Page 1

HOPHEADS

FRESH-HOP BEERS THAT HAVE US BUZZING PAGE 36

MEET THE SLANTS

THE BAND, THE FIRST-AMENDMENT CHAMPS PAGE 45

ROTTEN IS SOMETHING FRESH

KICKING OFF BEST OF BROADWAY’S SEASON PAGE 31

SEPT. 28-OCT. 4, 2017 | HOME OF THE FREE

Page 22

A CAMPUS TORN The forces pulling apart campus politics at WSU and other colleges across the country BY DANIEL WALTERS AND WILSON CRISCIONE


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INSIDE VOL. 24, NO. 50 | ON THE COVER: CORNELIA LI ILLUSTRATION

COMMENT NEWS COVER CULTURE

5 13 22 31

FOOD FILM MUSIC EVENTS

34 40 45 50

I SAW YOU GREEN ZONE ADVICE GODDESS LAST WORD

52 56 60 62

EDITOR’S NOTE

W

ashington State University — like other schools across the country — has become a BATTLEFRONT in the latest culture wars, where fights over decency, free speech and white supremacy are hitting a fever pitch. It’s been one thing after another: Nazi graffiti, bomb threats, protests and counter-protests. “The atmosphere on campus continues to worsen as tensions thicken,” says Chijioke Emeka, a WSU student organizer. Staff reporters Daniel Walters and Wilson Criscione explore the hypercharged campus climate (beginning on page 22) and how it may foretell where the country is heading in this age of Donald Trump and Twitter. Also this week: Food editor Chey Scott profiles the couple behind a locally produced line of aromatic bitters (page 34), and in Culture, we provide a sneak peek at the once-a-year art and music extravaganza known as Terrain (page 33). — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

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EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

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WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT NFL PLAYERS PROTESTING DURING THE NATIONAL ANTHEM? LATISHA TAXTER

In my mind I think it’s disrespectful. I’m not saying that I agree with what’s going on with the whole racial divide and everything else. What I’m saying is there’s a better way and a better place to do it. If they want to do it some other time, fine, but the national anthem is a national symbol. It puts a whole different perspective on everything.

DIGITAL & PROJECTS EDITOR

Chey Scott (x225) FOOD & LISTINGS EDITOR Nathan Weinbender (x250) FILM & MUSIC EDITOR

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I think it’s their right to do so. From everything that’s going on, I don’t have any problems with it. I mean, it’s getting people to talk about it. I think it’s drawing attention to a situation that needs to be looked at.

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DALE WACHHOLZ

I think it’s stupid. Why? I don’t think you should bring that into the NFL, I mean, the NFL is only a game. Is it how they’re doing it, or is it what they’re protesting? Oh, I believe in what they’re protesting. I just don’t think they’re going about it the right way.

BRONWYN RILEY

I think it’s great. I think using a platform where you’re in the spotlight to express your opinion peacefully is a really positive thing.

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B.J. SMITH

I like it. Hell, yeah. I’m with that. Because I feel like everybody gets to stand up for what they believe in. What’s your response to people who say it’s disrespectful? We’re just kneeling. We put our hand up and we band together. How is that disrespectful? We’re just showing that we’re together. That’s all it is.

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allelujah! Coeur d’Alene’s city leaders are on a visionary roll, seeking to bring a new stretch of waterfront into the city’s boundaries. The city is purchasing the last large stretch of unreconstructed mill waterfront property on the perimeter of Coeur d’Alene, left over from bygone days when lumber mills rimmed the city and logs floated the lake — the not-so-long-ago when lumber was king. The property is generally referred to as the Atlas Mill site, covering 47 acres of land and 2,500 linear feet of riverfront on the north side of the Spokane River. The property is being sold by a company with the quizzical name of Bad Axe LLC, which will receive $7.85 million in the deal. That 2,500 linear feet of waterfront has stirred the hopes and imagination of city leaders and large numbers of their interested constituents. The city of Coeur d’Alene has been eyeing this now-empty property for some time. In 2014, the city purchased the railroad right of way that crosses the property from east to west — a smart move, since that right of way controls what happens to the waterfront. We hope that Mayor Steve Widmyer and the city council will agree that it’s essential to keep the most valuable property, the waterfront, for the public to use.

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little more than 30 years ago, seven lumber mills were operating just outside the city limits of Coeur d’Alene. (The city fathers always respected the mills’ desire to avoid city taxes.) One by one, as the dollars fell out of the lumber market, the sites have been rewoven into the new economy. First, the Potlatch Mill was transformed into a handsome, green-velvet golf course. The DeArmond Mill was incorporated into an expanding college campus for North Idaho College, Lewis-Clark State College and the University of Idaho Coeur d’Alene. The greatest impact on the city has been the development of the Riverstone addition, formerly Northwest Timber, a division of Pack River. With a big boost from our urban renewal agency, ignite cda, Riverstone LETTERS has brought us Send comments to a new shopping editor@inlander.com. area, several restaurants, a Regal cinemaplex, condominium living and an enormous tax gift to ignite cda — a tax base that will very soon revert to the city. We all eat, drink and shop at Riverstone. But the public has no access to the river of Riverstone. We don’t swim, romp, kayak or paddleboard at Riverstone. The opportunity for public access to water at that large complex has been lost, probably forever. Doug Eastwood, former Director of Coeur d’Alene’s Park Department, and a newly ap-

pointed member of the Idaho State Parks Board, has written a piece for the Coeur d’Alene Press outlining how limited the beach access is within the city, even though the city is half-surrounded by water. Beach access for the public has been dwindling while the population has

multiplied tenfold. Doug points out that Sanders Beach on the eastern side of the city was once considered to be public. I remember 40 years ago, when families trooped to Sanders Beach on hot days throughout the summer. A large swim raft floated just offshore, always teeming with teenagers diving and flirting and having fun. Sun umbrellas, babies and beach balls covered the sand from one end of the beach to the other. Swimmers and floating devices dotted the water. In recent years, fences and walls and “keep off” signs have replaced the water play. On weekdays, throughout the summer, Sanders Beach is one long row of empty sand, bookended by the busy but limited public areas at each end.

S

o there is clearly a real need for more beach access. And there is strong public support for keeping the entire length of the waterfront for public use. Friends of the Spokane River Corridor, an organization formed in 2014 to advocate for the river and to preserve public access, has sponsored a “splash of blue” campaign to highlight the importance of water recreation to our area. FSRC’s knowledgeable river advocates firmly recommend that the city does two things with the Atlas site: 1) retain control of all the property between the railroad right of way and the river; and 2) have the city “ensure comprehensive planning for the entire Spokane River Corridor from Riverstone to Huetter, prior to development.” That’s a big order, and a wise one. This story marks only the beginning of the next life of the former Atlas Mill site. The land has just been purchased; the role of ignite cda is yet to be decided. Lots of decisions have yet to be made, and many dollars are yet to be spent. Now is the time for the community to help with the planning and development of this fine new addition. For nearly a century, Lake Coeur d’Alene and the Spokane River made it possible for lumber mills to harvest and transport our region’s natural bounty. We should cherish this last chance to make the most of our waterfront, the natural bounty they left behind. River advocate Roger Smith said it well: “When I called it a ‘once-in-a-lifetime’ opportunity, someone corrected me, saying ‘No, it’s a once-in-forever-opportunity!’” n


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NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY HIKE

Bring a lunch and plenty of water and plan to spend about 4 to 5 hours on the mountain. Meet at the trailhead across the street from the upper Kit Carson trail, a few miles off of the Summit Road. Free. Sat, Sept. 30 at 10 am. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. landscouncil.org (209-2404)

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A session focused primarily on the design of the U.S. Pavilion. Community members are encouraged to attend and engage with the design team, ask questions and provide feedback. Free. Tue, Oct. 3 from 6-7:30 pm. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main. bit.ly/2eSu52c n Tell us about your event or other opportunities to get involved. Submit events at Inlander.com/getlisted or email getlisted@inlander.com. JEN SORENSON CARTOON

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COMMENT | DEMOCRACY This is true in Washington state, despite the large communities of Latino, Asian and Asian-Pacific Islanders, and African-American folks who call Washington home. In its 128 years as a state, Washington has only had 12 state legislators of Native American descent. Something is horribly wrong with this picture.

Our democracy is built on robust participation. With a multiplicity of opinions, policy decisions are more informed.

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

One Voice, One Vote Automatic voter registration is an easy step towards a stronger democracy BY MARIAH McKAY

T

his past Tuesday was National Voter Registration Day. If you missed it, don’t panic. There’s still time to be counted in this November’s election. You have until Oct. 9 to register or update your voting address online, and until Oct. 30 to do so in your nearest elections office. With high-stakes races being won by narrow margins and Jim Crow-style voter ID laws passing in some states, voter disenfranchisement is a hot topic these days. Americans need to feel confident that our voices are

being heard. Those who are least represented among us — people of color, recent immigrants, people with disabilities, young people and folks living in rural areas — need a voting system that reflects the imperative of their full involvement. Our democracy is built on robust participation. With a multiplicity of opinions, policy decisions are more informed, and we elect legislators who are more likely to be accountable to our communities. This patriotic vision defines our freedom. But far too often, government disproportionately represents those with the most privilege: wealthy, white, able-bodied men born on American soil.

Mail-in ballot systems and drop boxes in urban areas are convenient, but they don’t do enough to serve all communities. We need more inclusive solutions, such as automatic voter registration, or AVR, to promote strong participation. AVR simply allows eligible Americans to register to vote or update their address when interacting with a government service, like during a trip to the DMV or a visit to City Hall. AVR is secure, accurate and keeps voter rolls up to date. We know that AVR is already working for many Americans. Ten states and the District of Columbia have approved it, some with strong bipartisan support. After AVR was implemented in Oregon, 375,000 eligible voters were added to the rolls in less than a year and a half. Of that number registered before the 2016 presidential election, 40,000 new voters, previously declared “disengaged” or unlikely to participate, voted last November. Overall, Oregon’s voter rolls became more representative of the population, including a greater percentage of rural, low-income and ethnically diverse voters in their ranks. With AVR and other crucial changes (such as paid postage for all ballots, which would eliminate what is essentially a poll tax), our state’s voting system would be more accessible for every Washingtonian. When more voices are heard, we are all better off. Those who have been politically marginalized have as much of a stake in how our state and country is run as anyone else. To build stronger communities, we need to stand with our neighbors and fight together for a real, representative democracy for all. n Mariah McKay is a fourth-generation daughter of Spokane and a community organizer campaigning for racial, social and economic justice. She has worked in biotech and government and currently serves as a public health advocate.

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FR E E M A N ST RONG The entire Freeman Family wants to thank the thousands of people and organizations from our community, our state and beyond for providing us with overwhelming support during our darkest hour. Your support has lifted us up and inspired us as we move along in our healing process. This tragedy has truly brought out the best in everyone—our students, our staff, our parents and our community—and we are so incredibly proud and grateful. On Monday last week, our Freeman Family came together to welcome our students back to school. It was a really good day for Freeman. Watching our students walk back into the High School, arms and hands linked surrounded by staff and family was truly moving and something we will never forget. In a week filled with emotion and grief, this was such a positive moment for our students, staff and parents. A special thanks to the first responders who acted so quickly and bravely to keep our students and staff safe. Along with all the displays and messages of support from around the region, volunteers and donated food and services, we had over 65 volunteer counselors from surrounding school districts and agencies along with therapy dogs here on campus providing invaluable services to all students, staff and parents. These resources will be available for as long as needed. We know the healing process will be long and difficult but your outpouring of love and support is so helpful and will never be forgotten. Thanks to you, our Freeman Family is Freeman Strong! Thank you,

The Freeman Family

S PAC E P R OV I D E D B Y T H E I N L A N D E R

10 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017


COMMENT | FROM READERS

LOOK BEYOND THE HYPE Thank you for Samantha Wohlfeil’s excellent article on Planned Parenthood (“Fear and Shame,” 9/21/17). Many Americans continue to call for the defunding of Planned Parenthood because of one very explosive issue — abortion. They fail to look beyond the issue, and see all the essential health care services Planned Parenthood provides. These include preventive health care services, such as well-women exams, breast and cervical cancer screenings, vaccinations and birth control. More than half of all Planned Parenthood clinics are in rural or underserved communities. Planned Parenthood provides essential health services to millions of women, men and young people. Many have low incomes, and nearly 4 in 10 report Planned Parenthood as their only source of health care. Efforts by the Trump Administration and local state officials to defund Planned Parenthood would jeopardize access to comprehensive health care for millions of Americans. I ask everyone to try and look beyond their own beliefs about abortion, and see Planned Parenthood for what it is — a valuable health care provider, providing essential services for all Americans. RUSSELL FLEMING Cheney, Wash.

GAGE SKIDMORE PHOTO

Readers respond to “Trump blasts Warriors’ Curry, NFL” (9/23/17), our New York Times story about the president’s media storm over football players protesting police brutality:

STEVE BERDE: This man is definitely a piece of work. Fine for a private citizen but from the president? Beyond words. Whether you’re right or left it’s beyond words. LOANNE ODELL: Wouldn’t it be great if there were respectful people who actually cared about tradition, honor, respect, and believing in one’s country? Athletes are entitled spoiled idiots, making millions, who think they are oppressed. SURE! JAMES PLAID: Methinks everyone is blowing this out of proportion. Everyone is entitled to their opinion, and as much as I may disagree with the disrespectful stance ot many of the pro athletes, and the bombastic outbursts of the President, they both have the right to say what they will. Freedom of speech isn’t always pretty, or respectful, but so be it. Everyone is entitled to it in this country. I don’t see any of this as newsworthy. NICHELLE PETERS: While I don’t think it’s very respectful to sit during the national anthem, as Americans, it is our legal right to sit or stand. People feel they are being treated unfairly, this is how they voice their concern. People march for things they believe in, they sat at counters for rights, why is it so different to sit now? n

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CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Until Proven Guilty The people and the algorithm behind Spokane County’s efforts to reform the pretrial criminal justice system BY MITCH RYALS

T

Aaron Stromberger sits in court while a judge decides who stays and who is released from jail. Judges agree with his office’s recommendations to release people charged with crimes about 83 percent of the time. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

here are two things we know for sure. The Spokane County Jail is overcrowded, with its population frequently spiking beyond the 650 inmates the downtown facility is designed to hold. And the bail system — requiring cash in exchange for freedom ahead of trial — is an inefficient and discriminatory way to decide who stays in jail and who gets out. To some extent, the second problem begets the first. For the past several years, criminal justice decisionmakers in Spokane, and elsewhere in the United States, have tossed around ideas to reduce rising jail populations. Many ideas focus on the people accused, but not yet convicted, of crimes. For example, New Jersey has virtually done away with bail after a new law took effect earlier this year. The changes are similar to practices in Washington, D.C., where about 90 percent of people accused of crimes are released, usually with some form of court-ordered monitoring such as an ankle bracelet. Although bail is still baked into the system in Washington state, Spokane County has been moving toward a similar system — one based on risk, rather than wealth. Thanks to a $1.75 million grant from the MacArthur Foundation, Spokane County’s Office of Pretrial Services has nearly doubled its workforce. Pretrial officers gather basic information about people accused of crimes and provide a report to the judge, including their recommendation on whether or not to hold the person in jail while the case is pending. The grant money also helped pay for a statistical risk assessment tool that uses personal information to calculate a person’s likelihood to skip court or commit a new crime. The goal of the tool and the beefed-up pretrial office is to provide judges a clearer picture of each person who appears before them. The more information a judge has, ...continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 13


NEWS | CRIMINAL JUSTICE “UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY,” CONTINUED... the more confident they can feel releasing, or detaining, a person while the case is pending. Early statistics indicate that the renewed focus on people accused of crimes could help drive down the jail population without jeopardizing public safety. “This information is helpful for those people who have had a couple warrants, maybe some [criminal] history — they’re in the middle,” says Spokane County Superior Court Judge Annette Plese. “The more things I can look at to give me advice, why not?”

A

aron Stromberger rattles off questions from the second floor of the jail to the inmate standing in front of him. Where do you live? Do you have a job? If you’re released, do you have a place to stay? The man dressed in yellow scrubs and orange socks responds as best he can. Joey Yamada has been homeless for two months, but he could stay with a brother, who lives in town, he says. He’s been picking up odd jobs

public defender for court the following day. Yamada, facing misdemeanor and felony charges, will appear in two different courts. That means he needs approval from two judges to be released. Stromberger then hustles back to his office where he’ll sift through 10 different databases to fill in the rest of Yamada’s information, such as how many times he’s missed court and whether he has warrants in other states. Stromberger will also call the man’s family members to ask if whether Yamada is welcome to stay there. All of that information is compiled into a report, along with Stromberger’s recommendation for release or detention. He can also suggest a monitored release, which typically involves a weekly check-in and court date reminders. Before the pretrial services office expanded, this level of attention was only given to felony defendants and those accused of domestic violence and DUIs. Now, nearly all defendants are interviewed, Stromberger says. The judges will also see the results of a statistical risk assessment for Yamada, which factors in his age, criminal history, housing situation and substance abuse issues, among other variables. The tool, known as SAFER, or “Spokane Assessment for Evaluation of Risk,” was developed by Washington State University criminal justice and criminology professor Zachary Hamilton specifically for Spokane’s population using data from about 14,000 criminal cases. Actuarial decision-making in criminal cases has

“Then we can sit down and say, ‘What’s the reason behind this?’ And a lot of that can depend on the type of crime, the person’s age.” recently, making about $800 per month. Do you need mental health or drug treatment? asks Stromberger, a pretrial services officer. Yamada nods. Both. “They go hand in hand, I would think,” he says. Stromberger tells Yamada that he’ll help get him a

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On Sept. 26, 1,019 people were detained in Spokane’s two jail facilities — well beyond the 938 they’re designed to hold. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO drawn some criticism in recent years for potentially perpetuating bias in the criminal justice system. Since she began using the tool, Judge Plese, who currently decides which felony defendants get released, has been keeping notes of what she believes are anomalies in the calculations. For example, she says a younger person with no criminal record might be considered high risk, whereas someone else who’s missed court dozens of times is considered by the tool to be low risk. “Then we can sit down and say, ‘What’s the reason behind this?’” she says. “And a lot of that can depend on the type of crime, the person’s age.” The SAFER tool has been “validated to predict equally for all races,” Hamilton says. It’ll take a year’s worth of data to determine whether he needs to make any tweaks in that regard. “To a certain extent, risk assessment tools help diminish racial and ethnic bias by removing the human bias

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inherent in prosecution or judicial discretion,” he says. “There’s inherent racial bias within all measures of the criminal justice system, and risk assessment tools can only be as good as the data that’s provided.” As for Yamada, considering his charges (driving on a suspended license and a nonviolent drug charge) and his limited warrant history, “he looks pretty releasable to me,” Stromberger says.

I

n 2014, half of Spokane’s jail was full of people only accused of crimes — not yet convicted or serving a sentence, jail statistics show. Many of those people were charged with minor offenses, and 34 percent were given relatively low bonds of $10,000 or less. A snapshot of the jail population for one day in September 2017 shows that 78 percent of the jail’s population is awaiting trial. But only about 15 percent of those people are charged with minor crimes. Cheryl Tofsrud, the Spokane County pretrial office manager, emphasizes that her staff is focused on keeping the right people in jail — those who pose the biggest threat to public safety. Since more attention (and money) has been devoted to pretrial justice in Spokane, Tofsrud says her staff’s recommendations for release from jail have increased by about 10 percent. And the results are encouraging. In 2016, 77 percent of the people monitored by her office did not commit a new crime, and 84 percent didn’t pick up a new warrant before the case was resolved. Those figures are fairly consistent with the numbers for 2017. She is concerned, however, with the anticipated cuts to the county’s budget. The office may have to reduce its weekend workforce, which could mean that judges don’t have reports and recommendations for every person arrested over the weekend. “That could impact the jail population and judges’ comfort level in releasing,” Tofsrud says. “They could be seeing inmates without the full write-up, and without the SAFER tool. We have to run our operation seven days a week, or we’re sunk.” n 2017

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Henry Valder was among dozens of citizens who gave suggestions to the Spokane City Council on Monday night regarding how they could better tackle homelessness. DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO HOMELESSNESS After negative public reaction to the city’s decision to place $150,000 of BOULDERS under Interstate 90 to discourage camping and beautify the public space, Spokane City Council President Ben Stuckart called on the community to deliver their ideas for how to solve issues related to homelessness. And they did. During the council meeting on Monday, Sept. 25, which was set aside just for the open forum, people suggested changes that could help, including: Eliminate or change the sit-lie ordinance; require that landlords give a cause before evicting tenants; put more immediate medical assistance at shelters to decrease 911 calls; ban the application box that requires people to divulge their criminal history before they are ever interviewed; create an LGBTQ-friendly shelter for adults; work on the housing voucher system; and look to marijuana as a revenue source. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL) IMMIGRATION They cook, they clean the bathrooms and they do the laundry. Washington state’s only PRIVATELY OWNED PRISON — the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma (pictured) — relies on the work of its detainees to keep the place running. In exchange, those people sometimes earn about $1 per day. Other times they’re compensated in extra chips and candy, which is a violation of the state’s minimum wage law, according to a lawsuit filed by Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson. GEO Group Inc., which contracts with U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement to operate the detention facility that houses people awaiting immigration hearings or deportation, refuted the allegations and vowed to “vigorously defend our company against these claims.” (MITCH RYALS)

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PARENTING “Grit” is the new buzzword in parenting — in our efforts to create a happy life for our kids, how can we raise them to also persist in the face of challenges? NEW RESEARCH shows one way to do just that is to let them observe you working hard to solve your own problems. “It fits with a lot of prior research showing that infants are good at imitating adults’ goals,” says Temple University psychology professor Liz Gunderson, “but it goes one step further in showing that infants can imitate adults’ persistence toward a goal.” (ANNE McGREGOR)

MUSIC When James Mercer (pictured) of THE SHINS and his five-piece backing band walked out onto the Knitting Factory stage Sunday night and ripped right into “Caring Is Creepy,” it came with a tidal wave of nostalgia. There’s a reason, I think, that the Shins were pegged as the band that could change your life in the 2004 indie comedy Garden State: Despite the eye-rolling earnestness of that statement, Mercer’s ability to marry melodic simplicity with lyrical specificity taps into a kind of wet-eyed adolescent longing that we’re all a bit too cool to admit we identify with. Mercer and company’s Spokane show boasted a comprehensive setlist that covered all the bases — they busted out crowd favorites like “Australia,” “Phantom Limb” and “Kissing the Lipless,” and you can bet everyone (myself included) was singing along to every heartfelt word of his hipster rallying cry “New Slang.” (NATHAN WEINBENDER)

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NEWS | BRIEFS

The Price of Progress? Monroe Street businesses file $15 million lawsuit against city over lane reduction; plus, Department of Ecology says “no” to giant coal terminal in Longview TO THE BITTER END

Even now, the group of Monroe Street businesses haven’t given up trying to stop the LANE REDUCTION on the 1.12-mile stretch of North Monroe Street between Kiernan and Indiana avenues. The “Monroe Street Business Association” — a group formed to oppose the project — sent a letter to Mayor David Condon claiming they had been “recipients of intentionally misrepresented, contradictory, deceitfully camouflaged, arrogantly vague, and fraudulently misdirected misinformation” about the lane reduction. The letter is signed by 24 Monroe businesses, including Skipper’s Restaurant, Azar’s Restaurant, All American Tattoo, Spokane Vacuum Cleaner, Fred’s Appliance and the Aloha Island Grill. Additionally, they hired attorney Bob Dunn to file a $15 million tort claim against the city. Dunn not only names the city officials as liable parties in his tort claim, he names Emerson-Garfield Neighborhood Council members as well. Dunn argues that what the public was told about the project originally has changed. Originally, he claims, the businesses were told the project would last two years, and would only disrupt a handful of businesses at a time.

Now, it’s being discussed as an eight-month project, where two four-block segments of the street would be shut down at a time. “If they want to be transparent, they ought to be back to the drawing board,” Dunn says. But city spokeswoman Marlene Feist says that the construction strategy was only finalized this month. It uses two different contractors to get the construction done as fast as possible, precisely because the city wanted to limit the damage done to local businesses. This timetable doesn’t appear to be new: July 2016 Monroe Street Planning meeting minutes show that the city was planning on a tentative nine-month construction schedule. Misconceptions about the project continue to flourish. On Monday, Dunn insisted several times that the project included new bike lanes. In fact, the project never has — and still doesn’t. (DANIEL WALTERS)

ANOTHER ONE BITES THE (COAL) DUST

In the latest blow to what would be the largest COAL TERMINAL in North America, the Washington State Department of Ecology on Tuesday denied a needed water quality permit to Millennium Bulk Terminals. Environmental groups and Ecology viewed the deci-

sion as essentially killing the project, which is one of the only major fossil fuel export operations still proposed for the state. However, the company has 30 days to appeal The terminal in Longview, Washington. the decision. MILLENNIUM BULK TERMINALS PHOTO The Longview terminal, more than five years into the permitting process, would ship up to 44 million metric tons of coal to Asia each year, and create 230 direct and indirect jobs at first, with 300 ongoing jobs at full buildout, according to the company. That coal would pass through Spokane on its way from Wyoming to the port in Western Washington, with eight loaded trains headed west and eight empty trains returning to the Powder River Basin every day. The permit that Ecology denied Tuesday was needed under the federal Clean Water Act before the company could dredge more than 40 acres of the Columbia riverbed, fill 24 acres of wetland, and install a new trestle and docks. In a statement, Ecology said the permit was denied because the terminal “would have caused significant and unavoidable harm to nine environmental areas: air quality, vehicle traffic, vessel traffic, rail capacity, rail safety, noise pollution, social and community resources, cultural resources, and tribal resources.” The terminal company did not return a message seeking comment by press time Tuesday. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

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DUE PROCESS

State education leaders are proposing changes to STUDENT DISCIPLINE that would limit how and when certain students can be suspended or expelled. For years, Washington schools have tried to reform student discipline, as students of color and special education students are kicked out of school more than other students. But the effort to reduce exclusionary discipline has clashed with teachers who say classrooms have become unsafe. Now, state education leaders are proposing new rules to make the discipline process fairer for all schools. Under the proposed revisions, school districts would be prohibited from expelling any student in a grade lower than fifth grade, except for firearm violations. No child can be suspended for being late or missing class. And when a student is suspended, schools must work with a student’s family to help a student return to school. Vanessa Hernandez, American Civil Liberties Union of Washington education equity director, says she appreciates that the rules would focus on increasing parental engagement in addressing discipline issues. But she says they still allow for shortterm suspension of the youngest students, and she would like to see that changed. Spokane Public Schools spokesman Kevin Morrison says the district is studying the proposed revisions to the policy, like every other district. Spokane, he points out, already has some policies in place that match the revised rules. For example, Spokane already collaborates with parents of suspended or expelled students and develops re-engagement plans. And some restrictions on when to discipline kids in kindergarten through fourth grade were already in place. Four public hearings will be held this fall for state education officials to receive comments about the proposed rules. The first will take place in Spokane during the afternoon of Oct. 17 at 4202 S. Regal Street. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

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NEWS | BUSINESS

A new cross-laminated timber factory is expected to employ 150 people in Spokane Valley. KATERRA RENDERINGS

Silicon Valley meets Spokane Valley An innovative construction company will bring cutting-edge timber production to Spokane Valley BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

W

ant to put up a building? OK. You’ll just need an architect, an engineer, a contractor, an electrician, a plumber, an HVAC installer, vendors for timber, sinks, cabinets and faucets, and maybe a few other folks to contract onto the project along the way. But what if you only had to go to one source for all those things? Two-year-old design-build company Katerra, based in California, is doing just that, and Spokane Valley is set to become a key part of their plan. “Katerra is intended to be one throat to choke for the entire construction process,” says Fritz H. Wolff, one of the company’s three co-founders. “It’s owning everything in the construction process and minimizing the amount of handoff that has traditionally happened.” This fall, Katerra, which labels itself a technology company, will break ground on a 250,000-square-foot mass timber factory near Trent Avenue and Barker Road. It’s expected to create at least 150 manufacturing jobs locally, and could grow thousands of construction jobs around the country. The facility will be used to manufacture glulam and cross-laminated timber (CLT), wood products that are being turned to more often as more sustainable and cost-effective alternatives to traditional building materi-

20 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

als. Because the lion’s share of the wood will likely be sourced from forests in the Pacific Northwest, the facility could revive some local timber industry jobs, which have lagged in recent years. The company chose Spokane Valley for this part of its plan in part because of its proximity to timber resources, access to rail lines and the freeway, and closeness to major markets in the Northwest, Wolff explains. It probably doesn’t hurt that Wolff’s family has a long history here: he’s Fritz H. Wolff also the CEO of real estate builder and investor the Wolff Company, which was started in Spokane in 1949.

INNOVATING

Where typical projects basically function as “one-off prototypes,” Katerra’s website explains that the company hopes to streamline basic parts of the building process, to make building more like the manufacturing industry. As with other technology, as the company creates

methods to become better, faster and cheaper, they’ll be able to make construction and construction-related jobs viable that otherwise wouldn’t be available in today’s market, Wolff says. When starting the company, Wolff worked with Katerra’s other co-founders, Jim Davidson and Michael Marks, both of whom have many years of experience in the tech industry, to see what lessons they could take from electronics manufacturing and apply to building. “That industry has had great gains in innovation, dragging quality up and cost down for consumers,” Wolff says. So what does that really look like? Katerra recently opened another factory in Arizona, which is being used to manufacture fully built components like countertops, doors, cabinets and fully built walls. “[For the] concept of enclosed wall panels, we complete the framing, doors, the windows, the electricity, the plumbing, the sheetrock, and what’s shipped to the site is a finished wall that’s stood up and plugged in,” Wolff says. In large construction projects with many repetitive parts, like apartment buildings, the company is saving a lot of time and money, while boosting the quality, he says.


“Let’s take a three-story, walk-up apartment building. That used to take three or four months in the best-case scenario to get to dry-in, with doors and windows and framing complete, and a roof that’s on, so you’re now doing finish work that’s out of the environment,” Wolff says. “Katerra has demonstrated it can do that in plus or minus two weeks.” As a Katerra customer himself (the Wolff Company has hired Katerra for its own building projects) Wolff says those savings will help provide what he refers to as essential housing. “I don’t like the connotations that come with affordable housing. Every community has essential employees,” Wolff says. “From my perspective, Katerra enables us to deliver to a renter constituency, for example in the apartment market, that isn’t able to be reached without the tools that Katerra enables. Katerra enables us to provide that essential housing without sacrificing the quality.”

The factory could make CLT materials more accessible to projects across the country.

MASS TIMBER

While the Spokane Valley factory won’t be making components such as the fully built walls, CLT and mass timber made there will be key structural components in many Katerra-built buildings. “Cross-laminated timber is part of a thirst to do things not only more efficiently, but effectively. CLT is very helpful in assembling faster than traditional methods,” Wolff says. The material, which is made by gluing strips of wood together in perpendicular layers, has been used for decades in Europe, but has only recently been adopted as a building material in the United States. Spokane just got what planners believe was its first CLT building earlier this year, when Beacon Builders put up a new gym for CrossFit Duratus on North Helena Street. One of the first projects Katerra plans to make with its CLT locally will be a new Hospitality Center in association with the Community Cancer Fund, Ronald McDonald House, and Kootenai Health’s Walden House. The new building, expected to be finished by 2019, will provide a place for families to stay while their kids are in the hospital, as well as provide rooms for adult outpatients and their families while they receive treatment at Kootenai Health Facility. The material has been lauded for its sustainability, as it can reduce the carbon footprint for building projects and keep carbon sequestered in the timber. Smaller trees that aren’t otherwise used for building can be used to make CLT, helping thin forests and reduce wildfire risk, and even trees that have been killed by beetles can be used. “Everything that we’re looking at, we’re hopeful that we can have an impact on environmental sustainability,” Wolff says. Until a few years ago when factories were opened in Oregon and Montana, all CLT had to be shipped in from factories in Canada and around the world. With the new Spokane Valley facility, Katerra also hopes to scale production of CLT in the U.S. so more people across the industry will use it. The factory is expected to be built and producing CLT by early 2018. n samanthaw@inlander.com

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 21 EagleRidge_FallFestival_092817_12V_JI.pdf


22 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017


CLASS WARFARE How the campus culture wars in the age of Trump and Twitter have reached a fever pitch at Washington State University — and everywhere else BY DANIEL WALTERS AND WILSON CRISCIONE

T

he tweet, from an account called “Yes, You’re Racist,” captures the moment in freeze frame: A young man grinning in the glow of white supremacists holding tiki torches. “This is James Allsup — speaker at the alt-right rally, [Washington State University] College Republicans president,” the tweet announces. And while Allsup’s planned speech is canceled, his own streaming video footage makes clear his allegiances in last month’s clashes in Charlottesville, Virginia: When white nationalist Richard Spencer — who has called for a “peaceful ethnic cleansing” — appears before cheering onlookers, Allsup runs up to Spencer and thanks him. Within moments of students and administrators learning of Allsup’s involvement in the rally, where a Nazi sympathizer drove into a crowd of protesters, killing a woman, they demand action. WSU President Kirk Schulz takes to Twitter after the “Yes, You’re Racist” tweet to issue a statement condemning racism, Nazism and the violence in Charlottesville. “I was heartbroken,” Schulz says in a letter to the campus. “Hate has no place at WSU.” It isn’t nearly enough to mollify critics. Students and alumni condemn Schulz’s statement as weak and equivocal, and nearly 6,000 people sign an internet petition insisting that WSU “must expel James Allsup for Nazi activities.” Allsup’s resignation from the College Republicans doesn’t end the firestorm. Students organize a “March Against White Supremacy” on Aug. 19. Two days later, a bomb threat and Nazi graffiti force the evacuation of a dorm. The following week, hundreds of students hold a sit-in protest inside an administration building and deliver a list of demands. “I worry about the campus being painted with any particular brush,” Schulz tells the Inlander. “We had [only] one person attend the Charlottesville rally.” Yet a group of 12 Democratic state lawmakers still called on Schulz to strip official recognition of the WSU

College Republicans, so students could “see that the University is truly not tolerating and encouraging hate speech.” Welcome to the new culture wars gripping colleges across the country. One side accuses the campus of complicity in racism, and calls for restrictions on students’ free speech rights. The other mocks these students as overly sensitive “snowflakes” and delights in stoking their anger. The situation is hyper-charged by a social media landscape that can inspire and outrage student activists, or simply exhaust them. It can allow figures like Allsup to hitch himself to a national movement and become a social media star in the process, or it can crush students under the weight of an online mob. And it may foreshadow where the country, in the age of Twitter and Donald Trump, is headed, as small but vocal groups of white nationalists clash with the demands of multiculturalism. “The atmosphere on campus continues to worsen as tensions thicken,” says Chijioke Emeka, president of WSU’s Black Student Union, who helped to organize the Aug. 25 sit-in.

‘INTENDED TO CAUSE PAIN’

LEFT: The “Unite the Right” rally in Charlottesville, Virginia — which left a counter-protester dead — inflamed already simmering tensions at Washington State University. RODNEY DUNNING PHOTO ABOVE: A Twitter account identified then-WSU College Republican President James Allsup as a participant at the rally in Charlottesville.

“Less tweets!” somebody shouts. And in response, the crowd of over 200 students packed into a WSU administration building thunders: “More action!” They chant that “white silence is white violence” and that the “people united will never be divided.” The protesters, driven by a coalition of five different minority student groups, are demanding change. “We sit in,” students proclaim on a big sheet of butcher paper, “till WSU stands up.” “We argue that any institution where any student feels not only comfortable, but also safe enough, to spew hate and encourage violence says a lot about this climate ...continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 23


EDUCATION “CLASS WARFARE,” CONTINUED... and environment,” says Emeka in a statement about the sit-in. During the last few years, a movement at U.S. colleges has sought to eliminate offensive ideas from campuses. The college campus, many students feel, should be a “safe space” protected from words or ideas making students feel uncomfortable. To some on the left, words can be violence. Something as seemingly innocuous as asking “where are you from?” could be considered what’s now known as a “microaggression,” a common interaction felt as a slight or insult against marginalized groups. And students often blame school officials for allowing hateful words to be expressed at all. At times, it’s bordered on the absurd: Students at Oberlin College in Ohio, for instance, lambasted inauthentic cafeteria sushi as “cultural appropriation.” But Emeka says her classmates aren’t reacting to a single incident. Instead, they see a troubling pattern. “It has been one incident after another here at Washington State University, and the responses from the administration, or lack thereof, are unacceptable,” Emeka says. For starters, there was the Trump wall. College Republicans, led by Allsup, built it last October: an 8-foot-high wall, surrounded by red caution tape, with “TRUMP” written on the faux-brick surface with big white letters. About a dozen Trump-supporting students were dwarfed by more than a hundred counter-protesters. A number of undocumented students attend WSU, and to the counter-protesters, the wall represented an enthusiastic celebration of a candidate’s policy calling for them to be deported. “I feel as though I shouldn’t have to worry about going to class and being faced with something like the Trump wall, and dealing with the fact that like, ‘Oh crap, there’s James Allsup, he’s right there,’” says Nicklaus McHendry, a WSU student who helped organize the sit-in. To that, add a slew of anonymous racist messages that have popped up on campus in the past year. First, the N-word was found etched in the library above the words “Trump 2016.” Later, in November, a student’s car was painted with antigay slurs. Then, in February, fliers popped up on campus claiming in bold capital letters that “IT IS YOUR CIVIC DUTY TO REPORT ANY AND ALL ILLEGAL ALIENS” to immigration enforcement. Then, in May, in the middle of finals, a pseudonymous troll named “Ultramemelord” uploaded a video: Someone had added racist commentary over footage, taped by Allsup, of an argument at the Trump wall between a white student in a Trump hat and several black students. The edited version of the video adds text saying, “Maybe you should go back to Africa,” and includes a clip of a child with an accent saying, “I do not associate with n------.” In a statement titled “No place for racism at WSU,” Schulz says the video was “intended to cause pain to our community of color at WSU.” In a tweet, he promises the university “will hold the person who did the video accountable.” But anonymous internet videos can be just as hard to track down as anonymous racist graffiti. The culprit is never found.

24 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

That’s a fundamental difference that the social media age has brought, says Mary Jo Gonzales, WSU’s vice president of student affairs. Decades ago, a racist idea would have manifested as a poster on campus. Now, it can be broadcast for hundreds of thousands of people. “Social media has forever changed the vitriol of the conversation,” Gonzales says. By the time students organize the sit-in protest, shortly after the start of the new school year, their frustration is palpable. (The authorities would later arrest and charge Jose Andres Tecuatl, saying that the resident advisor who’d reported the bomb threats and swastikas to the campus police was allegedly behind them.) “In the first week of class, we shouldn’t have to deal with three swastikas and two bomb threats,” Emeka says during the sit-in, according to the Spokesman-Review. They’re tired of official statements and initiatives and committees and task forces — they want actual change. So they lay out their demands: Mandate cultural competency training programs for staff and students. Hire more people of color. Protect the multicultural centers and Critical Culture, Gender and Race Studies courses. Build more “gender-inclusive” facilities — that can be used by any student, no matter their gender — and offer free menstrual products in all bathrooms. And, most controversially, they call for the university to separate “free speech” from “hate

On Aug. 25, hundreds of WSU students staged a sit-in inside an administration building. CODY COTTIER PHOTOS


David McLerran, the president of the libertarian Young Americans for Liberty club on campus, says Allsup has unquestionably been the most influential figure on campus, socially and politically. He’s taken advantage of the political climate. As a result, McLerran says, the campus has become more divided — the right has gone further right, and the left further left. Allsup has nearly 18,000 Twitter followers, more than twice as many as Schulz. He has 150,000 YouTube subscribers, 55 times more than WSU’s official college YouTube channel. Using only the internet and social media, Allsup has built a dedicated national following.

“Using the Trump momentum and energy, I’ve been able to connect with hundreds, millions of people across the country who share similar beliefs.”

speech.” McHendry says what the right is being asked to do is not drastic. “They’re being asked to not be racist, and they’re being asked to not be homophobic, and they’re being asked to not be transphobic,” McHendry says. “And that’s a threat to someone who has never experienced actual discrimination.”

THE KIDS ARE ALT-RIGHT

A Trump bobblehead stands on the bookshelf behind James Allsup. A Trump poster, “Hillary for Prison” and “Infowars.com” stickers decorate his computer. Two Cathy McMorris Rodgers stickers are stuffed in the bottom of his trash can. He threw them away sometime after the congresswoman for Eastern Washington disavowed his involvement in Charlottesville. Allsup, surrounded by sound equipment, studies notes for a podcast he’s about to record. “I just always think it’s funny that from here, a room in a townhouse, we’re able to produce content for YouTube and stuff that, like, beats KXLY,” Allsup says. Allsup’s influence at WSU is undeniable — even if others, like President Schulz, downplay the influence of a single person in a student body of 30,000. Allsup has driven right-wing activism on campus, where it was previously nearly nonexistent. And he’s served as a catalyst for resistance from the left.

Allsup helped to increase enrollment in WSU College Republicans from only a few members to around 40, he says. Allsup’s successor as College Republican president, Amir Rezamand, says he’s proud of what the club has done over the last year. He calls the Trump wall a “big success” and notes Allsup’s “unique” way of doing things. On a recent Saturday morning, from his bedroom studio setup, Allsup messages the co-host of his Nationalist Review podcast, 19-year-old Nick Fuentes, a former Boston University student who left the school after he says he received death threats for his political views. A woman once secretly recorded Fuentes saying race-mixing was “degenerate,” and before the podcast starts, Allsup laughs at sound bites he plays of the woman talking about Allsup and Fuentes. “These people just take themselves so seriously,” Allsup says. Allsup hates being labeled a racist, a Nazi, a white supremacist, even a white nationalist. The media got it wrong about Charlottesville, he says. Just because some people carried Nazi flags doesn’t mean everyone there is a Nazi, he says. It wasn’t him carrying a Nazi flag. It wasn’t him shouting the N-word. Allsup’s beliefs have evolved. As a teenager, he says he was into anarcho-capitalism, a philosophy calling for the elimination of the state in favor of private property and a free market. He supported Ron Paul when he ran for president in 2012. After he became WSU College Republican president, Donald Trump changed everything. “He’s given me a career,” Allsup says. “Using the Trump momentum and energy, I’ve been able to connect with hundreds, millions of people across the country who share similar beliefs and similar concerns about the future of the country.” He describes himself as a nationalist. He ...continued on next page

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EDUCATION

WSU student James Allsup has become a lightning rod on campus for his views on race and diversity — but those same views have made him an internet celebrity in the alt-right world.

WILSON CRISCIONE PHOTO

“CLASS WARFARE,” CONTINUED... wants all illegal immigrants, and all recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, out of the country. That includes DACA students at WSU. Allsup dismisses the word “racist” altogether. “It’s a racial preference,” he says. “But ‘racist’? Like, I don’t think the term ‘racist’ is even a real term. I think ‘racist’ is only used to try to attack people on the political right most of the time.” The answer echoes, nearly word-for-word, what Richard Spencer, the white nationalist, told Allsup once in an interview. Allsup says he prefers simply “nationalism” because that way he doesn’t need to get caught up in a “purity spiral” and the intricacies of “what percent white” it would need to be. He fears living in a society where whites are a minority. “I don’t want to be a minority,” he says. “Being a minority sucks. I think that’s an area where I can agree with people on the left.” Yet he doesn’t think that minorities in America are disadvantaged. White politicians, he says, are not advocating for white interests in the way they should, he argues. When discussing the issue with Fuentes, they eventually agree that races should not be forced to associate with one another. Fuentes calls it “peaceful segregation.” Allsup prefers “freedom of association.” They lament that not enough research has been done to study the IQ of different races and scoff at the idea that “anthropological research” could be racist. “We live in such a bubble of discourse that we can’t talk about those things,” Allsup says. “But in the media, if you were to bring it up, it would be this horrible racist conspiracy.” Of course, there are places where talking about that kind of stuff is celebrated. All across the internet, for one. Conservative pundit Ben Shapiro says social media

26 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

can provide the mix of anonymity and community that can allow alt-right beliefs to flourish. He should know: He was formerly an editor-at-large at Breitbart News, yet found himself the main target of anti-Semitic tweets during the 2016 campaign.

“I’m not even convinced he believes half of what he says, to be honest. I think he’s just the living, breathing, walking version of a meme.” “If you go around to your local group, and say, ‘OK, how many people believe that white people are superior?’ How many hands go up in that group of 100? Zero?,” Shapiro tells the Inlander. But on websites like Reddit, he says, there are entire anonymous communities where everybody believes white people are superior and are eager to talk about it. Shapiro points to a progression: A young conservative starts out enjoying, say, the politically incorrect memes, like jokes about the shooting of the gorilla Harambe, on anonymous messageboard websites like 4chan. But then they start to glom onto other taboo stuff, like discussions of racial IQ. “I think the gateway drug is sort of fun and troll-y stuff,” Shapiro says. “I don’t think it always mainstreams into actual alt-right white-supremacist ideology, but it

can.” According to a tweet in May, Allsup has been marinating in 4chan since he was 12 or 13 — starting at a board called “/b/” focused on internet memes and randomness and eventually ending up at “/pol/,” the “politically incorrect” message board brimming with fringe beliefs and racist jokes. In her book Kill All Normies: Online Culture Wars From 4Chan and Tumblr to Trump and Alt-Right, author Angela Nagle lays out two opposite camps online: On the one side, there’s the flourishing identity politics of left-wing communities on sites like Tumblr and Salon, where a “culture of fragility and victimhood” is mixed “with a vicious culture of group attacks” against anyone who says anything insensitive. On the other, there’s the anarchic raunch at anonymous cesspools like 4chan, reveling in obscene and racist provocations. “The hysterical liberal call-out produced a breeding ground for an online backlash of irreverent mockery and anti-PC,” Nagle writes. McLerran, the president of the libertarian Young Americans for Liberty club on campus, calls Allsup a “provocateur,” and suggests he was born out of internet culture. “He wants to be offensive. He wants to get under people’s skin,” McLerran says. “I’m not even convinced he believes half of what he says, to be honest. I think he’s just the living, breathing, walking version of a meme.” Allsup is constantly recording his interactions with the left on campus and posting them on YouTube. When Trump won the election, he approached Trump protesters on campus and asked if they were excited. When the protesters drowned him out, shouting “F--- Donald Trump,” Allsup yelled, “White man, yeah! I love being a white man.” The YouTube video, titled “Students TRIGGERED ...continued on page 28


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EDUCATION

So far, WSU President Kirk Schulz has resisted calls to restrict students’ free-speech rights, and he’s remained optimistic about working with student protesters to improve the campus climate.

RYAN PUGH PHOTO

“CLASS WARFARE,” CONTINUED... by Trump’s victory,” got more than a million views. It’s an intentional dig at the term “trigger warning,” a statement that precedes material that could be distressing to a victim of trauma. Allsup denies he’s only seeking a reaction. Instead, he says he’s trying to challenge others’ ideas, though that doesn’t stop him from posting their reactions online for fun. “That’s how this genre works,” he says. So while Shapiro is glad to see campus conservatives become more willing to take the fight to the left, he says there are a few who respond to the left’s identity politics with white identity politics. And then each side attacks the other, feeding each other, ramping up the aggressiveness. “It’s reaction to reaction to reaction to reaction,” Shapiro says. “It’s a cycle of reaction.”

FREE SPEECH ISN’T FREE

WSU English professor David Leonard got his Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley, the liberal institution where, in the ’60s, students led the Free Speech Movement, fighting to overturn a ban on political activities on campus. But Leonard, who writes about the intersection of white supremacy and culture, says the context around free speech is different these days. “Often those who are advancing ‘free speech’ today, that has more to do with levels of prejudice, than the principle of free speech,” Leonard says. “The principle of free speech has become a vehicle to justify and rationalize.” Indeed, left-leaning student activists at Berkeley are now seeking restrictions on free speech, particularly against controversial speakers at universities. When Shapiro spoke at Berkeley this month, the campus paid an estimated $600,000 to law enforcement for security, though Shapiro blames outside anarchists more than students. A Gallup poll last year found a large majority of college students supported schools being able to police

28 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

intentionally offensive language and restrict costumes that stereotype ethnic groups. Washington state institutions are no exceptions. At Western Washington University, students crashed a trustee meeting last year, demanding the university create a student-led committee with the power to terminate professors for offensive speech.

“Our political climate in our country is becoming more fractured. We see a microcosm of our national political feelings played out on our campus.” Last spring, Evergreen State College professor Bret Weinstein questioned an event that asked white students to leave campus for a day, and the resulting protests became so intense that police told Weinstein it wasn’t safe for him to be on campus. (“F--- free speech,” one Evergreen student told VICE News as other students snapped their fingers in agreement.) “We are witnessing the sabotage of the core principle of a free society — rationalized as self-defense,” Weinstein wrote on Twitter after resigning from the university and receiving a $500,000 settlement. “Short term, it’s a big win for the right — most especially the reactionary fringe.” In a meeting with college officials after the sit-in, WSU protest organizers lamented how free speech had been “misinterpreted” and that current college policies had “loopholes” that have allowed hate speech to proliferate on campus.

The U.S. Supreme Court has repeatedly ruled that the Constitution gives public institutions little power to crack down on offensive speech, except in very narrow circumstances like explicit threats, repeated harassment or obscenity. But Leonard pushes back against those who would dismiss student complaints about microaggressions, noting research that shows campus climate can impact a student’s education. Lately, that climate has been exhausting for many students, and not just because of what’s happening on campus, he says. Before smartphone video, many agonizing police shootings would have gone largely unseen. Before Twitter, many outrageous comments would have gone unread. Today, it’s hard not to feel it all as a deluge. Leonard notes an instance when a student was contacted by a white supremacist because of something they’d written on their class blog. In another case, a WSU student who objected to the racist video on Twitter found herself singled out by alt-right websites. Ari Cohn with the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education, a national nonprofit focused on civil liberties on college campuses, says that social media can exacerbate free speech fights on campus by elevating controversial student comments. It doesn’t help, he adds, when some students seek intentional provocation. “Making a free speech point by simply saying the most outrageous thing you possibly can? It’s not helpful,” Cohn says. “It makes actual free speech advocates’ lives more difficult.” On top of that, the pressures of social media can cause college administrators to overreact as they try to deal with the public outrage that can result. “They know that one viral tweet could be the end of the career,” Cohn says. Schulz knows those pressures well. He says he often finds out about the latest controversies through Twitter. A decade ago, with the rise of Facebook as the primary social media site, administrators had time to wait to put out a statement.


“We could put out something on Monday and everyone went, ‘Oh, the university is being responsive,’” Schulz says. “Now, if it’s out on social media it’s seen as — ‘Well, it’s out there. How come you haven’t done anything?’” At WSU, a week after the sit-in, some student leaders held a “free speech” rally in response to the demands from other student groups to regulate “hate speech.” WSU student Andrew Luedeke, state director for Young Americans for Liberty, believes free speech shouldn’t be curtailed. But he understands why some students, feeling targeted by Trump and Allsup, want restrictions. “There wouldn’t be a call for a reduction of free speech on campus if it wasn’t for people like James Allsup,” Luedeke says. “He has definitely sparked a debate about what should be allowed to be said on campus.” So far, Schulz has largely resisted the calls for campus censorship. In response to the Democratic lawmakers calling on him to boot the College Republicans, he cited the $5 million that WSU spends annually to create a diverse, supportive campus culture, but declined to punish the College Republicans. He adds that organizers of the sit-in, after discussing the constitutional limitations of a public university, have shifted their goals — focusing more on clarifying the university’s harassment and disruption policy to address student conduct. “We allow our students to say what’s on their mind,” Schulz says.

MENDING THE TEAR

Sitting on the stage after hosting a town hall two weeks ago, Schulz expresses a bit of optimism. “Our political climate in our country is becoming more fractured,” Schulz says. “We see a microcosm of our national political feelings played out on our campus.” But the meetings with the sit-in organizers have been productive, he says. What started as student demands have turned into requests, he says, though he knows that students won’t be satisfied until they see real changes. In June, the university announced a new campus climate initiative. It includes hiring a new administrator to coordinate campus culture activities and appointing an external review team to look at the university’s diversity efforts. “Our students are willing to give us a chance to sit down and work with them. I don’t see that everywhere,” Schulz says. “I think that says a lot about our student body.” Among some students, there’s an eagerness to have more civil political discussions. This year, WSU senior Stella Kim and several other students formed LETTERS the Political Science club at Send comments to WSU to bridge the divide on editor@inlander.com. campus, calling for a “stronger focus on having civil political discussion.” Political groups across the spectrum at WSU have seen their membership levels explode — and the numbers haven’t declined after the election. Gavin Pielow, president of the WSU Young Democrats, looks at campus debates between Republicans and Democrats — and side-by-side columns in the student newspaper — as a positive trend. “We’ve way too often become unwilling to compromise,” Pielow says. “Perhaps the political climate has been poisoned by the isolation. We’re unwilling to hear another side out.” But Allsup sees another development: politics at WSU and across the nation are being redefined. It’s identity politics, with both sides using race and social background to infuse their ideology, he says. And he sees that as a good thing. “I think Donald Trump radicalized American politics and I think Trump was the catalyst for these emotions and feelings,” Allsup says. Allsup is the extension of that at WSU. But if it weren’t Allsup, McLerran thinks it would have been someone else. “WSU is a reflection of the times,” McLerran says. “I don’t think the times are a reflection of him.” n Forrest Holt contributed reporting to this story.

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 29


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THEATER

Retaining Relevance As the world changes around it, audiences keep finding new things to like about the satire of Something Rotten! BY E.J. IANNELLI

“F

or me,” writes John O’Farrell, “being a satirist is about poking fun at the high and mighty, and in theatrical terms, Shakespeare is more revered and untouchable than anyone.” No wonder, then, that the Bard became the natural antagonist in Something Rotten!, the tongue-in-cheek musical comedy that O’Farrell co-wrote alongside brothers Karey and Wayne Kirkpatrick. It sees two fictional brothers, Nick and Nigel Bottom, hatch the idea for the very first musi-

cal — titled Omelette, a soothsayer’s misreading of Hamlet — back in 1595 as a way to one-up their contemporary and dramaturgical rival, William Shakespeare. “I love the writing of Shakespeare — but there is a certain pomposity to the modern directors and critics who want us to revere him, and it was that that we wanted to prick, to remind people that Shakespeare was a jobbing writer like the rest of us, with all his insecurities and deadlines,” O’Farrell writes via email ...continued on next page

From Broadway to Spokane. JEREMY DANIEL PHOTO


CULTURE | THEATER “RETAINING RELEVANCE,” CONTINUED...

A punch line about Nazis is delighting audiences in the age of Trump.

JEREMY DANIEL PHOTOS

from London. “The second song is called ‘God, I Hate Shakespeare!’ so I’m not expecting our musical to ever play in Stratford-upon-Avon!” When he finished writing Something Rotten! two years ago, O’Farrell was already an established author, sociopolitical pundit and sometime political candidate, well known in the UK for his regular column in the Guardian as well as his work on topical humor programs like Spitting Image (long before HBO floated the idea of resurrecting the TV show for the Trump presidency earlier this year, its puppets made their most prominent stateside appearance in the music video for Genesis’ “Land of Confusion”) and Have I Got News for You. Though the musical is set in the late 16th century and deals much more directly with the strange business of show business, O’Farrell believes it isn’t too far a cry from his usual stock-in-trade: “The show has a gentle undertone of political context — the theater is threatened by the ideological zealotry of the Puritans, and we were determined to make our (apparently powerless) women characters have something to fight for. So I’m proud that [Nick Bottom’s wife] Bea is such an optimist[ic] 16th-century feminist!” There’s even some accidental up-to-theminute relevance as the show “keeps changing, not just in location but in relation to the outside world,” O’Farrell writes. “There’s a line in the show when Nostradamus is foreseeing The Sound of Music, and when he mentions Nazis, Nick says, ‘Just a moment, are these ‘Nazis’ good guys or bad guys?’ And the soothsayer says, ‘Not sure, but it feels important to get that one right!’ For two and a half years that line was getting a decent enough laugh,” O’Farrell writes. “But then came Charlottesville and Trump’s reaction to it, and suddenly we had a topical joke, and now the show was stopping and people were standing and applauding and cheering — and I just loved that! That these characters in Tudor England have something to say about America in 2017.” Despite living across the Atlantic, O’Farrell knows that line is getting guffaws and ovations because he’s been following audience reaction to Something Rotten! like a concerned parent ever since the musical entered the preview phase. Writing about the show’s genesis in a piece for the Guardian in 2015, he talked about the “thrilling and terrifying” experience of subjecting his creation to the whims of a live audience. And when the show comes to the INB Performing Arts Center on Oct. 3 for a five-day run, it’s almost certain that he’ll be sent a recap of which songs and one-liners resonated with Spokane audiences. “Every morning I get an email telling me how the previous night’s show went, and I always love the little bits of detail that our stage manager includes: ‘Big laughs for Nick and Portia’s poetry scene tonight.’ And it never ceases to fascinate me how every audience is different.” n Something Rotten! • Oct. 3-7 • Tue-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sat, 2 pm • $39.50-$79.50 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • inbpac.com • 279-7000

32 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017


CULTURE | MUSIC

Electronic musician Manatee Commune (aka Grant Eadie) is one of the artists returning to perform at Terrain’s upcoming preview night.

Throwback Thursday

JANGO

The alias of enterprising rapper Elijah Kilborn, Jango is looking to take the still-burgeoning Spokane hip-hop scene by storm. He’s only 21, but already has a crew of producers and hype men backing him; he’s had his face on a couple of billboards downtown, and the Inlander profiled him just two weeks ago. Jango’s recently released mixtape Alone by Choice, inspired by a friend’s suicide, On Friday, Terrain’s free night turns out to be an upbeat record and a also features a slew of bands and dance-floor-filling collaborations clear distillation of his prevailing musiand DJs. Here’s the schedule: with a number of vocalists on the two cal message of positivity, individuality albums he’s released in the past year. and mental health awareness. 5 pm: Dario Ré There are beats aplenty, for sure, but (NATHAN WEINBENDER) 6 pm: Atari Ferrari Manatee Commune is no EDM By 7 pm: Soul Man Black Numbers. In his live shows, he might 8 pm: Kalaj bounce between violin and guitar, By this point, Marshall McLean is 9 pm: T.S The Solution drums and keyboards, all while satucertainly one of the quintessential 9:15 pm: King Skellee rating the stage with a visual show Spokane artists. The singer-songwriter 9:30 pm: Romaro Franceswa every bit as winning as his songs. has carved out a significant regional 9:45 pm: Jango (DN) following, both as a solo musician and 10:30 pm: Salve as a member of the now-defunct alt11:30 pm: Indian Goat Americana band Horse Thieves, and Midnight: DJ Soul1 Portland-based Ford is no stranger he’s been voted as a favorite by Inlander to Spokane, and every appearance readers several times. McLean’s most Terrain 10 • Fri, Oct. 6 at 5 pm • by the rootsy rocker and her band is recent solo album, SoDak, is his most free • Jensen-Byrd Building • a welcome one. She played Terrain accomplished work to date, a collec131 E. Main • terrainspokane.com in 2009 with her former band the tion of rambling road songs exploring Sound Outside, and she’s evolved in themes of creativity and fame, of growthe years since. While still rooted in ing up and settling down. He’ll play an acoustic set here; classic rock ’n’ roll sounds, Ford’s new songs have grown his voice, so defined by the rustic beauty of the Northto tackle a variety of genres. What hasn’t changed is her west, will come through even louder and clearer. (NW) n magnificent voice, a powerful instrument that moves easily into whatever style strikes her fancy at the moment, Terrain 10 Preview Night • Thu, Oct. 5 at 5 pm • whether it’s surf or power-pop or doo-wop. Consider her $15 advance, $20 at the door • Jensen-Byrd Building • a must-see on preview night. (DN) 131 E. Main • terrainspokane.com

Terrain celebrates 10 years with a preview night and musical returns BY DAN NAILEN AND NATHAN WEINBENDER

T

errain’s annual fall arrival is already reason for the region’s art lovers, music fans and cultural cognoscenti to celebrate. It stands to reason, then, that the festival’s 10th birthday will bring a little something special into the mix. That something special comes via a new “preview night,” in which the “Best of Terrains Past and Spokane’s Future” will be on display via a new ticketed event that includes a sneak peek at this year’s artwork on display at the Jensen-Byrd Building, Terrain’s new home for this year. Thursday attendees will have the first chance to buy art, and will escape some of the madding crowds that inevitably make Terrain’s (free) Friday night featured event one of the craziest, most jam-packed and fun art events each year. Also Thursday, Terrain’s stage will be filled with the music of artists who have performed during its first decade. Here’s a breakdown of who the early birds will get to hear on preview night. — DAN NAILEN

MANATEE COMMUNE

A veteran of the first Bazaar summer arts fest, this Bellingham-based (and Spokane native) multi-instrumentalist (real name: Grant Eadie) crafts melody-rich soundscapes

MARSHALL McLEAN

SALLIE FORD

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 33


Aromatic bitters have a long history of medicinal uses; now the tonics are seeing a resurgence in modern bartending practices. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

BETTER WITH BITTERS A Spokane couple with more than two decades of combined bartending experience are making a line of aromatic bitters to enhance any cocktail or spirit

W

hile the craft of mixing cocktails is celebrated as a complex and careful art, it doesn’t always have to be a complicated undertaking. This is partly the philosophy behind a Spokane couple’s growing business producing small-batch aromatic bitters that can offer a flavorful complement to both alcohols served neat, or as multi-ingredient libations of any scale. Shelayna and Tyson Skidmore — who’ve each worked more than a decade in the hospitality industry — have seen Skidmore Alchemy, their line of aromatic bitters, significantly expand in use at bars across the region since early this year. Nearly two dozen local bars and restaurants now carry the couple’s cocktail additives, which can be used to splash a hint of herbal or fruit-based flavors, among others, to all variety of alcoholic beverages. “Bitters is the salt and pepper of the spirits world,” says Tyson. “They’re not there to change the flavor of the product, but to enhance it and make it better.” Skidmore Alchemy currently offers 12 flavors: peach,

34 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

BY CHEY SCOTT orange, honey ginger, basil lavender, cherry, grapefruit, chocolate, curry, rhubarb, blueberry mint and huckleberry jalapeño. The line also includes an aromatic whiskey bitters, which the couple say is more cohesive to use in a classic Old Fashioned cocktail than the traditionally used Angostura bitters, which is rum-based. Instead, the Skidmores use whiskey as the bitters’ base spirit, then infuse it with cinnamon, clove, allspice and other herbs and spices. The whiskey bitters can be used in place of Angostura, if desired, or in any other way a bartender or home mixologist sees fit. “The craft cocktail movement is so big right now, and people are seeing how expensive it is in the bars, and they also are wanting to make these drinks at home,” explains Shelayna of their inspiration to found the business, which the couple currently manage in addition to their full-time jobs; she’s on the waitstaff of the Manito Country Club, and her husband is assistant manager of Poole’s Public House on the upper South Hill. The pair met while both working at the now-defunct MarQuee

Lounge in downtown Spokane. “What we’re hoping to achieve is that people can use the bitters at their home bars,” she continues. “That’s where the cherry and orange bitters come in — you don’t need fruits, you can just make an Old Fashioned with whiskey, sugar and orange and cherry aromatics.”

A

lcoholic bitters, also called aromatic bitters, have a history stretching back to the ancient Egyptians. The earliest uses of bitters, and for centuries thereafter, were mainly for medicinal and digestive applications. In modern bartending practices — and originally in the pre-Prohibition era — the highly concentrated alcoholic flavorings are used to add a sweet, sour, bitter or spicy note to spirits or cocktails. In most instances, as with the Skidmore Alchemy line, only a few drops of bitters — taste one drop on your tongue and see where the name comes from, and why the tonics aren’t meant to be consumed alone — are needed to add the desired flavors to a standard beverage serving.


Sold in 3.5-ounce bottles ($12-$13 each), the couple estimates that customers can make 100 or more cocktails per bottle. “As far as uses go, it could be as simple as you want a martini and you want it up, and without any crazy mixers, but you want some grapefruit bitters, which just gives a little bit of flavor without adding calories,” Shelayna notes. “The same with gin and tonics with a little bit of basil lavender bitters — it brings out the botanicals in the gin.” She mentions a few other easy substitutions: cherry bitters in place of sweet vermouth, rhubarb bitters for sweet and sour, and orange bitters for triple sec. The aromatics used in Skidmore Alchemy’s products come from Lorien Herbs & Natural Foods in the South Perry District. Fruits are also sourced locally when available, from friends’ and families’ gardens and local farms.

Tyson and Shelayna Skidmore’s bitters are designed to enhance any cocktail or spirit. To make a batch of bitters, the couple uses a high-proof, neutral-grain spirit as a base that’s then steeped for two to six weeks with a blend of all the herbs, spices and fruits needed to achieve a specific flavor. The solids are then strained out of the liquor and cooked down with any sweeteners (sugar or honey). After the cooked mash steeps by itself for several days, it’s strained, and the resulting liquid is added back into the base spirit it was previously steeped in. Skidmore Alchemy initially began back in 2014, when Shelayna was bartending at Casper Fry, where she’d often make her own bitters blends to use in house cocktails. Around that time, the couple was tapped to help make a bitters infusion for Orlison Brewing’s Old Fashioned beer, the 2 Finger Pour. That collaboration required the couple to set up standard business licensing, which led them to continue producing bitters as a small side venture. “We’ve been slowly growing since, and didn’t think it was going to be something big, but people asked for more flavors,” she says, adding that the eventual goal is to open a brick-and-mortar retail space with a bar. Tyson adds that their ultimate dream beyond that is to distill the spirits used in their products. While cocktail lovers can find Skidmore Alchemy behind the bar at many local spots, including Remedy Kitchen and Tavern, Volstead Act, Durkin’s, Lantern Tap House, El Que, Press Public House, Dry Fly Distilling’s tasting room and many others — including both of the couple’s places of employment — home bartenders can order the products online. “We always encourage people to come sit at the bar and learn from us,” Tyson notes. “We are a product that is forever changing… and if you can teach us something that works in your recipe book at home, we can share it with more people, and we can learn how people use [bitters] in their own way.” n cheys@inlander.com Find Skidmore Alchemy’s products online at skidmorealchemy.com.

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SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 35


NEWPORT/PRIEST RIVER ROTARY CLUB

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FOOD | BEER

Hop to It! Fresh-hop season is an exciting time in the Inland Northwest; these seven local offerings caught our attention BY DEREK HARRISON

I

t’s that time of year again: Local hopheads are celebrating the arrival of fresh-hop beers at breweries throughout town. For a few weeks this fall, local bars and taprooms will be filled with kegs of these hoppy, aromatic beverages. The vast amount of fresh-hop beers available locally may be overwhelming, so here’s a list of those we think you should try. The season is short, so drink up while you can.

HARJU FRESH HOP IPA

Badass Backyard Brewing, 1415 N. Argonne Rd., Spokane Valley This single-hopped IPA is brewed with locally grown Cascade hops straight from the backyard of owner Charlene Honcik’s friend. Harju is a classic IPA that balances bitterness and malt. It’s available now at Badass Backyard’s taproom in Spokane Valley. Also on tap is the First Snow Double IPA — a partial fresh-hop ale brewed with Cascade, Willamette, Chinook and Galena hops and dry-hopped with Cryo Cascade, Citra and Simcoe.

LUPOSLIPAPHOBIA RED ALE

Bellwether Brewing Co., 2019 N. Monroe Named after a Gary Larson cartoon illustrating the made-up “fear of being pursued by timber wolves around a kitchen table while wearing socks on a newly waxed floor,” brewer Thomas Croskrey is implying that you don’t want this hoppy goodness in your hands when the timber wolves strike. Luposlipaphobia, a red ale brewed with fresh Chinook, Cascade and Centennial hops from Big Barn Brewing’s farm in Green Bluff, will be released this Saturday, Sept. 30, at Bellwether’s second anniversary party.

MIDNIGHT HARVEST CASCADIAN DARK ALE

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36 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

Big Barn Brewing Company, 16004 N. Applewood Ln., Mead Craig Deitz has a significant advantage over most other local brewers — he owns a hop farm. This Cascadian dark ale (or black IPA) boasts wet Cascade, Chinook and Willamette hops that are harvested and brewed on the same property. Once a collaboration between Big Barn and Steam Plant, Midnight Harvest is now reemerging with a completely different recipe. It’s available Saturday, Sept. 30 at Big Barn’s High Hopes for High Hops charity event.

SPOHOP IPA

Iron Goat Brewing Co., 1302 W. Second Iron Goat’s SpoHop is the Frankenstein’s monster of fresh-hop ales. It’s a community project that’s brewed with donated hops grown in yards

FRESH FESTS HIGH HOPES FOR HIGH HOPS

Sat, Sept. 30 from 2-6 pm at Big Barn Brewing Co. Big Barn hosts a fresh-hop charity event with eight local breweries and a cidery. The afternoon on Big Barn’s farm includes live music and a keg auction. All proceeds benefit the Green Bluff Lions Club. Tickets are $25 in advance and $30 at the door. You’ll get five drink tokens and a bratwurst meal.

MANITO TAP HOUSE 6TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY

Wed, Oct. 4 from 11 am-10 pm Following a theme set last year, Manito Tap House celebrates their sixth anniversary with another fresh-hop festival. This year’s tap lineup features 32 fresh-hop beers with a wide selection of styles.

FREMONT FRESH HOP FEST

Fri, Oct. 13 from 6-11:30 pm at Steel Barrel Taproom The second annual event from Steel Barrel (154 S. Madison) features Fremont Brewing’s three Field to Ferment fresh-hop ales (Centennial, Amarillo and Citra) and the highly sought-after Cowiche Canyon Pale Ale with fresh, organic Citra and Simcoe hops. The freshness doesn’t stop there; you can expect to see other regional beers on tap, too.


CRAFT Cocktails

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SEPT 28TH 6:30 PM

Live Music with The Dapper Devils & Sulphur Banks!

OCT 13TH 6:00 PM

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OCT 19TH 3:00 PM

Oktoberfest - Beer and Bratwurst!

The regionally grown Cascade hops are a favorite among brewers.

BANQUET ROOM AVAILABLE

throughout Spokane. This year’s batch contains 157 pounds of mystery hops. The IPA is expected to be released early next week, along with a single-hopped Citra fresh-hop IPA. Iron Goat will also be brewing a late-season Ekuanot fresh-hop ale.

FRESH HOP NEW ENGLAND IPA

Perry Street Brewing, 1025 S. Perry The latest version of Perry Street’s series of New England IPAs contains fresh Loral and Simcoe hops. Two hundred pounds of hops were picked early in the morning at Carpenter Ranches in the Yakima Valley, then added to the 7-barrel batch of beer in about eight hours. True to the style, this beer is super hazy and juicy. You can find it at Perry Street’s taproom right now, along with their Amarillo fresh-hop pale ale. Available later in the season will be the brewery’s single-hopped Mosaic fresh-hop IPA.

BOATLOAD IPA

Trickster’s Brewing Co., 3850 N. Schreiber Way, Coeur d’Alene Trickster’s Evan Ruud starts the beginning of every harvest season with a rafting trip down the Tieton River in Yakima Valley. On his way home this year, Ruud made a stop at Carpenter Ranches, where he loaded his trailered raft with 600 pounds of freshly picked hops. The result is an IPA with 25 pounds per barrel of wet Loral and Simcoe hops. It is available now at Trickster’s taproom and will be tapped Saturday, Sept. 30 at Growler Guys in Coeur d’Alene during IPA-off.

HOPPERCUT HARD CIDER

154 S. Madison St. • THESTEELBARREL.COM • TUE-SUN 11AM-LATE

DEREK HARRISON PHOTO

Twilight Cider Works, Green Bluff and Kendall Yards Fresh-hop season is an exciting time for Northwest breweries, but with the rise of popularity in dry-hopped ciders, one local cidery is joining the mix. Twilight Cider Work’s Hoppercut is a crisp cider that was dry-hopped with wet Simcoe hops for nearly a week, then back-sweetened with apricots. You can find it on draft at Twilight’s taproom in Green Bluff and Solace Mead & Cider in Kendall Yards. A limited number of bottles also are available. n

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FOOD | OPENING

Body and Soul A Coeur d’Alene couple’s joint effort to create a “food farmacy” is devilishly clever BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

Y

ou’ve got a late-night craving, but you’re torn between something ooey-gooey comforting or crispy-green and healthy. Regardless of your choice, Devil’s Lettuce Food Farmacy, a fairly new Coeur d’Alene food stand, has the right medicine for whatever your tummy needs: On one side of the menu, “Heal The Soul” with finger food and sandwiches. The “Feed the Body” menu, meanwhile, offers salads and rice bowls, and will soon add soups. The Doujaha Dog, for example, is two corn dogs stuffed with jalapeño peppers, sautéed onion, and cream cheese, then drizzled with Sriracha and wasabi aioli ($5.50). The truck’s Just a Bowl, meanwhile, is a serving of teriyaki chicken and rice, garnished with sesame seeds and green onions ($6).

Devil’s Lettuce’s fresh “Mamma Thai Tacos.” CARRIE SCOZZARO PHOTOS Devil’s Lettuce’s limited menu is in keeping with their modest approach, say owners Larry “Moe” Konsella and Shawna Wallace, who took over the long-shuttered Teriyaki Tiki behind Coeur d’Alene’s Corner Bar in 2016. “We want to start small and grow,” says Konsella, who notes that the couple previously went to North Da-

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is r a P in t h g i N A A BENEFIT FOR

A BIG THANK YOU to the models, volunteers, and guests who made this night a huge success! Mark your calendars for September 22, 2018 when we will Rock the Runway again! 38 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

kota for two years, living in a fifth wheel to save money and plan their food-based venue loan-free. The place has been a well-kept secret (until now) since it opened almost a year ago, mostly enjoyed by patrons of Corner Bar and nearby Slate Creek Brewing. “It’s a win-win for both of us,” says Slate Creek’s Mollie Wing, who stopped over recently for a to-go or-

14th & Grand Salon 16 Cents, 3 Shoes, 5 Socks 49 Degrees North All About Fitness Anthony’s Restaurants Arby’s Avista Investment Recovery Mike and Peggy Blowers Deb Breen TJ Brill Buffalo Wild Wings Cory and Stacy Ceder Chili’s Karen Ciaffa Complete Office Davenport Tower Dominos Pizza DoubleTree Theresa Fears Michael and Amy Finkel Float Spokane Garland Pub and Grill Gonzaga Men’s Basketball Team Nancy Goudge Great Harvest Bread Company Tom and Sandy

Green Greencastle Soap Company Colin Harris Don Hawkins Mary Heitkemper Iron Goat Jensen Autobody Todd Jensen Joey Dimarco Kassi Kain Mariah Kincaid Kitchen Engine Laser Quest Lilac Lanes and Casino Amy Lindh Ryan Loosmore Luigi’s Macy’s Maid Naturally Dana McBride Miley’s BBQ Katie Moreau Mosaic Holistic Beauty Mountain Gear Mt. Spokane Ski and Snowboard Park Mustard Seed New Moon Family Wellness Shahrokh Nikfar No-Li Brewhouse Nothing Bundt

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SCENE: 73

— Your neverending story —

Zombies. Find the Devil’s Lettuce food stand tucked behind the Corner Bar in Coeur d’Alene. der: Mamma Thai Tacos ($5.50) for herself and burgers ($7) for the kids. Her indulgence? The King Tut burger with secret sauce. “I don’t eat hamburgers that much, so I when I do I want it to be that experience,” says Wing. But what about the name of the place? Isn’t “devil’s lettuce” slang for a controlled substance not legally permissible in Idaho? Yes, say the owners, but it’s also totally memorable and meant to be a reflection of Wallace’s coastal California hippie upbringing and the couple’s spin on healthy food. They use all organic products and biodegradable serving dishes, for example, will sub tofu for meat, and make their own sauces. That makes for a menu that reads like cannabis — the Kosher Kush is pastrami, sauerkraut, Swiss cheese and caraway cream cheese rolled into an egg roll and fried ($4) — without any side effects. Being naughty never tasted so good. n

Snakes. Psychics. Gotta love

October.

Devil’s Lettuce Food Farmacy • Fourth Street and Spruce Avenue, Coeur d’Alene • Open Tue-Thu and Sat from 3-10 pm; Fri from 3 pm-midnight • facebook.com/ TheDevilsLettucefoodfarmacy • 208-964-4789

in North Spokane Starting this Friday come celebrate with us all October. Octoberfest Menu and Specials featuring Authentic old-country recipes, German favorites and steins of great German beer. Business & family reservations, off site catering and Oktoberfest dinners to go.

— UPCOMING EVENTS — Something Rotten! INB Performing Arts Center, October 3 – October 7

Titanoboa: Monster Snake Mobius Science Center, Through November 26

Spokane Zombiecon Bing Crosby Theater, October 7

Pigs on the Wing: A Tribute to Pink Floyd Bing Crosby Theater, October 13

Spokane Arts Month October 1 – October 31

Theresa Caputo Live! INB Performing Arts Center, October 17

Don’t miss the next First Friday: November 3rd, 2017

Specials all October

Plan your neverending story: www.downtownspokane.org

1812 W. FRANCIS | 509.326.2214 | M-F 11AM -2AM | SAT-SUN 9AM -2AM

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 39


Cruise (Out of) Control The entertaining true-crime film American Made is a lot like its star: stylish, charming and dead behind the eyes BY MARYANN JOHANSON

A

merican Made, based on the true story of commercial airline pilot-turned-international criminal mastermind Barry Seal, hits a lot of the same beats as GoodFellas, though it misses some it tries to hit, too. By the time that Barry, in his gleeful voice-over narration, says, “The money was coming in faster than I could launder it,” I felt like I’d seen this all before, and done better. Barry is, in the typical way of stories like this, a bit of a prodigy, and a bit bored with the mundane world. He’s a hotshot, the youngest-ever commercial pilot or some such for TWA, but he’s basically a bus driver on short-haul routes, ferrying people from one dull place to another. He gets a bit of a thrill with the petty delinquency of smuggling Cuban cigars in his cockpit — I guess pilots weren’t searched much in the late 1970s, when he’s getting away with this — but the real fun comes after he is approached by Central Intelligence Agency agent Monty Schafer and recruited to fly missions over South America taking spy photos (not in TWA planes, obviously). One thing leads to another, as tends to happen when you fall down rabbit holes of espionage and clandestine operations, and soon Barry is acting as a bagman in transactions between the CIA and Panamanian strongman (and CIA informant) Manuel Noriega, and then he’s smuggling drugs into the U.S. for the Medellín cartel, which leads to (after he’s caught) becoming a Drug Enforcement Agency informant. And then comes the Iran-Contra scandal… Director Doug Liman and Cruise, as Seal, are reteaming here after their huge 2014 success, the sci-fi thriller Edge of Tomorrow, which also saw the actor taking on a character who is less than totally likable. But Cruise’s Edge character was merely a coward, and he learned how to be brave because he had no choice. The charm and the humor with which Liman and Cruise regale us during Barry’s adventures feels inappropriate for a movie about this level of corruption and outright lawless banditry from the federal government. I mean, these are the events that have led to the conspiracy theory — which isn’t quite so far-fetched and is supported by solid evidence, some of which we bear witness to here — that the CIA was actively involved in importing cocaine into the United States in the 1980s, and that the agency’s activities were in large part responsible for the crack cocaine epidemic. (See also: the intense 2014 film Kill the Messenger, which details the work of one journalist who uncovered the story in the 1990s.) Cruise is undoubtedly entertaining here, as is Domhnall Gleeson as Schafer, a hustling junior CIA agent looking to make a name for himself. The scene in which

40 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

Barry is forced to overload a small plane with cocaine, wife, Lucy (Sarah Wright), who is actually a composite of then take off on too short a South American mountain the real Barry Seal’s succession of spouses. We never rerunway — will the overweight plane make it? — is genually understand why she stays with him; if it’s just about inely gripping. The finale, involving a simultaneous raid the money, she’s nowhere near venal enough, at least by agents of the DEA, the Bureau of not that we see. Wright’s performance is at Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, the FBI fun, though. AMERICAN MADE leastBut and Arkansas state police (where Barry here’s the thing: Should we be enRated R has set up his smuggler’s headquarters) tertained by this story? You can’t even call Directed by Doug Liman is like a clown car of law enforcement American Made’s attitude cynical: It’s more Starring Tom Cruise, Domhnall descending and stumbling over one a winking shrug of acceptance of a massive Gleeson, Sarah Wright another; it’s funny. Uncle Sam-approved criminal enterprise, Screenwriter Gary Spinelli mostly dispensed with panache and style galore. knows what he’s doing. The film’s one real misstep (Love that vintage ’70s color palette!) But really, is this (apart from that tonal problem), and a significant way how this particular story deserves to be told? Are we now in which it misses the genius of GoodFelthis blithe and blasé about the depths to which America las, is in the depiction of Barry’s can sink? n


FILM | SHORTS

Flatliners

OPENING FILMS AMERICAN MADE

See Tom Cruise run! See Tom Cruise fly a plane! See Tom Cruise smuggle thousands of kilos of cocaine for Colombian drug cartels! Director Doug Liman’s true-life espionage thriller is inspired by the antics of Barry Seal, a TWA pilot who rubbed elbows with the likes of Manuel Noriega and Pablo Escobar in the 1980s. Sure, it’s no GoodFellas, but Cruise is undoubtedly entertaining in toothy slickster mode. We are left to wonder, though: Should this material really be told with a winking shrug of acceptance? (MJ) Rated R

FLATLINERS

A group of rebellious medical students develop a particularly unusual extracurricular activity — they each take turns stopping their hearts, then jolt one another back to life, all to see what it’s like to die. This plot was explored before in a 1990 Joel Schumacher thriller, and if these new recruits could learn anything from their predecessors, it’s that this hobby is, uh, dangerous. (NW) Rated PG-13

RUMBLE: THE INDIANS WHO ROCKED THE WORLD

This documentary looks to embolden the Native American musicians whose influence on rock has either been diminished or completely forgotten. The likes of Quincy Jones, Martin Scorsese, Tony Bennett and Iggy Pop discuss the legacies of singer-songwriter Buffy Sainte-Marie, the Band’s Robbie Robertson and guitarist Link Wray, whose instrumental hit “Rumble” is an invaluable piece of rock ’n’ roll history. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

TANGLED

One of Disney’s best recent animated musicals (and certainly the funniest), a postmodern, self-reflexive take on Rapunzel that flips the script on the kind of regressive gender roles that the studio itself helped normalize. This 2010 feature, returning to theaters this week, might be about a princess trapped in a tower and the roguish bandit determined to protect her. But what’s so refreshing about Tangled is that Rapunzel is hardly a damsel in distress, and Alan Menken’s songs underscore the film’s playful, sardonic tone. (NW) Rated PG

NOW PLAYING ALL SAINTS

John Corbett stars as a corporate salesman-turned-pastor who is assigned to shut down a struggling church in his small town. When a group of South Asian refugees shows up at his door, he teams up with them to turn the church’s land into a working farm. The latest from Affirm Films, which produces family-friendly features aimed at evangelical audiences. (NW) Rated PG

AMERICAN ASSASSIN

From a novel you’d purchase in an airport bookstore comes a film you might one day half-watch on an airplane, a grisly thriller about a brooding dude with a tragic backstory (Dylan O’Brien) training to become a CIA superagent at the hands of a gruff Cold War vet (a slumming Michael Keaton). Thoroughly generic, from its plot to its leading man to its title, but with a sadistic streak that makes it as unpleasant as it is dull. (NW) Rated R

THE BIG SICK

Inspired by the courtship of Kumail

Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon (who also wrote the script), this is the rare rom-com that’s both consistently funny and genuinely emotional. Nanjiani plays himself, a stand-up who meets and falls in love with Emily (Zoe Kazan). There’s only one problem: He’s keeping their relationship a secret from his traditional Pakistani parents. This is further complicated when Emily falls into a medically induced coma. At the Magic Lantern. (SS) Rated R

BRAD’S STATUS

As he takes his son on a tour of prospective universities, a dad played by Ben Stiller is seized by a midlife crisis when he realizes that all his old college friends now have cool, interesting jobs and he’s stuck at a lame nonprofit. That might sound like an annoying premise, but writer-director Mike White doesn’t let his protagonist off the hook easily. And yet he still manages to extend some empathy to the guy, and the movie, as low-key as it is, develops into a perceptive comedy about aging and settling. (NW) Rated R ...continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 41


NTERN THEAT GIC LA ER MA FRI, SEPT 29TH - THU, OCT 5TH TICKETS: $9

RUMBLE: THE INDIANS WHO ROCKED THE WORLD (103 MIN) FRI/SAT: 7:30 SUN: 11:45am WED/THU: 6:00

LY D ON KEN WEE

THE BIG SICK(120 MIN) FRI-SUN: 5:15 MENASHE (80 MIN) FRI-SUN: 1:45 LAST WEEKEND VICEROY'S HOUSE (100 MIN) FRI-SUN: 3:15 WED/THU: 4:00

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Entertaiment for your Business!

FILM | SHORTS DAWSON CITY: FROZEN TIME

This documentary should be required viewing for anyone obsessed with rare, archival film footage. Director Bill Morrison focuses on a cache of nitrate film reels that was literally unearthed in northwestern Canada; it’s not only about the contents of the celluloid itself, but also the history of the former mining town where it was buried. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

DESPICABLE ME 3

The hugely popular animated series continues unabated, and this time reformed bad guy Gru (voiced by Steve Carell) has just been kicked out of the Anti-Villain League. Enter his long-lost twin brother Dru, who convinces Gru to go back to all his evil ways. (NW) Rated PG

DUNKIRK

Christopher Nolan’s WWII drama, painstakingly and authentically depicting the bloody Battle of Dunkirk, is a remarkable example of sheer filmmaking craft. The only thing it’s missing is a little humanity. Although the technical skill on display is dazzling, Nolan’s attempts to elicit any emotion from the audience feel strangely calculated. (SS) Rated PG-13

FRIEND REQUEST

Shot way back in 2014, this technophobic horror film fails to generate scares with its deeply stupid plot about a popular college student whose acquaintances meet unfortunate ends after she deletes a weird social outcast from her friends list. It’s a little bit of Final Destination, a little bit of The Ring, and far less coherent than either. (NW) Rated R

THE HITMAN’S BODYGUARD

Ryan Reynolds is a bodyguard whose career has hit the skids, and Samuel L. Jackson is his newest charge, an assassin who must be transported to the Hague, where he’ll testify against an Eastern European dictator (Gary Oldman). The twist: Jackson has previously tried to kill Reynolds numerous times, and now they’re forced into helping each other. Only fitfully amusing. (NW) Rated R

HOME AGAIN

ATMS

NEW!

509.326.1551

42 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

Single mother Reese Witherspoon has a one-night stand with a handsome 20-something and then begrudgingly allows him and his two deadbeat friends to move into her house. Sure. This rom-com is preposterous, sexist and weighed down by white privilege, and since it was directed by the daughter of Nancy Meyers (It’s Complicated), you won’t be surprised to learn it’s set in a tastefully decorated bungalow with a beautiful, spacious kitchen. (MJ) Rated PG-13

IT

Stephen King’s cerebral horror tome hits the big screen for the first time, and while it significantly streamlines the novel’s expansive vision, it captures the spirit of King’s writing. Set in the late ’80s in the fictional small town of Derry, Maine, seven adolescent outcasts team up to battle an evil force that takes

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

NEW YORK TIMES

VARIETY

METACRITIC.COM

(LOS ANGELES)

(OUT OF 100)

Stronger

76

mother!

74

Brad’s Status

72

It

70

The LEGO Ninjago Movie

55

American Assassin

45

Kingsman: The Golden Circle

44

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

on numerous terrifying forms, most notably the razor-toothed clown Pennywise. The movie is breaking all kinds of box office records, so expect Chapter 2, focusing on the same characters as adults, to hit theaters in the next couple years. (NW) Rated R

KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE

The follow-up to the surprise 2014 hit Kingsman: The Secret Service is even cruder and more absurd than before. This time around, most of the Kingsman organization’s agents, save for superspy Eggsy, are taken out by a sinister rival group, which also threatens to release a devastating virus. Over-thetop, comic-book spectacle abounds. Whether or not you enjoy it depends on how much you value style over tact. (SS) Rated R

LEAP!

A French-Canadian animated film about an aspiring ballerina who escapes from her orphanage and hitches a train ride to Paris in hopes of making it big as a dancer. Features the voice talents of Elle Fanning, Carly Rae Jepsen, Kate McKinnon and the invaluable Mel Brooks. (NW) Rated PG

THE LEGO NINJAGO MOVIE

Another fast-paced, genre-goofing animated feature from the LEGO film factory, this time playing around with the company’s popular Ninjago toy line. It’s bright and occasionally very funny, though it hardly holds a candle to the anarchic verve of the earlier LEGO movies. It’s also more of a traditional family film than its predecessors, with a light, all-ages story about the importance of a parent-child bond, listening, selfawareness and self-worth. (SS) Rated PG

MENASHE

An empathetic character study set in a primarily Orthodox Jewish borough of New York, in which a widowed father works against the tenets of his religion to win back his young son. Because it’s directed by documentarian Joshua Z Weinstein, the film possesses the shagginess and sense of place that you’d expect from a nonfiction film, and it’s authentic in both its emotions and its exploration of faith. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

MOTHER!

Nothing makes a damn lick of sense in Darren Aronofsky’s hysterical arthouse whatsit, in which the idyllic existence of a young woman (Jennifer Lawrence) and her artist husband (Javier Bardem) is disturbed when a couple of weird strangers show up — and then won’t leave — their rambling mansion in the middle of nowhere. It’s meant to be an allegory, but of what is anybody’s guess. Aronofsky seems to believe it’s secret and cryptic when it is, in fact, utterly banal. (MJ) Rated R

SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING

After being mistreated in his last few movies, Peter Parker and his web-slinging alter ego finally get another feature worthy of the character’s long history. With fresh-faced Tom Holland donning Spidey’s spandex, the Spider-Man franchise feels more grounded and human than ever. (ES) Rated PG-13

STRONGER

The second narrative feature to tackle the Boston Marathon bombing (last year’s Patriots Day was the first), starring Jake Gyllenhaal as Jeff Bauman, a real blue-collar worker who lost both legs in the attack. The first hour of the film, based on Bauman’s memoir, is a tough, uncompromising portrait of trauma; its second half is far more conventional, a well-acted feel-good story that you can’t help but wish was a bit grittier. (SS) Rated R

VICEROY’S HOUSE

An upstairs-downstairs historical comedy set in 1947, as India transitions to independence from its British rule. Downton Abbey’s Hugh Bonneville stars as the final viceroy of India; Gillian Anderson is his socialite wife. From the director of such crowd-pleasers as Bend It Like Beckham and Bride & Prejudice. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

WIND RIVER

After the body of a young woman is found on a Native American reservation in Wyoming, a local wildlife tracker (Jeremy Renner) acts as a makeshift envoy for the visiting FBI agent (Elizabeth Olsen) assigned to the case. Unlike director Taylor Sheridan’s scripts for the thrillers Sicario and Hell or High Water, this snowblind noir is overwritten but under-plotted. (NW) Rated R n


Desert Jewels Nursery

FILM | REVIEW

Learning to Walk Again

Plant perennials and shrubs now! "Bee" ready for spring!

Stronger dramatizes the struggle of the Boston Marathon bombing victim who defined the slogan “Boston Strong” BY SETH SOMMERFELD

B

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Tatiana Maslany and Jake Gyllenhaal in Stronger.

efore images flash across the screen, the whether he likes it or not. He becomes a dehuaudio from the Today Show finds the hosts manized item that his city can literally wheel discussing how the Boston Marathon around to feel good about itself. Who cares if he would be happening tomorrow. It’s the type of might have PTSD in large crowds? Roll out the overly perky empty chatter that fills the hours on Boston Strong guy to fire up the Bruins fans. The morning TV, but in the context of Stronger, the bombers may have taken his legs, but the city cavalier tone feels ominous and chilling. takes his humanity. Stronger filters the Boston Marathon bombAnd just when this ultra-compelling angle ing and its aftermath through the lens of Jeff seems ready to make a very bold statement, Bauman (Jake Gyllenhaal). Upon introduction, everything softens. The plot slowly shifts to beJeff is a stereotypical “Masshole,” the type who ing a standard inspirational tale (crossed with a gathers with his rough-around-the-edges friends love story). Perhaps it was hoping for too much and family at local dives to scream at the Red for John Pollono’s script to fully tap into the dark Sox game on TV. When his on-again/off-again side of tragedy exploitation (especially considergirlfriend Erin (Tatiana Maslany) shows up to ing it’s based on Bauman’s memoir), but the end do some last-minute fundraising before running results feel a tad mundane. in the marathon, Jeff sees it as a chance to get Gyllenhaal fully commits to the flawed and back in her good graces. While he’s never the wounded protagonist, managing to balance reliable type who shows up, he the frustrating aspects of Jeff’s promises to be waiting with a sign personality with Bostonian charm STRONGER when she crosses the finish line. in a way that properly makes one Rated R Unfortunately for him, he picked waver on him the same way Erin Directed by David Gordon Green the wrong time and place to finally Starring Jake Gyllenhaal, Tatiana does. While a few scenes of Jeff in show up. pain and literally crawling for forMaslany, Miranda Richardson When Jeff wakes up in the giveness seem to unabashedly beg hospital, his legs have been amputated above for an Oscar nomination, there’s just not enough the knee. Cognizant enough to communicate, weight in the part for Gyllenhaal’s acting to rise he provides information that leads authorities to to the level of winning awards (it doesn’t come the bombers. The press gets wind of the story close to his turn in Nightcrawler). and before he can even leave the hospital, Jeff While Gyllenhaal chews up scenery in the becomes a local celebrity. Once he’s discharged, flashy role, Maslany delivers the film’s best there’s a lot on his plate: readjusting to normal performance in her much more understated part. life, figuring out his relationship with Erin, and She’s the glue that holds Stronger together. Erin is learning to walk again. the calming rock in Jeff’s hectic and harsh world. But Jeff isn’t allowed to return to his old The devotion and muted agitation Maslany life. While his name is being held up as a sign conveys while having to deal with not only Jeff’s of strength, he’s struggling to even use the toilet overbearing family and disrespectful mother, without injuring himself. His family proves to but also Jeff being a terrible boyfriend, keeps the be a constant, inescapable, chaotic din, and Erin audience invested. She’s really the only rational serves as his only saving grace, the one person he and likable character for much of the film, and can be honest, quiet and vulnerable around. He’s certainly the only one looking out for Jeff’s best confused and angry as to why he’s a “hero” for interests (Jeff included). getting his legs blown off. He didn’t do anything. There’s nothing inherently wrong with any In these brief moments, Stronger flirts with an part of Stronger. The film tells a compelling (if impactful, but tough to swallow, message. familiar) and emotionally moving feel-good story The second act takes a harsh look at the with the aid of some very fine acting. It’s only the symbol-making machine that exists in America. middle-act tease of something deeper that ends Jeff is stripped of any personal agency. He is up making Stronger feel like a missed chance to the human embodiment of “Boston Strong”… not completely paint by numbers. n

REWARD for return of STOLEN one-of-a-kind marble table with inlaid duck design.

If you have any information please call: 509-939-3169 SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 43


Russia

Bosnia

Kosovo West Bank Iraq

44 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

Afghanistan Pakistan


Simon Tam (left) and his band the Slants, who set legal precedents in their battle for a trademark.

SARAH GIFFROW PHOTO

ROCK

SUPREME COURT

JUSTICE Asian-American rock band the Slants became unsuspecting First Amendment advocates, and they rock, too BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

T

he Slants might be the only active band that’s as well known within legal circles as it is amongst pop-punk die-hards. Earlier this year, the Portland dance-rock quartet were on the winning side of a landmark Supreme Court case, which was put into motion when Slants founder and bassist Simon Tam was denied a trademark for his band’s name. The U.S. patent office deemed it derogatory toward Asian people, never mind

the fact that all four members of the Slants are of Asian descent. “They said it’s because people looked at our faces and saw the name of our band, and they would only think of the racial slur,” Tam tells the Inlander from a tour stop in Austin. “Basically, anybody could register for the name ‘Slants’ unless they were Asian. When they deliberately pointed out my race as a reason for denial, ...continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 45


MUSIC | ROCK “SUPREME COURT JUSTICE,” CONTINUED... I realized I couldn’t walk away from it. “But nobody believed it was going [to the Supreme Court]. We thought it’d be over within a year.” The case was tied up in the legal system for several years, with an appeals court again denying the Slants a trademark in 2015. When the Supreme Court verdict ruling unanimously in Tam’s favor was reached this summer, it was a cathartic end to a hard-fought battle. “I didn’t even know what to feel,” Tam says of the verdict. “I didn’t care if we get slammed in the press, and believe me, there were people slamming us. I knew that was the price of winning, was having people misunderstand. I knew that was going to be part of the deal. “At the end of the day, I still had to do the right thing, even if people didn’t totally understand.”

I

t all started with, of all people, Quentin Tarantino. Tam says he got the idea to start a swaggering Asian rock band after seeing 2003’s Kill Bill: Vol. 1, and marveling at its depiction of Lucy Liu as the cold-blooded assassin O-Ren Ishii, backed by a masked Japanese gang called the Crazy 88. “It was a very profound moment. It was the first time I’d seen an American film that depicted Asians as cool, confident and sexy,” Tam says. “There are 17 million Asian-Americans, and not one at the time had graced the cover of Pitchfork or Spin. That’s when I decided something needed to change.” So he started putting up posters around town and placing ads on Craigslist. It took two years for a lineup to coalesce, not only because Portland isn’t exactly known for its racial diversity but because Tam had a lot of requirements for his applicants: You had to be Asian-Amer-

ican, you had to be passionate about your own culture, you had to have experience with a touring band, and you had to like synth pop. Following their formation in 2007, the Slants stayed mostly under the mainstream radar, up until their legal issues thrust them into the national conversation about ethnicity and the appropriation of racial slurs. (Their case also determined that the Washington Redskins could keep their trademark.) The band’s plight was covered in the New York Times and on a segment of The Daily Show titled “The Right to Discriminate Against Yourself,” during which correspondent Ronny Chieng suggested even more offensive potential names than the Slants. It’s a juicy story, to be sure, but so many profiles of the Slants skip right over the qualities of their music, as if the band exists only to provide material for future law school textbooks.

T

he Slants’ latest EP, released in the aftermath of the Supreme Court decision, is cheekily titled The Band Who Must Not Be Named, which is both a nod to the band’s legal battles and, as Tam explains, a tip of the hat to Harry Potter fans. It clocks in under 20 minutes, but it’s loaded with shiny synths and sugary, singMORE EVENTS along choruses. Visit Inlander.com for It would be easy to complete listings of hear the lyrics of the local events. record as the band’s reactions to its own sudden notoriety, but Tam says only one of the EP’s five tracks — the anthemic “From the Heart” — is a commentary on being thrust into the position of unsuspecting First

Amendment advocates. (“No, we won’t be complacent / It’s a rock ’n’ roll nation,” vows singer Ken Shima.) “It’s a direct correlation to what we’ve been doing,” Tam says of that track. “It’s actually the only song we’ve written about the situation. It serves as our final statement on the battle itself.” Another of the EP’s catchiest songs is “Fight Back,” a rallying cry about resisting racial oppression that’s certainly a rejoinder to the band’s most vociferous critics (“Don’t be their alibi / Don’t feed their greedy mouth”). “The guitarist originally wrote it because he noticed I’d get bombarded with angry activists or people who took a different position, everything from white supremacists to militant leftists,” Tam says. “And I’d interact with every single one of them, and some thought it was a waste of time. “I thought it was a form of activism myself, expressing compassion for those with different beliefs.” And now Tam finds himself in an unusual position — as an indie rock star, a paragon for social justice and an unwitting fixture on the academic lecture circuit, regularly engaging in debates with lawyers and professors about the legal precedents set by his band. “Because I’ve lived this every day for a decade and have read every document about the legislation, I probably know the law better than a lot of attorneys,” Tam says. “But surprisingly, it usually goes really well. … It probably helps that they have low expectations.” n The Slants with Nat Park and the Tunnels of Love • Tue, Oct. 3 at 7:30 pm • $8 advance, $10 day-of • Allages • The Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • bigdipperevents.com • 863-8098

v

Buy a ticket. Help a child’s future. Saturday ~

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OCTOBER 21, 2017 The 14th Annual Pumpkin Ball ~ A Magical Evening Benefiting:

T H E P U M P K I N B A L L . O R G S 5 0 9.474.4 9 1 7 46 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017


MUSIC | FOLK

Fresh off a couple of Grammy wins, singer-songwriter Sarah Jarosz hits the Bartlett on Saturday.

Hitting Her Stride Grammy-winning songwriter Sarah Jarosz has a musical ear well beyond her 26 years BY DAN NAILEN

S

arah Jarosz has already had a lot of career highlights, starting as a pre-adolescent bluegrass prodigy, landing a record deal when she was still in high school and evolving into a daring multi-instrumentalist and songwriter who collaborates with some of the biggest names in acoustic music circles. Even with critical accolades and the respect of her musician peers, there was no denying the excitement she felt at this year’s Grammy Awards, where she took home the trophy for Best Folk Album for her 2016 release Undercurrent. She also won in the Best American Roots Performance category for one of the album’s best songs, “House of Mercy.” “It was such a thrill, I won’t lie,” Jarosz says from her New York City home, on a rare day off from the constant touring she’s been doing since Undercurrent’s release. “I’ve definitely dreamed of that happening since I was a little kid, so it was pretty special.” The Grammys typically include about 100 categories, so Jarosz’s big moment happened at a ceremony before the televised awards. Even so, she got to walk the red

carpet and present a few awards in the classical categories. “When we went to the actual televised ceremony, I was sitting in front of Chance the Rapper’s mom,” Jarosz recalls. “It was really sweet because he was performing and he won an award, and the whole time she was like, ‘That’s my baby!’” Undercurrent is a worthy winner; the album, her fourth full-length release, is an assured step forward. While her talent was obvious when her 2009 debut Song Up in Her Head arrived, each subsequent release has showcased an artist becoming more fully herself. Undercurrent is Jarosz’s first album of all original songs, her first since moving to New York City from her native Texas, her first since graduating from the New England Conservatory of Music and her first for which she’s co-written many of the songs rather than working on her own. Parker Millsap, Aoife O’Donovan and the Milk Carton Kids’ Joey Ryan all co-penned tracks on Undercurrent. Jarosz puts a lot of the credit for Undercurrent’s success to a period she took away from her solo career to work with other

SCOTT SIMONTACCHI PHOTO

artists. In 2015, she spent time touring as part of I’m with Her, a trio she formed with O’Donovan and Nickel Creek’s Sara Watkins. “I feel like 2015 was an important year for me in terms of having the opportunity to do other projects, [I’m with Her] being one of them,” Jarosz says. “Also being really involved with A Prairie Home Companion with both Garrison Keillor and Chris Thile. “That year was the first time I really stepped away from my own thing in a while, and I think ultimately being in a more supportive role — or equal role with I’m with Her — I think you become a better musician when you’re put in more of a ‘listener’ mode and aren’t necessarily at the helm the whole time. I learned a lot.” After she winds up this fall’s tour, Jarosz will again focus on outside projects before thinking about an Undercurrent follow-up. The attention that came with the Grammys has led to bigger shows and new fans, and inspired her to “spread my music to more people.” It’s also meant she hasn’t seen much of her house lately. “I’ve rarely been home this year,” Jarosz says, noting that on the rare day off she goes for runs, sees her friends play music or stays in to watch Netflix. Pretty typical stuff for a 26-year-old, Grammys or no. “I think it’s important to at least sometimes unplug a bit.” n Sarah Jarosz with Brother Roy • Sat, Sept. 30 at 8 pm • Sold out • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

Saturday, September 30th 2pm to dark German beer & food specials Live music

2727 S. Mt Vernon, Lincoln Heights, Spokane

wedonthaveone.com

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 47


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCK SCORPIONS AND MEGADETH

B

ack in the commercial heyday of both the Scorpions (pictured) and Megadeth, the idea of the two bands touring together would have seemed ludicrous. Certainly there were people who were fans of both, but Scorpions’ greatest success came in the ’80s when the German rockers started delivering power ballads like “Wind of Change” and “Still Loving You” alongside more aggressive hits like “Rock You Like a Hurricane” and “No One Like You.” Balladry was anathema for Megadeth, one of the “Big Four” bands of thrashmetal pioneers (alongside Metallica, Anthrax and Slayer), and the group led by Dave Mustaine still prides itself on rapid-fire riffs and mosh-ready rock. The Scorps are now 52 years (!) into their existence and Megadeth 34 years into theirs, and together they make the kind of double bill sure to thrill old headbangers who’ve lost the need for divisive labels among their hard-rock and metal heroes. — DAN NAILEN

MARC THEIS PHOTO

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 09/28

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Harvey Stanley BEEROCRACY, Open Mic BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen CORBY’S BAR, Open Mic and Karaoke CRAVE, DJ Freaky Fred CRUISERS, Open Mic Jam Slam DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Usual Suspects J HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, Wonder JACKSON ST., Zaq Flanary J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Kicho J THE OBSERVATORY, The Dancing Plague of 1518, Newman, Paisley Devil, 80’s Kid J THE PIN!, Young Neves, The Outsiderrz POST FALLS BREWING CO., Bill Bozly THE RESERVE, Karaoke with DJ Dave RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler STEEL BARREL TAPROOM, Sulphur Banks, The Dapper Devils ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 09/29

12 TRIBES RESORT CASINO, The Marlin James Band 219 LOUNGE, Right Front Burner J J THE BARTLETT, The National Parks, RIVVRS BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn

48 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

FOLK CITY AND COLOUR

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anadian songwriter Dallas Green (pictured) gets around. He’s been the guitarist for the screamo band Alexisonfire for years, and he’s also one half of the folk duo You+Me (the other half is platinum-selling pop star Pink). He’s probably best known, though, as the brain — and the heart — behind City and Colour, producing emotionally naked songs that lean into sentiment without getting overtly sappy. Green hasn’t released an album under his City and Colour moniker since 2015’s If I Should Go Before You, but that record explored fresh musical ideas that suggested he was branching out in new directions, taking cues from ’70s rock and roots music. Green’s presence would be enough of a reason to hit up Friday night’s Knitting Factory show; the fact that Pedro the Lion’s David Bazan will be opening is merely icing on the cake. — NATHAN WEINBENDER ALYSSE GAFKJEN PHOTO

J THE BIG DIPPER, Danny Newcomb and the Sugarmakers, Buffalo Jones, Fake News J BING CROSBY THEATER, The Doors Experience, Creedence Revelation BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Sterling BLACK LABEL BREWING CO., From the Sea BOLO’S, Dangerous Type BULL HEAD TAVERN, Sammy Eubanks CHECKERBOARD BAR, Rage Rabbit Presents EDM Night

CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Bill Bozly J J THE COEUR D’ALENE RESORT, George Winston CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke CURLEY’S, Whiskey Rebellion FEDORA PUB, Nate Ostrander FORZA COFFEE CO., Wyatt Wood GARLAND DRINKERY, Chad O’Moore and Joshua Belliardo J HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, Stubborn Son

Scorpions and Megadeth • Fri, Sept. 29 at 8 pm • $34.50/$49.50/$69.50/$89.50 • All-ages • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon • spokanearena.com • 279-7000

City and Colour with David Bazan • Fri, Sept. 29 at 8 pm • $32 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, John Hastings IRON HORSE BAR, Ryan Larsen Band THE JACKSON ST., Black Jack Band JOHN’S ALLEY, Bart Budwig and Maita J J KNITTING FACTORY, City and Colour (see above), David Bazan J LOST BOYS’ GARAGE, Ray Vasquez MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Devon Wade CD Release Party MOONDOLLARS BISTRO, Kelly Hughes Band

MOOSE LOUNGE, Usual Suspects MULLIGAN’S, Just Plain Darin NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, DJ Patrick NYNE, Step Brothers, DJ Soul1 THE OBSERVATORY, Sista Otis, Lucas Brown, Casey Ryan ONE WORLD CAFE, Jodie Marie PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Riff Hangers


THE PIN!, Kozmo, Footmuzik, Brainfunk, Dave Keset RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROADHOUSE, Hair Nation SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Truck Mills J J SPOKANE ARENA, Scorpions, Megadeth (see facing page) SPOKANE EAGLES LODGE, Stagecoach West ZOLA, Royale

Saturday, 09/30

12 TRIBES RESORT CASINO, Gary Farmer and the Trouble Makers 219 LOUNGE, Folkinception J J THE BARTLETT, Sarah Jarosz (see page 47), Brother Roy BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J BING CROSBY THEATER, Buckethead, Brain and Brewer BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Stud BOLO’S, Dangerous Type CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Bill Bozly COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, The Original Lakeside, The Bar-Kays COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, Wyatt Wood CURLEY’S, Whiskey Rebellion

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Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

FARMIN PARK, Truck Mills FEDORA PUB, Mike McCafferty FLAME & CORK, Son of Brad IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Brown Salmon Truck IRON GOAT BREWING, Andru Gomez IRON HORSE BAR, Ryan Larsen Band JACKSON ST., Karaoke w/James JOHN’S ALLEY, Flying Mammals MAX AT MIRABEAU, Mojo Box MCEUEN PARK, Fall Fest feat. Melefluent, The Rub, Bill Bozly MOOSE LOUNGE, Usual Suspects MULLIGAN’S, Rusty Jackson J NASHVILLE NORTH, Freeman Benefit with The Hankers, Jesse Quandt, Luke Jaxon NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, DJ Patrick J THE OBSERVATORY, Six State Bender, Redvolt, Itchy Kitty PANIDA THEATER, The Doors Experience PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Monarch Mountain Band J THE PIN!, Retrouvaille, Rusted Hand, Jacob Vanknowe, Serenity and Psychosis, Ceòl Roc POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE, Nick Grow POST FALLS BREWING, Echo Elysium REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Buffalo Jones, Danny Newcomb and the Sugar Makers RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos SPOKANE EAGLES LODGE, Sharky and the FIns STATION HOUSE BAR & GRILL, Just Plain Darin THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave ZOLA, Royale

Sunday, 10/1

MUSIC | VENUES

BIG BARN BREWING CO., Spare Parts DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church J MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Home Free J HARVEST HOUSE, Donnie Emerson and Nancy Sophia, Just Plain Darin LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam O’DOHERTY’S, Live Irish Music J J OBJECT SPACE, Tatsuya Nakatani (see page 51), Ellingson ONE WORLD CAFE, Lia Menaker J THE PIN!, Green River Thrillers, Corde Comedenti, Quaggadog, Scared of Bears RIDLER PIANO BAR, Karaoke ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 10/2

J CALYPSOS COFFEE, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam J THE PIN!, MayDay!, The Late Ones, Diz Dean, The Kid, NWO, Manwitnoname, Virginia Slim RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 10/3

J THE BARTLETT, Sawyer, Lane King J J THE BIG DIPPER, The Slants (see page 45), Nat Park and the Tunnels of Love, Bandit Train BULL HEAD TAVERN, Rusty Jackson LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday MIK’S, DJ Brentano J THE PIN!, Devils of Loudun RAZZLE’S, Open Mic Jam RED ROOM LOUNGE, Tuesday Takeover with Storme RIDLER PIANO BAR, Open Mic/Jam Night ZOLA, Dueling Cronkites

Wednesday, 10/4

J J THE BARTLETT, Lavoy, Vervex, Summer in Siberia BEEROCRACY, Marshall McLean BLACK DIAMOND, Tommy Gantt GENO’S, Open Mic w/Travis Goulding JOHN’S ALLEY, Brad Parsons Band LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 J THE PIN!, Necromantix, The Dead Channels, Wasted Breath, Sweet Rebel D, One Man Train Wreck J POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE, Just Plain Darin RIDLER PIANO BAR, The Ronaldos feat. Ron Criscione, Ray Younker and Emily Ridler THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave ZOLA, Whsk&Keys

Spokane Preservation Advocate’s 18th Annual

Coming Up ...

J THE BARTLETT, Grieves, Oct. 6-7 J HUMBLE BURGER, Modest Music Fest, feat. Built to Spill, Finn Riggins, Bart Budwig & more, Oct. 7-8 J RESURRECTION RECORDS, Indian Goat, Oct. 7 J SPOKANE ARENA, The Piano Guys, Oct. 7 J KNITTING FACTORY, Tech N9ne, Oct. 10 J INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, Joe Bonamassa, Oct. 10 J THE BARTLETT, Palehound, Oct. 11

Cannon Hill Park Neighborhood 4 homes on w. 24th Ave. between Bernard & Howard

Sun, October 1

Noon to 4:00pm Tickets $20 available at the tour - cash, check, or online www.SpokanePreservation.org More info: (509)456-3828 No spiked heels, photos, backpacks or strollers allowed in homes.

315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BRAVO CONCERT HOUSE • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 DIAMS DEN • 412 W. Sprague • 934-3640 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOTEL RL BY RED LION AT THE PARK • 303 W. North River Dr. • 326-8000 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208667-7314 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N. Market St. • 466-9918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RESERVE • 120 N. Wall • 598-8783 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 49


FOOD TASTE IT ALL

Restaurant Wars is back and bigger than before, happening this Saturday on the outfield of Avista Stadium. After the event’s inaugural run last fall significantly surpassed expectations, organizer Kris Kilduff knew he’d need to find a bigger location, offer more tickets, and add more local restaurants to the lineup. A total of 18 restaurants (compared with eight the first year) and 10 breweries are featured at the second annual tasting-style event, which offers separate tickets for three food categories: meat, veggie or gastropub rations. Individual tickets for each category allow guests to sample a total of six 3- to 4-ounce small plates. Entry to the all-ages event is free; it includes a farmers market, beer garden, live music and local food trucks on site. For a complete list of participating restaurants and to pre-buy your tasting tickets (a cap of 1,000 per category are available this year) visit the Restaurant Wars website. — CHEY SCOTT Restaurant Wars II • Sat, Sept. 30 from 2-10 pm • Free to attend; $17/tasting category • All-ages • Avista Stadium • 602 N. Havana • restaurant-wars.com

50 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

FESTIVAL CELEBRATION TIME

FILM NIGHT OF THE LOCAL DEAD

Fiesta Spokane Hispanic Heritage Festival • Sat, Sept. 30 from 11 am-8 pm • Free • Wall Street south of Riverfront Park • facebook.com/hhfspokane

Z Nation Season 4 Premiere • Fri, Sept. 29 at 8 pm • $20 • Garland Theater • 924 W. Garland •northwestmuseum.org • 456-3931

There’s nothing quite like a party to bring people together; even strangers walk away from a worthy celebration with joy in their heart and probably some new friends, too. Consider the Fiesta Spokane Hispanic Heritage Festival just such an opportunity as you watch performances from Son Dulce, Los Vigiles, Mariachi Huenachi and the EWU Ballet Folklórico de Aztlán. Between dances you can sip a beer, enjoy some delicious food and shop for goodies crafted by local artists. Best of all? It’s free to attend, so there’s really no good excuse for missing out. — DAN NAILEN

Now that filming at sites across the Inland Northwest — including the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture’s campus in Browne’s Addition — has wrapped, Z Nation is ready to premiere the first episode of its fourth season during a special local screening. Select cast and crew members, along with showrunner Karl Schaefer, are set to meet fans of the ongoing zombie apocalypse series on Syfy, which has filmed in the Spokane area since 2014. For those who attend the screening, be on the lookout to identify as many Spokane locales as you can. — CHEY SCOTT


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Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

ARTS SHOWCASE ON SPRAGUE

Get an early start to the flurry of arts events still to come this fall at the 7th annual Art on the Ave outdoor festival in the East Sprague Business Corridor / Sprague Union District. With four blocks (from Madelia to Napa) of the newly reconstructed section of East Sprague closed to traffic, the festival hosts more than 40 local artists working across mediums, along with performances from local groups, a kids’ zone, and live music from the start of the event and into the evening, until 8 pm. Local businesses along the event’s stretch are also involved. Many of the artists featured this year are local, but others are coming from outside the Inland Northwest to share their creativity with attendees. Find updates on the artists to be featured at Art on the Ave’s Facebook page and website. — CHEY SCOTT Art on the Ave • Sat, Sept. 30 from noon-6 pm • 1700-1900 blocks of East Sprague • Free • All-ages • facebook.com/ArtontheAve or artontheavespokane.com

MUSIC OFFBEAT ART

Percussionist Tatsuya Nakatani can make music with just about anything. Bells, bowls, pipes, even his own breath — the Japan-born, New York-based artist will use just about anything to construct his jazz-inflected, avant-garde soundscapes. (He uses regular drums, too, but like anything in Nakatani’s musical arsenal, he doesn’t employ them in ways you’d expect.) And, true to form, he doesn’t just stick to traditional music venues: Consider his selfdescribed Gong Orchestra, a traveling art project for which Nakatani recruits different people for each performance and instructs them how to play gongs of various sizes. Spokane’s Object Space gallery, then, seems a perfect fit for Nakatani’s unique sensibilities. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Tatsuya Nakatani with Ellingson • Sun, Oct. 1 at 7 pm • All-ages • $6 • Object Space Gallery • 1818½ E. Sprague

SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 51


W I SAW YOU

S S

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU CAMPAIGN KICK-OFF CUTIE I saw you at Lisa Brown’s campaign kick-off. I was impressed to see another ‘young person’ dedicated to the cause. You looked amazing in black and gray and your light brown curls, dimples and radiant smile had my heart racing. Maybe next time there’s a chance to bump-elbows with the amazing and dedicated progressives in this town, I wont be as shy. I was the one in blue that offered to take your photo, stuck in the back due to being at capacity. Maybe I will see more of you as the campaign progresses? SWEETEST SWEETYNIZZLE I saw you in the early morning light. You are so beautiful to my sight. I look at you and my heart goes pang. I feel it in my arms, toes and .... As you look at this you may think, “wow this guy’s literary style has a stink.” Well, I may not be good with my writing style but I’ll be thinking of you mile after mile. IMPROVING ON RACE RELATIONS Driving home from the grocery store, I saw you struggling with 2 shopping bags walking up the hill on Perry street. You a middle aged black women with possible lung issues. You would walk a few paces and place your bags down and then walk a few more. Me a white retired nurse with the core belief that when confronted with someone in need you

at least have to acknowledge need. One doesn’t always have the time to actually help someone. I did however, and turned around and asked you if you needed a lift. Not only did you not smile and thank me; but you gave me a look of suspicion and started crossing the road. Now I’m sad and I don’t understand. GUTTER GIRL You, sitting there on the curb with your friend outside Monterrey. Me sitting in the bar looking at you inquisitively. Ever since that moment I’ve been absolutely infatuated with you. Amanda will you be my girlfriend? It would make me the happiest man alive. TO MY HIGHWAYMAN Mr. G. -- Alas, you are my Highwayman, the one that comes and goes. I am so happy to have you in my life again, even if it can’t be how we want it to be. I will take it for now. Olive Juice..

I SAW YOU MOLLY’S It was 9 am on September 21 that my girlfriend and I were having breakfast at Molly’s. You were sitting behind my friend at the next table facing me. I looked up and you smiled at me, you said goodbye as you walked by when you left. I gave Ashley my card and told her to give it to you when you returned. She said you’d just moved back to Spokane and were meeting your brother to go fishing today. She has my number! Hope to hear from you. RE: WHATEVER I do enjoy a winning hand in Solitaire! Perhaps a game for two next time. Care to join me? Message me: scottinthenw@yahoo.com

CHEERS COMPLIMENTING CASHIER Hey cute glasses-clad cashier at the Main Market, I deeply appreciate all of your weekly comments on/of my glasses and your chatting with me about my ‘difficult job’ ... your kind words make my week. — Your crazy glasses, lunch-break visiting, friend.

ALL CAMAS CLUB REPRESENTATIVES AT NORTHERN QUEST: To ALL the Camas Club Representative Team Members at Northern Quest: October 2nd is the beginning of Customer Service Appreciation Week. We know we shared with you in May how awesome we thought all of you were. Now we would like to share with

amazing at their job, but was given no notice, just up and let go. For the record, I do not work for this company, but I consider this person a friend and I simply feel that there was a massive injustice in this situation, and felt the need to speak up for them.

who hires a male coach for a girls team that tells them boys are better than girls and no one wants to coach them. Jeers to the high school that has a coach hand out varsity bags before tryouts. Jeers to a high school who proclaims no bullying and yet allows bullying by their coaches. After Freeman we all need to self-evalu-

I am so tired of seeing nonservice dogs in grocery stores.

Inlander readers how amazing we think you all are, especially with the start of Customer Service Appreciation Week. We receive NOTHING but the BEST customer service whenever we are assisted by anyone on this team. You all make us feel special each and every time. You are superb at your job. So THANK YOU for all you do for ALL your guests. All of you are amazing! Thank you also for always offering a smile and saying ‘hello’ whenever we walk by the desk even if we don’t need any assistance. If the GM is reading this, we feel this team truly deserves an award for excellence in Customer Service. So Happy Customer Service Appreciation Week to all of you wonderful Camas Club Team Members! (To Jacob: thanks for always making us laugh with your wonderfully weird sense of humor.)

JEERS SHAFTED This is aimed at a well known downtown business. Someone at the very top of the corporate chain made a decision to shaft one of their best employees. Your company hired this person to clean up a mess created by the previous holder of the position. Six months after being hired, they were let go. Why? Because it is cheaper not have a department head. This person was

NOISE POLLUTION IN SPOKANE City of Spokane, it’s not disturbing nor painful enough that our nerves, ears & stomachs are suffering from the constant, every 10 minutes, moving of diesel trucks, carrying thousands of pounds of gravel transported by our windows @ Riverside & Jefferson throughout the day, the city now sends street cleaning machines also throughout the day. Irritation is putting it mildly, more like “jumping off the balcony irritating.” Agree, the streets, do need cleaning to pick up the excess gravel, but knowing the neighborhood as I do, twice a day street cleaning would certainly do the job. Please have mercy for the seniors experiencing, living through this construction nightmare. Thank you. LEAVE YOUR DOG AT HOME! What is with the dog owners in this town? I am so tired of seeing non-service dogs in grocery stores. These stores have signs posted out front stating only service dogs allowed. I was at the South Hill Super one around 11:30 this morning and a man had his white Pekingese in the store. This dog was NOT a service dog. Either the man can’t read the obvious signs out front or thinks the rules don’t apply to him. I’m guessing it’s the latter!! HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Jeers to the high school who hires coaches that have their kids on the team. Jeers to the high school

EMBARRASSED AND ASHAMED FOR SPOKANE So disappointed in the repeated booing and hissing coming from the audience at NPR’s On Point recording at the Bing [Friday] night, evidently in response to statements made by a person on the panel that you disagreed with. Especially considering what a gracious, fair, and respectful host Tom Ashbrook is with all of his guests, and that NPR listeners generally consider themselves to be an enlightened and open-minded bunch. Embarrassed and ashamed for Spokane. n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS S E T T E

E T H E L

A R B U S

P A I G E

F L E E E A

SOUND OFF

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

OPENING NIGHT

AND PRE GAME PARTY

SATURDAY 9/30 vs. KOOTENAY ICE The Chiefs kick off the 2016-2017 season. Join us for our pre-game party at 4:00pm.

For Tickets Call 509.535.PUCK

52 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

Game Time:

www.SPOKANECHIEFS.com

M I M A I S I M P T S E C A R R I S I G M A H S T E W E N I R T N I E G E R

B M P C E D E A S C N N P O P S C A P E R O L Y N U G S D P A N S L A N C O P E N T L A T E D Y S C O N L Y L O T T A T S E

W A R T S

A V I A

L A M B R D O O N A R A S E T O P O S N O T C H I A E A S

L E I L E S D I T K A

S T E I G

H E L L O

A S D O I

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Thur 9/28, Inlander

Sponsored By:

ate how we bully. It has become a culture norm that our kids emulate, they are just following our lead. Give respect, get respect, foster respect.

7 PM


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

IMPACT IMPANDA The locally-based nonprofit supports at-risk youth in Rwanda by providing enrichment programs centered around health, basic education, music and art. Join its founders to celebrate what they’ve accomplished in their first two years. Sep. 29, 5:30-7 pm. Free. The McGinnity Room, 116 W. Pacific. (991-9201) TURKEYS & MORE SHOWCASE OF TALENT An evening of entertainment to benefit the Community Action Partnership (CAP) Food Bank’s Thanksgiving fund. Sep. 29, 7 pm. $25. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda. org (208-667-1865) OKTOBERFEST The celebration features a traditional German meal along with live music and silent/live auctions. Proceeds benefit the Post Falls Historical Society & Museum. At 12365 N. Parkway Dr, Post Falls. Sep. 29, 5-8:30 pm. $6.50-$7.50. (208-262-9642) TRANSITIONS’ PEOPLE WHO CARE Help bring respect and a sense of power to the more than 1,600 women who are served by the local nonprofit each year by becoming a table captain and inviting your friends to hear stories of inspiration from a participant and community leader. Oct. 5. Free. Hotel RL at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr. help4women.org (328-6702)

COMEDY

SAM MORRIL In 2011, Sam won The Laughing Skull Comedy Festival and was named one of Comedy Central’s “Comics to Watch.” Sept. 28-30 and Oct. 1 at 8 pm, Sept. 30 at 10:30 pm. $10-$16. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com NO CLUE Join the BDT Players as they put a comedic spin on everyone’s favorite macabre guessing game. Fridays at 8 pm, Sept. 29-Nov. 3. For general audiences. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com SAFARI The fast-paced short-form improv show for mature audiences relies on audience suggestions to fuel each scene. Saturdays at 8 pm, through Dec. 30. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) THE SOCIAL HOUR COMEDY SHOWCASE Featuring comics from the Northwest and beyond, and hosted by Deece Casillas. Sundays, 8-9:30 pm. Free. The Ridler Piano Bar, 718 W. Riverside Ave. socialhourpod.com BUTTON SMASHERS A monthly video game tournament for adults; each month a new game is selected and battled on a 10-foot screen. Comedians act as color commentators to keep things entertaining, and the winner of the tourney takes home a cash prize. Sign-ip at 7, starts at 7:30 pm. Oct. 2. $5. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. bit.ly/2wR1jdM (318-9998) CHAD DANIELS The comedian has appeared on his own Comedy Central special, Conan, The Late Late Show, and at numerous regional comedy festivals. Oct. 5-7 at 8 pm, Oct. 7 at 10:30 pm. $16-$22. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998) THE PUNDERGROUND: OCTOBER Spokane’s only community punning competition. Registration at 7, event begins at 7:30. Oct. 5, 7-10 pm. Free. Boots, 24 W. Main. (703-7223)

COMMUNITY

COLVILLE CORN MAZE & PUMPKIN PATCH Come explore the 12-acre corn maze and a 3-acre pumpkin patch. Open Mon-Fri from 3-7 pm, Sat-Sun from 11 am-7 pm, through Oct. 31. $5$7. Colville Corn Maze, 73 Oakshott Rd. colvillecornmaze.com (684-6751) SPOKANE VALLEY LIBRARY PLANNING MEETING The city of Spokane Valley and Spokane County Library District host a free public workshop for residents of the city of Spokane Valley to hear about the proposed library project and provide their input. Sep. 28, 6-8 pm. Free. Spokane Valley City Hall, 10210 E. Sprague. (893-8200) TAPROOT SPEAKER SERIES: VINCAS GREENE Vincas is the director of Vytal Movement Dance Company; he’s working to build an adult dance community locally, develop professional dance in the region, cultivate a larger audience for dance and more. Sept. 28, 7-8:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org TITANOBOA: MONSTER SNAKE The Smithsonian shares an exhibit which features a full-scale model of Titanoboa, casts of the original fossil vertebrae, and clips from the Smithsonian Channel documentary on this enormous prehistoric reptile. Through Nov. 26; Tue-Sat, 10 am-5 pm; Sun 11 am-5 pm. $8. Mobius Science Center, 331 N. Post. mobiusspokane.org WA STATE PARKS & REC COMMISSION MEETING The Commission gathers for regular meetings a year at locations around the state. A time for public comment is provided; full agenda available online: bit.ly/2wEJ1aS Sep. 28, 9 am. Free and open to the public. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. bit. ly/2wEJ1aS (509-688-0300) YWCA SPOKANE WOMEN OF ACHIEVEMENT AWARDS Celebrate seven high-achieving women from Spokane who have gone above and beyond to give back to their community. Featuring keynote speaker Janine Latus, author of the NYT bestseller, “If I Am Missing or Dead.” Sept. 28, 11:30 am-1:30 pm. $125/person. Davenport Grand Hotel, 333 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. ywcaspokane.org (789-9307) C.O.P.S. NORTHWEST FREE SHRED DAY Join C.O.P.S. at the Shadle Shopping Center (Wellesley & Belt) for a free shred day, with services donated by United Data Security. Sept. 29, 11 am-2 pm. Free. (625-3336) FALL FESTIVAL OF HOMES The 13th annual event is the largest new home construction showcase in the Inland Northwest, featuring 28 homes from 19 Spokane-area builders. Sept. 29-Oct. 1 and Oct. 6-7 from 10 am-5 pm. Free. spokanefestivalofhomes.com FEED MY STARVING CHILDREN Help pack meals for hungry kids around the world. Register at give.fmsc.org/spokane. Sept. 29-30. Redeemer Lutheran, 3606 S. Schafer Rd. (994-3016) SCARYWOOD The theme park’s annual haunted house attraction includes areas like the “Blood Bayou,” “3Dementia” and new this year, “Planet Zombie.” Through Oct. 28, Thu from 7-11 pm, Fri-Sat from 7 pm-midnight. $26-$45. Silverwood Theme Park, 27843 U.S. 95. scarywoodhaunt.com

EXPLORE THE LARGEST NEW CONSTRUCTION SHOW IN THE INLAND NORTHWEST

THIS WEEKEND!

SEPT. 29-OCT. 1 | OCT. 6-8 HOURS: 10 AM-5 PM

SPOKANEFESTIVALOFHOMES.COM SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 53


EVENTS | CALENDAR 1889 SALVAGE CO. GRAND REOPENING Visit the local business’s new space for a “Trailer Rally” and one-year anniversary. The parking lot will be filled with vintage camper trailers and local vendors. Sep. 30, 9 am-6 pm. Free. 1889 Salvage Co., 2824 N. Monroe. facebook. com/1889SalvageCo/ (315-4485) ALMS BOWL RUMMAGE SALE The monastics of Sravasti Abbey near Newport live as instructed by the Buddha to only eat food that is offered. Because they do not shop, we purchase their food with donations by supporters from near and far. Sept. 30, 8 am-3 pm. Free. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (971-301-2521) BOOK LAUNCH: BEAUTY & THE BEAK Celebrate the release of the new children’s nonfiction book about the effort to help a bald eagle that lost its beak in an illegal shooting. Two free programs (at 10 am and noon) also feature live birds from Birds of Prey Northwest (BPN) in St. Maries. Sep. 30, 10 am. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org COHOUSING: LIVING SUSTAINABLY IN COMMUNITY Local families have secured a site in the South Perry District to build an intergenerational village. Come learn more about this welcoming and eco-friendly community during a public presentation. Sep. 30, 3-5 pm. Free. Cheney Library, 610 First St. facebook. com/spokanecohousing (235-7333) FIESTA SPOKANE Celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month at a free, familyfriendly event with live entertainment, kids crafts, a health and education fair, product and food vendors and a beer garden. Sept. 30, 11 am-8 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane. latinohopefoundation.org (768-1971) HANDS ACROSS THE FALLS Join others on the Monroe Street Bridge in a show of public support celebrating recovery. Friends, family and individuals and organizations who support the recovery movement in Spokane are encouraged to attend. Sep. 30, 12-1 pm. community-minded.org/event/handsacross-the-falls/ (960-8529) HOLISTIC FESTIVAL The day-long event offers a variety of healthy-living information from free, 25-minute lectures and 50 booths featuring organic/ natural products, remedies, body care and pain relief. Sep. 30, 10 am-6 pm. $6. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. (468-9001) OPEN HOUSE: ANIMALS ARE EVERYWHERE: Visitors can enjoy activities

and crafts, as well as a chance to meet the reptiles, birds of prey and other critters that call the OLC home. Sept. 30, 10 am-2 pm. $5 suggested donation. West Valley Outdoor Learning Center, 8706 E. Upriver Drive. facebook.com/westvalleyoutdoorlearningcenter/ (340-1028) PEND OREILLE EXCURSION TRAIN RIDES Due to track safety issues, the rides hosted by the Newport/Priest River Rotary Club now depart from Newport to take riders on a scenic, 24mile ride along the Pend Oreille River to Dalkena, Wash. and back. Fall rides on Sat/Sun from Sept. 30-Oct. 15.) $15$20. sporttrainrides.com/tickets VANDAL OVERNIGHT GAMES More than 800 people are expected to fill the Idaho Commons for the fourth year of the U of Idaho’s largest community gaming event — open to all types and genres of gaming, including video, board, tabletop, card and role playing games — on the Palouse. Games run from 1 pm Sept. 30 to 1 am on Oct. 1. Sep. 30. Free and open to the public. University of Idaho, 709 S Deakin St. uidaho.edu/vog (208-885-6111) AUTUMN HISTORIC HOME TOUR Spokane Preservation Advocate’s 18th annual historic homes tour takes place around the Cannon Hill Park neighborhood, along West 24th Avenue between Bernard and Howard. Oct. 1, 12-4 pm. $20/person. spokanepreservation.org CREATE SPOKANE ARTS MONTH KICKOFF A community celebration with live music, interactive arts activities for all ages, printed Arts Month schedules for pick up, and more. Oct. 2, 5-7 pm. Free. Spokane Tribal Gathering Place, 347 N Post St. spokanearts.org OCTOBER SPOKANE DSA GENERAL MEETING A meeting of the Spokane Democratic Socialists of America Organizing Committee. Meeting open to members and non-members. Oct. 3, 6-8 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main. spokanelibrary.org RIVERFRONT PARK REDEVELOPMENT OPEN HOUSE A session focused primarily on the design of the U.S. Pavilion. Community members are encouraged to attend and engage with the design team, ask questions and provide feedback. Oct. 3, 6-7:30 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main Ave. bit.ly/2eSu52c WEDNESDAY CONTRA DANCE Spokane Folklore Society’s weekly dance, with contra band StringRays playing, and caller Penn Fix. No experience necessary, beginner workshop at 6:40 pm.

D E S I A R WE R THE BAG

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54 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

Oct. 4, 7-10 pm. $8/$10. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. womansclubspokane.org (598-9111) ZINE-MAKING WORKSHOP Taught by Spokane Zine Fest organizers Chelsea Martin and Ian Amberson, this workshop introduces the tools and techniques of zine making. Oct. 4, 7-9 pm. $10. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org WHO IS HISPANIC? People sometimes choose to describe themselves as Hispanic or Latino. This session examines who is Hispanic or Latino, and the state of this population in the U.S. Oct. 5, 12:30-1:30 pm. Free. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu FALL FOR HISTORY FESTIVAL Wallace, Idaho celebrates its colorful past with guided tours of historic homes, commercial buildings, museums, and the cemetery, along with presentations on the town’s most colorful citizens and events. Oct. 5-8. bit.ly/2f5ltpD

FILM

DR. JEKYLL & MR. HYDE The 1920 classic silent film is accompanied by an all-new original score by local composer Dylan Champagne, performed live by an 8-piece orchestra. Sep. 28, 6 pm. $10-$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org MANHATTAN SHORT FILM FEST Back for its 20th anniversary the touring festival features the 10 best films of 1615 entries from 75 countries. Sept. 28 at 7:30 pm, Sept. 29 at 5:30 and 8:30 pm, Oct. 1 at 3:30 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801) Z NATION PREMIERE PARTY Join the MAC and Z Nation showrunner Karl Schaefer, along with select cast and crew members, for a special premiere party and screening of the series’ fourth season, which was filmed in and around Spokane this summer. Sept. 29, 9:30 pm. $15-$20. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com MONDAY NIGHT MOVIES: BENDING THE ARC The uplifting story of a team of young doctors in Haiti who battled the medical establishment, dysfunctional governments and patient isolation to ignite a revolutionary global movement for healthcare for the poor. Oct. 2, 7 pm. $8. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main. magiclanternonmain.com REEL MOVIE MONDAYS: ZOMBIE FEST A screening of the film “Fido.” Get your photo with a zombie, a zombie make-

over and more. All donations fund the purchase of an accessible/portable stage lift for Kenworthy and the community. Oct. 2, 6:30 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. bit.ly/2eHAyxd PALOUSE FRENCH FILM FEST: CÉZANNE ET MOI This historical drama traces the lifelong friendship between renowned 19th century French artists Paul Cézanne and Emile Zola from their first meeting as schoolmates to their creative rivalry as fame and success continue to elude Cézanne. Oct. 3, 7 pm. $5; free for students. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org FISH & WILDLIFE FILM FESTIVAL The event is held as part of 75th anniversary celebration of the UI’s College of Natural Resources Fish and Wildlife Sciences Department. Finalist films will be screened and prizes awarded. Oct. 5. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. uidaho.edu/fwff DAN SAVAGE’S HUMP! FILM FEST Twelve years strong, Dan Savage’s HUMP! Film Festival is still the only place to see creative, homegrown dirty movies. Films are a cornucopia of body sizes, shapes, ages, colors, and genders all under the welcoming umbrella of positivity and self-expression. Oct. 6-7 at 7:30 pm. $20. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. humpfilmfest.com/

FOOD

GREEK DINNER FESTIVAL The 82nd annual food and culture festival features traditional Greek dishes served for lunch and dinner, along with pastries, deli items, wine/beer and more. Sept. 2930, lunch from 11 am-2 pm, dinner from 4:30-8 pm. $8-$18. Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, 1703 N. Washington St. spokanegreekfest.org BEGINNER’S CAKE DECORATING CLASS In this interactive, hands-on class learn how to fill and frost a cake, and how to do some basic decorating with frosting tips. Sept. 29, 6-8 pm. $25. My Fresh Basket, 1030 W. Summit Pkwy. myfreshspokane.com (558-2100) 90S BAR CRAWL A throwback to the 90s, with participating bars featuring 90s pop hits, drink specials and more. Sep. 30, 2-10 pm. $15+. Downtown Spokane. bit.ly/2gnAy9y RESTAURANT WARS II The culinary event is back for a second year with three restaurant categories: Meat, veggie and gastropub rations. Purchase one or all three. Sep. 30, 2-10 pm. $3$17. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana. restaurant-wars.com

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his background in tech startups and how the cannabis industry could be the next field for major technological and marketing innovation, and Jared Mirsky will relate his experience creating Seattle’s Online Marijuana Design, one of the world’s largest cannabis branding agencies. The lecture should be a great opportunity for aspiring businesses looking to stand out in a saturated and competitive postprocessing market.

THE TRILLION DOLLAR HEMP INDUSTRIES (SAT, 11 PM)

There have been a range of repercussions related to the ongoing federal prohibition of cannabis, not only involving the Department of Justice, but also manufacturing. The conflation of hemp with marijuana has resulted in one of the most utilitarian plants on Earth being unavailable to the numerous industries that could take advantage of its fibrous nature. Industrial hemp specialist Joy Beckerman (pictured left) will give a lecture on the plant’s importance, and why its legalization is vital in a political climate that claims to care greatly about industry.

Tad Hussey is expected to discuss different approaches to growing.

Weed, the People

The spotlight is on all aspects of marijuana at Spokane’s King Cannabis Expo BY TUCK CLARRY

C

annabis takes over the Spokane Convention Center this Friday and Saturday for the second annual King Cannabis Expo. The seed-to-sale event offers experiences for enthusiasts and entrepreneurs alike, with event passes, booths, seminars and access to a networking lounge. The expo will showcase companies and up-andcoming technology for prospective cannabis businesses, ranging from producing and processing to investment and marketing groups. But what really sets this conven-

tion apart is the seminars and guest lectures offered throughout the two days. Guest speakers at the King Cannabis Expo range from Washington state agricultural labor and pesticide investigators to marketing heads and security counselors. Here are some noteworthy scheduled talks:

TAKING CANNABIS TO THE MARKETPLACE (SAT, 2 PM)

Roger Obando (pictured above, right), Baker Technologies’ co-founder and chief technology officer, speaks from

PESTICIDES AND CANNABIS (FRI, 10 AM)

As a new pot farm in Washington, there are a lot of things to know. Scott Nielsen, a Washington State Department of Agriculture investigator for pesticide management, explains the regulatory compliance laws for cannabis cultivation and the importance of offering a safe, potent product.

RUSTLING THE RUSSETS (FRI, 11 AM; SAT, 10 AM)

KIS Organics’ Tad Hussey and Sound Horticulture’s Alison Kutz will speak to their respective experiences in the world of horticulture, and how growers can achieve a strong yield despite the use of pesticides and natural foes. Hussey will also focus on the difficult balance between natural, organic grows and the fast-paced nature of growing involving hydroponics. n King Cannabis Expo • Sept. 29-30: Fri-Sat, 10 am-7 pm • $70 for a two-day pass/$40 per day • Spokane Convention Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • kingcannabisexpo.com

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RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess JAMES AND THE GIANT LEECH

I’ve been dating this girl for just over a month, and she never offers to pay for anything. I was okay with this in the beginning, as I saw it as a courtship thing. I guess I wonder whether this points to problems down the road with her not being a real partner, pulling her weight, etc. How do I politely broach this without blowing up the blooming relationship? —Feeling Used

AMY ALKON

This woman lives paycheck to paycheck. Unfortunately, it’s your paycheck. At this point, you’re probably musing on the perfect birthday gift for her — a sparkly little Hello Kitty crowbar she can use to pry open her wallet. However, mystifying as it is that she has never squeaked out the words “This one’s on me!” consider that if there’s one thing heterosexual men and women have in common these days, it’s confusion over who exactly is supposed to pay on dates. The problem driving the confusion is a sort of Godzilla vs. Mothra clash between age-old evolved emotions (still driving us today) and modern-day beliefs about male and female equality. As I explain with some frequency (per big cross-cultural studies by evolutionary psychologist David Buss, among others), women evolved to seek male partners who show they are willing and able to invest in any children they might have. Whether the particular woman actually wants children is immaterial — as in, of zero interest to her emotions. Anthropologist John Marshall Townsend observes from his research and others’ that women’s emotions evolved to act as a sort of police force for a man’s level of commitment — making women feel bad when the investment isn’t there. This leads women to either push a man to invest or ditch him and find a man who will. Men coevolved to expect this, meaning that men evolved to try to appeal to the ladies by showing (or successfully faking) generosity, high status, and earning power. Many people mistakenly assume evolved adaptations like this will change with the times, as in, “Ye Olde Evolved Emotions, I’d like to introduce you to Gloria Steinem and the women’s movement.” Unfortunately, evolution is not a lickety-split process — especially when it comes to our psychological engine panel. In fact, anthropologist Donald Symons explains that “natural selection takes hundreds or thousands of generations” (generations being 20- to 30-year periods) “to fashion any complex cognitive adaptation.” So women, even now — even highly successful women who can comfortably pay for their own meals (and everyone else’s in the restaurant) — have their emotions pushing them to look for a man who shows generosity, as well as the ability to “provide.” This is reflected in the findings by sociologist Janet Lever and her colleagues from a survey of heterosexual men and women — 17,067 “unmarried and non-cohabitating” heterosexuals, ages 18 to 65 — on the extent to which they embrace or reject the traditional “man pays” dating behavior. (Surprisingly, millennials’ responses were generally pretty close percentage-wise to those of older adults — mostly within a few percentage points.) A snapshot of the responses from women: Overall, 57 percent of women said yes to “I always offer to help pay even on the first date.” But check out the mixed feelings: Many women (39 percent) wished men would reject their offer to pay. But many (40 percent of women) said they are bothered when men don’t accept their money. Hello, confusing financial stew! Men’s responses were similarly contradictory. Overall, more than half the men — 64 percent — said that after the first few dates, the woman should help pay expenses, and nearly half (44 percent) said they would stop dating a woman who never offers to pay. Yet, men overwhelmingly — that is, 76 percent of men — feel guilty if they don’t pay the bill on dates. So, the reality is, like all of these conflicted men, some women just aren’t sure where the lines are on whether to chip in and when. (Of course, some women are conveniently unsure.) As for this woman you’re seeing, it is possible that she’s waiting until you two are “exclusive” to start picking up the tab. Instead of assuming the worst, do two things: First, observe and reflect on her behavior and attitudes -- so far and as you get to know her — and see whether they suggest an interest in partnership or princess-ship. Second, simply ask: “Hey, we’ve been dating for a while, and it seems like we should start sharing the costs. Where do you stand on that?” See what she says and take it from there -- tempting as it is to opt for a passive-aggressive approach, like panhandling outside the restaurant where you’re meeting her: “Hey, Amber. You’re early!…Meet ya inside. Just trying to beg enough for the tip.” n ©2017, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

60 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

EVENTS | CALENDAR GRANDE RONDE CELLARS OPEN HOUSE A tasting event and sale of Grande Ronde’s wines, after the winery’s sort-of two-year hiatus. Oct. 1, 1-4 pm. Marketplace Winery, 39 W. Pacific Ave. (509-474-1070) FARM-TO-TABLE BENEFIT DINNER Backyard Harvest hosts a gourmet, five-course, farm-to-table dinner to raise funds to support programs and services that increase access to fresh food on the Palouse and in the LewisClark Valley. Oct. 2, 5:30 pm. $100. Bloom, 403 S. Main, Moscow. backyardharvest.org (208-882-4279) COOKING CLASS: ONE POT SOUPS & STEWS Join Jandyl in The Kitchen as she demos her hearty Spanish-style chorizo and lentil stew, and her veggie chickpea soup. Oct. 4, 5:30-7:30 pm. $30. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. secondharvestkitchen.org

MUSIC

AN EVENING OF MUSIC A program featuring Whitworth alumni Hannah Flaherty on violin and Kayley Martenson on piano. The duo performs classical works by Sarasate, Rachmaninoff, Lalo, Bach, Vieuxtemps and more. A portion of proceeds benefit victims of recent wildfires. Sept. 29, 7-8:30 pm. By donation. Lewis and Clark High School, 521 W. Fourth. (360-471-2783) GEORGE WINSTON IN CONCERT The accomplished solo pianist and guitar player has, since 1980, released 10 solo piano albums; his latest, “Spring Carousel,” benefits cancer research. Sept. 29, 8 pm. $30-$35. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdaresort.com BRYAN BOWERS IN CONCERT The folk folk singer, autoharp master and storyteller is joined by Greg Spatz and Caridwen Irvine-Spatz for an evening of fun and music. Sept. 30, 6:15-10 pm. $15. V du V Wines, 12 S. Scott St. facebook. com/vduvspokane (990-8706) SNAPSHOT! AND FRIENDS: JOURNEY TO VEGAS A performance by the North by Northwest Region 13’s fourth place a cappella barbershop harmony quartet before they compete in the 2017 Sweet Adelines International contest. Sept. 30, 7-9 pm. By donation. Opportunity Presbyterian, 202 N. Pines. (554-9339) SPOKANE GUILD OF ORGANISTS CONCERT The Spokane chapter of the AGO presents a varied program of choral, organ, and chamber music. Oct. 1, 4 pm. Free, donations accepted. Messiah Lutheran, 4202 N Belt St. (624-5627) VELLAMO BAND Based in Kokkola, Finland, Vellamo combines the rich tradition of Finnish folksong with an appealing “retro” sensibility, creating a modern folk experience. Oct. 3, 6 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry. (444-5331) SPR PRESENTS: BEAUSOLEIL WITH MICHAEL DOUCET Beausoleil has 12 Grammy nominations; their distinctive sound is a mix of New Orleans jazz, blues rock, folk, swamp pop, Zydeco, country and bluegrass. Proceeds benefit Spokane Public Radio. Oct. 5, 7:3010 pm. $47. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

FRIENDS OF TURNBULL NWR CELEBRATE PUBLIC LANDS DAY Take a

walk and enjoy local public lands. Sept. 30, 9:30 am-noon. Free. Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge, 26010 S. Smith Rd., Cheney. fotnwr.org/activities.html NATIONAL PUBLIC LANDS DAY HIKE Bring a lunch, plenty of water and plan to spend about 4-5 hours on the mountain. Meet at the trailhead across the street from the upper Kit Carson trail. Sept. 30, 10 am. Free. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. landscouncil.org (209-2404) SPOKANE CHIEFS SEASON OPENER The Chiefs start their regular season against the Kootenay Ice. Includes a Bud Light pre-party (at 4 pm) with food trucks, beer garden, live music, kids entertainment and more. Sept. 30, 7:05 pm. $10-$24. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanechiefs.com (279-7000) WWE LIVE Champion Jinder Mahal takes on Shinsuke Nakamura; also features U.S. Championship Match with AJ Styles taking on Kevin Owens, and many more WWE Superstars. Oct. 1, 5 pm. $17-$107. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. EVERETT SILVERTIPS Regular season game; the first 1,000 fans through the gates receive a magnet featuring a Chiefs player. Oct. 4, 7:05 pm. $10-$24. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanechiefs.com

THEATER

THE MIRACLE WORKER Expressed through memories, this play portrays the moving relationship of Helen Keller and her teacher Annie Sullivan. Sept. 28-30 at 7:30 pm. $12-$20. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N. Grand Ave., Pullman. rtoptheatre.org SISTER ACT A production of the beloved musical. Through Oct. 8; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $23-$25. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. lakecityplayhouse.org (208-673-7529) WEST SIDE STORY Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet is transported to New York City in the turbulent 50’s as two young, idealistic lovers find themselves caught between warring street gangs. Through Oct. 15, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $30-$32. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) ACADEMIA NUTS Laughter abounds as chaos is created by the manuscript hunting rivals of this New England-set story. Through Oct. 8; Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm and Oct. 8 at 6 pm (dinner theater). $5-$12. $30/dinner show. StageWest Community Theatre, 639 Elm St., Cheney. (768-4792) A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR’S COURT A local production by Old Orchard Theater, with proceeds supporting the Green Bluff Grange scholarship fund. Through Oct. 1, performance times TBA. $10. Green Bluff Grange, 9809 Green Bluff Rd. oldorchardtheatre.com (979-2607) RIPCORD The play by Pulitzer winner David Lindsay Abaire takes place in a senior living center where a cantankerous resident is not taking kindly to her new roommate. Through Oct. 1; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $12-$15. Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway. igniteonbroadway.org 72ND SEASON MIS-CAST GALA The local nonprofit theater’s season fundraising gala features an evening of miscast actors, food, wine, games, raffles and more. Sep. 30, 6-9 pm. $25-$35.

Spokane Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia. spokanechildrenstheatre.org SOMETHING ROTTEN! Brothers Nick and Nigel Bottom are desperate to write a hit play but are stuck in the shadow of that Renaissance rock star known as “The Bard.” Oct. 3-7 at 7:30 pm, also Oct. 7 at 2 pm. $37.50-$77.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. wcebroadway.com

ARTS

ART ON THE AVE The annual arts fest features more than 40 local artists, music, interactive art, a kid zone, 10+ participating businesses and an after-party from 6-9 pm. On the 1700-1900 blocks of East Sprague. Sep. 30, 12-6 pm. Free. facebook.com/ArtontheAve/ LITTLE SPOKANE RIVER ARTIST STUDIO TOUR The 10th Anniversary studio tour features more than 30 artists represented at the studios of Kay O’Rourke, Gina Freuen, Jill Smith and Shani Marchant. Sep. 30, 10 am-5 pm. Free. LittleSpokaneStudios.com EN PLEIN AIR Celebrate National Public Lands Weekend by joining an informal outdoor painting and sketching event. Artist Megan Perkins leads participants in plein aire sketching. Oct. 1, 1-3 pm. Donations welcome. High Bridge Park, Riverside Ave. and A St. bit.ly/2fuS9wr JENNIFER STABLER HOLLAND: A RETROSPECTIVE An exhibition of the artist’s 40-year career, featuring watercolor, acrylic, photography and 3D dress form sculptures of women who made a difference. Oct. 1-29; Thu-Sun from 1-6 pm; reception Oct. 1, 1-3 pm. Free. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org (229-3414)

WORDS

BOOTSLAM Spokane Poetry Slam’s allages performance poetry competition with a $50 grand prize. First Sunday of the month; sign-ups at 7, slam at 7:30 pm. $5 to compete or watch. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org (509-703-7223) BOOK LAUNCH + SIGNING: MAJOR MARGARET WITT “Tell: Love, Defiance, and the Military Trial at the Tipping Point for Gay Rights” is the riveting story of Major Witt’s dedicated and decorated military career as a frontline flight nurse, and of her love and devotion to her partner Laurie Johnson. Oct. 3, 7-8 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com PIONEER PLANTS FOR OUR 21ST CENTURY GARDENS Gardener, author and radio host Mary Ann Newcomer shares lessons we might learn from the histories of tough and adaptive plants and people of the West. Oct. 5, 6:309 pm. Free. CenterPlace Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. tieg.org READING: JOY PASSANANTE The Moscow-based author reads from her novel “Through a Long Absence: Words from My Father’s Wars,” a touching saga of a wartime medical unit, a longdistance love, the making of a surgeon, and first-generation American Italian and Jewish families. Oct. 5, 7 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. bookpeopleofmoscow.com n

MORE EVENTS Visit Inlander.com for complete listings of local events.


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SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 INLANDER 61


“You can’t just say there are 10 types of autism and here’s how to handle them. We have to teach them how to think like a person with autism, so they have tools in their toolbox,” says Holly Bahme Lytle.

Handle with Care How one mother helped push Spokane to become a national leader in training first responders BY MITCH RYALS

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s a mother to kids on the autism spectrum, Holly Bahme Lytle knows what typical behavior looks like for a person with autism. She also recognizes that you might see someone spinning in circles, stomping their feet, hitting themselves or engaging in other odd behavior and think that person is intoxicated or dangerous. First responders can often have the same reaction, she says. As part of her work with the ISAAC Foundation, which she started in 2007, Bahme Lytle has helped develop a curriculum to teach first responders how to interact with people with autism and other disabilities. She developed the curriculum along with Spokane Fire Department Lt. John Goodman, who also has a child with autism. “These are people we’re going to be interacting with, and some are mildly affected and hold jobs, and some are not,” Goodman says. “This training really parlays itself into the autism world, and to other disabled folks.”

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ince 2015, the curriculum has expanded into a full-blown, four-hour training course for firefighters, emergency personnel and police. All Spokane police officers have had the hour-long training, and at least 32 officers have taken the full course as part of the “enhanced crisis intervention training.” And when Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich caught wind of the program, his office pushed to have the curriculum nationally certified. In August, the law-enforcement-geared curriculum

62 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 28, 2017

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

wrote to Bahme Lytle about her son’s experience with Spokane firefighters. “A firetruck and paramedics rolled, treated [him] for heat exposure, and treated him with great kindness,” the mother wrote. “And when we got there to pick him up I asked about their training with individuals with autism and they mentioned the John Goodman training and the ISAAC Foundation. Yeah you!!!!”

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ahme Lytle is surrounded by kids’ smiling faces in her downtown office — including the one in a single frame on her desk. Her son Isaac was diag— called “Autism in the Wild” — earned national accredinosed with autism at a young age. He died unexpectedly tation from the International Association of Directors of due to a heart defect, and in 2007, Bahme Lytle started Law Enforcement Standards and Training. Now, more the ISAAC Foundation, which is dedicated to helping cops throughout the country will learn what it’s like those touched by autism. inside the mind and body of a person with autism, and Initially, her goal was to raise money to help families how to communicate with them. pay for the expensive therapy children Goodman says he’s working on a with autism require. Her role has national accreditation for the firesince expanded dramatically. The ISAAC Foundation’s 10TH ANNIVERfighters’ version of the training. The training course that Bahme SARY CELEBRATION is this Saturday. The This training is becoming esLytle helped craft for Spokane’s event at Project ID (1412 W. Central Ave.) sential for first responders, Bahme first responders is only one piece of will feature bouncy houses, face painting Lytle says. her work. For the past three years, and live music by Elijah and the Tufnels, The number of people in the she’s also organized station visits Sovereign Citizen and Non Prophets and United States diagnosed with auso that children with autism can get Spokane’s Brenna Yaeger. Sat, 2 to 7 pm tism spectrum disorder continues acquainted with the men and women • $10, children under 3 are free to rise (1 in 68 in 2012, compared who respond to emergencies. She’s to 1 in 150 in 2007), according to currently working on rolling out a the Autism and Developmental similar school-based program. Disabilities Monitoring Network. And an analysis of She also helped install an “Isaac Alert” in the 911 disrecent data by the Ruderman Family Foundation, which patch system, which pops up as a note to first responders advocates on behalf of people with disabilities, found that when they’re called to a home with a person with autism at least one-third of people killed by police have some or special needs. The alert tells emergency responders type of disability. if the person is nonverbal, has physical limitations and “We have this training, and departments are using could be a risk to wander away, among other things. it because they want to do it,” Bahme Lytle says. “They “As parents who have special-needs loved ones, we recognize that their people need it and the community have to do things to help them be successful,” she says. needs it.” “It’s not only first responders who need to do a better job She points to the comments from community memat this. As a community, we all need to come together, bers, who’ve seen the training in action. One mother and with this model, we can do that.” n


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