Inlander 08/31/2017

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AUG. 31-SEPT. 6, 2017 | LOCAL AND NATIONAL NEWS AT INLANDER.COM

SEEING RED KAY O’ROURKE’S ARTWORK GETS POLITICAL PAGE 29

SCHOOL OF HARD KNOCKS FROM PRISON TO THE CONSTRUCTION SITE PAGE 13

GOOD TIME: ONE OF THE YEAR’S BEST BAD DECISIONS PRODUCE GREAT CINEMA PAGE 37

COLLEGE FOOTBALL 2017

SIZING UP the Inland Northwest’s pass-happy teams PAGE 20

EWU QB Gage Gubrud


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INSIDE VOL. 24, NO. 46 | ON THE COVER: YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

COMMENT 5 NEWS 13 COVER STORY 20 CULTURE 29

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EDITOR’S NOTE

Y

ou can feel it. Even with lingering days of 90-degree weather, fall is coming. Labor Day tells us that. So does Pig Out in the Park (see pages 41 and 44 for details). And, of course, there’s COLLEGE FOOTBALL. Say what you will about sports, but they remain one of the few arenas where people actually invent ways to challenge themselves. This year at Eastern Washington, that challenge falls to a new head coach who faces sky-high expectations. At Idaho, meanwhile, the storyline is a little different — the university is set to become the first school in NCAA history to drop down from the top level of athletic competition — but fans have a hot QB in Matt Linehan to root for. At WSU, there’s head coach Mike Leach, who keeps things interesting, on and off the field. Our complete coverage, including a look at the Whitworth Pirates, begins on page 20. — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634

FOOTBALL SEASON IS NEARLY HERE: DO YOU HAVE ANY GAME-DAY RITUALS?

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DENISE STETTLER Yes; it actually annoys some people. I yell, “Hey, batter batter!” to throw off the other team, but people are always like, “Hey, this is a football game.”

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COMMENT | IN MEMORIAM

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F

ormer Idaho Governor Cecil D. Andrus has slipped away and out of our lives, passing away last Thursday at his home in Boise, one day short of his 86th birthday. He was the last of the Democratic Party giants who Idaho produced in the 20th century. His departure leaves a gaping hole in the fabric of the state’s civic culture and Democratic Party, and in our hearts. Cece — everyone called him Cece — had a big heart, big enough to hold thousands of Idahoans. He remembered the name of every person he ever met, and forever after, he remembered what mark that person left on his — Andrus’ — view of the best of all possible worlds. In that same massive memory, he also silently stored flaws and disagreements and funny stories. He didn’t carry a grudge, but he never forgot a misstep.

C

ece was a born leader and a natural politician, in the kinder sense of the word. He cared about people — individuals — which is why he remembered them. Cece and his wife Carol, a lifelong devoted team, moved from Oregon to tiny Orofino in North Idaho after Cece’s service in the U.S. Navy during the Korean War. He was only 29 years old when he was elected to a seat in the Idaho Senate. In his years in the Senate, Andrus and his fellow senators were almost evenly split between Republicans and Democrats, with Republicans holding the edge. Forced by numbers to work together, legislators made legendary strides — they passed a 3 percent sales tax to fund public schools, started the state park system, created the water resource board, and reorganized the state’s election system to include a primary vote. After his first two terms in the state senate, Andrus was encouraged to run for governor. It was on that 1966 campaign trail that I first observed Cecil Andrus in action. I have a vivid memory of the young Andrus, speaking with fire in his voice, his face turning reddish in excitement. I instantly understood that he was energized by the responsiveness of the crowd. He was in his element. And it was ever so. Cecil Andrus loved crowds, and crowds loved him. He didn’t take up all the oxygen in a room — he received and radiated energy back, making a roomful of people smile, laugh, think, appreciate and clap happily. He didn’t win that first gubernatorial race, but he bounced back to win handily in 1970 on a platform of saving the White Clouds and Chamberlain Basin from being mined for their molybdenum, a mineral that’s hard to spell, and to consider significant. Recent Congressional designation of White Clouds as a wilderness area finally vindicated Andrus’ vision, 45 years later. Two years into his second term, Gov. Andrus was tapped by President Jimmy Carter to serve as Secretary of the Interior. His signature achievement in that role was the establishment of the

Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, with its more than 19 million acres under federal protection. Glorious pictures of Alaska’s frozen beauty were hung with pride on the walls of his offices. The headline in last Friday’s New York Times obituary named Andrus “Carter’s Preservationist Interior Secretary.” Secretary Andrus would have been horrified. He rejected all labels — “environmentalist” or “tree-hugger,” and certainly “preservationist.” As Interior Secretary and Idaho governor, Andrus maintained that the environment and the economy were not an either-or proposition. He believed that good practices in the forests or on the land would not compete, but would be mutually beneficial. All his life, Cecil Andrus cared about the great outdoors. He fished the streams, he hunted deer and elk, he rode horses and mules. He had hunting and fishing buddies, whom he listened to all their lives. He was a man’s man, who valued friendship, trust and loyalty. Never sold on the games and gossip of Washington, D.C., Cece and Carol returned to private life in Boise in 1981. The New York Times repeated his classic statement: “The only reason so many people live on the East Coast is that they don’t know any better.”

B

ack on the ballot in 1986, Cece once again became Gov. Andrus. As governor, Andrus was a natural. He understood executive power and exercised it with diligence and ease. He understood budgets and their significance in the public arena. He understood the importance of good staff and treating them respectfully. Early in his career, he recruited a passel of bright, young college graduates, who remained as close as family members over the course of his lifetime. Gov. Andrus was a centrist, which is where most of the people usually are. I was a little left of center in the Boise Statehouse and wasn’t always on his A-list, but time healed all differences. Gov. Andrus was strong and tough and fair. Lots of stories have circulated about individuals calling on him and asking for help. The governor kept lists of people who had supported him and lists of people who had supported his opponents, and he took some glee in pointing out when a suppliant had not been on his side. Gov. Andrus stood up to the National Rifle Association and refused to be bullied by the gun lobby. He was adamant in efforts to keep additional nuclear waste from being buried in Idaho. The Andrus appeal to Idahoans of all political persuasions was his independence, his authenticity, his willingness to look at both sides, and his ability to bring opposing parties together. We need more just like him. n


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COMMENT | GUEST EDITORIAL We need to stand up to these overt behaviors in our efforts to combat racism in our culture. That is imperative. To rid our society of discrimination and hate, we cannot only denounce these fringe terrorists. As a culture, we need to flush out our tolerance of intolerance. I would like to invite my fellow Inland Northwestern white folks, especially the men, to reflect on what you are doing to combat racism. It is everywhere. If we fail to address its presence around us, it will continue to flourish. For the dream of a country that treats all people equally to come true, we have to do the work to make it happen. Our system was designed to give white people an advantage. Unless we use that privilege to fight for justice, hate will win.

Our system was designed to give white people an advantage.

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

We Can’t Tolerate Intolerance White people need to actively fight racism, or we will allow hate to win BY JACE BYLENGA

T

hose who know me might expect this piece to be about the environment, as I have been an avid environmental advocate for my entire professional life. I have fought for a beautiful, natural world that will sustain the health of all of humanity, and will continue to do so.

But right now, we need to talk about racism. I love you all, but we have a problem: People of color are under constant attack in the United States. This country was built upon the exploitations of peoples and lands, with countless, horrifying acts of racism occurring up to the present day. The tragic events in Charlottesville, Virginia — and the response of the President of the United States, who sympathized with hate groups — is just one example.

Microaggressions are indirect, subtle or unintentional acts of discrimination toward marginalized groups of people. These behaviors have been normalized in our culture, even in so-called progressive spaces within our own community. The huge negative impacts on the people of color they are aimed at are easily overlooked by the white people around them. A racist joke that went unobjected to, an assumption about someone based on a racial stereotype, asking a person of color to speak on behalf of their whole race, and on and on. We can do better, and we need to do better. We owe it to our brothers and sisters of color. It is up to us to make these behaviors unacceptable and inappropriate. Let’s get empathetic! Can we imagine what it would be like to deal with oppression and microaggressions many times every day? Hopefully then, we can begin to understand the barriers others face. Do the people of color around you feel safe? Do they feel like they are treated equally? We must understand and feel this pain in order to move toward fixing its causes. Educate yourselves about the foundational role that racism has played in the U.S. and abroad. There are a multitude of resources online, and in books. Check them out. Discuss them with your friends and family. This is our work to do. We need to change our hearts and minds, and it doesn’t get much harder than that. Be brave, and expect to make mistakes. Be patient. Listen more, talk less. Be persistent. Let’s build the society we hope for. n Jace Bylenga is an activist, community organizer and educator. Born in western Michigan, he has lived and worked in the Inland Northwest for 10 years, focusing on the environment, energy and social justice.

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

SPOKANE CAN, AND SHOULD, PROTECT RENTERS hen I first moved to Spokane a year and a half ago, I signed a lease

W

with one of the area’s largest property management companies. I was absolutely elated to move into my high-ceilinged, naturally lit Browne’s Addition apartment. Six months into my year-long lease I was notified, along with the single mothers and retirees who occupied the building, that we had 120 days to vacate, as the owner planned to turn the century-old mansion into condos. And it was LETTERS legal. Send comments to I’ve moved twice since then due editor@inlander.com. to other renter’s woes and despite what you’ve heard about millennials, I do not enjoy the instability. As Daniel Walters pointed out (“Out of Rooms,” 8/17/17), the scales have been tipped in the landlord’s favor. Yes, this trend ebbs and flows like any market, but why are there such heavy ramifications for renters who break leases but not for landlords? Spokane ought to adopt policies that force landlords to honor their contracts and protect renters. Pay moving costs, or three months rent, or present available options for replacements. The market is certainly weighted against renters in Spokane, but so are the regulations. CLAIRE MILLER Spokane, Wash.

HANK WILLIAMS JR SEP 15 WITH THE CADILLAC THREE

INDOOR SHOWS Sheriff Knezovich

Readers respond to our blog post (8/25/17) about Spokane Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich saying he’d like the government to stop taking away driver’s licenses for failure to pay fees:

DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

JESSICA TURNER: My dad always told me this was the path to keep minor criminals committing crimes, possibly in perpetuity (and the working poor, poorer still). KIM LAMORA: I agree. Taking away a person’s driver’s license and with it access to most employment options because they don’t have enough money is counterproductive to the entire community, not just the individuals stripped of their licenses. KARIN MORRIS: Anyone driving needs to have valid insurance and pay car tab fees too. If not — then find another way to get to work/ school/store/around town. Live near a bus line, call a friend, Uber, walk, ride a bike, etc. People should have to pay their fines, even if it’s $10 a month or whatever they can pay. Sorry. That teaches them nothing if they are let off the hook. n

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Todd Wright, a graduate of a trades program, says the classes changed his life.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

JOBS

REBUILDING LIVES A city-funded program trains former prisoners and others in the construction trades, precisely when contractors need more employees BY DANIEL WALTERS

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hen Jason Jones first heard about the program, he was still behind bars, in prison for a drug offense. That’s when he got the call from local pastor Shon Davis that changed everything. Davis told him about classes that over the course of six weeks would hand him the tools, training and connections to get him a job in the construction industry. The last time Jones had held a job — a real job — was working in a movie theater back in high school. He’s 46 now. “I was in class [in] April,” Jones says. “I was at work by June.” Since April, the Inland Northwest Associated General Contractors, thanks to federal grant funding distributed by the city of Spokane, have been conducting Head Start to the Construction Trades training classes. Todd Wright, who also has a felony on his record, says he was at a state office renewing his food card when the woman helping him told him about the class. “She pointed up at the flyer on the cubicle wall,” Wright says. “That was it. It changed my life.” Last week, with a tape measure holstered under his mud-splotched, black T-shirt, Jones is hooking a long blue chain between the tines of a backhoe and a massive concrete cone. He and Wright are working for T. LaRiv-

iere Equipment & Excavation, installing a catch basin under a street near the Northeast Community Center. “Yeah, we work hard and we’re in the dirt all day. But we both make, like, 30 bucks an hour,” Wright says. “Bottom line is that that class brought Jason and I to where we are at now. And where we are at now is a pretty damn good spot.” The AGC classes aim to tackle two problems at once. The first problem: A person’s past can doom their future. It can be hard to get a job with a criminal record, or not much of a résumé. And if you can’t get a job, it’s easy to slip back into destructive habits. “They’re not going to keep walking the straight and narrow if … they can’t make enough money to assist their family the way they feel they should,” says Judith Gilmore, grant coordinator for AGC’s apprenticeship program. The second problem: The housing and apartment markets are booming right now, but because the recession hollowed out the construction industry, there simply aren’t enough workers for all the work available. Gilmore says that contractors have seen it firsthand. “It seemed like a perfect storm, when contractors were dropping to their knees and begging [AGC Director of Apprenticeship Mike Ankeny] for trained people,”

Gilmore says. “Particularly women and minorities.” Already, more than 30 people have found work through the Head Start to the Construction Trades program, and there are a lot more on the way. “Some have had substance abuse issues, and have lost jobs or have lost families,” Gilmore says. “Almost everybody who comes is on a second chance.”

FIXING THINGS

Danielle Rosenberg’s little brother watches from the audience as she’s handed her AGC training certificate and a tape measure during the Head Start to the Construction Trades graduation ceremony, last Thursday at the East Central Community Center. “I’ve had a pretty bad drug addiction since I was really young,” she says. That addiction, Rosenberg says, was why she lost her last job at an Old Country Buffet four years ago. She says she’s been clean for 14½ months, thanks to Washington state’s drug offender sentencing alternative program. But while celebrating her sobriety, she knows she needs to find work. That’s why she took six weeks of AGC training. “I’m going to need a job to able to do things, to have the things I need to support myself,” Rosenberg says. ...continued on next page

AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 13


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Todd Wright (right) helped Jason Jones learn construction skills during their trade classes.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“REBUILDING LIVES,” CONTINUED... “It’s giving me a fresh start. I’m learning all these skills.” Shawn Kingsbury, founder of Pura Vida Recovery and an instructor in the Head Start to the Construction Trades program, says the classes teach more than how to hammer a nail or use a saw. The mornings focus on fitness of the mind and body. Participants listen to a podcast about neuroscience and the power of positive thinking. They watch TED Talks. They do interval training and yoga. They work through the curriculum to understand the intellectual skills, like math and geometry, that construction requires. The afternoons are dedicated to hands-on practice. “Tools can be really intimidating,” Kingsbury says. “A Skil saw can be really intimidating. A Skil saw, to make a straight cut, it takes a lot of repetitions to learn.” He says he’ll take a 2-inch-by-6-inch board, draw 25 evenly spaced lines, and tell students to “make these 25 cuts.” “I have a hashtag called #10,000reps,” Kingsbury says. Practice, practice, and then practice again. The students work on actual construction projects. They’ve built a bunkhouse, built a juice bar, and they’ve rehabbed shelves and tables at Habitat for Humanity. Todd Wright and Jason Jones’ class went out to the Spokane County Raceway and built an observation tower, enabling officials to view

every part of the course. Wright, who has a construction background, took Jones under his wing, helping him learn the basics. The classes are free, but they aren’t easy. “They’re not getting paid for six weeks,” Kingsbury says. “They have to find a way to survive and show up to class.” Showing up is tougher than it might sound. Many of the participants don’t have valid driver’s licenses or access to a car. One man was an hour late to his first class. He’d gone to the Vets Garage — the location of the previous class, advertised on an old flyer. He didn’t have a car, but he didn’t give up, Gilmore says proudly. He persisted, walking more than three miles from the Vets Garage to the East Central Community Center. “If they need a bus pass, we’ll get them a bus pass,” Gilmore says. AGC works with the city prosecutor’s office and the Center for Justice to help those with a suspended driver’s license get on a payment plan to reactivate their licenses. Scott Foster, project manager for T. LaRiviere, looks out from his pickup truck, overseeing the construction site where Jones and Wright are working. All he has to do, he says, is just call AGC’s Ankeny when he’s looking for new laborers from the Head Start to the Construction Trades program. “I tell him what I’m looking for, what I need, and he tries to come up with a fit,” Foster says. “We’ve had about a 50 percent success rate, where they really, really like what they’re do-

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ing. Some of them, maybe they need to go back and learn some more.” Gilmore says that there are other programs that connect felons with jobs. But many of these train people for low-paid dishwashing jobs, or jobs in kitchens. A going-nowhere job often isn’t enough, says Layne Pavey, founder of I Did The Time, an advocacy group working to help former inmates transition back to society. “Being stuck working a low-income and minimum-wage job may be the thing that leads them back into addiction,” Pavey says. But the Head Start to the Construction Trades program, she says, helps people find what can be a career, one that provides a path for advancement, and a sense of satisfaction and pride. For Wright, who’d spent years working odd construction jobs under the table, it’s a welcome shift. “When you work under the table,” Wright says, “you get treated like you’re working under the table.”

COSTS AND BENEFITS

Five of these AGC construction training classes — including one to come next year — have been funded by $60,000 of federal Community Development Block Grant dollars from the city of Spokane. Two more classes, Gilmore says, have been funded by a nearly $18,000 grant from the Spokane nonprofit Women Helping Women. That has allowed AGC to fund a miniature training class for juveniles age 16 and 17, and an upcoming all-woman construction training class in September. And in October, drawing on city and county funding, AGC will be running a class inside prison. “This will be the first time this has ever been tried inside Geiger [Corrections Center],” Gilmore says. Gilmore hopes that the program can expand further. “I need to talk to you about some money,” Gilmore says to County Commissioner Josh Kerns after the Head Start to the Construction Trades graduation last Thursday. “It’s a small amount of money compared to what your budget deals with, but it’s amazing how we can stretch it like salt-water taffy. If we can get this many people training to work, I can’t see how anybody LETTERS loses on that.” Send comments to Right now, Head Start to editor@inlander.com. the Construction Trades generally serves only residents of the city of Spokane, part of the conditions of the grant funding. For residents outside of the city to be able to enroll in the program, she says, they need funding from the county. The county commissioners opted not to ask voters for a tax increase this year. Instead, they’re asking every department head to cut 7 percent across the board from their budgets. But Gilmore argues that the money the program is asking for is a drop in the bucket compared to the benefits it produces. “$100,000 a year,” she says, “seems like a pretty small amount of money to get 50 people working.” n danielw@inlander.com

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AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

PHOTO EYE RIP OUT AND RENOVATE

STUART DANFORD PHOTO

The skeleton of the former Macy’s building on Main Avenue in downtown Spokane is undergoing renovations. The building — renamed and rebranded “The M” — was purchased by the Cowles Company (which also owns the SpokesmanReview and the River Park Square shopping mall) and will include retail stores, office space and approximately 100 apartment units.

On Inlander.com

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412 W Hay cra f t Ave., Coeur d 'Al ene 208.277.00 0 0 | c o s m i c c o w b o y . c o m CONSTRUCTION Work has been halted on a new behavioral health building at Spokane’s Mann-Grandstaff Veterans Affairs Medical Center after crews discovered a vein of soil unlike the ground around it while excavating for the foundation. The planned two-story building is expected to house intensive outpatient MENTAL HEALTH services and educational space for medical residents who study through the VA. Because of the soil difference, more geotechnical research will be required before the work is resumed. For now, the site is exposed, and based on the results, the building may have to be redesigned to mitigate for the difference, says Bret Bowers, a spokesman for Mann-Grandstaff. “Delays in construction projects aren’t uncommon in the construction world,” Bowers says. “We didn’t foresee this, but we’re doing all we can to move past this setback and continue on.” (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

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EDUCATION Eastern Washington University has announced a collaboration with Microsoft on a DATA ANALYTICS DEGREE PROGRAM that the school says is unlike any other in the country. Starting this fall, EWU will begin offering courses from Microsoft’s data science program to seniors in the school’s College of Business and Public Administration. Students can earn a professional distinction certificate in data science from Microsoft, along with a Bachelor of Science in data analytics from EWU. Scott Gordon, EWU Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs, says that with data science being a growing field, this collaboration will better serve students. “Most decisions now rely on the ability to take big data and make sense out of them, and understand the science behind them,” he says. (WILSON CRISCIONE)


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RIM RIDE HOUSING The Spokane-based Supportive Services for Veteran Families program, which helps HOMELESS VETERANS and their families find housing, needs more landlords who would be willing to rent to their clients. Since October 2013, the program, run through Goodwill Industries of the Inland Northwest, has helped more than 1,200 veteran families access services and find housing. But at the same time as people across the board are having a harder time finding housing in an increasingly competitive rental market, service agencies are also having a hard time helping people find an affordable place to live. If you’re a landlord and want to learn more about helping, you can find more information at DiscoverGoodwill.org/rent-to-a-veteran. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

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YOUTH The persistent drips that have rained down from the roof of Spokane’s Excelsior Youth Center will finally be fixed, thanks to a $217,000 grant from the city. The youth center in northwest Spokane’s Indian Trail neighborhood, which specializes in treating foster kids with behavioral issues, has utilized strategically placed buckets to deal with its LEAKY ROOF for at least the past eight months. City staff visited the center and ultimately decided to award the money out of the Community Development Block Grant Program. Neighborhood councils also donated about $10,000 to Excelsior, according to a news release from the city. (MITCH RYALS)

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IMMIGRATION Ever since the city of Spokane passed a policy officially prohibiting city employees from asking about a person’s immigration status, critics have been trying to undo it. The latest attempt to reverse Spokane’s policy by initiative was tossed off the November ballot last Friday morning by Spokane County Superior Court Judge Julie McKay. Backers of the initiative, Proposition 1, repeatedly refer to Spokane as a “SANCTUARY CITY,” conflating our approach with much more radical policies in cities like San Francisco. On Inlander.com, we dive into the contradictory definitions of “sanctuary city.” Yes, the city of Spokane has a policy banning city employees from inquiring about immigration status. And yes, Spokane County, in an attempt to follow federal law, doesn’t accept detainer requests from U.S. Immigrations and Customs Enforcement without a warrant. But as far as the way President Trump uses the phrase “sanctuary city,” accusing local governments of actively constructing walls intended to block federal immigration actions? We’re not even close. (DANIEL WALTERS)

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NEWS | SOCIAL SERVICES

Blessings and Burdens Where Blessings Under the Bridge will serve those in need remains up in the air as the nonprofit’s eviction deadline nears BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

O

n one side of a chain-link fence, a line stretches around the block. People have been waiting for hours to get into the annual summer luau put on by Blessings Under the Bridge, a nonprofit that provides people in need with meals, pet food, groceries and other services. On the other side, smiling greeters stand, ready to hand each person a plastic lei. Pigs’ heads chomping down on apples decorate the first in a line of many platters holding the smorgasbord of meat, fruit, salads and cupcakes. But for many of the guests, the food isn’t the main motivation for weathering the late August heat under Interstate 90 in downtown Spokane. Instead, many are here for what’s waiting for them after dinner: clean socks and tampons, gently used shoes and clothes, school supplies and backpacks. Every Wednesday, Blessings serves meals to hundreds of people in need in this spot at Fourth and McClellan, but once in summer and once in winter, the organization puts on a massive event that’s like a “Wednesday night on steroids,” Blessings founder Jessica Kovac tells volunteers just before they open the gates at the Aug. 26 luau. Today there’s ice cream from Ben and Jerry’s, and the chance to get flu shots from Walgreens, and haircuts, and face painting and storytime. It’s all about making people feel loved. But it’s not clear how long the organization will be able to keep serving people under the freeway here. The city served Blessings with a 120-day eviction letter on May 12, which means they’ll need to find a new spot to serve meals by Sept. 9. Conversations with the city continue to be positive, and there’s a chance that Blessings might get a little more time to figure out its next move, but nothing’s certain yet. The organization has let the city know it wants to stay put.

“Working minimum wage is not enough, so you find help in any way you can,” Heather says. “[This event] means they can go back to school having pencils and papers and things they need.” In the line for clothing, Adare Mahan looks for some new shoes for her 3-year-old son Chad. The blond toddler tries on a few hats, arguing with mom when she wants him to take one that isn’t 10 sizes too big for his head. Near the entrance, Tara Johnson stands by as her 5-year-old daughter Ava hands out candy to guests as they come inside the fence. They started volunteering with Blessings over the summer after Ava said she wanted to go feed people who were living on the street, Tara says. “I was amazed how much they do every single week,” she says.

NOT US VS. THEM, BUT...

Complaints about the impacts of people living under the freeway throughout the week played a key part in the city’s decision to boot Blessings from the site. The property where the nonprofit serves is owned by the state, but rented to Blessings by the city. Spokane officials argue that leasing the space for the weekly event has given the appearance that this space is always open to the public when it’s not, making enforcement of city rules against loitering and trespassing difficult. A common thread among neighboring business owners, Lewis and Clark High School

“Working minimum wage is not enough, so you find help in any way you can.”

Don Sausser

SERVING NEEDS

Eckart Preu Music Director

M ARTIN WOLDSON THE ATER AT THE FOX

TICKE T S | 509 624 1200 | SpokaneSymphony.org 18 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017

At the front of the lunch line stands Vinny Ash. At 58, he’s been sleeping on the streets for about two years, and carries his belongings with him in a backpack and bucket. He’s looking forward to the food, and finding a sweater. “Or maybe a blanket,” he says. Around the corner, Heather Fowler has been waiting with her two 17-year-old sons, Michael Williams and Hunter Fowler, and her 4-year-old daughter, Brooklyn Fulkerson. The boys are headed into their senior year of high school, and Brooklyn is just about to start school. They moved here in March from California because the cost of living there was too high. Currently, they’re living in a basement they found on Craigslist.

officials, and Blessings volunteers is that everyone seems to hate that the discussion has been framed as an “us vs. them” situation in recent months. And most everyone who’s been a vocal opponent to the negative impacts of homelessness has also said they support the work that Blessings is doing. But that’s usually followed by a “but…” But... business owners shouldn’t have to ask their employees to clean up human feces and urine from the back of their buildings. But... students shouldn’t have to walk through a parking lot littered with used condoms and feminine hygiene products. People experiencing homelessness should receive services, but should be encouraged to do so at shelters. Blessings isn’t necessarily to blame for issues that occur the rest of the week, but their services do encourage people to hang around. Jim Redmon says he and his wife Laura, and their employees at Divine’s Auto Center and Towing on Third Avenue, have noticed a definite increase in problems in the past few years since Blessings started serving in that area.


“I think that they’re really trying to figure out where the impact is, and of course their feelings are that it’s not on them,” he says. “Of course there’s always been some homelessness and so forth, but we just haven’t seen it like it’s been in these three or four years.” More people are defecating behind their building, and recently they had a crew out to pump an antifreeze canister, but the workers refused to finish the job when they discovered that the bottom of the bin was filled with needles. “I think they’ve become enabling in a way, and I don’t think it’s the answer, I really don’t, not just because it’s the back of our building,” Redmon says. “I look at [Union Gospel Mission] and you have to make life choices to get a bed and get fed there.” Redmon and his employee Harry Jensen shared their concerns with Spokane City Council on Aug. 14. Jensen told the council that it’s not adequate for Blessings to say they can’t be held responsible for the actions that happen the rest of the week. “That’s kind of like me coming to your house and saying, ‘Yeah, I turned on the water, but then I left, so I’m not responsible for the flooding in the basement,” Jensen says. “That just doesn’t fly.”

Vinny Ash gets a plate at Saturday’s luau.

STUART DANFORD PHOTO

LC Principal Marybeth Smith also shared the school’s increasing struggles with the city council. In the past year, a teacher was robbed in the parking lot, a student was assaulted during lunchtime on campus, transient people twice overdosed on campus during the school day, and students were chased and menaced on campus at least three times, Smith told councilmembers. Even with security upgrades, including changes to landscaping, fencing, lighting and policing in the area, Smith says there are still people who are drawn to camp and hang out around the school. Ask any one of the people at a Blessings event if those things are issues, and they’ll agree with you, says Kelly Kiki, a high school teacher and coach at North Central High School and a Blessings spokesman. “Every issue that’s been brought up — those are real things and real concerns,” he says. “No one feels the pressure and struggle of this issue more than [founders] Jessica and Mike [Kovac]. It’s been their child for 10 years.” The organization has asked the city to consider adding an exemption to its “sit-lie” law to explicitly state that it doesn’t apply to people being served at events put on by nonprofits, but is enforceable outside of those hours. Guests have asked whether Blessings will keep serving them, and the answer has been an enthusiastic “Yes, we’re not leaving you,” says Kiki. “We’re going to continue to try to do what we do,” he says. “I think this is a chance to sit down with everyone and talk about what we can do differently. The homeless issue is part of that charge. Let’s do something different than any other city. Let’s be really deliberate in asking ‘What should we do?’” n samanthaw@inlander.com

AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 19


COLLEGE FOOTBALL PREVIEW

Best Foot

Eastern Washington’s new head coach knows that sky-high expectations now come with leading the Eagles BY DAN NAILEN

Forward ailure isn’t an option. Aaron Best knows that. Stepping into the Eastern Washington head football coach position after 16 years as an Eagles assistant and four years as an offensive lineman on the team, Best knows intimately how the program has gone from plucky upstart to powerhouse. Big Sky Conference championships are expected; they’ve won five since 2010. Football Championship Subdivision playoff trips are expected; they’ve made five since 2010. National championships are expected; they’ve won one (2010) and were one last-second Youngstown State touchdown away from returning to the championship game just eight months ago. “Is it harder to rebuild, or is it harder to stay on top of the mountain?” Best muses before a recent Eagles practice, considering the position he’s in at his first head coaching job. “Just because you’re not rebuilding doesn’t mean it’s a small task. When you’re following arguably the most successful coach in Eastern Washington history — with a lot of respect to a few of the coaches that came before Beau Baldwin — that’s a huge challenge in itself, because you’ve gotta keep them on top of the mountain.”

F

In many ways, the 39-year-old Tacoma native was born for this job leading young men onto the Inferno turf of EWU’s Roos Field. His path to the gig started as a player wanting to use his talent for blocking to get an education. And that path took him to Cheney. “My main focus was to come to Eastern and play at the highest level I was recruited at, and get my education degree,” Best says. “I wanted to be a high school educator, I wanted to teach PE and history. I got my teaching certificate and I wanted to be a high school coach.” He never got the chance, but he did have the choice. After earning his degree and starting a master’s program,

20 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017

Eastern’s offensive-line coach quit and Best was offered the job by former coach Paul Wulff. “I could follow my ambitions and do the high school thing, go back to the Westside and see a bunch of brake lights every day and a bunch of rain, as I was falling in love with the opportunity to coach the offensive line here,” Best says. “I was at a good crossroads, where I got to decide one or the other.” Taking the college-ball road led Best to becoming coach of an often-dominating offensive line, a group that has produced more than a dozen All-Americans during his time at the helm. The evolution from lineman to line coach to head coach is a common one, given linemen’s often-cerebral approach to an often-brutal game. “You tend to have a lot of personalities in the offensive-line room, but one thing that’s foundational in that room is they all want to know the ‘why,’” Best says. “So you tell them how to block this, you tell them how to protect that, you tell them where to go in certain situations, and they all end up saying, ‘Why?’ Then, after the ‘why,’ you have to answer the ‘how come?’” “When you get in front of an audience of 105 [as a head coach], it’s not like I’m audience-shy, because you’ve been in those situations. You get battle-tested in the offensive-line room, believe me. You need to be on your P’s and Q’s for sure.” When former coach Beau Baldwin left in January to become offensive coordinator at Cal, Best says the assistants on the team all had the same thought. “If our boss leaves, what’s the plan for us?” Within a few hours Best got his answer: He and defensive coordinator Jeff Schmedding were named co-interim coaches, allowing the Eagles to complete their recruiting period. ...continued on next page


Aaron Best is Eastern Washington’s 21st head football coach. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 21


COLLEGE FOOTBALL PREVIEW “BEST FOOT FORWARD,” CONTINUED... “It really was one of those situations where there wasn’t any practice or hours preparing,” Best says. “You get told your boss is leaving, then within six or eight hours you’re told you’re going to be co-head coach. It’s kind of like becoming a parent all of a sudden, but you don’t have the nine months to prepare. You’ve got one day.” After interviewing both interim candidates for the job, Best was named head coach on Jan. 21 and jumped right in. While his experience as an assistant helped the transition, Best says that becoming a head coach is one of those things you’re never truly prepared for. “I liken coaching, whatever level you’re coaching, to parenting,” Best says. “You can say you’re ready, you’ve been in the room, you have nieces and nephews, you think you’re ready. You’ve got enough money, you’ve got enough patience, you’ve got it all. Then all of the sudden — ‘Wah! Wah!’ It’s like, wait a minute, we didn’t practice this!”

“It’s kind of like becoming a parent all of a sudden.” The practice field is one place where players are noticing a difference between Best and former coach Baldwin. Junior linebacker Ketner Kupp says “the philosophy has been the same, but the approach is a little different. I wouldn’t say it’s ‘hard-nosed’ with Coach Best, but it’s definitely been a little more direct with him.” All-American quarterback Gage Gubrud says that when players first heard Baldwin was leaving, there was naturally talk about the team’s future. When Best was hired, though, life as an Eagles student-athlete went right back to feeling “normal.” “The practice style is a little different, we’re a little more up-tempo,” Gubrud says. “Coach Best is also around everything a little bit more. He’s around the defense, the special teams and offense about the same. Coach Baldwin was more of an offensive head coach. Coach Best, you see him kind of chiming in on everything.” That hands-on approach to the team should serve Best in maintaining the family vibe he’s always felt at Eastern — including starting his own family after marrying Kim Walker 10 years ago; the couple has three kids who’ve grown up in Cheney. When the Eagles travel to New York City to face Fordham next month, he’s going to get the players to Times Square and 9/11 Ground Zero, because “some of these kids will never be back there, so why not experience those things?” Juggling his role as leader of a football team and husband/father of a household is just one more new challenge for the Eags’ head coach. And while he’s seen mentors successfully navigate those roles, Best clearly has his priorities right as he enters season one: “I’m going to try and not allow my being a head coach be an excuse for why I can’t get home for dinner, or why I can’t be at certain events, because the last time I checked, I was a parent before I was a head coach.” n

22 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017

Gage Gubrud will try to follow up a record-setting season throwing to six new receivers.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

QB SPOTLIGHT

GAGE GUBRUD Is this the best college quarterback in the Northwest? BY DAN NAILEN he region is awash in awesome quarterback play. On the Palouse, both Washington State’s Luke Falk and Idaho’s Matt Linehan are building on monster junior years that came with NFL buzz. In Seattle, Jake Browning at Washington was the Pac-12 Offensive Player of the Year and led the Huskies to college football’s Final Four. He’s a pro prospect as well. Fans of those teams might not want to hear it — and probably won’t believe it — but Eastern Washington’s Gage Gubrud, our cover boy, might be better than all of them. Granting the fact that EWU’s weekly competition in the Football Championship Subdivision isn’t the same as those higher-division schools, there’s no denying that Gubrud’s first year under center for the Eagles resulted in an unparalleled dream season. As a sophomore, he set the FCS record for passing yards in a season (5,160 yards), threw for 48 touchdowns and also led the Eagles in running the ball with 606 yards and five more touchdowns. Oh, and he also led his team to a season-opening win against Falk and the Cougs in Pullman in his first start, announcing his arrival with 474 yards passing and five touchdowns, in addition to another 77 yards on the ground and a sixth TD.

T

Those are video-game stats for a guy who started the season as a relative unknown and ended it as the Big Sky’s co-MVP and a third-place finisher for FCS Player of the Year. While Gubrud acknowledges how special last season was, don’t expect him to dwell on it heading into 2017, with a new head coach in Aaron Best, as well as a new offensive coordinator and new receivers to break in. “I try not to think about that too much,” Gubrud says in a pre-practice interview. “I don’t worry about what happened last year because last year is in the past. It was awesome. It was a great year, and I’m looking forward to making this year even better. You’re not going to do that resting on past success.” It’s hard to imagine that Gubrud will repeat the insane statistics of his 2016 season, primarily because he lost three All-American wide receivers to graduation in Cooper Kupp, Kendrick Bourne and Shaq Hill; together they combined for more than 800 receptions, 12,000 yards and 132 touchdowns in their years together. But Gubrud does have six returning lettermen to catch the ball, and the Oregon native says he started throwing with them almost immediately after last season ended with a crushing last-second home loss to Youngstown State in the national semifinals.


EASTERN WASHINGTON EAGLES Coach: Aaron Best, first season (0-0)

2016 record: 8-0 Big Sky, 12-2 overall 2017 preseason predictions: 2nd in Big Sky coaches’ poll/2nd in Big Sky media poll The big story: Seasons don’t end much more cruelly than the Eagles’ 2016 run, when a last-second touchdown by Youngstown State cost Eastern a trip to the Football Championship Subdivision national championship game. That 40-38 loss, combined with the graduation of all-everything receiver Cooper Kupp and his NFL-bound running mate Kendrick Bourne, as well as the departure of longtime head coach Beau Baldwin for an offensive coordinator gig at Cal, made this offseason the most eventful in Cheney 2017 EAGLES SCHEDULE in recent memory. Sept. 2 at Texas Tech Here’s the thing, though: The Sept. 9 vs. North Dakota St. Eags aren’t likely to miss a beat Sept. 16 at Fordham in 2017. All-American quarterback Sept. 23 at Montana Gage Gubrud is back, and new Sept. 30 vs. Sacramento St. head coach Aaron Best has been a Oct. 7 at UC Davis presence at EWU for two decades, Oct. 14 vs. Montana St. as a player and assistant coach, Oct. 21 at Southern Utah giving the squad some continuity Nov. 4 vs. Weber St. in its leadership. The defense has Nov. 11 at North Dakota improved steadily the past couple of Nov. 18 vs. Portland St. years under defensive coordinator Jeff Schmedding, and new offensive coordinator Bodie Reeder will no doubt keep the pass-first focus the team had under Baldwin as he arrives at Eastern from throw-happy Oklahoma State, where he worked as quarterbacks coach. After bumping off Washington State in Pullman to open last season, the Eags have a chance to make a similar splash with a road trip to Lubbock, Texas, for a season-opening tilt against Texas Tech on Sept. 2. Throw in a trip to New York City a couple of weeks later, and these Eagles will be flying a lot early in the season. And their home opener, Sept. 9 against perpetual FCS powerhouse North Dakota State, means we’ll know a lot about how the team is adjusting to the post-Baldwin era before the Big Sky season even starts. The big game: Last year, EWU and North Dakota tied for the Big Sky championship with identical 8-0 conference records as the schedule kept them apart. That won’t happen this year, as the Eagles travel to Grand Forks for a showdown that should make one of them the Big Sky champs. (DAN NAILEN)

“Not just in spring ball and fall camp, it happened all in between,” Gubrud says. “I’d go out and throw with a bunch of the guys, get a feel for how they run routes, the different speeds of the receivers, their different body languages. Just getting a lot of reps.” Gubrud, a management major who loves watching NFL quarterbacks Aaron Rodgers and Marcus Mariota for inspiration, also knew he had to keep improving his own game to help keep the Eagles competitive in the Big Sky and vying for a national title. “The biggest thing for me was leadership,” Gubrud says of his offseason focus. “And then just working on your craft — footwork, accuracy, all the little things that make you a great quarterback. But the biggest thing for me is being a great leader, vocally especially. I’ve always been the kind of guy to lead by example, but I need to step into that vocal leadership and make sure I have a voice.” That voice comes through when he starts looking at the year ahead, and a schedule dotted with road-game challenges like Texas Tech and a trip to New York City to play Fordham, a home game against perennial FCS powerhouse North Dakota State, and the typically challenging Big Sky slate. “It excites me, honestly,” Gubrud says. “It’s a challenge. Those are good teams and they’re going to be tough road trips. But iron sharpens iron. You’re not going to get any better going out and playing a bunch of cupcakes.” n

AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 23


COLLEGE FOOTBALL PREVIEW

Luke Falk put his NFL dreams on hold for one more season in Pullman. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

QB SPOTLIGHT

LUKE FALK Coach Mike Leach tends to always have an outstanding quarterback at the helm of his offense, but Luke Falk might be the one to find consistent success in the NFL once his college career is over. The 6-foot-4 senior has the arm, the footwork and, most important, the mind needed to sling the ball efficiently all over the field without making many mistakes. In 2016, he threw for 4,468 yards (third-most in the country, and in WSU history) and 38 touchdowns, tying his own single-season WSU record. The Utah native could have left for the pros after a junior season that saw him named as a finalist for various quarterback awards and as part of the All-Pac-12 second team, but Falk is back to take one last shot at leading the Cougs to the Pac-12 title. (DAN NAILEN)

24 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017


Coach: Mike Leach, sixth season (29-34 at WSU/113-77 overall) 2016 record: 7-2 Pac 12/8-5 overall 2017 preseason prediction: 3rd in Pac-12 North in Pac-12 media poll The big story: Washington State’s 2016 season was marked by a stunning eight-game winning streak in the middle of the season, when Leach’s high-octane offense was generating a ton of points and some serious blowouts against typically stellar Pac-12 foes like Oregon and Stanford. Unfortunately for Coug fans, that streak was bookended by two losses to open the season — including the second straight season-opening fail against a lower-division opponent — and three to end it, most painfully a home drubbing in the Apple Cup to rival UW. The good news for the Cougars entering 2017 is that they’re still led by quarterback Luke Falk, who skipped the chance to go pro for the opportunity for one more shot at winning a conference championship. While he lost some seriously skilled receivers with the graduation

of Gabe Marks and River Cracraft, Leach seems to always come up with new weapons for the offense — keep an eye on sophomore running back James Williams and junior receiver Tavares Martin Jr. If third-year defensive coordinator Alex Grinch can keep the Cougs’ D improving, they’ll have a chance in every game they play. The Cougs’ schedule lends itself to a hot start with five straight home games to open the season, although both Boise State and USC offer serious challenges. If they somehow come through September at 5-0 or 4-1, the Cougs will be in good shape to battle UW and Stanford for the Pac12 North title. The big game: The Cougs’ fifth straight home game to start the season, against USC, gives them an opportunity to knock off the nation’s No. 4 team (in preseason polls) and launch themselves into the meat of their Pac-12 schedule on a path, potentially, for an Apple Cup showdown with UW to win the conference’s North division. (DAN NAILEN)

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#RAIS E THEBAR AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 25


COLLEGE FOOTBALL PREVIEW

QB SPOTLIGHT

MATT LINEHAN The skinny kid who arrived in Moscow as a freshman in 2013 is nearly unrecognizable; he’s added nearly 55 pounds to his 6-foot-3 frame, is rewriting Vandal record books and was recognized by both the Unitas and Manning watch lists of college football’s top quarterbacks. Linehan seeks to build on a breakout junior season, as he completed 62 percent of his passes for almost 3,200 yards and 19 touchdowns and ran for four more scores. In the Vandals’ first bowl game since 2009 (and third ever), he strafed Colorado State for 381 yards and four touchdowns, running for a fifth. And he’s continuing a Linehan legacy; his father Scott — a former NFL head coach, now the Dallas Cowboys’ offensive coordinator — quarterbacked Idaho in the ’80s and coached there in the ’90s. Two uncles, Ron and Rick, played linebacker for the Vandals, as does younger brother Mike, a sophomore. (MICHAEL MAHONEY)

2017 VANDALS SCHEDULE Aug. 31 vs. Sacramento St. Sept. 9 vs. UNLV Sept. 16 at Western Michigan Sept. 30 at South Alabama Oct. 7 vs. Louisiana-Lafayette Oct. 14 vs. Appalachian St. Oct. 21 at Missouri Oct. 28 vs. Louisiana-Monroe Nov. 2 at Troy Nov. 18 vs. Coastal Carolina Nov. 25 at New Mexico St. Dec. 2 at Georgia St.

Matt Linehan will likely hear his name called in next spring’s NFL draft. JOE PALLEN PHOTO

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IDAHO VANDALS Coach: Paul Petrino, fifth season (15-33 at Idaho & overall)

2016 record: 6-2 Sun Belt /9-4 overall 2017 preseason prediction: 6th in Sun Belt Conference coaches’ poll The big story: After a brutal first two years, Petrino has turned the program around — just in time for Idaho to become the first school in NCAA history to drop down from the Football Bowl Subdivision (formerly Division I-A) to the Football Championship Subdivision (formerly Division I-AA), and from the Southern-dominated Sun Belt, a poor geographical fit, to the Northwest-centric Big Sky. That happens in 2018. Idaho’s unexpected success last year was due to a potent offense that scored at least 30 points seven times in the final 10 games, more than doubling that in a nationally televised 61-50 takedown of Colorado State at the Famous Idaho Potato Bowl in Boise, as Christmas came to Vandals fans three days early. Senior QB Matt Linehan is a legitimate pro prospect, but graduation took a serious toll on his supporting cast — the Vandals lost four of their top five receivers and three starters on the offensive line. RBs Isaiah Saunders and Aaron Duckworth combined for close to 1,500 yards and 14 touchdowns last year. A defense that gave up more than 31 points per game suffered big losses on the line and in the secondary, where all four starters are new. The line still features two seniors, pass-rushing DE Aikeem Coleman and DE Zach Cable, son of Seahawks offensive line coach and former Vandals head coach Tom Cable; the strength of the unit is junior LBs Kaden Elliss, Ed Hall and Tony Lashley. The big game: The Vandals have never won a Sun Belt title, and that’s still unlikely in their eighth and final opportunity. But a home victory over conference favorite Appalachian State on Oct. 14 could change that narrative. It would be an upset: The loaded Mountaineers placed a dozen players on preseason all-conference teams, and in Taylor Lamb have a QB who can match Linehan throw for throw. (MICHAEL MAHONEY)

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COLLEGE FOOTBALL PREVIEW

WHITWORTH PIRATES Coach: Rod Sandberg, fourth season (23-8 at Whitworth & overall)

Ian Kolste completed nearly 72 percent of his throws last season for the pass-first Pirates.

WHITWORTH ATHLETICS PHOTO

QB SPOTLIGHT

IAN KOLSTE He’s the catalyst for a Whitworth offense that led the Northwest Conference in scoring in 2016 and is poised to be even more potent this season. The senior quarterback from Oak Harbor, Washington — who is drawing preseason All-America notice — broke out in his second year as a starter (his average game day: 35-of-49 for 379 yards and three touchdowns) and was named first-team all-conference. Kolste cut down on interceptions, throwing just eight in 488 attempts, and ran for four scores. The Pirates have depth and experience at quarterback; backup Jonah Koski, from Bend, Oregon, is also a senior. At 6-foot-4 and 210 pounds, he has 3 inches and almost 20 pounds on Kolste, offering opposing defenses a different look. Koski saw action in eight of 10 games last season, completing all 13 of his passes for 130 yards and a pair of scores. (MICHAEL MAHONEY)

2017 PIRATES SCHEDULE Sept. 2 at Central (Iowa) Sept. 9 vs. Whittier Sept. 16 vs. La Verne Sept. 30 at Linfield Oct. 7 vs. George Fox Oct. 14 at Pacific Lutheran Oct. 21 vs. Puget Sound Oct. 28 at Pacific (Oregon) Nov. 4 at Lewis & Clark Nov. 11 vs. Willamette

2016 record: 6-1 Northwest Conference/8-2 overall 2017 preseason prediction: Inlander says: 2nd in NWC for the 3rd consecutive year The big story: It’s not on the field, or off the field. It is the field. The Pine Bowl, the Pirates’ home for more than 80 years, is getting a makeover; the centerpiece is a million-dollar green carpet — a new FieldTurf playing surface. Whitworth was the second-to-last conference holdout; Puget Sound is now the lone team to play on grass. The Pirates are on a strong three-year run (with a 2015 playoff appearance) under Sandberg, who made his reputation as a defensive coach at Division III power Wheaton. He guided Whitworth to its second straight runner-up finish last year despite a defense that surrendered 30 points per game, giving up more than 40 four times. This year’s unit has strong senior leadership in LB Patch Kulp and CBs Taylor Roelofs and LJ Benson, but the line, which Sandberg also coaches, is greener than the new turf. The defense may not have to improve much if the offense plays to its potential. Under coordinator (and former Shadle Park coach) Alan Stanfield, the Pirates throw the ball all over the yard. They were a scoring machine in 2016, averaging nearly 46 points per game and racking up more than 50 four times. Senior Ian Kolste is the NWC’s best quarterback, and three senior standouts, Garrett McKay and former Greater Spokane League stars Kevin Thomas (Gonzaga Prep) and Nick Kiourkas (Shadle) lead a loaded receiving corps; last year, the trio teamed for more than 2,200 yards and 21 touchdowns. The big game: One team has stood between the Pirates and first place the past two years: Linfield, a perennial Division III power with 61 consecutive winning seasons, eight straight conference crowns (40 overall) and four national titles. This year’s game is Sept. 30 in McMinnville, Oregon, where the Wildcats are 48-2 in their past 50. Last year, the Pirates fell 45-31 at the Pine Bowl, their 10th loss in a row to Linfield. (MICHAEL MAHONEY)

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VISUAL ARTS

All Fired Up This weekend’s exhibition at Object Space is energized with politically charged artwork BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

K

ay O’Rourke is seeing red these days, and it shows in her work. Instead of her usual semibiographical illustrations of animated animals and literary characters, the artist’s latest canvases feature Lady Liberty crying bloody tears and cameos by current world leaders, including a naked President Trump pulling North Korean leader Kim Jong-un atop a bomb in a Radio Flyer wagon. “I don’t necessarily want to shock, but I do have a need to express what I’m feeling,” says O’Rourke, whom Kendall Yards developer Jim Frank commissioned in 2015 to produce a series of historical paintings, “The River Remembers.” “When the whole painting happens [in my mind], I have to paint it.” The immediacy of O’Rourke’s approach caught the attention of Jennifer LaRue, a multifaceted writer and artist who also promotes art and artists, writers and select social causes through events at Hatch: Creative Business Incubator in Spokane Valley. “Kay’s pretty sure that her Trump paintings aren’t a sure thing as far as sales,” says LaRue, “not like her flowers.” Yet that’s why LaRue chose O’Rourke’s work for Connect the Dots, an upcoming group exhibition of “socially, spiritually, and politically charged” work. The election isn’t the only thing on the minds of local artists, however. Hazel Ann Mann is concerned about how technology can entangle us, which she’ll explore in a sitespecific performance/installation. Ryan Babcock has a painting about James J. Lee, described by mainstream media as an environmental militant after he took hostages in the Maryland-based Discovery Channel headquarters in September 2010. Lee was shot and killed by police, ending a nearly fourhour standoff. “The world today involves desperate people who

feel powerless and want to make change,” says Babcock. “In the eyes of the media, [Lee] was a crazy guy and got very little attention.” His piece explores the fine line between terrorism and vigilantism, says Babcock. “People are quick to put labels on violent individuals and cast them out, without wondering about the catalyst that moved them.” Spokane artist John Thamm is well known for his portrait painting tinged with social and political commentary, including those featured in his 2013 book Vets: 50 Portraits of Veterans and Their Stories, and courtroom sketches during volatile federal trials, including those involving the Aryan Nations. He’s doing an interactive piece about the death penalty, giving viewers the opportunity to voice their opinion about capital punishment. LaRue says she curated Connect the Dots to get conversations started, and let people know they’re not alone. Since last November’s presidential election, for example, local artists have only had one large-scale collective opportunity to voice their angst, when Terrain organizers created Rally, an open-call exhibition available for viewing on a handful of dates through this past January. LaRue figures that a lot of artists making socially and politically charged work don’t or won’t show it, like O’Rourke, who appreciated the opportunity to meet much younger artists participating in the show. “When I was the age of some of these young people, I didn’t think as much about politics,” says O’Rourke, 74. “It wasn’t who I was.” n

Kay O’Rourke’s latest work finds inspiration in America’s current political climate. STUART DANFORD PHOTO

Connect the Dots • Sept. 1, 5-10 pm; Sept. 2, 5-9 pm; Sept. 3, 5-8 pm • Object Space • 1818½ E. Sprague • Facebook: Object Space Spokane • 456-3931

AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 29


CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS

First Friday: September Celebrate the last unofficial weekend of summer with a wide variety of local arts events BY CHEY SCOTT

P

repare for your eyes to be drenched in the vivid, gem-hued tones of Alfredo Arreguín’s heavily detailed, tapestry-like paintings. The Mexicoborn and Seattle-based artist is showcasing his work in Spokane for the first time this weekend as part of September’s First Friday arts celebration. Arreguín’s work is a treat to the senses, with its deeply layered, complex textures and kaleidoscopic colors and patterns. “The result is an exuberant, phosphorescent visual interplay in which images combine to form other images, yielding a potent narrative power and pointing up the profound, ambiguous symbiosis between human beings and nature, fiction and reality, and the natural and super-

natural worlds,” according to a description of Patterns of Dreams and Nature, a 2007 book featuring the renowned artist’s work. Don’t miss the chance to see Arreguín’s exquisite visual interplays during their brief display here. His stunning paintings — influenced by his native Michoacán, lush rainforests, Japanese ukiyo-e prints, sacred and endangered animals, gods, and other icons — are also part of the Smithsonian’s esteemed collection. n Alfredo Arreguín • Fri, Sept. 1 from 5-8 pm • Marmot Art Space • 1202 W. Summit Pkwy (at Adams Alley) • marmotartspace.com

RECEPTIONS ON FRIDAY, SEPT. 1 FROM 5-8 PM, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, VISIT FIRSTFRIDAYSPOKANE.ORG. 1900 House and Home, 114 W. Pacific Found-object jewelry and ink drawings by Megan Holden; steampunk-inspired industrialized art by Robert LaMonte. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main The store hosts its first Friday poetry open mic with “Remember the Word” featured reader and poet Maya Zeller. Guest poets can share up to 3 min. of material. Avenue West Gallery, 907 W. Boone Scratchboard art and watercolors by artist Robert Karr in a show titled On the Wild Side, on display through the month. Barili Cellars, 608 W. Second Mixed-wood pieces by Brazilianborn artist Rebeca Abdala. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. Watercolors by Spokane artist Jeannine Marx Fruci. Bellwether Brewing Co., 2019 N. Monroe The brewery displays stylized representational and mixed-media

art by Jaymie Crafts. Bistango, 108 N. Post Art by Casey Ryan in a show titled Reema. Bon Bon, 926 W. Garland Art by Alleyworks Photography, from 6 pm to midnight. Chase Gallery, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. Opening reception for Dislocated Memories, an installation by Julie Gautier Downes examining the artist’s childhood memories and past trauma. Community Pint, 120 E. Sprague Upcycled and repurposed metal art by Nick Bradley from Iron Sharpens Iron Studio. Core Pilates and Wellness, 1230 W. Summit Pkwy. Canvas prints by Amy Jennings, founder of the brand Spokaloo. Reception from 4-8 pm. Craftsman Cellars, 1194 W. Summit Pkwy. Contemporary photography by Mike DeCesare. Tasting room

open from 2-9 pm. Hills’ Restaurant & Lounge, 401 W. Main Live music by the Front Porch Trio, from 6:30-9:30 pm. Iron Goat Brewing Co., 1302 W. Second Watercolors by award-winning Spokane artist Stan Miller. Kolva-Sullivan Gallery, 115 S. Adams A guest show featuring the sculpture work of Missoula, Montanabased ceramicists Beth Lo and Trey Hill, both with the University of Montana. Kress Gallery, 808 W. Main (third floor) A Brush With Watercolors featuring Joy Gruenewald, Kim Gardell, Greg Pritchett, Jan Lytle. LeftBank Wine Bar, 108 N. Washington Photography by Chad Ramsey and traditional batiks by Nicholas Sironka. Marketplace Winery, 39 W. Pacific Three-dimensional relief art by

Perkins. Scout Real Estate, 429 W. First An open house featuring art by Seattle-based artist Jorden Heidal. Spokane Public Library, 906 W. Main A live concert by participants of this year’s Girls Rock Lab workshops, from 6:30-8 pm. Steelhead Bar & Grille, 218 N. Howard Photography by Nick Nelson in What I See: Photographic Art of Life and Landscape. Trackside Studio Ceramic Art Gallery, 115 S. Adams The gallery hosts Seattle guest artist Loren Lukens’ show Squirt Bottle Art Marks. On display through Sept. 22. V du V Wines, 12 S. Scott A collection of watercolor paintings by San Francisco-based artist Alex Harris. William Grant Gallery and Framing, 1188 W. Summit Pkwy. Funky Chickens, original watercolors by Bari Federspiel. n

FR I DAY 9/ 1

SATU RDAY 9/ 2

S U N DAY 9/ 3

RAINING MONEY NIGHT

HALLOWEEN NIGHT

SEASON FINALE FIREWORKS

After the game a helicopter will drop 2,000 $1 bills for 30 lucky fans to collect. Sign-up at the game.

Wear a costume and celebrate Halloween a little early. Plus postgame Dairy Queen Circle the Bases.

sponsored by:

sponsored by:

vs. Everett AquaSox @ 6:30pm

FREE PARKING 30 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017

Shannon Niles Caruso and live music by Kevin Gardner and Scott Randall, from 5:30-9 pm. Missing Piece Tattoo, 410 W. Sprague Photography by Grace June. Object Space, 1818½ W. Sprague Connecting the Dots, a group exhibition of socially and politically charged work, from 5-10 pm. Nectar Catering & Events, 120 N. Stevens Acrylics on canvas by E.L. Stewart. Reception from 5-10 pm. New Moon Art Gallery, 1326 E. Sprague A preview of artists featured in the upcoming Little Spokane River Art Tour (opening on Sept. 30. Patit Creek Cellars, 822 W. Sprague Art by Liz Calderwood. Philanthropy Center, 1020 W. Riverside Photography by Robert (Bob) Charlo of the Kalispel Tribe. Robert Karl Cellars, 115 W. Pacific Paintings by local artist Megan

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Sharing the Bounty Why a local couple grow and give away their harvest each year to fight hunger in rural Eastern Washington BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

Dr. Dave (left) and Ruth Bare of Nine Mile Falls estimate they’ve grown and donated more than 6,000 pounds of fresh produce.

D

r. David Bare works in the secular realm, yet you get the sense upon meeting him that he and his wife, Ruth, feel a calling towards helping others. Their good deeds are done by the ton, every one a nutritious, sustaining mouthful. For several years, the couple has donated the majority of their garden’s bounty to address local food insecurities. “We harvested about three-and-a-half tons of vegetables last year, and we already have harvested two tons so far this year,” says Dr. Bare, who figures that weekly harvesting through early fall totals around 105 hours each year. “Five people, including Ruth, help pick, and they are doing this, on average, at least three times a week.” The process starts in March from seedlings Bare tends to in the basement until the couple can get them planted in their nearly 17,000-square-foot garden. A new cold frame extends the season about two weeks on either end, says Bare, who plants beans, berries, squash, root vegetables, tomatoes — 17 varieties — and more, totaling around 180 different plant types.

The Bares have been growing a garden at home since the couple were first married and Bare was in medical school in Seattle. He realized early on that getting people to eat healthy was a challenge, and advised his family practice patients: “If it grows on a plant, eat it; it it’s manufactured in a plant, don’t eat it.” Currently, Bare works full time as an urgent care physician for CHAS Health in Spokane, as well as several days a month as a medical director for the Medically Managed Treatment via Suboxone or Subutex (combating opioid addiction) program at Spokane’s Riverside Recovery Center. The couple keep some of what they grow, sharing with their adult children’s families nearby, but donate the rest: more than 6,000 pounds since moving onto their Nine Mile Falls acreage four years ago. Picture a zucchini or pumpkin the size of a Volkswagen bus, times three. In the beginning, Ruth was hauling the produce to Second Harvest in Spokane. Then the Bares met Donna Russell, an associate with AmeriCorps VISTA who was working with Rotary First Harvest’s Harvest Against

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Hunger program connecting gleaners to area farmers. Russell had heard about the Bares three years earlier from a friend who attended the same church as the couple. They agreed to let Russell pick up and deliver produce to 13 of the 15 food pantries in Stevens and Pend Oreille counties served by the nonprofit Providence Northeast Washington Hunger Coalition, with a service area stretching from Colville to Kettle Falls to Wellpinit and other small, rural towns in between.

P

overty, hunger, poor life choices and inadequate access to healthy food are common denominators in several regional needs assessments of rural Northeast Washington — and all factors that helped prompt the forming of the Northeast Washington (N.E.W.) Hunger Coalition in 2011. “The majority of the food pantries had never seen such a magnificent harvest of fresh vegetables,” says Russell. “Normally the produce they get is tired and old, having been on store shelves for a few days, before being ...continued on next page

AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 31


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donated and then warehoused before being trucked out.” In addition, says Russell, some of the food pantries deliver to homebound seniors, who are thrilled with fresh produce. “Living in a rural area, we aren’t always able to have programs like Meals on Wheels available, and the food pantries have stepped up to fill that gap,” she says. Russell’s passion for addressing food insecurities is personal. In 2012, when her husband lost his job of 34 years with Wonder Bread, they relied on her part-time, $10-an-hour job, but had to tap the food bank to get by. “I have always felt an obligation to give back and not be a taker,” says Russell, who initially volunteered with the Food

Produce from the Bares is distributed by the N.E.W. Hunger Coalition.

1. Scan See participating locations at firstfridayspokane.org.

2 . plan Get your peeps together and start hitting locations at 5pm.

Pantry in the Stevens County community of Tumtum. When her husband resumed employment, Russell was able to devote more time to the coalition, including their annual fundraising gala. Word is getting around about the coalition’s programs, says Russell, who has found people eager to help. “I have had various types of produce just hanging from my mailbox, donated by neighbors, and my newspaper delivery person,” she notes. Russell got an early boost from a few other coalition volunteers, including Nils Johnson of Washington State University’s Stevens County Extension office, who helped build a refrigerated trailer Russell now tows behind her vehicle. Johnson also helped the Bares adjust their planting plan, advising them on which foods had the most nutritional value and that people most often requested. Working in medicine, says Dr. Bare, can take a lot out of you. “I’m an introvert, and so [working in the garden is] a real part of energizing each day,” he says. It’s also one way he can personally impact larger societal issues: “I will never have to worry that [the food is] going to be wasted, because it won’t be.” n

3. expand

TRAVEL WITH US

Go to more locations; enjoy free food and fun until 8pm.

Don’t miss the next First Friday: September 1st, 2017

For event listings visit: www.firstfridayspokane.org Most venues open 5-8pm

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Serving Spokane & Beyond!

CARIBBEAN CRUISE

9/24 Civic Theatre “Westside Story” &

Air-Land-Cruise & Hotel

at the Circle Moon

69

Longhorn BBQ on “West Side”

10/7-8 Oktoberfest in Leavenworth (COZUMEL, HOUSTON & 10/20 Mystery Play and Dinner GALVESTON)

$

259

$

75

$

11/14-16 Ainsworth Hot Springs 359 1/16/18 - 1/23/18 12/2 & 9 Leavenworth Lighting Festival $75 $ $ 12/17 Traditions of Christmas 89 $

1995

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32 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017


FOOD | OPENING

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sporttrainrides.com | (877) 525-5226 Little Kyoto serves bento boxes for lunch and dinner.

The Son and the Moon In North Idaho, a new, family-owned Japanese eatery moves into the former Yellow House café spot BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

D

aniel Moon has nearly worn a path between the dining area and modest kitchen of his family’s new restaurant, Little Kyoto Japanese Kitchen and Sushi, while his father, Byoung “David” Moon, and mother, Young Moon, prepare food orders in the kitchen. Lunchtime is busy in the Hayden restaurant located inside a converted house built in 1940 — every table is full from noon to around 2 pm on a recent Monday — and Daniel Moon has his hands full with bento boxes and sushi rolls on the pared-down lunch menu. Sushi rolls cover the Americanized classics — yellowtail, tuna, cucumber, salmon — with a

DAN COUILLARD PHOTO

few surprises like the volcano roll, with scallop, masago (capelin roe), sprouts, and lava-like spicy sauces over a “mountain” of California rolls ($11.95). Try bento or lunch box entrées like salmon teriyaki ($8.50) or something a bit less common in the area’s small-but-growing Japanese restaurant scene: a curry bento ($8.95-$11.95). Bento boxes, served in a specially partitioned dish, also include steamed rice, miso soup, four California rolls, steamed gyoza (also known as potstickers), and salad. Although the bento box is known as a lunch box, it’s also served on the dinner menu, which includes a vastly expanded sushi and special roll offering, as well as more appetizers, salads and entrées. Again, many dishes are what you’d expect on a Japanese menu: karaage ($6), tonkatsu ($11), yakisoba ($8) and udon soup ($8). There are surprises, too, like the stir-fried calamari rice bowl ($11) with chef’s secret sauce (we’re hoping it’s gochujang, a fermented red chili paste typical in in Korean cooking) and something called a monkey ball, which is a deep-fried mushroom stuffed with spicy tuna ($6). Although they’ve only recently opened the restaurant, Daniel Moon says they’re looking ahead to winter, when they’ll adjust the menu with more soups and warming comfort foods. n

WINERY & BREWERY TOURS • 4 HOURS - $350 • spokanepartybus.com

Little Kyoto Japanese Kitchen and Sushi • 11050 N. Government Way, Hayden • Open Mon-Fri, 11 am-2:30 pm and 5-8 pm • Facebook: Little Kyoto • 208-772-3850

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AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 33


Comedy à la Carte Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon eat and joke their way through The Trip to Spain BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

Rob Brydon (right) is the Sancho Panza to Steve Coogan’s Don Quixote in the mostly improvised comedy The Trip to Spain.

T

he Trip to Spain is an esteemed member of the “If along to ’70s pop tunes on the radio, visit historical sites it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” school of cinema. It’s and eat some of the finest cuisine in the world. the third entry in a series that started in 2010, They also bust out celebrity impressions, often and it follows the exact same premise of its previous two schooling each other on the specific intonations and installments: British comedians Steve Coogan and Rob inflections of various screen icons. This time they riff on Brydon, playing slightly fictionalized versions of themAl Pacino, Anthony Hopkins, John Hurt, David Bowie, selves, travel through a country reviewing a number of Rex Harrison, two different James Bonds and, of course, high-end restaurants. Michael Caine. Perhaps the best running bit in The Trip If you loved this routine the first time, you’ll probably to Spain involves their dueling impersonations of Mick still enjoy it. I found the original Trip to be an amusing Jagger, who Brydon claims exchanged Caine impressions diversion, but I wasn’t exactly clamoring with him at a party. (It’s a lot funnier for seconds. I certainly enjoy spending a THE TRIP TO SPAIN than it sounds on paper.) little time with Coogan and Brydon, and Not Rated The laid-back, off-the-cuff feel of I generally laughed at their spirited back- Directed by Michael Winterbottom the series is typical of director Michael and-forth here, but it’s hard not to notice Starring Steve Coogan, Rob Brydon Winterbottom, whose best comedies — that the luster has worn off since the first the fourth-wall-demolishing 24 Hour Party movie. Any comic bit, no matter how brilliant, is inevitaPeople and Tristram Shandy: A Cock and Bull Story — have bly going to become less amusing each time you see it. (perhaps not coincidentally) also featured Coogan and These are films of mostly simple pleasures, even as Brydon. There has, however, been an overarching plot they’re luxuriating in architectural and culinary opulence. running through the series, as each man’s individual The loose structure of this series is fairly straightforward: professional fortunes shift and occasionally eclipse the In scene after scene, the two stars improvise against one other’s. That Coogan is following the same route through another, drive through sun-dappled countrysides, sing southwestern Europe that he references having made 30

34 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017

years prior, when he was in his twenties, should tell you everything you need to know about what stage of midlife crisis he’s in. Those themes of insecurity have haunted this fictionalized version of Coogan throughout the series. Since 2014’s The Trip to Italy, the real-life version of Coogan has received a couple of Oscar nominations for co-writing and producing the drama Philomena (a fact he drops regularly into conversation, regardless of its relevance). Brydon, meanwhile, has recently become a father in real life and has settled into suburban domesticity, a fact that clearly distresses Coogan, who finds that his teenage son is drifting away from him. Each of the Trip films originally aired as three-hour, six-episode TV series in Europe, and they’ve all been pared down to feature length for American release. The irony there is that they still feel too long: At 108 minutes, Coogan and Brydon’s shtick runs itself a bit ragged before the movie’s over. It’s not that I mind meeting up with Rob and Steve every few years, though perhaps this format, if it is to continue, would work much better as it’s seen in the UK — in weekly half-hour installments on the small screen. n


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND

In 1977, two years after breaking box office records with Jaws, Steven Spielberg made this sci-fi masterwork, a fable that looks with wonder, horror and awe at the possibility of life beyond Earth. And like he’d do later in E.T. and Poltergeist, Spielberg shoots his otherworldly conceit through the lens of suburban uniformity, casting Richard Dreyfuss as a family man obsessed with the existence of UFOs. Spielberg’s director’s cut of the film is returning to theaters for a weeklong engagement, and it’s absolutely worth seeing on the big screen. (NW) Rated PG

PATTI CAKE$

Teenager Patti Dombrowski has but two life goals — to finally leave her low-income New Jersey neighborhood, and to become the world’s next great rapper. But being an overweight white girl, she meets plenty of resistance from the local, male-centric hiphop scene. This low-budget riff on 8 Mile has won over audiences at various film festivals, earning raves for Danielle Macdonald’s starring performance. (NW) Rated R

THE TRIP TO SPAIN

The third of director Michael Winterbottom’s Trip films, in which British comedians Steve Coogan and Rob Bry-

don travel through various photogenic countries and taste the finest cuisine. Along the way, they bust out dueling improv routines and a cavalcade of celebrity impressions. Like its predecessors, it originally screened as a sixpart BBC miniseries and was trimmed to feature length, though it still seems long at nearly two hours. But if you liked the first two, you’ll probably like this. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

TULIP FEVER

In 17th-century Amsterdam, an artist (Dane DeHaan) is commissioned to paint the portrait of a lovely young noblewoman (Alicia Vikander), and the two soon begin a passionate affair. Because her jealous husband is played by Christoph Waltz, you know things won’t turn out well. This bodice-ripper, based on Deborah Moggach’s novel, has been sitting on the shelf for more than a year; that’s rarely a good sign. (NW) Rated R

VALLEY OF BONES

A discredited paleontologist gets a tip about a T. rex fossil buried in the badlands of North Dakota, the uncovery of which could bring in big bucks. In her rogue excavation scheme, she enlists the help of a former oil rig worker with drug problems, who may or may not be trustworthy. (NW) Rated R

NOW PLAYING ALL SAINTS

John Corbett stars as a corporate salesman-turned-pastor who is assigned to shut down a struggling church in his small town. When a group of South Asian refugees shows up at his door, he teams up with them to turn the church’s land into a working farm. The latest from Affirm Films, which produces family-friendly features aimed at evangelical audiences. (NW) Rated PG

ANNABELLE: CREATION

Everyone’s favorite demonic doll is back to terrorize a new batch of characters, namely a group of young orphans and their kindly nun overseer. Quickly devolves into a series of predictable jump scares, in spite of its eerie atmosphere. (NW) Rated R

ATOMIC BLONDE

Charlize Theron kicks a whole lotta ass as an MI6 agent tracking down a double agents in 1989 Berlin. This second action spectacle from John Wick director David Leitch is too long and densely plotted, but it’s uber-stylish and set to a thumping soundtrack of great ’80s pop hits. (NW) Rated R

BABY DRIVER

The latest genre deconstruction from Edgar Wright stars Ansel Elgort as a young, music-obsessed getaway driv-

er who becomes wrapped up in a heist that’s destined to self-destruct. Stellar car chases, a fully loaded soundtrack and a deceptively sweet love story. (SS) Rated R

THE BIG SICK

Inspired by the courtship of Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon (who also wrote the script), this is the rare rom-com that’s both consistently funny and genuinely emotional. Nanjiani plays himself, a stand-up who meets and falls in love with Emily (Zoe Kazan). There’s only one problem: He’s keeping their relationship a secret from his traditional Pakistani parents. This is further complicated when Emily falls into a medically induced coma. At the Magic Lantern. (SS) Rated R

BIRTH OF THE DRAGON

Although this film is, according to its poster, “inspired by a true event,” accounts of its central fight — a fabled 1965 bout between future martial arts legend Bruce Lee and kung fu master Wong Jack Man — differ so widely that it’s possible it never even happened. It still could have made for an entertaining movie, but this turns out to be a cheap, clunkily written cash-in of a screen icon’s enduring legacy. (NW) Rated PG-13 ...continued on next page

AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 35


FILM | SHORTS

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Stephen King’s epic, multi-novel fantasy series finally hits the big screen, and the result is rushed, incoherent and lifeless. The interdimensional world of mythical gunslinger Roland Deschain (Idris Elba) and the evil Man in Black (Matthew McConaughey) was complex enough to span thousands of pages in King’s books, but all that mythology has been condensed down into 95 chaotic minutes. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE INLANDER

This documentary should be required viewing for anyone obsessed with rare, archival film footage. Director Bill Morrison focuses on a cache of nitrate film reels that was literally unearthed in northwestern Canada; it’s not only about the contents of the celluloid itself, but also the history of the former mining town where it was buried. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

DESPICABLE ME 3

The hugely popular animated series continues unabated, and this time reformed bad guy Gru (voiced by Steve Carell) has just been kicked out of the Anti-Villain League. Enter his long-lost twin brother Dru, who convinces Gru to go back to his evil ways. (NW) Rated PG

DUNKIRK

Christopher Nolan’s WWII drama, painstakingly and authentically depicting the bloody Battle of Dunkirk, is a remarkable example of sheer filmmaking craft. The only thing it’s missing is a little humanity. Although the technical skill on display is dazzling, Nolan’s attempts to elicit any emotion from the audience feel strangely calculated. (SS) Rated PG-13 Dreamworks’ latest family-friendly animated allegory about the importance of individuality has a “meh” emoji discovering he has more than one emotion. Feature films have been predicated on concepts less substantial, but does that mean this needed to be made? (NW) Rated PG

THE GLASS CASTLE

This adaptation of Jeannette Walls’ bestselling memoir is buoyed by three stellar performances: Woody Harrelson as an alcoholic father, Naomi Watts as his equally irresponsible wife, an aspiring artist who shirks most of her maternal responsibilities; and Brie Larson as their grown daughter. (KJ) Rated PG-13

GOOD TIME

Robert Pattinson stars as an opportunistic criminal who orchestrates a bank robbery that gets his learning-disabled brother sent to prison. He then spends a particularly harrowing night trying to drum up the bail money by any means necessary. Once it puts its foot on the gas, it never lets up, and while its message remains as elusive as its troubling protagonist, it’s deliriously hedonistic viewing. (DR) Rated R

THE HITMAN’S BODYGUARD

Ryan Reynolds is a bodyguard whose career has hit the skids, and Samuel L. Jackson is his newest charge, an as-

NEW YORK TIMES

VARIETY

METACRITIC.COM

(LOS ANGELES)

(OUT OF 100)

Dawson City: Frozen Time

85

Good Time

80

Logan Lucky

78

Wind River

73

Ingrid Goes West

71

The Trip to Spain

66

The Hitman’s Bodyguard

50

DAWSON CITY: FROZEN TIME

THE EMOJI MOVIE

36 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017

CRITICS’ SCORECARD

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

sassin who must be transported to the Hague, where he’ll testify against an Eastern European dictator (Gary Oldman). The twist: Jackson has previously tried to kill Reynolds numerous times, and now they’re forced into helping each other. Anybody wanna play Buddy Comedy Cliché Bingo? (NW) Rated R

INGRID GOES WEST

In a 21st-century spin on Single White Female, Aubrey Plaza plays a mentally disturbed woman who becomes infatuated with a moderately famous internet celebrity (Elizabeth Olsen) and heads off to L.A. to befriend her. Despite its themes of technological obsession, this dark comedy is hardly a millennial hit piece, presenting us with realistically absurd characters and using their connections to social media as a means of explaining their flaws. (SS) Rated R

KIDNAP

When Halle Berry’s son is nabbed by strangers from the park, she morphs into an unstoppable action hero in an increasingly ludicrous high-speed pursuit. Although not long enough to be tedious, this cheap thriller is clumsily directed and full of frustrating lapses in logic. (NW) Rated R

LEAP!

A French-Canadian animated film about an aspiring ballerina who escapes from her orphanage and hitches a train ride to Paris in hopes of making it big as a dancer. Features the voice talents of Elle Fanning, Carly Rae Jepsen, Kate McKinnon and the invaluable Mel Brooks. (NW) Rated PG

LOGAN LUCKY

Steven Soderbergh has re-emerged from his four-year “retirement” and has returned to the heist genre with this leisurely, off-the-cuff comed about an out-of-work coal miner (Channing Tatum) who enlists a group of misfits — including his superstitious brother (Adam Driver) and an incarcerated explosives expert (Daniel Craig) — to rob a NASCAR speedway. (ES) Rated PG-13

THE NUT JOB 2: NUTTY BY NATURE

Remember the first Nut Job movie, in which enterprising rodents foiled a robbery? No? Well, it doesn’t matter, because now there’s a sequel, with Surly the Squirrel and friends thwarting a crooked mayor from bulldozing their

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

home to build an amusement park. (NW) Rated PG

SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING

After being mistreated in his last few movies, Peter Parker and his web-slinging alter ego finally get another feature worthy of the character’s long history. With fresh-faced Tom Holland donning Spidey’s spandex, the Spider-Man franchise feels more grounded and human than ever. (ES) Rated PG-13

TERMINATOR 2: JUDGMENT DAY

James Cameron’s hugely entertaining 1991 blockbuster gets the 3-D rerelease treatment, and it still holds up as one of the few sequels to improve upon its predecessor. The film returned Arnold Schwarzenegger to his most iconic role — the catchphrase-spouting cyborg from the future — but as a hero rather than a villain, sent to the past to protect the young boy who will eventually save humanity from destruction. (NW) Rated R

WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES

This third installment in the rich Planet of the Apes franchise is another sophisticated sci-fi epic, with super-intelligent primate Caesar (Andy Serkis) and his simian army taking on a human warlord (Woody Harrelson). It’s emotionally involving, and more focused on its nuanced characters than action. (ES) Rated PG-13

WIND RIVER

After the body of a young woman is found on a Native American reservation in Wyoming, a local wildlife tracker (Jeremy Renner) acts as a makeshift envoy for the visiting FBI agent (Elizabeth Olsen) assigned to the case. Unlike director Taylor Sheridan’s scripts for the thrillers Sicario and Hell or High Water, this snowblind noir is overwritten but under-plotted. (NW) Rated R

WONDER WOMAN

DC’s latest actually does justice to one of its longest-running and most beloved characters in one of the better superhero origin films. Gal Gadot announces herself as a major new star, playing the Amazon princess and Lasso of Truth-brandishing warrior who finds herself on the front lines of the first World War. (MS) Rated PG-13 n


FILM | REVIEW

Robert Pattinson is a criminal in over his head in the propulsive thrill ride Good Time.

Run All Night

Good Time makes great cinema out of bad decisions BY DAVID RIEDEL

T

here is one quiet scene in Good Time, and foot by cops until Nick crashes headfirst through it’s the first, as Nick Nikas (co-director a glass door and is arrested. Benny Safdie) is asked to play word asI’ve described only Good Time’s first 15 sociation with a social services psychiatrist. Nick minutes; the rest of the movie is so bonkers, so is developmentally disabled; the psychiatrist is completely unpredictable, that it’s completely (likely) court-appointed. The camera cuts back exhilarating. There’s little character development, and forth in tight shots between the two of them, but plenty of plot to keep it hurtling forward, as with the shrink gently pressing Nick more and Connie tries in vain repeatedly to bail Nick out more to explain his answers, and Nick becoming of jail, yet it never feels episodic or disjointed or emotional — a single tear rolls down his cheek inorganic. It exists as a piece of pure cinema; all — as he is unable to explain himself. Moments it asks is that you accept it and go along. later, Nick’s degenerate brother Connie (Robert If you grimace at four-letter words, fistfights Pattinson) bursts in. He chastises the shrink for and the occasional screaming match, Good Time making Nick cry, then herds isn’t for you. But if you’re Nick out of the office and into a willing to let Good Time roll, it’s GOOD TIME life of crime, and Good Time puts something to behold. Whether Rated R its foot on the gas and never Connie is scamming his obliviDirected by Josh Safdie, Benny Safdie lets up. ous girlfriend Corey (Jennifer Starring Robert Pattinson, Benny Safdie, This is a movie about deciJason Leigh), pleading with Jennifer Jason Leigh, Barkhad Abdi sions, and two main characters a bail bondsman, or dealing who make only bad ones. The with characters who make even first bad decision Connie makes — after taking worse decisions than he does — and there are Nick from the people who could help him — is to several — there’s no letting up. rob a bank with Nick’s help. We see them standThe script, by Ronald Bronstein and coing in a teller’s line, wearing masks designed to director Josh Safdie, has Connie tumble from make them look like black men. They also have one bad situation to the next, and Sean Price bright orange vests on, making it appear as if Williams’ cinematography is a wonderfully skitthey’re working construction nearby. tery jumble of handheld shots, extreme close-ups The bank robbery goes off well enough, until and static work that changes with Connie’s mood Connie makes another bad decision — though and circumstances. Daniel Lopatin’s emphatic probably the best one under the circumstances — electronic score ramps up tension or eases it at to have the teller go to the vault to gather more just the right moments, and there isn’t a false money. Although Connie and Nick ditch their note from the actors. robbery attire and masks and even have a livery Pattinson’s performance is worlds away from driver waiting to take them to Port Authority in Edward the vampire in the Twilight franchise, but Manhattan, they don’t count on the anti-theft he’s been turning in dynamite, under-the-radar pack hidden with the cash. It explodes and covers work for years (see Maps to the Stars and The them in fluorescent puce-colored powder, renderRover). Buddy Duress, who’s so good it’s almost ing most of the money useless. like he’s not acting, pops up halfway through the Connie hauls Nick to a fast-food restaurant movie as the guy who makes worse decisions to get cleaned up — at first, Nick uses toilet water than Connie, and Benny Safdie is heartbreaking to get the powder off of him — and stuffs the bag as Nick. into the bathroom ceiling. Then, back on the There hasn’t been such a thrill ride in what street, nearly clean but clearly covered in antifeels like a decade. Good Time is one of the best theft powder, Nick and Connie are chased on films of the year. n

AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 37


OPENING NIGHT ROMANCE

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38 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017


POP-ROCK

PUMPED UP KICKS Since scoring a surprise radio hit in 2011, Foster the People continue to explore the dark side of pop on their third album BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

B

ack in the summer of 2011, it seemed like “Pumped Up Kicks” was always playing somewhere. The song, recorded by the Los Angeles band Foster the People, appeared to come out of nowhere, and it was both maddeningly catchy and seemingly inescapable. But “Pumped Up Kicks” actually had a relatively slow ascendance to mainstream saturation: Frontman Mark Foster first released it as a free online download in early 2010, and it would take more than a year for the single, with a bouncy pop melody set idiosyncratically to lyrics about the violent thoughts of a troubled youth, to crack the Billboard charts. Looking back on it now, Foster the People keyboardist Isom Innis says the band’s rise to popularity really did seem like an overnight development. “I feel like you don’t really have perspective on how big a song is, because you’re just busy all the

time, every day,” Innis tells the Inlander. “One day we’re playing 100-cap rooms and only 50 people are standing in there. And then all of a sudden, you’re traveling the world to almost every continent, and you’re playing every night to sold-out rooms. “It’s weird — when you’re in that moment, you’re almost the last person to know how big it is.” Innis originally joined the band as a hired gun, going out on tour with Foster and company right as “Pumped Up Kicks” was starting to gain traction and their debut album Torches was released. “My first rehearsal, it was in this industrial rehearsal space in downtown L.A.,” Innis says. “It was before any music had come out. Mark had sent me a couple demos — he was working on ‘Helena Beat’ and ‘Houdini’ at the time. It was really exciting, but it was really crazy. … The music came out and we went on the road for three years, without stopping.

Over time, we’ve become like a family.” On the band’s subsequent two LPs, the slinky pop of Torches developed in a more muscular and experimental direction. Foster the People’s third album, the recently released Sacred Hearts Club, is pulling from all kinds of disparate influences — the freeassociation rock and funk of Talking Heads’ Remain in Light, the hip-hop samples of late producer J Dilla, the twisty krautrock of Can — and it’s far more in tune with contemporary, radio-friendly electronica. Innis says the record started gestation about three years ago when he and Foster began jamming and improvising in actor Danny Masterson’s Bronson Island recording studio, which was previously owned by Chuck Berry. “When we went to write this record, we didn’t put limitations on what we were doing,” Innis says. ...continued on next page

NEIL KRUG PHOTO


MUSIC | POP-ROCK “PUMPED UP KICKS,” CONTINUED... “We weren’t trying to characterize what we wanted the songs to sound like. We started making beats, we started jamming. We’d follow an idea wherever it went. After a year and a half, we had a huge chunk of material we then got to start refining and connecting dots, seeing where we could piece certain sounds together.” Although the band’s sound has stretched and grown since the days when “Pumped Up Kicks” first became a summertime earworm, Sacred Hearts Club proves that Foster can still produce songs whose poppy melodies only occasionally betray the darkness of the lyrics. It’s a drunk, disoriented album, bubbling over with themes of hedonism and images of late-night bacchanalia. The slyly titled “Doing It for the Money” (“Close your eyes / We’re gonna run this light”) and “I Love My Friends” (“They got no money / Because they’re dumb and reckless”) are the kind of nightclub-ready bangers that practically give you the side-eye as you dance along to them. The band is about to take these songs on the road, having recently finished up a three-week European tour and playing a handful of festivals. Innis says the crowd reaction to the newest tunes has been strong, likely because these songs, more than anything they’ve ever written, were put together specifically with the live shows on the brain. “When we wrote the record, we were writing the songs with playing live [in mind],” Innis says. “Having that experience of touring the world to draw on, it’s something we keep in mind when we’re writing music. … We’re trying to come up with parts that you’re gonna wanna stand by for the rest of your life, or for as long as people want to come to your shows.” n Foster the People with Palm Springsteen • Sun, Sept. 3 at 8 pm • $35 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

Tinnabulation_Tinnfest_082417_12V_MB_NEW.jpg

40 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017


MUSIC | FESTIVAL

Soundtracking Your Feast From rock to blues to hip-hop, these Pig Out in the Park headliners are the choicest cuts BY BEN SALMON AND NATHAN WEINBENDER TOO SLIM AND THE TAILDRAGGERS

ELVIN BISHOP BIG FUN TRIO

Thursday at 8:30 pm, Lilac Stage After spending many years leading one of the Northwest’s very best (and busiest) blues bands, Tim “Too Slim” Langford moved his Taildragger operation from Seattle to Nashville in 2012. Now they’re back where it all started — Langford formed the band in Spokane in the mid-’80s. Thankfully, one thing hasn’t changed: Langford’s gritty blend of low-down blues, smoldering roots-rock, guitar heroics and honest lyrics. Welcome home to one of the sturdiest musical acts this town has ever turned out. (BEN SALMON)

Saturday at 8:45 pm, Lilac Stage Both as a solo artist and guitarist for the groundbreaking Paul Butterfield Blues Band, Elvin Bishop has been recognized as one of the preeminent blues guitarists of the ’60s and ’70s. He’s probably best known for the AM radio classic “Fooled Around and Fell in Love,” a hit single in 1976 which has had a second life as a movie soundtrack staple, popping up most memorably in Boogie Nights and Guardians of the Galaxy. Inducted into the Blues Hall of Fame last year and the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame the year before, the 74-year-old’s newest project, the Big Fun Trio, is playing Pig Out and features Bishop alongside guitarist and pianist Bob Welsh and drummer Willy Jordan. (NW)

PAUL REVERE’S RAIDERS

Friday at 12:30 pm, Clocktower Stage; 8:30 pm, Lilac Stage The original founder and namesake of Paul Revere and the Raiders — Paul Revere himself (not the American Revolution hero, but the Idaho-born keyboardist) — passed away in 2014. But his classic band continues on as Paul Revere’s Raiders, playing iconic hits like WEEKEND “Kicks,” “Hungry” and C O U N T D OW N “Indian Reservation” Get the scoop on this for happy, dancing weekend’s events with people across the our newsletter. Sign up at country and beyond. Inlander.com/newsletter. In a world that seems scarier every day, losing oneself in the cozy familiarity of mid-20th century mega-hits doesn’t sound so bad, does it? (BS)

RAIL

Saturday at 9 pm, Clocktower Stage The story of the Seattle-area hard rock band Rail is one marked by incredible high points. After first coming together in junior high school, the quartet opened 47 U.S. tour dates for Van Halen in 1980, before they even had an album out. Three years later, Rail won a nationwide contest on MTV and earned a major label recording contract. Since, they’ve settled into a long career on the regional scene, with all four original members still writing and recording their fist-pumping brand of ’80s-flavored melodic rock together. That’s pretty cool. (BS)

SIR MIX-A-LOT

Sunday at 9 pm, Lilac Stage Mix must really love Spokane. The “Baby Got Back” rapper, based in Seattle, performed at Pig Out last year, and also headlined 2015’s Perry Street Shakedown. Perhaps next time he’s in town, he’ll play your kid’s bar mitzvah. If you missed either of those free shows, you really don’t have much of an excuse to skip this one. I mean, you probably already know all the words to his ode to voluminous posteriors, so you may as well see it performed in the, ahem, flesh. (NW) n

LEROY BELL AND HIS ONLY FRIENDS

Friday at 9 pm, Clocktower Stage LeRoy Bell’s career spans five decades, and yet he’s still finding his way to new audiences. With his longtime songwriting partner Casey James, he’s penned blues and R&B tunes that have been recorded by the likes of Elton John, Gladys Knight and Teddy Pendergrass, and he was recently a competitor on the American version of The X-Factor as a protégé of pop star Nicole Scherzinger. He hits Pig Out with backing band His Only Friends, which promises to deliver some A-level musicianship. (NATHAN WEINBENDER)

Elvin Bishop hits the Lilac Stage on Saturday night.

BOB HAKINS PHOTO

Pig Out in the Park • Wed, Aug. 30 through Mon, Sept. 4 • Free • Riverfront Park • spokanepigout.com

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Friday, September 15th

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AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCKABILLY REVEREND HORTON HEAT

W

ith the regularity of Easter Mass, or of a particularly devout Catholic hitting the confessional, the Reverend Horton Heat and his crack backing band make their annual pilgrimage to Spokane next week (they were here last March, and in May 2015 before that). Since his first performances in his native Dallas, the good Reverend, the alias of musician Jim Heath, has amassed a devoted congregation with the fervency of any preacher worth his salt, and his local fans are sure to show up pretty much any time he ambles into town. Despite his name, Horton Heat’s music is gloriously sacrilegious, a winking, double-entendre-laced brand of rockabilly that swaggers with the raised middle finger of classic punk rock. See him live and become a member of his church. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Reverend Horton Heat with Strung Out and Larry and His Flask • Wed, Sept. 6 at 7 pm • $20 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 08/31

219 LOUNGE, Honeysuckle ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Martini Bros. J J THE BARTLETT, The Railsplitters, Sulphur Banks BEEROCRACY, Open Mic BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Randy Campbell BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen THE COEUR D’ALENE RESORT, Bands on Boats feat. the Rub CORBY’S BAR, Open Mic and Karaoke CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Dan Hall CRAVE, DJ Freaky Fred CRUISERS, Open Mic Jam Slam Hosted by Perfect Destruction and J.W. Scattergun FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Nate Ostrander J J HUMBLE BURGER, Run On Sentence and An American Forrest THE JACKSON ST., Christy Lee, Luke Yates and Zaq Flanary JOHN’S ALLEY, Jason Boland and the Stragglers J KNITTING FACTORY, Josh Turner THE LOCAL DELI, Devon Wade MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Kevin Dorin NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), PJ Destiny NORTHERN RAIL PUB, Joshua Belliardo, Tyler Lang, Nathan Chartrey THE OBSERVATORY, Vinyl Meltdown J THE PIN!, Decapitated, Thy Art Is Murder

42 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017

POP-ROCK FLYING MAMMALS

T

he four Birdsall brothers, better known as Flying Mammals, aren’t easy musicians to pigeonhole. The Coeur d’Alene band is set to release their new album Vier on Friday, and based on the samples of the album that are available on the band’s website, the record is far glossier and fuller-sounding than their 2013 EP New Funk Fam. And while it continues the Birdsalls’ penchant for mostly upbeat, genre-defying tunes, its sounds cover a wide spectrum: There’s a little hard rock, some folk and funk; there are clap-along pop anthems, spacey jams; sitars and mandolins make the occasional appearance. They’re definitely artists to keep an eye on, because it’s impossible to predict what they’ll do next. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Flying Mammals Album Release with Heart Avail, Deschamp and Over Sea Under Stone • Fri, Sept. 1 at 7 pm • $8 • All-ages • The Pin! • 412 W. Sprague • thepinevents.com • 624-0746

POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Echo Elysium RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL, Open Mic THE RESERVE, Karaoke with DJ Dave THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler J J RIVERFRONT PARK, Pig Out in the Park (see page 41) feat. Too Slim and the Taildraggers, B-Radicals, Sovereign Citizen and the Non-Prophets, Bobby Patterson Band, Zenbotz, Ragtag Romantics, Redneck Bees, Slow Cookin’ and more J RIVERSTONE PARK, Nu Jack City ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 09/1

219 LOUNGE, Beat Diggers J THE BARTLETT, Honeysuckle, Little Wolf BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Sterling BOLO’S, Vern and the Volcanoes CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Tommy G J CONKLING MARINA, Uppercut CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke CURLEY’S, Karma’s Circle FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Donnie Emerson GEM STATE CLUB, JamShack J HILLS’ RESTAURANT & LOUNGE, Back Porch Trio

IRON HORSE BAR, Smash Hit Carnival LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Devon Wade MOOSE LOUNGE, Tell the Boys NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), KOSH and Vent NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, DJ Patrick PEND OREILLE PLAYHOUSE, Open Mic J J THE PIN!, Flying Mammals Album Release Party (see above), with Deschamp, Heart Avail, Over Sea Under Stone and more THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling

Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler J J RIVERFRONT PARK, Pig Out in the Park feat. LeRoy Bell and His Only Friends, Paul Revere’s Raiders, Cattywomp, Whitney Monge, Bossame, Garrett Bartley Band and more J SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT, Fall Fest feat. New Kingston and Incredible Flying Dookie Brothers SILVER MOUNTAIN, Son of Brad SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Starlight Motel V DU V WINES, Misty Mountain Pony Club ZOLA, Raggs and Bush Doktor


Saturday, 09/2

219 LOUNGE, Truck Mills BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE, Robby French J THE BARTLETT, Lillie Mae, Chris Molitor BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Stud BOLO’S, Vern and the Volcanoes CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Tommy G J CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, Uppercut CURLEY’S, Karma’s Circle J DAHMEN BARN, Jessica Lynne J EVANS BROTHERS COFFEE, Honeysuckle, Harold’s IGA FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Hannah Rebecca FLAME & CORK, Wyatt Wood IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Kori Ailene IRON HORSE BAR, Smash Hit Carnival THE JACKSON ST., Booze-a-Palooza feat. Children of the Sun, Heroes for Ghosts, Sins and Sinners, and more J KNITTING FACTORY, Cody Jinks, Ward Davis MOOSE LOUNGE, Tell the Boys

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, DJ Patrick J J PANIDA THEATER, Sonic Bloom J THE PIN!, Oliver Spittz, DJ 900, CCB Crew, Cordell Drake, Savvy Rae POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Rusty Jackson THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler J J RIVERFRONT PARK, Pig Out in the Park feat. Rail, Elvin Bishop’s Big Fun Trio, Fat Lady, Kenny James Miller Band, Voltalux, Sammy Eubanks, David Raitt and the Baja Boogie Band, Ron Reed Music Project and more J SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT, Fall Fest feat. The Electric Cole Show, Dimestore Prophets, Blake Nobel, Andrea Harsell and Luna Roja SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Son of Brad ST. MARIES, Paul Bunyan Days feat. JamShack, Steve Starkey Band, Kevin Gardner THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave TWO RIVERS CASINO AND RESORT, Christy Lee ZOLA, Raggs and Bush Doktor

Sunday, 09/3

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Atomic Jive J J THE BARTLETT, An Evening with Super Sparkle BULL HEAD TAVERN, Rusty Jackson

CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), KOSH J COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, Electric Bent J CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, Uppercut CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Donnie Emerson CURLEY’S, Karma’s Circle DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church J J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Guns N Roses IRON HORSE BAR, Smash Hit Carnival J J KNITTING FACTORY, Foster the People (see page 39), Palm Springsteen LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), KOSH and Vent O’DOHERTY’S IRISH GRILLE, Live Irish Music J THE PIN!, Young Neves, Dom Lee, Young Smoke, Jared and Jamaal THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Sunday Karaoke Night J J RIVERFRONT PARK, Pig Out in the Park feat. Sir Mix-A-Lot, David Luning, Peter Rivera, Cordell Drake and Mista Snipe, Stepbrothers, Doghouse Boyz, Milonga and more THE ROADHOUSE, Karrie O’Neill J SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT, Fall Fest feat. Danny Dodge and the Dodge Gang, Hawthorne Roots, Honeysuckle ST. MARIES, Paul Bunyan Days, feat. JamShack, Down South, Aaron Cerutti ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 09/4

J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown J J RIVERFRONT PARK, Pig Out in the Park feat. Mojo Box, Just Plain Darin, Smash Hit Carnival, David Wolff Project, Trailer Park Girls, Steven King J SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT, Fall Fest feat. Petty Fever and Voltalux ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 09/5

J BABY BAR, Cherry Death, Dusk, Outercourse THE EMPEROR ROOM, T.A.S.T.Y with DJs Freaky Fred, Beauflexx THE JACKSON ST., Pamela Jean LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday MIK’S, DJ Brentano PARAGON BREWING, Wyatt Wood POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE, Nick Grow RED ROOM LOUNGE, Tuesday Takeover with Storme THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Open Mic/ Jam Night UP NORTH DISTILLERY, Kicho ZOLA, Dueling Cronkites

Wednesday, 09/6 J THE BARTLETT, Broncho, Billy Charger

BLACK DIAMOND, Clint Darnell GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES, Open Mic with Host Travis Goulding J J KNITTING FACTORY, Reverend Horton Heat (see facing page), Strung Out, Larry and His Flask LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 J MCEUEN PARK, The Powers NO-LI BREWHOUSE, Kori Ailene THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, The Ronaldos feat. Ron Criscione, Ray Younker and Emily Ridler RIVELLE’S RIVER GRILL, Jam Night with Truck Mills and Guests THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave ZOLA, Whsk&Keys

JOIN THE

Coming Up ...

J KNITTING FACTORY, Com Truise, Nosaj Thing, Cleopold, Sep. 7 J RIVERFRONT PARK, Tinnabulation Festival feat. John Butler Trio, OK Go, American Authors, Sep. 8-10 12 TRIBES RESORT CASINO, Totally ’80s feat. Debbie Gibson, Tiffany, Downtown Julie Brown, Sep. 9 J THE BARTLETT, Tacocat, Lisa Prank, Itchy Kitty, Sep. 9 J THE BARTLETT, Thelma and the Sleaze, Donna Donna, Sep. 10 J KNITTING FACTORY, Thundercat, PBDY, Sep. 11 J KNITTING FACTORY, Michael Franti and Spearhead, Hirie, Sep. 12

Spokane Association of REALTORS

®

Thurs & Fri, Sept 7 & 8, 2017

For our annual food drive to raise food and es. money to help Second Harvest fill their shelv

at any of our 6 local neighborhood Albertsons from Noon to 6:00 pm.

FIND YOUR HAPPY PLACE Search Happy Hour Specials, Times and Locations

INLANDER.COM/DRINKSPOTTER PRESENTED BY

EnjoyHeinekenResponsibly.com

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 DIAMS DEN • 412 W. Sprague • 934-3640 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE EMPEROR ROOM • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOTEL RL BY RED LION AT THE PARK • 303 W. North River Dr. • 326-8000 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208667-7314 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N. Market St. • 466-9918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RESERVE • 120 N. Wall • 598-8783 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 43


The Spokane Symphony fills local parks with music for its annual, end-of-summer concert series.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

CLASSICAL OUTDOOR SYMPHONICS

It’s the last three-day weekend of summer, so you might as well make it count. The Spokane Symphony has been turning local parks into makeshift concert halls on Labor Day weekend for years, and the orchestra will perform for free at Liberty Lake’s Pavillion Park on Saturday and at Comstock Park on Sunday. The afternoon programs include some of the most iconic symphonic pieces ever composed, including works by George Handel and Leonard Bernstein, selections from two world-famous operas (George Gershwin’s Porgy and Bess and Georges Bizet’s Carmen) and even John Williams’ “Throne Room Suite” from Star Wars. Both evenings will be bookended by performances of two undeniably great works — “The StarSpangled Banner” and Tchaikovsky’s “1812 Overture.” — NATHAN WEINBENDER Spokane Symphony Labor Day Weekend Concerts • Sat, Sept. 2 at 2 pm at Pavillion Park, Liberty Lake • Mon, Sept. 4 at 4 pm at Comstock Park, Spokane • Free • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

COMEDY HE’S MONEY

Most touring comedians have a tight hour-long set that gets delivered over and over again to audiences in different towns, who have no idea they’re getting the same show as the night before. Maybe the comic builds in some improv time, which is where Los Angeles-based comedian Cash Levy lives. The guy is an improvisational machine, riffing on interactions with audiences to create a new show basically every time he’s on stage. He’s probably best known for co-hosting a podcast with unpredictable madman T.J. Miller (Cashing In With T.J. Miller), and he’s made appearances on @midnight (R.I.P.) and various late-night talk shows as well. — DAN NAILEN Cash Levy • Thu, Aug. 31 at 8 pm • free/women; $10/men • Fri, Sept. 1 at 8 pm; Sat, Sept. 2 at 8 and 10:30 pm • $16 • 21+ • Spokane Comedy Club • 315 W. Sprague • spokanecomedyclub. com • 318-9998

44 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017

COMEDY BLUE REVIEW

An icon in the local comedy scene is celebrating a big milestone this year: the Blue Door Theatre is turning 20. To mark the moment, the theater and its troupe of improv “players” are rounding up some of the silliest and most creative show formats from the past two decades for a series of weekend revivals running through most of September. Each of these nights, the Blue Door Players gather for “snack-sized” versions of audience favorites like “Family Dinner,” “Fairy Tale Under Construction” and “Garage Sale.” Take a trip down memory lane, and be prepared to laugh until your sides ache. — CHEY SCOTT Once More With Feeling • Fridays, Sept. 1, 8, 15 and 22 at 8 pm • $7 • Rated for general audiences • Blue Door Theatre • 815 W. Garland • bluedoortheatre.com


SCENE: 135

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

— Your neverending story — Medvengers Turkuaz

Blitzen Trapper El Katif Broncho. Yes, we are speaking English.

FOOD CHOW TOWN

For nearly four decades, Pig Out in the Park has been satiating local appetites for indulgent food and something to do throughout the (unofficial) final weekend of summer. People pack Riverfront Park during the food festival’s six-day run with one big challenge to face: deciding what to order from more than 40 food booths, which in total boast more than 200 menu items. If the food isn’t enough to draw you downtown, the music might be. Pig Out’s other big draw has always been its long list of free outdoor concerts, this year featuring headliners like Sir Mix-A-Lot and Paul Revere’s Raiders (see page 41 for more on Pig Out 2017’s music). Don’t forget, there are also three beer gardens to quench your thirst as you rock out. If your appetite’s not huge — or you simply seek a wider sampling of the vendors — the special $4 bites menu is offered daily from 3 to 5 and 9 to 10 pm. — CHEY SCOTT Pig Out in the Park • Wed, Aug. 30 to Mon, Sept. 4: open daily from 11 am10 pm • Free to attend • Riverfront Park • 507 N. Howard • spokanepigout. com • 921-5579

— UPCOMING EVENTS —

FESTIVAL FALL FAVE

After 25 years as one of the region’s biggest end-of-summer celebrations, Fall Fest at Sandpoint’s Schweitzer Mountain Resort has outgrown its digs in the resort’s village. This year’s four-day party offering beer, bands and much more is now spreading its reach, with the beer garden (pouring more than 100 varieties of craft beer and cider) to be located on the resort’s tennis courts. The Fall Fest stage, host to four days of live, local music, now overlooks breathtaking views of Lake Pend Orielle. To make the weekend fun for the whole family, kids can mix their own wild flavors in a DIY soda tent. Between music sets or rounds of drinks, don’t forget that this will be the final weekend (until ski season, of course) for chairlift operations to hike, bike and sightsee from the peak. Head online to preorder tasting packages, book lodging and see the full event schedule, including this year’s beer list. — CHEY SCOTT 25th Annual Fall Fest • Fri, Sept. 1 through Mon, Sept. 4: daily from 11 am-6 pm • Schweitzer Mountain Resort, Sandpoint • schweitzer.com • 208-2639555

Spokane Public Market, Parkade Plaza, Tuesdays

Medvengers Gala, Spokane Convention Center, 9/15

Broncho, Billy Charger, The Knitting Factory, 9/6

Turkuaz, Sinkane, The Knitting Factory, 9/21

Blitzen Trapper, The Bartlett, 9/14

El Katif Duck Race, Downtown, 9/24

Don’t miss the next First Friday: October 6th, 2017

Plan your neverending story: www.downtownspokane.org

AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 45


W I SAW YOU

S S

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU HUNGRY GUY You: A nice blue-eyed fellow having dinner at my workplace sometime around July 4th; ordered the pasta special and a beer and proceeded to inhale your food faster than I could say, “enjoy!” It was like that scene from Coneheads where the alien chick ate a subway sandwich in basically one bite and Chris Farley’s character was all, “my mom’s the only other woman I’ve ever known that can take a sandwhich like that!” Anyway, I guess that makes me Chris Farley (but a smaller female version) so, color me impressed. And come back for dinner again sometime. We got new specials ;) BLUE-EYED BABE I saw you at the Pita Pit near the Gonzaga campus last weekend — orientation weekend. You had the most amazing smile — lit up the entire room. I love your curly brown hair, muscular shoulders and denim-blue eyes — those eyelashes too!! Do you think I would take you out for dinner sometime soon? I saw you carrying an Inlander- So, I thought there was a chance you might see this! I was the blonde in the lightwash jeans and Mariners tank top. Email me at letterstomrsfreebird@gmail.com if you’re interested. Please. ;) ORANGES AND OATMEAL Cheers to the smartly dressed gentleman who paid for

the oranges and oatmeal that I decided were outside my grocery budget. You saw me juggling my two-year-old, my wallet and my budget at Safeway on Francis the other day. It was a delight when you dropped into our cart a bag of oranges and oatmeal I selected but hadn’t purchased. I said “Thanks,” then let my big summer hat conceal my thankful, watery eyes. LOVE IS WEIRD I just don’t think I can get over you that easy. Though your gone, is it strange of me to say that I will always love you? I love you so much it hurts and now all I can do is pray to the Almighty that love will find you too, because I feel your pain and I feel you are apart of me, I can’t “just get over it”, I don’t care what you said I know you didn’t mean it, I know you have a good heart. xo SEAN THE LEPRECHAUN Sean Patrick Murphy, I love you. Even if you don’t love back, I love you and I don’t care who knows, but I told everyone I loved you. I don’t understand why I shouldn’t love you after all we have been through. You came into my life for a reason, and I know there is a deeper lesson and meaning to all aspects of our relationship as confusing and chaotic as it has been. I really wish you all the happiness in the world for you and may all your dreams come true. Love the crazy lady Reilly <3 HONESTY IS REWARDED You scraped the front of my car while parking in front of The Fieldhouse at Liberty Lake on 8/25. You left a note on my windshield telling me about it, how terrible you felt about it, and leaving your name (Leslee) and phone number. Even through the scratches are deep enough so I can’t buff them out, I thank you for your honesty and as a reward for that, you or your insurance company will not be hearing from me about it. But please be a bit more careful in the future .

JEERS

ENOUGH ALREADY Am I the only person in America who thinks that survey requests have gotten crazy? I buy

a sprinkler, please fill out a survey (PFOAS). Get a haircut, PFOAS. Buy a burger, PFOAS. Now many ask you to take a selfie and post it. My biggest complaint is the business that requires cashiers to parrot PFOAS. It appears they are evaluated on how many responses they get. To be honest, it encourages me to not return. Please stop!! JADED INLANDER ANTI-ROMANTICS How am I supposed to find the cute guy who eats fast if you don’t post my I Saw You?! I’m pretty sure he’s “The One” you guys! And the fact that he eats so fast is such a plus for me ‘cause I’m not the best

RED MEANS STOP Many Jeers to the drivers that BLOW through the intersection of Lincoln and Main (going south taking a left turn) when the light is red. Myself and others who walk across that crosswalk daily have almost been hit numerous times! I know that sitting at a red light is soooo inconvenient, and slamming on your brakes because you’re driving 40 mph downtown is even more

others may also benefit from the free books. I spend my money going to thrift stores and yard sales, specifically looking for children’s books. I believe that we need to encourage children to read, instill a love of books in them at an early age, and feed that love by making sure books are available to them. When you take all of the children’s books in my Little Free Library, you are leaving nothing for the many other children in the neighborhood that might want a book. LOVE IS BLIND I feel like I have been living a lie love you. I wish I had never met you. You played me and fooled me and

I said ‘Thanks,’ then let my big summer hat conceal my thankful, watery eyes.

cook so the less time someone spends tasting my food the better. Who knows, maybe he would prefer to do the cooking! But I guess I’ll never find out because somebody at the Inlander doesn’t want to help me to find true love :( RUDE SUSHI CREW Sushi Maru 8/23/17. I was absolutely astonished as I heard the conversations at the table next to mine. I was there having a special dinner with my boyfriend and his daughter and we were unfortunately sat by four young “adults” on a double date. They demanded specific special orders like princesses the second they sat down. They were rude when they were not served their order right away, were cussing and saying derogatory things about the waiter. The worst is that during it all, I truly believe they felt they were in the right to do so. I even gave the waiter props for putting up with it and keeping his cool. Who raises these young people? Who would allow their children to even think this kind of behavior is acceptable. They tried to top it off by leaving no tip to their waiter and writing “special mes-

SOUND OFF

sages” on their bills instead. I know they won’t change but I would hope more parents would realize these children are becoming our young adults and what a shame that this is what is the result.

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

inconvenient, but so is a negligent homicide charge (I’m assuming). Please, take the time to look up and see that the light is red, and that means STOP. RUDE CUSTOMER Dear rude customer that came to the Mead Yoke/s grocery store, just wanted to know you ruined my day! You have no right to come in and yell at any of us employees! Leave your attitude at home!!!! — sincerely a hard working employee BOOK HOG: I saw you at my Little Free Library, armload of children’s books, hubby waiting in the car, son in the back seat. You said, “I think I found one you’ll like” to your son as you proceeded to take about 15 children’s books. What about the other 14 books? Do you think your child is the only one that might benefit from this wonderful FREE library? These Little Free Libraries are for everyone to enjoy- “Take a book, leave a book” means - don’t take all of them and leave nothing! Please consider bringing some children’s books back for others to enjoy. Also consider only taking one or two so

HEY @$$HAT! I KNOW garbages are too far & few between, but when my dog sneaks your melted kit kat off ze street (thank god i F’n caught him, chocolate is heroin×10 fer dogs FYI!) I wonder what person could be of this (inconsiderate, ignorant, evil, or just plain lazy) mind??? It’s our world let’s EXSIST w/ it. Please put your $#!+ where it belongs! Thanks:) n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS C L E A C A R R I T S A F S U D A C R A T U G H M E L A I E T R S L O P T Y P O A S T R B E E T S E N S

R A N I N A N N E G A L E

46 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017

O D O R

F I G S

F I N L S E A O A R I O T A N D L R O G A S A U L M A H A B P A L I A M I X I A T R E X I H I T S E V E K H L Y C E M I A L E D I T M L I T T E E S L E T S D

A N S A R I

I C E S I N

D E N T S

T A I L

U M N O

P I K E

E N U R E R O W N

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

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you broke my heart and you will never say sorry. You don’t know me and you never will. Goodbye El Scorcho.

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EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

PINTS FOR A CAUSE A fundraising event for the American Heritage Wildlife Foundation. Mother Earth Brewing Co. sponsors beverages; also includes a raffle, appetizers and live music. Sep. 6, 5-7 pm. Idaho Pour Authority, 203 Cedar. ahwf.org BRINGING IN THE HARVEST Spokane Edible Tree Project’s 4th annual FriendRaiser features local food and beverages, a silent auction, and live music. All proceeds benefit food recovery and hunger relief programs. Sep. 8, 6-9 pm. $30, free for kids under 12. Philanthropy Center, 1020 W. Riverside Ave. spokaneedibletreeproject.org

COMEDY

CASH LEVY Cash has appeared on on Comedy Central, Fox Sports, NBC, The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson (CBS), Comics Unleashed and much more. Aug. 31-Sept. 2 at 8 pm, Sept. 2 at 10:30 pm. $16-$22. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998) ONCE MORE WITH FEELING In celebration of the BDT’s 20th anniversary, they’ll revisit as many previous shows as possible each night with the turbo speed version. Fridays, 8 pm, through Sept. 22. For all ages. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) MYLES WEBER Myles has appeared on MTV’s “Greatest Party Story Ever,” has hosted for Portico TV and worked as a correspondent for Popular Science. Sep. 3, 8 pm. $10-$16. Spokane Comedy

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COMMUNITY

I AM ENOUGH Equip your middle schooler to be ready to “launch” into the school year armed with character building, life affirming sexual integrity. Aug. 31, 7-8 pm. Free (suggested $5 donation). Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org (208-667-1865) UNDER THE FREEWAY FLEA MARKET Hundreds of vendors from across the West ply their wares in the protected, open-air space underneath I-90 and on the Wallace Depot grounds. Also includes live music, kids’ games and more. Sept. 1-4. Wallace, Idaho. wallaceidahochamber.com FALL FEST The 25th annual end-ofsummer festival features four days of live music, regional wine, hard cider and more than 60 regional microbrews and beers on tap. Also includes kids activities, arts and food vendors and more. Sept. 1-4. Free. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, Sandpoint. schweitzer.com VISION OF PEACE & JUSTICE RALLY Partake in a demonstration of the Peace and Justice Action League’s vision of peace and justice. Bring signs that share our commitment to no war, justice for all and immigration reform. Sep. 1, 4:30 pm. Free. Community Building, 35 W. Main. pjals.org FUNKY JUNK The North Idaho antique and craft show celebrates its 10th anniversary, hosting vendors of salvaged, retro, antique and vintage goods for the home. Sept. 2 from 10 am-6 pm

and Sept. 3 from 10 am-4 pm. Kids 12 and under free. $5/weekend admission. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Rd. funkyjunkantiqueshow.com THE LEGAL OBLIGATION TO PREVENT & PROSECUTE TORTURE Juan Mendez, a respected authority and advocate on this issue, is joined by Lisa Hajjar, Professor of Sociology at UC Santa Barbara, and Upendra Acharya, Professor of Law at Gonzaga. Sep. 6, 5 pm. Free. Gonzaga University School of Law, 721 N. Cincinnati St. (747-3304) SPOKANE CONTRA DANCE Spokane Folklore Society’s weekly community dance starts up again for the fall. River City Ramblers band is playing with caller Nancy Staub. No experience necessary; beginner workshop at 7:15 pm. Sep. 6, 7:30-9:30 pm. $5/$7. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. womansclubspokane.org (598-9111) FALL PLANT SALE The Friends of Manito again offers “Garden-in-a-Box” designs for the fall plant sale. Choose from three different designs and order in advance for pick up. Sep. 9, 8 am-3 pm. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. thefriendsofmanito.org (456-8038)

FILM

THE POSTMAN A 20th anniversary screening of the locally-filmed feature (Rated R) starring Kevin Costner. At 2 pm and 6 pm. Sep. 3. By donation. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St. cuttertheatre. com (509-446-4108)

Advice Goddess YAWN JUAN

My friend and I are debating why it is that men don’t want you when you want them yet they’re all gung-ho when you aren’t interested. She believes that we just want what we can’t have. Could it be that simple? —Pondering In looking for love, a number of people confuse “the chase” with something closer to criminal stalking. In their defense, these ideas don’t come out of nowhere. For AMY ALKON example, consider how creepy the Cupid dude with the little bow and arrow actually is. Basically, he’s the chubby baby version of the maniac hunting people down with a crossbow. The reality is, nobody pines for what’s easy to get or, worse, what’s chasing madly after them. It’s about value. Being easy to get or seeming desperate suggests one has what anthropologists call “low mate value.” Social psychologist Robert Cialdini explains this with “the scarcity principle,” which describes how the less available something is the more valuable it seems and the more we want it. Being scarce doesn’t necessarily equate to being more valuable; however, because of how psychologically painful we find regret — feeling that we screwed up and thus missed out — scarcity kicks us into a motivational state, making us all hot for whatever’s in short supply. This is the sales principle behind those chichi boutiques with just one item on a rack, as if they were a mini museum of the little black dress. There’s a good chance they have 20 more in the back. But putting out 20 sends a different message — like one of those shops with a big yellow sign, “Everything in the store, $15, including the dog.” Still, the scarcity principle sometimes gets falsely accused of causing a burgeoning relationship to tank when other factors are actually to blame. Consider whether you’re choosing wisely — going for someone who’s ready to be in a relationship. Some people who think they’re ready may not be. (Time — along with wanting to know instead of just wanting to believe — will tell.) Others will admit that they aren’t ready. Believe them — or at least tread cautiously — and recognize the propensity many women have for Svengali-ette-alism: “I’ll be the one to change him!” (Kleenex has succeeded as a brand in no small part thanks to these women.) With someone who is a real possibility, you’ll have your best shot by coming off appropriately interested instead of stalkerishly so. If you tend to go from zero to texting a guy 36 times in a row while sitting in your car with binoculars trained on his house, figure out proactive ways to avoid that and other crazypants stuff you do. (Perhaps, for example, give your next-door neighbor custody of your phone and car keys upon coming home.) Sure, love is said to be “a journey,” but it shouldn’t be one that has something in common with being chased by feral hogs down a lonely country road.

THE THINGS WE DO FUR LOVE

My sweet boyfriend always leaves his nose hair and beard trimmings in the sink. He claims he forgets to wipe up afterward and asks, “Is it that big of a deal?” Am I being petty, or is this disrespectful when you share a space with somebody? —Annoyed

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Surely, your boyfriend eventually notices dropped bits of beard hair — about when the sink starts panting and pawing in response to “Here, boy!” However, chances are he’s leaving you a furry sink not out of disrespect but because he goes into a behavioral coma. This comes out of how our brain conserves energy by creating stored strings of behavior. The first time you ride a bike or eat with a spoon, you have to put conscious thought into each step. But with time and practice, the sequence becomes automatic and unconscious. Eventually, when you get a bowl of oatmeal, you just eat; you don’t need to figure out how to load up the spoon and manage that “Bzzzz, here comes Mr. Airplane…” thing that transports the oatmeal to Mr. Tummy. Research on habit change by psychologist Wendy Wood and her colleagues suggests that “disrupting” the usual physical sequence of a stored behavior can jolt a person out of autopilot, triggering their conscious mind to take over. You can disrupt your boyfriend’s beard-snipping routine simply by changing where the scissors get stored. Maybe put them in a kitchen cabinet for a while -- and of course, clue him in and explain why. Yes, this could actually work to get him to remember your “Yoo-hoo…sinkiepoo!” However, what ultimately matters is how you treat each other. If your sink continues to have a five o’clock shadow, maybe decide to just laugh about your sweet daydreamy slob instead of going all toxic-ragey “I’ll show him!” and throwing out the beard clippings yourself -- by dragging the sink to the curb. n ©2017, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 47


Made-for-TV strains.

TV Strains Netflix came up with an amazing promotion for its terrible new cannabis-focused sitcom BY MIKE BOOKEY

N

etflix is among the world’s biggest entertainment companies, and apparently the streaming media and video-on-demand giant isn’t afraid to dip its toes into the legal marijuana realm. Believe it or not, Netflix actually released a collection of cannabis strains in coordination with a California medical dispensary. While this might sound like the craziest portfolio diversification in the history of corporate America, let me stop you right there — this is all a promotion, and the strains were only available to medical cardholders at a Hollywood dispensary for one weekend.

48 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017

But it was a good idea, nevertheless. Netflix rolled out these strains to hype its new series Disjointed, a comedy starring Oscar winner Kathy Bates about the hilarious happenings at a medical marijuana dispensary in California. For the promotion, Netflix tied particular strains to its original series, many of which relied on deep knowledge of the show in question, but seemed spot-on for those in the know. “Each strain was cultivated with the specific shows in mind, designed to complement each title based on their tone,” Netflix said in a press release. “For example, sillier shows may be more indica dominant, while dramedies will be more sativa dominant to help the more powerful scenes resonate.” For Arrested Development, the cult classic that got a second life on Netflix as the company waded into original content, there’s Banana Stand Kush, a reference to the Bluth family’s money-lined frozen fruit operation. Fans of Wet Hot American Summer: Ten Years Later could melt into their couches with the Camp Firewood indica. Fans of the prison dramedy Orange is the New Black could enjoy

a sativa hybrid called Poussey Riot. If you’re into the depressing yet hilarious Bojack Horseman, an indica hybrid called Prickly Muffin was recommended. The other three strains are named after the new show, Disjointed, but I won’t share those names because — sheesh — it’s not a good show, certainly not a show that anyone with a modicum of cannabis knowledge is going to appreciate. You can tell that Bates, in her lead role as a hippie-dippy dispensary owner, is trying everything to make this conventional sitcom float, but it’s too busy feeding stereotypes to its eager-to-laugh studio audience to do anything but flounder. It seems that Disjointed’s producers and writers (it comes from Chuck Lorre, who brought us The Big Bang Theory) missed the past decade, during which cannabis culture has evolved beyond jokes about lazy people who laugh a lot and wear tie-dye. Netflix’s marketing team was in tune with the industry enough to realize they could pull off a creative and effective marketing campaign. Too bad it was all to promote a lackluster series. n

Cannabis culture has evolved beyond jokes about lazy people who laugh a lot and wear tie-dye.


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EVENTS | CALENDAR UNACKNOWLEDGED A screening of the documentary about extraterrestrial contact. Sep. 3, 12:15 pm. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. uuspokane.org (325-6283) VOICES OF COLFAX The local film explores the history of Colfax through interviews with a number of community residents and was compiled by the 2016-2107 sixth graders from Jennings Elementary. Sep. 5, noon. Free. Colfax Library, 102 S. Main St. whitco.lib.wa.us ONE HEART NATIVE ARTS & FILM FESTIVAL The second annual celebration of contemporary native arts and culture includes screenings of featurelength and short Native films, a Native art gallery, music and more. Sept. 8-9. $10-$50. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. oneheartfestival.org

FOOD

PIG OUT IN THE PARK The 38th annual food and free music festival in downtown Spokane, featuring 44 food booths, 225 menu items, three beer gardens and 85 concerts on three stages. Aug. 30-Sept. 4, 11 am-10 pm daily. Free admission. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard St. spokanepigout.com RIDE & DINE DINNER SERIES Enjoy a scenic gondola ride, live music, and a savory mountain top barbecue. Sept. 1, 2-8 pm. $41-$48. Silver Mountain Ski Resort, 610 Bunker. silvermt.com PIE MAKING 101 Guest instructor, Jeri’ Kanally demystifies the art of making apple pie. Sept. 7, 5:30-7:30 pm. $30. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front. secondharvestkitchen.org

MUSIC

A MISCAST CONCERT Local performers sing songs their roles normally wouldn’t call for, like “16 Going on 17” and “At the Ballet.” Sep. 1, 7:30 pm. $12. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 236 S. Union Ave. pendoreilleplayers.org NAVAH PERLMAN’S UNFORGETTABLE MUSICAL MEMOIRES Hear stories of Navah’s life growing up as the daughter of super-star violinist Ithzak Perlman, see select family photos and enjoy beautiful musical interludes. Sep. 1, 7:30-8:30 pm. $40. Hamilton Studio, 1427 W. Dean. nwbachfest.com SPOKANE SYMPHONY LABOR DAY CONCERT Say farewell to summer in spectacular fashion. The Symphony performs light classics, pop favorites and patriotic tunes. Sept. 2, 6 pm. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. spokanesymphony.org SPOKANE SYMPHONY LABOR DAY CONCERT The Symphony performs light classics, pop favorites and patriotic tunes. Sept. 4, 6 pm. Free. Comstock Park, Spokane. spokanesymphony.org MUSIC OF THE WEST AFRICAN KORA Sean Gaskell gives a performance and educational demonstration on the Kora, an ancient 21-stringed harp from West Africa. Sep. 5, 6 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry. spokanelibrary.org (444-5331)

SPORTS

SPOKANE INDIANS VS. EVERETT Three-game home series; Sept. 1-3 at

6:30 pm. $5-$20. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana. spokaneindiansbaseball.com

ARTS

DISLOCATED MEMORIES An installation by Julie Gautier-Downes. The entire gallery is occupied by a room, recreated from the artist’s childhood. Through Sept. 29; Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm. Reception Sept. 1, 5-8 pm. Chase Gallery, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanearts.org FIRST FRIDAY Art galleries and businesses across downtown Spokane and beyond host monthly receptions to showcase new displays of art. Receptions held the first Friday of the month, from 5-8 pm. Free. Additional details at firstfridayspokane.org. GRAIN ELEVATORS OF WHITMAN COUNTY A collection of photos by Dennis Witmer, featuring more than 60 sites across Whitman County. Sept. 1-Oct. 1; open daily during library hours. Free. Colfax Library, 102 S. Main St. whitco.lib.wa.us (509-397-4366) UNTAMED: TERRY LEE A collection of wildlife in oils by the featured artist. Sept. 1-30, opening reception Sept. 3, 1-3 pm. Gallery open daily from 10 am-5 pm. Free admission. Entree Gallery, 1755 Reeder Bay Rd., Priest Lake. entreegallery.com (208-443-2001)

WORDS

LAURA READ POETRY READING Listen to the poems written in two previous workshops for the Snapshot Spokane show. Aug. 31, 6-8 pm. Free. Terrain, 304 W. Pacific. terrainspokane.com 3 MINUTE MIC FEAT. MAYA ZELLER: This month’s “Remember the Word Featured Reader” is poet Maya Jewell Zeller. Open mic readers can share up to 3 minutes of poetry. Sep. 1, 8-9:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) READING + DISCUSSION: DAVID GOODRICH, CLIMATE SCIENTIST Dr. David Goodrich’s book, “A Hole in the Wind: A Climate Scientist’s Bicycle Journey Across the US” details his journey from Delaware to Oregon, sharing information and speaking with others about climate change. Sep. 2, 7-8 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) BOOTSLAM Spokane Poetry Slam’s all-ages performance poetry competition, with a $50 grand prize. Sign-ups at 7, slam at 7:30 pm. $5 to compete or watch. Held the first Sunday of the month. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org FOLIAGE FIRST Garden designer and author Karen Chapman for a presentation and mini show-and-tell on garden foliage, covering year-round color and texture. Sep. 7, 6:30-9 pm. Free. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. tieg.org N. IDAHO DISTINGUISHED HUMANITIES LECTURE FEAT. JON MEACHAM The Pulitzer Prize-winning presidential historian delivers the 14th Annual North Idaho Distinguished Humanities Lecture: “America Then and Now: What History Tells Us about the Future.” Sep. 7, 7-10 pm. $60-$125. The CdA Resort, 115 S. Second. idahohumanities.org (208-345-5346) n


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AUGUST 31, 2017 INLANDER 53


Dave and Mari Clack at their South Hill home.

A Legacy of Giving Dave and Mari Clack reflect on years of helping medical students feel at home in Spokane BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

W

hen students go to medical school through the University of Washington’s regional WWAMI program in Spokane, they’re in for years of hard work, but unlike students at most medical schools, they have a support system that’s ready to help out when life kicks them in the pants. WWAMI is short for Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana and Idaho, and students from all five states train to be doctors through the WWAMI program in Washington. Mari and Dave Clack helped start the Friends of WWAMI Spokane to assist medical students with scholarships, but also to help out with aspects of daily life that can make school that much more stressful. Your daycare is closing and you need to find a new center? They’ll help you figure it out. You car has broken down? An emergency fund can help with the cost. The Friends host dinners and celebrations with the students, so they’ll get a better introduction to the Spokane community, Dave says. “Frankly, for those of us who have lived here a long time, it was a little bit of a

54 INLANDER AUGUST 31, 2017

recruiting effort, so that when they finished their medical education and their residency and became doctors, they would consider Spokane as a great place to come live and raise their families and practice medicine.” The Clacks keep up with students in a personal way: One year when they were hosting a holiday party, a scholarship student in Seattle asked if he could bring a carload of people over, and they said, “Of course!”

T

he program has had a presence in Eastern Washington since the 1970s. Until a few years ago, students would spend their first year at Washington State University, then go on to Seattle and clinical rotations. After WSU decided to split with UW Medicine a few years ago and start its own medical school, UW partnered with Gonzaga University. Now the first two years — recently compressed into an 18-month curriculum — are hosted on Gonzaga’s campus, and students are getting into the field more quickly. The Clacks were instrumental in helping with the transition, and have long had a passion for supporting doctors and students. Both are UW alumni (Dave, 1957; Mari, 1958). Mari served as a UW regent, and her father, Clyde Jensen, was one of the doctors who helped start UW’s medical school after World War II. Between them, the couple’s achievements are almost too numerous to list. Mari has a long history of serving on boards in the community: Among many others around the state, she has served on the boards for Mothers Against Violence in America, National Park and Recreation Association, Planned Parenthood of Spokane and YWCA of Spokane, and she helped co-found the Women Helping Women Fund. Dave served as director of Avista’s board for nearly 20 years, chaired Northwest Venture Associates, opened the Spokane office of Meridian Capital private banking investment firm, and has served in many other positions. “Due in part to your leadership, not only did the UW School of Medicine remain in Spokane after separating from Washington State University, but the program expanded dramatically and dynamically, working with

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Gonzaga University to form the Regional Health Partnership,” writes Paul Ramsey, CEO of UW Medicine and Dean of the School of Medicine, in a thank-you letter to the Clacks. “With your counsel, the medical education program turned a challenge — the need for a new partner — into a wonderful opportunity. When we first asked you to take on the task of welcoming students to the Spokane community, we had just 20 first-year students. Now the program has 100 first- and second-year students combined, housed on the welcoming Gonzaga University campus.”

O

ne of the activities the Clacks have most enjoyed hosting is the white coat ceremony. Students used to get their white coats partway through their medical education, but the Clacks and Friends of WWAMI Spokane encouraged the school to hold the ceremony before the first day of class. “It was fascinating to see the transformation that took place right on that stage when the doctor put the white coat on that student,” Dave says. Mari says one student came up to her before a ceremony and said he was too nervous; he couldn’t do it. “I said, ‘You’re not going into neurosurgery, just put your arms in there!’” she says. “He did, and walked up to me, and said, ‘That’s the best feeling, because I’m telling everybody I’ll do the best I can.’ That’s what I want any student ever to feel, that this school, this opportunity, is helping you. Is there to not only teach you, but to have your back.” After years of forming close relationships with students, and with the school’s transition to partnering with Gonzaga, it’s time to let others in the community take a turn and share their own ideas to improve the program, the Clacks say. “We believe in serving our community. We’ve done a lot of it, and loved every minute of it,” Mari says. “It’s time for somebody to step in and have as much fun as we have.” n This article first appeared in the current issue of InHealth, the Inlander’s health magazine.


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