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Fourteen Challenges Facing Spokane’s Next Police Chief By Mitch Ryals

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EDITOR’S NOTE

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n this much we can all agree: CRAIG MEIDL has his work cut out for him as Spokane’s next police chief, assuming the city council confirms him. He’s taking over the department at a time when law enforcement across America is under increased scrutiny for its use of deadly force. The way Meidl got the job didn’t help any, either: Mayor David Condon appointed him to the position last week, foregoing a public process that had yielded two finalists in favor of Meidl, who had publicly declared he didn’t want the job. Who can blame him, really? The department is still recovering after the previous police chief, Frank Straub, was forced out last September amid complaints of an abusive management style and allegations of sexual harassment. For this week’s cover story (page 22), staff writer Mitch Ryals interviewed scores of community leaders to create a definitive list of the biggest challenges facing Meidl in his new role. — JACOB H. FRIES, editor

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WHAT CAN SPOKANE’S NEW POLICE CHIEF DO TO BUILD PUBLIC TRUST? LOUIS STEPHENS

Mind you, this is coming from someone that just came out of jail. I think he needs to crack down more on the real things that are going on and actually take interest in the people that he’s arresting, because there’s good people out there that have things against them that they shouldn’t, like myself. I am a good person trying to get my life started.

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My opinion is that he could help out by being more respectful to homeless people and helping out the community, rather than trying to punish the criminals. … They need to learn how to deal with the mentally ill rather than taking them down with a bullet. It would help out if the police chief or the police department learned more about how to handle mentally ill patients.

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COMMENT | ELECTION 2016

Road to Nowhere

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Donald Trump has taken the low road in his campaign, and Republicans of character simply won’t follow BY GEORGE NETHERCUTT Craig Mason

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here’s a familiar saying: “What goes around, comes around.” Donald Trump, the Republican Party’s nominee for president, is experiencing that truism as numerous Republicans won’t endorse him against Hillary Clinton. Trump won the Republican nomination by amassing enough delegates, but he violated at least one wise political maxim: You can’t get hurt for what you don’t say. Approaching the nomination, Trump pilloried his Republican opponents, humiliating and ultimately defeating them. He called Jeb Bush, an accomplished conservative former governor of Florida, “low energy” and rudely criticized Bush’s father and older brother, both former presidents. He called Florida Sen. Marco Rubio, a rising Republican star, “Little Marco,” among other things. “Lyin’ Ted” was a moniker Trump reserved for conservative Sen. Ted Cruz, an ambitious Texan who came in second in the delegate count. Mr. Trump also publicly criticized Cruz’s wife and father. When popular Hispanic New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez failed to endorse Trump, he criticized her in her own state. South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham was roundly insulted by Mr. Trump, who called Graham’s friend, Arizona Sen. John McCain, a former prisoner of war, a “loser” because he was captured by the North Vietnamese and eschewed his personal freedom. Fearing political defeat at home with Trump as their presidential nominee, 16 Republican senators seeking re-election in 2016 avoided the Republican National Convention, refusing to climb aboard the Trump bandwagon because of his offensive language. Now he wants their help. Trump won the nomination, but has paid a high price.

T

rump says he’s new to politics, but as a savvy 70-year-old businessman, he must realize that criticizing fellow Republican candidates in a deeply personal manner won’t earn their support at election time. Cruz is selfserving and calculating and will run again for president, so it’s no surprise that he used the convention stage in Cleveland last month to lay the groundwork for his own political gain, rather than endorse Trump. Some will mistakenly replicate the Trump style. Mistakes have plagued the Trump nomination. Plagiarism is always fruitless: Instead of parroting liberal First Lady Michelle Obama’s words, Melania Trump could have chosen to quote Laura Bush, Nancy Reagan or some other conservative, avoiding plagiarism by giving them credit. The words’ impact wouldn’t have lessened, but the political fallout would have. The good things Mrs. Trump said about her husband were diminished by using someone else’s words.

6 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016

Trump’s choice of Indiana Gov. Mike Pence as his running mate was diminished by reports that Trump operatives approached Ohio Gov. John Kasich to be VP, but he declined, even choosing not to address the convention in his own state. Kasich, deeply religious and moral, couldn’t embrace the divisions Trump has fostered. One Spokane woman — an elected official, even — told me that she wouldn’t let her children watch the Republican debates, fearing that Trump would utter something inappropriate or crude. That indictment of Trump’s rough political style explains Republicans’ reluctance to endorse him.

T

rump supporters argue that refusing to support him hands the election to Hillary Clinton, who many believe to be the most dishonest presidential candidate ever. Trump will need every vote available to defeat the truly liberal Clinton machine. With millions on hand, she’ll not miss a political trick, because with the Clintons, obsessed with political power, the ends always justify the means. But if Trump loses in November, his supporters will have only themselves to blame for abandoning their civility standards. Demanding that Republicans with high standards lower them just because the alternative is so bad is a fool’s errand. It’s OK to be a tough campaigner, but it’s not OK to diminish opponents personally and crudely like Trump has. Most first-time candidates usually say something stupid enough to sour the public on their candidacy. The savvy campaigner, however, takes high political ground, because after a bruising election campaign, a loser shouldn’t want the public to recall the low ground the losing campaign took, especially if that loser wants future respect. Trump may not care, adopting the “election is rigged” excuse instead. Trump’s supporters ask voters to abandon their principles and ignore the past because “Hillary would be so bad.” They’re right about Hillary, but demanding that voters abandon civility and integrity to support one flawed candidate because the other is so distasteful is asking too much. In doing so, they expect voters to travel a low political road by supporting a candidate indiscriminately; that’s something the majority won’t do. In politics and in life, one reaps what one sows. November 8 will deliver a flawed 45th president. 


COMMENT | TRAIL MIX

Tea Leaves PREPOSTEROUS PREDICTORS

The presidential race between HILLARY CLINTON and DONALD TRUMP continues to baffle the politically savvy and slow alike. Last September, for instance, statistical journalist Nate Silver predicted that Trump had a 5 percent chance of winning the GOP nomination. As long as we’re guessing, Politico found seven other predictors. Here are three: • How deep are candidates’ voices? A 2015 experiment by a University of Miami professor concluded that Americans are more likely to vote for the male candidate with a deeper voice. However, in races with a female candidate, higher-pitched vocals tended to prevail. Score one for Clinton. • Did the Lakers play in the Finals? According to Politico, Republicans won the White House in every election since 1960 (except for 2008) when the Los Angeles Lakers played in the NBA Finals. This year, the Lakers finished dead last in the Western Conference. Clinton again. • Where are the Olympics? In every election (except for 1988) since 1968, if the summer Olympic Games are hosted by a city that already has hosted an Olympics, the incumbent party wins. Rio de Janeiro has never hosted before. Advantage Trump. (MITCH RYALS)

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(SOME OF) THE PEOPLE HAVE SPOKEN

Washington voters spoke last week (or at a fraction of them did). About a third of voters statewide and in Spokane County voted in last week’s primary election, which advanced the top two vote-getters to the general election. In the 6th District race to replace retiring state Rep. Kevin Parker, R-Spokane, Democrat LYNNETTE VEHRS and Republican MIKE VOLZ beat out three other candidates with 43 percent and 29 percent of the vote, respectively. Notably, Ian Field, a 26-year-old former congressional operative, finished third, despite a fundraising advantage and the backing of much of Spokane’s Republican establishment, including embattled Mayor David Condon. Former Spokane City Councilwoman Nancy McLaughlin unexpectedly lost her bid to retain her seat on the Spokane County Board of Commissioners. Despite McLaughlin being selected earlier this year by the Spokane County GOP to fill the commission’s vacated seat, Republican legislative aide JOSH KERNS attacked her record and finished with 32 percent of the vote. In November, he’ll face City Councilwoman CANDACE MUMM, a Democrat who finished with 39 percent of the vote. CATHY McMORRIS RODGERS, who represents Eastern Washington in the U.S. House of Representatives, finished with 42 percent of the 5th Congressional District vote and just 40 percent of the vote in Spokane County, her worst showing since she first ran in 2004. Democrat JOE PAKOOTAS was second in the race with 32 percent of the vote, beating out independent Dave Wilson. (JAKE THOMAS)



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COMMENT | YOUTH

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Beating the Odds Our child welfare system needs a revamp to help foster kids succeed in college BY TARA DOWD

A

s back-to-school commercials dominate our televisions and students gear up for classes to start this fall, I can’t help but think of the 10 percent of foster-care youth doing the extraordinary and heading off to college against the odds. Many of us can remember the anxiety and excitement, even fear, we felt when our parents dropped us off at the dorms for the first week in college. It was probably both exhilarating and panic-inducing. For kids who spent

most of their childhood in foster homes, those feelings are exponentially more powerful. Being a foster youth is one of the hardest things I have ever faced. Yes, my parents’ failure to be good parents was hard, but not the worst. If you think that abuse and neglect is bad when it comes from your own parents, imagine what it feels like when you experience it from strangers that the state says can take care of you. I was placed in nine-plus foster homes before I was 12 years old, and all but one were emotionally or physically abusive. I was better off with my alcoholic mother. Sadly, my story is not all that unique. So instead of

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packing college dorm accoutrements and new clothes from the mall, our foster youth carry a whole bunch of emotional and mental baggage as they head off to college — if they can even make it that far. The terror I felt was like nothing I had experienced before. At some point you become numb to the different foster parents you meet, the different homes, where you lay your head down at night. But then you choose to do something for yourself, hoping to end the terrible cycle your family seems fated to repeat, and your self-doubt grows to gigantic proportions. That self-doubt is an unshakable companion to almost every former foster kid who ever walked the halls of the Department of Social and Health Services. Once in college, only 3 percent of the 10 percent of former foster youth will graduate. That number is heartbreaking. Foster-youth college attendance and graduation rates should closely mirror the rates for the general population. This tells me more than any other data about how the child welfare system in our country performs. And it’s not good. I’m not saying that I haven’t met a dozen fantastic people who social-work themselves practically to death trying to keep families together and children safe. The problem is that the system is broken, and nothing will change until our society does. We have to keep families together by helping them to get out of poverty through a higher minimum wage, easier access to higher education, and job training. We have to end the schoolto-prison pipeline. We LETTERS have to treat drug and Send comments to alcohol abuse like the editor@inlander.com. medical diseases they are, and fully fund treatment. We have to figure out a way to fully support mental health services. We have to help marginalized groups find their voice and gain social equity within our communities. Changing the way we deal with child welfare seems impossible, but then I’m reminded that weeks after I turned 18, I began school at the University of Montana, and somehow made it to the end. I took that self-doubt as a companion to every class I walked into, and made it a motivation to graduate four years later. The way I see it, if an anomaly like me can get through college, we can come together and change outcomes for every child in our community. We just have to face down the self-doubt, something foster kids do every day.  Tara Dowd, an enrolled Inupiaq Eskimo, was born into poverty and now owns a diversity consulting business. She is an advocate for systemic equity and sees justice as a force that makes communities better.

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

Readers react to a blog post that the city of Spokane has, so far, spent more than $468,000 in legal defense and on an independent investigation into Frank Straub’s ouster:

MICHELLE FLOWERS: So how many more lawsuits will it take before our city realizes they are doing something wrong? BRANDON BRALEY: I’ve been waiting my entire life for the city of Spokane to get it right. HOLLY ROBERTSON: For everyone bitching about our mayor, please remember you voted him into office twice. MICKEY LONCHAR: Advice for Condon: When you find yourself in a hole, quit digging. MICHELLE FLOWERS: The Republican Party backed him and that tells me he was the wrong choice from the beginning. The big parties had not been involved in local politics until him. C.A. PEPPERMAN: For that amount, you could fix a few potholes. KAT PANZA: Con-man, er, I mean Condon needs to GO!

Frank Straub

Reactions to a blog post reporting that a wildlife observer’s camera captured an image of a wolf passing through Mt. Spokane State Park:

ALAN WALKER: Hopefully it and its pack is not causing problems to farmers in the area... TRACY MARTIN: Great news! I hope more come back. CASSEY RUTTER MILLER: It’s beautiful and I hope the humans will leave it alone and let it be. KELLY MICHAEL COLLITON: ...and this is a good thing why? CHRISTOPHER PATRICK CUSTANCE: Hope nobody shoots it like the dumbass who shot the one that was at the Grand Canyon. It even had a radio collar on... JOHN THOMAS: One may not be bad, but just wait ‘til they multiply. Then find out how rotten they are.

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MICHAEL OLSON: I am sure some numbnuts will feel the need to kill it. VICKI BARNES: Sorry Inlander, this makes me sad in so many ways that this was reported. There is a wild west mindset about these animals and some yahoo will probably go load up the rifle and try to kill this animal whether or not it’s on state or private lands. Some things just need to be left alone… 

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Alex Rodriguez wants the people who busted his jaw at a party to face the consequences.

JACOB JONES PHOTO

SPORTS

A Blind Eye The WSU football team wants to move on from a house-party brawl weeks ago, but victims want the players held accountable BY WILSON CRISCIONE

A

nyone who plays for Mike Leach knows the rules. Don’t abuse women. Don’t use illegal drugs. Don’t steal. Break one of those rules, and you’re kicked off the football team. As soon as Leach arrived as Washington State University’s head football coach in 2012, he made it obvious he wasn’t kidding around. He kicked three potential starters off the team before he ever coached a game. One player had been arrested for theft, one for possession of

marijuana (before it was legal in Washington), and one for assault following an altercation at a fraternity party. But now, four years later, after a fight involving football players at an off-campus party weeks ago left one WSU student concussed and another with a broken jaw, the victims are calling for the same kind of accountability, fearing that the incident will be forgotten. It may not involve hitting women, using drugs or stealing, but multiple witnesses at the party say the behavior of a small group of players caused the fight, and that it was those players

dealing the blows. Leach has said he doesn’t anticipate kicking anyone off the team at this point. That worries Susana Senent, the mother of one victim. “I don’t want the school to hide this and not hold the people who did this responsible,” she says. Pullman police say they’re investigating. Police Cmdr. Chris Tennant says a handful of players were at the party, and a few of those players are persons of interest. But so far — nearly three weeks later — no arrests have been made. Leach answered a series of questions about the fight from Spokesman-Review and Seattle Times reporters who cover WSU football regularly. He declined repeated Inlander interview requests for this story through athletic department spokesman Bill Stevens, who said via email, “[Leach] has commented on the issue and until the legal process is complete does not plan to comment further.”

THE FIGHT

Alex Rodriguez wore his Cougs jersey the night he says WSU football players smashed his jaw. Now, Rodriguez ...continued on next page

AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 13


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speaks through gritted teeth, with the wires he’ll wear for weeks keeping his mouth shut and the metal plates he’ll have for the rest of his life keeping his face together. The senior has made it to every WSU football home game since his freshman year. He says that’ll change if the people who did this to him aren’t reprimanded. The fight happened the final weekend of July, Alex Rodriguez may not regain when Rodriguez feeling in his upper lip for a year. and his roommates threw a house party to celebrate the end of WSU’s summer session. By about 1:15 am, he says there were up to 80 people there. It was around this time that Rodriguez’s roommate, who spoke on the condition that he was not named in this article, says a group of football players kept lighting fireworks in the middle of the crowd and wouldn’t stop when asked. The roommate went to Rodriguez and told him about the fireworks and how the group had started pulling wood off the side of the house. The roommate remembers that Rodriguez flickered the lights and shouted for everyone to get out. The next thing the roommate remembers is waking up with a concussion and EMTs standing over him. Rodriguez remembers what happened clearly. As soon as he told everyone to leave, he says a firework was “thrown” at him. He looked to his right and saw his roommate get clocked by a man with a sleeve tattoo, red shorts and a black sleeveless shirt — a moment that happened to be captured on a cellphone video. Witnesses say they know who that person is, and that he’s a football player. One of those witnesses is Pedro Diaz, who fought back during the brawl. He described it as “a bunch of people throwing fists everywhere.” One connected with

Diaz. Rodriguez got hit before he could make it over to his fallen roommate. Rodriguez fell to the ground and says he was kicked repeatedly by at least two people, snapping his lower jaw in two. He wasn’t sure who it was at the time, only that they were big — more than 200 pounds. He was later told by several eyewitnesses that these people also were football players. “I don’t think it can even be called a fight,” Rodriguez says. “I just got my ass kicked.”

‘WE EVALUATE FACTS’

Tennant, with the Pullman police, says they have a “pretty good handle” on what happened that night. Somebody (he wouldn’t identify who) set off fireworks. The guys in charge yelled for everyone to get out. A few other guys, who he again did not identify, didn’t like the way they were being told to leave. A fight ensued. He says a few players were part of it. There were five or six players there, but he doesn’t think all of them were “actively involved in criminal activity.” The injuries to Rodriguez and his roommate are serious enough to constitute felony assault, he says.

“I don’t think it can even be called a fight. I just got my ass kicked.” Tennant says that police met with football administrators, who asked if police could get the investigation “wrapped up ASAP so it doesn’t affect play.” Leach, according to the transcript from the Spokesman-Review, said the whole situation has been overblown, and that members of the media are seeing how many times they can “write sentences with a football player in it and still sound like a sentence.” “We evaluate facts. We don’t leave it to the outside to evaluate the facts,” he said. “We evaluate the facts with the help of law enforcement.” Leach called the initial stories recounting the incident “ridiculously inaccurate reflections of the events that night,” but he didn’t point out specifics when asked by reporters. He described that

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A CIGAR LOVER’S EVENT WSU coach Mike Leach has called news reports of the fight “ridiculously inaccurate reflections of the events that night.” YOUNG KWAK PHOTO night as a series of skirmishes, and said “football players were in the room when the room erupted.” He said he was disappointed they didn’t get out sooner. He said the bigger question, not “did a football player punch somebody,” is how an environment of underage drinking and fighting was created. (Police say there’s no evidence of underage drinking, and it’s not being investigated.) Leach said the team would cooperate with police. “I just don’t want anything that’s unwarranted. I mean, nobody does a better job of addressing, taking care of players and using team discipline than our staff,” Leach told reporters. Senent, Rodriguez’s mother, still says it is “unbelievable” that no arrests have been made. She’s concerned that police will never make an arrest, or wait until after the football season is over. Pullman police Sgt. Jake Opgenorth said the investigation is actually going “pretty quick” considering the amount of witnesses. But Senent is not convinced. “I don’t want a slap on the wrist. This is a broken jaw, this is a very serious injury,” she says. “They could have killed my son.”

SEEING BOTH SIDES

Rodriguez says he has backup plans should police fail to arrest anyone and should the football team enact no further discipline. He says he’s been told that WSU’s Division of Student Affairs will conduct its own investigation. That would be separate from any other investigation and could result in suspension or expulsion, whether a student is a football player or not. Rodriguez has seen the reaction of people on social media who don’t want to believe that members of their favorite team did anything wrong. He says LETTERS he doesn’t care when people acSend comments to cuse him of trying to sabotage editor@inlander.com. the team. He’s had enough support on the other side. “I’m a big sports fan too, especially for the NFL. If I see something that happens, I’m like, ‘Why would you do that, dude? I hope he doesn’t get kicked out,’” Rodriguez says. “But from a more personal perspective, I now have a new sense of what it’s like to be that person on the other end of that.” n

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AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

PHOTO EYE A GOOD CAUSE

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Former Washington State University and NFL player Steve Gleason, center, with former college teammate Steve Birnbaum and his wife, Kyla Birnbaum, catch one of five bands to rock Gleason Fest last Saturday. The annual event, this year held at Riverfront Park’s Lilac Bowl Amphitheatre, raises money for people who, like Gleason, suffer from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

On Inlander.com MORE INLANDER NEWS EVERY DAY

ENVIRONMENT Last month, the Spokane City Council voted to put a measure on the ballot to fine railroads for sending OIL AND COAL TRAINS through Spokane. But just a few days before, their own policy adviser warned them the measure was on very thin legal ice. Analyzing federal law and court rulings, City Council legal adviser Brian McClatchey warned the council that there was only a “very small chance that this proposed ordinance would survive a legal challenge.” But the author of the ordinance, councilmember Breean Beggs (pictured), came to a different conclusion — suggesting that because the oil trains posed a danger to the Spokane aquifer, a unique local feature, the law might qualify for an exception to federal regulations. Voters will get a chance to weigh in on the question in November — if, that is, a pre-election challenge doesn’t get the initiative removed from the ballot first. (DANIEL WALTERS)

16 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016

EDUCATION When Washington lawmakers passed a bill earlier this year that kept state charter schools open, the state’s LARGEST TEACHERS UNION wasn’t convinced that the problem was really fixed. The new law shifted funding for charter schools from the state general fund to the lottery account as a response to the state Supreme Court ruling that the state funding of charters was unconstitutional. But the Washington Education Association says the legislative fix still doesn’t make charter schools legal. So last week, the union joined a coalition of parents, educators and civic groups in filing a lawsuit in King County Superior Court arguing that point, using the same lead attorney who led the first challenge to the state’s charter school law. (WILSON CRISCIONE)


NEWS | BRIEFS

Another Lawsuit The fallout continues from Straub’s rocky tenure as Spokane police chief; plus, DSHS settles with former mental health patients THE OTHER SPOKESWOMAN

For more than a year, the city has weathered the fallout from the transfer of former police spokeswoman Monique Cotton to the Parks Department after she approached Mayor DAVID CONDON with allegations of sexual harassment by then-police Chief Frank Straub. Now, after Straub’s lawsuit was dismissed, the city has been hit with another lawsuit. Former parks spokeswoman Nancy Goodspeed alleges that, while on medical leave for brain surgery for her Parkinson’s disease, she’d effectively been replaced by Cotton. When Goodspeed returned, according to her lawyer, the city refused to allow her to return to full-time work or her previous duties. “Under the law she’s entitled to be returned to her position and her duties,” says Goodspeed’s attorney,

Kevin Roberts. Roberts accuses the city not only of discrimination, but of violating Goodspeed’s medical privacy by requiring her to submit to “fitness for duty” exams. He also accuses Condon of violating Goodspeed’s right to privacy by stating publicly that Goodspeed had a “chronic medical condition.” “They thought that Nancy was an easy target,” says Roberts. Ultimately, both Cotton and Goodspeed resigned. The lawsuit names the city as a defendant, as well as Condon, City Administrator Theresa Sanders, outgoing Human Resources Director Heather Lowe and Occupational Medicine Associates, which conducts the exams. Roberts says that the timing of the lawsuit was not related to the release of the Straub investigation last month. Instead, he had to wait 180 days for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to pass on filing its own lawsuit. Roberts says a city attorney recently offered Goodspeed a $45,000 settlement, but he rejected that as insultingly low. (DANIEL WALTERS)

RESTORING PATIENTS’ RIGHTS

The Department of Social and Health Services has reached a settlement agreement with former MENTAL HEALTH patients that plaintiffs hope will foster quicker and more effective recovery for those confined in the state’s psychiatric hospitals. The agreement stems from a case originally brought to the attention of attorneys by the Inlander in 2014. Back then, Ketema Ross, one of six plaintiffs in the lawsuit, was locked away in Eastern State Hospital after he was found not guilty of burglary charges by reason of insanity. He committed the alleged crime while in the

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throes of a mental illness episode. Ross was confined to Eastern for a total of seven years — six of those, he says, were spent in a constant “chess match” with staff as he struggled to maintain his sanity and dignity as a human being. He says he maxed out on his treatment after a year, but was not permitted to leave, in part, because of recently enacted hospital policies and state laws. Even a walk outside, often therapeutic and recommended by doctors as treatment, required a judge’s approval. These and other restrictions on how and when patients could leave hospital grounds undermined clinicians’ authority, hindered recovery, and violated patients’ constitutional rights, the suit alleged. “These hospitals have two major roles: protect the public and help patients recover and get back into society,” says Spokane attorney Andrew Biviano, one of the lead attorneys in the case. Biviano says public safety became a much bigger concern, and the goal of helping patients was “far weaker, and virtually nonexistent.” The settlement provides for a more streamlined process for granting permission to temporarily leave the hospitals, among other modifications. “This will hopefully stop the logjam,” Biviano says of the backlog of inmates waiting for beds in the two hospitals. “No system will ever work until we start working with a mindset that we need to treat people, not warehouse them.” Ross, now 38 and engaged to be married, says the terms of the settlement are beyond what he could have hoped for. “This is about the people who are still there and who, if things go according to plan, will give people a greater hope of recovery,” says Ross. (MITCH RYALS)

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AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 17


NEWS | POLITICS

Choosing Sides

Laura McAloon, Condon’s recent pick for city attorney, argues that electing city attorneys would just make the position all the more political.

Would electing the city attorney make them more accountable to the people — or just more swayed by the whims of the mob? BY DANIEL WALTERS

E

ven before the explosive report came out last month, City Council President Ben Stuckart was flirting with the notion of yanking the power to pick Spokane’s city attorney out of the hands of Mayor David Condon and placing it in the hands of the public. But the independent investigative report pushed him over the edge: It concluded that the city attorney’s office intentionally withheld important documents concerning a police chief scandal until after the mayor’s election last November. While the Condon administration has vehemently denied impropriety, to Stuckart it just underscored the fear that, because the city attorney can be hired or fired by the mayor, the role of city attorney is skewed in the mayor’s favor. “That role shouldn’t be acting to protect the mayor. They should be acting in the best interest of the citizens,” Stuckart says. “Which to me would be releasing the goddamn documents.” He wants to put a measure changing the city attorney to an elected position on the ballot in the spring. “Instead of being an appointment of the mayor, it would have true political independence and answer to the whole city,” Stuckart says. Condon has said he wouldn’t support the idea, citing how crucial it is for the city to be able to pick an attorney with specific qualifications at a specific time. His recent pick for city attorney, Laura McAloon, shares his opposition. “Ben’s comment in the media that, that’s why you

18 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016

need an elected city attorney, to take the politics out of it?” McAloon said at a press conference. “For Pete’s sake, you just inserted politics into the position. I believe that if you have an elected city attorney, that person is always going to struggle with, if you give advice, what will the voters think? Will I get re-elected?” This question — is Spokane better served by putting the job of city attorney into the hands of the mayor or the voters? — is one the city has returned to time and time again. After all, this wasn’t the first time the Spokane city attorney’s office has been accused of covering up important documents.

Yet the city’s attorney office repeatedly invoked attorney-client privilege to prevent reporters from getting their hands on crucial documents that exposed the truth about the deal, and just how much city councilmembers knew. By 2006, the decision to hide documents resulted in a nearly $300,000 settlement from the city for violating public records law, and an apology from the city for misusing attorney-client privilege. Beggs, then an attorney for the firm that won the public records case, says it was then the biggest public records award in state history. That same year brought a new scandal: The death of developmentally disabled janitor Otto Zehm. There were four camera angles in the Zip Trip showing that

“The legal answers are almost always much easier to arrive at than the political answers.”

A BRIEF HISTORY

While Stuckart is a new convert to the belief that city attorneys should be elected, his fellow councilmember Breean Beggs has been pushing the idea for five years. “In my view, it’s always political,” Beggs says. “The question is who has the power to make the political choice. Is it the mayor’s office or the voters? I don’t think ‘political’ is a bad thing.” He says he’s witnessed problems with the city attorney’s office time and time again. Take the River Park Square parking garage debacle — a convoluted partnership between the city and the wealthy Cowles family that ended in a disaster costing the city tens of millions of dollars.

Officer Karl Thompson beat Zehm with his baton. But Assistant City Attorney Rocky Treppiedi only revealed two in response to public records requests, hiding crucial information from the public and investigators. Beggs, who faced Treppiedi during the subsequent civil lawsuits, says he often wondered who the city attorney’s office was working for. “If you cross the mayor, you risk getting fired,” Beggs says. “[That] has got to be in the back of the mind of the city attorney.” Take former City Attorney Howard Delaney, for example. Condon scored a surprise 2011 victory over incumbent Mayor Mary Verner, in part by promising to fire Treppiedi. To do that, he first fired Delaney, Treppiedi’s boss. Today, Delaney suggests attorneys would feel less constrained were they elected. “Anyone in an elected position, I think, feels much less inhibited at telling members of the executive and/or


legislative branch ‘no,’” Delaney says. “Any good lawyer who’s advising the client has to feel free to say no.” Other local leaders worry that voters would risk getting saddled with a dangerously unqualified politician if they voted on city attorney. “Someone who is a good campaigner could get elected and not know diddly about the job,” says County Commissioner Al French. But Larry Haskell, the elected county prosecutor, sees value in campaigning and debating for a skilled attorney job like his. “It gives the people an opportunity, if they choose, to find out what the issues are,” Haskell says. He believes voters should decide whether they want to elect the city attorney. Verner is also cautiously supportive of electing the city attorney, as long as the public understands that the attorney would represent the city, not the voters. By contrast, her predecessor, Dennis Hession, worries that voters may not be equipped to choose the best attorney. “Are you creating an opportunity for people to weigh in? Yes. Are you giving them the tools to make the decision? Maybe not,” Hession says. “You have to remember you’re creating another politician. Do you really want your city attorney to be a politician?”

Friday, August 12th 10:30 pm

SEATTLE vs. SAN DIEGO

For proof of the positive impacts of an elected city attorney, both Beggs and Stuckart point to Seattle, the sole city in Washington where the city attorney isn’t appointed. And while Spokane’s city attorneys have only rarely agreed to speak with the press, Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes is happy to talk to the Inlander. “If you’re appointed, there is no upside to making a statement,” Holmes says. “You will have a much more responsive office if you have that person be elected. I’m answerable to the voters of Seattle. I don’t shy away from tough questions.” Holmes is the sole decision maker for the city of Seattle to decide when to settle, when it’s worth going to trial, and when to sue. “I cannot be fired, nor can I fire my client when I’m in this role,” Holmes says. “That forces us to work together. That forces us to solve our differences.” For example, he sued to challenge ballot initiatives over Seattle’s deep-bore tunnel against the wishes of then-Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn. The two feuded publicly over issues like police reform. At the end of it, Holmes was re-elected. McGinn was not. While Holmes says the public feuding between him and the mayor was not healthy for the city at the time, he believes the ultimate result put the city in a better place. “I lay awake nights wondering what success looks like,” Holmes says. “I can tell you this. The legal answers are almost always much easier to arrive at than the political answers.” Not every city appreciates the additional conflict that an elected city attorney can create. In 2013, San Diego CityBeat argued that San Diego should stop electing city attorneys and start appointing them. At the time, the San Diego city attorney had called the mayor “impetuous” and accused him of trying to “intimidate others into submission,” while the mayor called her “unethical” and “incompetent.” “Epic battles between city attorneys, mayors and city councils are fun for journalists to cover, but, as citizens, we’ve grown weary of them,” the CityBeat editorial argued. In Spokane, Stuckart is still compiling examples, both positive and negative, from elected city attorneys nationwide for a white paper about the issue, in preparation for a push to put it on the ballot next spring. As McAloon waits for the council to approve her as city attorney, she cautions against hastily changing the system. “The most important thing to me is that it isn’t a knee-jerk reaction to the current situation,” she says. “I don’t think it should be something that should be done quickly.”  danielw@inlander.com

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NEWS | HOUSING

When Benjamin Loraas moved into an apartment on West Augusta Avenue, he thought it was a step up. But he now worries he’ll be pushed back down.

JAKE THOMAS PHOTO

‘Unreasonable Threat to Life and Property’ Spokane’s rental housing has problems, but landlord and tenant groups are split on a solution BY JAKE THOMAS

A

miracle turned into a nightmare at the apartment complex on West Augusta Avenue. About a year and a half ago, Benjamin Loraas and Kami Holgate were living in homeless shelters. They wanted to regain custody of their son, but were told they’d need stable housing first. With the help of a local nonprofit, they secured a one-bedroom apartment in the basement of a house that had been converted into an eight-unit apartment complex. The small $525-a-month apartment had scuffed wood-panel walls, and the windows were in various states of disrepair, either broken or missing a pane. But they had their son. They were home. “We were ecstatic,” recalls Holgate. Things went downhill from there, they say. Their landlord had the windows repaired, but they were either nailed shut, boarded up or sealed with a glaze, creating a potentially perilous situation. “If there’s a fire in the main floor, we can’t get out,” says Loraas. “We’re screwed.” In December, they say the apartment above them flooded, and they worry that the ceiling is falling apart. A rat chewed a hole through the drywall in the kitchen where the sink is full of dirty dishes, because the faucet has no running water. Loraas says they’ve complained to their landlord, Jack Radke, who they say doesn’t take the situation seriously. Radke is a Liberty Lake resident who owns various properties in Spokane County through the Radke Living Trust, according to county records. Last year, according to county records, Radke sold a building

20 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016

downtown for nearly $1.5 million. “He thinks the city will let it go like it has for the last 30 years,” says Holgate. But now the city isn’t letting it go, and the building’s tenants will bear the brunt of the fallout. Although neighbors complained about the property for years, it wasn’t until July 20 that the Spokane Fire Department sent a letter to Radke calling the building an “unreasonable threat to life and property.” It listed 14 problems that needed to be addressed, including extending the fire escape ladder to the ground, putting emergency exit windows in the basement, repairing plumbing and fixing hazardous electrical wire, as well as installing carbon monoxide and smoke detectors in units. When reached by the Inlander, Radke declined to comment, but said the building is safe and he would have no problem using the fire escape. As of press time, Assistant Fire Chief Brian Schaeffer says the the fire marshal is considering condemning the basement and top floors of the unit. “It’s not the tenants’ fault,” says Schaeffer. “They are the ones who suffer here.” Although the city contracts with Spokane Neighborhood Action Partners (SNAP), a local nonprofit, to help relocate displaced tenants, Loraas says there are few openings in Spokane’s tight rental market, especially for anyone with criminal offenses on their record. “I’m worried about being forced into homelessness,” he says. Teri Anderson, Tenants Union of Washington State’s Spokane-based community organizer, says that situations

like this are proof of the city’s failure to hold landlords accountable. She says that state landlord-tenant law makes it too easy for landlords to intimidate tenants, keeping them from complaining to code inspectors. As a result, she says, buildings fall into disrepair while landlords continue to cash rent checks. “I just feel like we are in the wild, wild west here when it comes to landlords and tenants,” says Anderson. “Our landlords don’t even hold a business license.” That could be changing. Spokane’s decaying housing stock and neglectful landlords have caught the attention of city leaders, some of whom are interested in joining other Washington cities that have embraced greater regulation of their rental housing markets. But landlords in Spokane say that more regulations will deter needed investments in rentals and ultimately hurt tenants who are already facing a historic housing crunch. Alexander Scott, vice president of the Landlord Association of the Inland Northwest, says that most landlords are responsible. While he says the building on West Augusta Avenue is troublesome, he claims that weeding out unscrupulous landlords can be accomplished through a better use of existing laws. “It’s already a marginal business,” says Scott. “Somebody is going to have to pay [for the new regulations].” That somebody, he says, will be tenants.

S

pokane has lots of rental housing that has lots of problems. According to a report from the Landlord Association, 60 percent of Spokane’s rental housing


is more than 55 years old, making it costly to maintain. According to the report, 47 percent of Spokane’s housing units are rental properties and provide shelter for approximately 100,000 people. The issue has caught the attention of the Community Assembly, a coalition of the city’s neighborhood councils. Last year, it directed its Public Safety Committee to convene a stakeholders group comprised of individuals representing tenants, landlords, public health officials, neighborhood groups and others to identify issues involving rental housing and make recommendations. But Scott, who served on the group, says things became polarized. “We ended up with no consensus,” he says. “It ended up in a bit of a farce, which was unfortunate.” One of the bigger points of contention for the group, which disbanded last month, concerned evictions. State law doesn’t require landlords to tell tenants not covered by a lease why they are being evicted. Anderson, who also served on the stakeholders group, says the law allows landlords to kick out tenants who complain about conditions of their rental. Because code enforcement in Spokane is complaint-driven, she says that tenants, worried about moving costs or a black mark on their rental record, might keep quiet about needed repairs. “They don’t like living in substandard housing, but it’s better than living under a bridge,” says Anderson. During the process, she suggested a “just cause” ordinance, similar to one in place in Seattle that requires landlords to give tenants a reason why they are kicking them out (i.e., nonpayment of rent, causing damages). Eric Steven, a Spokane lawyer who represents landlords, says that requiring a just cause unduly infringes on property rights. He also says that under state law, if a landlord evicts a tenant 90 days after they complain to a government agency, it’s presumed to be retaliatory. To evict a tenant in LETTERS Washington, Send comments to a landlord editor@inlander.com. needs to file for an unlawful detainer action in court, asserting that they have a justified reason to take back their property. In Spokane County, the number of these filings has risen from 1,332 in 2010 to 1,719 in 2015. Steven says he charges landlords $750 for a clear-cut eviction. A more complicated eviction, he says, can cost more than $10,000. That can happen when the tenant has a lawyer, like Barry Pfundt, an attorney with the Center for Justice who represents low-income renters. “[Landlords] know that not a single aspect of the residential landlord-tenant law is self-enforcing,” says Pfundt. According to Pfundt, who says there are just three attorneys in Spokane who routinely represent low-income tenants, landlords can easily overcome the presumption of retaliation by giving another reason for the eviction. Pfundt says he has successfully used the retaliation defense only once. During the stakeholders group meeting, Anderson called for a requirement that rentals be periodically inspected, similar to laws in place in Seattle and Bellingham, to ensure they’re

being maintained. That idea met resistance from landlords. “They want to be able to come into the tenants’ homes and look around at their stuff just like the British did in 1776,” says Kevin McKee, a landlord and board member of the landlord association who served on the stakeholders group before stepping down. Scott says rentals are major investments for landlords and they have an active interest in maintaining them. An inspection program, he says, will cost millions, which he says will be paid by tenants. He also points out that Spokane is experiencing a vacancy rate of 1.4 percent, which already makes it harder for tenants to find housing. New regulations will likely deter investments in much-needed housing, he says, and some landlords may opt for more upscale rentals. One idea floated by tenant advocates, that Scott says his association is open to, is establishing some sort of list of rental properties, and who owns them. He says that can be accomplished through existing data kept by the county.

J

onathan Mallahan, the city’s director of community and neighborhood services, says that if a tenant doesn’t feel safe in their rental, they shouldn’t hesitate to reach out to the city for help. That’s because since 2009, the city has contracted with SNAP to help households that make under 50 percent of the area median income, and are losing their housing as a result of a city regulatory action. Bob Peeler, a SNAP housing specialist, has reached out to the tenants at the house on West Augusta Avenue. Although he has $2,000 available to help with each tenant’s moving costs, he says they’re scared. With a tight rental market, Peeler says he can pay for hotels for each tenant if need be, but he says that can burn up money fast. While Peeler says it’s rare for the money to run out before the tenant secures housing, he says it does happen. “We have a lot of low-income people looking for the same housing,” he says. Pfundt says the state landlord-tenant law allows cities to pass ordinances requiring landlords whose property has been deemed uninhabitable to pay for relocation assistance for their tenants. “Relocation assistance is really a no-brainer fix that the city needs to implement,” he says. “Instead, we give money to SNAP for assistance that isn’t recovered and could be used elsewhere.”

PastBlessingsFarm_PickinOnThePrairie_081116_4S_JP.jpg

E

arlier this spring, Mayor David Condon convened a task force, comprised of city councilmembers, city officials, representatives from nonprofits and others to look into housing issues facing Spokane. The task force concludes later this month. Afterward, City Councilwoman Amber Waldref, who serves on the task force, says she’ll meet with stakeholders to consider a possible ordinance that could include registration and inspections of rentals. “My goal is to find a way to take the burden off the tenants,” says Waldref, who adds that some of the city’s current tools aren’t well suited for making sure that rentals are maintained. However, she adds, “I don’t know if you’ll ever have a way to fix every issue for every tenant.”  jaket@inlander.com

TM

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AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 21


Tall Order As Craig Meidl prepares to lead the Spokane Police Department, here are the 14 most pressing challenges he’ll face as chief BY MITCH RYALS

22 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016


C

raig Meidl didn’t want to be Spokane’s next police chief. And why would he? Police officers nationwide face intense scrutiny as video evidence of cops beating, choking and shooting citizens cast them as an occupying force. In a matter of seconds, a new incident beams across America; with it, another wave of outrage follows. The brutal murders of officers in Dallas and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, meanwhile, have only served to put police further on edge. Then, of course, there’s the issue of local politics and the personal baggage Meidl would bring to the Spokane job.

After disgraced local cop Karl Thompson was convicted of using excessive force in the 2006 death of developmentally disabled janitor Otto Zehm and lying to cover it up, Meidl sent an email to about 80 other officers saying the “system failed,” and “an innocent man was found guilty.” Indeed, as Thompson was led away by U.S. Marshals, Spokane officers — including Meidl — stood and saluted their discredited colleague. Still, it was Meidl whom Mayor David Condon tapped to become Spokane’s chief of police last week. Condon has been trying to stabilize the department since

he forced out former Chief Frank Straub last September, and in the end, the mayor bypassed two finalists for the job in favor of an inside hire. “Sometimes you have to look far and wide to discover what you’re looking for has been in the department the entire time,” Condon said when announcing Meidl as chief on Aug. 1. In doing so, Condon discarded the work of an expensive recruiting firm and input from scores of citizens to appoint a man who had publicly stated he did not want the job. ...continued on next page

Craig Meidl’s daughter, Emma, pins the chief’s badge on her dad following the announcement of his nomination last week. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 23


COVER ST OR Y P OLICE “TALL ORDER,” CONTINUED... In the week since the mayor’s announcement, prompted by news reporters, Meidl has offered an apology for saluting Thompson. (He says he previously met in private with the Zehm family.) He’s pledged honesty, transparency and humility, and has asked for approval from the city council. A vote is set for Aug. 22. Meidl nevertheless has a daunting task ahead. The Spokane Police Department is still unwinding the mess left by Straub — a tenure plagued by infighting, deception and obscene tirades. That’s just for starters. Over the course of two dozen interviews, we collected input on the biggest challenges facing Meidl. Those are outlined in more detail below, but the two issues repeated most often were the trust of the community and Meidl himself.

1. OVERCOME POLITICAL TURMOIL,

GAIN APPROVAL FROM THE CITY COUNCIL

David Condon took a page out of Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s playbook. Facing intense pressure in the aftermath of a deadly police shooting, the Chicago mayor ignored three candidates submitted by the Chicago Police Board, instead appointing a 27-year veteran of the department as interim superintendent. Condon’s decision to discard two outside candidates and promote from within followed an elaborate show of transparency and inclusiveness. First there were recommendations from a committee tasked with establishing qualifications for the next chief. Then came a nationwide recruiting effort by an outside firm and input from a selection committee comprised of nine city leaders and community members. The final two candidates participated in public interviews and answered questions from panels consist-

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“How are we supposed to trust this administration when they don’t seem to care what the community wants?”

2. MEND ROCKY RELATIONSHIPS

SANDY WILLIAMS, PUBLISHER OF THE BLACK LENS NEWSPAPER

WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT

Even before Chief Straub, there were disagreements among

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ing of more than 40 stakeholders. Sandy Williams, publisher of Spokane’s Black Lens newspaper, says she was active throughout the process. She says she staked her reputation on convincing others in the community that “the mayor really wants your input.” “I thought we were going through a process, and then he did an end-around,” Williams says. “It feels fishy to me. The mayor basically thumbed his nose at the community and the process, and I’m not OK with that.” Condon was further criticized when he announced he would not immediately seek approval from the city council, as required by the city’s code. City Councilwoman Lori Kinnear then submitted a resolution to bring Meidl’s appointment to a vote. First, two public forums will take place. The first is set for Thursday, Aug. 11, from 6 to 8 pm at the West Central Community Center. The second is Wednesday, Aug. 17, from 6 to 8 pm at the East Central Community Center. “We’ve been through this too many times where it feels like a dog and pony show,” Williams says. “If Craig Meidl goes through the appropriate process, and people feel comfortable with him, then I’m fine with that, but how are we supposed to trust this administration when they don’t seem to care what the community wants?”

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Spokane’s top brass. “It’s a divided house, uniquely so,” says former Spokane Police Chief Anne Kirkpatrick, who served from 2006 to 2012. “Their fractures internally are more pronounced than any other agency I’ve ever seen.” She points to a physical divide — detectives are literally in a different building than patrol officers — and possible backlash after Meidl was selected over Capt. Brad Arleth, who was the only internal candidate to apply. Straub’s divide-and-conquer tactics exacerbated existing tensions, according to several members within the department. His abrupt dismissal appears to have created some of the miscommunication that culminated in what is now mockingly referred to as “furniture gate.” Last year, Meidl accused Arleth of insubordination when the downtown precinct leader moved furniture from the old precinct to the new location at the Intermodal Center despite (somewhat confusing) orders not to do so. Arleth had shared with downtown business owners his concerns about the move. He suggested that crime would increase if the precinct were relocated from its home near the Spokane Transit Authority Plaza. In his interview with internal affairs, Meidl says he did not think it was appropriate for Arleth to talk publicly about those concerns. Upset that he was being scolded for speaking against the “company line,” Arleth said he was not going to be a “cheerleader for somebody’s bullshit.” Arleth was given a letter of reprimand, which he is currently appealing. “I would just say there are difficulties regarding relationships within the department and the association,” says Lt. Dave Mc-

Cabe, president of the Spokane Police Lieutenants and Captains Association. “And something dramatically shifted while Straub was here, and it’s something we all need to work to try to make better.” McCabe adds: “Craig needs to foster an atmosphere where teamwork, camaraderie and integrity are foremost in dealing in our interpersonal relationships.” Meidl, for his part, says he fosters no “heartburn” toward anyone in the department. “Words have meaning,” he says. “And when we in positions of authority say something, people put a lot of weight on what we say. So you have to be careful that your words are not creating an issue that may not actually occur.”

3. REPAIR HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE COMMUNITY One of the biggest challenges facing Craig Meidl is Craig Meidl. By nominating a man whose reputation is closely linked to the division created after the death of Otto Zehm at the hands of Spokane officers, Mayor Condon is forcing a question: How much longer can Meidl and the department be tarred for Zehm? Meidl, when questioned by reporters, offered an apology “for the hurt and the pain” while maintaining that his salute was intended to honor Thompson’s years as an officer — not to discount the crime. He says he also spoke with members of Zehm’s family, some of whom were in the courtroom that day in 2011. The incident is burned into the memories of some as symbolic of law enforcement’s dismissive view of citizens. Still, others are ready to forgive. “I know there’s history. I get that, but we cannot become hypocritical in saying we want to support legislation like ‘ban the box’ ...continued on next page

“It’s a divided house, uniquely so.” FORMER SPOKANE CHIEF ANNE KIRKPATRICK, WHO SERVED FROM 2006 TO 2012, SAYS OF SPD.

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COVER ST OR Y P OLICE

“Now more than ever, we find ourselves as police officers wearing multiple hats: Law enforcer, counselor, mediator, mental health professional, order maintainer, problem solver and peace keeper,” Meidl says. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“TALL ORDER,” CONTINUED... that give convicted felons a second chance and not give another individual a chance to rise above past mistakes,” says Phil Tyler, president of the Spokane NAACP. “He’s shown he’s willing to be humble, admit what he doesn’t know, willing to learn and willing to participate in things that are trying to make this community a better place.” “He’s contrite,” says Councilwoman Lori Kinnear, who chairs the Public Safety Committee. “What more do we want him to do? At some point we have to say, ‘Thank you for apologizing. Now let’s move on.’” “Trust is easily lost and slowly gained,” Meidl says. “My executive staff and I will be making an effort to get out into the community as much as possible, hear their concerns, let them have unfettered access to us and just be honest about how we got here.”

4. CONSTRUCT A LEADERSHIP TEAM

As he walked out the door, Jim McDevitt, the former U.S. Attorney who ran the department for four months before Meidl’s nomination, promoted Meidl’s wife, Tracie Meidl, to captain in charge of investigations, along with other promotions. As assistant chief at the time, Craig Meidl says he removed himself from that selection process. He now must make final decisions on whether to keep that command structure. Meidl expects it will take a month before any decisions are finalized, but Tracie Meidl’s eligibility for one of those spots complicates things. “I don’t want my wife to get any preferential treat-

26 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016

ment because of where I’m at,” Meidl says. “But I also don’t want her to be punished for the rest of her career because her husband is the chief.” The logistics are still being worked out, but Meidl will remove himself from any decisions involving his wife, and delegate those to a panel of officers. City policy bars Meidl from directly supervising his wife.

5. SUPPORT CIVILIAN OVERSIGHT

The city has been without a permanent ombudsman for more than a year and a half. Meanwhile, interim ombudsman Bart Logue is working to establish the type of civilian oversight demanded by Spokane voters. At times, that has meant pushing up against the parameters of what the ordinance says he can and can’t do and questioning his role where city law is silent. For example, Spokane’s ombudsman is specifically disallowed from making any disciplinary recommendations, though Logue has given informal suggestions, either in passing or in a letter, for more training and review. Logue is also questioning how to comply with the city charter, which grants him the authority to conduct independent investigations. The city’s municipal code, however, is silent on a definition for such an investigation, and the ombudsman does not have the authority to compel officers to answer questions outside of an police internal affairs investigation. Community activists are searching for ways to alter the ordinance. Some have suggested removing the

ombudsman’s right to ask questions during internal affairs investigations, which would counter the union’s argument that the ombudsman is impacting working conditions. Asked if he would support granting the ombudsman authority to compel officers to answer questions, Meidl says he’s not against it as long as it’s agreed to in the labor contract with the Spokane Police Guild. “I think one thing that the Guild is understandably concerned about is if you get an ombudsman who has greater aspirations of moving to a bigger city, higher in politics, are they coming in with a different angle than truly providing a complete, fair and unbiased interview,” he says. Logue, for his part, says that for every case he’s sent back with concerns, Meidl has agreed to take another look. “We’re going to have to get to independent investigations to get us into compliance with the charter,” Logue says. “The community wants that. It was voted for and now we need to figure out how to get there. The department will accept forms of civilian oversight as the police chief will accept or embrace it.”

6. ESTABLISH THE BODY CAMERA POLICY

All Spokane police officers are wearing body cameras, but the department has yet to establish an official policy telling them how and when to use them. ...continued on page 28


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COVER ST OR Y P OLICE “TALL ORDER,” CONTINUED... Over and over, the country is reminded of the importance of video evidence, whether from cellphones, surveillance cameras or dashboard and body-worn cameras. Although body cameras are not a panacea for police accountability, the footage has opened the eyes of the nation to questionable, if not downright dishonest, police practices. Meidl says he’s waiting for the unions to approve the body camera policy. He expects a finalized policy “very soon.” SPD’s “draft” policy generally gives officers some degree of discretion whether to turn on the cameras. They must activate the camera during interactions that will generate an incident number, but the policy specifically notes that not all interactions need to be recorded. Officers are also allowed to view all of their own footage at any time, a provision that is in direct conflict with policies endorsed by the American Civil Liberties Union, NAACP and 33 other civil rights organizations. The argument comes down to the “independent evidentiary value” of an officer’s report and imperfect nature of video footage. “Footage of an event presents a partial — and sometimes misleading — perspective of how events unfolded,” civil rights advocates argue. “Pre-report viewing could cause an officer to conform the report to what the video appears to show, rather than what the officer actually saw.”

SPD’s internal culture, but one has never been conducted, in part, because former Chief Straub said he had everything under control. Details surrounding Straub’s ouster for an abusive management style and an allegation that he sexually harassed a female employee have renewed calls for such an audit. Penny Harrington, former chief of the Portland Police Bureau and founding director of the National Center for Women and Policing, also pointed to recent examples of an SPD sergeant charged with rape (and questions of whether officers interfered with the investigation into that case) and of another officer, who hooked up with an alleged victim of domestic violence, as further evidence of issues with internal culture. “I absolutely believe the culture of the department comes right from the top,” she told the Inlander last year. “If the person at the top has that kind of attitude, you can bet people underneath are going to also. If you’re going to thrive in that department, you have to adopt that kind of attitude.” Following his nomination, Meidl listed the culture audit near the top of the list of most pressing objectives. Just last week, the city finalized an agreement with Gonzaga University to conduct such an exploration. The audit will cost up to $8,000, according to city records. The final report is expected in February 2017.

7. FINISH THE CULTURE AUDIT

LANGUAGE FROM STATE LAW

The city of Spokane’s Use of Force Commission and separate Department of Justice review recommended an audit of the

“He’s shown he’s willing to be humble, admit what he doesn’t know, willing to learn.” PHIL TYLER, PRESIDENT OF THE SPOKANE NAACP, SAYS OF MEIDL.

8. ADDRESS EFFORTS TO REMOVE “EVIL INTENT” For a cop in Washington state to be held criminally liable for the use of deadly force, prosecutors must prove that officer acted ...continued on page 30

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“TALL ORDER,” CONTINUED... with “malice” and without a “good faith belief” that his or her actions were justifiable. That language, defined as “evil intent,” puts up a barrier so onerous that it’s nearly impossible for prosecutors to surmount, according to Dan Satterberg, King County prosecutor. A 2015 Seattle Times investigation identified 213 people killed by police in the state from 2005 to 2014. Only one officer was criminally charged in state courts — the only case in the three decades since the law was enacted in 1986. (Former SPD Officer Karl Thompson was convicted of excessive force in federal court.) The report called Washington state’s statute “the nation’s most restrictive law on holding officers accountable for the unjustified use of deadly force.” An effort to change state law is now afoot, as family and friends of those killed by law enforcement officials collect signatures for a ballot initiative. The initiative would not appear on the ballot until 2017.

9. CONSIDER THE STAFFING ANALYSIS

Jim McDevitt, the former U.S. Attorney who ran the department for four months before Meidl’s nomination, identified a depleted force as one of the three challenges facing the next chief. SPD could use 30 to 40 more officers and civilian employees to help

30 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016


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with records, crime analysis and dispatch, McDevitt believes. Later this year, Meidl expects to get results from a staffing analysis. That report will make recommendations for how many more (or less) officers the department needs, based on how much discretionary time Meidl deems necessary. Generally, more discretionary time means more time patrolling in hot spots and engaging with the community. “Right now we tend to be a call-driven agency, which means we don’t have a lot of discretionary time to engage in activities other than taking the next call off the screen,” Meidl says. ...continued on next page

“Sometimes you have to look far and wide to discover what you’re looking for has been in the department the entire time.” MAYOR CONDON, DURING AN AUG. 1 PRESS CONFERENCE ANNOUNCING MEIDL AS CHIEF.

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COVER ST OR Y P OLICE “TALL ORDER,” CONTINUED...

10. CONTINUE NATIONALLY RECOGNIZED COMMUNITY POLICING EFFORTS

Police departments across the country struggle to balance two major demands from the citizens they serve: reduce crime and engage with the community. The Spokane Police Department already has several community policing programs in place, including the Youth Police Initiative, the Police Athletic League, partnerships with juvenile court and Spokane Public Schools, Coffee with a Cop, public CompStat meetings and the opening of precincts in three areas of the city. In fact, last year, Spokane was recognized at a White House forum on community policing as a nationwide leader. “As far as community policing… if we want the community to know the police department cares about them, that’s not just at the direction of the chief,” interim police ombudsman Bart Logue says. “The chief gets to set the tone, but it’s up to every officer to implement it.” In his parting note to the city, Straub called out the “old guard[’s]” resistance to community policing. “The Chief and his/her command staff must commit to the sea change and end the internal conflict. He/she must make community policing a priority,” he wrote. Then there’s the precinct model, which Straub attempted to implement. Meidl acknowledges that it’s a great crime reduction and community connection tool, but it’s typically most successful in larger departments with more officers. Still, Meidl says he anticipates keeping the precincts up and running, as store fronts, more or less. “They’re great for allowing officers to have more contact with the community, but to be effective, we need more detectives and would have more officers working out of the precincts,” he says. “If the city is willing to give me more bodies, we could use one in the Northwest.”

11. FUND THE RACIAL AND

ETHNIC DISPARITY RESEARCH

Last year, Eastern Washington University professor Ed Byrnes, with the help of Capt. Brad Arleth, released a report showing disproportionate contacts between minorities and Spokane police officers. Byrnes promised a second report drawn from a more robust data sample, one that could potentially drill down to the neighborhood level. That report still has not come out and the project is at a standstill, due in part to the city’s unwillingness to pay for it. “It can’t be about a budget issue,” says Phil Tyler, Spokane’s NAACP president. “It must be a priority.”

“It was clear to me that, from Jim McDevitt’s perspective, the city was not intending to fund this,” Byrnes says of a meeting with the former interim law enforcement director and other city leaders. The group discussed funding the project with money from the regional MacArthur Grant. He has a meeting with Spokane Regional Criminal Justice Administrator Jacquie van Wormer to discuss details, though nothing is official yet. Byrnes did the work to produce the first report for free, but says now that he’s gotten a promotion, the city would have to buy out time spent teaching one of his classes at EWU. He estimates the cost at about $14,000. “It will go forward no matter what,” Meidl says. “If we are not able to get that additional funding, we are committed to seeing that through to completion.”

12. FIND A SOLUTION TO OFFICERS

AS DE FACTO MENTAL HEALTH WORKERS

Earlier this year, Spokane police officers were involved in three shootings in five days, one of which ended in the death of a man outside a shelter and a second involving a man recently released from the state psychiatric hospital who’d been shot by police once before. All three had previous contact with the mental health system at some point. In the aftermath of those shootings, law enforcement leaders called on the Legislature to pump more money into the state’s mental health system. All Spokane police officers have gone through at least 40 hours of crisis intervention training (CIT), where they learn tactics to handle those in mental health crisis, struggling with addiction and dealing with personality disorders. Some officers have taken additional training as well. “He needs to push the training for the enhanced CIT,” interim ombudsman Bart Logue says of Meidl. Additionally, there is talk of a regional pre-arrest, pre-booking facility designed specifically for officers to take people struggling with mental health other than jail. “We’re looking forward to having Craig help us work to build the necessary resources, whether that’s through the department or physical structures,” Spokane Regional Criminal Justice Administrator Jacquie van Wormer says. “The MacArthur Grant calls on us to address the mental health population, so law enforcement doesn’t have to continue to rely on the jail as a mental health facility.”

“The Chief and his/ her command staff must commit to the sea change and end the internal conflict. He/she must make community policing a priority.” FORMER CHIEF FRANK STRAUB, FORCED OUT IN SEPTEMBER, IN PARTING NOTE TO THE CITY.

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As the city looks toward contract negotiations with the Spokane ...continued on page 34

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COVER ST OR Y POLICE “TALL ORDER,” CONTINUED...

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Police Guild and the Lieutenants and Captains Association (a start date has not been set), one discussion happening on the other side of the state could bring more transparency to that process. Should those negotiations — where decisions about officer accountability, discipline and how to spend public money take place — be public? Court documents filed in the Western District of Washington in conjunction with Seattle PD’s consent decree earlier this year showed “near consensus” among the Department of Justice and major police accountability entities for more transparency in the collective bargaining process. The Seattle Times editorial board suggested a model where the public is kept in the loop throughout negotiations. “I would have no problems with them being public,” Meidl says. “The concern I think both sides will have is one might start using the public to apply pressure to the other group. But if you’re honest throughout the whole thing, why would there be a concern? Maybe I’m missing something that others see.” Greater transparency during collective bargaining is something that Spokane’s Use of Force Commission previously recommended. This time around, the public will have a chance to voice any demands before negotiations begin, says Councilman Breean Beggs. “The negotiations themselves will not be open to the public, but they will weigh in on the front end, and then compare to what the mayor achieved,” Beggs says. “This way everyone is on record for what the public wants.”

14.

REDUCE CRIME

Even as Meidl faces a laundry list of administrative tasks, community demands and challenges stemming from his surprise appointment, he’s also looking toward doing what police are hired to do: reduce crime. “I know there’s talk of more home monitoring for less serious offenders,” he says, referencing efforts coming from the Spokane Regional Law & Justice Council. “We’ll have to work through that to determine which ones are less serious. How do you address those in the community who are arrested and get out, arrested and get out, arrested and get out?” According to the most recent CompStat data, which reports preliminary crime numbers, property crime is up almost 4 percent compared to the same time frame last year, and violent crime jumped nearly 5 percent. But narrowly constructed statistics can be misleading and often don’t show the bigger picture. According to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting stats, violent crime in Spokane is low and holding relatively steady, while the property crime rate is gradually declining, but is still high. “We need stability,” Meidl says. “We’ve been without a CEO for too long.”  mitchr@inlander.com

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ARTS

A Pressing Matter

Breanna White with her main press, a 1926 machine she restored to working condition two years ago.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Typebee Letterpress’ Breanna White unites old-world printing processes with modern technology BY CHEY SCOTT

B

reanna White needed to work with her hands — anything more tangible than spending hours upon hours in front of a computer, anchored to the mouse and keyboard. One day she glanced an advertisement seeking a letterpress print shop intern. Without even knowing what a letterpress was, she decided to inquire. “The first time I made an impression, it was like, ‘This is what I want to do,’” White recalls of that first time operating a press. At that time, she was working toward her degree in visual communication and graphic design from the Illinois Institute of Art in Chicago. Five years later, and White is now operating her own

one-woman shop and design studio, Typebee Letterpress Printshop, out of a cozy Post Falls warehouse. The scent of ink, paper and plate-washing solvents lingers in the air. Illuminated by the mid-morning sunlight coming through an open window is her main machine, a finicky and noisy 1926 Chandler & Price printing press. Grabbing an orange extension cord from the corner of the room, White fires up the hulking, castiron beast. Its electric motor hums as the gears crank to life, moving the press’s metal parts into a rhythmic clankand-clatter song and dance. It all started here for Typebee about two years ago when White offered to help restore the 90-year-old print-

ing press, purchased by DOMA Coffee Roasting Co., to print its coffee bags featuring local artists’ designs. As Typebee, White still prints labels and other marketing materials for the sustainability-focused, local roaster. To many, the concept of letterpressing may bring to mind the tedious process of hand-setting individual letters (called “sorts”) into lines of mirror-reversed type. White doesn’t hand-set her own type. Rather, she creates or manipulates images and text digitally, sending off the files to one of two companies in New York that manufacture printing plates. Depending on the job, she’ll have plates made from either magnesium or polymer. ...continued on next page

AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 39


CULTURE | ARTS “A PRESSING MATTER,” CONTINUED... “I don’t think letterpress would exist still today without digital technology,” she remarks. Without digital tools, making plates of, say, a custom illustration by a local artist would require someone with the skills to carve an image into a printable surface. The melding of digital techniques with the manual craft of letterpress printing allows White to work more efficiently, even if her overall method is many steps back from the digitized and automated nature of today’s printing industry.

“People gravitate toward letterpress because they can touch it and it gives them something to feel. You can’t create that on a computer.” “Typesetting is more for fun these days, and there are still people who do that — it’s not cost effective or efficient, but this is neat because it’s where technology and old-world craftsmanship come together nicely,” she says. Another major difference between modern letterpressing versus the craft of yesteryear is that now printers are often looking to achieve a debossing effect in which the typeface or outline of an inked image makes a visible impression into the paper. This textured effect was considered bad technique by letterpress operators in the past — their goal was to smoothly ink a page leaving no visible indentation on the paper. “I think people gravitate toward letterpress because they can touch it and it gives them something to feel. You can’t create that on a computer,” White muses. The range of work White can create by letterpress spans from business cards, wedding and event invitations, postcards and beyond; she’s pressed cassette tape inserts for a French band, custom stationary and drink coasters. The presses can also be used to score and die-cut finished pieces. Besides creating designs digitally, just about everything else for White’s Typebee projects is done manually. She mixes ink by hand. She feeds individual sheets of paper into the press by hand. She maintains and oils the

Breanna White melds modern graphic design technology with an outdated, manual mode of printing that’s seeing a resurgence. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO presses by hand. “For me, it’s more the process that goes into it,” White says of it all. “You have to think from the end of the final product and come back to the beginning.” As she’s focused on honing the art of old-craft style printing — a trend that’s risen along with other handcrafted, artisan movements in the past decade — White has worked to master both the creative and technical aspects of the trade, one that’s close to being lost to history as the printing industry evolved. “There is a big generational gap in the older pressmen and those who’ve fallen in love with the process” more recently, she says. “Not just in knowledge of [the letterpressing process] but mechanical things. When something would break, we would call a guy to come fix it and he’s like 75 years old, so I realized I had to learn to

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fix these things, too.” While gleaning as much mechanical know-how as she can from these experienced printers and mechanics, White also describes herself as a “pro jerry rigger.” Many a time, she’s had to implement makeshift fixes, like ducttaping a belt wheel, on her presses to keep them running. “My favorite part about the whole letterpress thing is that I feel like I understand the press and I know how it works,” she says. “I can’t do what the machine can do, but it can’t operate without me. … There is this really neat relationship between the printer and the machine. We’re both giving to get this certain output.” 

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CULTURE | DIGEST

KIDS’ TV BEAT BUGS

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION BY JAKE THOMAS

Beat Bugs introduces the Beatles to a new generation.

M

ost children’s television is awful, as any parent of a young child can tell you. For those without children, these shows feature some sort of brightly colored talking dog or cat, or maybe even both, providing your child 18 minutes of ostensibly educational viewing while you take advantage of the free time allowed by this on-demand animated nanny. But the medium nevertheless allows for the occasional moment of brilliance, and that’s what I found when I powered up Netflix at 6 am through sleep-starved eyes last week and clicked on Beat Bugs for my 3-year-old. The opening sequence treated me to “All You Need is Love,” which, in addition to providing a lesson in human decency even my kid could understand, is a freaking Beatles song. I soon realized that every episode of this kids’ program is based on the lyrics and themes of a single Beatles track, eventually including the song itself. This is genius and also makes complete sense, given that the Beatles’ whimsical lyrics can easily lend themselves to a children’s show. Beat Bugs creator Josh Wakely, who said that he’d always wanted to bring the Beatles’ music to life through television, somehow — given how tightly held the Beatles’ catalogue is

controlled — pulled it off with aplomb. “What is it to go into a strawberry field forever? What would it be like to actually be inside that yellow submarine?” Wakely told the New York Times on the eve of Beat Bugs’ release last week. The show itself is about bugs (and a slug), all with their own distinct personality traits, who live in a suburban backyard. You’d be correct in saying that summary sounds tragically similar to myriad other kids’ shows. But when, for example, the extremesports-loving Jay gets trapped in a glass jar that’s slowly filling with rainwater, he shouts for help... and of course, we hear him sing “Help.” Wakely was able to bring in star power to voice many of the songs, including Eddie Vedder on an even wackier “Magical Mystery Tour,” as well as cuts from Pink and Regina Spektor, among others. For those of us who believe that the Beatles’ catalogue needs to be handed down to the next generations, Beat Bugs is an oddly important piece of pop culture. But those who just like to watch brightly colored bugs while lying around in their jammies will also love it. — MIKE BOOKEY

MOVIES SUICIDE SQUAD WINS AT THE BOX OFFICE

By this point in summer, typically all the blockbusters have come and gone and there’s a lull when megaplexes are filled with indie flicks, pre-Halloween horror and dreck from now until awards season ramps up. Not this year, as the critically drubbed and fanboy-loved Suicide Squad set an August release record with a $135 million opening weekend, easily outpacing old August recordholder Guardians of the Galaxy’s $94 million in 2014. And it wasn’t just Suicide Squad; the box office top 12 made 87 percent more money than they did in the same weekend last year.

ARTICLE Earlier this year, Twin Falls, Idaho, made the national news when a rumor took on a life of its own. The story that circulated through the town concerned Syrian refugees sexually assaulting a young child. It sparked outrage in the southern Idaho city, which is home to a refugee resettlement center, and became a rightwing cause célèbre after residents worked themselves into a fervor over concerns that outside forces were reshaping and endangering their community. Online magazine Slate took a break from the think pieces it’s known for and did some onthe-ground reporting in “IF YOU WANT TO LIVE HERE, YOU NEED TO LIVE BY THE RULES HERE”; the piece sheds light on what really happened in Twin Falls, and how the situation speaks to the country’s deeper anxieties. TWITTER Maybe you don’t think Donald Trump is temperamentally fit to be president, or even dog catcher. But how about “dungeon master” in a game of Dungeons & Dragons? The Twitter account @DUNGEONSDONALD aptly channels Trump’s combative and self-aggrandizing persona as a dungeon master who makes specious claims about witnessing armies of goblins, brags about Republican unity in his latest D&D quest, questions where Hillary Clinton is hiding her dungeon maps and threatens to fire other players. The account provides some nerdy silliness that’ll help take the edge off this long and acrimonious election season. GAME After a string of adaptations of older installments of Final Fantasy, game developer Square Enix has developed a version of the franchise that’s meant to have the epic feel associated with the series designed specifically for your smartphone. MOBIUS FINAL FANTASY follows Wol, a man who awakes in the land of Palamecia not knowing where he is. The game has many of the same elements of previous FF incarnations: Onion Knights and White Mages, turn-based combat, moogles and other creatures that suddenly interject themselves into the game, as well as a monarch of an ailing kingdom desperately needing help. 

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BY DAN NAILEN

R

olling into the black maw of a Montana mountain, the images in my head were of one Wile E. Coyote. Countless times I’d watched the Western native — far more acclimated to outdoorsy pursuits than I — go into a tunnel only to find his body pancaked by a train rushing through from the other side. Happily, no trains have traversed the St. Paul Pass Tunnel (aka Taft Tunnel) since 1980, offering my friends and I an easy, albeit wet and chilly, trip through the mountain’s passage, a nearly 2-mile feat of incredible engineering and labor undertaken in the early 1900s to connect the Milwaukee Railroad line to the West Coast. The Taft Tunnel is, for most, the starting point of the Route of the Hiawatha, a rails-totrails success story that set a record in 2015 for the number of bicyclists — 39,400 — cruising its 15-mile expanse along the Montana/Idaho border. Jason Bergman of Lookout Pass Ski & Recreation Area, which operates the trail for the U.S. Forest Service, says the record likely will be broken this year; July’s 15,100 riders set a onemonth visitation record, no doubt helped by the

lack of forest fires and heat waves that filled last summer. As a relative newcomer to the area, I considered a ride down the Hiawatha a rite of passage necessary for becoming a true Inland Northwesterner, like reading Jess Walter’s Beautiful Ruins, sampling any craft beer in arm’s reach and losing any sense of surprise at Spokane Police Department scandals. Not being WEEKEND much of a C O U N T D OW N bicyclist, the Get the scoop on this Route of the weekend’s events with Hiawatha was our newsletter. Sign up at last on that list Inlander.com/newsletter. to get crossed off, but ride it I did recently, spending a glorious morning rolling through the trail’s 10 tunnels and across its seven acrophobe-challenging trestles boasting both incredible views and frightening drops over their (well-guarded and utterly safe) edges. I would hazard a guess that the 17 or so miles I rode that morning (because of where we


The Route of Hiawatha is one of the most scenic bike routes in North Idaho. DAN NAILEN PHOTO parked, we had to ride the St. Paul tunnel twice) is more distance than I’ve ridden on a bike, collectively, in the previous 20 years. Getting hit by a car in college scared me off two wheels for the most part. The utter lack of car traffic — save for the occasional maintenance truck or shuttle bus — is just one reason the Hiawatha proved a great ride for an amateur like me. Here are a few more things to consider for your riding purposes if you’ve never taken a cruise down what the Railsto-Trails Conservancy named one of just 15 “Hall of Fame” trails: You can do it. Most of the trail is a gentle downward slope, so gravity does a lot of the work for you. There are flat stretches, and some loose rocks requiring some bicycling savvy, but the Hiawatha is friendly for kids through somewhat-fit seniors, and everyone in between. No bike? No problem. You can reserve wheels in advance to pick up at Lookout Pass, and they’ll throw a bike rack on your car and include the helmets and lights you need. It’s not super-cheap — adult bikes are $32 or $38; kids’ are $22 — but it’s the cost of convenience. And you can always bring your own bike and just pay for the trail’s day-use pass ($10 for adults, $6 for kids). A mountain bike or hybrid cruiser both work well; you won’t want to ride your roadracing bike.

Pack light, and pack efficiently. Your cruising speed to cover the trail can vary wildly, so you’ll want to bring some small snacks or a light lunch along with plenty of water and sunscreen, although there’s plenty of shade depending on what time of day you ride. You’ll also want a layer just for traveling through Taft Tunnel, since the temperature in there hangs

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“I would hazard a guess that the 17 or so miles I rode that morning is more distance than I’ve ridden on a bike, collectively, in the previous 20 years.” around the low 40s at all times. Plan on at least three hours on the trail and riding the shuttle bus. The return trip. Unless you’re one of those psychopaths who actually wants to ride the trail uphill, too, you’re going to want to catch a shuttle back to your car near the start of the trail at Taft Tunnel. Through Sept. 5, there are five shuttle trips daily, and then through Sept. 25 there are only four. You can buy your shuttle tickets in advance at ridethehiawatha.com, or in person when you ride. Seating is first-come, first-served. n Route of the Hiawatha • Open daily through Sept. 18, plus Sept. 23-25 • ridethehiawatha. com • 208-744-1234

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Beer, Right Here Do the inaugural Spokane Brewers Festival your way

TOM STOVER PHOTO ILLUSTRATION

BY INLANDER STAFF

T

he beer festival is a lot of things to a lot of people. For one, it’s a place to drink beer with other people who really enjoy beer. It’s also a chance to discover new brews, especially from far-off breweries whose taproom door you’re not likely to darken any time soon. And it’s a chance for a city or a region to come together and celebrate the fact that they’re doing good things in the brewing world. As the Inland Northwest’s brewing scene has continued to grow, the Spokane Arena has tossed around the idea of using its sprawling parking lot — one of the bigger open spaces in downtown Spokane — to showcase our beer. “Wouldn’t it be cool if we had the Ale Trail in our parking lot?” says Matt Gibson, the arena’s general manager, referring to the self-guided tour of the region’s breweries. The idea for the Spokane Brewers Festival was sim-

44 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016

ply to give Inland Northwest breweries a chance to come together — maybe 20 booths, Gibson guessed. But after word got around, there are now 33 breweries and two cideries slated to pour at the two-day event. For Gibson’s crew, the philosophy has been one of inclusion, and they didn’t turn down breweries from central Washington who wanted in on the action. “There are a lot of folks in this town that are brewing some incredible stuff that aren’t getting the spotlight on them like they should be,” he says. The Spokane Brewers Festival features free admission, but you do have to pay $7 for a tasting mug and $1 per tasting token. There’s a root beer garden sponsored by River City Brewing for the under-21 crowd, as well as a local music showcase that we here at the Inlander put together (see facing page). Adding to the festival atmosphere are a number of food trucks. “One of these breweries might really hit it off with

the people here, and that’s what we’re aiming for,” says Gibson. Before you get those tokens burning a hole in your pocket, though, let us share our extensive research of the brewery and beer lists so you can efficiently navigate this first-ever festival. Here are some of our tips.

A POOR MAN’S TOUR OF CENTRAL WASHINGTON

Unless you head to a specialty beer store, or happen to catch them on a guest tap at one of our nearby breweries, chances are you’re going to miss trying most of the following breweries’ creations. If you’re looking to try some new-to-you brews this weekend, check out the goods from these beermakers, all based in Washington towns between here and the Cascades. From the heart of hop country, the folks at Yakima Craft Brewing Co. are bringing their 1982 Amber Ale, ...continued on page 46


Working Spliffs

Silver Treason (left) and Carli Osaka.

The Sounds of Sipping W hile tasting all of the beers this weekend, you’ll also get a taste of some of the most talented local musicians around, with everything from indie rock to reggae. (Full disclosure: The Inlander, along with Volume producers Patrick Kendrick and Shea Walser, assembled the lineup.) FRIDAY CARLI OSIKA, 3-4:30 pm An up-and-coming North Idaho singer-songwriter, Osika is a constant presence at regional community festivals and events, playing everything from an uber-slow version of “Ring of Fire” to some of her own sweet pop-country tunes. RAGTIME ROMANTICS, 5-6:30 pm Most of the members of this seven-piece ska/soul/R&B band live together in the same South Hill house; you can tell that just listening to the tightness of their party-infused sound. RIVER CITY ROOTS BAND, 7-9 pm River City Roots Band often plays as a backing band for local rootsreggae performer Jus Wright. On their own, the band is every bit as uplifting and peace-filled.

SATURDAY TYLER AKER, noon-1:15 pm This local singer-songwriter can usually be found out and about with his indie-rock act Pine League, but for this solo performance, expect Aker’s wily sadness on full blast. LUCAS BROOKBANK BROWN, 2-3:15 pm A member of myriad local acts past and present, Brown’s acoustic solo work is his most finely crafted yet. FAT LADY, 4-5 pm A newer 1960s-inspired rock act in Spokane, Fat Lady isn’t one of those bands afraid to go against the grain — their band includes a flute player, after all.

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WORKING SPLIFFS, 5:30-7 pm Around since 1999, Working Spliffs have evolved over the years from a classic reggae act to one infused with punk, psychedelic rock and jazz. Their horn section will blow you away. SILVER TREASON, 7:30-9 pm Don’t be fooled by their country classification; Silver Treason is a band full of musicians who previously played in punk groups. When they play, even those most country-music-averse will want to dance around. — LAURA JOHNSON

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FOOD | BEER “BEER, RIGHT HERE,” CONTINUED... a “homage to the brewing history of Yakima,” along with their take on the classic Pacific Northwest-style IPA, the Vern NW IPA. From farther east, we’ll also be treated to brews from Washougal’s 54°40’ Brewing Co., located on the north side of the Columbia River Gorge not far from Portland and Vancouver. Heading back to the heart of central Washington, Moses Lake, St. Brigid’s Brewery and Ten Pin Brewing are keeping residents’ thirst satisfied. Ten Pin’s moniker pays tribute to a 1967 state law that made drinking beer while you bowl legal. They’ll be bringing their signature Ten Pin IPA, a session IPA and a pineapple wheat. From the same general region of the state, we’ll also get three brews from Ellensburg’s Iron Horse Brewery, whose cans you can find at many Spokane grocers, and Icicle Brewing Co. of Leavenworth. A bit closer to Spokane, the fest also features Waitsburg’s Laht Neppur Brewing Co., whose unusual-sounding name is owner and head brewer Court Ruppenthal’s last name spelled backward. (CHEY SCOTT)

FRUIT BEERS IN THE SUMMERTIME — IT’S A GOOD THING

On a recent visit to San Diego, I dropped by Ballast Point Brewing to sample the beer that convinced Constellation Brands to buy the company for $1 billion. Bellying up, I asked for what best represented the brewery’s style — three pours, all fruit-flavored. Having largely and loudly disavowed fruity beer after one particularly syrupy-sweet Raspberry Wheat years ago, I was skeptical. Their Grapefruit Sculpin, though, encouraged me to be more fruit-inclusive. One of my favorite local beers is Iron Goat Brewing Company’s (Spokane) Blackberry Apricot Sour, one of the featured brews (and few sours) at the Spokane Brewers Festival. The lineup is fruit-heavy, and given the heat, this is an ideal time to expand your palate to include some stone fruits or berries in your brew. Among the locals, I’m particularly interested in Young Buck Brewing’s (Spokane) Raspberry Berliner Weisse, Big Barn Brewing Company’s (Mead) Apricot Wit, and a couple of Steam Plant (Spokane) offerings: the Blood Orange Ale and Wild Strawberry Sour. As for long-distance travelers, the Grapefruit Explosion from St. Brigid’s Brewery (Moses Lake) and Groove Pineapple Wheat from Ten Pin Brewing (Moses Lake) are both intriguing, as is the Huckleberry Pucker Shandy from Paradise Creek Brewery (Pullman) because I love me some huckleberries. Ordnance Brewing (Boardman, Oregon) is packing Bloops Blueberry Wheat as well. (DAN NAILEN)

GO AHEAD, DIVE INTO THE HOP BOMBS

You’re a Northwest craft beer fan, which means you were raised on big ol’ burly IPAs brewed with hops grown a few hours drive from your home. Over the years, you’ve likely expanded your horizons with maltier porters and stouts, then sours and now German-style stuff, but you can’t forget your roots. So if you want

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The first-ever Spokane Brewers Festival features an array of adventurous brews, as well as some local favorites. to spend most of the Spokane Brewers Festival indulging in the hoppiest stuff out there — even if fresh hop season is mere weeks away — go for it. Start with the Dunn Day IPA from Big Barn Brewing Co., a very full-flavored ale brewed on a rolling berry farm in Green Bluff. It will save you a drive to the in-town brewery that feels very out-of-town. Then there’s Black Label Brewing, the little brewery that could, with their Main Ave. IPA, a tribute to their location on the east side of downtown Spokane. To cool your hop-strained tongue for a spell, try the Session IPL from Perry Street Brewing, a lager brewed in a hoppy style that maintains a smooth finish. The Seltice Smash IPA from Post Falls’ Downdraft Brewing Co. features strictly Chinook hops and one malt style and is equally crisp. If you want another fresh-feeling brew, try Paradise Creek Brewery’s citrusy Over the Hop IPA, or the very sessionable Shin Splints IPA from Orlison Brewing Company, which is no longer lager-only and is making adventurous ales like this one. For some fruit in your IPA, try No-Li Brewhouse’s Cherry Bomb IPA. For something you’re not going to find too often, there’s the Adrenaline Seeker IPA from Badass Backyard Brewing. And if you want to taste a big beer that’s not actually an IPA, go with River City Brewing’s Inconceivable Imperial Pilsner, or keep it classic with their Riverkeeper IPA. (MIKE BOOKEY)

JUDGING A BEER BY ITS NAME? TRY THESE

With so many breweries popping up around the country, it’s getting even more challenging to stand out in a sea of suds. These days brewers

aren’t just designing enticing labels and logos, they’re also hatching creative monikers for each new brew. Of all the beers being poured at this weekend’s Spokane Brewers Festival, here are some of the most eye-catching names. Going with their froggy theme, Top Frog Brewery out of Newport introduces Poison Dart Porter to the masses this weekend. Don’t worry — while the poison dart frog is brightly colored and toxic, the porter is luscious brown with a smooth finish. English Setter Brewing Company also sticks with animal subject matter with Who’s A Good Boy Amber and Clifford the Big Red, a clear reference to man’s best friend. The Snozzberry Belgian Wit, made by 238 Brewing Company in Green Bluff and named by the owner’s daughter, employs the fictional fruit invented by Roald Dahl for Charlie and the Chocolate Factory (raspberry stands in for snozzberry here). Speaking of chocolate, Leavenworth’s Icicle Brewing Company offers up a Dark Persuasion German Chocolate Cake ale, which judging by its name alone shouldn’t have to work hard to persuade many. For those looking for a beverage off the beaten path, try Steam Plant’s strong and intense barleywine (18 percent ABV) and Rants & Raves Brewing’s Ægir’s Grog, a braggot ale named after the Norse gods’ own brewer. (LAURA JOHNSON)

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48 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016


Twigs Martini Bar & Bistro chain, it makes sense. Not that the two spaces look identical (Tortilla Union is a bit more rustic), but rather in the classy-meets-casual vibe that has made Twigs a massive and still-growing success. On the menu, you’ll find items that would be at home in a Mexican restaurant, but also many that wouldn’t. “I would call Tortilla Union Southwestern cuisine... but some people might call it Tex-Mex,” says Trevor Blackwell, vice president of Twigs and its parent company, QOL Restaurant Group. The price point for entrées is around the $13-to-$16 mark, with salads under $10 and appetizers that range from chips and three different salsas at $5 to bacon-wrapped prawns at $13. Again, the menu is a collection of items you may not have seen on a menu together. There is a burrito, there are tortas, six different kinds of tacos, enchiladas and other options, but you can also get a burger with ENTRÉE jalapeños, cast Get the scoop on local iron chicken, food news with our weekly spicy mac and Entrée newsletter. Sign up cheese, chipotat Inlander.com/newsletter. le-flavored ribs, seared wahoo and orange peel shrimp. There’s a full bar with a happy hour from 2 to 5 pm and again from 9 pm to close, and a long list of cocktails, perhaps a nod to the martini bar that gave birth to Tortilla Union. Just having

Tortilla Union is owned by the same company as Twigs Martini Bar & Bistro. JEFF FERGUSON PHOTO

opened the new venture at the beginning of August, the goal is to perfect this first Tortilla Union for starters, then someday replicate the eatery in other locations, just as Blackwell and company did with Twigs. “The goal eventually is that we’ll get one open and take it to other markets where we’re already operating,” says Blackwell. “We’ve been talking about doing this for a few years now, and then we put it on the back burner, and then picked it back up.” 

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• AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 49


Meat is Murder Sausage Party puts the gross in grocery store BY PAUL CONSTANT

I

n a letter to a friend, William S. Burroughs famously explained the title of his novel Naked Lunch by describing it as “a frozen moment when everyone sees what is on the end of every fork.” At some point in human history, surely, after the third deep bong rip, some stoner must have heard that quote, grown very silent, and then wondered aloud, “But what if the food at the end of the fork, like… looked back?” The answer to that question is Sausage Party, the adults-only animated comedy that Seth Rogen and his pals have been trying to bring to multiplexes for nearly a decade. It’s a simple premise: all the food in supermarkets come to life when humans aren’t paying attention, Toy Story-style. The sentient food believes that when humans put them in their baskets and leave the store, they’re taking the food to a wondrous afterlife. In that paradise, a hot dog named Frank (Rogen) and a hot dog bun named Brenda (Kristen Wiig) believe they’ll finally break free from their plastic packaging, have sex, and live happily ever after. Sausage Party is a stoner comedy, through and through. Unless you’re incredibly high, that means it’s a mixed bag. It’s packed with clever sight gags that

thing original. At the end of a godforsaken sumwouldn’t be out of place in Airplane!, but it’s also a mer movie season that’s been weighted down with comedy that is precariously constructed on the belief disappointment after disappointment, at least Sausage that an anthropomorphic jar of honey mustard ranting Party has the balls to embrace an R rating (unlike, say, about ejaculating in someone’s eyes is possibly the funSuicide Squad) and tackle an original niest thing anyone has ever heard. idea (unlike the ninth or 10th or 16th You will probably laugh at someSAUSAGE PARTY X-Men movie) with as much gusto as thing in Sausage Party, but the parts Rated R humanly possible. This is a hardthat fall flat are almost unbearable. Directed by Greg Tiernan, Conrad Vernon R comedy that wants to embrace And oh my goodness, the hipster Starring the voices of Seth Rogen, concepts like atheism, the ethics of racism in this thing is off the charts. Kristen Wiig, Jonah Hill food, myth-making and mortality as The Chinese food talks in a bad a responsible philosophical retort to fake Asian accent, the tequila is a nihilism — even if it’s only willing to do so with a rapey Mexican stereotype that Donald Trump would stoner’s superficiality. probably find hilarious, and a bottle of Firewater brand Sausage Party is nowhere near as consistently booze is the worst Native American caricature to hit funny as the riotous Rogen comedy This Is the End, screens since Johnny Depp slapped a dead bird on his but I would still rather watch it than a hundred clockhead for The Lone Ranger. Blend in Rogen’s signature work Adam Sandler comedies, or the next formulaic portrayal of women as humorless shrews and garnish Will Ferrell blockbuster. It is at least a movie that isn’t with a sprig of gay panic, and you’ve got yourself the interested in launching a franchise. It’s just a good oldest recipe in the book: the comedian who believes pot-infused joke that gets milked for every ounce of he’s fine because he’s offending everyone equally. Recomedy that it’s worth — and then some.  ally, it’s more lazy than anything else. That said, Sausage Party is at the very least some-


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OPENING FILMS SAUSAGE PARTY

Sausage Party stars an anthropomorphic hotdog and a bun — and it’s the brainchild of Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, who graced the world with This Is The End and The Night Before. From that description alone, most filmgoers should have no trouble deciding whether or not this crude animated laugh-fest chronicling the escapades of a bunch of talking food in a supermarket is up their alley. Don’t take the kids to this one. (IH) Rated R

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Stephen Frears, who oversaw Helen Mirren in the acclaimed The Queen in 2006 and Judi Dench in Oscar-nominated Philomena in 2013, continues his streak of directing talented, highly respected older actresses in leading roles with this biopic, a dramedy centering on a largerthan-life personality. Meryl Streep takes center stage as the titular New York heiress who aspires for a career in opera, with the only barrier to entry being her abominable singing voice. Hugh Grant co-stars. (IH) Rated PG-13

OUTDOOR MOVIE AT OLMSTED PARK, IN KENDALL YARDS

ANTHROPOID

In this historical thriller, a pair of Czechoslovakian soldiers played by Cillian Murphy and Jamie Dornan are tasked with infiltrating their home country, which has been occupied by Nazi forces, in December of 1941. Their mission, code-named Operation Anthropoid, is to eliminate Reinhard Heydrich, Hitler’s overseer of the Nazis in Czechoslovakia. (IH) Rated R

INDIGNATION

Based on the Philip Roth novel of the same name, this indie film takes place in 1951 at a small Midwestern university where a young man is struggling with coming to age. He pursues a relationship with a young woman, but is encouraged to break it off because of her perceived mental issues. (MB) Rated R

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Park ranger Grace (Bryce Dallas Howard) discovers Pete (Oakes Fegley) living in the woods where he’s been alone for six years, after an outing with his parents ended in a car wreck that killed them. But then he reveals that he’s had the companionships of a big green dragon named Elliot. (MJ) Rated PG

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AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 51


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SEPTEMBER 17-23, 2015 | DREAMING BIG SINCE

1993

Set one year after the events of Finding Nemo, Dory is still settled in with Marlin and Nemo, but a flash of memory includes a clue to her parents’ possible whereabouts. Setting out across the ocean with Marlin and Nemo (Hayden Rolence), Dory eventually reaches a California aquarium for an adventure that may reunite her with her family. (SR) Rated PG

FREE STATE OF JONES

Here, we see the story of poor Mississippi farmer Newton Knight (a controversial historical figure played by Matthew McConaughey) who led a group of rebels made up of farmers and slaves against the Confederate army — which led to his home of Jones County seceding from the Confederacy and becoming the Free State of Jones. (LJ) Rated R

This documentary will likely make you cry. Here, we have a documentary that follows Spokane native turned NFL star and hero of New Orleans, Steve Gleason, as he battles ALS. The linearly constructed film shows the disease ripping away Gleason’s physical abilities one by one, while also demonstrating the strain on his marriage and family. But there’s plenty of inspiration to be found, too. You’ll walk away wanting to be a better person. (MB) Rated R

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Perhaps due to the overwhelming success of Dirty Grandpa comes this raunchy flick headlined by a smattering of big-name female stars: among them, Mila Kunis, Christina Applegate and Kristen Bell. As the title suggests, it’s one of those “let loose,” party-likewe’re-young-again movies, this one chronicling the shenanigans of a group of moms who set out on a rampage of cathartic indulgence and inappropriate behavior that, at least in theory, makes for hilarious results. (IH) Rated R

The plot follows a similar track to that of the original, with Columbia University physics professor Erin Gilbert (Kristen Wiig) and the more paranormally inclined academic Abby Yates (Melissa McCarthy) teaming up, along with Jillian Holtzmann (Kate McKinnon) and Patty Tolan (Leslie Jones) to hunt down the ghosts suddenly showing up all over town. (MJ) Rated PG-13

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INDEPENDENCE DAY: RESURGENCE

It’s been two decades since Independence Day was released, and with the Fourth of July approaching, it’s coming back. Director Roland Emmerich is bringing the aliens back to invade planet Earth and take out the human race in

NEW YORK TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Gleason

82

Pete’s Dragon

70

Sausage Party

65

Jason Bourne

62

Secret Life of Pets

61

Ghostbusters

60

Suicide Squad

40

BAD MOMS

GHOSTBUSTERS

COMMENT

CRITICS’ SCORECARD

DON’T MISS IT

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the long-awaited sequel that somehow doesn’t feature Will Smith. This time the human race unites to fight off the invasion with enhanced technologies they obtained after the earlier attack. (KL) Rated PG-13

JASON BOURNE

Matt Damon is back in the role of Jason Bourne after nine years away from the franchise. This installment touches on the privacy concerns that total surveillance raise via tech wunderkind Aaron Kalloor (Riz Ahmed), and it’s up to Bourne, yet again, to save the world. (MJ) Rated PG-13

THE LEGEND OF TARZAN

The newest big-screen incarnation of the legendary jungle-dwelling, apebefriending hero is a new spin on the character. In the film, Tarzan (Alexander Skarsgård) returns to his home in Africa after years of living in London with his wife, Jane (Margot Robbie). (IH) Rated PG-13

LIGHTS OUT

When Rebecca (Teresa Palmer) moves out of her childhood home, she thinks she’s left the horrors of her past and her mentally unstable mother (Maria Bello) for good. But when her little brother starts seeing a woman in the night as well, Rebecca comes home for answers. Clocking in at just a quick 81 minutes, you’ll still want to keep the lights on after this film is over. (LJ) Rated PG-13

THE MUSIC OF STRANGERS

If you think a documentary about a group led by a cellist named Yo-Yo Ma sounds dry and academic, forget it. The dramatic changes of scene and gorgeous cinematography is gripping throughout, and the passion coming through as the players discuss their lives and love of music is undeniable. (DN) Rated PG-13

NERVE

Venus (Emma Robertson) and Ian (Dave Franco) take the risk to play an online video game of truth or dare, minus the truth. Once a dare is completed, the player is rewarded money. When the dare is not followed, the players find themselves faced with frightening consequences. Venus and Ian become prisoners of the game and realize the

WATCH IT AT HOME

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only way out is to win the lethal game. (KH) Rated PG-13

NINE LIVES

Let’s start by saying that everything about this film — in which a workaholic dad played by Kevin Spacey gets trapped in the body of his daughter’s cat — is oozing with cheese and slapstick comedy (from a CGI cat, nonetheless). Spacey’s character Tom Brand is too busy building his business empire to pay attention to his wife and daughter, so quirky pet store owner (Christopher Walken) casts a spell on him with the requirement that he reconnect with his family, or be trapped in the cat’s body for the rest of his life. Antics ensue. (CS) Rated PG

THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS

Created by the team behind the Despicable Me films, The Secret Life of Pets tells the story of a dog named Max (voiced by Louis C.K.) suddenly forced to welcome another pet to his apartment in the shaggy, sloppy Duke (Eric Stonestreet). Mayhem naturally ensues, and the two pups get lost in the city and have to find their way home with the help of a pack of Max’s friends. (DN) Rated PG

STAR TREK BEYOND

The Starship Enterprise has yet again set out to explore the furthest reaches of the universe, and all is well until the ship and crew are unexpectedly attacked by a flurry of enemies, sent by the malicious Krall (Idris Elba). The Enterprise crash lands on an unknown planet, leaving its surviving crew members, including Captain Kirk (Chris Pine) and Spock (Zachary Quinto), with little to defend themselves against Krall’s forces. (CS) Rated PG-13

SUICIDE SQUAD

The premise of Suicide Squad is kind of a nifty spin on the concept of antiheroes, building a team of incarcerated “meta-humans” who have to be threatened, blackmailed and cajoled by a shadowy government operative (Viola Davis) into forming a team of disposable villain/heroes for particularly dangerous missions. They include Deadshot (Will Smith), Harley Quinn (Margot Robbie), the Joker (Jared Leto), Killer Croc (Adewale AkinnuoyeAgbaje) and El Diablo (Jay Hernandez). (MB) Rated PG-13 


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Magic Monster

Pete and his dragon.

Pete’s Dragon is a reboot with an infectious spirit BY MARYANN JOHANSON

I

suppose this new Pete’s Dragon falls under in the other direction — toward simple, familythe umbrella of Disney’s ongoing project oriented entertainment — is what led to the gentle to produce live-action remakes of all of its mildness of Pete’s Dragon; at times, the movie even animated features. The 1977 film was mostly drifts into dullness. live-action, of course, except for the key element There’s certainly little of the frenetic, colorful of the mischievous giant reptile itself, which was action that characterizes many movies aimed at really cartoonish. The opportunity for a dragon kids these days: this is more like a pleasant walk do-over in the era of lifelike CGI must have been in the redwood forest where Pete and Elliot live irresistible. than a rollicking adventure with them. There’s And this new dragon — again called Elliot — surprisingly little in the way of drama, too: when is a delight and a marvel: a sweet-faced creature park ranger Grace (Bryce Dallas Howard) discovof green fur and exuberant spirit, he may be ers Pete living in the woods — where he’s been monstrously enormous, but there’s little of the alone (except for Elliot) for six years, after an monster about him. He’s more like a really big outing with his parents to the middle of nowhere mutt of a dog. And he loves his ended in a car wreck that killed boy — orphaned, abandoned Pete them — it’s easier than we might PETE’S DRAGON (newcomer Oakes Fegley), who’s expect for her to get Pete to Rated PG about 10 years old and lives a come back to civilization. Directed by David Lowery Mowgli-like existence in the forI often felt, in the midst Starring Oakes Fegley, Bryce Dallas ests of the Pacific Northwest. of the movie, that it wasn’t Howard, Robert Redford Indeed, this new Pete’s Dragon enough of anything: not scary has more in common with Disenough, not funny enough. But ney’s recent Jungle Book remake than it does with its sereneness and warm heart is infectious, and the 1977 original — this one is set in the 1980s, even as it tells a story that feels familiar, it avoids not the turn of the 20th century, and it’s no lonthe sort of clichés that might have rendered it ger a musical — and even more in common with tiresome: the character of Gavin, a hunter who E.T., with its tale of a lonely little boy attempting plans to capture Elliot, turns out not to be quite to protect his secret fantastical friend from adults as villainous as he could have been, for one. who would do him harm. In the end, I found that the mildness of the Director and cowriter (with Toby Halbrooks) film had fooled me, and that some big feeling had David Lowery’s previous features are decidsnuck up on me and left me in happy tears. The edly on the arthouse end of the spectrum. So I magic of Pete’s Dragon may be understated, but it’s wonder if a conscious decision to go very much also soft and clean and lovely. 

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Still Celebrating Boy George and Culture Club paved the way for genre- and gender-bending rock stars BY DAN NAILEN

M

ichael Jackson was the big story at the 1984 Grammys, thanks to his Thriller album and its cavalcade of hits. But those awards also marked the first time the influence of MTV and the dawning of music video were felt — particularly when the winner of the Best New Artist trophy beamed in via satellite. “Thank you, America!” Boy George said with a mischievous smile after Culture Club won the prize. “You’ve got style. You’ve got taste. And you know a good drag queen when you see one.” By the time Culture Club was accepting the prize, the band led by the flamboyant frontman already had two hugely successful albums — 1982’s Kissing to Be Clever and 1983’s Colour by Numbers — that sold tens of millions of copies around the globe on the strength of George’s soulful croon and a reggae-fied synth-pop sound from drummer Jon Moss, guitarist Roy Hay and bassist Mikey Craig, as well as videos that played up the band’s

visual appeal. Looking back now, as the band is in the midst of its longest-ever tour, Craig still considers the fact that Culture Club broke through in America to be “a miracle.” Someone at the record label had the idea of putting out the band’s first single “Do You Really Want to Hurt Me?” without any photos of the band on the record sleeve, he says, “because of the fear of how we looked and how we might be perceived.” “America, especially in those days, was quite a conservative place,” Craig says. “It was genius in the end, because the record broke on its own merit. And then the whole situation was compounded by America getting a look at us, seeing this kind of strange collection of people.” It’s safe to say that for much of Middle America, Boy George was one of the first introductions to androgyny, thanks to MTV sending videos for songs like “Karma Chameleon,” “I’ll Tumble 4 Ya” and “Miss Me Blind”

into living rooms right alongside those by Madonna and Bruce Springsteen. “After the airplay of ‘Do You Really Want To Hurt Me?’ it was basically MTV that broke the band, really,” Craig says. I remember fighting with my sister over whether Boy George was a man or woman after seeing Culture Club on weekly countdown show Solid Gold. I lost the argument, since my prepubescent self had never seen a man dressed, well, in a dress. But I became enough of a fan of the band’s music to put a Culture Club poster on my bedroom wall, alongside soccer star Pelé and movie star Darth Vader. Culture Club’s commercial peak was over by the band’s third album, 1984’s Waking Up with the House on Fire, and George’s drug addiction and tumultuous romantic relationship with Moss led to the band breaking up in 1986. In the years since, the singer has had some solo hits and success as a DJ, and the band regrouped for occasional reunion gigs and recordings. In 2014, the ...continued on next page

Culture Club is currently on their biggest tour of all time, with 60-plus dates.


MUSIC | POP “STILL CELEBRATING,” CONTINUED... band reformed for the first time in 12 years to write and record new songs for an album that Craig expects to finally see the light of day in 2017. “Once we came back together, it feels like you want to write something new,” Craig says. “You want to add to what we’ve already done.” First, though, is the band’s 60-plus-date tour that’s been through Australia and Japan and is now crisscrossing America. “Playing in America is just the best,” Craig says. “The shows have been really, really good. I think we’ve surprised a lot of people. We obviously play the familiar old ‘battle hymns,’ as George calls them, and there are some new songs in there.” Clearly, nostalgia is the big selling point for the show coming to Airway Heights, with fellow ’80s hitmakers Berlin and the English Beat in tow. But Craig believes that Culture Club is drawing audiences now, more than 30 years after their initial success, for much the same reason they broke through in the first place. “As well as our music, there’s a massive social element to Culture Club,” Craig says. “People who grew up with us are people who perhaps were a bit shy about life a little bit. Not all the people, but a lot of people. There are people we helped gain the confidence to step out into the light and be themselves, people who perhaps were a bit frightened of being themselves. Perhaps because they’re slightly different. “I think Culture Club gave the confidence to a lot of people to step out and celebrate who they are.” n dann@inlander.com Culture Club with Berlin and the English Beat • Fri, Aug. 12, at 7:30 pm • $55/$65/$85 • All-ages • Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com • 481-2100

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MUSIC | INDIE ROCK

Band of Horses’ new album proves that sometimes you have to go back to go forward.

Band of Horses are ‘OK’ The roots-rock band’s new album is largely a return to earlier form BY BEN SALMON

T

he new Band of Horses album isn’t perfect. But the worst thing about it might be the lack of a question mark at the end of its title, Why Are You OK. And if that’s the worst thing you can say about an album, it bodes well for the actual music contained within. In Band of Horses’ case, all the above is also a relief after the relative listlessness of the group’s previous full-length effort, 2012’s Mirage Rock. Good news: Why Are You OK is significantly better than its predecessor. There was a time when Band of Horses, which started in Seattle and is now based in Charleston, South Carolina, could do no wrong. Built around the skyscraping voice and restless spirit of lead singer and songwriter Ben Bridwell, the band burst onto the scene in 2006 with Everything All The Time, a shimmering synthesis of reverberant indie rock and Southern twang. It was a near-perfect debut and one of the best albums of that year. The band followed it up with two more wonderful records: 2007’s Cease to Begin and 2010’s Infinite Arms. The former ably continued the sound of the debut and featured two of Bridwell’s very best songs (“Is There A Ghost” and “No One’s Gonna Love You”). The latter explored slower tempos and a softer sound, pushing Band of Horses toward classic rock but also emphasizing their everbeautiful melodies. Why Are You OK sounds like the logical follow-up to Infinite Arms, but it takes its sweet time getting there. The album’s second half is

better than its first, precisely because it’s stuffed with the kind of hazy dreamsongs that Bridwell and company can apparently (and appropriately, non-believers might say) crank out in their sleep. “Country Teen” is a lovely tick-tock pop tune that sounds like the Beach Boys toying with dusty electronics. “Throw My Mess” effectively fuses slide guitar and some barbed production choices into something like a psychedelic hoedown. The more upbeat songs here aren’t quite as successful, except for “Casual Party,” a hardcharging repudiation of inane small talk. And then there’s the seven-minute opening track, “Dull Times / The Moon.” Its first five minutes feature Bridwell cooing about setting suns and slow clouds while guitars ring like wind chimes on a breezy front porch in the South Carolina low country. Then, in its final two minutes, the song shifts into a scorching rocker, with Bridwell chanting “Home is where the heart is / home is where you are.” In a way, “Dull Times / The Moon” is the perfect song title for Band of Horses, because when they nail what they do well, it’s like an awe-inspiring journey across the sparkling horizon. But when they miss the mark, it’s time for a nap. Why Are You OK lands on the right side of that dichotomy. n Band of Horses with The Wild Feathers • Tue, Aug. 16, at 8 pm • $29.50/$35 • All-ages • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • foxtheaterspokane.com • 624-1200

AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 57


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

SINGER-SONGWRITER BEN HARPER

H

e’s hard to classify. Even the Grammys haven’t had much luck defining Ben Harper’s music, as he’s won awards in pop instrumental, traditional soul gospel and blues categories. Whether he’s singing straight and sorrowful tunes accompanied by his acoustic guitar or delving into breezy island rock, Harper proves he’s a musician without limits. On Saturday, he’ll help close out the Festival at Sandpoint’s final weekend. Thankfully, this is a dance show, so folks wanting to get closer to the stage can do so in the middle of the venue. — LAURA JOHNSON Ben Harper & the Innocent Criminals, Tom Freund and Sadie Waggoner • Sat, Aug. 13, at 6 pm • $65 • All-ages • War Memorial Field • 855 Ontario St., Sandpoint • festivalatsandpoint.com • 208-265-4554

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 08/11

ArBOr CreST Wine CeLLArS, Ron Greene BArLOWS AT LiBerTy LAKe, Sunny Nights Duo J THe Big Dipper, Mike Love, Jimmy Nuge, Andy Rumsey BOLO’S, Inland Empire Blues Society Monthly Blues Boogie BOOMerS CLASSiC rOCK BAr & griLL, Randy Campbell acoustic show J BOOTS BAKery & LOunge, The Song Project J BuCer’S COFFeeHOuSe puB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen BuCer’S COFFeeHOuSe puB, The Winter Days BuCKHOrn inn, The Spokane River Band J CHApS, Spare Parts COeur D’ALene CASinO, PJ Destiny J COeur D’ALene pArK, Coeur d’Alene Park Summer Concert Series feat. Maxie Ray Mills and Steve Sackett with Kari Margurite CrAFTeD TAp HOuSe + KiTCHen, Kicho CrAve, DJ Freaky Fred O’SHAyS iriSH puB & eATery, Open mic with Adrian and Leo THe OBServATOry, Vinyl Meltdown THe riDLer piAnO BAr, The Bobby Patterson Band riveLLe’S river griLL, Truck Mills and special guests Jam Night J riverSTOne pArK, Ian McFeron THe viKing BAr & griLL, Tommy G, Zaq Flanary J WAr MeMOriAL FieLD, Festival at Sandpoint deat. Angelique Kidjo, Afrosonics ZOLA, The Powers

Friday, 08/12

J THe BArTLeTT, Moon Hooch

58 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016

FOLK-ROCK TRAMPLED BY TURTLES T

hey’re from the land of 10,000 lakes, a place so muggy and mosquito-filled in the summer and freezing in the winter, it’s a wonder anyone there ever leaves the house. Thankfully, Trampled By Turtles has left their Duluth, Minnesota, haven many times to bring their joyous, boot-stompin’ bluegrass/folk-rock to the rest of the world. After bypassing Spokane to play the Festival at Sandpoint last year, the five-piece comes to the Knitting Factory next week to share some of their string-heavy tunes (they still play mostly acoustic instruments). Their most recent album Wild Animals is quite a bit more introspective than their 2010 effort Palomino, which brought the band into the national spotlight with its scorching and high-flying tracks. But their wild energy will never fully go away. — LAURA JOHNSON Trampled By Turtles with Lord Huron • Thu, Aug. 18, at 7:30 pm • $27.50 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

BeverLy’S, Robert Vaughn J THe Big Dipper, Broken Whistle, Hagerty Lane, Bottle Creek String Band BigFOOT puB, NightShift BLACK DiAMOnD, DJ Major One BOLO’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE BrOWne’S TAvern, Jip Skippy and the Unprepared CHeCKerBOArD BAr, Caustic Casanova, Dark White Light, Tsuga and Oracles CLOver, Pat Coast COeur D’ALene CASinO, Donnie Emerson and Nancy Sophia Duo, Somebody’s Hero COnKLing MArinA & reSOrT, jamShack J CruiSerS, Texas Hippie Coalition, Scott H. Biram, Bridge to Grace, Local 945ers, Children of Atom, North Fork CurLey’S, Tell the Boys

FiZZie MuLLigAnS, Back at It Duo FOrTy-One SOuTH, Truck Mills J HAyS pArK, Music Under the Oaks feat. Rusty Jackson THe Hive, The Revivalists JOHn’S ALLey, Bread & Circus J KniTTing FACTOry, Kings of Love Tour: Bobby V, J Holiday, and Pleasure P MAx AT MirABeAu, Jesse Weston MOOSe LOunge, Chris Rieser and the Nerve MuLLigAn’S BAr & griLLe, Wyatt Wood J nOrTHern QueST CASinO, Culture Club (See story on page 55), English Beat, Berlin THe OBServATOry, Haunted Summer, Crystalline, Sea Giant J THe pALOMinO, Hafi Album Release Party feat. Cordell and Mista Snipe, New York Yao, Young Dom, Young East, J-Mack, A-Town

J pArK BenCH CAFe, Laddie Ray Melvin pATiT CreeK CeLLArS, Ken Davis In Transit penD D’OreiLLe Winery, Daniel Mills J reD LiOn HOTeL AT THe pArK, Outdoor Concert Series feat. Robin Barrett and the Coyote Kings, Tiphony Dames reD rOOM LOunge, The Smokes, Supervillain, Wind Hotel THe riDLer piAnO BAr, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler J SpOKAne ArenA, Spokane Brewers Festival feat. River City Roots, Ragtag Romantics, Carli Osika SpOKAne vALLey eAgLeS, Stagecoach West THe pin!, Hip Hop Showcase VI”: Manwitnoname, Diz Dean, Alex Xander, Hounds of Hell, Project Potent, ParODime, Traverse, Destiny,

Legion Six, Chadrick THe rOADHOuSe, The Lucky Losers THe STATiOn HOuSe BAr & griLL, Cary Fly J WAr MeMOriAL FieLD, Festival at Sandpoint feat. Nitty Gritty Dirt Band, Luke Bell J WATerFrOnT pArK, 2016 Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival feat. Front Country, The Lowest Pair, Bluestreak ZOLA, Dirty Rice

Saturday, 08/13

BABy BAr, Paisley Devil, Statues of God, The Dancing Plague of 1518, Pop Goddess Athena J THe BArTLeTT, Marshall McLean Band, Planes on Paper, the Holy Broke BeverLy’S, Robert Vaughn J THe Big Dipper, Odyssey, Astronaut and The Trees, Mother Yeti


BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Major One BOLO’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Jon & Rand COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Donnie Emerson and Nancy Sophia Duo, Somebody’s Hero CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, jamShack CURLEY’S, Tell the Boys FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Back at It Duo J GARLAND DISTRICT, Garland Street Fair feat. Peter Rivera, Karrie O’Neill, Cary Fly, the Bight, the Backups, Ragtag Romantics and more J THE HIVE, Moon Taxi THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave JOHN’S ALLEY, Angel Mary & the Tennessee Werewolfs LA ROSA CLUB, Open Jam THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, The Thomsen Boys and Grand Teton MAX AT MIRABEAU, Jesse Weston MOOSE LOUNGE, Chris Rieser and the Nerve MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Pat Coast NASHVILLE NORTH, Jason Boland and the Stragglers J NO-LI BREWHOUSE, Rockin’ on the River feat. Wyatt Wood NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Ramsin THE PALOMINO, Rock/Metal Fest feat. Charlie DrownThunder Knife, Ground Zero, Disciples of Descent PROHIBITION GASTROPUB, Jazz Night with Rachel Bade-McMurphy J RED LION HOTEL AT THE PARK,

Outdoor Concert Series feat. Devon Allman THE RESERVE, Zaq Flanary THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler J SPOKANE ARENA, Spokane Brewers Festival feat. Silver Treason, Working Spliffs, Fat Lady, Lucas Brookbank Brown, Tyler Aker J THE PIN!, Avoid the Void, For the Likes of You, Heart of An Awl, Deaf To, Glass Alley, Late show: J. Stalin and Friends THE ROADHOUSE, The Hankers J WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, Festival at Sandpoint feat. Ben Harper & the Innocent Criminals (See story on facing page) J WATERFRONT PARK, 2016 Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival feat. Jody Stecher & Kate Brislin, Chatham County Line, Front Country, Slocan Ramblers ZOLA, Dirty Rice ZYTHUM BREWING COMPANY, Random Generation

Sunday, 08/14

BIG BARN BREWING CO., Feral Anthem COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh, Bill Bozly CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Hannah Rebecca CRUISERS, Kicho DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church IRON HORSE BAR, Riverboat Band

LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open jam O’DOHERTY’S IRISH GRILLE, Live Irish Music OBJECT SPACE, Tatsuya nakatani, Kurva Choir and guests J THE PIN!, Ice Nine Kills, Moretta, Deaf To J WATERFRONT PARK, 2016 Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival feat. Jody Stecher & Kate Brislin, Chatham County Line, ZOLA, Blake Braley Band

Monday, 08/15

J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with MJ The In-Human Beatbox REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Front Country J THE PIN!, Losing Skin, Griever, Wake of Humanity, East Sherman ZOLA, Fus Bol

Tuesday, 08/16

J MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Band of Horses (See story on page 57) THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday THE OBSERVATORY, Marcus Blacke, Duke Chevalier J POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE (SOUTH HILL), DJ Charley THE RESERVE, Deschamp’s Artist Showcase

THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Jam night with Gil Rivas THE PIN!, Elektro Grave ZOLA, The Bucket List

Wednesday, 08/17 J THE BARTLETT, Muuy Biien J DOWNTOWN COEUR D’ALENE, Live After 5 feat. West Coast Women’s Blues Revue EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard J KNITTING FACTORY, Michael Franti & Spearhead J NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Big & Rich, Gary Allan J POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE (SOUTH HILL), Soulful Max J REANEY PARK, Concerts in the Park feat. Bare Wires RED ROOM LOUNGE, Hip Hop Is A Culture THE RESERVE, EDM Wednesdays with DJs Ayzim, Radikill, Gestut THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Piano Bar with Christan Raxter THE ROADHOUSE, Open mic with Vern Vogel and the Volcanoes THE VIKING BAR & GRILL, Burgers and brews open mic night ZOLA, The Bossame

Coming Up ...

J KNITTING FACTORY, Trampled by Turtles (see story on facing page), Lord Huron, Aug. 18 THE VIKING BAR & GRILL, RageApalooza feat. The Fall of Troy, Red Fang, Invasive and more, Aug. 18-21

BlueWatersBluegrassFestival_BluegrassFestival_081116_8H_GG.pdf

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N Liberty Lake Rd, Liberty Lake • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CALYPSOS • 116 E Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208665-0591 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CONKLING MARINA & RESORT • 20 W. Jerry Ln., Worley• 208-686-1151 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • (208) 773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 THE JACKSON ST. • 2436 N. Astor • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N Market St, Mead • 4669918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LOON LAKE SALOON • 3996 Hwy. 292 • 233-2738 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • (208) 265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-6647901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • (208) 765-3200 x310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR• 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY• 15 S Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO • 6425 N Lidgerwood St • 242-8907 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RESERVE • 120 N. Wall • 598-8783 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside . • 822-7938 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SWAXX • 23 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 59


FILM TRIUMPHANT TIME TRAVEL

Grab your blankets, grab your lawn chairs and grab all your friends for our annual summertime outdoor version of Suds & Cinema, happening a week (or less) from the time you’re reading these words. On the schedule is an excellent flick from the excellent year of 1989, Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure. It stars a young Keanu Reeves (pre-Keanu-is-Sad meme era), alongside George Carlin and a cast of historical figures. As per usual, Suds is more than just a film, and there will be plenty of food and beverage options for your enjoyment, including 3ninjas food truck, Orlison Brewing Co., One Tree Hard Cider and Brain Freeze Creamery. See you there, dudes. — CHEY SCOTT Suds & Cinema: Bill and Ted’s Excellent Adventure • Thu, Aug. 18, at 7 pm • $5 suggested donation to Friends of the Centennial Trail • Olmsted Park, Kendall Yards • bit.ly/SudsandCinema

THEATER LIVE AFTER DEATH

On April 23 of this year, exactly 400 years after the death of William Shakespeare, England’s Royal Shakespeare Company put on an extraordinary event to commemorate the occasion, filmed live and soon to screen at the Bing. The performance included enactments of iconic Shakespeare scenes by a variety of big-name actors, Benedict Cumberbatch and Helen Mirren among them, as well as Shakespeare-inspired dance and musical performances. A part of the Bing’s monthly Stage to the Screen series, Shakespeare Live! promises to deliver the closest possible approximation of being an audience member at the original performance, and at a far more accessible price point. — ISAAC HANDELMAN Shakespeare Live! • Sun, Aug. 14, at 2 pm • $17 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • friendsofthebing.org • 227-7638

60 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016

FESTIVAL BLOCK OFF THE STREET

The Garland Street Fair & Car Show is back Saturday to celebrate one of the most eclectic and artistic areas in Spokane. Along with an assortment of local vendors and businesses, you can expect two packed music stages. The main stage features many established Spokane acts, including Peter Rivera of Rare Earth and Sammy Eubanks, while the smaller stage (on Wall Street) showcases acts for the more indie rock-inclined, with local artists like the Bight, the Backups and Ragtag Romantics. A portion of the event proceeds will be used for revitalization projects in the Garland District. — LAURA JOHNSON Garland Street Fair & Car Show • Sat, Aug. 13, from 10 am-7 pm • Free • Intersection of North Monroe and West Garland • garlandstreetfair.com


GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

1 WEEKEND = $3.47 MILLION (AND WE ARE STILL COUNTING)

THANK YOU TO OUR PARTNERS AND THE COMMUNITY FOR THEIR GENEROUS SUPPORT HELPING US RAISE OVER $3.47 MILLION THIS PAST WEEKEND TO FIGHT CANCER IN THE INLAND NORTHWEST. L E A R N M O R E AT C O M M U N I T YC A N C E R F U N D . O R G BENEFIT TING:

THEATER LAND OR SEA

The final summer show at the Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre has a fitting theme, as audiences take to the water with the merfolk of Disney’s beloved adaptation of The Little Mermaid. We all know the story — Ariel falls in love with the handsomely human Prince Eric, and makes a bargain with Ursula to trade her tail for legs and a life on land… but things don’t go as planned, as things in fairy tales usually tend to do, and Ariel must rectify her mistake to restore order to the seas. Cap off your summertime adventures and see the charming, all-ages show performed live in a musical format by Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre’s professional cast. — CHEY SCOTT Disney’s The Little Mermaid • Aug. 11-28: Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $27-$49 • Kroc Center • 1765 W. Golf Course Rd., CdA • cdasummertheatre.org • 208-660-2958 P R E S E N T I N G PA R T N E R :

P L AT I N U M PA R T N E R S :

ARTS BURN IT DOWN

Before artist Le Anne Iverson takes her life-size sculptures down to Burning Man — the world-famous, weeklong, people-powered creativity experiment that takes place in the Nevada desert — she’s making a stop in Spokane Valley to show her work. The one-day event will give you a chance to see Iverson’s seven pieces, while also taking in other artistic performances. Local artists will join in on the fun, too, with a sculpture garden, vendor booths and other opportunities to get a taste of the burner vibe, but without the dust storms. — MIKE BOOKEY

M E D I C A L PA R T N E R S :

G O L D PA R T N E R S :

2nd Degree Burning Man • Sat, Aug. 13, from 10 am-10 pm • Free •  Hatch Creative Business Incubator • 9612 E. Sprague, Spokane Valley •  hatchspokane.com

AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 61


W I SAW U YOU

RS RS

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU YOU ARE LOVED DON Tragically, on July 31, 2016, a bright light was snuffed out due to a heinous act. Don Meilike was the kind of man who would do anything for anyone. He built bikes for the neighborhood children, who couldn’t afford them and was always there to extend a helping hand to any of his neighbors. All across the Hillyard community Don could be seen riding his bike and stopping to help anyone in need. A cold, unfeeling person decided Don didn’t have the right to live and ran him down. Don died on a neighbor’s lawn, at 6 am. Because of this monstrous crime those of us who knew him are left bereft and empty. Thank you Don, for everything. You are loved, will be missed and always remembered by those whose lives you touched. IT ALL STARTED WITH A PICTURE OF YOUR EYE ON MYSPACE... Esme, I have wanted to write this a million times. I fell in love with you from the first time we met and when you told me you usually get tired of a guy, I always tried to do my best tyo not let it happen with me. I loved to make you laugh by saying and doing stupid stuff. I would make you laugh so hard when we were walking, you’d have to stop. I loved that. You said that I ruined your life and I can’t stop hearing that. I am truly sorry it ended the way it did. I should have just been a man and told you how I felt. I never wanted to hurt you, but ended up hurting you in the worst way and I can never forget, or forgive myself for what I did. I impacted your life as well as mine and both of us lost. You did what you needed to do and I realize that. I have no hard feelings for you or what

happened, it’s done. But I will always miss you and love you. I care for you and am sad I couldn’t make you happy. If I never loved you like you said, why am I so sad, even to this day almost a year after we parted the way we did. I think about you all the time. I miss you and I hope all is well for you and the cats are well. I could go on and on, but I just want you to know I wish you only the best. I’ll miss you forever. M FRED MEYER CASHIER You check me out at Fred Meyer in the valley on Aug 4. Our small talk was about you attending college and potentially studying to be a nurse. I am the guy from Vegas. You are really nice and sweet. I would like to get to know you over coffee. fongpj85@gmail.com TO SAASHA ROSE GARVIN This goes out to Saasha Rose and Judy Marlinda. I thank you both for doing everything in your power to make sure I didn’t become a statistic like my father no matter how ruff it got. I am still clean and sober and very much happier for it. I will always need and miss you both. Thank you again, love always David Lee. CAPTAINETTE PLANET A lady with cute tattoos shares my passion for Main Market bulk aisle. You spoke of nobly defending our forests against fires. No wonder you’re so hot. If not for my barking dog I may have been wise enough to leave you my number. For now, I will spend Monday lunches at the Market.

YOU SAW ME I CAUGHT YOU CHECKING ME OUT... ...and I was not displeased. Wed Aug 3 around noon, you were the cowboy with a black beard, a hat, and a really cute butt. You had just come out of O’Reillys on 29th and Regal and were about to get into your truck (jeep? I was too busy checking you back). I was on my way in, and I think you were “distracted” when you saw me. At least I hope so. If you are a gay cowboy and you are looking for your cowgurl you need to answer this ad and sign me up for the rodeo. Sure, I have pix and all for the right guy, but you need to tell me something real. I do so hope you find me. bhu8nji9890@ yahoo.com

CHEERS THANK YOU! I would like to thank from the bottom of my heart the amazing couple

who anonymously paid for the Royal Fireworks Show downtown last Sunday. I have spent the majority of my 34 years living in Spokane, this is where I grew up so it holds so many amazing memories for me. One of my great memories was always going with my mom to the fireworks concert, we had to get to the park at 6 just to have a seat. I also have a jeers for the citizens of Spokane. There was plenty of room to lay out large blankets at 9:30! This saddens my heart because this used to be one the amazing things Spokane does, but it now seems like the citizens of Spokane

Written by Joe M. Charles • Directed by Paul Roberts August 3RD - August 28TH Wed - Sat 7:00PM | Sun 2:00PM

ALL TICKETS: $10 1-877-SIXTHST (208) 752-8871

sixthstreetmelodrama.com 62 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016

MAGGOTS MAKING SPOKANE UGLY To the boys who speed down Upriver Drive between Boulder Beach and the Greene Street Bridge, I hope a nice police car is around the corner next time and gives you the most expensive ticket you’ve ever received.

TO THE NICE GUY IN CHENEY I drive an ice cream truck and you gave me some cash telling me to buy ice cream for the kids in the neighborhood who couldn’t afford it. Thank you on behalf of childhood memories. That was a cool thing to do.

BARE FEET VS DOG PAWS We were at the CdA craft show on Sherman Ave Friday when the temp was 93*. To all dog owners attending any summertime outdoor event. If it’s too hot for you to walk on hot asphalt or concrete without footwear, do not expect

Do not expect your dog to do something that you would not do. Don’t be an idiot when it comes to your best friend.

just don’t care. Everybody, these are the things that make this town so great, but if we don’t step up as a community before great events like this are no long! HONEST MOVIE GOERS My deepest gratitude to the young people who came across my movie tickets for the 11:25 am showing of Nerve at Riverpark Square cinemas. My son and I were visiting your great city and inadvertently left our tickets in the ticket machine. As I ran frantically towards the machine, a nice young lady was already taking my tickets to the counter. It is so refreshing to know that honesty and respect are present in today’s uncertain world. Thank you! SWEET HONEST JANITOR CARSON I saw you — kind of. I’d been to hear Handel’s music on the river. I stopped into Fast Eddie’s for a bathroom break on the way back to my car and lost my phone there. You came in later to clean the place and found my phone and turned it in. Many thanks oh sweet Janitor Carson. VIKING Thank you a million times! You came in a moment I was dying, you bring me back to live again. I feel stupid to let you go. Still thinking about you every day. I wish I could be a part in your life again but don’t know. Still doing my workouts, still eating right, and still moving forward. I learned one

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

THE OLD COOKIE SHOP, OR…NELLIE WAS A BAKER ‘CAUSE SHE KNEADED THE DOUGH!

mistake=MORE CARDIO for me. Also, drink water and everything that it’s not have caloric value, and when I go to Applebees I checked the nutritional value of the food. Still, I’m getting stronger physically, I just wish you were still with me. Sincerely, The Girl from Wallace.

TO MY ONE WOMAN FOXY SQUAD Feeding Belgian waffles to ducks. Throwing darts at canvas by the river. Licking stone letters on mountainsides. We’ve never really been the conventional type, you and I. In fact we seem to outright defy it. But you’ve touched my life enormously since we met, and I’m glad that 20 years ago today, you were born. Cheers to many more years of howling into the wind with the woman of my dreams. Happy birthday, love!

your dog too. Paws are very sensitive. Place the back of your hand on the hot surface for 5 seconds. If you cannot, then your dog’s paws will burn and blister very quickly. Do not expect your dog to do something that you would not do; this includes riding in the back of a hot pickup truck. Don’t be an idiot when it comes to your best friend. 

JEERS JESUS ON THE FREEWAY Jeers to whomever removed Jesus from the Freeway!! Really loved driving past him and saying, “Thank you Jesus! Love you and Have a Groovy Day!” Lol YOU STOLE CPR MANNEQUINS You know who you are and what you did. You took CPR mannequins, probably thinking they were something else. I filed a crime check report, the pawn shops know. You might be trying to sell them to pay for your drugs. But guess what? Those were being used to train people how to save your sorry self when you go into cardiac arrest because of your drug habit. You know where to return them. Put them back and let me get back to saving lives.

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

CAR WASH FOR SIA STUDENTS Get your car washed, enjoy lemonade and purchase art made by children, all while supporting the students of Spokane International Academy in Hillyard. Aug. 13, 9 am-3 pm. $10 donation requested. Spokane International Academy, 2706 E. Queen. (209-8730) CELEBRATE LIFE FUN RUN WALK Run, walk or ride across Sandpoint’s scenic Long Bridge for this 10th annual event that supports local families affected by cancer. Aug. 13, 9 am. CelebrateLifeFunRunWalk.org BOOSH CRUISE FOR AUTISM The ninth annual event features three cruise boats, with 12 DJs aboard, live entertainment and more. All proceeds benefit the Autism Society of Washington. Aug. 14, 6-10 pm. $30-$50. Coeur d’Alen. bit.ly/1ZkhTXs NONPROFIT FUNDRAISER NIGHT Come out for a screening of the film Stuart Little and help support local nonprofits through a silent auction and concession stand. Participating nonprofits include animal rescues, homeless outreach and veteran services. Aug. 14, 7 pm. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter. facebook.com/LoveLikeBuddy WALK WITH THOUGHT A 5K brain injury and disability walk-a-thon to bring awareness to the issues surrounding those living with Traumatic Brain Injury and other neurological disabilities. Proceeds go to local nonprofit TBI Network. Aug. 14. $17. Mission Park, 1208 E. Mission. walkwiththought.org STARS ON THE HILL FEAT. MASTERCLASS BIG BAND The P.E.O. Chapter CW hosts its sixth annual event, with proceeds supporting P.E.O. philanthropies. Tickets include hors d’oeuvres, dessert and music by the 20-piece MasterClass Big Band. Aug. 16, 5-9 pm. $20-$35. Arbor Crest Wine Cellars, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. arborcrest.com LBD ROOFTOP COCKTAILS Hosted by the YWCA of Spokane, a women’s networking event with proceeds supporting the programs and services of the YWCA. Aug. 18, 5:30-7:30 pm. YWCA of Spokane, 930 N. Monroe. ywcaspokane.org (326-1190) 6TH ANNUAL MUTT STRUT The sixth annual 2.5 mile walk benefits Higher Ground Animal Sanctuary, and honors the memory of Chris Anderlik, a Liberty Lake resident known for her lifelong love and commitment to animals. After the walk, check out live music,

vendors, a silent auction and more. Aug. 20, 8 am-1 pm. Free, donations accepted. Pawpular Companions Pet Supplies, 21950 E. Country Vista Dr. pawpularcompanions.com (927-8890) TAILS AT TWILIGHT: TALES IN FLIGHT Kootenai Humane Society’s annual benefit, with live/silent auctions, dinner, awards presentations and more. Aug. 20, 5-9 pm. $65/single; $125/pair. Pappy Boyington Field, Hayden. kootenaihumanesociety.com TEAM PARKINSON’S WALK Support the local Parkinson’s community with two easy courses, along with resources, music, food, games and more. Register online for this event supporting the Parkinson’s Communities in the Inland Empire. Aug. 20, 9:30 am-noon. Free. Southside Community Center, 3151 E. 27th. teamparkinsons.org

COMEDY

CHAD DANIELS The comedian has performed in major comedy competitions, festivals and has his own Comedy Central special. Aug. 11-13 at 8 pm, Aug. 13 at 10:30 pm. $10-$20. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998) GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open mic comedy night; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. (847-1234) EXPEDITION The BDT’s Friday night improv show for July and August, starting at 8 pm. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com STAND-UP COMEDY Live comedy featuring established and up-and-coming local comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. No cover. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. (509-838-6688) SAFARI Fast-paced, short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Recommended for ages 16+) Saturdays at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) IMPROV JAM SESSIONS An opportunity to try something new, polish your improv skills and have fun. Each session is led by a BDT Troupe member, and is an informal get together and not considered an improv class. For ages 18+. Meets most Mondays, 7-9 pm (see website for dates). Free. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) TRIVIA + OPEN MIC COMEDY Trivia starts at 8 pm; stick around for open mic comedy afterward. Tuesdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. Checkerboard Bar, 1716 E. Sprague Ave. checkerboardbar.com

Featured Attractions Featured Attractions Featured Attractions Featured Attractions

Main Arena Events

Sawyer Brown Concert &

Fireworks Spectacular Show

Aussie Kingdom Kangaroos Aussie Kingdom Kangaroos Aussie Kingdom Aussie Kingdom Kangaroos Kangaroos

Wednesday, August 24th

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African African African African

Acrobats All American Acrobats Dubois Circus All American Circus Acrobats Dubois All American Acrobats Dubois All American Circus Dubois Circus

PRCA

Xtreme Bulls Thursday, August 25th

Jungle Jungle Jungle Jungle

Stilt Walkers Stilt Walkers Stilt Walkers Stilt Walkers

Canadian Canadian Canadian Canadian

Lumberjack Lumberjack Lumberjack Lumberjack

Show Show Show Show

North Star and Paradise Strolling Mariachi Band Amusements North Star andCarnival Paradise Strolling Mariachi Band Amusements Carnival North Star and Paradise TerranceB Celebrity Hypnotist • European Children’s Theatre • Peruvian North Star andCarnival Paradise Strolling Mariachi BandAlpacas Amusements TerranceB Celebrity• Hypnotist • European Children’s Theatre • Peruvian Alpacas Kid’s Amusements Pedal Tractors Japanese Taiko Drummers • Chinese Dragons • Beers of the World Strolling Mariachi Band Carnival

Kid’s Pedal Tractors • Japanese Stages Taiko Drummers Chinese • Beers •ofPony the World Farm To Table Park • Community • Funtastic•Kid’s ZoneDragons • Daily Parade Rides TerranceB Celebrity Hypnotist • European Children’s Theatre • Peruvian Alpacas Farm To TableCelebrity Park • Community Stages ••Funtastic Kid’s•Zone • Daily••Parade • Pony Rides All Aboard Express Train • Carnival Fair Children’s Foods Exhibits Much More! TerranceB Hypnotist • European Theatre Peruvian Alpacas Kid’s Pedal Tractors • Japanese Taiko Drummers • Chinese Dragons • Beers of the World All Aboard Express •Train • Carnival • Fair Foods • Exhibits • •Much More! Kid’s Pedal Tractors Japanese Taiko Drummers • Chinese Dragons Beers of the World Farm To Table Park • Community Stages • Funtastic Kid’s Zone • Children’s Daily Parade •Theatre Pony Rides TerranceB Celebrity Hypnotist • European FarmAboard To TableExpress Park • Community Stages ••Funtastic Kid’s•Zone • Daily• Parade • Pony Rides All Train • Carnival Fair Foods Exhibits Much More! Peruvian Alpacas • Chinese Dragons All Aboard Express Train• • Kid’s CarnivalPedal • Fair Tractors Foods • Exhibits • Much More!

Japanese Taiko Drummers • Beers of the World • Daily Parade Farm To Table Park • Community Stages • Funtastic Kid’s Zone Pony Rides • All Aboard Express Train • Carnival • Fair Foods Exhibits • Much More!

Gem State Stampede

PRCA Rodeo Friday, Saturday & Sunday August 26th-28th

Draft Horse Show & Pull Friday & Saturday August 26th-27th

Demolition Derby Sunday, August 28th

Corner of 1st and Monroe 1001 West 1st., Downtown Spokane Delivery & Catering • 509-835-4177 brooklyndelispokane.com

AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 63


EVENTS | CALENDAR OPEN MIC A free open mic night every Wednesday, starting at 8 pm. Doors open at 7 pm. Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com TYLER BEOH: The comedian’s resume includes top finishes in the Portland Comedy Competition and the Oregon International Comedy Competition. Aug. 18-20 at 8 pm, Aug. 20 at 10:30 pm. $10-$22. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com

COMMUNITY

BODIES HUMAN For the first exhibit in its new home, Mobius hosts more than 100 individual organs, and transparent body slices that have been preserved through plastination, a technique that replaces bodily fluids with reactive plastics. Exhibit runs through Dec. 31; hours are Tu-Sat, 10 am-5 pm and Sun, 11 am-5 pm. (Recommended for ages 10+.) $15. Mobius Science Center, 331 N. Post. mobiusspokane.org (509-321-7137) BONNER COUNTY FAIR The 89th annual Bonner County Fair offers the PRCA rodeo, ag demos/displays, entertainment, food, live music and more. Aug. 9-13. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Ave. bonnercountyfair.com TAKE A BREAK SERIES The park hosts a free summer series to help residents restore, invigorate and recharge during their lunch break. On weekdays, from noon-2 pm, through Sept. 2. Events include yoga, backyard games, tai-chi, music and more. Free. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard. facebook.com/SpokaneRiverfrontPark (625-6601) LATE NIGHT AT THE LIBRARY Wear play clothes and be ready for games, snacks, crafts and more. Signed permission form is required, for kids entering grades 3-5. Registration required. Aug. 12, 7-9 pm. Free. Moran Prairie Library, 6004 S. Regal St. (509-893-8340) 26TH INLAND NORTHWEST CAMARO CLUB OPEN Car show open to the public. See website for details. Aug. 13, 9 am-3 pm. $20/entry; free to spectators. Mirabeau Park Meadows, 13500 Mirabeau Pkwy. inlandnorthwestcamaroclub.com COEUR D’CON The library hosts the second annual event celebrating books, movies, games, manga, comics and all other avenues of geek culture. Events include crafts, games, a cosplay contest and more, for all age groups. Aug. 13. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. coeurdcon.wordpress.com NINE MILE DAM DAYS The annual community festival hosts vendors, food, entertainment and more in the park. Proceeds raised at Dam Days 2016 go to the four Parent-Teacher Groups of the Nine Mile Falls School District. Aug. 13, 9 am-10 pm. Sontag Park. damdays.com SOUTHSIDE ARTISAN MARKET More than 30 area craftspeople and artisans offer their wares, including jewelry, photography, art cards, painting, home decor and more. Aug. 13, 10 am-4 pm; Aug. 14, 10 am-3 pm. Free admission. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac.org (509-535-0803) COMMUNITY SWING: LINDY IN THE PARK Enjoy swing music and dance, and get a free lesson from Colleen Robinson of Lindy Town, USA. Held Sundays, from 12:45-2 pm, through Sept. 4. Free. Spokane Tribal Gathering Place, 347 N Post St. vintageswingspokane.com POKÉMON TOURNAMENT Bring your cards or borrow a deck and do battle to

64 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016

catch ‘em all at the library this summer. All ages are welcome; kids age 8 and under must bring an adult. Aug. 15, 6-8 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. (893-8350) ADULT COLORING Drop in for a relaxing evening of art, and color any of our free coloring sheets or a postcard to mail to a friend. Aug. 16, 6-7 pm. Free. Medical Lake Library, 3212 Herb. (893-8330) WOOD, WATER, WILDLIFE & WAFFLES Start with waffles and coffee, then talk about urban forests and all the amenities they provide, focusing in particular on stormwater mitigation. Also hear from an expert in the Audubon Society about the urban wildlife habitat trees provide. Aug. 16, 8-10 am. $20. The Scoop, 1001 W. 25th Ave. thescoopspokane.com (477-2175) ADULT COLORING Drop in for a relaxing evening of art, and color free sheets or a postcard to mail to a friend. Aug. 18, 6-7 pm. Free. Airway Heights Library, 1213 S. Lundstrom. (893-8250) PEND OREILLE COUNTY FAIR The rural northeastern Washington county fair is themed “Blue Jeans, Country Dreams” and features traditional ag/garden displays, livestock, food vendors, entertainment and more. Aug. 18-21. $3-$7. Cusick Fairgrounds, 419152 Hwy 20. povn.com/ pocofair (445-1367) MONTHLY SWING DANCE A monthly dance for all swing dance styles. Open to all ages. Includes a lesson from 7-8 pm, and dancing until 11 pm. Aug. 19. $5. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. strictlyswingspokane.com PICKIN’ ON THE PRAIRIE Set on a 1898 farmstead, this 80-booth offers antiques, vintage, home decor, primitives, industrial, farmware, yard art, artisan hand crafts and more. Aug. 20-21, 10 am-4 pm. $5/weekend admission. Past Blessings Farm, 8521 N. Orchard Prairie Rd. pastblessingsfarm.com PORSCHE CLUB CAR SHOW See all models out on display on the grass around the resort. Aug. 20. Hill’s Resort, 4777 W. Lakeshore Rd. hillsresort.com UNITY IN THE COMMUNITY Spokane’s annual multicultural celebration features a youth fair, career and education fair, health fair, early learning fair and local vendors and organizations. Aug. 20, 10 am-4 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard St. nwunity.org (509-625-6601)

FESTIVAL

GARLAND STREET FAIR & CAR SHOW A day of music, art vendors, food and a car show. Offering activities for the family, with nine blocks of Garland closed to traffic. Music at the main stage includes Sammy Eubanks, Hot Club Spokane, Cursive Wires and Peter Rivera. Aug. 13, 10 am-7 pm. Free. garlandstreetfair.com POAC ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR Elements of the 44th annual fair include artist booths, food vendors, live entertainment, and a youth art arena. All proceeds directly support POAC’s programs in visual and performing arts and art education for the community. Aug. 13-14. Downtown Sandpoint. artsinsandpoint.org AIRWAY HEIGHTS DAYS Events include a classic car show, watermelon races, a talent competition, kids activities, charity rummage sale, live music, fireworks and more. Aug. 19-20. Free. cawh.org GOODGUYS 15TH GREAT NORTHWEST NATIONALS The annual automotive festival features hot rods, customs, trucks, muscle cars and more on display, along

with a swap meet, live music, model car show, kids’ activities and more. Aug. 1921. $6-$17. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. good-guys.com NATIONAL LENTIL FESTIVAL For 27 years, the Lentil Festival has brought national attention to the Palouse region, which producing the most lentils in the U.S. Events include a beer/wine garden, live music, cooking demos, kids’ activities, the legendary lentil cook-off, lentilbased foods and more. Aug. 19-20. Free to attend. Pullman, n/a. lentilfest.com WALLACE HUCKLEBERRY FESTIVAL The town’s annual celebration of all things huckleberry, with live music, street dances, raffles, a huckleberry pancake breakfast, street vendors, kids’ activities on the depot lawn, a dunk tank plus the 5k walk and run. Aug. 19-20. Wallace, Idaho. wallaceidahochamber.com HOPPED UP ON ART, MUSIC & BEER The fourth annual event features food trucks, craft beer, local arists and vendors, live music and more. Aug. 20, 1 pm. Free to attend. Hopped Up Brewing Co., 10421 E. Sprague. bit.ly/1UHVsHz THE STEAM PLANT BLOCK PARTY Neato Burrito/Baby Bar and Unifest team up to throw the first Steam Plant Block Party Music Festival, with two outdoor stages, beverages, local vendors and more. See website for full music line-up and schedule. Aug. 20, 3-11 pm. $10. Steam Plant, 159 S. Lincoln. steamplantblockparty.com

FILM

BOYS OF ’36 In 1936 an unlikely crew of rowers brought home gold medals from the Olympics in Nazi Germany. The Library, in partnership with the Coeur d’Alene Rowing Association, screens the documentary about that crew. Aug. 11, 7 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. (208-769-2315) BATMAN VS. SUPERMAN An outdoor screening as part of U. Idaho Student Involvement’s “Screen on the Green” series, on the Theophilus Tower lawn. Aug. 12, 8:45 pm. Free. U. of Idaho, 709 S Deakin St. uidaho.edu (208-885-6111) GOOSEBUMPS An outdoor screening of the family-friendly film hosted by the Friends of Pavillion Park. Movie starts at dusk. Aug. 12. Free. Half Moon Park, Holl Blvd. & Indiana Ave. pavillionpark.org LORD OF THE RINGS: THE TWO TOWERS Enjoy Peter Jackson’s masterful adaptations of Tolkien’s classic, “The Lord of the Rings,” with us this summer on our large screen. Aug. 12, 7-10 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkwestcentral.org (509-279-0299) THE JUNGLE BOOK An outdoor screening of the family-friendly film hosted by the Friends of Pavillion Park. Movie starts at dusk. Aug. 13. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. (755-6726) SATURDAY MARKET CARTOONS Weekly screenings during farmers market hours, offered Saturdays, 9-noon, through Sept. 24 Free. Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. (208-882-4127) SOUTH PERRY SUMMER THEATER: INSIDE OUT Movie starts at dusk, in the parking lot of The Shop. Each showing benefits a local charity. Aug. 13. Free. The Shop, 924 S. Perry. (509-534-1647) BEING JOHN MALKOVICH Screening as part of the Garland’s “Summer Camp 2016” series, this year featuring staff favorites. Aug. 18, at 7 pm and Aug. 18, at 5 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. garlandtheater.com (327-1050)

SPOKANE OUTDOOR MOVIES: JURASSIC WORLD Offering outdoor, open-air seating and drive-in style in your car. $3$5/person; $20/carload (four or more). Cash only entry at the gate. Aug. 16, 7 pm. Joe Albi Stadium, Wellesley and Assembly. bit.ly/28kZyQ6 DEPARTMENT Q: KEEPER OF LOST CAUSES An adaptation of the first of Jussi Adler-Olsen’s popular series of Department Q crime novels with Carl Mørck, a burned out detective reassigned to investigate cold cases. Aug. 17 and 20. $7-$15. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801) ICE AGE: COLLISION COURSE A screening as part of the Kenworthy’s 15th annual Summer Matinee Movie Series for kids. Aug. 17-18, 1 pm. $3. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) SPOKANE OUTDOOR MOVIES: DEADPOOL Offering outdoor, open-air seating and drive-in style in your car. $3-$5/ person; $20/carload (four or more). Cash only entry at the gate. Aug. 17, 7 pm. Spokane County Raceway, 750 N. Hayford Rd. bit.ly/28kZv6N (244-3333) DEPARTMENT Q: THE ABSENT ONE The murder of young twins initially implicates a group of upper class students as the killers, though the case takes a turn or two from its starting point. Aug. 18 and 20, times vary. $7-$15. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org SUDS & CINEMA: BILL AND TED’S EXCELLENT ADVENTURE An outdoor film screening as part of the Inlanders beer + film series. Screening is at Olmsted Park in Kendall Yards (take the Centennial Trail west. Also includes $5 pints/cider in a beer garden, a TBA food truck, and ice cream from Brain Freeze. Donations benefit Friends of the Centennial Trail. Event at 7 pm, program at 8 pm, movie at 8:30 pm. Aug. 18. $5 suggested donation. Olmsted Park, Kendall Yards. bit.ly/ SudsandCinema SOUTH PERRY SUMMER THEATER: THE GOONIES Movie starts at dusk; each showing benefits a local charity. Aug. 20. Free. The Shop, 924 S. Perry. theshoponsouthperry.com

FOOD & DRINK

PERFECTED STEAK Chef Curtis Smith leads a session on tricks to perfectly cook your steaks consistently, including classic and modern techniques. Aug. 11, 6-8 pm. $59. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy, 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) RIDE & DINE DINNER SERIES Enjoy live music and a barbecue dinner at the top of the mountain. Every Friday, from July 1-Sept. 2. Silver Mountain Ski Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. silvermt.com ROCKET MARKET WINE CLASSES Rocket’s wine specialist Matt Dolan and cheese expert Christine Jameson teach attendees how to pair wine and cheese with food, and how to find affordable wines from all over the world. Fridays, at 7 pm. See website for details. $20. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd. rocketmarket.com SPOKANE BREWERS FESTIVAL The inaugural event celebrates the growing craft beer industry in the Inland Northwest. Admission is free; to sample attendees need a 10-ounce mug ($7) and can purchase tasting tokens for $1 each. Also featuring live music, local food vendors, a root beer garden and more. Aug. 12-14; Fri-Sat, noon-9 pm, Sun noon-6 pm. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanebrewersfestival.com VINO WINE TASTING A tasting on Friday

Aug. 12 featuring Spain’s Marqués de Cáceres, from 3-6:30 pm. On Sat. Aug. 13, taste new wine finds to the shop, from 2-4:30 pm. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington. (838-1229) ALES FOR THE TRAIL The annual beertasting fest raise funds for the North Idaho Centennial Trail. Entry includes six tasting tickets, live music by the Rub and Strange Brewed; food, vendors and more. Aug. 13, 2-8 pm. $30. McEuen Park, 420 E. Front St. alesforthetrail.org GREEN BLUFF PEACH SEASON Summer’s next favorite fruit comes in the form of juicy peaches, in season at Green Bluff’s orchards from Aug. 13 through Labor Day weekend. Green Bluff Growers. greenbluffgrowers.com MUSIC, MICROS & BBQ The CdA Casino’s summer food and drink series continues, highlighting breweries from Southern Idaho, Hornitos Tequila spirits, and music by Donnie Emerson and Nancy Sophia, with an $18 all-you-can-eat barbecue. Aug. 13, 5-10 pm. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S Hwy 95. cdacasino.com FARM TO FORK SERIES FEAT. CAT CORA Chef Cora is known for her featured role as an Iron Chef on the Food Network, and as co-host of Around the World in 80 Plates on Bravo. She comes to CdA for a cooking demo, held in conjunction with a farmers market at the casino (10 am, free to attend). Aug. 14, 7 pm. $25-$50. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S Hwy 95. cdacasino.com FOODIE DELIGHT SIZZLIN’ SUMMER Spend a warm August evening on the patio for a night of seasonal cocktails, live music, and food prepared by a guest chef. Featuring spirits from 21 Loons and Dry Fly Distillery. Aug. 14, 4:30-7:30 pm. $65/adult, $25/kids. Mont Lamm Events, 7501 Enoch Rd. montlammevents.com PICKLING VEGETABLES Learn how to pickle your produce for tasty eats in the winter with food preservation specialist Anna Kestell. Aug. 17, 6:30-7:30 pm. free. Medical Lake Library, 3212 Herb. (299-4891) SUMMER DAYTIME SERIES COOKING CLASSES Each class covers scratchcooking skills, applied to simple, healthy, and cost-effective meals. All recipes are based on what is readily available through Spokane County food banks. Register online. Wednesdays, 10-11:30 am, through Aug. 31. Free. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front. (252-6271) EL CORAZON WINE DINNER A six course gourmet dinner prepared by Clover’s Chef Travis Dickinson, paired with wines from Walla Walla’s El Corazon Winery. Aug. 18, 6:30 pm. $99/person. Clover, 913 E. Sharp. cloverspokane.com GSI TASTING ON THE TERRACE An evening to meet fellow GSI members while enjoying hors d’oeuvres and drinks, with tastings from multiple Spokane wineries and breweries. Aug. 18, 5-7 pm. $25-$30. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanecenter.com CLASS & A GLASS A guided yoga/pilates class under the vineyard tent, open to all levels and led by local instructors; also accompanied by live music. Entry includes one glass of wine in a souvenir glass. Ages 21+. Aug. 19, 5:30-9 pm. $35/ session. Arbor Crest Wine Cellars, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. arborcrest.com GARLIC & HERB INFUSED OILS Come and learn how to make sure your infused oils are safe to eat by following food safety guidelines. Aug. 20, 2-3:30 pm. Free. Indian Trail Library, 4909 W. Barnes. (444-5331)


GREEN

ZONE

REAC

1 5 5 ,0

SPOK AN COUN E T READ Y ERS

Local curators dig up soundtracks for an altered state of mind BY CONNOR DINNISON

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CALL 325-0634 xt. 215 EMAIL sales@Inlander.com

Take a Trip

sk any Gen-Xer who ever attempted, in stereotypical stoner fashion, to sync a VHS of The Wizard of Oz with Dark Side of the Moon, and this becomes clear: Music and cannabis are inextricably linked. Budtender Justin Fulton, who is spinning Tupac on a summer

H

afternoon at Lucky Leaf, calls it a “mood setter.” He says customers dig everything from old-school hip-hop and R&B to heavy metal. But pot’s raison d’être as music’s narcotic of choice is perhaps most indebted to its amity with another revolutionary export of the psychedelic 1960s: rock and roll.

BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

“Here’s a band called Free Weed,” says JJ Wandler, owner of the downtown Spokane record shop/restaurant/bar Garageland, with a smirk as he rummages through his collection of obscure LPs. He singles out groups like Nebula and Sleep, modern inheritors of the storied collaboration between loud guitars and marijuana, and on his phone plays a cut by the band Fu Manchu, torchbearers of what he calls “total stoner rock.” It’s a genre with a loyal following in Spokane. Alex Edmonds, Garageland’s record shop manager, says this year’s Black Sabbath vinyl reissues flew off the shelves; the English group’s seminal 1971 album Master of Reality is considered a touchstone of the genre. Other progenitors of the proto-metal sound include beloved giants Led Zeppelin and Kyuss, whose founding guitarist Josh Homme would later form Queens of the Stone Age. ...continued on next page

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AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 65


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AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 67


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess Look on The ALWAys RiGhT side

AMY ALKON

I’m a Harvard-educated man in my late 30s. I’ve had many ugly arguments with girlfriends, probably because I am highly opinionated and won’t give in when I’m right. I’ve always dated smart, professional women around my age, but I’m now dating a 21-year-old girl, and I’m thinking this could be it. She doesn’t complain, bug me, or question or challenge me. It strikes me that having a partner who challenges you is overrated. Could this be a lifelong relationship? Can’t I just pursue intellectual discussions elsewhere? —Peaceful

Why not take this to the next level and get an inflatable girlfriend? You wouldn’t need to feed her, and you could save big on travel if you’d just let the air out of her, fold her up, and stuff her in your carry-on. This actually might make some sense. After all, conflict is bad, right? Well, not exactly. It turns out that there’s good conflict and there’s bad conflict. Bad conflict involves the stuff of “ugly arguments” — sneering, mocking, and getting up on moral high ground…just so you can shoulder-check the other person off the edge. Good conflict, on the other hand, involves getting (and giving) healthy pushback — which means being what Nassim Taleb calls “antifragile.” In “Antifragile: Things That Gain From Disorder,” risk researcher Taleb, a former derivatives trader, explains that antifragile is “the exact opposite of fragile” — but it goes beyond “resilience or robustness.” Antifragile describes the way living things are improved by stressors — becoming better, stronger, and more able to cope with difficult, unpredictable stuff that comes their way. Beyond how being challenged improves you as a person, marriage researcher John Gottman finds that the happiest, most stable relationships are those in which husbands accept “influence” from wives, making wives “far less likely” to go ugly in disagreements. This starts with what Gottman calls “deep friendship” — love between two equals with mutual respect, not one person who can’t believe his luck at finding another who, intellectually and emotionally, is basically a zygote with boobs. Of course, this woman’s silent partner thing may just be a feature of her being 21. Increasingly, 21 is the new, oh, 8 and a half. Kids are, as Taleb might say, raised “fragile” — helicopter-parented to encounter as few stressors as possible and then bubble-wrapped off to college for more of the same. Universities, formerly centers of free speech and free inquiry, now have speech codes so nobody gets hurt feelz and have “trigger warnings” about course material, lest someone suffer emotional trauma from something untoward in, say, Plato’s “Republic.” (Yes, college is now basically nursery school with beer.) Still, even these kids have to grow up sometime — which is to say, your girlfriend could begin to have opinions and get a little miffy that you have a heartfelt interest in, um, never, ever hearing them. Your welcoming opinions and influence from a partner — this woman or a more challenging (but still loving and good-natured) woman — starts with having humility, which those frail of ego tend to see as a sign of weakness. The truth is, it takes a strong person to admit that he may be wrong and maybe doesn’t know everything in the known universe (and any yet-to-be-discovered galaxies). Should this come to describe you, you might start to see the appeal of a woman with more to say than those “three little words” — “Uh-huh. Uh-huh. Uh-huh.”

heiGhT CRime

My new boyfriend is sweet, successful, and handsome, and he rocks my world in bed. The problem? I’m 5‘8”, and he’s 5’6”. I’m embarrassed to admit this, but I’m just not that attracted to him when he’s standing up. —Shallow Women like things that are tiny and cute, so it’s been kind of a trend to go around with a little dog poking out of your purse. Sadly, dressing your itsy-bitsy boyfriend in a sailor shirt and sunglasses and tossing him in your handbag has yet to catch on. Okay, 5’6” isn’t exactly itsy-bitsy — but it might as well be to you. Your preference for taller men — which biological anthropologist Boguslaw Pawlowski finds 89 percent of women have — didn’t come out of nowhere. Tallness in a man suggests an ability to protect a woman and is associated with social status and access to resources. It also suggests good genes, because ancestors who weren’t starving to death and riddled with parasites would have had the metabolic resources to put toward growing tall. People say looks shouldn’t matter — which doesn’t for a moment change the fact that they do. Clearly, shortness is a deal breaker for you. This doesn’t make you “shallow.” It makes you somebody who should stop dating short guys -- ideally before you blurt out your true feelings in bed: “Grow, Bradley!…I mean, ‘Oh...Bradley!’” n ©2016, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

68 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016

EVENTS | CALENDAR

MUSIC

HOT CLUB OF SPOKANE Hot Club of Spokane swings the best tunes from the repertoires of Bing Crosby, Paul Whiteman’s Rhythm Boys, Mildred Bailey and other classic favorites. Aug. 11, 7-8 pm. Free. Moran Prairie Library, 6004 S. Regal St. (893-8340) BLUEWATERS BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL The annual music festival at Medical Lake’s Waterfront Park lineup includes Chatham County Line, Front Country, Jody Stecher & Kate Brislin, Slocan Ramblers, The Lowest Pair and more. Aug. 12-14. Waterfront Park, 1386 S. Lefevre St. bluewatersbluegrass.org WALLACE ACCORDION FESTIVAL The annual festival brings in players from around the country for another music and dance in the streets event. Aug. 12-14. Downtown Wallace, Idaho. wallaceidahochamber.com THE BIG NOISE A live music expo and demos during an event celebrating “Northwest craftsman building cars, motorcycles and musical instruments,” with a motorcycle/car show and more. Aug. 13, 11 am-11 pm. Free. Cruisers, 6105 W. Seltice Way. (208-773-4706) SPOKANE SYMPHONY SOIREE ON THE EDGE The Symphony’s annual, outdoor summer concert series, on Aug. 17 (“Symphonic Vistas”) and 24 (“Sunset Serenade”), at 7 pm. Lawn and table seating options. $20-$40. Arbor Crest Wine Cellars, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. arborcrest.com (927-9463) MAIN STREET SOUVENIRS A multimedia performance featuring live piano music, a spoken narrative, and a video presentation by pianist, composer and artist Scott Kirby. Proceeds benefit the Holy Names Music Center’s programs. Aug. 18, 7 pm. $25. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

CAMP DART-LO COMMUNITY SWIM Cool off in Camp Dart-Lo’s outdoor pools. Offered Mon-Fri, 3-5:30 pm, July 5-Aug. 19. $4/person per visit; or $30/ pass of 10 visits. Camp Dart-Lo, 14000 N. Dartford Dr. campfireinc.org/events OMAK STAMPEDE The 83rd annual event celebrates all western entertainment, and includes the famous “suicide race.” Aug. 11-14. Omak, Wash.. omakstampede.org PRACTICAL CENTERING USING PILATES-BASED MOVEMENTS Weekly sessions focus on the benefits of Pilates movement exercise inside the museum’s outdoor amphitheater. Thursdays, July 7-Aug. 25, from 10:30-11:45 am. $10/session. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) SPOKANE INDIANS VS. EUGENE Home game series promotional nights include fireworks, family feast night and the second “Bark in the Park” night. Aug. 12-13 and 15-16, 6:30 pm, also Aug. 14 at 3:30 pm. $5-$20. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. (535-2922) CDA SKATEPARK CLASSIC A two-day skateboard contest, open to kids and adults, including sponsored skateboarders. Also includes booths, food, music and more. Aug. 13-14, at 10 am. $20 to compete. CdA Skate Park, 480 W. Garden. facebook.com/cdask8prk

COEUR D’ALENE TRIATHLON Race options include an Olympic and sprint distance triathlon, as well as a duathlon. Aug. 13. $50-$110. Coeur d’Alene City Park, 415 W. Mullan Rd. cdaidparks.org/ index.php/parks/city-park DOWNHILL MOUNTAIN BIKE RACE: Course is open for practice on Aug. 13, with the race held on Sun, Aug. 14. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, Sandpoint. schweitzer.com TECHNIQUES OF GARDEN PHOTOGRAPHY A talk by TFM member Claudia Biggs, emphasizing basic rules of photography such as composition, lighting, background details and more. Aug. 13, 10-11 am. Free. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. (456-8038) STAND-UP PADDLEBOARD TOUR A flat water paddle board tour on the Spokane River, beginning with an intro lesson, then a tour along the water. Discover Pass required. $23. At Plese Flats. Aug. 14; two sessions per day. Register at spokaneparks.org. CENTENNIAL TRAIL EXTENSION RIBBON CUTTING The event celebrates the completion of the northwest extension of the trail, approx. 2 miles from Sontag Community Park to Nine Mile Recreation Area. Aug. 15, 4 pm. Free. Riverside State Park Nine Mile Recreation Area, 14925 N. Hedin Rd. (465-5064)

THEATER

DOGFIGHT A musical set on the eve of a group of young Marines’ deployment, as they set out for one final boys’ night of debauchery. Through Aug. 14; ThuSat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $24-$27. The Modern Theater Coeur d’Alene, 1320 E. Garden. themoderntheater.org CDA SUMMER THEATRE: THE LITTLE MERMAID A performance based on the classic animated Disney film. Aug. 11-28; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm; Sun at 2 pm. $27-49/adults. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasummertheatre.com OLD COOKIE SHOP OR NELLIE WAS A BAKER ‘CAUSE SHE KNEADED DOUGH Sweet Nellie O’Grady just wants to make a living with her bakery and take care of her sick mother, but the evil Mortimer Whiplash has other plans. Through Aug. 28, Wed-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Sixth Street Theater, 212 Sixth St. sixthstreetmelodrama.com MEET ELEANOR ROOSEVELT Corbin Center member Paul Ruch wrote a play about Eleanor Roosevelt’s life, work, and thoughts. In the play, Judith Albrecht plays Eleanor and Paul is the reporter, interviewing her. Aug. 12, 2-3:15 pm. $5/$8. Corbin Senior Center, 827 W. Cleveland. (327-1584) SHAKESPEARE LIVE! FROM THE RSC A collection of theatrical royalty took the stage at the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford-Upon-Avon to celebrate William Shakespeare on the 400th anniversary of his death. The historic show was recorded live and is screened at the Bing as a special addition to its monthly Stage to Screen series. Aug. 14, 2 pm. $17. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) BAD BOYS OF BROADWAY A concert exploring the nastier side of theatre through the songs of its villains and villainesses. Aug. 17, 7:30 pm. $25. Coeur d’Alene Eagles, 209 Sherman Ave. (208-651-6950)

VISUAL ARTS

DRAWN TO THE WALL VI The museum’s summer show features artwork by well-known regional artists on 8-by11 foot moveable walls. Closes on Aug. 20; gallery hours Mon-Sat, 10 am-4 pm. Free and open to the public. Jundt Art Museum, 200 E. Desmet. (313-6843) JAN GORDON BROWN “Distinctive Detail” reflects the lifelike renderings of mostly animals and wildlife by the artist, who has been illustrating and painting in oils for more than five decades. Through Aug. 28; reception Aug. 14, from 1-3 pm. Free. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org (229-3414) MICHAEL R. LEE & CARLA O’CONNOR Featuring the clay sculptures of Lee, alongside watercolorist O’Connor. Aug. 12-Sept. 3, open daily from 11 am-6 pm. Opening reception Aug. 12, 5-8 pm; artist talk/demo Aug. 13, 1-3 pm. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com (208-765-6006) ART ON THE STREET Spokane Art School sets up an easel on the sidewalk and a well-known, local artist hosts a community drawing event. Saturdays, through Aug. 27, from 1-4 pm. Free. Spokane Art School, 809 W. Garland Ave. spokaneartschool.net (325-3001) SECOND DEGREE BURNING MAN California artist Le Anne Iverson is displaying seven life-sized sculptures at the Burning Man event, but not before bringing them to Spokane. Event includes live music, interactive and introspective displays, performance artists, and a sculpture garden. Aug. 13, 10 am-10 pm. Free and open to the public. Hatch: Creative Business Incubator, 9612 E. Sprague. (768-0309)

WORDS

SPOKANE AUTHORS & SELF PUBLISHERS Meet 18 local authors at the Southside Senior Community Center’s Artisan Market, with book signings and books available for purchase. Aug. 13, 10 am-4 pm; Aug. 14, 10 am-3 pm. Free. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. spokaneauthors.org 2016 SPOKANE SLAM TEAM SHOWCASE FUNDRAISER The team representing Spokane Poetry Slam at the National Poetry Slam has returned, ready to share their poems and their stories in one last fundraiser to help re-fill the Spokane Poetry Slam coffers. Aug. 13, 7-10 pm. Free; donations accepted. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org SIGNING: STEPHEN BANKS In a biographical novel, the author imagines a plausible life story, involving obsessions, broken promises and international espionage. Aug. 13, 1:30-3:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series, open to all readers and all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org COFFEE WITH A BOOKSELLER: MELISSA OPEL Melissa hosts an informal discussion of upcoming books and some of her favorite new releases. Selected titles will be available for discount. Aug. 18, 10-11 am. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks. com (838-0206) n


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ACROSS 1. “Enough, I get it!” (or what to look for in 17-, 30-, 49- and 65-Across) 5. E.g., e.g. 9. Brand owned by Whirlpool 14. Tandoori flatbread 15. Chase off 16. “Sweet Love” singer Anita 17. In whatever way possible 20. Minors 21. Neighbor of Wash. 22. Restful places 23. Like a comfy pillow 25. This and that 27. Starz alternative 30. Song involving body parts 34. “Roseanne” star 36. Wood problem 37. Know-it-alls? 39. Step up 41. Like a wallflower

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43. Eleniak of “Baywatch” 44. Thing removed before signing 46. Arrest 48. Long, arduous walk 49. Swamp on the Georgia/Florida border whose name means “trembling earth” in Seminole 52. GPS heading 53. Irene of “Fame” 54. Drains, as energy 56. Rudolph of “SNL” 59. N.L. home run king until Mays surpassed him in 1966 61. “Business in the front, party in the back” haircut 65. Falsifying accounting records 68. Hot state 69. Scrutinizer 70. Like school for toddlers, in brief 71. Bait 72. World Cup chorus

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45. 1950s coup victim 47. Obviously happy people 50. “Wicked Tuna” airer 51. Digital book file extension 55. Geometry calculation 56. Hurdle for a would-be doc 57. Super-duper 58. Spa class 60. “Bye for now,” in textspeak 62. Bereft 63. Squeezed (out) 64. Some reproaches 66. Vexation 67. When doubled, a giggle

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AUGUST 11, 2016 INLANDER 69


Problems arise when mountain goats start to see humans as easy sources of food or salt.

The Goats Who Stare at Men Scotchman Peak is known for picturesque views as well as cute, furry mountain goats — that may bite or gore you BY JAKE THOMAS

A

t Trailhead 65, which leads to the top of Scotchman Peak, is a foreboding sign announcing to hikers that they’re entering “Bear Country” and should take care to neither attract nor antagonize the potentially ferocious omnivores. But the animal that people around here are more concerned about isn’t a large mammal capable of mauling hapless hikers. “Watch out for the mountain goats,” said the cashier at the gas station in Clark Fork, the town just outside of the peaks, referring to the herbivores that stand under 4 feet. “They’re aggressive.” The day before my hiking partner and I made our ascent up Scotchman Peak — a 7,009-foot mountain that’s the highest point in Bonner County and provides a panoramic view of Lake Pend Oreille — we stopped at the trailhead where a woman who’d just finished descending from the peak told us it was a beautiful hike. But she cautioned us to beware of the goats. One of them, she said, was particularly belligerent and was “bullying” the other goats. Her friend brought a can of mace for the trip. Last year, the U.S. Forest Service closed the trail after multiple reports of goats attempting to head-butt or charge hikers. That year, a hiker required stitches after being bitten by a goat. In 2010, a man died after being gored by a goat in Olympic National Park. The problem, says Shoshana Cooper, public affairs officer for the Idaho Panhandle National Forests, is that once goats get used to obtaining salt by licking the sweaty

70 INLANDER AUGUST 11, 2016

bodies of hikers, they can become demanding and aggressive toward humans. It’s easy to see why so many hikers oblige the goats. They have snow-white fur, pitchblack noses and eyes that exude a gentle curiosity. Some hikers go further, giving them food. “They are animals,” says Cooper. “And they’re doing what they need to do to survive.”

A

fter about three hours of huffing and puffing our way up the trail, the trees thinned, making way for the final rocky stretch, marked with a sign reading “PLEASE DO NOT approach, feed or harass the goats.” As we continued our ascent, we kept our eyes peeled for any goats preparing to charge us, devour our food and lick the sweat clean from our battered bodies. But it wasn’t until we reached the summit that we saw a goat reclining on a nearby ridge about a hundred feet away, chewing its cud. The goat, which was joined by another, seemed indifferent to the nearby hikers. A chipmunk was more aggressive in trying to steal a bite of my sandwich. As we prepared to leave, the goats got up and glided down the steep cliff. One disappeared into the craggy backdrop. The other made its way toward us. The other hikers on the peak turned their attention from their sandwiches, trail mix and cans of Pabst Blue Ribbon and pointed their cellphone cameras at the goat. The goat just stared back before disappearing down the side of the peak. On our descent, the goat made a brief and uneventful reappearance.

JAKE THOMAS PHOTO

M

ary Franzel was waiting near the wooded area on our way down. Wearing a dark red Friends of Scotchman Peaks Wilderness hat, she was out volunteering on behalf of the organization, appealing to hikers to not get within 150 feet of the goats. “We want you to view them from a ridge,” she said. Despite all the efforts to educate hikers that goats and humans don’t mix, she says the message is still ignored. Just a few weeks ago, she said she chatted up a man making the descent from the peak. She said he conspicuously avoided talking about the goats. After they finished their conversation, Franzel found that he had left a pile of corn for them. She also recalled an older couple feeding baby goats right out of the palms of their hands. When Franzel confronted them, they responded, “They’re not endangered.” She says that if a goat gets too close, she advises hikers to make noise or even throw rocks. She said a goat that becomes aggressive after becoming habituated to people might have to be relocated. If it injures a person, she said, even worse can happen. “I’d rather have [a goat] get hit with a rock than get shot,” she told us.

S

ome people just can’t help themselves around wild animals. This year, a bison calf in Yellowstone National Park had to be euthanized after a well-meaning visitor put it in his car. In Alaska, a goat drowned while fleeing camera-wielding tourists. After a moose was injured by a car in Spokane, some people insisted on taking selfies with the wounded animal. But Cooper says that things on Scotchman Peak are improving. Last year, after Trailhead 65 was closed following incidents with goats, she says the Forest Service put salt blocks away from the trail in hopes of getting the animals to forget about humans. A year later, she says, there have been no reported incidents of goats acting aggressively toward hikers on Scotchman Peak. But that could easily change. “People see goats, and they look cute and furry and they want them to come close,” says Cooper. “And people forget they are wild animals.” n


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Profile for The Inlander

Inlander 08/11/2016  

Inlander 08/11/2016