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INSIDE

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AUG 14-20, 2014 | VOL. 21, NO. 43

COMMENT NEWS COVER STORY CULTURE FOOD FILM MUSIC

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EVENTS ADVICE GODDESS GREEN ZONE INHEALTH BULLETIN BOARD I SAW YOU LAST WORD

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ON THE COVER | JESSIE SPACCIA ILLUSTRATION

COMMENT

We need to find some ways to engage voters at the beginning of the process

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MENTAL HEALTH

What a new court ruling means for Washington’s mentally ill

PAGE 13

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

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WHO IS YOUR FAVORITE FICTIONAL CHARACTER OR PERSONA? JOHN WAITE My favorite is Batman. He fights crime and still stays under the radar. He’s incredibly smart, but he doesn’t really have superhero powers.

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COMMENT | FOREIGN AFFAIRS

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L

ast month’s downing of the Malaysian jetliner over Ukraine has created worldwide concern over what appears to be such aggressive action by Russia. There’s no greater concern anywhere than in the Netherlands, the nation whose countrymen suffered the highest death toll, percentage-wise even greater than Americans suffered on 9/11. Having just returned from Amsterdam, the Dutch are clearly a barometer of worldwide concern over international conditions. The Netherlands is a small, densely populated country with some 16 million residents. A proud nation, the Netherlands survived World War II with help from the United States and Great Britain. The Dutch remain grateful for their wartime survival after German occupation. Though not strategically a strong European military force, it borders Belgium and Germany. Its government leans left and is generally socially liberal. It has a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary democracy. Fifty percent of the Netherlands lies below sea level; its name means “low country.” A member of NATO and other European organizations, it was recently designated by the United Nations World Happiness Report as the fourth “happiest country” in the world. Its history stretches back to the 1500s. Its economic fortunes have ebbed and flowed over hundreds of years. The Dutch connection with America stems from its immigrant settlements in the 1600s in what is now New York. King Willem-Alexander heads the Dutch constitutional monarchy.

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aving served as a member of the Board of Supervisors of a large Dutch-based company — ARCADIS NL — since 2005, made some 70 trips to the Netherlands and cycled much of the country, I like and respect the Dutch people and their opinions. When told of the anger at Russia, seething yet controlled out of respect for the deceased, I understood the Dutch way. It remains to be seen whether the economic stranglehold Russia holds over Europe trumps the violence it wreaked on a passive Netherlands. Dutch television showed two large cargo aircraft from Ukraine landing in the Netherlands on July 24, greeted by the King and Queen, and the sobering, silent, stoic offloading of 74 coffins to a line of black hearses nearby. Soldiers offering full military honors to the deceased tenderly carried the coffins of slain Dutch citizens, marching them reverently to nearby transport vehicles, guarded by saluting military personnel, to be driven to places designated for body identification. The hearses drove from the airport, forming a thin black line observed by thousands of Dutch citizens paying their last respects, laying flower tributes in memory of their slain countrymen.

One Belgian friend lamented to me how vulnerable the Netherlands, and all of Europe, is to the geographical arc of trouble spots worldwide, from Israel and Gaza in turmoil, to the ISIS sectarian warfare in Iraq, to Iran seeking nuclear capability, to the spark of unrest occurring in Africa, to the hegemony of Russia. Unchecked aggression by the world’s bad actors is consequential for freedom-loving and relatively benign countries, such as the Netherlands. Egypt is in turmoil, and Israel is threatened lately with thousands of Palestinian and Jewish war victims. Afghanistan is war-torn, and China is aggressively controlling Hong Kong. Perhaps the tragedy of the 194 dead Dutch citizens will wake up the world to the danger of unchecked aggression by nations that have little respect for human life. The question for policymakers everywhere is whether aggression on Europe’s borders will be confronted. Historically, the United States has acted as a bulwark against aggressive Send comments to nations, but today, U.S. editor@inlander.com. leadership is missing where action is required. Largely absent in Syria, disrespected by Russia and now exiting Afghanistan and Iraq, the U.S. has an international role to fulfill. Idly waiting for Europe to solely defend itself against aggression from a ruthless Russia won’t work. Without someone standing strong, too many innocents will die. Other nations will follow America’s lead — if it will lead. Today’s American leaders seem unwilling to use America’s power — or even its voice — to influence world affairs. The result? International chaos.

LETTERS

T

hough American military power cannot solve all of Europe’s challenges, Europe would be emboldened by strong U.S. words against aggression and lawlessness, coupled with strategic actions (reinserting missile defenses and public military exercises) to condemn the deaths resulting from the missile attack. It’s in Europe’s best interest to assert its independence and demand collective action, more than economic sanctions alone, against Russia’s unchecked aggression. The Dutch United Nations representative publicly summed up, in one word, the feelings of all nationalities who abhor senseless killing by aggressive peoples everywhere: “Despicable.” n


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Primary Concerns BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

I

had planned on writing a column this week about how low voter turnout is killing our democracy. After Idaho’s appalling 21.7 percent showing in its May primary election, I had circled our primary on my calendar to see whether we’d follow suit. Well, here in Spokane County we did pretty much average for the past eight elections, with a 35.1 percent turnout at last count. I understand the move to voting by mail — it saves money, is more secure and accurate — but I never much liked the loss of the public part of Election Day, when you went to your local polling place like a kind of annual American pilgrimage. So of course I felt affirmed by the findings of a 2007 study of California voters that found a 3 percent decline in voter turnout under by-mail voting. But now, eight full election cycles after Spokane County switched in 2006, we can look at the actual results. The bottom line? Spokane County turnout is up three to four percentage points from the eight elections prior to 2006. From 2006-13, our average primary election turnout was 35.6 percent; from 1998-2005 it was 32.6 percent. The general election turnout in the vote-by-mail era has been 63.8 percent; for the eight cycles prior to 2006, it was 59.8 percent. So the evidence shows that voting by mail is helping. What’s still a nagging problem is our primary election turnout — especially in non-presidential years. And it’s nothing new. As far back as 1979, we had a 13.9 percent primary election turnout. Just last year, only 22.2 percent bothered to vote. I understand the impulse to tune politics out: Nothing seems to change, no matter whom we elect. But we’ve made it mighty easy, delivering the ballot to your door, and still we get 22 percent? This makes it way too easy for candidates. They should have to defend or articulate their vision, but if only a few voters are paying attention, what does it matter? And for those in districts securely in one political camp, winning the primary is often all you need. We need to find some ways to engage voters at the beginning of the process. Maybe Washington should consider moving its primary to April or May? Vote-by-mail was good, but what’s next, Olympia? Or perhaps we should go back to some kind of public voting opportunities — like little civic celebrations at the collection boxes. Bring in some food samples like at Costco, tap a couple of local microbrew kegs. Then we’d have the kind of political party everyone can agree on. 

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COMMENT | POVERTY up and we have our Pleasantville utopia? What happens to the people who aren’t whizzing around nabbing their morning Starbucks and snapping that occasional red-light selfie? They get left behind. In fact, as you read this, life is getting a lot more difficult for people in Spokane who, by any definition, don’t have it easy.

“Perhaps we should ask the experts on struggle themselves.”

Spare Your Change

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Power plays in downtown Spokane are not sustainable solutions for the poor BY RACHEL DOLEZAL

T

o the casual summer roadtripper passing through Spokane, our city seems downright ordinary. The coffee stands, gas stations, city buses, churches, graffiti and panhandlers are all part of an average Inland Northwest life. Golly, there is even enough visible “diversity” to seem big-time compared to North Idaho. But scratch the surface of this normalcy, and you will find something far more sinister at work. Some might even call it a war, and the target is on the backs of the poor. So stealthy is the sustained effort to clean

up the streets of “undesirables” that even some poor people find themselves duped by this month’s cause to “Give Real Change.” Cloaked in charitable language and good intentions, this movement was launched by the Downtown Spokane Partnership last week as a campaign to discourage people from giving money to panhandlers. The effort is supposed to starve people off the streets and force them into homeless shelters or agencies that are ready and able to serve their every need. Rhetoric aside, who does an anti-panhandling crusade really benefit? This monthlong emphasis is part of a larger movement that is powering through our city like a morning street sweeper. So what happens when the people are all swept

Per the usual system of levying solutions on oppressed groups from a perspective of privilege, all three of the recent strikes against the poor have been paraded about as positive change. Strike 1 was the sit/lie ordinance criminalizing sitting or lying down on public sidewalks for 18 out of 24 hours each day. Strike 2 was public officials delaying the renovation of the downtown bus hub as part of their plan for moving it — and the passengers — out of the downtown area. Strike 3 was this camouflaged “Give Real Change” campaign. In the month of August, we will be reminded by a variety of propaganda materials that we have the option, right and even civic duty to not give to panhandlers. If you agree with this premise, then please don’t roll up your window and forget to at least give to a local charity of choice. However, to find real, sustainable solutions for economic advancement in our area, perhaps we should ask the experts on struggle themselves. Empowerment and upward mobility come by way of personal agency, education and choice, and we as humans operate on the basic need to have the opportunity for self-determination. If we don’t want to include the public opinion of the poor, we should to admit that our charity is possibly more self-serving than helpful. As my dad always said: “You can’t eat someone’s good intentions.” n Rachel Dolezal, formerly of the Human Rights Education Institute in Coeur d’Alene, is an award-winning artist and activist who teaches courses in art, Africana history and culture at area universities.

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“What if we took the areas where we feel uncomfortable and did the opposite of restricting people’s access? What if we tried to get everyone to come?”

— LUKE BAUMGARTEN

“We associate the word ‘conservative’ with those who want to expand urban growth boundaries and the word ‘liberal’ with those who don’t. Yet arguably, it’s the ‘smart growth’ supporters who are the real ‘conservatives.’”

— ROBERT HEROLD

“The issue of loitering and bad apples is not entirely an STA problem; it’s an allof-Spokane problem.” — TED S. McGREGOR JR.

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

Readers react to “The Father of Spokane” (8/7/14) about James Glover and his threatened legacy IMMIGRATION

How the crisis is affecting local relief organizations PAGE 13

THEATER

The Book of Mormon renews faith in musicals PAGE 31

AUGUST 7-13, 2014 | FIRST DRAFT OF HISTORY

Should we erase James Glover from our history? BY LISA WAANANEN JONES PAGE 20

In light of the primary results, is Cathy McMorris Rodgers’ support trending up or down?

JAMES STRIPES: As an historian, I will not cease to credit James Glover as the forward-thinking real estate speculator whose vision of Spokane Falls led to his place as a city father. It is natural, however, to sanitize history in the creation of new urban space. Most folks don’t really want to know the truth about those who built this country. BARB LEE: Very good read, thank you. I learned a lot and it is always nice to read a well researched article. As to Glover’s legacy, truth is always the best legacy and people are rarely either good or bad. They are much more complicated. Although I also think it is essential to understand cultural norms of the time period before passing judgment. I appreciated that your piece brought this into the conversation as well. DUSTYN SAINT JAY DAUTERMAN: And no one understands that it was a different time? I read the article and you hold him to today standards. Stuff like that happened all the time back then. Seems to me that this isn’t news.

KËLLY ZIMMERMAN: It would be nice to have an actual representative. DAVID TREMBLAY: On a scale of 1 to 10, I would say minus 5. DIANA CAMPBELL ROBERTS: It is interesting to me that so many folks vote for someone who does not even live in their district and votes against the district’s best interests time and time again. SHERI CHIN: Frankly, I would vote for just about anyone but her. I wouldn’t vote for any sitting Congress member after the showing they have had. That a Congress would go so far to see a president fail — even throwing our own economic recovery under the bus with a reduction to our credit rating and a government shutdown — there is no way I would ever vote for one of the participants of that mess and that kind of agenda. JEFF GERHARDSTEIN: Now that she doesn’t have Cantor to stand behind in photo ops, how will we recognize her? KEITH HOLMAN: I voted for Mickey Mouse... Figured he would get more accomplished than any congressional incumbent. 

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Crowded Out What a new court ruling means for Washington’s mentally ill who have nowhere to go BY JACOB JONES

When state psychiatric facilities are full, patients often end up in emergency rooms.

A

Washington State Supreme Court decision last week outlawed a loophole in the mental health treatment system that allowed the state to “warehouse” patients in emergency rooms when space could not be found in psychiatric hospitals — banning an oft-used patch on the region’s overcrowded network. Reports show the “psychiatric boarding” of patients in the state’s ERs has increased dramatically in recent years as psychiatric facilities have struggled with a shortage of beds. In some reported cases, patients were secured to gurneys without any mental health treatment for several days, until they could be transferred. Local mental health officials do not yet know how the new court ruling will force them to change their intake procedures. John Wiley, spokesman for the Department of Social and Health Services, which oversees state psychiatric care, says a court order does not simply make more treatment beds available. “We just don’t have any place to put them,” Wiley says of state hospitals such as Eastern State in Medical Lake. “We only have so many certified beds. They are full.” Until now, overcrowded state hospitals could provide a “single bed certification” to an outside facility, such as an ER, ...continued on next page

AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 13


Cathy is getting results for Eastern Washington

NEWS | MENTAL HEALTH

Thank You Thank you for your support in the primary - working together, we can do great things for Eastern Washington. • • • • • • •

Helping military families and veterans Leading efforts to create small business jobs Bringing more doctors to our area Promoting hydropower Finishing the North-South Freeway Advocacy for Fairchild Air Force Base Protecting and Strengthening Medicare and Social Security

“CROWDED OUT,” CONTINUED... to house a patient if there wasn’t enough room at a certified hospital, but the practice many times left patients in a treatment limbo without any interim mental health care. The state’s Involuntary Treatment Act allows for the involuntary commitment of mental health patients, but also ensures certain rights and treatment certifications. The court’s unanimous Aug. 7 opinion ruled that a lack of space or money does not justify failing to provide necessary treatment. “By its plain terms,” the opinion states, “[the state’s ITA] does not authorize a single bed certification merely because there is no room at certified facilities… ”

T CONGRESS (R) Paid for and authorized by Cathy McMorris Rodgers for Congress • www.cathyforcongress.com PO Box 137 • Spokane, WA 99210

he court’s ruling stems from a 2013 motion in which 10 mental health detainees contested the conditions of their involuntary commitment facilities, mostly initiated in hospital ERs or medical centers — not certified psychiatric hospitals. A 2011 Washington State Institute for Public Policy assessment of the state’s treatment capacity found that approximately 550 to 720 patients qualified for involuntary commitment each month. About 20 percent of those individuals

spent some time in psychiatric boarding awaiting treatment. “However, it should be noted that boarding an ITA patient is not a preferable outcome for a treatment admission,” the WSIPP assessment states. “In many cases, the locations where ITA patients are boarded may not be staffed or equipped to handle the acute psychiatric needs of these individuals.” DSHS and Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center, which has a certified psychiatric ward, could not immediately provide any figures on local boarding rates. Providence officials declined to comment further and could not confirm whether they track single bed certification numbers.

I

daho operates under a different commitment system, but has also faced some challenges in placing mental health patients. Kootenai Medical Center, which serves as the intake facility for many North Idaho patients, has previously reported that about 700 patients had spent more than 12 hours in the emergency room awaiting a psychiatric bed in the past year. Many Washington state mental health officials opposed the new ruling, arguing psychiatric boarding was preferable to no treatment or

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14 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014


In Idaho, Sandpoint police officers, like Capt. Rick Bailey, often wait with patients in need of treatment. JACOB JONES PHOTO releasing an endangered patient back onto the streets. Wiley says budget cuts have intensified the demand on beds and staffing, forcing hospitals toward single bed certifications. Patient advocates with Disability Rights Washington and the American Civil Liberties Union of Washington have called for ending psychiatric boarding, arguing that the state has a legal responsibility to follow through on treatment upon commitment. “This is a step in the right direction,” says Sandi Ando in a statement from the state’s chapter of the National Alliance on

“The result of this decision should be that people with mental health needs get more, not less treatment.” Mental Illness. “The result of this decision should be that people with mental health needs get more, not less treatment. We need to remain vigilant to ensure that the correct actions occur now.” Wiley says state officials in Olympia will now work with Regional Support Networks, which manage community treatment programs, to determine how the system must adapt in the coming weeks. The Seattle Times reports Gov. Jay Inslee has given officials until Aug. 27 to comply with the court’s order. “We really don’t know what the future holds,” Wiley says. “We have known all along that there are more people with mental health issues than there are beds.” n jacobj@inlander.com

“LAW SHARK” I am the

AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

The Big News of the Past Week

PHOTO EYE FLYING HIGH

1.

Coeur d’Alene has hired Lee R. White as the city’s new police chief. White, currently an assistant police chief in Mesa, Arizona, will start work Sept. 2.

2.

Spokane’s second recreational pot store, Satori, has opened on North Division. The state has now licensed four stores in Spokane County, where up to 18 will be allowed.

3.

In three unrelated incidents, Spokane police say a man was stabbed on North Division, a man was shot to death at a North Spokane hotel and a woman was arrested for throwing her 1-year-old child over a fence and down an embankment.

4.

While insisting he would not send ground troops back to Iraq, President Barack Obama has authorized airstrikes and humanitarian assistance as militants gain ground and terrorize members of a religious minority there.

5.

Legendary comedian and actor Robin Williams died Monday of an apparent suicide.

ON INLANDER.com What’s Creating Buzz YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Jimmy Hill, a member of the freestyle stunt team Metal Mulisha, performs during the 14th annual Moto X at the Kootenai County Fairgrounds in Coeur d’Alene on Friday. The event drew both professional and amateur riders, some as young as 5, from as far away as Alberta and California.

DIGITS

3.4

$

Total legal recreational marijuana sales, in millions, in Washington as of Aug. 4, according to the Liquor Control Board.

The Inlander’s Annual

Give e d i u G On Stands August 28th

16 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014

2.5

$

Annual revenue, in millions, from Spokane’s $20 vehicle tab tax, which, under a proposal from City Councilman Jon Snyder, would be revoked if the city does not complete a plan for new pedestrian infrastructure by the end of 2015.

NEWS: Bike thieves, Idaho’s Medicaid money loss and more election analysis. Check Inlander.com for news all week long. FOOD: Our Food Blotter blog is back. Find it on Thursdays.

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Church and State Spokane’s budget wrangling starts; plus, a Cheney school under fire for religious speech BUDGET SEASON BEGINS

Mayor David Condon unveiled his broad 2015 BUDGET plans last week, emphasizing spending on public safety and promising that, in contrast to massive cuts in 2013, the city won’t lay anyone off to make ends meet. Following up on funding last year to hire 25 new police officers, this year’s $585 million budget plan includes $450,000 to fund a police “hire-ahead” program to train incoming officers as others retire and directs a 1 percent property tax increase to buying police and fire equipment. Condon’s plan also directs $30 million to ongoing river cleanup efforts and $163 million toward capital projects, like street repairs. That spending would be in addition to the $25 million street levy and a $60 million bond to renovate Riverfront Park, both of which the city will ask citizens to approve this fall. While the 2015 budget cuts no positions, 32 city positions will be eliminated this November when the county takes over management of the regional solid waste system and two city waste transfer stations. Those employees will be offered other positions throughout the city, according to city spokeswoman Marlene Feist. The city council will study the mayor’s proposal in

coming months before hashing out a more specific lineitem budget with him this fall. Read the full budget and give feedback at myspokanebudget.org. — HEIDI GROOVER

McMORRIS RODGERS’ TOWN HALL

Heading into the fall election, U.S. Rep. CATHY McMORRIS RODGERS plans to host a community town hall meeting Monday in Spokane to discuss hydropower, veterans issues and other topics as chosen at random from audience-submitted questions. The town hall is scheduled from 5 to 6 pm on Monday at the Lincoln Center. A Spokane-area mailing recently mislabeled the date of the event. Spokeswoman Audrey Scagnelli says the office corrected the mistake online, but hopes the typo does not impact attendance. “At the end of the day, the congresswoman wants to hear from the community,” Scagnelli says. “That’s what matters most. She’s looking forward to it.” In her fifth term in the U.S. House of Representatives, McMorris Rodgers faces Democratic challenger Joe Pakootas in November. — JACOB JONES

GOSPEL OF CHENEY

Before speaking at a Cheney Middle School assembly back in March, former Army Ranger Gary Horton, with an organization called American Freedom Assembly, was warned not to TALK ABOUT GOD. The administrators specifically walked him through what his speech was to be about. After all, this was a public school before a captive audience. But Horton talked about God anyway — letting “the Lord speak through him,” he said in a newsletter. That ignited a parental complaint. “Both [vice-principal Nicole Nanny] and I were incredibly disappointed that the speaker went off-topic and decided to do their own thing,” says Cheney Middle School principal Mike Stark. “He was brought in to do a motivational speech to get our kids to try their best on their tests.” As of this week, the Cheney school district has officially apologized for bringing Horton in as a speaker for the mandatory assembly and for not stopping the speech when Horton began to talk about religious matters. “You took advantage of a captive audience to deliver a message that we did not ask for, and one that is not even legal to promote in a public school,” Stark wrote in a letter to Horton after his speech. “I will do everything I can do to make sure other public schools don’t make the same mistake that we made, allowing you into our school under false pretenses.” Despite the district’s apology, the parent who made the initial complaint tells the Spokesman-Review he still wants the district to go further, by sending out an apology to all parents and holding those who brought Horton accountable. — DANIEL WALTERS

AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 17


NEWS | ELECTION 2014 the son of the late Bob McCaslin Sr., a longtime state senator and Spokane Valley councilmember. Yet according to Wilhite, the commissioners’ sense of who was most electable was a prime factor when selecting Christian. “I was told I was the most qualified candidate, but they didn’t think I could be elected in the 4th,” Wilhite says. Ultimately, it was Christian who the 4th didn’t find electable.

MONEY DIDN’T MEAN VOTES

What Didn’t Happen Big endorsements, cash and political power couldn’t swing last week’s primary election BY DANIEL WALTERS

H

ere’s the thing about primaries: They’re lousy at predicting general elections. When only 35 percent of registered voters mail in their ballot, drawing conclusions about the rest of the electorate is especially risky. Remember the primary where Mayor Mary Verner crushed David Condon, 58 percent to 33 percent? Today, Condon is mayor. Last week’s primary offers more lessons through what didn’t happen than what did. Some factors, predicted to be crucial, didn’t seem to matter at all.

COMMISSIONERS’ PICKS DIDN’T WIN

Last Tuesday wasn’t a good night for the Spokane County commissioners’ preferred candidates. Mary Kuney, the Republican treasurer candidate they endorsed against sitting Republican treasurer Rob Chase?

Knocked off by a huge margin. Leonard Christian, handpicked to replace Rep. Larry Crouse as the 4th Legislative District representative? Crushed Despite support from Spokane County commisby the same two sioners, Mary Kuney and Leonard Christian lost. people the commissioners passed over to pick Christian. To be fair, Kuney and Christian’s opponents had better name recognition: Treasurer candidates Chase and Amy Biviano’s names are known from previous elections. In the 4th, Diana Wilhite is the former mayor of Spokane Valley, while the more conservative Bob McCaslin Jr. was

#BeINC BeINCREDIBLE 18 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014

Two of the losing candidates had the most funding in their race. Kuney was the best funded treasurer’s candidate in the state of Washington. Christian led both of his opponents in funding. “He had the most amount of money, he had more signs than everybody else,” McCaslin says of Christian. Ultimately, they didn’t seem to help. So what did? “The doorbelling and the one-on-ones are what win elections,” says Beva Miles, chair of the grassroots organization Republicans of Spokane County. In Spokane County, observers on both sides say, a good, firm handshake still matters. “My campaign strategy was to touch as many people as I could,” says Wilhite. “Even though the 4th District was very large, I was able to doorbell a substantial portion of it.” Of course, it never hurts to have both doorbells and donors. That’s Kevin Parker’s strength: The Republican 6th Legislative District representative has a war chest 32 times the size of opponent Donald Dover’s, and he still doorbells even in years he’s not running. He says he’s knocked on about 9,000 doors so far this election cycle, bringing his total since 2008 to about 49,000. “One lady commented, ‘You come and visit more than my own kids do,’” Parker says. The result? He walked away with 63 percent of the primary vote.

DEPUTIES DIDN’T DENT THE SHERIFF’S RACE

It’s no surprise that Ozzie Knezovich defeated his opponent, Spokane Police Department detective Douglas Orr — Knezovich has always been popular. The surprise is in the spread. Many of Knezovich’s own Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich has his critics, deputies wouldn’t but crushed Douglas Orr in the primary. support him. After all, the sheriff is known for firing deputies who, among other things, have sex on duty. Despite narrowly losing the endorsement of the Spokane County Deputy Sheriff’s


Association, Knezovich still brought in 2½ times as many votes as Orr.

FRENCH DIDN’T DOMINATE

Even County Commissioner Al French’s most venomous critics see him as a potent political force. He’s an incumbent in a Republican county. He was going up against Democrat Mary Lou Johnson, who had little name recognition. Johnson’s vote was bound to be split by liberal former commissioner Bonnie Mager, running as an independent. It seemed like French would run away with the primary. He didn’t. In the most recent tally, French received only 36.6 percent of the vote, ahead of Johnson by little more than a point. (Mager won the vote in Cheney, but not much elsewhere.) “I was very, very pleased with the results,” Johnson says. Many Republicans aren’t worried. “If you’re looking at the economy and jobs in Spokane, Al French isn’t the one you Commissioner Al French faced a stronger-thanwant to take on,” expected opponent in Mary Lou Johnson. says Beva Miles of the group Republicans of Spokane County. Only voters in French’s relatively liberal district were allowed to vote for commissioner in the primary, they point out, while the entire county will vote in November’s election. And Johnson performed dismally outside the city of Spokane, hinting at a bigger challenge when the battlefield expands countywide. Send comments to Yet the signs aren’t good for French editor@inlander.com. either: For the first time in at least 12 years, the sum total of votes for Republicans in a County Commissioner primary fell below 45 percent. Even when precincts in the city of Spokane were removed from the total, French didn’t crack 50 percent. His best hope is a 2002 repeat: Back then, incumbent Republican Commissioner Phil Harris, facing two Democratic opponents, received just 47 percent in the 3rd District primary, but gained nearly 12 percentage points in the general to win by a huge margin. But even if French (who did not return requests for comment) made the same 12-point leap, he’d still fall short of victory. “I think Al French has a tough race coming up,” says Bob McCaslin Jr. But that’s true of practically any race, he says. In the months between the primary and general election, nothing can be taken for granted. “You better be running like you’re 50 points behind,” McCaslin says. 

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Y R A N I G A IM ES V I L Y A D Y ER V E R U O IN S Y A L P Y AS T N A F T A H T E L O R L EA R Y R E V E TH


IT DOESN’T MATTER WHO THIS MAN REALLY IS.

S D N E I R F L I T T O S H A BY LE

Furries at Spokane’s First Night

E

In this world, no one cares that he’s a 31-year-old business owner who lives in North Idaho. What matters is who he wants to be. Who he wants to be is Quip — a mostly white York Chocolate cat with a striped tail. Quip likes to hide underneath desks and sneak inside cabinets when they’re open. Occasionally, he’ll nap in the afternoon sun on the top of a late-model sedan parked in the driveway. He likes stuffed animals and jumping on the counter. Sitting at a downtown Spokane coffeehouse, Quip explains that he’s a lot more than just a man sitting here. That this animal side is him, too — a part of his personality he has nurtured for decades as a member of the “furry fandom,” a worldwide subculture devoted to animal characters with human traits. For some, being furry means enjoying books, cartoons or films starring talking animals — say, Watership Down or The Muppets. For others, it means adopting an animal personality, or a “fursona,” like Quip. And for others, it means spending thousands of dollars to create a custom “fursuit” to wear at conventions and furry meetups. Quip, who spoke on the condition his real name wasn’t printed, is this man’s fursona. Being Quip is his escape. “My fursona — it’s like a person’s counterpart — is a cat. Others identify themselves as a wolf,” he says. “We even have people who identify themselves as dragons, lizards — we call them scalies. There’s no fur, but we still love them too.” Escapism is nothing new to the human experience. Ask the guy who drops his paycheck on Zags season tickets, or the people waiting in line for a movie on a Friday night. Ask comic book fans, artists, musicians, gamers, woodworkers, distance runners, Civil War re-enactors, avid fans of Game of Thrones. Odds are they’ll all tell you they’re just looking for a vacation from the norm, a few minutes when they can forget the bills to pay, the obligations to meet, the 9-to-5, the problems they don’t want to address. “When we fantasize, we experience the same emotions we would feel if we were in reality. Think of the fear you feel with a nightmare. Happy fantasies make us feel good,” says Norman Holland, author of Literature and the Brain and a researcher of psychoanalytic psychology. “All work and no fantasy makes Jack pretty gloomy. We all should have some space for fantasy in our lives. Fantasies — escapism — give our emotions a workout. That’s why the imaginative arts are good for you.” But even today, when there are arguably more outlets for people to escape their everyday lives than ever before in our history, some fantasy cultures still raise eyebrows. Some people feel they are social pariahs because of how they choose to escape. Some say they have keep their fantasy lives secret. Like Quip. He says to him, being a furry is just a casual hobby. But he knows that’s hard to understand — so his family and friends, and especially his clients, have no idea that he’s a part-time cat. “You know, you’re a professional,” he says. “What would happen if tomorrow you dressed up like a half-nude panda bear and started playing fetch with all the vases in the office?” People aren’t that open-minded, he says. “I do much the same thing [as anyone else],” he says. “I just go home, I make myself a nice little salad, I catch up on email, and then I put on a dog collar and go to sleep.”

E

than Gilsdorf, author of Fantasy Freaks and Gaming Geeks, has made a career out of studying escapism. He writes about geek culture for the New York Times, Boston Globe and Washington Post and has appeared as an expert on escapist cultures on PBS, the Discovery Channel and BBC. He points to what he sees as one of the modern-day origins of fantasy-escapist culture: Dungeons & Dragons, a game that remains wildly popular today. “Dungeons & Dragons, which celebrates its 40th anniversary this year, was … one of the few ‘games in town’ for immersive fantasy escapism when it first came on the market in 1974,” he ...continued on next page

AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 21


COVER STORY | FANTASY

“IMAGINARY FRIENDS,” CONTINUED... says. “Back then, a game like D&D was cutting edge. Today, its tools — dice, maps, rules books — seem rather rudimentary compared with the sophisticated toys and diversions we have today.” But as technology has evolved, Gilsdorf says fantasy has become a part of day-to-day life. It’s in the CGI movie effects that make movie monsters larger than we could have ever imagined. It’s in the immersive digital communities and social media that have become as integral to our lives as going to work and eating breakfast. Fantasy isn’t just for geeks anymore. In fact, fantasy escapism is a booming business. Last year the largest comic and pop culture convention, San Diego Comic-Con International, attracted more than

22 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014

Scenes from this year’s Northwest Renaissance Festival in Nine Mile Falls. 130,000 attendees. Tournaments of one of the world’s most popular video games, Defense of the Ancients — better known as DotA — have become so massive, they’re being broadcast on ESPN. “People are attracted to fantasy lives for a variety of reasons: to escape from bad times, to get a break or respite from day-to-day life, to experience wonder and magic, to feel empowered, to be able to do something or be someone they can’t be or do in real life, to feel camaraderie, fellowship and socialization,” Gilsdorf says. “Ultimately, we want to feel part of something bigger than ourselves, something grander, something more epic than day-to-day life.” Even the smaller subcultures, like the furry fandom,

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

play to that notion. This year’s Anthrocon in Pittsburgh attracted 5,861 furries from 26 countries. That’s a far cry from the beginnings of the furry fandom, which sprouted out of 1970s fanzines, found an online home in 1990s chat rooms and took off with the advent of the World Wide Web. Here in Spokane, the Inland Northwest Fur Folk group on Meetup.com boasts more than 130 members — that’s everyone from actual “fursuiters” who wear animal costumes, to folks like Quip who simply have fursonas but don’t dress up, to people who just like to nerd out on talking animal characters. Ritzgaul Gryphs is another member of the group here. The 28-year-old man works at a Spokane Valley


grocery store, but he won’t divulge any other details about himself or use his real name — and it’s not because he’s ashamed. He says it’s how the media has portrayed the furry fandom as an a animalcostuming-wearing sex group of sorts that keeps him anonymous. He says that’s not what the the majority of the fandom is about. And yeah, sure, he says some furries do like to have sex while dressed up as foxes and wolves. But not all of them. And it’s certainly not exclusive to fursuiters. “There’s no denying things like that go on,” he says. “There’s no denying that at Trekkie conventions there’s going to be Klingon sex.” Ritzgaul says he’s been a furry since 1998, but he’s never assumed a fursona. He’s a human. “I never found a furry side of me,” he says, “but when you really deeply think about it, humans are animals too.” But he’s just as much a part of the fandom as people who wear costumes. When Ritzgaul thinks about his attraction to the furry fandom, he thinks about being an 8-year-old kid watching afternoon cartoons. His still remembers his first crush: a villainGet a taste of all things fantasy, sci-fi ous wolf on the cartoon and escapist at this weekend’s SpoCon TaleSpin. convention at the downtown DoubleWhen he found the tree Hotel, Aug. 15-17. Visit spocon. fandom as a teenager, he org for more details. Later this fall, the said it actually changed new Pac Con Spokane comic convenhim as a person. tion, Oct. 24-26, boasts an impressive “It got me social. It lineup of industry stars, including Stan got me out of the house Lee and William Shatner. more. It got me to discover myself as a person. It helped me,” he says. “It pretty much saved me from boredom. It helped me become more active and discover things, learn things.” Quip, the man who identifies in the fandom as a cat, says with furries he found a group that was more accepting of who he was than anyone else he’d encountered. “That’s the interesting thing about the furry fandom, it’s really an anything-goes sort of community,” Quip says. “Nobody will lambaste you because you listen to this type of music as opposed to another type of music. No one will rib you because you like to watch cartoons.” So it isn’t sexual for these men, but would they prefer to date someone who is a furry, too? Quip answers that with a laugh. “If you know anyone, just…” — and he holds his hand up to his ear like a telephone.

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very summer, far from the city, far from their homes, they travel back in time. For 20 years, the cast of the Northwest Renaissance Festival have made camp on a plot of dusty land in Nine Mile Falls, evoking a time when men were fighters and ladies were damsels. Each weekend, they live here among their fellow time travelers. Each weekend, they forget who they really are. It’s a sentiment you hear from several members of the Renaissance Festival cast — being here is a vacation from themselves, from their problems. Ken Slack, 45, is the fight director at the Festival — essentially, the guy who coaches the other actors how to sword-fight and make it look realistic. He has been with the festival for 20 years — moved here from Boise, in fact, to be a part of it. Slack, who is on disability and suffers from agoraphobia, says the festival has helped him break through those issues he deals with every day. “Anytime I have to leave the house, I have to start preparing for it far in advance, and calm my nerves and almost medicate beforehand in order to be able to get out of the house,” he says. “That’s why [it’s] so good for me — it gets me out of the house.” Fantasy role-playing such as this is something that can actually ...continued on next page

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AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 23


COVER STORY | FANTASY

“IMAGINARY FRIENDS,” CONTINUED... be very therapeutic for disabled communities, Gilsdorf says. “For the disabled community, a fantasy experience like a role-playing game or video game can offer a safe, non-judgmental space where the disabled or ‘differentlyabled’ have agency and authority, and where people they meet might not know about their mental, emotional or physical handicaps. This can be liberating,” he says. At Renaissance Festival, Slack plays a pirate named Sir Lazloe. “He’s a knight, he’s an explorer. He does everything I’ve always wanted to do in real life, but I haven’t had the money to do. He’s an English noble, friend of the king. At one point he was married to a gypsy,” Slack says. “It’s kind of like I put on a mask when I become him. ... Once I put the mask on, I’m a totally different person and it doesn’t bother me. I don’t see the crowd out there.” For one month each year, he lives with this ragtag family of actors. He wears his mask, and he feels good.

24 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014

But when August comes each year and the festival winds down, he knows it’s OK to be Ken Slack again. Being Sir Lazloe has helped him, but he’ll never stop being the person he is under the mask. “The last few women I’ve dated, I’ve said, ‘Don’t fall in love with Sir Lazloe!’ Because that’s not me 24/7,” he says. “Most of them I’ve broken up with because they have fallen in love with Sir Lazloe, and Ken comes around and it’s a different story. I’ve always been a lone kind of guy.”

T

hey said they caused an earthquake. After BronyCon 2013 — the largest annual convention for bronies, male fans of the cartoon My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic — blogs blew up with the news: There were so many people jumping up and down at the late-night concert at the end of the convention, it allegedly caused the building’s seismometer to measure 1.6 on the Richter scale. Whether it’s true or not, it would make sense: Bro-

nies do things big. In just a few years, the brony fandom — yes, that’s “bro” plus “pony” — has exploded. The first BronyCon, held in 2011, had just 100 attendees. This year’s BronyCon, held in early August in Baltimore, had 9,607 attendees and raised $26,877 for charity. Dustin Coffey, who acts as the admin for the Spokanterlot Bronies Facebook group, says when you declare yourself a brony, you get asked a lot of questions. But they’re ones you have to ask yourself first. “When I first got into it, and a lot of times it’s just like, ‘We’re liking a show about candy-colored cartoon equine. Let’s just think about this, guys, for just five seconds,’” he says. The brony fandom is fairly new, but has spread quickly since the cartoon’s debut in 2010. The show originally was intended for a young female audience, but after it became Internet meme fodder on sites like 4chan, it soon gained a 20-something male following — the sort of guys who might have embraced programs


Characters at the anime event KuroNekoCon at the Spokane Convention Center earlier this month. like The Powerpuff Girls. Meetup groups popped up in cities and college campuses. The weird phenomenon was captured in the 2012 documentary Bronies: The Extremely Unexpected Adult Fans of My Little Pony. “It’s so totally uncool that I think it comes clear around the other end of the spectrum and makes it cool,” Robert Thompson, a Syracuse University professor and media scholar, told the Omaha WorldHerald last year. “It’s one thing for guys to like motorcycles and muscle cars and soccer. For a guy to like My Little Pony, it’s so out there that it becomes almost avant-garde. It has a hip quality to it.” When Coffey, 20 years old and well over 6 feet tall, sits down at a Spokane Valley Starbucks, he’s wearing a black T-shirt with a yellow-and-pink pony across the chest that reads “YAY.” He shows off the gold

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

medallion he picked up at a pony convention — it’s got a pony etched into it. He takes out his phone — with a pony phone case — to show off some of his pony fan art, which he sells at conventions. “My dad’s a total sci-fi nut. He got me watching Star Trek Trek,, Firefly, Babylon 5. Like, a bunch of science fiction, and Lord of the Rings and things like that,” he says. “I’ve dabbled in a lot of other nerdy things. Like, really nerdy things.” But he says nothing had ever grabbed him the way My Little Pony did. “A lot of bronies, in all honesty, are very socially awkward. And I was too, for the longest time,” he says. “Like, in high school I was having a really hard time socially interacting with people. And then watching ponies, talking with other bronies, and then ...continued on next page


COVER STORY | FANTASY

Chris “Burr” Martin YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

A meetup of Spokane Bronies.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

“IMAGINARY FRIENDS,” CONTINUED... working retail helps too. You have to talk to people.” Kevin Parks, a 27-year-old student at Eastern Washington University, says he loved the show instantly — not just because it was funny and well-written, but had a good message. “One of the big things it’s about is just being a good, helpful person,” he says. “Not judging people. Not being mean. Always being polite. Trying to look from another person’s perspective.” Parks and Coffey say the local group kind of reflects that: It’s just bronies hanging out, eating pizza, playing games, going to movies. Though there are some female bronies (some call themselves “pegasisters”), bronydom

26 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014

— at its core — is simply about just being kind and having fun. Parks says some people don’t buy that it’s that innocent. “It’s not so much that it’s just a cartoon. It’s the fact that people look at it and go, ‘OK, it is a cartoon for little girls. But what else?’” he says. “They always look at it and go, ‘There must be something deeper. There must be something actually wrong with this person, either mentally or socially. They have to be inept.’ Because socially, we should not like something like that. Regardless of whether it’s just a cartoon. Even cartoons for boys, something like SpongeBob — if a man in his 40s likes SpongeBob,

you kind of laugh at the whole idea. But if a man in his 40s likes a little girl’s cartoon?” Coffey, one of five boys in a Mormon family, says his biggest reservation was telling his father that he was not only a fan of My Little Pony, but a superfan. So he got his younger brothers to watch it, too, and soon found out his older brother was also watching the show at college. “We sat down, watched it, and he gets, like, this angry look on his face,” he says of when he and his brothers watched the show with their father. “Then he finds out, ‘OK, they’re just watching a show about ponies. That is weird, but at least it’s not gay or whatever.’” Parks says when he goes to hang out with the bro-


nies, he’s in a safe spot — one free from ridicule and other macho expectations. For some reason, not everyone can understand a group of guys who would want that. “Let’s put it this way: I would not wear this shirt around my girlfriend,” he says, pointing to his T-shirt — which depicts a My Little Pony riff on Van Gogh’s Starry Night. “I would not go out wearing this shirt with my girlfriend. She would kick my butt. It’s not that she doesn’t like it. “Let’s just say that she… how can I put this lightly? She’s a little uncomfortable with it.”

! e l a S n o s l e d o M All 2014omBfoikr e2015 bikes and winter gear Making ro

C

hris Martin makes friends out of foam. Today he walks into Merlyn’s, the downtown comic shop where he works, with one of them — one he’s been spending a ton of time with lately. He proudly carries in a 6-foot tall, foam-and-PVC recreation of the extraterrestrial tree character Groot from the film Guardians of the Galaxy. He’s been working on Groot for months, whittling away by day, propping him up in the corner of his bedroom at night. “My wife’s not into it. She sees Groot every night standing in the bedroom, and she’s just, like, ‘OK,’” he says, smiling. At this point, she’s gotten used to it. Martin — most people know him by his nickname, Burr — has become known locally for his cosplay creations as the host of the Spokane Comicon Send comments to costume contest. editor@inlander.com. At any time, Martin, 46, can open his closet and become Indiana Jones, a Ghostbuster, Hawkeye from The Avengers. He can be Captain America, Hitman, Star-Lord, Gru from Despicable Me. “I know what my family is going to wear on Halloween in March,” he says. And of course, at any time, he can be a Stormtrooper, a Sandtrooper and an Imperial Officer from Star Wars. Martin is a card-carrying member of the 501st Legion — an elite organization of hard-core Star Wars costume enthusiasts who have exactly replicated costumes from the Star Wars films. They wear those costumes to brighten the lives of kids in need. After a rigorous approval process, Martin was accepted into the 501st, and now is deployed to children’s hospitals, parades and birthday parties when duty calls. When Weird Al Yankovic played the Spokane County Fair a couple of years ago, he asked for Stormtroopers to dance onstage during one song. Martin was there, too. One time “we were doing a parade in Coeur d’Alene and it started to snow,” he says. At the end of the parade loop, he hopped into the back of a truck to get a ride back to the start. “So I’m standing in the back of this wagon, I have Darth Vader over here, I have Spider-Man standing next to me. And this princess in front of me. It’s dark, it’s snowing, it’s, like, 30 degrees. I’m like, ‘Where’s my life going right now? How did I get here at this moment?’” Sure, not every guy his age makes costumes in their spare time. Not every guy his age thinks a badass Iron Man costume would be the Holy Grail of their collection. But he’s not every guy. “This is my car — I don’t know anything about fixing cars. But this is my car,” he says, relating to guys who tinker with classic cars. “It’s like they’re on eBay and they see a window that’s $500 that they need. It’s the same with me. I’m like, ‘Oh, I could really use that helmet.’” He’s not ashamed. He gets to make kids smile. He gets to play Halloween whenever he wants. Every now and then, he’ll run into someone who’ll call him a nerd. Every now and then, it’ll even piss him off. And then sometimes, he’ll have a moment that surprises even him. Like the time at a Children’s Hospital party, when a tiny girl undergoing chemotherapy walked so brazenly up to him and Darth Vader and handed them each — without a glimmer of fear in her eyes — a bright pink My Little Pony doll. It sits on a shelf in his home — a reminder of those moments when the magic is real. n

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Summer Stages THEATER

There’s still plenty of time to get in on the season’s theater boom BY MIKE BOOKEY AND FRANNY WRIGHT

A

s this epically hot summer soldiers on, there’s plenty of time to seek shelter from the heat inside the confines of an air-conditioned theater. Not a movie theater — those blockbusters can wait — but rather the region’s playhouses, where a number of excellent performances have been running this season, with still more to come. Already, the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre, in its rebirth as a pared-down series on a smaller stage, has delivered a pair of quality shows, including the currently running Addams Family musical (see the review, as well as a look at Interplayers’ take on A Midsummer Night’s Dream, in this section). But it’s not just that seasonal cultural stalwart that is making the end of a summer a big time for local stages. It seems like there’s a production — from touring heavyweights to youth plays — happening on almost every local stage to close out the season. (MB)

COEUR D’ALENE MURDER MYSTERY THEATRE

There are still two evenings of mystery left in this summer series. Each show has a limit of 50 people, so reserve your spot in advance. Don’t worry, no one actually gets killed. The two performances include The Mafia Murders on Fri, Aug. 15, and A Taste for Wine and Murder on Fri, Aug. 22. $30-$35 • Coeur d’Alene Cellars • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, Coeur d’Alene • cdacellars.com (FW)

THE EMPIRE SINGS FLAT

If you’re heading east for a long weekend, you might want to stop off in Wallace, Idaho, where you’ll find this creative local production with a clear Star Wars influence. The play tells of a heroic hand model who attempts to save a princess from the dastardly Dorf Vader. The Western-themed melodrama was written and directed by locals Eli and Brady Bourgard. Through Aug. 24 • Wed-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $16-$18 • Sixth Street Theater • 212 Sixth St., Wallace, Idaho • sixthstreetmelodrama.com (FW)

AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 29


CULTURE | THEATER

THIS WEEK AT THE LANTERN!

“SUMMER STAGES,” CONTINUED...

THE BOOK OF MORMON

Featuring Inland NW craft beers on draft. Meet brewery reps, taste new beers, win swag and celebrate local beer!

There’s been no shortage of buzz around this traveling Broadway production. Local theater fans have been clamoring about it for a year now. It was written by the creators of South Park — Trey Parker and Matt Stone — and it’s a nine-time Tony award-winning musical that’s been killing it at the box offices since opening in 2011. Its music was co-written by Robert Lopez, one of the composers and lyricists of Avenue Q. Through Sun, Aug. 17 • Showtimes vary • $45-$155 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • bestofbroadwayspokane. com (MB)

Saturday Aug 16th 5pm-8pm

Featuring 11 Breweries Iron Goat, No-Li, River City, Ramblin’ Road, Orlison, 12 String, Big Barn, Paradise Creek, Steam Plant, Wallace Brewing, and Perry Street Brewing.

LEGALLY BLONDE

Live music from Duke Hogue and Dry & Dusty at 10pm.

Beginning tomorrow night, a cast of young, local actors in grades 7-12 tell the story of Elle Woods, a blonde, fashion-focused sorority girl who decides to attends Harvard Law School. Through Sun, Aug. 17 • Wed-Sat at 7:30, Sun at 2 pm • $10-$19 • Spokane Civic Theatre • 1020 N. Howard • spokanecivictheatre.com (FW)

LAKE CITY PLAYHOUSE SEASON PREVIEW AND AWARDS SHOW

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Get a look at this Coeur d’Alene community theater company’s 2014-15 season at this one-night only event. You’ll see numbers from some of the season’s productions, including Tommy, Rent, The Last 5 Years, Les Misérables, Hair and others. Sat, Aug. 23, at 7:30 pm • $15 • Lake City Playhouse • 1320 E. Garden Ave. • lakecityplayhouse.org (MB) n

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CULTURE | THEATER

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Nich Witham (center) plays the mischieveous Puck in Interplayers’ A Midsummer Night’s Dream. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

Lovers and Madmen

Interplayers and EWU join forces to stage a wonderful performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream

MY SPOKANE IS

BY E.J. IANNELLI

W

hen Theseus, Duke of Athens, waxes philosophical by lumping together “the lunatic, the lover and the poet,” he hits on something closer to the heart of A Midsummer Night’s Dream than the far more frequently quoted axiom by Lysander that “the course of true love never did run smooth.” He’s suggesting that all three individuals fall prey to wild imaginings and fantasies, the very same ones that drive the intertwining plots of Shakespeare’s whimsical play: the ragtag Mechanicals, poets in their own fevered minds; the quartet of lovers, who take turns abasing themselves for each other’s affections; and the forest fairies, that troupe of unpredictable madmen and -women who think that transmogrifying the unsuspecting is a fun way to pass the time. This co-production between Eastern Washington University and Interplayers, directed by EWU lecturer Jeff Sanders (Macbeth, It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play), serves Midsummer well by maintaining an uncommon balance among these three parts. Impish Puck (Nich Witham) gets more blacklight than limelight; he remains firmly under the thumb of temperamental Oberon (Brian Demar Jones, who also plays Theseus). Jaclyn Archer’s Helena is fierce and assertive, even when she’s on all fours imploring Demetrius (Paden Vance) to “[u]se me but as your spaniel — spurn me, strike me, / Neglect me, lose me.” If ever that balance becomes skewed, it’s when Sanders threatens to steal his own show as Nick Bottom, the overconfident, malapropism-prone weaver turned donkey. Shana Joslyn’s set is unassuming at first: two raised circular platforms painted a blotchy green. But the rear one conceals trap doors that the characters use, like Laugh-In’s joke wall, to deliver

lines or appear and vanish in ways that add to the mischief and the humor. For the first time in recent memory, the set also cleverly makes use of the area normally reserved for backstage. It’s where, for instance, spellbound Titania (Sara Goff, who also plays Hippolyta) cuddles in a hammock with her asinine lover, backdropped by an ethereal purple light. So many other things are elegantly thought out. Incidental gestures and accents like an untucked shirttail subtly complement the dialogue. The blocking manages to be both natural and exactingly precise, which is even more impressive considering the size of the cast. And what a cast it is. To call out the actors best suited to their parts would read like a dramatis personae; there is such an incredible mix of young and veteran talent on display here. That makes this Midsummer everything it can and should be: absurd, hilarious, bawdy, captivating, illuminating and even a little contemplative, since Sanders has bookended the play with a hospital scene. Taking this kind of metaphysical, dream-within-adream approach is an interesting touch, but connecting the two in a relevant way takes a bit of a stretch. Whatever unsatisfying ambiguity that might introduce is inconsequential, though. There is so, so much to enjoy about this production and take home at the end of a delightful midsummer evening. 

WILD! Boo Radley’s Uncommon Gifts

232 N. Howard . 456-7479 across from the carousel

A Midsummer Night’s Dream • Through Aug. 17: Thu-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm • $28 ($22 seniors, active military; $12 students) • Interplayers • 174 S. Howard • interplayerstheatre.org • 4557529

AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 31


CULTURE | THEATER

At

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21 and Over Event

SOIREE on the EDGE

Wednesday and Pugsley at “play.” TYLER KRIEG PHOTO

You’ll Die Laughing Tickets on sale now 509-624-1200

or visit www.spokanesymphony.org

Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre’s Addams Family is full of campy hilarity BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

O

32 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014 PickinOnThePrairie_080714_4S_JP.jpg

ne of America’s favorite dysfunctional families is back in a musical that’ll have you humming the now-familiar theme all over again: ba-da-da-dum — snap-snap. Kooky? Yes. Spooky? Not so much. But funny? Yes — expect enough loud laughter to wake the dead at The Addams Family: A New Musical Comedy at Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre. Directed by Makaela Pollock, CST’s version mostly follows Broadway’s, which ran 18 months until beginning a national tour in 2011. Based on the book by Marshall Brickman and Rick Elice, who first teamed up on the smash play Jersey Boys, and with music and lyrics by Andrew Lippa, the new Addams Family is a twisted twist on the classic theme of boy-meets-ghoul. Wednesday, the morose daughter of Gomez and Morticia Addams, is a devious schemer prone to attempted murder of her brother, Pugsley, and hunting with her crossbow. She meets Lucas Beineke (Cody Bray) who not only is not weirded out about her weirdness, but inspires her to wax poetic about all things fluffy and cute. Her “unusual” behavior creates chaos in the family, who host the Beineke family for a gettingto-know-you dinner, sort of Meet the Fockers meets the Rocky Horror Picture Show. The macabre family has been with us since the 1940s, when American illustrator Charles Addams first introduced them in cartoons in The New Yorker magazine. Picture black-and-white line drawings with simple crosshatching for shadows and you have the foundation for CST’s innovative set designed by Jenny Littlefield: an ornate stairway in the family’s run-down Central Park mansion, the concrete walls with requisite manacles in the torture chamber. When Addams was asked to provide names for a new television show in 1964, he lent his

last name and The Addams Family enshrined the characters into our collective visual memory. That created a barometer against which subsequent iterations — including CST’s version — get measured. Thus Wednesday (Jessi Little), whom Addams named for the nursery rhyme in which “Wednesday’s child is full of woe,” seems too perky up-front and would benefit from Broadway’s treatment, in which the opening scene establishes her innate quirkiness. Instead, the opening scene in the ancestral cemetery — fog rolling from underneath the curtain — launches a nonstop onslaught of song and dance, punctuated by wonderfully campy humor. Gomez (Steve Czarnecki) captivates as the nattily dressed patriarch, torn between keeping his daughter’s betrothal a secret and his love (and fear) of wife Morticia (Christine Riippi), who vacillates between aloofness and Vaudevillian humor, such as in “Secrets.” Both Wednesday and Lucas Beineke’s mother, Alice (Heidi Santiago) prove their golden pipes. Even Lurch (Andy Renfrew) gets in on the action with a surprise vocal well into the curtain call. The real scene-stealer, however, is Uncle Fester (Lanz Edwin Babbitt), who channels Nathan Lane’s Birdcage persona (Lane played Gomez in the Broadway Addams Family). His “But Love” and “The Moon and Me” extends the theme of boy-meets-girl, and brilliantly sets up the final scenes with a Honeymooner reference typical of the play’s rapid-fire, rim-shot humor.  The Addams Family: A New Musical Comedy • Through Aug. 24: Thu-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sat-Sun, 2 pm • $27-$49 • Kroc Center • 1765 W. Golf Course Rd., Coeur d’Alene • cdasummertheatre.com • (208) 660-2958


CULTURE | DIGEST

BASEBALL MID-SEASON REPORT SPR PRESENTS

The Indians have already secured a playoff spot. MATT WEIGAND PHOTO

E

ntering this week, the Indians boasted the Northwest League’s three leading hitters and three of the top four home run hitters. On the mound, Spokane led the league in the all-important categories of lowest WHIP (walks and hits per innings pitched) and fewest walks. The Indians started the season 7-0 and won the North Division’s first-half championship with a 25-13 record. Recent promotions by the Texas Rangers cost the Indians power hitters Zach Cone and Marcus Greene, but Spokane was just one game out of first place in the second half with a 7-10 record entering the week. The first-half title guaranteed Spokane a berth in the league playoffs, which begin Sept. 2. The Indians have spread the glory around: second baseman Seth Spivey led the league at the start of the

week with a .358 batting average, followed by left fielder Eduard Pinto (.352) and right fielder Luke Tendler (.340). Third baseman Jose Trevino and Tendler were tied for first in homers with nine, one more than Cone. Shane McCain (1-0, 0.36 earned-run average, three saves) spearheads a deep and talented bullpen. Strong offensive support helped starting pitcher Nick Gardewine (6-3, 5.77) move into a tie for the league lead in wins despite a bloated ERA. Spokane batters have honed their craft under hitting coach Rick Down, who coached the likes of Derek Jeter, Cal Ripken Jr. and Wade Boggs in the majors. — HOWIE STALWICK The Spokane Indians open a three-game homestand with Tri-City on Sat, Aug. 16, at 6:30 pm • Avista Stadium • $5-$13 • 535-2922 • spokaneindians.com

For Your Consideration

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 20th 7:30pm

Cirque

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Use promo code “FOB” at Ticketswest.com (exp 08/17/14)

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BY FRANNY WRIGHT

Presented by 95.3 KPND

Save 20% - All 4 Shows just $72 now at ticketswest.com

Tickets at Ticketswest.com and 1-800-325-Seat FILM | What if you could know the exact moment you meet the person you are supposed to the spend the rest of your life with? In TiMER, a device that can easily fit onto the underside of a wrist (with a small installation and monthly fee) does just that. Once your “one” gets their timer, both of yours will begin to count down until your paths cross and they both sing a little harmonized tune. But what if your significant other gets a timer and it begins to count down when yours is still blank? How do you spend your time if your countdown is 15 years off? This film explores the chaos that this kind of device could create.

MUSIC | Since the release of their previous album Transference four years ago, Spoon has been through a lot of change. They’ve added guitarist and keyboardist Alex Fischel, new producers — Joe Chiccarelli, who has worked with Jason Mraz and the Shins, and Dave Fridmann, who has worked with the Flaming Lips and MGMT — and a new label. Each member explored new sounds and worked on side projects after Transference. That’s evident in their eighth album, THEY WANT MY SOUL, which dropped earlier this month. The more complex ways in which this Austin, Texas-based band is now incorporating guitar and keyboard into the classic, trance-like jams will keep you moving to the beats all the way through the album.

TV | Get rid of most everything you and your family own, including hundreds of square feet of space, and build a structure that would fit within a typical parking space. Now live in it. TINY HOUSE NATION (Fyi Network, Wednesdays at 10 pm) not only encourages people to do this, but in each episode John Weisbarth and Zack Griffin help a different family accomplish this extreme downsizing within seven days. The idea that “less is more” is not new, but this tiny house movement has raised questions about what exactly it means for a house to become a home, and how getting rid of almost all nonessential belongings can affect a family’s lifestyle.

Blue Sky Productions NW Presents

COMING TO SPOKANE

SAT • SEPT 20

Riverside Masonic Auditorium

Presented by

Warren Haynes www.mule.net

$35 GA • 800-325-SEAT • TicketsWest.com

AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 33


Map to Health

Suzie Willcox with her kiosk that helps shoppers find diet-specific foods. STEPHEN SCHLANGE PHOTO

Diagnosed with diabetes, Suzie Willcox designed a way to put healthy meal planning directly into the grocery store BY LISA WAANANEN JONES

S

uzie Willcox expected the doctor to say something was wrong with her heart. She’d been having dizzy spells, and both her parents had died of massive coronaries. So the true diagnosis — diabetes — came as a surprise. Another surprise came when Willcox — always a good cook and conscientious about nutrition — took a

34 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014

diabetes education class and realized how difficult it can be for newly diagnosed people who are learning about healthy meal planning for the first time. “I was pretty shocked at people not knowing the difference between a carbohydrate and a protein,” Willcox says. “I just started thinking about that: ‘Gosh, this is really hard for people — and it’s hard for me. I wonder

how I can make this easier?’” She’s recalling the story this summer at the Rosauers grocery store on 29th Avenue, seven years after she was diagnosed. Nearby is the answer she’s been puzzling over and planning all that time: a cheerful, bright-green kiosk that greets shoppers as they head toward the produce section. This is Suzie’s MAPS — Meals Already Planned System — one of three kiosks installed in local Rosauers stores by the end of June for beta testing. The touch screen guides users through the options: Select the number of people you’re cooking for, choose one of several featured recipes, and then take the printed recipe and shopping list to finish the meal. What differentiates Suzie’s MAPS from the abundance of recipes on the Internet is the careful thought she puts into it — the recipes change based on the weekly specials, and ingredients are organized by the aisle where they can be found in that particular store. A healthy


menu plan doesn’t do people any good if they can’t find or afford the ingredients, Willcox says. The diabetes menu is Suzie’s MAPS flagship, but the kiosks also have menus for heart-healthy and gluten-free meals — and others in the works — with the same goal of linking healthy intentions with the actual shopping. “They can just come in, and they don’t have to think about calculating anything,” Willcox says. “Here it is, and they can just use it.” he problem Willcox identified after she was diagnosed is well-known to doctors and educators: It’s difficult for people to successfully form new eating habits, even if they know it’s important for their health. The ideal diet for people with diabetes is essentially a healthy one — it’s not about restrictions so much as about balanced, consistent meals to keep blood sugar in check. Each experience is different, but patients diagnosed with diabetes are typically referred to group classes or one-on-one sessions to learn about the disease and how they should be eating. But following through can be challenging, says Megan Bolam, a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator with Providence Health Care. “When they’re first diagnosed, some people can be so overwhelmed that it’s better to find out what they’re doing well and then introduce small steps,” she says. Many factors can make it difficult: old habits, cost, other family members’ preferences, conflicting information and confusion. Patients often have other health issues as well, and must work closely with their team of health care providers. Rosauers, 2610 E. 29th Ave. “One of the most important Rosauers, 9414 N. Division St. Rosauers, 10618 E. Sprague Ave., things is to really have a good support team,” says registered Spokane Valley nurse Anne Vold, another certified diabetes educator with Providence. Providence has been an enthusiastic supporter of Suzie’s MAPS, sending out information to employees and putting posters in the elevators so patients and caregivers know where to find kiosks. Particularly because of the convenience and customized recipes, Bolam and Vold believe Suzie’s MAPS can be a part of that support patients need to successfully follow through with diet changes. side from the acronym, Suzie’s MAPS also represents the way Willcox envisions diabetes as sort of a journey, with her menu plans helping others find the way. She and her husband, Greg, have owned businesses for decades, but this is the most personal, and every decision has her detail-oriented touch. Energetic and persistent, Willcox went through many versions and disappointments — “doors closed and heartbreaking things” — before getting to the version that’s had an overwhelmingly positive response at demonstrations. Providence and Rosauers have both been encouraging, she says, as are the smiles from people who try out the kiosk and say it’s a good idea. “I’m still dazzled when I hear that, and it pleases me so,” Willcox says. “I guess I’m amazed at all this.” The team has eagerly incorporated feedback about improving the system — Rosauers suggested more photos of food, a father asked about displaying nutrition information with the recipes — and has plans to add other features, like showing the price associated with a convenience option vs. home-cooked. Willcox would like to have menus for a full range of allergies, and also plans to have novelty menus like a Mother’s Day brunch for dads who are shopping and cooking. “There’s lots of fun things to do with this,” she says. “The ideas come so fast I can hardly keep up with them.” n

T

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AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 35


FOOD | DESSERT

Q: Why Patrick? Jackie Brown

In the years I have known Patrick he’s been professional, friendly, well organized & fun. Whether helping you house hunt, or running his own event, you can guarantee a job well done. He’s awesome.

KXLY Radio

Patrick made the process of searching for our house a positive experience. He was personable and professional, and we were always able to trust that he had our best interests in mind.

Jason, Liz & Nelson

I’ve sold a lot of houses, but Patrick hooked me into a client-base in Spokane I hadn’t found before. He’s detailed oriented and spends as much time on the presentation of his listings as with the presentation of his hair. Patrick is my go-to agent and he should also be yours as well.

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Investor

(509)991-2470

patrick@509properties.com

#pkgivesback

I donate a percentage of every commission to my clients’ favorite local charity chef adam hegsted presents

YARDS B R U N C H E O N

Cream + Science = Delicious The Scoop is crafting super-smooth ice cream the liquid nitrogen way

Patrick Kendrick

The

The Scoop’s Jennifer Davis in her labratory. SARAH WURTZ PHOTOS

Now Serving

Dinner! Open Til

Tues-Sat

8pm

BY LAURA JOHNSON

I

t’s like a mad science experiment going on behind the Scoop’s shop counter. Grasping a liquid nitrogen-filled stainless steel pitcher with a thick, royal-blue glove, co-owner Jennifer Davis pours the substance into the commercial-sized mixer that’s slowly beating a combination of cream, milk, sugars and bananas. “Oh, gotta put on my protective eyewear,” Davis says, flipping down her sunglasses to her face. As she transfers the negative 321-degree liquid from the pitcher, the bowl begins to spew vapors — it’s like a witch’s cauldron. “It’s getting crazy!” Davis exclaims. After three full pours of the magic ingredient, a sprinkle of toffee, and some tastes along the way, the banoffee pie ice cream is ready for eating, taking about 30 minutes from prep work to the delicious final product. Besides a seriously short processing time, the difference between liquid nitrogen frozen ice cream and regular ice cream is the smooth, creamy end result, thanks to incredibly small ice crystals. Davis isn’t pretending the process is new; it’s been around for at least a century. Dippin’ Dots, flash-dried liquid nitrogen ice cream in ball form,

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was invented in the late 1980s. High-end chefs have been impressing diners with made-to-order ice cream for decades. In 2009, San Francisco’s Smitten Ice Cream kicked off the trend, inspiring more liquid nitrogen shops around the country until the Scoop took up the cause in Spokane in June. For Davis, it’s less about the process and more about the fact that she can make ice cream in her shop without having to rely on a separate storage facility. “I don’t think this method will ever eclipse the regular way of making ice cream,” Davis says. “But it’s the perfect method for the small business.” The Scoop will continue to sell Brain Freeze Creamery ice cream, too. The shop’s own ice cream is simply an accompaniment, something Davis has been dreaming of since she took over in 2011. Currently, rotating Scoop flavors include Nutella, Butter Love (Butterfinger), chocolate chip cookie dough, brownie crunch, vegan piña colada, caramel toffee, banoffee pie and more. n The Scoop • 1001 W. 25th • Open Mon-Fri, 7 am-9 pm; Sat-Sun, 9 am-9 pm • thescoopspokane.com • 535-7171

Stock up on this year’s batch of Hatch Chiles and peel them for storage in the freezer throughout the year for use in Chile Con Queso, Chiles Rellenos, Chile Verde, Salads, Soups, Stews, and Sandwiches or infuse them in chocolate for a spicy kick! Hatch Peppers from Hatch, New Mexico! Only available

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FOOD | OPENING

Celebrating Italy Lasagna and more at Uva Trattoria in Coeur d’Alene BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

I

t was coincidentally National Lasagna Day when I visited, but it was no coincidence that Uva Trattoria was serving lasagna, says chef Steve Van Zeveren, who recently opened the fine dining eatery with his sister Lisa and his wife Crystal. “It’s our best seller,” says Van Zeveren, whose background includes the pastry department of the Coeur d’Alene Resort and, more recently, MacKenzie River Pizza Company. Like most dishes at Uva Trattoria, lasagna ($12) is scratchmade, says Van Zeveren, who trained at San Francisco’s California Culinary Academy, followed by several years at Napoli Pizza in Vallejo, California. Pizza is a staple at Uva Trattoria, where you can choose various meats, veggies, cheeses and seasonings for a custom pizza in three sizes. Occasional specials include unusual combinations like the Cave Bay, with shrimp, capers and a tangy, lemony white sauce. Conventional Italian dishes prevail, from starters to soups and salads, like à la carte meatballs in marinara ($4), tomato-and-mozzarella caprese ($9), and minestrone ($4). Standard entrées include chicken marsala ($14), a vegetarian lasagna with squash, zucchini, mushrooms and spinach ($11), and spaghetti bolognese ($10). Lunch and dinner specials — like chicken saltimbocca ($17), a bruschetta burger on grilled ciabatta ($12) or the pesto ravioli with marinated tomatoes ($12) — vary daily. Also look for wine-paired dinners, like the most recent one featuring Italian winemaker Fontanafredda, known for its Barolo and Barbera wines. The wine offering at Uva Trattoria — uva means “grapes” in Italian — is coordinated by Van Zeveren’s sister Lisa, who worked in Napa Valley’s wine country. With its remodeled interior featuring blue-gray walls, dark wood paneling and tables, and a sleek new bar — hardly recognizable as the former Fiesta Mexicana — Uva Trattoria offers a nice place to celebrate Italian food. Or maybe just beat the heat and let someone else do the cooking. 

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FOOD | UPDATE

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he Screaming Yak is ready for football season. The North Spokane bar is still serving the same delicious wings, burgers and brews they always have, and they’re introducing some new items to the menu specifically for college football season. New College Game Day Specials, which pay tribute to local teams, will give you the energy you

need to keep cheering, including $7 pitchers, their new IncREDible Wings and the Cougar Gold Burger on Saturdays and the Blitzdawg — a half-pound German sausage wrapped in bacon and topped with Cougar Gold cheese — on Sundays. The level of spice in their 13 varieties of wings range from mild Honey BBQ to Screamin’ Demon,

which are so hot you’re required to sign a waiver before feeling the burn. In between game days, sip $3-$4 beers during happy hour between 3 and 6 pm, and on Mondays try a pound of their hot wings for $6. And they always serve $3 Jack Daniels. — FRANNY WRIGHT

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ITALIAN TITO’S ITALIAN GRILL AND WINE SHOP 210 E. Sherman Ave. I Coeur d’Alene (208) 667-2782 Tito’s Italian Grill and Wine Shop upped the elegance several years ago, shifting to cloth tablecloths, adding candles and expanding its wine cellar to 125 labels. The new everyday menu features plenty of small plates, salads, brick-oven pizzas and a smattering of entrées. Chef Jim Barrett often incorporates a Mediterranean flair into the Italian dishes. During the warm season, diners can choose to sit outside. LASAGNA’S-ON-YA 521 E. Holland I Spokane 467-9100 Pick up pre-made lasagnas inside this family-run operation on Holland Avenue or just swing through the drive-through. There are five basic kinds to choose from, ranging from the classic meat lasagna to the Tuscan chicken (there are even gluten-free options). And that’s not all they’ve got. Cheese lasagnas are offered and you can also craft your own delicious Italian dish. Just in case that didn’t fill you up, pick up

some tiramisu or one of the seven different flavors of cheesecake (we suggest you try the huckleberry). ITALIA TRATTORIA 144 S. Cannon I Spokane 459-6000 Nestled into the heart of Browne’s Addition, Italia Trattoria is a homecooked hit from former Luna chef Anna Vogel. With a focus on natural and sustainable ingredients, the menu features handmade pastas, racks of wild boar and seasonal vegetables spiced and grilled to perfection. No one is doing Italian quite like this. MAMMA MIA’S 420 W. Francis I Spokane 467-7786 It’s all home-style southern Italian at this north-side dining room, with sauces, pastas and breads made from old-time family recipes. The menu has plenty of munchable appetizers to keep families happy, alongside traditional pastas, pizzas and meat entrées (we love the garlic chicken). Mix and match any of their pastas and sauces for a new combination each time, or request the advice of owner Jerry to craft a meal that matches your cravings. They offer simple, hearty lunch options,

too: Italian sub sandwiches, pizzas and calzones. FERRANTE’S MARKETPLACE CAFE 4516 S. Regal I Spokane 443-6304 This family-owned neighborhood restaurant serves up true Italian style pies, hand tossed and thin-crusted. The toppings are simple, but chosen for their exceptional quality. Order the Margherita for the simple and traditional combination of mozzarella, tomato, fresh basil and olive oil. The pepperoni is thicker, with more spice and none of that telltale grease. The Linguini Pomodoro is light and flavorful, and in the winter, the Sweet Italian dish- house sausage served in a Chianti sauce on penne pasta- is the ultimate comfort food. ARLO’S RISTORANTE 330 N. First Ave. I Sandpoint (208) 255-4186 When it comes to eating Italian in Sandpoint, Arlo’s has got you covered. The restaurant added flatbread pizzas to its offerings, as well as solidified a spot on the menu for its extremely popular mussels dish — an item that sold out every time it was on special. Kick back with a great meal and a glass of wine. 

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AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 39


Marcia Gay Harden (left) and Emma Stone in Woody Allen’s latest.

Spinning Wheels

work over the years, perhaps most often when he figures out how to combine the two. What little attempt at comedy there is in Magic in the Moonlight, however, feels utterly leaden, both because the typical Allen witticisms now often feel recycled, and because Firth seems like exactly the wrong actor to make them work — too solid and straightforward to come off like a cynical wiseacre. It’s even more frustrating as a treatise on a specific philosophy, because there’s absolutely nothing about that philosophy that’s new. The narrative takes a twist when Stanley becomes increasingly convinced that Sophie’s there’s nothing beyond this world that isn’t trickery and/ psychic gifts are the real deal, shaking his earthbound or wishful thinking. So when he’s informed by an old prejudices to the point where he actually prays when his friend that a young woman named Sophie (Emma Stone) beloved aunt (Eileen Atkins) is injured in a car accident. is enjoying the patronage of a wealthy family in France Yet Magic in the Moonlight ultimately plays as a repudiation while claiming to make contact with of that comforting spirituality, and a return to the dead husband of the matriarch one of Allen’s most frequently recurring paraMAGIC IN (Jacki Weaver), Stanley is more than Nietzschean thesis statements: that existence is THE MOONLIGHT happy to take on the job of exposmeaningless, and only romantic love provides Rated PG-13 ing her. any point at all. It is, of course, a perspective Written and directed by Woody Allen Once again, it’s hard not to drag Starring Colin Firth, Emma Stone that repeatedly defends Allen’s infamous “the Allen’s personal life into his work; heart wants what it wants” quote, and the freFilm Comment’s Nicolas Rapold puckquency with which he has hammered at it in ishly observed that the premise involves “an older entermovie after movie over the course of 40-some-odd years tainer trying to prove that a young woman is lying.” And makes it look more than slightly defensive. while it’s still unsettling watching yet another Allen movie Allen is too fundamentally competent a writer and in which the age difference between the romantic leads is filmmaker to make complete garbage, and too much of approximately a generation, it’s also hard not to acknowla legend for talented actors like Stone — who’s appealedge that such an approach simply follows the standard ing enough in a fairly standard-issue, late-period Woody Hollywood model for May-December relationships, in ingénue role — to be able to resist working with him. Yet which you better believe the dude is gonna be December, it’s ironic that the primary knock on him tends to be that and maybe the girl is actually more early April. he’s not the filmmaker he used to be. To the extent that But on a more rudimentary level, this is just a tedious he’s slipped, it’s because he’s spinning his creative wheels. slog of a movie to sit through. Allen generally has two He’s more or less exactly what he used to be — and that’s speeds — his frothy romps, and his more serious philojust not going to be good enough if he ever wants to sophical meditations — each of which has produced great change the conversation. 

Woody Allen recycles old philosophical material in Magic in the Moonlight BY SCOTT RENSHAW

W

oody Allen. There: Now I’ve said all I need to say to let you know whether you want to continue paying attention. Those words may be as contentious as any in contemporary movie fan circles — or at least on a par with “Marvel Cinematic Universe” or “Oscar-worthy,” albeit for completely different reasons. From the scandals and accusations in his personal life to his homogeneous, hermetically sealed on-screen character demographics to the widely varying quality of his recent work, there is no middle ground in a conversation that involves Woody Allen. His movies don’t just arrive with baggage; they’re an overhead bin that couldn’t possibly fit all the baggage. Magic in the Moonlight is in many ways a paradigm for 21st-century Woody Allen cinema — and that’s perhaps also indicative of its biggest problems. Once again, he’s giving us a period-piece milieu, in this case 1928; once again, he’s taking us to a European location. And once again, he’s made his protagonist a misanthropic entertainer. His name is Stanley (Colin Firth), though he performs as a touring stage illusionist under the name Wei Ling Soo. In addition to his theatrical performances, he also delights in acting as a debunker of fraudulent mediums and diviners of all kinds, intent on proving his conviction that

40 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014


FILM | SHORTS

haute /öt/ (adj.) Elegant or high-class

OPENING FILMS THE EXPENDABLES 3

In the third installment of this action franchise, in which an aging crew of do-gooder mercenaries have to challenge their group’s original founder (Mel Gibson, apparently allowed in movies again), who’s now a ruthless arms trader. The cast includes Sylvester Stallone (who wrote the script), Jason Statham, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Antonio Banderas, Wesley Snipes, Harrison Ford and Dolph “Ivan Drago” Lundgren. (MB) Rated PG-13

THE GIVER

Based on the classic young adult novel of the same name, The Giver is set in a utopian society with almost no struggle or pain. When a young man (Brenton Thwaites) is selected to learn the history of his surroundings, the truth of how things came to be so perfect comes into view. Starring Jeff Bridges as the Giver and Meryl Streep as the Chief Elder. (MB) Rated PG-13

and diviners of all kinds. So when he’s informed by an old friend that a young woman named Sophie (Emma Stone) is enjoying the patronage of a wealthy family in France while claiming to make contact with the dead husband of the matriarch (Jacki Weaver), Stanley is more than happy to take on the job of exposing her. (SR) Rated PG-13

MOON INDIGO

Experimental French director Michel Gondry, the guy who brought you Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, comes another hyper-stylized film. The premise here is that a guy finds out that the woman he’s madly in love with is sick — because there’s a flower growing in her lungs — and sets about to find a cure for her ailment. In French with subtitles. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

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RICH HILL

UST G U Being a cop can be tough. That’s what EA T best of friends Ryan (Jake Johnson U A TN H from New Girl) and Justin (Damon S • U Wayans Jr.) find out anyway in the film TS UG H A that could have been called “Let’s Be G I E T US N Stupid.” One night, the pair dresses up U G T A U S as cops for a costume party, only to •H GU EA T U S realize they like the attention the uniT U A HA form gains them. Things quickly escaST IG H • UTE U N A S G late however, when they get involved T T H H AU US WHAT IF with some real mobsters. Soon their G S• G I E T T U N Daniel Radcliffe has done the Harry H pretend badges aren’t nearly as fun U A GU T G A U S E H A Potter thing and mastered Broadway,NI T U as they used to be. Meanwhile, many • U G Tinto TE S so, what the hell, whyU notS get ridiculous gags keep the audience T HA U AU H A • G E the romantic U comedy business, right? laughing (many involving comedians G H T S • T U Aas the charming Wallace, UST NI H A Here, he stars S Rob Riggle and Keegan-Michael Key) T G E T T G H U S I guy who thinks N hituntil the plot has to kick in at theA S• GU IG H EA T(Zoehe’s T H end.U atingniceit British T U N S off with U a woman Kazan), H (LJ) Rated R U A T A UG S G she has a boyfriend.T NIG E only to realize H A T U U • U A G E S worse, she puts him in U the dreadMAGIC IN THE MOONLIGHT TS HA UT AU TE Even H A • U E ed “friend zone” and heG has to struggle Stanley (Colin Firth) is a touring stage G H A T U S I H in acting withTtheE Ahe’s in love with her. IGHT fact that AU S• illusionist who also delights GU TN T H U S H • A U (MB) Rated PG-13 N as a debunker of fraudulent mediumsAU TS H TE UG N IG ST H U A U T G A S G I E H AU T U U N • U A G E T A T U S S E T H T H AU • GU EA G H T U S I • T HAU U A N H A S H TE UG ST IG HT • A U N G S G I E T T HAU T U N U A T GH A S G US I E H T U U N BEGIN AGAIN • U A G EA A T U S E status. Strangled by class systems andUST Gretta (Keira Knightley) has been T H U A T Belle begins to findU herG voice HA dragged onstage at a bar open-mic TE S • WWW.THEHANLEYCOLLECTION.COM IG H • T HAUprejudice, U A N H only when she fallsE in love with a man A S night by a friend (James Corden) to T HT •H Uto T US who A wants change the world for the N IG perform an original composition; in the G S G I T T H U N S better, but does not have the rank her crowd is Dan (Mark Ruffalo), a onceU ST G IG H EA family requires. At Magic Lantern (ER) T U U hot music industry executive. But Dan N U A G T Rated T PG E hears something in Gretta’s song — we HA AU US • G E see what he hears in a cutesy bit where AU T U S H BOYHOOD TE A AU instruments float in the air, playing the GHT H I • U Richard Linklater’s newest film, shot N arrangement in his head — and he beA TS ST over H the course of 12 years, is a true comes determined to record her work H U G G I masterwork and eschews the bigand get her a distribution deal. (SR) AUin favor of UST N bang theory ofE dramatics Rated R T U thatUG Amillion-and-one little things Hthe A accumulate daily and help shape who BELLE E UNIQUE . TIMELESS . TR ADITIONAL . UwillT we are, and who we become. The Dido Elizabeth Belle (Gugu MbathaA H story focuses on Mason, who we follow Raw) has always lived her life between LET’S BE COPS

Cousins Tracy Droz Tragos and Andrew Droz Palermo directed this documentary that follows three teenage boys for more than a year as they navigate life in the titular rural Missouri town. Rich Hill is home to just 1,300 people who’ve remained long after the mines closed and most of the shops were boarded up. It’s a heartbreaking but endlessly impactful film. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

NOW PLAYING

two worlds. The illegitimate child of Admiral Sir John Lindsay (Matthew Goode), Belle is of a higher rank than the servants, but cannot eat with her own family because of her mixed-race

from age 7 to 19 as he struggles with divorced parents and the process of learning how to navigate the world. (MB) Rated R ...continued on next page

5 0 9 . 5 3 5 .1 1 1 1 | 17 27 E S P R AG U E AV E | S P O K A N E WA 9 9 2 0 2 M O N DAY - S AT U R DAY 1 0A M - 6 P M | S U N DAY 1 1 A M - 4 P M

AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 41


THE MAGIC LANTERN FRI AUG 15TH- THUR AUG 21ST THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (96 MIN) Fri/Sat: 8:30 Sun: 7:30 Tue-Thu: 7:30

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MOOD INDIGO (94 MIN)

Fri/Sat: 6:15 Sun: 5:15 Tue-Thu: 5:15

LIFE ITSELF (120 MIN)

Fri/Sat: 4:00 Sun: 3:00 Tue-Thu: 3:00

THE GRAND SEDUCTION (116 MIN) Fri/Sat: 2:30 Sun: 1:30 *weekend only!

WHITEY: US V JAMES J BULGER (104 MIN) Fri/Sat: 2:00 Sun: 1:00 *weekend only!

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It’s been a few years since James Franco’s ape Caesar took smart pills and then led every other ape in the greater Bay Area on a rampage of epic proportions. Those smart pills ended up causing a worldwide epidemic, killing off much of the human race. War took care of many others. Now, the surviving humans are bristling up against the apes, led by Caesar and the two species are on the brink of war. (MB) Rated PG-13

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS

The girl has cancer, the boy is in remission from cancer; this story can only end badly. As far as teenage cancer love stories go, John Green’s recent young adult novel of the same name isn’t half bad — not nearly as sappy as A Walk to Remember. With Shailene Woodley (The Descendants, Divergent) as the lead for this film adaption, many lovesick teenage girls and their boyfriends will show up for this one. (LJ) Rated PG-13

GET ON UP

The James Brown story told here is less a portrait of how he became the “Godfather of Soul” and more a series of snapshots of his life, told in jumps and starts, and flashes backward and forward. The music and musical performances are exciting, and Chadwick Boseman (who played Jackie Robinson in 42) has perfectly caught the moves and moods of Brown. (ES) Rated PG-13

THE GRAND SEDUCTION

Taking place in the village of Tickle Cove, this film details the tiny village’s attempt to “seduce” doctor Paul Lewis to live and work in their town. Without a town doctor they are not able to open a factory, which will provide enough jobs to save their village from financial crisis. To convince the doctor to stay, the villagers join efforts to make their town appealing. At Magic Lantern (MAB) Rated PG-13

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

The titular Guardians are a ragtag, fivepronged crew of interstellar outcasts tasked with stopping Ronan the Accuser (Lee Pace), a rogue zealot bent on planetary destruction. The Guardians are led by Peter Quill (Chris Pratt), a cocky, wisecracking treasure hunter from Earth who likes to go by Star-Lord. (SS) Rated PG-13

HERCULES

Oh wow, The Rock grew a beard! Or had someone in makeup put a beard on him. Either way, that beard for some reason means that he’s Hercules, the mythological strong man who endured 12 labors and came out clean on the other side. In this take, Hercules, post labors, is essentially a mercenary and is hired to take down an evil warlord played by John Hurt. (MB) Rated PG-13

HUNDRED- FOOT JOURNEY

Directed by Lasse Hallstrom, The Hundred-Foot Journey is the story of Hassan Kadam and his family. After relocating from their home country, India, the

42 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014

Kadam family decides to open an Indian restaurant, Maison Mumbai, in their new home in the south of France. After seeing Maison Mumbai, Madame Mallory, the harsh restaurant owner across the street, senses competition and treats her new competitors with vengeance. (MAB) Rated PG

I ORIGINS

While studying the evolution of the eye, molecular biologist Dr. Ian Gray becomes all consumed with his project. After years of researching, Dr. Gray and his colleague Karen make a life-altering discovery that causes them question both their spiritual and scientific beliefs. In order to prove their findings right, Dr. Gray travels around the world while endangering everything he has ever known. (MAB) Rated R

INTO THE STORM

In the small northern Oklahoma town of Silverton, a team of storm chasers — led by driven filmmaker Pete (Matt Walsh) and meteorological researcher Allison (Sarah Wayne Callies) — try to find some amazing footage for their planned documentary before their funding runs out. Meanwhile, it’s highschool graduation day in Silverton, and vice-principal Gary (Richard Armitage) is trying to track down his missing son, Donnie (Max Deacon). Then, a massive tornado hits. (SR) Rated PG-13

LIFE ITSELF

This documentary, intimately detailing the last years of Roger Ebert’s life, not only inspires and entertains, but also presents a more fully realized portrait of him than I’ve ever encountered. Being a study of Ebert, it is, by necessity, also a film about movies. Eloquent, it is surprisingly moving and beautifully structured. Directed by Steve James. At Magic Lantern. (LB) Rated R

LUCY

Scarlett Johansson continues her scifi streak playing the titular character working as a drug mule in Taiwan when a drug accidentally leaks into her system, giving her access to 100 percent of her brain. Now in possession of otherworldly powers, Lucy goes on a rampage to take vengeance against those who’ve wronged her. (MB) Rated R

A MOST WANTED MAN

It’s tough to see these posthumously released Phillip Seymour Hoffman films and realize the talent that was lost, but here we go again with A Most Wanted Man. Hoffman plays a German intelligence officer who is trying to ferret out terrorists in Hamburg, the city where the Sept. 11 attacks were planned and where paranoia runs high. (MB) Rated R

THE PURGE: ANARCHY

This is the sequel to last year’s sneaker hit. This time around, the Purge is still very much happening and five people find themselves stranded on the streets of Los Angeles as night falls, making them prey for all those on the prowl in search of something to kill. (MB) Rated R

SNOWPIERCER

It’s the future and everything is super screwed up thanks to a weather control experiment gone wrong, leaving the world completely frozen. The only remaining humans live on a train that circles the globe, never stopping. On that train, there’s a strict divide between the haves and have-nots, overseen by a fierce administrator played by Tilda Swinton. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R

STEP UP: ALL IN

The first Step Up film (2006) wasn’t too terrible — it starred Channing Tatum and eventual wife Jenna Dewan — but as it typically goes, any Hollywood franchise taken too far loses originality pretty fast. We’re now on the fourth sequel to the first film, starring a few original cast members, though the Tatums have since moved on to bigger and better roles. (CS) Rated PG-13.

WHITEY: THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA VS. JAMES J. BULGER

This documentary by Joe Berlinger, who brought us the Paradise Lost series that’s credited in playing a part in freeing the West Memphis Three, doesn’t make notorious mobster, drug lord and murderer Whitey Bulger look great. But it also doesn’t do much for the reputation of the FBI, which as you see in this hard-driving film, did nothing to stop Bulger’s terrorization of south Boston for much of 30 years. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Boyhood

100

Life Itself

86

Snowpiercer

83

Planet of the Apes

79

Guardians/Galaxy

75

Magic in the Moonlight

54

Into the Storm

44

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

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FILM | REVIEW

Adv. Tix on Sale AS ABOVE, SO BELOW [CC,DV]

Adv. Tix on Sale FRANK MILLER'S SIN CITY A DAME TO KILL FOR 3D

Never send a boy to do a man’s job.

THE EXPENDABLES [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1200 300) 700 1000

LET'S BE COPS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1230 330) 730 1020

THE GIVER [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1130 200) 430 720 950

AIRWAY HEIGHTS

10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444

THE EXPENDABLES 3

PG-13 Daily (10:50) (1:15) (4:00) 6:40 9:20

THE GIVER

PG-13 Daily (12:30) (2:45) (5:00) 7:10 9:25

LET’S BE COPS

R Daily (12:45) (3:00) (5:15) 7:20 9:50

Andrew, 14, puts a face on impoverished children in Rich Hill.

Kids in America Rich Hill gives us a grim look at the lives of kids growing up in rural poverty BY MIKE BOOKEY

Y

ou’re going to be worried about our kids almost daily and is closely monitored by juvenile when you get done watching Rich Hill. services. Not just your kids, but all the kids out The film is shot in a crisp, ironically gorgeous there. The ones you see waiting at bus stops manner, full of tight shots that are far more cineand wandering the streets, looking just a bit too matic than you’d expect from an indie documenyoung and too aimless to be where they are. tary. This approach allows the crushing despair That’s the haunting impact of Rich Hill, a of these kids’ poverty-stricken lives to elicit an documentary from cousins Tracy Droz Tragos unexpected amount of empathy. The structure and Andrew Droz Palermo that follows three and pacing make for a fluid story that takes us teenage boys for more than a year as they navithrough a calendar year, with a sense of progresgate life in the titular Missouri town. Rich Hill sion (or lack thereof) in the boys’ existence. All is home to just 1,300 people who’ve remained of this is furthered by brutal honesty from every long after the mines closed and most of the shops subject, none of whom seem to hold much back, were boarded up. a testament to the remarkable access We meet Andrew, a hardworkthese filmmakers earned with these RICH HILL ing 14-year-old whose hard-luck people. Not Rated father moves the family from town There’s a scene where ApDirected by Tracy Droz Tragos to town every few months, while pachey, suspended from school and Andrew Droz Palermo his mother is in bed, suffering from for assaulting another student, is At Magic Lantern what looks like an addiction to pills. sprawled on the couch, playing Then there’s 13-year-old Appachey, video games on a blurry TV and an angry wannabe skateboarder living with his smoking cigarettes. You realize that there isn’t a single mother and siblings in a trash-littered lot of hope out there for a kid like this. You can’t house. Finally, we meet Harley, 15, living with pull yourself up by your bootstraps when you’ve his grandmother while his mother is in jail for never had any boots. Worst of all, you know attempted murder. Medicated for his volatile that there are more than just these three kids out mood, he feigns sickness to leave school early there. 

TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES PG-13 Daily (2:15) 9:00 In 2D Daily (11:50) (1:00) (4:30) 6:45

Adv. Tix on Sale AS ABOVE, SO BELOW [CC,DV]

INTO THE STORM

PG-13 Daily (11:20) (1:20) (3:20) (5:25) 7:30 9:35

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

PG-13 Daily (5:15) 9:40 In 2D Daily (10:40) (1:40) (4:20) 6:40 7:00 9:20

LUCY

R Daily (11:00) (1:10) (3:15) (5:15) 7:15 9:15

Adv. Tix on Sale FRANK MILLER'S SIN CITY A DAME TO KILL FOR 3D

HERCULES

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (2:10) (4:30) 6:40 9:10

PLANES: FIRE & RESCUE

PG Daily (11:00) (1:00) (3:00) (4:50)

AND SO IT GOES

PG-13 Daily (11:00) (3:15) 7:40 9:35

THE EXPENDABLES [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1215 330) 700 1015

WANDERMERE

12622 N DIVISION • 509-232-7727

THE EXPENDABLES 3

PG-13 Daily (10:50) (1:15) (4:00) 6:40 9:20

THE GIVER

THE GIVER [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1245 350) 645 935

PG-13 Daily (12:30) (2:45) (5:00) 7:10 9:25

LET’S BE COPS

R Daily (12:45) (3:00) (5:15) 7:20 9:50

TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES PG-13 Daily (11:00) (1:15) In 2D Daily (11:45) (2:00) (4:20) 7:15 9:30

STEP UP ALL IN

PG-13 Daily (2:30) 7:20 In 2D Daily (11:50) (4:50) 9:45

INTO THE STORM

PG-13 Daily (11:20) (1:20) (3:20) (5:25) 7:30 9:35

THE HUNDRED-FOOT JOURNEY

PG Daily (11:00) (1:40) (4:10) 6:50 9:30

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

Adv. Tix on Sale AS ABOVE, SO BELOW [CC,DV]

PG-13 Daily (3:50) 6:30 9:10 In 2D Daily (10:40) (1:40) (4:20) 7:00 9:40

LUCY

R Daily (11:00) (1:00) (3:00) (5:00) 7:10 9:20

HERCULES

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (2:15) (4:50) 7:10 9:35

AND SO IT GOES

Adv. Tix on Sale FRANK MILLER'S SIN CITY A DAME TO KILL FOR 3D

PG-13 Daily (4:20) 9:00

PLANES: FIRE & RESCUE

PG Daily (11:00) (1:00) (3:00) (4:50)

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES PG-13 Daily (10:50) (1:50) 6:40

TAMMY

THE EXPENDABLES [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(100) 400 700 1000

R Daily (3:00) (5:15) 7:25 9:35

TRANSFORMERS: AGE OF EXTINCTION PG-13 Daily 6:30 9:25

EARTH TO ECHO

PG Daily (10:45) (12:45)

Times For 08/15 - 08/17

regal_081414_4V.pdf

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 8/15/14-8/21/14

AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 43


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Like us on Facebook for upcoming events & specials! 44 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014


Bow Tie Madness With Gaytheist, you can’t judge a band by what its lead singer wears BY LAURA JOHNSON

T

he show at the Volume festival was getting wild. The drum kit already had been knocked over twice — which can easily happen at Mootsy’s, the downtown Spokane venue where audience often merges with performers into one sopping hot mess of noise. Portland three-piece Gaytheist liked the spirit, but didn’t know how they would continue playing if their instruments kept getting slammed into. Then a miraculous thing happened. Everyone in the front row linked arms, forming a wall of protection between the band and the concertgoers, people coming together to absorb the pounding layers of sound. This happens at a Gaytheist show. It’s a methodical, steady roar. The punk metal trio plays their instruments with the fury of hell, fingers running up and down guitar and bass necks like water, the drumming absolutely incendiary. Some songs speed by so quickly, they’re barely

a minute long. “We don’t think we have to play a riff over and over,” explains lead singer and lyricist Jason Rivera from his Vancouver, Wash., home earlier this week. “Why not just play something once? It’s more fun that way.” Together officially since January 2011 when they played their first Vancouver house show, Rivera says this is about the longest he’s been with one group. For two decades, Rivera, 42, has been in a bunch of bands, but with Gaytheist he’s really having fun and people are starting to pay attention. Along with Volume, this year alone the band has played Treefort Music Festival, Capitol Hill Block Party, Portland Queer Music Festival and Crucial Fest in Salt Lake City, and this week is headed to Missoula’s Total Fest. ...continued on next page

AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 45


MUSIC | PUNK “BOW TIE MADNESS,” CONTINUED... “It’s our fourth time applying to play there, and it’s our first time we’re in,” Rivera says. “It’s really cool. The goal with playing so many festivals is just to be heard by as many people as possible.” Rivera is a gay man who also happens to be atheist, hence the name Gaytheist. The band’s moniker often draws a lot of attention, and while Rivera admits there has been some negative feedback about it from journalists and music promoters, they’ve nevertheless managed to have their record played on Portland radio stations. “I just thought the name was hilarious,” he says. Rivera has just made a cup of tea right before the interview. He’s genial, laughs easily and is slow to employ curse words. He’s not at all what you’d expect from a lead singer of a heavy rock band, especially in his apparel choices. He dresses well; it’s not some costume he dons only for the stage. He wears bow ties and suspenders, suit jackets and wire-rimmed glasses all the time. “I’m not a T-shirt and jeans kind of guy,” says Rivera, who as a graphic designer by day, designs all of the band’s T-shirt and album artwork. Weaned as a kid on his older brother’s metal

records, heavy music has always been his sound of choice. His bandmates, bassist Tim Hoff (who played guitar in Lopez and has known Rivera since high school) and drummer Nick Parks, feel that way too. In the beginning, they had songs where one word or phrase like “dance” or “I’m on top” was sung on a perpetual loop. As the records have progressed, Rivera says they’ve put more effort into them — especially 2013’s Hold Me…But Not So Tight. “I’m really bad. I could write the same couple songs over and over,” Rivera admits. But his bandmates keep him on task. And as they go back into the studio this fall to make their fifth album, they stick with the same process — Rivera will come in with a melody, and Hoff and Parks take it in a different direction. “They always tell me, ‘OK, we like it. Now can we just speed it up and make it louder?’” Rivera says.  Gaytheist with the Bugs, Peace Creep (all Total Fest bands) • Thu, Aug. 14, at 8 pm • $6 • All-ages • The Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • bigdipperevents.com • 624-4319

TOTAL FEST IN SPOKANE Total Fest rages through the weekend in Missoula, but even if you can’t make the three-hour drive down I-90, there are

LMGConcert_081414_4S_BD.pdf

a couple of underground rock, metal and punk bands playing Spokane before and after they perform at the all-ages, multi-venue Montana music festival (in addition to the Gaytheist show). Lord Dying, Prizehog: Sat, Aug. 16, at 8 pm; Big Dipper, $10 He Whose Ox is Gored, Lord Dying: Sun, Aug. 17, at 8 pm; Mootsy’s, $5

OCTOBER 16 -19 INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

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ON SALE NOW! 46 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014


MUSIC | METAL You’re Invited to Lunch! Now Open at 1 1 am

Amplifier Worship

Whenever cult metal act Boris plays live, be sure to bring ear plugs.

Japanese three-piece Boris may just be the loudest band you’ve ever heard BY JORDAN SATTERFIELD

I

t is entirely possible that when Boris thunders through Spokane and plays at the Big Dipper, it will be the loudest thing that has ever happened in this city. Boris, a three-piece heralding from Tokyo, can’t be tagged with any one genre, especially in their home country; it’s most apt to refer to them as “loud.” Over the two-plus decades they’ve been together, Boris have touched on numerous sounds, most leaning towards the direction of slowburning, feedback-worshiping niches like doom, sludge and drone metal. Though Boris’ members sing in Japanese, they take their name from a song by American doom legends Melvins — one of the best Melvins songs, actually — and play

in the tradition of that band’s quest for all things heavy. Boris has a wild spirit in a way that few bands do, never spending too much time in one place. Between 1996 and 2008, they released 14 studio records, all as sonically rich and adventurous as they were consistently great. The crushing growl of their early darker, slower albums bloomed into a twisted, blistering rush of guitar shreds, hypnotic loops and dream-like synthscapes. Still, experimentation can be a tricky game. In 2011, Boris released three albums almost simultaneously, all of which covered completely different ground. One of them, an inexplicable sequel to an older record, was a forced attempt to return to some of

their simpler riffage. Another was a fairly competent, mostly forgettable exercise in noise-pop. The third, simply called New Album, was an abysmal mess of an LP. The less said about it, the better. But 2014 is an excellent time to be a Boris fan. Earlier this year, they released one of their best records yet, a near-perfect hour of sounds that span their whole career, aptly titled Noise. It’s inspired, daring, and pummeling, and hopefully will be representative of their live performance. Boris has made a career out of being a cult band, allowing them to explore an amount of musical terrain that most bands could never dream of. To hear the full timeline live would be like a reading of an author’s personal memoir. Backed by a solid wall of high-wattage tube amplifiers, expect one thing from the mysterious, shape-shifting figures known as Boris: they’ll make you wish you had brought earplugs. n Boris with Master Musicians of Bukkake • Fri, Aug. 15, at 8 pm • $15/$17 day of • All-ages • The Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • brownpapertickets.com

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AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 47


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCK TOM PETTY & THE HEARTBREAKERS

T

his week, the Gorge plays host to a little rock band you might have heard of — Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers. They’re one of the biggest bands around, seemingly growing in popularity as they age — their recent release, Hypnotic Eye, debuted at No. 1 on the Billboard charts last week, the band’s first album ever to take the top spot. With such a huge catalog to choose from — don’t be surprised if Petty plays a song or two from his supergroup the Traveling Wilburys — the show is sure to encompass decades of sweet rock ’n’ roll, the hits, new stuff and everything in between. — LAURA JOHNSON Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers with Steve Winwood • Fri, Aug. 15, at 8 pm • $65-$155 (fees included) • Gorge Amphitheatre • 754 Silica Road NW, George, Wash. • livenation. com • 785-6262

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 08/14

ARbOR CReST WiNe CellARS, Performers on the Patio feat. Spare Parts Trio J The bARTleTT, Man Man, Landlady beveRlY’S, Robert Vaughn J The biG DiPPeR, Gaythiest (See story on page 45), The Bugs, Peace Creep The CellAR, Isaac Walton COeuR D’AleNe CASiNO, PJ Destiny J COeuR D’AleNe PARK, Browne’s Addition Summer Concerts feat. Sidetrack CRuiSeRS (624-1495), Armed & Dangerous CuRleY’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE J FeSTivAl AT SANDPOiNT, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue with Galactic GRANDe RONDe CellARS, Old Time Music The hANDle bAR (474-0933), The Usual Suspects J hAYDeN CiTY PARK, David Raitt & the Baja Boogie Band J The hOP!, Outpost, “Question? No Answer”, Griffey, Cutback Davis, Skunktopus JONeS RADiATOR, Los Chingadores J KNiTTiNG FACTORY, Charm City Devils, Vial 8 leFTbANK WiNe bAR, Stephen King J luxe COFFeehOuSe, Particlehead J MezzO PAzzO WiNe bAR, Dirk Swartz (Land of Voices) O’ShAY’S, Open mic J The PhAT hOuSe, The Tone Collaborative and friends ReD liON hOTel AT The PARK (3268000), Chris Rieser & Jay Rawley RePubliC bReWiNG CO., Hillfolk Noir RiveRSTONe PARK, Summer Concerts at Riverstone feat. 2nd Opinion ROCKY hill PARK, The Angela Marie Project

48 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014

SERIES ROCK THE NEST

N

ext Wednesday is your last chance this summer to experience the Rock the Nest concert series at Kendall Yards. Bringing local talent to the Yards for the past three weeks, the event has brightened the Inlander’s own backyard with a wall of sound. Concertgoers are invited to bring fully stocked picnic baskets, along with blankets and/or lawn chairs, to properly enjoy the free event. Next week’s show features the aptly named Folkinception, named one of the best local bands in this year’s Inlander Best Of poll. — LAURA JOHNSON Rock the Nest feat. Folkinception • Wed, Aug. 20, at 7 pm • Free • All-ages • The Nest Outdoor Plaza at Kendall Yards • 1335 W. Summit Pkwy. • facebook.com/ kendallyards • 720-8401

SARANAC PubliC hOuSe (4739455), Hey! is for Horses, Bossame The viKiNG bAR AND GRill, Jimmy Nuge WebSTeR’S RANCh hOuSe SAlOON, Pacific Suns zOlA, Troubadour

Friday, 08/15

J The bARTleTT, Black Joe Lewis, Loomer beveRlY’S, Robert Vaughn J The biG DiPPeR, Boris (See story on page 47), Master Musicians of Bukkake biG SKY’S TAveRN (489-2073), The Usual Suspects bOlO’S, Nova bOOMeRS ClASSiC ROCK bAR & GRill, Haze bOWl’z biTez AND SPiRiTz, Likes Girls bROOKlYN Deli & lOuNGe (835-

4177), Ryan Dunn J buCeR’S COFFeehOuSe Pub, Bucer’s Street Concert feat. Simba & the Exceptionsal Africans CARliN bAY ReSORT, Kosh & the Hitmen The CellAR, New Mud CheCKeRbOARD bAR, Jake Ryan COeuR D’AleNe CASiNO, JamShack, Kicho CONKliNG MARiNA & ReSORT, Stagecoach West Band CuRleY’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE J FeSTivAl AT SANDPOiNT, Ray LaMontagne with The Belle Brigade Fizzie MulliGANS, Slow Burn GATeWAY MARiNA AND ReSORT, Shiner J GORGe AMPhiTheATeR, Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers (See story above) with Steve Winwood GRANDe RONDe CellARS, Maxie Ray Mills J The hive eveNT CeNTeR, Big

Sam’s Funky Nation J The hOP!, Insidious Flow, Jesus Spades, Kingz Gone Madd, Notes, Pest, Havoc tha Clown, Hounds of Hell, Jayskii Loud, NRG iDAhO POuR AuThORiTY (8354177), Charley Packard iRON hORSe bAR, Johnny Qlueless JACKliN ARTS & CulTuRAl CeNTeR (208-457-8950), Ron Greene JOhN’S AlleY, Toney JONeS RADiATOR, Daniel Amedee J KNiTTiNG FACTORY, The Next Big Thing feat. Chuck Wicks, Natalie Stovall & The Drive, Joe Bachman leFTbANK WiNe bAR, Carey Brazil and Jay Condiotti MAx AT MiRAbeAu, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve The MeMbeRS lOuNGe (703-7115), Fabulous Fridays ft. DJ Wesone J NeATO buRRiTO/bAbY bAR, Bandit Train, Paisley Devil, Bitwvlf NORTheRN QueST CASiNO, DJ Ramsin, DJ Freaky Fred

NYNe, DJ The Divine Jewels O’ShAY’S, Arvid Lundin, Deep Roots J PARK beNCh CAFe (456-4349), Brad Keeler J The PhAT hOuSe, Ragtime Steve J RAThDRuM CiTY PARK, Spectrum ReD ROOM lOuNGe, DJ D3VIN3 RePubliC bReWiNG CO., Robert Sarazin Blake and the Put-it-alldown-in-a-letters The ROCK bAR, Fire and Ice ROCKeR ROOM, Krashbox J The ShOP, Starlite Motel SilveR FOx, Six-Strings n’ Pearls SOulFul SOuPS AND SPiRiTS, DJ Q TRiNiTY AT CiTY beACh, Truck Mills, Bright Moments The viKiNG bAR AND GRill, Stepbrothers WebSTeR’S RANCh hOuSe SAlOON, Echo Elysium zOlA, Raggs and Bush Doktor

Saturday, 08/16 beveRlY’S, Robert Vaughn


 THE BIG DIPPER, Lord Dying with PrizeHog, He Whose Ox Is Gored and Losing Skin  BING CROSBY THEATER, Zoso (Led Zeppelin Tribute) BOLO’S, Nova BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Haze BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Likes Girls CARLIN BAY RESORT, Kosh & the Hitmen THE CELLAR, New Mud  CHAPS, Just Plain Darin CHECKERBOARD BAR, Royal Wolfe, Rylei Franks, Gardening Angel CLAYTON FAIRGROUNDS, The Usual Suspects  CLEARWATER RIVER CASINO (208-298-1400), Sara Evans COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, JamShack, Kicho, Sam Amazyan CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, Stagecoach West Band CURLEY’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Ticking Time Bomb  DOWNTOWN SANDPOINT, Summer Sounds feat. The Powell Brothers, Arvid Lundin ENGLISH SETTER BREWING (9286063), Keith J. Milligan  FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT, Montgomery Gentry with Wade Bowen, Chris Weber and Nina Gerber FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Slow Burn  GARLAND STREET FAIR & BLOCK PARTY, Mayfair, Elijah and the Tufnels, Endangered Species, An Dochas, The Bucket List, Karrie O’Neill, Real Life Rockaz GATEWAY MARINA AND RESORT, Shiner  GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Aerosmith with Slash  THE HIVE EVENT CENTER, Ivan Neville, Dumpstaphunk, Taylor Hicks [in place of Dr. John]  THE HOP!, Ashlee Jensen Benefit: Reason for Existence, Zan, Infrablaster, Death By Pirates, Rat Monger IRON HORSE BAR, Johnny Qlueless JOHN’S ALLEY, Sphynx JONES RADIATOR, Shotgun Hodown THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE (3159531), Duke Hogue, Dry & Dusty LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Karrie O’Neill LONE WOLF HARLEY-DAVIDSON (927-7433), The Usual Suspects MAX AT MIRABEAU, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Ramsin, DJ Freaky Fred, DJ Patrick NYNE, DJ C-Mad  THE PHAT HOUSE, World Banditis PICNIC PINES (299-3223), Johnny Cash Tribute feat. Maddy & the Ravinz  RED ROOM LOUNGE, The Nixon Rodeo, Banish the Echo, Drone Epidemic, Beyond Today, DJ D3VIN3 ROCKER ROOM, Krashbox  ROCKET MARKET, Sidhe feat. Michael and Keleren Millham SILVER FOX (208-667-9442), SixStrings n’ Pearls

SWEET OLD BOB’S (534-4843), Parking Lot Party feat. Diminishing Faculties and The Inside Job TRINITY AT CITY BEACH (208-2557558), Truck Mills, Bright Moments UNDERGROUND 15 (290-2122), Flying Mammals THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Echo Elysium WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, Pacific Suns, Cary Fly Band ZOLA, The Bossame

Sunday, 08/17

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Concerts on the Cliff feat. Sara Brown Band BIG BARN BREWING CO. (238-2489), Music on the Lawn feat. Jazz Northwest THE CELLAR, Pat Coast CDACASINO, Kosh, Echo Elysium  COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, Atomic Jive CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, PJ Destiny CURLEY’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church  THE HOP!, Chimaira, The Plot in You, Allegaeon, Upon this Dawning, Silence the Messenger, Cold Blooded, Raised by Wolves JOHN’S ALLEY, Bill McGee Blues Band  KELLY’S IRISH PUB, Songwriter Sundays with the Flying Mammals  MOOTSY’S, Losing Skin, He Whose Ox Is Gored, ZAN, Rot Monger WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, Chris Lucas ZOLA, Son of Brad

Monday, 08/18

 THE BIG DIPPER, The Bob Curnow Big Band  CALYPSOS, Open Mic CHECKERBOARD BAR, Robber’s Roost EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills JOHN’S ALLEY, Bill McGee Blues Band  RICO’S (332-6566), Open Mic SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, DJ Q ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 08/19

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, The Rub  THE BARTLETT, Open Mic BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE CELLAR, Ron Criscione CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN (208-292-4813), Kosh FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills  THE HOP!, Corrosion of Conformity, Morbid Inc, Undercard, Rasputin JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Open-ness THE PHAT HOUSE, Open Bebop Jam  ROCKET MARKET, Scott & Pete TRINITY AT CITY BEACH, Tuesdays with Ray Allen ZOLA, The Bucket List

Wednesday, 08/20 219 LOUNGE (208-263-9934), Truck Mills  THE BARTLETT, Black Kids BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Likes

Girls THE CELLAR, Carli Osika  DOWNTOWN COEUR D’ALENE, Live After 5 feat. The Rhythm Dogs EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho  FOUNTAIN CAFE, Just Plain Darin  THE HOP!, Witchburn, Mercy Brown, Amnija, Children of Atom JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop Jazz  KOOTENAI COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, Dustin Lynch LA ROSA CLUB, Robert Beadling and Friends THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Open Turntables Night with DJ Lydell LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3  MEZZO PAZZO, Ron Criscione

 THE NEST AT KENDALL YARDS, Rock the Nest feat. Folkinception (See story on facing page) PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Holly McGarry  THE PHAT HOUSE, Open Mic QUALITY INN (638-3150), Mark Holt SOULFUL SOUPS, Open mic WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, Nate Ostrander

Coming Up ...

THE BIG DIPPER, Fly Moon Royalty, Flying Spiders, Aug. 22 GLEASON FEST, Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real, Old Man Canyon, the Grizzled Mighty, Tango Alpha Tango and more, Aug. 23

IgnIte the nIght tour

On Sale

Fri 10:00AM

monday oCtober 27 martin Woldson theater at the Fox 1001 w. sprague ave · spokane, wa 8:0pm show · all ages tickets at ticketswest charge By phone 800-325-seat

an evening of stand up comedy with

Anjelah Johnson saturday september 13 martin Woldson theater at the Fox 1001 w. sprague ave spokane, wa 7:30pm show all ages tickets at ticketswest charge By phone 800-325-seat

dave rawlings machine featuring: gillian welch John paul Jones · willie watson paul kowert

tuesday september 23 bing Crosby theater

901 west sprague ave · spokane, wa 7:30pm show · all ages tickets at ticketswest charge By phone 800-325-seat tickets also at Bing crosBy theatre Box office, the spokane arena Box office & the inB performing arts center Box office

and raining Jane Wednesday oCtober 22 inb perForming arts Center 334 w. spokane falls Blvd · spokane, wa 8:00pm show · all ages tickets at ticketswest charge harge By phone 800-325800-325-seat

saturday november 8 inb perForming arts Center

334 w. spokane falls Blvd · spokane, wa 8:00pm show · all ages tickets at ticketswest charge By phone 800-325-seat

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 THE BLIND BUCK • 204 N. Division • 290-6229 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CARLIN BAY RESORT • 14691 Idaho 97, Harrison, • 208-689-3295 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 20 W. Jerry Ln., Worley • 208-263-6971 CONKLING MARINA • 20 W. Jerry Ln, Worley • 208-686-1151 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LIBRARY LOUNGE • 110 E. 4th Ave. •747-3371 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 456-5678 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 THE ROCK BAR • 13921 E. Trent Ave. • 43-3796 ROCKER ROOM • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 ROCKET MARKET • 726 E. 43rd Ave. • 343-2253 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 UNDERGROUND 15 • 15 S. Howard St. • 290-2122 THE VAULT • 120 N. Wall St. • 863-9597 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON • 1914 N. Monroe St. • 474-9040 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 49


INNOVATION ROBOTS!

Robots are the future, just not in the funky, sci-fi way pop culture likes to present. Hear and see for yourself at this weekend’s thinktank event, featuring presentations by respected researchers and innovators from the international robotics community who will cover everything from ethical and social issues to the economics of robots. This symposium isn’t just for super-smart science folk to impress each other with knowledge; attendees can sit in on live pitch sessions, test out Segway scooters and attend a post-fest pub crawl around downtown Coeur d’Alene to mingle with guests. Presentations during the daylong event also will highlight the lesser-known yet growing industry of robotics technology in our own region. — CHEY SCOTT Think Big Festival • Fri, Aug. 15, from 9 am-4:30 pm • $10 • North Idaho College • 1000 W. Garden Ave., CdA • thinkbigfestival.com

COMMUNITY IN IT TOGETHER

Two decades ago, community leaders organized the first annual Unity in the Community multicultural celebration as a way to overcome ethnic fragmentation across the Spokane area. Since then, the summertime celebration of diversity, inclusion and equity has grown to involve hundreds of local sponsors, volunteers and vendors, and thousands of attendees. Aside from providing an outlet for Inland Northwest groups to showcase their cultural heritage through performances, displays and interactive events, UIC also offers a back-to-school supply giveaway that organizers hope benefits as many as 1,000 local children this year. — CHEY SCOTT 20th Annual Unity in the Community • Sat, Aug. 16, from 10 am-4 pm • Free • Riverfront Park • 507 N. Howard • nwunity.org

50 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014

COMMUNITY BLOCK IT OFF

The Garland District Street Fair is back for the 12th time this weekend with vendor booths, food trucks, beer gardens and kids’ activities. New this year is a farmers market starting at 10 am. The music lineup includes everything from reggae to Irish: Mayfair, Elijah and the Tufnels, Endangered Species, An Dochas, Darin Hilderbrand, Karrie O’Neill and Real Life Rockaz. Closing the evening is the annual Runway Renegades fashion show, showcasing six local fashion designers and their crews of hair and makeup artists, accessories designers, photographers and models. — LAURA JOHNSON Garland Street Fair & Block Party • Sat, Aug. 16, from 10 am-9 pm • Free • 1000 W. Garland • garlanddistrict.com • 216-7312


o 10 PM t M A 1 1 ILY OPEN DA

n o i s s i m d FREE A

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

• Great FooBdooths • 45 Foodnu Items • 225 Me

August 27 September 1

$3 BITES

offered DAILY! 3-5 PM and 9-10 PM

BENEFIT TEEING OFF FOR CANCER

Watching golf doesn’t need to involve a couch and remote. Professional golfers like Spokane native Alex Prugh (pictured) paired with local athletes and coaches, along with ESPN personalities, will tee off together for a 9-hole exhibition right here in the Inland Northwest. The best part? Your ticket to watch them helps the newly formed Community Cancer Fund and the V Foundation provide local cancer prevention and screening programs, as well as support for local cancer patients and their families. Clinics and activities with professional golfers take place before the Showcase begins, and an interactive Nike Golf demo center and Fan Zone let attendees work on their swing. — FRANNY WRIGHT The Showcase • Mon, Aug. 18; events starting at 9 am • $20/general; $150/VIP • Coeur d’Alene Resort Golf Course • 900 S. Floating Green Dr. • showcasegolf.com

s ge Garden s a r e v e B lt • 3 Adu e Concerts on 3 Stage • 100 Freg over a measly $9.95 • Nothin

2014

You’ll never eat it all!

Riverfront Park • Spokane, WA

Men in the Making Civilized Animal Cary Fly Big Mumbo Blues Band Spokane Songwriters Org. Jim Boyd Band Ayron Jones and the Way Big Red Barn Chance McKinney Gatorloops Hoodoo Udu Jeff Aker Laura Love & Big Bad Gina Los Lobos Milonga Miss B. Havers Cedar & Boyer Monarch Mountain Band Peter Rivera & Celebrate Pine League Rail

FREE Concerts include Randy Hansen Robb Boatsman & Rampage Sherfey & Acuff The Cronkites The Hollers Willie Nile Yesterday’s Cake Zoe Muth & The Lost High Rollers Jonathan Jackson + Enation Too Slim & The Taildraggers Sammy Eubanks Steven King Laffin Bones Yellow Dog Kari Marguerite Hot Club of Spokane Silver Treason

Blue Canoe DBC Band Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve Pages of Harmony Jazz Northwest Big Band Trailer Park Girls Sidetrack Working Spliffs Kathleen Cavender The Dick Frost Magic Show Abe Kenney Karen McCormick Nicole Lewis Ron Greene Cathedral Pearls Big Hair Revolution Angela Marie Project The Camaros

Kozmik DreamZz Atomic Jive Soul Proprietor B-Radicals Bob Weisbeck Butterscotch Blondes Buzz Vineyard Danielle Oliver Flying Spiders Kevin Brown & The Beloved Country Lillies Of The Valley Lyle Morse Mama Doll Spokane Johnny Stanley & Rice Sweet Rebel D Spare Parts Hamish Anderson . . . And many more

Produced with assistance from: Second Harvest Food Bank, The Travelodge, Silhouette Staging and Lighting, Impact Lighting, Electric City, Inc., Pro Sound Audio, Too Far North Talent Booking, KXLY-TV, Eljay Oil Denise Adam, Wild Bill Graphics, Starplex/Crowd Management Services, American On-Site Rental, Spokane Parks and Recreation Department, the staff of Riverfront Park, Spokane Police Department, Spokane Fire Department, Spokane Regional Health District, Washington State Liquor Control Board, Design Spike, Inc., Oxarc and A to Z Rental. Sponsored in part by: SR Media/The Spokesman-Review, Comcast, BATH FITTER of Eastern Washington & North Idaho, Verizon, Inland Northwest Bank, Centurylink, Geico Insurance, Renewal by Andersen, Washington Healthplanfinder, Grant County Tourism Commission, ATM Marketing, Budweiser, No-Li Brewing, KXLY-TV, Eljay Oil and A to Z Rental. 0rganized by: The Six Bridges Arts Association

For a complete list of food booths and bands: 509.921.5579 or

spokanepigout.com BEER TASTES FOR THE TRAIL

We take pride in the Centennial Trail around these parts. You can do your part to keep the North Idaho portion of the path pristine simply by drinking beer. The Ales for the Trail craft brew fest features more than 10 local and regional breweries for your tasting pleasure, all on the grounds of the freshly revamped McEuen Park in Coeur d’Alene. There’s also food on-site and if you ride your bike, you can enter to win prizes. Entry fee includes five 6-ounce samples. — MIKE BOOKEY Ales for the Trail • Sat, Aug. 16, from 1-7 pm • $24/advance, $30/gate • McEuen Park • 420 E. Front St., CdA • northidahocentennialtrail.org

Copyright ©2014 A Burke Event All rights reserved

Looking for the Perfect Tenant for Your Rental Home?

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509.465.9052 | Info@MadisonSpokane.com

AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 51


Advice Goddess I’M WITH STUPOR

AMY ALKON

A close friend has a drinking problem. His wife kicked him out, he lost his job, and he’s been a lousy father to their 1-year-old son. He begged to stay with me (his only single friend) and has been sleeping on my couch for months. Despite my lecturing him a thousand times, he’s still going out and getting wasted — while trying to talk his wife into taking him back. She called to ask how he’s been. I said “pretty good,” though the truth is, I just want him out of my apartment. —Feeling Guilty

No wife, no job, probably no car, and no house — it’s like there’s a country song sleeping on your couch. You have been helping him — helping him stay exactly where he is. Welcome to the dark side of empathy: empathy that backfires, ultimately causing harm. Dr. Barbara Oakley, who studies this “pathological altruism,” explains in a paper that empathy is a knee-jerk emotional response rooted in our fast-responding intuitive thinking system. Empathy jumps right in, shoving us into action. Our slower rational thought system often isn’t consulted, isn’t given the chance to say, “Hey, wait a minute, Bub. Will you maybe be helping a drunk stay a drunk by turning your living room into the Schlitz-Carlton?” Perhaps contributing to your unhelpful empathy was the myth (not supported by science) that addiction is a “disease,” a condition that, like multiple sclerosis or Parkinson’s, people are powerless to overcome. Sociologist Lee Robins first dispelled this disease myth with her 1974 research on heroin-addicted Vietnam vets. Robins found that one-fifth of the American soldiers in Vietnam had become addicted to the heroin or other narcotics they used to escape the horrors and lack of control they experienced while over there. Yet eight months to a year after returning home, about 10 percent had used opiates, and less than 1 percent were still addicted. What made the difference was no longer needing to escape. Outside a war zone, addiction is adult baby behavior. As clinical psychologist Dr. Frederick Woolverton explains in “Unhooked,” addiction involves ducking into a substance or activity to avoid experiencing uncomfortable emotions that are a normal part of adult life. Take a new father’s feelings about the ginormous responsibility ahead of him. Understandably scary. But rather than try to figure things out, your friend resorts to child abandonment in liquid form — instead of running away, floating away: clinging to that worm in the tequila bottle like a rat on driftwood. You can’t lecture a guy out of addiction. To overcome one, a person needs to realize that it “interferes with their deepest values or goals,” explains addiction expert Dr. Stanton Peele in “Recover!” Peele gives the example of Phil, a lifelong smoker who’d made numerous failed attempts to quit. After a heart attack, Phil woke up in the hospital longing for a smoke. His daughter said that if he had another cigarette, he’d never see her again. That moment was the end of Phil’s smoking. Peele notes that “Phil’s core life” was about being a father, not a smoker. When forced to choose, smoking got tossed fast. Peele says that even someone who isn’t a therapist — you, for example — can remind an addict of what he values through “Motivational Interviewing,” a sympathetic, nonconfrontational questioning technique Peele details in “7 Tools to Beat Addiction.” First, draw out what matters to the person — in your friend’s case, maybe how it felt to have a child born, what he wants for his son, etc. Then, gently inquire about how his goals and dreams square with his current life. Don’t push; if he’s resistant, pull back. Your job is simply asking questions, not judging or criticizing. By getting him to recognize the discrepancies between what he wants and what he’s doing, you’re getting him to do the math: that he needs to make some changes if he wants more out of life than cirrhosis. It’s also time for some healthy kindness — the sort that feels bad in the moment but, in the long run, may get him on the road to contributing to a college fund (beyond the one for his bartender’s kids). Give him some deadlines. First, he has to tell his wife the truth, or you’ll at least tell her you weren’t completely honest. Next, inform him that your apartment is retiring from its stint as the Motel 6-Pack. Give him a move-out date, and be prepared to stick to it. Remember, your being cruelly kind is his best shot at getting a handle on more than the sides of your toilet bowl. It’s also your best shot at charming a woman into bed without the added challenge of explaining the guy in your living room who can’t figure out whether to hit on your plant or vomit into it.  ©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

52 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

DINNER UNDER THE STARS Shared Harvest Community Garden hosts its annual dinner fundraiser, featuring a Fiesta Theme with food from Cafe Carambola. Proceeds benefit the garden, event also includes a silent auction from 6-8, with dinner will be from 7-9 pm. Aug. 16, 6-9 pm. $25. Shared Harvest Community Garden, 1004 E. Foster Ave. sharedharvestgarden.org (208755-3320)

COMEDY

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. bluznews.com (483-7300) EXPEDITION A fast-paced improvised comedy show, rated for all ages. Fridays all summer, through Aug. 29, at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) KIP ATTAWAY A special comedy night concert in a dinner theater format with optional dinner served at 7 pm. Aug. 15, 8:30-11 pm. $15, reservations recommended. Doc Holiday’s Saloon, 9510 Government Way. docholidayssaloonandgrill.com (208-449-1562) OPEN MIC COMEDY Live stand-up comedy, open to newcomers and experienced comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. (475-6209) PHIL THE MIKE Improv comedy show featuring Phillip Kopczynski and Michael Glatzmaier, with a monologue

based on a suggestion, songs based on the monologue and scenes based on the song. Repeat. Aug. 15, 10-11:15 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) RED LIGHT COMEDY SHOW Live, local comedians perform. Aug. 15, 9 pm. Checkerboard Bar, 1716 E. Sprague Ave. checkerboardbar.com (509-535-4007) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Not rated.) Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) LIVE COMEDY Live stand-up comedy shows. Sundays at 9 pm. Goodtymes, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070) OPEN MIC COMEDY Wednesdays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Brooklyn Deli & Lounge, 122 S. Monroe St. brooklyndelispokane.com (835-4177)

COMMUNITY

SECOND HARVEST FOOD SORTING Join other volunteers to sort and pack produce and other bulk food items for delivery to local emergency food outlets. Ages 14+. Shift dates and times vary, sign up at inland.volunteerhub. com/events. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. 2-harvest.org (252-6267) WOMEN & CHILDREN’S FREE RESTAURANT VOLUNTEERS Volunteers are needed as prep cooks, servers, dishwashers, food platers and to work various other shifts during the week, MonFri. Positions are weekly or biweekly, and a food handlers card is required. Submit a volunteer application online.

wcfrspokane.org (324-1995) GOODGUYS 13TH GREAT NW NATIONALS An annual outdoor auto show, feat. 1,500+ hot rods, customs, classics, muscle cars, trucks and more, from 1972 or older. Also includes vendors, swap meet, live music, kids’ activities and more. Aug. 15-17, Fri-Sat from 8 am-5 pm, Sun from 8 am-3 pm. $6-$15. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. good-guys. com (509-477-1766) TEEN POOL PARTIES Offering music, basketball and volleyball with food and beverages for purchase. Open to all teens ages 13-18. Aug. 15 and 18, from 7-9 pm. $2. Hillyard Aquatic Center, 3000 E. Columbia Ave. beta.spokanecity.org/recreation/aquatics (363-5415) FOURTH ANNUAL MUTT STRUT The fourth annual doggie “dress-up” fundraiser walk hosts local pet vendors, adoptable pets, a silent auction and more; and is held in memory of local animal advocate Chris Anderlik. Proceeds benefit Higher Ground Animal Sanctuary. Aug. 16, 8 am-1 pm. Pawpular Companions Pet Supplies, 21950 E. Country Vista Dr. #100. pawpularcompanions.com (509-927-8890) STRIDE FOR STRONG BONES The fourth annual osteoporosis awareness 5K walk/run also features a raffle, bone screenings and educational information and presentations. Aug. 16, 9 am. $15$25. Waterfront Park, 1386 S. Lefevre St. wastrongbones.org (953-9924) SMAC PICNIC FT. JOE PAKOOTAS Spokane Moves to Amend the Constitution hosts a community picnic, hosting 5th Congressional District candidate Joe

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Pakootas. Aug. 17, 3-7 pm. Free. Glover Field, 216 N. Cedar St. (844-1776) CULTIVATE SPOKANE SALON SERIES An informal monthly event for people active in Spokane’s arts, culture and creative industries to meet up and share, learn and connect. August’s theme is “Let’s Put On a Show”, an arts events how-to session about permitting, licensing, and more from City permitting, Liquor Control Board, and local arts presenters. Aug. 19, 6-7:30 pm. Free. Details and location TBA; check facebook.com/spokanearts or spokanearts.org. (321-9614) NORTH IDAHO FAIR & RODEO The annual community fair and rodeo celebrates Kootenai County’s 150th anniversary, and features competitive agricultural exhibits, food, live music, rodeo, a demolition derby and more. Aug. 20-24, gates open at 9 am daily. $7-$9; parking $3 kids 5 and under free. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. northidahofair.com (208-765-4969) FOURTH FRIDAY PUB PEDDLERS Group cycling ride, making a few stops along the way to a final destination. Meets at 7 pm, departs at 8 pm. Free. Swamp Tavern, 1904 W. Fifth Ave. (251-2107) PAJAMA DAY AT MOBIUS Wear your favorite pajamas to the children’s museum and create some fun nighttime crafts in the “Out of Hand Art Studio.” The first 125 children receive a book light from Avista. Aug. 22, 10 am-5 pm. Free with admission. Mobius Kids, 808 W. Main Ave. mobiusspokane.org (509-624-5437) RUN TO THE PARTY Event previewing the upcoming “Glow in the Park” 5K fun run, with a quick jog before a glow party at the club. Ages 21+. Aug. 22, 9 pm. Club

412, 412 W. Sprague. tinyurl.com/lhtyw42 CHILDHOOD CANCER AWARENESS WALK The fifth annual 3-mile walk in Medical Lake includes a barbecue and live entertainment, and is hosted by the Clayton Schneider Foundation. Sat, Aug. 23, at 10 am. Free, registration required. $15 T-shirts available. Aug. 23, 10 am. Waterfront Park, 1386 S. Lefevre St. facebook.com/theclaytonschneiderfoundation (723-7765) 4TH ANNUAL DOGGIE DIP After the city pools close for the season, they’re open for dogs to take a splash, with proceeds benefiting SpokAnimal and the Spokane Parks & Rec Foundation. Well-mannered dogs must be attended to by an owner and have proof with them of an up-todate rabies vaccination. Aug. 23, 3-5 pm. $10. Comstock Park, 29th and Howard St. spokanimal.org POST FALLS POLICE OPEN HOUSE 4th annual “Cops-n-Kids and Rodders-nMore” open house event, featuring a car show ($10-$15 registration, 9 am day of), emergency vehicle parade and tribute to local first responders, a food drive and family activities. At the Post Falls Police Department, 1717 E. Polston. Aug. 23, 10 am-2 pm. Free. Post Falls, Post Falls. postfallspolice.com FAMILY FUN DAY Second annual event, hosted by American Family Insurance, offering free family activities, including a barbecue, kids’ carnival games, face painting, local pet adoptions and more. Aug. 24, 11 am-3 pm. Free. American Family Insurance, 106 N. Evergreen. (924-4704) PAWS IN THE POOL The third annual event, hosted by Spokane Valley Parks

TM

& Rec, opens up the city pools to local pups. Aug. 24-25; times vary. Pre-registration suggested. Dogs must be at least 6 mos. old and current on vaccines. $5/ dog. Valley Mission Pool, 11123 E. Mission Ave. spokanevalley.org/recreation (6880300) 4TH ANNUAL DOGGIE DIP After the city pools close for the season, they’re open for dogs to take a splash, with proceeds benefiting SpokAnimal and the Spokane Parks & Rec Foundation. Well-mannered dogs must be attended to by an owner and have proof with them of an up-todate rabies vaccination. Aug. 25-27, 5-7 pm. $10. See particpating pool dates at spokanimal.org

FESTIVAL

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July 30th - Aug 24th Wednesday-Saturday at 7:00pm Sunday at 2:00pm Adults: $18 Students/Seniors $16

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BENEWAH COUNTY FAIR This year’s fair theme is “Sew it, Grow it, Show it” and features agricultural displays and competitions, entertainment, food and more. Aug. 13-17. St. Maries, Idaho. benewahcountyfair.com PEND OREILLE COUNTY FAIR Themed “Where the Wild Things Grow,” the fair features traditional events including a rodeo, ag demos, live entertainment and more. Aug. 17-14; Cusick Rodeo Aug. 16 and 17. $6/adults, $2/kids 6-12. Cusick Fairgrounds, 419152 Hwy 20. povn.com/ pocofair (445-1367) RIVERSTONE STREET FAIR Coeur d’Alene’s Riverstone Village hosts a weekly outdoor market and street fair, hosting 200+ vendors of arts and crafts, food, live music, a farmers market and more. Thursdays from 4-9 pm, through Aug. 28. Free. riverstonestreetfair.com (509-703-9345)

Sunday, Aug 17th The Silent Witness: Looking Close From Far Away Rev. Dr. Todd Eklof, UUCS Minister

Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane

4340 W. Ft. Wright Drive 509-325-6383 www.uuspokane.org

Sunday Services

Religious Ed & Childcare

9:15 & 11am

Indoor & Outdoor Car Show Featuring Thousands of Hot Rods, Customs, Classics, Muscle Cars & Trucks Thru ‘72!

AUGUST 15-17

SPOKANE CO. FAIR

& EXPO CENTER

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AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 53 #goodguys


EVENTS | CALENDAR TOTAL FEST XIII 13th annual independent music fest featuring more than 40 bands playing rock, metal, punk, pop, dancey and other rad tunes. Aug. 14-16 in downtown Missoula. TotalFest is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven and community-based event. Bands featured include: Shannon and the Clams, Gaytheist, Kitten Forever, Prizehog, Treasure Fleet, Ol Doris, Ed Schrader’s Music Beat, Pissing Contest, Onbox, Vaz, Chastity Belt, Al Scorch, Mass FM, Boys and more. $50/three day pass. totalfest.org (406-281-1377) GARLAND STREET FAIR & BLOCK PARTYThe 12th annual community arts celebration features 4+ blocks of music, entertainment, vendor booths, food and beverages, along with kids’ art activities and games with the Spokane Art School. New this year is a farmers market, and the event culminates with the Runway Renegades Fashion Show. Aug. 16, 10 am-9 pm. Free. garlanddistrict.com (2167312) GREEN BLUFF PEACH FESTIVAL Juicy peaches are ripe in the orchards and ready for harvest, and many orchards and farms also sell peach cobbler, ice cream, cakes and pies. Festival runs Aug. 16-Sept. 1. Green Bluff Growers, Mead, Wash. greenbluffgrowers.com UNITY IN THE COMMUNITY Themed “20 Years Together,” the region’s largest multicultural celebration celebrates its 20th year and invites families to spend the day enjoying main stage performances, cultural villages, free K-8 school supplies, a job and education fair, interactive children’s center, health fair, music, art, food and more. Aug. 16, 10 am-4 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard St. nwunity. org (444-3088) BONNER COUNTY FAIR 2014 county fair, themed “Welcome to the Land of Awes” includes a rodeo, ag displays, the cowboy boot camp, demolition derby, food, entertainment and more. Aug. 1923. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Ave. co.bonner.id.us/fairgrounds (208-263-8414) AIRWAY HEIGHTS FESTIVAL & CAR SHOW Includes the 31st annual Ford Open Car Show, local food and craft vendors, kids carnival games and activities, the 4th annual watermelon races, 2nd annual “Airway’s Got Talent” and more. Aug. 22-23. Free. Sunset Park, S. King St. cawh.org CLAYTON COMMUNITY FAIR Weekendlong community fair hosting a livestock sale (Sat) and a fire dept, ambulance and Med Star demo (Sun). Aug. 22-23 from 8 am-8 pm, Aug. 24 from 8:30 am-4 pm. $2. Clayton Fairgrounds. claytoncommunityfair.com (276-2444)

GATHERING AT THE FALLS The annual cultural event commemorates gatherings of past generations as a sacred tradition of many Northwest tribes to celebrate the Spokane River’s resources, and to create or renew friendships. Dancers and singers, young and old, come from both near and far to showcase their songs and their dance styles for the community. Aug. 22-24. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard St. facebook.com/RiverfrontParkPowwowSpokane (509-625-6601) NATIONAL LENTIL FESTIVAL The annual celebration of the Palouse’s beloved legume features cooking demos, a parade, fun run, bike ride, food/drink vendors, live entertainment, local vendors, the lentil chili cook-off and more. Aug. 2223. Free admission. Downtown Pullman. lentilfest.com (800-365-6948) MILLWOOD DAZE The 6th annual community festival raises funds for Meals on Wheels Spokane, and includes a fun run, local vendor/nonprofit booths, pancake breakfast, vintage motorcycle show, pet food drive and more. Aug. 23, 8 am-3 pm. Free to attend. Millwood, Wash. mowspokane.org (232-0864)

FILM

AMERICAN MUSTANG Exclusive 1-night screening of the blended documentary/ character-driven narrative, on the wild horses of the American West. Must pre-purchase tickets at tugg.com Aug. 14, 7:30-8:45 pm. $12. AMC River Park Square 20, 808 W. Main. americanmustangthemovie.com (888-262-4386) RIFFTRAX LIVE: GODZILLA The Rifftrax/ MST3K crew are back to riff on the ‘90s remake of the classic monster movie. Aug. 14 at 8 pm, Aug. 19 at 7:30 pm. $12.50. Regal Cinemas Riverstone (CdA) and Regal Cinemas NorthTown, 4750 N. Division. fathomevents.com ROCKET MARKET MOVIES An outdoor movie screening of “How to Train Your Dragon” projected on the side of the market, starts at dusk. Aug. 14. Free. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com (509-343-2253) THE CROODS Outdoor film screening in the park at dusk. Aug. 16. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd., Liberty Lake. pavillionpark.org (509-755-6726) PULP FICTION Screening of the classic (rated R) as part of the Garland’s 2014 Summer Movie series. Aug. 16 at midnight, Aug. 19 at 7 pm and Aug. 21 at 9 pm. $1. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. (327-1050) SATURDAY MARKET CARTOONS The Kenworthy and the Moscow Farmers

Market hosts classic cartoons every Saturday morning from 9 am-noon, June through September. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. (208-882-4127) SOUTH PERRY SUMMER THEATER Outdoor movie screening of “Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure,” at dusk. Aug. 16. Free. The Shop, 924 S. Perry St. (509534-1647) SWIM AND A MOVIE The Spokane County aquatic centers (North and South) host a 2-hour swim followed by a family-friendly screening of “Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs 2” at dusk. Aug. 16, 6 pm. $2-$4. Spokane County Aquatic Centers. spokanecounty.org/parks DOLLAR SUMMER MOVIES Screening sponsored by the Kootenai Alliance for Children and Families. Aug. 19-20, 10 am. $1. Regal Cinemas Riverstone Stadium 14, 2416 Old Mill Loop. (800-326-3264) FOOD FOR THOUGHT FILM SERIES Screening of “Ingredients” hosted by the Moscow Food Co-op. The documentary film features farmers and chefs creating a sustainable food system. Aug. 20, 6:30 pm. $4-$6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) A HARD DAY’S NIGHT A screening of the Beatles’ feature-length film, with restored film and sound, in recognition of its 50th anniversary. Hosted by Spokane Public Radio; also includes a live taping of SPR’s Movies 101. Aug. 20, 6:30 pm. $10. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7404) CHEF A chef who loses his restaurant job starts up a food truck in an effort to reclaim his creative promise, while piecing his estranged family back together. Aug. 21, 7:30-9 pm. $5-$7. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801) FREE MOVIE: MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN Seating is on a first-come basis. Aug. 21, 1:30-3 pm. Free, suggested $1 donation. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org (208-667-1865) ROCKET MARKET MOVIES An outdoor screening of “FernGully,” projected on the side of the market, starts at dusk. Aug. 21. Free. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com (343-2253) SHARKNADO 2: THE SECOND ONE Screening of Syfy’s pulp horror sequel. Aug. 21, 8 pm. At Regal Cinemas NorthTown and Riverstone. fathomevents.com MOVIES IN THE PARK: FROZEN Free showing in the park, with activities and crafts an hour before the film at dusk. Aug. 22. Free. Mirabeau Park Meadows, 13500 Mirabeau Parkway. spokanevalley. org (688-0300)

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FOOD & DRINK

CANNING BASICS: GETTING STARTED Anna Kestell teaches the step-by-step process, covering necessary equipment, safety basics and which food cans well. Aug. 15, 2 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry. spokanelibrary.org (4445385) NO-LI BREWHOUSE TOURS See what goes on behind the scenes and how NoLi’s beer is made. Fridays at 4:30 pm. Free. No-Li Brewhouse, 1003 E. Trent Ave. nolibrewhouse.com (242-2739) SUMMERTIME ROSE, WHITE & BUBBLY A tasting class highlighting crisp, light and dry wines and champagnes. Aug. 15, 7 pm. $20, reservations required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket. com (509-343-2253) VINO WINE TASTING Fri, Aug. 15 tasting feat. Vietti Wines of Piedmont, Italy, from 3-6:30 pm ($15). Sat, Aug. 16 tasting feat. J. Lohr of California, from 2-4:30 pm. Wine also available by-the-glass; tastings include cheese and crackers. Vino!, 222 S. Washington St. vinowine.com (509-838-1229) “WOK TOGETHER” Part of INCA’s “Summer Date Night Series,” a cooking class teaching how to make stir fry using fresh, local ingredients. Aug. 15, 6-8 pm. $75/ pair. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) ALES FOR THE TRAIL Outdoor, local microbrew fest to benefit the North Idaho Centennial Trail Foundation, at the newly renovated McEuen Park. Ticket includes five, 6 oz pours and a stainless steel pint cup. Also features games, food and live music. Aug. 16, 1-7 pm. $24/advance; $30/day of. McEuen Park, 420 E. Front St. tinyurl.com/pjheerm (208-292-1634) BREWSFEST Beer festival featuring 35 beers, 18 breweries, 3 live bands, access to activities on the mountain and more. Aug. 16, 1 pm. $30/$35. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. tinyurl.com/ngwvhh2 (208-783-1111) GARLIC FAIRE An organic wine and food festival where garlic is king. Features live music, gourmet foods, arts and crafts and more. Aug. 16-17, from noon-5 pm each day. $5. China Bend Winery, 3751 Vineyard Way, Kettle Falls. chinabend.com (509-732-6123) SAVORING THE BERRIES Chef Robert Amodei from Sicily Spokane introduces ways to feature berries in a dish rather than as just a garnish. Attendees are encouraged to bring questions about other

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garden edibles. Aug. 16, 10 am. Free, registration requested. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. (456-8038) 1ST ANNUAL LOBSTER BOIL A dinner featuring fresh, live Maine Lobster with live jazz music by the Spokane Jazz Society. Ticket includes wine and beer and a multi-course lobster dinner. Reservations required. Aug. 17, 6-9 pm. $100/person. Clover, 913 E. Sharp Ave. tinyurl.com/ kuudkl4 (487-2937) INLAND NW VEGAN SOCIETY POTLUCK Bring a plant-based (no animal products or honey) dish to share along with an ingredient list, the recipe and your own plates and utensils. Third Sunday of the month (Aug. 17), from 5-7 pm. Donations accepted. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. inveg.org (315-2852) HAPPY HOUR, MARKET STYLE A farm-to-table, tapas-style meal featuring farmers and producers of Kootenai County, with live music, local beer and wine and more. Tickets available at the market only, Wed/Sat. Kids welcome. Aug. 19, 5-7 pm. $15. Hayden Farmets Market, Hwy. 95 and Prairie Ave. kootenaifarmersmarket.org SWEET & SAVORY DESSERTS A cooking class led by Chef Bruce Wing, teaching puff pastry and tart-making techniques. Aug. 20, 5:30 pm. $50. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St, Post Falls. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) NEIGHBORHOOD BARBECUE SERIES Central Lutheran Church hosts weekly neighborhood barbecues every Wednesday at 6 pm, through Aug. 27. Also includes games for all ages after the meal and the chance to get to know your neighbors. Free. Central Lutheran Church, 512 S. Bernard St. (624-9233) HEROES VS. VILLAINS PUB CRAWL Dress as your favorite hero or villain, (real or imagined) and hash it out over drinks at a pub crawl event with prizes, costume contests, games and more. Aug. 23, 6 pm-2 am. $20. Brooklyn Deli & Lounge, 122 S. Monroe St. tinyurl.com/mkadbm8 (362-8162) LAUGHING DOG 9TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY The Sandpoint brewery celebrates its 9th anniversary with a party, live music, barbecue, games and more. Aug. 23, 12-7 pm. Laughing Dog Brewing, 1109 Fontaine Drive. laughingdogbrewing.com (208-263-9222) NO-LI 12: SMALL BATCH FESTIVAL The brewery hosts its second small-batch beer fest, featuring 12 rare beers on tap including barrel-aged, experimental and infused beers, along with food and live music. Limited tickets available. Aug. 23, 12-4 pm. $20-$27. No-Li Brewhouse,

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MUSIC

FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT The 32nd annual, outdoor summer music festival continues, Aug. 14-17. $6-$65. Sandpoint, Idaho. festivalatsandpoint.com THE COFFEY TWINS A 50s and 60sstyle rock-and-roll show in a dinner-theater format. Aug. 15-16. $12/show only; $25/show and dinner. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy 211 off Hwy 2, Newport, Wash. circlemoon.webs.com (208-448-1294) CABARET BY THE LAKE Featuring performances by professional vocalists, including cast members of the CdA Summer Theatre’s current season. Aug. 20, 7:30-9 pm. $20-$30. Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdasummertheatre.com (208-660-2958) FIVE MINUTES OF FAME A monthly open mic (third Wed) for poetry, prose and music. Aug. 20, 6:30 pm. Free. Cafe Bodega, 504 Oak St. fosterscrossingantiques.com/cafe.html (208-263-5911) SPOKANE SYMPHONY SOIREE ON THE EDGE Music Director Eckart Preu and Symphony musicians perform as part of the annual summer concert series at Arbor Crest Wine Cellars Cliff House. Aug. 20 at 7 pm. $20-$40. Arbor Crest Wine Cellars, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) DINNER CONCERT FEAT. BRETT YOUNG Acoustic performance by the Nashville singer/songwriter. Ticket price includes dinner from Chef Joan of Swilly’s, with tableside bar/dinner service during performance. Doors open at 5 pm. Aug. 21, 6:30-8 pm. $48. BellTower, 125 SE Spring St. (509-334-4195) HENRY C. & THE WILLARDS A blues/ rock/Americana concert. Aug. 23, 7:30 pm. $8. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org (509-229-3414) COMMUNITY MUSIC DAY A day of music and fun, with free music lessons for all ages and abilities. Other activities include yard games, face painting, movies, demos, a record sale and more. Aug. 24, 10 am-4 pm. Free. Holy Names Music Center, 3910 W. Custer Dr. (3269516) PLAZA CONCERT SERIES Featuring a performance by the Community Band of the Palouse. The Plaza opens to the public at 5:30 pm with beer, wine and other beverages available. Music starts at 6:30 pm. Aug. 25, 5:30-8 pm. Free. 1912 Center, 412 E. Third, Moscow. 1912center.org (208-669-2249)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

ALOHA RACE SERIES Mountain Gear hosts 5 stand-up paddleboard races on Liberty Lake; race all five for the event’s Hawaiian shirt. Final race Aug. 14 from 6:30-8:30 pm. $15. Liberty Lake Regional Park, 3707 S. Zephyr Rd. tinyurl. com/mekaedl (340-1151) KING OF THE CAGE Mixed martial arts fights. Aug. 14, 7 pm. $20-$50Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S Hwy 95. cdacasino.com (800-523-2467) THURSDAY NIGHT PADDLES The Coeur d’Alene Canoe & Kayak club hosts weekly paddles, open to the public, Thursdays from 5:30-7:30 pm. See website for details. Free. cdacanoekayakclub.com WASHINGTON TRAILS ASSOC. WORK PARTIES Register online to spend a day giving back to trails at Mount Spokane State Park. Projects are to improve trails for all user groups. 24 hrs. of volunteer service on State Park trails earns a Discover Pass. Upcoming work parties: Aug. 14, 16-19, from 8:30 am-3:30 pm. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. wta.org (921-8928) SPOKANE TO SANDPOINT RELAY The 7th annual overnight, team relay starts at the top of Mt. Spokane and ends at the beach in Sandpoint after 200 miles. Open to teams of up to 12 runners. $420/high school team, $840-$1440/ adult runner team. Proceeds benefit local nonprofits. Aug. 15-16. spokanetosandpoint.com (541-633-7174) WACANID RIDE An annual, 6-day, 350-mile bicycle tour taking cyclists on paved roads encircling the Selkirk Mountains of Washington, Canada and Idaho. Aug. 15-20. Departs from Sandpoint. wacanid.org (888-823-2626) COEUR D’ALENE SUP CUP An all-day family event with paddle board races for all ages and abilities, with men’s, women’s and youth divisions; relays and more. Aug. 16, 8 am-3 pm. $45; youth/free. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. tinyurl.com/kwexvva (208-699-3805) FESTIVAL CAMPING PREP Learn how to stay comfortable when camping during an event. Aug. 16, 11 am. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/spokane (509-328-9900) LAKE CITY FLYERS Lake City Flyers is a community cycling group with an emphasis on vintage bicycles and cruisers, and meets monthly in Coeur d’Alene on the third Saturday, from 1-4 pm, with

periodic rides throughout the year. Free. Fort Ground Grill, 705 W. River Ave. bicyclebites.com/lake-city-flyers (208-991-0040) SPOKANE INDIANS VS. TRI-CITY DUST DEVILS Games held daily Aug. 16-18, Sat and Mon at 6:30 pm, Sun at 3:30 pm. $5-$11/single game. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. spokaneindians.com (535-2922) TREE SCHOOL The inaugural conference hosted by the Spokane Conservation District and WSU Spokane Extension offers education for foresters, arborists, small forestland owners and backyard gardeners who want to expand their skills and knowledge. Aug. 16, 8 am-3:30 pm. $50. Spokane Conservation District, 210 N. Havana St. sccd.org/forestry.html (535-7274) WEST FORK LAKE & PEAK HIKE Wetlands, alpine flora and fauna, old growth forests and spectacular vistas await those who embark on this trek to the West Fork Lake in the heart of caribou country near the Canadian border. Aug. 17, 8:30 am-5 pm. Free. Sandpoint. idahoconservation.org (208-265-9565) SPOKANE BADMINTON CLUB Meets Sun from 4:30-7 pm and Wed from 7-10 pm. $6/visit. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. wccc.myspokane.net (448-5694) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS CLUB Pingpong club meets Wed from 6:30-9 pm and Sun from 1:30-4 pm. $2/visit. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac.org (456-3581) WEST PLAINS WUNDERWOMAN TRIATHLON The women-only event includes sprint and Olympic distance courses, and raises awareness for women’s osteoporosis. Also includes free bone-density screenings. Olympic triathlon starts at 7:30 am, sprint distance at 8:15 am. $90-$100/individual, $145-$155/team. Aug. 17. Waterfront Park, 1386 S. Lefevre St, Medical Lake. emdesports.com (953-9924) THE SHOWCASE A celebrity-amateur charity event, presented in partnership with Nike Golf. Featuring professional golfers, including players from the PGA Tour, in a 9-hole golf exhibition. Proceeds from the event benefit the established Community Cancer Fund. Aug. 18, 9 am. $20. Coeur d’Alene Resort Golf Course. showcasegolf.com (509-499-4692) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS Ping-pong club meets Mon and Wed, from 6-9 pm. $3/visit. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. spokanetabletennis.com (768-1780)

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Beyond “Just Say No” How to talk to kids about pot BY KATE GIBBONS

56 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014

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SPOK AN COUN E T READ Y ERS

BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 and Initiative 502). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington State, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor Control Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

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“M

om. It’s legal.” This phrase has likely flown from more than one teenager’s mouth when a parent was trying to talk about drugs since the passage of Initiative 502. Regardless of whether a parent indulges or not, talking to your kids about marijuana became a bit more challenging. While many teens — and younger children — insist that it’s legal, the simple fact is that it isn’t until age 21, and can have adverse developmental consequences for children and teens. To assist parents, the Washington State Department of Social & Health Services partnered with Seattle Children’s Hospital and the Social Development Research Group at the University of Washington to create a guide aimed at preventing underage marijuana use. The guide is thorough — tackling the effects and offering tips for teaching your kids about them, signs of underage use, and advice on how to manage marijuana in a house with

SativaSisters_081414_10H_RR.jpg

users and minors. Here are a few tips to get you started: START EARLY: Some kids try marijuana by age 14, so the guide recommends talking about drugs as early as fourth grade. Be clear about what your family’s expectations are when it comes to marijuana use. POTENTIAL SIDE EFFECTS: Although many say it is “natural,” marijuana is potentially a harmful drug. Teen cannabis use is associated with many health problems: paranoia, anxiety, depression, hallucinations and even permanent decrease in IQ with prolonged use. SIGNS YOUR CHILD IS USING MARIJUANA: Look for differences in your child’s behavior, such as mood changes, carelessness in appearance, and relationship problems with friends or family. You also may see changes in grades, skipping school, loss of interest in


EVENTS | CALENDAR favorite activities, or changes in sleeping and eating habits. YOUR CHILD IS USING MARIJUANA: Keep calm. Communicate your disapproval of the behavior, not the child. If you have properly laid out guidelines, stick to the consequences but leave the door open for problem solving.

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DON’T SAY: YOU CAN DO IT AS LONG AS YOU’RE AT HOME: Studies show that teens who use alcohol at home are more likely to abuse alcohol when not at home. The same holds true for marijuana. YOU USED MARIJUANA, OR USE MARIJUANA: Just like with alcohol, tell your child that it is against the law to use marijuana until they are 21. The teen brain can be harmed by regular marijuana use in ways that the adult brain is not. Using marijuana as a teen increases the likelihood that a person will become addicted to marijuana. n The entire guide is available at learnaboutmarijuanawa. org.

THEATER

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PACIFIC NORTHWEST CAMPING BASICS A presentation highlighting diverse camping opportunities in Washington, Oregon and Idaho, and the essential gear and equipment you’ll need to enjoy them. Aug. 21, 7 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/spokane (509-328-9900) SPRINGDALE MOTORCYCLE RODEO The Springdale Motorcycle Rodeo for 2014 features several new events, live music and more. Aug. 23-24. Springdale, Wash. frontierdaysrodeos.com PRIEST LAKE TRIATHLON Participate as a team or individually in an Olympic- or sprint-distance triathlon. Aug. 23, 8 am. $65-$210. Hill’s Resort, 4777 W. Lakeshore Rd. priestlakerace.com (208-946-9543) THE SLIME RUN An obstacle-course style 5K run/walk during which participants are sprayed with green “slime.” Aug. 23, 10 am. $27-$65. Spokane County Raceway, 750 N. Hayford Rd. theslimerun.com (509-244-3333)

Glass Pipes, Vaporizers, Lighters and Papers

509.919.3467 • Spokanegreenleaf@gmail.com 9107 N. Country Homes Blvd. One Block W. of Division Y, North Spokane WARNING: This product has intoxicating affects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

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CDA SUMMER THEATRE: THE ADDAMS FAMILY CST is the first professional regional theater to produce the new musical comedy, a recent Broadway hit. Through Aug. 24, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm. $49/adults, $42/seniors, $27/kids 12 and younger. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasummertheatre.com THE BOOK OF MORMON The 9-time Tony Award-winning Best Musical from the creators of South Park. Contains Explicit Language. Through Aug. 17, show times vary. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. bestofbroadwayspokane.com THE EMPIRE SINGS FLAT Summer season production of an original, locallywritten Western-themed melodrama. Through Aug. 24, Wed-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $16-$18. Sixth Street Theater, 212 Sixth St., Wallace. sixthstreetmelodrama.com (208-752-8871) LEGALLY BLONDE The 2014 Academy music performance camp production, based on the film and novel by the same name about a sorority girl heading to Harvard. Through Aug. 17, WedSat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM Performance of Shakespeare’s “funniest magical romantic comedy” in collaboration with EWU. Through Aug. 17, Wed-Sun, show times vary. $28/adults; $22/senior, military; $12/students. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. interplayerstheatre.org (455-7529) THE MUSIC MAN Performance of the classic Broadway musical, featuring local cast members of all ages. Aug. 14-16 and Aug. 20-23 at 7:30 pm, also Aug. 16, 23-24 at 1:30 pm. $10-$20. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N Grand Ave,. rtoptheatre.org (509-334-0750) CDA MURDER MYSTERY THEATRE A dinner-theater performance during which characters are introduced, a murder occurs, questions and clues arise, and the audience has a chance to guess who dunnit, and the mystery is eventually solved. Aug. 15 and Aug. 22 from 6-9 pm. $30-$35, reservations suggested. CdA Cellars, 3890 N. Schreiber Way. cdacellars.com (208-664-2336) THE COMPLETE WORKS OF WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE (ABRIDGED) A per-

formance mash-up featuring 37 plays in 97 minutes, by Moscow Art Theatre (Too). Aug. 21-23, at 7:30 pm. $15. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy. org (208-882-4127) QUICK EXIT A comedic play about life, love, religion, death and the things we leave behind. This play was first performed in Sandpoint last year and this reprisal features the show’s original cast. Contains adult content/language. Aug. 22-23, from 7-9 pm. $8-$10. The Pearl Theater, 7160 Ash St, Bonners Ferry. (208-267-7327)

VISUAL ARTS

INSPIRATION: SPOKANE August’s gallery show celebrates Spokane, with art works inspired by and depicting icons, landmarks and features of the area, by regional fine artists. Show runs Aug. 8-Sept. 8, with an artist meet-andgreet Aug. 21 from 5-7 pm. Free. Pacific Flyway Gallery, 409 S. Dishman Mica Rd. pacificflywaygallery.blogspot.com (747-0812) SANDPOINT ARTIST STUDIO TOUR The 11th annual self-guided tour lets the public visit the working studios of North Idaho artists. Aug. 15-17 and Aug. 22-24. Free. arttourdrive.org (800-800-2106) ART & GLASS FEST Annual arts festival featuring 50+ art vendors working in media including glass, painting, sculpture and more. Aug. 16-17 from 11 am-6 pm. Free admission. Arbor Crest Wine Cellars, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. arborcrest. com (509-927-9463) MIDWEEK MONET A class designed to let participants relax over a glass of wine while an experienced local artist gives a step by step introduction to acrylic painting. Offered and Aug. 6, Aug. 20 and Sept. 3 at 5:30 pm. $40/ class. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950)

WORDS

POETRY WORKSHOP Spokane-born poet Thomas Aslin hosts a workshop (Fri, from 1-5 pm and Sat, from 10 am-3 pm) followed by a reading and open mic for students of the workshop at 3:30 pm. Aug. 15-16. $50/workshop; reading/free. Sandpoint Library, 1407 Cedar St. losthorsepress.org (208-255-4410) DAVE GORDON The lay-ordained Zen Buddhist monk signs copies of his book “Into the Light and Shadow” about his near death experience while attempting to climb some of the world’s highest peaks. Aug. 16, noon. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (509-838-0206) SPOKANE POETRY SLAM Competitive performance poetry, in which poets are judged by 5 audience judges, chosen at random; winner gets a $50 prize. Held the third Monday of the month at 8 pm; doors open at 7 pm. $5. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org (747-2174) MALCOM BROOKS The new author shares his debut book, “Painted Horses” set in the mid-century American West. Aug. 19, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s weekly open mic reading series, open to all readers and all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org INLAND EMPIRE WRITERS GUILD Area writers are invited to attend two

special sessions at the group’s monthly meeting. Aug. 20, 6 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (0206) MALCOLM BROOKS The Missoulabased author reads from his latest book “Painted Horses,” a story set in the American West during the mid-20th century. Aug. 21, 7:30 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. bookpeopleofmoscow.com (208-882-2669) CARRIE MAY LUCAS: Signing of “Where Fault Lies,” a book examining the healing process for victims of rape, sexual abuse or domestic violence. Aug. 23, 12-2 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. carriemaylucas.com (838-0206)

ETC.

TANGO NIGHT Argentine Tango dancing every Thursday from 7-10 pm. Beginner’s lesson offered from 7-7:45 pm, dance and practice from 7:45-10 pm. $5. German American Hall, 25 W. Third. tinyurl.com/SpokaneTango (499-1756) GROW YOUR OWN TREE SEEDLINGS Workshop to give landowners and others interested in growing tree seedlings a primer on all of the critical steps to successfully grow tree seedlings for reforestation or similar purposes. Aug. 15. $20. University of Idaho Kootenai County Extension, 1808 N. Third St. (208-446-1680) ST. JOHN’S CATHEDRAL TOURS Guided tours of the cut-stone, English Gothic Revival cathedral designed by Spokanite Harold C. Whitehouse. Tours offered Wed, Fri and Sat from 11 am-2 pm. Free. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. stjohns-cathedral.org (838-4277) TANGO & SALSA DANCING Dance classes. Friday and Saturdays at 7 pm. 7 pm. $5. Satori, 122 S. Monroe. (360-550-5106) THINK BIG FESTIVAL Robotics and technology experts from around the world hosts live pitch sessions, a pub crawl and public forums. Aug. 15, 9 am4:15 pm. $10. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. thinkbigfestival.com (208-769-3300) SPOKANE BALLET STUDIO SUMMER ARTIST SHOWCASE Local dance, artist and music showcase, with proceeds benefiting the Inland Northwest MS Society. Featuring art by Michael Pontieri, Michelle Inman and Scott Martinez; music by Keleren and Michael Millham; and dancing by the Up in Arms Dance Project, Emily Grizzell and Sara Donally. Aug. 15, 7:30 pm. $15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) RUNWAY RENEGADES: Local fashion show as part of the Garland Block Party, featuring designs by: Lynne Blackwood, Deanna Noland, Jen & Jessica Kennedy, Jessica Potuzak, Kadra Evans and Ronnie Ryno. Aug. 16, 8 pm. Free. Garland District. facebook.com/RR.spokane PICKIN’ ON THE PRAIRIE Antiques, home decor, handcrafts and more. Aug. 16-17, from 10 am-4 pm each day. $4 admission. Past Blessings Farm, 8521 N. Orchard Prairie. tinyurl.com/m4ca4yl SET THE STANDARD Bob Alexander, a SAT and ACT test prep expert, and college admissions coach Sharon Alexander, share tips on choosing which tests to take, what colleges look for in an application and more. Aug. 18, 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8350) n

AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 57


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4. “Solve for x” subj. 5. Largest OH airport 6. Communication syst. for the hearing-impaired 7. “The Fugitive” actress Ward 8. Follow closely 9. Pull from the ground 10. Parchment? 11. ____ operandi (methods) 12. Eligible for “The Biggest Loser” 13. Cause to pull over 14. French cup 20. ____ Paulo, Brazil 21. 1960s dance 22. Four, on some clock faces 23. Range part: Abbr. 26. Popeye’s ____’ Pea 27. Zesty taste 28. Wedding band 29. More than sniffle 31. Had way too much of

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I Saw You

Cheers

Cheers

Cheers

Rosauers I saw you at Rosauers on 3rd, July 8, you were behind me at the deil. You ordered strips, then I saw you at the bakery, then at the checkout, but I left before you finished. I saw you looking for me in the parking lot. I tried to find you but couldn’t. If you’re single let’s meet there for lunch.

my word that the lessons I learned will be passed on. I promise no matter the distance, time or other people in our lives that I will always love you. You will always be a hero in the eyes of the people who matter most in your life. Love your dirtybird

serial number, you with the bike and connects to most social media. In the event your bike gets jacked, insurance companies, police. Can use this info, and all of your friends can be notified .(529garage.com) Bike Thieves Suck.

and love. You are so hard working, loyal, respectful and, I might add, devilishly handsome. Thank you for loving me and the kids. I look forward to many more years of big fun. Yours forever, JM

I Miss My Friend and Lover George. Downtown Brewery Wonderful I miss you, our talks, our afternoon loving soul beautiful lady! You say delights. I miss the smell of you you are shy, but you don’t seem and the taste of your skin. I miss shy to me. I try to play the confident logging in to my email and seeing guy when I see you, but I am just as replies from you. For months you shy as you if not worse. I may be were everything I could think of just a couple years older, but we and want and somewhere along have so much in common... You the way I lost you. And myself. I work at a local brewery downtown, never felt the way I felt with you or I stop by only to chat with you; connected in the way I have with because you have so much to tell when you are willing. Maybe we can play some Mario Party or watch a movie, maybe “The Wizzard” sometime soon? You’re not so shy, Put a non-identifying email but super shy biking friend address in your message, like

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Cheers To My Filthy Condor Scooby doo... where are you? Although we haven’t known each other for long, you have made an everlasting impression on my heart and in my life. You changed my outlook on life by restoring my faith in kindness, love and my ability to trust. You are always there for me no matter how far I push you away. When everyone, including my family gave up on me you were there. You are an amazing man, father, son and friend. You have a big heart, a big heart that holds a lot of love and sometimes hurt. At times it can be hard to carry all that weight on your own. You give so much of yourself that sometimes you forget to love and nurture yourself. I love you like I have never loved anyone else. I would give anything to carry even a fraction of the weight you hold in your heart. I know from the bottom of my heart our love will always grow, it may change shape or direction occasionally, but it will always be there. The suffering you sometimes feel is not for nothing. You changed my life and I will pass that kindness on. You showed me things no one else has and you have

you. You became my best friend and my lover. Who cares what our lives, jobs, and intentions were. I just wanted you and to be with you. Please come back to me....

My Prince Has Arrived We got married last August and my world changed forever. It is amazing to find true love in your 50’s but that is just what I did!! You are my prince, my rock, the keeper of my heart, the maker of my dreams. With you I feel loved, cherished, safe, protected, wanted and needed. Our marriage is one of true give and take, a partnership that is based on respect, loyalty, laughter

Cheers To Tipping! I enjoy giving tips! Why complain-- it’s just how we do business. Instead, just go with it and enjoy rewarding people when they’re doing a great job. When a barista is working super fast with 10 people in line, let’s reward that effort. The other day, we went to Baskin Robbins and they had a tip jar out. I had my four-year-old put the dollar in the jar and watched Bernadette V. is this week’s winner of as the teenage the “Say it Sweet” promotion! employee’s eyes lit up. That’s what Send in your CHEERS so you too can it’s all about. be entered to win 1 dozen

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Project 529 Cheers to the Project 529 for Free registration of your bicycle. The free app allows you to take pictures of your bike, receipt,

“Cheers” cupcakes at Celebrations Sweet Boutique. Valid for 30 days. Call to Redeem 509-327-3471 or 509-315-5973

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60 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014

“petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

Jon You continue to amaze me. Since my divorce you have been one of the truest friends a girl could ask for. Listening to me process, holding me when I cried, waiting for my heart to make sense of things. You step back when I need space, reassure me when I’m scared. You give support when I need to conquer something. You help nourish not only my body with amazing food but my soul as well. Your ability to make me laugh astounds me. How is it that we understand each other so well? I’m not sure where this road is leading or how this story will continue....but for now there is an amazing man working behind that meat counter at Huckleberries. Who knew? Open heart. All my love, Joy

2bd,1ba basement Apt. in historic West Central. Free on-site laundry, on bus line,furnished kitchen, dining & livingrm.$425 + deposit. Util. Separate, no pets, smoking. 6883509 or 499-3405 evenings. Equal Housing Opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Law which makes it illegal to advertise any preference to, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for our real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain on discrimination call HUD free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

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My Beautiful Bride To Be I’m sitting on a plane destine for Hawaii with my love. In one week we will exchange vows and you will make me the happiest man in the world. Thank you for everything you have done and for the amazing life together we are about to embark on. I love you cutie bug to the moon and back. Happy Anniversary!! 8-18 Mr. Davis, I can’t believe it has been 2 years since we started dating, and 1 since our totally awesome wedding with the bagpipe music. I am so lucky to have you and your beautiful daughter as a part of my life. You are such a wonderful husband and father. I couldn’t ask for a more humble and loving (and sweetly old fashioned at times). Here’s to many, many more years ahead of us and to the family we will be bringing into this world together. I love you. - Mrs. Davis Train Bridge Art Cheers to the guys that painted the art under the train bridges on 2nd and Maple, downtown. YOU GUYS ROCK! That’s the best art work I have seen in a long time. That is talent that should not go unrecognized. Not to mention it really brightened up that area. Hope they do it more around here. You guys are awesome. Thank you! You’re the Obi-Wan For Me My amazing husband, you had me at, “My favorite Stars Wars movie is The Empire Strikes Back.” You came into my life like a hurricane and this rollercoaster, though often times strange and quirky, is one that I do not wish to get off of. The forces between you and I, we could rule the Universe. I’ll never grow tired of our lazy afternoons, arguing in bed about the ins and outs of time travel and worm holes. Your nerdy enthusiasm and passion for life will forever put a smile on my face. Marrying you guaranteed that I will always have a partner in crime and zombie apocalypse buddy. Cheers to adventure. “I would rather share one lifetime with you than face all the ages of this world alone.” Love, Samantha Lynn Good Samaritan I lost my phone and didn’t know it. August 2 at Airway Heights Wal-Mart got back

“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


Cheers

Jeers

Jeers

to my car and my phone was on my car thanks to whomever found it and returned it. I would be so upset if I lost all of my son’s pictures thank you again!

on the long lawn chair! What the hell?! Were you both on Extacy or something? A bigger boo hiss to the managers who did NOTHING about it while two other shoppers were calling crime check. A SUPER big boo-hiss to those who were taking pictures and posting it to whatever it is you post that kind of crap to. It’s official, our society has gone to hell.

hypocrite and say that I think this section sucks ass! I’m seriously wondering why we feel the need to publicly put down, insult, bash and humiliate one another. Please don’t get me wrong, I am not innocent by ANY means whatsoever, I mean I am writing this right now! And don’t get me wrong, I have caused my fair share of public misbehavior, bad decisions, intentional and unintentional hurt and grief that I cannot undo, all of which I am truly and deeply sorry for... every last bit of it. Unfortunately for those that I have hurt, disappointed and betrayed, maybe, just maybe they are able to find peace and forgiveness, if at all possible, by not only reading this but also knowing that I stew upon all those mishaps a good 22.3 hours a day. Words just don’t fix all the pain and suffering people! The point is this: SCREW JEERS! Although there’s no face behind the writings, someone out there knows, they matter of factly know, its “dedicated” to them. How horrible! Seriously! I know that I would rather be the cause of some spectacular feeling within another rather then the “cherry topper” of someones day.

Jeers Crosswalk Indicators Jeers to the new crosswalk indicators that lead people to believe the countdown timer is how much time they have left to cross the street. Clarification: When the Red Thing starts flashing, do not start to cross. RE: Pajama Pants I’ve been loving reading these comments on wearing pajama pants in public. More often than not, when I see people wearing pajama pants at the store, they’re generally filthy from dragging on the ground. I cringe to think these people might actually wear these same pants to bed. Nobody’s saying you need to put on a suit or cocktail dress to go to Safeway. Sure, there’s times when I’ll wear sweatpants, t-shirt and a baseball hat to run to the store. But I don’t wear pajama pants out in public for the same reason I don’t wear a nightgown, slippers or a bathrobe when I go to the store, it’s SLEEPWEAR!! Seriously, have a little self-respect. Dogs In Hot Cars When will people ever learn? Just a couple days ago, it was 93 degrees and there was a dog left in a minivan with the windows cracked at Shadle center. Not an hour later, I was at Petsmart and there was another minivan parked outside with several dogs inside. People, why don’t you try putting on a fur coat and sitting inside a closed car in 90+ degree weather and see how it feels? As a matter of fact, I think in addition to criminal charges and having your dog taken away, that should be part of your punishment. If you see a dog locked inside a hot car, please call SCRAPS at 477-2532 to report it and don’t leave until help arrives. Library Patron To the wonderful library patron who decided to cut out the article of the library copy of Mother Earth News....I appreciate not being able to turn to page 28-34. I didn’t REALLY need to know how to make natural soughdough bread. Good job making off with an article you could have just photocopied or (gasp) written down! I’m sure no one really needed it, not as much as you! Get A Room A big boo hiss to the fat hicks getting it on at Wall-Mart

Suicide Sucks To anyone who thinks that beautiful park should be named after Isamu L. Jordan. That person, whom I did not know, did not just die last year, he committed suicide. Suicide is a permanent solution to a temporary problem. And depression is treatable! That individual left behind not only family (including his wife and young children) and friends, but apparently affected the community. That’s not very brave. I don’t like to judge and certainly don’t have all the facts but this man should not be represented as a pillar worthy of a park named after him. And The Inlander thought James Glover would be a bad influence! Very discouraging when society thinks suicide is worthy of recognition. Ignore his means of death and focus on his accomplishments? Why? Isamu left us no reason to do so. CrossWALK Not Bike Fast Lane Hey you, yea you speeding down the sidewalk on your bicycle. Did you know you’re breaking laws? Did you know you’re putting yourself and others in danger just to save a couple minutes? When someone on a bicycle rides 30mph through a crosswalk do you really think a car about to turn is going to see you? I have almost hit several people biking because they come shooting down from 4 blocks up speeding through a crosswalk riding on the sidewalk. Am I supposed to feel bad, being at a complete stop about to turn just to inch out and slam on my breaks so I don’t hit you? I’m all for people biking, but it’s these idiots that think they have special “I’m on a bike I have the rights” Portlandia superpowers that enables them to ride however and wherever they want. If there is a bike lane..use it, riding in the middle of the street blocking traffic or down the sidewalk at full speed just makes everyone hate you. If you are crossing through a sidewalk...get off your damn bike. Or at least have the courtesy to check for oncoming traffic before biking across the street. A crossWALK exists for pedestrians to safely cross. Not for bicycles to zip through town and avoid traffic. Fellow Jeers Contributers To all those jeers writers out there, I just wanted to take a moment to be a documented

’S THIS WEEK! S R E W ANS

SUNBLOCK

Bus Haters To be honest, if I had looked into how mad everyone gets at the mention of the Plaza, I would have probably agreed. But now I am 18 years, old, living in a group home so far on the South Hill you cannot tell you near a city at all. So when I go for a walk and I have enough time to explore Spokane, I get some bus passes and I walk for 25 minutes to the bus stop at Freya Street and 55th Avenue, and I ride a city-bus all the way down to the Plaza. I am always happy to see so much diversity on that thing. The Coach-Operators (the drivers) are so nice, they are always a few minutes before schedule, and you get some pretty cool views of Spokane where-ever you go for the most part. If I get a job soon, having just applied for four jobs and having volunteered at the 2nd Harvest, I need this great system of city-busses to get me where I need to go. So seeing so many bus-haters in this Inlander who accuse bussers of being “shady”, or “homeless” or “stupid” or “lazy”, or “having no class”, whatever that is supposed to mean, kindof makes me wonder if a couplethousand of you people might be the only people who are lazy. If you actually get off the dang cellphone while you are creating traffic jams on the freeway 18 miles long, you would see that people literally have to work to find a bus-stop to get to, plan for when the bus comes, and constantly watching the huge 6-lanes-wide road for one dang bus. This is not being lazy, this is being persistent . . . and I do not mean the “I-think-I-love-thissexy-girl-in the-NorthTown-MallI-must-find-out-where-she-lives” kind of persistent. It’s Spayed Not Spaded! I’m constantly amazed how many people make this mistake when referring to getting a cat or dog fixed. You spay a female dog, after it’s done, she’s been spayed, not “spaded.” She was fixed, not shoveled. And male dogs do not get spayed or spaded, they get neutered.

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AUGUST 14, 2013 INLANDER 61 GirlScouts_081414_6HBB_RW_NEW.pdf


YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Home Sweet Everywhere An artifact of Spokane boosterism calls the region “a special place to be.” But that’s only half of the story BY HEIDI GROOVER Taking pride in the Inland Northwest A special place to be Building for tomorrow Making history Growing up together Stronger every day Taking pride in the Inland Northwest Believing all the way

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hose are the opening words to the title track of Taking Pride in the Inland Northwest, a record of eight songs swelling with a completely un-ironic brand of boosterism that promises “the future is now,” “love is our thing” and “there’s no better place to be.” This album came across my Facebook feed after a friend found it at a thrift store, its frowning sepia-tone cover children still wrapped in cellophane. “If anyone knows what led to the creation of this beauty, please share,” he wrote. “This album is my white whale.” From the TV-announcer narration to the big ad for Empire Ford on the back, this discarded artifact is, at worst, an awkward marketing campaign by someone who thought that a vinyl record was the best way to sell Spokane, even in 1991. In a different light, though, it’s a charming reminder of the kind of pride our area has in its own beauty, the way we’re always trying to convince others this really is “a special place to be.” An Internet search shatters that charm. It turns out

62 INLANDER AUGUST 14, 2014

that Impact Broadcast Marketing, the company that partnered with KREM-TV to make the record, takes pride in plenty of other places too: Topeka, Dayton, Portland, Peoria, Maine, Wichita, Cedar Rapids, Nevada, San Antonio, Rochester, Asheville, Omaha, Georgialina, East Tennessee, Central Florida, Four States, Eastern Carolina. Throughout all of these Taking Pride records, with the exception of the narration between tracks, you’ll find the same lyrics in the same songs, only two of which actually mention the place in which they’re taking pride. Taking pride in Topeka A special place to be

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n a track called “This town” (We’ve built a town we can be proud of / Neighbor helping neighbor in the spirit of love), there’s no actual mention of which town. The same goes for “This City’s Moving” (This city’s moving / Right up to the top / This city’s moving / The heartbeat never stops) and “Love Your Lady” (Love your lady / She’s your town / Treat her right / And don’t let her down). In my research, I found people who used to work for the Nashville, Tennessee-based Impact Broadcast Marketing company (which now appears to be nonexistent) and for the studio where the album was recorded, but got few responses. I was handed off to different employees at KREM, but no one seemed to remember the effort. Staff at Visit Spokane and Greater Spokane Incorporated hadn’t heard of the album and didn’t know anyone who

was at those organizations two decades ago. No one, it seemed, would be able to answer my many questions. Yet, even though she hadn’t heard of this album, Visit Spokane Chief Marketing Officer Jeanna Hofmeister wasn’t surprised by it. “Who doesn’t want to be friendly and beautiful and all the things we pride ourselves on being?” Hofmeister says. “Every community wants that.” The songs’ generic vagueness may be exactly their point. “Taking Pride in the Inland Northwest” may be just like taking pride in Topeka or Nevada or Central Florida. Even Spokane’s signature slogan — “Near Nature, Near Perfect,” a mix of natural beauty and urban sophistication — is not so different from other places. The narration on Taking Pride in Topeka describes that city as “capital city; Hometown, USA; the perfect blend of bigcity convenience and small-town friendliness.”

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romotional materials from the ’50s and ’60s proclaim Spokane a “paradise for vacationers” and “sunshine land.” One brochure calling it the “Hospitable Center of the Pacific Northwest Vacationland” promises: “If you have not visited Spokane, you’ll find its ready-made vacation possibilities almost incredible.” A 2009 Visit Spokane video called “This is Our Place” promotes the Fox as “our Carnegie Hall” and Arbor Crest as “our Tuscany.” But over time, the approach has become more realistic. Even those who promote Spokane seem to empathize with those things we’ve all felt: the inferiority complex; justifying our choice to live here; the hard-to-explain strangeness that doesn’t quite rise to the marketable level of the weirdness in a place like Portland. Instead of the perfect destination, the Spokane pitch now is that you’ll be surprised at what you find: craft breweries, a symphony, an Apple store. “We don’t sell ourselves as ‘the nice city’ or that kind of thing,” Hofmeister says. “We try to position this area as unexpectedly cosmopolitan. You’ll find more here than you were expecting.” And that, unlike the sugar-glazed call of “Taking Pride,” may be our best sell yet. n Hear Taking Pride in the Inland Northwest on Inlander.com.


THURSDAY, OCTOBER 2ND 4:00 PM - 8:00 PM

PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE w w w. Sp o k aneFest i valO fHom es.com N Market St

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Lexington Homes | Wasabi Bistro 10801 N Navaho Drive, Spokane

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Up ri v e r

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Harvard Rd

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Spoka

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32nd Ave

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Many homes will feature live music!

Start your tour at ANY of the nine homes in the Festival of Chefs in any area of the city, and visit as many as you’d like.

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Spokane Rive

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n Ha w thor e Rd

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SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

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local wine or beer in various Fall Festival Homes.

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AUGUST 14, 2014 INLANDER 63



Inlander 08/14/2014