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DO YOU FEEL MORE OR LESS INFORMED ABOUT THE NEWS NOW COMPARED WITH 10 YEARS AGO? DIANE REUTER I feel more informed. I don’t have TV at home, so I get most of my news either from the radio or the Internet. With the Internet, it’s amazing how much you can find out about what’s going on in the world.

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COMMENT | IDAHO

Failing at the Three E’s

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As you judge whether to give Butch Otter a third term, consider his track record on education, the economy and the environment BY CHRIS CARLSON Craig Mason

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here are three solid reasons Idaho voters should reject Governor C.L. “Butch” Otter’s bid for a third term. They constitute major failures on his part to fulfill the basic “Three E” requirements for anyone in the office: education, the economy and the environment. A governor takes an oath to uphold the state’s constitution, which clearly states the primary purpose of the state government is to provide for a uniform and equal public education of the state’s young people. The governor has failed miserably, as the record reflects nothing less than a deliberate evisceration of state support for both K-12 and higher education. This evisceration has led more than 80 percent of the state’s school districts to pass override levies, increasing individuals’ local property taxes to replace what the state has taken away. For residents of those districts, it’s nothing less than a tax burden shift and a tax increase brought about by a governor who claims he has lowered taxes. Facts say otherwise. Idaho’s former state economist Mike Ferguson has presented evidence showing that after decades of the state spending on education at roughly 4.4 percent of annual personal income, starting in 2000 a steady decline began and accelerated under Governor Otter’s watch to where the figure is now, 3.4 percent — a 20 percent cut under Otter and his Republican predecessors. Idaho now ranks 51st in the country (including D.C.) — dead last, below even Mississippi, in state support for public education. What was even more surprising to many was that the Governor endorsed his Education Task Force’s recommendation to add back $350 million to $400 million that had been drained away from education. Then he turned around and, in his next executive budget, recommended even less, the equivalent of 3.3 percent of personal income. That’s disingenuous at best. At worst, it’s blatant lying.

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n the meantime, the Governor spearheaded a number of measures he claimed were designed to stimulate the economy but were nothing more than general fund giveaways to big business. They came at a cost to education. Set aside that these incentives have developed few if any good-paying jobs. Otter tries to make a virtue out of growth in minimum-wage jobs while not acknowledging that these jobs cannot, and do not, provide a sustainable living wage for people. Additionally, these incentives often come at the expense of Idaho’s existing businesses, which both directly and indirectly end up subsidizing the new boys on the block. Years ago, when Hewlett-Packard was looking around the country for a location to build a new assembly plant, they came calling on Gov-

ernor Cecil D. Andrus. Andrus told them what a great labor force they would have and what a great life they’d find, with all sorts of recreational opportunities available to pursue on the weekends. He pointedly said there were no giveaways or subsidies because they would come at the expense of existing businesses. H-P was welcomed as long as they understood they had to pay their fair share like all Idaho businesses. H-P came because they understood a competitor five years down the road would not come in and be given goodies that were not available to them. They understood the “level playing field.”

T

he governor’s third major failure is especially surprising for a Republican: Otter has failed miserably to protect Idaho’s water. Perhaps you noticed a little news item around Oct. 1, which said the Department of Energy had failed to make another deadline on the cleanup of nuclear waste materials at the National Lab site out in the Arco Desert. The lab, of course, sits above the priceless Snake River Plain Aquifer, a major source of irrigation water for Idaho farmers. This was a major milestone that was missed and not one peep came from the governor’s office. There’s a memorandum of agreement that specifies penalties for missed deadlines, but did anyone hear the governor saying Idaho would impose them? Nor have Idahoans heard much from the Governor supporting Congressman Mike Simpson’s efforts to keep the Environmental Protection Agency from trying to eliminate the distinction in the Clean Water Act between navigable waters (which they oversee) and nonnavigable waters, like groundwater (which the state oversees). Simpson has been fighting for four years to leave the language as is and to thwart this latest intrusion. In 2010 this effort was brought to the attention of the Governor, and the response was basically nothing until this past August, when he issued a press release supporting Simpson. If Idaho farmers think they have a friend in Otter, they better think again. Hopefully all Idaho voters will look at Otter’s record and conclude he has done nothing to merit a third term. n Chris Carlson is the former press secretary for Gov. Cecil Andrus. He lives on Cave Lake in North Idaho.


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Time To Move On BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

C

areful readers may notice something different this year. It’s election season, yet there are no official Inlander endorsements here in the Comment section. After 20 years of advocating, as an institution, for candidates or initiatives, I’ve decided to stop. It’s been a long time in the making, as I have discussed the pros and cons with staff, readers and fellow publishers over the years. Journalists and academics are mixed on endorsements, with more newspapers ending the practice in recent years. But traditionally, daily papers have made endorsements, which is why I included them when we first started publishing in 1993. When I came home to start a paper, I felt Spokane was in need of a more open mind about the world. Our daily paper, I felt, had a too-conservative, small-minded outlook that held sway for a century. We needed a wake-up call. A monolithic mindset doesn’t help anyone; America thrives with a robust marketplace of ideas. I felt the Inlander could, in a small way, balance the scales — perhaps encourage people who thought differently by showing they weren’t alone, or even get more progressive people to run for office. Today Spokane is more open-minded, and that is translating into a dynamic, problem-solving, entrepreneurial community. But while daily papers employ a committee to come up with their endorsements, here it’s always been just me. Of course it’s been part of my job to dig into local politics, and I meet with lots of candidates — as do our reporters. Still, I’ve never felt entirely comfortable saying the Inlander is for so-and-so and against that one guy. I have been projecting that onto every member of my staff, and potentially onto everything else we do in the paper, and that’s not fair. I don’t want any reader to confuse the opinions in our Comment section with our news stories. Not everybody understands the difference. And I don’t want anyone to judge all the great things we do every week because of one endorsement, which, by definition, is a contentious thing. Voters beware: Times have changed. Too many candidates want to fly under the radar, keeping voters at a distance, only to reemerge briefly with their bags of money to win re-election. More than ever, our news team needs to break through that fortress and deliver coverage that takes us beyond the canned sound bites and into the heart of the issues. We’re up to the challenge. Of course, I will continue to share my thoughts in this Publisher’s Note space, under my own byline. Vote wisely!  JEN SORENSON CARTOON

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COMMENT | ELECTION 2014

Save Our Democracy

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Fingerprinting? There’s a better way to protect Idaho’s elections BY JOHN T. REUTER

F

or close to 50 years, Idaho has elected Republicans to the office of Secretary of State. In our deeply “red” state this is hardly surprising, but what is notable is how little their party affiliation has mattered. Republicans Pete Cenarrusa and Ben Ysursa have run the office of Secretary of State with a deep commitment to nonpartisanship, ensuring that elections are run fairly and that every citizen’s right to vote is respected. In doing so, they have become some of the most popular elected officials in Idaho’s history.

Idahoans have come to take this nonpartisan approach to our elections for granted. It’s a fundamental expectation we have for the office and it’s assumed anyone running for the position would, of course, continue the tradition of looking out for all Idaho voters, regardless of their party. In fact, this is so ingrained that both Democrat Holli Woodings and Republican Lawerence Denney have publicly and repeatedly pledged to follow the nonpartisan example set by Cenarrusa and Ysursa. If we could count on both of them to truly follow that pledge, there wouldn’t be much at stake in the race for Secretary of State this November. For her part, Woodings appears to be sincerely committed to open and fair elections. She’s emphasized increasing voter participa-

tion, transparency around campaign contributions and making sure voters have the information they need to make an informed decision. (All three were also priorities for Ysursa and Cenarrusa.) She’s demonstrated her commitment to these goals by creating a new election phone app called “IdaVotes” as part of her campaign — it provides fair election information, even including a link to her opponent’s campaign website. Denney has different policy priorities. He says the most important issue is “ballot security” and has proposed scanning voters’ fingerprints before allowing them to vote. He also wants to shrink the Secretary of State’s job by eliminating primary elections and letting Republican and Democratic Party bosses choose their nominees without interference from the voters. Just as troubling as his radical ideas on how to run Idaho’s elections (at least those elements he plans on eliminating) is Denney’s partisan record. His Republican colleagues tossed him from the Speakership of the Idaho House after he was found to be untrustworthy for the position, punishing his own members for raising legitimate ethics issues or casting votes based on their conscience rather than his whims. He also personally stopped a bipartisan bill to reform lawmakers’ pensions when they take higher office — an action that now means he has the opportunity to pocket payments of more than $70,000 a year from the state of Idaho forever, if he wins this election. By the way, at the same time he was protecting his own future payday, he opposed increasing pay by even 1 percent for state employees. It’s true that Republicans have occupied the office of Secretary of State since the late 1960s. But if Idahoans are going to continue our tradition of fair and open elections, the best thing to do isn’t to vote for establishing fingerprinting at the ballot box. Instead, it’s to vote for Democrat Holli Woodings. n John T. Reuter, a former Sandpoint City Councilman, is the executive director of Conservation Voters for Idaho. He has been active in protecting Idaho’s environment, expanding LGBT rights and the Idaho Republican Party.

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“Room for improvement in Spokane? Plenty. But let’s not forget to recognize what’s working, why it is needed and look for ways to support the tender shoots and saplings that could become the healthier forest of Spokane’s future.”

— RACHEL DOLEZAL

“Public officials have a sacred duty to uphold the national standards and values of which generations of Americans have been proud — free enterprise, liberty, human rights and justice for all.”

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LETTERS

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

Responding to news about the Spokane City Council and Mayor Condon’s disagreements over the proposed 2015 budget, which included significant pay raises for both Condon and members of his cabinet.

TRICIA ADAMS: I guess Condon will see how the people feel about him wanting more money in the next election. Bet he wouldn’t be doing this if he was up for reelection right now. I agree with Mr. Stuckart — just because you can doesn’t mean you should. MERRIE ADAMS: Why should a mayor make more than a seasoned congressman? Some being on the job more than 10 years. MARK MOMB: What a gig, to make more bucks than the governor of Washington state does.

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SUSAN TRAVER: The real elephant in the room is the pay for the police chief and the fire chief and their raises being tied to union raises for the their ranks. That really needs fixing now!

Council President Ben Stuckart

Responding to the latest Elway poll of voters’ stances on Washington’s two conflicting gun initiatives — I-594 (background checks) and I-591 (gun protections).

DEBORAH DI BERNARDO: Condon wiped out tons of living wage City Hall jobs this past year — how does he expect (with greatly reduced tax base) to fund his raise? 

SCOTT D. SMITH: There should be background checks. The bill might not be right, but I am voting yes because it’s better than no bill. If ya don’t like it, write a better one. LANE GUIN: The typically uninformed public needs to read the initiative as it’s not what is being promoted in the misleading ads. KENTON RYAN: How exactly is this gonna stop criminals from getting guns? The law will say that a check will have to be done, but does that mean people are gonna actually do it? Some will, maybe. Most won’t. Not really buying this law. Doesn’t really do anything. RALPH ANDERSON: Honest people will have more regs they will follow. Dishonest people will not be impacted by the rule. It will cost more regardless and give attorneys more work. HEATHER SMITH: Yes, those supporting this will turn in our ballots. I am one of them. There is no reason a person buying privately should not have a background check. Drunk driving laws don’t prevent all drunk driving deaths, but that doesn’t mean we don’t need those laws. Likewise, this won’t stop all criminals from accessing firearms illegally, but it will stop some. 

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Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich says introducing civilian oversight is one of the many challenges facing the agency.

ELECTION 2014

Running on Oversight Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich and challenger Doug Orr agree on at least one thing: new civilian oversight for the agency BY JACOB JONES

U

nder the lights of a televised debate last week, Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich and his challenger, Spokane Police Det. Doug Orr, appear physically uncomfortable sitting so close to each other. Both listen politely as a moderator from the League of Women Voters explains the rules. They acknowledge each other as little as possible, staring straight ahead. The tense cease-fire doesn’t last long. “I’m running for sheriff because we can do better,” Orr says in his opening volley. “[Orr] does not know this Sheriff’s Office,” Knezovich counters a few minutes later, “nor does he have any knowledge of leadership.” Both Knezovich and Orr consider themselves Republicans. Both have embraced the county’s “Blueprint for Reform,” a Smart Justice-driven plan to reshape the local criminal justice system. Both have campaigned on

reducing property crime, rebuilding staffing and fixing an overcrowded jail. But both would also rush to note their many differences. While Knezovich has faced some vocal opposition from disgruntled union leaders and community members, the sheriff argues he has proven he can make the many important and unpopular choices that need to be made, Spokane Det. Doug Orr including asking for tax increases. He still walked away with 72 percent of the primary vote. Orr contends the sheriff has proven more a bully than a leader, sacrificing the trust of his deputies while falling behind on training and technology. Orr pitches

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himself as an intellectual alternative — a “Cop 2.0” with a badge, a gun and a Ph.D. In the final weeks of the campaign, both Knezovich and Orr have shifted the public debate toward civilian oversight, deputy-worn body cameras and accountability. “It translates to increased public trust,” the sheriff says of oversight. “That’s what is so desperately needed right now.”

S

ince taking office in 2006, Knezovich has earned both respect and scorn over his firing of several deputies for misconduct, ranging from intentionally humiliating inmates to overcharging for security shifts to having sex while on duty. Arbitrators have in some cases forced him to rehire those deputies, and he has repeatedly failed to push through new legislation to reinforce those types of termination. Knezovich takes the simple stand that deputies should not be dishonest or commit crimes. He explains that the department has a Citizen Advisory Board, but additional civilian oversight would bring new perspective to any disciplinary disputes. On Tuesday, he asked county commissioners to consider partnering with the city’s Office of Police Ombudsman to monitor the Sheriff’s Office. “Done correctly,” he says, “the ombudsman becomes a way for us to give that transparency and the proper amount of scrutiny to what we’re doing internally. … I’m doing this because I see the value of it.” Orr, a detective with the Spokane Police sex crimes unit and a part-time criminal justice professor at Gon...continued on next page

OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 13


NEWS | ELECTION 2014

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zaga, has criticized the sheriff for being slow on oversight, lagging at least five years behind the efforts at the Spokane Police Department. Orr’s greatest coup in this campaign has been securing the endorsement of the Spokane County Deputy Sheriff’s Association, arguing that the deputy union’s support will prove vital to introducing any new oversight. “I’m not talking about just an ombudsman,” he says. “I’m talking about front-to-back civilian oversight.” Orr explains that he had to go before a commission of citizens before being hired for a police officer job in South Carolina. Giving the public ownership in officer hiring helps set the tone for the force and how they engage the community. It also gives the public a stake in disciplinary actions. Body cameras should also play a large role in deputy accountability. Knezovich, who recently conducted a two-month trial, says a full commitment on body cameras hinges on a pending state Attorney General decision on recording issues, as well as getting funding from the county. Orr agrees the county should have had the cameras “yesterday.” “That’s what I’m going to bring to Spokane,” Orr says, later adding, “Why hasn’t the county done this? The sky’s not going to fall. Let’s do this.”

S

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14 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014

pokane Police Ombudsman Tim Burns, who has served since 2009, confirms he has discussed expanding the office to cover the sheriff’s agency. Providing new oversight for the county would likely start as a “fee for services” model in which the county contracts the office for certain services such as complaint tracking, use-of-force auditing, Internal Affairs certifications or other actions. “Everybody seems to be open to the discussion,” Burns says. “There are a couple major questions in my mind.” Burns says his office currently operates for about $250,000 a year. He believes a joint city-county office could potentially double that, but expects there would be an opportunity to cut shared expenses on joint staffing and infrastructure. One of his first steps toward expanding the office would be conducting a study to see how much time each service tends to take. Officials would also have to decide how the new Ombudsman Commission might factor into a joint office. That five-person city board holds its first meeting Monday. But Burns says his office certainly could provide an enhanced level of review that has proven valuable to rebuilding public confidence in the city department. “In regards to trust and transparency, I’d say it’s priceless,” he


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Both Sheriff Knezovich, left, and Doug Orr embrace Smart Justice ideas, but disagree on leadership styles. JACOB JONES PHOTO says, noting, “[But] the county commissioners and the sheriff need to drive this train.” County Commissioner Todd Mielke says the idea of partnering on the ombudsman office has come up before. He supports the concept, but emphasizes that oversight expenses have to balance against a wide variety of new justice reforms underway. “We have finite resources,” he says, asking, “What serves the public interest better, an ombudsman or body cameras?” Mielke, who has endorsed Knezovich Send comments to and sits on the new county Law and Justice editor@inlander.com. Council, says commissioners have already been struggling to find money to hire additional deputies, increase jail rehabilitation programing and expand pretrial assessment services. He notes he has not heard much public demand for extra civilian oversight at the Sheriff’s Office. “We are open-minded,” he says, “[but] we’ve got a lot of balls we’re juggling in the criminal justice arena.”

LETTERS

S

ome of those challenges include an overcrowded jail and a criminal justice system that increasingly takes on the care of defendants with severe mental health issues. Knezovich believes the county needs to rebuild its jail facility, which would take a significant investment but would include new rehabilitation programs. He says the current jail struggles to care for inmates with mental health issues due to funding cuts at state facilities. Orr argues a first step would be instructing county deputies in Crisis Intervention Team training, helping them better recognize which people need treatment instead of jail. He went through the Spokane Police CIT course last year, learning about mental health symptoms and de-escalation techniques. “We now know that putting them in jail is not productive at all,” he says, calling for increased triage of inmates into mental health facilities. “Those programs need to be expanded.” Orr says he represents significant change at a time when the Sheriff’s Office needs to redefine itself under a newer, more nuanced mission. Knezovich says he has provided firm and forwardlooking leadership. During the recent debate, both men repeatedly outlined the high expectations and difficult tasks ahead of whoever takes the office: replacing retired deputies, cutting overtime expenses, replacing the aging dispatch system. It’s a long list, the sheriff tells the audience. “There are many things we need to be paying attention to.” 

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OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST ON INLANDER.COM More Inlander news every day

PHOTO EYE GO HOME, CONDI

PAKOOTAS LAUNCHES FIRST TV AD

Fifth district congressional candidate Joe Pakootas released his first campaign commercial earlier this week. The 30-second spot features a narrator commending Pakootas’ support of “equal pay for equal work” and his belief that women’s health-care decisions “should be made between a woman and her doctor — not a woman and her boss.” The ad is bookended by personal endorsements from Heather Foley, wife of former 5th District Congressman Tom Foley. Pakootas, a Democrat, is vying for Republican incumbent Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers’ seat. His campaign has been vastly outraised by the congresswoman and, until last week, couldn’t afford TV or radio ads. (DEANNA PAN)

KRISTEN BLACK PHOTO

About 70 people, including these three in jumpsuits and oversized bobbleheads of Condoleezza Rice, Dick Cheney and George W. Bush, protested Rice’s visit to Spokane as part of Whitworth University’s President’s Leadership Forum. The rally was organized by the Peace and Justice Action League of Spokane and other groups. “Her legacy of lies misled our country into a disastrous war based on false pretenses, which has resulted in 150,000-plus dead and 2.8 million displaced in Iraq, over 13,000 U.S. troops and contractors dead, and over 875,000 officially disabled veterans,” PJALS Director Liz Moore said in a statement about Rice.

TRAGEDY

“We’re trying to figure out why and how this happened. He was only 18. He had so much to live for.” Andrea Parrish, the cousin of a West Valley High School student who died at an Idaho corn maze Friday night, to KXLY. Jeremy McSpadden (pictured) had been playing a zombie at the maze when he fell and was run over by a “zombie slayer bus,” from which customers could shoot role-players dressed as zombies with paintball guns.

CALLING ALL WRITERS

Get festive or drunk or spooked. The Inlander launched its 2014 Short Fiction Contest this week with the theme of “Spirits,” however writers want to interpret that concept. For the first time, winning authors will receive cash prizes totalling $500. Submit original, unpublished stories of less than 2,000 words by Nov. 21. Stories must reference at least one Inland Northwest landmark. Send all submissions to: jacobj@inlander.com with “Fiction Contest Entry” in the subject line. The top stories will run in the Dec. 25 issue. (JACOB JONES)

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16 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014


NEWS | BRIEFS

Heating Up

cash infusions in recent weeks. Ex-Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer and his wife Connie donated another $250,000 to the campaign earlier this month, bringing their total contributions to more than $1 million. Last week, Everytown for Gun Safety, former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg’s advocacy group, pledged to invest another $1 million in support of I-594. — DEANNA PAN

The Spokane City Council calls out Condon; plus, Washington’s gun initiatives

STILL WAITING

HAVES AND HAVE-NOTS In a day of dueling press conferences Friday, the mayor and a majority of the city council clashed over next year’s BUDGET. At issue are raises for the mayor and some of his cabinet members and a handful of unfunded council requests. Under Mayor David Condon’s budget, members of his cabinet, including the police and fire chiefs, would get raises ranging from 2 percent to 5 percent. According to the city charter, the mayor’s salary should match the highest paid city employee, so he would also get a raise to $179,484 a year under the plan. Condon argues legal and contractual issues mandate the raises. Cabinet members are hired at various points in their pay plans and guaranteed raises after a certain amount of time on the job, and the police chief’s pay is linked to lower ranking officers, whose raises were approved by the council in contracts this year. Council President Ben Stuckart calls that argument “ludicrous” and points to former Mayor Mary Verner, who took a salary lower than what was required by law. Condon said he planned to donate the amount of his raise next year and Stuckart said he wouldn’t take the raise he’s scheduled to get. Among the council’s asks that didn’t get funded in the mayor’s budget are $60,000 for the COPS program,

an additional city planner and a council attorney who is independent from the administration’s legal department. — HEIDI GROOVER

AHEAD IN THE POLLS

Although both of Washington’s conflicting gun-control measures are losing support, the majority of voters still prefer INITIATIVE 594, the measure to expand criminal background checks for all gun sales, according to a new poll by Elway Research. In the latest poll, released earlier this week, 60 percent of voters surveyed said they would “definitely” or “probably” vote for I-594. Meanwhile, 39 percent said they were more likely to support its rival measure on Election Day, Initiative 591, which would prohibit the state from enacting any additional background checks except those mandated by the federal government. Support for the competing measures has been declining since April when voter majorities paradoxically favored both. This change may indicate that voters are less confused about the similarly titled initiatives than they were six months ago. The Yes on 594 campaign, run by the Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility, has benefited from large

A federal judge last week denied a request from mental health advocates to order state psychiatric hospitals to reorganize staffing and wards to more quickly admit and evaluate people with mental health issues now sitting in jail cells. An ongoing CLASS-ACTION LAWSUIT alleges the state Department of Social and Health Services has failed to provide timely treatment for those waiting months in jail competency evaluations — often in solitary confinement and without treatment. U.S. District Judge Marsha Pechman voiced sympathy for people awaiting treatment, but stopped short of issuing a temporary restraining order that would have forced hospitals to immediately change how they prioritize and admit such individuals. The judge instead ordered an accelerated trial timeline. Advocates with Disability Rights Washington and the ACLU of Washington argue the constitutional right to proper health care should not be subject to available funding at state hospitals. DSHS officials say state hospitals already operate at capacity and immediately admitting additional jail inmates would undermine the treatment of other patients. Both sides have until Monday to put together requests for proceeding to trial on the lawsuit, which references multiple Spokane inmates as well as several other individuals from across the state. — JACOB JONES

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NEWS | ELECTION 2014

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Incumbent Al French focuses on growth and jobs. Challenger Mary Lou Johnson focuses on criminal justice reform.

Jobs and Justice A rookie Democrat has a decent shot of defeating a powerful, conservative county commissioner BY DANIEL WALTERS

A

ttorney Mary Lou Johnson is a first-time politician. She’s a relative unknown running as a Democrat in Republicandominated Spokane County. And she’s going up against a longtime titan of local politics: Al French — developer, architect, commissioner, veteran and former Spokane city councilmember. But this fight hasn’t been a lopsided one. Despite competing with former Commissioner Bonnie Mager, Johnson nearly topped French in the primary. Today, she actually leads French by more than $25,000 in cash contributions. (Include French’s in-kind donation to himself of materials left over from his previous election and they’re basically tied.) The General Election will be a steeper climb: The primary only covered the more liberal 3rd District (the general is countywide) and even there Johnson struggled to pick up votes outside the city of Spokane. But with Mager out — and endorsing Johnson — the race is wide open. It could all come down to just a few issues:

LEADERSHIP STYLE

“People I speak to want balance in government, to ensure that the best decisions are made,” Johnson says in her introduction at a League of Women Voters candidate forum. “Currently all three county commissioners have similar views and most measures are passed unanimously.” She’s worn a number of hats throughout her life: She’s been a nurse practitioner, a teacher, a mediator, a lawyer, a nonprofit leader and a volunteer helping homeless kids. Politician is a new one. Johnson believes she’ll be able to provide a balance to the business-minded conservatives on the commission. But she doesn’t position herself

18 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014 CdaCasino_StopViolence_100214_4S_KE.jpg

as someone who’ll just play the role of the loyal opposition, always voting against the two other commissioners. She says she wants to seek common ground, to act as a mediator on contentious issues. “I am a person who can see both sides of an issue,” Johnson says. “That’s my legal training.” French can point to Send comments to moments where he has editor@inlander.com. built diverse coalitions — he’s won awards for his leadership on the Spokane Transit Authority board, for example, bringing deeply conservative and liberal members together to support public transit. Even back when he was on the Nevada-Lidgerwood Neighborhood Council in the ’90s, he says, he brought neighbors together to build a COPS Shop and neighborhood council office. “I know that Mary Lou wants to say, you know, ‘He just doesn’t play well with others,’” French told the Inlander earlier this year. “That’s just not supported by the facts.” But Johnson points to moments where coalitions have collapsed. After French tried to wrangle more than a dozen municipalities to stick with the countywide garbage system, several cities pulled out. French is praised by fans and panned by critics for aggressively pushing his agenda forward. Those critics can be particularly colorful in their dislike of French, who has been accused of retaliation — as when he refused to fill Spokane Historic Landmarks Commission vacancies in part because the commission raised concerns about construction he supported. “There are probably as many negative

LETTERS


relationships he has had as positive relationships,” Johnson says. “That does not speak well of a public official.” On many issues, French is confident, where Johnson is more cautious and skeptical. He provides answers, she provides questions: To him, there isn’t a doubt in his mind that constructing a Spokane tribal casino poses a risk for Fairchild Air Force Base. Johnson isn’t so sure. She believes that the Air Force, not the county, should be the one raising concerns about any alleged impact to the base. “I would not have the county taxpayers spending more money to litigate that issue,” she says.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM

Johnson has nearly two decades of experience in the courts. She was part of the Smart Justice Campaign, a broad coalition of community members and organizations looking to reform the criminal justice system by finding alternatives to jail for nonviolent offenders. Four years ago, French mocked his county commissioner opponent for wanting to “hug a criminal” instead of putting him in jail. Yet in the time French has been in office, the county — and French himself — has moved significantly closer to the Smart Justice philosophy. “My opponent says that he realized that criminal justice reform was needed in 2010,” Johnson says. “But unfortunately we have not seen any improvements over the last four years during his term in office. And I think that’s unacceptable.” French lists a bevy of improvements, like new early-case resolution and pretrial service reforms, already underway at the county. “We’ve made some improvements. We’ve made corrections,” French says. “But this is a big ship and it’s going to take some time to change it.” Johnson admits there have been positive reforms, like restarting the legally required Law and Justice Council in May, but thinks they need to be bigger and come faster. “None of these have been taken to scale,” Johnson says. “A lot of [the courts] are doing good things, but they’re very, very small compared to the number of people that could be in those programs.” Her expertise, she says, can get them there.

JOBS AND DEVELOPMENT

Criminal justice may be Johnson’s specialty, but development is French’s. His real-estate past and long developer-friendly voting record has won him praise from manufacturers and groups like the Spokane Home Builders Association. His aggressive support for expanding the dense-development boundaries in the county, however, has earned him criticism from Spokane city councilmembers, who worry about the long-term economic and environmental consequences. (French argues that part of the expansion, extending sewer service to the Mead-Mt. Spokane area, actually helps protect the aquifer.) By contrast, Johnson has been a volunteer lawyer with the Center for Justice, the organization that has repeatedly sued the county for its land-use decisions. She believes the county has opened itself up to expensive lawsuits, noting that it never ran a full cost-benefit analysis about the impact of its expansion. “I promised I’d bring more jobs to the county, which I did, and have done,” French says at the forum. “The rate of growth on the West Plains for the last three and a half years has been greater than any other period in the previous three decades. Good paying jobs. Aerospace. Advanced manufacturing. Regional distribution facilities.” French credits that, in part, to his business-friendly reforms like streamlining the permitting process and to his tireless efforts selling Spokane County to businesses. But Johnson objects to French’s taking credit for those jobs. In an interview, Johnson pushes forward a printout from French in 2007 mocking then-Spokane Mayor Dennis Hession’s claims of job creation: “What created those jobs is the private sector,” French said back then. “It’s like staring at the horizon and watching the sun rise and taking credit for it.” n danielw@inlander.com

OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 19


NEWS | MARRIAGE EQUALITY

Led by Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter, Idaho has spent about $70,000 so far defending its ban on same-sex marriage.

Every Last Effort Is Butch Otter finally done defending Idaho’s marriage ban? BY HEIDI GROOVER

I

n Idaho Gov. C.L. “Butch” Otter’s office, the trends don’t matter. It doesn’t matter that Pew Research data shows a steady growth in acceptance of same-sex

marriage or that a cascade of court rulings across the nation have toppled bans on gay marriage like the one Idaho voters passed in 2006. “As governor, I don’t get to pick and choose which

parts of the Idaho Constitution I uphold and protect — no matter how ‘inevitable’ legal experts say the outcome may be,” Otter says by email. “I take very seriously my responsibility to carry out the will of the people of Idaho as expressed through the democratic process.” That’s been his argument throughout the past year of defending the ban as the rest of the country passed Idaho by. The state had dedicated $1 million to the fight and has spent just under $70,000 so far, according to Otter’s office. Now, he may finally be running out of options. “This is a momentous case for Idaho,” says Deborah Ferguson, one of the lawyers representing four couples who sued the state over its ban. The couples won in a lower court this spring, a decision the state appealed to the 9th Circuit in San Francisco. “It means a great deal for its gay and lesbian citizens, having this very fundamental right to marry and being treated with the dignity and respect they and their families deserve.” Last week, the 9th Circuit ruled that bans in Idaho and Nevada “impose profound legal, financial, social and psychic harms on numerous citizens of those states.” That came on the heels of the U.S. Supreme Court deciding it would not hear appeals to lower courts’ rulings on same-sex marriage in five other states — a decision with major implications. Because those lower circuit courts, whose rulings the Supreme Court was upholding, each cover multiple states, the decision effectively brought the number of states with legal same-sex marriage to 30. After the 9th Circuit ruling, Otter’s team quickly requested and won a temporary stay, keeping Idaho marriages on hold, from U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, who oversees the 9th Circuit. By the end of the week, the Supreme Court lifted the stay, but the state still needed an express order from the 9th Circuit to

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actually start issuing marriage licenses. For couples across the state, “It’s been quite the roller coaster,” says Ferguson, whose clients will try this week for the third time to get an Idaho marriage license. Couples had lined up at courthouses after the 9th Circuit’s ruling only to leave disappointed when Kennedy issued the stay. After the removal of the stay, a clerk in Latah County began issuing marriage licenses, but others held off for the 9th Circuit order. The Columbus Day this Monday added yet another delay. Finally, the 9th Circuit ruled that marriages could begin Wednesday at 9 am. Send comments to If Idaho’s leaders decide to keep fighteditor@inlander.com. ing, they can ask the Supreme Court to hear the case, but in light of the past week it’s unlikely the court would. University of Idaho constitutional law professor Shaakirrah Sanders, who has been following marriage rulings across the country, says there is one academic element of Idaho’s case that gives it a slim chance. The 9th Circuit ruling argues that laws based on sexual orientation should face “heightened scrutiny.” In other words, like laws that divide people based on their race or gender, those based on sexual orientation are “inherently suspicious,” Sanders says. Even though the outcome — marriage equality in Idaho — would be unlikely to change, the court could still hear the case in order to rule on whether sexual orientation should be considered like race and gender. Or, of course, the state could step aside, and Otter may finally be ready to do that. “I continue to believe that the federal courts are mistaken in abandoning the sanctity of traditional marriage and in undermining the will of Idaho voters and each state’s right to define marriage. But we are civil society that respects the rule of law,” Otter said in a statement this week. “We have done all we can through the courts for now to defend traditional marriage in Idaho.”  heidig@inlander.com

LETTERS

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media analysis

BENEATH THE SURFACE Important stories you may have missed amid the constant onslaught of information By Joe Fitzgerald Rodriguez


O

ur oceans are acidifying — even if the nightly news hasn’t told you yet. As humanity continues to fill the atmosphere with harmful gases, the planet is becoming less hospitable to life as we know it. The vast oceans absorb much of the carbon dioxide we have produced, from the industrial revolution through the rise of global capitalism. The ocean’s self-sacrifice spared the atmosphere nearly 25 percent of humanity’s CO2 emissions, slowing the onslaught of many severe weather consequences. Although the news media have increasingly covered the climate weirding of global warming — hurricane superstorms, fierce tornado clusters, overwhelming snowstorms and record-setting global high temperatures — our ocean’s peril has largely stayed submerged below the biggest news stories. The rising carbon dioxide in our oceans burns up and deforms the smallest, most abundant food at the bottom of the deep blue food chain. One vulnerable population is the tiny, shelled swimmer known as the sea butterfly. In only a few short decades, the death and deformation of this fragile and translucent species could endanger predators all along the oceanic food web, scientists warn. This “butterfly effect,” once unleashed, potentially threatens fisheries that feed more than 1 billion people worldwide. Since ancient times, humans fished the oceans for food. Now, we’re frying ocean life before we even catch it, starving future generations in the process. Largely left out of national news coverage, this dire report was brought to light by a handful of independent-minded journalists: Craig Welch from the Seattle Times, Julia Whitty of Mother Jones, and Eli Kintisch of ScienceNOW. It is also the top story of Project Censored, an annual book and reporting project that features the year’s most underreported news stories, striving to unmask censorship, self-censorship and propaganda in corporate-controlled media outlets. The book is set for release later this month. “Information is the currency of democracy,” Ralph Nader, the prominent consumer advocate and many-time presidential candidate, writes in his foreword to this year’s Project Censored 2015. But with most mass media owned by narrow corporate interests, “the general public remains uninformed.” Whereas the mainstream media poke and peck at noteworthy events at single points in time, often devoid of historical context or analysis, Project Censored seeks to clarify understanding of real world issues and focus on what’s important. Context is key, and many of its “top censored” stories highlight deeply entrenched policy issues that require more explanation than a simple sound bite can provide. Campus and faculty from more than two dozen colleges and universities join in this ongoing effort, headquartered at California’s Sonoma State University. Some 260 students and 49 faculty vet thousands of news stories on select criteria: importance, timeliness, quality of sources and the level of corporate news coverage. The top 25 finalists are sent to Project Censored’s panel of judges, who then rank the entries, with ocean acidification topping this

year’s list. “There are outlets, regular daily papers, who are independent and they’re out there,” Andy Lee Roth, associate director of Project Censored, says. Too many news outlets are beholden to corporate interests, but the Seattle Times’ Welch bucked the trend, Roth says, by writing some of the deepest coverage yet on ocean acidification. Computer modeler Isaac Kaplan, at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration office in Seattle, told Welch that his early work predicts significant declines in sharks, skates and rays, some types of flounder and sole, and Pacific whiting, the most frequently caught commercial fish off the coast of Washington, Oregon and California. Acidification may also harm fisheries in the farthest corners of the earth: A study by the Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme outlines acidification’s threat to the arctic food chain. “Decreases in seawater pH of about 0.02 per decade have been observed since the late 1960s in the Iceland and Barents Seas,” the study’s authors wrote in the executive summary. And destroying fisheries means wiping out the livelihoods of the native peoples of the Antarctic. Acidification can even rewire the brains of fish, Welch’s story demonstrates. Studies found rising CO2 levels cause clownfish to gain athleticism, but have their sense of smell redirected. This transforms them into “dumb jocks,” scientists say, swimming faster and more vigorously straight into the mouths of their predators. These Frankenstein fish were found to be five times more likely to die in the natural world. What a fitting metaphor for humanity, as our outsized consumption propels us towards an equally dangerous fate. “It’s not as dramatic as, say, an asteroid is hitting us from outer space,” Roth says of this slowly unfolding disaster, which is likely why such a looming threat to our food chain escapes much mainstream news coverage. Journalism tends to be more “action focused,” Roth says, looking to define conflict in everything it sees. A recently top-featured story on CNN focused on President Barack Obama’s “awkward coffee cup salute” to a Marine, which ranks only slightly below around-the-clock coverage of the president’s ugly tan suit as a low point in mainstream media’s focus on the trivial. As Nader notes, “important stories’ are often viewed as dull by reporters and therefore unworthy of coverage.” But mainstream media do cover some serious topics with weight, as in the wake of the police officer shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. So what’s the deciding factor? As Roth tells it, corporate news focuses on “drama, and the most dramatic action is of course violence.” But the changes caused by ocean acidification are gradual. Sea butterflies are among the most abundant creatures in our oceans, and are increasingly born with shells that look like cauliflower or sandpaper, making this and similar ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 23


analysis | project censored “BENEATH THE SURFACE,” CONTINUED...

Kenyan police in Nairobi tortured, raped or otherwise abused more than 1,000 refugees from 2012 to 2013

species more susceptible to infection and predators. “Ocean acidification is changing the chemistry of the world’s water faster than ever before, and faster than the world’s leading scientists predicted,” Welch says, but it’s not getting the attention it deserves: “Combined nationwide spending on acidification research for eight federal agencies, including grants to university scientists by the National Science Foundation, totals about $30 million a year — less than the annual budget for the coastal Washington city of Hoquiam, population 10,000.” Our oceans may slowly cook our food chain into new forms with potentially catastrophic consequences. Certainly 20 years from now, when communities around the world lose their main source of sustenance, the news will catch on. But will the problem make the front page tomorrow, while there’s still time to act?

external iron cages built outside the IPS transition facility in Ramla,” the PDO wrote, according to The Independent. The next top recipients of U.S. foreign aid were Afghanistan, Egypt, Pakistan, Nigeria, Jordan, Iraq, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda. All countries were accused of torture by human rights groups such as Amnesty International and Human Rights Watch. Kenyan police in Nairobi tortured, raped or otherwise abused more than 1,000 refugees from 2012 to 2013, Human Rights Watch found. The Kenyan government received $564 million from the United States in 2013-14. When the U.S. funds a highway or other project that it’s proud of, it plants a huge sign proclaiming “your tax dollars at work.” When the U.S. funds torturers, the corporate media bury the story, or worse, don’t report it at all.

2

3

TOP 10 U.S. AID RECIPIENTS PRACTICE TORTURE

Sexual abuse, children kept in cages, extrajudicial murder. While these sound like horrors the United States would stand against, the reverse is true: This country is funding these practices. The U.S. is a signatory of the United Nations’ Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, but the top 10 international recipients of U.S. foreign assistance in 2014 all practice torture, according to human rights groups, as reported by Daniel Wickham of online outlet Left Foot Forward. Israel received more than $3 billion in U.S. aid for fiscal year 2013-14, according to a Congressional Research Service report. Israel was criticized by the country’s own Public Defender’s Office for torturing children suspected of minor crimes. “During our visit, held during a fierce storm that hit the state, attorneys met detainees who described to them a shocking picture: in the middle of the night dozens of detainees were transferred to the

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TRANS-PACIFIC PARTNERSHIP, SECRETLY HELPING CORPORATIONS

The Trans-Pacific Partnership is like the Stop Online Piracy Act on steroids, yet few have heard of it, let alone enough people to start an Internet campaign to topple it. Despite details revealed by Wikileaks, the nascent agreement has been largely ignored by the corporate media. Even the world’s elite are out of the loop: Only three officials in each of the 12 signatory countries have access to this developing trade agreement that potentially impacts more than 800 million people. The agreement touches on intellectual property rights and the regulation of private enterprise between nations, and is open to negotiation and viewing by 600 “corporate advisors” from big oil and pharmaceutical to entertainment companies. Meanwhile, more than 150 House Democrats signed a letter urging President Obama to halt his efforts to fast-track negotiations, and to allow Congress the ability to weigh in now on an agreement only the White House has seen.


Sparkling white. - OR -

Free BOTOX John Oliver, host of Last Week Tonight on HBO, has spoken passionately on the importance of net neutrality, but Project Censored argues that the issue still hasn’t received enough coverage from corporate media outlets. Many criticized the secrecy surrounding the TPP, arguing the real world consequences may be grave. Doctors Without Borders wrote, “If harmful provisions in the U.S. proposals for the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) agreement are not removed before it is finalized, this trade deal will have a real cost in human lives.”

4

CORPORATE INTERNET PROVIDERS THREATEN NET NEUTRALITY

This entry demonstrates the nuance

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in Project Censored’s media critique. Verizon v. FCC may weaken Internet regulation, which the Electronic Frontier Foundation and other digital freedom advocates allege would create a two-tiered Internet system. Under the FCC’s proposed new rules, corporate behemoths such as Comcast or Verizon could charge entities to use faster bandwidth, which advocates say would create financial barriers to free speech and encourage censorship. Project Censored alleges corporate outlets ...continued on next page

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OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 25


analysis | project censored

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The mainstream media has failed to underscore Vladimir Putin’s oil interest in Ukraine, says Project Censored. REMY STEINEGGER PHOTO

Enter at:

Inlander.com/freestuff

“BENEATH THE SURFACE,” CONTINUED... such as the New York Times and Forbes “tend to highlight the business aspects of the case, skimming over vital particulars affecting the public and the Internet’s future.” Yet this is a case where corporate media were circumvented by power of the viral web. John Oliver, comedian and host of Last Week Tonight on HBO, recently gave a stirring 13-minute treatise on the importance of stopping the FCC’s new rules, resulting in a flood of comments to the FCC defending a more open Internet. The particulars of net neutrality have since been thoroughly reported in the corporate media. But as Project Censored notes, mass media coverage only came after the FCC’s rule change was proposed, giving activists little time to right any wrongs. It’s a subtle but important distinction.

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26 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014

BANKERS REMAIN ON WALL STREET DESPITE MAJOR CRIMES

Bankers responsible for rigging municipal bonds and bilking billions of dollars from American cities have largely escaped criminal charges. Every day in the U.S., low-level drug dealers get more prison time than these scheming bankers who, while working for GE Capital, allegedly skimmed money from public schools, hospitals, libraries and nursing homes, according to Rolling Stone. Dominick Carollo, Steven Goldberg and Peter Grimm were dubbed a part of the “modern American mafia,” by the magazine’s Matt Taibbi, one of the few journalists to consistently cover their trial. Meanwhile, disturbingly uninformed cable media “journalists” defended the bankers, saying they shouldn’t be prosecuted for “failure,” as if cheating vulnerable Americans were a bad business deal. “Had the U.S. authorities decided to press criminal charges,” Assistant U.S. Attorney General Lanny Breuer told Taibbi, “HSBC [a

British bank] would almost certainly have lost its banking license in the U.S., the future of the institution would have been under threat, and the entire banking system would have been destabilized.” Over the course of decades, the nation’s bankers transformed into the modern mafioso. Unfortunately, our modern media changed as well and are no longer equipped to tackle systemic, complex stories.

6

IGNORING EXTREME WEATHER CONNECTION TO GLOBAL WARMING

7

U.S. MEDIA HYPOCRISY IN COVERING UKRAINE CRISIS

In what can only be responded to with a resounding “duh,” news analyses have found mainstream media frequently report on severe weather changes without referring to global warming as the context or cause, even as a question. As Project Censored notes, a study by Fairness and Accuracy in Reporting found extreme weather events in 2013 spurred 450 broadcast news segments, only 16 of which even mentioned climate change. National news outlets have failed on the job as well, as the New York Times recently shuttered its environmental desk and its Green blog, reducing the number of reporters exclusively chasing down climate change stories. “There is a huge mismatch between the magnitude of the challenge and the response we heard here today,” Graça Machel, the widow of former South African President Nelson Mandela, told the recent United Nations conference on climate change. “The scale is much more than we have achieved.”

The U.S. battle with Russia over Ukraine’s independence is actually an energy pipeline


squabble, a narrative lost by mainstream media coverage, Project Censored alleges. Russian President Vladimir Putin has drawn fire from the media as a tyrant, without complex analyses of his country’s socioeconomic interests, according to Project Censored. As the media often do, they have turned the conflict into a cult of Send comments to editor@inlander.com. personality, talking up Putin’s shirtless horseback riding and his hard-line style with deftness missing from their political analysis. As The Guardian’s Nafeez Ahmed reported, a recent U.S. State Departmentsponsored report noted “Ukraine’s strategic location between the main energy producers (Russia and the Caspian Sea area) and consumers in the Eurasian region, its large transit network, and its available underground gas storage capacities,” highlighting its economic importance to the U.S. and its allies.

LETTERS

8

THE W.H.O. SUPPRESSES REPORT ON IRAQ IMPACTS

The U.S. legacy in Iraq possibly goes beyond death to a living nightmare of cancer and birth defects, due to the military’s use of depleted uranium weapons, a World Health Organization study found. Iraq is poisoned. Much of the report’s contents were leaked to the BBC during its creation. But the release of the report, completed in 2012 by WHO, has stalled. Critics allege the U.S. is deliberately blocking its release, masking a damning Middle East legacy rivaling the horrors of Agent Orange in Vietnam. But Iraq will never forget the U.S. intervention, as mothers cradle babies bearing scars received in the womb.  What’s your critique of the media? Email letters to editor@inlander.com. A version of this article first appeared in the San Francisco Bay Guardian.

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PERFORMANCE

Behind the Blue Becoming a part of the Blue Man Group takes more than face paint and a spooky stare BY CHEY SCOTT

N

ot everyone is cut out to be a Blue Man. Even after the initial audition, future wouldbe Blue Men — the blue-skinned, black-clothed trio known around the world for their quirky, mimed performances — are on a temporary contract during an extended rehearsal period, and could be cut from the roster at any time. The performance group’s casting team is looking for a very specific, yet almost undefinable, set of traits that make a successful Blue Man.

Adam Zuick, a 25-year-old actor with the Blue Man Group’s North American tour, stopping in Spokane for four nights of shows Oct. 16-19, says trying out for the role was one of the most interesting experiences in his young acting career. Even though he’s now a Blue Man, Zuick still has trouble defining the essence of the character and what it takes to become one. “I’ve talked to people trying to do an audition and they’ve wondered what I could tell them to help them,

but it’s tough because going in blind is almost better,” Zuick explains over the phone from San Diego, five stops before the show heads to Spokane, where Zuick lived briefly as a child. “It’s very strange, and they want a certain thing from people. You can’t force that thing — you have or don’t have it. If you get cut it’s not because you’re a bad actor, you just don’t fit the criteria for Blue Man.” Most of the audition, he says, is silent improvisation, in which actors must convey a story with only their eyes and facial expressions, just as the mute Blue Men do in a live show. Zuick then rehearsed with other Blue Man cast members for about 10 months before hitting the road in late September for his first string of shows with the company. Oddly enough, Zuick admits he never saw a live Blue Man show before trying out, though he’d seen them on TV. It wasn’t until after the company chose to offer him the role that he went to a live show to see what he was getting himself into: “It blew my mind.” Blue Man Group shows are like mimed improv comedy in the atmosphere of an electronic dance party ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 29


CULTURE | PERFORMANCE

The Blue Man Group has been touring since 1987.

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“BEHIND THE BLUE,” CONTINUED... — black lights, neon colors, thumping beats — mixed with overthe-top performance art, like unfurling rolls of toilet paper into the audience using the air blast of an industrial fan. There are also elements of science and learning, complementing the show’s overarching theme of discovery. Those who’ve heard of Blue Man but have never seen a show can at least recall the bald-headed, wide-eyed, androgynous trio (yes, Zuick confirms — women can play the role). Or maybe they’ve heard of the band’s giant PVC pipe keyboard, or the mesmerizing paint-splatter drumming segment. The Blue Man Group, created in 1987 by three friends as a tribute to the 1980s, later took off when their commissioned show “Tubes” was critically acclaimed by the New York Times. Even though all Blue Man shows, whether in Las Vegas, New York or on the road, contain many of the same acts or elements, Zuick affirms that each performance is different from the next. Blue Men always react and respond to the environment they’re in, he says. “It’s us responding to them and trying to connect with different people, so we change it up, and certain times we’re inspired to do different things, and it’s all random,” he says. Zuick describes the Blue Man as a hypersensitive being — hearing and seeing everything — and as actors in the show, they’re trained to create improvised scenes together based on this trait. “We’re a collective group that moves as one even though there are three,” he says, describing a technique in Blue Manspeak called “flocking.” Even with this groupthink mentality as a major influence in the performance, Zuick points out that while they all look identical and portray similar mannerisms, each Blue Man is still encouraged to be an individual. “It’s weird because they tell you these things that a Blue Man has to be and has to do, but in the long run you learn the Blue Man is more yourself than anything,” he says. “It is you broken down into the most simple state, discovering things for the first time, not taking things for granted and trying to make a connection with people, and breaking through the barrier people put up.”  cheys@inlander.com Blue Man Group • Thu, Oct. 16-Sun, Oct. 19; showtimes vary • $33-$73 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • bestofbroadwayspokane.com

30 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014


CULTURE | DIGEST

TV BLACK-ISH

WEEKE

ND

W

ith Black-ish (ABC, Wednesdays, 9:30 pm), it would be tempting to accuse ABC of just creating an African-American-led sitcom in order to cynically rake in cash by targeting the African-American demographic. So it’s a good sign for self-awareness that, in its first episode, Black-ish features an ad executive giving an African-American a promotion in order to rake in cash by cynically targeting the African-American demographic. Black-ish, fortunately, is a long way from token. To be clear, Black-ish is often a family sitcom at its most generic: Like the Cosby Show, it’s about an upperclass black family. The dad, Andre Johnson (Anthony Anderson, Treme) works at an ad agency, while his wife Rainbow (Tracee Ellis Ross, CSI) works as an anesthesiologist. They raise the requisite precocious little kids, while crotchety Pops (Laurence Fishburne) makes wry comments over his morning newspaper. There are the plot lines (Dad and Mom try to be cool for their kids) that every sitcom has done before. The comedy is light and pleasant, instead of out-and-out, gut-busting uproarious. It’s more funny “heh” than funny “ha-ha.” But it differentiates itself with its take on race: Instead of just ignoring it entirely, or relying on hoarierthan-hoary “Black people do this like this, but white people do this like that” comedic tropes, it explores how those stereotypes pose knotty complications to culture and self-perception. It’s about being in a world where the lines of racial identity have become blurrier, one

October 17th | 8pm Tickets: $15 Black-ish’s Anthony Anderson and Tracee Ellis Ross. that often pretends, with a plastered smile and a cheesy handshake, to be post-racial. This deft treatment is no surprise when you see that Larry Wilmore, the Daily Show’s “Senior Black Correspondent,” is the showrunner. He’ll be leaving for the Colbert replacement Minority Report after the first half of this season, however, handing his replacement an ongoing challenge: Make the characters more interesting, the jokes funnier and preserve the bite of cultural criticism that keeps Black-ish from being another milquetoast mimic of Modern Family. — DANIEL WALTERS

For Your Consideration BY HEIDI GROOVER

Felicia Michaels

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MUSIC | We all say we like to discover new music, a prospect that’s easier today than it’s ever been. But then comes the moment when we slip our headphones on or key up our i-devices for a drive. For most of us, whatever we already know and love gets played. Enter NOON PACIFIC, a service that finds the best new music and sends you a playlist every Monday at noon. The songs’ genres are all over the map, but the list is always full of enough upbeat tracks to get you through the Monday afternoon slump. It takes the searching out of finding new music and brings you back to the days of getting a handmade mixtape or CD from a friend. (Bonus: it’s curated by Spokane native Clark Dinnison.) Sign up at noonpacific.com.

APP | It seems like there’s great journalism happening just about everywhere. Even Buzzfeed is investing in serious long-form work. But more stuff is only making it easier to get overwhelmed and end up missing something you might love. The LONGFORM APP wants to help. The free app — from the same people who run longform.org, the website that highlights the best narrative journalism and the podcast that interviews writers — lets you subscribe to writers or publications you love, browse staff picks and curate a reading list you’re sure to like. Using an algorithm, it pulls only long-form work, so your feed won’t get clogged with short blogs or listicles.

TV | If you haven’t heard of UTOPIA yet, you’re about to. And no, this is not the same Utopia reality show that’s currently bombing hard on FOX. Director David Fincher is going to remake the British show for American audiences on HBO and it’ll get lots of ink. So get ahead of all your friends and watch the original version now, because there’s nothing about it that needs a remake. The story centers around a group of fans of a cult graphic novel who find themselves caught up in a government conspiracy. It’s hard to get too far into the plot without spoilers, but like other British dramas, Utopia’s storytelling is totally next-level compared to American shows. The seasons are shorter, the characters more unsettling, the twists more surprising and the aesthetics infinitely more stunning. It’s not on Netflix or Hulu, but you’ll figure it out.

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OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 31


CULTURE | BOOKS

How to use THIS

PULL-OUT SECTION

Pull down then out

Bruce Holbert’s writing captures the rugged ethos of the American West.

Strange Bedfellows Completing his newest novel The Hour of Lead was a Herculean effort for Bruce Holbert BY E.J. IANELLI

T

he Hour of Lead, Bruce Holbert’s second and most recent novel, takes its title from an Emily Dickinson poem that begins, “After great pain, a formal feeling comes.” In keeping with the salient themes of her work, the poem deals with grief, loss, resignation and death in a way that’s too matter-of-fact to be sentimental and self-pitying, too lyrical to be grim. For those familiar with Holbert’s fiction, most notably his 2012 debut Lonesome Animals, there’s little wonder why he might be drawn to her verse. There was always something odd about Dickinson: the melancholic disposition that emerged while still a schoolchild, her preoccupation with death, her withdrawal from society in her thirties. But those quirks of personality might seem tame compared to the grotesques — reticent or sadistic men, impulsive or self-abnegating women — who populate The Hour of Lead. “I’m really interested in just the strangeness of people,” says Holbert. “Maybe part of it is because I teach high school, and you see kids pretty stripped. Kids, they have this idea of normal, but once you get past the surface, they’re participating in the strangeness in a way that’s interesting because it’s new to them.” Holbert, a teacher at Mt. Spokane High School, has previously noted his own preoccupation with the Western myth, a tangle of

32 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014

ideas and beliefs that cater to the romanticization of the serene isolation, rugged individualism and aloof and emotionally constricted men or self-sufficient women who are supposedly unique to this sliver of America. The straightforward “bad guy chasing bad guy” of Lonesome Animals approached this myth head-on, whereas Lead addresses it more obliquely through the prism of strangeness. “One of the things about the Western myth that doesn’t get talked about is just how weird we all are. We walk around with these strange kinds of demons that we don’t talk much about, which makes them even stranger,” he says. In Lead, the characters are defined by their demons. Matt Lawson spends a long time coming to terms with the deaths of his father and twin brother in a monumental snowstorm. Linda Jefferson, the schoolteacher, is a hostage of loneliness. Horace Jarms, prodigal son of kind, levelheaded Roland, harbors a seething resentment toward his absent mother. You could even say that Lead engages with the Western myth by offering a mythology of its own. A scene between Wendy and Matt deliberately echoes the story of Cupid and Psyche. Lucky’s fraught relationship with his own father has elements of Oedipus but owes more to Freud than Sophocles. Attributes like Matt’s height

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

and muscularity or certain parts of Lucky’s anatomy are exaggerated to Olympian proportions. For Holbert, the many lyrical passages that describe the landscape or manual labor are meant to enhance the mythological quality of Lead. “Manual labor is, for this kind of person, their therapy. That’s where they go to work out the zigs and the zags. Matt uses it as an escape. The person who’s probably the most f---ed up in the book is [Horace] Jarms, and he’s the one who doesn’t do any work,” says Holbert. “I think in some ways people feel almost a nostalgia for [manual labor], and I’d say that’s part of the mythical idea too — the Herculean idea of taking on, wrestling with the god of death. Hercules was always doing work, you know? Killed his family, he went to work. He had labors.” The Hour of Lead proved to be a Herculean labor for its author. Originally titled The History of a Happy Family, It evolved from a short story Holbert wrote in the 1990s, and its size and scope ballooned and shrank over the years. Holbert abandoned it several times only to return to it at the urging of his wife, Holly. “I was still struggling to shape it right up until the last edit,” he says. “At the end of the book, I guess what I want to have happen is to be able to say, OK, that’s a complete thought. I felt more like Lonesome Animals was a complete thought than I do The Hour of Lead. But I think that’s because Hour of Lead is a bigger book than Lonesome Animals was. It’s maybe more ambitious as far as the size of the thought.” n Bruce Holbert introduces The Hour of Lead at The Book Club Fandango • Tue, Oct. 21, at 6:30 pm • Auntie’s Books • 402 W. Main • auntiesbooks.com • 8380206

NOT dinner. NOT a football.

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PULL-OUT & KEEP! SNOWLANDER

2014


N I R A E G • S E I V O M • S T S A C E OR F R E T N I W • EXPO

4 1 0 2 R E B O T C O Y A W A G N I T T E NDER G UP • G THE INLA SUPPLEME

NT TO

OCTOBER 2014 SNOWLANDER 1


DREAMING OF WINTER?

Check out the Washington Trust Rail Jam at the Snowlander Expo Saturday November 8, 2014.

IF YOU CAN DREAM IT, CHANCES ARE WE CAN FINANCE IT. With a variety of personal loans* available, Washington Trust Bank can help make your dreams come true so you can keep playing all winter long. Stop in to any branch to learn about the personal loan that’s right for you. Or give us a call at 800.788.4578. *Subject to credit approval.

2 SNOWLANDER OCTOBER 2014

Be Social watrust.com


Freeride Media

EDITOR’S NOTE

FALLING INTO WINTER

I

t’s October. Life quickly changes from carefree days enjoying summer activities in the warm sun to pulling out cold weather gear. It happens overnight. One day it’s sunny and 77 degrees; the next brings 50 degrees with cold rain and forecasts of winter storm watches in mountains. To some people this is the painful part of the next six months. But Inland Northwest skiers and snowboarders are smiling as the anticipation of the upcoming ski season becomes more of a reality. October brings ski movie premieres, ski swaps and the last-minute realization of the need to get into shape for ski season. Some mountains in the West have already had a dusting of snow this

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LOCAL EVENTS

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LAST RUN

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ON THE COVER: EACH ISSUE OF SNOWLANDER WILL FEATURE ONE OF OUR FIVE LOCAL MOUNTAINS, WITH ILLUSTRATIONS BY CHRIS BOVEY

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14/15

GEAR GUIDE

season, as early as the beginning of September. Most of that snow has come and gone. October brings more snow, some of which will stick around for the season. And November is right around the corner, which means Snowlander Expo and PowderKeg Inlander Brew Festival. Over the past few years, this has meant a time of winter celebration, catching up with winter friends, imbibing craft beers from all over the Pacific Northwest, previewing the latest ski films by Teton Gravity Research and getting the best deals of the season from area retailers. Mark your calendars for Friday, Nov. 7, and Saturday, Nov. 8, .and make sure to pick up the November issue of Snowlander or check out snowlanderexpo.com for all of the details. As a parting note, just remember that the rainy, cold days ahead mean snow in the mountains. It’ll only be a matter of time before the chairlifts are turning and ski season will be in full swing. So until then, wax those skis and snowboards, keep doing your ski season workouts and continue the countdown until Opening Day — 43 days, to be exact. Think snow! — JEN FORSYTH Snowlander Editor jen@snowlander.com

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OCTOBER 2014 SNOWLANDER 3


NEWS AND NOTES

EXPO ’14

The scene at last year’s Snowlander Expo STEPHEN SCHLANGE PHOTO

Consider, for a moment, this number: 2,000. That’s how many first-in-line attendees will get a free lift ticket to 49 Degrees North or Red Mountain each day at this year’s Snowlander Expo, put on by the Inlander at the Spokane Convention Center. When doors open at 4 pm on Friday, Nov. 7, and 10 am on Saturday, Nov. 8, expect a stampede from local skiers and snowboarders eager to snatch up the hottest gear at rock-bottom prices and season tickets from 12 different resorts. “It’s the lowest prices of the year on new gear,” says Kristina Elverum, the Inlander’s marketing director.

“It is all brand-new gear. It’s intended to get people really excited about the ski season.” Along with the Inlander, it’s put on by three local stores just as pumped about the ski season as any Spokanite: Wintersport, Tri-State Outfitters and Spokane Alpine Haus. “We put it on, but what we’re most excited about is creating the kickoff to the ski season, the winter culture for the Inland Northwest area,” says Eli Coski, Wintersport store manager. He says Wintersport is offering its best selection of product in the expo’s three-year history. For the

experts, there’s the finest, state-of-the-art equipment. Specialists will be standing by to help guide bunnyhill beginners through their first selection of quality, low-priced gear. Factory reps from companies including Atomic, Blizzard, K2 and Nordica will be there. “The [factory reps] who have committed all say, ‘It’s our favorite event,’” Coski says. “The vibe is really fun and funky.” That’s because it’s more than just a place for vendors to hock their wares and give away swag. It’s a celebration of every aspect of ski culture — from the equipment to the competitions to the powder-porn videos to the beer. The Inlander will hold its PowderKeg brew festival, with more than 50 varieties of local and regional beers. A rail jam competition, with snow trucked in, will take place outside. Teton Gravity Research will showcase gorgeous snow-sport movies Higher and Almost Ablaze. Before the Inlander stepped in, Elverum says, there wasn’t an event like this. “We felt it was kind of a gap,” she says. “We felt it was something the Inlander needed to do to bring together all the retailers and all the resorts.” To Coski, Spokane citizens have a choice: You can either rage in vain against Spokane’s long winters, or you can embrace them. You can ski downhill. “Our thought is the people who live here have got to get out and enjoy, or otherwise it’s going to be a miserable winter,” Coski says. To get your tickets ahead of time and skip the long lines, check out the new website Snowlanderexpo.com. — DANIEL WALTERS

The Human Potential Project Presents:

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How the world of work is changing and what it means for your career and your company. The Organization of the Future is an introductory session that is intended to open a doorway to a new future for you and your company. In this session you will: • See in detail how and why the world of work has changed. • Discover a better way to manage • Be introduced to Commitment Based Management • Get a peek at the Organization of the Future • Gain new understanding of Authentic Leadership • Experience work in a Coordinated Environment

Special Half-Day Session Who Should Attend The Organization of the Future: • Managers who want to expand their competence • Leaders who want to steer organizations toward success • Anyone interested in having a sustainable career • Managers who want less stress • Leaders who want a new way to work • Anyone who wants to practice authentic learning

At the Davenport Hotel, October 21st • Register at www.HumanPotentialProject.com Two sessions offered, Morning (8:30-12:00 or Afternoon (1:00-4:30) Cost is $250 per individual. We offer discounted rates for groups of 5 or more 4 SNOWLANDER OCTOBER 2014


Snowboarding at Schweitzer

MAYBE MILD With 80-degree temperatures lingering into October, it’s not terribly surprising. Early season indicators suggest the Inland Northwest may see a slightly warmer winter than usual as El Niño weather conditions raise Pacific Ocean temperatures amid an already fairly toasty fall. John Livingston, a meteorologist with the Spokane office of the National Weather Service, explains a moderate El Niño developing in the tropical Pacific may drive up average temperatures by as much as 2 to 3 degrees. “Less snow in the valleys and more rain,” he

predicts, based on previous years of comparable El Niño activity. As with all weather predictions, especially those projected so early in the season, that could change. But he notes there are some helpful initial indicators. The NWS Climate Prediction Center also expects above average temperatures to continue through the end of the year based on the latest observations of weak or moderate El Niño activity. The center also predicts decreased precipitation across parts of the Pacific Northwest. Livingston says meteorologists last year predicted a “normal” winter. The season proved fairly mild with a

couple Arctic outbreaks involving prolonged cold snaps of temperatures in the teens. At first glance, this year may be milder still. In Idaho, Silver Mountain Resort general manager Jeff Colburn says he has closely watched early forecasts throughout the fall and his staff is preparing for a better than normal snow season with a more consistent snowpack earlier in the year. “Everything we’ve seen so far says we’re looking at a good winter,” he says. “We’ve got everything brushed up, cleaned up and ready to go.” — JACOB JONES

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MOVIES

CHILLS AND THRILLS Before you hit the slopes, hit the theaters for the best new ski films BY JENNA MULLIGAN

WARREN MILLER: NO TURNING BACK

Warren Miller Entertainment has reached its 65th annual movie release with this year’s No Turning Back. The name seems to capture its essence — the film is reminiscent of the immense progression that has occurred in the sport, and still their skiers are pushing forward to navigate this progression themselves. Narrated once more by the ski-world-infamous Jonny Moseley, the film was shot on exotic mountains across the country and the world. It includes some unique segments, featuring ski racing with Bode Miller and “speed-riding” in Switzerland, a variation of the sport that combines skiing with paragliding. REI is hosting this film at the Bing in Spokane, while the Alpine Shop in Sandpoint will bring Warren Miller to the Panida Theater.

LEVEL 1: LESS

Local terrain-lovers rejoice: Our North Idaho slopes have made the big screen. Schweitzer was a primary location in Level 1’s 15th annual ski film, less. Level 1 is a smaller production company that brings unique energy to the screen by highlighting the enthusiasm of some up-and-coming skiers. It’s heavy with backyard jibbing and urban features that capture what skiers can do with conservative budgets or imperfect snow conditions. Cinematic director Josh Berman puts those features on film with fluidity and a unique perspective. less • Thu, Oct. 23, at 7 pm • $11 • Panida Theater • 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • level1productions.com

No Turning Back • Sat, Oct. 25, at 7 pm • $13 • Panida Theater • 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • Sat, Nov. 1, at 6 and 9 pm • $20 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • skinet.com/warrenmiller

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The Inland Northwest’s Guide to Shopping Local • Toys, Games, & Recreation

Days of My Youth • Fri, Oct. 17, at 7 pm • $20 • Panida Theater • 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • Fri, Oct. 24, at 7 pm • Spokane County Fair & Expo Center • 404 N. Havana • Thu, Nov. 13, at 7:30 pm • Wolff Auditorium, Gonzaga University • 502 E. Boone • skimovie.com

This film company claimed “Film of the Year” at the 2014 International Freeski Film Festival for Almost Ablaze, which highlights skiers’ constant inner battle to fight their fears and take another risk. Each athlete was wired for sound during shooting, which captures the emotion of the rider right as they experience each drop, sluffing turn or suffocating face-shot of snow. TGR wants you to feel the adrenaline and intensity that are just as much a part of the sport as the blissful turns and flawless runs. Almost Ablaze • Fri, Nov. 7, at 8 pm • $10/$5 for kids under 16 • Panida Theater • 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • Sat, Nov. 8, at 3 pm • $10 • Snowlander Expo Theatre • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (Also, see TGR’s Higher at the Expo 6:30 Fri, Nov. 7) • tetongravity.com/films/ almost-ablaze

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For the first time ever, Matchstick Productions took two entire winters to collect film for this fall’s debut film, Days of My Youth. Thematically, the film embraces all the childlike wonder of the sport, and celebrates the journey of a skier who moves from beginner on the slopes to full-on ski bum. MSP partnered with Red Bull Media, and the story line centers on skier Richard Permin while capturing many other big names such as Bobby Brown, Mark Abma and Michelle Parker.

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Shaping Healthcare Education. Building a World-Class Medical School for Spokane. Over 40 years ago, the University of Washington School of Medicine pioneered a communitybased approach to medical education. Today, it is ranked the #1 primary care medical school in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. They also rank it #1 in the nation for teaching rural medicine and family medicine. The school is #2 in the nation for NIH research funding, providing our students with greater access to critical information. And it’s ranked as the #3 medical school in the world according to the 2014 Academic Ranking of World Universities. The University of Washington School of Medicine brought this world-class medical school to Spokane in 2008. We realized a goal of building a world-class health sciences hub to educate future generations of physicians and to fuel Spokane’s economic development. Why? The region continues to grow, and with it the need for more physicians. But we cannot do it alone. We need the continued support of the Spokane community and our legislature in order to expand the University of Washington School of Medicine to meet this need. Thank you for continuing to support these efforts. Our partnership is the future of medical education.

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THRILL MERCHANT A new adventure company launches in the Pacific Northwest BY JORDY BYRD Devin Dufenhorst is starting an outdoor company in Sandpoint.

8 SNOWLANDER OCTOBER 2014

D

evin Dufenhorst is in the business of selling adrenaline. His company Rush-On Worldwide will work to create sweaty palms and upright hair on the back of your neck. The Sandpoint-based outdoor company will launch in a few weeks, but Dufenhorst already has grand ambitions — to become a one-stop shop and online marketplace for all things adventure. “We want to be the first comprehensive database for adventure activities, kinda like Yelp has done with restaurants,” Dufenhorst says. “But we’re not just trying to create another e-commerce place, we’re trying to create a culture for people who really love these activities — a social network to keep people engaged in the spirit

of adventure.” The company’s website and mobile app will allow users to find whitewater rafting, hunting, skiing, skydiving and scuba diving activities and more, all based upon your geographic location. Rush-On Worldwide has upward of 700 adventure merchants in its database within the Pacific Northwest; by this time next year Dufenhorst plans to expand the database nationally. “We want people in Sandpoint or Boulder, Colorado, to be able to pull out their phone and find 50 to 60 activities in that geographical area,” Dufenhorst says. “We want to inspire people to get out there and have some fun.” Dufenhorst is no stranger to adventure and the entrepreneurial


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Snow season is coming! Get hot deals on cold weather gear spirit. The Idaho native grew up ski jumping and slalom racing at Bogus Basin outside Boise. By age 13 he held the mountain’s 30-meter-hill jump record. He studied at the University of Idaho to become a pilot with the United States Marine Corps, and while there opened his first business. “I had a hot dog cart in college,” he says, laughing. “I’ve always been an entrepreneur. I used to freeze my butt off in the middle of winter to try and sell hot dogs to the bar crowds.” Although he dreamed of becoming a pilot, a medical condition with his back changed the course of his life. He’s spent the past 20 years working in the medical and pharmaceutical field and has focused his energies on outdoor adventure. He competed as a professional gelande ski jumper throughout the Northwest for 10 years and

has appeared in numerous ski films over the past 18 years. He even got his pilot’s license. The company has been a dream more 20 years in the making, but official plans got underway three years ago. Dufenhorst says he simply wants to share his passion for outrageous adventures with others. “It’s about that moment when you say, ‘Oh my God, this was the hardest thing I’ve ever had to do,’” he says. “When you push yourself and finally get to the top of that hill or mountain and you look down and smile and say, ‘That was all worth it. That was fun.’ “It’s in that spirit that we at Rush-On want to keep challenging people and pushing their boundaries.” 

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he buzz about an impending ski season starts early in mountain country, typically well before summer turns to fall. Casual skiers start musing on the year ahead around the first frost if not before, and the chatter is pretty much year-round among hard-core powderhounds and backcountry recreationists. Eli Coski, the store manager at Wintersport, has noticed a considerable uptick in customers browsing at the shop, even as temperatures remain in the 70s in early October. “There’s definitely a lot of people who are excited,” Coski says. “We have a good amount of people coming in and looking around already at the new gear. With that long summer that we’ve been having, people are like, ‘OK, I had a great summer. I’m ready for winter now.’” The question, then, is how ready are you for hitting the slopes this season? To help you answer, Snowlander hit up local gear shops to find the latest products to help you navigate the mountains easily and safely — and look good doing it. We break it down, from head to toe.

PROTECT THAT NOGGIN (a)

Micah Genteman, manager at Sports Creel, notes the importance of having a quality helmet, no matter your preferred mountain sport. The problem in the past, he says, is that “if you take a shot to the head in a hard shell, that helmet is pretty much lost.” Enter the era of the “soft” helmet like the Giro Combyn, which offers a bit of give and takes more punishment than many of the traditional hardhats. When it comes to goggles, more than one of the folks we talked to praised the Smith I/ O7 for advancing quick-change lens technology to a whole new level. Genteman points out the twist dial on top of the goggles that makes for an easy switch, making sure you have the best vision possible, whether it’s cloudy and foggy or glaringly bright on the slopes. Likewise, Burton’s goggle company Anon has a quickchange system, the Anon M2, that uses magnets, and Rhen Lyden, shop manager at Hayden Lake’s Ski Shack, is a fan of the ease of simply twisting the goggle frame to pop out the lens. “They’re also doing one called the Anon Mig that comes with a facemask you can magnet-snap to the bottom of the goggles,” Lyden says. “When you don’t want it, you just tug it right off.”

STYLE AND SUBSTANCE IN OUTERWEAR (b)

Does it seem like you’ve seen a lot of neon on the mountain lately? Did you think you were having a flashback to Hot Dog… The Movie? Don’t worry, it’s just another example of everything old eventually becoming new again. “It seems like everybody likes the colors from the ’80s,” Lyden says. “They’re coming back full circle, those bright neon colors. Younger kids are wearing those bright colors again.” Another big look? Camouflage. “Trends-wise, camouflage is definitely back in,” Coski says. “Camouflage is everything.” Sports Creel’s Genteman concurs, noting that Armada just signed a threeyear deal with Realtree to put some of that company’s familiar camouflage on Armada’s pullovers, jackets and bibs. Carla Geiser, clothing manager at Tri-State Outfitters in Coeur d’Alene, has noticed a distinct trend, too. “Vests, especially down and synthetic vests, have been hitting really hard,” she said, noting both the North Face ThermoBall and Patagonia Nano Puff are particularly popular among the vested. “It’s nice,” Geiser says. “It’s lightweight, you can dress it up or dress it down. They’re not big and bulky. They’re making them in really nice styles and cuts.” ...continued on page 12

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Finding great-fitting outerwear that keeps you warm and dry can be a challenge for many skiers, but Genteman says Volkl has a new line that makes it easier for people to find some great gear. The Volkl Perfect Fit system, he says, “has really cool sizing options. We’ve had customers who have struggled for decades trying to find something that fits and is comfortable and keeps them warm and dry. This suddenly became a very easy option” because Volkl’s Perfect Fit gear covers everyone from a 30-inch to 69-inch waist and 28-to-38-inch inseam for men, and a similar range for women. Travis Nichols, merchandise planner for Mountain Gear, says “the most important trend that we’re seeing right now, and we’ve supported and encouraged it, is people getting into the backcountry for skiing. A lot of people watch the latest Warren Miller, and they want to get to that fresh powder.” Part of hitting the backcountry is educating yourself on the dangers, and making sure you have an avalanche airbag in a backpack like those made by ABS.

FIT FOR FEET (c)

There was a common theme when we asked about ski and snowboard trends — there’s not a lot new under the sun, but there’s something for everyone, at every level of expertise, to make a day on the mountain easier to enjoy. Both Coski and Nichols mentioned the growing emergence of splitboards that snowboarders are using to access the backcountry — the Rome Whiteroom and Burton Family Tree Landlord being two examples. For downhill skis, the longtime trend of the everwidening ski might finally be abating, according to Alpine Haus owner Brian Ellsworth. “Obviously everything’s gotten wider for the last five to 10 years,” Ellsworth said. “What we’ve seen in the last year or two is the trend coming back. We’re never going to get as narrow as we used to be, but if people want a true one-size-fits-all ski to go out and have a fun time in all the conditions we can get around here, we’ve seen a trend of moving back to something a little narrower.” For skiing strictly groomers, Nordica’s Hell & Back and Steadfast could work just fine. For skiers who like to combine some groomers with some powder days, slightly wider skis like the Salomon Q-98 or Blizzard Kabookie do the trick. More advanced skiers looking for powder in the trees might go a little wider with the Dynastar Cham 107 or Nordica El Capo. Both Ellsworth and Lyden noted Rossignol’s efforts to lighten the tip and tail of the Rossignol Soul 7, Super 7 and Squad 7 skis via its Air Tip technology, making it easier to bounce through trees and bumps. Boots have become remarkably customizable in recent years, thanks to heat-moldable foam in the liners. Even the hard outer shell is now able to be fitted to the skier’s individual foot. Ellsworth encourages people to focus on their feet first, since a quality boot and good fit can make all the difference on the mountain. “If you have a budget, always take $100 more for boots and take that $100 out of the skis,” Ellsworth says. “The boots are that important. You can be on a mediocre ski, and if you have a good boot that fits well, you’re going to have a good day.” To add the comfort, you might want to consider a Hotronic FootWarmer, battery-powered heat pumping into your boots all day. Sure beats those little plastic packets. n


49 Degrees North October 18th • Ski Patrol Swap November 7th - 8th • Pass Processing - Snowlander Expo December 20th • Holiday Season Begins

Lookout Pass November 1st • Winter Swap November 22nd • Projected Opening Day December 20th • Holiday Season Begins

Mt Spokane October 25th • 50th Annual Ski Swap November 1st • Job Fair December 6th • Projected Opening Day December 19th • Night Skiing Begins

Schweitzer October 31st • Season Pass Deadline November 10th • Ski3 Deadline

Silver Mt November 1st • Winter Swap

OCTOBER 2014 SNOWLANDER 13


GETAWAY

POWDER POWER Great Northern Powder Guides helps you find your backcountry bliss Backcountry skiing north of Whitefish, Montana BOB LEGASA PHOTOS

T

here’s something special about a family-run business. It’s more than just a business, it’s a passion that has been passed along through generations. Jay and Kylanne Sandelin and their two boys own and operate Great Northern Powder Guides, a snow-cat skiing operation north of Whitefish, Montana. GNPG runs day and multi-day cat skiing trips for all levels of riders in the Stillwater Forest. This operation is fueled by passion and a love for family. Jay, a former World Cup and professional speed skier, once was one of the top-ranked speed skiers in the sport, reaching speeds of 142 miles per hour. He was raised in Steamboat Springs, Colorado, where in his younger days he could be found ski racing on Steamboat’s slopes or sending it big off the 70-meter jump at Steamboat’s legendary Howelsen Hill. It was at Steamboat in the early ’80s that

14 SNOWLANDER OCTOBER 2014

BY BOB LEGASA

Jay met Kylanne, who had moved to Steamboat from Illinois to ski-bum for a year. Well, most ski bums know how that “Just one year” story plays out — several years later, Ky was still at Steamboat with a wedding ring on her finger and a bright future ahead with Jay. “We came to Montana to raise a family,” said Jay. “We couldn’t afford to live in Steamboat anymore, so we moved to Whitefish; it was 10 years in the past. It was like Colorado was, only the prices were less expensive and it offered a great environment to raise our family.” That was more than 20 years ago; since then, Jay and Ky have had two boys, Tarn and Dayne, and own and operate a successful road construction company. Hard work during the week was rewarded with family skiing at nearby Whitefish Mountain Resort every chance they got. Skiing and road construction were a major part of the boys’ upbringing, so when the oppor-

tunity to take over an existing cat skiing permit came up five years ago, the Sandelin clan jumped in with all eight feet. It seemed like a perfect transition for the whole family. Jay and Ky handle day-to-day operations, including bookings, making lunches, guest services, bookkeeping, some guiding, cat driving and janitorial work. The boys are in the mix; Tarn drives the cats, turns wrenches and fabricates custom-made cat skiing boxes — a business which morphed out of GNPG — for other operators. Younger brother Dayne is one of the guides, a cat and helicopter mechanic, and drives cats as well. A family that works together stays together. GNPG operates with three custom-designed PistenBully 300s. Each cat holds up to 12 guests, two guides and one GNPG staff photographer, who documents the day and provides guests with an opportunity to take home memorable images of their cat skiing experience at a nomi-


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nal fee. GNPG has a permit to guide powder-hungry riders in 15,000 acres of varying terrain in the Stillwater State Forest. Their terrain has something for everyone: “We have open areas, we have burned areas, we have pillows, we have glades, we have steeps, we have rocks, we have pretty much everything that is out there, and that’s what makes it unique,” says Jay. “We have terrain for just about anybody who skis with us.” Someone who knows a little bit about the Montana backcountry is Landon Gardner, a Missoula native and a former member of the U.S. freestyle ski team for nine years. This was his first trip out to GNPG, and he was blown away. “I’m going to need to come back to Great Northern Powder Guides. I’m getting an idea of the terrain out here; it’s really cool,” he says. “We did get to sample a portion of their terrain over the past two days — plenty of fun, steep treed runs, lots of rocks and small poppers, 5, 10, 15 feet of air. That’s what I like. I can’t wait to come back.” GNPG is a four-hour drive from the Spokane/Coeur d’Alene area, located 20 miles north of Whitefish on Highway 93. ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 2014 SNOWLANDER 15


GETAWAY

Winter

“POWDER POWER,” CONTINUED... “It’s right off the highway,” says powder aficionado Tommy Frey, from Hayden, Idaho. “You come in the morning and have a nice breakfast, go over what’s gonna happen for the day, load up right there on the cat. A short cat ride up and you’re skiing. A real easy, accessible place to come to, and real fun to ski.” With Whitefish right down the road, there are plenty of choices for food and lodging. Put the Great Northern Bar & Grill, a Whitefish landmark, on your list for good burgers and beers. GNPG is committed to keeping its guests safe and educated before heading into the backcountry; each guest participates in an avalanche safety session greatnorthernpowderguides.com prior to going up. Not only do explorewhitefish.com the guides have vast avalanche greatnorthernbar.com and first aid training, they also serve up a pretty good meal, as Hayden Lake’s Rhen Lyden found out: “Lunches have been great. Yesterday we ate in the cat in between runs and it was really good. Today, Tarn cooked some big Montana-style burgers for us on the BBQ at the yurt. It was nice to get in there, dry off, sit down, have some hot soup, coffee, cocoa — they have everything you need right here.” On our first day last March, we were treated to bluebird skies and just over 11,000 vertical feet of skiing in the “steep and deep” cat. Steep is right: We got on a few runs that definitely got the heart pumping! Landon and Rhen were in heaven, sending off pretty much everything in sight. Day 2 saw a couple of new guests join our group. One of the guests had flown out from Vermont for his very first cat skiing trip; the other was enjoying his third trip of the season to GNPG, which says a lot. It snowed all day, steadily stacking

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Local and Regional Craft Beer & Cider up and making each run better and better as the day progressed. It was sad to leave, just when it was getting so good. We heard the next day was fantastic. We’re used to hearing “You should have been here yesterday” — just our luck. Oh well, not bad for late March! “I really think Great Northern Powder Guides has the most amazing trees; there’s lot of character trees, everywhere you ski, that are old, gnarly trees,” says Desiree’ Leipham of Spokane, who has visited her fair share of backcountry operations. “You can tell the weather really rolls

through up here. The character trees, mixed with the surrounding scenery, is breathtaking. [This] is a special place I want to come back to.” The top-notch riding comes with famous Montana hospitality — one of the reasons why GNPG’s business has just about doubled in guests every season. “It’s a combination of the snow, the family atmosphere and giving the client what they want,” says Jay. “They’re here on vacation, and the goal is to give them something special, something they want to come back for.” n

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WINTER EVENTS of four, early registration is suggested. Matches are set for Sunday nights, Nov. 2-Dec. 14. $125/person to participate in the season. Meets at Riverfront Park Pavilion, 507 N. Howard. spokanecurling.com SNOWSHOEING BASICS Want to try snowshoeing after the white stuff falls? Learn the basics of the sport and what kind of gear you’ll need on Nov. 6 from 7-8:30 pm. Free. REI Spokane, 1125 N. Monroe St. (328-9900) SNOWLANDER EXPO The Inlander’s annual expo hosts local winter sports vendors offering sale prices. New this year is the Washington Trust Rail Jam in the Convention Center breezeway and screenings of Teton Gravity Research’s 2014 films ($10-$15; Higher, 6:30 Fri; Almost Ablaze, 3 pm Sat). Nov. 7-8, Fri from 4-9 pm, Sat from 10 am-8 pm. Expo admission $7 (good both days; kids under 12 free); Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlanderexpo.com

THE BIG SWAP

F

or winter sport enthusiasts, there are few traditions more time-honored than the local, annual ski swap. An inevitable source of winter accessory gems, ski swaps offer vets and newcomers alike a chance to find top-notch gear for a fraction of the price. The Mt. Spokane Ski Patrol’s annual ski swap kicks off the winter season, offering a wide selection of items from local business, along with gently used equipment from local riders looking to trade in their gear for cash. Now in its 50th year, the event also includes a Friday night screening (5:30 pm, $6)

OCTOBER SNOWSHOEING BASICS REI staff host an informational class on the basics of this winter activity, covering gear selection and how to find local spots to snowshoe. Oct. 16, at 7 pm. Free. REI Spokane. 1125 N. Monroe. (328-9900) DAYS OF MY YOUTH The latest film from Matchstick Productions and Red Bull Media House examines the lives of skiers and their journey of self-discovery. Screening is also a benefit for 24 Hours for Hank. Oct. 17, at 7 pm. $16. Panida Theater, 300 N. First, Sandpoint. panida.org (208-2557801) ALPINE SKIING & SNOWBOARD WAXING BASICS A hands-on maintenance class focusing on how to prep skis and boards throughout the winter season. Shop technicians walk attendees through the best practices for waxing skis and snowboards. Oct. 23 and Nov. 5 from 6:30-8:30 pm. $35/members; $55/nonmembers. REI Spokane. 1125 N. Monroe. (328-9900) LEVEL 1’S LESS Screening of the upcoming winter ski movie, parts of which were filmed at Schweitzer Mountain. Oct. 23, at 7 pm. $10. Panida Theater, 300 N. First, Sandpoint. panida.org (208-255-7801) LOOKOUT JOB FAIR The Idaho resort hosts its annual job fair, seeking lift operators, cashiers, ski/ snowboard techs, food/beverage staff,

18 SNOWLANDER OCTOBER 2014

of Matchstick Productions’ Days of My Youth. If you chance it and wait to shop until the swap’s end, there’s a 25 percent discount offered on Sunday morning. — CHRISTIAN VOSLER Mt. Spokane Ski Patrol Ski Swap • Fri, Oct. 24, from 7-11 pm (VIPs only; $50); Sat, Oct. 25, from 9 am-5 pm; Sun, Oct. 26, from 9 am-noon • $5/door; $12/advance • Spokane County Fair & Expo Center • 404 N. Havana • skipatrolskiswap.com • 535-0102

groomers, maintenance, instructors and more. Oct. 24, from 9 am-noon. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) WARREN MILLER’S NO TURNING BACK A screening of the 65th ski-enthusiast film by the legendary filmmaker, paying homage to mountain culture and adventure film making. Oct. 25, at 7 pm. $13. Panida Theater, 300 N. First, Sandpoint. panida.org (208-255-7801) CURLING CLINIC The Lilac City Curling League hosts introductory lessons to the sport, with all equipment provided. Open to all ages. Oct. 26, from 6-10 pm. $15/hour. Riverfront Park Pavilion, 507 N. Howard. spokanecurling.com MT. SPOKANE SKI PATROL SWAP Now celebrating its 50th year, the annual swap offers new and used winter sports gear from local shops and individuals. Friday evening of event also includes a screening of Days of My Youth by Matchstick Films (5:30 pm, $6). Oct. 24-26; Fri from 7-11 pm (VIPs only; $50); Sat from 9 am-5 pm, Sun from 9 am-noon. $5-$12/admission. Spokane Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. skipatrolskiswap.com (535-0102) PRAY FOR SNOW PARTY Wenatchee’s Mission Ridge resort hosts its inaugural preseason party, with live music, a winter sports film screening, beer garden and activities to encourage positive outlooks on the coming season. Oct. 31, from 7 pm-midnight. Pybus Public Market, 3 N. Worthen St., Wenatchee, Wash. missionridge.com/events

NOVEMBER WARREN MILLER’S NO TURNING BACK A screening of the 65th ski-enthusiast film by the filmmaker, paying homage to mountain culture and adventure film making. Nov. 1, screenings at 6 pm and 9 pm. $20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com (2277404) MT. SPOKANE JOB FAIR Bring your resume and be prepared to interview on the spot for seasonal positions on the mountain this winter. Nov. 1, at 8 am, in Lodge 2. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (2382220) WINTERSWAP 2014 Lookout Pass and Silver Mountains volunteer ski patrols host the 16th annual ski swap event, offering new and used ski/snowboard equipment, accessories and clothing. Nov. 1, from 9 am-3 pm. $5 admission. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way, CdA. winterswap.org WHITEWATER SKI TEAM SWAP The annual swap offers savings on gently used gear to get your started for the season. Nov. 2 from 1-3 pm. Whitewater Ski Resort, 601 Front St., Nelson, BC. skiwhitewater.com (250-354-4944) LILAC CITY CURLING LEAGUE The local coed curling league is open to all ages and experience levels. The club supplies stones, brooms and other equipmentt. Space is limited to 16 teams

POWDERKEG INLANDER BREW FEST Snowlander’s winter beer festival returns for its second year, featuring 22 local and regional breweries and cideries. Nov. 7-8, Fri from 4-9 pm, Sat from 10 am-8 pm. $7 expo admission; tasting packages from $15-$25. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. snowlanderexpo. com/powderkeg SARS SKI SWAP The Schweitzer Alpine Racing School hosts its annual ski swap. This year the event includes a season pass sign-up booth. Sellers can register Nov. 7, from 12-7 pm. Sale on Nov. 8, from 9 am-2 pm. $2/person; $5/family. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Ave., Sandpoint, Idaho. sars.net CROSS COUNTRY SKIING BASICS CLASS REI staff offer insider tips and advice if you’re looking at getting into this wintertime activity this season. Nov. 11, from 7-8:30 pm. Free. REI Spokane, 1125 N. Monroe St. (328-9900) GETTING TO KNOW YOUR GOPRO Need some insight on using your camera this winter? REI staff offer a rundown of the camera’s interface and how to capture images and footage using different settings. Nov. 20, from 7-8:30 pm. Free. REI Spokane, 1125 N. Monroe St. (328-9900) BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL The annual, nine-day festival kicks off in Banff, Alberta at the beginning of November, after which the year’s featured mountain films tour the U.S. and the world. Spokane screenings Nov. 21-22 at 7 pm, Nov. 23 at 6 pm. $17/show; $45/ three-day pass. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com SNOW DANCE 2014 The 16th annual black-tie affair benefits the 49 Degrees North Winter Sports Foundation and the Forty-Nine Alpine Ski Team (FAST). Nov. 15, starting at 6 pm. $110/person; $135/couple (includes dinner, tux rental). Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside Ave. ski49n.com (747-5207) BIG WHITE OPENING DAY The BC resort kicks off the winter season, opening the runs and lifts bright and early. Nov. 27, from 8:45 am-3:30 pm. Big White Ski Resort, 5315 Big White Rd., Kelowna, BC bigwhite.com (250-7653101)

MUSTACHE MILE The inaugural cross-country race serves as a fundraiser for the Canadian Cancer Society. Nov. 28 at 5 pm. $5-$10 donation. Silver Star Mountain Resort, 123 Shortt St., Silver Star Mountain, BC. skisilverstar.com (800-663-4431) TRI CITIES GEAR SWAP Snow sport lovers in the southern part of Washington shouldn’t miss this annual gear and clothing sale. Nov. 28-30. Free admission. Holiday Inn at TRAC, 4525 Convention Pl. Pasco, Wash. facebook. com/tricitiesskiswap (509-522-1443) SKI INSTRUCTOR CLINIC Lookout Pass hosts its annual preseason professional clinic for aspiring ski instructors. Nov. 29-30. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout. com (208-744-1301)

DECEMBER BIG WHITE RALLY WEEKEND Performance auto rally teams test out their traction on snowy terrain, making three passes past a spectator point. Dec. 6-7, from 7 am-5:30 pm. Big White Ski Resort, 5315 Big White Rd., Kelowna, BC bigwhite.com (250-765-3101) WSU UNIVERSITY RECREATION GEAR SWAP The 40th annual gear swap offers new and used gear for sale. Dec. 5 from 6-9 pm and Dec. 6, from 9 am-noon. $1 admission. WSU Hollingbery Fieldhouse, Pullman, Wash. skiswap.wsu.edu (509335-7856) MT. SPOKANE SCHEDULED OPENING DAY Stay tuned to the snow report to see if this Saturday will mark the opening of the mountain’s 2014-15 season. Dec. 6. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220) SILVER STAR CHRISTMAS LIGHT-UP The mountain hosts its official kickoff event of the holiday season, offering family craft activities and games, sleigh rides and fireside snacks. Also includes the “Trail of Lights” snowshoe tour at 6 pm. Dec. 6, from 4-6 pm. Silver Star Mountain Resort, 123 Shortt St., Silver Star Mountain, BC. skisilverstar.com (800-663-4431) NIGHT SKIING KICKOFF PARTY Bringing the first night skiing event of the season in with a bang, the snowy runs will glow under the night lights. Also includes live music, a s’mores party and Terrain Park etiquette event. Dec. 19, from 3:30-9:30 pm. $20 lift tickets. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220) LOOKOUT HOLIDAY GAMES The mountain hosts a kids rail jam contest sponsored by Red Bull and Pistole Boardshop, along with the inaugural Stocking Stuffer Races and an ugly sweater contest in the Loft bar. Dec. 2021. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) n

MORE EVENTS

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Get a 32oz Mini-Growler by visiting 12 breweries on the Ale Trail.

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INLAND NW CRAFT

BREWERS

THE BEER OF WINTER

/inwaletrail inlandnwaletrail.com

Will PBR continue to be every ski bum’s beverage of choice? BY JEN FORSYTH A piece of winter is now owned by a Russian company

I

n the Last Run column in October 2011’s Snowlander, I listed the top 10 reasons that classify a skier or snowboarder as a ski bum, with No. 1 being the consumption of PBR. I half jokingly/half seriously ran as mayor of Ski Town USA in a contest put on by a national ski publication and used PBR vending machines located at bus stops throughout town as part of my platform. The argument was to have frosty PBRs readily available as the official libation to enjoy after endless epic bluebird powder days. I have incessantly classified PBR as not just a beer, but rather a lifestyle, and deemed it the Official Beer of Winter. The tradition of PBR runs deep in the ski industry, with ski bars filling recycling containers with what seems like an infinite amount of cans after closing weekend celebrations. With a choice of 12-ounce can or bottle, 16-ounce tallboy and PBR draft, the PBR delivery man’s weekly restock gets standing ovations from bar patrons. In September, Pabst Brewing Company, following in the footsteps of beer giants Anheuser-Busch and MillerCoors, sent shock waves through the beer and ski industries with the announcement of their sale to a foreign company, Russia-based Oasis Beverages, leaving many skiers

and snowboarders with the question of what they’ll drink for après ski this winter. For years, microbrews have gained momentum within the industry. Craft beers with quirky names followed up by delicious flavors are drawing attention from ski enthusiasts. Beers like Big Sky Brewing’s Powder Hound, Deschutes’ Red Chair and KettleHouse Brewing’s Cold Smoke. Is there an opening for these and other local beers? A survey of loyal PBR consumers brings varied responses to the lingering question of what will be the beer of choice this winter, from “I guess I’m not going to drink PBR anymore” to “PBR was sold to a Russian company?” Most look at the economics of the situation. I discovered the PBR tallboy during economic woes early in my ski bum career, realizing the delicious attributes that come with an affordable price ($2.50 at my favorite watering hole). Assuming that doesn’t change, neither will my loyalty to the red, white and blue label that has been synonymous with ski season. Is this the end of an era? Or the beginning of a new generation for beer drinkers? Will another brand swoop in to become the official beer of winter? Or will life just continue as it has been? Only time will tell. n

OCTOBER 2014 SNOWLANDER 19


20 SNOWLANDER OCTOBER 2014


Not the Wurst Off Oktoberfest might be winding down, but there are ways to enjoy German cuisine all year BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

T

he pilsner buzz might have lasted longer than some of the area celebrations of Oktoberfest, but fear not, liebchen, opportunities to celebrate German culture are plentiful in the Inland Northwest. So if you got a taste for German cuisine this fall, you’re not out of luck. Vas ist das Oktoberfest? Officially, it started in 1810 as a really, really big 16-day wedding celebration (lengthened to 17 days in 1994) honoring the wedding of Germany’s King Ludwig the First. Basically, all of Munich was invited, consuming much food and drink, but also listening and dancing to traditional music, playing games and just generally having one uber huge party. The party actually kicks off in September, counting back 17 days from the first Sunday in October. So when the town of Odessa, Washington, celebrated its popular Deutschesfest this year (Sept. 19-21), it was right on schedule. As was Daanen’s Delicatessen in Hayden, Idaho (Sept. 27) during the annual free event they’ve hosted for 21 years. Ditto for most of the other Oktoberfests in the area — Harrison, Coeur d’Alene, Post Falls, Priest River, Sandpoint, even Spokane, which recently renamed their event the Inland Northwest Craft Beer Festival. Places like Leavenworth are push...continued on next page

A bratwurst combo from Das Stein House in Spokane. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 33


FOOD | SEASONS

OCTOBER is Arts month in Spokane!

“NOT THE WURST OFF,” CONTINUED...

Join us in celebrating our region’s creativity and innovation, at the first annual Spokane Arts Costume Ball and Arts Awards

34 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014

ing it darn close to Halloween, but you can hardly blame them for wanting to put a little more oomph in the oom-pah season best known for its accordion music, lederhosen (or dirndls), brats and beer. The same Bavarian-style bratwurst you’d find in Leavenworth is sold at Daanen’s Delicatessen (8049 N. Wayne Dr. in Hayden) for dine-in or takeout. From the deli menu, try a bratwurst plate featuring zesty warm German potato salad and tangy sauerkraut ($6.95). Or buy bratwurst by the pound ($8.99) or other deli meats and cheeses and pair them with a mix-and-match six-pack selected from about 250 different beers. Friday night specials rotate — veal schnitzel, Königsberger klopse (savory meatballs in lemon caper sauce), rouladen (beef rolled and stuffed with onion, bacon and pickles) — as do the beer taps. Jens Kuehl, a graduate of Inland Northwest Culinary Academy and a man of German heritage, recommended an unlikely location for wurst (sausage): the 29th Avenue Super 1 (830 E. 29th). They make their own bratwurst ($5.98/lb.), bockwurst with ground veal, green onion and parsley, and a whole host of other meats. In Spokane, Alpine Deli (417 E. Third) combines cuisine from Germany, Austria and Bosnia. In addition to your spaetzle noodles, you can sample cevapi, a Bosnian meat dish, while Reflections Kaffee Haus (618 W. Riverside, #200) currently features a schnitzel sandwich ($8.95) with an unusual sweet curry sauce. For another year-round venue, check out Das Stein Haus


$6.00

Lunch Specials 11am-2 pm daily

Oktoberfest runs all month at Das Stein House, where you’ll be greeted by (left to right) Nicole Garner, Stefanie Cordero and Alyse Honnold. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO (1812 W. Francis). They also make their own bratwurst, as well as several kinds of schnitzel ($12.95/$15.95): Jager, meaning hunter, with brown mushroom and onion gravy; Zigeuner or Gypsy style, with onions, peppers and paprika; even hybrid versions such as the Hawaiian with Swiss cheese, pineapple and ham. Das Stein Haus celebrates the whole month of October with weekly live music, drink specials, and their already adorable servers dressed up in even more adorably in traditional dirndl — skirt, apron, a peasant-style blouse and an, uh, uplifting vest (picture St. Pauli Girl beer). German food specialties include Pfeffersteak ($20.95) with a cream and green peppercorn sauce and meat-stuffed cabbage rolls called Krautwickel ($10.95), while the non-German specialties read like a United Nations roll call: quesadillas, beef stroganoff, prawns tempura. The biggest sellers? Bratwurst and schnitzel, says manager Stacy Hayes of the popularity of German food. “We get a lot of military who spent time there,” she says. Of course, German beer is a big draw at Das Stein Haus and elsewhere across the Inland Northwest, so if you’re feeling a little verkatert (hung over) from sampling, try one of the hearty breakfasts at Old European (locations in Post Falls, Pullman and Spokane) to get you feeling gesund (healthy) in a jiffy. Their multi-page menu covers the continent from Hungary to Sweden to Denmark to Germany, represented by potato pancakes with spicy sausage and applesauce ($7.99). Ask for that and ein Kaffee, bitte, and you’re well on your way back to feeling wunderbahr. n food@inlander.com

Thai Chicken Flatbread

509 789 6800 • Davenport Tower 111 S. Post St., Downtown Spokane • davenporthotelcollection.com

OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 35


FOOD | OPENING

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HALLOWEEN BASH October 31st

6-9pm: FREe Kids Haunted House & Concert

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11420 E. Sprague • Spokane Valley Corner of Bowdish & Sprague • 509-891-0608 Find Us On 36 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014

Owner Mika Maloney at Batch Bakeshop’s new store in Spokane’s West Central neighborhood. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

Home Sweet Home After years without a storefront, Batch opens its own bakeshop BY JO MILLER

S

pokane is already acquainted with the sweet creations of Batch Bakeshop. Owner and baker Mika Maloney started her business in 2011 selling baked goods wholesale, catering weddings and keeping a weekly presence at the South Perry Thursday Market. She’s been working out of a commercial kitchen, but outgrew the space and decided she needed her own space with a storefront so she could try out new recipes and get immediate reactions. After a successful $15,000 Kickstarter campaign to help her make the transition, Maloney opened Batch’s new bakery in an early 1900s building in the West Central neighborhood last month. It has inside seating as well as a patio that can be reserved for parties, but the biggest plus for Maloney is the large kitchen space that enables her to keep up with increasing wedding requests. This year, Batch catered about 18 weddings and already has begun booking for next summer. The bakery also fills orders for birthdays, baby showers, work meetings and other parties. If you’re trying to picture Maloney’s decorating style, it’s not the fondant-full, cartoon cakes you see on TV shows like Ace of Cakes. She tends toward a simple, modern style that can range

from a rustic look to glamour. “[My] focus is on the food more than anything else,” she says. “We use real ingredients, seasonal stuff and fresh flavors.” In the storefront you’ll find tons of desserts made with seasonal fruit Maloney gets from the farmers market, including apples, pears, pumpkins, plums and cranberries. There’s a constant rotation of muffins, scones, cookies, bars and cakes, and savory items in the afternoons such as pitas, biscuits, dinner rolls and big pretzels, as well as coffee roasted by Indaba and tea for sipping. You can also still find Batch treats at the South Perry market, West Central Marketplace, Atticus, Cannon Coffee and Cone, Indaba and Santé. As the holidays approach, Maloney says Batch’s Facebook page will soon announce when they’ll begin taking orders for Thanksgiving pies and Christmas fruitcakes. Maloney estimates that in about a month, Flora — a yogurt company that also ran a successful Kickstarter campaign — will join the bakery, pasteurizing yogurt in the back and selling it by the jar up front. n Batch Bakeshop • 2023 W. Dean • Open Tue-Fri, 7 am-4 pm • batch-bakeshop.com • 413-3759


FOOD | OPENING

Lunch by the Lake

gnteurp NNooww! ReSigis ccEdN.oDrOgR! to wwbewa.sV Saturday

4th Annual INW Small Farms Conference, Nov. 1, 2014 The Coeur d’Alenes brings a fresh Food & Farming for Everyone Spokane Community College LAIR menu to its namesake city

Better Bread.

SPOKANE COUNTY EXTENSION

BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

O

Presented by:

In Downtown’s newest neighborhood, Kendall Yards

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$50 Per Person & $80 Per Pair (includes lunch & snacks)

Spokane Conservation District, WSU Spokane County Extension and

4th Annual INW Small Farms Conference, Nov. 1, 2014

riginally from the mining community of Wallace, Idaho, Variety of seminars, vendors & prizes Food & Farming for Everyone chef Troy Fausett isSpokane lookingCommunity to hit the College motherAgriculture lode in and Horticulture Club. Presented by: Coeur d’Alene with a restaurant that takes its name from * Seminars Include the Following this city on the lake. Tucked into the trees within walking distance Spokane Conservation District, WSU Spokane County Extension and • Spokane’s Urban Ag Ordinances • Planning for Farm Emergencies of the Kootenai Medical Center campus, the Coeur d’Alenes Spokane Community College Agriculture and Horticulture Club. • Hydroponics • Heirloom Vegetables • Growing Culinary Herbs caters to the lunch crowd with scratch-made meals, select organic • Keeping Weeds Out of Your Pasture • Managing Predators ingredients, and bread products from nearby Pilgrim’s Bakehouse. • Raising Meat Rabbits • Ducks • Permaculture • Grazing The menu at the Coeur d’Alenes sparkles with sandwiches • Butchery/ Charcuterie • Basic Food Preservation • Forestry and soup and salad offerings, as well as a range of entrées and • Labor Laws/ Hiring Help • Insurance Coverage desserts. Try classic sandwiches like the Kobe burger ($8.25), Presented by: • Growing Small Fruits & Berries • Alternative Gardening chicken cordon bleu ($9.75) or French dip with Havarti cheese • Grass Fed Beef Marketing & more… ($8.95). The BLT, featuring house-smoked bacon, gets a gourmet Spokane Conservation District, WSU Spokane County Extension and upgrade with caramelized onions and jalapeño cheddar bread. Questions? Call SCD 509-535-7274 or info@sccd.org Spokane Community CollegeDistrict Agriculture and and Horticulture Club. WSU Extension & Spokane Conservation programs services are offered without Entrées run the gamut, from empanadas with New Mexico discrimination. Available seminars subject to change. pork chile verde ($9.25) to potstickers with Thai dipping sauce ($9.50) to quiche with Havarti, Swiss, white cheddar and asiago cheeses and spinach, mushrooms, roasted peppers and a housemade crust ($9.50). All entrées, like chicken piccata ($9), include organic salad with choice of scratch-made dressings. The Coeur d’Alenes features local beer — from Wallace Brewing and Spokane’s No-Li Brewhouse — as well as a smattering of reds and whites. Nona’s Ultimate Carrot Cake is from Fausett’s grandmother, while the seasonal fruit galette is a nod to Fausett’s training at Portland’s Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts. This is Fausett’s second restaurant in a career that includes a foundation in the mining industry, as well as five years in the USDA’s Food Safety Inspection Service. Prior to attending Le Cordon Bleu, Fausett owned and operated the venerable Parkline Supper Club, a popular lakeside steak-and-seafood destination near St. Maries with a history dating back to 1938. n

4th Annual INW Small Farms Conference, Nov. 1, 2014 Food & Farming for Everyone

www.sccd.org

YOUR PHONE. SMARTER. The region’s best source for events, restaurants, music & movies.

Always in reach

The Coeur d’Alenes Restaurant • 1116 Ironwood Pkwy., CdA • Open Mon-Fri, 10:30 am-3 pm • coeurdalenesrestaurant.com • 208-665-7007

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OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 37


Small-batch, locally made, and

FOOD | UPDATE

NATURAL.

Made the old-school way. I was robbed! I spent the whole night waiting for the Great Pumpkin, when I could have been eating Brain Freeze Pumpkin Ice Cream!

White Box Café and Bakery has expanded its location and menu, but still offers its beloved pies. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

WHITE BOX CAFÉ AND BAKERY

1215 N. Ruby | 927-8850

W

sandwiches &

hile keeping its tasty gluten-free and takeout options, White Box Café & Bakery adopted a new space, expanded menu and double the seating and staff. Two weeks ago, the café reopened in its new location within the same building, just west of Gonzaga. With 76 seats and a full kitchen, it’s ready to become a new sit-down breakfast and lunch option for the neighborhood. The “burgers and browns” lunch option is one to look out for — a choice of one of six kinds of burgers served

espresso too!

IN KENDALL YARDS 1238 W. Summit Parkway • 321-7569

alongside hashbrowns. The breakfast menu boasts various homemade waffles, including the peanut butter and jelly, caramelized banana and nut, pecan, bacon, mixed fruit and chocolate chip. Looking for gluten-free goods? Not to worry: the wheat-free kitchen is separate from the rest to prevent cross-contamination, and all the menu items are available sans gluten. Check out the new patio seating and, of course, the additional desserts. — MOLLY SMITH

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FOOD | SAMPLER

SEAFOOD ANTHONY’S AT SPOKANE FALLS 510 N. Lincoln | 328-9009 Fresh seafood is the top priority for Anthony’s — the restaurant company works directly with fishermen and shellfish suppliers to make sure every salmon, swordfish and oyster meets a high standard. But diners don’t need to know the details to appreciate the fine-dining atmosphere, daily specials, happy hour offerings and — perhaps most impressive — the postcard view of the Spokane Falls. THE CEDARS FLOATING RESTAURANT 1514 Marina Dr., Blackwell Island | Coeur d’Alene 208-664-2922 This isn’t lakeside dining — when you eat at Cedars’ floating restaurant, you’re dining on the water at the confluence between the Spokane River and Lake Coeur d’Alene. Seafood is the specialty here and the smoky, cedar-planked, wild-caught salmon is consistently good. The patio is the place to be. You can even arrive by boat and tie up at one of Cedars’ docks.

HAY J’S BISTRO 21706 E. Mission Ave. | Liberty Lake 926-2310 Squatting directly off the highway in Liberty Lake, Hay J’s blocky strip-mall exterior — and book-cover first impressions — are immediately overturned the second you open the door. Inside, the bistro is pure class, with candle flames flickering atop wine bottles at the tables and metallic vine sculptures wrapping around wine bottles on the walls. With a wine list boasting 100 choices, and a wine bar next door, the selection manages to live up to the hype set by the décor. The relatively pricey menu boasts steaks, tapas, burgers, pastas and risottos — but seafood remains the most popular genre. MILFORD’S FISH HOUSE 719 N. Monroe | 326-7251 This iconic restaurant and bar has led a luxurious life. The original tavern opened in 1911 and was turned into a cigar store, market and barbershop. Original cigar cases, an antique mahogany bar, pin-up girls and stamped-tin ceilings exude a dim, masculine atmosphere. The fine-

dining menu features modern fish and seafood dishes for a hefty price. Open for dinner only. THE BOATHOUSE BAR & GRILL 3799 E. Hayden Lake Rd. Hayden, Idaho 208-772-5057 Who wants to cook after a day of leisure on the lake? That’s where the Boathouse comes in, with its bird’seye view of the Hayden Marina. The best seat in the house is on the deck. Drop in for appetizers, like the stuffed brie and roasted garlic, or linger over a plate of their popular fish tacos while you watch the sunset on the lake. 

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OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 39


Brad Pitt returns to badass mode in Fury.

Battle Fatigue Fury finds its creator in familiar hellish men-with-guns territory BY SCOTT RENSHAW

S

everal years ago, my colleague Mike D’Angelo directed by David Ayer, because I like to think eventually attempted a rather audacious experiment. While I’d have been able to identify his handiwork, much to my covering the 2007 Cannes Film Festival, he attended dismay. all the films in the festival’s competition slate completely At the outset, Fury feels like a bold approach to a blind as to what he was going to see: not the title, not brothers-in-arms soldier story. The in medias res opening the premise, not the stars, not the director, finds the five-man crew of the U.S. Sherman nothing. It was in part an experiment in the tank nicknamed “Fury” in a hell of a mess: FURY relative effect of surprise vs. expectation, but broken down and alone in the middle of a Rated R I personally found it intriguing to speculate German battlefield in April 1945, one member Directed by David Ayer how long it might take — considering Cannes’ Starring Brad Pitt, Logan of the team already dead and the odds of usual lineup of established, world-class survival looking bleak. Instead of rallying Lerman, Shia LaBeouf filmmakers — to figure out the director if the together, these guys seem barely able to tolercredits did not come at the beginning of a ate one another. The tank’s commander, Sgt. film. How singularly identifiable, I wondered, was any “Wardaddy” Collier (Brad Pitt) doesn’t just verbally given auteur’s fingerprint? berate his men, including engineer “Coon-Ass” Travis I flash back to this unique critical enterprise thanks to (Jon Bernthal); he literally kicks the crap out of them. Fury, a period war epic by a director known for cinematic Throughout much of the first half of Fury, there’s a vibe subject matter — modern-day crime-fighters — fairly disof barely concealed contempt between most of the men, tinct from period war epics. I wish I’d had the opportuniespecially when the team’s dead member is replaced by ty to watch Fury without knowing that it was written and combat virgin Pvt. Norman Ellison (Logan Lerman). It’s

40 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014

not merely hazing; it’s a sense of complete disdain for the guys you need to protect your back. Yet that exact dynamic is also why Fury begins to drift inexorably into something that’s obviously “a David Ayer movie” — and that’s not a great thing if you’re not on his wavelength. As the screenwriter of Training Day and the writer/director of movies like End of Watch and this year’s Sabotage, Ayer has focused his attention on men — and it’s almost always men — who have to trust one another with their lives, even at times when someone is morally compromised. It’s thematic material that’s great at creating viscerally intense moments, but while Ayer has a knack for making his gritty violence feel real — and Fury offers more trauma inflicted on human bodies than Saving Private Ryan’s Omaha Beach opening — he’s not nearly as successful at finding reality in his characters. Instead, he turns to something rudimentary in the central relationship between Collier and Ellison, in which Collier becomes exactly the “Wardaddy” mentor to the terrified rookie suggested by his nickname. There’s a certain daring to the complexity Ayer tries to give Collier — playing both the Tom Berenger and Willem Dafoe roles from Platoon, his own traumatic experiences visible in the scars on his back and his hidden emotional breakdowns — and Pitt pitches his performance in a way that evokes his cocky commander character from Inglourious Basterds while also deepening it. Yet neither that character, nor any of the others, ultimately feel like they matter all that much to where Fury is going as it builds to the tank team’s climactic suicide mission. It’s two hours of high tension, lacking enough resonance to be truly memorable an hour after you’ve left the theater. 


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS ADVANCED STYLE

You don’t see many models on the runway much older than 25, but this documentary shows that fashion extends far beyond that age. Directed by first-timer Lina Plioplyte, the film follows seven women in New York City who’ve kept their fashion sense sharp well into old age. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

THE BEST OF ME

It looks like Nicholas Sparks movies are still trendy. Estranged high school sweethearts Amanda and Dawson reunite 20 years later to reclaim their history. It’s like The Notebook, except… well, nothing. Expect the story you’ve heard and loved a few dozen times. (MS) Rated PG-13

THE BOOK OF LIFE

Goofy competing princes Manolo and Joaquin seek the affection of unconventional badass princess Maria, who seems to be amused with how foolish the two of them look in their attempts. Manolo’s journey becomes more complicated when he’s transported to another spooky but outrageously fun world, perfect in time for Halloween. This animated film stars an eclectic cast of Channing Tatum, Christina Applegate, Diego Luna, Zoe Saldana and, of course, Ice Cube. (MS) Rated PG

FURY

The five-man crew of the U.S. Sherman tank nicknamed “Fury” is in a hell of a mess: broken down and alone in the middle of a German battlefield in April 1945, one member of the team already dead and the odds of survival looking bleak. They’re forced to band together behind their sadistic leader (Brad Pitt), who goes by the name “Wardaddy” and beats the living crap out of his troops. The guys learn a thing or two about humanity along the way. (SR) Rated R

MEN, WOMEN & CHILDREN

From an exploration technology comes

the fictional stories of several people’s reactions to modern communication. There’s a hovering mother, cheating spouses, neglected kids, curious adults and everyone in between. Jason Reitman, director of Juno and Up in the Air, adds his indie, quirky flair to this film based on the book by Chad Kultgen. (MS) Rated R

T AT

IGH MOVIE N

PUMP

Some documentaries aim to inform, others to activate, and Pump falls firmly in the latter camp. The film, directed by Joshua Tickell and Rebecca Harrell Tickell, traces how America came to be addicted to oil, from the early corporate oil barons setting up the fuel distribution system, to the current monopolies keeping prices inflated. Ultimately, Pump advocates for a future of alternative fuels and showcases entrepreneurs trying to find a better way to keep American drivers moving. (DN) Rated PG

PG-13

SOUL OF A BANQUET

The next time you eat Chinese food here in the U.S., you can almost guarantee that Cecilia Chiang had something to do with influencing the taste. In 1961, Chiang opened the Mandarin in San Francisco with the intention of bringing authentic Chinese cuisine stateside. This documentary tells Chiang’s story of growing up in Beijing before changing the course of Chinese food in America. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

ST. VINCENT

Bill Murray stars as the titular Vincent, a broke, alcoholic, degenerate, curmudgeonly gambler with a crude Brooklyn accent who manages to become the after-school babysitter of his neighbor kid when his mother (Melissa McCarthy) takes extra hours as a nurse. The pair slowly warms to each other as Vincent shows Oliver the ways of the world in his unconventional manner (certainly more Bad Santa than Up). (SS) Rated R

N O Y T R A P

ER’S D N A INL E H T AY! D H T IT’S R I 21ST B

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23

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NOW PLAYING ALEXANDER AND THE TERRIBLE, HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD DAY

Little Alexander is used to having terrible luck. He’s the classic, nerdy child in a way cooler and put-together family. But one day, the tables turn and everybody in his family is hit with unpredictable drama, chaos and embarrassment. Don’t worry, this isn’t your average family comedy — former Community star Donald Glover has an appearance. With a true Disney message at heart, Alexander will show you how to avoid letting the haters get you down. (MS) Rated PG

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ANNABELLE

Creepy doll movies are never going to get old. Neither are satanic cult legends. That’s why, when a pregnant couple buys a seemingly lovely vintage doll for their baby, it of course turns into a supernatural killing machine and invites more murderers along. You’ll never be able to look at smiling toys the same way again. (MS) Rated R ...continued on next page

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FILM | SHORTS

THE MAGIC LANTERN

NOW PLAYING

FRI OCT 17TH - THUR OCT 23RD THE SKELETON TWINS (93 MIN) Fri/Sat: 6:15 Sun: 4:15 Tues-Thurs: 4:15

BOYHOOD (160 MIN)

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BOYHOOD

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PUMP (88 MIN)

Fri/Sat: 5:00 Sun: 3:15 Tues-Thurs: 5:30

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ADVANCED STYLE (73 MIN) *one week only! Fri/Sat: 3:30 Sun: 12:15 Tues-Thurs: 4:00

WALKING THE CAMINO (80 MIN)

Fri/Sat: 6:45 Sun: 1:45 Tues-Thurs: 7:15 SOUL OF A BANQUET *one night only! Sun: 7:00

clayconnection.net

25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $8 www.magiclanternspokane.com

714 E. Sprague Spokane | 509-747-6171

Richard Linklater’s newest film, shot over the course of 12 years, is a true masterwork and eschews the bigbang theory of dramatics in favor of the million-and-one little things that accumulate daily and help shape who we are, and who we will become. The story focuses on Mason, who we follow from age 7 to 19 as he struggles with divorced parents and the process of learning how to navigate the world. (MB) Rated R

DRACULA UNTOLD

To cause supernatural destruction to his enemies in order to protect his wife and son, warrior Vlad Tepes ventures to the dark side. After drinking some blood, the Dracula powers inside him make him stronger than he could imagined, but he is later conflicted between right and wrong and self identity. Can a monster be a good guy, too? (MS) Rated PG-13

THE INLANDER HAS THE SEASON OF SNOW COVERED. Look for the REGIONAL SKI MAP & FIVE PRINT EDITIONS in The Inlander throughout the season. MOUNTAIN UPDATES • EVENTS • EPIC REGIONAL JOURNEYS & MORE

WINTER ROADMAP October 17

WINTER ISSUE SERIES November 6 December 18

January 15 February 12

INLANDER SUPPLEMENT TO THE

12 13

1 14

10 13

here it comes

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YOUR LIST ROADTRIPPING WITH KIDS 8 SCHWEITZER TURNS 50 4 | GIFTS FOR THE SKIIER ON

to the top SUPPLEMENT

LOT 32 THE PARKING 28 | IGLOOS! | S FROM AN OLYMPIAN OLYMPIC WATCHING TIP

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WINTER MOVIES 6 | GEAR REVIEWS 8 | POWDER’S JOHN STIFTER 10 | REEL CAMERAS 12

SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

| MONASHEE 14

TO THE INLANDER

37

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42 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014

THE EQUALIZER

Denzel Washington plays McCall, a former professional badass who clearly misses his past life. He can’t sleep, you see, because even though he seems happy with his minimum-wage job, he isn’t following his own philosophy of “gotta be who you are in this world no matter what.” He relates this to — you’ll love this — a hooker with a heart of gold and the soul of an artist, Teri (Chloë Grace Moretz), who also hangs out in a diner where McCall always finds himself in the wee hours. When Teri gets beat up by some thugs, McCall goes out for revenge. (MJ) Rated R

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS

The girl has cancer, the boy is in remission from cancer; this story can only end badly. As far as teenage cancer love stories go, John Green’s recent young adult novel of the same name isn’t half bad — not nearly as sappy as A Walk to Remember. Shailene Woodley (The Descendants, Divergent) plays the lead. (LJ) Rated PG-13

GONE GIRL

David Fincher (Fight Club, The Social Network) gets his paws on the novel by Gillian Flynn (who also wrote the script) and comes up with one of the twisting-est, turning-est and most unsettling movies of the year. Ben Affleck is the once-happy husband whose once-happy wife, Rosamund Pike, up and vanishes on the morning of their fifth anniversary, with lots of clues and a few secrets pointing directly at him as the perpetrator. But amidst the curious cops, nosy neighbors, distraught relatives, and ratings-chasing news people, the mood of the film changes radically, then does so again, and again. (ES) Rated R

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

The titular Guardians are a ragtag, five-pronged crew of interstellar outcasts tasked with stopping Ronan the Accuser (Lee Pace), a rogue zealot

bent on planetary destruction. The Guardians are led by Peter Quill (Chris Pratt), a cocky, wisecracking treasure hunter from Earth who likes to go by Star-Lord. (SS) Rated PG-13

THIS IS WHERE I LEAVE YOU

Robert Downey Jr. plays Hank, a hotshot lawyer who reluctantly reconnects with his father, Joseph, a respected veteran judge. Joseph is also about to find himself on the receiving end of a murder charge — the victim is a convicted murderer whose crime was made possible by Joseph’s leniency — and thus the angry son and the prickly father must work together and possibly come to respect one another and so on and so forth. (SR) Rated R

Judd (Jason Bateman) is a simple guy whose marriage is falling apart just as he receives the call that his father has passed away. So off he heads to the family home in upstate New York for the funeral, and to learn from his mother, Hillary (Jane Fonda), that Dad had one last request: the entire family should sit shiva for the full traditional seven days. That means an often-contentious week for Judd, stuck in the same house with Mom, his older brother Paul (Corey Stoll), his sister Wendy (Tina Fey) and youngest brother Phillip (played by an amazingly hilarious Driver), a perpetual screw-up. (SR) Rated R

KILL THE MESSENGER

THE SKELETON TWINS

THE JUDGE

In 1996 San Jose Mercury journalist Gary Webb published an investigative series alleging that the CIA had allowed Nicaraguan drug traffickers to inundate Los Angeles with crack cocaine in the 1980s to fund rebels in Nicaragua. In this biopic, Jeremy Renner plays Webb, whose newspaper eventually rebuked their support of his reporting, leading to Webb’s eventual suicide in 2004. Years later, it is widely believed that Webb’s reporting was accurate. Directed by Michael Cuesta, who directed some of the best episodes of Homeland. (MB) Rated R

THE MAZE RUNNER

A group of displaced young men with erased memories find themselves trapped in a deserted wasteland with no way out, except for a treacherous maze known to kill those who dare enter. A mysterious and powerful force keeps the prisoners hostage and in constant fear. Once Thomas arrives on the scene, he inspires the group to attempt an escape as they try to solve the mystery of their capture. (MS) Rated PG-13

MEET THE MORMONS

This documentary is produced by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, which looks into the lives of six different members of the worldwide religion. All proceeds from the film benefit the Red Cross. (MB) Rated PG

As a winner at the Sundance Film Festival, this story of an estranged family is perfectly bizarre, emotional and lighthearted. Siblings Milo and Maggie, played by Bill Hader and Kristin Wiig, reunite after 10 years of separation and attempt to find understanding in their messy relationship. Their quirky, loving and complicated dynamics are highly entertaining. (MS) Rated R

THE TRIP TO ITALY

Over six amazing Italian courses, old coworkers Steve and Rob, played by Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon, respectively, develop their quirky friendship on a food critic tour. The two share silly conversations, delicious meals and whimsical adventures among the backdrop of the Italian countryside. With feel-good side plots of romance and self-discovery, the film’s overall story stays close to the food and the landscape. (MS) Not Rated

WALKING THE CAMINO: SIX WAYS TO SANTIAGO

Walking the Camino documents the journeys of a wide swath of hikers, from a pair of Canadian retirees to a Brazilian woman looking to defeat depression to a guy just looking for a physical challenge, all of whom have taken it upon themselves to walk the length of a 500mile trail in northern Spain. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Boyhood

100

Gone Girl

81

St. Vincent

63

The Boxtrolls

60

The Equalizer

57

This is Where I Leave…

48

The Judge

40

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT


FILM | REVIEW

FRI, OCTOBER 17TH TO THURS, OCTOBER 23TH

If I Stay FRI-SUN 5:00 WED-THURS 5:00

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles FRI 7:15 SAT 12:30, 2:45, 7:15 SUN 2:45, 7:15 TUES 5:00 WED-THURS 7:15

Lucy FRI-THURS 9:25PM

Seahawks vs. Rams SUN 10:00AM DOORS OPEN AT 9:00AM

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 18. MIDNIGHT

Hocus Pocus TUES 7:15

AIRWAY HEIGHTS

10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444

You’d mow Bill Murray’s dirt patch if he asked. Admit it.

Divine Degeneracy Bill Murray displays his unangelic charm in St. Vincent

FURY

R Daily (4:15) 7:00 8:30 9:45 Sat-Sun (10:50) (1:30)

THE BOOK OF LIFE

PG Daily 9:15 Sat-Sun (11:15) In 2D Daily (3:15) (5:15) 7:15 Sat-Sun (1:15)

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ALEXANDER AND THE TERRIBLE, HORRIBLE, NO GOOD, VERY BAD DAY

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GONE GIRL

BY SETH SOMMERFELD

R Daily (3:15) 6:15 9:15 Sat-Sun (12:15)

ANNABELLE

S

t. Vincent tells a rather familiar cinematic doesn’t shy away from getting a little twisted, but tale: The grumpy old shut-in befriends a most of St. Vincent’s success comes from letting plucky young kid, and as unlikely as their Murray do his thing. He revels in playing up pairing seems at first, they both end up teaching all of Vincent’s crooked mannerisms, crushing each other a little something about life. Only St. lows, gleeful highs and nonsensical non sequiturs Vincent opens with said old man getting it on with (though watering a dirt yard is an apt metaa pregnant foreign prostitute. That may be a clue phor for Vincent’s existence). When the movie that this dark comedy isn’t the archetypal paintreaches its tender moments, Murray is able to by-numbers, feel-good story. hit the right emotional chord without shifting the Bill Murray stars as the titular character. There may be a reason to Vincent, a broke, alcoholic, degenerpartially explain his attitude, but at ST. VINCENT ate, curmudgeonly gambler with a his core he’s still a jerk. Rated R crude Brooklyn accent who frequently Lieberher holds his own when Directed by Theodore Melfi employs the services of the aforementasked with playing opposite MurStarring Bill Murray, Melissa tioned lady of the night, Daka (Naomi ray, providing the right balance of McCarthy, Naomi Watts Watts with a bold Eastern Bloc timidity, optimism and stern defiance accent). When new neighbors show when needed. McCarthy feels natural up in the form of single mom Maggie in the fairly straight role of Oliver’s (Melissa McCarthy) and her scrawny son Oliver overworked mother, and it’s refreshing to see her (Jaeden Lieberher), Vincent sees them as another in a part that doesn’t rely on absurd physical huthorn in the side of his crummy life. But when mor. Apart from Murray, the laughs mostly come Maggie has to work extra hours at her nursing from Watts’ outlandish but big-hearted hooker job, Vincent manages to becomes Oliver’s de and Chris O’Dowd as Oliver’s droll Catholic facto babysitter for the right price. In cinematic school teacher. fashion, the pair slowly warms to each other as While St. Vincent softens the edge of its black Vincent shows Oliver the ways of the world in comedy in favor of sentimentality as it nears a his unconventional manner (certainly more Bad conclusion, it doesn’t venture too far and become Santa than Up). pure saccharine. The movie, like Vincent, is Writer/director Theodore Melfi’s script messily heartwarming. 

THE BEST OF ME

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JASON MRAZ

AND RAINING JANE

wednesday oCtober 22 Inb PerformIng arts Center 334 W. Spokane FallS Blvd · Spokane, Wa 8:00pm ShoW · all ageS TickeTS aT TickeTSWeST · charge By phone 800-325-SeaT

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44 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014


Crossing Lines Within seven months, the Sweeplings have created the next big Cami Bradley vehicle BY LAURA JOHNSON

I

t’s been a year since Cami Bradley’s sixth-place America’s Got Talent finish and subsequent tour, and we haven’t heard too much from the singer-songwriter since. She’s released a few music videos, all cover songs. She performed at Volume and Hoopfest. But over the past months she’s been cultivating a new project, one she’s ready to unveil to her hometown fans at last — the Sweeplings. On Friday, this cinematic folk-pop duo, which includes Bradley and Huntsville, Alabama, singer-songwriter Whitney Dean, perform in Spokane for the first time.

D

ean and his wife Bethany have been on the ground in Spokane for about an hour. After a quick coffee stop to warm up (it’s 85 degrees at home) and jolt the mind through the three-hour time difference, they’re with Bradley at Life Center Foursquare Church, where Bradley still volunteers as part of the worship team, something that was once her full-time job. Her husband Eric works here, too. The new friends and collaborators have a full week of activities planned before their show Friday night, including dinner with Bradley’s parents. Meeting up is not cheap or easy. Huntsville is more than 2,200 miles away from Spokane. An airplane ticket ranges from $500 to $800. So when they get together, it’s a whirlwind. But what is effortless is what transpires when Dean and Bradley write and play music together. Within one weekend of the pair’s first meeting in Spokane in April, the output was an impressive eight songs. Since April, the duo’s arsenal has extended to 20 songs. They’ve also released a four-track EP and multiple music videos, performed five times (mostly in the South) and even had one of their songs picked up by ABC, although they’re not sure yet which TV show it will play on. “To have that many songs we felt really good about after one weekend, we knew this was special, so we knew we couldn’t just walk away from this,” Bradley says.

Cami Bradley and Whitney Dean make up the new cinematic folk-pop duo the Sweeplings.

L

ast year, just as millions of Americans were watching Bradley perform on AGT, so was Bethany Dean. She asked her husband to come to the living room and watch one of Bradley’s ethereal performances, telling him that’s who he should ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 45


MUSIC | INDIE POP “CROSSING LINES,” CONTINUED...

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be collaborating with. “I told her, ‘Good luck with that,’” recalls Dean, who speaks with a light drawl. “I told her she could reach out to Cami if she wanted, but it wasn’t going to be me.” A songwriter for Nashville artists — “None of which you’ve heard of,” Dean says — the 30-year-old has had many brushes with fame. He played lead guitar and sang backing vocals with John Paul White just before the artist would go on to create the critically acclaimed (but now defunct) Civil Wars. While on the reality show, Bradley received many emails from admirers, many of them a little out there. She remembers Bethany’s email being the most normal of the bunch. When Bethany followed up a couple of months later, Bradley was intrigued. “For some reason we decided to go forward with it,” says Bradley, 26. “My husband and I were sitting in the airport parking lot the first time Whitney came here, and we said to each other, “What if he’s crazy?” “I had no preconceived notions that I would win her over,” Dean continues with a laugh. But everything came naturally. Even with varying musical backgrounds (him: country, her: jazz, pop, blues) they were able to find a sound that’s different from other singer-songwriter duos out there. As Dean describes, even with Bradley’s angelic vocals and his sparse tones under hers, their songs have weight and texture. When writing, Dean sees the big picture of the song, and Bradley paints in lyrical pieces. While the songs are mostly about love and come from a place of love, they’re obviously not about being in love with each other. “We want to make sure our chemistry is musical and doesn’t come off another way,” Bradley says.

O

n stage the group appears to be two people, but the Sweeplings are really four — two couples changing their lives to make this project work. Both spouses have helped with various aspects of marketing, recording and video production and are involved with every big decision. This means they’ve gotten to the point where they can be very honest with each other. Like now, when Bradley explains why she kept the Sweeplings semi-under wraps. “I wanted to be careful. I didn’t want to confuse the fan base if this wasn’t it,” she says. “That’s why I put out those solo covers, because I wanted people to remember me while I was figuring this out.” She looks at Dean. “I guess for Whitney, he was always ready with this, but finally after searching, this makes me excited because it is something I would be willing to sacrifice for,” Bradley says.  lauraj@inlander.com The Sweeplings with Patchy Anders (early show) and Betty and the Boy (late show) • Fri, Oct. 17, at 7 and 9 pm • $15/$18 day of • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

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al, Submit originries of less than ’ unshared sto s, based on this year s 2,000 w“ordpirits” — however the them e of S es to int erpret it. writ er wish

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46 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014

CAMERA READY


MUSIC | FOLK ROCK

Nashville folk-rockers the Apache Relay recorded at the legendary Sound City Studios — renamed Fairfax Recordings.

Sunny Side Up The Apache Relay brighten their rootsy sound, traveling to L.A. to record their latest album BY DAN NAILEN

T

he image adorning the cover of the Apache Relay’s self-titled album is striking, and seemingly not of its time, much like the Nashville band’s music. A man is caught midair, long locks flying as he plummets toward a waiting backyard swimming pool. Nearby, one buddy seems to be cheering him on, while another sits poolside in a lounge chair, lazily picking at an acoustic guitar.

It’s an idyllic image, and a true-to-life one as well. The high-flying man is Apache Relay fiddler Kellen Wenrich, and he was jumping from the roof of an old Bel Air house the band rented when they traveled to Los Angeles to record their third fulllength, which was was released this spring. “We have some Airbnb masters in the band,” says guitarist Ben Ford, recalling Wenrich’s dramatic leap and noting the

luck they had in finding the old ranch-style rambler. “It was super ’70s inside. We ended up getting pretty attached to that house. We spent a lot of time there. Unfortunately, I think it’s been purchased and bulldozed, which is kind of heartbreaking.” Ford and his cohorts will always have the memories, yet spending five months in a house right out of The Brady Bunch will probably recede in their minds as the sextet continues its rise through the ranks of young folk-rock acts. Just five years since forming at a Belmont University dorm jam session and releasing their first album, the Apache Relay has already toured with the likes of Mumford & Sons and Jenny Lewis, hit major festivals like Bonnaroo and Hardly Strictly Bluegrass and headlined their own tours across the country. When it came time to record new music, they left Nashville for sunny skies and the legendary Sound City Studios — renamed Fairfax Recordings after Dave Grohl’s documentary introduced much of the world to the place where countless monster hits were born. The experience of moving together to a strange land to record was a bonding one, Ford says, since “we were all in it together, figuring out how to do it.” They figured it out just fine, judging by the lush sounds filling The Apache Relay, from the “Wall of Sound” vibe of album opener “Katie Queen of Tennessee” to harmony-laden love songs like “Don’t Leave Me Now.” Not only is the songwriting the best of the band’s three albums, they just sound great. “That room, I get why so many people have recorded there,” Ford says. “It sounds so good. It sounds crazy, but I feel like you can hear [the room] on the records that have been recorded there. When I listen to those old Tom Petty records, I can hear that room in it, almost. It sounds weird, but it’s true.” n dann@inlander.com The Apache Relay with Desert Noises • Thu, Oct. 23, at 8 pm • $10/$12 day of • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

UNCORKED

SAINT JOSEPH FAMILY CENTER CORDIALLY INVITES YOU TO

SJFC

A TOAST TO WELLNESS

AN AFTERNOON OF WINE TASTING PAIRED WITH LIGHT HORS D’ OEUVRES 3-6PM • SUNDAY OCTOBER 26TH, 2014 ST. JOSEPH FAMILY CENTER • 1016 N. SUPERIOR • SPOKANE, WA 99202

25 PER TICKET All proceeds benefit the programs at SJFC

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RSVP TO JACKIE BELL AT 509.483.6495 ext.112 OR WWW.SJFCONLINE.ORG

THURSDAY OCTOBER 16TH

Random acts of randomness & drinks to boot! FRIDAY OCTOBER 17TH

Sidetrack SATURDAY OCTOBER 18TH

Dem Empire SUNDAY OCTOBER 19TH

Nerd Night w/ Nehemiah MONDAY OCTOBER 20TH

Trivia @ 7 TUESDAY OCTOBER 21ST

Open Mic of Open-ness @ 7:30pm WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 22ND

Whiskey Wednesday w/ Sally Bop Jazz @ 7:30pm COMING UP:

Halloween Party with the Go-Man-Gos

120 E. Sprague Ave.

Parties

Company Weddings School Events

Find holiday wines for your meals over the course of the three hours. You will have the opportunity to pair the wine with foods that complement their flavors & pre-order your favorites at a discounted price.

OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 47


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCK GUNS OF NEVADA

W

ith some bands, you can take a scan through their song or album titles and immediately get where they’re coming from, musically speaking. And that’s not a bad thing when you’re talking about a straightforward rock crew like Seattle’s Guns of Nevada, whose most recent release is the anthem-filled Songs in the Key of Whiskey. Older songs “Outlaws” and “Hard to Wave Goodbye in Handcuffs” got the band some attention via CMT’s reality show Chopper Challenge, but they’ve spent the majority of their career burning up the highways of the Northwest. Their gigs are full of boisterous beer-raising and sing-along choruses that immediately embed themselves in the listener’s noggin, even through a haze of booze. — DAN NAILEN Guns of Nevada with Sweet Rebel D. • Sat, Oct. 18, at 8 pm • $7 • 21+ • Underground 15 • 15 S. Howard • facebook.com/Underground15 • 868-0358

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

INDIE ROCK MAGPIES

A

fuzzed-out piece of Missoula comes to Spokane next Thursday by way of indie rockers Magpies. The quartet just released their new album Tornado in their hometown and are now on a Northwest mini-tour promoting the 10-track disc. Their music features heavily distorted guitar work and pounding drums paired with bright melodies from lead vocalists Tolan Harber and Samantha Pollington, the married couple who started the group as a two-piece in 2007. Despite all of the big crashes and waves of sound weaving throughout, Magpies’ songs almost have a quietness to them. — LAURA JOHNSON

Thursday, 10/16

J THE BARTLETT, The Growlers, The Garden BIGFOOT PUB, DJ Dave J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen BUCKHORN INN, Spokane River Band COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN (208-292-4813), Echo Elysium FEDORA PUB, CdA Charter Jazz Jam FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Luke Jaxton THE FLAME, DJ WesOne GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Howling Gaels J THE HOP!, The Funeral and the Twilight, Itchy Kitty, Joli, Crow’s Head, Marijuana Killed Marc JOHN’S ALLEY, Bradley Sherrer J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Particlehead J MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE (208-265-9382), Singer-songwriter Open Mic O’SHAY’S, Open mic J THE PHAT HOUSE, Super Highway, the Cryptids, Tone Collaborative ZOLA, The Jason Spooner Band

Friday, 10/17

J THE BARTLETT, The Sweeplings (See story on page 45), Patchy Anders, Betty and the Boy BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Thira, Progenitus BIGFOOT PUB, The Bobby Bremer Band J BING CROSBY THEATER, Nicole Lewis, Christy Lee Comrie, Angela Marie Project BOLO’S, FM BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Innersanctum

48 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014

Magpies • Thu, Oct. 23, at 9:30 pm • Free • 21+ • Baby Bar/Neato Burrito • 827 W. First • 847-1234 BROWNE’S TAVERN (315-9934), Kenneth Rokicki J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Mise, Skinny the Kid, Help Yourself BUCKHORN INN, Sammy Eubanks COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kicho, JamShack CURLEY’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE FEDORA PUB, Harmony Clayton FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Dragonfly THE FLAME, DJ Big Mike GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Heartbreak Pass J THE HOP!, Elektroween IRON HORSE BAR, Slow Burn JOHN’S ALLEY, Finn Riggings JONES RADIATOR, Sidetrack J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Diane Copeland LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Truck Mills THE MEMBERS LOUNGE (703-7115), DJ Selone and DJ Eaze J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Nick Grow

MOOSE LOUNGE (208-664-7901), Cary Fly and Chris Rieser NECTAR, Cris Lucas (of Cruxie) and the Rub NYNE, The Divine Jewels THE PALOMINO CLUB, Limosine with the Cronkites PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Garth Olson ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, The Olson Bros. Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE, Untied ROCKER ROOM, Shiner SOUTHSIDE SENIOR & COMMUNITY CENTER (535-0803), Variety Pak SPOKANE EAGLES LODGE (4893030), Spokane River Band SULLIVAN SCOREBOARD (891-0880), Johnny & the Moondogs THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Stepbrothers ZOLA, Karma’s Circle

Saturday, 10/18

219 LOUNGE (208-263-9934), Flying Mammals J BABY BAR, Bullets or Balloons, Northern Shakedown, Blackwater Prophet J THE BARTLETT, Burger Records Caravan of Stars feat. Together Pangea, The Memories, AJ Davila & Terror Amor, Mozes & the Firstborn BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, SonReal, Fierce Vill BIGFOOT PUB, The Bobby Bremer Band BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Innersanctum J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Brasil a Dois, Bossa Nova BUCKHORN INN, Sammy Eubanks J CHAPS, Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston CHECKERBOARD BAR, Mudhelmet

COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kicho, JamShack COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS (208-6642336), Steven Harris CURLEY’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE ENGLISH SETTER BREWING (9286063), Keith J. Milligan FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Dragonfly THE FLAME, DJ WesOne J GENO’S (368-9087), Geno’s Anniversary Party with the Rub J THE HOP!, Before the Mourning, Malaki, Brace for Betrayal J INDABA (443-3566), Erin Parkes IRON HORSE BAR, Slow Burn JOHN’S ALLEY, Ease Up JONES RADIATOR, Dem Empire KNITTING FACTORY, Majestic As Fak, Kill the Noise, Milo & Otis, Ape Drums LINNIE’S THAI CUISINE (835-5800), DJ Dave MOOSE LOUNGE, Cary Fly and Chris Rieser


NYNE, DJ C-Mad THE PALOMINO CLUB, Bruiser REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Good4U ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Robbie Walden CD Release Party ROCKER ROOM, Shiner THE SHOP, Robinsong SILVER FOX (208-667-9442), Untied SPOKANE EAGLES LODGE, Spokane River Band SULLIVAN SCOREBOARD, Johnny & the Moondogs UNDERGROUND 15, Guns of Nevada, Sweet Rebel D (See story on facing page) THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Thunderhound, Pushback Resistance, Uncommon Evolution WILLOW SPRINGS (235-4420), SixStrings n’ Pearls ZOLA, Karma’s Circle

Sunday, 10/19

THE CELLAR, Pat Coast DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church THE FLAME, DJ Dave J THE HOP!, This Wild Life, Peace Mercutio, Try Child,Rylei Franks, David Simmons, Jeremy Fogle

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Carli Osika J NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Kenny Rogers SLAB INN (208-773-5440), Raise the Roof feat. Spokane River Band, Steve Starkey, Border Patrol Band, 9 Lives Band, Shayne Rammler Band ZOLA, Dan Tedesco Band

Monday, 10/20

J THE BIG DIPPER, The Bob Curnow Big Band J CALYPSOS (208-665-0591), Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills THE FLAME, DJ Dave J THE HOP!, Consider Me Dead, the Paramedic, Catchin Your Clouds, the Persevering Promise J INDIE AIR RADIO, Concerts @ Indie Air Radio feat. Sarah McQuaid J THE PHAT HOUSE, Open Mic J RICO’S (332-6566), Open Mic ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 10/21

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, The Rub J THE BARTLETT, Open Mic CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Kicho FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills J THE HOP!, Hemlock, Dank Submission, Dysfunctional KAOS, Vultra JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Open-ness J KNITTING FACTORY, The Mad Caddies, Facedown, Oh Snap!

MUSIC | VENUES

THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Cameron Moore ZOLA, The Bucket List

Wednesday, 10/22

J THE BARTLETT, Polecat, Communist Daughter, the Holy Broke BIGFOOT PUB, DJ Dave EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho GENO’S, Open Mic with T & T J THE HOP!, Serial Hawk, Children of Atom J INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, Jason Mraz with Raining Jane JONES RADIATOR, Jazz night with with Brendan McMurphy, Rachel Bade-McMurphy and more LA ROSA CLUB, Robert Beadling and Friends THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE (3159531), Open Turntables Night with DJ Lydell LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Evan Denlinger RED ROOM LOUNGE, Bodhi Drip SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Jordan Collins ZOLA, The Bossame

Coming Up ...

THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Ishkov, Cold Mountain Yeti, Oct. 23 J THE BARTLETT, The Apache Relay (See story on page 47), Desert Noises, Oct. 23 KNITTING FACTORY, Alter Bridge, California Breed, Oct. 23 THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Death By Pirates, Jimmy Nuge, Oct. 24 THE BIG DIPPER, Tanzer4 Rock Off Battle of the Bands final round, Oct. 24 BEASLEY COLISEUM, Creedence Clearwater Revisited, Oct. 24 THE BARTLETT, Mudhoney, Barton Carroll, Oct. 24 KNITTING FACTORY, Allen Stone, Bad Rabbits, The BGP, Oct. 24 BUCKHORN INN, Halloween Monster Mash feat. Tufnel, Oct. 24 THE HOP!, Halloween Cover Show feat. Reason for Existence, Xingaia, Oct. 25 THE BIG DIPPER, Sarah Cameron CD Release, Oct. 25 SWAXX, Haunted Heads Costume Ball feat. AN-TEN-NAE, Russ Liquid, Splatinum, Crave and more, Oct. 25 CHECKERBOARD BAR, Hip Hop Showcase feat. Big K & Z MAC Aubrey Major Jay Cope Joey Frey Kush, Oct. 25 MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Chase Rice with Old Dominion, Oct. 27 CHECKERBOARD BAR, Copper & Congress, Oct. 28 THE BARTLETT, Lonesome Shack, Von the Baptist, I Am the Albatross, Oct. 29 THE HIVE EVENT CENTER, Sir Mix-ALot, Oct. 31

315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 THE BLIND BUCK • 204 N. Division • 290-6229 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 20 W. Jerry Ln., Worley • 208-263-6971 CONKLING MARINA • 20 W. Jerry Ln, Worley • 208-686-1151 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 456-5678 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 624-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NECTAR• 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO CLUB • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St • 443-5213 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 THE ROCK BAR • 13921 E. Trent Ave. • 43-3796 ROCKER ROOM • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 ROCKET MARKET • 726 E. 43rd Ave. • 343-2253 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 UNDERGROUND 15 • 15 S. Howard St. • 290-2122 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON • 1914 N. Monroe St. • 474-9040 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

Greenstone_KYOktoberfest_101614_4S_JP.pdf

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OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 49


ALLEN DUFFY ILLUSTRATION

WORDS NIGHTY NIGHT

For the third year now, Humanities Washington is corralling some of the region’s best writers for Bedtime Stories. This time around, the theme is “Bump in the Night,” so expect scribes like Washington state Poet Laureate Elizabeth Austen, novelist Jamie Ford, poet and Gonzaga professor Tod Marshall and Spokane’s current it-woman of literature, Sharma Shields, to bring some appropriately timed spookiness. Or maybe they’ll take that theme down a totally different path. However it pans out, expect to hear some great writing paired with food and wine. — MIKE BOOKEY Bedtime Stories • Fri, Oct. 17, at 6 pm • The Spokane Club • 1002 W. Riverside • Registration at humanities.org/programs

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

50 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014

COMEDY FUNNY GIRL

COMEDY THE GI:S:T! OF THINGS

Bing Comedy Series feat. Felicia Michaels with Charlie Laborte and Tom Meisfjord • Sat, Oct. 18, at 8 pm • $20 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638

Great Ideas: Spokane: Today! • Fri, Oct. 17, at 10 pm; (also Oct. 24 at Neato Burrito, free) • $5 • Blue Door Theatre • 815 W. Garland • bluedoortheatre.com • 747-7045

Seasoned comic Felicia Michaels stars in the next installment of the Bing’s ongoing comedy series, which features several more shows through the beginning of 2015. Michaels has developed a risqué and ruthless reputation, never holding back on vulgar topics and the male/female dynamic. She’s a Star Search Grand Champion, and over the past couple of decades has appeared on many major television networks and radio shows. Opening the show are Spokane comics Charlie Laborte and Tom Meisfjord. — MOLLY SMITH

The brainchild of Blue Door Theatre comedian Matt Dargen, this TED Talk-esque parody mashup takes all the awkward, uncomfortable and boring elements of lectures spins them out of control. As the pitch from Dargen himself states: “When you hear a GI:S:T! talk, you’re getting pure genius straight from the source.” Some audience members’ laughter may turn into salty tears. Most will walk away stunned, wondering what the hell they just witnessed, yet yearn for more. — CHEY SCOTT


65th SKI FILM S I N C E

1 9 49

CULTURE QUILTING TRADITION

Stories and family histories are pieced together scrap by scrap in the heirloom quilts that many families have held onto over the generations. While yours might be carefully folded inside a box in the basement, the Washington State Quilters are displaying around 500 of their members’ newer creations for the organization’s annual Spokane show. The nonprofit works to preserve the art of quilting and educate the public about the long-held tradition; practiced as an art form for necessity in centuries past, though more so as an outlet of creative expression today. For the 36th year, thousands of curious quilters of all ages and skills gather to appreciate the intricate patterns and combinations of colors. — MOLLY SMITH 36th Annual Quilt Show • Oct. 17-19; Fri-Sat from 10 am-6 pm; Sun from 10 am-4 pm • Spokane County Fair & Expo Center • 404 N. Havana • $8 weekend admission • wsqspokane.org

CLASSICAL FOUR BECOME FIVE

When a piano is added to a classical string quartet, the grouping is renamed a piano quintet — a misnomer for sure, as the designation implies five pianos are performing together. For the Spokane String Quartet’s season opener, the group will add pianist Armen Guzelimian to their ranks for Edward Elgar’s Piano Quintet in A minor. Back again are violinists Mateusz Wolski and Amanda Howard-Phillips, violist Jeannette Wee-Yang and cellist Helen Byrne. Also on the program, featuring mostly British composers, are the String Quartet No. 1 in D Major by Benjamin Britten and Joseph Haydn’s Sonata No. 38 in F Major. All of these works are as intimate as they are soaring. — LAURA JOHNSON Spokane String Quartet: “London Honors” • Sun, Oct. 19, at 3 pm • $12-$20 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanestringquartet.org • 624-1200

SPOKANE BING CROSBY THEATER SATURDAY NOV. 1 6:OOPM & 9:00 PM

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

RESCUE ON THE RUNWAY The fourth annual charity date auction benefiting the animals of the Spokane Humane Society, with food, cocktails and auctions. Oct. 16, 5 pm. $10/advance; $20/ door. Knitting Factory, 919 W. Sprague. tinyurl.com/nap9ckn MASQUE-YOUR-AID The 7th annual gala and auction benefits Communities in Schools of Spokane County, which provide mentoring, resources and services to at-risk students at 20 regional schools. $50/person; $75/ pair. Oct. 18, 6-9:30 pm. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. spokane.ciswa.org (326-8000) THANKSGIVING OF COMPASSION: A HARVEST FOR THE ANIMALS A celebration and benefit for the animals

of River’s Wish Animal Sanctuary. Special guest Geshe Phelgye blesses the harvest for the animals at 2 pm. Oct. 18, 1-4 pm. $10. River’s Wish Animal Sanctuary, 11511 W. Garfield Rd. riverswishanimalsanctuary.org (951-3650) SALUD A tapas, dessert and wine tasting gala benefiting The Family Guide and The Coeur d’Alene Tribe’s STOP Violence Against Women program. Oct. 19, 4-7 pm. $25. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. facebook.com/StopViolenceAgainstWomenDay (509-928-9664) THIRD ANNUAL GHOST BALL Appetizers, no-host bar, dancing, photography, auctions and raffles. Event benefits Elevations - A Children’s Therapy Resource Foundation. Costumes encouraged. Oct. 25, 7 pm-midnight. $50/person. Riverside Place, 1108 W. Riverside. ghostball.org (981-6475)

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OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 51


EVENTS | CALENDAR

1001 West Sprague Ave. • 509-624-1200

Mozart & Strauss Featuring Soprano

Martha Guth

“Magical!” -Opera Now with Spokane Symphony Chorale

COMEDY

OCT. 25 & 26

BRAZIL’S BOSSA NOVA KING

SAT. NOV. 1 - 8pm sponsored by

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Band, Bar & Banter: 5-6:45pm Symphony Performance 7-8pm

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THE PUMPKIN BALL 11th annual fundraiser gala with proceeds benefiting the Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital and the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery. Gala reception includes passed appetizers, live and silent auction, 3-course dinner, pumpkin carving competition and more. Oct. 25, 5:30 pm. $150/person. Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. thepumpkinball.org (474-2819) MASQUERADE BALL CHARITY DANCE The Crystal Chandeliers ballroom dancing club, Tuxedo Junction Big Band and the Lincoln Center co-host a masquerade ball to benefit the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery, offering appetizers, line dance lessons and more. Oct. 26, 3-6 pm. $25/person. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln. ccballroom.com

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. bluznews.com (483-7300) GABE RUTELDGE Live comedy show. Oct. 17-18 at 8 pm. $8/show. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. (483-7300) GREAT IDEAS: SPOKANE: TODAY! Much like its estranged cousin, TED Talks, this event is a meeting of brilliant minds, a public forum of cutting edge ideas. Oct. 17, 10 pm. $5. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com LAST COMIC STANDING TOUR Contestants from the 8th season of NBC’s comedy contest perform. Oct. 17, 7:30 pm. $35-$65. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (509-481-6700) NO CLUE Audience-participation, murder-mystery comedy improv show. Fridays at 8 pm through October. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) OPEN MIC COMEDY Live stand-up comedy, open to newcomers and experienced comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third. (475-6209) BING COMEDY SERIES FT. FELICIA MICHAELS The long-time stand-up comedian performs with Spokane comedians Charlie Laborte and Tom Meisfjord. Oct. 18, 8 pm. $20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com (534-5805) BLUE DOOR OPEN AUDITIONS Open auditions for new Blue Door “players.” Must be 18 or older. Oct. 18, 3 pm. Free. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Not rated.) Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) ERIK ESCOBAR & FRIENDS COMEDY TOUR A comedy show featuring LA comedians Erik Escobar, Chris Kao and Alex Duong, along with Spokane’s Matt Dargen and other special guests. Monday night show preceded by a Oct. 19 show at Goodtymes, at 8 pm (free). Oct. 20, 9 pm. $8-$10. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) FREE ADULT IMPROV CLASSES The Blue Door partners with Create Spokane arts month to present free classes through October, Mondays from 7-8:30 pm. Free. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) OPEN MIC COMEDY Wednesdays at

8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Brooklyn Deli & Lounge, 122 S. Monroe St. (835-4177)

COMMUNITY

COLVILLE CORN MAZE & PUMPKIN PATCH Explore 12 acres of corn maze and pumpkin patches, offering u-pick or pre-picked. Open daily through Oct. 31 (hours vary by day). $5/kids (5-12), $7/adults, free/under 5. Colville Corn Maze, 73 Oakshott Rd. colvillecornmaze.com (509-684-6751) SCARYWOOD 2014 Silverwood Theme Park’s annual haunted nights run through Nov. 1. Thur from 6:30-11:30 pm; Fri-Sat from 7 pm-1 am; Oct. 31 and Nov. 1 from 7 pm-midnight. $21-$40. Silverwood Theme Park, 27843 U.S. 95. scarywoodhaunt.com (208-683-3400) A T. REX NAMED SUE Mobius hosts the Chicago Field Museum’s exhibit centered on the most complete Tyrannosaurus rex fossil ever discovered. Exhibit runs through Jan. 4, 2015. Museum open Tues-Sun; hours vary. $7-$10. Mobius Science Center, 811 W. Main Ave. mobiusspokane.org (509-443-5669) COMMUNITY DANCES Featuring music by local band Variety Pak. “Tea Dance” on Oct. 5 from 5:30-8:30 pm; and “Wear Something Gaudy” on Oct. 17, from 7-10 pm. $6-$10. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac.org (535-0803) PET TUNE-UP CLINIC Halloween can be a scary time for pets - doors opening, people dressed up and loud noises. Make sure your pet can find its way back home by getting a microchip, renewing or purchasing a license with a free rabies vaccination. Oct. 17, 3-6 pm. SCRAPS, 2521 N. Flora Rd. (477-2984) POST FALLS LIONS HAUNTED HOUSE The annual event offers new features this year and is open Fri-Sat, through Oct. 25 from 6 pm-midnight; also the week of Oct. 26-30 from 6-10 pm. $7/ person or $5 with 2 nonperishable food items. Located at 4th and Post. $7/ person or $5 with 2 non perishable food items. tinyurl.com/kly5dvv SPOKANE COUNTY SHERIFF CANDIDATE DEBATE Two-term Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich and 2014 election challenger Douglas Orr, currently a detective with the SPD, participate in a debate at the Spokane Valley Chamber’s Business Connections Breakfast. Oct. 17, 7-9 am. $25/members & guests; $35/non-members. Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. (924-4994) VALLEY MISSION HAUNTED POOL The annual twist on the traditional Haunted House takes the setting of the pool locker rooms and deck. $3 or $2/person with canned food donation. Oct. 17-25, Fri and Sat nights from 7:30-10 pm Valley Mission Pool, 11123 E. Mission. spokanevalley. org/hauntedpool (688-0300) APOCALYPSE CORPS ZOMBIE RUN Outrun a horde of zombies and make it to resistance outposts to be equipped and resupplied. Entry gets players for 2 “lives;” but you can still buy more. Also includes a raffle and concessions. Proceeds benefit the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery. Event includes three sessions for various age levels. Oct. 18, 2-5 pm. $5. Comstock Park, 29th Ave. and Howard St. tinyurl.com/ktvaxgg (850-5587) BULL-O-WEEN Maddie the Gonzaga Bulldog mascot hosts the second annual Halloween-themed pet adoption event, offering a costume contest, silent auction, kids activities, music and more. Benefits Spokanimal, Double J Dog

Ranch and Washington Basset Rescue. Oct. 18, 6-8 pm. $10/dog. At George Gee Automotive in Liberty Lake. (723-7936) GUARDIANS OF CHILDHOOD WALK A walk to raise awareness of the importance of early childhood development. Include a short walk, family activity stations, activities and games, resources and more. Oct. 18. Free. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard St. (625-6601) LIONS CLUB EXCURSION TRAIN RIDES The North Pend Oreille Valley Lions Club hosts its annual fall season scenic train rides along the Pend Orielle River from Ione to Metaline Falls, Wash. Offered Oct. 18-19 and 25-26, departing at 11 am, 1 pm and 3 pm daily. Costumes encouraged for the fourth “Great Pumpkin Rides.” Ione, Wash. lionstrainrides.com (887-525-5226) STOP VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN DAY A community resource fair for domestic violence survivors and those who’ve lost their direction after an illness, accident, divorce, death of a loved one, change in career or other life-altering event. Local resources for physical, spiritual, mental and financial programs are on site. Oct. 19, 11 am-5 pm. Free. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. facebook.com/StopViolenceAgainstWomenDay (509-928-9664) CLEARING THE HAZE OF MARIJUANA “What’s Legal, What’s Not, and Employers’ Best Practices,” with a panel of local experts. Oct. 22, 7:45 am. $20/ members; $35/non-members. Greater Spokane Incorporated, 801 W. Riverside Ave. (624-1393) FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE The Friends of the Spokane Public Library hosts its annual, fall sale offering gently used library materials as a fundraiser for library programs. Member pre-sale Oct. 22 from 4:30-8 pm (register for $10); public sale (free admission) Oct. 23-25; Thur-Fri from 10 am-5 pm, Sat from 10 am-3 pm. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main. (444-5307) MEET THE CANDIDATES FORUM The public is encouraged to attend this educational event to meet, listen and pose questions to candidates running for office in the upcoming election. Oct. 23, 7-9 pm. Free. Northeast Community Center, 4001 N. Cook St. necca. myspokane.net/index.html (487-1603)

FESTIVAL

APPLE FEST Event includes crafts, entertainment, food trucks, apple dumplings and more. Through Oct. 19, Sat from 10 am-5 pm and Sun from 12-5 at the Green Bluff United Methodist Church; also Oct. 25-26 from 9 am-5 pm at the Green Bluff Grange. Free admission. Green Bluff United Methodist Church, 9908 E. Greenbluff Rd. (979-2607) PAC CON SPOKANE First annual comic/ sci-fi convention, featuring guest headliners Stan Lee, William Shatner, Jim Cummings, Denise Crosby, Dirk Benedict and others. Also features 300 exhibitors, including artists and vendors from across the US. Oct. 24-26, Fri from 3-8 pm, Sat-Sun from 10 am-6 pm. $60-$100/ weekend pass; $20-$25/day. Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. pacific-conventions.com/spokane

FILM

100 FOOT JOURNEY When the Kadam family move to a quaint village in the South of France with the plan of opening an Indian restaurant, they’re undeterred by a Michelin-starred clas-


sical French eatery 100 feet from their establishment. Oct. 16 and 18 at 7:30 pm. $5-$7. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-263-9191) MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP PRESENTS: BLACKFISH Blackfish shows the sometimes devastating consequences of keeping intelligent and sentient creatures in captivity. Oct. 16, 7 pm. $4-$6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. (208-882-4127) DAYS OF MY YOUTH The latest film from Matchstick Productions and Red Bull Media House, examining the lives of skiers and the journey of self-discovery that skiers experience. Screening is also a fundraiser and benefits 24 Hours for Hank. Oct. 17, 7 pm. $16. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801) THE TRIP TO ITALY Years after their successful restaurant review tour of Northern Britain, Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon are commissioned for a new tour in Italy. Oct. 17-19, show times vary. $3-$6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. (208-882-4127) FRANKENSTEIN: NATIONAL THEATRE ENCORE PRESENTATION Friends of The Bing present the National Theatre Live’s broadcast of Frankenstein. Films featured include Benedict Cumberbatch and John Lee Miller, each playing the roles of Frankenstein. Screenings Oct. 18 at noon and 3 pm; Oct. 19 at 2 pm and 5 pm, with a 30min. intermission between films. $10/ students; $15/public. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7404) SECRET SURPRISE FRIGHT NIGHT Throughout October, the Garland shows lesser-known scary movies that aren’t announced before the screening. Saturdays, Oct. 18, at midnight. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. (327-1050) SING ALONG MOVIE: LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS Sing along with the evil dentist, Seymour, Audrey and of course “Audrey II” in this classic. Oct. 18, 2 pm. Free. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. (509-444-5300) SOUL OF A BANQUET Special film screening event. Oct. 19, 7 pm. $8. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main Ave. magiclanternspokane.com (2092383) HOME Screening hosted by the National Alliance on Mental Health’s Spokane chapter, of a film about a man recovering from mental illness. Oct. 20, 5-7 pm. $10 suggested donation. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main Ave. (209-2383) UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO PRESENTS: RIP! A REMIX MANIFESTO Screening of the 2009 open-source documentary on creativity, copyright, and collaboration in the digital age. Oct. 20, 7 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. (208-882-4127) CITIZEN KOCH Documentary screening followed by a panel, Q&A and community discussion/panel talk. Panelists include Rick Eichstadt, Center for Justice; and Ted Hensold, President of Move to Amend. Net proceeds to benefit Meals on Wheels Spokane. Oct. 21, 6 pm. $10 suggested donation. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. tinyurl.com/ kgwvgng (993-5785) PALOUSE FRENCH FILM FEST: I KILLED MY MOTHER A turbulent relationship between mother and son unfolds with a compelling combination of savage fury and melting affection. $4/

show; $15/festival pass. Oct. 21, 7 pm. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. (208882-4127) TOTALLY TUBULAR TUESDAYS The Garland’s classic old-school movie series returns, every Tuesdays at 7 pm. See website for each week’s featured film. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. (327-1050) SPOKANE FILM PROJECT PRESENTS: DECASIA Decasia is a 2002 American film by Bill Morrison, made from found decomposing footage and set to an original score by Michael Gordon. Oct. 22, 7:30 pm. $5. The Big Dipper, 171 S. Washington. tinyurl.com/kjqoja4 ALIVE INSIDE Screening of the Sundance Film Festival award-winning documentary about treatment of Alzheimer’s and dementia through music. Oct. 23, 6-9 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. dacnw.org SUDS & CINEMA: WAYNE’S WORLD Featuring beer ($4/pint) from Orlison Brewing Co. and ice cream from Brain Freeze Creamery to celebrate the Inlander’s 21st birthday. Doors open at 6:30 pm, film screens at 7:30 pm. Oct. 23, 6 pm. $4/admission. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. inlander.com/ sudsandcinema

FOOD

FRIDAY FALL RELEASE SERIES Wine release parties include a glass of that week’s featured wine, paired with cheese. Oct. 17 from 4-7 pm. $10/person. Coeur d’Alene Cellars, 3890 N. Schreiber Way. cdacellars.com SMALL VINEYARDS OF FRANCE Guest Tristan Ohms joins Matt Dolan to host a class featuring small vineyard wineries from around France. Oct. 17, 7 pm. $20, registration requested. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) VINO WINE TASTING Friday, Oct. 17 features Alexander Valley Vineyards. from 3-6:30 pm ($15). Sat, Oct. 18 highlights new fall releases, from 2-4:30 pm ($10). Wine available bythe-glass; tastings include cheese and crackers. Vino!, 222 S. Washington St. (838-1229) OCTOBER KOREAN FOOD SALE The church’s monthly food sale features a menu of Korean barbecue beef, spicy pork, gimbap, fried rice, kimchi and more. Oct. 18, 11 am-3 pm. $10/dish. Spokane Hope Christian Reformed Church, 806 W. Knox Ave. (720-9646) OCTOBREWFEST A beer tasting event to benefit the National Multiple Sclerosis Society. Ages 21+. Oct. 18, 5:30 pm. $15/advance; $20/door. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. (742-5173) OKTOBERFEST AT KENDALL YARDS A community celebration offering live music, pumpkin carving and a “restaurant crawl” featuring the neighborhood’s local eateries. Oct. 24, 5-9 pm. Free to attend. The Nest at Kendall Yards, 1335 Summit Parkway. tinyurl. com/jvvljkt (280-2776)

MUSIC

BROADWAY ON BERNARD Concert featuring local men’s and women’s choruses, soloists and quartets performing classic Broadway hits. Oct. 17-18 at 7 pm, Oct. 19 at 3 pm. $15/advance; $20/door. Unity Spiritual Center, 2900 S. Bernard St. unityspokane. org (448-6403)

S TA R T H E R E

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RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess WILL ONESIES NEVER CEASE?

My married friend just had a baby and posts what’s essentially the same “Look how cuuute!” shot on Facebook several times daily. Beyond finding this annoyingly boring, I’m 32 and unhappily single, and seeing all of her blissful pix is making me envious and resentful. Is it wrong to secretly block her photos? I feel it would be better for our friendship. —Baby On Overboard

AMY ALKON A lot of people use Facebook to announce their accomplishments: “I became CEO of the company!” “I got into Juilliard!” And then there’s your friend: “We had sex without birth control, and look at what happened!” Of course, the fledgling CEO typically posts the good news once; there aren’t hourly selfies: “Here I am teething on my new desk!” “Here I am spitting up on the sales director!” And yes, like many new parents, your friend’s excitement may have led her to misplace her “Don’t be boring!” filter. But as you’re feeling blissbombed, you might keep in mind that she’s sharing only the cute moments — her mini-vacations from the screaming and the sleeplessness, going online at 3 a.m. to play “Match That Rash,” and the endless analysis of the cut, color, and clarity of baby diamonds — otherwise known as poo. (If a new mom’s actual reality were on parade, Facebook would be renamed Buttbook.) Sympathizing with your friend (and even working up to feeling happy for her) is actually in your self-interest. In “The How of Happiness,” social psychologist Sonja Lyubomirsky wisely notes: “You can’t be envious and happy at the same time.” Though we rather automatically compare ourselves with others, Lyubomirsky’s research finds that the happiest people aren’t weighed down by others’ achievements; they take pleasure in others’ successes and appear to judge themselves by their own internal standards. Unhappy people, on the other hand, feel deflated by their peers’ accomplishments and relieved about their failures. They tend to be very focused on how much better others are doing, which causes them to feel “chronically vulnerable, threatened, and insecure.” To become a happier person, start acting like one — expressing generosity of spirit. Lyubomirsky’s research finds that one of the most effective ways to be meaningfully happier is to do kind acts for others. So, instead of blocking your friend, try a counterintuitive approach: Block out time to spend with her. Go over there, maybe fold a towel and put away a couple of dishes, and treat her to an interaction that doesn’t end with somebody chewing on her nipple. As long as you’re in the generosity of spirit aisle, pick some up for yourself. Remind yourself that finding a partner is hard for most people. Get in the habit of taking stock of what’s good in your life, and think of constructive ways to get closer to what you want. Replacing your sneery mindset with a more upbeat outlook should have you radiating the sort of positive energy that draws people — including single male people — to you. Keep that up and you should eventually find yourself married, pregnant, and the envy of every woman whose dream it is to throw up violently every morning but still look like that girl who turned into a giant blueberry in “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory.”

TAKE A TOAD OFF

I’m a single woman who likes hiking, and I agreed to let a male friend set me up with his hiking-loving buddy — and then he showed me his picture. I was not at all attracted. I didn’t want to seem shallow (though I guess I am), so I told him to give me his info, but I never reached out. My friend keeps asking whether the guy should call me. Is it rude to say I’m not interested based on looks alone? —No, Thanks People who say you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover won’t be ending their Saturday night dodging the book’s make-out attempts on their front porch. Sure, it’s possible that this guy’s photo doesn’t entirely capture how he looks face to face. But photos are not cave drawings. If you aren’t attracted to skinny blond guys, seeing a particular skinny blond guy in person is unlikely to change that. And turning down a date with a man you aren’t attracted to isn’t “shallow”; it’s the kind thing to do — basically breaking up before the first date instead of after he’s gotten attached to you. Doing this doesn’t require the whole cruel truth, just enough of the truth — like “not really my type” — to send him on his way. Communicate that to your mutual friend and you’ll free Hiker Guy up to focus on women he might have a chance with and free yourself up to find a man who can make your heart race — without chasing you up and down the trails with an ax.  ©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

54 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014

EVENTS | CALENDAR THE IN-BETWEEN: FROM CLASSICAL TO JAZZ A concert featuring classical musician soprano Jill Terhaar Lewis with jazz musicians Robert Lewis (saxophone) and Gerald Gregory (piano). Oct. 17, 7:30 pm. $10. Holy Names Music Center, 3910 W. Custer Dr. (326-9516) NICOLE LEWIS, CHRISTY LEE COMRIE, ANGELA MARIE PROJECT Three local singer-songwriters team for “Take Strides Against Breast Cancer” in a special benefit performance. Oct. 17, 8 pm. $12. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7404) PIANIST YELENA BALABANOVA The Steinway Concert Artist and pianist performs a free community concert. Oct. 17, 7 pm. Steinway Piano Gallery, 13418 E. Nora Ave. (327-4266) BIG BING THEORY Performance by Gonzaga’s student-run, coed a cappella group. Concerts Oct. 18 (Moran Prairie, Spokane Valley); Nov. 8 (Argonne, Otis Orchards) and Nov. 15 (Airway Heights). Free. All events at Spokane County Library branches. scld.org INLAND NW BLUEGRASS MUSIC ASSOCIATION SHOWCASE Live music performed by local and regional bluegrass and related acoustic bands. $5/ members; $7/non-members; free/ages 12 and under. Concerts held monthly on the third Saturday, from 7-9 pm. Trent Elementary School, 3303 N. Pines Rd. spokanebluegrass.org (484-4668) BE THE MEDIA: PRODUCE AUDIO FOR RADIO Learn how to produce audio for radio, field recording, sound editing, interviewing techniques and on-air training with staff at KYRS-Thin Air Community Radio. Oct. 18, 2-5 pm. Free. KYRS,

25 W. Main. kyrs.org (209-2428) MALE ENSEMBLE NORTHWEST A concert by the Northwest choral ensemble, featuring music educators from Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, performing a wide variety of music from classical to jazz and pop. Oct. 18, 8-9 pm. Free will donations accepted. Post Falls High School, 2832 E. Poleline Ave. menorthwest.org (208-769-3275) NORTHWEST SACRED MUSIC CHORALE “An American Tribute” concert, under the direction of Gaynell Coppess, giving tribute to men and women of the military. Oct. 18 at 7 pm, Oct. 19 at 3 pm. Donations accepted. First Presbyterian Church, 521 Lakeside, CdA. nwsmc.org (208-667-8446) WSU CHORAL FESTIVAL The Choral Festival final concert features Concert Choir, Madrigal Singers and guest high school choirs performing at 5 pm in the Bryan Hall Theatre. Oct. 18. WSU Pullman campus. libarts.wsu.edu/music MALE ENSEMBLE NORTHWEST A concert by the Northwest choral ensemble, featuring music educators from Idaho, Oregon, and Washington, performing a wide variety of music from classical to jazz and pop. Oct. 19, 2-3 pm. Freewill donation. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 5720 S. Perry. menorthwest.org SPOKANE BRITISH BRASS BAND: PHANTOM BRASS Opening night of the band’s 20th season with a program revisiting favorite pieces from the past 20 years of concerts. Oct. 19, 3-4:30 pm. $10/door only; students free. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. sbbb.org (999-8717) SPOKANE STRING QUARTET: LON-

W itches Night Out

Shop Hop

BRING ALL YOUR GHOULFRIENDS FOR A WICKED GOOD TIME!

Thurs. Oct. 23rd

3-8pm

Chance to WIN over $1000 in prizes. Enjoy tasty treats, in-store specials and dress up in your favorite costume!

DON HONORS A concert featuring guest pianist Armen Guzelimian and a program of English composers. Oct. 19, 3 pm. $12-$20. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanestringquartet.org (998-2261) CENTRAL VALLEY HS MARCHING BAND See the award-winning group perform their 2014 production of “The Sun & The Moon.” Dessert to follow the performance. Oct. 21, 7:30 pm. Free. Central Valley HS, 821 S. Sullivan. (927-6848)

SPORTS

SNOWSHOEING BASICS REI staff share the basics of snowshoeing, including selection of gear and where to go to get started. Oct. 16, 7 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. (328-9900) SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. KELOWNA ROCKETS Hockey match. Oct. 17, 7 pm. $10-$23. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com SHEJUMPS WAX NIGHT The nonprofit that encourages female participation in outdoor activities teaches how to wax your own skis or board; event also includes a raffle. Oct. 17, 7 pm. $10. Alpine Haus, 2925 S. Regal. shejumps.org (253-228-6011) HAYDEN LAKE MARATHON Road race offering marathon, half-marathon and 10K courses. Oct. 18. $25-$110. Hayden, Idaho. haydenlakemarathon.org SPOKANE ANARCHY WRESTLING: XPERIENCE TAPING The last show of the year for Spokane Anarchy Wrestling, with several matches filmed for the group’s YouTube channel. Oct. 18, 3 pm. Peaceful Valley Community Center,

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214 N. Cedar. facebook.com/SpokaneAnarchyWrestling (509-624-8634) SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. EVERETT SILVERTIPS Hockey match. Oct. 18, 7 pm. $10-$23. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com SPOKANE BADMINTON CLUB Meets Sun from 4:30-7 pm and Wed from 7-10 pm. $6/visit. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. (448-5694) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS CLUB Pingpong club meets Wed from 6:30-9 pm and Sun from 1:30-4:30 pm. $2/visit. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. (535-0803) WASHINGTON TRAILS ASSOC. AT ILLER CREEK Register online to join WTA for a day of giving back to one of our local conservation futures properties. Work parties scheduled for Oct. 19 and 26-27, from 8:30 am-3:30 pm. free. Iller Creek Conservation Area. wta.org/ volunteer/east (921-8928) SPOKANE MOUNTAINEERS MEETING Member Rika Ream presents a photo tour of a recent 3-week bus trip through Cuba at the group’s Oct. meeting. Oct. 20, 7-8:15 pm. Free. Mountain Gear Corporate Offices, 6021 E. Mansfield. spokanemountaineers.org SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS Ping-pong club meets Mon and Wed, from 6-9 pm, now at the HUB in Liberty Lake. $3/visit. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo. spokanetabletennis.com (768-1780) MAP & COMPASS NAVIGATION BASICS Learn basic navigation skills using a map and compass to find your way. Oct. 22, 6:30-8:30 pm. $30/members; $50/non-members. REI, 1125 N. Monroe

St. rei.com/spokane (328-9900) ALPINE SKIING & SNOWBOARD WAXING BASICS A hands-on maintenance class focusing on how to prep skis and boards throughout the winter season. Oct. 23, 6:30-8:30 pm. $35-$55. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. (328-9900) OCTOBERWEEN II RIDE The Fourth Friday Pub Peddlers and Swamp Ride team up to host the second annual costume-themed pub ride. Event features live entertainment (TBA) and drink specials. Ride meets at 7 pm, departs at 8 pm. Oct. 24, 7 pm. Swamp Tavern, 1904 W. Fifth. tinyurl.com/pauokmn

THEATER

A BRIGHT NEW BOISE Written by Samuel D. Hunter, a former Moscow resident, and with Jonathan Rau, (John Travolta’s nephew) in the cast, “A Bright New Boise” is co-produced by Moscow Art Theatre (Too) and the UI Department of Theatre Arts. $15/adults; $10/seniors, UI faculty and staff; free/ UI students. Oct. 16-19, Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10-$15. U. of Idaho Hartung Theater, 6th & Stadium Way. (208-885-6465) FIDDLER ON THE ROOF The season opening show is performance of the classic musical, directed by Troy Nickerson and Heather McHenry-Kroetch. Through Oct. 19, Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $22-$30. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) THE POLISH BOOK OF KARMA A reader’s theater production of the comedy play. Oct. 17-18 at 7 pm, Oct. 19 at 3 pm.

$10-$12. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave, Newport. pendoreilleplayers.org (509-671-3389) BYE BYE BIRDIE Musical performance by the local children’s theater nonprofit. Oct. 17-26; Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sat at 3 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $7.25-$9.25. Theater Arts for Children, 2114 N. Pines. (892-5413) DR. JEKYLL & MR. HYDE Drama based on the novella by Robert Louis Stevenson. In the Firth J. Chew Studio Theatre. Oct. 17-Nov. 16; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $22. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) THE DROWSY CHAPERONE The 2006 Tony Award-winning musical is a parody of 1920s musical comedies. Through Oct. 18; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $8$10. Whitworth Cowles Auditorium, 300 W. Hawthorne. whitworth.edu/theatre FUNERAL FOR A GANGSTER A murder-mystery dinner theater performance, set in a 1920s speakeasy. Guests are encouraged to dress up. Oct. 10-11 and 17-18 at 6 pm. $25. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St., Metaline Falls. cuttertheatre.com (509-446-4108) LAFFING ROOM ONLY A fast paced, mad-cap comedy performed in a dinner-theater format. Oct. 17-18; dinner at 6:30, show at 7:30. $12-$25. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy 211 off Hwy 2, Newport, Wash. (208-448-1294) THE LITTLE MERMAID Performance of the classic tale based on Hans Christian Anderson’s story. Through Oct. 26, Fri at 7 pm (no show Oct. 17); Sat at 1 and 4 pm, Sun at 1 pm. $8-$12. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia. spokanechildrenstheatre.org (328-4886)

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BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 and Initiative 502). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington State, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor Control Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

 In Colorado, a Denver ad agency is feeling the blowback from telling the New York Times that in working to normalize marijuana use it was “weeding out the stoners.” “I don’t understand why one group has to be insulted so the other can feel better about what they’re doing,” a Colorado photographer focused on the marijuana industry told the Cannabist. “It’s one of the things that I’ve always enjoyed about cannabis culture: There doesn’t have to be a cultural divide.”  According to a newspaper in South Bend, Indiana, high-quality weed from Washington and Colorado is fetching $800 an ounce on the black market. According to the cops, “they call this stuff ‘Loud.’”  Washington, D.C., residents with nonviolent marijuana convictions could get those records sealed under a bill that passed a first


EVENTS | CALENDAR

Spokane’s Newest

RECREATIONAL MARIJUANA STORE Open Daily 10am - 8pm 10309 East Trent Avenue 509.309.3193 • greenlightspokane.com WARNING: This product has intoxicating affects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

vote of the city council, reports the Washington Post.  A Georgia man tells local TV that cops mistook the okra plant in his garden for marijuana, knocking on his door with a K9 unit and a helicopter overhead. Yes. A helicopter.  This year’s campaigns for legalization are heating up. Rick Steves is campaigning in Oregon and the New York Times has endorsed measures in Oregon, Alaska and D.C.

 The adorable creature pictured above is called a fisher, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is proposing listing it as a threatened species. Part of the reason: illegal pot farms’ use of rat poisoning. The FWS says the poison is increasingly being found in fishers in California and Oregon, threatening their already eroding populations. n

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THE MOUSETRAP Performance of the Agatha Christie mystery story. Oct. 10-19; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $12. Pullman Civic Theatre, 1220 NW Nye St. pullmancivictheatre.org (509-332-8406) BASH Performance of a two, dark oneact plays by Neil LaBute, both exploring the complexities of evil in everyday life. Through Oct. 19, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org THE SHAPE OF THINGS Performance of the play by Neil LaBute. Limited seating; mature themes and language. Oct. 23-Nov. 1, Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu (208-769-3300) THE CLINK Following its highly successful run of staged readings last spring, this locally-written play comes of age with its first full productions in CdA and Spokane in preparation for its move to the San Francisco Bay Area in the spring of 2015. Oct. 23-Nov. 1; FriSat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third. spokanestageleft.org/ClinkNW2 (208-667-3933)

VISUAL ARTS

ART ‘N CIDER RECEPTION The Corbin Art Center and MONARCH Arts feature an exhibit by artists age 55+ as part of Create Spokane arts month. Reception Oct. 14 from 1:30-4 pm; exhibit also open Oct. 14-16 and 21-23 from 1-4 pm. Corbin Art Center, 507 W. Seventh. (467-9030) LINDA GARRATT SCULPTING DEMO “Clay Creatures” demo by local potter Linda Garratt. Oct. 18 from 12-3 pm. Free. Pottery Place Plus, 203 N. Washington. potteryplaceplus.com (327-6920) EUGENE A. ROSA “Installations, Love, and Environment” is an installation showcase featuring 48 pieces by the late WSU Sociology Professor and Affiliated Professor of Fine Arts. Oct. 18, 12-3 pm. Bank Left Gallery, 100 S. Bridge St., Palouse, Wash. bankleftgallery.com (509-878-8425) MELISSA COLE & FRIENDS An art show to celebrate the Hallows Season, featuring the artist’s dramatic paintings alongside art by Ric Gendron, Rita Vigil, Kim Long, and Neicy Frey, based on the traditional Mexican holiday “Dia de Muertos” (Day of the Dead). Oct. 18-Nov. 15, TuesSat from 10 am-6 pm. Free. Manic Moon & More, 1007 W. Augusta. manicmoonandmore.com (413-9101) SUPER SATURDAY AT THE MAC October’s event theme is “Celebrate the Arts,” and features family arts activities, admission to the museum’s current exhibits and historic Campbell House in an open-house format. Members/ free; regular museum admission applies. Oct. 18, 11 am-3 pm. NThe MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) CULTIVATE SPOKANE Spokane Arts’ monthly, informal gathering to connect those active in the local arts scene. October’s featured speaker is Inlander publisher Ted McGregor, talking about opportunities for artists in the Riverfront Park Master Plan. Oct. 21, 6 pm. Free. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague Ave. createspokane.com ART CELEBRATES WILDERNESS A juried show featuring works in a variety of media by local and regional artists. Oct. 23-Nov. 20; reception Oct. 24, from 5–7:30 pm, with a “Women in the Wilderness Speaker Panel” from 6–7:30 pm. Gallery hours Mon-Fri from 8 am-5 pm. Third Street Gallery, City Hall, 206 E. Third.

ci.moscow.id.us/art (208-883-7036) ONE-NIGHT ART GALLERY A program focusing on the current state of the U.S. educational system. Event includes art viewing, live performances, and a moderated discussion on education reform led by Jennifer Garrison Stuber. Nohost beer/wine reception included. In the MAC Auditorium. Oct. 25, 2-5 pm. Free. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931)

WORDS

PALOUSE BASIN WATER SUMMIT FEAT. CHARLES FISHMAN The 10th annual community dialogue about water includes information about how we continue to manage this important resource. Features a keynote presentation by best-selling business journalist and author of “The Big Thirst – The Secret Life and Turbulent Future of Water,” Charles Fishman. Oct. 16, 4:30-8 pm. Free and open to the public. University Inn Best Western, 1516 Pullman Road, Mocow. palousewatersummit.org SPOKANE IS READING FEAT. KAREN RUSSELL The county-wide reading initiative by the Spokane libraries (county and city) host the program’s 13th author, a Miami native who has authored two short story collections, a novella and this year’s SIR novel, the awardwinning “Swamplandia!,” which was shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize. Oct. 16, 7 pm. Free. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. spokaneisreading.org AUTHOR MARY DAVIES A reading, signing and discussion with the author of “The Ultimate Guide to Dating for Women.” Oct. 17, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) BEDTIME STORIES SPOKANE Celebrated Northwest authors unveil original short works inspired by the event theme, “Bump in the Night.” This year’s authors are Elizabeth Austen, Jamie Ford, Tod Marshall and Sharma Shields, with emcee Gary Stokes. Proceeds benefit Humanities Washington. Reception at 6 pm, dinner at 7 pm. Oct. 17, 6 pm. $75/ person. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside. humanities.org (206-682-1770) IS YOUR MANUSCRIPT READY TO SUBMIT? Mary Cronk Farrell, author of “Pure Grit,” offers tips and tools to apply to a manuscript to determine whether your voice, characterization and plot development are ready for publication. Oct. 18, 10 am-noon. $10/ SCBWI members; $15/non-members. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. inlandnw.scbwi.org (838-5371) SATURDAY AUTHOR SERIES BookPeople host authors Nick Gier, Floyd Loomis, Anesa Miller and Corrie Williamson. Writers read and discuss their work, sign book copies, and answer questions. Light refreshments to be served. Oct. 18, 11 am. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main. (208-882-2669) WASH. STATE POET LAUREATE Elizabeth Austen presents with local poet Christopher Howell, senior editor of EWU’s Willow Springs Editions. Workshop to follow. Oct. 18, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. wapoetlaureate.org/events (838-0206) SPOKANE POETRY SLAM Competitive performance poetry, in which poets are judged by 5 audience judges, chosen at random; winner gets a $50 prize. Held the third Monday of the month at 8 pm; doors open at 7 pm. $5. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague. spokanepoetryslam.org

WSU VISITING WRITER SERIES: BRENDA HILLMAN The award-winning poet, teacher, and activist presents a public reading and discussion of “Seasonal Works with Letters on Fire.” Oct. 20, 5-7 pm. Free. Museum of Art/WSU, Pullman. go.wsu.edu/visitingwriters AUTHOR PETE FROMM Fromm reads from his latest novel “If Not For This,” story of two river guides. Oct. 21, 7:30 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. (208-882-2669) GU VISITING WRITERS SERIES FEAT. BRENDA HILLMAN The award-winning author of nine poetry collections presents a reading. Oct. 21, 7 pm. Free. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. tinyurl.com/GUvisitingwriters CDA IN THE 20TH CENTURY The final presentation of the 12-month lecture series hosted by the library and the Museum of North Idaho, by regional historian Robert Singletary, examining history from 1900-2000. Oct. 23 at 7 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front. cdalibrary.org (208-769-2315)

ETC.

OPUS PRIZE AWARDS Gonzaga University is collaborating with the Opus Prize Foundation to award its $1 million prize for faith-based humanitarian leadership. Oct. 16, 7-9 pm. Free, tickets required. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. gonzaga.edu (624-1200) BLUE MAN GROUP This performance group is known for its theatrical shows and concerts combining comedy, music and technology. Oct. 16-19, show times vary. $32.50-$72.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (800-325-7328) BEAD STAMPEDE Vendors from the Northwest region display a selection of glass, stone, silver, bone, and ceramic beads among other varieties for show and sale. Oct. 17-19. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. spokanecounty.org/fair (208-661-2911) WASHINGTON STATE QUILTERS SHOW 36th annual three-day quilt show highlighting the work of hundreds of local and regional quilters, whose work includes traditional, modern and art quilts. Event includes vendors, a “Quilter’s Boutique,” demos/lectures and more. Oct. 17-19, Fri-Sat from 10 am-6 pm, Sun from 10 am-4 pm. $8/weekend. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. wsqspokane.org (468-3729) ST. JOHN’S CATHEDRAL TOURS Guided tours of the cut-stone, English Gothic Revival cathedral designed by Spokanite Harold C. Whitehouse. It features a unique collection of Medieval-style French stained glass by Charles J. Connick and William Willet & Sons, a 4,100+ pipe organ, and a 49-bell carillon. Offered Wed, Fri and Sat from 11 am-2 pm. Free. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th. stjohns-cathedral.org (838-4277) VIDEO GAME HACKATHON Using a variety of free game development tools, create original video game. Monthly on the third Friday; Oct. 17 and Nov. 21, from 6-9 pm. $5 suggested donation. Gizmo-cda, 806 N. Fourth. gizmo-cda. org (208-651-6200) SPOKANE SWING DANCE CLUB COSTUME DANCE Includes a lesson from 6:15-7:15 pm followed by open dancing. Also includes a children’s and adult costume contest. Oct. 19, 6:15 pm. $3/childern, $10/non-members; $5/members. Corbin Senior Center, 827 W. Cleveland Ave. (327-1584) n

OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 57


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ACROSS 1. Auto additive with a red oval logo 4. Word after good and bad 7. Sarcastic remarks 13. Thornton Wilder’s “____ Town” 14. Man from Oman 16. Surname in punk rock 17. Prefix with lateral 18. Husband of Octavia 19. Iger’s predecessor at Disney 20. Give ____ of approval 22. Buddy of “The Beverly Hillbillies” 24. Breathalyzer determination, for short 25. Tailbone 27. Absorbs, with “up” 28. “Well, now!” 29. Fin de ____ 30. One side in a close encounter 31. Name of three Giants outfielders in 1963

THIS ANSW WEEK’S I SAW ERS ON YOUS 32. Gore and Roker 33. Novelize, e.g. 35. Expels forcibly 36. RR stop 38. ____ kwon do 39. Grandpa on “The Simpsons” 40. Acted bullish? 42. His Twitter bio boasts “I perform random acts of Shaqness” 44. Ringo’s drumming son 47. Dope 48. Butt 49. Borden acquitted of murder in 1893 51. Hillbilly negative 52. Green-lighted 53. Zoo section 54. Wash. neighbor 55. Plant more crops in 57. Org. that runs the annual event Life@50+

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OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 59


n e e W Bull-O Party!

Sat Oct 18th + 6-8pm

George Gee Automotive, Liberty Lake (just off I-90)

Pets:

People: Free $10 donation ea.

All crowd friendly pets welcome Fundraising benefits:

Giveaways • treats • vendors • adoptions • raffles

Costume contests for people & pets

Someone cut you off?

Time to let off some steam. You can really let them have it. Place a FREE ad in the Jeers section. I Saw You • You Saw Me • Cheers & Jeers • ISawYou@Inlander.com

IT’S FREE

1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

I Saw You

You Saw Me

Cheers

Jeers

Roxy’s I gave you a hug at Roxy’s and you said it was what you had needed for a very long time, then asked for another hug. It was great to see you having fun after you said you had a babysitter. I hope you see this S. Get a hold of me, A.

Field about 12:30 pm Saturday, October 11th. I’d like to apologize for my wife’s actions. She is more like an overgrown adolescent at times and I’m certain her parents, who were parked at the curb, were as embarrassed as I was. There was simply no reason or excuse for what she did and I let her know that. I hope you had a good game in spite of her.

dear friend and so very grateful for the opportunity to wake up with you every day. Thank you for making our family whole, we love you very much. D.M.

service truck With the holidays, right around the corner...

Montana Visitor Nicole, I am still kicking myself for not talking with you more!! We met at the Ultimate Bagel. You were visiting Spokane from Montana to see the Willamette-Whitworth football game. Your friend plays for Willamette and you have several friends at Whitworth. I do not believe in “love at first sight,” but meeting you has made me question my belief. Your curly blond hair and beautiful smile just radiated and immediately caught my attention. Just exchanging a few sentences with you hinted at a fun and spunky spirit. I hope to God that someday I see you again. In the off chance that your Whitworth friends read this, I hope they relay this message. Jr. If you like green avocadoes, and gettin’ caught in the rain; if you’re not into yoga, and you have half a brain; if you like makin’ love at midnight, in m’moons an’ m’nape, I’m the lover you’ve looked fo.r. Come with me an’ escape. Bench Bistro, Baby. Say when. GAn Hour Late and A Size Short You were shopping in BCF on Friday, September 12th sometime in evening. Looking for black guy jeans with a “little” stretch to them. I did end up finding the size/black jeans you were out for but no stretch. Funny enough I did think to check each of them!

You Saw Me Re: Valley Dollar Store I think I’m the guy you’re talking about. I was in a hurry. I wanted to talk to you. I’d try to come back and say hi, but I never caught your name. Apology To the coach of the purple girls soccer team at Andrew Rypien

Cheers Road Workers on Lincoln Project Thank you for being so kind and patient with people needing to cut through the road construction site! Everyone I’ve encountered has been considerate and friendly-whether it was for groceries at Huckleberries or going on daily jogs. Thanks!

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” Good Samaritan I’d like to give a huge thank you to the kind gentleman who found my boyfriend’s lost iPhone 4 in the parking lot of the Liberty Lake Home Depot on Sunday, October 12th. We re-traced all of our steps that morning looking for the phone, to no avail. Even though you didn’t have to, thank you for calling us back and leaving the phone at the store’s customer service desk for us to pick up. Many blessings to you! -Sherry Dot Cheers to you my friend, my love, and my hero. I have never met anyone so beautifully devoted to simply being a good human being. You make yourself so available to those around you who may be in need, always willing to lend a helping hand. You have amazed me every day since our first weekend together, I am in awe of you my

Your Mom Again... Trying to let go of you is like trying to live without part of my soul. I don’t know if there is a such thing as a soul-mate, but you are a part of mine like no one has ever been, and if there is, you are definitely mine. There is an emptiness that I can’t explain, there is a feeling of loneliness that no one but you can make go away. The Universe works in mysterious, sometimes cruel ways. I’m not sure if no one loves you but me, but no one loves you as much as I do. Thank you for the time I had with you- Although I don’t feel our time is done-it may be on hold, but not done. You have changed my life forever and taught me so many things. I appreciate you, I respect you, and most of all I adore you.

Jeers

Grumpy Breakfest Cowboy You were at a restaurant berating your young daughter for...everything as far as I could tell. Then you started grunting at your wife, mother-inlaw (?), and other children. Funny, I didn’t hear anyone else at the table make a sound except you. Everyone at the table and the customers were a little scared and uncomfortable, but I just wondered how you ended up with a family to begin with. All I do know is your kids are going to rebel big time one day and the quality of your nursing home is heading south quicker every minute you continue to grumble under your big cowboy hat. RE: Tree Killers Omg! Smh! Someone spells one word wrong and you lose it and call them idiots and ignorant? Lol. You should look in the mirror. Crying over trees in your neighbors property. Take your psych meds; turn off your soap operas and get out into your own property and plant your own trees and shrubs. You’re responsible for your own happiness. Duh!

RE: Cyclists You drivers aren’t perfect either. I’ve seen you putting makeup on, reading a book, talking on your cell phone, eating behind the wheel and oh, is the dog on your lap helping you drive. I was RE: Pedestrians It looks like stopped at a red light when I looked some Inlander readers need a over at the gal driving the car next to me. She was pecking away on a tablet. Once I was even used as a pick. I was going straight and a car stayed behind me waiting for the right turn lane to open up for them. Another car passed me on Alana B. is this week’s winner of the the left and then went hard right in “Say it Sweet” promotion! front of me to Send in your CHEERS so you too can make the turn. Now be entered to win 1 dozen I’d like my 3 ft please.

WINNER!!

Hooded Couple On October 7th, 2014, Wellesley Road in Otis Orchards at 21:08 hours a family was almost RUINED! This is to the man/boy and woman/girl who decided to STEAL my personal tools out of a white Ford F250

“Cheers” cupcakes at Celebrations Sweet Boutique. Valid for 30 days. Call to Redeem 509-327-3471 or 509-315-5973

“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

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Equal Housing Opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Law which makes it illegal to advertise any preference to, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for our real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain on discrimination call HUD free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.


SEE ME!

4 Bedrooms/3 Bathrooms. 2 Car Attached Garage. Large master suite w/walk-in closet, garden tub in desirable Mead area. www.1622WestKedlinLane.com Jeers

Jeers

“sarcasm” sign waved at them, like Sheldon Cooper, in order to recognize it. I suppose it’s possible that this poster is just a troll, but I think it’s more likely that he or she has been a pedestrian and has experienced almost being run over at downtown intersections. I would love to hear from the original poster on this.

these wrong numbers (so to speak) to be hanging around where we drive or cycle. What to do? If they violate the traffic laws, call 9ll on your cell and follow the offender until the cops catches up to them, then sign as a witness. If you feel like it, get the jerk to safely pull off to the side of the road and calmly tell them what a menace to the community they are with their free-style riding. Telling the Police might be a good idea, too. Don’t worry, these Bozo’s traffic behavior is illegal and an item of interest to the Cops. Above all, I sincerely hope some day soon, that the motorists and we Cyclists will stand up, shake hands and cheer as partners in the on-going project of making Spokane’s streets and roads safe for everybody!!

Bicycle Riders This is in response to all of the complaints that have been lodged with the Inlander about bicycle riders in our Faire City. First of all, my spouse and I have been serious cyclists all of our young and adult lives I have deep permanent knee scars from a so-called “monster truck” literally running me off the road for no reason four years ago here in Spokane on Wellesley. The driver must have had terrible anger issues toward bikes. So I’m NOT insensitive to the frustration of motorists. Tooling around town, I have been around bike riders (I won’t call them “cyclists”) who I wanted to jump out of my car and strangle; by the way, I also have a current license and I nice newish car. My point is that there are Cyclist and Bike Riders here in Spokane. They aren’t the same. The CYCLISTS, who wear helmets, don’t smoke/drink while exercising, ride with their family and friends for recreation and ride to work or shop, enter competitions (like the STP in Oregon, Tour the Blast, Spokefest, Century, triathlons, half-triathlons, Cycle Washington, etc.) We pay good money to belong to professional organizations (Critical Mass and so on) to distinguish ourselves as SERIOUS CYCLISTS. The CASUAL BIKE RIDERS have no interest in this. They’re riding to get their licenses back or their drunk driving convictions lifted. They’re abusing bicycle transportation because it’s an easy way to sell drugs. We, in NO way, claim these clowns. They unfairly give our numbers an extremely bad name, and none of my friends and associates want

Jeers

your heads against the same political party year after year and continue your nose dive to the bottom in all important indicators and categories. Idaho is at, or near bottom, for all education areas and others; pay for teachers and staff, dollars per student spent, drop out rates, college bound students, the list goes on. “More of the same” is what the “R”everse Party, or the “R”ich Party, wants for you: keep you uneducated, keep you poor, keep you from proper health, keep you from voting, keep you distracted, medicated, and frightened and angry about federal control of anything, and keeping you thinking your guns and God are at risk. (Oh and by the way, God and Jesus would never approve of using their names with guns in the same sentence). Many Halloween Thieves Some little of you are on Federal assistance a-holes have nothing better but yet you bad mouth the system to do than steal my Halloween that is keeping you alive. Your decorations. Really? Who does State Government has done that? So if you notice your nothing for you for decades but neighbor suddenly has a one of a strip your natural environments, kind, hand made giant spider web your healthcare, your wages, your with a 6’ black and purple spider equal rights. Idaho State Reversers and another 3’ spider, it’s probably receive a “D” grade for operating mine. Hope they enjoy a lot of ethics. In other words, Corruption! They have refused 100’s of millions another persons hard work. of dollars from the feds for your healthcare. You have the second to Dog Thieves Service/sick dog last worst roads in the nation. You thieves...hope you know that the are in third place for aggressive dog you stole on October 11th at drivers. Building codes are almost Wal-Mart in Airway Heights out of a non-existent resulting in lousy green Crown Vic has a loving home construction methods and crappy and an owner that needs him back homes and buildings. You hunters because he is a service animal, also whine about wolves all the time the dog BLUE has health problems but don’t get off your asses to that require special treatment or he actually hunt big game away from gets really sick, so if you find it in roads. If you are a woman and your heart to return him, take him don’t mind being a second class to the local shelter where we can citizen, don’t want to choose how reclaim our family memeber. But if to run your own life, and don’t not hope you enjoy him pooping all mind making 77% of what men do; over you house and car and tearing vote Reverse. If you are a person everything you own apart and yes of color (we are ALL ethnically I mean everything and hope you diverse) and don’t mind racism don’t have other pets especially and discrimination, vote Reverse. cats ‘cause he hates them. If you don’t mind your clean water and environment disappearing so Try Something Else, Idaho! You the wealthy 1 percent can make poor people. Literally. You bash huge money, paying you little for a very short time and then stripping and poisoning your last free playground and clean water (state and federal lands); vote Reverse. If you don’t mind being squashed by your state government, finically, healthfully, emotionally, and if you love being afraid and angry all the time and enjoy following sociopathic leaders like sheep off a cliff; vote Reverse. You ’S K E E THIS W ! are going down the toilet so fast you can’t even smell ANSWERS yourselves, and do want the rest of us mingling around to help you. You want to become your own country, (as if that will ever happen) and want No help from tourism because you want your woods to yourselves. Sheeesh, Idaho! Maybe it is time for us to take our money elsewhere. Maybe it is time to Boycott Idaho. BOB

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the youth of America. Oh diary, Lady Fortune can be a mean old bird sometimes. TUE, OCT. 7, 5 PM My spirits have rebounded from last night. This morning I even called Stanford head coach David Shaw and told him we’re going to run the ball a ton against him on Friday. We’re actually going to pass more than ever! I think he bought it. It’s these sort of mind games that could take me to the next level of coaching. TUE, OCT. 7, 11:35 PM I think I finally cracked the secret to time travel!

WED, OCT. 8, 10 PM At today’s film session, I lectured the team on the Peloponnesian War and how it relates to today’s situation in Ukraine and this, naturally, led us to pirates and my bestselling book on Geronimo, which was available for sale at a special friends-only discount price. We didn’t get a chance to talk about improving our pass defense, but as a coach, you must have priorities. After that, I gave a guest lecture in a doctoral-level physics class and still had enough time to hit the library to take in some Proust. Sometimes you have to have some fun in this business, you know what I mean?

Leach knew that taking over at WSU wouldn’t be easy.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

SATIRE

The Leach Diaries

We managed to get our hands on the diary of Mike Leach, head football coach at Washington State University. What follows are selected entries from the last couple of weeks, which have not been the best of times for the beleaguered Cougars: FRI, OCT. 3, 7 PM We take on Cal tomorrow at home. I told the kids to be ready for a fight and to come out swinging their swords and all the usual pirate stuff. You know, just classic Mike Leach. I have to admit, though, I was a little distracted. Turns out that philosophical treatise about the dangers of technology I spouted at Monday’s press conference has gone, as the kids say, “viral.” The people are beginning to listen! SAT, OCT. 4, 11:45 PM Oh dear diary, I fear our mighty ship has gone down once again, this time by way of a field goal calamity even Zeus himself could not have predicted. Connor Halliday’s golden arm threw for more yards than any other arm in the long history of this beloved sport of kings. I thought writing this with old-timey flair would help my

62 INLANDER OCTOBER 16, 2014

spirit, but it has not. Now for a long meditative walk through my garbanzo bean field.

THU, OCT. 9, 8 PM Today we flew to Palo Alto in advance of tomorrow’s battle against Stanford. The captain said we were flying at 35,000 feet, but my calculations had us at only 33,400 feet. I drafted a letter to the FAA. Also, the flight didn’t offer peanuts; this complaint was levied in a separate letter addressed to an agency to be determined at a later date. THU, OCT. 9, 9:30 PM Drew a super cool spaceship on my dinner napkin tonight and now I can’t find it. That’s unfortunate, as it was better than those other spaceships I’ve been drawing all week. It had a force field and, like, five rocket boosters. FRI, OCT. 10, 7 AM It’s game day again. Didn’t sleep much last night. I watched film of Stanford’s formidable defense into the wee hours, and I think I might have found some ways to get by them. The plan involves throwing the ball more than EVER. I think Halliday is going to throw for 800 or more yards tonight. Feeling good about this game.

SUN, OCT. 5, 10 AM If I hear the phrase “Couged it” one more time…

FRI, OCT. 10, 2 PM Why in the hell are we playing on a Friday night again? I think ESPN is trying to get back at me. Something doesn’t smell right about this.

MON, OCT. 6, 7 PM Just fired the special teams coach. I had to do something. Right, diary? I mean, we gave up two touchdowns on kick returns and that missed field goal… I can’t even think about it. Did I do the right thing, my dear spiralbound friend? You know where I’m coming from, right? Who knew this job was going to be so tough? The Pac12 has gone and gotten itself really damn good, and we’re trying to bring kids here over places like UCLA and Washington, which are located in cities with freeways and rock and roll concerts and other things that tempt

SAT, OCT. 11, 10 AM Sitting on the plane as I write. We are returning to the Palouse with a 34-17 loss the only souvenir of another long road trip. The losses are mounting, dear diary, and my men can sense the season slipping away from them. There’s only one thing we can do — keep passing the ball. For it is through five-step drops and timing routes that a man finds truth. If that doesn’t work, we need to get to work on that time travel plan and find a way to fix this season. — COMPILED BY MIKE BOOKEY


ok, so my subs really aren't gourmet and we're not french either. my subs just taste a little better, that's all! I wanted to call it jimmy john's tasty sandwiches, but my mom told me to stick with gourmet. Regardless of what she thinks, freaky fast is where it's at. I hope you love 'em as much as i do! peace!

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#13 GOURMET VEGGIE CLUB® Double provolone, real avocado spread, sliced cucumber, lettuce, tomato & mayo. (Try it on my 7-grain whole wheat bread. This veggie sandwich is really yummy! Sprouts* optional)

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The same as our #3 Totally Tuna except this one has a lot more. Housemade tuna salad, provolone, sliced cucumber, lettuce & tomato. (Sprouts* optional)

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"YOUR MOM WANTS YOU TO EAT AT JIMMY JOHN'S!" ® *WARNING: THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH ADVISES THAT EATING RAW OR UNDER-COOKED SPROUTS POSES A HEALTH RISK TO EVERYONE, BUT ESPECIALLY TO THE ELDERLY, CHILDREN, PREGNANT WOMEN, AND PERSONS WITH WEAKENED IMMUNE SYSTEMS. THE CONSUMPTION OF RAW SPROUTS MAY RESULT IN AN INCREASED RISK OF FOODBORNE ILLNESS. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT YOUR PHYSICIAN OR LOCAL PUBLIC HEALTH DEPARTMENT. ©1985, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2007, 2008, 2013, 2014 JIMMY JOHN’S FRANCHISE, LLC ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. We Reserve The Right To Make Any Menu Changes.

OCTOBER 16, 2014 INLANDER 63


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Inlander 10/16/2014  
Inlander 10/16/2014