Page 1

NEWS TIM BURNS ON THE SPD 18 CULTURE TAILGATING: DISTILLED 30 FILM 2014’S TOP 15 MOVIES 35

JANUARY 1-7, 2015 | FREE!

flashback YEAR IN REVIEW

A look at 2014 through Young Kwak’s lens PAGE 22


WARMTH. CARING. GENEROSITY OF SPIRIT. That’s what the holidays bring into our busy lives. And it’s what you’ll find at our Providence ministries every day of the year.

www.phc.org

Hospitals: Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center & Children’s Hospital • Providence Holy Family Hospital Providence Mount Carmel Hospital (Colville) • Providence St. Joseph’s Hospital (Chewelah) Physician Services: Providence Medical Group Care Facilities: Providence Medical Park - Spokane Valley Providence Emilie Court Assisted Living • Providence St. Joseph Care Center & Transitional Care Unit Home Services: Providence VNA Home Health • Providence DominiCare (Chewelah)

2 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015


INSIDE

This. Is. Big.

Find out all the things we have planned in February for THE BIG READ by visiting www.scld.org/BigRead2015.

JANUARY 1-7, 2015 | VOL. 22, NO. 11

COMMENT NEWS YEAR IN PHOTOS CULTURE FOOD FILM MUSIC

5 13 22 27 31 35 38

EVENTS ADVICE GODDESS GREEN ZONE INHEALTH BULLETIN BOARD I SAW YOU LAST WORD

44 46 48 50 51 52 54

THE BIG READ is a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest. Find out more at www.NEABigRead.org.

ON THE COVER | JOSHUENA WILLIAMS AT A FERGUSON RALLY IN SPOKANE IN NOVEMBER; YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

NEWS

The local stories that shaped 2014 PAGE 13

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com)

WHAT WAS YOUR MOST MEMORABLE MOMENT OF 2014?

PUBLISHER

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

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CULTURE EDITOR

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ERICA WALTERS When the Seahawks won the Super Bowl. My husband is a big fan, so since being with him, he has turned me into an even bigger fan. We ended up going to the parade together in Seattle. What are you looking forward to most in 2015? I’m having a baby in July!

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Young Kwak

The international fireworks display in Vancouver. It was serendipitous to our vacation time. Do you have any vacations planned for 2015? We are headed down to California in July.

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Caleb Walsh

ILLUSTRATOR

Amy Alkon, Luke Baumgartern, Jordy Byrd, Chris Carlson, Jo Miller, Scott Renshaw CONTRIBUTORS

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MARGARET ANDERSON I went to New York and the family I stayed with was incredible; they paid for our transportation, food and bought us tickets for Broadway shows and the Empire State Building. They brought us to all the cool places and it was a great first experience. I was able to check New York off my bucket list.

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LINDA AND DAVID CLARKE LINDA: We were able to bring our grandbaby, Ethan, home in January in perfect health. It was wonderful. Do you two have a New Year’s resolution for 2015? DAVID: We are hoping to grow our business, Clarke Stephens Golf Shop.

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COMMENT | ELECTION 2016

Webb For President

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ear Senator Webb: Recently you announced the formation of a committee to explore whether you should make a bid for the presidency in 2016. From a small stop on what once was a railroad stop, a now gone town named Medimont, lost away in the Silver Valley of Idaho within a 24-square-mile Superfund site, comes this answer: Run, Jim, run! This writer thinks you possess the qualities this country desperately needs, namely an ability to make tough decisions. Additionally, you demonstrated an ability to keep many southern white men in the biracial coalition so necessary for the future success for the Democratic Party. Your tough election in Virginia in 2006 demonstrated the unique ability to inspire both black and white men, and to say to folks, “follow, lead or get out of the way.” Whether Hillary Clinton runs or not, and I personally think she will not, I hope you can stay the course because you recognize, as both Bill and Hillary do, that the long overdue generational change is occurring in American politics. The mantle of leadership is blowing toward a different breed of Democrats like you and Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York. For much the same reason, despite announcing an exploratory committee, I don’t think Jeb Bush will decide to run either. The Republicans will nominate someone like Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker, or a younger U.S. Senator, like Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul or Texas Sen. Ted Cruz. Allow me to be so bold as to lay out the key elements of your platform and a successful winning strategy. The key item you offer the American people is the ability to lead. From your days at Quantico, when you were receiving the tough indoctrination only the Marine Corps offers, to your service as Ronald Reagan’s Secretary of the Navy, to your seat in the Senate, you have always resonated leadership. It is the sine qua non for any president.

doubts about whether he was truly capable of leading. Taking that stance will put Hillary Clinton on the spot since she did not endorse the commission. It will also split the Republicans, with the fiscal conservatives led by folks like former New Hampshire Sen. Judd Gregg and Idaho’s senior Sen. Mike Crapo supporting the package in the national interest and separating out the Tea Party fanatics like Ted Cruz who would rather see the economy collapse than have any increase in revenue from tax reform. THE SECOND ISSUE is to support tax reform and demonstrate with easy-to-understand examples how the middle class is subsidizing the upper 1/10th of 1 percent, many of whom say “only stupid people pay taxes.” If you read all three of New York Times tax writer David Cay Johnston’s books exposing the subsidy in such

The mantle of leadership is blowing toward a different breed of Democrats.

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he best way for you to demonstrate that leadership and courage is to make your NO. 1 ISSUE the need for the 2016 election to be a referendum on the ALL the recommendations of the Simpson-Bowles Commission. Correcting the horrible deficit and the nation’s incredible debt in order to restore fiscal sanity and meet our obligations to future generations can only be accomplished if everyone is asked to sacrifice. Everyone sees the need to do their part. Many of us mark President Obama’s failure to endorse the balanced solution of his own commission as the beginning point that raised serious

graphic detail, your blood will boil. THE THIRD ISSUE is to campaign as the true champion of women’s rights by supporting equal pay for equal work measures, endorsing the “No more” campaign, and having talented women in key positions in your campaign organization. FOURTH, no one knows defense issues better than you, and if Hillary Clinton is in the race and you have the chance to engage her in a debate, you’ll tie her in knots. FIFTH, your efforts to revise our archaic, borderline barbaric prison practices, which has led us, as you know, to have not only the world’s worst recidivism rate, but to squander an enormous amount of human capital that could be tapped if we as a society would adopt more enlightened practices such as seeing a released prisoner has a job and a support system. FINALLY, tap into the nation’s network of Marines who are in the reserves or retired. I suspect many are just waiting for a retired Marine to run. You’re it. It goes without saying your colors will be Marine red and gold. Go for it, Jim. Where do I send my check? Semper Fi! n Chris Carlson is a former journalist and press secretary for Idaho Gov. Cecil Andrus. He lives on Cave Lake in North Idaho.


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Year in Preview: 2015 BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

T

his week in the Inlander, you can look back at the year that was. That’s a good thing, since history can tell us where we’re heading. And nowhere is that pivot between past and future more stark than in our NATIONAL POLITICS. Will we stay stuck in the past in 2015? Will we double down on a failed Cuba policy, for example, or will we chart a new course? Will the ruling GOP turn the clock back on Obamacare and immigration reform, or will they finally see the writing on the wall that changing times require new solutions? The pace is so fast, in fact, even the Keystone Pipeline is being undercut by falling gas prices. Beenthere-done-that politics are also on display in the specter of a Bush-Clinton rematch. Hopefully 2015 can be the year that America finally cleans out the fridge, dumping the stale stuff we’ve been force-fed for too long. Nationally and locally, 2015 is going to be a big year for POLICE REFORMS. With what we’ve seen in Missouri and New York, Spokane should be proud of the way we’ve had this debate over the past eight-plus years. It wasn’t easy, and it took the involvement of the Department of Justice, but we’re now being recognized as a model for other cities. Obviously America is not done with this issue. We all know the men and women who serve us in law enforcement take on our most dangerous work and earn our admiration and support every day. But as military-style gear has hit our streets and egregious uses of police force on citizens have become functionally legal, it’s clearly become time for stricter oversight. People are angry, and the best way to channel that into something positive is by tackling reform together. Here in Spokane, despite early pushback, we had the conversation. We found common ground. Elections turned on the issue. Now we’re enacting reforms. We’re not there yet, but as body cameras are deployed and DOJ recommendations are adopted, we can get closer in 2015. In one of the big surprises of 2014, Spokane somehow wound up in the running to host not one but TWO MEDICAL SCHOOLS. Sure, one is an expansion of the existing UW program, but the other could be an entirely new WSU School of Medicine. If both plans are funded, this will be the biggest thing to happen here since Expo. But after a year, this Fair will not end — it will go on, fueling our economy in ways we can’t yet comprehend. The challenge is to embrace success. Such institutions would spark huge private investments. Are we ready? Do we have the proper leadership, both in public and private, to envision and create that future wisely? So 2015 will be a year to make sure we get our act together. And on this one, we’ve got to get it right. 

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COMMENT | PUBLIC SPACES

Completely Repellent

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

How can we expect people to find constructive uses for space that wasn’t built for them? BY LUKE BAUMGARTEN

I

t was one of those idyllic holiday scenes. A Norman Rockwell moment of the sort Spokane loves to conjure around the holidays. Last weekend, I watched a father and daughter walk hand in hand down Wall Street. The daughter had her face scrunched up, asking a question I couldn’t hear. I reached earshot in time to catch her father’s reply: “I think they’re called ‘mosquito boxes.’” Not the conversation I expected. “Why do they make that noise?” the daughter asked.

“It hurts.” The father squeezed her hand and began telling the story of high-pitched, noise-making machines that only young people can hear, and how local property owners had installed them to shoo away “the street kids.” Except they don’t just affect street kids. We know this. And though people outside their mid-20s aren’t supposed to be able to hear the piercing shriek, here I am, almost 34, and my ears bleed every time I walk past one. These painful little boxes went on sale globally in 2006. Spokane got its first unit in 2008. They are wildly popular in the UK; on the continent, though, the Council of Europe called for a ban on the devices in June 2010, saying they amount to a form of torture.

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We need these devices, we are told, because of pervasive antisocial behavior. As of April 2013, though, only about 100 mosquito boxes had been sold in America. I walked around downtown the other day and counted at least five here. Can hooliganism in Spokane be so bad that our city should account for 5 percent of America’s market for youth repellents? Maybe we’ve just taken the easiest, narrowest course. When you plot the locations on a map, mosquitoequipped buildings make an L-shape around the STA block, which fits the narrative that our Plaza is the hellmouth from which all urban ills flow. But actually walk to the corner of Sprague and Howard — with not one, but two mosquitos — and you’ll see a more complicated scene. From there, look southwest to find Bank of America’s homely concrete parking garage. Northwest, see Bank of America tower itself. It’s prettier, but there’s no street-level retail at either location and there’s a skywalk connecting the two, so workers can spend as little time on city sidewalks as possible. Northeast now: the surface parking lot where Spokane’s oldest block was demolished in 2005. Look east-southeast, and — yep — there’s the vacant, oft-urinated-upon Ridpath. Now scan westward again and gaze upon the Symons building where our painful little mosquitos perch. Symons retail spaces make up less than 15 percent of the possible store frontage on the four streets leading to that intersection. Everything else is car parks, derelict buildings and cloistered office towers. There’s almost nothing in any direction that was built for people. How can we expect people to find constructive uses for those spaces? We can’t. But the answer isn’t noise machines. Now head directly across Riverside from the Plaza. The street has enough retail to engage walkers from Lincoln to Stevens. No surprise: Mosquitos aren’t needed. Go one block farther north to Main and you’re in the heart of our shopping district, which is quickly filling in to encompass the entire breadth of downtown, Monroe to Division. It’s proof: Those horrific screeching boxes aren’t a solution, they’re a repellent. Repellents don’t fix problems, they push them away. And just as often, they create new ones: like sad little girls in adorable coats. No, the fix for downtown is returning each street, block-by-block, to person-centered uses. It’s a big job and will probably take the work of a generation. Let’s begin by getting rid of those evil-ass boxes. n Luke Baumgarten is a co-founder of Terrain, the founder of Fellow Coworking and former culture editor of the Inlander. He tweets @lukebaumgarten.

You saw her. She saw you.

And you totally chickened out. There’s still a chance. Place an ad in the I Saw You section, for FREE. I Saw You • You Saw Me • Cheers & Jeers • ISawYou@Inlander.com


JANUARY 1, 2015 INLANDER 9


FIND ART

and more this Friday, January 2nd! Venues open 5 - 8 pm unless otherwise noted.

AVE WEST GALLERY

707 W MAIN AVE, SKYWALK LEVEL

Outdoor phtography: Animals, birds, flowers, and scenery. 5 to 8:30pm.

NECTAR TASTING ROOM

SATELLITE DINER AND LOUNGE

If you’re partied out on January 2, Nectar will help make the magic of the holidays last just a little bit longer. In the Main Room: Live music by Cris Lucas with “Haradise,” art by Hara Allison. In the Barrel Room: Party with over $600 in prizes from 10 vendors. Open until 10pm.

Tom Norton, Micheal Eldred, Roch Fautch, Nora Egger: Four artists release their work into the wilds of Downtown Spokane. Starts at 5pm Friday and runs all month long.

120 N STEVENS ST

425 W SPRAGUE AVE

NYNE BAR & BISTRO 232 W SPRAGUE AVE

Photography from Linda Gay. With no favorite subject, Linda photographs whatever catches her eye.

POTTERY PLACE PLUS 203 N WASHINGTON (ADJACENT TO AUNTIE’S BOOKSTORE)

Hand Spinning, Juaquetta Holcomb of Garden Party Fibers uses locally sourced, natural animal fibers and then spins and dyes her own yarns. Holcomb will demonstrate spinning in the shop at various times throughout the month.

WHITESTONE WINERY 8 N POST ST

Lively Jazz Singer, Abbey Crawford. 6 to 9pm.

RAMBLIN ROAD BREWERY BARILI CELLARS

608 W SECOND AVE

Artist Ona Jacobson brings the beauty of the outdoors into Barili Cellars. With unique canvases and painting on glass, her pieces are inspiring. 4 to 9pm.

BOZZI GALLERY

221 N WALL, STE 226

“Celebrating What Is” by Melinda Melvin, new syles of painting and functional art. Jewelry by Jill Smith and Danny Caldwell will be showing creative robots. Musical performance by Christy Lee and Fiddlin Sarah Jean. Wine by Latah Creek Winery.

HILLS’ RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE 401 W MAIN AVE

Singer/Songwriter Kori Eagle, folk music from 6:30 to 8:30pm.

MAC NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS & CULTURE 2316 W FIRST AVE

730 N COLUMBUS ST

View the latest abstract artworks of Audreana Camm. Enjoy folk music by Andrew Dempsen, while you watch a live painting performance by the artist and free art raffle. 6 to 8pm with live painting to music at 7pm.

RIVER CITY BREWING 121 S CEDAR ST

“Liquid Art” is a one-time beer made for each First Friday using a special style of keg, a Firkin. Poured that day only. 3 to 9pm.

ROBERT KARL CELLARS 115 W PACIFIC AVE

Photographer and painter, Gail Johannes. Wines by the glass or bottle.

SARANAC ART PROJECTS 25 W MAIN ST

An exhibition of Sculptural Mobiles and Shodo [Japanese calligraphy] from Roger Ralston and Kurt Madison. Roger is an active sculptor presenting a new body of kinetic works. He has executed a number of public artworks around the region. Kurt Madison is bringing together, for the fi rst time, his calligraphic work from the last 10 years.

Exhibits: “100 Stories: A Centennial Exhibition” and “The Artist’s Palette: Th rough the Lens of Dean Davis”, Live Music by Mike Ross and Cafe MAC specials. Free admission. downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org | Brought to you by Downtown Spokane and Spokane Arts


COMMENT | FROM READERS

MORALLY BANKRUPT? read the article by Mr. John Reuter (“Sorry, Senator Risch,” 12/18/14)

I

regarding the torture report and want to add my comments. I too do not agree with Senator Risch. I’m a disabled veteran and speak from that background; when we act in such a manner, those actions tarnish the very fabric of democracy. I rarely agree with Senator McCain, but regarding torture he is 100 percent on target. But what I find even more troubling is reports in the news indicating that over 40 percent of the American public at large supports torture. Have we become so morally bankrupt as a nation to LETTERS condone this? Send comments to We apparently have, and that editor@inlander.com. is disturbing. Many of our military, including my father, fought and died attempting to eradicate the horrors of WWII and the genocide perpetrated on Jewish people in Europe. The United States railed against Hitler for his actions and now 60 years later we’ve imprisoned, tortured and killed prisoners (many of whom were innocent) in secret sites. Really. We sure have grown. JOSEPH J. FORD Spokane, Wash.

Reaction to “Face to Face with Jessen” (12/24/2014), a article about an Inlander reporter’s encounter with the Spokanebased architect of the CIA’s torture program

GINGER NINDE: Bruce Jessen is an embarrassment to Spokane, the military, his church and all of humanity. Did I cover everything? He and James Mitchell and their cheerleader Dick Cheney designed barbaric, disgusting and shameful interrogation techniques that will make our soldiers less safe for eternity. If he can’t get a taste of his own medicine (because that is illegal) at least he and James Mitchell should be tried for war crimes. ROSEANN COPEL: I’m not sure I agree with how this brief encounter was obtained — clearly without consent, possibly by trespassing. It’s no wonder he’s on edge. I just wonder why he agreed to work with the CIA on torture. It’s a shame people think it’s somehow necessary to “protect American lives.” All lives matter, not just American ones. How do they think the world views a nation of nationalistic savages hungry for “enhanced interrogation techniques” on whoever is deemed an enemy? ATANIA GILMORE: We can debate ethics and politics... but we paid $80 million for this — seriously? 

JANUARY 1, 2015 INLANDER 11


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2014 CLOCKWISE, FROM LEFT: Sheena Henderson; gay marriage comes to Idaho; Spokane police test body cameras; doors open to retail pot; WSU Spokane; Spokane’s park bond passes.

Paradigm Shift

Marijuana, wildfires, marriage equality, gun control: The local stories that shaped the past year RETAIL POT SHOPS OPEN

It was a historic event marked by thousands of people who clamored to fill out government paperwork and hundreds who stood in line for hours to buy a product that was taxed at 50 percent. On July 8, a dream long held by stoners across the country came true when legal pot retailers opened their doors for business. I-502, the initiative that legalized pot in Washington, made it legal for adults to possess the drug beginning in December of 2012. But selling it in a legal, regulated environment under the auspices of the Washington Liquor Control Board was largely uncharted territory — and it showed. Critics complained that under the new regulatory structure, legal pot had become too expensive to affect the black market and that there wasn’t enough product to keep up with demand, prompting VICE News to run an article titled “Legal Weed in Washington State Has Been Completely Screwed Up.” It took the Liquor Control Board a year of rule-making, but in March 2014 the regulatory agency announced that Spokane’s Kouchlock Productions had received the state’s first license to produce and process recreational

marijuana. A few months later, retail stores opened their doors. Spokane Green Leaf was the only store in the Spokane area operational on opening day; since then nine stores have become active in Spokane County. “The way I explain it to people, it’s like dogs’ years — for every month, it’s a year,” says Kirk Smith, one of Spokane Green Leaf’s owners, of the rapidly maturing market. He says that more growers and processors are getting licenses and making more product available to retailers, which is driving down prices. Taxes are still high, he says, but Green Leaf has gotten prices down to $15 for a gram. Despite problems with the rollout of retail marijuana, there’s still plenty of money to go around. According to a November revenue forecast, pot taxes are slated to bring in $36.1 million for the 2015-17 biennium — more than expected. And while lines are shorter to buy legal pot, ganjapreneurs are still queuing up to get in on the burgeoning market. According to the Liquor Control Board, there are tens of thousands of applications from businesses seeking to produce, process or sell legal pot. — JAKE THOMAS

THE SHOOTING OF ARFEE

It was a snarling, lunging pit bull (or pit bull mix, at least) that was about to jump through the van’s window and tear into the police officer’s face. The frightened officer, who was responding to reports of a suspicious van, reacted by drawing his gun and putting a round in the dangerous animal. At least that was the initial story about a July day in a parking lot in Coeur d’Alene. But in reality, the officer had shot a 2-year-old black Labrador named Arfee, drawing condemnation from dog lovers across the country and sowing mistrust between the police and the Coeur d’Alene community. The dog’s distraught owner, Craig Jones, hired two attorneys and a private investigator to sue the city for $350,000. A Facebook group demanding justice for the slain dog drew followers and bumper stickers condemning the killing started to appear in the area. City officials received a flood of angry messages from as far away as Alabama, Florida and New Hampshire. Coeur d’Alene police, citing death threats, initially refused to release the name of the officer. But in September, the police department released a report on the incident naming David Kelley, a 17-year veteran of the force, as the officer who pulled the trigger on Arfee. The report concluded that the officer violated use-of-force standards in shooting the dog and failed to “fully consider the totality of the circumstances presented at the time.” The report also questioned why the officer didn’t just move away from the van. In response to the incident, Coeur d’Alene police now require officers to watch five videos, each running about 10 minutes, on how to handle dogs. After city officials refused to state what discipline Kelley faced, the Coeur d’Alene Press, using public records law, found out that his pay was cut. — JAKE THOMAS ...continued on next page

JANUARY 1, 2014 INLANDER 13


NEWS | YEAR IN REVIEW “PARADIGM SHIFT,” CONTINUED...

THE BOND TO RENOVATE RIVERFRONT PARK

Remember Expo ’74, when Spokane hosted the World’s Fair, drawing people from across the globe during the sixmonth celebration? If you grew up here and remember those heady days, you might’ve had a reason to vote for a $64.3 million bond that will revamp Riverfront Park. And if you weren’t around for Expo ’74, you’ll at least get to enjoy some of the new features, including a skating pond and an outdoor events venue. In November, voters overwhelmingly approved the bond for improvements to the park. The city expects the improvements to attract more visitors, but it was likely nostalgia that convinced some voters to sign off on the bond. “There’s a yearning to come back and celebrate with our community,” Mayor David Condon, who was born in Spokane the year of Expo ’74, told the Inlander in October. Spokane’s central park hasn’t seen many major renovations and improvements in 40 years. Originally designed to be a temporary home for the fair, it was filled with exhibits from countries from around the world and vacated when the event was over. The lighting and buildings are old, the bridges need fixing, the inefficient facilities devour energy and the irrigation system is so ancient that replacement parts are no longer available. The park’s state of disrepair stands in contrast to the economic development that’s happened downtown. The bond will revamp the U.S. Pavilion to create an events space, a tree-lined promenade, plazas, playgrounds, a visitor center, parking lots and entrances and an outdoor ice-skating rink, among other improvements. Although the money is secure, construction doesn’t start until after Labor Day weekend of 2015. — JAKE THOMAS

SPOKANE POLICE TRY BODY CAMERAS

Since the unrest in Ferguson and elsewhere, police officerworn body cameras have won broad national support, but the Spokane Police Department had spent years weighing the technology before the launch of a pilot program on Sept. 1. Seventeen SPD officers volunteered to wear the cameras for four months to help evaluate practical issues and logistical challenges. Police Chief Frank Straub has pledged to start rolling out the cameras on regular shifts starting this month. While an officer failed to activate his camera during a November shooting, LETTERS both police officials Send comments to and accountability editor@inlander.com. advocates call the cameras “game changers” that could provide an unparalleled window into police conduct good and bad. “[Spokane] is going to get to see just how professional and dedicated the police department is,” Straub says, “and to a large degree how much crap they put up with on any given day.” The Washington state Attorney General recently determined that police officers do not have to get permission to record citizens, an important clarification for many departments trying to balance privacy rights with increased transparency. The ACLU, Center for Justice and other advocates have raised many concerns about whether the department’s evolving policy on camera use will protect against misuse. The Spokane County Sheriff’s Office also conducted a brief pilot program in hopes of adopting the technology in the near future. — JACOB JONES

14 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2014

The Carlton Complex fire scorched more than 250,000 acres. JACOB JONES PHOTO

CENTRAL WASHINGTON WILDFIRES

A series of lightning strikes sparked four small fires in July that would quickly grow into the Carlton Complex fire, scorching more than 250,000 acres and destroying close to 300 homes — the largest burn in state history. One retired state trooper collapsed and died during firefighting efforts. Hundreds more went homeless. Flames blackened miles of pristine riverbanks along the Methow and Okanogan rivers. As wildfire crews and TV news vans descended on Omak, Brewster, Twisp and nearby communities, locals raked through the ashes. Richard Mathews, of hard-hit Pateros, found almost nothing left to salvage. “I didn’t lose much,” he says amid a neighborhood of ruins, “just a house.” Scores of displaced residents have prepared lawsuits alleging that the Department of Natural Resources failed to mount a proper firefighting response. Residents say equipment went unused or was mismanaged. A KING 5 investigation found the DNR had paid almost $2 million to a large orchard while denying compensation to others. Relief efforts continue for those working to rebuild their homes and restart family businesses impacted by the fire. State officials have scheduled a public meeting in Brewster on Jan. 5 to discuss ongoing challenges from the Carlton Complex fire as well as wildfire preparation strategies for the 2015 season. — JACOB JONES

VA SCANDAL HITS SPOKANE

Veterans Affairs medical facilities, including the MannGrandstaff center in Spokane, endured tremendous scrutiny this past year as national VA investigations uncovered widespread manipulation of patient wait times and other administrative misconduct. Spokane VA officials in June acknowledged “longer-than-average” wait times, but cited recent progress as the hospital worked to replace staff vacancies. “We care deeply for our veterans,” a statement reads, “and our intent is to provide timely access to the quality care our veterans have earned and deserve.” Much of the national outrage focused on the Phoenix VA Health Care System after multiple reports of delays that allowed patient illnesses to worsen. Phoenix director

Sharon Helman, who previously managed the Spokane center until 2010, lost her position in November over the results of the recent investigations. Spokane’s VA hospital was listed among 112 facilities requiring “further review” of practices. “Lack of oversight and misconduct by VA leaders runs counter to our mission of serving veterans, and the VA will not tolerate it,” VA Secretary Robert McDonald says in a news release. Despite efforts to fill several high-profile positions, the Spokane center in December announced a reduction in Emergency Room services, cutting access from 24 hours to 10 hours a day. Officials attributed the temporary reduction in service hours to a shortage of physicians. — JACOB JONES

MED SCHOOL WARS

Washington desperately needs more doctors — specifically, 4,000 more by 2030. Meanwhile, the state’s only medical school, at the University of Washington, enrolls only 120 students a year. The obvious solution is that Washington needs to train more students to become doctors. The question, though, is where. For the past year, the University of Washington and Washington State University have been locked in a bitter battle over the future of medical education in the state. Concerned about the lack of medical students in rural areas and frustrated by its fraying relationship with UW, WSU set out to create its own medical school. But UW feared WSU’s ambitions would suck valuable resources from its own Spokane-based program. Within a twomonth period this past autumn, both universities released conflicting studies about the feasibility of a new medical school in Spokane. In October, the Apple Cup rivals finally severed their decades-long rural medical education partnership in Spokane. Now UW is mulling a new partnership with Gonzaga University in order to continue training its students in Eastern Washington. Republican state Sen. Michael Baumgartner and Democratic state Rep. Marcus Riccelli, meanwhile, are planning to introduce bipartisan bills in the upcoming session to revise a 1917 state statute giving UW a monopoly


on medical education in the state. Once that law is changed, WSU will still need $2.5 million from the state to pay for its medical school’s accreditation — a relatively small ask in what will be a tough budget year. UW is asking the legislature for more — about $10 million — to increase enrollment in Spokane. The schools have agreed not to sabotage the other’s funding requests. — DEANNA PAN

GUN CONTROL WINS

In November, just under 60 percent of voters approved Initiative 594, a statewide ballot measure expanding criminal background checks for all gun sales in Washington state. (Another 55 percent defeated a competing measure to prohibit the state from mandating additional background checks unless required by the federal government.) The Washington Alliance for Gun Responsibility raised more than $10 million to fund the I-594 campaign, thanks in part to hefty contributions from mega-rich donors like Bill and Melinda Gates. In the battle against increased gun control in Washington, the National Rifle Association, surprisingly, barely put up a fight, pouring less than half a million dollars into its opposition campaign. The new background check law — which was met by protesters outside the Spokane County Courthouse less than two weeks ago — took effect in early December. The first known denial under the law occurred 48 hours later, when a man with a warrant out for his arrest attempted to buy a firearm at the Lewis Clark Trader Gun Show in Spokane. You can expect to hear about more gun-related policies in the next legislative session. District 3 state Sen. Andy Billig, for instance, is planning to introduce a gun-safety bill in response to this summer’s shooting death of Sheena Henderson on the Deaconess Medical Center campus. Billig’s proposal would create a notification system for family members when a firearm is returned to a potentially dangerous person. In July, Henderson was shot and killed by her estranged husband while at work at the Rockwood Cancer Treatment Center, before he turned the gun on himself. In May, her husband’s gun was confiscated by police after he threatened to commit suicide. It was finally returned to him the day before the murder-suicide. Neither Henderson nor her family were notified when the Department of Health and Social Services agreed to release the weapon back to her husband. — DEANNA PAN

THE RIGHT TO MARRY IN IDAHO

Poor Butch Otter. The Idaho governor spent almost $87,000 of taxpayer money defending the state’s same-sex marriage ban only to see it defeated again… and again. In May, U.S. Magistrate Judge Candy Dale ruled that the state’s 2006 voter-enacted constitutional ban on same-sex unions was unconstitutional, writing in her decision that it relegated gay and lesbian Idahoans to “a stigmatized, second-class status without sufficient reason for doing so.” The state appealed to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, which four months later, on Oct. 7, invalidated Idaho’s ban for the second time. A week later, after the U.S. Supreme Court agreed to temporarily block gay weddings in Idaho, marriage licenses were issued en masse to samesex couples across the state. But Otter vowed to keep fighting. “When I took the oath of office, I swore to uphold the Constitution of the State of Idaho. Article 3 Section 28 of the Idaho Constitution is very clear. It identifies a marriage in Idaho as that union between one man and one woman,” Otter told KTVB news in late October. He submitted a petition to the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals for an en banc review of the court’s previous ruling upholding Dale’s decision. Dale, meanwhile, recently ordered the state to cough up more than $400,000 in attorney fees and litigation expenses to the plaintiffs, four lesbian couples from Boise who won their case, overturning the ban. Nationwide, the tide has clearly turned against marriage-equality opponents like Otter: Same-sex marriage is now legal in 35 states and under court review in five others. — DEANNA PAN

JANUARY 1, 2014 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST ON INLANDER.COM More Inlander news every day

PHOTO EYE RAISING GREEN

DUI DISSENT

The Washington State Supreme Court has determined that just because a cop has “no doubt” that someone is UNDER THE INFLUENCE of drugs or alcohol, it’s not proof that they are. After turning off the lights on his truck and fleeing from a state trooper attempting to pull him over for doing 56 mph in a residential area of Mead, Ryan Richard Quaale surrendered to the officer who noticed a strong odor of “intoxicants” on his breath. After giving him a horizontal gaze nystagmus test (a common roadside sobriety test), the trooper charged Quaale with DUI. However, the court’s 5-4 decision found that the test and the trooper’s confidence that Quaale was intoxicated wasn’t enough to convict him. (JAKE THOMAS)

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Troop 400 of the Boy Scouts of America helped collect Christmas trees last weekend as part of a fundraiser, with assistance from Sunshine Waste and Disposal, which provides containers and hauls the trees for recycling. The troop will be back at work this weekend, Jan. 3-4, from 9 am-3 pm, at Central Valley and University High Schools. Suggested donation is $5 to $10.

MISSING FLIGHT

“I am touched by the massive show of support especially from my fellow airlines. This is my worse nightmare. But there is no stopping.” AirAsia Group CEO Tony Fernandes on Twitter about the AirAsia plane that disappeared during a flight from Indonesia to Singapore on Sunday with 162 passengers onboard

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January 4, 2015 Requiem Their Lives Are a Legacy to Us Honoring people who have died during 2014 This is a salute and a “thank you” to individuals for having lived their lives.

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The big story in our WEED WEDNESDAY roundup of goings-on in ganja news is that Nebraska and Oklahoma are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down Colorado’s voter-approved recreational marijuana law. The central gripe of the two neighboring states’ lawsuit is that they are being flooded with weed from Colorado, causing them to expend more resources chasing stoners. Speaking of Colorado, a campaign is being mounted to get a measure on the 2016 ballot that would, if passed, prohibit sheriffs from denying concealed carry permits to people because of pot use. (JT)

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Impound My Ride

DEADLINE EXTENDED

Spokane City Council looks to curb prostitution; plus, the fight over Mt. Spokane continues

SLIPPERY SLOPES

Just days after the ski slopes opened for the season, conservation groups have pledged new legal efforts to stop a recently approved expansion of the Mt. Spokane ski area. The SAVE MT. SPOKANE COALITION announced Monday it had hired an attorney to argue the expansion approval violated land-use procedures. The state Parks and Recreation Commission in November approved designating 800 acres of unclassified property on the mountain’s northwest side as available for development of a new chairlift and seven new trails. Conservation groups have argued the disputed land supports old growth forest and wildlife habitat. “Mt. Spokane State Park belongs to all the citizens of the state of Washington,” says former Spokane County Commissioner John Roskelley in a coalition news release, “not just to one small user group of skiers from the Spokane area for less than four months a year.” Mt. Spokane resort managers have voiced commitment to carrying out the expansion in an environmentally responsible fashion in hopes of opening up access to the area for winter recreation. General manager Brad McQuarrie said the project has been in the works for a decade. The Save Mt. Spokane Coalition includes the Sierra Club, the Lands Council, the Spokane Mountaineers, Conservation Northwest, the Spokane Audubon Society

and the local Washington Native Plant Society. — JACOB JONES

JOHNS’ CARS

They’ve tried locking them up. They’ve tried making their names public. Now they might lose their cars. Suspected patrons and promoters of PROSTITUTION could find themselves walking or taking the bus under an ordinance that is set to be considered by City Council on Monday. If passed, the ordinance would declare part of East Central Spokane along Sprague Avenue to be an “area of high prostitution activity.” Under the ordinance, if law enforcement suspects someone of using their car to promote or patronize prostitutes in this area, then the arresting officer has the option of impounding the car of the suspected pimp or john. The text of the ordinance states that it’s intended to penalize the demand for prostitution and targets motor vehicles because they are typically used in these crimes. Crime statistics show that the area attracts more prostitution-related crimes than other parts of Spokane, and the ordinance was developed in response to complaints from local residents and businesses that the area had become a magnet for the buying and selling of sex. — JAKE THOMAS

The Washington Health Benefit Exchange has extended the deadline for customers who attempted to purchase HEALTH INSURANCE through the state’s online insurance marketplace last week, but were unable to finish their applications due to a technical error. Dec. 23 was the last day to purchase a qualified health plan through the Washington Healthplanfinder website for coverage starting on Jan. 1. According to Michael Marchand, the exchange’s director of communications, almost 6,000 customers were affected by a recent cancellation error and “may have received an incorrect tax credit calculation through Washington Healthplanfinder.” Through Feb. 23, 2015, customers who started an application for health insurance before 5 pm on the 23rd will have a 60-day special enrollment period to sign up for retroactive coverage beginning on Jan. 1. “We will be doing a case-by-case review of each petition received in order to determine if a customer qualifies for a special enrollment period,” Marchand says by email. About 101,000 Washington residents have purchased or renewed their health insurance so far in the open enrollment period, includLETTERS ing about 25,000 new Send comments to customers. This time editor@inlander.com. last year, about 65,000 people had purchased private health insurance through the exchange. Those affected by the technical errors can visit petition.wahealthplanfinder.org or call customer support at 1-855-923-4633 to request for coverage that begins on the New Year. Those who qualify for an extension will be notified by email or mail. — DEANNA PAN

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JANUARY 1, 2014 INLANDER 17


NEWS | POLICE OVERSIGHT

Departing police ombudsman Tim Burns: “I’m still struggling, in all candor, about leaving now.”

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Unfinished Business

A Justice Department report leaves the departing police ombudsman with high hopes for reform to come BY JACOB JONES

O

18 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2014

utgoing Spokane police ombudsman Tim Burns has long felt like his time might be short. As the city’s first civilian responsible for oversight of the Spokane Police Department, he has served since 2009 under a constantly shifting atmosphere of contract deadlines, political posturing and uncertain authority. About 15 months ago, he even accepted an outof-town job offer. “I had come to the conclusion,” he says, “that I had done all I could within the confines of what we had at that point.” As soon as he took the new job, Burns says, Spokane officials confirmed they would move forward on seating a new police ombudsman commission to oversee his office and provide new investigative support. He called back and turned down the new job. “I decided I have to be there for this,” he says. Looking back, Burns says he spent much of his time defining the role of his office, gauging community concerns and working with a police force still finding its way following the controversial 2006 police custody death of Otto Zehm. Burns, always a cautious optimist, sees great progress and many opportunities for continued improvement.

“It’s all been positive in hindsight,” he says, “but living through it has often been a struggle.” A long-awaited use-of-force audit released last month by the Department of Justice confirms many of his assessments. DOJ officials did not find any pattern of inappropriate force, but criticize a variety of issues involving SPD policies and officer accountability. Burns notes the DOJ also called for increased community outreach and collaboration with his office. With the DOJ outlining 42 reform recommendations for the SPD to take on in the coming year, Burns acknowledges doubts about his departure. As he retires Friday, he just hopes he has left a strong foundation for the future. “I’m still struggling, in all candor, about leaving now,” he says. “But I’ve also come to the conclusion that there’s never a good time.”

P

oring over the 132 pages of the DOJ’s use-of-force report, Burns says he could have anticipated many of the findings. The report targets inconsistent policies, unorganized records, intradepartmental communication problems and administrative delays. As far as the ombudsman’s office is concerned, the DOJ cites lingering ambiguity over how the ombudsman and commission will operate as well as commu-


nity confusion over their authority. Burns notes that many recommendations suggest policy clarifications or new protocols for recordkeeping. While the department may need to evaluate its staffing and other resources, most of the reforms can be made through inexpensive changes to training, manuals and communication. “I don’t see that there’s anything that is earth-shattering,” he says. “I don’t see there being anything in this report that’s inappropriate or unrealistic or can’t be accomplished within a reasonable amount of time.” DOJ officials analyzed 243 use-of-force incidents, selected at random from 2009 to 2013. They found no deliberate or routine excessive force, but did find misunderstandings or inconsistencies in policies on appropriate force. While some incidents included inappropriate force, those officers did not face discipline due to ambiguity or limitations in policy. Police accountability advocates have long criticized the SPD’s suspiciously perfect use-of-force record stretching back to at least 2007. No citizen complaints of excessive force have been upheld in that time. “It certainly explains some of the community’s angst,” Burns says. Community advocates also noted apparent disparities in the department’s use of force against people of color. The DOJ report concluded the SPD did not use force in any pattern of bias, but statistics indicate force was used against minorities in greater percentages than the rate of population. Liz Moore, with the Peace and Justice Action League of Spokane, notes that census data measures the city’s black population at 2.3 percent while use-of-force incidents came to 10 percent. While American Indians make up just 2 percent of the population, they accounted for 7 percent of SPD force. “I think it’s critical that this kind of disparity be named,” Moore says. “It just doesn’t make sense on its face.” DOJ officials consider the new report a first step in a yearlong “technical assistance” partnership to help the SPD implement their recommendations. The department will take community feedback and incorporate comments into six-month and 12-month follow-up reports. Burns says he hopes those additional reviews can expand on the role of race. “Clearly there’s still some concern by the community about the disparity in use of force as it relates to race,” he says. “The report wasn’t intended to address that … but it’s clear to me that it’s something that should be given some consideration.”

B

urns has often proven most effective when calling for the department to release additional information to the public or when recommending stronger definitions regarding uses of force. He takes pride in helping to make the police department more transparent and knows the office will need to grow to keep up with new investigatory responsibilities. He acknowledges that one of his few regrets will be leaving before three independent investigations get started. While the new five-member commission expands the reach and authority of the office, Burns may leave them with one of his most ambitious reform recommendations yet — requesting an independent auditor position to evaluate budgets and performance at both the police and fire departments. Burns says an additional auditor could track spending, overtime, sick leave, performance metrics and other data. While the ombudsman oversees officer conduct, he believes a broader administrative oversight system could potentially save the city money and confront inefficiencies. “The auditing thing to me is really important,” he says, “but I think it’s outside the scope of the ombudsman’s role. It’s much bigger than that.” Spokane is ready for that next step. Burns says he believes the next police ombudsman will have more time to focus on doing the job, instead of building the office. But they will still have plenty to do. “In my mind, I can leave with a clear conscience, although still somewhat conflicted,” he says. “There’s work to be done, but in all consideration I think we’re leaving it in a good place.” n

JANUARY 1, 2014 INLANDER 19


NEWS | MENTAL HEALTH

Amanda Cook, a 25-year-old mother, spent weeks in jail waiting for a mental health assessment. She killed herself before the evaluation was ever conducted.

HEARTS AND MINDS Why the Inlander spent the past year examining the mental health system

A

merica, it seemed, only talked about mental illness in moments of crisis — in the aftermath of unimaginable tragedies: Newtown, Tucson, Aurora, and on and on. But grief and anger are not conducive to analyzing good public policy, let alone seeing another person’s perspective. Hence, our yearlong “State of Mind” series was born. Our goal was simple yet ambitious: Tackle the stigma surrounding mental illness, and identify the essential reforms that we as a community should consider — for practical, if not moral, reasons. It was a journey that took us to local jails, Eastern State Hospital, emergency rooms, doctors’ offices and rural communities in Idaho, and in the end, we published more than 40 articles on the subject. Our series is yielding results, as the debate moves into law offices and courtrooms around the region. In a civil rights lawsuit, attorneys are challenging the state of Washington for its care of patients in psychiatric hospitals. Others are fighting for rights to medication and timely mental health assessments inside county jails. Soon the conversation will move to Boise and Olympia with the start of the legislative sessions later this month. Our job isn’t done, but we wanted to take a moment to update you on the people and issues we’ve featured over the course of the year. Find all the articles in the series online at Inlander. com/stateofmind. — JACOB H. FRIES, Inlander editor

20 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2014

AMANDA COOK AND JAIL EVALUATION ISSUES In February, the Inlander started its examination of the local mental health system with the tragic story of Amanda Cook, a 25-year-old mother facing assault charges for attacking her mother during a psychotic episode. She wrote her family letters from within the Spokane County Jail, increasingly desperate for mental health treatment. After several weeks of waiting for a competency evaluation, she killed herself in the shower at the jail. Cook’s story, along with several others, now form the basis for a federal class-action lawsuit against the state for failing to conduct evaluations within legal deadlines. U.S. District Court Judge Marsha Pechman ruled last week that the current wait times of 30 to 60 days infringes on the due process rights of defendants awaiting trial in jail. “The state has consistently and over a long period of time violated the constitutional rights of the mentally ill — this must stop,” Pechman’s Dec. 22 order states. “The in-jail wait time experienced by [inmates] today is far beyond any constitutional boundary.” Anita Khandelwal, with the Public Defender Association, says the order does not automatically trigger any speedier evaluations, but it does give

defense attorneys new ammunition for petitioning the court. The association, which has worked the case along with Disability Rights Washington and the ACLU of Washington, feels the new order sends a strong message. “[It’s] a very clear finding that the wait times violate due process rights,” Khandelwal says. “Certain wait times are indefensible.” — JACOB JONES JOHNSON SHOOTING AND POLICE TRAINING As police officers have increasingly served as first responders to mental health crises, many departments have adopted Crisis Intervention Team training to provide officers with additional de-escalation and communication skills. The Spokane Police Department has worked to put all officers through a 40hour CIT course, but officials say some situations will still result in force. Last January, two Spokane police officers opened fire on 29-year-old Aaron Johnson during a confrontation behind the Truth Ministries shelter on East Sprague. Johnson, who has been diagnosed with schizophrenia, survived multiple bullet wounds and denied threatening officers. “They straight wanted to kill me,” he told the Inlander in March. Johnson spent several weeks recovering at Providence Sacred Heart

Medical Center before being admitted to Eastern State Hospital in July. His family says he remains at Eastern State under a civil commitment, but has restricted how much information the hospital can share with them. Spokane Police Chief Frank Straub says the department has now put 95 to 98 percent of officers through CIT training. He says 15 more officers are set to complete an “enhanced CIT” course covering specialized tactics in the coming months. Long term, the department has also considered developing a dedicated Behavioral Health Unit for engaging subjects in crisis or conducting proactive welfare checks. Straub says he wants Spokane to help lead the conversation on engaging and protecting the mentally ill. “We get that there’s a mental health crisis in our nation and in this community,” he says. — JACOB JONES NGRI PATIENTS AND THEIR ENSUING LAWSUIT The Inlander’s second major story in the series, “Patients and Prisoners,” uncovered the punitive and possibly unconstitutional conditions affecting patients adjudicated not guilty by reason of insanity, or NGRI, at Washington’s public psychiatric hospitals. The story describes the public outcry after patient Phillip Paul’s high-profile escape from the Spokane County Fair in September 2009 and the state’s swift and severe reaction — at the expense of patient treatment and reintegration into the community. The Inlander was the first news outlet in more than a decade to meet and interview a forensic patient inside Eastern: Ketema Ross, a former Yale Law student, was found not guilty by reason of insanity after assaulting an elderly couple in 2007 while in the throes of psychosis. Although his commitment at Eastern is indefinite, Ross hasn’t experienced any symptoms of psychosis in more than five years. He and other patients painted a dismal story for the Inlander about their loss of rights and privileges following Paul’s escape and later, the 2012 murder of patient Duane Charley at the hands of another patient. “We are fighting one thing and one thing over all, and that is despair,” Ross told the Inlander during his first interview last October. “I mean that on multiple levels. People have given up on the system. … [They’ve] given up on ever getting out of here.” Spokane attorney Andrew Biviano read the Inlander’s investigation and teamed up with the advocacy group Disability Rights Washington, Ross and two other NGRI patients at Eastern


and Western State hospitals to sue the state. In May, Biviano filed a lawsuit in federal court against Washington and the Department of Social and Health Services, alleging that the current restrictions on NGRI patients violate their constitutional and civil rights to adequate mental health treatment. Rather than seeking compensatory damages, Ross and the other plaintiffs are asking the court to nullify the two laws passed in the aftermath of Paul’s escape. The lawsuit, scheduled for trial next October, has already led to the release of one of the original plaintiffs: “J.T.”, as he’s referred to in court documents, was a former NGRI patient at Eastern State. In 2011, J.T. suffered from drug-induced psychosis and attacked two nurses at a TriCities hospital. On the advice of his public defender, J.T. pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to assault charges in 2012. During his commitment at Eastern, J.T. was never diagnosed with a mental illness, nor did he take any psychiatric medication. In September, J.T. was permanently discharged back to his family’s home in Seattle after the prosecutor and state T HISTORY HWEStried D NORT judge where J.T.’s INLAN case was agreed that his commitment was unconstitutional. Biviano’s lawsuit alleges that there are other patients, like J.T., who have no mental illness and remain hospitalized with no plans for release.

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A World’s Fair? rich history of the the tales that define the Those are just a few of retold in the pages of the first were that es stori Inland Northwest — ries, you’ll meet Nell in 1993. In Inlander Histo es Inlander newspaper starting her own studio on the shor ched laun who star film t Shipman, the silen Helens on a particularly Mt. St.NGRI over t fligh a Last month, three additional plaintiffs — also hop ll You’ . m of of Priest Lake Walt Worthy kept the drea you’ll learn howmental orable day. patients who, like J.T., noAnd diagnosable illness memhave downtown Spokane. in alive t npor Dave s Loui Carriker and William or like Ross, are in remission — joinedJack theNisb lawsuit et, Robertagainst Noted local historians i Boggs, Andrew Sher ding inclu rs, der staff write the state. Biviano and Disability Washington also son join InlanRights Stim tour of some of the most a on you take to ey, kman and Mike have uncovered moreStric evidence of Book punitive treatment at ther for the first Collected toge n’s past. rtant moments in the regio Eastern Washington stry ofnew tape the ther the hospitals. In one impo disturbing example, one of the toge s piece time, Inlander Histories in the “inland” ting a rare document of life re, crea h Idah Nortin plaintiffs was forced to hiso cultu own waste during a docandsit t. inen cont the of er part of this corn

tor’s appointment outside the hospital because Western DESIGN BY CHRIS BOVEY State staff refused to remove his shackles so he$14.95 could COVER use the bathroom. During last year’s legislative session, former Democratic state Rep. Tami Green sponsored a bill to repeal the 2010 law confining patients inside state hospitals. Green’s bill never made it out of committee, and she later lost her state Senate bid in the LETTERS November election. Send comments to While Biviano hopes aneditor@inlander.com. other lawmaker will pick up where she left off, he says it’s unlikely the bill will move forward. “Public fear is a massive driver of legislative action, and I don’t see them as a public wanting to give them their rights back,” Biviano says. “This is why we have judges.” In the months since the Inlander’s original story was published, Ross has successfully fought in court for a conditional release to live in the community as has his friend, “DB,” who’s now living with his family in Spokane. On Jan. 11, Ross will move into a transitional house in Spokane. He hopes to get a full-time job working as a mental health peer counselor and soon, go to law school. (He took the LSAT in September and recently started the application process at Gonzaga University.) It’s been seven and half years since Ross has lived outside the hospital. “Good things are coming,” Ross says over the phone in late December. “Good things.” — DEANNA PAN

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G N I R A BE NESS T I W

e eyes h t h g u o r h t 2014 t a k c pher a a b r g k o o t o o h Al p f ’s staf r e d ak n a l n I e By Young Kw of th

MEN WHO STARE AT GOATS Jason Gamache feeds a Boer goat with his 4-year-old son, Landon, on Sept. 14 during the Spokane County Interstate Fair.

22 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015


ALL WALKS OF LIFE CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP: Bloomsday 2014 // Ten-year-old Quinn at John A. Finch Arboretum // Nick Hamm at the Spokane Highland Games // Spokane Symphony Concertmaster Mateusz Wolski, left, and Music Director Eckart Preu // Bon Bon bartender Kristy White // Forey Walter preps a hot air balloon for flight // Marcia Erskine and her 9-year-old Chihuahua Chico

JANUARY 1, 2015 INLANDER 23


G N I R A BE NESS WIT

HIGHS AND LOWS CLOCKWISE, FROM TOP: Members of the Golden Knights, the U.S. Army parachute team // Eastern Washington’s Cody McCarthy tackles an Illinois State runner // SpokeFest // Dakota Beck of Moses Lake riding Mr. Buddy during the Wrangler Professional Bull Riders Classic // Wesley Tuttle trims cannabis at Yield Farms

24 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015


PRESENTS

RESTAURANT WEEK

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JANUARY 1, 2015 INLANDER 25


G N I R A BE NESS WIT

ZOMBIES AND REPUBLICANS Zombie extra Susan Cleveland prepares for a scene on the set of Z Nation // On Election Night, Republican Larry Haskell learns he’ll become the next Spokane County prosecutor

26 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015

FROM THE COVER Nineteen-year-old Joshuena Williams leads a chant in front of Spokane City Hall during a march and rally after the grand jury decision in death of Ferguson teenager Michael Brown.


2014

Clockwise from top left: KuroNekoCon, Create Spokane, Knights of Badassdom, Modern Theater, Spokane Mural Project, Terrain, Z Nation, Spokane Arts Awards, The Big Dipper.

Pushing Forward It was a year of new efforts and big projects in the region’s cultural scene KNIGHTS OF BADASSDOM FINALLY HITS THEATERS

January The prospect of anyone ever seeing this sci-fi film was starting to become more of a fantasy than its otherworldly story line, but the winter of 2014 finally delivered the made-in-Spokane flick Knights of Badassdom. Filmed in Spokane, the film features stars including Peter Dinklage and Steve Zahn as live action role players (LARPers) whose interest in medieval fantasy battle gets a little more intense when the hapless goofballs accidentally summon a succubus into reality. The film opened to a pair of soldout shows at the AMC theaters in River Park Square, then had a steady run at the independent Magic Lantern Theatre, an extra reward for all the locals who’d worked on the film four years ago. (MIKE BOOKEY)

THE BIG DIPPER REOPENS AS AN ALL-AGES MUSIC VENUE

April A two-year silence for one of Spokane’s most iconic downtown music venues ended this year after it reopened under new ownership with its name and focus as an allages venue intact. The Big Dipper has since hosted dozens of shows, numerous album releases, touring acts and two nights of Volume, the Inlander’s annual music festival. Behind its revival is Spokane native Dan Hoerner, with his wife, Dawson. Hoerner is remembered as the lead guitarist of the influential Seattle emo band Sunny Day Real Estate. Music hasn’t been the Dipper’s entire focus — it’s also hosted film, literary and arts events throughout the year. Even so, the path to success hasn’t been paved

with gold. The venue still hasn’t installed a much-needed fire suppression system that would roughly double its occupancy, and the Hoerners’ original business partners became estranged from the venture after a publicized falling-out in September. (CHEY SCOTT)

Z NATION FLOODS SPOKANE WITH ZOMBIES

April-December When news came in the spring that the Syfy network was going to shoot a zombie-themed television show in Spokane, people got pumped. Not because of the economic impact a television production would bring, or maybe some increased recognition in the industry, but due to the fact that producers put out an open casting call for zombie extras. Apparently, getting your gored-up face on TV is a big deal for some folks. Z Nation debuted in September, and while it’s no The Walking Dead, it garnered a cult following who lapped up its blood, guts and campy acting. As the series aired, there were no shortage of chances to catch glimpses of Spokane landmarks that had been post-apocalypsed. The first season wrapped up in December, but even before that, North by Northwest, the local production company working on the project, announced that Z Nation had been picked up for a second season. The lesson: people really, really loved zombies in 2014. (MB) ...continued on next page

JANUARY 1, 2015 INLANDER 27


CULTURE | YEAR IN REVIEW

“PUSHING FORWARD,” CONTINUED...

EXPO TURNS 40

May The framework of Expo ’74 is still very much visible throughout Spokane, especially downtown, and residents have not forgotten the biggest thing ever to come to our not-so-big city. In May, the city celebrated the 40th anniversary of Spokane’s hallmark event that drew 5.2 million people to town for an environmentally themed celebration that would shape Spokane’s future. The anniversary festivities included an exhibit at City Hall’s Chase Gallery featuring the colorful, very 1970s artwork that accompanied Expo. The anniversary also came months before voters passed a measure to fund improvements to Riverfront Park, the Expo site. (MB)

WE GO CRAZY FOR CONVENTIONS

May, October After eight successful years taking over Spokane Community College’s student Lair for one day each spring, Spokane Comicon has both a new name — Lilac City Comicon — and new digs at the Spokane Convention Center coming in 2015. Since its start in 2007, event organizer/founder Nathan O’Brien has noticed Spokane’s acceptance and appreciation of all things comic book, sci-fi and pop culture building year after year. While O’Brien’s event is more focused on local and regional artists and exhibitors, the success of this past fall’s inaugural Pac-Con Spokane is another major indication of a trend that’s been growing nationally. Hosting Marvel icon Stan Lee and actor William Shatner (who later returned to Spokane in early December for

28 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015

The Book Of Mormon played to a full house during its run at the INB Performing Arts Center. a separate appearance), Pac-Con drew fans from across the Northwest during its threeday run, many more than willing to drop $80 to $200 for the opportunity to meet the stars for autographs and photos. (CS)

THE YEAR SPOKANE TOOK MURALS SERIOUSLY

June It was a good year for public art, especially when it came to breathing some life into downtown Spokane’s sometimes drab underpasses. The Spokane Mural Project provided artists with all the supplies and paint (much of which was donated by supporters including Miller Paint), as well as a stipend between $1,500 and $1,700, depending on the location, to create massive pieces of art. The results from artists (and artist teams) including Erin Mielcarek and Ellen Picken, Todd Benson, Eric-Alain Parker and Lisa Soranaka and a youth-driven initiative from the Spokane Urban Mural Artist Collaboration were well-received and led to the possibility of more murals arriving in future years. An unexpected bonus was the opportunity for the public to watch these artists at work over the course of the summer. Also on the mural front, the Spokane Mobile Mural Project arrived in October to surround an eyesore lot at Division Street and Third Avenue downtown with artwork from 17 different artists. (MB)

TERRAIN GETS ITS OWN DIGS

Summer Perhaps you were among the thousands who stopped by the seventh Terrain in October, partaking in all manner of visual arts, music, comedy, spoken word and cuisine.

The move to the Washington Cracker Co. building on West Pacific gave Terrain a massive canvas on which to convey all the Spokane art scene has to offer, and it was a serious upgrade from previous years at the Music City Building, where the smaller space and lack of sprinklers meant attendees often spent the night in line instead of engaging with the artists. If Terrain organizers’ new fundraising campaign is successful, the new venue will become a permanent home, one that’s open year-round to showcase everything the fall event tries to capture in one night — and then some. “It’s a beautiful space and a big space — it’ll feel like Terrain, hopefully just year-round,” said Terrain co-founder Luke Baumgarten. (DAN NAILEN)

THE INB HAS A BIG YEAR

Throughout Rarely is there buzz about a show for an entire year before it opens in Spokane, but that was the case with the news that The Book of Mormon would make a stop in the Lilac City this summer. Tickets for the risqué comedy, written by the creators of South Park, sold briskly and made more than a few unsuspecting theater patrons squirm in their seats at some of the edgier moments. But it wasn’t just Book of Mormon that kept the INB full. This past year also saw the return of Wizard of Oz spin-off musical Wicked in May; it already been a Spokane blockbuster when it came in 2011. With all the other events — including shows by William Shatner, the Blue Man Group and Cirque du Soleil — it made for a strong showing from the city’s opera house. (MB)


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September Proving that the literary scene in Spokane continues to boom, Shawn Vestal took home perhaps the most prestigious award ever bestowed on a local author when he was named the winner of the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction. The longtime Spokesman-Review columnist had already received praise for his gritty and imaginative short story collection Godforsaken Idaho, but the Bingham Prize seemed to announce Vestal’s arrival as an up-and-coming literary star. “Shawn Vestal’s Godforsaken Idaho ranges not only across time but across genres — historical fiction, fantasy, contemporary realism — all executed with the sure hand of a versatile and gifted writer,” the awarding judges said. Vestal received the $25,000 prize at a ceremony in New York City. (MB)

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September After years struggling to keep their doors open, the board of directors of Interplayers, Spokane’s only professional theater, decided to turn over the keys to Lake City Playhouse of Coeur d’Alene. The two organizations merged in the fall, adopting the name The Modern Theater, and managed to make the transition while only canceling a couple of shows. Part of the deal included the Modern assuming about $92,000 of Interplayers’ outstanding debt, something George Green, Lake City Playhouse’s former director who now oversees The Modern Theater, said was necessary to keep a much-loved stage from going dark in Spokane. “I just want to make sure that both Spokane and Coeur d’Alene understand that this is being done in an effort to create something positive for artists and patrons alike,” he said. The Modern Theater Spokane got off to a strong start with a well-received production of The Glass Menagerie. (MB)

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OCTOBER BECOMES SPOKANE ARTS MONTH

October The Inland Northwest is home to some incredibly creative and passionate people, truly invested in making our region a better place. Recognizing these innovators and their efforts is a big part of what this year’s inaugural Spokane arts month, Create Spokane, was all about. Modeled after similar programs in other cities around Spokane’s size, October was packed full of special performances, exhibitions, classes and other arts-related events, with the intent to encourage residents of all ages and backgrounds to do or see something creative. Most events were free or low cost, and Create Spokane month’s founder, outgoing Spokane Arts director Shannon Halberstadt, said a main goal was to dispel the notion that the arts community is an unaccessible “ivory tower.” One of the most visible elements helping celebrate our artistic culture was Spokane Throw, messages from locals about the city that were light-projected onto the sides of downtown buildings at night. Create Spokane is set to continue in 2015, under the direction of newly hired Spokane Arts director Laura Becker. (CS)

THE SPOKANE ARTS AWARDS MAKE THEIR DEBUT

October Spokane Arts had a big 2014, changing leadership while working to promote the local creative scene. October marked a massive effort by the group, via the month-long Create Spokane celebration of all things artistic in the Lilac City that packed the calendar for 31 days of engaging events. On Oct. 30, it put a bow on Create Spokane with the first-ever Spokane Arts Awards at the Davenport Hotel, an effort to recognize major contributors to the Spokane arts community through nominations by the public in a variety of categories. The inaugural winners were Brenda Nienhouse, executive director of the Spokane Symphony (Leadership Award), the Mobile Murals Project (Collaboration Award), Terrain (Inclusion Award) and artists Todd and Cain Benson and musician Marshall McLean (Imagination Award). (DN) 

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JANUARY 1, 2015 INLANDER 29


CULTURE | DIGEST

Family Forged in Cold and Fandom BY DAN NAILEN

T

odd Claypool slugs down beer from a red Solo cup as he flips and prods the hissing sausages on his hibachi. The rain is holding off for the moment and his family buzzes around. One stirs some bubbling chili. Another secures the bright-red Eastern Washington University tents used to mark the group’s slab of parking lot. Someone mixes cocktails from the ad hoc bar in the back of a white GMC Acadia. The truck is pumping Joan Jett and the Blackhearts, then Sly Fox, then late-period Billy Joel; it’s an ’80s soundtrack fit for a guy like Todd, class of ’87. During the week, he’s a Spokane-based financial advisor. But on fall weekends, he’s a crimson-clad, Cheneybased party host, chef D I S T I L L E D and ringleader. A SHOT OF LIFE This isn’t a family by blood, although there’s a little of that. Todd’s sister married Kay’s son. Mike and Todd went to high school together. Kay is married to Dave, a ’68 grad, and their friend Randy is here, too. Others drop in and out of the scene throughout the morning, the tailgate version of distant cousins who visit only for big occasions. This is a family by choice, a group drawn together as football fans and lovers of a good pregame party. Enough so that two hours before kickoff — in a playoff game against familiar foes from Montana — they’ve already weathered the frigid December blacktop for two hours. And that doesn’t take into account that Todd’s transmission blew on the drive to Cheney, forcing a family rescue to gather him

(and his much-needed supplies) along the side of the road. The truck can stay there ’til later: It’s Game Day. Like a traditional family holiday gathering, everyone knows his or her role. Some cook, some clean, some freeload off the generosity of the more organized. The little ones bounce around the periphery, while some elders lounge in chairs waiting to be served. The family is ever expanding, and Todd seems determined to include as many passersby as he can. “Hey, get over here!” he calls to familiar faces from past weeks/months/years at Roos Field. A quick handshake. A shared beer or shot from a flask. Memories of past Eagles — and tailgate — glories exchanged as the wind kicks up and the smoke from the sausages blows its tempting aroma toward another family’s RV nearby. “Remember when we could have open-pit fires out here?” JESSIE SPACCIA ILLUSTRATION “Man, Brian has a combine wheel he’s made into a grill!” “Remember when the snow was piled up to the sign on the light poles? It was 9 degrees!” Another visitor pops by with an outdated cellphone and promptly pulls off its “antenna” to reveal its true purpose. Covert booze. Todd takes a pull, and his family tree grows. 

MOVIES DIGITS

15 million

$

The estimated amount of money The Interview brought in only from online sources over the four-day Christmas weekend. The film, which Sony initially pulled from theatrical release because of threats from hackers, was shown in a select number of independent theaters over the weekend, raking in just $2.8 million. In case you didn’t know, the Seth Rogen-directed film is about a pair of journalists who try to kill North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un.

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION BY JAKE THOMAS

TV | If you were a child of the ’90s who grew up watching The X-Files, Gillian Anderson will always be Special Agent Dana Scully, the more skeptical counterweight to the evercredulous Fox Mulder. Those of us who associate Anderson with this role will find her well-cast as a serious, hard-nosed investigator (but with a different accent) of strange events as Det. Superintendent Stella Gibson in the BBC series THE FALL. The first season, currently streaming on Netflix, features Gibson chasing a creepy serial killer in Northern Ireland. The second season, being broadcast by the BBC, will be available Jan. 16 on Netflix. MOVIE | Portland is a progressive city full of bikes, beards, beer and gentle quirkiness. It’s also among the cities that have had problems with how their police treat mentally ill people. ALIEN BOY: THE LIFE AND DEATH OF JAMES CHASSE documents a particularly wellpublicized incident involving a schizophrenic man dying in the back of a police cruiser after an encounter with officers, all of whom are still working in law enforcement. Released in 2013, it toured the indie film circuit and is now available on streaming services. MUSIC | RUINS is the latest release from Grouper, the performing name of Portland-based ambient musician Liz Harris. Recorded in Aljezur, Portugal, on a portable four-track and upright piano, Harris would walk several miles through the ruins of old estates and small villages to the beach. The result is a melancholic haze that seems to hauntingly fade in and out, with Harris’ soft melodies hovering over the bittersweet piano chords. She describes the recording as “a nod to that daily walk. Failed structures. Living in the remains of love.” 

Stay Connected, Wherever You Are Follow the Inlander on Pinterest, Twitter, YouTube and Facebook for exclusive news, contests and more!

30 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015


Veraci Pizza

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A Year of Trends All of the gastronomic notables of 2014 BY JO MILLER

W

hether it was the gluten-free craze or the juicing movement, culinary trends seemed to influence the Inland Northwest food scene in 2014. Some entrepreneurs ventured into new territory to open meaderies and join the rest of Washington state in starting up hard cideries. The food truck revolution continued to go strong and, like usual, we gained a slew of new restaurants and inevitably lost a few.

A DIFFERENT KIND OF BOOZE

Last year, two cideries debuted on the not-yet-traversed Spokane hard cider scene. Liberty Ciderworks opened a tasting room downtown while Twilight Cider Works opened on Green Bluff, near the orchards where they source some of their apples. Hard cider kept its momentum this year, with the cideries joining the rest of the state in celebrating Wash-

ington Cider Week, which the Northwest Cider Association started four years ago. Governor Jay Inslee officially backed the 10 days of cider celebration with a formal proclamation. In the spring, One Tree Hard Cider started up and began brewing in Spokane Valley. And just a few days ago, North Idaho Cider opened their Coeur d’Alene tasting room and launched their first release, Lake City Cider, a crisp and dry cider made with Washington apples. Hard cider wasn’t the only alternative libation to hit the local market. Hierophant Meadery and Apothecary started making mead, the extremely ancient — but new, in the sense that it’s just now making a trendy comeback — beverage of fermented honey and water. Because the owners are both herbalists, they focus mostly on several kinds of metheglin (herbal mead). Launching

Nudo Ramen House

South Perry Cupcakes

in the spring, Fenwyr Cellars Meadery began crafting four varieties, including a Sweet Mead and a Huckleberry Dry.

LEAVING GLUTEN BEHIND

Certainly, “gluten-free” was one of the most pervasive buzzwords bouncing around food land in 2014. It seemed the global diet trend had everyone swearing off gluten and looking for yummier versions of the gluten-free foods offered in previous years. While the fad became somewhat controversial when a study said non-celiac gluten sensitivity might not exist, we can at least all agree that now our celiac disease-suffering friends have gained a whole host of eating options. In Spokane, throngs of restaurants added gluten-free items to their menus, but most notable are some of the bakeries. Alpine Bakery Co. closed down the bistro portion of their business to make room for a gluten-free baking room that produces several varieties of loaves, along with hamburger buns, croutons and pastries. With the extra room left over from the changes, a new coffee shop called Alpine Grind began operating the front of the bakery. The Shop launched a line of gluten-free cupcakes — branded South Perry Cupcakes — to accompany their already vast array of foods that include many healthy ...continued on next page

JANUARY 1, 2015 INLANDER 31


FOOD | YEAR IN REVIEW “A YEAR OF TRENDS,” CONTINUED...

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and allergen-free choices. Big changes happened over at the White Box Café and Bakery when they expanded their space along with their breakfast and lunch menus, with all of the items available without gluten. A new gluten-free face debuted on the scene when Cole’s Fine Foods, a 100-percent gluten-free bakery and market, opened on the Northside. They pump out takeout products like artisan pizza, granola, crackers and cheese, scones, cookies and cinnamon rolls — you’ve got to try those cinnamon rolls.

DRINKING TO HEALTH

The Inland Northwest isn’t exactly known for being the most health-conscious area in the country. Sometimes we’re slow to catch on to healthy eating trends. But this was the year we finally decided to jump on the juicing wagon, and we now have several newly opened juice bars to prove it. Jack LaLanne would be so proud. While Method Juice Cafe has been serving fresh-pressed juice in downtown Spokane for a couple of years, until now it’s been kind of a loner. But this summer several cafes making juice opened their doors. June saw the opening of Tierra Madre Cafe and Juicery in Sandpoint and Ephata Cafe in Spokane’s Emerson Garfield neighborhood. The former serves their veggie and fruit juices and smoothies alongside vegan and vegetarian dishes; the latter pairs their juice with a Korean-inspired menu. The following month, the publisher of North Idaho Wellness magazine opened The Wellness Bar in downtown Coeur d’Alene, where you can get lots of kale, celery, cilantro, blueberries and bananas in liquid form. In the fall, grab-and-goers got a place to swing by and get a cup when Guice opened as a drive-thru stand on the South Hill. While not juice, another notable opening in the healthy category is the area’s first kombucha taproom, Bare Culture Kombucha, in the midtown section of Coeur d’Alene. Owner Heather


Threadgill brews the fermented tea with all kinds of crazy-good infused flavors like honey crisp cranberry and strawberry coconut.

FOOD TRUCKS ROLL ON

Food trucks made it onto the big screen in 2014 with Jon Favreau’s film Chef, about a Los Angeles chef going out on his own to start a food truck. On the street in Spokane, food trucks did just as well. Several food truck rallies, where a handful of food trucks gathered downtown, occurred since the first one took place last December. The city’s first Food Truck Palooza was a big hit, with 1,500 people in attendance. Eighteen vendors filled the parking lot near Luigi’s Restaurant, and each attendee bought an entry ticket that allowed them free samples from all of the trucks. It looks like the coming year might have even more in store for the food truck scene. A year-round food truck park is currently in development at a lot near the corner of Sprague Avenue and Perry Street. The park, set to hold eight to 10 food trucks, picnic tables and a heated area for wintertime, is slated to open early next year. A few more trucks joined the ranks of those already traversing the Inland Northwest streets, including The Pizza Truck and 3 Ninjas, a taco truck where they make their own chipotle tortillas. A couple of mobile businesses also ventured into stationary storefronts. Veraci Pizza spent several years on wheels with a clay oven, but this summer they opened a brick-and-mortar restaurant in Kendall Yards. The popular Bistro Box truck announced plans to open a food market, called Fresh Plate, in addition to their food truck.

OPENINGS AND CLOSINGS

The year was full of other changes, with numerous new restaurants popping up and a few closing down:  Anthony’s Beach Cafe — part of the restaurant family that owns Anthony’s at Spokane Falls — opened up in the new Regal Plaza where the South Hill got a Target. Other eateries are slated to soon pop up around it, including Ezell’s Famous Chicken, Jersey Mike’s Subs and Mod Pizza.  Coeur d’Alene’s beloved coffee shop and downtown hangout, Java on Sherman, moved down the road a ways to a larger spot where they expanded their menu. Vault Coffee opened in Java’s old digs.  Batch Bakeshop and Brain Freeze Creamery had both been operating for years without storefronts until they opened their own this year, Batch in West Central and Brain Freeze in Kendall Yards.  Chef Adam Hegsted (formerly of Coeur d’Alene Casino Resort) opened not one but two restaurants in Kendall Yards: The Wandering Table and Yards Bruncheon.  The family behind Madeleine’s Cafe and Casper Fry opened Durkin’s Liquor Bar at 415 W. Main Ave. and temporarily closed Madeleine’s in order to reopen it next to Durkin’s this January.  The ramen trend arrived in Spokane with the opening of Nudo, featuring shoyu ramen, miso ramen, seafood ramen and ramen burgers.

Anthony’s Beach Cafe. ASHLEY TOMLINSON PHOTO  As for the closings, Dawn of the Donut opened in 2013 much to the joy of zombie fans, but closed in September and transformed into Casual Friday Donuts, now run by the owners of Celebrations Bakery.  The Daiquiri Factory opened downtown at the start of the year, but pissed nearly everybody off with an offensive drink title and was evicted in June for not paying rent. n

Cancellations Cost Businesses 20% in Revenue Every Year

Until Now

Learn More

rebooked.com JANUARY 1, 2015 INLANDER 33


FOOD | YEAR IN REVIEW

English Setter Brewing Company was one of several new breweries to launch in 2014. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

Buzzworthy

The region’s craft brewing industry boom has yet to peak BY MIKE BOOKEY

T

hose who thought 2014 would bring the collapse of the Inland Northwest’s craft brewing bubble are going to have to wait — and wait for a long while, it seems — for that prognostication to become reality. If anything, this year proved that the region’s beer drinkers are still very much thirsty for locally made suds and will welcome more of them. The spring saw the opening of Ramblin’ Road Craft Brewery, which specializes in Belgian-style ales.

34 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015

It’s just a few blocks from Gonzaga, and conveniently for beer tourists, only a stone’s throw from the No-Li Brewhouse pub. In the increasingly trendy Perry district, former Big Sky brewer Ben Lukes and his wife, Christy, opened Perry Street Brewing, offering a wide array of creative brews (thanks to Lukes’ use of multiple yeast strains) inside the slick space. English Setter arrived in Spokane Valley with rotating beers, almost all with dog names, while Newport got into the game with the arrival

of Top Frog Brewery. In North Spokane, Waddell’s, already well known for their South Hill pub, began making their own beer. The already established breweries continued to grow, with Orlison Brewing Co. installing its own canning line and taking those cans — including the ALS-fighting Pilsner 37 inspired by Steve Gleason — to more and more stores and bars across the Northwest. Iron Goat expanded production and also had the chance to collaborate with craft heavyweight Ninkasi Brewing on a triple IPA. River City Brewing rolled out excellent seasonal beers like their Afternoon India Session Ale and the Riverkeeper IPA, the latter of which raised funds to maintain the health of the Spokane River. No-Li won big at a winter beer festival in Seattle in December, thanks in part to their increased focus on barrel aging, which they also showcased at a pair of sold-out small-batch festivals at the brewery. At the far north end of the region, Kootenai River Brewing Co. out of Bonner’s Ferry was the only Inland Northwest brewery to medal at the Great American Beer Festival, with a bronze for their Scottish Ale. In Kettle Falls, Northern Ales rolled out its first canned beer, the Grouch Lager. To fit the boom in both the number of breweries and beer drinkers, the Inland Northwest Craft Beer Festival moved from downtown Spokane to take over the entire outfield of Avista Stadium, home of the Spokane Indians. It was also ample space for Twelve String Brewing to display its impressive 10-tap pouring system for the big crowds that came out on the unseasonably warm lateSeptember weekend. Looking forward, Black Label Brewing began brewing last week with plans to soon open a tap room in the Saranac Commons space in downtown Spokane. It doesn’t stop there — additional breweries have applied for liquor permits and may very well open next year. n


The Lego Movie

2014 Mistaken For Strangers

Big Flicks

Nightcrawler

A list of 2014’s top 15 movies that doesn’t include Boyhood BY SCOTT RENSHAW

A

calendar year is as arbitrary a way to recognize greatness as a numbered list is, especially in an era when so many people see movies in places other than theaters. But if nothing else, year-end list-making offers a chance for readers to revisit movies that they might have missed, or reach beyond the box-office champs to find something new for a Netflix queue. Here are 15 of 2014’s best — at least according to me.

15. ALAN PARTRIDGE: ALPHA PAPA Steve

Coogan returns to his signature role, with the oblivious, self-absorbed titular chat-show host in the middle of a hostage situation at a small-town radio station. It’s nothing more than riotously funny work by Coogan, plus blistering writing by The Thick of It /Veep creator Armando Iannucci — and that’s enough.

14. NIGHTCRAWLER Writer/director Dan Gilroy rides Jake Gyllenhaal’s masterful performance as an ambitious crime-scene photographer to craft a terrific allegory not just about journalistic ethics, but about the inherently sociopathic nature of pure capitalism. 13. EDGE OF TOMORROW I may be in the tank for Doug Liman, but he managed to take a simple, killer sci-fi premise — a soldier (Tom Cruise) caught in a loop of dying and “rebooting” while trying to find a way to defeat an alien invasion — and turn it into a story of how we learn that

They Came Together there may be something in our lives more important than ourselves.

12. THEY CAME TOGETHER Genre parodies are a dime a dozen, but is this spin on urban romantic comedies — with Paul Rudd and Amy Poehler as the meet-cute couple — one of the funniest cliché-skewering efforts in years? You can say that again. 11. SELMA In the same way that Lincoln was wisely not a cradle-to-grave biopic, but a snapshot of a legendary leader’s approach to leadership, Ava DuVernay’s study of Martin Luther King’s organization of voting-rights protests in Alabama captures something not merely inspirational, but nuts-and-bolts vital.

Pynchon’s novel just the way it should’ve been adapted. And if you find a finer contemporary example of physical comedy than Joaquin Phoenix’s performance as Doc Sportello, please let me know so I can laugh my face off at it.

7. THE LEGO MOVIE If you’re going to craft a

3. UNDER THE SKIN Jonathan Glazer completely upended the source-material novel for this sci-fi tale of a unique predatory visitor (Scarlett Johansson). But his haunting visual style made it one of the year’s creepiest, most hypnotic trips, as well as a surprisingly potent exploration of sexual power as seen through inhuman eyes.

narrative out of a toy that allows you to turn colorful pieces into nearly anything, this is exactly what you should make. Phil Lord and Christopher Miller manage a smart, wildly imaginative manifesto on how to find the joy in any creative endeavor — even one based on a corporate product.

6. FORCE MAJEURE All it takes is one crucial

hilariously embodies the self-loathing/ self-absorption spin cycle of a moderately successful young writer in writer/director Alex Ross Perry’s caustic comedy about “genius” as an excuse for being an a-hole.

moment during a ski holiday for the marriage of Tomas (Johannes Kuhnke) and Ebba (Lisa Loven Kongsli) to change forever, in Ruben Östlund’s darkly satirical portrait of whether we can still live with someone else — or with ourselves — when traditional roles are called into question.

9. MISTAKEN FOR STRANGERS It was mistaken

5. WE ARE THE BEST! Lukas Moodysson

8. ONLY LOVERS LEFT ALIVE Tilda Swinton and

4. INHERENT VICE It’s a rambling, shambling, shaggy dog of a detective movie, adapted by Paul Thomas Anderson from Thomas

10. LISTEN UP PHILIP Jason Schwartzman

for a “The National concert movie,” but it’s actually a funny, surprisingly emotional portrait of sibling rivalry, as still-livingwith-mom would-be filmmaker Tom Berninger chronicles his time on tour with his brother, The National lead singer Matt Berninger.

Tom Hiddleston are centuries-old vam-

The Babadook

pires living in the modern world in Jim Jarmusch’s dreamy, sometimes hilarious paean to the eternal beauty of art, and how it might give meaning to immortal lives by delivering something new and beautiful.

adapts his wife’s autobiographical graphic novel about life as an early-’80s punker girl in Stockholm, and the result is an exuberant, wildly entertaining study of adolescent girlhood, anchored by three terrific young performances.

2. TWO DAYS, ONE NIGHT The gut-punching

humanism of Belgium’s Dardennes brothers continues in this stunning story of a depression-plagued woman (the sublime Marion Cotillard) forced to beg coworkers for a chance to keep her job. It’s a potent economic horror story, but just as heartbreaking in its refusal to find an obvious villain.

1. THE BABADOOK Jennifer Kent’s stunning debut feature is pitched as a horror movie, and it’s true that there’s genuinely unsettling stuff in this tale of a single mother haunted by a figure from a pop-up book. But it’s also so much deeper and richer than mere genre jolts, with Essie Davis’ best-of-the-year performance bringing terrifying immediacy to a single mother’s guilt, grief, bone-weary exhaustion and a possibly homicidal inability to cope. n

JANUARY 1, 2015 INLANDER 35


FILM | SHORTS

THE MAGIC LANTERN

OPENING FILMS

FRI JAN 2ND - THUR JAN 8TH

ANTARTICA: A YEAR ON ICE (91 MIN)

*Opening!

Fri-Sun: 6:00 Wed/Thu: 6:00

CITIZENFOUR (111 MIN)

ANTARTICA: A YEAR ON ICE

Fri/Sat: 7:45 Sun: 4:00 Wed/Thu: 4:00

*last week!

AWAKE: THE LIFE OF YOGANANDA (81 MIN) Fri/Sat: 4:30 Sun: 2:30 Wed/Thu: 2:30

THE BABADOOK (93 MIN)

Fri/Sat: 8:15 Sun: 6:30 Wed/Thu: 6:30

MY OLD LADY (102 MIN)

Fri/Sat: 6:15 Sun: 4:30 Wed/Thu: 4:30

FORCE MAJEURE (117 MIN)

*last week!

Fri/Sat: 4:00 Sun: 2:15 Wed/Thu: 2:15

A nominee for the Most Foreboding Film Title Ever award, this sequel to the 2012 horror flick that starred Daniel Radcliffe takes us to World War II London, where bombs are raining down on the city. A schoolteacher evacuates her class to a house in the countryside, but soon stuff starts to get weird and deadly when an otherworldly force possesses the kids. (MB) Rated PG-13

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WOMAN IN BLACK 2: ANGEL OF DEATH

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THE GAMBLER

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THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF FIVE ARMIES

2

MOVIE

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ANNIE

PG Daily (4:15) 6:45 9:20 Fri-Sun (11:15) (1:45)

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: SECRET OF THE TOMB PG Daily (5:00) 7:10 9:25 Fri-Sun (12:30) (2:45)

EXODUS: GODS AND KINGS PG-13 Daily 6:15 9:15

THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY PART 1 PG-13 Daily (4:20) 7:00 9:35 Fri-Sun (11:15) (1:40)

PENGUINS OF MADAGASCAR

PG Daily (4:15) Fri-Sun (12:15) (2:15)

BIG HERO 6

PG Daily (3:15) Fri-Sun (10:40) (12:50)

INTERSTELLAR

Trivia

PG-13 (5:30) 8:45

in

WANDERMERE 12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

WOMAN IN BLACK 2: ANGEL OF DEATH

ANNIE

The original Broadway version of Annie came out in 1977. And while the story told four decades later could use some updating, the newest film version of the beloved orphan leaves much to be desired. The pieces are all here — Jamie Foxx in the Will Stacks (aka Daddy Warbucks) role, Cameron Diaz as Miss Hannigan and the cheeky Quvenzhané Wallis (Beasts of the Southern Wild) as Annie. (LJ) PG

AWAKE: THE LIFE OF YOGANANDA

Yeah, everybody does yoga these days, but it didn’t always used to be that way. This documentary tells the story of Paramahansa Yogananda, who brought the ancient art to the Western world in the 1920s and also penned The Autobiography of a Yogi. Without him, your Saturday mornings would probably have a lot less downward dog. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated PG

BIG EYES

PG-13 Daily (12:00) (2:20) (4:50) 7:15 9:35

INTO THE WOODS

PG Daily (1:15) (4:00) 6:45 9:25 Fri-Sun (10:30)

THE GAMBLER

R Daily (2:10) (4:40) 7:10 9:40 Fri-Sun (11:40)

WILD

8am-3pm

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UNBROKEN

PG-13 Daily (12:30) (3:30) 6:30 9:30

THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF FIVE ARMIES

New Year’s Day.

PG-13 In High Frame Rate Daily 8:00 Fri-Sun (11:00) In 2D Daily (12:10) (2:00) (3:10) (5:00) 6:15 9:15

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NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: SECRET OF THE TOMB PG Daily (12:30) (2:45) (5:00) 7:10 9:25 Fri-Sun (10:30) PG-13

EXODUS: GODS AND KINGS

Daily 9:15 In 2D (12:15) (3:15) 6:15

THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING PG-13 Daily (4:40) 7:20 9:40

PENGUINS OF MADAGASCAR

PG Daily (12:40) (2:40) Fri-Sun (10:45)

THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY PART 1 PG-13 Daily (1:00) (3:40) 6:20 9:00 Fri-Sun (10:30)

BIG HERO 6

PG Daily (12:50) (3:15) Fri- Sun (10:40)

INTERSTELLAR

PG-13 Daily (5:30) 8:45

eatCENTRALFOOD.com

36 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 1/2/15-1/8/15

THE BABADOOK

Australian writer/director Jennifer Kent makes a stunningly assured feature filmmaking debut with this unnerving thriller about a single mom, Amelia, who’s exhausted due to the sleeplessness of near-7-year-old Samuel, who fears monsters that he believes to be hiding in closets and under the bed. Things escalate when Mister Babadook, an ominous children’s pop-up book, mysteriously appears in Samuel’s bedroom and warns against a dark and evil creature who cannot be gotten rid of once he’s been allowed into one’s home. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

BIG EYES

Back in the 1950s, Walter Keane (Christoph Waltz) convinced his wife Margaret Keane (Amy Adams) to let him take credit for her big eye-filled work. Art critics scoffed, but the art eventually became hugely popular. Decades later, the truth would emerge, shocking fans. This film is sure to have some strangeness; it’s directed by Tim Burton

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Birdman

89

Citizenfour

88

The Babadook

87

Interstellar

76

Into the Woods

70

The Hobbit

61

Unbroken DON’T MISS IT

60 WORTH $10

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THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

THE WOMAN IN BLACK 2: ANGEL OF DEATH

25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $8 www.magiclanternspokane.com

$ 50

CRITICS’ SCORECARD

After a decade of filming, Anthony Powell has completed his award-winning international documentary, Antarctica: A Year on Ice. The visual phenomenon offers viewers an immersion into a full year in the life of people who choose to live in one of Earth’s most isolated regions characterized by harsh climates and awe-inspiring displays of nature. At Magic Lantern (KG) Rated PG

*Oscar Nominee!

after all. But expect shades of Ed Wood, rather than Big Fish. (LJ) Rated PG-13

BIG HERO 6

Boy genius Hiro Hamada (Ryan Potter) spends his time illegally hustling in robot fights until his brother shows him his college science lab where his buddies are making astounding inventions under the tutelage of professor Robert Callaghan (James Cromwell). But after tragedy strikes, Hiro accidentally activates Tadashi’s project — a marshmallow-puffy medical robot named Baymax (Scott Adsit). (SS) Rated PG

BIRDMAN

After good work in lots of small supporting roles over the past couple of decades, Michael Keaton gets back to work as a former franchise movie star now trying to make a comeback on the Broadway stage, but finding obstacles everywhere, many of them in his own head. He’s accompanied by a great cast, including Naomi Watts and Emma Stone, but the most sparks fly in Keaton’s scenes with a Method-mad actor played by Edward Norton. (ES) Rated R

CITIZENFOUR

An intimate look at Edward Snowden’s life in the days just before his spooky treasure trove of NSA secrets went public thanks to Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, the latter of whom directed this film. Citizenfour takes place almost exclusively in Snowden’s Hong Kong hotel room. The details laid out, though, are enough to keep you riveted and make you wonder why this story isn’t still dominating the news cycle. At Magic Lantern (MS) Rated R

EXODUS

Here, Ridley Scott has turned to the story of Moses (Christian Bale) and Rhamses (Joel Edgerton), raised as brothers in the palace of Egypt’s pharaoh, until Moses learns that he was actually born of the Hebrews who serve as Egypt’s slaves and becomes their leader in their

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

fight for freedom. The effects are impressive and on a grand scale, but the performances and chopped-up story undermine those efforts. (SR) Rated PG-13

FORCE MAJEURE

A sly satire of masculinity as well as an engaging family drama, Force Majeure follows a Swedish family that travels to the (gorgeously shot) French Alps for a ski vacation that is brutally disrupted by an avalanche that turns a relaxing lunch into a disaster — particularly for family patriarch Tomas. How the family deals with the unexpected turn in their vacation made this a best foreign film nominee for the Golden Globes and Independent Spirit Awards. At Magic Lantern (DN) Rated R

THE GAMBLER

Jim Bennett (Mark Wahlberg) leads an improbable double-life as a college English professor and gambler. In an effort to pay off accumulating debt, Bennett borrows money from a gangster (Kenneth Williams) and places his own life on the line as collateral. (KG) Rated R

GONE GIRL

David Fincher (Fight Club, The Social Network) gets his paws on the novel by Gillian Flynn (who also wrote the script) and comes up with one of the twisting-est, turning-est and most unsettling movies of the year. Ben Affleck is the once-happy husband whose once-happy wife, Rosamund Pike, up and vanishes on the morning of their fifth anniversary, with lots of clues and a few secrets pointing directly at him as the perpetrator. (ES) Rated R

THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF THE FIVE ARMIES

Peter Jackson’s conclusion to The Hobbit is a perfect tie-in to the beginning of The Lord of the Rings. This one picks up right where the previous one ended, with a fiery attack by the dragon Smaug, reintroduces all of the main


characters, kills off quite a few of them, and leaves us with a feeling of complete satisfaction. Epic filmmaking by a master. (ES) Rated PG-13

HOMESMAN

Tommy Lee Jones, Hilary Swank and Meryl Streep star in this film that offers a glimpse into the challenges faced in the early American West. When three women become mentally unstable due to their trying pioneer lifestyles, the hardened Mary Bee Cuddy — played by Swank— sets out to deliver them to safety in Iowa. (KG) Rated R

HORRIBLE BOSSES 2

Seeking to raise funds for their business, a trio played by Jason Bateman, Jason Sudeikis and Charlie Day turn to venture capitalist Bert Hanson (Christoph Waltz) and his son Rex (Chris Pine) to get them started. But when Bert deliberately screws them on their deal, the friends turn to an option that conveniently combines revenge with fiscal practicality: kidnapping Rex and using the ransom money to save their business. (SR) Rated R

THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY, PART 1

Katniss Everdeen (Jennifer Lawrence), reluctant heroine of District 12, has been snatched from the arena where impoverished teenagers play out a tothe-death bloodsport for the amusement of their overlords of the decadent Capitol. In that arena, she accidentally inspired a nation of downtrodden serfs in the future North American nation of Panem to begin tentatively to rise up. (MB) Rated PG-13

THE IMITATION GAME

During World War II, the Germans used a machine called an Enigma that created what were thought to be unbreakable codes for top-secret military communications. British mathematician Alan Turing, played here by Benedict Cumberbatch, was hired by Allied forces to decipher the machine’s codes and help win the war. To do so, he had to create a machine of his own. (MB) Rated PG-13

MY OLD LADY

PENGUINS OF MADAGASCAR

Newcomers, however, might get the white-and-black cuties mixed up as they blur around the screen making dad jokes and getting into their usual hijinks as they fight off a mean octopus named Dave who’s trying to eradicate penguins from the face of the earth. (KJ) Rated PG

THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING

Inspired by Jane Wilde Hawking’s memoir about her life with former husband Stephen Hawking, the brilliant theoretical physicist (A Brief History of Time) diagnosed with motor neuron disease at age 21, the film’s heart beats with a romantic optimism, even when each of them finds new soulmates and their union ends. (SD) Rated PG-13

INTO THE WOODS

Angelina Jolie’s adaptation of Laura Hillenbrand’s tells the story of Louis Zamperini (Jack O’Connell), a bombardier during World War II who, as a young man, was a medal-winning athlete at the 1936 Berlin Olympics. Ultimately, the story takes us to the hardships Zamperini endures during the war: stranded for more than a month on a raft at sea after his plane goes down only to be captured by the Japanese and imprisoned. (SR) Rated PG-13

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: SECRET OF THE TOMB

It’s up to Larry the security guard (Ben Stiller) to save the day and make sure

HAPPY NEW YEAR!

Searchable by Movie, by Theater, or Time

TOP FIVE

INTERSTELLAR

The song-filled new telling of familiar Grimm fairy tales is a terrific piece of work, with wonderful performances, outstanding production design and snappy writing. But this film, based on the Broadway musical, is also extremely dark, featuring themes of deception, greed, infertility, and even a taste of lasciviousness, and should be of some concern for parents who are thinking of bringing their kids. (ES) Rated PG

on

Kevin Kline is Mathias Gold, a 57-yearold New Yorker with no family, no money and no prospects who arrives in France to take ownership of an apartment left to him by his estranged father. There, Mathias finds an elderly British woman named Mathilde Girard (Maggie Smith) living in the place, the result of an odd bit of French property law called a viager. Accordingly, not only must Mathias wait until Mathilde’s death to take ownership of the place, he also has to continue his father’s payments to her until her demise. At Magic Lantern (DN) Rated PG-13

Chris Rock plays writer, director and also star of this comedy in which he plays big time comedic actor Andre Allen looking to ditch his ridiculous movie career and be taken seriously. When Andre spends time with a journalist (Rosario Dawson) who questions his career choices, he starts to evaluate his choices. (MB) Rated R

Coop (Matthew McConaughey) is a lonely would-be adventurer in a world that, like ours, has lost its taste for space exploration and is teetering on the edge of environmental collapse. Mathematician Brand (Michael Caine) and his scientist daughter Amelia (Anne Hathaway) have discovered a wormhole out near Saturn that could hold the key to humanity’s salvation: a new planet to call home on the other side. (MJ) Rated PG-13

MOVIE TIMES

the nighttime shenanigans at the Museum of Natural History continue. The powers of the Egyptian tablet breathing life into the museum’s inhabitants is fading, so Larry and his crew head to London on an epic quest. (CS) Rated PG

UNBROKEN

WILD

Reese Witherspoon stars as Cheryl Strayed, the woman who walked the length of the Pacific Crest Trail and lived to write a hit book (upon which this film is based) about it. Directed by Jean-Marc Vallee (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild follows Strayed as she deals with her mother’s death and her crippling addiction issues by heading into the wilderness alone. (MB) Rated R n

JANUARY 1, 2015 INLANDER 37


Five Alarm Funk

Shovels & Rope Future Islands

2014 Alice Cooper at the Spokane Arena in November. DAVE KOTLAN PHOTO Pixies

Big Show The best local performances of the year BY INLANDER STAFF AND CONTRIBUTORS FUTURE ISLANDS The Bartlett | April 2 2014 was huge for Future Islands — now appropriately labeled the band’s “breakthrough” year after the release of its fourth record, Singles. So it was no surprise when the Baltimore-based trio sold out its Spokane debut well before arriving. (In hindsight, the band likely would have filled a much, much larger venue.) Locals already turned on to Future Islands’ electric stage presence — mostly frontman Samuel T. Herring’s emphatic dance moves — and driving, upbeat tracks danced the hour-long show away. Herring never stopped moving, sweat soaking through his all-black T-shirt-and-slacks ensemble and dripping from his face into tiny puddles onstage. (CHEY SCOTT)

38 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015

SHOVELS & ROPE The Bartlett | April 19 Musical chemistry can’t get much better than a husband-and-wife duo like Shovels & Rope. With a deep well of soul and endless energy, the two trade off on sharp harmonies and lively duets. They also switch instruments throughout the set, going back and forth on guitar and percussion. Light-hearted banter peppered their set — except for a moment when a voice called for Michael Trent to take off his shirt. A protective Cary Ann Hearst, in the most dead-cold delivery I’ve ever heard, wheeled around and warned: “I will cut you in half.” Nobody made any more catcalls. (JACOB JONES)

ANGEL OLSEN The Bartlett | July 30 Of the few times I was fortunate enough to see Angel Olsen in 2014, her performance at the Bartlett was unquestionably the best show I saw in Spokane all year. Dripping with confidence and wit, she tore through almost an hour-and-a-half worth of songs new and old. She is a remarkable talent, with a stunning, gold-plated voice and a charming wisdom far beyond her years. Admittedly, I’m usually not one to sing along at a show, but there was something cathartic about letting it all out. “Are you lonely too? / High five! / So am I.” (JORDAN SATTERFIELD) AGAINST ME! The Knitting Factory | Aug. 12 As I approach 30, the list of songs that can lure me into a mosh pit has dwindled to a small handful. While Against Me!’s “Pints of Guinness Make You Strong” remains on that list, I did not really expect it to happen. I had all but given up on Against Me! after some disappointing records. Their music didn’t resonate like it used to. But this year’s Transgender Dysphoria Blues proved

Wayne Hancock

singer Laura Jane Grace still knew how to raise hell. And their live show kept that promise with a rapid-fire set of anarcho punk anthems from across their career. Grace owned that stage and belted out for all she was worth. When the band started into “Pints,” I charged into the flailing crowd. (JJ) BORIS The Big Dipper | Aug. 15 One of the biggest musical shocks I had all year was finally getting to see Japanese doom metal vets Boris and being completely stunned by… how loud it wasn’t. The intimidating walls of Orange and Sunn amplifiers seemed to heed a volume-related warning, but instead they delivered an articulate, thoughtful and completely audible arrangement of tracks ranging from sludgy to uncontrollably wild. After playing the entirety of their brilliant new album Noise, the highlight of the night was their final song — a particularly gnarly rendition of the implosive “Vomitself,” one that seemed to last a swirling, crushing eternity. (JS)


FIVE ALARM FUNK Perry Street Shakedown | Sept. 14 Five Alarm Funk surprised me. I didn’t think I was into funk, but the Vancouver B.C.-based band had me at the words “I’m gonna wash your face!” Yes, the raucous nine-piece band played a sassy funk song about washing another person’s face, and it was so cool. On stage, there was brass for days and congas and timbales. One singer marched in place and saluted the crowd. The whole show was so bizarre and priceless that the high schoolers in front of the crowd were as into it as the old folks in the back. Under the night sky, I jumped to the groovy beat with new friends, pretended to wash faces and even marched in place. I couldn’t stop smiling. (LAURA JOHNSON) DAVE RAWLINGS MACHINE Bing Crosby Theater | Sept. 23 It’s rare that one actually feels privileged for the opportunity to buy a concert ticket, but the visit by roots-music supergroup the Dave Rawlings Machine was just that, a privilege. Led by Rawlings, longtime musical partner of Gillian Welch, the band played a joyous blend of old traditionals, covers and Rawlings originals, and they were clearly as thrilled as the audience to be there. The instrumental interplay was awe-inspiring between guitarists Rawlings and Welch, former Old Crow Medicine Show cat Willie Watson, Punch Brothers bassist Paul Kowert and a mandolin master you might remember from his days in Led Zeppelin — John Paul Jones. (DAN NAILEN) PIXIES INB Performing Arts Center | Oct. 3 The cavernous INB is not the ideal environment to see what is essentially an indie band — albeit a long-running, legendary one. Even so, the Pixies had little trouble making the place feel intimate as Black Francis’ howls and Joey Santiago’s distinct guitar squalls filled the space with the band’s distinctly spacey post-punk sound. The old hits thrilled, as “Wave of Mutilation” and “Planet of Sound” bookended a two-hour blaze through nearly 30 songs. And the new songs from the band’s 2014 release Indie Cindy fit in just fine, as did bassist Paz Lenchantin, who joined David Lovering in the rhythm section in Kim Deal’s stead. (DN) SAFE IN SOUND Spokane Arena | Oct. 9 Featuring Adventure Club, Destroid and Flux Pavilion, young Spokanites flocked to the traveling electronic dance music show Safe in Sound. The arena’s size intensified the feeling of chaotic grandiosity. With blends of drum and bass, dubstep and trap, these artists brought the alternative ravers and the classic college partygoers together for a night of flashing lights and throbbing beats. For five hours in a row, it was all about that bass. (MOLLY SMITH) WAYNE HANCOCK The Bartlett | Oct. 26 Tireless road warrior and keeper of the honky-tonk flame, Wayne “the Train” Hancock, finally made it to Spokane in October, and boy, was he worth the wait. The show was made all the sweeter because it almost didn’t happen at all — Wayne was originally scheduled to play June 4, but was involved in a serious motorcycle accident in his native Texas. Luckily for us, he appears to be invincible and showed up no worse for wear. With the demeanor of a favorite, crazy uncle and the voice of Hank Sr., Hancock took us on a musical tour of the old, weird America and brought along some of the hottest players around. (GAWAIN FADELEY) MÖTLEY CRÜE AND ALICE COOPER Spokane Arena | Nov. 22 “I swear to God, our music is going to haunt you until the day you die,” frontman Vince Neil proclaimed near the end of Mötley Crüe’s Spokane Arena show. For many fans in the packed-to-the-raftersaudience, that’s the truth. But the spectacle of the show is what will stick with me forever. Part of the Crüe’s alleged final tour, the crazy night included extreme pyrotechnics, fiery anarchy signs and Tommy Lee and his drum kit hitting up a roller coaster. Alice Cooper kicking off the night with a beheading didn’t hurt either. (LJ) n

JANUARY 1, 2015 INLANDER 39


MUSIC | 2014

Spinning to the Top The 2014 records most worthy of a listen, according to Inlander music writers LAURA JOHNSON Inlander Music Editor

10. Lake Street Dive: Bad Self Portraits 9. Jenny Lewis: The Voyager 8. alt-J: This is All Yours 7. Mac DeMarco: Salad Days 6. Doug Paisley: Strong Feelings 5. Jessica Lea Mayfield: Make My Head Sing 4. TV on the Radio: Seeds 3. Cloud Nothings: Here and Nowhere Else 2. Conor Oberst: Upside Down Mountain 1. Big Freedia: Just Be Free Every song on Big Freedia’s recent release is about shaking your body, a continuation of previous booty-movin’ efforts. Sometimes the artist (born Freddie Ross) directs you to “wiggle” or “jump on it” or “go crazy,” but it’s all about getting up and dancing. The music, a strain of New Orleans hip-hop called bounce, is so refreshing because of its simplicity. Drum machine, sirens, yells, and claps provide the firm foundation for Freedia to rap/shout over in a very repetitive manner. In a world full of music that’s far too serious, this is the album to play when you just want to be free.

DAN NAILEN

Inlander Staff Writer 10. Ex Hex: Rips 9. The New Pornographers: Brill Bruisers 8. Spoon: They Want My Soul 7. Run the Jewels: Run the Jewels 2 6. Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers: Hypnotic Eye 5. Afghan Whigs: Do to the Beast 4. St. Vincent: St. Vincent 3. Drive-By Truckers: English Oceans 2. Lydia Loveless: Somewhere Else 1. Jenny Lewis: The Voyager Lewis’ music lands at the nexus of indie rock, classic country and sunny retro-pop, and she easily avoids the danger of coming off too precious, with biting lyrics set in a darker, uneasy present than her rainbow suits and glammy

40 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015

L.A. background might suggest. Her third solo album comes on sonically like an easy-listening soundtrack to a summer convertible cruise (Beck and Ryan Adams are both on board as producers), but Lewis is excavating deep feelings about old breakups, family deaths and the reality of facing down 40 — issues that make it easy for young and old, male and female, to relate to where she’s coming from.

SETH SOMMERFELD Inlander Contributor

10. Posse: Soft Opening 9. S: Cool Choices 8. PAWS: Youth Culture Forever 7. Dude York: Dehumanize 6. La Sera: Hour of the Dawn 5. TacocaT: NVM 4. Angel Olsen: Burn Your Fire for No Witness 3. Sharon Van Etten: Are We There 2. St. Vincent: St. Vincent 1. Against Me!: Transgender Dysphoria Blues If punk rock is supposed to give a voice to the brash, rebellious, maligned, and disenfranchised through unfettered aggression, then Against Me!’s Transgender Dysphoria Blues might just be the most punk album ever. The record serves as Laura Jane Grace’s screamed declaration of arrival as an open and out transgender woman. Over the course of 10 unrelenting tracks, she says: “Here’s who I am, here are the insecurities I’ve dealt with all my life, and I’m gonna kick in the teeth of any bigot who gets in my way.” Against Me! turns explorations of transgender issues into catchy, anthemic sing-alongs and capture the heartbreaking anguish of being a true outsider.

GAWAIN FADELEY

Inlander Contributor/Musician 10. Old 97’s: Most Messed Up 9. Blake Mills: Heigh Ho 8. Sturgill Simpson: Metamodern Sounds in Country Music 7. Future Islands: Singles 6. The Budos Band: Burnt Offering 5. St. Vincent: St. Vincent 4. Various artists: Country Funk II 3. The War On Drugs: Lost in the

Dream 2. Jenny Lewis: The Voyager 1. Real Estate: Atlas I know the last thing we all need is another easygoing, whitedude guitar band, but these five fellows from north Jersey have something figured out. On this, their third LP, they’ve managed to solidify an immediately identifiable sound in the confines an all-too-familiar format, with an understated and limber rhythm section, an abundance of shimmering guitar hooks, and terrific, evocative songwriting courtesy of frontman Martin Courtney. The entire album, both lyrically and musically, plays like the soundtrack to that perfect summer afternoon back in junior year, driving the family station wagon down leafy suburban streets, the hazy light fading into the promise of the night ahead.

JORDAN SATTERFIELD

Inlander Contributor/Musician 10. Total Control: Typical System 9. St. Vincent: St. Vincent 8. Xeno & Oaklander: Par Avion 7. Tombs: Savage Gold 6. Kodomo: Patterns & Light 5. Angel Olsen: Burn Your Fire for No Witness 4. Boris: Noise 3. Swans: To Be Kind 2. Aphex Twin: Syro 1. FKA twigs: LP1 So far, this decade has been full of highly confident debut records — ones with both palpable density and graceful subtlety. The first full-length by English producer and songwriter FKA twigs is a prime example, an intoxicatingly sexual yet unapologetically dark record of trip-hop and electronic R&B. What it lacks in bombast it more than makes up for in staunch intensity and effortless class. LP1 is FKA twigs laid bare, a twisted but simple collection of elegant pop tracks with cavernous depth and a razor-sharp edge. For a record that is so hopelessly modern by virtue of its very existence, it also feels inescapably timeless. n


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MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

DEATH METAL INCANTATION

I

ncantation is celebrating 25 years of mind-blowing, eye-popping death metal. Since 1989, when the band was co-founded by John McEntee, the sole original member, Incantation has had somewhat of a bumpy ride, with more than 30 musicians rotating through the lineup over the years. In June the group released Dirges of Elysium — a work that aptly leaps between sludge and speed — more than proving they‘ve gotten/kept it together. Show up at their upcoming Hop! event if you’d like to be ensnared by the depths of hell. — LAURA JOHNSON Incantation with Funerus, Rutah, Xingaia, In Defiance • Thu, Jan. 8, at 7:30 pm • $13 • All-ages • The Hop! • 706 N. Monroe • thehopevents.com • 368-4077

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 01/01

HIPPIE BODHI DRIP

T

ruth. Freedom. Love. Let Bodhi Drip’s peace-loving music take control of you and these idioms will certainly become your mantra. This band, an everrevolving collective of local musicians anchored by guitarist Lucas Brown, crafts tunes that feel as epic and carefree as a beachside summer day. With their music — sandy garage funk amplified by plenty of saxophone and tinged with notes of reggae — Bodhi Drip hopes to start a revolution of kindness and goodness. The group is currently working on a new album set for a February release. — LAURA JOHNSON

BUCKHORN INN, Spokane River Band COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Doublewide

Friday, 01/02

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOLO’S, FM BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Johnny Qlueless BOZZI GALLERY (290-5604), Christy Lee, Sarah Jean THE CELLAR, Echo COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Traveling Keys, M80s CURLEY’S, Torino Drive FEDORA PUB, Kicho FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Karma’s Circle GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Dru Heller Band THE HANDLE BAR (216-1900), The Usual Suspects J THE HOP!, Bibster, Hali Vaye, NRG, Mad Money and Tru 1, CB Trippin’, Kemicals, Demon Assassin IRON HORSE BAR, Slow Burn LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil THE MEMBERS LOUNGE, DJ Selone and DJ Eaze NECTAR TASTING ROOM, Cris Lucas J NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS & CULTURE (456-3931), Mike Ross NYNE, DJ C-Mad PEND OREILLE PLAYHOUSE (4479900), Open Mic RAMBLIN ROAD BREWERY (9953901), Andrew Dempsen ZOLA, Sammy Eubanks

Saturday, 01/03 BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, The Working Spliffs, Bodhi Drip (See story above) BOLO’S, FM BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Johnny Qlueless

42 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015

Bodhi Drip and the Working Spliffs • Sat, Jan. 3, at 8 pm • $8/$10 day of • All-ages • The Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • bigdipperevents.com • 863-8098 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Traveling Keys, Disco Inferno COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS (208-6642336), Pamela Benton CURLEY’S, Torino Drive DI LUNA’S CAFE (208-263-0846), David Raitt & the Baja Boogie Band ENGLISH SETTER BREWING (4133663), The English Setter Trio FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Karma’s Circle GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Kevin Brown and Beloved Country J THE HOP!, I Declare War, Serpentspire, Benign IRON HORSE BAR, Slow Burn THE LARIAT, Widow’s Creek LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Karrie O’Neill NYNE, DJ Fusion ZOLA, 3 Earred Dogg

Sunday, 01/04

THE CELLAR, Pat Coast COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh

DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church

Monday, 01/05

J CALYPSOS (208-665-0591), Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills J THE HOP!, Humut Tabal, VD, Over Sea Under Stone J RICO’S (332-6566), Open Mic UNDERGROUND 15, Open Showcase ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 01/06

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, The Rub J THE BARTLETT, Open Mic CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN (208-292-4813), Kosh FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Open-ness

ZOLA, The Bucket List

Wednesday, 01/07 J THE BIG DIPPER, Fernway J CHAPS, Land of Voices with Dirk Swartz EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho GARLAND AVENUE DRINKERY (3155327), Open Mic with DJ Scratch n Smith GENO’S (368-9087), Open Mic with T&T IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Open mic JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop Jazz LA ROSA CLUB, Robert Beadling and Friends THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Open Turntables Night with DJ Lydell LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic ZOLA, The Bossame

Coming Up ...

J THE HOP!, Incantation (See story above), Funerus, Rutah, Xingaia, In Defiance, Jan. 8 THE BIG DIPPER, One Shot: Singer Songwriter, Jan. 8 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Bare Grass, Jan. 9 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Sammy Kershaw, Aaron Tippin and Darryl Worley, Jan. 9 THE BARTLETT, Mama Doll, Jan. 9 BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn, 8 pm CHATEAU RIVE, An Evening with David Lindley, Jan. 9 THE HOP!, Demon Assasin, Kid Ace, Hali Vaye, Jan. 9 THE HOP!, No Bragging Rights, Jan. 10 THE BIG DIPPER, Uncommon Evolution, Jan. 10 THE BARTLETT, The Round No. 4 feat. Silver Rotches, Marshall McLean,


NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Rain – A Tribute to the Beatles, Jan. 19 THE BIG DIPPER, The Bight, Jan. 21 JOHN’S ALLEY, Jelly Bread, Jan. 22 THE BIG DIPPER, Haunted Summer, Jan. 23 CHATEAU RIVE, Nicole Lewis Band, Jan. 23 KNITTING FACTORY, RL Grime, Lunice, Tommy Kruise, Jan. 23 THE BARTLETT, The Holy Broke album release party feat. Planes on Paper, Matt Arthur, Jan. 24 THE BIG DIPPER, Powerman 5000, Jan. 25 THE BARTLETT, Beacon, Jan. 25 THE HOP!, The Toasters, the Camorra, the Ragtag Romantics, Collateral Damage, Jan. 26 THE BARTLETT, Bass Drum of Death, Jan. 27 KNITTING FACTORY, Tribal Seeds, Hirie, Leilani Wolfgramm, Jan. 28 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Aaron Lewis, Jan. 29 SPOKANE ARENA, Eric Church with Halestorm, Jan. 29 KNITTING FACTORY, Trigger Hippy, Jan. 29 THE HOP!, Skull Fist, Knight of Tears, Jan. 30 THE BARTLETT, Mimicking Birds, Jan. 31 KNITTING FACTORY, G Love & Special Sauce with Matt Costa, Jan. 31 JONES RADIATOR, So Pitted, Loomer, 66Beat, Phlegm Fatale, Jan. 31

MUSIC | VENUES

Regrets... I've had a few.

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Eliza Johnson, Lauren Gilmore (poet), Chris Dreyer (artist, Jan. 10 THE BIG DIPPER, Ben Miller Band, Crow Moses, Jan. 11 KNITTING FACTORY, Randy Rogers Band, Jan. 11 THE HOP!, Elektro Grave, Jan. 13 CHATEAU RIVE, Korby Lenker and Marshall McLean, Jan. 15 JOHN’S ALLEY, Cody Canada and Jason Boland, Jan. 15 THE CELLAR, The West Side Cobras, Jan. 16-17 THE BIG DIPPER, Anna Copley Benefit Show feat. GS3, Jan. 16, 8 pmmidnight. HAMILTON STUDIO, Flannel Math Animal CD Release Party, Jan. 16 KNITTING FACTORY, Invasive, Beyond Today, Thirty Three, Marry the Mistress, Jimmy Nuge, Jan. 16 JOHN’S ALLEY, Village, Jan. 16 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Cloud Person, Jan. 16 THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Outcold Concert Series feat. Thirion X, Seven Cycles, Death By Pirates, the Broken Thumbs, Beyond Today, Driven In Waves, THUNDERHOUND, Jan. 17 THE BIG DIPPER, Razing Venus, Jan. 17 KNITTING FACTORY, Hell’s Belles, 3LP, Jan. 17 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Marshall McLean Band, Duke Hogue, Jan. 17, THE HOP!, Dalima, Jan. 18

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315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 THE BLIND BUCK • 204 N. Division • 290-6229 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 456-5678 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 624-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NECTAR• 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO CLUB • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St • 443-5213 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 THE ROCK BAR • 13921 E. Trent Ave. • 43-3796 ROCKER ROOM • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 ROCKET MARKET • 726 E. 43rd Ave. • 343-2253 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 UNDERGROUND 15 • 15 S. Howard St. • 290-2122 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON • 1914 N. Monroe St. • 474-9040 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

JANUARY 1, 2015 INLANDER 43


JEROME POLLOS PHOTO

VISUAL ARTS A LOCAL MASTER

Quick — name a famous Spokane artist! Chances are, many would answer Harold Balazs, one of the Inland Northwest’s most recognizable artists, known for his impressive, geometric sculptures. After more than six decades, Balazs is still creating art every day, and even at age 86 his drive to “make” has not waned. Which is why in his newest exhibition, a few dozen new works are showcased alongside many older favorites. Meet Balazs at a reception Jan. 9 (5 pm), or the next day, Jan. 10, for an informal presentation, starting at 11 am. — CHEY SCOTT “Harold Balazs: Old and New” • Fri, Jan. 9-Sat, Feb. 7; gallery hours Tue-Sat, from 11 am-6 pm • Free admission • The Art Spirit Gallery • 415 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-765-6066

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com or visit Inlander.com/getlisted to submit your event. We need the details a week prior to our publication date.

44 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015

VISUAL ARTS AMEN FOR ART

SPORTS HEATING UP

“Amen, Amen: Religion & Southern Self-Taught Artists” • final week, through Jan. 10, daily from 10 am-4 pm • Free admission • Jundt Art Museum • 200 E. Desmet • gonzaga.edu/jundt • 313-6843

Spokane Sizzler • Jan. 3-4; tournament play Sun, Jan. 4, from 9 am-5 pm • Spokane Convention Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • spokanesizzler.com • 456-5812

Though it opened back in October as one of many Create Spokane events, there are now less than two weeks left to visit the Jundt Art Museum’s current exhibit before it’s gone for good. Featuring more than 100 pieces of art following the theme of religion and spirituality, “Amen, Amen” is on loan to Gonzaga from the private Mullis Collection in Atlanta. Common dialogues in the art examine sin and redemption, the crossroads of religion and politics and portrayals of religion on a day-to-day basis in the American South. — KIANNA GARDNER

The Spokane Sizzler volleyball tournament is appropriately named, considering its tag line as the “winter’s hottest adult coed 6s tournament.” For its 25th year — also the second year since moving to Spokane from Cranbrook, B.C. — the tournament will be held in the newly renovated Spokane Convention Center. This tourney is no casual walk in the park. With open and competitive divisions, Spokane Sizzler attracts teams from near and far looking for matched competition, making it a spectator favorite too. — KIANNA GARDNER


THE

MUSEUMS DISCOVERY DAY

Take your time the first morning of the new year, but don’t wait too long. After a night of festivities to bid farewell to 2014, the first day of 2015 has much to offer. Lucky for attendees of First Night Spokane, the button giving access to the numerous events around downtown also provides free admission to the MAC on New Year’s Day. In addition to the ongoing “100 Stories” regional history exhibit, and its newly opened component “The Artist’s Palette,” the museum hosts local musicians and a magician. Riverfront Park attractions also offer discounts to visitors with First Night buttons. — CHEY SCOTT

ROYAL

IGHT MOVIE N

TENENBAUMS

AT

RATED R

First Day Spokane • Thu, Jan. 1, from 10 am-5 pm • Free with First Night button • Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture • 2316 W. First • firstnightspokane.com

SPORTS GIMME GIMME

When I was a little kid, any time a local team had some sort of promotional giveaway, I’d beg my parents to take the family to the game. It didn’t matter if it was life-sized plastic batting helmets from the minor-league baseball squad, or seemingly homemade “football cards” with bike-safety tips from the police on the back — I was in. So you can bet I took notice that the first Spokane Chiefs home game of 2015 is also TicketsWest Chiefs Player Magnet night for the first 1,000 through the door. — DAN NAILEN Spokane Chiefs vs. Portland Winterhawks • Wed, Jan. 7, at 7:05 pm • $10$22 • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon • spokanechiefs.com • 535-7825

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

FRIENDS OF SCOTCHMAN PEAKS GALA The local environmental nonprofit celebrates 10 years, looking back at and toward the future of its advocacy, stewardship and education. Event includes food, live and silent auction items and more. Jan. 9, 5:30-9 pm. $40. Tango Cafe, 414 Church, Sandpoint. scotchmanpeaks.org (208-290-1281)

COMEDY

OPEN MIC COMEDY Wednesdays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Brooklyn Deli & Lounge, 122 S. Monroe. (835-4177) STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N.

Market St. bluznews.com (483-7300) CHOOSE TO LOSE A live comedy improve show based on audience suggestions. Fridays at 8 pm, Jan. 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Not rated.) Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045)

COMMUNITY

CAMPBELL HOUSE HOLIDAYS The historic Campbell House offers living history demonstrations, festive decorations and music box tunes. Through Jan. 4; Wed-Sun, from 12-4 pm. Regular admission applies. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum. org (456-3931)

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RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess ALL OF MEH

I’m a 30-something woman, and my best friend is a guy. We talk and text day and night, and I truly adore him. All our friends think we should be dating, but I don’t feel sexually attracted to him. I agree that we’d otherwise make a perfect couple. Can chemistry grow or be built? — Bestie There’s no such thing as a one-night friendship, and for good reason -- because friendship is based on trust, AMY ALKON fondness, and mutual respect, not on how the other person’s butt fills out a pair of pants. And though you might love your friend as a human being, loving him as something more won’t work unless you also feel a little short of breath when you see him bend over. Unfortunately, this isn’t a feeling you can practice and get better at like the clarinet. Who you have the hots for is partly borne of history, like when a guy’s lip curl pings up your tween longing for the older bad boy next door. There are also some evolved “human universals” at play in attraction, like how women across cultures tend to prefer a man who’s taller than they are. And even your immune system seems to have a say. Research by Switzerland’s Claus Wedekind and others suggests we evolved to be attracted to the scent of a partner with an immune system dissimilar to our own -- one that would combine forces with ours to make a baby with a broad set of defenses against infection and disease. Though you (and others aspiring to be attracted to somebody they’re fond of) surely mean well, you can’t give sexual bonus points to somebody for being a good person. It’s actually cruel to get romantic with somebody you aren’t attracted to, and biology doesn’t help matters. The hormone-driven heat of the naked and new is easily mistaken for attraction, but it’s actually just a temporary biochemical Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride. Before long, your newly beloved will be about as appealing a sex partner as your desk lamp, and you’ll be mulling over whether you’d rather get it on or snip off a few of your toes with rusty bolt cutters. Ask yourself something: Why do you have to be all “let’s take this to the next level” anyway? Romantic partners often crow about the wonderfulness of their relationship by saying they’re “best friends.” You already have that. And frankly, platonic has its benefits, like how there’s no canceling plans because it’s “that time of the month” or you accidentally dyed your hair the color of Bozo’s ugly shoes. And ultimately, two people are far more likely to “grow old together” if they aren’t the sort of best friends who have sex, which comes with all sorts of risks and complications. (Note that reality TV shows have titles like “Wives With Knives” and not “Best Friends Chasing Each Other With Hatchets,” and the detective on “The First 48” never says, “Yeah, whenever somebody dies of suspicious causes, the first one we look at is the BFF.”)

I Would dye For you

My new boyfriend asked me to dye my ashy blonde hair dark. I think it would be fun to go brunette, but it seems rather unfeminist to do it for him. The bigger problem is that I recently stumbled across some photos of his ex-girlfriend of eight years, a brunette. Should I be concerned that he’s still into her and I’m just a stand-in? — Wigging Sure, a romantic partner can go too far in making appearance-related requests, like by asking you to have a new set of breasts bolted on or to wear a ski mask to the liquor store. But the reality is, we all transform ourselves to be more physically appealing to romanatic partners and others. It’s the reason for Rogaine, lipstick, and those control-top pantyhose that make you feel like someone’s giving your intestines an all-day mammogram. And here’s a man you want to want you. Why would fulfilling this request -- one you deem “fun” -- be a bad thing? Yes, there is the question of whether he’s asking this because he thinks you’d look hot as a brunette or because you’d look like the hot brunette he dated before. But there’s a simple way to figure that out, and it’s calmly (and non-prosecutorially) asking him about this hair color preference, as well as what he sees in you (lookswise and otherwise). Keep asking until you either are satisfied with his answers or -- sadly -realize that this request is just a prelude to other requests. (Really, all you’d have to do is a few pages of paperwork to legally change your name, saving him the pain and expense of getting that “Melanie” tattoo lasered off his “special place.”) n ©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

46 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015

EVENTS | CALENDAR GLAD CITY NEW YEAR’S EVE PARTY An all-ages dance party for families and kids. Includes dance competions, prizes, live performances, and other activities for all ages. Dec. 31, 7 pm-1 am. $5/person; $20/family. Millwood Community Center, 3223 N. Marguerite Rd. facebook.com/ kingdomculturespokane (348-0132) JOURNEY TO THE NORTH POLE The 40-min. holiday cruise departs nightly from the Resort Plaza Shops, offering views of the holiday light display over the water. Daily through Jan. 4 at 5:30, 6:30 and 7:30 pm. $19.75/adults; $18.75/students, seniors; $5/ages 6-12. Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdacruises.com (855-956-1977) NEW YEAR’S EVE CRUISES Several cruises offered through the night, boarding at 7 pm, 9 pm and 10 pm. See website for more details. Dec. 31, 7 pm-12:15 am. $20-$35. Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdacruises.com SECOND HARVEST FOOD SORTING Join other volunteers to sort and pack produce and other bulk food items for delivery to local emergency food outlets. Ages 14+. Shift dates and times vary, sign up at inland.volunteerhub. com/events. Second Harvest, 1234 E. Front. 2-harvest.org (252-6267) WINTER GLOW SPECTACULAR The new holiday event in Riverfront Park features light displays through the park, including an animal lights zoo. Display lit daily at 5 pm, through Jan. 1. Free. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard St. spokanewinterglow.com A T. REX NAMED SUE Mobius hosts the Chicago Field Museum’s exhibit centered on the most complete Tyrannosaurus rex fossil ever discovered. Exhibit runs through Jan. 4, 2015. Museum open Tues-Sun; hours vary. $7-$10. Mobius Science Center, 811 W. Main. mobiusspokane.org (321-7133) WINTER BREAK COOL CAMPS A winter break activity day camp, hosted by Spokane Valley Parks & Rec, and open to ages 6-11. Dec. 29-Jan. 2. $32/day; $65/two days; $104/week. Spokane Valley, Spokane Valley. spokanevalley. org/recreation (688-0300) FAMILY DANCE & POTLUCK Family contra dance, with basic steps taught; called by Susan Dankovich. Potluck begins at 6:30 pm, dancing begins at 7 pm. Jan. 2. Donations accepted. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. (533-9955) CHRISTMAS TREE RECYCLING Drop off your tree at U High or CV High. All funds raised benefit local Boy Scout Troop 400. Scouts can also come pick up trees; see website for more information. Jan. 3-4, from 9 am-3 pm. $5-$10. troop400.net/trees (926-6981) EAGLE SCOUT BANQUET Eagle Scouts past and present are invited to attend the Inland Northwest Council’s annual banquet, recognizing achievements and work performed by Scouts in the class of 2014. Jan. 3, 6-8 pm. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln. nwscouts.org/ eaglebanquet (325-4562) EASTERN WASH. GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY The group’s monthly luncheon is open to the public, and features a presentation by Kim Morgan from the Kootenai County Genealogical Society. Jan. 3. Free to attend (not including meal). Timber Creek Grill Buffet, 9211 E. Montgomery Ave. (892-6390) THIRD DISTRICT STATE REP. TOWN HALL Meet and share your concerns

with Sen. Andy Billig, Rep. Marcus Riccelli and Rep. Timm Ormsby, as well as Scott Sigmon, lobbyist for LeadingAge of Washington. Jan. 5, 3:30-4:30 pm. Rockwood South Hill, 2903 E. 25th Ave. (536-6656) SOCIAL SKETCH Spend a night drawing, sketching, collaborating and socializing with other creatives at Spokane’s 1st #socialsketch. Bring your art supplies; all are welcome. Jan. 8, 7-10 pm. Free. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague Ave. thebartlettspokane.com SULLIVAN ROAD PROJECT MEETING Learn and ask questions about the City of Spokane Valley’s project to resurface Sullivan Road between Sprague and Mission in summer/fall of 2015. Jan. 8, 5:30-7:30 pm. Free. Valley Assembly of God, 15618 E. Broadway Ave. valleyassembly.org/ (720-5411)

FESTIVAL

FIRST NIGHT SPOKANE Annual New Year’s Eve winter festival of arts and entertainment in downtown Spokane. Dec. 31, 3 pm-midnight. $15-$18. Downtown Spokane. firstnightspokane. org (981-0971)

FILM

BIRDMAN Screening of the drama starring Michael Keaton. Jan. 2-3, times vary. $5-$7. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave, Sandpoint. panida.org (208-2557801) FROZEN SING-ALONG A family singalong event, screening the popular new Disney film. Jan. 3, 1 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org (208-769-2315) FOOD CHAINS A documentary about where our food comes from, and who grows/makes it. Jan. 6, 6:30-8 pm. $12. AMC River Park Square 20, 808 W. Main. tugg.com/events/12297 (443413-5212) TOTALLY TUBULAR TUESDAYS The Garland’s classic old-school movie series returns, Tuesdays at 7 pm. See website for schedule of upcoming featured films. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com (327-1050) REELSPOKANE In its fifth year, ReelSpokane showcases locally-made films. Jan. 10, 7:30-9 pm. $8. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main Ave. reelspokane.org (209-2383)

FOOD & DRINK

NO-LI BREWHOUSE TOURS See what goes on behind the scenes and how NoLi’s beer is made. Fridays at 4:30 pm. Free. No-Li Brewhouse, 1003 E. Trent Ave. nolibrewhouse.com (242-2739) VINO WINE TASTING Friday, Jan. 9 highlights selections from Vino’s Wine of the Month Club, from 3-7:30 pm. Also on display as part of First Friday is artwork by Robert Kraut. Tastings include cheese and crackers. Jan. 9. $10. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington St. vinowine.com (509-838-1229)

MUSIC

PUTTIN’ ON THE RITZ The annual gala benefits the Spokane Symphony, and features elaborate decor, big band music by the Master Class

Jazz Orchestra, live entertainment, free dance lessons and a midnight champagne toast with celebratory gift bags, hors d’oeuvres and door prizes. A no-host bar is available. Black tie preferred. Dec. 31, 9:30 pm. $85/ person. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) SPOKANE SYMPHONY NEW YEAR’S EVE SPECIAL The Symphony Orchestra and Chorale kick off New Year’s Eve with their annual performance of Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony, a German tradition introduced to Spokane by musical director Eckart Preu. Dec. 31, 7:30-9 pm. $23-$28/ adults, $16/youth. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) CLOVER’S JAZZ BRUNCH Clover hosts jazz brunch on the first Sunday of the month (through May 2015) featuring a rotation of classic, local jazz duos. Clover, 913 E. Sharp Ave. spokanejazzscene.com (487-2937) GIRLS ROCK LAB A workshop by INK Artspace to teach girls (ages 8-18) various skills including guitar, drums, singing/song writing in a collaborative, supportive environment. No experience required. Four-week series hosts class sessions on Jan. 6, 13, 20, and 27; plan on attending all four. Registration required, call 444-5380. Free. Hillyard Library, 4005 N. Cook St. (444-5380) AMERICAN PRIMITIVE GUITAR MUSIC Concert featuring performances by Glenn Jones, RC Johnstone and Ryan Leaf. Jan. 10, 8 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. tinyurl.com/ mz7dama (227-7404) HANDEL’S “MESSIAH” Program includes selections from Handel’s “Messiah,” sung by a choir of local church singers and soloists Heather Parker, Ann Benson, Jadd Davis and Steve Mortier. Also featured are Alice Hostetter, organ and Paul Brueggemeier, conducting. Jan. 10. Free. Central Lutheran Church, 512 S. Bernard St. (624-9233)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

SPOKANE BADMINTON CLUB Meets Sun from 4:30-7 pm and Wed from 7-10 pm. $6/visit. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. wccc.myspokane.net (448-5694) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS Ping-pong club meets Mon and Wed, from 6-9 pm. $3/visit. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo. spokanetabletennis.com (768-1780) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS CLUB Pingpong club meets Wed from 6:30-9 pm and Sun from 1:30-4:30 pm. $2/visit. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. (535-0803) SPOKANE BRAVES HOCKEY Hockey matches; kids are free with each paid adult. $5/adults; $4/seniors and students with ID. Includes a beer garden, chuck-a-puck and music. Games on Jan. 2, 9, 11, 16, 24-25 and Feb. 1 and 6. Eagles Ice-A-Rena, 6321 N. Addison St. spokanebraves.com (4899295) SPOKANE SIZZLER 2015 The 25th annual co-ed volleyball tournament hosts 64 teams. Jan. 3, from 8:30 am-4:30 pm and Jan. 4 from 9 am-5 pm. $375/team. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd.


spokanesizzler.com (279-7000) CROSS COUNTRY SKI LESSON Learn to cross country ski and tour the trails of 49 Degrees North’s Nordic Area. Transportation and equipment provided; bring a lunch. Ages 13+. Jan. 4, 8 am-3 pm. $49. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd. ski49n.com (935-6649) FROST FEST VOLLEYBALL TOURNEY Scrimmage with other local teams in a round-robin format event. Teams guaranteed four matches each. Jan. 4, 8:30 am-4:30 pm. $100/team. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. hubsportscenter.org (927-0602) SNOWSHOEING BASICS REI staff host a class on the basics of snowshoeing, focusing on the appropriate selection of gear, and where to go to get started. Jan. 6, 7-8:30 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe. rei.com/spokane (328-9900) SKI & SNOWBOARD WAXING BASICS A hands-on maintenance class on how to prep skis and boards throughout the winter season. Jan. 7, 6:30-8:30 pm. $35-$55. REI, 1125 N. Monroe. rei.com/spokane (328-9900) SPOKANE CHIEFS Hockey match vs. the Portland Winterhawks. Jan. 7, 7:05 pm. $10-$23. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com SKIJORING BASICS Ski-jor-ing is a winter sport in which a person wearing skis is drawn over snow by one or more dogs. Learn about the sport, equipment, local opportunities and what it takes to get started. Jan. 8, 7-8:30 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/spokane (328-9900)

THEATER

CHURCH BASEMENT LADIES: A SECOND HELPING The Northwest premiere of an all new musical comedy featuring the endearing characters from the original production. Through Jan. 4, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $19-$25. The Modern Theater Spokane, 174 S. Howard. themoderntheater.org/ special-events (455-7529) THE LAST FIVE YEARS The points of view of a relationship between a writer and an actress played out in this contemporary song-cycle musical. Jan. 9-25, Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $17-$25. The Modern Theater CdA, 1320 E. Garden Ave. themoderntheater.org (208-667-1323)

VISUAL ARTS

IDAHO WATERCOLOR SOCIETY Every year, the Idaho Watercolor Society sponsors an annual juried competition for its members throughout the state. Through Jan. 30; reception Jan. 8 from 5-7 pm. Gallery open Mon-Fri, 8 am-5 pm. Free admission. Third Street Gallery, City Hall, 206 E. Third St. ci.moscow.id.us/art (208-883-7036) FIRST FRIDAY Galleries and businesses across downtown Spokane and beyond host receptions for new, month-long art displays. Jan. 2, from 5-8 pm. Free. More event details at Inlander.com/FirstFriday COUCH POTATO A viewer-participant art installation featuring art videos and films beginning from the 1960s and ’70s, to contemporary artists working today. Jan. 6-Feb. 6, open Mon-Fri, from 8:30 am-3:30 pm. Some films

may not be suitable for all audiences. Free and open to the public. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. sfccfinearts.org/ gallery (533-3710) MIDWEEK MONET PAINT PARTIES Local artist Chelsea Cordova provides a step-by-step introduction to acrylic painting. Glass of wine included in admission; all supplies provided. Jan. 7 and Jan. 21, from 5:30-8:30 pm. $40/ class. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) HAROLD BALAZS: OLD & NEW A collection of the longtime, renowned Northwest artist’s work, including twodozen newly created works alongside past favorites. Jan. 9-Feb. 7, reception Jan. 9 at 5 pm and artist talk Jan. 10 at 11 am. Gallery open Tues-Sat, from 11 am-6 pm. Free admission. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman. theartspiritgallery.com (208-765-6006)

WORDS

3 MINUTE MIC Auntie’s monthly poetry open mic, hosted by Chris Cook. January’s featured reader for the “Remember the Word” showcase is Spokane writer Sheri Boggs. Open mic readers have up to 3 minutes to share their poetry, or someone else’s. Open to all ages; content not censored. Jan. 2, 7-8:45 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) BOOTSLAM A competitive poetry slam open to poets and audiences of all ages. Poets have three minutes per round to present their original work. Five audience judges score the work, and the poet with the highest cumulative score after two rounds wins $50. (Content not censored). Jan. 4, 7-10 pm. $5. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org

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JOYA-E SERVICE A spiritual Buddhist observance to ring in the new year. All who attend can ring the “calling bell” 108 times during the short 3040 minute service. Dec. 31, 7-8 pm. Free. Spokane Buddhist Temple, 927 S. Perry St. spokanebuddhisttemple. org (534-7954) TANGO NIGHT Argentine Tango dancing every Thursday from 7-10 pm. Beginner’s lesson offered from 7-7:45 pm, dance and practice from 7:45-10 pm. $5. German American Hall, 25 W. Third. tinyurl.com/SpokaneTango JACC BRIDAL FAIR Tour the JACC facilities, see a runway show, visit wedding industry vendor booths and more. Jan. 3, 11 am-4 pm. Free admission. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) SPOKANE COMPASS CLUB January’s monthly luncheon includes a presentation by Steve Tammaro, CEO of the YMCA of the Inland Northwest. Check in at 11 am; lunch at noon. RSVP with Sheryl at 455-7789, or email compassres@gmail.com. Jan. 6, 11 am. $20. Twigs Bistro, 401 E. Farwell Rd. twigsbistro.com (443-3589) SPOKANE MOVES TO AMEND THE CONSTITUTION The local activist group meets on the first Tuesdays of the month. at 6:30 pm. All are welcome. Donations accepted. Liberty Park Methodist Church, 1526 E. 11th Ave. s-m-a-c.org (844-1776) n

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... or a clue to solving 17-, 24-, 50- and 61-Across 43. Rock and Roll Hall of Fame architect 44. Everglades reptile 45. Proactiv target 48. Bud 49. World Cup chorus 50. 1850 Nathaniel Hawthorne novel 55. Rhymes of rap 56. Boat turner 57. “____ dreaming?” 60. They always appear right in the middle of dinner 61. 1943 Norman Rockwell painting 66. Item attached to a boot 67. Ready-made 68. Common part of a Happy Meal 69. “The Waste Land” poet’s monogram 70. Pacific weather phenomenon

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JANUARY 1, 2015 INLANDER 51


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52 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015

I Saw You

I Saw You

Cheers

Cheers

Petite Blonde Cougar I saw you multiple times at the Golden Corral on north Division Street. You’re a busgirl there. I complimented you one day by calling you a doll, and you caressed my back in response. That caress was so magical, it has haunted me ever since. There was so much love in your touch, it was amazing. I’m assuming you’re single and hoping you are, but can’t seem to get enough courage to ask you. You are a slender, petite, mature blonde. It is difficult to say how old you are, but I am guessing somewhere from your late 30’s to mid 40’s. Your name Is Tami. I would love to ask you for a date if you are available. Now if I can just find the courage. I haven’t dated for almost 20 years, so it has been awhile. ME 6’ gentleman with a few extra pounds wearing a baseball cap with the initials BNSF on it.

sharing a toddy with me? Merry Christmas gorgeous! There I did it.

The upscale tire stores need to realize that not everyone can dig up $400 to $600 for a full set of four tires when you have the misfortune of ruining just one of your tires. This wonderful place will sell you exactly what you need and what you can just barely afford. A lot of people need just one tire so they can keep that car running to get them to their minimum wage job that helps to feed and house a family. There is an especially nice man there named Keith - who will get you what you need. Let’s all hope this place never goes out of business.

in Brooklyn this last week. Those men and women put on a uniform, which has now become a target, every day to do the scary and thankless jobs we can’t do ourselves. Thank you. Let’s also be grateful to their spouses. Can you even imagine that life? Saint Michael is the patron of police. To those of you who pray, please send up a few. I am donating (no..not DO-nutting) a dozen cupcakes at Celebrations Bakery as a thank you to all the police officers everywhere who, symbolically, do do the right thing. One each and no using your lights and sirens to get there. God bless them, our firefighters and EMTs for all you do. Merry Christmas and a safe and happy new year. j.

Aff or Neg You were at the debate tournament, as a parent judge? I was there to watch my son. You: perfect red hair, poetically beautiful eyes--gorgeous. Let’s meet sometime over coffee and an especially tricky resolution? Allured at Costco Saturday, November 15th, 2:30ish (yep in my longing of finding you again, completely tore apart my home to locate the receipt). You graciously, even charmingly, came to my rescue at the condiment stand. I know what an idiot huh? Who doesn’t know how to secure the lid on a soda cup??? Or perhaps it was simply fate? I do believe you absolutely took my breath away! Unfortunately, by the time I regained my composure, all I was left with was the slightest glimpse of those exquisite dark locks cascading as you sashayed, exiting the crowd. At the risk of sounding cliche, may you consider starting out the New Year (or thereabouts)

#27 Hillyard Thursday December 18th, we were finally on the same bus, but I didn’t have the courage to say hi. You were talking to a young girl who sat next to you. “You can do anything you want, don’t let any one tell you different” you told her. We see each other often, even talked a couple of times. We always seem to catch each other looking. I would like to get to know you more. You’re a caretaker with beautiful eyes and smile. I would like to make you laugh.

TO C O N N E C T

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo. com” — not “j.smith@ comcast.net.”

You Saw Me Winter Formal/Baby Bar The world is like a muffin pan, and there certainly were a lot of muffins there that night ...but, I’m almost positive I was the only one wearing a faux fur shrug that was not leopard print? Possibly, maybe? I’d hate to guess wrong on who you are and I wont pretend I know how this works. “Its never too early for karaoke!” -B.

Recycle Center Surprise Today, December 18th, I went to American Recycling to cash in my cans and I was greeted right away by a kind man that called me a pretty lady and also added a couple pounds to my slip. So then I went to the office to collect my money and that nice man gave me 2 cents more a pound. Well not only did I feel lucky I did feel pretty. You two gentlemen made this lady who just turned 66 ever so happy and special. “I was the lady in the blue Acura.” Thank you so much for giving me a wonderful experience and Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. Hugs!

Thank You! For stopping to see if I was ok, in my time of distress. Whatever happens with regards to school, it is not the end of the world. Thanks for helping me see the positive side of things.

Fire Station 1 I would like to thank Chief Bobby and the men of Fire Station 1 for the rescue on Thursday, December 11. Coming across Riverside and Browne, my mobility scooter went kaput and they loaded me and my scooter up in the squad truck and gave me a lift home. My thanks and my hat is off to you. You made me feel safe and to know we can always depend on you guys to help in any situation.

Hillyard Tire Thank God for this place in north Hillyard where a person can go if you can only afford to buy just one tire or even a used tire.

Thank You! WF61YO....I am no fan of the police (the “po po” for all of us “Madea” fans), but I am heartsick and disgusted by the assasination of the officers

Cheers

Taco Bell Tipper Thank you to the gentleman who was so very generous when he tipped two hard working Taco Bell employees $20. Such a kind gesture goes a long way, and certainly had a positive impact for those two employees. Way to lead by example for being good-hearted to one another. Thank You Bernie I just wanted to reach out to Bernie from Shadle Walmart. Thank you so much for paying for my entire cart full of groceries! I was so stunned, I found myself in complete lack of manners and not quite knowing what to do or how to properly thank you. It had been such a stressful few days and your act of kindness made everything so much easier and the stress of the season go away! You made me remember the reason for the season and that there are good people out there. Thank you for restoring my faith in the season of giving and making my children’s Christmas all the more to celebrate. I hope that your family has true joy in their togetherness this year as well! Merry Christmas to you and Happy New Year!

“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


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To The Person Who Stole Everything I Own I know this isn’t going to reach anybody who cares, but if you broke into my car Friday night/ Saturday morning let me tell you a little about myself. I am an unemployed student, I have been to multiple interviews and been denied the job. You stole everything I owned. You stole my Christmas presents. Want to know a little more about me? Had you knocked on my door you could have had anything in my car had you given me a chance to get my baby blanket and other important things out. You want my passport, I would have let you have it. I would give a stranger the clothes off my back if they needed them and asked. My phone was stole earlier this year, had I been asked I would have happily given it to the drug addict who took it had he allowed me to get all my pictures off of it. If you have it in you please feel free to drop it back off where you broke into my car (off SR27). All I want is the blanket, really, but if you have anything else I’d take it all. If you read this and see a bunch of boxes somewhere “DRESSER” is written on them in hot pink I’m asking you let me know. I don’t have anything, it was all stolen, but I will find a way to make it up to you. I have no desire to “tell” on you I don’t orchestrate that way. Like I said you could have my clothes if you asked. Thank you, S.M

Boldsmobile blaring Taylor Swift We pulled up to the light, side by side. You, in the red Oldsmobile with a B glued before it, screaming T-Swift lyrics. I winked your direction and you flipped me off and mouthed something that I couldn’t make out. You were so rude. Maybe I got that response due to catching you picking your nose at the red light but truthfully it was kind of cute, in a gross unhealthy way. Back to the point, T-Swift sucks. I hope Santa brings you coal!

Jeers

you would be receiving the traffic infraction. Now whoever designed an on-ramp that condenses from two lanes to one right before it enters the interstate should be imprisoned for life or shot without trial regardless, but your anger, old woman, is so misplaced because you’re engaging in behavior that will and has absolutely gotten people pulled over and into wrecks. But don’t feel too badly because 9/10 of the driver’s who use the Maple St. on-ramp are just as ignorant. Call me terrible or I Might Be A Jerk, But You’re whatever you’d like, but I get Just A Bad Driver I’ve been a deep sense of contentment putting this one off for a while, when I see two or more people but little old woman that smashed together at the top flipped me off today (no doubt of that devious ramp due to because I laid on my horn while improper usage because I behind you in the merging lane know exactly how it happened of the on-ramp from Maple to without ever having to witness I-90), not only are you rude it. We have enough issues with and oh so becoming of your bikers who also believe they age, but you’re just wrong as are piloting two-ton guided well. When you merge on missiles and wish to be treated I-90 going 40 mph, you are as such that we don’t need unequivocally a bigger danger people who would fail the test if than if I merged going 100 asked to describe the rules and mph. It is easier physics-wise common approved practices to go past your intended point of on-ramps and interstate of merging then slow down usage. Please quit putting to reach it than it is to try and everyone on the interstate and go from 30 mph to at least 55 everyone attempting to get on uphill, all while trying to find it at risk, go the speed you an open spot to merge. It is not should be going by the time the duty of those in the slow you merge. Merry Christmas lane to move out of the way and safe driving. to accommodate your boat driving, hence the yield sign Getting Baby Bumped To the at the top of said on-ramp. sweet first-time mother who is If you merged at speeds of so far along that she probably sub-60 mph and someone shouldn’t be in a movie c o l l i d e d with your rear theater, especially for a three end, it would be hour film. You kicked, bumped, without a doubt and rocked the back of my your fault and seat constantly during the movie. And after, muttering, grunting, and complaining ’S K E E throughout, your grand finale W IS H T was a substantial smack to the ANSWERS! back of my head with your sixty pound purse. I guess I could have hurled an insult or an evil glare, but I think having your Neanderthal boyfriend’s dozen kids will be punishment enough.

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JANUARY 1, 2015 INLANDER 53


Requiem for a Year 2014 died this week; it was 1 year old and it kind of sucked BY MIKE BOOKEY

I

n the waning seconds of Dec. 31, the year 2014 passed away. In accordance with its wishes, 2014’s death was commemorated on national television with cheap champagne and squeamishly awkward interactions between Kathy Griffin and Anderson Cooper. 2014 was born on a winter night in January and got off to an unassuming start, accomplishing little of note before making its first splash by bringing us the Winter Olympics. The games were held in Russia, where warm temperatures, weird toilets and the realization that the host country was going to start annexing sovereign nations in a matter of months put a damper on things. But also in the sports world, around this same time, 2014 delivered upon us a moral rightness in the Seattle Seahawks’ Super Bowl victory. The year would struggle to top that accomplishment throughout the remainder of its short life. In a harbinger of things to come, 2014 lost a plane in March. Like, literally lost it. It had no idea what happened to an entire airplane full of people. To cement its status as one of the more irresponsible years on record,

54 INLANDER JANUARY 1, 2015

2014 managed to misplace another commercial airliner in December. To 2014, airplanes were just random socks in the dryer. The year’s ineptitude was evidenced by multiple conflicts throughout the world. There were mass kidnappings and the killings of innocent children and other atrocities, which 2014 thought it could make up for by giving us the World Cup, which America learned is “a soccer thing.” The year made us think that maybe our country should start caring about soccer things. You know, in a metaphorical sense. But then 2014 got Ebola and started spreading that shit all over the place. Well, mostly in Africa, and all that World Cup goodwill went out the window. American folks lost their minds, and their collective sense of basic scientific fact, when someone in Dallas came down with the disease. Then everyone in America forgot all about Ebola, right around the time of 2014’s half-assed, sparsely voted-in midterm elections. We didn’t need to be afraid any more, apparently. Meanwhile, Ebola remained very much alive in Africa.

ALLISON BAYLEY ILLUSTRATION

Realizing that perhaps people needed to chill out a bit, 2014 experimented with marijuana retail stores. Suddenly, scoring some bud didn’t require you to know a buddy whose brother knew a guy. The process merged the wonder of a toy store with the please-follow-thevelvet-ropes protocol of a very chill DMV. Not coincidentally, fast food menus threw up their hands and said. “Screw it. You stoners want burritos with Fritos inside of them? F--- it, give us a dollar at the next window.” To give credit where credit is due, 2014 did accomplish some cool things in outer space. It gave us proof of methane on Mars and saw some scientist land a spacecraft on a comet. The latter was the result of a drunken night in which 2014 made a series of outrageous bets with a group of rocket scientists. The last few months of the year were marked by racial unrest sparked by the killing of unarmed citizens by police officers across the U.S. You would think 2014 would have used this as an opportunity to bring together divergent viewpoints for an educated and thoughtful discussion on the state of race in America. Instead, because it was busy with Tinder or helping Seth Rogen mess with the North Koreans, among other distractions, 2014 let this racial tension serve only as a chance to reveal how racist your friends are on Facebook. 2014 was preceded in death by its siblings, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008 and so on. It is survived by its recent offspring, 2015, which is expected to be a lot like 2014 but with a lot more Republican influence. In lieu of flowers, 2015 asks that you celebrate the life of 2014 by just shrugging and trying to forget it ever existed. n


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