Page 1

THE SHINS

THE INDIE GROUP PLAYS THE LILAC CITY PAGE 45

GRIEF AND QUESTIONS THE AFTERMATH FOR FREEMAN HIGH PAGE 20

FARMING WITH RECYCLED POOP

LOCALS CONCERNED ABOUT ‘BIOSOLIDS’ PAGE 13

SEPTEMBER 21-27, 2017 | #FREEMANSTRONG

ENFORCER the

Why Idaho Congressman Raúl Labrador stands in the way of protecting ‘Dreamers’ BY DANIEL WALTERS PAGE 24


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INSIDE

BEFORE

VOL. 24, NO. 49 | ON THE COVER: CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

COMMENT NEWS COVER CULTURE

5 13 24 31

FOOD FILM MUSIC EVENTS

36 40 45 50

I SAW YOU GREEN ZONE ADVICE GODDESS LAST WORD

52 54 60 62

EDITOR’S NOTE

B

efore he was an Idaho congressman, RAÚL LABRADOR was an immigration attorney who spoke passionately about the kids caught in the middle — children of undocumented immigrants, smuggled to the United States through no fault of their own. When Labrador arrived in Congress, many believed he might be the key to getting comprehensive immigration reform passed. The Washington Post went as far as calling him the “middleman” on the issue in a 2013 article. But times have changed. Labrador is now viewed more as a hard-liner, preferring the stick to the carrot, and he’s in a powerful position to frame the debate. Staff writer Daniel Walters digs into Labrador’s record (page 24) and what it may mean for the kids in the middle, the hundreds of thousands of so-called Dreamers. — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com)

WHAT SHOULD BE DONE TO IMPROVE OUR IMMIGRATION SYSTEM?

PUBLISHER

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

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MATT BURROWS

My wife immigrated here from Israel and we went through the whole immigration process. We went through a lot of stuff that seemed pretty unfair. So you had to prove it was a legit marriage? They did a lot of interrogations. They interviewed us each one of us separately and asked us the same question to make sure our answers lined up.

Chey Scott (x225) FOOD & LISTINGS EDITOR

Nathan Weinbender (x250) FILM & MUSIC EDITOR

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Wilson Criscione (x282), Mitch Ryals (x237), Daniel Walters (x263), Samantha Wohlfeil (x234) STAFF WRITERS

Young Kwak

ANNA GUDIMA

Make it easier to immigrate here. Eighty percent of people are denied immigration. I read it — I actually did some studying on this. What caused you want to research this issue? My parents immigrated here [from] Russia. They applied for visas and got a green card. They did it the right way.

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IGOR DRAGNYA

I immigrated with my parents here in the spring of 2001. A couple months before 9/11 happened. Now they’re trying to close doors and build walls and whatnot. What do you think about that? I have a lot of Mexican friends. But I haven’t really looked into why [Trump] is doing it. He’s doing it because cheap labor, and because of the people live here, right?

LAUREN ERICKSON

It’s not as easy as people like to make it sound. What’s complicated about it? Well, there’s two extreme sides. People that think we should let anything and everybody in because it’s the kind thing to do. And then people who think it’s unwise financially and not fair to people in the country. The reality is somewhere in the middle.

ANNA SPEIGHTS

I think to come up with a specific criteria of what qualifies someone to enter the country, and then what kind of benefits they should receive… Especially with health care and stuff like that, to not easily provide it. [Require] someone to get established in the country before they receive some of the benefits.

Kristin Wagner (x210) ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

INTERVIEWS BY DANIEL WALTERS 9/18 & 9/19/17, DOWNTOWN SPOKANE

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Cannon Hill Park Neighborhood 4 homes on w. 24th Ave. between Bernard & Howard

Sun, October 1

Noon to 4:00pm Tickets $20 available at the tour - cash, check, or online www.SpokanePreservation.org More info: (509)456-3828 No spiked heels, photos, backpacks or strollers allowed in homes.

6 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

New York State of Mind President Trump won’t be on the 2018 ballot, but if challengers are smart, the election will be all about him BY ROBERT HEROLD

I

n one of the biggest surprises in eight months of shocking twists, turns and tweets, President Trump has started up peace talks with Democratic congressional leaders Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi. It’s making his Republican lapdogs sad and confused; how might we explain such a seeming contradiction? First off, Trump never has been a “movement conservative.” He’s a dealmaker, and with almost nothing to show as president so far, he needs to make a deal with somebody. There’s another simple explanation: Both Democrats are big-city people, comfortable with the rough-and-tumble, the diversity, even the lingo — the shared culture, so to speak. Could it be that Trump just would rather spend his time with New Yorkers and people from the Bay Area? Like many New Yorkers, Trump is crude — pretty much a New York pastime. He is loud, as are New Yorkers weaned on hailing cabs and waiters. When you think about it, Trump has little cultural common ground with either Mitch McConnell or Paul Ryan. McConnell grew up in a small town in Alabama. His family moved to Georgia, then on to Kentucky. And Ryan? His roots go back to a small city in southern Wisconsin. No New York, no San Francisco. So maybe all we’re seeing here are shared social comfort levels being used as a means of communication. It’s informality, translated into deals that rely on mutual understandings; something more basic than ideology. It seems trivial, I know, but we are talking about Donald Trump here. If I’m right, what does this mean for the upcoming midterm elections?

T

he sparring and fundraising over Washington’s 5th Congressional District has already begun. Seven-term incumbent Cathy McMorris Rodgers will have lots of money and also what’s left of Trump’s “ base” rooting her on. But the evidence of her 13-year tenure shows her consistently working against the interests of her district, as challenger Lisa Brown has already pointed out. It’s as if our congresswoman believes that Spokane is the economic mirror image of Mercer Island or Kirkland. McMorris Rodgers has stuck with Trump even on his very unpopular health care bill — by consensus, the worst, most draconian, out-of-touch piece of legislation to come along in decades. That health care bill, if approved (and now it’s coming back again), would take away health care from tens of millions of Americans while putting local hospitals out of business. And let’s not stop there: McMorris Rodgers has voted against food stamps and the continued level of funding for the Community Development Block Grant program, and she can’t even figure out how to frame a good farm bill. But this all plays just fine to “the base” — the

Trump base, that is. Trouble is, we’ve all seen the numbers, and it’s a shrinking base — likely to shrink more, because their hero is now consorting with Democrats. Still, according to polls, the most bedrock elements of his base seem to be sticking with Trump. For now. If the Trump base begins to feel abandoned, however, Republicans could lose the House, perhaps even the Senate. If the base holds, McMorris Rodgers’ chances of keeping her seat improve. So for the time being, incumbents tied to Trump are putting on their best smiley faces, despite the fear that watching him yuck it up with Chuck and Nancy elicits.

S

o Trump and McMorris Rodgers are bound together, sink or swim. It falls to challengers here and in districts all over America to make a case for change — a plea, really, to turn around this ship of state before it runs aground.

If the Trump base begins to feel abandoned... the GOP could lose the House. One thing is for sure here in the 5th: To win, Lisa Brown can’t run the campaign that every Democrat has run here since Tom Foley. She can’t win on “politeness.” The dark Republican money is already coming after her. But she has something that previous opponents haven’t had. She has Trump. Brown must drape the president around McMorris Rodgers until all you see is Trump — a man who combines the worst of Chance in the movie Being There, the derangement of old King George III and the temperament of a spoiled 6-year-old. Meanwhile, our Secretary of State has all but disappeared. Dozens of high-ranking important positions remain unfilled. Morale is at rock bottom. Confusion is the word of the day. It’s creating a profoundly dangerous situation, leaving America’s future in the hands of three militaryclad babysitters and one Arizona senator who is dying of a brain tumor. And now, by ditching congressional Republicans for the more familiar likes of Chuck Schumer, Trump seems to be hanging his foot soldiers out to dry, just as the election looms. McMorris Rodgers has been a most loyal Trumpette, so this strategy shouldn’t be all that difficult. Let the draping begin. n


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Join the American Heart Association for its annual family-friendly 5K. Form a team, join a team or register as an individual and set a fundraising goal to support the fight against heart disease and stroke. Sat, Sept. 23 from 9 am12:30 pm. WSU Spokane, 412 E. Spokane Falls Blvd. bit.ly/2teM0oA

• The Baby Boomer years begin

A CALL FOR HOUSING JUSTICE: RALLY & MARCH

• Tupperware sales begin in the U.S.

PJALS organizes a rally in front of Cathy McMorris Rodgers’ downtown Spokane office (10 N. Post) to protest the proposed Trump administration’s budget, which will affect a variety of programs in Spokane. Participants will then march to City Hall to “Rally against the Rocks” and join the City Council’s forum on homelessness. Mon, Sept. 25 at 4:30 pm. pjals.org

NATIONAL VOTER REGISTRATION DAY

The Spokane Public Library, in partnership with several local organizations, celebrates National Voter Registration Day with focused, nonpartisan voter registration efforts and related publicity campaigns. Free. Tue, Sept. 26: 10 am-1 pm at Downtown, Shadle branch; noon-2 pm at Eastside, Indian Trail, Hillyard branch; 10 am-noon at South Hill branch; 11 am-1 pm at North Central and Lewis & Clark High Schools. nationalvoterregistrationday.org (444-5347) n

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COMMENT | DEVELOPMENT The housing bubble briefly popped, but driven in large part by Amazon’s appropriately well-paid workers, it’s refilled in a hurry in Seattle. The average home price keeps going up at a dramatic pace (doubling in the past five years) and rents are rising even faster. Housing is a concern for almost everyone not smart enough to have been born earlier and bought before the latest boom. More than 10,000 people are homeless in the city.

If cities like Spokane want Amazon Headquarters 2.0, they’re going to have to pay.

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Amazon Goes Shopping Why cities shouldn’t sell themselves out to the online commerce behemoth BY JOHN T. REUTER

S

eattle may be America’s largest company town. As Amazon has grown into a sprawling online empire, it has invested heavily in its hometown. The New Urbanist campus rising in Seattle’s South Lake Union area is impressive. It’s also cool that residents have early access to whatever services Amazon dreams up to revolutionize the world: delivery of pretty much anything in under an hour, from a six-pack of beer to a meal from a local restaurant to a light bulb. Similarly, you can hire a professional to unclog a pipe or fix your car, and soon

Seattle will have grocery stores that allow you to just grab what you need and automatically be charged as you walk out. With Amazon, Seattle is living — just a bit quicker — in the future. But it isn’t all roses. Amazon has brought the city the future, and that future is damn expensive. I’m not just talking about Amazon’s services — which, while starting free, tend to take a bigger bite out of your wallet as they’re developed into version 2.0. But just like those services, while Amazon has left beta and grown into an economic juggernaut, it has made living in Seattle much more costly. This is most clearly seen in housing.

So while more than a few of Seattle’s politicians and the local chamber of commerce panicked at the recent news that Amazon plans to build a second headquarters — with more than 50,000 new employees — someplace else, others across the city breathed a sigh of relief. Seattle can definitely handle more growth in the decades to come (and even without Amazon’s second headquarters, it will keep growing), but the city needs to catch up with the urgent demand for housing. All that said, Seattle is probably better off with Amazon, but then, beyond paying for its impacts through skyrocketing rents and mortgages, Seattle got Amazon during its initial rollout LETTERS — which is to say it Send comments to located in the city for editor@inlander.com. free. Seattle didn’t have to offer a package of tax breaks or subsidized land (it didn’t hurt that Washington state has the most regressive tax system in the nation, but I’ll leave that for a different column). But now if cities like Spokane, for instance, want Amazon Headquarters 2.0, they’re going to have to pay. And like a lot of Amazon’s services, you’re not going to realize just how expensive it is until you’re already hooked. So if you’re a city leader out there desperate for growth (and trust me, I get that Seattle is in many ways blessed to have the problems it’s got), my advice is not to participate in the Amazon hunger games. Don’t spend the significant resources necessary to put together a bid that will require you to pay even more if you win. I’m here from the future, and I’m telling you, there’s a better way to grow. n John T. Reuter, a former Sandpoint City Councilman, has been active in protecting the environment, expanding LGBT rights and Idaho’s GOP politics. He currently lives in Seattle.

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A dishonest day’s work. Online employment scams are on the rise; don’t be a victim.

L

et’s say you’re browsing the online classifieds and you come across a job listing that looks good. Maybe it’s a nanny position, a gig as a housepainter, or a work-from-home job. The pay is decent — possibly even incredible. You send your résumé via email and cross your fingers. The employer responds quickly: You’re hired! In fact, they want to pay you an advance. All you need to do is cash a large check for them and send the money to other people they need to pay. Or, better yet, just send them your online banking username and password, and they’ll deposit the check for you.

“We used to see checks regularly for just under $5,000, but now we’re seeing them as low as $900,” Fuher says. Don’t take the gamble Scam victims often tell Fuher that they responded to a sketchy offer just to see if it was legitimate, or that they only gave out their online banking credentials so their new “employer” could make a mobile deposit. “They didn’t think it through, that by having those access credentials, you can do anything and everything,” Fuher says.

You should be hearing alarm bells. The checks you receive will be bogus, or the alleged employer will use your banking login credentials to siphon your money out of your account.

Evolution of the employment scam

Poor spelling and grammar. Real employers’ job listings generally look professional.

It just looks fishy.

To avoid becoming a victim yourself, he recommends staying vigilant, paying attention to warning signs like easy money and a rapid hiring process, and remembering that one mistake on your part is all it takes for a con artist to succeed. “We should protect our access credentials as much as we protect our other personal information,” Fuher says, “and never give it out.”

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Advance payment. Sorry, but easy money almost always comes with a catch.

A rapid hiring process, usually immediate and sight unseen.

“We used to see these employment scams every couple of months. Now we’re seeing them on a fairly regular basis,” says Jim Fuher, fraud prevention manager at STCU.

And scammers have adapted to eliminate some of the biggest red flags ― by reducing the size of counterfeit checks, for example.

Is that job posting legit? Here are some causes for concern.

Requests for your online banking login information, or for you to transfer money via Western Union or MoneyGram.

Yet job seekers can and do rationalize all those irregularities.

Craigslist, the classified advertising site, is one of the most common online platforms for employment scams. But that’s changing, Fuher says. Scammers now are sending unsolicited e-mails to job seekers who post their résumés online or post comments about their job search in public forums.

Warning signs


COMMENT | FROM READERS

WELL PLAYED My name is Chris Hansen. I am a local actor in the area and have been for a decent amount of time. I am also SFCC Technical Director for their theatre department. I just want to say “thank you” for handling a great subject matter on the whole in regards to the theatre article “Post-Modern Era” (9/14/17). The truth behind the article was put elegantly. Thank you for not shying away from the tension in our arts community and our efforts to find a better connection to one another. We need more of this transparency of truth in the world. Thank you. CHRIS HANSEN Spokane Falls Community College, Spokane, Wash.

HOLIDAYS HAPPEN HERE. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

MAKE EDUCATION A PRIORITY Wilson Criscione’s excellent article, “Passing the Buck: The Steep Cost of Online Education for Taxpayers and Kids” (9/7/17) shows how difficult and expensive it is to educate our children. There are no easy solutions. I do believe we need to use a mix of “brick and mortar” schools and online education technology to address problems facing our nation’s schools. Both have their place in today’s world. Instead of choosing between LETTERS one or the other, we should be bring Send comments to both together to complement each editor@inlander.com. other’s strengths and weaknesses. Financing both is the key, and unfortunately money is always the bottom line. Until we make education a priority in this country, we will continue to fail our children. RUSSELL FLEMING Cheney, Wash.

PUT HISTORY IN CONTEXT I agree that not every type of memorial needs to be struck down due to some

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newly found political correctness, but George Wright is someone that needs not be celebrated in any way (“Wrights and Wrongs,” 9/7/17). We need to remember how our government treated the Natives as a way to understand our history in context. But if names are to be changed, I would also suggest swapping the names of Steptoe and Kamiak Buttes, as Steptoe lost the battle and fled, and yet he gets the highest peak. Also I would love to see Spokane’s name changed back to Spokan Falls. GARY D. RHODES Colville, Wash.

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 11


12 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017


AGRICULTURE

MAKING A STINK For decades, cities and towns have spread their sewage on agricultural land, but one group questions if regulations have kept pace with current science BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

A

s cold wind whips the air on a recent September morning, bringing the first taste of fall to an empty wheat field near Reardan, workers spend the morning loading the soil with about 75 wet tons of a material that will help feed next year’s crop. That material they’re spreading? Well, it’s kind of your poop. And the city of Spokane alone creates enough of it to cover 5 to 7 acres every single day. Technically, it’s not just human waste, but treated sewage sludge from homes and industrial users, processed at the city’s wastewater treatment plant before being tested to meet federal and state regulations so it can be spread on farmland. The stuff that meets the requirements is commonly called “biosolids.”

Since at least the 1980s, local farmers such as the Carstens, who tend this field about 30 minutes west of Spokane, have been using biosolids to help nourish dryland crops, with great results. “It’s adding organic matter and macroand micronutrients we wouldn’t normally apply,” says Kurt Carstens, whose family has stewarded the land since homesteading in the 1860s. “[Crops] respond to it like it’s fertilizer.” The Carstens were among the first to get biosolids from Spokane, which rotates between a list of farmers and properties, as crews have to distribute biosolids every day of the year. In winter, workers create berms and pile it on farms so the solids can be spread once the ground thaws.

Over the years, the quality of the city’s biosolids has improved as the treatment process has gotten better, Carstens says. “It’s funny, when we first started, you might get squash or tomato or something you hadn’t planted,” Carstens says. “We haven’t seen that in years.” But even though biosolids have been used successfully on aboveground crops in Eastern Washington for years, a recent request to spread the material on a farm north of Davenport has been met with strong resistance from neighbors, who question whether regulations created more than 20 years ago have kept pace with research into potentially harmful contaminants that might be found in biosolids. ...continued on next page

Kevin Johnbrow, from Spokane’s wastewater treatment plant, spreads biosolids on a farm near Reardan last week. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 13


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Kyle Arrington, a chemist with Spokane Wastewater Management, shows the press that removes excess water from biosolids. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

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14 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

More than a year ago, Fire Mountain Farms, based in Western Washington, started the process of renewing its permit with the state Department of Ecology to spread biosolids on properties around the state. One property the company hoped to add to its list this time was Rosman Farms in Lincoln County. Farmer Garry Rosman says he got interested in biosolids maybe a decade ago, but didn’t get serious about it until a few years ago, when Fire Mountain Farms, which was clearing a nearby town’s treatment lagoon, asked if he’d be interested in permitting his land for biosolids. Fire Mountain Farms cleans out treatment lagoons for smaller towns and cities, and typically tries to apply those biosolids to sites as close as possible, says president and CEO Robert Thode. For small towns, those sites may only have to be cleaned out once every 25 years or so, he says. It takes a while to go through the permitting process, so it’s common for Fire Mountain to permit a site and then find a source of biosolids nearby, Thode says. There isn’t a set source determined yet for Rosman’s site, if it gets permitted. When neighbors in Mill Canyon found out about the plan for Rosman Farms, they were concerned about whether the biosolids might wind up in their water, or come down the hill with wind or flooding. State rules require buffer zones to keep biosolids away from surface water and steep slopes to prevent contamination. While treatment facilities are required to test biosolids for certain metals, and treat them to reduce the risk of disease, they aren’t required to test for other potentially harmful materials such as chemicals found in medications or household products, which concerns the neighbors, who formed the group “Protect Mill Canyon Watershed.” Among their ranks are organic gardeners and farmers, including current and former residents of the intentional community of Tolstoy Farm —

or “granola types,” says Chrys Ostrander, who lived in the community for about 20 years before moving to a nearby town. He’s helping spearhead the efforts to protect the watershed. The intentional community’s business, Tolstoy Farms, supplies produce to Spokane restaurants and helped start the Saturday farmers’ market, and while the farms’ source of water is upstream from the proposed application site, they support their concerned neighbors, such as Morton Alexander, who owns a private, organic orchard in the canyon. In addition to opposing the application near their homes, the group is calling on the Department of Ecology to halt all biosolids permits in the state until further research is completed. That effort is supported by the local chapter of the Sierra Club, the Columbia Institute for Water Policy, and concerned environmental groups and nonprofits. “They only look at a tiny fraction of what is in biosolids, and it is completely unacceptable,” Ostrander says. While Ostrander says he appreciates that some parts of the treatment process have gotten better, he feels that relevant research showing that antibiotics and chemical contaminants make their way into biosolids is being ignored. “The thing that hasn’t changed is they haven’t added any other substances under their list of what they’re concerned about,” Ostrander says. “They’ve just stuck with these same metals for years and years and years.”

CURRENT TESTING

Under state and federal rules, biosolids are tested for nine metals. Washington’s rules are a little more stringent on the amounts of those metals allowed, but in general, mirror the federal rule, says Wayne Krafft, section manager for Ecology’s Eastern Region Waste 2 Resources program. While Ecology’s role is simply to enforce the regulations put in place by the state legislature, Krafft says, the regulations were also created


with an eye on what is worth testing for to protect people and the environment. “Sure, we could have them test for absolutely everything, and find out over and over again the levels we find are below what would cause any sort of risk,” Krafft says. “While you will find pretty much any chemical in biosolids, the concentration is so low that it doesn’t pose any threat to human health by any sort of potential exposure pathway.” Those thoughts were echoed by Andy Bary, a senior scientific assistant with Washington State University Puyallup, who has researched biosolids for more than 25 years. In the cases he’s studied, Bary says, “the use of biosolids improves soil quality, improves crop production and is not a risk.” In general, biosolids tend to be more regulated than other fertilizers, Bary says. They are applied at calculated rates to match the nutrient needs of the crop they are being applied to, which is meant to prevent excess nitrogen from leaching into water sources. “The amount of research that’s been done on biosolids is huge,” Bary says. “There’s probably been more research on biosolids application than on dairy manure.” Bary, who advises groups around the country on biosolids use, says that Washington is known around the U.S. for managing biosolids well.

NEW RESEARCH

A lot of new biosolids research is focusing on substances such as pharmaceuticals, antibiotics, flame retardants and other chemicals that are more of a concern now, Bary says. However, in the research that he’s seen, the risk of exposure from biosolids is significantly lower than exposure from day-to-day materials. Take, for instance, flame retardants. “Are you sitting on a foam chair?” Bary asks. “Your exposure to that is greater sitting on that than it would be from biosolids application.” Or look at over-the-counter medicines. “Let’s say you are a gardener,” Bary says. “It’s going to take greater than 50,000 years to be exposed by gardening to get to one tablet of ibuprofen. Your exposure is extremely, extremely low.” But Ostrander points to a 2010 study from Canada that found the presence of dozens of antibiotics like penicillin, and chemical compounds such as Bisphenol A (BPA), in biosolids. That study recommended further research into possible risks for the substances they found most, such as BPA. He also points to a long-term soil study from Scotland that found some bacteria that help plants absorb nutrients had been killed off on land where biosolids had been applied for a long time. “I understand that there are some studies out there that indicate biosolids are safe. Most of those ignore large slots of categories of chemicals and other pollutant contaminants,” Ostrander says. “Small amounts of 100 different chemicals is not necessarily small anymore. They don’t talk about how these might interact in the environment.” Rosman says he’s been friends with his neighbors for 30 years, and doesn’t want any of this to come between them, but he does find some of their concerns a little hypocritical, considering that some of his neighbors use outhouses on their land. Ecology has yet to issue its decision on the Rosman Farms application, but could do so in the next few weeks. If they approve it, Protect Mill Canyon Watershed says they’ll appeal the decision. Rosman says he hopes the group understands that if the application is approved, he’d only get biosolids sporadically, when a town nearby needs its treatment lagoon cleaned out. Even though biosolids could save him $25,000 in fertilizer costs each year he gets them, he says that if the permit isn’t ultimately approved, it won’t change the way he farms one bit. “I want to emphasize that I’m not mad at them,” Rosman says. “I started this with good intentions. I started it thinking I was putting [in] a source of nitrogen that was more stable, more earth-friendly and everything. I had no idea it would cause them so much angst.” n

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SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

ON INLANDER.COM

COUNTY Faced with choosing from three candidates to be the next SPOKANE COUNTY COMMISSIONER, current commissioners Al French and Josh Kerns opted for a fourth option: send the choice to Gov. Jay Inslee. French and Kerns, both Republicans, announced last week that they were unable to agree on an appointment for the open seat on the Spokane County Board of Commissioners before the deadline, Sept. 15. That means Inslee will have to 30 days to choose from three candidates recommended by the Spokane County GOP: Rob Chase, Spokane County treasurer; Mary Kuney, Spokane County deputy auditor; and John Guarisco, Spokane Valley marketing firm executive. “It is apparent that commissioner French and I are looking for different qualifications in the person whom we would appoint to fill this vacant position,” Kerns said. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

2017

NOW FEATURING NATIONAL NEWS FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES

REVIEW I can honestly say I never imagined I’d find myself watching a pharaoh flanked by half-naked Anubises (is it Anubi? did anyone ever think there’d be this many dog-headed Egyptian gods in one place?) as they all stripped to flashing lights and modern, bumping dance music. But that’s what went down at the Bing Crosby Theater last week, when MAGIC MEN LIVE put on their hunky show, where nudie ancient civilizations and Fifty Shades of Grey collide. While the dancers weren’t totally in sync at the beginning of the show, they clearly understood that for the mostly female audience, the key element to being sexy is a lot less about the dancer and a lot more about the idea he represents, like getting an up-close rodeo lesson from a cowboy who just happens to be wearing nothing but form-fitting undies. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

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HISTORY The behind-the-scenes tale of how Ted and Jer McGregor got the INLANDER off the ground nearly 25 years ago is the featured story of the current issue of the University of Washington alumni magazine Columns. And while there are a lot of great details about the evolution of Spokane along with that of this paper, we particularly liked what Spokane-raised Tim Egan, a Pulitzer Prize winner and Ted’s former coworker, had to say: “I was so impressed by the way Ted took what he learned in graduate school and then applied it to Spokane, and made a great success of it,” says Egan, his old friend from the New York Times. Pictured above, from left: Anne McGregor, editor of InHealth; Ted S. McGregor Jr., Inlander publisher; Jer McGregor, general manager; Tamara McGregor, editor of Annual Manual. (DAN NAILEN)

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FOOTBALL Eastern Washington fans can breathe a wee bit easier after the EAGLES got their first victory Saturday on a trip to New York City for a game against Fordham. That win was an emphatic one, a 56-21 rout that featured a school-record 10 sacks by the defense and the first appearance of the EWU offense that fans have come to expect. Quarterback Gage Gubrud threw for 399 yards and three touchdowns, and ran for two more scores, while helping new head coach Aaron Best notch his first win. Next: The Eagles, now 1-2, kick off their Big Sky season this Saturday with a game at Montana against the Grizzlies. (DAN NAILEN)

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Pain Relief A WSU professor will investigate online and alternative solutions to cutting opioid usage; plus, Sessions’ Justice Department leaves SPD hanging on reform “Especially now when we’re finding a lot of people ONLINE RX Marian Wilson, an assistant professor at Washington State University’s College of Nursing in Spokane, has focused her research on helping people use online resources and alternative techniques to manage their pain and mental health, often in conjunction with their prescriptions. Over the next five years, Wilson will expand on research she started in Spokane, co-leading an investigation to see if an online tool called the Goalistics Chronic Pain Management Program can help patients reduce their dosage or stop using OPIOIDS. She’ll work with lead investigator Theresa Winhusen, director of the Addiction Sciences Division at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, on the $2.5 million study of 400 noncancer patients. The online program walks people through ways to recognize their negative thinking, use meditation and physical activity to alleviate pain, and offers insight on social relationships, as many in constant pain can isolate themselves and feel misunderstood, Wilson says: “We want to empower people to feel they can manage their pain.” While helpful tools are often taught at pain management clinics and through cognitive behavioral therapy, not everyone has access to those resources, she says.

with difficulty getting doctors to fill prescriptions, clinics are closing down and physicians are prescribing less, we have this growing group of people that relied on opioids, but are now having their access cut off,” Wilson says. “We never want those people to stay in pain and have no options.” (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

NO REPORT CARD FROM DOJ

Spokane will not get a final report card on the 42 reforms recommended by the U.S. Department of Justice, Assistant Police Chief Justin Lundgren told members of the city council this week. The announcement in Spokane followed U.S. Attorney Jeff Sessions’ decision to redirect a Justice Department program designed to help REBUILD COMMUNITY TRUST in local police departments. “We kind of expected that might happen,” Lundgren says. “And at this point they quit engaging with us some time ago, so if they were to give us a report now, in a lot of ways it could be outdated.” Sessions announced the changes last week to the DOJ’s Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, or COPS. Under President Barack Obama, the COPS program engaged with local agencies on voluntary

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reform efforts. The COPS office would typically conduct a review, recommend changes and work with the department to implement them. Under former Chief Frank Straub, Spokane was the second department in the nation to invite this type of review in the aftermath of Otto Zehm’s death. The 2014 COPS report recommended updates to SPD’s training and policies, better tracking and analysis for uses of force and an internal culture audit, which was released in March of this year. Although the Justice Department will not publish a final report, Lundgren says all 42 recommendations are implemented. SPD also went beyond the recommendations and established subject matter review panels for critical incidents such as pursuits and uses of force. A background document from Sessions’ DOJ provided to news outlets last week stated that collaborative reforms, such as the one in Spokane, “led to the unintended consequences of a more adversarial relationship between DOJ and the participating law enforcement agencies.” The repurposed COPS office will provide technical assistance and grants and assist local departments combat violent crime, gangs and drugs. But Lundgren says the process in Spokane was not adversarial. “The reform was truly collaborative,” he says. “They didn’t come in and dictate to us, ‘You must do this or that.’ We did a lot of things really well prior to working with the DOJ, but they certainly made things better, and helped us improve upon the good.” (MITCH RYALS)

LOCAL CONTROL

In the name of protecting PARENTAL RIGHTS, Spokane Valley City Councilman Ed Pace is pushing a


potential ordinance that would restrict schools and health agencies from making decisions about student vaccinations, school curricula and gender-neutral bathrooms. “We have a mandate to protect the individual rights of our residents,” Pace says. Last month, Pace, who is running for re-election this year against former councilman Ben Wick, proposed that the ordinance be put on the city council’s advanced agenda. According to a draft of the ordinance’s goals, it would give parents complete authority in deciding to vaccinate their children, and in deciding whether or not to keep children home during a disease outbreak or epidemic. Pace says that’s in response to a mumps outbreak in local schools last year, during which schools prohibited unvaccinated students from coming to school. Additionally, the ordinance would give parents “complete and final authority” over curricula and teaching methods. It would also repeal protections for transgender people adopted by the state’s Human Rights Commission. Rick Eichstaedt, executive director of Spokane’s Center for Justice, says the ordinance would invite lawsuits costing Spokane Valley thousands and thousands of dollars. He says that state law reserves the right to make decisions on health emergencies, curricula and the privacy of minors. “I’m pretty confident if they were to pass something like this, it would be struck down by a court,” Eichstaedt says. “I think it’s a foolish effort.” Pace says Eichstaedt is correct that these are things that should be handled at the state level. Currently, he says he is working with the state legislature. He’s not sure when the ordinance will be up for a vote. “One possibility would be to change state law to say that city governments can pass ordinances in the interests of protecting constitutional rights, even if the ordinance contradicts a state law,” Pace says. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 19


NEWS | CRIME

It Happened Here The unimaginable took place at Freeman High School, and a community is left reeling with grief and questions BY MITCH RYALS

I

t all happened so quickly. A Freeman High School sophomore — who had been suspended after giving threatening notes to classmates — returned to school last Wednesday morning with two guns and opened fire, killing one Freeman student and wounding three others, authorities say. The 15-year-old suspect was confronted by a custodian, who held the teen until law enforcement arrived. Parents rushed to the school to retrieve terrified children. Then came the national news media. And then the question: How could this happen here? Students returned to school on Monday as investigators continue to sort it all out. The accused shooter, Caleb Sharpe, sits in juvenile detention, charged with murder and attempted murder, and could be tried as an adult. Meanwhile, the family of Sam Strahan, killed in the hallways of Freeman High, grieves. “The reality is that kids being bullied have access to unsecured firearms and in return are committing devastating acts due to their untreated mental health issues,” Sam’s cousin, Anna, says in a statement on behalf of the family. “This incident was preventable. Sam is gone because another teen with mental health issues had the tools to carry out this horrific event.”

Sam Strahan (left) was killed after he confronted a classmate who brought guns to school. Sam’s father, Scott (center), died just 12 weeks before.

WHO WAS SAM?

Sam Strahan sat down at school last year to eat his lunch of tomato soup. But he’d grabbed a fork by mistake, according to a classmate, who recently posted her favorite memory of Sam on social media. Sam declined offers from friends to get him a spoon. “I can make this work,” he said. “Sam ate that entire bowl of soup with a fork,” the girl wrote. “I remember a week later finding a quote on here saying ‘Life is soup, and I’m a fork,’ so I naturally sent it to him and shared a laugh at the memory. This quote speaks to me on an entirely different level now. As stupid as it sounds we are all forks in this soup life and no matter how hard it is, we’ve just gotta make it work.” The stories about Sam continue to pour out. Classmates remember a kindhearted boy, who was always “cracking jokes.” “I remember he was one of the first people who said ‘Hi’ to me,” says Kassidy Reilly, who transferred to Freeman High last year. “I didn’t know a lot of people, but right when I met him, he told me a joke. He was really

20 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

outgoing. That’s what I remember most.” Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich calls him a hero. Sam confronted the accused shooter before being killed, officials say. “I always knew you were going to shoot up the school,” Sam reportedly told the gunman. “You know that this is going to get you in trouble.” The shooter then fired a pistol twice, killing Sam, whose own father, Scott Strahan, had died just 12 weeks earlier in an accident on Father’s Day, according to an obituary. The gunman continued firing down the hallway, striking three freshman girls: Emma Nees, Jordyn Goldsmith and Gracie Jensen. All three survived. “Sam had a great sense of humor, loved his cat Bella dearly and enjoyed playing video games,” Sam’s cousin, Anna, says in a public statement for the family. “He was an active member of the community,” she continues, “volunteering at Generation Alive and serving as a member of the Boy Scouts of America where his father was the troop leader.”

WHO IS THE SHOOTER?

For some Freeman High School students, no explanation could help reconcile the deadly shooting in their hallway with the “nice, nerdy kid” they knew. Two students in particular, freshmen Elisa Vigil and Masha Stuart, got to know the accused shooter, Caleb Sharpe, while producing two school musicals: The Wizard of Oz and Rapunzel. Sharpe played the Cowardly Lion and Rapunzel’s prince. “Can I just say something?” Stuart says after a candlelight vigil after the shooting. “Online, I’ve been seeing everyone saying really awful things about him. I don’t really think he was that bad of a person. He was just going through a lot of stuff, and he took his anger out on the wrong people. He gave out notes to people to try and let them know, and no one did anything. It wasn’t a case of bullying or anything. His best friend moved away about a year before, and he just went downhill.” In the week since the deadly incident, more details about Sharpe’s actions have trickled out. The sophomore told detectives that he’d been seeing a school counselor for “suicidal ideations,” according to court documents. His parents confirmed to police that he’d written a suicide note more than a week before the shooting. Sharpe had recently been suspended after the school became aware of notes he’d handed to friends saying he was going to do “something stupid,” authorities say. Sharpe allegedly brought the guns to school on his first day back. A friend of Sharpe’s told police that the teen bragged about “owning multiple guns” and has made explosive devices out of chemicals and gas. When investigators searched Sharpe’s room, they found a Freeman yearbook with faces of classmates marked with an “X,” records indicate. “X=kill,” a detective writes in court documents. From the Sharpe family home, detectives also collected a PlayStation 4, a computer, a “notebook manifesto list of dads ammo,” a “revolver w/ 5 bullets,” and a “prac-

tice molotov cocktail” under some clothes near Sharpe’s closet, records show. After his arrest, Sharpe told detectives that he didn’t come to school that day to specifically target anyone, but “to teach everyone a lesson about what happens when you bully others.”

A JUVENILE OR AN ADULT?

Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich has already stated that his office will push to “try [the shooter] as an adult for pre-meditated murder.” Ultimately, it’s up to a judge. If Caleb Sharpe is found guilty in juvenile court, the most time he could spend behind bars is about six years — or until he turns 21. As an adult, he would face at least 20 years, and at most 26 years, in prison, though a judge can lessen the sentence, says Megan Manlove, a Spokane County public defender who works in juvenile court, but is not involved in Sharpe’s case.

A Freeman High School student fled to the nearby elementary school and tweeted this photo. A juvenile conviction would also allow Sharpe to seal his criminal record after he’s released. That means any potential conviction would not show up on a background check. Finally, Manlove points out that the goals of the juvenile system are different. “Juvenile court tries to rehabilitate,” she says. “Adult court is more punitive.” Regardless of where the case ends up, if convicted, Sharpe would be held in juvenile detention until he’s 18, rather than an adult prison. “He’s going to get out eventually,” Manlove adds. “I don’t know what good it’s going to do to send him to adult court. The research is pretty clear; adult court does not lead to better community safety. Those kids actually have a very high recidivism rate. The community could actually benefit more if the case stays in juvenile court.”

RECOGNIZING WARNING SIGNS

It’s not easy to spot someone who will turn violent, says Washington State University psychology professor Chris Barry, who specializes in studying behavioral disorders of children and adolescents. School shooters typically feel isolated, disconnected from their peers, Barry says. And they can get frustrated easily. Generally, kids who commit violent acts are less remorseful. But just because a student has those characteristics doesn’t mean they’re going to act on them, he adds. Barry says there are some steps that schools can take to prevent kids from acting on violent threats. If students are threatening to harm themselves, the school should address it immediately, including counseling. If there are threats against other students, the school is obligated to report the threat to law enforcement, Barry says. “What we find in some of these school shooting cases is a lot of times there was an elaborate plan in terms of


date, time and potential targets,” Barry says. Regardless of the warning signs, Barry says, students need support, not punishment. “If they express anger and frustration and threaten to harm themselves or others, it’s not a punitive thing,” he says. “It’s ‘Let’s find out what’s going on here.’”

LAW AND ORDER

It’s difficult to know which gun control regulations, if any, could have prevented the Freeman High School shooting. For state Rep. Laurie Jinkins, a public health official from Tacoma who has focused on reducing gun violence, there isn’t a “single magical solution.” Washington state has been among the leaders in gun control in the United States. In 2014, voters passed a ballot initiative that expanded firearm background checks after similar efforts failed in the legislature. Two more gun control laws were enacted over the past year. A bill passed by state lawmakers requires gun dealers to notify the Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs when anyone tries to buy a gun and fails a background check. That information is kept in a database. And voters passed a ballot initiative last November that empowers police, family members and others to ask a judge to remove guns from people who are in danger of hurting themselves or others. Other gun regulations have failed, such as the “Safe Storage” bill that would have required a gun to be locked in a gun safe if a minor is at home. Efforts to intensify background checks for people looking to buy military-style semiautomatic weapons and weapons with high-capacity magazines stalled in committee. And a bill pushed by Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson, which would have banned all semiautomatic rifles with detachable magazines and a pistol grip, went nowhere. Still, it’s possible that those protections wouldn’t have mattered in this case. Caleb Sharpe, the sophomore accused of killing one classmate and injuring three others, knew the combination to the gun safe in his family’s home, both Sharpe and his father told police. And the semiautomatic AR-15 rifle Sharpe brought to school jammed before he could fire any rounds. The 15-year-old allegedly brought a pistol as a backup.

FUTURE

UNDER CONSTRUCTION

WHO STOLE THE PURSE?

Parents of Freeman students descended on the school as word of the deadly shooting spread. Traffic jammed on nearby Highway 27, and many parents abandoned their vehicles and ran to the school — some unsure whether their children were alive or dead. One mother returned to her vehicle to find her purse missing, and by Friday afternoon the crooks had racked up more than $36,000 in fraudulently cashed checks and credit card charges, according to the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office. Tips came pouring in, and by Monday detectives had arrested one woman — Nicole D. Jensen, 33, of Spokane — and have identified a second suspect, who is not in custody.

FIRST DAY BACK

No one sat in Sam Strahan’s usual seat in first-period biology. The first day back after the shooting was hard, especially walking through the hallway where it all unfolded, says Kassidy Reilly, a sophomore and Sam’s biology classmate. “Like a gazillion” counselors were at the school in case students wanted to talk, Reilly says. “Most people seemed OK. It still sucks, but everyone is recovering slowly together.” And with that recovery, the already tight-knit Freeman High School community has grown tighter. “These kids have been going to school together all their lives,” says Reilly, who transferred to Freeman last year. “Since the shooting, it’s insane how much closer I’ve gotten. Freeman feels like a family.” n mitchr@inlander.com Staff writers Daniel Walters and Wilson Criscione contributed to this report.

THANK YOU SPOKANE. As summer comes to a close, we want to sincerely thank everyone for your patience with all of the downtown construction projects. Yes, we’re building better infrastructure, a better Riverfront Park, and a better future. But it wouldn’t be possible without your cooperation and understanding. See the latest updates at:

futurespokane.com

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 21 DowntownConstruction_ThankYou_091417_12V_JI.pdf


NEWS | HEALTH

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BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

A

bout half of the dozens of teenage girls who go through Daybreak Youth Services’ inpatient and outpatient services each year report having been sexually assaulted. Some of them have been coerced into sex while under the influence of drugs or alcohol, many have been victims of sexual violence, and more than a handful were victims of sex trafficking, the Spokane nonprofit says. For the past year, each teen going through the treatment center’s program has spent about five hours over two days learning about sexual health, consent, and how to properly use condoms and avoid sexually transmitted infections and diseases. The comprehensive course is called Sexual Health and Adolescent Risk Prevention or SHARP, and it’s specially designed for youth in juvenile detention centers or treatment programs. “The SHARP program has really enabled them, in a really safe environment, to talk about their sexual health in an environment that is non-triggering for them,” says Daybreak CEO Annette Klinefelter. “Being able to process what [consent] means is absolutely important for them to be sexually safe and healthy moving forward.” But this summer, the center learned that their facilitator won’t be able to offer the program anymore. And they weren’t the only ones: Schools, youth organizations and centers that help at-risk youths are all among the places where thousands of Eastern Washington teens were set to take one of several pregnancy prevention courses through the Healthy Youth Collaborative, which is run by Planned Parenthood of Greater Washington and North Idaho. The local Planned Parenthood had secured federal Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program grant funding for five years, through June 30, 2020, but learned that the final two years had been cut when reading their grant-award letter this summer, says Rachel Todd, education manager for the local Planned Parenthood affiliate. They immediately reached out to the Office of Adolescent Health, the arm of the federal Health and Human Services department managing the teen pregnancy prevention grants. They wanted to see if their program wasn’t measuring up, or whether this was about the fact that they’re a Planned Parenthood helping teach the courses, Todd says. It was neither. All 84 grantees across the nation, which include public health offices, universities and community groups, had their funding

cut. Some are in the middle of researching and creating new courses, while others, like the affiliate in Eastern Washington, are teaching evidencebased programs to prevent teen pregnancies in low-income and minority communities. The Trump administration decided to cut the Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program entirely due to what it says was “very weak evidence of positive impact of these programs,” calling them “a poor use of more than $800 million in taxpayer dollars,” according to a statement that Health and Human Services sent to CNN. But grant recipients say the program was designed to create and test courses in the first round from 2010 to 2015, then have the programs that proved most effective implemented during the second round. “These changes create uncertainty that impacts the effectiveness and viability of sex education and reproductive health care programs that people depend on,” says Karl Eastlund, CEO of the local Planned Parenthood, in an emailed statement. “What this means is that essential programs like the Healthy Youth Collaborative could be replaced by outdated, ineffective pro-

This administration is moving forward to push fear- and shame-based, abstinenceonly education programs despite all evidence that shows they don’t work.” grams. This administration is moving forward to push fear- and shame-based, abstinence-only education programs despite all evidence that shows they don’t work and aren’t based in reality.”

LOCAL NEED

While the teen birth rate has dropped steadily since 1991 — from 61.8 births per 1,000 teen girls ages 15 to 19, to 22.3 per 1,000 in 2015 — the rates in the U.S. are still higher than other developed countries such as Canada and the United Kingdom, according to Health and Human Services. In addition to improving outcomes for teens who might be more likely to drop out of school and rely on public assistance if they have a baby, reducing the birth rate saves taxpayers money, according to the Healthy Youth Collaborative. In Washington state, teenaged childbearing cost taxpayers $124 million in 2010, and it cost $9.4 billion nationally, according to the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy.


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“Central and Eastern Washington have double the state average for teen pregnancy, so there’s definitely a very high need for some sort of intervention and education for the teens in our area,” Todd says. In Spokane, 21.7 of every 1,000 teens aged 15 to 17 got pregnant in 2015. The rate statewide that year was 11.9 per 1,000. The same year, the Spokane birth rate for teens was 13 per 1,000, and abortion rate for teens was 8.7 per 1,000. Since the federal Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program started in 2010, the teen birth rate declined by 29 percent nationally. Losing the grant, which would have provided nearly $2 million over the next two years for the Eastern Washington program, means that much of the education effort will go away, Todd says. “There are basically not other community foundations or national grants that have the same amount that they can give, and have similar objectives that this grant has,” Todd says. “We also know it’s not sustainable to ask our supporters and our donors to try and cover the gap.” Washington’s Democratic senators, Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell, joined a letter calling out Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price for the shift in funding, and demanding to know how the decision was made. “These notices of LETTERS shortened projSend comments to ect periods are editor@inlander.com. highly unusual, especially given that Congress has yet to act on [fiscal year] 2018 appropriations,” the July 21 letter states. “This action is short-sighted and puts at risk the health and well-being of women and our most vulnerable youth who depend on the evidence-based work that TPP Program grantees are doing across the nation.” Each year, the local programs in Yakima, Franklin, Benton, Okanogan and Spokane counties were projected to reach about 2,000 youths, and could reach more where schools take on one of the curricula.

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In addition to Daybreak, other Spokane youth organizations that have taught teens through the program include the Excelsior Youth Center, Odyssey Youth Movement, Richard Allen Court Apartments, Crosswalk, and the West Central Community Center, among others. “One of the biggest barriers in Spokane is that we have not been able to partner with any of the schools,” Todd says. After two years of evaluation, Spokane Public Schools were close to adopting a new human growth and development curriculum called “Get Real” this summer, but put off their vote after backlash from local conservatives, who did not like that the course was designed by a Planned Parenthood affiliate in Boston. The program, geared to middle schoolers, is one of the curricula offered through the grant. It emphasizes abstinence as the safest choice for youth, teaches emotional and social skills for healthy relationships, and encourages dialogue with parents and trusted adults. “It’s not just us saying this is a good curriculum. There is some really hard evidence behind it that really supports it,” Todd says. “It reduces young people’s risk behavior for unintended pregnancy and STDs. It also helps bring about that communication between young people and a trusted adult.” The school board sent the decision back to a committee of local parents, religious leaders, members of the medical community and youth educators (including Todd) that could vote on whether they still support the curriculum at their Sept. 27 meeting, Todd says. In preparation for funding to run out, Healthy Youth Collaborative educators will be helping to get programs and teachers around the region set up to teach the courses on their own. That includes the staff at Daybreak. “We will, as an organization, have to determine how we’ll have to backfill this critical educational resource,” says Klinefelter, the Daybreak CEO. “We’ve always done work around healthy sexual identity formation, but we haven’t had a really, really solid curriculum to follow, and that’s really what SHARP did.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

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24 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017


Labrador’s Migration Before he ran for Congress, Idaho’s Raúl Labrador argued in favor of the DREAM Act to protect children of illegal immigrants. Times have changed

Y

BY DANIEL WALTERS

ou may have heard a story like this before. A kid is smuggled into the United States when she’s still a toddler. She grows up in America and later marries an American — a sergeant in the Army who goes to fight in Iraq. But then she makes a big mistake. She visits Mexico for Christmas and returns illegally. And that means she can’t become a legally permanent resident unless she leaves the U.S., stays in Mexico for 10 years and then applies for legal status. She walks into an immigration attorney’s office, looking for help. That attorney’s name is Raúl Labrador. Labrador shared this story during a panel discussion at the City Club of Boise in 2007. “That is ridiculous,” Labrador said then. “I could not believe there was nothing we could do to help her.” At the panel, Labrador’s answers were nuanced. He discussed employer crackdowns and internal security measures, but also urged reforms to help the people already here. “I’m personally, I guess, more of a moderate on the immigration question,” said Labrador, who joked that immigration was one of the few issues where “anyone will say I’m to the ‘far left’ of anything.” He said he had come to doubt that comprehensive immigration reform was feasible, and suggested that Congress should make smaller changes first. He pointed to two small changes that could be made to help his client, in particular. The first was to tweak part of the Immigration and Nationality Act that requires a citizen leave the country for 10 years to become legal. “The second small change is a bill called the DREAM Act,” Labrador told the audience. He said it would give children of unauthorized immigrants who are high school graduates or college students an opportunity to become legal. “They wouldn’t have just helped this particular individual, they would have helped millions and millions and millions of people,” Labrador said then about the two reforms. “The problem with the law right now is it doesn’t make any sense. … It puts too many barriers in front of people.” A lot has changed in the past decade — including Labrador’s support of these so-called Dreamers. After the DREAM Act died in Congress, President Barack Obama created a policy in 2012 known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, protecting nearly 800,000 children of unauthorized immigrants from deportation. But earlier this month, President Donald Trump ordered that DACA be phased out in six months.

Idaho U.S. Congressman Raúl Labrador sees little daylight between his views on immigration and the policies Donald Trump campaigned on. GAGE SKIDMORE PHOTO

Now, as both parties scramble for a compromise, few stand to wield as much power in the immigration debate as Labrador. While Trump now indicates that he might work with Democrats to protect Dreamers — taking many Republicans by surprise last week — Labrador, chairman of the House Immigration and Border Security Subcommittee, rejects that notion. “No,” Labrador tells in the Inlander in a phone interview. “I’ll never trade any kind of amnesty for anything.” In 10 years, Labrador went from saying the DREAM Act would “help millions” to condemning it as “amnesty.” “If they’re found to be here illegally, they’re going to be deported,” Labrador says when asked what he would say to immigrants losing their protections. He says that Trump now has major leverage to force serious immigration reform. Labrador argues that his position has never changed. Instead, he points his finger at Obama’s record and Democrats’ priorities. It’s the world that’s different now, Labrador says, compared to the way it was 10 years ago.

HE’S NO MODERATE

Today, Labrador says he’s no moderate on immigration. He says he’s never been a moderate on immigration, and dismisses his self-description as a moderate in 2007 as a joke. Labrador, born in Puerto Rico, spent 15 years as an immigration attorney. With less than a year and a half left in his fourth term in Congress, he’s now running for Idaho governor in 2018. He still supports fixing the “ridiculous” aspects of the Immigration and Nationality Act and improving the visa system, but his recent record shows just how focused Labrador is on first cracking down on illegal immigration. One bill he co-sponsored would hand states and cities the ability to enforce immigration policy. Another Labrador-introduced bill would allow states and municipalities to refuse to accept refugees. But don’t think that his overarching concern is handing local governments more control: In the past few months, he’s also praised bills punishing local jurisdictions that refuse to help federal law enforcement with immigration enforcement. Labrador says there’s very little difference between his immigration agenda and the one Trump campaigned on: Implement serious immigration enforcement measures before seeking to help unauthorized immigrants already here. In essence: Giant wall first; big, beautiful door later. ...continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 25


IMMIGRATION

The generally pro-Trump media outlet Breitbart News called Donald Trump “Amnesty Don” after Democrats announced a potential deal with the president to protect DACA recipients — but Raúl Labrador hasn’t publicly weighed in. GAGE SKIDMORE PHOTO

“LABRADOR’S MIGRATION,” CONTINUED... While he praised the DREAM Act in 2007, Labrador says the context was different back then. That was during the Bush administration. “You had an administration that was trying to enforce a law,” Labrador says. “Since then, we’ve had eight years of an administration that willfully failed to enforce the law.” President Obama’s record on immigration is more complicated than either his critics or supporters generally admit. Some immigration advocates dubbed him the “deporter in chief,” due to Obama’s policy of officially removing illegal immigrants detained at the border, instead of allowing them to voluntarily return to their countries. But as the recession diminished the draw of the American economy, border apprehensions fell significantly during Obama’s tenure. And as he enacted policies to only deport criminals, overall removals fell as well. “During his first term, he did deport a record number of people inside the United States, but during the second term he narrowed the scope of deportations significantly,” says Randy Capps, a policy analyst at the Migration Policy Institute. “It was a dramatic shift.” Labrador argues that Obama inappropriately focused on helping the 12 million unauthorized immigrants already here instead of fixing the flawed system, spurring more illegal immigration. In particular, conservatives were infuriated by Obama’s use of executive power to change immigration policy. In 2012, after the DREAM Act failed to pass, Obama took executive action. While his DACA policy didn’t provide the path to citizenship like the DREAM Act would have, it protected hundreds of thousands of young immigrants from deportation. Then, on Sept. 5, facing the prospect of defending DACA against lawsuits in court, Trump announced he was ending the program. Democrats were outraged. Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson joined more than a dozen states in filing a lawsuit against Trump’s decision, arguing that it violated constitutional due process and equal-protection guarantees. But Labrador heaped unvarnished praise upon Trump’s decision, calling DACA unconstitutional and arguing that it undermined the rule of law. “The reason Trump won the presidency is the

26 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

American people don’t trust Congress right now, and don’t trust the American government to enforce the law,” Labrador says. Labrador believes that Trump has the credibility to be able to effectively win the trust of a reform-wary public in order to modernize the immigration system. And that, he says, should make both sides happy. “I’ve said to immigration advocates that they shouldn’t look at Trump as an enemy,” Labrador says. “He’s actually a friend.” Ultimately, Trump may be more of a friend to immigration advocates than Labrador anticipated. Last Wednesday, Democratic congressional leaders Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi announced they were striking a deal with Trump — protecting DACA recipients in exchange for increased border security. Iowa GOP Rep. Steve King worried that the deal would mean the Trump base would be “blown up, destroyed, irreparable, and disillusioned beyond repair.” But Labrador remained quiet. Last Thursday, he declined to comment on Trump’s apparent reversal. After all, no deal had officially been made. So far.

Labrador called for enforcing current laws and stationing the National Guard at the border. A month after the Department of Justice sued Maricopa County, Arizona, Sheriff Joe Arpaio for stonewalling an investigation into racial discrimination, he touted Arpaio’s endorsement. When Idaho Statesman journalist Dan Popkey raised Labrador’s previous support for the DREAM Act during a 2010 debate — asking why he was “pandering” on immigration — Labrador argued that the details of policy were the issue, not the concept. (Today, Popkey works for Labrador, as his press secretary.) “The general concept of the DREAM Act, I’m in favor of,” Labrador responded. “I have always said we need to do something for these children who are brought here through no fault of their own.” But he said he objected to pieces of the act allowing unauthorized immigrants to receive in-state tuition, and not requiring them to leave the United States before returning to become U.S. citizens. In a 2010 press conference concerning immigration, Labrador planted his flag on the middle ground: He called for enforcement of existing laws and improving border security. He stressed a proposal he’d floated at the Boise City Club forum, requiring immigrants to leave the United States before getting in line to become legal. But he also called for compassion, reminding the audience that unauthorized immigrants “too are children of God.” “I would offer illegals who have a desire to become legal, productive members of our society an incentive to come forward,” Labrador said. “Should they do so willingly and within some reasonable time frame, we would give them consideration by the State Department to return legally.” Today, Minnick’s former campaign manager, John Foster, argues that while Labrador has a complex position on immigration, he hasn’t wavered from that. “Whatever your view of him politically, he is intellectually consistent,” Foster says. “I think that the perception that he is more hard-line doesn’t take into account all the other things that have happened since 2010.” But Brian Tanner, a Twin Falls immigration attorney who worked with Labrador occasionally when the congressman was still practicing law, sees a dramatic change. “At the beginning, he made that choice: ‘I wanted to help immigrants.’ This isn’t something you step into because you want to make gallons of money,” Tanner says. “He’s way more hard-line now than he was. No question... He’s now lockstep with Trump.” The only question in Tanner’s mind is why Labrador changed. “I’m not sure if it’s a political thing or it’s sincere,” Tanner says. “Attacking immigrants is politically popular. It has been from the beginning of time.”

“I have always said we need to do something for these children who are brought here through no fault of their own.”

BOTH SIDES

During his first congressional campaign seven years ago, Labrador saw exactly how little Idaho trusts the government on immigration. In 2010, both Democratic and Republican opponents accused Labrador of being too soft on immigration. His primary opponent, Vaughn Ward, compared Labrador’s work as an immigration attorney to lawyers who represent terrorists. Even the Democratic incumbent, Walt Minnick, launched an ad arguing that illegal immigration was “good business” for Labrador as an attorney. “He almost wants people to believe that I’m an illegal immigrant,” Labrador scoffed at Minnick’s ads during a 2010 debate.

WOULD-BE REFORMER

After the Tea Party wave propelled Labrador to a sizable victory in 2010, he quickly became a celebrated figure within the conservative movement. Even before he became a major player in the right-wing Freedom Caucus, Labrador was beloved by the right for telling Republican establishment leaders they failed because they were too eager to roll over for Democrats in exchange for scraps. Labrador was not the symbol of compromise — he was the symbol of defiance. ...continued on page 28


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IMMIGRATION

Now running for governor, Labrador has a little over a year to make a large slate of immigration reforms happen.

GAGE SKIDMORE PHOTO

“LABRADOR’S MIGRATION,” CONTINUED... Yet immigration reform advocates saw Labrador as one of their best hopes to convince the Tea Party faction regarding comprehensive immigration reform. “He sees the human side of immigration, the families that are being ripped apart by deportations,” fiercely proimmigrant Democratic Rep. Luis Gutiérrez of Illinois said in a 2013 statement to the Inlander. One of Labrador’s closest friends in D.C., Gutiérrez met with Labrador regularly to discuss immigration. That year, Labrador was a member of the “House Gang of Eight,” a bipartisan group of representatives looking to hash out a comprehensive immigration bill. A Washington Post article around that time called Labrador the “middleman” on immigration, quoting him criticizing the Republican Party’s hard-line views on the issue. “They’re moderate on every other issue, and they think this is the one issue where they have to become conservatives,” Labrador told the Post. “I feel the reverse.” The article highlighted his belief that unauthorized immigrants could obtain legal status through a “nonimmigrant visa,” but also noted that his moderation earned him flak from Idaho constituents. But in June 2013, Labrador left the House Gang of Eight, effectively signaling the death knell for immigration reform: In particular, he had refused to support any bill that helped unauthorized immigrants pay for health care. Yet this scenario had been posed at the 2007 panel: How can American taxpayers afford to support the “social and medical needs” of unauthorized immigrants? Back then, Labrador acknowledged that immigration reform would result in formerly illegal immigrants receiving more social services, but said that the social welfare debate should be considered separately from immigration. “We cannot afford as a society to pay for all these social programs, but I don’t want to distinguish between

28 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

aliens and non-aliens,” Labrador said. Today, asked about what seems to have changed, Labrador suggests that it’s obvious. “I’m not sure if you’re obtuse, or if you’re doing it on purpose. What you’re missing is that … in 2007 there wasn’t an Obamacare,” Labrador says. “In 2007, there wasn’t any concern about illegal people getting free health care.” In the years since, Republicans and Democrats have drifted further and further apart on immigration. “If I’ve changed on anything, I assumed that Democrats in good faith would come to the table and deal with their border security issue,” Labrador says. He doesn’t believe that anymore.

THE LABRADOR LEGACY

Today, when Labrador speaks about his 15 years as an immigration attorney, he doesn’t dwell on anecdotes of hardworking Americans facing deportation. Instead, he cites a different lesson: “I saw an immigration system that, instead of preventing illegal immigration, was encouraging illegal immigration.” In 2010, Labrador closed his immigration press conference by reading from Ronald Reagan’s January 1989 farewell address about America being a shining city upon a hill, where “the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here.” Today, Labrador says that Reagan’s 1986 amnesty of 3 million illegal immigrants is a clear lesson in how disastrous it would be to allow legalization to take place before more enforcement. After the 2012 presidential election, Labrador slammed Republican nominee Mitt Romney for his inartful comments about immigration that hurt him with Hispanics, but today, Labrador praises Trump’s approach. “Some of his rhetoric was strong because people were missing the point about what’s important with immigration reform,” Labrador tells the Inlander. “I think you do,

and I think many people do.” When he hears politicians or reporters express concern about DACA recipients, he says that’s the wrong focus. “Many Republicans make this mistake where they start talking about DACA — you know, the first thing that comes out of their mouth is ‘DACA’,” Labrador says. “The concern that American people have is mostly, ‘Do they feel safe and secure in the United States?’” Most research suggests that immigrants, legal and illegal, actually commit crimes at lower rates than do nativeborn citizens. But Labrador has targeted exceptions: Last week, the House passed a Labrador bill allowing deportation of members of criminal gangs, like MS-13, even before they commit deportable offenses. He’s still developing legislation reforming other pieces of the immigration system — expanding the number of visas for farm workers, for example — but there’s not much more time left on the clock. If Labrador is elected governor in 2018, it would mean giving up the unique LETTERS power he wields on the Send comments to immigration debate. And editor@inlander.com. there’s no guarantee that the person who replaces him will hold the same values. One candidate, Idaho State Rep. Luke Malek, who represents Coeur d’Alene, argues that Obama’s executive order overstepped its bounds and that Congress needs to protect the DACA recipients. “Congress needs to step up and ... take care of this issue,” Malek says. “These are model citizens that we want in this country.” Labrador says he took the immigration reform issue into consideration before running for governor. “The reality is, if it doesn’t happen this term, it’s not going to happen,” Labrador says. “Next term is a presidential election term. Big things like this don’t happen in a presidential election term.” n danielw@inlander.com


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MUSIC

SHAKEN FROM COMPLACENCY

Local band Itchy Kitty ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

Local women-fronted punk bands unite in solidarity and in protest BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

B

ack in July, Kelly Fay Vaughn saw that the longrunning punk act the Casualties had booked a September show at the Pin!, the all-ages venue downtown that caters primarily to hard rock and metal. She took to her personal Facebook page with a post about the band’s mohawked frontman Jorge Herrera and the sexual assault allegations swirling around him. “A majority of the cases involve underage women. This show is ALL AGES,” Vaughn wrote. “By having shows like this come through our city, it sets back our community and allows for complacency. … WE NEED TO SHUT THIS SHIT DOWN.” The post was shared numerous times and inspired dozens of comments, both supportive (“Love your

advocacy!”) and not (“You’re all so f---ing dumb”). The Pin! itself even responded, posting a comment on the business’ official Facebook page, clearly directed at the anti-Casualties camp: “F--- the ignorant, self righteous, band wagoners!” “I had to stop reading the comments,” says Vaughn, who identifies as a victim of past domestic assault. “It was going off on my personal appearance, my credibility as a person, anything that you can say to tear down a person.” This was not, however, an isolated incident: A dozen of the band’s 2015 Canadian tour stops got the axe in light of the allegations against Herrera, and there’s a “Boycott the Casualties” Facebook group with more than 4,200 followers. It should be noted that Herrera has

never been tried for any of the accusations leveled at him, and the Casualties themselves issued a statement in 2014 defending him. “It is becoming infuriating,” the statement reads. “The accused has to prove his innocence and when witnesses step forth to do just that, they are being ignored.” Just a few days after Vaughn made her post, it was announced that Herrera, the last remaining founding member, had departed from the Casualties; according to a public statement, it was because “the touring life was no longer for him.” But this didn’t deter Vaughn, whose band Thigh Gap will be playing its first show at Mootsy’s on Monday ...continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 31


CULTURE | MUSIC

Members of the Polish death metal band Decapitated were accused earlier this month of kidnapping and raping a Spokane woman.

“SHAKEN FROM COMPLACENCY,” CONTINUED... night. That date isn’t random: The Casualties will be performing right down the street at the same time. This will be another punk show, but it will be dominated by women, including local hard rock stalwarts Itchy Kitty and Phlegm Fatale, and donations made at the door will benefit the YWCA and the Spokane chapter of the National Organization for Women. “Regardless of the situation, I wanted this show to happen,” Vaughn says. “When a band like this continues to play, especially where there’s a ton of complacency and people looking the other way because just one person left the group, there’s still that whole culture present. “You took out the character from the scenario, but there’s still a problem. You’re setting a tone and an example.”

a venue no longer responsible for the actions of the bands it books? “You can’t control everything, but you can create a foundation of respect,” Ingersoll says. “A lot of that starts from the kind of bands you let in your room. Sometimes you don’t know and you find out later and there’s not a ton you can do about it. … You can’t take anything lightly.” TC Chavez, owner of the Pin!, declined to comment about the Mootsy’s show or the Decapitated incident, but he did point out that his venue frequently hosts charitable events, too, including one on Sept. 23 that will benefit Truth Ministries’ homeless shelter. He also notes that Some Kind of Nightmare, one of the bands that will be opening for the Casualties at the Pin!, is fronted by a woman. Still, there’s no doubt that the issue is much larger than the alleged actions of PWR BTTM, the Casualties or Decapitated. The upcoming Mootsy’s show is designed to draw attention to insidious behavior that Vaughn sees within music communities, both in Spokane and elsewhere. The poster for the show, designed by local artist Susan Webber, says it all: A leather-clad woman brandishes a switchblade, next to a comic book-style bubble that shouts “Complacency = Complicity!” “When you address things and you’re more mindful of the community and the spaces you’re playing in, you’re making it a better city to play in,” Vaughn says. “Being female-identifying is already hard enough. … Within all these marginalized groups, there are voices that have been muted for so long, and it’s about goddamn time they’re heard.” n

“You can’t control everything, but you can create a foundation of respect.”

T

he notion of touring bands bringing disturbing baggage along with them is nothing new. The Bartlett faced a similar issue this summer when one of their bookings, the New York-based indie rock duo PWR BTTM, was mired in sexual assault allegations. The venue announced on social media that it would not be going on with the show; shortly thereafter, the band’s entire summer tour was canceled. “Before I announced anything, I got a couple emails from people who had tickets to the show who were like, ‘I can’t be in a space where there might be anything like that, because I’m a survivor of assault,’” says Bartlett co-owner Karli Ingersoll. “If a customer doesn’t feel safe, what’s the point of it all?” And earlier this month, members of the Polish death metal band Decapitated were arrested for allegedly kidnapping and raping a woman in their tour bus following a show at the Pin! Scenarios like this prompt a difficult question that may not have a concrete answer: At what point is

32 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

Itchy Kitty, Phlegm Fatale, Wretched F--- and Thigh Gap • Mon, Sept. 25 at 9 pm • 21+ • $5 suggested donation • Mootsy’s • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570


CULTURE | DIGEST

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

ALBUM When the electro-rock collective LCD Soundsystem halfheartedly announced its retirement in 2011, there was immediate incredulity that it would actually take. Sure enough, songwriter James Murphy and company are back again with their fourth studio album AMERICAN DREAM, a bittersweet, hour-plus slow-burner of a record. Murphy has always been a master of seamlessly blending witty, dance-floor-ready jams with laconic reflections on the artistic process, drugs, hipsterdom and the perils of going gray and getting large around the middle; here, he’s delivered a handful of pulsating bangers (“Other Voices,” “Tonite” and the insistent single “Call the Police”) alongside some of his most melancholy songs to date, including “Oh Baby,” the title track and the 12-minute closer “Black Screen.”

FILM Obituaries are not actually about death, one of the interviewees in the documentary OBIT. reminds us. They are, in reality, celebrations of memorable lives. Director Vanessa Gould’s film, now streaming on Amazon Prime, is a look inside the New York Times obituary department and the notable people its writers profile — artists, authors, activists, athletes. It also examines the ways in which the Times broke away from traditional obit structure, takes us into the bowels of the paper’s clip archives (known as “the morgue”) and hovers around the newsroom as deadlines loom. It’s both an engaging behind-the-scenes portrait and a love letter to print media.

BOOK Like her spellbinding 2014 debut novel Everything I Never Told You, Celeste Ng’s new book LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE explores themes of race, class and intergenerational secrets through a serpentine plot that’s as compelling as any thriller. Set in Shaker Heights, Ohio, in the late 1990s, the novel revolves around a seemingly perfect upper-middle-class family, a wayward mother and daughter who rent a room from them and the Chinese woman whose custody battle disrupts the solitude of their well-manicured suburb. Ng allows us to burrow into the minds of her characters, and we seemingly disappear into her carefully observed world. This is the kind of book that you pick up and won’t put down for hours. n

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 33


CULTURE | THEATER

Pulling out the knives: Preston Loomer (left) as Riff and Arnoldo Heredia as Bernardo in West Side Story. JEFF FERGUSON PHOTOS

Not Just Black and White

Nuance is at the heart of Spokane Civic Theatre’s new production of West Side Story BY E.J. IANNELLI

I

quaint as its stylized take on gang rivalry might seem to us today, generated no small amount of controversy for depicting a seamier side of American life than some theatergoers thought necessary. “It was a trend-setting piece,” says Lenny Bart, the Spokane Civic Theatre’s artistic director. “It’s probably, in my opinion, the greatest piece of American

musical theater, period. And I think I would have a lot of people who would agree with me on that. The music is phenomenal and astounding.” That doesn’t mean it was an easy sell for its creators. “It was a challenge to get the piece produced in the first place by some of the strongest people in musical theater at the

PHOTO © JEREMY DANIEL

t was almost 60 years ago to this very day that West Side Story opened at Broadway’s Winter Garden Theatre. More than just a contemporary reimagining of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, the show represented the combined creative talents of giants in the fields of music and theater — Leonard Bernstein, Stephen Sondheim, Arthur Laurents, Jerome Robbins — and, as

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time, so you know that they were facing huge uphill challenges to get something that loosely uses Romeo and Juliet to make modern commentaries,” says Bart. Though Bart is now directing a new production of West Side Story, he hasn’t had the smoothest experience bringing it to the stage, either. It’s been on his “bucket-list shows” for more than three decades, and it wasn’t until he proposed having the musical launch the Civic’s 71st season that he was finally Duncan Clark Menzies (left) as Tony and Arnaldo Heredia as Bernardo. given the green light. In the meantime, things As West Side Story did six decades ago, Bart have fallen into place, which has left him feeling is hoping that the love story thwarted by societal more comfortable in terms of both his executive conflict will “provide a background for a deeper role within the theater and the production he’s conversation” on topics that continue to have the currently heading. Bart says that he’s settled into power to polarize and divide. the Civic’s culture and gained vital “institutional “A piece that was written in the ’50s dealing knowledge of the organization” since being with class and immigration issues is still relevant hired around this time last year, allowing him to today. It reminds us that there are issues that concentrate more fully on “the thing I love most,” seem to face us from a generational perspective, directing. and I think it’s important in the arts that we’re “This particular show is in very strong shape. able to not necessarily make judgments on these We have a really incredible and functional set issues, but, as they say, hold that mirror up to that Matt Egan has designed for us. Our choresociety,” he says. ographer, Angela Pierson, is really a good choice With that in mind, in this production Bart for this piece. And we have a lot of young and has intentionally tried to avoid the “black-andnew performers in this show, our youngest being white look at things” that risks overshadowing 14. The athleticism that they’re bringing to the the more true-to-life nuance of characters and dances and the blocking, and the utilization of situations. the set is very exciting and stimulating to watch,” “One of the things I’ve tried to find is a says Bart. In recent weeks, Henry McNulty has blend,” Bart says. “Quite often, many of us are also been working alongside Bart full-time as the brought along by the strongest and loudest voices theater’s resident music director. in the room, and it’s hard for us to stand our Among the cast are Preston Loomer as Riff, group and back our individual principles. There leader of the Jets; Arnoldo Heredia as Bernardo, are a lot of these characters, based on the way leader of the Sharks; Duncan Clark Menzies as they react in the show, that want to get along, Tony, an ex-Jet; and Maddie Burgess as Maria, that are hoping things can work. And so I’ve the Juliet to Tony’s Romeo. tried to find those few places to bring that up. I “Both [Duncan and Maddie] are wonderful think it’s important to point out the people that singers and actors,” Bart says. “Having these aren’t on either extreme.” n believable lovers and young kids who can carry this show is imperative. Even though it’s such a West Side Story • Sept. 22-Oct. 15 • Thu-Sat, dance show and there are so many large group 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm • $15-$32 • Spokane Civic scenes, when you break it down to those intimate Theatre • 1020 N. Howard • moments, they’ve got to keep that storyline going spokanecivictheatre.com • 325-2507 and plausible. We have to want them to succeed.”

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 35


Spokane-area universities like Gonzaga, pictured here, are taking a new approach to campus dining.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

NUTRITION

Better Campus Cuisine Modern trends in meal plans at local colleges and universities range from allergen-free eating to a focus on sustainability and diversity BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

F

ood is important to Chase Wilcutt, a former 230-pound defensive lineman from Onalaska, Washington, who visited two other comparable universities before selecting Whitworth University, where he now plays defensive end for the Pirates. “I made a chart, actually,” says Wilcutt, who liked Whitworth’s food and appreciated the unlimited meal plan option, which is called all-you-care-to-eat — versus all-you-can-eat — in the parlance of today’s college dining services. It’s a subtle yet vital shift in phrasing that represents evolving trends in campus dining, which according to several industry websites includes more diversity in what, when, where and how students can eat, through efforts such as branded dining, ethnic options, to-go locations, local and sustainable dining and increased allergen-free requirements. Regarding sustainability, for example, many area col-

36 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

leges are using recyclable serving materials and maintain a campus garden, including Eastern Washington University, which also composts its food waste. “In some ways, we have to set the standard for students to learn from us in this area,” says EWU Director of Dining Services David McKay, who notes that other trends include “convenience, portability, and the words ‘nutritious and healthy.’” EWU Dining Services taps a food services committee, plus its 300 to 350 student employees, for feedback on campus dining. Some residence halls have on-site stores, for example, and when it reopens next year, the Pence Union Building will feature a global café and a Panda Express franchise.

S

tudent feedback also drives some of this decisionmaking at Gonzaga and Whitworth universities, both of which utilize Sodexo, a multinational food

services and facilities management company, to run their on-campus dining services. “We don’t determine the meal plan — students do,” says Pat Clelland, Gonzaga Food Services’ resident district manager. Options are important. Inside Gonzaga’s John J. Hemmingson Center, a brightly lit $60 million hub completed in 2015, students enjoy Starbucks Coffee and Einstein Brothers Bagels while lounging on modular turquoise seating, or gazing across Mulligan Field to the McCarthey Athletic Center. The Circulus Omnium Gonzagaorum, aka the COG or Center of Gonzaga, is a hip, multilevel dining facility, more like a mall food court than the old-school cafeterias that Gen Xers may remember. Here students dine on flatbread pizza at Mediterranean Coast, Mongolian-grill food from 360 Degrees, American comfort food at Spike’s and global cuisine like Brazilian beef at World’s Fare.


“They want to feel like they’re getting a complete meal,” says Clelland, who notes that college dining isn’t just about the food: “It’s about taking care of the whole person.” Spike’s, for example, stays open until 1:30 am for students wanting alternatives to off-campus, late-night dining or bars. Other students, however, like the flexibility of using their meal card or “Bulldog Bucks” at select off-campus eateries like Sushi Sakai or Method Juice Cafe. Off-campus students can sign up for Gonzaga’s Chopped 4U ready-to-make meal program. The campus dining services’ mission, says Clelland, is to ensure that students have access to good, healthy food, however it fits them: “People have recognized [food] is so much a part of a student’s success or failure.”

I

ndeed, numerous studies have shown that nutrition and academic performance go hand-in-hand, yet there may be another benefit to student dining: fellowship. Typically, freshmen and sometimes sophomores are required to have some kind of meal plan, which Jim O’Brien, Whitworth Dining Services general manager, says also promotes community on campus. Adds EWU’s McKay, “We have more contact with students than most of their professors, and that’s a good thing.” Some of that contact includes nutritional counseling, including food allergies, which the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology estimates impacts 3.6 percent of Americans. Eight food items are responsible for most serious reactions — milk, egg, peanut, tree nuts, wheat, soy, fish and crustacean shellfish — prompting Gonzaga to offer what it calls “Simple Servings,” an allergen-free station inside the COG that’s popular with 60 percent of students who have never self-reported an allergy, says Clelland. Whitworth also works with students to stock their dorms with allergen-free foods; EWU, in addition to going nut-free in its food processing, provides a secure space for students to store specialty foods inside its primary dining facility, Tawanka Main Street Dining.

Some ingredients, like this kale, served at Gonzaga are even grown on campus. Not all the changes happening in college dining are studentdriven; schools are always looking to improve efficiency and reduce cost, says EWU’s McKay. Six years ago, for example, Eastern teamed up with Washington State University and Food Services of America to maximize its buying power on several commonly purchased food items. “We basically do the best job for our campuses and our students by using that collaborative model,” says McKay. Gonzaga, Whitworth and the Community Colleges of Spokane also collaborated recently in developing the Better Tomorrow Plan, intended to reduce students’ sodium intake. Funded by a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention grant through the Spokane Regional Health District, the program empowers the schools to collectively push their vendors for lower-sodium canned goods. That, in addition to all menus listing nutritional information — ahead of U.S. Food and Drug Administration requirements to do so — empowers students to make informed choices, says Clelland, which is the right thing to do. “We’re not in the food business, serving people,” says Clelland, modifying a sentiment made famous by Starbucks founder Howard Schultz, “we’re in the people business, serving food.” n

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The Observatory team is ready to share their newfound knowledge of whiskey with customers. TYSON SICILIA PHOTO

Journey South

The Observatory sent its staff to Kentucky to learn about whiskey, and they lived to tell about it BY DAN NAILEN

M

ost of us have had jobs where hanging out at length with co-workers was more a trial than a treat. And even when there’s genuine camaraderie among work peers, spending an inordinate amount of time together can push a friendly vibe into a testy one. That was one of few things that gave Tyson Sicilia, co-owner of the Observatory bar (15 S. Howard), pause when he and his business partners decided to take their staff to Kentucky for a week-long crash course in all things whiskey. “I had a few trepidations about going to Kentucky,” Sicilia recalls in a recent conversation after the group returned to Spokane a couple of weeks ago. “One was that I thought it was going to be super redneck-y and I was going to hate it, and it turned out it was super-progressive and the people were awesome. And the other was, ‘Okay, we’re all going to be living together and I hope we don’t all hate each other at the end.’ And it was exactly the opposite of that, too. Everyone was cool with each other the whole time.” The trip in early September had been planned from the very beginning of the Observatory two years ago, when Sicilia and his partners Esa Lariviere, Isaac Lariviere and Alicia Purvis-Lariviere decided to buy construction materials and liquor for the bar with credit cards that would accrue airline miles they could later use for the journey to the South. Sicilia always pictured the Observatory as a “whiskey-heavy” bar — indeed, they sell more of their well whiskey, Old Forester, than any other establishment in the state — but he figured a little education could help the staff refine their own palates and pass their new knowledge on to customers. With that in mind, a few of the owners and five staffers flew to Kentucky and holed up in a Louisville Airbnb. By day, the group would pile

into a van and drive an hour or more to visit distilleries making Woodford Reserve, Buffalo Trace or Willett, or places like the Bourbon Heritage Center. “Some were kind of bubblegum, Disneyland tours,” Sicilia says, “and some were really great, and in-depth.” By night, they’d roam down the street to a dive bar with live music and a selection of the spirits they’d learned about. Scottie Feider, one of the Observatory bartenders on the trip, said the experience opened his mind on how to drink whiskey, sipping it slow and “acknowledging the notes of the whiskey.” Learning about how the different barrels used for the aging process can affect whiskey’s flavor, he says, “kind of blew me away.” “It definitely gave me more of an appreciation [for whiskey],” Feider says. “And more passion for it, too.” His co-worker Kelly Fay Vaughn says she could tell her palate was becoming increasingly refined over the course of the week, as she sipped and learned about the ingredients and processes used to make bourbon and whiskey. “It was really cool to see all the natural aspects in bourbon,” Vaughn says. “You have different wood, chars, all that. The more places we visited and seeing all the stills different places had, that definitely changes your taste buds as you go.” Sicilia was right there with them, learning at the distilleries when he wasn’t rousting everyone at the house to get ready for the day’s journey. He and his co-owners appreciate the bonding experience the staff had, as well as the knowledge they gained in Kentucky. “Before, I just knew what I liked,” Sicilia says. “Now I can actually speak more intelligently about whiskey, which is great. I think everybody can.” n


FOOD | OPENING

Favorable Fruits One Tree Hard Cider’s new downtown cider house showcases the growing regional industry with 20 taps

A bit of the Orient

OCTOBER 7TH, 2017 11:00�� - 3:00��

BY CHEY SCOTT

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oining the ranks of numerous craft breweries in the west end of downtown Spokane, regional craft cider is now part of the tasty, local mix. Much to the excitement of One Tree Hard Cider’s fans, the Spokane Valley-based cidery announced earlier this year its plans to open a full-service cider house — essentially a taphouse featuring hard cider, and serving food — in the downtown core. If anything indicated the anticipation for the cider house’s debut, it was the line of customers wrapping around the block at various times during its first day of business a few weekends ago. “It’s been really exciting to see everyone, whether first-timers or people who trekked out to the Valley,” says co-owner and -founder Grant Barnes, who started One Tree with business partner Neal Hennessy five years ago. “There are not too many places that can open in Spokane and have a line completely wrapped around [the corner] to Orlison, and that was until 9 at night — people were lined up out the door.”

there are so many companies here.” Cider lovers and those new to the alcoholic craft beverage’s diverse offerings can find batches from Yakima’s Tieton Cider Works, Tacoma’s Tilted Tree, Pullman’s Whiskey Barrel and Seattle’s Schilling Hard Cider, among offerings from many other Washington and Oregon cider makers. There are also a few pear ciders, called perrys, on tap. Barnes notes that some of the regional cider makers featured at One Tree have never previously been distributed in the Inland Northwest. If you can’t make up your mind — not an easy feat, considering you have 20 choices — pick a tasting flight of four 4-ounce pours ($3/each; $12/flight). One Tree’s new spot also serves 16-ounce drafts ($6-$7) and 64-ounce growler fills ($15-$18). Soon, Barnes says that customers will be able to visit One Tree’s website to view a synced tap list showing what’s available at the cider house at any given time. Balance out the typically higher alcohol content of hard cider (compared with beer) with some filling carbs, in the form of four versions of housemade pizzas ($11-$13), featuring locally made Rizzuto Foods pizza dough, and fresh, local toppings (gluten-free crusts are available). Other snacks to enjoy as you sip include tater tots ($5) and cheese bread with marinara ($8). Be warned: One Tree’s Bavarian pretzel ($8), which comes with a lemon-basil mustard to dip, is truly as massive as the menu implies. Although most customers are probably coming to sample its wide regional variety of ciders, One Tree’s new downtown spot features a sleek and cozy design. HECTOR AIZON PHOTO One Tree also serves three styles of bottled wine, and a selection One Tree’s sweeter (versus dry) and often of canned craft beer. mixed-flavor hard apple ciders — its lineup One Tree Cider House opens a little more includes varieties like huckleberry, ginger apricot, than a year after the local company revamped dark cherry and caramel cinnamon, among a tasting room connected to its Spokane Valley others — can be found in bottles at many local production facility. That tasting room has since retailers, and on tap at local restaurants and bars. closed in lieu of the downtown spot, a move But the new cider house goes beyond serving just that’s allowed the cidery to expand its production the local maker’s offerings. Of the 20 total cider space to meet increased demand, Barnes says. taps, Barnes says at any given time, only five The new spot, just down the block and around or six will feature One Tree’s products, usually the corner from the Fox Theater, also negates a mix of seasonal and mainstay batches, like its former plans for One Tree to open a tasting room popular lemon basil. in Kendall Yards. n “The biggest goal is to choose companies that cheys@inlander.com are independently owned, don’t use high-fructose corn syrup, and only fresh-pressed apple juice,” One Tree Cider House • 111 S. Madison • Barnes says. “There is so much great cider out Open Tue-Thu, 2-9 pm; Fri-Sat, 2-11 pm; Sun, there, but really here in the Inland Northwest… noon-7 pm • 309-2996 • onetreehardcider.com

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SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 39


Another Brick in the Wall The LEGO Ninjago Movie delivers fun family action, but can’t quite rise to the level of its predecessors BY SETH SOMMERFELD

I

t’s easy to feel like everyone hates you in high journeys into the jungle in search of an “ultimate school; teenage hormones and angst always get ultimate weapon” to undo what Lloyd has done, the better of you. But in the case of Lloyd, The and Garmadon soon catches wind of the plan and LEGO Ninjago Movie’s protagonist, those feelings tries to find it himself, leading to more delightfully are totally justified. Not only do his classmates hate awkward father-son encounters. him, everyone in the city of Ninjago (other than his While The LEGO Ninjago Movie still feels like it’s mom) loathes him to the point where the No. 1 set in the same sort of fanciful, imaginative realm song on the charts is a playful pop ditty about how as previous LEGO feature films, it can’t live up to nobody likes him. The LEGO Movie or The LEGO Batman Movie’s coThat’s what happens when you’re the son of medic chops. While both those films were littered the evil Lord Garmadon, who attempts to conquer with nonstop pop culture jokes (many of which the city on a daily basis (even if said deadbeat dad weren’t targeted at children), Ninjago feels more was never around to raise you). Thankfully, Lloyd like a traditional kids’ movie. There’s still plenty has an outlet for his pent-up frustrations: Heading of humor that everyone can enjoy, but it’s more into battle as the Green Ninja, the city’s masked situational (as when Master Wu tells the Secret hero and leader of the six-member Secret Ninja Ninja Force, post-attack, “If I was going to die, it’d Force, who also happen to be his only high school be to teach you a lesson”) and a far cry from the pals. Dealing with your daddy issues by thwarting onslaught of zingers that made those other entries his evil plans on the regular turns out to be decent, great. if unconventional, therapy. This shift can be attributed to Ninjago’s separaBased on the LEGO Ninjago toy line and subtion from established pop culture realms and the sequent TV series, the movie frames its animated creative team helming the film. While the dynamic tale as a story told in the real, human comedy writing/directing team of Chris world by a mysterious antique shopTHE LEGO Miller and Phil Lord oversaw The keeper (Jackie Chan) to a young boy LEGO Movie, and Robot Chicken veteran NINJAGO MOVIE who wanders in while playing with a Chris McKay directed and co-wrote Rated PG Ninjago figurine. Under the sage guidLEGO Batman, former art and animaDirected by Charlie Bean, ance of Master Wu (voiced by Chan), tion department workers for projects Paul Fisher, Bob Logan Green Ninja (Dave Franco) and his Starring Jackie Chan, Dave like the films Madagascar and the How to team of Fire (Michael Peña), Ice (Zach Train Your Dragon — Charlie Bean, Paul Franco, Justin Theroux Woods), Water (Abbi Jacobson), Earth Fisher and Bob Logan — co-directed and (Fred Armisen) and Lightning (Kumail Nanjiani) assisted writing Ninjago. The result is something ninjas wage epic battles with their mech vehicles that feels more like those aforementioned children’s across the toy brick city in tight action reminiscent movies, which isn’t necessarily a knock, but it of a Transformers movie (but a million times easier to certainly moves at a different speed than the rest of follow than a Michael Bay explosion-fest). the LEGO cinematic universe. In a reverse Skywalker situation, Garmadon is It’s a bit of a bummer that the script doesn’t oblivious to the fact that his greatest foe is actually offer more for a voice cast loaded with comedy his son. In fact, obliviousness is Garmadon’s definveterans. Nanjiani and Woods draw laughs via ing characteristic and the source of most of the their characters’ cowardice, but there’s basically film’s best humor. Justin Theroux hits it out of the nothing for Armisen, Jacobson or Peña to do with proverbial park with his vocal performance as the their generic roles. evil warlord: The insults directed at his ever-changThe LEGO Ninjago Movie is a family film ing stable of right-hand men and women, as well through and through, ultimately offering a light, as lines about not understanding how the Green all-ages story about the importance of a parentNinja never learned to catch, land with a stupid, child bond, listening, self-awareness and self-worth. charming punch. We might not all fight our familial battles with Unfortunately, all the hostility Lloyd feels high-tech weaponry or have to deal with dads toward his unwitting father finally bubbles over, who live in volcanic lairs, but family dysfunction leading him to take a drastic shortcut that puts is universal. The LEGO Ninjago Movie may not be the entire city in peril far greater than the prospeak LEGO cinema, but the second-tier offerings pect of Garmadon’s rule. The Secret Ninja Force are still something entertaining to build on. n

40 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017


FILM | SHORTS

Stronger

OPENING FILMS BRAD’S STATUS

As he takes his son on a tour of prospective universities, a dad played by Ben Stiller has something of a nervous breakdown, realizing that all his old college friends now have cool, interesting jobs and he’s stuck at a lame nonprofit. Midlife crisis alert! From writer-director Mike White, whose previous scripts include School of Rock and The Good Girl. (NW) Rated R

FRIEND REQUEST

Sure, social media can be stressful, but this is pushing things a bit too far. A popular college student deletes a weird outcast from her Facebook friends list, and then her other acquaintances start meeting grisly ends. This German production was shot in South Africa back in 2014, and it’s already been released to tepid reviews in other parts of the world. (NW) Rated R

KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE

The follow-up to the surprise 2014 hit Kingsman: The Secret Service is even cruder and more absurd than before. This time around, most of the Kingsman organization’s agents, save for superspy Eggsy, are taken out by a sinister rival group, which also threatens to release a devastating virus. Over-the-top, comic-book spectacle abounds. Whether or not you enjoy it depends on how much you value style over tact. (SS) Rated R

THE LEGO NINJAGO MOVIE

Another fast-paced, genre-goofing animated feature from the LEGO film factory, this time playing around with the company’s popular Ninjago toy line. It’s bright and occasionally very funny, though it hardly holds a candle to the anarchic verve of the earlier

LEGO movies. It’s also more of a traditional family film than its predecessors, with a light, all-ages story about the importance of a parent-child bond, listening, self-awareness and self-worth. (SS) Rated PG

MULAN

Disney continues its dogged mission of re-releasing all of its animated properties from recent years, because your kids clearly hadn’t worn them out enough on home video. Now we’ve got 1998’s Mulan, an update of the Chinese folktale story of a maiden who disguises herself as a male warrior. It isn’t one of the studio’s masterpieces — and it’s mostly to blame for Eddie Murphy’s second career as wisecracking cartoon sidekick — but it’s still notable for popularizing the sort of strong female hero that the studio wasn’t then known for. (NW) Rated G

STRONGER

The second narrative feature to tackle the Boston Marathon bombing (last year’s Patriots Day was the first), this one stars Jake Gyllenhaal as Jeff Bauman, a real blue-collar worker who lost both legs in the attack. Directed by David Gordon Green (George Washington, Prince Avalanche) and co-starring Orphan Black’s Tatiana Maslany as Bauman’s fiancée. (NW) Rated R

VICEROY’S HOUSE

An upstairs-downstairs historical comedy set in 1947, as India transitions to independence from its British rule. Downton Abbey’s Hugh Bonneville stars as the final viceroy of India; Gillian Anderson is his socialite wife. From the director of such crowdpleasers as Bend It Like Beckham and Bride & Prejudice. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

NOW PLAYING ALL SAINTS

John Corbett stars as a corporate salesman-turned-pastor who is assigned to shut down a struggling church in his small town. When a group of South Asian refugees shows up at his door, he teams up with them to turn the church’s land into a working farm. The

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latest from Affirm Films, which produces family-friendly features aimed at evangelical audiences. (NW) Rated PG

AMERICAN ASSASSIN

Dylan O’Brien, the bland leading man ...continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 41


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FILM | SHORTS

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who was previously in those Maze Runner movies you forgot existed, plays Mitch Rapp, a counterterrorism operative who first appeared in Vince Flynn’s series of best-selling novels. Here we see him at the start of his career, being trained by Michael Keaton’s grizzled former CIA agent and going on a mission to stop some bad hombres in the Middle East. (NW) Rated R The latest genre deconstruction from Edgar Wright stars Ansel Elgort as a young, music-obsessed getaway driver who becomes wrapped up in a heist that’s destined to self-destruct. Stellar car chases, a fully loaded soundtrack and a deceptively sweet love story. (SS) Rated R

THE BIG SICK

Inspired by the courtship of Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon (who also wrote the script), this is the rare romcom that’s both consistently funny and genuinely emotional. Nanjiani plays himself, a stand-up who meets and falls in love with Emily (Zoe Kazan). There’s only one problem: He’s keeping their relationship a secret from his traditional Pakistani parents. This is further complicated when Emily falls into a medically induced coma. At the Magic Lantern. (SS) Rated R

This documentary should be required viewing for anyone obsessed with rare, archival film footage. Director Bill Morrison focuses on a cache of nitrate film reels that was literally unearthed in northwestern Canada; it’s not only about the contents of the celluloid itself, but also the history of the former mining town where it was buried. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

DESPICABLE ME 3

The hugely popular animated series continues unabated, and this time reformed bad guy Gru (voiced by Steve Carell) has just been kicked out of the Anti-Villain League. Enter his long-lost twin brother Dru, who convinces Gru to go back to all his evil ways. (NW) Rated PG

DUNKIRK

NEW!

Christopher Nolan’s WWII drama, painstakingly and authentically depicting the bloody Battle of Dunkirk, is a remarkable example of sheer filmmaking craft. The only thing it’s missing is a little humanity. Although the technical skill on display is dazzling, Nolan’s attempts to elicit any emotion from the audience feel strangely calculated. (SS) Rated PG-13

THE HITMAN’S BODYGUARD 509.326.1551

42 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

THE INLANDER

Ryan Reynolds is a bodyguard whose career has hit the skids, and Samuel L. Jackson is his newest charge, an as-

NEW YORK TIMES

VARIETY

METACRITIC.COM

(LOS ANGELES)

(OUT OF 100)

Dawson City: Frozen Time

85

Menashe

81

Logan Lucky

78

mother!

74

It

70

The Hitman’s Bodyguard

50

Home Again

43

BABY DRIVER

DAWSON CITY: FROZEN TIME

ATMS

CRITICS’ SCORECARD

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

sassin who must be transported to the Hague, where he’ll testify against an Eastern European dictator (Gary Oldman). The twist: Jackson has previously tried to kill Reynolds numerous times, and now they’re forced into helping each other. Only fitfully amusing. (NW) Rated R

HOME AGAIN

Single mother Reese Witherspoon has a one-night stand with a handsome 20-something and then begrudgingly allows him and his two deadbeat friends to move into her house. Sure. This rom-com is preposterous, sexist and weighed down by white privilege, and since it was directed by the daughter of Nancy Meyers (It’s Complicated), you won’t be surprised to learn it’s set in a tastefully decorated bungalow with a beautiful, spacious kitchen. (MJ) Rated PG-13

IT

Stephen King’s cerebral horror tome hits the big screen for the first time, and while it significantly streamlines the novel’s expansive vision, it captures the spirit of King’s writing. Set in the late ’80s in the fictional small town of Derry, Maine, seven adolescent outcasts team up to battle an evil force that takes on numerous terrifying forms, most notably the razor-toothed clown Pennywise. The movie is breaking all kinds of box office records, so expect Chapter 2, focusing on the same characters as adults, to hit theaters in the next couple years. (NW) Rated R

LEAP!

A French-Canadian animated film about an aspiring ballerina who escapes from her orphanage and hitches a train ride to Paris in hopes of making it big as a dancer. Features the voice talents of Elle Fanning, Carly Rae Jepsen, Kate McKinnon and the invaluable Mel Brooks. (NW) Rated PG

LOGAN LUCKY

Steven Soderbergh has re-emerged from his four-year “retirement” and has returned to the heist genre with this leisurely, off-the-cuff comed about an out-of-work coal miner (Channing Tatum) who enlists a group of misfits — including his superstitious brother (Adam Driver) and an incarcerated explosives expert (Daniel Craig) — to rob a NASCAR speedway. (ES) Rated PG-13

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

MENASHE

An empathetic character study set in a primarily Orthodox Jewish borough of New York, in which a widowed father works against the tenets of his religion to win back his young son. Because it’s directed by documentarian Joshua Z Weinstein, the film possesses the shagginess and sense of place that you’d expect from a nonfiction film, and it’s authentic in both its emotions and its exploration of faith. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG

MOTHER!

Nothing makes a damn lick of sense in Darren Aronofsky’s hysterical arthouse whatsit, in which the idyllic existence of a young woman (Jennifer Lawrence) and her artist husband (Javier Bardem) is disturbed when a couple of weird strangers show up — and then won’t leave — their rambling mansion in the middle of nowhere. It’s meant to be an allegory, but of what is anybody’s guess. Aronofsky seems to believe it’s secret and cryptic when it is, in fact, utterly banal. (MJ) Rated R

SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING

After being mistreated in his last few movies, Peter Parker and his web-slinging alter ego finally get another feature worthy of the character’s long history. With fresh-faced Tom Holland donning Spidey’s spandex, the Spider-Man franchise feels more grounded and human than ever. (ES) Rated PG-13

WIND RIVER

After the body of a young woman is found on a Native American reservation in Wyoming, a local wildlife tracker (Jeremy Renner) acts as a makeshift envoy for the visiting FBI agent (Elizabeth Olsen) assigned to the case. Unlike director Taylor Sheridan’s scripts for the thrillers Sicario and Hell or High Water, this snowblind noir is overwritten but under-plotted. (NW) Rated R

WONDER WOMAN

DC’s latest actually does justice to one of its longest-running and most beloved characters in one of the better superhero origin films. Gal Gadot announces herself as a major new star, playing the Amazon princess and Lasso of Truth-brandishing warrior who finds herself on the front lines of the first World War. (MS) Rated PG-13 n


FILM | REVIEW

Channing Tatum is one of the many A-listers to join the squad in Kingsman: The Golden Circle.

Shocking Awe

Kingsman: The Golden Circle amps up its spectacle and cruder comic-book elements for round two BY SETH SOMMERFELD

K

ingsman: The Golden Circle doesn’t pussyfoot around. It takes about one minute for the movie to launch into a full-blown, high-speed chase through the streets of London that includes cybernetic limbs, hand-to-hand combat, acrobatics, a Gatling gun, gadgets and missile fire. It’s just the first of many ridiculously elaborate action sequences spread across snowy peaks, jungles and dive bars in director Matthew Vaughn’s second installment of the larger-than-life espionage franchise based on the Kingsman comic book series. And while 2014’s original felt like a spy movie with grand comic-book flair, the comic-book absurdity takes over in the follow-up. The plot once again centers around chav-turned-

dapper spy Eggsy (Taron Egerton), and the titular secret British cloak-and-dagger organization. In the aftermath of the initial battle across London, a shadowy organization manages to hack into the Kingsman computer system, resulting in a surprise attack that takes out everyone in the agency except Eggsy and behind-the-scenes tech ace Merlin (Mark Strong). It turns out the attack was executed by the Golden Circle, a sinister organization that holds a monopoly under the watch of the cheerily maniacal mastermind Poppy Adams (Julianne Moore). While wallowing in their sorrows, Eggsy and Merlin find a clue that leads them to Kentucky, where they discover Statesman, Kingsman’s stateside counterparts. The American crew includes the gunslinging Tequila (Chan-

ning Tatum), lasso-and-rope expert Whiskey (Pedro Pascal), Merlin’s U.S. equivalent Ginger (Halle Berry), and Statesman’s leader Champ (Jeff Bridges). In short order, the Golden Circle lets it be known that unless drugs are universally legalized, they’ll kill millions via a blueveined virus they’ve synthesized into all their products. When the Brits and Yanks find out that the President of the United States has no intention of meeting Poppy’s ransom (in fact, quite the opposite), they must team up to take down the Golden Circle. There’s plenty of action and comedy to keep the heart pumping, but while the original Kingsman film toed the line of absurdity and crudeness, the sequel blows past any notion of gentlemanly behavior. Things often veer into outrageousness, seemingly for empty shock value alone. Be prepared for human meat grinders, tactical KINGSMAN: fingering, cannibalism, THE GOLDEN CIRCLE a callback to an anal sex Rated R joke (the original’s crudest Directed by Matthew Vaughn Starring Taron Egerton, Colin Firth, moment) and a lot of Elton John (which could’ve been Julianne Moore, Mark Strong fun if every scene with the knighted singer didn’t feel like it was grabbing the viewer and shaking them while screaming “ISN’T IT CUTE AND ZANY THAT ELTON JOHN IS DOING THIS?!?”). Every time the action moves past its previous bawdy moment, a new one pops up. Subtlety dies a more undignified death than the rest of the Kingsmen. At least the performances by Egerton and Strong provide the movie with some solid ground; Strong especially provides an emotional core in a film that desperately needs one. On the other hand, it’s almost a shame that The Golden Circle has such an all-star cast, because there’s really so little for them to work with in Vaughn and Jane Goldman’s script. Berry’s Ginger is a glorified low-key, low-energy keyboard lackey, Tatum’s Tequila literally gets put on ice after a few scenes, and Bridges’ Champ is a paper-thin version of a cowboy sheriff that he’s played better on many occasions. While Moore, as Poppy, gets more screen time than those three put together, the villainous role is just written so… dumb. She’s weird, kooky (her hidden base looks like ’50s America — so nuts!) and maniacal without rationale. There’s no backstory to justify it, or anything to ground Poppy in even a comic-book sense of reality. Moore leans in and fully hams it up, but it’s not within the realm of her considerable talents to save the character. If you can look past the groan-worthy elements of the story and its nutters, there’s a fun, fast-paced, over-thetop action film to be mined out of Kingsman: The Golden Circle. It’s all a matter of valuing style over tact. Ironically, this sequel probably wouldn’t meet the gentlemanly requirements to join its own organization’s ranks. n

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Z NATION 4

PREMIERE EVENT Hear from the creator, cast and crew then see Season Four, Episode One. family owned and operated for 36 years

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SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 43


a co-production with Opera Coeur d’Alene

FRIDAY

Sept 22

SATURDAY

Sept 23

8:00 pm

Eckart Preu, Conductor, Jadd Davis, Director Sandra Piques Eddy, Carmen, Dinyar Vania, Don José, Matt Hanscom, Escamillo Semi-Staged Production SPONSORED BY: Frank Knott, Billie Severtsen, Inland Northwest Community Foundation

Overtures and Arias WITH

THOMAS HAMPSON

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

8:00 PM

3:00 PM

Nov 4 Nov 5 SPONSORED BY: FRANK KNOTT & ESTATE OF SHERRY MARTIN KNOTT

SEPT 26-27

HISTORIC DAVENPORT

7:30PM

A mix of baroque, classical and contemporary music introduced and performed by various ensembles from the Spokane Symphony.

G a l l e r y & Ta b l e S e a t i n g A v a i l a b l e

(509) 624-1200 • SpokaneSymphony.org Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

44 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017


Coming full circle: The Shins’ James Mercer channels pop sounds of the band’s past on their latest album Heartworms.

MARISA KULA PHOTO

INDIE POP

GETTING BACK TO BASICS Heartworms is a welcome return to the Shins’ quirky early sound BY BEN SALMON

T

here’s a stretch of songs on Heartworms — the Shins’ fifth album, released in March — that sounds and feels very much descended from the band’s 2001 debut album, Oh, Inverted World. It starts with the buzzy opening chords of “Fantasy Island” and runs through the album’s penultimate track, a gentle, reverberant lullaby called “So Now What” that floats on cotton-candy clouds of melancholy. In between is “Mildenhall,” an ultra-personal storysong with just a hint of twang, and “Rubber Ballz,” a slice of strummy perfection featuring frontman James Mercer’s trademark helium-high vocals. “Half a Million” is the

kind of punchy, effervescent indie-pop that filled the Shins’ incredible 2003 sophomore album Chutes Too Narrow. And the acoustic bounce and echoey atmosphere of “Dead Alive” sounds like it could’ve been lifted straight from Oh, Inverted World. The Shins’ first two albums are indie-rock classics in part because Mercer’s quirky melodies are simply too potent to be held back by lo-fi production values. With Heartworms, it seems, he’s gone back to basics, now with time, experience, success and better gear on his side. “I felt like I wanted to have a link to that first record,”

Mercer says. “I sort of wanted to go full circle to some extent, but also elaborate on the themes. And I had better equipment and better engineers around me.” That hints at another big difference between the Shins’ fourth album, 2012’s Port of Morrow, and Heartworms. For the new one, Mercer took on the role of producer, leaning on talented friends like current band member Yuuki Matthews, ex-Shin Richard Swift and the Decemberists’ Chris Funk when he needed guidance. Self-producing was an intentional full swing of the pendulum from Port of Morrow, which was produced by ...continued on next page

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 45


MUSIC | INDIE POP “GETTING BACK TO BASICS,” CONTINUED... Greg Kurstin, an in-demand pop genius who has worked with Adele, Sia and Foo Fighters. “You can’t replace Greg, who’s just a pile of massive talent. So Port of Morrow definitely has its own sound,” Mercer says. “But this time, I really wanted the luxury of time. I wanted the luxury to just sort of sit there and noodle around and … get back into the sort of kooky weirdness that ends up happening when I’m left alone in the studio for too long.” Indeed, Mercer’s likeable brand of kooky weirdness is all over Heartworms, from “blah blah blah” backing vocals on “Name For You,” to the video-game dub-pop of “Cherry Hearts,” to the suffocatingly fuzzy bass line that runs under “Painting a Hole.” And then there’s “Mildenhall,” which finds Mercer leaving behind the wordplay and metaphors and opening up about his past more than ever before. He references his upbringing in a military family, having an awkward haircut, skateboarding on cobblestone streets and learning to play his dad’s guitar. Mercer says those lyrical choices were driven by the song’s simple guitar hook, which reminded him of Merle Haggard and prompted him to tell a story. But the more personal style also seems to line up nicely with his concurrent desire to take the Shins’ music back to where it started. “I think I’m more comfortable just saying the truth about who I am. If I were to go back to the mid-’90s, I would’ve been embarrassed to say that I had a flat-top, because I still felt ownership

of that teenaged shithead who wasn’t cool at all,” Mercer says. “I still wanted to think somehow that I could ever be cool. Once you give that up, you can be honest.” And with mid-career honesty comes a clearer vision of the future. Not only does Mercer consider Heartworms to be “full circle” for the Shins, he also feels like we’re nearing “the end of the album as a medium” and that he wants to “enter some sort of new mode.” Which doesn’t mean the Shins are over, necessarily. It just means that Mercer’s way of running his operation might be changing. “I just don’t know that I wanna go through that process of making a full-length record anymore,” he says. “I don’t think there’s much of a reason to, for my own entertainment and for the people that we sell records to... or don’t sell records to.” Translation: The future is wide open for James Mercer and his popular pop-rock project, the Shins. Even he may not know where he’s headed. And that’s OK, he says: “It’s easier to admit your flaws when you’re older, I’ve learned. I don’t sweat the small stuff as much. Well, sometimes I do, I guess.” n The Shins with Day Wave • Sun, Sept. 24 at 8 pm • $39.50 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

PEOPLE WHO CARE EVENT 15th Annual Fundr aising Event

Thursday, October 5th at the Hotel RL

303 W North River Drive – FREE PARKING –

The Save Date

Breakfast (7:30 am - 8:30 am) —&— Lunch (12:00 pm - 1:00 pm)

RESPECT LIVES HERE

Will you help it thrive?

For more information about this event, including Table Captain opportunites, Sponsorships and Virtual Pledges, please contact: Mary Tracey at mtracey@help4women.org or 509-328-6702

This event raises funds to support Transitions mission to end poverty and homelessness for women and children in Spokane, WA. Help us provide safety, support and the skills for success to more than 1,600 women and their children each year.

46 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017


MUSIC | INSTRUMENTAL

Musical Pictures

The Texas-based instrumental quartet Explosions in the Sky prove you don’t need lyrics to tell a musical story.

Explosions in the Sky make instrumental post-rock with powerful, cinematic imagery BY HOWARD HARDEE

I

was trekking across the sunbaked grounds of the 2009 Sasquatch! Music Festival, looking for a friend I’d lost in the crowd, when I was distracted by a big, spacey sound emanating from one of the smaller stages — lots of delicate guitar jangling, a little bass and the raw power of pounding drums, but no singing. Even so, it certainly wasn’t background music. Until then, I had never knowingly listened to Explosions in the Sky; I had probably heard the band’s music in some movie or TV show. I was mesmerized. Individual instrumental phrases stuck out like good vocal melodies and proved equally as memorable; one cascading, reverb-soaked guitar melody in particular echoed in my mind well after the music festival was over. (I rediscovered that melody buried among the mini-symphonies that make up the band’s 2003 opus, The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place, in a song called “First Breath After Coma.”) The song was in constant flux, growing more majestic and expansive by the note, finally crescendoing in a guitar freak-out that sounded like, well, explosions in the sky. And so I was introduced to the quartet from Texas and their brand of post-rock that doesn’t need lyrics to paint pictures, tell stories or tug heartstrings. As with

most good music, Explosions in the Sky’s richly textured, constantly moving soundscapes are ambiguous enough for each listener to attach their own, deeply personal images and emotions. Most everyone seems to find a sort of cathartic power buried there, however, and their live shows have gained a reputation as deeply moving, quasispiritual events where some people absolutely lose it. On the back end of a worldwide tour in support of their latest record, 2016’s The Wilderness, Explosions in the Sky is set to bring their impactful live show to the Knitting Factory on Saturday night. The band’s cinematic sound is no coincidence. They’ve written, performed and produced four movie soundtracks — most notably the 2004 high school football drama Friday Night Lights — and their songs have been featured in all sorts of commercial settings. “We’re lucky in that regard, that many people can see it with different visuals, which allows for it to play into these films, television programs or video games,” said guitarist Munaf Rayani during the band’s performance on Seattle’s KEXP-FM last year. “[It] helps get our name out that much further — or that melody out. I feel like many people who don’t know us by name know us by sound.” The band’s ability to conjure strong imagery explains

why they’ve achieved great success without ever veering too far from the formula laid out by their debut album, 2000’s How Strange, Innocence. (Which raises a valid criticism. In 2007, Pitchfork skewered the band’s fifth fulllength record, All of a Sudden I Miss Everyone: “It would be pointless to discuss this album on a song-by-song basis, since each funnels different permutations of chords and changes into the same inflexible template.”) Unsurprisingly, The Wilderness is more of the same, albeit softer and more meditative than the band’s previous records, dreamily floating along with the clouds rather than pushing through the stratosphere like a rocket shooting for space. With a purely instrumental approach and seven remarkably similar-sounding albums, they remain the only quiet-then-loud post-rock band of their era left standing. As a consequence of such a long run, Explosions in the Sky has provided something of a personal soundtrack to mark the passing years WEEKEND for many fans — myself C O U N T D OW N included. There was a Get the scoop on this yearlong stretch where weekend’s events with I wrote exclusively our newsletter. Sign up at while listening to Take Inlander.com/newsletter. Care, Take Care, Take Care (2011), and more than one road trip has been soundtracked by those familiar jangly guitars and pounding drums. But most vividly of all, the guitar melody in “First Breath After Coma” will always remind me of the first time I heard Explosions in the Sky alongside the Columbia River Gorge. n Explosions in the Sky • Sat, Sept. 23 at 8 pm • $22 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 47


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

FUNK EARTH, WIND & FIRE

T

here are myriad reasons to go see an Earth, Wind & Fire show, but let’s start with the simplest one: Philip Bailey. His falsetto is one of the most stunning vocal instruments you’ll ever hear, and that’s as true now as it was when he joined EWF in 1972 and started trading vocals with baritone Maurice White, the band’s founder. White, who died in 2016, hadn’t toured since 1994, but Bailey and fellow longtime members Verdine White and Ralph Johnson have kept EWF on the road, delivering dance-floor fillers like “September,” “Boogie Wonderland” and “Shining Star” to adoring audiences around the world. The band’s blend of funk, soul and R&B (and the much-loved horn section required for those genres) gets added punch due to their ability to stretch out into Latin and African rhythms as well as straightforward pop and rock. If a night of nonstop dancing (and occasional slow jams) sounds appealing, it’s hard to do better than Earth, Wind & Fire. — DAN NAILEN Earth, Wind & Fire • Sat, Sept. 23 at 7 pm • $43.50-$101.50 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd • inbpac.com • 279-7000

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 09/21

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Sara Brown BEEROCRACY, Open Mic J J THE BIG DIPPER, Van Eps CD Release with Elephant Gun Riot, Trash Dogs, Foxtrot Epidemic J J BING CROSBY THEATER, Kelly and Ellis, Luke Yates, Nick Canger BOOTS BAKERY, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen CORBY’S BAR, Open Mic and Karaoke CRAVE, DJ Freaky Fred CRUISERS, Open Mic Jam Slam FARMIN PARK, Brown Salmon Truck J GILDED UNICORN, Dylan Hathaway THE JACKSON ST., Zaq Flanary, Dave McRae JOHN’S ALLEY, Jeff Crosby and the Refugees J J KNITTING FACTORY, Turkuaz, Sinkane J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin J MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE, Open Mic hosted by Scott Reid NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), PJ Destiny NORTHERN RAIL, Joshua Belliardo, Mary Hoffman, Kaylee Goins THE OBSERVATORY, Vinyl Meltdown J THE PIN!, Rayven Justice, Eazy EQ, Jac Mov, DJ Don Gee POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Wyatt Wood REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Casual Acoustic, Cross Current THE RESERVE, Karaoke with DJ Dave

48 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

ROCK DEATH VALLEY GIRLS

T

he Los Angeles quartet Death Valley Girls makes the kind of spaced-out rock that would be right at home in a film on the bottom half of a 1970s drive-in double bill. In interviews, they’ve talked about how much they dig dark auras, psychic readings, demonic possessions and the lore surrounding the Manson family; you can hear it in the music, too, which channels the rawest proto-punk and instills it with a come-hither purr of menace. Glow in the Dark, the band’s most recent fulllength release on the cultishly adored Burger Records label, is all knotty guitars and cooing girl-group-style vocals that turn into Iggy Poplike snarls at the flick of a fuzz pedal. You’ll have images of go-go girls, gutter punks and Russ Meyer movies dancing in your head. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Death Valley Girls with Peru Resh and Indian Goat • Fri, Sept. 22 at 7:30 pm • $10 • Allages • The Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • bigdipperevents.com • 863-8098

RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 09/22

12 TRIBES RESORT CASINO, The Evolution Band 219 LOUNGE, Von the Baptist, Trash Dogs, Van Eps AVISTA STADIUM, Inland Northwest Craft Beer Fest feat. Dimestore Prophets J THE BARTLETT, Jeff Crosby BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn

J J THE BIG DIPPER, Death Valley Girls (see above), Peru Resh, Indian Goat BIGFOOT PUB, Usual Suspects BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Sterling BOLO’S, Chris Rieser and the Nerve THE BUZZ PIZZERIA, BAR AND LOUNGE, Dawna Stafford CHECKERBOARD BAR, Rage Rabbit Presents EDM Night CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Donnie Emerson and Nancy Sophia

COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Emerson Drive CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke CRUISERS, Bobaflex, Beitthemeans, The Complication CURLEY’S, Mojo Box FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Tommy G IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Dylan Hathaway IRON HORSE BAR, Dangerous Type THE JACKSON ST., Electric Bent J KNITTING FACTORY, Aaron Lewis MAX AT MIRABEAU, 3D Band

MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Harold’s IGA MOOSE LOUNGE, FM MULLIGAN’S, The Teccas NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NASHVILLE NORTH, Joe Nichols NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Tell the Boys NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, DJ Patrick O’SHAYS IRISH PUB, Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Ron Kieper


J THE PIN!, Lich King, Against the Grain, Hidden Intent, Alcohology POST FALLS BREWING CO., Royale PRIME TYME, David Wolff Project RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos RIPPLES, Yesterdayscake J SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Just Plain Darin VALLEY EAGLES, Stagecoach West ZOLA, DragonFly

Saturday, 09/23

12 TRIBES RESORT CASINO, Got ‘90s? J AVISTA STADIUM, Inland Northwest Craft Beer Fest feat. Folkinception and Grand Avenue BARLOWS, Jan Harrison, Barry Aiken, Roxy McDaniel J THE BARTLETT, The Cave Singers BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Big Business, Dark White Light, Belt of Vapor BIGFOOT PUB, Usual Suspects BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Stud BOLO’S, Chris Rieser and the Nerve J CENTERPLACE REGIONAL EVENT CENTER, Valleyfest feat. Hot Club of Spokane, Bristol, Milonga CHECKERBOARD BAR, Saturday Night Beatz

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Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA & SPIRITS, Donnie Emerson and Nancy Sophia CURLEY’S, Mojo Box FEDORA PUB, Harmony Clayton J FLAME & CORK, Just Plain Darin HARVEST HOUSE, Nick Grow, Slightly Committed IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Truck Mills J J INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER, Earth, Wind & Fire (see facing page) IRON HORSE BAR, Dangerous Type THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke w/James JOHN’S ALLEY, Henry C & the Willards J J KNITTING FACTORY, Explosions in the Sky (see page 47) LAGUNA CAFÉ, Diane Copeland MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, The Teccas MOOSE LOUNGE, FM MULLIGAN’S, Wyatt Wood NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE, Tell the Boys NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, DJ Patrick J THE OBSERVATORY, Cathedral Pearls, Cedar & Boyer POST FALLS BREWING, Son of Brad PROHIBITION GASTROPUB, Mary Chavez J J RESURRECTION RECORDS, Peru Resh, Tyler Aker, Walker, Newman RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos RIPPLES, Yesterdayscake J SPOKANE ARENA, Jason Aldean, Chris Young, Kane Brown, DeeJay Silver THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave ZOLA, DragonFly

Sunday, 09/24

ARBOR CREST, Common Ground CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), KOSH CURLEY’S, FM DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night J EMERGE, ThePETEBOX J HARVEST HOUSE, Just Plain Darin, Stagecoach West IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Clayton Lee J J KNITTING FACTORY, The Shins (see page 45), Day Wave LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam O’DOHERTY’S, Live Irish Music RIDLER PIANO BAR, Karaoke Night ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 09/25

J THE BARTLETT, Stephen Kellogg J THE BIG DIPPER, Slaves, Secrets, Velafire, Of Truth J CALYPSOS COFFEE, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam KAIJU SUSHI & SPIRITS, Mateo J MOOTSY’S, Itchy Kitty, Phlegm Fatale, Thigh Gap, Wretched F--J THE PIN!, The Casualties, Some Kind of Nightmare, Plague Shaman, Valley King RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic J TERRAIN, KnowMads, All-Star Opera, T.S The Solution ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 09/26

J THE BARTLETT, Northwest of Nashville feat. Ira Wolf, Quinell,

Windoe, Chris Molitor BULL HEAD TAVERN, Rusty Jackson J KNITTING FACTORY, I Prevail, We Came As Romans, The Word Alive LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tue. MIK’S, DJ Brentano RAZZLE’S, Open Mic Jam RED ROOM LOUNGE, Tuesday Takeover with Storme RIDLER PIANO BAR, Open Mic UP NORTH DISTILLERY, Cris Lucas ZOLA, Dueling Cronkites

Wednesday, 09/27 BLACK DIAMOND, Luke Stuivenga J CARUSO’S, Just Plain Darin THE FILLING STATION, Ron Greene GENO’S, Open Mic w/Travis Goulding IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Kicho LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE, Nick Grow PROHIBITION GASTROPUB, Kori Ailene RIDLER PIANO BAR, The Ronaldos SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open Mic THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave ZOLA, Whsk&Keys

Coming Up ...

J KNITTING FACTORY, City and Colour, David Bazan, Sep. 29 J SPOKANE ARENA, Scorpions, Megadeth, Sep. 29 J THE BARTLETT, Sarah Jarosz, Brother Roy, Sep. 30 J BING CROSBY THEATER, Buckethead, Sep. 30 J THE BIG DIPPER, The Slants, Oct. 3

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BRAVO CONCERT HOUSE • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 DIAMS DEN • 412 W. Sprague • 934-3640 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOTEL RL BY RED LION AT THE PARK • 303 W. North River Dr. • 326-8000 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208667-7314 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N. Market St. • 466-9918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RESERVE • 120 N. Wall • 598-8783 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 49


FESTIVAL FIELD OF BREWS

Summer has officially come to an end and it’s time for the beer to flow in the outfield of Avista Stadium: The 8th annual Inland Northwest Craft Beer Festival features 175 beers from 41 Washington breweries. From local giant No-Li Brewhouse to downtown newcomer Whistle Punk Brewing, to regional favorites like Bale Breaker Brewing and Fremont Brewing, the lineup is set to impress. Harvest season is upon us, so you can expect nearly 20 fresh-hop beers, including a fresh-hop version of the deliciously trendy New England IPA from Perry Street Brewing. Parents, no need to find a sitter; Saturday is all-ages with a kids play area. Tickets include a tasting glass and six 5-ounce tastings. — DEREK HARRISON Inland Northwest Craft Beer Festival • Fri, Sept. 22 (21+) from 4-9 pm and Sat, Sept. 23 (all ages) from noon-7 pm • $20/$25 at the door • Avista Stadium • 602 N. Havana • washingtonbeer.com

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

50 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

WORDS MODERN LEGACY

Each week since the beginning of this year, the Spokane City | County Historic Preservation Office has showcased a historic property erected during the Mid-Century Modern architectural/ design movement of the 1950s and ’60s. The “Mid-Century a Week” showcase is also tied to a big, federally funded survey and inventory project of significant mid-century properties around the county, which residents can now hear the results of during a free public presentation. Consultants on the project will share examples of the styles and types of mid-century architecture found in the Spokane area, the innovative modernist architects whose designs have shaped our city’s urban identity, and other interesting details. For even more insight into the region’s incredible mid-century design legacy (the topic of a big MAC exhibit several years ago), visit midcenturyspokane.org. — CHEY SCOTT Spokane’s Mid-Century Modern Legacy • Tue, Sept. 26 at 3 pm • Free • Washington Cracker Co. Building • 304 W. Pacific • bit.ly/2gHQHTT

MUSIC CLASSIC COLLABORATION

I’ll admit to being far from an opera authority. The first time I heard of Carmen was when MTV aired Carmen: A Hip Hopera starring Beyoncé, Mos Def and Mekhi Phifer in 2001, and that modern adaptation was a reimagining of the Broadway show and then movie Carmen Jones, itself a retelling of the classic opera. That speaks to the timelessness of Georges Bizet’s work delving into a love triangle between a solder, bullfighter and gypsy woman. Carmen is the kind of opera anyone from purists to neophytes can appreciate, and watching and hearing the collaboration between the Spokane Symphony and Opera Coeur d’Alene as the love story unfolds on stage should be a treat. — DAN NAILEN Spokane Symphony presents Carmen with Opera Coeur d’Alene • Fri, Sept. 22 and Sat, Sept. 23 at 8 pm • $28-$107 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200


Come Back New® With Princess®

Whether you are new to Princess Cruises® or a previous passenger, come join us to hear about exciting new initiatives and enhancements on Princess Cruises that will provide new and enriching experiences. You’ll also learn about promotional offers and the advantages of booking with AAA, such as highly experienced travel agents, reduced deposits, onboard spending credits and exclusive AAA offers. RSVP today!

WORDS RADIO ON STAGE

You’ve heard his smooth and reasonable voice on National Public Radio; now local listeners get a chance to hear — and see — On Point host Tom Ashbrook up close when he comes to Spokane as part of his ongoing “Listening to America Tour.” Although the event, hosted by Spokane Public Radio, is sold out (having been rescheduled from a May date), you’ll still get a chance to hear the special program during On Point’s Sept. 25 broadcast. A panel of local experts join Ashbrook on the Bing’s stage for a discussion on climate change and the growing number and intensity of wildfires in the West. These guest panelists are Peter J. Goldmark, former Washington State Commissioner of Public Lands, Spokesman-Review columnist Sue Lani Madsen, and Cody Desautel, natural resource director for the Colville Confederated Tribes. — CHEY SCOTT SPR Presents: Listening to America with Tom Ashbrook • Fri, Sept. 22 at 7:30 pm • $27 (sold out) • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • spokanepublicradio.org

AAA COEUR D’ALENE STORE 296 W. Sunset Ave., Suite 33 Wednesday, October 4 at 1:30 p.m. RSVP: (208) 666-5715

AAA NORTH SPOKANE STORE 7307 N. Division St., Suite 103 Wednesday, October 4 at 5:30 p.m. RSVP: (509) 468-1138

SPOKANE AAA CRUISE & TRAVEL STORE 1314 S. Grand Blvd., Unit 1 Thursday, October 5 at 5:30 p.m. RSVP: (509) 358-7039

*Space is limited. Agency #178-018-521 Job #2374 CDL, NOR, SPK

farmVfood FESTIVAL FALL’S FIRST FUN

Bid summer farewell and welcome the cool, crisp fall season in festive fashion at the 27th annual Valleyfest celebration, a weekend of food, live music, outdoor activities, a parade and more. Festivities kick off Friday evening (6:15 pm) with the annual Lions Club Bed Races — literally a team-based race on beds with wheels — followed by the Hearts of Gold community parade. Saturday morning begins bright and early with a pancake breakfast, followed by the 6:45 hot air balloon launch (weather permitting; also happens Sunday). Events in Mirabeau Park throughout the day and into Sunday offer something for everyone, including a car show, PG-rated comedy cup and beer/wine garden. Hopefully you kept a copy of last week’s Inlander, which included an insert of the complete guide to Valleyfest 2017; if not head to valleyfest.org for all the details. — CHEY SCOTT Valleyfest • Fri-Sun, Sept. 22-24 • Mirabeau Point Park and CenterPlace Regional Event Center • 2426 N. Discovery Pl., Spokane Valley • valleyfest.org

LEARN ABOUT TODAY’S FOOD & FARMING CULTURE

NOV. 3-4 More info at SCCD.org

SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 INLANDER 51


W I SAW YOU

S S

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU NITA The last time I saw you was 2012 when my daughter and I left for Tennessee. The last time we talked was when you were hanging out with my sister so we got to talk. You were supposed to call me back. But its been over a year since any of our mutual friends have heard from you. Please get a hold of one of us. We miss you Nita! Our mutial friend in Spokane has my number. Call him to get it if you want. We love you! ANGEL ON DIVISION To the wonderful good simatatian gentlemen who stopped the crazy tweaker on a bicycle in front of delish’s trying to attack me in my red Honda I absolutely adore you and thank god there are wonderful humans such as yourself left in this world to defend a defense as woman I didn’t get your name but I will remember your kindness the rest of my life thank you so very much:) FIVE YEARS GONE Five years gone without you. What’s sixty more, right? Everyone kept telling me I’d get over you but it never happened. I tried so hard to just move on but it was impossible. I’ll never open myself up like that again because I could never handle that kind of heartache again. I wish I could go back in time to the night we took our friendship to the next level and stop it from happening. I would have taken your friendship over a broken heart any day. I hope you never have to feel the way it felt. Feels.

OFFICE LOVE I saw you in the Bear Lake Conference room, we sat across the table from each other. Our eyes both meet a number of times. I made quirky smile I think you made one back at me. When will you build up the nerves to ask me out! WHATEVER I saw you tonight on the 8th floor of Sacred Heart. You were playing some sort of card game and laughed at the conversation I was having with my grandpa. I should have stopped and furthered a conversation with you... I blew it. LOVING A GREAT MAN It’s so hard to believe Tazz, then when I met you last year that I honestly didn’t like you at all but over time I got to know you and now I’m so in love with you. I’m so very glad that I gave you a chance. You are a wonderful person and you treat me better than any man has ever treated me before. I love you so very much.

CHEERS LUCKY TO BE YOUR WIFE These past few months have tested our marriage to the fullest. During the hardest times of my life you stepped up and showed us all how much of a man you really are. I’m not exaggerating at all when I say that you ARE the most amazing man I have EVER met — and Mia and I are so lucky to have you “babe”. Happy one year anniversary to my handsome man- and cheers to many many more! *Nick+Mandy 9/24/16* LOST PHONE Big giant cheers to the man and his daughter for finding my phone. I was grocery shopping with my 2 tiny people and hadn’t even noticed my phone was missing. You found me, asked if the phone you were holding was mine and proceeded to not take my word for it when I initially stated it was not since I didn’t notice yet. That was a miracle. Period. Praise God and thank you very much sir. I could not be more appreciative! BUS DRIVER 9-12-17 To the STA bus driver that helped the woman load her stroller on the bus, thank you so very much! Your helping hand is appriciated THANKS FOR TRUSTING! Thanks so very much to the great people

at Domini’s Sandwiches and Einstein Brothers Bagels on Mission. Tuesday of last week when I arrived at your establishments to pick up my call in orders, I was dismayed to discover I had left my wallet at home. But both of you kindly insisted I

I was no longer someone you wanted in your life because I chose to self medicate a very serious mental illness that I was afraid to talk about. I miss you everyday, all of you. I also hate you every single day for doing what you told me would never

car length between us. I was already exceeding the speed limit, but that wasn’t good enough for your petulant self, so you passed me, only to cut me off with less that ten feet between us! That was a stupid move you repeated several more

The “Christian” biker patch on your pleather jacket was the icing on the cake.

take my order and pay you next time. You made my breakfast and lunch hours a lot more cheerful! Steve THANKS TO THE ER STAFF Thank you to the staff of the Sacred Heart Hospital emergency room, especially to Dr. Dan Hagerty and his phenomenal suturing skills. MY HEALER I have completely fallen for you and everything you do, everything you say and everything you are. So often, You are my first thought in the morning and my last thought at night — you are so much in between. I love your deeply romantic yet completely logical and intelligent soul that seems to create internal conflict for you but is complete bliss for me. When I ache, you are the cure. I was missing something my entire life — until I found you. You are my soul healer, my person... I am deeply and endlessly in love with you.

JEERS JEERS TO YOU, THE GROUP THAT BECAME MY FAMILY. When I call someone my family, I don’t use the term lightly. When I say I love you, I mean it, and will not leave you in your times of heartache and despair. I reached out to you, I needed you, I needed help. I expected understanding, I expected support, I expected you to care. Instead you turned away from me, you decided that

do. You left. You say you’re angry and hurt and I can’t even begin to fathom what I did that could have hurt you. I wish that things could go back. I miss my family. I miss having you in my life. Holidays are fast approaching and it’s weighing heavy in my heart that I will once again spend them alone. “MEAN LADY ACROSS THE STREET...” Unless you are willing to take credit for all the horrific acts paid for by US taxes, such as the killing of at least 1,201 Iraqi children between 2003-2011 (see John Horgan article, Scientific American website, 9/10/15), you should stop insinuating that your tax dollars are paying for this woman’s food. How arrogant! Do you actually know anything about this woman? Is she disabled? Is it hard for her to carry her groceries some distance to her house? Or is she just someone who is poorer than you? Have you ever given her a friendly word? As someone who lives next door to the Spokane Montessori School, I can tell you that the school traffic is frustrating at times; just last week during morning drop-off, someone rearended my blue Subaru (you know who you are, but unfortunately, I don’t). My point is, many times, people aren’t JUST mean... even you. MOTORCYCLE MORON Dear Biker Moron, I’m more than happy to share the road, but then a prick like you rolled up on me Saturday morning on S. Dishman-Mica Rd. and tailgated me with less than a

RE: PIGS IN THE PARK So appreciated the note written about Pigs in the Park. The annual Labor Day event was once a great treat. However, it’s become increasingly less enjoyable over the years. It’s not surprising to hear of young punks threatening newspaper people. It’s really too bad police weren’t there to observe and arrest for the assault. Riverfront Park is such a pretty place. It’s too bad so many in Spokane choose to stay away from it now, most likely due to exactly what you described. Great comments! Totally agree! n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS W I L M A

S T U B

O N A I R

I O N A

T R D I S A

SOUND OFF

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

52 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

times while you were apparently busy proving how low your IQ is?!? If you value your life that little, may someone roll over you like the roadkill you deserve to be. The “Christian” biker patch on your pleather jacket was the icing on the cake. You’re a Christian as much as Kim Jong Un is a rational, compassionate human being. You suck idiot!

K E N N Y G

S I C R T G A K I E S O R T H

R O S F R I N K S L O I T E D R R O O O N E A V I S N E A T Y S N O

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W M D I P U T

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U M N T O E N D M T I I T N R I

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NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

SCOTT REED CONSERVATION DINNER The Idaho Conservation League presents the second annual conservation lecture and dinner in honor of the late founder Scott Reed. This year’s focus is “Our Path Together—Moving Forward in Idaho and Beyond.” Sept. 21, 6-9 pm. $60. Hayden Lake Country Club, 2362 E. Bozanta Dr. idahoconservation.org (208-265-9565) APPETITE FOR CONSERVATION The fourth annual fundraiser to celebrate 26 years of conservation, featuring a keynote from Jon Snyder, Outdoor Recreation and Economic Development Policy Advisor to Governor Jay Inslee. Sept. 22, 6-10 pm. The McGinnity Room, 116 W. Pacific. inlandnwland.org ART IN BLOOM The 4th annual event benefits the preservation and maintenance of the Moore-Turner Heritage Gardens, and features local artists’ work paired with floral arrangements, along with refreshments, tours and more. Sept. 22-23, noon-6 pm $7. Corbin Art Center, 507 W. Seventh. (625-6677) FAMILY PROMISE OF NORTH IDAHO CARDBOARD BOX CITY An awareness and fundraising event to help homeless children and their families. Participants are asked to gather pledges, cardboard, build a shelter, sleep in the box and enjoy food and fun and prizes. Sept. 22. $25+ donation. Community United Methodist Church, 1470 W. Hanley Ave. familypromiseni.org (208-755-3212) SPOKANE HEART & STROKE WALK Join the American Heart Association for its annual family-friendly 5K. Form a team, join a team or register as an individual and set a fundraising goal to support the fight against heart disease and stroke. Sep. 23, 9 am-12:30 pm. Free. WSU Spokane, 412 E. Spokane Falls Blvd. www2.heart.org (818-3200) NIC POKER SCHOLARSHIP RIDE Grab your bike and ride around Coeur d’Alene to raise money for the Brian Williams Memorial Scholarship. Entry includes a t-shirt, barbecue, and live music by Broken Mantle. Sep. 24, 11:30 am-6 pm. $25. Slate Creek Brewing Co., 1710 N. Fourth St., CdA. (208-676-7169) SPA PENTHOUSE PARTY An event with Spokane Preservation Advocates, in the historic Paulsen Penthouse, and featuring appetizers, live music, drinks and tours. Ages 21+. Sep. 24, 5 pm. $75/ person. Paulsen Center, 421 W. Riverside Ave. (509-624-3952)

COMEDY

2.0PEN MIC Local comedy night hosted by Ken McComb. Thursdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The District Bar, 916 W. First Ave. facebook.com/districtbarspokane/ GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open mic comedy night hosted by Casey Strain; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (509-847-1234) JOHN HEFFRON Long before winning the 2nd season of NBC’s “Last Comic Standing,” Heffron took the stage at the University of Michigan’s Main Street Comedy Showcase. Sept. 21-22 at 8 pm. $15-$23. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com ONCE MORE WITH FEELING In celebration of the BDT’s 20th anniversary, players revisit as many previous shows as possible each night. Fridays, at 8 pm, Through Sept. 22. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045)

DREW LYNCH In 2015, Drew Lynch captured the hearts of America with his Golden Buzzer performance on Season 10 of “America’s Got Talent.” Sept. 23 at 8 and 10:30 pm. Sep. 23. $20-$27. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (318-9998) SAFARI The fast-paced short-form improv show for mature audiences relies on audience suggestions to fuel each scene. Saturdays at 8 pm, through Dec. 30. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com STAND-UP COMEDY FEAT. NATHAN BRANNON Enjoy stand-up comedy featuring Brannon, on tour from L.A., with Fred Bowski and Morgan Preston. Brannon is a Portland native who recently relocated to LA, and was the winner of the 2014 Seattle International Comedy Competition. 21+. Sep. 23, 8 pm. $10-$12. 219 Lounge, 219 N. First Ave, Sandpoint. 219.bar THE SOCIAL HOUR COMEDY SHOWCASE Featuring comics from the Northwest and beyond, and hosted by Deece Casillas. Sundays, 8-9:30 pm. Free. The Ridler Piano Bar, 718 W. Riverside. socialhourpod.com JAY MOHR The comedian, actor, radio host and best-selling author has been performing stand-up comedy since he was 16. Sep. 25, 8 pm. $22-$30. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com

COMMUNITY

COLVILLE CORN MAZE & PUMPKIN PATCH Explore the 12-acre corn maze and a 3-acre pumpkin patch. Open Mon-Fri from 3-7 pm, Sat-Sun from 11 am-7 pm, through Oct. 31. $5-$7. Colville Corn Maze, 73 Oakshott Rd. colvillecornmaze.com (684-6751) INTERNATIONAL DAY OF PEACE CELEBRATION The community celebration includes a rededication of the peace pole, a presentation by Fifth District Congressional candidate Lisa Brown and a community lunch. Sept. 21, 12:05 pm. Free. Cheney Congregational Church, 423 N. Sixth St. (991-5117) THURSDAY EVENING SWING Event includes an intermediate lesson at 6:30 pm, a beginner lesson at 7:15 and social dancing from 8-10 pm. No partner or experience necessary. Runs through Nov. 17. $8/door or $50/10-week punchcard. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. 9th. strictlyswingspokane.com TITANOBOA: MONSTER SNAKE A Smithsonian exhibit featuring a fullscale model of this prehistoric snake, along with casts of the original fossil vertebrae and more. Through Nov. 26; open Tue-Sat, 10 am-5 pm; Sun 11 am-5 pm. $8/admission. Mobius Science Center, 331 N. Post. mobiusspokane.org BREWFTOP PARTY A gathering to introduce future leaders, supporters, and activists to the work of the Lands Council, with free beer, tacos and live music. Sep. 22, 5-8 pm. Saranac Rooftop, 25 W. Main. bit.ly/2wELmXq (209-2407) JUST BETWEEN FRIENDS FALL/WINTER EVENT A consignment sale offering clothes for infants, juniors, maternity, along with shoes, baby gear, toys, books, games and more. Sept. 22-24; Fri 9 am-8 pm, Sat 9 am-4 pm and Sun 8 am-1 pm. $5/Fri-Sat; free/Sun. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. spokane.jbfsale.com HERITAGE GARDENS TOURS A guided

tour of the gardens, restored in 2007 to look as they did when in use in 1915. Sept. 24, 11 am-noon; also offered during Art in Bloom, Sept. 22-23, at 1 and 3 pm. Free. Moore-Turner Heritage Gardens, 507 W. 7th. heritagegardens.org SOUTHEAST SPOKANE COUNTY FAIR The 74th annual small town community fair features exhibits, animals, food, a fireman’s breakfast, entertainment, a parade, fun run, vendors and more. Sept. 22, noon-9 pm; Sept. 23, 9 am-9 pm; Sept. 24, noon-6 pm. Free. Rockford, Wash. sespokanecountyfair.com CHILDREN’S RENAISSANCE FAIRE The Friends of Manito presents this cultural family experience with storytelling, face painting, balloon animals, games and more. On the lawn east of Duncan Gardens. Sep. 23, 11 am-2 pm. Free. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. thefriendsofmanito.org GHOST HUNT & WALK Join Ghostologist and storyteller Chet Caskey for a stroll from the Corbin mansion, through the Moore-Turner Gardens and on to the Undercliff Mansion for tales of murder, intrigue and paranormal disturbances. Ages 12+. Sept. 23, from 8-10 pm. $17. Corbin Art Center, 507 W. 7th. spokaneparks.org JUNIOR LEAGUE OF SPOKANE’S TOUCH-A-TRUCK EVENT Kids are allowed to touch their favorite service vehicles, get behind the wheel, and meet the people who help to build, protect, and serve our community. Sep. 23, 9 am-2 pm. $5/child; $20/family. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. bit.ly/2i6rc2v A CALL FOR HOUSING JUSTICE: RALLY & MARCH PJALS organizes a rally in front of Cathy McMorris Rodgers’ downtown Spokane office (10 N. Post) to protest the proposed Trump/Pence/ Republican budget, which will affect a variety of programs in Spokane. Participants will then march to City Hall to “Rally against the Rocks” and join the City Council’s forum on homelessness. Sep. 25, 4:30 pm. Free. pjals.org CITY OF SPOKANE FORUM ON HOMELESSNESS A public forum hosted by the Spokane City Council, details TBA. Sept. 25, 6-10 pm. Free. Spokane City Hall, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. bit. ly/2xXTK14 (755-2489) NATIONAL VOTER REGISTRATION DAY The Spokane Public Library, in partnership with several local organizations, celebrates National Voter Registration Day with focused, nonpartisan voter registration efforts and related publicity campaigns. Sessions at all Spokane library branches, times vary; see website for specific details. Sept. 26. spokanelibrary.org SPOKANE’S MID-CENTURY MODERN LEGACY A presentation to the public on the city/county’s Mid-Century Spokane Survey & Inventory project. More details at midcenturyspokane.org. Sep. 26, 3-4:30 pm. Free. Washington Cracker Co. Building, 304 W. Pacific. bit. ly/2gHQHTT GSI ANNUAL MEETING 2017’s keynote speaker is Bruce Katz, Centennial Scholar at the Brookings Institution and co-author of “The Metropolitan Revolution,” which argues that cities have become the vanguard of policy innovation and problem-solving in the U.S. and the world. Sept. 27, 11:30 am-1:30 pm. $55/$75. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. greaterspokane.org

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Hot Off the Press

A press, applying heat and pressure, produces a concentrate without solvents.

A new Spokane-based manufacturing business wants to change how cannabis is processed BY TUCK CLARRY

I

n an unassuming office building, stashed away on Market Street in North Spokane, a new company is taking root. Sesh-Technologies Manufacturing (STM) — headquartered in Spokane, with a second location in Denver — is making its mark on the cannabis technology market, offering a commercial-grade “rosin” press that extracts cannabis concentrates simply through heat and pressure. The resulting “rosin” is a sappy oil, secreted from flowers, hash and/or kief, that can be smoked or used in a dabbing rig. STM engineer Jason Dueweke calls it the cousin of butane hash oil (BHO) and CO2. But unlike BHO or CO2 oils, there are zero foreign substances — like butane or propane — used in the extraction process. “You shouldn’t be using anything that you’re going to come in contact with or ingest with that,” Dueweke says.

A proper rosin pressing will be able to extract the oil from the plant at specific heat levels and weighted pressure that retains the terpene values — which give a strain its aroma and flavor. “The rosin press has been around for awhile,” says Erik Blackerby, STM director and chief technology officer. “A lot of them are just imported from China, or they’re something that some guy built from components from a hardware store. They’re very crude; they don’t have even heat or pressure. We wanted to address the need from this market, where you could get an actual commercial-grade machine and do high-volume production and processing that is consistent.” Dueweke says that Colorado’s Marijuana Enforcement Department is in the preliminary stages of using STM’s 4.0 Rosin Press as a benchmark for future

processing technologies. STM prides itself on its press’ food manufacturing compliances, as well as its OSHAlevel safety features. The company even offers a mobile processing service for farms. The press is part of STM’s Clean-Green Cannabis Initiative, a zero-waste line of equipment that helps farms utilize the entirety of their plant after the rosin oil is made, rather than losing the plant’s excess after secretion. They offer a machine called the “Pucker” that presses the flower into “pucks” (a major boon for high-volume processing on farms). And they’re set to release the Rocket Box, a pre-roll filler that will take what’s left of the pressed plant and make up to 453 cones of 1 or .5 grams. The Rocket Box will debut at November’s MJ Biz Con in Las Vegas, the country’s largest cannabis conference. n

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EVENTS | CALENDAR RACIAL INJUSTICE, HOUSING & SPOKANE HISTORY Local historian Logan Camporeale, M.A., gives a presentation on racial restrictive covenants in Spokane history. In Weyerhaeuser Hall, 107. Sep. 27, 7-8:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. whitworth.edu SPOKANE CONTRA DANCE The Spokane Folklore Society’s weekly dance, with music by the band Crooked Kilt, and caller Emily Faulkner. No experience necessary; beginner workshop at 7:15 pm. Sep. 27, 7:30-9:30 pm. $5/$7. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. womansclubspokane.org SPOKANE VALLEY LIBRARY PLANNING MEETING The city of Spokane Valley and Spokane County Library District host a free public workshop for residents of the city of Spokane Valley to hear about the proposed library project and provide their input. Sep. 28, 6-8 pm. Free. Spokane Valley City Hall, 10210 E. Sprague. (893-8200)

24 and Sep. 25. $13. fathomevents.com VAL KILMER LIVE: CINEMA TWAIN! Val Kilmer appears in person to introduce the screening of his one-man play about Mark Twain. After the 90-minute film, he conducts a Q&A with the audience. Sep. 24, 7:30 pm. $32-$75. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com TRAILS OF HOPE AND TERROR To mark Hispanic Heritage month author and screenwriter Dr. Miguel de la Torre shows his award-winning documentary detailing the struggles of people crossing the border. Q&A to follow. Sept. 25, 7-9 pm. Free and open to the public. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. whitworth.edu DR. JEKYLL & MR. HYDE The 1920 classic silent film is accompanied by an all-new original score by local composer Dylan Champagne, performed live by an eight-piece orchestra. Sep. 28, 6 pm. $10-$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org

FESTIVAL

FOOD

THE MAD HATTER VINTAGE FLEA MARKET A two-day shopping event at the hosting more than 30 curated vendors of vintage, antique and handmade goods. Also includes live music, food, art demos and more. Sept. 22, 4-9 pm and Sept. 23, 10 am-4 pm. $5 admission. Five Mile Grange, 3024 W. Strong Rd. junebug-design.com VALLEYFEST The annual community celebration features live family entertainment, a parde, booths, vendors, a pancake breakfast, car show, duathlon, fun run, family bike ride and more. Sept. 22-24. Free. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. valleyfest.org (922-3299) BLUES & BREWS FESTIVAL This third annual festival features live music from Tuck Foster & The Tumbling Dice, Deepforest Project and Steve Starkey. Also enjoy craft beers on tap by the Steam Plant and other local breweries, along with local food trucks. Sep. 23, 1-7 pm. Free. Steam Plant Square, 159 S. Lincoln St. bit.ly/2gPRGF2

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58 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

ROOTED IN PEACE In celebration of the upcoming International Day of Peace, the theater screens Greg Reitman’s globally transformative, socially-conscious, environmentally-based film. Sep. 21, 7 pm. $6-$11. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org Z NATION: BEHIND THE CAMERA During summer 2017, the MAC became a working TV studio and a celebration of the dozens of local artists behind the hit Syfy series Z Nation. The exhibit features props, costumes and other items used in the show. Through Sept. 24; Tue-Sun, 10 am-5 pm. $5-$10/admission. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org THE BLUES BROTHERS A screening of the classic comedy as part of the Garland’s Midnight Movie series. Sep. 23, 11:59 pm. $5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com STUDIO GHIBLI FEST: NAUSICAÄ OF THE VALLEY OF THE WIND The debut film from Hayao Miyazaki is considered by many to be his masterwork. Sept. 24 (dubbed) at 12:55 pm and Sept. 25 (subtitles) at 7 pm. At Regal Cinemas Northtown and Riverstone (CdA). Sep.

HOPTOBERFEST The annual festival in celebration of fresh hop season, with special beers, food, and more. Sept. 2122. Perry Street Brewing, 1025 S. Perry St. bit.ly/2xbJVAz (509-279-2820) SOUPTEMBER Sample soups from Sandpoint-area restaurants during this annual fundraiser. Tickets include soup tasting, rolls and dessert; event also includes live/silent auctions and raffle. Benefits the Sandpoint Community Resource Center, a nonprofit connecting those in need with those who serve. Sep. 21, 5-7 pm. $10. Farmin Park, 3rd and Main. SandpointCommunityResource.com THURSDAY NIGHT THROWDOWN NW A regional latte art competition organized by Espresso Parts and hosted at Indaba. Includes giveaways and other prizes from sponsors. Sep. 21, 7-9 pm. Free/spectators; $5/competitors. Indaba, 1425 W. Broadway. bit. ly/2jHXWjm COEUR D’ALENE OKTOBERFEST The 8th annual fall beer festival features live bands, 30+ beers and ciders on tap, three beer gardens and tasting throughout downtown CdA. Sept. 22, 4-9 pm and Sept. 23, noon-9 pm. $25$35. coeurdaleneoktoberfest.com HELIX WINES GRAND OPENING Celebrate the opening of the new tasting room for the Walla Walla-based winery in downtown Spokane with tastings and more. Helix Wines, 824 W. Sprague. (522-1994) INLAND NORTHWEST CRAFT BEER FEST The annual event features 40 craft breweries pouring more than 150 types of beer. Also features live music, food and baseball-themed fun. Sept. 22, 4-9 pm and Sept. 23, noon-7 pm. $20/$25. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. washingtonbeer.com VINO WINE TASTING Friday’s (Sept. 22) tasting highlights Pure Varietals, from 3-6:30 pm. On Saturday (Sept. 23), tasting theme is “The Art of the Blend,” from 2-4:30 pm. $10/tasting. Vino!, 222 S. Washington. (838-1229) MUSIC, MICROBREWS & BBQ Live music, local microbrews and all youcan-eat barbecue ($18), with beer from Ten Pin, and music from the Dimestore Prophets. Sep. 23, 5-9 pm. CdA Casino, 37914 S Hwy 95. cdacasino.com


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RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess LOATHE STORY

My boyfriend who dumped me says he wants to be friends (talk to me, see me sometimes), but I’m not ready for that because I’m still in love with him. A female co-worker said that if he can be friends, he was never in love with me to begin with — that if he’d really loved me, he’d hate me now. Is this true? —Feeling Worse According to your office Socrates, “How do I love thee? AMY ALKON Let me count the ways” should be answered with “I slashed your tires. I sprinkled a strong laxative in your latte. And I’m looking forward to chasing you down the street while waving highly realistic replicas of scary medieval weapons…” Romantic love actually comes in two flavors — “passionate” and “companionate” — explains social psychologist Elaine Hatfield. Passionate love is the initial “wildly emotional,” lusty kind that wanes over time. Companionate love, on the other hand, involves “friendly affection and deep attachment” — deep appreciation for who somebody is and what they do and believe in — and tends to have more staying power. The difference between the two is best illustrated in relation to what we’ll call “car trouble.” Passionate love is what leads to the physics problem of how to have sex in a Porsche in your driveway (because going inside and doing it in the foyer instead would take too long). Companionate love likewise gets two people working out a physics problem in a car; however, it’s trying to collectively muster the NASA-level intelligence required to install an infant car seat. Companionate love does sometimes lead to “I hate you! I hate you”-style loathing, but typically just when there’s been a betrayal. But sometimes what people call love is really an unhealthy dependency with sparkly hearts painted on it — one person using the other as a sort of human grout, to fill the empty spaces in themselves so they can take a shortcut to feeling whole. In this situation, “I’m nothing without you!” really does feel like the case, and who doesn’t hate a person who makes them feel like nothing? However, real love doesn’t suddenly curdle into hate. If the respect and the “wow, you’re an amazeballs person” and all the rest was there, that remains as a base — even when the relationship tanks. Even so, this doesn’t necessarily mean you should convert your ex into your BFF. What you should do with respect to your ex — now and in the future — is whatever works for you, when it works for you. This may mean never seeing or speaking to your ex again — despite any “love becomes hate!” urging from your co-worker that you owe him a scolding phone call: “If you’d ever really loved me, you’d want the best for me now — the best undetectable poison money can buy!”

PI IN THE FACE

Not to brag, but I’m a very intelligent woman with probably too many degrees. I’m always thrilled when a guy says he’s seeking “a smart woman.” However, a guy who initially said that just stopped dating me because he finds my intelligence “emasculating.” Do all men feel this way? Am I supposed to dumb it down to find a partner? —Smarts Men don’t mind being corrected by a woman if it’s “Oooh, yes…a little more to the right” — not “I think you meant ‘whom,’ but hey, no judgments.” The reality is, intellectually average women tend to have an easier time finding a partner. In research by social psychologist Lora E. Park, men imagining their hypothetical ideal partner expressed interest in a woman of high intelligence — even higher than their own. However, when they were in the same room with a woman and they were were told she scored far better on a math test (getting 90 percent correct versus their 60 percent), the men were less interested in exchanging contact info or planning a date with her. Park and her colleagues speculate — per research by evolutionary psychologists reflecting women’s preference for male partners who are higher-achieving than they are — that being intellectually “outperformed” by women leads men to experience “diminished feelings of masculinity.” (Understandable — as nothing quite ignites romance like needing to coax your date out from under the couch: “Why are you hiding? I promised not to hurt you with my mind!”) The answer for you, as a very smart woman, isn’t dumbing down; it’s being selective about the men you date (while recognizing that there are brainiacs working as, say, cabinetmakers). Assuming you aren’t chasing guys away by lording over them -- “Well, hello… intellectual earthworm!” -- it’s probably best to narrow your search parameters to the highly intelligent: men who won’t feel like their IQ test results, in comparison with yours, would read something like “Water every other day, and place in indirect sunlight.” n ©2017, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

60 INLANDER SEPTEMBER 21, 2017

EVENTS | CALENDAR TANTALIZING TERROIR Mont Lamm welcomes back Chef LJ Klink for a fourcourse farm-to-table experience featuring wine from Shannon Faye Winery and live music by Just Plain Darin. Sep. 24, 4:30-7:30 pm. $55/adults; $25/children. Mont Lamm Events, 7501 Enoch Rd. montlammevents.com (276-7636) COOKING CLASS: FALLING FOR SQUASH In this hands on cooking class, learn recipes using acorn squash, zucchini, spaghetti squash, basil, tomatoes, apples and more. Sep. 25, 5:30-7:30 pm. $30. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front. secondharvestkitchen.org DINNER UNDER THE STARS A fivecourse dinner featuring beer from Ordnance Brewing. Sep. 25, 6-9 pm. $80. Prohibition Gastropub, 1914 N. Monroe. (509-474-9040) THE ETHICS OF EATING MEAT ON A SMALL PLANET Join a conversation with philosopher Brian G. Henning exploring the costs of and possible alternatives to industrial livestock production. Sep. 25, 6 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. humanities.org

type including a night ride, ladies day, kids races, downhill race and more. Sept. 22-24. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. silvermt.com COEUR D’FONDO The annual bike ride benefiting the North Idaho Centennial Trail showcases the forest, roads and scenery along Idaho’s Scenic Byway, Highway 97, before finishing back in CdA. Sep. 23. $25-$90. cdagranfondo.com HAPPY GIRLS RUN SPOKANE The popular women’s race series offers a course of varied terrain, pre- and postrace yoga, music and race swag bags. Includes 5K, 10K and half-marathon distances. Starts/ends at SFCC. Sep. 23. $30-$90. happygirlsrunspokane.com

THEATER

OPERA CDA & SPOKANE SYMPHONY PRESENT: CARMEN The full opera in a semi-staged production, with Metropolitan Opera star Sandy Piques Eddy in the title role. Sept. 22-23 at 8 pm. $25-$104. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) THE HISTORY OF COUNTRY MUSIC Live concert featuring country music from the genre’s first 50 years, performed by the Spokane River Band and special guests. Sept. 23, 6-9 pm. $12. Newman Lake Grange, 25025 E. Heather Ln. CountryHistoryShow.com SPOKANE JAZZ ORCHESTRA The first concert of the 2018-17 season features guest jazz vocalist Dee Daniels, and is titled “A Swingin’ Good Time.” Sep. 23, 7:30 pm. $17-$27. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. spokanejazz.org WASHINGTON IDAHO SYMPHONY: BRAHMS & RACHMANINOFF The first concert of the 2017-18 includes Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 2, featuring Rajung Yang on piano; along with Brahms’ Symphony No. 3. Sept. 23, 7:30 pm. $10-$25. Pullman High School, 510 NW Greyhound Way. (332-1551) GEORGE WINSTON The renowned pianist returns to the Cutter. Add dinner (4:30; reservations required) before the show for $12. Sept. 24, 4 pm. $25. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St, Metaline Falls. cuttertheatre.com (509-446-4108) SPOKANE STRING QUARTET The quartet opens its 39th season with a look at three eras of chamber music. Sept. 24, 3 pm. $12-$20. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanestringquartet.org SPOKANE SYMPHONY CHAMBER SOIREE The Symphony’s annual, three-concert series presents a mix of baroque, classical and contemporary music, performed by various ensembles from the Symphony. Sept. 26-27 at 7:30 pm. $50-$140. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post. spokanesymphony.org

SISTER ACT A production of the beloved musical. Through Oct. 8; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $23-$25. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. lakecityplayhouse.org (208-673-7529) 71ST ANNIVERSARY GALA: WEST SIDE STORY The Civic’s gala to kick off the 71st season, with opening night of “West Side Story,” and a pre-show social hour at 5, with dinner at 6 pm. Sept. 22. $75, or $40 with season subscription. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. bit.ly/Civic71Gala ACADEMIA NUTS Chaos is created by the manuscript hunting rivals of this New England-set comedy. Sept. 22Oct. 8; Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. Also Oct. 8 at 6 pm (dinner theater; $30). $5-$12. StageWest Community Theatre, 639 Elm St., Cheney. (768-4792) A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR’S COURT A local production by Old Orchard Theater, with proceeds supporting the Green Bluff Grange scholarship fund. Sept. 22-Oct. 1, times TBA. $10. Green Bluff Grange, 9809 Green Bluff Rd. oldorchardtheatre.com CYRANO The most legendary nose in literature gets a makeover with this lively American adaptation. Through Sept. 24, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third. spokanestageleft.org THE MIRACLE WORKER Expressed through memories, this play portrays the moving relationship of Helen Keller and her teacher Annie Sullivan. Sept. 22-23 and 28-30 at 7:30 pm. $12-$20. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N. Grand Ave. rtoptheatre.org (334-0750) RIPCORD The 2015 play by Pulitzer winner David Lindsay Abaire. Through Oct. 1; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $12$15. Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway. igniteonbroadway.org WEST SIDE STORY Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet is transported to NYC in the turbulent ’50s as two young, idealistic lovers find themselves caught between warring street gangs. Sept. 22Oct. 15, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $30-$32. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. spokanecivictheatre.com WILD KRATTS - LIVE! The popular PBS KIDS show comes to the live stage. Sept. 24 at 1 [sold out] and 4:30 pm. Sep. 24, 1-4 & 4:30-7 pm. $35-$45; $100/VIP. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com

OUTDOORS

VISUAL ARTS

MUSIC

SILVEROXX MOUNTAIN BIKE FEST A three-day celebration of two-wheel, off-road fun, with events for every rider

EYE CONTACT A one-night exhibit featuring art by homeless women and children in our community, hosted by

Volunteers of America. Sep. 21, 6-9 pm. $40-$50. Washington Cracker Co. Building, 304 W. Pacific. voaspokane. org/eye-contact DEBBIE MCCULLEY: FOOD FOR THOUGHT Quirky and whimsical paintings by the Spokane artist. Also see the opening of the gallery’s new “Treasure Room” featuring art by Bobbi Dupre. Sept. 22-Oct. 6; receptions Sept. 23, noon-4 pm and Oct. 6, 5-9 pm. New Moon Art Gallery, 1326 E. Sprague, Ste. B. newmoonartgallery.com

WORDS

PIVOT STORY SLAM: SCHOOL DAYS The live, local storytelling series invites community members to tell a true story from their own lives (up to 5 min.) in front of an audience. Sept. 21, 7-9 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (279-0299) READING: EOWYN IVEY The author discusses her new novel, “To the Bright Edge of the World,” a tale of discovery, adventure, love, and survival. Sep. 21, 7:30 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main. bookpeopleofmoscow.com READING: ELLEN “ALOHA” WILLIAMS + STEVE MURPHY Williams she pirouettes, leaps, and dances her way through Asia and the Pacific in her new book “Dancing with Chopsticks.” Meanwhile, “On the Edge” details the autobiography of a young Murphy hoping to find himself as he travels through some of the most formative decades in U.S. history. Sep. 21, 7-8 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com READING: RODNEY FREY The U of I professor of ethnography shares his personal experiences and insights about the power and value of storytelling during a reading of his new book “Carry Forth the Stories: An Ethnographer’s Journey into Native Oral Tradition.” Sept. 21, 7 pm. Free. University of Idaho (Library), 709 S Deakin St. uidaho.edu (208-885-6534) READING: EOWYN IVEY The author is on tour for her paperback edition of “To the Bright Edge of the World.” Sept. 22, 7-8 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com SPR PRESENTS: TOM ASHBROOK The host of NPR’s “On Point” comes to Spokane to tape an upcoming program as part of his “Listening To America Tour.” Sept. 22, 7:30 pm. $27 (sold out). Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. spokanepublicradio.org THE GREAT GATSBY: F. SCOTT FITZGERALD’S MASTERPIECE Film and literature scholar Lance Rhoades shares the story of the life of Fitzgerald and the legacy, including cinematic adaptations, of The Great Gatsby. Sep. 23, 3 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org READING: DAVID LEONARD “Playing While White: Privilege and Power On and Off the Field” argues that whiteness matters in sports culture, both on and off the field. Sept. 23, 7-8 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (509-838-0206) TAROT TIME: A BOOK PROJECT WITH ELISSA BALL In this creative writing class, learn how the Tarot tradition shares similarities with poetry and creative writing. Sept. 26, 7-9 pm. $10. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (279-0299) n


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Laugh It Up Jay Mohr brings a range of experiences to the stand-up stage BY DAN NAILEN

J

ay Mohr started doing stand-up in New Jersey as a 16-year-old, so it makes sense that he’ll be headlining the Spokane Comedy Club on Monday night. What makes little sense is the circuitous route Mohr’s career has taken in the intervening years. In between delivering jokes and excellent impressions in theaters and comedy clubs virtually nonstop, Mohr. now 47, has created one of the more expansive entertainment careers you’ll ever hear about. To wit:  He successfully auditioned for Saturday Night Live and was in the cast from 1993 to 1995. He was largely forgettable, save for a mean Christopher Walken impression.  His first major movie role was a doozy, playing skeezy sports agent Bob Sugar opposite Tom Cruise and Renée Zellweger in 1996’s Jerry Maguire. A year later, he played a romantic lead opposite Jennifer Aniston in Picture Perfect.  In 2004, he wrote a best-selling memoir about his battles with panic attacks and depression while on SNL called Gasping for Airtime: Two Years in the Trenches of Saturday Night Live.  He’s starred in numerous TV shows. The best of the lot, Action, was a short-lived Fox series skewering the movie biz. The most successful was Last Comic Standing, a show he created and hosted through its early years, earning a Primetime Emmy nomination.  Mohr’s entertaining guest spots on sports talk radio, the Jim Rome Show in particular, led to him getting his own nationally syndicated show, Jay Mohr Sports, that ran on Fox Radio from 2013 until early this year. He continues to host a weekly talk-show podcast, Mohr Stories, numbering more than 400 episodes to date, in which he chats up entertainers, comedians and sports figures.  Most recently, Mohr is executive producer of a documentary called Finding Joseph I, exploring the failing mental health of legendary punk frontman Paul “HR” Hudson, aka Joseph I, from the band Bad Brains. The movie will be released nationally Nov. 3. Through all those projects, Mohr has continued performing live throughout the country, and he’ll do just that for one show only in Spokane on Monday night. n Jay Mohr • Mon, Sept. 25 at 8 pm • $22/$30 • 21+ • Spokane Comedy Club • 315 W. Sprague • spokanecomedyclub.com • 318-9998

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