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LONG LIVE BOWIE! A MUSICAL TRIBUTE TO THE BELOVED ICON PAGE 39 ‘A LITTLE TWISTED’ MEET SPOKANE’S NEW POET LAUREATE PAGE 8

OCTOBER 10-16, 2019 | AN ANTIDOTE TO FAKE NEWS

R U O HOW

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O o b P a o G BEIN ou can d what y

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Whatever it is, we’ll help you get there.

See how our Spokane banking team provided Dry Fly Distilling the high-touch service they deserve. Hear more from Dry Fly and see other stories at watrust.com/awesomebusiness.

2 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019


INSIDE VOL. 26, NO. 52 | ON THE COVER: JON MERRELL ILLUSTRATION

COMMENT 5 NEWS 13 COVER STORY 22 CULTURE 27

FOOD 32 FILM 36 MUSIC 39 EVENTS 44

I SAW YOU GREEN ZONE ADVICE GODDESS BULLETIN BOARD

46 48 52 53

EDITOR’S NOTE

F

orget the Information Age. We are now decidedly living in the DISINFORMATION Age. That’s not a partisan argument — it’s a fact, one of those weighty things that anchor us to reality. Admittedly, facts and truth can be harder to spot in the toxic stew of the internet where trolls, bots and your Aunt Edna spread hoaxes, conspiracy theories and otherwise bogus information. One of the experts cited in this week’s special report by Daniel Walters describes it as a type of pollution (page 22): “We’re sort of at the whims of everyday folks, disinformation agents, algorithms, white supremacists, all jockeying to win the attention economy. The result is an air that is so clogged that we can barely breathe.” Sadly, with 2020 on the horizon and tech advances making it easier to mash together “deepfakes,” things are bound to get weirder. But as tired and fed-up as you might be, don’t lose heart. There are things we can all do. Giving up can’t be one of them, though. A world where no one cares what’s right or wrong or just plain horseshit is not one we can willingly embrace. — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

START SMALL PAGE 6

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A BIRD’S-EYE VIEW PAGE 32

LIFE ON THE STREET PAGE 44

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

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EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

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WHERE DO YOU GET YOUR NEWS?

JUSTIN McKINNEY

Social media. How do you distinguish between what’s real and fake? What makes logical sense. What do you consider “fake news”? It’s emotional, not fact-driven. It’s an opinion that’s emotionally charged to get people to believe it’s news.

FILM & MUSIC EDITOR

ART DIRECTOR

Quinn Welsch (x279) COPY EDITOR

Wilson Criscione (x282), Josh Kelety (x237), Daniel Walters (x263), Samantha Wohlfeil (x234) STAFF WRITERS

Young Kwak PHOTOGRAPHER

Caleb Walsh

LUIS GARCIA

TV news is probably the biggest thing, because it’s easiest and most convenient. I try to get it from a lot of sources. Why do you see that as most trustworthy? If you get multiple sources, you can form your own opinion based on that instead of one source. Things can get polarized and it’s good to look at everything.

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RACHELLE ARNOLD

Mostly my friends, the people I live with. Why your friends? Because my friends are always watching news all day and night, so they know. It’s like music at our house.

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I like Apple News and CNN. Why do you see those as most trustworthy? I feel like they show sides of both political spectrums.

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Probably NPR. I listen to a lot of NPR podcasts. What do you consider “fake news”? Things that focus on just getting people to read it rather than delivering the news.

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Small Steps

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Why we must think big, but act small BY JOHN T. REUTER

T

he nature of many of our biggest problems requires that successful solutions will be small and incremental. That’s one CliffsNotes version of the book Strong Towns: A Bottom-Up Revolution to Rebuild American Prosperity by Charles Marohn, out earlier this month. For thousands of years, Marohn writes, we built the communities within which we lived incrementally, slowly developing some “spooky wisdom” about what works and what doesn’t. That wisdom was passed down and built upon by generation after generation until the classic model of growth was created. A settlement might start with a few wooden shacks. Then those would be gradually replaced

by larger wooden structures, eventually replaced by brick buildings and potentially even taller buildings as time went on. Slowly, but surely, some places — for reasons we didn’t always understand — would grow into cities and others simply faded, forgotten by time. This incremental process ensured we rarely invested too much in the wrong places and were able to build magnificent communities when the time and place were right. We largely stopped building this way in

SAY WHAT?

DO SOMETHING!

“He should probably stay in his lane — like I tell my players — and figure out homelessness and I think he’s got a state that borders Mexico and get that mess figured out.”

REFOREST SPOKANE DAY: The Lands Council is partnering with Avista for this annual event, this year focusing on urban reforestation and revitalization of Spokane’s downtown corridor. Urban trees can help mitigate some negative impacts and social consequences of urbanization, and thus make cities more resilient to these changes. Sat, Oct. 12 from 10 am-1 pm. Free; register online. Downtown Spokane. landscouncil.org (209-2407)

Gonzaga men’s basketball coach Mark Few speaking about California’s governor, Gavin Newsom, who recently signed into law the “Fair Pay to Play Act,” enabling college athletes to receive some compensation from their name, image and likeness. Few, who says he supports the idea of compensating players, was talking with Stadium sports network.

6 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019 Racking your brain for creative ideas for holiday gifts? Let us do the work. We're a pullman-based


North America after World War II and embarked on a grand “Suburban Experiment.” We started building for automobiles in new novel ways that required intensive capital investments upfront. Sadly, these investments have rarely panned out. Today most of our America’s cities are slowly going broke and things are falling apart. The amount of infrastructure (from miles of roads to parking spots to feet of pipe to number of fire hydrants) has expanded dramatically on a per capita basis since the middle of the last century. The result is we can’t afford the roads and other infrastructure we built initially during those postwar boom years. Some suggest megaprojects will save us, but looking into the economics of such proposals reveals that usually they just dig the ditch deeper. No, Marohn argues, the only way back to a prosperous America is by returning to those old practices of building communities bit by bit, one increment at a time. I first stumbled across Marohn’s writing (then just a blog) as a 20-something-year-old small town councilman in Sandpoint. As we’ve become friends over the last decade — I now serve on his organization’s board — I’ve realized that his insights can be applied beyond city planning and finance. The reality is that many of our problems are simply too complex to be solved by big solutions driven top-down. We don’t fully understand the nature of many problems and often our solutions can actually cause as many new problems as they address. Wendell Berry writes about this in regards to industrial agriculture in his essay “The Whole Horse.” We add more fertilizer or pesticides or whatever and the result in the system changes in surprising ways that require yet more applications. Incrementalism, on the other hand, requires the humility to realize that many of our clever modern ideas are probably not as clever as we think they are. It also requires policy makers to realize they may not even have the ideas that should be implemented at all — but instead to create a platform for others to experiment. I remembered how tough this can be for our leaders when recently watching an episode of Netflix’s Abstract: The Art of Design about designer Cas Holman, who creates tools, toys and platforms for children to play. Part of her challenge is convincing people to accept toys that don’t come with prescribed instructions of how to play with them, but instead create opportunities for children to direct their own play. If we have difficulty accepting that children figure out how to play and create, it’s no wonder we struggle with allowing people to make decisions about how to build our places. And yet, the solutions to many of our biggest challenges rest on rediscovering the humility to allow experimentation, instead of insisting on unlikely giant gambles. Ultimately, we can build a better world, but only by rebuilding trust in each other first and then taking small steps forward together. n John T. Reuter, a former Sandpoint City Councilman, has been active in protecting the environment, expanding LGBT rights and Idaho’s Republican Party politics.

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FROM THE VAULT OCT. 12, 2006: Breakfast food is arguably some of the best food, and the 2006 Dining Guide took this statement to a new level. This cover section took us around the Inland Northwest to the best of the breakfast places, some of which still stand as the gold standard for this category of food (like Donut Parade). The guide also highlighted the region’s best bagels, benedicts and bougie brunches.

AT THE MAC Norman Rockwell’s America™ © 2019 The National Museum of American Illustration, Newport, RI and the American Illustrators Gallery, NYC.

Norman Rockwell, The Doughboy and His Admirers, 1919, Oil on canvas. © NMAI

NORMAN ROCKWELL’S AMERICA

OCTOBER 5, 2019-JANUARY 12, 2020

northwestmuseum.org

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | NEWSMAKERS

Q&A CHRIS COOK Spokane’s new poet laureate brings with him a dark sense of humor and a passion for music BY QUINN WELSCH

“A

little bit twisted.” After a brief pause, that’s how local poet Chris Cook describes his style of verse. Cook, a familiar face to Spokane’s poetry scene, was named the city’s poet laureate at the Spokane Arts Awards Gala on Sept. 29. Current Poet Laureate Mark Anderson passes the torch to Cook in early November. You may already know Cook in a number of different roles in the community: as a trumpet player with the Spokane Symphony (since 1981), a Gonzaga music instructor, the host of poetry open mics at Auntie’s and Baby Bar, author of two poetry books (The View from the Broken Mic, Damn Good Cookie) or possibly even as a yo-yo enthusiast. A true Renaissance man. We spoke to Cook about his poetic style, what the new title means to him and what we can expect during his two-year gig. The responses below have been lightly edited for length and clarity. INLANDER: What does it mean to be Spokane’s poet laureate and what made you apply for the position? COOK: I think in the past few years I’ve seen myself obtain more of a servant’s heart. I still enjoy getting up on stage and stepping up to a microphone. But I get more out of serving others, helping them find their voice. And I think I realized I’ve been involved in the poetry scene for 20 years, which is kind of a milestone, and so I thought I’m going to regret it if I don’t throw my hat in the ring. I’m also excited to create some events for Spokane where we can encounter poetry and the arts in new and appealing ways. I’m very excited to cross-pollinate the arts so you don’t just go to a poetry reading. Maybe there’s music, or visual arts, or culinary arts. What were some of your early musical and literary influences?

I grew up in a musical house. My dad was a clarinetist and he had a really amazing vinyl collection and the best sound system around. We were the last family to get a television because we spent a lot of time listening to classical jazz, folk music, and we always kept books around as well. There was this really twisted collection of children’s poetry called Beastly Boys & Ghastly Girls, it was like cautionary tales that were really gruesome, not acceptable by today’s standards, but they stuck with me and I’ve written some gruesome poetry. There does seem to be a darker theme in some of your poems. No doubt [laughing]. No Doubt. But the music tie-in... I am very attuned to the rhythm of words and I enjoy the challenge of structure and rhyme and meter — just like music has a time signature — or phrase length. My uncle was my childhood hero. He was a professional trumpeter in Boston and an early music specialist and was one of my first teachers. He used to play at family weddings and it raised the hair on the back of my neck. It affected me deeply. Something else that affected me deeply was that he saved his instruments for me and he gave them to me. Who are you reading today? I like musicians whose lyrics are poetic. I’m not a big fan of Bob Dylan’s poetry. He has a book called Tarantula that I’ve yet to figure out, but I love his song lyrics. I love Randy Newman, Tom Waits and Ben Folds for their lyrics. In some ways they’re a little twisted. They step over the line. And you like that? What’s not to like by something that doesn’t toe the line or play by the rules? I think maybe that’s why I enjoy trying new forms. n

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M A R T I N

W O L D S O N

T H E A T E R

A T

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F O X

CALENDAR OF EVENTS SPOKANE SYMPHONY: MUSIC OF DAVID BOWIE

WHITWORTH UNIVERSITY JAZZ ENSEMBLE FEATURING RYAN KEBERLE & CATHARSIS

GREEN FEET RESCUE BOOSTER CLUB BENEFIT FOR WOUNDED WARRIORS FEATURING DAVID DAVINCI

SPOKANE YOUTH SYMPHONY 70 YEARS OF INSPIRATION

Spokane Symphony Masterworks 3

Wednesday, Nov. 6, 7:30pm

Saturday, Nov. 23, 8pm Sunday, Nov. 24, 3pm

Saturday, Oct. 19, 8pm Sunday, Oct. 20, 3pm

KIP MOORE: ROOM TO SPARE TOUR

GEORGE LOPEZ: LIVE IN CONCERT

SPOKANE SYMPHONY: ANCIENT TALES OF MAGIC: MUSIC OF HARRY POTTER

SPOKANE SYMPHONY POPS 2: A CELEBRATION OF VETERANS

SPOKANE SYMPHONY PRESENTS: THE NUTCRACKER

Saturday, Oct. 12, 8pm

Sunday, Oct. 13, 3pm

SOVIET TRANSCENDENCE

Saturday, Nov. 2, 8pm

Sunday, Nov. 3, 4pm

NICK NORTON PRESENTS: PHANTASM AN EVENING OF MAGIC

Thursday, Nov. 7, 8pm

Saturday, Oct. 26, 2pm & 8pm Sunday, Oct. 27, 3pm

Saturday, Nov. 9, 8pm

FOX PRESENTS RAY LAMONTAGNE JUST PASSING THROUGH Thursday, Nov. 14, 7:30pm

Music of Harry Potter & Other Halloween Faves

ANCIENT TALES OF MAGIC

Oct 26 2PM & 8PM

Oct 27 3PM

Thank you Sponsors:

This Spokane Symphony favorite sells out fast. Actors, dancers, and a magician explore musical tales of wizards, witches, muggles and magical creatures, all backed by the powerful Spokane Symphony.

Spokane Symphony Masterworks 4

50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE MOON LANDING

Saturday, Nov. 16, 8pm Sunday, Nov. 17, 3pm

Spokane Symphony Movies & Music

TIM BURTON’S THE NIGHTMARE BEFORE CHRISTMAS IN CONCERT LIVE TO FILM

Saturday, Nov. 30, 8pm

Thursday, December 5, 7:30pm Friday, December 6, 7:30pm Saturday, December 7, 2pm & 7:30pm Sunday, December 8, 2pm

Spokane Symphony Pops 2

Spokane Symphony Masterworks 4

Nov 9

Nov 16

CELEBRATION OF VETERANS 8PM

Musical salute to our veterans from all branches of the armed forces. Patriotic music from each era from the Civil War to present day. Conductor: Morihiko Nakahara

Thank you to our Sponsor: Carol and Colin Lampard

50TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE MOON LANDING 8PM

Nov 17 3PM

High-definition NASA films set to Holst’s The Planets capture the inspiration and excitement of space exploration. Other space-themed music celebrates the moon landing.

Thank you Sponsors: Maxine Kopczynski and Don & Charlotte Lamp on behalf of:

T i c k e t s • 5 0 9 6 2 4 1 2 0 0 • S p o k a n e S y m p h o n y. o r g • F o x T h e a t e r S p o k a n e . o r g 10 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019


COMMENT | FROM READERS

Author Jess Walter.

Readers respond to an opinion by author Jess Walter (“Who Runs This Place,” 10/3/19) that next month’s mayoral election is a battle between “old and new Spokane”:

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

BLAISE BARSHAW: As the [title] says, and the posts below prove, it is a battle of old and new Spokane. But old Spokane needs to accept that they are on the way out, so it helps everyone to try and work together to both share in the new opportunities and curb the other inevitable social issues to accommodate the process. Fighting and name calling helps nothing. DAVID BACKUS: Let’s look at the policies of failing big cities like L.A. and Seattle where no one can afford to live and homelessness and drug addiction is soaring… do they have “forward” leadership too? MIGUELITO ES SORRE: Don’t you mean a battle between various elitist entities neither of which will bring meaningful change where it actually matters. Good restaurants and art festivals are not the benchmark for uplifting the fallen. BRENDAN FLYNN: Spokane is a drug and crime infested shithole. DREW SWAYNE: Spokane is the best it has ever been, which is why I moved my family back here. Let’s keep it up, and keep moving forward! ADAM J. VINCENT: Vote Nadine Woodward. Get the scummy political a-holes that keep destroying this place outa here. RON TUSSEY: Thanks for writing this Jess. Your comments are deadon and insightful. STEVEN KALE: Thank you Jess. There’s nothing worse than a declining city core, neglected by those who flee to the suburbs. ADAM J. VINCENT: Hilarious… welcome to Spokane’s wannabe big city politics and its downfall. RON TUSSEY: Trump playbook. Build a wall. The homeless will pay for it. n

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 11


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The Realtors PAC backing candidates Nadine Woodward and Cindy Wendle says that increasing density isn’t enough to address Spokane’s housing crisis. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

ELECTION 2019

THE DEEP POCKETS

OF REALTORS Spokane’s city elections get major investment from the Realtors PAC as many look to change leadership at City Hall BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

I

n some ways, spending half a million dollars to get candidates elected is nothing new for the Washington Realtors Political Action Committee. The Realtors PAC spent nearly $1.9 million statewide in 2018, a year with both local and state elections. According to Public Disclosure Commission data, that year the PAC spent about $9,000 on radio and social media ads for county candidates Al French, Mary Kuney and Tom Konis, and made contributions to state and local candidates including Vicky Dalton ($250), Mike Volz ($500), Marcus Riccelli ($750), Tom Konis, Al French and Michael Baumgartner ($1,000 each) and Matt Shea ($2,000). But spending nearly $280,000 for just four candidates in Spokane this year is totally unprecedented. Not only does that represent more than half the PAC’s statewide spending this year (reported as about $488,000 of Monday, Oct. 7), but the spending from just one group represents more than the combined total of all independent expenditures by committees in any previous Spokane election going back to at least 2007. With the November election weeks away, the Realtors PAC is on pace to more than double the amount of independent expenditures that all committees spent on six separate City Council candidates in 2017. Significantly, the Realtors PAC money has nearly doubled the expenditures for the campaigns of mayoral candidate Nadine Woodward and Spokane City Council president candidate Cindy Wendle, who are running against current City Council President Ben Stuckart and Councilman Breean Beggs.

WHY NOW?

The large spend this year is due to an ask from the Spokane Association of Realtors, which interviewed about 90 percent of candidates running for office back in May before deciding to reach out to the state PAC to support their picks, explains Spokane Realtor and Washington Realtors PAC Chair Tom Hormel. “The Washington Realtors PAC never gets involved in a race they aren’t asked to get involved in,” Hormel says. “It’s a bottom-up approach.” During the interviews, candidates were asked about their stances on property rights, growth, homelessness and other real estate-related topics, he says. ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 13


NEWS | ELECTION 2019 “THE DEEP POCKETS OF REALTORS,” CONTINUED...

Council President Ben Stuckart, who’s running for Spokane mayor, says his opponent Nadine Woodward is pushing for sprawl outside the city. the Beacon Hill area and credits Stuckart for helping to advance that project. “Ironically, Ben Stuckart and Mike Fagan are the reason Beacon Hill is moving forward,” Rayner says, “and they are as opposite politically as you can get.” Rayner says he was the one who pushed the conservative Spokane Home Builders Association to endorse Stuckart in 2015. “Ben and I agree on growth and how you get things done,” he says, adding, “My fear is that we have a lot of nice people serving as mayor, and they don’t have the experience or skill set.” Stuckart, for his part, says he thinks it’s pretty clear the Realtors support his opponent for her willingness to look at building outside the city.

“This election is about whether we build up our neighborhoods or sprawl outside Spokane,” Stuckart says, noting that in a July 21 Spokesman-Review story, Woodward was quoted saying she’d support the idea of using city resources to encourage development outside city limits. “That’s the definition of sprawl.” Stuckart says he supports a three-pronged approach to address the housing crisis: increase the supply of housing, which he says is achievable within the city’s limits and existing urban growth area; provide incentives for work force and senior housing; and strengthen protections for renters with programs such as relocation funds that can help those who get priced out. So why interview with the Realtors in hopes they

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“The main thing right now is we’re in a housing crisis,” Hormel says. “There’s no one single policy that’s going to fix that. We were looking for somebody who had ideas and the way they thought that whole issue could be tackled. We’ve got to build out, we’ve got to build up.” For Woodward, a former longtime TV news anchor, the Washington Realtors PAC has spent nearly $162,000 to send mailers and advertisements to voters and pay for people to canvass for her campaign. For Wendle, the spend on similar products is almost $85,000 so far. Woodward was favored for “looking at bringing in all of the stakeholders” and a willingness to make decisions based on the information they provide and not just on an opinion she already holds, Hormel says. “She wants to build coalitions and talk to everybody involved before she jumps forward with a housing plan,” Hormel says. Hormel wouldn’t say that means Stuckart isn’t willing to listen to all the voices involved. “I won’t speak negative about any of the candidates, you can infer whatever you want from that,” he says. Realtors in the area want to address a lack of inventory, but that doesn’t necessarily mean they just want sprawl either, Hormel says. “You can’t just say you want density in the downtown core and that will fix the issues,” Hormel says. “When people talk about unbridled sprawl, that can’t happen. We have the Growth Management Act. But within that law, how can we best fix the issues coming at us?” Not all Realtors and developers invested in Spokane share the vision of Hormel and the PAC. Pete Rayner, a prominent local developer and longtime conservative, is working to build as many as 2,000 housing units in


might fund his campaign earlier this year? “I have better policies than her. I’m just not willing to go sell myself and tell them everything they want to hear,” Stuckart says. “Where I’m not willing to go is subsidizing housing outside of the city of Spokane, which is shocking. … There’s a land-quantity analysis that shows we have plenty of land both in and out of the city, and we don’t need to expand the urban growth area until 2030.” Woodward has not agreed to a phone or in person interview with the Inlander since late June, sending only emailed statements on occasion. In response to an emailed request to talk about election spending as well as climate change — Woodward did not attend a candidate forum on the topic at Gonzaga last week — Woodward’s campaign manager responded, “We have no comment” and clarified that applied to both topics.

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side from the mayoral and council president races, this year represents a chance to change the balance of the council, Hormel says. While council races are nonpartisan, most current members of the council tend to lean progressive. “It’s been a six-one council for quite a while, and we just see an opportunity to change the face of our City Council,” Hormel says. “I’ve been to a few [council] meetings and not everybody feels heard or talked to in a proper fashion.” The PAC has so far spent about $23,000 for Andy Rathbun in his race against incumbent Karen Stratton in District 3, and about $10,000 for Michael Cathcart, who is challenging Tim Benn in the open race for District 1. “The housing crisis is the largest problem that this city has,” Hormel says. “When people tell you that homelessness is caused from rising rents, that’s part of the housing crisis. That’s the No. 1 issue that should be on the table and that’s what we’re working to try to fix.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Promising Trends Study: Marijuana legalization in Washington and Colorado didn’t increase crime

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egal marijuana in Washington and Colorado hasn’t led to spikes in violent crime and property crime, according to a NEW STUDY from Washington State University researchers. In 2012, voters in both Washington and Colorado approved measures that legalized the sale, possession and consumption of recreational marijuana for adults 21 and over — the first states in the nation to do so. At the time, some critics of legalization argued that the measures would increase crime, while proponents countered that crimes associated with the illicit marijuana market would decrease. The study, which was published in the academic journal Justice Quarterly, analyzed monthly crime rates compiled in the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reports from 1999 to 2016. The researchers compared data from Washington and Colorado to 21 states where recreational and medical marijuana is still illegal.

Additionally, Willits says that law enforcement officials contacted by the researchers working on the study reported trends similar to what their analysis found. “Law enforcement told us to expect this, that they weren’t seeing an uptick in crime,” he says. “But they were seeing issues with DUIs, youth access. A lot of them made claims about the persistence of the black market.” (JOSH KELETY) YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

In short, the researchers found that legalizing marijuana had “no statistically significant long-term effects” on serious violent crime and property crime rates. And while property crime in both states — and aggravated assaults in Washington — spiked following legalization in 2012, those increases do not reflect “permanent shifts” in crime trends. In fact, burglary rates in Washington have since declined. “Our results from Colorado and Washington suggest that legalization has not had major detrimental effects on public safety,” the study reads. However, Dale Willits, an assistant professor of criminal justice and criminology at Washington State University and a co-author of the report, tells the Inlander that their findings don’t necessarily indicate a long-term decrease in crime, either. “I would be hesitant to honestly say that any of our results show that legalization reduced crime or increased crime,” he says. “At best, they say that legalization of cannabis is not fulfilling the claims of either the proponents or opponents of legalization.” He adds that the researchers only looked at certain types of violent crimes, like rape, homicide, and robbery. Lower level offenses were not examined.

THROWN UNDER THE BUS

Back in 2016, the Inlander told the story of Ooh Media, an advertising firm fired by the SPOKANE TRANSIT AUTHORITY. Today, that story has become a central piece of a lawsuit against the STA, filed last week by Ooh Media in federal court. In 2016, STA CEO E. Susan Meyer accused Ooh Media CEO Ted Carroll of “continuing to misrepresent the board’s ad policy.” The final straw, Meyer had said, was an ad for the Amalgamated Transit Union — the union representing STA bus drivers — informing other drivers they have the “right to organize.” While Carroll thought the ads were fine, Meyer argued they were a violation of a policy preventing advertisements from “expressing or advocating” views on public issues. The union sued after the ads were denied. But since then, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals vindicated both the union and Carroll. STA’s advertising policy was too vague, the court ruled, and STA violated the First Amendment by rejecting the transit union ad. Ooh Media’s lawsuit argues that Carroll had been punished for correctly arguing that the ads should be accepted. “[STA] was his one client as they well knew,” says attorney Jeffry Finer, representing Carroll. “He has been doing all he can to make ends meet.”

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16 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019


And Finer argues that Meyer made untrue statements in the Inlander article that have made it difficult for Carroll to find work. For example, Meyer had publicly blamed Carroll for initially refusing to run the United Coalition of Reason’s ads about atheism in 2011. But internal emails, according to the lawsuit, showed that it was an STA employee who initially told Carroll not to run the advertisement, saying “let’s not go there with this ad” due to “huge pushback from both [the] CEO and director of operations.” “They may have been trying to balance their duties to their public and the obligations on the law, but they let the hammer fall on Mr. Carroll,” Finer says. The lawsuit seeks “significant damages” to be proven at trial. STA spokesman Brandon Rapez-Betty says that he cannot comment on pending litigation, but that STA hasn’t been running advertisements on buses since it got sued in 2016. (DANIEL WALTERS)

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NEWS | DIGEST

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HIGHER BILLS, BUT NOT SO HIGH? Washington Utilities and Transportation Commission (UTC) staff disagree with rate hikes proposed by AVISTA and have suggested lower increases for electric and natural gas customers over the next two years. Instead of Avista’s proposed increases that would raise the average residential customer’s bill by $7.93 per month for electricity and $4.60 per month for gas, UTC staff have recommended an average increase of $4.72 per month for electricity and $2.97 per month for gas. The three-member commission can choose to agree with staff or not, and is accepting public comments on the proposed rate increases, with a public meeting scheduled for Oct. 28 at the Northeast Community Center. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

FEATURING NATIONAL NEWS FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES

LANE SWITCHING When asked where he stands on college athletes being able to get paid, Gonzaga coach MARK FEW said in an interview that he’s “all for” finding a way to do that. But that was only after Few took a shot at California Gov. Gavin Newsom, who just signed the recently passed Fair Pay to Play Act that would permit college athletes there to get paid for the name, image and likeness. Few says: “He should probably stay in his lane — like I tell my players — and figure out homelessness, and I think he’s got a state that borders Mexico and get that mess figured out, and the budget and some things like that.” (WILSON CRISCIONE)

SHELTER PLAN HITS ANOTHER OBSTACLE As the city of Spokane scrambles to find more shelter space before WINTER hits, the employee heading up those efforts is resigning. Kelly Keenan (above), Spokane’s Community Housing and Human Services director, submitted his resignation to Mayor David Condon last week. His last day will be Friday, Oct. 11, according to his letter of resignation. Stuckart and other council members have criticized city administration for not having a plan in place for additional shelter space following the reduction at House of Charity. But Stuckart says he places zero blame on Keenan. “I just don’t think he has the support of the administration. They did not make these type of issues a priority,” Stuckart says. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

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Special – only $84.99 in October! HEAVY-WEIGHT THOUGHTS Legendary Washington Post journalist BOB WOODWARD (above) swung through Spokane last week to speak at Whitworth University’s President’s Leadership Forum, where he addressed the impeachment inquiry against President Donald Trump, Watergate and importance of dogged watchdog journalism. While he didn’t equate the current impeachment inquiry against Trump over his pressuring the Ukranian president to investigate Joe Biden to Watergate in terms of the alleged misconduct, he highlighted recent alarming behavior by the president, such as Trump publicly calling on China to investigate Biden. He also urged journalists to keep an open mind when it comes to Trump: “We can be so wrong,” he said. He also urged reporters to remain as objective as possible given Trump’s routine attacks on the media. “We’re being tested,” he said. “I hope we’re up to it.” (JOSH KELETY)

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NEWS | ELECTION 2019

No Liberals Here The two conservatives who want to replace Mike Fagan on the Spokane City Council largely cite differences in style over substance BY JOSH KELETY

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here’s not a lot the two candidates jockeying to represent Northeast Spokane on the Spokane City Council don’t agree on. Both Michael Cathcart, director of the pro-business group Better Spokane and a former legislative aid in the state Senate, and Tim Benn, the chair of the Minnehaha Neighborhood Council and radio talk show co-host, are conservative. They both, for instance, want to increase the number of police officers and pave the numerous dirt roads in the district. But that hasn’t stopped them from taking shots at each other as the city hurtles closer to the Nov. 5 general election. Benn slams Cathcart as beholden to special interests that have donated heavily to his campaign — like the Spokane Association of Realtors — while Cathcart, in turn, paints Benn as unfit for public office. “I think he just doesn’t have the energy or the ability to forge the relationships to actually get policy to move that’s going to benefit the district. And I think that is a substantial difference,” Cathcart tells the Inlander at the Forza Coffee Company on North Hamilton Street. (He says the coffee shop is one of his favorite places in North Spokane.) “It’s one thing to go on the radio and scream and yell about issues that you hate. It’s another to build relationships to actually advance those policies to get them across the finish line.” Benn fires back that he is a man of the people whose priorities aren’t skewed by heavy-weight interest groups throwing gobs of money around in the 2019 election. “He might have friends in Olympia, he might have powerful business groups that he knows, but when it comes to representing the people, I know the people,” Benn says while sitting on a chair inside Little Precious One’s, a child care business in Northeast Spokane’s Minehaha neighborhood that he and his wife run. “I won’t have the marketing campaigns that he will. But we’ll see if the people want to buy a big marketing campaign or if they want to buy local and elect someone who is one of them. “He’s going to work for the people that got him into office,” Benn adds.

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hen it comes to policy issues, both candidates are largely in lock-step with one another. They both generally argue that Northeast Spokane doesn’t get its equitable share of city investment in infrastructure projects. They also both want the Police Department to move to a community-policing model where officers proactively patrol beats.

“It’s one thing to go on the radio and scream and yell about issues that you hate. It’s another to build relationships to advance those policies.”

oth Benn and Cathcart rose out of a crowded field. Last year, Councilman Mike Fagan, who has represented Northeast Spokane since 2011, announced that he would run for council president. Fagan, however, didn’t make it through August’s primary, and in the race for the seat he’s vacating, Benn came in first with 2,370 votes while Cathcart landed second with 2,121 votes. Reflective of the political diversity of the district, two of the more liberal candidates in the race, Spokane Public Schools board member Jerrall Haynes and community organizer Naghmana Sherazi, came in fourth and third, respectively, in the primary. Meanwhile, Councilwoman Kate Burke, a lefty voice in City Hall, represents the district’s other seat on the council. Despite coming in second, Cathcart says he feels like he’s the “frontrunner.” He’s got endorsements from local officials like Spokane County commissioners Al French

20 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019

and Josh Kerns, Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich and organizations like the Spokane Home Builders Association. His campaign war chest is stocked with roughly $40,000 in contributions, with big donations from the Spokane Association of Realtors, according to the state Public Disclosure Commission. Benn, meanwhile, has about $16,000 in contributions and no burgeoning endorsement list, aside from Fagan, who co-hosts Right Spokane Perspective, a conserative radio show, with Benn. But he stresses that he’s banking his campaign on grassroots support in the community to push him across the finish line. He points out that while he’s lived in the area for most of his adult life, Cathcart only moved into the district a few years ago: “I don’t know how he can know what’s going on in the district, know where the issues are,” Benn says. Cathcart argues that Benn lacks the ability to have working professional relationships with officials and stakeholders. As evidence, he cites an instance in 2017 when Benn stood on a stage at a conservative rally alongside Fagan and projected an image of Burke with Bill Clinton — Benn was running against her at the time — while Fagan said in a crass reference to sexual misconduct allegations against the former president: “Hey, where’s Bill’s hand?” “Putting up photos of Bill Clinton and asking where his hand is? How inappropriate is that?” Cathcart says.

Disagreement comes on some of the details: Benn criticizes Cathcart’s decision not to vote for the public safety levy that passed in February, which will pay for an additional 20 police officers and 30 existing firemen. “I voted for the public safety levy because we’ve got to start somewhere,” Benn says. “It’s an empty promise that you yourself weren’t even willing to vote to add more officers, but you tell the public you want 50 more when they voted for 20 more and you didn’t vote for any more.” Cathcart defends his vote by arguing that the levy was misleading: “The levy was a fire levy, and they threw in officers to try and sell it to the public,” he says. He adds that he’d first take a “scalpel” to the city budget to look at “unnecessary spending” that could be redirected to the Spokane Police Department before

Tim Benn (top) and Michael Cathcart. considering new taxes. On homelessness, the differences are only in degrees. Benn argues that the region’s homelessness problem is really a drug addiction issue, and that the city needs to crack down on dealers to cut down on the supply of addictive illicit drugs like heroin. He adds that he’s skeptical of data in Spokane’s most recent Point-In-Time-Count survey that found that family conflict and a lack of income were the two most frequently cited reasons for why people were homeless: “Drug addicts are great at lying to people, right?” He also says that he wants to “criminalize open drug use,” though he refrains from explicitly endorsing incarcerating drug users: “I think we need to have a conversation about how we’re going to handle that, but we can’t continue to allow it.” Cathcart, meanwhile, says that the system should try to divert nonviolent and first-time offenders into mental health services and drug addiction treatment if possible. But recidivists should “go to jail and stay in jail.” And, ultimately, if services are lacking, incarceration is still necessary for drug users, Cathcart argues: “You cannot leave them on the street,” he says. On housing, both candidates agree that the city needs to increase its housing supply — and that District 1 doesn’t necessarily need widespread upzones to accommodate additional housing development to ease the city’s tight rental market. They point to the numerous vacant lots in Northeast Spokane as ripe for potential development. When it comes to the Office of the Police Ombudsman, Cathcart is unequivocal about his support for the independent watchdog of the city’s Police Department. Benn, however, says that the office is more of an “observer paperwork position” and that there are existing avenues for holding police departments accountable, like outside law enforcement agency investigations. n joshk@inlander.com


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Trolls, conspiracy theorists, hoaxers and Trump have twisted Facebook, YouTube and the news to toxic levels — and it’s only getting worse

I

t may be getting harder and harder to figure out the truth, but at least this much is clear: It’s a good time to be a liar. We’ve spent three years arguing if fake news swung the 2016 election — debating whether the hordes of Russian bots, hoax Facebook pages and inflammatory, dishonest tweets tipped the democratic balance to elect Donald Trump as president. Yet in those same years, we’ve learned that the stakes in the fight against truth, in a muddy world of social media platforms, go beyond politics. In Brazil, public health workers were attacked after far-right activists lied on YouTube that they were spreading the Zika virus. In Myanmar, government soldiers used fake Facebook accounts to drive an ethnic cleansing, full of incendiary claims and false stories about Muslim minorities raping Buddhist women. Gunmen radicalized by false white-supremacist conspiracies on internet forums like 4chan and 8chan shot up a synagogue in California, a Walmart in Texas and mosques in New Zealand. Elections have consequences. So do algorithms. So now, heading into the 2020 election, experts are warning that trolls, hoaxers and dishonest politicians are arming themselves with a whole new arsenal of weapons of mass deception. New technology is making it easier to hoax audio and video, while advances in artificial intelligence are making it all the more difficult to weed out computer-automated “bot” accounts. And there’s a deeper risk, beyond figuring out the inaccuracy of any one article. The deluge of misinformation — full of Trump tweets, deepfakes, InfoWars videos, Russian bots, 4chan trolls, that Washington Post correction, those out-of-context memes and your great aunt’s latest questionable Facebook post — has become so overwhelming that some of us may simply give up trying to make sense of it all. A lie doesn’t need to be believed. It just needs to create enough doubt that the truth becomes polluted. With enough pollution, it’s impossible to see what’s right in front of you. “When you’re flooded with so much bullshit,” New York Times media columnist Charlie Warzel tells the Inlander, separating fact from fiction becomes so difficult that “the task of trying to do it becomes, you know, tiresome, so you just stop.” It’s the sort of thing your college philosophy professor might call an “epistemic crisis.” We don’t know what to believe. Truth is hazy. Reality itself becomes irrelevant. It’s a phenomenon that has already happened in places

like Russia and the Philippines — and experts say that in the past few years, the United States has suddenly found itself on the same path. “And that, to me, is one of the scariest things to think about,” Warzel says. “It feels like we’ve come incredibly far since 2015.”

THE WEB OF CONSPIRACY

History has a pattern. An advancement in communications technology hands liars the means to lie louder and spread those lies further. Look at the 1830s, when the invention of the steam printing press and other paper-making technologies produced the rise of the “penny press.” Newspapers became cheaper, more independent, more widespread, more competitive, and eager publishers found the power of the 19th-century version of clickbait. The New Yorkbased Sun put out a series of entirely fictional stories that purported that “man-bats” and other exotic creatures were scurrying around on the moon. Soviet-born British TV producer Peter Pomerantsev, author of This is Not Propaganda: Adventures in the War Against Reality, argues that when tech rips open the floodgates of communication, the bad guys always find a way to exploit it. Dictators quickly harnessed the power of radio. Joseph McCarthy, as a U.S. senator in the ’50s, used television to spread his anti-Communist conspiracy theories. Yet for decades, the internet was heralded as a new frontier that allowed “citizen journalists” to take on the stodgy media elite. In 1998, the Drudge Report, a right-wing news-aggregating website, broke the Monica Lewinsky scandal when Newsweek got cold feet. In 2004, when Dan Rather and 60 Minutes put out a 1973 memo purporting to show that President George W. Bush had received special treatment while in the Texas Air National Guard, Drudge elevated the conservative bloggers who persuasively argued the memo was a fake written in Microsoft Word. An “Army of Davids” — as some bloggers dubbed themselves — swarmed to debunk flawed media accounts, trying to counter bias wherever they saw it. The gatekeepers were being overthrown, the drawbridge had been flung open and the villagers could storm the castle. But the villagers had their own standards for newsworthiness. Drudge also sent his readers to darker corners, where sketchy websites claimed Barack Obama wasn’t an American citizen and Bill Clinton had a secret love child. Drudge even provided fuel for “Pizzagate,” the conspiracy that drove a man in 2016 to fire an AR-15

inside a pizzeria, because the internet told him that they were harboring child sex slaves. Conspiracy theorists used to spread their gospel through books, newsletters, public access television shows, and by standing on street corners and handing out fliers. But the web gave every community a niche — no matter how fringe — and allowed them to spread their message in only a few keystrokes. On the internet, the corkboard is infinite and the spool of yarn used to connect pictures of shadowy figures never runs out. The internet, Warzel says, handed fringe figures like Alex Jones of InfoWars a powerful new megaphone. “He was one of the early pioneers of internet radio and video,” Warzel says. “It was a way to get around the notion that it was hard to sell advertising around some of his kooky ideas.” An audience of millions repeatedly tuned into Jones’ red-faced rants about 9/11 being an inside job, Obama chemtrails turning frogs gay, and the Sandy Hook shootings being faked. Drudge repeatedly linked to him. Social media sites only accelerated the spread of misinformation. It’s easier than ever for a single comment, particular an untrue one, to go viral. In ancient times, the opinions of quacks were largely quarantined to a newspaper’s page of letters to the editor. New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman and racist Twitter randos with names like “@WhiteGenocideTM” are all simmering in the same stew together. Both, after all, get retweeted by the president. A Massachusetts Institute of Technology study published last year took a look at over a decade of Twitter posts and found that tweets about false news went viral six times faster than tweets about true news. After all, lies are often more sensational, tapping into human emotions of shock, fear and disgust. It wasn’t just that humans were more likely to share these kinds of stories. It was that Facebook, Twitter and YouTube developed algorithms to elevate certain types of content into your social media feed. It usually didn’t matter if they were true — social media sites didn’t want to become the truth police. It mattered that the stories drew people in. “The way they keep people clicking and sharing and commenting is prioritizing things that get your heart pumping,” says Andrew Marantz, author of Antisocial: Online Extremists, Techno-Utopians, and the Hijacking of the American Conversation. “It’s like stocking a huge grocery store, but all of the visible aisles are Oreos and rat poison.” Hell, YouTube actually started rewarding con...continued on next page

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 23


MEDIA

“THE DISINFORMATION NATION,” CONTINUED...

Millions of people tuned into Alex Jones’ red-faced rants about 9/11 being an inside job, Obama chemtrails turning frogs gay, and the Sandy Hook shootings being faked. Donald Trump has been a fan. “Your reputation is amazing,” Trump assured Jones on the conspiracy theorist’s radio show. “I will not let you down.” SEAN P. ANDERSON PHOTO

spiracy theories above popular content. YouTube used to have what they internally called the “Gangnam Style” problem, where YouTube’s autoplaying recommendation engine would eventually send every viewer to the 2012 South Korean pop hit. In response, YouTube changed their algorithm in 2015, turning down the recommendation dial for merely popular videos and cranking up the preference for videos that led people down rabbit holes. Conspiracy-theory videos flourished. Simultaneously, the internet had handed brand-new weapons to pranksters, vandals and assholes — “trolls” who could use misinformation and harassment to make life hellish for chosen targets. Image boards like 4chan combined anonymity and a near-total absence of moderation to become a frothing hive of racists, trolls and trolls pretending to be racists. The boards delighted in pulling hoaxes — creating fake Jewish Twitter accounts to sow discord in the Jewish community, publishing coupons claiming black people were getting free coffee at Starbucks, and attempting to trick journalists into identifying mass shooters as the wrong person. Sometimes the hoaxes became reality. A 4chan scheme to trick mainstream media outlets into reporting that the “OK” hand gesture was a white-supremacist sign resulted in white supremacists actually adopting the signal. One particularly pernicious trolling tactic was to call 911 from a spoofed number and report a horrific crime, in hopes an armed SWAT team would descend on that location. Marantz says he spent three years embedded in this world. “There are people who just want to watch the world burn,” Marantz says. “And that’s a phrase I returned to again and again.” The motivations vary. In Macedonia, Warzel says, there are clickfarms filled with teenagers pumping out hoax news stories for fake publications, buying Facebook

24 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019

likes, all as a way to make money. “It’s essentially just like a lemonade stand for them,” he says. But there are also foreign governments trying to influence global trends, politicians trying to game power, and true believers who spread falsehoods because they think it’s the truth. “To some degree, it doesn’t matter as long as there’s power to be gained and money to be made,” Warzel says. And you don’t get much more powerful than the leader of the free world.

ART OF THE LIE

Politicians are known to lie. It’s what they do. Presidents lie, whether about WMD or keeping your health care or not having sexual relations with this or that woman. But there used to be limits. “There were unwritten rules or norms about spin,” Jeb Bush’s former campaign spokesman, Tim Miller, tells the Inlander. “You exaggerated for your candidate. You used hyperbole. You tried to muddy the waters.” But there were unspoken, unwritten lines, implicit walls that mainstream candidates didn’t try to breach. But then came Trump. “Trump has been the Kool-Aid Man who bashed through the wall,” Miller says. And the GOP drank the Kool-Aid. Misinformation comes in a hundred ways from a hundred different sources. And yet Trump is somehow all of them. Trump is America’s top troll. Other primary contenders nitpicked Sen. Ted Cruz’s policy record — Trump called him “Lyin’ Ted,” insulted his wife’s appearance and suggested Cruz’s dad helped assassinate JFK. Trump is America’s chief conspiracy theorist, building his political brand on the lie that Barack Obama wasn’t born in the United States. Everyone expected Trump to claim the election was rigged if he lost — but Trump one-upped the cynics. He claimed the election was rigged when he won, falsely

charging that thousands of illegal votes had been cast in the election. Trump is America’s preeminent liar. At the Toronto Star, fact-checker Daniel Dale tallied over 5,200 false statements from the president since his inauguration, dealing with everything from tariff policy to payoffs to a porn star. “I was flabbergasted by the frequency and the triviality of many of them,” Dale told the Los Angeles Times. “Trump was simply making things up about everything, for no apparent reason, about the smallest things.” And now, as House Democrats pursue an impeachment inquiry into whether Trump inappropriately pressured Ukraine to investigate his political rival Joe Biden, America gets to watch, once again, how powerful Trump’s misinformation machine is.

“As the credibility of the mainstream media continues to deteriorate, it’s only going to embolden bad faith actors.” A September Monmouth University poll shows that only 40 percent of Republicans believe that Trump mentioned an investigation into Joe Biden during his call with Ukrainian president, ignoring both the rough transcript of the call and Trump’s own words. Indeed, in March, a Quinnipiac University poll found that two-thirds of Republicans believe Trump is honest. Some of that’s simple partisan psychology. Whether you voted for Trump because of immigration, judges, abortion or tax rates, your mind needs to continually justify your vote. You wouldn’t vote for a liar. You voted for Trump, so Trump must not be a liar. Besides, have you seen those wild claims the Democrats are making? “At this stage it’s less about defending Trump,” writes


HOW TO AVOID SPREADING MISINFORMATION Wait before reposting. You won’t need to apologize for forwarding untrue information if you never share it to begin with. 

Don’t share something just because it comes from a friend. Double check the source to make sure the reporting is from a respectable publication and that they’re not just summarizing the reaction on social media. Better yet, wait until a second publication independently confirms the reports. 

Read the actual story first. Follow links to make sure the links actually back up the news stories. Biased news sources are infamous for making sensational claims in their headlines that the underlying material doesn’t support. 

Be cautious about sharing bogus stories just to point how stupid or wrong they are. That’s an easy way to inadvertently spread a falsehood. 

Mute #Resistance Twitter stars like Seth Abramson and Eric Garland and ignore far-right websites like Gateway Pundit, Breitbart and (increasingly) the Federalist. Just because they tell you what you want to hear doesn’t mean they’re giving you a straight story. — DANIEL WALTERS 

columnist Peter Wehner in the New York Times, quoting a conservative psychologist friend. “They are defending their own defense of Trump.” It’s the same principle that drove feminists to attempt to justify President Bill Clinton’s sexual escapades. Trump has a legion of staffers and supporters willing to lie for him. He ordered his press secretary to lie about his inauguration crowd size. He pressed the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to defend his inaccurate statements about Hurricane Dorian. “I have no obligation to be honest to the media,” former Trump aide Corey Lewandowski recently told Congress, speaking under oath. “Because they’re just as dishonest as anybody else.” And today, Trump has a loyal media apparatus willing to run interference for his falsehoods. The moment a negative story about Trump goes up, Fox News, the Federalist and a horde of Trump Twitter acolytes fire back with a mix of spin, falsehoods and irrelevancies. The speed of that response, Miller says, makes it impossible for the truth to get a foothold. “It prevents the ability for the facts to make it out at all,” Miller says. “People are hearing the alternate story at the same time they are hearing the story.” So on the right, Trump’s Ukrainian scandal quickly became a story about the motivations of the anonymous whistleblower, the dishonesty of House Intelligence Committee Chair Adam Schiff, and the purported corruption of Biden and his son. The Robert Mueller-led special counsel’s investigation into whether Trump’s team colluded with Russia to interfere in the 2016 election turned into a story about the malfeasance of the “deep state,” about Trump-hating FBI agents concocting a scheme to undo the American’s actual election. And for those seeking clarity, the firehose of factually shaky information on Twitter from all sides didn’t help matters. It wasn’t just from Trump fans. Self-proclaimed members of the anti-Trump #Resis-

tance rack up hundreds of thousands of followers hawkenemy to attack. ing anti-Trump conspiracies and assurances that Trump’s “As the credibility of the mainstream media continues downfall was always imminent. to deteriorate, it’s only going to embolden bad faith acIt’s made social media stars of guys like Ed and Brian tors,” Miller says. Krassenstein — who put out a children’s book featuring a muscled, shirtless Mueller — and former British member of Parliament Louise Mensch. In the video footage back in May, Speaker of the House “My sources say the death penalty, for espionage, Nancy Pelosi sounded drunk. Her words seemed artifibeing considered for [former Trump campaign manager] cially slow, like a drawling slur. @StevenKBannon,” Mensch tweeted in 2017, just a “What is wrong with Nancy Pelosi?” Trump lawyer few months after she’d written an op-ed about Russian Rudy Giuliani tweeted. “Her speech pattern is bizarre.” hacking for the New York Times. “I am pro-life and take no In reality, the video itself had been doctored, slowed pleasure in reporting this.” down to make Pelosi sound like she was slurring. GiIn the meantime, the media outlets charged with sortuliani later deleted the tweet but refused to apologize. ing out the messy truth were being hammered from all “How could I have figured out that it was inaccusides. Republicans charged that journalists were clearly rate?” he told the New York Times. biased against Trump — just look at all the negative stoIf an altered video that simple could get shared ries they wrote about him! — while Democrats slammed millions of times, experts worried, what could a more journalists for “false balance” for failing to call Trump’s sophisticated hoax look like? falsehoods outright lies. In 2017, a Reddit user named “deepfakes,” using Millions of eyes watched every Trump story, ready to Google’s open-source artificial intelligence software, send a barrage of tweets attacking every misstep. developed a technique to take footage of one face and “You could get away with a lot more in the old days,” overlay it onto video footage of someone else. As is Miller says. “If you had an error on A17 on the LA Times, typical with new technologies, the internet immediately people weren’t going to see it.” harnessed it for both pornography and Nicolas Cage The vast majority of media reporting on the Russia memes. The faces of pop stars were imposed on the bodscandal was proved to be accurate by the Mueller report. ies of porn stars, while the face of the Face/Off actor was But some bombshells — like reports about former Trump swapped onto footage of Gollum and Yoda. attorney Michael Cohen visiting Prague, a Trump computer server communicating with a Russian bank or WikiLeaks’ Julian Assange meeting repeatedly with former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort — turned out to be irrelevant or entirely bogus. Each big mistake plays into Trump’s hands. And since most national media outlets rely on anonymous sources, YouTube changed their algorithm in 2015, turning down the recommendation dial for merely popular videos (like “Gangnam it’s relatively easy Style”) and cranking up the preference for videos that led people down rabbit holes. Conspiracy-theory videos flourished. for Trump aides to intentionally trick reporters into making a mistake. At the same time, another piece of a deceptive puzzle “In some cases, they’re actually trying to put out is clicking into place. Audio-editing products like Adobe disinformation this way,” Miller says. “The media reports Max give editors the option to go beyond cutting and it, the White House dunks on them for being incorrect.” splicing sentences, to editing individual sound fragments In this environment, where liars are everywhere and to make it appear like a speaker said things they never the truth is almost too strange to be believed, journalists said. Mix and match the sounds, and with a large enough are constantly second-guessing themselves. audio library of a politician, you could make them say “It leads to exhaustion. It leads to burning out,” Waranything. Combine it with video? It doesn’t take a Black zel says. “And then those mistakes are a breeding ground Mirror script-writer to predict how the technologies can for more potential misinformation.” undermine confidence in the truth. In 2016, BuzzFeed reported that in the last three Just imagine that a week before the 2020 election, months before the election, 20 fake news stories from a video is leaked. It appears to be Trump, engaged in hoax sites — Clinton sold weapons to ISIS! The Pope criminal and/or sexually explicit acts. Trump denies it. endorsed Trump! — received more engagement on FaceMaybe the video is a deepfake hoax. Or maybe it’s real, book than the top 20 stories on actual news sites. and Trump is just using the existence of deepfakes to But Trump hijacked the phrase — “FAKE NEWS!” deny it. Now imagine experts are divided on which is — and twisted it into his own catchphrase, a way to which. When you can’t believe your lying eyes or your disparage any story he didn’t like. It was a joke, but the lying ears, you’re left to trust your lying gut. sort of joke that everyone repeats until it burrows into the Now, at least, government officials and technology national psyche. companies are aware of the chaos that these hoaxes could If all news is fake news, anything can be true. Everycause. The House Intelligence Committee has already thing is a lie and nothing is. In the fight over truth, the held hearings on the issue. ...continued on next page fog of war is thick. It’s the perfect environment for an

DEEPFAKE IMPACT

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 25


MEDIA

“THE DISINFORMATION NATION,” CONTINUED... “The tech companies aren’t ready,” Schiff, the House Intelligence Committee chair, said on a Vox podcast in June. “The government isn’t ready. We don’t have the technologies yet to be able to detect more sophisticated fakes. And the public is not ready.” In August, the Pentagon started talking to partners for their new Semantic Forensics program, intending to develop technologies “to help to identify, understand and deter adversary disinformation campaigns.” The private sector’s pushing for similar measures. Last month, Facebook, Microsoft and a slew of research institutions announced they were joining forces for the “Deepfake Detection Challenge,” a contest to better understand the little clues that give even sophisticated deepfakes away. Deepfakes rarely blink in the right way. The heads might have a strange tic. The eye color might be off. Facebook chipped in $10 million to the effort. But those trying to create hoaxes are innovating, too, trying to think of ways to outthink the detection system. “Networks of bots are behaving more and more like you and me,” Warzel says. Ultimately, he says, it may come down to two different artificial-intelligence systems trying to outthink each other. “You basically have two sets of computers playing war games with each other,” Warzel says. The fight isn’t just about technology. It’s about corporate policies. In the last two years, tech companies have tried to change their policies, ditching their laissezfaire libertarian approach to try their hand at benevolent censorship. White supremacists and conspiracy theorists like Alex Jones got banned from Facebook, Twitter and YouTube. YouTube shifted viewers away from straightup conspiracy theory videos in its recommendation stream — although liberals may be unhappy to learn they often landed at Fox News instead. Twitter banned the #Resistance-tweeting Krassenstein brothers in June, citing rules that prohibit “operating multiple fake accounts and purchasing account interactions.” Right now, both major political parties are calling for regulation, including raising the prospect of forcing Facebook to shrink in size. But Republicans and Democrats

26 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019

Donald Trump is America’s chief conspiracy theorist, building his political brand on the lie that Barack Obama wasn’t born in the United States. As Jeb Bush’s former campaign spokesman Tim Miller says, “Trump has been the Kool-Aid Man who bashed through the wall.” GAGE SKIDMORE PHOTO want different things. While liberals complain about lax regulation allowing “Nazis” to run wild on the site, conservatives fret about overregulation, worried that conservatives could be censored for their political opinions. But the lack of censorship is dangerous, too, argue some experts. Whitney Phillips, author of the forthcoming book You Are Here: A Field Guide for Navigating Network Pollution, points to YouTube and Facebook’s recent announcement that since political statements were newsworthy, the sites would rarely take down posts from politicians, even if the posts broke the rules. “At every turn, at every conceivable opportunity, despite how loud the chorus might get, these technology companies made a choice to protect their bottom line over protecting the democratic process,” Phillips says. Facebook’s motto for its developers was “move fast and break things.” Phillips thinks they were successful. “Yeah, they’ve broken democracy,” Phillips says. “There’s no more simple way to describe it.”

TOO MUCH INFORMATION

Phillips wants to make it clear that it’s not just Facebook or Twitter’s fault. It’s not just the fault of Alex Jones or Donald Trump or 4chan. It’s your fault, too. “A lot of the misinformation being spread is not the result of bad actors,” Phillips says. “It’s everyday people doing everyday things.” She thinks of it in terms of an ecological metaphor, where pollution is the accumulation of a billion little actions from individuals. All of the tweeting, retweeting and Facebook posting adds up. “We’re sort of at the whims of everyday folks, disinformation agents, algorithms, white supremacists, all jockeying to win the attention economy,” Phillips says. “The result is an air that is so clogged that we can barely breathe.” In that environment, with so many different competing and contradictory claims, people “don’t even necessarily trust there is such a thing as truth.” But Phillips doesn’t necessarily agree that more information is the answer. Journalists like to say that sunlight is the best disinfectant. But Phillips argues that sometimes the sunlight simply heats up the petri dish and spreads the disease — especially when people are liable to believe

a hoax is true because a journalist says it isn’t. “The truth can contribute to pollution as much as falsehood can,” Phillips says. “It is easy to feel like you are pushing back against a story when you are saying, ‘This story’s terrible.’ But the algorithm doesn’t care about your righteous indignation. The algorithm cares that you’re engaging with content.” She urges journalists and everyday people to shift the lens, focusing less on the liars and more on how lies and ideologies have impacted communities. Warzel, meanwhile, also urges social media users to slow down. Be wary about clicking that retweet button. If a story seems too perfect, doubt it. If a crazy news story doesn’t come from an established media outlet, wait until at least one outlet covers it — ideally two. Marantz, the expert on online trolls, says the longterm solution to the disinformation crisis is a deep and philosophical one that he’d explain at length with phrases like “reaffirming our commitment to epistemic depth.” But for now, the simpler way to react to disinformation is to rely a little bit more on the old gatekeepers. “If you read the New York Times or the BBC or the alt-weekly in your town or the New Yorker, you’re going to be better informed than if you read Facebook,” Marantz says. Not because they’re perfect — there’s a billion reasons to complain about mainstream journalists, he says — but because, for all their flaws, right now they’re the best we’ve got. “It’s the best short-term solution,” he says, “as opposed to just living a world where no one knows anything.” n

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Daniel Walters, born and raised in Spokane, has been writing for the Inlander since 2008. In that time, he’s written about investor fraud, online bullying and how Facebook is destroying the news business. He once retweeted a hoax claiming the Seahawks were signing Colin Kaepernick, but quickly deleted it in hopes no one saw it.


Band-in-training First Issue tackle Led Zeppelin as part of their Rock Club lessons.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

MUSIC

Legends in the Making Budding rock stars hone their music at Spokane Valley’s Rock Club BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

D

iving into their jam session in a small practice space sandwiched between the living room and garage of a Spokane Valley home, four members of First Issue put on their headphones and start the ba-nanuh-nuh-nuh-jug-jigga-jug-jigga-jug intro to Led Zeppelin’s “Whole Lotta Love.” Ray Tozzi, 18, rocks the bass riff while looking across to 16-year-old Garrett Santoro, strumming a guitar. Between them, Nolan Watts, 17, holds the rhythm steady on drums. Holding a power stance in the corner, mic in hand and elbow popped out to the side, 17-year-old singer Dylan Highwood belts out the first words — “You need cooling, baby I’m not fooling” — in his best imitation of Robert Plant. But after a few lines of the chorus, he starts singing off mic where the others can’t hear him through their headphones, and music teacher Sean Burgett asks the band to pause. “Even if you’re not sure you can hit those notes, just go for it,” Burgett tells Highwood. “If you’re the singer and you’re not sure, we’re probably not sure, either. Just

be confident.” It’s early September and the band is gearing up for a Battle of the Bands where they’ll face off against more than a dozen other groups from Burgett’s Rock Club music program at the Pin in downtown Spokane. Through the School of Rock-style Rock Club, formed in 2014, Burgett offers music lessons with a focus on weekly practices that place students into a group setting. For $125 a month, the bands practice covers and come up with original songs, participating in seasonal showcases. “The goal for me from the very beginning of this is that whoever’s in the band — say if it’s four kids — I try to give them all a song pick,” Burgett says. “I try to give them the steering wheel, but I’m student-driving with my foot on the brake the whole time. It takes a lot of coaching. We’re always trying to get to where we can do whatever they want to do.” Most days you’ll find three or four bands filtering in and out of the practice space at Burgett’s home. Occasionally, students pop in the back door to run downstairs for a private lesson with fellow teacher Emily Westman,

or Burgett’s wife and two young sons might run through to get to the car. The same afternoon, members of another band, Point Blank, work through their covers of “Renegade” by Styx and Bob Dylan’s “All Along the Watchtower.” Burgett keeps the students on track as he coaches them about bringing flair on stage for the showcase. “Give us a little Freddie [Mercury] flourish to know we’re at the end,” he tells 12-year-old singer Bella Dice before turning to 17-year old Drake Beale on drums and saying, “If you ever think, ‘Should I maybe do the crash right now?’ Yes. The answer is yes.” After practice, bassist Jillian Persicke, 14, hangs on the lawn for a minute as 13-year-old guitarist Matt Fischer grabs his bike and Beale comes out with his drumsticks. “I like the diversity of people that can be in your bands,” Persicke says, noting this iteration of Point Blank, which also includes 16-year-old guitarist Kaylee Martin, has members in middle and high school. Burgett moves members around until they find a good fit. ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 27


CULTURE | MUSIC

Rock Club music program teacher and founder Sean Burgett.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“LEGENDS IN THE MAKING,” CONTINUED... “I’ve been in Rock Club for seven years,” Beale says. “I originally did private lessons and then went into bands, and I’ve probably been in six or seven bands in that time.” First Issue bassist Tozzi says he joined Rock Club after seeing a poster at Guitar Center, and he appreciates practicing on the high-quality equipment. Highwood, who’s been singing in Rock Club for five or six years, explains that First Issue formed just a few weeks before the Battle. “I’m excited for us to just play all together and excited to start gigging with this band,” he says. “It’s weird to see it all come together,” guitarist

Santoro adds. “Like a month ago, it was me and Dylan in my basement.”

B

y the time the Battle of the Bands rolls around, the groups are all ready and anxious to get on stage as the Pin fills up with their parents, siblings and other family members. Musicians ranging from 10-18 take their turn commanding the stage and covering artists like Green Day and Joan Jett, as well as performing originals. Their band names are goofy and creative, from Gnarwhal to Quantum Understandium, “the band formerly known as Brutal Noodle.” Some rock light-up shoes and colorful

hair, while others wear ripped denim and punk vests outfitted with buttons and patches. As First Issue takes the stage, it’s clear their practice has paid off: Highwood belts out the lyrics throughout their Led Zeppelin cover, and Santoro plays a lengthy guitar solo on their original song. Later on, Point Blank starts their set with “Heartbreak Hotel” before moving through their other covers and ending with their original song, “Moving On,” which singer Dice wrote the lyrics for with her sister. After four hours of music, the judges are ready to announce the winners, who take home everything from songwriting and performance workshops to instrument accessories. The members of Point Blank and First Issue stand near the front of the room with the other bands, hoping to hear their name called. Three other bands win prizes and then it’s time for first place, the chance to record a single at Kaotic Studios. “Please give it up for Violet Ice!” a judge announces. The band members look at each other and shrug, continuing their conversations before asking Burgett for their final feedback from the judges. While they didn’t win one of the top spots, just days later, Point Blank and First Issue are already back at it, snacking on chips and cookies bought with Battle proceeds and honing the same songs with their eyes set on the next showcase. “Our next show is Oct. 12 at 5 pm. This is our farewell at the Bartlett,” Burgett says. “We’re really sad to see that closing. … It’s going to be bittersweet, but it’ll be an adventure to venture out to new venues.” n Rock Club showcase • The Bartlett • 5 pm • Oct. 12 • 228 W. Sprague • $5 • rockclubmusic.com

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CULTURE | DIGEST

WITH FRIENDS LIKE THESE PBS’s Frontline regularly delivers some of the best documentaries in news, and I can’t recommend enough its recent episode “The Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia.” A year after the murder and dismemberment of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi, Frontline reporter Martin Smith visits Saudi Arabia to explore Mohammed bin Salman’s role in the murder, his often brutal rise to power, and his friendly relationship with the current U.S. president — both before and after Khashoggi’s demise. It’s an eye-opening crash course in modern U.S.-Saudi relations, now streaming on pbs.com. (DAN NAILEN)

One for the Road

I

BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

t’s possible that I’ve never listened to another album as many times as the Beatles’ Abbey Road. It’s the first of their records I heard outside their greatest hits compilations, and the first I ever bought on vinyl (from a Tower Records — RIP). I played it over and over again on my dad’s old portable turntable with fuzzy built-in speakers and a decades-old needle that eventually ravaged the wax. That copy has since been replaced, but I still have it, decorating my desk at work. Abbey Road recently turned 50, which was as good an excuse as any to replay it for what seemed like the millionth time. This time, I opted for the so-called “Super Deluxe Edition,” a new mix engineered by Giles Martin,

THE BUZZ BIN

THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music arrives online and in stories Oct. 11. To wit: KIM GORDON, No Home Record. Punk-rock mama bear and Sonic Youth vet drops her solo debut. Hopefully her ex Thurston Moore is in the crosshairs of a few tunes. BIG THIEF, Two Hands. The Brooklyn buzzband’s fourth album arrives just eight months after their third, U.F.O.F. Prolific! BEETLEJUICE ORIGINAL BROADWAY CAST RECORDING. Featuring Spokane’s own Sophia Anne Caruso as Lydia! LIGHTNING BOLT, Sonic Citadel. The fact they have songs called “Hüsker Dön’t” and “Van Halen 2049” on this album is all I need to know — I’m in. (DAN NAILEN)

son of longtime Beatles producer George Martin. Though I’d admired his work on the 50th-anniversary remixes of Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band and the White Album, I assumed I’d heard all Abbey Road had to offer. I put the album on as I was writing late one night, as background music I wouldn’t have to think too much about. And about two minutes and 30 seconds into album opener “Come Together,” I heard a little guitar doodle I had never noticed before. It’s almost a one-off note, as if George Harrison was absentmindedly sliding his finger up the neck of his instrument. It had been lost in the original mix, but pushed forward in this new arrangement. I rewound, just to be sure I was hearing it right, and then rewound it again, and again. I went back to the version of the album I’ve owned for years, and confirmed that the note is in there, too, but barely detectable. George’s guitar had been buried for decades. Now it was exposed. It forced me to go back and really pay attention to an album I had merely put on as background noise. The strings that weave themselves into “Something” suddenly have more clarity. Paul’s dextrous basslines have much more power, as do his larynx-shredding vocals on “Oh! Darling.” The complex harmonies of “Because” have never sounded better; same goes for the shifting sonics of the thrilling multipart suite that closes the record. And it all goes back to that little guitar part, one that could easily pass by without any consideration. To hear something you thought you knew in a totally different light is a remarkable thing, even if it’s just a little note, and now Abbey Road seems as fresh and exciting as it did the first time I brought it home from Tower Records. n

MOUTHFUL I was late to jump on the Big Mouth bandwagon, but season three is here and I couldn’t be happier. The new episodes pick up right after the events of season two. The kids are facing a uniform policy that unfairly targets the girls. Like most Big Mouth episodes, it’s a conversation equally applicable to the pubescent characters as it is to real-world adults — but with a healthy sprinkling of perviness. (QUINN WELSCH)

THAR SHE SHOWS! A local theater production is going bigtime this winter. Moby Dick - the Musical was workshopped in April at the Spokane Civic Theatre with an assist from a Spokane Arts SAGA grant, and now the show created by writer Ed Bryan, composer William Berry and director Jean Hardie has been accepted as one of eight new musicals (from more than 90 applicants) to perform at the Chicago Music Theatre Festival in February. The trio will stage five shows in Chicago — and more if those sell out. Kudos! (DAN NAILEN)

BROCKHAMPTON IS BACK Ginger, the swagger-filled fifth studio album from hiphop collective Brockhampton, is a welcome return to prominence after the failure of their last release. Throughout the sound feels quite fresh and much different than the cookie-cutter projects of other artists seeking the top of the charts. If you don’t have time for a whole album, “No Halo” is probably the best song — it’s clever, unique and has multiple distinctive verses. If you do have time, it’s not just 12 great songs — it’s a full album worth listening all the way through. (CARSON McGREGOR)

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 29


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Cautionary Tale

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Through 36 roles, Mike Wiley tries to convey the tragedy that catalyzed America’s civil rights movement BY E.J. IANNELLI

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Mike Wiley was inspired by tragedy — and Kanye — for his one-man Emmett Till drama.

T

he 1955 lynching of 14-year-old Emmett Till and the subsequent acquittal of his unrepentant white killers was an event that had swift as well as lasting repercussions. It immediately catalyzed the wider movement for civil rights in America, and for years afterwards artists sought to capture its tragic injustice in one work after another. In the same year Till was kidnapped, mutilated and murdered for allegedly making what was described as a “wolf whistle” at a white woman, Langston Hughes published a poem that would later be titled “Mississippi — 1955.” Around 1962, Bob Dylan wrote a folk song recounting the racially motivated murder and the subsequent trial. To those who refused to speak out against the crime, he sang, “Your eyes are filled with dead men’s dirt, your mind is filled with dust.” A little over two decades afterwards, Toni Morrison

premiered Dreaming Emmett, her first-ever play, which examined contemporary social and racial injustices through Till’s eyes. For writer and actor Mike Wiley, who later took up Emmett Till’s story in his own play, the inspiration came from an unlikely source. “I wish that I could tell you that it was some deep, fiery muse that turned me toward the story of Emmett Till,” he says. Instead, his path started with Kanye West. “It was in the early 2000s when Kanye was really making great music, and he put out a song where he samples [Chaka Khan’s] ‘Through the Fire.’ Within the lyrics, he compares himself after a car accident to Emmett Till. He says that his face looks like Emmett Till’s. And it honestly angered me. Anyone looking at that poor little boy’s body and face would know that there is little chance of recognizing him as a human being.”


Wiley recalled his grandmother showing him that gruesome photograph as a “cautionary tale” and felt that West’s self-martyring comparison “sullied the memory of these tragic individuals by putting them in a flippant context.” And so, “out of a desire to not let [Till’s] story not only die but be mangled and turned into a different narrative,” he channeled that anger and indignation into a one-man play called Dar He. The title comes from a sentence that was supposedly uttered by Till’s uncle, Mose Wright, as he stood to identify one of the boy’s killers in court. Though only two words long, it speaks volumes about the prejudices and institutionalized racism of the era. For Wright to rise and single out a white man was an act of almost unprecedented defiance in the American South, yet there were accusations that newspapers twisted his actual words — “There he is” — in an attempt to make him sound less intelligent. Wright was for a long time a “forgotten tragic player in this story,” Wiley says. “After testifying against these men, he immediately had to leave Mississippi. Whatever life he had in Mississippi was done because he would have been killed had he stayed. He left his farm and his community to be an elevator operator in Chicago. The following year, he came back to harvest his crops, and because he knew that he would be killed, he slept in his fields at night and he could hear his house being shot up.”

“Within the lyrics, [Kanye] compares himself after a car accident to Emmett Till, says his face looks like Emmett Till’s. And it honestly angered me.” To perform the play, Wiley alone adopts 36 different roles. That’s certainly a challenge for him as an actor, and in less experienced hands, it might also be one for the audience. But Wiley also worked distinct clues into the writing, establishing characters through dialogue that conveys their age and other important traits. “Ninety-nine percent of the time people stick with me and have no issues understanding. I have kind of a nonverbal agreement with the audience that I’m not going to lose them,” he says. “Now, it’s a handful of main characters, say six or seven, and the rest are people that pop in and out — a waitress, a bartender, a townsperson, a cousin. You’ll know those folks are completely different because they’re a different voice and a posture and even where I stand onstage.” Today, more than six decades after Till’s body was pulled from the Tallahatchie River, Wiley continues to perform Dar He for audiences of all ages across the country, and with as much urgency as ever. There was a time when he might have worried about the piece’s emotional intensity fading, but that has changed along with the political climate. “Living in 2019, there is no worry about that at all,” he says. “I live in a progressive small town in North Carolina, and yet some guys erected a Confederate flag across the street from my son’s middle school yesterday. I live in the bluest little town in the state, and yet for the third weekend in a row, we’re having to stand out on the street and counter-protest the Klan, who are protesting the removal of a Confederate statue.” What spurs him on aren’t these retrograde events but the glimmers of hope amid them. Like the tearful elderly woman who quietly waited to hug him after a recent performance. “I hugged her right back,” says Wiley. “Because what I see in that is that it’s never too late to move somebody to action.” n

SPOKANE LOVES OUR NURSES. WHY DOESN’T PROVIDENCE?

Providence is taking the heart out of our Sacred Heart “I mean, I love the people who work for me and I think they know it,” Rod Hochman, president and CEO of Providence St. Joseph Health, told Modern Healthcare in January 2019. More than 1,900 Sacred Heart registered nurses represented by the Washington State Nurses Association are not feeling Hochman’s love. At all. Providence has launched an ugly corporate scheme right at the heart of our hospital and communities across Washington and the West Coast. The Seattle suits have a new mission: slash earned sick time, earned paid time off, and other benefits nurses have earned—some over many years of service.

Meanwhile, Providence gained nearly $1 billion in profits in the first half of 2019 alone. That’s nearly enough to pay for three NFL football stadiums (CenturyLink Field, home of the Seahawks, cost $360 million to build). With profits like these, Providence can afford to take care of the Sacred Heart nurses who care for you, our community.

Spokane deserves a hospital with a heart.

Dar He: The Story of Emmett Till • Thu, Oct. 17 at 7:30 pm • $25 • Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center • 211 E. DeSmet Ave. • gonzaga.edu/myrtle-woldson-performing-artscenter • 313-2787

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 31


OPENING

BIRD’S EYE VIEW Osprey Restaurant & Bar is the new iteration of the former Ripples Riverside Grill, now open at the Ruby River Hotel BY CHEY SCOTT

T

he newly remodeled and rebranded restaurant inside the Ruby River Hotel offers an osprey’seye view of the Spokane River. Osprey Restaurant & Bar opened in late September inside the downtown Spokane hotel formerly known as the Red Lion River Inn; its restaurant was Ripples Riverside Grill. Hotel owners Jerry and Patty Dicker recruited chef Steve Jensen, who most recently helmed the kitchen of Craft & Gather in Spokane Valley, to design Osprey’s menu and launch the restaurant. They also completely renovated the space overlooking the Spokane River at water level directly east of the Division Street bridge. Osprey’s menu is described as “new American cuisine with international influences.” Chef Jensen defines it as approachable while pushing boundaries.

32 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019

Chef Steve Jensen is leading Osprey’s kitchen. “I’m all about doing interesting and unique things and keeping them approachable and not pretentious,” Jensen says. “Most people in Spokane want something they can recognize and know most of the ingredients.” The resulting array of dishes, many with elements inspired by Jensen’s world travels, range from a classic burger ($14), using regionally raised Kobe beef and topped with house-made sauce and pickles, to one of the chef’s personal favorites, the Bird in the Woods ($24). “This has Northwest-foraged mushrooms with locally cultivated mushrooms and a huckleberry broth,” Jensen explains. “It’s just a really nice chicken breast that I brine for a couple days, but it’s still fairly simple: roasted fingerling potatoes, mushrooms, chicken and a delicious broth — nothing crazy — but I’m trying to elevate things as much as I can.” Jensen also highlights his take on the Cuban sand-

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

wich, the Cubano Fuego ($15), featuring a house made ancho-jalapeno chile jam and pickles. Osprey’s dinner menu also features his take on staples such as Northwest king salmon, a 12-ounce ribeye steak, ratatouille, and mushroom pappardelle. Shareables, soups, salads and sandwiches round out the menu, with many dishes overlapping on the lunch menu. As a hotel restaurant, Osprey also serves breakfast from 6-11 am daily. Jensen was able to flex his creativity there, too, in dishes like the braised beef short rib hash ($14) — the ribs are slow cooked for four hours — and caramelized peach French toast ($12) made with a brandy-infused custard batter. He’s particularly proud of the cassoulet ($13), a traditional French country breakfast not commonly found in this area. His version has braised chicken, house sausage, white beans, herbs, a hearty sauce and golden breadcrumbs.


“It’s a really hearty, stick-to-your-ribs breakfast,” Jensen says. Menus at Osprey will rotate seasonally, and daily specials are planned to largely highlight fresh regional seafood to pay homage to the restaurant’s waterside location. In the bar, Osprey focuses on regional wine, says General Manager Brendan Neeson, but he’s also picked out several varieties from around the world to help customers learn about wine’s many nuances. A highlight on the house craft cocktail list is called Stay on the Trail, a take on the whiskey Old Fashioned featuring a creative and unexpected ingredient: baked bean syrup. “We take the juice from the beans and make a simple syrup from it,” Neeson explains. “It has a really smooth rind — it’s hard to explain how it comes out at the end. It has an incredible sweetness to it.” Sixteen taps in the bar showcase local and regional brews. Happy hour runs daily from 3-6 pm, offering $3 bottled beers and one draft rotator, $5 house wines and four featured appetizers (truffle fries, wings, chickpea popcorn, bacon popcorn) for $6 each. Guests can enjoy expansive views of the Spokane River from the sleek and modern dining room’s picture windows while they sip and nibble. Come next spring, Osprey’s completely reconstructed patio will open. It’s perched right on the riverbank, above a loop that connects back to the Centennial Trail, and will have lounge-style seating, fire pits, a stage for live music and easy access from the trail. “We’re going to have a great patio,” Neeson says. “We’ll have the only outside dining [downtown] that is literally on the river.” n

& PRESENT

“Best Laid Plans”

AN OLD H OLL YW OO D W H O D U N N I T

A night of mystery, mayhem and murder! (period dress encouraged)

Thurs, Oct 17 • Doors open 6pm • Show 7-9pm

$60/pp • Heavy hors d’oeuvres included (wine & beer available) ages 21+

For reservations , call (509) 927-9463

Cliff House Estate • 4705 N Fruit Hill Rd • (509) 927-9463 •

arborcrest.com

Osprey Restaurant & Bar • 700 N. Division • Open daily: breakfast 6-11 am, lunch 11 am-4 pm, dinner Sun-Thu 4-9 pm and Fri-Sat 4-10 pm; bar 11 am-close • ospreyspokane. com • 326-5577

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 33


FOOD | OPENING

SPOKE N RIVER

River Rock’s Taphouse burger.

A River Runs Brew It

A Spokane Riverkeeper Benefit

River Rock Taphouse serves up craft beer and comfort food in the Chronicle Building

S POK A N E RIVERKEEPER It’s Your River. We Protect It.

Over Enter To Win es!! $1800 In Priz

SHOWING

NOV 2ND

Bing Crosby Theater • 6pm & 9pm

ENTER TO WIN:

GRAND PRIZE: K2 Skis (Value $700) 1ST PRIZE: Mt. Spokane Adult Season Pass (Value $679) 2ND PRIZE: 4 Pack of Lift Tickets to Whitefish (Value $332) 10 additional winners will receive a pair of tickets to “Timeless” and a “Faces Of Winter” DVD

Winners will be pulled on October 18th

Enter at: Inlander.com/freestuff

34 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019

HECTOR AIZON PHOTO

®

BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

W

hen Mike and Denise Magee decided to open a new downtown spot for beer lovers, their early plan was to expand on their passion for homebrewing. “I’ve always loved craft beer,” Mike Magee says. “I started home brewing and I have a passion for the science part of it. I’m a techie — that’s my career — so that was a big part of the interest that I developed for craft beer.” He and his wife initially looked into opening a brewery, but after learning about regulations around things like what has to happen with all that leftover water and ingredients, they pivoted to the idea of a taphouse. As lovers of pubs and breweries, the idea would still allow them to continue sharing their love of brews. “It lets us stay in the industry we have a passion for,” Magee says. With that, River Rock Taphouse was born, opening on the main floor of the Chronicle Building earlier this year, the same weekend as Hoopfest. Inside the taphouse, the first thing that draws your eye is the custom bar, made from giant slabs of wood, rocks and resin poured to create a light-up riverbed within the bar itself. Belly up to it and TV screens show the current tap list, which includes a well-curated list of 32 rotating craft beers along with eight taps of wine, cider and kombucha. “We have more of a local and regional focus. Part of our business model was to try to serve the small breweries in our area,” Magee says. “It’s hard for them to get exposure and there’s so much great beer around here.” The rotating list, which changes with the seasons, is updated live on River Rock’s Facebook page. There, guests can see local breweries currently on tap, including Little Spokane, Post Falls and Steam Plant Brewing, alongside dozens of other beers from Washington, Oregon, Montana, Idaho and Colorado.

In addition to its focus on brews, River Rock also serves up a menu of comfort food, which continues to evolve. So far, the most popular item has been the Taphouse Burger ($14), a 1/3-pound beef patty topped with cheddar, onions, lettuce and tomato, and served with a mustardy “river rock sauce.” The burger comes with a side salad or fries, and pairs well with many of the local beer options, including the Archtop Amber by Spokane Valley’s Twelve String Brewing. The menu also includes plenty of shareable appetizers like nachos ($13), tots ($7), beerbattered cauliflower ($12) and artichoke dip ($12). Other mains include a selection of hot and cold sandwiches ($14-$15) and flatbreads ($13). “As we go along, we’re trying to adjust to what our customers want and we’ve been finding they really want more of what would be considered traditional taphouse fare,” Magee says. “We have some different ideas we’re kicking around. We want it to be more like comfort food.” With the burger being so popular, River Rock may add a few more burger options to its menu, as well as some fall salad offerings. One of the most popular shareables, Magee says, has been the giant Bavarian pretzel ($11) which is served hanging from a hook above a platter with house-made beer cheese dipping sauce. The restaurant also offers a sweet deal for downtown concert-goers: bring in your ticket for that night and get 25 percent off your alcohol purchase. Plus, happy hour is from 4-7 pm each day (except Mondays, when they’re closed) with pints at $4 and appetizers for 20 percent off. In addition to roughly 100 seats in the main dining area, there’s a meeting space that can hold about 30 people. It’s free for groups to reserve, Magee says, and the restaurant is able to design buffet-style offerings for events held there. The bar is in the process of applying for its spirits license, since that’s one of the most frequent requests from after-concert visitors. “Once we get that, it’ll add quite a bit more to our overall offering,” Magee says. n River Rock Taphouse • 926 W. Sprague • Open Tue-Thu, 3-10 pm; Fri-Sat, 1-11pm; Sun, 11 am-10 pm • facebook.com/riverrocktap • 473-9301


FOOD | TO GO BOX

CLAM STORM November 5th, 6th & 7th! We only do this twice a year so call today for reservations! (509) 326-6794

1018 West Francis Ave • Spokane

Maryhill Now Serving Food Chef David Hill takes the lead on the new menu at the winery’s Kendall Yards tasting room

A

s of this fall, wine enthusiasts who stop into Maryhill’s downtown Spokane tasting room can not only enjoy a flight, glass or bottle, but also a diverse menu of complementing food from longtime Spokane chef David Hill. The winery’s new menu created by the former chef-owner of Hills’ Restaurant, which closed earlier this year, was introduced to offer guests an easy option for food that didn’t require them to leave the winery and head somewhere else, says Richard Jacobs, a tasting room employee. “There’s tons of really, really nice restaurants around us… so people come into this neighborhood expecting to eat,” Jacobs says. “It didn’t make sense to us to have people going all over if we can provide a nice level of food, too. So we decided to open up a full kitchen.” Previously, Maryhill offered a limited selection of food to purchase on site, but had allowed guests to bring in outside food during regular hours. On the new menu are a variety of shareable small plates at a range of price points, like a spicy olive mix ($5), Marcona almonds ($6), hummus plate ($15), Dungeness crab cakes ($18) and steamer clams ($17). Four sandwiches are also offered: a Reuben ($16), crab roll ($23), grilled brie and feta ($13) and pesto chicken ($16). Charcuterie and cheese boards ($12-$22) are each available in two sizes. A Ceasar salad ($10) has options to add chicken ($16) or crab ($20). The new menu is now being served at all of Maryhill’s Washington state locations; three

The Kendall Yards tasting room opened in late 2017.

ALICIA HAUFF PHOTO

in total along with its newest opening in early November in Woodinville, Washington. Jacobs says the menu’s seafood focus is a nod to the fact that three of the four tasting rooms are located on waterfronts. (CHEY SCOTT)

COSMIC COWBOY TO OPEN RIVER PARK SQUARE LOCATION

Cosmic Cowboy Grill, a Coeur d’Alene eatery known for its health-conscious, Southwesterninspired menu, is heading to the heart of downtown Spokane. The restaurant announced via Facebook last week that it plans to move into a space recently vacated by Tortilla Union, located on the first level of River Park Square, between Nordstrom and Williams Sonoma. Cosmic Cowboy’s Coeur d’Alene location opened in spring 2017, offering a menu of grain bowls, wraps, sandwiches, soups, salads, burgers and much more, with many options for glutenfree, vegan and vegetarian diners. In a video on the restaurant’s Facebook page, owner Steve Eller says the Spokane location is slated to open in January, and will feature the same menu served in Coeur d’Alene, in addition to a full-service bar. (CHEY SCOTT)

O’SHAY’S IRISH PUB & EATERY IN COEUR D’ALENE CLOSES

It’s been the place to go for St. Patrick’s Day since opening more than 15 years ago, and one of the few local joints in Coeur d’Alene’s upand-coming East Sherman District to host live music. But, sadly, O’Shay’s Irish Pub & Eatery has closed its doors. No more fish and chips or corned beef and cabbage while the Coeur d’Alene Firefighters Pipes and Drums made the rounds, nor the lively banter spurred on by whiskey or Guinness. And no more live music like Deep Roots with master fiddler Arvid Lundin. The group, which plays eclectic Celtic music, played at O’Shay’s for around 10 years, including for closing night at the end of September. “Most nights it was fun,” says Char Beach, who sings and plays the harp and bodhran. “We often got the audience singing along and [owner] Steve Saunders was often quick to raise his glass for an Irish toast and include the house.” (CARRIE SCOZZARO)

O P E N 3 p m - 2 a m d a i l y // 2 1 + // l u c k y y o u l o u n g e . c o m 1 8 0 1 W. S U N S E T B L V D . ( 5 0 9 ) 4 7 4 - 0 5 1 1

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WEDNESDAYS

15 APPETIZER

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32OZ DOMESTIC BEERS $5.50

12303 E Trent, Spokane Valley • (509) 862-4852 • www.norms.vip

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 35


DOUBLE TROUBLE

Will Smith and Will Smith star in the disappointing Gemini Man.

Ang Lee’s Gemini Man gives us two Will Smiths for the price of one, but forgets to tell a story anyone would care about BY MARYANN JOHANSON

I

t’s Will Smith versus Will Smith! Fifty-something badass military sniper Will Smith goes up against the 20-something clone that he never knew he had, who is more wiseass than badass. It’s like someone in Hollywood was pining for a 1990s-era marquee-worthy name and figured, “Hey, why not jumpstart the next horrific trend in movies and get on with creating virtual actors so we never have to hire an actual human being ever again!” So they digitized and de-aged 50-something Will Smith, and apparently they told the actual 50-something Will Smith that he would be co-starring with the very CGI version of himself that is going to replace him someday soon. Smith will get royalties on his digitized self, probably, but soon they won’t even need an original human to copy. Our movie stars will be constructed entirely of invented pixels, and then we’ll be sorry. To be clear, this is not Alita: Battle Angel, with its real-fake big-eyed faux-anime heroine. We are meant to take de-aged young Will Smith as wholly organic, as an authentic and fully biological homo sapien… and for the most part, that works here. There’s very little uncannyvalley stuff happening in Gemini Man. Which is ghastly in its own way. Might as well go ahead and get our own

36 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019

jumpstart on writing the future history of cinema and call more to what sort of person we become. There’s a potenWill Smith “the Last Movie Star.” tially intriguing sidebar here about how older Henry has a Anyway, no movie has ever been more high concept fear of drowning, acquired through a traumatic childhood than this. No movie has ever been sold to us, and then experience around learning to swim, that his young clone delivered to us, more solely on its high concept alone. does not have, because the clone didn’t have the same There is quite literally nothing to Gemini Man that isn’t experience as a child. This seems ripe for exploitation, “Will Smith versus Will Smith, OMG! Cool!” (It’s not that somehow, in a big action sequence… and it never happens. cool, actually.) And yet somehow the script — so anemic it Making matters worse, this bafflingly awful, comshould be dead — takes fully more than half of its runtime pletely wasted storytelling opportunity comes via usually to get to the “revelation” that what is going on is precisely visionary director Ang Lee (Life of Pi, Brokeback Mountain), what we knew was going on even before the who does little but tread tedious spy-action film began. The supporting cast is wasted — see: GEMINI MAN water. We wait for a solid hour-plus as old Will the excellent Mary Elizabeth Winstead, as Rated PG-13 Smith’s Henry Brogan wonders just who Henry’s unwitting sidekick — and there’s nary Directed by Ang Lee could it be, this mysterious young whipa single plausible relationship developed; Starring Will Smith, Mary persnapper who is trying to kill him. (It’s the most believable one is between Benedict Elizabeth Winstead, Clive Owen another you, dude.) We wait to find out why Wong’s even-more-sidekick-y pilot and the whippersnapper Will Smith has been sicced lovely Gulfstream jet the film deploys for a on older Will Smith by black-ops honcho Clive Owen redundant detour to Budapest. All that’s left is Lee’s goof(in one of the embarrassingly worst performances of his ing around with a high-frame-rate format that delivers (in career). That we never learn. some cinematic presentations) an empty story in a visually But, hey, maybe there will be some exciting explorarazor-sharp IMAX that is pointlessly ultrarealistic. It’s like tion of the nature-versus-nurture debate, the idea that looking through a window beyond which there is nothing DNA is not destiny, and it’s how we are raised that matters worth seeing. n


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS THE ADDAMS FAMILY

An animated take on America’s most morbid family, which moves to the decidedly un-spooky suburbs of New Jersey. Charlize Theron, Oscar Isaac and Chloë Grace Moretz lend their voices. (NW) Rated PG

EL CAMINO: A BREAKING BAD MOVIE

The saga of Breaking Bad continues,

Broadway to its continued relevance. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

with Aaron Paul reprising his role as Jesse Pinkman and answering the lingering questions left by the series finale. At the Magic Lantern and on Netflix. (NW) Not Rated

Two Will Smiths for the price of one? If only it were worth the admission. Here’s an anemic sci-fi thriller about an assassin whose greatest nemesis is a younger version of himself. (MJ) Rated PG-13

FIDDLER: A MIRACLE OF MIRACLES

JEXI

This backstage documentary details the making of the popular musical Fiddler on the Roof, from its unlikely success on

NOW PLAYING ABOMINABLE

A reclusive girl befriends an escaped yeti and gets suckered into taking him across China to Mount Everest. Scenic animation, righteous violin solos and unexpected voice acting by Eddie Izzard make it worthwhile. (QW)

AD ASTRA

In this heady sci-fi parable, Brad Pitt travels across the solar system to find his long-lost astronaut father. Part silly space adventure, part heavy meditation on existence and masculinity, it’s intriguing on multiple levels. (NW) Rated PG-13

DOWNTON ABBEY

The beloved British series gets a big screen sequel, fast-forwarding to 1927 to catch us up on all the goings-on of the titular estate and its stiff-upper-lipped inhabitants. (NW) Rated PG

FARMER OF THE YEAR

An elderly farmer goes on a road trip for a reunion with his army buddies, and he takes his unemployed granddaughter with him. From Metaline Falls filmmakers Kathy Swanson and Vince O’Connell. At Village Centre Cinemas. (NW) Not Rated

FIDDLIN’

The history of bluegrass music and the time-honored traditions of Appalachian fiddling are explored in this rousing documentary. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

GOOD BOYS

A trio of 11-year-olds encounter obstacles

GEMINI MAN

on their way to a big-kid party in what’s best described as Superbad about the middle school set. Raunchy, funny and unexpectedly sly. (MJ) Rated R

What if Siri were more like HAL 9000? So asks this raunchy comedy, starring Adam Devine as a guy whose smartphone becomes increasingly involved in

IT: CHAPTER TWO

The follow-up to 2017’s horror smash is a leaden, overlong slog, with those precious kids, now jaded adults, returning to Derry to finally kill the evil force that is Pennywise the clown. Nothing floats here. (MJ) Rated R

JOKER

The Clown Prince gets his own origin story, with Joaquin Phoenix as a failed stand-up who violently lashes out at society. A Scorsese pastiche that’s not nearly as edgy as it thinks it is. (MJ) Rated R

JUDY

Renée Zellweger disappears into the role of legendary torch singer Judy Garland, whose career is falling apart in the final year of her life. The central performance is revelatory; the film itself is not. (ES) Rated PG-13

LINDA RONSTADT: THE SOUND OF MY VOICE

The towering rock vocalist receives the affectionate career retrospective treat-

LUCY IN THE SKY

Inspired by true events, Natalie Portman is an astronaut whose plan to kidnap a fellow NASA employee goes horribly awry. Spoiler alert: She does not wear a diaper. (NW) Rated R

MY PEOPLE, MY COUNTRY

An epic dramatization of the founding of the People’s Republic of China, told from the perspective of seven characters, with each chapter helmed by a different director. (NW) Not Rated

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

NEW YORK TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

ABOMINABLE

62

AD ASTRA

80

HUSTLERS

80

IT: CHAPTER TWO

58

JOKER

58

JUDY

65

LINDA RONSTADT: THE SOUND OF MY VOICE

76

HUSTLERS

Based on the true story of strippers who swindled their Wall Street customers, this is a terrific, intelligent heist film. Director Lorene Scafaria weaves sympathy, sensitivity and humor into the tricky clockwork plot. (MJ) Rated R

his personal life. (NW) Rated R

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

ment, looking back at her groundbreaking legacy and talents that were silenced by Parkinson’s. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE LION KING

Sure, it’s nowhere near as good as the original, but this CGI remake of Disney’s 1994 classic is nonetheless an entertaining, visually sumptuous jungle adventure. The stories and songs remain foolproof — hakuna matata, indeed. (SS) Rated PG

THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON

A young man with Down syndrome and pro wrestling aspirations runs away from his care facility, teaming up with a downand-out fisherman (Shia LaBeouf) in this heartwarming road-trip fable. (SR) Rated R

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

RAISE HELL: THE LIFE & TIMES OF MOLLY IVINS

A documentary portrait of irascible, outspoken political pundit Molly Ivins, who made a career of dencouning corruption and calling out B.S. As garrulous and entertaining as its subject. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

RAMBO: LAST BLOOD

Sylvester Stallone’s super soldier returns to the big screen one final time, going after the Mexican drug cartel that kidnapped his niece. Super violent, super dumb. (NW) Rated R

WAR

In this Bollywood action epic, a soldier must use his know-how to take down his now-evil mentor. Expect elaborate set pieces and outlandish stunts. (NW) Not Rated n

TER GIC LAN N THEATER A M TH TH FRI, OCT 11 – THU, OCT 17 TICKETS: $9

RAISE HELL: THE LIFE AND TIMES OF MOLLY IVINS (92 MIN) FRI: 2:45, 5:00 SAT: 5:00 SUN: 12:45, 5:00 MON-THU: 6:15 LINDA RONSTADT: THE SOUND OF MY VOICE (95 MIN) FRI/SAT: 4:30 SUN: 2:30 MON-THU: 4:45 FIDDLIN ‘(93 MIN) MON-THU: 2:45

LAST WEEK

BRITTANY RUNS A MARATHON (100 MIN) FRI/SAT: 8:30 SUN: 1:15 MON-THU: 4:25 EL CAMINO: A BREAKING BAD MOVIE ONE WEEKEND ONLY (122 MIN) FRI: 6:30, 8:45 SAT: 2:15, 6:30, 8:45 SUN: 4:15, 6:30 FIDDLER: MIRACLE OF MIRACLES (92 MIN) FRI-SUN: 3:15, 6:45 MON-THU: 3:00, 6:30

25 W Main Ave #125 • MagicLanternOnMain.com

Our menu is almost as interesting as Gardner Minshew 1931 W. Pacific Ave. 363-1973 • wedonthaveone.com

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 37


CA M ERO N M AC K I N TO S H PRESENTS

B O U B L I L & S C H Ö N B E R G ’S

800.325.SEAT GROUPS SAVE! 509.818.3440 38 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019


TRIBUTE

Ch-Ch-ChChanges David Brighton uses glitz and glitter to transform into David Bowie, performing this weekend with the symphony BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

D

avid Bowie made a career out of being a chameleon, forever altering his sound and transmogrifying into personae that were somehow both fascinatingly alien and deeply human. David Brighton, meanwhile, has made a career out of being David Bowie. His first stint as an impersonator was playing George Harrison in a touring Fab Four tribute act, and he decided to trade in his Beatle wigs for sequined bodysuits in 2001. Brighton’s tribute to the Thin White Duke has him traveling all over the country, and this weekend he makes his way to Spokane for a Bowie retrospective with the symphony. Brighton spoke to the Inlander before his Inland Northwest stop, discussing Bowie’s legacy, the fine art of impersonation and what it was like to work alongside the man himself. Responses have been edited for clarity. INLANDER: You’ve twice performed as iconic rockers — first as George Harrison and now as Bowie. What’s the process of disappearing into another artist? BRIGHTON: You study every piece of footage you can find. You read everything you can find. You look at every photograph and listen to every recording. And you practice. It takes years to assimilate a character and actually become reminiscent of a person, and you have to choose a character that you have some sort of physical resemblance to. But beyond that you’ve got to learn their mannerisms and their vocal stylings, the way they speak. It’s an insane amount of work. What was your relationship with Bowie and his music before you started playing him? He was always one of my favorite artists. I’ve listened to him since I was a kid. I remember the first time I heard one of his songs on the radio, and I had never heard anything like that. His writing and his performance, everything about him was so individual and unique and sort of haunting, and I’m intrigued by his brilliance still. ...continued on next page

David Brighton is David Bowie.

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 39


MUSIC | TRIBUTE

MYRTLE WOLDSON PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

“CH-CH-CH-CHANGES,” CONTINUED...

AT GONZAGA UNIVERSITY presents

DAR HE: THE

In your studies of Bowie, was there anything you learned about him that most surprised you? I had the honor and privilege of doing a television commercial with him a number of years back. I was hired to dress up in his earlier personas, while he appeared as he did at the time. And while working with him on set, he was quite the comedian. He pulled out a whole repertoire of performance skills off camera that no one there even realized he had in his arsenal. He was whipping out comedy bits and impersonations of people. Another thing is, we were watching a take on the video screen, and the director said to him, “Can you do that again?” And Bowie says, “Yeah, I’ve got a photographic memory,” and he did it again exactly. An insane talent, just unbelievable.

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What’s it like to be in the same room with a legend like that? It was terrifying to be impersonating someone with them watching, and it was also very flattering and validating. He thought I was worthy to do this, so of course there are these contradicting thoughts going through my head. But he was very much the perfect English gentleman, just stuck out his hand with a big smile on his face and said, “Hi, I’m David.” I went back to being a high school kid again.

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“I think the strength of his art is up there with anyone. ... For decades, practically everyone in show business was imitating him.”

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Since Bowie died, how have audience responses changed? It must have been a seismic shift for you. Huge. Enormous. In fact, we had a show only days after he passed; we’d already had it booked. His fans showed up wearing all sorts of different Bowie costumes, and people are crying. It was cathartic and healing, but also very difficult. We managed to get through the show and hold it together. We were working before he passed, but human nature is such that when we lose something, we tend to value it more. Things got so busy that we couldn’t keep up with the demand. And expectations from the audience are different. Some people viewed it as cashing in, which, of course, it wasn’t — we had been doing it for years. And Bowie himself was more than generous with us. So that was a tough pill to swallow. We try to treat his legacy with as much respect and honor as possible.

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So many artists have come and gone, but why do you think Bowie has remained so relevant and beloved by people? I think the strength of his art is up there with anyone. I’ve always said that he’s one of the few solo artists talented enough to have been a Beatle. John Lennon used to say, “I can’t believe he goes on stage and does all that.” But it was the quality of his songwriting and his bravery, to step out and do something completely different from what he was doing. Not everything he did maybe worked, but enough of it worked so well that he created new genres. For decades, practically everyone in show business was imitating him. CELEBRITY

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What’s it like to perform these songs with the full symphonic backing? It’s simply amazing to hear everything being played to perfection and having a real orchestra instead of synthesizers. Synthesizers are wonderful, don’t get me wrong, but having the real instruments is incredibly magical. n Spokane Symphony: The Music of David Bowie • Sat, Oct. 12 at 8 pm • $28-$90 • All ages • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200


MUSIC | FOLK-ROCK

M.C. Taylor, aka Hiss Golden Messenger, makes songs that feel like journal entries.

Surrender to Feeling With Hiss Golden Messenger, M.C. Taylor channels the perils and pleasures of being a professional wanderer BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

U

nder the moniker Hiss Golden Messenger, singer-songwriter M.C. Taylor has been making folk-tinged alt-rock for the last decade, playing with a rotating lineup of musicians and morphing between styles, his weary voice and humane songwriting the axis around which the wheel spins. It’s an approach that’s indicative of Taylor’s eclectic musical background. He grew up in Southern California with a folk musician father — “There was always a guitar around the house, and he always sang,” he tells the Inlander — and Taylor himself was obsessed with early hiphop acts like Eric B & Rakim and EPMD, and later hardcore punk. That might seem a strange jumping-off point for such an inward-looking artist, but Taylor says he related to musicians who could project their feelings, sometimes at the highest possible volume. “As I got older — and I don’t think I would have said this at the time — I needed to understand how to convey my emotions, and hear the emotions that I was feeling in music in a way that was more nuanced,” Taylor says. Hiss Golden Messenger’s latest album Terms of Surrender conveys that many times over. It was written at an emotional impasse: Taylor’s dad had recently suffered a heart attack, which only underlined his own uncertainties as a father whose job required him to be away for long periods of time, and he found himself in a period of depression.

GRAHAM TOLBERT PHOTO

He retreated into Virginia’s Blue Ridge Mountains to write, and the material he came back with finds him pondering his own station in life. “Katy (You Don’t Have to Be Good Yet)” is a wisdom delivery system for a friend who has lost their way, while the closing title track lays out Taylor’s conditions for finally letting go completely. “Happy Birthday, Baby,” a song to his young daughter, is both a soothing lullaby and something of an apology (“I’m trying to repay you for all these miles that I roam”); on the very next track, “Down at the Uptown,” he seems to come to terms with his way of life — “I guess we only get so many chances to shine,” he determines. Terms of Surrender was recorded in a series of studios — in the upstate New York facility owned by the National’s Aaron Dessner (who also plays on the album), in the legendary Sound City in Los Angeles, in Nashville — and features musicians, including Dessner and Jenny Lewis, who happened to be around at the time. That approach, Taylor explains, is in keeping with “the pleasures and pitfalls of wandering for a living,” the idea that the places we inhabit have a way of imprinting themselves onto us. And as for the personal lyrical themes: Getting them onto tape and putting them out into the world isn’t unlike spilling his guts to a therapist. “I’m not talking about quantum physics — I’m talking about why life feels so complicated and so joyful at the same time,” Taylor says. “And that’s something everybody understands. I’m not trying to put any answers out into the world. I just think it’s a good idea to voice the questions. … The trick is to actually articulate what the question is, because then you start to understand what path it is that you’re on.” Listening to Terms of Surrender, you get the sense you’re overhearing conversations that were always meant to be private, or peering into the most personal thoughts of someone who’s doing their best to overcome their own worst impulses. That’s the idea, Taylor says. “My number one goal is to not obscure the initial impulse for writing the song,” he says. “It’s got to feel like it’s coming straight off the page of the journal, even if there are a million moving parts.” n Hiss Golden Messenger with Erin Rae • Mon, Oct. 14 at 8 pm • $21 • 21+ • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

R&B ST. PAUL & THE BROKEN BONES

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f you like a band that can deliver an excellent slow jam one minute and a fiery funk blast the next, you’re in luck. Based around the killer vocals of frontman Paul Janeway, St. Paul and the Broken Bones is an eight-piece soul crew from Alabama guaranteed to get you sweating on the dance floor. With a monster horn section blasting throughout their three albums, the band recalls everyone from Al Green to the Isley Brothers to Sly Stone. It’s not often you see a retro soul band that takes on the deep-fried Southern soul sound and really, truly owns it. — DAN NAILEN St. Paul and the Broken Bones with Jeremie Albino • Fri, Oct. 11 at 8 pm • $30 • All ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 10/10

A&P’S BAR AND GRILL, Open Mic Night with KC Carter J BABY BAR, L’Freaq, Eliza Catastrophe BERSERK, Vinyl Meltdown BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE BIG DOG BAR & GRILL, DJ Dave BOLO’S, Inland Empire Blues Society Monthly Blues Boogie J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Open Mic J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen CALYPSOS COFFEE ROASTERS, Marbin CRUISERS, Open Jam Night FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Country Dance GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES, Retro Roger Album Release THE HIVE, Bombargo J HOUSE OF SOUL, Jazz Thursdays J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Jonathan Tibbitts LION’S LAIR, Karaoke with Donny Duck MOOSE LOUNGE, Country Night with Last Chance Band THE NYC PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos O’SHAYS IRISH PUB & EATERY, O’Pen Mic Thursdays RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL, Songsmith Series feat. Michael Boucher THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, Jam Series STEAM PLANT KITCHEN + BREWERY, Nick Grow TAPP’D OFF, Karaoke on the Patio UTARA BREWING COMPANY, The Hackles and the Bart Budwig Band ZOLA, Blake Braley Band

42 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019

COUNTRY LORRIE MORGAN

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onsidering her parents named her Loretta Lynn Morgan when she was born, there was perhaps a little pressure from her country musician pop to join the family business. Good thing her torch-song pipes and an attitude that would make her namesake proud combined to make her one of country’s brightest stars for much of the ’90s, when she was the first woman in country to have three straight albums go platinum. Her 30-year career now includes more than 40 hit singles, including three No. 1s — “Five Minutes,” “What Part of No” and “I Didn’t Know My Own Strength.” — DAN NAILEN Lorrie Morgan • Thu, Oct. 17 at 7:30 pm • $39-$59 • All ages • Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com • 481-2800

Friday, 10/11

219 LOUNGE, Devon Wade 1210 TAVERN, Jan Harrison Blues Experience J BABY BAR, Ross Cooper BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE BIG DOG BAR & GRILL, DJ Dave BIGFOOT PUB, Caretakers BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Diego and the Detonators J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Brothers from Other Mothers CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Nick Grow CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke THE COUNTRY PLACE BAR & GRILL, Steve Starkey CRUISERS, Karaoke with Gary CURLEY’S, Mojo Box DAN & JO’S BAR & GRILL, Usual Suspects FREDNECK’S, James Motley J THE HIVE, Sugarhill Gang and Furious 5’s Grandmaster Mele Mel

HONEY EATERY AND SOCIAL CLUB, Brian Sacco IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Bright Moments Jazz IRON HORSE (COEUR D’ALENE), Dangerous Type J JACKLIN ARTS & CULTURAL CENTER, Friends of Guitar Hour feat. Xuefei Yang JOHN’S ALLEY, Laney Lou and the Bird Dogs J J KNITTING FACTORY, St. Paul and the Broken Bones (see above), Jeremie Albino J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Vanna Oh!, Itchy Kitty, The Emilys; DJ ROSETHROW MAX AT MIRABEAU, Bobby Patterson Band MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Harold’s IGA MOOSE LOUNGE, Chris Rieser and the Nerve NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom THE NYC PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos

OLD MILL BAR AND GRILL, Gil Rivas & Pamela Jean PATIT CREEK CELLARS, Ken Davis PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Mike Wagoner & Sadie Sicilia THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROXIE, Dopest of the Locals J SARANAC COMMONS, Kevin Partridge J SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Just Plain Darin SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES, Stagecoach West STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, DJ Danger Karaoke THE VIKING, Ashley Pyle Send Off ZOLA, Whack A Mole

Saturday, 10/12

12 TRIBES RESORT CASINO, Pastiche 219 LOUNGE, Cedar & Boyer BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BIGFOOT PUB, Caretakers BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Diego and the Detonators

J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Dan Maher CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Nick Grow CURLEY’S, Mojo Box GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Usual Suspects J HARVEST HOUSE, Just Plain Darin HOUSE OF SOUL, Curtis Salgado IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, John Firshi IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Dario Ré, Andie Daisley & Michael Starry IRON HORSE (COEUR D’ALENE), Dangerous Type THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke JOHN’S ALLEY, Funky Unkle J THE KENWORTHY, Pigs on the Wing: Animals 2019 – A Tribute to Pink Floyd J KNITTING FACTORY, Blistered Earth: The Ultimate Tribute to Metallica J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Bad Bad Hats, Mountains in the Sea; Kung Fu Vinyl, Vernita Avenue, Exzac Change, Matisse


Sunday, 10/13

DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Rev. Yo’s VooDoo Church of Blues Jam

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MAGIC

GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke J HARVEST HOUSE, Nick Grow; Stagecoach West THE HIVE, Ginstrings HOGFISH, Echo Elysium IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Heather & John J KNITTING FACTORY, Yelawolf LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam MATCHWOOD BREWING CO., Laney Lou and the Bird Dogs THE NYC PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos O’DOHERTY’S, Traditional Irish Music PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Piano Sunday with Bob Beadling THE PIN, The Goddamn Gallows RED ROOM LOUNGE, Jason Perry Trio THE ROXIE, Hillyard Billys J SOUTH HILL GRILL, Just Plain Darin ZOLA, Donnie Emerson & Nancy Sophia

Monday, 10/14

J THE BARTLETT, Hiss Golden Messenger (see page 41), Erin Rae THE BULL HEAD, Songsmith Series J CALYPSOS COFFEE ROASTERS, Open Mic CRAVE, DJ Dave EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills THE NYC PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 10/15

219 LOUNGE, Karaoke with DJ Pat BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke

CRAVE, DJ Dave GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke JOHN’S ALLEY, Space Monkey Mafia THE NYC PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos J THE PIN, Doobie RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL, Open Mic Jam THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Country Swing Dancing THE ROXIE, Open Mic/Jam TAPP’D OFF, Karaoke on the Patio J THE VIKING, Songsmith Series feat. Bret Allen ZOLA, Desperate 8s

Wednesday, 10/16

219 LOUNGE, Truck Mills & Mike Elliott BELLWETHER BREWING CO., Joel Haugen BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J J BING CROSBY THEATER, Geoff Tate’s Operation: Mindcrime J BLACK DIAMOND, Songsmith Series feat. Retro Roger CRAVE, DJ Dave CRUISERS, Open Jam Night Hosted by The Jam Band GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES, Open Mic with Host Travis Goulding IRON HORSE (COEUR D’ALENE), Open Jam IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Daniel Hall THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LION’S LAIR, Funk You Up Wednesdays with Storme LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3

MAD BOMBER BREWING COMPANY, Open Mic THE NYC PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos J POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE (SOUTH HILL), Just Plain Darin RED ROOM LOUNGE, Blowin’ Kegs Jam Session THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, Steve Starkey ZOLA, Cruxie

Coming Up ...

J J NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Lorrie Morgan (see facing page), Oct. 17 BABY BAR, Nick Vivid, Portable Morla, Bitwvlf, Oct. 18 J THE BARTLETT, Ivan & Alyosha, Oct. 18 J KNITTING FACTORY, Pete Yorn Acoustic, Oct. 18 LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Joe Pug, Oct. 18 THE BARTLETT, Lucy Dacus, Oct. 19 J KNITTING FACTORY, Highly Suspect, Slothrust, Oct. 19 LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Son Volt, Oct. 19 J THE BARTLETT, John Reischman & the Jaybirds, Oct. 20 J KNITTING FACTORY, GWAR, Sacred Reich, Toxic Holocaust, Against the Grain, Oct. 20 J THE PIN, Michale Graves (formerly of The Misfits), Oct. 21 J KNITTING FACTORY, Judah and the Lion, Flora Cash, Oct. 22

THURSDAY 10.17.19 SPECIAL GUESTS Chet Caskey \ Spokane Ghost Tours Carly Haney \ Artist Jazmine Hunt \ Artist CATE \ Music FREE SHOW + CASH BAR

DINNER, DRINKS, MAGIC

LILAC LILAC LILAC CITY CITY CITY LIVE LIVE LIVE

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110 S. Monroe St, Spokane In The Montvale Hotel

A FREE ‘LATE NIGHT’ TALK SHOW

J J MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Spokane Symphony: The Music of David Bowie (see page 39) MARYHILL WINERY, The Ronaldos MAX AT MIRABEAU, Bobby Patterson Band MOOSE LOUNGE, Chris Rieser and the Nerve NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom THE NYC PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos NYNE, Laney Lou & the Bird Dogs PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Brian Jacobs RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL, SalIva, Undercard, White Trash Romeo, Bearing Heavy Crowns THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Echo Elysium STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, DJ Danger Karaoke THE VIKING, SideStep ZOLA, Whack A Mole

DOWNTOWN LIBRARY EVERY 3rd THURSDAY DOORS @7 \ SHOW @8

MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-2639934 A&P’S BAR & GRILL • 222 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-263-2313 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens • 714-9512 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS • 39 W. Pacific • 838-7815 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 THE BULL HEAD • 10211 S. Electric • 838-9717 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 COSMIC COWBOY GRILL • 412 W. Haycraft, CdA • 208-277-0000 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • 279-7000 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-457-2392 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HONEY EATERY & SOCIAL CLUB • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-930-1514 HOUSE OF SOUL • 25 E. Lincoln • 598-8783 IRON GOAT BREWING • 1302 W. 2nd • 474-0722 IRON HORSE BAR • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., CdA • 509-926-8411 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside • 456-5678 LUCKY YOU LOUNGE • 1801 W. Sunset LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy, Ste. 100 • 443-3832 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PACIFIC PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific • 443-5467 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN • 412 W. Sprague • 385-1449 POST FALLS BREWING CO. • 112 N. Spokane, Post Falls • 208-773-7301 RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL • 10325 N. Government Way, Hayden • 208-635-5874 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON • 12303 E. Trent • 862-4852 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 43


SPOKANE BEARD & MUSTACHE PHOTO

BENEFIT BEARD-OFF

The proud beard owner/enthusiast’s ultimate calling is imminent. The Spokane Beard & Mustache Foundation’s 8th Annual Epic Beard Competition at the Pin is a good bet to bring the best chops, whiskers, etc. from all over the region. With 13 categories ranging from the professional (“Business Beard,” “Full Beard”) to the more curious (“Build-a-Beard,” “Couples”), there’s a variety of beards and personalities to see that don’t get justice from photos alone. A grand champion is crowned at the end of the event so as to settle any controversy, as well as top fundraisers, best club participation and charity champion. Tickets are available for spectators or participants, so there’s no reason not to show up, even if you’re incapable of growing your own beard. This year’s beneficiary is local nonprofit Free Rein Therapeutic Riding. — CONNOR GILBERT 8th Annual Epic Beard Competition • Sat, Oct. 12 from 4-8:30 pm • $10/spectators; $25/competitors • The Pin • 412 W. Sprague • spokanebeardandmustache.org

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44 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019

MUSIC REVOLUTION CALLING

In a metal era dominated commercially by hair-farming glamrockers, Queensrÿche’s explosive success with its third album, Operation: Mindcrime, remains surprising 30 years later. The Seattle prog-metal band’s rock opera about a recovering addict who reluctantly becomes a political assassin became an unlikely hit thanks to killer concerts and songs like “I Don’t Believe In Love” and “Eyes Of A Stranger” that made sense on radio and MTV even without the surrounding story. Singer Geoff Tate is no longer in Queensrÿche, but he still has those powerful pipes that turned Operation: Mindcrime and other hits like “Empire” and “Silent Lucidity” into part of the soundtrack of the early ’90s. On his current tour, Tate and his band are doing Operation: Mindcrime in its entirety, plus a greatest-hits set. — DAN NAILEN Geoff Tate’s Operation: Mindcrime • Wed, Oct. 16 at 8 pm • $27-$47 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638

MUSIC SEASON OF STRINGS

The Spokane String Quartet is celebrating four decades of instrumental harmony, as its current iteration — cellist Helen Byrne, Amanda Howard Phillips and Mateusz Wolski on violin, and Jeannette Wee-Yang on viola — has developed a musical rapport over the many years they’ve been together. Their latest season kicks off on Sunday afternoon with a program of pieces that will put that unity front and center, with works by Beethoven, 20th century writer David Diamond and Joseph Haydn, arguably the most influential of all string quartet composers. You have a few more chances to catch the quartet throughout this year’s 40th season, which stretches into May 2020 and features concerts at the Fox and Bing Crosby theaters. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Spokane String Quartet • Sun, Oct. 13 at 3 pm • $12-$20 • Spokane Falls Community College, Music Building • 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. • spokanestringquartet.org • 998-2261


BENEFIT TRASHY FASHION

One person’s trash is another person’s haute couture at the Kootenai Environmental Alliance’s annual Junk2Funk fashion show, featuring “ecofashions” made from recycled or discarded materials by local artists, and presented on the runway by models of all ages and genders. The popular event this year takes on the theme “Evolution Revolution,” which suggests some counterculture vibes and inspiration. As with past iterations of Junk2Funk, guests can expect to see artists who’ve really pushed themselves in the creative reuse theme, taking materials like plastic, feed sacks, CDs, wine corks and junk mail to create wearable art that’s also a commentary on our throwaway culture. Proceeds from the event benefit the Kootenai Environmental Alliance, Idaho’s oldest conservation-focused nonprofit. — CHEY SCOTT Junk2Funk 11th Annual Trashion Show • Sat, Oct. 12 from 6:30-8:30 pm • $40 • Coeur d’Alene Eagles Lodge • 209 Sherman Ave. • kealliance.org • 208-667-9093

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COMMUNITY SUNNY DAY

For a half-century now, young audiences have tuned in to learn how to count, read and be kind to each other with the beloved cast of Sesame Street. As part of the show’s 50th anniversary celebration this year, local station KSPS Public TV is celebrating the milestone with Elmo, Bert, Grover, Oscar, Big Bird, Cookie Monster, Abby Cadabby and crew at a series of special events. The first kicks off this weekend at Green Bluff with a visit from Elmo himself. Storytime events with other Sesame Street characters at area branches of the Spokane County Library District continue the celebration on Oct. 12 (Deer Park), Oct. 19 (Airway Heights) and Oct. 26 (Cheney). Each storytime starts at 10:30 am, where kids and their families can meet their favorite fuzzy friends, take home books and, in the show’s true spirit, make some new pals, too. — CHEY SCOTT

G E K R E L A D V I T S E W F W E PINO R B R LANDE $ 10

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50 Years and Counting: Sesame Street 50th Anniversary • Fri, Oct. 11 from 12-4:30 pm • Free • Green Bluff Fall Harvest Festival • 9919 Greenbluff Rd. • ksps.org/50-years

OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 45


FELTS FIELD AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS On 10/1, what could have become a serious incident was avoided, thanks to a caring friend on the ground and to a professional and compassionate air traffic controller at the Felts Field tower when a senior aviator had some difficulty preparing for a flight. It should be noted that the team of controllers at Felts do an outstanding job every day.

I SAW YOU TACO ABOUT A NICE GUY I saw you at Taco John’s on Friday <National Taco Day> and you kept your cool, miraculously, throughout the hectic craziness. I was impressed by your cool demeanor and kind smile. Thank you for brightening my night. WINCO-N I SEE YOU AGAIN? I saw you at Winco up north last Saturday. You picked up an item I accidentally dropped and we mused about the new seasonal moscato. I hope we can share a bottle soon. DO-OVER I’m sorry that I accidentally let you expire on the first go-around. I’m thankful that I saw you again and it led us to THIS moment. Thank you for always giving me QT and WOA; our talks mean the world to me. You said that it may be your “secret fantasy” to be written about here someday. Well, I’m here to tell you that you ARE special to me and that I’m SO thankful that I SAW YOU. XOXO

CHEERS ACRO-YOGA ACROBATS Dear Drew, Jenna and Chris, you sweethearts helped me FLY in the meadow east of Duncan Gardens on a Wednesday afternoon. Lumi and I hope to see you again! xox ellie

SOUND OFF

WHO IS MOST QUALIFIED? Well after reading Robert Herold ‘s article, I am voting for not only the most qualified, Ben Stuckart, but the only qualified mayoral candidate. I saw what disaster happened in California when the voters sent Schwarzenegger, a well known bodybuilder to lead the state as governor. Mayor of Spokane should not be voted for because they were seen on the evening news for years. Ask yourselves, after reading Mr. Herold ‘s column, who is really smart, intelligent and hardworking and will use common sense when making important decisions. Your only answer is Ben Stuckert. (Congratulations, you have made the right choice for your own well being.) TIP-TOP AT THE MAN SHOP Wow! Talk about a job well done. By far, it was the best haircut I have ever had. You might be thinking to yourself, “What could possibly make THIS experience better than the countless other mundane ones I’ve had before?” Simple... the right person. Ashley at the 3rd Ave location to be exact. She did a fantastic job. Her cleanliness, thoroughness, and attention to detail were above and beyond what you might expect for your average, runof-the-mill haircut. Not to say the average experience is bad, but this one was just that much better. And while getting a haircut might not be a life-changing thing, having a positive experience does make for a better day. Thank you for doing such excellent work, Ashley! DINO! :) Dear Dino, Since you’ve entered our family we’ve had so many laughs and smiles! Thank you for completing our family. We love you! You, Mr. Dino,

are the best golden retriever ever! We love you so much you fatty! RLDAHFSM THANK YOU TO A HOLY FAMILY NURSE Cheers to a Holy Family nurse I’ll never forget. My mother was hospitalized for a week in July. We had been visiting her daily but she had gotten much worse. I

whistle blowing here is a different matter. I am Not particularly a fan of Larry Stone however he spent his money and time to produce a piece meant to create dialogue about issues in Spokane. Once again Freedom of Speech in Spokane is ONLY speech that the people associated with City Hall wants to hear. Which

crossed the line from need to greed. I hope your latest request is met with a resounding no vote. Respectfully, D. Swanson DIGNITY AND SELF RESPECT Ok Spokane, help me out with this one please.... Why are there so many men

I found a chair in a hallway and attempted to become one with a dark corner. You found me. You took me to a room to gain my composure. I can’t thank you enough.

knew she was leaving this world. I knew she wasn’t going to get better. I found a chair in a hallway and attempted to become one with a dark corner. You found me. You took me to a room to gain my composure. I can’t thank you enough. She died the next day. I just wanted to say thank you for your kindness. HOPS & DROPS Shout out to Hops & Drops for resurrecting me every Sunday morning with house made Hollandaise for the Eggs Benny and sausage gravy for the fried smashed taters. They’re the bomb diggity in my wiggity fa shizzy yo! #BLAMthereitis

JEERS WHISTLING’S GREAT JUST NOT IN SPOKANE WOW! If you’re Left Leaning, the Whistle Blower’s next attempt for the Democrats to take over the government and get rid of President Trump must be heartwarming. You should check out the real qualifications and the connections of the “Whistle Blower” though. However

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

seems to be blather limited to support established agendas. Otherwise your multimillion dollar projects to build and benefit Spokane get their city support money’s jerked! Notice how Walt Worthy keeps quiet (smartly) and get tens if not hundreds of thousands including street repair for free when the crane lifting up sections of the new hotel break water mains and damages buried street utilities. Larry won’t have to worry about that!!! His support went right down the toilet — I mean thrown down into the bottomless pit of homelessness! Just like education, the more promises made if money is allotted the more it is wasted on NO fix programs — soon to be the story of homeless support in Spokane! ENOUGH IS ENOUGH Jeers to the Mead School district. You came to us for a bond increase, and we gave it to you. You came to us for a levy increase with the promise that our property taxes would actually go down, and we gave it to you, Now you come back to us for another levy increase, because the state said you could increase the levy rate. You have

that lie, sneak around, and cheat on their wife or significant other? If you’re unhappy, just end things! I can think of at least two dozen D-BAGS that I have met or dated over the years. So please, don’t draw sh*t out while you window shop or make a purchase that you know you can’t afford. How do you think you’re gonna get away with it?!?! Shame on you for trying/doing this to your wife and for shattering her confidence for every man that comes along for the rest of her life. She deserves better. n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS I D I O M S A C H A A M Y S C H H E A I S A N T I N E A R A N D Y S A L E R O I A D O W E A N O A L L Y S H R O U E O R C S A R S I K H E N Y A T

S C U L L M E A D E

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F R E E A R P P E R R G I O A N D T A I N Y P S E N O I R P E

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NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

OPEN HOUSE

OCTOBER 20 1-3:30PM

ALL PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS AND FAMILIES are invited to experience Gonzaga Prep. Each family is given a student host to guide them through Gonzaga Prep’s academic, spiritual and athletic programs. Experience our community and discover the difference of a Jesuit, Catholic education. Learn about Fair Share, our unique tuition program that makes a Gonzaga Prep accessible.

[ FIND YOUR PLACE AT GONZAGA PREP] Katie O’Brien `03, Admission Director at kobrien@gprep.com or (509) 777-8122

46 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019

R E A C T


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS OF THE INLAND NORTHWEST: CASINO ROYALE The annual gala helps the local chapter match thousands of local kids with a mentor, and includes dining, games, raffle, Big and Little testimony and more. Oct. 11, 5:30 pm. $80. Spokane Valley Event Center, 10514 E. Sprague Ave. spokanevalleyeventcenter.com (328-8310) WOMEN OF ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS YWCA Spokane’s 37th annual Women of Achievement Impact Luncheon expresses gratitude for the outstanding contributions of 2019’s honorees, provides inspiration to attendees, and raises awareness of domestic abuse in our community. Oct. 11, 11:30 am-1:30 pm. $125. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. ywcaspokane.org/event/woa2019/ BRIDGE TO BRUNCH MultiCare hosts this third annual 5K run/walk, with all proceeds supporting the Community Cancer Fund. All participants receive a winter beanie. Includes a fully catered breakfast at end of course. Oct. 12, 9 am-noon. $20-$30. WSU Health Sciences Spokane, 412 E. Spokane Falls Blvd. bridgetobrunch.org (509-358-7500) JUNK2FUNK The 11th annual benefit fashion show features local artists of all ages and gender rocking the runway in “eco-fashions” made from “junk,” “trash” and recycled materials. Oct. 12, 7 pm. $40. Coeur d’Alene Eagles, 209 Sherman Ave. kealliance.org (208-651-6950) SILENT AUCTION FOR A REFUGE A Refuge: Trauma Informed Therapies, is a nonprofit striving to improve mental health in the Spokane community. This event raises funds to help address barriers to mental health services for those in need of quality, trauma-informed mental health. Oct. 15, 6-9 pm. $10/$12. Trailbreaker Cider, 2204 N. Madison St. traumainformedtherapies.com

COMEDY

POST COMEDY THEATRE With the change of a hat or wig and impeccable dialect, comedian Robert Post switches at lightning speed between six hilarious characters in a quick-change spoof of a murder mystery. Oct. 10, 7:30-9:30 pm. $15-$25. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 211 E. Desmet Ave. (313-2787) TOM ARNOLD As a writer, producer and actor, Arnold has established himself to TV and film audiences worldwide, having won awards including the Peabody and a Golden Globe. Oct. 10-12 at 7:30 pm, Oct. 12 at 10 pm. $15-$30. Spokane Comedy

Club, 315 W. Sprague. (509-318-9998) NO CLUE Join the BDT Players as they put a comedic spin on a favorite macabre guessing game. Fridays at 7:30 pm through Oct. 25. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com DRINK N DEBATE A monthly improv comedy competition featuring four teams of three comedians from across the Pacific Northwest. Oct. 13, 7:30 pm. $5/$10. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com DRY BAR COMEDY LIVE The popular online series that offer clean “Comedy for Everyone” is expanding to live shows. Performing in Spokane: Shayne Smith, Jay Whittaker, Steve Soelberg, Alex Velluto. Oct. 15, 7:30 pm. $25. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998)

COMMUNITY

COLVILLE CORN MAZE & PUMPKIN PATCH Visit the 12-acre corn maze and take home a pumpkin. Open daily from 11 am-7 pm through Oct. 31. $6-$8 for maze. Colville Corn Maze & Pumpkin Patch, 73 Oakshott Rd. colvillecornmaze.com OPIOID SOLUTION SYMPOSIUM Join Panhandle Health District for the 2nd annual North Idaho Rx Opioid Solution Symposium, open to all community members interested in collaborating to reduce opioid misuse, abuse and overdose within our region. Oct. 10, 10 am-8:30 pm. Free. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. PRxOSsymposium2019. eventbrite.com (208-667-1865) SCARYWOOD HAUNTED NIGHTS For a decade now, Silverwood has transformed into Scarywood Haunted Nights, boasting an array of horrific haunts and endless scares. Thu from 7-11 pm, Fri-Sat from 7 pm-midnight through Nov. 2. $27$41. Silverwood Theme Park, 27843 U.S. 95. scarywoodhaunt.com CELEBRATE SESAME STREET TURNING 50! Join KSPS Public TV at Beck’s Harvest House on Green Bluff to meet and take pictures with Elmo and share your favorite Sesame Street memories. Includes giveaways, crafts and more. Oct. 11, 12-4:30 pm. Free. Harvest House, 9919 E. Greenbluff Rd. ksps.org (443-7700) FRIENDS OF THE MEDICAL LAKE LIBRARY BOOK SALE Proceeds from book sales support library programs, activities, and services. Oct. 11 from 10 am-4 pm; Oct. 12 from 10 am-3 pm. Free. Medical Lake Library, 3212 Herb. scldfriends.org FRIENDS OF THE NORTH SPOKANE LIBRARY BOOK SALE Proceeds support

library programs, activities and services. Oct. 11-12 from 10 am-3 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scldfriends.org/events (893-8350) 24 HOUR COMIC BOOK & ART DAY Make a 24-page comic book or finished work of art in 24 hours. Event begins Oct. 12 at 10 am and finishes Oct. 13 at 10 am. Participants don’t have to make a comic; work on any piece of art you’d like or just come by to watch artists work. Free. Spokane Print & Publishing Center, 1925 N. Ash. facebook.com/spokaneprint/ ARTISAN CRAFT & FOOD FAIR More than 125 vendors are featured, offering handmade crafts and art and popular consumer items. Proceeds from admission and vendor fees support the awardwinning bands of Mt. Spokane. Oct. 12 from 9 am-5 pm and Oct. 13 from 11 am-4 pm. $2. Mt. Spokane High School, 6015 E. Mt Spokane Park Dr. (456-0446) BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE FALL FESTIVAL Enjoy activities including the giant corn maze, pumpkin patch, fall treats (pumpkin donuts, fresh-pressed apple cider) and more. Sept. 21-Oct. 27; Sat/ Sun from 10 am-5 pm. Harvest House, 9919 E. Greenbluff Rd. (238-6970) COOKIE MONSTER CELEBRATES 50 YEARS OF SESAME STREET KSPS Public TV celebrates with Cookie Monster making an appearance for story time. Sesame Street books and educational resources also given away. Oct. 12, 10:30-11:30 am. Free. Deer Park Library, 208 Forest St. ksps.org (443-7700) DANZA MEXICA: AZTEC DANCING & CULTURE Danza Mexica, also known as Aztec Dance, is an ancient ritual dance and ceremony that originated with the Mexica people of Mexico. After a demonstration and discussion, a step-by-step lesson is given, closing with an experiential dance ceremony. Oct. 12, 3:30-4:30 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St. spokanelibrary.org HARVEST FAIR Celebrate autumn with the library and enjoy a chili feed, pumpkin decorating, live music, giant yard games, and more. Oct. 12, 1-3 pm. Free. Post Falls Library, 821 N. Spokane St. (208-773-1506) PUTTING YOUR GARDEN TO BED WSU Master Gardener Jan Baker discusses how a few chores completed in the fall can eliminate a lot of work and problems the following spring, including general clean-up, trees and shrubs, lawns, perennials, berries and roses. Reservations required. Oct. 12, 10:30 am. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry. thefriendsofmanito.org (444-5331)

Have an event? GET LISTED! Submit your event details for listings in the print & online editions of the Inlander.

• Community • Film • Food & Drink

• Music • Sports • Theater

Deadline is one week prior to publication Inlander.com/GetListed

• Visual Arts • Words • Etc.

REFOREST SPOKANE DAY The Lands Council is partnering with Avista for this annual event, this year focusing on urban reforestation and revitalizing Spokane’s downtown corridor. Oct. 12, 10 am-1 pm. Downtown Spokane. landscouncil.org CDA MAKERS: FALL MARKET A community gathering of Inland Northwest artists, jewelers, bakers and crafters staging an open marketplace with food samples, shopping and more. Oct. 13, 10 am-4 pm. Free. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. bit.ly/2YrABGz (208-765-4000) WHAT YOUR HOME SAYS ABOUT THE WORLD Join sociologist and writer Michelle Janning to discover how home spaces and objects tell the story of what’s happening in contemporary families. Oct. 13, 2 pm. Free. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. humanities.org (509-456-3931) COLFAX CITY COUNCIL CANDIDATE FORUM Candidates set to appear are Council Position 4: Mark Mackleit and Andrew Stewart, Position 5: Sarina Roberts and Ben Miller, Position 6: Jim Kackman and Dominic Vilareal and Position 7: Jeremiah Roberts. Tom Huntwork incumbent for Position 7 is unable to attend due to a prior commitment. Oct. 16, 7 pm. Free. Colfax Library, 102 S. Main St. lwvpullman.org (332-2114) LILAC CITY LIVE! Hear from local authors, musicians, artists, comedians and more. Doors open at 7, show starts at 8. Oct. 17, 8-9 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main. spokanelibrary.org PRESERVATION DIY! Join museum collections staff for a do-it-yourself deep dive into the world of preservation, and learn some helpful tricks to preserving the treasures passed down in your own family. Oct. 17, 5:30-7:30 pm. $20/$25. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org

FILM

THE FAREWELL A Chinese family discovers their grandmother has only a short while left to live and decide to keep her in the dark, scheduling a wedding to gather before she dies. Oct. 10-11 at 8 pm. $7; $50/pass. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) FARMER OF THE YEAR A feature film by Metaline Falls husband-and-wife team Kathy Swanson and Vince O’Connell, starring Emmy-nominated Barry Corbin (Northern Exposure, No Country for Old Men,), Mackinlee Waddell (Good Christian Belles), and Terry Kiser (Weekend at Bernie’s). Showing Oct. 7-17, times vary. $8-$13. Village Centre Cinemas Wander-

mere, 12622 N. Hwy 395. (509-232-7727) THE WAY OF CONSCIOUSNESS The Gurdjieff Foundation of Idaho presents a documentary about the philosopher and spiritual teacher Gurdjieff and his teaching, with a Q&A discussion to follow. Oct. 10, 7-9 pm. Free. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801) ART IN ACTION DOCUMENTARY REVEAL & FUNDRAISER The reveal of the ART in ACTION documentary from this summer’s collaborative mural project in the Garland Art Alley. Proceeds benefit the Garland Art Alley projects. Oct. 12, 10 am. $10. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlanddistrict.com (327-1050)

FOOD

KID’S COOKING CLASS: CHOCOLATE ART Come make awesome shapes, straws and flowers out of chocolate. One parent can attend free with registration. Oct. 11, 5:30-7:20 pm. $42. Modernist Cooks & Catering, 1014 N. Pines Rd. modernistcooks.com (789-0428) BARBECUE & GRILL ACADEMY Learn the art and science behind grilling and barbecue, including direct and indirect heat applications such as smoking, roasting, braising, etc. This is a three-series course. Participants learn through handson instruction. Oct. 12, 9 am. $35-$135. WSU Spokane County Extension, 222 N. Havana St. extension.wsu.edu/spokane A BIT OF THE ORIENT The annual fall food festival offers dishes including chicken curry, lumpia, tempura veggies, yakisoba, rolls, baked goods and more. Oct. 12, 11 am-2 pm. Highland Park United Methodist, 611 S. Garfield St. (535-2687) COOKING WITH CHEF RICKY Decorate Halloween cookies with Spokane chef Ricky Webster, winner of 2018 Food Network’s Christmas Cookie Challenge. Oct. 12, 3:30-4:30 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org BOTTOMLESS MIMOSA SUNDAY BRUNCH Chef Steven and team create a buffet brunch (new menu each week) with a bottomless(ish) mimosa bar. Service at 9 am and 10:30 am. Oct. 13, 20 and 27; Nov. 3, 10, 17 and 24. $20. Nectar Catering and Events, 120 N. Stevens St. nectartastingroom.com (509-869-1572) PANCAKE & APPLESAUCE BREAKFAST A weekly fall breakfast buffet featuring all-you-can-eat pancakes, sausage, eggs, Green Bluff applesauce and beverages. Sundays from 8-11 am, through Oct. 20. $3.50-$7. Green Bluff Grange, 9809 Green Bluff Rd. greenbluffgrowers.com

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Pesticides on your food is one thing. Pesticides on your pot is something different entirely.

NEWS

Chemical Reactions It’s illegal to use many pesticides on marijuana — but the state isn’t yet testing it BY DANIEL WALTERS

I

f you must consume pesticides, as a general rule, it’s better to eat them than to smoke them. Eat food covered in pesticides, and you have the liver to filter them out, and your stomach lining and intestines to help absorb them. But smoke marijuana soaked in highly toxic pesticides? That’s almost as bad as injecting it directly into your bloodstream, argues Jeffrey Raber, co-founder of the California-based Werc Shop marijuana testing lab. A 2013 peer-reviewed study he co-authored found that nearly 70 percent of contaminates end up floating inside the marijuana smoke you’re inhaling. And that, his team writes in the Journal of Toxicology, may “pose a significant toxicological threat in the absence of adequate regulatory frameworks.”

In Washington state, marijuana growers are banned from using most pesticides. At least, they’re supposed to be. The problem is there isn’t any actual regime for testing marijuana for pesticide levels. “We currently do not test for pesticides, but it’s coming,” says Brian Smith, spokesman for the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board. It’s the consequence, he says, of being one of the pioneers in the recreational marijuana market. “There weren’t any labs in the states that were testing for any of the stuff,” Smith says. “For testing for pesticide, you need some very expensive equipment.” Most pesticides used for agriculture are regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency, and pesticide levels in food are enforced by the Food and Drug Admin-

istration. But marijuana is still illegal at the federal level. For now, Smith says, the state only tests products that are associated with specific complaints. And sometimes the people sending in the complaints may have an ulterior motive. “Often, they’re from competitors,” Smith says. In 2016, the Platinum Panda pens from Grow Op Farms in Spokane Valley were recalled for having higher than acceptable pesticide levels. There have been 12 recalls of marijuana crops since December of 2016, according to the LCB — and eight of those are just in 2019. Pesticides in marijuana, Smith says, have been around for as long as pesticides were existing. That goes for both legal and illegal drugs. According to Business Insider, 90 percent of illegal grow farms raided in California last year contained traces of extremely toxic pesticides. Meanwhile, other states with legal marijuana implemented specific testing regimes. But some of those states have struggled with the scale of the challenge. A recent audit from the Oregon Secretary of State criticized the state’s testing system, noting the lack of ways to prevent growers from scamming the system by fibbing about which samples they’d submitted for testing. When Colorado’s mandatory testing regimen was introduced last year, growers grumbled about weathering the additional cost — while a coalition calling itself “#WhatsInMyWeed” complained that the tests aren’t expansive enough to detect many pesticides. “We think it’s time to get in line with other states,” Smith says. “We think testing for pesticides would add some uniformity across the industry.” One sector of the industry has been particularly active in pushing for mandatory testing in Washington: advocates for medical marijuana. According to the Stranger, one such advocate, John Kingsbury, wrote a letter to the LCB, arguing that the testing failures were so high that he estimated a full third of legal marijuana in the state was contaminated by illegal levels of pesticides. There’s an irony: When it comes to pesticide controls, medical marijuana is actually more regulated than recreational marijuana. The state Department of Health requires medical marijuana to be tested for pesticides. And that’s had the impact of distorting the marketplace, Smith says. For most marijuana retailers, it’s not worth the hassle or risk to get their marijuana tested in order to be able to legally sell medical marijuana. “A lot of producers don’t want to go through the extra step and run the risk of failing,” Smith says. Smith says the testing requirement is coming, but will probably have to wait until at least 2020. “This is going to require a lot of work with the industry and the labs to prepare for this,” Smith says. “This is going to have a major business impact.” n A version of this article first appeared in the Inlander’s cannabis-focused quarterly magazine, GZQ.

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48 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019


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OCTOBER 10, 2019 INLANDER 49


GREEN ZONE

NEWS

Proceeding with Caution More states react to vaping scare BY WILL MAUPIN

A

s we reported in last week’s Green Zone, Washington Gov. Jay Inslee signed an executive order banning flavored vape products. The Evergreen State joined an ever-growing list of states and jurisdictions that have taken similar action in the wake of the outbreak of vape-related illness and death across the country. As of Oct. 1, the CDC has received reports of over 1,000 cases of vape-related illness across 48 states. The vast majority of cases involve THC rather than nicotine containing vape products or electronic cigarettes. Government officials from every state in the union have, in some form or another, issued public warnings about the dangers associated with vaping and many have asked citizens to avoid vaping altogether. But only a handful of states have gone as far as Washington and taken real action. Oregon, a state where recreational marijuana is legal, is the most recent state to implement a ban. Gov. Kate Brown’s executive order, issued on Oct. 4, is very similar to Inslee’s. It calls for a sixmonth ban on all flavored vaping products and gives authority to ban any additional additives that are linked to the health crisis. Further south in California, a state where recreational marijuana is legal but the black market is not only thriving but outpacing the legal market, legislators have stopped short of a statewide ban. Instead, last month Gov. Gavin Newsom signed an executive order requiring merchants who sell vape products to post consumer warnings about the health risks associated with those products. The order also allocates over $20 million in revenue from cannabis and tobacco taxes to be spent on, essentially, an anti-vaping ad campaign. Michigan, which legalized recreational marijuana last year but has yet to open its legal market, was the first state to issue a ban in response to the vape crisis. Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, and many who have followed in her footsteps, targeted nicotine vapes with her ban. “Companies selling vaping products are using candy flavors to hook children on nicotine and misleading claims to promote the belief that these products are safe,” Whitmer said in a release. The other states with bans in place are Massachusetts, which banned all vape products, not just flavored ones, Rhode Island and New York. (New York’s ban has been put on hold due to legal challenges from the vaping industry.) State lawmakers in Delaware, Illinois and New Jersey have drafted legislation on the issue, but they won’t get to vote on it until next year. n

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RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess THE DUMPSTER FIRE WITHIN

AMY ALKON

About six weeks ago, I started dating the nicest guy. I have some intimacy issues (basically, fear of abandonment), and having somebody be nice to me is new and uncomfortable. I freaked out one night and had sex with somebody else. I know this guy I’m dating isn’t sleeping with other women, but we haven’t had the official talk. I don’t plan on doing this again, but I really want to confess. The guilt is terrible. —Disgusted With Myself

The only man in your life with whom you should be discussing your recent sexual history is Dr. Maury Finkelbaum, your 7,000-year-old gynecologist. You and Neighbordude might be all kinds of fond of each other, but you have no agreement for sexual exclusivity, and you can’t violate a treaty that doesn’t actually exist. Still, assuming that he isn’t getting it on with anyone else, it’s natural that you’d feel guilty about an apparent asymmetry in sexual grazing. Human psychology evolved to have a sort of inner accounting staff monitoring the fairness level of our behavior — calculating whether we’re giving as much as we’re getting. However, unlike everybody’s grandma, evolution doesn’t care whether we’re nice people. It just wants us to survive so we can pass on our genes. Accordingly, this fairness monitoring system safeguards our physical survival through safeguarding our social survival. (In ancestral times, slackers or freeloaders booted from the ancestral band markedly increased their chances of becoming some sharp-fanged thing’s Sunday brunch entree.) Even today, when we perceive that we’re getting more than our fair share of something — whether it’s cake or sex with hot strangers — our behavioral accounts payable team pings us in the form of feelbad: the noxious, gut-churning feeling of guilt (and/or its poisonous BFF, shame). Research by evolutionary psychologist Daniel Sznycer and his colleagues deems guilt a “recalibrational emotion.” Translated from the Professorese, this means that our wanting to stop the feelbad from guilt motivates us to even the balance between ourselves and somebody we’ve shorted in some way. The thing is, emotion, which rises up automatically, with no effort from us, needs to be fact-checked by reason. Unfortunately, reason has to be dragged out of bed and forced to work. And that’s what you need to do with yours. Again, remember that you and this guy had no exclusivity agreement that would have barred you from venturing into other men’s beds, back seats, or sex dungeons. Also, let’s get real on why you’re longing to tell. It isn’t to make the guy feel better but to make yourself feel better — to rid yourself of the psychological tension that comes from holding back information. (It’s basically the emotional version of a really bad need to pee.) Next, consider the view from psychiatrist and evolutionary researcher Randolph Nesse that painful emotions are important motivational tools — just like physical pain, when you, say, lean back at a party, all apex of cool, and rest your palm on a hot stove. Just as the searing pain gets you to lift your hand pronto, you can use your guilt-induced discomfort in a positive way: as reinforcement against your stepping out on the guy once you two do have a relationship. Other helpful insight comes from research on “attachment.” The “attachment behavioral system,” explain social scientists Mario Mikulencer and Philip Shaver, motivates human beings, from infancy on, “to seek proximity to significant others (attachment figures) in times of need.” A person’s “attachment style” indicates the degree to which a person “worries that a partner will not be responsive in times of need” (including the worry that one’s partner will flee the relationship entirely). However, Mikulencer and Shaver note that “a growing body of research shows that attachment style can change, subtly or dramatically.” One way to change it is through asking your partner to be very physically and emotionally expressive with you in loving, cuddly-wuddly ways. Research by psychologist Brooke C. Feeney finds that the more an insecurely attached person sees their partner is there for them — like with touch that “conveys acceptance, warmth, and intimacy” — the more independent (that is, the less clingoramous) they can be. Finally, there’s something you can do to help yourself feel more secure, per Mikulencer and Shaver’s research: Turn on the TV in your head and run helpful programming — mental video of warm, fuzzy “attachment figures.” The researchers explain that “thoughts of an available and supportive attachment figure” lead people with a lot of attachment insecurities “to behave more like secure people.” Or, putting this another way, your response to a man being really loving to you would be to give love in return — as opposed to giving excuses like “I was so freaked out by how nice you were to me that I tripped and fell on somebody else’s penis.” n ©2019, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

52 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2019

EVENTS | CALENDAR TASTES OF THE WORLD, SOUNDS OF THE EAST Inland Curry’s Dinner Series continues with an evening of international cuisine from Afghanistan, East Africa, Iraq, Jordan, Nepal, and Syria. Oct. 13, 5:30 pm. $11.49-$42.99. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. uuspokane.org OKTOBERFEST COOKING Join chef Bob Black for some Oktoberfest flavors: reuben egg rolls, goulash soup, jagger schnitzel and deconstructed black forest cake. Oct. 15, 5:30-7:30 pm. $50. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org

MUSIC

FRIENDS OF THE GUITAR HOUR CONCERT SERIES Featuring guitarist XueFei Yang. Oct. 11, 7:30 pm. $105.99. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org SOUNDS OF THE EAST An Indian classical music concert based in classical styles blended with contemporary influences and improvisation. Featuring musicians Pandit Partho Sarothy, Pandi Abhijit Banerjee and Somnath Roy. Oct. 11, 6 pm. $10-$20. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org THE MUSIC OF DAVID BOWIE WITH THE SPOKANE SYMPHONY The Symphony performs with vocalist David Brighton as Bowie, conductor Brent Havens and a full rock band in a concert that explores the incredible range of Bowie’s music. Oct. 12, 8 am-10 pm. $28+. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) PACIFIC NORTHWEST MARCHING BAND CHAMPIONSHIPS Eleven of the best high school marching bands in the Northwest perform in competition during a day of music and pageantry. Oct. 12, 9 am-8 pm. $10-$15. Joe Albi Stadium, Wellesley & Assembly. pnwmbc.org SPIRIT OF SPOKANE CHORUS Celebrate with the Sweet Adelines Spirit of Spokane Chorus as the group turns 30. Featuring special guest performers, the Coeur d’Alene Chorus, Rivers Edge Chorus, Pages of Harmony and Lake City Harmonizers. Hosted by “Sunshine” Shelly Monahan. Oct. 12, 7 pm. $21.69. Riverside Place, 1108 W. Riverside Ave. recspokane.com (509-747-1200) WASHINGTON IDAHO SYMPHONY: REVISITING AMERICAN GEMS A program celebrating favorite American composers, with music from Leonard Bernstein, Morton Gould, Aaron Copland, Steve Winteregg, and Howard Hanson. Oct. 12, 7:30 pm. $10-$25. Pullman High School, 510 NW Greyhound Way. wa-idsymphony.org GORDON MOTE CONCERT The awardwinning recording artist has been awarded top piano/keyboard player of the year by the Academy of Country Music. Blind from birth, Gordon sat down at the piano at three years old and began playing with both hands. Oct. 13, 6-8 pm. Free. Valley Assembly of God, 15618 E. Broadway. (924-0466) SPOKANE STRING QUARTET The first concert in the quartet’s 40th anniversary season is a program of works by Joseph Haydn, David Diamond and Ludwig van Beethoven. Oct. 13, 3 pm. $12-$20. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanestringquartet.org WHITWORTH UNIVERSITY CHOIR: CHORAL EVENSONG The evening service features choral and organ works by

Herbert Howells, Healey Willan, Thomas Tallis and Felix Mendelssohn. Oct. 13, 5-6 pm. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th. saintjohns-cathedral.org BALLET ROCKS Ballet Victoria presents a classical ballet set to classic rock. Oct. 16, 6:30 pm. Free-$27.24. Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, Washington State University Pullman Campus. (335-8522)

THEATER

THE BOOK OF WILL William Shakespeare wrote his plays in pieces, never putting all the parts together until actors were on stage, for fear of someone stealing his work. Who’s to stop people from stealing it after he dies? Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm through Oct. 20. $13-$25. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. (325-2507) ROALD DAHL’S MATILDA THE MUSICAL Matilda is a little girl with astonishing wit, intelligence and psychokinetic powers. Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm through Oct. 13. $15-$35. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) SPARK CENTRAL RADIO THEATRE: TREASURE ISLAND A revival of radio theatre featuring a local cast who performs a version of the classic Treasure Island at Spark Central. Oct. 10, 7:308:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org THE ADDAMS FAMILY Wednesday Addams has grown up and fallen in love with a sweet, smart young man from a respectable family – a man her parents have never met. Fri at 7 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm through Oct. 27. $12-$16. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia. spokanechildrenstheatre.org A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM A performance of the Shakespeare classic by students of Whitworth University. Oct. 11-12 and 18-19 at 7:30 pm, Oct. 13 and 20 at 2 pm. $12-$15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (777-3707) STRANGER IN THE ATTIC Set in the country home of freelance writer Brian Hollander and his wife, the couple’s life is unexpectedly upset by the arrival of a stranger offering an exclusive story about a murder that hasn’t happened yet. Oct. 11-19; Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Dinner theater Oct. 19 at 6 pm. $5$30. StageWest Community Theatre, 639 Elm St. stagewestct.org THE SECRET OF CORNBREAD FLATS Punning their way to a surprise conclusion, flavorful characters, with a little help from a witty narrator, cook up a mighty storm of laughter. Includes dinner of chili, cornbread and brownies. Oct. 11-12 at 7 pm. $15. Sandpoint High School, 410 S. Division. (208-263-3034) MURDER AT THE PIANO BAR A night of mystery and intrigue in the roaring 20s. Tickets include dinner. Oct. 14, 6 pm. $45. The NYC Piano Bar, 313 Sherman. crimesceneentertainment.com DAR HE: THE STORY OF EMMETT TILL This riveting one-actor, multiplecharacter drama chronicles the murder, trial and unbelievable confession of the men accused of Till’s lynching. Oct. 17, 7:30-9:30 pm. $25, $15/student, youth. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 211 E. Desmet Ave. (313-2787)

ARTS

INK! RALLY PRINT SHOWCASE The opening night for Emerge’s annual

showcase of the prints from September’s INK! Rally. Includes beverages and musical entertainment. Oct. 11, 5-8 pm. Emerge, 208 N. 4th. emergecda.com MEL MCCUDDIN, DENNIS MEINERS & DEB OLIVA McCuddin is back with over 40 new uncanny works for his solo October exhibition. Oct. 11-Nov. 3; Wed-Sun from 11 am-6 pm. Opening reception Oct. 11 from 5-8 pm. WFree. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com VHS PRESENTS: THE ROCKY HORROR ART PICTURE SHOW A night of Rocky Horror themed art (and maybe the Time Warp). A portion of proceeds support cancer relief fund of Kelly Vaughn. Oct. 11, 6-11 pm. Resurrection Records, 1927 W. Northwest Blvd. (853-0591) 13TH ANNUAL ARTIST SHOWCASE AND ART AUCTION The main fundraiser for the Spokane Valley Arts Council. Local and national artists submit art for sale; art catalog is available online. Includes silent auction and “quick finish” demos by artists from 5-6:30 pm with dinner and live auction 6-9 pm. Oct. 12, 5-9 pm. $60. CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. spokanevalleyarts.org VISITING ARTIST LECTURE SERIES: STEPHEN SEEMAYER & PAMELA WILSON The film “Tales of the American” was completed in 2018, and follows the history of the hotel, those who lived there and the hotel’s transition from the early 1900’s to the early part of the 21st century. Lectures Oct. 16 at noon (EWU Art Dept.) and Oct. 17 at 11:30 am (SFCC Bldg. 24, Rm. 110) and 6:30 pm (MAC, auditorium). Oct. 16, noon and Oct. 17, 11:30 am & 6:30 pm. Free. (533-3710)

WORDS

PAULA COOMER: SOMEBODY SHOULD HAVE SCOLDED THE GIRL A release party for the short story collection by long-time regional poet and author Paula Coomer. Oct. 10, 7 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. bookpeopleofmoscow.com PIVOT October’s theme is “Full Circle,” featuring stories told by Melissa Luck, Jessa Lewis, Claudine Richardson, Emily Gwinn, Rob Bryceson, Anna Jennings and Scott Leadingham. Oct. 10, 7 pm. $10. Washington Cracker Co. Building, 304 W. Pacific. pivotspokane.com JONATHAN JOHNSON: THE DESK ON THE SEA EWU professor Jonathan Johnson reads from his new memoir “The Desk on the Sea.” He’s joined by Spokane musician Liz Rognes, who plays original and traditional Celtic tunes. Oct. 11, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com LILAC CITY LIT CRAWL This program of the Spokane Poet Laureate and Spokane Arts travels from venue-to-venue while hearing local writers reading their poetry or prose. Oct. 13, 4-7 pm. Free. Browne’s Addition. spokanearts.org READING: MICHAEL HERZOG The Chaucerian scholar and Gonzaga English Professor Emeritus returns for a reading, reception and book-signing for his new historical fiction novel “This Passing World.” Oct. 13, 4-7 pm. $35. Gonzaga Magnuson Theatre, 502 E. Boone. gonzaga.edu/theatrearts SHEPHERD SIEGEL: DISRUPTIVE PLAY Siegel discuss tricksters and pop culture, examined in his new book “Disruptive Play: The Trickster in Politics and Culture.” Oct. 16, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. bit.ly/2zfvhqK n


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COEUR D ’ ALENE

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

On the Ball

Four places to finish out your golf season in North Idaho

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olf fans: Were you discouraged by the recent dusting of snow and drop in temperature? Fear not; many golf courses are still open. In fact, fall is the preferred time for many players who appreciate thinned out crowds, blue bird days and walking the course in the crisp autumn air.

The COEUR D’ALENE RESORT is hosting its 13th Annual Golftoberfest, Saturday, Oct. 12, with a shotgun start at 11 am. Lunch is on them: complimentary grilled Bavarian-style bratwurst, as well as traditional sausages and hotdogs will be served throughout the day. Sample from numerous micro beers and ales, too. Rates begin at $168 and overnight stay packages are available. Farther south, the COEUR D’ALENE CASINO RESORT & HOTEL is celebrating the end of their 15th season with their annual Circling Raven Golf Course endof-season bash. Because it’s never too soon to plan for next year, they are offering tidy discounts on all Circling Raven apparel in the pro shop, which is where you’ll find plenty of dining and drink specials at their popular Twisted

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Earth Grill (aka the 19th hole). Even better, enjoy a whopping 15 percent off green fees and a sneak peek into 2020 scheduling, including incentives to book now. Make it an overnighter at Circling Raven with their popular stay-and-play packages (starting at $223). They call it the “wurst” tournament ever, but you know they’re being clever at TWIN LAKES GOLF COURSE. Their OktoberFest Tournament on Oct. 13 gets you nine holes of golf with a cart, a beer and a German-inspired meal at MoonDollars Bistro for $39 (nonmembers). Want to play a private course that’s open to the public? You can at AVONDALE GOLF COURSE, in beautiful Hayden, Idaho, which just rolled over to its fall rate schedule: $37 plus cart for nonmembers. For $35, nonmembers are also invited to participate in Avondale’s one remaining tournament on Oct. 19. It’s the Halloween Night Light Tournament with glow in the dark accessories. You might just say it will be the “highlight” of your season.


C O E U R

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Upcoming Events ArtWalk OCTOBER 11

Fall is the perfect time to explore downtown Coeur d’Alene and enjoy its vibrant art scene. More than two dozen locations, from galleries to shops, are showcasing local and regional artists. Free; 5-8 pm; download a map at artsandculturecda.org/artwalk.

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Full Moon Ride OCTOBER 13

Ready for a full moon adventure? Join the friendly folks at Slate Creek for their monthly full moon bike ride. The pre-party starts at 6 pm, and the ride gets rolling at 8 pm. Expect a midpoint stop at a local business to add to the fun. Go to Visitcda.org for more details.

Nearly Famous Comedy OCTOBER 15

This October, Honey Social Club and Eatery features the nearly famous duo of Michael Glatzmaier and Deece Casillas for a night of comedy. 8:30-10:30 pm.

The Addams Family OCTOBER 28-27

Based on the bizarre and beloved characters created by Charles Addams, this original story finds the famously macabre Addams Family put to the test when outsiders come to diner, hurling the Addams household into comic chaos. $19-25; Thursday-Saturday 7:30 pm; Saturday-Sunday 2 pm; Kroc Center Theater.

For more events, things to do & places to stay, go to VisitCDA.org

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