Inlander 08/18/2022

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OUT OF REACH A STEP IN AIDING LOW-INCOME HOUSING PAGE 8 ISLAND TRUCKIN’ COMMUNITY AND FOOD MEET ON WHEELS PAGE 21 LARGER THAN LIFE

BACKSTREET BOYS HIT SPOKANE ARENA PAGE 26

AUGUST 18-24, 2022 | DROPPIN’ KNOWLEDGE SINCE 1993

Schools reopened, but many students haven’t returned to the classroom PAGE 12


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t’s hard to believe it’s BACK-TO-SCHOOL season, since it seems summer arrived really late, but here we are. In this week’s cover package (page 12), Daniel Walters looks into what happened to kids who never returned to school when COVID forced everyone home, and Nate Sanford chats with Spokane Public Schools Superintendent Adam Swinyard about how 2022-23 is shaping up. That’s just the start of a great issue, though, as we talk with comedian Adam Conover ahead of his stop at Spokane Comedy Club this weekend (page 18), and we test your Backstreet Boys knowledge before they pop into Spokane Arena (page 26). In other news, this will be the last week you’ll see that mug shot, as I’ll be leaving the Inlander after eight great years, the last one as editor. It’s been an awesome experience, and I’m sticking around Spokane and will join our regular readers in seeing the great things the Inlander does next. — DAN NAILEN, editor

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1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, SPOKANE, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 | EMAIL: INFO@INLANDER.COM THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. Please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x210 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email frankd@ inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia and is published at least twice per month. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2022, Inland Publications, Inc.

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

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WHAT WAS YOUR FAVORITE POP MUSIC GROWING UP? LIZ BLUFF

Backstreet Boys, for sure! What was your favorite song? Probably “Backstreet’s Back.”

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Chey Scott (x225) ASSOCIATE EDITOR Derek Harrison (x248) CREATIVE DIRECTOR Samantha Wohlfeil (x234) BREAKING NEWS EDITOR Daniel Walters (x263) SENIOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER Seth Sommerfeld (x250) MUSIC & SCREEN EDITOR

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One Direction, easily. Who was your favorite member of the band? Niall!

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MANDY NGUYEN

Interestingly, I got a ticket to Backstreet Boys because I loved them. I think my favorite song of theirs was “I Want It That Way.”

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HAILEY DEAKINS

Probably Imagine Dragons. What was your favorite song? “Radioactive,” their first one, was my favorite.

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Well, of course, Backstreet Boys and NSYNC and 98 Degrees, and all of them. Did you have a favorite member of any of those groups? All of them. The whole team was fantastic and so dreamy!

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COMMENT | CRIME

FAMILY LAW Divorce Spousal Maintenance / Alimony Child Support Modifications Parenting Plans

Craig Mason

AUTO INJURY • CIVIL LITIGATION

W. 1707 BROADWAY, SPOKANE, WA | 509443-3681

Reforming criminal justice is just one step toward stronger communities.

Regaining Control

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

Local leaders need to first restore law and order, then tackle much-needed reforms BY BILL BRYANT

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ommunity safety is one reason we have a government, but across Washington state governments are failing to provide this basic service. For crime and safety, Spokane, for example, is ranked in the bottom 3 percent of U.S. cities, according to data compiled by neighborhoodscout.com. Total crime in Spokane is 145 percent above the national average. Property crime is 163 percent above the national average, and violent crime is 55 percent higher. In Spokane, the murder and assault rates are twice the Washington state average, all according to the FBI Uniform Crime Report. These aren’t just statistics; they’re signs of a weakening community.

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You’d think with those numbers that elected officials would come together and implement a plan to restore safety, but too many talk past each other. Many Republicans talk about needing more officers, while many Democrats talk about needing more training. Some talk about the need to prosecute crime, while others talk about addressing root causes. Thing is, they’re both right.


First, we need swift action. City Council members and county commissioners need to publicly encourage officers to arrest those who assault citizens, vandalize businesses, steal property or deal drugs, and make it clear they expect prosecutions. Judges need to harshly sentence anyone convicted of a crime while armed. While much attention has been focused on police killing suspects, 94 percent of people killed by police are armed. Committing a crime while armed must be severely punished. Every state legislator should commit to repealing the antipolice laws passed two years ago. The combined effect of those laws has been to handcuff police officers trying to investigate a crime or pursue a suspect. And police unions, in exchange for this support, need to expedite the discipline and firing of abusive or negligent officers.

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hile all of the above is necessary, it won’t build a just community. To do that we need to rebuild a broken mental health system, recriminalize drug possession, reclaim our public spaces and overhaul our foster care system. Among the 50 states, Washington’s mental health system ranks near the bottom. Individuals with untreated mental health issues too often are left to the streets — and are 16 times more likely to be killed by police officers. Before blaming the police, as a community we should acknowledge we’ve failed these people. If a society is measured by how it treats its most vulnerable, we have work to do. Washington’s experiment with decriminalizing hard drug possession, largely spurred by a state supreme court decision, has failed. Legislators need to pass laws making hard drug possession a crime that results in more than a year of confined rehabilitation, during which time mental health care, vocational training and a post-incarceration housing plan will be provided.

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If a society is measured by how it treats its most vulnerable, we have work to do. It’s a short skip and a jump from a broken mental health system and decriminalizing drug possession to homelessness spilling out onto our streets — and to crime rising on those streets and around camps. Those who have untreated mental issues or are addicted to drugs too often do not seek services. Tolerating camping on public property enables that destructive “choice.” Local and state officials should make it clear that when alternative shelter exists, there is a zero tolerance for camping on public property. To do otherwise is cruel, not compassionate.

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ashington also needs to overhaul its foster care system. Repeatedly, media exposés and court orders have revealed the state to be warehousing kids in motels and cars. Those who are placed in homes often are bounced around without any stability and then are aged-out onto the streets with little support. Immediate stern action could begin reversing Spokane’s crime statistics, but addressing root causes and building a just community will require reinventing 20th century mental health and social systems. n Bill Bryant, who served on the Seattle Port Commission from 2008-16, ran against Jay Inslee as the Republican nominee in the 2016 governor’s race. He is chairman emeritus of the company BCI, is a founding board member of the Nisqually River Foundation and was appointed by Gov. Chris Gregoire to serve on the Puget Sound Partnership’s Eco-Systems Board. He lives in Winthrop, Washington.

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AUGUST 18, 2022 INLANDER 7


HOUSING

BRIDGING the LAND GAP

“What it really does is remove barriers to building low-income housing,” says Ben Stuckart, pictured here at a potential Peaceful Valley parcel. ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

Spokane’s new land bank wants to obtain properties so nonprofits can build low-income housing BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

W

hile many nonprofits want to build lowincome housing, at times it can be difficult to get things rolling. For example, when a nonprofit applies for housing project grants from the state or federal government, agencies often want to see that an organization already has the land to build on, says Ben Stuckart, executive director of the Low Income Housing Consortium. But for nonprofits, buying a piece of land before knowing they’ll get grant money to build there is a huge risk, he says. A new land bank that Stuckart and others just started in Spokane could help solve that problem by obtaining land and abandoned properties, then working with nonprofits so they can buy those properties over time. “What it really does is remove barriers to building low-income housing,” Stuckart says. “The land bank is a

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neutral agency. I’m not building the low-income housing, I’m representing all of the low-income developers in town.” In partnership with STCU, the Low Income Housing Consortium worked to obtain seed money for the Spokane Regional Low Income Housing Land Bank from the GoWest Foundation, which works with credit unions and community organizations in six Western states to help communities with projects such as affordable housing, financial literacy and more. With $45,000 from GoWest, the new land bank is now up and running, and Stuckart is excited to start collecting donations so the bank can start gathering properties. It’s the first bank of its kind in Washington state. “I’ve got a goal that the land bank needs to raise $1 million over the next year. That may come from soliciting the city, the county, the state and the feds, and it may come from me talking to businesses about what a great

idea it is,” Stuckart says. “But in order to pursue the path where I’m buying land, I’m going to either have to start with a gift of land or I’m going to need some money.” Already, he’s in talks with multiple property owners who may be interested in selling their land at a discount to the land bank with the knowledge it will be used for low-income housing; other proposed changes to state law could help the land bank even more in the future.

NEW RULES AND OPPORTUNITIES

In 2018, Washington’s Legislature changed state law so that state agencies with surplus land can gift that land to organizations that will use it for the public good by providing affordable housing. Before, it was illegal for agencies to gift public property at low or no cost, but with a housing crisis affecting ...continued on page 10


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every part of the state, facilitating affordable housing projects appealed to lawmakers. That means Spokane’s land bank could immediately start approaching agencies to get parcels of land. But other changes to state and local rules may be necessary to address another possible source of affordable housing: zombie houses. When homes have been vacated or abandoned, becoming nuisance properties that cities legally obtain, they typically get put on the market to go to the highest bidder. When Stuckart served as the Spokane City Council president, he frequently questioned why nonprofits couldn’t get the first crack at those properties. There were occasions, he says, when the city would offer a particular home to an organization, but if it didn’t plan to build in that neighborhood within a few years, the property would be sold on the market instead.

“Across the country, more than 250 land banks have been created over the last decade.” But with the land bank in place, the bank could take ownership of those homes and hold onto them until a nonprofit or developer is willing and ready to build a low-income residence there, Stuckart says. If state and local laws are also changed to allow for those transfers to happen outside of the typical auction process, those properties could more easily be promised for affordable housing. Across the country, more than 250 land banks have been created over the last decade, largely in response to the Great Recession’s housing crash, according to an August 2021 report on land banks solicited by Spokane Neighborhood Action Partners (SNAP) and Invest Health Spokane. The report, by the Center for

“Out of Reach” is the Inlander’s occasional series investigating why finding a home, or even an affordable rental, has increasingly become out of reach in the Inland Northwest — and what we can do about it. Follow the series at inlander.com/housing.


Community Progress, outlines how several states changed their laws to specifically allow cities and regions to create land banks to put abandoned properties to good use. “Most land banks focus on a subset of [vacant, abandoned and deteriorated] properties that are causing the most harm to a community by creating public health and safety hazards, driving down property values, and draining local tax dollars through repeated service calls for police, fire, and housing and building code enforcement resources,” the report states. “The targeted inventory of land banks are usually those properties that the private market has rejected given various legal and financial barriers, such as tax or other public liens against the property, that exceed the value of the property.” Some states have enabled land banks to obtain those properties for less than the value of the tax burden remaining on that property. Deals with Spokane’s land bank could also allow nonprofits to pay off a property over 20 or 30 years (rather than buying an entire property up front) depending on the type of loan or grant they get for their project, Stuckart says. “It’s a lot cheaper and a lot less risk for the nonprofit,” Stuckart says. “Instead of them having to come up with that capital up front, they’d build that cost into their proposal.” The newly launched land bank is still gathering support. Stuckart encourages anyone who wants to get involved with the board, which will decide who the land bank works with, or who wants to help with fundraising for land acquisition or is interested in selling or gifting their own property, to reach out to him. His email is ben@slihc.org. “The waitlist for low-income housing right now is still three years,” Stuckart says. “If people really want to see a difference on the streets, like a visible difference, we’re gonna have to build a lot more low-income housing.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

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THE

MISSING J

KIDS

anell Harvey’s son had already been having trouble in public middle school before the pandemic hit. He’s a great kid, but he has dyslexia, which can make learning tough sometimes. He was on an individualized education plan. He was horrified, he told his mom, to learn that he’d been “tracked” — stuck with kids also struggling in school. And when the pandemic hit and they were plunged into the world of online education, what engagement he had became almost impossible. “He wasn’t on Zoom,” Harvey says. “He was on YouTube… he wouldn’t engage. He couldn’t handle the stimulation.” But for her family, it was a chance to deal with the frustration that had been building for a long time. “COVID happened and we had an opportunity,” Harvey says. “I’m like, ‘We’re out.’” For the 2020-21 school year, she and another parent homeschooled, splitting tutoring costs. “Our daughter improved two grades of math in three months,” Harvey says. And the next year, she enrolled her kids in a small fledgling private school, Grace Alliance Christian. “That school focuses on small class sizes, focuses on good values and meets students where they’re at,” Harvey says, “There’s that one-on-one attention. And you have teachers that can work one-on-one with students, and you can also modify the curriculum to their level.”

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arvey’s hardly alone. In fall 2020, Washington state lost more than 50,000 students from enrollment in public schools — an almost 5 percent drop. Nearly 2,200 were gone from Spokane Public Schools alone. The number of preschoolers and kindergartners in Spokane Public Schools fell by more than 30 percent. This was a consequence, not just of the pandemic but of the reaction to it. When the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank, looked at which districts had lost the most students during the pandemic, they found that — with a few exceptions — the states that were the most cautious about COVID, like New York, California, Oregon and Washington, lost the most students during the pandemic. The states that opened up schools earlier and got flak for being more cavalier about COVID, like Florida, Texas and the Dakotas, suffered much less loss of student enrollment. As a whole, Idaho’s enrollment numbers were some of the least affected in the nation. Josh Westermann, director of Student & Family Services at the Mead School District, says that even after school returned to

The pandemic shook enrollment numbers in Washington state, with some parents finding new options that may stick as pandemic restrictions have been lifted BY DANIEL WALTERS

ONLINE

Find the Washington State Enrollment Explorer on our website, which lets you look at which districts — and individual schools — saw the biggest declines during the pandemic. Check out which grade levels were the most affected and see firsthand that this is mostly a story about preschool and grade schools, instead of high schools. It’s easiest to navigate on your desktop. Go to inlander.com/enrollment.

being in person, other COVID measures became a major factor for why students didn’t return. “The biggest reason really was some of the COVID restrictions. That was what we heard, over and over and over. The masking and the testing.” They got hit from both flanks: You had parents who didn’t want their kids to have to deal with all the masking and other restrictions, and then you had students who were worried that attending school in-person would put their loved ones at risk. “A lot of times I’ve heard that they’re really fearful for their family member’s lives because of the pandemic,” says North Central High School Assistant Principal Jessica Everman. “They go home, and grandma has cancer. Grandma lives with them. If grandma gets it, she’s not gonna make it.” North Central High School Principal Tami McCracken says the pandemic was particularly difficult for low-income students. Sometimes older students were distracted by needing to help out their younger students with school. Other times, you had a situation where four kids — all at different grade levels — were all in the same room, all trying to Zoom with different teachers at the same time. The school committed to not giving up on those students, McCracken says. “There were two students specifically that I could drive to their houses without even looking them up anymore because we visited them so often,” McCracken says. “While the counselor and I would say we felt unsuccessful last year, those students [were] in school every day [in 2021-22].”

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n the higher-income Mead School District, meanwhile, homeschooling exploded by 150 percent in fall 2020. “They’re surprised by how easy homeschooling is and how much easier there is than Zoom school,” says Jen Garrison Stuber, with the Washington Homeschool Organization. “They’re surprised by how much they like their kids… you end up spending all this time with your kids, and you end up helping them become better people.” The number of homeschooled students inside the boundaries of Spokane Public Schools precisely doubled from fall 2019 to fall 2020 — from 573 to 1,146 students. And one county — Okanagan — increased its number of students by more than 50 percent in a single year, adding 2,800 students in fall 2020. To that, you can credit the flood of students into an online charter school, the for-profit Washington Virtual Academy, which is hosted by the Omak School District. Stuber expects many of those who have now tried it to keep homeschooling, even after the pandemic completely fades away. n

AUGUST 18, 2022 INLANDER 13


Emerging from the Storm

Spokane Public Schools Superintendent Adam Swinyard on enrollment, mental health and the coming school year BY NATE SANFORD

A

dam Swinyard was sworn in as Spokane Public Schools superintendent in July 2020. It was a crazy time for everyone — especially educators. “The pandemic has put us in the midst of a storm,” Swinyard said to the Spokane School Board on the night of his swearing-in ceremony. Two years later, the storm is receding, but the district is still grappling with the enduring effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. The Inlander met with Swinyard at the school district office to talk about enrollment, mental health, staffing and the district’s goals for the new school year. INLANDER: Is there a big takeaway you or the district learned during the pandemic? SWINYARD: Just the importance of relationships and community and how our schools are a hub for supports, for services. [The schools] are such a key landmark in our neighborhoods. And that’s something we knew pre-pandemic, but the pandemic certainly reinforced how incredibly important it is for kids to feel that sense of belonging and to be able to socialize and interact and communicate and be involved in activities outside the school day… Whether that’s sports or clubs or performing arts, those are the types of things that are really essential to a student’s school experience. Is there anything you’re particularly concerned about going into this year? Mental health continues to be very prominent on our mind. The pandemic impacted our community in lots of different ways and disproportionately impacted some parts of our community. And we’re really committed to making sure that we’ve got supports and resources in place. Spokane Public Schools is actually one of the largest mental health providers in the county. So we have therapists inside of our schools. We also make sure that we have invested in school counselors and intervention staff so that we have a really strong network of resources and supports for kids. Is learning loss something you’re concerned about? I think certainly you’re hearing lots of national discourse about learning loss. Certainly the pandemic impacted students in a variety of different ways. Certainly distance learning created an impact to progress and learning, and our teachers were really mindful and focused on that this past year. I think as we move forward, we will deepen our understanding of the impacts of the pandemic and try to put ourselves in the best position possible to respond to the needs of the students that were most impacted.

Spokane Public Schools Superintendent Adam Swinyard YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

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Washington saw a big statewide drop in enrollment, and that was the case in Spokane as well. Is that something you’re concerned about? Do you see that going in the opposite direction? We’re hearing from families — even families that have historically been a public school family. We know that some of them decided on a different schooling option during the pandemic. What we hear from them is the awareness that they have around transitions for their student. And even though they may have historically been a public school family, their student is now acclimated to a different schooling option. And they don’t want to put them through another transition. All indications [show] that our enrollment will stabilize over time and align with historic trends and the growth that we’re seeing in Spokane County.


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When you talk to parents who made that choice, do you get a sense for their reasons why? I think there was a wide range of reasons why families made choices during the pandemic to transition away from a public school setting, or whatever school setting their current student was in. So I’m not sure any type of school setting was immune from families not agreeing with the approach, or were concerned about COVID and kind of shifted their options. So I think we saw that across all parts of the K-12. We had families that were concerned about masks being on, masks being off. We had families concerned about social distancing; we had families concerned about having vaccinations, not having vaccinations. There was a broad range of opinions and perspectives. Is the district looking at any approaches to draw some of those families back? One of our main focuses is to continue to provide an incredible academic experience for kids. We have historically low class sizes; we’re experiencing record high graduation rates; we have more resources and support inside of our schools than ever before; we had four of the six Spokane scholars from our school district. So we’re continuing to share the story of the really great academic in-school experience we provide for kids. We’ve also learned from the pandemic that families are interested in a variety of different school options, and that one size doesn’t fit all. I think that something we learned is certainly that distance learning was very impactful for some kids, we also had students who thrived in distance learning. And we have families that really appreciated that model and have a high interest to continue. And that’s why we have created Spokane Virtual, which is a fully online K-12 school option for students to participate in. And we’re receiving really overwhelmingly positive feedback and an excitement that that is one of a wide range of options that we have in Spokane Public Schools. When it comes to making that choice to go virtual, is that something that parents or kids are able to switch out of? If you commit to a virtual school, are you there for the full year? We do everything we can to meet the needs of families within some of the realities of our constraints around staffing. And like many other parts of our economy, and many school districts across the state, we’re facing significant labor shortages with classroom teachers and support staff. But to the greatest extent possible, we do what we can to be flexible and malleable.

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How much of an impact have staffing shortages had? It’s had a significant impact. We’ve experienced it for secretarial staffing, custodial staffing, there’s a national bus driver shortage. Anytime you’re down 20, 30, in some cases 40 percent of where you’re typically accustomed to be staffed, it becomes very difficult to provide continuity of services and experiences for kids. So we’ve had to be very creative and flexible. There was a point last year where our building administrators were driving rented vans and transporting kids to school, which I think really reinforced the culture of our school district. We’re about kids, and we’re going to do everything we possibly can to make sure that we serve them to the best of our abilities. Are there any new programs that you’re particularly excited to see rolling out this year? We’re creating a significant emphasis on early learning. And in Spokane County, we have one of the lowest kindergarten readiness rates in the entire state. And we have one of the lowest percentages of eligible students being served in preschool programs. So we tripled the number of slots — preschool offerings — that our school district offers [from] last year. We are working really closely with community partners that offer preschool to be a collaborative thought partner and a resource and helping them to expand that offering. We need every single kid in our community to have a quality preschool experience so that when they walk into kindergarten they are ready to go and ready to learn. n

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AUGUST 18, 2022 INLANDER 15


Private Schooling Checking in on alternatives to public education around the Inland Northwest

CHESTERTON ACADEMY OF NOTRE DAME

BY NATE SANFORD

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or families seeking an alternative to public education, the Inland Northwest has a range of secular and private school options. While public schools in Spokane and other parts of Washington are still facing a pandemicrelated decline in enrollment, many private schools report an increase in students. Jamie Tender, head of school at Saint George’s, a K-12 private school in north Spokane, says the school has seen an increase in interest from prospective students — especially 9th and 10th graders. Tender says he’s also seen a growing number of families from out of town searching for their first school in Spokane. “The nice thing about Spokane is we’re able to both provide good public schools, but also strong private schools,” Tender says. For families interested in exploring private schooling options, Tender says his biggest piece of advice is to visit the school in person. Doing research on the school’s website is a good start, but

PRIVATE SCHOOLS

Tender says nothing beats seeing the campus yourself and getting a sense of the school’s values, mission and vibes. Derek Duchesne, vice principal of academics at Gonzaga Preparatory School, agrees. “My advice would be to go on a family tour of the school and do the same thing at a local public school too. Really sit down and weigh the pros and cons and figure out what’s the best fit for their family situation.” Duchesne says small class sizes, rigorous college prep and specialized programs are typically the biggest draws for families seeking out private education. Looking ahead to the fall, both Duchesne and Tender say they’re excited about the return of school activities that were cut short by the pandemic. At Saint George’s, students can expect to see field trips to Montana and to the Pacific Coast to study marine biology. At Gonzaga Prep, Duchesne says he’s excited to see the full return of the school’s extensive retreat program. See this page for a partial list of major private schools in the Inland Northwest.

Spokane; Catholic; 9-12; 509-242-3750 or chestertonacademyofnotredame.org

ENLIGHTIUM ACADEMY Spokane; Christian; K-12; 886-488-4818 or enlightiumacademy.com

GONZAGA PREPARATORY SCHOOL

Spokane; Catholic; 9-12; 509-483-8511 or gprep.com

LAKE CITY ACADEMY

Coeur d’Alene; Seventh-Day Adventist; K-8; 208-667-0877 or lakecityacademy.org

NORTH IDAHO CHRISTIAN SCHOOL

Hayden; Christian; 1-12; 208-772-7546 or northidahochristianschool.com

NORTHWEST CHRISTIAN

Spokane; Christian; pre-K-12; 509-862-4175 or nwcs.org

THE OAKS ACADEMY

Spokane Valley; Christian; K-12; 509-536-5955 or theoakscca.org

SAINT GEORGE’S SCHOOL

Spokane; nondenominational; K-12; 509-466-1636 or sgs.org

SALISH SCHOOL OF SPOKANE Spokane; nondenominational/ Salish language immersion; P-8; 509-325-2018 or salishschoolofspokane.org

SANDPOINT WALDORF SCHOOL Sandpoint; nondenominational; nursery-8; 208-265-2683 or sandpointwaldorf.org

SPOKANE K-12 CATHOLIC SCHOOLS

There are nine K-12 Catholic schools in Spokane and Spokane Valley, including All Saints, Cataldo and St. Thomas More; dioceseofspokane.org/schools

SUMMIT CHRISTIAN ACADEMY Spokane; Christian; K-12; 509-924-4618 or ncek12.com

The “Three Companions Statue” at Gonzaga Prep. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

16 INLANDER AUGUST 18, 2022

For details on these schools and others, check out privateschoolreview.com


FINDING the

On Track Academy is one special option for keeping Spokane Public Schools students engaged. CHIANA McINELLY PHOTO

RIGHT FIT

Spokane Public Schools offers more than its traditional schools to district high schoolers

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hile some students thrive with six periods, a rotating host of teachers and standard textbook curricula, others need a different approach. Thankfully, they don’t need to leave Spokane Public Schools to find it. The school district offers what are known as “option” schools for students who would benefit from a different approach to their learning. For high school students, there’s the Community School, Lisa Mattson On Track Academy (named for the school’s principal) and Pratt Academy. There’s also a newly created Open Doors program — a virtual GED classroom aimed at those aged 16-24 who are not expected to graduate. There are various programs and alternatives for middle and elementary school students as well. Chris Burke, assistant principal at On Track Academy, says the school used to be primarily focused on students who are falling behind and at risk of not graduating. It still serves those students, but it’s also expanded to accommodate students who are simply looking at a more individualized approach to learning.

BY NATE SANFORD Instead of six periods, students at On Track Academy have a block period, often taught by two instructors who co-teach the students. This allows students to build a more personal connection with teachers, who can get to know the students and tailor instruction to their individual needs. “One of the big things students say they like is that they’re not shuffling between six different classes a day,” Burke says. On Track Academy, which accepts students in grades 10 through 12, offers continuous enrollment. Students will often start the school year at a traditional neighborhood school and realize part way through that they need a different approach. On Track Academy usually starts the school year with around 300 students and ends with closer to 500. Burke says he’ll often get calls from students or parents who are considering transferring to an option school, but are on the fence about whether or not they should make the switch or just stick it out for the rest of the year. Burke says his first piece of advice is for them to get

in touch with the school counselor and see what options might be available at their current school. If they think transferring is the best option, the counselor can help them fill out an online application on the school website. Administrators will look at the student’s transcript and get in touch to talk with them about whether On Track Academy is the right fit. Burke notes that over the past five years, he’s noticed parents becoming more open to the idea of alternative education. There used to be a perception that the option schools were just for kids who are in trouble, but that’s quickly changing. On Track Academy moved into a new building last year, which Burke says allowed them to add more elective programs and more hands-on project-based classes. There’s a program called Pathway that offers students experience in things like engineering, digital media and art. Burke’s biggest piece of advice for struggling students: “Don’t be afraid to ask.” n Visit spokaneschools.org/domain/173 for more info

AUGUST 18, 2022 INLANDER 17


COMEDY

CENTER OF ATTENTION Adam Conover’s new act looks inward and outward for lessons and laughs about attention itself BY NIC RENSHAW

18 INLANDER AUGUST 18, 2022

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dam Conover built his career on the cold, hard truth — but that’s only half the story. By the time Conover debuted his show Adam Ruins Everything on CollegeHumor in 2014, he had already been rehearsing its core formula for a while, a two-step process Conover describes as “One, say a fact; and two, get yelled at.” He’s never been shy about sharing stories from the days before his endless well of pedantry was paying all his bills, but audiences this summer may well be hearing a very different side of those stories, as Conover’s new hour of stand-up, Pay Attention, takes a more personal tack to explore the topic of attention through Conover’s own childhood diagnosis with attention deficit disorder, or ADD. To those familiar with Conover’s work, Pay Attention might seem like a sharp left turn from the guy who jovially pokes holes in pseudoscience and old wives’ tales, but to hear Conover tell it, it’s just the latest spin on his long-standing fascination with cultural myth and inherited misinformation. “The sort of stories that I look to talk about are the ones we were brought up being told,” Conover says. “I was told a story my whole life about how I was a lazy kid, that I was bad, that I was impulsive, and it took a long time for me to unlearn that story and come to understand myself more realistically. We’re told a particular story about kids with ADD that I’m trying to piece apart and replace with something a little bit more true.” Conover describes his recent Netflix special The G Word in much the same way, saying, “It’s this story that the government can’t do anything, that it’s ineffective and we need to take it apart. That’s a story that’s become a very deep part of American

culture... Whenever there’s a narrative like that, it is the most fun thing in the world to puncture it, to tell people ‘hold on a second, here’s the actual story.’”

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onover’s work, and The G Word in particular, often tackles controversial or politically charged topics, but he’s careful to avoid “political comedy.” “When people say ‘political comedian,’ they’re thinking of someone who’s… making fun of Ted Cruz or whatnot, like what Bill Maher does,” Conover says. “I like to take a larger lens than that. I look at the facts as we know them. Sometimes that ventures into the world of politics. More often, though, it’s about policy.” Even when speaking directly about the inner workings of government, it’s clear that Conover’s preferred angles are completely distinct from those of his self-professed “Johnny Carson figure” Jon Stewart. “The G Word is... about this thing that we hire the politicians to manage, not Republicans vs. Democrats,” he says. Pay Attention seems to speak directly to this unwillingness to be boxed into one narrow subject, though Conover stresses that even his new material touches on broader social issues. “[Pay Attention] is [also] about the attention economy and all the businesses that are built on trying to steal our attention away from us,” he says. “It’s about how we can gain more control over that aspect of our lives. That is broadly informational and searching, about me looking for those answers, and I think it goes way beyond any kind of political comedy.” Though the germ of Adam Ruins Everything was initially a stand-up routine, Conover found his niche in visually splashy


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Adam Conover promises a selfie with everyone at his shows. Be sure he makes this face. COURTESY OF NETFLIX

sketch comedy, and admits that returning to traditional stand-up has required a few adjustments. “I’ve actually had to unlearn some of what I was doing as a TV host,” he says. “In the past, when I’ve toured, I’ve often brought in some of the elements of television... that was great fun to do, but it felt a little bit distant from the audience for me. It felt like I was doing a TV show onstage.” The more personal tone of the material seems to have inspired a shift to a more personal format, and Conover is enthusiastic about the results. “What I wanted to do for this show was... just be myself in front of an audience with no mediating graphics or writers writing for me,” he says. “It’s been incredibly rewarding, because WEEKEND I really feel like I am myself C O U N T D OW N onstage, in a way I often haven’t Get the scoop on this been in the past.” weekend’s events with Conover brings Pay Attention our newsletter. Sign up at to the Spokane Comedy Club Inlander.com/newsletter. this weekend, and his pitch to local audiences is a simple-yetcompelling one: “If you come, you will laugh a lot, and you will learn a lot, and I will take a selfie with literally every single person in the crowd who wants one after the show. That is the Adam Conover guarantee.” n Adam Conover • Thu, Aug. 18 at 7:30 pm; Fri-Sat, Aug. 19-20 at 7:30 and 10 pm • $20-$35 • Spokane Comedy Club • 315 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-318-9998

Fairy Festa A Free Fantasy Festival

August 27th 10~4

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409 S Dishman Mica Rd AUGUST 18, 2022 INLANDER 19


CULTURE | DIGEST

THE BUZZ BIN

ORIGINAL PREPPER “When the shit hits the fan” is a popular term for end-days enthusiasts, along with TEOTWAWKI (the end of the world as we know it). The terms ricocheted inside my brain during the 2020 pandemic shutdown when I discovered the 5-year-old series PRIMITIVE TECHNOLOGY on YouTube. It featured an outdoor MacGyver type (actually North Queensland’s John Plant) making all manner of stuff from nature: weapons, a kiln to fire clay, increasingly sophisticated buildings. I watched every video, soothed by the bare-chested, barefoot man’s dogged and mostly silent videos (other than bug- and birdsong). After abruptly halting posts in 2020, Primitive Technology resumed posting recently, including a video on making a metal speartip from swampwater. Pretty handy to know for WTSHTF. (CARRIE SCOZZARO)

Yo, Joe! The animated G.I. Joe recently turned 40.

IT’S THE NOSTALGIA FOR ME G.I. Joe, kids’ toys of the ’80s and ’90s, and the powerful pull of childhood nostalgia

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BY CHEY SCOTT

n case you missed the big news, the G.I. Joe cartoon recently celebrated its 40th anniversary, and to celebrate, Hasbro has been running a 24/7 livestream of remastered episodes on its YouTube channel. As a girl of the ’90s with not even the slightest interest in G.I. Joe back then, watching the flat, 2-D antics of all the goofy-named characters — Roadblock, Dusty, Shipwreck, Sgt. Slaughter and even Barbecue, to name a few — was unexpectedly entertaining, and oddly soothing. The plot of each G.I. Joe episode is pure silliness, with just enough absurdity to make grown-ups chuckle. (At times, you really wonder what the writers were going for.) My also-just-turned-40 partner, Will, grew up with the cartoon. One night after catching a few episodes after dinner, we fell deep down the rabbit hole of the internet, finding catalogs of old G.I. Joe action figures that he and his brothers once had. While Will’s G.I. Joe figurines are long gone (along with most of my own childhood toys, save for a few Barbies and Pound Puppies), the memories of them live large in the kingdom of adult nostalgia. Companies like Hasbro and others take full advantage of this fact, pumping out a ridiculous number of special collector edition reissues of the original toy models. The real deal from back in the day are hot items on eBay, and in local antique shops.

20 INLANDER AUGUST 18, 2022

During a recent visit to the Pine Street Market vendor mall in Spokane Valley, I saw original G.I. Joe figures — still sealed in plastic — with price tags of $200 and up. Others that had once been played with, even sporting a few backyard battle scars to show for it, were just as much. Even if we grown-ups don’t orchestrate grand showdowns between the evil Cobra and the heroic Joes, many still desire to put them up on a shelf to collect dust, if only just to glance over and relive that gloriously golden, carefree past. As they say, nostalgia is a helluva drug, and the feelings evoked by the defining toys of our youth might be one of its most potent forms. Among the many other toys I saw that day scattered throughout the vendor mall, waiting to be rediscovered, were Beanie Babies, Matchbox cars, Star Wars action figures, Barbies and so much more. Toys like those and the old school G.I. Joes are generationally defining. And as we age, their former center place in our lives fades to an almost dreamlike state. “I think we had that guy?” Will said to me as we scrolled that site listing all the G.I. Joe toys from the mid-’80s. Even his own memory of a thing once beloved had blurred. n

A LIGHTER TOUCH Considering his sixth novel (2016’s The Underground Railroad) and seventh novel (2019’s The Nickel Boys) both won Pulitzer Prizes for Fiction, you can imagine expectations were high for novel No. 8 from Colson Whitehead. And HARLEM SHUFFLE does not disappoint, even if the intersecting stories of Harlem’s criminal underworld don’t quite add up to have the same power as those other two books. As a reader, though, delving into the life of furniture salesman Ray Carney and his criminal cousin Freddie who drags him into a web of shady characters and questionable deals that go oh-so-wrong, is pretty delightful. While Whitehead’s prize-winning past marked him as a trenchant writer on race and history, Harlem Shuffle is less thematically heavy while remaining a pretty thrilling bit of crime fiction. (DAN NAILEN) THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Noteworthy new music arriving in stores and online Aug. 19: DEMI LOVATO, HOLY FVCK. Presumably taking cues from Olivia Rodrigo and Machine Gun Kelly, the pop star’s latest album takes things in an “edgy” pop-punk direction. PANIC! AT THE DISCO, VIVA LAS VENGEANCE. You chimed in with a “Haven’t you ever heard of a Panic! song after that first single back in the day?” I chimed in with a “No.” SILVERSUN PICKUPS, PHYSICAL THRILLS. The alt-rock mainstay made this new Butch Vig-produced album during pandemic times, and frontman Brian Aubert’s yearning for personal connection seeps through the tunes. (SETH SOMMERFELD)


COMMUNITY

Island Inspiration A local food truck is ‘building community through the universal language of food’ BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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sland Style Food Truck founder Nicholas DeCaro has never heard of John Donne, a 16th-century English priest who wrote what’s now known as the poem “No Man Is an Island.” Although they’re centuries apart, the two men have some things in common. Both triumphed over personal setbacks, employing the island as a metaphor to inspire others. Most people today, in fact, have never heard of Donne, yet modern audiences might remember the latter part of Donne’s phrase: “never send to know for whom the bell tolls; it tolls for thee.” This phrase is part of Donne’s larger message that humans are connected; whatever happens to one, happens to us all — no one is an island. In modern parlance, Donne might have used the word community, a word that resonates with DeCaro. Later this month, for example, the mobile eatery will be at a local nonprofit’s “chef’s camp,” teaching teens and preteens about the benefits of being good to their bodies and to the earth through organic gardening. “Our motto on the truck is ‘Island style is a lifestyle of building community through the universal language of food,’” DeCaro says. “Food is a language that everybody speaks.”

Indeed, Island Style Food Truck is multilingual, with a panoply of cultural influences: Korean beef bulgogi ($14), Chineseinspired sesame chicken ($13), and French fries with a Japanese seasoning called furikake ($7). Spam musubi is often associated with Hawaiian cuisine and appears on the truck’s rotating menu, but Filipino lumpia is a staple (three for $6). “Last year we sold 11,000 [lumpia], all hand-rolled by me and my fiancée,” DeCaro says.

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n addition to catering and farmers markets, Island Style can be found at assorted community events. The mobile food business has partnered with Bellwether Brewing Co. to benefit people from Ukraine and with Feast World Kitchen to benefit families in the Philippines. Island Style also frequently works with schools such as Liberty Lake Elementary for its art festival and a STEM class held at Whitworth University for upper elementary age kids. He’s big on helping kids, especially teenagers, says DeCaro, who considered pursuing teaching before he immersed himself in cooking. ...continued on next page

Nicholas DeCaro (right) runs Island Style with his son Angelo. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

AUGUST 18, 2022 INLANDER 21


FOOD | TO-GO BOX

FOOD | COMMUNITY

One More Thing Chad White’s Uno Más Taco Shop opens in the Wonder Building; plus, more openings and closures BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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ome readers may wonder why chef-owner Chad White gets so much local press. The answer: The innovative restaurateur always has one more thing up his sleeve. A little over five months since closing his High Tide Lobster Bar inside the Wonder Building (835 N. Post St.), White filled the spot with UNO MÁS TACO SHOP, which means “one more” in Spanish. The menu is very straightforward: five types of “big ass” tacos; three sides; two variations of chips and dip; and assorted extras, like soda ($3). Get a combo meal of one taco and side ($12), like the pork carnitas and the elotes en vaso (street corn in a cup) or two tacos and sides ($22) like the spicy fish tacos and frijoles charros (cowboy beans). Or spring for the “whole ass menu” ($59). The process is also straightforward: Wait in line (this place is already popular), order, pay, and listen for your name. White has two additional restaurants. Zona Blanca (157 S. Howard St.) is a popular spot for ceviche and coastal Mexican cuisine, while barbecue and a meat-centric menu is the focus at TT’s Old Iron Brewery and BBQ (4110 S. Bowdish Rd., Spokane Valley). To open Uno Más, White partnered with Travis Thosath, his business partner at TT’s, as well Ramsey and Amy Pruchnic, the owners of Hello Sugar, which has locations in Liberty Lake and Kendall Yards.

A Spokane Valley version of Uno Más is also slated to open soon. It will be located in a former Hello Sugar location (11205 E. Dishman Mica Rd.). Visit facebook.com/unomastacoshop.

OPENINGS

Uno Más isn’t the only new eatery serving Mexican food. CALIFORNIA MEXICAN FOOD (7326 N. Division St.) recently opened in the former location of a Señor Froggy. Like Uno Más, it also has a planned second location, in a former Taco Time in Spokane Valley (6704 E. Sprague Ave.). The restaurant is open 24 hours and serves breakfast all day, as well as burritos, tortas, taquitos, tacos, quesadillas, combination plates and desserts. And another Mexican favorite, DE LEON’S TACO & BAR (10208 N. Division St.) has reopened after significant remodeling and expansion, including adding a patio. The longtime family-run business has two additional Spokane restaurant locations (2718 E. 57th Ave. and 1801 N. Hamilton St.), as well as two locations of DeLeon’s Foods, which also features a grocery store (102 E. Francis Ave. and 15530 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley). Visit deleonstacoandbar.com. Mollie Villarreal-Ruiz opened BRIGHT BITE FOODS, a Spokane-based meal service company early in 2022, offering weekly meal plans with a minimum of three meals. The menu changes weekly and includes dishes like spaghetti with turkey meatballs and a teriyaki rice bowl. Local delivery is available, as well as pickup at NorthTown Mall. Visit facebook.com/ brightbitefoods.

CLOSINGS

Get the “whole ass” Uno Mas menu for $59. COURTESY PHOTO

22 INLANDER AUGUST 18, 2022

What’s more incredible than burgers and eggs? You’ll have to wait to find out, as the home of INCREDIBURGER & EGGS (909 W. First Ave.) is set to transition to a new concept after the fast-casual eatery’s owners, Eat Good Group, rebrand the downtown spot. Visit eatgoodgroup.com. COSMIC COWBOY GRILL (822 W. Main Ave.) has left the River Park Square universe after just under two years in business there. The Coeur d’Alene location (412 W. Haycraft Ave.) remains open. Visit cosmiccowboygrill.com. Within a few weeks of opening its second bakery location in Spokane Valley (18123 E. Appleway Ave.), BAKE MY DAY announced it was closing its original Chattaroy space (34911 N. Newport Hwy.) to focus efforts on the new spot. Visit facebook.com/bakemydayspokane. n To-Go Box is the Inlander’s regular dining news column, offering tasty tidbits and updates on the region’s food and drink scene. Send tips and updates to food@inlander.com.

“ISLAND INSPIRATION,” CONTINUED... Six years ago, while enrolled at Spokane Falls Community College for sculpture and arts administration, DeCaro created a life-size self-portrait titled Footprints using skull forms, metal chains, pill bottles and broken glass. It symbolized DeCaro’s struggles with drugs and the death of several immediate family members in a short time period. The artwork, which was displayed outside the college library, impacted many of his peers who sought out DeCaro to share their stories. “I decided at that point, I was gonna get my master’s and I was gonna teach art because I could reach out to people and understand pain and hardships and hurt,” DeCaro says. But instead of art, DeCaro ended up developing a food truck in a narrative that underscores the power of community. According to DeCaro, shortly after transferring to Whitworth University, he noticed an old utility truck in his cousin’s auto body shop. The two men casually discussed starting a food truck business. Next thing he knew, his cousin had bought preliminary equipment to make that happen. But other than his parents’ place, the former DeCaro’s Italian Restaurant, DeCaro had never run a food business, so he leaned on faith and family to guide him. He says one thing his father, Frank DeCaro (who works in the Inlander’s circulation department), taught him is not to think of other restaurants as competition, but as opportunity. DeCaro employed social media to understand the market and build relationships among the food community. He also built up excitement for what would become a thriving business.

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Get spammed at Island Style Food Truck.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

eCaro is currently working on a larger trailer and looking for a brick-and-mortar location. The truck is so busy with catering clients like Phat Panda, Avista and Amazon that Island Style has only a handful of regular markets on its schedule (check facebook.com/I.S.FoodTruck to see where it will be next). And when opportunities to contribute to the community come along, DeCaro likes to say yes, like to the upcoming Growing Chefs Camp (Aug. 22-26, noon to 9 pm, growingneighbors. wordpress.com). The free event ($150 suggested donation) is geared toward preteens and teens, says organizer John Edmondson, director of ministries for Shadle Park Presbyterian Church, where the camp will be held. Some of the produce for the camp will come from the Growing Neighbors garden at Shadle Park Presbyterian, meaning DeCaro won’t know until closer to the event what he’ll actually be cooking. He does know, however, how he’ll approach teaching. “The thing I really want to keep in mind is some of these kids don’t have the same resources, so I want to keep things simple — basic — and give them an understanding that everything comes down to salt, fat, acid, heat, right?” says DeCaro, echoing the popular cookbook and television show by chef Samin Nosrat. Once the event is over, DeCaro will remain involved with Growing Neighbors, serving on its strategic planning committee. “In life, my experiences have been: The more involved you are and the more you give of yourself in the community, everything else comes back tenfold,” DeCaro says. “And I don’t give to get that tenfold back, but it seems like it’s always been that way — to think about others and take care of others. And I just grew up with that lifestyle.” n


REVIEW

NOT-SO-LITTLE

GIRL LOST

Unfortunately for this prequel, Isabelle Fuhrmann kept growing up.

Oprhan: First Kill is the rare horror follow-up that’s better than the original — but that’s not saying much BY MARYANN JOHANSON

O

rphan: First Kill, a prequel to 2009’s horror mystery Orphan, is better than its progenitor. No, scratch that: First Kill is, rather, not quite as bad as the previous movie. Still, this is a rare cinematic occurrence, and one to be commended, no matter how qualified. The original 2009 movie played like a parody of horror movies, and, alas, not a knowing one. It had little beyond overbaked tropes of the genre: the “scary” music, the “menacing” camera angles, the telegraphing of every boo. Its big twist — look away now if you don’t want a 13-year-old horror movie spoiled — was that its central “sinister child,” the titular orphan, was not, in fact, a 9-year-old but actually an adult with a pituitary disorder that left her perpetually childlike in body. But she was not childlike in mind: cunning and devious, a violent, psychopathic con artist. Anyway, the secret of the first movie is the entire point in First Kill, which rewinds to explain just how it is that Leena, a murderous 30-year-old criminal incarcerated in Estonia, ends up playacting an American waif called Esther. Now, the 2009 movie was, at best, a modest hit, and I’m not sure that anyone was clamoring for Esther’s backstory. But we can be grateful for small favors: This screenplay (written by David Coggeshall with story by Orphan writers David Leslie Johnson-McGoldrick and Alex Mace) is more aware of the clichés of the genre this time around, and takes advantage of them in ways that offer some mild surprises.

First Kill does take an unreasonably long time to get that Esther escapes from, even though they know how around to those surprises, however. If I were the bailingwily and dangerous she is. It is ridiculously easy for her on-a-movie-halfway-through type, I would have given to pass herself off as the missing daughter of a wealthy up before the stuff that makes this minimally intriguing American couple, the Albrights (Julia Stiles and Rossif showed up. And there are some almost insurmountable Sutherland), with a story about how she was kidnapped problems from the get-go. For one big thing, Isabelle and trafficked to Eastern Europe. (She Googled to find Fuhrman made a memorable child-actor splash in 2009 missing-kid alerts.) Questions abound: Did no one think as Esther; Orphan was shot when she was only 10 years to do a DNA test? Wouldn’t there be an alarm from the old. But she’s back as Esther, 23 when this was filmed, institution she escaped from, like: Be on the lookout for this and her character is meant to be even younger! Director grownup who looks like a kid, and here’s a photo? How does William Brent Bell engages in a lot of camera trickery almost everyone just look right past all the red flags even to pretend that this normal-sized adult can pass as a they acknowledge that Esther raises? There’s no suspense prepubescent girl — such as using a child stand-in for here at all... until the moment that Esther realizes that she long shots, and then only showing her from has a more complicated family behind — and many of them are laughably unORPHAN: FIRST KILL situation on her hands than she convincing. But nothing can hide the fact that bargained for. Rated R Fuhrman’s face is now that of a grown woman. Directed by William Brent Bell What is going on with the (This is probably why Esther has her back to Albrights retrospectively acStarring Isabelle Fuhrman, us on the movie’s poster.) If the very young counts for some of the seeming Julia Stiles, Rossif Sutherland Fuhrman was compelling as a creepily precoplot holes in a way that is clever, Streaming on Paramount+ cious kiddie, adult Fuhrman is... just... very yet also way too much out of the obviously a grownup with a bit of a pixie face. blue: a hint that something more Is there at least any sly commentary on infantilization of has been going on is needed so that it doesn’t feel like a women in our culture? Ha! That doesn’t even seem to cheat. Perhaps worse than that, though, is that there is have crossed the movie’s mind. ultimately no one here to root for — or at least be riveted This is one of those horror movies in which people by in Hannibal Lecter-esque disturbing way — in First Kill. have to behave very stupidly in order for anything to The movie doesn’t compel viewers to care about anyone happen. Security is absurdly lax in the Estonian facility or anything that happens to them. n

AUGUST 18, 2022 INLANDER 23


SCREEN | REVIEW

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they quickly fall into an obligatory relationship. Reinhart is bubbly and likable, but both of Natalie’s romances are bland and lifeless, and she barely has any chemistry with either of the male leads. Natalie’s pregnancy is the only convincing evidence of any sexual connection between her and her two paramours. Screenwriter April Prosser throws in various parallels to show how both Natalies experience the same hopes and the same doubts, although Natalie is a pretty shallow character in both BY JOSH BELL iterations, and Reinhart doesn’t do much to difs a way to cram two mediocre rom-coms ferentiate the two. At least she has more dimeninto a single movie, Netflix original sions than Gabe or Jake, whose own vaguely production Look Both Ways has the life of defined interests exist only in relation to Natalie’s main character Natalie (Riverdale’s Lili Reinhart) latest mini-crisis. And poor Cara gets only the split along two paths, diverging on the night of barest hints of her own subplots in each timeher college graduation. After a one-night stand line, with girlfriends who show up as essentially with her friend Gabe (Danny Ramirez), Natalie is background details in a handful of scenes. The worried that she might be pregnant. She takes a friendship between Natalie and Cara is as thinly pregnancy test, and the movie follows her as she developed as the romances. deals with both possible outcomes. It’s a duller, Look Both Ways takes place over a period of more predictable take on the delightful 1998 five years, but often the only way to tell how Gwyneth Paltrow comedy Sliding Doors, with minmuch time has passed is by observing the growth imal humor and minimal passion. Like the recent of Natalie and Gabe’s daughter. Especially in short-lived NBC drama series Ordinary the LA timeline, there’s so Joe, it finds multiple ways to make the little plot progression that LOOK BOTH WAYS it seems like the characters same person’s life uninteresting. Directed by Wanuri Kahiu The pregnant version of Natalie have just been standing Starring Lili Reinhart, Danny Ramirez, decides to forgo her plans of moving to around doing nothing for David Corenswet Los Angeles with her best friend Cara years at a time. Natalie never Streaming on Netflix (The Bold Type’s Aisha Dee) and instead meets anyone new or purmove back in with her parents (Andrea sues any new goals, and the Savage and Luke Wilson) in Austin to save movie plods dutifully toward its predetermined money while preparing to give birth. Although end, which still somehow takes nearly two hours. Gabe supports her decision to have the baby, the Kenyan filmmaker Wanuri Kahiu, whose two of them keep their relationship platonic, and 2018 LGBTQ drama Rafiki was a film festival she even encourages Gabe to date other women. sensation, makes her American directorial debut Natalie also puts her dreams of working in with the kind of anonymous product that seems animation on hold, but it’s not hard to guess how like it could be helmed by anyone, lacking any both her career aspirations and her connection distinctive style or personal vision. The entire with Gabe will work out eventually. finale is nearly indistinguishable from a proIt’s only slightly harder to guess how things motional video for South by Southwest, which will go for the non-pregnant Natalie, who does represents the pinnacle of artistic achievement for move to LA with Cara and takes a job working both Natalies. Lucy tells LA Natalie that the most for her animation idol, Lucy (Nia Long). She important thing is to bring her authentic self to has a mild meet-cute with burgeoning docuher art, but there’s nothing authentic about this mentary producer Jake (David Corenswet), and prefab piece of faux-empowerment. n

Lili Reinhart plays two versions of the same underachiever in Netflix’s Look Both Ways

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BEAST

In this thriller, a widower (Idris Elba) takes his teenage daughters on a vacation to the African savanna to reconnect only to be hunted by a murderous rogue lion. Rated R

CLAYDREAM

Few art styles are as instantly recognizable as Will Vinton’s stop-motion animation known as Claymation. This documentary tracks Vinton’s rise to mainstream popularity and the reasons why that success faded. Not Rated At the Magic Lantern

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DRAGON BALL SUPER: SUPER HERO

The 21st (!) Dragon Ball feature is the first to employ mainly 3D animation. This time around Piccolo and Gohan must save the world from Commander Magenta’s reformed Red Ribbon Army and the android Cell Max. Rated PG-13

WE ARE AS GODS

Stewart Brand has lived a life on the intellectual forefront, from being an early environmentalist to starting the Whole Earth Catalog. This doc tells Brand’s story and explores his controversial efforts to resurrect extinct species. Not Rated At the Magic Lantern

AUGUST 18, 2022 INLANDER 25


“Backstreet Men” just doesn’t have the same ring to it. DENNIS LEUPOLD PHOTO

TICKETS AVAILABLE TRL fans rejoice! You can still get tickets for the Backstreet Boys show Sun, Aug. 21 at Spokane Arena (720 W. Mallon). The show starts at 7:30 pm, and tickets range from $25-$300. Get them at spokanearena.com

POP

Backstreet’s Back...

and Fans Want It That Way OMG, how big of a Backstreet Boys fan are you? Take our quiz! BY DENA OGDEN

A

wise man — errr… group of five men — once said, “Sometimes I wish I could turn back time / impossible as it may seem.” And who can blame them? They probably weren’t thinking about their 2022 tour schedule when they recorded those lyrics. Turns out, it is possible to turn back time, and that time warp comes in the form of nostalgic ’90s feel-good radio hits and men in their 40s (and one who’s 50!) in

26 INLANDER AUGUST 18, 2022

coordinated outfits performing sharp choreography. That’s right, Backstreet Boys fans. After two COVID-related reschedules, our time has finally come. Ohmigod they’re (finally) back again, and it’s looking to be worth the wait. Their DNA World Tour is larger than life — yes, many puns intended. Previous setlists show more than 30 songs on the docket, including their biggest hits, semi-forgotten favorites, sexy slow ballads and plenty of high-energy bops with snappy

choreography. For boy band fans, it’s the sort of night dreams are made of. But boy bands aren’t everyone’s cup of tea, and the tickets aren’t exactly cheap. In case the decision to attend isn’t obvious for you, we’re here to help with the aid of another ’90s cultural juggernaut: the magazine quiz. Answer the following questions to help decide what to do when the Backstreet Boys take the Spokane Arena stage on Sunday, Aug. 21.


12th Annual

OF THE FOLLOWING “I WANT 1 WHICH IT THAT WAY” LYRICS ARE CORRECT?

a) I never wanna hear you say / I actually prefer it the other way b) But we are two worlds apart / Can’t eat through your tart c) Tell me why / Ain’t nothin’ but a heartache / Tell me why / Ain’t nothin’ but a mistake d) Am I your fire? / No, here’s a lighter e) Am I original (Yeah!) / Am I the only one (Yeah!) / Am I sexual (Yeah!)

BACKSTREET BOYS SONG 2 WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE AND WHY?

a) “The Call”: Early aughts cellphone references deserve more love and attention. b) “I Want It That Way”: Is there any other choice? c) “All I Have To Give”: It’s the most underrated song of their entire discography. Fight me. d) Any of them: I love Justin Timberlake and Nick Lachey’s harmonies! e) Idk, I was too busy voting for Limp Bizkit on TRL when these songs were popular.

WHO WAS NOT A BACKSTREET BOY 5 FROM 2006 TO 2012, WHEN HE TOOK A HIATUS FROM THE GROUP? a) b) c) d) e) f)

Nick Carter Brian Littrell AJ McLean Jordan Knight Howie Dorough Kevin Richardson

d) Backstreet Boys, Millenium, No Strings Attached, 98 Degrees and Rising, Celebrity e) Backstreet Boys, Millennium, Black & Blue, Never Gone, Unbreakable, This Is Us, In a World Like This, DNA

DOES 7 WHAT KTBSPA STAND FOR?

6

WHICH LIST CONTAINS THE CORRECT CHRONOLOGICAL ORDER FOR BACKSTREET BOYS AMERICAN STUDIO ALBUMS? a) I Want It That Way, I Want It That Way (Remixes), In a World Like This, DNA b) Millenium, DNA, Backstreet Boys, Never Gone, In A World Like This, Black & Blue, This Is Us c) Millenium, I Want It That Way, Larger Than Life, Shape Of My Heart, Black & Blue, Never Gone, Unbreakable, DNA

a) Kiss Those Backstreeters Singing Perfect Acapella b) Keep Telling Brian (to) Stop Pinching A.J. c) Keep The Back(S)treet Pride Alive d) Keep The Back(S)treet People Active e) Kevin The Baritone Sounds Pretty Amazing

BONUS: WHICH TWO

BACKSTREET BOYS ARE COUSINS?

Songwriting Workshop and more!

WITHOUT GOOGLING, LYRICS FROM 3 WHICH BACKSTREET BOYS SONG ARE QUOTED IN THE FIRST LINE OF THIS STORY? a) “Quit Playing Games (With My Heart)” b) “I Want It That Way” c) “Shape Of My Heart” d) “Bye Bye Bye” e) “Incomplete”

IS NOT A 4 WHO BACKSTREET BOY? a) b) c) d) e) f)

Nick Carter Brian Littrell AJ McLean Jordan Knight Howie Dorough Kevin Richardson

WEIRD? SCORING

Give yourself the points that correspond with the answer you chose for each question. Then total up your score and see below to learn just how big a Backstreet Boys fan you are. 1. a) 4 b) 3 c) 5 d) 2 e) 1 2. a) 4 b) 3 c) 5 d) 2 e)1 3. a) 5 b) 3 c) 4 d) 1 e) 2 4. a) 1 b) 1 c) 1 d) 5 e) 1 f) 1 5. a) 1 b) 1 c) 1 d) 1 e) 1 f) 5 6. a) 2 b) 4 c) 3 d) 1 e) 5 7. a) 3 b) 1 c) 5 d) 4 e) 2 BONUS: Kevin and Brian (5 points).

35+ I’m not sure why you’re reading this, you already have VIP tickets,

you picked out your outfit months ago, and you made a sign to wish Howie a happy birthday (it’s next week, obviously). You’ll be there.

28-34 You’re a true fan, and you should absolutely go. You definitely

owned at least two of their albums, and you have a favorite member (probably AJ, but Kevin is a close second). If you haven’t already bought your tickets, you need to.

21-27 You would have a blast, you should get some friends together

and make a night of it. You maybe had one of their albums, and you can at least sing along to the big singles off the others. For a while, your favorite was Brian, but you lost interest after he started getting political. But you’re willing to give him another shot.

maybe

COOL? definitely

14-20 It’s debatable, you could stay home or go and be happy either way. Maybe listen to a few ’90s pop playlists to help you decide.

8-13 You’d be happier staying home. It’s OK. Less people for me to elbow on my way up to the stage.

AUGUST 18, 2022 INLANDER 27


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

POP COUNTRY MAREN MORRIS

A

fter clawing her way to country relevancy with her 2016 breakthrough album, Hero, Maren Morris has only seen her stardom in both the country and pop realms skyrocket. She teamed up with EDM standouts Zedd and Grey for the mega crossover hit “The Middle” (not a Jimmy Eat World cover) and had two singles (“The Bones” and “Girl”) top the country airplay charts with her follow-up album, Girl (which won CMA Album of the Year). Morris’ ability to balance an ever-feisty edge with a casualness to sink into moving and relatable ballads is on full display on her new 2022 LP, Humble Quest. She may still be humble, but certainly expect that star swagger when she takes the stage at Northern Quest. — SETH SOMMERFELD Maren Morris • Wed, Aug. 24 at 7:30 pm • $59-$236 • 16+ • Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 8/18

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Spare Parts J BOTTLE BAY BREWING CO., Echo Elysium BRICK WEST BREWING CO., Kyle Richard CHECKERBOARD TAPROOM, Weathered Shepherds J COEUR D’ALENE PARK, Browne’s Addition Summer Concerts: Soul Proprietor J EAGLES 15TH STREET PAVILION, Theresa Edwards & The Bobs J KNITTING FACTORY, King Lil G J THE MASON JAR, Emma Michelle J THE NEST AT KENDALL YARDS, Rock The Nest Concert Series: Blue Canoe, Starlite Motel J J PAVILION AT RIVERFRONT, Phoebe Bridgers PINE STREET PLAZA, Music on Main: Paradox POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Pat Coast J QQ SUSHI & KITCHEN, Just Plain Darin RED ROOM LOUNGE, Hip-Hop Night RED WHEEL BAR AND GRILL, Wiebe Jammin THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, Karaoke with Rich SHERMAN SQUARE PARK, Floating Crowbar ZOLA, Desperate8s

Friday, 8/19

AK ASIAN RESTAURANT, James Motley J AVISTA STADIUM, Into the Drift Duo J THE BIG DIPPER, Snacks At Midnight, No Soap, Radio, Carl Christensen and the Lake Flora

28 INLANDER AUGUST 18, 2022

FOLK PUNK AJJ

I

f you took Woody Guthrie and raised him on the Mountain Goats, anarchist punk music and general Millenial cynicism, you might have something resembling AJJ (formerly Andrew Jackson Jihad). Led by singer/guitarist Sean Bonnette, the group’s lyrics-driven screeds against an unjust world offer biting criticisms on politics, religion and the general f---ed-up nature of modern society. While Bonnette’s warbly voice can certainly be an acquired taste, once you’re on board it opens up a world of revolutionary rabble-rousing where marginalized voices can sing along and sunny pop songs can revolve around the hopes of a mega guillotine. — SETH SOMMERFELD AJJ, WHY? • Sat, Aug. 20 at 8 pm • $20 • 21+ • Lucky You Lounge • 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. • luckyyoulounge.com • 509-474-0511

J J BRICK WEST BREWING CO., West End Summer Series: DJ Unifest CHAN’S RED DRAGON ON THIRD, Steve Livingston COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Heather King Band J J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Bass Canyon Music Festival LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, 22 & Good 4 U J J THE NEST AT KENDALL YARDS, Spark Central’s 6th Birthday Celebration OLD MILL BAR AND GRILL, Lucas McIntyre J ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, Whack-AMole PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Scott Reid Trio RED ROOM LOUNGE, Live DJs J REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Shamarr Allen and the UnderDawgs

THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Just Plain Darin J RIVER CITY LANES, Karaoke with Rich SILVER MOUNTAIN RESORT, Jonathan Arthur TRANCHE, Mulholland

Saturday, 8/20

BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE, Gin, Smoke & Lies CHAN’S RED DRAGON ON THIRD, Cary Fly COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Heather King Band J COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, JamShack DAHMEN BARN, The Cherry Sisters Revival J J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Bass Canyon Music Festival J IDAHO CENTRAL CREDIT UNION

ARENA, Riverstone Summer Concerts: Soul Proprietor JOHN’S ALLEY, Michelle Moonshine J KNITTING FACTORY, Knit Nite: Local Country J LAKE CITY CENTER, Highwaymen Tribute Show J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, AJJ, WHY? LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Imagine Collective MCINTIRE FAMILY PARK, Stagecoach West NOAH’S CANTEEN, Son of Brad NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Papa Roach, Falling in Reverse, Hollywood Undead, Bad Wolves J ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, Laketown Sound PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Brian Jacobs J PONDEROSA BAR AND GRILL, The

Ronaldos POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Kyle Swaffard RED ROOM LOUNGE, Live DJs J RIVER CITY LANES, Karaoke with Rich J ROCKET MARKET, Indy TRANCHE, Robbie Christmas ZOLA, Blake Braley

Sunday, 8/21

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, SideStep BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE, Sam Leyde Band COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, Tuxedo Junction Big Band J CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, PJ Destiny CRAVE, Karaoke with Rich J J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Bass Canyon Music Festival


MUSIC | VENUES J J MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Nitty Gritty Dirt Band NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Tesla, Buckcherry, Great White J J SPOKANE ARENA, Backstreet Boys: DNA World Tour

Monday, 8/22

J COEUR D’ALENE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Music on Mondays: Coeurimba CRAVE, Karaoke with Rich DAHMEN BARN, Birds of Play J EICHARDT’S PUB, Monday Blues Jam with John Firshi J KOOTENAI COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, Jordan Davis RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic Night

Tuesday, 8/23

THE BUOY, Wiebe Jammin COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, The Theresa Edwards Band J KOOTENAI COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, Skillet LITZ’S BAR & GRILL, Shuffle Dawgs OSPREY RESTAURANT & BAR, Sam Leyde J WINE COUNTRY AMPHITHEATER, Maren Morris ZOLA, Lucas Brown & Friends

Wednesday, 8/24 BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE, Wine Wednesday: Nick Grow J IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Just Plain Darin J KENDALL YARDS, Lyle Morse, Brad Keeler, Bill Compher

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

J J KOOTENAI COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, The All-American Rejects J J NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Maren Morris ONE TREE CIDER HOUSE, The Hanks OSPREY RESTAURANT & BAR, Son of Brad PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Peter Lucht RED ROOM LOUNGE, The Roomates ZOLA, Runaway Lemonade

Coming Up ...

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Carli Osika, Aug. 25, 5:30 pm. J QQ SUSHI & KITCHEN, Just Plain Darin, Thurs., 5:30-8:30 pm. THE STEAM PLANT, Wiebe Jammin, Aug. 25, 5:30-8:30 pm. COEUR D’ALENE PARK, Browne’s Addition Summer Concerts: Brassworks, Aug. 25, 6 pm. IDAHO CENTRAL CREDIT UNION

ARENA, Riverstone Summer Concerts: Kelly Hughes, Aug. 25, 6-8 pm. J THE NEST AT KENDALL YARDS, Rock The Nest Concert Series: Rosie Cerquone & Band, Aug. 25, 6-8 pm. SHERMAN SQUARE PARK, Ben Klein, Aug. 25, 6-8:30 pm. J LINCOLN COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, Southerland, Aug. 25, 7-10 pm. J THE MASON JAR, Midnight Sun, Aug. 25, 7 pm. J KNITTING FACTORY, Durand Jones & The Indications, Kiefer, Aug. 25, 8 pm. ZOLA, Desperate8s, Thurs., 8-11 pm. J MISSOULA, River City Roots Festival, Aug. 26-27. PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Maya Goldblum, Dave Schmedtje, Mike Johnson, Aug. 26, 5-8 pm. THE HEARTWOOD, The Sweet Lillies, Aug. 26, 7 pm. J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Los Bukis, Aug. 26, 8 pm. J KNITTING FACTORY, The Waiting (Celebration of Tom Petty), Aug. 26, 8 pm. J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, The Districts, All Things Blue, Aug. 26, 8 pm. J LIVE AT ANDRE’S, Red Wanting Blue, Aug. 27, 6 pm. J BING CROSBY THEATER, Paula Fuga, Aug. 27, 7 pm. J J KNITTING FACTORY, Shakey Graves, Jade Bird, Aug. 27, 8 pm. LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Courtney Marie Andrews, Windoe, Aug. 27, 8 pm. J THE BORDER STOP, The Ronaldos, Aug. 28, 3-5 pm. ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Soul Proprietor, Aug. 28, 5:30 pm. J LIVE AT ANDRE’S, Stolen Silver, Aug. 28, 6 pm. J THE BIG DIPPER, Creeping Death, 200 Stab Wounds, Tribal Gaze, Ingrown, Spirit World, Aug. 28, 7:30 pm. KNITTING FACTORY, The Score, Dreamers, Aug. 28, 7:30 pm. CRAVE, Karaoke with Rich, 9 pm-1 am and 9 pm-1 am. J J THE BIG DIPPER, OWTH, Seth Anderson, Magic by Quentin Scott, Aug. 30, 7:30 pm. ONE TREE CIDER HOUSE, The Hanks, 6-8 pm through Aug. 31. J EMMA RUE’S, Jared Hall: The Music of Kenny Dorham, Aug. 31, 7-9 pm. J J FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Chicago, Aug. 31, 7 pm. J NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, I Love the ‘90s: Vanilla Ice, Mark McGrath, Montell Jordan, All-4-One, Color Me Badd, Coolio, Rob Base, Aug. 31, 7:30 pm. LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Death Valley Girls, The Black Tones, Aug. 31, 8 pm.

219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208263-5673 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 509-847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 509-924-1446 BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens St. • 509-315-5101 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 509863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 509-467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague Ave. • 509891-8357 BOLO’S BAR & GRILL • 116 S. Best Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-891-8995 BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR • 18219 E. Appleway Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-368-9847 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main St., Moscow • 208-596-0887 THE BULL HEAD • 10211 S. Electric St., Four Lakes • 509-838-9717 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw, Worley • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-292-4813 CRAVE • 401 W. Riverside Ave. • 509-321-7480 CRUISERS BAR & GRILL • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-446-7154 CURLEY’S HAUSER JUNCTION • 26433 W. Hwy. 53, Post Falls • 208-773-5816 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • 509-279-7000 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-6241200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-4572392 HONEY EATERY & SOCIAL CLUB • 317 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-930-1514 IRON GOAT BREWING • 1302 W. Second Ave. • 509-474-0722 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-926-8411 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 509244-3279 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington St. • 509-315-8623 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 509-456-5678 LUCKY YOU LOUNGE • 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. • 509-474-0511 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 509747-2605 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy. • 509-443-3832 THE MASON JAR • 101 F St., Cheney • 509-359-8052 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-922-6252 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-838-1570 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 877-871-6772 NYNE BAR & BISTRO • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-474-1621 PACIFIC PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 509-443-5467 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 POST FALLS BREWING CO. • 112 N. Spokane St., Post Falls • 208-773-7301 RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL • 10325 N. Government Way, Hayden • 208-635-5874 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 509838-7613 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 509-822-7938 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-8008 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 509-459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • 509-2797000 STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON • 12303 E. Trent Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-862-4852 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 509-624-2416

AT

SATURDAY, AUG 27

PAULA FUGA

SUNDAY, SEP 25

MONOPHONICS

FRIDAY, OCT 28

WHO’S BAD: THRILLER NIGHTS

SUNDAY, OCT 30

LEONID & FRIENDS: WORLD’S GREATEST CHICAGO TRIBUTE

WEDNESDAY, DEC 14

JAKE SHIMABUKURO

SEE OUR OTHER EVENTS AT SBLENTERTAINMENT.COM AUGUST 18, 2022 INLANDER 29


MUSIC DOWN AND DIRTY

Country rockers the Nitty Gritty Dirt Band might have looked like a bunch of California hippies when they got started in the late ’60s, but they gained a lot of respect among musicians and critics with their monumental 1972 album Will The Circle Be Unbroken. Collaborating with some of the legends of bluegrass and traditional country like Roy Acuff, Earl Scruggs and Mother Maybelle Carter, the Dirt Band boys introduced some of America’s best musicians to a younger audience, and showed the old-timers what a great young band could do, too. The band’s worked almost nonstop since 1966, and despite a few lineup changes, it’s still led by founding member Jeff Hanna and includes a couple more players in the sextet who’ve been with the band 40 years or more. Their latest release, Dirt Does Dylan, is dedicated to the tunes of America’s greatest poet rocker, and they’ll surely play plenty of it when they stop in Spokane. — DAN NAILEN Nitty Gritty Dirt Band • Sun, Aug. 21 at 7 pm • $35-$52 • All ages • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague Ave. • foxtheaterspokane.org • 509-624-1200

30 INLANDER AUGUST 18, 2022

MUSIC KEEPING THE SPARK ALIVE

FESTIVAL LOTS TO SEED AND DO

Spark Central’s 6th Birthday Celebration • Fri, Aug. 19 from 6-8 pm • Free • The Nest at Kendall Yards • 1335 W. Summit Pkwy • spark-central.org

National Lentil Festival • Fri, Aug. 19 from 5-11 pm and Sat, Aug. 20 from 11 am-5 pm • Free • All ages • Spring St. and Reaney Park, Pullman • lentilfest.com • 509-334-3565

Spark Central, located just across the street from Inlander HQ in Kendall Yards, is a nonprofit focused on igniting creativity, innovation and imagination in people of all ages. With free programming to boot, Spark Central is committed to breaking down barriers within the West Central community. Their dedication to the community is what brings us to now: the organization’s sixth birthday party. Join Spark Central staff and fellow community members for a free concert at the Nest in Kendall Yards. Emceed by a longtime friend of Spark, Kiantha Duncan, the concert stars The Latrice Experience. Get your fill of celebratory warm fuzzies and soul music — there’s no better combination. — MADISON PEARSON

Call them seeds, pulses, legumes or the name known throughout the Palouse: lentils! These versatile, nutritious agricultural gems are the star of a two-day festival back in person this year with cooking demos, kids’ crafts, a 3-on-3 basketball tournament and live music both days, like country music star Tyler Rich, who takes the stage at 2:30 pm on Saturday. Of course there’s food, including this year’s lentil cookoff. The 2020 lentil recipes are available for download from the festival website for free! And if you need another reason to attend, know that proceeds benefit a slew of local organizations, which means you’re helping grow the community by just showing up. — CARRIE SCOZZARO


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LOANS AVAILABLE

COMMUNITY FAIR GAME

I’m a sucker for a fair. Large or small, near or far, if there’s some rigged games, unhealthy fried food and a demolition derby involved, I’m all about it. With the North Idaho State Fair kicking off Friday, you get all that and then some, like monster trucks and a big-air motorcycle show. In between deep-fried Twinkies and elephant ears, you can check out concerts by the likes of Jordan Davis (Aug. 22), Skillet (Aug. 23) and the All-American Rejects (Aug. 24), although they’ll cost you a bit extra than just fair admission. I’m more likely to go for the $30 all-day, all-you-can-ride pass because nothing screams “fun!” like getting on a dicey roller coaster or the brand new Freak Out ride (basically a giant flipping, swinging pendulum). — DAN NAILEN North Idaho State Fair • Fri, Aug. 19-Sun, Aug. 28; hours vary • $8 adults; $6 kids and seniors • 4056 N. Government Way, Coeur d’Alene • nisfair.fun

New Construction

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After 28 years, Unity in the Community is still just as exciting an event as it was when it first started in 1994. The region’s largest multicultural celebration promoting equity and inclusion throughout every facet of the Northwest happens this weekend in Riverfront Park. There are five different vendor areas — a youth fair, career and education fair, health fair, early learning fair, and general vendors — as well as a cultural village and a stage where performers provide entertainment for the entirety of the event. This fun-filled day of community companionship and educational engagement has something for anyone and everyone. — LAUREN RODDIS Unity in the Community • Sat, Aug. 20 from 10 am-4 pm • Free • Riverfront Park • 507 N. Howard St. • nwunity.org and facebook.com/unityinthecommunityspokane

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8919 E Euclid, Millwood • Tues-Sun 10a-6p • 509.922.6080 AUGUST 18, 2022 INLANDER 31


LOOK GORGEOUS Sierra… the reason this was never done was because I didn’t know. Hope you smile reading this, gorgeous.

I SAW YOU YOUR TURN, YES IT IS Just a shout-out for Camp Hope and its benefactors. You do great work, but we need you to step up one more time, and when these people (really are they just pawns in some sick cosmic game?) need to move, we’d like to know where you live and shop and relax so that they can head your way. Jewels Helping Hands’ Julia Garcia where do you call home? The Barbieris? Smith-Barbieri Foundation off Garland? (South Hill, North of Garland, Spokane Valley, we are talking to you!) Do you get to go home and wind down and relax? We don’t. Your neighbors in Browne’s Addition, Downtown and Liberty Park, phew, we are tired, so we would like your neighbors and your neighborhood park to share in the responsibility, the trash, the crime, the vandalism. Really, it’s your turn. And thank you for all you do. MEOW KAPOW! You were in the produce section of the Super 1 on 29th singing to the ’80s hits, and occasionally dancing. You wore a sweatshirt featuring a kitten throwing a grenade. I liked the silver in your hair. I complimented your dancing skill and your shirt. You made me laugh. Want to meet up and dance to ’80s songs? I have a kitten shirt I can wear, too.

CHEERS

CHEERS TO THE JEERS IN THE DOG ISSUE To the person who wrote “Protect your furry friends” about keeping your dogs leashed unless in designated areas, thank you. Some dogs may be in training when they’re out, possibly working on behavior issues; some may have aggression issues or protective problems that they’re working on. You don’t know if the leashed dog is blind or deaf, and sometimes owners and dogs are just having bad days and don’t want to socialize. I have a 14-year-old rescue who can’t see well and when startled will snap. I’ve lost count on how many times I have told owners “my dog is not nice” and they still disrespect my dog’s boundaries saying, “It’s OK, hehe;” “I’m telling you, it’s not OK,” then my dog attacks. He’s drawn blood many times, and he’s also ended up at the ER thankfully only once, but I’ve known a lady who had two of her senior rescues die because of encounters from off-leashed dogs and irresponsible owners. It’s heartbreaking. It’s not right to people who are respecting the law by doing what’s correct and responsible. If I’m having a stressful day and just wanna have a picnic with my dog to clear my mind, I don’t need some loose dog running up into our area. I’ve also noticed that a lot of the people who have their dogs unleashed are unhealthy, as when those dogs come running up to my dog, in no way are their owners able to even get to a bad situation fast enough, so I have to constantly be on the lookout to protect just taking my dog on a walk. And like the other person said, dogs in truck beds, not cool. FELLOW CONCERTGOERS The Sum41/ Simple Plan concert at the Knit was a night I’m going to remember forever. I want to thank my fellow concert fans for keeping an eye out for my daughter, the 8-year-old in the black tee with red ear muffs. You seriously made her first concert INCREDIBLE. She was able to be right in front and was protected at all times by those around her. She had an absolute blast and was so excited to see Simple Plan up close! Thank you, thank

you, thank you, and rock on! FEMALE RESPONSE TO MAN WHO WAVED To the succinct lady making very clear why women recreate outdoors. THANK YOU!!! Most of us worry about unwanted male interactions when we are doing what we’re doing. Women being outside

THIS IS BREAKING NEWS? REALLY KXLY? Local wildfires, explosion of homelessness, city looking to cram homeless warehousing (not services) down my neighborhood’s throat, global warming’s effects on farmers, residents, etc., shootings, murders, national level corruption and your GMA Breaking News

that includes law schools, many attorneys and “nonprofit” legal aid organizations. They benefit from catch and release! So rather than punishing behavior that damages the law abiding and society in general, they support a flawed system that instead encourages repeated crime.

Women have a whole myriad of reasons for fitness, working out and adventure...

IS NOT AN INVITATION... to anything. I LOVED how you focused on exactly what is going through your mind and body when you (we) work out outside. It’s NOBLE AND HEALTHY AND STRONG and has absolutely nothing to do with passing males. There was something transcendent about your wording. Almost like... women have a whole myriad of reasons for fitness, working out and adventure... just like men. Hmmm! Anyway just wanted to send a huge thanks!!!! DEDICATED SOUTH HILL WALKER Cheers to the older gentleman in the grey sweatsuit who walks up and down the South Hill every single evening. The heat didn’t even stop you; you’re a dynamo! I honestly don’t know how you do it, but wow! Watching you these past months has truly been a joy and reminds me daily, “If he can do it, I can do it.” Thank you for your inspiration.

JEERS KEEP YOUR BUTTS IN THE CAR I’m not going to pass judgment on cigarette smokers. What you do with your money and your body is none of my business. However, that ends when you flick a butt out the window of your vehicle. That is a scum bag move. Keep it in the vehicle until you can toss it in the trash like an adult. Be a good human.

lead is Serena Williams’ eventual — not even immediate — retirement from tennis????? REALLY? STUPID DRIVERS I’m a nurse at the largest hospital in Spokane. I work on the trauma unit. Shame on all the STUPID drivers! We will meet either you or your victims. I’m not just talking about the drunk or drugged drivers. I’m also talking about the drivers in such a hurry to get somewhere. And the drivers that treat the road like a video game. And the drivers that may be perfect in every other way, but they can’t turn off their freaking cellphone while they’re driving!!! I only live 9 miles from the hospital, and I’m almost a victim every day I drive to work. Rest assured, we will continue to give you and your victims kind and compassionate care. One thing that we’ve noticed is that the people that cause these accidents are usually the whiniest patients. Our sympathy goes to the victims. If YOU caused the accident, find your sympathy in the dictionary — it’s somewhere between shit and syphilis. MISDIRECTED JEERS Regarding the comments about Crime Check. My understanding is that they get close to 2,000 calls per day. Remember, they cover the whole county. I too have been frustrated by lack of response and “script following” by Crime Check reps. But let’s direct our anger where it really belongs. At the county prosecutor’s office, state government and an entrenched system

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS J O E Y S

U N D U E

U T E P

N O S H

F A A R D I

SOUND OFF

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

HISTORIC WALLACE Driving back from a camping trip with a hungry family of four, we’re lured by the signs along the interstate: “Visit historic Wallace, Idaho.” Despite negotiating a hazardous construction zone, we choose to exit and grab a bite to eat. But alas, historic Wallace truly is history since the town was shuttered at 2:30 on a Tuesday afternoon in the middle of summer! One place didn’t allow minors, many places were closed, and others were ending food service at 3 pm. Why? Is it the labor shortage? COVID? The town establishments seem charming and interesting... through the front windows. Too bad we couldn’t browse and buy. n

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Saturday Aug 20th - 7:05PM

Wear your prince or princess costume and take pictures with all of your favorite storybook princess characters! Presented by:

Visit 32 INLANDER AUGUST 18, 2022

for Tickets

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G O B I G

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Storybook Princes Night! vs.

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Games Through Sunday 8/21

FREE PARKING


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

INLAND NORTHWEST OPERA GALA: FLY AWAY TO CASABLANCA Celebrate with casino games, cocktails, arias and a Moroccan-inspired meal. Aug. 18, 5:30 pm. $125. Historic Flight Foundation, 5829 E. Rutter Ave. inlandnwopera.com EPICUREAN ON THE GREEN A ninehole couple’s golf scramble. The tournament features food and libation samples throughout the course, followed by an afterparty with dessert, drinks, prizes, raffles, team awards and live music. Aug. 25. $125. MeadowWood Golf Course, 24501 E. Valleyway Ave. epicureandelight.org (509-232-4567) SALMON BARBECUE DINNER PICNIC Dinner includes salmon, potato salad, green salad, baked beans, dinner roll and ice cream cup. All proceeds benefit Spokane Square Dance. Aug. 28, 12-4 pm. $10-$15. Western Dance Center, 1901 N. Sullivan Rd. SquareDanceSpokane.org

COMEDY

ADAM CONOVER Adam is a self-proclaimed “investigative comedian” and the host of Adam Ruins Everything on HBO Max. Aug. 18, 7:30 pm, Aug. 19-20, 7:30 & 10 pm. $20-$35. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998) LARRY THE CABLE GUY An evening of laughter and entertainment with comedy icon and multiplatinum recording artist. Aug. 18, 7:30 pm. $39-$89. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (509-481-2800) MOSTLY CLEAN COMEDY NIGHT A comedy night hosted by Jody Carroll featuring Charles Hall Jr. and Ryan McComb. Aug. 19, 8 pm. $20-$25. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org SUMMER IMPROV CHAOS The Blue Door Theater players turn your summer mishaps into laughs and better memories. Fridays at 7:30 pm through Aug. 26. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheater.com (509-747-7045) SAFARI A fast-paced, short-form comedic improv show. Saturdays from 7:30-9 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com NEW TALENT TUESDAYS Watch comedians of all skill levels work out jokes together. Tuesdays at 7 pm (doors at 6 pm). Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com KELSEY COOK The Spokane native is a writer and actress known for her work

in Wrists of Fury. Aug. 25, 7:30 pm, Aug. 26-27, 7:30 & 10 pm. $15-$28. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998) COMEDY CAFE: TOURNAMENT OF LAUGHS A stand-up comedy competition with audience judging and participation. Aug. 27, 8 pm. $17.39. Wren Pierson Community Center, 615 Fourth St. cityofcheney.org (509-498-9250) DUSTIN NICKERSON Dustin Nickerson calls himself “the world’s most average person” but has appeared on Comedy Central, Fox, Hulu and Netflix doing stand-up comedy. Aug. 28, 7 pm. $20-$28. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com

COMMUNITY

GOLDEN HARVEST: FLOUR SACKS FROM THE PERMANENT COLLECTION The MAC’s collection of cloth flour sacks offers a window into the early development of Eastern Washington’s wheat industry, which today contributes billions of dollars to the state’s economy. The sacks are also a tangible reminder of the mills that played a critical role in Spokane’s early growth. Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm, third Thursdays from 10 am-9 pm, through Oct. 30. $15-$20. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org GRAND COULEE DAM LASER LIGHT SHOW The 2022 light show theme is “One River, Many Voices.” Aug. 1-31 at 9:30 pm and Sept. 1-30 at 8:30 pm. Free. Grand Coulee Dam Visitor Center. usbr. gov (509-633-9265) PEND OREILLE COUNTY FAIR The 104th annual fair features vendor booths, food trucks and a rodeo. See website for full schedule. Aug. 18-21. Pend Oreille County Fairgrounds, 419152 State Route 20. pocfair.com (509-445-1367) THE RUM REBELLION: PROHIBITION IN NORTH IDAHO Featuring historical photographs, newspaper articles and artifacts including a moonshine still, this exhibit tells the story of how the panhandle of Idaho was anything but dry during Prohibition. Through Oct. 29, open daily from 11 am-5 pm. $2-$6. Museum of North Idaho, 115 Northwest Blvd. museumni.org (208-664-3448) THE WAY WE WORKED An exhibit curated by the Smithsonian Museum and the National Archives that celebrates the history of work in America and explores the places that Americans worked, from farms to factories and mines to restaurants, as well as in homes. Wed-Sat from

11 am-4 pm through Aug. 20. $3-$6. Spokane Valley Heritage Museum, 12114 E. Sprague. spokanevalleymuseum.com NORTH IDAHO STATE FAIR Celebrate the 100th year of the North Idaho State fair with 10 days of fun. Aug. 19-28, times vary. $6-$8. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Gov’t Way. nisfair.fun WALLACE HUCKLEBERRY FESTIVAL A festival celebrating all things huckleberry featuring a 5k race, pancake breakfast, food and craft vendors, live music, kids events and more. Aug. 19, 7 am-9 pm and Aug. 20, 7 am-3 pm. Free. Wallace, Idaho. wallacehuckfest.com (406-241-7134) DROP IN & RPG Stop by and explore the world of role playing games. Build a shared narrative using cooperative problem solving, exploration, imagination and rich social interaction. First and Third Sat. of every month, 1-3:45 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (509-279-0299) HOG HAVEN: BATTLE OF THE BANDS AND CLASSIC CAR SHOW A battle of the bands competition paired with a classic car and motorcycle show. Proceeds support Palouse Cares Food Network. Aug. 20, 3 pm. Free. Eastside Marketplace, 1420 S. Blaine St.. Moscow. eastsidemarketplace.com (208-882-1533) NEIGHBOR FEST A community event with food, lawn games and live music. Aug. 20, 1-4 pm. Free. Post Falls Library, 821 N. Spokane St. communitylibrary.net PANIDA THEATER OPEN HOUSE Stop in for a tour, a cold brew or just to check out classic Charlie Chaplin shorts and more. Aug. 20 from 12-4 pm. Free. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org UNITY IN THE COMMUNITY A multicultural event featuring a cultural village, career and education fair, senior resources, free school supplies and bikes helmets and entertainment. Aug. 20, 10 am-4 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. nwunity.org (509-625-6600) SPOKANE RENAISSANCE FAIRE WORKSHOP: IMPROV & PATRON INTERACTION An educational and interactive workshop on improv and patron interaction while in character at the ren faire. No previous acting experience is necessary. Aug. 21, 1-4 pm. Free. The Hive, 2904 E. Sprague Ave. facebook. com/spokanerenfaire (509-499-5700) AMERICANS & THE HOLOCAUST This traveling exhibit from the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum examines the motives, pressures and fears that shaped Americans’ responses to Nazism, war and genocide in Europe during the 1930s and

40s. Located on the third floor of the Foley Center Library. Aug. 23-Oct. 7, Mon-Fri from 3-8 pm and Sat-Sun from 1-5 pm. Free. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. gonzaga.edu (509-328-4220) CREATIVE ENTERPRISE PITCH PARTY Terrain’s version of Shark Tank. Thirteen artist entrepreneurs give three-minute presentations followed by a Q&A from a panel of local business experts. Aug. 23, 5-8 pm. Free. The Philanthropy Center, 1020 W. Riverside. terrainspokane.com LAUNCHNW COMMUNITY TOWN HALL: NORTH SPOKANE An opportunity to engage with the community and participate in facilitated discussions about how to ensure student success. Aug. 23, 5:307 pm. Free. Northwood Middle School, 12908 N. Pittsburg St. (509-624-2606) KERNEL During the Kendall Yards Night Market, kids are encouraged to participate in activities for a voucher to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables. Wednesdays from 5-7 pm through Aug. 24. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (509-279-0299) VOLUNBEER WITH ICICLE BREWING COMPANY Volunteering with Second Harvest followed by an exclusive beer tasting with Icicle Brewing Co. Registration required. Ages 21+. Aug. 25, 5:307:30 pm. $25. Second Harvest, 1234 E. Front Ave. secondharvestkitchen.org AIRWAY HEIGHTS DAYS Take part in watermelon races, a cornhole tournament and hear live music from local bands. Aug. 26-27. Free. Sunset Park, 924 S. Lawson St. airwayheightsparksandrec. org (509-244-4845) VALLEYGIRLS VINTAGE VENDOR SHOW & SALE This summer vintage sale features a bake sale, handcrafted goods, furniture sales, vintage clothes and more. Aug. 26-27, 10 am-5 pm. Free. ValleyGirls Vintage Market and Classes, 17618 E. 6th Ave. valleygirlsvintage.shop MILLWOOD DAZE The annual celebration includes a pancake breakfast, 5k run/walk, car show, scavenger hunt, vendors, food trucks and more. Aug. 27, 9 am-4 pm. Free. Downtown Millwood. millwoodnow.org (509-939-1083) FAIRY FESTA This fantasy festival includes crafts, music-making activities, a marketplace with vendor booths and more. Wear a costume for special discounts at Spokane Gallery. Aug. 27, 10 am-4 pm. Free. Spokane Gallery and Framing, 409 S. Dishman Mica Rd. spokane-gallery.myshopify.com SUMMER PLANT SALE The biannual plant sales, hosted by Friends of Manito,

include selections of perennials, houseplants and home/garden decor items. Aug. 27, 8 am-3 pm. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. thefriendsofmanito.org HAWAIIAN DANCE & DINNER A night of Hawaiian fun, dining and dancing. Included with admission is dinner and one raffle ticket. Ages 21+. Aug. 27, 6:30-9:30 pm. $15-$25. Southside Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. southsidescc.org OPEN HOUSE The family nudist ranch offers hiking, hot tubs, bocce ball, pickle ball and more. Meet other naturalists for a barbecue lunch for $5. Aug. 27, 10 am-4 pm. Free. Kaniksu Ranch, 4295 N. Deer Lake Rd. (509-233-8202) COASTER CLASSIC CAR SHOW Classic cars from across the Northwest are shown at Silverwood during Labor Day weekend. Sep. 3-4, 7 am-4 pm. $35-$40. Silverwood Theme Park, 27843 U.S. 95. silverwoodthemepark.com FUNKY JUNK ANTIQUE & CRAFT FESTIVAL The annual event features farmhouse and barn-chic decor vendors, food vendors, live music and vintage sellers. Sept. 3-4 from 10 am-4 pm. $5. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Rd. funkyjunkantiqueshow.com UNDER THE FREEWAY FLEA MARKET The market features over 80 vendors with unique items and food and drinks. Sep. 3-4, 8 am-6 pm and Sep. 5, 8 am-2 pm. Northern Pacific Depot Railroad Museum, 219 Sixth St., Wallace. wallaceid. fun (208-752-0111)

FILM

DREAMWORKS ANIMATION: THE EXHIBITION — JOURNEY FROM SKETCH TO SCREEN From the makers of Shrek, Madagascar, Kung Fu Panda, How to Train Your Dragon and Trolls, comes an extraordinary exhibition celebrating over 25 years of DreamWorks Animation. Through Sept. 11; Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm (third Thursdays until 9 pm). $15-$20. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS Part of the Garland’s free kids movies series. Aug 15-19, daily at 9:30 am. Free. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com MAMMA MIA! Moscow Community Theatre partners with Inland North Waste to present the original Mamma Mia film and its ABBA soundtrack. Proceeds support upcoming MCT shows. Aug. 18, 7-9 pm. $15. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127)

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EVENTS | CALENDAR NOPE The residents of a lonely gulch in California bear witness to an uncanny and chilling discovery. Aug. 19, 7 pm, Aug. 20, 4 & 7 pm and Aug. 21, 4 pm. $7. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) MOVIE IN THE PARK: AVENGERS ENDGAME Part of the Liberty Lake Summer Festival, Avengers Endgame is the conclusion of the Avengers’ fight against Thanos. Movie starts at dusk. Aug. 20. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. pavillionpark.org (509-755-6726) SATURDAY CARTOONS AT THE FARMERS MARKET Showings of cartoons during the Moscow Farmers Market. Every Sat through Oct. 31 from 8 am-1 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) THE SMURFS Part of the Garland’s free kids movies series. Aug 22-26, daily at 9:30 am. Free. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com INTERNATIONAL FLY FISHING FILM FESTIVAL This festival features a lineup of official selections produced by professional filmmakers around the world that showcase the passion, lifestyle and culture of fly fishing. Aug. 25, 7-9 pm. $20. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main Ave. spokaneriverkeeper.org MILLWOOD DAZE MOVIE NIGHT Bring chairs or blankets, relax and enjoy Encanto, the tale of an extraordinary family who live in the mountains of Colombia. Aug. 26, 8:30-10 pm. Free. Millwood Park, 9205 E. Frederick Ave. millwoodnow.org (509-939-1083) OUTDOOR MOVIE NIGHT: THE GOONIES Join Mikey and his friends as they seek out fabled treasure left by the pirate One-eyed Willy and his crew. Aug. 26, 8-10:15 pm. $5. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org RRR A fictitious story about two legendary revolutionaries and their journey away from home before they started fighting for their country in 1920s. Aug. 26, 7-10 pm. $5. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) SUMMER MOONLIGHT MOVIES: HOLES Bring a lawn chair, blankets, snacks and enjoy a movie under the moonlight. Movie begins at dusk. Aug. 26. Free. Sunset Park, 924 S. Lawson St. airwayheightsparksandrec.org

FOOD & DRINK

SIP & SHOP A wine and shopping event benefiting the Panida Theater. Aug. 18, 4-8 pm. Free. Pend d’Oreille Winery, 301 Cedar St. powine.org (877-452-9011) CANINES & COCKTAILS Bring your dog to the patio and enjoy dinner, drinks and treats for you and your furry friend. Every Friday from 2-7 pm. South Perry Lantern, 1004 S. Perry St. lanternspokane.com (509-473-9098) FOOD TRUCK FRIDAY This year’s food truck selection includes Mixed Plate, Skewers, One Night Stand, Tacos Camargo, Good Dilla and more. Located on Wall Street. Fridays from 11 am-2 pm. through Aug. 26. Downtown Spokane. downtownspokane.org NATIONAL LENTIL FESTIVAL A festival that celebrates Eastern Washington and North Idaho’s lentil production, featuring lentil dishes, a lentil cook-off, beer garden and live music. Aug. 19 and Aug. 20. Reaney Park, 460 NE Morton St.,

34 INLANDER AUGUST 18, 2022

Pullman. lentilfest.com U-PICK HUCKLEBERRIES Ride up the chairlift to pick huckleberries on Lookout Pass. Aug. 19-Sept. 5, Fri-Sun from 10 am-3:30 pm. $13. Lookout Pass Ski & Recreation Area, I-90 Exit 0. SkiLookout.com (208-744-1234) RIDE & DINE This summer series includes a scenic gondola ride, live music and a mountain-top barbecue dinner. Fridays from 3-8 pm through Sept. 2. $8-58. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. silvermt.com BIGFOOT PUB 50TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY Celebrate with live music, special drinks, games and prizes all weekend. Aug. 19-21, 11 am-2 pm. Free. Bigfoot Pub, 9115 N. Division St. (509467-9638) ALES FOR THE TRAIL The annual craft beer, cider and wine fest raises funds for the North Idaho Centennial Trail and includes live music from Kyle Richard (2-5 pm) and Jam Shack (5-8 pm), plus a mimosa and wine bar (4-8 pm) and Coeur d’Alene-area food trucks. Aug. 20, 2-8 pm. $35-$55. Coeur d’Alene City Park, 415 W. Mullan Rd. nictf.org/ales BARONESSE BARLEY HARVEST DAY Stand in the field where the barley is grown while enjoying brews and spirits made with Baronesse Barley. The Joseph’s Grainery crew is harvesting the 2022 crop while guests tap their toes to local band Tone Sober. Experience a “full-circle moment” and meet the farmer, maltster, brewers and distillers standing in the field where it’s grown. Aug. 20. Free; reservations required. Colfax. josephsgrainery.com BREWS & VIEWS Enjoy the views from the Vista House at the top of Mt. Spokane while drinking selections from local breweries. Saturdays from 12-5 pm through Aug. 27. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com FOOD TRUCKS & FRUIT FESTIVAL The fourth annual festival includes fresh fruit and food truck vendors all weekend long. Aug. 20-21, 9 am-6 pm. Beck’s Harvest House, 9919 E. Greenbluff Rd. becksharvesthouse.com PILSNER PICNIC Tickets include a glass and sample of each pilsner from participating breweries: Bale Breaker, Brick West, Icicle, Laughing Dog, Lumberbeard, Pelican, Perry Street and Whistle Punk. Aug. 20 at noon. $17.39. Brick West Brewing Co., 1318 W. First Ave. brickwestbrewingco.com STRENGTH FOR THE JOURNEY BBQ The annual barbecue includes food, drinks, swag and prizes. RSVP required. Aug. 20, 11 am-1 pm. Free. Spokane Regional Health District, 1101 W. College Ave. sannw.org (509-324-1500) CAMP COCKTAIL A three-class series during which participants explore signature cocktails from U.S. cities; the final installment explores New Orleans with Hogwash’s Simon Moorby and Raising the Bar’s Renée Cebula. Aug. 21, 5 pm. $65. Hogwash Whiskey Den, 304 W. Pacific Ave. raisingthebarnw.com DRAG BRUNCH Watch Nova Caine and the cast of Runway perform while enjoying a full breakfast menu and mimosas. Sundays from 10 am-2 pm. Globe Bar & Kitchen, 204 N. Division. globespokane.com (509-443-4014) GARDEN TEA PARTY Spend the afternoon in a flower field sipping gourmet tea and eating finger foods. Aug. 21, 1 pm. $30-$45. Grumpy Chicken Farm,

1535 E. Shingle Mill Rd. grumpychickenfarm.com (208-274-3358) LUAU DINNER SHOW Enjoy Hawaiianfusion cuisine served buffet-style along with Hawaiian music, dancers and flame throwers. Aug. 21, 4:30-8 pm. $45. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S. Nukwalqw. cdacasino.com (208-769-2464) RIVERFRONT EATS Riverfront Park’s local food truck series. Tuesdays from 11 am-2 pm through Aug. 30. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.org (509-625-6600) POURS & PICKS Enjoy $6 wine by the glass and $4 charcuterie picks in the Cafe, every Wednesday from 4-6 pm through Aug. 31. The Culinary Stone, 2129 N. Main St. culinarystone.com WINE WEDNESDAYS Enjoy wine specials, food and live music while watching the sunset over the orchard. See website for live music lineup. Wednesdays from 5-8 pm through Aug. 24. Free. Beck’s Harvest House, 9919 E. Greenbluff Rd. becksharvesthouse.com A NIGHT OUT A five-course meal including appetizers, rosé hour, bubbles and a rooftop view. Each course is paired by expert sommeliers. Aug. 25, 5 pm. $205. Wanderlust Delicato, 421 W. Main Ave., Suite 103. culinarydope.com TACOS Y TEQUILA FESTIVAL The second annual festival brings together great food, family fun, and tequila to help raise scholarship funds for Hispanic youth in the community sponsored by the Hispanic Business/Professionals Association. Aug. 27, 1-10 pm and Aug. 28, 11 am-7 pm. Free. Flatstick Pub, 618 W. Main Ave. tacostequilaspokane.com

MUSIC

RIVERSTONE SUMMER CONCERTS Featuring the Van Peepeghem Quartet. Aug. 18, 6-8 pm. Free. Idaho Central Credit Union Arena, Coeur d’Alene. artsandculturecda.org ALBUM RELEASE PARTY: JAKE ROZIER’S HARD TO KILL A GHOST To celebrate the release of Rozier’s new album, the band is joined by Ben Vogel and the Contraband and Bailey Allen Baker. Aug. 19, 7-10 pm. $5-$7. Black Diamond, 9614 E. Sprague Ave. blackdiamondspokane.com (509-385-4263) THE SOUNDS OF MUSIC Families can rotate through stations to explore various aspects of music including pitch, rhythm and how different textures relate to the sounds instruments produce. DIY you own percussive instrument, take sound samples and make beats on Garageband. Aug. 23, 12-2 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (209-279-0299) SPIRIT OF SPOKANE CHORUS A fourpart harmony barbershop chorus. Rehearsals held every Tuesday from 6:309 pm. Free. Opportunity Presbyterian Church, 202 N. Pines Rd. opportunitypresbyterian.org (509-924-9750) TUMBLEWEED MUSIC FEST A threeday music festival in Richland’s Howard Amon Park, also featuring craft and food vendors. Sept. 2-4. Richland, Wash. tumbleweedfest.com LIBERTY LAKE SUMMER FESTIVAL: SPOKANE SYMPHONY An outdoor memorial concert performed by the Spokane Symphony. Sept. 3, 6 pm. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. spokanesymphony.org (509-755-6726) RIVER CITY ROOTS FESTIVAL Featur-

ing live performances on a big stage on West Main Street, a fine art show, entertainment for children and families, and a 4-mile run through the heart of Missoula. Aug. 26-27; see schedule online. Missoula, Montana. rivercityrootsfestival.com

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

NEWMAN LAKE BASS BATTLES This three-week tournament is a catch-andrelease tag-style tourney. Utilizing the MyCatch app, anglers record catches with a photo and then release the fish back into the lake. Prizes totaling over $3,000 are awarded to the top ranking competitors. Through Aug. 20. $20. Newman Lake. anglersatlas.com SPOKANE INDIANS VS. TRI-CITY DUST DEVILS Promo events during the six-game series include Family Feast Night (Aug. 18), Fireworks Night (Aug 19), Storybook Princess Night (Aug. 20) and Dollars in Your Dog Night (Aug. 21). Aug. 18-20, 6:35 pm and Aug. 21, 1:05 pm. $8-$22. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. milb.com/spokane (535-2922) YOGA & MIMOSA CRUISES Tickets include a 45-minute class by CDA Power Yoga, and a mimosa (or sparkling cider). Snacks, cocktails, mimosa flights and more available for purchase. BYO yoga mat. Thursdays at 9 am through Aug. 25. $29.50. cdacruises.com COME FEED THE BISON Tours include farm history, a talk on bison and a Q&A session. Then, meet, greet and handfeed the bison. Fri-Sat from 12:30-1:30 pm through Sept. 2. $7. Win-Tur Bison Farm, 4742 W. Highway 231. winturbisonfarm.com (509-258-6717) LIBERTY LAKE THROWDOWN This annual cornhole tournament raises funds for the HUB Sports Center. Aug. 20, 11 am-8 pm. $30-$75. Orchard Park, 20298 E. Indiana Ave. pavillionpark.org SILVER MOUNTAIN TRAIL RUN Choose between a 6k, 9k or 18k course and ride up North America’s longest gondola to the mountain start line. Aug. 21. $45$105. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. nsplit.com CIRCLING RAVEN CHAMPIONSHIP This annual tournament features a 54-hole format and a $200,000 purse prize. Aug. 22-28. $10-$40. Circling Raven Golf Course, 27068 S. Highway 95. cdacasino.com (800-523-2464) ROOFTOP SUMMER YOGA Each week of the donation-based class brings a different feel and practice. Tues from 6-7:15 pm through Aug. 30. By donation. Saranac Rooftop, 25 W. Main. rootedyogapnw.com (509-315-8862) WINE & YOGA CLASS A 60-minute hatha yoga emphasizing somatic movement and breath work. Ages 21+. Aug. 23, 5:30-7:30 pm. $50. Arbor Crest Wine Cellars, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. arborcrest.com (509-927-9463) HISTORIC WALKING TOURS Join local historian Chet Caskey for a free walking tour of Riverfront Park, where the city’s past and present merge in unique ways. Aug. 27, 10 am & noon. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.org SPQNI SHOOTOUT A youth 3-on-3 basketball tournament for kids in grades 3-12. Registration does not guarantee entry. Aug. 27-28, 9 am-6 pm. Free. Spokane Tribe Casino, 14300 W SR


Highway 2. spokanetribe.com

THEATER

NUNSENSE A musical farce about a convent of nuns staging a fundraiser to enable them to bury the last four nuns of their order who died of botulism in an unfortunate convent cooking accident and are temporarily being stored in the freezer. Aug. 18-20, 7:30 pm and Aug. 21, 2 pm. $50-$142. Schuler Performing Arts Center, 1000 W. Garden Ave. cdasummertheatre.com SISTER ACT A woman hiding in a convent helps her fellow sisters find their voices as she rediscovers her own. Aug. 5-21, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $25-$41. University High School, 12320 E. 32nd Ave. svsummertheatre.com THE SOUND OF MUSIC At this annual show, cast members ages 8-108 perform together for the local community. Aug. 19-28, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sat-Sun at 3 pm. $15-$20. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cytnorthidaho.org SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK: KING LEAR Performed by Montana Shakespeare in the Parks. Aug. 21, 5 pm. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. pavllionpark.org

VISUAL ARTS

LOST IN TRANSLATION A self-guided mini-exhibition in the Campbell House that explores the history of Orientalism, Egyptomania and other forms of exoticism in design and fashion. TuesSun from 10 am-5 pm through Nov. 13. $15-$20. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org OBJECT/ARTIFACT Sculptors Rob McKirdie, Tybre Newcomer and Cozette Phillips present a collection of work that reflects on their past explorations and how materials preserve and shape perception. Mon-Fri from 10 am-5 pm through Aug. 26. Free. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland Ave. spokaneartschool.net (509-325-1500) HOT SUMMER NIGHTS A group show featuring paintings, sculptures, photography, wood carvings, mixed media art and more. Aug. 5-28, Fri 5-8 pm and Sat 12-5 pm. Free. Shotgun Studio, 1625 W. Water Ave. (509-688-3757) TERRAIN GALLERY FUNDRAISER Support Terrain by purchasing artwork made by over 50 local artists. All proceeds support Terrain and gallery maintenance. Fridays from 4-7 pm through Aug. 27. $200. Terrain Gallery, 728 N. Monroe St. terrainspokane.com ART & GLASS FEST This annual event features over 50 local artists of various trades and expertise. Enjoy live music, wine, beer and food all weekend. Ages 21+. Aug. 20-21. Free. Arbor Crest Wine Cellars, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. arborcrest.com (509-927-9463) BYO PIECE PAINT CLASS A workshop to help develop work-in-progress pieces. Pre-registration required. Mon from 12-3 pm, Sat from 2-5 pm. $85. Paint In My Hair, 3036 N. Monroe St. facebook.com/paintinmyhair SUNDAY ART MART Local emerging artists and crafters exhibit and sell their work in a casual environment. Sundays from 12-4 pm through Aug. 28. Downtown Spokane. downtownspokane.org ADULT PAINT NIGHT Explore the medium of acrylic pouring by creating a beach landscape. Aug. 22, 6 pm. $10. Colfax Library, 102 S. Main St. whitcolib.org (509-397-4366)

JUVENTINO ARANDA: ESPERÉ MUCHO TIEMPO PA VER Aranda’s work expresses a search for identity at the intersection of Mexico and America. Aranda’s art draws from preColumbian sources as well as current affairs related to the social, political and economic struggles of late capitalism and notions of the American dream. Aug. 23-March 11, Tue-Sat from 10 am-4 pm. Free. Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU, 1535 NE Wilson Rd. museum.wsu.edu RIVER RIDGE ASSOCIATION OF FINE ARTS MEETING Bring in a piece for a “critique with kindness, please” session. Aug. 24, 10 am-noon. Free. Spokane Art Supply, 1303 N. Monroe St. rrafaofspokane.com ARTISTS STUDIO TOUR The 10th annual event takes the public on a tour of artists studios in and around the Coeur d’Alene area. Download the free map and take a self-guided tour or take a VIP shuttle bus ride for an extra cost. Aug. 27-28 from 10 am-5 pm. Free. artsandculturecda.org (208-292-1629) MEGAN PERKINS OPEN STUDIO Visit Perkins at her studio in Deer Park. The event features never-before-seen paintings, a tour of the artist’s creative space, food and drinks. Aug. 27, 9 am-2 pm. Free; RSVP required. meganperkinsart.com

WORDS

HOW THEY MAKE IT: CREATING A STORY AT DREAMWORKS DreamWorks storyboard artists Heidi Jo Gilbert and Joel Crawford discuss how they develop animated characters. Aug. 18, 6-9 pm. $10. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org TIMOTHY CONNOR: BEAUTIFUL WOUNDS The Ice Age Floods Institute Cheney-Spokane Chapter offers an evening with Timothy Connor discussing the Channeled Scablands of Eastern Washington. Aug. 18, 6:30-7:45 pm. Free. The Hive, 2904 E. Sprague Ave. iafi.org (509-954-4242) LILAC CITY LIVE! Jess Walter, Ryan McComb and Tanya Ballman make an appearance at this edition of Spokane’s late-night talk show. Cash bar is available. Aug. 18, 8 pm. Free. Central Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org (509-444-5336) POETRY PRELUDE: THOM CARAWAY A poetry reading before a performance of music by Soul Proprietor. Aug. 18, 6 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Park, 300 S. Chestnut St. annie@matlow.org BEVERLY HODGINS: MERCY AND MADNESS Hodgins explores the story of Spokane’s first female physician in her new book, “Mercy and Madness.” Aug. 19, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com BOOKSTORE ROMANCE DAY Local romance author Courtney Davis discusses her book Princess of Prias. Aug. 20, 5 pm. Free. The Well-Read Moose, 2048 N. Main. wellreadmoose.com MICHELE HARPER: THE BEAUTY IN BREAKING As a part of the SCLD Online Author Series, Michele Harper discusses her book “The Beauty in Breaking.” Aug. 22, 6 pm. Free. scld. org/authors-series BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm; sign-ups at 6 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. bit.ly/2ZAbugD (509-847-1234) n

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annabis is becoming a hot commodity on the stock market. Recently, Tilray Brands’ CEO Irwin Simon, who leads a company that is among the largest cannabis brands on the planet, and one publicly traded on NASDAQ, said he thinks cannabis can become a seriously profitable industry within the United States. “The U.S. is a $100 billion opportunity in cannabis,” Simon told Yahoo Finance. “If you look at cannabis today in the U.S., 93 percent of Americans want medical cannabis legalized and about 63-65 percent want adult use. Today, it’s legal in about 33 states, plus D.C.” The money-making potential of cannabis is well known. In fiscal year 2021, Washington state alone generated $1.49 billion in retail sales. Washington is one of 19

36 INLANDER AUGUST 18, 2022

BY WILL MAUPIN states that have fully legalized cannabis, and it is far from the largest state that has done so. States like California and New York have more than double the population of Washington, and they’ve legalized cannabis as well. As have states like Virginia, Michigan and New Jersey, which also have more people than Washington. As of market close on Friday, Aug. 12, Simon’s Tilray Brands had a market capitalization of $2.34 billion. That’s just one company, but it has a market cap of nearly a billion dollars more than Washington’s legal market generates annually. The Motley Fool, a publication covering the stock market, regularly updates a list of what it considers to be good investments called “Best Marijuana Stocks for 2022.” Yahoo, Investopedia and U.S. News and World Report, among many others, offer similar lists.

Despite the federal prohibition of cannabis, the industry is being traded on renowned stock exchanges such as the NASDAQ and New York Stock Exchange. Some companies, like Tilray, are forthright in their commitment to the cannabis industry. Others, like British American Tobacco (NYSE: BTI) are involved in the cannabis industry through more convoluted and hidden ways. Whether they’re upfront about it or not, there are numerous publicly traded companies who are deeply involved with cannabis, which means regular people who invest in the stock market are able to invest money into the cannabis industry. Whether or not investing in cannabis or cannabisadjacent businesses is wise from a financial standpoint is still to be determined, but it is possible despite the drug’s legal ambiguity. Imagine that a decade ago. n


BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a five-year sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

AUGUST 18, 2022 INLANDER 37


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