Page 1

HALLOWEEN

THE FILM FRANCHISE WON’T DIE. THAT’S GOOD PAGE 43

LARGER THAN LIFE A MUSICAL TRIBUTE HONORS MILDRED BAILEY PAGE 38 PARTY LIKE THE ’80s!

SPOKANE’S ALL FALL DOWN IS RESURRECTED PAGE 49

OCTOBER 25-31, 2018 | MAKE AMERICA VOTE AGAIN!

This thing only works if you show up and vote!

PAGE 22


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INSIDE VOL. 26, NO. 2 | COVER ILLUSTRATION: CRAIG WINZER

COMMENT NEWS COVER STORY MILLER CANE

5 13 22 33

CULTURE FOOD FILM MUSIC

35 40 43 47

EVENTS 52 I SAW YOU 54 ADVICE GODDESS 55 GREEN ZONE 56

EDITOR’S NOTE

W

e kick off this week’s ELECTION COVERAGE with two stories on the same contest: The U.S. House race between Republican Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers and Democratic challenger Lisa Brown. In one, staff reporter Daniel Walters examines the congresswoman’s insistence that the ballooning national debt, fueled by tax cuts, won’t be used as a justification to cut Medicare or Social Security. In the other report, Walters assesses just how liberal Brown really is, mining her 20-year legislative record. Find those and many other election-related stories beginning on page 22. Also this week: Culture editor Dan Nailen introduces us to the women behind the Ouija Broads podcast (page 35), and education reporter Wilson Criscione explores an innovative project to make AP classes available to everyone (page 13). — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. It’s printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x210 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email justinh@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2018, Inland Publications, Inc.

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com)

WHAT IS MOTIVATING YOU TO VOTE THIS YEAR?

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ERIN BRUNER

I vote every year because I believe in the power of voting and this year is no different. Is there a particular issue that is on the ballot this year that you care about? No, not more than normal. Everything feels more urgent this year than previous. I just want to make sure I read as much as I can before I vote.

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We always vote, but the stakes are higher this year. What would you say are the stakes? Turning the rather horrible tide the country has been on.

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KATHRYN DEXTER

Because my family members and my parents have told me that I should, so I do, and then a lot of people go around and have little registration clipboards. The initiative about the food taxes, that’s what’s motivating me. What about it is motivating you to vote? I don’t want the groceries to be taxed because it’s hard enough to afford food as it is.

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It’s my civic duty to vote. It’s everyone’s civic duty to vote. What would you say to people who choose not to vote? My brother... would start to complain about what’s going on about … taxes, or who’s running the country, or who’s his representative. I would say “did you vote?”

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MEGAN MARTENS-HAWORTH

A sense of outrage like I have never felt before. Is there something in particular that outrages you the most? Too many to list right now, but basically I feel like the women of this country are going to have a lot to say about how things are going.

OPERATIONS Dee Ann Cook (x211) BUSINESS MANAGER Kristin Wagner (x210) ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

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or the first week of October, the emotionfilled confirmation hearing of Supreme Court nominee Judge Brett Kavanaugh held us and our fellow Americans glued to our TVs, in moods ranging from horror, for some, to anger and tears for others and sheer disgust for the many. You surely agree there must be a better way to recruit fresh blood to the highest court in the land? This time around, too many people were sacrificed along the way — Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and her family, and the family of nominee Brett Kavanaugh — not to mention the state of mind of the millions of us watching and listening. A nudge from the Economist, that British weekly that is always several visions ahead, suggested that it’s time to enact term limits for Supreme Court justices. Turns out that several individuals and groups have been working for some time on changing the lifetime tenure written into the Constitution by the Founding Fathers. When polled, 62 percent of voters support term limits. Two law professors well schooled in the issue have stated that the “system of life tenure is essentially a relic of pre-democratic times.” The most obvious reason given for putting time limits for justices to serve is that we are all living a lot longer than our forefathers did at the time the Constitution was written. Justice Clarence Thomas was only 43 when he was elevated to the Court. After 27 undistinguished years on the court, he still has the possibility of serving 20 more years. Because they are living longer and tense political pressures continue to mount, justices are staying on the court longer. Where once justices served an average of 16 years, “the most recent 10 justices to leave the court averaged 25 years each,” according to bloomberg.com.

B

rett Kavanaugh is now 53 years old after barely winning the seat by the vote of two senators. Unfortunately partisanship has replaced merit, so replacements on the court are chosen in part by their age and political inclination. Kavanaugh at 53 exemplifies the current trend — choosing justices because they are younger and consequently will serve longer than in earlier times. In Justice Kavanaugh’s case, he will bring a super-conservative vote to the scene with the prospect of serving years and years into the future. As we are all aware, the Supreme Court wields an enormous amount of power. Decisions in the past have determined a presidential election, as in year 2000, Bush v. Gore; in 1973 the Roe v. Wade decision said women have a constitutional right to an abortion; and before that in 1964, Brown v. Board of Education, targeted school inequality for African-American children. My friends and I are all Ruth Bader Ginsburg fans and wish she could stay on the court and

live to be 106. That wish is, of course, too issue and partisan driven, and reflects the kind of irrational thinking that screams for term limits. As the rift between parties has become more antagonistic, the Supreme Court seats have become evermore valuable. Little question that our current system has turned the appointment of a new justice into a free for all — someone has called it a media circus. The fact that President Obama was denied by Republicans the opportunity to fill Justice Antonin Scalia’s chair, breaking all precedents, reflects the value the seat has in these times of partisan war. Suggestions abound as to just how many years would comprise the ideal term for a Supreme Court Justice to serve. While nine years has been suggested, the most support among advocates for change is 18 LETTERS years, with a Send comments to replacement editor@inlander.com. every two years. When fully phased in, the system would guarantee each president two appointments. Scheduled terms would take some of the pressure off these precious appointments. I would suggest that nobody should be appointed to a job for life. “’Til death do us part” is probably best reserved for the marriage vow, and even there it’s becoming a rarity.

W

ill term limits mend the current partisan split that has been so evident in the Kavanaugh nomination? All issues have become politicized along party lines. How can the court be returned to its original assignment — to be accountable to the Constitution and above politics? I turned to Idaho-born problem solver Keith Allred, who founded the Common Interest, a citizens group in Idaho focused on reaching bipartisan solutions to Idaho’s problems — especially problems of funding and policy in public education. Dr. Allred, who taught mediation theory at Harvard and Columbia universities, told me term limits for Supreme Court justices may be a good idea, but he does not believe enacting term limits will solve the current partisan war that has overrun Congress, state legislatures and the entire country. The Kavanaugh debacle brought home how serious this partisan national shouting match has become. Term limits for justices might be one small way to take down the volume long enough for us all to think straight. n


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Learn how you can use your business as a force for good in the Inland Northwest. SIMBA and Odegard Consulting co-sponsor this workshop providing an overview of the certification process and how businesses benefit from becoming a B Corp. Learn about the new city of Spokane tax incentives for Certified B Corps as well. Mon, Oct. 29 from 5-7 pm. Free; RSVP required. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spokaneindependent.org

BIPARTISAN SOLUTIONS TO CLIMATE CHANGE?

Bob Inglis and Brian Baird are both former members of Congress. They discuss the possibility of bipartisan approaches to climate change policy in this event hosted by the Thomas S. Foley Institute of Public Policy and Public Service at WSU. Tue, Oct. 30 from 4:30-6 pm. Free and open to the public. Washington State University, Pullman campus, CUE 203. foley.wsu.edu

WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP LUNCHEON: THE POWER OF SHAME Rachelle Strawther, director of leadership training and development for Gonzaga’s School of Leadership Studies, presents a keynote address. This interactive presentation helps attendees identify obstacles that hold people back from becoming their best selves, both in the workplace and at home. Thu, Nov. 1 from 11:30 am-1:30 pm. $39; registration required. Gonzaga University Hemmingson Center, 702 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga.edu/womenlead (313-3684) n Tell us about your event or other opportunities to get involved. Submit events at Inlander.com/getlisted or email getlisted@inlander.com.

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COMMENT | HORROR not a universal experience. There are as many horror subgenres as there are ways to die in the Saw franchise. I’ve divided my recommendations into a few different categories so that you can choose your own adventure. For the NEWBIE who is a sensitive flower and prone to nightmares, consider an entry-level movie that is low on terror, but high on ambiance. Crimson Peak will certainly encourage you to keep the lights on, but won’t leave any lasting damage. Unless you have pre-existing phobias of gothic set pieces and Tom Hiddleston.

Fear is an excellent focusing agent. It sharpens our senses.

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Treat Yourself to a Fright Night Give your brain a good scare BY AILEEN KEOWN VAUX

A

s a 10 year-old I stood in a line that wrapped around the Mercy Movie 6-Plex in Yakima waiting to see Jurassic Park on its opening night. I didn’t know then that Steven Spielberg’s “Jaws on Land” would kickstart my lifelong obsession with scaring myself silly at the movies. As the line inched toward the ticket counter and we shuffled over the worn carpet, I felt a surge of equal parts dread and excitement for the moment when the lights dimmed and the dinosaur rampage began. In their article “The Science of Fright: Why We Love to Be Scared,” Arash Javanbakht and Linda Saab, assis-

LIGHT UP YOUR NIGHT

tant professors of psychiatry at Wayne State University, describe the brain as splitting into two when watching a scary movie. The “thinking” mind reassures us that we are safe while allowing us to enjoy the adrenaline high that corresponds with the “emotional” mind’s fight-orflight response. In fact, fear is an excellent focusing agent. It sharpens our senses and asks us to stay in the present moment. In other words, horror movies are a type of dopaminefueled meditation. Therefore, as a matter of promoting public health and as an alternative to yoga, I’d like to recommend some of my favorite horror movies for you to enjoy this Halloween season. A word of warning: Being a horror movie fan is

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If you’re a ROMANTIC who believes Children of the Corn is a good first date movie, then queue up Shaun of the Dead, which balances slapstick zombie splatter with the age-old question: Is it possible to rekindle a failed relationship during the middle of an apocalypse? Maybe you’ve dug a cement bunker in your backyard or stocked an entire basement with canned goods. If so, you are a PREPPER and should see It Comes At Night, a tale of two families defending a single house during a devastating plague when they discover paranoia may be more of an existential threat than a planet-decimating virus. When a friend and I recently saw Hereditary, a movie that was developed around the premise “How many beheadings are too many beheadings?” I turned to him and said, “Hmmm, that’s a mood.” If that sounds like a familiar reaction to seeing a terrifying movie, then you might be an ART HOUSE ENTHUSIAST who likes horror with a high production value. Check out The Witch or It Follows, two movies that don’t compromise their aspirations for being “serious films” while also being seriously disturbing. Finally, for my HOROR NIHILISTS who have scorched their amygdalas with an increasing escalation of cinematic terror, I suggest The Descent, a movie that has it all: monsters, spelunking, found-footage, and also shares Game of Thrones’ strategy of trying to kill every single character when you least expect it. Now, remember, the brain rewards people who can regulate their fears, so whichever fright plan you create for yourself this spooky season, feel satisfied that you are embarking on a self-improvement journey that will be worth the night terrors and pay dividends long after the calendar flips past Oct. 31. n

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

A HIDDEN ENDORSEMENT obert Herold’s endorsement of Lisa Brown in the Oct. 18 issue of the

R

Inlander and the endorsement of Cathy McMorris Rodgers in the Oct. 22 issue of the Spokesman-Review differ in more than a congressional candidate being favored. Robert Herold has the courage to put his name with his opinion, but the Spokesman-Review puts no name with its editorial and, unlike other newspapers, doesn’t make readily available who is on its Editorial Board. (A Google search quickly reveals the Editorial Board members of other newspapers, such as the Yakima Herald, Wenatchee World or Seattle Times, but the same is not true for the Spokesman-Review.) Hiding the author of the Spokesman-Review’s recent endorsement, who I assume is William “Stacey” Cowles, one of the great grandchildren of paper’s founder, is problematic for at least two reasons. First, it is hypocritical — the Spokesman-Review will not publish unsigned letters to the editor. LETTERS Second, failing to point out whether Send comments to the letter was written by a Cowles editor@inlander.com. family member could be an attempt to mask the bias at its base — the Cowles benefit from McMorris Rodgers’ vote for a tax plan that lets wealthy families avoid an inheritance tax and, as owners of Inland Empire Paper Company, the Cowles profit from McMorris Rodgers’ support for the Republican Party’s efforts to remove environmental protections. Two days ago I emailed to the Spokesman-Review a similar letter. For obvious reasons, I don’t expect the Spokesman-Review to publish my letter. MERILEE CORBIT Spokane, Wash.

Clarinda Academy, a foster care institution in Iowa, is located on the grounds of a state prison. TINA PINEDO PHOTO

Readers respond to a story about Washington foster children being sent to an outof-state facility with conditions described as unacceptable by a Washington group (Oct. 18, 2018):

SUE NOTT: If a facility cannot meet our state standards they should not be sent there. We’re paying for this with our tax money and the kids pay the big price. Disgusting. ERIKA JEAN: Not at all saying this is OK, but as a state worker in Montana… don’t hate on the foster care system in this article if you are not a foster parent. There is such an extreme shortage in every state. It is always preferable to have kids in a situation with a family — if you can be therapeutically licensed that’s even better! Again this facility is not OK and I’m glad I saw this. But again, all states are experiencing shortages especially for teens, and really I mean ages 10 and above! These kids need love, just because they aren’t little doesn’t mean they don’t deserve a family! Don’t sit there and think someone else will do it. It needs to be you! n

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EDUCATION

AP for Everyone? Spokane Public Schools was chosen for a national pilot program that will accelerate the district’s goal of making AP classes available to all kids BY WILSON CRISCIONE

I

magine you’re a freshman in high school. You love science, but you’ve never considered yourself a good enough student to do well in Advanced Placement biology. If you take it and succeed, you get college credit. If you fail? You risk not graduating. It’s a common predicament for Washington students. And if they’re not already in an honors-level course as freshmen, many students — more frequently those living in low-income households — will opt against taking the AP course, putting them at a disadvantage in their college endeavours. Spokane Public Schools wants to change that. It’s the only district in the country chosen by the College Board to have all of its comprehensive high schools join a pilot program that will offer what are called “pre-AP” courses to all freshmen. Those are courses designed to give students the skills and tools they need to eventually be successful in AP courses, which studies show have become crucial for students who not only want to get into college, but do well once they get there. The district thinks freshmen exposure to pre-AP will make it more likely that they’ll choose AP in later grades. “Pre-AP is an opportunity to demystify the AP experience and open the doors for all kids,” says Heather Bybee, Spokane Public Schools director of secondary curriculum. The philosophy of giving all students the chance for AP is already paying off in Spokane, where the number of high school seniors who passed an AP exam in 2018 is nearly twice the national average. Spokane students living in poverty, who would typically have far lower rates of passing AP exams than their peers, have AP pass rates ...continued on next page

Natalie Heilman, a Shade Park freshman, thinks her pre-AP class will set her up for success. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 13


NEWS | EDUCATION

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“AP FOR EVERYONE?,” CONTINUED... that outpace the national average for all students, says Adam Swinyard, the district’s chief academic officer. “We’re having some of the best success of really anybody in the country doing that work,” Swinyard says.

ON THE RIGHT TRACK

Chloe Flerchinger, a freshman at Shadle Park High School, didn’t know that the English and biology classes she signed up for would prepare her for AP classes down the road. “They kind of just gave us these booklets and said we were working out of them and they will prepare us for later classes,” says the 14-year-old. But then she noticed that both her English and biology classes taught similar skills. In both classes, for instance, Flerchinger was told to annotate complex texts — highlighting and circling certain words, flagging important information. She realized those kinds of skills might help her later on. “It’s going to help set you up for college classes, having that knowledge of how to take notes and how to listen in lectures,” Flerchinger

14 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

says. “There are some pretty big words and complex sentences that we have to decipher.” As part of the national pilot that Spokane Public Schools is participating in, Shadle replaced its regular English and biology courses with pre-AP ones. North Central, Rogers, Lewis and Clark and Ferris high schools also either replaced or added pre-AP courses for freshmen. It’s not the same thing as an honors course for kids who are typically more advanced, but it similarly dives deeper into certain texts and adds foundational pieces — from College Board’s pre-AP program — that can lead to success in an AP course. Chris Dunn, Shadle assistant principal, says the goal is to combat the idea of there being a vast difference between “honors kids” and “nonhonors kids.” Oftentimes, that can make kids feel like they’re marked either for an AP course or for a non-AP track. “Every kid has a choice to go on and take it,” Dunn says. “The idea is that this doesn’t automatically track kids and say, ‘You’re going to take AP bio,’ but it would provide the foundational skills for every kid to access AP and be successful when they get there.”

ShelleySzambelan_SuperiorCourtJudge_092018_3H_CPR.pdf


NO LIMITS

Spokane Public Schools wants all students to successfully complete some form of higher education, whether it’s a technical program, a two-year program or a four-year program. It’s partly why the district has been leading the effort to get kids enrolled in AP classes. Rogers High School, for example, made AP English the default course for all 11th graders. The idea stemmed from a grant the school received two years ago from College Spark Washington, an organization that funds programs across the state for low-income students. College Spark noticed in 2016 that even though 70 percent of Rogers graduates attended college, only 11 percent graduated within five years. The idea was that by exposing juniors to college-level work, they’d be more prepared for college.

REUNION

“The idea is that this doesn’t automatically track kids and say, ‘You’re going to take AP bio.’” Since then, AP enrollment at Rogers has shot up by 134 percent, according to Spokane Public Schools. It coincides with overall growing enrollment and success rates within Spokane. The persistence rate, or percentage of students who stay enrolled in college for at least two years, has shot up district-wide as well, the district says. It’s exactly what’s supposed to happen when more AP courses are offered, says Swinyard, the district’s chief academic officer. Swinyard credits the leadership of Superintendent Shelley LETTERS Redinger. Send comments to Swinyard says that Redingeditor@inlander.com. er preaches the value of high expectations for kids, “and AP has been a part of that work.” But as state graduation requirements become stiffer, won’t those higher expectations leave some kids behind? It might be a common concern among parents, but Bybee, the director of secondary curriculum, doesn’t think they should be worried. The same supports are built into the pre-AP and AP courses as there would be with any course — teachers will give all their students the tools they need to succeed. More than the data, Bybee hopes the pre-AP pilot program will shed any perceived barriers that might cause a student not to take an AP class. It’s not that every student should take an AP class — though Bybee wouldn’t want to put a limit on it — but she hopes every student can reach their potential. “What we say is that everybody has a skill and a passion that we want to support and stretch,” Bybee says. n

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OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

ON INLANDER.COM

‘CRUEL PUNISHMENT’ OF KIDS A week after striking down the death penalty, the Washington State Supreme Court ruled last week that sentencing youth to live in prison without parole is UNCONSTITUTIONAL. The justices ruled 5-4 that trial courts cannot sentence juveniles to a minimum life term, arguing that doing so would be “cruel punishment.” Sentencing children to life in prison without parole, the ruling states, does not achieve the goals of retribution or deterrence, since children are not as criminally culpable. “We find that states are rapidly abandoning juvenile life-without-parole sentences, children are less criminally culpable than adults, and the characteristics of youth do not support the penological goals of a life without parole sentence,” the court says. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

16 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

FEATURING NATIONAL NEWS FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES

HELP FOR HOMELESS FAMILIES Open Doors, the city’s only 24/7 emergency family shelter, will be moving to a new location in the former CASSANO’S GROCERY building on Mission once certain upgrades are made to the building. The move, which will require about $100,000 in community support, will enable the shelter to go from sleeping about 50-65 people per night to about 80, with office space onsite. The hope is to have enough office space in the new location that outside service agencies could come on a weekly basis or more often and help clients at the shelter. The move is expected to be complete by December. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

DISCORD OVER PROPOSED SMELTER The public has until Friday, Oct. 26, to submit comments on what the Washington Department of Ecology should consider while conducting an environmental study for a SILICON SMELTER that’s been proposed just south of Newport. Opponents have voiced concerns over the emissions at the plant and potential harm that could come to the environment, as well as worries about noise and traffic impacts caused by the operation of the smelter. Opposition groups who are suing Pend Oreille County and the county’s Public Utility District are also concerned about proposed countywide rezoning that could change the type of development allowed on public land, including the parcels HiTest Sand Inc. purchased for the smelter. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)


Authoritarian

Left

Right

LB

CMR

Libertarian INTERNAL COMPASS How liberal is Lisa Brown? How radically right-wing is Cathy McMorris Rodgers? Much of the 5th District congressional race has come down to fights over POLITICAL IDEOLOGY, with McMorris Rodgers tarring Brown as “Liberal Lisa” — pointing to her record of pushing for a state income tax — while Brown’s slammed McMorris Rodgers for not standing up to Donald Trump. So when we sat down with the two candidates last week, we asked them to place their initials on the crude political compass grid that divides the political spectrum into left-right and libertarian-authoritarian axes. Both McMorris Rodgers and Lisa Brown considered themselves moderately libertarian. But where McMorris Rodgers put herself down in the approximate middle of the right-wing section, Brown placed herself in the moderate-leaning middle of the left-wing quadrant. (DANIEL WALTERS)

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OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 17


NEWS | BRIEFS

Big Oil, Big Money It’s flowing into next month’s election

W

ith tons of help from big oil companies, the fight to defeat Initiative 1631, which would put a fee on carbon pollution, is now the MOST EXPENSIVE CAMPAIGN to defeat an initiative in state history, with those opposed to it dumping more than $26 million into the fight. The No On 1631 campaign reported $26.2 million in contributions as of Oct. 23, and had already spent $18.8 million on advertising and voter research. The largest donors to the “No” campaign include BP America ($9.8 million), Phillips 66 ($7.2 million), Andeavor, formerly Tesoro ($4.4 million) and American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers ($1 million). The Yes On 1631 campaign, under Clean Air Clean Energy WA, 2018, has raised a little less than half that, with nearly $13 million in contributions and $9.1 million in expenditures on advertising and campaign staff wages. The largest donors to the “Yes” side include the Nature Conservancy ($1.6 million), the League of Conservation Voters ($1.4 million), Michael Bloomberg (yep, that one) ($1 million) and William H. Gates III, aka Bill Gates ($1 million).

18 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

Initiative 1631 would put a fee on carbon pollution, a proposition that has drawn the ire of big oil companies. The “No” campaign’s advertising efforts largely claim the proposed carbon fee is unfair, as some of the state’s largest polluters would be exempt under the initiative. They also focus on the potential for increased costs to consumers and businesses, who would likely see gasoline and home heating prices increase as big polluters like oil companies pass along the burden. Multiple newspaper editorial boards in the state have urged their readers to vote no on the measure, largely echoing the “No” campaign’s talking point that an unelected board would be in charge of figuring out how to use the billions of dollars collected, with little room for the Legislature to guide which projects get funded. But the “Yes” campaign says that talking point is misleading. First, the types of projects the funding must go toward are explained in the measure, and second, the board would be appointed by the governor, similar to others that help guide business decisions in the state. “Washingtonians know better. Out-of-state oil companies are just trying to protect their billion-dollar profits

at the expense of our health and our kids’ future,” says Abigail Doerr, campaign manager for Yes on 1631, in a statement. “The truth is, 1631 is a sensible step to protect our air and water and improve our children’s health. I-1631 will hold the state’s largest polluters accountable and invest in proven strategies to reduce pollution. It will expand clean energy while reducing energy costs and creating tens of thousands of jobs across our state.” (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

SPANKED OUT OF SCHOOL

Weeks after starting as Roosevelt Elementary’s new principal, Laura Franks resigned last month amid an investigation into her SPANKING a disruptive kindergarten student. The reason for her resignation had been a mystery to parents and students at the school. But new records released last week to the Inlander reveal details of the incident leading to her choosing to leave the school. A kindergarten student was being disruptive in class


and then started running around the school, the records state. He then began to “topple over chairs,” then throw them towards staff members. He also spit at, hit and kicked a staff member, records show. When Franks saw the student, she asked “Do I have to sit on you?” according to notes detailing the incident. The student continued to “throw items, kick at staff, climb on the table and mark on posters, table, and wall,” records say. When he stood on a table, Franks “swatted him on the bottom with an open hand,” interview records say. Franks admitted as much about the incident to a district official later that day. “I did swat his butt,” she said on Sept. 13. “I did it to get him to snap out of it — he did.” After the spanking, a staff member began talking with the student. The student asked about a “solid glass egg” on the shelves, and the staff member told him the egg had magical powers. Eventually, the student sat down and quietly talked. Franks said of the spanking, “I’ve never done this before.” It was enough for the district to put her on paid leave and initiate an investigation. The district also wrote the state Office of Professional Practices, under the Office of the Superintendent of Public Instruction. “I possess sufficient reliable information to believe that Ms. Franks may have committed an act or acts of unprofessional conduct,” the letter from district Superintendent Shelley Redinger said. But Franks quickly resigned. State law prohibits the use of “corporal punishment” in schools. But it’s unclear what discipline would have been handed down by the district or the state. Spokane Public Schools spokesman Brian Coddington says each case is handled individually. He adds that the district knew of no similar incidents from Franks’ time as an administrator in California. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 19


NEWS | POLICING

‘Flashing Back’ An ordinance prohibiting unauthorized Border Patrol sweeps at Spokane’s Greyhound station won’t be enforced by the mayor BY DANIEL WALTERS

F

or over a year, City Council President Ben Stuckart has been upset over the Border Patrol’s long-standing practice of conducting sweeps at the Greyhound depot at the city-owned Intermodal Center, arguing that the practice intimidates residents, including those here legally. And last night, Stuckart and the council took action. They voted 6-1 in favor of an ordinance barring Border Patrol from entering the nonpublic areas of city property — including the bus depot — without either a warrant or permission from the mayor. “Greyhound supports the action proposed by the city,” says an Oct. 19 letter from Tricia Martinez, Greyhound Lines Inc.’s vice president of legal affairs.

Sandy Williams spoke in favor of banning Border Patrol sweeps. DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

Still, Mayor David Condon says he’s not going to be enforcing the ordinance. The council vote was preceded by over three hours of public testimony, with the vast majority — including religious leaders, doctors, attorneys and activists — speaking in favor of the ordinance. Local pastors like Walter Kendricks and Mark Finney referenced Bible verses commanding Christians to care for the “stranger” and the “alien.” “No human being is illegal!” activist Alfredo LLamedo said, while tearing up his naturalization and citizenship papers at the lectern.

Sandy Williams, editor of the Black Lens newspaper, drew parallels to the Civil Rights movement. “Badges? Guns? Dogs? Government representatives exercising power and intimidation over people of color,” Williams says. “So I’m flashing back. Deja vu.” But while several speakers expressed the hope that the ordinance would be unanimous, conservative Councilman Mike Fagan immediately made it clear he would not be supporting it. “Y’all may as well get up and turn around,” Fagan said to kick off his comments, referencing the penchant of many in the crowd to stand and turn their backs to critics of the ordinance. Indeed, some in the audience jeered Fagan’s comments, which sought to tie illegal immigration to drug trafficking and property crime. “While I don’t make the claim that every illegal alien transports drugs and things to that effect, there are some that do,” Fagan says. (Studies have shown that immigrants, both legal and illegal, actually commit fewer crimes than do native-born Americans.) Councilman Breean Beggs, meanwhile, pointed out that of all the thousands of people interrogated every month by Border Patrol at the bus depot, only an average of two each month were arrested for being unauthorized immigrants. Still, Councilwoman Candace Mumm stressed that the success of the ordinance rested on the willingness of the mayor to enforce it. Indeed, in a response on Tuesday afternoon, Mayor Condon wrote that “neither the mayor nor city employees have the authority to impede” Border Patrol sweeps. “They’re not going to ask his permission, in the first place,” city spokeswoman Marlene Feist says. “Practically, there’s no way to enforce this ordinance.” n

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OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 21


VOTERS’

HOW LIBERAL IS LISA BROWN?

Is Lisa Brown a radical firebrand or a pragmatic moderate?

T

here was a moment, during a rally in Pullman last year, when Lisa Brown seemed like a different kind of candidate. She’s talking about political courage, about leading outside of the mainstream, even when it’s risky. She points to her fight in the Washington State Legislature, first when she pushed for a law against discrimination by sexual orientation and then when the Legislature legalized same-sex marriage. “I think the issue of our time right now, that has the same resonance of having a logjam that needs to be broken, is health care — universal health care!” There’s a torrent of applause and whooping and cheering from her audience. She quotes liberal Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, that “health care is a basic

22 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

BY DANIEL WALTERS human right and it’s time to fight for it.” “How can a country that talks about life, liberty and pursuit of happiness in its founding documents not see health care as fundamental to all three?” Brown says. At these times, Brown almost sounds like Bernie Sanders. But that’s not the case a year later, at a town hall debate with U.S. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers. A reporter presses Brown on whether she supports the Sanders’ version of getting to universal health care, Medicare for All. At first, she dodges. So the reporter presses again: Does she favor Medicare for All? “I think we need to strengthen and expand Medicare,” Brown says. She later clarifies with the Inlander that she doesn’t

“think you can practically take the whole health care system and reinvent it.” It’s an inherent tension in the race. Brown has to show herself as liberal enough to inspire a Democratic base to turn out and vote, but conservative enough to win in solidly red Eastern Washington. And she’s been in the public eye long enough that there’s a lot of material for critics to draw on.

F

or years, Brown’s critics mocked her as “Sandinista Lisa,” noting newspaper articles about Brown’s stint teaching in Nicaragua in 1990 that feature her cheering “viva la revolucion!” and fretting that the ...continued on page 24


GUIDE

CUTTING BOTH WAYS Once a deficit hawk, Cathy McMorris Rodgers is now condemning her opponent for making budget cuts

I

n 2011, in the depths of recession, with the American economy starving, U.S. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers called for the American government to go on a diet. The budget deficit had topped $1.3 trillion, and McMorris Rodgers was warning that America was careening toward a Greek-style debt crisis. “As parents and grandparents, we fear the impact that reckless spending and borrowing will have on the future of the American Dream,” McMorris Rodgers said in a 2011 op-ed. “We cannot have a true economic recovery until our leaders get serious about the national debt. Talk to your friends about the debt crisis.” This was McMorris Rodgers back when Republicans were deficit hawks, back when they were proposing major overhauls to Medicare and Medicaid. She slammed President Barack Obama’s stimulus bill as a “misguided

BY DANIEL WALTERS attempt to revive the economy.” She called for a balanced budget amendment. Cutting spending wasn’t fun, but leadership, she argued, was about tough choices. Today, as Republicans control Congress and the presidency, the economy is soaring. And yet, despite what should be a flood of new tax revenue, the deficit has been climbing back up, jumping 17 percent in a year to reach $779 billion. The Republicans’ massive tax cuts last year are estimated to eventually add around $1 trillion to the national debt. Today, McMorris Rodgers is on the other side: She’s championing the deficit-ballooning tax cut. She’s criticizing her opponent’s recession-era budget cuts. And she’s charging that Democratic attacks that she wants to cut Medicare or Social Security are flagrantly false.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

N

ot only does McMorris Rodgers not see the tax cut as a problem for the deficit — she sees it as part of the solution. “We have 12,000 new jobs in Eastern Washington,” McMorris Rodgers tells the Inlander. “Small business optimism is at a record high. … Part of addressing our debt is getting our economy to grow.” The economy wasn’t exactly ailing last year when Republicans passed the tax cut. The unemployment rate was half what it was in 2011. But the rate is even lower today — and other economic indicators are soaring lately. The tax cuts will not only pay for themselves, the theory goes, they’ll actually produce so much revenue they’ll actually help reduce the deficit. “Corporate tax revenue is up,” McMorris Rodgers ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 23


VOTE FOR EXPERIENCE

FOR COUNTY

TREASURER

It takes accounting and financial experience to effectively serve as County Treasurer. Only one candidate, David Green, has that experience.

VOTERS’ GUIDE “CUTTING BOTH WAYS,” CONTINUED... says, before immediately correcting herself. “No, it’s down, it’s down. But I believe we will have an increase in the next few years.“ Economists debate over whether tax cuts produce significant economic growth at all. But the Inlander spoke with multiple national experts on tax policy across the spectrum — including the conservative Tax Foundation — and they all came to the same conclusion: Tax cuts don’t pay for themselves. Twice this year, the Inlander has asked McMorris Rodgers to cite an example of a tax cut fully paying for itself through economic growth. Both times, she came up empty.

D

emocrats, on the other hand, have a theory: They believe that Republicans will use the deficit — driven in part by their corporate tax cuts — as an excuse to cut social services. The rich get more, the poor get less. So when Senate Majority Leader Mitch Mcconnell blamed ballooning Medicare, Social Security and Medicaid costs for the budget deficit, Democrats pounced. McMorris Rodgers says these kinds of cuts

are not on the table. “Let me be crystal clear: I do NOT support cuts to Medicare or Social Security,” McMorris Rodgers said in a recent tweet. “[My opponent] Lisa Brown is using an age-old scare tactic long championed by Democrats.” And yet, that budget McMorris Rodgers urged everyone to support in 2011? It attempted to radically overhaul Medicare, transforming it into a system where the government would give vouchers to senior citizens, and encourage them to shop for insurance on the public market. As recently as last year, McMorris Rodgers was celebrating the Congressional Budget Office’s score for the Republican’s health care bill, noting that it would result in “major entitlement reform, capping Medicaid spending for the first time, saving taxpayers $880 billion.” Today, however, McMorris Rodgers shies away from even calling for major cuts to Obamacare. This summer, McMorris Rodgers condemned the Justice Department’s refusal to defend Obamacare’s pre-existing conditions guarantees from a Republican-led lawsuit. And when

“HOW LIBERAL IS LISA BROWN?,” CONTINUED...

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See you November 15th! 24 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

defeat of the Sandinista government would result in the privatization of state-owned banks and fewer subsidies to the poor. “If they let the market control credit, it will go to the wealthy,” Brown is quoted as saying in one article. Today, Brown claims that reporting was inaccurate. “I don’t believe in state-owned enterprises and never have,” Brown says. She’s critical of media outlets for focusing on three-decade-old controversies like these instead of, say, her role in bringing a medical school to Spokane or her 20 years in the state Legislature. But her legislative record, too, gives her critics fodder. An early series of attack ads referred to her by the Trumpesque alliterative moniker “Liberal Lisa,” citing her passion for bringing a progressive income tax to Eastern Washington and her lawsuit that tried to overturn a voter initiative that required a supermajority for the Legislature to raise taxes. Brown has countered by pointing to her bipartisan bills and her role bucking the Democrats to establish a rainy-day fund in the Legislature. Yet, a dozen years ago, even the Inlander referred to Brown as a “liberal, pro-environment senator” who was “surprisingly progressive to Seattle types.” So, the Inlander asks Brown today, does she consider herself “liberal?” “I have considered myself a ‘progressive’ since before it was a term,” Brown says. “I’ve always emphasized bringing people in who have been left out.” She says she’s neither a Hillary Clinton-style technocrat nor a Bernie Sanders-style firebrand. “I’m not the person who’s going to come in with the 10-point plan,” Brown says. “But I’m not just going to stand out waving the flag.”

Instead, she says, she’ll be the dealmaker behind the scenes, listening and responding to constituent concerns. Different settings require differing strategies, she says. That is, she says, why her health care rhetoric sounds so different at a rally than when answering a debate question. “When I’m meeting with my supporters and my base, they want to be inspired by a vision,” Brown says. But when she’s asked about specific policy questions, she says, she goes into policy-making mode, grounded by the limitations of political reality. “I’m going to work with people, and sometimes I’ll accept less progress than I’ll ultimately like to see,” Brown says. And so sometimes Brown strikes comparatively moderate positions. She’s against defunding Planned Parenthood, yes. But unlike Hillary Clinton, she says she’s not in favor of changing the law to allow taxpayer funding for abortions. And even though Brown says the Republican tax cuts were a mistake, she says that she’d vote to keep the tax cuts for individuals in place. She says she’d want to focus on closing corporate tax loopholes instead of upending the entire tax bill. Sometimes, Brown declines to take a binary position at all: U.S. Senator Patty Murray has endorsed banning the AR-15. But when the Inlander presses Brown whether she’d vote for or against such a measure, she refuses to say: Instead, she pivots to more modest and popular measures, like improving background checks. “I understand you want to focus on the most controversial one, ‘Yes or no?’” Brown says. “That’s just not where I’m at. I’m right here in the spectrum of, ‘What are all the things that there’s absolutely no excuse that Congress has not done in the past 14 years?”


the Seattle Times asked her three times this week whether she still intends to repeal Obamacare, she wouldn’t answer directly. McMorris Rodgers says she still believes cutting spending is necessary to address the deficit. But she’s vague about which program she’d cut. Instead, she calls for consolidating bureaucracy, like the hundred or so federal government job-training programs. She calls for giving states more “flexibility,” in the hopes that they’ll find new efficiencies without cutting services. “I believe there will be savings, but I’m not just about going in and taking a hatchet to the federal government,” McMorris Rodgers says.

“A

s the debate moves forward, there will be politicians who will try to change the subject. They will ignore the debt,” McMorris Rodgers warned in her 2011 op-ed. “They will focus exclusively on the spending cuts. Every single cut.” But today, McMorris Rodgers is using spending cuts as a cudgel against Brown: She slams Brown for the Washington state spending cuts the state Legislature made during the recession: McMorris Rodgers slams Brown for cutting Washington state higher ed funds, for failing to fully fund K-12 education and for supporting tax increases. “It’s about priorities,” McMorris Rodgers says. But when pressed on what, exactly, should have been cut instead, McMorris Rodgers can’t identify anything. “I wasn’t there at the time,” she says. n

H Compassionate H Common Sense H

Kuney SPOKANE COUNTY COMMISSIONER • GOP

County Commissioner Mary Kuney is endorsed by the Spokane Regional Labor Council and leaders from both parties: County Auditor Vicky Dalton, former Commissioners Shelly O’Quinn & Kate McCaslin, Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich, Spokane Co. Fire District 8 Local 3711, Laborers Union Local 238, Carpenters Union Local 59 Mary has the background to find

vs.

HUTCHISON

CANTWELL

WASHINGTON

U.S. SENATE

You might say that this is a race in which you should “vote your conscience,” but do so at your own peril: When Texas Sen. Ted Cruz told the 2016 Republican Convention to vote their conscience, SUSAN HUTCHISON called Cruz a “traitor” for not simply endorsing Trump. In other words, as the Republican Party has become the party of Trump, Hutchison has eagerly adopted her political identity as Trump Train conductor. Hutchison supports Trump’s tariffs. Hutchison supports Brett Kavanaugh. When Seattle passed a local income tax, she encouraged “all to exercise civil disobedience” to refuse to pay it. Meanwhile, Hutchison’s opponent, Sen. MARIA CANTWELL has a voting record that puts her square in the middle of the Democratic Party. If you love Trump, you’ll love Hutchison. If you don’t? You’ll vote Cantwell. (DANIEL WALTERS)

fiscally responsible solutions to get the County back on track: • Certified Public Accountant • Washington State Auditor • Business owner

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electmarykuney.com

Paid for by Friends of Mary Kuney • PO Box 13103 • Spokane Valley, WA 99213 GOP

U.S. Congressional Debate – Washington 5th District

Monday at 7 Also available online at ksps.org

And sometimes, Brown sounds a lot more ambitious, arguing that, as a freshman representative, she’ll be able to bend the entire party toward her region’s needs. “I’ll be helping to define where House Democrats go,” Brown says. “If the agenda is not good for Eastern Washington I will change the agenda.” n

Lisa Brown (D) v. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R)

www.ksps.org/election2018

OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 25


VOTERS’ GUIDE WASHINGTON’S INITIATIVES

HOT TOPICS

Washington voters will consider a variety of statewide issues, including fees on carbon and safety regulations on guns BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

I-1631

(POLLUTION)

I-1634 (GROCERY TAX)

This is the “carbon fee” that’s also commonly being called a carbon tax. Fossil fuel companies are spending more than $26 million to stop the initiative, which would charge $15 per metric ton of carbon pollution starting in 2020, increasing by $2 per metric ton per year, plus inflation, until the state reaches its 2035 greenhouse gas reduction goal, set by previous legislation. It would raise $2.3 billion in the first five years, with funds earmarked to address pollution, make the state more resilient to changing climate, help retrain fossil fuel workers and assist low-income families that will be impacted the most by rising gas and heating prices. U.N. climate scientists recommend carbon pricing be implemented worldwide if the world is going to remain below 2 degrees celsius warming over pre-industrial levels.

This measure would prevent local taxes or fees on groceries, most of which are already exempt from tax under state law. Those that aren’t, namely soft drinks, would also be exempt if the measure passes. Existing local grocery taxes, such as Seattle’s tax on sugary beverages, would remain in place if in effect by January 2018, but they couldn’t go up or be expanded if the measure passes. The measure would not prevent the state’s ability to tax groceries in the future. Major beverage companies are behind the initiative with Yes! To Affordable Groceries raising more than $20 million, its three largest donors being Coca-Cola ($9.7 million), PepsiCo ($7.2 million) and Keurig Dr. Pepper/Dr. Pepper Snapple Group ($3 million).

I-1639

This measure deals with the use of deadly force by police and would require de-escalation and mental health training, as well as change the liability for officers who use deadly force. It took an unusual route to the ballot, after lawmakers passed legislation with the same language, then another bill that would have immediately amended that language. The state Supreme Court weighed in to say that move wasn’t one of the three allowable options for lawmakers to take with an initiative and ruled the original language should go on the ballot, without the alternative that included compromise language from HB 3003. Those who’ve worked on the initiative expect nearly immediate moves to amend the measure if it passes. n

(FIREARMS)

This initiative would raise the minimum age to buy a semi-automatic rifle to 21, from 18, to match the current minimum age to buy a handgun. For “semi-automatic assault rifles,” the measure would also implement a 10-day waiting period for purchases and require purchasers to show they’ve completed a safety training course. It also would allow the Department of Licensing to implement a $25 fee on gun purchases and require safe gun storage by making it a felony to leave a gun where someone prohibited from owning one could access it.

I-940

(LAW ENFORCEMENT)

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26 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

Thanks to a partnership between the city and the school district, Spokane Public Schools can save money and build the three new middle schools it needs on cityowned property. But voters have to approve the $495.3 million bond first. The middle schools would help accommodate the change in grade configuration in Spokane Public Schools that would move the sixth grade to the middle school level. The bond would also allow the school district to replace three existing middle schools (Glover, Shaw and Sacajawea), add space for option programs at Libby Center and On Track Academy, upgrade safety and technology districtwide and add a commons area at Lewis and Clark High School. Oh, and there’s one other thing: It would pay for replacing the aging Joe Albi stadium with a smaller multiuse stadium. Exactly where that new stadium would be is up to voters in a separate advisory vote. They will decide if it will be built downtown or at the current Albi location.

But the current 30,000-seat Joe Albi stadium has worn out its useful life, the school district says. It’s never close to being at capacity for high school games and the costs to maintain its infrastructure have become a burden. So something needs to happen to it wherever it goes, the district says. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

LIBRARY BOND

The internet hasn’t made the library irrelevant, it turns out: It’s made it all the more essential for people without reliable access to the internet. The city’s asking voters to chip in a little extra for property taxes — $38 a year if you have a $200,000 house — in order to upgrade and rebuild the city’s library facilities. The package includes major renovations to the downtown and Shadle libraries and a rebuilt east-side branch library. The bond would also team the city up with Spokane Public Schools to build two new libraries — one in Hillyard and one near the Libby Center in the East Central Neighborhood. (DANIEL WALTERS)


OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 27


VOTERS’ GUIDE vs. FRENCH

vs. ANTHONY

KUNEY

CHASE

SPOKANE

COUNTY COMMISSION AL FRENCH vs. ROBBI KATHERINE ANTHONY

A vote for Robbi Katherine Anthony, a political newcomer and Democrat who owns two Spokane businesses, would represent change. Katherine Anthony, a transgender woman, hopes to attract business to Spokane by making it a more welcoming and inclusive county, starting with the Board of Commissioners. She says a more inclusive community would help attract new businesses to the area. Spokane County Commissioner Al French, however, argues change isn’t necessary. French has been key in economic development initiatives like forming the West Plains Public Development Authority and helping recruit the Amazon warehouse to the area. And he’s backed by years of experience in politics: He’s been Spokane County Commissioner for eight years, and before that served as a Spokane City Council member. He’s also the longestserving member of the Spokane Transit Authority Board in the history of the organization. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

MARY KUNEY vs. ROB CHASE

Mary Kuney has never run for office against anyone other than Rob Chase. A former state auditor, Kuney lost to Chase for Spokane County Treasurer in 2014, but won the appointment to the Spokane County Commission last year with the resignation of Shelly O’Quinn. Kuney, a Republican, touts her experience managing budgets and analyzing systems of government in a time when the county is dealing with a lean budget. Chase is further to the right of Kuney, calling himself a “paleo-conservative.” He takes a hard line on not raising taxes. He’s running in large part because he was the first choice among Spokane County Republicans to fill O’Quinn’s seat, before Gov. Jay Inslee chose Kuney instead. “If I had come in second place [among county Republicans] I never would have run,” he says. (WC)

vs. BAUMGARTNER

COUNTY TREASURER

GREEN

The differences between Republican MICHAEL BAUMGARTNER and Democrat DAVID GREEN go far beyond political. The two have a far different idea of what job the county treasurer should do. Baumgartner, after serving eight years as a state senator representing Spokane, decided he will not return to the Senate. But he plans on fighting for “conservative principles of fiscal responsibility, jobs growth and quality education” as county treasurer, his campaign website says. He has frequently touted his success in helping facilitate Washington State University’s new medical school, a new science building at Eastern Washington University and Spokane’s North Spokane Corridor. But are those qualifications for a position as Spokane County Treasurer? Green, a certified public accountant, argues they’re not. In debates with Baumgartner, Green has argued that the treasurer’s office does not set policy and should focus instead on things like the county’s investment portfolio, which he has criticized. He has experience as treasurer of the Fox Theater and the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture and is a former adjunct professor at Gonzaga’s Graduate School of Businesses. According to the SpokesmanReview, Green has promised to serve a full four-year term, while Baumgartner has not. (WC)

28 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

Fourteen candidates are vying for seats in the 3rd, 4th and 6th Districts. C HANCHEY PHOTO

WASHINGTON STATE LEGISLATURE

THE RACE TO OLYMPIA The candidates looking to shape policy in the capital BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL DISTRICT 3, HOUSE

In the race for Position 1 covering central Spokane, incumbent Democrat MARCUS RICCELLI faces Republican TOM TAYLOR. First elected in 2012, Riccelli has served three terms in the Legislature, with a major focus on health care and access to dental care, and helped push for WSU’s medical school. He works as a project manager for CHAS Health. Taylor, a recent WSU grad who decided to run after Riccelli blocked him for making negative comments toward his constituents on his Facebook page, has reported spending $0 on his campaign. If elected, he says he’ll invest 100 percent of his taxpayer salary into startups and small businesses in Spokane.

lican MATT SHEA and Democrat TED CUMMINGS. Shea, first elected in 2008, is an attorney and Army veteran with staunchly conservative, small government views. He’s rallied for gun rights, has many fans among the prepper crowd and the American Redoubt and helped sponsor anti-transgender legislation that could require people use the bathroom that matches their physical genitals. Cummings, a Kaiser Aluminum employee since 1988 who also owns a small ranch, ran to keep worker protections strong in the state and hopes to support apprenticeships and trade programs. He has told news outlets that Shea’s “fear-mongering” and hateful rhetoric, especially toward Islam, shouldn’t be tolerated.

DISTRICT 3, HOUSE

DISTRICT 4, HOUSE

For Position 2, incumbent Democrat TIMM ORMSBY faces Republican DAVE LUCAS. Ormsby was first appointed to the position in 2003 and has won re-election every two years since. He’s chair of the House Appropriations Committee, which writes the House version of the budget, and he hopes to continue focusing on education funding. Lucas was a Marine for more than two decades, serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the retired lieutenant colonel moved to Spokane with his family in 2013. He chairs the Rockwood Neighborhood Council, serves on the Mann-Grandstaff Veterans Affairs Medical Center committee and works with Boy Scouts in the area. He hopes to focus on addressing property crime through community supervision policy change for offenders, and eliminating unnecessary taxes.

DISTRICT 4, HOUSE

Serving Spokane Valley and parts of eastern Spokane County, the race for Position 1 features incumbent Repub-

For Position 2, incumbent Republican BOB McCASLIN faces Democrat MARY MAY. McCaslin, a former elementary school teacher, is aiming for a third term. He has voted with Shea and others farther to the right and co-sponsored a bill with Shea to divide Eastern Washington into its own state called Liberty. May, a former city planner in California and Spokane Valley, says she’ll prioritize fiscal responsibility while focusing on health care, education including vocational training and infrastructure investments.

DISTRICT 6, SENATE

In the open race for the Senate seat being vacated by Michael Baumgartner, Republican Rep. JEFF HOLY faces Democrat JESSA LEWIS. As of the most recent filings to the Public Disclosure Commission, Lewis had raised more than $219,000 compared to Holy’s more than $165,000. Holy is a former Spokane Police detective and has said he’d like to continue focusing on education afford-


ability and public safety issues. Lewis, who’s worked as an advocate for single-payer health care, wants to focus on affordable health care for all and hopes to bring a fresh perspective on how to push for infrastructure improvements in the district.

DISTRICT 6, HOUSE

For Position 1 in the House, incumbent Republican MIKE VOLZ faces Democrat KAY MURANO. Volz supported tying the measures together to get a “fix” to the Hirst decision, which had limited exemptions for rural wells. He served in the Army and is the deputy county treasurer. He initially ran to work on education issues and intends to continue work in that area and is also working on a task force that will determine which of the Legislature’s documents should be made public. Murano works in the lowincome housing sector and would push for affordable housing statewide. She decided to run after the Legislature failed to act on a capital budget during the last budgeting session in 2017, when it was held up until wateruse legislation was passed.

DISTRICT 6, HOUSE

Lastly, for Position 2, Republican VIRGINIA “JENNY” GRAHAM faces Democrat DAVE WILSON. Graham, who was abused as a child and lost her siblings to suicide and murder, has a large focus on being a victims’ advocate and public safety. She’d also like to focus on mental health improvements and looking at ways to reduce the business and occupation tax burden for small businesses. Wilson, who started a computer technology school in Spokane, believes education needs to be the prime focus, as it’s an investment in the state that can build a stronger economy altogether. He also hopes to work on infrastructure and economic development in the district. n

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OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 29


VOTERS’ GUIDE IDAHO LEGISLATURE

BOISE BOUND? North Idaho’s candidates looking to head south BY WILSON CRISCIONE DISTRICT 3, SENATE

DON CHEATHAM is currently in his second term serving as a member of the Idaho Legislature representing Post Falls, but now has his sights set on the Senate. He’s a Republican, a former member of the Los Angeles Police Department and a former regional director for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. As a state representative, he’s proposed a bill that allows a concealed weapon permit to serve as ID to vote and another bill that allowed active military members — even if they’re not Idahoan — to carry concealed handguns. Both bills became law. Cheatham is facing Democrat PATRICK LIPPERT, who has made little noise during the campaign. KEN LUND PHOTO

TONY WISNIEWSKI is an active member of the Kootenai County Republican Central Committee, serving as vice chairman, and he checks many of the boxes of an Idaho Republican in his run for state House of Representatives. He’s anti-abortion, pro-Second Amendment and against Common Core education standards.

He’s facing Democrat DAN HANKS, who is focusing his campaign on education, saying schools in Idaho are “in a state of chronic financial crisis.” He says he’ll also fight for better conditions for working families of Idaho and says he’ll support small businesses.

DISTRICT 4, SENATE

Incumbent state Sen. MARY SOUZA has worked as a critical care registered nurse, a nursing instructor and a small business owner. Last session, she supported bills that made certain public records from school districts accessible. She also supported bills that

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DISTRICT 3, HOUSE


vs.

LITTLE

JORDAN

IDAHO

GOVERNOR attempted to improve low voter turnout in school board elections and improve the foster care system. Democratic challenger CORY JANE ENGLISH is a physical therapist in Coeur d’Alene. She’s made supporting education, expanding access to health care and fairer wages priorities in her campaign. She’s the wife of Dan English, a Coeur d’Alene city councilman, and has been his “silent partner” during his runs for office.

DISTRICT 4, HOUSE

JIM ADDIS is a Republican, a Coeur d’Alene small businessman and a proud member of the National Rifle Association. He’s seeking the House seat currently held by Rep. Luke Malek, who lost in his bid for Congress. Addis wants Idaho to manage federal lands in Idaho, and he wants to expand access to affordable health care. REBECCA SCHROEDER, a Democrat, is all about expanding Medicaid in Idaho. She’s served as the Idaho State Advocacy chair for the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation,

and then was co-chair for the foundation nationally. She wants higher wages for Idahoans and she wants to invest more into education.

DISTRICT 4, HOUSE

Incumbent Republican PAUL AMADOR is seeking another term in the Idaho House of Representatives after winning the seat in 2016. He wants to invest in education, but he also advocates for “higher expectations” of students, teachers and administrators in schools, he says on his website. He also wants to focus on competition and transparent pricing for health care. Democratic challenger SHEM HANKS, meanwhile, supports Medicaid expansion in Idaho. Hanks is focusing his campaign on fighting for the working class of Coeur d’Alene, advocating for higher wages for Idaho workers and ending “Right to Work” in Idaho. He wants to invest more in education, including funding preschool education. n

In the open race for Idaho’s governor, Republican Lt. Gov. BRAD LITTLE faces Democratic Rep. PAULETTE JORDAN, both of whom opted to leave their seats to run for the state’s highest office. Jordan, a two-term representative serving Latah and Benewah counties, previously served on the Coeur d’Alene Tribal Council and would be the first female governor in Idaho, and the first Native American governor in the country if elected. She grew up in rural North Idaho and her family history in the area goes back thousands of years. Little has served as lieutenant governor since 2009, and had previously served in the state Senate since 2001. He’s a third-generation Idahoan, part of a longtime ranching family. He turned over his ranch operation in Emmett, Idaho, to a son once he became lieutenant governor. Jordan supports Medicaid expansion, which is also on the ballot, while Little has said he’ll support the will of the people however the vote goes. Both say the state needs to improve education and pay teachers more, with Jordan emphasizing investment in preschool and higher education, while Little is emphasizing career-technical education and vocational training. Little believes marriage should only be between a man and woman, while Jordan supports marriage equality regardless of sexual orientation. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

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OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 31


VOTERS’ GUIDE vs. FULCHER

McNEIL

IDAHO’S DISTRICT 1

U.S. HOUSE

Facing off in the open race for the U.S. House seat that Republican Rep. Raúl Labrador left to mount his unsuccessful gubernatorial campaign are Republican RUSS FULCHER, former state Senate majority caucus leader, and Democrat CRISTINA McNEIL, a real estate agent. Fulcher, a former tech executive, has said he’d likely carry on much the way Labrador did, and is endorsed by the far-right House Freedom Caucus. McNeil, a business owner and dual citizen of the U.S. and Mexico, wants to focus on health care, education and immigration reform. Five other candidates are also on the ballot for the race, including W. Scott Howard, Gordon Counsil, Paul Farmer, Natalie Fleming and one man who legally changed his name to Pro-Life. (SW)

The issue of slot-machine gambling is heading to the voters.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

IDAHO INITIATIVES

HEALTH AND HORSES PROPOSITION 1

SO-CALLED “HISTORICAL HORSE RACING”

Should Idaho legalize slot-machine-style video gambling machines exclusively on certain race tracks in order to help those horse-racing tracks survive? You may have heard that these “historical horse-racing” machines allow gamblers to wager on past horse races without knowing the outcome. That’s the premise that the Idaho Legislature was sold on in 2013 before they concluded, two years later, that they’d been duped: Most of the machines only include the horse racing in a tiny window below the flashing lights, spinning slots and bonus rounds of the main video screen. But now, horse racing advocates are trying to convince Idaho voters to restore the legality of these gaming machines, arguing that it’s the only way to keep the horse-racing industry alive. (DANIEL WALTERS)

PROPOSITION 2 IDAHO’S GAP YEAR

Picture a bridge that only goes halfway across a river. Now picture 62,000 cars with Idaho license plates plunging into the water. That, metaphorically, is what happened when Idaho decided not to take Medicaid expansion. Since Obamacare was designed to assume that every state would take federal aid to expand Medicaid, tens of thousands of low-income Idahoans have been stuck in this surreal space where they make slightly too much to get Medicaid, but yet don’t make enough to get Obamacare’s health care subsidies. Idaho’s Proposition 2 would do what states like Montana, Washington and Oregon have done and expand Medicaid. Idaho is passing up federal aid to help sick people, supporters say. Opponents argue that, even though 90 percent of the Medicaid expansion would be paid by the federal government, tax money is still tax money, and the cost of expanding health care has to be paid for by somebody. (DW)

32 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018


PREVIOUSLY...

Miller Cane is on the coast of Washington state, traveling in his motorhome with a doll-making 8-year-old girl named Carleen. Miller’s been asked to take care of Carleen by her mother, Lizzie, who is stuck in jail after shooting her estranged husband. Miller had been making his living conning the survivors of mass shootings, but he’s now contemplating a different life on the road — with Carleen, exploring America, our heroes and our villains.

CHAPTER 2, PART 2

E

verything Miller remembered of Washaway Beach was gone. State Route 105 had already been rerouted once, maybe ten years ago, and was about to fall into the ocean again; only one lane was open. The pioneer graveyard was as he remembered it from childhood when his family had visited on a trip from Spokane, only now it was much closer to the ocean, though the sign marking it was the same: “North Cove Pioneer Cemetery. Established 1892. Eroded 1977.” There were almost no buildings left, a few squatters’ trailers, one house on a point jutting into the sea surrounded by blasted concrete and rebar, holding on, all of it ramshackle, the resort town long, long gone and the remaining trailers derelict and marked with Keep Out and No Trespassing signs, good places to cook meth it seemed. Each gravestone in the pioneer graveyard had a small rock laid atop it, hand decorated with hearts or stars and the word “Love” written in 1970s bubble letters, but the paint fresh and vibrant. “I bet the grandchildren painted

ABOUT THIS PROJECT

Miller Cane: A True and Exact History, a new novel by Samuel Ligon, is being published for the first time in the pages of the Inlander. The latest installments of the book will always appear in print first, then on the web the following Wednesday MADE POSSIBLE BY and then on Spokane Public Radio, which is broadcasting audio versions of each installment. Visit MillerCane.Inlander.com for more details.

these,” Carleen said. “Or schoolchildren.” Across the road the surf pounded, chewing at the point. “Do you think they’ll have to move it again?” Carleen said, and Miller said, “I do,” and Carleen said, “They should move it farther from the ocean next time.” That day at Washaway when Miller was 10, his father had told the story of his grandfather losing his car at Moclips in 1920, Miller’s great grandfather parked on the beach and falling asleep in his A model Ford — “That’s what he always called it,” Miller’s dad said, “an A model Ford,” the tide washing up and waking Miller’s great grandfather when the water started seeping in through the doors, destroying the car. That story always led to talk about the line of failures Miller’s great grandfather had come from and transcended, the family failing its way across the continent from Virginia in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries to end up in Walla Walla in 1860, thirteen years after the Whitman massacre, failing in Walla Walla on some of the richest farmland in the world, something that was almost impossible to achieve. Great Grandfather Cane made something of himself in spite of his parents’ and grandparents’ failures, proof that Miller himself and his brother and sister were also exceptional, Great Grandfather putting himself and his siblings through Linfield College in Oregon, then teaching, then becoming a principal in Gresham, before finally becoming superintendent of the Multnomah County Farm, a poor farm outside Portland that housed indigents

and alcoholics and the mentally ill. Miller’s father had visited the farm many times as a kid in the early ’60s, afraid of the smells of the old poor people, inmates they were called, his grandfather playing ping pong with them in the basement recreation room and helping old men roll cigarettes from pouches of Bull Durham. “He did what he could for those people,” Miller’s dad said, “made their lives better, made the farm more productive and a safer place to live.” The poor farm was an adorable inn now with a brewery and winery and pottery shack, and beautiful art along its institutional hallways. You could get a room there with a sink in it and a bathroom down the hall for one-fifty a night. Miller had stayed there with his brother and sister and parents before his dad died and his mom started slipping. There was a picture of his great grandfather on one of the walls, though no one there would have known who the man was, and Miller himself wouldn’t have known either if his father hadn’t shown him. At Washaway Beach that day in 1986 there were still neighborhoods, still plenty of houses, but his father said, “This is all going to be swallowed,” which terrified Miller. If these houses were going to be swallowed, why wouldn’t the ocean keep swallowing until it reached their house in Spokane? They sat on a blanket in the pioneer cemetery eating lunch. “If it wasn’t for your great grandpa,” Miller’s dad said, “the family might’ve failed its way right to this spot, the end of the country, the end of the continent — all of us swallowed up right here by the ocean.” ...continued on next page

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MILLER CANE: A TRUE AND EXACT HISTORY  Chapter 2, Part 2 continued...

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“Really?” Miller said. “Jack,” Miller’s mom said. “That’s not true,” Miller’s sister Dena said. “You’re right,” Miller’s dad said. “It’s not true.” But now everything his father had said about the houses washing away was true. And he himself was gone, and so was Miller’s brother and Miller’s nephew — and Miller’s mother with no memory left was as good as gone, a horrible thing to think. How had he let himself become so maudlin on the Fourth of July when he had a job to do and the smoke was thinning? Miller told Carleen that he’d been here when he was her age, and was now surprised by how much of it had washed away, even though his dad had told him it would. “Well,” Carleen said, “it’ll probably wash back in someday.” Miller imagined the town reassembling itself piece by piece, the people reassembling themselves. “It’s not that interesting, really,” Carleen said, “to see what isn’t here.” “You’re right,” Miller said, and Carleen said, “I wonder if it’s because of cars on the beach that it washed away.” “No,” Miller said. “It isn’t.” “Mom says cars shouldn’t be allowed on the beach,” Carleen said. “But it’s fun to drive on the beach,” Miller said. “And that’s how they do it here.” Carleen held up her mermaid. “Let’s send her back to sea,” she said. “Really?” Miller said. “I can make another one,” Carleen said. They found a high bluff over the water and hurled Carleen’s mermaid into the ocean. “She might make it to Asia,” Carleen said. “Or she might get torn apart by sharks.” n

MILLER CANE CONTINUES IN NEXT WEEK’S INLANDER


Manito Park Zoo in more bear-riddled times. DEREK HARRISON PHOTO ILLUSTRATION

CREEPY CRAWLIES

MURDERS, MORGUES

AND MADNESS The hosts of the Ouija Broads podcast share some Spokane stories that really bring the Halloween vibe BY DAN NAILEN

L

iz Wood and Devon Kelley have been telling each other stories about all things creepy, crawly, historical and haunted for more than 20 years. It started when they became fast friends at Chase Middle School over their shared scary reading preferences, continued through their teen years and then as roommates in their 20s in a house that may or may not have been possessed with otherworldly spirits. Nearly two years ago, Wood and Kelley decided to share some of their storytelling with the rest of the world

via their Ouija Broads podcast, a Pacific Northwest-focused weekly dive into strange tales they find via old-fashioned research in history books, science texts and the like. That makes sense considering both their adult lives have led them toward historical research — Wood is an assistant professor and researcher of health policy at WSUSpokane, and Kelley got a master’s degree in museum studies and now works at the Old South Meeting House in Boston. “We’ve both always liked weird, witchy, interesting,

spooky stuff, and the historical stuff, too, is fascinating,” Wood says. “One of the reasons I like policy and government stuff is there’s nothing I like more than finding out about how strange people were in the past. We tend to think of them as having a really coherent worldview and doing things in a very logical way, and really it was a bunch of fools muddling through just like us.” They record the Ouija Broads episodes — now at 84 and counting — through phone calls they each individu...continued on next page

OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 35


CULTURE | CREEPY CRAWLIES “MURDERS, MORGUES AND MADNESS,” CONTINUED...

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BING CROSBY THEATER (509) 487-6540

ally record, then Wood takes the recordings and edits them together into what sounds to the listener like a seamless and often hilarious discussion. Among the subjects tackled in recent episodes are UFO visits to Washington, mysterious sightings of giant black cougars, and the Cedars, which Wood calls “basically a concentration camp for women with STDs in Oregon.” “My favorite thing to talk about on the show are the animal stories,” Kelley says. “Cryptids [aka, an animal whose existence is questionable], but also the really neat biodiversity of the Pacific Northwest that seems strange to folks just because maybe they haven’t been introduced to it yet. One of my favorite episodes to research was about the Shunka Warakin, which is a wolflike cryptid in Montana, and the recently discovered ‘swimming wolves’ of British Columbia. It was a good contrast of lore, with contemporary research.” Launching the podcast served as a way for the two friends to talk regularly, and that’s about to get easier as Kelley prepares to move to Seattle in November. The work it takes to make an episode is pretty intensive — “a weekly schedule is maybe a decision I would not make again,” Wood says with a laugh — but their shared passion for the odd and macabre comes through. As does their long friendship. “Hands down, the best part of doing this show with Liz is that she cracks me up,” Kelley says. “Just absolutely makes me laugh so suddenly and so loud that I may as well be barking.” Maybe “The Case of the Barking Podcast Host” will make for a future episode. In the meantime, the Ouija Broads share five of their favorite Spokane-related weird people, places and legends, in their own words:

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36 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

Ouija Broads Liz Wood (left) and Devon Kelley. file for divorce repeatedly, accuse each other of abuse, and occasionally chase each other out of the house with a sword. The police were called to the mansion on a May evening in 1940 by Dr. Hahn, who said his wife had shot herself in the head. Hahn, who was “drunk as a hoot owl” according to the officers, was investigated but never charged with her death, which was ruled a suicide. Years later, Hahn himself was stabbed to death with a bayonet from his own antique weapons collection. At the time, he lived in room 503 of the New Madison Hotel (First and Madison). Instead of haunting his homes, Hahn’s ghost still evidently pushes around his old desk in his former office in the Raznik Building (309 W. Riverside Ave.).

gave the Lilac City its name. But in its early days, Manito Park was the home of many ambitious projects meant to lure Spokanites to the new development — including a spark-flinging, horse-startling electric trolley and a loosely supervised zoo where a bear once tore the arm off a young girl. A different bear escaped at one point and they gave up looking for it after four days. The area itself seems to bring out a strange side of Spokane folks: someone once robbed a guy who was driving a morgue wagon; the famous Spokane architect Kirtland Cutter got kicked in the ass, literally, by his wife’s ex when he was getting off the trolley; various dead bodies have appeared. You can find the iron rings where they used to tie the bears during cage-cleaning time still in the rocks behind the Park Bench Café.

THE POST ST. BRIDGE

For 54 years, the water under this bridge concealed the murder weapon from the nation’s coldest case. During the Great Depression, some corrupt Spokane cops

“We’ve both always liked weird, witchy, interesting, spooky stuff, and the historical stuff, too, is fascinating.”

THE MARKS FAMILY’S CURSE CORNER

POST & SPOKANE FALLS BLVD. 2525 E. 19TH AVE. Not everyone waits until their death to visit This home on the South Hill started as a misfortune upon those who have wronged love nest for Sarah “Hecla” Smith, the boythem. The Spokane Police Department toy of a silver mine magnate. But thanks to committed an illegal search and seizure his philandering, the lovebirds never spent in two homes belonging to any happy hours together the Marks clan in 1986. To there. Several husbands Listen to the Ouija Broads cover all their bases, Marks later, Hecla disappeared in podcast and learn more by paterfamilias Jimmy Marks Canada. Her worried relavisiting ouijabroads.com. both sued the Police Departtives attempted to track her ment and cursed Spokane (and the inheritance) down, City Hall, as well as asking but their quest ended with his deceased father to haunt city officials. Hecla’s lawyer’s wife handing them a bag of Jimmy attributed many of the city’s misforashes: the earthly remains of Sarah (and no tunes, scandals and shames to his curse uninheritance to go with them). til his death in 2007. While Jimmy is gone, Next, the house became the property of his family still practices palmistry from “Dr.” Rudolph Hahn, a self-taught lobotoSister Jane’s home (802 S. Thor St.), and a mist and abortionist. On Hahn’s watch, former palmistry building they owned on the property saw some mighty weird times, East Sprague has recently been purchased including: a car being driven into a pool, for renovations (1914 W. Sprague). booming speakers hanging from the trees, and a playful young Lt. Jimmy Doolittle MANITO PARK dive-bombing the house for Hahn’s enterIt’s a lovely old place on Spokane’s South tainment. Unfortunately, the home also Hill that boasts a Japanese Garden, a formal had a dark side. Hahn and his wife, Sylvia, garden, a rose garden, and the lilacs that had one of those relationships where you

robbed a creamery with some friends (yes, butter was a luxury worth stealing). During the crime, a Newport city marshal was shot and killed. They flung the murder weapon off the Post Street Bridge, where it stayed until 1989 when sheriff and local historian Tony Bamonte retrieved it (see Timothy Egan’s Breaking Blue for details). The bridge itself was responsible for several deaths when it collapsed during its initial construction in 1917, throwing dozens of workers into the water.

THE SPOKANE ST. HOTEL

162 S. SPOKANE ST. Behind the bright yellow and orange of the Marilee Apartments, a faded yellow arrow points to a dark red building. That is the remains of the Spokane Street Hotel, where Frank and Tessie Pozar spent their springs and summers, while fall and winter were spent in Hawaii. Frank and Tessie were supposed to make their usual pilgrimage to Hawaii on Oct. 30, 1984, but never made their flight. Their Hawaii friends assumed they were staying late in Spokane, and their Spokane friends assumed they were already in Hawaii. And so it was early 1985 before people realized the couple was missing — and remain so until this day. Their son Frank Jr. was arrested for cashing his parents’ savings bonds, using their credit cards and signing their names to checks after their disappearance. After being questioned about their deaths, Frank left town. His whereabouts are now unknown as well. Frank and Tessie’s packed suitcases were eventually found in the basement of the hotel. n


CULTURE | DIGEST

CUTEST CATURDAY The two littlest residents of Cat Tales in Mead made their public debuts a month ago, and continue to steal visitors’ hearts. Kachina is a three-month-old North American cougar who came to the nonprofit sanctuary with her pal Sibella, a five-month Canadian lynx, from a Montana facility. Both kittens are on display daily; Sibella in her indoor nursery and Kachina in an outdoor play area. See both kittens and all their friends this weekend during the annual Boo at the Zoo celebration, Oct. 27-28 from 10 am-4 pm, when all Cat Tales’ animals enjoy special meat-filled pumpkin treats. Details at cattales.org. (CHEY SCOTT)

“The Very Best of Us”

T

BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

hough he’s now known as Bing Crosby’s biographer, Gary Giddins never set out to write about him. Sure, he’d heard of the Spokane-born crooner, at one time America’s most recognized celebrity, but Giddens really wanted to write about Duke Ellington. Thing was, Ellington’s estate had just been donated to the Smithsonian, and it was going to take years to archive. So, the hard sell his editor had been making, trying to get him to write a Crosby biography, finally landed. Giddins dove in, conducting hundreds of interviews. The resulting book, Bing Crosby: A Pocketful of Dreams: The Early Years, 1903-1940, was published in 2001 and covered the first part of Crosby’s life. While many opened their doors to Giddins for that book, it wasn’t until it was published that Crosby’s widow not only agreed to an interview, but allowed

THE BUZZ BIN

THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music arrives online and in stores Oct. 26. To wit: JOHN LEGEND, A Legendary Christmas. ’Tis the season for a cash grab. ROBYN, Honey. Bow before your Swedish dance-pop queen. THE STRUTS, Young and Dangerous. These glamour boys opened for Foo Fighters last year. WILLIAM SHATNER, Shatner Claus: The Christmas Album. Forget Shatner “singing” — what are Iggy Pop, Judy Collins and Yes’ Rick Wakeman doing on the same album!?! Ain’t right. (DAN NAILEN)

Giddins to go through mounds of letters from soldiers, as well as Crosby’s journals and financial documents, for a never-seen-before peek at his life during the ’40s. “After days of that, I had a whole different story about the Second World War that I never anticipated,” Giddins says. “I really wanted to write a book not just about Crosby, but about the home front and what that is.” The documents gave an inside look at Crosby’s correspondence with the government and insight into how much he was relied on to rally support both at home and in his tours performing to troops on the front lines. One of the most emotional moments for Crosby was performing to the few children who’d survived the Freckleton disaster, when a B-24 heavy bomber lost control in a storm and crashed into a school in England, killing 61, including 38 children. “Churchill was so nervous about the effect this might have on morale that he put a censorship on it,” Giddins says. “To this day, very few know about it. Crosby insisted on visiting these four children who were wrapped head-to-toe in bandages. He held onto their fingers and thanked them.” At the same time, Crosby was really coming into his own as a performer, starting to sing new Latin American songs, country, rhythm and blues, and helping “so many black performers at a time when integrated performances on the air were virtually unknown,” Giddins says. “In many respects, he represented the very best of us at that time,” Giddins says. n Giddens visits Spokane Nov. 1 to promote his new book, Bing Crosby: Swinging on a Star: The War Years, 1940-1946, at the Bing at 2 pm and Gonzaga’s Hemmingson Center at 7 pm.

LET’S TALK ABOUT EX Crazy-Ex Girlfriend, the CW musical comedy, has entered its final season. Yes, there’s plot. And yes, there are jokes. But most of all, there are a lot of silly songs, which is what pushes the series from “likeable” to “brilliant.” Two episodes into its final season, there have already been several new standout songs. Our favorite? “Time to Seize the Day,” a frantic patter song about how anxiety thwarts our carpe diem ambitions before we can even leave the house. (DANIEL WALTERS)

SWEET JANE HBO’s new documentary Jane Fonda in Five Acts is a fascinating look at a life that probably warrants more than the two hours dedicated to it here. Director Susan Lacy structures her “acts” around Fonda’s relationships with her father, three husbands, and finally her life as an older, single woman. While the interviews with Fonda reveal her to be the thoughtful feminist and activist you’d probably expect, they also uncover a life full of self-doubt you wouldn’t know from her fiery exterior. (DAN NAILEN)

CURIOUS CREATIVITY I stumbled across the mindblowing Instagram feed of domestic Renaissance woman Christine McConnell several years ago and was immediately captivated by her spooky edible creations: Alien facehugger cakes, haunted gingerbread mansions and more. Since gaining widespread attention, McConnell also landed her own horrifically delightful Netflix series, The Curious Creations of Christine McConnell. The show peels back the curtain on McConnell’s baking prowess and brings along some silly darkness in the form of three ghastly puppet “friends” — a garbage truck-mangled raccoon, a sassy reanimated cat mummy and a gruff, misunderstood werewolf. (CHEY SCOTT)

OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 37


CULTURE | JAZZ

Larger than Life Musical tribute honors Mildred Bailey, a pioneering Schitsu’umsh (Coeur d’Alene) jazz and blues singer BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

G

ary Edwards is interested in helping others tell their stories, especially involving cultures different than his own. He’s published a few of his own stories — about growing up in North Idaho and his grandmother’s cooking for the family’s wheat farm crew — plus eight musicals, two concertos, three screenplays, a TV sitcom and hundreds of pieces of music. Past projects include editing and helping translate Domingo “Tony” Orozco’s memoir, La Esperanza Nunca Muere (Hope Never Dies), and penning an opera about the Yakama Nation from 1849-1858 featuring the lovestruck warrior Qualchan. There’s a rich Native American tradition of music, art, history and culture he laments was not taught in school, says Edwards, who remembers watching and listening to members of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe sing, dance and converse in their native language during celebrations in Coeur d’Alene’s City Park. “My goal is to help area Natives tell their untold stories,” Edwards says. He’s currently finalizing a musical tribute to jazz singer Mildred (Rinker) Bailey, born between 1900 and 1907 (sources differ on exact dates). Her mother was Coeur d’Alene (also known as Schitsu’umsh), her father was ScotsIrish, and both were musical. Bailey was barely into her 20s when she was noticed by “King of Jazz” bandleader Paul Whiteman, who had just signed Bailey’s brother, Al Rinker, and Rinker’s friend, Harry Lillis Crosby, better known as Bing. Whiteman positioned Bailey at the front of his band, where she’d soon out-earn her male counterparts. She subsequently carved out a brief yet vibrant career singing early American jazz and swing music in clubs, doing radio vocals and performing with the likes of Benny Goodman and the Dorsey Brothers. Despite her influence on other singers and musicians throughout the ’30s and ’40s, Bailey died without fanfare in 1951 and might have remained obscure if not for continued interest in American jazz. In 1994, the U.S. Postal Service honored American jazz and blues legends, including Bailey (whom they still incorrectly list as African-American), helping refresh memories about the woman dubbed “Mrs. Swing.” The Schitsu’umsh, however, hadn’t forgotten about Bailey at all. In 2012, tribal members persuaded the Idaho Legislature to pass a resolution honoring Bailey (although the Ertegun Jazz Hall of Fame at New York’s venerable Lincoln Center

38 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

Mildred Bailey.

WILLIAM P. GOTTLIEB/U.S. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS PHOTO

has yet to acknowledge Bailey amongst the ranks of honorees such as Duke Ellington and Bessie Smith). When Edwards went looking for Coeur d’Alene stories to tell, Casino Resort and Hotel Cultural Affairs Director Quanah Matheson didn’t hesitate in suggesting one: Mildred Bailey. That struck a chord with Edwards, he says, reflecting on a 2010 North Idaho College performance he attended in which Spokanebased singer Julia Keefe (a Nez Perce member) performed several Bailey songs. Edwards chose Cecelia “CeCe” Curtis-Cook for the Bailey tribute, which features a speakeasystyle theme and big band sound (directed by Edwards). Like Bailey, Curtis-Cook has been singing since she was a teenager and went on to study vocal music at the University of Idaho’s Lionel Hampton School of Music. “This is my chance to celebrate Ms. Bailey not only as a major contributor to and influence on the music scene during her day, but to celebrate her as an indigenous woman, specifically a Schitsu’umsh woman,” says Curtis-Cook, who serves as director of Music, Youth, Language, and Liturgical Ministries for the Sacred Heart Mission Church in De Smet. “Her cultural heritage must have influenced her creatively, musically, and spiritually to help develop her into the artist she became. That’s a beautiful thing.” n Mildred Bailey Show • Sat, Nov. 1 at 6 pm • $10 • All ages • Coeur d’Alene Casino Resort Hotel • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • cdacasino.com • 800-523-2464


CULTURE | EVENT

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Seriously Scary

SFCC’s Bigfoot Haunt brings some scares to academia.

SFCC’s Bigfoot Haunt speaker series brings together local experts on subjects scary and grotesque BY CHEY SCOTT

A

group of local academics are ready to spook listeners while also setting them straight on some slightly strange topics. Leading up to Halloween night, the fifth annual Bigfoot Haunt lecture series, Spooks Real & Imagined, is offering free, daily presentations at Spokane Falls Community College, a campus appropriately home to its own Bigfoot mascot. The Bigfoot Haunt is organized by SFCC history professor Monica Stenzel, a self-proclaimed Halloween superfan. One of her research focuses is the history of witchcraft. “I just really love Halloween,” Stenzel reiterates. “And when I started talking to people, as we talked about our disciplines, I got this idea that it would be kind of fun to have an academic but kind of lighthearted series of talks at the college” that all somehow relate to scary, Halloween-ish topics. On this year’s schedule of lectures, held weekdays between Oct. 25-31 (see sidebar for details), are discussions about witchcraft, animal graves, organic decay, supernatural horror, comic book monsters and Martians. Faculty presenters have backgrounds in anthropology, astrology, creative writing and forensic science. All talks are free and open to the public, though Stenzel says campus guests will want to make sure to park in a metered lot. All but one talk begins at 8:30 am, and held in campus building 24, room 110. The final presentation, on Halloween, is at 11:30 am in the college’s planetarium. Stenzel’s presentation is titled “Witchcraft: Diabolic Pacts or Doting Parents?” It kicks off the series on the morning of Thursday, Oct. 25. “Mostly what I look at is Renaissance and early modern European witchcraft, and

JESSIE HYNES ILLUSTRATION

American colonial — the Salem trials and other American trials in Connecticut,” Stenzel explains. “There are two traditions of [belief] where magical powers come from: inherited, like Harry Potter, or, one of the big traditions of European witchcraft is they persecuted people because they thought they got powers from making pacts with the devil.” Anthropologist Sarah Martin, who’s giving the talk “Grave Tales: Ancient Animal Burials,” on Monday, Oct. 29, meanwhile, is BIGFOOT HAUNT sharing some of In SFCC Building 24, Room 110 her research on ancient world Thu, Oct. 25 at 8:30 am cultures known “Witchcraft: Diabolical Pacts to have pracor Doting Parents?” by ticed ritualistic Monica Stenzel and intentional Fri, Oct. 26 at 8:30 am animal burials. “Monsters & Murder & Drugs, Perhaps Oh My!: Comics and Moral one of the Decay” by Tim Greenup more gruesome Mon, Oct. 29 at 8:30 am Bigfoot Haunt “Grave Tails: Ancient Animal topics, Stenzel Burials” by Sarah Martin says, is Anna Tue, Oct. 30 at 8:30 am Ballard Wil“Bon-ified Tale of Decomposison’s “Bonetion” by Anna Ballard Wilson ified Tale of DeWed, Oct. 31 at 8:30 am composition,” “A Short Tour of Browning on Tuesday, County: Readings from SuperOct. 30. Wilson natural Horror” by Jay Gunter also works for Wed, Oct. 31 at 11:30 am the Washington SFCC Planetarium State Patrol “War of the Worlds: Mars Crime Lab. Then and Now” by John “I’ve heard Whitmer Anna talk before, and she’s done a lot with forensic entomology. When [the WSP] finds dead bodies, they find out how long they’ve been dead by what bugs are crawling through them,” Stenzel notes. Stenzel is excited to bring together experts across varied academic disciplines to share some of the darker elements of their work. “With interdisciplinary talks, it’s great to find common ground and holidays are a great way to do that,” she says. “Someone can find something in common with science, or food and the language of Halloween.” n Bigfoot Haunt Speaker Series: Spooks Real & Imagined • Oct. 25-26 and Oct. 29-31; times vary • Spokane Falls Community College • 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. • bit. ly/2Mfavf2

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OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 39


NEWS

To-Go Box Ramen Fest, Ruins’ veggie binge, and projects bringing more craft beer and cider to the Inland Northwest BY CHEY SCOTT Coeur d’Alene Cider Co.’s brewmaster and owner Jill Morrison.

RETURN OF THE RAMEN

Soup season is here, and helping kick it off is the Spokane Buddhist Temple’s annual Ramen Fest on Sunday, Oct. 28. Offering dine-in or take-out orders from the temple in the South Perry District at 927 S. Perry, the festival from 11 am to 3 pm serves a menu of pork, chicken and tofu ramen ($12 each). Sides include inari sushi ($6), which doesn’t contain raw fish, but rather a pocket of sushi rice and veggies enclosed in fried tofu. Snacks for sale are edamame ($5) and Chex arare ($5), a salty-sweet mix of rice cereal coated in sesame seeds and soy. For dessert is Japanese mochi ($6), a sweet rice-flour treat that’s being made in three flavors: butter, red bean or peanut butter and honey. Stop by, or call 534-7954 to place an order for pickup.

RUINS LAUNCHES VEGETARIAN DINNER SERIES

Vegetarians now get a night all their own at Ruins, the celebrated small plates restaurant from chef Tony Brown. Ruins’ new “Last Supper” series is served Sunday nights from 5-9 pm, offering a $35 fixed-price menu of four vegetarian courses. Brown says the series will showcase weekly rotating menus created by himself and Ruins’ sous chefs, and potentially from local guest chefs as time goes on. The first Last Supper dinner on Oct. 20 featured mushroom fritters with spiced yogurt and cilantro; a

40 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

salad course of celery root, pear, coleslaw, carrot and raisins; main course of curried root vegetables, toasted grains, pumpkin seed and coconut cream; finished off with dessert of apple cobbler and chai ice cream.

AMY’S DONUTS OPENING IN SPOKANE VALLEY

The anticipated Spokane Valley location for small national chain Amy’s Donuts is set to open on Monday, Oct. 29. Located at 11519 E. Sprague in a pink-and-orangestriped building, the store is now one of five locations for the eclectic donut shop that started in Colorado Springs in 2013. Amy’s Donuts locations are all open 24 hours a day; the treat shop is known for its funky, nontraditional donut toppings and flavor combinations. Some of the more creative standouts on the Amy’s Donuts menu include a pistachio cake donut, “Nutella fluff,” and plenty of pastries topped with cereal and candy bar crumbles. Seasonal flavors listed include a maple pumpkin spice and the “spider donut,” a glazed donut topped with two donut holes forming an abdomen, with legs and eyes in icing.

COEUR D’ALENE CIDER IS GETTING A TASTING ROOM

Earlier this year, we introduced readers to a few members of a growing female demographic of the region’s craft brewing industry. One of those brewmistresses is Jill Mor-

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

rison, owner and brewmaster of Coeur d’Alene Cider Co., which opened last year to become North Idaho’s third craft cidery. While the cidery doesn’t have its own tasting room, instead selling its seasonal and staple lineup of ciders — including a blackberry lemon, winterberry and semi-dry cider — at farmers markets and via other retailers, that’s about to change. A recent announcement made on Facebook shared the news that Coeur d’Alene Cider Co. is getting a tasting room and bottle shop on East Sherman Avenue, with more details forthcoming.

BRICK WEST BEER BREAKS GROUND

Amidst all the construction that’s been going on around downtown Spokane’s west end this year is a new project that beer lovers can get excited about. Brick West Beer was announced earlier this fall to be moving into a historic building at 1312 W. First built in 1905 that long served as an automotive shop. Brick West Beer is owned and operated by four local business partners made up of two sets of brothers with collective experience in real estate development and the hospitality industry. The brewpub is projecting to open by mid-2019, and in time for summer’s patio dining season. Plans for the venue include both rooftop and street-level patios, with plans to host live music, events and more. Follow the brewpub’s progress at facebook.com/brickwestbeer. n


FOOD | OPENING

Entertaining Eats Fujiyama Japanese Steak House in Liberty Lake fills tummies and dazzles senses BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

W

e can imagine the job posting for Fujiyama Japanese Steak House and Bar: “Experienced cook wanted. Responsibilities: Prepare up to 12 different meals simultaneously as you entertain customers with feats of derring-do. Ability to juggle sharp knives and firesticks a plus.” Fujiyama, like many teppanyaki-style venues, is dinner and a show. Some Fujiyama chefs play with fire. CARRIE SCOZZARO PHOTO places cringe when a party of eight to 10 folks arrive, but not Fujiyama. Here, the more the merrier. When there are four or more people seated around a grill — each grill table accommodates 12, but between eight and nine is more comfortable — the cook appears, dressed in red and black with some variation in his or her uniform,. “Every person has a different personality,” says our chef, Jalos Capada, who was only two weeks into the job as well as living in Spokane after relocating from Texas. “Everyone has a different style of cooking,” he adds. Capada unveils his growing list of tricks as he prepares the meals. Pouring oil on the hot grill, for example, is an opportunity to draw a face. Cooking a conical stack of raw onion rings becomes a way to simulate a volcano. The egg he’s just broken for fried rice devolves into strands of white and yellow lines as he uses it to “draw” on the hot griddle. Some tricks, however, are just frickin’ cool and all about the wow factor, like working with fire. A Fujiyama chef who goes by just “AJ” likes to pop things into his hat — an egg, his spice shaker, something lit on fire. Chef “Kloud” elicits oohs and ahhs with the flick of a wrist as his conical onion stack lights up. Capada juggles firesticks. There’s a lot of fire at Fujiyama, whose two sister restaurants are located in Silverdale and Richland, Washington, yet the chain has origins in the Midwest. Another location in Pullman is under different ownership. The Liberty Lake restaurant opened in midsummer. In the bar, there’s a full menu and a nice assortment of Japanese beers. Appetizers are a mashup of cuisines: Japanese edamame ($5), Chinese dim sum — dough pouches stuffed with pork and shrimp ($7) — and the ubiquitous American wings, with Fujiyama’s send-up of wasabi, sriracha or garlic sauce ($7.50). The real draw, however, is Fujiyama’s hibachi meals, all of which include clear onion soup, dressed lettuce, two cooked shrimp (served with dinner) and plain rice. Lunches run $10.50$15.50 and dinners between $14.50 and $24.50, ranging in portion size, but both offering similar main dishes: vegetables, chicken, beef and various seafoods like calamari and scallops. Available for dinner only is the house special combo, offering pairings such as steak and shrimp ($26.50), a 10-ounce center-cut filet mignon ($30.50) and two tails of lobster ($37.50). n Fujiyama Japanese Steak House & Bar • 21801 E. Country Vista Dr., Liberty Lake • Open Mon-Thu 11 am-10 pm, FriSat 11 am-11 pm, Sun 12-9 pm • fujiyamawa.com • 903-0888

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HORROR

MICHAEL LIVES A look back at the weird, wild Halloween franchise, 40 years after it all began BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

I

n 1978, John Carpenter’s Halloween forever altered the trajectory of modern horror, and 40 years and several sequels later, a new Halloween is storming the box office. Like villain Michael Myers, the franchise is still very much alive. In response, we’ve gone through the Halloween series — ignoring the Rob Zombie reboots — and have catalogued the bizarre twists and puzzling narrative decisions in a franchise lousy with them. (Spoilers ahead.)

HALLOWEEN (1978) Masked murderer Michael Myers escapes a mental institution and starts killing people on Halloween in his hometown. The pinnacle of the slasher subgenre, and a master class in music, editing and shot composition. New Mythology: We meet Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis), who narrowly survives Michael’s attacks, and psychiatrist Dr. Loomis (Donald Pleasence); both feature prominently in the sequels. Also established: Michael’s apparent invincibility. How does Michael “get it”? Coat hanger to the eye, multiple gunshot wounds and a fall from a second story balcony. Little good that does, because… HALLOWEEN II (1981) Later that same night, Michael, still kicking, follows Laurie to the hospital and terrorizes her and the graveyard-shift staff. Michael’s murders got more creative, with faces submerged in boiling water and syringes plunged into eyeballs. New Mythology: Michael’s real reason for targeting Laurie: They’re long-lost siblings. Gasp! This twist guides the rest of the franchise. How does Michael “get it”? Shot, then engulfed in flames. RIP? HALLOWEEN III: SEASON OF THE WITCH (1982)

The odd duck: There’s no Michael Myers. This is a standalone entity, with an evil novelty manufacturer sell-

ing cheap Halloween masks secretly designed to kill kids. It’s developed a well-earned cult following. New Mythology: None, but you can see some of those creepy masks in the 2018 Halloween. How does Michael “get it”? Well, he doesn’t.

HALLOWEEN 4: THE RETURN OF MICHAEL MYERS (1988)

We return to our regularly scheduled programming. Michael emerges from a decade-long coma, escapes custody, and again wreaks havoc. New Mythology: Who’s he after this time? Well, Laurie has died between movies, but left behind a daughter named Jamie (get it?). The girl inherited her uncle’s bloodthirsty ways, and after evading Michael, she stabs her foster mother in the movie’s final moments. How does Michael “get it”? Hit by a truck, riddled with bullets by a redneck vigilante squad, falls down a mineshaft. But…

HALLOWEEN 5: THE REVENGE OF MICHAEL MYERS (1989)

He escapes and is nursed to health by an old hermit. A year later, he emerges to terrorize Jamie again. New Mythology: So Jamie wasn’t actually a killer — her foster mom was only injured — and now Jamie’s mute from trauma. She’s also telepathically linked to her uncle now, which allows her to narrowly escape again. The film also introduces a shadowy deus ex machina known as the Man in Black. How does Michael “get it”? He’s tranquilized, then whacked with a board. He’s jailed, but the Man in Black busts him out.

HALLOWEEN: THE CURSE OF MICHAEL MYERS (1995)

Tommy Doyle (a clearly embarrassed Paul Rudd, in his film debut) tries to warn the town of Haddonfield that Michael is back. Will anyone listen? Some “relatives” of the Strodes have conveniently moved into the abandoned Myers house, in what has to be the worst real estate deal since Amityville. New Mythology: Buckle up: Jamie has given birth to the next descendent in the Myers bloodline. She escapes from a cult that wants to sacrifice the baby, only to be killed by Michael. We also learn of a druid curse — the reason Michael can’t be killed — and that the Man in Black is really the head doctor at the sanitarium from

which Michael originally escaped. Because this movie flopped, these are all narrative dead ends. How does Michael “get it”? Do you really care at this point?

HALLOWEEN H20 (1998) Psych — Laurie Strode lives! She’s changed her name, has a teenage son (Josh Hartnett) and is now principal of a California boarding school. But Michael tracks her down, driving cross-country (now that’s the movie I wanna see) to confront his sister 20 years after they first crossed paths. New Mythology: Installments four, five and six have now been erased. In this timeline, Jamie never existed, Laurie (obviously) never died, and Michael has been dormant since that fateful night back in ’78. How does Michael “get it”? Laurie pins him to a fence with a truck, then decapitates him. HALLOWEEN: RESURRECTION (2002) Psych — Michael Myers lives! Here we reach the bottom of the Halloween barrel. Busta Rhymes and, uh, Tyra Banks star as TV producers who strap cameras to some annoying college kids and make them spend a night in the Myers house. Guess what happens? New Mythology: Laurie didn’t really behead Michael. It was some poor schmuck in Michael’s mask, and that mistake has driven Laurie mad. Curtis returns only to be knocked off by her evil brother in a lousy prologue. How does Michael “get it”? Busta Rhymes overpowers him with kung-fu, then electrifies him right in the groin. Cause of death: embarrassment.

HALLOWEEN (2018) Everything you’ve just read? Pretend most of it never happened. The new Halloween ignores the convoluted mythology from Halloween II on. Michael and Laurie aren’t siblings, there was never any cult or poisoned bloodlines and Paul Rudd became a terrific comic actor. Director David Gordon Green wisely channeled Carpenter’s original (perhaps a bit too closely), crafting a meat-and-potatoes thriller about an unstoppable killing machine and the trauma he leaves in his wake. Jamie Lee Curtis, returning as an emotionally weathered Laurie Strode, finally gets a plotline worthy of her talent. It’s nowhere near as gripping as the original, but it’s as good a Halloween sequel as you could hope for. Here’s hoping they keep it simple from here on out. n OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 43


FILM | SHORTS

Get Ti cket s Now!

Indivisible

OPENING FILMS

T HIS SATUR DAY !

HUNTER KILLER

Gerard Butler and Gary Oldman shout their way through this Tom Clancy-ish thriller about Navy SEALs on a mission to save the kidnapped Russian president. (NW) Rated R

SPOKANE

INDIVISIBLE

In this Christian drama, an Army chaplain and his wife struggle to hold their marriage together when he returns from Iraq. (NW) Rated PG-13

b i ng cr o s by theate r

JOHNNY ENGLISH STRIKES AGAIN

SATURDAY, OCT. 27 AT 6:00PM & 9:0 0 PM

Because everyone was clamoring for it, Rowan Atkinson returns as the bumbling private eye, tasked this time with stopping a hacker from revealing agents’ identities. (NW) Rated PG

LONDON FIELDS

A clairvoyant woman knows she’s going to be murdered, but she’s not sure

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which of her three lovers is the killer. (NW) Rated R

MID90S

A socially awkward latchkey kid finds kinship amongst the L.A. skater scene in this semi-autobiographical period piece written and directed by Jonah Hill. (NW) Rated R

SILENCIO

A woman gains possession of a mysterious, all-powerful stone with ties to the Zone of Silence, considered the Bermuda Triangle of Mexico. (NW) Rated R

TEA WITH THE DAMES

Pretty self-explanatory: A documentary in which Eileen Atkins, Judi Dench, Joan Plowright and Maggie Smith discuss their decades-long careers with one another. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

RETURNING FILMS HOCUS POCUS

o f f e r s to t h e s e r e s o rts :

A trio of 17th-century witches are transported to modern day Salem in this campy 1993 Disney cult favorite. Oct. 26-31 at AMC River Park Square. (NW) Rated PG

THE NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS

Producer Tim Burton’s 1993 stopmotion marvel finds Jack Skellington trying to bring Christmas to spooky Halloween Town. Oct. 26-31 at Regal Northtown and Valley. (NW) Rated PG

NOW PLAYING BAD TIMES AT THE EL ROYALE

W IN TER STARTS WI T H WA RREN MILLER!

WARRe NMIl l eR. CoM

A bank robber, a CIA agent, an aspiring singer and a femme fatale converge at a Tahoe hotel on a fateful, violent night in 1969. Stylish and fitfully amusing, but also overlong and littered with narrative dead ends. (JB) Rated R

BLACKKKLANSMAN

Spike Lee’s latest joint concerns the true tale of black cop Ron Stallworth, who posed as a white supremacist

44 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

...continued on next page

and befriended David Duke in 1979. An endlessly fascinating story is occasionally undone by Lee’s own dramatic heavy-handedness. At the Magic Lantern. (JB) Rated R

COLETTE

A biopic of the French author Colette (Keira Knightley), who began as a ghostwriter for her husband and eventually published acclaimed work under her own name. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R


NOW PLAYING FIRST MAN

Ryan Gosling is Neil Armstrong in Damien Chazelle’s rousing biopic, which meticulously details the sheer risk and courage that went into the moon landing. A tad overlong, but technically dazzling. (ES) Rated PG-13

FREE SOLO

A documentary following climber Alex Honnold’s attempt to successfully ascend Yosemite’s El Capitan rock formation sans rope and safety harness. Not for acrophobes, especially in its stunning final minutes. (NW) Rated PG-13

GOOSEBUMPS 2: HAUNTED HALLOWEEN

Pointless sequel has R.L. Stine’s kid-lit creations again coming to life and terrorizing a small town. About on par with the old Goosebumps TV show. (NW) Rated PG

HALLOWEEN

Masked killer Michael Myers is on the loose and after Laurie Strode again, resulting in a surprisingly solid, if slightly routine, thriller. A direct follow-up to the 1978 horror classic, ignoring a litany of earlier sequels. (NW) Rated R

THE HATE U GIVE

From Angie Thomas’ YA bestseller, a teenager becomes an unwitting symbol for injustice after she witnesses a cop shoot her childhood friend. A provocative social-issue drama that tackles race, class and police brutality. (JB) Rated PG-13

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

NEW YORK VARIETY (LOS ANGELES) TIMES

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

60

BAD TIMES AT THE EL ROYALE

NTERN THEAT GIC LA ER MA TH ST FRI, OCT 26 - THU, NOV 1 TICKETS: $9

COLETTE (111 MIN)

FRI/SAT: 4:15, 7:00 SUN: 1:00, 4:15 TUES-THU 6:00

TEA WITH THE DAMES (83 MIN)

FIRST MAN

84

FRI-SUN: 2:30, 5:15 TUES-THU: 4:45, 6:20

FREE SOLO

83

FRI-SUN: 3:15 TUES-THU: 4:00

HALLOWEEN

68

THE HATE U GIVE

82

THE SISTERS BROTHERS

78

A STAR IS BORN

88

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

across the American West. Simultaneously classical and postmodern, both darkly funny and bluntly violent. (NW) Rated R

SMALLFOOT

An animated tale about an outcast yeti who sets out to prove to his village that humans do exist. With an anonymous visual style and forgettable songs, this toon barely clears a very low bar. (JB) Rated PG

A STAR IS BORN

This third remake of the classic ragsto-riches story finds a booze-soaked musician (Bradley Cooper) eclipsed by his protege and lover (Lady Gaga, who can really act). An engaging rock melodrama that offers both the glitter

WATCH IT AT HOME

THE WIFE (93 MIN)

BLACKKLANSMAN (128 MIN)

FRI: 6:30 SUN: 12:15 (PM)

THE CLAW (102 MIN) SAT: 7:00 PM

LAST WEEKEND

ONE NIGHT ONLY

(509) 209-2383 • 25 W Main Ave MagicLanternOnMain.com • /MagicLanternOnMain

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of escapism and the grit of serious issues. (EB) Rated R

VENOM

Tom Hardy’s bad-boy journalist is possessed by a wisecracking alien symbiote, and he goes after a billionaire scientist doing dangerous experiments. Plays like a 13-year-old boy’s idea of a cool, edgy superhero movie. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE WIFE

After her husband receives a Nobel Prize for literature, a doting housewife (Glenn Close) comes to terms with the significant contributions she has made to his work. An involving character study that unfolds like a mystery. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R n

Breast Exams October is Breast Cancer Awareness &

THE HOUSE WITH A CLOCK IN ITS WALLS

Prevention month.

Based on John Bellairs’ beloved book, a fantasy about an orphaned boy and his warlock uncle trying to stop an evil sorcerer’s doomsday clock. An odd duck of a children’s film, too goofy in some places and too scary in others. (NW) Rated PG

Please take time for self-care AND selfexamination. Book an appointment

NIGHT SCHOOL

Kevin Hart as a high school dropout getting his GED meets a ragtag night school crew and a teacher (Tiffany Haddish, the best thing here) who see through his boastful exterior. Can’t decide between slapstick farce or a PSA about learning disabilities. (DN) Rated PG-13

with us if you notice

THE OATH

866.904.7721

any lumps or other changes. Schedule online at ppgwni.org, or call

Ike Barinholtz (who also wrote and directed) and Tiffany Haddish are a couple debating the decision to sign a loyalty pact to an authoritarian president. It makes for an awkward Thanksgiving. (NW) Rated R

We offer quality health care, backed by medical experts and over 100 years

THE OLD MAN AND THE GUN

Robert Redford gives his supposed swan song as an escaped convict who becomes the world’s most charming bank robber. A throwback to the films of the ’70s, and based on a true story. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE SISTERS BROTHERS

During the Gold Rush, sibling assassins Joaquin Phoenix and John C. Reilly pursue a chemist with a secret formula

NOW STREAMING

of research in reproductive care.

THE STRANGERS: PREY AT NIGHT (AMAZON PRIME)

That trio of masked home invaders from the 2008 horror hit return, menacing a road-tripping family in a desolate trailer park. Brief flashes of style and pitch-black humor don’t compensate for all its slasher movie cliches. (NW) Rated R

OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 45 PlannedParenthood_BreastExams_102518_3V_CPW.pdf


A Juried Art Show & Sale October 26th 4pm to 9pm October 27th 10am to 5pm ArtOnThePrairieSpokane.com

46 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018


R&B

Making Moves With upbeat covers and soulful originals, Blake Braley and his band have Zola crowds grooving BY CHERRI COVILLO

Spokane vocalist Blake Braley has cultivated a following with his breezy style and a weekly gig at Zola.

O

n a warm September evening, the Blake Braley Band is setting up gear and getting ready to record a test single in the studio. Blake Braley sits in a 1970s camper on the roof of Lead Pencil Recording Studios, accompanied by tweed, Grateful Dead records and the smell of stale smoke. His namesake band is funky and indebted to the sounds of Motown, and while he has big plans for the group’s future, he started from humble beginnings. “Tristan Pierce, my guitar player and fellow co-writer of most of the songs, was one of the main reasons I started playing music,” Braley says. The two would jam together and post videos of acoustic covers when they were attending University High School in Spokane Valley. Pierce brings blues influences like Gary Clark Jr. to the table, while Braley

finds inspiration in the classic R&B of Stevie Wonder and Donny Hathaway. But it was Chewelah native Allen Stone who found the two musicians meeting in the creative middle: Pierce introduced Braley to Stone’s 2011 song “Unaware,” and their band has taken much of its sweetness and groove from that. “Once I found Allen Stone, and I listened to him, I really dove into his influences,” Braley says. “[He] was the first guy that I was like, whoa.” Since that encounter, Braley has actually had the opportunity to perform alongside Stone on the stage at Zola, where Braley’s band has a weekly slot. “Allen is an amazing guy,” Braley says. “Both he and his wife Tara are some of the most generous and loving people I’ve met in my short 22 years of life. It’s really

ALICIA HAUFF PHOTO

cool to call them friends. Allen was the first musician who really sparked my interest in music. His music also got me through some really tough times. “Being on the same stage, playing tunes and passing around the smiles with one of my biggest musical inspirations was quite the trip. An honor to say the least.”

B

raley didn’t always know he had the ability to move people’s emotions with his voice. But when he made a video singing a John Mayer cover that got 5,000 views on Facebook, he realized there might be a future in music. Now he’s committed to it full time, and he’s still working on new material. “One of us has an idea,” Braley says of his writing process with guitarist Pierce. “Tristan or I will come up ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 47


MUSIC | R&B “MAKING MOVES,” CONTINUED... with chords, a hook, melody, lyrics and a framework. Then we jam with it, and then we bring the whole band in.” The rest of Braley’s band consists of some of the most recognized players in the Inland Northwest. Bassist Eddie Ramirez, a versatile musician who plays exclusively by ear, cut his teeth performing at church and grew up with a Latin influence. “He plays everything,” Braley says. “He has one of the best ears of any musician I’ve ever heard in my whole life.” Drummer Juan Paris (Braley refers to him as “mysterious island man”) is a familiar face from Zola’s live music lineup, as he plays drums there most nights. He grew up learning how to play on buckets and trash cans, a story he enjoys telling. Paris also records and produces artists out of Lead Pencil with real estate developer Dan Spalding, who dabbles in bass, keys, saxoMORE EVENTS phone and harp. Visit Inlander.com for Since each member keeps complete listings of himself busy, finding time to local events. bring all the members together to record has been one of the bigger challenges the group has faced. They’ve spent most of this past year on an EP of original songs that will showcase the same groovy live sound you might get from a night at Zola. Pierce will soon be touring for a month in Europe with another project, but they plan to put on all the finishing touches when he gets back. “[They’re] the hardest working musicians in Spokane,” Braley says of his band. “They rarely have days off.”

O

n an early fall night at Zola, the Blake Braley Band rips through a set of danceable cover tunes that span decades, while incorporating some of their originals. The room buzzes with energy. An elderly couple, dressed to the nines, dances across the floor. The bassline thumps insistently as Pierce breaks out of the melody, his guitar dancing solos around the groove. Braley complements him with soulful, soaring vocals. As the evening continues, they play tunes about love and dancing and all the good things that lift the spirit. They get to an original called “Darlin’” that has the crowd singing along to its relatable refrain: “The days just aren’t the same without you / And I just can’t go on without you, darlin’.” The verses explain the struggle of missing someone who you are still in love with, and Braley sings them with so much conviction and soulful energy that it seems to speak personally to every ear in the room. It’s just a typical Thursday night for them. “The goal is to do this for as long as I possibly can until I can’t physically do it anymore,” Braley says. “I’m hopeful for the friendships to be made and grateful for the ones I have made. I’m excited for my tunes to be out in the universe.” n The Blake Braley Band • Thursdays at 9 pm • 21+ • Zola • 22 W. Main • zolainspokane.com • 624-2416

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NIGHTLIFE

THE INSIDER’S GUIDE TO THE INLAND NORTHWEST

48 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018


MUSIC | REUNION NOW HEAR THIS

All Fall Down’s Joe Brasch shared a few of the band’s favorite songs from the old days: “Promises in the Dark” by Pat Benatar “[All Fall Down’s Brenda Boschee] just really killed that song. It has all that Pat Benatar angst that Brenda just happened to capture.” “Talk To Ya Later” by the Tubes “It’s one of those songs the band could really stretch out on and have some fun.” “Middle of the Road” by the Pretenders “[Tracy Kendrick’s] got that rock rasp that just makes it the perfect song for her.” “Rock and Roll” by Led Zeppelin “Jilla [Webb] would do the Heart version. She’s a big fan of Ann Wilson, and she can do all that stuff.” “Baby Got Back” by Sir Mix-A-Lot “Danny [Lee’s] known primarily for his jazz stuff. He’s out there doing ‘Baby Got Back’ and it’s freaking awesome!”

All Fall Down vocalist Tracy Kendrick performs during the Spokane cover band’s heyday.

Into the ’80s Groove Spokane’s All Fall Down resurrects the old JJ’s Lounge vibe to raise money for a good cause BY DAN NAILEN

S

ome might suggest if you remember partying in the ’80s, then you weren’t really partying in the ’80s. But enough Spokanites remember raging at JJ’s Lounge at the old Sheraton Hotel downtown, and even if some of the details are hazy — lost in a cloud of hairspray and foggy “youthful indiscretions” — there’s no doubt that something special was going on. And cover band All Fall Down was providing the soundtrack. “In the ’80s, people were ready to party at that point in their lives,” says Joe Brasch, All Fall Down guitarist. “We were certainly there to help them do that. And JJ’s was kind of the perfect place to do that.” “It was the years of partying,” concurs Tracy Kendrick, one of the vocalists of the band that played up to six nights a week at JJ’s between 1982 and 1994. “It was the thing to do! You got dressed up and you went down to JJ’s. You just did. It was cool. It was a lot of big hair. A lot of Aquanet. I wish I would have appreciated it more then. I so appreciate it now.”

Brasch, Kendrick and the rest of the surviving All Fall Down members will spark a few vivid memories when they reunite for a benefit show this weekend. They’ll play at Northern Quest Resort & Casino and recreate that old ’80s JJ’s magic, from playing the same songs to using the same light and sound guys who made the old club “look and sound a lot like a concert,” Brasch says. Proceeds will go to the Future Song Foundation, which provides instruments, teachers and mentors to underprivileged kids interested in music.

A

band doesn’t last more than a decade just by partying with their friends, and both Brasch and Kendrick are quick to note how serious All Fall Down was about honing their craft. Even when they were playing four hours a night, they still practiced three nights a week to add new songs from the radio into their sets — and those rehearsals would typically start at 2 am right after a show. “The band could play,” Brasch says.

“Whatever was new, we were learning. We always had new material.” “We’d hear Cyndi Lauper on the radio and say, ‘Oh, Cyndi Lauper has a new song!’” Kendrick recalls. “If it was on the radio right now, we were doing it. We were the most current band in town. That included all the lace and hairspray and the colored boots. It was a pleasure to do those songs, and people really responded to it.” Brasch says the reunion show will include songs from all three eras of the band, basically divided up by the three female lead singers All Fall Down had: Kendrick, Brenda Boschee and Jilla Webb. Singers Dave Lee and Danny McCollim also lent their voices at different points and will be part of the reunion. Given the band’s long history, there’s a whole generation of Spokane residents who got to see them back in the day (and probably more than once). Expect a lot of them to don their ’80s finest alongside the band whose members still get recognized. “There’s not too many places I go that somebody doesn’t mention, ‘Oh, man, I was at JJ’s all the time,’ or ‘I met my husband at JJ’s,’ or ‘I was there the night you played with Eddie Van Halen,’” Brasch says. “For me to be able to go up on stage with my best friends on the planet and play some songs and bring back the glory days to make sure kids have the opportunity to play — there’s nothing better than that.” n All Fall Down Reunion Show • Sat, Oct. 27 at 8 pm • $29/$100 VIP • 21+ • Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com • 481-2100

VOTE!

Also, eat here. wedonthaveone.com

OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

R&B LIZ VICE

L

iz Vice’s music keeps one foot rooted in gospel with the other in traditional R&B, a reflection of her own background as a pop fan growing up in the Catholic Church. The Portland-based vocalist and songwriter’s most recent album, Save Me, marries the stirring lyrical power of a generations-old hymn with the vitality of Motown, a collection of smooth jams, rousing anthems and lilting mid-tempo ballads. Vice’s vocals are haunting enough when unaccompanied, but they’re occasionally fortified by a choir’s worth of harmonies. Her record has the soulfulness of a Sunday morning service, but you need not be devout to find religion here. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Liz Vice with Moda Spira • Fri, Oct. 26 at 8 pm • $10 advance, $12 day of • All ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 10/25

BERSERK, Vinyl Meltdown BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BISTANGO MARTINI LOUNGE, The Double Downs J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen J J COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Ratt CORBY’S BAR, Open Mic and Karaoke THE CORK & TAP, Truck Mills CRUISERS, Open Jam Night DARCY’S, Karaoke w/DJ Dave THE JACKSON ST., Zaq Flanary and the Songsmith Series JOHN’S ALLEY, D.on Darox and the Melody Joy Bakers J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin MARYHILL WINERY, Mark Holt NASHVILLE NORTH, John Anderson NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Rockadelic NORTHERN ALES, Pickett J THE PIN!, Demun Jones, Charlie Farley, Luke Yates, Big Kountry RED ROOM LOUNGE, I Want BNGRZ! RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, Jam Series THE ROXIE, Steve Starkey SLICE & BISCUIT, Bluegrass Jam J ZOLA, Blake Braley (see page 47)

Friday, 10/26

THE AGING BARREL, Just Plain Darin ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Son of Brad J J THE BARTLETT, Liz Vice (see above), Moda Spira BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOLO’S, The Happiness BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke BOOMERS, Kostapalooza J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Red Light Challenge

50 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

COUNTRY ELI YOUNG BAND

T

he namesake of members Mike Eli and James Young, the Eli Young Band is unapologetically sentimental one moment, party animals the next. You’ve probably heard them soundtrack the first dance at a wedding, and then played during the ceremony after. A few years ago, Eli, Young and company scored back-to-back No. 1 country singles with “Crazy Girl” and “Even If It Breaks Your Heart,” which remain their signature tunes, and you better believe everyone in the crowd at one of their concerts knows every word. The native Texans have yet to make that coveted crossover to Top 40 radio, but there’s still time. — NATHAN WEINBENDER The Eli Young Band • Thu, Nov. 1 at 8 pm • $30 • All ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279 CHECKERBOARD BAR, Halloween Cover Show CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), KOSH CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke CRUISERS, Sovereign Citizen and The Non Prophets CURLEY’S, Gigawatt DARCY’S, Karaoke w/DJ Dave DOWNTOWN CHENEY, Usual Suspects & Milonga FARMHOUSE KITCHEN, Tom D’Orazi HILLYARD LIBRARY SPORTS BAR, Halloween Party ft. Bobby Patterson Band HOUSE OF SOUL, Halloween Party with Nu Jack City IRON GOAT BREWING CO., El Primo IRON HORSE (CDA), Royale JOHN’S ALLEY, Jeff Austin Band J KNITTING FACTORY, SOB x RBE, Quando Rondo J LAGUNA CAFÉ, The Renaldos LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Cris Lucas

MARYHILL WINERY, Jacob Westfall MAX AT MIRABEAU, Jan Harrison Blues Experience MILL BAY CASINO, Smash Hit Carnival MOOSE LOUNGE, Dragonfly NASHVILLE NORTH, Craig Campbell, Everette, Luke Jaxon NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Seaforth J NYNE, Atari Ferrari, Cursive Wires PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Ron Kieper Jazz J THE PIN!, Bonita Sarita, Tyler Rose, Alex Allison, Anthemusiq, Rotti Adms PLAYERS & SPECTATORS, Aaron Cerutti, Sailor Jerry, Gordon Ewell, Kristin “Chief” Beck, Jenny Munday RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Stella Jones THE THIRSTY DOG, DJs WesOne & Big Mike ZOLA, The Cronkites

Saturday, 10/27

3RD WHEEL, Sin Circus, Everyone Loves a Villain, Bearing Heavy Crowns ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Scott & Kevin J BABY BAR, Halloween Cover Show with Whiskey Dick Mountain, Atari Ferrari, Soul Man Black, Nat Park & the Tunnels of Love and more BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE, Jan Harrison J THE BARTLETT, FY5, Kevin Brown BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOLO’S, The Happiness BOOMERS, The Smoke’n Wheels J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Dan Maher THE BULL HEAD, Halloween Bash w/ DJ Hood J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Matt Baird CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), KOSH

CORBY’S BAR, Halloween Party feat. The Zach Cooper Band CRUISERS, KrashKarma, My Own Affliction, Harmonic Pariah CURLEY’S, Gigawatt FREDNECK’S, Just Plain Darin GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Dangerous Type HOUSE OF SOUL, Halloween Party with Bobby Patterson Band J HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET, Guy Caliouet IRON HORSE (CDA), Royale THE JACKSON ST., Sovereign Citizen and the Non Prophets JOHN’S ALLEY, DJ Miles J KNITTING FACTORY, Kozmik Dreamzz (Janis Joplin Tribute), Steve Livingston & Triple Shot J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Diane Copeland THE LARIAT INN, Christy Lee and the Broken Rosary Whiskey Thieves LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Jona Gallegos THE LOCAL DELI, Son of Brad


MARYHILL WINERY, Donnie Emerson MILL BAY CASINO, Smash Hit Carnival MOOSE LOUNGE, Dragonfly NASHVILLE NORTH, ’90s Country Party w/Jeremy McComb & Luke Jaxon NECTAR WINE AND BEER, I Love the ‘90s w/DJ Benny Blanco NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Seaforth J J NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, All Fall Down Reunion (see page 49) OBJECT SPACE, Gorilla Rabbit Chicken and Guests J THE OBSERVATORY, Halloween Bash feat. Indian Goat, Itchy Kitty, Skunktopus, Dustfuzz PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Brian Jacobs J J THE PIN!, Halloween Cover Show w/Age of Nefilim, FAUS, Dysfunktynal Kaos, Sid Broderius and the Emergency Exit & more POST FALLS BREWING, Sam Leyde RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL, Halloween Bash ft. Kidd Whiskey J RED ROOM LOUNGE, Hip-Hop Halloween with Kung Fu Vinyl and Speaker Minds

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Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

REUNION

RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos RIPPLES RIVERSIDE GRILL, Jojo’s THE ROXIE, Halloween EDM Night w/ Exsto & The deanE SILVER FOX, The Jukers STORMIN’ NORMAN’S, Karaoke ZOLA, The Cronkites

Sunday, 10/28

THE BLIND BUCK, Show Tune SingAlong J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Danielson Recital CRAVE, DJ Dave DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Rev. Yo’s VooDoo Church Jam GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke J HARVEST HOUSE, Just Plain Darin IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Land of Voices LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam MARYHILL WINERY, Howard King NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Seaforth O’DOHERTY’S, Live Irish Music PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Annie Welle J THE PIN!, Mayday!, 1TON, D.U.IVan STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, Karaoke ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 10/29

THE BULL HEAD, Songsmith Series J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic CHECKERBOARD BAR, Open Mic CRAVE, DJ Dave EICHARDT’S, Jam with Truck Mills

J THE PIN!, Ingested, Enterprise Earth, Body Snatcher, Aethere RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown ZOLA, Lazy Love

Tuesday, 10/30

219 LOUNGE, Karaoke with DJ Pat J THE BARTLETT, Northwest of Nashville feat. Jenny Anne Mannan, Prairie War, The Eyer Family Band, Keisha Jimenez-Brown BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke J J CHATEAU RIVE, EmiSunshine and The Rain CRAVE, DJ Dave GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke J KNITTING FACTORY, SOJA, Xiuhtezcatl LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tues. THE OBSERVATORY, Musician’s Open Mic J THE PIN!, Culture Bane, Doktor Reaktor, Killmore, Gothnik RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL, Open Mic Jam RIDLER PIANO BAR, Country Swing Dancing J SARANAC ROOFTOP, Kid Bohemian, S1UGS, Moonchyld SWEET LOU’S, Pamela Benton THE VIKING, Songsmith Series ZOLA, Dueling Cronkites

Wednesday, 10/31 219 LOUNGE, Truck Mills Quartet BLACK DIAMOND, Songsmith Series feat. Steve Livingston CRAVE, DJ Dave

CRUISERS, Open Jam Night EICHARDT’S, John Firshi GENO’S, Open Mic HOUSE OF SOUL, Jazz Wednesdays IRON HORSE (CDA), Open Jam IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Maxie Rae Mills THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke JOHN’S ALLEY, Free the Jester, State of Krisis J KNITTING FACTORY, Trivium, Avatar, Light the Torch J THE LOCAL DELI, Devon Wade LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 OMEGA EVENT CENTER, Monsters Bash w/Rome, Shauk, DJ McFly, Kid Kaotic, Pewpewspload RED ROOM LOUNGE, Blowin’ Kegs Jam Session RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open Mic J SOUTH HILL GRILL, Just Plain Darin THE THIRSTY DOG, Karaoke J TWO SEVEN PUBLIC HOUSE, Matt Mitchell ZOLA, Cruxie

Coming Up ...

J J KNITTING FACTORY, Eli Young Band (see facing page), Nov. 1 J THE BARTLETT, Molly Burch, Jesse Woods, Nov. 2 CLEARWATER RIVER CASINO, America, Nov. 2 THE OBSERVATORY, Dancing Plague, Soul Man Black, Paisley Devil, Nov. 2 THE OBSERVATORY, The Purrs, Telepathic Station Nine, Nov. 3

’80s COSTUME DANCE PARTY ALL FALL DOWN / Oct 27

Bust out your dancing shoes and killer ’80s outfit for a reunion of All Fall Down, Spokane’s iconic cover band that owned the stage at JJ’s Lounge. This 21+ event benefits the Future Song Foundation. Learn more at futuresong.org

Get tickets at NORTHERNQUEST.COM

877.871.6772 | SPOKANE, WA

MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-2639934 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens • 714-9512 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-457-2392 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOLLYWOOD REVOLVER BAR • 4720 Ferrel, CdA • 208-274-0486 HOUSE OF SOUL • 120 N. Wall • 217-1961 IRON HORSE BAR • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., CdA • 509-926-8411 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy, Ste. 100 • 443-3832 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 381-5489 OMEGA EVENT CENTER • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 51


GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

CLASSICAL HEAR HOGWARTS

Third time’s a charm for this favorite annual concert series performed by the Spokane Symphony Orchestra, celebrating the music of one of the most beloved wizarding worlds of all time: Harry Potter. The program, under the baton of resident conductor Eckart Preu for one last time, features familiar motifs from the movie scores by John Williams, mixed with some other “magical” classics new and old. Come early for pre-concert activities in the Fox’s glorious lobby, beginning 90 minutes before each show. Wizards of all ages are encouraged to wear robes and Hogwarts house garb — show your pride for Gryffindor, Slytherin, Ravenclaw or Hufflepuff! — but leave the practice of any “muffliato” charms at home, for the sake of all concertgoers. — CHEY SCOTT Haunted Hallows: The Music of Harry Potter • Sat, Oct. 27 at 2 and 8 pm; Sun, Oct. 28 at 3 pm • $20-$29/ages 12 and under; $29-$125/adults • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

52 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

OUTDOORS WINTER IS COMING

COMEDY INSOMNIACS WELCOME

Mt. Spokane Ski Patrol Ski Swap • Sat, Oct. 27 from 9 am-5 pm and Sun, Oct. 28 from 9 am-noon • $5; ages 12 and under free • Spokane County Fair & Expo Center • 404 N. Havana • skipatrolskiswap.com

Dave Attell • Fri, Oct. 26 and Sat, Oct. 27 at 7:30 and 10 pm • $25-$35 • Spokane Comedy Club • spokanecomedyclub.com • 318-9998

As the temperature begins to drop, the snow watch is on for ski and snowboard season. Before you hit the slopes, check out the Mt. Spokane Ski Patrol Ski Swap benefiting the Mt. Spokane Ski Patrol’s efforts to keep everyone safe as they shred down the mountain. Celebrating its 54th year, the ski swap boasts 25,000 new and used winter sports items from regional sporting goods stores and individuals. Drop off your unwanted snow gear to sell the Friday before the event from 3-8 pm. A larger inventory of gear is being offered this year to accommodate a recent seven-run park expansion at Mt. Spokane. Stock up on all of your winter sports needs and get hyped for the 2018-19 ski and snowboard season. — MICHAELA MULLIGAN

Dave Attell is a comedy pro, and you’d be hard-pressed to find a better stand-up gig coming to Spokane before the end of the year than his show. He’s probably best known for the four-season run of Insomniac with Dave Attell, a Comedy Central show that combined aspects of a travel show with drunken members of the general public, with Attell as overseer and instigator. He came to prominence in New York’s comedy scene alongside the likes of Dave Chappelle, and a spot on David Letterman’s show helped him land a writing gig on Saturday Night Live in the mid-’90s. More recently, he hosted Dave Attell’s Comedy Underground on Comedy Central, helping introduce the likes of Ali Wong and Nikki Glaser. He’s performing four shows in two nights when he comes to Spokane. — DAN NAILEN


Spokane writer Kate Lebo is calling out to Cathy McMorris Rodgers. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

WORDS ’TIS THE SEASON

Kate Lebo grew up on the west side of Washington, and her move to Spokane a few years back came with the realization that she was now a citizen of a place considerably politically “redder” than she was used to. With that came the knowledge that Republican Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers, who’d spent years trying to kill the Affordable Care Act Lebo relied on, was now the poet, author and pie maestro’s representative in Washington, D.C. Such pistol-whippings of new clarity often make for great art, and that’s certainly true in Lebo’s case with the recent publication of Seven Prayers to Cathy McMorris Rodgers. Part witty dissection of modern politics and part letters from a concerned constituent, Seven Prayers gets a public reading that is also serving as a fundraiser for McMorris Rodgers’ opponent in the current election, Lisa Brown. Lebo will be joined by local authors/readers Laura Read, Chelsea Martin, Sharma Shields, Ellen Welcker, Nance Van Winckel and Maya Jewell Zeller. — DAN NAILEN Kate Lebo’s Seven Prayers to Cathy McMorris Rodgers Release Party • Sun, Oct. 28 at 4 pm • Free • All ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

LEINENKUGEL’S HOCKTOBERFEST

Saturday Oct.27 at 4:00pm

FREE AND OPEN TO ALL AGES Join us before the Chiefs game for HOCKtoberfest and enter to win a weekend trip for two to Leavenworth.

MUSIC, FOOD, BEER, SILENT AUCTION, SPECIAL T-SHIRTS & BEER STEINS, FACE PAINTERS & KID ACTIVITIES

WORDS CARNIVORE’S DILEMMA

The number is pretty staggering: More than 87 billion animals are raised on Earth each year just to feed us. How will that number grow and its impacts be felt, then, as the human population pushes 9 billion people by the middle of the 21st century? What about the impacts on our climate? This complicated issue is explored by Gonzaga University professor and philosopher Brian G. Henning during a discussion hosted by Humanities Washington and the Spokane Public Library. We already know animal-based agriculture is a leading polluter and contributor to climate change, but meat-heavy diets might also be making us sick. Learn more, including some possible alternatives to the current model, at this insightful conversation, which is perhaps more timely than originally intended after the recent release of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change’s latest climate report. — CHEY SCOTT

SATURDAY OCT.27

Game Time:

7 PM

vs. TRI-CITY AMERICANS Sponsored by:

For Game Tickets Call 509.535.PUCK

www.SPOKANECHIEFS.com

“The Ethics of Eating Meat on a Small Planet” • Mon, Oct. 29 at 6:30 pm • Free • South Hill Library • 3324 S. Perry • humanities.org

OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 53


W I SAW YOU

S S

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU MCMORRIS RODGERS SUPPORTERS. I went to the “debate” on 10.17.18 at the Fox with an open mind, completely cleared my mind of all I had seen on TV. Although I had not seen McMorrisRodgers enact a bill or vote on anything that would enhance neither my or my grandchildren’s educational or medical circumstances, I was willing to listen to her in person. I DID, and what I heard were the words, “I’m excited---, I’m happy” and other expressions describing how SHE feels about the job she has done. I found Brown addressing the actual issues and providing info. that I wanted to hear. Sitting in front of me were McMorrisRodgers supporters applauding for her so hard with tears in their eyes, that I said they could have been teenagers applauding for a rock-star. Less emotion folks, read and listen. Who gave us the most intelligent and worthwhile answers last night? You know. BLOCKING THAT INTERSECTION ...Because you thought you could squeeze in behind the car ahead of you and hope the light stays green.

Meanwhile, you’re blocking cross traffic who can’t proceed through their own green light. Listen: your lack of planning ahead shouldn’t interrupt everyone else who is also trying to make it to work on time or get home from a day of hell at the office. Washington law states: “No driver shall enter an intersection or a marked crosswalk unless there is sufficient space on the other side of the intersection, crosswalk to accommodate the vehicle he or she is operating without obstructing the passage of other vehicles.” Also, it keeps you from being an entitled A-hole, mmmmk? Thanks. BIG SHAGGY DOG MAN I see you every Saturday morning at the Rockwood bakery on the patio with your gigantic fluffy Newfie. You with your sky blue eyes; him with his adorable slobbery jowls. Wanna share a cappuccino? FALL FUN I saw you at Siemers this Sunday. You were wearing the most ugly-cute tie I have ever seen, thoroughly enjoying a huckleberry doughnut and singing along to the cheesy ‘90s tunes. You made my day. Don’t stop finding joy in the little things. HOTTIE AT THE HOTPOT I saw you at Hong Kong Express on Sunday the 21st. You were dressed in turquoise and ordered Hotpot. I admire your adventurous nature and kind treatment to the restaurant employees. Your smile was infectious and your optimism was refreshing. I would love to share a bowl with you sometime!

CHEERS KUDOS Congrats to 25 years of

Inlander. What I appreciate most is you don’t hide your liberal leanings as made clear by writers like Robert Herold. You provide the most comprehensive weekly guide to happenings

cast a negative vibe at the beginning of this performance. Cheers to the person who quickly alerted theater staff to 86 the drunk dude. Spokane doesn’t need to tolerate intoxicated

heavily-traveled road. WHY didn’t you move that car to the shoulder (there was plenty of room)? I hope the reason is because it wouldn’t’ start... because if you sat there and watched the traffic

If you do not vote, then move to a country that does not have elections.

and arts in our community. I never miss reading an issue. Keep it up!

idiots and hopefully this one will seek much needed help.

LGBTQ+SENIORS Cheers to the lgbtq + seniors for partnering with the new diversity choir at a saturday potluck. And cheers again for partnering with medical students at wsu spokane to show gen silent about lgbtq+ aging issues!

REUTER’S “FACTS” John Reuter’s comments in last week’s issue is titled “Facts Matter,” and while it was heartfelt and rousing it was woefully short on facts that pertain to Initiative 1631. The initiative exempts 60% of the states largest polluters and the money raised will be overseen by an unelected board of officials with no clear or binding guidelines in how the money will be spent. It puts a permanently escalating tax on Washington families who already live in the MOST regressively taxed state in the nation. Voting for fact does still matter and Reuter’s article urging us to “save the world” by voting yes on 1631 is short on facts and long on hype.

MY HERO FROM WIZZLE TOWN “I see her in the mornings, smiles abound. She makes my day so there’s no need to frown. She’s funny and smart, she’s the cutest thing around. When it comes to cookies, she really knows how to get down. Her eyes are blue, and her hair is brown. She’s my number one buddy, she’s the shizz nizzle from Wizzle Town”

JEERS KEB MO DRUNK DUDE Jeers to the drunk dude that was escorted from the Bing Crosby Theater during the Keb Mo performance. This guy made an idiot of himself, made many others around him uncomfortable and

CLUELESS FENDER BENDER To the people involved in what looked like a minor fender bender on Bruce Road just south of Day Mt. Spokane road on Sunday around 11:30 a.m.... I say minor because there were maybe 4-5 adults standing on the side of the road casually chatting as one of your cars fully blocked a travel lane on a very

NON-VOTERS If you do not vote then move to a country that does not have elections. You suck. n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS S P A N S

T O N O W

A L O H A

E D E N S

S O L O S

Q U I P S

A C T I R U R O G

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

If you don’t vote, then you can’t complain

MIND, BODY, SPIRIT HOLISTIC FAIR

40 VENDORS, INFORMATION, DEMONSTRATIONS & 9 DYNAMIC SPEAKERS: Balancing, Artists, Life Coaching, Massage, Chiropractic, BodyTalk, Reiki, DNA Activation, BEMER, Qhantum Vibrational Healing, Maitreya,

Downtown Spokane on Howard St.

54 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

Unity Spiritual Center on South Hill on the corner of 29th and Bernard Spokane WA for more information: (509) 496-8138 LindaChristine@LindaChristineStudios.com

B A M E P D A R M M I N O M O B L E S A A I N D E N O W I V L E E R

P E O N U R N N Y O N G O

P O L O

S S P W H U I O L F O U L T O T S S N O F E U B E G A T I T I N O G A I N N E M A N N O O V A C L I B O D D S N

A G O R O N I V E N U E V E

A S R E D

P S S S T

S C O P E

T R E E S

S Y N C S

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Medical Intuitive Readings, Botanicals, Chakra

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 3RD 10AM TO 5PM FREE EVENT AND FREE PARKING

chaos that ensued in both directions, cars lined up as far as the eye could see on a two-lane road... and still thought it was ok to leave your car in the middle of the road — then you clearly need a reality check. Take pictures and move out of the way!!

Nutritional Products, Blue Rune Readings, Crystals & Lavender Products, Astrology Readings, Essential Oils, Biomat Therapy, Eckancar, Angel Readings, “Good Vibrations”, Books & CD’s, Herbs, Tarot, Medication, Homeopathy, Shamans, Sound Healing, Botanicals, Faith Healing & Jewelry


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

CANSS NEWPORT SMELTER DINNER & AUCTION A spaghetti dinner and auction, with proceeds going to CANSS’ lawyer fund to aid in a legal battle to stop the construction of a massive silicon smelter near Newport. Oct. 27, 5-8 pm. Donations accepted. canss.org THE GHOST BALL Celebrate Halloween with music, dancing, drinks and appetizers, live/silent auctions, photography and more. Proceeds support Elevations: A Children’s Therapy Resource Foundation. Oct. 27, 7 pm-midnight. $60/$75. Riverside Place, 1108 W. Riverside. ghostball.org (385-2116) EMERGE’S DAY OF THE DEAD FIESTA The arts nonprofit’s fourth annual benefit and celebration of Latin-American culture and art, with cuisine from local chefs, live art making, music, dance and an auction. Nov. 1, 6 pm. Emerge, 208 N. Fourth St. emergecda.org GENERATION ALIVE IGNITE! FALL FUNDRAISER Generation Alive instills into young people that their compassion, generosity, and energy are paramount in identifying and alleviating needs in their communities. Nov. 1, 6-8:30 pm. $100. Northern Quest, 100 N. Hayford Rd. generationalive.org

COMEDY

LILAC CITY LIVE The “late night” talk show featuring local Spokane talent at the Downtown Library. Doors and drinks at 7, show starts at 8. October’s show (rescheduled) features Mary Ann Wilson from “Sit and Be Fit.” Oct. 25, 7-9 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main. spokanelibrary.org ROCKY DALE DAVIS Rocky’s first TV appearance was on MTV’s Greatest Party Stories. Most recently, he was selected by Team Coco for the Comics To Watch showcase at The New York Comedy Fest. Oct. 25, 8 pm. $8-$14. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998) DAVE ATTELL Dave was named one of the “25 Funniest People in America” by Entertainment Weekly. Oct. 26 and 27 at 7:30 and 10 pm. $25-$35. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998) LATE LAUGHS An improv show with a mix of experiments with duos, teams, sketches and special guests. First/last Friday at 10 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com NO CLUE!: Audience suggestions start a night of mayhem for quirky characters trapped at an inn with someone who has a grudge to settle. Fridays at 8 pm through Oct. 26. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) TOM PAPA With more than 20 years as a stand-up comedian, Papa is one of the top comedic voices in the country finding success in film, TV, radio, podcasts and the live stage. Oct. 26, 8-10 pm. $32.92. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com THE DOPE SHOW! Comedians joke, then toke, the joke some more! Last Sunday of the month at 8 pm. $8-$14. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com

COMMUNITY

BIGFOOT HAUNT: SPOOKS REAL & IMAGINED An SFCC speaker series

featuring horrific tales offered by Spookane’s own terrorific academic talent. Oct. 25-26 and 29-31 at 8:30 am. Free. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. bit.ly/2Mfavf2 (533-3500) LEGISLATIVE FORUM ON DISABILITY ISSUES Learn where Spokane County legislative candidates stand on issues affecting people with disabilities. RSVP to dladwig@arc-spokane.org. Oct. 25, 6-7:30 pm. Free. SFCC, 3410 W. Ft. George Wright Dr. (328-6326) SCARYWOOD Silverwood transforms into a spooky, haunted experience, featuring zombie infestations, cursed tombs, a demented fun house and more. Through Oct. 27; Thu 7-11 pm; Fri-Sat 7 pm-midnight. $26-$45. Silverwood Theme Park, 27843 U.S. 95. scarywoodhaunt.com (208-683-3400) FALL FEST & AMAZING MAZE Teens can come find their way through the “Amazing Maze” (Oct. 26 from 7-9 pm). Families with young children are invited on Oct. 27-28 from 6-8 pm for their own maze, games, concessions and more. First Church of Nazarene, 9004 N. Country Homes Blvd. (467-8986) HAUNTED PALOUSE The 17th annual event in downtown Palouse (Main and Whitman) includes two haunted houses and a haunted hayride. Oct. 26-27 from 7-10 pm. $20. visitpalouse.com RANDOM FANDOM TRIVIA NIGHT: STEPHEN KING Trivia nights take on the biggest realms of fandom at the Spokane Valley Library. Costumes and cosplayers are welcome. Oct. 26, 6:308:30 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. scld.org (893-8400) SPOOKWALK Mee behind Browne’s Tavern (1928 W Pacific), between 6:307 pm to drink cider and sing pumpkin carols. Then walk through the neighborhood to hear tales of murder, mayhem and mystery. Oct. 26-27 and Oct. 31 from 6:30-8:30 pm. $20. (850-0056) WSU AUTUMN ARTS & CRAFT FAIR The annual fair features rustic Americana, industrial chic, farm style and other fall-themed items. Oct. 26 from 10 am-8 pm and Oct. 27 from 9 am-5 pm. Free admission. Beasley Coliseum, 925 NE Fairway Rd. bit.ly/2oL8HB6 ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR This local event features 20-25 vendors of homemade crafts, arts, photography, jewelry and baked goods. Oct. 27, 9 am-4 pm. Free admission. Chattaroy Community Church, 3711 E. Chattaroy Rd. (999-8211) BOO BASH DANCE The annual Halloween costume ball begins with a tango lesson, followed by general dancing, refreshments and door prizes. Oct. 27, 7 pm. $5-$9. Sandpoint Community Hall, 204 S. First. usadancesandpoint.org CHEMISTRY IS OUT OF THIS WORLD: Make rockets, pocket sized solar systems, look at the effects of asteroids and how craters are formed and more. Grades K-6. Oct. 27, 11 am-2 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main. spokanelibrary.org LIGHT UP THE PARK CHEWELAH Events include a zombie run, family movie, games, pumpkin carving and contests, costume parade, dancing, food vendors, and a huge display of carved, lighted pumpkins and sky lanterns. Oct. 27, 3-8 pm. Free. facebook. com/#lightuptheparkchewelah CORBIN PARK WITCH’S RIDE A Halloween-themed group cycle, starting at Corbin Park’s east end and then on to bars down Monroe. See link for details.

RELATIONSHIPS

Oct. 27, 4 pm. Free. Corbin Park, 2914 N. West Oval St. bit.ly/2PJnzf8 GHOST SIGNS OF SPOKANE A guided tour of “ghost signs” around downtown Spokane, led by museum archivist Anna Harbine. Oct. 27, 10 am. $18-$20. northwestmuseum.org (509-456-3931) SPARK-O-WEEN Spark Central gets spoooooky for a day of creative learning and trick-or-treating. Oct. 27, 2-3 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org SPOOKY LOOFF Riverfront Park’s first teen-only event, offering music, food, video games, carrousel rides and other spooktacular surprises. Oct. 27, 7-10 pm. $12/$15. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard. riverfrontspokane.org/events SPOOKY SCIENCE An evening of creepy experiments for kids and family members of all ages. Dinner included. Oct. 27, 5:30-8 pm. $5-$10. Girl Scouts of Eastern Washington and N. Idaho, 1404 N. Ash St. bit.ly/2QQVe6P BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE FALL FEST Enjoy fall activities with the family, including pumpkin donuts, apples, a farm “funland,” live music, pumpkin patch, crafts, apple cider and more. Oct. 27-28 from 10 am-5 pm. Free. Harvest House, 9919 E. Greenbluff Rd. (238-6970) SCIENCE CAFE Hear about the topics of this year’s Nobel Prizes: lasers, directed evolution, and cancer therapy. Oct. 30, 7-8 pm. Free. Lindaman’s, 1235 S. Grand Blvd. bit.ly/2pUbVml (706-461-1627) A CAMPBELL HOUSE HALLOWEEN Bring a flashlight and explore three floors of the shadowy mansion at your own pace. Oct. 31, 4-8 pm. $5. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org TRICK OR TREAT SO ALL CAN EAT WSU College of Nursing students created this event to involve children of all ages and abilities, with carb counts for those with diabetes or dietary restrictions, plus crafts, games, prizes, music, and a photo booth. Oct. 31, 5:30-7:30 pm. Free. WSU Spokane, 412 E. Spokane Falls Blvd. trick-or-treat-so-allcan-eat.eventcreate.com

FILM

HALLOWEEN (1978) Celebrate the 40th anniversary of John Carpenter’s horror classic. Oct. 25, 8 pm. $3. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main kenworthy.org NORTHWEST HORROR FEST A night of spooky stories made by local PNW filmmakers. Event is black-tie/costume optional. Ages 13+. Oct. 26, 7 pm. $15. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. bit.ly/2J2wcyT (327-1050) ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW A seasonal screenings of the cult classic. Oct. 26-27 at 9:30 and 11:59 pm. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. kenworthy.org THE SHINING Stanley Kubrick’s classic horror film. Oct. 26 at 7:30 pm and Oct. 31 at 8:30 pm. $6-$8. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org IT’S THE GREAT PUMPKIN, CHARLIE BROWN Includes a costume parade with prizes, followed by the film. Oct. 27, 12-2 pm. Free. Panida Theater, 300 N. First. panida.org ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW The Garland’s regular screenings of the cult classic include prop bags, shadow casts and other revelries. Oct. 27 at midnight. $7. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. (327-1050)

Advice Goddess HERE WE GLOW AGAIN

My friends tease me, saying that I’m such an obnoxious jerk, but amazingly, everybody seems to love me. Somebody said it’s because I have charisma — like a rock star/movie star quality. Honestly, I don’t think that highly of myself. I’m interesting-looking, outgoing, funny, and relatively talented in what I do. What is charisma exactly, and can people create it? —Weirdly Beloved Woman

AMY ALKON

There are certain people throughout history that you just know had charisma. Moses, for example: “Hey, fellow Jews, just follow right behind me as I take a jog into the sea.” Charisma is the Pied Piper of personality traits — a mix of personal magnetism, likability, and powerful presence that leads people to flock to and follow a person who has it. This can have creepy and even deadly results when the charismatic person is a cult leader, but evolutionary researchers Allen Grabo and Mark van Vugt believe that charisma evolved to be a cooperation booster. Their research suggests it is a “credible signal of a person’s ability” to inspire a group of people to unite behind him or her so they can collectively solve some problem that would stump them individually. Looks are an element of charisma. Being tall, good-looking, and physically stronger than your peers, as well as appearing healthy, are correlated with charisma, note Grabo and van Vugt. That said, though it’s helpful to be a ringer for Gisele Bundchen, you can more closely resemble a hamburger bun in a bikini and still be mad charismatic. Accordingly, the researchers observe that “anecdotal evidence” suggests that having “particularly unique” features — “such as Abraham Lincoln’s elongated face or Rasputin’s piercing eyes” — may amp up charisma “as a result of their attentiongrabbing ability.” The good news — for anyone who lacks height, hots, or eyes that burn a hole in people — is that how a person acts appears to be the main driver of charisma. And though some people are naturally (that is, genetically) equipped to be more charismatic through their set of personality traits, there are charismatic behaviors that anybody can learn and practice (or, perhaps in your case, engage in more often). The behaviors that drive charisma are those that reflect a combination of “high power and high warmth,” explains business coach Olivia Fox Cabane in her researchbased book “The Charisma Myth: How Anyone Can Master the Art and Science of Personal Magnetism.” Most people probably believe that charisma comes simply out of speaking powerfully — Martin Luther King-ing it rather than mumbling their message. Actually, listening powerfully — tapping into how somebody’s feeling, engaging with it emotionally, and empathizing — is essential to having charisma. Connecting in this way drives what people experience as warmth, which Cabane sums up as “goodwill” — the sense that another person cares about them and their well-being. And sorry, but you can’t just fake the look of someone who’s listening (nod, nod, nod, eye contact, eye contact) while you’re all up in your to-do list or formulating the brilliant thing you’re going to say next. You’ll think you’re hiding your inattentiveness, but little bits of your body language will always sell you out. Charismatic body language comes out of the antithesis of nervousness — being comfortable in your skin, having a sort of high-powered calm. That’s reflected in slower speech (rather than squirrel-like chit-chattering), the confidence to take pauses while speaking, and breathing from your diaphragm instead of taking shallow gulps of air. (For the basics on speaking more powerfully, read speech therapist and pathologist Morton Cooper’s “Change Your Voice, Change Your Life.”) Slower, expansive body movements are another mark of the charismatic, in contrast with the herky-jerkyness of the perpetually uneasy — those who always seem on the verge of making a run for it. However, there’s a caveat to all of this walking and talking advice: If you’re insecure and self-loathing, you can’t just plaster some alphagirl body language on top of that. Not credibly, anyway. You’ve got to put in the work to fix your foundation. (See my “science-help” book, “Unf*ckology: A Field Guide to Living with Guts and Confidence.”) Finally, consider that it takes a strong person to be open about their weaknesses and failures. Counterintuitive, I know. But people don’t relate to greatness. They relate to other people who show how human and imperfect they are. Cabane explains that “drawing attention to your vulnerabilities” ultimately enhances your power. In other words, instead of always working hard to look good, you’ll amp up your charisma by making intermittent efforts to look bad -- like by confessing, “I’m socially awkward. Always have been. I’m really bad at leaving conversations at parties -- to the point where I wish a meteorite would crash through the ceiling so I could make my escape.”n ©2018, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 55


INDUSTRY

A Growth Sector Cannabis is reaching new demos BY TUCK CLARRY

A

s with most consumer industries, the recreational cannabis world has often been dictated by large swaths of male demographics. Males in the 20-to-40 age range are often the most heavily targeted in ads, and weed sales are no different. But noticeable trends in cannabis participation may affect trends as those over 55 now account for 18 percent of active cannabis users, a quadruple increase from 2007, according to the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Just from 2013 to 2014, 55-and-older cannabis users grew from 2.8 million to 4.3 million. The trends are forcing major cannabis tech companies like Canopy Growth to look into the development of a long-term cannabis study. “There is clearly an interest in the long-term care space to explore medical cannabis as an alternative to traditional medications for pain and degenerative cognitive function,” said Canopy Growth CEO Mark Zekulin. “The pilot study we’ve announced today is the first step in developing an evidence-based, best practice approach to medical cannabis that will result in consistent care for thousands of seniors and ultimately improve quality of life and outcomes in long-term care homes.” The six-month pilot program will look at how medicinal marijuana can positively impact pain and improve cognitive functions for roughly 500

56 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

preliminary participants. The Ontario Long Term Care Association will run the program while Canopy’s subsidiary producer, Spectrum Cannabis, will supply the cannabis. The survey also found a 3 percent increase in women participants over a 15-year track. Another survey study by the Brightfield Group found that women were more likely to use CBD than men. Previous research has shown that cannabis’ effects are greatly altered based off of estrogen levels and the strength of the endocannabinoid system attachment. It’s believed that this increased bond makes the medicinal aspects of THC and CBD stronger for those with higher estrogen levels. The steady increase of women in the marketplace has brought on a wider focus on cannabis-infused feminine products like lubricants and suppositories and products that focus on easing painful menstrual cramps and menopause symptoms. “Women in my demographic are prescribed antidepressants at a rate higher than any other group of Americans,” cannabis-focused event planner Jane West said in an interview with High Times, “and I want them to be open to learning more about the plant and all of the benefits it can provide, including understanding that marijuana is safer than alcohol and a healthier alternative to prescription medication.” n

Usage among those over 55 is on the rise.

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OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 59


EVENTS | CALENDAR

GREEN ZONE

WARREN MILLER’S FACE OF WINTER The 69th installment from Warren Miller Entertainment, presented by Volkswagen. Oct. 27, 6-8:30 & 9-11:30 pm. $15-$18. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. warrenmiller.com (227-7404)

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PUNKTOBERFEST Featuring nine German-style beers on tap, Germaninspired food from Heritage Bar & Kitchen, a stein-holding contest and more. Oct. 26-27 from 3-11 pm. Free admission. Whistle Punk Brewing, 122 S. Monroe. bit.ly/2yWpB4A KID’S HALLOWEEN COOKIE DECORATING A one-hour decorating session with apple cider and all decorating materials provided. Oct. 27, 1-2 pm; registration required. $20. My Fresh Basket, 1030 W. Summit Pkwy. (558-2100) OCTOBER MONSTER MASH A dinner by Chef LJ Klink themed around famous movie monsters. Costumes encouraged Oct. 28, 4:30 pm. $60. Mont Lamm Events, 7501 Enoch Rd. montlammevents.com (276-7636) RAMEN FEST The 29th annual Japanese fall food festival serves a menu with traditional Japanese ramen (chicken, pork or tofu) for $12; various snacks and desserts ($5-$6). Oct. 28, 11 am-3 pm. Spokane Buddhist Temple, 927 S. Perry St. SpokaneBuddhistTemple.org CHEF & SOMM DINNER SERIES A a multi-course cuisine and fine wine pairing by chefs Adam Hegsted, Ian Wingate and Aaron Fish. Nov. 1, 6 pm. $120. The Wandering Table, 1242 W. Summit Pkwy. thewanderingtable.com

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PUDDLES PITY PARTY The ‘Sad Clown with the Golden Voice’ performs his heartfelt anthems with a suitcase full of Kleenex. Oct. 25, 8 pm. $35-$100. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) DAY OF THE DEAD PARTY Matchwood Brewing & Evans Brothers Coffee team up to celebrate Dia de los Muertos. Oct. 27, 5 pm-2 am. $5/$8. Evans Brothers Coffee, 524 Church St. (208-265-5553) HAUNTED HALLOWS: THE MUSIC OF HARRY POTTER The magical music from Harry Potter is performed by the Spokane Symphony. Oct. 27 at 2 and 8 pm; Oct. 28 at 3 pm. $20-$125. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org GRAYSON MASEFIELD The New Zealand-born artist is the first accordionist to win World Championships in Classical, Virtuoso and Digital accordion categories during the same competition. Oct. 28, 7-9 pm. $20. Bartell Music Academy, 418 W. Pacific. (998-5422) VOCAL VICES: A HALLOWEEN HOOTENANNY A concert of spooky, fun music by EWU vocal students. Oct. 30, 7:30 pm. Free. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague. thebartlettspokane.com

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

CHAMPION CLIMBER CRAIG DEMARTINO The world-renowned climber and motivational speaker talks about overcoming adversity and empowering leadership in times of crisis. Oct. 26, 7-8:30 pm. Free. EWU Riverpoint Cam-

pus, 668 N. Riverpoint Blvd. (359-2331) SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. PORTLAND WINTERHAWKS Promo night: glow bracelet giveaway. Oct. 26, 7:05 pm. $11-$25. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com MT. SPOKANE SKI SWAP The 54th swap benefits the Mt. Spokane Ski Patrol, offering 1,000s of new and used winter sports items. Oct. 27, 9 am-5 pm and Oct. 28, 9 am-noon. $5; free/12 and under. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. skipatrolskiswap.com SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. TRI-CITY AMERICANS Promo night: is Leinenkugel’s HOCKtoberfest. Oct. 27, 7:05 pm. $11-$25. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. SEATTLE THUNDERBIRDS Promo night: player magnet giveaway. Oct. 30, 7:05 pm. $11-$25. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com

THEATER

42ND STREET A celebration of Broadway, Times Square and musical theatre. Through Oct. 28; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm. $19-$25. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. aspirecda.com CHEAPER BY THE DOZEN The classic story about a family with 12 children. Oct. 19-Nov. 4; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20-$23. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. (208-673-7529) JAMES & THE GIANT PEACH Roald Dahl’s tale of a boy, his insect friends and their amazing journey. Through Oct. 27; Thu-Sat at 7 pm; Sat at 2 pm. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway. libertylaketheatre.com PHILIP GLASS BUYS A LOAF OF BREAD NIC Theatre Department presents “Philip Glass Buys a Loaf of Bread,” by David Ives, and “SYM” by Gerard Mathes. Oct. 25-27 at 7:30 pm. Free. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu DISNEY’S BEAUTY & THE BEAST Based on the Academy Award-winning animated feature. Through Oct. 28; Fri at 7 pm; Sat-Sun at 2 pm. $10-$14. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia. spokanechildrenstheatre.org PLAYWRIGHT’S PLAYGROUND Performances of 15, 10-minute plays by playwrights from around the world. Oct. 26-28. $12. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org NT LIVE: FRANKENSTEIN Captured live in 2011 from the National Theatre stage in London, this production became an international sensation. Oct. 28, 6:30 pm. $12. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127)

VISUAL ARTS

3 EMERGING A group exhibition featuring art by Jamie Nadherny, Eva Hilary and Marilyn Runyan (EM Jackson). Oct. 25-Nov. 30; Mon-Fri 8:30 am-3:30 pm. Artist reception/talk Oct. 25 at 11:30 am. Free. SFCC Fine Arts Gallery, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr., Bldg. 6. spokanefalls.edu/gallery (509-533-3710) GERRI SAYLER: DARK MATTER A sitespecific installation with works inspired by the geophysical history of Northwest landscapes. Oct. 26-Dec. 23; opening Oct. 26, 5-7 pm. Gallery talk Oct. 27, 1-3

pm. Free. Prichard Art Gallery, 414 S. Main, Moscow. (208-885-35896) OUTSIDE IN Laboratory artist in residence Oksana Kryzhanivska investigates a concept of the collective body in an exploratory VR landscape. Oct. 28, 2-4 pm. Free. Fellow Coworking, 304 W. Pacific. laboratoryspokane.com

WORDS

ON THE CHINESE WALL: NEW & SELECTED POEMS 1966-2018 University of Montana Professor Emeritus Roger Dunsmore reads from his latest collection of poetry. Oct. 25, 6 pm. Free. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com BEDTIME STORIES SPOKANE Northwest writers Matthew Sullivan, Maya Jewell Zeller and Washington State Poet Laureate Claudia Castro Luna unveil original short stories based on the theme “In Your Dreams.” Oct. 26, 5:30 pm. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside. humanities.org (838-2310) EWU VISITING WRITERS SERIES: MARY NORRIS The writer and editor spent 38 years at The New Yorker and is author of the New York Times bestselling “Between You and Me: Confessions of a Comma Queen.” Oct. 26, 7:30-8:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkwestcentral.org FRANKENFEST To celebrate the 200th anniversary of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, Spokane artist Thomas Froese reads the complete novel live. Oct. 26 from 4-10 pm and Oct. 27 from 4-8 pm. Free. Object Space, 1818 1/2 E. Sprague. BOOK RELEASE: JONATHAN JOHNSON The author reads from his newest book, “May Is an Island.” Johnson is a professor of creative writing at EWU. Oct. 27, 7:30 pm. Free. Spokane Public Library, 906 W. Main. spokanelibrary.org THE EXTRATERRESTRIAL BOOK Artist Timothy Ely discusses his imaginative encounter with UFO books at the library, and the effect of that discovery on his drawings and subsequent life as a maker of books. Oct. 27, 1-3 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8350) SEVEN PRAYERS TO CATHY MCMORRIS RODGERS A release party for Kate Lebo’s poetry collection, featuring readings by Sharma Shields, Laura Read, Maya Zeller, Nance Van Winckel, Ellen Welcker and Chelsea Martin. Oct. 28, 4 pm. Free. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague Ave. thebartlettspokane.com SPOKANE POETRY SHOWCASE Presenting four readers from outside Spokane: Maury Barr from Colville; Thome George of Twisp; Charles Potts of Walla Walla; and Susan Rae Sampson of Wenatchee. Oct. 28, 7-9 pm. Free. Unitarian Universalist, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (714-3613) GARY GIDDENS: BING CROSBY, SWINGING ON A STAR Giddins’ presentation coincides with the release of his new book, the final volume in his Bing Crosby biographies. Nov. 1, 7 pm. Free. Gonzaga Hemmingson Center, 702 E. Desmet Ave. (842-8664) JACK NISBET: THE DREAMER AND THE DOCTOR In the turn-of-the-20thcentury Northwest, the lives and passions of an American physician and her Swedish naturalist husband helped shape a territory on the cusp of change. Nov. 1, 7-8:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. bit.ly/2NQHGas (838-0206) n


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for this puzzle 43. Actress Donovan of “Clueless” 44. Cookie holder 45. “Spring forward” hrs. in NYC 46. Bodybuilder’s mantra 51. Air-escaping-from-a-tire sound 52. Susan of “L.A. Law” 53. Tree houses? 57. It’s #37 on Rolling Stone’s list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time 61. When Otello dies in “Otello” 64. Salmon variety 65. “The Big Lebowski” director 66. “That was awesome of me!” 67. Smooth-talking 68. Oil grp. 69. “Copy that” 70. Bookies give them 71. Loch ____ monster

9 16

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ACROSS 1. Random guess 5. iPad purchases 9. Wolfgang Puck restaurant 14. Firehouse fixture 15. ____ Mix 16. Tribe with a lake named after it 17. Give ____ of approval 18. ____ sci (coll. major) 19. Shade of green 20. “It’s okay ... you didn’t mean anything by it” 23. Hindu teacher 24. Preschooler 25. Preschooler’s break 28. A breeze to use, in adspeak 33. “Roman J. Israel, ____” (2017 Denzel Washington movie) 36. It’s mined 37. Some paid rides 38. They’re often frowned upon by grammarians ... or a good title

8

Where real gay men meet for uncensored fun! Browse & reply for free. 18+ 206.576.6631

31. Manage 32. Former org. for James Comey 33. Utopias 34. Performs unaccompanied 35. Many Conan O’Brien lines

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39. Youth org. since 1910 40. Had a break between flights 41. Musician’s booking 42. Funnywoman Gasteyer 47. Just-made 48. “Black Panther” actress Lupita 49. Business with a guestbook 50. The Weekly Standard reader, perhaps 54. Listerine alternative 55. For whom the Lorax speaks 56. Matches up 57. One with a big mouth in Africa? 58. Gross growth 59. Gung-ho 60. Slaps the cuffs on 61. It’s thin on top of Everest 62. ____-Magnon man 63. Yank (on)

OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 61


COEUR D ’ ALENE

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

Savoring the Season

Saturday is the day to celebrate the harvest in Coeur d’Alene

E

very year the KOOTENAI FARMERS MARKET gets bigger and bigger. Not only does it run Saturday (in Hayden), the Wednesday evening market in downtown Coeur d’Alene is the biggest ever, says market manager Beth Tysdal. Help them celebrate the end-ofthe-season during FALL FEST on Saturday, Oct. 27, from 10 am-3 pm, a collaboration with the COEUR D’ALENE DOWNTOWN ASSOCIATION taking place on Fifth Street from Lakeside across Sherman Avenue to Front Street.

This busy corner is also where you’ll hear the bluegrass and country stylings of the Buck 99 band, so feel free to bring your camping chairs and sit awhile. If you get hungry, there are plenty of local places to try, from homemade bread and scrumptious desserts to street tacos and lovely salads.

Did you bring your furry companion? Great! Enter them into the socialmedia-based doggie pet costume contest. Look for the large “prop” area where you can pose the pooch for a quick Saturday pic. Then simply upload for a chance to win gift Oct. 27 10am - 3pm certificates to the market!

FALL FEST

Head to the corner of Fifth and Sherman to pick up your ballots for the popular 208-667-5986 Apple Palooza, a tasting Of course your market event featuring regional trip wouldn’t be complete apples transformed into sips and bites without a last visit to our local farms, and available throughout participating including longstanding market favorites, businesses. Nearby is the departure Killarney Farms. Look for all the fall point for complementary hayrides; head favorites like squash, assorted greens, towards Evans Brothers Coffee to catch onions, cabbage, potatoes and yummy a ride and enjoy the charm of old Coeur root vegetables like carrots and beets. d’Alene in the fall.

62 INLANDER OCTOBER 25, 2018

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


C O E U R

D ’A L E N E

Upcoming Events Halloween Moonlit Monster Cruise OCTOBER 24-31

There’s no better way to spend Halloween week than on the spooky waters of Lake Coeur d’Alene. It’s “Scary Week” from Wednesday, Oct. 24, through Wednesday, Oct. 31, for the Halloween Moonlit Monster Cruises featuring music, spooky décor, onboard entertainment, a grand prize photo contest, signature Halloween cocktails and more. Prepurchased tickets required. $10 adults; Children 3 and under free; 4:30 pm boarding; 5 pm departure.

Coeur d’Alene Downtown Association

See visitcda.org to purchase tickets.

Scarywood Heroes Weekend OCTOBER 25-27

What’s scarier than Scarywood itself? Our community without its firefighters, active and veteran military, police and EMT! Scarywood is showing them some love with free admission Oct. 25-27 (with current identification). This weekend also marks the general public’s last chance to face their fears at Scarywood’s Haunted Nights. Tickets

are $26 Thursdays; $40 Friday-Saturday; 7 pm-12 am.

Downtown Trick or Treat OCTOBER 31

Trick or treating has never been so much fun or so safe! Bring your little ghouls or goblins to downtown Coeur d’Alene for some family fun before the sun goes down. Trick or treat at participating downtown businesses or visit the “Trunk or Treat” at Sixth and Sherman. Go to visitcda.org for more details.

Halloween Monster’s Ball OCTOBER 27

Looking for an epic Halloween Bash? The Monster’s Ball is your ticket. Event organizers promise wilder costumes, “demon drinks,” beer pong, live music, “fearful food” and of course, an awesome costume contest with amazing prizes. Tickets $25 in advance;

$30 a the door; overnight packages start at $209; Resort Plaza Shops; 9 pm-2 am.

For more events, things to do & places to stay, go to VisitCDA.org

COEUR D’ALENE

SPONSORED BY THE COEUR D’ALENE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

OCTOBER 25, 2018 INLANDER 63


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