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s we breathlessly count down the days, minutes and seconds until Tuesday — for what looks to be a record-breaking election about unbreaking America — we could all use a little distraction. Enter local scary-story writer T.J. Tranchell with a FRIGHTFUL TALE of trick-ortreating (which, during a pandemic, is terrifying in its own right). Find his original story on page 14, plus some goosebump-raising reads (page 20) and the best and worst new horror flicks streaming right now (page 34). Speaking of horror stories: News reporter Wilson Criscione looks at how local universities, even those doing online instruction, have been haunted by COVID-19 (page 8). — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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NICOLE GOES: The Purge… because the future of our democracy hinges on this year’s election. CHUCK TINGSTAD: The Old Testament. After that, The Shining movie. ELIZABETH ANNE: Lore Podcast always has great spooky stories! Plus Aaron Mahnke’s 13 Days of Halloween is some of the most terrifying storytelling I’ve heard.

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MICHAEL CLIMU: My wife and I just finished The Haunting of Bly Manor and it’s good. A good podcast to check out for short horror stories is Pseudopod.

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DANE ANDERSON: Many favorites but Marianne on Netflix really impressed me! It’s a French series but the spook-level is fantastic, the soundtrack is great, and there were some serious It vibes with the “small-town kids growing up and then returning to destroy the evil they stumbled upon” (no spoilers, don’t worry!). For more “familyfriendly” spooky, you can never go wrong with Over the Garden Wall. MATTHEW WEAVER: Christina’s Ghost by Betty Ren Wright appears to be for young readers, but do not be fooled. It has one of the most harrowing scenes ever to be found in literature. Utterly terrifying. LARRY CEBULA: The Art of the Deal. Chilling

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At least President Trump has the Spokesman-Review’s endorsement. GAGE SKIDMORE PHOTO

Shock and Awe

Now would be a good time to acknowledge the pandemic BY GARY CROOKS

R

ecently, I was walking with my girlfriend, and we saw a man with a German shepherd approaching. As we crossed the street to keep our distance, he said something like, “I guess you saw me coming,” and explained that his dog is well-trained and safe. Nine months into a global pandemic, and it never occurred to him that we considered him the danger. What is it with oblivious responses to such a deadly scourge? It’s a question that painfully hit home on Sunday after reading the Spokesman-Review’s stunning endorsement of President Donald Trump, a man who already has been whipped by the pandemic. Publisher Stacey Cowles said as much in the editorial, along with calling Trump a “bigot” and “a bully.” Not mentioned is that the president has branded journalists “an enemy of the people,” an omission that hasn’t gone unnoticed in the publisher’s newsroom. Despite all of that, Stacey just couldn’t get to “You’re fired,” because the other guy might raise his taxes. In a past life, I wrote endorsements for the Spokesman-Review, and Stacey was my boss. I authored the 2016 endorsement for Hillary

Clinton, which marked only the third time the paper had not endorsed a Republican. I was proud of Stacey’s decision. I cannot explain this one.

L

et’s set aside Trump’s bigotry, mendacity and general nastiness, and focus on the pandemic. The coronavirus is our greatest enemy since World War II. It’s killed more than 225,000 Americans in nine months, or about half the number who died in World War II over four years. It’s shattered the economy and shuttered businesses. Nothing will return to normal until the virus is contained. Doing so requires a calm, unified national response. Trump has responded with chaos and division. He has no plan for the next four years. On Sunday, White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows waved a white flag, saying, “We’re not going to control the pandemic.” Instead, each state competes for resources and goes its own way, and the coronavirus seeps through the political fissures and thrives.


Yet, we still have people complaining that Gov. Jay Inslee is treating this like an emergency by implementing restrictions on public gatherings and businesses and imposing mask mandates. His administration also has established guidelines for opening schools. Many of these critics were fine with Trump invoking an “emergency” to shift funds over to wall-building on the southern border in response to “caravans” of illegal immigrants headed our way. Check the toll on the caravans. Check the toll on the coronavirus. Then ask how people can get so worked up about a phantom menace while downplaying a real one.

“Not mentioned is that the president has branded journalists ‘an enemy of the people.’” This dizzying disregard cropped up in the Spokesman-Review’s Oct. 11 endorsement of Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, where, incredibly, the coronavirus is never mentioned. Trump’s response to the pandemic is reason enough to dump him. Need the assurance of endorsements? Here are two for the history books: For the first time in its 175-year existence, Scientific American endorsed a presidential candidate, picking Joe Biden. The publication called Trump’s response to the coronavirus “dangerous” and “inept.” The New England Journal of Medicine said Trump “took a crisis and turned it into a tragedy.” It’s the first time in that prestigious publication’s 208-year-history that it has spoken out on a political candidate. Checking in from Planet Oblivion, McMorris Rodgers recently called Trump’s actions “extraordinary.” And the German shepherd was trained.

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he real tragedy of the Republican Party is how it has turned against science to further short-term political goals. It did it with climate change, and it’s doing it with coronavirus. The willingness to choke on summer smoke and push for relaxed coronavirus restrictions as the death toll mounts is barbaric. The Trump administration had all year to accurately communicate the coronavirus threat and to map out and implement a cohesive national strategy. Instead, the president panicked about the impact on his political future and rejected the sensible, sciencebased measures other countries have implemented to stem the spread. The Spokesman-Review editorialized against the state’s lockdown in spring, signaling a willingness to accept more deaths in exchange for better business outcomes. But the pandemic cannot be separated from the economy. Some states have never shut down, and their economies have cratered. The only way to return to prosperity is to unite and square off against the virus, but the president has already tossed in the towel. Like many, I’m doing my best to follow the advice of public health experts: Wear a mask, keep my distance and stay out of spaces where the virus thrives. It isn’t easy. It isn’t fun. And it keeps me apart from people I love. When I see people acting in ways that prolong the agony, I want to see consequences. It’s like reckless drivers. I don’t want them to die, but I do want them taken off the road. President Trump is a danger to us all, and he gets away with it because Republicans allow him to weave in and out of traffic and barrel down the sidewalks. Shockingly, my hometown paper is one of few to endorse this madman. And for the first time, I’m ashamed to say I worked there. n Gary Crooks is the former editorial page editor for the Spokesman-Review.

It’s time to elect a leader who will follow science, protect public health and safety, and rebuild our local economy. Affordable housing, access to healthcare and educational opportunity are at the top of Tom’s agenda.

Paid for by People for McGarry, Tom McGarry, Democrat www.Time4Tom.com

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COVID testing is conducted on the WSU campus in September.

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EDUCATION

COLLEGE EXPERIMENT THE

Colleges like WSU and EWU went online to avoid the coronavirus — but the virus found them anyway BY WILSON CRISCIONE

W

ashington State University tried to prevent this. In July, due in part to concern of a COVID-19 outbreak in Pullman, WSU abandoned its plans to start the school year in-person. But by the time school started in August, thousands of students — many of them unable to get out of lease agreements — arrived in Pullman anyway. And in September, a COVID-19 outbreak exploded in Pullman, topping the New York Times list of COVID-19 hot spots in the country relative to population. As of this writing, Whitman County has counted 1,787 positive COVID-19 cases, six active hospitalizations and 13 fatalities related to the illness. Students in Pullman made up nearly 1,400 of those cases, yet none of the hospitalizations or deaths, WSU says. “As soon as classes started, we started to see increases in illness,” WSU spokesman Phil Weiler says. That’s true across the country as colleges have been

8 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020

linked to more than 214,000 COVID-19 cases. But after a summer where local universities wrestled with the decision to open in-person or not, the first couple of months of the school year have revealed a messy reality: In-person classes have played a tiny role in how the coronavirus spreads. University of Idaho opened in-person this summer and experienced a significant outbreak of its own, but it was still much smaller than the outbreak at WSU, just 10 miles away. In Spokane County, Gonzaga and Whitworth opened for in-person instruction while Eastern Washington University kept classes online — yet EWU saw the biggest COVID-19 outbreak among the three. Public health officials say that’s because it’s not college itself driving the spread of COVID-19. Rather, it’s the college experience. That includes the Greek life, parties and small social gatherings in dormitories. “Most of our transmission with college students is

not really related to the context of what happens in the classroom,” says Mark Springer, epidemiologist with the Spokane Regional Health District.

‘PLANNING FOR THE WORST’

There’s no doubt that fewer students returned to Pullman this school year than the roughly 20,000 who normally do. However, it didn’t stop some students from acting like things were normal anyway. Before long, reports surfaced that students were throwing parties. Police tried to issue tickets for violating pandemic restrictions, but social gatherings continued nonetheless. Jason Sampson, WSU’s assistant director of public health, says 95 percent of the COVID-19 cases associated with WSU are students, with 15-20 cases among faculty or staff. In all cases, social gatherings drove the spread of the virus. ...continued on page 10


OCTOBER 29, 2020 INLANDER 9


NEWS | EDUCATION “THE COLLEGE EXPERIMENT,” CONTINUED... “It doesn’t matter if it was the students, or the faculty or staff. It was, really, the socializing,” Sampson says. “In a structured environment when people are at work, when people are in the classroom, even when working out of the recreation center, there was no transmission.” Living situations that involved several people living in one house made things worse. He says WSU and its team of contact tracers haven’t identified any superspreader events. Instead, it was more common to have something like this cycle: A student would go hang out with friends, then bring the virus back home, and spread it to their five roommates. Then those roommates would go hang out with other friends and spread it to them. Relatedly, the presence of fraternities and sororities have been correlated with higher spread of COVID-19 at local universities. WSU, along with UI and EWU, all have a Greek system, and all were hit with COVID-19. Last week, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee issued a proclamation in response to the college outbreaks limiting the number of people who can share a sleeping area. The proclamation also called for colleges to provide isolation and quarantine facilities for frats or sororities. Sampson says no WSU students in Pullman have been hospitalized from COVID-19. The concern, however, is the virus spreading to more vulnerable populations. The virus has made its way into long-term care facilities in Pullman, and all the COVID-19 fatalities in Whitman County have occurred since school started. Yet Sampson says it “doesn’t appear” like the outbreaks at those long-term care facilities stemmed from WSU students. Troy Henderson, Whitman County public health director, confirms that case investigators haven’t established a clear link between WSU cases and

long-term care facilities, but they haven’t ruled it out. “Anything that increases the viral activity within the community increases the probability that the virus will find its way into these facilities and threaten the most vulnerable in our community,” Henderson says. In Cheney, EWU saw what was happening at these colleges, which start earlier than Eastern does, says Annika Scharosch, associate vice president of risk management for EWU. “We were planning for the worst,” she says. Still, the virus spread in a similar manner in Cheney despite EWU classes being mostly online. Since mid-September, when school started, there have been 170 cases among EWU students and employees in Cheney. “We saw a significant peak right when students were moving back to Cheney,” Scharosch says. “Our understanding is they are catching it outside of the classroom, whether that’s social gatherings, parties, or family gettogethers.” The number of new cases have dropped back down in recent weeks. But the outbreak at EWU was still worse than at Gonzaga and Whitworth. Whitworth, the smallest of the three, had zero active cases Monday among on-campus students, and just over 51 overall since school began. Gonzaga has had 111 cumulative positive cases among students and employees since August. Both universities conduct surveillance testing, or pre-emptive testing of a sample of the population. So far, there have been no proven instances of classroom transmission. Gonzaga officials credit the design of classrooms and a team tasked with responding to positive COVID tests and moving students into quarantine.

“GU has laid out effective strategies to this point. But we know we cannot let our guard down,” says Kristiana Holmes, director of health and counseling services. The relative success at the colleges that opened in-person may not mean much to those who didn’t, how-

“It doesn’t matter if it was the students, or the faculty or staff. It was, really, the socializing.” ever. Weiler, with WSU, says the choice to go online may have prevented an even bigger outbreak. “I believe that not having 20,000 students return to Pullman was the right choice,” he says. “If we truly had every student back, I think we would have seen a larger outbreak.”

MOVING FORWARD

WSU has already announced that next semester will be virtual as well. That’s based in part from advice from Whitman County public health officials, Weiler says. “It’s looking like this winter and fall are going to be really bad,” Weiler says. But Springer, the Spokane Regional Health District epidemiologist, says his thinking has been “modified” since the summer, indicating he’s more confident with in-person classes. “I think, yes, we could move forward with those

REGISTER in person TO VOTE You can register in person to vote through Election Day, Tues, Nov. 3. For locations and hours, visit:

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safely,” Springer says. There are some caveats: Classes in the fine arts, or in engineering, might be more challenging to conduct safely. And food service remains a concern, since students may eat together without facial coverings. The bigger issue, he reiterates, is the other stuff that goes along with college life. Housing will remain an issue, as long as groups of people are crowded in a living space together. Students socializing may remain an issue, too, especially if they let their guard down and don’t wear masks together. Even though case counts at local universities have stabilized for now, and even if colleges can conduct classes face-to-face without major problems, that doesn’t mean college will feel normal anytime soon. “We’re not going to be seeing people in the stands watching Gonzaga basketball,” Springer says. “That’s not going to be a safe option to restart any time soon.” n wilsonc@inlander.com

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McMorris Rodgers Stands Behind Her President The 2020 election is a referendum on Donald Trump and his enablers. Rep. McMorris Rodgers has no defense for not calling out her president for the lack of a national strategy to combat the pandemic, businesses continuing to close, people suffering, and the death toll rising. During this campaign, in every debate with Dave Wilson, McMorris Rodgers has doubled down in her support of Trump. There is no excuse for her complicit behavior – she must be defeated in this election. International Brotherhood of Boiler Makers Local 242 International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers, Local 73 Retired Public Employees Council of Washington Spokane Regional Labor Council LIUNA: Laborers Local 238 Spokane Fire Fighters Local 29 United Food and Commercial Workers, Local 1439 Washington State Labor Council, AFL-CIO Ambassador Ryan Crocker Breean Beggs, Spokane City Council President Andy Billig, State Senator Tim Hattenburg, Spokane Valley City Council Lori Kinnear, Spokane City Council Candace Mumm, Spokane City Council Timm Ormsby, State Representative Marcus Riccelli, State Representative Karen Stratton, Spokane City Council John Taves, Cheney City Council Teresa Overhauser, Cheney City Council Calder Abbott Laura Ackerman Prudence Addy Melissa Ahern Carol Albietz Mustafa Alijagic Jack Alley John Allison Carol & Dennis Anderson Eric Anderson & Angela Valenti Shirley Andrews James Andrews Sharon Andrews Susan Ankenbrand Joseph Astorino Albert Ayars Lee Ayars Ron Baer Andrew Bagley Joanne Bailey & Jan Baker Karen Baker Sheri Barnard Susan Barnett Patricia Bates Judith Baumgartner Ardis Beaman Donald Beaman Heather Beebe-Stevens Danny Beeson Pam Behring Mike Bell Elizabeth Bendinelli Sharon & Jon Bentz Barb Berkseth Carly Vallejo Berquam & Michael Berquam Todd Beyreuther Riley Bierig Rosemarie Bisiar & Harvey Brown Brian Blair Anthony Blankenship Douglas Boe Bob Boehme Mia Bohn Donna & Joseph Boileau David Bonga Julie & Arthur Bookstrom Mary Ann Bosky Donald & Virgina Bott Lynda & Leonard Bowman Gloria Boyer Veda Bradley Gary Brajcich

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NEWS | HEALTH

The Idaho Plague A coronavirus case surge tests Idaho’s “local control” and “personal responsibility” strategy BY DANIEL WALTERS

T

he coronavirus was spreading unchecked in Idaho, and Gov. Brad Little knew it. While the entire nation has been hit with a massive COVID surge, Idaho is among the worst. Last week, Idaho ranked fifth in the nation for new daily cases per capita, lagging only behind Wisconsin, Montana and the Dakotas. And now its hospitals are facing a crisis. In just two days last week, 172 new cases were reported in Kootenai County. And with 28 Kootenai Health staffers out sick with COVID themselves, the hospital in Coeur d’Alene was so full that patients were being sent elsewhere. “Patients in North Idaho needing a higher level of care — whether for an injury, heart attack, or other reasons — are being transferred out of state,” Little said at a press conference Monday. For the past four months, as most of Washington state faced a host of Stage 2 coronavirus restrictions, Little had moved the bulk of Idaho to Stage 4 — opening nearly everything, from nightclubs to movie theaters, with very few distancing requirements. “From a business-economic perspective, there are no restrictions in place,” Dave Jeppesen, director of Idaho Department of Health and Welfare, told the Inlander last week. But in a press conference on Monday — as Facebook commenters flooded the livestreamed press conference with claims that masks don’t work, that the virus was a hoax, and that Little wasn’t a real Republican — the Idaho governor announced that he’d be moving the entire state back to Stage 3.

Kootenai Health in Coeur d’Alene has been so full that it’s had to send patients to other hospitals. defied the recommendations of doctors and ditched Kootenai County’s mask mandate. “In some parts of the state there has simply been insufficient efforts to protect lives,” Little said. “Even in the face of an overwhelming need for action, the ‘no-action’ approach for dealing with COVID is not a responsible option.”

THE VACUUM

Back in late April, Tommy Ahlquist, a former emergency room doctor and gubernatorial candidate, was bursting with optimism. Citing the success of the #CrushTheCurve effort he spearheaded, he argued that Idaho had built enough testing capacity to safely reopen. While there was a spike of cases in the summer in Idaho, it had looked for a while like the state might dodge the worst of it: Idaho’s economy was comparatively booming. Their unemployment rate had plunged. But today, Ahlquist’s cheeriness has been replaced by horror. “We are on fire here,” he says. While Idaho’s rural nature had shielded the state from the spread of the virus for months, now he says it was going to be the state’s “downfall as you watch all of these little rural counties on fire and have nowhere to go for health care.” According to Jeppesen, the director of Idaho’s health department, the pandemic had spread largely due to activities outside work and school — the “backyard barbecues, the family reunions, the extended family Sunday dinners.” Experts blame COVID fatigue. We just want to get back to normal. But Ahlquist also sees a failure of leadership. Every one knew that “this fall and this winter was going to be a complete crap show. And it is,” he says. “We’re not prepared for this in any way, shape or form. It’s going to get ugly. ” Months had gone by, Ahlquist felt, and almost nothing had been done to lead a statewide effort to coordinate testing and tracing or effectively convincing its population to wear masks. After Idaho built up its testing capacity, most of the tough decisions, he says, had been handed off to teeny school districts and ill-equipped health districts. “Literally, it was all dumped on seven [health]

“We’ve known a pandemic would be coming. What never crossed my mind ... is that a public health emergency would be politicized.” “Last week, things changed for the worse,”Little said. “This is unacceptable and we must do more.” Once again, indoor gatherings would be capped at 50 people, nursing homes would require masks, and the capacity of nightclubs and bars would be limited. Still, it was a lot less than the sort of restrictions still in effect throughout most of Washington. Little defended his approach to largely leave the decision to impose further restrictions or mask mandates up to regional health districts and local cities. But the local-control approach, he acknowledged, was struggling to contend with an out-of-control virus. Indeed, the same week Kootenai County’s biggest hospital was overwhelmed, the Panhandle Health District

12 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

districts that were not prepared for this. They said, ‘Hey, figure this out. Each of you individually,’” Ahlquist says. “This is what it looks like in a leadership vacuum.”

PANDEMIC HEALTH

Decades ago, Jeppesen says, the Idaho Legislature wrote into state code that the front-line response to a public health crisis would be the state’s health districts. “Idaho is a very independent-minded state,” Jeppesen says. “A very local-control state.” David Pate, former president of the St. Luke’s Health System and member of Little’s coronavirus workgroup, says that the quality of the performance from the seven health districts has varied radically. “The unfortunate thing is there are very few people on these boards — typically only one — who have any kind of medical expertise,” Pate says. With some of them steeped more in online conspiracy theories than medicine, the results have often been exasperating for public health professionals. So while Panhandle Health District has a family doctor and a nurse on its board, the board has for 23 years also included Dr. Allen Banks, a man who, despite being touted on the health district website as a “world-renowned expert” in the controversial alternative medicine practice of “prolotherapy,” is a Ph.D., not a doctor of medicine. For months, Banks has unfurled a steady stream of unscientific claims at health district meetings — that lockdowns don’t stop infections, that most COVID tests are false positives, that vast numbers of COVID deaths are mislabeled, that masks are harmful, vaccines are dangerously untested and that there wasn’t any pandemic at all. “Something’s making these people sick, and I’m pretty sure that it’s not coronavirus,” Banks insisted at last week’s Panhandle Health District board meeting. To Pate, the meeting was “shocking and embarrassing.” Still, no sooner had the Panhandle Health District lifted the mask mandate for Kootenai County, the Coeur d’Alene City Council implemented its own mask mandate. Idaho remains a patchwork of various COVID policies: About half the state is under a mask mandate, and even then, some sheriffs have declined to enforce it. Drive across the Idaho state line from Washington, and watch COVID cases surge and mask usage plum-


met: In Washington, over 90 percent of those surveyed over Facebook by Carnegie Mellon University say they wear masks most of the time. In Idaho, only 75 percent do.

IN CASE OF EMERGENCY, BREAK GLASS

Little argues that a state-wide mask mandate might be less effective than local mandates. “We all know that if somebody locally asks us or tells us to do something, the compliance rate is a lot higher than it is from somebody from a higher level of government,” Little said. Yet much of Idaho does trust someone from a higher level of government: President Donald Trump. At his press conference Little insisted that, in phone calls he’s had with them, the White House coronavirus working group is firmly supportive of mask use. Yet even after the president spent three days in the hospital being treated for the coronavirus, he’s continued to mock masks and tweet that the “Fake News Media Conspiracy” media was exaggerating the virus to impact the election. “I’ve been pandemic planning for probably two decades. We’ve known a pandemic would be coming,” Pate says. “What never crossed my mind — which probably just shows you how naive I am — is that a public health emergency would be politicized.” Idaho politicians at all levels have had to contend with furious activists. In August, when state lawmakers held a special session to discuss the coronavirus, they attempted to limit seating to follow social-distancing recommendations. Instead, they were greeted with an angry mob, maskless and armed, who shattered a glass door and rushed to pack the seats. The next day, a supermajority of the Idaho House voted to end Gov. Little’s emergency declaration — though the measure went nowhere in the Senate. At times the anti-mask LETTERS sentiment has resulted in showSend comments to downs with local officials: This editor@inlander.com. month, an entire football game in Caldwell was canceled at halftime because a dad in attendance had refused to wear a mask. The dad? Ammon Bundy — a far-right Idaho resident famous for leading a troupe of armed militants to occupy the federal Malheur wildlife refuge in Oregon in 2016. Starting in March, Bundy launched People’s Rights, using COVID-19 opposition to quickly unite an army of over 22,000 far-right activists across nine states. They didn’t just protest outside government buildings. They targeted the personal homes of Jeppesen and Spokane Regional Health District Officer Bob Lutz. “I would say, outside of the president, no one has had more of an impact on anti-masker sentiment than Ammon Bundy and the organization that he’s put together,” says Devin Burghart, executive director of the Institute for Research and Education on Human Rights, a national nonprofit that tracks far-right groups. At last week’s Panhandle Health District meeting, Walt Kirby, a 90-year-old Boundary County commissioner, recalled the backlash he had received for voting for the original mandate this summer. “You guys have no idea the amount of heat I took because I voted for mandating the masks in Kootenai County,” Kirby said. “There were a lot of people who were pretty damn nasty to me.” And so, despite believing that masks work, he voted to lift the mandate. If people wanted to be dumb and not mask up, he said, he didn’t care. “Nobody’s wearing the damn mask anyway. All they are is just thumbing their nose at us,” Kirby said. “People are dying. And they’re gonna keep dying. And they’re going to keep catching this stuff. And they’re going to keep giving it to one another, right along until there’s a vaccine.” And then, he predicted, there’s going to be a bunch of people fighting against the vaccine. “I’m just sitting back and watching them catch it and die,” Kirby said. “Hopefully, I’ll live through it.” n danielw@inlander.com

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CAMERA READY


THE

HOUSE ON RESIDENCE STREET FICTION BY T.J. TRANCHELL

T

he square shapes of miniature bottles of hand sanitizer bumped against Mason’s leg as he walked along A Street. He felt lucky to be able to go trickor-treating this year, but those bottles annoyed him. Even Mr. Laymon handed them out when he usually handed out coupons for movies and one year fifty-cent pieces. Even more houses kept their lights off, their doors locked, and their families snug inside. What a waste of a full moon Halloween, Mason thought. His twelfth Halloween had turned crummy months ago when his mom reminded him that it was the last year he’d be allowed to go trickor-treating. A few weeks later, the possibility of not getting to go out loomed over his favorite holiday. Why pick a costume, his mom said, when there might not be a school day to show it off at anyway. Reminding her that Halloween would be on a Saturday earned him a screen-free day. But here he was now, a tinge of wildfire smoke still in the air, his candy bag banging against one leg and his Black Panther mask in his other hand, staring up a hill and wondering if any of the houses at the top were handing out candy. His friend Tobias once rode bikes with him to the park on Residence Street. The park overlooked the other side of Moscow and

north, but Mason and Tobias were distracted by the used condoms scattered around the lone park bench. Cars parked in driveways hid any sign of life that afternoon, but they were big houses, especially the one at the west end. “Let’s bail, this is lame,” Tobias said, lightly punching Mason in the upper arm. “Yeah, let’s ride down to Rosauer’s and get a drink,” Mason said, feigning his own punch but knowing he’d get worse from his larger friend if he made contact. Last summer seemed so long ago. The gulf between eleven and twelve was more like an ocean, bigger than crossing from nine to ten even, and not just because the world around Mason had changed so much. He’d never knocked on the doors of the Residence Street homes because most years there was snow in Moscow by midOctober and walking up Cherry Street to get there was a no-go. Some kids had their parents drive around with them, but Mason and Tobias were a pack of lone wolves, old school traditionalists who pounded the ground for every Reese’s Cup and Fun Size Snickers and popcorn ball they could get. That and Mason’s mom wouldn’t take them. She wanted them in a group and her Impreza wouldn’t hold them all. ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 29, 2020 INLANDER 15


“THE HOUSE ON RESIDENCE STREET,” CONTINUED... Tobias’s parents had him locked in the house. Their summer of being twelve — the last year for real boyhood mischief — had been stolen from them and now Halloween had taken a serious blow. When the city announced they’d allow trick-or-treating, Mason texted Tobias, but got a frown emoji in return. His parents weren’t going to let him go. A real lone wolf this year, Mason thought. There were only a few other kids out, most of them with their parents. No one casually bumped into each other by walking opposite directions on the same side of the street. Mason knew his mom would have liked that as she remained vocal about people in stores not following the clearly marked arrows on the floor. Every kid he did see seemed dejected (week four spelling test), and their buckets and bags proclaimed the weight of hand sanitizer bottles just like his.

Cherry Street ran three blocks straight up. After the first block, the sidewalk ended. At the intersection after the second block, the road turned mostly to gravel. At the top, a silver water tower ascended toward the sky. Mason skidded a bit on the gravel part and caught his balance before tumbling back down the hill. “Panther skills, yo,” he said aloud, mimicking the fake ghetto accent Tobias often used just out of earshot of Mason’s mom. Maybe going lone wolf — lone panther — wasn’t such a bad idea, he thought. Finally reaching the top of the hill, he first turned east and saw the scattering of homes all with their lights off. Facing west, the only light came from the house at the end of the street, the big score, the house that everyone knew was too big for the skinny ridge it sat on. The house all the kids he knew in Moscow Middle School, and the ones he knew the year before at Lena Whitmore, would tell you was haunted. Indian ghosts are buried there, Grace Jensen said, earning the laughs of an entire lunchroom because everyone knows you don’t bury ghosts. The house used to be a hospital, Jeanie Motton said. Everyone listened because they all knew she was the smartest kid in class and both her parents were professors (which made her smartest because many of the kids only had one parent who taught at the university). People used to die during surgeries all the time, and especially women during childbirth. The girls always gasped and more than one would proclaim they never wanted to have kids after that. No, it was a school, Anthony Underwood said. When kids misbehaved, they got sent to the basement and when the town flooded, a bunch of them drowned. How the floods reached the basement of a house on

“Reaching out for the doorbell he knew must be broken, Mason saw a nest of spider eggs where the button should have been.” Mason reached into his bag, the plastic claws on his hands pushing away the bottles of ill omen, and grabbed a Kit Kat. The wafer candy bar was Tobias’s favorite and they usually traded, Mason giving up Kit Kats in return for Reese’s or the rare Big Hunk which he gave to his mom. After chowing down the single piece of candy, he put the wrapper back in the bag and stared up the hill again. Now or never, he thought.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

T.J. Tranchell was born on Halloween, grew up in Utah, and now lives, teaches, and writes in the Pacific Northwest. A former resident of Selah, Washington, Walla Walla and Moscow, Idaho, he now lives in Kennewick. He misses going to horror movies alone. His 2016 book Cry Down Dark was recently named the scariest novel set in Utah by the New York Times. Blysster Press released his third book, The Private Lives of Nightmares, in September. Visit www.tjtranchell.com to order it, or request it through your favorite independent bookstore.

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16 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020


the hill no one knew, but this story kept most kids away from the house. Walking toward the house, bag of candy and hand sanitizer smacking his thigh, Mason thought of all these stories. Any one of them could be true. They could all be lies. As he grew closer, only one story really frightened him, but he didn’t want to think of that now. The lights were on and this would be the last house he ever got to trick-or-treat. His foot landed on the first step of the wide, wooden porch and Mason thought he heard birds take flight somewhere. He looked around but didn’t see any birds left in the sparse trees. When he placed his other foot on the second step, he heard a chime and a tune, something his mom said certain people she distrusted used for their doorbells. When he reached the landing, both feet near the door, the house seemed to swell before him, as if every door inside opened at the same time, breathing in his essence, then slamming shut again. Reaching for the doorbell he knew must be broken, Mason saw a nest of spider eggs where the button should have been. One dark-bodied spider crawled on the wall above the nest, not noticing him yet. He moved over a bit and knocked instead. The door shook beneath Mason’s small fist and he nearly turned and ran. He heard his mom again — Running is what the Somner men are known for: running downfield, running the bases, running away — and stayed put. He knocked again, harder but not impolite. Nothing shook, no out of place noises, no malicious odors… The doorknob turned and Mason swallowed a mouthful of spit as it did. The heavy door began to swing open, revealing a well-lit foyer, a table draped with a red and gold cloth, a dishful of old-fashioned candies atop it. He did not see who opened the door. “Hello? Trick-or-treat?” Mason said, softly but with confidence. The door pushed open farther, but Mason still couldn’t see who was behind it. “Who’s there?” ...continued on next page

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“THE HOUSE ON RESIDENCE STREET,” CONTINUED...

What can you give this week? VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES Kitchen Helpers Needed - WOMEN & CHILDREN’S FREE RESTAURANT & COMMUNITY KITCHEN

Would you like to support vulnerable women, children and seniors during the pandemic? Please join us in making nutritious food accessible to women and their families. We offer freshly prepared meals and groceries every week, both curbside and at locations across the community. Energy and passion needed in the kitchen to work alongside our culinary professionals. Flexible volunteer shifts are available throughout the week. Find out more on the Women & Children’s Free Restaurant’s website. wcfrspokane/org/volunteer-openings

Dependable Volunteers Needed – CAT TALES WILDLIFE PARK Cat Tales Wildlife Park is looking for volunteers who aren’t afraid of hard work or the weather. Winter doesn’t stop the animal care and operations at Cat Tales and we need volunteers who can keep going in any season. Volunteers who can commit to three to five hours a day at least once a week are particularly needed. Work indoors and out is physical and often messy, but always rewarding. Construction and carpentry skills are a plus. The application and more info is available on the website. You are also welcome to email mail@cattales.org or call 238-4126 if you want to join the Cat Tales family. cattales.org/volunteer

Volunteer Drivers/Riders Needed - KOOTENAI COUNTY FOOD BANK Community Action Partnership Food Bank needs grocery rescue drivers and riders to pick up donated food items from various locations throughout the community. This work supports the Food Bank in its mission to serve up to 1,400 people a week. Volunteers must be able to lift 40 pounds and have good communication skills and a valid driver’s license and an approved driving record. The shift is from 9 am to approximately noon or 1 pm. Just one day a week is appreciated. If you are interested, call 208-770-3018. cap4action.org

EVENTS/BENEFITS Walkathon - GIRLS ON THE RUN What’s a walkathon? It’s a chance for us all to get out and get moving, while raising money for Girls on the Run of Spokane County. It starts Oct. 25 and ends Oct. 31. Participating is as easy as signing up, setting a fundraising goal or distance goal (for instance, setting a goal to walk 10 miles in one week), then challenging your friends and family to a walk-off. Girls on the Run will send you fundraising tips and all the information you need to participate. gotrspokane.org

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18 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020

“That’s my line, son,” a gruff voice from the stairwell Mason could now see beyond the table. “What?” “You knock-knocked. My line is who’s there, not yours.” An old man, bent over to where his head was not much above the table, emerged from the darkness. He reached for the candy dish with a hand that looked to be all knuckles and nails. His fingers stretched out, grasping one entire side of the dish that must have ignited the arthritis in his hand, but since the man’s face was already a grimace, Mason didn’t notice any change. “Good joke,” Mason said. “Finish it and you can have some candy. Mind me now.” As much as Mason wanted to say he’d trick-or-treated the house on Residence Street, being told what to do by a stranger — an old white man, even — irked every ounce of his preteen spirit. “Nah, I’m good. Have a happy Halloween.” Mason was inside the house just far enough not to be knocked down by the heavy front door slamming closed behind him. “Mind me now, boy. Finish the joke.” “I’m leaving now…” Instinctually, Mason wanted to say sir. His mom raised him with manners, but not with subordination. “However you are controlling the door, open it back up, please.” “Finish the joke, boy.” Inhaling the musty air of the house, Mason gave in, just to get out. “Mason.” “Mason who?” the man said, trying to smile through his twisted face. “My son will never come to this house.” “That’s not funny.” “Neither are you. Now let me out.” Mason puffed his chest out, wishing he was as big as Tobias or as big as the pictures of his father in his Army uniform, and pointed to the door. “Open it yourself,” the man said, placing the candy dish back on the table and turning away from Mason.

“A gray cap sat on the skull, tilted to show a hole on the side and the dark, empty cavity where a brain once was.” “Thank you,” Mason said, keeping his manners. He shuffled to the door, keeping his eyes on the man’s bent back. Reaching for the knob, he felt something touch his hand. Just that spider, he thought. Tobias would have freaked out. But then whatever touched his hand grew and swallowed first his fingers then his entire hand. Mason looked and saw a skeleton hand where the doorknob should have been, covering his own hand. He screamed like he’d not screamed since he was a little kid. Somewhere behind him, the old man laughed. The bony hand held as a full skeleton, more than six feet tall, emerged from the door. Tattered gray cloth hung in strips around its shoulders and hips. A gray cap sat on the skull, tilted to show a hole on the side and the dark, empty cavity where a brain once was. In the hand not holding Mason’s was a set of rusty shackles. “Run… away,” the skeleton said, despite the lack of lungs and vocal cords. “Runaway!” The skeleton tried to clamp the shackles on Mason’s wrists, but the young man squirmed free. Looking to see if the old man was still in the room, Mason moved to the right, where he remembered seeing windows from the outside. He did not see the man and he did not see the windows. From inside, the house appeared to be solid walls and locked doors. Mason slammed into solid oak doors and rammed himself into the walls where he thought windows should be, hoping the solidity he


saw was a ruse. Nothing gave way except his shoulders. Nothing cracked except his collarbone. Behind him, he could hear nothing but the skeletal voice saying, “Runaway.” “I’m trying to run away,” he said to no one, but received a reply anyway. “He’s not telling you to run away, boy,” the old man said although Mason had no idea where he might be. “He’s calling you a runaway, just like your ancestors.” The man’s laughter filled the entire house, filled Mason’s head. Mason let the cacophony roll over him, envelope him, make him want to give up. Then another voice came to him, one he knew but had never heard live. “Don’t run away. Run toward.” He knew his dad wanted him to run toward a better life. His mom always told him that. She told him about the first time she saw him run: stealing a base during a high school baseball game. She told him how they both ran from her parents when they didn’t approve of their marriage. Most of all, she told Mason about her father running toward a burning Humvee after it ran over an IED to save the soldiers inside. She told him he wouldn’t have run from the bullet that took his life, even if he’d seen it coming. “Run toward, Mason. My son.” Mason shook his head, stood up, and looked down the hall he’d come from. The skeleton lumbered in the middle, taking its time, knowing Mason had nowhere to go. But that was wrong. Mason had one way to go: toward it. Mason, through everything, had never let go of his mask or his bag. He slid the Black Panther mask over his face and moved the bag to his hand not at the end of the broken collarbone. Thankful for the added weight of the hand sanitizers, Mason swung the bag as he sprinted down the hall. Just before reaching the skeleton, he jumped, causing the bag to connect with the skeleton’s jawbone. The skull exploded and the skeleton collapsed. Mason’s momentum carried him a few feet beyond the bones, but after coming to a stop, he turned and saw not a pile of dust and bones, but the twisted old man, now missing the bottom half of his face. His tongue wagged like he was still trying to talk but could form no words. Angry grunts and half-hearted hisses emanated from the hole that was the man’s throat. One abnormal hand still clutched the corroded shackles, barely able to shake them at Mason. Approaching the man, Mason reached into his bag and took out one of the bottles of hand sanitizer. He flipped the cap open and drizzled it over the man’s hands and even his half-face. “You are a virus,” Mason said. “I won’t let you spread.” When the sanitizer hit the man’s skin, it began to smoke. Patches of wrinkled white skin turned gray, then black, then to dust, until the man was a skeleton again. Mason grabbed another bottle of sanitizer and sprayed it at the bones until they became dust, too. The front door was not as far away as it seemed. It opened with little effort from Mason. As he did, he saw three kids in superhero costumes about to mount the steps. “No one’s home here, kids,” he said. “Go back home.” A boy — Mason thought he looked about eight and was also dressed as the Black Panther — looked at him and smiled. “Wakanda forever,” the boy said. “Wakanda forever,” Mason replied. “Trick-or-treat with us,” a tiny Wonder Woman asked. “Yeah,” Mason said. “Let’s get some candy.” n

Cultural Tours & Events

Lifeways Workshops Make Your Own Classes 6 HOURS Create your own traditional pieces in a hands-on Authentic Coeur d’Alene Tribal member guided workshop. Classes offered are making your own Baby Pendleton Moccasins, Adult Pendleton Moccasins and Beaded Necklace and Bracelet.

Native American Sip ‘N’ Paint 2 HOURS Create with the talented Native American Jeremy Salazar of the Navajo Nation. Jeremy has dedicated his life to the contemporary emergence of native art. “My art is like resurrecting our ancestors with the brilliance of color,” said Jeremy. Sip and create your own brilliance with Jeremy.

Visit cdacasino.com or the Casino Box Office for tickets and information on all upcoming Cultural Tours.

W E LC O M E H O M E .

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OCTOBER 29, 2020 INLANDER 19


WORDS

SCARY READS Six books to keep you up at night BY LAUREN GILMORE

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or someone with an anxiety disorder, I read a lot of horror. I always have. Predictably, my obsession started with Stephen King. I carried around a frayed paperback copy of The Stand until its cover was torn. In every class in middle school, I finished my work early so I could get to the next chapter of Bag of Bones, or finally find out what happened to Paul Sheldon in Misery. Whatever was in them — murderous ex-nurses, ghosts rearranging magnetic letters on the fridge, a species-annihilating new strain of flu — couldn’t scare me, because I was already terrified. I was terrified all the time. I had phobias and night terrors and regularly woke up my family in the early hours of the morning, screaming and not knowing why. In retrospect, maybe I should have stopped. But as an anxious kid, horror was the only thing that didn’t lie to me. Other books told me the world was a song and dance of bright colors and costumes. Horror told the truth, no matter how gruesome. The truth: The world is horrifying. People you love will disappear. People you don’t love will find bizarre ways to hurt you, and sometimes they will succeed. You will make terrible mistakes. You will not always be forgiven. Because I trusted its honesty, I also trusted the other things horror told me. Like: I could be brave and resourceful and stronger than I looked. Monsters could, sometimes, be destroyed. Even at its most desperate and cruel, the world contained stories worthy of hearing. I learned to trust the small, defiant voice that sat in the back of my throat, the one that knew I was haunted, even if kind, well-meaning grownups couldn’t see any ghosts. In turn, horror made clear my obligation to listen when someone said they were haunted even if their ghosts didn’t touch me. Even if the people in power kept insisting those ghosts didn’t exist. So, it’s as a lifelong horror fan that I offer six books, some new and some old, to see you into the bone chill of Halloween season:

1. MEXICAN GOTHIC

BY SILVIA MORENO-GARCIA (2020) Yes, the buzz surrounding Moreno-Garcia’s latest novel is completely justified. Everyone says you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover, but you’d be forgiven for assuming that this one’s as gorgeous as its artwork. (Really though, my friend Monica bought this for me based entirely off its cover and I immediately forgave her.) ...continued on page 22

20 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020


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CULTURE | WORDS “SCARY READS,” CONTINUED... After receiving a weird letter from her newlywed cousin, Noemí Taboada travels to High Place to check on her. Towering over the Mexican countryside, High Place is a house of rusted silver, nightmares, and silence. Her cousin’s family insists everything is fine. If she wants to figure out the truth, Noemí will need to find a way around the labyrinth of the home’s oppressive rules and secrets, and she needs to work quickly; every inch of the family’s history she uncovers makes it harder to find the way out. Moreno-Garcia reimagines classic Gothic forms with precision and deadly poetic grace.

2. THE QUAKER CITY or THE MONKS OF MONK HALL

BY GEORGE LIPPARD (1845) OK, hear me out. I know it may not SOUND exhilarating to read a 600-page book published in 1845, but I promise it is. George Lippard was a labor activist and his novel braids stunning social critique with just about every campy horror trope imaginable. Quaker City is set in a mysterious, Philadelphia mansion nicknamed Monk Hall. Monk Hall’s patrons are respectable gentlemen in the daytime. At night, they slither through the various floors of the hall, engaging in unspeakable crimes. Published serially, Quaker City was both immensely popular and incredibly controversial. Most importantly, it features the best dream sequence ever written, featuring a zombie proletariat uprising.

3. FRIDAY BLACK

BY NANA KWAME ADJEI-BRENYAH (2018) Adjei-Brenyah’s debut is the kind of book you want to

22 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020

throw at everyone you meet, and stare at them until they finish it. An unflinching interrogation of the layered, everyday terrors faced by Black Americans, this short story collection confronts systemic racism, capitalist accumulation and normalized violence through imaginative, heartstopping prose. Pieces like “The Hospital Where” and “Things My Mother Said” highlight the notes of tragedy underlying the fear, reminding us of what’s at stake when our vulnerable bodies enter horror stories. Seriously, read this book. Order a few copies and start throwing them at anyone who looks too comfortable.

4. HAUNTING OF HILL HOUSE

BY SHIRLEY JACKSON (1959) You may have seen the recent Netflix adaptation of this show, and while that program was good in its own way, it has almost nothing to do with the source material. You owe it to yourself to read Jackson’s foundational haunted house novel. A handful of guests travel to an infamous mansion at the request of an eccentric researcher who wants to document a true supernatural experience. The narrative unfolds from the perspective of Eleanor Vance, a nervous woman who becomes increasingly wrapped up in the house. More than any other guest, the house speaks to Eleanor, and therefore, to us. Jackson is a master of psychological horror, and bends language to leave an unsettling shadow that doesn’t lift after the last page. Plus, if you read Haunting of Hill House then you can shout at your TV when you see the abomination that is the end of the Netflix version.

5. HER BODY AND OTHER PARTIES

BY CARMEN MARIA MACHADO (2017) Machado’s short story collection begins with a stage direction: “If you read this story out loud, please use the following voices.” From this point onward, Her Body and Other Parties is unlike anything I have ever read before. Playfully experimental and sarcastic, her writing works across genres to mine and articulate the terrifying experiences of women. For instance, in “Real Women Have Bodies,” a mysterious illness makes women disappear from the physical world. “Especially Heinous” explores sexual violence in the format of SVU episode descriptions. Read Her Body and Other Parties for the kind of horror that makes you cry, for lines like: “nothing makes pink taffeta pop like a dark void.”

6. HOUSE OF LEAVES

BY MARK Z. DANIELEWSKI (2000) I know in the introduction I claimed that horror couldn’t scare me, but this may be the one exception. Reading House of Leaves made me physically sick to my stomach. It’s a bit hard to explain this book. The central story — if anything is truly at the center of this book — is about a couple who discovers their house measures impossibly larger on the inside than on the outside. Copious footnotes require paging forward and backward. For some lines, you need to rotate the book. For others, you need to solve a code. If you endeavor to read House of Leaves, a moment will come where you will sink to the floor, forgetting how to read, forgetting that you ever knew how to read, and wishing you could stop. But you won’t. n


CULTURE | DIGEST

Something Wikipedia This Way Comes SURPRISE SURPRISE! The Drive-By Truckers just surprise-dropped The New OK, a sterling nine-song album arriving just eight months after their excellent January release The Unraveling. Made up of leftover tracks from that album’s sessions and new songs recorded during the pandemic, The New OK is remarkably good. One of the band’s best, actually, and it moves from swinging, horn-drenched killers like “Sea Island Lonely” to topical angry fare like “Watching the Orange Clouds,” written the weekend after George Floyd’s murder. The closing cover of the Ramones’ “The KKK Took My Baby Away” is both joyful and annoyingly topical. The New OK is available digitally now, and on vinyl and CD in December. (DAN NAILEN)

B

BY DANIEL WALTERS

lame my Christian upbringing, where we just didn’t watch R-rated movies — much less scary R-rated movies. My experience with the horror genre was largely confined to the gnarled faces screaming at me from the aisles of Blockbuster. And now, even as an adult who is technically mature enough to watch R-rated movies all by myself, I rarely do. Sure, I like deconstructions of the horror genre, like Cabin in the Woods. But straight-up mind-warping, bone-crushing horror? Even Black Mirror episodes are often too disturbing for me. But here’s the thing: Horror is such a crucial part of American culture, the foundation of so many references and homages, that completely covering my eyes is hardly a solution. I’m left with the same sort of foolish curiosity that plagues the victims in these movies: I know I shouldn’t go in there, but some dark force still compels me to find out what happens. Enter Wikipedia.

THE BUZZ BIN

THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music hits online and in stores Oct. 30. To wit: EELS, Earth To Dora. Main man “E” is in a happy place on the band’s 13th studio effort. ELVIS COSTELLO, Hey Clockface. Any new Costello album is reason to rejoice, and he’s joined by Bill Frisell and Nels Cline on this one. STEVIE NICKS, 24 Karat Gold Tour. A live document of Nicks’ most recent tour. No word on whether skate boarding Ocean Spray guy has another vid in store. (DAN NAILEN)

The Wikipedia summaries of horror movies sap away the gore and mop away the blood, leaving only black text on a white background. They’re clinical, matter of fact, mostly humorless. And Wikipedia is how I experienced the most grisly moments in movies like Saw (“...with a cigarette dipped in the corpse’s tainted blood...”), Final Destination (“... whose house explodes after she is impaled by a falling kitchen knife...”), Hellraiser (“the blood resurrects Frank as a skinless corpse...”), and Event Horizon (“...a video log of the Event Horizon’s crew fornicating and mutilating each other”...). No jump scares. No shrieking violin soundtracks. No scary images. No scarring images. My curiosity is satiated. I can walk away with my mind unscathed and my pants unsoiled. That’s the power of spoilers. Spoilers are despised because, by giving away surprises, they defuse a movie’s drama, stealing that tension of not knowing what’s going to happen next. But spoilers can also be used to defuse horror. When you know, going in, who’s going to be chainsaw-massacred and who’s going to ride the pickup truck to freedom, it feels a bit safer to watch. Still, even the protective shield of Wikipedia can only do so much: After I read the summary detailing a particularly twisted twist in the nasty home invasion movie Funny Games, it was such a cheap and unfair violation of the internal rules of cinema that it stuck. A few lines of Wiki text burrowed into my skull, squirming to the surface every so often to disturb me anew. After all, horror isn’t always about gore or music or screams or images. Horror, at its core, is an idea. And once an idea begins haunting you, it’s almost impossible to exorcise. n

REUNION WORTH ATTENDING I’ve been binging The West Wing to revisit an admittedly fictional time when politics seemed glamorous and serious and inspirational instead of, well, you know. The original series (streaming on Netflix) holds up pretty well, and long-time fans should definitely check out the recent reunion/live theatrical presentation of the episode “Hartsfield’s Landing.” Every living cast member returns for the creatively staged production, which is delivered interspersed with “get out the vote” messages from Michelle Obama, Lin-Manuel Miranda and others. A West Wing Special to Benefit When We All Vote is now streaming on HBO Max. (DAN NAILEN)

THE CONSERVATIVE PODCAST LIBERALS SHOULD LISTEN TO The problem for liberals wanting to get out of their bubbles and consider conservative arguments is most conservative media is swamped by die-hard Trump acolytes and you walk away more certain of your opinions. But partake in an anti-Trump conservative site like the Bulwark, and you’ll encounter Aaron Sorkin Republicans — folks who might own a gun and dislike taxes, but spend their time delivering impassioned monologues about decency that make liberals feel good about themselves. The Dispatch podcast is the ideal middle ground, where contributors are happy to decry Trump’s actions as unconscionable and horrific, but still call out Biden’s debate dodges. Like, you know, a conservative would. (DANIEL WALTERS)

COURT OF PUBLIC OPINION Maybe I’m just a sucker for a courtroom drama, but I enjoyed Aaron Sorkin’s new film The Trial of the Chicago 7 (streaming on Netflix) despite it being one of the corniest movies in recent memory. Sorkin inherently knows how to pace this material — he wrote A Few Good Men, after all — and his take on the 1969 conspiracy trial of a group of anti-war revolutionaries, including Abbie Hoffman and Tom Hayden, is filled with his trademark purple dialogue and overheated performances from the likes of Eddie Redmayne and Sacha Baron Cohen. Did I laugh derisively at many scenes, including the maudlin ending? Sure did. But was I absorbed by it all? Somehow, yes. (NATHAN WEINBENDER)

OCTOBER 29, 2020 INLANDER 23


Zed’s Dead, Baby My first time… watching Pulp Fiction BY JEREMEY RANDRUP

W

henever I told people I would be watching Pulp Fiction for the first time, there was a gasp. Undoubtedly, someone would question my love for movies and who I am as a person. If I watch movies so much, how could I have not seen one of the most storied films in recent memory? Pulp Fiction was released in 1994 to great critical and commercial success, getting nominated for seven academy awards and winning Best Original Screenplay. Quentin Tarantino was still up and coming, and other classics like Forrest Gump and The Lion King were just coming out that year as well. Pulp Fiction brought John Travolta’s dying career back to life and boosted the likes of Samuel L. Jackson and Uma Thurman to greater stardom. Admittedly, even though I watch a lot of movies, my knowledge can be limited when it comes to films that came out before my time. I’m a millennial born in 1998 and most things I’ve watched from the ’90s and before were for my college film classes, like Citizen Kane, Battleship Potemkin, The Maltese Falcon and other super-old films. They are the film textbooks that every class looks to for the fundamentals of moviemaking, but they also were the same reason that I didn’t have much of an interest in older movies. They taught me a lot, but they were dated in terms of trying to retain the attention of younger people. For me, these were the overanalyzed films that I wrote essays and took mountains of notes on. “Did people think this movie was really good?” I’d think, “or was it good because they watched it when they were younger and more impressionable?” I often ask myself the same thing when it comes to TV shows, video games and music I liked when

24 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020

I was younger, and it was the question in my mind approaching Pulp Fiction. Further, Pulp Fiction would be my first Tarantino movie. All of the others slipped through my movie radar. I was diving into Tarantino’s wacky world with no prior knowledge, other than that there were many fan theories surrounding the movie, like the suitcase or the Band-Aid on the back of Marsellus Wallace’s neck. Besides that, I had no clue of what I was about to get into. The early scenes in Pulp Fiction were pivotal in keeping me glued to the screen. I realized immediately the dialogue was great when I first heard the menial yet punchy conversation between Vincent and Jules involving the “royale with cheese” and the foot massage that may have gotten someone murdered. It mixed mundane, everyday talk with more serious situations, a theme prevalent throughout the film. The dialogue, while pedestrian by nature, kept me hooked. Vincent and Jules were dangerous hitmen of a notorious gangster, but I saw them as my unlikely friends. Even in the crude business of murder, they were searching for philosophical answers to even the smallest questions in life. They were on the search for happiness, which was very relatable. I was wary of my initial trust of the two characters, though, as I realized the movie plays with your perception of people and the roles they play.

T

here is a certain unpredictability in Pulp Fiction that gives it a chaotic edge. The couple in the diner hold everyone hostage, only to be held hostage by Jules and Vincent. Coffee seems to be a little bit of an afterthought to the friend of Jules who is forced to help the duo hide a body stinking in his garage, but it becomes

the main focus when the Wolf comments on it minutes after. Marsellus Wallace, possibly the most powerful character in the movie, is put in a very vulnerable state and saved by Butch, the very person he was hunting. It was ultimately refreshing to watch a movie where I could never truly tell what was going to happen in the next scene, even though I surprisingly didn’t get lost either. I mentioned some older films were overanalyzed, but how can you not with Pulp Fiction? It has the perfect balance of things you know and things you don’t know. Why are bathrooms so prominent in the movie? What does the use of each song mean for the scenes they’re in? What’s in the suitcase? Why does Marsellus Wallace have that bandage? I found myself analyzing the movie in my head for days after watching, and I understood why it stuck in the minds of so many. I knew that I would only scratch the surface with one screening. I hardly felt the two-hours-and-34-minute run time. My favorite scene was when Vincent injected Mia with the adrenaline. The pacing was so good when the characters were working at a recklessly fast pace only to stop for a dilated three seconds before actually injecting Mia. I held my face in anticipation. It was the same when Butch was about to leave the store where Marsellus was getting raped. I actively spoke to my screen, urging Butch that “you can’t just leave him like that, man.” I grew more on edge when Butch took his time to choose a weapon from the front of the store. Just take the bat and go! This masterful time manipulation by Tarantino got me really excited. Watching Pulp Fiction gave me a new urge to watch all the other classic movies that I never got around to, since I realize that I may be missing out. My own perspective on filmmaking has been broadened in terms of how a movie can fit and stray away from audience expectations while still delivering on great performance, dialogue and scene construction. I’m going to watch the movie again, and I’ll make sure my friends watch it as well. n

SHOPPING

Vincent (John Travolta) and Jules (Samuel L. Jackson), two of Tarantino’s best characters.

PULL OUT AND KEEP

CULTURE | FILM


VOLUME 4 PRESENTED BY

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Dear 142 members who shopped at Swank Boutique during COVID-19, you’re bringing business back with every matching loungewear set. STCU and The Inlander are teaming up to support local businesses during COVID-19. To learn how to help and find great deals at local shops, go to btb.inlander.com.

Restaurant Guide

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SUPPORTING HOSPITALITY BUSINES IN OUR COMMUNITYSES

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INSIDE Shop Early, Shop Safe, Shop Local....................................6 Pots, Pans and Pandemics...........10 Bringing Hollywood Home ........ 14 Freshen Up..................................18 Closer to Home.......................... 22 Pandemic Pups & Covid Kitties............................26 Get Comfy................................. 30 Giving Season............................34 Spin City.................................... 38 House Sipping........................... 42 Sustainable Style....................... 46

On The Cover Auntie’s Bookstore in downtown Spokane

Your Comfort Zone It became clear early on in the pandemic

as the state shut down and many of us suddenly found ourselves hunkered down at home — retail businesses, even those deemed “nonessential” in the early days of coronavirus, sure feel essential when you’re trying to work at home, educate your kids at home and entertain the whole family at home. Spokane County’s retailers have been fighting to recover from those lost weeks in March and April ever since. And while the region’s shoppers were thrilled to return to their favorite bookstores and furniture outlets and clothing shops once they were allowed, all those businesses are functioning under dramatically limited capacity as the county remains in Phase 2 for the foreseeable future. Like many of the area’s restaurants, Spokane County retailers of all types found themselves forced to get creative. Suddenly, a mom-and-pop hardware store offers home delivery, or a dress shop creates a new live shopping experience done completely online using Facetime. Thankfully, many regional shoppers have responded positively to help local businesses navigate their new challenges. “2020 has been unlike anything I’ve ever seen,” Kerry Halls, manager of Auntie’s Bookstore, tells Atticus and Boo Radley’s co-owner Kris Dinnison in this Retail Guide. “But we’re really lucky to have the relationship with Spokane that we do. The people of Spokane show up for local businesses.” That’s going to have to continue as we

navigate the pandemic. And working together is the inspiration for Back to Business, a local marketing effort developed by the Inlander and a variety of community institutions, including STCU and Washington Trust Bank (see page 5 for more details). Together these partners recognize the importance of Spokane County’s retailers — not just in helping us look good, feel good and create happy homes, but also to the economic well-being of the entire region. These businesses are generally small, family-owned operations, and as they go, so goes the Inland Northwest. This Back to Business Guide, the fourth in a series, is part of that team effort. Inside you’ll learn more about how retailers are creatively and safely coping in these turbulent times. We’re covering a lot of ground, both geographically and in the kinds of retailers we talked to for this issue. We’ll help you find baking equipment, outfit your home theater, keep your new pandemic pet happy and healthy, and help you get a jump on buying gifts for the coming holidays. We’re also checking in with small business owners about the unique challenges of holiday shopping this year, from limited capacity to slow shipping times, and how you can still find that special something for everyone on your list. Readers will discover a call to action throughout the guide: We all need to do what we can to ensure these vital businesses continue to thrive. Thankfully, a day out shopping Spokane County’s stores is as fun as it is important. ◆

A GREAT DEAL! Grab the next Back to Business Guide on Nov. 19 when Volume 5 will be inserted in the Inlander. Find resources and details about this ongoing project at BTB.Inlander.com.

VOLUME 4

3


INTRO

How to Do... Everything! The Back to Business marketing campaign is all about helping our local community successfully and safely navigate the pandemic. Here’s how you can get involved.

Over 100 Businesses WHO WE ARE

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Check Out Each Business In The Guide

LUCKY VINTAGE AND PRETTY THINGS

How to...

...Support Local Retailers: Our retail stores are critical

to the Inland Northwest, and we all need to do our part to help them succeed right now. Fortunately, there are a lot of attractive reasons to shop local. Spending your hard-earned cash in local shops helps the local economy, keeps your neighbors employed and generates much-needed revenue for our local governments. So go buy some flowers, grab a new book, hit a record store or remodel your out-of-date kitchen or family room. While you’re at it, buy a gift card from a local shop to give to someone else. Also, help spread the word about what our local shops are doing well, and what great buys you’ve found. Finally, tell your friends and family to pick up this guide!

...Use this Guide: Inside you’ll find

lots of inviting stories about how Spokane County businesses are figuring out ways to thrive in these difficult times. But importantly, you’ll also see over 150 ads

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VOLUME 4

promoting area businesses. Each one includes all you need to know about your favorite local retailers. Spend a moment with each of these, and remember that each individual business represents something so much bigger: These are our friends and neighbors, they are major employers who provide the goods that make our lives a little better, but also pump money back into our local communities as a whole.

the end of the year; these pages feature our Fresh Sheet with the latest news, deals and specials being offered by area businesses. Find more at BTB.Inlander. com.

...Keep Up on the Latest Developments: This Back to Business

guidelines about social distancing and mask-wearing. Here’s an easy way to remember what to do: Spread Kindness Not COVID-19. (Find out more about that countywide awareness effort at kindnessnotcovid.org.) As a business owner, there are a lot of resources available to help you, starting with Back to Business and all of its partners. Additionally, visit inlandbizstrong.org for other resources. ◆

is the fourth in a series that will be published in the

...Stay Safe as a Consumer or Business Owner: For starters, follow public health

DO YOUR PART TO KEEP YOUR FAVORITE RETAIL SHOPS OPEN AND SAFE: MASK UP! coming weeks and months. In the meantime, find Back to Business pages in the Inlander every week through SPONSORED CONTENT


WELCOME

About Back to Business This guide is part of a local marketing effort in support of the hospitality sector developed by leading local institutions and community-minded businesses to help promote our region’s recovery. The project was unanimously approved for support by Spokane’s County Commissioners through the CARES Act with the express goal of supporting affected businesses. It should be noted that the Inlander’s editorial coverage remains separate and independent from this marketing effort.

AWESOME TOGETHER

Volume four is focused on retail and local shopping around Spokane County. Through the end of the year, watch the Inlander for more special Back To Business guides focused on businesses in our community, along with special features, sharing even more recovery stories.

Since 1902, Washington Trust Bank’s mission to put people first has never wavered. During these challenging times, we remain committed to what matters most. That dedication continues as our team works tirelessly to help local companies get back to business. Businesses are currently experiencing unprecedented economic hardship related to the outbreak of COVID-19 and it’s going to take all of us working together to support an economic recovery. Fortunately, we believe the Inland Northwest’s greatest asset is how we support each other as a community and rally behind those who need our help the most. Join us in celebrating and supporting the local businesses that make our region unique. We can all help business owners, employees, and their families thrive—buy local, pick up a meal to-go, surprise a friend with a gift card, post a positive review on social media, or even offer meaningful words of encouragement. It’s important that we all do what we can to make a difference. If there’s one thing we’re certain of, it’s that we’ll get through this together. We are #AwesomeTogether.

BUsinesses are working hard to serve customers and stay safe. Finding ways for everyone to connect with area businesses is critical in keeping our community moving forward during this challenging time.

Find deals, specials and business updates from area businesses at BTB.Inlander.com

... and in the weekly Back to Business pages in the Inlander Support provided from Spokane County through the CARES act

Jack Heath President/COO

Peter F. Stanton Chairman/CEO

BACK TO BUSINESS PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS

VOLUME 4

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ESSAY

AUNTIE'S BOOKSTORE 6

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SPONSORED CONTENT


Shop Early, Shop Safe,

Shop Local A local shopkeeper’s guide By Kris Dinnison

A few months ago, I wrote a piece for the Inlander about lists. In it, I rattled off the catalog of things I was worried about as we all tripped into the new reality thrust on the world by the pandemic. Fortunately, many of those worries KRIS have not come to DINNISON pass. Unfortunately, the months since March have brought brand new things to fret about. We reopened our two businesses, Atticus and Boo Radley’s, in June, and for the most part things are going as well as can be expected in the midst of the most unexpected and uncertain time most of us have ever experienced. Like most local businesses, we are so grateful for the incredible support we’ve gotten from the community, even as we continue to worry every day about other businesses, especially the restaurants, bars, and venues that are still unable to open or operate in any way that feels stable or even sustainable. But a few weeks ago, we started working through a new challenge: How would we manage holiday shopping safely? We’re all in this together, so I hoped to find some solutions to this challenge by reaching out to other local retailers. How were they planning to navigate the (hopefully) busier time during the holidays? But first I wanted to know how they were all holding up. Kerry Halls, manager at Auntie’s Bookstore, echoes what they all told me: Spokane supports its local businesses. “2020 has been unlike anything I’ve ever seen. But we’re really lucky to have the relationship with Spokane that we do. The people of Spokane show up for local businesses.” April Gascon-Stricker, who manages Prairie Dog Mercantile, says, in addition to customers, her staff keeps each other afloat. “What’s giving us hope are those positive customers who want us to succeed and stay safe by wearing their mask appropriately and keeping their distance. I also believe our team gives each other hope. We allow each other to be vulnerable, keep each other positive, and laugh when we can.” Even with things going OK, there are plenty of

persistent concerns still in the mix. The ongoing “conversations” about masks seem to be a problem with every business I talked to. “I’m worried that the longer this continues, the more anxious or frustrated people get,” Gascon-Stricker says. “When they do, they come in without a mask and take it out on the team. They are looking for that confrontation, and we are just doing our best to be safe, for our customers and ourselves.” Other concerns were more prosaic. “We’re definitely a little concerned with supply chain issues,” Halls says. “There’s a real chance that restocking this season is going to be tricky, especially once we’re in the full swing of things.” Gascon-Stricker’s seen some of the same problems at Prairie Dog Mercantile. “There are so many shipping delays and everything is still playing catch up.”

Of course, having product only matters if people have the resources to buy gifts. With so many people still out of work and pandemic aid stalled, many of us are wondering if people will be shopping at all. Nate Huston, owner of Giant Nerd Books, has been thinking a lot about that. “I worry about money, always money. Will people run out of it? Will they have enough left after food and rent/mortgage to buy books or art for themselves and each other?” One of the new concerns brought by the pandemic is managing the reduced capacity required to keep people safe. In our stores we can only accommodate about 20 percent of the people who showed up on a typical December weekend last year. “There’s a certain thrill to last-minute shopping, but I can’t imagine that working out too well for people this year,” Halls says. “Retail establishments in the area are going to be struggling with new capacity guidelines none of us have had to deal with before.” Smaller stores, like Giant Nerd, may adapt with more personalized shopping experiences. “If demand warrants, I may set up an appointment schedule to keep people from having to wait in the cold,” Huston says. Both Huston and Halls recommend people rethink their holiday shopping patterns and methods. “We do curbside pickup and mail-order business via the shop’s Instagram and Facebook pages,” Huston says. Halls says Auntie’s offers similar options and has some other ideas as well. “Shop early in the season. Do a little research ahead of time and be prepared with an idea of what you want,” she says. “It’s 2020, man! All bets are off! But in all seriousness, if there’s a must-have item on your list this year, book or otherwise, I’d highly

suggest you pick it up sooner rather than later.” Other suggestions included shopping in smaller groups, shopping during off-peak hours and on weekdays, and spreading shopping trips out over the next couple of months rather than leaving it all for the last couple weeks in December. “The idea of turning people away during the holidays is a very stressful one for local businesses, for a variety of reasons,” Halls says. “But like it or not, this is going to be a very different kind of season.”

With all these challenges, Spokane businesses still hope shoppers will keep up the commitment to shopping local, even when it means a little extra planning. “We encourage people to shop locally, even just buying gift cards, because so many small businesses have been affected by this pandemic. … A small purchase goes a long way for the little guys like us,” Gascon-Stricker says. Halls agrees: “It’s such a fantastic and simple way to safely support your home-town favorites.” And the restrictions might even make shopping a little more enjoyable for some. “I’ve found that people enjoy not feeling crowded or pressured,” Huston says. “There’s almost a specialness in being one of just a handful of customers in a place at a given time.” Gascon-Stricker agrees that the relationships formed by shopping local make it special. “It’s the advantage of being locally owned. Our customers are not just a customer; we really get to know them.” Finally, being open the last few months have given retailers some insight and wisdom into how we humans can support each other as the pandemic persists and the months roll by. “Be kind to one another,” Gascon-Stricker says. “It’s been a tough year; some of us have lost someone, and some of us have lost a little bit of hope. But at the end of the day, we all just want to be safe.” Such a simple thing, but it was reiterated by all the retailers we talked to. “Please remember to be kind,” Halls says, echoing the others. “Retail workers are going to be in the thick of it nonstop this season. … We’re trying to provide moments of normalcy and connection to our patrons in a very weird world. But we are all human, and we are all struggling. We need to take care of each other this year, now more than ever.” Huston’s message is even simpler: “Wear your masks and be civil to each other,” he suggests. “Good manners don’t cost a thing!” ◆

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COOKING

Pots, Pans and Pandemics

FAT DADDIO'S

The places to find the best equipment — and ingredients — for home chefs and bakers "After we reopened, it pretty much just exploded,” says Eric Frickle, owner of the KITCHEN ENGINE. In fact, the biggest challenge has just been keeping everything in stock — some of the most popular items are on backorder. Some of that’s because manufacturers have cut back their capacity because of COVID challenges. But a lot of that’s demand. “Housewares in general is up 50 to 70 percent. The demand went from normal to extreme,” Frickle says. “We saw the same thing in 2008 and 2009, when the whole recession hit.” When people eat out less — whether because of finances or pandemic-related restrictions — they eat in more. And so when you sell tools to make home cooking easier and tastier, it’s a great business to be in. Everything is selling better, but he’s been particularly surprised by the sales in baking supplies. “For so long we have been in this weird phase of ‘no carbs.’ Now everybody is like, ‘Screw it, we’re baking,’” Frickle says. “We’ve sold more bakeware in the last three months than we have in the last year and a half.” The bakeware they sell — everything from square cake pans and round cake pans to bread pans and springform pans — are from FAT DADDIO'S, another local company. These aren’t the cheap pans that wear out quickly, he notes, this is quality, professional-grade equipment. Other popular items include the Instapot-style all-inone-cooking gadgets like the Zavor Multicooker — a device Cook’s Illustrated named one of the best on the

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market a few years ago — and the Breville convection toaster oven, which also doubles as an air fryer and slow cooker. And if you ever cook meat and don’t have a Thermapen-style digital thermometer, you’re recklessly risking turning quality steak into shoe leather. You might also check out WILLIAMS SONOMA in River Park Square and bring home some fancy dishware, a quality mortar and pestle, or a spiffy spice grinder. If you’re particularly into dessert baking, check out CAROLYN'S CAKE AND CANDY SUPPLIES. With fewer weddings, graduations or big birthday parties, the cake business has been a bit rough, says owner Char Silva. But what has been popular? Sugar cookies. “They’re really neat cookies,” says Silva. “You can do a lot with the decoration.” Carolyn’s sells practically every shape of cookie cutter. Better yet, sculpt with chocolate. Carolyn’s sells everything from conventional caramel or bonbon molds, but also molds in the shape of letters, sporting equipment, even animals. “We have dolphins, fish, farm animals,” Silva says. “We have teddy bears, llamas, moose and zoo animals.” Of course, great cooking tools are useless without great ingredients. That’s where some of Spokane’s incredible grocery stores come in handy. Looking to make one of those 26-ingredient moles? Head to DE LEON FOODS for your pick of quality Mexican ingredients. Pick up SPONSORED CONTENT

some cactus paddles while you’re there to make some nopalitos. And don’t overlook the seasonal manzana peppers — a yellow chili with a slightly fruity heats that builds in intensity as you savor it. Perfect for salsa. And if you’re making Asian food? Head up to BEST ASIAN MARKET — this beloved Sprague Avenue staple closed down during the pandemic, but then opened back up, remodeled and as wonderful as ever. Look up a specific dish — like a sundubu jjigae Korean soup, one of the few acceptable uses of soft tofu — but prepare to be inspired and surprised. You could pick up king oyster mushrooms for grilled skewers, Thai bird chiles for spring roll wraps, duck eggs for a duck egg omelet, and gochujang chili paste for Korean stir fry paste. And always, always bring home a few cans of Thai curry paste and coconut milk. There are few cooking tasks as simple as improvising a curry — and few dishes as tasty. And speaking of spicy dishes, Spokane also features some premier spice companies. There’s MICHLITCH SPOKANE SPICE COMPANY which has been around for 72 years, selling blends like “Cajun Red Eye,” “Chili Chipotle Lime” and “Hickory Steak Rub.” And then there’s SPICEOLOGY: Whip up a fast sauce for a quick shrimp po’boy sandwich? Mix some of Spiceology’s Black Magic Cajun Rub and some sauce in with some mayonnaise. And if you’re not quite sure what flavor profile you want your meat or veggies to have, you can pretty much never go wrong with Spiceology’s Smoky Honey Habanero Spice Rub, a blend that somehow hits a sweet-smoky-spicy trifecta. ◆


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SHOWTIME

CHRIS DEL PIZZO AT HUPPIN'S

Bringing Hollywood Home

Where to get the essentials for a new pandemic-friendly home theater set-up If you're a movie buff who’s been stuck at home for the last six months, you’re no doubt missing being surrounded by an audience and taking in the latest films, absorbed in the visual grandeur and room-shaking sound of the cinema. But maybe you’ve started itching to set up your own movie theater in your rec room or basement, complete with crystal-clear projection image, bass-heavy surround sound and all the ambience you’d expect from your local mall multiplex. If you’ve been wanting to sate your inner cinephile, here are some tips for what you’ll need. Spokane’s go-to place for home electronics of all kinds is HUPPIN'S, which has been in business for a literal century. Since the pandemic hit, Huppin’s has leaned into the challenge of making your home more comfortable, and their new slogan — “life and technology connected” — reflects those changes. One of their biggest concentrations right now is on home theater set-ups and custom home installations, as more and more people want to make their living rooms into a makeshift multiplex. “With everyone staying at home and working on their homes, it makes more sense for us to kind of pivot the business,” says Chris Del Pizzo, the retail manager at Huppin’s. “We’re definitely not getting out of the retail side of things, but we’re going to make our showroom into more of an experience.” As far as setting up a state-of-the-art home theater under your own roof, audio is as important as the visuals. The closest you’ll get to approximating theater sound is with a fancy set of Atmos speakers, which literally envelops you in sound — not just from the sides but also from above with ceiling speakers and a center

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channel speaker on the ground in front of you. “It gives another dimension to the sound,” he says. “It allows the sound engineers for these movies to really play with sound, and in all three dimensions, which is really cool.” For something less ornate, Del Pizzo says a quality surround sound system will start around $2,500. If you’re considering setting up a digital projector, you’ll need to install it in a room where the light can be easily controlled (and, ideally, completely extinguished). Huppin’s sells Epson and Sony brands: Mid-range projectors can start at around $250 or so, with the more high-end, high-quality projectors starting around $1,500. The higher you go in price, the better the resolution of the projector. And if you go the route of the projector, you’ll also need a screen. Del Pizzo says customers should follow the advice that you “date a projector but marry a screen,” because the screen will likely outlast the technology of the projector. Projecting images directly onto a wall or flat surface could work, too, but a screen gives you better color and contrast. Huppin’s actually installs custom screens, depending on the size and light quality of your desired home theater room. Obviously, projectors require distance between the bulb and the screen and a complete lack of light for optimal picture quality. If you’ll be watching movies in a smaller room or in a room where light isn’t easily controlled, your best bet may be investing in a flat-panel 4K or 8K TV instead (Huppin’s sells Samsung, Sony and LG flat panels). In all of these scenarios, Huppin’s will do free inhome estimates within Spokane County to tell you how SPONSORED CONTENT

best to set up your new equipment. Of course, once you get your actual viewing equipment set up, you’re only halfway there — you also need some cozy furniture. Most multiplexes now have those plush recliner seats to approximate the experience of watching a movie from the comfort of your own living room, so simply wander down Furniture Row on North Division — SPOKANE FURNITURE, MOR FURNITURE FOR LESS and WALKER'S FURNITURE — all of which are open and have regular clearance sales. Try out a reclining loveseat with pillow-soft armrests, or go for leather seating designed specifically for home theater needs, with a center console and cup holders, so that your beverage of choice is always within reach. Ambience is important, too, so you’ll want to make your personal movie palace a shrine to all things Hollywood. Consider some framed art, posters of your favorite classic films — BOO RADLEY'S is easily the quirkiest gift shop in the downtown core, and one of the back corners of the store has a great selection of cool cinematic prints and retro movie posters. But don’t just pin them to your walls with scotch tape: THE GREAT FRAME-UP, which has a location in the NorthTown Mall, can set your prints in gilded frames worthy of a movie theater lobby. And what’s a movie theater experience without the popcorn? Sure, you could throw a bag of Orville Redenbacher in the microwave, or you could turn to CONCESSIONS SUPPLY near the Gonzaga neighborhood, which offers a catalog of commercial popcorn poppers. Maybe it’s a bit of an extravagance, but you’ll be glad you have it once the pandemic ends and you can host some truly epic movie nights. ◆


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DECOR

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Shops to help you take your home decor to the next level Many of us are reacquainting ourselves with our homes as we navigate the new normal of spending considerably more time there. And if shopping reports are any indication, we’re investing in the kinds of things that help us feel our experience is less about being housebound and more about being happy to have a home base. Pillows and blankets, for example, are very popular lately. Since reopening this summer, SAVVY HOME could barely stock enough of them, says Jacki Reed, who started the year-old business with close friend Kim Mehaffey. Like many retail business owners, the duo found themselves initially flummoxed by the statewide shutdown, yet quickly pivoted. They developed Facetime shopping options and upped the timeline for their online store, where customers can peruse such items as sassy barware, classy serving dishes and handsome furnishings. They’ve recently added small, private events to “continue that conversation with new and existing customers,” says Reed. “We’re all about welcoming people to come in and … try it all out.” Are you missing your usual First Friday jaunts? Get your art fix with home décor of a different sort like art glass or elegant textiles at the NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS & CULTURE's museum store. POTTERY PLACE PLUS is just such a place, too, with an everchanging selection of artwork, of course, but also

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locally made pottery and handcrafted wood items. Have some fun decorating for the holidays this year at UNIQUELY CHIC BOUTIQUE, which is packed with gifts, household décor and fun items that will make you smile. Spokane has numerous home décor outlets, many of which have grown up in clusters of creativity. Downtown, look for FIG TREE HOME, KIRISHIAN RUGS, 1900 HOUSE AND HOME, POTTERY BARN in River Park Square, and Spokane’s very own outlet for midcentury modern, DANIA FURNISHINGS. Drive up Division for many of Spokane’s longstanding furnishing outlets, including MOR FURNITURE FOR LESS and SPOKANE FURNITURE, which has a Spokane Valley location, too. Nearby is locally owned MADISON HOME, known for its exceptional design services and custom furnishing options, as well as for its sister company, MADISON COUNTRY. Heading north towards the Y, discover ENNIS FINE FURNITURE and CASUAL SPACES FURNITURE, which specializes in living rooms and can help you turn that spare room into a rec room the whole family will enjoy. Don’t forget about Spokane’s rich vintage market, like TOSSED AND FOUND, BOULEVARD MERCANTILE and METRO ECLECTIC, all of which can help you curate your own unique home décor vibe. Heading east from Spokane, Sprague Union District continues to evolve as a district for fun and interesting shops like RAIL CREEK FURNITURE. TIN ROOF FURSPONSORED CONTENT

NITURE has been a mainstay on Sprague in one form or another since 1945 and is now run by third-generation owner Heather Hanley. In addition to Tin Roof and its furniture outlet, RESKUED, Hanley recently launched BIDE AND BURGEON in the original building owned by her grandfather so many years ago. The focus of Bide and Burgeon is “accessibly priced” items so no special order pieces, says Hanley, who is stocking the 4,000-square-foot showroom to the hilt and keeping a large inventory of quick-ship items. “You can spend a whole afternoon there,” Hanley says of the new space. For those missing international travel, a trip to TROVATO INTERIORS is just the ticket. Let co-owner Susan Usai be your guide at Trovato, which means “found” in Italian. A blue-and-white overstuffed vase feels like England or France, while new pillows from carpet remnants suggest eastern realms. See them all in one place at Trovato. If some of the joy of shopping is in leisurely exploring, consider making a day of it with a road trip. Head to Vinegar Flats for LUCKY VINTAGE AND PRETTY THINGS or out to Rockford where you’ll find a huge assortment of décor from country to rustic at HURD MERCANTILE AND COMPANY. And in Liberty Lake, CONSIGN FURNITURE promises to amaze visitors with nearly 60,000 square feet of furnishings and décor, including antiques and one-of-a-kind items. ◆


dearly 509-319-7096

consignment bridal shop

SPOKANE [ EAST ]

dearlyconsignmentbridal.com 1003 E TRENT AVE #101

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

126 N. WASHINGTON

spokane boutique // hair salon Partner

WHILE WE KNOW TRAVELING LOOKS DIFFERENT

right now, we want to assure you that Spokane is focused on keeping you and your family safe and healthy. We encourage locals and visitors alike to be socially responsible to help ensure the health and safety of others.

quality, sustainability, community. curated artisan goods // eco-friendly hair salon SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

VisitSpokane.com 20 W MAIN AVE

beautiful, one of a kind hand painted furniture and home decor.

We’ll help you build your best wardrobe yet.

resale never looked so good

Wed to Sat 11:30 to 4:00 & By Appointment (509) 939-5939

Mon-Fri 10am-6pm, Sat 10am-5pm Closed Sunday

509.747.0890

Stop in for a visit & follow us online. elsielaneboutique.com

echoconsignment.com SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

1033 W 1ST AVE

SPOKANE VALLEY

100 N HOUK ROAD

VOLUME 4

19


or more information about Back To Business

formerly Spice & Vine Mercantile 509-315-4036 • SpiceAndVineMerc.com

SPOKANE VALLEY

Visit BTB.Inlander.com

328 N. SULLIVAN, SUITE 2

Estheticians are a girl’s Best Friend!

To inquire about being included in future Back To Business editions 509.655.9354 Open M-F 9am-7pm | Sat 9am-3pm empoweraestheticsspokane.com

mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com

Full Service Hair Salon Skin & Beauty Specialists Beauty Supply Store & Jewelry Shop

509.533.0598 | | endlessbeautysolutions.com SPOKANE [ SOUTH ]

804 S MONROE ST SUITE 200

SPOKANE [ SOUTH ]

2528 E 29TH AVE

CO M FO R T SO LU T I O N S

Visit our Showroom or Shop Online

FIREPLACE & HEARTH GRILLS & OUTDOOR DUCTLESS & HVAC Thank you to our Community for your support and loyalty. We are 92 years strong because of you!

Fashion Eyewear For All Ages

Stop by to check out the new Michael Kors glasses. 509-468-2020 SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

20

falcospokane.com • 509.926.8911 9671 N. NEVADA ST, SUITE 210

VOLUME 4

SPOKANE VALLEY

SPONSORED CONTENT

9310 E SPRAGUE AVE


FARM

Salvation M E D I C A L L A K E , WA

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October 31st • 15% OFF YOUR ENTIRE PURCHASE Wed-Saturday 10-4pm • A simple 16 minute drive west from Downtown Spokane 509.933.1723 • farmsalvation.com

MEDICAL LAKE

106 S LEFEVRE

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

2 W 3RD AVE

Partner

SINCE 1942, the West Plains Chamber has served the business community in Airway Heights, Cheney, Medical Lake, Fairchild AFB and West Spokane County. Today we are over 320 members strong and one of the most engaging and dynamic chambers in the state and serving one of the fastest growing areas in the state.

Shop in store! Mon-Sat 12-6pm 1325 W 1st Ave Downtown Spokane Shop online! shopfringeandfray.square.site

WestPlainsChamber.org

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

1325 W 1ST AVE

Small Gaming Events

Indoor Shopping Curbside Pick-up Online Ordering Shipping Available

Legendary Precautions Temperature taken Masks required Barriers between players Social distancing

509-443-5992 • thegamershaven.net SPOKANE VALLEY

Disinfected between rounds

509-808-2395 2114 N PINES RD SUITE 2

genusbrewing.com

SPOKANE VALLEY

17018 E SPRAGUE AVE

VOLUME 4

21


TOOLS

Closer to Home If you’re stuck inside, your local hardware store can help with your home improvement projects

MILLER'S HARDWARE

This spring, under quarantine, everyone suddenly had to live and work at home, and often they didn’t like what they saw. There were rooms to paint. Gardens to plant. Things to fix. And no longer could they say that they just didn’t have time to do it. It’s why you could drive by the Home Depot or Lowe’s on a Saturday and see a line of people extended around the parking lot. But Larry Myers, owner of RIVER RIDGE HARDWARE on Garland Street, says there’s always another option. Why not try your friendly locally owned hardware store? “Give your local hardware store a call and see if they have what you’re looking for before you park a mile away at one of the big box stores,” Myers says. Myers purchased River Ridge hardware in 2017. He’d never owned a hardware store before, but he had managed other businesses. And he knows what matters: Good customer service. That’s what separates them from the bigger stores, he says. “The first thing you get when you walk in is you’re greeted at the door, and then somebody immediately asks if we can help you,” he says. Myers says it’s been as busy as ever this year. It’s not just that people were at home more; some had stimulus money to throw around, too. Not to mention some savings from not filling up the gas tank, or going out for meals. It’s the same at MILLER'S HARDWARE, on the South Hill. Miller’s closed earlier this year, not long after the pandemic started, leaving customers confused. Stace Heston, who owns the Ace Hardware on Ninth and Monroe, says customers kept asking him what happened to Miller’s, clearly upset that the beloved store was no more. Heston, who drives by Miller’s every day on his way to work, says he saw an opportunity. He purchased Miller’s and opened it back up the first week of August. Since then, he says he’s spent 99 percent of his time there. That’s because he’s immediately made some changes: A new paint department, a new plumbing department, a new lawn and garden department, and an expansion of the hardware department. He hopes the changes make it easier for the customers to find what they’re looking for — it’s better when things are categorized, so customers can find things in one place. Plus, they’ve started selling grills, which Miller’s didn’t have before. The response from locals has been great, and Heston says he’s grateful for the support. Business during the pandemic has been good, he says. In fact, it’s been steadily growing at Miller’s since they took over. Hardware stores were deemed essential under the early shutdown orders, largely because they sell plumbing supplies. But also because “people need to maintain their houses,” Heston says. Heston says his ACE HARDWARE store has been doing well during the pandemic as well. There are locally owned Ace locations throughout the area. In the Valley, go ahead and try SAVEMORE BUILDING SUPPLY. Because you can’t replace the service you get at a local hardware store. “Every one of us, as a small business owner, we really appreciate and care for everyone,” Myers says. ◆

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SPONSORED CONTENT


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SPOKANE

ONLINE ONLY

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To check out the Fresh Sheet

Visit BTB.Inlander.com or pick up the Inlander To submit a Deal, Special or Business Update

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16814 E SPRAGUE AVE

hapter Two

d Pacific Kitchen and Hogwash Whiskey Den continue serving ive drinks and dishes after ownership shift

IS 30 YEARS OLD!

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VOLUME 4

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Open 7 days a week 9am-6pm

A Special Shopping Experience!

or more information about Back To Businesswww.highcountryorchard.com | (509) 238-9545

Visit BTB.Inlander.com To inquire about being included in future Back To Business editions

COLBERT GREENBLUFF

Yarn, roving, top, fleece, and select fiber handwork

8518 E GREENBLUFF RD

We sell Louet and Schacht looms & spinning wheels.

mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com

By appointment only (509)309-3239 • honestinivory.com •

SPOKANE [ EAST ]

1003 E TRENT AVE #105

www.thehookandneedlenook.com • 509-368-9527

SPOKANE [ NORTH ] MONROE DISTRICT

1508 N MONROE ST

SPOKANE [ NORTH ] FAIRWOOD DISTRICT

413 W HASTINGS RD

MODERN, UNIQUE ANTIQUE & ARTISAN

(509) 473-9815 SPOKANE VALLEY

24

17325 E SPRAGUE AVE

VOLUME 4


We’re here for you

On Trend Fashion

For Women of Every Shape & Size

Book online now • www.Jaazzsalon.com • 509-838-4995

509

Across from Sushi.com

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

421 W. MAIN STREET

321-2330

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SPOKANE VALLEY

m

323 S PINES

Fashion Floorward Rug Collections

SPOKANE’S PREMIER GOLF SHOP PGA certified experts Lessons Open to the public

kalispelgolf.com 2020 PNWPGA Merchandiser of the Year - Resort SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

Free Shipping | Fully Guaranteed Rug Washing | Open 9am-5pm Daily | kirishianrugs.com | 509.624.8084

2010 W WAIKIKI RD

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

220 EAST 2ND AVE

FOR NOW, NOT FOREVER Keep Wearing a Mask

Keep Washing UP

Keep DISTANCING

VOLUME 4

25


PETS

AQUILA BROWN AT YUPPY PUPPY

Pandemic Pups & Covid Kitties

With pet adoptions setting records, here’s where to treat your new fur baby right Perhaps when coronavirus hit you found yourself working from home, juggling countless Zoom calls while entertaining your suddenly home-schooling kids and converting your wardrobe into a lovely array of sweatpants. And perhaps you also thought, “You know, now is the perfect time to get a puppy.” You’re not alone. Reports from across the country and from Spokane County’s own adoption centers like the SPOKANE HUMANE SOCIETY and SCRAPS indicated throughout the pandemic thus far that pet adoptions are on a record pace. That was true when prospective adopters had to schedule visits by appointment, and remains so now that those adoption centers are back to (a socially distanced, masked) semi-normal. Considering the pandemic shows little sign of slowing down heading toward winter, it’s safe to say 2020 will be memorable for countless families celebrating adoptions of dogs, cats and all manner of critters. And if you haven’t adopted a new pet yet, well, Christmas is right around the corner. Thankfully, the area has a wide array of shops, trainers and groomers to help you pamper your new family member. You can find outlets of major pet stores like PETCO and PETSMART in Spokane County, but you can also find everything those places have to offer, and then

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some, in locally owned businesses like PRAIRIE DOG PET MERCANTILE, which offers everything from food to toys and treats at locations on Spokane’s South Hill and Kendall Yards. Likewise, URBAN CANINE has two outlets to serve pet owners, on the South Hill and in North Spokane, and they carry an impressive array of food, treats, toys and clothes for your dogs and cats. YUPPY PUPPY has plenty of supplies, too, at its downtown Spokane and North Spokane locations, and also offers professional grooming, do-it-yourself washing stations at both spots where you can clean your dog with their supplies (and keep your own house dry!), and doggie day care at its northside outlet. Owner Aquila Brown said her downtown outlet took a pandemic hit due to the lack of tourists and downtown workers, and once Washington Gov. Jay Inslee lifted restrictions on grooming in May, it was hard for her staff to catch up with all the shaggy pups needing a haircut. Brown was frustrated that her small business wasn’t allowed to do grooming while big-box pet stores were early on in the pandemic. “It was extra frustrating. It really felt like they were targeting the little guys specifically,” Brown says. NORTHWEST SEED & PET has been helping owners of animals large and small in Spokane County for 76 years. Whether you have a dog or cat, or something a little more specialized like a bird, fish, rabbit

or reptile, their locations on North Division and East Sprague have everything you need to keep your pets healthy and happy. BARK, A RESCUE PUB has been a pandemic business success story so far. The pub on the north side of downtown Spokane partnered with the Spokane Humane Society to showcase animals in need of adoption at a space adjacent to its tasteful dining room and bar spaces. The spot in the former Broadview Dairy building opened in early August and successfully found homes for dozens of animals in its first months open. In North Spokane, the area’s first cat cafe opened this spring. KITTY CANTINA teamed with SPOKANIMAL to keep kitties stocked for visitors and potential adopters during the pandemic, important since SpokAnimal’s own shelter has been closed due to COVID. All of the pandemic adoptions have made life busy for trainers, too. DIAMONDS IN THE RUFF is used to having classes full of yapping pups and their families, but the arrival of the coronavirus forced them to postpone some classes, then dramatically limit their sizes once they were allowed to reopen. The warm months allowed for a large slate of classes at the school’s outdoor training field, but expect classes inside during the coming cold months to fill up fast. You’ll want to get your family’s new furry face signed up there or with another trainer as early as you can. ◆


FAIR TRADE • HANDMADE • LOCAL GIFTS • CLOTHING • ACCESSORIES • HOME GOODS

Discover your inner chef

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Open 12-5:30pm or by appointment

thekitchenengine.com | 328-3335 SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] FLOUR MILL

(509) 464-7677 • kizurispokane.com 621 W. MALLON

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

35 W. MAIN

THE HAPPIEST HOUR – OR LONGER. Complimentary bubbly, access to our indoor pool and whirlpool, and experiential showers are included with every La Rive Spa service. And we've taken extra steps to ensure that not only will you have a relaxing experience, but a safe one too.

NORTHERNQUEST.COM | 509.481.6108

AIRWAY HEIGHTS NORTHERN QUEST

VOLUME 1 PRESENTED BY

RESTAURANT

Guide

A GUIDE TO SUPPORTING HOSPITALITY BUSINESSES IN OUR COMMUNITY

LOOK FOR THE NEXT

Back to Business Restaurant Guide

VOLUME 3 PRESENTED BY

RESTAURANT BACK TO BUSINESS PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

Guide

Spokane County, Washington ZDATE, 2020 INLANDER

1

SUPPORTING HOSPITALITY BUSINESSES IN OUR COMMUNITY

VOLUME 5: SHOPPING in the NOVEMBER 19, 2020

BACK TO BUSINESS PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

Spokane County, Washington

100 N HAYFORD RD.

The only retailer of La-Z-Boy Furniture in Spokane County Our delivery crew always uses masks, gloves and booties before entering our customers homes. They are very careful to insure the safety of each customer and the crew

We’ve got forsomething Everyone on your list!

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for wine tasting, shopping & more

(509) 465-4380 www.la-z-boy.com SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

Winery & Gift Shop

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10205 N DIVISION ST

13030 E. Indiana Ave | Spokane, WA 509-926-0164 | 1-800-LATAHCR

www.latahcreek.com SPOKANE VALLEY

13030 E INDIANA AVE

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CURBSIDE PICK-UP • PRIVATE APPOINTMENT • SHIPPING AVAILABLE

Local family owned variety store in Greenacres filled with home decor, gifts, and treasures! Come check out our Christmas room!

Open Tuesday-Saturday 12pm - 5pm (509) 414-0051 • LibertyAcresMercantile.com

or more information about Back To Business

Visit BTB.Inlander.com

Toys, Arts, Crafts, Fabrics, Thread, Quilting Materials, Antiques, Books, Hats, Bird Houses, Collectibles, Decorations, Antique Kitchen, Pictures, Clothes... You name it!

SPOKANE VALLEY

18223 E APPLEWAY AVE

To inquire about being included in future Back To Business editions

mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

159 S LINCOLN ST

SPOKANE VALLEY

9616 E SPRAGUE AVE

Breathe Life into Your Home.

Featuring the Newest Trends in Living Room, Dining Room, Home office & Bed Room Furniture Wednesday-Saturday 10-4pm • 509-321-7230 SPOKANE [ SOUTH ]

28

1406 S EMPIRE WAY

VOLUME 4

STORE HOURS: Mon-Sat 10a–5p • Sun 12p–4p

madisonhomenw.com | (509) 325-1815

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

2826 N. RUBY


Market Street ANTIQUES

Fine Antiques • Vintage • Collectibles • Specialty items and much more!

Antique Mall 20+ Dealers 2 Full Floors 509-482-2066 • MarketStreetAntiques.com

SPOKANE [ NORTH ] MONROE DISTRICT

3111 N. MONROE ST

Spokane’s biggest and best Comic, Game, Magic the Gathering and more store

SPOKANE [ NORTH ] HILLYARD

4912 N. MARKET ST

Mid-Century, Danish Modern, and Contemporary Furniture

Mon-Sun: 10 am - 9 pm

(509) 624-0957 • www.merlyns.biz SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

Open Thur & Sat 12p - 5p or by appointment MetroEclectic.com | 15 W MAIN AVE

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

604 N MONROE ST

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29


CASUAL

FLEET FEET

Get Comfy

Stocking up on cozy athleisure wear for autumn Let's be honest: Working from home means our athleisure wear is getting more use than normal. Let’s be more honest: It’s past time to retire those sweatpants and stock up on some new pieces. Whether you’re looking for something to get you through Zoom conferences in comfort and style, or dreaming of your next camping trip, there are plenty of shops all across Spokane County to get what you need. You can design yourself a quest for the perfect pair of yoga pants without leaving Spokane’s Main Avenue, since specialty stores LULULEMON and ATHLETA are within walking distance of each other. Then, continue your tour-de-slouch down the street to THE NORTH FACE for iconically soft sweatshirts and pants, and the NIKE FACTORY STORE for shoes and men’s and women’s apparel. Other downtown retailers that we don’t always associate with gym clothes also have plenty to offer, like NORDSTROM and THE GAP. Of course, it isn’t all happening downtown. Cross the river heading north, and you’ll find answers to all of your outdoor needs at REI, including equipment for more adventurous activities. If you’re further north and are of the hunting persuasion, SPORTSMAN'S WARE-

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HOUSE offers gear for adults and kids. The General Store offers a wide array of equipment, including clothes, but also all kinds of sporting goods you can imagine to keep your kids occupied and active while they’re stuck at home. If you’re looking for a sports bra, you can’t beat the NorthTown Mall. Victoria's SECRET has options in a variety of different sizes and styles and will guarantee that you get the right fit, and while you’re there, you might as well indulge in some PINK sweatpants. If traditional retailers never seem to carry your size, check out TORRID for an unparalleled selection of plus-size sports bras in bright prints and colors. Speaking of women’s sporting clothes, TITLE NINE is nestled in the middle of the Perry District, a Spokane neighborhood known for its market and accumulating mass of niche shops and restaurants. Named after the landmark civil rights law that expanded sporting opportunities to female students, Title Nine stocks all kinds of athletic gear from plus-size swimsuits to sneakers. Lots of Spokane’s athletic wear stops have locations in the Valley, too. FLEET FEET now has three locations: Kendall Yards, in the Valley, and in North Spokane.

They provide expert, hands-on help in selecting your next running or walking shoe. After observing your gait, their staff will make recommendations for inserts and shoe type so you can have the safest and most comfortable treks possible. JUST SPORTS, located both in the NorthTown Mall and in the Spokane Valley Mall, has licensed professional and college sports apparel so you can don your favorite players’ jerseys. Also in the Valley Mall are LIDS, a store specializing in licensed team hats, and FOOT LOCKER which stocks a variety of shoes and apparel. When you’re thinking of where to pick up your next favorite pair of stretchy pants, don’t forget our local exercise studios. BEYOUTIFUL HOT YOGA on the South Hill and SPOKANE BARRE above the Globe on Division offer some handpicked options to purchase and carry out of the lobby, or change into for a sweat session at the same place. Whether you’re exercising at home, getting your outdoor time from jogs and hikes, or have no interest in raising your heart rate but want to sit comfortably, you deserve to look and feel your best. With everything so uncertain and stressful, our waistbands should at least be able to relax. ◆


ice Company p S s e’ n ka o p S re We a & Herbs ly of Spices TR Y

ES

Large Supp

IC O UR S P

Seasonings for sausage and jerky making as well as rubs and sprinkles to compliment every meal. If you need casings or knives or processing supplies we’ve got you covered.

Come by and let us help you spice up your life. Shipping Available

509-624-1490 • spokanespice.com

SPOKANE [ EAST ]

130 N STONE ST

20% OFF OF THE ENTIRE PURCHASE if you mention the Inlander

www.NorthSpokaneApothecary.com | (509)919-3759 SPOKANE [NORTH ]

NICKSBOOTS.COM

Online Ordering

9323 N. DIVISION ST.

SPOKANE VALLEY

6510 E SPRAGUE AVE

Pick up the Inlander every week for more recovery stories and community business features.

FREE, Every Thursday

dining

· shoppi

ng · cu

Businesses are working hard to serve Support them customers and you supp and stay safe: ort our regio n’s recovery.

A COLORFUL

FLIGHT

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BACK TO

BUSINES S PARTNER

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12 INLANDER OCTOB

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going into COVID,” dining in the buildi says Brandt. He weather ng’s alley adds that holds will contin outdo ue “as long or patio Once tempeout.” as the ratures door-to-do drop, Iron Goat also early on or delivery, a service and then plans “We found paused during that it had exper to reinstate imented the summ that peop delivered with er le were to their pretty excite months. homes,” ing chef he who puts d of positi out some laughs. “And we to have beer ve really great have an might be feedback on that. amazpretty So we’re stuff. We just got thinking a lot Of cours good for us to that continue that’s gettin e, Iron Goat that in the it actually isn’t future.” COVID-19 g into the Oktob the only Spok ane-a erfest spirit Brick West guidelines. Perry while still rea brewery sonal beers and many others Street, Snow Eater adhering to are all releas , Whistle also have . If they also have Punk, some sort dining facilit ing their own (Check seaof food ies, they with your typically favorite component to tap this match month brewery to see what’ the theme. ers at faceb ; stay conne s special ook.com/i cted to the on “Brewing nwaletrail.) Inland NW Craft Brewschedules can get kind of crazy with the whole

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ncial reso urces for busines

(509) 328-5838 www.northwestgolfcars.com

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Customer Appreciation Day every Wednesday

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2422 E. Sprague - 534.0694 U 7302 N. Division - 484.7387 Lawn, Garden, Pets, Fish, Ponds, House Plants & Wild Birds SPOKANE VALLEY

7001 E TRENT AVE

BA KITC

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SPOKANE [ NORTH, DOWNTOWN ] SPRAGUEUNION DISTRICT

VOLUME 4

31


HOURS* m 10am - 6p Mon-Sat: - 3pm Sun: 11am

and we y is open *The lobb ELIVERY and D r also offe PICKUP CURBSIDE

or more information about Back To Business

Visit BTB.Inlander.com

509-535-4864 • Spokane@nothingbundtcakes.com

SPOKANE [ SOUTH ]

2525 E 29TH AVE. SUITE 1B

To inquire about being included in future Back To Business editions

mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com upcycled, repurposed furniture, hand-painted signs, gifts, apparel, accessories and home decor. Breathing New Life Into Old Things (509) 326-6999 | www.paintinmyhair.com in-store shopping // Curbside Pick-up // Online Ordering // Private Appointment SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

304 W PACIFIC

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

3036 N MONROE ST

Everything for Knitting, Weaving and Spinning! Your Home Project Experts

ORDER BY PHONE - ONLINE QUOTES - WE DELIVER!

(509) 536-7746 • paradisefibers.com SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

32

225 W INDIANA AVE

VOLUME 4

FENCING

HARDSCAPES

SPOKANE [ EAST ]

SIDING

CABINETS

WINDOWS

DOORS

4111 E FRANCIS AVE


PARRISH & GROVE botanicals

HAVE FUNOPOLY. E

TAMAR PUBLIC HOACK USE

926 W SPR

AGUE

TERRA BL

ANCA

NROE

ICORN

518 W RIV

ERSIDE

INDABA CO

FFEE

WANDER LU DELICATO ST

803

DAVID’S PIZ

ZA

421 W MA

W MALLO N

IN

SH

621 W MA EBA THE FLOUR LLON MILL

QUEEN OF

912 W SPR AGU

110 S MO

GILDED UN

19 W MAIN

T

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

PLAY KINDOPOLY. INCREDIB URGE & EGGS R

saranac commons

909 W FIRS

Hours Wednesday - Saturday 12pm - 6pm • Sunday 10-4pm

T

222 N HOW ARD

ATTICUS COFFE & GIFTS E

835 N POS

EVA BROTHERSNS COFFEE

LS

KANE FAL

T

O’DOHERT IRISH GR Y’S ILLE

108 N POS

BISTANGO

525 W SPO

T ST

TAQUERIA

BOO RADL

232 N HOW ARD

EY’S

10 N POS

COCHINITO N TOW WN AT D O F E R RG HAT OF ANE.O LL T AS TONSPOK A H E W LOR ANE NTO EXP SPOK W.DOW

WHIZ KID

S RIVER PAR K SQU 3RD FLOOR ARE

BEN & JER

RIVER PAR RY’S K SQU 3RD FLOOR ARE

112 N WA

LL

THOMAS COFFEE ROHAMMER ASTER

WW

OIL & VIN

RIVER PAR EGAR K SQU 2ND FLOOR ARE

ANDERSON MEN’S CLO & CO. RIVER PAR THIER K SQU 1ST FLOOR ARE

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

21 E LINCOLN ST

Coffee | Wine | Chocolate | Specialty Foods Wine Dinners | Event Space

THE MELTI

NG POT

707 W MA 2ND FLOORIN

Through November 9, catch compassion, have some fun, and have a chance to win $500 when you play Kindopoly. You’ll learn fun facts about our amazing downtown while you visit businesses that make our city one-of-a-kind. So, it’s your move. Go to downtownspokane.org/play-kindopoly to get started now.

(509) 328-4257 SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

- One block off NW Blvd & Monroe St.

Find a complete list of all downtown destinations and events at www.downtownspokane.org

2010 N MADISON ST

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GIFTS

FROM HERE

GIVING SEASON Where to shop for gifts heading into the holidays From flowers and sweet treats to books, mugs and dish towels with those funny sayings on them, Spokane County’s got some incredible gift options for everyone on your list as we head into the holiday season. Many people are finding it’s more important than ever to shop local, and stores are doing their part in turn to keep customers safe. Some locations provide delivery throughout the county or virtual shopping that enables you to simply pick up your order at the curb.

BOO RADLEY'S

Remember how Boo Radley, the character in To Kill a Mockingbird, collected little knick-knacks and hid them in a tree? Boo Radley’s in downtown Spokane is kind of like that. Walk in to discover a selection of toys and quirky gifts for the young and young at heart right in the heart of downtown. 232 N. Howard St., facebook. com/BooRads, 456-7479

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VOLUME 4

FROM HERE

A store full of art and gifts made by local artists, yearround? Yes, please. From Here gives you the chance to buy prints, mugs, cards, jewelry and many other oneof-a-kind gifts while supporting Spokane-area artists at the first retail store run by arts organization Terrain. 808 W. Main St., Suite 251, terrainspokane.com/ fromhere, 808-2943

SIMPLY NORTHWEST

Whether you want to pop into the store to pick out some gifts on your own, or go online to buy a beautiful gift basket put together by staff, Simply Northwest offers a variety of options for your gift-giving needs. Many local gift baskets are available, featuring everything from Washington wine and huckleberries to novelty mugs and sweets. You can even pay to have your gift delivered to many parts of Spokane County. 11806 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley, simplynorthwest.com, 927-8206

THE GREAT PNW

With an extensive online presence, the Great PNW is perfect for those shoppers who want to support a local Spokane business while shopping remotely. The brand’s apparel features hip designs for those who are in love with the Pacific Northwest. Many designs are inspired by popular PNW outdoor passions, from hiking in the beautiful mountains and forests to fishing and road trips. thegreatpnw.com, info@thegreatpnw.com

Ritters Garden & Gifts

With indoor and outdoor garden options year-round, this local Spokane store can meet your green thumb needs. Apart from plant and garden supplies and a beautiful selection of plants, the shop in North Spokane also offers gift baskets, a selection of home decor, and tasty spreads, dips and treats. Virtual shopping is available for those who require curbside assistance. 10120 N. Division St., 4ritter.com, 467-5258 ◆


antiques • vintage items • oddities • handmade crafts • tools • & much more!

PLAY IT AGAIN SPORTS IS YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD SPORTING GOODS STORE OFFERING NEW AND QUALITY USED SPORTS AND FITNESS EQUIPMENT

The most

unique & exciting

WE HAVE ADULT AND KIDS SKI AND SNOWBOARD RENTALS!

place to visit in the

Spokane Valley!

Pine Street Market & Boutique SPOKANE VALLEY

509-263-2232 12107 E SPRAGUE AVE

OPEN 10AM - 6PM MONDAY-SATURDAY • 509-368-9882 www.PlayItAgainSportsSpokaneWA.com SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

1808 W. FRANCIS

VOLUME 1 PRESENTED BY

Back To Business Guides and much more…

RESTAURANT

Guide

A GUIDE TO SUPPORTING HOSPITALITY BUSINESSES IN OUR COMMUNITY

AVAILABLE AT VOLUME 3 PRESENTED BY

Community Centers

RESTAURANT BACK TO BUSINESS PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

at these area grocery stores

Guide Spokane County, Washington ZDATE, 2020 INLANDER

1

SUPPORTING HOSPITALITY BUSINESSES IN OUR COMMUNITY

BACK TO BUSINESS PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS

ADVERTISING SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

Spokane County, Washington

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN, NORTH ] • SPOKANE VALLEY VALLEY MALL, PINES RD

Fine Crafted Unique Gifts All Locally Handmade

Shop in person (Covid safety precautions strictly followed) Shop online for in-store or curbside pickup. We also ship!

Next to Aunties Bookstore • 509-327-6920 • potteryplaceplus.com DEER PARK

5552 S WALLBRIDGE RD

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

203 N WASHINGTON

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35


• Deep cleans, dries fast, no residue • Specializing in pet odor removal

Call now & receive

• Free estimates

466-1057 or 327 -5676 www.radiantrugs.com

• Certified, licensed & insured

• Tile & grout cleaning or more information about Back To Business

Visit BTB.Inlander.com

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

To inquire about being included in future Back To Business editions

mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com

Vintage Farmhouse Rustic Home Decor | rebeljunk.com | Open Mon-Sat 10a-5p

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]•MEAD • SPOKANE VALLEY • CDA

Vintage, Vintage Reproductions & Handcrafted Goods (509) 981-9155 CHENEY

409 1ST ST

Fall Fashion 2020

12501 N. Division St. 509-868-0846

reeceboutique.com SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

36

12501 N. DIVISION ST

VOLUME 4

Reskued.com

@tinroofreskued

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] SPRAGUEUNION DISTRICT

1702 E RIVERSIDE AVE


REVIVAL LIGHTING DIY Record Label and Store

Home Furnishings, Lighting and Luxury Gifts

New & Used Vinyl Records, Cassettes, CD’s & Stereo Equipment

OPEN MON-SAT 9AM-5PM SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

1927 W NORTHWEST BLVD

| REVIVALLIGHTING.COM (509) 747-4552

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

14 W MAIN ST

Vintage Rare & Cool Guitars RiverCityGuitars.com • 509-818-7693 SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

415 W MAIN AVE SUITE 100

SPOKANE [ SOUTH ]

2910 E 29TH AVE

Spread Kindness. It's Contagious! VOLUME 4

37


MUSIC

Spin City

TOTAL TRASH RECORDS

Spokane’s record stores crank up the sounds that make the city a little more vibrant It was only about a decade ago that vinyl records seemed destined for obsolescence, an antiquated medium that was bound to be eclipsed by CDs and MP3s. But now the sonic shoe is on the other foot: Sales of vinyl records not only turned around but continue to rise each year. They’re mostly selling vinyl these days — both used and newly pressed wax — but you can also find your fair share of CDs, tapes and listening equipment, from turntables and receivers to cassette players and reelto-reel machines. Here are the record sellers that give Spokane County its beat.

4,000 Holes

For more than 30 years, Bob Gallagher has been selling records from behind the counter at 4,000 Holes, a Monroe Street mainstay that’s jam packed with music. The store has experienced everything from the ’90s grunge explosion to the rebirth of vinyl, and Gallagher’s encyclopedic knowledge means he knows exactly which bin contains the record you’re looking for. And true to the store’s name, a reference to the Beatles song “A Day in the Life,” has more Fab Four paraphernalia than anywhere else in town. 1610 N. Monroe, facebook.com/Bob4000Angel, 325-1914

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VOLUME 4

Groove Merchants

Resurrection Records

Recorded Memories

Total Trash Records

Over in the Garland District, Groove Merchants is one of those stores that you’ll feel compelled to check out if you just happen to walk by. It’s a tiny shop, but it makes up for its minimal space with a killer selection, and owner David Thoren is usually on hand to point you in the right direction. It’s a haven for vinyl aficionados, but it’s just as welcoming to neophytes: If you’re thinking about finally starting your record collection, you can find not only the listening equipment you’ll need but some vinyl staples to get going. 905 W. Garland, groovemerchantsspokane.com, 328-2327 Another spot that’s seemingly been around forever, Recorded Memories is a go-to spot for anyone who loves the physical act of browsing, thumbing through a stockpile of records and stumbling upon a hidden treasure you weren’t expecting to see. The store is stocked practically floor-to-ceiling with used and new vinyl, cassettes and CDs, and owner Richard Terzieff is a massive music fan: He’s got pictures of himself with countless rock luminaries everywhere you turn. 1902 N. Hamilton, richardsrecordedmemories.com, 483-4753

Resurrection Records isn’t just a music shop; it’s a label in its own right, having released dozens of garage rock, punk and psychedelic artists (mostly on cassette and limited-run vinyl) since it was founded in 2009. Owner Mike House is Resurrection’s sole employee, and he’ll be happy to either point you in the direction of your latest find or special order what you’re looking for. It’s one of those places that seems to attract music fans like moths to a flame: Stop by and you’ll no doubt leave with an armful of records and good conversation. 1927 W. Northwest, getresurrected.com, 414-1429 Sitting right on the edge of the Browne’s Addition neighborhood is this decidedly quirky shop, which took over the space formerly housed by a hair salon and named itself after a feedback-drenched Sonic Youth anthem. Owner Scott Kellogg took the remnants of the collection from the former Garageland (back when it was merely a bar/record store) and made something new out of it, and Total Trash prides itself not only on personality but on its stacked, diverse inventory. 1601 W. Pacific, totaltrashrecords.com, 995-5977 ◆


CUSTOM FRAMING & MATTING DISCOVER WHAT’S NEW FOR FALL NORDSTROM · AMC THEATRES · APPLE

Wide Selection of Frames & pre cut mats

Open Art Available for Sale Fridays 2-4 Saturdays 12-4 and by appointment INSIDE for wine sales.

RIVERPARKSQUARE.COM

  Hours: Tue-Sat 10am-7pm SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

808 W MAIN AVE

509.328.0915

& FULLY SUPPLIED RENTAL CENTER

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

www.riverridgehardware.com 2803 W GARLAND

My hormones are better than yours • Balanced • Bio-identical • Made with the highest quality ingredients from Riverpoint Pharmacy

Open Fridays 2-4 Saturdays 12-4 and by appointment for wine sales.

We have the only Pharmacist who is a Menopause Practitioner Certified by the North American Menopause Society to work with you and your provider to customize your specific prescription. Free shipping for one year on all transferred compounded prescriptions.

Limited Hours + Days | 509-363-1353 | 888-4CLARET 509.343.6252 • RiverPointRX.com SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

1802 N. MONROE

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

115 W. PACIFIC

Home Delivery

shop online curbside pickup

Online Ordering

Curbside Pick-up

Private Appointments

A locally owned full-service neighborhood gathering place, whose mission, and passion, is for all things LOCAL. Get your organic produce, bread, wine/beer and groceries or sit down for a cup of coffee or a glass of wine with food from our Bistro. This Small Market of Epic Proportions has you covered!

full service florist • www.roseandblossom.com

Weekly VIRTUAL ZOOM wine/beer classes - Friday night 7pm - sign up rocketmarket.com

SPOKANE [ SOUTH ]

726 E 43RD AVE

SPOKANE VALLEY

219 N PINES RD

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FULL SERVICE SALON We take pride in our salon having passion for making our clients look & feel amazing

or more information about Back To Business

Visit BTB.Inlander.com To inquire about being included in future Back To Business editions

509-924-2204

LIBERTY LAKE

23505 E APPLEWAY AVE #105

SPOKANE’S PREMIER GIFT SHOP GARDEN CENTER & NURSERY       

mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com 509.290.6866 • www.Sculptured-Gardens.com

OPEN YEAR

ROUND LIBERTY LAKE

1334 N WHITMAN LANE SUITE #210

FREE

CUSTOM POTTING

GIFT WRAP

SPOKANE VALLEY

15614 E SPRAGUE AVE

Winter gear YOUR

HEADQUARTERS

Serenity HAIR & NAIL DESIGN

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

40

WE OFFER A VARIETY OF SELF-CARE SERVICES 509 325 4744 4726 N OAK ST

VOLUME 4

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

4505 N DIVISION


SPOKANE RIVER

We specialize in body piercing, ear piercing, and micro dermal anchors and carry the region’s largest selection of body jewelry & silver jewelry.

GUIDED FLY FISHING TRIPS

Locally Owned & Operated Since 1999 • silversafarionline.com • 509.893.1321 SPOKANE

SPOKANE VALLEY SPOKANE VALLEY MALL

14700 E INDIANA AVE, #2182

Wellness Pharmacy offering products and solutions to help people live healthy fulfilling lives. We offer a wide selection of professional grade supplements and CBD products. Mentions this ad to receive 10% off CBD products. • Curbside Pickup • Home Delivery • Shipping Available

Your Neighborhood Compounding Pharmacy Since 1964

www.snevamfg.com

Call us today! (509) 455-9345 • SixthAvenuePharmacy.com SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ]

508 W 6TH AVE, SUITE 104

Relaxing and Gentle Dog & Cat Grooming 509-328-4040

Shop our dog and cat food, treats, supplements, toys and outfits!

SPOKANE [ SOUTH ]

4420 S. CUBA ST

HOLIDAY SHOPPING for everyone on your list!

Custom Gift Bask featuring ets L oc a Sourced lly Products

southernspecialtiesspokane.com SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

928 W. SPOFFORD AVE

509 590-7625

SPOKANE [ SOUTH ]

307 E 18TH AVE

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DRINK

House Sipping A few places to shop to build a functioning home bar Maybe you've recently moved into a new place or you’re just ready for a shopping spree, either way you’ve been considering building up a home bar. It’s the perfect time to make space for one while your favorite local watering hole remains closed. Since you’ll need more than just a few bottles of different alcohol, here’s a list of a few places for buying the tools, accessories and furniture you may need.

THE KITCHEN ENGINE

If you’re looking for some tools to either kickstart your home bar or upgrade that second-hand cocktail set, the Kitchen Engine in the Flour Mill is your one-stop shop. The store is loaded with high-end items for various bar needs: A steel jigger for measuring, a bamboo muddler for mojito mashing, knives to slice up garnishes or even a Vacu Vin Wine Saver to keep your nice bottle of cab sauv at its freshest. 621 W. Mallon Ave., thekitchenengine.com, 328-3335

ATTICUS COFFEE & GIFTS

HURD MERCANTILE & COMPANY

Atticus has become a downtown hit over the years as a gift store, but that doesn’t mean you can’t shop there for yourself. There are plenty of options stocked throughout the store for your low-key home bar. For one example, you can pick up the Good Measure recipe glass to keep your cocktailmaking simple. Markings on the glass show you the perfect ratio of booze needed to make various drinks. Atticus also carries a large selection of coffee table books to either read up on delicious alcoholic beverages or just to have reading material while you’re sipping on that handcrafted cocktail. 222 N. Howard St., Facebook: Atticus Coffee & Gifts, 747-0336

POTTERY PLACE PLUS

Pottery Place Plus in the Liberty Building is more than an art gallery. It’s a shop that features fine arts and crafts made by Spokane artists. You can find many different handcrafted cups and mugs — perfect for adding a little character to your next hot toddy. Beyond clay creations, you can also find plenty of other art to decorate your home bar. Right now you can visit the shop in person or check out their online store. 203 N. Washington St., potteryplaceplus.com, 327-6920

HURD MERCANTILE & COMPANY

POTTERY PLACE PLUS 42

VOLUME 4

Once you’ve started a decent collection of tools, accessories and art for your home bar, you’re going to need a place to put it all away. It’s time to take a short road trip through the Palouse to visit Hurd Mercantile. This 8,000 square-foot store is certainly worth the drive to Rockford for a vintage bar cabinet or wine rack. The shop kept the feel of the 1900s general store it once was. You’ll be dreaming of old fashioneds and martinis while wandering about. You might even find a sweet set of retro lowball glasses while you’re there. 30 S. First St., Rockford, Facebook: Hurd Mercantile & Company, 291-4077 ◆


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HOME COOKING NEVER TASTED SO GOOD

- All Services Now Available -

Over 300 unique spice blends to choose from

best SPA

Locally Owned & Produced

CALL 509-74-RELAX (747-3529)

spiceology.com

Set appointments at SpaParadiso.com or on our app | Follow us on

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] KENDALL YARDS

1237 W SUMMIT PARKWAY

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] SPRAGUEUNION DISTRICT

715 E SPRAGUE AVE

We’ll get through this together, Let’s Keep It Creel.

SPOKANE GALLERY FRAMING • BOUTIQUE • WORKSHOP

LOCAL SINCE 1985 • SPOKANEGALLERY.COM • 509.747.0812

CUSTOM

F R A M I N G

Locally Owned & Operated Since 1954 (509) 924-2330

ARTISAN BOUTIQUE

SPOKANE VALLEY

409 S DISHMAN MICA

SPOKANE VALLEY

12505 E. SPRAGUE AVE

Spokane 's Full -service , Profe ssional Fly shop

( 5 0 9 ) 6 5 5 - 513 0 SWANKBOUTIQUE.NET

the region's most comprehensive selection of superior quality tying materials 509.323.0500

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

4727 N DIVISION ST

SPOKANE [ NORTH ] GARLAND DISTRICT

825 W GARLAND AVE

VOLUME 4

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or more information about Back To Business

Visit BTB.Inlander.com

SPOKANE [ SOUTH ]

Celebrating our 10th Year in Business selling quality Mid Century Furniture & Decor, Antiques, Fine Art & Vintage Items including Vintage Clothing Jewelry and Accessories.

To inquire about being included in future Back To Business editions

mail BackToBusiness@Inlander.com FURNITURE

+

ART & DECOR

+

LIGHTING & RUGS

+

DESIGN SERVICE

TinRoofFurniture.com @tinrooffurniture Curbside Pick-Up • Home Delivery | Tues-Thurs 11am-4pm Fri & Sat 11am-5pm •

SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] SPRAGUEUNION DISTRICT

1727 E SPRAGUE AVE

SPOKANE [ NORTH ] MONROE DISTRICT

325-2607

509

2607 N MONROE ST

MARK YOUR MOMENT

106 N Evergreen Rd | 893-2929 | tracyjewelers.com SPOKANE VALLEY

44

106 N EVERGREEN RD

VOLUME 4

HOME DECOR • GIFTS • CANDLES • MUCH MUCH MORE 509-326-2742 • CORNER

SPOKANE [ NORTH ]

OF

NW BLVD & OAK

1803 W. JACKSON AVE.


High quality, locally grown produce at great prices Premier Nail Salon in the Spokane Valley, offering a wide range of Beauty services & products to give you the look you want. We’ve got you covered with our extensive selection. Is there a wedding, party, or event in your future? Or are you simply ready to be pampered?

Christmas Trees

Are Coming!

Friendly Shopping Experience Locally Owned & Operated

Book Online or Give Us a Call Today!

9am-6pm Daily - (509) 926-4160 corner of 32nd Ave & Best Rd.

509-822-7500 valentinonailsandspa.com SPOKANE VALLEY

14102 E SPRAGUE AVE

SPOKANE VALLEY

3324 S BEST RD

SPOKANE VALLEY

4002 E FERRY AVE

SHOP IN STORE OR

ONLINE

WALKERSFURNITURE.COM • WALKERSMATTRESS.COM SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] • SPOKANE VALLEY • CDA

OVER THE PAST COUPLE OF MONTHS, JAN, THE TOY LADY, HAS RECONNECTED WITH MANY CUSTOMERS WHO FELT COMFORTABLE ENOUGH TO RETURN TO HER STORE:

We specialize in bringing people and nature together.

Welcome back!

We offer a variety of bird food, bird feeders, bird houses, and bird baths.

wbu.com/spokane (509) 862-4715

River Park Square (509) 456-TOYS SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] RIVER PARK SQUARE

808 W MAIN AVE

SPOKANE [SOUTH ]

2925 E 29TH AVE SUITE B

VOLUME 4

45


VINTAGE

SUZY GAGE AT ECHO BOUTIQUE

Sustainable Style Where to find your newest look from local secondhand stores Secondhand clothing is not just a frugal way to save money and look stylish at the same time — it’s a sustainable alternative to the rapid-cycle fast-fashion market, where trends seem to come and go every few months, resulting in a hugely negative impact on the environment and the garment industry’s labor force. Good news for style seekers: Spokane’s vintage and consignment boutique scene is flourishing, offering everything from one-of-a-kind vintage pieces to highquality brands at budget-friendly prices. Here’s where to start your next closet refresh.

higher-end items in excellent condition and make an appointment with Echo’s team, led by owner Suzy Gage, to take a look and help you earn some extra spending money. The boutique stocks women’s clothing in all sizes, from athleisure-wear to shoes, handbags to coats. Also, don’t miss the shop’s end-of-season clearance sales for an even better deal. Another great detail of Echo’s model is that consignors can opt to have anything of theirs that doesn’t sell in a season donated to a local nonprofit. 1033 W. First Ave., echoconsignment.com, 747-0890

Veda Lux Boutique

Fringe & Fray

Located in an adorably tiny converted cottage — affectionately and aptly dubbed “the Dollhouse” — in the South Perry District, Veda Lux is literally brimming over with hand-picked, and statement-making clothing and accessories. Owner Summer Hightower is known to travel near and far to find unique, covetable vintage and contemporary attire to stock Veda’s racks, as well as for her handmade jewelry collections that aren’t for the faint of heart. Those who’ve shopped there before know a trip to Veda is like playing dress-up in your coolest sister or gal pal’s closet, where fashion “rules” are meant to be broken and personal styling is the team’s priority. New pieces and outfits are frequently shared on Veda’s Instagram and Facebook page, so if you see something there you like, don’t wait too long to call “dibs.” 1106 S. Perry St., vedalux.com, 475-1674

Echo Boutique

Located in the heart of downtown’s flourishing west end, Echo Boutique offers amazing discounts for bargain-hunting fashionistas — up to 70 percent off retail prices — for its complete inventory of new and gently used consignment pieces. If you’re doing a pandemicinspired closet cleanout, consider setting aside any

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VOLUME 4

Also located on West First Avenue in downtown Spokane is this must-visit, locally owned resale clothing shop. Like its local counterparts, Fringe & Fray operates on a “buy, sell, trade” model, meaning you can trade in gently used pieces from your closet for cash or store credit. Check out the store’s website for a rundown on what styles and items they’re looking for and to book a trade-in appointment. Shoppers can expect to find a mix of vintage and modern clothing for both men and women on Fringe’s racks, which are also virtually browsable on its website. Outfit flat lays and new inventory are also frequently shared on its social media accounts, where buyers often snap up pieces within minutes of a post. Besides clothing, Fringe stocks locally made jewelry from several area artisans and a small section of home decor. 1325 W. First Ave., fringeandfray.net, 720-7116

Boulevard Mercantile

For both vintage home decor and clothing — some of the best in the region, in fact — treasure seekers know to make regular rounds at Boulevard Mercantile, which moved to a new and larger space on North Washington Street back in March. The store is home to a handful of top-notch vintage sellers, including

Red Leaf Vintage (offering midcentury men’s and women’s clothing) and Vagabond Soundtrack (focusing on vintage workwear), each of which have owners committed to seeking out high-quality vintage as their full-time jobs. Rounding out the store’s vintage fashion variety is Evening Star Vintage, a local vendor specializing in a huge selection of old-school band and pop culture T-shirts, plus denim and more. If you love vintage and don’t want to miss something epic from any of these sellers, make sure to follow all of them, and Boulevard’s main account, on Instagram for the latest inventory updates. 1012 N. Washington St., facebook.com/BoulevardMercantile, 327-7547

Garland Resale

Despite its name, this boutique is not located in Spokane’s Garland District, but rather downtown. Garland Resale is a newer arrival to the region’s secondhand style scene, having opened in summer 2019 after a major hurdle: a fire at its building earlier that year just weeks before initial grand opening plans. The boutique gladly accepts consignment pieces from local customers, and focuses its inventory on high-quality, upscale women’s clothing, accessories and gift items. The latter includes new items like candles, jewelry, artist prints and greeting cards. Customers can shop confidently knowing that each item, whether consigned or handpicked by staff, has been carefully inspected for flaws and was chosen for having quality construction and fabrics that meet Garland’s mission of sustainability. To that end, the shop is committed to making careful repairs to items that may have minor flaws but a lot of life left in them. If this commitment to sustainability is important to your fashion ethos, make sure to check out Garland Resale and stay in touch via social media and its customer email newsletter. 11 S. Howard St., garlandresale.com, 676-6030 ◆


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VOLUME 4

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Inland Northwest Strong.

If there’s one thing we’re certain of, it’s that we’ll get through this together. #AwesomeTogether


COVID-19

FROM LEFT: Spokane Hospitality Coalition founders Byran Toston, Mark Starr, Matt Goodwin and Chad White. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Sticking Together Local restaurant owners form Spokane Hospitality Coalition to help the industry make it through the winter BY CHEY SCOTT

H

and in hand with the arrival of cold weather, local restaurant owners’ biggest fear is already coming true. In just the last week, two Spokane eateries (Geno’s pub in the Logan neighborhood and Garageland downtown) announced permanent closures, citing among the reasons nearly eight months of depressed sales since the COVID-19 pandemic upended the hospitality industry. Unfortunately, as the year comes to a close, these two spots likely won’t be the only forever goodbyes in the local dining scene. The Washington Hospitality Coalition is predicting, in the worst case, that up to one-third of the state’s restaurants could permanently close by year’s end. “No one really knows how many restaurants are

going to close,” says Washington Hospitality Coalition President Anthony Anton. “But what the association can do is be honest with the public about what we’ve budgeted… We’re anticipating 35 percent of our [member] businesses to go out of business this year,” mostly in the full-service, independently owned categories. With patio dining — crucial for restaurants limited to 50 percent capacity since mid-May — disappearing alongside fall’s freeze, and coronavirus cases across the U.S. spiking again, restaurant owners are feeling squeezed. Enter what could be a vital lifeline: the Spokane Hospitality Coalition. The collective of locally owned restaurants hope by speaking up together and sharing creative ideas to help sustain business over the winter that

more closures can be prevented. “We’re working with the city and the state to find different things to get us through the wintertime,” chef and restaurateur Chad White says to a room full of mask-clad restaurant owners at a recent coalition meeting at Brick West Brewing. “We’re collaborating to maintain standards, and marketing to customers that businesses are safe for guests and employees, and we keep on driving the three W’s — wear a mask, watch your distance, wash your hands. If we can keep doing that as business owners, maybe our health department and governor will help us out,” White continues. ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 29, 2020 INLANDER 25


FOOD | COVID-19 “STICKING TOGETHER,” CONTINUED...

Holiday Editions Holiday Dining

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The fee-free, voluntary membership group has more than 100 local eateries on its roster, whose owners signed a pledge to follow a set of sanitation and safety guidelines that goes beyond state- and county-mandated regulations. A complete list of coalition members and standards are listed on its website, save509.com. White, along with David’s Pizza owner Mark Starr and multi-location restaurant owner Matt Goodwin, co-founded the coalition, and scheduled the meeting with Spokane Mayor Nadine Woodward to share ideas and hear concerns from fellow restaurant and bar owners. “I love that this is a grassroots coalition to come up with proactive ways, and lobby the governor and state health department for ways to reopen,” Woodward tells the room. “Industries that have come up with their own best practices and protocols got to reopen, and reopen even wider, so that is what I am here to encourage today.” Ideally, restaurants want to see their seating capacity expanded from 50 to 75 percent even as Spokane County remains in Phase 2 of the state’s economic reopening plan. Or additional extensions to alcohol service hours (recently changed from a 10 pm to an 11 pm cutoff) and individual party size (also expanded early this month from five to six people). As the meeting continues, Spokane Parks and Recreation Director Garrett Jones takes the floor to outline how some of his department’s recent strategies to keep open recreation facilities like golf courses and the Ice Ribbon could be tweaked to apply to restaurants. Jones’ ideas include creating incentives for people to safely return to downtown to shop, recreate and dine by offering promotions like free parking vouchers and discounts at restaurants that could potentially be back funded with some of Spokane County’s remaining $40 million in federal CARES Act funding so restaurants don’t lose money while customers get a discount. (On Monday, county commissioners unanimously voted to allocate up to $10.8 million for the new Spokane County Hospitality Relief Grant, managed by Greater Spokane Inc. (GSI), to provide financial support to local businesses in lodging, arts, entertainment, food services and recreation.) “Just send your ideas to us, no matter how crazy,” White says after Jones finishes. “Just send us your ideas and we’ll format them and talk about what we can bring to Mayor Nadine and [Health Officer] Bob Lutz. Having this big group of people here, and business owners that are creative and tenacious, let’s just keep moving toward that.”

“Not a lot of people are going out right now. They’re staying home and waiting for the day they can go out to their favorite places again.”

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26 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020

Not a lot of people are going out right now. They’re staying home and waiting for the day they can go out to their favorite places again.” “Think again,” he continues, “because those places might not be there when this is over.” Starr references the national industry statistic that most restaurants operate on a 4 to 6 percent margin, with most of the money coming in going to cover the increasingly high cost of goods, labor and rent. So for every $100 table check, a restaurant is only making $4 to $6 after its bills are paid. Starr says many places are now operating at a net loss. “At a place like David’s, we have over 5,000 square feet and can [normally] seat over 200 people,” he says. “And god bless the public — they say ‘You’re still doing takeout, you must still be doing good,’ but if I was doing that I could get away with what Chad is doing at High Tide,” which has a counter-service model.

he afternoon before the coalition’s meeting with the mayor, White and Starr discuss deeper nuances of the challenges restaurants are facing, and how these factors are pushing the industry’s already razor-thin margins toward an even steeper precipice. “Conservatively, this is going to last through spring,” Starr says. “One of the first things people have to know is that even at 50 percent capacity, very few places are achieving that [maximum].

The pandemic has also hit downtown restaurants harder than others. “Conversely, neighborhood businesses on the lower South Hill, Northside and Valley, they’ve actually seen an uptick,” Starr says. “A lot of people, now that their offices are their homes, are they going to hop in their car and drive downtown to grab a beer and quick bite?” The answer is not likely. The most pressing question, though, is how can restaurants of any size and location make it through the winter if outdoor patio seating is not an option. Heated tents and transparent geodesic domes may work for some, but such options are also highly cost-prohibitive for businesses already inching toward the red. “I don’t know how practical that is for our area,” Starr says. “I have a big huge circus tent I could put on our deck, but I just don’t know that I could make that work or that the public would respond well to that.” The easiest answer to this problem, he says, may simply be maxing out what indoor seating places do have as much as possible — “putting butts in seats,” one of the coalition’s unofficial taglines — throughout the cold season, while the world awaits the pandemic’s end. “The reason why we even discussed creating the Spokane Hospitality Coalition is that business owners have really big challenges ahead,” White says. “So how do we turn a negative situation we have little control over, where we’re also being told how to operate our business, into a positive one? How do we come together and bring attention to the situation to work together to bring business through our doors?” n Inlander staff writer Samantha Wohlfeil contributed reporting.


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OCTOBER 29, 2020 INLANDER 27


FOOD | TO-GO BOX

Having a Ball Steel Barrel Taproom launches new meatball menu, plus creative, outdoor winter dining and more COVID casualties BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL AND CHEY SCOTT

A

The Davenport Grand isn’t the only spot with dome dining this winter.

28 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020

COURTESY DAVENPORT HOTELS

fter a monthslong closure due to pandemic restrictions, the Steel Barrel recently reopened with a new food menu featuring the flavors of global street food in meatball form, or “streetballs,” if you will. A reader board inside the downtown bar teasingly asks patrons to please, keep the ball jokes to a minimum. With chef Chad White moving his Zona Blanca out of the connected kitchen space, Steel Barrel was able to take over and become a restaurant of its own. Now, the bar well known for carrying the best up-and-coming breweries’ creations on tap can also sell that beer to go, in addition to serving up tasty bar food for hungry downtown drinkers. White helped design the new menu of meatballs, which can be ordered a la carte in a lettuce wrap or as a slider, or three in a bun to make for a hefty meatball


Each option is generously seasoned with the distinct herbs and spices from the cuisine it represents, and if the sizable meatballs aren’t enough to fill you up, you can make it a combo with sides including bar nuts (let the giggling commence), chips and more. Keep an eye out for information about growler fills, new cocktails and beer releases at facebook.com/thesteelbarrel. (SW)

TWO MORE CLOSURES: GENO’S AND GARAGELAND

Meatballs are now on the menu at Steel Barrel.

COURTESY STEEL BARREL

sandwich. You’ll find choices like a Mexican burritoinspired vegetarian “beanball,” filled with cheese and rice and served with coriander mayo; the Doner Baahb — a doner kebab shoutout made from lamb with flavors like sesame, dill and garlic mayo; the Nashball hot chicken meatball, which is served with pickles, garlic mayo and hot sauce, and more.

Spokane is losing two locally owned restaurants this month, adding to the list of 2020’s permanent closures: Geno’s pub in the Logan neighborhood and Garageland downtown. Geno’s owners directly cited challenges related to doing business during a global pandemic among the reasons behind their decision. Garageland’s announcement was more vague about the contributing factors, but COVID-19 restrictions have deeply impacted bars and other nightlife venues since spring. Geno’s was operated since 2013 by the same duo behind several other regional restaurants, including the Elk Public House and Moon Time. Its last day of business was Friday, Oct. 23. Meanwhile, Garageland bar and restaurant downtown at 230 W. Riverside Ave. is planning for its last day of business to be Friday, Oct. 30. “Well, the day we’ve been hoping wouldn’t happen has finally shown up,” Garageland’s owners shared in a Facebook post. “Thank you so much for the last five years. We’ll miss you dearly, Spokane.” (CS)

COZY UP FOR DINNER

Offering outdoor dining when snow’s on the ground

may not seem like a reasonable option for many local restaurants, but there’s actually one way to do it without freezing. Luna on Spokane’s South Hill recently unveiled a pair of heated, reservation-only “snow globes” on its bar terrace patio, set to open on Nov. 5 (reservations are now available). The option to dine in the transparent, domed structures is designed to be an exclusive, elevated experience. Luna’s full, seasonal menu is available, along with several exclusive cocktails. Cozy, wintertime decor and seating inside each was created by local interior designer Erin Haskell. Guests, up to six per structure, who make a reservation for the snow globes must be over 21, and checks can’t be split for one of two reservation options: a $300 tab minimum on Sunday through Wednesday, and a $400 minimum Thursday to Saturday. A $200 nonrefundable deposit is taken upon reservation, which goes toward guests’ check total. To ensure safety and enjoyment while dining in the globes, only one reservation per globe is allowed per night, beginning between 5-6:30 pm and lasting as long as guests choose, or until closing at 9 pm. For complete details and reservation info, head to lunaspokane.com. A similar experience introduced last year has returned to the Davenport Grand Hotel, set to run through March 2021. Six domed “igloos” are open for reservations starting Oct. 29. With space for up to six guests per structure, reservation packages ($250 or $300; food is included with each) offer an hour and a half to enjoy the experience, with a $100 credit to spend at the bar. All ages are welcome inside, and while each structure is heated, it’s still recommended to bundle up. Details and reservations at davenporthotelcollection.com. (CS) n

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dining • shopping • culture Businesses are working hard to serve customers and stay safe: Support them and you support our region’s recovery.

personal, intimate milestones keep happening regardless of global events. “The holiday time is always a time that people like to be engaged. So, even though this year is looking very different for some of our clients and they are not going to be having these large gatherings that they usually have for Thanksgiving and Christmas, they are still choosing to get engaged in a more intimate scenario.” Like Tracy, Tunca has also seen an uptick in jewelry repair or gem resetting since her business reopened in Phase 2. That might come down to folks having more time at home to sort through family heirlooms. It could also be a desire to continue supporting the small, locally owned businesses that they value. “Our community in Liberty Lake has been amazing,” she says. “People are realizing that we’re around and they’re bringing their jewelry in to be inspected or to be cleaned. I just feel really supported by the community.” And given that jewelry serves as an “instant pick-me-up,” Tunca is busy creating a custom line of “everyday friendly”

TRACY JEWELERS OWNERS SEAN AND MAUREEN TRACY

Searching for Silver Linings When Sean Tracy first got involved in the family business several decades ago, he probably didn’t foresee a year like 2020. Luxury retailers like Spokane’s Tracy Jewelers typically pride themselves on an unhurried, highly personalized experience. But providing that level of service hasn’t always been easy during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially when curbside pickup was the only option. “That was tough,” he laughs. “People would pull up and say, ‘I’d like to have a pendant for my wife for our anniversary,’ and so you’re taking diamond pendants back and forth out to the parking lot one at a time. It’s a little dangerous and a little time consuming, but every little bit helps.” One incidental lesson of COVID-19, then, is that the drive-through model that works so well for burgers isn’t ideally suited to precious metals and rare gems. Tracy’s business has since moved back indoors, where he and his staff are adapting to modified cleaning routines and social distancing guidelines. Jewelry is sanitized for about 48 hours after being tried on. Complimentary masks are offered to customers when they enter the store. By now, the extra steps have almost become second nature.

“It’s not that big of a challenge, really. In our business, we don’t have 40 people in here at once. Generally speaking, we normally have a maximum of six people. It’s not that big of a deal. Everybody’s like, ‘This is what we have to do, so let’s just get it done.’” That matter-of-fact attitude might also explain why Tracy hasn’t seen a decline in demand for commemorative jewelry like engagement rings. Despite the fact that large-scale gatherings are still on hold, he’s found that wedding-related business has remained more or less unchanged so far. “I don’t know what to attribute that to,” he says. “I think it shows that people want to express their feelings for one another. Even though they’re postponing weddings, they want to do the small things now and do something bigger later when they can.” Lorraine Tunca has seen very similar trends among her clientele. Along with her husband Naim, she owns and operates Lorraine Fine Jewelry in Liberty Lake. “Jewelry is still one of the most sentimental and emotional purchases. It’s always attached to something — a birthday, an anniversary, the birth of a child,” she says, and those

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30 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020

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jewelry that lends itself to more casual scenarios like working from home. Her plan is to make better use of their website to showcase and sell her new designs. “We reinvent ourselves constantly. We’re always working and creating new things. The silver lining for us is to get inspired, so we’re always in search of improving and making sure we are ready for the next challenge.” ◆ Tracy Jewelers is located at 106 N. Evergreen Rd. For more information on their services and opening hours, visit tracyjewelers.com or call 893-2929. Lorraine Fine Jewelry is at 21950 E. Country Vista Dr. in Liberty Lake. Reach them by visiting their website at lorrainefinejewelry.com or by calling 701-2711.


SPORTS CREEL SPORTING • SPOKANE VALLEY Snow skier? For over 66 years, three generations of family have been working tirelessly to make the Sports Creel the simple choice when it comes to seeking out customer service, ski boot fitting, as well as snow ski tuning. Deeply rooted in the Spokane Valley, the “Creel” has been a destination for skiers since 1954. We sell new gear, we offer used gear, and we have run a very successful trade-in program for kids and adults for decades. Season lease? Nope… ski all season for less! Come by, say hi, and keep it Creel! 12505 E. Sprague Ave., 924-2330, keepingitcreel.com

LEATHER HANDBAG BY TEDDI JOELLE

THE GREAT PNW APPAREL • SPOKANE The Great PNW creates casual apparel for those who love this amazing area we call home. Whether it’s a T or hoodie or one of our many accessory items, you’ll always find something so you can show your love for the PNW. Locally you can find many of our products downtown at Atticus, but you can find our full product offering online and we will deliver your order right to your door. 954-9625, thegreatpnw.com

GREENACRES VENDOR MALL VINTAGE • SPOKANE VALLEY We are home to over 200 local small businesses in 14,000 square feet of shopping bliss! New, throwback, retro, vintage, antique and artifact, you’ll find everything here. We carry tons of unique gifts, home decor, furniture, health and beauty, art, clothing, snark and more! We’re a one-stop awesome shop. All surfaces are sanitized twice daily. We also have a 3-D walk-through on our website that gives you a virtual shopping experience. If you want to see the latest items to come into the store, our Facebook page is the place to be. If you don’t see something you’re after online, we can search for you, send you pictures and find the perfect thing. We take phone orders or Venmo and do curbside delivery of anything you need! 16814 E. Sprague Ave., 991-7851, greenacresvendormall.com

INFUSED WELLNESS HEALTH & WELLNESS NORTH SPOKANE Infused Wellness is a new type of health store with a mission. Our goal is to help

empower those in our community to achieve a lifetime of good health and wellness. Our hope is to do this by providing education, information, plant-based wellness products, ionic minerals, essential and carriers oils, organic body products for men, women, new moms and babies, custom blended herbal teas and the tools to brew them, healthy candles and all things that lead to better health. Come join us for a house-made organic probiotic drink, (by the glass or growler), a warm herbal latte or pot of tea while destressing in our inviting and comfortable space. 413 W. Hastings Rd., 863-9027, infused-wellness.com

LA-Z-BOY FURNITURE GALLERIES HOME • NORTH SPOKANE Locally owned La-Z-Boy Furniture Galleries store is the only retailer of La-Z-Boy furniture in Spokane County. Our delivery crew always uses masks, gloves and booties before entering our customers’ homes. They are very careful to insure the safety of each customer and the crew. 10205 N. Division St., 4654380, la-z-boy.spokane.com

PAINT IN MY HAIR VINTAGE • NORTH SPOKANE Paint In My Hair is a group of people passionate about breathing new life into old things. From upcycled, or repurposed furniture to hand-painted signs, gifts, apparel, accessories and home decor. We are proud Annie Sloan Chalk Paint stockists and carry General Finishes products as well as Redesign transfers by Prima. Something for everyone. 3036 N. Monroe St., 326-6999, paintinmyhair.com

TEDDI JOELLE ACCESSORIES • SOUTH HILL Timeless women’s leather goods handcrafted from start to finish out of our small shop in Spokane. We’re all about quality over quantity, mindful and intentional consumption, and investing in things with longevity in mind. We use the highest quality Italian vegetabletanned leather (the oldest and cleanest form of processing leather without chemicals) paired with timeless, minimal design to create bags for your life that withstand the test of wear and time. Our ultimate goal is for you to love your goods even more after years and years of use as they begin to tell your story — this is why quality and timelessness are at the forefront of everything we do. teddijoelle.com

WILD BIRDS UNLIMITED RETAIL • SOUTH HILL At Wild Birds Unlimited, we offer a variety of bird food, feeders, birdhouses and birdbaths. We specialize in bringing people and nature together. Our store is locally owned and operated by folks living right here in the community. We’re proud to provide the highest quality bird feeding products available anywhere, backed with expert advice to help you bring the joy of bird feeding into your backyard. Although our showroom is currently closed, we have two options to serve our customers. Contact free curbside pick-up and home delivery. Order online or by phone. Shipping is free on all orders over $75 (some restrictions apply) and for orders delivered in a 20-mile radius of the store. 2925 E. 29th Ave., Ste. B, 862-4715, mywbu.com/spokane

ABOUT Back to business • These weekly pages are part of a local marketing effort in support of the hospitality

sector brought to you by leading institutions and businesses to help promote the Spokane County economy, supported in part by Cares Act funding. With the goal of balancing commerce and public safety, you can follow along here in the Inlander, and via the links below, as local restaurants, shops and more share their stories and invite your support.

Fresh sheet deals • specials • updates DINING DING HOW ASIAN RESTAURANT LIBERTY LAKE Special sake half price 1332 North Liberty Lake Road

REVIVAL TEA COMPANY SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] Enjoy buy one, Get one 50% off all retail teas. Available in loose leaf and tea bags as well as pre-made 1/2 gallon jugs of premades. 415 West Main Avenue

WANDERLUST DELICATO SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] Private parties and cooking classes for corporate team building and friends/family are still available for this fall/winter. 421 West Main Avenue

EVANS BROTHERS COFFEE SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] Our Cafe in the Wonder Building is now open Friday 8 am-1 pm, Saturday 8 am-2 pm, Sunday 8 am-1 pm. People’s Waffles same times; Sat Farmer’s Market in Wonder Bdg Evans Brothers Coffee

SPICE & VINE MERCANTILE SPOKANE VALLEY We just got in 15 new varieties/flavors of pasta but hurry because we only got 2 or 3 of each and they’re going fast. Ready to try Calimari Linguine? 328 N Sullivan Rd, Suite 2

FIESTA GRANDE SPOKANE VALLEY Now open daily for take out and dine -in 13411 East 32nd Avenue

LEFEVRE ST. BAKERY & CAFE MEDICAL LAKE Monster-Mosas, Holiday Pies and Cakes, Pumpkin Cinnamon Rolls. We will be at Rusty Ranch Pumpkin Patch for the season. 123 South Lefevre Street

FRESH SHEET CONTINUES ON THE NEXT PAGE

more to come • Through the end of the year, watch

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OCTOBER 29, 2020 INLANDER 31


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BISTANGO MARTINI LOUNGE SPOKANE [ DOWNTOWN ] Wine on Wednesday at Bistango.... happy hour house pours all day. 108 North Post Street

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MORE FRESH SHEET follow up-to-date info at btb.inlander.com 32 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020

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FOOD | OPENING

Sweet Rewards Local ice cream maker Sweet Annie’s Artisan Creamery gets permanent spot in Liberty Lake BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

A

nnie Stranger found a sweet spot in Liberty Lake for the first brick-and-mortar location of her business Sweet Annie’s Artisan Creamery. “We’ve been doing farmers markets and events for the past few years,” says Stranger, who was a regular at the South Perry Thursday Market, “and have always had great support from the Spokane and Liberty Lake communities.” Located on the western end of Liberty Lake in a newly developed business strip across from Orchard Park, Sweet Annie’s specializes in housemade, locally sourced and carefully curated ice cream flavors. The creamery currently offers 16 flavors ($2.50-$6/ scoop, $10-$20/pint). Two of those flavors are vegan and two others are seasonal (try the Pumpkin Pie Me) all made with cream from Pure Eire Dairy’s organically fed

Sweet Annie’s Artisan Creamery now has its own shop. cows in Othello, Washington. Toppings like pecan oatmeal crumble or bacon brittle are also housemade ($.75 each), as are the goodies that go in gourmet sundaes like the Voodoo Magic ($12) with a beignet, or the Crunch Berry Glitter Sand in the After School Special ($8.50). Also look for seasonal specials like new hot chocolate drinks with melting chocolates, as featured in the Melting Witch ($5.50-$7), and ingredients from other local providers including Tonnemaker’s Fruit, Vessel Coffee Roasters and Footehills Farms. “While we put a tremendous amount of energy into creating all of our mix-ins and toppings in house, it’s the organic, grass-fed dairy that we source exclusively from

Pure Eire that sets us apart,” says Stranger. Although the varying fat content in the cows’ milk requires some adjustment in each recipe, supporting local and the amazing flavor in the ice cream is worth it, she adds. Stranger started the business in 2015, beginning with a “pints club” to test flavors, and turning a family affinity for homemade ice cream into the beginnings of a cottage business. She took advantage of numerous business development support options, including the Women’s Business Center and Washington State University’s Center for Innovation, to kickstart her initial cart-based company. As her ice cream gained in popularity (it’s also available at Rocket Market on Spokane’s South Hill) Stranger fine-tuned her approach. This is the second career for the Coeur d’Alene native whose background is in commercial design. After about eight years in the Big Apple, Stranger returned to the Inland Northwest with the idea to open an ice cream shop catering to grownups. Instead, she fashioned a business based on a blend of elevated traditional flavors like bourbon bananas foster and interesting new ones like the seasonal rooibos chai, with plenty to appeal to all ages and both new and repeat customers. “While living — and eating — in New York, I learned that you can provide a complete and very special experience for your customers when you combine amazing food, a joyful environment and top-notch customer service,” says Stranger. n Sweet Annie’s Artisan Creamery • 1948 N. Harvest Pkwy., Liberty Lake • Open Tue-Sun from noon-8 pm • facebook.com/AnniesIceCreams and anniesicecreams.com • 381-5469

OCTOBER 29, 2020 INLANDER 33


STREAMING

STREAMS & SCREAMS

Bad Hair

Zombies, witches and Adam Sandler: A rundown of the best and worst new horror films you can stream now BY INLANDER STAFF

F

or some of us, horror movie season is a yearround occasion, but our predilection for stories about specters, skeletons and slashers really amps up as soon as the calendar flips to October. Streaming services are lousy with scary movies, but studios have been dropping new Halloween-friendly titles like stray candy wrappers in the last few weeks. So we sifted through the recent glut of horror releases, finding the ones that are scary good and the ones that are just plain boo-ring.

#ALIVE

In this South Korean thriller, an unexplained zombie apocalypse has a lonely young man barricading himself in his third-floor apartment that overlooks the mayhem outside. Just as he’s about to lose all hope, he discovers there’s another survivor in the building across the way, and the very knowledge of another survivor encourages him to break from his confines. Worth a stream? If you’re a fan of undead narratives or South Korean cinema (and you haven’t already seen the superior Train to Busan), then yes. It doesn’t reinvent the zombie movie wheel, but it’s made with a lot of style by first-time director Il Cho. Streaming on Netflix (NATHAN WEINBENDER)

34 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020

BAD HAIR

Elle Lorraine stars as Anna, an aspiring TV personality working behind the scenes at a BET-like network but struggles to climb the corporate ladder. When her new boss (Vanessa Williams) suggests she sport a hairstyle that’s less, uh, natural, Anna gets a weave that changes more than just her looks, and pretty soon everyone who crosses her path suffers for her beauty. Worth a stream? Set in 1989, Bad Hair feels like an episode of a horror anthology series from that era. If only it were as long. Writer-director Justin Simien (Dear White People) has a terrific visual eye, but his thorny themes of racial inequality and biased beauty standards eventually get away from him. Streaming on Hulu (NW)

HOST

Hi there, Rob Savage is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting. Everything looks a little different in the time of COVID-19, including seances. Instead of a circle of hands around a table, a group of friends has to connect via unstable wifi and shaky webcams. Filmed entirely over everyone’s favorite video meeting app and clocking just under an hour, Host is an expertly paced exploration of digital communication and paranormal forces. Worth a stream? Definitely. A swift, inventive

contribution to the found footage genre and a cathartic comment on our current isolation. Streaming on Shudder (LAUREN GILMORE)

HUBIE HALLOWEEN

What to say about Hubie Halloween? Fans of old school Adam Sandler will most likely feel right at home, as he plays a familiar character in “Halloween monitor” Hubie Dubois — lovable, stupid, kindhearted and barely comprehensible. This is Sandler at his best, which is, coincidentally, Sandler at his worst. I’ll spare you an unimportant storyline, which isn’t half as entertaining as the long list of Sandler’s friends and family who make up the film’s cast: Kevin James in a mullet and aviators, Steve Buscemi as a werewolf, Shaq with a woman’s voice. Worth a stream? It’s an hour and 42 minutes of dick jokes, nut shots and farts. It is dumb. But what did you expect? If scary movies aren’t your thing, Hubie Halloween is probably an OK alternative. I cracked a smile at least a couple times… I’ll give it that. Streaming on Netflix (QUINN WELSCH)

THE OWNERS

You’ve seen this premise before. Some thugs catch wind


of a treasure-filled safe in the cellar of a rich elderly couple’s sleepy country house, and so they orchestrate a quick and easy break-in when the homeowners leave for the night. But the old folks return unexpectedly, necessitating a hostage situation, and… well, let’s just say the true villains aren’t who you think they are. Worth a stream? With Brit film vets Sylvester McCoy and Rita Tushingham as the sinister septuagenarians, this has the quality of a throwback to a slasher film from an earlier era. It’s somewhat predictable in its final moments, but it should generate enough tension to keep you engaged. For rent on Amazon and Google Play (NW)

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RANDOM ACTS OF VIOLENCE

As he prepares to end his graphic novel series inspired by a reallife serial killer, an author (Jesse Williams) embarks on a road trip that follows the murderer’s spree, hoping it will inspire the final issue. But his trip is marred by a string of gruesome crimes that eerily resemble his own illustrations, forcing him to reconcile not only with his work but with a dark event in his past. Worth a stream? The movie is extremely violent, so gorehounds should get their fill. But despite its good concept, the various plot strands never really come together, and the third act feels weirdly truncated. Streaming on Shudder (NW)

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SCARE ME

Following a power outage, two horror writers played by Aya Cash and writer-director Josh Ruben pass the time by making up spooky but funny stories on the spot and trying to creep the other out. So it’s an anthology film of sorts, except the two stars act out everything, leaving all of the horrors up to our imaginations. Worth a stream? Online reviews suggest some horror fans are enjoying the film’s admittedly bold premise. For me, this ran out of gas right out of the starting gate, and too often it felt like I was trapped inside an endless improv exercise with two truly annoying people. Streaming on Shudder (NW)

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VAMPIRES VS. THE BRONX

Oz Rodriguez, who cut his teeth (or, should I say, fangs) helming shorts on Saturday Night Live, makes his directorial debut with this allegory about New York City gentrification. A group of kids watch with anguish as a new real estate developer buys up all the landmarks in their predominantly Dominican neighborhood, and they quickly discover there’s a reason none of their business deals happen in bright sunlight. What to do? Cue up Blade to learn some slaying skills. Worth a stream? A little bit Stephen King, a little bit Edgar Wright, it’s more derivative than not. But its unpretentious blend of preteen comedy and mostly bloodless vampire action makes for a fun evening. Streaming on Netflix (NW)

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THE WITCHES

Roald Dahl’s creepy kids novel gets a second feature adaptation courtesy of director Robert Zemeckis, whose bright, synthetic style is sometimes at odds with the material. In 1970s Alabama, an orphan and his grandmother (Octavia Spencer) escape a witch’s curse at a seaside resort hotel, just in time for a conference led by the vicious, kid-hating grand high witch (Anne Hathaway). Worth a stream? It starts off fine but ends up feeling like a plastic reproduction of Nicolas Roeg’s 1990 version of The Witches, which is streaming on Netflix and is the far superior telling of this story. See that instead. Streaming on HBO Max (NW)

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THE WOLF OF SNOW HOLLOW

Someone — or something — is mutilating young women in a Utah ski resort village, leaving behind little evidence beyond giant paw prints and clumps of fur. The sheriff’s deputy (writer-director Jim Cummings), a divorcee who has problems with both rage and alcohol, is on the case, determined to debunk the prevailing theory that the town has a werewolf problem. Worth a stream? Though Cummings makes a better filmmaker than a leading man, his visual sense is sharp and his script hurtles along with some solid twists. And any movie that features a final performance from the late, great Robert Forster can’t be all bad. For rent on Amazon and Google Play (NW) n

LEARN MORE OR CHECK OUT THE DIGITAL EDITION AT:

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OCTOBER 29, 2020 INLANDER 35


Boss Tracks With the release of his new LP, we run down Bruce Springsteen’s 10 best studio albums BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

B

efore he was 30, Bruce Springsteen had already been crowned the poet laureate of working-class America. His blue-collar background in New Jersey manifested itself in deeply humanistic portraits of broken families, oppressed factory workers, teenage hoodlums, star-crossed lovers and lost souls who wanted to jump behind the wheels of their Cadillacs and break free from small-town tedium. He’s the great short story writer of American rock, but he’s also a master of the rousing arena anthem and a student of Phil Spector’s pop symphonies. Springsteen just dropped his 20th studio album, Letter To You, recorded in just days with his E Street Band and featuring songs that have been kicking around since the earliest days of their careers. The album reads like a Springsteen user’s manual: It runs through all his favorite images (dive bars, VFW halls, dusty country roads, fading pictures in a scrapbook) and revisits the themes (aging, unemployment, romantic regret, hypocritical authority figures) that echo throughout his work, all while the E Street Band clicks perfectly into place behind him. On the occasion of this new release, we’re looking back at the Boss’ legacy and picking the 10 best albums of his career up until now. This is, of course, totally subjective — every superfan has their own personal favorite Bruce record, and my tastes skew toward his older stuff — but these are the ones I come back to most regularly. You, no doubt, have your own list.

10. MAGIC (2007)

You can start to hear Bruce repeating himself thematically

36 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020

The Boss has a new album, Letter To You, and we have a list of his best studio work for you, too. and melodically here (to be fair, he was 15 records in), but it’s impossible to deny the electric musicianship that drives the aptly named Magic. That’s unusual, considering the band’s individual parts were recorded in piecemeal fashion, but it nonetheless sounds like the work of a group half its age.

THE GHOST OF TOM JOAD (1995)

9. An underrated title in Springsteen’s discography, and I’ll admit that I shortchanged it for years. Its spare folk-country ballads make it a spiritual cousin to 1982’s Nebraska, and like that landmark album, the brutality of the American heartland, haunted by images of John Steinbeck’s Dust Bowl itinerants, is beautifully communicated through Springsteen’s weather-beaten vocals.

WESTERN STARS (2019)

8. The cover art resembles the kind of painting you might see hanging in a desert motel room, and Springsteen’s songs here are similarly worn, familiar and contain occasional strokes of genius. In a way, he’s deconstructing the mythic iconography of the American Western, with his cast of aging movie stars and broken-down rodeo riders, and that thematic throughline inspired his strongest collection of songs in years.

THE WILD, THE INNOCENT AND THE E STREET SHUFFLE (1973) 7.

Bruce’s sophomore album, released the same year as his debut Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J., is where he truly establishes his template for lush, multipart epics, filled with sharply drawn characters and novelistic details. It’s perhaps a tad overindulgent, but all these years later, it’s thrilling to hear a legend planting the flag of his signature style before he was a legend.

THE RISING (2002)

6. Bruce hadn’t gone anywhere, and yet The Rising somehow feels like a triumphant return, and one of the first pieces of popular art to grapple with the Sept. 11 attacks (recording started about four months after, in January 2002). Springsteen examines the tragedy inwardly and outwardly, from both micro and macro levels, through some of his finest midperiod songs, especially the instant classic title tune.

DANNY CLINCH PHOTO

NEBRASKA (1982)

5. Springsteen’s lonely characters were never lonelier than in the murder ballads of Nebraska, and the starkness of his midwestern tableaux is reflected in its sound: Springsteen recorded the whole thing by himself on a four-track recorder, and though he intended to take the rough drafts to his full band later, he decided he liked it as is. Written during a depressive episode, the album’s worldview is mostly violent and hopeless, and yet achingly beautiful all the same.

DARKNESS ON THE EDGE OF TOWN (1978)

4. Although it’s not a concept album, the evocative title of Springsteen’s fourth record manages to conjure a plotline in our heads, one that blends blue-collar malaise with shadowy, noirish intrigue. Here we see Springsteen, at this point in his career a burgeoning superstar, shifting gears between all his signature modes — the sweeping romanticism of “Prove It All Night,” the quotidian drudgery of “Factory,” the heedless optimism of “Badlands” — and doing it brilliantly.

THE RIVER (1980)

3. Springsteen’s follow-up to Darkness is far more ambitious and far less disciplined, running an unwieldy 83 minutes and 20 tracks. But it’s a pretty damn consistent set of tracks, which includes early rock ’n’ roll riffs (“Sherry Darling,” “Cadillac Ranch”), Wall of Sound-esque pop gems (“Hungry Heart,” “Out in the Street”) and forlorn ballads (“Wreck on the Highway,” “Drive All Night”). It’s like a catalog of Springsteen’s early influences in one thrilling two-disc package.

BORN TO RUN (1975)

2. The moment when the Boss became the Boss, and the album most often cited as Springsteen’s crowning artistic statement. What’s so remarkable about Born to Run is that it was just Springsteen’s third record, released when he was only 25, and from the exhilarating opener “Thunder Road,” which begins at a purr before revving up and speeding off, to the final moments of the urban epic “Jungleland,” it’s a remarkably confident work. Recording sessions stretched out over 14 months and were reportedly fraught: Springsteen not only struggled to accurately capture his desired production style onto


tape but his relationship with longtime friend and manager Mike Appel was starting to fracture. You wouldn’t know it from the sparkling musicianship, though, which spilled over into a now-legendary tour that cemented the E Street Band as one of the great live institutions of American rock.

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Springsteen’s best selling record is an assemblage of leftovers and spare parts that had been recorded over the course of two years, so it’s a wonder that the disparate pieces of Born in the U.S.A. cohered at all. Maybe that unusual method of curation explains why it’s arguably his strongest collection of songs, seven of which were released as singles and all of which cracked the Billboard Top 10. Although Springsteen’s consideration of working-class America was always fiercely political,

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email related details to getlisted@inlander.com. he was perhaps never more polemical than on this title track, a blistering anti-war ballad that was transformed somewhat ironically into a towering arena-rock powerhouse. That cognitive dissonance led to it being embraced at the time as an alternate national anthem, and it was even namedropped by then-President Reagan as an example of the country’s re-emerging patriotism. It remains the most misunderstood song in the modern rock canon, though the rest of the album’s allkiller, no-filler track list is much easier to understand and yet just as terrific: the rockabilly rave-up “Working on the Highway,” the synth-drenched high school reunion of “Glory Days,” the lustful longing of “I’m on Fire,” and the irresistible “Dancing in the Dark,” written on deadline and specifically engineered to be a hit (it was). True to its name, this is an American masterpiece. n

OCTOBER 29, 2020 INLANDER 37


FILM DRIVE-IN HORROR

Several makeshift drive-ins have popped up around the Inland Northwest in the wake of nationwide movie theater closures, and one of the most popular took over the parking lot of the University of Idaho’s Kibbie Dome. They’re really getting into the Halloween spirit this year, starting on Oct. 30 with a double feature of the cult favorite The Nightmare Before Christmas and last year’s Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark, both of which are appropriately creepy but still OK for older kids. Oct. 31, meanwhile, is more for the grown-ups, as you can marathon three grisly, gory horror favorites: Wes Craven’s original A Nightmare on Elm Street, the 2003 remake of The Texas Chainsaw Massacre and 2017’s box office juggernaut It (all rated R). Gates open at 6:30 pm, and movies start an hour later. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Drive-In Halloween Movies • Oct. 30 and 31 at 7:30 pm; gates open at 6:30 pm • All ages • $30-$40/car • Kibbie Dome at the University of Idaho • 875 Perimeter Dr., Moscow • uidaho. edu/vandal-entertainment • 208-885-6331

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Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

38 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020

COMMUNITY SWEET SPREE

Trick-or-treating might not take its usual form this year, but fortunately for the sweet-seeking kids out there, several downtown Spokane organizations have stepped up to offer a safe alternative. From now until Halloween on Saturday, families with kids ages 13 and under can head downtown for a riddle-driven scavenger hunt through Riverfront Park and River Park Square. There, head to 10 spooky scenes marked on a map, and log answers to the riddle found at each spot on a printable worksheet, available online or in person at the mall or park. Once solved, turn in your answer for a special treat-filled goodie bag. Completed activity sheets can be dropped off during regular business hours at Whiz Kids in the mall (on the third floor) and the Sky Ribbon Cafe in the park. — CHEY SCOTT Spo-Candy Crawl • Through Oct. 31; daily from 10 am-7 pm • Downtown Spokane, locations vary • Details at downtownspokane.org and riverparksquare.com

PARTY NORTH IDAHO NIGHTS

Things are getting spooky in North Idaho this weekend, where the Coeur d’Alene Resort is hosting both its annual Halloween bash and several moonlit Monster Cruises, the latter with options both for families and adults. This year’s 21+ Halloween costume party is at the Resort Plaza Shops, offering prizes for the best get-ups, a live DJ, no-host bar and more. Book an overnight package and you won’t have to worry about making the late drive home. Adult-only lake cruises are also happening Oct. 30-31 at 8:30 pm, featuring costume contests and themed cocktails. Family-friendly holiday cruises, meanwhile, are scheduled nightly from Oct. 29-31, with departures each hour between 5 and 8 pm. Find tickets and details at the resort’s website. Face masks are encouraged but not required, so determine your personal risk acceptance appropriately. — CHEY SCOTT Monster’s Ball and Moonlit Monster Cruises • Oct. 29-31; times vary • $11.50-$45 • Coeur d’Alene Resort • 115 S. Second St., Coeur d’Alene • cdaresort.com


“S P O K A N E ’S E S S E N C E ” BY B E V I E L A B R I E

FILM KILLER CULT CLASSIC

Killer Klowns from Outer Space not only has an excellent title, but all the factors necessary for a true ’80s cult classic. Low-budget special effects. A cast of no-names (unless you can recognize the lead from Hardbodies or Dean Wormer from Animal House). A nonsensical plot and a sense of humor about its own cheesiness. The story, such as it is, involves (you guessed it) actual killer clowns from outer space who invade a town and start offing the citizenry. Only a few kids realize what’s happening because the adults all think of clowns as harmless. Fools! Hard to imagine anyone would look at these clowns and think they’re just child’s play, but I suppose if they didn’t we wouldn’t have this fun 1988 flick to catch on Halloween Eve. — DAN NAILEN Killer Klowns from Outer Space • Fri, Oct. 30 at 7:30 pm • $9/adults; $6/18 and under • Panida Theater • 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • panida.org • 208-263-9191

FESTIVAL VICARIOUS ADVENTURES

Running out of films that you’re looking forward to streaming? Good news: The annual Banff Mountain Film Festival is right around the corner, and this year it’s offering nine days of programming that can all be accessed from home. The annual winter recreation film festival happens in Banff, Alberta, but you might have caught screenings at local venues in the past during its subsequent tour around Canada and the states. This year, get a festival pass for your household and you’ll have front row seats to 75 films and 40 related events over nine days. Plus, immersing yourself in the expansive, breathtaking scenery of these adventure films is a great way to combat any cabin fever you might have been accumulating these past few months. — LAUREN GILMORE Virtual Banff Mountain Film Festival • Oct. 31-Nov. 8 • $10-$20/event; passes from $150 • Online; details at banffcentre.ca/virtual-festival

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OCTOBER 29, 2020 INLANDER 39


6 months with two lines is not “caring for me”. What makes it okay for you to lie and cheat on her? I do not care what she is to you if she put a ring on it then you belong to her duh!!! Over 40 and still trying to play the field is just sad buddy. Go tell her the honest truth and stop stalking me please!!!!

I SAW YOU

I SAW YOU GINGER-BEARD Monday afternoon, you were sitting majestically in the hatch of you Subaru waiting for a friend at Riverside State Park, 7-mile bridge trailhead, so you could embark on your adventure once your friend arrived. My friend and I came into the parking lot after our fat bike ride when I saw your adorable smile, I felt the breath leave my chest. Your beauty is as glorious as a unicorn dancing across a rainbow with its spiraling horn glistening from sun and fresh as the rain. As my friend and I loaded our bikes onto my bike rack. I grasped my breath tightly with my fist as muttered threw my giant, ginger-beard, “Have you ever ridden a fat bike before.” You responded, “No, but I would like to.” I thought to myself, her voice is as sweet as a songbird. Again, I muttered through my giant, ginger beard, “I have a second fat bike if you ever want to try it.” Overwhelmed with your beauty and the sweetness of your voice. I got into my vehicle and drove away. Realizing I never asked if you would want to take up my offer to ride my fat bike. Therefore, I ask you if you will ride my fat bikes with me? STILL TRYING TO GET UNDER MY... I see that you are like that cat that keeps coming back CHT. What if I told you that I STILL do not want you? You keep living a lie and I cannot and WILL not be that other women. When are you going to get the message? You say you care and will still be here but actually a text every

MATCH.COM GONE WRONG! Darrel 43 of Spokane who works in IT field, you sent me a message on match and you piqued my interest. I checked out your profile and think we are a great match! I was so excited to send you a message so we could get to know each other. My puppy needed to be let outside, so mid-sentence I set down my phone and let my pup out. When I picked up my phone you and my message to you had vanished. I guess I deleted you when I set down my phone! I searched the FAQ, and there is no way to reverse this mishap! Online dating is hard enough as it is, but then when I find someone I’m truly interested in this happens!?!? Hoping our paths will cross again! pebbles02510@gmail.com

CHEERS YOU ...deserve a heartfelt thanks for always saying YES, with no advance notice, nor time to change your own plans. You never fail to cover our Sundays. The intense ending to already “filled” days is a monster to us. Thanks for your calm, efficient leadership EVERY time we ask you to stay. We’re guessing you’re as exhausted as any of us. Know that we never doubt, nor wonder, how it is accomplished. We have believed in you, always. We hope you are blessed by accepting the challenges and responsibilities. We hope to rise to your level of commitment to our mission. Accept only the best in your days. We know you give yours, every time you’re here. Your presence has been a light. We are grateful. LAKE LANDING Cheers to the pilots of the two boat hulled amphibian planes who landed on the small lake northwest of Newport two weekends ago. It was a joy to watch and you made my dad’s day!

SOUND OFF

LAST BUT ABSOLUTLY NOT LEAST Cheers to the wonderful, caring people at “SCRAPS”. On 10/19 (despite the fact that they were closed) they opened their doors and very compassionatly did their very best to try and help a dog I had brought to them that was hit by a car. Even though the poor guy succumbed to his injuries you people cared enough to

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Groovy Jazz Thanks to the Vinyl Hour on KYRS on Thursday night

try. Bless each and every one of you.You will get your just rewards too! And I know it will be wonderful in every way! Thank you. SLEEP SWEET. I LOVE MY COUNTRY So grateful for our President and Vice President during this time! It was so wise to hand off the leadership to make decisions during this time to our state leader. Proved who we will and will not vote for. Stop blaming the high death rates on our president. He’s done all he could for our country during this time! Also, stop watching CNN, as a professional, the deaths are HIGHLY inflated! Question why the death rates of the #1 killer, heart disease, is at an all time low. Everything is recorded as covid death. Thank you Mr. President for pushing to keep our freedoms at a time where some people would push communism for their own fake security. SPOKANE COMMUNITY Thank you! To all the people supporting local businesses at this time, thank you! As someone who relies on tips with minimum wage (complete joke with the cost of living) your generous tips do not go unseen or unfelt. Groceries are had at this time because of you. And to everyone buying local goods, yay! Let’s keep our community going! Don’t think your $20 spent is too little and unnoticed. Everyone in ser-

for the super groovy jazz! And the super great vinyl music in general! Long live vinyl! COFFEE KINDNESS With this crazy year it’s the little things that others do that really pick up your spirits. I just wanted to give a shoutout to the gentleman with his dog in the big truck hauling a bunch of rock at the White Dog coffee stand on Pines in the Valley. With his big trailer he was oddly spaced in line to prevent himself from blocking traffic and I cut in front of him on accident. He honked to let me know he was there, waiting his turn in line and that I had cut. I waved and (embarrassed) quickly got behind him. When it was my turn the fabulous baristas let me know he felt so bad about honking (which he needed to do to make his presence known) that he bought my coffee! TOTALLY MADE MY DAY! I bought the person’s behind me hoping it would help make their day. Whether it’s a cup of coffee, a smile, a kind note or whatever just remember we’re all in this together and it’s the little things that can brighten someone’s day. THANKS GARY CROOKS It is comforting to see reasoned folks like you call out the Stacey Cowles endorsement of Trump. Thank you.

mostly a bully coward. Can you imagine him as a foot soldier in a war? He would hold up his fox hole buddy to take the bullet meant for him, he would be the first to retreat even though a retreat was not called, he would be over with the enemy selling out his own platoon and their positions leading to their deaths. Donald Trump is no patriot! He has been “fleecing” America and Americans all his life, and he wants to fleece you for another four more years. Get educated on this coward America before you vote. SPOKESMAN EDITORIAL FROM 10/25 What a pile of none sense garbage. Very frustrating and in this case embarrassing to have only one official newspaper for our city. How do we go about boycotting the Spokesman and making the Inlander our officially official paper? n

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40 INLANDER OCTOBER 29, 2020

DONALD TRUMP PATRIOT.....NOT!! You can stand in front of 1,000 American flags and not be a patriot! Donald Trump is anything but a patriot! Donald Trump is a pathological liar, a lifelong con artist, cheater, thug, racist, “crybaby” , and

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NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

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JEERS

Your beauty is as glorious as a unicorn dancing across a rainbow with its spiraling horn glistening from sun and fresh as the rain.

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

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vice industry and local retail are hurting, spending money at your favorite coffee shops and places such as the Rocket bakery and Garland Resale, does SO much good! Keep on going community, I believe in the us.


NEWS

Return of the Reign Man Former Sonic Shawn Kemp announces new cannabis dispensary in Seattle BY WILL MAUPIN

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wo 50-year-old guys named Shawn sent shockwaves through the cannabis world last week. First it was Shawn Kemp, a star in the 1990s with the NBA’s Seattle SuperSonics, who announced last Wednesday that he would be opening his own Seattle dispensary. Two days later, news broke that Beyonce’s husband, Shawn Carter — who is also known as Jay-Z, and is rather famous in his own right — was launching a cannabis brand. As of now, little is known about Jay-Z’s newest business venture, Monogram, other than it’s generating a ton of publicity. The announcement was picked up not just by the usual cannabis-focused publications but also

Shawn Kemp goes green. by giant national outlets from CNN to CBS and Rolling Stone. Monogram is part of California cannabis company Caliva, which Jay-Z joined last year as the company’s chief brand strategist. Closer to home, details about Kemp’s project are far more clear. Shawn Kemp’s Cannabis is set to open on Oct. 30, just two blocks south of the Sonics’ former home arena in Seattle. According to a release, Kemp will be joined at the opening day festivities by fellow Sonics’ legend Gary Payton. But the shop won’t just be notable for its ties to Seattle’s former team. “I hope that Shawn Kemp’s Cannabis will be an inspiration for people to get involved with the legal cannabis industry, especially people of color,” Kemp says in a statement. The statement goes on to say that Shawn Kemp’s Cannabis will be the first Black-owned dispensary in the state. Washington Liquor and Cannabis Board data from

RONALD WOAN PHOTO

January shows that 3 percent of Washington state’s dispensary owners self-identify as Black or African American, but regardless, Kemp’s claim is still important. Even with Kemp’s entry into the legal market, minorities remain underrepresented in an industry that for decades prior to legalization had a disproportionately large and negative effect on those groups. Kemp’s platform will help boost the visibility of the social equity programs Washington is currently implementing in the state’s cannabis industry. This past March, Gov. Jay Inslee signed into law a bill that essentially admits a historical, systemic failure by the state in terms of equitable application of drug law. The bill hopes to help in part make up for those past failures by encouraging equitable representation in the legal cannabis market going forward. Shawn Kemp’s Cannabis will open before the bill goes into full effect, which will hopefully make it a harbinger of equity to come. n

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ACROSS 1. “For what reason, though?” 7. Chef’s collection 11. Sighs of pleasure 14. El Al alterntative 15. Individually 16. Foldable bed 17. Ignores 19. Signal to go onstage 20. Waits awhile 21. Part of UNLV 22. Nelson Mandela’s mother tongue 24. Harry Styles’ old group, to fans 25. Without 26. “The Clan of the Cave Bear” author 27. #1 hero on the American Film Institute’s list of 100 Greatest Heroes and Villains 31. Good drink for a sore throat 34. Jannings who won the first Best

Actor Oscar (1928) 35. ____ Te Ching 36. Brian in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame 37. One more than bi39. ____ Lanka 40. Furniture wood 41. Gym surface 42. Overhaul 44. Sitting at a red light, say 46. “No more for me, thanks!” 49. Pixar clown fish 50. Baby carriers? 51. Individually 55. “Good ____!” 57. ____ tai 58. Le ____, France 59. Existed 60. Pick up an audience’s vibe ... or what you can do with this puzzle’s circled words once

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1. “The Hobbit” hobbit 2. “What’s the ____ trying?” 3. Swap 4. Greeted from across the street, say 5. Skedaddles, to Shakespeare 6. ‘21 and ‘22, e.g. 7. Actor Jack of “City Slickers” 8. They have the shortest gestation (12-13 days) among all mammals

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29. Satellite radio giant 30. Summer romance, perhaps 31. U.S. author credited with popularizing the word “cojones” as a synonym for bravery 32. “Generally speaking ...” 33. Like some Native American tribes of the Pacific Northwest 38. Brainstorming diagrams 43. Tracked by air traffic control 45. “Message received” 47. Groundbreaking invention? 48. Leave out 52. Circumvent 53. “Time in a Bottle” singer Jim

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Discovering the Coeur d’Alene

Coeur d’Alene tribal members share their stories through cultural tourism program

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hey call themselves Schitsu’umsh, which means “those who were found here” or “the discovered people,” yet the more familiar name for the federally recognized tribe on the southern end of the lake that bears the same name is Coeur d’Alene. It’s French, translating to the “heart of the awl,” from fur traders during the late 1800s to early 1900s who admired tribal members’ keen trading skills. Discovery, however, is an apt word when talking about the Coeur d’Alene, who have generously shared their culture beyond the tribe. Their Cultural Tourism program, for example, last year earned them the honor of Tribal Destination of the Year. The year-round program offers hands-on experiences, from tours of tribal battlegrounds to interactive classes that showcase the tribe’s history and traditions.

Although the upcoming plateau basketry workshop and eagle aviary tour are sold out, spots are still open for three cultural tours focusing on art.

Includes lift tickets, lodging, and indoor waterpark. Restrictions apply. Call 855.810.5061 or visit silvermt.com.

On Nov. 7, join artist Jeremy Salazar (Navajo/ Dine’) at one of two sessions of Native American Sip and Paint ($50, includes two drink tickets, snacks and all art supplies). Salazar is known for his vibrantly colored paintings — his work can also be found at Studio 107 in Coeur d’Alene — and expressive brushwork. On Nov. 14, The story of Mildred Bailey will be acted and sung by none other than Coeur d’Alene Tribal member CeCe Curtis-Cook. Her performance will take you to the turn

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of the century when America was going through its struggles and its heyday of the roaring 20’s and beyond.

Nov. 15, a tribal member artist Leanne Campbell will guide you through making a bead-wrapped rope necklace and bracelet. The Coeur d’Alene people value adornment highly, and this workshop focuses on the ornamentation worn by Coeur d’Alene people ($65 includes supplies and instruction). Begun in 2017, the Coeur d’Alene’s Cultural Tourism program initially offered such opportunities as a visit to a local bison ranch and guided excursions outdoors or to the nearby Cataldo Mission. Built in the 1850s, the mission is home to the exhibit, Sacred Encounters: Father De Smet & the Indians of the Rocky Mountain West, which narrates the collaboration between tribal members and incoming Jesuit missionaries (Visit parksandrecreation. idaho.gov/parks/coeur-d-alenes-oldmission for ticketing and other information). A smaller historical exhibit is housed inside the COEUR D’ALENE CASINO AND RESORT HOTEL, which is another example of how the Coeur d’Alene have generously shared their culture. In addition to donating more than $33 million to local education since opening in 1993, the casino is known for being a welcoming place for all guests, what they call “traditional tribal hospitality.” Visit cdacasino.com/cultural-tourism for more information and to stay informed about upcoming events.

Apple Palooza at Fall Fest

Shop Hop

Moonlit Monster Cruises

Indulge in a variety of apple treats throughout downtown Coeur d’Alene shops and vote for your favorite! Plus, shop the Harvest Farmers Market at Fifth Street and Sherman Avenue and the Downtown Market at Fifth Street and Lakeside Avenue from 10 am-3 pm.

Sip and nibble your way through downtown Coeur d’Alene, and get a jump on your holiday shopping. Downtown businesses have banded together to offer a “Shop Hoppers Card.” Purchase one and you’ll have access to discounts and exclusive special offerings.

There’s no better way to celebrate Halloween than on the spooky waters of Lake Coeur d’Alene! These fright-filled 45-minute cruises featuring spooky décor, a grand prize costume/photo contest, signature Halloween cocktails and much more. Visit cda4.fun for departure times and tickets.

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OCTOBER 29, 2020 INLANDER 47


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