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POLICE

SPD to track the race of people they stop PAGE 13

POLITICS

The role of our local leaders in the shutdown PAGE 24

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COMMENT | THE SHUTDOWN

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Our leaders need to stop with all the 24/7 campaigning for reelection; it’s time to serve the people BY GEORGE NETHERCUTT

A

deeply faithful friend from Virginia recently told me of the routine he follows each morning. Rather than immediately focusing on the day’s bad news, he lists his blessings and counts them. In our troubled world, it’s a routine worth replicating, if only to give us a sense of perspective — to prioritize what’s important and what’s not. Every morning at breakfast, I find myself reading newspapers that chronicle a distasteful government shutdown, bitter debt-ceiling fight, recurring Obamacare glitches or embarrassing intractability on the international scene. By the time I finish my bowl of cereal, I’m either depressed or angry, oftentimes both. Focusing on public affairs as a first order of the day misplaces my priorities. While it’s perfectly appropriate for citizens to be passionate about public policy and our country’s direction, the most important priorities in our lives (health, faith, family, friendships) are often either overlooked, or taken for granted. Author Stephen Covey once said, “The key is not to prioritize your schedule, but to schedule your priorities. ”

F

or decades, Congress was a place where the toughest of arguments could be made, where dissention flourished, but where, at the end of a day’s disputes, leaders made it a priority to come together to act civilly toward one another and resolve differences, recognizing that the nation’s business had priority over a Member’s reelection, pet project or political philosophy. It’s different today, but it just may be a case of misplaced priorities. Now, instead of fulfilling national responsibilities, Members of Congress and our President attend more to political victory and self-promotion and less to moving America forward. Today victories must be total so that “winners” achieve 100 percent of their priorities and losers get nothing they want legislatively. Too many officials’ priorities today are misplaced — they’re not leading. And the real losers are the American public. Perhaps this is the result of gerrymandering, so that more “safe” districts breed extremists, able to take outrageous positions and still secure reelection. Perhaps today’s breed of self-serving elected officials believes that appealing to a narrowly focused but active constituency will encourage activists to show up at election time to secure their reelection. While part of today’s extremism may be justified because it’s in response to America’s debt-ridden economic condition, shutting down government rarely ends well, whoever is blameworthy. Members of Congress who truly believe they’re doing what’s right for America and faithfully representing

their constituents’ best interests should hold fast, but they need to be shrewd enough to develop an alternative to a shutdown. Whatever the cause, Members whose priorities are total victory and the destruction of opponents produce paralyzing gridlock. Legislative standoffs cause major public losses — damaging the economy, wasting precious time and further paralyzing government agencies stuck in the middle between warring political factions and, ultimately, a disgusted public. Too many elected officials today also believe they’re Presidential material. Running for President is their ultimate goal because they think the public deserves them. President Obama met that test. Based on his domestic and foreign policy record to date, Mr. Obama entered the presidency unprepared. I join others who believe it’s healthy for America to have elected a racial minority as our president, but the presidency deserves and demands a person of wisdom, stature and accomplishment. Mr. Obama lacked all three as he sought our nation’s highest office. Now the public knows it, lately assessing his job approval at only 43 percent. Presidential service shouldn’t be symbolic, an image builder or a proving ground. It always requires negotiation with Congress on critical issues. Now other first-termers exploit single issues, believing that such attention-getting qualifies them as leaders — makes them qualified for President.

O

ur Constitutional guarantee of freedom affords citizens and elected officials broad latitude in the conduct of their affairs. But those who balance their ego with the satisfaction of helping others are the best public servants. All elected officials, particularly Presidential candidates, should take note. Their priorities should be focused on national progress and bringing credit and respect to the offices they hold, because good policies usually produce good politics. Impasses that produce government shutdowns demonstrate failure, and failing to communicate to resolve political or policy differences is wretched leadership. Officeholders will ultimately be judged mostly on how well they pursued the public good and led with conviction. Those with high standards of conduct — who distinguish the office they hold — will best be remembered for their evenhanded service. What they do for the common good marks effective leaders. n


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Trust on the Ballot BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

T

here are plenty of reasons to worry about our food supply. Just this week, we learned of an 18-state outbreak of salmonella in chicken — just as federal inspectors were furloughed. We’re also learning more and more about iffy additives like food dyes, growth hormones and sodium nitrite (to name a few). And as we documented in our recent cover story, an entire wheat field just south of here showed up to have been genetically modified. No one can explain how. Americans are fighting back, favoring restaurants that can pinpoint the sources of the food they serve, reading labels like never before, and, in at least 20 states now, trying to get comprehensive labels on the food they buy. Here in Washington, it’s coming in the form of Initiative 522 — a proposal to tell citizens if their food has been genetically modified. Count me as one of those who are excited about the possibilities of better crops — to feed more people, to require fewer resources. We all want progress, and science continues to make our lives better. But as we unlock the mysteries of our planet, we have also come up against plenty of unintended consequences. We are told the chances of cross-pollination between natural food and GMOs will be small, but we humans tend to downplay the risks. Remember, tobacco was first sold as a health aid, and DDT was just fine to spray on your crops. Then there’s Hanford. We need to tread carefully — and with humility. But I-522 is about more than whether genetically modified foods are safe — I believe most will be proven to be just fine. It’s more about, in the words of author and food expert Michael Pollan, “the public’s confidence in the industrial food chain.” There isn’t much. As yet another sign that our government is failing us, oversight agencies — from Wall Street watchers to food safety inspectors — are defanged, infiltrated and underfunded by Congress. I wish I could be more trusting, but it’s hard when our leaders just got done lying to us about how much the NSA is spying on America. It’s a sad situation when you can trust Whole Foods (which plans to label GMO foods itself by 2016) more than your own federal agencies. Americans care about food just as much as all those European nations that have such strict rules; we just don’t have a government that looks out for us as much as it should. If we did, measures like I-522 might not be necessary. This is not a vote to ban genetically modified foods; I just want the truth right there on the label so I can decide for myself. I’m voting yes on I-522. 

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LETTERS

TOO MUCH WE DON’T KNOW

I have no problem with the idea of Genetically Modified Organisms (“Who Is Afraid of the GMO?” 9/26/13). I think we could successfully meet many of the world’s challenges through genetic engineering. All of the technical progress that has ever been made was made by modifying something — and the benefits of modifying genes probably hold more potential gains for humanity than most other technical pursuits do. What I do have a big problem with is who is doing genetic engineering and why. I don’t believe that Monsanto, DuPont, Dow and Bayer are working for the benefit of humanity. I believe these companies feel a need to keep their doings secret because if what they are doing were well known, the lawsuits against them would never end.

genetics. Now they are helping write the Trans-Pacific Partnership, which would internationally ban labeling and generic drug production. If democracy, health and freedom are evil, then Monsanto is saintly. DUSTIN MUSTANG Spokane, Wash.

SPOKANE OWES HIM

I found “Museum of Discontent” (9/12/13) to be slanted toward the high school mentality antics of disgruntled workers, and unfair toward Forrest Rodgers. I’ve only experienced Forrest as a kind, very thoughtful and very knowledgeable person. The measured way he’s gone about this whole debacle speaks very loudly to his character. JEREMY STREET Even Rodgers’ detractors have to admit that this Cheney, Wash. situation has been highly politicized. But that seed was planted long ago in the operations of the museum, and germinated when the Board illegally (according to their own by-laws) fired Rodgers. In “Is Monsanto Evil?” (9/26/13), you wrote, “MonsanSince then, Forrest has been caught in the middle, to’s crackdown on ‘seed piracy’ has drawn comparisons and he’s dealt with the whole thing very gracefully. to the Recording Industry Association of While the sides were as split as our ConAmerica.” It is important to contrast that gress, Forrest kept his mouth shut and let music we avoid doesn’t spread in the wind people have their say, and suffered all the and just land on our albums. Monsanto Send comments to sued a farmer for piracy when Monsanto’s editor@inlander.com. criticism with great dignity. I do harbor some serious disdain toseed fell out of trucks and invaded a field. ward the behind-the-scenes machinations Monsanto sued federal governments for not of the MAC’s past regime. There have been too many enforcing piracy laws in cases where Monsanto’s genetamateurs playing the game for too long, saddled with ics invaded farms, where farmers never wanted them. too many tender and needy egos. The Supreme Court loyally ruled 9-0 in favor of This situation is Spokane’s fault, not Forrest RodgMonsanto. Clarence Thomas failed to recuse himself for ers’ fault. Buck up, shut up and let the man do his job. having been an attorney for Monsanto. Close ties within Give Rodgers a real second chance instead of setting the Bush administrations are paying off now that saving him up for failure. seed from one’s own crops has been banned in Iraq. Monsanto invades our fields with terminator genes CARL DAVID LEETH destroying our own genetic collections and then sues Spokane, Wash. us after infecting our crops with their experimental

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LETTERS

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LISA MARIE: Yup. My settlement is on hold because it was signed by the wrong district judge, and because of the furlough, all cases are canceled. HEIDII KLAUS: I work for an insurance company; phones have been ringing off the hook because the Medicare offices are closed. Lots of freaked out people out there right now and we just can’t handle the call volume. LINDSAY GIAMPIETRI: I got married and I can’t change my name because the Social Security office isn’t open! DEAN LAMBSON: Aside from clogging my FB news feed and starting a few arguments with the least educated people on Earth... no. TIM DIEHL: Yes, being in the National Guard and not having drill has not been good. AMANDA HUMPHREY: I can’t go to the commissary on base, my housing stipend from the GI bill hasn’t come in, and I couldn’t access a gov website I needed to use. KATE DERRICK: I am required to continue showing up for work; however, my paychecks will not come until the shutdown is over. AUGUST WYSSMAN: Only insofar as the lack of updates to several sites has made writing a research paper harder. I’m lucky though. This time last year I was heavily relying on several social programs to feed my child and myself. DEBRA R. MASTERS: Not yet, but I work for the state and some of our funding comes from federal sources, so it may happen, just don’t know when… 


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COMMENT | SATIRE

It’s About Teamwork S BY ANDY BOROWITZ

peaker of the House John Boehner (R-Ohio) said that he was disappointed after meeting with President Obama at the White House last week, telling reporters, “The President is stubbornly refusing to end the crisis I created.” “Government is about teamwork,” Boehner continued. “I’ve done my part by putting together an entirely optional crisis that has shut down the government and will throw thousands out of work. Now it’s up to the President to do his part by ending it.” Boehner said that he was “flabbergasted” that the President was looking to him to bring the current government shutdown to an end: “So after doing all of the hard work to push the country to the brink, I’m supposed to pull it back, too? How about you pitching in a little, Mr.

President?” The House Speaker said that he hoped he did not have to manufacture another entirely avoidable crisis over the debt ceiling in order to stir the President to action. “Quite frankly, orchestrating these unnecessary stalemates takes a lot of energy and I could really use a rest,” he said. Elsewhere, Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) raised the ante in the battle over the Affordable Care Act on Sunday, telling CNN’s Candy Crowley that “destroying the entire planet is really the best and only way to stop Obamacare.” n For more fake news from Andy Borowitz, visit borowitzreport.com.

COMMENT | LOBBYING

What’s In A Name?

3 DELECTABLE KOBE BEEF SLIDERS. PERFECT FOR NOT SHARING.

BY JIM HIGHTOWER

H

ere’s a scary number to ponder: 12,407. That’s how many registered lobbyists there are in Washington, D.C. — the bulk of whom are paid handsomely to carry water for avaricious corporations. And that doesn’t count the untold number of influence peddlers who do not stoop to register, for they don’t consider to be mere lobbyists, even though they are paid extravagant salaries by elite lobbying firms. Rather than lobby, they “advise.” These are longtime Washington insiders who act as sherpas, guiding corporate favor-seekers through the labyrinth of congressional backrooms and executivebranch offices to reach the peaks of legislative and regulatory power. Today’s lobbying corps, you see, is no longer the domain of common hustlers, but of credentialed and well-connected professionals, including more than 400 former U.S. Senators and House members, plus more than 5,000 former legislative staffers — all cashing in on the connections and insider knowledge they gained at taxpayer expense. Lobbying is now a $3.3 billion-a-year influence industry —

an unelected, private government of, by, and for special interests. And get this — it even has its own lobbying group, the American League of Lobbyists, which lobbies for lobbyists! As you might imagine, having such a powerful presence has given many within LobbyWorld an elevated sense of their own worthiness, so they now want to drop the tacky label of “lobbyist.” Instead, the League of Lobbyists is asking its members to suggest a more prestigious (and less pejorative) brand name. Reportedly, an early favorite is “Government Relations Professional.” But that’s too ponderous. I think any new phrase needs to spell out a zippy acronym — like SLICK, CREEP or LEECH — that really defines their work. To paraphrase Shakespeare, a lobbyist, by any other name, would smell the same. n

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Ed Byrnes, a statistician and associate professor at Eastern Washington University, helped SPD develop a new system to track who officers stop.

SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

POLICE

The Race Card As officers contact citizens on the street, the Spokane Police Department will now record and track statistics on race BY JACOB JONES

I

n a new program to track police interactions and deter racial profiling, Spokane Police officers will start packing statistic forms while out patrolling their beats next year. Every time an officer questions a citizen or makes a traffic stop, the officer will have to fill out a short data form, noting the person’s race, location and other details. With just a handful of questions, each individual form offers minimal insight, but combined with thousands of other data records on contacts across the city, the Spokane Police Department hopes to compile an unprecedented look into how its officers interact with citizens on a daily basis.

Cmdr. Brad Arleth, who has overseen the development of the program, says many metro-sized law enforcement agencies have logged similar race data for years. Amid ongoing national debate over the role of race in “stop and frisk,” gang enforcement and other targeted policing strategies, tracking who Spokane officers engage on the street can provide telling clues about how race may factor into local policing decisions. “A lot of other agencies have done it,” Arleth says, adding, “Essentially, it’s an audit function. … It goes to transparency.” As the department prepares to launch the new data tracking program at the beginning of next year, police

accountability advocates hope the new information can advance the local conversation on racial profiling. Community groups say existing jail and use-of-force records already show signs of significant racial disparities in how Spokane agencies arrest and incarcerate people of color. Liz Moore, director of the Peace and Justice Action League of Spokane, says collecting the data serves as a critical first step in addressing those institutional inequalities, a step long overdue. “People don’t get to the jail by themselves,” she says. “It starts with an interaction with the police. … What we need is a really comprehensive understanding of what happens.”

L

aw enforcement agencies first started tracking race data on police contacts in the late ’90s in response to nationwide concerns over racial profiling. In the early 2000s, several Washington departments, including Seattle, Tacoma and Vancouver, started recording contact data. The state Legislature also passed a law encouraging departments to collect and analyze race data on all traffic stops to prevent racial profiling, but Spokane never implemented such a program. During public testimony before the city’s Use of Force Commission last year, accountability advocates ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 10, 2013 INLANDER 13


NEWS | POLICE

SPD expects to begin collecting data on race beginning Jan. 1.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“THE RACE CARD,” CONTINUED... called for the police department to address racial disparities in the local justice system. Ed Byrnes, a statistician and associate professor at Eastern Washington University, volunteered to help the department develop the new tracking system to assess how officers approach citizens of different races. “We can have some hope of impacting how officers make decisions based on their perceptions,” Byrnes says. “That’s a lot of what’s driving this. … We have to start somewhere and we’re going to start now.” Byrnes, who also works with the Spokane Police Accountability and Reform Coalition, says he has based the new data program on the “best practices” from the Racial Profiling Data Collec-

tion Resource Center at Northeastern University. The center promotes data tracking as a tool for improving transparency, increasing officer accountability and identifying potential misconduct. Spokane officers will carry data forms in their ticket books and complete a brief checklist after each citizen encounter. Those forms will be scanned into a computer after each shift and loaded into a database that can break down interactions by officer, neighborhood or other variables. When recording a person’s race, officers will report what they believe the person’s race to be. Byrnes says if the data is supposed to track how officers treat people of different races, the information should be based on how the officers view

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the other person’s race. “It comes down to an officer’s perception of race. That’s really the key variable,” he says. “It’s how the officer is perceiving me that’s going to drive their decision to stop me.” While Moore acknowledges this as a “good goal,” she warns allowing officers to make their own determinations on race could lead to miscounts or manipulation of the data. Arleth says the department continues to work out details on the data forms, scanning procedures and training schedules for the program, but officials expect to be able to start recording data on Jan. 1. Bynes will then meet with police administrators regularly to review the data. While the Legislature urges agencies to log traffic stops, Arleth says the local department will exceed that mandate by also tracking pedestrian and other contacts. Officials have worked with Byrnes to try to make the data forms thorough without drowning officers in excess paperwork. “Even people who they don’t issue infractions to, they’ll have to complete a form for,” Arleth says. “So it is going to be an extra workload, but so are a lot of other things. … Doing better police business takes extra work.”

M

oore and other justice advocates hope the new police interaction data can provide important insight into what they see as troubling trends in the Spokane criminal justice system. While records from 2011 show black citizens account for just 1.5 percent of the county population, black inmates appear to make up 12 percent of the county jail population. SPD use-of-force records also indicate a “consistent, high” number of Taser deployments against black and Native American subjects, Moore says. Of the 106 people Tasered by the Spokane Police between 2009 and 2012, advocates say 16 percent were black and 9.4 percent were Native American, well above population levels. So far this year, that rate has shown a decrease. James Wilburn Jr., president of the Spokane NAACP, says the proposed data program represents a long-awaited and muchneeded effort to recognize and address the many signs of profiling and disparity in the local system. “It’s going to be very valuable,” he says. In addition to serving as an important check against profiling, police officials say the new data will also help establish a baseline portrait of common citizen interactions, outlining what people and neighborhoods officers engage with most. That information should only help officers better serve those communities. “Certainly we need to be doing it,” Arleth says. “Most communities across the United States expect their department to be cognizant of those issues. … We’re on a mad dash to get this in place and moving.” After years of hearing stories about Spokane citizens being pulled over for “driving while black” or other seemingly racemotivated stops, Moore hopes the new data will clear up the bigger picture and help people understand how law enforcement operates throughout the city. “We need to know what is a pattern,” she says. “Collecting data is just a really basic step in correcting that.” n jacobj@inlander.com

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OCTOBER 10, 2013 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

The Big News of the Past Week

PHOTO EYE CALLING ON CATHY

1.

After 21 months of negotiations, the Spokane Police Guild and city administrators last week reached a tentative agreement on a new police contract. Both sides have declined to offer details until the agreement goes before the City Council. (See p. 18.)

2.

Two University High students, Josie Freier and McKenzie Mott, both 15, died Sunday in a vehicle collision along Bates Road in Spokane Valley. The 16-year-old driver remains hospitalized with significant injuries.

3.

President Obama called on House Republicans to increase the federal debt ceiling Tuesday as the country entered its second week of the federal government shutdown. (See p. 24.)

4.

U.S. military forces executed raids in both Libya and Somalia over the weekend against “high-value” al Qaeda operatives working out of the two African countries. One alleged terrorist leader was captured.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

About 20 people gathered at the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture’s MAC Cafe Saturday to urge Congress — specifically Eastern Washington Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers — to pass immigration reform. The Main Street Alliance of Washington, a small business coalition, released a report at the event about the economic impacts immigration reform could have, saying it could help generate $900 million in new economic activity in Washington.

5.

Corrections Corporations of America will not renew its private prison operations in Idaho after facing criticism over prisoner violence, understaffing and potential contract fraud.

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The Condon Plan New details on Mayor Condon’s proposed 2014 budget; plus, prosecutors won’t charge a homeowner in a fatal shooting BUDGET DETAILS EMERGE “We are on solid footing,” MAYOR DAVID CONDON told the Spokane City Council Monday before members of his cabinet handed out hefty black binders to each council member. Inside each was a copy of the mayor’s line-item $600 million budget for 2014, detailing plans to fund 25 new officers and restore full capabilities to a South Hill fire station cut last year. The addition of new officers, as well as the mayor’s intention to take two years’ worth of the 1 percent-per-year property tax increase, became clear in August, but this week was the first time he committed to restoring Fire Station No. 9 near Bernard Street and 18th Avenue. The new spending comes primarily from paying off an old debt, new parking meter revenue and administrative cuts at the police department. (The property tax increase will be directed at capital spending, like new police cars.) Nine city staffers will be laid off, a stark contrast to last year’s nearly 100 positions cut. Three are clerk positions that City Spokesman Brian Coddington says can be easily reassigned; the rest are positions in the engineering, finance, planning, and asset management departments, plus one police secretary and a fleet equipment servicer.

Those employees will soon get layoff notices, with hopes to begin finding them new city jobs, Coddington says. — HEIDI GROOVER

SELF-DEFENSE SHOOTING

Months after a domestic confrontation led to a fatal shooting at a north Spokane home in March, the county Prosecutor’s Office has released a memo confirming its decision to not pursue charges against homeowner GEORGE WALLACE in the death of 28-year-old Marshall Balduff. Chief Criminal Deputy Prosecutor Jack Driscoll writes in his charging decision that Balduff had a blood alcohol level of 0.18 and a “foot-long” knife when he tried to force his way through a dog door into Wallace’s house on March 6. Investigators report Balduff had threatened people in the house and refused multiple warnings to leave in the moments before he was shot once and killed by Wallace. “It would be reasonable for a jury to conclude that Wallace acted on a good faith belief, based on Balduff’s actions, that he, or another, faced actual danger of great personal injury or death,” Driscoll writes, adding, “No

charges will be filed.” Driscoll filed the decision memo on June 14, but the Prosecutor’s Office did not release the memo until Oct. 4, following multiple public records requests. Balduff’s family has questioned what they consider to be inconsistencies in the investigation and asked why Wallace did not call 911 for police assistance prior to the shooting. — JACOB JONES

HIGH ENROLLMENT

Despite technical glitches that marred the opening of Washington state’s HEALTH INSURANCE EXCHANGE, more than 9,000 people have successfully enrolled in coverage since the online marketplace debuted last week, more than half of which are newly eligible Medicaid enrollees. According to the latest figures released by the Washington Health Benefit Exchange, 9,452 people Send comments to completed enrollments, including editor@inlander.com. 916 in qualified health plans, 2,594 in immediate Medicaid coverage and 5,946 in expanded Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act. An additional 10,497 people have applied for qualified health plans, but haven’t paid for them yet. The Washington Healthplanfinder website, where consumers can shop for health plans, garnered more than 837,000 total site visits and 2.5 million page views in its first week of operation. Exchange officials hope to enroll 130,000 people with qualified health plans by January 2014 and another 280,000 by January 2015. — DEANNA PAN

LETTERS

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OCTOBER 10, 2013 INLANDER 17 71952_DMC_Mammo_9_3x5_4c.indd 1

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NEWS | POLICE

On Hold A late-hour tentative agreement with the Police Guild halts progress empowering the civilian ombudsman BY HEIDI GROOVER

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18 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2013

s citizens streamed forward to the microphone Monday, Councilman Steve Salvatori looked out to the audience and down at his hands, long-faced and exasperated. “Transparency is awkward until your eyes adjust to the light,” Salvatori told the group, carefully choosing his words to explain an ordinance he championed that was now a shell of its former self. Though Salvatori initially introduced an ordinance that would have granted far-reaching independence to the city’s Office of Police Ombudsman, the version approved Monday simply established a citizen commission to oversee the office, putting on hold provisions like the authority to conduct independent investigations of police actions. After 21 months of police contract negotiations and a ballot measure to add the strengthened ombudsman to the City Charter, the move began as an attempt to bypass or speed up secret guild negotiations. Then, late last week, the city administration announced it had reached a tentative agreement with the guild, but wouldn’t discuss any details publicly until guild members pass the agreement and it goes to the council for consideration. Councilmembers were briefed in executive session last week about the agreement, leaving them in the awkward position of knowing what the contract grants the ombudsman but not being able to discuss it — even as they voted on an ordinance about the ombudsman. “This is not where we want to be tonight,” said Councilman Jon Snyder. “This is not ideal.” The vote came after a month of shepherding the ordinance through the council process and, the council says, pleas Monday from Police Chief Frank Straub to hold off for fear of upsetting the guild at such a fragile stage. Salvatori also faced criticism for sharing too much about the still-confidential guild contract. After learning the details of the agreement in confidential meetings, Salvatori sought legal advice from local watchdog nonprofit the Center for Justice. Center representatives told the Inlander Friday that Salvatori showed them the part of the agreement outlining ombudsman powers and that it didn’t explicitly allow independent investigations, long advocated for by the Center and now outlined in the city charter as a result of February’s vote on Proposition 1. (Salvatori says he didn’t expect the details of his meeting with the Center to become public.) Center for Justice representatives railed against the council and city administration Monday night for not doing more to make sure a tentative agreement squared with Proposition 1. “When this becomes public, you’re all going to be suffering with the embarrassment that it did not, and that has cost us time that we didn’t have,” said the Center’s communications director

Oversight advocates continue to push for independent investigative powers for Spokane’s Office of Police Ombudsman, currently held by Tim Burns. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO Tim Connor, expressing concerns about the impact of secret negotiations on public trust of the police. “We anticipated everything that has gone on in the last few days, as the guild saw us rushing toward democracy and made sure that we couldn’t get there tonight.” Salvatori called Monday’s action a “compromise” between those asking him to put off the ordinance altogether and those who want an empowered ombudsman before guild negotiations are finalized. “I am totally ill-equipped to deal with that kind of process,” Salvatori says of closed-door negotiations and confidentiality mandates. “The last thing you expect when you get into office is to have such an elimination of public process … on things that are policy driven.” Monday’s vote leaves everything else outlined in Salvatori’s original ordinance — most notably, independent investigative powers for the ombudsman — to a later ordinance, which the council plans to pass at the same time as the guild contract. Stuckart asked councilmembers Salvatori, Snyder and Nancy McLaughlin to start working on that ordinance. He says once the guild approves the agreement, which he expects to happen later this month, he’ll schedule three public forums throughout November and early December to hear citizen input on the contract. That could mean an approved contract and an ordinance to go with it by the end of the year. At Monday’s meeting, Peace and Justice Action League Executive Director Liz Moore asked the councilmembers to each make a public pledge that they would reject a guild contract that does not explicitly grant expanded powers. No one took her up on the offer from the dais, but Salvatori says citizens can expect nothing less. “There’ll be hell to pay if we don’t come up with independent investigative authority. That’s not a secret,” Salvatori says. “We have to figure out how we get there.” n heidig@inlander.com


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t’s been nearly 70 years since the idea first surfaced and a decade since workers first broke ground. But the future path of Spokane’s North-South Freeway, winding all the way to I-90, remains unbroken and unfunded, and city council members want to remind state lawmakers just how much remains to be done. In a study session last month, councilmembers agreed the project should be high on its wish list of issues the city will ask its lobbyists to focus on in the 2014 state legislative session, which starts in January. They should also guard against “regulations that hamper urban development,” especially fire code regulations, the council decided. Council president Ben Stuckart and others say they’re concerned state lawmakers are considering mandating fire sprinklers in all single family homes. “I find that an impossible burden if we want people to move inside the city,” Stuckart told councilmembers. “I understand sprinklers save lives, but we’re not going to be able to revitalize any of our neighborhoods if you have to put in sprinklers every time you touch [a house].” Along with development in the University District, the list includes a handful of issues that, like the North-South Freeway, carried over from last year: a ban or fee on studded tires, changes to labor arbitration laws and dollars for the public works trust fund, which usually offers low-interest loans to local governments for infrastructure projects but was tapped last year to help cover other costs to the state’s general fund. Meanwhile, Mayor David Condon’s administration is crafting its own list of priorities, as is Greater Spokane Incorporated, which usually focuses on economic development issues and will announce its final list in early December. The administration and council priorities will also get a final vote later this year. The Association of Washington Cities, where councilmember Nancy McLaughlin has served as president and currently sits on the Legislative Steering Committee, has approved its preliminary list with an eye toward taxes. The group is again urging the state to increase the amount of liquor tax revenue passed on to cities and wants the Legislature to act on marijuana. Along with a cut of new pot taxes, the group wants medical marijuana rules in place to square that market with the new recreational one. A transportation package, potentially funded by tax increases, and the public works trust fund also made the list. The council is likely to sign on in support of each group’s list.  heidig@inlander.com

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NEWS | EDUCATION

Students in a class titled “Animals” — which the instructor describes as “a semester-long autodrama on steroids, without human communication skills.”

Monkey See, Monkey Do Why a group of University of Idaho students is learning to crawl, grunt and howl BY MATT BENOIT

I

n a grassy clearing at the University of Idaho’s Shattuck Arboretum, 14 wild animals are taking a midafternoon nap. In the distance, a bell tower chimes 2 o’clock, and as if on cue, a black bear begins stirring. It rises slowly, lets out a growl and lumbers up a path before climbing into a tree. There, it waits as two humans, crawling on all fours, slowly pass by. This isn’t an experimental zoology study — it’s an acting class. The black bear, 22-year-old Anthony Luna, is a senior majoring in theater performance. “It’s been a mythic class for, like, four years,” says Luna, covered in dirt and grass after the class’ second

outdoor session. The class, titled “Animals,” is an elective offering in its 12th year at the university. In his syllabus, instructor David Lee-Painter describes the course as “a semesterlong autodrama on steroids, without human communication skills.” Students drink from a plastic watering hole, run their “paws” through leafy piles of brush and howl on their haunches. “If you’re just to walk in, it looks completely insane,” Lee-Painter says. Startled outsiders walking through the arboretum have thought so. Some have called police.

MATT BENOIT PHOTOS

WALK LIKE THE ANIMALS

The method to the course’s madness is to enhance an actor’s primal instincts for the stage. Lee-Painter learned of the animal acting technique from Jean Scharfenberg, an instructor at his graduate school, Illinois State University. Scharfenberg learned the concept from famed acting instructor Lee Strasberg, whom she studied with the Actor’s Studio. At Illinois State, “Animals” was a signature performance course, and students who took it include actors John Malkovich, Gary Sinise, Jane Lynch and others. When Lee-Painter began teaching theater at University of Idaho in 1995, he used the technique as part of another course. Its popularity, however, led “Animals” to become a separate class, and Lee-Painter took the technique a step further by taking students outside. After signing up for the class — offered this year to non-performance majors for the first time — students must select and research either a predatory or territorial animal. Students then take a group trip to a Portland or Seattle-area zoo to observe their chosen animal, returning to the classroom to give presentations about why they

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chose their animals and what they hope to something bigger: being human. get from becoming them. “I think it has merit in terms of trying After that, students head outdoors for to be a more authentic human being,” he the next five or six weeks to forge their says. “I think that that idea of becoming an animal identities. animal just kind of takes away all the filters, Students also use common materials right?” to “make a baby” they’ll carry with them while in character, raising the emotional On the class’ second day outdoors, Leestakes of the class and leading to confrontaPainter stands clad in a black longtions where students can sleeve shirt. The shirt reads “Animals fight each other to the fake 2012” on the front, and “canis lupus” death. Send comments to — the scientific name of the gray wolf Near its end, “Animals” editor@inlander.com. he once embodied many years ago — moves back indoors, where on the back. students transfer animal “Get comfortable smackin’ each other a work into human character work in scripted little bit,” he says, instructing his students as scenes and monologues. they practice gently — and sometimes not so Students are graded on their animal pregently — wrestling each other to the ground. sentation and scripted work, as well as an After wrestling, students spend 50 end-of-semester reflection paper, but a large minutes exploring their habitats individuportion of the grade comes from participaally, looking for dens and becoming more tion in becoming their animal. comfortable in their animal bodies. Howls While Lee-Painter says “Animals” and yips echo into the breeze, sometimes can certainly help students become better drawing bemused expressions from stuactors, he says the course is also about

THE DR. DOOLITTLE OF ACTING

LETTERS

dents passing through the arboretum. Lee-Painter warns students in his syllabus that the course is mentally and physically taxing, and by the time the day’s class is over, it’s easy to see why. Actors crawl back to the grassy clearing to re-assume human form, exhausted, coughing and out of breath. The hair and clothing of nearly every student is covered in dirt, seeds, grass and leaves. Some students have scrapes or scratches, and many of them seem relieved they only have to do it twice a week. “It’s an experience to make you value your humanity,” says Luna, the aforementioned black bear. “Because the second I’m done with this class I’m hoppin’ in the shower, and usin’ Q-Tips with thumbs, and just having a great time.” n

REALLY,

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This article was provided by Murrow News Service, which is produced by journalism students at the Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University.

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NEWS | HEALTH CARE

Sick and Tired

Idaho’s refusal to expand Medicaid leaves thousands uninsured BY DEANNA PAN

purchased through the exchanges. The high court’s decision created a “wacky policy result,” says Necochea: “Families who work for low wages or have hit hard times remain vulnerable to health emergencies, while families with higher incomes receive assistance to pay for coverage.” Under ACA, individuals earning between 100 and 400 percent of the federal poverty line (or $11,490 and $45,960, respectively) who purchase insurance in the online exchanges can apply for tax-credit subsidies to offset the cost of their plans. The law intended to provide Medicaid coverage to anyone making up to 138 percent of the federal poverty line (about $15,856 for an individual).

F

ive years ago, Robinson, 37, and her husband, Jeffrey, 42, were working in Olymvery day, Amy Robinson and her husband pia — she in retail management and he as down a cocktail of prescription drugs — plumber — and taking home nearly $100,000 a antidepressants to battle their anxiety and year. In early 2009, Robinson was laid off. Six pain pills to dull their chronic discomfort. Robinmonths later, her husband lost his job too, and son has fibromyalgia, but she can’t afford to see their income was instantly halved, and their a physical therapist. Her husband has asthma, house soon slipped into foreclosure. So they but he can’t afford an inhaler. About two years, moved to Caldwell, Idaho, west of Boise, to start Robinson’s husband contracted bronchitis. It got over and live a little cheaper. They poured every so bad, he developed pneumonia in both lungs. penny of their savings into Jeffrey’s plumbing They should have taken him to the hospital, but career, but it never took off. they didn’t know how they’d pay for it. Their Now the Robinsons are both taking classes only option is $150 worth of medications from at Treasure Valley Community College, hoping Costco. to once again reinvent their careers. Robinson Amy prays they don’t get worse. makes roughly $1,000 a month working part“What if something happens to me and I time jobs as a school bus driver and a family have to go to the hospital?” she says. “We’ve put support specialist for the nonprofit Idaho Federaa Band-Aid on the problem. Everything comes tion of Families for Children’s Mental Health. down to money, and we can’t afford it.” Her husband just started a part-time job as a As thousands of people across the country welding teacher’s aide. Between her two jobs and began enrolling in health care coverage under the their student loans, her family’s annual income is Affordable Care Act last week, millions of poor just under $25,000 — that puts her household of Americans, including Robinson and her husseven at 70 percent of the federal poverty level. band, won’t see any of the promises of President When Robinson logged into Idaho’s health Obama’s sweeping health care law fulfilled. insurance exchange website, she found the cheapThat’s because Idaho is one of 26 Republiest and lowest coverage plan she could purchase can-controlled states that have so far declined to through it would cost $620 a month with a expand Medicaid under ACA, leaving as many $6,500 deductible. The most expensive? $1,300 as 75,000 people in the state uninsured and with a $1,000 deductible. She doesn’t qualify for ineligible for financial assistance under the health any subsidies. care law, according to a Kaiser Family FoundaAnd it’s the uninsured, lacking access to regution study. lar and preventative care, who often need health In Idaho, 222,533 people, 17 percent of the insurance the most. The nonprofit advocacy population, are uninsured. As in the rest of the organizations Families USA estimates that two country, the majority of them are low-income Idahoans die every week because they delayed or working adults like Robinson. went without necessary medical care due Expanding Medicaid in Idaho would to a lack of health coverage. provide free health insurance to “If you don’t have coverage or a Send comments to nearly half of them. usual source of care, you live thicker and editor@inlander.com. you die younger,” says Dr. Ted Epperly, “The Affordable Care Act was designed to give a path to affordable CEO of the Boise-based Family Medicoverage to all Americans,” says Laucine Residency of Idaho. “If you wait ren Necochea, director of Idaho KIDS COUNT, and things get worse instead of better, then it a nonprofit research center on children’s issues. could mean hospitalization. Suddenly now that’s When the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the $20,000 [in medical bills] and that’s where people Affordable Care Act last summer, the justices end up going bankrupt.” barred the federal government from requiring Robin Evans, from tiny Grangeville, Idaho, states to expand Medicaid eligibility. Now, by works three different low-wage, part-time jobs. the New York Times’ count, as many as 8 milShe brings home less than $13,000 a year to suplion people across the country making less than port herself and her husband, who suffers from the federal poverty level are stuck without any a heart condition. (They don’t know what it is affordable options and with no fix in sight: because they can’t pay for any medical tests.) She They don’t qualify for Medicaid under current hasn’t had health insurance since she lost her job state laws, and they earn too little to receive tax working with developmentally disabled people subsidies to help them pay for health insurance about five years ago. About a year ago, after

E

LETTERS


President Obama’s signature health care law is falling short in Republican-controlled states.

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resident Obama’s health care reform law is a politically volatile issue in Idaho, where, in 2010, Republican Gov. Butch Otter became the first state executive to sign a law authorizing his attorney general to sue the federal government if residents are required to buy health insurance. Otter, however, has since moderated his position on Obamacare; he’s still against it, but he’s willing to make the law work on Idaho’s terms. He formed a workgroup of public and private stakeholders to study the state’s Medicaid options, and twice the group unanimously voted to expand Medicaid. According to the consulting firm Milliman, hired to study the issue, Medicaid expansion would result in a net savings of $9.8 million between 2014 and 2024. A big chunk of those savings comes from the assumption that the state and counties will spend less on services for the medically indigent, 90 percent of whom would be eligible for insurance coverage through expansion. Last session, Idaho state lawmakers spent more than 15 hours on the floor debating (and eventually passing) the creation of Idaho state-based health insurance exchange. It was the longest debate Rep. John Rusche, D-Lewiston, remembers in his nine years in the Legislature. In March, the House Health and Welfare Committee voted unanimously to introduce a pair of bills that would expand Medicaid eligibility and repeal the state’s catastrophic health care fund. But state leaders refused to give the bills hearings. Rusche, who plans to bring up the issue next session, thinks Medicaid expansion is a no-brainer, but he says it’s unlikely that Medicaid expansion will pass next year with primary elections looming in the spring. “I’m also afraid it’s too hot of a political issue for Republicans to allow it to come up, because the party legislators are very conservative and won’t have anything to do with Obamacare,” he says. “If you’re a moderate Republican in a swing district and you vote for Obamacare, you can pretty well guarantee someone is going to run against you in the primary coming from the right side of the political spectrum.” Meanwhile, people like Robin Evans are frustrated about their lack of options for affordable health care. “Obamacare isn’t helping those that need it the most,” Evans says. “We’re not looking for somebody to hand us something for nothing. We’re just looking to survive. We just want a hand up. Between the Idaho state legislators and the federal government, I don’t know. It seems like it’s getting harder and harder and harder.” n deannap@inlander.com

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experiencing long bouts of intense pain, Evans finally checked into the emergency room at a nearby hospital. She had a kidney stone, about half the size of a cigarette butt. Between her ER stay, CAT scan, shockwave procedure to remove the kidney stone and visits with a urologist in Lewiston, Evans now has $27,000 in medical bills hanging over her head. “I don’t have insurance. I live paycheck to paycheck. I’m not making any payments on this,” she says. Epperly sees two solutions to Idaho’s health coverage gap: Either expand Medicaid or raise minimum wage so more people can afford insurance. Idaho leads the nation in its share of hourly workers making as little as $7.25. “Something’s gotta give here,” he says. “This really boils down to dollars and cents in many ways.”

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NEWS | POLITICS

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Shutdown Squad Idaho and Eastern Washington’s congressional leaders show just how difficult it will be to end the government shutdown BY DANIEL WALTERS

W

hile blame over the partial shutdown of the federal government has sent fingers pointing, make no mistake: the Republican-controlled House started it. To keep funding the government, a “continuing resolution” needed to pass both houses of Congress. But every variation of the resolutions from the House came with an extra demand: Defund or delay major pieces of the Affordable Care Act, the health reform package also known as “Obamacare.” The Senate, controlled by Democrats, was unsurprisingly reticent to make huge changes to the president’s signature piece of legislation and outright refused to pass the resolution. But now the question is less “Who started it?” and more “Can anyone end it?” Republicans don’t want to walk away from this showdown empty-handed. But Democrats, including Obama, don’t want to negotiate until the government starts back up again, saying they’re tired of seeing crises used for political leverage. To understand just how tricky it will be to extract the government from the shutdown, look no further than Idaho and Eastern Washington’s senators and representatives.

CATHY McMORRIS RODGERS: VOICE OF THE GOP ESTABLISHMENT

As House Republican Conference chair, Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers has been a close ally of Speaker of the House John Boehner. Behind the scenes, national reporting has highlighted serious uncertainty among GOP leadership. But publicly, McMorris Rodgers’ message has not wavered. She blames Democrats for refusing to compromise, condemns barricades erected around open-air memorials, highlights Republican attempts to reopen some important parts of the government and criticizes Obamacare. In a USA Today editorial last week, she used the Spokane region to justify the House’s fervent opposition to Obamacare. “No matter where I go when I’m home in Eastern Washington — the grocery store, the local coffee shop, the county fair — the concern is the same: Obamacare is making life harder for everyday Americans,” she wrote. That article earned her pushback — the Seattle Times dedicated a story last week to McMorris Rodgers’ constituents who’d been bothered by her rhetoric. But to the Inlander, McMorris Rodgers maintains Obamacare has been “overwhelmingly” opposed

locally. She argues that tying government funding to a one-year delay in the individual mandate (requiring everyone to have insurance) is perfectly reasonable — after all, Obama had already delayed the mandate for employers. Ending the shutdown “starts with getting to the table and starting to talk,” McMorris Rodgers says. Democrats say they’re more than willing to negotiate if Republicans pass a “clean” continuing resolution without any extra baggage, but McMorris Rodgers isn’t biting. “‘I give you everything you want and then you’re going to start talking to me?’ That’s not a negotiation,” McMorris Rodgers says. “It’s outrageous — it’s ‘either my way or the highway.’”

RAUL LABRADOR: THE GOP HARDLINER

“I’ve been, for two months, leading the charge to making sure that we could delay Obamacare for a year,” says Idaho Rep. Raul Labrador. “The law’s not ready for prime time.” After Labrador was elected in 2010, he clashed with Boehner, accusing him of “abandoning” conservatives. In January, Labrador helped organize opposition to Boehner’s re-election as speaker. He’s criticized Boehner for being too willing to buckle under pressure, too quick to give up a good hand by folding. But lately, Labrador has been proud of Boehner’s ability to stand his ground. “I think he’s done a very good job with this,” Labrador says. Many congressional reporters argue the ground Boehner has to stand on is limited, precisely because of Republicans like Labrador. If he folds now, National Review’s Robert Costa reports, Boehner risks angering hardliners, further complicating negotiations for the upcoming debt limit. “The insurgents are now his palace guards,” the Washington Post wrote, describing how powerful the far right has become. After the shutdown, the New York Times cited Labrador as one of a small group of hardliners who “outflanked” House leadership. Labrador was among the first dozen House Republicans to sign onto a letter in August encouraging Boehner to refuse to fund Obamacare in the

. . COMING 11 1 12 2 13 24 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2013


continuing resolution. But in this fight, Labrador sees Republican unity, not division: “How could a small group of conservatives tie [Boehner’s] hands? We have a majority of the conference with us. When leadership has been following a more conservative position, and listening to us as conservatives, we’ve had a more unified conference,” he says. “The irony’s that it’s the ones who don’t want to fight that find themselves in the minority.”

MIKE SIMPSON: THE MODERATE

Labrador’s eastern neighbor Mike Simpson, meanwhile, was making headlines for a different reason: A comment to a Roll Call reporter earned him a spot on the Washington Post’s tally of approximately 22 Republican moderates supposedly willing to pass a clean continuing resolution to fund the government. He’s proof of what a moderate image gets you in Idaho: A primary opponent, funded by the Club for Growth. “Congressman Mike Simpson is showing his true colors as a leader today,” Simpson’s opponent Bryan Smith says in a press release. “He is willing to cave to Senator Harry Reid and President Obama instead of standing up and fighting for the people of Idaho.” Simpson took to his website to clarify: “Let me be clear, I am going to continue to support the position of our Republican Caucus in the ongoing shutdown dispute,” he said, explaining he’d be willing to support passing a clean resolution, but only a very short and temporary one. Such hedging calls into questions claims there are enough supportive Republicans in the House to successfully pass a clean continuing resolution. So far, the question is purely academic: Boehner has not been willing to even allow a vote on the issue.

PATTY MURRAY: THE BUDGET BOSS

In the Democratic-controlled Senate, meanwhile, Washington Sen. Patty Murray, chair of the Senate Budget Committee, could be crucial to a deal to end

the shutdown. Republicans have pointed to unofficial talks between Murray and House Budget Committee Chair Paul Ryan as a possible path through the shutdown crisis. But when Boehner repeatedly mentioned those talks in conversations with President Obama, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid laughed. “I couldn’t take it any longer. I said: ‘Stop it. They’ve met a few times and talked about nothing,’” Reid said, according to the New York Times. “The meetings were only for you, for show.” This year, Murray eliminated a longtime Republican talking point by passing a Senate budget for the first time in four years. No surprise: It was much more liberal than Ryan’s budget in the House. But on 19 occasions during the past six months, Democrats have asked Republicans for a conference committee to hammer out the differences between the two budgets. If they’d been able to agree on a full budget, the government shutdown wouldn’t have happened. The intention of the talks between Ryan and Murray, Murray spokesman Matt McAlvanah says, was merely to get the parties to the conference committee table. “Since Republicans have been unwilling to do that, those conversations have in fact been less than productive to this point.” Republicans have refused to meet, calling for preconditions. “Until Senator Murray is willing to address the spending [reductions put into place with the] Budget Control Act, we haven’t been willing to go to the table,” McMorris Rodgers says. Now that Republicans say they want budget negotiations, Murray and Senate Democrats say they aren’t willing to hold those negotiations until the government shutdown ends. “It’s allowing yourself to be negotiated with a gun to your head — either you do this, or we tank the economy,” McAlvanah says. “That’s not the kind of negotiating tactic that Senator Murray is willing to do. … A lot of what she’s doing is making a stand against that type of governing by crisis.” So far, neither side shows signs of budging. And the stakes are about to get higher than closed national parks, shuttered offices and furloughed federal workers. Next Thursday, the United States will hit its debt limit ceiling yet again. If Congress can’t agree to raise it, the economic consequences could be disastrous — and far from temporary. n danielw@inlander.com

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Decrying Death

Sister Helen Prejean wrote Dead Man Walking in 1993 and has been fighting against the death penatly since. DON LAVANGE PHOTO

The 74-year-old nun who fights capital punishment — and stands with men when they die BY LEAH SOTTILE

S

he’s a 74-year-old Catholic nun who stands by electric chairs and prays with men during their last days. When I ask Sister Helen Prejean whether this is what she envisioned her life would be like, she starts laughing into the phone. “What do you think?!” she says. Her journey began in the 1980s, when she corresponded with two death row inmates and eventually witnessed their executions. It’s an experience she captured in her book Dead Man Walking: An Eyewitness Account of the Death Penalty in the United States (which was made into an

Academy Award-winning movie). To this day, Prejean continues to write and lecture about the death penalty. The Inlander spoke with Prejean on the phone to ask whether or not she thinks capital punishment will ever go away, and what are the biggest tasks facing the American justice system. INLANDER: Your work with death row inmates has been documented at length, but after all these years, what is your stance on capital punishment today? SR. PREJEAN: What I learned in the beginning

from being with people who were executed, and also being with the victims’ families and also with the guards who have to carry out the executions, [my] stance is what I have seen close up as an eyewitness: that the death penalty is mostly about political symbolism. The reality is it doesn’t solve anything. It’s futile. In a way, it’s an act of profound despair for us to try to show that killing is wrong, and that we abhor killing, and that we want to killing to stop … and we do that by imitating the worst possible behavior. It’s amazing to me that we’re still doing ...continued on next page it.

OCTOBER 10, 2013 INLANDER 27


CULTURE | JUSTICE

“DECRYING DEATH,” CONTINUED... I was up at San Quentin [State Prison] two days ago, and I looked up and there’s five tiers of cells back to back. Over 724 people condemned to death in California … you see that [the death penalty] has got to be driven by this political symbolism, because what would make a district attorney go for the death penalty? Something that cost millions, and probably won’t [result in anyone being] executed. So why do you think the death penalty still exists? I’ve figured one of the last reasons — because people know it isn’t a deterrent, people who do crimes don’t even think they’re going to get caught, there’s not a lot of consciousness — is that when people run for political office, it is the easiest symbol in the world that you are really tough on crime. Simply say you’re for the death penalty, because that’s the toughest penalty we can give. And we have to do it for the victims’ families … whether consciously or not, the victims’ family has given us the ultimate legitimization for the death penalty. But does the death penalty, in your experience, help the families of victims? What I know, knowing victims’ families, sometimes it’s so sad: you see them come out of the death penalty trial and they’re putting up their fingers in a “V” for victory. ‘We got him!’ And then they start waiting … for 10 years, 20 years. And what’s the promise? … As more and more victims’ families are speaking out now, they say that revictimizes [them]. And the person who did the crime gets all the media attention, all the notoriety.

September 19 - October 12, 2013

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Sr. Prejean’s book inspired the Academy Award winning film.

What is it that keeps you coming back to this work? It’s the dignity of the people that have been condemned to death, who are made to feel that they’re nothing more than basically human refuse to be disposed of — that they’re so evil that the only way we can carry on as a society is to kill them. To terminate their lives. To rid ourselves of them. And I look into their eyes. … when you encounter the human person like that, you know that everybody is worth more than the worst thing. We all are. What do you think is the biggest task facing our justice system right now? We know where the violence comes from in our society. It comes out of poverty, it comes out of addiction… you put oily rags next to a kerosene canister, you’re gonna have a fire. All of these are things we have to solve, but at least this: we have to take death off the table. Let’s acknowledge that we can’t handle death. Realistically, do you think capital punishment will go away? It is going away. We can see it happening.  leahs@inlander.com “The Journey Towards Justice”: a performance of Dead Man Walking and lecture by Sr. Helen Prejean • Fri, Oct. 11, at 7 pm • Gonzaga University, Globe Room • 502 E. Boone Ave. • Free • FellowshipOfPeaceFoundation@gmail. com


CULTURE | DIGEST

WORDS POET LAUREATE T

hom Caraway has a new job — he’s your official poet. As the first-ever Spokane poet laureate, Caraway will be the go-to figure for all things literary in Spokane. He’s also going to write about Spokane, something the West Central resident has been doing for years, winning awards for his work along the way. Caraway, a senior lecturer at Whitworth University, got right to work. After being announced as Spokane’s poet laureate over the weekend at the Individual World Poetry Slam championships, Caraway stood before the Spokane City Council meeting on Monday night. After a brief introduction, he read his poem “Ash,” a piece packed with imagery, the title of which referred both to the street that runs across his city and vivid images of a fire burning on a winter day. Caraway, who will be writing and reading more over the course of his two-year term, also is looking to champion a burgeoning literary scene in the city. “For the poets in the area, the goal is to highlight and showcase them in a way that raises the public’s awareness of what’s going on around them,” says Caraway, 40, who holds a doctorate in English. Caraway had heard about the new position and encouraged several writer friends to apply. They said he should put his name in the hat, too. And soon, he got the call saying he’d be Spokane’s poet laureate. He’s glad to be the champion for poets in a city where there’s no shortage of them — but there’s sometimes a shortage of recognition for their works. “There are a lot of poets in this area, and they’re all

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CULTURE | CLASSICAL

A Fresh Face Zuill Bailey plans to bring awareness to the Inland Northwest’s classical music scene By Laura Johnson

C

onfusion begins from the top, when the first chair violinist (concertmaster) comes out from the wings meeting the orchestra; here, you’re supposed to clap. The A note is given from the oboe and tuning is initiated; no clapping when that’s completed. The conductor materializes — do clap here. Silence then blankets the space. The maestro brings the baton up and the orchestra takes its cue to play. If the piece has multiple movements, clapping isn’t correct in between; wait until the end. It’s because of these types of uncomfortable formalities that there’s been a lot of dumbing-down of classical music to try to attract younger crowds. But cellist Zuill Bailey doesn’t accept that that’s the way to bring in an audience. “Classical music is often seen as something off limits, but it’s not at all,” Bailey says from his home in El Paso, Texas. “The answer is more exposure, and the knowledge that what we’re bringing in talent-wise is the best in the world.” This year, after Gunther Schuller retired, Bailey took over as director of the Northwest Bach Festival. Fittingly, Bailey has spent his life mastering Bach’s works for the cello. Bailey says people should be awed and respectful at what classical music is in its most pure and enigmatic form. “That’s why I always dress up, not down, when I’m going to perform,” he says. Bailey’s name is illustrious in the cello world. Starting his craft at age 4, he grew up not only in a musical family, but in an area outside of Washington, D.C., saturated in classical music. It’s the kind of community Bailey wants to emulate no matter where he goes; it’s what he wants to bring to Spokane. How Bailey came to be here is rather serendipitous. A staple in the El Paso music scene as a teacher at University of Texas-El Paso and artistic director of El Paso Pro Musica, he took over duties in Sitka, Alaska, as artistic director of its music festival. Traveling between the two led to many layovers in Seattle, and an invitation to play the Bach Cello Suites at the Northwest Bach Festival a few years ago. From there a conversation was sparked. “It’s daunting because you’re on the shoulder of giants, with Gunther, and I’ve been given the responsibility of not just investing ideas but also blood, sweat and tears,” Bailey says. “I’m trying to give back what I was so prolifically given growing up.” What catapults someone’s career as a soloist is somewhat of a mystery — a rare combination of technique, artistry and personality that can be difficult to explain. Bailey reasons he’s been so

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successful — he graduated from Julliard and has played with almost every major national symphony — because of his self-awareness. “I’m very comfortable being me,” he explains. “At 20 years old I was given the advice to focus on what makes you, you. That’s what people want to see on stage, a sincerity.” This weekend, Bailey lends his sincerity to the Spokane Symphony for the first time, bringing together the Bach Festival and Symphony. Bach will not be performed; instead the Schumann “Cello Concerto” and Tchaikovsky’s “Rococo Variations” will emanate from the Fox Theater stage. “This is a different kind of situation because

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I’m not saying ‘goodbye,’ I’m saying ‘hello’ with this concert,” Bailey says. “I have made a decision that Spokane is a part of me now, and I admire so much what [symphony conductor] Eckart Preu is doing, the symphony has such an impact on the community. We get to share music together, this is why we do this.” n lauraj@inlander.com

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Anything Goes opens up the Best of Broadway season.

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Josh Franklin went from understudy to leading man on the S.S. American in Anything Goes BY E.J. IANNELLI

“I

n olden days a glimpse of stocking / was looked upon as something shocking / but now, God knows, / anything goes,” run the lines to Cole Porter’s tune “Anything Goes,” which was written for the 1934 musical of the same name. Penned in the thick of the socioeconomic upheaval of the Great Depression, Porter’s characteristically spry couplets express a familiar (and glibly tongue-in-cheek) lament over the permissiveness of contempo-

rary society relative to some past golden age, all while lampooning the high-society figures of that era. Those same lines also try to make sense of the madcap farce that’s playing out onstage — one where a mild-mannered Wall Street broker boards a cruise ship and finds himself pretending to be a

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notorious gangster, and where romances ebb and flow like the ocean tide. Anything Goes was one of the first generation of productions that today’s audiences would recognize as a proper Broadway musical, in which song and dance are a cohesive part of the narrative. Despite its age, it has remained an audience favorite throughout its almost 80-year history. That’s due in large part to Porter’s “timeless” music and wit, says Josh Franklin, who plays the aforementioned Wall Street broker named Billy Crocker. “Cole Porter was ahead of his time in a lot of ways,” he says. “Some of the jokes in his lyrics were initially inside jokes written for a small group of people, but we get the references even more nowadays.” To keep Anything Goes limber, its libretto has been subject to several revisions: first in 1962, then in 1987 and most recently in 2011, which is the multiple Tony Award-winning version that will be coming to the INB Performing Arts Center as part of the Best of Broadway series. “The little tweaks in the script have been really beneficial,” says Franklin. “In some ways they went back to the original formula. We have the character Erma, who sings ‘Buddie, Beware.’” This revision also brings back “Gypsy in Me” from the 1934 production and cuts “Let’s Misbehave,” first introduced in the 1962 revival. For Franklin, who’s become a favorite casting choice of Anything Goes director and choreographer Kathleen Marshall and has seen his star ascend rapidly both as an actor and a recording artist, much of this is euphorically new. He leapt

from ensemble and understudy roles in national productions of Legally Blonde and All Shook Up to playing Bob Gaudio in Jersey Boys, the jukebox musical chronicling the career arc of the Four Seasons. It was a leap he almost didn’t make. “I didn’t really see it coming,” he says. “I was doing Legally Blonde, understudying on Broadway, and I was focusing on writing a musical and also my singer/songwriter stuff. And for a second there I thought, ‘I’m done with performing. I’m going to sit back and write.’” That’s when his agent called with an audition for Jersey Boys. By the following morning, he’d been cast as the show’s lead. Although Anything Goes is the first classical musical he’s done and is “vastly different” to Jersey Boys in its style (“I’ve not danced quite this much,” Franklin chuckles), he’s noticed considerable audience overlap. “It’s interesting to watch,” he says. “The same young theater fans that go crazy for Jersey Boys or Wicked or any of these big pop musicals are loving this. There are some of the corniest jokes ever, but they’re so funny in the world of the show.” All joking aside, Franklin attributes the show’s wow factor to its colossal tap number. “After dancing for nine minutes, the star, Reno Sweeney (played by Rachel York), turns around and belts a high note,” he says. “Which just gives you everything you’d want.”  Anything Goes • Through Oct. 13, showtimes vary depending on date • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • $32.50-$72.50 • inbpac.com • 1-800-325-SEAT

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America’s Condiment We love mayonnaise — it makes everything g o down easier

34 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2013

BY ARI LEVAUX

mericans eat more mayonnaise than any other condiment, according to Businessweek, which named three mayo brands in the top six selling condiments. The proliferation of niche mayo brands, and at least one gourmet mayo shop, suggest it could undergo a bacon-like renaissance. Clearly, we love our mayo, but we do we know why? The other three condiments in Businessweek’s top six were ketchup, salsa, and Miracle Whip, which is often conflated with mayonnaise. But Miracle Whip is thickened with starch, while mayonnaise achieves its coveted body via the process of emulsification. An emulsion occurs when two liquids that typically don’t mix are coerced into doing so, thanks to the presence of an emulsifier. In the case of mayonnaise, the emulsifier is lecithin, which is found in egg yolk, among other places. This emulsification is a key aspect of why mayo behaves the way it does, and can also be a source of confusion. Scott Jones, Chef de Cuisine at Boston’s No. 9 Park, loves mayo with a passion that renders him basically unable to comprehend that people exist who don’t like it. He blames lack of understanding about emulsification. “I have never understood why people don’t like mayonnaise, because in its essence it’s just a vinaigrette that has been stabilized with egg yolk,” Jones told me by phone. Mayonnaise should have a humble, complementary flavor that doesn’t steal the show, but is assertive enough to improve the food. And it needs that custard-like texture that will add body to food, instead of collapsing into Miracle Puddle. Beyond the process of emulsion at its core, according to Jones, mayo is essentially a distillation of French cuisine that you can dollop onto whatever’s on the table. “Mayonnaise, smeared on something, just makes it more delicious. All you’ve done is just add some fat and some vinegar, which is really everything that the French want on everything. Mayonnaise is like the perfect balance of things. It’s just like a decent vinaigrette, you’ve got the texture from the fat, and the heaviness, and the lightness from the acidity. That’s what I want on everything.” By Jones’ standard, egg yolk shouldn’t be essential, as a vinaigrette could be stabilized with a different emulsifier. But when I told Jones that I prefer Vegenaise — a mayo-like product emulsified with soy lecithin and not egg


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yolk — it rocked him. “Oh no,” he moaned. He then launched into Put two eggs in a blender, with a a story about the inferiority teaspoon of Dijon mustard and 3/4 of Whole Foods mayo, as if teaspoon salt, and blend for one minassuming that I’m into Vegute. With the blender still going, add enaise because it’s healthier. oil — olive, grape seed and sunflower True mayo lovers will rarely oils work best — very slowly, just a make concessions, in terms thin drizzle at first, and then faster as of mayo performance and it starts to thicken. With the motor flavor, for the sake of healthy still running, add 2 tablespoons each or natural. My preference for of lemon juice and vinegar. Drizzle in Vegenaise may look like an more olive oil until it’s the right thickexception to this pattern, but ness, and adjust salt and vinegar to I’m not a vegan. taste. Finally, stir in by hand whatever Gail Vance Civille is presother seasonings you may desire, such ident of the consulting firm as minced garlic. Store it in the fridge. Sensory Spectrum, which specializes in “linking product understanding and consumer understanding.” She says a key quality of mayo is “lubricity,” which she describes as, “moistness — a fatty moistness as opposed to a wet moistness, which makes it easier to eat. If you were to eat tuna fish out of a can, it would not be easy to eat because it’s so dry. When you add mayonnaise, it adds a nice lubricity that makes it easier to chew and swallow.” The egg flavor in mayo, she told me, is important to her, but she was open to the possibility that another oil/acid emulsion could hold its own in the lubricity department. Chef Jones also acknowledged as much. “We had a vegan come in and order a salad that we have on the menu that has mayonnaise as a main component. I felt bad giving her the salad without mayonnaise. So we made some vegan mayonnaise on the fly, and we were impressed with how it came out.” His emulsifier: soy lecithin, the very emulsifier used in Vegenaise. “It does a good job,” he admitted. The vegan mayo “came out tasting pretty good, actually. I was impressed.” An emulsion is like a marriage, and the emulsifier is like the officiant. While this person, and what he or she stands for, is important and must be chosen carefully, it is the bride and groom who will make or break the partnership. The success or failure of mayo depends less on how it came to be than what it does. “It’s the lubricity, the moistness, and the compatibility of the flavor with the things you put it in,” Civille summarized. n

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Bundt Cake Homecoming A national bakery chain with Northwest ties opens on the South Hill BY JO MILLER

S

amuel Canty and his family were on their way to a friend’s house for brunch with the intention of bringing a coffee cake. Instead, his dad suggested picking up a cake from Nothing Bundt Cakes, a bakery the rest of the family had never heard of. Canty had been looking into a couple of different franchise opportunities, but once he tasted Nothing Bundt Cakes, it caught his attention. “We tried it and it was amazing,” he says. Now, the 25-year-old — along with his mom — is opening a Nothing Bundt Cakes on the South Hill, and the family came back to the Northwest just to do so. After growing up in Hayden, Idaho, Canty’s family moved to northern California when he was 13. But they always knew they wanted to return to the Northwest. “This is the perfect opportunity to do just that,” Canty says. The Bundt-cake bakery chain has about 70 locations nationwide, but this will be the first to open in Washington. It’s a homecoming not only for Canty, but also for Nothing Bundt Cakes cofounder Debra Shwetz, who grew up on the South Hill. Shwetz was crowned the 1975 Lilac Princess, attended Lewis and Clark High School and later graduated from the University of Washington. At the Spokane location’s official opening on Friday, Oct. 11, the cakes Shwetz dreamed up with cofounder Dena Tripp in Las Vegas will finally make their way into the mouths of her fellow Spokanites.

Nothing Bundt Cakes has nine year-round cake flavors and one seasonal flavor. (From October to Christmas you can get pumpkin spice.) Each cake — whether it’s white chocolate raspberry, chocolate chocolate chip, red velvet or cinnamon swirl — is wrapped in chunky strokes of pedalBundtinis — a bundt cupcake. shaped cream cheese frosting. The cakes come in both individual and large sizes. The Bundtinis are a 12-pack of bite-sized cakes and the Bundtlets are a single serving. “The Bundtlet is sort of our answer to the cupcake,” Canty says. The 8 and 10-inch cakes can come simply frosted or decorated for occasions with large colorful flowers, signs, party hats and more.  Nothing Bundt Cakes • Grand opening celebration Oct. 25 and 26 • 2525 E. 29th St. • Mon-Sat 9 am-6 pm • nothingbundtcakes. com • 535-4864

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FOOD | BEER

Fall Sipping

Fresh hops, cans on the way and more from your local brewery scene BY MIKE BOOKEY

F

all is a good time for beer lovers. The hops have been harvested, yielding new brews, the pumpkin ales are pouring and the big winter beers are waiting in the wings. It’s been a crazy few months in the Spokane beer community, so let’s get you caught up. Iron Goat Brewing Co. debuted a trio of excellent fresh hop beers this fall. All of them were on tap at the first-ever Inland Northwest Craft Beer Festival a couple of weeks ago, earning them one of the festival’s longer lines. Both the Citra and Centennial fresh hop ales proved aromatic, as a good fresh-hopper should, but even more intriguing was their Spo-Hop. This fresh-hopped ale was created with 60 pounds of hops farmed from around town by local growers, Iron Goat fans and the Iron Goat brewers themselves — a community brewing effort, if you will. These beers were made in seriously small batches, so you’ll want to head to the Iron Goat tap room before this stuff is all sucked down. Something always seems to be in motion over at No-Li Brewhouse. Their latest announcement

came this week, revealing their new No Boundaries series. The 22-ounce line features a new brew every two to three months; the first release, a bold winter brew called Winter Warmer at 7.5 percent alcohol, shipped out this week. Expect the next No Boundaries beer in January. We’ve been waiting a few months for Spokane’s first canned craft brew to hit the market, and it looks like Orlison Brewing is getting mighty close to rolling out their signature lagers. Cans are at the brewery and are being filled — you’ll have one in your hands soon. On the tasting room front, there’ll be two more places to sip in Spokane soon, as River City Brewing has plans to open a tap room later this fall. The location at 111 S. Cedar St., formerly occupied by the Whitestone Winery tasting room, is in the same building as River City’s brewing facility. Also, Ramblin’ Road Beer has plans to open their Gonzaga-district tasting room (730 N. Columbus St.) sometime in November, giving Spokane a taste of their Belgian-style creations. n

Why URM Food Service?

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FOOD | UPDATE

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The quesadilla con ensalada from Cafe Carambola. CARRIE SCOZZARO PHOTO

CAFE CARAMBOLA

610 W. Hubbard, #110 | Coeur d’Alene 208-676-8784

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resh, bright, tropical and yet prominent throughout Latin America, the carambola fruit is the inspiration for the Coeur d’Alene cafe of the same name. Run by Colomba Zavala-Aguilar, her father Juan and husband Carlos, Cafe Carambola serves lunch-only crowds in a cozy storefront along Northwest Boulevard. Cafe Carambola’s menu features salads, soups, drinks, quesadillas and tortas (sandwiches) that reflect chef Colomba’s fusion cooking style. From-scratch French bread, for example, reflects French influences on Central Mexican cuisine, while the contents of Carambola’s

sandwiches run the cultural gamut from the El Cubanito (pulled pork and pineapple salsa) to El Argentino (with chimichurri). Recipes blend travel experiences, family get-togethers, and Colomba’s classic training at San Francisco’s Le Cordon Bleu and its affiliate, the California Culinary Academy. Look for daily soup specials like the zesty sweet potato, as well as seasonally changing, Mexican-style fresh fruit coolers. — CARRIE SCOZZARO

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FOOD | SAMPLER

ITALIAN ARLO’S RISTORANTE 330 N. 1st Ave. | Sandpoint 208-255-4186 Sandpoint, Idaho, seems like the last place you would find great Italian cuisine. But thanks to the people down at Arlo’s, that’s not the case. Next time you’re heading out to our neighboring state, you need to taste the food here and find out why so many locals love it. The restaurant has recently added its sensational flatbread pizzas to the permanent menu, as well as its mussels dish — a local favorite. Kick back with a great meal and a glass of wine and Arlo’s will cover your cab ride home — another of the restaurant’s great offerings. CAFÉ ITALIANO 4334 S. Regal St. | 290-6943 Café Italiano manager Vagelie Karatzas and his family relocated their two-year-old, home-style Italian joint to the corner of Regal and 43rd Street from a tiny strip-mall spot in the Indian Trail neighborhood. Both the size of the restaurant and its menu have roughly tripled, he says, with the menu offering classic

Italian cuisine, seafood, Greek and Mediterranean dishes. So far, the community’s reception has been very favorable. EUROPA 125 S. Wall St. | 455-4051 When longtime owner Janice Maas retired at the beginning of 2013, the restaurant’s veteran chef Jeff Engels and server Aja Engels stepped up to take over. Jeff has made his mark on the menu, improving all of the classic Italian dishes to accommodate hungry customers and increasing the number of events they host in their back room. Everything, from the time-intensive gnocchi (with spinach and lemon sage brown butter) to their acclaimed desserts, is made fresh, in-house. Come for the food but savor the rich, warm tones and inviting mood of this European-style building, with its brick walls and exposed-beam ceilings. LASAGNA’S-ON-YA 521 E. Holland Ave. | 467-9100 Pick up pre-made lasagnas inside this family-run operation on Holland Avenue or just swing through the

LOCAL & INDEPENDENT NEWS • INNOVATION • WELLNESS

drive-thru. There are five basic kinds to choose from, ranging from classic meat lasagna to Tuscan chicken (there are even gluten-free options). Don’t worry, they have more. Cheese lasagnas are offered, and you can also craft your own delicious Italian dish. Just in case that didn’t fill you up, pick up some tiramisu or one of the seven different flavors of cheesecake (we suggest you try the huckleberry). MAMMA MIA’S 420 W. Francis Ave. | 467-7786 It’s all home-style southern Italian at this north-side dining room, with sauces, pastas and breads made from old-time family recipes. The menu has plenty of munchable appetizers to keep families happy, alongside traditional pastas (that you can now take home), pizzas and meat entrées (we love the garlic chicken). Mix and match any of their pastas and sauces for a new combination each time. They offer simple, hearty lunch options, too: Italian sub sandwiches, pizzas and calzones. n

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OCTOBER 10, 2013 INLANDER 39


Beware of Pirates

activity in the area. The film doesn’t leave much time for viewers to ponder those notes, as almost immediately afterward, the captain sees a couple of mysterious and fast-approaching blips on his radar screen, and moments later attains visual contact — of men with guns on them — through his binoculars. There’s not much room to take a breath in Greengrass’ film after that, for a variety of reasons. There’s convincing panic among the crew, there’s much strife among the pirates, and the tension level goes shooting dire circumstances and “how-are-they-gonna-get-out-ofskyward as a four-person skiff attempts to hook a boardthis” tension, I was always aware that everything would ing ladder to the big, unprotected ship. be OK in the end. Even with the eventual inclusion of Navy ships and The good news: My attitude was misguided. Director SEALs entering the fray, the film turns into more of a Paul Greengrass (United 93, the first two Bourne films), character study than an adventure story, and focuses on Hanks and an actor unknown to me named Barkhad the uneasy relationship that develops between the decent Abdi have given us a movie that’s near-impossible not to but crafty Phillips and the self-proclaimed pirate leader get grabbed by and wrapped up in. named Muse, played by newcomer Abdi, an incredibly Two brief intros show us Phillips and his wife (maybe expressive actor who makes superb use of his eyes, smile, five minutes of screen time for Cathand body language, and exudes an inner CAPTAIN PHILLIPS erine Keener) at home as he prepares energy that, despite being the villain, will Rated PG-13 to head out on another voyage, and a elicit a modicum of empathy for him in some Directed by Paul Greengrass totally disorganized group of dirtviewers. Starring Tom Hanks, Barkhad Abdi poor Somalis who are being noisily When the action moves over to the assembled to jump into a couple of ship’s cramped lifeboat, a bright orange twin-engine skiffs because an unseen Somali boss wants contraption that could pass for a toy in a giant’s bathtub, “more people out there getting more ships and making Greengrass keeps his cameras right up in people’s faces, more money.” as he did in United 93. That ups the tension even more. The script by Billy Ray makes sure to specify that the But miraculously, the ending gives us a bit of respite, and Maersk Alabama, already far out at sea, is an unarmed any feathers the movie had ruffled will be all smoothed ship, and that the captain knows there might be pirate down. 

You know what happens in the end, but Captain Phillips will still stun you BY ED SYMKUS

I

shouldn’t have been so surprised by how good this movie is. After all, most of the time when you put Tom Hanks at the center of a film — well, with the exception of The Money Pit and The Bonfire of the Vanities — you get quality stuff. Still, I had doubts about this one, as I’ve found myself having more and more with Hollywood’s incessant parade of “based on fact” movies. Is there anyone in America, who owns a television, who doesn’t know the story of Captain Richard Phillips? For those with short memories: In 2009, the Vermonter’s ship, the MV Maersk Alabama, loaded up with commercial cargo, water, and food aid, was making its way down the East Coast of Africa when it was attacked by Somali pirates who demanded money, then let greed get in the way of things and ended up wanting something more. For those who don’t know the story at all, let’s just say that the cool, calm captain (Hanks) underwent a harrowing experience but ended up a hero. I knew the outcome of the story, and even a great deal of its details, so no matter how many instances of

40 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2013

Tom Hanks plays the real-life captain of a cargo ship held hostage by pirates.


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS CAPTAIN PHILLIPS

The true story of the Vermont cargo ship captain who delivers food and water to Africa, and whose ship is hijacked by Somali pirates is both a nail-biter and a fascinating character study, mostly centering on the relationship between the cool, calm captain (Tom Hanks) and the determined but unsure pirate leader Muse (newcomer Barkhad Abdi). The adventure parts are thrilling, the attack and takeover is unnerving, the lifeboat sequences are claustrophobic. Another great film from director Paul Greengrass (United 93, the first two Bourne entries). (ES) Rated PG-13

GENERATION IRON

On the surface, there’s an icky feel to bodybuilding — the popping veins, the greasy spray tans, the Speedos, the obvious signs of steroids — but this documentary looks at the other side of the sport. We see the insane amount of hard work and discipline that goes into transforming your body from human to HeMan. It’s narrated by the exceptionally muscle-y Mickey Rourke, in case greasy Speedos weren’t selling it for you. At Magic Lantern. (MB) Rated PG-13

MACHETE KILLS

This time out, forget about the socially conscious core that fueled the exploitation engine of the first film. Robert Rodriguez has gone for flat-out, no-message  action comedy that is so outrageously over-the-top violent, it’s impossible to object to any of it. Machete (Danny Trejo) is invited, no refusal allowed, by the president of the United States (Charlie Sheen — not kidding) to head on down to Mexico and pull off a job that no legitimate American agent could manage: Stop the insane cartel lord from shooting a missile at Washington, D.C. (MJ) Rated R

THE PATIENCE STONE

Golshifteh Farahani, a Muslim woman in

a country torn apart by war, is watching her husband die. Shot in the neck, he is comatose and the world has abandoned him, all except for his wife of 10 years. With him unconscious, she suddenly finds that she can tell him things she had not said in all of their years together, and by doing so, he has become, according to Persian myth, a syngue sabour, a stone that will protect her and take away her sadness. Struggling to survive and awaiting her husband’s awakening, slowly but surely, the woman falls in love with a young soldier and begins to strive for freedom. (ER) Rated R

THE INLANDER’S 20TH ANNIVERSARY MOVIE NIGHT AT

ROMEO AND JULIET

It’s a timeless story that once again has come to grace movie screens with its show of teenage passion and angst. This go around, Hailee Steinfeld takes on Juliet who once again falls in love with her sworn enemy, Romeo, portrayed by Douglas Booth. The tragedy of a family feud going terribly, horribly wrong is characterized by fabulous costumes and a beautiful setting, but it may or may not be enough for those of us who saw the other seemingly endless movie portrayals of Shakespeare’s classic. (ER) Rated PG-13 RETURNING

THE SPECTACULAR NOW

Sutter Keely is the most popular guy at his school. He’s funny, he parties, he has a hot girlfriend and he lives “in the moment,” that is until his girlfriend dumps him and he wakes up one morning on the lawn of “nice girl” Aimee’s house. Aimee (Shailene Woodley from The Descendants) is completely the opposite of Sutter: She has goals, she’s smart and a little shy and nerdy. In many ways, this plot seems like the typical “bad-boymeets-girl-next-door” coming-of-age story, but this film — from the writers of modern cult classic (500) Days of Summer — doesn’t take the harsh realities of youthful love and confusion about the future and tie it all up in a tidy little package. At Magic Lantern (CS) Rated R

1993’s

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New York socialite Jasmine (Cate Blanchett) is down on her luck. Her marriage to a wealthy husband (Alec Baldwin) fell apart after he lost all their money in a Wall Street scam, forcing Jasmine to move to San Francisco to live with her sister, Ginger, a grocery store clerk. To Jasmine, it seems like there’s not much left in her life to look forward to, as she struggles to cope with her downfall from a life of luxury to one where she’s forced to decide whether she should become a dental receptionist or a nurse. Writer/director Woody Allen presents us a modern yet familiar character study of how the haves and the have-nots perceive themselves. (CS) PG-13

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS TWO

Flint Lockwood (voice of Bill Hader,) the lovable inventor, has achieved his dreams and is now working for his idol, Chester V, creating things to benefit society. But when he learns that the food

machine he thought he had destroyed is still up and running this time producing scary humanoid food hybrids including melonheads, mosquitoasts,  and shrimpanzees he and his team, including love interest and weather girl Sam Sparks (voice of Anna Faris,) must get rid of the machine once and for all in this animated flick. PG (ER)

DON JON

Joseph Gordon-Levitt (The Dark Knight Rises) stars in and makes his writing-directing feature debut as Jon, a nightclub hopper who likes and regularly scores with the ladies, but gets more satisfaction watching porn at home on his laptop. There aren’t too many sex-porn-addiction comedies out there, but this one kind of shines. A great supporting cast: Scarlett Johansson and Julianne Moore as possible love interests, Tony Danza and Glenne Headley as Jon’s parents, only make things better. (ES) Rated R

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FILM FILM||SHORTS SHORTS

NOW PLAYING MACHETE KILLS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(100 345) 730 1005 CAPTAIN PHILLIPS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1215 315) 625 700 920 1000 GRAVITY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1200 305 530) 645 745 900 1000

225 E. 3rd Ave., Spokane, WA

RUNNER RUNNER [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1230 245) 500 720 935 GRAVITY [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(215 PM) 430 PM DON JON [CC] (R) Fri. - Sun.(115 350) 715 940 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1205 255) 515 735 CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE 2 IN REAL D 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.955 PM PRISONERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1220 PM 355 PM) 800 PM

Help Us Help Children in need! Poetry Reading Book Signing | Q&A by author of "Unremembered Wings"

INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(105) 415 705 945 RIDDICK [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1250 335) 635 915 PERCY JACKSON: SEA OF MONSTERS [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1240 PM 325 PM) WE'RE THE MILLERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(120) 410 650 925 DESPICABLE ME 2 [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1245 PM)

Paul Wayne

Friday, October 11th 6:30pm-9pm

CAPTAIN PHILLIPS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sat.(1230 310 335) 630 705 935 1005 Sun.(1230 310 335) 630 705 935

Enjoy wine & hors d'oeuvres by Sante Restaurant & Charcuterie

MACHETE KILLS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(200) 435 715 950

Call Johnny Chapman at (757) 389-2966 with questions. Tickets at door.

GRAVITY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(315) 400 615 700 900 930

Intended Publication Date(s): Friday, October 11, 2013. Saturday, October 12, 2013. Sunday, October 13, 2013. Published WA, Inlander [I_Directory_Update to Publish or Proof] 1.7" X 11" Produced: 7:00 PM ET, 10/8/2013 100813070035 Regal 865-925-9554

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CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(115 PM 345 PM) 640 PM CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE 2 IN REAL D 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.925 PM RUSH [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1230 325) 625 925 PRISONERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1250 PM) 450 PM 830 PM THE FAMILY [CC] (R)

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RIDDICK [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(130) 410 655 950 Sun.(130) 410 655 940 WE'RE THE MILLERS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(135) 420 705 945

MACHETE KILLS [CC,DV] (R)

Fri.700 PM

Big Screen: CAPTAIN PHILLIPS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri.710 PM Times For 10/11 - 10/13

42 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2013

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INSIDIOUS: CHAPTER 2 [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(100 PM) 650 PM 935 PM

the rts?

A

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ENOUGH SAID

INSIDIOUS CHAPTER 2

GETAWAY

METALLICA: THROUGH THE NEVER 

Eva (Julia Louis-Dreyfus), a divorcee, is facing the possibility of an empty nest, as her daughter goes off to college. As she bonds with similarly situated Albert (James Gandolfini) and the two click, it seems like the perfect romance. Eva also befriends Marianne (Catherine Keener), whose only flaw is her tendency to rag on and on about her ex-husband. When this friend’s ex-husband turns out to be her new boyfriend, Eva suddenly finds herself looking at Albert through Marianne’s eyes. (ER) Rated R Ethan Hawke gave us an amazing performance in the remarkable Before Midnight earlier this year, so it’s OK for him to take some time to do something, well, less remarkable. Here, Hawke plays Brent Magna, who used to be a professional race car driver, which comes in handy when his wife is kidnapped by some jerk and he has to steal some other chick’s car (that chick is a post-Bieber Selena Gomez; the car is a Shelby Mustang) and drive really fast to rescue said wife. (MB) Rated PG-13

GMO-OMG

GMO-OMG goes deep into the world of genetically modified food and its potential repercussions.  Directed by Jeremy Seifert, this documentary follows a family trying to avoid eating GMOs in a world where it has become harder and harder for the average consumer to do just that.  At Magic Lantern. (ER) Unrated

GRACE UNPLUGGED

Grace Trey (AJ Michalka)  wants to sing about something other than God. As a talented performer in her church’s worship band, Grace wants a taste of her pop star dad’s fame, before he gave it all up to become a pastor. Running away from home and gaining stardom is more than little Grace bargained for, and she begins to think she should listen to her dad (James Denton) and cute intern (Michael Welch) and give up her new-found success to worship and serve the big man upstairs in this Christian drama. (ER) Rated PG

GRAVITY

Astronauts Matt Kowalski (George Clooney) and Ryan Stone (Sandra Bullock) perform extra-vehicular repairs on the Hubble space telescope and then all hell breaks loose when pieces of a destroyed satellite come their way. Thus begins a series of domino effect crises: Will they have enough air and/or jetpack life to make it to the station alive? Director Alfonso Cuarón (Children of Men) uses crazy effects that dazzle, while also sometimes distracting from the story. (SR) Rated PG-13

IN A WORLD...

Lake Bell wrote, directed and stars in this big-hearted comedy that goes behind the scenes of the voiceover industry — in other words, the dude who says “In a world..” at the beginning of those action movie previews. As Carol, Bell gives us a luckless daughter of a voiceover master who is trying to forge her own career in the industry while also dealing with her nutso family. It’s quirky and full of laughs, but also a sign that Bell is an indie director to keep an eye on. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R.

RUNNER RUNNER

The Lambert family returns in the sequel to the bone-chilling thriller aptly named Insidious: Chapter Two. Patrick Wilson stars as Josh Lambert, the reassuring father to the now healing family, attempting to erase the events of the past.  But as unusual things begin to once again happen in the household, Renai Lambert, played by Rose Byrne, begins to suspect that perhaps her husband’s reassurance is simply denial, and something has followed her hubby out of the spirit-world, (ER) Rated PG-13

They’ve made 10 albums, played hundreds of sold out concerts, and now, the heavy metal band have their own movie. Trip, played by Dane Dehaan, is a young roadie on tour with Metallica who is sent out to pick up some precious cargo. Along the way, he crashes his car, and must go head to head with a masked horseman. Features Metallica’s music as background to Trip’s epic adventure, as well as radically cool visuals. (ER) Rated R

POPULAIRE

1958. A boy, a girl and a typewriter. Rose Pamphyle (Déborah François)  is a small town girl living in the big city and, incidentally, a terrible secretary. Her handsome boss (Romain Duris) wouldn’t have hired her, except for the fact that her abilities on the typewriter are top notch. Determined to train young Rose to be the winner he wasn’t, boss-man Louis Echard takes Rose’s fast fingers on the road to compete in the sport of speed typing, attempting to gain fame and fortune along the way. At Magic Lantern. (ER) Rated R

PRISONERS

The kidnapping-revenge genre gets a refreshing makeover when a child goes missing, Dad gets mad, and the cops don’t know what to do. It stars Hugh Jackman (the dad) and Jake Gyllenhaal (the detective). This goes places that Taken and Frantic never thought of going. A real nail-biter that’s violent and unpredictable. (ES) Rated R

There’s not much to see here. Mostly it’s just Justin Timberlake sitting at computers for a bit — not even naked or anything — and later he is vaguely menaced by Ben Affleck… with words only, except for some hints of threats of being fed to mostly offscreen crocodiles. Timberlake is a student at Princeton, working on a masters degree in financial shenanigans — he was, we’re meant to understand, the sole guy on Wall Street in 2008 who was actually honest in his work, and so he lost all his dough in the crash. Now, he tries to take down Affleck, who plays an online gambling mogul. (MJ) Rated R

RUSH

The action begins with a crucial race in 1976, before flashing back to the early years of the rivalry between Formula 1 race car drivers James Hunt and Niki Lauda on the minor leagues of the European racing circuit. Director Ron Howard and screenwriter Peter Morgan — who collaborated on Frost/Nixon — effectively set up the initial parallel between the two men as children of privilege who rebel against the expectations of their families, before focusing on the clash of styles that differentiated them. (SR) Rated R.

THE WAY, WAY BACK

Fox Searchlight continues to establish itself as, perhaps, the premier indie film distributor. From them we’ve received films like Sideways, Juno and Slumdog Millionaire. Their newest film seems to contain the same charm they’ve become known for. This time around, Steve Carell, Toni Collette, Maya Rudolph and a young actor named Liam James look to deliver said charm with a tale about a forlorn kid who finds a new life with a summer job at a water park. At Magic Lantern (JR) PG-13

WE’RE THE MILLERS

Jason Sudeikis plays a small-time pot dealer who finds himself in major debt to his supplier (Ed Helms). He’s then forced to make a trip to Mexico to pick up some bud, and he believes he’ll keep a lower profile if he crosses the border with his family. Without one, he recruits a nerdy boy, a punk girl and a stripper (Jennifer Aniston — as a stripper!) to pose as his kin travelling in an RV. (JR) Rated R 

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75

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59

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41

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MACHETE KILLS

Fri 5:00, Sat-Sun 12:30, 5:00, Mon-Thurs 5:00

Machete Kills brings Robert Rodriguez’s wacky violence back to the big screen

Monsters University

BY MARYANN JOHANSON

R Fri-Sat (4:45) 7:15 9:50 Sat-Sun (11:45) (2:15) Mon-Thur (4:00) 6:45 9:20

GRAVITY

PG-13 Daily (3:40) (5:15) (5:45) 7:20 7:50 9:30 Fri-Sun 10:00PM Sat-Sun (10:45) (11:15) (1:30) In 2D Daily (3:10) Sat-Sun (1:00)

RUNNER RUNNER

R Daily (3:20) (5:30) 7:40 9:50 Sat-Sun (11:00) (1:10)

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 PG Daily (3:00) In 2D Daily (5:10) 7:15 9:15 Sat-Sun (10:50) (12:50)

Fri 7:10, Sat-Sun 2:45 7:10, Mon-Thurs 7:10

I

t started with a trailer: a fake movie ad “left missile he’s bought with his ill-gotten millions, over” from the 1970s for a Mexploitation flick from launching the thing at Washington, D.C., dropped into Quentin Tarantino’s Grindhouse intended as a sort of WMD middle finger to U.S. ... which Robert Rodriguez later expanded into arrogance. the very funny and pointedly satirical full-length The plot, in the grand scheme, sounds actionMachete. Now, the sequel, Machete Kills, opens with movie straightforward enough. It’s in the details a new fake 1970s relic trailer, for, heh, Machete that the brilliant foolishness comes to the fore Kills Again in Space. It hints at a completely ridicu(and accidentally holds up for ridicule the sorts lous expansion of the Machete legend into Star of action movie plots we yawn at nowadays). Wars-era space opera, and it’s as many degrees The President is played by Carlos Estevez... that of insanity beyond where Machete would be Charlie Sheen, of course, MACHETE KILLS Kills will take you. in a wicked riff on his father’s Rated R Never let it be said that Roturn in the role in a more serious driguez lets any fear of embracing Directed by Robert Rodriguez capacity. The drug lord is played cartoonish absurdity stop him. His Starring Danny Trejo, Carlos Esteby Demian Bichir, a serious acwonderful recklessness isn’t always vez, Demian Bichir, Amber Heard tor turned very, very goofy here. successful — his Spy Kids movies Machete’s control operative in San quickly became an embarrassment Antonio is... Miss San Antonio — but so far, so good with the former Mexican (Amber Heard), because beauty pageants turn Federale-turned-knife-wielding man of justice and out to provide awesome cover for a secret agent bloody mayhem. (apparently no one expects a blonde Barbie who This time out, forget about the socially condreams of world peace to be plotting covert ops). scious core that fueled the exploitation engine of All that beautiful idiocy is front-loaded into the first film. Rodriguez has gone for flat-out, noMachete Kills. There’s so much more beyond that. message action comedy that is so outrageously It hasn’t even gotten anywhere near Lady Gaga over-the-top violent, it’s impossible to object to as a hired killer after Machete, or Mel Gibson any of it. The human body, when it meets a helias... well, you’ll see. copter — we see that here, but it simply wouldn’t The whole thing is completely preposterous happen. Yet it’s so inventively gory that I laughed in the best way. Rodriguez uses cheap ’70s film my head off. gimmicks and tropes in smart, funny ways, parMachete (Danny Trejo) is invited, no refusal ticularly to underscore the problems today’s movallowed, by the President of the United States to ies often have with treating women as disposable head on down to Mexico and pull off a job that props. When misogyny is met with a gunshot to no legitimate American agent could manage: the knee, it smoothes the way for a gal like me to stop the insane cartel lord, with the crazy-ass go along with the fun. 

4

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BLUE JASMINE (98 MIN- PG 13)

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THE SPECTACULAR NOW (100 MIN-R) Fri/Sat: 8:00, Sun: 3:00, Tues-Thurs: 8:00

PG-13

GRAVITY

Daily (12:30) (1:00) (1:30) (2:40) (3:40) (4:50) (5:15) 7:00 7:20 7:50 9:10 9:30 Fri-Sun (10:45) 10:00 In 2D Daily (3:10) (5:45) Fri-Sun (11:15)

CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2

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RUNNER RUNNER

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POPULAIRE (111 MIN-R)

LEE DANIEL’S THE BUTLER

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IN A WORLD (93 MIN -R)

THE FAMILY

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Grown-Up Punks How Red Hare has grown, changed and, in some ways, stayed exactly the same BY LEAH SOTTILE

B

y the time skateboarding, punk rock, guitars and drums took over their lives, the members of the hardcore band Swiz were almost too late. It was 1987 in Washington, D.C., and a whole wave of hardcore punk bands had come and gone: Rites of Spring had split, Minor Threat broke up in 1983, and some devout hardcore scenesters were already trying their hand at the next genre: “post-hardcore.” In that time, after the first punch of punk and before the heyday of alternative rock, Jason Farrell says that he and his Swiz bandmates — who weren’t done yet with

BRIAN MISHOE PHOTO

the aggressive sounds of hardcore — started to feel punk changing, softening and getting more experimental. “We kind of missed that first wave. The people that sort of organized that sound were moving on to something a little more thoughtful, more mellow in some ways. It didn’t have the same type of aggression,” Farrell, who now plays guitar in the band Red Hare, says. “We were about eight years younger than the originators of that sound and we thought that [those people] would be more excited than they were. We instantly pigeonholed ourselves as shortchanged.”

But now — so many years later — it’s clear that Swiz was trying something different, too. They were a hardcore band, but they weren’t hammering home the same sociopolitical message that had come with that first flight of punk bands. They were in their late teens, and they sung about what they knew. Swiz made proclamations about identity and staying true to exactly who they were. On “Tylenol,” a track from their 1990 LP Hell Yes I Cheated, the band yelled “I wouldn’t change who I am! Even if I could!” On Dischord ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 10, 2013 INLANDER 45


MUSIC | PUNK “GROWN-UP PUNKS,” CONTINUED...

HAR MAR SUPERSTAR 21+ ONLY | 7:00 PM | $10 ADV

OCT 11 | 7PM

THE CENTER - SPOKANE

THE RADICAL SOMETHING

DOWN WITH WEBSTER ALL AGES | 7:00 PM | $12 ADV

THE CENTER - SPOKANE

OCT 12 | 7PM

LIONS LIONS

A LOT LIKE BIRDS | INDIRECTIONS ANCHORLINES ALL AGES | 7PM | $10 ADVANCE

OCT 15 | 7PM

THE CENTER - SPOKANE

RED FANG

HELMS ALEE | GAYTHIEST | WITCHBURN ALL AGES | 7:00 PM | $12

THE CENTER - SPOKANE

OCT 17 | 7PM

THE CENTER TICKETS AVAILABLE AT: THECENTERSPOKANE.COM 6425 N. LIDGERWOOD

46 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2013

Records, a seminal D.C. punk label, Swiz was a youthful, less dystopian foil to their labelmates. “I’ve never been very good at political statements. I was really drawn more toward these sort of darker, more personal stuff,” Farrell says, “More like human things rather than political things.” It’s a sentiment that Farrell carried with him after that band’s demise in 1990, and into his other bands, Bluetip and Retisonic. Last year, 26 years after he and his friends picked up instruments and made their first songs, Farrell and three of his Swiz bandmates formed a new band: Red Hare. But now everything has changed again. They live scattered across the country. They’re dads with careers. They write songs via email and record riffs on their phones. And punk rock is nothing like what it used to be. “I think it’s very easy to say [punk] is not as pure as it was. It’s very easy to think that your era is the era that matters,” he says. “I think I’ve gotten a lot less precious about what is the right era. “It’s this weird thing, and I don’t think I’ve ever considered myself ‘punk rock’ ever,” he continues. Though Farrell says he and his bandmates all experimented with weirder, less punk sounds in their other bands, with age they’re slowly coming back again to the original sound they fell in love with. On Red Hare’s first album, Nites of Midnight, the band captures the same drive and power that

once drove Swiz — but the lyrics now capture the worries, thoughts and passions of a group of 40-something men. “Thankfully the topics have changed, because we’re quite a bit older,” Farrell says. “I’m more worried. I have a kid, I have these bigger, larger pressures. … [The lyrics are] coming from the same place, but it’s a different set of circumstances.” He remembers those early days, when the circumstances behind their brand of punk rock used to be so sweet and pure. He chuckles as he tells about a box his mom recently found in his childhood home. “It’s just literally full of letters from people. Weird letters, like, ‘I bought your 7-inch and I wanted to say hello!’” he says. “I found letters from people in there that I’m currently friends with that we would both be embarrassed about.” But all these years and bands later, he says somehow that youthful, inclusive spirit they once felt as kids is still with them today. “The people that come out [to our shows] are our age — they’re our friends,” he says. “It’s like a weird reunion of people that we’ve known forever and it just feels amazing. … The people that I know are just glowing. Like, ‘Hello you! Yay!’” n leahs@inlander.com Red Hare performs with Coliseum, Heiress and Losing Skin • Fri, Oct. 11, at 9 pm • Carr’s Corner • 230 S. Washington St. • $8 • 21+ • 474-1731


MUSIC | METAL

Beer Cocktails Music Food 120 E. Sprague Ave.

B

runo Mars better watch out. Thanks to a fan-started petition that so far has received more than 40,000 signatures, the pop star, recently named the halftime entertainment for the 2015 Super Bowl, has some serious competition in the form of Gwar. Gwar dresses up in some of the craziest costumes (think orc-like masks, trap-jaw helmets, 2-foot-long dildos, assless chaps), but on the other hand, they have incredible mastery of their instruments and their lyrics aren’t even entirely satirical. Yet that doesn’t mean they expect you to take them seriously — regardless of how disgusting, bloody and literally fleshy their stage show gets. Lead singer Dave Brockie created the act nearly 30 years ago in Richmond, Va., but it doesn’t matter where the thrash metal group hails from. When you get Brockie on the phone, he insists on being interviewed in character, as his alter ego Oderus (pronounced ODER-us) Urungus. “I could annihilate Bruno Mars with a just a fart at 30 paces away, I’m not worried about that,” Oderus says. “But we would rather play in the game. We could take on the entire NFL and the coaches, and the cheerleaders, with one hand tied behind our backs.” He says it’s satisfying to know that fans would turn to Gwar to be entertained during halftime, but he still doesn’t understand why, especially since his band’s whole purpose is to “destroy humanity.”

“We’ve used it as a lure; music is like a worm for us,” Oderus explains. “We’ve kind of figured out that we enjoy playing rock ‘n’ roll while we’re on this planet. Heavy metal helps us replicate the sound of our childhoods through our music.” Last week, the band kicked off the new tour promoting Gwar’s first album in three years, Battle Maximus. In a way, there were demons to fight like the band had never faced before. On tour in 2011, their guitar player Cory Smoot, aka Flattus Maximus, was found dead on their bus. “I’m not going to lie and say it wasn’t difficult, we miss him every day,” Oderus says. “But there would have been a worldwide outbreak of fury if we didn’t continue.” Perhaps because of this, the band went deeper and darker for this album, recorded in their supposed home of Antarctica. “It’s f---ing heavy as hell,” Oderus assures. “Our new guitar player, Pustulus Maximus, is really kicking it off. He’s kind of an ornery asshole who’s all over the stage with an attitude of savagery that fits in well with us.” Clearly, Mars has every reason to be worried.  lauraj@inlander.com Gwar with Whitechapel, Iron Reagan, A Band Of Orcs • Sun, Oct. 13 at 8 pm • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • $20 • Allages • sp.knittingfactory.com

SUN

BY LAURA JOHNSON

SAT

FRI

Gwar is back and would like to play the Super Bowl

THUR

OCT 10th - 16TH

KARAOKE

W/ LIVE WIRE

at Irv’s 9pm-2am

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

at Irv’s 6pm-10pm

DANCE TILL DAWN

KARAOKE W/ MATTY

at Irv’s 6pm-10pm

DANCE TILL DAWN

KARAOKE

W/ LIVE WIRE

at Irv’s 9pm-2am

SAT. OCTOBER 26TH

Power Trip

This metal band of Scumdogs, as Gwar refers to themselves, wants to destroy humanity with their music.

415 W. Sprague Ave.

509.624.4450

OCTOBER 10, 2013 INLANDER 47


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

R&B HAR MAR SUPERSTAR

W

hen you hear Har Mar Superstar and then you see Har Mar Superstar, something just doesn’t quite connect. The sound is like what you’d envision was playing in the background of that famous Burt Reynolds photo, when he’s all butt-naked on a bearskin rug. But Har Mar — aka Sean Tillmann — is a chubby, balding white guy obsessed with his own sexual prowess. He’s got the same weird allure as Ron Jeremy. And sure, that strange juxtaposition of sexy music by a not-so-sexy guy has given him a career, but the music is pretty rad too. I dare you to listen to his “Lady, You Shot Me” and try not to dance. Told you. It’s impossible. — LEAH SOTTILE Har Mar Superstar with Rom Leo • Fri, Oct. 11 at 7 pm • The Center • 6425 N. Lidgerwood • $10 • 21+ • thecenterofspokane.com • 433-7328

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 10/10

BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn BUCER’S (208-596-0887), Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen Trio BUCKHORN (244-3991), Texas Twister THE CELLAR, Kosh COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny J DILUNA’S CAFE (208-263-0846), Birds of Chicago GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos GRANDE RONDE CELLARS (4558161), Carlos Alden J THE HOP!, Diamond Head, Raven, Helldorado, Invasive, Thirion JONES RADIATOR, Jordan Sandness J KNITTING FACTORY, Disclosure, T. Williams J LAGUNA CAFE, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dirk Lind O’SHAY’S, Open mic J THE PHAT HOUSE, The Tone Collaborative, Bodhi Drip RICO’S (332-6566), Palouse Subterranean Blues Band THE ROADHOUSE, Sammy Eubanks THE VAULT, DJ Seli ZOLA, Black Carl

Friday, 10/11

315 MARTINI BAR, Maxie Ray Mills BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn BOLO’S (891-8995), Not Guilty BUCER’S (208-596-0887), Simba Land J CARR’S CORNER, Coliseum, Red Hare (See story on page 45), Heiress, Losing Skin THE CELLAR, RBMC Jazz J THE CENTER, Har Mar Superstar (See story above) COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Nova, Echo Elysium

48 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2013

POP THE HOOT HOOTS

T

he Hoot Hoots are not a band of owls. Actually, the four-piece is as human as you — their interests, according to their Facebook page, are yoga, Donkey Kong, ice cream and Arrested Development. All of these elements can actually be heard in their music. Their mixed-up power pop is flexible, punchy, sweet — and at times, just like the Bluth family, crazy. With catchy tunes that sound like early Beatles fused with Modest Mouse and the Postal Service, they do their own thing, implementing Nintendo-sounding background synthesizers. Brothers Adam and Chris Prairie started their operation in Illinois, but after moving to Seattle took it to a new level. Their most recent EP Feel the Cosmos, released last November, is imperative listening for you right now. — LAURA JOHNSON The Hoot Hoots • Sat, Oct. 12 at 9 pm • Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague • $5 • 21+ • 838-1570

COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR (208263-6971), Bright Moments THE COUNTRY CLUB (208-6762582), Copper Mountain Band CURLEY’S, Shiner EICHARDT’S, Douglas Cameron FEDORA PUB, Keith Wallace FIRST STREET BAR (276-2320), Protocol FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Scorpius GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos GRANDE RONDE CELLARS (4558161), Rob Bryceson J THE HOP!, Koffin Kats, Freak System, Almost Home, Collateral Damage IRON HORSE, Phoenix IRV’S (624-4450), DJ Prophesy JONES RADIATOR, Whiskey Rebellion J KNITTING FACTORY, Kid Ink J LAGUNA CAFE, Robinsong LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Starlite Motel LUCKY’S IRISH PUB (747-2605), Likes Girls

MAX AT MIRABEAU (922-6252), The Usual Suspects MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Spare Parts NYNE, The Divine Jewels PEND D’OREILLE WINERY (208-2658545), One Street Over J THE PHAT HOUSE, Liz Rognes, John Michaelson, Hannah Beans, Upbeat for Sundown J THE ROADHOUSE, Last Chance Band SATAY BISTRO (208-765-2555), Bill Bozly THE VIKING, Martini Brothers ZOLA, Bruiser

Saturday, 10/12

BABY BAR, Kramer BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn BOLO’S (891-8995), Not Guilty BUCER’S (208-596-0887), Jon & Rand

THE CELLAR, RBMC Jazz J THE CENTER, The Radical Something, Down With Webster CHAPS (624-4182), Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Nova, Echo Elysium COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS (208-6642336), Talmadge & Kassandra COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR (208263-6971), Rick Burness THE COUNTRY CLUB (208-6762582), Copper Mountain Band CURLEY’S, Shiner J EWU SHOWALTER HALL, Derik Nelson (of the show Glee) FEDORA PUB, Keith Wallace FIRST STREET BAR (276-2320), Protocol FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Scorpius GIBLIANO BROTHERS, Dueling Pianos J THE HOP!, Widower, Destroyer of Light, 427, I Hate This City, Chemical Reaction

IRON HORSE, Phoenix IRV’S (624-4450), DJ Prophesy J JONES RADIATOR, Oooob, Xerox Machine, Rice Queen J KNITTING FACTORY, The Revision Scheme, T-180, Extortionist, Upbeat For Sundown LATAH CREEK WINERY (926-0164), Maxie Ray Mills LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil MAX AT MIRABEAU (922-6252), The Usual Suspects J MIK’S (208-666-0450), EDM Fright Night feat. F3lon, Johnny Disco, Digi J MOOTSY’S, The Hoot Hoots (See story above) NYNE, DJ C-Mad J THE PHAT HOUSE, World Bandits RED LION RIVER INN (328-9526), Chris Rieser and Snap the Nerve REPUBLIC BREWING CO. (775-2700), Birds of Chicago J THE ROADHOUSE, Last Chance


Band  ROCKET MARKET (343-2253), One More for Som! benefit show feat. Flying Spiders, Kari Marguerite, Lyle Morse, Sidhe, Just Plain Darin, Sam Enderess, Mark Ward THE VIKING, Charlie Butts & The Filter Tips THE WAVE (747-2023), Likes Girls ZOLA, Bruiser

Sunday, 10/13

THE CELLAR, Pat Coast COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Echo Elysium DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with Voodoo Church  THE HOP!, The Maxies, The Beat, The Camorra, Waggy Plank  KNITTING FACTORY, Gwar (See story on page 47), Whitechapel, Iron Reagan, A Band of Orcs PEARL THEATER (208-610-2846), Sara Grey  THE PHAT HOUSE, Open mic ZOLA, Bill Bozly

Monday, 10/14

BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ, Open mic

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.  CALYPSOS COFFEE (208-6650591), Open mic EICHARDT’S, Truck Mills  THE HOP!, Hemlock, Entanglement, Abode for the Dead, Benign  KNITTING FACTORY, Zeds Dead, Paper Diamond, DJ Green Lantern, Branchez  THE PHAT HOUSE, Bebop Jazz Night PJ’S BAR & GRILL (328-2153), Acoustic Jam with One Man Train Wreck  RICK SINGER PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO (838-3333), Pearl Django RICO’S (332-6566), Open mic

Tuesday, 10/15

BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn THE CELLAR, Max Daniels  THE CENTER, Lions Lions FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills  THE HOP!, Deicide, Disgorge, Broken Hope, Necronomicon, Rutah, Fueling the Heathen KELLY’S IRISH PUB (208-667-1717), The Powell Brothers  MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP (208-8828537), Saticoy  THE PHAT HOUSE, Drum Night  RED ROOSTER COFFEE CO. (2029138), Open mic THE ROADHOUSE, Justin Jurkovac THE VAULT, DJ Q THE VIKING, Jimmy Nuge, The Mayfields

Wednesday, 10/16 BEVERLY’S (208-765-4000), Robert Vaughn

MUSIC | VENUES

BISTRO ON SPRUCE (208-664-1774), Truck Mills  CAFE BODEGA (208-263-5911), Five Minutes of Fame CARR’S CORNER, DJ Wesone THE CELLAR, Eric Neuhausser EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard  FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho IRV’S (624-4450), DJ Prophesy JOHN’S ALLEY, Brothers Gow JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bob  KNITTING FACTORY, Carbon Leaf, Brian Wright LUCKY’S IRISH PUB (747-2605), Likes Girls  MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Kevin Gardner  THE PHAT HOUSE, Be Open Mic RICO’S (332-6566), WSU Jazz Band THE ROADHOUSE, Luke Jaxon SOULFUL SOUP & SPIRITS, Open mic STIR EATERY & LOUNGE (466-5999), Jimmy Nuge (The Fail Safe Project) SUKI YAKI INN (624-0022), One Man Train Wreck THE VAULT, DJs Freaky Fred, MC Squared THE VIKING, Jordan Collins, Cross My Heart ZOLA, The Bucket List

Coming Up…

THE CENTER, Red Fang, Helms Alee, Gaytheist, Oct. 17 BING CROSBY THEATER, The Lion Oh My EP Release feat. Death by Pirates, Summer in Siberia, 5 Times Over, Oct. 18 THE CENTER, Soceity 1, The Maension, Oct. 18 GERMAN AMERICAN HALL (7470004), Solomon Douglas Band, Oct. 18 THE HOP!, Elektroween feat. The Sauce, DecibelKaos, SFD, Vexxem, DerpyDash, F3lon, Foxtale, Hapi, Dave Keset, Mac Mumble, Deane, Miraj, Oct. 18 KNITTING FACTORY, Passion Pit, The Joy Formidable, Oct. 18 NORTHERN QUEST, The Moody Blues, OCt. 18 NYNE, A Hairy Halloween feat. Nixon Rodeo, December in Red, Cross My Heart, Oct. 18 PACIFIC AVE PIZZA, AVEtoberFest feat The Winter War, Strange Mana, Oct. 18 GERMAN AMERICAN HALL (7470004), Glenn Crytzer and his Syncopators, Oct. 19 INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, The Avett Brothers, Nicholas David, Oct. 19 JONES RADIATOR, Jonathan Warren & The Billy Goats, Tyler Aker, Oct. 19 KNITTING FACTORY, Living Colour, Oct. 19 PACIFIC AVE PIZZA, AVEtoberFest feat. McDougall, Primal Shakes, Acoustic Noir, Oct. 19 THE HOP!, Monsters Scare You!, Victory Heights, Lion I Am, Measures, The Perservering Promist, Almost Home, Oct. 20 CARR’S CORNER, Sea Giant, Andrew Dempsen, Oct. 21

McCONKEY YOU HAVE ONE LIFE. LIVE IT.

OCTOBER 15th, 2013

BING CROSBY THEATRE

Doors open at 7 | Movie starts at 7:30

Tickets

The Sports Creel 12505 E Sprague Ave 924-2330 or TicketsWest.com

(509)

315 MARTINIS • 315 E. Wallace Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-9660 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BELLTOWER • 125 SE Spring St., Pullman • 509-334-4195 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division • 467-9638 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-9463 THE CENTER • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 433-7328 THE CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 South Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2467 CURLEY’S BAR & BISTRO • 26433 W. Hwy. 53, Hauser • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St. Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGAN’S • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROTHERS • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 315-8765 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague Ave. • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 4480887 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington St. • 315-8623 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th Ave. • 863-9313 MOON TIME • 1602 Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-2331 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague • 474-1621 O’SHAY’S • 313 Coeur d’Alene Lake Drive, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-4666 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne St. • 443-4103 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR • 20 N. Raymond Rd., Spokane Valley • 413-1894 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPLASH • 115 S. Second St., Coeur d’Alene • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W 5th Ave • 458-2337 VIKING BAR & GRILL • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 ZOLA • 22 W. Main • 624-2416

OCTOBER 10, 2013 INLANDER 49


MUSIC COLOR RUSH

Life in Color is billed as the world’s largest paint party. We’re not sure how many other paint parties there are happening around the planet, but it doesn’t really matter. The artistic/ electronic dance music/acrobatics/paint 3D extravaganza came to Spokane last year and was so successful it’s back again at the Spokane Arena this Friday, hoping to excite every person 16 and over enough to show up wearing white and get paint spray-gunned at them. Starting in college campuses in Florida, the event became so popular the show now tours worldwide. Perfect for those looking for something not so black and white. — LAURA JOHNSON Life in Color • Fri, Oct. 11 at 7 pm • $37-$60 • Ages 16+ • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • ticketswest.com • 325-7328

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

50 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2013

BENEFIT ZOMBIES FOR A CAUSE

LECTURE WHAT WOULD LINCOLN DO?

Walkers for the Cure • Sun, Oct. 13 at 6 pm • $5 minimum donation • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • bingcrosbytheater.com • 222-7638

Doris Kearns Goodwin • Tue, Oct. 15 at 7:30 am • $40 • Spokane Convention Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • whitworth.edu/ leadershipforum

The Bing Crosby Theater hosts a viewing party for The Walking Dead season four premiere, and fans of the undead-themed show are invited to help support the living in a fundraiser for Spokane’s Relay for Life (set for May 2014). Join in the family-friendly fun and sample special character-themed donuts from the popular zombie-themed donut shop Dawn of the Donut. The theater will be specially decorated, and attendees are encouraged to get dressed up for a zombie costume contest. The event also features the music of Patrick Dwyer, playing in zombie make-up. — KATELYN SMITH

If “presidential historian” seems like a dull vocation, you obviously missed Doris Kearns Goodwin retelling one of Abraham Lincoln’s outhouse jokes on The Colbert Report last fall. Her book, Team of Rivals, was the basis for Steven Spielberg’s Oscar-winning Lincoln, and she’s also written about Lyndon B. Johnson, Franklin and Eleanor Roosevelt and the Kennedys. Her new book about Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft comes out in less than a month. The Pulitzer Prize winner speaks at a breakfast lecture for Whitworth University’s fall President’s Leadership Forum. — LISA WAANANEN


THE SPOKANE SYMPHONY PRESENTS Classics

WELCOME TO ZUILL

Saturday, October 12 - 8pm Sunday, October 13 - 3pm Guest cellist Zuill Bailey Featuring Tchaikovsky/ Rococo Variations and Beethoven/ Symphony No. 7 sponsored by

Symphony SuperPops

SYMPHONY IDOL

Saturday, October 19 - 8pm THEATER WHO DONE IT?

In an entertaining approach to showing off the latest renovations at the Bing Crosby Theater, local arts patrons are invited to tour the historic venue during a special audience-participation, murder-mystery performance appropriately dubbed “Murder at the Bing.” The original performance, written by Jim Becker of the local Lion’s Share Theatre, takes the audience on a historically accurate journey through the Bing’s past, and to many areas of the theater most visitors don’t get to see, as they try to solve the murder that takes place at the beginning of the performance. Featuring a cast of local talent and a behind-the-curtain peek into the Bing’s past and present, the one-night show has limited tickets available. — CHEY SCOTT

Top Contestants Haley Scarnato (season 6), Matt Giraud (season 8) and LaKisha Jones (Season 6) Trio: Devil Went Down to Georgia LaKisha: I Will Always Love You Haley: My Heart Will Go On

509.624.1200

SPOKANESYMPHONY.ORG

ALL CONCERTS AT MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX

Murder at the Bing • Fri, Oct. 11 at 7:30 pm and 10 pm • $17-$20 • All-ages • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave • bingcrosbytheater.com • 325-7328

23;34)2

FREE

SEASONAL UNDEAD IN THE PARK

The second annual Haunted Zombie Hike kicks off the Halloween season as hiking enthusiasts and zombie lovers alike are asked to proudly march through Riverside State Park to be viscously attacked by our favorite form of the undead. Not only are the fake blood and guts impressive, but funds raised from the event also go to a good cause, supporting the popular state park. For visitors to the event, a Discover Pass isn’t required — just show up in warm, comfortable hiking clothes and shoes as the terrain can be a bit uneven, and be prepared for some fun and/or screaming. An adult must accompany all hikers under age 12, and pets need to be left at home. — EMERA L. RILEY Haunted Zombie Hike • Fri and Sat, Oct. 11-12, 18-19, 25-26 from 6:30-9:30 pm • $5 • Riverside State Park Equestrian Area • 3402 N. Aubrey L. White Parkway • riversidestatepark.org

Every Friday and Saturday from 6pm-11pm

Drive-In Movie Saturday at 8pm +,378&978)67 provided by FunFlicks Outdoor Movies

STATELINE, IDAHO

Corn Cannon • Helicopter Rides Food Concessions • Pumpkin Patch • Straw Maze Tractor Tire Playground and More!

CORN MAZE and

PUMPKIN PATCH

®

For d ate s and time s vis it: w w w.I n c red ib leCo rn M aze.c om 3405 North Beck Road • Hauser, Idaho • 83854 • Toll Free 855.855.MAZE OCTOBER 10, 2013 INLANDER 51


EVENTS | SEASONAL

Where to get lost in a cornfield or get freaked out for fun

Friday

BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE MAZE, 9919 E. Green Bluff Rd., 5-9 pm. (238-6970) COLVILLE CORN MAZE, 73 Oakshott Rd., 4-9 pm. (684-6751) CREEPY HALLOW, 6493 Hwy. 291, Nine Mile Falls, 7-11 pm. (2767728) HUB SPORTS CENTER CORN MAZE, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., 5-8 pm. (927-0602) SCARYWOOD HAUNTED NIGHTS, 27843 N. Hwy. 95, Athol, 7 pm-1 am. (208-683-3400) THE INCREDIBLE CORN MAZE, 3405 N. Beck Rd., Hauser, 5-11 pm. (855-855-6293)

Saturday

BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE MAZE, 9919 E. Green Bluff Rd., 10 am-9 pm. (238-6970) COLVILLE CORN MAZE, 73 Oakshott Rd., 11 am-9 pm. (684-6751)

CREEPY HALLOW, 6493 Hwy. 291, Nine Mile Falls, 7-11 pm. (2767728) HUB SPORTS CENTER CORN MAZE, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., 10 am-8 pm. (927-0602) SCARYWOOD, 27843 N. Hwy. 95, Athol. 7 pm-1 am. (208-6833400) THE INCREDIBLE CORN MAZE, 3405 N. Beck Rd., Hauser. 11 am-11 pm. (855-855-6293)

Sunday

BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE MAZE, 9919 E. Green Bluff Rd., 10 am-5 pm. (238-6970) COLVILLE CORN MAZE, 73 Oakshott Rd.., 11 am-9 pm. (684-6751) HUB SPORTS CENTER CORN MAZE, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., noon-5 pm. (927-0602) THE INCREDIBLE CORN MAZE, 3405 N. Beck Rd., Hauser, noon-5 pm. (855-855-6293) 

Whitworth Theatre presents

THE

Wakefield Mysteries

A M er r y al Romp Mediev

fr om

Creation to Nativity

Oct. 11, 12, 18, 19 at 7:30 p.m. and Oct. 13 at 2 p.m.

Cowles Auditorium | Whitworth University General admission: $8 | Student/senior (62-plus): $6 Tickets: Call 509.777.3707 or www.whitworth.edu/theatretickets

52 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2013

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

A LITTLE NIGHT MUSIC Annual fundraiser event benefiting the Women and Children’s Free Restaurant and Community Kitchen, featuring fine dining, auction, dancing and live music by the Sammy Eubanks Band. Oct. 11 from 6-10 pm. $75. Northern Quest, 100 N. Hayford Rd. (324-1995 x. 305) SIGNATURE CHEFS AUCTION Annual fundraiser event for the March of Dimes featuring an auction, food prepared by notable Inland Northwest chefs and beverages from local wineries and breweries. Oct. 12 at 6 pm. $150. Red Lion at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. marchofdimes.com OKTOBERFEST “ROARING TWENTIES” The EWU Libraries’ annual fundraiser features a ‘20s-era theme, including a catered dinner, drinks and more. Oct. 12 from 5-10:30 pm. $35. Eastern Washington University, JFK Library, Cheney campus. ewu.edu/oktoberfest (3596915) POOR MAN’S BRUNCH 28th annual open house and brunch meal to benefit Catholic Charities of Spokane’s House of Charity men’s homeless shelter’s sleeping program. Oct. 13 from 10 am-1 pm. Ticket prices TBA. House of Charity, 32 W. Pacific Ave. catholiccharitiesspokane.org (358-4250) HOUSEWARMING PARTY FOR FAYE’S HOUSE Open house and tours of the new facility to house cancer patients coming to Spokane for treatment. Oct. 13 from 1-4 pm. Free. Faye’s House, 7912 E. Woodland Park Dr. Free, donations accepted. becausethereishope.org (939-9672) GUARDIANS OF HOPE Annual breakfast benefiting Cancer Patient Care. Oct. 17 from 7:30-8:30 am. The Davenport Hotel, Grand Pennington Ballroom, 10 S. Post St. cancerpatientcare.org (4560446) THE PUMPKIN BALL Annual black-tie gala benefiting the Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital and the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery, featuring dinner, auction and entertainment. Oct. 19 at 5:30 pm. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. $150. thepumpkinball.org (474-2819) PEOPLE WHO CARE 11th annual fundraiser breakfast and luncheon benefiting Transitions for Women, serving women and children in the Inland Northwest. Oct. 23, breakfast at 7:30 am, lunch at noon. Free admission. Red Lion Inn at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. help4women.org (328-6702)

MASQUE-YOUR-AID BENEFIT 6th annual fundraiser gala benefiting Communities In Schools of Spokane County, a public school dropout-prevention organization, featuring food, drinks, and more. Oct. 25 from 6-9:30 pm. $50-$75. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. cisspokane.org (413-1436) YWCA WOMEN OF ACHIEVEMENT The 31st annual event features keynote speaker Leslie Morgan Steiner, author of the NYT best-selling memoir Crazy Love, recognizes local community leaders and raises funds to support women and children through YWCA programs. Oct. 30 from 11:30 am-1:30 pm. $125. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. ywcaspokane.org (789-9299) CELEBRITY FASHION SHOW Fashion show featuring local celebrities, luncheon, wine tasting, a silent auction and more to benefit Volunteers of America’s Hope House. Nov. 1 at 11 am. $45. Doubletree Hotel, 322 N. Spokane Falls Ct. voaspokane.org (624-2378) LINKING FAMILIES FOR LIFE 4th annual benefit dinner supporting Catholic Charities of Spokane’s CAPA (Childbirth and Parenting Assistance) program. Nov. 1 at 5:30 pm. $50. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside Ave. catholiccharitiesspokane.org (455-4986) EPICUREAN DELIGHT The 32nd annual black-tie gala event features 30 local wineries and breweries and more than 30 local restaurants, with proceeds benefiting the Inland NW Blood Center. Nov. 8 from 6 pm to midnight. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. epicureandelight.org (232-4567) FURR BALL The Spokane Humane Society’s annual fundraiser gala features silent and live auctions, dinner, dancing and adoptable pets. Nov. 23 at 6 pm. $125. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. spokanehumanesociety.org (467-5235) CRAB FEED AND AUCTION Crab feed dinner and auction benefiting local children’s organizations including the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery, Support Care and Networking (SCAN) and the Children’s Home Society of Washington. Dec. 7 at 4:30 pm. $65. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. downtownspokaneexchangeclub. com

COMEDY

STAND-UP COMEDY Local comedians. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy, 2721 N. Market St. (483-7300) OPEN MIC COMEDY Live stand-up com-

edy. Fridays at 8 pm. Free. Ages 21+. Chan’s Red Dragon, 1406 W. Third Ave. (838-6688) NO CLUE Audience-participation, murder-mystery comedy improv show. Fridays at 8 pm through October. $7-$9. Blue Door Theater, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) SAFARI Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) LIVE COMEDY Live stand-up comedy shows every Sunday at 9 pm. Free. Goodtymes Bar and Grill, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070) VICKI LAWRENCE & MAMA Live comedy show by the actress and comedian, in celebration of her character Thelma Harper “Mama’s” 40-year anniversary. Oct. 13 at 7:30 pm. $35-$55. Northern Quest, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (481-6700) SHORT STACKS Live improvised comedy show. Nov. 1 at 10 pm. $5. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045)

COMMUNITY

THURSDAY NIGHT DANCE Community dances featuring live music by local bands. Thursdays from 7:30-9:45 pm. $5.50. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. (535-0803) WOMEN AND CHILDREN’S FREE RESTAURANT Volunteers are needed as prep cooks, servers, dishwashers, food platers and more to work various shifts during the week, Mon-Fri. Positions are weekly or biweekly. Visit wcfrspokane. org to submit a volunteer application. (324-1995) COLVILLE CORN MAZE Pumpkin patch, corn maze and more. Through Oct. 31. Mon-Fri 4 pm to dusk, Fri 4-9 pm, SatSun 11 am-9 pm. $5-$7. Colville, Wash. colvillecornmaze.com (684-6751) SPOKANE FATHERHOOD PROJECT VOLUNTEERS NEEDED Fathers over age 30 are needed to mentor young fathers as part of the Spokane Fatherhood Project, a free service offered by Catholic Charities Spokane. Meets on Mondays from 5:30-7:30 pm. Location TBA. (4554966) SCARYWOOD Annual haunted nights Halloween-themed festival and walkthrough at Silverwood. Oct. 4-Nov. 1. Fri-Sat from 7 pm-1 am, Thu, Oct. 10, 17 and 24 from 6:30-11 pm, Nov. 1-2 from 7 pm-12 am. $21-$40. Silverwood Theme Park, Athol. scarywoodhaunt.com


SPOOKY SPOKANE Walking tours highlighting haunted areas and buildings in downtown Spokane. Oct. 10-25, Thu-Fri at 7 pm. $15. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200) FOLK FESTIVAL VOLUNTEERS Volunteers needed to help at the 18th Annual Fall Folk Festival (Nov. 9-10) to run kids’ activities and more. Sign up at spokanefolklore.volunteerhub.com RIVERPOINT HEALTH FAIR Annual “Highway to Health” fair, featuring glucose testing, cholesterol testing, flu shots, exercise testing, health screenings and more. Oct. 10 from 11 am-2 pm. Free. Riverpoint Campus, Phase 1 Building, 668 N. Riverpoint Blvd. (358-7528) BLANKET DRIVE New and gently used blanket donations accepted, along with sleeping bags, hats, winter coats, scarves, gloves and other winter clothing items. Donations accepted Mon, Tues and Thu from 9 am-1 pm. Our Place Ministry, 1509 W. College Ave. ourplacespokane.org (326-7267) INCREDIBLE CORN MAZE Three corn mazes, haunted maze (Oct.), drive-in movies (Saturdays in Oct. at 8 pm), pumpkin patch, concessions, games and more. Through Oct. 31, Fri 5-11 pm, Sat 11 am-11 pm, Sun noon-5 pm. Incredible Corn Maze, 3405 N. Beck Rd. (993-5242) HAUNTED ZOMBIE HIKE 2nd annual fundraiser event benefiting the Riverside State Park Foundation, featuring a scary hike through woods filled with zombies. Oct. 11-26, Fri-Sat from 6:30-9:30 pm. $5, no Discover Pass required. Riverside State Park Equestrian Area, 3402 N. Aubrey L. White Pkwy. (465-5064)

ACT SIX SCHOLARSHIP INFO Informational sessions on the YMCA’s Act Six Scholarship program. Oct. 12 from 9:3011 am, Whitworth Weyerhaeuser Building, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. actsix.org SPOKANE FIREFIGHTERS MEMORIAL AUCTION Benefit auction to raise funds for a visual tribute to fallen Spokane firefighters, featuring music, hors d’oeuvres and more. Oct. 12 from 7-11 pm. $15. Mukogawa Fort Wright Commons, 4000 W. Randolph Rd. (9983617) BULL-O-WEEN PARTY Dog costume party featuring Maddie the Gonzaga mascot, benefiting the Washington Basset Rescue and the Northwest Boxer Rescue. Oct. 12 from 6-8 pm. Free. George Gee Automotive, 21602 E. George Gee Ave., Liberty Lake. (2102000) SCIENCE SATURDAYS Program hosted by Mobius Science Center for kids in grades K-5. Oct. 12, 19, 26 and Nov. 2 and 9. Times and locations vary. Visit scld.org for complete schedule and locations. (893-8200) RIVER CITY MODELERS OPEN HOUSE Visitors can view the 40 ft. x 45 ft. double deck model railroad. Oct. 12-13, Sat 4-8 pm, Sun noon-4 pm. Free. River City Modelers, 1130 E. Sprague Ave. rivercitymodelers.org (535-3462) CRAFT FAIR Annual crafts, baked goods, raffle, concessions sale benefiting the Mt. Spokane HS music and dance programs. Oct. 12-13, Sat from 9 am-5 pm, Sun from 11 am-4 pm. $1 admission. Mt. Spokane High School, 6015 E. Mt. Spokane Park Dr.

SPOKANE TRAIN SHOW Hosted by the Inland NW Train Museum and River City Modelers, featuring operating model railroad layouts, vendors and more. Oct. 13 from 9:30 am-3:30 pm. $3-$6. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. (991-2317) GANG AWARENESS STRATEGIES Community workshop and discussion on realistic methods to addressing gangs within youth, presented by the Spokane Violent Crimes Gang Task Force. Oct. 15 from 6-8 pm, Messiah Lutheran Church, 4202 N. Belt St. spokanecops.org (8354572) MEDICARE BENEFIT WORKSHOP Community workshop on choosing a Medicare plan and more. Oct. 15 at 5 pm. Free. Care to Stay Home, 12810 E. Nora Ave. bellandersenfinancial.com (9931816) BETTER ME, BETTER MOMS Conference for women featuring workshops, speakers and local resources. Oct. 15 from 9 am-3 pm. Free. Family of Faith Community Church, 1504 W. Grace Ave. (8386092 x. 322) FEED THE NEIGHBORHOOD Free meals provided every Wednesday from 4:306 pm. Free. (Volunteers also needed to cook and serve meals) 7th and Catherine Ave., Post Falls, Idaho. (208-661-5166) INSURANCE EXCHANGE WORKSHOP Learn about the new Washington Healthfinder insurance exchange, including how to compare health plans, determine financial assistance eligibility and more. Oct. 16, Dec. 18 and Feb. 19 from 6-8 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main Ave. (893-8400)

FRAUD PREVENTION WORKSHOP Workshop on the tell-tale signs of scams, frauds and resources to keep your finances safe. Oct. 17 from noon1:30 pm. Free. Hayden Library, 8385 N. Government Way. stcu.org/workshops (208-619-4027) SWINGTOBERFEST Swing concerts, including performances by Solomon Douglas and Glenn Crytzer, dance workshops, and more. Oct. 18-20, times of events vary. Concerts, $20-$25. Full weekend of workshops and concerts, $165. German American Hall, 25 W. Third Ave. swingtoberfest.wix.com/ swingtoberfest TURNBULL COMMUNITY WORK PARTY Help restore riparian habitat to benefit birds and other species living on the wildlife refuge, hosted by the Lands Council and Audubon Society. Oct. 19 from 9 am-noon, potluck at noon. Preregistration requested. Turnbull NWR, 26010 S. Smith Rd., Cheney. (838-4912)

WEEKEND COUNTDOWN

Get the scoop on this weekend’s events with our newsletter. Visit Inlander.com/newsletter to sign up.

MEDICARE BENEFIT WORKSHOP Community workshop on choosing a Medicare plan and more. Oct. 22, 29, 31, Nov. 6, 7, 18, 26 and Dec. 3 at 1 pm and Nov. 5 at 1:30 and 5:30 pm. Free. BellAnderson Financial, 12309 E. Mirabeau Parkway. bellandersenfinancial.com (993-1816) SUPERFRIENDS PARTY Superhero-

themed Halloween party hosted by PJALS, with live music by the Angela Marie Project. Oct. 25 from 7-9 pm. Free. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. peacejustice.org (838-7870)

ETC.

AFFORDABLE CARE ACT (IDAHO) INFO A representative from “Your Health Idaho” will be on hand to answer questions about the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) open enrollment process. Oct. 8 at 6:30 pm, Post Falls Library. (208-7731506) Oct. 10 at 6:30 pm, Athol Library. (208-683-2979) TED TALK DISCUSSION GROUP Weekly discussion group on TED talks. Meets Wednesdays at 5:30 pm. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. chatham@labaratoryspokane.com ARGENTINE TANGO LESSONS Lessons for beginning to advanced dancers. Thursdays, lessons from 7-8 pm, dancing from 8-9 pm. $5/person. Spokane Woman’s Club, 1428 E. Ninth Ave. (5344617) PREVENT IDENTITY THEFT Learn to protect your finances in a workshop hosted by STCU. Oct. 10 from noon-1 pm. Free. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org (444-5307) WELLNESS CELEBRATION & RALLY “Everybody Needs a Hero” event featuring professional makeovers, runway show, keynote speaker Lyle Hatcher, silent auction, vendors and more, hosted by the E. Wash. Chapter of the Women’s Council of Realtors. Oct. 10 at 10 am. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (362-3362)

OCTOBER 10, 2013 INLANDER 53


EVENTS | FARMERS MARKETS

CHEWELAH FARMERS MARKET, Fri through Oct. 18 from 11:30 am5:30 pm. City Park, 600 N. Park St. (936-4353) COLVILLE FARMERS MARKET, Wed through Oct. from noon-5 pm. Stevens County Fairgrounds, 317 W. Astor. (732-6619) DEER PARK FARMERS MARKET, Thurs through Oct. from 4-7 pm. 412 W. Crawford. (979-1051) EMERSON-GARFIELD FARMERS MARKET, Fri through Oct. 18 from 3-7 pm. Knox Presbyterian, 806 W. Knox. (398-9628) HAYDEN FARMERS MARKET, Sat through Oct. 19. from 9 am-1:30 pm. Corner of Hwy. 95 and Prairie Ave.(208-772-2290) LIBERTY LAKE FARMERS MARKET, Sat through Oct. 12 from 9 am-1 pm. 1421 N. Meadowwood Ln. (879-4965) MOSCOW FARMERS MARKET, Sat through Oct. from 8 am-1 pm. Friendship Square. (208-883-7132) NE WASHINGTON FARMERS MAR-

KET, Wed and Sat through Oct. from 9 am-1 pm. Main & Astor, Colville. (517-414-0399) PULLMAN FARMERS MARKET, Wed through Oct. 16 from 3:30-6 pm. Spot Shop, 240 NE Kamiaken. (509-334-3565) RITTER’S FARMERS MARKET, Sat through Oct. from 11 am-5 pm. Ritter’s, 10120 N. Division St. (467-5258) SANDPOINT FARMERS MARKET, Sat through Oct. 12 from 9 am-1 pm; Wed from 3-5:30 pm. Farmin Park, Sandpoint. (208597-3355) SOUTH PERRY MARKET, Thurs through Oct. from 3-7 pm. The Shop, 924 S. Perry St. (720-8449) SPOKANE FARMERS MARKET, Sat through Oct. 30 from 8 am-1 pm; Wed from 8 am-1 pm. 20 W. Fifth Ave. (995-0182) WEST CENTRAL MARKETPLACE, Tues through mid-Oct. from 3-6 pm. A.M. Cannon Park, 1920 W. Maxwell Ave. (703-7433) 

EVENTS | CALENDAR BEYOND PINK 4th annual designer bra fashion show fundraiser to help pay for women to receive thermography breast scans. Oct. 11 from 5-9 pm. $35. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. beyondpink.net MOSCOW ZOMBIE WALK Seaonal fundrasier benefiting Palouse Habitat for Humanity, featuring a kids’ carnival, costume contest, zombie walk through downtown Moscow, horror short film screening and more. Oct. 11 starting at 4 pm. Walk at 6 pm. Admission by donation. Screenings at the Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St., Moscow. (208-882-4127) MINIATURES GAMING CONVENTION 9th annual tactical miniature gaming convention featuring gaming from various periods and types of combat. Oct. 11-13. $25-$35. CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Pl. tactical-solutions-gaming.tripod. com (208-882-0614) ARTS ANONYMOUS 12-step program for artists to explore, expand and receive support for their work in any media and at all skill levels. Meets Saturdays from 3-4:30 pm. Free. St. Luke’s Rehab Center, 711 S. Cowley. (280-0325) VETERANS ESTATE PLANNING CLINIC Free estate planning services and planning documents provided to veterans of the U.S. Armed Forces. Oct. 12 from 9 am-noon and 1-5 pm. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. Register online at wavetswillclinic.com/sign-up HOLISTIC FESTIVAL Healthy living fair featuring vendors, lectures and more. Oct. 12 from 10 am-6 pm. $6 admission. CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Pl. holisticfestivals.com (624-1865) SANTA DOLL WORKSHOP Artist Mary Lou Wayne leads a class to make a Santa character doll. Oct. 12 from 10 am-2 pm. $77. Ages 16+. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way, Uniontown, Wash. artisanbarn.org (229-3414) INLAND NW FREETHOUGHT SOCIETY The secular social group meets on the second Sunday of the month. Oct. 13 at 2 pm. Free. Shari’s, 320 N. Sullivan Rd. infreethought.org (216-4788) TWEEN CLUB Monthly activities for kids in grades 4-6. Oct. 15, Pumpkin Decorating; Nov. 19, Hands-on Science; Dec. 17, DIY Gifts. Third Tues at 4 pm. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8200) ZENTANGLE Introductory class on the relaxing method of creating structured patterns. Oct. 15 at 6 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St. (444-5331) FUNDRAISING FOR NONPROFITS Workshop for nonprofits on successful fund-

raising efforts. Oct. 15 from 9 am-6 pm. $75. The Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside Ave. (928-9664) CHILD ATTACHMENT WORKSHOP “When Attachment and Bonding Go Awry” workshop for parents, social workers, teachers, and other professionals working with children. Oct. 15 from 1-5 pm. $25. Film screening of “The Boarder” to follow at 8 pm, the Magic Lantern $7. Workshop at the Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. attachmentworkshopspokane.eventbrite.com SPOKANE PARANORMAL TEAM Presentation on paranormal investigations, phenomena, equipment used by the team and more. Oct. 15 at 6 pm. Deer Park Library, 208 S. Forest Ave. (8938300) STATE OF THE GREEN ECONOMY 5th annual panel on clean tech, climate change, job creation and more in the Spokane region and Washington state, with keynote speaker Gov. Jay Inslee. Oct. 16 from 3-6 pm. $20-$30. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. greaterspokane.org (321-3630) DINNER AMONG FRIENDS Monthly dinner and entertaiment series hosted by Young at Heart Seniors. Oct. 17 from 5-7 pm. $15, reservations requested. Skyway Café at Felts Field, 6105 E. Rutter Ave. nwdinneramongfriends@yahoo. com (238-9187) QUILT SHOW Annual quilt show hosted by the Spokane chapter, featuring 500+ quilts, vendors, demos and more. Oct. 18-20, Fri-Sat from 10 am-6 pm, Sun from 10 am-4 pm. $8 admission/all weekend. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. wsqspokane. org SMALL FARMS CONFERENCE 3rd annual conference on the theme of “Country Living with Purpose and Profitability” feat. 15 seminars, vendors and more. Oct. 19. $35-$60. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. sccd.org (535-7274) HOLISTIC PET CARE “Pet Health Care: The Holistic Approach” talk by Spokane veterinarian Dennis Thomas. Oct. 22 at 6:30 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St. (444-5331) PREVENT IDENTITY THEFT Learn to protect your finances in a workshop hosted by STCU. Oct. 23 from 5:30-6:30 pm. Free. Hillyard Library, 4005 N. Cook St. spokanelibrary.org (755-3980) BECOME DEBT FREE Workshop hosted by STCU. Oct. 24 from noon-1 pm. Free. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org (755-3980) INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL BASICS Learn

about what goes into planning an international adventure trip. Oct. 24 at 7 pm. Free. REI Spokane, 1125 N. Monroe St. (328-9900) PAMPER YOURSELF FOR PURPLE Facials, manicures, chair massages and more in recognition of Domestic Violence Awareness Month. Oct. 24 from 6:30-8 pm. Free, donations accepted. Pilgrim’s Market, 1316 N. Fourth St. (208-676-9730)

FESTIVAL

ART FROM THE HEART Community celebration of arts featuring workshops, kids’ programs, concerts and more. Oct. 3-12, times and locations of events vary. artsincda.org (208-292-1629) APPLE FESTIVAL Activities throughout Green Bluff’s member farms, including produce and fruit for sale, live music, local vendors, kids activities and more. Weekends through Oct. 27. Visit greenbluffgrowers.com for map of and hours for participating farms.

FILM

THE ACT OF KILLING Screening of the documentary on Indonesian gangsters who killed alleged communists in the country. Oct. 10 at 7 pm. $7. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main Ave. magiclanternspokane.com (209-2211) FAITH, FILM AND PHILOSOPHY “Bedazzled, The Devil and Freedom” lecture by Katherin Rogers, philosophy professor at the University of Delaware. Oct. 10 at 7 pm. Free. Whitworth University, Weyerhaeuser Hall. (592-0377) FAITH, FILM AND PHILOSOPHY “The Metaphysics of Elfland” lecture by Michael Foley, professor of patristics at Baylor University. Oct. 11 at 7 pm. Free. Gonzaga, Jepson Center, 502 E. Boone Ave. (592-0377) BANFF RADICAL REELS Screening of the touring action sports film festival. Oct. 11 at 7 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. panida.org (208-2639191) RADICAL REELS TOUR Screening of the annual Banff Centre’s winter action sports films. Oct. 12 at 7 pm. $15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) GIRL RISING Documentary on the impact of women’s education in different parts of the world. Oct. 12-13, show times vary. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St., Moscow. (208-882-4127) WALKING DEAD SEASON 4 PREMIERE

Washington State Quilters - Spokane Chapter proudly presents its

35th Annual Quilt Show

A Cottage in the Country Sherry Thompson Featured Quilter

South Spokane

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October 18 - 20, 2013 • Merchant Mall • Enjoy 600 Quilts • Quilter’s Boutique • Hoffman Quilt Exhibit • Master Quilter Demos

www.wsqspokane.org Spokane County Fair & Expo Center 404 N. Havana, Spokane Valley

$8.00 All 3 Days • Free Parking • Children under 11 free


Bellezzaspokane.com

Screening of the hit show’s fourth season premiere episode, benefiting Spokane’s Relay for Life fundraiser. Oct. 13 at 7 pm. $5. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) AMERICAN WINTER Documentary on eight families struggling to get by since the Great Recession of the late-aughts, hosted by PJALS, the Center for Justice and other local organizations. Oct. 14 at 6:30 pm. $10 suggested donation to benefit Operation Healthy Family. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) MCCONKEY Documentary about the career of Shane McConkey, freeskiing pioneer and ski base-jumper. Oct. 15 at 7:30 pm. $10. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) SPIFF PROFESSOR FILM SERIES Screening of “Amélie” with Leonard Oakland of Whitworth University. Oct. 16 at 7 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. spokanefilm.org (227-7638) YOGAWOMAN Screening of the film as part of the “Food for Thought” film series. Oct. 16 at 7 pm. Free. Kenworthy Performing Arts Centre, 508 S. Main St., Moscow. moscowfood.coop (208-8828537) SUDS & CINEMA Screening of “Dazed & Confused” as part of the Inlander’s film and local beer showcase featuring NoLi Brewhouse. Oct 17 at 6:30pm. Movie shows at 7:30pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater. com FROM SPOKANE WITH LOVE Premiere of a film about a local delegation from Spokane who went to Iran to bridge the gap of stererotypes and cultural misinformation. Oct. 17 at 7 pm. $20, proceeds benefit PJALS. Magic Lantern, 25 W. Main Ave. peacejustice.org (838-7870) GIRL RISING Screening of the documentary on women’s/girls’ education issues. Oct. 21 at 1 pm. Free. SFCC Bldg. 15, 3410 Ft. George Wright Dr. Oct. 22 at 1 pm, SCC Bldg. 16, 1810 N. Greene St. (5334113) GIRL RISING Screening of the documentary on women’s/girls’ education issues. Oct. 23 at 1 pm. Free and open to the public. EWU Monroe Hall, Cheney Campus. (359-2829) A FORCE MORE POWERFUL Screening of the documentary on nonviolent protests, followed by a discussion led by Liz Moore, director of PJALS and Eastern’s Activist-in-Residence for winter quarter 2014. EWU Monroe Hall, Cheney Cam-

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E. 911 Marietta (East of Hamilton)

Mon-Fri 8-5 • Sat 8-4

pus. (359-2829) SPIFF HALLOWEEN FILM SCREENING Screening of a to-be-announced Halloween-themed film, hosted by SpIFF. Oct. 25. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. spokanefilm.org (327-1050)

FOOD

WINE RELEASE PARTY Release of the 2007 Vintage Seven Hills Vineyard Cabernet Sauvignon featuring tastings, refreshements and music by Carlos Aldean. Oct. 10 from 6:30-8:30 pm. Admission is a $10 donations to the local food bank. Grande Ronde Cellars, 906 W. Second Ave. (455-8161) FALL INGREDIENT COOKING Cooking class focusing on whole, plant-based ingredients. Oct. 10 from 6-8:30 pm. $15, registration required. Pilgrim’s Market, 1316 N. Fourth St. (208-676-9730) SANDPOINT HARVEST WINE WALK Month-long event taking place around Sandpoint, featuring free tastings from local breweries and wineries and downtown restaurants, live music, activities and more. Runs through Nov. 2. For event schedule and more information visit dinearoundsandpoint.com BORDEAUX WINE TASTING Wine tasting class featuring wines from Bordeaux, France. Oct. 10 from 6:30-8:30 pm. $25, reservations required in-store. Total Wine & More, 9980 N. Newport Hwy. (466-1644) COFFEE POUR COMPETITION Handbrewed coffee competition with judging on aroma, flavor, aftertaste and other characteristics, with prizes for 1st-3rd place. Oct. 11 from 7:30-10:30 pm. Free. Indaba Coffee, 1425 W. Broadway Ave. (443-3566) WINE TASTING Tasting with Tamarack Cellars, Oct. 11 from 3-6:30 pm. $10. Craft hard cider tasting Oct. 12 from 2-4:30 pm. $5. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington St. (838-1229) GLOBAL WINE SHOWDOWN Blind wine tasting of Washington wines vs. Italian wines. Oct. 11 at 7 pm. $20, reservations required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) SOUP FOR THE SOUL Participating restaurants are donating a portion of proceeds from sales of soup to supports Providence’s Arts in Healing program. Wednesdays from Oct. 2-30. For participating restaurants visit washington. providence.org/events CUISINE FOR CRITTERS Twenty percent of the proceeds of food and drink sales is donated to SpokAnimal. Oct. 16 from

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11 am-2 am. Happy hour from 4-8 pm, triva, prizes and adoptable pets from 6-8 pm. Monterey Café, 9 N. Washington St. spokanimal.org (534-8133) CLASS FOR THE SERIOUS FOODIE Cooking class on new techniques for culinary creativity with Chef Adam Hegsted. Oct. 17 from 6-8 pm. $50. Orlando’s, SCC, 1810 N. Greene St. incaafterdark.scc. spokane.edu CHOCOLATE THERAPY Annual chocolate and wine dinner event, featuring a four-course dinner using chocolate as a main ingredient. Oct. 17 from 6-10 pm. $32. The Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. thelincolncenterspokane.com (3278000) ARGENTINE WINE ADVENTURE Sample wines from the South American country. Oct. 18 at 7 pm. $20, reservations required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) ARTISAN TAMALES Cooking class with Chef Colomba of Café Carambola. Oct. 22 at 5:30 pm. $50. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. (208-457-8950) TAPAS COOKING Learn to make three Spanish-style small plates including stuffed peppers, baked asparagus and more. Oct. 23 from 6-8 pm. $50. Orlando’s, SCC, 1810 N. Greene St. incaafterdark.scc.spokane.edu REVELRY WINE DINNER Quarterly winemaker’s dinner as part of the Connoisseur’s Club, featuring a four-course dinner paired with wines from Revelry Vintners. Oct. 25 at 6 pm. $55. The Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. thelincolncenterspokane.com (327-8000)

MUSIC

BLAZE & KELLY Singer-songwriter concert. Oct. 10 at 7:30 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. panida.org (208-263-9191) MARIA IN THE SHOWER Cabaret-style concert. Oct. 10 at 7:30 pm. $15-$20. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. thejacklincenter. org (208-457-8950) HEART Rock concert. Oct. 11 at 7:30 pm. $60. Beasley Coliseum, 225 N. Grand Blvd., Pullman. ticketswest.com LIFE IN COLOR Electronic dance music paint party. Oct. 11 at 7 pm. $37-$60. Ages 16+. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000) COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY “Picture This!” concert featuring the Whitworth University Orchestra. Oct. 11 at 7:30 pm,

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RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess SOCIAL NOTWORKING

My 40-something younger brother has been “friending” my hot female friends on Facebook, women I have befriended in real life whom he’s never even met! I said nothing at first. Then, one of these women posted a photo of herself, and I commented on it in a flirtatious way. Up pops my brother, commenting on my comment in a way that killed her ability to respond to me and adding a personal message to me, “Hey, bro, call me when you’re up.” I was upset that he’d butted into my conversation with her, and I don’t think AMY ALKON her page is a place for him to leave messages to me. I asked him to remove his comment, and he was upset and insulted. Shouldn’t etiquette standards apply online, too? If I’m having a face-to-face conversation with someone, it’s considered rude to just walk up and butt in. And, isn’t it a little creepy that my brother trolls my Facebook page and “friends” women he’s never met? —Invaded Facebook brings a lot of people closer, like the hot women you’ve gone to the trouble of developing friendships with in real life and your brother, who’s gone to the trouble of paying his electric bill and turning on his computer. Hot women on the Internet — those who don’t take credit cards for their friendship — can be pretty guarded. Luckily, your brother shares your last name, so instead of your hot friends seeing his friend request and thinking “Eek, who’s this perv?” they probably think something like, “Oh, how adorable. Joe Blow has a little brother, Bo Blow.” As unfair as it seems that your brother logged in to Facebook and sat there in his underwear helping himself to a salad bar of your female friends, you seem to have misunderstood something about the nature of Facebook conversations. “Facebook” is not the name of a romantic restaurant where you’ve booked a table for two. You’re having these flirtatious exchanges at a “table” for, oh, 547 of a woman’s closest friends — along with any “friends” she might’ve made through those friends. This might explain why they call it “social networking” and not “social isolation.” No, your brother shouldn’t turn some woman’s Facebook page into the digital version of the write-on/wipe-off board your mom used to have by the kitchen phone. Because he got to this woman through you, this makes you look bad by association. So, you aren’t wrong to want him to change his message-leaving behavior, and you can call dibs if there’s one particular woman you’re putting the moves on. But telling someone what to do, even when a demand is phrased as a request (to remove the comment, in this case), generally doesn’t inspire him to say, “Right, I was a jerk. I’ll change, pronto!” It makes him angry, hurt, and defensive. A more effective approach is telling him you feel bad about something he’s doing, evoking his sympathy. That’s probably your best bet for getting him to back off a bit from your Facebook harem, considering it’s a little late to put your privacy settings on lockdown and way late to take the age-old approach to brotherly conflict resolution: “Maaaaa! Bo’s stealing all my hotties — just like he stole my firetruck 45 years ago!”

BATTLE OF THE DIVULGE

My boyfriend won’t “friend” my friends or relatives on Facebook. He says he doesn’t want to worry about censoring his posts or friends’ comments. Well, I have a handful of friends, and now a brother and a cousin, who’ve told me that he never responded to their friend request, and I worry that they’ll think he is rude or doesn’t like them. —Bothered Your boyfriend probably prefers your brother remember him for the wonderful way he helped your granny and not for how he looks in that photo his friend likes to post — the one where he’s passed out on someone’s bathroom floor with a bra draped across his chest and “Princess” written across his face with a Sharpie. Although privacy is reportedly dead, it’s his right to be one of those holdouts who refuses to be a 24-hour gas station of personal information. The problem comes in his ignoring your friends and family — tossing their friend requests in the Internet landfill with all the personal messages from African warlords with $19 million in diamonds to share with a trustworthy total stranger. Tell your boyfriend you’re afraid feelings are getting hurt, and suggest he message people back with something like, “Thanks, but I mainly use Facebook to stay in touch with a few old friends. Hope to see more of you in real life.” It’s gracious but boundary-maintaining, and if you break up, his lack of connectedness should provide a healthy barrier between him and explosive revelations about your new boyfriend, such as what he had for lunch. n ©2013, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

56 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2013

EVENTS | CALENDAR WYLIE & THE WILD WEST Country concert feat. cowboy yodeling, benefiting the Bonner County Fairgrounds. Oct. 11 at 7 pm. $5-$20. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Ave., Sandpoint. (208-263-4414) CHELY WRIGHT Concert by the country singer in celebration of National Coming Out Day. Oct. 11 at 5:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Riverpoint Phase 1 Building, 412 E. Spokane Falls Blvd. (359-7870) SPOKANE SYMPHONY Classics Series: “Welcome to Zuill” feat. Zuill Bailey on cello. Oct. 12 at 8 pm, Oct. 13 at 3 pm. $15-$54. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) THE DIGITAL AGE Faith-based concert. Oct. 13 at 6 pm. $10-$15. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd., CdA. kroccda. org (208-667-1865) UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO CHOIRS Performances by the men’s, women’s and university chorus. Oct. 13 from 3-5 pm. $3-$5. University of Idaho, Lionel Hampton Music Bldg., 1010 Blake Ave. uidaho.edu (208-885-7251) JAMES REID GUITAR RECITAL Solo recital by the professor at the University of Idaho’s Lionel Hampton School of Music. Oct. 13 at 4 pm. $10 requested donation. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. (838-4277) GONZAGA SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Concert featuring guest soprano Arianna Zukerman. Oct. 14 at 7:30 pm. $10-$13. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200) RUBY DEVINE Concert by the local musician. Oct. 14 at 6 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org (444-5331) NIC CHORALE “Across the Vast Eternal Sky” concert featuring the NIC Cardinal Chorale and Chamber Singers. Oct. 15 at 7:30 pm. CdA First Presbyterian Church, 521 E. Lakeside Ave. SPOKANE SYMPHONY SuperPops Series: “Symphony Idol” feat. former American Idol finalists. Oct. 19 at 8 pm. $26-$62. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) THE AVETT BROTHERS Rock/folk concert. Oct. 19 at 8 pm. $35-$45. Allages. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000) SPOKANE STRING QUARTET 35th season opening concert “Counterculture.” Oct. 20 at 3 pm. $12-$20. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200) JOE SATRIANI Concert by the acclaimed rock guitarist. Oct. 21 at 7:30 pm. $35-$68. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200) MACKLEMORE & RYAN LEWIS Hiphop/rap concert. Oct. 23 at 8 pm. $33$45. All-ages. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. (325-7328) PATRICIA BARBER TRIO The acclaimed jazz trio performs a concert hosted by SFCC Jazz. Oct. 25 at 8 pm. $15-$20. SFCC Music Building Auditorium, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. ticketswest. com (533-3741) SPOKANE SYMPHONY Classics Series: “Angels Are Among Us” feat. the Spokane Symphony Chorale. Oct. 26 at 8

pm, Oct. 27 at 3 pm. $15-$54. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. (624-1200) STYX Rock concert. Oct. 27 at 7:30 pm. $25-$75. Clearwater River Casino, 17500 Nez Perce Rd., Lewiston. ticketswest.com (208-298-1400)

PERFORMANCE

NORTHWEST SUPPER CLUB Variety show performances in a dinner-theater format, featuring local musicians and performers. Oct. 15 at 7:30 pm. $10. The Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. nwsupperclub.com MARTHA REDBONE ROOTS PROJECT Cultural music concert. Oct. 18 at 7:30 pm. $10-$20. WSU Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, Pullman Campus. ticketswest.com (328-7328) A NIGHT OF EDGAR ALLAN POE “From Page to Stage” theatrical interpretations of Poe’s work performed by Lake City Playhouse. Oct. 19 at 8 pm. $15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7638) THE NUTCRACKER Ballet performed by the State Street Ballet, musical score by the Spokane Symphony. Dec. 5-8, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm. $25-$75. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200)

SPORTS

SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS Ping-pong club meets on Saturdays from 1-4 pm and Mondays and Wednesdays from 7-9:30 pm. $2/visit; open to the public. North Park Racquet Club, 8121 N. Division. spokanetabletennis.com (768-1780) TABLE TENNIS TOURNAMENT 2013 Spokane Ultimate Table Tennis Tournament, a four-star USATT-sanctioned event. Oct. 12-13. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave., Liberty Lake. hubsportscenter.org (927-0602) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS CLUB Pingpong club meets Sundays from 1:30-4 pm and Wednesdays from 6:30-9 pm. $2/visit. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. (4563581) SPOKANE BADMINTON CLUB The club meets on Sundays from 4:30-7 pm and Wednesdays from 7-10 pm. $6/visit. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. info@spokane.northwestbadminton.org (448-5694) SPOKANE VALLEY TABLE TENNIS Club meets on Mondays from 1-3 pm and Tuesdays from 8:30-10:30 am. CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Place, Spokane Valley. (924-9480) SPOKANE CHIEFS Hockey game vs. Swift Current Broncos. Oct. 16 at 7:05 pm. $10-$22. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (2797000) SPOKANE CHIEFS Hockey game vs. Everett Silvertips. Oct. 18 at 7:05 pm. $10-$22. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (2797000) SPOKANE CHIEFS Hockey game vs. Victoria Royals. Oct. 19 at 7:05 pm. $10-$22. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (2797000) FOURTH FRIDAY PUB PEDDLERS Meets the fourth Friday of the month. Oct. 25 at 7 pm, departs at 8 pm. The

Swamp, 1904 W. Fifth Ave. pubpeddlers.blogspot.com (922-3312) SPOKANE CHIEFS Hockey game vs. Brandon Wheat Kings. Oct. 25 at 7:05 pm. $10-$22. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. (279-7000)

THEATER

BRIGHTON BEACH MEMOIRS Broadway comedy by Neil Simon. Through Oct. 12, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, except Sept. 27 at 6:30 pm, Sat matinees at 2 pm on Sept. 21, 28 and Oct. 5, 12. Sun at 2 pm. No performances on Oct. 3, 4. $12-$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. interplayerstheatre.org (455-7529) LES MISÉRABLES Stage musical adaptation of the Victor Hugo novel. Through Oct. 27, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $26-$33. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) ORDINARY TIME Drama/satire by Spokane-based playwright Sandra Hosking. Through Oct. 13, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $8-$10. Hartung Theatre, University of Idaho, Moscow. uidaho.edu/theatre (208-885-7212) ANYTHING GOES Performance of the Tony Award-winning musical as part of the Best of Broadway series. Oct. 10-13, times vary. $33-$73. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000) SACAGAWEA Interpretive dramatization benefiting the SFCC Revelers Club. Oct. 10 at 7:30 pm. $10. SFCC Spartan Theater, 3410 Ft. George Wright Dr. (533-3222) THE COUNSELOR Performed by Sandpoint Onstage. Through Oct. 12, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm. $10-$12. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208263-9191) AX OF MURDER Performance of three one-act murder-mystery plays performed in a dinner theater format. Oct. 11-12 and Oct. 18-19, dinner at 6:30 pm, show at 7:30 pm $12-$25. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy. 211 off Hwy. 2, Newport, Wash. circlemoon.webs.com (208448-1294) ENTER FAIRY GODMOTHER A fairy godmother gives lesser-known folktales a magical twist. Through Oct. 20, Fri-Sun, show times vary. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia St. (328-4886) MURDER AT THE BING Murder-mystery show performed by the Lion’s Share Theatre featuring audience-participation activities and theater tours. Oct. 11 at 7:30 pm and 10 pm. $17-$20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) THE WAKEFIELD MYSTERIES Modern adaptation of the medieval English mystery. Oct. 11-19, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $6-$8. Whitworth University, Cowles Auditorium, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-3707) IT WAS A DARK & STORMY NIGHT Thriller/mystery drama performed by StageWest Community Theater. Oct. 11-27, Fri-Sat at 7 pm except Oct. 26 at 6 pm, preceded by dinner. Sun at 3 pm, Oct. 13 and 27. $10-$12, $25 dinner theater. Emmanuel Lutheran Church, 6399 Elm St., Cheney. (235-2441) REUNION WITH MURDER Murder-mystery dinner theater performance. Oct. 11-12 and Oct. 25-26 at 6:30 pm. $25. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St., Metaline


Falls, Wash. cuttertheatre.com DEATH BY CHOCOLATE A “whodunit” comedy performance. Oct. 18-27, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway Ave. libertylaketheatre.com (342-2055) SHERLOCK HOLMES Mystery/drama. Oct. 18-27, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $8-$10. Theater Arts for Children, 2114 N. Pines Rd., Ste. 3. theaterartsforchildren.org (995-6718) CARRIE THE MUSICAL Performance of the musical adaptation of the classic Stephen King tale, by Lilac City Performing Arts. Oct. 23-24 at 7:30 pm. $20-$25. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (953-2979) THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK Drama featuring former 1993 cast member Tracey Vaughan (playing Anne) as director. Oct. 24-Nov. 2, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm. Post-show discussions Oct. 25 and 31. Free. North Idaho College, Schuler Auditorium, 1000 W. Garden Ave. (208676-1667) SECOND SAMUEL Comedy. Oct. 25-Nov. 24, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $22. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. (325-2507)

VISUAL ARTS

MAPPING THE SPOKANE RIVER Gallery installation and community project featuring photos, stories, samples of river water from community members and more. Through Oct. 18. Lecture and reception Oct. 18 at 11:30 am. SFCC Fine Art Gallery, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. sfccfinearts.org

JAN CLIZER “Looking Across the Pond to Scotland” featuring paintings by the local artist and Celtic fiddler. Through Nov. 1. Gallery hours Mon-Fri from 10 am-5 pm. Free. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) ARTWALK Monthly art showcase throughout downtown galleries and businesses. Oct. 11 from 5-8 pm. Free. Downtown Coeur d’Alene. artsincda.org (208-292-1629) ALLEN & MARY DEE DODGE 88 new works by the couple, residents of Coeur d’Alene, alongside works by Mary Frances Dondelinger. Oct. 11-Nov. 2, artist reception Oct. 11 from 5-8 during ArtWalk. The Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. (208-765-6006) DAN KIESSLING Abstract painting exhibition. Oct. 12-Nov. 2, artist reception Oct. 12 from 1-3 pm, followed by an artist dinner from 5:30-7:30 pm. Exhibition is free and open to the public. Bank Left Gallery, 100 S. Bridge St., Palouse. bankleftgallery.com (878-8425) LET’S PAINT Children’s art class with artist Tresia Oosting on exploring color, drawing and studying famous artists. Tuesdays from through Oct. 29 from 1-2 pm or 4-5 pm. $12/class. Ages 4-7. Spokane Art School, 809 W. Garland Ave. spokaneartschool.net (325-3001) DRAWING CLASS Basic traditional drawing skills class teaching line, structure, value/shading and composition. Through Oct. 23, Wednesdays from 4:30-6 pm. $128/session or $32/class. Ages 15+. 1912 Center, 412 E. Third St., Moscow. (208-669-2249)

COMIC ART INDIGENE A Native American exhibit from the New Mexico Museum of Indian Art. Oct. 18-Dec. 1. Exhibit reception and lecture Oct. 18 from 5-8 pm. Prichard Art Gallery, 414 S. Main St. (208-310-1231)

WORDS

SPOKANE IS READING Annual literacy event featuring presentations by best-selling author Maria Semple, of “Where’d You Go, Bernadette” Oct. 10 at 1 pm, Spokane Convention Center. Also at 7 pm at CenterPlace Event Center, Spokane Valley. spokaneisreading. org (444-5307) MARY BROOKS Reading and signing of “Gladys: An American Story.” Oct. 10 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) COMING OUT POETRY SLAM Event celebrating National Coming Out Day, hosted by the Pride and Women’s Studies centers. Oct. 10, time and location TBA. EWU, Cheney. (359-2829) JOHNNY CHAPMAN Poetry reading and signing of the collection “Unremembered Wings.” Oct. 11 from 6:30-9 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) LIZA BLEY Reading, discussion and signing of “Not Your Mother’s Meatloaf: A Sex Education Comic Book.” Oct. 12 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) ELDON TAYLOR Reading by the NYT best-selling author. Oct. 12 at 1 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint. panida.org (208-263-9191)

CHRISTINE BYL Reading and book signing by the author of “Dirt Work.” Oct. 14 at 7 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. (208-882-2669) DORIS KEARNS GOODWIN The Pulitzer Prize-winning presidential historian presents at Whitworth’s fall President’s Leadership Forum. Oct. 15 at 7:30 am. $40/person. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. whitworth.edu/leadershipforum (777-4974) NANCE VAN WINCKEL The award-winning author will read from her published works. Oct. 15 from noon-1 pm. Free and open to the public. North Idaho College, Writing Center, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu (208-769-3337) JEANA MOORE The author and walker shares stories of her hikes across American and Europe, enrolling potential bone marrow donors. Oct. 16 at 7 pm. Free. REI Spokane, 1125 N. Monroe St. (328-9900) THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF GENDER Lecture on the “Feminine Devine” by Bonny Bazemore. Oct. 16 from noon-12:50 pm. Free and open to the public. EWU Monroe Hall, Cheney Campus. (359-2829) YOU ARE NEXT YOUNG AUTHOR TOUR Featuring teen literature authors Cat Patrick, Sean Beaudoin, Martha Brockenbrough and Kevin Emerson. Oct. 18. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) DAVE RAMSEY LIVE “The Legacy Journey” live presentation by the financial author and motivational speaker. Oct. 17 at 7 pm. $50-$70. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000)

SARAH CONOVER The author will read from and discuss her latest book “Muhammad: The Story of a Prophet and Reformer.” Oct. 17 at 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) JOYCE WILKENS The author of the photo coffee-table book will sign copies of her book. Oct. 17 from 2:30-5:30 pm, Second Look Books, and from 5:307 pm at Forza Coffee Co., 2829 E. 29th Ave. joycewilkens.com BOLD SPIRITED TRAVELERS Authors Jim and Linda Hunt present from their books, “Restless Fires” and “Bold Spirit” about John Muir and Helga Estby. Oct. 17 at 7 pm, North Spokane branch, Oct. 19 at 2 pm, Argonne branch, Oct. 20 at 2 pm, Cheney branch and Oct. 24 at 7 pm, Spokane Valley branch. scld.org (893-8200) JULIA STRONKS Lindaman Chair Lecture “Civil Rights for the Gay Community and Religious Freedom: Avoiding a Constitutional Clash.” Oct. 17 at 7 pm. Free and open to the public. Whitworth, Robinson Teaching Bldg., 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-4937) JAAK PANKSEPP The local author will read from and discuss his book “The Archaeology of the Mind.” Oct. 17 at 7 pm. Free. BookPeople, 521 S. Main St., Moscow. (208-882-2669) LET’S TALK ABOUT GIRLS PANEL Panel and discussion hosted by the JFK Library and the Women’s Studies Center. Oct. 17 from noon-12:50 pm. Free and open to the public. JFK Library Atrium, EWU Cheney Campus. (359-2829) 

OCTOBER 10, 2013 INLANDER 57


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39. Pricy boxing match tickets ... or something to find in four places in this puzzle’s grid 41. Home to billions 42. Have a quiet dinner, say 44. “24” agent Jack 45. Oklahoma’s “Wheat Capital” 46. Washington airport named for two cities 51. Teacher’s advanced deg. 53. UFO crew 54. Hair curl 56. Fanatic 58. Perplex 59. Forest gaps 65. “Old Time Rock & Roll” singer 66. The facts of life? 67. “From ____ shining ...” 68. ____ v. Wade 69. Craving 70. Risky rendezvous

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Hooters 22. Online feed letters 23. Word with grand or soap 24. Their business is always picking up 26. Five Nations tribe

27. Dodger or Yankee, e.g. 30. Salon job, for short 32. Actresses Graff and Kristen 34. Green org.? 35. “Do ____ favor ...”

36. Whiten 37. Clear wrongs 38. In ____ (agitated) 40. One often seen revolving around Venus? 43. Burns and Bradley 44. Pre-A.D. 46. Many telenovela viewers: Abbr. 47. Quilt filler 48. Words following touch or stop 49. Southern dairy company since 1925 50. Tiger or Twin, in brief 52. Limp Bizkit lead singer Fred 55. Frozen dessert chain since 1981 57. Echelon 60. Piece of fiction 61. Lo-o-o-ong time 62. Aye’s opposite 63. Some sporty cars 64. Boozehound


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60 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2013

I Saw You

Cheers

Cheers

Cheers

Stepping Out Of The BarYou must be the only other social worker in town that likes wine besides me. You looked smart, and well put together in your glasses and salmon colored shirt. I always dreamt that I would have a fun co-worker like you. And now we work together. I was the late redhead with the effed up haircut, wanting you to help me organize my paperwork. If you read this, would you consider going for wine? I’ll be at the goat on Tuesday

Army nurse who helped me after I fell on the sidewalk at the SE corner of 1st and Monroe on September 23rd about 11:20 a.m. You helped me get back on my feet when I couldn’t get up by myself, you helped me stop the bleeding, you called 911 and best of all you stayed with me until the emergency crew from Fire Station 4 arrived. My heartfelt thanks to each of you. Truly you went above and beyond. Thanks also to the emergency crew who patched me up and got me on my way. Thanks to all of you for your help. Ron

anymore. I don’t know what’s currently going on in your life right now but I hope I hear from you so that we can talk some more. Truth be told, I think getting to know you better would be one of the best things that ever happened to me. Anthony

Coffee AffectionsTo the person who sent the Cheers several weeks ago to the baristas who make your 12 cream - 12 sugar coffees: Cheers to YOU for openly admitting your strange coffee affections. That takes balls, especially in a world of caffeine-crazed addicts. If I drank coffee, I would definitely as for 12 creams and 12 sugars, too.

Greene Street BridgeThank you to the driver of the red Ford truck who let me in on the morning of September 24th. I was afraid I’d never get to work on time with all the traffic, but your kind gesture

Thank You!To the kind person who found my Kindle on Alaska Airlines and turned it in. Thanks! I couldn’t thank you in person, so I made a donation to the American Red Cross to pay it forward. May karma bless you.

Noodle ExpressNoodle Express on Sullivan in Spokane Valley (Tuesday) 10/1/13 at around 4:30. Pretty woman with blond hair, white shirt and blue jeans... Having a bud light with your noodles. I sat in the corner booth behind you with my young son... Your smile was amazing I was wondering if you were single... ? Coffee? Dinner? AT&T StoreI saw you at the AT&T store in the Riverfront Mall Saturday night. You helped my friend try to figure out her phone situation. I was holding her daughter and kept trying not to smile too big. You’re quite tall and handsome. Wearing a work sweater vest. You were so kind to us and I’d love to grab coffee sometime if you’re interested. The world needs more kind guys like you! I believe your name started with a C. lostinmymind5@yahoo. com

Cheers Cheers to Mr. BarrettWe’re sorry you moved away. We miss you. Love your Lidgerwood Neighbors. I Love You For Being YouYou make me feel like a very special girl. I love the way that the day we meet “we clicked.” Feel in love with each other and since then have been a happy couple.We have both been down rough roads, but we hold each others hand and walk through all the challenges in life we face together. I love everyday being with you. I love going place’s as a family. I enjoy every moment we spend together. You mean the world to me. You came in my life at the right time, I’m so bless to say you are “my best friend, my lover”. You make everything go smooth when rocks get in the road. I want to thank you for your unconditional love and support through everything. You are my hero and always will be. You make me feel like I can be myself and shine my life away to the goals I have in my life! Thanks for being you! I love you from the bottom of my heart! Always and forever! Micheel & Mr. Man To All That Helped MeCheers to the two beautiful young women and the wonderful young man who introduced himself as a former

To connect

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” helped me get there on time. I have no idea if you read the Inlander or not, but I’ll do my best to pay it forward. Anyone else who reads this, keep in mind that taking only 10 seconds to help out a stranger can sometimes go a long way. Standing In Front Of YouYou and I have been friends for a couple months now. We have met up 3 times, and I have to say I like you. Through all of our texts and back and fourth chats, I have grown fond of you, and I think I’m starting to fall for you. you always say you are looking for a girl, and you think you will never find someone, however, if you look a little harder, I think you will find that you have found me. God bless you, I love you B. Keep SmilingCheers blondie....just thought I would send a shout out to my best friend and girlfriend. I know you are going through so much right now, but I am here for you. I promise everything will get better and on the up and up, it will because you are an amazing person and amazing girlfriend... plus RedDog is up above watching out for you!! Keep smiling k babe, you are so much better when you are smiling, plus you have me, what’s not to smile about?? Kisses babe!! Christina Wow, what a beauty you are! I just wanted to say how much I appreciate the little bit of sharing we’ve done; you’re such an interesting woman to me and I’m sad that I have to leave town for a while and we can’t have our little conversations in the morning

Neighborly Thank you to the neighbor who delivered my mail. I didn’t think to get your name, but I greatly appreciate your taking the time. There was an important document in it which I was looking for.

Beauty InspiresTruth unfolding... that first kiss echos deep from within, calling us back to remember. As we embrace, the sands of time adorn our skin. Love reigns. Beauty inspires. Rock On!Cheers to the tall guy who just wanted to enjoy the rock show! From a middle-aged woman who knows what she’s getting into when she goes to a show and stands up front, and even crowd surfed for the first time at this year’s Rock Hard at the Park. Rock on, Tall Guy!! I Love You! Entangle in this incredible beautiful present of what our future may have in store as I gaze at the stars I make a wish as I envision the look in you eyes. There`s no other feeling than the feeling of love . I`m reaching for you, I will never stop reaching for you! The day will come when happiness never leaves us. My heart beats faster hoping each day is closer to the reality of how our love will bloom like a flower, a flower that never wilts. I love you!

Cheers To RickRick’s Kar Korner. I came across an article in the Spokane Chronicle from 1982 featuring young Rick as a car salesman. He was 21 years old and 2 years into the business. I admired the love he expressed not only for the business, but the customers as well. It wasn’t just about making a “sale” for him. It was about meeting people, connecting with them, and helping them. I recently got a great opportunity to work with Rick at his car lot and it’s truly been an amazing experience. 31 years later and he is still that same kind-hearted, honest man. He has taught me so much and continues to teach me every day. I’ve got to know him as a boss, a person, and as a friend. He, like many of us, has been through so much throughout the years and even through all the “crap” life has handed him he still manages to maintain a positive outlook. When I read the article it made me smile and brought tears to my eyes. Knowing how hard he has worked to accomplish his goals has completely moved me. So I wanted to take this opportunity to say thank you Rick for everything that you do. You have made a very big impact on my life and I couldn’t be happier to be working for such a wonderful person. Sometimes you meet people that change who you are and inspire who you will become...you are one of those people in my life. Keep up the good work boss and stay away from those deadly ninja bees! Shelby

Joy! Sacred Discovered AssuREDness- Signs of pleasure abound, as love permeates all direction. Your smile brings so much joy to life!

Be Cheerful! ...get free sweets

I Love You Ever After! The first clear night this week: As I glanced East toward your constellation, the Southern horizon bestowed a brilliant diamond that danced before me. It’s slow and gentle nature was undeniably the sweetest, eurythmic release. I love you whole-heartedly. I love you ever after.

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The new

PIZZABUrger IT’S HERE

Cheers

Jeers

Jeers

Thai Bamboo Family I would like to say a very heartfelt thank you to my amazing co-workers and the owners of Thai Bamboo! And all of our wonderful and loyal customers who can turn my day around in a second! I, like many others, have held various different jobs throughout my 32 years, and I’m grateful to say, that being given the opportunity to work for this company and the amazing and awesome people within it, that I have found my home. My job (server/waitress) is one of the most unpredictable, crazy and stressful jobs out there, but it is by far the most rewarding in my eyes! And I wouldn’t trade it for the world. I could serve anywhere, but here’s a few reasons why Thai Bamboo is my first and only choice: the people I work with are absolutely amazing! All the other servers and bartenders are truly the best, our HR department is spectacular and goes above and beyond! All of the kitchen staff, they rock!! What more can I say? And last but not least, the owners of the company, who have made us a family and care about each and every one of their employees! In this day and age, it’s rare to find people who still care about the individual and thankfully I have found an employer who does. Is it all rainbows and butterflies and nicey nice? Heck no! But I chose to write this because no matter what there is always going to be negative things in life and situations to complain about, but I am thankful and grateful for the good and positive people and things I am blessed with now! So again thank you to my Thai Bamboo family!!!

Monster Truck To the silver fat ass monster truck at the Francis coffee shop. You are terrible. I was waiting in line to participate in a fund raiser. I was parked in line with the other customers and I was close to the curb on my right. Where was I suppose to go?! I know where you can go. What were you doing with your fat ass monster truck? Hauling McDonald’s? Maybe if you buy a big ol’ monster truck you should probably only drive it in places that it will fit.

my still full plate and brings a bill not bothering to comment why a fully grown man eats only two bites of his meal. Am I destined to only eat scrambled eggs in Spokane???

Our Wicked Ways When I first saw you I knew you were wicked awesome and now we are wicked awesome together. I’m glad we make each other so wicked happy, and after this wicked awesome wedding weekend we get to be wicked awesome husband and wife. Here’s to spending the rest of our wicked awesome lives together, I love you so much!

Traffic Control at Jason Aldean concert. It was the worse mess I have ever seen after a concert, roads were blocked going East and South leaving you the option of going North. I do not live north and maneuvering through all these road blocks was more than frustrating. Along with barricades there were humans in their bright vest (I hope not the police department because the guy I spoke to flunked courtesy training) I am sure he knows who he is as he was stopping everyone on Wahington to delay this process even longer. Spokane step up and do a better job! Just another reason not to visit downtown. What a sorry mess Texting To the young, blonde woman driving the white Land Cruiser in Hayden. I have passed you roughly 8 times, all of which your head is burried in your lap. It’s obvious you have something more important on your phone than paying attention to other drivers and pedestrians. The value of other peoples lives is more important than any message that could be on that phone. Hopefully a “Jeers” will give you the message, rather than a $160 ticket, accident, or worse, a life.

Breakfast Cookc Jeers to every breakfast cook in Spokane. Over medium and poached eggs should have fully cooked protein. My stomach turns every time that clear liquid (that resembles mucas) bursts from my undercooked eggs and floods my plate soaking into the toast and hash browns. The waitress takes O A S U N P O T S C I F I O S E A T E W R I N G S

K I D I P R A Y A L E O G N R I E S E A T U R T L R S V U E N O S R O T U N T I L S P A M M P A A L S E X A P P E A ’S E A T S THIS WEEK! S E D I S G R I N S R E E ANSW D I N E A L O N A S I A E N I D B A U E R E T S M S E D S E A T A C T U N T R I N G L E S C L E A R I N G A D D L E O T A E S O I B S E G E R T S Y R T Y E N R O E RINGSIDE

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Husband Jeers to my husband. If you don’t start spending time with your wife somebody else will.

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Rude Server I was eating a few days ago with my hubby and I can’t get you out of my head can not stop thinking of you. You were a short little blonde gal. OMG you were the ruddiest sever I have ever had going out to eat. You were all over my husband even though I was sitting right there. Thank you for ruining the week of our anniversary you little sleazy ho! Federal Budget Jeers to the G.O.P. and especially Cathy McMorrisRodgers. ‘Selfish’ is the nicest word I can come up with for House Republicans who are holding the federal budget and thousands of government workers hostage. Like kids on the playground who didn’t get your way, you hide the ball and pout. Obamacare is the law! Grow up and get over it.

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So Disrespectful! To the guy who I caught peeing in one of the gallery rooms at Terrain, I hope you get a killer UTI. We were all in the same boat, under less than ideal conditions. The folk in charge of Terrain are doing the best they can with an (awesome!) event you don’t have to pay for. You peed inside. On the carpet. Like a dog. That is gross. And horrifically disrespectful.

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OCTOBER 10, 2013 INLANDER 61


Confession of an Almost Bureaucrat Thoughts on the government shutdown and a path not taken BY SCOTT A. LEADINGHAM “To most Americans, ‘bureaucracy’ is a fighting word. Few things are more disliked than bureaucracy, few occupations held in lower esteem than the bureaucrat. Both are subjected to repeated criticism in the press and damned regularly by political soap box orators and ordinary citizens. ‘Inefficiency,’ ‘red tape,’ ‘stupidity,’ ‘secrecy,’ ‘smugness,’ ‘aggressiveness,’ and ‘self-interest’ are only a few of the emotionally charged words used to castigate bureaucrats.” — Richard Stillman, Public Administration: Concepts and Cases

A

s I type those words, nearly 10 years after having read them in an undergraduate political science textbook, I am at home, prevented from working. Today marks one week since the federal government shutdown (or as Fox News prefers, “slimdown”) began. This is my fifth day of not incurring a paycheck for the job I was hired to do. So far I have been furloughed 13 work days in 2013 due to the current shutdown and the previous budget sequestration that caused automatic, across-the-board cuts to federal agencies. I try to be optimistic — thinking it’ll all be resolved soon and maybe, just maybe, I and my fellow 800,000 “non-essential” furloughed employees can go back to work. If what I hear on the news is correct, Republicans and Democrats, including the president, endorse giving back pay to us once this ends. Hope springs eternal, right? Now, a confession: None of that is true, insofar as I am not a furloughed federal employee. But I could be. In fact, I should be based on my background and education.

62 INLANDER OCTOBER 10, 2013

The above quote from Richard Stillman is from a standard undergraduate textbook for political science and public administration students. It’s one of many college textbooks I keep on my bookshelf. However, the anecdote about being furloughed for 13 days (as of this writing) is very real — just not for me. It applies to a friend from graduate school who works in the “other Washington” for a federal agency. Since the shutdown began, he’s posted on Facebook about his frustrations with the situation. His experience, and the experience of many other fellow classmates, is one I would likely share had I stayed on the public administration/government service track on which I began. It started in high school with an interest (obsession, really) in federal law enforcement. For much of my teenage years, I thought about how I’d eventually work for the FBI or U.S. Marshals. Eventually that morphed into National Park Service ranger. Who doesn’t like a guy in an olive-green uniform? I thought. And as I found by job-shadowing a park ranger, they carry M16 rifles. Uniforms, guns, cool hats, hanging in National Parks? I’m in. Somewhere in college, though, the law enforcement bug died, but the government service idea remained. After all, my dad had worked for and retired from the federal government as a forester. If he could make an honest, middle class living, so could I. In graduate school I learned more about the exciting topics of public finance and budgeting and helped teach undergraduates about public

policy. But where many of my classmates were on obvious paths to work in federal and state government, I shifted toward journalism. Rather than work in government, I reasoned it was more intriguing to study it. I wanted to report on and analyze it from an informed perspective. (Yes, the idea of journalism being relatively more stable than government employment is a sad joke not lost on me.)

BUREAUCRACY

“Weber said bureaucracy was supposed to be stable.” Weber refers to Max Weber (pronounced “VAY-ber”), the German social scientist known widely by students of politics for his descriptions of bureaucracy. I glanced at my bookshelf as soon as I read those words on Facebook from my graduate school friend who had just been furloughed on Day One of the shutdown. The book in my collection contained the essay in which Weber outlines how bureaucratic systems work. Or rather, how they’re supposed to work. At the least, the moment validated having kept so many college textbooks like some hopeless academic hoarder. Deeper, though, it reiterated what I’d long known, something of no surprise to political scientists and government workers alike: Federal employees — bureaucrats, if you will — are incredibly necessary to a stable, functioning, representative democracy such as ours. People can (and certainly do) have reasonable differences of opinion about the necessary and proper role of government. By extension that

means having political debates about the size of government and the necessity of this agency or that program. Plus, there is no doubt that certain processes and ways of doing “bureaucratic” things can and should be improved. Is there “waste” in the federal government? Yes. Is it the fault of every employee? Certainly not. By and large, federal workers are honest, educated, public service-minded individuals. Among the 2.1 million of them, there will be those who don’t pull their weight or do little to benefit the public good. But that’s no reason to throw out the baby with the proverbial bathwater. The federal government is large and complex because this country is large and complex. Serving the interests of 315 million people is no easy task — one not accomplished by simply citing passages of a 226-year-old Constitution. As Weber noted: “However much people may complain about the evils of bureaucracy, it would be sheer illusion to think for a moment that continuous administrative work can be carried out in any field except by means of officials working in offices.” A lot of people who would otherwise be in those offices — or watching the gates of a National Park or whatever other job function — have been out of work for more than a week. I very well could be one of those people. If I were, I’d be honored to join my fellow public servants.  Scott A. Leadingham, a freelance writer in Spokane, is also editor of Quill, the magazine for the Society of Professional Journalists.


OCTOBER 10, 2013 INLANDER 63



Inlander 10/10/2013