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OCTOBER 7-13, 2021 | HARD NEWS, SERIOUS FUN SINCE 1993

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INSIDE VOL. 28, NO. 52 | COVER PHOTO: YOUNG KWAK

COMMENT NEWS CULTURE DINING OUT

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FILM MUSIC EVENTS I SAW YOU

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EDITOR’S NOTE

M

y journalism life is inextricably linked to the Pacific Northwest, inspired by my first experience in the area nearly 30 years

ago.

I took a job at Mount Rainier National Park the summer after graduating from the University of Utah, not quite sure what to do with my political science degree. I wish I could tell you I outfitted trips to the summit, but I spent my summer selling trinkets to tourists and then blowing my paychecks in Seattle seeing music. It was pretty great, and I met a friend who somehow put together my future in a way I couldn’t when she said, “Oh, you’re from Salt Lake City? You’d love Missoula, and they have a great journalism school.” Six months later I visited Montana for the first time, and soon I was living there and waiting tables at a Rosauers restaurant to get through journalism school at the University of Montana. As classes started, I got a job at a scrappy alternative weekly, the Missoula Independent, that launched a couple years before the Inlander and died just a couple years ago. On the cover of this Inlander, my first as editor, you’ll find an old motto from my Independent days: “Hard News, Serious Fun.” I’ve treated those as words to live by in journalism in the decades since, because as important as it is to cover issues like our political divisions and the pandemic, I never LETTERS want to forget the fun. Send comments to With the Inlander, the Inland editor@inlander.com. Northwest boasts one of the best alt-weeklies in the country. The proof is in the awards our staff brings home in competitions against far larger markets, in categories ranging from breaking news and investigative reporting to music, food and culture coverage. More importantly, the proof is in your hands (or perhaps on your phone) every week, thanks to a crack staff of reporters, more than a decade of formative leadership by my predecessor Jacob Fries, supportive and involved ownership, and a team of artists, designers, office staff and sales folks dedicated to the mission of doing serious journalism, and having serious fun doing it. There’s arguably never been a more important time for journalists to inform and serve the public. I’m lucky to work with a team passionate about our community, and up for the challenges ahead. — DAN NAILEN, editor

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COMMENT | INDIGENOUS PEOPLES

The land worth celebrating, and honoring.

Land Acknowledgment, Valley County, Idaho A poem to acknowledge that the land itself — along with the people whose language, culture and religion were born of it — is rarely acknowledged BY CMARIE FUHRMAN

L

et us pause for a moment and acknowledge the land on which we live. This is the traditional land of the Nimiipuu and Tukadeka. We should take another moment to acknowledge the ways Indigenous people have been/are being removed and erased from the land they’ve stewarded for over 16,000 years: Swiftly. Brutally. Culturally. Fatally. Let us acknowledge that soldiers for the United States killed women and children because they were Native. Let us acknowledge the recentness of this. Let us acknowledge the Native people buried in their land without markers while unnamed settlers rest in fenced graves. Let us acknowledge Indian graves dug up and looted. Let us acknowledge

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that place names like Squaw Meadows and Dead Indian do not honor ancestors. Let us take a moment and acknowledge that this land was not stolen from the people whose language, culture, and religion was born of it; let us acknowledge that the people were stolen from this land. The people who celebrate this land with song, dance, ceremony; people who do not commodify and commercialize trees and water or call it resource. Here we pause to acknowledge that the land itself


is rarely acknowledged. The land buried beneath asphalt, cement, floorboards, and foundations. Let us acknowledge that this buried land which once grew food and medicine now grows dollar stores and subdivisions. Let us acknowledge the land in the way subdividers do, with the blade of the bulldozer and with names like Forest Trails, Aspen Ridge, River Ranch, with words, the way the Government recognizes only Federally recognized tribes and has taught some Natives to recognize others only on paper, through blood quantum and CIB instead of commitment to rights and sovereignty. Let us recognize Land Acknowledgments that serve as consolation, another box checked on a list titled Due Diligences. The way wearing a Black Lives Matter t-shirt acknowledges white wokeness while the same whites shop at white lives businesses; acknowledgment as performative allyship. Let us acknowledge that internment camps were prisons. This Land Acknowledgement was written for the people who acknowledge land in the way spotted knapweed acknowledges it, the way a For Sale sign acknowledges it, the way the Forest Service acknowledges land by stating #itsallyours but meaning #itsnottheirs. This statement acknowledges the land in the same way the media and FBI acknowledge the over 2,000 missing Native women and girls — by recognizing the one missing white woman for whom hundreds search and whose picture is present on all our screens, the way Native silhouettes are screened on paper to sell cigarettes. This Land Acknowledgment is inked on the heartwood of a pine that escaped the fires but fell for the mill from a land that cannot help but acknowledge climate crisis and carrying capacities, the grizzly bear fatally removed, and the salmon who can no longer reach their original homelands. This land acknowledges the wolves shot by stockmen and sportsmen to preserve the animals stockmen and sportsmen will thenceforth kill in the name of husbandry and sport.

Land Back means languages back, means medicine back, means ceremony back, means culture back, means reparations. Let us acknowledge how we honor loss with dollars and not grief. Let us make depredation a science and pay officers from the bank of conservation. Let us acknowledge the words used to disassociate kill/er/ing/ed from the act of execution. This land acknowledges that it is recognized for its monetary value, recreational value, and aesthetic value. Because it too is living, this land recognizes us by our carbon footprint, our clear-cuts, our gold mines, and our greed. This acknowledges that Land Back means languages back, means medicine back, means ceremony back, means culture back, means reparations. Means all people depend on the land. Let us acknowledge that unless action is taken to identify and empower Indigenous peoples, erase inaccurate history from every school curriculum, carry out land-based justice and climate change policy, a Land Acknowledgment is a perfunctory, alienating, and an otherwise hollow gesture. Acknowledgment means acceptance, admittance; acknowledgment is a dead word, is not a verb, is not deed, does mean education. Acknowledgment means too late for an apology. Read me your Declaration of Change. Detail your Plan of Procedure. Show me your Map to Equality. And then, just maybe then, I might be convinced that your Land Acknowledgment is not but another broken treaty. n CMarie Fuhrman is the author of Camped Beneath the Dam: Poems (Floodgate 2020) and co-editor of Native Voices (Tupelo 2019). She has forthcoming or published poetry and nonfiction in multiple journals including Emergence Magazine, Yellow Medicine Review, Cutthroat a Journal of the Arts, Whitefish Review, Platform Review, Poetry Northwest, as well as several anthologies. Fuhrman resides in the mountains of West Central Idaho.

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Shadle Park is one of many high schools hit with vandalized bathrooms, because all it takes is a TikTok trend and view-hungry students to cause chaos. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

SOCIAL MEDIA

VIRAL SPREAD IN SCHOOLS

TikTok adds yet another devious challenge for an already overwhelmed school system BY DANIEL WALTERS

T

he first thing Ayden Franklin noticed when he walked into the boys’ bathroom in the basement of Lewis and Clark High School on Friday was that all the mirrors were missing. They’d been taken completely off the walls. And then, the 18-year-old senior says, he heard the toilet flush. Once, then again. He spotted kids stuffing paper towels into the toilet and repeatedly flushing it. Bathrooms, of course, have been vandalized since the invention of indoor plumbing. It’s the other kid — the dude standing just outside the stall filming his buddies — that’s a clue that something is amiss. Franklin is an Eagle Scout, but he didn’t need to be one to know exactly what’s going on. “I know this is the #DeviousLicks challenge,” Franklin says. He’s speaking the ever-shifting lingo of TikTok, the short-video smartphone app that within a few years has come to dominate adolescent social media. Bathroom vandalism is all the rage. It’s not just the bathrooms at Lewis and Clark. Multiple restrooms get hit at Shadle Park High School a few miles away. “Stuff gets ripped off the walls and then dumped in the toilets and the urinals, and then those flood,” says Shadle Park High School Principal Chris Dunn. Paper towel dispensers are stolen. Soap dispensers are torn from

8 INLANDER OCTOBER 7, 2021

their moorings, soap strewn across the floor. It’s happening at North Central High School too, and high schools in Coeur d’Alene, California and Michigan. It all starts with one kid: On Sept. 1, a TikTok user swipes a package of disposable masks from his school, tapes himself taking them out of his backpack and then uploads the video to TikTok, describing it as an “absolutely devious lick.” It’s funny, precisely because the “lick” — hip-hop slang for a particularly lucrative heist — is so petty. A few days later, another TikToker films himself showing off his own ill-gotten gains — his school’s bathroom soap dispenser — and quickly racks up millions of views. And then other videos of other purported thefts appear: a microscope, Chromebooks and more. It becomes a TikTok “challenge.” Even as it mutates from larceny to vandalism, almost all of it is concentrated on school restrooms. Students get arrested in Kentucky and Florida. And of course, this had to happen now: On top of school cafeteria supply chain hiccups and COVID outbreaks, on top of bus driver and substitute teacher shortages, on top of the culture wars over vaccine mandates and critical race theory, as anti-maskers bang on doors and scream at cops at school board meetings — now even the bathrooms themselves are under siege?

“THOUSANDS of dollars of damage done to restrooms,” an exhausted Nampa, Idaho, teacher lamented in a Facebook post shared by Idaho Public Television’s Melissa Davlin. “I am talking about sinks pulled out of the wall and pipes destroyed.” It’s enough to make Franklin — an avid TikTok fan himself — marvel at how much the world has changed in just the last four years. When he was a freshman, Franklin remembers, some kid unscrewed a bench in the hall and dragged it into the boy’s restroom. It was the sort of prank that got shared with self-erasing messages, not broadcast to the whole universe. “In the past when there was mischief, they’d post it on Snapchat,” Franklin says. “It wouldn’t be national.”

KIDS THESE DAYS

Dunn, the Shadle Park principal, graduated from the school himself back in 2006, a year after YouTube launched and a year before Steve Jobs revealed the first iPhone. Today, he knows the pressure is continuous and unrelenting. “That feeling of being on and being seen and kind of being vulnerable at all times through that, that’s a reality,” Dunn says. ...continued on page10


OCTOBER 7, 2021 INLANDER 9


NEWS | SOCIAL MEDIA

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“VIRAL SPREAD IN SCHOOLS,” CONTINUED... University of Washington developmental psychology professor Lucía Magis-Weinberg researches the impact of social media on adolescent brain development. The impact isn’t all negative, she stresses. Imagine if the pandemic had happened before social media, when isolation was truly isolating. “Social media has been a lifeline to stay in contact with other people, to building friendships,” Magis-Weinberg says. If Zoom is the Zoomer hell of the pandemic era — imprisoned in your little box, listening to your teacher drone on and on — TikTok is Zoomer heaven, a never-ending free-association carousel of wonders. It’s goofy lip-syncing and awkward dancing and musicians harmonizing with singing cats; fashion montages and conspiracy theories and activist rants; celebrities who become regular people, and regular-people who become celebrities. And for marginalized youth and for minority youth, MagisWeinberg says, the infinite reach of social media means they “can find like-minded peers with similar interests.” It’s called the “long tail.” The internet is so vast that anyone — no matter how strange, no matter how isolated — can find someone like them. So it’s appropriate that the title of the front page of TikTok, with its bottomless feed of algorithmically curated videoclips, is called “For You.” But the long tail has a dark side: There are 41 million teens and tweens in America. Imagine daring every single one of them to do something dumb in front of, tantalizingly, “an infinite audience.” “You know that doing risky things will get more traction, get more views, get more engagement,” Magis-Weinberg says, “We know that in the heat of the moment, adolescents struggle to think in the longer term.” Some are perfectly primed for anyone to dare them to be stupid. Last year’s “Nutmeg Challenge” — which dared users to chug down the spice — sent hallucinating teens to the hospital. A 15-year-old girl died after swallowing a massive amount of antiallergy medication as part of the “Benadryl Challenge.” Just one month before the #DeviousLicks phenomenon, the “Milk Crate Challenge” convinced scores of TikTokers to ascend an ad hoc staircase made of teetering crates — up, up, up, all the way to the emergency room. TikTok banned the milk crate challenge hashtag. On Sept. 15, TikTok started banning the #DeviousLicks hashtag too. “Please be kind to your schools & teachers,” the official TikTok Communications Twitter account pleaded in their announcement. When TikTok banned the milk crate challenge hashtag, Franklin says the phenomenon seemed to just disappear instantly. But #DeviousLicks has been “harder to get rid off,” he adds. North Central High School, for example, was only hit with the wave of bathroom vandalism last Thursday, two weeks after the tag was banned. “You don’t even need to post a hashtag on your TikTok for it to go on the ‘For You’ page,” he says. The algorithm is smart enough — or devious enough — to get around a simple hashtag ban.

A STAR IS BORN

This printed material is supported by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $250,000. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by CMS, HHS or the U.S. Government.

10 INLANDER OCTOBER 7, 2021

For his part, Franklin sees a simple motive for the devious and dangerous behavior of some TikTokers: fame. TikTok offers a new route to a kind of popularity that plenty of high schoolers crave, beyond athleticism or beauty or traditional talent. “I’ve heard kids, they sit there, and that’s like their big dream,” Franklin says. Become “TikTok famous.” Franklin can tell you about Charli and Dixie D’Amelio, the two girls who parceled their phenomenal TikTok success into their own Hulu show. He can tell you stories about, say, a friend who shaved her head and her hair grew back blonde and curly, and she got tens of thousands of followers because of it. And he can even talk about the thrill of his own mild brush with TikTok fame, like when three of his TikTok comments got liked by socialite Paris Hilton. “All these kids were like, ‘Wow, that is so cool!’ And it started


spreading through the school,” Franklin says, “Look, Ayden got his comments liked by Paris Hilton.” You may have had a nebulous idea of how popular you were in high school, Magis-Weinberg says, but these kids have actual data metrics to measure it. “Now you can actually quantify that,” she says. “Whether you’ve got 213 likes and whether I got 209, I can see, well, what did you do in your account to get those extra likes?” And there’s an easier way than truly doing something stupid and risky to get those likes: lie. When a reporter from Curbed dug further into the #DeviousLicks trend, he found that a lot of the apparent criminal activity — like the supposedly stolen microscope and Chromebooks — were kids pretending to steal things they already owned.

In a TikTok video, Lewis and Clark student Ayden Franklin shows a TikTok comment of his that got liked by Paris Hilton. When talking about all the crazy things that have happened because of #DeviousLicks, Franklin brings up a particularly wild claim: “Kids ended up, for the #DeviousLicks challenge, taking their principal hostage.” Indeed, in mid-September, a North Dakota TikToker posted a video that includes swarm of law enforcement and military vehicles outside a high school in Fargo, before he claims that “the principal of this school was held hostage with the bag over his head and tied to the chair.” A spokeswoman for the Fargo school district confirms to the Inlander, that no, of course a principal hadn’t been kidnapped for a TikTok meme. All the emergency vehicles in the footage were only there for a “National Freedom Flag” ceremony for the 20th anniversary of 9/11. “So someone probably wanted to say that for views,” Franklin texts. The single minute-long video racked up 2.3 million views for the hoaxer, and several low-quality content mill websites repeated the claims. Fads fade, Franklin points out. Memes burn out. But, inevitably, new ones rise from the ashes. At Spokane Public Schools, they’re bracing for a potential second wave of DeviousLicks deviancy. “The October challenge is to ‘smack a teacher,’” North Central High School Principal Tami McCracken warned in a newsletter Friday. “Please help your student understand the seriousness of this behavior.” n danielw@inlander.com

OCTOBER 7, 2021 INLANDER 11


NEWS | EDUCATION

‘We Belong to Each Other’ With her nonprofit A Life YOUnited, one Spokane woman aims to teach suicide prevention in schools BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

W

hen she started work on her doctorate in education several years ago, Mary Stover expected she’d be focusing on suicide prevention work for adolescents. Stover was inspired to help after a friend’s 16-year-old son died by suicide, and she learned there were few, if any, suicide prevention resources for youth. What she didn’t expect, however, was what she would soon learn: Researchers had interviewed Pacific Northwest teenagers in the hopes of better understanding when any of them first had thoughts of harming themselves. Their answers? For some, those thoughts had appeared as young as 9 years old. “That completely changed my focus,” Stover says. “If kids are thinking about suicide at [9], we’ve got to get to them before they’re [9].” In 2016, Stover (who briefly worked at the Inlander several years ago) started the nonprofit A Life YOUnited, through which she offers support for people who’ve lost a loved one to suicide. She attends events to hand out resource cards and bracelets so people know where they can find help.

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Mary Stover plans to move around the PNW to teach the suicide prevention curriculum she designed. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO Through her doctoral work, Stover also created a suicide prevention curriculum for elementary students in kindergarten through fifth grade, which she intends to teach through the nonprofit. While the plan is for her to be the first one teaching the courses, she hopes to eventually train mental health professionals in communities around the Pacific Northwest on how to offer her courses for free to schools in their area. The classes focus on emotional traits intended to teach students how to care for themselves and others, Stover says. The idea is that each grade level focuses on a single concept for one hour per week over a six week time frame. In kindergarten it’s kindness, in first grade it’s belonging, then on up through the grades the courses focus on resilience, compassion, awareness and responsibility. While parents may not like the sound of their young children talking about suicide prevention, many of the lessons focus on things like being kind to yourself and giving yourself grace, as well as looking out for others, she says. “We’re talking about building character traits,” Stover says. “What does it mean to be kind to yourself? Would it be kind to hurt yourself? Or to tell someone else to hurt themselves?” The need for suicide prevention courses among young students is evident from statistics and the experiences of behavioral health experts who work with local schools. Between 1999 and 2019, suicide rates in the U.S. increased by 33 percent, and suicide is the second leading cause of death for those ages 10 to 34, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Washington schools aren’t required to provide suicide prevention classes, although they do have requirements for social and emotional learning courses, explains Keara Rypien-Peltram, behavioral health coordinator for the Center for Student Support Services for NorthEast Washington ESD 101. Rypien-Peltram’s office works with 59 districts in Washington’s seven northeastern counties to provide

things like behavioral health and suicide prevention training for teachers, particularly in smaller, rural districts. One of the most common questions they get after that training is whether there’s a curriculum for kids. “There definitely is a need for it,” Rypien-Peltram says. “There’s been a tremendous increase in mental health related [emergency room] visits from our young people. The need has never been as great as it is right now.” Unfortunately, the reality is that some very young kids die this way, she says, emphasizing the need to understand how to intervene in those situations. “A few years back there was, I believe, a 9-year-old in Spokane Public Schools who died by suicide. Just this past year there was a sixth grader,” Rypien-Peltram says. “Whether we want to believe it or not, it’s here. We have to have some of the skills to know how to address this.” Stover hopes her courses can change things for the better soon.

F

or now, Stover is remodeling an RV with family and friends, which she plans to move into full time this month. Once districts invite her to teach, she’ll move the trailer to different places around Washington to live in while teaching her six-week curriculum, a move the board of A Life YOUnited agreed was cheaper and more tenable than spending weeks on end in motels. Eventually, Stover hopes to train up community volunteers to teach the courses throughout the Pacific Northwest and beyond. The lessons in her curriculum also apply to older kids and adults who may encounter someone going through a tough time. “I talk a lot about if someone is hurting and they don’t want to get help, it’s on you to get help because we belong to each other,” Stover says. “We’re responsible for looking out for each other. I’m telling you right now you’d rather have someone angry with you next week than not be here next week.” One of the myths Stover says she’s encountered in her work in “suicidology” is that even talking about


suicide with someone may plant that idea in their head. In reality, Stover says, she encourages people to be direct when speaking with a loved one they’re concerned about. “Be bold and ask questions. Make it awkward. ‘Are you telling me that you want to die? That you want to die by suicide?’” Stover says. “We use the word, because there’s this myth that if you say it you’re making them think about it. That’s not true, they’re already thinking it. And if you say it, now they’re seen.” Many suicide prevention campaigns focus on the idea of bringing the conversation out of the darkness into the light, Stover says. “It’s not as scary when it’s out of the darkness, because we can handle it together,” Stover says. In her classes she intends to teach kids that even as little people, it’s everyone’s responsibility to look out for one another. “We have a lot of violence in our country,” Stover says. “Hopefully this [curriculum] echoes in a way beyond suicide prevention. If we belong to each other, what does that mean?” Stover hopes to not only open dialogue about suicide, but to also shift the way people talk about it and think about modeling behavior for their children. “[We] say they died by suicide, we don’t say ‘committed suicide,’ because the language really makes the family of the person who’s gone feel like they committed a crime,” Stover says. “People don’t understand all the time, because it is taboo, and when there’s a stigma around something, you don’t always learn how to talk about it.” She also says it’s common to hear people say things like “that was so selfish” or “what a coward,” but she hopes that people realize that sometimes an invisible battle with depression was going on with that person. “When someone loses a battle with cancer, we have grace for that, they fought really hard. Sometimes you can see it. They get thinner, they lose their hair, they’ve been in treatment,” Stover says. “We can’t see depression. … We have to have as much grace for that loss as someone who’s fought a different battle and passed.” In general, mental health is still a topic that many people find hard to talk about. That’s why people like Rypien-Peltram are enthusiastic about the opportunities to get students and families to open up through courses like the ones Stover has designed. “One of the things that comes up is the question, HELP IS AVAILABLE ‘Are we ready for You can get free and confidential help this?’ — not just from a skilled, trained counselor in your for suicide prevenarea by contacting the National Suicide tion, but for mental Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255 or health as a whole,” you can text a crisis counselor 24/7 by texRypien-Peltram says ting HOME to the Crisis Text Line at 741741. of discussing new courses to bring into schools. “Especially in a lot of our rural areas where we know that stigma is alive and well still, unfortunately, that’s one of the realities we’ve had to face in this work.” For now, Stover is in something of a holding pattern as she hopes to get into school districts to teach her course for the first time and see what needs adjusting. “People think I’m crazy for moving into an RV for my nonprofit, but I’m going to give it two years and see if I can get this off the ground and get into schools and make a difference,” Stover says. While the COVID-19 pandemic has in many ways been a curse, she says it’s also illuminated the dire need for mental health resources everywhere. “Nobody’s gone untouched by this. We all need help, we all need each other,” Stover says. “Many people are hurting because they’re alone or felt they didn’t have connection during this time. We want to change that, this little tiny nonprofit, with this curriculum.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

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Nick Grow FRIDAY, OCTOBER 8 TH & SATURDAY, OCTOBER 9 TH CHINOOK LOUNGE 6 PM – 9:30 PM Spend the evening at the Chinook Lounge with Nick Grow. This talented musician will be covering hits from the 70s to present day as well as performing some original music.

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OCTOBER 7, 2021 INLANDER 13


COMEDY

THERE IS NO PUNCHLINE On formerly being a fan of Louis C.K. and his artist abusive ilk BY SETH SOMMERFELD

M

y aesthetic taste was shaped by horrible men. It’s something that became clear the past five years, as time and time again entertainers who were my faves growing up were revealed to be terrible, abusive people. Obviously, my internal mental struggle with this fact isn’t even remotely comparable to the anguish inflicted upon their victims. It’s just an upsetting idea to constantly juggle in the back of my mind as an arts writer. If you asked what my favorite stand-up special and TV shows were in 2012, I would’ve answered Louis C.K.’s Chewed Up and FX’s Louie. I’d become a fan of Louis C.K.’s humor after seeing him on Late Night with Conan O’Brien (where he formerly wrote) and watching his Comedy Central Presents half-hour. His style blended absurdism and biting anger in a way that hit my teenage sweet spot, and he honed that voice as his fame grew. When he’d rant against deer, Cinnabon or offensive words, it

14 INLANDER OCTOBER 7, 2021

Louis C.K. is back headlining large theaters after a scandal briefly put his career on pause. felt twisted and delightful. When Louie had episodes on bullying, relationships or his feud with Dane Cook, it felt honest and profound in ways shows that didn’t straddle the line between comedy and drama rarely do. In the moment, it felt like Louis was a vessel for catharsis. As a viewer, I felt like when he was yelling about his kids being a pain or his wife being difficult or some weird masturbatory material, it was a form of venting, a sort of I’m gonna unleash the unhappy thoughts that pop around in my brain in an amusing way so they don’t hurt me or anyone else. But as we now know, the gross parts were not merely part of the man’s persona. Rather, it was a classic case of when someone shows you who they are, believe them. After years of swirling rumors about his being inappropriate around female comedians, in 2017 the New York Times published a report on Louis C.K.’s history of sexual misconduct. Incidents included exposing his genitals to women, forcing them to watch him masturbate and

describing sexual fantasies during professional situations. The lewd laundry list is even rougher to stomach when you realize Louis always portrayed himself as the meek, feckless loser. All the while he was exploiting and abusing women because he was the one who had all the power in their professional dynamics. His victims were hesitant to come forward because going against one of comedy’s biggest stars, and the behind-the-scenes backing that protected him, was tantamount to career suicide in a pre#MeToo climate. I can’t go back and enjoy any of Louis C.K.’s standup specials or Louie episodes because it’s impossible to view them in a vacuum separated from how he hurt women. His voice and perspective casts a cloud over all of it. The old material could probably be mined to understand the pathos of someone who’d commit those acts, but that’s a grim, laborious task. ...continued on page 16


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Jeremy Whittington Nicholas DeCaro Morgan Walters Yvonne Johnson Spokane Playwrights Laboratory Inland Northwest Opera Dr. Amanda Cantrell of the Spokane Shakespeare Society

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Stage Left Theater Sid Al-Thumali and the

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INCLUSION

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Sonny & Lisa Moeckel Darrien Mack Wishing Tree Books Spokane Valley Summer Theatre North Monroe Business District

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CULTURE | COMEDY “THERE IS NO PUNCHLINE,” CONTINUED... And as someone who at a formative age was a fan consuming the content of someone who turned out to be this morally repugnant, I can’t help but question what impact that had on my artistic worldview. I have to look in the mirror and ask the unsettling question of if what I was connecting to was actually the toxic, impotent, pentup white male rage bubbling under the surface. Was I actually just attracted to the real venom? It would also be easier if that was an isolated incident. In the same time period, I would probably say my second favorite standup special was Aziz Ansari’s Intimate Moments for a Sensual Evening, and I frequently listened to Chris Hardwick’s Nerdist podcast and watched every episode of @Midnight. In 2018, Ansari faced allegations of sexual misconduct regarding levels of consent with a woman he went on a date with, while Hardwick was accused of having an emotionally abusive and coercive relationship with one of his exes. Neither rose to the level of Louis C.K.’s misconduct, and Hardwick was cleared by the media companies he worked with after investigations (though how often do such investigations ever really favor the women making allegations?), but I’ve still distanced myself from consuming their content ever since. It just doesn’t feel like a laughing matter. It’s probably important to make clear the distinction between jokes and conduct. I have no problem with comedians pushing boundaries. Anthony Jeselnik’s whole schtick is saying horrendous humorous things, but he’s not harming actual people. I’m not a fan of comedians making gross punching-down jokes at marginalized communities because it’s hurtful and lazy. Teenage Bo Burnham told gay jokes that wouldn’t fly now, but he literally owns up to that with a song on Inside (“Problematic”).

It’s also been interesting to notice how different subcultures react to the actions of horrible men. As evidenced by Louis C.K. still booking major theater shows like Sunday’s gig at First Interstate Center for the Arts, “Cancel Culture” isn’t a thing. Really, it’s “Face Very Minor Consequences Culture.” Louis C.K.’s “cancellation” amounted to having to take a year off from standup and then playing slightly smaller theaters, having his questionable movie I Love You, Daddy pulled, and no longer being a voice in The Secret Life of Pets movies. Oh, what an unbearable burden for acting monstrously.

ate relationships with children. People were still bumping R. Kelly music at clubs up until he was found guilty of sex trafficking in September (one would hope they’d stop now, but who knows?). The carnage left behind by so many of these male artists is hard to fathom. That might seem overblown to some, but we always need to empathize with their victims rather than feeling upset for the abusive millionaires who lost a couple of gigs. I think the only way to move forward when you were culturally raised by these bad men is to not whitewash that past fandom. It goes beyond comedy too, as I haven’t once listened to what was my all-time favorite band — Brand New — since 2017 after after it came to light that singer Jesse Lacey coerced underage girls into sexually compromising situations. I’m not proud of having loved Louis C.K., Brand New, et al, but I’m not going to pretend like that wasn’t part of my own history either. Their jokes, songs and aesthetics are burned into my brain, and I need to deal with that when approaching any new art. I didn’t ever do a mass social media cleansing — deleting all of the pre-allegation praises I sang of these problematic men. It’s not much, but the least I can do is bear those mistakes like embarrassing, regretful tattoos. As tiny a step as it seems, we can’t strive to be better people than the artistic demons from our past until we acknowledge our own imperfections in the form of fandom flaws. n

“Cancel Culture” isn’t really a thing. It’s "Face Very Minor Consequences Culture” as evidenced by Louis C.K. Many other men of his ilk face similar weak slaps on the wrist, if that. Alleged assaulter (both physical and sexual) T.J. Miller has four nights of shows booked at Spokane Comedy Club in November. Dr. Dre has an admitted history of abusing women and just got named the next Super Bowl halftime performer. Assaulting female icon Rihanna hasn’t seemed to slow Chris Brown’s career. Woody Allen and Roman Polanski are both still working directors. No one in Hollywood seems to care about Mark Wahlberg’s history of assaults on people of color. Bill Cosby got out of prison for rape on a technicality. Folks still play Michael Jackson songs at weddings despite the mountain of evidence of inappropri-

Louis C.K. • Sun, Oct. 10 at 8 pm • $32-$77 • First Interstate Center for the Arts • 334 W Spokane Falls Blvd • firstinterstatecenter.org • 509-279-7000

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CULTURE | DIGEST

WHAT ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT?! The good, the bad, the idiotic: Ranking the Top NFL announcing teams BY WILSON CRISCIONE

N

ow that the NFL is back, I can happily return to my fall NFL Sunday routine: making breakfast, sinking into my recliner, and spontaneously yelling at the TV. “YOU’RE AN IDIOT” is something I might say to the TV. Another good one: “WHAT ARE YOU TALKING ABOUT, TROY?” Typically, I’m not screaming at the players or the coaches. I’m yelling at the announcers. Critiquing a bad broadcast gets me just as worked up as watching the Seahawks let a mediocre quarterback like Kirk Cousins march up and down the field. Likewise, a good, informative announcing crew leaves me delighted, as if the three hours I spent watching a bunch of padded-up dudes knock each other around was not a waste of time. Because I wish other people cared about this as much as I do, I’ve ranked my top NFL announcer teams. I don’t have space for all of them here, just the ones you’re likely to see most often.

1. AL MICHAELS AND CRIS COLLINSWORTH — NBC

While it’s fun to mock Collinsworth for that noise he makes that sounds like a creepy Santa laugh — “Oh, ho ho, that was great, Al” — at least he’s excited. And then, thanks to a great production crew, Collinsworth immediately has the replay to break down what happened. Great stuff all around.

2. JIM NANTZ AND TONY ROMO — CBS

Some people don’t like it, but I love when Romo calls out a play before it happens. But for me, what makes Romo the best color commentator are those times they show guys talking and Romo adds his own dialogue, creating a comedic scene on the fly. Truly great TV.

3. PEYTON MANNING AND ELI MANNING — ESPN

Somehow the new alternate broadcast with the Manning brothers is much better than the regular Monday Night Football broadcast. It feels natural, like these two all-timegreat quarterbacks (depending how you feel about Eli) are sitting in the living room with me. It’s refreshing as the last game of the week.

4. GUS JOHNSON AND AQIB TALIB — FOX

Really, anytime Gus Johnson is on the call, you can not only count on him making everything more awesome, but also on awesome things happening because he’s there. I’m convinced that 109-yard “Kick Six” in the recent Jaguars-Cardinals game would not have happened if anyone else but Johnson had been calling the game.

5. JOE BUCK AND TROY AIKMAN — FOX

This is a bit of a hot take, but I think Buck is great. He’s funny and attentive and knows what he’s doing. But I’ve had enough of him and Troy Aikman. I’ve spent years trying to figure out why I feel this way, and here’s where I’ve landed: Buck and Aikman’s voices sound too much alike. Seriously. By the end of the broadcast, I never want to hear either of them again.

SOMEWHERE WAY DOWN THE LIST…KEVIN KUGLER AND MARK SANCHEZ — FOX

Remember that deep Russell Wilson throw with three minutes left in the SeahawksVikings game that was incomplete because of a clear pass interference in the end zone? The production crew kept showing this play, over and over, begging Sanchez to suggest this was, in fact, a penalty. But Sanchez was clueless. I was losing my mind, screaming at the TV. I may or may not have written this entire column just to complain about it. n

Al and Cris: Simply the best.

THE BUZZ BIN

How to use THIS

PULL-OUT SECTION CUTE CAMP I’ll be the first to admit I’m not a big anime fan, but this adorably chill show about a group of high school girls in a camping club may just convert me. Laid-Back Camp is based on a bestselling manga, and its second animated season aired earlier this year. (Stream both seasons on Crunchyroll.) Falling under the umbrella of relaxing, “cozy” media, Laid-Back Camp is low-stakes TV following the club’s members and friends as they travel around to camp at beautiful settings around central Japan, near Mount Fuji. Every adventure includes elaborate and delicious fireside meals, a deep respect for nature and lots of geeking out about cool camping gear. (CHEY SCOTT) WHITE KNIGHT’S WOKE JOKER Batman is a menace. A thug. Just look at the bone-crunching extrajudicial brutality, the collateral damage left behind on his insane rooftops car chases, the way he considers himself accountable to no one. This is the case made by many wry cultural critics of the Batman series. And it’s a case made, with surprising earnestness, by the Joker in Batman: White Knight, a 2017-era comic book arc that relies on some pharmaceuticals to transform the Joker back into the fresh-faced Jack Napier, who swears his days as the clown prince of crime are over, and that Gotham police should turn their attention to reining in Batman’s excesses. And you know what? The artist-formerlyknown-as-Joker actually makes a lot of good points. (DANIEL WALTERS) THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST There’s noteworthy new music arriving in stores and online Oct. 8. To wit:

Pull down then out

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LALA LALA, I Want the Door to Open The Chicago songwriter opens up new booming and blooming sonic realms, assisted by pals like NNAMDÏ and Death Cab for Cutie’s Ben Gibbard. BILLY BRAGG, The Million Things That Never Happened On his 10th studio album, the firebrand folk activist turns his attention to being an empathetic vessel with tunes like “I Will Be Your Shield.” THE WORLD IS A BEAUTIFUL PLACE & I AM NO LONGER AFRAID TO DIE, Illusory Walls The Epitaph atmospheric post-rock band was clearly named pre-2020. (SETH SOMMERFELD)

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PULL-OUT & KEEP! DINING OUT 2021


B E HIND EV E RY BITE

DINING OUT

2021 GUIDE

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magine the moment. A beautifully composed plate of food comes floating through the dining room on a server’s steady arm. It’s placed on the table in front of you with a flourish. You grab your phone to snap a couple quick photos for social media, and dig in before the anticipation from your salivating taste buds becomes unbearable. Next, your senses begin to automatically identify the food’s myriad nuances: spicy, sour, sweet; chewy, crispy, creamy. Maybe it evokes a memory — a similar dish prepared for you long ago by a loved one, a special moment in time or place in the world. Before you know it, the meal is over, your plate wiped nearly clean. You sit back, wipe your mouth, take a sip of water. Your belly is full — perhaps even too full — and soon the check will come, and you’ll head home. At any time during this theoretical meal,

PHOTOGRAPHY BY YOUNG KWAK

or any real dining experience you’ve had, though, how often does your mind wander beyond the brain signals coming from your eyes, nose, mouth, hands? Do you often wonder just how the food made it from a field or farm or factory to this kitchen, your plate, your belly? What about the countless people whose own hands had a role in that extensive process, no less those of the chef of the restaurant you’re in? These are the sorts of questions and emotions we set out to ask and explore for this year’s fall Dining Out issue. We talked to three chefs and one restaurant owner about their personal and professional culinary journeys, their processes for menu and recipe creation, sourcing ingredients and much more. We hope these stories leave you both hungry to eat and hungry to learn more next time you dine at one of the region’s multitude of great restaurants. — CHEY SCOTT, Food Editor

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DINING OUT GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 3


Seasons of Pork They tweaked their seasonings and swapped out their pig farm, but Wild Sage’s tenderloin is as tender as ever BY DA N I E L W A LT E R S

O

fficially, Wild Sage’s pork tenderloin au poivre is a year-round dish. Only the entree’s fresh, local vegetables change with the calendar, but as rain drizzles on the sidewalk outside the downtown eatery, it feels like a meal designed precisely for this very moment of the year: When summer retreats as autumn invades. You can watch the seasons change on the plate: A few flashes of green herb oil brighten one side. The brilliant colors of a watermelon radish. Crisp, fresh green beans — plucked by a small local farmer — are the last remnants of the fading summer. But then we plunge deep into fall: buttery mashed potatoes, vibrant rainbow carrots, roasted onion petals and a fan of thin crunchy apple slices. Finally, the pork itself. Calling it tenderloin is an understatement. Melt-in-your-mouth soft without tasting the slightest bit undercooked, topped with a light sweet-andsour gastrique, and basking in a rich, brown sauce.

W

Wild Sage Executive Chef Elijah Crume

4 INLANDER DINING OUT GUIDE 2021

ild Sage Executive Chef Elijah Crume didn’t come from a long line of culinary talents. His parents, he admits, at risk of insulting them, were pretty terrible cooks. It wasn’t that they were doing anything wrong, exactly. They just didn’t have the time to spend. But Crume’s aunt? The way she baked croissants, pastries — peach pie! — all from scratch? That was something magical: Cooking as a joy of its own, not just as a necessity. “This is what food tastes like,” Crume remembers thinking. “And then my mind starts clicking. It’s like: How can I do this all the time?” So, by the age of 8 or 9, his life was set: He wanted to be a chef. One of his first cooking jobs was as a line cook at a hip, new, little Spokane restaurant called “Wild Sage.” In those early days, he says, some of Wild Sage’s offerings ended up “scaring the Spokane food scene.” ...continued on page 6


DINING OUT GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 5


Wild Sage’s pork tenderloin au poivre.

“SEASONS OF PORK,” CONTINUED... Maybe Spokane wasn’t quite ready back then for, say, prawns with their heads still attached. Gourmet cooking, at times, can be pretentious, even alienating. But it can also be a route to deepening the depths of the familiar, uncovering new contours of comfort food. Wild Sage’s pork tenderloin doesn’t come in an edible pillowcase. It isn’t a post-modern genre-inverting deconstruction on the concept of “pork-ness.” “It’s kind of a straightforward meat-and-potatoes kind of dish,” Crume says. Indeed. There’s meat. There’s potatoes. Even the fancy French “au poivre” simply means “peppered.” It’s just peppered meat and potatoes done with a kind of perfection. The original version was developed by the restaurant’s previous executive chef, Charlie Conner, a few years ago, when Crume was serving as his sous chef, the kitchen’s second-in-command. First, cover the tenderloin with the pepper rub. Next, sear it gently, before cooking very low and very slow in the Alto-Shaam, a high-tech kitchen oven that specializes in cooking food at precise temperatures for a long period. When it’s the absolute perfect temperature (at least 145 degrees, of course, the health inspectors reading this article say aloud) slice it on the diagonal, and serve it with mashed potatoes, veggies and two types of sauces. One is the gastrique. The other is a demi-glace — a classic French brown sauce made with veal stock — infused with sweet green peppercorns. The kitchen adds cognac, cooks it down, and finishes it off with heavy cream.

6 INLANDER DINING OUT GUIDE 2021

Even after you’ve generously dipped every slice of pork in the demi-glace, there’s some left over. Swirl it through your mashed potatoes. Drag your carrots through it. Savor every last drop. The pork is the headliner of the dish. But it’s the brown sauce — the deep, rich chorus — that’s the true star.

And they changed their pepper rub. Today, it includes black peppercorns, green peppercorns, floral pink peppercorns, and mouth-numbing Sichuan peppercorns. But the flavor is “not overwhelmingly, punch-the-bass pepper,” Crume says. Credit the brown sugar, which not only serves as a glaze, but as a counterpoint to the intensity of the pepper. he employees who work here, it’s one of their “The balance of the spice on the pepper meeting the favorite dishes,” says Wild Sage sous chef brown sugar of the rub, but also the sweetness of the Mike Busto. He’s been working with Crume gastrique — it’s a really nice contrast,” Busto says. “Two since the days they both cooked at Sante, Jeremy Hanflavors, not colliding, but complementing each other.” sen’s high-end innovative French restaurant that closed But the pandemic’s legacy continues to linger. As several years ago. supply chain problems continue to reverberate throughCrume became Wild Sage’s executive chef in 2020, a out the entire food system, even longtime suppliers like hell of a time to start leading a restaurant. First, the lockSnake River Farms in Idaho were coming up empty some down shut down in-person dining entirely. When serving weeks. to-go orders was allowed, the restaurant’s team had to “‘Well, we don’t have pork belly anymore,’” Crume figure out how to translate a high-end fine-dining experiremembers hearing from the farm. “‘We don’t have pork ence into something they could package into to-go orders. tenderloin anymore; we don’t have pork chops.’” One riddle: How do you cook pork tenderloin to the Wild Sage switched to Carlton Farms in Oregon to right temperature so it tastes just as good for those who keep the pork coming. reheat it at home as for those who scarf it down immedi“But now we’re printing [the menu] in-house, because ately in the parking lot? every week we’re running into the same issue with someWith crisis comes opportunity, a chance to reexamine thing else,” he says. Sometimes it’s been skyrocketing beef the dish, down to sauces and seasonprices or the cost of cooking oil. ings. Crume modified the gastrique, the Outside the window, the skies are light sour-sweet pink peppercorn sauce gray. The air is getting colder. Great Wild Sage Bistro • 916 W. drizzled on top. local food is always about adapting to Second Ave. • Open Sun“We wanted something more flavorchanging seasons. It’s just that lately, Thu 4-9 pm, Fri-Sat 4-10 based,” Crume says. “Something that the seasons are changing faster than pm • wildsagebistro.com was sweeter, a better product.” ever. n • 509-456-7575

“T


DINING OUT GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 7


Keep it Simple Masselow’s Steakhouse’s new fixed-price menus help control quality, costs while serving 100 steaks a night BY C H E Y S COT T

A

s she and her team begin pre-dinner prep on a recent Friday afternoon, Executive Chef Tanya Broesder realizes it’s been almost a year to the day since Masselow’s Steakhouse reopened after a six-month, pandemic-caused pause last year. When the award-winning steakhouse at Northern Quest Resort and Casino reopened last September, it introduced a totally new format of two fixed-price, coursed menus. Two options, a three-course menu at $70 per person and a four-course menu at $90, replaced the white-linen steakhouse’s previous a la carte-style offerings. Broesder says the new format has resulted in better efficiency and quality control of ingredients like its USDA Prime steaks, fresh seafood, seasonal produce and more. “It mainstreams the menu and keeps our food costs controlled, so we are utilizing everything we bring in, which means less waste and fresher product. We’re not keeping a bunch of things on hand that don’t [sell],” Broesder says. Masselow’s culinary team recently released the first of its seasonal fall menus, and continues to develop new items that may be included on the next iteration. Since it is a steakhouse, however, one thing that won’t ever leave Masselow’s two menu options is its USDA Prime beef, showcased in three steak options: a Manhattan steak, ribeye and filet mignon. (In industry-spreak, Prime beef is the highest USDA grade and comes from young, well-fed cows, featuring abundant marbling of fat and protein.) While there’s some distinction between this fall’s three- and four-course menus, diners can find an 8-ounce ribeye steak as an entree option on both. A meat-and-potatoes plate is a steakhouse

8 INLANDER DINING OUT GUIDE 2021

classic after all, but under Broesder’s direction, the dish is both comforting and refined. “We ask for a minimum of a 28-day wet age before the steaks arrive to us from our vendors,” Broesder says. Wet aging is a process in which the meat is vacuum sealed, versus dry aging that exposes the meat to air inside a cooler. Both aging processes are done to allow natural enzymes to tenderize the meat. “Then we hand cut all the primal [cuts] here. And, you know, just seasoning with simple salt and pepper is all your steak needs,” she continues. “We don’t put a bunch of seasonings on there. We have a wonderful charbroiler and serve it with traditional things.” Those traditional accoutrements include buttery-smooth russet mashed potatoes plated with a flourish via a large decorative pastry tip, and a side of seasonal veggies lightly sauteed in oil and white wine that might be baby carrots one night and broccolini the next. For a steak sauce, Broesder chose a traditional French béarnaise. “Béarnaise is a very traditional steakhouse sauce,” she says. “I feel that the buttery tarragon plays well with the fat of the ribeye, but of course if a guest sees a different sauce, like a horseradish demi, we’ll offer whatever they’d enjoy.” This flexibility and focus on guests’ satisfaction is a hallmark of the Masselow’s experience,

Masselow’s Executive Chef Tanya Broesder

Masselow’s Steakhouse • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • Open Wed-Sun 5-10 pm • northernquest.com • 509-481-6020

Masselow’s USDA Prime ribeye


where white-gloved waitstaff present each artfully plated dish, and the wine and spirits list offers some of the most luxurious, highend brands to be found in the Inland Northwest. “We have one goal, which is to make our guests happy,” Broesder says. “And it’s not about me writing a menu and handing it to my team, it’s about us creating a menu so that we all buy in as a group and we’re all proud of this menu.” If guests aren’t ready to commit to an entire three- or fourcourse meal — both are filling and include a bread course and palate-whetting amuse bouche, in addition to a salad course and dessert; the four-course adds a round of appetizers — Masselow’s lounge still serves an a la carte selection. The lounge offerings include several shareable appetizers and fully portioned entrees, including steak and a burger. Broesder expects Masselow’s switch from a la carte to a fixedprice menu to be permanent, especially considering the myriad challenges that have arisen in the hospitality industry since the pandemic began, from staffing and ingredient sourcing struggles to rising costs all around. “Between the dining room and the bar, we probably serve about 100-plus steaks a night,” she says. “Doing this, we get to control the flow of the dining room so no guests feel rushed, and we do ask for reservations so we can make sure things are placed, and so the restaurant doesn’t get too full because then it’s noisy and less enjoyable.”

SERVING BREAKFAST & LUNCH DAILY

B

roesder has been with Masselow’s since 2009, starting as a cook before landing a promotion to sous chef and eventually to executive chef in 2014. The rural Iowa native has loved being in the kitchen and caring for others through food since childhood. “I grew up on a dairy farm in Iowa, and we were just constantly going — butchering something, canning something, pickling — and we had a garden that we all took care of,” she recalls. “We had laying hens for eggs every day, and we’d bottle feed calves. Just doing all of that growing up, it changes your perspective on things. Your work ethic is different, and your drive to achieve the things you want,” she continues. At home, she usually took the lead on family meals. “I’d make supper while my dad and siblings were out doing chores,” she says. Broesder’s lifelong passion of caring for others through a hearty, lovingly prepared meal continues for her staff. Each Sunday, the Masselow’s team has a “family dinner” before opening for dinner service, and before the staff head into their two days off each Monday and Tuesday. “We create a meal for the front and back [of house] and have that meal together, and then by 4 pm we’re back to business to make sure we’re set and open at 5 pm,” she says. “We literally are a family unit, spending eight hours a day, five days a week, together. To have people back in the kitchen a year ago was so amazing.” The chef’s family roots at Northern Quest stretch a little deeper than her tight-knit team. Broesder met her husband of seven years, Peter Disantis, at the venue. Disantis runs the casino’s Riverbank Taphouse and its team member dining room. “We have crazy, almost opposite schedules, so it’s nice to have your other half in the same building as you — you actually get to see them a little bit,” she says. “But it’s also great because he’s been here for 16 years, and I’ve been here 12. To see where we have come, [Masselow’s] used to be a gravel lot when I first started here!” n

517 N. Pines • Spokane Valley

7640 N. Division • North Spokane

littleeurorestaurant.com • 509.891.7662

oldeuropeanbreakfast.com • 509.467.5987

Hours: 7am-2pm Everyday

New Fall Menu Coming October 18th! Classic flavors are always in season!

vieuxcarrespokane.com (509) 495-1400 1403 W Broadway Spokane DINING OUT GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 9


That’s a Mole

ABOVE: Terraza Executive Chef Bjorn Thompson FACING PAGE: Terraza’s chicken en mole negro

Terraza Waterfront Café infuses a passion for Central and South American cooking into its complex chicken en mole negro BY C A R R I E S COZ Z A RO

S

cratch-made is the standard when it comes to fine dining, yet the construction of some dishes can require a heavierthan-usual lift of ingredients, preparation or technique. With a whopping 31 ingredients and several days of prep and processing just for the sauce, Terraza Waterfront Café’s chicken en mole negro is just such a dish. There are five parts to this $24 entree: sauce, chicken, rice and beans, slaw, and a garnish of fried plantains. The superstar of the dish is the mole (pronounced mo-LAY), which translates to sauce in Nahuatl, an Aztecan language native to southern Mexico and parts of Central America. And like salsas or curries, this Mexican mother sauce follows a few basic rules like using chilis, fruits and nuts, yet varies widely across Mexico. “Mole is quite ubiquitous as a concept but can be as unique and personal as a last name to families in Mexico and central America,” says Terraza Executive Chef Bjorn Thompson. The restaurant’s mole recipe is inspired by owner Doug Johnson’s heritage and Thompson’s travels in Mexico, as well as cooking among people from all over Latin America. Mole negro hails from the Oaxacan and Puebla regions of

10 INLANDER DINING OUT GUIDE 2021

Mexico and is characterized by its velvety, thick texture and dark color, which owes more to the toasted chilis than the inclusion of chocolate. Indeed, chilis are an essential ingredient in mole, and Terraza uses a variety. “Each type of chili has its own flavor profile,” Thompson says. “Some are more fruity, some more earthy, and some add heat,” he says. He uses negro, pasilla, ancho and guajillo chilis, toasting them to bring out their flavor. “Think of toast versus bread,” says Thompson, who rehydrates both the toasted chilis and the fruit component of the dish, raisins, by soaking them in Terraza’s Bolivian blend coffee. Next up are nuts and seeds, which, when toasted and pureed, give mole a smooth, rich texture and “buttery mouthfeel without the use of dairy,” says Thompson. Terraza’s mole uses almonds, pecans, peanuts and pumpkin, sesame and fennel seeds, but also fennel pollen, which adds a more intense fennel flavor and floral notes, he adds. Breadcrumbs are made from telera bread, leftover from Terraza’s sandwiches and hamburguesa, which also thickens the sauce.

Terraza Waterfront Cafe • 1950 Bellerive Lane, Coeur d’Alene • Open Mon and Wed-Fri 11 am10 pm, Sat 10 am-10 pm, Sun 10 am-9 pm • terrazacda.com • 208-758-0111


Meet, Eat and Have Fun

Into the stock made from vegetable scraps goes tomato, onion, tomatillo, garlic and plantain, plus herbs — allspice berries, cinnamon, cloves, cumin seed, fresh oregano, thyme and marjoram — and all the other ingredients, along with some Mexican chocolate. Everything gets simmered for a few hours, then pulled from the heat and allowed to cool enough to begin the blending process. “With the small space that we have in our kitchen and no huge industrial equipment, we use two Vita Prep blenders, and sometimes they overheat in the process and have to be cooled down for a couple hours before they will function again,” says Thompson, who makes the mole negro in five-gallon batches. A bit of kosher salt and sugar are added at the very end, says Thompson, whose two rules in the kitchen are to taste and season everything. Mole can be paired with any number of other dishes, and Terraza’s chicken was chosen to showcase the sauce “because it is the least obtrusive and also one of the most commonly used” in Mexican cooking, Thompson says. Terraza elevates the humble chicken through its sourcing of free-range poultry and by preparation. The airline cut of the breast with the first wing joint still attached makes for a moister dish that’s further enhanced through tenderizing and brining for 24 hours in a mixture of water, salt, apple cider vinegar and agave. Accompanying the chicken is a hearty bed of gallo pinto, Terraza’s Costa Rican version of rice and beans. The scratch-made recipe includes black beans, bell peppers, onion, cilantro, Costa Rican Lizano sauce (similar to Worcestershire), ginger, garlic and some special spice blends.

Breakfast Served Until 2pm Everyday

Happy Hour Everyday 3-6pm

1018 W Francis, Spokane, WA (509) 326-6794 theswingingdoors.com Locally Owned & Operated For 40 years

Finally, a side of slaw adds a fresh, brightness to the dish via crunchy jicama, cilantro and green cabbage. The dressing features pineapple juice, shallots, Dijon mustard and olive oil plus hoja santa or holy leaf, which Thompson describes as having notes of mint, basil and slight eucalyptus. Response so far to the chicken en mole has been good, including with diners familiar with Latin American cuisine. Since opening this spring, Terraza has experienced similar challenges as other restaurants, like specialty ingredient sourcing. However, anticipating that its relatively new staff might be unfamiliar with Central and South American food, management has also focused on training and building a strong team. “We have had many compliments on our staff, and I thoroughly believe that we retain them because of how we treat them,” Thompson says. n

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DINING OUT GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 11


A Sweet Staple Since opening 15 years ago, Ambrosia Bistro has become a Spokane Valley dining destination BY S . M I C H A L B E N N E T T

R

estaurateur Scott Cook spent a number of years as a managing partner in Chili’s Bar & Grill, but in 2006 he started looking for a change. He’d been doing legwork for a friend trying to open a brewpub in Spokane when his wife, Kara, asked, “Well, if you’re going to do that for somebody else, why not just do it for yourself?” So, he did. Ambrosia Bistro opened in 2005 and quickly became more of a fine dining restaurant than Scott and Kara Cook had originally intended. Over the past 15 years, it’s been featured in Wine Spectator three times and has won many local culinary accolades, such as the Epicurean Delight First Course award. “We never set out to be an award-winning restaurant,” Scott says. “We’re more known for our personalized level of service and as a neighborhood hangout.” Truthfully, Ambrosia can be classified as “polished casual” dining with loyal customers who return not just for the food, but also for the staff. Four front-of-house employees have been with the Cooks since before the doors even opened. “They were there painting the walls and putting furniture together,” Scott recalls. Ambrosia is also a kitchen away from home. All three of Scott’s sons grew up at the restaurant and worked their first jobs there. One of his sons, Tanner, currently helps run the restaurant. Customer loyalty is also a family affair as Ambrosia sees a third generation of diners coming through the door. “Mom and dad brought the kids,” says Scott, “and now the kids are married and they’re bringing their children. That’s just awesome.”

I

n 2007, the Cooks hired their first executive chef, Jeremiah Timmons. “If there was a Build-A-Bear for chefs, Jeremiah would have been our Build-A-Bear,” says Kara. Although Timmons has moved on to pursue other culinary endeavors, he and the Cooks established a well-rounded menu that still incorporates not only a variety of cuisines, but also takes common menu staples and elevates them to a more polished level. For example, Ambrosia’s bistro burger ($16) is made with a juicy mix of Wagyu and Angus beef, and one of its toppings is a housemade sweet relish aioli. The sriracha burger ($16) takes this staple to another level with avocado, jalapeños and a creamy sriracha sauce. The curry chicken ($24) isn’t just curried chicken. The creamy sauce and fluffy rice are enhanced with apricots, and the whole dish is topped with crunchy cashews. Two pasta dishes — prawns and purses ($27) and the Cajun pasta ($25) — offer drastically different flavors drawn from cuisines around the U.S. Black truffle essence enhances the porcini stuffed pasta purses, and a New Orleans mix of proteins gets a fiery kick from Cajun spices.

12 INLANDER DINING OUT GUIDE 2021

ABOVE: Ambrosia’s sweet potato fries FACING PAGE: Ambrosia owners Scott and Kara Cook with their son/manager Tanner Cook.


One of the appetizers from Timmons’ 2007 menu became an Ambrosia staple and has since remained one of its most popular dishes. “It’s so unusual,” says Scott. “People can’t really find anything like it at any other restaurant in town.” Timmons’ sister-in-law and her husband, who is of Indian heritage, were dancers at the Royal Winnipeg Ballet in Manitoba, Canada. During a visit to their home, Timmons enjoyed true Canadian poutine at a local restaurant, as well as authentic Indian dishes cooked by his brother-in-law. Experiencing these foods side-by-side, the chef was inspired to combine the concept of poutine with the intense flavors of Indian cuisine, thus creating Ambrosia’s exclusive sweet potato fries ($9). Ambrosia’s menu is modest with its titles. Sweet potato fries is a common dish on many restaurant menus, but further inspection reveals Timmons’ unique reworking of what seems simple to start, with a decadently creamy garam masala sauce, goat cheese and scallion. The stack of perfectly crisp, bright orange fries is both sweet and savory.

Sweet potatoes were domesticated in South America around 5,000 years ago, and a recipe for fries made with these tubers was first published in the early 1930s by the famous agricultural researcher and innovator George Washington Carver. He couldn’t have known how popular they would become in the early 21st century. Ambrosia’s sauce uses a specific blend of Indian garam masala spices that has remained mostly unchanged since the dish was first introduced. “One of the biggest focuses at our restaurant is consistency,” says Scott. “The food needs to stay the same in style and quality, but that’s a little tougher to do today.” Recently, the consistency of this dish was challenged when the restaurant had difficulty sourcing its spice blend due to COVID-19 supply chain issues. They switched briefly to another brand, but the results were noticeably different. So, the Cooks spent time tracking down another supplier of the dish’s original garam masala, and the sauce is once again impeccable. The spice blend imparts a level of flavor without heat that invokes both the comfortable and the exotic in each bite. Traditional Indian garam masala blends include fennel, bay leaves, black and white peppercorn, cloves, cumin, coriander, red Ambrosia Bistro • 9211 E. Montgomchili powder, nutmeg, ery Ave., Spokane Valley • Open Tueand cardamom. Thu 11 am-8 pm, Fri-Sat 11 am-9 pm • The fresh and ambrosia-bistro.com • 509-928-3222 tangy, soft goat cheese cuts through the rich sauce, making what could be a heavy dish effortless to enjoy with every forkful. Paired with the expertly knifed scallion, the cheese perfectly completes this scrumptious dish. Whether you’re an Ambrosia regular or heading there for the first time, this delectable and interesting twist on poutine is a musthave as an appetizer, a main dish or alongside a succulent burger. Share with family or savor each bite solo while sipping a glass of award-winning wine on their newly renovated dining patio. n

DINING OUT GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 13


pozole

DINING OUT

fall is here, eat

2021 GU I DE

ABI’S ARTISAN ICE CREAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

BACKYARD PUBLIC HOUSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

BARNWOOD SOCIAL KITCHEN & TAVERN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

BRICKWEST BREWING . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

CHECKERBOARD TAPROOM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

COCHINITO TAQUERIA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

CREPE CAFE SISTERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

DE LEON’S TACO & BAR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

EAT GOOD GROUP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

EL QUE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

THE ELK PUBLIC HOUSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

ELLIOTTS AN URBAN KITCHEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

GORDY’S SICHUAN CAFE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

HANG 10 HAWAIIAN BBQ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

HAYMAKER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

taqueria

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14 INLANDER DINING OUT GUIDE 2021

INLAND CIDER MILL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

LITTLE EURO/OLD EUROPEAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

LOGAN TAVERN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

LORD STANLEY’S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

MARYHILL WINERY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

MOON TIME . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

NORTH HILL ON GARLAND PUB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

REMEDY KITCHEN AND TAVERN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

SATAY BISTRO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

SCRATCH RESTAURANT & LOUNGE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

SHAWN O’DONNELL’S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AMERICAN GRILL & IRISH PUB . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

THE SWINGING DOORS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

TWO SEVEN PUBLIC HOUSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

UNCLE RUSTY’S DINER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

VERSALIA PIZZA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

VIEUX CARRE NOLA KITCHEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

VOLSTEAD ACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15


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1931 W Pacific Ave. Brownes Addition

1602 Sherman #116 Coeur d Alene, ID

FOR MORE INFO AND TO SEE OUR WEEKLY SPECIALS GO TO 16 INLANDER DINING OUT GUIDE 2021

2727 S Mt Vernon #5 South Hill

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4.55” wide by 5.4” high

Join us for daily specials All Day Happy Hour Monday Taco Tuesday J ia o zi D umplin gs

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Tue-Sat 4PM-Close ~ gordysspokane.com ~ E. 501 30TH Ave ~ 509.747.1170

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Open 7AM-3PM DAILY DINE IN OR DELIVERY

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Hamilton & Sharp in the GU District 509-474-0584 • logantavernspokane.com

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108 N Washington St #101, Spokane • LordStanleysSpokane.com DINING OUT GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 17


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18 INLANDER DINING OUT GUIDE 2021

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ISH! E FULL IRnd COME TRYidTH ay 9a-1p Su & ay rd ay, Satu

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DINING OUT GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 19


REVIEW

A BOND FAREWELL Daniel Craig says goodbye to 007 in the frustrating, uneven No Time to Die BY JOSH BELL

E

Bond has some time to drive.

ver since George Lazenby took over for Sean Connery in 1969’s On Her Majesty’s Secret Service, it’s been clear that the story of James Bond will never end. The five movies starring Daniel Craig as the iconic British superspy have been a sustained effort in defying that incontrovertible fact, and the last three Craig movies have all been crafted as valedictions in some way. With No Time to Die, Craig is truly, officially leaving the role, and the movie spends so much time on its sentimental farewell to Bond that it seems to forget what made him worth watching in the first place. It doesn’t help that Craig’s Bond already had a perfect send-off in 2012’s Skyfall, the strongest of the Craig movies and one of the best Bond movies overall. No Time to Die puts much more effort into its sense of finality, but it never achieves the emotional resonance of Skyfall. Part of the problem is that No Time to Die has been set up not only as a culmination of the Craig era, but also as a direct sequel to 2015’s mediocre Spectre. ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 7, 2021 INLANDER 19


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WE TAKE THINGS SERIOUSLY BOO ATTICUS RADLEY’S COFFEE & GIFTS DOWNTOWN SPOKANE • HOWARD ST.

MOVIE TIMES on SEARCHABLE

FILM | REVIEW “A BOND FAREWELL,” CONTINUED... Bond has left the spy life behind to settle down with psychiatrist Madeleine Swann (Léa Seydoux), his thinly established Spectre love interest, and No Time to Die often feels like it’s as much Madeleine’s story as Bond’s. The movie opens with a flashback to Madeleine’s childhood, as she’s forced to confront a dangerous home invader. In the present, the idyllic life that Bond and Madeleine have built is soon shattered, and he insists they go their separate ways. Cut to five years later, and Bond is a recluse living in Jamaica, where he’s recruited by his old CIA pal Felix Leiter (Jeffrey Wright, returning after two movies away) to help track down a scientist who’s been abducted along with a deadly bioweapon. That eventually puts Bond back in the orbit of MI6 and his old boss M (Ralph Fiennes), along with familiar supporting characters Q (Ben Whishaw) and Moneypenny (Naomie Harris). There’s also a new agent (Lashana Lynch) who’s been given Bond’s old 007 designation. That’s not to mention Spectre villain Ernst Stavro Blofeld (Christoph Waltz), NO TIME TO DIE who’s locked away in an Rated PG-13 elaborate prison like he’s Directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga Magneto, and of course Starring Daniel Craig, Léa Seydoux, Madeleine herself. Ralph Fiennes No Time to Die runs an interminable 163 minutes (the longest Bond movie ever), and it can feel like watching an entire season of a TV series crammed into a feature film. And yet most of the supporting characters are still underused, especially Lynch’s much-hyped Nomi. Ana de Armas shows up for one lively sequence set in Cuba, rousing the movie from its drippy doldrums as a nervous, quippy rookie operative who’s more capable than she first appears. She’s the highlight of the movie, and then she disappears. Instead, No Time to Die is filled with unremarkable action sequences, convoluted betrayals and reveals, and lots of moping, from both Bond and Madeleine. Eventually, Rami Malek arrives as ludicrously named villain Lyutsifer Safin, whose plan for world domination via bioweapon is frustratingly vague, and whose connection to Madeleine feels forced. With his whispery delivery, Malek makes for an underwhelming adversary, not even matching up to Blofeld, whose onscreen time is similarly brief. Cary Joji Fukunaga is the first Bond director to get a screenwriting credit, but aside from Safin’s elaborate, deadly base, he doesn’t come up with much that plays to his strengths as a visual stylist, mostly in TV work (True Detective, Maniac). By the time the movie arrives at its weepy end, its long goodbye has become more maudlin than celebratory. n

OPENING FILMS I’M YOUR MAN

Finding love is hard even when your ideal partner is programmed for you. Dan Stevens stars as a robot who is programmed to be the perfect match for a skeptical scientist (Maren Eggert) in this award-winning German sci-fi rom-com. At the Magic Lantern (SS)

KAREN DALTON: IN MY OWN TIME

Armed with a crackling melancholy voice, singer-songwriter Karen Dalton was revered by her ’60s Greenwich Village folk scene peers like Bob Dylan, but never found — or strove for — stardom. This new doc examines her sad story and beautiful music. At the Magic Lantern (SS)

LAMB

An unsettling modern Icelandic folk tale from A24, Lamb deals with a sheep farming couple who get an unexpected “gift” in the form of a unique “lamb.” The less said and spoiled, the better. (SS)

NO TIME TO DIE

James Bond may not have time to die, but after many COVID delays, he finally has time to show up on the big screen. Daniel Craig’s last dance as 007 should be overstuffed with dashing intrigue and drama, as its runtime is nearly three hours. (SS)

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ShopKizuri.com 35 W Main Ave Every Theater. Every Movie. All in one place.

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DON’T MISS YOUR CHANCE TO DEFY GRAVITY

The untold true story of the Witches of Oz

March 9–27

First Interstate Center for the Arts

TICKETS ON SALE NOW BroadwaySpokane.com


Pictured: Machine Gun Kelly, tattooed pop punker. Not pictured: Machine Gun Kelly, Prohibition gangster. CHRIS VILLA PHOTO

22 INLANDER OCTOBER 7, 2021


GET YOUR LIFE BACK ON TRACK!

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Name Games

Spokane County, WA 509-462-0827

1707 W Broadway Ave, Spokane, WA 99201

DeissnerLaw.com

I’m missing Machine Gun Kelly, but let my loss be your gain BY DENA OGDEN

B

ack in early summer, my spouse casually mentioned that Machine Gun Kelly would be coming to Spokane in October. And I, with a boost of confidence from the early summer sun, the fresh evening air yet to be saturated with smoke, and the optimism that lower COVID numbers brought, said something hopeful and pure back to him like, “Really? Should we go?” Because MGK’s single “My Ex’s Best Friend” is by all definitions a bop, and I’d love to hear it live and enjoy some honest-to-goodness entertainment for the first time since shutdown. Well, dear reader, as it turns out, we aren’t ready. Early-summer-me was so young and naive, I look back at her like, “Aw, isn’t that sweet? She thought she’d make it to a concert. In October. How cute.” I wish we were ready though, I really do. I wish my husband and I had enough foresight to buy tickets and secure a babysitter, and that we weren’t distracted by the bouts of COVID my kids and I had shortly after that conversation, or that we weren’t now stumbling through jarring back-to-school schedule changes and shaky new routines. I don’t doubt that there are a number of other people — those of you who got tickets before it sold out because you weren’t lying on your couch, halfconscious — who have been looking forward to this show with bright, clear eyes for a while now. I’m genuinely happy for you. While I’ve come to terms with sitting this one out, I’d be remiss if I didn’t mention this concert is one of the few that we were both excited about the prospect of attending. We both like Machine Gun Kelly, which is a rare thing for us when it comes to music. Our kids even know some of his songs, and our 4-yearold refers to “Forget Me Too” as “that breakup song.” While they know his music, they do not

know his name because they’re still young enough that the concept of a stage name will take some explaining. Admittedly, I did not know the origin of Machine Gun Kelly’s name until recently. Did you know that his name isn’t actually Kelly, or Machine, or even Gun? It’s Colson Baker, which, if you ask me, is a reasonably cool name that could have worked for a career in music, but probably country. And since MGK has yet to release anything twangy, it seems like the stage name was probably a good decision. Also, MGK is not even the first Machine Gun Kelly. That honor goes to a Prohibitionera gangster in the literal sense who earned the moniker by doing gangster-y, criminal things. Apparently lots of people already knew that fact, because when my husband found out I didn’t, he looked at me like, “Aw, isn’t that sweet? She didn’t know there was a real Machine Gun Kelly who broke many laws nearly a century ago. How cute.” It just goes to show that I need to read up more on the origins of current chart-topping musician stage names, and I am sorely lacking in my Prohibitionera gangster trivia. I guess I know what I’m doing while the rest of you are at the concert Tuesday. In the meantime, I’m reminded there are many singers out there, hiding in plain sight, with stage names that possess equally deep roots that may not be familiar to some of us. And since I have time because, as we covered, I’m still in a state of semi-hibernation post-COVID, and the Inlander has graciously given me a space, I’ve put together a list of some of my favorite stage names, and song recommendations to build a playlist for Tuesday for anyone else who’s not going to MGK (or for anyone who is and just wants something to cleanse the palate on the way to or from the show). ...continued on page 24

NOW THAT FALL IS OFFICIALLY HERE, JAN, THE TOY LADY, ANTICIPATES MORE FAMILY GAME AND PUZZLE NIGHTS:

Don’t fall, Yeti!

River Park Square (509) 456-TOYS OCTOBER 7, 2021 INLANDER 23


MUSIC | ALIASES “NAME GAMES,” CONTINUED...

THE WEEKND

THE KID LAROI

According to a 2013 AMA (Ask Me Anything) thread on Reddit, The Weeknd felt that the stage name just “sounded cool.” And, he dropped the last “e” since a band already existed with the full word. Seems fitting, since most weekends feel inexplicably shortened anyway. Recommended song: “Starboy”

If you’ve been on the internet at all this year, you’re probably familiar with The Kid Laroi, indeed young at 18 years old. But what about the second half of his stage name? Laroi is a reference to the Kamilaroi people, and the Aboriginal Australian heritage on his mom’s side. Recommended song: “Stay” (with Justin Bieber)

REAL NAME: ABEL MAKKONEN TESFAYE

LADY GAGA

REAL NAME: CHARLTON KENNETH JEFFREY HOWARD

REAL NAME: STEFANI JOANNE ANGELINA GERMANOTTA

LIL NAS X

BRUNO MARS

Each part of his name has a separate origin story, with Lil serving as a callout to the popular name choice among other rappers, Nas as part of an already-existing internet alias, and X in reference to the Roman numeral for 10, and how he predicted a career for himself lasting at least a decade. Recommended song: “Industry Baby”

The lore is that “gaga” is inspired by Queen’s “Radio Gaga” and “lady” was added as a contrast to it. Although, depending on which source (and which side) you read, there is discrepancy over how involved her then-producer was in coming up with the name. Recommended song: “The Cure”

REAL NAME: PETER GENE HERNANDEZ

I don’t know why it never occurred to me that someone in the 21st century might not actually be named “Bruno Mars,” but life is funny like that. “Bruno” is a childhood nickname that turned into something more, with “Mars” added as a tongue-in-cheek reference to how out of this world he is. Recommended song: “Just The Way You Are”

LORDE

REAL NAME: ELLA MARIJA LANI YELICH-O’CONNOR I love the simplicity and ferocity behind this one. The idea of a “lord” evoking regality and nobility, and then adding an “e” to make it feminine. Fitting that the name of her first single was indeed “Royals.” Recommended song: “Royals,” of course

REAL NAME: MONTERO LAMAR HILL

DOJA CAT

REAL NAME: AMALA RATNA ZANDILE DLAMINI

She likes weeds and cats, and straightforwardness, it seems. If only we all had the luxury of going by our favorite things (I’d be Lip Balm Bunny). Recommended song: “Kiss Me More” n Machine Gun Kelly with jxdn, carolinesdaughter • Tue, Oct. 12 at 6:30 pm • $45+ • Spokane Pavilion • 574 N. Howard St. • spokanepavilion.com • 888-929-7849

LIZZO

REAL NAME: MELISSA VIVIANE JEFFERSON

Shhh! Don’t call Lizzo “Melissa.”

Not unlike Bruno Mars, Lizzo is a childhood nickname that stuck. I just took a DNA test and turns out, I’m 100 percent behind it. Recommended song: “Good as Hell”

Improve Your Home... Improve Your Life. Shop... Compare & Save! One weekend only! Meet with amazing exhibitors, attend informative seminars and SAVE on all your home related projects. Visit www.spokanehomeshows.com for more information & discount. 24 INLANDER OCTOBER 7, 2021

Oct 8-10

Spokane Fair & Expo Ctr.


UPCOMING SHOWS THE CYBERTRONIC SPREE Sun, Oct 10 at 8 pm Lucky You Lounge $15-$18 D’DAT, MAIAH WYNNE Wed, Oct 13 at 8 pm Lucky You Lounge $10-$12 JIMMY EAT WORLD, TAKING BACK SUNDAY, THE BEACHES Fri, Oct 15 at 6 pm Spokane Pavilion $38-$43 SCATTERBOX 20-YEAR ANNIVERSARY SHOW, GOTU GOTU, TOUCH OF EVIL Sat, Oct 16 at 7 pm Big Dipper $8 TREGO, TERRIBLE BUTTONS, FOLK CRIMES Sat, Oct 16 at 7 pm Lucky You Lounge $15 PALOMA, THE HOME TEAM, GLACIER VEINS Wed, Oct 20 at 6 pm Big Dipper $10 PURITY RING Sat, Oct 23 at 8 pm Knitting Factory $26 TLC Thu, Oct 28 at 7 pm Coeur d’Alene Casino $55-$80 Be sure to check with venues about vaccination/COVID test requirements.

Wind and sun—both are powerful forces. It’s why we’ve added more wind and solar power to our energy mix. But the wind doesn’t always blow and the sun doesn’t always shine. Thankfully, there’s clean, reliable natural gas. It’s an affordable choice that’s always there when you need it. It’s no wonder why 367,000 of our customers choose it for heat, hot water and cooking. Learn more at myavista.com/greener

OCTOBER 7, 2021 INLANDER 25


FESTIVAL PARKING LOT PRIDE

Much like last year, Spokane Pride’s annual procession of love and affirmation will take place from the comfort of your own personal bubble — this year, that’s your car. The Spokane Arena parking lot is serving as the host site for this year’s drive-thru parade and festival, which still includes local favorite drag queens and food trucks, as well as local businesses and nonprofits with booths along the route. If you’re looking to get vaccinated for COVID-19 or tested for HIV, there’s also an inclusive health corner available for all attendees. In addition to the Saturday afternoon fest, the first annual Big Gay Dance Party is happening the night before at nYne Bar & Bistro on Fri, Oct. 8, from 8 pm to 2 pm. Masks are required for all participants at both events regardless of vaccination status. — MADISON PEARSON Spokane Drive-Thru Pride Parade • Sat, Oct. 9 from 4-8 pm • Free • All ages • Spokane Arena • 702 W. Mallon Ave. • spokanepride.org • 509-822-7190

VISUAL ARTS MEL-ANCHOLIA

Diving into the painted worlds of octogenarian Spokane artist Mel McCuddin can feel like getting lost in the blurred corners of a dream. His style of subconscious-driven expressionism results in cherubic human figures that feel off-kilter and slightly twisted and vivid animals that pop with expressive colors. “The paint is poured, dripped, rubbed and wiped, and I use rags and my fingertips at least as frequently as I do brushes,” McCuddin says of his process. For its October show, the Art Spirit Gallery presents a vast swath of McCuddin’s oil paintings, a collection that spans decades and showcases the artist’s humorous, unsettling and stirring sides. — SETH SOMMERFELD The Magnificent Mel McCuddin • Through Oct. 30, open Wed-Sun from 11 am–6 pm • Free • The Art Spirit Gallery • 415 Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • theartspiritgallery.com • 208-765-6006

26 INLANDER OCTOBER 7, 2021

WORDS EXPERT INSIGHT

As a fitting tribute to its 10th anniversary, this year’s TEDx Spokane event presents 10 speakers sharing something they’re deeply passionate about for 10 minutes each. This mini-TED Talk event, for which local experts and visionaries share innovative ideas and insight with their fellow community members, offers options to attend in-person at the Bing, or stream the event from the comfort and safety of home. The 10th anniversary speaker lineup includes local philanthropist Rick Clark and Spark Central’s Executive Director Brooke Matson, alongside experts in music, film, psychology, childhood development, technology and more. See the full speaker lineup and learn more about them online. — CHEY SCOTT TEDx Spokane • Sat, Oct. 9 at 6:30 pm • $35 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • Also online; details at tedxspokane.com


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Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

WORDS COMING TOGETHER

One unexpected benefit of Humanities Washington’s Bedtime Stories fundraiser going virtual yet again: You can actually cozy up in your PJs on the couch while listening to its special storytime session with acclaimed Evergreen State writers. On this year’s program is Spokane’s own Jess Walter and Moscow-based poet Tiffany Midge. They’re joined by acclaimed Seattle author Charles Johnson, and each is sharing a story centered on the theme “Coming Together Again.” Washington State Poet Laureate Rena Priest (pictured) also reads at the event, which raises funding for the statewide nonprofit whose mission is to “open minds and bridge divides by creating spaces to explore different perspectives.” Make sure to preregister online, and consider supporting the nonprofit’s mission through a donation or by purchasing a “Nightstand Package” ($50) of books from this year’s featured writers. — CHEY SCOTT Bedtime Stories • Fri, Oct. 8 at 6 pm • Free (registration required) with optional donation packages • Online; details at humanities.org

WORDS A VIRTUAL CROSSROADS

Auntie’s is teaming up with fellow independent bookstores in the Pacific Northwest to present this special virtual event with bestselling authors Jonathan Franzen and Maria Semple, in celebration of Franzen’s new novel, Crossroads. A suspenseful story that largely unfolds over a single winter day in 1971, Crossroads examines a Midwestern family teetering on the brink of moral crisis. Each member of the Hildebrandt family has a secret they’re trying to keep from each other, and won’t be able to achieve their own personal end-goals without maintaining that critical secrecy. Franzen talks about the novel’s creation, inspiration and more with Seattle-based writer Semple, best known for her 2012 novel Where’d You Go, Bernadette. — CHEY SCOTT Crossroads: Jonathan Franzen in Conversation with Maria Semple • Tue, Oct. 12 at 6 pm • $35 (book purchase as ticket) • Online; register at auntiesbooks.com

numericacu.com Federally insured by NCUA OCTOBER 7, 2021 INLANDER 27


longer works there. WTF!! They would not give me any information at all, so I’m lost. Does anyone know Jayme from Oasis? I don’t know her last name, but I’ve been going to her for more than five years.

CHEERS

I SAW YOU FLAGS ON PICKUPS You people who drive around with big flags on your pickups are only announcing to the world that you pee sitting down and disrespect women. You know who you are. You don’t impress anyone. HAPPY TO BE STUCK WITH YOU... IN THE CHECKOUT LINE You were ahead of me in the North Division Fred Meyer checkout line on 9/29/21. You were wearing black jeans and a sweater with stylish black boots. We laughed about how empty we thought the parking lot was compared to the long lines inside the store. From your funny comments and laughter, you seem to have a very fun personality. You had the most gorgeous eyes surrounded by cute freckles. The rest of you was pretty nice to look at as well. I’m sorry if I appeared standoffish when I stared at my cellphone. I had to do it to force myself from staring at you. Which is a good thing, because I would have soaked my face mask with drool. I hope whoever you are with tells you how special you are every single day. LOOKING FOR MY HAIRDRESSER My hairdresser worked at Oasis Salon on 29th. I called today to make an appointment, and they said she no

NFL FOOTBALL NATIONAL ANTHEM Cheers to the NFL deciding to have two national anthems before each game this year (the Star Spangled Banner and Lift Every Voice). It’s a step in the right direction, but isn’t complete yet. At last report, there were players from many different countries. So, to be fair to everyone, the NFL should also include the national anthems from their countries. Now I know some may object to playing the national anthem from other countries and insist on only playing the two national anthems from the U.S., but I wish the NFL would at least think about it. Also, I know some of those represented below are actually part of the U.S., but since they also have their own anthems, I think it would make sense for them to also be included on the list. So, my advice is to play anthems from each of the following countries before each NFL game: Germany, Canada, American Samoa, Jamaica, Liberia, England, Australia, Nigeria, Haiti, Tonga, Scotland, Virgin Islands, Ukraine, Uganda, Trinidad, South Korea, Sierra Leone, Romania, Puerto Rico, Poland, Philippines, New Zealand, Malaysia, Japan, Estonia, Czech Republic and Cameroon. As players join from other countries in the future, I hope their national anthems will be added as well, so as not to leave anyone off or make anyone feel bad. THANKS FOR MAKING ME HAPPY!! Mr Bill, I’ve been in love with you since the day we met. You’ve made me so happy, and I’m looking forward to spending the rest of my life with you. I love you very much, and I hope you never forget that.

JEERS SELF ENTITLED?? ME?? Lol You left a nasty note on my car at Wandermere Fred Meyer Sunday the 3rd (afternoon). You said I am self-entitled and I am what’s wrong with the world. I

there, but I am very disappointed. DIRT ROAD TRASH Jeers to the King and Queen of the trash heap in North Spokane. The queen has conned your way through the trash that is your lies and left nothing but garbage behind for me to clean up. The king is dumber

fellow Americans by getting the shot and getting on with the job. RE: JEERS UNVAXXED BY CHOICE Smokers, alcoholics and the obese do not overwhelm ICU beds. Eastern WA and North ID must be very liberal. Per conservative dogma, liberals make

The real public servants treating patients have no problem with doing what’s best for our patients...

actually waited for you to move to the side of the lane for cars like everyone else does, like you are supposed to do. When you continued right down the middle, I safely went around you. You need a reality check, and I want you to know: You are the self-entitled one here!!! God I hope this reaches you!! DISAPPOINTING THRIFT STORE IN SPOKANE VALLEY For months this Spokane Valley thrift store’s public restrooms have been closed. The restrooms in their downtown store remain open. I think they could invest in reopening the restrooms in the Spokane Valley store to be helpful to their customers. It’s a popular store; you think they would care about the needs of their customers. Lots of families, elderly and handicapped people depend on public restrooms. I believe it is very inconsiderate to fail their customers too. They’re pricing has gone crazy too, and it is really giving me second thoughts about shopping there. The other day I saw a plain, beat-up, used black tote, and they wanted an outrageous $9.99. A plain dog harness was priced $9.99. That’s the price for new in a pet store. I thought they were supposed to offer good deals. Not sure what’s going on

enough to believe you and may have taken you in, but we all know the stench of your lies. Good riddance to bad rubbish. RE: INLANDER 9/29/2021 JEERS SECTION A quick tally of readership priorities: One person came to the defense of missing women of color. Three people came to the defense of Dodge truck generalizations. Yikes. RIGHTEOUS SHERIFF OZZIE I watched your YouTube video on officers not wanting to receive the vaccine. I am a health care provider, and the idea the so-called “public servants” refuse to get vaccinated is disgusting. Remember that all health care providers for the public also care for you and your officers. We are pleading for people to get vaccinated for the health of us all. So much for protect and serve. The last person I want “first responding” to me is someone unvaccinated that places their own selfishness above public health and safety. Honestly if you don’t get the vaccine, just quit and save all of us from your “personal beliefs or religious exemptions” banter. The real public servants treating patients have no problem with doing what’s best for our patients and

poor choices and then expect others (the taxpayers) to rescue them. That is exactly what the unvaxxed are doing: making a stupid choice and then expecting our health care system to save them via the sacrifice of others. RINOs! YOU MAKE THE CALL It’s easy — either get the shot and potentially be one of the rare hundreds who experience a breakthrough COVID infection and survive, or don’t get the vaccine and be one of the millions who have died from COVID-19...YOU make the call... it’s a no-brainer... the folks who aren’t getting the vaccine do exhibit signs of not having a brain, soooo? n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS A N A I S

C A R D I

O D I L E

T O F I T

S M R A I N

SOUND OFF

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

28 INLANDER OCTOBER 7, 2021

L E T S K E E P I N T O U C H

H I R E A U N T I E

S L I T S K I R T

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S T O C U B L O Y L E

A B O V E R E P R O A C H

S I G H D S R A O T Z T W O O U T

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C A T S K I L L S

C O O E R S M A N O

R U M P E L S T I L T S K I N

E D Y E E S D A M O N

I M H O T

T H I N E

O U N C E

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

HOEDOWN FOR HOPE Spokane HOPE’s 10th annual, western-themed fundraiser with dinner, auction packages, raffles, music and dancing. Proceeds bring HOPE to local children from birth to age 5 who are deaf or hard of hearing on their journey to listen and talk. Oct. 9, 5-10 pm. $77. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanehope.org TRANSITIONS’ PEOPLE WHO CARE Transitions’ 19th annual event celebrates Women’s Hearth’s 30 years through alumnae stories and a keynote address centered on work by a university professor on the effectiveness of the Hearth’s community-focused drop-in center model. The 30-minute celebration will be streamed on Transitions’ YouTube channel. Oct. 14, noon. Free registration. help4women.org/pwc2021 (509-328-6702)

COMEDY

NO CLUE Join the BDT Players as they put a comedic spin on everyone’s favorite macabre guessing game. Fridays in October at 7:30 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com SHULER KING When he isn’t on the road performing across the country, King works as a licensed funeral director and embalmer at his family’s funeral business in South Carolina. Oct. 8-9 at 7:30 and 10:30 pm, Oct. 10 at 7:30 pm. $25-$35. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com/events/47556 SAFARI Blue Door’s version of “Whose Line,” a fast-paced improv show with a few twists and turns added. Rated for mature audiences/ages 16+. Reservations recommended. Saturdays from 7:30-9 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com LOUIS C.K. Six-time Emmy Award winner Louis C.K. has released over nine stand up specials including most recently “Sincerely,” currently available on his website. Oct. 10, 8 pm. $30-$75. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. firstinterstatecenter.org

COMMUNITY

COLVILLE CORN MAZE & PUMPKIN PATCH The Inland Northwest’s largest corn maze, plus a pumpkin patch. Hosted by Knight Farms, one hour north of Spokane. Open daily through Oct. 31; MonThu 4 pm to dusk; Fri 4-7 pm, Sat-Sun 11 am-7 pm. $7-$9. Colville Corn Maze & Pumpkin Patch, 73 Oakshott Rd. colvillecornmaze.com (509-684-6751) LOUIS COMFORT TIFFANY: TREASURES FROM THE DRIEHAUS COLLECTION A celebration of the artistry and craftsmanship of the Tiffany artworks from Chicago’s distinguished Richard H. Driehaus Collection, highlighting masterworks never before presented in a comprehensive exhibition. Open Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm through Feb. 13. $7-$12. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org CONVERSATIONS ON NATURE The Master Gardener Foundation of Spokane County is offering this educational series, the final event is a live stream to create pumpkin centerpieces with botanical elements. Oct. 7, 7-8:45 pm. $25. mgfsc.org SPOKANE COUNTY REDISTRICTING COMMITTEE: FINAL PUBLIC HEARING The Spokane County Independent Redistricting Committee is hosting its fourth and final public hearing for the redistrict-

ing process; the committee expects to consider a final redistricting plan for approval after the public hearing. Includes a virtual option. Call in to 253-215-878; Meeting ID: 970 8247 9718, Passcode: 518970 Oct. 7, 5:30-7:30 pm. Free. Northern Quest Resort, 100 N. Hayford Rd. redistrictspokaneco.com (509-242-7000) 42ND ANNUAL HOME IDEA SHOW A vendor expo offering ideas for home renovations and much more. Oct. 8 from 12-8 pm; Oct. 9 from 10 am-7 pm and Oct. 10 from 10 am-5 pm. $7-$10. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. spokanehomeshows.com THE GREAT PUMPKINFEST A weekendlong event featuring a pumpkin patch, line dancing, face painting, photo booth, live music, a raffle and more. Proceeds support Bite2Go, YoungLife, Generation Alive and the Ronald McDonald House. Oct. 8 from 4-9 pm, Oct. 9 from 11 am-10 pm and Oct. 10 from 11 am-7 pm. $5-$20/ pumpkin. Brick West Brewing Co., 1318 W. First Ave. seeyouatthepatch.org SHRINERS HAUNTED HALLOWEEN DRIVE-THRU HUNT Take a slow drive through the El Katif Shriners’ Halloweenthemed “Fez Forest.” Look for hidden items spooky characters. Proceeds support the El Katif Shriners’ mission and programs. Oct. 8-30; Fri-Sat from 5:308:30 pm. $10/car. Shriners Event Center, 7217 W. Westbow Blvd. elkatif.org SPOKANE PRIDE: BIG GAY DANCE PARTY Spokane Pride is hosting its inaugural “Big Gay Dance Party” at nYne featuring performers, drink and food specials, lots of neon and glitter, body painting, drag and more. Proceeds benefit Spokane AIDS Network. Proof of COVID vaccination required. Oct. 8, 8 pm-2 am. nYne Bar & Bistro, 232 W. Sprague Ave. facebook.com/spokanepride/events ARTISAN CRAFT & FOOD FAIR The Mt. Spokane Bandstand presents their annual fair, featuring raffles, a bake sale and more than 100 vendors of handmade crafts, art and popular consumer items. Proceeds benefit the award-winning Mt. Spokane High School Bands and Color Guard. Oct. 9, 9 am-5 pm and Oct. 10, 11 am-4 pm. $2. Mt. Spokane High School, 6015 E. Mt Spokane Park Dr. mtspokaneband.com/craft-fair.html (456-0446) THE GREAT PUMPKINFEST A community, charity-supporting, weekendlong event featuring a pumpkin patch, photo booth, live music, a raffle and more. Proceeds support Bite2Go, YoungLife, Generation Alive and the Ronald McDonald House. Oct. 8 from 4-9 pm, Oct. 9 from 11 am-9 pm and Oct. 10 from 12-7 pm. Oct. 9-10. $5-$20 per pumpkin. Bellwether Brewing Co., 2019 N. Monroe St. seeyouatthepatch.org (509-328-0428) MODEL TRAIN SHOW See over 800 feet of HO track, with 18 tunnels, a large rail yard, city, bridges and more in a full scenic layout. Oct. 9, 5-9 pm. Free. Evergreen Model Railroad Club, 18213 E. Appleway Ave. (939-5845) PREGNANCY & INFANT LOSS REMEMBRANCE October is Pregnancy & Infant Loss Awareness Month. Heritage Funeral Home invites anyone whose life has been touched by pregnancy and infant loss to honor all the babies gone too soon. Please provide your baby’s name by calling Heritage at 509-838-8900 or email marketing@fairmountmemorial.com. Oct. 9, 10-11 am. Free. Heritage Funeral Home, 508 N. Government Way. (509838-8900) MODEL TRAIN SHOW Presented by the River City Modelers Train Club, with

200+ tables of railroad related items for sale including model and toy trains, photographs, books, toy autos and trucks, bridges and buildings. Oct. 10, 9:30 am3:30 pm. $6; ages 12 and under free. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. (509-477-1766) CITY CELEBRATES THE RIVERFRONT CLOCK TOWER The City of Spokane is honoring the man who spearheaded the community effort to save the clock tower in Riverfront Park 50 years ago. Oct. 13, 11 am. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. spokaneriverfrontpark.com CLIMATE GIRL EFFECT A discussion of the book “Fridays, Flint, and Fire: The Climate Girl Effect” that explores girls’ technofeminist activism in the climate justice movement. Oct. 13, 4-5:15 pm. Free. Gonzaga University Jepson Center, 502 E. Boone Ave. gonzaga.edu/centerfor-climate-society-environment/events YW TABLE TALK Listen in to a conversation between Kiantha Duncan (NAACP Spokane President and WSCADV board member), Annie Murphy (Executive Director of Spokane Regional Domestic Violence Coalition) and Jeanette Hauck (CEO of YWCA Spokane) as they discuss how workplaces, business leaders, HR professionals, supervisors and co-workers can take action to foster a supportive environment for survivors and help to hold perpetrators accountable. Watch online at ywcaspokane.org. Oct. 13. Free. ywcaspokane.org/event/yw-table-talk

FESTIVAL

SPOKANE PRIDE DRIVE-THRU FESTIVAL & CAR PARADE This year’s celebration is a special drive-thru event with local nonprofits, businesses and, of course, drag queens. Experience Spokane’s proudest procession of affirmation and love for our community. The Greater Spokane Food Truck Association also hosts local food trucks. An inclusive health corner offers vaccines and HIV testing. Masks required. Oct. 9, 4-8 pm. Free. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. facebook.com/spokanepride/events STONELODGE FARMS FALL FESTIVAL Includes food, vendors and activities for all ages, a pumpkin patch and fresh pumpkin donuts. Sat and Sun from 10 am-5 pm through Oct. 24. Stonelodge Farm, 6509 Stonelodge Rd. (509-991-4389) LAKE CITY COMICON The 4th annual event features over 75 exhibitors and artists, a cosplay photo booth, exclusive merchandise, special guests and more. Oct. 16, 9:30 am. $11.49. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. lakecitycon.com (208-765-4969)

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OCTOBER 7, 2021 INLANDER 29


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GRAND OPENING WEEKEND Enjoy locally made cider, live music, a raffle and more at the newly opened cider house in North Spokane, featuring 8 ciders on tap. Oct. 7 from 3-9 pm, Oct. 8 from 3-11 pm, Oct. 9 from 2-11 pm. Free. Inland Cider Mill Tap House, 1020 W. Francis Ave. Ste B. inlandcidermill.com PAIRING WINE WITH FOOD Join instructor Sharon Irvine in this new class and sample wines and accompanying dishes while learning how to pair the two together. Oct. 8, 6:30-8:30 pm. $65. The Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org PIE + PINTS POP-UP Bean & Pie is popping up at Lumberbeard every Friday in October from 5-7 pm. Enjoy a rotating assortment of sweet and savory pies each week, alongside beer from Lumberbeard. Order ahead for best selection. Lumberbeard Brewing, 25 E. Third Ave. beanandpie.com (509-381-5142) BREWERSFEST United Way of Moscow/Latah County and the Latah County Fair Board of Directors host this 3rd annual event featuring regionally produced and local food trucks. Oct. 9, 4-10 pm. $20-$25. Latah County Fairgrounds, 1021 Harold St. latah.id.us/fair APPLE DUMPLINGS During Green Bluff’s annual Apple Festival, enjoy “world famous apple dumplings,” available Saturday (10 am-4 pm) and Sundays (12-4 pm) the first three weekends of October. $5 each. Green Bluff United Methodist Church, 9908 E. Greenbluff Rd. (509-979-2607) ALL YOU CAN EAT PANCAKE BREAKFAST A pancake breakfast served with eggs, sausage and OJ, plus fresh homemade Green Bluff applesauce. Sundays from 8-11 am through Oct. 17. $3.50-$7. Green Bluff Grange, 9809 Green Bluff Rd. (509-279-2607) BOTTOMLESS(ISH) MIMOSA SUNDAY BRUNCH Sunday brunch and bottomless(ish) mimosas, with a variety of choices. Sundays at 9:30 and 11 am. $25. Nectar Catering & Events, 120 N. Stevens St. bit.ly/3qIJju9

MUSIC

COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY: BLAZING FIDDLES GALA This second annual event includes happy hour, performances by the Rose Creek Singers and Fancy Dancers from the Coeur d’Alene Tribe, a buffet dinner and the Coeur d’Alene Symphony’s lively rendition of music from old movie and TV westerns. Oct. 9, 5 pm. $125. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S. Nukwalqw. cdasymphony.org FALL FAMILY WEEKEND CONCERT The Gonzaga Music Department’s student choir performs for the annual family weekend concert. Oct. 9, 7:30 pm. Free; donations accepted. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 211 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga.edu (509-313-4776) SPOKANE SYMPHONY MASTERWORKS 2: BEETHOVEN’S SOUL While Beethoven may be best known for his “greatest hits,” like Symphony No. 5, Music Director James Lowe has mined the archives for jewels that deserve to be heard and that reflect the composer’s inner life. Oct. 9 at 8 pm and Oct. 10 at 3 pm. $19-$62. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org MADELEINE PEYROUX: CARLESS LOVE FOREVER TOUR The American

jazz singer and songwriter began her career as a teenager on the streets of Paris singing vintage jazz and blues songs before finding mainstream success in 2004. Oct. 10, 8 pm. $41-$68. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com AN EVENING WITH AMY GRANT Amy Grant is the first contemporary Christian artist to have a platinum record. Oct. 11, 7:30 pm. $46-$100. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. firstinterstatecenter.org WSU JAZZ CONCERT The concert features faculty ensemble Jazz Northwest, the award-winning WSU Jazz Big Band and Big Band II under the direction of Regents Professor and Coordinator of Jazz Studies Greg Yasinitsky. Oct. 12, 7:30 pm. Free. Kimbrough Music Building (WSU), WSU Pullman. events.wsu. edu/event/jazz-concert-12

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. SEATTLE THUNDERBIRDS Regular season match. Face coverings required for all guests ages 5+. Game special: Numerica Magnet schedule giveaway. Oct. 8, 7 pm. $17-$37. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com SPOKANE NORDIC SKI ASSOCIATION TRAIL DAY Volunteers should meet at the Selkirk Lodge. Please RSVP and bring your own loppers or pruning saws if possible. Oct. 9 and Oct. 24, 8:30 am-3 pm. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanenordic.org

THEATER

DR. JEKYLL & MR. HYDE A staged adaptation by Jeffrey Hatcher of the classic novella by Robert Louis Stevenson. Oct. 7-10 (times vary). $12. Pullman Civic Theatre, 1220 NW Nye St. pullmancivictheatre.org (509-332-8406) SUNSET BOULEVARD A stage adaptation of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Tony Award-winning musical masterwork of dreams and desire nestled in the shadowed hills of Hollywood. Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm and Sat-Sun at 1:30 pm. through Oct. 10. $18-$23. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N. Grand Ave. rtoptheatre.org (509-334-0750) MASTERPIECE MONOLOGUES: NEW WORKS Ten new short works make their on-screen debut in this audienceacclaimed continuation of Masterpiece Monologues, which also streams free. Oct. 8, 7 pm. Free. vimeo.com/ stagelefttheater ROALD DAHL’S MATILDA, THE MUSICAL The theater’s 75th season opener. Matilda is a little girl with astonishing wit, intelligence and psychokinetic powers. She’s unloved by her cruel parents but impresses her schoolteacher Miss Honey. Oct. 8-24; Fri at 7 pm, SatSun at 2 pm. $12-$16. Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia. spokanechildrenstheatre.org MET LIVE IN HD: BORIS GODUNOV Bass René Pape, the world’s reigning Boris, reprises his overwhelming portrayal of the tortured tsar caught between grasping ambition and crippling paranoia, kicking off the Live in HD season. Oct. 9, 9:55 am and Oct. 18, 6 pm. $15/$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) AN AVIARY FOR THE BIRDS OF SAD-

NESS Spokane Playwrights Laboratory’s inaugural staged reading, featuring an original full-length play by Tristen Canfield. Free; donations appreciated. Oct. 14, 7:30 pm. Washington Cracker Co. Building, 304 W. Pacific. spokaneplaywrightslaboratory.com

VISUAL ARTS

EWU FACULTY EXHIBITION This annual exhibition features art by EWU’s Art Faculty in an array of styles and media, including painting, sculpture, printmaking, ceramics, photography, video and digital art. Through Nov. 4; Mon-Fri 9 am-5 pm. Free. EWU Gallery of Art, 140 Art Building. ewu.edu/cahss/fineperforming-arts/art/gallery THE MAGNIFICENT MEL MCCUDDIN A solo showcase of the prolific Northwest artist’s work. McCuddin has been painting for more than four decades, and is known for his figurative imagery of people and animals. Through Nov. 1; Wed-Sun 11 am-6 pm. Free. The Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com RECENT ACQUISITIONS: SELECTIONS FROM THE SAFECO ART COLLECTION Seattle-based Safeco Insurance began collecting art in the ’70s to build a collection that reflected “the creativity and diversity of the communities it served.” Recognized nationally as a model for corporate collecting, the collection evolved to capture a uniquely Pacific Northwest aesthetic. Eventually, it was distributed amongst several Washington state institutions, including the MAC. Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm through Feb. 7. $7-$12. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org SPOKANE WATERCOLOR SOCIETY JURIED MEMBER SHOW Guest juried by Molly Murrah of the Northwest Watercolor Society. Mon-Fri from 10 am-5 pm through Oct. 29. Free. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland Ave. spokaneartschool.net (509-325-1500.) SECOND FRIDAY ARTWALK Stroll the streets of downtown Coeur d’Alene and enjoy locally and nationally acclaimed artists, along with local shops, restaurants and businesses. Second Fridays from 5-8 pm. artsandculturecda.org THERE AND BACK AGAIN A show featuring the work of John Thamm, Roch Fautch, Rick Davis, Jesse Swanson, Darrell Wilcox, Hank Chiappetta, Matt R. Wolf and Jared Anderson. “There and Back Again” signifies their return from COVID isolation and a celebration of the rebuilding of a double shotgun building in Peaceful Valley by Roch, Jesse, Rick, Rodney and Matt. Fridays from 5-9 pm through Oct. 29. Free. Shotgun Studios, 1625 W. Water Ave. (509-688-3757) HAVE A BLAST WITH GLASS Enjoy activities including stained glass-inspired projects, and visit “Louis Comfort Tiffany: Treasures from the Driehaus Collection” for inspiration to create your own family artwork. Oct. 9, 11 am-3 pm. Free w/ admission. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org SVAC ARTIST SHOWCASE ART AUCTION The Spokane Valley Arts Council’s 14 annual fundraiser includes artists completing “Quick Finish” pieces from 5-6:30 pm, followed by dinner. Proceeds support student scholarships and to purchase monumental statues. Oct. 9, 5 pm. $60. CenterPlace, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. spokanevalleyarts. org n


CONGRESS

Ready for MORE? Congress is likely to punt on national legalization, again BY WILL MAUPIN

O

nce again, Congress is taking on cannabis legalization. But is there any reason to believe the government won’t continue to punt on an overwhelmingly popular issue? Probably not. The Marijuana Opportunity, Reinvestment and Expungement Act, or MORE Act, is working its way through Congress. On Sept. 30, the House Judiciary Committee passed the measure by a 26-15 vote. As a result, the MORE Act is now eligible to be voted upon by the full U.S. House of Representatives. If passed, it would go to the Senate and ultimately to President Joe Biden’s desk for signature to become law of the land.

Congress again has the chance to make legalization happen nationwide. Should this bill become law, cannabis would be legalized at the federal level and a series of social justice changes will follow, including expunging some cannabis convictions and requiring equity rights to a potential new market in the world of cannabis. If this sounds familiar, that’s because it should.

This isn’t the first time the MORE Act has made its way through the Judiciary Committee. Legalization efforts have made it this far multiple times before, but each has stalled out somewhere between this phase and becoming law. ...continued on next page

OCTOBER 7, 2021 INLANDER 31


GREEN ZONE

BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habitforming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

We’re celebrating dining out...

CONGRESS “READY FOR MORE?,” CONTINUED... Once upon a time, not all that long ago, simply making it out of committee was a historic moment for cannabis legislation. Now though? Lawmakers are rehashing the same issues year after year, and then punting. The MORE Act itself has reached this point before — as recently as just last year. The MORE Act was introduced in the House by Rep. Jerrold Nadler, a New York Democrat, during the previous session of Congress. It made it out of committee in 2020 and was eventually passed by the House, but it was not taken up by the Senate before the end of that Congress’ term. Could Nadler’s bill make it all the way through this time?

It could, but if history is a guide, it won’t. Cannabis simply isn’t a priority at the federal level right now. Giant infrastructure bills and government funding are front of mind for both parties, and the midterm elections are coming up uncomfortably soon. Despite the overwhelming, and growing, support for cannabis legalization among the American people, it appears Congress is willing to continue to punt on the issue. Maybe next term. Maybe next Congress. Maybe someday they’ll take seriously an issue that is being handled effectively on a state-bystate level while the federal government continues to play hot potato to ignore it. n

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32 INLANDER OCTOBER 7, 2021


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34 INLANDER OCTOBER 7, 2021

I love my boyfriend. We’ve been together two years. Recently, however, we’ve been experiencing conflict over the issue of children. He wants kids; I don’t. I’ve always felt strongly about this, and he said he was fine with this when we started dating. But he’s been bringing up the subject of kids a lot lately (I suspect because he’s thinking about popping the question). The discussions have grown fraught — to the point where he was in tears at the end of an argument. I eventually said I AMY ALKON could be open to kids because I love him and don’t want to lose him. But can this be healthy for us long-term? —Conflicted Though many things in life come with the opportunity to push the “back” button, once you have a kid, you have a kid. You can’t just drop ‘em off at the fire station if they turn out to be precociously criminal — already hot-wiring cars at age 7. Deciding whether to have kids is a very recent state of affairs, coinciding with the development and availability of reliable birth control (starting in the late 1950s with the Lippes Loop IUD). For most of human history, unless a woman spent her fertile years all alone on one of those New Yorker cartoon desert islands, there was a good chance she’d have not just a child but the beginnings of a litter. There’s a widespread (and mistaken!) assumption that a woman who gives birth will immediately and unconditionally bond with her baby, explains anthropologist and primatologist Sarah Hrdy. Probably because of this, many people seem to believe the only thing stopping any woman from wanting a child is having yet to bring one into existence. In fact, neither humans nor other mammals “automatically nurture each baby born,” Hrdy observes. Clinical psychologist Idun Roseth and her colleagues, reviewing research on mother-infant bonding issues, report: “Most mothers find that feelings of affection come within a week from birth. However, some mothers are still struggling with this after many months. ... A small percentage may even have hostile feelings towards their infant.” In other words, the public has an overly rosy, sentimental — and scientifically incorrect — view of what’s often referred to as the “maternal instinct.” There is no such thing — and the term “instinct” is the problem. The actual scientific definition of an instinct is an innate behavior (“factory-installed” — present at birth rather than learned afterward) that members of a species perform automatically. An example is a baby’s crying — alerting everybody in earshot, “YO! I HAVE UNMET NEEDS!” (Nobody has to send their baby to crying school. It automatically wails its little head off when it’s wet, scared, cold, or wants a sip o’ nippy.) In contrast with automatic instinctual behavior, there’s behavior that’s learned as well as behavior that is only sometimes triggered in some members of a species. Accordingly, the misnamed “maternal instinct” would be better termed a maternal impulse or motivation. The impulse to nurture one’s infant is just one motivation that may arise in a woman. Hrdy has long emphasized that ambivalence and even rejection of an infant are other impulses a new mother may feel. (Unfortunately, the myth of instantly falling in love with one’s infant is so pervasive and strong that women who don’t experience this tend to feel there’s something wrong with them.) In reality, “maternal commitment” tends to emerge “piecemeal,” Hrdy explains, and is “chronically sensitive to external cues.” By “external cues,” she means a woman’s current context — such as whether she’s unable to adequately feed and protect her infant. War, famine, postpartum depression, or even a new partner who doesn’t want another man’s child are contexts that may even trigger infanticide: a horrifying maternal impulse but a maternal impulse just the same. Thankfully, this impulse is relatively rare in our society, and many women (and men!) report “falling in love” with a child they never planned to have. Maybe...possibly...you’d become one of those “in-love” women and be wildly happy you’d had children. However, in your email, you repeatedly made it clear that you don’t want kids. You are only considering it because you love this man and don’t want to lose him — which is quite different from wanting children. You might ask friends who are parents to an infant and other young kids to let you spend a long weekend with them. Admittedly, this isn’t the same as parenting your own kids, but it might give you a sense of whether you’re actually up for the job — or whether you’re like me. Personally, though I have great respect for devoted, loving parents, if I were in charge of a thing that screams like it’s being eaten alive by a zombie, it would take about 20 minutes before there was grain alcohol in my coffee — and in someone’s sippy cup. n ©2021, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)


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208-714-4970 • 509-327-3700 • edenspokane.com 208-765-2020 3879 North Schreiber Way Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

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61. Raunchy 63. 100-stamp purchase, often 64. Many wedding guests 65. Part of CORE 66. 1991 NHL MVP Brett 67. LLC relative 68. Cry after “Psst!” 69. Talking-____ (reprimands) 70. Jill Biden, ____ Jacobs DOWN 1. “Delta of Venus” author Nin 2. ____ B with the 2017 #1 hit “Bodak Yellow” 3. “Call me” 4. Leg-revealing attire 5. Remini who hosts GSN’s “People Puzzler” 6. Taking prescription drugs, informally

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ACROSS and Gasteyer 35. Campus mil. group 37. Texter’s “I can’t believe this” 38. Athlete who uses steroids 39. “Oh yeah? ____ who?” 40. “Are not!” response 42. “Don’t mind ____ do” 43. Letter-shaped auto feature 45. Sully 46. Jean Hagen’s “Singin’ in the Rain” role 48. Brusque 50. Tina Fey was its first female head writer 51. “____, Brute?” 52. Spread dandelion seeds, say 53. “Alien” actor Yaphet 56. “That’s wrong ____ many levels ...” 58. Isao of the Golf Hall of Fame 60. Moo ____ pork

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1. Common sports injury spot, for short 4. ____-mo replay 7. Holy 13. When doubled, a 2010s dance 14. Singer/activist Horne 16. Daniel ____, first JapaneseAmerican to serve in Congress 17. Kid’s refrigerator display 18. Metrical foot, in poetry 19. Some garden statuary 20. Passports, e.g. 21. Vincent van Gogh’s brother 22. Uriah of “David Copperfield” 23. Turbaned Punjabis 25. Some library offerings 27. Instant, in product names 30. Apt. feature 31. Blood fluids 32. Grand ____ 33. 50-Across castmate of Shannon

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7. Expresses exasperation toward 8. Rice on bookshelves 9. Doves, at times 10. Fairytale gold producer 11. Part of a needle

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THIS W ANSWE EEK’S I SAW RS ON YOUS

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Mehmet 28. One of the Wayans brothers 29. “Can we open a window?” 45 33. “Swan Lake” swan 34. Tailored ____ 49 50 (customized) 36. “Rip Van Winkle” setting 53 54 55 39. 2020 Pixar film 41. One with cinco dedos 58 59 60 44. “The Road to Wellville” novelist 63 64 47. Em, to Dorothy 49. Like a situation in which a 66 67 clutch hitter might shine 54. “To ____ own self be 69 70 “TSK” true”: “Hamlet” 55. Small amount 12. ____ Moines 57. Milky Way component 15. Exemplary ... or what this grid’s 59. Drug bust unit circles all are 61. ____ Lanka 24. Add to the payroll 26. Talk show host whose first name is 62. “Geez!” 40

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OCTOBER 07, 2021 INLANDER 35


8 Hours of Winning We’re Hiring! APPLY NOW Looking for a fun place to work? We want you to be a part of our team! We’re hiring on the spot at our event.

Contact Human Resources for more information at 1 800-523-2464 or visit www.cdacasino.com to view our current job openings and apply online now!

You win when you work at Coeur d’Alene Casino! HEALTH & WELLNESS BENEFITS • 100% Paid Medical, Dental & Vision Plans for Team Members with Low Copays and Low Deductibles • Free Team Member Meal - One Per Shift • Free Marimn Health Wellness Center Membership • 5% Company Match with your 401(k)

• 20¢ Per Gallon Gas Discount • Free Transportation Through CityLink & Spokane Area Shuttles • Discounted Annual Passes for Silverwood • Referral Bonus Program

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• Charity Volunteer Opportunities

HOLIDAYS & TIME OFF • • 9 Paid Holidays Per Year • • 13–26 Days of Paid Time Off

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