Inlander 08/11/2022

Page 1

SURRENDER

COURT ORDERS TO GIVE UP GUNS ARE TRICKY PAGE 10

GRILL LIKE A PRO COMPETING FOR THE RARE PERFECT STEAK PAGE 28 GENERATIONAL VOICE PHOEBE BRIDGERS STOPS AT THE PAVILION PAGE 34

AUGUST 11-17, 2022 | NOURISHING NEWS SINCE 1993

D O D O D O F O D O F O D O F S O T D O F S O R O T D E S F O R S O T D E S E F O R D S O T E D S E F O R D S O T E D F S E O R T D S O D E E S O R S O T D E D S E O R S O T D E D S E R O D S O T E D S E O R D S O T E D ESDERRTSS OEO est w h t r o N land urity c n I e s e n h i t d f f foo ple o o o e s p e g e n h T challe e h t e 16 t PAGE naviga M A NGH IZA BY EL

BILLI

Jolly Ghebreab of West Central’s Jolly Mart


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INSIDE VOL. 29, NO. 44 | COVER PHOTO: YOUNG KWAK

COMMENT NEWS COVER STORY CULTURE

5 10 16 24

FOOD SCREEN MUSIC EVENTS

28 32 34 38

40 I SAW YOU 43 GREEN ZONE BULLETIN BOARD 47

PRESENTED BY: PULLMAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, CITY OF PULLMAN + WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY

August 19-20, 2022 | Pullman, WA Featuring

Tyler Rich

EDITOR’S NOTE

August 20 on the Hometown Chevy Main Stage FREE TO ATTEND!

W

hen you hear the phrase “FOOD DESERT,” you probably imagine areas where it’s hard for community members to access a wide variety of healthy foods. That traditional definition is still in play, but experts have expanded the concept of food deserts to include areas where the community members can’t afford the food options nearby or even just have the perception that they lack access to nutritious food. The Inland Northwest has several areas defined as food deserts, and recent surveys show one-third of Spokane County families face food insecurity. Inlander summer intern Eliza Billingham zeroes in on how one of Spokane’s food deserts, the West Central neighborhood, is trying to make nutritious food accessible to all in our cover story on page 16. Also in this week’s edition, reporter Nate Sanford digs into the issue of weapons being confiscated in domestic violence cases (page 10), Madison Pearson chats with the founder of the Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival before it celebrates its 20th birthday this weekend (page 24), and Carrie Scozzaro delves into just how to judge the perfect, competition-worthy steak (page 28). — DAN NAILEN, editor

IN NEED OF RESCUE PAGE 14

LAKESIDE BLUEGRASS PAGE 24

FARM TO GLASS PAGE 30

PRINCESS DI’S TIME PAGE 33

INLANDER

SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO • INLANDER.COM

1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, SPOKANE, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 | EMAIL: INFO@INLANDER.COM THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. Please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x210 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email frankd@ inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia and is published at least twice per month. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2022, Inland Publications, Inc.

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

Jer McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Dan Nailen (x239)

ARE THERE ANY GROCERY ITEMS YOU’VE STOPPED BUYING DUE TO RISING PRICES? DENISE BARNES

We eat a lot less meat, but part of that is just for health reasons as well. I’m still happy that I’m eating less meat because I wouldn’t want to pay the prices.

EDITOR

Chey Scott (x225) ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Derek Harrison (x248) CREATIVE DIRECTOR Samantha Wohlfeil (x234) BREAKING NEWS EDITOR Daniel Walters (x263) SENIOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER

ASIS ROZALEZ

Yes, meat and things like that.

Seth Sommerfeld (x250) MUSIC & SCREEN EDITOR

Nate Sanford (x282), Carrie Scozzaro (x232) STAFF WRITERS

How often do you grocery shop? Once a week.

Madison Pearson (x218) LISTINGS EDITOR

Chris Frisella Young Kwak, Erick Doxey PHOTOGRAPHERS

INTERNS

Knute Berger, Chase Hutchinson, MaryAnn Johanson, Will Maupin CONTRIBUTORS

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Yes. More hamburger, less high-end beef.

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Have any items you usually buy been hard to find? Yes, and I even shop at Walmart and WinCo, and there’s big vacancies on the shelves in both places.

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INTERVIEWS BY LAUREN RODDIS 8/5/2022, SPOKANE PUBLIC LIBRARY – LIBERTY PARK

AUGUST 11, 2022 INLANDER 5


COMMENT | HISTORY The Lands Executive Council Amanda PaDirector rrish NT TO THE

SUPPLEME

GIVE GUIDE

INLANDER

IN

COUNT US WS COME TO COUNTING CRO

76 TOWN PAGE

ED? YOU VAXX EEK WE ASK LOCAL

LEADERS TO FESS

UP PAGE 10

TREW NTHE URAOUT PAGE 70 STA RE LATE TO GET IT’S NOT TOO

AUGUST 26, 2021

EMB AUGUST 26 - SEPT

ER 1, 2021 | FAMILY

ITY FOCUSED. OWNED. COMMUN

In 1923, the Ku Klux Klan was so widespread in Washington, they were a featured part of the Dayton Days parade. WASHINGTON STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY PHOTO

GIVE GUIDE 21

The Mean Decade

GIVE GUIDE

History seems to repeating itself between the Roaring 1920s and whatever it is the 2020s will be remembered for

the people Celebrating ference in making a dif Northwest the Inland SECTION SPECIAL PUL

LOUT

G iv e G ui de

BY KNUTE BERGER

sa, Jennyfer Me s Latino founder of kane En Spo

SUPPLEMENT

ON STANDS AUGUST

25

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GET YOUR NON-PROFIT NOTICED! Reserve your Give Guide listing by August 18th advertising@inlander.com

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TO THE INLA

NDER

T

he end of the 1918 influenza pandemic in the early 1920s ushered in a rough, reactionary period in America. People were frustrated by war, inflation and pandemic restrictions. Pent-up resentments with a rapidly changing society let loose as flu masks flew off and quarantines ended. The Jazz Age was flourishing, thanks in part to new Prohibition laws. In Seattle, the so-called Jackson Street nightclub and speakeasy scene took off, spreading from Pioneer Square to the Central District and eventually birthing more than a generation of great music and musicians. But while the races exuberantly mixed in the after-midnight hours at clubs like the Black and Tan, nationally — and locally — reactionary racial politics took hold. By day, the segregating redlines in the city were steadfast and racist covenants spread. Politically, the white middle class yearned for “normalcy,” which brought a sequence of conservative Republican presidents, including Calvin Coolidge, Warren G. Harding and Herbert Hoover, all of whom carried Washington state. But “normalcy” for many people meant a return to aggressive white supremacy. In some cases, Washington state led the way.

T

he Ku Klux Klan revived in the ’20s. Once mostly limited to the South, it found new enthusiasts in the white middle class of the far West and Midwest. The KKK took over towns and statehouses, including for a time Oregon’s. Anti-Black, anti-Semitic, antiCatholic and anti-modernity, the Klan became a powerful force that paraded openly in the streets and rallied tens of thousands of people to witness

late-night cross burnings in places like Issaquah, Yakima and Renton. Some events attracted 30,000 or more people. Seattle author Timothy Egan has written a book about the 1920s Klan revival, A Fever in the Heartland, due out next spring. Some 5 million Americans joined the 1920s KKK. In 1924, the Democratic delegations from Washington, Oregon and Idaho together unanimously opposed a plank in the party’s platform that would repudiate Klan violence. New anti-immigration laws targeting Asians were passed to keep America white. The Northwest had been founded on race-based policies that impacted who could settle here and who could homestead. In 1921, the Washington Legislature passed the first law since statehood aimed at cracking down on Japanese immigrants by revoking their right to lease or rent land. A Washington congressman, Albert Johnson, shepherded a bill through Congress, the Immigration Act of 1924, that essentially halted all Asian immigration. Johnson called it a “bulwark against alien blood.” These kinds of bills had strong support from both the KKK and the general public. The year of the immigration act also saw the election of a conservative Republican governor in Washington, Roland Hartley, an Everett politician and timberman who broke with the progressive wing of the GOP. Historian Dave M. Buerge has written, “The 1924 campaign was a particularly grotesque one in Washington politics, with the Ku Klux Klan fomenting hatred against Blacks, foreigners, Jews, and Catholics. Government intervention in private life during the war had fostered a backlash.”


Hartley capitalized. He was anti-labor, anti-tax and anti-government when he couldn’t control it with his autocratic ways. He slashed funding for the state highway department and for public schools, and he almost drove the University of Washington into the ground by cutting its budgets and seizing control of its board of regents. He bullied and name-called his enemies, though I’m not sure anyone today would be insulted by being called a “pusillanimous blatherskite.” Not only was Washington a leader in opposing nonwhite immigration and hounding people of color with legal restrictions and burning crosses, it was also an early adopter in 1909 of eugenics laws that took “choice” away from some Americans by installing a system of involuntary sterilizations. In 1921, the state Legislature took an even harsher stand against the “unfit” with a broadened list of who could be forcibly sterilized, including the “feeble-minded, insane, epileptic, habitual criminals, moral degenerates, and sexual perverts.” Such laws received U.S. Supreme Court sanction under the Buck v. Bell decision of 1927 when Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes infamously declared that “three generations of imbeciles is enough” to justify sterilizing women — as it turned out, mostly poor Black women. Nearly 700 Washingtonians were sterilized under state law until the practice ended here in the 1940s. More than 2,600 in Oregon were sterilized until the early 1980s.

In 1921, the state Legislature took an even harsher stand against the ‘unfit’ with a broadened list of who could be forcibly sterilized.

O

f the 1920s, Egan has written, “That was a mean decade, with Jim Crow locked in place, Prohibition the law of the land and immigrants who weren’t white Protestants all but locked out. The underlying theme of all this meanness is intolerance.” That was in a prescient 2021 New York Times column about our current state, called “America Is Getting Meaner.” Things have gotten even meaner since. We’re emerging from the jagged end of our own pandemic — doffing our masks even as an average of 250 Americans continue to die each week, adding to a growing total of 1,010,000 dead. Meanwhile we’re just beginning to learn about the impacts of long COVID. History is rhyming hard as we enter the 2020s with the pandemic shifting into the background for many Americans. We’re facing an altered world and people who want to change it even more radically, some wanting to turn the clock back to earlier centuries. The Supreme Court’s recent decision to overturn Roe v. Wade, for instance, runs strongly against public sentiment and takes away a constitutional right established a half-century ago. Justice Clarence Thomas and Republican activists who seek to roll back same-sex marriage and contraception threaten more rights and norms. We’re not only seeing the acolytes of intolerance in the streets but running some of our institutions as well, including the present Supreme Court. Congress’ Jan. 6 committee hearings are also revealing how many elected officials — including the committee’s own congressional colleagues — are willing to discard the will of the voters for violence if they don’t get their way, led by the former president of the United States who has amped everyone up on a lie. The Roaring ’20s got a nickname that suggested thrills and wild times, including running us into the Great Depression. In this century, we’re making a good effort to be dubbed “The Mean Decade.” Let’s hope we stop trying to earn that title. n Knute Berger is editor-at-large at Crosscut, where this article first appeared. Visit crosscut.com.

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

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The cooling center at Camp Hope has fans, water misters and space for 150 people. NATE SANFORD PHOTO

Readers respond to an article on Inlander. com about the Camp Hope cooling shelter that city officials wanted to remove (8/1/22):

KRISTY WHITE: The City of Spokane leadership should be ashamed. GLEN MOWBRAY: Spokane city government is a waste of tax money period. They should go run Idabama next door. TOM SANDERSON: Nadine should start emptying her office cubicle STACY GARRY: You mean taxpayers are getting fined. n


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UNARMED Spokane cops have taken in a record-breaking number of guns this year; here’s the story of three of them BY NATE SANFORD

J

esse L. Jones loves guns. Rifles. Handguns. Shotguns. His ex-girlfriend tells the court that Jones has bragged to her about storing more than 30 of them in a secret underground bunker. “Hahaha i don’t f--- around,” Jones says of the bunker in a text message entered as evidence. It’s June 7, and Jones, 39, is in Spokane County District Court as part of a domestic violence protection order brought by his ex-girlfriend. In February, the court found that Jones presented a credible threat of harm and ordered him to surrender all of his guns to law enforcement. The case has been dragging on ever since. The problem: Jones says he doesn’t have guns anymore. Sure, he used to have a bunch of guns, but Jones claims to have given them all away before the protection order went out. Debra Hayes, the presiding judge, doesn’t buy it. “Jesse has made consistent statements about one thing: He has guns, and he loves his firearms,” Hayes says from the bench.

For months now, Jones and the court have been locked in a holding pattern. The court will issue an order to surrender weapons, and Jones will sign a declaration saying he doesn’t have any. Then the court will point to evidence submitted by Jones’ ex-partner that appears to indicate otherwise, issue a finding of noncompliance and schedule another hearing. Rinse and repeat. After months of back and forth, Hayes is putting her foot down. Jones, a Post Falls resident, has avoided giving the court a list of who he supposedly gave his guns to, and Hayes says there’s ample evidence to suggest he isn’t being honest. He’s also facing two criminal charges for allegedly violating the protection order. She charges Jones with direct contempt for giving false statements and failing to comply with the surrender order. He’s sentenced to 30 days in jail. A few years ago, Jones probably wouldn’t have gotten in so much trouble.

P

eople in other Washington jurisdictions have seen contempt charges for failing to comply with weapon surrender orders before, but Jones appears to be the first in Washington to actually see jail time for it. That’s according to Amie Simeral, a firearms investigative analyst who works closely with the Spokane Police Department to follow up on surrender orders and make sure people are complying when ordered to turn in weapons. Simeral says it’s not uncommon for people facing firearm surrender orders to lie and say they don’t have any. The contempt charge is a big deal, she says, and a sign that the courts are cracking down and taking firearm surrender orders more seriously. “Now that Judge Hayes has laid that foundation, I think a lot of people will follow that lead, now that they know that’s an actual consequence,” Simeral says. Noncompliance with firearm surrender orders is a longstanding issue. Washington passed legislation in 2014 requiring people served with

Spokane law enforcement took in 1,015 guns in the first half of 2022.

10 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2022


protection orders for things like domestic violence to surrender their guns to law enforcement, but the original law lacked clear enforcement and implementation tools. In recent years, reforms and training have significantly improved compliance rates. Washington House Bill 1320 and its companion HB 1901, which went into effect July 1, are intended to further strengthen the process and make protection orders easier for victims to navigate. “With the recent reforms, the 1320 and 1901, we would anticipate to be seeing more of the kinds of cases where there are contempt hearings and really holding people accountable to make sure that firearms either are removed or have been sufficiently documented,” says Renee Hopkins, CEO for the Alliance for Gun Responsibility. The text of HB 1320 notes that, when an abusive partner has access to a gun, a victim is 11 times more likely to be killed. In the first half of this year, law enforcement in Spokane County took in 1,015 guns. That’s a 48 percent increase from the same period in 2021 and a 35 percent increase over 2020, which was an all-time high. Sgt. Jordan Ferguson, head of the Spokane Police Department’s domestic violence unit, says 44 percent of those guns came from domestic violence and court-ordered surrender. That’s up from 37 percent in 2021 and 31 percent in 2020. In 2017, just 15 percent of guns came from domestic violencerelated surrender orders.

O

n June 13, the jail made a mistake and released Jones prematurely after he posted bond on several pending, unrelated charges. Three days later, Jones invited the Inlander to tour his underground bunker. While the protection order was filed in Spokane, Jones lives in Post Falls. It’s made things complicated. Spokane police aren’t able to cross state lines to search his house. Jones says he got his first gun when he was 7. It was a .22, a gift from his grandfather. After spending almost all of his life with at least one gun at his side, Jones said going unarmed — as he claims to have done for months — is terrifying. Every bump in the night could be a potential intruder. He said he started sleeping with a cake knife under the mattress. In text messages entered as evidence, Jones told his ex-partner the bunker has 1-inch-thick steel doors and gun ports in case the “zombies come or the chinese invaid.” The Inlander followed Jones as he pulled aside a tool cabinet and ducked through a 4-foot-tall hole cut into the foundation of his house. What’s immediately clear is that the steel doors with gun ports Jones bragged about in text messages don’t exist in this bunker. The door is plywood. It was just a dumb joke, Jones said. There weren’t any guns visible in the bunker, but there were several replicas that Jones welded himself with scrap metal. Jones explained that the bunker is mainly used to store valuables. He mentioned concern about the ATF — the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, a government agency famously unpopular with firearm enthusiasts. This is the second protection order Jones has been subject to. The first was filed by the same ex-partner in fall 2021 and expired in December. Jones claimed to have given all his guns to his brother before the first protection order. Jones also denied ever telling his ex-girlfriend that he owned more than 30 guns. At most, there may have been a time when there were 20 in his house, he said, but most of them were owned by parents or friends and just on loan. There’s no central registry of firearm ownership in America. Jones scoffs at the idea, but without one, it’s hard for the court to verify who owns which guns. The chain of ownership for many of the guns Jones describes is messy. They’re traded around, given as birthday gifts, loaned and pawned. That transitory relationship with firearms is part of what’s made this case such a headache for everyone involved. In March, Jones’ brother surrendered two guns to law enforcement on Jones’ behalf, but there was confusion about whether or not they belonged to Jones or Jones’ brother. ...continued on next page

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n the day Jones was bonded out of jail, three more guns were surrendered on his behalf: a Winchester 12-gauge shotgun, a Ruger P94 .40-caliber handgun and a Ruger SR9 semi-automatic pistol. On June 24, Jones was back in court with a new lawyer, Sarah Freedman. Jones was apologetic and told Judge Hayes he’d never lied to the court but admitted to not always giving the complete truth either. He claimed that all of the guns had actually been taken from him in the fall by family members who were concerned about his well being. Jones said he didn’t tell the court about it earlier because of the stigma that

surrounds mental health. Hayes was sympathetic, but said it’s still clear that Jones was lying to the court about his guns earlier. The court has a video of him shooting targets in January 2022. Hayes issued a new sanction of 15 days in jail. “I think that a lot of time has passed where you could have been honest about where the firearms were,” Hayes said. “That’s really all I asked you to do.” The three guns submitted on the day Jones was bonded out satisfied the court’s order. Hayes said she knows Jones’s ex-partner thinks Jones has other guns, but that the court


can only go after the ones they have evidence of. Rachel Hills, Jones’ ex-partner, tells the Inlander that the 4½ months it took to get to the bottom of the weapons surrender order have been exhausting and emotionally draining. While she’s glad to see things finally end, she worries that Jones still has access to guns. She recalls him talking about owning others but doesn’t have enough information to prove their existence to the court. “My concern isn’t even solely for my own personal safety; it’s for his and everybody around him,” Hills says. As Jones left the courtroom, Hills spoke up and said Jones had lied again in the process of explaining himself. But Jones was already out the door. Hayes told Hills that if she sees Jones with guns again, she has to call 911 and protect herself. Hills said she still can’t turn her wrist because of an April incident in which Jones allegedly tried to push her out of a moving car. Freedman, Jones’ lawyer, tried to reassure Jones’ ex-partner by saying that Jones is required to wear a body camera at all times as part of their client contract. If there are allegations of future violations, they’ll be able to check the footage, Freedman said. Freedman tells the Inlander that her client no longer possesses weapons and hasn’t possessed any since the protection order went out. Jones is currently facing criminal charges for two alleged violations of the protection order. Freedman says she is planning to file a motion to reverse the protection order altogether. If that happens, the charges will be dropped, and Jones will no longer be barred from coming into contact with Hills. He will also be allowed to own guns again. Before she tries to reverse the protection order, Freedman is appealing to the Spokane County Superior Court to try to get Hayes herself removed from the case because of alleged procedural issues and bias on the part of Hayes. A status conference in Jones, Jesse Lynn v. Judge Debra Hayes is set for later this month. n nates@inlander.com

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NEWS | PETS

Haven for Animals, but What About Staff? Whitman County Humane Society staff have quit amid overtime issues and a poor relationship with the board BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

A

s of this week, due to the resignation of nearly the entire staff, the only animals remaining at the Whitman County Humane Society’s AnimalHaven shelter in Pullman were a few stray dogs going through the legal wait time to be picked up by their owner before being adopted out to someone else. Over the past two weeks, every other cat, exotic pet or dog was either transferred to another animal rescue in the region or adopted into the community. The near total closure was sparked on July 25, during the monthly meeting of the society’s volunteer board of directors. Annie Lindsey, the shelter’s director, as well as Zoë Skiadopoulou, the shelter’s training enrichment coordinator and interim foster care director, told the board they were resigning by Aug. 8, along with three part-time employees and an intern whose time was wrapping up. That leaves just one staff member, who has been out on medical leave. In an open letter accompanying a community petition, Lindsey and Skiadopoulou outlined issues between the board and the staff. “There are severe issues with overtime allotment and the lack of understanding that working overtime is not a choice in our field, but a must,” the letter states. “Animals do not live on a human schedule so when an emergency comes up after we humans reach 40-hours in a work week, we either let the animals suffer or we provide the needed care whether we are paid or not. What choice do you think that we, as caring animal professionals, have been making?” The petition calls on the board to resign and allow people who are dues-paying members of the nonprofit organization to form a new board. While the society’s bylaws (updated in January 2022) no longer require board members to pay dues, dozens in the community have signed the petition. Some of the eight board members said they were completely shocked by the resignations. “They didn’t give us any warning,” says Dr. Nicky Finch, a veterinarian who serves as the medical director for the shelter, a permanent board position. “We would get emails about overtime or something going on, but I can’t remember us ever saying no to overtime for anything that was an emergency situation.” But Lindsey and Skiadopoulou tell the Inlander they

14 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2022

Annie Lindsey (left) and Zoë Skiadopoulou both resigned from Whitman County’s AnimalHaven shelter in late July. feel there’s been a lack of clear communication and respect for the staff. With a policy that overtime be requested via email and approved by board members, the two say they would often send those requests, but may not hear back for days. “By definition, the need for overtime presents on an emergency basis,” their letter states. “Requiring overtime to be requested ahead of an emergency is illogical and results in the staff having to make choices nobody should have to make: work as unpaid volunteers or watch animals suffer?” Finch says the staff left the meeting before the board could ask them any questions or try to have a conversation about the situation. But Lindsey and Skiadopoulou say they told the board they’d be happy to answer any questions by email. “Neither of us have been reached out to one single time by the board to find out why we’re leaving,” Lindsey says. “We’ve had the community asking us questions. We’ve had news stations asking us questions. We’ve had other facilities and law enforcement asking us questions, and not a single board member has done the same thing.”

TOO MUCH WORK, NOT ENOUGH HOURS

In general, there has been a breakdown in communication between the staff, the board and the public over the last few years. Between the pandemic, multiple changes in board membership and high staff turnover, issues arose. No board meeting minutes are posted on the society’s website, and despite calls from the public to post the recording of the July meeting, the board has so far declined to do so. Lindsey says few, if any, emails to dues-paying society members have been sent out over the past two years, and no email was sent explaining what is currently going on. While overtime was sometimes approved, she says it was regularly denied. Some board members asked why part-time staffers couldn’t take on more work to reduce the need for Lindsey and Skiadopoulou to go over 40 hours.

COURTESY PHOTOS

“The kind of issue with that, that we’ve explained multiple times and just been completely ignored on, is that [for] our part-time staff, this is not their full-time responsibility,” Lindsey says. “They have school, they have other jobs, they have other commitments, they are part-time employees, and they work as much as they can for us.” Lindsey and Skiadopoulou were the most experienced employees on staff, with just about three years each working for the shelter. When reaching the end of their weekly 40 hours, if they still needed to take animals out for exercise or provide medical attention or food, the two say they felt they had to choose between clocking off and finishing those tasks, or leaving the animals without their needs met. “It got to the point where we were working up to 20 or 30 hours off the clock because it simply wasn’t approved,” Lindsey says. “And nobody would respond to crisis emails of ‘Hey, this really big thing happened. We just got 25 cats in today, we need extra hours to make sure that their care is fit for the night.’ And it would get denied.” Some board members disagree that overtime has regularly been denied and say they volunteer to help in emergency situations. Finch, in a written statement, tells the Inlander, “They did not give the board any warning, nor did they communicate intentions to resign or the need for anything aside from more overtime, which we could not provide them at this time, though we had approved overtime many times over the previous year, both for emergencies as well as non-emergent situations.” The shelter needs to raise about $90,000 through the end of the year in order to break even with its budget, according to the board and the staff. Jeff DeBoer, who joined the board in June, shortly before the resignations, and who volunteered to help with technology at the shelter over the last couple of years, says that overtime was regularly approved. “We’re trying to figure out how to work within the budget and still be able to do this,” DeBoer says. “The


overtime thing was difficult.” In his short time on the board, DeBoer did deny an overtime request to assess stray cats in Albion. Rather than spend staff time to do that, DeBoer says he and another board member volunteered to check it out instead. Skiadopoulou says that in addition to having multiple emailed conversations about the pressures on staff members, she emailed board member Dayna Cooper a week before the resignations, urging the board to take staff concerns seriously. “Our staff is hanging on in order to continue saving homeless lives, but I can personally attest to the fact that many of us are at the end of the line,” Skiadopoulou wrote to Cooper on July 14. “The [board] faces a great risk of losing many of its staff, two of which being the only staff members fully up to speed on how to fully operate this shelter in terms of medical protocols, community resources, etc.” Cooper declined to be interviewed, but in a written statement says the issues may be related to problems with an ex-board member. Cooper writes that a former member (who she declined to identify) was bullying other board members and resigned when confronted. Staff, she writes, likely didn’t know about the issue, and liked that board member. (Staff said their resignations stemmed from compensation/respect issues.) “I couldn’t help but to feel that if I wouldn’t have confronted the bully, [staff] would have given this newly elected executive committee a chance,” Cooper writes. “From then, it has been pure hell for all involved.”

CURRENT STATE OF SHELTER

The shelter can typically hold about 10 dogs at a time if they need to be put in separate cages, or slightly more if two dogs can be housed in a cage together, Finch explains. For cats, she says, there are two large enclosures that can hold between about three and six cats each, plus about 20 individual cat cages, which at times can hold litters. Before leaving, staff members reached out to more than 100 animal rescues throughout the Pacific Northwest and successfully moved all the remaining animals except for strays. By law, stray dogs that are brought in must stay for a set amount of time to allow owners to reach out before the animal is sterilized and listed for adoption, Finch says. The Humane Society of the Palouse in Moscow won’t be taking animals from Whitman County, but has offered some of its Latah County services to Whitman residents while the LETTERS Pullman shelter hires new staff. Send comments to Those services include spay and editor@inlander.com. neuter assistance ($50 toward a spay or $30 toward a neuter at a regional vet), reduced price microchips (usually $30, now $15), and reduced cost engraved name tags (usually $8, they’ll be $4), says Sierah Beeler, director of that shelter. The Whitman County Humane Society board is already looking at applications for new staff members. AnimalHaven shelter serves all of Whitman County’s nearly 50,000 residents, including in Pullman, Colfax and Albion. Other work, such as deep cleaning that can’t be done with animals present, is likely to be completed while the shelter is closed. It’s unclear if any legal action is likely. Pullman police were called to the shelter on July 31 when a burglar alarm was triggered. They found three board members in the facility, and no charges were filed as they were allowed to be there, according to police. There are no active police investigations into the current situation. The board is speaking with an attorney and may investigate claims of the misuse of funding, though some board members and staff appeared confused about what those allegations referenced. Meanwhile, the resigned staff remain distraught. “It was and still is really devastating for us,” Skiadopoulou says. “I didn’t want to leave. I still don’t want to leave. It’s heartbreaking. I mean, we’ve put so much love into those animals, so much care.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

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AUGUST 11, 2022 INLANDER 15


RECLAIMING OUR

FOOD DESERTS

16 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2022


Fighting food insecurity in West Central and greater Spokane means more than just adding grocery stores BY ELIZA BILLINGHAM

J

olly Ghebreab walks into Jolly Mart, ready to run the register after singlehandedly unloading a pallet of popsicles in 100-degree heat. He wears his red apron and jeans, his usual attire at the store his brother named for him. To his left, typical convenience store items line the shelves: gummy candies, Hostess snacks, peanuts, jerky and Vitamin Water. To his right, however, are rows of canned goods, cereal, onions, avocados, oranges and freezers full of frozen meals. The Ghebreab family owns Jolly Mart and nearby Bong’s on Boone Avenue, two local convenience fixtures in Spokane’s West Central neighborhood. They’ve lived in the neighborhood for over a decade, time that Ghebreab’s also spent figuring out what’s missing in his community. “It’s been hard for the neighborhood to have access to produce,” he says. West Central is historically one of the lowest income neighborhoods in Spokane and is vulnerable to many health injustices. The Environmental Protection Agency

created an environmental justice mapping tool to track concerns like air pollution and hazardous waste levels across socioeconomic levels, but it also keeps a record of critical service gaps, like broadband and medical service gaps, plus “food deserts.” The EPA designates West Central as a food desert, meaning most residents don’t have access to nutritious food within a mile of their homes. The U.S. Department of Agriculture likewise considers homes “food insecure” if they have “limited or uncertain access to adequate food.” But it’s not just about the amount of food someone can find; the USDA links food security to nutrition security,

where a person has consistent access to affordable foods that “promote well-being, prevent disease, and, if needed, treat disease.” In other words, eating enough calories isn’t necessarily the same as eating a healthy diet. Sure, plenty of people who are completely foodsecure eat poorly. But there’s a big difference between choosing an unhealthy diet and being forced into one because of where you live. Poor nutrition is the leading cause of illness in the United States, according to the USDA, and those living in food deserts are more at risk of diet-related diseases. Combating food deserts is about bringing equity to everyone’s food decisions. In 2020, almost a third of Washington families faced food insecurity, according to a Washington State Food Security Survey, including one-third of Spokane County families. West Central is one area struggling with food access, but it’s hardly alone in the greater Inland Northwest. Portions of East Spokane, Hillyard, rural areas stretching from Orchard Prairie to Mead, the Kalispel and Coeur d’Alene reservations, and big swaths of Moscow, Idaho are all considered food deserts by the EPA. And West Central is a good case study in the ongoing efforts undertaken and the daunting challenges these communities face in trying to make food accessible for its residents. ...continued on next page

West Central’s Jolly Mart is a rare source of fresh produce for the neighborhood. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

AUGUST 11, 2022 INLANDER 17


Jolly Mart’s Jolly Ghebreab considers it part of his mission to help provide basic nutrition to his West Central neighborhood.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“RECLAIMING OUR FOOD DESERTS,” CONTINUED... Some relief trickles into West Central in the form of fresh produce at convenience stores like Jolly Mart and Bong’s, since they provide basic nutrition at a walkable distance for the neighborhood. But factors like income and community perception can impact food insecurity even more than distance. While efforts like food education and urban agriculture have limited direct impacts on food security, they significantly improve community involvement and identity among residents, which are also key characteristics of public health. Working together to address these various aspects of food insecurity, businesses, community members and nonprofit agencies are trying to turn this food desert into a well-fed urban oasis.

SHRINKING OPTIONS

Usually, a big service gap means a great business opportunity. Think of how well a lemonade stand would do on a long stretch of the Centennial Trail in August. So why don’t grocery stores open in neighborhoods with little to no access to fresh food? The whole model for the food market has changed, according to Pablo Monsivais, an associate professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology at Washington State University. Grocery stores operate on “skintight profit margins,” he says, which prompts markets to consolidate into bigger stores. These supermarkets then move to arterial roads to increase the amount of traffic to their stores. Monsivais says it’s common for multiple supermarkets to be located close to each other. Though it seems counterintuitive, it actually increases the density of customers in the area and the amount of people in each store. These economic incentives drive local grocers out of neighborhoods, especially low-income neighborhoods where profits are even skimpier due to surrounding families’ lower food budgets and higher rates of shoplifting.

“Unfortunately, what’s good for business is not always good for public health,” Monsivais says. West Central has long experienced such economic abandonment. There’s been a “decades-long process of systemic divestment from this neighborhood,” according to Elizabeth Marlin, the chair of the West Central Neighborhood Council. In 2020, the community lost Broadway Market, a local grocer with a modest offering of essentials. In 2012, when the owner of Clancy’s Produce was killed in a car accident, no one took over his local stand offering fresh fruits and veggies to the community. Marlin is used to carpooling with neighbors to Walmart or WinCo at the start of each month to stock up on a 30-day supply of dry goods and other essentials. The nearest Walmart is about 2½ miles from the heart of West Central, while WinCo is over 6 miles away. Despite the distance and rising gas prices, these are the best options for what Marlin and her family need, like bulk bags of flour or multipurpose cuts of meat.

“Unfortunately, what’s good for business is not always good for public health.”

18 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2022

“I know what it’s like to stretch a dollar,” says Marlin, a single mother and foster parent. My Fresh Basket opened in 2017, and is only a mile from the middle of West Central. It has a coffee bar, a bakery and a deli, and lots of specialty local items. When customers walk through the doors, they’re often greeted by a security guard and rows of beautiful fruit and vegetables. A breakfast bar and salad bar are just past the avocados.

If food deserts are simply determined by distance to a grocer, My Fresh Basket’s location on the edge of West Central would clear the EPA’s label from the neighborhood. Yet, the issue of food insecurity in the neighborhood remains. “Is [My Fresh Basket] solving food accessibility?” Marlin asks. “No.” Then she continues, “But I don’t expect it to.” The Kendall Yards development has taken over the south edge of West Central, where it links to downtown Spokane. Its apartments and high-end housing bring a greater income diversity to the community. Though some long-term West Central residents view the addition as an intrusion, Marlin doesn’t agree. “Kendall Yards is not a bad thing,” she says. “They’re not the other side. They’re part of our neighborhood.” She has the same attitude toward My Fresh Basket. It’s simply a grocery store that serves some needs and not others. It serves a lot of employees in Kendall Yards and downtown who are looking for healthy, quick lunches. Marlin also says My Fresh Basket has made a conscious effort to serve a variety of customers, and prices on things like hamburger, produce and chicken are sometimes comparable to other grocery stories. She can stop by if she’s in a rush and needs to supplement her regular supplies. But it’s only helping her fill in the cracks. “Can I afford to do my weekly grocery shopping there? Hell no,” Marlin says.

PERCEPTION MEETS REALITY

When Greenstone, the developer behind Kendall Yards and other planned neighborhoods around Eastern Washington, mapped out the new community, founder Jim Frank noted the need for a nearby grocery. He said the store was intended to serve people in a 2- to 3-mile radius, from West Central to other neighborhoods like downtown’s Riverside, and Emerson-Garfield a little further north. ...continued on page 20


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AUGUST 11, 2022 INLANDER 19


Jolly Ghebreab and his brother

“RECLAIMING OUR FOOD DESERTS,” CONTINUED... “I would like to see the day when groceries are more accessible, where you don’t have to drive 4 to 5 miles to the grocery store,” Frank says. The store does a lot to address customer needs, according to Frank. If people think the store is too expensive for them, “I don’t think they’ve looked at the prices,” he says. A gap exists between My Fresh Basket’s mission and some of the community’s perception of the place, though. This illuminates an evolving understanding of food deserts. First, the USDA deemed a neighborhood a food desert if it was isolated by distance. Then, they expanded the definition — if people couldn’t afford groceries at the store near their house, they were left with only a mirage, still stuck in a food desert. Now, it’s evolving even more to consider the community’s perception of the store, and whether they feel the store is intended for them or not. A 2014 research study in Philadelphia highlighted the importance of customer perception. A new grocer opened in an underserved area, yet buying patterns in the community didn’t change. Researchers suggested that building a new store isn’t enough to help people buy more fresh food. Appropriate branding and marketing may be just as necessary as affordable pricing to increase local consumption of produce and nutritious foods. The things at My Fresh Basket that might be attractive to one part of the community — a hot bar, specialty foods — don’t necessarily draw food insecure families into the store. Whether because of prices or branding, Ghebreab and Marlin say most West Central residents don’t shop there. As West Central diversifies in income, Marlin thinks it needs to diversify resources, too. “We don’t need My Fresh Basket to lower prices,” Marlin says. Instead, in her mind, the community needs another grocer to serve a whole different community.

WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR

Typically, you don’t run to the gas station to pick up a bag of potatoes. But at Bong’s, a place where you can fill your tank and grab a lottery ticket, the previous owner was dedicated to carrying some grocery staples in her store. Now that the Ghebreab family

20 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2022

owns and operates the shop, they’ve kept her legacy alive and added their own array of fresh foods. “No matter what, we need to carry produce and essentials so everyone has access to basic nutrition,” Ghebreab says. He sees a lot of elderly ladies in Bong’s and Jolly Mart, plus kids who come by after school for a free banana on Fridays. Some neighbors fill up a few bags of groceries each week. Most people don’t come regularly for produce, he says, but if they forget something during their regular grocery run or are suddenly missing an ingredient, they’re delighted to find it at his shops. Carrying produce is a financial risk and not especially lucrative, Ghebreab says. Small stores with small orders can’t get the wholesale discounts that large vendors can. He does a lot of loading and unloading himself to cut down on delivery costs. Produce doesn’t have a long shelf life and has to be thrown away if people don’t buy it in time, unlike processed snacks. But Ghebreab doesn’t consider profit his main goal. “This is our neighborhood now,” he says. He wants to make sure kids have access to fruit, not just candy. He says it makes him feel better when customers are surprised and happy with his wide selection of goods. When customers are smiling, “we know it was worth it,” says Ghebreab. Natalie Tauzin, a Healthy Eating Policy and Systems Specialist for the Spokane Regional Health District, did research on the effect of produce in corner stores on the health of the community. And despite the good intentions of business owners like Ghebreab, she says it’s unlikely that some apples and garlic in Jolly Mart will significantly impact food security in West Central. However, Ghebreab has dreams that may have a much bigger effect. He and his brother plan to demolish and rebuild Broadway Market into a full-service grocery store. Other chains have shied away from the old building because it’s not big enough for the typical 10,000-square-foot footprint of a modern grocery, and it has very limited parking. Other potential operators may not want to

“No matter what, we need to carry produce and essentials so everyone has access to basic nutrition.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Eliza Billingham is one of the Inlander’s 2022 summer interns. She’s currently working on her master’s degree in journalism from Boston University, and after filing this story, she was off to Vietnam to work for a month as a reporting fellow for the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting before fall semester starts.


ACCESS IS JUST THE FIRST STEP Getting to food is one thing, but what do you do next? BY ELIZA BILLINGHAM

I

r are working to turn the closed Broadway Market into a full-service grocery store.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

deal with the shoplifting issues that often crop up in low-income neighborhoods. Jolly Mart loses about $3,000 to $4,000 a month due to stolen goods, Ghebreab says. Once the Ghebreabs bought the Broadway lot, the pandemic interrupted their progress. City processes slowed down. It took 20 months to simply get approval on the initial architectural plan. Now, building costs have skyrocketed and contractors are booked. But the brothers have dedicated themselves to being patient and flexible. Ghebreab needs to make money to support himself and his store, but ultimately his goals for West Central are different. He wants to improve the neighborhood and is willing to do so at a certain personal cost. “The thing that makes change is not your profit,” he says, “but the change that you’ve done.”

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS

Marlin, the West Central Neighborhood Council chair, grows more tomatoes in her backyard than she can use. So she trades them with her neighbor for fresh cherries. Then she bakes them into a cherry tart. Urban agriculture refers to food grown in a metro area, whether it be in someone’s backyard or a community garden plot. Even though it has a modest impact on food security at best, it’s helpful for other reasons, says Eric Williams, director of Second Harvest’s Community Partnerships program. “We love it when people bring fresh produce from their backyard,” Williams says. Large-scale farmers are amazingly generous, he says, but often donate big amounts of a single crop. Community fruits and veggies help provide a variety of foods for families in need. According to Tauzin at the SRHD, a quarter-acre of food crops in the city can produce enough vegetables for about six people, at best. This doesn’t really improve diet quality or variety for more than one family. But setting aside land for food instead of development is really healthy for the soil and the environment, Tauzin says, not to mention the people nearby. ...continued on next page

magine walking into a supermarket. Do you have a plan? What do you grab first? Do you walk down each aisle? Do you keep your eyes level, or look at the top and bottom shelves? Do you notice sale stickers? Do you know how much time you have to cook this week? Even if someone is in a grocery store with food they can afford, shopping and meal prep take a lot of know-how. Some food-security advocates are focused on providing people with the knowledge to put SNAP customers can double their fresh produce at some local markets. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO together nutritious meals on a budget. Having nutritious food comparison and meal prep skills, according to on hand that you look forward to eating can EFNEP data. improve a diet, reduce food waste and reduce Second Harvest also has an educational food spending, according to Kylie Pybus, an kitchen program that aims at “maximizing the extension coordinator specialist at WSU for the monetary and nutrition value of everything in federal Expanded Food and Nutrition Education your kitchen,” says Eric Williams, director of SecProgram (EFNEP). ond Harvest’s Community Partnerships program. “There are so many ways to be healthy and For example, lentils are extremely nutritious have adequate food,” Pybus says. and available, especially because Washington The program runs adult and youth programs farmers produce a large amount of the legume. that help participants get the most out of their But not many people like to eat lentils, or at least food budget, avoid relying on emergency food they think they don’t, because they don’t know sources and build healthy, enjoyable meals. Pybus how to prepare them. A cooking class can change considers food insecurity a systemic policy and this. wage issue. Even so, usually it’s possible to feed But food doesn’t just have a price sticker — it your family, even on a tight budget, she says. has a time cost as well, notes Pablo Monsivais, an Incentives like produce and market matching associate professor in the Department of Nutriprograms can make buying fresh produce more tion and Exercise Physiology at Washington rewarding for families that use Supplemental State University. Buying fresh produce or raw Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits. ingredients is a non-starter for some families, he These programs double the amount of produce says. Low-income families may be pressed for users can buy in the grocery store or at farmers time as well as dollars, and nutritious food may markets like those at West Central Abbey and the be inaccessible simply because of the time it takes Kendall Yards Night Market, which helps stretch to prepare. food budgets while improving diet. Matching SNAP benefits at markets is great, When EFNEP starts a food education class, but nearby supermarkets are vital to food and nuinstructors ask participants what they like to eat trition security because they often provide quick, or what their favorite childhood meal was. Then, ready-made meals for busy families, Monsivais they think together of ways to include more servsays. He thinks the next step in nutrition security ings of vegetables or fruits in those meals, and is the availability of low-cost, healthy premade how to have that kind of food ready quickly, even food. in five minutes or less, according to Pybus. “It’s an interesting situation in our food enviAlthough it’s difficult to measure nutrition ronment,” says Monsivais. “Affordable, convesecurity, EFNEP surveys adult and youth particinient food is pretty much unhealthy.” pants before and after their programs. In 2021, In order to pursue equity, advocates for nutriEFNEP directly or indirectly impacted over 2,200 tion security should consider and lessen the time family members. At the end of class, 96 percent barrier to healthy eating. of survey participants were eating more fruits “I would love to see fast food healthy,” he and vegetables, and 91 percent were getting more says. n out of their food budget from improved price

AUGUST 11, 2022 INLANDER 21


River City Food Ops participant Katerina Chayka, left, hands a squash to Pam Remmel, right, at West Central Abbey’s weekly market.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“RECLAIMING OUR FOOD DESERTS,” CONTINUED... “Community gardens are really helpful for the physical and mental health of the people who work them,” Tauzin says. They can also give immigrants the opportunity to grow familiar food and meet other people. But having enough space to designate a community garden can end up “being an elitist thing” if the neighborhood isn’t careful. River City Youth Ops is an organization at the West Central Abbey that hosts teenagers from surrounding areas to provide job and résumé training while farming a plot of land from seed to harvest. The Youth Ops grows kale, peas, beets, squash, garlic and herbs, as well as flower bouquets. Produce is then sold at a weekly farmers market, with excess veggies donated to local food banks. Teen volunteers sell to everyone, from young families with children to elderly neighbors. “Walmart is far away,” says Justice, a 16-year-old River City Youth Ops participant. “This helps provide for people who can’t always go to the grocery store.” WSU professor Monsivais emphasizes that urban agriculture helps mainstream and normalize gardening,

which exposes children to different, and more nutritious, foods early in their lives. It’s hard to get someone to eat beets if they’ve never seen one or if their palate is accustomed to processed, sugary foods. Stephanie Watson is the River City Youth Ops program director. She dedicates herself to connecting young people to food and the environment where it grows. “We all deserve food from the ground,” Watson says. “If you don’t see yourself as part of the environment, of course you’re not going to put effort into getting access to it.” Even if urban agriculture doesn’t dent food insecurity, it promotes healthy habits to everyone who walks by. “Just seeing it creates so much wonder,” she says.

WORKING TOGETHER

West Central isn’t the only part of Spokane facing food and nutrition insecurity, or finding unique ways to sow opportunity in a food desert. More work needs to be done to center the voices of people in the community finding new ways to feed themselves and their families.

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Sometimes, people who would qualify as “food insecure” don’t consider themselves as such. “I am of the mindset that how we frame things matters,” says Watson of River City Youth Ops. “Creating this binary of ‘haves’ and ‘have-nots’ isn’t helpful.” Both Watson and Monsivais stress the need for equitable decision-making. Food can create a more level playing field, according to Watson. Watson and Marlin are optimistic that as West Central changes, the diversified income of its residents and more resources can improve equity instead of increasing hostility — if the community works toward knowing one another and growing together. Though the Health District’s Tauzin focuses on government policies and systemic issues, she recognizes the outsized impact that small, local acts of support can have on big, complex problems. Shrinking food deserts means not deserting each other. “One of the most important things we can do as a society,” says Tauzin, “is be there for our neighbors.” n



Kevin Brown’s helped bring bluegrass to the shores of Medical Lake for 20 years.

COMMUNITY

FIT AS A FIDDLE The Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival celebrates 20 years of banjos, mandolins and camaraderie BY MADISON PEARSON

A

bout 20 minutes outside of downtown Spokane and a few more miles down a curvy, meandering road sits Medical Lake’s Waterfront Park. The park, while quite desolate during the colder months, is vibrant and full of activity once the weather creeps up past 70 degrees. The beach harbors sandcastles made by careful hands and the baseball fields are often flocked with Little League teams just learning how to slide into home. However, the biggest event that the tiny town, and even tinier park, sees is the annual Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival.

24 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2022

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO


For that weekend, the park is filled with magical tunes of bluegrass music. It seemingly emanates from every corner of the park, coming from campsites and the main stage that’s situated between the evergreen trees that tower above. With the festival celebrating its 20th year this weekend, the bands and the attendees keep coming back to bask in the beauty of music and community. Kevin Brown, the festival’s music director, thinks that he’s pinpointed why the festival has had such lasting power. “First off, it’s just a great spot,” Brown says. “It’s beautiful and a wonderful, perfect place for a festival like this one. All of these traveling bands come here and the first thing they say is ‘Wow, this is so nice with the lake and all of the trees!’ I think the other reason is just the local folks and the local bluegrass community that continuously get the word out there and help us out year after year.” Brown has been with the festival since day one, along with good friend and board member Steven Meltzer. Both stepped up to the task when Denny McDaniel, the late owner of Medical Lake’s only grocery store, approached Brown about starting a bluegrass festival. The first meeting was held at a small resort area just west of Medical Lake. “Half of the people there were ML locals,” Brown says. “And the other half were well-established bluegrass folks. After some discussion and divvying of roles, we decided that we needed to take this on and create an area festival that would be successful.”

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he first iteration of the festival was attended by about 20 people. Now, Waterfront Park is bustling and filled to the brim with musicians, fans and families for three days out of the year. “The very first year of the festival, 2002, I invited this band called John Reischman and the Jaybirds,” Brown says. “John is my absolute favorite mandolin player and now, 10 years later, they’re coming back for the 20th anniversary. It’s a full-circle moment that I’m so happy to be a part of.” This year’s lineup includes the aforementioned Jaybirds, Eli West, Monroe Bridge and a newly formed trio of female musicians, Karli Ingersoll, Caroline Fowler and Jenny Anne Mannan. As a child, Mannan traveled the country with her family, playing bluegrass music from the time she was 5 years old until she branched out on her own ventures. Mannan says that Blue Waters has always been more inclusive when it comes to what type of bluegrass music can be performed at the festival. Typically, bluegrass bands are composed of fiddles, banjos, upright basses, acoustic guitars and mandolins; however, in the world of “newgrass,” a term coined in the ’70s to describe rock ’n roll/bluegrass fusion, the world is your oyster. “Kevin always made sure to broaden the categories,” she says. “From what I’ve seen, the bluegrass scene on the West Coast is far more balanced. There are always more female performers on the lineups, and it’s OK to stray from bluegrass-specific instrumentation and throw in your own creativity. Blue Waters and the larger Spokane bluegrass community is one of the most inclusive, accepting and encouraging.” When curating the lineup each year, Brown says he tries to find “something for everyone.” Though the festival has changed and grown over the years, the meaning has stayed the same from the very start. “We might not get the biggest names in the bluegrass world,” says Brown. “But, we get people who have matured along with the festival and an incredible community that has kept coming back for 20 years now. We’re in it for the community and as long as they keep coming, we’ll be here.” n Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival • Fri-Sun, Aug. 12-14, times vary • $25-$55 • Waterfront Park • 1300 S. Lefevre St., Medical Lake • bluewatersbluegrass.org

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CULTURE | DIGEST

THE BUZZ BIN

Spreadsheets — a key to logging your life.

OUT OF LEFT FIELD There’s a very fine line between funny and cringe, and Nathan Fielder has completely obliterated that line into smithereens. His new HBO show, THE REHEARSAL, has me covering my eyes to hide from the perpetual secondhand embarrassment I feel. The premise is anything but simple: Fielder inserts himself into someone’s life and aims to take away uncertainty and unpredictability by focusing on a specific facet of their everyday lives that they wish to improve. He even goes as far as to build an exact replica of the bar where a high-stakes conversation will take place and creates a flowchart of any which way the conversation might go just to ensure that there are no hiccups along the way. It’s reminiscent of his show Nathan For You, but he commits even harder to the bits — which I didn’t know was possible. (MADISON PEARSON)

KEEPING TRACK What my obsession with bookkeeping did for my brain in tumultuous times

I

BY MADISON PEARSON

have a spreadsheet or app for almost everything that occurs in my daily life that is trackable. This includes what books I read, what music I listen to and my migraine headaches, to name a few examples. During the lockdown of March 2020, I decided to start writing down every book I read during my time inside. That quickly evolved into creating a spreadsheet with even more information. I kept track of the title, the author, the genre, where I purchased books and how much they cost, the number of pages in the book and, of course, my rating on a five-star scale. The tracking was something uniquely my own, something I could control when I had no control of the world around me. I was scared of the state of things, I didn’t want to get sick. Tracking took my mind off of things. The tracking progressed past books and into the realm of music. I have a vast collection of vinyl records and CDs that are my pride and joy. From the Star Wars soundtrack to Elliott Smith, I’ve got it all. But that got me thinking: Which artists/albums do I listen to the most? What are my most played songs? Does the data accurately portray my love for BTS? If not, I’ve gotta fix that. I started using an app called Last.fm to compile my music listening habits into easy-to-digest reports and graphs. (Spoiler alert: The data does accurately portray my love of BTS. They have about 10,000 lifetime plays and a spot as my No. 1 artist of all time compared to my No. 2 most-played artist, Phoebe Bridgers, who only has 1,500 lifetime plays.) At the beginning of 2022, I was still afraid, but life had to go on at some point. I was back at in-person classes and work was back to pre-pandemic normalcy.

26 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2022

I looked at my various spreadsheets and apps at the start of the new year. The information I’d so carefully collected was, digitally, collecting dust. I hadn’t touched my spreadsheets in months. When I scrolled through the list of books I read in 2020, a collection of T.S. Eliot poems stood out to me. I remember reading the Eliot poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” after logging off of my first college class via Zoom ever. “Let us go then, you and I, / When the evening is spread out against the sky / Like a patient etherized upon a table; / Let us go, through certain half-deserted streets...” But I couldn’t go anywhere because my mind wouldn’t let go of the horror I felt at that moment. I couldn’t walk through the “half-deserted streets” of my hometown and see the carnage that a pandemic had done to the lively downtown area. When I look at my 2022 reading log, I don’t see many entries. Only 18 this year so far. I’m reminded of how much life has changed. I’m too busy to read 52 books in a year now. Those spreadsheets serve as time capsules that remind me of when life was hardly life at all. They show me that perseverance is key and that I can reach goals even in the most difficult of times. (And that getting vaccinated and being able to go to bookstores again really did a number on my wallet.) Though my tracking is unconventional, it’s been cathartic. I’m grateful to the habit for keeping me levelheaded even when the world seemed to be crumbling down around me. To quote Charles Dickens: “I have been bent and broken, but — I hope — into a better shape.” n

R-R-REALLY GOING FOR IT The Indian blockbuster RRR might be the best action movie of 2022. It’s also a lot. It makes Top Gun: Maverick look subtle and grounded. Now streaming on Netflix, the story takes two real-life Indian revolutionaries against the British Raj from the 1920 and imagines what it would be like if they had a bromance that left an astonishingly high body count. Over the course of three hours (don’t worry, there’s a clean act break halfway through if you don’t want to watch in one sitting) we get so many wildly choregraphed fight scenes (some with wild animals), Bollywood dance battles, a musical number amid Passion of the Christ-esque torture, romance, and the most blissfully bonkers prison escape of all time. The whole package is presented so sincerely (no knowing winks to the camera here) that it’s hard to not buy into the absurdity while chuckling and cheering along. (SETH SOMMERFELD) THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Noteworthy new music arriving in stores and online August 12: DANGER MOUSE & BLACK THOUGHT, CHEAT CODES. The producer extraordinaire and the Roots’ MC team up for a soulful, swagger-filled hip-hop album that includes features from A$AP Rocky, Run the Jewels, and the late MF DOOM. SYLVAN ESSO, NO RULES SANDY. The electro-pop duo deliver another collection of shimmering artful dance ditties to keep the summer vibes flowing. PANDA BEAR & SONIC BOOM, RESET. The members of Animal Collective and Spaceman 3 unite to create some trippy pop rock that blends synth swells with jangly guitars. (SETH SOMMERFELD)


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AUGUST 11, 2022 INLANDER 27


COOKING

Ace of

Steaks

The first-ever Steak Cookoff Association event in Idaho offers cash for cooking the best steak — and an opportunity to win more BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

T

he best grilled steak you’ll ever eat might not come from a restaurant. Picture an inch-thick ribeye, tender enough to cut with a plastic knife. Inside: an even ring of gray wrapped around a light pink center. And the flavor! Just enough salt and spice to complement the steak’s meatiness with buttery bits of fat melting on your tongue. Impossible? Not for countless home cooks grilling consistently great steaks, including competitors at a recent steak cookoff in Athol, Idaho. Maybe you’re one of them. If so, organizations like the Steak Cookoff Association fork over big bucks to potential grillmasters, paralleling the rise of barbecue competitions (which are typically about chicken or pork and the all-important sauce). The Texas-based Steak Cookoff Association, which members and the association both refer to as SCA, helps event planners standardize steak judging nationwide with a growing international membership. It was formed by restaurant industry recruiters and home-grilling enthusiasts Brett Gallaway and Ken Phillips, who realized cookoff judging varied from place to place. In 2013 they created SCA, which sanctioned 19 events the following year. This year, SCA events may top 600, including international ones, according to Michelle Dang, who works both in medical care and as a SCA rep. Dang traveled from Texas to help coordinate the first-ever Idaho SCA event, held on July 23 at Super One Foods in Athol. The North Idaho event featured 16 teams and two events costing competitors $160 each. Some cooks are local like Daryl Kunzi from Coeur d’Alene’s Drummin Up BBQ food truck, who took third and eighth place, earning $500 total. Others hail from as far as Oregon, like Alta Hertz and husband, Jason, who split the contests, each taking first place, winning $1,000 and a “golden ticket” to the 2023 championships,

28 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2022

where top prize is $10,000. “I like SCA because it’s a level playing field,” says Dang, explaining that SCA supplies the meat for every competition, which shifts the focus from who can afford the best raw ingredients toward who has the best cooking skills.

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ang leads the 10 am pre-competition meeting, reviewing rules such as how steaks should arrive for judging: one per styrofoam clamshell, nothing extra; no toothpicks, skewers or strings some cooks often use to keep their steaks uniform. “I’m an operating nurse,” she quips. “We count what goes in, we count what comes out.” Following the meeting, competitors queue up to select the two steaks they get per cookoff, in this case, gorgeously marbled USDA Choice Angus ribeyes, which Super One ordinarily sells for $15.98 per pound, according to event organizer Dan Wright. Competitors have 30 seconds to choose what they hope are winners, then hustle to their individual tents. Sandpoint resident Josh Roberts and his son wear matching BBQ360 shirts. Roberts’ equipment is new looking, and he moves like someone accustomed to athletic competition. He’ll chill the steaks to firm them, after which he’ll trim, skewer, tie, then marinate them. Around 20 minutes prior to turn-in time, the steaks will go on the 540-degree grill, says Roberts, who works in medical sales and cooks as a hobby. “Then you cross your fingers and hope it works,” says Roberts, who snagged $200 for his fifth-place finish. Jake Parli has driven up from Lewiston, Idaho, with the black Weber kettle grill he inherited from his father and fond memories of backyard cookouts. A paper towel with the words “Not a Pitmaster” hangs in his tent.

Could this steak be worth $10,000?


Jake Parli packed his hand-me-down Weber from Lewiston to compete. “Normally I have a banner but I forgot it,” says Parli, who works as a traffic signal technician. Parli is wearing gray camo shorts, a purple Team Thrash hat, and a black T-shirt that reveals a dirt bike tattoo covering one arm and a hydrathemed sleeve on the other. He accepts a piece of steak from Tanya Schoonover-Turner (who will turn out to be a second-place finisher), and chats amiably with other competitors. “Everyone is really friendly,” he says. “They’ve helped me out a ton.” At the end-of-day award ceremony, after sheepishly admitting he dropped one of his steaks, Parli has pocketed $400 for his fourthand ninth-place finishes.

S

CA is like family. It isn’t like other competitions. You hear these remarks from competitors, anyone who’s judged before and SCA representatives. Another difference: In addition to providing steaks, SCA offers judging workshops, which are also open to would-be cooks. It demystifies the evaluation process, makes judging fun and helps create a network of well-trained evaluators. “Every box that comes to you … it’s a 10,” Dang says during judges’ training, which includes practice evaluation of two steaks. Rebecca Boifeuille, who works in Super One’s floral department, signed up for the judging class to discover secrets to cooking good steaks. “And I like to eat ’em,” she adds. At the appointed hour, steaks begin arriving, one per styrofoam box, to which is taped an empty envelope and randomly assigned ticket for the double-blind judging process. Dang opens the container, cuts the steak in half, closes the container, and hands it to one of the judges. She wipes her knife and waits for the next box. “You’re not comparing box to box,” Dang reminds the 10 male and three female judges. “You’re judging each box on its own.”

CARRIE SCOZZARO PHOTO

Like the other judges, Gary Tellesen paid $100 to learn SCA’s critique method ($60 of which was refunded by the event organizer). Tellesen, whose sons Dusty and Kacy Tellesen created Spokane-based Nordic Smoke BBQ, also took the previous night’s cooking class ($125), taught by championship griller Marty Plute. Plute knows steak. He’s the current Alabama and Georgia cookoff champion, an SCA top-10 points earner with six wins this year, and has his own line of rubs called Twisted Steel. Competition steaks are judged on appearance, doneness, texture, taste and overall impression, explains Plute, who notes that texture was the most challenging category for him. He uses both manual tenderizing and marinades, varying the time depending on the steak. “I have learned to let my steak tell me what it needs,” says Plute, an Illinois-based cabinetmaker by trade. “Each steak is different and has to be approached differently.” Other tips: Let the steak warm up prior to grilling, which helps meld the rub into the meat, and use a temperature probe inserted into the steak for continuous feedback. Plute also uses lights matching those in the judging area so he can see what the judges see. “For competition, they are looking for a medium steak, or warm pink center, and lighting can make or break you there,” says Plute, who offered to teach the steak cooking class to help grow SCA’s reach in the Pacific Northwest. Plute’s must-have equipment includes duck fat to oil the grill grates and provide a sheen to finished steak, a reliable way to check the temperature of both steaks and grill, sharp knives, a timer and, of course, a grill and fuel. He also includes “good music and good friends” on his list of essentials. “Because in the end,” Plute says, “it’s the friends I have made from all over the country that make me keep coming back for more.” n

AUGUST 11, 2022 INLANDER 29


FOOD | BEER

Farm to Glass Brewers, farmers and maltsters from around the Pacific Northwest head to YaYa Brewing Company for Grainmaker Beer and Grain Festival BY DEREK HARRISON

W

hen you break it down, the beer-making process is pretty straightforward. It takes four simple ingredients: water, hops, yeast and, at the base of it all, grain. The last of which is the source of inspiration for Friday’s Grainmaker Beer and Grain Festival — a collaborative effort between YaYa Brewing Company, LINC Malt, and Cold Stream Malt and Grain. It’s a small fest with a fresh idea. LINC Malt’s Brian Estes wanted to gather several outstanding breweries from the region (and one from NorCal), bring them to the Palouse farms where LINC’s barley is grown, and put together a brewfest highlighting both the breweries and the farms. “The thing that sets our region apart, and what makes it interesting to brewers, is that the greater Palouse is one of the world’s greatest grain-growing regions,” Estes says. “But for the average Pacific Northwest beer drinker, there aren’t a lot of pathways back to the farms where that world-class grain is being grown.”

A $50 ticket (available at yayabrewing.com) is required to taste the beers from the visiting breweries. Along with seven 8-ounce pours, festival goers get Grainmaker-branded glassware and an opportunity to talk with brewery representatives and farmers. The YaYa taproom will remain open to the public (still serving their regular house beers), and tickets are expected to still be available the day of the event. Big Daddy’s Bánh Mì’s food truck will also be on site serving their excellent Vietnamese grub. The seven beers produced for Grainmaker range from pale ales and IPAs to a Lithuanian farmhouse (Holy Mountain) and a mixed-culture saison This glass (filled with fresh beer) could be yours at Grainmaker on Friday. COURTESY PHOTO (Fair Isle). Every one of them using Estes needed a location to pour the beer, so it only specialty grain from LINC Malt’s partner farms. That’s made sense that he asked YaYa — one interstate exit away where Cold Stream Malt and Grain comes in. from the LINC Malthouse in Spokane Valley — to host The cooperative between Clearwater Farms in Nez the event. Perce, Idaho, and Horlacher Farms in Latah, Washington, “We have a really good partnership with LINC. So it produced the barley used in each event beer. The owners was kind of a no-brainer. I mean, we’re basically neighfrom both farms will also be at YaYa on Friday, and LINC bors out in the Valley,” YaYa co-owner Jason Gass says. will have a grain sensory table set up where attendees can “We’re honored to be alongside all of these farmers, to be taste the malted barley in its solid form. able to use their locally grown products.” “You get to meet the chef, basically, behind the base Along with YaYa, Grainmaker will feature Seattle’s ingredient in your beer,” Gass says. Holy Mountain Brewing, Ravenna Brewing Company “We’re fortunate to give people the opportunity to and Fair Isle Brewing; Yakima Valley’s Varietal Beer Co. interact with that entire supply chain,” Estes adds. n and Bale Breaker Brewing Company; and Moonraker Brewing from Auburn, Calif. All seven use LINC Malt Grainmaker Beer and Grain Festival • Fri, Aug. 12 on a regular basis to make their beer, connecting them to from 4-9 pm • $50 • YaYa Brewing Company • 11712 E. the Spokane area and the surrounding Palouse farms. Montgomery Dr., Spokane Valley • yayabrewing.com

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ALSO OPENING EMILY THE CRIMINAL

In need of money, Emily (Aubrey Plaza) gets sucked into the crinimal underground and finds herself wanting to dive even deeper in this tense thriller. Rated R

E.T.: THE EXTRA TERRESTRIAL

Put your alien in your bike’s basket and head to River Park Square as the Spielberg classic celebrates its 40th anniversary. Rated PG

FALL

Two young women who love pushing the extremes of climbing must figure out how to survive after finding themselves stranded atop a remote radio tower in the desert with no clear way down. Rated PG-13

SUMMERING

Four young girls wrestle with growing up as they spend the last weekend of summer together before middle school. Rated PG-13

MACK & RITA

REVIEW

THE KIDS ARE NOT ALRIGHT

A young woman feels like a 70-year-old soul trapped in her 30-year-old body. After a magical event, she becomes that 70-yearold (Diane Keaton) and finds herself in comedic situations as a social media influencer. Rated PG-13

The four young stars try to remain living bodies.

In Bodies Bodies Bodies, a horror whodunit for a new generation, the joke is on us BY CHASE HUTCHINSON

T

ension is the name of the game in Bodies Bodies Bodies. It’s felt in the pause that goes on for just a bit too long and the slight change in expression at an unexpected statement, early signs of the impending descent into chaos. It all comes together to tell the story of seven friends who find themselves stuck in an isolated mansion during a hurricane and how everything goes sideways when the party game the film is named for becomes far too real after someone ends up dead. At the center of this is the relatively new couple of Sophie (Amandla Sternberg of The Hate U Give) and Bee (Maria Bakalova of Borat: Subsequent Moviefilm), who arrive last at the gathering. Sophie recently got out of a stint in rehab and didn’t tell the group of friends the duo would be coming, starting things off on already awkward footing. They are still tentatively greeted by the spoiled rich kid that is David (Pete Davidson), his insecure girlfriend Emma (Genera+ion’s Chase Sui Wonders), the sharp-eyed Jordan (Industry’s Myha’la Herrold), and the aggravating Alice (Shiva Baby’s Rachel Sennott), who all have a history with Sophie. There is also the odd man out in Greg (Foundation’s Lee Pace), who Alice recently met on Tinder. This ensemble cast is almost all uniformly wonderful though there are a few particularly strong performances

32 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2022

that rise above the rest. Sternberg and Bakalova, each reHalina Reijn in a second feature that makes one wish her spective standouts in their prior work, efficiently create a debut, 2019’s Instinct, wasn’t nearly impossible to watch. complex relationship defined from the very beginning by The way she lets certain moments and visuals linger uncertainty as both of their characters are vastly different instills many of the early scenes with a looming sense of people. Sennott had already shown in Shiva Baby that she dread. While the film would benefit from a bit better paccould navigate discomfort and cringe with ease, though ing, it still hits its stride when it counts. she fully leans into that here. Pace also is a welcome presAs the night of terror and paranoia goes on, you ence who, as the oldest character there, can shift from soon discover that the gag of it all is inseparable from the being seemingly harmless to menacing in moments of film’s aspirations. The way it pokes fun at itself and its confrontation. The only one who feels out of place is a characters is key to understanding the why to everything distracting Davidson who is basically playing that is going on. Each of the main characters a version of himself that remains indistinis a child of the internet, shaped and warped BODIES guishable from his other roles. Thankfully, in a way that the film is surprisingly adept BODIES BODIES he isn’t the focus of this tumultuous tale. at skewering. It is never showy about this, Rated R Even as the film can frequently get eschewing typical “How do you do, fellow Directed by Halina Reijn caught up in circles as it wanders through kids?” levels of pandering to find something Starring Amandla Stenberg, the dark halls of the mansion, the hauntthat is honest, gruesome and hilarious all Maria Bakalova, Rachel Sennott ing and humorous moments where all the at once. It is the type of film that rewards a buried truths come out are appropriately second viewing once all the pieces fall into cutting. That Bee, one of the few we recognize has come place in its conclusion. Though it is necessary to be crypfrom more humble means, is able to recognize these tic about this to preserve the experience, just know that truths more clearly than anyone offers a bit more to chew it becomes cathartic and chaotic in seeing it all unfold. on. However, even she might not be able to see the danThough it can drag a bit in the middle and a few of the ger that is building or its origin until it is too late. jokes fall flat, the final punchline so thoroughly kills that This is all directed with a patient playfulness by it largely absolves it of its prior missteps. n


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The Princess and the Papar(azzi)

Princess Di via the media’s eye.

family. Quite the opposite. I do not understand any Americans who valorize them — we fought a war to get rid of this appointed-by-God bullshit — and it seems that even the Brits should see that the institution is a horrific anachronism in the 21st century. No, the thing is that I now understand that Diana represented, at the barest minimum, a possibility that the British royal family could potentially have modernized, and that her death signaled the end of that. Then, and apparently still. The fact that her second son, Prince Harry, now Duke of Sussex, has followed in her footsteps in absconding from royal life, because he seemingly had no other option if he wanted to retain his sanity, seems proof that whatever legacy Diana might have had remains partly hypothetical. And the current condition of poor Harry might be the best recommendation for this film. Because he is continuing the unfinished smash-the-monarchy work that his mother began. No matter what happens to the British monarchy in the coming years and decades, The BY MARYANN JOHANSON Princess is brilliant. Using nothing but contemhis month will mark the 25th anniversary poraneous archival footage, Oscar-nominated of the death of Diana, Princess of Wales. filmmaker Ed Perkins has assembled a portrait of I vividly remember it, because I had literDiana’s life in the spotlight that is incendiary, inally just stepped in the door after attending the cisive, and transfixing. Starting from early-1980s funeral of a close friend and turned on the TV news footage, from the moment that her engageas the news of the crash of her car in a tunnel ment to Charles was beginning to be rumored, in Paris — precipitated by the paparazzi this is a devastating indictment chasing her in pursuit of juicy pix to sell THE PRINCESS of celebrity “journalism.” Even to trashy tabloids — was breaking. if you believe that the comNot Rated Desperate for some distraction from ings and goings of the British Directed by Ed Perkins my own personal — decidedly non-royal royal family are newsworthy, Streaming on HBO Max — grief, I remained glued to CNN for the way Diana was treated is days, through the announcement of her clearly beyond the pale... and death and the widespread gnashing of teeth and it is also very clearly a harbinger of the appalling rending of garments that ensued in the UK. The celebrity “journalism” that was to come. public reaction of the Brits to her death, mobs of Cameras in her face, all the time. Vox pop people wailing and sobbing outside Buckingham assessments of her life, and commentators who Palace, absolutely incensed me. I had just buried knew nothing — nothing — offering their nonsensisomeone who — to this day — remains the person cal analysis. After their “fairy tale” wedding in closest to me who has died. And I thought, 1981, Diana and Charles would “live happily “These people didn’t know her! They have no idea what ever after,” supposed experts at the time were it means to lose someone they love! How dare they behave sure. How the characterization of Diana in the like this!” eyes of the press morphs from “nice” and “shy” In the intervening years, I have become someearly in her public life to “determined and domiwhat more generous to the nice people of the UK neering” is beyond cringy and disheartening. The when I think back to those days in 1997. But if I Princess offers an incredibly valuable look back hadn’t already, the stunning HBO documentary not just at this specific life story, but at how pubThe Princess might have prompted a softening of lic stories were — and continue to be — shaped by my thoughts on this matter. the media. And that doesn’t benefit anyone at all: Not that I am any fan of the British royal not the famous folk, nor society at large. n

MOVIE TIMES on

The Princess brilliantly uses archival footage to showcase the media’s toxic fascination with Princess Diana

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AUGUST 11, 2022 INLANDER 33


Phoebe Bridgers has become a voice of a subset of her generation.

ROCK

I Know the End… and the Beginning

FRANK OCKENFELS PHOTO

Experiencing Phoebe Bridgers’ meteoric rise since before it fully began BY SETH SOMMERFELD

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veryone has different motives when entering a church. Some seek salvation. Some yearn for community. Others just want to find some sort of meaning for these lives we all know will be fleeting. Some are just exhausted souls looking for a momentary place to rest surrounded by a little music. I suppose I’d have been closest to that last one when I wandered through the doors of Central Presbyterian Church in Austin, Texas, on March 18, 2017. I’d spent the week binging music as part of South by Southwest, taking in well over 50 live sets over the course of the week, and everything was winding down. But I hadn’t made my way to a set in one of Austin’s downtown churches — a prime SXSW experience — so I trekked to see the last one of the week. I just wanted some musical peace, regardless of the performer. I entered the sanctum and sat near the front to take in the music of a 22-year-old singer-songwriter from Los

34 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2022

Angeles who I’d never heard of before (not surprising, as her debut LP wasn’t set to drop for another six months). When the white-haired young woman took the stage, she was humorously sheepish, bantering about how weird it was to sing the curses in her songs in a church. Her presence was so disarming and casual that I was not fully prepared for the beauty of the songs she had to offer. They were hushed, crushingly sad hymns that seemed to haunt the holy space with spellbinding melancholy. I wouldn’t say my first time seeing Phoebe Bridgers was a religious experience, but the sacred surroundings that warm Austin night might belie that point.

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hen her album Stranger in the Alps arrived later that September, getting to spend time digging into these songs which I had only heard on first-pass live, made me yearn to go back to Central Presbyterian to relive the show with all Phoebe’s wordsmith-

ery and mournful melodies freshly tattooed in my mind. I instantly became a disciple preaching the Good Word (Bummer Word?) of Bridgers. One of the best albums of the past decade, Stranger in the Alps offers so much more than the oft-used and reductionist “sad girl songwriter” label conveys and made Phoebe such a breath of fresh air. While there are true moments of rip-your-beating-heart-out-of-your-chest devastation on tracks like “Funeral,” the first thing that grabbed me was the underlying wit and mirth hidden in her complex lyrical dexterity. There’s just the hint of playfulness amid the gloom that feels like the actual experience of being human — tiny smirks in the darkness. Bridgers made undeniable pop-rock songs out of grooming (“Motion Sickness”), whispered lullabies that float aimlessly amid loss (“Smoke Signals”), and folkrock wrestling with the pain and disconnect of young adulthood (“Scott Street”). Debut albums simply aren’t


supposed to be packed to the gills with such masterful songwriting. It’s hard not to be invested in an artist when you happen to stumble across their immense talent before a large audience catches on. It’s like seeing a young family member grow up and thrive, rooting them on all the way. Hoping others recognize their immense potential. Thankfully, indie music fans caught on to Bridgers pretty quickly. Stranger in the Alps didn’t set the world on fire, but it caught on enough that Bridgers became a legit headliner who could pack ’em in at rock clubs. At the very least, she’d reached the level of success where she’d be around for years to come. Her profile was further boosted by joining her elite songwriter contemporaries Julien Baker and Lucy Dacus to form the indie supergroup Boygenius. The band’s lone self-titled EP is loaded with gorgeous, harmony-packed songs full of keen songwriter details, and the three vocalists blend seamlessly for one of the most instantly relistenable albums in recent years. (The Boygenius tour remains one of the best concerts I’ve ever attended.) As a fan, I was incredibly pleased that Bridgers had “made it,” and would probably hang around the enviable career success level comparable to Baker — a small-theater headlining indie songwriting heartbreaker. Even as an early booster, I didn’t expect Bridgers to reach a superstar level. Not because her talent is deficient, but because the music industry doesn’t often prop up its beautifully bummer poets on the pedestals reserved for pop stars. Then the world shut down.

awkward bashfulness she doesn’t try too hard to hide. She’s never (intentionally) felt like a rock star, more like your coolest friend who occasionally drops the veneer to be nerdy and sad with you. She might try to smash a guitar on SNL, but she’ll probably do an amusingly subpar job of it, then laugh it off by dunking on old men trying to shame her on Twitter for it. Bridgers has become the voice of Millennials and Gen Zers who feel physically and mentally ground down and exhausted by continually living in “unprecedented times.” Her music allows for both a flood of sadness and eye-rolling mirth to walk hand in hand for a two-pronged coping mechanism. Her songs carry a starry-eyed nihilism, feeling the tech-age doomscroller weight of reality but finding a shining moment of wonder in the midst of all the muck.

SATURDAY, AUG 27

PAULA FUGA

SUNDAY, SEP 25

MONOPHONICS

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n Feb. 26, 2020, Bridgers released “Garden Song,” the first single off her sophomore album Punisher, mere weeks before COVID upended life. Global pandemics don’t exactly offer the ideal climate for rolling out a new record. But when Punisher arrived in June, it proved to be the perfect album for the time. This collection of tunes entered the world amid lockdowns and death and peak fear, and in a strange way its vibe almost felt like a comforting balm. The pandemic made everything feel adrift in 2020, and Bridgers’ songwriting about untethered young adult confusion (unintentionally) matched the mood. Loaded with dark humor, painful heartbreak and distinctly young millennial turns of phrase (“And when I grow up, I’m gonna look up / from my phone and see my life,” “Windows down, scream along / to some America First rap country song,” etc.), the album quickly snowballed in popularity as new listeners felt incredibly seen by these wistful and depressive rock songs. Even when diving into hyperspecifics like struggling with daddy issues in Japan or drugstore hours in LA, the tone carried an aura of universality for pretty much anyone 35 and under. In these strange times with limited new releases, Bridgers suddenly became an “it girl.” She had a perspective and look that caught on with young adults and kids, so every publication imaginable had to have an interview or profile. She was seemingly everywhere to the point of overexposure. Compared to other major pop acts, Bridgers exuded a vibe of extreme casualness. There’s an

AT

FRIDAY, OCT 28

WHO’S BAD: THRILLER NIGHTS

Phoebe Bridgers’ live show is now a spectacle.

CARTER K. HOWE PHOTO

Things came full circle for me when I traveled to Chicago in 2021 to see Phoebe Bridgers headline the Pitchfork Music Festival. Predictably, the stellar show concluded with Punisher’s closer, “I Know the End.” The song finishes with Bridgers screaming at full throat-shredding intensity until the cacophonous pomp fades out and she’s left isolated and alone. All the air has left her lungs, and she’s gasping for the final bursts of cathartic vocal release. The screams may have been a far cry from the peaceful quiet of a church in Austin, but it’s the perfect aural embodiment of how so many of us have felt these past few years. Phoebe Bridgers has become a star because she releases the ball of angst we all try to bury deep inside and invites us to scream it the f— out with her. n Phoebe Bridgers, Christian Lee Hutson • Thu, Aug. 18 at 7 pm • $50 • All-ages • Spokane Pavilion • 574 N. Howard St. • spokanepavilion.com

SUNDAY, OCT 30

LEONID & FRIENDS: WORLD’S GREATEST CHICAGO TRIBUTE

WEDNESDAY, DEC 14

JAKE SHIMABUKURO

SEE OUR OTHER EVENTS AT SBLENTERTAINMENT.COM AUGUST 11, 2022 INLANDER 35


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

COUNTRY ROCK LUKAS NELSON & PROMISE OF THE REAL

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ike many folks who’ve become fans of Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real over the past 10 or so years, I first showed up to one of his gigs having never heard a note of his music. I just knew he was the offspring of Willie Nelson and that was good enough for me. I had no idea I was about to get a dose of seriously tasty blues-rock guitar, way closer to Stevie Ray Vaughan’s style than Nelson’s old man’s country sounds. In the years since Nelson and his ace band have pushed their music into ever more creative directions while still rooted in his excellent guitar work and strong voice (and yes, he does sometimes sound like Willie). They’ve been regular collaborators and tourmates with Neil Young, they now have seven albums under their belt (most recently 2021’s A Few Stars Apart), and the live shows, like the band members, have only gotten better with age. — DAN NAILEN Lukas Nelson & Promise of the Real • Sat, Aug. 13 at 8pm • $28 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague Ave. • sp.knittingfactory.com • 509-244-3279

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

POP PUNK SUM 41

Thursday, 8/11

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Pamela Benton J BARK, A RESCUE PUB, Gil Rivas BRICK WEST BREWING CO., Kyle Richard COEUR D’ALENE PARK, Free Whiskey J DOWNTOWN SPOKANE, Live By Five: Buffalo Jones HAYDEN CITY PARK, Stagecoach West IDAHO CENTRAL CREDIT UNION ARENA, Nu Jack City J KNITTING FACTORY, The Backseat Lovers J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Built to Spill, Prism Bitch, Pappas, Itchy Kitty J THE MASON JAR, Atomic Frequencies PINE STREET PLAZA, Auf Gehts POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Rusty Jackson J QQ SUSHI & KITCHEN, Just Plain Darin REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Walking Bear SHERMAN SQUARE PARK, The Justin James Band STEAM PLANT RESTAURANT & BREW PUB, Valerie Jeanne ZOLA, Desperate8s

Friday, 8/12

AK ASIAN RESTAURANT, Debrah Stark J THE BIG DIPPER, The Gray Goo, Dead Channels, Lich, Toxic Vengeance CHAN’S RED DRAGON ON THIRD, Ryan Dunn J KNITTING FACTORY, Smells Like Nirvana, Stubborn Will LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Shawn James, Gravedancer

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ith pop punk having a moment of mainstream revival, it’s time to put some respect on Sum 41’s name. While the band broke through with fun-loving teenage angst of the genre classic All Killer No Filler (which completely holds up), they had much more depth than their contemporaries. There was also a darker side and metal influence to the band’s songwriting and that shone through on 2004’s Chuck, a severely slept-on album that packs more than a few issue-driven heavy emotional wallops of tunes that no mere pogo punks could achieve. The band has continued to fold more of that metal edge on recent albums, including 2019’s incredibly solid Order in Decline. If you’re going to a Sum 41 show for teen nostalgia, you’ll get that. But you’ll also get some more mature depth to sink your teeth into. — SETH SOMMERFELD Sum 41, Simple Plan, Magnolia Park • Sun, Aug. 14 at 8pm • $36 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague Ave. • sp.knittingfactory.com • 509-244-3279 J J MEDICAL LAKE, Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival MOOTSY’S, Touch of Evil, The Dilrods, The Emergency Exit J ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, Kosta La Vista PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Sara Brown Band THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Just Plain Darin J RUNGE FURNITURE, B Radicals, Jason Perry Trio SILVER MOUNTAIN RESORT, Pamela Benton TRANCHE, Whiskey Creek Band ZOLA, Lucas Brown & Friends

Saturday, 8/13

BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE, Sara Brown Band J BERSERK, Kadabra, Itchy Kitty J BRICK WEST BREWING CO., Dylan Hathaway CHAN’S RED DRAGON ON THIRD, Cary Fly THE CUTTHROAT RESORT, JamShack J J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, The Chicks, Patty Griffin J J KNITTING FACTORY, Lukas Nelson & Promise of The Real J J LATAH COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, Moscow Mountain Music Fest

J LIVE AT ANDRE’S, Sam Lewis J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Hurray For the Riff Raff, Atari Ferrari LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Alcohol & Feelings (Covers Show) MCINTIRE FAMILY PARK, The Hankers J J MEDICAL LAKE, Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival NOAH’S CANTEEN, Kyle Swaffard OLD MILL BAR AND GRILL, Gil Rivas J ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, Kosta La Vista J J PAVILION AT RIVERFRONT, Iration, Atmosphere, Katastro, The Grouch with DJ Fresh PEND D’OREILLE WINERY,

Lucas Brown J PONDEROSA BAR AND GRILL, Rhythmic Collective J POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Just Plain Darin TRANCHE, Great American Train Wreck ZOLA, Blake Braley

Sunday, 8/14

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Kyle Richard Band BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE, Aaron Crawford COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, The Ryan Larsen Band


J J KNITTING FACTORY, Sum 41, Simple Plan, Magnolia Park J LIVE AT ANDRE’S, Andrew Duhon J J MEDICAL LAKE, Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, The Australian Pink Floyd Show J ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, The Ronaldos

Monday, 8/15

J COEUR D’ALENE PUBLIC LIBRARY, T & Company J EICHARDT’S PUB, Monday Blues Jam with John Firshi RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic Night

O P E R A

B Y

G I U S E P P E

V E R D I

SEPTEMBER 9 & 11

MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX DIRECTED BY DAN WALLACE MILLER

BUY TICKETS NOW! INLANDNWOPERA.COM

Tuesday, 8/16

COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, The Kelly Hughes Band OSPREY RESTAURANT & BAR, Valerie Jeanne J RIVERFRONT PARK, Just Plain Darin J ROCKET MARKET, Melissa Landrus J TRUE LEGENDS GRILL, Gil Rivas ZOLA, Lucas Brown & Friends

Wednesday, 8/17 BARRISTER WINERY, Stagecoach West BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE, Wine Wednesday: Crown Rational J THE BIG DIPPER, Rank & Vile, Rat King, Reaping Fields FALLS PARK, Nu Jack City J KENDALL YARDS, Ben Clark, Jona Gallegos, Gil Rivas J MCEUEN PARK, Donnie Emerson, Nancy Sophia, Dreamin’ Wild MEMORIAL COMMUNITY CENTER, Beth Pederson & Bruce Bishop ONE TREE CIDER HOUSE, The Hanks OSPREY RESTAURANT & BAR, Son of Brad PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Bob Beadling RED ROOM LOUNGE, The Roomates J WINE COUNTRY AMPHITHEATER, Bonnie Raitt ZOLA, Runaway Lemonade

1.51 2.53 %

APY*

%

APY*

Coming Up ...

J J PAVILION PARK, Phoebe Bridgers, Aug. 18, 7 pm. J J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Bass Canyon Music Festival, Aug. 19-21. J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, AJJ, WHY?, Aug. 20, 8 pm. J J SPOKANE ARENA, Backstreet Boys: DNA World Tour, Aug. 21, 7:30 pm. J J NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Maren Morris, Aug. 24, 7:30 pm. J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, The Districts, All Things Blue, Aug. 26, 8 pm.

AUGUST 11, 2022 INLANDER 37


BENEFIT SAVE THE CLUBHOUSE!

Spokane’s historic Woman’s Club on the lower South Hill is teetering on the precarious edge of fate after two years of upheaval that made community gatherings — income from which normally funds the 111-year-old building’s maintenance and operation — a public health risk. Truly, the club’s existence as locals know it hangs in the balance, which is why this next fundraiser event is so vital. Ten regional breweries are joining forces for an afternoon of sipping and socializing — Black Label, No-Li, The Grain Shed, YaYa, Golden Handle, Bellwether and Mountain Lakes, Millwood, Humble Abode and Badass Backyard — which also features live music by Kari Marguerite and the Seventy Six. Tickets include a commemorative pint glass, five 5-ounce tastings and one 16-ounce pour. When guests are hungry, there’s brats and barbecue, too. — CHEY SCOTT Save the Woman’s Club Brewfest • Sun, Aug. 14 from 1-6 pm • $35 • Woman’s Club of Spokane • 1428 W. Ninth Ave. • thewomansclubofspokane.org • 509-838-5667

38 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2022

FESTIVAL DOWNTOWN DELIGHT

MUSIC MOUNTAIN TUNES

50th Annual POAC Arts & Crafts Fair • Sat, Aug. 13 from 9 am-5 pm and Sun, Aug. 14 from 9 am-4 pm • Free • All ages • Second Avenue and Main Street, Sandpoint • artinsandpoint.org/artscrafts-fair • 208-263-6139

Moscow Mountain Music Fest • Aug. 13 from 12-11 pm • $25 • Latah County Fairgrounds • 1021 Harold Ave., Moscow • moscowmountainmusicfest.com

Fifty years ago, a fledgling art organization based in Sandpoint, Idaho, called the Pend Oreille Arts Council created an event that has become a summer mainstay for visitors and locals alike. Originally held lakeside at City Beach, the annual Arts & Crafts Fair has since moved inland to downtown Sandpoint, which has been a boon for the event. Last year, more than 4,000 people strolled through tents to peruse paintings, pottery, photography, wearable art and more. With food vendors, a kids’ art area and plenty of amazing art to look at, the two-day event has something for everyone. — CARRIE SCOZZARO

One of the summer’s greatest pleasures is live music enjoyed in the great outdoors. Some of my favorite and most cherished concert memories took place while seated on grass, singing and swaying along to band after band. This weekend, you can be part of the inaugural Moscow Mountain Music Fest. The festival lineup includes plenty of local indie goodness: Moscow native Desolation Horse (pictured), married synth-rockers Camp Crush, alternative rock artists The Brevet and many more. After catching your favorite groups on stage, stop by one of the many food and drink vendors for a cold one and the sustenance to keep on rockin’. — MADISON PEARSON


GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

THANK YOU COMEDY SOUND DECISIONS

Some artists have a talent so unique, they’re basically a walking, breathing definition of that thing they do. Spokane-born Michael Winslow is a case in point. His utterly fascinating ability to create a huge array of sound effects using just his mouth helped him forge a career in movies, television and video games that’s been going since he debuted on the big screen in 1980’s Cheech & Chong’s Next Movie. He’s probably best known for appearing in several Police Academy movies, or for his role in Mel Brooks’ Spaceballs, naturally doing all his own sound effects. I’m a fan of his wicked Jimi Hendrix impression, delivering “Purple Haze” with just his mouth and an air guitar. More recently he lent his noisy larynx to America’s Got Talent in 2021 and a new YouTube doc called Video Game Sound in which, you guessed it, he replicates video game sounds. — DAN NAILEN Michael Winslow • Aug 11-13, Thu at 7:30 pm, Fri at 7 and 9:45 pm, Sat at 6:30 and 9:30 pm • $20-$35 • Spokane Comedy Club • 315 W. Sprague Ave. • spokanecomedyclub.com • 509-318-9998

TOGETHER, WE RAISED OVER $6.1 MILLION. (AND COUNTING!)

Thanks to the generous support of our partners and community, we raised over $6.1 million this past weekend to fight cancer in our region; bringing the total monies raised to over $28 million in eight years.

THEATER SUMMER NUN

The notion that two are better than one takes on a whole new meaning as Spokane Valley Summer Theatre and Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre wrap up both of their seasons with two beloved nun-themed shows, Sister Act and Nunsense. Sister Act, the feel-good musical comedy based off the 1992 movie, follows a woman who becomes a nun through unconventional means and elevates the choir to star-level status, allowing her to rediscover her voice while her sisters find theirs. In the hilariously silly and absurd musical Nunsense, a convent of nuns must stage a fundraiser to bury the last four nuns of their order who died in a cooking accident and are being temporarily stored in a freezer. Both these shows bring fun for every-nun, so be sure to check them out as summer theater in the Inland Northwest takes its final bow. — LAUREN RODDIS Sister Act • Through Aug. 21; Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $25-$41 • University High School Theater • 12420 E. 32nd Ave., Spokane Valley • svsummertheatre.com • 509-368-7897 Nunsense • Aug 12-21; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $45-$60 • Schuler Performing Arts Center • 880 W. Garden Ave., Coeur d’Alene • cdasummertheatre.com • 208-660-2958

Together, we are Community Cancer Fund. PRESEN TI NG PAR T NER

THANK YOU TO OUR MAJOR CORPORATE PARTNERS TO G E TH E R , W E AR E

ELITE PAR T NERS

PLATI N UM PAR T NERS

M A RL E ON

CAP ITA L

communitycancerfund.org

AUGUST 11, 2022 INLANDER 39


until 2021. Remember? You were going to vote to overturn the election, until the insurrection, then you changed your mind. I think our state needs a candidate that does what she says she’ll do, not just mouths the words; so far you’re 0-2, not supporting our Veterans, blaming Biden for what happened in 2020, when he’s done more since 2021,then Trump did in four years.

I SAW YOU RIVERPARK SQUARE 8/2 My friend and I were headed up the escalator from the first floor as you were headed down. You very clearly made intentional eye contact and smiled in a way that I haven’t been smiled at in a long time. If you’re interested, email me what you or I were wearing to dwntwnspokaneadventure@ gmail.com

CHEERS DARRELL, I LOVE YOU SO MUCH DWS, you are my love, boyfriend, significant other, my man!! Here is to us, honey. We are a team, and I vow from this day forward to love you and be by your side, no matter what we call our relationship. I love you, Darrell! Thank you, for choosing me. Kisses and hugs, Jennifer R

JEERS MEMORY LOSS CMR Cathy McMorris Rogers. Your TV ads are confusing. First you say you supports the veterans and then vote no on the Veterans Bill; then you say that Biden hasn’t done much in two years, but two years ago was July 2020 and Trump was still the president — and you’re right there, Trump didn’t do much. Biden didn’t become president

SMOKE AND MIRRORS — ZERO TRANSPARENCY Why is no one addressing Catholic Charities and city of Spokane plans to place a low barrier shelter at Quality Inn on Sunset, homeless camping in Finch Arboretum, and pallet homes on Empire Health-acquired property on Sunset adjacent to Ascenda, which was supposed to provide additional housing from the Empire Health land purchase? Unlike low and no barrier shelters, which appear to be basically “anything goes” warehouses, programs such as Ascenda give folks access to resources, structure and empowerment for breaking the cycle of poverty, addiction and homelessness through sobriety, employment skills, and family health. Two overwhelming responses from Spokesman Review’s Camp Hope poll — a negative answer to wanting access to resources for addiction, mental health, or job training, and the highest percentage answer for the biggest reason for the respondents’ homelessness is conflict with family or friends; neither of which is addressed or solved by low barrier housing. Transparency and true help by Catholic Charities and Spokane officials is very low! RE: CHECK-UP ON CRIME CHECK OMG! I thought it was just me who had problems with Crime Check. I live near Double Eagle in the apartments across the way. In January of this year there was a break-in. I called Crime Check. I was asked how I knew the place was broken into? I replied that the alarm was going off and I saw a shadowy figure running away. No, there was no car, just a figure. Crime Check proceeded to ask me race, age, hair and eye color, and they were VERY annoyed when I didn’t know. If I was Wonder Woman I wouldn’t need Crime Check. I’m not Wonder Woman, so we need Crime

Check; we just need them to be better. ALSO RE: CHECK-UP ON CRIME CHECK Two years ago, I called Crime Check to report suspicious activity in the alley behind my apartments. Vehicles of all

people do that” then they HUNG UP! Two days later, my brother comes out to his car to find Carvana loading it up on a truck. Cargurus taking a lady’s car. The lady was screaming and throwing rocks at the guy taking her car, and THAT’S when the police came. Good job, Crime Check.

you, I also have a special needs child. District 81 has come through exceptionally for us. Having been both a teacher and a parent, I understand the difficulties and also the cost of meeting students needs. Perhaps you could spend more time with our public school teachers, and then tell

...That child could hold their own against a husky on crack.

kinds had tape over their license plates and makes and models. The men of all the cars got out, high-five each other, switched vehicles and drove off. Because I didn’t have sufficient info, Crime Check didn’t believe me. This activity went on every weekend for weeks until I found an officer in an unmarked car. When I told him what happened he said it was suspicious and he’d investigate. The next weekend the bad guys were caught. Not all of us citizens are criminology experts, but some of us know what time it is. CONTROL YOUR KIDS Look, I don’t mind giving kids their freedom and encouraging them to have a say in things. But I seriously draw the line at letting them run up and down aisles in a Red Robin. What’s going to happen to Little Timmy when he runs into one of the poor servers trying to get food out? He might get hurt, the server might, other people might. But it’s not Timmy’s fault, he’s just a child. The person who I put the blame on is the person who is supposed to be looking after him, not letting him treat that place like it’s the McDonald’s playhouse. Now I don’t care about the noises kids make, that’s what they do. But that child could hold their own against a husky on crack. RE: CRIME CHECK Last summer I was at my brother’s apartment, and I noticed shadowy people taking pictures of the inside of people’s cars. I couldn’t discern race, hair or eye color so I was told “Yep,

TRAFFIC ON FREYA BETWEEN SPRAGUE AND 5TH I don’t know who I hate more, the junior college level “engineers” that regulate traffic flow, or the damned idiot drivers who are so impatient that they create chaos. Get it together, Spokan’t. WOKE-PHOBIA AT WHACK-O-BARREL How dare they put a plant-based “sausage” at the trough alongside the fatty bacon, greasy gravy and real pig portions? Cracker Barrel patrons are outraged: It’s another Woke conspiracy, all part of the Antifa Agenda! This “protest” would be merely hilarious if it weren’t so pathetic. Go ahead, folks — keep lining your arteries with lard. What could happen? CATHY, I’LL TELL YOU WHO OUR TEACHERS ARE… Yes…who are our teachers? The ones who are underpaid? The ones who spend many hours outside their classroom planning equitable instruction? The ones who are there to guide students who have absentee parents at home… who also have to double as counselor and comforter in order for certain students to get through the day and learn?! The ones who uplift all their learners. And what are they teaching? Perhaps you should visit a local Spokane school and investigate. Maybe then, you wouldn’t be asking questions such as in your commercial. State standards haven’t changed... and many teachers go above and beyond to deliver a sound, quality education. Like

EMMY LOU HARRIS CONCERT What a great concert… what my 90-year-old mother and I could hear of it, anyway. [Some] people were so drunk and loud, constantly talking over the music so that they could hear each other… it bothered people three rows away from you, even; but especially the people sitting directly in front of you. You were oblivious to the music and the rest of us, whose tickets cost as much as yours did. My mother waited 50 years to get to hear Emmy Lou sing, and you totally ruined it for her. And me. Basically, you sucked at concert behavior 101. n

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1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

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your constituents that you do know our local teachers, and you understand that what they are teaching is standardsbased and woven into every lesson that is delivered. If not… you have offended many educators who work tirelessly to meet the needs of their students.

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NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

FRIENDS OF THE DEER PARK LIBRARY SUMMER BOOK SALE Thousands of gently-used books of all genres, with new books added daily. All proceeds support the Deer Park Library and community. Every second Fri and Sat of each month from 9 am-4 pm. Deer Park Auto Freight, 2405 E. Crawford St. (509-555-1212) TERRAIN TABLE A community fundraiser supporting local arts nonprofit Terrain featuring music, a full-course meal, art and more. The event takes place at the farm of Celeste Shaw-Coulston and Dan Coulston, address provided after ticket purchase. Aug. 17, 5-9 pm. $200. terraintable.org INLAND NORTHWEST OPERA GALA: FLY AWAY TO CASABLANCA Celebrate opera at Inland Northwest Opera’s annual gala with casino games, cocktails, arias and a Moroccan-inspired meal. Aug. 18, 5:30 pm. $125. Historic Flight Foundation, 5829 E. Rutter Ave. inlandnwopera. com (509-535-6000)

COMEDY

MICHAEL WINSLOW Spokane native Winslow is an actor, comedian and beatboxer billed as “The Man of 10,000 Sound Effects.” Aug. 11, 7:30 pm, Aug. 12, 7 & 9:45 pm and Aug. 13, 6:30 & 9:30 pm. $20-$35. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com SUMMER IMPROV CHAOS The Blue Door Theater players turn your summer mishaps into laughs and better memories. Fridays in August at 7:30 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheater.com (509-747-7045) SAFARI A fast-paced, short-form comedic improv show. Saturdays from 7:30-9 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com GOING AWAY SHOW FOR RYAN AND ROB The Spokane Comedy Club says goodbye to two of their regular acts, Ryan McComb and Rob Wentz. Aug. 14, 7:30 pm. $16-$22. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998) SPOKANE COMEDY ACADEMY Learn the fundamentals of stand-up comedy, proper joke structure, what makes people laugh, how to create original material and perform in front of a live audience. Aug. 9-30, meets Mondays from 7-9:30 pm. Graduation show for friends and family Sept. 13 at 7 pm. $150-$200. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998) NEW TALENT TUESDAYS Watch comedians of all skill levels work out jokes together. Tuesdays at 7 pm (doors at 6 pm). Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com ADAM CONOVER The self-proclaimed “investigative comedian” hosts the HBO series “Adam Ruins Everything.” Aug. 18, 7:30 pm, Aug. 19-20, 7:30 & 10 pm. $20-$35. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com LARRY THE CABLE GUY An evening of laughter and entertainment with comedy icon and multiplatinum recording artist. Aug. 18, 7:30 pm. $39-$89. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (509-481-2800) MOSTLY CLEAN COMEDY NIGHT A comedy night hosted by Jody Carroll featuring Charles Hall Jr. and Ryan McComb. Aug. 19, 8 pm. $20-$25. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org

COMMUNITY

GRAND COULEE DAM LASER LIGHT SHOW The light show theme is “One River, Many Voices.” Aug. 1-31 at 9:30 pm and Sept. 1-30 at 8:30 pm. Free. Grand Coulee Dam Visitor Center. usbr.gov THE RUM REBELLION: PROHIBITION IN NORTH IDAHO Featuring historical photographs, newspaper articles and artifacts including a moonshine still, this exhibit tells the story of how the panhandle of Idaho was anything but dry during Prohibition. Open daily from 11 am-5 pm through Oct. 29. $2-$6. Museum of North Idaho, 115 Northwest Blvd. museumni. org/whats-on (208-664-3448) THE WAY WE WORKED An exhibit curated by the Smithsonian and the National Archives that celebrates the history of work in America. Wed-Sat from 11 am-4 pm through Aug. 20. $3-$6. Spokane Valley Heritage Museum, 12114 E. Sprague. spokanevalleymuseum.com GALACTIC SHENANIGANS NIGHT MARKET & STREET FAIR A street fair featuring vendor booths, live music, immersive art experiences, food and beverage vendors and more. Aug. 12, 5-9 pm. Free. Runge Furniture, 303 E. Spokane Ave., Coeur d’Alene. (208-920-1856) ATHOL DAZE The annual event begins with a parade and includes various vendors, beer gardens, game booths and live music. Aug. 13, 9 am-5 pm. Free. Athol Community Hall, 30355 Third St. cityofathol.us (208-683-2101) EDUCATOR’S DAY Art Salvage invites classroom teachers, art teachers, homeschool teachers and educators of any kind to pick up free supplies, enter to win prizes and learn DIY tutorials for their classroom. Aug. 13, 11 am-3 pm. Free. Art Salvage Spokane, 1925 N. Ash St. artsalvagespokane.com (509-598-8983) PANIDA THEATER OPEN HOUSE Stop in for a tour, a cold brew or just to check out classic Charlie Chaplin shorts. Sat from 12-4 pm through Aug. 20. Free. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org PARTY IN THE PARK The fundraising celebration includes a petting zoo, dunk tank, face painting, lawn games, food trucks and live music. This is a ticketless event, but a donation of $20 is encouraged to benefit the Ronald McDonald House Charities. Aug. 13, 1-8 pm. By donation. Brick West Brewing Co., 1318 W. First Ave. rmhcinlandnw.org BRITBULL BRITISH CAR SHOW Hosted by Northwest British Classics Car Club, this car show brings fine British motorcars like Bugeye Sprites and Rolls Royces to the Inland Northwest. Show car entry is $25, spectating is free. Aug. 14, 9 am-2 pm. Grant Park, 1015 S. Arthur St. northwestbritishclassics.com SHARING THE DHARMA DAY A monthly opportunity for newcomers and old friends to explore Buddhism and community fellowship with a Tibetan Buddhist monastic community. All are welcomed. Registrations and proof of Covid-19 vaccination required. Aug. 14, 10 am-3:30 pm and Sep. 11, 10 am-3:30 pm. By donation. Sravasti Abbey, 692 Country Lane Rd. , Newport. sravastiabbey.org GRANT COUNTY FAIR A six-day fair the features a carnival, livestock shows, live music and food vendors. Aug. 16-21. $28. Moses Lake. gcfairgrounds.com KERNEL During the Kendall Yards Night Market, kids are encouraged to participate in activities for a voucher to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables.

Wednesdays from 5-7 pm through Aug. 24. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (509-279-0299) LAUNCHNW COMMUNITY TOWN HALL: CENTRAL SPOKANE This series is an opportunity to engage with the community and participate in facilitated discussions about how to ensure student success. Aug. 17, 12:30-2 pm. Free. North Central High School, 1600 N. Howard St. (509624-2606) PEND OREILLE COUNTY FAIR The 104th annual fair features vendor booths, food trucks and a rodeo. See website for full schedule. Aug. 18-21. Pend Oreille County Fairgrounds, 419152 State Route 20. pocfair.com (509-445-1367) NORTH IDAHO STATE FAIR Celebrate the 100th year of the fair with 10 days of fun. Aug. 19-28. $6-$8. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. nisfair.fun (208-765-4969) WALLACE HUCKLEBERRY FESTIVAL A festival celebrating all things huckleberry featuring a 5k race, a pancake breakfast, food and craft vendors, live music, kids events and more. Aug. 19, 7 am-9 pm and Aug. 20, 7 am-3 pm. Free. Wallace, Idaho. wallacehuckfest.com (406-241-7134) DROP IN & RPG Stop by and explore the world of role playing games. Build a shared narrative using cooperative problem solving, exploration, imagination and rich social interaction. First and Third Sat. of every month, 1-3:45 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (509-279-0299) HOG HAVEN: BATTLE OF THE BANDS AND CLASSIC CAR SHOW A battle of the bands competition paired with a classic car and motorcycle show. Proceeds support the Palouse Cares Food Network. Aug. 20, 3 pm. Free. Eastside Marketplace, 1420 S. Blaine St., Moscow. eastsidemarketplace.com (208-882-1533) NEIGHBOR FEST A community event with food, lawn games and live music. Aug. 20, 1-4 pm. Free. Post Falls Library, 821 N. Spokane St. communitylibrary.net UNITY IN THE COMMUNITY A multicultural event featuring a cultural village, a career and education fair, senior resources, free school supplies and bikes helmets and entertainment. Aug. 20, 10 am-4 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. nwunity.org (509-625-6600)

FILM

DREAMWORKS ANIMATION: THE EXHIBITION — JOURNEY FROM SKETCH TO SCREEN From the makers of Shrek, Madagascar, Kung Fu Panda, How to Train Your Dragon and Trolls, comes an extraordinary exhibition celebrating over 25 years of DreamWorks Animation. Through Sept. 11; Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm (third Thursdays until 9 pm). $15-$20. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (509-456-3931) SUMMER CAMP: THE OUTSIDERS Part of the Garland’s summer cult classic film series. Aug. 11, 10 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. (509-327-1050) HALLELUJAH: LEONARD COHEN, A JOURNEY, A SONG This feature-length documentary explores the life of singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen as seen through the prism of his internationally renowned hymn, Hallelujah. Aug. 11-14, Thu-Sat at 7 pm and Sat-Sun at 4 pm. $7. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) MOVIE IN THE PARK: SONIC THE

HEDGEHOG 2 Part of the Liberty Lake Summer Festival’s Movie in the Park series. Movie starts at dusk. Aug. 12. Free. River Rock Park, North Holt Blvd. and Kalama Ave. pavillionpark.org MOVIES IN THE PARK The Salvation Army Spokane’s family friendly summer movie series, Fridays at Sally’s Park. All movies begin at sundown. Free. The Salvation Army Spokane, 222 E. Indiana Ave. salvationarmyspokane.org MOVIE IN THE PARK: ENCANTOPart of the Liberty Lake Summer Festival’s Movie in the Park series. Aug. 13. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. pavillionpark.org SATURDAY CARTOONS AT THE FARMERS MARKET Showings of cartoons during the Moscow Farmers Market. Every Saturdays from 8 am-1 pm through Oct. 31. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) DREAMWORKS MOVIE MATINEES: THE CROODS Visit the DreamWorks Animation Exhibition - Journey From Sketch to Screen and then watch the The Croods. Aug. 14, 2 pm. $15-$20. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS Part of the Garland’s free kids movies series. Aug 15-19, daily at 9:30 am. Free. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com THEY LIVE Hosted by the Moscow Film Society as part of its “Retro Macho Action Hero” series. Aug. 17, 7 pm. $5. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org MAMMA MIA! Moscow Community Theatre is partnering with Inland North Waste to present a community event with the original Mamma Mia film and its ABBA soundtrack. Proceeds support production costs for upcoming MCT shows. Aug. 18, 7-9 pm. $15. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org MOVIE IN THE PARK: AVENGERS ENDGAME Part of the Liberty Lake Summer Festival’s Movie in the Park series, Movie starts at dusk. Aug. 20. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. pavillionpark.org

FOOD & DRINK

CANINES & COCKTAILS Bring your dog to the patio and enjoy dinner, drinks and treats for you and your furry friend. Every Friday from 2-7 pm. South Perry Lantern, 1004 S. Perry St. lanternspokane.com FOOD TRUCK FRIDAY This year’s food truck selection includes Mixed Plate, Skewers, One Night Stand, Tacos Camargo, Good Dilla and more. Located on Wall Street. Fridays from 11 am-2 pm through Aug. 26. Downtown Spokane. downtownspokane.org GRAINMAKER BEER & GRAIN FESTIVAL Celebrate beer and grain culture throughout the Inland Northwest with special one-off brews, unique beers, grain and malting sensory lessons, conversations with brewers from around the region and live music. Aug. 12, 4-9 pm. $50. YaYa Brewing Company, 11712 E. Montgomery Dr. yayabrewing.com RIDE & DINE This summer series includes a scenic gondola ride, live music and a mountain-top barbecue dinner. Fridays from 3-8 pm through Sep. 2. $8-58. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. silvermt.com (208-783-1111) BREWS & VIEWS Enjoy the views from the top of Mt. Spokane while drinking selections from local breweries. Saturdays

from 12-5 pm through Aug. 27. Mt. Spokane State Park, Vista House. mtspokane. com BREWSFEST Enjoy the offerings of breweries and cideries from the Inland Northwest craft beer scene. Aug. 13, 1-6 pm. $40-$57. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. silvermt.com (208-783-1111) GARDEN TEA PARTY Spend the afternoon in a flower field sipping gourmet tea and eating finger foods. Aug. 13 and 21 at 1 pm. $30-$45. Grumpy Chicken Farm, 1535 E. Shingle Mill Rd. grumpychickenfarm.com (208-274-3358) MOLLYDOOKER WINE TASTING EVENT Celebrate International Left Handers Day with Australia’s iconic MollyDooker (slang for left-handed) Winery. Taste wine, including their syrah and cabernets. Aug. 13, 4-6 pm. $12. Nectar Wine and Beer, 1331 W. Summit Pkwy. nectarkendallyards.com (509-290-5239) SAVE THE WOMAN’S CLUB BREWFEST This brewfest features 10 local brewers and a barbecue meal. Each ticket includes five 5-ounce tastes, a 16-ounce pour and a commemorative glass. Aug. 14, 1-6 pm. $35. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. thewomansclubofspokane.org (509-838-5667) EASY NO-OVEN MEALS Chef Aaron Nowitzi offers recipes and demonstrates nutritious options that are quick, easy, and don’t require an oven. Registration is required. Aug. 16, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8350) POP-UP SUMMER DINNER: HATCH CHILIS Kick off hatch chili season with this three-course, pop-up buffet dinner with three paired wines. Aug. 16, 5-8 pm. $30. Fête - A Nectar Co, 120 N. Stevens St. fetespokane.com (509-951-2096) RIVERFRONT EATS Riverfront Park’s local food truck series. Tuesdays from 11 am-2 pm through Aug. 30. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.org (509-625-6600) POURS & PICKS Enjoy $6 wine by the glass and $4 charcuterie picks in the Cafe, every Wednesday from 4-6 pm. The Culinary Stone, 2129 N. Main St. culinarystone.com (208-277-4166) WINE WEDNESDAYS Enjoy wine specials, food and live music while watching the sunset over the orchard. See website for live music lineup. Wednesdays from 5-8 pm through Aug. 24. Free. Beck’s Harvest House, 9919 E. Greenbluff Rd. becksharvesthouse.com (509-238-6970) SIP & SHOP A wine and shopping event that benefits the Panida Theater. Aug. 18, 4-8 pm. Free. Pend d’Oreille Winery, 301 Cedar St. powine.org (877-452-9011) BIGFOOT PUB 50TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY Celebrate with live music, special drinks, games and prizes. Aug. 19-21, 11 am-2 pm. Free. Bigfoot Pub, 9115 North Division. (509-467-9638) NATIONAL LENTIL FESTIVAL A festival celebrating Eastern Washington and North Idaho’s lentil production featuring lentil dishes, a lentil cook-off, beer garden and live music. Aug. 19-20. Reaney Park, 460 NE Morton St., Pullman. lentilfest.com ALES FOR THE TRAIL The annual craft beer, cider and wine fest raises funds for the North Idaho Centennial Trail. Also includes live music, plus a mimosa and wine bar (4-8 pm) and food trucks. Aug. 20, 2-8 pm. $35-$55. Coeur d’Alene City Park, 415 W. Mullan Rd. nictf.org/ales

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EVENTS | CALENDAR BARONESSE BARLEY HARVEST DAY Stand in the field where the barley is grown, while enjoying brews and spirits made with Baronesse Barley. The Joseph’s Grainery crew is harvesting the 2022 crop while guests tap their toes to local band Tone Sober. Experience a “fullcircle moment” and meet the farmer, maltster, brewers and distillers standing in the field where it’s grown. Aug. 20. Free; reservations required. Colfax. josephsgrainery.com FOOD TRUCKS & FRUIT FESTIVAL The fourth annual festival includes fresh fruit and food truck vendors all weekend. Aug. 20-21, 9 am-6 pm. Beck’s Harvest House, 9919 E. Greenbluff Rd. becksharvesthouse.com (509-238-6970) PILSNER PICNIC Tickets include glass and sample of each pilsner from these participating breweries: Bale Breaker, Brick West, Icicle, Laughing Dog, Lumberbeard, Pelican, Perry Street and Whistle Punk. Aug. 20, noon. $17.39. Brick West Brewing Co., 1318 W. First Ave. brickwestbrewingco.com STRENGTH FOR THE JOURNEY BBQ The annual barbecue includes food, drinks, swag and prizes. RSVP is required. Aug. 20, 11 am-1 pm. Free. Spokane Regional Health District, 1101 W. College Ave. sannw.org (509-324-1500) CAMP COCKTAIL A three-class series during which participants create three signature cocktails from different U.S. cities. Taught by Hogwash’s Simon Moorby and Raising the Bar’s Renée Cebula. Aug. 21, 5 pm. $65. Hogwash Whiskey Den, 304 W. Pacific Ave. raisingthebarnw. com/event (509-464-6541) LUAU DINNER SHOW Enjoy Hawaiianfusion cuisine served buffet-style, Hawaiian music, dancers and flame throwers. Entertainment, dinner and non-alcoholic drinks are included in the ticket price. Aug. 21, 4:30-8 pm. $45. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S. Nukwalqw. cdacasino. com (208-769-2464)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

NEWMAN LAKE BASS BATTLES This three-week tournament is a catch-andrelease tag-style tourney. Utilizing the MyCatch app, anglers record catches with a photo and then release the fish back into the lake. Prizes totaling over $3,000 are awarded to the top ranking competitors. Through Aug. 20. $20. Newman Lake. anglersatlas.com (250-613-7727) YOGA & MIMOSA CRUISES Tickets include a 45-minute class by CDA Power Yoga, and a mimosa (sparkling cider for under 21). Snacks, cocktails, mimosa flights and more available for purchase. BYO yoga mat. Thursdays at 9 am through Aug. 25. $29.50. cdacruises.com COME FEED THE BISON Tours include farm history, a talk on bison and a Q&A session. Then, meet, greet and hand-feed the bison. Fri-Sat from 12:30-1:30 pm through Sept. 2. Call to reserve. $7. WinTur Bison Farm, 4742 W. Highway 231. winturbisonfarm.com (509-258-6717) DAN KLECKNER’S GOLF CLASSIC All proceeds from the two-day tournament support wounded warriors and local veterans. Aug. 12-13, 7 am-8 pm. $160. Downriver Golf Course, 3225 N. Columbia Circle. northwestgolfersforwarriors.org GRAND OPENING TOURNAMENT FOR ICCU PICKLEBALL COMPLEX OUTDOOR COURTS Celebrate the grand opening of 10 new pickleball courts with a tourna-

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ment featuring women’s, men’s, mixed doubles and couples events. $25 to enter plus $10 per event. Aug. 12, 8 am-5 pm, Aug. 13-14, 7:30 am-7 pm. $25. Pickleball Playground, 10505 N. Newport Hwy. pickleballbrackets.com/ICCUTourney SPEELYA GOLF TOURNAMENT Open to Native Americans from the entire Northwest and open to all ages and abilities. The 36-hole event offers several different flights for men and women. Aug. 12-14, 10:30 am. $350. Circling Raven Golf Course, 27068 S. Highway 95. cdacasino. com (800-523-2464) THE INLAND EMPIRE FITNESS CONFERENCE A conference centered around fitness, health and personal training. See link for full schedule. Aug. 12-13 at 8 am. $300. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside Ave. spokaneclub.org (838-2310) ANTIQUE & CLASSIC BOAT FESTIVAL Vintage boat owners show off their restored, rebuilt and preserved classics. Aug. 13, 10 am-4 pm and Aug. 14, 10 am-2 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene. coeurcustoms.com HISTORIC WALKING TOURS Join local historian Chet Caskey for a free walking tour of Riverfront Park, where the city’s past and present merge in unique ways. Aug. 13 and 27 at 10 am & noon. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontspokane YOGA AT THE BAKERY Yoga classes take place on the patio. Included with the one -hour class, a cookie, and a custom water bottle. Registration required. Aug. 14, 3:30-4:30 pm. $40. Made With Love Bakery, 2023 W. Dean Ave. mwlbakery.com ANCHORING YOGA Join certified instructor Meggie Cafferty for a yoga session designed to anchor participants in the present moment. $5 suggested donation. Aug. 15, 6 pm. By donation. Lookout Park, 822 E. Valleyview Ave. whitcolib.org MUSIC, MOVEMENT & WINE Professional guided yoga by Larkin Barnett with light appetizers, charcuterie and formaggio trays, and full wine menu available for purchase. Aug. 16, 5:15-8 pm. $50. Arbor Crest Wine Cellars, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. arborcrest.com (509-927-9463) RIVERFRONT MOVES: PILATES IN THE PARK Precision Pilates classes welcome all levels of movers as they work to improve stability, alignment and inner strength. Aug. 16, 6-7 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.org (509-625-6600) ROOFTOP SUMMER YOGA Each week of the donation-based class has a different feel and practice. Tuesdays from 6-7:15 pm through Aug. 30. By donation. Saranac Rooftop, 25 W. Main. rootedyogapnw.com (509-315-8862) SPOKANE INDIANS VS. TRI-CITY DUST DEVILS Promo events during the sixgame series include Businessperson’s Special Day (Aug. 16), Back to School Night (Aug. 17), Family Feast Night (Aug. 18), Fireworks Night (Aug 19), Storybook Princess Night (Aug. 20) and Dollars in Your Dog Night (Aug. 21). Aug. 16, 12:05 pm, Aug. 17-20, 6:35 pm and Aug. 21, 1:05 pm. $8-$22. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. milb.com/spokane (535-2922 SILVER MOUNTAIN TRAIL RUN Choose between a 6k, 9k or 18k course at Silver Mountain Resort. Ride up North America’s longest gondola and then run a course with views from Kellogg and Wardner Peaks. Aug. 21. $45-$105. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg. nsplit.com

LIBERTY LAKE THROWDOWN This annual corn hole tournament raises funds for the HUB Sports Center. Register online by Aug. 8 to participate. Aug. 20, 11 am-8 pm. $30-$75. Orchard Park, 20298 E. Indiana Ave. pavillionpark.org

THEATER

COME FROM AWAY This New York Times Critics’ Pick takes you into the heart of the remarkable true story of 7,000 stranded passengers on 9/11 and the small town in Newfoundland that welcomed them. Aug. 9-13 at 7:30 pm; also Aug. 13 at 2 pm and Aug. 14 at 1 and 6:30 pm. $42-$100. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. broadwayspokane. com (509-279-7000) SISTER ACT A woman hiding in a convent helps her fellow sisters find their voices as she rediscovers her own. Aug. 5-21, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $25-$41. University High School, 12320 E. 32nd Ave. svsummertheatre.com NUNSENSE A musical farce about a convent of nuns staging a fundraiser to enable them to bury the last four nuns of their order who died of botulism in an unfortunate convent cooking accident and who are temporarily being stored in the freezer. Aug. 12-21; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $50-$142. Schuler Performing Arts Center, 1000 W. Garden Ave. cdasummertheatre.com ONE ACT PLAY FESTIVAL The festival features performances of eight one act plays from unpublished playwrights. Aug. 12-14, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 236 S. Union Ave. pendoreilleplayers.com MONO-MANIA See the revamped Panida Little theater, watch a monologue competition and help raise $2,000 for the theater. Aug. 13, 7 pm. $17-$20. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org WELCOME TO WONDERLAND A curated cabaret show with a tea party that’s Alice in Wonderland themed. Aug. 13, 6:30-10 pm. $35-$45. Atomic Threads Boutique, 1905 N. Monroe St. atomicthreadsinc.com THE SOUND OF MUSIC At this annual show, cast members ages 8-108 perform together for the local community. Aug. 19-28, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sat-Sun at 3 pm. $15-$20. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cytnorthidaho.org (208-660-9870) SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK: KING LEAR Performed by Montana Shakespeare in the Parks, King Lear is about Lear dividing his kingdom among the two daughters who flatter him and banishing the third one who loves him. Aug. 21, 5 pm. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. pavllionpark.org (509-755-6726)

VISUAL ARTS

AWAKENINGS: TRADITIONAL CANOES AND CALLING THE SALMON HOME The MAC, in collaboration with the United Tribes of the Upper Columbia, tells the story of the annual inland canoe journey, from the purchase of old growth cedar logs and carving the dugouts, to the annual launch and landing at Kettle Falls, through contemporary and historic canoes supported by the words of those who have experienced it. Through Aug. 21; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm; third Thursdays until 9 pm. $15-$20. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (509-456-3931) BOLD BEAUTY The show features work by artists Aaron Johnson, Maggie Jaszczack, Stephanie Frostad, Molly Sims,

Wilson Ong, Tom Jaszczack and Doug Fluckinger. Open daily from 11 am-6 pm through Sept. Free. The Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com CARL RICHARDSON & GARRIC SIMONSEN The August exhibit features collage works by Carl Richardson and drawings by Garric Simonsen. Gallery open by appointment through Aug. 31. Free. KolvaSullivan Gallery, 115 S. Adams St. kolvasullivangallery.com (509-458-5517) CLEANING OFF THE SHELVES The annual sale features $25 grab bags filled with ceramic pieces, plus other discounted pieces. Through Aug. 31. $25. Trackside Studio, 115 S. Adams. tracksidestudio.net HOT SUMMER NIGHTS A group show featuring paintings, sculptures, photography, wood carvings, mixed media art and more. Aug. 5-28, Fri from 5-8 pm and Sat from 12-5 pm. Free. Shotgun Studio, 1625 W. Water Ave. (509-688-3757) MOSAIC STEPPING STONES In this class, learn what materials to use and how to go about designing and creating your own mosaic. Ages 15+. Aug 12, 10:30 am5:30 pm. $70. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland Ave. spokaneartschool.net DATUM / RECENT PAINTINGS A collection of recent works by Harry Mestyank, Dustin M. Regul and Richie Masias with paintings by Tobe Harvey. Aug. 5-27, FriSat from 12-8 pm. 5-8 pm through Aug. 27. Free. Saranac Art Projects, 25 W. Main Ave. sapgallery.com (509-350-3574) SECOND FRIDAY ARTWALK Stroll the streets of downtown Coeur d’Alene and enjoy locally- and nationally-acclaimed artists, along with local shops, restaurants and businesses. Aug. 12, 5-8 pm. Free. Downtown Coeur d’Alene, Sherman Ave. artsandculturecda.org TIE-DYE PARTY Spruce up your wardrobe with fun colors and designs that can only be achieved with tie dye. Ages 12-18 and families. Registration required. Aug. 12, 2-3:30 pm. Free. Cheney Library, 610 First St. scld.org (509-893-8280) FILM PHOTOGRAPHERS MEET UP & SWAP MEET This second annual gathering features photography activities, workshops, networking events, gear swaps and more. Aug. 13, 10 am-3 pm. Free. Grant Park, 1015 S. Arthur St. spokaneparks.org POAC ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR This twoday features artist booths, food vendors and a youth art arena. All proceeds support POAC’s programs in visual and performing arts and community arts education. Aug. 13, 9 am-5 pm and Aug. 14, 9 am-4 pm. Free. Downtown Sandpoint. artinsandpoint.org/arts-crafts-fair SUMMER FORGING SATURDAYS MINI HAMMER-INS Whether you’re trying blacksmithing for the first time or you’d like to forge but don’t have a home shop, there are plenty of beginner projects to choose from with steel provided. Saturdays from 9 am-1 pm and 2-6 pm through Aug. 13. $40. Mad Co Labs, 3038 E. Trent Ave. columbiafireandiron.org SUNDAY ART MART Local emerging artists and crafters exhibit and sell their work in a casual environment. Sundays from 12-4 pm through Aug. 28. Downtown Spokane. downtownspokane.org TIE-DYE PARTY Spruce up your wardrobe with fun colors and designs that can only be achieved with tie dye. Ages 12-18 and their families. Registration required. Aug. 16, 2-3 pm. Free. Fairfield Library, 305 E. Main St. scld.org GARLAND SKETCH CRAWL Sketch the

landmarks of the Garland neighborhood with Megan Perkins. Aug. 17 from 9-11 am. $20. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland Ave. spokaneartschool.net ARTISTS IN THE GARDEN Artists from around the region present and sell their work. Art includes fiber arts, copper wire art, Kimekomi fabric art, children’s books, wooden bowls and more. Aug. 18, 10 am-1 pm. Free. Create Arts Center, 900 Fourth St. createarts.org (509-447-9277) TIE-DYE PARTY Spruce up your wardrobe with fun colors and designs that can only be achieved with tie dye. Only 15 people will be able to tie dye at a time. Ages 12-18 and their families. Registration is required. Aug. 18, 2-3 pm. Free. Otis Orchards Library, 22324 E. Wellesley Ave. scld.org (893-8390) DROP IN & DRAW Join a creative community for this weekly free-form drawing program. All skill levels are welcome. Supplies and projects provided. Wednesdays from 5:30-7 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org ART & GLASS FEST This annual event features over 50 local artists of various trades and expertise. Enjoy live music, wine, beer and food all weekend. Ages 21+. Aug. 20 and Aug. 21. Free. Arbor Crest Wine Cellars, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. arborcrest.com (509-927-9463)

WORDS

POETRY PRELUDE: LAURA READ A poetry reading before a performance of live music by Free Whiskey. Aug. 11, 6 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Park, 300 S. Chestnut St. annie@matlow.org UNDERSTANDING YOUR DREAMS This class teaches students how to examine dreams and what to look for in their dreams. Aug. 13, 11 am-noon. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org (509-444-5390) BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic series. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm; Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. bit.ly/2ZAbugD J.T. GREATHOUSE: THE GARDEN OF EMPIRE Greathouse continues his Pact and Pattern fantasy series. Celebrate the release of his book The Garden of Empire, the sequel to The Hand of the Sun King. RSVP at the link provided. Aug. 17, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (509-838-0206) HOW THEY MAKE IT: CREATING A STORY AT DREAMWORKS DreamWorks storyboard artists Heidi Jo Gilbert and Joel Crawford visit the MAC to discuss how DreamWorks creates and develop their animated characters. Aug. 18, 6-9 pm. $10. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (509-456-3931) LILAC CITY LIVE! Jess Walter, Ryan McComb and Tanya Ballman make an appearance at this edition of Spokane’s late-night talk show. Aug. 18, 8 pm. Free. Central Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org (509-444-5336) POETRY PRELUDE: THOM CARAWAY A poetry reading before live music by Soul Proprietor. Aug. 18, 6 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Park, 300 S. Chestnut St. annie@ matlow.org BEVERLY HODGINS: MERCY AND MADNESS Hodgins explores the story of Spokane’s first female physician in her new book, “Mercy and Madness.” Aug. 19, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com n


You can visit Pasco, but you need to pack your own cannabis.

LOCAL CONTROL

Pasco Reconsiders Cannabis Seeds of change are being planted in Washington’s largest cannabis desert

A

t a Pasco City Council meeting in late July, David Morgan, an owner of downtown Spokane’s Lucky Leaf, gave a presentation about the benefits cannabis retailers can bring to a blighted or overlooked area within a city. He had to give the presentation because before Morgan can open a new Lucky Leaf location in downtown Pasco, the city will need to change the rules on its books. Since 2014, cannabis businesses have been prohibited in the city of Pasco, as well as the entirety of Franklin County. Only 39 percent of Franklin County voters supported legalization in the 2012 election, the second-lowest percentage in the state behind only tiny Garfield County. Cannabis, of course, is legal everywhere in the state of Washington, even Pasco. It just can’t be grown, processed or sold there. In the decade since legalization, cannabis has become ubiquitous around the state, especially in larger cities. But

BY WILL MAUPIN according to the Municipal Research and Services Center the past decade. Another noted that a similar shift has of Washington, cannabis businesses are prohibited in 82 occurred on the council. municipalities in the state, as well as on unincorporated “We’ve had a 100 percent turnover on council since land in six counties. our previous ban on retail sales passed,” City Council Closer to home, there are places around the Spokane member Craig Maloney said, not long after stating that area that have taken a similar approach to that of Pasco he specifically would not be patronizing any cannabis and Franklin County. Cannabis businesses are prohibbusinesses. “I certainly think we owe the community a ited in Chewelah, Deer Park, Medical Lake and Liberty vote on this.” Lake, though there are dispensaries nearby, outside those After the hour-plus discussion, the council agreed municipalities’ boundaries. that the rules currently in place needed to be reevaluated, Morgan’s presentation to the Pasco City though the council did not take Council emphasized the lack of nearby dispensaries any action on the issue during LETTERS And despite the area’s overwhelming vote against the meeting. There were calls Send comments to cannabis legalization and subsequent establishment for more discussion, and on poeditor@inlander.com. of laws prohibiting cannabis businesses, the Pasco tentially taking it to the voters City Council was receptive during the presentato decide. It wasn’t a decisive tion and Q&A session. Council members noted shifts in hour, but it was a potentially important one for the future demographics and perceptions of cannabis in Pasco over of cannabis in the region. n

AUGUST 11, 2022 INLANDER 43


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