lost his first battle in court when he asked a federal judge to rule on a motion forcing DSHS to review and identify these patients who aren’t mentally ill and are currently languishing at Eastern and Western State hospitals. They don’t meet constitutional commitment criteria, Biviano argued, and DSHS should facilitate their release into the community. “They get why they’re there in the first place,” Biviano says. “They don’t understand why so many years have passed when they’ve reached the maximum benefit of treatment.” Outside the hospitals, there’s no way to know exactly how many patients fall into this category due to confidentiality laws, Biviano says. DSHS and the Attorney Gen-

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tional. A second suit, filed in September, is challenging the time it takes DSHS to conduct mental health evaluations of jail inmates. “All these cases could go away if the state would invest more in the mental health service delivery system and provide people with the right treatment in the right location,” says David Carlson, director of legal advocacy at Disability Rights Washington. “They’re in the hospitals taking up beds. It doesn’t make sense if you could move them out.” The state’s own private consultants agree. An independent review of Washington’s forensic mental health system commis-

“All these cases could go away if the state would invest more in the mental health service delivery system and provide people with the right treatment in the right location.” sioned this summer by DSHS called the state’s conditional-release system — the court-approved process by which NGRI patients can make visits to or live under supervision in the community — “much more punitive and restrictive (and therefore expensive) than most. … Currently, a person acquitted by insanity in Washington is more likely to be discharged to a civil geriatric hospital unit or to the coroner’s office than to be discharged on conditional release.”  deannap@inlander.com

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NEWS | ELECTION 2014

‘There is No Misstep’ More scandal follows Idaho’s Sherri Ybarra; plus, early ballot returns and Washington’s gun initiatives BIO HAZARDS

Bad press continues to dog Sherri Ybarra’s campaign to be Idaho’s next SUPERINTENDENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION. She’s already dealt with a plagiarism scandal and the revelation that she had never voted in an Idaho General Election. The past week brought another stream of articles from the Spokesman-Review, Idaho Education Sherri Ybarra News and the Idaho Statesman calling into question her biographical statements. There was her claim that she had a doctorate — an “EdDs in Educational Leadership” — when she’s only earned a lesser educational specialist degree so far. Then her claims to have won “Educator of the Year” in 2005 and 2006 came under scrutiny. When the Inlander called Ybarra’s campaign two

weeks ago, questioning the Educator of the Year claim — noting it was different than the statewide Idaho Teacher of the Year title — her campaign insisted that she had indeed won the award, but didn’t mention the caveats: Ybarra was one of several nominees considered by the Mountain Home School District to compete Jana Jones for Idaho’s statewide Teacher of the Year prize, but was never the final district nominee nor the ultimate winner. “There is no misstep,” Ybarra spokeswoman Melinda Nothern insists. “Sherri won the Educator of the Year award. … She was among 10 other winners who also had that title.” With Democratic challenger Jana Jones being their best chance to win statewide office in Idaho, the state

Democratic Party has seized on Ybarra’s gaffes, arguing “we cannot let a dishonest politician be Idaho’s top educator.” — DANIEL WALTERS

TRAGIC TALKING POINTS

Competing gun campaigns have moved quickly, but lightly, to assess the potential impact of last week’s mass shooting at Marysville-Pilchuck High School in which a 15-year-old student killed himself and two other students, wounding another two and deeply shaking a community. Washington state’s Yes on 594 campaign, pushing an initiative for BACKGROUND CHECKS on all firearm sales or transfers, issued a public statement within hours, voicing support for victims and a call for action. “While the facts of today’s shooting are still unclear, we do know that incidents like these are examples of the gun violence that’s all too frequent in our Send comments to state,” the statement reads. “It is up editor@inlander.com. to all of us to come together and work to reduce gun violence.” Gun rights advocates favoring Initiative 591, which would limit such background checks and firearm confiscation, have accused opponents of politicizing the recent tragedy while otherwise remaining fairly quiet. A statewide poll released the week before the shooting found 60 percent support I-594’s expanded background checks. Gun rights advocates note the proposed restrictions would not have addressed the firearm in the shooting, which was purchased legally by a family member. — JACOB JONES

LETTERS

E x tr a Pa tr o ls On N o w

D R I VE HI G H G ET A D UI

22 INLANDER OCTOBER 30, 2014 564_WTSC_DHGD_4V_Ad_F.indd 1

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PROCRASTINATING AT THE POLLS

With just days left until Election Day, voters across Washington appear in no rush to turn in their BALLOTS. Just 14.5 percent of ballots have been returned statewide, according to data from the Secretary of State’s Office. Spokane County is doing better than King and Franklin counties, where returns are around 12 percent, but we’re behind counties like Columbia, where a whopping 32 percent of all ballots have already been returned. About 50,000 ballots — just under 18 percent of all the ballots sent out — have been returned in Spokane County, according to the elections office. “It’s a little behind [previous years], but it’s also a complicated ballot,” says County Elections Manager Mike McLaughlin, pointing to contested judicial races that weren’t on the primary ballot and state advisory votes. “We’re hearing lot of questions on that.” In the city of Spokane, where city leaders await the voters’ take on a park bond and streets levy, returns match county-wide numbers. Reminder: Washington’s ballots must be postmarked or in a drop box by 8 pm on Election Day. Catch up on all the candidates and issues at Inlander.com/election2014. — HEIDI GROOVER

ATTACKS ADS IN IDAHO

Idaho Gov. Butch Otter’s handling of the state’s PRIVATE PRISON SCANDAL is taking center stage in the governor’s race, with the recent release of dueling TV ads by the Otter campaign and his Democratic challenger A.J. Balukoff.

Earlier this year, Idaho assumed control over the Idaho Correctional Center, the state’s largest prison, previously run by the Tennessee-based Corrections Butch Otter Corporation of America. The decision came on the heels of multiple lawsuits and reports of widespread violence, understaffing and fraudulent billing. The state Department of Corrections settled with A.J. Balukoff CCA for $1 million over the staffing dispute before the FBI launched a criminal investigation into the private-prison operator. Balukoff’s commercial criticizes Otter, a longtime proponent of privatization of public services, for cutting “a sweetheart deal” with CCA and “stall[ing] a criminal investigation for nearly a year.” Otter is hitting back with a new TV ad, accusing the Boise businessman and school board president of “falsely smearing” the governor. The ad defends the Otter administration’s role in the scandal, noting that the governor “asked for a criminal investigation.” “Balukoff is being dishonest,” the ad claims, “to steer attention away from his liberal policies,” like raising taxes and the Affordable Care Act. — DEANNA PAN

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OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 23


PRISON OF WAR THE WAR ON DRUGS ISN’T OVER. STILL IN THE FEDS’ CROSSHAIRS: MEDICAL MARIJUANA GROWERS ACROSS EASTERN WASHINGTON

BY HEIDI GROOVER

24 INLANDER OCTOBER 30, 2014


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eventy-year-old Larry Harvey can’t tell the truth. At least not the whole truth. Not the part about his gout, his

wife’s degenerative disc disease and carpal tunnel, her daughter-inlaw’s uncontrolled weight loss and the neck and back injuries of her son and a family friend. No, the retired truck driver who shares a double-wide with his wife in the woods north of Colville can’t say why he started growing medical marijuana. He can’t even say the words “medical marijuana.” It just won’t be allowed at the federal trial in Spokane set for December that could put Harvey and his family, the so-called “Kettle Falls Five,” behind bars for a long time. Indeed, the War on Drugs rages on: While Washington state may have legalized medical marijuana in 1998 and licensed recreational pot stores earlier this year, in the eyes of federal prosecutors there’s still no such thing as legal pot and certainly nothing so benign sounding as “medical marijuana.” In deciding that the Harveys couldn’t talk at trial about the medical benefits of pot or their compliance with state law, a federal judge said that “could tempt the jury to disregard federal law.” “One question I have: Where are we?” Assistant U.S. Attorney Earl Hicks asked in a hearing on the case in April. “I think we’re in federal court. And that’s very important because federal law says you can’t have these grows. ... You can be prosecuted for two marijuana plants, if you’re growing them, in federal court. We don’t do it, but you could be. And that’s the law.” Until recently — when the state’s first recreational growers were licensed — people cultivating marijuana in Washington generally did so under the flag of medicine, and it is those people, like the Harveys, who have fallen into the feds’ crosshairs. And should any of them be found in possession of a firearm, as was the case with the Harveys, the federal government will spare almost no effort in laying down the law. Some attorneys argue that defendants should be allowed to testify about their medical use of marijuana; the judge could then instruct the jury to ignore it in their decision. Otherwise, “you’re forcing the defendant to lie,” says Seattle defense attorney Doug Hiatt. “When you cannot tell the truth, you cannot get justice. “There’s a meme out there [that marijuana is legal in Washington],” Hiatt adds, “and the meme is full of shit.”

O

Larry Harvey says he ate marijuanainfused cookies to help with pain from gout. He could face 10 years in prison for growing pot and possessing firearms. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

n a hot August morning as Harvey’s wife, Rhonda, put on her eyeliner to go float the Kettle River with friends, Stevens County Sheriff’s deputies fanned out around the house and pounded on the sliding glass door. Over the course of a few hours, they took 29 of the family’s 74 bushy indica plants, bringing the count down to the state-allowed 45 per medical collective. Rhonda, who is 56, remembers asking them when they left, “What’s going to happen now?” and an officer telling her, “With the way the laws are changing, we’re not really sure.” A week later, they were back — the same officers, she says, now in Drug Enforcement Agency gear — and it was a different story. They pulled the remaining plants from the ground and took, among other things, the Harveys’ three guns, computer, two motorcycles and $700 out of Rhonda’s panty drawer. Then nothing for six months. It was February 2013 when, while Rhonda visited family in Alaska, a U.S. Marshal rolled up the driveway and gave Larry Harvey five minutes to “shut the coffee pot off and feed the dogs” before taking him to the Spokane County jail. Warrants were out for Rhonda and the other three. Since then, the trial has been repeatedly postponed. Federal Judge Fred Van Sickle said the last time he granted a new trial date that this one, scheduled to begin Dec. 1, would come “hell or high water.” All five defendants face charges for growing and distributing 100 or more plants, triggering five-year, mandatory-minimum prison sentences if they’re found guilty. (While court documents reference 74 plants, those familiar with the case say prosecutors plan to argue that photos found on the family’s computer show they once had more.) They’re also charged with possessing the guns, which prosecutors contend they were using “in furtherance of” the drug crime. That brings their minimum sentence, if convicted, to at least 10 years. “I really think, a guy like me, they throw me in prison and I’m done,” says Larry, who describes how his gout worsened during his ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 25


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“PRISONERS OF WAR,” CONTINUED... short stint in jail after his arrest. The new medicine he’s been given for it, he says, has caused diabetes. Together, the two conditions require a strict diet and close medical watch. “If they put me in prison, it’s a life sentence for me.” In the ongoing national discussion of how we should think about marijuana, cases like this have, for some, become evidence of the way the federal government ignores the will of the citizens while costing them money. At a cost of about $29,000 per federal prison inmate per year, the price of putting the Kettle Falls Five away for 10 years could total $1.45 million. “It’s fundamentally unfair what the government is doing,” says Greg Scott, a Yakima defense attorney who has worked on marijuana cases in federal court. “This really should be left alone. It’s a state issue; let the states deal with it. Don’t be coming in just because you don’t like the law to find a way to punish people.”

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he rhetoric, the outrage — none of this is new for Michael Ormsby, the President Obamaappointed U.S. attorney for Eastern Washington. He’s been hearing about the controversy around cannabis prosecutions since he took this office in 2010. Both he and his predecessor, Jim McDevitt, say defense attorneys are blowing the issue out of proportion. “People talk about, ‘Oh, our prisons are so full of people and their only sin has been possession of minor amounts or personal use of dope,’ and that’s just not the case,” McDevitt says. “Quite frankly, we had much bigger fish to fry. … The idea that the U.S. Attorney is going to focus on marijuana cases to the exclusion of others is absolutely ridiculous.” Instead of why people are growing marijuana or even that they’re growing it at all, other factors make cases worth federal attention, they say: the involvement of guns, making pot available to kids, growing on federal or public land. Cases are often referred from local law enforcement to the DEA, which investigates and hands its evidence over to the U.S.

Rhonda and Larry Harvey grew 74 marijuana plants on their property north of Colville before they were raided in 2012. Attorney’s Office. Ormsby and McDevitt say the small percentage of marijuana cases the office ends up actually pursuing involve one or more of those priorities. “If one of those factors isn’t implicated, then we’re not going to look at that case,” Ormsby says. “It’s that simple.” It’s hard to determine how many cases like the Harveys are out there. Ormsby says his office doesn’t share data on prosecutions, so he won’t say how many marijuana-related cases he handles each year.

DOING TIME UP TO

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26 INLANDER OCTOBER 30, 2014

Nationally, despite the liberalization of state laws and public opinion on the issue, the portion of all drug arrests that are for marijuana — about half — has actually grown slightly over the past 20 years, according to FBI data. Most pot cases are handled in local or state court. In federal court, where the Harveys are to be tried, just 6 percent of people sentenced are there for marijuana, according to the U.S. Sentencing Commission. In Washington state, attorneys say anecdotally that Ormsby is less marijua-

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

na-friendly than his westside counterpart. Prosecutions in Western Washington, like a current case targeting hash-oil makers who caused explosions, they argue, seem more deserving than those Ormsby pursues. But according to the Sentencing Commission, federal pot cases actually make up a larger portion of all cases handled in the Western District than here on the eastside, where meth is a much bigger factor. The legal reasoning these cases can still happen is simple: The drug remains

Under federal mandatory-minimum sentencing rules, marijuana growers’ jail time is based on how much pot they’re caught with and the number and type of guns involved. Sentences increase for short-barreled rifles, shotguns or semiautomatic assault weapons, then for machine guns or guns with silencers. More firearms can either be lumped into the initial five-year sentence or can tack on 25 more years for each gun, depending on how the prosecution pursues the charges. +

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illegal under federal law. Once the case is in the hands of federal authorities, state law is eclipsed by marijuana’s classification in the Controlled Substances Act: Schedule I, “drugs with no currently accepted medical use.” That’s the same classification as heroin and considered more dangerous than cocaine and meth. Enforcement of that law, though, remains up to individual U.S. attorneys. Colorado Assistant U.S. Attorney M.J. Menendez said in court last year that she considered the compliance with state law when deciding whether to prosecute pot cases. “It’s been years since we’ve seen anyone prosecuted at the federal level who is in fact following state law in Colorado,” says Brian Vicente, an attorney and executive director of the marijuana advocacy group Sensible Colorado, which campaigned for the state’s medical and recreational cannabis laws. And that’s where things get complicated. Washington’s medical marijuana law doesn’t include some of the regulations that states like Colorado have, leaving it with “no state regulatory program to be in clear compliance with,” says Robert Capecchi, a marijuana lobbyist for the national Marijuana Policy Project. The feds have also spelled out certain types of cases where they’re likely to get involved, implying they’ll stay out of other ones. Like Ormsby’s, the priorities for the federal government include keeping marijuana away from kids, keeping it inside the states where it’s legal and preventing the use of weapons in the growing and selling process. (These also apply to Washington’s recreational market. For example, state law doesn’t ban guns in licensed pot stores, but the Liquor Control Board warns its licensees that having firearms at their businesses could make them vulnerable to federal action.) Any guidance from Washington, D.C., includes a disclaimer reminding those in the marijuana business that pot is still federally illegal and prosecution is always possible. In other words: You’re safe. Probably. The focus on guns is particularly troublesome in rural areas, like Eastern Washington, where firearms are common for hunting or protection, defense attorneys argue. The Harveys say they grow and can much of their own food, and hunting is an important part of their way of life. They also worry about protecting their two dogs from bears and other wildlife, they say.

According to them, the guns had nothing to do with the marijuana grow, but instead with the realities of living on a mountain. The Harveys add that whether it’s about the guns or the pot, they didn’t know they were doing anything wrong. They didn’t choose to risk federal enforcement because they didn’t know they were. For lawyers and activists, this is exactly the type of case that shows how the U.S. government is targeting the wrong people. “Just because you’re a medical marijuana patient or grower, your constitutional right to have a gun goes out the window,” says Hiatt, the Seattle attorney, who has worked on cannabis cases in Washington since the mid-’90s and was contacted by the Harveys for advice. “They’re not thinking about justice or whether anybody is hurting anybody. These people in the middle of nowhere growing a little bit of marijuana aren’t hurting anybody. It’s totally anti-democratic and completely against the wishes of At a cost of about the people in this state.” $29,000 per federal To the government, not prison inmate per knowing is not a sufficient year, the cost of defense and guns are nonputting the Kettle negotiable. Falls Five away for Under federal manda10 years could total tory-minimum sentencing $1.45 million. rules, started in the 1980s, anyone who has a firearm “in furtherance of” a drug crime faces a five-year sentence for the first gun, more if it’s an assault weapon or a machine gun. More firearms can either be lumped into that five-year sentence or can tack on 25 more years for each gun, depending on how the prosecution pursues the charges. Last year, U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said his department would no longer impose “draconian mandatory-minimum sentences” on low-level nonviolent offenders, including those convicted of drug crimes. But the involvement of guns in cases like the Harveys’ could classify them as “violent.” Ormsby calls the presence of firearms in pot cases a “bright red line” for his office because the combination of drugs and guns poses a threat to public safety. “The burden shifts dramatically if you have a gun anywhere near the production or sales of marijuana,” Ormsby says. “You may have a small amount of marijuana that wouldn’t otherwise ...continued on next page

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be prosecuted, but if you’ve got a gun, we’re going to look at the case very, very seriously.”

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everal other recent cases in the state demonstrate Ormsby’s willingness to go after growers, especially if they’re gun owners. u On a June night last year, police in Union Gap, a town of 6,000 that hugs the freeway outside Yakima, responded to a domestic violence call. According to his lawyer, Curtis Roberts and his girlfriend had gotten in a fight after getting home from dinner, “she was whoopin’ up on him” and he called 911. When officers arrived, Roberts, who lost his right arm after a snowmobiling accident and treated phantom pains with marijuana, willingly led them to his grow. He also showed them some processed marijuana in a backpack and three guns: two rifles and a pistol, for which he had a concealed pistol license. “They say, ‘What’s [the pistol] for?’ and he says, ‘Are you kidding me? Look at me. It’s for protection,’” says Roberts’ attorney, Greg Scott. Two months after the first officers saw the grow, DEA agents raided, took the marijuana, grow equipment and guns and arrested him. Because of mandatory minimums for drug crimes that involve weapons, Scott says his client could have faced 55 years in prison if convicted on all counts. “So we really have no choice here but to work out some kind of a deal,” Scott says. “A ‘plea negotiation’ with the government is a misnomer. There’s very little give-and-take.” Five days before Christmas 2013, Roberts signed a plea deal, agreeing to admit he was an illegal drug user in possession of a firearm (a charge with no mandatory minimum). On June 30, eight days before the state’s first legal recreational marijuana stores opened, Roberts was sentenced to two and a half years in prison and three years of supervised release. “That just seems wrong to me,” Scott

Americans for Safe Access Washington State Coordinator Kari Boiter has worked to share the Harveys’ story ahead of their trial on Dec. 1. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO says. “Technically, it’s legal, but just because it’s legal doesn’t necessarily make it right.” Roberts is serving time now in Sheridan, Oregon. He requested that prison to be close to his girlfriend, who, he found after his sentencing, is pregnant. u Jeffrey Steinborn, a Seattle-based defense attorney who’s spent 40 years working on pot cases, calls this “the smallest case I’ve ever seen in federal court”: A 6:30 am DEA raid last spring turned up 14 plants and 16 harvested plants’ root balls — just 30 plants total — along with about 20 pounds of drying bud and just under 20 ounces of processed cannabis in Nathan and Suzy Nelson’s home and storage shed southeast of Yakima. While the couple had doctors’ recommendations

for up to 15 plants each, statements from Suzy and texts from Nathan’s phone also showed he was likely selling the marijuana to a dispensary in Seattle, something not explicitly allowed under state law. Nelson agreed to plead guilty and received no jail time, but the relevance of such a small grow came into question as the government and defense argued over his sentencing. “This is not a close case,” wrote Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Hanlon, requesting three months in prison and three months home detention. “The Defendant was in no way complying with state law. The Defendant obtained a medical marijuana card as cover for his grow.” “Before the court is what this counsel sees as the ‘new breed’ of defendants,”

Steinborn countered. “A large and significant number of Washington residents believe that the conduct here is legal under state law and tolerated under federal enforcement priorities. … These are citizens who do not set out to break the law, nor would they intentionally or knowingly risk the enormous consequences of a federal drug prosecution.” Like all of the cases in this story, Nelson’s crime was a felony, meaning he will face difficult job prospects, can no longer own guns and in some states will not qualify for assistance programs like food stamps. u Over the winter of 2011-12, Spokane County Sheriff’s Office detectives, with the help of the DEA, searched a house in a gated community near New-

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man Lake. They arrested Jared Kynaston, then 23, and six others living or working there, at what the defense argues was a medical grow, providing for multiple patients whose doctors’ recommendations were found at the house. Inside the house, officers had cataloged 562 living plants and 677 pots with just the roots left in them, possibly left over after being harvested (the defense argues that some of those pots actually were empty). In its prosecution, the federal government is counting all of those. That means the seven defendants are facing charges for manufacturing 1,000 or more plants. Because of that count, if they go to trial and are convicted, they’ll face 10-year, mandatory-minimum sentences. That could grow for Kynaston and others, since officers found a .40-caliber Glock in the garage. With a larger grow and cops’ accusations that he sold the pot on the black market instead of to patients, Kynaston may be a less sympathetic character than some of the others. But because this would be his third felony drug offense (he has previous convictions for marijuana possession) and because he’s charged with growing 1,000 plants or more, he could face a mandatory-minimum life sentence. “Life for marijuana?” says Kari Boiter, an Americans for Safe Access activist who is working on the Harveys’ case and others. “I don’t care what you’re doing with marijuana, that’s crazy.”

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hen a photographer and I arrive at the Harveys’ home, Boiter is the first one to greet us. She welcomes us in, introduces everyone and takes a seat on a couch behind me. As I ask the Harveys about their time on the mountain, their lives before all this and what they remember about the three times law enforcement came speeding up their driveway, they’re constantly looking over my shoulder for Boiter’s silent approval. In lieu of their lawyers, Boiter has been the one arranging media interviews and sitting in on them, from local outlets to CNN and Time magazine. While part of the reasoning for this is to make sure neither of them say anything that could get them into trouble in court, it’s also a window into the careful crafting of narrative that’s happening in this fight. While 77 percent of Americans believe marijuana has “legitimate medical uses,” according to Pew Research, few people are eager to sympathize with accused drug dealers. So activists make the most of stories like the Harveys’ to support

their view that medical users are wholly different from violent drug traffickers. “You don’t just go to bat for accused criminals every day,” Boiter says. “You do it because they’re people like the Harveys that are worth going to bat for.”

Public opinion continues to arc toward support for marijuana legalization as fewer politicians defend the War on Drugs. Three states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. territory of Guam all have either medical or recreational marijuana measures on the ballot in this week’s election. Politically,

“This is what people are paying attention to right now. It’s the latest civil rights struggle of our generation.” -Kari Boiter, Americans for Safe Access As Larry Harvey talks about truck driving and commercial fishing, his work before retirement, Boiter interjects. “He’s so modest about how hard he’s worked,” she says. “He didn’t just go and be a long-haul trucker or fish in Alaska. He bought his own trucks and was an owner-operator. He bought his own fishing license and own boat and became an owner-operator. I mean, a self-made man in all of this.” The Harveys’ story is not flawless. The prosecution will present evidence that they had labeled 1-pound bags and kept sales logs. The Harveys say this was all part of their personal recordkeeping and that they barely knew how to grow decent marijuana plants. Theirs didn’t produce enough usable pot to sell even if they had wanted to, they say, and they didn’t do anything to hide their activities. Larry had painted a green cross on a plywood sign, thinking that if law enforcement helicopters spotted it, they’d know the grow was medical and move on. However, with severe medical issues they won’t be able to explain to a jury, the Harveys make for a sympathetic case in Boiter’s eyes. With a background in the state Legislature and TV news, she’s the one who came up with the name “Kettle Falls Five,” knowing it would stick. She took Larry to Washington, D.C., earlier this year, taking a red-eye flight from Spokane and pushing him in a wheelchair from one congressperson’s office to another, telling his story and asking them to vote for marijuana law reform. Now, she hopes to organize enough supporters of the family to pack the courtroom during the trial and show the jury that the Harveys are not alone. Advocates believe this may be their moment.

the prospect of legalization, decriminalization or rescheduling often brings together people on far ends of the spectrum: justice-conscious liberals and hands-off libertarians. Parse the results of Initiative 502 in Eastern Washington and you’ll see that even traditionally conservative precincts that rejected that year’s measure legalizing same-sex marriage favored legalizing marijuana. “This is what people are paying attention to right now,” Boiter says. “It’s the latest civil rights struggle of our generation.” While public opinion may be changing, that fact doesn’t do much in a courtroom. So activists and attorneys like Doug Hiatt have to take the long view. “If you don’t know the giant injustice happening in America on a goddamn daily basis in courtrooms everywhere, you can’t change it,” he says. “The reason I talk about a lot of this isn’t just for my clients or just for that particular case. It’s for the system. I hope for systemic change … and I don’t think we get any change unless the truth gets told.” The Harveys’ trial date is approaching quickly, and Larry spends most of his time watching NASCAR and hunting shows to keep his mind off it. With each pretrial back-and-forth in court, the defense seems to lose another piece of the story it hopes to tell the jury. Meanwhile, Rhonda and Larry maintain that they won’t take a plea. “Even in the plea deals they’ve offered, I’d come out of it a felon and that means I can’t vote, I can’t leave the country, can’t do nothin’,” Larry says. “It’s just so hard to believe my country is doing this to me. It just don’t make sense.” n heidig@inlander.com

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uw.edu/spokanemedschool 30 INLANDER OCTOBER 30, 2014


Up to the Mic

How a fresh crop of jokesters are changing comedy in Spokane BY MIKE BOOKEY

M

attie Sobotka doesn’t want to spend a lot of time thinking about coffee, but she can’t help it. When the 24-year-old isn’t studying nutrition at Washington State University’s Spokane campus, she’s working as a barista. She’d rather be out at a Spokane bar working on her comedy act, though. “A lot of my jokes are coffee related,” says Sobotka. “I’d say about 40 percent of them have something to do with coffee.” It hasn’t yet been a year since Sobotka decided she wanted to give stand-up comedy a whirl, but on Halloween night she’ll take to the Bing Crosby Theater stage with four other up-and-coming entertainers for a showcase of Spokane’s new comedic talent. It’s been a big year for Sobotka and for comedy as a whole in Spokane, where open mics and comedy nights have sprung up, ushering in a fresh crop of folks looking to do one of the most difficult things in all of entertainment — stand at a microphone and try to make people laugh. “You can go out to a movie and spend $15, or you could go see quality comics from your own backyard,” says Mike Schneider, who organized a series at the Bing’s Ovations bar that served as the preliminary rounds for the Spokane Laugh Off on Friday night, which he also hosts. Schneider, whose day job finds him as a consultant to auto dealers, also founded a weekly Friday night open mic at the Red Dragon, where he’s been known to get behind the mic himself. He says the boom in open mics helps comics find a different route to getting stage time.

“There are amazingly funny people in Spokane and this is just another way for them to get their name out,” he says. Many comics still flock to Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, where owner Don Parkins has long fostered a supportive environment for the comedy community. Sobotka performed her first set at Uncle D’s and still makes her way there for the weekly Thursday night open mic, but like many other young comics is pleased to see other options out there now. “There’s this one big group of people who are super supportive,” she says. “I don’t know if it’s something in the water, but so many people suddenly want to come out and participate.”

W

hen he unfolds the slip of paper, Nick Cavasier can’t help but cringe. “The topic is airplane food,” the host of the Wednesday open mic at Brooklyn Deli says. The first comic approaches a microphone in the corner of the bar. Next, there’s the sort of silence — punctuated only by the shaggy-haired guy at the mic mumbling the words “airplane food” — that comics dread and audiences perhaps dread more. But he comes through. He’s 21, too young for the days of airline food, and has only been on a plane once. He goes on to riff about the absurdity of this suggestion. It’s good stuff and people laugh. Crisis averted. At the new Brooklyn Deli open mic, the crowd writes suggestions on slips of paper and the ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 31


CULTURE | COMEDY

Comics appearing at Spokane Laugh Off: (from left) Will Seagrim, Steven Tye, Mattie Sobotka, Michael Glatzmaier and Tom Meisfjord.

“UP TO THE MIC,” CONTINUED...

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comics have to riff on whatever topic happens to one of the shows, which played around town be selected, even if it’s suggested by a smartass throughout October, Dargen, playing the part knowing that someone is going to accidentally of the dweeby, idiosyncratic Shempy Bronkus, re-create an old Jerry Seinfeld bit. They go headexplained why Spokane is so “quaint.” Eventuto-head (the competition is more friendly than ally, the presentation veers into something akin fierce) until someone walks out a winner. to a bad science-fiction book proposal. It’s about It’s a different take on the open mic and as weird as you can get while keeping people brings together the sort of improv goofiness that laughing. the Blue Door Theatre has been purveying for “I’m not so far from traditional stand-up. I years with the stand-up scene. Matt Dargen has still tell stories and have some pretty standard had a hand in both improvisation and stand-up, ‘jokey’ jokes,” says Dargen. “I’ve just been first as a member of Gonzaga’s Boone Street amazed how supportive [other comics] have Hooligans sketch comedy troupe, as well as been.” performances at the Blue Door, before getting up chneider, who is heading up the Hallowin front of the mic alone about a year ago. His een night Spokane Laugh Off at the Bing, comedy, and that of some of the other performbelieves in Spokane’s comedy scene. He ers you’ll find at the Brooklyn Deli show, is a cites Dan Cummins, arguably the most suclittle more out there. Some call it alternative, or cessful comic to come out of the Lilac City, as indie comedy. proof that funny people can emerge “The stereotype was that people from smaller towns. He also tosses just wanted to hear dick jokes. But out names like Michael Glatzmaier that’s far from the truth. Places like Brooklyn Deli & Lounge and Harry J. Riley as people whose Neato Burrito [an open mic every Every Wednesday, 8 pm talents should land them on TV. other Thursday] have been more Schneider thinks of himself as a receptive to more nontraditional Uncle D’s Comedy champion for Spokane comics, and acts. It’s not hard to get time [in Underground he’d love to see someone break out Spokane],” says Dargen, a 22-yearEvery Thursday, 8 pm of here. The solution, he says, is to old who is wrapping up his last class make this fledgling scene as inclusive for a computer science degree from Neato Burrito as possible. Gonzaga. Every other Thursday, “I want it to be an environment Dargen’s comedy aspirations 10 pm where anyone can come out and it’s might seem inverted to some. He’s not political. If you want to hone actually from Los Angeles, growing Red Dragon Chinese your skills, there are bigger and betup just across town from some of the Every Friday, 8 pm ter shows we can get you,” he says, most renowned comedy clubs in the adding that the Bing comedy series world. But it’s in Spokane where he aims to use these up-and-comers as opening acts sees a future in kick-starting his comedy career for the big names they plan on continuing to — which he’d rather pursue instead of computer book. science, at least for the time being. Mattie Sobotka will to need to keep that “I think that doing stand-up in L.A., whether barista job for now. But soon, she hopes making you like it or not, it’s a commercial endeavor. people laugh can get her away from thinking Spokane is a very thriving scene, and a place about coffee all the time. where if you have something you want to do and “When I first started I wanted a side hobby. you believe in it, people are willing to watch,” After my first four months, I was hooked. Now says Dargen, citing other local young comics I’m doing the Bing show with the best comics in like Josh Teaford, who plays shows in Seattle, as Spokane. How far it goes, I shall see.”  examples of how comics can go from Spokane to bigger stages. Spokane Laugh Off • Fri, Oct. 31, at 7:30 pm Lately, Dargen has been focusing some of • $20 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague his energy on a TED talks-gone-awry series • bingcrosbytheater.com • Show is followed by called “Great Ideas: Spokane: Today,” featuring a screening of Halloween bizarrely hilarious PowerPoint presentations. In

NOW!


CULTURE | DIGEST

WORDS RAILTOWN RHYMES T

he fire burning in the Inland Northwest’s writing scene hasn’t been exclusive to fiction. It’s no secret anymore that the region is home to a plentiful number of local poetry writers and performers. That depth of local talent is largely what spurred Spokane Poet Laureate Thom Caraway, in collaboration with friend and fellow writer Jeffrey Dodd, to curate the forthcoming Railtown Almanac: A Spokane Poetry Anthology. The 170-page collection was also inspired by the successes of two recent collections of regional prose writers: Spokane Shorties, released during this past April’s Get Lit! festival, and Lilac City Fairy Tales, a collection of short works organized by buzzworthy Spokane writer Sharma Shields. “We wanted something that featured only poets and only poems, though we certainly have prose writers in the collection as well,” Caraway says. “It’s a good cross-section of all the different kinds of poetry. That says good things about Spokane, that there aren’t just many people writing poems, but writing good and different poems.” The launch of the collection comes a little later than Caraway and Dodd originally intended, during the first week of October as part of Create Spokane Arts Month, but at that time Caraway was coordinating Verbatim, a collaborative written word and visual art showcase. Railtown Almanac is published by Caraway’s poetry

press, Sage Hill Press, and both he and Dodd hope to curate sequential editions, possibly expanding to include essays and nonfiction. The anthology’s name acknowledges Spokane’s rich history as a major Western railroad hub. Even though some of the poetry included in Railtown isn’t explicitly about Spokane, each of the 84 writers featured — from established local poets to newcomers, and of all ages, from high schoolers to retirees — call the region home. “Even though you think you know who the writers in Spokane are, you get all these submissions from people you don’t know, so it was cool to see the breadth of the poetry community in Spokane,” Caraway notes. After this weekend’s launch and reading, Railtown Almanac will be available at Auntie’s, the Book Parlor and Atticus Coffee & Gifts for $14.95. Several other readings from the collection’s contributors are scheduled to follow through the month (see Inlander.com/events). “There are so many great things coming out of Spokane right now, that to have all this poetry in one place starts to give a shape to the kind of work that is going on here, which is really interesting,” Caraway says. — CHEY SCOTT Railtown Almanac: Launch! feat. Tod Marshall, Ellen Welcker, John Whalen, Emily Gwinn and others • Sat, Nov. 1, at 7 pm • Free • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main • auntiesbooks.com • 838-0206

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Idiot Detector Who better to brace us for the midterm elections than Lewis Black? Tickets at Ticketswest.com and 1-800-325-Seat

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ixar has a new computer-animated feature coming out next June called Inside Out. It’s about a young girl uprooted from the Midwest to fast-paced San Francisco and her resulting emotional roller coaster. Her inner emotions — Joy, Anger, Disgust, Fear and Sadness — are all voiced by well-known comics. Guess who they picked for Anger? “Yeah, I was up for Joy,” deadpans Lewis Black from his home in Manhattan, “but when I lost, I got so pissed off they gave me Anger.” Black started his career as a playwright and actor — he’s a Yale drama grad and has appeared in 12 films — but he’s landed in our collective consciousness for his comedy, especially his “Back in Black” appearances on The Daily Show. His “The Rant Is Due” tour hits the INB Center on Sunday night. Bring your questions, comments and observations, as you can text him right there on stage. He’s been wrapping up his

recent shows by riffing on the best ones. Black still gets calls for film jobs, but he says he’s often too busy to audition. He tours almost nonstop, having just returned from gigs in Europe. Europe? Do they even get his American politics-centered jokes? “Trust me, they get it better than some people in this country,” he says. Recently Black has lent his outrage to the ACLU in its campaign to roll back the various voter ID laws that have been sweeping Republican-controlled states. “It’s nuts that we need a group like the ACLU to monitor the groups that are supposed to do this shit in the first place,” says Black, his voice rising. “None of this is difficult, people! But the Supreme Court, they just seem to flip coins on this stuff. They knocked out [voter ID laws in] Wisconsin and North Carolina — those two, they said, ‘Enough is enough.’ “But with Texas,” Black is now literally yell-


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Lewis Black: Channeling anger on both stage and screen, like in his forthcoming role as Anger in Pixar’s Inside Out (below). ing into the phone, “they said, ‘That one? Oh, that one — well, that one’s OK.’ “I DON’T GET IT!” Then calmer, he continues: “There’s no sense of us moving forward; this is taking us back to when I was a kid. And if they want it to be 1961 again, well, go ahead and get out your blackand-white TV and enjoy life.” That’s the appeal of Lewis Black. He’s funny, for sure, but he’s also serious and — amid the F-bombs — high-minded about what America is supposed to be. “This is a country that screams and yells about freedom, and the big thing is you get to elect people here. But it’s not inspirational anymore. There’s a feeling we make no difference and it’s all about money.” Instead of being lulled into apathy, Black uses that sad state of affairs to launch his next rant. If politicians can’t or won’t do it, he’s ready to use his jokes to inspire people to care. The need for outrage, idiot alerts and, of course, laughter is urgent and palpable — Black’s show is just two days before the midterm elections. “Now we go from the saddest Congress ever to the saddest midterms ever,” he says. “Right after the government shutdown, 51 percent of Republicans and 49 percent of Democrats said they wouldn’t vote for their member of Congress. But watch — they’re all going to get reelected. That’s not government; that’s Groundhog Day.”  Lewis Black: The Rant Is Due • Sun, Nov. 2, at 7 pm • INB Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • $40-$65 • inbpac.com • (800) 325-SEAT

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CULTURE | THEATER

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fter more than two decades in gestation, The Clink went from a staged reading to a full-blown production in relatively short order. It was only this past June that local composer Tom Cooper and Kristin Cooper Herby, the father/daughter pair who cowrote the musical, gave it a scaled-down trial run at Stage Left.

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Anika Bryceson plays the lead character Fifi in the full production of the locally written and produced play, The Clink. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO But that was enough to pique the interest of John Allred of Onstage Repertory Theatre in Martinez, California. Under his direction, The Clink is now receiving the props-and-costumes treatment on the same stage as it prepares to make a leap to the San Francisco Bay Area in the spring of next year. Anika Bryceson remains in the role of Fifi, a sheltered and self-pitying young blonde who gets sentenced to two days in jail after a DUI arrest (loosely based on Cooper Herby’s own experience some 20 years ago). Her brief incarceration is enlivened by cellmates Deana LaCoco (Stacia Bruner), Norma Rae Strong (Faith Mitchell) and Lula (Morgan Keller), each of whom has a story to share and wisdom to impart. If The Clink crosses the line into afterschool special — albeit an R-rated one — it does so knowingly and in good humor. Fifi’s patronizing moralizing is the subject of the song “Preacher Woman,” and it sets her up for Deana’s foulmouthed put-downs, which Bruner, covered in fake tattoos, delivers with all the requisite sneer and swagger. Not only is her character a

welcome antidote to Fifi’s enervating whining, Bruner’s bluesy vocals (showcased well in songs like “Queen of Mean”) offset the high sopranos nicely. Though Act 1 is solid, the second still feels like a work in progress. The penultimate song, “Fast Food Blues,” comes out of nowhere and leads in Visit Inlander.com for complete the same direction. listings of local events. Confessions and bonding moments seem hasty, and some — though certainly not all — serious issues are addressed with an unsatisfying superficiality. Yet the fact that The Clink is already as mature as it is, and that Stage Left successfully packs all of this into barely one-third of its performance space, suggests that it has considerable potential to ripen in the California sun. n

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“I

Shake It Up Spokane artist Sheila Evans finds new inspiration in old drinks BY DAN NAILEN Paintings that appear in Sheila Evans new book of cocktail recipes and paintings, entitled Mixology: the Art of Classic Cocktails.

38 INLANDER OCTOBER 30, 2014

have a bit of a shaker problem.” That’s a potential career-ender for an artist whose craft relies on a steady hand. And if that artist is mixing up cocktails using exacting recipes as part of their work, it really might become an issue. The shaker worry Sheila Evans is describing, though, is more of a hoarding situation than a nervous-system breakdown. As she worked on her latest project, a book called Mixology: the Art of Classic Cocktails, she found herself a bit addicted to collecting all the beautiful accoutrements necessary for a proper classic beverage — the antique glasses, juicers, and yes, shakers. The shaker in question is an antique Indian brass-and-enamel one she found at the United Hillyard Antique Mall the day after discovering a new drink, the Pegu Club, at a birthday dinner. A little research indicated the drink was the house cocktail at its namesake bar in 1930s Burma, and finding it in Spokane, of all places, made her decide to add the Pegu Club — a gin-based drink flavored with bitters and lime — as the final entry to her book of cocktail recipes and accompanying paintings. Mixology: the Art of Classic Cocktails collects images of 19 classic cocktail still-life paintings Evans composed this summer, along with a few recipes and some personal reflection on her immersion into cocktail crafting. On Friday, Nov. 7, she’ll have a public showing of the 12”-by-12” paintings and a book release party at Mizuna. The decision to make cocktails the centerpiece of a new series of paintings came out of a random desire to mix things up for the lifelong Spokane resident, both in theme and painting style, after years of “doing these big, sort of abstract-but-realistic floral things, more pastel than oil,” Evans says. “I think I just wanted to do something different,” and she’d had an idea kicking around for several years that still lifes of cocktail ingredients could make for some striking visuals. “I just love them, I always have,” Evans says during a chat at Casper Fry over a Corpse Reviver No. 9, a gin-based cocktail and a mutation of one included


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Sheila Evans paints a Manhattan cocktail. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

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in her book, the Corpse Reviver No. 2. “I love the process of making it. I like watching somebody make it. There’s so much care, PEGU CLUB and they’re making someThe house drink of the original Pegu thing. As a craftsperson, I Club in Burma, this cocktail starts out can appreciate that. And deceptively sweet, Evans says, “but there’s so much beauty in finishes with a lovely balance of gin the glassware and everyand bitter orange.” thing that goes with a cocktail.” 1½ oz. gin While brushing up on ¾ oz. curaçao her oil-painting skills just 1 tsp. lime juice took a quick, week-long Dash of Angostura bitters refresher course, making Dash of orange bitters drinks instead of simply Grapefruit or lime twist ordering them was a taller order. She researched Combine gin, curaçao, lime and recipes and used weekly bitters in a shaker with ice. Shake and cocktail parties with friends strain into a chilled cocktail glass. to try different versions Garnish. of the various drinks she was interested in painting. Typically, Evans would do two paintings and perfect two recipes each week. “I made gimlets and Manhattans and that’s about it” before the Mixology project, Evans says, adding that her palate expanded into new realms as well. “I didn’t think I liked gin, but it turned out to be which gin, and what you do with it. It got to the point that I was drinking just straight-up gin martinis, because it was some Gun Club gin that was amazing.” Evans stuck with classic cocktails for the book because she figured the recipes would be relatively simple, and “it gave me an excuse to buy a bunch of antique glassware.” All of the drinks that made the book — from the whiskey sour to the Negroni — are ones she wouldn’t hesitate to recommend. She’s already planning on a Mixology sequel that would expand both her cocktail repertoire and painting approach. “For this book, because it was vintage cocktails, I kept it fairly straightforward and traditional still-life setups,” Evans says. “I think it would be fun to do more modern setups and viewpoints, kind of shake it up a bit.” n Mixology: the Art of Classic Cocktails exhibit and book release party • Fri, Nov. 7, 5-10 pm • Mizuna • 214 N. Howard • MixologyArt.blogspot.com

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Hayden gets a Hawaiian hot dog joint with the arrival of Lavadog BY JO MILLER

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he island theme inside Lavadog is apparent once you take in the bright yellow walls covered with images of crisp ocean waves and erupting volcanoes. The blue countertop is even painted in such a way that it looks perpetually wet. You quickly realize that this isn’t your typical hot dog spot with the typical fixings. Instead, think pineapple relish and guava mustard. Eric and Sabra Burkholder opened Lavadog in Hayden in mid-July to fulfill their ambition of starting some kind of Hawaiian-style business. Sabra grew up on Oahu, so the couple modeled their shop after local island joints like Puka Dog. “We’re just trying to bring a little local flavor to Idaho,” Eric says. For the most part, each dog on the menu ($3.50) has a sauce, mustard and relish, all of which are homemade by Sabra. There are combos like lemon garlic sauce, pineapple relish and guava mustard on the Maui Dog, or mango relish and wasabi mustard with the lemon garlic

sauce for the Big Island Dog. Other options range from sweet — banana relish and passionfruit mustard — to flavors with more of a kick, like jalapeño mustard and hot chili pepper sauce. Weekly specials feature alternatives, such as the Kalua Pig, a Hawaiian-style pulled pork sandwich with or without the dog. If you’ve already pictured yourself with tropical fruits running down your hand as you take bites out of your hot dog, you’ll have to reimagine that image. The hot dogs at Lavadog don’t come in the customary top-split bun. Each whole roll is impaled on a prong of a spike toaster and toasted from the inside. It comes out sitting in a basket alongside Hawaiian kettle chips and a couple of extra cups of the fixings for dipping, in case you still desire the dripping-topping effect. n Lavadog • 180 W. Hayden Ave., Hayden, Idaho • Open Mon-Sat, 11 am-5 pm • facebook. com/Lavadoghawaiianhotdogs • 208-818-9564


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Sandpoint’s Thai Nigiri offers Asian food in two forms BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

C

an’t decide on Japanese or Thai food? A recent addition to Sandpoint’s dining scene means you can have your curry and eat it (with chopsticks), too. In addition to fried tofu ($5.50) and fried spring rolls ($4.50) Thai Nigiri offers lighter appetizers like seared Tuna Tataki on daikon ($9.50) and baked green mussels with (imitation) crab, masago and green onion ($9.95). Thai and Japanese influences mingle among soup and salad offerings. Try Thai coconut soup ($4.50-$6.95) or yum woon sen salad with glassy noodles, shrimp and lime-chili dressing ($10.95), as well as Japanese sunomono salad with octopus, crab and shrimp ($7.95). Traditional Thai dishes vary from noodleto rice-based, while curry options include red, green, yellow or milder Panang style. Further customize your dish with chicken, beef, tofu, mixed vegetable, shrimp or seafood ($11.95$15.95), or try the house special: duck, seafood, soft-shell crab, grilled salmon or walleye with your choice of five sauces, including ginger teriyaki and sweet basil ($15.95-$16.95)

On the Japanese side, choose nigiri or sashimi, either a la carte or in combo platters ($15-$23). On the specialty roll menu, “In” refers to the interior of any of two dozen rolls, while “Out” is the external topping, such as the TNT roll’s spicy tuna and cucumber topped with spicy salmon, scallop and green onion ($13.95). Although the crab featured in a majority of the rolls is imitation, our Spider Man roll was a wonderful mix of spicy tuna, soft-shell crab, cucumber, avocado and eel ($11.50). Thai Nigiri is the first restaurant for Uma and Tim Tientong, who liked Sandpoint so much, they specifically relocated to the area from Colorado earlier this summer. In addition to their dinner menu, Thai Nigiri has a large lunch menu featuring plentiful dishes from $7.50 to $10.50, as well as a reasonable range of beer, wine and sake served hot or cold.  Thai Nigiri • 209 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • Open Mon, Tue and Thu, 11 am-2:30 pm and 5-9 pm; Fri, 11 am-2:30 pm and 5-10 pm; Sat, noon-10 pm; Sun, noon-9 pm • 208-265-2587

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Night Moves

If it bleeds, it leads. Joe has long been busy chasing the grisly stuff, and now so is Lou, and their paths keep crossing. When Lou beats Joe to an accident scene, Joe offers him a job. Around the same time, Lou builds up the courage to ask Nina out on a date. Both requests are answered with a no, and while Joe just shrugs it off (not wise when you’re dealing with a psychopath), Lou doesn’t take it well. He knows Nina is in a desperate spot at work, and calmly tells her, “You need me and I want you.” It’s hard (Rene Russo). She’s the news director on the “vampire to figure out exactly what drives this guy, but he sure is shift” who knows what her viewers want — graphic frighteningly persistent. urban crime and accident video — and since her station The film kicks up a notch in creepiness when it’s is the lowest-rated in the city and it’s revealed that there are no lines Lou won’t sweeps time, Lou is hired on the spot as cross to get what he wants, then goes NIGHTCRAWLER a freelancer. further by presenting more lines popping Rated R She also unknowingly unleashes up right in front of him. One involves Written and directed by Dan Gilroy a monster. “I’m a quick learner,” he him beating the cops to a major scene of Starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Rene Russo, brags to her, even before he has any carnage, getting footage of dead bodies Riz Ahmed, Bill Paxton idea of how to do what she wants him in a private home, and of the killers (who to do. Lou hires an assistant, Rick (Riz don’t see him), and beating it out of there Ahmed), a shiftless fellow who just needs a job, to be his before the cops arrive. navigator as he maniacally drives around town following It’s the point in the film where we realize, once and bloodshed. for all, that Rick knows the difference between right The film hints that there are no scruples among nightand wrong, but Lou is oblivious to it. There’s a regular crawlers, then brazenly shows it when Lou breaks into supply of shocking plot turns and unbearable tension, as a shooting scene, steals footage, and gets it to Nina. He well as an atmosphere of dread, and all sorts of violence. wants to impress her, and receives the words “OutstandThen there’s Lou, just a man doing his job — happy, smiling work, Lou,” in kind. ing and insane. 

Jake Gyllenhaal is at his creepiest in Nightcrawler BY ED SYMKUS

L

ou Bloom (Jake Gyllenhaal) is a creepy guy with obvious psychotic tendencies. Just look at that mop of hair, long, hollow face and those big, staring eyes. He’s got no job, no direction in life, and not a hell of a lot of common sense. He ekes by via the fast cash he gets from tearing down metal fencing around L.A. and reselling it to junkyards. Then he meets his first nightcrawler. In TV news jargon, that’s someone who goes out after dark, following leads from police scanners and, video camera in hand, rushes to crime — or accident — scenes, gets bloody footage, then hightails it to whatever local TV station will pay the most to put it on the air first. Lou is fascinated when he sees freelance nightcrawler Joe Loder (Bill Paxton) in action, and because he doesn’t have an original thought in his head, decides he wants to do the same thing. A scanner and camcorder purchase later, Lou grabs some accident footage, barges into a TV station, does some fast talking, and soon meets Nina

42 INLANDER OCTOBER 30, 2014


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS BEFORE I GO TO SLEEP

A thriller based on a global best-selling novel, Before I Go To Sleep tells the story of a woman (Nicole Kidman) who wakes up every day with no memory due to a traumatic attack. Working with a doctor (Mark Strong), though, she starts to uncover some scary truths about her background, documenting the information Memento-style as she tries to determine if her husband (Colin Firth), the doctor or someone else is responsible for her situation. (DN) Rated R

THE BLUE ROOM

Premiering at this year’s Cannes, this dark and sexual French thriller follows an adulterous pair who may have taken their fling a little too far, keeping the audience on the edge of their seats through twist after twist. The film is based on a novel by celebrated Belgian crime writer Georges Simenon. (CS) Rated R

NIGHTCRAWLER

Lou Bloom (Jake Gyllenhaal) is a creepy guy with obvious psychotic tendencies. Then he meets his first nightcrawler, someone who goes out after dark, following leads from police scanners and, video camera in hand, rushes to crime scenes, gets bloody footage, then hightails it to whatever

65th

local TV station will pay the most to put it on the air first. Lou gets good at this, sells a lot of footage and then begins getting in way over his head. (ES) Rated R

SKI FILM S I N C E

1 9 49

PRIDE

Based on true events during the 198485 British miners’ strike, this comedydrama follows a group of Londonbased gay and lesbian activists who raise money to help families affected by the strike. The award-winning film follows the group’s relationship with residents of the small Welsh town they help during the strikes. The partnership mutually benefited both groups, as the LGBT movement also gained ally support from the miners. (CS) Rated R

RUDDERLESS

In William H. Macy’s directorial debut, Billy Crudup stars as Sam, a successful executive whose son Josh is killed early on, sending Sam on a drinking binge that lands him, two years later, living alone on a boat and painting houses for a living. When Sam’s exwife Emily (Felicity Huffman) shows up with notebooks and CDs full of songs Josh was writing when he died, Sam decides to perform the music with the help of a local musician (Anton Yelchin). At Magic Lantern (DN) Rated R

TH SATURIDSA Y!

NOW PLAYING ADDICTED

Based on the novel by erotic author Zane comes a dramatic story of a mother, wife and successful career woman whose affair with a hot colleague leads to a full blown, out of control sex addiction. Once her wild lifestyle of takes over, she is forced to choose between her family or the new men in her life. (MS) Rated R

ADVANCED STYLE

You don’t see many models on the runway much older than 25, but this documentary shows that fashion extends far beyond that age. Directed by first-timer Lina Plioplyte, the film follows seven women in New York City who’ve kept their fashion sense sharp well into old age. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

ALEXANDER AND THE TERRIBLE, HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD DAY

Little Alexander is used to having terrible luck. He’s the classic, nerdy child in a way cooler and put-together family. But one day, the tables turn and everybody in his family is hit with unpredictable drama, chaos and embarrassment. Don’t worry, this isn’t your average family comedy — former Community star Donald Glover has an appearance. With a true Disney message at heart, Alexander will show you how to avoid letting the haters get you down. (MS) Rated PG

THE BEST OF ME

It looks like Nicholas Sparks movies are still trendy. Estranged high school sweethearts Amanda and Dawson reunite 20 years later to reclaim their history. It’s like The Notebook, except… well, nothing. Expect the story you’ve heard and loved a few dozen times. (MS) Rated PG-13

THE BOOK OF LIFE

Goofy competing princes Manolo and Joaquin seek the affection of unconventional badass princess Maria, who seems to be amused with how foolish the two of them look in their attempts. Manolo’s journey becomes more complicated when he’s transported to another spooky but outrageously fun world, perfect in time for Halloween. This animated film stars an eclectic cast of Channing Tatum, Christina Applegate, Diego Luna, Zoe Saldana and, of course, Ice Cube. (MS) Rated PG

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BOYHOOD

Richard Linklater’s newest film, shot over the course of 12 years, is a true masterwork and eschews the bigbang theory of dramatics in favor of the million-and-one little things that accumulate daily and help shape who we are, and who we will become. The story focuses on Mason, who we follow from age 7 to 19 as he struggles with divorced parents and the process of learning how to navigate the world. (MB) Rated R ...continued on next page

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OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 43


FILM | SHORTS

THE MAGIC LANTERN MY OLD LADY (102 MIN)

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DRACULA UNTOLD

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Fri/Sat: 4:45 Sun: 3:00 Tues-Thurs: 5:00 RUDDERLESS (100 MIN) *one week only! Fri/Sat: 8:00 Sun: 6:15 Tues-Thurs: 6:15 WALKING THE CAMINO (80 MIN) *held over! Fri/Sat: 3:15 Sun: 1:30 Tues-Thurs: 3:30

THE TRIP TO ITALY (108 MIN) *weekend only! Fri/Sat: 6:00 Sun: 4:15

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To cause supernatural destruction to his enemies in order to protect his wife and son, warrior Vlad Tepes ventures to the dark side. After drinking some blood, the Dracula powers inside him make him stronger than he could have imagined. (MS) Rated PG-13

THE EQUALIZER

Denzel Washington plays McCall, a former professional badass who clearly misses his past life. He can’t sleep, you see, because even though he seems happy with his minimum-wage job, he isn’t following his own philosophy of “gotta be who you are in this world no matter what.” He relates this to — you’ll love this — a hooker with a heart of gold and the soul of an artist, Teri (Chloë Grace Moretz), who also hangs out in a diner where McCall always finds himself in the wee hours. When Teri gets beat up by some thugs, McCall goes out for revenge. (MJ) Rated R

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS

The girl has cancer, the boy is in remission from cancer; this story can only end badly. As far as teenage cancer love stories go, John Green’s recent young adult novel of the same name isn’t half bad — not nearly as sappy as A Walk to Remember. Shailene Woodley (The Descendants, Divergent) plays the lead. (LJ) Rated PG-13

FURY

The five-man crew of the U.S. Sherman tank nicknamed “Fury” is in a hell of a mess: broken down and alone in the middle of a German battlefield in April 1945, one member of the team already dead and the odds of survival looking bleak. They’re forced to band together behind their sadistic leader (Brad Pitt), who goes by the name “Wardaddy” and beats the living crap out of his troops. The guys learn a thing or two about humanity along the way. (SR) Rated R

GONE GIRL

David Fincher (Fight Club, The Social Network) gets his paws on the novel by Gillian Flynn (who also wrote the script) and comes up with one of the twistingest, turning-est and most unsettling movies of the year. Ben Affleck is the once-happy husband whose oncehappy wife, Rosamund Pike, up and vanishes on the morning of their fifth anniversary, with lots of clues and a few secrets pointing directly at him as the perpetrator. But amidst the curious cops, nosy neighbors, distraught relatives, and ratings-chasing news people, the mood of the film changes radically, then does so again, and again. (ES) Rated R

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

The titular Guardians are a ragtag, five-pronged crew of interstellar outcasts tasked with stopping Ronan the Accuser (Lee Pace), a rogue zealot bent on planetary destruction. The Guardians are led by Peter Quill (Chris

44 INLANDER OCTOBER 30, 2014

Pratt), a cocky, wisecracking treasure hunter from Earth who likes to go by Star-Lord. (SS) Rated PG-13

to continue his father’s payments to her until her demise. At Magic Lantern (DN) Rated PG-13

JOHN WICK

OUIJA

Keanu Reeves stars as a revengeseeking hit man who jumps back into the game to get even with those who stole from him — and killed his helpless, adorable puppy. Fueled by bitterness, John Wick tracks down his enemies. Cars blow up, guns get shot and stoic lines are delivered. (MS) Rated R

THE JUDGE

Robert Downey Jr. plays Hank, a hotshot lawyer who reluctantly reconnects with his father, Joseph, a respected veteran judge. Joseph is also about to find himself on the receiving end of a murder charge — the victim is a convicted murderer whose crime was made possible by Joseph’s leniency — and thus the angry son and the prickly father must work together and possibly come to respect one another and so on and so forth. (SR) Rated R

THE MAZE RUNNER

A group of displaced young men with erased memories find themselves trapped in a deserted wasteland with no way out, except for a treacherous maze known to kill those who dare enter. A mysterious and powerful force keeps the prisoners hostage and in constant fear. Once Thomas arrives on the scene, he inspires the group to attempt an escape as they try to solve the mystery of their capture. (MS) Rated PG-13

MY OLD LADY

Kevin Kline is Mathias Gold, a 57-yearold New Yorker with no family, no money and no prospects who arrives in France to take ownership of an apartment left to him by his estranged father. There, Mathias finds an elderly British woman named Mathilde Girard (Maggie Smith) living in the place, the result of an odd bit of French property law called a viager. Accordingly, not only must Mathias wait until Mathilde’s death to take ownership of the place, he also has

Innocent teenagers who mourn the loss of their friend gather together at the scene of her death to communicate with her spirit through a Ouija board. Once they play the game, they open a connection to terrifying spirits who were responsible for killing their friend. The house they occupy becomes haunted and they have to figure out how to re-establish the separation between worlds. (MS) Rated PG-13

THE SKELETON TWINS

As a winner at the Sundance Film Festival, this story of an estranged family is perfectly bizarre, emotional and lighthearted. Siblings Milo and Maggie, played by Bill Hader and Kristin Wiig, reunite after 10 years of separation and attempt to find understanding in their messy relationship. Their quirky, loving and complicated dynamics are highly entertaining. (MS) Rated R

ST. VINCENT

Bill Murray stars as the titular Vincent, a broke, alcoholic, degenerate, curmudgeonly gambler with a crude Brooklyn accent who manages to become the after-school babysitter of his neighbor kid when his mother (Melissa McCarthy) takes extra hours as a nurse. The pair slowly warms to each other as Vincent shows Oliver the ways of the world in his unconventional manner (certainly more Bad Santa than Up). (SS) Rated R

THE TRIP TO ITALY

Over six amazing Italian courses, old coworkers Steve and Rob, played by Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon, respectively, develop their quirky friendship on a food critic tour. The two share silly conversations, delicious meals and whimsical adventures among the backdrop of the Italian countryside. With feel-good side plots of romance and self-discovery, the film’s overall story stays close to the food and the landscape. (MS) Not Rated 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Boyhood

100

Gone Girl

81

St. Vincent

63

The Boxtrolls

60

The Equalizer

57

Rudderless

52

The Judge

40

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT


FILM | REVIEW

THE CITY SHINES BRIGHTEST AT NIGHT

FRI, OCTOBER 31ST TO THURS, NOVEMBER 6TH

The Giver

FRI 5:00 SAT 12:45 5:00 SUN-THURS 5:00

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles

FRI 7:05 SAT 2:50 7:05 SUN-MON 7:05 WED-THURS 7:05

Let’s Be Cops FRI-THURS 9:15PM

Seattle vs Oakland SUN 1:00PM DOORS OPEN AT NOON

AIRWAY HEIGHTS

10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 4 7:05PM

SAW 10TH ANNIVERSARY

R Daily (5:00) 7:15 9:30 Sat-Sun (12:30) (2:45)

Billy Crudup (right) delivers a strong performance in William H. Macy’s flawed directorial debut.

Oh So Close

A sweet story in Rudderless is undermined by some serious distractions

W

BEFORE I GO TO SLEEP

R Daily (3:10) (5:20) 7:30 9:35 Sat-Sun (11:00) (1:10)

JOHN WICK

R Daily (4:45) 7:00 9:15 Sat-Sun (12:15) (2:30)

OUIJA

PG-13 Daily (3:20) (5:20) 7:20 9:20 Sat-Sun (11:20) (1:20)

ST. VINCENT

PG-13 Daily (4:30) 6:50 9:00 Sat-Sun (11:40) (2:15)

FURY

R Daily (4:15) 7:00 9:45 Sat-Sun (10:50) (1:30)

THE BOOK OF LIFE

PG Daily (3:10) (5:10) 7:10 Sat-Sun (11:10) (1:10)

THE BEST OF ME

BY DAN NAILEN ith his feature directing debut, you certainly can’t say William H. Macy played it safe with Rudderless. The film tries to turn a tragic mass shooting on a college campus into a redemption story about the healing power of music and human connection. And while Macy succeeds in that ambition effectively for long stretches, the movie is ultimately underwhelmed by some tone-deaf non sequiturs and unneeded tangents. Billy Crudup stars as Sam, a successful executive whose son Josh is killed early on, sending Sam on a drinking binge that lands him, two years later, living alone on a boat and painting houses for a living. Sam’s ex-wife Emily (Felicity Huffman) shows up one day with boxes full of Josh’s belongings — including notebooks and CDs full of songs Josh was writing when he died. Inspired by what he reads and hears, Sam learns Josh’s songs on an old acoustic guitar, finding some joy in connecting with his son’s music. The songs pull Sam out of his depression, even inspiring him to take the stage at a local bar for open mic night. That’s where Sam meets Quentin (Anton Yelchin), a socially awkward young musician who likes Sam’s performance so much that he stalks him for days until he agrees to start a band. Suddenly surrounded by three young and remarkably capable musicians, Josh’s songs turn from quiet acoustic musings into catchy pop-rock

NIGHTCRAWLER

R Daily (4:40) 7:10 9:40 Sat-Sun (11:30) (2:10)

PG-13 Daily (4:30) 7:15 9:40 Sat-Sun (11:40) (2:00)

tunes that attract a rabid following in no time. Quentin is happy to be in a band that actually has fans, and Sam is finding himself again through his new young friend — although he keeps the origin of his songs a secret for a reason the audience is left to guess. That decision will, naturally, come to haunt Sam later as a major twist changes what was to that point a relatively sweet, straightforward story of a man connecting with a stand-in for his dead son into something else entirely. RUDDERLESS That’s unfortunate, Rated R because the chemistry Directed by William H. Macy between Crudup and Starring Billy Crudup, Anton Yelchin is genuinely Yelchin, Felicity Huffman engaging and moving. If Rudderless had kept it simple and stuck to their relationship, it would ultimately have been successful. Instead, the film is undermined by some distracting choices made by Macy. And I mean DISTRACTING. One example is a Caddyshack homage that comes out of nowhere, aiming for laughs in a movie doing fine without slapstick. Another is Selena Gomez as the dead son’s girlfriend, an obvious publicity stunt more than thoughtful casting choice. As a fine actor himself, it’s surprising that Macy failed Crudup and Yelchin, and Rudderless, with some of his own choices. 

MOVIE TIMES on

ALEXANDER AND THE TERRIBLE, HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD DAY

PG Daily (2:50) (4:50) 6:50 8:50 Sat-Sun (10:50) (12:50)

THE MAZE RUNNER PG-13 Daily 9:10

WANDERMERE

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

SAW 10TH ANNIVERSARY

R Daily (12:30) (2:45) (5:00) 7:15 9:30

NIGHTCRAWLER

R Daily (2:10) (4:40) 7:10 9:40 Fri-Sun (11:30)

BEFORE I GO TO SLEEP

R Daily (1:10) (3:10) (5:20) 7:30 9:35 Fri-Sun (11:00)

JOHN WICK

R Daily (12:15) (2:30) (4:45) 7:00 9:10

OUIJA

PG-13 Daily (1:20) (3:20) (5:20) 7:20 9:20 Fri-Sun (11:20)

ST. VINCENT

PG-13 Daily (2:15) (4:30) 6:50 9:00 Fri-Sun (11:40)

FURY

R Daily (1:30) (4:15) 7:00 9:45 Fri-Sun (10:50)

THE BOOK OF LIFE

PG Daily (1:15) (3:15) (5:15) 7:15 9:15 Fri-Sun (11:15)

THE BEST OF ME

PG-13 Daily (2:00) (4:30) 7:10 9:40 Fri-Sun (11:40)

THE JUDGE

R Daily (4:00) 9:00 Fri-Sun (11:15)

ALEXANDER AND THE TERRIBLE, HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD DAY

PG Daily (12:50) (2:50) (4:50) 6:50 8:50 Fri-Sun (10:50)

DRACULA UNTOLD PG-13 Daily (2:15) 7:00

GONE GIRL

R Daily (12:15) (3:15) 6:15 9:15

ANNABELLE R Daily 9:20

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

PG-13 Daily (1:30) (4:10) 6:45 9:20 Fri-Sun (11:00)

THE MAZE RUNNER

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PG-13 Daily (1:40) (4:10) 6:40 Fri-Sun (11:15) Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 10/31/14-11/6/14

OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 45


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Y G B OT A B

S T K O C R A Y B ck s glad Ni i t o L x-A Sir Mi

i Minaj sampled his song, proud of Macklemore and

F

or Sir-Mix-A-Lot, Halloween used to mean passing out Costco-sized Snickers bars to the trick-or-treaters in his Seattle neighborhood. This year, however, the Grammy-winning Sir Mix-A-Lot (born Anthony Ray, he answers to both: “I don’t understand guys who say ‘Call me by my rap name,’” he says) will perform at the Hive in Sandpoint for the holiday. “What I wear on stage is already an obnoxious costume, so that fits right in,” Ray says from his home studio in Seattle. He promises he’ll perform his hit track “Baby Got Back” — an extended 10-minute version. He’s more than happy to do so.

BY LAURA JOHNSON

excited for Ha llowe e

n

“Would you call up Apple and ask if they get tired of making iPhones?” he asks. “People are paying money to hear that song, and as a performer I’m proud to have a song like that.” His best-known anthem has never quite disappeared. This year, Jimmy Fallon and Brian Williams parodied it and Ray performed it live with the Seattle Symphony. But it’s Nicki Minaj’s “Anaconda,” which heavily samples “Baby Got Back” and currently sits at No. 11 on the Billboard charts, that has resurrected and remixed Ray’s 1992 No. 1 track for a new generation. “People are saying I should be upset she used my song, but I’m not. I’m having fun ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 47


MUSIC | HIP-HOP

Seattle-based rapper Sir Mix-A-Lot plays Sandpoint for the first time Friday.

“BABY GOT BACKSTORY,” CONTINUED...

Sparkling white.

listening to it,” says Ray, who gave Minaj permission to use his work. Odes to round butts have infiltrated the pop charts this year, led by Meghan Trainor’s “All About That Bass” and “Booty” by J. Lo and Iggy Azalea. Ray is pleased to see big bottoms back in the spotlight, but notes that this time it’s different. “When I did that song, it was serious,” he explains. “African American women on TV were portrayed as black maids or they would assimilate to another culture, and that was something that bothered me a lot. But I didn’t want to be preachy, so I made ‘Baby Got Back’ tongue in cheek. Nicki, she’s not preaching; she’s having fun because her look is accepted, and that’s progression.” Ray grew up in Seattle housing projects, living in what he describes as the ’hood until 1988, after his single “Posse on Broadway” hit the national charts. “Unlike a lot of rappers, I embrace capitalism, otherwise it’s a life of struggling,” the 51-year-old says with a laugh. He began as a DJ playing parties, soon moving to rhyming and rapping. Ray describes the early-’80s Seattle hip-hop scene as aggressive, rappers always talking trash about one another. “When we were fighting that made us look bad,” he says. Almost the second “Baby Got Back” hit MTV, it blew up. The video, depicting a multitude of posterior close-ups, was so controversial for the time, it was only played late at night. The world was taken with his song, but at home

some said he sold out. Which is where he identifies with Macklemore and Ryan Lewis, the duo putting Seattle hip-hop back in the limelight. When local rappers complain to Ray that Macklemore doesn’t represent the scene well enough or that he sold out, “I tell them: ‘Instead of getting mad, embrace the fact that eyes are on Seattle and capitalize on that.’ I’m proud of Macklemore. He’s been grinding it for years.” Ray, taking his own advice, just released the new beat-heavy single “Buddy” (on which he describes himself as an “ass connoisseur”). Trying to conjure another hit hasn’t been easy for the rapper since he rocketed to fame. His 1996 track “Jump On It” saw success, but nothing after that drew similar praise. Now, he’s finally creating tunes for an upcoming album with a working title of Dun 4got about Mix; his most recent studio release was 2003’s Daddy’s Home. From root to fruit, Ray writes and produces all of his music. He’s hoping to entice fans by releasing his upcoming singles in imaginative ways, such as live-streaming his entire creative process. “It’s kind of hard at my age, people think I’m trying to remain relevant,” Ray says. “But that’s not it. I’m here because I still have something to say.”  lauraj@inlander.com Sir Mix-A-Lot • Fri, Oct. 31, at 9 pm • $25/$30 day of • 21+ • The Hive • 207 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • livefromthehive.com • (208) 2903048

- OR -

Free BOTOX (20 Units - $240 Value)

With Purchase of a New Patient Exam, Necessary X-rays & Recommended Cleaning. Offer expires 11/30/14.

22106 E. Country Vista Drive Suite D • Liberty Lake www.LibertyLakeDental.com

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saturday nov 8 InB PerformInG arts Center Dr. Ross Simonds • Dr. Amanda Roper

48 INLANDER OCTOBER 30, 2014

334 W. Spokane FallS Blvd · Spokane, Wa · 8:00pm ShoW · all ageS TickeTS aT TickeTSWeST · charge By phone 800-325-SeaT


MUSIC | LOCAL SCENE

Some Enchanted Evening The places to spend your Halloween night listening to live music

BARN AID 2014

BY LAURA JOHNSON

W

eathering Halloween as an adult is challenging. Do you still dress up? Do you use the holiday as an excuse to drink something out of character? It’s all up to you, but note that the Inland Northwest’s live music options are pretty hoppin’ Friday night. We’ve grouped the shows into experiences you might want out of your evening. Many of these venues offer costume contests as well. So you want to go to a show where you’ll…

GET SPRAYED WITH FAYGO

Juggalos never need an excuse to dress up, donning face paint and black, white and red clothing for every show. Expect the costumes for Friday’s Tech N9ne performance to be more exceptional than usual. The Kansas City rapper was here in May, but his fan club always welcomes a return visit. Tech N9ne feat. Stevie Stone, Krizz Kaliko, Knothead and Tyler Denbeigh, at Knitting Factory, $28, All-ages

STRAIN YOUR NECK HEADBANGING

Nov 1, 7:30 p.m. Nov 2, 2:00 p.m. Nov 8, 7:30 p.m.

British speed metal act Raven never used Aqua Net, but their sweaty, long locks certainly make them a hair metal band. These guys have been around for 40 years; they know how to put on one hell of a loud show. Raven feat. Night Demon, Invasive, Morbid INC and Aardvark at the Hop!, $10, All-ages

Tim Campbell, Artistic Director

EXPERIENCE LOCAL ROCK OVERLOAD

Bethlehem Lutheran Church 2715 S. Ray Street Spokane WA 99223

It’s obviously impossible to experience local rock music overload, but in the case of the two shows happening at the Big Dipper and the Phat House, you may at least get overwhelmed. Buy tickets at one venue and you get in the door both places. On the lineup are local rock and psychedelic favorites. Bodhi Drip, Blackwater Prophet, the Mother and Buffalo Jones at the Big Dipper; Moksha, Flying Mammals, B-Radicals and Good Ol’ Phat Jam at Phat House; $5/$2 with costume, Allages

Tickets $10.00 509-327-3598

DANCE LIKE A ZOMBIE

for reservations or purchase tickets at the door

“Thriller” is the one Halloween song that never goes out of style. Expect the Michael Jackson favorite to play at least once at Swaxx on Friday night, as it’s the theme of the entire event. Watch the video again and make sure you have the moves down pat. Thriller Halloween Costume Party feat. DJ Freaky Fred, DJ X and DJ K-Phi at Swaxx, $10, 21+

N.O.W (Northwest Opera)

HEAR THE DEVIL GET DEFEATED

The Charlie Daniels Band isn’t playing Friday, but we couldn’t leave them off the list: “The Devil Went Down to Georgia” is just too damn memorable, not to mention Halloween-themed. The country band plays Sunday, Nov. 2, and after a full day of rest on Saturday, you should be able to make the performance, still in the holiday spirit. Charlie Daniels Band at Northern Quest Resort & Casino, $45-$65  These clearly are not the only acts playing Friday; flip the page for more terrifying music options.

JESSIE SPACCIA ILLUSTRATIONS

SPONSORED BY Bethlehem Lutheran Church Thinking Cap Manito Ship & Copy Mission Mountain Winery Homes 4 You LLC Steve Wee, Esq.

Made here. By locals. Pushing boundaries. Spokane-Style.

No Boundaries. No-Li.

1003 E. Trent Ave. 509.242.2739 NoLiBrewhouse.com

OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

INDIE HORSE FEATHERS

S

ometimes you need to give what you love a break or risk burning out. That’s what Justin Ringle, frontman of Portland-based indie folk quintet Horse Feathers, realized before recording the band’s latest album So It Is With Us, which came out last week. Having become disillusioned after touring behind the band’s fourth album Cynic’s New Year, Ringle put down his guitar, unsure when he would pick it up again. After months of reflection and a fresh perspective, Ringle, originally from Lewiston, Idaho, chose to come back to writing and playing. His new attitude is evident on So It Is With Us; there’s a sense of joy and vibrancy to both the music and lyrics, even on the more somber tunes, marking a rejuvenated Horse Feathers. — AZARIA PODPLESKY Horse Feathers with Hollow Wood • Fri, Oct. 31, at 8 pm • $15 • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 10/30

HIP-HOP DELTRON 3030

BIGFOOT PUB, DJ Dave BUCKHORN INN, Spokane River Band CHINESE GARDENS (534-8491), Big Hair Revolution COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN (208-292-4813), Casey FEDORA PUB, CdA Charter Jazz Jam FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Luke Jaxton THE FLAME, DJ WesOne JOHN’S ALLEY, Fruition J KNITTING FACTORY, Bassjackers, Dyro J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Particlehead O’SHAY’S, Open mic ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Luke Jaxon Acoustic ZOLA, Phil Lamb Band

Deltron 3030 and Kid Koala • Thu, Nov. 6, at 8 pm • $20 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

Friday, 10/31

J BABY BAR, Halloween show feat. Pine League, Von the Baptist, Every Last One J THE BARTLETT, Horse Feathers (See story above), Hollow Wood BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Halloween bash feat. Bodhi Drip, Blackwater Prophet, the Mother, Buffalo Jones (See story on page 49) BIG SKY’S TAVERN (489-2073), Big Sky Halloween Party with DJ Aphrodisiac BIGFOOT PUB, Karma’s Circle THE BOAT LAUNCH RESTAURANT & LOUNGE (447-2035), Tracer BOLO’S, Johnny Qlueless BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Boomer’s Halloween Party feat. Dragonfly BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Likes Girls BROTHERS GOOD FOOD & SPIRITS (258-8875), DJ Dave

50 INLANDER OCTOBER 30, 2014

I

t’s the year 3040 A.D … on the album Event 2 by hip-hop supergroup Deltron 3030. The longawaited record, released last year, is a futuristic continuation of the group’s only other studio album, a self-titled disc released back in 2000 that was well-received by critics and indie hip-hop fans alike for its searing lyrics and outer space themes. The three-piece consists of producer Dan the Automator, rapper Del the Funky Homosapien and turntablist Kid Koala, all of whom have collaborated on various Gorillaz projects. Proving their star power, the Lonely Island, comedian David Cross, actor Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Rage Against the Machine’s Zack de la Rocha appeared on the act’s latest record. — LAURA JOHNSON

COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Bill Bozly, Strictly Business CURLEY’S, Bad Monkey FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Phoenix THE FLAME, DJ Big Mike J THE HIVE EVENT CENTER (208290-3048), Sir Mix-A-Lot (See story on page 47) J THE HOP!, Raven, Night Demon, Invasive, Morbid INC, Aardvark IRON HORSE BAR, JamShack JOHN’S ALLEY, Sol Seed J JONES RADIATOR, Halloween Party with the Go-Man-Gos J KNITTING FACTORY, Tech N9ne, Krizz Kaliko LAGUNA CAFÉ, Halloween Party feat Diane Copeland THE LARIAT (466-9918), Halloween Party feat. Six-Strings n’ Pearls LOON LAKE SALOON (233-2738), Untied MAX AT MIRABEAU, Mira-BOO Hal-

loween Party feat. Martini Brothers, Dean Jaxon THE MEMBERS LOUNGE (703-7115), DJ Selone and DJ Eaze NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Monster Mash with DJ Ramsin NYNE, Halloween Party feat. DJ C-Mad THE PALOMINO CLUB, Big Hair Revolution and Misfit Toys Halloween Party PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Fresh Off the Vine J THE PHAT HOUSE, Halloween Bash feat. B Radicals, Moksha, Flying Mammals, Good Ol’ Phat Jam ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Halloween Party feat. Luke Jaxon Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE, Fire and Ice J SWAXX (703-7474), Thriller Halloween Costume Party feat. DJ Freaky Fred, DJ X, DJ K-Phi

UNDERGROUND 15, Halloween party feat. Dueling DJs THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Halloween Party feat. Elephant Gun Riot, Drop Off, the Vine That Ate The South WAGON WHEEL (466-9991), Armed & Dangerous ZOLA, Jesse Weston Trio

Saturday, 11/01

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Crushed Out, BBBBandits BIGFOOT PUB, Karma’s Circle BOLO’S, Johnny Qlueless J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Rising Tide BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Likes Girls J CHAPS, Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston J CHECKERBOARD BAR, Odyssey,

Blackwater Prophet, Flannel Math Animal, Pyramids of Panic COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Bill Bozly, Strictly Business COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, Eric Neuhausser CURLEY’S, Bad Monkey FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Phoenix THE FLAME, DJ WesOne FREDNECK’S (291-3880), In Transit J THE HOP!, Outline in Color, What Wings Once Held (final performance), Elenora, Light Up the Sky, Deaf To, Lions Beside Us IRON GOAT BREWING CO. (4740722), Nic Vigil IRON HORSE BAR, JamShack JOHN’S ALLEY, Vial 8 JONES RADIATOR, Gil Rivas THE LARIAT, Halloween Party feat. Route 66 LINNIE’S THAI CUISINE (835-5800), DJ Dave


NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Halloween Party w/DJ Freaky Fred & DJ Patrick NYNE, Halloween Party feat. Divine Jewels THE PALOMINO CLUB, The Mountain’s Halloween Party feat. Jon Pardi J THE PHAT HOUSE, World Banditis REMINGTON’S RESTAURANT & LOUNGE (838-5211), Bobby Patterson solo ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Zombie Night feat. Luke Jaxon Band UNDERGROUND 15, Thunder & Lightning, Death by Pirates, Jimmy Nuge THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Foosball WILLOW SPRINGS (235-4420), SixStrings n’ Pearls ZOLA, Jesse Weston Trio

Sunday, 11/02

219 LOUNGE (208-263-9934), Truck Mills THE CELLAR, Pat Coast COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. THE FLAME, DJ Dave J THE HOP!, 36 Crazyfists, Skinlab, Incite, All Hail the Yeti, Benign J NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, The Charlie Daniels Band (See story on page 49) SOUTHSIDE SENIOR & COMMUNITY CENTER (535-0803), Variety Pak ZOLA, Son of Brad

Monday, 11/03

J THE BIG DIPPER, The Bob Curnow Big Band J CALYPSOS, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills THE FLAME, DJ Dave J THE HOP!, Cruel Hand, Cross Me, Vulgar Display, Losing Skin J THE PHAT HOUSE, Open Mic J RICO’S (332-6566), Open Mic ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 11/04

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, The Rub J THE BARTLETT, Open Mic CHECKERBOARD BAR, Shyan Selah, Reji LeFluer CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Kosh FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Open-ness THE PHAT HOUSE, Jazz Sessions THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Cameron Moore ZOLA, The Bucket List

Wednesday, 11/05 BIGFOOT PUB, DJ Dave

BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Likes Girls EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard GENO’S (368-9087), Open Mic with T&T J THE HOP!, Tonight Alive, Major League, PVRIS, Light Up The Sky IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Open mic JONES RADIATOR, Jazz night with Sally Bop Jazz LA ROSA CLUB, Robert Beadling and Friends THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Open Turntables Night with DJ Lydell LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Ron Criscione J THE PHAT HOUSE, Songwriter Forum RED ROOM LOUNGE, Bodhi Drip SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Tommy G ZOLA, The Bossame

Coming Up ...

THE BIG DIPPER, Alien Ant Farm, the Failsafe Project, Nov. 6 J KNITTING FACTORY, Deltron 3030 (See story on facing page), Kid Koala, Nov. 6 JOHN’S ALLEY, The Quick and Easy Boys, Nov. 6 THE BIG DIPPER, Project Local with the Nixon Rodeo, Odds Unfavored, Nov. 7 JOHN’S ALLEY, Dead Winter Carpenters, Nov. 7 THE BIG DIPPER, Aardvark with Stucco, Nov. 8 KNITTING FACTORY, Black Veil Brides, Falling in Reverse, the Black Mass 2014, Sit it Off, Drama Club, Nov. 8 THE BARTLETT, Marshall McLean Band, Nov. 8 INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, Tedeschi Trucks Band, Nov. 8 KNITTING FACTORY, Citizen Cope Greenwood Recordings 10th Anniversary Tour, Nov. 11 BABY BAR, The Everymen, Nov. 12 PANIDA THEATER, Greg Brown, Nov. 13 THE BARTLETT, Birds of Chicago, The Rustics, Nov. 13 KNITTING FACTORY, Yelawolf, Rittz, Big Henry, DJ Klever, Nov. 13 THE PALOMINO CLUB, The Cold Hard Cash Show, Nov. 13 IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Liz Rognes, Nov. 14 SPOKANE ARENA, Winter Jam 2014 feat. Hillsong United, Jeremy Camp, Francesca Battistelli and more, Nov. 14 SERVICE STATION, Ben ‘Preslee’ Klein & the Rockabillies with Just Plain Darin, Nov. 14 THE BARTLETT, The Round No. 2 feat Galen Disston from Pickwick, Duke Hogue and Hannah Reader, Nov. 14 THE BIG DIPPER, Tristan Doors, Nov. 15 THE BARTLETT, Shook Twins, Nov. 15 KNITTING FACTORY, Gwar, Corrosion of Conformity, American Sharks, Nov. 15

MUSIC | VENUES

ZOLA, Son of Brad, Every other Sun.. through Nov. 30. J THE HOP!, Fortunate Youth, Thrive, the Expanders, Evergreen, Nov. 16, 7:45 pm. THURSDAY OCTOBER 30TH J THE BARTLETT, David Bazan and Craft Cocktails, Passenger String & Quartet, David Great Beer, No TV! Dondero, Nov. 19, 8 pm. OCTOBER 31ST JFRIDAY MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE, Singer-songwriter Night with Scott Halloween Reid, Nov. 20. Party with J MONARCH MOUNTA IN COFFEE, the Go-Man-Gos Singer-songwriter Open Mic, Third Thurs. of every month, 6-9 pm. NOVEMBER 1ST JSATURDAY THE HOP!, Onslaught, Artillery, GilNov. Rivas - Live! Striker, 20, 7:30 pm. & Halloween J THE BARTLETT,recovery Twin Peaks,day Meatbodies, Criminal Hygiene, Nov. 20, SUNDAY NOVEMBER 2ND 8 pm. Time Prices all day & Happy J KNITTING FACTORY, Super Dianerd night w/ Nehemiah mond (Neil Diamond Tribute), Nov. MONDAY NOVEMBER 3RD 20, 8:30 pm. Trivia @ 7 TUESDAY NOVEMBER 4TH

Ani DiFranco album release listening party. WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 5TH

Whiskey Wednesday w/ Sally Bop Jazz @ 7:30pm

120 E. Sprague Ave.

6425 N. Lidgerwood

paliminoclubspokane.com

YOUR PHONE. SMARTER. The region’s best source for events, restaurants, music & movies.

Roadhouse_103014_2V_RW.jpg

Always in reach

315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 THE BLIND BUCK • 204 N. Division • 290-6229 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 456-5678 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 624-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NECTAR• 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO CLUB • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St • 443-5213 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 THE ROCK BAR • 13921 E. Trent Ave. • 43-3796 ROCKER ROOM • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 ROCKET MARKET • 726 E. 43rd Ave. • 343-2253 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 UNDERGROUND 15 • 15 S. Howard St. • 290-2122 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON • 1914 N. Monroe St. • 474-9040 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 51


LECTURE OUT OF THIS WORLD

Whether you’re certain about aliens’ existence, curious about possible life on Mars or completely skeptical about anything outside this rock we call the Earth, engineer Kobie Boykins presents captivating information about his work on NASA’s Mars Exploration Program. This presentation is the second in National Geographic’s four-part speaker series, covering topics from outer space to Antarctica, predatory animals and marine life. With the limited information we have beyond this planet, Boykins uses his resources to explore the unknown and share his findings with the public. — MOLLY SMITH National Geographic Live! Exploring Mars: The Next Generation • Tue, Nov. 4, at 7 pm • $41.50 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • inbpac.com • 2797000

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

52 INLANDER OCTOBER 30, 2014

ARTS CELEBRATING CREATIVITY

This year, with Halloween falling on a Friday night, having more than one costume in your arsenal is a smart plan. Perhaps one that’s a little creative and leaning toward formal, if you’re planning to attend the culminating event of October’s Create Spokane arts month activities — the Spokane Arts Award Costume Ball. Yet this event goes beyond just dressing up, as winners of the First Annual Spokane Arts Awards will be announced and celebrated that evening. Four category winners will be recognized from a pool of more than 40 nominees working to make the Inland Northwest a more vibrant and creative place. — CHEY SCOTT Spokane Arts Awards Costume Ball • Thu, Oct. 30, at 7:30 pm • $25/person • Davenport Hotel, Marie Antoinette Ballroom • 10 S. Post • createspokane.com

SPORTS GAME OF ROCKS & BROOMS

While watching the Winter Olympics, many of us find ourselves daydreaming about competing in one of the many sports. The one that probably seems most achievable is curling, because who can’t handle a broom? Lilac City Curling Club, established three years ago, teaches curling lessons with all equipment provided. If you find yourself particularly talented, or just really into this seasonal sport, the Curling Club’s fall league ($125/seven weeks) also accepts participants of all ability levels. — MOLLY SMITH Curling Clinic • Sun, Nov. 2, from 6-10 pm • $15/hour • Riverfront Park Ice Palace • 705 N. Howard • spokanecurling.com


CLASSICAL IMPORTED FROM BRAZIL

Pop-inflected Brazilian jazz: no one plays the genre better than Brazilian pianist/songwriter Sergio Mendes. Over the past six decades, Mendes has shared his Latin-inspired, funky songs with the world, making more than 40 records, including the recently released Magic. He’s most known for the highflying “Mas Que Nada” with Brasil ’66, but you’ll also be familiar with “Girl from Ipanema” and “Never Gonna Let You Go.” The jazz icon has significantly slowed his tour schedule over the years, but does perform at select engagements, like the Spokane Symphony’s SuperPops concert Saturday. As Mendes was originally trained in classical piano, it makes sense to combine his sultry tunes with the orchestra for an evening. — LAURA JOHNSON

Deals

Delivered Daily with

Checking

Spokane Symphony SuperPops 2 feat. Sergio Mendes • Sat, Nov. 1, at 8 pm • $28-$62 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

WORDS THE BEST OF POE

Edgar Allan Poe never sought to be literature’s favorite Halloween author, but 165 years after his mysterious death on a street in Baltimore, that’s how he’s best remembered by most. To celebrate the American author’s spooky prose, Lake City Playhouse is inviting some of the region’s best actors, including Troy Nickerson, Jadd Davis and Marianne McLaughlin, to their stage for readings of Poe’s work, accompanied by the original music of Zack Baker. Stephen Shortridge will be on hand to paint the dark imagery that’s made Poe a lasting literary great. — MIKE BOOKEY

Want to save on monthly expenses? Give Twist a try!

With discounts on shopping, dining, entertainment and travel, Twist offers deals from local and national merchants. Visit watrust.com/twist to learn more.

A Night of Poe: Dreams and Visions • Sat, Nov. 1, at 7:30 pm • $20 • Lake City Playhouse • 1320 E. Garden Ave., Coeur d’Alene • lakecityplayhouse. org

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

HOPE HOUSE CELEBRITY FASHION SHOW The 16th annual event features local public figures modeling formal wear, along with a luncheon, wine tasting and silent auction. Proceeds support Volunteers of America of E. Wash. and N. Idaho. $45/person. Oct. 31, 11 am-2 pm. Doubletree Hotel, 322 N. Spokane Falls Ct. voaspokane.org IMPACT NWC 2014 Former Seattle Seahawks quarterback Jon Kitna is the keynote speaker at the benefit event, giving a talk titled “Transforming Hearts One Student at a Time.” Proceeds benefit Northwest Christian Schools. Nov. 1, 7-10 pm. Free. Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. nwcs.org (238-4005) SOCIAL STAR MASQUERADE BALL An alcohol-free Halloween party with

a live band (8-9 pm) and DJs, raffle, prizes and more. Also includes a dinner and VIP passes. Nov. 1, 6 pm-midnight. $20+. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln. (842-0782) NATIVE PROJECT SILENT AUCTION & POKER TOURNAMENT Includes a Texas hold-’em teaching session at 4 pm, followed by a silent auction and tournament at 5 pm. $50/buy in; $10/ raffle; free admission to silent auction. Nov. 1, 4-10 pm. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. nativeproject. org (483-7535) INLAND NORTHWEST FUNDRAISING LUNCHEON Lutheran Community Services hosts its 31st annual community fundraising seminar, offering a wine and social hour followed by programming and a luncheon. Nov. 2. By donation. Mukogawa Institute, 4000 W. Randolph Rd. (343-5020)

OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 53


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess THE AGONY OF DELETE

I just had the humiliating experience of being dumped via email. I’d been seeing the guy for three months. Just days before, we had a romantic date, and he kept saying things like “We’re so good together” and was very lovey-dovey. In the email, he said he realized that we aren’t compatible, because I’m too driven and careerfocused and he needs a more traditional woman. Why did he never mention this before? How does a guy who was very affectionate for months suddenly take to the AMY ALKON computer to send you a quick note that it’s over? I’m so hurt and confused by how he handled this. —Devastated Unfortunately, personal disasters like getting dumped get none of the funding and attention of natural disasters. There’s no early warning system to make that annoying sound on your TV, and FEMA doesn’t show up the day after with pallets of Kleenex and vodka. Making matters worse, this guy didn’t just dump you; he robo-dumped you. It’s okay to take to the Internet to break up with your cable company or somebody you’ve gone out with a few times. But once you have a relationship with a person, you owe it to them to sit down with them and tell them it’s over; you don’t get to shove your dirty work off on their phone, their computer, or their vacuum cleaner. Being willing to put yourself in misery’s way and break up face to face preserves the other person’s dignity — their feeling that they have value. “Subj: we r thru,” on the other hand, suggests that they don’t matter; their feelings don’t matter; all that matters is discarding them in the most expedient way. The pre-Internet equivalent would be breaking up via postcard — maybe “Scenic Lake Minnetonka: Wish You Were Here!” but with the “Here!” crossed out and replaced with “Beer!” As for how a guy can be all snookieloviepoo one day and all “go away, career lady” the next, chances are, he fell in love — with the feeling of being in love. Early on, with all the sexytime hormones rushing, it’s easy to forget to step back and do the “Hey, wonder whether we’re compatible” check. Eventually, the hormone high wears off, and incompatibilities get highlighted instead of blurred. It’s normal to feel guilty for not noting them sooner. But it’s a stew of guilt and bad character that has a guy taking the e-weenie way out — telling you it’s over with a bonus link at the bottom informing you that there’s never been a better time to enlarge your penis. When life gives you a wedgie, you can mitigate the hurt by reframing it as a protective experience — one that keeps you from falling into a similar hole in the future. Maybe you can use this to be mindful of asking questions, early on, about the kind of lifestyle and temperament a guy’s most comfortable with, which could help you spot the red flags instead of using them as bedsheets. Weeding out the wrong guys fast will keep you on track to finding the right one — the man who wants a woman who’s breaking through the glass ceiling instead of just getting up on a stepstool and Windexing it.

LOUVRE, ACTUALLY

I’m really into this beautiful, funny girl I’ve been dating for three weeks. I think she likes me, but my gut says she’s pulling away a little. If this fizzles, I’ll be heartbroken. She’s leaving on a 10-day business trip to Europe in two days. Should I get her a gift or a card to let her know I’m really into her (and to not fall in love with any European dudes while she’s away)? —Worried What kind of gift were you thinking of giving her — the duct tape you’d use to strap her to a chair in your den? When somebody you’re interested in seems to be backing away, it’s natural to want to chase them. It’s also the most counterproductive thing you could do. (You look desperate, and they look for doorways to hide in.) Your best bet is to remain present but be minimal about it, like by texting her on the morning she leaves, “Hey, have a safe trip and a great time.” While she’s away, keep seriously busy, both to stay okay in the head and so, when you do see her, you won’t come off like you spent 10 days in your bunk bed drawing sparkly hearts in a notebook with her name on the cover. Upon her return, wait at least a few days, and then ask her out. Give her the space to miss you and she just might do that, and you just might find yourself showing her the American version of “if the gondola’s a-rockin’, don’t come a-knockin’.” n ©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

54 INLANDER OCTOBER 30, 2014

EVENTS | CALENDAR THERAPEUTIC RECREATION BENEFIT BREAKFAST An all-you-can-eat breakfast, to support the City of Spokane Parks & Recreation’s therapeutic recreation programs. $6/seniors and kids; $7/adults. Nov. 2, 9 am-noon. Knights of Columbus, 302 E. Boone Ave. (6256245) LOVE BOLDLY BENEFIT LUNCHEON Christ Kitchen’s 16th annual benefit luncheon features guest speaker Stephy Nobles-Barnes. Nov. 3, 11 am-2 pm. $35/ person. First Presbyterian Church, 318 S. Cedar. christkitchen.org (325-4343) HOPE, SUPPORT, CURE BENEFIT LUNCHEON Hosted by the Inland Northwest Diabetes Consortium, a luncheon fundraiser to support the American Diabetes Assoc., Juvenile Diabetes Research Fund and Camp Stix. Nov. 6, 12-1:30 pm. Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (624-7478) FACE ME Screening of a local film about Spokane’s homeless population, alongside an exhibit of original photography by Dan Baumer and Karmen Naccarato. Oroceeds support Brigid’s Cloak, a latenight homeless outreach program. Nov. 7, 5 pm. $5 or warm clothing item donation. Spokane INK Art Space, 224 W. Sprague Ave. inkspokane.org SHARING OUR WORLD Annual benefit event to support the work of the local nonprofit assisting Spokane’s refugee community. Details TBA. Nov. 7, 5-7:30 pm. Community Building, 35 W. Main. refugeeconnectionsspokane.org (232-1950)

COMEDY

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. bluznews.com (483-7300) AFTER DARK An adult-rated version of the Blue Door’s monthly, Friday night show. On the last Friday of the month at 10 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) NO CLUE Audience-participation, murder-mystery comedy improv show. Fridays at 8 pm through October. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) OPEN MIC COMEDY Live stand-up comedy, open to newcomers and experienced comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. (475-6209) SPOKANE LAUGH OFF All comedians involved in this competition were previous winners of the “Stand Up To Bigger Things” open mic comedy nights at The Bing. Event is concluded with a special Halloween-night showing of John Carpenter’s “Halloween.” Oct. 31, 7:30 pm. $20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7404) IMPROV COMEDY NIGHT An evening of live comedy by Lilac City Improv Troop, with one glass of wine included in ticket price. Nov. 1, 6:30-9 pm. $20. Nectar Tasting Room, 120 N. Stevens St. nectartastingroom.com (869-1572) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Not rated.) Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) TEEN IMPROV CLASSES Workshops for ages 11-18, held on the first Saturday of the month from 11:30 am-2 pm. Upcoming classes Nov. 8 and Dec. 6. $25/ workshop. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045)

LEWIS BLACK: THE RANT IS DUE TOUR Performance by the Grammy-winning standup comedian. Nov. 2, 7 pm. $39.50$65. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com LIVE COMEDY Live stand-up comedy shows. Sundays at 9 pm. Goodtymes, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070) ADULT IMPROV CLASSES Learn how to be funny on the fly in an adult improv class. Sessions on Tuesdays from 7-9 pm, Oct. 28-Dec. 16. $25/class or $150/ eight-week session. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) OPEN MIC COMEDY Wednesdays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Brooklyn Deli & Lounge, 122 S. Monroe. (835-4177)

COMMUNITY

COLVILLE CORN MAZE & PUMPKIN PATCH Explore 12 acres of corn maze and pumpkin patches, offering u-pick or pre-picked. Open daily through Oct. 31 (hours vary). $5/kids (5-12), $7/ adults, free/under 5. At 73 Oakshott Rd. colvillecornmaze.com (509-684-6751) FIFTH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT DEBATE Candidates Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers and Joe Pakootas focus on national issues that have a direct effect on our local community in a debate organized by the region’s chambers of commerce. Oct. 30. $10. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln. (327-8000) KING FAMILY HAUNTED HOUSE The annual, locally-created haunted house runs through Oct. 30, from 7-9 pm each night. Rated PG-13. Donations welcome. Residence at 15604 N. Freya St, Mead, Wash. facebook.com/thekingfamilyhauntedhouse MOSCOW MARDI GRAS’ HALLOWEEN CELEBRATION Thursday (Oct. 30) features a family event with pumpkin carving, mask making and a dinner buffet ($5-$25). Then on Oct. 31, the organization hosts a 21+ masquerade ball ($8$10). Proceeds from both events benefit the MMG Youth Grant Programs. Moscow Moose Lodge, 210 N. Main. moscowmardigras.com (208-596-3145) SCARYWOOD 2014 Silverwood Theme Park’s annual haunted nights run through Nov. 1. Thur from 6:30-11:30 pm; Oct. 31 and Nov. 1 from 7 pmmidnight. $21-$40. Silverwood Theme Park, 27843 U.S. 95, Athol. scarywoodhaunt.com (208-683-3400) A T. REX NAMED SUE Mobius hosts the Chicago Field Museum’s exhibit centered on the most complete Tyrannosaurus rex fossil ever discovered. Exhibit runs through Jan. 4, 2015. Open Tues-Sun; hours vary. $7-$10. Mobius Science Center, 811 W. Main. mobiusspokane.org (509-321-7133) CREEPY HALLOW The 12th annual Halloween event on the grounds of the Northwest Renaissance Festival. Oct. 31, from 7 pm-midnight. $5/person. Northwest Renaissance Festival, 6493 Hwy 291. creepyhallownw.net (362-2964) FALL OPEN HOUSE An evening of fun with bounce houses, gym games, free open swimming and climbing. All ages; open to the public. Oct. 31, 5-8 pm. Free. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org (208-667-1865) HALLOWEENIE ROAST Community event offering hot dogs on a stick with condiments, by an outdoor fire, to send kids off into the neighborhood for a night of trick-or-treating. Oct. 31, 5-8 pm. Free. Origin Church, 5115 S. Freya St. originspokane.org (448-1311)

HARVEST HEALTH FEST A collaborative community Halloween celebration offering cultural presentations, food, free health screenings, vendor booths, prizes, kids activities and a “trunk-ortreat” event for kids. Oct. 31, 3-6 pm. Free. Emmanuel Family Life Center, 631 S. Richard Allen Ct. facebook.com/emmanuelcenter (535-6913) THE HOLLOW HAUNTED HOUSE A locally-created haunted house, open to the public for its second year. Admission is a donation to Second Harvest Food Bank. Residence at 1927 W. Carlisle Ave, Spokane. Oct. 31, 7-11 pm. facebook.com/TheHollowHauntedHouse MOBIUS BROOMSTICK BASH An evening of spooky games, crafts, a costume contest and more at the children’s museum. (ages 10 and under) Also that evening is trick-or-treating in River Park Square, from 6-8 pm. Oct. 31, 5:30-7 pm. $1/person. Mobius Kids Children’s Museum, 808 W. Main. mobiusspokane.org SPOOK-TACULER PRESCHOOL EVENT Young children are invited to explore the not-so-scary “Ghoul-Pool” and participate in a scavenger hunt, face painting, and Halloween games. $1, or free with a canned food dontation. Oct. 31, 2:30-3:30 pm. Valley Mission Pool, 11123 E. Mission Ave. (720-5408) KROC FALL 5K The Kroc hosts its first ever race along the Centennial Trail. Costumes are encouraged, and price includes a commemorative mug. All proceeds support The Kroc’s Press On program. Nov. 1, 2 pm. $7-$18. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd., CdA. kroccda.org (208-667-1865) SELF DEFENSE CLASS A course led by East West Martial Arts focusing on physical defensive tactics to deal with a physical assault. No previous experience in martial arts is required. Open to women only, please. Accepting donated children’s coats, canned food and cash as payment. Nov. 1, 10 am-noon. Sinto Activity Center, 1124 W. Sinto Ave. sintocenter.com (327-2861) A SPOOKY NIGHT IN SPOKANE Spooky Spokane is teaming up with the Spokane Police Chaplaincy to present an evening of food, drinks and a walking ghost tour of downtown Spokane. Proceeds benefit the Spokane Police Chaplaincy. Ages 21+. Nov. 1, 6:30-9:30 pm. $55/person. Steam Plant Brewing Co., 159 S. Lincoln. tinyurl.com/lrlje5f (625-4091 or 385-9169) COMMUNITY DANCING Local dance band Variety Pak plays for once monthly Friday and Sunday dances. Sunday “Tea Dances” (Nov. 2 and Dec. 21) are from 5:30-8:30 pm and Friday night “Formals” (Nov. 21 and Dec. 21) are from 7-10:00 pm. $6-$10. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac.org (535-0803) NATIONAL COLLEGE FAIR Prospective students can meet with representatives from more than 100 colleges across the U.S. Nov. 5, from 9 am-noon and 6-8 pm. Nov. 5. Free. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. nationalcollegefairs.org (279-7000)

FESTIVAL

BARN PARTY & FALL FESTIVAL Event offers games, activities, crafts and food. Free admission, food and game tickets for purchase. Nov. 1, 6:30-9 pm. Spokane Valley Adventist School, 1603 S. Sullivan Rd. (926-0955) FALL FOLK FESTIVAL The 19th annual folk cultural festival features eight


stages of traditional and ethnic dance, music, workshops, entertainment, vendors, food and more. More than 100 groups perform over the weekend, which culminates with a New England Contra Dance. Nov. 8 from 11 am-10 pm, Nov. 9 from 11 am-5 pm. Volunteers are also needed to help with the event; sign up online at spokanefolklore.volunteerhub.com. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. spokanefolkfestival. org (828-3683)

FILM

NIC FILM CLUB: THE SHINING Screening co-hosted by North Idaho College and the library. Halloween costumes encouraged. Oct. 30, 7:30 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org (208-2924637) RIFFTRAX LIVE: ANACONDA Michael J. Nelson, Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbett, of “Mystery Science Theater 3000” take on the giant boa in a live screening event. At Regal Cinemas Northtown and Riverstone 14. Oct. 30, 8 pm. $12.50. fathomevents. com ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW A special screening at midnight Halloween night, Oct. 31. Doors open at 11 pm with a beer and wine bar and a costume contest 11:30. $10. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. (208-290-0597) THE LAND OF OPPORTUNITY The documentary follows the reconstruction of New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Sponsored by the Kootenai Environmental Alliance, City of CdA, and NIC. Oct. 30, 6-9 pm. Free. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. (208-667-9093) HOCUS POCUS Special Halloween night screening of the retro classic. Oct. 31, 7 pm. $3. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) SANDPOINT FILM FESTIVAL The short film festival features screenings of locally-made films and offers prizes to top submissions in animation, documentary and narrative. Screening blocks from noon-2 pm; 3-5 pm and 6-9 pm. Nov. 1, 12-9 pm. $7/each or 3 films/$20. Panida Theater, 300 N. First. sandpointfilmfestival.com WARREN MILLER’S NO TURNING BACK The 65th ski enthusiast film by Warren Miller, paying homage to mountain culture and adventure filmmaking. Screenings at 6 pm and 9 pm; group rates available. Nov. 1. $20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7404) TELLURIDE MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL 2014 The Selway-Bitterroot Frank Church Foundation hosts some of the best films from the weeklong festival in Telluride as a benefit for trail maintenance and wilderness stewardship. Nov. 3, 7 pm. $10-$12. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127)

FOOD & DRINK

RED WINE & CHOCOLATE A Halloween special class focusing on treats for adults; featuring bold red wines paired with fine chocolates. Oct. 31, 7 pm. $26, registration required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) HARVEST DINNER The church hosts its 74th Annual Harvest Dinner, offering turkey, ham, Swedish meatballs,

potatoes, squash, beets and more, with dessert and beverages. Also includes a silent auction for gift baskets, available during the dinner. Nov. 1, 5-7 pm. Free; donations accepted. Veradale United Church of Christ, 611 N. Progress Rd. (926-7173) HEALTHY HOLIDAY EATING STRATEGIES A presentation by University of Idaho CDA dietetics students on how to eat healthy during the holiday season. Workshop includes food demos. RSVP to asowers@uidaho.edu. Nov. 5, 12-1 pm. Free. University of Idaho CdA, 1031 N. Academic Way. (208-667-2588) JACC COOKING CLASS SERIES Fall cooking classes taught by local top-rated chefs. Each class focuses on a different culinary style or culture. Upcoming classes Nov. 5, 12 and 19; all start at 5:30 pm. $50/person. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William, Post Falls. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) HOMEMADE HOLIDAY PIES Pastry Chef Katie teaches how to make a double-crusted fruit, pumpkin, pecan and chocolate cream pies. Nov. 6, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) DECADENCE CHOCOLATE FESTIVAL Samples from chocolatiers, confectioners and chefs, both sweet and savory. Ticket holders can also add a wine and chocolate pairing class with Patit Creek Cellars at 6 pm, or a port and chocolate pairing class, with John Allen of Vino! featuring ports by Knipprath Cellars. Nov. 7, 12-9 pm. $10-$45. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. decadencefestival.com (326-8000) MIXOLOGY BOOK RELEASE & COCKTAIL PARTY Release event for “Mixology: the Art of Classic Cocktails,” a project by local artist Sheila Evans, celebrating mixing drinks and art. Also includes a showcases of 18 paintings representing a vintage cocktail featured in the book. Nov. 7, 5-10 pm. Free. Mizuna, 214 N. Howard. mixologyart. blogspot.com

MUSIC

STAR SEARCHIN’ FINALS Perfechter Productions and The 5ifth Element Talent Productions host the second annual live talent show, featuring local vocalist, models and a comedian. Also includes a performance by last year’s winner, 16-year-old Mersaides Ellis. Oct. 30, 7 pm. $15/$20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com (216-1535) GERMAN-AMERICAN PIONEER DAY The German-American Society of Spokane celebrates the of Germanspeaking immigrants who settled in the Pacific Northwest with a concert by the Concordia Choir and the Spokane Horn Club. Nov. 1, 6 pm. $15. Deutsches Haus, 25 W. Third. (747-4626) NORTHWEST OPERA’S BARN AID2014 Directed by Tim Campbell and written by Fern McMillan, the familyfriendly show features area artists singing selections from a wide range of musical genres. Nov. 1 and Nov. 8 at 7:30 pm, Nov. 2 at 2 pm. $10. Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 2715 S. Ray St. (327-3598) SPOKANE SYMPHONY SuperPops Series No. 2 with guest Sergio Mendes features an evening of jazz, samba, American and Brazilian pop by the Grammy-winning, Oscar-nominated pianist-composer. Nov. 1, 8 pm. $28-$62.

Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony. org (624-1200) AFRICAN CHILDREN’S CHOIR The program features well-loved children’s songs, traditional spirituals and Gospel favorites. Concerts are free and open to all. Concerts held Nov. 2 at 9 am, 11:15 am and 5 pm at Life Center Church; also on Nov. 5 at St. Aloysius Catholic Church and Nov. 12 at New Life Church. africanchildrenschoir.com (290-1036) OVER THE RHINE The Ohio-based folk music band performs. Earlier in the day, the duo presents on their approach to music and writing. Nov. 5, 7 pm. Free. Whitworth HUB, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-3253)

1001 West Sprague Ave. • 509-624-1200

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SPORTS & OUTDOORS

SAT. NOV. 1 - 8pm

PREPARING FOR THE UNEXPECTED sponsored by Program offering information to better prepare you for your adventures, from a day in the state park to an extended backpacking adventure deep into the wilderness. Oct. 30, 7-8:30 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. (328-9900) SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. RED DEER Band, Bar & Banter: 5-6:45pm Hockey match. Nov. 1, 7 pm. $10-$23. Symphony Performance 7-8pm Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanearena.com .................................... WINTERSWAP 2014 Lookout Pass and Live Local Music in the Lobby with Silver Mountain volunteer ski patrols host the 16 annual ski swap, offering Doghouse Boyz before the Symphony performance new and used ski/snowboard equipment, gear, accessories and cloth............................. ing. Nov. 1, 9 am-3 pm. $5 admission. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 Beethoven Symphony No. 10 with a splash N. Government Way. winterswap.org (208-765-4969) CURLING CLINIC Attend an hour or more of curling lessons, with all equipment provided. (Has been rescheduled from Oct. 26.) Nov. 2, 6-10 pm. $15/hour. Riverfront Park, Ice Palace. spokanecurling.com “New World Symphony” AVALANCHE AWARENESS Learn to access local avalanche bulletins and weather reports, recognize basic signs of avalanche danger, and learn simple Cellist Edward Arron ways to help avoid avalanche danger. Nov. 4, 7-8:30 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. plays Haydn’s Cello Concerto Monroe St. rei.com/spokane (3289900) OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT SALE & SKI SWAP The 40th annual event is at the Student Recreation Center’s MAC court. Anyone can register to sell their own equipment for a $5 donation to the UI Vandal Ski Team. Nov. 6, 6-8 pm. Free admission, $5/sell. University of Idaho, Moscow. (208-885-6810) SNOWSHOEING BASICS Learn how to appropriately select gear, what you need and where to go to snowshoe. WITH LIVE MUSIC BY Nov. 6, 7-8:30 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. THE SPOKANE SYMPHONY! Monroe St. rei.com/spokane (509-3289900)

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THEATER

DR. JEKYLL & MR. HYDE Drama based on the novella by Robert Louis Stevenson. In the Firth J. Chew Studio Theatre. Through Nov. 16; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $22. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. (325-2507) MARY SHELLEY’S FRANKENSTEIN An American Laboratory Theatre Production presented by Sandpoint Onstage. Oct. 30-31. $10-$12. Eureka Center, 513 Oak St. sandpointonstage.com (208265-4000)

Coming December 4 - 7 Get Great Seats Now! Tickets start at $12.50 for children

................. SPOKANESYMPHONY.ORG MARTINWOLDSONTHEATER.COM ................. OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 55


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GREEN ZONE | TIPS

Up in Smoke Advice on the best smoking device for newbies BY JORDY BYRD

S

o you bought an ounce of weed and don’t know what to do with it? If your fingers aren’t nimble enough to roll a joint and a gravity bong scares the bejesus out of you, fear not. The smoking paraphernalia industry revolutionized long before states like Washington and Colorado legalized marijuana. “Smoking technology has changed,” says Justin Wilson, owner of the Spokane recreational dispensary Satori. “And there are definitely a lot of people coming back to the market and first-time smokers.” Wilson and his staff encourage newbies to smoke with water filtration devices such as water pipes — aka bongs — or vaporizers. “Water helps filter carcinogens in the smoke,” he says. “Vaporizers are the healthiest way to do it because they heat up to a level that reacts with the THC, the active ingredient in weed, but doesn’t burn the plant matter.” Vaporizers turn the active ingredients into a light, inhalable mist which is consumed through

a hose or an inflated bag. The devices either plug into an electrical outlet or are charged with batteries. They can be quite large — tabletop size — or small and portable. Smokers claim the effect is more of a body high than a head high. If you aren’t ready to make the financial leap into a vaporizer — anywhere from $150 to $500 — and you want an immediate head high, Wilson says a water pipe is the way to go. He recommends pipes from a Spokane collective of glass artists called Funky Buddha Glass (funkybuddhaglass.com). Despite a cultural stigma around ostentatious 2-foot-long bongs, Wilson says small, discreet water pipes in the $50 price range are becoming more popular. “There is kind of a new trend in water pipes; they are going back to small,” he says, claiming the pipe he uses at home is around 6 inches tall. “It’s kinda like what Apple did for a while. Pipes are smaller and smaller, but getting better and better.” n

EVENTS | CALENDAR MONSTERS ANONYMOUS The Empire Theater Company presents the premiere of a story about Dracula, Frankenstein, Wolf-man, and friends as they share their troubles one fateful Halloween night. Also includes a costume contest. Oct. 29-30 at 6:30 pm. $25. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln. etcspokane.com (327-8000) MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING Performance of the beloved Shakespeare comedy. Oct. 30 and Nov. 1 at 7:30 pm, Nov. 2 at 2 pm. $15. Gonzaga University Magnuson Theatre, 502 E. Boone Ave. gonzaga.edu/theatreanddance (313-6553) THE SHAPE OF THINGS Performance of the play by Neil LaBute. Limited seating; mature themes and language. Oct. 30-Nov. 1, at 7:30 pm North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. (208769-3300) THIS OLD HAUNTED HOUSE A spooky drama about the renovation of a belived haunted house. Through Nov. 2; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun at 3 pm (no show Fri, Oct. 31). $12. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway. libertylaketheatre.com (342-2055) THE CLINK Following its highly successful run of staged readings last spring, this locally-written play has its first full productions in CdA and Spokane in preparation for its move to the San Francisco Bay Area in the spring of 2015. Through Nov. 2; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third. spokanestageleft. org (208-667-3933) A NIGHT OF POE The theater’s annual fall event celebrating the work of Edgar Allen Poe, featuring original music by Zack Baker and live art-in-progress sketch by local artist Stephen Shortridge. Nov. 1, 7:30 pm. $20. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden. CdA. lakecityplayhouse.org THE WOMEN A special one-night performance of the comedy/drama by Clare Booth Luce. Nov. 1, 7:30 pm. $20. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507)

VISUAL ARTS

SPOKANE ARTS AWARDS COSTUME BALL The grand finale of Create Spokane is the formal, festive costume ball and presentation of the first annual Spokane Arts Awards Oct. 30, 7:30 pm. $25. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post. createspokane.com NOT JUST FOR READING: BOOK ART Learn how to make origami star books and hanging accordion books; with all supplies provided. Registration required; space limited. Nov. 4, 6:307:30 pm. Free. Cheney Library, 610 First St. (893-8280) MIDWEEK MONET PAINT PARTIES Local artist Chelsea Cordova provides a step-by-step introduction to acrylic painting, with themes ranging from landscapes to still life to abstracts. Glass of wine included in admission; all supplies provided. Nov. 5, 12 and 19. All classes at 5:30 pm. $40/class. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William, Post Falls. (208-457-8950)

DRIVE HIGH GET A DUI

WORDS

AUNTIE’S HORROR STORIES 2014 Local historian Chet Caskey (author

GreenLight_103014_4S_KG.tif

of “Haunted Spokane”) and writer Kelly Milner Halls (“Ghostly Evidence: Exploring the Paranormal”) read from their creepiest works and discuss Spokane’s “haunted” history. Ages 13+. Oct. 31, 6:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) DR. CAROL CASSELLA Cassella reads from her latest book “Gemini,” copies are also available for sale and signing. Refreshments provided, also includes a no-host bar. Nov. 1, 7 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. bookpeopleofmoscow.com (208882-2669) NATIONAL NOVEL WRITING MONTH KICKOFF Take advantage of November’s extra hour and join the library for a 1 day, 25-hour kickoff write-in. Drop in or write the entire 25 hours. Get started on your novel, meet other writers and find inspiration. Nov. 1 at 6 pm to Nov. 2 at 6 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8350) RAILTOWN ALMANAC: LAUNCH! Includes readings from the new collection of local poetry, edited by Thom Caraway and Jeffrey Dodd. Featured readers include Tod Marshall, Ellen Welcker, Kristine Iredale, Brian Cooney, Aimee Cervenka, John Whalen, Adam McDaniel and Emily Benson Gwinn. Nov. 1, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. tinyurl. com/n4ub5ls BOOTSLAM Spokane Poetry Slam’s monthly, all-ages performance poetry competition, offering a $50 grand prize. Held on the first Sunday; sign-up at 7 pm, slam at 7:30 pm. November’s guest poet is Roma Raye, who has represented Seattle at national events. $5. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main. spokanepoetryslam.org CONVERSATIONS ON THE MIDDLE EAST Dr. Raja Tanas, a native of Lebanon and Professor and Chair of the Sociology Department at Whitworth, leads a series of presentations on critical issues facing the Middle East historically and currently. Sundays, Nov. 2 and 16, from 9-10 am; also Nov. 9 and 16, from 10:30-11:30 am. Free. Bethany Presbyterian Church, 2607 S. Ray St. (534-0066) BATS: WONDERS OF THE NIGHT Biologist Jenny Taylor presents a program on bats, including why they are important to humans, common myths about bats and species native to North Idaho. Nov. 3, 7 pm. Free. CdA Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. (208-769-2315) NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LIVE: EXPLORING MARS Kobie Boykins, a mechanical engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, shares his role in the Mars rovers’ success. Nov. 4, 7-9 pm. $41.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. ticketswest.com ROMAN EMPIRE ARCHAEOLOGY LECTURE Beth M. Greene, asst. prof. of Roman Archaeology at the University of Western Ontario presents “Women, Children and Families in the Military Communities of the Western Roman Empire.” The talk addresses the social role of women and family in Roman military communities, primarily in the western provinces. Nov. 5, 6:30 pm. Free. The MAC, 2316 W. First. archaeological.org/societies/spokane n

MORE EVENTS

Visit Inlander.com for complete listings of local events.

OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 57


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Equal Housing Opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Law which makes it illegal to advertise any preference to, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for our real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain on discrimination call HUD free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

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OCTOBER 30, 2014 INLANDER 59


IT’S FREE

1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

You saw her. She saw you.

And you totally chickened out. There’s still a chance. Place an ad in the I Saw You section, for FREE. I Saw You • You Saw Me • Cheers & Jeers • ISawYou@Inlander.com

GIVE BLOOD SAVE LIVES

I Saw You

Cheers

Jeers

Jeers

Bus Stop I was waiting at bus stop and you got there just as I had been waiting. I said hello and you were looking anxiously awaiting the same. This was over on Sprague and Farr Road bus stop. You with your black hair and moody expression that I found completely enchanting. Would love to crinkle your Kris this Christmas.

listening to the people of Spokane and their safety. Couple of years ago the City of Spokane, turned Sprague into a one lane street going east and west from downtown to Altamont. The intersection of Altamont and Sprague created a bottleneck, due to the fact, the people in the left hand lane of Sprague going west, were to turn left on Altamont, however, either due to poor signage, instructions, or people can not read in Spokane, people in the left hand lane would merge with the people in the right hand land and those people would get pushed off the road. After many complaints, calls to the mayor and threats if I got killed, the City of Spokane finally did the right thing and re worked the intersection. I drove it for the first time yesterday and what a improvement. Thank

your misery as you have taken in my child’s misery and the misery of a special needs child.

homeless once, and never did I beg for money. I made finding a job my job- I spent 8 hours a day pounding the pavement, and within two weeks I was employed full time. I now own my own home and am thriving!

Capone’s At Capone’s in Coeur d’Alene during the first game of the World Series. I was at the bar. You were the slim blonde in a pink sweater with another couple. We locked eyes a few times. I’d like to get together for an intelligent conversation over a pitcher of dark beer. Pawn One On Monroe You: Gorgeous male with blond hair, tattoos and a stache. Me: Tall, brunette wearing a black skirt with my friend who was pawning her TV and you were assisting us. (around the 18th). I would like to take you out for a drink and get to know you. I do believe your name tag said “Jason” If you remember me as well as I remember you and interested in getting a free drink, let me know.

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Brock November 11th, it will be the 3rd Anniversary since you went to heaven. You were a fine young man, with a beautiful smile, sparkling blue eyes, contagious laugh and huge heart. God works in mysterious ways, and if it took your addiction to draw you closer to him, so be it. You were always there to help the less fortunate, and you gave your life to Christ. It is an honor to be your mother, and I will always be your mother. God had a plan and he took you home. No more addition, no more suffering, no more oppression. You will never be forgotten Brock, you will forever be in our hearts Buddy. God Speed Son. Love mom and your Daughter Bowie Aunty Fay-Fay We wanted to say thank you for a creepy, silly, exciting halloween party. You put so much of yourself into making it really fun! And all the fun games and treats and food etc., that you had put together was so sweet... we love you! Happy Halloween! Love your sister, brother, angy,and JJ. Hello Batman Missing you. I love you more than breathing. Come over to the batcave in your cape this Halloween and we will celebrate a holiday especially for bats. Always on my mind. Love you. Batgirl City of Spokane Street Dept. Thank you, Thank you, Thank you, for

60 INLANDER OCTOBER 30, 2014

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” you once again for listening to the squeaky wheel. My Downtown Angel Nora, you are such a wonderful, kind person. You found my drivers license downtown on the street. I cannot tell you how much I appreciate your kindness and honesty for sending it back to me. It’s people like you who restore my faith in humanity. Thank you again!! Amy S.

Jeers Thanks! To the little punks that, for the 2nd year in a row have made my child cry. Thanks for destroying property that is not yours and having no respect for anyone else. I understand that you have nothing better to do. Not only did you destroy my child’s pumpkin that she was so proud of, you decided to steal a pumpkin from a special needs child in the neighborhood, classy! I’m sure your parents are very, very proud of your accomplishments, or maybe they don’t care about you and that will be your excuse for committing crimes later in life. In any event, I pray for you. I pray that you stop destroying and stealing before I catch you! The truth is, you never know who you are stealing from and you never know who’s property you are destroying, one day, you are going to destroy the property or steal from the wrong person and then it won’t be so funny. When you play a practical joke or mess with the wrong person, I pray I am there to take as much pleasure in

Low Self Esteem As it begins to actually take real shape the horror of it all starts to take hold as to the impact it will have for years on Spokane’s skyline! If you have been worried whether Joseph Stalin’s Soviet era architects all died in some concentration camp you can rest easy! They are alive and well in Spokane designing hotels in downtown. This creative blight that must represent the creativity skills of the people of Spokane or what they are willing to put up with is depressing! The size of the bad taste really brings it home. This has always been a city of “If you don’t like it you can leave” NOT “let’s try to make it better”. WELL that’s painfully come home to roost downtown! What’s Being Catholic Got To Do, Got To Do With It? 10/22/14 To the woman who thought it appropriate to follow my son into his school and engage him about my intolerance of her poor driving skills: Firstly, you cut me off. Your lane ended, as you well know - I am certain it wasn’t your first time on 29th Avenue. You sped up to get ahead of me, whereas I stayed steady in my lane. Secondly, it is not acceptable to talk to my 11 year old son if you have an issue with me. I am the one to speak to. Thirdly, being a ‘Catholic Mom’ has absolutely nothing to do with your inability to observe the rules of driving. Please acquire a driving manual and re-read it. Sincerely, the Mother of the child you endangered by not leaving your house in a timely manner.

Political Endorsements Jeers to the Inlander for no longer endorsing candidates for political office. Your endorsements were well thought out and informative (not always on the mark however). Maybe you can hire someone from the SpokesmenReview who lost or is about to lose their job to fill those shoes. Not providing for reader interests is a sure way to shrink circulation, certainly the Spokesman-Review is well aware of the consequences of failing the subscribers. Set A Good Example! What is with some of you parents at CVHS? Every time I drop my grandson off in the designated drop off area (in the parking lot), I watch a half dozen of you go around the “No Student Drop Off/Pickup Beyond This Point” sign. It’s not like you don’t see it...you purposely drive around it!! Are you special? Are your little bundles of joy so lame they can’t possibly walk another twenty feet? Are you teaching them that signs don’t mean anything or they don’t pertain to you? Stop being self-centered and do the right thing...for yourselves as well as for your kids. Disrespectful On Friday October 24, 2014 around 8 pm I watched a gentleman walk into a north Spokane business with his service dog. Mind you this business does not Have a “No Pets” sign anywhere on its store front. The gentleman and his dog grabbed what they were shopping for walked past multiple customers who wanted to pet this non aggressive dog and went to the counter; As the man

Feeding The Problem To all you so-called do-gooders who think they are actually being helpful by giving away your hard-earned cash to the panhandlers wielding their pathetic cardboard signs: Think about the old adage, “Give a man a fish, feed him for a day. Teach a man to fish, feed him for a lifetime.” The money they are being handed is merely a Katherine B. is this week’s winner of te m p o r a r y fix, whether the “Say it Sweet” promotion! it be for Send in your CHEERS so you too can be beer, drugs, food, etc. The entered to win 1 dozen “Cheers” more people give cupcakes at Celebrations them handouts, the less motivated they will Sweet Boutique. become to actually go Valid for 30 days. out and get a job. Stop Call to Redeem 509-327-3471 or giving them money, and 509-315-5973 they will be hopefully forced to bust their butts to get a job and stop sponging off us those that work hard. I was

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“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


624 W 28TH AVE “You gave me butterflies. You are such a charming 1930’s South Hill Tudor. The

thing I liked the most about your 11/2 story home was the in-law/nanny setup in basement with separate entrance. 5 bdrms 2 baths, large master w/sitting room, walk-in closets, wood floors, ceramic tile. New carpet, granite counter tops, charming wood burning fireplace. I dream of opening the French doors that lead to the deck where we will be entertaining friends, the private backyard & hot tub for those quiet nights. Meet me by the community pool and we will connect.”

www.624west28thavenue.com Cheers

Jeers

Jeers

was paying the man at the counter without skipping a beat said you can’t bring your dog in here! The man let the clerk know he is a Disabled American Veteran and this is is service dog, The clerk stated “I don’t care”. Another gentleman approached the owner and handed him a piece of paper with the multiple RCW’s and WAC laws that the owner was violating and the clerk crumpled up the paper and threw it away! How disrespectful!! This man served his country and was treated like he was a chunk of trash! I will not give them any of my business and hope others will not!

and the disabled the seats. You people are selfish. Thank you the kind lady with the cane, the world needs more people like you. And for all of those that didn’t offer me a seat or took one before I could get to it, shame on you!

He never could get enough noun action.) Yes,...uhm,.... I am sorry sonny, but I’m just not into that stuff anymore since I found wi-fi and tofu. I do appreciate the thought though, dear. Happy Halloween and drop by anytime. Love, Missus Witt.

RE: RE: Try Something else Idaho! To the hater spouting “D” misinformation, Anti-Obama slime and “thank God for Fox News”. You are very, very ignorant.

Left Standing Tonight my husband and I went out to dinner. The restaurant was very busy and had a long waiting time. I am 39 weeks pregnant and it definitely shows! Tonight the only person who offered her seat was a sweet little old lady who was using a cane. Not one other person waiting for a table offered me a place to sit down. Not the young girls, not the mother with 3 children who didn’t need to be sitting, not the young couple who took a seat before I could get to it. Shame on people for not being courteous anymore. Offer the pregnant woman, the elderly,

Valleyboy To Friends I want to thank the few friends that tried to help eastside 151 girl get clean and make her life better. We tried with love and caring and being there for her, but she chose the meth path and there is no longer anything for us to do but walk away. Thank you my friends and you know who you are. Pat yourself on the back! Rick in valley RE: Learn To Capitalize I was reading the Inlander the other day in Hades. That’s right, we get the Inlander in the abode of the dead. Anyways, I noticed one of my old students raising a big fat ta-do about nouns and capitalizations. (I bet it’s that little Stinky Jones.

A huge jeers to pet owners who let their dogs run around in the street! I almost ran over two little dogs running around free on a very busy road. We pulled over and tried to catch them, hurting my foot in the process (which was my own stupid fault but annoying nonetheless) They were almost hit by several more cars! When I had finally nabbed one of them, I noticed that the other one had made his way back across the street - to his house, and owner - calmly smoking a cigarette and watching us from the front porch as we tried desperately to save their dogs lives. Unbelievable! Keep your dogs out of the street - and if someone pulls over to try and rescue your dogs from getting run over, the least you could do is be grateful and help out, instead of watching from afar as strangers do it for you.

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Writing Her Place Maya Angelou, gender disparity and how one Inland Northwest woman is making Wikipedia a better place BY LISA WAANANEN JONES

C

hristine Meyer was on her way home from an anniversary trip with her husband this past May when she saw the news on her phone: Maya Angelou had died. She cried. And when she got home, she went to work. She wrote the Wikipedia articles about Angelou and her work, and she would be the one to add dates, update facts... “Change it all to the past tense,” she says. “That was hard.” It had started years earlier when Meyer, a sign language interpreter at Washington State University, started making small edits on Wikipedia on topics that piqued her interest. She wrote entries for the Wiggles, Blue’s Clues and Sesame Street. At some point she came across Angelou’s Wikipedia page and found it in surprisingly poor condition. “Then I went to the I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings article, and it was even worse,” Meyer recalls. “And I remember thinking, ‘This is kind of shocking to me that such an important writer would have these articles in this shape.’”

T

he thing everybody knows about Wikipedia is that anyone can edit it. But few actually do. Of the millions of people who view Wikipedia, only about 130,000 have made an edit in the past month. The typical “Wikipedian” is an English-speaking twentysomething man with a college degree but no children. And despite years of community discussion about how to fix the “gender gap,” only one out of 10 editors is female. Unlike the sexist threats and blatant hostility that plague other online spaces, Wikipedia’s gender controversies tend to involve more subtle judgments of prominence, worth and identity. In one 2013 case that became known as “category-gate,” the category list of “American Novelists” was deemed too long and hundreds of names on the list — including Louisa May Alcott, Harper Lee and Amy Tan — were moved to “American Women Novelists.” Tied into Who wrote the online history of Maya Angelou? WSU’s Christine Meyer (above) this is another

62 INLANDER OCTOBER 30, 2014

well-known problem, as Meyer found with Angelou: that women writers, artists and scientists often have shorter and sloppier Wikipedia articles than men with similar accomplishments. Sue Gardner — who stepped down as the Wikimedia Foundation executive editor in June after six years Christine Meyer as a strong advocate for “gender gap” issues — did a Reddit “Ask Me Anything” forum late last year about why these are difficult problems to solve. “It’s really, really hard to talk about ‘women’ or ‘women’s interests’ because of course women make up more than half the world’s population, so it’s kind of absurd to imagine you can easily pigeonhole what women are interested in,” she wrote. “But I always laugh when people say that Wikipedia is complete — that everything that needs to be written about has been written about — because when I read Wikipedia I am constantly stumbling across gaps in our coverage.”

M

eyer had read Caged Bird as a high schooler, and that was it. So when she decided to take on the project of fixing Angelou’s articles, she started by reading Angelou’s work. She sought out other resources and studied every one as she came to know the author and her fascinating life. Angelou kept Meyer busy by continuing to write and rewrite her own story, with Mom & Me & Mom published in 2013. “What 85-year-old publishes her seventh autobiography?” Meyer says. “Maya Angelou. All of our articles said she wrote six autobiographies, so I had to go back to every single thing: ‘She wrote seven… ’” Meyer credits several mentors for helping her through the process of writing about Angelou, especially Adrianne Wadewitz, a literature professor and influential Wikipedian whose death in a rock climbing accident this past April left a major hole in the community. “She basically taught me how to write a literary article and led me by the hand about what I needed to,” Meyer says. “There was one point when I went on her Talk page and said, ‘What am I doing? I’m this middle-aged white woman from Moscow, Idaho, writing about a black writer, about racism and childhood rape and civil rights — what am I doing?’ And she said, ‘Well, you’re the one who took it on. You were excited to do it, so you have to finish it.’” Meyer went to Washington, D.C., for training earlier this year, and now leads workshops on the Wikipedia basics that can be daunting for beginners. She’s known women who got fed up with the culture and others who’ve simply gotten busy with other things in life, but says that for her it’s always been worth the work. “If it wasn’t fun,” she says, “I wouldn’t waste my time.” n


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U p c o m in g E ve n t s ! Football Mondays Every Monday thru Dec 22nd | 5 pm Games, giveaways, drink and food specials in the Nighthawk Lounge and Red Tail Bar and Grill.

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Inlander 10/30/2014  
Inlander 10/30/2014