Inlander 09/22/2022

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SEPTEMBER 22-28, 2022 | SUPPORT THE LOCAL ARTS!

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INSIDE VOL. 29, NO. 50 | COVER PHOTO: ERICK DOXEY

COMMENT NEWS CULTURE FALL ARTS

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’m elated to announce: The arts are back! After two years of uncertainty as to whether it would be healthy to gather again in auditoriums, galleries, concert venues and other places where people congregate for the shared experience of arts interaction, all signs point to a return to “normal.” The proof is right inside this issue. In 2020, and 2021, our FALL ARTS ISSUE looked quite different — the season-long calendar of events from now until New Year’s Eve was less than half its usual size both years, and many of our feature stories focused on how artists were pushing their creative limits to connect with audiences and supporters in mostly “virtual” formats. While we certainly learned a lot about how the arts can be sustained, or even thrive, in times of major societal upheaval, this year’s issue is a welcome contrast to the “COVID times.” This year’s Fall Arts issue is back with a full slate of events — spanning 14 weeks — to do, see, hear and support: live theater, comedy, dance, gallery openings, museum exhibits, festivals, concerts, author readings and so much more. Also included are deeper looks from some of the Inland Northwest’s major arts scene players, who reflect both on what it was like to survive the pandemic — a feat overcome thanks in part to decades of precedence for legacy organizations like the Spokane Symphony — and what’s next, such as for Terrain, which is back with its flagship event after a two-year pause. It all begins on page 20. — CHEY SCOTT, arts and culture editor

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

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WHAT EVENTS ARE YOU MOST LOOKING FORWARD TO THIS FALL? MOLLY ROBBINS

I’m directing the fall production at Spokane Falls Community College. It’s called There’s Always Plenty of Light at the All Night Starlight Diner, and it’s a queer love story. Performances are in November!

Radical Hospitality

Is this your first time directing a show? No, this is actually my third time!

JULIE WALKER

I’m a big symphony fan. I was in orchestra for eight years, and I love playing. I’ve always wanted to go to the Spokane Symphony; I really hope that I can get in and see them this year. What did you play when you were in orchestra? Viola. I wanted to be different.

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I’m currently doing a show with the Spokane Shakespeare Society — Goodnight, Desdemona (Good Morning Juliet) — and we’ll be finishing our run in the next week. After we finish up, I’m really looking forward to enjoying the rest of my season tickets and getting to see some really good theater.

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What is something you’re really hoping to do while you’re in Spokane? I like everything here, but I need to see more of the city!

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SARAH EDGE

I’m super into theater and anything to do with it. I’ve done lots of theater all my life, so it’s something I’m very passionate about. What’s your favorite playor musical you’ve seen? Definitely has to be Anastasia. I saw that last winter with my mom and my sister. It was so incredible and so beautiful!

INTERVIEWS BY SAMANTHA HOLM 09/16/22, RIVERFRONT PARK

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022 INLANDER 5


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Spokane’s arts-funding mechanism hit a speed bump during the pandemic, but is still making important contributions to the local cultural scene

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Lisa Soranaka and Mallory Battista will use SAGA funding to build a mosaic sculpture in the EmersonGarfield neighborhood. COURTESY PHOTO

BY MELISSA HUGGINS                              

A

s we approach National Arts and Humanities month in October, there’s a lot to celebrate. An impressive array of arts and cultural events and programs across many disciplines has come back to life since the pandemic — some of which have been supported by the Spokane Arts Grant Awards (SAGA), the grants program administered by Spokane Arts. At this point in the year, Spokane Arts has awarded two rounds of funding, with the next application deadline coming Oct. 1. SAGA funds a mix of organizations, collectives and individual projects, with a requirement to show community impact. Investing even a tiny amount in arts and cultural events led to more ticketed events, which increased the admissions tax base, in turn increasing the amount available to grant the following year. The investment worked. But the pandemic hangover is still in effect: COVID impacts have a very long tail. The admissions tax has a delayed distribution, which means the portion of 2020 revenue earmarked

for the arts — $176,625 for the entire city — is what’s available to fund arts and culture projects in 2022. Consider that the small amount dedicated to supporting arts and culture here represents an expenditure of 80 cents per resident per year in 2022. Eighty cents! In the second-largest city in the state and in the cultural hub of our region. As a point of comparison, our city police department receives $68 million from the city’s general fund, along with other earmarks and revenue sources. To be fair, the city of Spokane has earmarked roughly 2 percent of their one-time American Rescue Plan funding received from the federal government toward supporting cultural festivals citywide and employment in the arts, but the vast majority of that one-time relief funding has not been distributed yet.


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rts, culture and creativity not only make our city a more healthy, attractive, welcoming, livable place, benefiting the hearts and minds of community members, but those things also make economic sense. According to Americans for the Arts, every dollar spent on admission to a cultural event generates $32 in the local economy. Investing in arts and culture is simultaneously investing in tourism, education, community wellness and mental health. We don’t need to have a scarcity mindset. We can fund a wide range of community needs while also thoughtfully investing in arts, culture and film. Even tiny investments — SAGA’s average grant size is roughly $5,000 — can yield big results. There’s no better testament to the impact of SAGA seed funding than the accomplishments of the grantees themselves, so in the spirit of celebration and gratitude, here are a few updates on what our grantees are up to: MY TURN THEATER provides the tools, opportunity and support for adults of varying abilities to experience the camaraderie and sense of achievement found in performance theater. One of only a dozen theaters of its kind in the United States, SAGA funding supported My Turn’s first Spokane performance, Guys and Dolls. Local artists LISA SORANAKA and MALLORY BATTISTA will use SAGA funding to enliven their neighborhood, building a large mosaic sculpture to be installed at the base of the Monroe Street hill in the Emerson-Garfield neighborhood. The sculpture will feature the sun, clouds and a rainbow, which the artists call “universal images of positivity and hope,” and will incorporate hundreds of tiles made by community members at free workshops. Musical duo THE SMOKES recently received funding to offer youth songwriting workshops, including an explanation of their songwriting process and a focus on improvisation and incorporating personal experiences into art.

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The funding source for the Spokane Arts Grant Awards is defined by ordinance: One-third of the city’s collected admissions tax each year is earmarked to support arts and culture activities. The admissions tax is collected at in-person, ticketed events, including many theater productions, concerts, movie theaters, festivals and other types of arts and entertainment. Beginning in 2016, when the city began investing a portion of that tax to create the SAGA program, collected admissions tax had been growing steadily each year, from 12 percent to 17 percent over the prior year. Then the pandemic hit, and in 2020, collected admissions taxes dropped by 55 percent. And in 2021, even as vaccines allowed certain events to resume, admissions tax collections were still down by nearly 20 percent In the world of literature, not one but two SAGA grantees were named as finalists for the 2022 Washington State Book Award: KATHRYN SMITH was nominated for her poetry collection Self-Portrait with Cephalopod while KATE LEBO’s The Book of Difficult Fruit took home the blue ribbon in the creative nonfiction category. Another grantee, CHELSEA MARTIN, published her novel Tell Me I’m An Artist, a project directly supported by SAGA funding, which received a starred review in Kirkus. Past SAGA grantee CHASE OGDEN’s documentary Super Frenchie, after a 2020 run on the festival circuit, recently had its national TV debut on Nat Geo. Spokane Tribe member RYAN ABRAHAMSON used SAGA funding to create a short film — a supernatural pre-colonial thriller, no less — filmed on tribal lands, in period costume, and with all dialogue in Salish. Strongest at the End of the World will debut at the Spokane International Film Festival, and Abrahamson hopes to gain enough momentum to produce a full-length feature. And photographer ARI NORDHAGEN is working on The Spokane Cookbook, which pairs interviews with local chefs, recipes and gorgeous photos to highlight the unique character of Spokane’s culinary heritage, with a focus on ingredients unique to the region. n Every SAGA grantee and their full project details can be found on Spokane Arts’ website, spokanearts.org. Melissa Huggins has served as the executive director of Spokane Arts since 2016.

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SEPTEMBER 22, 2022 INLANDER 7


Dr. Sam Schneider, the program director of Range Community Clinic, treats a patient in Fairfield, Wash. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

HEALTH

HOUSE CALL ON THE RANGE

With a roaming community clinic, WSU brings the family doctor directly to rural communities

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n many of the tight-knit farm towns and rural communities sprinkled throughout Washington, it’s difficult to find a doctor. Partly that’s because it’s hard for clinics to balance a budget when there’s a limited population of patients, particularly if many of them are insured by Medicaid or Medicare, which typically reimburse less than private insurance. With the nearest doctors sometimes an hour or more away, medical professionals say that aging populations and those limited by harvest and work schedules may put off routine visits as they struggle to access the care they need. Places may have primary care physicians, but not specialists such as eye doctors, dentists, pharmacists, cardiologists and psychiatrists. To assess the needs in some Inland Northwest communities, students from the Washington State University College of Nursing are in the midst of conducting interviews to see if pharmacies or doctors are available (they’re usually not), and which types of medical care people would like to see in their town. On trips to places like Sprague, population 511, a Columbia Basin town little more than a half hour drive

8 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL southwest of Spokane, they’ve heard anecdotes of how difficult it is to get to appointments. Some senior citizens say they’ve faked an injury to call an ambulance so they can get a ride to their doctor. In Fairfield, a town of 485 people about 40 minutes south of Spokane Valley on the Palouse, the closure of medical services in recent years left residents with no options for a simple doctor’s visit. Getting to the Valley or Spokane can require taking a full day off work, or prove difficult for transportation-limited senior citizens who live at an assisted-living facility in town. But since 2017, WSU’s health sciences schools — the Spokane-based colleges of medicine, nursing and pharmacy — have been hard at work building a nonprofit organization that can provide at least one solution: mobile health care. Known as the Range Community Clinic, the organization already has one mobile doctor’s office that can provide checkups, sports physicals, routine vaccinations, small wound care and more. With a doctor present and nursing students getting clinical practice, patients can show up to see if there’s walk-in availability or schedule an appointment before the clinic rolls into town, with

insurance getting billed just like other doctor’s offices. “Range Community Clinic is trying to fit into those places where those gaps exist and folks remain underserved,” says Jim Zimmerman, the chief operating officer for WSU’s College of Medicine and treasurer of Range’s board. “As we grow, and as we move out into the communities, there’ll be more things that the mobile units can provide, hopefully, along the lines of behavioral health and expansions of primary care into more pediatric and women’s health as well.”

FROM COVID TO SPORTS PHYSICALS

Although Range Community Clinic was founded in 2017, it took a few years to get a board of directors together, credential the medical personnel, build a doctor’s office on wheels and ensure electronic health records systems were in place, Zimmerman says. Just as the first mobile health unit was ready to roll out and start connecting with rural communities, the pandemic hit. So for much of the last two years, the unit was instead used to provide COVID testing and vaccinations in the Spokane area. ...continued on page 10


SEPTEMBER 22, 2022 INLANDER 9


NEWS | HEALTH “HOUSE CALL ON THE RANGE,” CONTINUED... But by February 2022, the focus shifted back to providing a broader suite of health care for patients and clinical training for students, with regular dates scheduled in places like Fairfield. Fairfield’s town clerk and treasurer, Cheryl Loeffler, and Mayor Jamie Paden say that the pandemic actually helped them connect with the mobile unit, as city leaders started contacting medical providers throughout the region to see if anyone could help with COVID vaccinations and testing. From there, they brainstormed how to bring more health care to town and partnered with Range. The need for local care is clear. Paden, who is also a volunteer emergency medical technician (EMT) with the local fire department, says they regularly get 911 calls for issues that could be addressed by having more medical options in town. “When you transport them, now you’re tying up your ambulance or EMTs for maybe a more emergent call that could be a field accident or something,” Paden says. “If they just had the basic health care here, they can drive here — we have a lot of elderly that can drive just here, but they can’t drive all the way to Spokane.” Some of those options are now getting better, as the Range Community Clinic has been visiting Fairfield roughly every other week since earlier this summer. Patients have appreciated the short walk or drive to the town’s community center to see a provider, Paden and Loeffler say. They’ve both been able to get shingles vaccinations at the mobile unit, and say that many parents in town have been able to bring their kids in after work for physicals to participate in school activities. “Right now we’re at twice a month,” Paden says. “In the future there’s a lot that can happen: virtual calls that EMTs could help facilitate … and we’ve got nurses here that are retired that we’ve talked about perhaps getting them involved in some way. We’re just continuing to try to brainstorm ways to keep health care in the community.”

TRUST, TIME AND MONEY

One of the best things the mobile unit can provide is the chance to build trust between patients and their providers, says Dr. Sam Schneider, the medical and program director for Range who was running the mobile unit in Fairfield on a recent Thursday afternoon with students Anna Syverson and Shreya Patel, both in their last semester of nursing school. “The vision of WSU is to build this network of health care where we are actually a part of the community, and people can rely on us and trust us that we’re going to be there,” Schneider says. Still, providing those services through the mobile unit is an expensive way to connect patients and providers, so they’re continuing to figure out how to keep things affordable for both sides, Schneider says. Affordability and access will ideally get patients to visit a doctor before their health issues worsen. “People out here work hard, they work long hours, they don’t have time to go see the doctor, so they don’t,” Schneider says. “That’s where you get these chronic disease problems — people who aren’t taking care of their blood pressure, their cholesterol, their diabetes, they’re just ignoring it, because they don’t really

A mobile doctor’s office brings medical care where people need it. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

MEET THE DOCTOR NEXT DOOR Together, the University of Washington and Gonzaga University are growing the next generation of health-care professionals, rooted in our community — and here to stay. Learn more: uw.edu/spokane

10 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

AMY EDDY, M.D. UW School of Medicine ’10 Internal Medicine Residency Director, Spokane Teaching Health Clinic


have the time or the resources to take care of it.” Syverson says she grew up in a small North Idaho town similar to the size of Fairfield, so getting the chance to help at the rural mobile clinic on top of her other clinical rotations is special. “Every time you come to a place like this, it’s a learning experience,” Syverson says. “It’s great to see that we’re really maximizing health care in different communities around us.” Range addresses a couple of goals for WSU’s health schools, says Zimmerman, the COO of WSU’s medical school. It provides education to students who need clinical practice, offers improved health care options to people around the state and creates opportunity for more research in rural areas. On the patient side, the clinic should also be able to offer better access to specialists, either through bringing providers directly to the patients, or providing referrals or even telehealth diagnoses through the mobile unit, with the help of medical school faculty who specialize in different areas. By next summer, the organization plans to start serving rural communities near WSU’s Tri-Cities location as well, he says. Another mobile clinic ordered before the pandemic has been delayed due to supply chain issues but will operate in that area, serving groups such as agricultural workers who may not speak English as their first language, Zimmerman says. WSU’s other major campuses in the state, and the extension offices that exist in every county, provide opportunities to offer more complex health care options from physical office locations, he says. “It may well be that over time we’re able to expand our operations to those campuses,” Zimmerman says. “The mobile unit has its place and allows us to get into communities … but for some things that are more sophisticated in nature, having the bricks-andmortar facility that’s properly outfitted is definitely necessary.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Heat Inequity

30th

Also, a construction moratorium; and misinformation about porn in Idaho

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new study shows that Spokane’s poorer neighborhoods are significantly hotter than the more affluent areas of the city. At its most extreme, there is a 13.9-degree difference between the pavement-heavy, poorer neighborhoods and the greener, richer ones. Overall, the hottest neighborhoods were Emerson/Garfield, West Central and downtown. Data was collected by volunteers who drove through the city with heat sensors mounted to their cars. The stark divide is caused by the “heat island effect,” a lack of green space and trees and an excess amount of asphalt and dense buildings, an urban phenomenon exacerbated by extreme events like the “heat dome” of summer 2021, which killed at least 20 people in Spokane. “One of the ways of thinking about it is as an environmental justice issue,” says Brian Henning, the director of Gonzaga University’s Center for Climate, Society and the Environment, which participated in the national study. Researchers are now working to gather data on community perceptions of extreme heat. You can take the survey at Gonzaga.edu/heatsurvey. (NATE SANFORD)

anniversary

tour

with special guest

sponge

OCT 13 2022

THURSDAY 7:30PM

SUNDAY

NOV 6, 2022

7:30PM

ALL NEW STAND UP TOUR

JAY LENO FRIDAY

NOV. 25, 2022

Spokane is pausing building new homes in Grandview/Thorpe.

7:30PM

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

BUILDING BAN

In order to update — and likely increase — development fees for new homes proposed along Highway 195, the Spokane City Council passed a six-month moratorium on new development in west Spokane in the area south of Interstate 90. The pause on new building permits in the Grandview/Thorpe and Latah/Hangman neighborhoods comes after neighbors and the state raised concerns about adequate transportation infrastructure in the area. There are limited access points in and out of those neighborhoods, and hundreds of new homes could significantly increase daily vehicle trips, especially without frequent or reliable transit. “Councils and administrations from the 1990s to 2000s knew that inadequate infrastructure in the area was a problem and did not act,” Councilwoman Lori Kinnear said in a statement after the 5-2 vote on Sept. 12. “This temporary moratorium is the first step towards completion of needed improvements.” A public hearing is scheduled for the Nov. 7 council meeting. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

AN APPALACHIAN CHRISTMAS WEDNESDAY

DEC 21, 2022 7:30PM

NAKED LIES

Last week, the right-wing activist group the Idaho Freedom Foundation made a stark, and false, claim that Idaho was offering something called “Porn Literacy” to primary and secondary public school students. The claim quickly went viral, showing up on major right-wing Twitter accounts like “Libs of Tik-Tok,” blogs like Red State, and even a segment on Laura Ingraham’s Fox News show. It wasn’t remotely true. While the company Idaho used for their middle and high school sex-ed curriculums, Education Training & Research Associates (ETR), did offer a free “porn literacy” webinar to teachers and parents to help them know how to answer tricky questions students might ask about porn, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare didn’t pay for it. More relevantly, there isn’t actually anything about pornography, at all, in Idaho’s actual curriculums from ETR. There is, however, a lot about abstinence. (DANIEL WALTERS) n

SATURDAY

MAY 6

2023 7:30PM

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NEWS | OUT OF REACH

Gavin Cooley (left) interviews a couple at Camp Hope.

CORNER BOOTH MEDIA

Houston, We Have a Problem Spokane’s former chief financial officer points the camera at Texas in a new series exploring the Inland Northwest’s homeless crisis BY NATE SANFORD

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14 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

oes Houston hold the answers to Spokane’s homeless crisis? According to a new video series hosted by Gavin Cooley, Spokane’s former chief financial officer, the answer is: maybe. The six-part series, called “Housing & Help,” is funded by the Spokane Low Income Housing Consortium. In the two, slickly produced episodes released so far, Cooley interviews an Eastern Washington University professor of social work and residents at Camp Hope, a 600-person homeless encampment in the East Central neighborhood, on land where houses were razed over the past two decades to make way for the north-south freeway’s interchange with I-90. In later episodes, Cooley pivots away from the roots of the problem and visits Houston to learn from the city’s success and see what might work for Spokane. Ben Stuckart, the executive director of the Low Income Housing Consortium and former city council president, started developing the idea for the series about a year ago. He’s been working on local homeless issues for several years now, including during his time at City Hall, and says he’s been frustrated by discussions that just keep going in circles. The video series, he hopes, will cut through the political jockeying, start a conversation and humanize the people at the center of the issue. “In these arguments it becomes ‘left’ and ‘right,’” Stuckart says. “You lose track of the fact that these are actual community members of ours that are on the streets and dying.” Homelessness, in other words, shouldn’t be a political issue. That’s why Stuckart chose Cooley as host. Cooley spent 18 years as the city’s CFO and served under five mayors, including the liberal Mary Verner and the conservative Jim West. He’s well-liked in the community and seen as politically neutral, Stuckart says. Cooley, who writes an occasional freelance opinion column for the Inlander and hosts the video series with a Rick Steves-esque curiosity, knows a lot about budgets, but acknowledges being a


novice when it comes to homeless issues. That was kind of the point, Cooley says. “I’m along for the journey every bit as much as every single person who might see one of these episodes,” Cooley says.

Live Lounge Entertainment

WHY HOUSTON?

Live Music is back at Coeur d’Alene Casino!

Houston is an outlier in America. Over the past decade, the nation’s fourth-largest city has managed to reduce its homeless population by 63 percent and move more than 25,000 people off the street and into apartments and houses. It’s a huge achievement that quickly caught the attention of the team behind “Housing & Help.” “Everything [was] leading to Houston,” says Frank Swoboda, president of Spokane’s Corner Booth Media, which produced the series. There’s a lot of national interest in Houston’s approach to homlessness and how it might be applied to other cities. A TikTok video of Cooley talking about the city’s homeless response went viral, and Spokane Mayor Nadine Woodward has spoken to her Houston counterpart about a potential trip in the near future. Houston’s achievement, Cooley says, comes down to the city’s ability to unite various entities and service providers and get them rowing in the same direction. Houston, like Spokane, has a strong mayor form of government. Houston’s mayor has used that executive power to bring the various entities together (with some initial resistance) and unite them under a single coalition. Spokane hasn’t done that. “It’s kind of a mess right now,” Cooley says. “Nobody is really communicating and working collaboratively.” Another big takeaway from Houston, Cooley says, is that the cost of not addressing homelessness is actually higher than the cost of doing something. Estimates vary, but leaders in Houston told Cooley that a single person living on the streets costs the city up to $96,000 a year, while a year of housing and wraparound services costs closer to $70,000.

Every weekend, you’ll find live music at the Nighthawk Lounge with local bands playing past midnight. For a more relaxed vibe earlier in the evening, choose the option of live acoustic music in the Chinook Lounge.

Theresa Edwards Band FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 RD & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 TH NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE 8:30 PM – 12:30 AM Enjoy the Theresa Edwards Band at the Nighthawk Lounge. A talented, upbeat, fun group playing a variety of dance music.

ONE SUPER AGENCY

Cooley says Spokane has what it takes to copy Houston’s approach — it’s just a matter of leadership. Stuckart, who ran unsuccessfully for mayor against Woodward in 2019, describes Spokane’s homelessness response as being pulled in different directions by eight entities all fighting for funding. He’s talking about the City Council, city administration, county commissioners, the city’s Continuum of Care services, and its Community, Housing and Human Services department, philanthropic organizations, business organizations, and the county’s Community Development Board. “None of them are on the same page,” Stuckart says. To follow Houston’s model, Stuckart says those entities would need to form one super agency, pool their money and give that agency sole authority for addressing the crisis. The organization would be run by experts who would make decisions on what to do with the money, Stuckart says. Houston’s approach to homelessness isn’t without its critics, and Stuckart and Cooley acknowledge that the city doesn’t hold all the answers. Home prices in Houston are also lower than in Spokane. Still, the team behind “Housing & Help” (housingandhelp.org) think Spokane can learn from Houston, and hope the series will inspire people to take collaboration seriously. Such collaboration, at least at this point, seems distant. In recent weeks, Spokane leaders and nonprofits have clashed over planned supportive housing in the West Hills, the legal status of Camp Hope and how to legally enforce the city’s sit-lie ordinance. As furious public meetings and threats of lawsuits escalate, 1,757 people (a likely undercount) continue to live on the streets. “Right now, everybody’s frustrated. Nobody’s coming together,” Cooley says. He’s optimistic but acknowledges the effort it will take to get Spokane to work together. The city is at a turning point, he says, and the time for action is now. n nates@inlander.com

Ed Shaw FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 RD & SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 24 TH CHINOOK LOUNGE 6 PM – 9:30 PM Ed Shaw performs hits by legends of country including Johnny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Hank Williams and many more.

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SEPTEMBER 22, 2022 INLANDER 15


Spokane author Lora Senf writes scary stories for kids. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

LITERATURE

MiddleGrade Spooks Local author Lora Senf introduces kids to horror writing through her debut novel, The Clackity BY MADISON PEARSON

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ike many, local author Lora Senf’s love for writing came from an intense enjoyment of reading in her childhood. Through the words of John Bellairs and Stephen King, Senf found her passion and admiration for a specific genre: horror. “As early as I realized an author was a thing you could be, I wanted to be one,” Senf says.

16 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 22, 2022


The Clackity, her new novel for middle-grade readers, takes place in Blight Harbor, the seventhmost haunted town in America, and follows Evie Von Rathe. Evie isn’t your regular horror protagonist. She outwardly shows her anxieties and doesn’t exactly see herself as the hero of Blight Harbor. During an upcoming book talk at Auntie’s, Senf plans to discuss her creative process, Evie, and the ghosts that inhabit Blight Harbor. “When I first started imagining Evie, I imagined her as a kid like myself,” Senf says. “She’s scared, but brave. I wanted her to be an authentic main character that kids could relate to.” After Evie’s parents mysteriously disappear, she moves to Blight Harbor to live with her grandmother Desdemona, the local expert on all things spooky and paranormal. Desdemona’s recent interest is staked in a local abandoned slaughterhouse, or abattoir, that sits on the edge of town. Then one day, Aunt Des mysteriously disappears, and Evie has a strong hunch of where her missing aunt might be. Despite Aunt Des’ wishes, Evie traverses the slaughterhouse, and it’s there that she meets The Clackity, a creature slinking in the shadows who talks exclusively in riddles. Our protagonist and the mysterious Clackity make a deal: Bring back the ghost of infamous serial killer John Jeffrey Pope and Evie can have her aunt back. The idea for The Clackity started with a text from Senf’s sister, an idea for an “otherworldly advice column.” The two joked back and forth for a day, but the idea never left Senf’s mind. Senf wrote the novel in between working her day job with Washington state’s Employment Securities Department and her duties as a wife and mother of twins. Her heart has always been in writing, and she often finds inspiration through her kids retelling stories from their dreams. Senf first came up with Aunt Desdemona’s character, and the rest followed shortly thereafter. While creating Blight Harbor in her mind, she took inspiration from Ray Bradbury’s characterization of small-town America and Stephen King’s fictional town, Castle Rock. Senf plans to create more books that take place in Blight Harbor, The Nighthouse Keeper and another, untitled work coming out in fall 2023 and fall 2024, respectively. “The abattoir is based on a building in Butte, Montana,” says Senf. “I saw it, fell in love with it and trespassed immediately. I’m absolutely convinced it’s haunted.”

“At this time I already had the seeds of The Clackity in my brain, so when I found that building I took that as my cue.”

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ccompanying Senf’s suspenseful writing, The Clackity also features moody illustrations by Chilean artist Alfredo Cáceres. Pages throughout the book are stamped with images of the ghoulish creatures that Evie encounters in the abattoir. The cover, also illustrated by Cáceres, features a Halloween color scheme of orange and black, and a haunted house, signaling to readers that they’re in for a scare. “When I saw his work, I was so moved by it,” says Senf. “It has this eerie whimsy about it that I loved. I also came to find out that he illustrated some of the Spanish editions of John Bellairs’ books. It felt right, such a fullcircle moment.”

YOUR LOCAL

NEIGHBORHOOD SHOPPING GUIDE

F

or some parents, handing their child a horror book may be daunting, but Senf explains that ageappropriate horror is essential reading material for early readers and that many middle-grade authors would agree that when writing a book, they enter into a contract with the kids and their parents. “It’s basically me saying that I’m going to take them on a scary journey,” she says. “But, in the end, it’ll be OK. Not perfect, but OK. I promise that to my readers and to their grownups.” With the recent rise of banned book discourse, Senf stresses that the only people who should tell kids what they can and cannot read are the kids and their adults. “It’s not the place of a school board or a politician to police what kids are reading,” she says. “We need to trust librarians and teachers to know what is age-appropriate for kids. Of course, kids need guidance. But I trust kids to stop when they feel it’s right.” Horror as a genre has been around since ancient times, and it’s not going anywhere soon. Writers like Stephen King and Dean Koontz keep the genre alive for an adult audience, but Senf is hell-bent on starting them young and creating the next generation of thrill seekers. “Let kids explore by reading,” she says. “Scary books are a place for them to practice being brave.” n Lora Senf: The Clackity • Sat, Sept. 24 at 5:30 pm • Free; reservations requested • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main Ave • auntiesbooks. com • 509-838-0206

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CALL (509) 358-7751 • labs.wsu.edu/sprc/ SEPTEMBER 22, 2022 INLANDER 17


CULTURE | DIGEST

BETTER CALL SAURON

THE BUZZ BIN

What Saul Goodman can teach Westeros and Middle Earth about prequel television

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BY DANIEL WALTERS

o begin with, the writers of The Rings of Power and House of the Dragon had a huge problem. They’re prequels. And anytime you write a prequel, especially prequels to two of the most famous fantasy series of all time — The Lord of the Rings and Game of Thrones — you have an inherent problem: You start with your ending already written. Even setting a series hundreds or thousands of years before your original series doesn’t get away from the spoiler issues. We already know Targaryens go crazy — it’s in their incest-addled blood. We already know that Galadriel and Elrond end up chilling with Bilbo and Frodo at the Grey Havens. They obviously don’t die or turn permanently evil. There’s this fallacy out there that making great TV is all about having a plan, having an endpoint in mind, and gradually working your way toward it by hitting a preplanned plot outline. But most experienced TV writers — and critics — know the opposite is true. Great TV writing rooms, like on shows like Breaking Bad, are agile. They see what isn’t working, and they fix it. They realize one plotline is dragging — like the silent Salamanca cousins stalking teacher-turned-meth-chef Walter White, and they cut it short. They see what is working, and they decide, “Hey, maybe we shouldn’t kill this Jesse Pinkman fellow off so quickly.” By already having the major plotlines etched into stone — literal stone in the case of some fantasy epics — you take away that power. The Breaking Bad prequel, Better Call Saul, which just finished its run brilliantly this year, showcased both the peril of prequel television and the prescription for fixing it. Turning the tale of Breaking Bad’s con-artist attorney into a full series seemed like a loser move. And yet, Better Call Saul was, in many moments, better

than Breaking Bad. Gus Fring and Mike Ehrmantraut both begin Better Call Saul as the same characters they were in Breaking Bad. They begin Better Call Saul as serious, hypercompetent and morally compromised, and they finish their stints on Breaking Bad as serious, hypercompetent and morally compromised. They’re treading water. We get to see exactly how Gus Fring built his meth superlab, but we’re just filling in backstories. And backstories don’t have the same capacity to surprise as front-stories. Yet, Saul Goodman was different. How do you make the backstory of Saul Goodman, a shady, scama-minute lawyer, surprising? To start with, don’t make it about Saul Goodman. Make it about Jimmy McGill, the flesh and blood beneath Saul Goodman’s veneer of zany sleaze. And instead of having him “break bad” right away, have him go the other direction initially — show him becoming a better person. Give him a contemptuous brother with whom he has a complicated relationship. Give him a love interest whose fate was never mentioned in Breaking Bad. Make them all their own characters as deep — or even deeper — than any character in Breaking Bad. In other words, turn it less into a prequel — explaining how Han Solo got his name, or where Indy got his hat — and much more into a spinoff. Take Frasier from Cheers, give him a family and friends, and turn him into Frasier from Frasier. Best of all, at the end, skip beyond the original story of Breaking Bad and show what happens to Saul. Show the full-arc tragedy and even a kind of redemption for the characters involved. And if we’re going to care about Teen Elrond or Proto-Daenerys, The Rings of Power and House of the Dragon need to pull a similar move. n

Better Call Saul sets a high bar for prequel TV series.

ART FOR ALL Few things in life are actually free, but there is a new art gallery in Coeur d’Alene with an ever-rotating display of art … all free! Patterned after the “little free library,” the LITTLE FREE ART GALLERY is a small, glass-windowed cabinet mounted on a pedestal that remains unlocked, allowing anyone to put in or take out an artwork. And people have. Since it was created and installed this summer by Coeur d’Alene Arts and Culture Alliance’s Abby Light, the gallery has seen quite a few visitors. What’s on display now? Find out on Facebook at CDA.ArtsAlliance or pop over to the gallery at Sixth Street and Garden Avenue anytime because this art exhibition, funded by Idaho Community Foundation’s Project Neighborly grant, is always open and open to all. (CARRIE SCOZZARO) KUDOS, KATE Serendipitously timed with the story she wrote for last week’s cover on the regional Indigenous tradition of spring’s camas root dig, Spokane writer Kate Lebo won some prestigious recognition for her latest book, The Book of Difficult Fruit. The collection of stories, essays and recipes centered on inedible, ugly and/or invasive fruit — such as the stinky durian, bitter quince and superfruit aronia — was selected as the winner of the WASHINGTON STATE BOOK AWARDS’ prize in creative nonfiction. Notably, The Book of Difficult Fruit is also this year’s title for Spokane Is Reading, the free communitywide literacy event on Oct. 26, organized by Spokane Public Library, Spokane County Library District and Aunties’s Bookstore. (CHEY SCOTT) THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Noteworthy new music arriving in stores and online Sept. 23: MAYA HAWKE, MOSS. The Stranger Things star (and daughter of Ethan Hawke and Uma Thurman) proves herself to be a true multi-hyphenate with a feathery voice on her second indie folk singer-songwriter album. WILLOW, <COPINGMECHANISM>. Speaking of famous offspring, Willow Smith (daughter of Will and Jada Pinkett) continues her transformation into a pop punker on her fifth LP. DR. JOHN, THINGS HAPPEN THAT WAY. The New Orleans blues legend gets a final, posthumous album featuring collaborations with the likes of Willie Nelson and Aaron Neville, plus some Hank Williams covers. (SETH SOMMERFELD)

18 INLANDER


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CULTURE | EXHIBIT

How to use THIS

PULL-OUT SECTION

Pull out and down

Never Forget Holocaust exhibit travels from D.C. to Gonzaga, sharing how xenophobia, isolationism and bureaucracy affected America’s response to genocide BY SAMANTHA HOLM

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he “Americans and the Holocaust” exhibition tells two stories. The first is a harrowing one with which we are all too familiar: The systematic persecution and extermination of European Jews by Nazi Germany and its allies, which resulted in the murder of 6 million people between 1933 and 1945. In the second, less-known story, America’s bureaucratic incompetence and all-consuming fear of outsiders led to a glaring disconnect between the country’s disapproval of the Nazi treatment of Jews and its desire to act. This moral stalemate rendered America largely ineffective in responding to requests for help from Jewish people. The exhibition, currently displayed in the Rare Reading Room on the third floor of Gonzaga University’s Foley Library, asks audiences to critically examine the documents presented, as well as their own preconceived notions about America’s response to the Holocaust. The exhibition contains four distinct

20 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

“Americans and the Holocaust” is on display through Oct. 6. sections, which chronicle American history leading into the Holocaust and then World War II. These sections contain primary source materials that demonstrate America’s awareness of the Holocaust and unfortunate lack of action. One 1938 newspaper article from the Los Angeles Examiner sticks out, with the headline “Nazis warn world Jews will be wiped out unless evacuated by democracies.” “You sort of expect people to go through in a very passive manner, and they really haven’t,” says Dustin Gomez, program assistant at Foley Library. “They’re really engaging with the ideas and having conversations.” The exhibition was originally created in 2018 and is permanently housed at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. In a continued effort to educate a wider audience about the Holocaust, the museum, in collaboration with the American Library Association, sponsored the creation and transportation of the 1,100-square-foot traveling exhibition to 50 U.S. libraries. According to Brad Matthies, associate dean of Gonzaga University’s Foley Library Center, the application process to host the exhibit was rigorous. When he reviewed the application back in 2019, Matthies said the most important question he needed to answer was, “Do we have a good network?” As it turns out, due to Gonzaga University’s community outreach efforts through groups like the Jewish Bulldogs and the Center for the Study of Hate, as well as contacts established by library Dean Paul Bracke, many organizations were ready to submit glowing reference letters on the Foley Library’s behalf. In total, about 20 organizations endorsed the library, including local synagogues, on-campus departments and human rights groups. Out of 250 public and academic libraries that applied, Foley Library was one of 50 selected to host the exhibition. Matthies was elated.

CHIANA McINELLY PHOTO

“I actually got the announcement when I was at a doctor’s appointment,” he recalls. Unfortunately, shortly after the Foley Library was awarded the traveling exhibit, Gonzaga’s campus shut down due to COVID. Matthies says this happened the day after he and his colleagues had finished setting up the exhibition, which was “devastating.” The exhibition sat untouched for three months before a small crew could go in and pack up the materials to send back to D.C. Matthies says during the height of COVID, he and his colleagues went to work strengthening relationships with various partners, including the Holocaust Center for Humanity in Seattle. These efforts culminated into a panel discussion held on Sept. 8 with Holocaust survivor and Spokane resident Carla Peperzak, now 98, as the keynote speaker. As a teenager, she aided the Dutch resistance by hiding fellow Jews and forging identity cards so members of the Jewish community could go undetected by Nazi officers. Peperzak is committed to sharing her experience as a member of the Holocaust Center for Humanity’s Speakers Bureau. The panel discussion, “Remembering Our Past to Inform Our Future,” drew upon Peperzak’s example of bravery and called upon the audience to stand firm against hatred. Vanessa Waldref, U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Washington, spoke at the event, declaring that when it comes to acts of hate, “reporting is critical.” In light of the prevalence of hate acts, Matthies encourages audiences to “engage with [the exhibition] and apply it to some of the hate and rhetoric that we’re seeing today.” n Americans and the Holocaust • Through Oct. 6, open Mon-Tue, Thu-Sun from 1-5 pm; Wed from 3-7 pm • Free • Gonzaga University Foley Library, third floor • gonzaga.edu/foley-library • 509-313-6533

NOT a beer.

NOT toast. YES a resource you keep and share with friends.

Now you know how!

PULL-OUT & KEEP! FALL ARTS 2022


WORDS THEATER VISUAL ARTS MUSIC CULTURE

FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 1


Join from the biggest show in town. Join anywhere, anytime. While enjoying Best of Broadway, you can join the region’s most loved credit union in minutes – during intermission of course. Your money and community will thank you. Join for free at stcu.org/join. Insured by NCUA.

2 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022


THE CENTER FOR CHILDREN’S BOOK ARTS WSU VISITING WRITERS . SPOKANE IS READING PAGE 6

A Triumphant Return

THE CIVIC’S PLAYWRIGHT-IN-RESIDENCE ACCORDING TO COYOTE . THE BOOK OF MORMON PAGE 12

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all it a comeback. A return to the “before” times. After two long years, the local arts scene appears to be back in full force, with a truly massive slate of events, from classical music to live theater, art and museum exhibitions to comedy shows, author readings, and much more. In this year’s Fall Arts issue, we’ve put together a jampacked, 13-week calendar of events with all this and then some, as well as staff-curated event previews and profiles on some major movers and shakers in the community. Meet the Spokane Civic Theatre’s playwright-inresidence, Bryan Harnetiaux, who over the course of four decades and counting has written and staged numerous original works there, including a new title this fall. We also chatted with all three of the Spokane Symphony’s living music directors, past and present, ahead of the orchestra’s 75th season, for which each is conducting a concert for its Masterworks concert series. Also get the scoop on the return of Terrain, one of the region’s most anticipated fall highlights, and get caught up on some of the region’s newest public art pieces. Finally, meet a new nonprofit that’s working to get quality children’s literature into the hands and homes of all Inland Northwest families. We’re so glad the creative community is “back,” having picked up the pieces of an unprecedented global disaster and persevered in a way few can without losing hope. So many of us were lost without in-person arts interaction, which — we now know all too well — is not something that can be replaced. So, dear readers, make sure to get out there this fall and show your support! The arts are back! — CHEY SCOTT Inlander Arts and Culture Editor

ON THE COVER:

Vincent De Felice's “Love Birds” at Manito Park Photo by Erick Doxey

EDITOR CHEY SCOTT

CREATIVE DIRECTOR DEREK HARRISON

CALENDAR EDITOR MADISON PEARSON

REGIONAL PUBLIC ART . KATIE CREYTS: TRAPPINGS MEL McCUDDIN AT THE ART SPIRIT GALLERY PAGE 20

CONTRIBUTORS E.J. IANNELLI SUMMER SANDSTROM CARRIE SCOZZARO SETH SOMMERFELD

SPOKANE SYMPHONY CONDUCTORS MATT MITCHELL . MODEST MOUSE PAGE 26

TERRAIN’S FLAGSHIP EVENT RETURNS SPOKANE ARTS AWARDS . BLUE MAN GROUP PAGE 32

EVENTS AROUND THE INLAND NORTHWEST THROUGH DEC. 31

PAGE 36

FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 3


4 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022


FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 5


WORDS

By the Book

Ashley Reese hopes to connect all kids to high-quality books. ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

The Center for Children’s Book Arts aims to increase kids’ access to high-quality picture books and literature

T

hink back to a time, perhaps long ago, when you were a child. What books were your favorite? Was it a classic bedtime story, like Goodnight Moon, with its vivid, monochromatic artwork and memorable rhymes? Maybe it was a magical chapter book series, like Harry Potter or A Series of Unfortunate Events? Perhaps something timeless and whimsical from Dr. Suess or Richard Scarry, Beatrix Potter’s beloved anthropomorphic animal adventures, or Eric Carle’s colorful, layered collages? Whether we knew it at the time or not, books such as these were quietly shaping and molding our young minds, sparking interests and spurring creativity. They’re the kind of stories that, for good reason, stick with us long after the last page was turned. Making sure local kids have access to quality books that inspire and inform through exquisite illustrations and enduring tales is the focus of a new local nonprofit, the Center for Children’s Book Arts. Founded in 2021 by local literacy educator Ashley Reese, the center operates a small bookstore on North Monroe Street, where it also hosts art- and book-related workshops for adults and children. The physical location,

6 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

BY CHEY SCOTT a space shared with the Terrain Gallery’s new home, opened this spring. Before that, Reese was mainly operating the center as a pop-up via its “Book Bus” and hosting workshops at other venues. While Reese acknowledges that public libraries certainly help increase kids’ access to books, the center aims to make book ownership a possibility for low-income families. “With the library, there’s not that sense of ownership of this sense of ‘This belongs to me, and this is part of my childhood culture, and we can come back to this over and over again as a family,’” she says. “I’ve taught internationally and locally, and have consistently seen the power of high-quality literature and art on engagement with students,” Reese adds. “And, just in researching best practices in literacy, it has consistently come up that a high-quality home library is the number one predictor of academic success in students.”

W

hile families can walk in off the street and browse for books on the shelves of the center’s cozy, library-like space, Reese’s hope is that customers sign up for a membership, modeled like a book subscription service. Memberships are offered in tiers, and include one

($16), two ($30) or three ($44) book credits a month, which allow customers to pick anything from the center’s inventory (with some minor limitations) each month. Reese says the price for books with a membership can be up to 30 percent off the cover price. Supporters can also sponsor memberships for low-income students ($18 a month or $108 for six months) who are nominated for the scholarship program by teachers. The center’s website (theccba.org) includes an online storefront for people to browse what’s in stock, and to place orders for pickup or shipping. Memberships can be started or stopped at any time. One main difference between the Center for Children’s Book Arts and other programs that seek to get more literature into the hands of kids, is the thoughtful curation of its inventory, Reese explains. “We’re trying to consider how to facilitate that in a way where books can be highly curated and selected, but still accessible to lower income families,” Reese says. “Most programs that get books into homes are usually looking at lower print quality, or lower-quality of even writing and art or illustration, and then you’re certainly not looking at hardcover, so usually those books just don’t last.” ...continued on page 8


FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 7


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“BY THE BOOK,” CONTINUED... For parents who want to ensure their kids are accessing some of the best in children’s literature available today, the center makes it easy. “At a library, you’re going to have access to almost every children’s book that is coming out, or that’s being published at the time,” Reese says. “And although you can sort through them, unless you have an eye for discerning what is considered good literature, it’s going to be hard to select for that. “The way we select our books, we ask ourselves, ‘Can this stand the test of time and be considered an heirloom quality text?’” she continues. “Both in its construction, if it’s hardcover, and in its themes and also its composition. And books that parents will want to keep around and out and available in their homes.” Reese looks for titles with diverse characters and multicultural stories, books that teach kids about history or the importance of being kind to others, popular series both new and old, and awardwinning authors and illustrators. Many titles at the center are translations of foreign-language books. And, when it comes to books that challenge societal norms or teach kids about sensitive or difficult subject matter, Reese seeks tastefully written titles that “normalize something in a way that it’s just kind of a matter of fact of society or humans, rather than something that’s so different it has to be shouted at me.” As a mother of two adopted daughters who are Black, she says it’s also important to her that books in the center have a diverse range of characters, so kids of all backgrounds, cultures and identities can connect with literature. “I’m so grateful they’re being raised in this time when there is a lot more access and awareness about having diverse literature,” she says.

2ND ANNUAL CHILDREN’S BOOK ARTS FAIR Sat, Oct. 1 from noon-4 pm Includes free workshops, live music, vendors, ice cream from The Scoop, the center’s Book Bus and more.

I

n addition to connecting readers with heirloom-quality books, the center hosts workshops for kids and adults. Tucked back behind shelves filled with colorful book covers and spines — a space that’s truly a bookworm’s dream — is a small studio that’s already hosted several sessions on topics such as printmaking, bookbinding, papermaking, hand lettering and more. These workshops are taught by local artists, and most are free to the public (a donation of $15-$35 is requested from those who can afford to contribute). A series for adults called “Create + Hydrate” has proven popular so far, Reese says, and is modeled after paint-and-sip classes, with wine or other beverages served while attendees work on the featured activity. As the center establishes itself as a literary hub for all, Reese says volunteers are needed to help run the storefront during regular hours, along with artists (who are paid for their time, thanks to grant funding) to collaborate and teach workshops. She hopes more families see value in signing up for a membership. Her goal is to have 200 active accounts by the end of the year. “It’s always interesting to see what kids select when they’re in here,” Reese says. “You get a different experience when you get to come in and browse and feel [a book].” n

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8 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

The Center for Children’s Book Arts • 628 N. Monroe St. • Open Fri-Sat 10 am-6 pm • theccba.org


OCT. 26

AN EVENING WITH REGINALD DWAYNE BETTS

OCT. 4, OCT. 25

WSU VISITING WRITERS SERIES: ROGER REEVES, SAM ROXAS-CHUA

The English department at Washington State University has two wordsmiths of note on its fall Visiting Writers Series lineup. First up, on Oct. 4, is poet Roger Reeves, whose award-winning work has been widely published in esteemed journals such as Tin House, American Poetry Review and others. Currently teaching at University of Texas at Austin, Reeves’ poetry largely explores the intersection of politics, aesthetics and race. Weeks later, the series hosts Sam Roxas-Chua, a transracial, transcultural and multidisciplinary artist who writes poetry and prose, makes multimedia art, has a podcast (Dear Someone Somewhere) and more. Roxas-Chua is currently artist in residence at Portland’s Chinatown Museum, and for his WSU stop he’s presenting at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art. Washington State University Pullman (also livestreamed on YouTube), Oct. 4 at 6 pm; Oct. 25 at 5 pm, free, english.wsu.edu/visiting-writers (CHEY SCOTT)

Lucky for most of us, you don’t have to be a local university student to take advantage of the myriad opportunities for artistic and cultural exposure and discourse, like that which is part of Gonzaga University’s annual Visiting Writers Series. Joining the series’ roster of past illustrious guests is Reginald Dwayne Betts, who went from a 16-year-old who was sentenced to nine years in prison to a Yale Law School graduate and award-winning poet with three published collections. Betts is also a Guggenheim Fellow and PEN New England Award winner, and founder of the nonprofit Freedom Reads, which seeks to increase access to literature inside prisons. Gonzaga University Hemmingson Ballroom, 7:30 pm, free, gonzaga.edu (CS)

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OCT. 8

TEDxSPOKANE

This year marks the 11th year anniversary of TEDxSpokane’s sharing of stories and elevating ideas from local community members to the public. This year, 10 speakers are taking the stage to share their passions and stories of metamorphosis with the audience. This year’s lineup is discussing the importance of things like nature and food in our personal lives and in community growth, the housing crisis, how grief can lead to growth, financial advice, and much more. Not only will you learn a variety of new things from this year’s event, you’ll walk out feeling a new sense of inspiration. Bing Crosby Theater, $21.49-$29.97, 6:30 pm, all ages, tedxspokane.com (SUMMER SANDSTROM)

OCT. 26

SPOKANE IS READING: KATE LEBO

Spokane’s Only Art House Theater

Bookworms everywhere, rejoice! Local author Kate Lebo’s The Book of Difficult Fruit was chosen as the 2022 Spokane Is Reading community-wide read. This unique book — which also just won the Washington State Book Award in creative nonfiction — contains 26 essays focused on the “difficult fruits” in question. The fruits take readers on unexpected turns and give insight into relationships and self-care. Grab a copy, plus another for a friend, and head to the North Spokane Library (1 pm) or the Central Library (7 pm) to hear Lebo talk about the book and discuss it with like-minded book lovers. North Spokane and Central Libraries, free, spokaneisreading.org (MADISON PEARSON)

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OCT. 21

BEDTIME STORIES: JESS WALTER

Hearing one of your favorite authors read his/her/their own work feels like you’re getting the inside track. That’s one of the benefits of Humanities Washington’s annual Bedtime Stories program featuring Northwest-area authors. This year’s event is in person at Riverside Place and has Spokane’s own Jess Walter reading one of his original stories on the theme of “Light in the Dark.” The other benefit of this program is that it raises funds for Humanities Washington, which means the continuation of such events in the future, all across Washington state. Riverside Place, 6 pm, $150, humanities.org (CARRIE SCOZZARO)

EVERYBODY READS: THE BEADWORKERS BY BETH PIATOTE

Get involved with another of the biggest community book clubs in the region and check out this year’s pick for Everybody Reads: The Beadworkers by Beth Piatote. A debut collection centered on Native experiences in the Northwest, Piatote’s mixed-genre storytelling in The Beadworkers explores themes of kinship, longing and the complexity of Native life in modern America. This year’s title also helps kick off the start of Native American Heritage Month for November. Piatote, who’s of Nez Perce heritage and an enrolled member of the Colville Confederated Tribes, meets with readers across the Palouse during a series of eight public events, with stops in Colfax, Pullman and Moscow. Locations and times vary, free, everybody-reads.org (CS)

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FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 9


WORDS NOV. 2

DIAMONDS IN THE ROUGH: THE GENTRIFICATION OF RURAL WASHINGTON

NOV. 19

Experts have recently identified a concerning trend relating to wealth inequality in rural areas: As more and more wealthy, former urbanites flee fast-paced life and city chaos for the peace and calm of country living, new problems caused by “class blindness” are popping up. Learn more about the pros and cons of America’s urban exodus, and why it matters, during a talk with Jennifer Sherman, professor of sociology at Washington State University. The event is co-hosted by WSU’s Thomas Foley Institute for Public Policy and Public Service, Humanities Washington, and the Spokane County Library District. Location and time TBA, free, humanities.org (CS)

NOV. 7

TRAVIS BALDREE: LEGENDS & LATTES

You might know Travis Baldree as the audiobook narrator behind Will Wight’s Cradle series. Or perhaps from his TikTok videos. Either way, Baldree’s debut novel is the wholesome D&D-esque fantasy that you didn’t know you needed. The book’s protagonist, a barbarian orc named Viv, is hanging up her sword after years of bloodshed in order to open her own coffee shop. She embarks on a new journey to realize her full potential and learn a bit about herself along the way. Meet with Baldree and celebrate this new novel of high fantasy and low stakes. Auntie’s Bookstore, 7 pm, free, auntiesbooks.com (MP)

10 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

AN EVENING WITH DAVID SEDARIS

Humor and wit are great cures for the pains that can be brought on by the chaos of everyday life, and that’s what to expect while spending a night listening to best-selling author and comedian David Sedaris. He’s written a wide variety of books, plays, short stories and more — familiar titles include the play Santaland Diaries and the short-story collection Me Talk Pretty One Day — and uses his satirical humor to analyze the human condition and current issues in a way that will brighten any day. The Bing Crosby Theater, 8 pm, $40.50-$50, bingcrosbytheater.com (SSa)

Master of satire David Sedaris makes an appearance at the Bing Nov. 19.

NOV. 16

POETRY RISING: FRANKIE GHEE, ELLICIA JONES, STEPHEN PITTERS Join the Spokane Public Library in highlighting the talent of the region’s poets and musicians at the next installment of its Poetry Rising series. The evening features poetry from three artists, each of whom bring their own unique perspective to their art. Expect a range of original and acoustic music from Frankie Ghee, prose from Ellicia Jones, and poetry from Stephen Pitters, the host of “The Spokane Open Poetry Program” on KYRS radio. Shadle Park Library, 6 pm, free, all ages, events.spokanelibrary.org (SSa)

DEC. 14

NICOLE EUSTACE: COVERED WITH NIGHT

Many acts of violence and brutality that occured in early colonial America against Indigenous peoples had a large influence on the definition of justice in early America. Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Nicole Eustace’s book Covered with Night: A Story of Murder and Indigenous Justice in Early America goes in depth about one story that started a series of cross-cultural negotiations and investigations that challenged prior forms of justice. Eustace’s talk is just one of many in this new, virtual author talk series hosted by the Spokane County Library District; find the full schedule at the following link. Online, 9 am, free, libraryc.org/scld (SSa) n


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THEATER

STILL IN PLAY

After 40 years as the Civic’s playwright-in-residence, Bryan Harnetiaux continues to turn out new work BY E.J. IANNELLI

I

n the theater world, playwrights-in-residence are writers who commit themselves to a particular venue for a set period of time. It’s intended to be a symbiotic relationship, with the theater giving the playwright access to the resources needed to bring a script to the stage, and the playwright ideally using that fertile environment to provide the theater with fresh and exciting work. Typically, resident playwrights have a term of a season or two. But there are exceptions. Some can last a few years. Or, in Bryan Harnetiaux’s case, four decades. Harnetiaux’s involvement with the Spokane Civic Theatre started when the organization itself was, in his own words, “the biggest game in town,” yet still young by institutional standards. He had moved to Spokane from the Los Angeles area to attend Gonzaga in 1965; and in 1973, having wrapped up his law degree, he decided to audition for The Importance of Being Earnest. The director, incidentally, was Margot Ogden, to whom, along with her husband, Robert, the Civic’s main auditorium is now dedicated. “It was after night school, and I had all these free evenings. So I just came down and tried out for a play,” Harnetiaux says. Roles in Bus Stop and A Thousand Clowns followed. He became the recurring narrator for the Civic’s regular production of A Christmas Carol. “Other than that, I proclaim no real acting skills. It’s just kind of one person’s community theater journey. But it ignited my writing,” he says. By June 1977, Harnetiaux had a one-act play of his

12 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

staged “downstairs” — shorthand for the experimental basement room with “penitential seats,” as described by local critic Mike Siconolfi — that would eventually, with Harnetiaux’s help, become the Civic’s proper Studio Theater. Over the next three years, several more of his short plays were staged there. Then, in 1980, his full-length comedy Dumb Luck got the main stage treatment. Eager to promote their homegrown dramatic talent, the Civic brought in a big-league critic who wrote reviews for United Press International. “He just blasted me. I was devastated. But it was straightforward, and it was valid,” Harnetiaux says. In response to the negative press, Harnetiaux’s circle of champions hired local film critic Bob Glatzer to write a second review of Dumb Luck with “maybe a little better hometown perspective.” “And Bob blasted me, too,” he laughs. “So that’s how my career upstairs started.” Humbled but undaunted, Harnetiaux pressed on with writing new work for the evolving studio space. “In ’82, I made the decision to leave the full-time practice of law so that I could write more. And, as it happens, I stumbled into an academic law practice that allowed me to spend much more time writing,” he says. That same year, Civic executive director Betty Tomlinson took him out for a fortuitous lunch. “Out of the blue, she says to me, ‘How would you like to be playwright-in-residence?’ And there’s never been a shred of paper about what that means, but it

was loosely understood that if I had something ready to mount, I could develop it here — at least downstairs if not upstairs,” he says. The plays that Harnetiaux went on to develop would result in life-altering collaborations and even national recognition. In 1998, there was National Pastime, which recounts Jackie Robinson’s historic rupture of Major League Baseball’s color line some 50 years earlier. The play was ultimately selected out of more than a thousand by Jim and Lissa Reynolds’ then-relatively new Fremont Centre Theatre in Robinson’s (and Harnetiaux’s) childhood stomping ground of Pasadena, California. Local teacher and actor David Casteal, who starred as Robinson in the Civic’s initial run of National Pastime, would then co-develop York with Harnetiaux in 2004. York is a one-man play about the only black explorer among Lewis and Clark’s 40-member Corps of Discovery. Harnetiaux wrote the script; Casteal created the Djembe drum rhythms that drive the story. The play brought the duo to cities like Portland, San Antonio and New York. During all this, Harnetiaux had also been working on a cycle of end-of-life plays. Holding On, Letting Go appeared in 2012 to complete that trilogy that also included Vesta (1996) and Dusk (2007). Originally written for members of Spokane’s pioneering all-black Onyx Theater Troupe, Holding On, Letting Go was selected and featured as a main stage production at the National Black Theatre Festival in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, the following year.


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or his 40th year in residence and the Civic’s 75th anniversary, Harnetiaux is back in the theater’s familiar Firth J. Chew Studio to debut his latest work, Exile, which has “been sitting in drydock,” he says, while waiting for COVID to pass. Featuring a cast of six, the play was inspired by his thoughts after attending his 50th high school reunion. “It’s about a son, 40 years later, returning to his hometown and reuniting with his sister and reexamining their childhood. So it’s a family drama, and it’s a bit of a ghost story. There are two nonspeaking parts who are ‘presences’ throughout the play,” he says. Veteran actor Jerry Sciarrio is directing this inaugural run. Along with Exile, the Civic also aims to produce National Pastime later this season. That planned 2023 revival coincides with the 75th anniversary of Robinson’s landmark desegregation achievement — which, according to one 1947 poll, put Robinson behind only Spokane’s own Bing Crosby as the most popular man in the country. New York-based writer, director and producer Pat Golden is slated to direct. As he contemplates the debuts and revivals scheduled for this season, what causes Harnetiaux to marvel isn’t the longevity of his tenure. It’s the fact that the opportunity even existed in the first place. “It’s unusual for a community theater to have a playwright-inresidence. That’s why I’ve always felt such gratitude for that. The hardest thing for a playwright is to find a home for their work,” he says. And 40 years on, he still can’t quite believe his luck. “Every time I look at a program, I check to see if I’m still listed.” n

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THEATER

Stage Left's 2022-23 season opened with Admissions. COURTESY PHOTO

SEPT. 23-OCT. 16

THROUGH OCT. 2

ADMISSIONS

Sherri Rosen-Mason is the head of the admissions department at a New England boarding school. Over the past 15 years, and with the support of her husband, Tom, who also just happens to be the headmaster, she’s succeeded in increasing the school’s diversity quotient to 18 percent from 6 percent. But their well-intentioned efforts in the name of affirmative action come under question when their high-achieving son Charlie doesn’t make the cut for Yale — even though his biracial best friend does. Susan Hardie directs this awardwinning social satire by Joshua Harmon. Stage Left Theater, $25, Thu-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm, stagelefttheater.org (E.J. IANNELLI)

SIGNIFICANT OTHER

OCT. 10, OCT. 16, OCT. 28-NOV. 4

If Stage Left’s Admissions leaves you craving more from playwright Joshua Harmon, you don’t have to wait long or even walk very far. Harmon’s Significant Other, a very different play that met with equal critical acclaim, centers on young Jordan Berman watching his close circle of single friends start to pair off and settle down. As Jordan laments how much his daily reality deviates from the life he’d imagined for himself, his sense of dissatisfaction is amplified by his impossible crush on the office hunk. Sarah Dahmen directs. Spokane Civic Theatre, $25, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm, spokanecivictheatre.com (EJI)

ACCORDING TO COYOTE

In Native American lore, Coyote is a wily, smooth-talking trickster who also sometimes gets tricked himself. And the outcome of those adventures has had profound effects on the world as we know it. Nez Perce actor Kellen Lewis reenacts the mythology of Coyote through music, dance and theatrics in this one-man show by John Kaufmann. Directed by Josephine Keefe, the playwright’s niece, this production by Spokane Ensemble Theatre is presented in partnership with One Heart Native Arts and Film Festival and Red Eagle Soaring. Locations and prices vary, details at spokaneensembletheatre.com (EJI)

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OCT. 28-30

LEAP OF FAITH

Self-styled “Reverend” Jonas Nightingale’s bus breaks down in a rural Kansas town. He decides to spin the misfortune in his favor by holding a classic tent revival that just happens to bilk the townspeople out of their hard-earned cash. But local Sheriff Marla McGowan is wise to this con man’s ploy, and she’s not having any of it. The catch is that neither of them planned on falling in love with each other. This rollicking musical features charts by Alan Menken (Beauty and the Beast, The Little Mermaid). Aspire Community Theatre, $19-$28, showtimes TBD, aspirecda.com (EJI)

The Book of Mormon has been to Spokane twice already — in 2014 and 2016. It was supposed to return again in 2020, but by now we’re all too familiar with the reason it didn’t. More than two years after that cancellation, the nationally touring production of this irreverent comedy musical is finally back on the bill. You’ll have three days to catch this satirical story about LDS missionaries and their misguided attempts to convert a Ugandan village. First Interstate Center for the Performing Arts, $60-$120, showtimes vary, bestofbroadwayspokane.com (EJI)

OCT. 28-NOV. 19

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW

OCT. 20-30

GUYS AND DOLLS

THE BOOK OF MORMON

Guys and Dolls has been a cornerstone of musical theater since its Broadway premiere in 1950. Set in New York’s “classic” 1920s gangster era, its tale of wayward gamblers finding love and redemption is a perennial favorite. The musical is based on two short stories by the trendsetting writer Damon Runyon, but it was the music of Frank Loesser (“Luck Be a Lady,” “Sit Down, You’re Rockin’ the Boat”) and the vivid book by Jo Swerling and Abe Burrows that fused Loesser’s memorable tunes with equally memorable characters. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, $30, Wed-Sat 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun 1:30 pm, rtoptheatre.org (EJI)

Both a sendup of and an homage to the schlocky B movies of the ’50s and ’60s, The Rocky Horror Show is an unapologetically camp, unabashedly libidinous and unquestionably outlandish musical. Seeking refuge on a rainy night, the young couple Brad and Janet enter the castle of Dr. Frankn-Furter, who’s just created the ideal manly specimen in his secret lab. What follows involves murder, seduction and a lot of dancing. Rocky Horror may have started out as a cult phenomenon, but it’s long since become a mainstream sensation. This production is co-directed by Heather McHenry-Kroetch and Troy Nickerson. Stage Left Theater, $25, Thu-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm (closing weekend shows at midnight), stagelefttheater.org (EJI)

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THEATER NOV. 25-DEC. 18

A CHRISTMAS CAROL

What kind of Christmas would it be without grumpy, miserly Scrooge discovering the true meaning of the season thanks to the supernatural advice of three different ghosts? Starting the day after Thanksgiving, you can get into the holiday spirit yourself with this production of Barbara Field’s stage adaptation of Charles Dickens’ classic short story. The show is co-directed this year by Bryan Durbin and Kearney Jordan as the Civic continues to celebrate its 75th anniversary season with a theatrical hit parade. Spokane Civic Theatre, $35, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm, spokanecivictheatre.com (EJI)

NOV. 25-DEC. 18

THE SOUND OF MUSIC

Rodgers and Hammerstein’s The Sound of Music — the last musical the famous duo would ever write together — likely needs no introduction. This fictionalized history of the Von Trapp family singers has given us a slew of earworms like “My Favorite Things” and “Do-Re-Mi,” not to mention the title song. The 1965 film is a cinema classic and has its own cottage tourist industry. The very name of the musical evokes images of Alpine meadows. In the run-up to Christmas, you can give yourself an early treat with this kid-centric production. Spokane Children’s Theatre, tickets and showtimes TBD, spokanechildrenstheatre.org (EJI)

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DEC. 2-18

NATIVE GARDENS

Tania, a pregnant doctoral candidate, and her husband, Pablo, an up-and-coming attorney, move into a new residential neighborhood. They’re welcomed by their next-door neighbors Frank and Virginia, who also happen to maintain a magazine-quality English garden. However, when Tania starts eyeing her own garden and plans to build a fence, a polite disagreement over property borders and aesthetics erupts into a full-blown backyard brawl. Karen Zacarias’ comedy, directed in this Civic studio production by Dawn Taylor Reinhardt, is about differences in taste, class and perspective — and finding shared values in spite of them. Spokane Civic Theatre, $25, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm, spokanecivictheatre.com (EJI)

DEC. 9-22

TRADITIONS OF CHRISTMAS A full-on, no-holds-barred display of pageantry, patriotism and Yuletide commemoration, Traditions of Christmas treats audiences of all ages to a visual and musical extravaganza. After showcasing time-honored Christmas celebrations in countries like Ireland, Austria and Mexico, this song-and-dance spectacular moves into elaborate set pieces featuring Santa Claus, USO singers and a living nativity. Nearly every scene is accompanied by a Radio City Music Hall-style kickline, choruses and more. For many families, seeing Traditions of Christmas is an annual holiday tradition in itself. The Salvation Army Kroc Center, $23-$36, showtimes vary, traditionsofchristmasnw.com (EJI) n

Spokane Children’s Theatre transports audiences to the Swiss Alps later this fall with The Sound of Music.


the fall activity guide is Here!

!

n me a c s

online only at SpokaneParks.org

OCTOBER 1 & 2 11AM - 5PM

Artist Fair with Spokane Arts Urban Pumpkin Patch Petting Zoo Live Entertainment Fall Photo Station and more activities for the whole family!

Presented by:

Sponsored by:

WSECUFALLFEST.ORG

FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 17


18 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022


Tickets on sale now at TicketsWest.com

FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 19


VISUAL CARRIE SCOZZARO PHOTO

ROGUE HEART MEDIA PHOTO

Public Exposure Murals, sculptures and other public artworks in our region are designed to educate, commemorate, celebrate and more

W

hile plenty of attention is paid to public art pieces that spark controversy, public art serves many roles, not the least of which is enlivening public spaces with imagery, color and design. It can commemorate important people, places and events. It can create or augment a sense of place. Public art can be serious, silly, or something in between. And yes, it can even spark people to think, act or feel something about the work and what it represents.

COMMEMORATING IDAHO HISTORY

There’s an obvious theme to the bronze figurative sculptures overlooking Coeur d’Alene’s McEuen Park, all of which were created by North Idaho artist Terry Lee: Idaho history. In addition to “American Worker,” “Idaho Lumberjack” and “Idaho Farmer,” Lee added “The Suffragist” in summer 2020. It commemorates the 100th anniversary of Idaho’s ratification of the 19th Amendment recognizing women’s equal right to vote, which may or may not be relevant to an act of vandalism occurring earlier this year in which someone spray-painted “Beta Males” on the piece (the paint has since been cleaned off, and no further incidents have been reported). In summer 2022, “The Miner” was added to the growing pantheon of permanent art along Front Avenue, which may continue to expand in coming years. Lee is currently working on a 1940s-era nurse from Farragut Naval Station and a historic Army soldier. Tour Coeur d’Alene’s vast public art collection at cdaid.org/190/committees/arts/public-art-collection

MANITO PARK SWANS

Swans have (sort of) returned to Manito Park after a 16-

20 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

BY CARRIE SCOZZARO year absence. In the early 1900s, a well-wishing resident imported the majestic white birds to the South Hill park, but not everyone was a fan. By 2006, the remaining pair descended from the original gaggle of mute swans had been permanently silenced. This spring, the swans were resurrected in the form of two lifesize avian sculptures created by local artist Vincent De Felice and funded by Washington Trust Bank. Titled “Love Birds,” they’re the first public art piece to grace Manito Park’s 78 acres, and they reside near the recently revamped Mirror Pond. The swans face each other, their necks forming a heart, which makes for a great photo. The swans’ bodies are abstracted so that there are no sharp edges, making them ideal for climbing. And because they’re made of bronze, there’s every possibility this pair will endure indefinitely.

SPOKANE CITY LINE BUS STOP SHELTERS

Riding the bus is better with a sheltered waiting area and clearly identifiable bus stops. Spokane Transit Authority’s ambitious new City Line project will accomplish both those things when it rolls out in 2023, with eight shelters featuring the work of local artists through Spokane Arts’ Art in Transit program. Four shelters are already visible — two from each artist, one for the eastbound stop and the other westbound — each helping to establish a sense of place in their respective communities. Look for Joshua Thomas’ “Symphony Station” flanking the Fox Theater at Monroe Street where it intersects First and Sprague avenues. Jimei “Mei” Lin’s work “The Melody We Share” celebrates diversity, including contributions of Japanese and Chinese community members, and can be found on Divi-

sion Street where it crosses Main and Riverside avenues. Find out more about the city’s Art in Transit and other public arts programs at spokanearts.org.

HOOPFEST MURALS

We tend to think of murals as being on the wall, but Spokane’s Hoopfest murals are on another large, flat surface where everyone’s looking: the basketball court. Beginning in 2020, Spokane Arts teamed up with Hooptown USA, MultiCare Health System and selected artists to create a unique background for on-court action at area parks’ public courts. The murals completed to date include courts in Peaceful Valley (by Tiffany Patterson), Chief Garry Park and Riverfront Park (both by Joshua Martel), and Thornton Murphy Park (by Nick Goettling). The most recently completed Hoopfest mural is by Ruben Marcilla, who happens to also be a longstanding sign painter for Avista Stadium. Marcilla’s design at Franklin Park celebrates the Spokane River, Salish language and Spokane Tribe, who sponsored the mural along with Spokane Indians baseball.

THE PODIUM

Overlooking Riverfront Park and the Spokane River, The Podium is Spokane’s much-heralded new sports facility. Spokane Public Facilities District, which operates the multifunctional 135,000-square-foot space, commissioned two art pieces for it that channel both playfulness and grandeur. “Chromasphere” is located inside the facility, yet visible from the exterior, especially at night. It features 11 suspended, basket-like structures that glow in different colors and was created by Washington State University


ARTS TAIJI MIYASAKA PHOTO

at the German-American Society’s Historic Deutsches Haus

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FROM LEFT: “The Suffragist” in Coeur d’Alene’s McEuen Park, Riverfront Park’s Hoopfest mural and “Chromasphere” inside the Podium.

ON THE INLANDER COVER

Jimei “Mei” Lin lives in Pullman and works at Washington State University. Lin recently teamed up with Terrain to create a new mural for the Warren, a 139-unit residential apartment building on Browne Street in between Main and Riverside avenues.

Professor Taiji Miyasaka and Clayton Binkley, a Seattle artist and engineer. “Aspire,” which was created by an international artists’ collaborative called Acrylicize, is a freestanding sculptural installation on the park-facing side of the building. Individual metal panels on the piece can be engraved with information celebrating significant athletic accomplishments related to The Podium’s diverse users.

SPOKANE PUBLIC LIBRARY’S READING FIGURES

Situated in the grass outside the Shadle Park Library are several painted cutout figures by Jasmine Iona Brown, which reinforce the library’s sense of place as a repository of knowledge. Although untitled, the flat figures are colloquially referred to as “The Readers.” Their colors — green, goldenrod, orange — mirror the natural surroundings, as well as the iconic green-and-yellow Shadle Park reservoir tank. Brown’s sculptures are part of a comprehensive program to infuse the Spokane Public Library system with artwork, both inside and out. Visit spokanelibrary. org for a list of permanent and rotating artwork.

MOSCOW’S VINYL WRAPPED UTILITY BOXES

Moscow utility box art by Rene Guggenheimer.

Typically “blah” utility and signal boxes are an ideal backdrop for art, and many organizations across the country — including Spokane Arts — have employed stretchy, form-fitting vinyl to cover these boxes with all manner of imagery. The city of Moscow has been commissioning artists to beautify its boxes since 2012, adding to sense of place and interjecting imagery into both rural and city environments. This year, the city selected five artists for its vinyl wrap program, including John Donald Carlucci’s “Murder in Moscow” at West Sixth Street between Main and Washington streets, and by Rene Guggenheimer’s “Full Circle” at South Mountain View and Troy Road/Highway 8. For more public art in Moscow, including new sculptures at the city’s Intermodal Transit Center’s gardens, check out www. ci.moscow.id.us/218/public-art. n

FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 21


VISUAL ARTS

Juventino Aranda’s sculpture.

THROUGH OCT. 25

OCT. 7

Chad “Little Coyote” Yellowjohn’s marker illustrations.

OPENING RECEPTIONS: IRWIN NASH & JUVENTINO ARANDA

CHAD “LITTLE COYOTE” YELLOWJOHN: MASKED PRESERVATION

Check out @lil_coyote on Instagram, then check out Chad “Little Coyote” Yellowjohn’s contemporary illustrations in real life. This talented young artist, who hails from the Shoshone-Bannock and Spokane ancestral lines, is the modern face of regional arts activism, including recent depictions of various Indigenous people dancing while wearing a gas mask. In honor of Indigenous People’s Day, Yellowjohn is leading an artist’s talk and performing a ceremonial grass dance on Oct. 10 beginning at 11:30 am (weather dependent) outside Building 6. Spokane Falls Community College Fine Arts Gallery, open Mon-Fri from 8:30 am-3:30 pm, free, sfcc.spokane. edu (CARRIE A. SCOZZARO)

THROUGH OCT. 28

KRISTA BRAND: PERIPHERY

For this local artist, one’s man’s trash is, indeed, treasure that’s ripe for inspiration and creative interpretation. As a multidisciplinary artist, Krista Brand is focused on exploring our relationship with urban litter and plastic waste. By incorporating materials found in parking lots, curbsides and other locales into art, such familiar throw-away objects may take on new meaning for the viewer. When she’s not making art — such as pieces displayed in her solo show this fall at Whitworth’s Bryan Oliver Gallery — Brand is an academic coordinator and art instructor at Washington State University. An opening reception (5-6 pm) and artist lecture (6 pm) for “Periphery” are set for Tuesday, Sept. 27. Whitworth Bryan Oliver Gallery, open Mon-Fri 10 am-4:30 pm, Sat from 10 am-2 pm, free, whitworth.edu/art-and-design (CHEY SCOTT)

THROUGH NOV. 4

KATIE CREYTS: TRAPPINGS

Her artwork looks cute, but beware the bite of social commentary, which artist and Whitworth University arts professor Katie Creyts incorporates in a new series exploring how humans and animals interact. “We push cultural needs on the natural and alternately want authentic and idyllic nature to be available for our pleasure,” says Creyts, who layers and fuses glass together to create complex and visually compelling pieces. “My work engages this pleasure of viewing artwork, the ‘trappings’ of materials and color, animals and decoration, but visual cues are placed to prick deeper contemplation.” North Idaho College Boswell Hall Corner Gallery, open Mon-Thu from 10 am-4 pm and Fri from 10 am-2:30 pm, free, nic.edu (CAS)

22 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

Katie Creyts’ layered glass art.

THROUGH JAN. 7, 2023

NEW TO YOU

Maybe you’ve stopped by the Jundt Art Museum on Gonzaga’s campus before, or maybe not. Either way, its current exhibit, “New to You” is for all museum visitors, old and new. The show features pieces from the Jundt’s collection that have never been on display before. Even though the museum has been open since 1995, its vast collection of art is seemingly never ending, teeming with surprises in every gallery. Jundt Art Museum, open Mon-Sat from 10 am-4 pm, free, gonzaga.edu/jundt (MADISON PEARSON)

SEPT. 29-NOV. 3

EMILY SOMOSKEY: SURFACING

Using digital collages and paint, Emily Somoskey creates art that is truly out of this world. It seems as if viewers have been taken to another plane where their surroundings don’t quite make sense. Though she’s from Ohio, the artist is currently working as a visiting assistant professor of art at Whitman College in Walla Walla. In this show, Somoskey explores the ways humans experience physical and mental space simultaneously. EWU Gallery of Art, open MonFri from 9 am-5 pm, free, ewu.edu/gallery (MP)

OCT. 1-31

MEL McCUDDIN

Few artists at The Art Spirit Gallery get a truly solo show; most monthly exhibits feature at least two to three artists, and sometimes four to five. But Mel McCuddin is special in many ways, including his instantly recognizable style (if you’ve exited the Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena, you’ve probably done so under the watchful eyes of McCuddin’s painted figures) and his longevity. McCuddin has exhibited at The Art Spirit for 25 years, since the gallery opened, and has been painting for more than twice as long. Correction: had been. McCuddin’s 2022 solo show is his last. The Art Spirit Gallery, open Thu-Sat from 11 am-6 pm and Sun from 11 am-3 pm, free, theartspiritgallery.com (CAS)

The Inland Northwest has no shortage of art museums, and these two ongoing exhibits at Washington State University’s Pullman campus are jampacked with gorgeous visuals and rich culture. “Our Stories, Our Lives: Irwin Nash Photographs” shines a spotlight on Washington’s agriculture scene and features photographs that span 11 years through the rise of labor and protest movements. Guest curator Lipi Turner-Rahman shares her process to select Nash’s photographs for the exhibit in a guided conversation. Meanwhile, Juventino Aranda showcases his art that relates to the social, political and economic struggles of late capitalism and notions of the American dream in “Esperé Mucho Tiempo Pa Ver,” which translates to “I Have Waited a Long Time to See.” Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, guided conversation 3-4:30 pm, reception 4:30-6 pm, free, museum.wsu.edu (MP)

OCT. 7-29

ORBITING MISFITS / 10TH ANNIVERSARY

Call it a supermoon! New Moon Gallery is hosting “Orbiting Misfits,” an invitational exhibition featuring more than 70 artists from Spokane and Seattle, and curated by former Spokane artist Tim Lord, known for his fantastical paintings and eclectic style. Concurrently, the gallery is also celebrating its 10-year anniversary with a private party during the regularly scheduled First Friday artwalk (RSVP to luna@newmoongallery.art by Oct. 3 to secure your spot). The anniversary party will spill out of the Sprague Avenue gallery space and onto a newly renovated outdoor area with beverages and food available for purchase. New Moon Gallery, open Wed-Sat from 11 am-5 pm, free, manicmoonandmore.com (CAS)

OCT. 9-MARCH 12, 2023

LILA SHAW GIRVIN: GIFT OF A MOMENT

The name Lila Girvin might be familiar to anyone involved with the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture (back when it was the Cheney Cowles Museum) or the Spokane Symphony, both organizations for which she’s served on the board. But Girvin’s interest in the arts goes back much further and is much more personal. Girvin has been painting since the ’50s and although she has shown her work regionally, the MAC’s feature exhibit is the first time modern audiences will be treated to a large body of Girvin’s ethereal abstract paintings. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, open Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm and third Thursdays from 10 am-9 pm, northwestmuseum.org (CAS)


CELEBRAT E AUTUMN OCT. 7-JAN. 7

PAMELA CAUGHEY: UNFORESEEN

A defining moment in Pamela Caughey’s life and career involved a catastrophic 2016 fire that destroyed her Hamilton, Montana, area home and studio. Caughey has since rebuilt her art practice creating paintings with a combination of acrylic paint, wax and pigments. Caughey shares her practice with viewers via classes and YouTube videos that encourage experimentation and free-form creativity. Learn more about her process in this comprehensive exhibit initially scheduled before the pandemic shutdown. Moscow Contemporary, open Tue-Fri from noon-5 pm and Sat from 10 am-1 pm, free, moscowcontemporary.org (CAS)

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NOV. 29-JAN. 27

MEGAN ATWOOD CHERRY: PRECIOUS CARGO

Toward the end of the semester, students and visitors to North Idaho College will get an eyeful of challenging artwork from Megan Atwood Cherry, a former NIC instructor-turned-arts program manager for the city of Moscow. Her newest series, “Precious Cargo,” combines painted wood, stone and fiber. “While the works are somewhat fraught with improvisational and urgent construction methods, the soothing of surfaces with paint suggests care, consideration, and possibly, celebration,” writes Cherry in her artist statement. Find out more by attending the free artist’s talk on Nov. 29 from noon to 1 pm, followed by a free reception. North Idaho College Boswell Hall Corner Gallery, open Mon-Thu from 10 am-4 pm and Fri from 10 am-2:30 pm, free, nic.edu (CAS) n

FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 23


AWARDS

NOMINEES

for

LEADERSHIP for

Matthew Blatman

INCLUSION Atomic Threads

Kelly Brown

Indian Youth Club of Spokane

Kingston Prescott Devonte Pearson

Marten Norr

Yvonne A.K. Johnson

M y Tu r n T h e a t e r Spectrum Center Spokane Ensemble Theatre Jeremy Whittington

for

I M A G I N AT I O N

Gatieh Nacario Stephen Pitters Misty Shipman Julia Emory Todderud Nanette Josephine Cloud

for

C O L L A B O R AT I O N Chris Hansen M.A.D. Co. Lab James Pakootas Julie Shephard

24 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022


celebrate with us

S AT U R D AY

lucky you lounge 7pm

|

21+

hosted by

ESTEBAN HEREVIA

with performances by

Madeline McNeill & Maura Garcia

Stephanie Sauvé Bogue

Jadrian Tarver Chris Cook

photobooth created by

The Smokes

nominee details, tickets & more at:

spokanearts.org

FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 25


MUSIC

THE BATON BRIGADE

FROM LEFT: Spokane Symphony music directors past and present: James Lowe, Fabio Mechetti and Eckart Preu.

A roundtable chat with the three living Spokane Symphony conductors/musical directors, all of whom will take the stage during the 2022-23 season

C

lassical music is a genre predicated on legacy. No other performance art form primarily leans on works created centuries ago. But within the symphonic realm, it’s also important to be mindful of living legacies. The Spokane Symphony is acutely aware of this. Before the COVID pandemic put a wrench in live music, the organization planned to bring together all of its living former conductors/music directors to each take up the baton and conduct a concert in its Masterworks series. That includes the current Brit in charge, James Lowe (2019-present); his German predecessor, Eckart Preu (2004-2019); and Brazilian maestro Fabio Mechetti (1993-2004). That vision becomes a reality during the symphony’s 2022-23 season. Lowe will conduct the bulk of the Masterworks, Mechetti will lead the symphony through a program of Brazilian and German compositions (Gomes, Strwauss, Wagner) in October, and Preu will take the stage for a German/Austrian combo of Wagner and Bruckner next March. In anticipation of the Masterworks performances, the Inlander organized a Zoom roundtable discussion with all three composers. Here’s a condensed version of that chat (find the full version at Inlander.com).

26 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

BY SETH SOMMERFELD INLANDER: WHAT’S THE FIRST THING THAT SPRINGS TO MIND WHEN YOU THINK OF THE SPOKANE SYMPHONY?

LOWE: I think the word I would use is family. That’s the feeling we have when we’re on stage. PREU: I had a similar feeling. The word that came to my mind first was warmth. It’s something that I felt at my audition concert — people were very open for ideas and were really trying to do whatever you asked them to. During my tenure, I found no matter their repertoire, no matter the venue, no matter what I tried — weird or not — they were always willing to try new things. And that was actually the entire organization, not just the musicians. Nobody would block anything. It has been a very adventurous organization. MECHETTI: That’s exactly the same feeling I had — what now… almost 30 years ago? What impressed me most about Spokane Symphony was this willingness to really make music and not being afraid to tackle the hardest repertoire. A very honest way of making music. LOWE: I’d just love to kind of chime in on that one, too. In my kind of selection week, when I had my concert, I’d been working in Finland. And I’d had an idea there, and I said it to the boss there, and she said, “Ah, we don’t do it that way.” And then I remember coming to my audition week and talking to Jeff vom Saal, the execu-

tive director, and I mentioned the same idea. And he said, “Ah! We don’t do it like that way… that’s really interesting! Try that!” And that was the moment I thought, “Oh yeah, this is a good gig.”

DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE PIECES OR PERFORMANCES DURING YOUR TENURE?

MECHETTI: Spokane Symphony was my first orchestra, so everything was exciting. Sometimes it was the first time they were playing it — things like Rite of Spring or whatever. I remember a program I did that was the Scythian Suite, Rite of Spring and a Tchaikovsky, The Sleeping Beauty or Swan Lake. It was all Russian, from the Romantics to Prokofiev. When we thought about doing that concert, there was some suspicion about it. Are you crazy? Are you really going to do it? And it was one of the best concerts I think we’ve done there. Another thing that I think was very important at that time was the recording. We did Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony. It was the first recording the city had done at the time. PREU: It was also my first orchestra, and I have 15 or so years to draw memories from. I’m like a malfunctioning computer where a lot of memories just come back randomly. I remember our Carmina Burana and ... Mahler’s Third.


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“Running a symphony orchestra is really like walking a tightrope blindfolded whilst juggling knives.”

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FREE PARKING

I loved when we branched out and did the adventurous concerts. When we went to the Big Easy [the current Knitting Factory]. I have great memories of our Concerts in the Parks. The opening of the Fox was of course a big deal; that was phenomenal. LOWE: I started in September 2019, right before the lockdown. There were a bunch of concerts we did pre-lockdown — a very enjoyable performance with the chorus of the first and second suites of Daphnis et Chloé. But I think about some of the work we did in lockdown, when we came and we filmed a lot of digital concerts. Although the audience wasn’t there — the magic ingredient wasn’t there — it was this real feeling of carving new ground. Nobody had done this anywhere before. We’d never had to do concerts without an audience. Figuring that out and putting all that together, that was a huge project. I really, really enjoyed that. Also, frankly, the relief of being able to make music again after a year of total silence, that was a very kind of magic moment. I remember the first rehearsal we did, the first note sounding for that project. It was very emotional.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE BRIGHT SPOTS AND CHALLENGES YOU FACED AS THE MUSIC DIRECTOR AT SPOKANE SYMPHONY?

MECHETTI: I’m sure it’s not much different than what it is today. The positive is the high quality of the orchestra for the size of the budget we have and the size of the community we have. And the difficulty is exactly the budget itself. But it’s always been a case that Spokane has always been an example of an orchestra that, even within a smaller city, can think big. It’s a model that many orchestras actually envy. PREU: In terms of highs and lows, I think the absolute low was the strike and how that was handled. When personnel issues and organizational issues come to basically a grinding halt for quite a while, everybody suffers. And so coming back out of that that was really, really tough. There are plenty of highs, though. First, all this stuff that we did for the first time: the concerts at the Big Easy, Symphony with a Splash, the concerts at Arbor Crest. We did a series of contemporary concerts where the orchestra and the audience would sit on stage. All these adventurous things. I was really, really proud of the organization’s willingness to try new things. The other high was the opening of the Fox. That was a game-changer for the symphony.

Playing at the Opera House just limited the artistic potential of this group. Being at the Fox meant double performances of the classics. So we have two shots at the same program. That makes a big difference. The second performance on Sunday afternoon is always different, and usually better than the first one. And just the acoustics of the Fox were very conducive to really working on music excellence. Really exploring all the wide palette the orchestra has for a sound. LOWE: Adding on to that, it’s actually quite rare that a symphony gets to rehearse and perform in the same hall. That is a luxury. It becomes part of the personality of the orchestra. When they know that they can rely on how they listen in the hall or how they hear, they have a much better feeling of how they’re going to sound out in the hall. And then you end up with this very rare thing where the hall and the orchestra start to develop a kind of symbiotic relationship. Running a symphony orchestra is really like walking a tightrope blindfolded whilst juggling knives. It is an extraordinarily complicated, difficult job. You can never quite predict what’s going to come around the corner. A little bit unusually for orchestras in America, our model is inverted. Most symphonies’ [finances] are like 60/40 donated/earned. We’re 60/40 earned/donated. So that meant that when the pandemic hit, it hit us financially harder than some other organizations. Symphony orchestras are evolving. I think there’s a model from the 1950s, which was your town has a symphony orchestra, and you’re really damn lucky to come and hear us and pay your money. And now I think that has to be inverted — we’re a community organization who happens to do that through giving concerts. You can see different orchestras are embracing that, and some orchestras are resisting that. And the ones that embrace that are really doing fantastically well, and they become an integral part of the community. I do love the idea that all three living music directors of the Spokane Symphony are appearing in the same season. And I think that that’s a really nice thing. Obviously, we were supposed to do this for the 75th anniversary, but, you know, COVID had other plans. Now we can finally do it in one season. That’s a very special thing for the orchestra. n

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FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 27


MUSIC SEPT. 30

IRON MAIDEN

For metalheads, Iron Maiden’s upcoming “The Legacy of the Beast” tour should be a glorious nightmare. The legendary English rockers have been near the top of metal’s pantheon for almost 50 years now, and this career-spanning, two-hour spectacle concert features extravagant set pieces, pyrotechnics and, of course, representations of the band’s zombie-esque mascot, Eddie. Aged necks might not be ideal for headbanging, but fans can certainly throw up their devil horns. Spokane Arena, 7:30 pm, $42-$225, spokanearena.com (SETH SOMMERFELD)

SEPT. 30

THE FRONT BOTTOMS, THE JOY FORMIDABLE

OCT. 8

MATT MITCHELL MUSIC CO.: RAMONA ALBUM RELEASE SHOW

Matt Mitchell has been a fixture in the local music scene for a while now, leading the band Trego (formerly Folkinception), and in 2019 he began exploring his own sonic realms with Matt Mitchell Music Co. On his new album, Ramona, the singer-songwriter takes his solo material in a slightly new direction. The 10-song collection moves away from acoustic folk to hop into the parallel lane of twangy American rock. It’s Mitchell’s second release of 2022, following the EP Captive of the Mind, so there’ll be plenty of fresh songs on display for this album release show. Lucky You Lounge, 8 pm, $12-$15, luckyyoulounge.com (SS)

OCT. 29 & 30

THE MUSIC OF HARRY POTTER & OTHER HALLOWEEN FAVORITES

Although not inherently spooky, Harry Potter movies are a go-to Halloween watch for plenty of ghouls and goblins. John Williams, composer of the films’ scores, has a way of transporting audiences straight into the wizarding world, through Diagon Alley and, of course, to the Great Hall of Hogwarts. The Spokane Symphony is sure to conjure up some magic and plenty of fun at this annual show. Costumes are not required, but where’s the fun in that? This concert is for everyone, Slytherins and Hufflepuffs alike. Throw on a robe and discover the wondrous world of Harry Potter all over again. Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox, Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 3 pm, $25-$64, spokanesymphony.org (MADISON PEARSON)

OCT. 30

This alternative rock pairing might not be the most natural fit, but it should make for a super fun show. The Front Bottoms have built an ultra-dedicated emo audience by belting out scrappy indie folk punk tunes with unvarnished emotional vulnerability. On the other hand, Welsh rock act The Joy Formidable puts on grand live shows as spitfire singer/guitarist Ritzy Bryan leads her band in crafting a melodic pop rock approach to swirling shoegaze noise. Together, the bill marries sing-alongs and headbanging in an idealized manner. Knitting Factory, 8 pm, $30, sp.knittingfactory.com (SS)

NIGHT OF THE ROCKING DEAD

Outside of horror movies and haunted houses, the other great Halloween entertainment once you’ve aged out of trick-or-treating is the array of cover band concerts. Northern Quest gets in on the seasonal action with a bill featuring three all-female metal tribute acts. Thundherstruck brings the classic hard rock riffs of AC/DC, Paradise Kitty welcomes you to the jungle with Guns N’ Roses hits, and Madame Ozzy offers her best interpretation of the Prince of Darkness, Ozzy Osbourne. Northern Quest Casino & Resort, 7:30 pm, $20-$30, northernquest.com (SS)

OCT. 14

A DAY TO REMEMBER, THE USED

People may be used to entering Spokane’s new indoor sports venue the Podium in order to break a sweat. While the athletic attire will be far less abundant, the same should hold true when the Podium takes its first crack at becoming a concert venue starting this fall. The first show announced for the space was a bill featuring the metalcore/pop punk hybrid sound of A Day to Remember and screamo standouts the Used. Doing laps around the mosh pit might be a shorter distance than around the track, but it’s a workout nonetheless. The Podium, 6 pm, $50-$70, thepodiumusa.com (SS)

OCT. 2

CHVRCHES

We all went to some dark places in COVID times, but few artistically utilized that mindset like Scottish synth-pop trio CHVRCHES. The group made its excellent 2021 album Screen Violence at a pandemic distance, but the band’s haunting melodic melancholy and youthful yearnings feel fully cohesive. Singer Lauren Mayberry’s fears of a world centered on screens and the alienation that fosters are laid bare over an array of catchy pop tracks. Expect a jubilant — if slightly dark — dance party when CHVRCHES holds mass at the Knitting Factory. Knitting Factory, 8 pm, $33-$35, sp.knittingfactory.com (SS)

28 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

OCT. 18

JUDY COLLINS

It’s hard to contextualize the true breadth of Judy Collins’ career, but here’s a tidbit: The folk icon earned a Grammy nomination for her 2017 album, Silver Skies Blue, 42 years after her most recent previous Grammy nomination… which she received 26 years into her career. Her soaring voice has made hits out of songs by Joni Mitchell and Stephen Sondheim, and her version of “Amazing Grace” has been preserved by the Library of Congress. Collins’ voice is still ringing true at age 83, garnering almost universally positive reviews with the 2022 release of her 29th album, Spellbound. Bing Crosby Theater, 8 pm, $35-$99, bingcrosbytheater.com (SS)

NOV. 4

MAITA

On I Just Want to Be Wild for You — one of 2022’s best albums — Maria Maita-Keppeler is yearning. What exactly for varies over the course of 11 tracks, which only makes the Portland-based indie rock singer-songwriter’s sonic dexterity seem more elite. Songs range from hyper-rock overthinkers to twangy odes to sarcastic “love” songs about her phone, and all the while her razor-sharp wit and composition variety shines through. After a stellar visit to Lucky You in the summer, MAITA returns for another dose of wild musical longing. Lucky You Lounge, 8 pm, $12-$14, luckyyoulounge.com (SS)


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FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 29


MUSIC

NOV. 10

WALKER HAYES

Even if you feel like Walker Hayes’ smash hit “Feels Like” (aka “The Applebee’s Song”)... ummm… feels like the nadir of modern lowestcommon denominator hyper-consumerist country with its advertorial chorus name-checking of Applebee’s menu items and all the wit of someone who named his album Country Stuff, there’s no denying there’s a massive audience for his reheated chain-restaurant quality songwriting. For Hayes’ fans, his stop at Spokane Arena is sure to be a country fried party. Spokane Arena, 7 pm, $35-$259, spokanearena.com (SS)

NOV. 9

SMASHING PUMPKINS, JANE’S ADDICTION, POPPY

The late-’80s/early-’90s alt-rock boom still survives, as this double bill makes evidently clear. Led by the mercurial Billy Corgan, Smashing Pumpkins created some of the era’s most indelible hits that still hold up decades later (“1979,” “Bullet with Butterfly Wings,” “Tonight Tonight,” etc.). Jane’s Addiction started out as edgy outsider artists only to take that freaky style mainstream with the Lollapalooza festival and tunes like “Jane Says” and “Been Caught Stealing.” (Make sure to show up early, as the show’s opener, Poppy, serves up a sugar-coated Hot Topic-friendly metalcore spectacle.) Spokane Arena, 6:30 pm, $49-$779, spokanearena.com (SS)

NOV. 10

THE COMMODORES

There have been a lot of Commodores over the years, most notably Lionel Ritchie, who masterfully piloted the longstanding musical group into the ’70s and early ’80s before going solo. Likewise for several other Commodores, but the core sound stitching together R&B, pop and funk has endured. So have three longtime band members who will be bringing the hits to Worley in November: Walter “Clyde” Orange, James Dean “JD” Nicholas, and William “WAK” King, who is partially responsible for randomly picking the band’s name when they first formed. And if the band doesn’t sound exactly like it did 40 or 50 years ago, chances are your hearing isn’t what it used to be either. Coeur d’Alene Casino & Resort, 7 pm, $50-$70, cdacasino.com (CARRIE SCOZZARO)

NOV. 19

MODEST MOUSE

There’s no indie rock album that captures the Pacific Northwest’s sense of isolation and modernity poisoning the well quite like Modest Mouse’s 1997 underground classic The Lonesome Crowded West. Well before they broke big with “Float On,” the Issaquah-bred band’s best album showcases Isaac Brock at his most lyrically and musically ferocious while still being able to draw out the tender moments of beauty in trailer parks and open spaces. To celebrate The Lonesome Crowded West’s 25th anniversary, the band is touring with a stripped-back four-piece setup to capture the raw, gritty D.I.Y. spirit of those glorious early days. Knitting Factory, 8 pm, $203, sp.knittingfactory.com (SS)

VERY SPECIAL GUESTS

TONIGHT • SPOKANE ARENA 30 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

DEC. 4

WILD PINK

Online music publication Pitchfork compared Wild Pink’s 2021 album A Billion Little Lights to a cross between Death Cab for Cutie and War on Drugs. That alone should pique indie rock dads’ interest, but there’s more — some rock critics who’ve heard the Brooklyn group’s upcoming album ILYSM have compared it to Wilco’s classic record Yankee Hotel Foxtrot. There’s a delicate grace to early singles like “Hold My Hand” and “ILYSM,” which should make for a magical evening of hushed indie rock beauty in the intimate confines of Lucky You. Lucky You Lounge, 8 pm, $16, luckyyoulounge.com (SS) n


SIGN UP AT: BELIEVEINME.ORG/BRAT-TROT

FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 31


CULTURE

Terrain is back this year, but at a different Jensen-Byrd building.

A Long-Awaited Return

COURTESY PHOTO

Terrain’s flagship event is back after a two-year pause, showcasing more local art than ever

S

pokane arts nonprofit Terrain started as a one-off thing: a party thrown in a vacant building, highlighting local artists and their work. In the decade-plus since, Terrain has become a permanent fixture in Spokane’s art world. The organization has expanded from vacant warehouses to its own gallery space, a retail storefront in River Park Square and year-round programming tailored to the local art community. While Terrain’s flagship event was put on hold for two years due to the pandemic, it’s making its triumphant return in 2022 under the leadership of Ginger Ewing and Jackie Caro, the organization’s executive director and operations director, respectively. “I think that the flagship event has become a sort of annual checkpoint for where we’re at as a creative com-

32 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

BY MADISON PEARSON munity,” Ewing says. “Not having that boost of energy to jump-start the year was hard. We lost our sense of togetherness without that intangible, electric feeling that we get from Terrain.” The organization’s events may have come to a screeching halt in the two-year interim, but the work behind the scenes didn’t. Ewing and Caro searched for ways to put money into the pockets of artists by hosting pop-up vaccination clinics and hiring BIPOC artists to do art tutorials in The Black Lens newspaper. After receiving grants and completing other fundraising efforts, Terrain brought in about $800,000 for local artists despite its own hardships. “As an organization, we were losing thousands and thousands of dollars a week during that time,” Ewing says. “We need Terrain to sustain our organization and to fulfill our mission of bringing people together and showcasing amazing art.”

In addition to featured art being sold directly to patrons at the flagship event, there’s also a major fundraising focus to secure donations from attendees during its one-night run.

T

he anticipation of Terrain’s return has been felt in myriad ways. Ewing says that even though the call for submissions for this year’s event was shorter than previous years, at just three weeks, they’ve received almost as many submissions as previ-


Pamper Your Skin Pamper Your Soul

THROUGH OCT. 7

ous years when the event was at its largest. By the midnight deadline on Sept. 11, the organization had received 445 artist submissions for its 13th iteration, compared to a previous record of 457. Ewing says about 75 percent of this year’s submissions are from artists with whom she’s not familiar. The event is known for bringing together the entire creative community — whether you’re a poet, a musician or a potter, you can find a sense of belonging at Terrain. “It’s the bread and butter of what we do at Terrain,” Caro says. “It’s the one time we get to celebrate every art form that we support all at once.” This year, Terrain is being held at a former JensenByrd property in downtown Spokane. Though the name is the same as recent years’ venue in the University District, it’s not the same warehouse, but a different building also formerly owned by the longtime hardware company. That space, being more central than the previous venue, gives the event a different feel by its location alone. “We anticipate having a stage outside of the venue this year,” Ewing says. “Our idea is that it’ll attract more people to the event — maybe some passer-by will wander in. We want to create a ton of energy outside of the building to match the energy inside.” The venue will transform from an empty building into a bustling hub of all things local art. Terrain usually features a couple hundred art pieces that occupy all of the nooks and crannies of whatever space it’s popping up in. Caro says that this year, they encouraged more digital art submissions and more site-specific installations. “In this new normal that we’re living in it’s more important than ever to the soul of the city to support local artists,” Caro says. “We need to invest in and support our creative community in a significant and meaningful way. Terrain accomplishes that.” That support doesn’t stop after Terrain is over. Its leaders are always looking for new ways to advocate for local artists. In addition to the flagship event and two seasonal arts markets — BrrrZAAR and Bazaar — Ewing and Caro have plenty of side projects in the works they say will come to life in the next six months to a year. “We have a lot up our sleeves,” Ewing says. “We’re just really excited about the future of our organization and the future of the city. It feels really, really good to be back.” n Terrain 13 • Fri, Oct. 7 from 5 pm-midnight • Free • All ages • 314 W. Riverside Ave. • terrainspokane.com

Ginger Ewing (left) and Jackie Caro. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

AMERICANS AND THE HOLOCAUST

Among 50 libraries across the U.S., Gonzaga University’s Foley Library was selected to host this traveling exhibit from the United States Holocaust Museum in Washington, D.C., that explores how Americans in the 1930s and ’40s responded to reports of Nazism and Jewish genocide. On display through early October, “Americans and the Holocaust” is on the library’s third floor and is free and open to the public. Using primary sources, the exhibit challenges long-held assumptions that most U.S. citizens at the time either didn’t know what was happening to Europe’s Jewish population or did little to help. Check the Foley Library website for hours and special events tied to the exhibit. Gonzaga University Foley Library, hours vary, free, gonzaga.edu/foley-library (CS)

SEPT. 24

SPOKANE ARTS AWARDS

It takes a lot of people to ensure that a region’s arts scene is alive, well and — most of all — flourishing. Each fall, Spokane Arts, the city’s nonprofit arts booster, sets aside an evening to celebrate the arts and honor those who are making lasting contributions to the region’s diverse artistic identity. By opening the nominations to the public, locals also get a say in who’s recognized, whether that’s a respected organization or one individual making waves in one of the awards’ four categories: leadership, collaboration, imagination and inclusion. All are invited to come find out who wins, and to celebrate at a joyful reception with music, poetry, dance and more. Lucky You Lounge, 7 pm, $25, ages 21+, spokanearts.org (CS)

(208) 699-7936 spastpierre.com

Heather King

FNP, MSN, owner, CNI

Fall & Winter Events 2022 OCTOBER 29

Harvest Festival & Apple Palooza

31

Trick or Treat Downtown

NOVEMBER 19

Wine for the Holidays

25

Lighting Ceremony Parade

25

Elf on the Shelf begins

26

Small Business Saturday

OCT. 15

DECEMBER

VIR DAS

It’s always heartening to see just how much humor transcends our conventional notions of borders that allegedly separate cultures. Comedian Vir Das is proof positive of this. He was born in India, raised in Nigeria and went to college in Illinois before starting a standup career in India, then transitioning to acting in Bollywood and, finally, carving out a niche on American TV as an actor and comedian (including five Netflix comedy specials). Basically, Das finds a way to succeed and be funny wherever he happens to be while never losing touch with his Indian roots (even if he’s using them for joke fodder). Bing Crosby Theater, 7 pm, $42, bingcrosbytheater.com (SS)

3

Santa Visits

18

Elf on the Shelf ends

Contact Us! 208.415.0116 info@cdadowntown.com cdadowntown.com

@downtowncoeurdalene

Stay for a weekend of fun!

FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 33


CULTURE OCT. 20

CAMPBELL HOUSE DARK HISTORY TOUR

When one digs into events of the past, it’s not uncommon to discover dirty, dark secrets that those long gone from this world probably hoped would, well, stay dead with them. While the grittier doings of the Amasa B. Campbell family, whose opulent home has long been a living history museum at the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture campus, may not be as salacious as, say, a modern true crime series, it’s still intriguing enough to warrant sharing. This special one-night tour series unveils some of the stranger actions of the mining magnate family and their connections, from persistent rumors to true misfortune. (Take note that tickets are only available in person, and tour spots are limited, so you should arrive by 5 pm to save a spot.) The MAC, tours from 6-6:45 pm, $4-$6, northwestmuseum.org (CS)

OCT. 28-30

SPOCON: REVAMPED

Admit it, you’re a nerd at heart. We’ve all got a little nerd in us, and it’s time to let it all out. SpoCon is Spokane’s premier science fiction and fantasy convention, and the 2022 lineup certainly doesn’t disappoint, featuring award-winning fantasy writers and horror TV show prop designers. The convention always includes a plethora of vendors, exciting panels, themed dances and multiple costume contests for attendees of any age. Get out there and geek out. Historic Davenport Hotel, times vary, $45, spocon.org (MP)

NOV. 14 & 15

BLUE MAN GROUP

How many other live performances require the issuance of an audience advisory? Cool, right? What started as late ’80s performance art on the streets of lower Manhattan by three quirky dudes, Blue Man Group has morphed into an epic stage production involving a complex and fast-paced narrative with sound, lights, fantastical instruments, screen images and occasionally splashing paint. The only constant in their repertoire is the Blue Men themselves: Dressed in black, all visible skin painted blue, they do not speak. So even if you saw them previously, expect all new full-sensory shenanigans when they come to Spokane. First Interstate Center for the Performing Arts, 7:30 pm, $45-$90, firstinterstatecenter.org (CAS)

OCT. 20, NOV. 17, DEC. 15

NOV. 19

LILAC CITY LIVE!

DANCE PRESENTS! GONZAGA DANCE

Spokane Public Library’s monthly late-night talk show is back, baby! Resuming in the newly reopened and remodeled Central Library, in the third floor space now named nxʷyxʷyetkʷ Hall, Lilac City Live! is a lively and often laugh-out-loud program hosted by local musician and humorous personality Ryan Dean Tucker, who’s also the library’s video education specialist. Featured guests each month range from writers to musicians and artists to chefs, and are usually announced a few weeks before each iteration. For October’s show, local paranormal investigator Amanda Paulson is set to chat with Tucker, with other “spooky season” guests expected to join the lineup as of this writing. Central Library, free, 8 pm, all ages, spokanelibrary.org (CS)

Join Gonzaga dance students at their annual Dance Presents! event, which highlights the dance and artistry of nationally renowned professional dance companies. This year, they welcome Utah’s most established contemporary dance institution, the Ririe-Woodbury Dance Company. The night also features a performance from the Gonzaga University Repertory Dance Company and is the perfect way to support the arts with friends and family. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 7:30 pm, $15, all ages, gonzaga.edu (SSa)

NOV. 4, 11, 18, 25

BEFORE IT’S IN THEATERS

While movie trailers are designed to give viewers fragments of the story to grab their attention, do they give enough plot information for viewers to determine if the movie will be a blockbuster hit or a waste of money? That’s what the Blue Door Theatre is testing in its new show, for which actors create an improvised version of a movie based solely on the trailer and nothing else. With the show rated for general audiences, it’s the perfect Friday night activity for all ages. The Blue Door Theatre, 7:30 pm, $8, all ages, bluedoortheatre.com (SSa)

OCT. 21-23

DISNEY ON ICE: ROAD TRIP ADVENTURES

There’s nothing quite like watching tiny smiling faces singing and dancing along with their favorite Disney characters. That opportunity usually only comes once a year when Disney On Ice skates into town. This particular edition of Disney On Ice invites audiences on a road trip to iconic Disney destinations. Go into the show with an open mind, maybe you’ll heal your inner child and have just as much, or more, fun as the little one standing next to you. Spokane Arena, Fri at 7 pm, Sat at 11:30 am, 3 and 7 pm, Sun at 11:30 am and 3:30 pm; $20-$100, spokanearena.com (MP)

34 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

NOV. 12 & 13

FALL FOLK FESTIVAL

Folk music has been around for… well, ever. It’s learned mostly through hearing rather than reading, which is what makes it so special. The Fall Folk Festival is the event of the year for all who enjoy the sweet sounds of the banjo. Wander throughout the halls long enough, and you might just stumble upon your new favorite folk artist or a workshop to attend. Along with the eight stages of constantly rotating folk bands and dancers, local vendors will sell their wares and spread the good word about folk music and culture to all who lend a listening ear. Spokane Community College, Sat from 11 am-8 pm, Sun from 11 am-5 pm, free, spokanefolkfestival.org (MP)

NOV. 25

JAY LENO

While Jay Leno is best known for his time hosting the Tonight Show, he’s making a return to the spotlight and his stand-up comedy roots with his all-new comedy tour that’s stopping in Spokane. Not only is Leno performing new material that he’s curated and perfected during his time off air, he’s also bringing back the trivia game “You Bet Your Life” to his set. Whether you’re a lifelong fan or just getting into his comedy, it’s bound to be a hilarious and memorable night for everyone. Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox, 7:30 pm, $58-$128, foxtheaterspokane.org (SSa)


PLESE PRINTING IS NOW DEC. 2-JAN. 1

NORTHWEST WINTERFEST

Remember the incredibly cool Chinese Lantern Festival at Riverfront Park back in 2015? A slightly scaled back and more holiday-themed version is returning this year when the Northwest Winterfest takes over the Spokane County fairgrounds. Transitioning from being the outdoor, drive-through event of 2021, this year’s Winterfest is all inside (where it’s warm!), and features dozens of highly detailed, lighted lantern displays, from Santa to cute woodland animals and decorated evergreens, plus more. There are also food vendors, games and other activities to enjoy. Details are still coming together, but mark your calendars now for this fun, family-friendly multicultural experience. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, $12-$17 (kids 10 and under free), Fri from 5-8 pm, Sat from 4-8 pm, Sun from 3-6 pm, northwestwinterfest.com (CS)

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The same high-quality service and products you’ve relied on, still locally-owned and operated by Spokane natives. MINUTEMAN PRESS SPOKANE EAST formerly Plese Printing & Marketing

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DEC. 1-4

THE NUTCRACKER BALLET

The Nutcracker is a staple of the holiday season, so when it comes to town for four days each year, it’s an experience you don’t want to pass up. Not only does the ballet include live music from the Spokane Symphony, it includes the dazzling performances from State Street Ballet of Santa Barbara, and the local youth dancers from Spokane who join them on stage each year. No matter how many times you’ve seen The Nutcracker in Spokane, the sets, costumes and talent of all of the performers remain as memorable and inspiring as ever. Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox, times vary, $25-$99, all ages, spokanesymphony.org (SSa)

Spokane Carvers Association + Spokane Public Library

Artistry in Wood 2022 FREE ADMISSION

Featured Artist

The Hive ® • 2904 E Sprague Ave

Saturday, Sept. 24 • 10am-5pm Sunday, Sept. 25 • 12pm-4pm

Dale Ramsdell

Juried Show • Raffle • Demos Happiest Holiday Contest • Wood Turnings

Teddy Bear’s Picnic • Dale Ramsdell

DEC. 17

BRRRZAAR

Spokane is an art city, and it’s all thanks to the incredible local artists that stick around and present their hard work to us year after year. BrrrZAAR is the one-stop shop for all things local art, but it might take you a few hours to see it all. The market takes place on all three levels of River Park Square, making it the largest art market in Spokane. Not only will patrons find thousands of locally made items, but the event also includes live music and activities for all ages. River Park Square, 10 am-8 pm, free to shop, terrainspokane.com (MP)

DEC. 29-31

Bananas • Tim Rahman

Cowboys • Tom Ellis

Jack the Legend Roger Storey

SERVING BREAKFAST LUNCH AND DINNER • SEVEN DAYS A WEEK

SAM MORRIL

While some stand-up comedians use high energy or gimmicks to hook an audience, Sam Morril is content to hang back and let his joke writing do the talking. His calm, raspy, almost deadpan delivery draws an audience in without desperately grasping to get their attention. His new Netflix special Same Time Tomorrow captures the fluidity of his humor. He can hit humorous insights on modern events and politics in such a matter-of-fact way (rather than try to be a provocateur) and then swiftly move onto another topic, craft hilarious bits from his own life and relationships, and do crowd work that actually pops. Whether pointing out the stupidity of moral statement shirts, the similarities between the Catholic Church and Amazon, or why slow drivers make him suspicious about Nazism, there’s always a new humorous spin around the corner. Laughing in the New Year with Morril sounds like a pretty good way to wind down 2022. Spokane Comedy Club, Thu at 7:30 pm, Fri at 7:30 and 10:30 pm; Sat at 5, 7:30 and 10:30 pm; $25-$50, spokanecomedyclub.com (SS) n

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TAKE-OUT • DRIVE THROUGH • CALL TO PLACE AN ORDER

FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 35


CALENDAR SEPT. 22-28 COMMUNITY

9/22-24 J 86th Greek Food Festival, Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church 9/22-28 Golden Harvest: Flour Sacks from the Permanent Collection, The MAC 9/22-28 The Rum Rebellion: Prohibition in North Idaho, Museum of North Idaho 9/22-28 J Americans and the Holocaust, Gonzaga University Foley Library 9/22 Block Party for Reproductive Care, The Scoop 9/23-25 J Valleyfest, Spokane Valley 9/24 Friends of the Library Book Sale, Moran Prairie Library 9/24 Acceptance Spokane Meeting, Atomic Threads Clothing Boutique

FILM

9/22 J Eraserhead, The Kenworthy 9/24 Saturday Cartoons at the Farmers Market, The Kenworthy 9/26 Drop-In Time: Video Studio, Central Library 9/27 J Totally Tubular Tuesday, Garland Theater

MUSIC

9/22 Cello, Cacao & Equinox Ritual,

Harmony Woods Retreat Center 9/22 J Spokane Symphony Sessions: An Immersive Music Experience, The Wonder Building 9/22 Kaz, The Mason Jar 9/22 Just Plain Darin, South Perry Lantern 9/22 Jeffrey Foucault, John’s Alley 9/22 Gonna Be Friends, The Stronks, Snacks at Midnight, Lucky You 9/22 Dead Animal Assembly Plant, Cruel Velvet, The Big Dipper 9/23 J Peter Rivera’s R&B Celebrate Symphony, The Fox 9/23 20th Century French Bijoux, Music Conservatory of Sandpoint 9/23 The Kenny James Miller Band, Chan’s Red Dragon on Third 9/23 The Home Team, Snacks At Midnight, Kaleb J., The Big Dipper 9/23 Soft Kill, Portrayal of Guilt, Lesser Care, Lucky You Lounge 9/23-24 Theresa Edwards Band, Coeur d’Alene Casino 9/24 Jack Johnson, Gorge Amphitheater 9/24 Home Free, Maggie Baugh, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 9/25 J Monophonics, GA-20, Kendra Morris, Bing Crosby Theater 9/25 John Brewer Vocal Jubilee, St.

Boniface Catholic Church 9/26 J Imagine Jazz, The Bad Seed 9/26 J Lynyrd Skynyrd, Too Slim and the Taildraggers, Northern Quest 9/28 Zach Deputy, KHALIKO, Lucky You

STAGE

9/22-25 J Shakespeare in the Park: Goodnight Desdemona. 9/22-25 J Admissions, Stage Left Theater 9/22-25 J Hairspray, First Interstate Center for the Arts 9/22-25 J The Wizard of Oz, Spokane Civic Theatre 9/22-25 JT: Tartuffe in Texas, Spartan Theater at SFCC 9/23 Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Ensemble, Hartung Theater 9/23-25 First Bite New Play Series, Hartung Theater 9/23-24 The Importance of Being Earnest, Panida Theater 9/23-25 J Significant Other, Spokane Civic Theatre 9/24 Dance Season Opener, Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center 9/25 Champions of Magic: The Fox

VISUAL ARTS

9/22-28 Our Stories, Our Lives: Irwin Nash Photographs, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 9/22-28 Voices, Vibrance, Vision, Liberty Building 9/22-28 J Sonny and Lisa Moeckel: Indigenous, Chase Gallery 9/22-28 Chad “Little Coyote” Yellowjohn: Masked Preservation, SFCC Gallery 9/22-28 New to You, Jundt Art Museum 9/22-28 Spokane Watercolor Society Juried Member Show, Spokane Art School 9/22-28 J Krista Brand: Periphery, Bryan Oliver Gallery 9/22-28 Juventino Aranda: Esperé Mucho Tiempo Pa Ver, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 9/22-28 Katie Creyts: Trappings, Boswell Corner Gallery at NIC 9/22-28 J Dancing with Life: Mexican Masks, The MAC 9/22-27 J River Ridge Association of Fine Arts 50th Anniversary Show, Mad Co Labs Studios 9/22-28 Jan Schnurr: Pattern Play, The MAC

Free Admission!

36 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

9/22-28 Iconocomix: The Art & Book Show, New Moon Art Gallery 9/22-28 Gloria Fox & Karen Robinette, Pottery Place Plus 9/22-27 The Bridge Between, The Art Spirit Gallery 9/22 J Art Activism!, The Hive 9/23-24 Margot Casstevens & Ann Porter, Saranac Art Projects 9/23-24 Artistry in Wood, The Hive 9/24 Art From the Attic, Corbin Art Center 9/24 J 15th Annual Little Spokane River Artist Studio Tour, North Spokane 9/24 J Spokane Arts Awards, Lucky You 9/28 Sugpiat Art Forms Event & Demonstration, The Hive

WORDS

9/23 J Poetry by Kat Smith & Emily Van Kley, Auntie’s Bookstore 9/23 Gabino Iglesias, BookPeople of Moscow 9/24 Storytelling with a Diverse Lens, Central Library 9/24 J How Stories Unite Our Community, Shadle Library 9/24 J Lora Senf: The Clackity, Auntie’s 9/26 A Look at Ukraine, Shadle Library 9/28 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito


J Inlander recommends this event

SEPT. 29 - OCT. 5

10/2 Casting Crowns, Cain, Anne Wilson, Spokane Arena 10/2 Sawyer Brown, Northern Quest 10/2 Ashley McBryde, Tigirlily, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 10/4 J Rocky Votolato, House Show (details at Inlander.com/events) 10/4 Yellow Ostrich, Lucky You Lounge 10/4 J GWAR, Light The Torch, Nekrogoblikon, Knitting Factory 10/5 Tyler Rich, Knitting Factory

COMEDY

9/29-10/1 J John Crist, Spokane Comedy Club 10/1 Safari, Blue Door Theatre 10/4 New Talent Tuesdays, Spokane Comedy Club 10/5 Open Mic, Spokane Comedy Club 10/5 J David Cross, Lucky You Lounge (sold out)

STAGE

COMMUNITY

9/29-10/1 Franciscan Film Festival, West Central Abbey 9/29-10/5 J Americans and the Holocaust, Gonzaga University 9/29 J Block Party, Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center 9/29 J Long Island Medium Theresa Caputo, The Fox 9/29-30 Library Card Drive, Coeur d’Alene Public Library 9/30 J Into Africa Auction, CenterPlace Regional Event Center 9/30-10/1 J Whiskey Barrel Weekend, Coeur d’Alene Resort 9/30-10/2 Gem State Tattoo Convention, Kootenai County Fairgrounds 9/30 Family Fun Fest, HUB Sports Center 10/1 Spokane Archaeology Day, The MAC 10/1 J 2nd Annual Children’s Book Arts Fair, Center for Children’s Book Arts 10/1-2 Harvest Festival Craft Faire, Green Bluff Grange 10/1-2 Pumpkin Patch, Garland Mercantile 10/1 The Small Biz Shoppe Grand

Best-selling author Ijeoma Oluo gives a talk at the University of Idaho on Oct. 5.

Reopening, River Park Square 10/1-2 J Fall Fest, Downtown Spokane 10/1 Oktoberfest, South Perry Lantern 10/1 J German-American Society Oktoberfest, German American Hall 10/4 Totally Tubular Tuesday, Garland Theater

MUSIC

9/29 Toadies, Reverend Horton Heat, Knitting Factory 9/29 J The Dip, Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center 9/29 Joe Satriani, Bing Crosby Theater 9/30 Faculty Artist Series: Julie Wieck and Elena Panchenko, Bryan Hall Theatre 9/30 J The Front Bottoms, The Joy Formidable, Mobley, Knitting Factory 9/30-10/1 Nate Ostrander, CdA Casino 9/30 J Iron Maiden: Legacy of the Beast World Tour, Spokane Arena

9/30 Everyone Loves A Villain, Alive In Barcelona, The Big Dipper 9/30-10/1 Royale, Coeur d’Alene Casino 10/1 J Spokane Symphony Pops 1: Classical Mystery Tour, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 10/1 J Spokane Jazz Orchestra, Bing Crosby Theater 10/1 In This Moment, Nothing More, Sleep Token, Cherry Bombs, The Podium 10/1 Sam Leyde Band, Kroc Center 10/1 An Evening with Hank and Patsy, Lake City Center 10/1 Matt Nathanson, Knitting Factory 10/1 River City Roots, The Big Dipper 10/1 Rüfüs Du Sol, Gorge Amphitheater 10/1 Coeur d’Alene Symphony: Welcome to (New) America, Schuler Performing Arts Center 10/1 Stop Light Observations, Lucky You 10/2 J CHVRCHES, Cafuné, Knitting Factory

9/29-10/2 J Admissions, Stage Left 9/29-10/2 J The Wizard of Oz, Spokane Civic Theatre 9/29-10/2 J Significant Other, Spokane Civic Theatre 9/30-10/1 The Importance of Being Earnest, Panida Theater 9/30-10/2 Universal Connections, Pend Oreille Playhouse

VISUAL ARTS

9/29-10/5 Our Stories, Our Lives: Irwin Nash, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 9/29-10/5 J Voices, Vibrance, Vision, Liberty Building 9/29-30 Sonny and Lisa Moeckel: Indigenous, Chase Gallery 9/29-10/5 J Chad “Little Coyote” Yellowjohn: Masked Preservation, SFCC Fine Arts Gallery 9/29-10/5 Emily Somoskey: Surfacing, EWU Gallery of Art 9/29-30 Spokane Watercolor Society Juried Show, Spokane Art School

9/29-10/5 Krista Brand: Periphery, Bryan Oliver Gallery 9/29-10/5 New to You, Jundt Art Museum 9/29-10/5 J Katie Creyts: Trappings, Boswell Corner Gallery at NIC 9/29-10/5 Juventino Aranda: Esperé Mucho Tiempo Pa Ver, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU. 9/29-10/5 J Dancing with Life: Mexican Masks, The MAC 9/29-30 J River Ridge Association of Fine Arts 50th Anniversary Show, Mad Co Labs Studios 9/29-30 Iconocomix: The Art & Book Show, New Moon Art Gallery 9/29-10/5 Meet Your Maker, From Here 9/30 Reception: Resolve by Teascarlet, Columbia Bank Community Plaza 10/1-2 J Fall Fest Artist Fair, Riverfront Park 10/1-5 J Mel McCuddin, Art Spirit Gallery 10/2 Diwali Rangoli Art Workshop, Central Library

WORDS

9/29 J Author Talk: Pulitzer Prize Finalist & PEN/Faulkner Award Winner Hernan Diaz, online at scld.org 9/29 On The Road, Washington Cracker Co. Building 9/30 J EWU MFA Visiting Writer Series: Peter Markus, Auntie’s Bookstore 10/4 J WSU Visiting Writers Series: Roger Reeves, Washington State University Pullman (also livestreamed) 10/5 The WRITE Time, The Hive 10/5 J An Evening with Ijeoma Oluo, Idaho Central Credit Union Arena

4.55” wide by 5.4” high

The

FUN is in the FIND! RARE TO RETRO

October 1 & 2, 2022 Spokane Fair and Expo Center

Two Days Only

SATURDAY SUNDAY

AM AM

PM PM

Buy Tickets Online CusterShows.com

ADMISSION

FREE PARKING

Presented by Jim Custer Enterprises, Inc.

www.terrainspokane.com

FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 37


OCT. 6-12

MUSIC

COMEDY

10/6 Nurse Blake: PTO Comedy Tour, Knitting Factory 10/6-8 Chris Franjola, Spokane Comedy Club 10/7 J Scott Baio: How Did I Get Here?, The Coeur d’Alene Resort 10/7 No Clue!, Blue Door Theatre 10/8 Safari, Blue Door Theatre 10/9 Nick Hoff, Spokane Comedy Club

COMMUNITY

10/6-7 J Americans and the Holocaust, Gonzaga University 10/7 Hoedown for Hope, Spokane Convention Center 10/8 J Lake City Comicon, Kootenai County Fairgrounds 10/8 Red, Black & Brew Beer Festival, Sutton Park 10/8 J Craft Beer & Cookie Festival, Girl Scouts of E. Washington & N. Idaho 10/8-9 Harvest Festival Craft Faire, Green Bluff Grange 10/8 J Filipino American History Celebration, Central Library 10/8 Cooking Demo: Healthy & Inexpensive Meals, Shadle Library 10/9 Drag Brunch, Globe Bar & Kitchen 10/11 Totally Tubular Tuesday, Garland Theater 10/12 J Birria Taco Cooking Class, Second Harvest 10/12 Five-Course Bourbon Pairing Dinner, Purgatory Whiskey and Craft Beer

10/6 October Open Mic, The Mason Jar 10/7 No Bragging Rights, Torture Culture, No Home, Clay City, The Big Dipper 10/7 Sam Lachow, Lucky You Lounge 10/7 Pamela Benton: StringzOnFire!, The Bee’s Knees Whiskey Bar 10/8-9 J Spokane Symphony Masterworks 2: Lowe Conducts Rachmaninoff, The Fox 10/8 J Matt Mitchell Music Co.: ‘Ramona’ Album Release Show, Lucky You 10/8 Washington-Idaho Symphony: Aubin & Kubo, Pullman High School 10/8 Bad Suns, Last Dinosaurs, Quarters of Change, Knitting Factory 10/8 Fit For an Autopsy, Dead Low, Manifesto, The Big Dipper 10/9 Todd Snider, Ryan Montbleau, Bing Crosby Theater 10/9 Tithe, Xingaia, Gekiretsu, Big Knife, The Big Dipper 10/10 Carbon Leaf, Lucky You Lounge 10/10 Imagine Jazz, The Bad Seed 10/11 Jaleel Shaw Workshop and Concert, Central Library 10/11 Lucas Brown & Friends, Zola 10/12 The Roomates, Red Room Lounge 10/12 Spokane Symphony Chamber Soireé 1, Barrister Winery 10/12 K. Flay, Knitting Factory 10/12 Runaway Lemonade, Zola

STAGE

10/6-9 J Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind, Magnuson Theatre 10/6-9 J The Wizard of Oz, Spokane Civic Theatre

10/6-9 J Significant Other, Spokane Civic Theatre 10/7 60x60, Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center 10/7-8 Barbecuing Hamlet, Circle Moon Theater 10/7-9 Murder Mystery Dinner Theatre, Cutter Theatre 10/7-9 Universal Connections, Pend Oreille Playhouse 10/8 Gonzaga University Theatre Sports Improv, Gonzaga Magnuson Theatre 10/8 J The Bombshell Revue: Monster Mash, Atomic Threads Boutique 10/10 J According To Coyote, Pavilion at Riverfront

VISUAL ARTS

10/6-12 Masked Preservation: Chad “Little Coyote” Yellowjohn, SFCC Gallery 10/6-12 J Emily Somoskey: Surfacing, EWU Gallery of Art 10/6-12 Teascarlet: Resolve, Columbia Bank Community Plaza 10/6-12 New to You, Jundt Art Museum 10/6-12 J Dancing with Life: Mexican Masks, The MAC 10/6-12 Krista Brand: Periphery, Bryan Oliver Gallery 10/6-12 Katie Creyts: Trappings, Boswell Corner Gallery at NIC 10/6-12 J Mel McCuddin, The Art Spirit Gallery 10/7 J First Friday, Spokane 10/7 J LR Montgomery Painting Sale, Wilson Conservation Area 10/7-12 J American Impressionism: Treasures from the Daywood

The Wizard of Oz opened the Civic’s 75th anniversary season.

Collection, The MAC 10/7-12 J Lila Girvin: Gift of a Moment, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 10/7-12 Jerry White, Avenue West Gallery 10/7-12 J Archie Bray Foundation Resident Exhibition, Kolva-Sullivan Gallery 10/7-12 Pam Hansen, Pottery Place Plus 10/7-12 J Chris Kelsey, Mark Moore & Gina Freun, Trackside Studio 10/7-12 Kurt Madison & Roger Ralston, Saranac Art Projects 10/7-12 J Carl Richardson & Mardis Nenno, Terrain Gallery 10/7-12 J Pamela Caughey: Unforeseen, Moscow Contemporary 10/7-12 Shelli Waters, Marmot Art Space

CHIANA McINELLY PHOTO

10/7-12 J Orbiting Misfits, New Moon Gallery 10/7 Guided Conversation with Lipi TurnerRahman, Jordan Schnitzer Museum 10/7 J Maker Fridays, Emerge 10/7 J Spokane Valley Arts Council Friday Soiree, CenterPlace Event Center 10/7 J Terrain 13, Downtown Spokane 10/8 Artist Showcase Art Auction, CenterPlace Regional Event Center

WORDS

10/8 Carroll W. McInroe: Death Came with the Postman, Auntie’s Bookstore 10/8 J TEDxSpokane 2022, Bing Crosby Theater 10/11 Drop In & Write, Spark Central

4.55” wide by 5.4” high

DISCOVER THE HISTORY, CULTURES AND ART OF THE INLAND NORTHWEST AND THE WORLD. THE MAC FALL 2022-SPRING 2023

Bring Art Into Your Home

Art Gifts • Exhibits • Featured Artist OCTOBER 7 - 29 th

NOVEMBER 4 - 26 th

ORBITING MISFITS

th

Northwest Artist Group Show th

DECEMBER 2nd - 30th

“TRANSMUTATION”

Mexican Masks

American Impressionism Treasures from the Daywood Collection

Gift of a Moment Lila Shaw Girvin

Plateau Pictorial Beadwork The Fred L. Mitchell Collection

Ubuhle Women

Beadwork and the Art of Independence

Featuring Kim Long and Susan Webber

FIBER AND FANTASY

Featuring Diane Rowen-Garmire and Michele Mokrey

1 East Sprague Ave, Spokane GALLERY HOURS

.. • newmoonartgallery.com 38 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

Dancing with Life

WEDSAT 11 AM TO 5 P.M.

2316 West First Avenue | northwestmuseum.org Mask photo by Dean Davis. Robert Henri, Kathleen, 1924, oil on boardHuntington Museum of Art. Photo by John Spurlock. Thando Ntobela, Ankoli Bull, 2013, glass beads sewn onto fabric. Courtesy of International Arts& Artists, Washington D.C


J Inlander recommends this event

OCT. 13-19 COMEDY

Frankenstein, The Kenworthy 10/18 Totally Tubular Tuesday, Garland Theater

10/13-15 John Heffron, Spokane Comedy Club 10/14 No Clue!, Blue Door Theatre 10/14-15 J Boone Street Hooligans, Gonzaga University Magnuson Theatre 10/15 J Vir Das, Bing Crosby Theater 10/15 Safari, Blue Door Theatre 10/16 Kenny DeForest, Spokane Comedy Club 10/19 Open Mic, Spokane Comedy Club

COMMUNITY

10/13-19 Golden Harvest: Flour Sacks from the Permanent Collection, The MAC 10/13-19 J The Rum Rebellion: Prohibition in North Idaho, Museum of North Idaho 10/13 J 2nd Annual CDAIDE Chef Challenge, Hagadone Event Center 10/14-16 Neon Jungle, Kootenai County Fairgrounds 10/15-16 Harvest Festival Craft Faire, Green Bluff Grange 10/15-16 29th Annual Ferris SAN Arts & Crafts Show, Ferris High School 10/15-16 Pumpkin Patch, Garland Mercantile 10/15 Drop In & RPG, Spark Central

FILM

10/13 Magic Hour, Bing Crosby Theater 10/15 Saturday Cartoons at the Farmers Market, The Kenworthy 10/16 J National Theatre Live:

MUSIC

10/13 J Spokane Symphony Chamber Soireé 1, Barrister Winery 10/13 Aaron Lewis, Coeur d’Alene Casino 10/13 City of Ember, The Mason Jar 10/13 Everclear, Sponge, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 10/13 J Scorpions, Whitesnake, Thunder Mother, Spokane Arena 10/14 J A Day to Remember, The Used, Movements, The Podium 10/14 Pigs on the Wing, Bing Crosby Theater 10/14 No Soap, Radio, TheWorst, Roderick Bambino, The Big Dipper 10/14 Apres Moi, Le Deluge, Threar, Hemwick, Gotu Gotu, Lucky You 10/15 Shanti Ragas (Peaceful Melodies), Unity Spiritual Center Spokane 10/15 J Saturday with the Symphony: A Children’s Program, CdA Library 10/15 Cicada Sessions: Hanna Rebecca and Willow Tree, Emerge 10/15 Aaron Crawford, The Heartwood 10/15 Pigs on the Wing, The Kenworthy 10/15 J Ivan & Alyosha, Evan Bartels, Alec Shaw, Lucky You Lounge 10/15 Spencer Crandall, Knitting Factory 10/15 Chase The Sun, Outer Resistance, Enemy Mine, The Big Dipper 10/16 J Spokane String Quartet, Bing Crosby Theater 10/18 J The Queers, Teenage Bottlerocket, The Big Dipper

10/18 J Judy Collins, Bing Crosby Theater 10/18 Lucas Brown & Friends, Zola 10/19 Runaway Lemonade, Zola 10/19 The Roomates, Red Room Lounge 10/19 J EWU Faculty Concert, EWU Music Building Recital Hall 10/19 The Movement, The Elovaters, Cydeways, Knitting Factory

STAGE

10/13-16 J The Wizard of Oz, Spokane Civic Theatre 10/13-16 Significant Other, Spokane Civic Theatre 10/14-15 Barbecuing Hamlet, Circle Moon Theater 10/14-15 J Vytal Movement Dance: Sanctuary, Vytal Movement Studio 10/14-15 J War of the Worlds (Radio Show), Pend Oreille Playhouse 10/14-16 J Of Mice and Men, Pullman Civic Theatre 10/14-16 Leap of Faith, Kroc Center 10/16 J According To Coyote, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture

VISUAL ARTS

10/13-19 J Our Stories, Our Lives: Irwin Nash Photographs of Yakima Valley Migrant Labor, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 10/13-19 J Orbiting Misfits, New Moon Gallery 10/13-19 The Chairman’s China: Transition and the Maoist Era, Whitworth University 10/13-19 Voices, Vibrance, Vision, Liberty Building

10/13-19 J Masked Preservation: Chad “Little Coyote” Yellowjohn, SFCC Fine Arts Gallery 10/13-19 J Chris Kelsey, Mark Moore & Gina Freun, Trackside Studio 10/13-14 Carlo Acutis Eucharistic Miracles Exhibition, St. Mary’s Parish Family Center 10/13-19 J Emily Somoskey: Surfacing, EWU Gallery of Art 10/13-19 Teascarlet: Resolve, Columbia Bank Community Plaza 10/13-19 J Krista Brand: Periphery, Bryan Oliver Gallery 10/13-19 New to You, Jundt Art Museum 10/13-19 Katie Creyts: Trappings, Boswell Corner Gallery at NIC 10/13-19 Juventino Aranda: Esperé Mucho Tiempo Pa Ver, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 10/13-19 J Dancing with Life: Mexican Masks, The MAC 10/13-19 J American Impressionism: Treasures from the Daywood Collection, The MAC 10/13-19 Lost in Translation, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 10/13-19 J Lila Girvin: Gift of a Moment, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 10/13-19 Jan Schnurr: Pattern Play, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 10/13-19 J Mel McCuddin, The Art Spirit Gallery 10/13-19 Jerry White, Avenue West Gallery 10/13-19 J Archie Bray Foundation Resident Exhibition, Kolva-Sullivan Gallery 10/13-19 Pam Hansen, Pottery Place Plus 10/13-19 J Chris Kelsey, Mark Moore &

Gina Freun, Trackside Studio 10/13-19 Kurt Madison & Roger Ralston, Saranac Art Projects 10/13-19 J Carl Richardson & Mardis Nenno, Terrain Gallery 10/13-19 Shelli Waters, Marmot Art Space 10/13-19 J Meet Your Maker, From Here 10/13-19 Pamela Caughey: Unforeseen, Moscow Contemporary 10/13 Costumed Figure Drawing, Central Library 10/14-16 J Washington State Quilt Show, Spokane County Fair & Expo Center 10/14 Second Friday Artwalk, Downtown Coeur d’Alene 10/14 Word Songs by Annette Duncan, Seasons of Coeur d’Alene 10/14 J Toby Keough & Alexandra Iosub Opening Reception, Emerge 10/14 Sip ‘n’ Spin, Emerge 10/15 J Art of the Renaissance Workshop with Tom Quinn, Spokane Art School

WORDS

10/13 Author Talk: Aziz Gazipura, online at scld.org 10/13 Author Talks: Shannon Potratz, Shadle Library 10/13 Auntie’s Book Club: New Fiction, Auntie’s Bookstore 10/14 J Frank Scalise & Colin Conway: The Ride Along, Auntie’s Bookstore 10/17 Integrating Science into Climate and Environmental Policy, Gonzaga University Hemmingson Center 10/18 Author Talk: Zain E. Asher, online at scld.org 10/19 J Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

4.55” wide by 5.4” high

Spokane String Quartet J O I N U S AT 3 P. M . S U N DAYS AT T H E B I N G C R O S BY T H E AT E R O C T. 1 6 , 2 0 2 2 N OV. 2 0 , 2 0 2 2

W i t h D a w n Wo l s k i , S o p r a n o

FEB. 19, 2023

W i t h C h i p P h i l l i p s , C l a ri n e t

MARCH 19, 2023 M AY 7, 2 0 2 3

W i t h L e o n a r d B y rn e , Tu b a

w w w. s p o k a n e s t r i n g q u a r t e t . o r g FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 39


OCT. 20-26

Adventures, Spokane Arena 10/21-22 Barbecuing Hamlet, Circle Moon Theater 10/21-22 J Vytal Movement Dance: Sanctuary, Vytal Movement Studio 10/22-24 MET Live in HD: Medea, The Kenworthy

COMEDY

10/20-22 Brendan Schaub, Spokane Comedy Club 10/21 No Clue!, Blue Door Theatre 10/22 Randy Feltface, Spokane Comedy Club 10/22 Safari, Blue Door Theatre. 10/25 New Talent Tuesdays, Spokane Comedy Club 10/26 Open Mic, Spokane Comedy Club

VISUAL ARTS

COMMUNITY

10/20-26 Golden Harvest: Flour Sacks from the Permanent Collection, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 10/20-26 J The Rum Rebellion: Prohibition in North Idaho, Museum of North Idaho 10/20 Witches Night Out Shop Hop, Spokane Valley 10/20 J Campbell House Dark History Tours, The MAC 10/20-23 Neon Jungle, Kootenai County Fairgrounds 10/22-23 Pumpkin Patch, Garland Mercantile 10/22 The Pumpkin Ball, Davenport Grand 10/23 Haunted Millwood 5k Run/Walk & Kids 1/2 Mile, Downtown Millwood

FILM

10/22 Saturday Cartoons at the Farmers Market, The Kenworthy 10/22 Drive-In Movies: Beetlejuice, The HUB Sports Center

Coco is the featured film for the HUB’s Drive-In Movie Series on Oct. 29.

10/22 Drive-In Movies: Friday the 13th, The HUB Sports Center 10/25 Totally Tubular Tuesday, Garland Theater

MUSIC

10/20 The Jars, The Mason Jar 10/20 Jelly Roll, Pavilion at Riverfront 10/20 Kelsey Waldon, Lucky You Lounge. 10/21 J James McMurtry, Jonny Burke, Lucky You Lounge 10/22 Sam Leyde Band, Knitting Factory 10/22 Indubious, Sol Seed, Lucky You 10/23 Psyclon Nine, Seven Factor, Corvins Breed, The Big Dipper 10/23 5th Annual IN-CMA Awards Show,

Bing Crosby Theater 10/22-23 J Spokane Symphony Masterworks 3: Fabio Returns, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 10/25 Animals as Leaders, Car Bomb, Alluvial, Knitting Factory 10/26 DJ Paul Crunk-Or-Treat Halloween Party, Red Room Lounge

STAGE

10/20-23 Of Mice and Men, Pullman Civic Theatre 10/20-26 J Guys and Dolls, Regional Theatre of the Palouse. 10/20-23 J Leap of Faith, Kroc Center 10/21-23 J Disney On Ice: Road Trip

10/20-25 Chad “Little Coyote” Yellowjohn: Masked Preservation, SFCC Gallery 10/20-26 J Orbiting Misfits, New Moon Gallery 10/20-26 Emily Somoskey: Surfacing, EWU Gallery of Art 10/20-26 Katie Creyts: Trappings, Boswell Corner Gallery at NIC 10/20-26 New to You, Jundt Art Museum 10/20-26 J Dancing with Life: Mexican Masks, The MAC 10/20-26 American Impressionism: Treasures from the Daywood Collection, The MAC 10/20-26 J Lila Girvin: Gift of a Moment, The MAC 10/20-26 Krista Brand: Periphery, Bryan Oliver Gallery 10/20-26 J Mel McCuddin, The Art Spirit Gallery 10/20-26 Shelli Waters, Marmot Art Space 10/20-26 Jerry White, Avenue West 10/20-26 J Archie Bray Foundation Resident Exhibition, Kolva-Sullivan 10/20-26 Pam Hansen, Pottery Place Plus 10/20-26 Chris Kelsey, Mark Moore & Gina Freun, Trackside Studio 10/20-26 Kurt Madison & Roger Ralston, Saranac Art Projects

10/20-26 J Carl Richardson & Mardis Nenno, Terrain Gallery 10/20-26 Meet Your Maker, From Here 10/20-26 Pamela Caughey: Unforeseen, Moscow Contemporary 10/20-26 David Herbold & John Larkin, Moscow Third Street Gallery 10/20 D&D Miniature Paint Night, The Comic Book Shop (NorthTown) 10/20 Power of Words: Vessels of Imperfection Workshop, Soulful Art Studio 10/22 J Bookbinding Techniques: Endbands, Spokane Print & Publishing Center 10/22 Impressionism Workshop with Tom Quinn, Spokane Art School 10/22 Community Mosaic Sculpture TileMaking Workshop, The Hive

WORDS

10/20 Open Mic Nite, Emerge 10/20 J Lilac City Live!: Haunted Edition, Central Library 10/21 J Bedtime Stories ft. Jess Walter, Riverside Place 10/25 Author Talk: Kate Quinn, online at scld.org 10/4 J WSU Visiting Writers Series: Sam Roxas-Chua, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 10/25 Drop In & Write, Spark Central 10/26 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito 10/26 J An Evening With Reginald Dwayne Betts, Gonzaga Hemmingson Center 10/26 J Spokane Is Reading: Kate Lebo: The Book of Difficult Fruit, North Spokane Library and Central Library

SPOKEN RIVER : 2022 Free Livestream Fundraiser & Auction October 28th | 7:00pm to 8:00pm

This livestream event features our journey down the Spokane River, highlighting the powerful connections that people and communities have to it. Your sponsorship or donation benefits Spokane Riverkeeper and our programs that keep the river clean and healthy. Join us and help ensure the best life for the river.

Be a sponsor and make an impact at:

www.spokenriver.com 40 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022


J Inlander recommends this event

OCT. 27 - NOV. 2 COMEDY

10/28 J No Clue!, Blue Door Theatre 10/29 Safari, Blue Door Theatre 10/30 Dave Fulton, Spokane Comedy Club 11/1 New Talent Tuesdays, Spokane Comedy Club 11/2 Open Mic Spokane Comedy Club

COMMUNITY

10/27-30 Golden Harvest: Flour Sacks from the Permanent Collection, The MAC 10/27-29 J The Rum Rebellion: Prohibition in North Idaho, Museum of North Idaho 10/28-30 J SpoCon 2022, Historic Davenport Hotel 10/28 Trick or Treat on Main Street, Colfax 10/28-30 Moonlit Monster Halloween Cruises, Coeur d’Alene 10/28-31 J SpookWalk, Browne’s Addition 10/29-31 Spo-Candy Crawl, Downtown Spokane 10/29 Ghost Ball 2022, Spokane Convention Center 10/29 Rogers Holiday Craft Fair, Rogers High School 10/29 J Spark-o-ween, Spark Central 10/29 Cosplay Contest Spooktacular, The Comic Book Shop (NorthTown) 10/29 J Ghoul Ol Fashioned Fun, Camp Dart-Lo 10/29 J Witches Ride, Corbin Park 10/29 Costume Ball Murder Mystery & Fear Room Attraction, GreenTent Station

10/29 Disco at Dark, Coeur d’Alene Resort 10/30 J Traditional Filipino Dance, Central Library 10/31 J Campbell House Halloween, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 11/2 Spokane Folklore Society Contra Dance, Woman’s Club of Spokane

FILM

10/29 Saturday Cartoons at the Farmers Market, The Kenworthy 10/29 J Drive-In Movies: Coco, HUB Sports Center 10/29 J Drive-In Movies: Hocus Pocus, HUB Sports Center 11/1 Totally Tubular Tuesday, Garland Theater

MUSIC

10/27 Jazz Workshop: Ryan Keberle’s Reverso Trio, Central Library 10/27 Reverso, Bing Crosby Theater 10/27 Hermano Kuya, The Mason Jar 10/27 Just Plain Darin, QQ Sushi & Kitchen 10/28 Just Plain Darin, Ridler Piano Bar 10/28 Cody Johnson, Randy Houser, Spokane Arena 10/28 Dead Poet Society, BRKN Love, Lucky You Lounge 10/28 J Who’s Bad: The Ultimate Michael Jackson Experience, Bing Crosby Theater 10/29 J Monster Party: Bored with Fire, Enemy Mine, Better Daze, Snacks at Midnight, Knitting Factory 10/29 Will Hoge, Lucky You Lounge 10/29 Blake Braley, Zola 10/29-30 J Spokane Symphony: The

Music of Harry Potter and Other Halloween Favorites, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 10/30 J Night of the Rocking Dead, Northern Quest Resort & Casino 10/30 Arlo McKinley, Lucky You Lounge 10/30 Leonid & Friends, Bing Crosby Theater 10/31 Whiskey Myers, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 11/2 Spirit of Spokane Chorus, Opportunity Presbyterian Church

STAGE

10/27-30 J Guys and Dolls, Regional Theatre of the Palouse 10/28-31 Misery, Panida Theater 10/28-30 J According To Coyote, Location TBA 10/28-30 J The Rocky Horror Show, Stage Left Theater 10/28-30 J The Book of Mormon, First Interstate Center for the Arts 10/28-30 J Exile, Spokane Civic Theatre 10/28-30 Cabaret, Hartung Theater at University of Idaho

VISUAL ARTS

10/27-28 Krista Brand: Periphery, Bryan Oliver Gallery 10/27-29 J Mel McCuddin, The Art Spirit Gallery 10/27-29 Jerry White, Avenue West Gallery 10/27-29 J Archie Bray Foundation Resident Exhibition, Kolva-Sullivan Gallery 10/27-29 Pam Hansen, Pottery Place Plus

10/27-29 Kurt Madison & Roger Ralston, Saranac Art Projects 10/27-29 J Carl Richardson & Mardis Nenno, Terrain Gallery 10/27-29 Voices, Vibrance, Vision, Liberty Gallery 10/27-29 Shelli Waters, Marmot Art Space 10/27-31 Chris Kelsey, Mark Moore & Gina Freun, Trackside Studio 10/27-11/2 Our Stories, Our Lives: Irwin Nash Photographs of Yakima Valley Migrant Labor, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 10/27-11/2 The Chairman’s China: Transition and the Maoist Era, Whitworth University 10/27-11/2 J Emily Somoskey: Surfacing, EWU Gallery of Art 10/27-11/2 Teascarlet: Resolve, Columbia Bank Community Plaza 10/27-11/2 J New to You, Jundt Art Museum 10/27-11/2 Juventino Aranda: Esperé Mucho Tiempo Pa Ver, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 10/27-11/2 J Dancing with Life: Mexican Masks, The MAC 10/27-11/2 J American Impressionism: Treasures from the Daywood Collection, The MAC 10/27-11/2 Lost in Translation, The MAC 10/27-11/2 J Lila Girvin: Gift of a Moment, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 10/27-30 Jan Schnurr: Pattern Play, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 10/27-11/2 Katie Creyts: Trappings, Boswell Corner Gallery at NIC. 10/27-11/2 Meet Your Maker, From Here, River Park Square

10/27-11/2 Pamela Caughey: Unforeseen, Moscow Contemporary 10/27-11/2 David Herbold & John Larkin, Moscow Third Street Gallery 10/29 J Pine Needle Basket Weaving, Emerge 10/29-31 Bring Your Own Piece Paint Class, Paint In My Hair 11/1-2 J Caitie Sellers: Scenes from an Underpass, SFCC Fine Art Gallery 11/2 Drop In & Draw, Spark Central

WORDS

10/27 J One Story Slam, Central Library 10/28 J Spoken River, online at event. gives/spokenriver2022 11/1 J Everybody Reads: Beth Piatote, Colfax Library 11/1 Drop In & Write, Spark Central 11/1 The Emotional Life of the Climate Justice Movement, online at gonzaga.edu/ClimateCenterEvents 11/1 Book Club: Science & Nature, Auntie’s Bookstore 11/1 J Everybody Reads: Beth Piatote, Neill Public Library 11/2 J Everybody Reads: Beth Piatote, Washington State University 11/2 J Lisa Napoli: The Extraordinary Story of the Founding Mothers of NPR, online; scld.org 11/2 The WRITE Time, The Hive 11/2 Broken Mic, Neato Burrito 11/2 J Diamonds in the Rough: The Gentrification of Rural Washington, online; humanities.org 11/2 J Everybody Reads: Beth Piatote, 1912 Center

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SPONSORED BY:

WINTERPARTY.INLANDER.COM FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 41


NOV. 3-9 COMEDY

11/3-5 John Caparulo, Spokane Comedy Club 11/4 Before It’s In Theatres, Blue Door Theatre 11/5 Safari, Blue Door Theatre 11/8 New Talent Tuesdays, Spokane Comedy Club 11/9 Open Mic, Spokane Comedy Club 11/9 J Kenan Thompson’s Young Stars Talent Show, Spokane Comedy Club

COMMUNITY

11/5 J Inland NW Toy Show Classic, Spokane County Fair & Expo Center 11/5-6 Fall Holiday Craft Show, Shadle Park High School 11/5 Drop In & RPG, Spark Central 11/6 Learn to Play TCG Games, The Comic Book Shop (NorthTown) 11/6 J SPA Annual Historic Preservation Awards, Montvale Event Center 11/8 Totally Tubular Tuesday, Garland Theater

MUSIC

11/4 Conservatory Concert Series: Evening in the Gardens of Spain, Music Conservatory of Sandpoint 11/4 The Black Jacket Symphony Presents: Led Zeppelin IV, Bing Crosby Theater 11/5 J Spokane Symphony Pops 2: John Williams’ 90th Birthday Celebration, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 11/5 J Washington-Idaho Symphony: Kah

Hoe & King, University of Idaho Administration Building 11/6 J Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 11/8 EWU Composers Forum Concert, EWU Music Building Recital Hall 11/8 Symphony Orchestra Concert, Bryan Hall Theatre at WSU 11/4 Pamela Benton: StringzOnFire!, The Bee’s Knees Whiskey Bar 11/3 Open Mic, The Mason Jar 11/4 J MAITA, Lucky You Lounge 11/4 J Deck the Halls with Disney featuring DCappella, First Interstate Center for the Arts 11/4 Jason Ross, Knitting Factory 11/5 Tryone Wells, Lucky You Lounge 11/5 Chelsea Cutler, Ayokay, Arden Jones, Knitting Factory 11/7 The Ongoing Concept, Fallstar, The Undertaking!, Meadows, The Big Dipper 11/8 Glen Phillips, Lucky You Lounge 11/8 Machine Head, Knitting Factory 11/9 J The Smashing Pumpkins, Jane’s Addiction, Poppy, Spokane Arena

STAGE

11/3-6 J The Rocky Horror Show, Stage Left Theater 11/3-6 J Exile, Spokane Civic Theatre 11/4-6 J According To Coyote, Location TBA 11/4-6 J Cabaret, Hartung Theater at University of Idaho 11/4-6 A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Gonzaga Magnuson Theatre

4.55” wide by 5.4” high

11/5-7 J MET Live in HD: La Traviata, The Kenworthy 11/5-9 J The Spongebob Musical, Bing Crosby Theater

VISUAL ARTS

11/3-9 Our Stories, Our Lives: Irwin Nash Photographs of Yakima Valley Migrant Labor, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 11/3-9 The Chairman’s China: Transition and the Maoist Era, Whitworth University 11/3 J Emily Somoskey: Surfacing, EWU Gallery of Art 11/3-9 Teascarlet: Resolve, Columbia Bank Community Plaza 11/3-9 New to You, Jundt Art Museum 11/3-9 Juventino Aranda: Esperé Mucho Tiempo Pa Ver, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 11/3-9 J Dancing with Life: Mexican Masks, The MAC 11/3-4 Katie Creyts: Trappings, Boswell Corner Gallery at NIC 11/3-9 J American Impressionism: Treasures from the Daywood Collection, The MAC 11/3-9 Lost in Translation, The MAC 11/3-9 Lila Girvin: Gift of a Moment, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 11/3-9 Meet Your Maker, From Here 11/3 Afternoon Intermediate Pottery, Emerge 11/3-9 Pamela Caughey: Unforeseen, Moscow Contemporary 11/3-9 David Herbold & John Larkin, Moscow Third Street Gallery

Among the MAC’s ongoing fall exhibits is “Dancing With Life: Mexican Masks.”

11/3-9 Caitie Sellers: Scenes from an Underpass, SFCC Fine Art Gallery 11/4 J First Friday, Spokane 11/4 Maker Fridays, Emerge 11/4 First Fridays with POAC, Pend Oreille Arts Council Gallery 11/4-5 Annual Coasters Benefit & Show, Trackside Studio 11/4-9 Vickie West, Avenue West Gallery 11/4-9 Megan Martens-Haworth, KolvaSullivan Gallery 11/4-9 LR Montgomery & T. Kurtz, Liberty Gallery 11/4-9 Frank Munns, Marmot Art Space 11/4-9 Transmutation: Kim Long & Susan Webber, New Moon Art Gallery 11/4-9 Spokane Jewelers Guild, Pottery Place Plus

11/4-9 J Lisa Nappa & Chris Tyllia, Saranac Art Projects 11/4-9 J Christa Ann Ames, Terrain Gallery 11/5 Pine Needle Basket Weaving, Emerge 11/5-7 Bring Your Own Piece Paint Class, Paint In My Hair 11/7 Made Art...Now What?, Liberty Park Library 11/8-9 Whitworth Faculty Biennial, Bryan Oliver Gallery 11/9 Drop In & Draw, Spark Central

WORDS

11/7 J Legends & Lattes by Travis Baldree, Auntie’s Bookstore 11/8 Drop In & Write, Spark Central 11/9 J Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

4.55” wide by 5.4” high

KNITTINGFACTORY.COM

NOVEMBER 5TH - 13TH BING CROSBY THEATER cytspokane.org

CLASSES • CAMPS • SHOWS 42 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022


J Inlander recommends this event

NOV. 10-16

11/14-15 J Blue Man Group, First Interstate Center for the Arts

VISUAL ARTS

COMEDY

11/10-11 J Jason Mewes, Spokane Comedy Club 11/11 J Hasan Minaj, WSU Beasley Coliseum 11/12 Safari, Blue Door Theatre 11/12-13 Becky Robinson, Spokane Comedy Club 11/15 New Talent Tuesdays, Spokane Comedy Club 11/16 Open Mic, Spokane Comedy Club

COMMUNITY

11/11 State Parks Free Day, Washington State Parks 11/11-12 Inlander Winter Party, Spokane Convention Center 11/12-13 J Fall Folk Festival, Spokane Community College 11/16 Spokane Folklore Society’s Contra Dance, Woman’s Club of Spokane 11/15 Totally Tubular Tuesday, Garland Theater

MUSIC

11/10 J Walker Hayes, Parmalee, Spokane Arena 11/10 J The Commodores, CdA Casino 11/10 Midnight Sun, The Mason Jar 11/10 Call Me Karizma, FAANGS, Astrus*, Anxxiety, The Big Dipper 11/10 Matt Watson, Lucky You Lounge 11/11 Odyssey, We Are William, Blighted Eye, Day Shadow, The Big Dipper 11/11 Surf Curse, Toner, Knitting Factory

The Flaming Lips play the Knitting Factory on Nov. 13.

11/11 Bombargo, Lucky You Lounge 11/12-13 J Spokane Symphony Masterworks 4: Fire & Ice, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 11/12 J Phantogram, GLU, Knitting Factory 11/13 J The Flaming Lips, Knitting Factory 11/13 Great American Ghost, 156/Silence, Hazing Over, Warcrime, The Big Dipper 11/15 J Tai Verdes, Knitting Factory 11/15 The Brothers Comatoes, Pixie & the Partygrass Boys, Lucky You Lounge 11/15 The Night Mayors, Zola 11/15 EWU Orchestra, EWU Music Building Recital Hall 11/16 Spirit of Spokane Chorus, Opportunity Presbyterian Church

STAGE

11/10-13 J The Rocky Horror Show, Stage Left Theater 11/10-13 CY T Spokane: The Spongebob Musical, Bing Crosby Theater 11/10-12 J A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Gonzaga Magnuson Theatre 11/10 Spokane Playwrights Laboratory: The Navigator, Spokane Civic Theatre 11/11-13 26 Pebbles, Eastern Washington University 11/11-13 CYT North Idaho: The Lightning Thief, The Percy Jackson Musical, Kroc Center 11/12 Cranberries, Turkey & Murder!, Coeur d’Alene Fresh 11/12 Blue’s Clue’s & You!, First Interstate Center for the Arts

27 Years of Celebrating Our Cultural Diversity

4.55” wide by 5.4” high

11/10-16 Our Stories, Our Lives: Irwin Nash Photographs of Yakima Valley Migrant Labor, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 11/10-16 Teascarlet: Resolve, Columbia Bank Community Plaza 11/10-16 New to You, Jundt Art Museum 11/10-16 Juventino Aranda: Esperé Mucho Tiempo Pa Ver, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 11/10-16 J Dancing with Life: Mexican Masks, The MAC 11/10-16 Whitworth Faculty Biennial, Bryan Oliver Gallery 11/10-16 J American Impressionism: Treasures from the Daywood Collection, The MAC 11/10-16 J Lila Girvin: Gift of a Moment, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 11/10-16 Savages and Princesses: The Persistence of Native American Stereotypes, The MAC 11/10-16 Meet Your Maker, From Here 11/10-16 Pamela Caughey: Unforeseen, Moscow Contemporary 11/10-16 David Herbold & John Larkin, Moscow Third Street Gallery 11/10-16 Vickie West, Avenue West Gallery 11/10-16 Megan Martens-Haworth, KolvaSullivan Gallery 11/10-16 LR Montgomery & T. Kurtz, Liberty Gallery 11/10-16 Frank Munns, Marmot Art Space 11/10-16 Transmutation: Kim Long & Susan

Webber, New Moon Art Gallery 11/10-16 Spokane Jewelers Guild, Pottery Place Plus 11/10-16 Lisa Nappa & Chris Tyllia, Saranac Art Projects 11/10-16 Caitie Sellers: Scenes from an Underpass, SFCC Fine Art Gallery 11/10-16 Christa Ann Ames, Terrain Gallery 11/10 J Made Art...Now What?, Central Library 11/10 Art Auction, M.A.D. Co. Labs 11/11 Second Friday Artwalk, Downtown Coeur d’Alene 11/11 J Adam C. Schluter, Paul Bonnell & Community Veterans: Art Walk Opening Reception, Emerge 11/11 Sip n Spin, Emerge 11/12 Frame Loom Weaving, Emerge 11/12 Living Loved: Vessels of Imperfection Workshop, Soulful Art Studio 11/16 J Keiko Hara Reception & Book Release, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU

WORDS

11/10 Author Talk - Bonnie Garmus: Lessons in Chemistry, online at scld.org 11/10 J Author Talks: Terece Hahn Metzger, Shadle Library 11/10 Terrain Talks: Navigating Business as a QTBIPOC Entrepreneur, From Here 11/15 Author Talk: Kwame Christian, online at scld.org 11/15 Drop In & Write, Spark Central 11/15 Mary Clearman Blew: Think of Horses, The Kenworthy 11/16 Poetry Rising, Shadle Library 11/16 J Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

4.55” wide by 5.4” high

Spokane Folklore Society Presents:

Spokane 2022

LIVE SATURDAY, NOV. 12TH 11:00am - 8:00pm SUNDAY, NOV. 13TH 11:00am - 5:00pm

KPBX (91.1 FM) Studio Broadcast

Saturday, Nov. 12th

Everyone Welcome! Shop for local arts and crafts, carvings, jewelry, home decor, hand-knitted accessories, baked goodies, handmade cards, and more! Enter to win one of our exciting prizes! Face painting, holiday activities and fun! Free Admission. Additional Parking available on W. Hastings near Thomas Hammer Coffee at the Fairwood Shopping Center.

11:00am - 1:00pm

FREE PARKING & ADMISSION Spokane Community College, Lair Student Center, 1810 N. Greene St. Thank you to our sponsors!

FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 43


NOV. 17-23

STAGE

11/17-19 J 26 Pebbles, Eastern Washington University 11/17-19 J The Rocky Horror Show, Stage Left Theater 11/17-20 CYT North Idaho: The Lightning Thief, The Percy Jackson Musical, Kroc Center 11/18 Diva Dance Nights, Sandra’s Studio of Dance 11/19 Gonzaga University Theatre Sports Improv, Gonzaga Magnuson Theatre 11/19 J Dance Presents!, Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center

COMEDY

11/17-19 Drew Lynch, Spokane Comedy Club 11/19 Safari, Blue Door Theatre 11/19 J An Evening with David Sedaris, Bing Crosby Theater 11/20 J Victoria Jackson, Spokane Comedy Club 11/22 New Talent Tuesdays, Spokane Comedy Club 11/23 Open Mic, Spokane Comedy Club

COMMUNITY

11/18-20 J Custer’s Christmas Arts & Crafts Show, Spokane County Fair & Expo Center 11/18 J Epicurean Delight, Spokane Convention Center 11/19 J Spokane Humane Society FurrBall, Davenport Grand Hotel 11/19 Drop In & RPG, Spark Central 11/20 Learn to Play TCG Games, The Comic Book Shop (NorthTown) 11/20 Drag Brunch, Globe Bar & Kitchen 11/22 Totally Tubular Tuesday, Garland Theater

MUSIC

11/17 EWU Wind Ensemble Concert, EWU Music Building Recital Hall 11/17 Weathered Shepherds, Checkerboard Taproom 11/17 Rosalie, The Mason Jar 11/17 J The Kingston Trio, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

VISUAL ARTS

The Spokane String Quartet opens its 2022-23 season Oct. 20 at the Bing Crosby Theater.

11/17 Desperate8s, Zola 11/17 J Midland, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 11/17 Just Plain Darin, QQ Sushi & Kitchen 11/18 Just Plain Darin, The Ridler Piano Bar 11/18 Fenix Flexin, Knitting Factory 11/18 Sports, Hot Flash Heatwave, SIPPER, Lucky You Lounge 11/19 Saturday with the Symphony: A Children’s Program, Coeur d’Alene Public Library 11/19 J Modest Mouse: ‘The Lonesome Crowded West’ 25th Anniversary Tour, Knitting Factory

11/19 Blake Braley, Zola 11/19-20 J Handel’s Messiah, St. John’s Cathedral 11/20 Richard Marx, Northern Quest Resort & Casino 11/20 J Spokane String Quartet, Bing Crosby Theater 11/20 J Spokane Youth Symphony: Bravo, Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox 11/23 Spirit of Spokane Chorus, Opportunity Presbyterian Church 11/22 The Night Mayors, Zola 11/23 The Roomates, Red Room Lounge 11/23 Runaway Lemonade, Zola

SAVE THE DATE! 46th Annual Christmas

509.924.0588 44 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

11/17-23 J Our Stories, Our Lives: Irwin Nash Photographs of Yakima Valley Migrant Labor, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 11/17-18 Teascarlet: Resolve, Columbia Bank Community Plaza 11/17-23 New to You, Jundt Art Museum 11/17-23 Juventino Aranda: Esperé Mucho Tiempo Pa Ver, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 11/17-23 Dancing with Life: Mexican Masks, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 11/17-23 Whitworth Faculty Biennial, Bryan Oliver Gallery, Whitworth 11/17-23 J American Impressionism: Treasures from the Daywood Collection, The MAC 11/17-23 J Lila Girvin: Gift of a Moment, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 11/17-23 J Savages and Princesses: The Persistence of Native American Stereotypes, Northwest Museum of

Arts & Culture 11/17-23 Meet Your Maker, From Here 11/17-23 Pamela Caughey: Unforeseen, Moscow Contemporary 11/17-23 David Herbold & John Larkin, Moscow Third Street Gallery 11/17-23 Vickie West, Avenue West Gallery 11/17-23 J Megan Martens-Haworth, Kolva-Sullivan Gallery 11/17-23 LR Montgomery & T. Kurtz, Liberty Gallery 11/17-23 Frank Munns, Marmot Art Space 11/17-23 Transmutation: Kim Long & Susan Webber, New Moon Art Gallery 11/17-23 J Spokane Jewelers Guild, Pottery Place Plus 11/17-23 Lisa Nappa & Chris Tyllia, Saranac Art Projects 11/17-23 Christa Ann Ames, Terrain Gallery 11/17 Costumed Figure Drawing, Hillyard Library 11/17 Adult Fine Art Workshop: Clay Earrings, Kroc Center 11/18 Maker Fridays, Emerge 11/18-19 J Spokane Handweavers’ Guild Show and Sale, Barrister Winery 11/19-21 Bring Your Own Piece Paint Class, Paint In My Hair 11/23 Drop In & Draw, Spark Central

WORDS

11/17 Emerge Open Mic Nite, Emerge 11/17 J Lilac City Live!, Central Library 11/19 J Artist Talk: LR Montgomery and Ruth Gifford, Liberty Building 11/22 Drop In & Write, Spark Central 11/23 J Broken Mic, Neato Burrito


J Inlander recommends this event

NOV. 24-30 COMEDY

11/25-27 J Preacher Lawson, Spokane Comedy Club 11/25 J Jay Leno, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 11/26 Safari, Blue Door Theatre 11/29 New Talent Tuesdays, Spokane Comedy Club 11/30 Open Mic, Spokane Comedy Club

MUSIC

11/24 Desperate8s, Zola 11/24 Weathered Shepherds, Checkerboard Taproom 11/24 Just Plain Darin, QQ Sushi & Kitchen 11/25 Just Plain Darin, The Ridler Piano Bar 11/25 J Trans-Siberian Orchestra: The Ghosts of Christmas Eve, Spokane Arena 11/26 Blake Braley, Zola 11/29 Lucas Brown & Friends, Zola 11/28 J EWU Jazz Concert, EWU Music Building Recital Hall. 11/30 Spirit of Spokane Chorus, Opportunity Presbyterian Church 11/30 The Roomates, Red Room Lounge 11/30 Runaway Lemonade, Zola

COMMUNITY

11/27 Learn to Play TCG Games, The Comic Book Shop (NorthTown) 11/27 Drag Brunch, Globe Bar & Kitchen 11/29-30 J Christmas Tree Elegance, River Park Square 11/29 Totally Tubular Tuesday, Garland

Theater 11/30 J Riverfront Market, Pavilion at Riverfront

STAGE

11/25-27 J The Sound of Music, Spokane Children’s Theatre 11/25-27 J A Christmas Carol, Spokane Civic Theatre 11/26-27 J Spokane Playwrights Laboratory: A League of Her Own, Location TBA

VISUAL ARTS

11/24-30 Our Stories, Our Lives: Irwin Nash Photographs of Yakima Valley Migrant Labor, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 11/24-30 The Chairman’s China: Transition and the Maoist Era, Whitworth University 11/24-30 New to You, Jundt Art Museum 11/24-30 J Whitworth Faculty Biennial, Bryan Oliver Gallery 11/24-30 Juventino Aranda: Esperé Mucho Tiempo Pa Ver, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 11/24-30 Dancing with Life: Mexican Masks, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 11/24-30 American Impressionism: Treasures from the Daywood Collection, The MAC 11/24-30 J Lila Girvin: Gift of a Moment, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 11/24-30 J Savages and Princesses:

The Persistence of Native American Stereotypes, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 11/24-30 Meet Your Maker, From Here 11/24-30 Pamela Caughey: Unforeseen, Moscow Contemporary 11/24-30 David Herbold & John Larkin, Moscow Third Street Gallery 11/24-30 J Caitie Sellers: Scenes from an Underpass, SFCC Fine Art Gallery 11/24-30 LR Montgomery & T. Kurtz, Liberty Gallery 11/25 Frank Munns, Marmot Art Space 11/25 Spokane Jewelers Guild, Pottery Place Plus 11/25 J Lisa Nappa & Chris Tyllia, Saranac Art Projects 11/25 Christa Ann Ames, Terrain Gallery 11/25 Vickie West, Avenue West Gallery 11/25 J Megan Martens-Haworth, KolvaSullivan Gallery 11/25 J Transmutation: Kim Long & Susan Webber, New Moon Art Gallery 11/26 Pine Needle Basket Weaving, Emerge 11/26-28 Bring Your Own Piece Paint Class, Paint In My Hair 11/29-30 J Megan Artwood Cherry: Precious Cargo, North Idaho College Boswell Corner Gallery 11/30 Drop In & Draw, Spark Central

WORDS

11/26 Auntie’s Book Club: Queer & Weird, Auntie’s Bookstore 11/29 Drop In & Write, Spark Central 11/30 J Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

Start your holiday shopping at the Riverfront Market inside the Pavilion.

ALYSSA HUGHES PHOTO

Ben Fife in his studio

6th Annual MAC

HOLIDAY ARTIST STUDIO TOUR Saturday, December 3rd, 2022

NOW PLAYING - OCTOBER 16

Tour 10 am-4 pm.Visit 6 local artists in their studios – see where they create and how they work. Art available for sale.

$20 Tour and Reception $15 Tour Only

Reception 4-6 pm. End your day at the Steam Plant and mingle with the artists, enjoy live music from Ron Kieper jazz, wine and beer for purchase, and a drawing for artwork from Helen Parsons, or a pottery lesson from Tim Lynch.

Purchase tickets online beginning November 1 at www.northwestmuseum.org and at the MAC.

Sponsored by

Christina Deubel – Painting Ben Fife – Leather Goods Tim Lynch – Pottery Brooke Martinez – Pottery Helen Parsons – Fiber Arts Amber Wyckoff – Jewelry

509-325-2507 I CIVICTICKETS.COM

FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 45


DEC. 1-7

MUSIC

COMEDY

12/2 J Ha!!mark Holiday Special, Blue Door Theatre 12/3 Safari, Blue Door Theatre 12/4 Matty Chymbor, Spokane Comedy Club 12/6 New Talent Tuesdays, Spokane Comedy Club 12/7 Open Mic Spokane Comedy Club

COMMUNITY

12/2-4 J Northwest Winterfest, Spokane County Fair & Expo Center 12/3 J Winterfest, Colfax 12/3 Pottery Place Plus Ornament Sale, Pottery Place Plus 12/3 Classical Mediterranean Music, Dance and Dinner, Lebanon Restaurant & Cafe 12/3 J HUB Drive-In Movie Series: The Polar Express, HUB Sports Center 12/3 Dahmen Barn Holiday Market, Dahmen Barn 12/3 Drop In & RPG, Spark Central 12/4 Learn to Play TCG Games, The Comic Book Shop (NorthTown) 12/4 Drag Brunch, Globe Bar & Kitchen 12/6 Totally Tubular Tuesday Garland Theater 12/7 J Riverfront Market, Pavilion at Riverfront 12/7 Spokane Folklore Society’s Contra Dance, Woman’s Club of Spokane

12/2 Pamela Benton: StringzOnFire!, The Bee’s Knees Whiskey Bar 12/2 J Joe Bonamassa, First Interstate Center for the Arts 12/2 J EWU Choral Concert, Central Lutheran Church 12/3 Washington-Idaho Symphony: Christmas Brass, Pullman High School 12/3 J Jim Brickman with Mat & Savanna Shaw: A Very Merry Christmas, Bing Crosby Theater 12/3 Coeur d’Alene Symphony: Celebrating Seasons Greetings!, Schuler Performing Arts Center 12/4 J Wild Pink, Trace Mountains, Lucky You Lounge 12/4 Blunts and Blondes, Yookie, Drinkurwater, Knitting Factory 12/6 Lucas Brown & Friends, Zola 12/7 Russell Dickerson, Drew Green, Knitting Factory

STAGE

12/1-2 Spokane Playwrights Laboratory: A League of Her Own, Location TBA 12/1-4 J A Christmas Carol, Spokane Civic Theatre 12/1-4 J The Sound of Music, Spokane Children’s Theatre 12/1-4 J The Nutcracker Ballet ft. Spokane Symphony and the State Street Ballet, The Fox 12/2-4 Christmas Belles, Pend Oreille Playhouse 12/2-4 J Native Gardens, Spokane Civic Theatre

12/2-4 Christmas Belles, Pend Oreille Playhouse 12/3 Gonzaga University Theatre Sports Improv, Gonzaga University Magnuson Theatre 12/2-2 J Snowflake Showcase, Gonzaga University Magnuson Theatre 12/3 J Peppa Pig Live!: Peppa Pig’s Adventure, First Interstate Center for the Arts

VISUAL ARTS

12/1 Caitie Sellers: Scenes from an Underpass, SFCC Fine Art Gallery 12/1-9 J Our Stories, Our Lives: Irwin Nash Photographs of Yakima Valley Migrant Labor, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 12/1-7 J Cup of Joy, Trackside Studio 12/1-7 J Whitworth Faculty Biennial, Bryan Oliver Gallery 12/1-7 New to You, Jundt Art Museum 12/1-7 Juventino Aranda: Esperé Mucho Tiempo Pa Ver, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU 12/1-7 J Dancing with Life: Mexican Masks, The MAC 12/1 J American Impressionism: Treasures from the Daywood Collection, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 12/1-7 J Lila Girvin: Gift of a Moment, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 12/1-7 Meet Your Maker, From Here 12/1-7 Pamela Caughey: Unforeseen, Moscow Contemporary 12/1-7 David Herbold & John Larkin, Moscow Third Street Gallery 12/2 J First Friday, Spokane

Peppa Pig Live! takes to the stage at the FIC on Dec. 3.

12/2-7 J Juan Alonzo-Rodriguez, Marmot Art Space 12/1-7 Megan Artwood Cherry: Precious Cargo, North Idaho College Boswell Corner Gallery 12/1-7 LR Montgomery and T. Kurtz, Liberty Gallery 12/2-7 J Fiber & Fantasy: Diane RowenGarmire and Michele Mokrey, New Moon Art Gallery 12/2-7 Mary Pat Kanaley, Pottery Place Plus 12/2-7 Sironka, Avenue West Gallery 12/2-7 J Melissa Cole, Kolva-Sullivan Gallery 12/2-7 J Annual Small Works Exhibition, Saranac Art Projects 12/2-7 Stefani Rossi & Shantell Jackson, Terrain Gallery

12/2-7 Ninth Annual Cup of Joy Invitational, Trackside Studio Ceramic Art Gallery 12/2 Maker Fridays, Emerge 12/2 First Fridays with POAC, Pend Oreille Arts Council Gallery 12/3 J Holiday Artist Studio Tour, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 12/3-5 Bring Your Own Piece Paint Class, Paint In My Hair 12/7 Drop In & Draw, Spark Central

WORDS

12/6 J Author Talk: Pulitzer Prize Winner Geraldine Brooks, online at scld.org 12/6 Drop In & Write, Spark Central 12/6 Book Club: Science & Nature, Auntie’s Bookstore 12/7 J Broken Mic, Neato Burrito

THE INLANDER’S 2022-23 ANNUAL REPORT

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ANNUAL REPORT

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ON STANDS NOW 46 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022

CVR_AM 2022_AMFINAL.indd 1

8/19/22 2:27 PM


DEC. 8-31 COMEDY

12/8-10 J Sarah Colonna, Spokane Comedy Club 12/10-17 Safari, Blue Door Theatre 12/11 The Virzi Triplets: The Tour Is Lava, Spokane Comedy Club 12/14-28 Open Mic, Spokane Comedy Club 12/15-17 Josh Wolf, Spokane Comedy Club 12/29-31 J Sam Morril, Spokane Comedy Club

COMMUNITY

12/9-31 J Northwest Winterfest, Spokane County Fair & Expo Center 12/9 J Holiday Lights Display, Manito Park 12/9-11 Monster Jam, Spokane Arena 12/10 T’Was the Night Before Murder, Coeur d’Alene Fresh 12/10-11 J Bing Crosby Holiday Film Festival, Bing Crosby Theater 12/11-25 Learn to Play TCG Games, The Comic Book Shop (NorthTown) 12/11-25 J Drag Brunch, Globe Bar & Kitchen (Sundays) 12/13-27 Totally Tubular Tuesday, Garland Theater 12/14-21 J Riverfront Market, Pavilion at Riverfront 12/17 Drop In & RPG, Spark Central 12/21 Spokane Folklore Society’s Contra Dance, Woman’s Club of Spokane

MUSIC

12/10-11 Sounds of Christmas, Schuler Performing Arts Center

J Inlander recommends this event 12/13 J Five Finger Death Punch, Brantley Gilbert, Cory Marks, Spokane Arena 12/13 Little Feat, Nicki Bluhm, Bing Crosby Theater 12/14 J Jake Shimabukuro: Christmas in Hawaii, Bing Crosby Theater 12/14-28 Spirit of Spokane Chorus, Opportunity Presbyterian Church 12/17 Saturday with the Symphony: A Children’s Program, Coeur d’Alene Public Library 12/17-18 J Spokane Symphony Pops 3: Holiday Pops, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 12/17 J Mannheim Steamroller Christmas, First Interstate Center for the Arts 12/17 J Spokane Jazz Orchestra, Bing Crosby Theater 12/18 J LeAnn Rimes - Joy: The Holiday Tour, Northern Quest 12/21 J Mark O’Connor: An Appalachian Christmas, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 12/31 J Spokane Symphony New Year’s Eve: Beethoven’s 9th, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

STAGE

12/8-18 J The Sound of Music, Spokane Children’s Theatre 12/8 J Native Gardens, Spokane Civic Theatre 12/8 Spokane Playwrights Laboratory: (antiMatter), Stage Left Theater 12/9-22 J Traditions of Christmas, Kroc Center 12/9-11 Christmas Belles, Pend Oreille Playhouse

12/9-11 A Christmas Carol, Gladish Community Center 12/10-12 MET Live in HD: The Hours, The Kenworthy 12/10 J Tis the Season at Stage Left!, Stage Left Theater 12/18 Blind Boys of Alabama, Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center 12/26 J The Illusionists: Magic of the Holidays, First Interstate Center for the Arts

VISUAL ARTS

12/8-30 Whitworth Faculty Biennial, Bryan Oliver Gallery 12/8-30 J Juan Alonzo-Rodriguez, Marmot Art Space 12/8-30 Mary Pat Kanaley, Pottery Place Plus 12/8-30 Sironka, Avenue West Gallery 12/8-27 LR Montgomery & T. Kurtz, Liberty Gallery 12/8-30 J Melissa Cole, Kolva-Sullivan Gallery 12/8-30 Fiber & Fantasy: Diane RowenGarmire and Michele Mokrey, New Moon Art Gallery 12/8-30 J Annual Small Works Exhibition, Saranac Art Projects 12/8-30 Stefani Rossi & Shantell Jackson, Terrain Gallery 12/8-31 J Ninth Annual Cup of Joy Invitational, Trackside Studio Ceramic Art Gallery 12/8-31 New to You, Jundt Art Museum 12/8-31 Juventino Aranda: Esperé Mucho Tiempo Pa Ver, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU

Sam Morril helps locals laugh in the New Year at the Spokane Comedy Club Dec. 29-31.

12/8-31 J Dancing with Life: Mexican Masks, The MAC 12/8-31 J Lila Girvin: Gift of a Moment, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 12/8-31 Meet Your Maker, From Here 12/8-31 Pamela Caughey: Unforeseen, Moscow Contemporary 12/8-31 David Herbold & John Larkin, Moscow Third Street Gallery 12/8-31 Megan Artwood Cherry: Precious Cargo, North Idaho College Boswell Corner Gallery 12/8 Adult Fine Art Workshop: Acrylic Painting, Kroc Center 12/9 Second Friday Artwalk, Coeur d’Alene 12/9 J Minis: Art Walk Opening Reception, Emerge 12/9 Sip ’n’ Spin, Emerge

12/10 J Winner Winner Gala, Emerge 12/10-11 J Holiday Art Market, Urban Art Co-op 12/14-28 Drop In & Draw, Spark Central 12/16 Maker Fridays, Emerge 12/17 J BrrrZAAR, River Park Square

WORDS

12/8 Author Talks: Selected Readings, Shadle Library 12/13-27 Drop In & Write, Spark Central 12/14 J Nicole Eustace: A Story of Murder and Indigenous Justice in Early America, online at scld.org 12/14-28 J Broken Mic, Neato Burrito 12/15 Open Mic Nite, Emerge 12/15 J Lilac City Live!, Central Library

The Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center proudly presents

SPOKANEFILMFESTIVAL.ORG

24

TH

EDITION

February 3-9 2023

Five-time Grammy-winning legends of Gospel

BLIND BOYS OF ALABAMA for a holiday event like no other

December 18 at 2pm

spokanefilmfestival.org submit your film

211 S. Desmet, Spokane 509-313-2787 gonzaga.edu/ticketcenter

FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022 INLANDER 47


Celebrate Native American Heritage Month

25 Winners of up to $2,500! SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19 TH | 7 PM Celebrate Native American Heritage Month and win big! You could be one of 25 players to win up to $2,500 in cash or Extra Play Cash. Play your favorite video gaming machines with your Coeur Rewards cards to earn entries. Get one entry for every 250 points earned on the day of the drawing between 12 am and 6:45 pm.

Tonia Jo Hall "Auntie Beachress" WILLIAMS & REE "THE INDIAN AND THE WHITE GUY"

Winter Blessing

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 18 TH 7 PM | $40 | GENERAL ADMISSION

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20TH | 2 PM FREE EVENT | LOCATED UPSTAIRS

Upstairs Conference Area.

Join us for an afternoon of traditional storytelling and dance exhibition, complete with complimentary fry bread and huckleberry jam.

Must be age 18 or older to attend. Purchase tickets at cdacasino.com, the Casino Box Office, or through the CDA Casino App. Call 1 800-523-2464 for more details.

W E LC O M E H O M E .

CASINO

|

HOTEL

|

DINING

All ages welcome.

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SPA

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CHAMPIONSHIP

GOLF

3 7 9 1 4 S O U T H N U K WA LQ W • W O R L E Y, I D A H O 8 3 8 76 • 1 8 0 0 - 5 2 3 - 2 4 6 4 • C D A C A S I N O . C O M

48 INLANDER FALL ARTS GUIDE 2022


RISE UP DRINK LOCAL

Uprise Brewing Co. brings more than craft beer to West Central with ‘elevated’ street food and a family-friendly vibe BY DEREK HARRISON

S

pokane’s latest brewery opened its doors just over a month ago, but that’s certainly not where the Uprise Brewing Co. story begins. The idea was born nearly a decade ago when two brothers attended a beer fest in the Rocky Mountains of Colorado. “We just knew this is what we wanted to do,” recalls Ryan Hare. “Yeah, this should have been around 2014 or 2015. That’s when the name Uprise was first created,” adds Brandon Hare. Both were bartenders, but didn’t have much experience in craft beer at that time. That Colorado trip, and the following years, however, propelled them toward the journey of opening their dream brewery. “We were those guys staying up late and nerding out on beers,” Ryan says. He came on as assistant manager at the Flying Goat, the Neapolitan-style pizza restaurant and craft beer bar owned by Jonathan Sweatt in

Spokane’s Audubon-Downriver neighborhood. Ryan looks back on that job as “going to school about craft beer.” He got to work with local breweries and regional brewery representatives through buying beer for the pub and hosting beer-centered events. Brandon joined him at the Flying Goat in 2016 and eventually became general manager. Ryan moved over to Sweatt’s other pizza joint Republic Pi, where he was also general manager. While both brothers were working for Sweatt, they told him early on their intentions to one day open their own spot. “We had gone to Jonathan a few years back,” Brandon remembers. “Ryan and I told him that eventually we were going to want to leave and do our own thing. And he said, ‘OK, that’s great. But, why don’t we do that together instead?’” That led Sweatt, who also co-owns Downriver Grill, to join Brandon and Ryan on their long venture to opening a brewery. It was an easy choice for Sweatt. He credits the Hares with turning his two pizza pubs into the craft beer destinations they are today. ...continued on next page

Finally, a brewery within walking distance to the center of Kendall Yards. DEREK HARRISON PHOTO

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022 INLANDER 21


FOOD | DRINK LOCAL

FROM LEFT: Owners Jonathan Sweatt, Ryan Hare and Brandon Hare — the experienced trio behind Uprise Brewing Co.

DEREK HARRISON PHOTOS

“RISE UP,” CONTINUED... “It was always about food, but also about craft beer. Really, Brandon and Ryan ran with that,” Sweatt says. “I love beer. But these guys live beer. I mean, it’s their passion, it’s their life.”

U

prise is the first brewery to move into the West Central neighborhood, bordering the ever-developing Kendall Yards. It’s in a new 6,500-squarefoot building with seemingly every tiny detail planned out by the three owners. It all starts with the beer. Nearly a third of the facility is dedicated to the actual brewery, and the Uprise tap list could quench nearly any craft beer drinker’s thirst for malt and hops. The well-rounded offerings range from several IPAs (both hazy and classic hop-forward varieties) to German light and dark lagers to a gose-style fruited sour ale. The 10-barrel brewhouse reflects Brandon and Ryan’s passion for beer. Along with the standard 10-barrel fermenters and two 20-barrel fermenters (for double-batching beer), the brewery’s equipped with something that’s pretty rare for Spokane: two traditional horizontal lagering tanks to make the ideal Pilsner and other lager goodness. Compared to ales, a lager requires storage for a longer period of time at a cold temperature. These horizontal tanks provide more surface area and less depth, making it easier for the bottom-fermenting yeast to do its job. It takes more than great equipment to make flawless beer, though. That’s where head brewer Riley Elmer comes in. The former Perry Street Brewing brewer left the industry four years ago to take up an office job, but remains a master of the craft. “We just loved the way that his palate reflected ours,” says Ryan. “Very lager driven, very new-school-IPA driven, and [he] just talked about beer in a very similar way to us. Not everybody sees eye to eye with our vision on beer, and Riley fit into that mold perfectly, adding tons of experience that we didn’t have.”

I

t doesn’t stop at the beer. In the taproom, there’s a “kids corner” loaded with games and activities, making it a truly familyfriendly place.

22 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

The mezzanine features additional seating and a TV suitable for whatever big game is airing, and large parties can rent the space for private use. The dog-friendly patio consists of large metal picnic tables, heaters for year-round use, and an outside bar and tap system where people can order beer on Friday and Saturday evenings without stepping foot inside. It’s bordered by an AstroTurf area where guests can enjoy cornhole or just huddle around one of several standing tables. Uprise also boasts an expansive food menu that has plenty of gluten-free and vegan/vegetarian options. Some highlights include the crowd-favorite smash burger with fries or salad ($16), pork taquitos ($11.50), and the jerk cauliflower served as an appetizer ($11) or rice bowl ($16). “Being hyper focused on food, I think that’s one thing that sets us apart,” Brandon says. “It’s not an afterthought, whatsoever. We have an executive chef that’s created an awesome menu of elevated street food.” That chef is Andrew Blakely. Years ago, he was the sous chef at Republic Pi. Since then, he’s built quite the impressive culinary résumé, most recently as the executive chef at Vieux Carré NOLA Kitchen. “He has tons of experience in really high-end fine dining, but also is really passionate about street food,” adds Ryan. “That just fit really well with our concept. We wanted to make food that was brewery friendly, but also not necessarily your standard brewery staples.” Uprise is also a totally nut-free facility. “We wanted to be very aware of allergies, too. [Brandon and Jonathan] have deathly nut allergies, so we know how much that can impact a lot of people,” Ryan says. To top it all off, Uprise brings something entirely fresh to the local scene. Attached to the brewery are five furnished units that are available to rent on Airbnb. There are four small lofts with a Murphy bed and kitchenette, and a larger, ground-floor unit that’s ADA- and pet-friendly. Inspired by the brewpubs and hotels owned by the Portland-centered chain McMenamins, Jonathan

wanted to bring that experience home. “They’re constantly booked,” says Jonathan. “I think a lot of people enjoy the fact that the brewery’s right here. They get a free glass when they stay, and they also get a discount when they come into the brewery. We definitely want to connect that experience.” The Hare brothers now share the general manager role at Uprise. But along with the common responsibilities of hiring, scheduling and social media posting, they also frequently work as bartenders as well.

One of Uprise’s most popular plates: the smash burger. “We want to be a part of creating the culture, creating the community,” Brandon explains. “We created a place that we love to work. It was never our goal to start this business and then take off.” “We love bartending,” Ryan adds. “That’s how we got into this. We really enjoy talking about beer, finding the right beer for somebody, and getting to pour it for them and see them enjoy that.” n Uprise Brewing Co. • 617 N. Ash St. • Open Sun-Thu 11 am-10 pm, Fri-Sat 11 am-11 pm • uprisebeer.com • 509-368-9411


FOOD | TO-GO BOX

Side Note Side Hustle Syrups’ new production facility includes The Boneyard tasting room, plus more local culinary openings BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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hat happens when your side hustle becomes your main hustle, but you take on another side hustle? You have a very full plate! Side Hustle Syrups’ founder Dillon Hueser is all smiles, however, even as he hustles from table to kitchen and back again serving customers at The Boneyard, the new tasting room at Side Hustle’s also new Spokane Valley production facility. The Boneyard offers a familyfriendly space to sample light bites and beverages featuring Side ANNUAL REPORT Hustle Syrups’ products, as well as local beer and wine like Lumberbeard Brewing’s Fluffy Puffy Sunshine Hazy IPA and Townshend Cellars’ syrah. The nonalcoholic creamsicle ($6) consists of orange vanilla syrup, oranges, strawberries and soda. The very popular tropical Ocean Missed ($11) is made with rum, orange vanilla syrup, cream of coconut, lime and neon blue curacao. Have a little snack from the Side Hustle’s Ocean Missed cocktail. menu, like steak bites ($14) with a zesty chimichurri sauce, made tender through sous vide cooking. The menu is still evolving, says Hueser, who was with Dry Fly Distilling when he developed a line of syrups that morphed into Side Hustle Syrups in 2017. Visit sidehustlesyrups.com.

THE INLANDER’S 2022-23

THE INSIDER'S GUIDE TO THE GREAT INW

ANNUAL REPORT

OPENINGS

The North Side has a new taqueria serving scratch-made ANNUAL REPORT Mexican dishes like loaded tacos ($4), gorditas ($5.50), birria ($8/two) andREPORT ANNUAL vegetarian flautas ($13.15/three). Head to 10115 N. Newport Highway to find LOS HABANEROS, next to Hop Chaos BrewANNUAL REPORT ANNUAL REPORT ing. Maybe you’re hankering for corn in a cup ($5.20) and other street foods you used to get at Chucherias and Snowcones food truck? (It recently closed to transition to a new brick-and-mortar spot inside River Park Square.) Find that and other craveables ANNUAL REPORT ANNUAL REPORT like mangonada ($7.29), which is frozen mango served with tangy chamoy sauce, spicy Tajin and tamarind. Find Los Habaneros Spokane on Facebook to stay updated. Also on the North Side, HAMMERS BAR & GRILL (12611 N. Division St.) opened in the former Prospectors Bar & Grill space. Think weekend breakfasts and everyday comfort food classics like meatloaf ($19), prime rib dip ($19), fish and chips ($19), pizza ($15-$20), and mozzarella sticks ($14). A late-night menu, live music, pool tables, big ol’ dance floor and plenty of parking makes this the place to go for full-scale entertainment and good eats. Visit facebook.com/Hammers.Spokane. The Garden Café & Local Eats has added a drive-thru spot called BLOOM COFFEE COMPANY on the South Hill (4020 E. 57th Ave.). Look for assorted coffee, tea and other beverages plus light bites like acai bowls and breakfast burritos. A portion of sales proceeds benefits a designated charitable venture. Visit instagram.com/bloomcoffee509. n To-Go Box is the Inlander’s regular dining news column, offering tasty tidbits and updates on the region’s food and drink scene. Send tips and updates to food@inlander.com.

CVR_AM 2022_AMFINAL.indd 1

THE GREAT PNW COLLAB EDITION

8/19/22 2:27 PM

ON STANDS NOW SEPTEMBER 22, 2022 INLANDER 23


Watch a movie starring Sidney Poitier instead of watching this doc.

REVIEW

Poitier’s Paper-thin

Puff Piece Praise Sidney is a dull, respectful tribute to a brilliant, complex man BY JOSH BELL

T

here are three names in the opening credits of Sidney: The although Hudlin gets some strong accounts from Poitier’s onetime first is the title, which refers to the documentary’s subject, co-star Louis Gossett Jr. and civil rights activist Willie Blue. legendary actor Sidney Poitier, and the third is director The movie takes a linear approach, devoting the majority of Reginald Hudlin. In between them is Oprah Winfrey, the movie’s its time to Poitier’s early career, when he was regularly breaking producer and benefactor, who was undoubtedly a primary factor boundaries for Black actors in Hollywood. Poitier had a remarkin recruiting big name interviewees like Denzel Washington, able run of roles in the 1960s, including a landmark Oscar win for Robert Redford and Halle Berry. More than a Hudlin film, Sidney 1963’s Lilies of the Field, and Hudlin gives each of those films their is a Winfrey production, a slick piece of dull hero worship that due. He emphasizes just how revolutionary it was for Poitier to frequently returns to Winfrey’s own reverence for Poitier. She’s rise to mainstream leading-man status, although he glosses over the first person to speak in the movie other than Poitier himself, some of the other performers who paved the way for Poitier, and as he’s talking about his childhood in the Bahamas. who worked alongside him. Later, she tells a story about meeting Poitier at her own The major exception is Poitier’s longtime friend and colbirthday party that sounds like desperate name-dropping from league Harry Belafonte, whose presence in Poitier’s life is one of one of the most successful media personalities of all time. the documentary’s key themes. Hudlin includes SIDNEY Following clips of an older Poitier receiving honors, includseveral clips of the two men on The Dick Cavett Rated PG-13 ing an American Film Institute Life Achievement Award, Show, and their interplay with each other and with Directed by Reginald Hudlin Cavett mainly highlights how much livelier these an honorary Oscar and a Presidential Medal of Freedom, Streaming on Apple TV+ there’s a clip of Poitier bestowing Winfrey with her own discussions can be with a more engaged, present honor during her talk show’s 20th anniversary. Out of all interviewer and more interactions among subjects. the interviewees, including both of Poitier’s wives and all six of his Even while recounting some of the most turbulent times in Ameridaughters, Winfrey is the only one who cries on camera. can history, Hudlin’s film remains sedate and nonconfrontational. Everyone Hudlin interviews has nothing but praise for Hudlin also breezes past any potential negative aspects of Poitier, a pioneering actor who was the first Black leading man in Poitier’s life and career, which diminishes the impact of all the Hollywood and leveraged his stardom into civil rights activism. accolades after a while. Poitier was certainly a great man, but that Poitier, who appears in an interview conducted before his death in doesn’t mean that he was perfect or that his work was unassailJanuary 2022, is a compelling storyteller as he recounts his youth able, and there’s no complexity to this movie’s portrayal of him. in the Bahamas, his move to the U.S., and his entry into the movie It’s a feel-good bit of puffery that could have been produced for business. Many of the supporting testimonials are redundant, from an Oprah Winfrey TV special — which is essentially what this is. cultural commentators stating the obvious to celebrities offering The clips of Poitier’s films show a performer with charisma and bland tributes. Anyone who’s a devoted Poitier fan is unlikely to passion, and watching any of those movies would be a better use learn anything new. There are surprisingly few direct anecdotes, of two hours. n

24 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

ALSO OPENING AVATAR

Has any pop culture property made more money while regaining less cultural relevance than James Cameron’s Avatar? Anyway, they’re rereleasing the sci-fi epic about the battle between colonizers and the blue Na’vi before a sequel hits theaters this December. Rated PG-13

DON’T WORRY DARLING

In this psychological thriller, the idyllic 1950s world of a housewife (Florence Pugh) unravels as she tries to figure out the secret project the husbands of their company town are working on. (Hopefully it can be as dramatic as real-world drama between the film’s cast and director Olivia Wilde.) Rated R

THE HARRY POTTER MOVIES

If you’ve ever wanted to binge the Harry Potter franchise on the big screen, now is your chance. Regal is doing a staggered rescreening of all eight films of wizarding action in chronological order this week. Rated PG & PG-13 At Regal Cinemas

HOWL’S MOVING CASTLE

Arguably the most visually grand fantasy adventure in Hayao Miyazaki’s legendary anime filmography, a young woman is cursed to age prematurely but might be saved by a powerful wizard who lives in a walking/flying castle. Rated PG Screening Sept. 25, 26 & 28

POLTERGEIST

Return to the Freelings’ haunted suburban home as Tobe Hooper’s supernatural horror classic returns to the big screen for its 40th anniversary. Rated R Screening Sept. 25, 26 & 28 at Regal Cinemas


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Athena foregrounds cinematic spectacle.

Gritty Grandeur

Athena is a tragedy defined by breathtaking one-shot sequences that becomes somewhat dulled by narrative hair-splitting BY CHASE HUTCHINSON

I

n 2012, French filmmaker Romain Gavras to a film like 1917 due to their shared extended created a music video for Kanye West and action, a more apt reference point would be to Jay-Z’s “No Church in the Wild.” Capturing a work like 2015’s Victoria. While that is fully scenes of clashes between police and protesters, continuous and Athena is not, each arrives at a it now plays as a precursor of sorts to his latest similarly grounded destination. film, Athena. The feature places us on the ground What frequently shatters the impact of the in the aftermath of a brutal killing of Idir, the film’s sequences are the repeated interjections youngest of four brothers. The death sparks of news broadcasts and phone calls that also explosive protests in a French neighborhood. It muddy the narrative waters. It is clear they are is a film that thrives on its presentation even as it meant to establish the potential futility of this frequently falls short conveying what it is trying fight, but they do so in a manner that is rather to say about the spectacle that unfolds before us. forced. Whereas most everything else was comThe story observes the three remaining municated visually via dynamic direction, these brothers of Idir navigating the fallout of his killasides jam in exposition that often rob the film ing in their own ways, often butting heads about of its bite. Without tipping off exactly what they what to do. The middle brother Abdel, played reveal, it is both underdeveloped and out of step by Dali Benssalah (who recently appeared in No with the realities of the world that Gavras had Time To Die), places his faith in the police to invesset out to grapple with. It holds back a good film tigate the incident by acting as an intermediary. from being a great one — a Opposite him, the youngest brother Karim, tragedy in its own right. ATHENA played by newcomer Sami Slimane, leads the What holds it together Rated R uprising in the hopes of pushing the police is that the characters — Directed by Romain Gavras to bring forth his brother’s murders. Then while swept up in the chaos Starring Sami Slimane, Dali there is the oldest brother, Moktar, played by — never get lost in all of Benssalah, Ouassini Embarek veteran actor Ouassini Embarek, who is more this. Karim has had to beStreaming on Netflix motivated by opportunism. The intensity of come wise beyond his years their emotions is what unites them, even as as the tragedy has thrust a they are increasingly driven apart as people. greater responsibility on him. Seeing him become What makes the film a standout is just how a general of urban combat is as mesmerizing as fluidly it captures the evolving escalations that it is maddening that he has had to take that path. befall them. The camera is rarely static, followThe beauty of seeing the flurry of weaponized ing characters in an almost balletic dance amid fireworks as the day turns to night is stunning to the brutality. This begins from the very opening behold though increasingly somber as there is moments, when the film throws us into a press a looming sense of dread that this may all come conference at a police station that is disrupted by to naught. One speech Karim gives to rally his a hurled Molotov cocktail. We then follow Karim fellow rebels is gripping yet grim, as we can feel with a one-shot as he methodically makes his everything threatening to fall apart. The use of an way through the subsequent fighting, driven by operatic score sets the stage for these sequences to a grieving rage that has hardened into a cold dedraw you in while also instilling everything with a termination. While this is not the sole sequence grander sense of timelessness, feeling almost akin that avoids cutting (or is very good at disguising to a fable. Even with its regrettable missteps, there it), it is the best of them all for just how complex is something arresting and enduring to Athena’s it is. Even as one may be tempted to compare it experience that still emerges. n

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SEPTEMBER 22, 2022 INLANDER 25


METAL

THIS IS MUSIC! Legendary metal band Iron Maiden returns to Spokane for the first time since 1988 BY T.J. TRANCHELL

K

ate Bush and Metallica are getting the Stranger Things bump press, but when the kids were frantically looking for tunes to save one of their pals, it wasn’t Hounds of Love or Master of Puppets that Eddie Munson grabbed. When one girl sifted through a stack of tapes and cried out in vain for “Madonna, Bowie, Blondie, Beatles! Music! We need music!” Eddie held a tape of Iron Maiden’s Piece of Mind aloft and proclaimed “This IS muuussicc!” The instantly memeified moment served as the teen’s declaration of the music that calls to him. Now, Iron Maiden is returning that call for all the local Eddie Munsons. The quintessential British heavy metal band brings the Legacy of the Beast World Tour to the Spokane Arena on Friday, Sept. 30. It’s the band’s first concert in Spokane since 1988, pretty close to the same time when Stranger Things is set. To put things in perspective, Guns N’ Roses opened for Iron Maiden at that ’88 show. Back then, I was not quite 9 years old and didn’t know a thing about Iron Maiden or Axl Rose. In a way, I am jealous of people who’ve had Iron Maiden their whole lives, like my own 9-year-old son. My son and I used to spend hours watching cartoons on YouTube of the band’s mascot, Eddie the Head, having crazy sci-fi adventures with the group’s songs playing. Sometimes the adventure suited the song, and sometimes it didn’t. What matters is that I turned my kid into a metalhead early on. His favorite song and official video are “Speed of Light” from the 2017 Book of Souls album. That’s the best thing about a band like Iron

Maiden. Their longevity means a person’s favorite song can be a newer one, or a track that was still new when they first heard the group. True to its name, the tour itself has indeed become a beast. Postponed shows from the pandemic era have joined stops such as Spokane that were announced late in the run. During the course of the tour and rescheduling, the band’s 17th studio album Senjutsu was released. I’m sure they’ll play at least one or two songs from the new samurai-inspired record, but it’s always the old stuff we want to hear vocalist Bruce Dickinson belt out. The cartoons by Val Andrade and music videos are fun, but Iron Maiden is one of those bands that has lived and died on touring and subsequent live albums. There are a handful of widely lauded “best live albums,” but when it comes to heavy metal, if Iron Maiden’s Live After Death isn’t on the list — and likely at the top — I question the writer’s judgment. That album was made in 1982 at a show in Long Beach, California. I was born there but have only visited once. Watching my glorious DVD version of the concert brings me closer to a place I should know and don’t. Of course, I’ve never been to England or Hell, and Iron Maiden makes me feel close to those places, too. I could get into how Iron Maiden, a band whose greatest popularity coincided with the Satanic Panic of the 1980s, is not satanic, but I don’t know if you are ready for that. Are you ready for me to point out that Satan (aka The Beast) on Iron Maiden’s most famous album Number of the Beast may look like he is pulling the strings of humanity,

but above him is Eddie, the real puppeteer? Does that mean Iron Maiden is in charge or that collectively they believe in some sort of higher power? While the band members can choose to claim a faith standpoint or not, the lyrics are filled with people exploring the implications of faith and whether to side with good or evil. My son — he’s 9, remember — doesn’t yet get that. He likes the guitars and the cartoony-creepy look of Eddie. There aren’t Halloween masks of drummer Nico McBrain or bassist Steve Harris, but most of the album cover versions of Eddie can be found around this time of year, ready to don for trick-or-treating. There are hundreds — maybe even thousands — of Iron Maiden T-shirt designs to wear year-round. Wear them to school or family reunions. You’ll quickly discover who among these groups is cool and who is not. I’m ready to find out how cool Bruce Dickinson is. Will he sing out, “Scream for me, Spokane!” with the short a, or will he belt it out with a bit of British on the end? “Scream for me, Spo-KANE!” Either way, that Friday night in the Arena should be one to remember. Break out the denim or leather jacket of your choice, some jeans you can move around in, and — most importantly — don’t take any guff from anyone who says heavy metal, and Iron Maiden in particular, isn’t music. n Iron Maiden, Trivium • Fri, Sept. 30 at 7:30 pm • $62$225 • All ages • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • spokanearena.com

Spokane metalheads finally get to headbang with Iron Maiden once more.

26 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 22, 2022


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It's called a linear accelerator, and it's used to treat cancer at MultiCare's Comprehensive Cancer Center. It's noninvasive, precision radiation capable of treating tumors anywhere in the body. What it can't do is provide emergency childcare. Which is why, along with precision cancer treatment, MultiCare partners with Vanessa Behan, giving parents a safe place to bring their children in a time of stress. Because healthy communities need more than health care. See how we're supporting communities at multicare.org.

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SEPTEMBER 22, 2022 INLANDER 27


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

INDIE ROCK ERIC BACHMANN

O

ne of the longtime stalwarts of true rough-edged indie rock, Eric Bachmann has made a workmanlike career releasing adored underground records as the singer/guitarist of Archers of Loaf, Crooked Fingers, and work under his own name. This October will even see the release of Reason in Decline, the first new Archers’ album since 1998. Bachmann travels solo to Spokane as part of Undertow Music’s living room tours, which place indie songwriters in cozy homes for extremely intimate shows (masks are required to help keep the artists COVID-free and on the road). Fans who buy a ticket for the show will be informed via email the specific address in advance. It all leads to concerts with a very casual communal feel, and this show should blend Bachmann playing fan favorites and possibly some new yet-to-be-heard Archers tunes. — SETH SOMMERFELD Eric Bachmann • Thu, Sept. 22 at 8 pm • $25 • All ages • House show (see website for details) • undertowshows.com

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 9/22

COUNTRY HOME FREE

W

hen you think about a cappella music, the first thing you picture probably isn’t a bunch of good ol’ country boys in jeans and boots. Home Free would like to challenge that perception. While the group started as a typical vocal group, they decided to do a hard pivot to being a country a cappella quintet in order to distinguish themselves when auditioning for NBC’s competitive singing competition, The Sing-Off. Home Free would go on to win the show’s fourth season and has kept up its momentum thanks to its hyper-specified niche. While the band does write some of its own original songs, expect the crowd to go craziest when the guys tackle country faves: Be it Johnny Cash standards, “The Gambler,” or any other hits they could arrange in a unique harmonic manner. — SETH SOMMERFELD

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Kristen Marlo J THE BIG DIPPER, Dead Animal Assembly Plant, Cruel Velvet BRICK WEST BREWING CO., Kyle Richard CHECKERBOARD TAPROOM, Weathered Shepherds J J HOUSE SHOW, Eric Bachmann JOHN’S ALLEY, Jeffrey Foucault LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Gonna Be Friends, The Stronks, Snacks at Midnight THE MASON JAR, Kaz PINE STREET PLAZA, Smith and Reilly J SOUTH PERRY LANTERN, Just Plain Darin STEAM PLANT RESTAURANT & BREW PUB, Jonathan Arthur ZOLA, Brittany’s House ZOLA, Desperate8s

Home Free, Maggie Baugh • Sat, Sept. 24 at 7:30 pm • $28-$124 • All ages • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague Ave. • foxtheaterspokane.org

Friday, 9/23

J THE BIG DIPPER, The Home Team, Snacks At Midnight, Kaleb J. CHAN’S RED DRAGON ON THIRD, The Kenny James Miller Band COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Theresa Edwards Band COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Ed Shaw LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Soft Kill, Portrayal of Guilt, Lesser Care J PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Molly Starlite Band REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Jason Eady J SNOW EATER BREWING CO., Oktoberfest at Snow Eater SPOKANE EAGLES LODGE, Into the Drift Duo SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES, Stagecoach West

28 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

ZOLA, Justyn Priest Band

Saturday, 9/24

CHAN’S RED DRAGON ON THIRD, The Rusty Jackson Band COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Theresa Edwards Band COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Ed Shaw J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Jack Johnson, Ben Harper & the Innocent Criminals, Ron Artis II JOHN’S ALLEY, Jason Eady J KELLY’S UNDERGROUND, Arvid Lundin and Deep Roots MIRABEAU POINT PARK, Valleyfest J THE FOX, Home Free,

Maggie Baugh J PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Mike and Sadie ZOLA, Blake Braley

NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Too Slim and the Taildraggers RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic Night

Sunday, 9/25

Tuesday, 9/27

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Common Ground J BING CROSBY THEATER, Monophonics, GA-20, Kendra Morris THE BUOY, Ron Greene MIRABEAU POINT PARK, Valleyfest

Monday, 9/26

J EICHARDT’S PUB, Monday Blues Jam with John Firshi

LITZ’S PUB & EATERY, Shuffle Dawgs OSPREY RESTAURANT & BAR, Sam Leyde ZOLA, The Night Mayors

Wednesday, 9/28 EICHARDT’S PUB, John Firshi LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Zach Deputy, KHALIKO OSPREY RESTAURANT & BAR,

Ron Greene J PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Paul Young RED ROOM LOUNGE, The Roomates ZOLA, Runaway Lemonade

Coming Up ...

J J SPOKANE ARENA, Iron Maiden, Trivium, Sep. 30, 7:30 pm. J J KNITTING FACTORY, The Front Bottoms, The Joy Formidable, Mobley, Sep. 30, 8 pm. J J KNITTING FACTORY, CHVRCHES, Cafuné, Oct. 2, 8 pm.


MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-263-5673 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 509-847-1234 BARRISTER WINERY • 1213 W. Railroad Ave. • 509-465-3591 BEE’S KNEES WHISKY BAR • 1324 W. Lancaster Rd.., Hayden • 208-758-0558 BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens St. • 509-315-5101 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 509-863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 509-467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague Ave. • 509891-8357 BOLO’S BAR & GRILL • 116 S. Best Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-891-8995 BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR • 18219 E. Appleway Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-368-9847 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main St., Moscow • 208-596-0887 THE BULL HEAD • 10211 S. Electric St., Four Lakes • 509-838-9717 CHAN’S RED DRAGON • 1406 W. Third Ave. • 509-838-6688 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw St., Worley • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-2336 CRUISERS BAR & GRILL • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-446-7154 CURLEY’S HAUSER JUNCTION • 26433 W. Hwy. 53, Post Falls • 208-773-5816 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • 509-279-7000 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-624-1200 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-926-8411 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208-883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-244-3279 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington St. • 509-315-8623 LUCKY YOU LOUNGE • 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. • 509-474-0511 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy. • 509-443-3832 THE MASON JAR • 101 F St., Cheney • 509-359-8052 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-922-6252 MILLIE’S • 28441 Hwy 57, Priest Lake • 208-443-0510 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-838-1570 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 877-871-6772 NYNE BAR & BISTRO • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-474-1621 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PODIUM • 511 W. Dean Ave. • 509-279-7000 POST FALLS BREWING CO. • 112 N. Spokane St., Post Falls • 208-773-7301 RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL • 10325 N. Government Way, Hayden • 208-635-5874 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-838-7613 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 509-822-7938 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 208-664-8008 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • 509-279-7000 SOUTH PERRY LANTERN • 12303 E. Trent Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-473-9098 STEAM PLANT • 159 S. Lincoln St. • 509-777-3900 STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON • 12303 E. Trent Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-862-4852 TRANCHE • 705 Berney Dr., Wall Walla • 509-526-3500 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 509-624-2416

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SEPTEMBER 22, 2022 INLANDER 29


FILM YER A WIZARD ’ARRY

When I was 12, I stood outside a movie theater for over four hours waiting to see the latest Harry Potter movie. I’ve been chasing that same feeling ever since the last film was released — I’ve yet to feel that specific kind of magic again. If you, like me, are nostalgic for that classic cinematic experience, or if you’ve never seen a Harry Potter movie in theaters, here’s your chance. For the next week, Regal Cinemas is showing all eight Harry Potter films at its theaters in Spokane and Coeur d’Alene. Join Harry and the rest of the Golden Trio at Hogwarts as they create mischief (and manage it) while single-handedly saving the Wizarding World from the dark wizard Voldemort. Just don’t forget to turn off that bloody muggle device you call a cellphone. — MADISON PEARSON Harry Potter Special Showings • Sept. 23-29, times vary • $5.25 • Regal Cinemas • Theaters in Spokane and Coeur d’Alene • regmovies.com

30 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

COMMUNITY VALLEY OF DISCOVERY

FOOD GREEK WEEKEND

Valleyfest • Fri, Sept. 23 through Sun, Sept. 25, hours vary • Free • All ages • Various locations, Spokane Valley • valleyfest.org • 509-230-6829

86th Annual Greek Food Festival • Thu, Sept. 22-Sat, Sept. 24 from 11 am-8 pm • Free admission • All ages • Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church • 1703 N. Washington St. • holytrinityspokane.org • 509-328-9310

Quick word association: When someone says Spokane Valley, you say … astronomy. How about sporting events? Line dancing? Or maybe hot rods and cool cars? Valleyfest is all those things, plus live music, fair-style foods, and multicultural performances from the Vietnamese Lion Dance troupe, Indian youth group and more. There’s a little something for everyone with events spread out over several venues, primarily in and around CenterPlace Regional Event Center and Plante’s Ferry Sports Complex. The festivities kick off Friday evening at 7:30 with a good ol’ fashioned hometown parade on Sprague Avenue, roughly from University to Pines Roads. — CARRIE SCOZZARO

In the early days of Spokane’s Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, the annual food festival took place inside the church. Not only has the annual, three-day event gotten much bigger — look for numerous tents on the adjacent lawn — it offers both on-site and to-go dining of such traditional foods as crispy, gooey baklava and gyros filled with mouthwatering grilled meat. There’s also music and dancing, tours of the church, and the opportunity to learn more about a place of worship whose parishioners hail from such regions as Armenia, Belarus, Bulgaria, Cyprus, Eritrea, Greece, Lebanon, Romania, Russia, Serbia and Ukraine. — CARRIE SCOZZARO


GET LISTED!

When garden-variety prose feels inadequate to process the chaos, the joy, the despair in life, poetry and its limitless forms step in gladly. For the two poets featured at this upcoming reading hosted by venerable local institution Auntie’s Bookstore, it is poetry each turns to when the world weighs heavily with grief and anxiety, but also glimmers with hope and human connection. Spokane’s own Kathryn “Kat” Smith, whose award-winning work has been widely published in journals and collections, reads poems from her latest, Self-Portrait with Cephalopod, a 2022 finalist for the Washington State Book Award in poetry. She’s joined by Olympia’s Emily Van Kley, whose collection Arrhythmia explores the shock and fallout of sudden loss. Together, this powerhouse duo should leave audiences inspired and introspective. — CHEY SCOTT Auntie’s Presents: Kat Smith and Emily Van Kley • Fri, Sept. 23 at 7 pm • Free, reservations requested • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main Ave. • auntiesbooks.com • 509-838-0206

WORDS ARCTIC ACTIVISM

Human-driven climate change is the leading cause of ice melt in the Arctic, which is having catastrophic effects on polar bear populations. Research from Polar Bears International, a group of scientists, conservationists and volunteers dedicated to protecting polar bears, predicts that without reducing carbon emissions and transitioning away from fossil fuels, the world’s polar bear population will be nearly extinct by the end of the century. It is up to us to protect these fascinating, vulnerable animals, not just for their sake, but for ours. Want to learn more? Dr. Steven C. Amstrup, chief scientist of Polar Bears International, who’s regarded by some as the world’s most influential polar bear conservationist, gives a lecture about how the fate of polar bears affects ours, and provides actionable steps to combat the threat of climate change. Registration is free, just visit the link below to sign up to attend. — SAMANTHA HOLM Connecting the Dots to the Rest of Us • Wed, Sept. 28 at 6 pm • Free • Gonzaga University Hemmingson Center • 702 E. Desmet Ave. • gonzaga. edu/ClimateCenterEvents • 509-313-5885

OCT OBE R-B REA ST

WORDS POETRY PARTY

NOV EMB ER LUN G

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

SEPTEMBER IS

CHILDHOOD CANCER AWARENESS MONTH

Fight Today for Their Tomorrow Childhood Cancer Awareness Month shines a light on the effects of children battling cancer, emphasizing the importance of much-needed services and lifesaving research, while providing the opportunity to join together for children and families who need our help most. The situation is immediate. Cancer remains the leading cause of death by disease for children. And unfortunately, diagnoses continue to rise. That’s why, since inception in 2014, Community Cancer Fund has committed over $7.3 million in direct funding to help pediatric cancer patients in our region.

CANCER STATISTICS IN THE UNITED STATES

10 The average child diagnosed with cancer is only 10 years old.

Pediatric cancers are often found in different areas of the body than adult cancers.

Every day more than 3 kids under 15 will die from cancer.

TOGETHER, WE

CANCER MAKE A DIFFERENCE.

LEARN MORE AT COMMUNITYCANCERFUND.ORG SEPTEMBER 22, 2022 INLANDER 31


do if I said hello to you. I went about my day and left you be. Anyway, hope life has been treating you well, and you finally get everything you want out of life. El Rodeo isn’t the same without you, eating lunches and having cheese pizza has also lost its appeal. Hope you got the issues worked out, cause lord knows I wanted to but can’t make anyone heal — they have to do it on their terms. Anyway, hope you are well.

I SAW YOU GHOST OF GIRLFRIENDS PAST The likelihood of my ladies night arriving at the same restaurant as your wedding dinner is slim to none considering most people get married once or twice in their lives, I was visiting from two states away, & my friend could have made our dinner reservations for anywhere. I was tickled to see you, and it took a few minutes to realize it was a wedding. Cheers to the look on your face, the intel received, and to your new nuptials! Raising a glass to you & your weird Karma. CONNECTION IN THE COOKIE AISLE? Shadle Walmart, afternoon of the 14th. Me blue hair and septum piercing. You caught me looking at you. (It wasn’t just to see if you were taller than me.) You very graciously helped me get the cookies I wanted off of the top shelf. We discussed cookies and your ice cream. You have an amazing smile. Immediately wished I had given you my number. Would love to share my cookies if you are interested. bidraggled@yahoo.com DOUBLE TAKE AT NORTHSIDE TARGET I saw you. A gentle soul at Target going about your day of shopping. Almost didn’t recognize the grey T-shirt and blue pants; but boy, somehow you still make it work. It’s been a minute since I talked to you and was still kind of worried of what it might

SPOKANE INTERSTATE FAIR Saturday, Sept. 10: You line dancing to the band June Bug. Western attire on your group and a whole lot of happiness while dancing. Me in a black T-shirt and a trucker’s hat. Your smile (at me?) and happy feet were sublime. Teach me to dance, and I’ll show you the great outdoors. MAVERICK EMPLOYEE AT DIVISION & LYONS I pulled into the station and saw all those cool classic cars in the parking lot last Friday night (9/16). But it was the smoking hot guy with ink and a sexy side smirk behind the counter who got my motor purring. Sir, you are VERY handsome. I’m the curvy woman who paid cash and asked if your station did the authorization code thing for the pump. I wanted to compliment you, but chickened out, now here I am writing an “I Saw You.” If you remember me and think I’m cute, get in touch. 20onpump8@mail.com

CHEERS GRATITUDE Thank you to the artist who drew a picture of Sandy in chalk at the breezeway near the convention center downtown. It was a lovely rendition. It reminded me to appreciate all she’d offered to our community as I took my walk in the park. Nicely done. MOMMAS HELPING MOMMAS Cheers to the momma behind me in line at the dollar store at the Y. I was checking out, and I couldn’t find my card to pay for my purchases. You had two adorable wellbehaved little girls with you, and I was going to have to go hunt for my card then come back, but out of nowhere you paid for my purchases. It was so very kind of you especially in a time when

even $10 is expensive anymore and most people wouldn’t show the kindness you did. So thank you again and cheers to you, momma!

of the city’s collective emotions. Sports are like religion: They provide a built-in community to residents. In a small town that has few other forms of community, Zags fandom stands out especially.

to the area and crybaby complain about how the city is being ruined by growth due to outsiders, I wonder if perhaps the problem is actually... you!?!?

A resident of the camp recently compared it to ‘Lord of the Flies’...

SHE HELPED FIND MY DOG On Sept 11th I believe I was out of gas you picked me up you had a dog named lucey you were very kind this was in loon lk wa I left my cell phone in your car please email me if u still have it tfdiedrich@gmail.com RE: DEAR PALOUSE ROAD BICYCLIST Cheers to all motorists who share the road and treat cyclists with courtesy and consideration. We’re all neighbors trying to share the road safely. Cyclists are injured or killed in 94% of collisions with motor vehicles, so special thanks to drivers who slow down a bit and give more than the 3 required feet of room to pass. Reminder: Washington cyclists are permitted to treat most stop signs as yield signs. Letting bikes take the lead at intersections improves safety and intersection efficiency. Let’s all be compassionate with one another and enjoy our scenic roadways together! GOD BLESS THE ZAGS On the surface, it might seem trivial or silly to claim that the quality of a town’s sports team could “save” that city or fundamentally change its residents’ quality of life. If this were true, the logical first thought would be that the difference would come through economic changes. Create a strong team, and a city will earn revenue from selling more seats and concessions that they can pass along into infrastructure projects and other economic stimulus schemes. But that’s essentially never the case. Rather, the change that the successful Zags have brought to Spokane is an adjustment

JEERS CAN WE STOP CALLING IT “CAMP HOPE”? Whoever christened Spokane’s disastrous conglomeration of squatters “Camp Hope” must have been a marketing genius — local media lapped up this obvious misnomer without a hint of how ironic it is, likely prolonging the camp’s staying power and bringing in more, and more cynical, trespassers. A resident of the camp recently compared it to “Lord of the Flies” — a dangerous, lawless place ruled by the most ruthless “campers.” Everyone knows it’s filthy, riddled with illegal drugs, plagued by violence. But no one dares mention this — that would risk self-righteous retaliation from all the Wokenites who fancy themselves angels of mercy. The lengths to which Spokane has gone to help the “campers” get back on track and the general resistance to these efforts at Camp Lord of the Flies should be a big clue to anyone who’s still sympathetic to the squatters. RE: HAVE RESPECT What a great message in the Sept. 14, 2022, Inlander Jeers section about having respect for entertainers. A group of us went to the Labor Day concert at Comstock Park with the Spokane Symphony. Due to the cacophonous kids screaming as well as the moronic talk of their parents who weren’t supervising them, we couldn’t hear much. Being newer to the area, I wonder if this is a rare event or if the citizenry of Spokane just lack class. For those who are “native”

GUY AT 1ST AVE COFFEE SHOP You intrusively approached me while I was minding my own business and made me take my headphones off just to have you ask me stupid questions about my tattoos. I was in the middle of taking a test, and I clearly did not want to talk to you, yet you persisted. Even told me that I “have to tell you at least one story about one of my tattoos before you leave.” No, I don’t. You don’t know me. Women don’t owe you anything. I’m not obligated to explain anything to you, you weirdo, invasive, creepy, d bag. You should learn to shake that bad attitude if you expect women to wanna talk to you. Also, honey, you’re way too f****ing old to be approaching 20-something-year-olds at the coffeehouse. n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS P R O T I P

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I S O H I H O L O P T S E E S T R W H E

SOUND OFF

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

S W A Y P O G O A R N O D E R T Y T O S L O N A N H A A H M E T H I S T H O A D D S T O T I C N E R V E R O D E O L F I T R E O B E R E S G O

O H T A N I I R A E D E B

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W A T E R J U N G Y C T O A D N O D Y

A L D L T H E R S W A P O

A Y G O O N N

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NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

TICKETS ON SALE All single game tickets On Sale NOW! Home Opener - Saturday 10/1 vs. Kamloops Blazers Tickets: spokanechiefs.com • Text or Call: 509-535-PUCK

32 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

HUMAN TRAFFICKING Quick question. Aren’t the governors who are transporting undocumented immigrants to other states involved in human trafficking? Just wondering.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

EYE CONTACT This one-night art event brings together local artists to showcase their work while drawing attention to the needs of some of Spokane’s most vulnerable residents. The evening includes food and beverages, live music, a silent auction of art by local artists, performance art pieces, and a gallery show of work created by youth and women who are experiencing homelessness. Sept. 22, 5 pm. $16.74-$21.99. Washington Cracker Co. Building, 304 W. Pacific. voaspokane. org/eyecontact (509-624-2378) ANGEL DAY This first annual event is in remembrance of Angel. The event benefits multiple organizations including SCRAPS and Teen and Kid Closet. David’s Pizza is offering $3 pizza slices. Sep. 24, noon to midnight. By donation. River City Brewing, 121 S. Cedar St. rivercitybrewingspokane.com/ (509-413-2388) BUILDING DREAMS: BRIGHT FUTURES FOR OUR KIDS West Central Community Center’s annual auction and dinner which support the programs offered to families through the center. Sep. 24, 6-9 pm. $60. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt. westcentralcc.org (509-326-9540) RHYTHM & BREWS An event that supports Beats and Rhythms, a local nonprofit for local children and adults affected by congenital heart disease. The event features a battle of the bands, a silent auction, a beer garden and food trucks. Sep. 24, 6-10 pm. $45-$50. South Side Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. (509-838-2007) INTO AFRICA AUCTION This annual auction features drinks, appetizers, a dessert dash and more, with proceeds supporting education and healthcare aide in Africa. Sep. 30, 5:30-8 pm. $75. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. partneringforprogress.org BACKSTAGE WITH THE BAND This year’s annual Kenworthy benefit auction and concert features musical headliners Golden Boy. Oct. 1, 7 pm. $25-$50. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy. org (208-882-4127)

COMEDY

ALEX FALCONE The Portland-based stand-up comedian has appear in several episode of Portlandia and on the Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Sep. 22, 7 pm at The Pearl Theater, 7160 Ash St., Bonners Ferry. Also Sep. 23, 7 pm. $17.39. The Heartwood, 615. Oak St., Sandpoint. heartwoodsandpoint.com

BRAD UPTON After going viral on Facebook in 2018, Upton found success in comedy and hasn’t looked back. Sep. 24, 4:30 pm and Sep. 25, 4:30 & 7 pm. $20-$28. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com SAFARI A fast-paced, short-form comedic improv show. Saturdays from 7:30-9 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com NEW TALENT TUESDAYS Watch comedians of all skill levels work out jokes together. Tuesdays at 7 pm (doors at 6 pm). Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com OPEN MIC STAND-UP Wednesdays at 7:30 pm. See website for advance signup. Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com TRIAL & ERROR An all-improvised parody of “Trial of the Century.” Sept. 7-28, Wed at 7:30 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheater.com JOHN CRIST A stand-up comedian most well known for a slew of viral videos including “Honest Football Coach” and “Every Parent at Disney.” Sept. 29-Oct. 1, Thu at 7:30 pm, Fri at 7:15 pm and 9:45 pm and Sat at 6 pm and 8:30 pm. $35-$45. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com

COMMUNITY

ALL OF US JOURNEY A mobile exhibit traveling across the country to engage communities that have been historically underrepresented in medical research. In Spokane, the Journey is available to educate and register new participants for the program. Participants take health surveys and provide biosamples, such as a blood sample, as part of joining the program. Sept. 20-23 from 10 am-5 pm. Free. WSU Health Sciences Spokane, 412 E. Spokane Falls Blvd. joinallofus.org AMERICANS & THE HOLOCAUST This traveling exhibit from the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum examines the motives, pressures and fears that shaped Americans’ responses to Nazism, war and genocide in Europe during the 1930s and 40s. Aug. 23-Oct. 6, Mon-Fri from 3-8 pm and Sat-Sun from 1-5 pm. Free. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. gonazga. edu (509-328-4220) BLOCK PARTY FOR REPRODUCTIVE CARE This block party features food trucks, ice cream from The Scoop and a guest appearance by Democratic Congressional candidate Natasha Hill. Sep. 22, 5 pm. Free. The Scoop, 1001 W. 25th Ave. instagram.com/spokanealliancefor-

ANNUAL CATHOLIC WOMENS’ LEAGUE FALL RUMMAGE SALE This annual rummage sale includes furniture, clothing, music and more. Sep. 23, 4-7 pm and Sep. 24, 8 am-noon. Free to shop. St. Mary’s Parish Family Center, 618 E. 1st St. stmarysparishmoscow.org FALL FESTIVAL OF HOMES The largest new construction home showcase in the Inland Northwest showcases the region’s most top design in prairie, farmhouse contemporary styles and more at newly-constructed homes located across the Spokane area. Sept. 23-25 and Sept. 30-Oct. 2 from 10 am-5 pm. Free. fallfestivalofhomes.com FALL ON THE PRAIRIE This vintage sale features furniture and handmade decor from Rustic Treasures and Stone Country. Sep. 23, 9 am-4 pm and Sep. 24, 9 am-4 pm. Free. Rustic Treasures, 8521 N. Orchard Prairie Rd. rustictreasuresllc.com JUST BETWEEN FRIENDS This sale features discounted children’s clothes, shoes, books and toys. Sep. 23, 9 am-8 pm, Sep. 24, 9 am-4 pm and Sep. 25, 8 am-1 pm. $5-$10. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. spokane. jbfsale.com (509-477-1766) VALLEYFEST The three-day celebration includes outdoor activities, food, music and family-friendly events. Events take place at various venues, see website for full schedule and locations. Sep. 23-25. Free. Spokane Valley. valleyfest.org ACCEPTANCE SPOKANE MEETING The inaugural meeting of Acceptance Spokane, a group dedicated to promoting mental health in LGBTQIA+ youth. Sep. 24, 3-4 pm. Free. Atomic Threads Clothing Boutique, 1925 N. Monroe St. atomicthreadsinc.com (509-280+9120) FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY BOOK SALE Offering titles in fiction, nonfiction, children’s books and videos. Proceeds support activities and materials for the Moran Prairie Library. Sep. 24, 9 am-4 pm. Free. Moran Prairie Library, 6004 S. Regal St. (509-893-8340) SIGN THE 11 INITIATIVES Sign the 11 initiatives for safety, lower taxes and best governance. The event also features live music and food on site. Sat, Sept. 24 and Sat, Oct. 22 from 12-4 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. letsgowashington.com (509-444-9822) JUNIOR LEAGUE’S TOUCH-A-TRUCK This family-centric event offers children a hands-on opportunity to explore all sorts of trucks and vehicles, such as emergency, utility, construction, transportation and buses. Sensory-friendly from 9 am-1 pm. Sep. 24, 9 am-2 pm. $5-$20. Spo-

good (509-954-1692) GOLDEN HARVEST: FLOUR SACKS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION The MAC’s collection of cloth flour sacks offers a window into the early development of Eastern Washington’s wheat industry, which today contributes billions of dollars to the state’s economy. The sacks are also a tangible reminder of the mills that played a critical role in Spokane’s early growth. Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm, third Thursdays from 10 am-9 pm, through Oct. 30. $15-$20. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org GRAND COULEE DAM LASER LIGHT SHOW The light show theme is “One River, Many Voices.” Sept. 1-30 at 8:30 pm. Through Sep. 30. Free. Grand Coulee Dam Visitor Center, Washington. usbr. gov (509-633-9265) LEGAL SYSTEM CANDIDATE FORUM Lutheran Community Servies, YWCA Spokan and MiA Mujeres in Action invite candidates running for office in the legal system to provide their perspectives and plan regarding how to process cases and support sexual assault and domestic violence survivors. Sep. 22, 4:30-6:30 pm. Free. Central Library, 906 W. Main Ave. bit.ly/candidateforum2022 LIBRARY CARD DRIVE September is National Library Card Signup Month. Get a new library card or renew an old one and get a free book. Sept. 14-30, daily. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org/ (208-769-2315) NATIONAL DAY OF REMEMBRANCE FOR MURDER VICTIMS The victim/witness unit from the Spokane County Prosecutors Office hosts a vigil to honor the memories of murder victims and recognize the impact of homicide on surviving family/friends. Sep. 22, 5:30-7 pm. Free. Spokane County Public Works Building, 1100 W. Mallon Ave. (509-477-3640) NATIONAL PET ADOPTION EVENT Better Together Animal Alliance is waiving adoption fees on all adult animals as part of a nationwide adoption event. Daily from 12-4:20 pm through Sep. 25, Free. Better Together Animal Alliance Animal Care Center, 870 Kootenai Cutoff Rd. bettertogetheranimalalliance.org THE RUM REBELLION: PROHIBITION IN NORTH IDAHO Featuring historical photographs, newspaper articles and artifacts including a moonshine still, this exhibit tells the story of how Idaho was anything but dry during Prohibition. Open daily from 11 am-5 pm through Oct. 29. $2-$6. Museum of North Idaho, 115 Northwest Blvd. museumni.org

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PAGE 8

WHY IS IT TAKING 8 GIVE OUT VACCINES? PAGE

SCREEN THE BIGSPOKANE THEATERS

NOT LOST LONG SHUTTERED, | NEAR NATURE, JANUARY 9-15, 2020 PAGE 44 BUT BEGIN PROJECTING AGAIN

NOVEMBER 11-17, 2021 | SHREDDING

SEEKING N INSPIRATIO POETRY PROJECT CELEBRATES

A NEW PAGE 14 SPOKANE’S NEIGHBORHOODS

THE SLOPES SINCE 1993 NOVEMBER 12-18, 2020 | PLEASE MASK

UP!

JANUARY 14-20, 2021 | LIBERTY, EQUALITY

SPEEDS SCARY ARE FREAKED OUT PAGE 13 5G IS COMING. WHY SOME D FOOD ART-INSPIRE PAGE 41 TWO NEW RESTAURANTS TONY BROWN’S

DOWNTOWN BY DESIGN

AND FREE PAPERS!

PLANNING FOR SPOKANE

OF THE FUTURE PAGE 18

kane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. spokane.jl.org MIDTOWN MARKET FALL OPEN HOUSE This annual event features new goods from Midtown Market and Lovely Chaos boutique, along with giveaways, live music and food vendors. Sep. 24, 10 am and Sep. 25, 10 am. Free. Midtown Home & Vintage Market, 1003 N. 4th St. midtownmarketcda@gmail.com (208-952-2927) NATIONAL DRIVE ELECTRIC WEEK An opportunity to see the latest EVs and to talk with EV enthusiasts, owners and dealers. Sep. 24, 9 am-1 pm. Free. Liberty Lake STA Park & Ride, 22501 E. Mission. driveelectricweek.org (509-818-9907) NORTHWEST ELECTRIC FLY-IN A piloting event featuring raffle prizes, family activities and aircraft viewings. Located at Paradise Field. See link for directions. Sep. 24, 9 am-4 pm and Sep. 25, 9 am-4 pm. $10/day. IEQF.org (509-780-9979) SPOKANE BRIDAL FESTIVAL This convention provides resources for wedding planning, florists, bridal gown and tuxedo specialists, photographers and more. Sep. 24, 10 am. $10. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. bridalfest.com (279-7000) SPOKANE COUNTY REPTILE & EXOTIC PET EXPO Browse Spokane’s largest exotic pet expo, which offers a range of exotic pets available for purchase. Sep. 24, 10 am-4 pm. $5. The Warehouse, 800 N. Hamilton St. (406-291-8026) VALLEYFEST CAR SHOW A classic car show accompanied by live music, barbecue and a beer garden. Car registration is $20. Sep. 24, 9 am. Free. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. valleyfest.org (509-688-0300) WSU SPOKANE COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS PLANT CLINIC Address your plant and lawn conundrums with local master gardeners. Sep. 24, 11 am-3 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org BOTTLE BAY FEST A parking lot party with lawn games, food and live music from RCA, Rosie Cerquone and Snacks at Midnight. Sep. 25, 12-10 pm. Free. Bottle Bay Brewing Co., 503 1/2 E. 30th Ave. bottlebaybrewing.com (509-960-8069) WASHINGTON BIKE, WALK, ROLL SUMMIT An online and in-person workshop dedicated to learning, sharing and exploring ways to expand and improve equity and active transportation for all. Online Sept. 28-30, in-person Oct. 3 from 8 am-5 pm. $10-$100. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. cascade. org/summit (533-7000)

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W I N T E R Monthly in the Inlander

S E R I E S October – February

SEPTEMBER 22, 2022 INLANDER 33


EVENTS | CALENDAR EARTH EXPLORERS: NATIVE PLANTS Learn about native plants and their roles in our local ecosystems. Ages 6-12 and their caregivers. Sep. 29, 4-5 pm. Free. Liberty Park Library, 402 S. Pittsburgh St. spokanelibrary.org MWPAC BLOCK PARTY A pre-show party taking place before The Dip concert. Includes food trucks, drinks and music. Sep. 29, 5-7 pm. Free. Myrtle Woldson Performing Arts Center, 211 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga.edu/mwpac EARTH EXPLORERS: NATIVE PLANTS Learn about native plants and their roles in our local ecosystems. Ages 6-12 and their caregivers. Sep. 30, 4-5 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org (509-444-5390) GEM STATE TATTOO CONVENTION This fist annual convention features vendor booths and regional guest tattoo artists. Sept. 30-Oct. 2, Fri from 2-11 pm, Sat from 11 am-11 pm, Sun from 11 am-8 pm. $20$45. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. gemstatetattooconvention.com (208-765-4969) HUB FAMILY FUN FESTIVAL Celebrate the HUB’s 15th birthday with an evening of fun activities and games for the family. Activities include pickleball, corn hole, martial arts and more. Sep. 30, 4-7 pm. Free. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. hubsportscenter.org MASTER GARDENER’S OF SPOKANE FALL BULB SALE Choose from a wide selection of bulbs for your garden. See website for full list of bulbs offered and pick-up locations. Sep. 30-Oct. 10. mgfsc. org/bulb-sale CHILDREN BOOK ARTS FAIR Includes free workshops, live music, vendors, ice cream from The Scoop, the center’s Book Bus and more. Oct. 1, 12-4 pm. Free. Center for Children’s Book Arts, 628 N. Monroe St. theCCBA.org DROP IN & RPG Stop by and explore the world of role playing games. Build a shared narrative using cooperative problem solving, exploration, imagination and rich social interaction. Ages 5-105. On the first and third Sat of the month from 1-3:45 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org FALL FEST This annual event spans multiple downtown businesses and includes a petting zoo, live music, beer gardens and more. Oct. 1-2, 11 am-5 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane. downtownspokane. org (509-456-0580) GARLAND MERCANTILE PUMPKIN PATCH A pumpkin patch and other activities. Every Sat and Sun in Oct. from 10 am-5 pm. Garland Mercantile, 823 W. Garland Ave. (509-315-4937) HARVEST FESTIVAL CRAFT FAIRE A craft fair held in conjunction with the Annual Green Bluff Harvest Festival. The fair includes arts and crafts vendors, food trucks and more. Oct. 1-16, Sat-Sun from 10 am-4 pm. Free. Green Bluff Grange, 9809 Green Bluff Rd. greenbluffgrowers. com (979-2607) ISAAC’S BOOKSHELF BLOOD DRIVE Donate blood or a new book. Oct. 1, 123:45 pm. By donation. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com MOTORTOPIA TRUCKFEST PNW 2022 This one-day event features live dyno runs, axle articulation demonstrations, a truck and Jeep show and more. Oct. 1, 10 am-6 pm. $18-$73. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. motortopia.com (509-477-1766) THE SMALL BIZ SHOPPE GRAND RE-

34 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 22, 2022

OPENING Celebrate the store’s new location on the second floor of River Park Square at the top of the escalators. Oct. 1, 10 am-8 pm. Free to shop. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. riverparksquare.com (509-570-4614) SPOKANE ARCHAEOLOGY DAY Experience the methods archaeologists use to learn about the heritage of the Inland Northwest. Among the activities, visitors can conduct an archaeological survey and a mock excavation, learn how to identify historic artifacts, make a tool through flint knapping, practice zooarchaeology by studying animal bones and more. Oct. 1, 10 am-3 pm. Free. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org

FILM

ERASERHEAD Henry Spencer tries to survive his industrial environment, his angry girlfriend, and the unbearable screams of his newly born mutant child. Sep. 22, 7-9 pm. $5. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org HARRY POTTER FILMS SPECIAL SCREENINGS Screenings of all eight Harry Potter films at Spokane and Coeur d’Alene Regal Cinemas locations. Times and locations vary, see website for details. Sep. 23-29. $5.25. regmovies.com SATURDAY CARTOONS AT THE FARMERS MARKET Showings of cartoons during the Moscow Farmers Market. Every Sat through Oct. 31 from 8 am-1 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) DROP-IN TIME: VIDEO STUDIO Stop by to edit, shoot or utilize any video-making element you may need. Sep. 26, 12-3 pm. Free. Central Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org (509-444-5336) TOTALLY TUBULAR TUESDAY A weekly screening of a throwback film. Check the website for each week’s film. Every Tuesday at 7 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com FRANCISCAN FILM FESTIVAL This inaugural festival features three evenings of independent films oriented around the three core tenets of St. Francis’s Rule: creation care, justice and compassion and joyful and simple living. See website for full schedule. Sep. 29-Oct. 1, 6-9 pm. Free. West Central Abbey, 1832 W. Dean Ave. westcentralabbey.org

FOOD & DRINK

86TH ANNUAL GREEK FOOD FESTIVAL This annual celebration includes traditional greek food such as gyros and baklava. Church tours are also available. Sep. 22-24, 11 am-8 pm. Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church, 1703 N. Washington St. holytrinityspokane.org (509-328-9310) OKTOBERFEST This event features local beer, live music and food vendors. Sep. 24, 12-10 pm. Free. Post Falls Brewing Company, 112 N. Spokane St. postfallsbrewing.com (208-773-7301) ALL YOU CAN EAT PANCAKE BREAKFAST A pancake breakfast with eggs, sausage, homemade apple sauce and orange juice. Children five and under are free with a paying adult. Sep. 25, Oct. 2, Oct. 9 and Oct. 23, 8-11 am. $5-$10. Green Bluff Grange, 9809 Green Bluff Rd. greenbluffgrowers.com (509-979-2607) DRAG BRUNCH Watch Nova Caine and the cast of Runway perform while enjoy-

ing a full breakfast menu and mimosas. Sundays from 10 am-2 pm. Globe Bar & Kitchen, 204 N. Division. globespokane. com (509-443-4014) MAKING APPLE CIDER VINEGAR Join certified food safety/preservation specialist Anna Kestell for this informative class about how to make homemade apple cider vinegar. Sep. 25, 2-3 pm. Free. Hillyard Library, 4110 N. Cook St. spokanelibrary.org (509-444-5300) WHISKEY BARREL WEEKEND A weekend centered around the 2022 Resort Blend: The Boardwalk Bourbon. Activities include a Grand Whiskey Dinner, open golf event and tasting events. Sep. 30, 6:30-9:30 pm and Oct. 1, 10 am. $85$150. Coeur d’Alene. cdaresort.com CLASSICAL MEDITERRANEAN MUSIC, DANCE & DINNER A Lebanese dinner show with classical Mediterranean/Egyptian music by Raqs Sharki. First Sat. of every month from 6-8 pm through Dec. 31. $10-$20. Lebanon Restaurant & Café, 707 W. Fifth Ave. lebanonrestaurantandcafe. com (509-279-2124) OKTOBERFEST AT ARBORCREST This event features live music, a Germaninfluenced menu and brews from Square Wheel Brewing. Oct. 1-2, 12-5 pm. Free. Arbor Crest Wine Cellars, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. arbocrest.com (509-927-9463) GERMAN-AMERICAN SOCIETY OKTOBERFEST An Oktoberfest celebration featuring live music, traditional German food and beer. All ages. Oct. 1, 4 pmmidnight. $10. German American Hall, 25 W. Third Ave. (509-954-6964)

MUSIC

CELLO, CACAO & EQUINOX RITUAL Jesse Ahmann composes calming soundscapes that can transport listeners to a place of soulful rest and recovery. This is an intentional time to give thanks for the plentiful harvest, on the land and in your life. Sep. 22, 6-8 pm. $45. Harmony Woods Retreat Center, 11507 S. Keeney Rd. sarahrusnakyoga.com (208-610-8666) SPOKANE SYMPHONY SESSIONS: AN IMMERSIVE MUSIC EXPERIENCE Experience the Spokane Symphony in the industrial setting of the Wonder Building. Music Director James Lowe takes listeners on a musical journey as they experience the orchestra up close and personal. Sep. 22, 8:30 pm. $29. The Wonder Building, 835 N. Post St. foxtheaterspokane. org (509-624-1200) CONSERVATORY CONCERT SERIES: 20TH CENTURY FRENCH BIJOUX This intimate cabaret-style concert features Gosia Dauksza on flute and Matthew Goodrich on piano Sep. 23. $15-$30. Music Conservatory of Sandpoint, 110 Main St. sandpointconservatory.org PETER RIVERA’S R&B CELEBRATE SYMPHONY This concert features all of he hits from Rare Earth, other favorites and new musical surprises. All performers are from the Spokane region. The evening benefits the music departments at Whitworth University and Gonzaga University, as well as Northwest Passage’s Community Journalism Fund. Sep. 23, 7 pm. $22$102. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. foxtheaterspokane. org (509-624-1200) JOHN BREWER VOCAL JUBILEE An evening of music performed by local vocal artists Olivia Baldwin, Brian Collins, Scott Milner, Matthew Myers, Stephanie Sant, Victoria Sundin, Alisa Toy, Julie Wieck and more. All proceeds benefit the Palouse Choral Society. Sep. 25, 4-6

pm. By donation. St. Boniface Catholic Church, 207 S. St. Boniface St. fb.me/ e/3bN1QxSlt (509-597-8917) LIBERTY QUARTET The men’s gospel group leads worship through harmony and song. Sep. 25, 6 pm. Free. Spokane First Nazarene, 9004 N. Country Homes Blvd. (509-467-8986) 24 PRELUDES IN POPULAR STYLE AFTER CHOPIN New preludes are performed by the composer and modeled on Chopin’s collection. Sep. 26, 7:30-9 pm. Free. Kimbrough Music Building, WSU Pullman. music.wsu.edu IMAGINE JAZZ Live jazz. Sep. 26, 7-10 pm and Oct. 10, 7-10 pm. Free. The Bad Seed, 2936 E. Olympic Ave. imaginejazz. org (509-822-7439) CHRISTMAS CANTATA A three-act nativity opera featuring Christmas carols, choir songs and performances by an orchestra. Sep. 28, 7 pm. Free. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. christmascantata.us SPIRIT OF SPOKANE CHORUS A fourpart harmony barbershop chorus. Rehearsals are held every Tue from 6:30-9 pm. Free. Opportunity Presbyterian Church, 202 N. Pines Rd. opportunitypresbyterian.org (509-924-9750) FACULTY ARTIST SERIES: JULIE WIECK AND ELENA PANCHENKO This recital highlights Jewish culture, composers and music by Leonard Bernstein, Maurice Ravel, Joaquin Nin-Culmell and George Gershwin. Sep. 30, 7:30-9 pm. Free. Bryan Hall Theatre (WSU), 605 Veterans Way. wsu.edu/music (509-335-7696) I WRITE THE SONGS A celebration of great composers of the past and songwriters of today. The event features a silent auction and diverse musical entertainment. All funds raised support the library. Oct. 1, 6 pm. $50. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org (208-769-2315) SPOKANE SYMPHONY POPS 1: CLASSICAL MYSTERY TOUR Classical Mystery Tour showcases the best of The Beatles with the addition of a symphony orchestra. Oct. 1, 7:30 pm. $47-$100. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. spokanesymphony.org SPOKANE JAZZ ORCHESTRA The SJO performance includes solos and improvisation from local musicians and guest artists. Oct. 1, 7:30 pm. $27-$32. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (509-227-7404) WELCOME TO (NEW) AMERICA The symphony performs Stravinsky’s Firebird Suite, Bernstein’s West Side Story and selections by Aaron Copland. Oct. 1. $10-$25. Schuler Performing Arts Center, 1000 W. Garden Ave. cdasymphony.org

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

FALL EQUINOX ROOFTOP YOGA A 90-minute empowerment yoga class followed by a sound bath and meditation. This class is for all skill levels. Sep. 22, 6:15 pm. $40. The Wonder Building, 835 N. Post St. wonderspokane.com END OF SEASON POKER RUN This run benefits Joya Child & Family Development of Spokane. Begins at Jackson St. Bar and Grill and ends at Hauser Junction. Sep. 24, 9 am-2 pm. By donation. The Jackson St. Bar & Grill, 2436 N. Astor St. doberbarn@aol.com (541-550-6728) STATE LAND FREE DAYS The Washing-

ton State Parks and Recreation Commission invites visitors to enjoy a state park for free on select days each year. Visitors are not required to display the Discover Pass for day-use visits to a Washington state park or on lands managed by the Washington Department of Natural Resources (DNR) or Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) on these dates. Sep. 24, Oct. 10, Nov. 11 and Nov. 25. Free. parks.wa.gov NBC CAMPS VARSITY ACADEMY BASKETBALL TRAINING Varsity Academy provides weekly gym times for players to learn from knowledgeable and inspiring coaches. Ages 9-17. 5:30-7:30 pm through Oct. 23. $250. The Warehouse, 800 N. Hamilton St. nbccamps.com PANHANDLE PADDLE Activists are invited to bring their boats to this on- and offshore protest of Northwest coal, oil, tar sands trains, terminals and derailments. See website for location information. Sep. 25, 10 am-noon. Free. Sandpoint. wildidahorisingtide.org BACK TEE CHALLENGE This two-person scramble offers a challenge for even the most skilled golfers. Oct. 1, 11 am-8 pm. $200. Circling Raven Golf Course, 27068 S. Highway 95. cdacasino.com (208-7692464) NPOV LIONS CLUB RAILRIDERS Enjoy the unique experience of a four-seated, pedal powered, railroad bicycle along the beautiful, scenic Pend Oreille River in Ione, Washington. First, ride north, up to the impressive Box Canyon Trestle, then south through scenic pastureland. Rides offered Oct. 1-2 and Oct. 8-9. Times vary, see website for tickets. $12/$24. Ione, Wash. lionsrailriders.com SPOKANE CHIEFS VS. KAMLOOPS BLAZERS Includes Bud Light opening night and a pre-game party. Oct. 1, 7:05 pm. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanechiefs.com (279-7000) 509 XLAB KICKOFF TO WINTER Meet pro athletes, enter in winter sport gear giveaways and enjoy food trucks at this kickoff party. Oct. 1, 3-7 pm. Free. 509 Xlab, 2818 N. Sullivan Rd. ride509.com

THEATER

ADMISSIONS A no-holes-barred look at privilege, power and the perils of hypocrisy. Sept. 16-Oct. 2, Thu-Sat at 7 pm and Sun at 2 pm. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. stagelefttheater.org HAIRSPRAY Broadway’s Tony Awardwinning musical comedy phenomenon features 16-year-old Tracy Turnblad in 1960’s Baltimore as she sets out to dance her way onto TV’s most popular show. Can a girl with big dreams (and even bigger hair) change the world? Sept. 2025; Tue-Fri at 7:30 pm, Sat at 2 and 7:30 pm, Sun at 1 and 6:30 pm. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. broadwayspokane.com JT: TARTUFFE IN TEXAS No one serves up a comic plate full of religious hypocrisy or political intrigue quite like the French master of satire, Moliere. Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm through Sep. 25. $7-$12. Spartan Theater at SFCC, 3410 W. Whistalks Way. sfcc.spokane.edu SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK: GOODNIGHT DESDEMONA An exuberant comedy and revisioning of Shakespeare’s Othello and Romeo and Juliet. Sept. 23 at 6;30 pm and Sept. 24 at 2 pm. Free. Manito Park, Duncan Lawns, 2112 S. Tekoa St. spokaneshakespearesociety.org THE WIZARD OF OZ Follow the yellow


brick road in the stage adaptation of L. Frank Baum’s beloved tale, featuring the iconic musical score from the MGM film. Sept. 16-Oct. 16, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10-$35. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (509-325-2507) FIRST BITE NEW PLAY SERIES A showcase for emerging U of I Master of Fine Arts playwrights, with a free staged reading of new work. Each performance is followed by a Q&A session with the playwright, to help in the refinement of the play. Sep. 23-25. Hartung Theater, 875 Perimeter Dr. uidaho. edu (208-885-6111) THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST A classic Oscar Wilde satire about the story of two bachelors who create alter egos named Ernest to escape their tiresome lives. Sept. 23-24 and Sept. 30-Oct. 1, 7 pm. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-263-9191) SIGNIFICANT OTHER Jordan Berman would love to be in love, but that’s easier said than done. Until he meets Mr. Right, he wards off lonely nights with his trio of close girlfriends. But as singles’ nights turn into bachelorette parties, Jordan discovers that the only thing harder than finding love is supporting the loved ones around you when they do. Sept. 23-Oct 16, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10-$25. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com

VISUAL ARTS

VOICES, VIBRANCE, VISION Local artists Shantell Jackson and Tracy Poindexter-Canton join creative forces to present new works inspired by Black contemporary novelists and poets. Sept. 8-Oct. 29, open daily. Free. Liberty Building, 402 N. Washington. spokanelibertybuilding.com SPOKANE WATERCOLOR SOCIETY JURIED MEMBER SHOW This year’s show features Kim Gardell, Oral Carper, Vicki West and more. An awards reception is on Fri, Sept. 23 from 5-8 pm. Gallery hours are Sept. 2-30, Mon-Fri from 10 am-5 pm. Free. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland Ave. spokaneartschool. net (509-325-1500) ANDREW SOMOSKEY: RELATIVE FICTIONS New revisions by artist Andrew Somoskey. Through Oct. 1, Thu-Sat from 4-7 pm. Free. Terrain Gallery, 728 N. Monroe St. terrainspokane.com ART ACTIVISM! Learn about activism through art throughout history and then create your own zines and buttons to promote change that you want to see occur. Sep. 22, 3:30-5 pm. Free. The Hive, 2904 E. Sprague Ave. spokanelibrary.org (509-444-5308) THE BRIDGE BETWEEN This exhibition features work by artists Jon Morse, Sara Taylor, Claire Akebrand, Linda McCray and Sandi Bransford. Sept. 3-27, daily from 11 am-6 pm. Free. The Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com (208-765-6006) CHAD “LITTLE COYOTE” YELLOWJOHN: MASKED PRESERVATION Yellowjohn comes from the Shoshone-Bannock/Spokane ancestral line. Through his art and activism, he shares inspiration and awareness of the issues Indigenous people face today. Open Mon-Fri from 8:30 am-3:30 pm through Oct. 25. Free. SFCC Fine Arts Gallery, 3410 W. Whistalks Way, Bldg. 6. sfcc. spokane.edu (509-533-3710) DANCING WITH LIFE: MEXICAN

MASKS Through humor and subversion, Mexican mask makers respond to the social and political circumstances of contemporary life. With a regional focus in Michoacan, Mexico, this exhibition presents a selection of dance masks from the MAC collection and contemporary Mexican artists. TuesSun from 10 am-5 pm through April 16. $15-$20. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (509-456-3931) KATIE CREYTS: TRAPPINGS Creyts’ work features a range of materials, including textiles, graphite on paper and etched glass. Sept. 13-Nov 4, Mon-Thu from 10 am-4pm, Fri from 10 am-2:30 pm. Free. Boswell Corner Gallery at NIC, 1000 W. Garden Ave., Building 22. nic. edu (208-769-3276) KRISTA BRAND: PERIPHERY This multidisciplinary artist and curator explores everyday encounters with litter and plastic waste, sifting through curbsides, parking lots and cracks in the sidewalk. Sept. 13-Oct. 28, Mon-Fri from 10 am4:30 pm. Free. Bryan Oliver Gallery, Whitworth, 300 W. Hawthorne Ave. whitworth.edu (777-3258) MEET YOUR MAKER Meet the artists behind all of the items in From Here. Daily from 11 am-6 pm. See website for artist schedule. Free. From Here, 808 W. Main Ave. fromherespokane.com SONNY & LISA MOECKEL: INDIGENOUS The contemporary portrait painters excel in the use of minimal color configurations and the art of transforming portraits into abstract realism paintings. Mon-Fri from 8 am-5 pm through Sep. 30. Free. Chase Gallery, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanearts.org (509-321-9416) TEASCARLET: RESOLVE A solo showing of acrylic paintings featuring trees, flowers and abstracts by Teascarlet AKA Hannah Sucsy. Sept. 21-Nov. 20, Mon-Fri from 9 am-5 pm. Free. Columbia Bank Community Plaza, 414 Church St. artinsandpoint.org (208-263-6139) WENAHA GALLERY CLOSING Just shy of celebrating its 29th year in business, Wenaha Gallery in Dayton is closing its doors. As a thank you to customers, the gallery is offering all in-stock, nonconsigned art at 50% off through Sept. 30. Free. Wenaha Gallery, 219 E. Main St. wenaha.com (509-382-2124) ARTISTRY IN WOOD Spokane Carvers Association is hosting the 31st annual juried show of regional wood carvings and an exhibition of woodturning. The show also includes woodturning and carving demonstrations. Sep. 23, 3:306:30 pm and Sep. 24, 10 am-5 pm. Free. The Hive, 2904 E. Sprague Ave. spokanelibrary.org (509-444-5300) MARGOT CASSTEVENS & ANN PORTER Casstevens’s work reflects a postpandemic society and Porter’s is titled “Hard Quilts for Hard Times.” Sept. 2-24, Fri-Sat from 12-8 pm. Free. Saranac Art Projects, 25 W. Main Ave. sapgallery.com (509-350-3574) 15TH ANNUAL LITTLE SPOKANE RIVER ARTIST STUDIO TOUR Five participating studios showcase over 48 artists and their work. The show is held outdoors in the Little Spokane River Valley at 15205 N. Shady Slope Rd. Sep. 24, 10 am-5 pm. Free. littlespokanestudios. com (509-981-2279) THE 2022 SPOKANE ARTS AWARDS The Arts Awards recognize the accomplishments of creatives, arts and cultural organizations, and local individuals committed to enriching our community through the arts. The four awards categories reflect the values of Spokane

Arts: leadership, collaboration, imagination and inclusion. Sep. 24, 7 pm. $25. Lucky You Lounge, 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. spokanearts.org ART FROM THE ATTIC This outdoor event features artists selling paintings, framed prints, home decor, sculptures and more. All proceeds support upkeep and maintenance of the Moore Turner Heritage Garden. Sep. 24, 9 am-4 pm. Free. Corbin Art Center, 507 W. Seventh Ave. (509-280-1902) PINE NEEDLE BASKET WEAVING Learn to create a Ponderosa pine needle basket starting with a pre-made center. Sep. 24, 11 am-3 pm. $75. Emerge, 119 N. Second St. emergecda.com SUGPIAQ ART DEMONSTRATION Hive Artist-In-Residence Heather Metrokin Cannon showcases Sugpiaq art and design and demonstrates fish skin processing. Sep. 28, 6 pm. Free. The Hive, 2904 E. Sprague. spokanelibrary.org

WORDS

GABINO IGLESIAS A public reading, Q&A and book signing with UI distinguished visiting writer Gabino Iglesias. Sep. 23, 7 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. bookpeopleofmoscow.com (208-882-2669) KAT SMITH & EMILY VAN KLEY Readings from Kathryn Smith’s and Emily Van Kley’s newest poetry books, SelfPortrait with Cephalopod and Arrhythmia. Sep. 23, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com AUNTIE’S BOOK CLUB: QUEER & WEIRD A book club with a focus on queer literature. Meets on the fourth Saturday of the month at 6 pm. See Auntie’s site for current title. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (509-838-0206) THE CLACKITY BY LORA SENF This eerie middle-grade novel tells the story of a girl who must enter a world of ghosts, witches and monsters to play a game with deadly consequences and rescue her aunt. RSVP on website. Sep. 24, 5:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com HOW STORIES UNITE OUR COMMUNITY Dr. Melissa Bedford discusses the history of banned books and current trends within the movement. Sep. 24, 3:30-4:30 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org STORYTELLING WITH A DIVERSE LENS A discussion with writers, academics and industry individuals about writing scripts, plays and fiction with stories of diversity in today’s world. Sep. 24, 11 am-1 pm. Free. Central Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanefilmproject.com (509-444-5336) A LOOK AT UKRAINE Visiting scholar Lance Rhoades shares his experiences and observations visiting western Ukraine shortly after Russia annexed Crimea and declared eastern provinces independent. Sep. 26, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm; sign-ups at 6 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. bit.ly/2ZAbugD POLAR BEARS & GLOBAL WARMING Dr. Steven C. Amstrup is chief scientist for Polar Bears International. His talk discusses how the plight of the polar bears affects us all. Sep. 28, 6 pm. Free. Gonzaga University Hemmingson Center, 702 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga.edu (719-464-5555) n

RIDE THE RAILS THIS SUMMER!

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Time for Tincture

DIY

res could be a pantry staple u t c n i t e d a m e m o H oks with cannabis for anyone who co BY WILL MAUPIN

Turn flower into liquid. WILL MAUPIN PHOTO

C

annabis tinctures are a tried-and-true method of consumption, hailed for their versatility and ease. They’re also a piece of cake to make at home. Some recipes call for long soak times — sometimes up to months, which are commonly known as “green dragon” as the longer soak time allows for more plant compounds to be absorbed into the tincture, including the chlorophyll which gives cannabis its green color. Shorter “quick wash extraction” methods, like the recipe below, are commonly known as “golden dragon” as they extract the fun compounds like THC and CBD, but not the green color of the plant matter. If you’re making a tincture to use medicinally, a longer soak time method would be preferable. Quick wash methods, on the other hand, are ideal for use in edibles as they produce intoxication but add far less plant-like cannabis flavor to the final product. Tinctures can also be consumed directly, either swallowed like a traditional edible or held under the tongue for a much faster onset of effects.

SUPPLIES

8 grams cannabis 6 ounces food-grade alcohol, 190 proof or above Sealable glass jars Cheesecloth Coffee filter

DIRECTIONS

Finely chop the cannabis. Open the windows, all of them, because this step will stink up the place: Lay cannabis flat on a parchment paper lined baking sheet and heat in a preheated oven at 220 F for 20 minutes. Transfer cannabis to a glass jar, seal and place in the freezer. In another jar, do the same with the alcohol. Freeze both for at least four hours. (Freezing helps keep unwanted compounds, like chlorophyll, from being absorbed into the alcohol.) Pour alcohol into the jar with the cannabis and shake

for one minute. Hold the jar in a kitchen rag to prevent your body heat from warming the mixture. Return to freezer for five minutes, agitating slightly every minute or so. Strain mixture through cheesecloth into a separate glass to remove large cannabis pieces. Then strain through a coffee filter into a separate glass to remove smaller pieces. Cover with a fresh piece of cheesecloth to prevent contaminants from entering while allowing airflow for evaporation. Leave out in a well-ventilated space until reduced by half (or more, to taste) to dampen the alcohol flavor and burn. Depending on conditions, this could take up to a day. Once reduced to desired level, store in a sealable glass jar (ideally an amber-colored dropper bottle) in a cool, dry place for up to three years. n When producing edibles at home for personal use, be careful. The potency may vary.

greenhand DAILY SPECIALS

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

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Warning: This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a five-year sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.


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GREEN ZONE

BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

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