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HEMP DAY

HOW HEMP COULD HELP THE COLVILLE TRIBES PAGE 13

GARRISON KEILLOR HE’S 75, BUT FAR FROM SLOWING DOWN PAGE 35

ON THE WAY: MORE CHARTER SCHOOLS DESPITE UNCERTAINTY, THE SCHOOLS EXPAND PAGE 18

AUGUST 10-16, 2017 | THE TRUTH SERUM

Durkin’s Ben Poffenroth pours a whiskey-based 65th Street cocktail.

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INSIDE CURVES VOL. 24, NO. 43 | ON THE COVER: YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

COMMENT NEWS DRINK LOCAL CULTURE

5 13 22 35

FOOD FILM MUSIC EVENTS

40 44 48 52

I SAW YOU GREEN ZONE ADVICE GODDESS LAST WORD

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EDITOR’S NOTE

I

t’s not about getting drunk anymore. (OK, it’s still a little about that, but there’s more to it.) There’s the craft of it all — of making local beer, or reinventing classic cocktails — that draws on the inspiration and passion of local people. There’s also a supportive community that forms from shared purpose — uniting brewers, vintners, distillers, mixologists and bar owners — to say nothing of the “I love you, man” feelings that inevitably bubble up with a good buzz. Yes, we love to DRINK LOCAL, and we’ve been known to wax poetic about its virtues, but this week, we take it up a notch (beginning on page 22). We go in search of the perfect whiskey and gin cocktails, we explore North Idaho’s newest beer creations and we create our own tours (by foot, and by bike) of local watering holes. It’s a thankless job, to be sure, but someone has to do it. Cheers! — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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WHAT DO YOU LIKE TO DRINK DURING THE SUMMER?

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GABE ELLZEY I either tend to gravitate towards crisper white wines or usually lighter, more… citrus-flavored beers. I like stuff from Whistle Punk quite a bit. He has been making some really cool, European-style beers. Great for sipping on during the summer.

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DRU BRENNAN I like to drink white wine. Typically Sauvignon Blanc, because it’s cold and refreshing. It’s good for the summer. Any recommendations? White wine is very particular. Some people like sweet and some people don’t, so no real recommendations other than coming to Nectar and drinking them.

SENA CRACIUN I like to drink beer sours because they’re refreshing. Beer goes great with summer. Any recommendations? It’s hard to find them. They have a couple of sours here that are really good. We went to Waddell’s yesterday, and they had a blackberry sour that was pretty good, too.

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JENNIFER PITCHER As far as beers, I like Corona and IPAs. On a hot day, a cold beer is really good. Any recommendations? Longboard [lager], and I like No-Li beers.

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INTERVIEWS BY FORREST HOLT NECTAR WINE AND BEER, 8/4/17

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COMMENT | THE PRESIDENCY

FAMILY LAW Divorce Spousal Maintenance / Alimony Child Support Modifications Parenting Plans

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C’mon, Get Happy! By turning that frown upside down, President Trump might just start to turn around his presidency BY GEORGE NETHERCUTT

B

ill Clinton and Ronald Reagan were likable presidents. George W. Bush was welcome at any backyard barbecue because he was quick with a funny quip and a relaxed demeanor — “a guy you’d like to have a beer with,” as the media put it during his first campaign for president. They all smiled. President Donald Trump, on the other hand, doesn’t seem as likable. He doesn’t smile enough — he has a nice smile when it comes out, but uses it too little. Perhaps it’s a sign of the times. America is divided philosophically, requiring seriousness from the Oval Office, but little of President Trump’s legislative agenda has passed Congress, so serious times don’t necessarily justify presidential frowns. Members of Congress are usually beholden to the president of their political party. In the early 2000s, the House supported President George W. Bush because they believed in him. Supporting his policies made them likable, and many bent their policies to gain his support. Perhaps members of the current House and Senate are more concerned about their own political futures and less about Trump’s, so they’re less likely to bend their philosophies just to give him a legislative victory. Most politicians smile regularly — and so do presidents. Bill Clinton was rarely photographed without a smile. Ronald Reagan had an attractive, engaging smile. Jimmy Carter often grinned from ear to ear. Dwight D. Eisenhower, new to national politics like Trump, had a beautiful, warm smile to accompany his high public approval ratings for all of his eight years in office. They were all likable. Whether Trump admits it or not, he’s a politician — and politicians usually smile. A smiling president announces to the world that the president is happy in the job, can accomplish his or her political objectives and is satisfied with him or herself. Trump is rarely seen smiling.

Because smiling faces sell magazines. Likewise, smiling politicians are often reelected. Their likability trumps their policies — or lack thereof. Voting is an emotional act. Voters support people they see and like. President Barack Obama was elected and reelected — he had a warm smile. The same was true for Reagan and Clinton. The national press may be so against Trump that they’ll portray him negatively at every opportunity. Most Democrats wouldn’t be caught dead supporting Trump. They figure that being “anti-Trump all the time” is their best strategy, especially since Democrats outnumber Republicans nationally. Look for them to be motivated in the midterm elections in 2018, though frowning at an incumbent president regularly rarely results in voter support. Smart Democrats smile even when they’re critical of the president. Trump seems self-conscious, tweeting at early morning hours and picking unnecessary media and political fights. Upping his likability quotient would benefit his standing with voters. Given his legislative record and low opinion poll ratings, Trump needs to improve both. Smiles from the president, especially when photographed, can help. Trump, who touts his ability to go directly, unfiltered, to voters, needs a winning smile before the 2018 and 2020 elections to prevent major Republican losses in the House and Senate. If Congress flips to Democratic control, Trump may see himself impeached, and he will be convicted if Democrats control the Senate. Smiles from him between now and then can only be productive. Frowning or scowling, no matter how serious our times, only feeds the opposition.

M

erhaps Trump should adopt as his mantra the lyrics of a fellow New York/New Jersey kid: Frank Sinatra’s version of “When You’re Smiling” offers great advice:

other Teresa once said that “peace begins with a smile.” Perhaps as Trump has demonized the national press, and they him, there’s not much to smile about. If Trump, a master media manipulator, would smile more, perhaps he’d uplift others and his press relations might improve. So might his legislative record. Trump often looks stern, serious or miffed. These looks usually don’t generate broad support, but smiles do. Smiles uplift other individuals. They often illustrate success or happiness, something to cheer about — an inner peace, perhaps. Frowns do the opposite. Look at today’s magazine covers in grocery store checkout lines — most all have pictures of smiling faces. Why?

P

When you’re smilin’, when you’re smilin’, The whole world smiles with you When you’re laughin’, when you’re laughin’ The sun comes shinin’ through. When you’re cryin,’ you bring on the rain, So stop your cryin,’ be happy again Cuz when you’re smilin,’ when you’re smilin,’ The whole world smiles with you. Smiles are contagious, Mr. President. Try one on and you’ll see. n


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COMMENT | GUEST EDITORIAL

Populism’s Problems It’s not an ideology but a style of political discourse, characterized by oversimplification BY CORNELL W. CLAYTON

A

specter haunts our politics — the specter of populism. Movements like the Tea Party and Occupy Wall Street thrive, Sarah Palin and Elizabeth Warren are political stars, and Donald Trump is president. In Europe, Britain votes to leave the EU, Hungary and Poland elect populist governments, and politicians like Marine Le Pen in France and Geert Wilders in the Netherlands grow in popularity.

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

What explains populism’s appeal? And when should we be concerned? First, populism is not an ideology but a style of political discourse; one which equates “the people” (the silent majority, the forgotten man, “real” Americans) with virtue, and elites (political, economic, or cultural) with evil. This Manichean view of politics as a struggle between the righteous people and a malevolent elite has distinctive left- and right-wing analogues. While Bernie Sanders talks of corrupt Wall Street bankers and corporate elites exploiting American workers, Trump lashes out at establishment politicians, media elites and government bureaucrats for abusing entrepreneurs and ignoring real Americans. Second, populism is not new. Many past leaders embraced populist themes. Thomas Jefferson touted a yeoman’s democracy, Andrew Jackson ran on the “people’s ticket,” and during the Gilded Age, William Jennings Bryan excoriated both corrupt political and business elites. While Franklin Roosevelt’s attack on “organized money” and pursuit of redistributive programs in the 1930s became the template for today’s left-wing populism, Ronald Reagan’s anti-government rhetoric and attack on cultural elites beginning in the 1960s embodied today’s right-wing populism. Third, although populism is not new, it’s not a permanent feature of our politics. Populists emerge during periods of major social or economic change, like those that accompanied industrialization in the Gilded Age, the

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economic dislocations of the Great Depression, or the cultural transformations in the 1960s. At its heart, populism is an appeal to losers; an explanation for why some people feel they are on the losing end of economic and cultural changes. If you are working harder than ever, but struggling to make ends meet at a low-wage job, it’s because greedy CEOs exploit workers or corrupt politicians sign bad trade deals. If you feel your cultural beliefs are under assault and unpopular, it’s because media elites are foisting their cultural agenda on you. Populists are not necessarily wrong, they just oversimplify problems. Rather than recognize the complexity of major economic and cultural shifts, populists reduce them to the machinations of evil elites. Hence their appeal; providing simple answers to complicated challenges. But simplistic solutions rarely work. Populist proposals to abandon trade alliances, build border walls or gut environmental regulations, for example, will not restore well-paying manufacturing jobs that once supported middle-class families. In fact, the U.S. manufactures more today than ever. Manufacturing output is at a 50-year high, while manufacturing-related employment is at a 50year low. Technology and automation — not evil CEOs or politicians — are primarily to blame. It’s actually a good thing that we can produce more today with less labor — that’s how wealth is created. The challenge is equitably distributing that wealth, and changing the way we think about a society that no longer requires everyone to be employed full-time. This is a very real, but very complicated challenge, and vilifying elites distracts us from discussing real solutions to it. The other danger populism poses is that it posits a moral clarity in majority will, which puts it at odds with democratic pluralism. While populists exalt majoritarian preferences, pluralists seek to protect minority rights. When populist leaders embrace non-pluralistic ideas like nativism, racism or authoritarianism, they give these a sheen of democratic legitimacy by equating them with the will of the majority, and delegitimize opposition to them as elites imposing “political correctness.” Not all populist politicians are simpletons or undemocratic, but even when they hold nuanced views, their supporters usually do not. Supporters hear only simplistic solutions and vilification of evil elites. This poisons our political discourse, making it hard to focus on the real challenges and even harder to strike the compromises necessary to address them. And that is the specter that haunts our politics today. n Cornell W. Clayton is the Thomas S. Foley Distinguished Professor of Government and director of the Foley Institute for Public Policy and Public Service at Washington State University.

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Northern Quest is committed to supporting responsible gaming. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call the Washington State Problem Gambling Helpline at 800.547.6133 or Camas Path at 509.789.7630.

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 9


You’re so money. financial education presented by stcu.

3 tips for end-of-life planning. For one family, sudden illness revealed financial unknowns.

L

ance Kissler thought his parents had prepared for everything as they grew older, with a good fix on their household finances and with long-term care and funeral policies in place. But when Lance’s mother suddenly fell ill and was hospitalized, his family discovered they weren’t as financially prepared as they thought. Lance had a better handle on this situation than many of us would. As STCU’s marketing manager, he’s surrounded by professionals wellversed in financial planning. Yet events often play out differently than we expect. And many of us are reluctant to discuss what is, sadly, inevitable. “End-of-life planning is one of those things you can do in advance,” Lance says, “to give you and your family some peace of mind.” Lance’s mother passed away this spring. For others looking ahead to their own or their family members’ end-of-life care, he offers three key pieces of advice.

a document that will help you make medical decisions on someone else’s behalf. Maintain a financial notebook As often happens, one parent in Lance’s family ― his mother ― had assumed primary responsibility for the day-to-day finances. His father took over when she was first hospitalized, but it would have been difficult for Lance or his brother to take them over next, if necessary. So Lance asked his dad to create a financial notebook ― gathering all the important information in one spot, accessible by whoever needed it. A financial notebook should contain all your family members’ names and contact information, insurance and health records, and information about loans and other financial accounts. It also should contain copies of your wills, advance directives, powers of attorney and other important paperwork.

Consult an elder law attorney

Have the tough conversations now

One of the first unpleasant surprises for Lance and his family: Their long-term care insurance didn’t cover his mother’s situation.

Discussing hospitalization and death with your relatives while they’re healthy might seem morbid, as if talking about it will make it happen sooner. But if you put off those conversations, you might never have them, Lance says.

“Dad had taken out a long-term care policy, and it looked good,” he says. “But when we dove deeper, we realized it was going to be difficult to get the benefits that came along with that plan.” There was fine print regarding an interim period between the end of Medicare coverage and the start of policy coverage — a period of outof-pocket pay that could have brought many families to the brink of bankruptcy. Ultimately, they didn’t even try to use the policy. An elder law attorney can help identify gaps in your policies. An attorney also can help you draw up a durable power of attorney,

As his mother’s condition worsened, Lance’s family realized they faced many unanswered questions about her preferred end-of-life care that had to be made almost on the spot. “Don’t put it off,” he urges. “There might be pride — or guilt — involved. There might be concern about past financial decisions. But you have to be willing to accept those and work with them.”

Check out more practical financial tips at stcumoney.org paid advertisement

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

SPOKANE PRIDE hank you for Shann Ray’s article on Sherman Alexie (“He’s On Fire,”

T

8/3/17). In February I was attending a regional church convention in Tukwila. There were three young women teachers there from Canada, and their first question to me about Spokane was, “Did you know Sherman Alexie?” They use Sherman’s books and poems in their teaching. It is wonderful to be from a town known for Sherman Alexie’s writings, Vanessa Behan’s Crisis Nursery, and Ken Spiering’s Red Wagon. I had thought that perhaps it might be a fitting venue for Sherman Alexie to speak at the next Spokane church convention, and say goodbye to the last remnants of LETTERS the Japanese-Americans who were Send comments to stripped of their homes, their jobs, editor@inlander.com. their businesses, their cars, their friends, and banished to our deserts during WWII. When I called Sherman’s agent in New York, I learned that Sherman can now command a fee about half the annual church budget. This was, of course, disappointing. But is also made me feel very proud and happy for Sherman, all of us readers, and for his family. Keep writing, Shann. Keep writing, Sherman. BOB GILLES Spokane, Wash.

Spokane County Prosecutor Larry Haskell.

Readers respond to “Old Boys’ Club” (8/3/17), our investigation regarding sexual harassment concerns in the Spokane County Prosecutor’s Office after a former intern wrote an accusatory essay:

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EMILY STOLL: Surprise, surprise … Oh wait, no it’s not. MICHELE BECKMAN: She stopped going to her internship without notice? Isn’t that abandoning her position? Did she tell her professors? Did she receive the college credits? She was dissatisfied with the internship but applied for a job? Something doesn’t add up.

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SCOTT RANDOLPH: Of course, HR, investigating its own, did not find enough evidence to take action. Been like this in Spokane for generations. White men in charge and the system protects them. … You have the fox protecting the hen house. DANIELLE MCBRIDE SHAWGO: Unfortunately this is not just in that job. I have experienced this myself and ended up changing jobs because HR at the organization did not take issues such as this seriously. n

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 11


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AGRICULTURE

Just for the Hemp of It The Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation are leading the way, growing some of the first industrial hemp in Washington BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

B

elow the shrub-steppe hills that hug the southern border of the Colville Reservation, situated between golden fields of grain, 60 acres of bright green hemp plants fan their leaves to collect sunlight along the Columbia River. The cannabis plants, unlike their cousin strains sold for medicinal and recreational purposes, have next to no presence of the psychoactive compound THC, but can be used in thousands of ways: Fibers can be used for clothing and building supplies, seeds can be used for health food items and cosmetics, and some research has shown that parts of the plant can even be used for the type of energy storage used to power electric vehicles. The crop is among the first permitted under Washington state’s Industrial Hemp Research Pilot program, and the first on tribal land. Leadership and staff who work for the 12 Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation are hopeful that the pilot crop will lead to increased revenue for their members, and create jobs in an area where timber harvesting has lagged in recent years.

CZECH YOUR RESOURCES

A few years ago, Tribal Chairman Michael Marchand returned from conferences where legalization of marijuana

in Indian Country was among the hot topics. Having grown up farming himself, and later getting a Ph.D. in forestry, Marchand saw that the combines and equipment used to farm cannabis were very familiar. “We’re in big wheat country here in Eastern Washington, so it seems like a good fit,” Marchand says, sitting in the tribes’ administrative building in Nespelem, less than 20 miles north of Grand Coulee Dam. “We have land, we have sun, we have water, we also have power too, so we have all the ingredients here.” With the 2014 Farm Bill, Congress cleared the way for industrial hemp crops by carving a narrow niche in the law for research. The Confederated Tribes also worked with their lawyers to update tribal code so by the time the Washington State Legislature allowed the industrial hemp pilot program in 2016, everything would be ready to get the first research crop in the ground. The tribes may have a head start on the other four growers licensed through the state Department of Agriculture this year, partly because they have so many types of experts already working on similar issues under one agency, Marchand says. “It’s kind of a rare combination that any group would have all this expertise under one roof, so that gives us an advantage,” Marchand says. “We’re always looking for ...continued on next page

The first legal hemp plants are growing on the Colville Reservation. SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL PHOTO


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NEWS | AGRICULTURE “JUST FOR THE HEMP OF IT,” CONTINUED... businesses where our tribe has an advantage over other people.” But even getting the seeds to the nearly 1.5-million-acre reservation was a massive undertaking, explains Jackie Richter, who manages the tribes’ conservation district and agriculture development. (She’s also now the “chief of hemp,” Marchand jokes.) “The state is kind of different, because they want you to have certified seed, and it has to go through them, but you have to find the seed and import it yourself,” Richter says. By the time Washington announced that permits were available for the first legal hemp growers this May, there were next to no seeds to be found, Richter says. Because you typically want to plant hemp by the first of June, sources in Canada and other countries were no longer available. That’s where hemp consultant Doug Fine came in. Fine, who advocates for hemp nationally, is the author of the book Hemp Bound, and is a hemp farmer himself. He helped connect the tribes with a source in the Czech Republic. After working with the Drug Enforcement Agency through the state Department of Agriculture — obtaining multiple permits and certificates for the tribe and their exporter at the Czech company Hempoint, and after a snafu when the seeds arrived at the Port of Seattle without their paperwork — the tribes finally got their seeds. They had to plant them the same day they arrived, July 9, per DEA rules. “The Colville tribal effort to successfully get hemp in the ground is one of the most monumental success stories I’ve seen to date of any kind, let alone that it’s the first time in Indian Country,” Fine says. Due to the late planting, the crop is still pushing its way upward, with some plants only a few inches tall as of early August, but others are already more than a foot in height, and will continue to grow. The first harvest will likely happen sometime in October, and the tribes, which have the only grower/processor combination license in the state so far, will have the chance to process the seeds and fiber on site if they want to.

‘AND DEFINITELY NO KETCHUP’

While hemp offers the chance to create many different products and create jobs, there are limi-

Jackie Richter, the tribes’ “chief of hemp”

tations to the research the tribes will be allowed to do amid an evolving regulatory framework at the state and federal levels. Technically, the plants are still classified as illegal under the Controlled Substances Act, but the limited exemption in the 2014 Farm Bill allows for research crops that are grown in partnership with a state or university. A federal judge held that the state where the project takes LETTERS place must have legalized Send comments to hemp growing editor@inlander.com. first, after the Menominee Indian Tribe tried to grow hemp and federal agents seized their plants. The sovereign nation argued that it should be allowed to partner with its own college under the new rules, but because Wisconsin had not yet legalized hemp growing, the judge held that the feds were within their bounds to confiscate the plants in 2015. “It’s crazy that resources were expended to stop an economic development program in an area that greatly needed it,” Fine says. Luckily for the plants on the Colville Reservation, the legal framework here is in place, he says. “By joining a state program, this tribe is unambiguously in sync with all laws,” Fine says. “This is such a huge head start for [the] Colville

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[tribes]. The learning curve of everything the Colville project will have dialed in after this season is vast.” Still, there are limits under Washington’s law. In a state where growing and processing medicinal and recreational cannabis into products with THC and cannabidiol (CBD) is allowed, Washington state rules prevent hemp growers under the pilot program from studying or using the flower of the plant, where CBD is harvested. While hemp has only 0.3 percent or less of the psychoactive compound THC, it can be high in CBD, which does not get you high but has many uses. The seeds and fibers may be used in myriad ways, but the flower is really where a lot of potential to market the plant comes in, says Fine, who argues that Washington state policy not to allow that research is just wrong. “In agriculture, imagine all the different things that tomatoes can be, from salad tomatoes to tomato sauce to sun-dried tomatoes,” Fine says.

“This is such a huge head start for Colville. The learning curve ... is vast.” Now imagine that there were rules saying you could only sundry tomatoes, but not sell fresh mini-tomatoes, Fine says. “And definitely no ketchup,” Richter (the “chief of hemp”) chimes in, “you know, ’cause that’s the most lucrative part of tomatoes.” Also, the tribes will again have to import seeds next year if they want to grow another crop, as their seeds this year won’t be “eligible to produce certified seed according to WSDA rules,” says Mike Louisell, public information officer for WSDA. Despite the current pilot program rules, which could change in the future, there will still be plenty of applications for the plants, Richter says. The tribes, who hope to get their crop certified organic in the future, are using no-till, no-spray methods this year. This crop won’t be allowed to be used for human consumption, as food-grade permits will take the tribes some time to get, but there are possibilities of using parts of the plants for animal bedding, protein meal that can be fed to animals that people don’t eat (people are marketing dog biscuits with CBD in them, Fine says), oil and more. While they’re not allowed to commercially sell the product, the tribes can conduct research on the “marketability” of the products, which means they can still swap parts of the plants for money, Fine says. “We’re going to have a lot of acreage in the ground ready to go as that industry develops,” Richter says. “We could be the processors, all in one, here on the reservation. That’s what we’re excited about. We’re excited about getting individual tribal members the ability to grow their own, and market their own crop as well.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

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NEWS | DIGEST

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HEALTH CARE Five minutes after Arizona Sen. John McCain gave a thumbs-down, killing the Republican health care bill and saving the signature achievement of the man who beat him for the presidency in 2008, Tennessee Republican Sen. Lamar Alexander walked up to Washington Democratic SEN. PATTY MURRAY at her desk. After months of increasingly complicated and convoluted Republican attempts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, aka Obamacare, Alexander told Murray he wanted Democrats and Republicans to start talking. Hold real committee hearings. Work together. “I had been saying to him since January, that if he put aside the partisan attempt to repeal Obamacare, I was willing to work with him on the real problems in our health care system,” Murray tells the Inlander. Starting on the week of Sept. 4, Murray and Alexander will hold health care committee hearings. (DANIEL WALTERS)

POLICE Spokane police spent four months looking for the person who “leaked” information about an officer’s atrocious behavior. Earlier this year, Officer Chris McMurtrey (pictured) filed a complaint seeking to root out the person who spread details of his PROFANITYLACED interaction with a suspect in the back of his car. But after eight interviews and a scan of internal emails and printer logs, internal investigators closed the case with nothing to show for it. The internal leaker remains at large. The “leaked” information has since been released via public records requests. (MITCH


NEWS | BRIEFS

TALK OF THE TOWN HALL

Spokane’s TOWN HALL DROUGHT is over. For months, none of Spokane’s national legislators — Sens. Maria Cantwell and Patty Murray and Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers — had been willing to hold town hall meetings in Spokane. McMorris Rodgers, in particular, had been targeted by local activists who held their own town halls and dared her to show up. Now, in a span of a week, both McMorris Rodgers and Cantwell are scheduled to hold town halls in Spokane. McMorris Rodgers’ traditional August town hall will be held at 5 pm in Gonzaga University’s Cataldo Hall on Thursday. The tickets to the free event, available briefly on Tuesday, were gone in less than hour, but it will be televised on KSPS. This year, McMorris Rodgers requires proof of residence at the door — like a driver’s license or a utility bill — before being allowed to attend the town hall. “The Congresswoman represents the people of Washington’s 5th Congressional District, and this is a chance for them to hear from their Representative and have their voices heard on the important issues facing Eastern Washington. People not from the 5th Congressional District will not be able to receive tickets to the event,” Jared Powell, spokesman for McMorris Rodgers, says in a statement. “However everyone is welcome to tune into KSPS-TV or watch the live stream online.” Cantwell’s town hall will take place the following Tuesday, Aug. 15, at 6 pm, also in Cataldo Hall. That leaves Sen. Patty Murray as the last of Spokane’s national legislators to decline to hold a town hall this year. According to LegiStorm’s Town Hall tracker, Murray hasn’t held an in-person town hall meeting since April of 2014. In an interview with the Inlander last week, Murray declined to agree to hold a town hall, arguing that there were more effective ways to hear from her constituents. (DANIEL WALTERS)

*

MT. SPOKANE GETS GO-AHEAD

Work is moving forward on an EXPANSION of the Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park after the Washington State Supreme Court declined to review a case challenging the development. In March, the Court of Appeals ruled 2-1 that it was OK for Washington state to designate a portion of Mount Spokane for recreation, which will allow for a new ski lift and runs. The decision to classify that land for recreation was challenged by the Lands Council and other environmental groups, with support from the Spokane Tribe. They argued that the natural resources and wildlife in that area should be protected, and that the area is historically significant to the tribe, which used it for hunting, gathering and spiritual purposes. With the Supreme Court opting not to review the Court of Appeals decision, the ski area is clear to go ahead with the expansion, which has been studied for more than 20 years. “We’re going to lose that wild part of Mount Spokane,” says Mike Petersen, executive director for the Lands Council. Those who have pushed for the new runs say they’ll allow for more people to access the mountain, and in a smaller footprint than the original plans to expand into 800 acres on the back side of the mountain. “Thousands of people were involved in this process on all sides. … People are passionate about state parks here in Spokane,” says Brad McQuarrie, Mt. Spokane general manager. “This is a huge improvement.” Crews are already clearing trees for the 79 acres of ski runs that sit inside a 279-acre “recreation” zone on the western side of the mountain. By the upcoming ski season, people should be able to use the runs, and take Chair 4 back to the top of the mountain, McQuarrie says. By the 2018-19 season, the plan is to have a chairlift called the Red Chair installed for the new runs. The ski park purchased the chair from Montana’s Bridger Bowl Ski Area in 2013. The ski area is inside Mount Spokane State Park; the runs are managed by Mt. Spokane 2000, a nonprofit concessionaire contracted by Washington State Parks. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

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NEWS | EDUCATION

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At PRIDE Prep, one of Spokane’s two charter schools, the waitlist is around 150.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Gaining Traction

More charter schools are on the way in Washington state, possibly signaling increased confidence that they won’t be shut down BY WILSON CRISCIONE

E

ver since charter schools were approved by a voter initiative five years ago, they have been entangled in court battles about whether they’re legal at all. Less than two years ago, the state Supreme Court ruled that they weren’t. But now, with plans for more charter schools in the state starting to emerge, there seems to be growing confidence that charters are here to stay. Lawmakers “fixed” the charter schools law after the Supreme Court’s ruling, and this February, a King County judge ruled that the fix was, in fact, constitutional. The decision has been appealed, but that’s not stopping the current charter schools in Washington from expanding. And it’s not stopping people like Jen Wickens from opening new ones. “You can see the need and demand is there, and the law has now been fixed. We feel confident that we passed a challenging hurdle,” Wickens says.

Wickens helped open Summit Public Schools in Seattle and Olympia, two of the first charter schools in the state. Now, she and Natalie Hester are co-founding a new charter school called Impact Elementary in Tukwila for the 2018-19 school year. Eventually, they hope to create a network of eight new charter schools across the state called Impact Public Schools. The project has been kickstarted by a $1 million grant from a fund partially funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The network would include four schools in the Puget Sound area and four in Eastern or Central Washington, says Wickens. She says they waited to have a restored law in place before moving forward with the plan for Impact. The state has eight operating charter schools, and two more are planned to open in the Seattle area this fall. Along with Impact, Willow Public School in Walla Walla — despite its name, a charter school — is scheduled to open in 2018. With charter school roots digging deeper into


Washington soil, it could be more difficult to uproot them with a court decision. But the Washington Education Association, the largest teachers union in the state and a top opponent of charter schools, still argues that the schools shouldn’t be planted here at all. “We still have huge concerns about privately run charter schools taking public money and not being accountable to taxpayers,” says Rich Wood, spokesperson for the WEA. “That fundamental problem is still there, independent of any individual group or organization running them.”

I

n Spokane, the two charter schools seemingly can’t keep up with the demand. At Spokane International Academy, there are around 400 students on the waitlist, even as it expands school grades next year, says founder Travis Franklin. At PRIDE Prep, the waitlist is around 150, after the school expanded to serve 100 students per grade instead of 75. Next year, there will be 300 students throughout grades 7-9, says founder Brenda McDonald. Both Franklin and McDonald say they would welcome more charter school choices in the area. “If you ask any of us, it’s exciting because we’re going to need more schools and more leaders to help us — not in a bad way — but to help more people understand what charters are,” Franklin says. Both of Spokane’s charter schools are stand-alone schools, not networks like Impact plans to be. Wickens says networks have the benefit of saving costs on administrative support, along with having common goals across a wider area. McDonald notes that networks typically have more resources at their disposal. Wickens says that diversity, equity and inclusion are among Impact’s core values. The school model is different than the traditional model. Students in kindergarten will keep the same teacher, or mentor, until fifth grade. But there will be other teachers; for example, students will attend a different project-based class during the day. Wickens says the first school is opening in Tukwila in part to help close the achievement gap among the diverse population there. She says Impact wants to get to Eastern Washington, where she sees a similar demand, as quickly as possible. “There’s incredible demand from Central and Eastern Washington for parents and communities of color,” Wickens says. “We’re excited for Impact to meet their needs.”

P

atrick D’Amelio, CEO of the Washington Charter Schools Association, doesn’t think there will be any competition if more charter schools open over the coming years. The eight Impact schools alone would double the number of charter schools which existed last year in Washington, but those won’t be the only new schools. “They will be part of a bigger mix,” he says. The law allows for 40 schools to open by 2021. D’Amelio says the focus should be on slow, steady growth, like the state has seen in the first three years. There are now 2,500 students enrolled in charter schools, double the number just two years ago. Wood, with WEA, says he may have concerns about networks not being as accountable to the local community as a stand-alone school. Accountability, overall, is at the heart of why the union sees charter schools as illegal — they don’t have elected school boards, yet they take public dollars. Whether it’s five charter schools or 40 in the state, he doesn’t see that changing. “That was the basis of the original lawsuit, and it’s still part of the fundamental legal point in the current case,” Wood says. McDonald, with PRIDE Prep, says the more charter schools exist, the more complicated closing them would become, should a judge decide they are unconstitutional. But the real goal, she says, is adding more school choice. That’s why she welcomes any kind of charter school. “I think replicating the same types of schools isn’t the point,” McDonald says. “I think we need to make sure that what we’re doing is adding different options for families, and being purposeful about encouraging schools to open in our area.” n wilsonc@inlander.com

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 19


NEWS | SEXUAL ASSAULT

Getting Away with It The state of sexual crime in Idaho remains dire for its mostly young, female victims BY MITCH RYALS

A

recent statistical analysis from the Idaho State Police confirms a devastating yet unsurprising picture of sexual assault in the state. Thousands of people are accused of sex crimes. Most get away with it. The majority of victims who come forward are female (83 percent) and younger than 18 (72 percent). Virtually all of the people accused of sexual crimes are male (94 percent) and know the victim (96 percent), the ISP analysis found. “Sexual violence is a prevalent concern in Idaho with a significant fiscal impact,� writes Danielle Swerin, a senior research analyst for the ISP who authored the report. “Results indicate that reports of sexual violence take almost 10 times longer to investigate, and are nearly half as likely to result in arrest, charges being filed, and a guilty disposition.� These characteristics are not necessarily unique to Idaho, but the analysis using crime and court data from 2009 to 2015 offers numbers that some advocates and researchers say highlight the need for continuing reform. Swerin estimates that rape cases cost Idahoans more than $14 million annually, including expenses for police, the court system and incarceration. At each point — from the time a sexual assault is initially reported to police, until it’s resolved (or not) by the criminal justice system — these cases fall away without a conviction at a higher rate than other violent crimes, the analysis found. Of the 3,269 reported rapes in Idaho from 2009 to 2015, only 4 percent resulted in a conviction for a sexual crime. Idaho has drawn national attention in recent years for its outdated laws surrounding sexual assault, for ignored forensic evidence and for the comments like those from Craig Rowland, sheriff of Bingham County on the state’s

The Idaho state crime lab is working to test forensic evidence in a more timely manner. IDAHO STATE POLICE PHOTO east side, who last year told a reporter that “the majority of our rapes that are called in are actually consensual sex.� The blame does not lie with any one person, one agency or one policy, says Laura King, a Boise State University criminal justice professor who specializes in sexual assault research. Rather, reform is needed throughout the system, she says, from state law to police to prosecutors to judges to society as whole. The question is, how? “I was not surprised by the findings,� King says. “This is generally the trend nationwide.�

THE POLICE

It’s estimated that about 67 percent of sexual assaults nationwide go unreported to police, according to the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Less than 25 percent of reported sexual crimes in Idaho result in an arrest, compared to 48 percent of nonsexual, violent crimes. In Nez Perce County the disparity is even greater, with only 12 percent of reported sex crimes, but 69 percent of other violent crimes, resulting in an arrest. On average, it takes 86 days from the time of the incident until police make an arrest, Swerin reports. “The time it takes for an arrest to occur for sex crimes compared to other violent crimes may highlight the unique complexity of sex crime investigations,� Swerin writes. “For example, the required timeframe for evidence collection and private nature of the offense result in unique barriers for law enforcement.�

King suggests that agencies train officers how to interact with victims of sexual assault. Interviewing techniques should avoid asking victims why they’re not crying, or why they waited so long to report the incident, she says. “Research shows that trauma can cause a person to have flat affect. Someone not familiar with trauma might think they’re lying. So having a basic understanding can be very helpful, particularly in sexual assault cases,� she says. Kootenai County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Det. Dennis Stinebaugh says several of their detectives have received specialized training in sex crime investigation. But “our office does not discuss the methods and/or techniques used in criminal investigations,� he adds.

THE PROSECUTOR

Prosecutors filed charges in only 26 percent of reported sexual assault cases statewide, but in 53 percent of violent, nonsexual cases, the ISP analysts concluded. Of the 8,452 sex crimes reported, only 11 percent resulted in a guilty verdict for a sex crime. Nearly half were dismissed. Others were reduced to nonsexual charges. “Corroboration is not always present in sex cases, which is one of the reasons they can sometimes be challenging to prove, more so than other cases,â€? Kootenai County Prosecutor Barry McHugh says via email. Another major obstacle for prosecutors is a “trend ‌ prohibiting evidence of prior sexual misconduct with other victims,â€? he adds.

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This June, the Idaho Court of Appeals threw out guilty verdicts for a Bannock County man convicted of molesting two girls, both under the age of 12. Appeals judges ruled that prosecutors were wrong to combine the two cases into one trial. The fact that the man was accused of similar crimes in two separate incidents could have prejudiced the jury, according to the ruling. Generally, neither a person’s criminal history nor unrelated allegations can be used as evidence of a person’s guilt. In that case, Idaho Court of Appeals Judge Molly Huskey LETTERS writes that evidence “merely Send comments to showing a criminal propeneditor@inlander.com. sity to opportunistically abuse young females entrusted to [the defendant’s] care” was not a good enough reason to combine the two cases. “That makes prosecuting defendants accused of molesting multiple children very difficult,” McHugh says. “Legislation could help address this issue.” A delay at the state’s forensic lab can also “create problems,” McHugh says. It can take up to eight months to process evidence; prosecutors have only six months to bring charges to trial. Delays in DNA testing, as well as the volume of untested evidence of possible sexual assaults, was the subject of a sweeping Idaho Press-Tribune investigation in 2015 and sparked changes to Idaho law.

THE EVIDENCE

Dating as far back as 1990, an Idaho State Police audit of rape kits that contain possible evidence of sexual assault found that nearly half were not sent to the state forensic lab for analysis. That revelation brought changes to Idaho’s laws, which went into effect last year. The changes require law enforcement to track each rape kit, though police are still not required to send each one for testing (police in Washington state are under such a requirement). For kits that Idaho police do not send for testing, prosecutors are able to review the decision and have the option to overrule. The state also implemented a first-of-its-kind online database that helps victims and law enforcement track each kit’s progress. Another reform, which took effect this year, requires police to store evidence for longer periods of time, depending on the type of case. King says more changes to Idaho’s laws, such as adding nuance to to the statutory definition of rape, could help close the gap between sex crimes and nonsexual violent crimes in Idaho. But she also sees a larger barrier regarding society’s perception of sexual assault, and the shame often attached to it. “There are so many factors that go into the different stages — arrests made, charges filed — so there are a lot of things to consider,” King says. “Educating the public and trying to break down the perceptions of sexual violence is important. It’s such a huge issue, it’s almost too much to comprehend.” n mitchr@inlander.com

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 21


k n i r D Here, There

and Everywhere Drinking local in the Inland Northwest has never been so easy, challenging and delicious he concept seems simple enough: “Drink Local.” And then you start to remember all that T entails for those of us lucky enough to be living in the Inland Northwest. The craft beer scene? Booming. The craft cocktail scene? Omnipresent. Awesome spots to belly up for a beverage? Every direction we look, from downtown Spokane to small towns on the Palouse and tourist spots and locals-only classics across North Idaho. In this year’s Drink Local guide, we explore the boozing scene by hunting for some favorite cocktails, setting out on foot and bicycle to explore some suggested homemade pub crawls, and throwing in some of our favorite spots for everything from hiding away from the world to hitting the dance floor. Enjoy! — DAN NAILEN, section editor

22 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

l a c o L


Not so Neat One man's search for whiskey-based cocktails beyond the "bourbon, straight" life BY DAN NAILEN love whiskey. I’m not an expert. I don’t care about visiting distilleries or debating the merits of Irish versus Scotch, or whether American bourbon should even be part of the discussion (although I will contend that most Canadian whiskey is terrible). Just give me a glass of some smooth Bulleit rye (or Jameson, or Laphroaig) and one cube (or less) and I’m a pretty happy camper. In an effort to expand my horizons and take advantage of the booming craft-cocktail opportunities in Spokane, I set out to sample some whiskey drinks that go beyond my usual.

I

THE 65TH STREET

Durkin’s Liquor Bar, 415 W. Main, durkinsliquorbar.com Not familiar with The 65th Street? Neither was I until Durkin’s bartender Danielle McGillis recommended the off-the-menu cocktail, a drink that lands somewhere between an Old Fashioned and a Manhattan, as something whiskey lovers might enjoy. The 65th Street, at Durkin’s, packs The 65th Street is a delicious punch. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO simple in terms of ingredients, but packs a punch because there’s nary a nonalcoholic addition to the bunch, unless you count the orange slice garnish. The mix of “hot” rye (i.e. potent, as in the 100 proof Rittenhouse rye in the one I sampled) with the bitter-leaning aperitif Aperol, some dry vermouth and Zaya rum, bringing the sweetness in lieu of sugar or simple syrup, makes for a delicious combination — and one you won’t need too many of to catch a serious buzz.

CABLEGRAM

Hogwash Whiskey Den, 304 W. Pacific, drinkhogwash.com The array of options at Hogwash would be daunting if you didn’t know that these folks know how to make everything whiskey-related delicious, whether you’re having a Prohibitionera classic or a more modern concoction. The Cablegram, a blend of rye whiskey, ginger, lime and soda served in a tall Collins glass, is a simple, delicious choice for the dog days of summer. I don’t love ginger, but I have no complaints here, and it’s easy to imagine sipping on these nightly as the temperatures hover above 90 — even though Hogwash is delightfully cool, literally, at all hours.

ar

WHISKEY SOUR

My Favorite B

OLD FASHIONED

...For Catching a Game

Prohibition Gastropub, 1914 N. Monroe, Facebook: Prohibition Gastropub Spokane My memories of whiskey sours are a little cloudy, and not because of the whiskey. A poor, bastardized version of the drink was one of the first things I ordered after turning 21, and I haven’t had many occasions since to revisit this particular cocktail, even as I learned to love whiskey and bourbon. I’ve been missing out, if this delicious concoction put together by Prohibition chef/owner John Leonetti is any indication. I used Bulleit rye as my preferred base, and Leonetti shook the hell out of the mix of lemon, simple syrup and egg white. The result was a frothy wonder balanced perfectly between sweet and sour. The Wandering Table, 1242 W. Summit Pkwy, thewanderingtable.com Not only is the Old Fashioned a classic go-to for whiskey lovers, it’s always fun to order at different spots to see what unique spins different establishments bring to the party. I can’t even imagine what a “bad” Old Fashioned would taste like, but I can say the Wandering Table has one of the tastiest in town. Their barrel-aged Four Roses bourbon is oh-so-smooth, and the atypical additions of Solerno blood orange liqueur and Bordeaux cherries aged in bourbon with vanilla beans make their Old Fashioned worth seeking out. That brûléed orange slice? Consider it either dessert, or a tiny bite to hold you over while you wait for your next Old Fashioned to arrive.

THE SMOKEY ROBINSON

Garageland, 230 W. Riverside, Facebook: Garageland Spokane One of the risks of ordering random cocktails based only on the fact they contain whiskey is getting a disturbingly dainty glass of some concoction that may taste great, but look ridiculous — at least in the hand of a slovenly cat like myself. The Smokey Robinson at Garageland is anything but dainty, served up in a Hurricane glass (complete with paper umbrella) and holding a surprisingly delicious blend of bourbon, peach, lemon, ginger beer and cardamom. Yes, cardamom, the spice with a slew of medicinal properties common in Indian and Thai food. In the Smokey Robinson, perhaps it helps stave off a hangover from the potent and delicious cocktail that is not for the faint-hearted (or light-weighted). n

There are entirely too many bars in the world that insist on having televisions blaring sports every night. That’s what sports bars are for, and when this non-Washington native wants to get a glimpse of the Cubs instead of the Mariners, or the Chiefs instead of the Seahawks, I go to 24 Taps in downtown Spokane. Most sports bars have the same basic elements: Tons of TVs, beer, nachos and various deep-fried delicacies. It’s the details that make a difference, and 24 Taps is my go-to for a few reasons. Their beer list leans local and crafty instead of corporate and shitty. Their food is better than I’ve come to expect from sports bars. And there are enough TV screens (and table-specific speakers) that I can get my game of choice dialed up, even when all the local teams are on at the same time. — DAN NAILEN

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 23


Drink Local

Post Falls Brewing is tapping into the trend of New England-style IPAs.

DAN COUILLARD PHOTO

Navigating North Idaho Seeking out the Panhandle's delicious new brews BY CARRIE SCOZZARO he pace has slowed down somewhat for new North Idaho breweries — the region only added a handful over the past few years — yet the development of new flavors and collaborations has not. Unlike Spokane, which tends to have conveniently clustered breweries and pubs within walking distance, exploring North Idaho takes a willingness to be adventurous.

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NORTHERN CROSS

Selkirk Abbey, 6180 E. Seltice Way, Post Falls, selkirkabbey.com Look to the night sky for the Northern Cross star formation, or to history, regarding the annual pilgrimage on the British Isles, or set your GPS to Post Falls for Selkirk Abbey’s first non-Belgian-style release since opening in 2012. Owner Jeff Whitman says he gave his brewers plenty of latitude to come up with an Amber, IPA, Pale Ale and Stout. Find out more about beermaking in general on Aug. 31 at a brewery tour and presentation in collaboration with the Inland Northwest Food Network (tickets $10-$15; inwfoodnetwork.org/event/drink-this-beer).

August 10-27

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Post Falls Brewing, 112 N. Spokane St., Post Falls, postfallsbrewing.com Brewery owner Dan Stokes describes Cruz Control as light and hoppy. “Fat Lenny is a Vermont-style or New England-style IPA which is a hazy, juicy IPA, heavy on finishing hops and dry hops,” he says, yet without any bitterness.

LOU'S BREW

October 12–15

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CRUZ CONTROL SESSION IPA, FAT LENNY NEW ENGLAND IPA

Sweet Lou’s, sweetlousidaho.com His mom won’t let the 14-year-old after whom Lou’s Brew — a collaboration with Laughing Dog Brewing — is named drink this beer, but you can. The India Pale Ale is only available at

Sweet Lou’s locations in Coeur d’Alene (601 E. Front Ave.) and Ponderay (4777272 Hwy. 95).

ANY SERIES, EVANS BROTHERS COFFEE PORTER

MickDuff ’s Brewing Company, 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint, mickduffs.com MickDuff’s isn’t just any brewer — it’s actually a brewery that serves yummy pub food, and a beer hall for hanging out with your mates — but you’ll be able to get Any beer there very soon. This new series is a play on words for New England-style (“NE” or “Any”) IPA, and will be followed by Any Other, Any More and Any Time. Also look for a return of their Evans Brothers Coffee Porter.

BLOOD ORANGE IPA, DOUBLE D PILSNER, KARI'S IRISH RED ALE

Daft Badger Brewing, 1710 N. Second St., Coeur d’Alene, daftbadgerbrewing.com With a big, citrusy nose and hoppy finish, Daft Badger’s new Blood Orange IPA blends bitter and sweet for a bracing summer sip. An even lighter sip, the Double D Pilsner, honors owner Darrell Dlouhy’s brother, Duane, while Kari’s Irish Red offers hints of toffee in a refreshing amber ale.

ON THE RADAR: OCTOBERFEST BEERS, WESTWOOD BREWING OPENING

Forget about the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown: Keep your eyes peeled for news of fall-release beers, specifically Oktoberfest offerings like OktobRYEfest, which MickDuff’s is brewing in collaboration with Coeur d’Alene’s Paragon Brewing (paragonbrewing.com). And stay tuned for news of Westwood Brewing (8162 W. Main St., Rathdrum), which is opening in phases, beginning with the bar, then adding food later this summer and opening the brewery sometime next year (facebook.com/WestwoodBrewing). n


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AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 25


Drink Local

A Tom Collins at Ruins is, essentially, a slightly watered-down version of a French 75.

Begin With Gin

An unsuspecting cocktail choice pushed me into the world of gin BY CHEY SCOTT ots of people hate gin. To these haters, gin tastes like a Christmas tree, or something equally unpalatable. I am, proudly, not one of those people. But up until about a year ago, I had no idea what I was missing. I’ve always been more of a beer drinker, yet now I find myself ordering up crisp and citrusy gin cocktails at every opportunity. Gin — for those as unfamiliar as I was — is a neutral spirit infused with botanicals, the main being piney juniper berry (the source of its signature evergreen taste). Made popular in London during the 18th and 19th centuries, gin’s history includes its reign as the commoners’ cheap liquor of choice, followed by a return to respectable prominence when it was found to make quinine, a malaria remedy, more palatable. Thus the gin and tonic was born, with gin, sugar, lime and ice added to mask quinine’s bitter taste. Gin has since enjoyed a long and steady revival, including its inclusion in the classic martini, and in 007’s favorite, the Vesper. Here are some of my favorite gin drinks, and favorite places to enjoy them.

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CORPSE REVIVER NO. 2

Clover, 913 E. Sharp, cloverspokane.com A regular on the menu at Clover’s award-winning bar, the Corpse Reviver No. 2 is the drink that kicked off my gin journey more than a year ago. Its curiously dark name and listing as the first drink under the “crisp” heading on Clover’s cocktail list piqued my

26 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

interest, and I was not disappointed. Truly a cocktail to raise the dead — it was made famous in the 1930s as a “hair of the dog” morning-after drink — the Corpse Reviver’s stout contents — gin, triple sec, Lillet, lemon juice and a splash of absinthe — make it a one-and-done drink for all the lightweights out there. I now order this drink again and again for sentimentality, though my fellow gin connoisseurs should also take note of the sheer number of gin cocktails on Clover’s list, including many classics — the Aviation, Vesper, Negroni, Last Word, French 75, lemon and jasmine fizzes — and a few contemporaries, like the house’s Clover Club.

THE LAST WORD

Butcher Bar at Santé, 404 W. Main, santespokane.com In my quest to sample the wide variety of gin cocktails, I’ve naturally honed my preferences for what I do and don’t like to be mixed alongside the spirit’s piney, herbed notes (despite its distinct flavor characteristics, gin is an incredibly versatile spirit). Though it’s considered one of the definitive gin classics, the Negroni’s mix of vermouth and Campari is too bitter and warm on the tongue for my palate. Rather, my personal tastes have led me down the path to gin and juice — specifically, lemon or lime juice. I was delighted by a citrus-forward, recently revived Prohibition-era classic called The Last Word, a mix of equal parts green Chartreuse (an herbed French liqueur), Luxardo maraschino liqueur and fresh lime juice. The cloudy,

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pale-green mixture, served here with a slice of lime floating on top, is truly one of the most refreshing summertime (or anytime) gin drinks.

BASIL GIMLET

Remedy, 3809 S. Grand Blvd., Facebook: Remedy Kitchen and Tavern Equally refreshing and summery is this counterpart to The Last Word: the gimlet, also considered one of gin’s definitive classics. If you’re sticking to the drink’s original recipe, a true gimlet would be made of half gin and half Rose’s Lime Juice Cordial, a longtime branded lime concentrate. Remedy’s version (as are many other modern variations) is a little less heavy on the lime, but stays true to the cocktail’s origins. With the addition of muddled basil, the drink is a shaken mixture of Broker’s London Dry gin — the designation “London Dry” means no flavors were added after distillation — lime juice and agave nectar. In tandem with the gin’s herby profile, the muddled basil (which, at first, almost fools me into thinking it’s mint) perfectly balances out the drink’s citrus and juniper notes.

TOM COLLINS

Ruins, 825 N. Monroe, Facebook: Ruins Spokane The last stop on my gin expedition is Ruins, where head bartender Crystal Bertholic has continued to solidify her reputation as one of the most adept mixologists in town. While the current Mediterranean/Polynesian menu at Ruins and its complementary cocktail list don’t include any gin drinks, I use my newfound knowledge about the gin classics and ask her for a Tom Collins. Comparable to the French 75 (gin, Champagne, lemon juice and simple syrup) the Collins is (literally) a slightly watered-down version, replacing Champagne with carbonated water. Served on the rocks with a straw, the Collins is a light, lemonade-like drink with clean, crisp flavors that pair beautifully with Chef Tony Brown’s menu of complexly spiced dishes, like the hummus plate, and a Lebanese flatbread called za’atar man’oushe. The consensus? Gin is always in. n


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ar

My Favorite B

Throughout Spokane and the Inland Northwest

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...For PreMovie Drinks Ever since the 72-year-old Garland Theater underwent a major renovation in 2013 and started serving a full menu of food and drinks (beer and wine), going there has become a favorite and frequent date night for my partner and I. We always get there early to grab beers or cocktails in the Garland’s tiny bar, Bon Bon, as we wait for our food (he always gets the basic hot dog, I always get the black bean sliders). With Happy Hour times (Mon-Thu, 4-7 pm; Fri-Sat 10 pmclose; Sun all day) and specials that are hard to beat, we often sample one of the rotating craft beers on tap, or a selection from the $5 Happy Hour cocktail menu. Bon Bon’s free popcorn is another pre-movie perk as we perch on the stools around the diminutive, Art Deco-styled space’s curving wooden bar. For all its charm and a staff of friendly bartenders who are beginning to know our names, we try to swing by Bon Bon often — even when we’re not catching a movie. — CHEY SCOTT

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 27


Drink Local

2017 SUMMER PINT NIGHTS 7/5 South Perry Pizza 1011 S. Perry Street Spokane, WA (509) 929 6047 Paragon Brewing 5785 N. Gov’t Way Coeur d’Alene, ID (208) 772-9292 7/12 Mulligan’s Bar & Grill Best Western 506 Appleway Coeur d’Alene, ID (208) 765-3200 7/19 Capone's  Pub & Grill 315 N. Ross Point Rd. Post Falls, ID (208) 457-8020 219 Lounge 219 N. 1st Avenue Sandpoint, ID (208) 263-5673

Times vary so check our Facebook page for more info

KPNDRadio.com

7/26 Beet and Basil at the Creek 105 S. 1st Avenue Sandpoint, ID (208) 304-9470 JR Perk Coffeehouse and Lounge 761 N. Idaho Street Post Falls, ID (208) 262 9253 8/2 Swinging Doors Corner of Francis & Monroe Spokane, WA (509) 326 6794 8/16 Capone's Pub & Grill 9520 N. Government Way Hayden, ID (208) 762 5999 8/23 Shooters at Black Rock Marina 10218 Rockford Bay Rd. Coeur d’Alene, ID (208) 667 6106

Take a breather between stops at Remedy’s rooftop patio.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Sudsy Cycle A totally doable bicycle bar crawl on the South Hill BY MITCH RYALS t was about halfway up High Drive, when the knot in my left calf muscle tightened beyond what I could bear, that I realized this might have been a bad idea. Each downward pedal stroke yanked the knot tighter, spreading dull and agonizing pain through the back of my leg. I wasn’t even halfway to the first bar. For this year’s Drink Local issue, I was assigned to do a bicycle bar crawl on the South Hill. Then, like any good journalist would, I was to ride the route, and report back. It should be

I

28 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

accessible. Popular bars. Nice beer selections. No problem, I thought. In hindsight, six bars was a little ambitious. I rode a total of 15 miles (starting from the Inlander office in Kendall Yards) and stopped at five bars over a span of about six hours. The route descends from 57th Avenue to 10th Avenue and (mostly) avoids busy roads. We begin the tour at a staple South Hill haunt: Morty’s. By the end, the knot, along with some of my vigilance, had disappeared.


THE BARS:

MORTY’S TAP & GRILLE 5517 S. Regal, mortystapandgrille.com Open every day, 7 am-2 am What I drank: Moose Drool Known for: Morty the Moose, whose head is displayed at the far end of the bar. The Wild Weasel, Morty’s friend and former pub namesake, stands atop his head; breakfast served until 1 pm. Bike rack? Yes; west side of the building near the dumpsters. WADDELL’S NEIGHBORHOOD PUB AND GRILLE 4318 S. Regal, waddellspubandgrill.com Open Sun-Thu, 11 am-11 pm; FriSat, 11 am-midnight What I drank: The Hoppy Sour, a collaboration between Waddell’s and Paradise Creek Brewery. Known for: The bar is named after the Baseball Hall of Fame pitcher Rube Waddell, an eccentric lefty with a nasty curveball and a smokin’ fastball. Waddell is rumored to have wrestled an alligator one year during spring training; 50 taps constantly on rotation. Bike rack? Yes; out front, across the parking lot. REMEDY KITCHEN AND TAVERN 3809 S. Grand Blvd., Facebook: Remedy Kitchen and Tavern Open Mon-Thu, 11 am-midnight; Fri, 11 am-2 am; Sat, 8 am-2 am; Sun, 8 am-midnight What I drank: The alwaysrefreshing Cascade Pilsner from Full Sail Brewery. Known for: Billed as the “cure for the common South Hill dining experience,” Remedy has a commendable beer selection (22 taps) and “crafty” cocktails mixed with fresh juices and “no shortcuts,” says bartender Jamie Young. Bike rack? No. MANITO TAP HOUSE 3011 S. Grand Blvd., manitotaphouse.com Open Sun-Thu, 11 am-10 pm; FriSat, 11 am-midnight What I drank: Scrimshaw Pilsner Known for: Named “the best bar in Washington state” by CraftBeer.com; 50 rotating taps Bike rack: Yes; right out front, with plenty of room. SOUTH PERRY PIZZA 1011 S. Perry, southperrypizzaspokane.com Open Tue-Thu, Sun, 11:30 am-9 pm; Fri-Sat, 11:30 am-10 pm What I drank: Kölsch from Perry Street Brewing Co. (right next door!) Known for: Artisan pizzas; $2 bottled beer on Wednesdays. Bike rack? Yes. n

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My Favorite B

...For Getting to Know People in Spokane On my third full day in my new city, I happened upon Andy’s. It was a match from the get-go, with ice-cold $3 Montuckys and $2 PBR tallboys. This isn’t a bar where everyone knows your name (those places don’t exist outside of ’80s sitcoms), but enough people do to offer a sense of familiarity, of belonging. A small but mighty kitchen turns out breakfast, lunch and dinner and keeps cranking late into the night, satisfying nocturnal hunger pangs. Ordering fries with your Andy’s burger? Go with the sweet potato fries; just don’t let ’em get cold. The patio’s prime spots are uncovered, at the far end. Enjoy the privacy; it’s separated from the sidewalk and Cedar Street by a tall fence and dense greenery. If you Google “Spokane gay bar,” Andy’s comes up more than once. This, despite a lit-up ABSOLUT sign being the only rainbow colors in sight. It’s more about tolerance and open-mindedness, about welcoming everyone and not judging anyone. — MICHAEL MAHONEY

...For Ending the Night I’m not much of a dancer anymore, but get a few whiskey drinks in me and I’m out on the floor the second a Whitney Houston jam starts blaring over the speakers. (And usually my aching joints are just as painful as the hangover the next morning.) In my experience, nYne is the best place in town to get your groove on, and it’s best enjoyed if you’re in a large group of like-minded people and have already hit up three or four other places beforehand. I’ve only been to nYne on a weekday a few times (I’ll cop to performing some Simple Minds during Wednesday night karaoke), but show up around 11 pm on a Saturday night, and the place is host to the craziest party in all of downtown. It attracts a diverse array of people — old, young, gay, straight. Most important, the music’s excellent. Dance until you’re sore and then Lyft home. — NATHAN WEINBENDER

...For Grown-Ups In college, we went to Rico’s to escape the deafening music, wall-to-wall neon and Busch-fueled amateurism of other bars and clubs in Pullman. Bookshelves and bricks line the interior, creating a warm space for conversation and even quiet contemplation. Gargoyles and soft lamps perch above the heavy wooden tables and plush lounge chairs. You can catch an open mic, jazz band or trivia night before heading upstairs for pool and pinball. It’s the place you go to for your first real glass of fine whiskey as a junior communication major. Or the place you sneak a cold pint with your 7-month-old hanging in a baby carrier. Or just a place to enjoy a drink like an adult. — JACOB JONES

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LOCATED IN SPOKANE, WA AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 29


Drink Local S LINCOLN ST

S MONROE ST

S MADISON ST

S ADAMS ST

S CEDAR ST

W 1ST AVE

W 1ST AVE

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5 3 6 2 W 2ND AVE

W 2ND AVE

Eight breweries, in six stops, in under three-quarters of a mile in downtown Spokane.

Walk This Way A walking tour of downtown breweries BY JACOB H. FRIES he best way to bar-hop is by foot, of course, and the west end of downtown Spokane provides fertile ground with — count ’em! — eight breweries located within three-quarters of a mile. (Technically, while the Steel Barrel Taproom is just one stop on our map, it’s home to three separate breweries.) If that short stroll isn’t sufficient for the thirstiest among us, a milelong jaunt across town is all that’s required to check out downtown’s only other brewery, Black Label, inside the Saranac Commons.

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1. RIVER CITY BREWING

121 S. Cedar, Sun-Wed, 3-9 pm; Thu-Sat, 3-10 pm Kids and outside food — Rocket Bakery is next door, and Andy’s Bar and Grill is across the street — are welcomed at this inviting taproom. There’s also a patio out front. Tasting pours are $2, pints $5-$6 and bags of chips $1.50. Don’t miss: dirt-cheap keg deals ($49 for a sixth barrel).

2. IRON GOAT BREWING

1302 W. Second, Daily, 11 am-11 pm The beautifully renovated industrial building, with exposed brick and heavy wood-and-steel tables, houses a full kitchen, with small plates, sandwiches and pizza. (They’re in the process of updating their menu with more vegetarian and dessert options.) Kids are welcome and Thursdays are busy with trivia. Tasters are $1.63-

30 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

$2.18, pints $5.50-$6. Don’t miss: the alleyway patio.

3. THE STEEL BARREL TAPROOM 154 S. Madison, Daily, 11 am-11 pm; closed Mon The hip brewery incubator space is shared by Little Spokane, Young Buck and, most recently, TT’s Old Iron Brewery, with 26 beers, two ciders and two wines on tap and a full liquor bar. (It’s 21+.) Tasters are $2$3.50, pints $5-$7. There’s also Zona Blanca, a ceviche counter run by Chad White, a former Top Chef contestant, as well as a cool, shade-filled patio out back. Don’t miss: the shuffleboard and darts.

4. ORLISON BREWING TAPROOM

1007 W. First, Daily, 2-9 pm; closed Sun-Mon The taproom welcomes dogs and outside food and has board games at the ready, should you want to while away an afternoon. (It’s 21+.) Tasters are $1.50, pints $5.50-$6, and the rotating beer selection often features new and small-batch releases. Don’t miss: $3 pints on Thursdays.

5. WHISTLE PUNK BREWING

122 S. Monroe, Tue-Thu, 4-9 pm; Fri-Sat, 3-11 pm; closed Sun-Mon A new arrival on the tour that’s quickly generating buzz, the small brewery is housed in what used to be Brooklyn Nights, with stylish exposed-rock walls and

a copper bar. Outside food and dogs are allowed, but it’s 21+. Tasters are $2, pints $5. (One imperial pint is $6.) Don’t miss: the free pretzels and spicy, housemade Chex mix. (TEMPORARILY CLOSED)

6. STEAM PLANT BREWING

159 S. Lincoln, Expected to reopen this fall The Steam Plant is undergoing a $1.5 million renovation, with planned updates to the Stacks restaurant and the brewpub, and the addition of a rooftop event center. We loved the tucked-away bar in the bowels of the historic building — it was a great hideout on Sundays, with all-day happy hour — and look forward to toasting its new incarnation. Don’t miss: its reopening. (OFF THE MAP)

BLACK LABEL BREWING COMPANY 19 W. Main (a mile walk from Whistle Punk), Mon-Thu, 1-8 pm; Fri-Sat, 1-10 pm; Sun, 1-6 pm Located in the back of the airy Saranac Commons — on the trendy strip of Main Avenue — the taproom features large, communal-style tables as well as smaller high tops and an outdoor patio. Kids are allowed, and so is outside food; conveniently, the Commons space is also home to Common Crumb bakery and the brandnew Biscuit Wizard. Tasters are $2, pints $5. Don’t miss: the brewery’s new foosball table. n


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My Favorite B

...For People-Watching in the Summer Coeur d’Alene’s Sherman Avenue in the summertime is primo for people-watching, and the Moose Lounge puts you front and center, making it my favorite local hangout, especially on Wednesday nights when trivia master Josiah Drewien holds court for a dozen or so local teams of Jeopardy wannabes (like myself). The swag is usually pretty crappy, but the waitstaff and friendly banter from other teams more than make up for it. And with the Moose’s mostly functional loudspeaker, you can sit indoors or out and still play the game. Or not. Situated at the corner of Sherman and 4th, you’ll hear every motorcycle and hot rod revving, and have plenty to gawk at from several patio tables outside, or inside the Moose, along their floor-to-ceiling windows and roll-up garage door. Pool tables next door, a new menu of French bread pizzas and a frosty glass of whatever’s on tap complete the bill for a perfect summer evening in the Lake City. In the winter, though the people-watching opportunities are somewhat muted, this is still a great place for getting one through the blahs until summer rolls around again. — CARRIE SCOZZARO

...For Disappearing Into a Dark Corner Despite the fact that trying to be sure no one will see you in a room the size of Baby Bar is about as effective as an ostrich burying its head in the sand, its stealthy side entrance, red lighting and limited seating make this bar feel like an exclusive, unreachable (if only briefly) corner of the city. The entire space is decorated with wonderfully peculiar art: stuffed creatures sit on a branch over the jukebox, which has one of the best selections in town; a large white-line drawing of mountains and a naked woman’s backside fills a wall above bench seating, where more butts can try to squeeze around the few small, round tables. The bar has something for every thirst, with Rainier as ready as a daiquiri with a raw sugar rim, but if nothing else, be sure to try the Greyhound made with fresh-squeezed grapefruit juice. — SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

TAP ROOM 121 S. CEDAR ST.

OPEN DAILY AT 3PM

9 styles of beer on tap, along with house made non-alcoholic Root Beer.

FIND YOUR HAPPY PLACE

...For Turning 21 I wish I had gone to Jack and Dan’s on my 21st birthday, but I didn’t. However, I went very soon afterward on someone else’s birthday. We rolled in just after she turned 21 at midnight. It was a Wednesday, so there weren’t very many people there, but the atmosphere radiated good times. I was brushing elbows with my fellow young’uns while waiting to get a beer when I struck up a conversation with a young woman next to me and told her I was here for a friend’s 21st. “I turned 21 here,” she told me. “I threw up on the bar and they kicked me out.” There is beauty in this story (Jack and Dan’s bar and tables are immaculately clean, by the way): Twenty-first birthdays are a jumbled mess of sky-highs and rock bottoms. Jack and Dan’s will be there for you the whole way through, and invite you back for more good times. — FORREST HOLT

Search Happy Hour Specials, Times and Locations

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AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 31


Drink Local

Checkerboard Bar has daily specials from 4 to 6 pm.

Be Happy! Hundreds of deals at your fingertips ho doesn’t love Happy Hour? The name “happy” is right there in the thing, and getting a deal on delicious drinks and food is certainly something that can bring a smile to one’s face after a long day, or as a result of meeting friends for a quick pop on the way home. Use the Inlander’s Drinkspotter web app (Inlander. com/drinkspotter) to find dozens, nay hundreds, of Happy Hour deals sorted by your location. (Be sure to turn on your phone’s location services.) How handy is that? Below is a sampling of the kind of information you can find every day via Drinkspotter:

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AREA 51 TAPHOUSE 7522 N. Division and 302 W. Riverside Mon-Fri, 3-6 pm $3 off growler fills, $2 off glass wine, $1 off well drinks, beer flights, beer pints and bottles; food specials BEVERLY’S 101 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene Daily, 4:30-6 pm Half-price appetizers, $3 off glasses of wine, martinis and specialty drinks, $1 off beer CHECKERBOARD BAR 1716 E. Sprague Daily, 4-6 pm $3 Fireball, $3 Patron Incendio, $3 Hot Donkey, $1 off craft beer DAS STEIN HAUS 1812 W. Francis Daily, 4-7 pm; in lounge only $4 house wine, $3.25 wells, $.50 off draft beers, 25% off appetizers THE FIELDHOUSE PIZZA AND PUB 4423 W. Wellesley and 1235 N. Liberty Lake Rd., Liberty Lake Mon-Fri, 3-6 pm $3.50 domestic bottles, $4.50 house wines, $5.50 mugs, $6.90 appetizers THE GLOBE BAR AND KITCHEN 204 N. Division Mon-Fri, 3-6 pm; Sun all day $2 wells and draft pints, $10 Bud pitchers, $3 off all starters and the Globe burger GRILLE FROM IPANEMA 2380 N. Old Mill Loop, Coeur d’Alene Mon-Fri, 3:30-6 pm $1.50 off tap beer, $6 wine, $7.99 small platters HUGO’S BOWL 3023 E. 28th Mon-Fri, 11:30 am-6 pm; Sat, 9:30 am-6 pm; Sun, all day $1 off all draft beer, house wines, well liquor

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

JJ’S TAP AND SMOKEHOUSE 8801 N. Indian Trail Rd. Mon-Fri, 3-5 pm and 9:30 pm-close; Sun, all day $1 off draft beer, $3 house wines, $3.50 well drinks; food specials LANTERN TAPHOUSE 1004 S. Perry Mon-Fri, 3-6 pm $1 off all drinks, soup, chili, side salad, cracklings, chips and salsa MASSELOW’S STEAKHOUSE 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights Mon-Sat, 4-6 pm; Sun 5-9 pm 20% off appetizers MICKDUFF’S BREWING COMPANY 312 N. First Ave, Sandpoint Mon-Thu, 3-5:30 pm; Sun, 3-5:30 pm $1 off core beers, $6 appetizer menu MY OFFICE BAR & GRILL 215 S. Grand Ave., Pullman Mon-Fri, 3-6 pm $1 off draft beers, $1 off wells; 35% off appetizers THE OVAL OFFICE 620 N. Spokane St., Post Falls Sun-Mon, 3-6 pm and 9-11 pm $5.50 martinis; $5.50 appetizers PADDY’S SPORTS BAR 601 W. Appleway Ave., Coeur d’Alene Mon-Fri, 4-6 pm $2.50 domestic pints, $3.50 craft pints, $10 beer buckets PEACOCK ROOM LOUNGE 10 S. Post Daily, 4-6 pm $4 wine, $4 draft RED DRAGON CHINESE 1406 W. Third Mon-Fri, 4-7 pm; Sat-Sun, 2-7 pm $3.25 well drinks, $3.50 select premiums SATELLITE DINER AND LOUNGE 425 W. Sprague Mon-Fri, 4-7 pm $1 off wells, $.50 off drafts SCOTTY’S DOGHOUSE 1305 N. Hamilton Mon-Fri, 4-6 pm $2 off draft pints, $3 wells, $10 Bud Light pitches, food specials SOUTH HILL GRILL 2808 E. 29th Mon-Fri, 2-5 pm $4 drafts and wells, $2 off wine, $3 off appetizers VERACI PIZZA 1333 W. Summit Pkwy. Mon-Fri, 3-5 pm $3 draft beers, $1 off house merlot and pinot grigio, $1 off slices, half-off focaccia platter WANDERING TABLE 1242 W. Summit Pkwy. Tue-Sat, 3-5 pm; Sun-Mon, 4-5 pm $4 beers, $4 snacks, $6 well drinks, $6 wine selection, $3 off house cocktails WILD SAGE 916 W. Second Mon-Thu, 4-5 pm $5 featured draft beer, drink and food specials n

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34 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

All proceeds benefit local charities


Describing his current tour, Keillor says: “It’s a variety show, but without the guest acts.”

WORDS

The Road Goes on Forever Garrison Keillor’s still writing, still touring, and still creating tales from Lake Wobegon BY DAN NAILEN

C

onsidering Garrison Keillor’s high-profile 2016 retirement from hosting long-running radio show A Prairie Home Companion, and his turning 75 just a few days ago, one might think he would shuffle off to find a real-life Lake Wobegon and relax until the end of his days. Turns out, the end of Keillor’s most high-profile gig

just means more time to scratch the creative itches that have helped make him one of America’s favorite humorists (as well as a reviled one among some hipper-thanthou naysayers). He’s doing columns for the Washington Post, he continues to host the Writer’s Almanac radio show, and he’s in the midst of a national concert jaunt called Garrison Keillor’s Prairie Home Love & Comedy Tour,

which stops in Spokane on Wednesday. As Keillor describes through an email interview before hitting the road, his new show differs from doing a Prairie Home taping, but longtime fans will find a lot to love. “It’s a variety show, but without the guest acts,” Keillor says. “No yodeler from Yakima, no cornetist from Coeur d’Alene — just the band and Rich Dworsky and Fred [Newman, sound effects man] and Aiofe [O’Donovan, singer] and me, but a great variety still. A gospel song, a demented dolphin or two, a string of limericks, some intense love duets in which we manage to keep our hands off each other, a hot band, a meandering story about the first girl I loved, and an intermission during which the audience stands and sings a cappella beautifully some old songs we’ve always known.” Sounds pretty idyllic as far as a night out — no shock ...continued on next page

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 35


CULTURE | WORDS “THE ROAD GOES ON FOREVER,” CONTINUED...

AVAILABLE HERE

36 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

given Keillor’s knack for stories evoking simpler, often better times, is a respectable, hardworking Republican publicist and handyman even when there’s a darkness lurking underneath the happy smiles who in a few short months was made an object of ridicule, largely and bucolic Minnesota scenes he sets. because he was charged with defending the indefensible.” While a 28-show tour is hardly relaxing, Keillor still gets excited No doubt Keillor’s focus on the White House is result of his about the prospect of seeing the country, “like a class field trip in gig writing weekly Washington Post columns, 750-word essays he 8th grade.” Unlike the old Prairie Home radio show, on this tour he tries to infuse with “humor and passion … something righteous can perform largely the same production in different towns. But and playful.” Asked if the current president is a boon or a curse Keillor still manages to change things up enough to keep it interestfor his columns, Keillor he doesn’t “think much about the Current ing for himself, and the audiences. He mentions doing the news Occupant.” from Lake Wobegon “and feeling it evolve, characters drop out, “He is who he is, a rather vulgar rogue without a religious bone dramatic twists appear.” in his body, a braggart and a bully, but he seems too weak and un“A radio show is a one-time deal,” Keillor says. focused to cause a great deal of harm,” Keillor LETTERS “Two hours and you’re out, and it’s luxurious to be able says. “He poses a real challenge to the ConstituSend comments to to do the same show night after night. Every night I try tion, and we shall see if it is strong enough to editor@inlander.com. to come up with a sound effect that Fred Newman can’t resist.” do — a French musk ox with hiccups, a talking toilet, a Those attending the Love & Comedy Tour robot carrying a tray of martinis who falls off a cliff and probably won’t hear Donald Trump’s name, but is swallowed by a whale — and sometimes I succeed.” it wouldn’t be shocking to hear some tales of one of Lake WobeJust before the Spokane show, Keillor and Co. will have a rare gon’s citizens who recalls the man. Keillor, though, knows that day off, and Keillor says he’ll sit in his hotel room and work on a people visit his shows and his fictional community to get away from Lake Wobegon screenplay. But don’t expect to see him lollygagging the day’s real-life travails. He doesn’t aim to disappoint them. around the Davenport fountain. “People want to be surprised and they want to feel good,” “We stay in economy hotels,” Keillor says. “Holiday Inn ExKeillor says when asked about designing his live shows. “I don’t do press, Union Gospel Mission, and I like that dormitory feel. A desk, devastating satire — that’s for 22-year-olds — and I don’t do incoman adjustable chair, a power outlet are all you need. They’re a little prehensible or self-loathing. bleak, but that helps you focus on your work.” “I’m 75. I think life is darned good, and I’ve been looking forAmong the work Keillor tackles on the road are passages for a ward to being an old man for a long time.” n memoir he’s penning, although when he’ll actually finish it remains up the air. He tells his editor it’ll be done “as soon as I stop rememGarrison Keillor’s Prairie Home Love & Comedy Tour • Wed, bering things.” Aug 16 at 7:30 pm • $49.50/$64.50/$84.50 • Martin Woldson Asked whose memoir he’d like to read, Keillor’s answer surTheater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • foxtheaterspokane.org prises: deposed White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer. “Here • 624-1200


CULTURE | DIGEST

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION BY CHEY SCOTT

FOOD This may sound weird, but I love ice cream so much that I actually avoid buying it because my self-control is the worst. Yet ever since discovering HALO TOP brand ice cream a few months ago, I have been eating and enjoying this low-calorie treat a pint at a time, and as often as I can. For those not on the Halo Top bandwagon: Each of its 17 glorious flavors, packed inside its signature gold-rimmed carton, are between 240 and 360 calories per pint. (Other brands are about four times the calories, per half-cup serving.) The best part? It actually tastes good! And you can eat a whole pint without feeling like a horrible glutton! The secret to Halo Top’s taste comes from natural alternative sweeteners, like erythritol, a form of sugar alcohol, and stevia. With flavors that range from basic vanilla bean to birthday cake, chocolate mocha chip, red velvet, oatmeal cookie and peanut butter cup — along with seven new flavor combos debuting later this month — there’s a pint of Halo Top for every sweet tooth out there.

BOOK You know that feeling when you read a book so good you can’t stop thinking about it or pleading with your bookworm friends to read it? UPROOTED, a 2015 title by bestselling fantasy author Naomi Novik, is one of those books. A fairy-tale-like story about a young woman learning to hone her magical capabilities under the scrutinous eye of her seriously uptight mentor, a mage called The Dragon, Uprooted was a finalist for the Hugo Award, and won the Nebula Award for best novel — both are major accolades in the genre. Set in a time and place inspired by European folklore, Uprooted’s protagonists must test the limits of their individual powers as they become the only hope to stop the encroaching Wood, a sentient, evil forest that threatens to destroy their world. With threads that are comfortably familiar to fans of the fantasy genre (the book has even been compared to the literary classic Jane Eyre), Uprooted manages to stay true to its genre roots (no pun intended) while simultaneously presenting a fresh and mesmerizing new realm of magical storytelling.

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Trailblazers

Million Dollar Quartet explores the magic of a legendary recording session in December 1956 BY E.J. IANNELLI

B

September 15-21, 2016 | alwayS colorful!

view

Pre

ge

Pa

25

‘s

Supplement to the inlander

ALSO THIS WEEK: buILdIng bETTEr ’HOOdS

13

79 zOmbIES 94 74 KrATOm 18 bridget jones’s baby dOLLy pArTOn

on stands september 14th Promote your event! EDITORIAL CALENDAR Inlander.com/getlisted or getlisted@inlander.com Submit by September 1st

38 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

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ack in early December of 1956, a handoffice records on the west side of Washington, in ful of young, up-and-coming musicians Issaquah and Everett; it opened on Broadway in happened to find themselves in a tiny 2010 and ran for more than a year. He played the recording studio in Memphis, Tennessee, with role of Sam Phillips, the man who owned the Sun little notion that their spontaneous jam session Records label and the recording studio where the would become the stuff of legend. The hit songs jam session took place. Phillips was a champion that would become forever associated with them of rhythm-and-blues music when the style was as performers — “Ring of Fire,” “Whole Lotta still underground and considered too exotic for Shakin’ Goin’ On” and, for two of them, “Blue popular (read: white) tastes. Suede Shoes” — had either “I rank him up there with Mark WEEKEND been released only recently or Twain and Walt Disney — anyC O U N T D OW N were yet to be recorded. The one who has left a huge mark on Get the scoop on this peak of their international our American culture that spread weekend’s events with fame still lay in the future. through the whole world,” says our newsletter. Sign up at Fifty years later, a jukebox Wolfe. “One of his musicians from Inlander.com/newsletter. musical based on that session Sun Records said that when Sam between Elvis Presley, Johnny walked into a room, the molecules Cash, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis would would shift. He had a real sense of mission to use emerge from similarly modest beginnings with music as a thing that would impact culture in a little foreknowledge of the massive success it positive way. I felt honored to give him a voice would later experience. It was called Million Dollar because so few people know about him.” Quartet. On account of Phillips’ fatherlike role in the Matt Wolfe, who’s directing a new produclives and careers of his musicians, his refusal to tion of the musical to close out Coeur d’Alene remain beholden to norms when it came to race, Summer Theatre’s 2017 mainstage season, gender and socioeconomic status, and the influperformed in the early productions of Million ence that his Sun Records artists would have on Dollar Quartet when it was starting to break box later bands, including the Beatles, Wolfe says that


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The dream team: Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis. Million Dollar Quartet transcends the usual jukebox musical format by telling his tale. “I’ve been referring to it as an all-American story. It’s all about the idea that every voice matters, and it’s also about the idea that one person can make a difference with a dream and the will,” he says. “What’s not in here is that, prior to these guys, [Phillips] was giving all sorts of African-American blues musicians in the South a chance that they wouldn’t have had otherwise. He said, ‘If I could get some white boys to sing this music, it would bridge the divide. People would accept it, and both sides would start to experience the culture of the other and begin a dialogue.’” That small group of musicians who helped that happen might explain another part of Million Dollar Quartet’s charm. The musical functions as a “time machine,” says Wolfe, transporting audiences to a period when these “simple country boys” weren’t yet altered by fame and age — a slightly more innocent and unsullied period before the “limited edition, collector-plate version” that came later. But the show’s popularity doesn’t just come down to Phillips’ progressivism or the “before they were famous” glimpse at its dramatized stars, played in this production by Jeff Rowden (Elvis), Michael Feldman (Johnny Cash), Matt McClure (Carl Perkins) and Henry McNulty (Jerry Lee Lewis). Some of it just comes down to a toe-tapping, pelvis-thrusting, rock ’n’ roll set list. “Oh, man, people aren’t going to know what hit ’em,” says Wolfe. “It’s such a fun show. It starts off like a steam train and just keeps going.” That’s why, he says, Million Dollar Quartet has some of the same outsider, trailblazing spirit as the figures it portrays. “It was written by a rock historian. It was music directed by a rockabilly musician from Nashville, not a guy who was part of the Broadway scene,” he says. “So, yeah, it does sort of step out of that jukebox tradition in a really special way. I think people come in for the hits and these characters, and they come away going, ‘Whoa, I didn’t know all this stuff.’” n

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AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 39


Food Triangle

An upcoming dinner unites a local farmer, chef and organizer in their goals to promote food solutions, and encourage more female participation in the farm-to-table movement BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

Chef Molly Patrick (left), rancher Beth Robinette (center) and food organizer Teri McKenzie join forces for an upcoming farm-to-table dinner. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

40 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017


T

he farmer, the chef and the organizer are and belonging — that sense that human beings three sides of the same triangle; each has are part of this planet, not in dominion over it,” a vital role to play in our food system, says Robinette. from production and distribution to prepara“We each have the power to influence the tion, education, communication and promotion. kind of world we want to live in,” she continues. This triangulation exemplified as the farm-to“Every time we buy food — and most of us make table movement (its origin is often credited to more financial transactions around food than just acclaimed California-based chef Alice Waters of about anything else — we are saying, ‘I want to Chez Panisse) emphasizes local, seasonal, organic pay into this kind of system.’” ingredients, and building relationships among It’s also a system, say the farm-to-table dinner restaurants, farmers and even the consumer. organizers, that remains male-dominated. “We see [farm-to-table meals] as a point of According to the USDA, 30 percent of entry to educating people about their food as American farmers are women (37 percent in much as giving them an awesome dining experiWashington), and they control 7 percent of U.S. ence,” explains Inland Northwest Food Network farmland, accounting for 3 percent of sales. founder and executive director Teri McKenzie. Regarding chefs, the Census Bureau indicates McKenzie founded the INWFN in 2014 to that men outnumber women nearly 5 to 1 in the help nurture and spread that vital connection profession and earn an average of $6,000 more between people, place, food and farms. per year. This month, the INWFN is collaborat“I was called ‘stupid girl’ for, like, six ing with Local Inland Northwest Cooperative months,” recalls Patrick of her early kitchen (LINC) Foods to commemorate Cheney-based experiences. Lazy R Ranch’s 80th anniversary with a farm-toShe’s not sure why there aren’t as many table dinner prepared by Molly Patrick, executive women chefs, because the necessary mindset and chef of the Blackbird Tavern + Kitchen. skill set has little to do with gender. The menu for the Aug. 13 event (open to 50 “You’re either built for it or you’re not,” diners) highlights beef-centric items like ribs, and Patrick says, noting that having gender-blind Patrick’s spin on barbacoa tacos, with fall-off-thementors helps. bone meat and spicy tomatillo sauce. Meat dishes In her Blackbird kitchen, she’s embraced are balanced by garden gatherings; both pickled diversity but ultimately wants the best person and charred corn, a sunflower kernel waffle, and for the job. Still, says Patrick, when that person cherry sorbet alongside Black Forest cake. happens to be female — and she’s known a few Farm-to-table, says Patrick, is about finding kick-ass women in the industry — a little part of and developing mutually beneficial, rock-solid her raises a fist in triumph. relationships with farmers and ranchers, and Robinette concurs: “To be a good farmer, communicating when each are impacted by such you need to have patience, you need to be able to factors as weather and crop losses. look at problems from a systems-level perspecIt also means “that you work tive, you need to love being many times harder in an already bruoutdoors, you need to be ENTRÉE tally difficult business to create food physically tough.” Get the scoop on local you’re proud of,” says Patrick, whose She doesn’t see gender as food news with our weekly experience includes C.I. Shenania factor. Robinette not only Entrée newsletter. Sign up gans, the former Ella’s Supper Club, appreciates mentors, she is at Inlander.com/newsletter. the Coeur d’Alene Casino Resort one. Her New Cowgirl Camp & Hotel, Eat Good restaurant and program, running Aug. 28 Wandering Table, before it became a brick-andthrough Sept. 1, will initially be geared only mortar restaurant. toward women, training them in basic ranching For Lazy R’s Beth Robinette, farm-to-table and farm ecology. events like the upcoming collaboration allow her From her vantage point as an organizer, says to showcase her family’s beef, as well as advocate McKenzie, who has a masters degree in nonprofit for change and promote holistic management, leadership, she sees more women than men at which has been practiced at the ranch for the INWFN events — cooking classes, discussion past two decades. groups, demonstrations. She’s seeing an increase When so many people live and work in in women in food industry roles, particularly in human-made environments, says Robinette, “the activism, which she says tends to be less powermost profound connection we have with our focused and more collaborative and solutionsplanet is through the food we eat. It’s the only oriented. ‘natural’ thing many people touch in a given So although the intent of the upcoming farmday,” she says. to-table dinner is to raise awareness about food, Robinette is also a co-founder of LINC it has — at least for this farmer, chef and orgaFoods, which connects food producers to potennizer — the added advantage of raising awareness tial purchasers such as stores, restaurants and about women’s growing role in America’s food educational institutions. system. “I really think that it’s important that we focus espite their varied connections to the on solutions, rather than just analyzing what’s production of food, McKenzie, Patrick wrong,” McKenzie summarizes. n and Robinette are united in their efforts food@inlander.com to promote health and wellness — of the earth, its inhabitants, and its food system — through the Lazy R Farm to Table Dinner • Sun, Aug. 13 food itself. from 4-8 pm • $75/person • Lazy R Ranch • “What I hope we’re doing at the Lazy R is 20811 W. Salnave Rd., Cheney • inwfoodnethelping connect people back to that sense of place work.org • 208-546-9366

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FOOD | BOOK

The Many Faces of Cider A newly released book explores hard cider tasting from historical and modern perspectives BY CARA STRICKLAND

I

t’s likely that you’ve noticed another beverage more frequently sharing draft lists and menus with your favorite craft beers and wines: hard cider. But though it might be newer to grocery shelves and some of our palates, it’s not new to America — in fact, it’s been around since our nation’s founding. “Cider is the drink that built the country,” says Erin James, Seattlebased editor-in-chief of CIDERCRAFT magazine and author of the new book Tasting Cider: The CIDERCRAFT Guide to the Distinctive Flavors of North American Hard Cider. Many of the Founding Fathers made and drank cider obsessively. James wrote the book with the same goals as those of CIDERCRAFT: “What we do at the magazine is try to share the stories of the people in the cider industry.

42 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

That’s everything from producers of the product, to stainless steel tank-producing companies.” As you might expect, there are cider tasting notes for a number of varieties of ciders (and perries, a cousin of cider made from pears), a short historical orientation, as well as recipes for cooking with cider and mixing it into cocktails, from chefs and bartenders all over the country. “We were just really trying to show all the sides of the apple,” says James. In Washington state, cider makes up 6 percent of the beer market (it’s at 3 percent for the rest of the country). That’s double what it was two years ago, with no signs of slowing down. This might make sense to us, since Washington is renowned for apple orchards, but Evergreen State residents might not be aware that cider apples are a whole different thing from those grown for culinary purposes. “They are called spitters, because they’re so bitter, so

sour, so acidic — you can’t chew them and swallow them down,” says James. Those new to cider might find some challenges to their assumptions about what it tastes like, which the book explores. “Cider doesn’t have to be sweet,” says James. “Taste is subjective — no one is going to force you to drink anything. If you’re looking for something drier, there are so many other options out there, and going to a cider bar or a bar with a good cider selection, if they have draft options, they are more often than not going to be dry. That’s a good way to learn what you like. The worst thing you can do is spit it out and pick something new. Cider is a really good counterpoint to food, too, if you want to try that route.” James is hopeful that her book provides a path for those just discovering cider, as well as those who already appreciate the beverage. “I don’t think people understand the simplicity that goes into it — the complexity that can come out of it,” she says, noting that at the elemental level, cider is just apples and yeast. “That’s something that I’m hoping that the book — as well as just the general growth of the beverage — can help people to wrap their brain around. It’s a basically made, historic beverage that’s made its first real comeback in 75 years. It’s pretty epic, and you, too, can be a part of it.” n food@inlander.com Find Tasting Cider ($19.95) at Auntie’s Bookstore, and explore some locally made hard ciders at Liberty Ciderworks in downtown Spokane, Twilight Cider Works in Green Bluff, One Tree Hard Cider in Spokane Valley and North Idaho Cider in Hayden.


FOOD | OPENING

A Northwest Original Former Coeur d’Alene Brewing founder T.W. Fisher celebrates 30 years of hometown pride and experience with his new pub BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

T

om Fisher goes by many monikers. He’s “TW,” or “TeeDub” to friends; he’s also a real estate broker, owner of Coeur d’Alene’s new Midtown Pub, and one of the original fathers of craft brewing in our region. In 1987, well before Laughing Dog Brewing’s start in Sandpoint, or any other North Idaho breweries, Fisher created T.W. Fisher’s Brewpub. The business housed Coeur d’Alene Brewing, which helped launch the brewing careers of people like Mark Irvin, the founder of Northern Lights Brewing Co., now known as No-Li Brewhouse. Just a year after opening, Coeur d’Alene Brewing’s T.W. Fisher’s Centennial Pale Ale won gold at the Great American Beer Festival. Fisher quickly expanded distribution well beyond Coeur d’Alene, to four additional states. And he’d created the place to go in downtown Coeur d’Alene, up until selling it in 2002. Although Fisher has built a successful real estate career over the years, he never abandoned the beer business. He held onto memorabilia — beer taps, serving trays, old signage — as well as his spot on the Idaho

liquor license waiting list for both Post Falls and Coeur d’Alene. In 2012, when the Post Falls license became available, he opened Club 41 in the former Paddy’s sports bar location, though he drew the ire of Coeur d’Alene Brewing’s new owners when he tried to call the place T.W. Fisher’s Club 41. Eventually Fisher sold Club 41, and Coeur d’Alene Brewing relocated to Spokane and became River City Brewing. Fisher also forgot about his Coeur d’Alene license application. Earlier this year — 30 years after he created T.W. Fisher’s Brewpub — Fisher discovered he was next up for a liquor license. He purchased a building at the corner of Fourth and Montana, formerly home to a commercial cleaner, florist, deli and a 1950s pharmacy. He painted the building bright red, added black awnings, removed five layers of flooring, getting down to the original wood, and added a custom, turn-of-the-century-style wooden bar. He transformed old T.W. Fisher’s signage into tabletops, lined a shelf along the ceiling with a portion of his collection of several hundred beer taps, and channeled a turn-of-the-century saloon feel to create Midtown Pub.

For the modest menu of appetizers, salads and sandwiches, Fisher consulted with chef CJ Fox-Lopp, whose experience includes Daft Badger Brewing, Tony’s on the Lake and the former Cellar in downtown Coeur d’Alene. Many dishes pay homage to Fisher’s longstanding friendships in the community, such as Michael D’s Pastrami sandwich, named for fellow restaurateur and Michael D’s owner Michael DePasquale ($11). Also try the Midtown Madness, a variation on nachos made from potato chips, roasted pastrami, blue cheese and mozzarella, roasted peppers and Cajun mushrooms ($10/$13). Have a spinach salad with red onion, goat cheese and walnuts ($8), or share the Parmesan and cream cheese crab dip on a baguette ($10). In his trademark Hawaiian shirt, the affable Fisher is already thinking about what’s next: Hanging plants, more outdoor seating, and helping to enhance the already popular midtown neighborhood. “No matter what I make, I spend a dollar more than I have,” jokes Fisher, who at 65 has no plans to retire. Born and raised in Coeur d’Alene, Fisher has been working since he was a teenager, starting with several former downtown businesses — J.C. Penney, Harvey’s Men’s & Ladies store, First National Bank — then moving on to the Hagadone Corporation as circulation manager for 14 years. Now, he jokingly refers to the Midtown Pub as his second office, happy to be working doubly hard at both it and his real estate ventures. “I always have to have something to do,” says Fisher. n food@inlander.com Midtown Pub • 826 N. Fourth St., Coeur d’Alene • Open Tue-Sun, 11 am-9 pm • facebook.com/teedubsmidtownpub • 208-765-3296

Tandoori Style Chicken Kabobs

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 43


Living in this doll’s house is a nightmare: The latest Annabelle movie is basically a series of increasingly tedious jump scares.

Voodoo Doll Annabelle: Creation is the latest horror franchise entry to rely more on cheap jump scares than atmosphere BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

A

nnabelle: Creation might be the first ever prequel to a a most dynamic performer, with a smirking expression prequel. The bulk of the film takes place 12 years that seems to vary in degrees of malevolence depending before the events of Annabelle (2014), which was on the angle from which it’s photographed. In Annabelle: itself a prelude to the goings-on in 2013’s The Conjuring, Creation, the doll is really working overtime, grinning sinand it fills a bunch of the gaps in the origin story of that isterly and moving on its own when no one’s looking and creepy porcelain doll. Finally, one of cinema’s greatest getting everybody killed. At one point, it’s tossed down mysteries has been put to bed. a well, only to pop up again in another location just moYou’ll recall (or maybe you won’t) that ments later. That’s commitment. anyone unfortunate enough to get their hands The story this time, for anyone who ANNABELLE: on Annabelle the doll falls upon particularly cares, is set in the mid-1950s and involves CREATION hard times. The poor woman in the last six young girls who are left homeless Rated R Annabelle movie was stabbed by a devil-worwhen their orphanage closes. Along with shipping cult member, menaced by an unseen Directed by David F. Sandberg the idealistic nun (Stephanie Sigman) presence in an elevator and nearly burned to Starring Anthony LaPaglia, looking after them, they’re invited to Miranda Otto, Stephanie Sigman stay in the sun-dappled country home of death in a house fire sparked by rogue Jiffy Pop, all in the span of 100 minutes. Because a kindly dollmaker (Anthony LaPaglia) each new installment in a horror franchise needs to amp and his ailing wife (Miranda Otto), who never leaves her up the intensity, the doll — or rather, the demonic force it room and wears a face mask that resembles one of her hosts — does even more terrorizing here, and the thing is husband’s wares. so unpleasant to look at that you start to wonder how no For such a seemingly nice man, LaPaglia sure does one tossed it into an incinerator long before it became a produce some awfully unsettling-looking dolls, one of conduit for unspeakable evil. which is the fabled Annabelle, named for his daughter In all of these films, the doll has proven itself to be who was struck and killed by a car so many years ago.

44 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

The dead girl’s room (as they always are in movies like this) is kept exactly as it was when she was alive, and it’s strictly off-limits. That doesn’t stop the most curious orphan (Talitha Bateman), in a leg brace because of polio, who finds everyone’s favorite devilish doll locked away in a closet plastered with pages from the Bible. Little good that did, because soon Annabelle is on the loose and wreaking havoc on the house’s young tenants. This is further compounded by the fact that this countryside property contains the kinds of hazards designed specifically to entrap children — the drafty dumbwaiter, the hidden room under the stairs, the corridor that appears to grow longer the darker it gets, doors that slam shut on their own, the aforementioned well. There’s also a glowering scarecrow that comes to life at the most inopportune time. Annabelle: Creation, like the earlier films in the Conjuring universe, looks quite good. This is only the second feature from director David F. Sandberg, whose debut was the low-budget ghost story Lights Out, and he has an eye for inventive visual compositions, allowing threats to sneakily introduce themselves in unexpected parts of the frame. And the house where much of the film is set has plenty of personality, as pastoral as a Norman Rockwell painting by day and a gloomy, gothic hellscape by night. But visuals can only get you so far, and once the film sets up its premise, it quickly settles into a familiar pattern. In one scene after another, a character hears a strange noise in another room and goes off to investigate, creeping oh-so-slowly toward it. The music swells to a deafening level on the soundtrack and then suddenly decrescendos into silence, which is precisely when — BAM! — something pops out from the shadows and everyone in the audience jumps. It reduces horror down to an almost Pavlovian exercise, and I found it tiresome. n


FILM | SHORTS

The Glass Castle

OPENING FILMS ANNABELLE: CREATION

Everyone’s favorite demonic doll is back to terrorize a new batch of characters, namely a group of young orphans and their kindly nun overseer. The only real nifty twist to this one: It’s a prequel to 2014’s Annabelle, which was itself a prequel to 2013’s The Conjuring. Although director David F. Sandberg (Lights Out) has a nice grasp on visuals, the film quickly devolves into a series of predictable jump scares. (NW) Rated R

THE GLASS CASTLE

A fictionalized adaptation of Jeannette Walls’ bestselling memoir exploring the dynamics of a family that’s unconventional in every sense of the word: Dad (Woody Harrelson) is an alcoholic who moves his brood around in order

to outrun his debts, and Mom (Naomi Watts) is an aspiring artist who shirks most of her maternal responsibilities. Walls is played as an adult by Brie Larson. Directed by Destin Daniel Cretton, who previously worked with Larson on the excellent 2013 drama Short Term 12. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE NUT JOB 2: NUTTY BY NATURE

Remember the first Nut Job movie, in which enterprising rodents foil a robbery? No? Well, it doesn’t matter, because now there’s a sequel with a subtitle referencing New Jersey’s most famous hip-hop trio. It’s another animated animal heist comedy, with Surly the Squirrel and friends thwarting their town’s crooked mayor from bulldozing their home to build an amusement park. (NW) Rated PG

NOW PLAYING ATOMIC BLONDE

At the Magic Lantern (NW) Rated R

BABY DRIVER

Inspired by the unlikely but true courtship of Kumail Nanjiani and Emily V. Gordon (who also wrote the script), this is the rare rom-com that’s both consistently funny and genuinely emotional. Nanjiani plays himself, a struggling stand-up who meets and falls in love with Emily (played by Zoe Kazan). There’s only one problem: He’s keeping their relationship a secret from his traditional Pakistani parents. This is further complicated when Emily is put into a medically induced coma. (SS) Rated R

This second action spectacle from former stuntman and John Wick director David Leitch is perhaps a bit too long and certainly too densely plotted for its own good, but it’s effortlessly cool, uber-stylish and set to a thumping soundtrack of great ’80s pop hits. Based on the graphic novel The Coldest City and set in 1989 Berlin, Charlize Theron kicks a whole lotta ass as MI6 agent (or is she?) Lorraine Broughton, on a mission to track down a list of double agents that could potentially blow her cover. (NW) Rated R The latest genre deconstruction from writer-director Edgar Wright stars Ansel Elgort as a for-hire getaway driver who scores all of his jobs to personal playlists. Just as he’s settling into a relationship with a charming waitress (Lily James), he’s pulled deeper into the criminal underworld, getting wrapped up in a plan that’s destined to self-destruct. The car chases are stellar , the soundtrack is fully loaded and its love story is deceptively sweet. (SS) Rated R

BEATRIZ AT DINNER

Salma Hayek stars as a poor masseuse invited to a wealthy dinner party out of kindness, only to find her ultra-liberal beliefs clashing with one of the guests, a boorish real estate magnate played by John Lithgow. Although well-acted and tightly paced, the film’s jabs at class disparity and racial intolerance are a bit mealy-mouthed, and the ending is frustrating in its moral ambiguity.

THE BIG SICK

THE DARK TOWER

Stephen King’s epic, multi-novel fantasy series hits the big screen after years in development hell, and the result is rushed, incoherent and lifeless. The interdimensional world of mythical gunslinger Roland Deschain (Idris Elba) and the evil Man in Black (Matthew McConaughey) was complex enough to span thousands of pages in King’s books, but all that mythology has been condensed down into 95 chaotic minutes. Those who haven’t read King’s books will be totally lost; fans will likely be disappointed at how the material has been treated. (NW) Rated PG-13

DESPICABLE ME 3

The hugely popular animated series continues unabated, and this time reformed bad guy Gru (voiced by Steve Carell) has just been kicked out of the ...continued on next page

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 45


FILM | SHORTS

NTERN THEAT GIC LA ER MA FRI, AUG 11TH - THU, AUG 17TH TICKETS: $9 LADY MACBETH (85 MIN)

FRI/SAT: 6:30 SUN: 1:00 WED/THU: 6:15

MAUDIE (110 MIN)

FRI-SUN: 4:15 WED/THU: 4:15

BEATRIZ AT DINNER (75 MIN) FRI-SUN: 2:45

LAST WEEKEND

NEITHER WOLF NOR DOG (108 MIN) FRI/SAT: 5:30 SUN: 1:45 WED/THU: 5:30

Great food, bad ads

THE HERO (93 MIN)

FRI-SUN: 3:45 WED/THU: 3:45 (509) 209-2383 • 25 W Main Ave MagicLanternOnMain.com • /MagicLanternOnMain

1931 W. Pacific Ave. 363-1973 • wedonthaveone.com

NOW PLAYING

Anti-Villain League. Enter his long-lost twin brother Dru, who convinces Gru to go back to his evil ways. (NW) Rated PG

DETROIT

The third collaboration between director Kathryn Bigelow and screenwriter Mark Boal (The Hurt Locker, Zero Dark Thirty) dramatizes a hellish evening in July 1967 when, during the riots of the Detroit Rebellion, a group of white police officers tortured and murdered three black men in a seedy motel room. At 143 minutes, it’s designed to make us feel the intensity and brutality of the situation, and despite some on-thenose storytelling beats, it’s a powerful, hard-to-watch and sadly relevant film. Detroit may be about a historical event, but we’re living the history right now. (SS) Rated R

DUNKIRK

Christopher Nolan’s WWII drama, painstakingly and authentically depicting the bloody Battle of Dunkirk, is a remarkable example of sheer filmmaking craft. The only thing it’s missing is a little humanity. Although the technical skill on display — from Hans Zimmer’s score to Hoyte Van Hoytema’s IMAX cinematography — is dazzling to behold, Nolan’s attempts to elicit any emotion from the audience feel strangely calculated because every character in the film is essentially a disposable pawn on a chessboard. (SS) Rated PG-13

THE EMOJI MOVIE

Sure, feature films have been predicated on concepts less substantial than that quirky emoticon alphabet your parents use way too much in texts, but does that mean this movie needed to be made? Dreamworks Animation offers up another family-friendly allegory about the importance of being yourself, this time with a “meh” emoji (voiced by T.J. Miller) discovering he has more than one emotion. (NW) Rated PG

GIRLS TRIP

A True Taste of the

Northwest

We Have Huckleberry Everything M-F 9-5:30pm Sat 10-4pm • 11806 E Sprague

509-927-8206 • simplynorthwest.com Simply the Best

46 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

The latest entry in the women-behaving-badly comedy subgenre assembles a quartet of likable actresses — Regina Hall, Queen Latifah, Jada Pinkett Smith and Tiffany Haddish — and takes them on a gleefully R-rated cross-country trip to New Orleans for the Essence Music Festival. “Crude and sexual content,” per the MPAA, abounds. (NW) Rated R

THE HERO

Sam Elliott plays a faded Western star who gets a grave health diagnosis just as he finds his career on an unexpected upswing. This Sundance-approved drama is pretty thin, but it just barely gets by on a stellar central performance from an old pro who doesn’t get nearly enough lead roles. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

AN INCONVENIENT SEQUEL: TRUTH TO POWER

Al Gore’s 2006 documentary An Inconvenient Truth was a wake-up call to

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

NEW YORK TIMES

VARIETY

METACRITIC.COM

(LOS ANGELES)

(OUT OF 100)

Dunkirk

94

The Big Sick

87

Detroit

82

Lady Macbeth

76

Atomic Blonde

63

Kidnap

45

The Dark Tower

35

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

anybody unaware of the dangerous implications of global warming. A decade later and we stupid humans haven’t learned our lesson, because the former Vice President is back in theaters to further explore the toll of climate change in an era when the leader of the free world believes it to be a hoax. (NW) Rated PG

KIDNAP

Halle Berry plays a divorced waitress who takes her son to the park one day, only to watch in horror as he’s nabbed by strangers and shoved into their car. She then morphs into an unstoppable action hero, engaging in an increasingly ludicrous high-speed pursuit. This cheap thriller has been languishing on the shelf for a few years, and although it’s not long enough to be tedious (it’s less than 80 minutes minus credits), it’s clumsily directed and full of frustrating lapses in logic. (NW) Rated R

LADY MACBETH

Not a Shakespeare adaptation but a loose interpretation of an 1865 Russian novella, which has been transplanted to 19th century rural England. Frances Pugh, a relative newcomer who’s completely transfixing here, plays a provincial young woman who’s forced into marriage with an older man and begins an affair with a servant when her husband is away. Considering the title, it doesn’t end well. Beautifully photographed and unflinchingly brutal, this is a steely portrait of a woman who’s perhaps a bit too determined to have her way. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

MAUDIE

The life of Canadian folk artist Maud Lewis, known for painting hundreds of colorful country scenes as her rheumatoid arthritis gradually worsened, is chronicled in this modest biopic. Sally Hawkins is great in the title role; less convincing is Ethan Hawke as her stern, weathered husband. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

NEITHER WOLF NOR DOG

A white writer is contacted by a 95-year-old Native American man wanting his life story documented before he dies, and he soon finds himself ferried about the Lakota reservation on a task he feels ill-equipped for. This sensitive indie comedy-drama, adapted

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

from a novel by Kent Nerburn, creates a trio of vivid characters and allows them to explore their cultural and generational differences without ever coming across as preachy or condescending. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING

After being mistreated in his last few movies, Peter Parker and his web-slinging alter ego finally get another feature worthy of the character’s long history. With fresh-faced Tom Holland donning Spidey’s spandex, the Spider-Man franchise feels more grounded and human than ever, with Peter’s high school drama taking just as much precedence as the large-scale superhero set pieces. (ES) Rated PG-13

VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS

Luc Besson’s latest space opera is daffy, exhausting, occasionally dazzling and frequently befuddling. Inspired by a French comic series about rakish intergalactic swashbucklers, this film is so overloaded with outlandish alien creatures and neon-colored space markets that Rihanna’s appearance as a shapeshifting stripper is one of its least bizarre occurrences. (NW) Rated PG-13

WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE APES

Who would have thought a reboot of Planet of the Apes would have spawned one of the best blockbuster franchises? This third installment is another sophisticated sci-fi epic, with super-intelligent primate Caesar (Andy Serkis) and his simian army taking on a human warlord (Woody Harrelson). It’s more focused on its nuanced characters than action, and it’s amazing how emotionally involved we get in the trials of CGI apes. (ES) Rated PG-13

WONDER WOMAN

On the heels of the lackluster Batman v. Superman and Suicide Squad, DC’s latest actually does justice to one of its longest-running and most beloved characters, and it turns out to be one of the better superhero origin films. Gal Gadot announces herself as a major new star, playing the Amazon princess and Lasso of Truth-brandishing warrior who saves the life of an American spy (Chris Pine) and finds herself on the front lines of the first World War. (MS) Rated PG-13 n


FILM | REVIEW

The Dark Tower has lots of ammunition but doesn’t hit any of its targets.

Cinematic Wasteland Stephen King’s magnum opus finally comes to the screen: The Dark Tower will likely confuse neophytes and disappoint fans BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

S

o there’s this tower at the center of our and now he’s come face to face with gunslinger universe, and it’s so tall that it seems to Roland Deschain (Idris Elba) and the Man in shoot up into the sky forever. It is, accordBlack (Matthew McConaughey), who he’s been ing to The Dark Tower’s opening text, the only seeing in his nightmares. The MiB wants to harthing protecting the human race from decimation ness Jake’s telepathic powers (his “shining,” if you by the forces of evil, though we’re also told that will); Roland serves as interim bodyguard. “the mind of a child can bring it down.” How Elba will never not be a magnetic screen powerful can it really be, anyway? presence, though he has nothing to work with And then there’s this gunslinger, who can here. McConaughey, meanwhile, is as oily and do amazing, physics-defying things with his sixlaconic as he’s ever been, vamping about in a shooter. He’s engaged in the neverhigh-thread-count shirt that’s alTHE ending pursuit of the devilish Man ways unbuttoned to his sternum. If DARK TOWER in Black, who wants to destroy the he’s ever supposed to be genuinely tower and therefore slaughter all of Rated PG-13 threatening, it doesn’t come across: Directed by Nikolaj Arcel humanity, so he kidnaps telepathic One of his more intimidating mochildren and straps them into these Starring Idris Elba, Matthew ments has him sneaking into Jake’s McConaughey, Tom Taylor bizarre torture chairs that will mom’s apartment to cook himself harness their brain power, which some chicken. shoots straight out of their heads like bottle It’s no secret that The Dark Tower has had a rockets on a bender. Why does he want to topple troubled production history. Both J.J. Abrams the tower? Well, because he’s the bad guy. Stop and Ron Howard (who’s still listed as a producasking so many questions. er) were set to direct the film at different points, That’s the sketchy setup for The Dark Tower, though the reins were eventually handed over inspired by Stephen King’s epic, cultishly adored to Danish filmmaker Nikolaj Arcel, who seems fantasy series, published over the course of two completely out of his depth here. Several of the decades, spanning more than 4,000 pages and movie’s biggest set pieces are so physically dark connecting the dots of a vast mythology within that it’s hard to see what’s going on, and they’re the prolific author’s body of work. This movie, often resolved so abruptly that you start to wonby comparison, runs a paltry hour and a half, der if a pugnacious editor took scissors to them which turns out to be something of a catch-22: out of sheer spite. There’s no way to adequately establish the ins I’m left wondering what possible audience and outs of such a massive universe in a mere this movie was made for. I can’t imagine acolytes 95 minutes, but I’m also glad that I didn’t have of the original series being anything less than to endure this movie for any longer than I had to. disappointed; as a huge King fan who’s only read It’s set both in contemporary New York City the first Dark Tower novel, I was totally perplexed and an alternate dimension known as Mid-World by what was going on. The characters’ mo(I don’t remember whether it’s actually referred tives are left unexplored. The dialogue consists to by name), which recalls old Westerns with its entirely of vague, allegorical nonsense. There’s shantytowns and craggy, desolate landscapes. no context to anything that happens (unless, Into this godforsaken place comes a troubled presumably, you’ve read the books). It’s paced Earth kid named Jake Chambers (Tom Taylor), so awkwardly that the entire thing feels like the who finds a portal into Mid-World inside an second act of a story that’s conspicuously missing abandoned house in Brooklyn. He’s been having its first and third, and it always seems to be in a visions of death and mayhem and scorched earth, rush to get absolutely nowhere. n

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 47


Troy Andrews, aka Trombone Shorty, brings a bit of the Big Easy to Spokane on Sunday night.

JAZZ

Bayou Badass Trombone Shorty is an ambassador of modern New Orleans with deep musical roots in the Big Easy BY DAN NAILEN

T

o see Trombone Shorty and his band Orleans Avenue in concert is akin to capturing the soul of New Orleans in one night-long burst of sound and energy. The trombonist/singer, born Troy Andrews, delivers the classic, horn-driven, Big Easy jazz he grew up on, but the 31-year-old performer also incorporates the funk, rock and hip-hop that are now as much a part of the “New Orleans sound” as the funeral-line dirges in his childhood neighborhood of Tremé. On his new album,

48 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

Parking Lot Symphony, Andrews manages to capture a lifetime of influences and all the undeniable chops that led to pop stars from across the spectrum — from the Red Hot Chili Peppers and Madonna to Foo Fighters and Macklemore — to come calling about collaborations or joint tours. On a flight to Japan to play the Fuji Rock Festival, Andrews answered some questions via email before returning to his U.S. tour, which includes a stop in Spokane on Sunday.

INLANDER: New Orleans’ music is so rich and full of great players. What was the first thing you remember inspiring you musically as a kid, beyond your parents? TROMBONE SHORTY: Probably my brother, James — he had me playing trombone by the time I was 4. My brother plays trumpet, he was a huge Louis Armstrong fan, and Louis always had a trombone player at his side. There was a shortage of trombone players in the family, so he really encouraged me on it. What sounds outside of New Orleans pulled you in new directions musically as you were growing up? Was there anything your hometown friends and family just didn’t understand about why you liked it? Not really, no. Growing up, for the most part, the music that I was exposed to was from New Orleans, and there’s so many different styles from different neighborhoods. My mom played Ray Charles, Stevie Wonder, Al Green, Marvin Gaye and that kind of thing. But most of my influences come from New Orleans. Even early Cash Money, Master P — I put that in with New Orleans music. A lot of the beats come from the second lines. It


wasn’t until I was older that I started to blend in things I learned from outside. I know the New Orleans scene is supportive among musicians, but how much does friendly competition inspire the players to up their game and practice? We would watch and learn from the established brass bands in the Treme — Rebirth [Brass Band] or Dirty Dozen [Brass Band] or Little Rascals, when they played at a jazz funeral or a party, or even just rehearsing. I’d stand on the side and watch what was going on, then I’d teach my band how to play all the different parts. Once the band saw us doing it, they’d pull us aside and tell us the right way and challenge us to learn it the right way. Then they’d go on tour and we thought maybe we could play against them when they came home, because we would see them challenging each other. But it was a positive environment with the older bands in the neighborhood helping us out and pushing us to be better. The first time I saw you, it was a show including your band, Allen Toussaint and Rebirth Brass Band. All of you were great, but the performances were all different, too. Who are some of the bands you’ve seen on stage — in New Orleans or elsewhere — that inspire you as a music fan and as a performer? Lenny Kravitz was a big one for me — seeing him commanding crowds, how he prepared, how he warmed up. Every detail from how he walked on stage, to the riffs that would catch the crowd, to the way he’d end the songs. Musically and personally he has been a big influence on me. You tour relentlessly, for years on end it seems. What drives you to stay on the road, and what do you miss most about home when you’re traveling the world? We go hard, but it’s due to people calling and wanting to hear our music — we’re grateful. As long as we can play, we’ll play, that’s what we say. A few years ago we were doing 200 nights a year, but we pick our spots more now. It’s still a sacrifice, to be away from home and family. That’s what I miss when I’m out on the road — my family, and the food. As soon as I come home, I head to my grandma’s for her red beans and rice. You collaborated with a wide range of artists on Parking Lot Symphony, from Aloe Blacc to Alex Ebert (Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros) to Kevin Griffin (Better Than Ezra). How do those team-ups come about for a guy as busy as you are? I’ve always been a fan of [Kevin’s] band, and I used to go by his studio in New Orleans, and when he and his bandmates decided to sell it, I actually bought it. This year, we’re playing his festival in Tennessee. And Alex moved to New Orleans a few years ago, but we’d bump into each other on the road, in L.A. or at festivals. Then he bought a studio, too! So I went over there and we wrote that song [“Where It At?”] there. I met Aloe at the NBA All-Star Game in New Orleans. So in those examples it’s still New Orleans bringing us together, plus our mutual respect, and from there it was just an organic process of working on the lyrics and melodies. What does joining Blue Note Records mean to you? It’s such a legendary home for blues and jazz. Was that part of the appeal for you joining the label? It’s an honor. I love the music they have been putting out, and of course they have that iconic catalog. It’s history; they’re in the Capitol Building in Hollywood. I am proud to be a part of that, and it was special to collaborate with [producer] Don Was to create my new album. Moving labels gave me time to sit back and plan out what I was going to do, and I think it came through on the album. n Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue with Ron Greene & GRE3NE • Sun, Aug. 13 at 7:30 pm • $40-$50 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • foxtheaterspokane.org • 624-1200

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

FESTIVAL GLEASON FEST

A

lthough he’s currently based in New Orleans, Spokane native and former NFL player Steve Gleason — diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease, in 2011 — is rightfully considered a local hero. Gleason has become one of the most vocal supporters of ALS sufferers since being sidelined by the disease, and his annual hometown music festival, Gleason Fest, has not only been dedicated to funding research, it’s brought a wide array of artists to town over the past six years. The big headliners this time include Grouplove (pictured), the electro-pop band best known for the earworm “Tongue Tied,” and the London Souls, a New York-based duo specializing in down-and-dirty, retro blues-rock. Local talent includes Lavoy, Hey! Is for Horses and the relatively new folk trio Sulphur Banks. If you can’t make the festival, worry not: You can still donate to the cause at gleasonfest.org. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Gleason Fest • Sat, Aug. 12 from 2-11 pm • $30 • Lilac Bowl in Riverfront Park • 507 N. Howard • gleasonfest.org

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

BLUEGRASS BLUE WATERS FESTIVAL

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Spare Parts Trio BABY BAR, The Blues, The Earwigs, Bruce Hormann BEEROCRACY, Open Mic J THE BIG DIPPER, Sol Seed, Jus Wright, DJ TEEJ BOLO’S, Blues Boogie BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Randy Campbell BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen J COEUR D’ALENE PARK, Full Metal Racket CORBY’S BAR, Open Mic and Karaoke CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Karrie O’Neill CRAVE, DJ Freaky Fred CRUISERS, Open Mic Jam Slam FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Kicho THE FLAME, State of Krisis, L3fty, Coaster, Nena Kapone J HAYDEN CITY PARK, Stagecoach West THE JACKSON ST., Kevin Dorin J J KNITTING FACTORY, Gojira, Pallbearer J J MEMORIAL FIELD, The Head and the Heart, Matt Hopper and the Roman Candles MICKDUFF’S BREWING COMPANY, Bright Moments Jazz MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Maya Goldblum NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), PJ Destiny THE OBSERVATORY, Vinyl Meltdown POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Devon Wade RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL, Open Mic THE RESERVE, Karaoke with DJ Dave RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler

50 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

I

t’s impossible to not have a good time at a bluegrass festival. That’s certainly true of the Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival, which brings an array of killer acoustic artists to the shores of Medical Lake every summer. This year’s has serious talent in store, including Rob Ickes and Trey Hensley and the Harmonic Tone Revealers (see bluewatersbluegrass.org for a full lineup), but the highlight just might be an homage to the Stanley Brothers (pictured). Each year the fest pays tribute to a bluegrass pioneer, and this year Jackstraw will act as house band as various musicians and festival director Kevin Brown explore Ralph and Carter Stanley’s influence through songs and anecdotes. The Stanley Brothers tribute is Saturday night, just one part of a weekend full of great music. — DAN NAILEN

Thursday, 08/10

Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival • Fri-Sun, Aug. 11-13 • $55 weekend pass/$25 Friday-only/$40 Saturday-only/$30 Sunday-only • Waterfront Park • 1300 S. Lefevre St., Medical Lake • bluewatersbluegrass.org

THE ROADHOUSE, Nick Vigarino ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 08/11

219 LOUNGE, Devon Wade Band BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BIG BARN BREWING CO., Prism Music J THE BIG DIPPER, Locust Grove, Nixon Rodeo, Helldorado, Vial 8, Sins & Sinners BIG SKY’S TAVERN, PJ Destiny BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Sterling BOLO’S, Haze CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Kicho J COLBERT TRADING CO., The Usual Suspects J CONKLING MARINA, Dan Conrad CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke CURLEY’S, Vern and the Volcanoes FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Ron Greene J J MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Rodrigo y Gabriela

THE HIVE, Beats Antique J HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, Randy Hansen Band IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Marty Perron and Doug Bond IRON HORSE BAR, Ryan Larsen Band THE JACKSON ST., Sidetrack KLINK’S ON THE LAKE, Nick Grow J KNITTING FACTORY, Too Broke to Rock feat. Ded LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil J J MEMORIAL FIELD, The Wailers, Iration MOOSE LOUNGE, Nightshift MULLIGAN’S, Just Plain Darin NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom J J NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Boz Scaggs, Michael McDonald THE OBSERVATORY, Breadbox, The Jack Mortensen Band, Nat Park and the Tunnels of Love

J PARK BENCH CAFE, Daniel Hall PATIT CREEK CELLARS, In Transit J THE PIN!, Demon Assassin, Kali Ranks, KL, Stephanie Adler RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROADHOUSE, Wiser Sin THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, DJ Afrodisiac SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT, Kyle Swaffard J SPOKANE ARENA, Jesus Culture, Lauren Daigle, Bethel Music, Chad Veach SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES, Honky Tonk A’ Go-Go J J WATERFRONT PARK, Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival (see above) ZOLA, Kalida

Saturday, 08/12 BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE, Jan Harrison Trio

J THE BARTLETT, Khun Narin (6 pm), Liza Anne and Windoe (9 pm) BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Stud BOLO’S, Haze CHECKERBOARD BAR, Rusted Hand CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Bob Sletner COLBERT TRADING CO., Will Nover J CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, Dan Conrad CRICKETS RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR, Ghost Mice, Bigger Than Mountains and guests CURLEY’S, Vern and the Volcanoes EICHARDT’S, John Firshi FLAME & CORK, Pamela Benton J J GARLAND DISTRICT, Garland Street Fair feat. Milonga, Dionysus and the Revelry, Mary Chavez and Pink Tango and more GARLAND PUB & GRILL, The Usual Suspects


THE HIVE, The New Mastersounds HOPPED UP BREWING CO., Rockslide J HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, The DooWah Riders IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Truck Mills IRON HORSE BAR, Ryan Larsen Band THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke w/James THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Buffalo Jones, Telepathic Station Nine LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Chuck Dunlop THE LOCAL DELI, Wyatt Wood J J MEMORIAL FIELD, George Thorogood and the Destroyers, The White Buffalo MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Mobius Riff MOOSE LOUNGE, Nightshift MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Rusty Jackson NASHVILLE NORTH, Jack Ingram, Jeremy McComb, Luke Jaxon NO-LI BREWHOUSE, Karen McCormick NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, DJ Patrick J THE PIN!, Trina POPEYE’S BAR, PJ Destiny POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Robby French PRIME TYME BAR & GRILL, Honky Tonk A’ Go-Go

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Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

J RATHDRUM, Kelly Hughes Band RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos J J RIVERFRONT PARK, Gleason Fest (see facing page) feat. Grouplove, The London Souls, Lavoy, Hey! Is for Horses, Sulphur Banks THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave J J WATERFRONT PARK, Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival ZOLA, Kalida

Sunday, 08/13

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Sammy Eubanks J J THE BARTLETT, The Holy Broke, And Yet, Winona Forever BIG BARN BREWING CO., Winona Forever CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), KOSH J CONKLING MARINA, Dan Conrad CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Brother Music CURLEY’S, Whiskey Rebellion DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church J EMERSON PARK, Buffalo Jones J J MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue (see page 48), GRE3NE HARVEST HOUSE, Sidetrack IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, AlgoRhythms LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam O’DOHERTY’S, Live Irish Music RIDLER PIANO BAR, Sunday Karaoke J J WATERFRONT PARK, Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival

MUSIC | VENUES

ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 08/14

J 1912 CENTER, Sass Brothers J J THE BARTLETT, Newman, The Dancing Plague of 1518, Walker J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 08/15

THE EMPEROR ROOM, T.A.S.T.Y with DJs Freaky Fred, Beauflexx GRANT COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, Grant County Fair feat. Jessie Leigh, Chad Bushnell, Rocklyn Road, Thief of Hearts, Lions Ambition and more (through Aug. 19) LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday MIK’S, DJ Brentano J THE PIN!, Lil No, Larry Budz POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE (SOUTH HILL), Nick Grow RED ROOM LOUNGE, Tuesday Takeover with Storme RIDLER PIANO BAR, Open Mic RIPPLES RIVERSIDE GRILL, Land of Voices SAPPHIRE LOUNGE, Sharon Daggett, Tom Pletscher, Chuck Sahagian UP NORTH DISTILLERY, Pat Coast ZOLA, Evan Denlinger

Wednesday, 08/16 J BABY BAR, The Plurals, Balonely, Indian Goat BARRISTER WINERY, Wyatt Wood BLACK DIAMOND, Kevin Dorin GENO’S, Open Mic with Host Travis Goulding IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Jeff Rowe LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LITTLE GARDEN CAFE, Nate Corning LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 J MCEUEN PARK, Ryan Larsen Band J PARKSIDE EVENT CENTER, Soul Proprietor J J THE PIN!, Le Yikes Surf Club, Random Noise, Rusted Hand, Fake News, Skunktopus POST FALLS BREWING, Devon Wade THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Live Piano RIVELLE’S RIVER GRILL, Jam Night: Truck Mills and guests THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave TIN ROOF, The 78s ZOLA, Whsk&Keys

Coming Up ...

J THE BIG DIPPER, River City Roots Band, Rootz Within, Icky Business, Brotha Nature, Aug. 18 J NORTHERN QUEST, Keith Urban, Devin Dawson, Aug. 18 THE OBSERVATORY, Archangels Thunderbird, Dapper Devils, Sulphur Banks, Aug. 18 J THE BARTLETT, Belt of Vapor, Old Kingdom, Dark White Light, Aug. 19 J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Zac Brown Band, Aug. 19 J THE BARTLETT, David Cook, Kathryn Dean, Aug. 20

INDIVIDUAL TICKETS ON SALE NOW

OPENING NIGHT ROMANCE

SAT, SEPT 9 8PM SUN, SEPT 10 3PM ECKART PREU, conductor JESSICA LEE, violin PETER STUMPF, cello

Brahms, Strauss and more

S UPER D IAMOND

RAMA KOLESNIKOW, Conductor RANDY CORDERO “SURREAL NEIL”, Vocals PM

SAT OCT 14 8

(509) 624-1200 • SpokaneSymphony.org

F A M I L Y

S E R I E S

THE UNDERWATER BUBBLE SHOW PM

FRI, OCT 13 7

GREAT FAMILY FUN (509) 624-1200 • FoxTheaterSpokane.org Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 DIAMS DEN • 412 W. Sprague • 934-3640 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE EMPEROR ROOM • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOTEL RL BY RED LION AT THE PARK • 303 W. North River Dr. • 326-8000 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208667-7314 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N. Market St. • 466-9918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RESERVE • 120 N. Wall • 598-8783 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 51


FILM BEER & BURGUNDY

If you’re in the Garland neighborhood for the street fair this weekend, consider sticking around in the evening to take in our latest Suds and Cinema event at the Garland Theater. The Inlander is screening two Will Ferrell favorites — 2004’s Anchorman: The Legend of Ron Burgundy at 7:30 pm, followed by 2008’s Step Brothers at 9:45 — which feature the Saturday Night Live alum at his most unapologetically goofy. Both films were hits when they were initially released, and they’ve maintained cult followings in the years since. Don’t be surprised if folks start shouting out their favorite lines. Not only will River City Brewing serve delicious beer in the lobby, but Brain Freeze Creamery is handing out free Ferrell-themed ice cream flavors. Leisure suits, drum kits and Billy Joel cover bands are highly encouraged. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Suds and Cinema: Anchorman and Step Brothers • Sat, Aug. 12 at 7:30 pm • All-ages • $6 • Garland Theater • 924 W. Garland • garlandtheater.com • 327-105

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52 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

FESTIVAL GET TO GARLAND

Celebrating its 15th year, the Garland Street Fair is one of the last local community festivals to enjoy in the Inland Northwest before summer fades away, as it quickly is doing despite the seemingly endless heat wave. With more than 125 booths, two stages of live music, the Garland Get Down Rod & Custom Show and dozens of local food and artisan vendors, the annual event brings together Spokane neighbors from near and far to enjoy all this quaint business district has to offer. With enough to see, hear and eat for hours, make a day of it and then join us to cap off the day with a cool evening inside the district’s crown jewel, the iconic Garland Theater, for a Suds and Cinema double feature (see left). — CHEY SCOTT Garland Street Fair • Sat, Aug. 12 from 10 am-7 pm • Free • Allages • Garland Business District • garlandstreetfair.com

MUSIC RETRO ROCK

While so many of his ’70s yacht-rock brethren have disappeared into the ether (or, more accurately, sailed off into the sunset), Michael McDonald managed to create a serious second act for his career after his early success as part of the Doobie Brothers and as a solo artist in the ’80s. I’ll fully admit his tune “Sweet Freedom” from the Billy Crystal action flick Running Scared is a guilty pleasure. While the ’90s were largely a lost decade for the smokysmooth-voiced frontman, his decision to do an album of Motown covers in 2003 led to a couple of Grammy nominations and a new explosion of popularity for the silver-haired crooner. Joining him for this show is Boz Scaggs, another singer/songwriter who cut his teeth with a popular ’70s act (Steve Miller Band) before lighting out for solo success with songs like “Lido Shuffle.” — DAN NAILEN Michael McDonald and Boz Scaggs • Fri, Aug. 11 at 7:30 pm • $45/$55/$75 • Northern Quest Resort and Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com • 481-2100


BENEFIT GAME ON!

Basketball coaches and star players from the Inland Northwest once again join up with community donors for the American Cancer Society’s annual Coaches vs. Cancer fundraiser. In past years, it’s taken on a swanky gala format, but this year’s event is a little more casual. With the tag line “It’s Game On Against Cancer! Let’s Shoot Out, Throw Out and Sink Cancer for Good!” the 2017 version is like a school field day for adults, with activities to challenge guests’ golf games, free-throw aims and football arms. For the less athletic crowd, there’s live entertainment, dancing and music from local classic-rock cover band the Cronkites. Coaches vs. Cancer has raised millions of dollars in Spokane over the years through ticket sales and auctions, which have included spa packages and jewelry. All proceeds from the event go toward helping local patients cover the cost of cancer treatment and to fund crucial cancer research. — FORREST HOLT Coaches vs. Cancer • Fri, Aug. 11 at 6 pm (5 pm for VIPs) • $95/person; $145/VIP; tables available • Arbor Crest Wine Cellars • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • cvcgameon.org

ARTS SUMMER IN SANDPOINT

If getting out of the big city heat is on your weekend to-do list, consider the short drive north to scenic Sandpoint, which also offers plenty to see and do this weekend, including the 45th annual Pend Oreille Arts Council’s arts and crafts fair lining the lawn of City Beach. With dozens of fine artists showing and selling their wares in all artistic media, the festival also features all the other usual suspects: food vendors, live music and entertainment and kids’ activities. For just $5, a youth art area offers a variety of hands-on projects for kids age 12 and under to get messy with. Remember to leave your pets at home — they’re not allowed on City Beach; it’s also just too hot. Head to the arts council’s website for a complete list of participating artists online at this summer arts highlight. — CHEY SCOTT POAC Arts & Crafts Fair • Sat, Aug. 12 and Sun, Aug. 13 from 9 am-4 pm • Free admission • Sandpoint City Beach • 58 Bridge St. • artsinsandpoint.org

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 53


W I SAW YOU

S S

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU BLONDE BIKER AT STATELINE I was already in the store, when you road in on your Harley. Black, of course, with a sunset and a guitar playing female skeleton....cool! You are blonde and wore a white tank top, buying a carton of Marlboro’s. I....didn’t have my glasses on and was holding up the line!! I also had a white tank top, from Cozumel! No Harley, though. Single? You had a quick smoke and were waiting on another biker chic....and then off you went. Let’s meet up??” AT SACRED HEART EMERGENCIE ON AUG2 W/2FRIENDS. I You with the Inlander in your hands red glasses on your head ...but the slides gotta go because you would look hot in a pair of stelletos red or black open back an open toe that is so sexy I really like your shape hope to one day to get the opportunity to spend time with you I’M NOT EMBARRASSED So we talked at Art on the Green @ NIC. Something happened that I’m assuming freaked you out but literally, (a little over exaggerated) besides rape and murder nothing shocks/ embarrasses/concerns me, I simply felt bad about the situation for you. It really was not a thing to me honestly so please shoot me a line at ed4998@gmail.com. I’d like to know more about the thing you do after work in the shade (I brought up the shade) laugh about this and at least be friends, you were really cool.

AT BOLOS ON ST. PATTYS Met you @ Bolos on St. Patricks day you said your friends from KAISER where you worked drug u out.. I was then taken but you sat with me all night long til I left so I wouldn’t be alone since my then bf was with friends. You bought a shot for me and I stole your marti gra beads. I believe your name was Sam but it was so loud im not sure. Im single now, want to continue the conversation?

CHEERS EMERGENCY ROOM ROUTINE Cheers to the staff and Sacred Heart Emergency! It is 95 degrees outside do you know where your brother, mother, aunt, cousin, sister, friend, co-workers are...? They are in the ER, some 40 odd of them in varying degrees of hurt, scared, desperate and in pain. One by one you triage, comfort and move through the stages of care every single one of them; that is the ones who don’t just up and leave after two hours. O.K. so at the four hour mark one does wonder what part of emergent the care actually is, but still, the ER staff manage to get everyone checked in and doctored eventually! Job well done under pressure! PARKING LOT SUPERHERO A giant cheers to Max for helping me with my truck at the South Hill T.J.’s a couple months ago. After a long day of work I stopped for groceries and my ride home was not cooperating one bit. You so kindly offered to help a stranger with your handy tools, cleaning my battery cables and getting me back to the potholes in no time at all. I offered up a thank you bottle of wine which you humbly refused. Thank you for being an awesome citizen and for helping a hard working girl in my time of need. You rule!

JEERS NOT WORTH IT To whoever it was who needed some quick cash and chose to accomplish it by stealing the wheels and tires off my son’s truck Friday night. You not only caused us a huge headache and a big chunk of change, you also stole a little more of my son’s faith in humanity, and you took it from a young man whose brother raised his hand in service to our country, and died in Afghanistan defending your rights and freedoms. The couple hundred bucks you

got were NOT worth it, and I hope you’ll think twice before you do it again. IMMIGRANTS You, you useless excuse for a human, the 2 young men in front of you were struggling with money and a language barrier, we eventually got that all sorted out and on their way, but you. You kept commenting on the transaction.

know you’re overwhelmed by the river and the trees, but do ya’ll think you could have some common sense? — Cyclist With a Bell for the Dumbells

why didn’t you just pass us when you had the chance to not be the ultimate bully and yell at us? Please remember that cyclists are people too.

DEAR CRABBY GEEZER ON THE BIKE Had to endure your foulness on River Avenue by CdA Lake. Instead of using the magical things on the front of your bike

LITTERBUGS Spokane has become a filthy mess. Litter is everywhere in this city. I am shocked driving around this city to see so much filth. I am also amazed at how so few

If you would NOT walk on the pavement barefooted, don’t expect your poor dog to!

“Learn to speak English, Damn Immigrants, go back where you came from. How. Dare. You. I did notice that you are as white as I am, and unless I miss my guess, there is not a drop of Native blood running through those biased veins. Therefore, NOT being First Nations, You, you racist idiot should keep your mouth shut and try to understand what these poor people have gone through to come to a country that embraces the different. My roots are immigrant, and I bet yours are as well.

called brake levers to stop and let a mother and a group of young kids cross from their car to the beach, you decided to shout out, “STUPID STUPID KIDS”. Humiliating them and their mother who bore your buffoonery in patient quietness. Try stopping next time. It’ll have less chance of raising your blood pressure which you probably need to watch. I hope you get that Strava PR you’re after you old lake crab. You’re bound to die alone with that sort of attitude toward your fellow humans.

POST FALLS FOUL MOUTH Granted it was almost 100 degrees out and you didn’t want to leave your mutt in the car, but why does it suddenly become the responsibility of the 7/11 to sort your dog? They had an obvious policy and apparently you didn’t like it due to the sudden barrage of filth from your mouth. Don’t hold others responsible for your ill planning and stupidity. Leave the dog in your air conditioned home. The public shouldn’t have to endure your dog or your mouth.

BICYCLE CLEAN-UP CREW Jeers to the person who just called me a “slob”, as I was cleaning up trash in an empty lot on Monroe. Just because I’m on a bike, in a bad part of town, doesn’t mean I’m part of the problem. If you don’t like seeing “the poors” clean up after you, when you toss trash out of your window... THEN STOP THROWING TRASH OUT OF YOUR WINDOW. Quit littering where people live; some of us take pride in our neighborhood. Your kind has thrown garbage at me, when I was cleaning up other people’s trash. STOP THAT.

CENTENNIAL TRAIL RUNS TWO WAYS FOR ALL... It’s simple really, figure the very wide trail like a two lane road. Stay to the right to allow faster walkers or riders pass. When you walk 4 a-breast or have your dog on a leash that spans the entire trail, or you don’t have your mutt on a leash at all, you’re creating a hazard for everyone else out there, including yourself. Don’t want to have a collision with you, and I

GREEN FORD EXPLORER Jeers to the green Ford Explorer driving through Kendall Yards at 5:40 am behind my husband and I as we commuted to work on our bikes. First of all, you don’t own the road since you’re in a vehicle. Secondly, we are legally able to take the lane, and ride two abreast. Also, you clearly didn’t care about traffic laws, so

LEAVE THEM AT HOME I was up in Coeur d’Alene on Sunday for Art on the Green and was sickened by the number of people who felt it necessary to bring their dogs. Walking up Sherman I had to stop and tell a lady that she was burning her dog’s feet. This poor dog was prancing around trying to get off the hot pavement while she looked at jewelry. Her response was “Oh I guess I don’t think about his feet”. UUUUGGGGGHHHHHHH get a clue people! If you would NOT walk on the pavement barefooted, don’t expect your poor dog to! I wanted to cry for the poor dogs I saw. It had to be pure torture for them :( If you want to go for a walk or run in 100 degree temps, go for it... but leave the dog at home! n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS R A B I D

54 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

E M O J I

A T F I R O H E C H E

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

people in Spokane take care of their yards. Their seems to be no city pride in Spokane any more. Very sad!

O N E A L

B A A L L A O S O H O O T R H E K W A N S V H S R I A B R S T A I U N S A I N D T P A T I E R G Y C S A R P S T E A T E A

B R I A N M D I E L L E S

A D E

M A D A M A B E W A N O C K I T E O S S N T S O O T I P O R I S T

A L E U T

A L O S T

M O R E I

S T O R E

E L S E T I E S N T A P A I D O N O B N T I E O W N S D O G E

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

YAPPY HOUR A happy hour to benefit the Spokane Humane Society, and to recognize its 120th anniversary year. Come for drinks and to see historical photos of the organization, and to hear its accomplishments and future plans. Aug. 10, 4:30-7:30 pm. Free admission. The McGinnity Room, 116 W. Pacific. spokanehumanesociety.org COACHES VS. CANCER This year’s event takes backyard games to a new level. Wear your game gear and bring your skills to test against local athletes and coaches. Aug. 11, 5:30-10 pm. Arbor Crest Winery, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. acsspokane.ejoinme.org/SpokaneGameOn 2BU YOUTH RANCH BARN DANCE Featuring a live band (Blue Water Strangers), boxed dinner, local beer, and a live auction. All proceeds benefit the nonprofit serving at-risk youth. Aug. 12, 5-8 pm. $20. 2BU Youth Ranch, 17412 E. Foothills Rd. 2buyouthranch.org (922-1981) TEAM PARKINSON’S WALK SPOKANE The 2nd annual local event offers a family-oriented walking course, and helps to raise awareness, build community and raise funds for Parkinson’s care and research. Aug. 19, 8:30-10:30 am. Free. Touchmark South Hill, 2929 S. Waterford Dr. teamparkinsons.org

COMEDY

2.0PEN MIC Local comedy night hosted by Ken McComb. Thursdays, from

8-10 pm. Free. The District Bar, 916 W. First Ave. (244-3279) GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open mic comedy night hosted by Casey Strain; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (847-1234) PIFF THE MAGIC DRAGON With more than 40 million YouTube hits, Piff has performed to hundreds of thousands of fans all over the world, and was a breakout start of “America’s Got Talent” season 10. Aug. 10-11 at 7:30 pm and Aug. 11-12 at 10 pm. $15-$30. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com EXPEDITION A game-based show with a few BDT twists and turns thrown in for laughs. Fridays at 8 pm, July 7-Aug. 11. For all ages. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland (747-7045) STAND-UP COMEDY Live comedy featuring established and up-and-coming local comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. No cover. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. (838-6688) DRINK N’ DEBATE A politically​incorrect comedy competition created by SpoKomedy. Teams of funny folks from around the region get pitchers of beer and then debate topics from the historical to hysterical. Aug. 13, 8 pm. $5/$12. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998) THE SOCIAL HOUR COMEDY SHOWCASE Featuring comics from the Northwest and beyond, and hosted by Deece Casillas. Sundays, from 8-9:30 pm. Free. The Ridler Piano Bar, 718 W. Riverside Ave. socialhourpod.com (822-7938)

YOU cordially

ARE

INVITED

You are cordially invited to the 13th Annual

Cobra Polo Classic WHERE: Spokane Polo Club

WHEN: September 10th, Noon – 4 pm

TICKET INFORMATION

CONTACT

• $200 per person/$400 per couple

Ami Kunz-Pfeiffer 509-624-0500 amik@rmhcspokane.org

• $2,000 per table • Sponsored table for 10 guests are available for $3,000, which includes signage & program recognition.

For more details, visit www.rmhcinlandnw.org/events

Inland Northwest

Three days of world class bluegrass! Rob Ickes & Trey Hensley * Lonely Heartstring Band Reischman, Nygaard & Gilchrist * Stanley Brothers Tribute Jackstraw * Kaia Kater * Fireball Mail * Panhandle Polecats Jenny Anne & Caleb Mannan and Bust it Like a Mule River City Ramblers * Brett & Janet Dodd

The water is blue. The grass is too. August 11-13, 2017

Waterfront Park at Medical Lake

BluewaterBluegrassFestival_Bluewater_080317_10H_KG.pdf

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 55


Will the pot debate move to D.C.?

At Last? A pair of proposed bills aim to end national cannabis prohibition BY MIKE BOOKEY

T

he Trump Administration’s Justice Department has made it clear that they are no fans of marijuana, and Attorney General Jeff Sessions has indicated that the Justice Department may go after states that have legalized either recreational or medical cannabis use. With this threat looming, two lawmakers introduced legislation in the past two weeks to prevent a step backward in federal cannabis policy. One of those bills originated here in our state from the desk of Rep. Suzan DelBene, a Democrat who represents the north Puget Sound region. DelBene’s State Marijuana And Regulatory Tolerance (SMART) Enforcement Act would protect from federal prosecution those users and businesses in states that have legalized medical or recreational marijuana. The bill would also aim to make it easier for banks to work with cannabis businesses in these states, most of which have to operate strictly with cash. “As states move forward with legalization, it is foolish to keep businesses, communities and lives at risk by making them targets of criminals. I don’t believe people in these states should have to live in fear of the actions of the U.S. Attorney General and Department of Justice,” DelBene said in a statement she released after introducing the bill.

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56 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

Another bill, this one introduced in the U.S. Senate by Sen. Cory Booker (D-New Jersey), goes a step further and calls for the removal of marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act, the law that makes certain drugs illegal at the federal level. Booker — who has been mentioned as a possible presidential contender in 2020 — told reporters that the new law would also expunge marijuana-related offenses from criminal records, and lead to resentencing for those currently incarcerated. “Apply the rule of law equally. Marijuana has been a tool with which we have undermined the economic well-being of millions of Americans, and it’s about time it stops,” Booker told reporters at a press conference in New Jersey. Booker has said that he is introducing the bill largely because marijuana prohibition has resulted in the needless incarceration of too many Americans, a disproportionate number of whom are people of color. “For decades, the failed War on Drugs has locked up millions of nonviolent drug offenders — especially for marijuana-related offenses — at an incredible cost of lost human potential, torn-apart families and communities, and taxpayer dollars,” Booker posted on Facebook upon announcing the bill. n

Ivey

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our Specials BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a fiveyear sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

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EVENTS | CALENDAR

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COMEDY OPEN MIC Five minutes for anyone who knows at least one joke. No two drink minimum, but with dollar beers, who cares? Monday nights; signups at 8:30 pm, mic starts at 9. Ages 21+. Free. Garland Drinkery, 828 W. Garland. facebook.com/drinkerynation/ MONDAY NIGHT COMEDY Hosted by Jared Chastain, with local acts followed by open mic. Mondays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Etsi Bravo, 215 E. Main, Pullman. etsibravo.com (715-1037) OPEN MIC A free open mic night every Wednesday, starting at 8 pm. Doors open at 7 pm. Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (509-318-9998)

COMMUNITY

BONNER COUNTY FAIR The traditional community fair features a rodeo, ag expos, food, entertainment and more. Aug. 8-12. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Rd. bonnercountyfair. com/events (208-263-8414) THE MAGIC OF HARRY POTTER’S WORLD: An exhibition exploring Harry Potter’s world, its roots in Renaissance science, and the ethical questions that affected not only the wizards of Harry Potter, but also the historical thinkers featured in the series. Through Aug. 12; open Mon-Thu 10 am-9 pm; Fri-Sat 10 am-6 pm, Sun 1-5 pm. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. (893-8400) HERITAGE GARDENS TOURS A guided tour of the gardens, restored in 2007 to look as they did when in use in 1915. Upcoming tours: Aug. 10 (2 pm), 13 (11 am), 17 (2 pm) and 31 (5:30 pm). Free. Moore-Turner Heritage Gardens, 507 W. Seventh. heritagegardens.org PJALS POSTCARD HAPPY HOUR An opportunity for the public to communicate a short message to Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers and Senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell. Post cards will then be delivered to these elected officials. Second Thursday of the month, 4:30-6:30 pm. Saranac Commons, 19 W. Main. (838-7870) PRINCESS PARTY Ariel, Moana, Belle, Snow White, and Rapunzel, who making a special visit to the gardens to sing, dance, and meet their fans. Aug. 10, 4-7 pm. $5/child. Ritter’s Garden & Gift, 10120 N. Division St. 4ritter.com/home MAGICAL TRIVIA NIGHT Fans of Harry Potter and Fantastic Beasts, this grownup themed party is for you! During an adults-only trivia night, celebrate all things magical with Butterbeer brewing, crafts, and Potter trivia. Ages 18+. Aug. 11, 6-8 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. (893-8400) SWIM & A MOVIE: FINDING DORY Enjoy a screening of the new animated film, at 8:15 pm, preceded by an evening swim session at the pool. Aug. 11, 5:30-8 pm. Free. Valley Mission Pool, 11123 E. Mission Ave. (688-0300) PEND OREILLE EXCURSION TRAIN RIDES The North Pend Oreille Valley Lions Club continues operating its weekend excursion rides, but due to track safety issues, the rides now depart from Newport to take riders on a scenic, 24mile ride along the Pend Oreille River to Dalkena, Wash. and back. 2017 summer rides offered Aug. 13-14 at noon and 3 pm, and Aug 26-27 at 11 am, 1 and 3 pm. $15-$20. sporttrainrides.com/tickets SAVING OUR FUTURE: THE “KIDS VS. GOVERNMENT” LAWSUIT Come meet 3 of the 21 youth involved in Kids

vs. Gov’t, the “trial of the millennium.” Plaintiffs Aji Piper, Adonis Williams, and Gabe Mandell share their stores in music and words and discuss lawsuits on ensuring a sustainable, livable environment for themselves and future generations. Aug. 12, 12-1:30 pm. Free. Gardenia Center, 400 Church St, Sandpoint. (208-627-9084) USS CRUSADER 20TH ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION The local Star Trek fan club celebrates its 20th anniversary with a presentation by Hal Donahue, who appeared on “Star Trek: The Next Generation,” and Dr. Kevin Decker, author and EWU professor with a passion for psychology and science fiction. Also includes buffet lunch, silent auction, games and more. Aug. 12, 12-5 pm. $30. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. bit.ly/2uvnyDx SPOKANE PARKS FREE SWIM DAYS Kids can access city pools for free, thanks to underwriting by Spokane Parks Foundation, Spokane Firefighters Union 29 and the Central Lion’s Club. Aug. 14 (Comstock), 15 (Liberty), 16 (Hillyard), 17 (Witter), 18 (Cannon) and 19 (Shadle) during regular public swim hours. spokaneparks.org ECLIPSE READINESS 101 A program covering what an eclipse is, and what we can expect in our area, along with important safety considerations, and the construction of a pinhole projector for viewing the eclipse. Aug. 15, 10 am-noon. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org SENATOR CANTWELL TOWN HALL Senator Maria Cantwell will hear directly from constituents about policies affecting them and answer their questions. Pre-registration at link required In the Cataldo Hall Globe Room. Aug. 15, 6-7:30 pm. Free. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone. bit.ly/2wEx4lN

FESTIVAL

SPOCON 2017 The locally-organized sci-fi and fantasy convention hosts authors, artists, cosplayers and other entertainers. Aug. 11-13. $30/$100. Doubletree Hotel, 322 N. Spokane Falls Ct. (499-9886) GARLAND STREET FAIR The annual community festival features live music, a car show, art and food vendors, kids activities, shopping and more along West Garland Ave. in the heart of the business district, which is closed to auto traffic. Aug. 12, 10 am-7 pm. Free. garlandstreetfair.com GOODGUYS ROD & CUSTOM SHOW The annual show features more than 1,500 hot rods, customs, classics, muscle cars and trucks through 1972. Other events include a dragster exhibition, pedal car show, swap meet, live music, arts and craft vendors and more. Aug. 18-20. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. good-guys.com

FILM

GARLAND SUMMER MOVIES: SING A mouse, a timid elephant, a pig, a gorilla and a punk-rock porcupine compete in a vocal competition planned as the saving grace of a failing community theater. Aug. 7-11, at 9:30 am. Free. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. (327-1050) PARIS CAN WAIT When her husband is occupied with work in Paris, an American woman takes a jaunt with his business associate. Aug. 10-13, times vary.

$3-$6. Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) MOVIES IN THE PARK: FINDING DORY A screening of the new animated film, with pre-movie activities for kids an hour before show time at dusk. Aug. 11. Free. Valley Mission Park, 11123 E. Mission Ave. (688-0300) SUMMER MOONLIGHT MOVIES: SING A screening as part of the City of Airway Heights’ annual summer outdoor movie series. Aug. 11, 9 pm. Free. Sunset Park, S. King St. cahw.org CDA FREE MOVIES IN THE PARK Free family-friendly movies are screened at dusk on Aug. 12 and 19. Coeur d’Alene City Park, 415 W. Mullan Rd. cdaid.org MUNE: GUARDIAN OF THE MOON An immerse story of wonder, magic and beauty in a fantastical animated adventure from the producers of “The Little Prince.” Aug. 12, 12:55 pm. $25. Regal Cinemas, 4750 N. Division. (482-0209) ROGUE ONE A family movie night on the lawn of the park; movie starts at dusk. Aug. 12. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. (755-6726) FANTASTIC BEASTS & WHERE TO FIND THEM Films start at dusk, with a short pre-show fundraiser to help raise donations for local charities. Aug. 12. Free. The Shop, 924 S. Perry. (534-1647) SUDS & CINEMA: ANCHORMAN + STEP BROTHERS A double feature of two comedy classics starring Will Ferrell, with free movie-themed ice cream, beer, prizes, trivia and more. Doors open at 6:30 pm; with Anchorman at 7:30 and Step Brothers around 9:45. Aug. 12, 6:30 pm. $5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. bit.ly/2tCXToA FROM THE ASHES: SCREENING + PANEL DISCUSSION The Sierra Club and 350 Spokane present a showing of the documentary film with a panel discussion to follow. Aug. 15, 7 pm. Free. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main Ave. bit.ly/2u1fmMA (509-209-2383) SUMMER CAMP: THE FAST & THE FURIOUS (ORIGINAL) A screening of the film as part of the Garland’s 2017 summer film series. Aug. 15, 7 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. garlandtheater.com (327-1050) FROM THE ASHES A screening of the Nat Geo documentary on the complexities of the coal industry. Aug. 16, 7-9 pm. $5. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden. idahoconservation.org

FOOD

VINO WINE TASTING On Friday, Aug. 11, 3-6:30 pm, the winery features selections from Eric Solomon, and on Sat, Aug. 12, 2-4:30 pm, the winery hosts its Chardonnay fest. $10/tasting. Vino!, 222 S. Washington. (838-1229) ALES FOR THE TRAIL The annual local beer festival features live music, food vendors and more, with proceeds supporting the North Idaho Centennial Trail Foundation. Aug. 12, 2-8 pm. $30. McEuen Park, 420 E. Front St. alesforthetrail.org (208-769-2252) OPEN HOUSE GRAND OPENING The new catering and culinary teaching kitchen, specializing in kids classes, hosts a grand opening with tours, staff meet-and-greets, food, drinks and more. Aug. 12, 5-8 pm. Free. Modernist Cooks & Catering, 1014 N. Pines Rd., Ste. 120. modernistcooks.com (789-0428)

AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 59


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess ONE WOMAN’S TRASH

AMY ALKON

A guy my girlfriend dated seven years ago is now an aspiring artist, and he gave my girlfriend one of his paintings. It’s abstract, splashy, and horrible. I find it disrespectful of him to give it to her (because she’s in a relationship). She said he does lots of paintings, sells almost none, and gives them as gifts to all of his friends. I asked her to throw it away, but she said that would be “too mean” and shoved it under the bed. Am I being overly jealous, or is it wrong to accept gifts from exes? —Chafed

Art — especially abstract art — says different things to different people. To you, the painting screams, “Ha-ha, I had sex with your girlfriend!” To everyone else, it’s probably an expression of a moment — the one that came seconds after “Outta the way! I had some bad clams!” It makes sense that a gift from a guy to your girlfriend would set off your internal alarms. Consider, as evolutionary behavioral scientist Gad Saad points out, that one sex — the male one — woos (as in, tries to get the other into bed) with gifts. When a guy arrives to pick a woman up, she doesn’t open the door with “Surprise, bro! Got you these roses! Take off your pants!” As I somewhat frequently explain, this difference comes out of how sex can cost women big-time in a way it doesn’t cost men — with pregnancy and the 18-year afterparty. So, women evolved to go for men who are willing and able to invest in any little, uh, nipple nibblers they give birth to, and gift-giving can be a signal of that. Your being upset over the painting could be a subconscious reaction to this. But considering that this guy is handing out paintings like they’re “We Buy Gold!” leaflets, this gift to your girlfriend is probably a sign of a few things: He paints badly (though prolifically) and lacks storage space. In general, as for whether it’s okay to accept gifts from exes, context counts. Did the two people break up just yesterday or a decade ago? Are there still feelings bubbling up? Was the ex’s gift, say, a tire jack or a diamond-encrusted thong? Because this was just an ugly painting given to your girlfriend by a friend (long stripped of benefits), she did the kind thing and accepted it. So maybe just appreciate that her willingness to shove it under the bed relieves you of the need to suggest an even better location: a la “Can I offer you a steak — mesquite-grilled with just a hint of carcinogenic paint fumes?”

WIFE IN THE FAST LANE

I’m a 31-year-old woman, and I’ve been dating my boyfriend for 10 months. I was hoping to get married eventually. Well, my friend goes to this famous “relationship coach” who says that if a guy doesn’t ask you to marry him within the first year, he never will. Is that true? It’s making me feel anxious and worried that I’m wasting my time. —Two More Months? It’s comforting to believe that somebody has the magical knowledge that can get us to happily ever after. That’s why there was a movie called “The Wizard of Oz” and not “The Dishwasher Repairman of Oz.” In fact, we crave certainty and get freaked out by uncertainty. Psychologically, a guarantee of something bad happening is way more comfortable for us than the mere possibility that it could. This sounds a little nuts, but it makes evolutionary sense, because uncertainty leaves us on constant alert, which is both psychologically and physiologically draining. When research subjects are given a choice — get an electric shock for sure right then and there or possibly get surprised with a shock later — they overwhelmingly opt for the certain zapping in the present. And neuroscientist Archy de Berker found that people experienced greater physical stress responses (sweating and enlarged pupils) when a shock came unpredictably than when they knew it was coming. This is why it can be tempting to buy into an “expert’s” doom-and-gloom timetable — despite countless examples disproving their “Marry before the year’s out or spinsterville forever!” pronouncement. And consider something else: University of Pisa psychiatrist Donatella Marazziti finds that people in love are basically hormonally inebriated for a year or two. Also, it’s typically adversity — which tends to be in short supply during a year of romantic picnics and spa vacations — that shows what two people are made of and how well they, as a couple, weather life’s kicks in the teeth. You know…like after you encourage your partner to be true to that inner voice — and he listens: “Thanks to you, honey, I’m quitting my soul-killing six-figure job to become a professional pogo stick artist.” n ©2017, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

60 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

EVENTS | CALENDAR TASTE OF RATHDRUM An annual barbecue competition with a beer garden, vendors, activities, hot dog eating contest, car show and live music. In Majestic Park, 5400 W. Majestic Ave. Aug. 12, 12-9 pm. Free. (208-687-2399) FARM TO TABLE DINNER Chef Molly Patrick of Blackbird prepares a multicourse dinner featuring ingredients from host site Lazy R Ranch and other regional providers, including wine from Maryhill Winery. Guests also enjoy a farm tour before dinner. At 20811 W. Salnave Rd., Cheney. Aug. 13, 3:30 pm. $80. inwfoodnetwork.org INSTANT POT COOKING CLASS Learn basic techniques to help you feel more comfortable executing any “Instant Pot” recipe. Aug. 15, 5:30-7 pm. $30. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. secondharvestkitchen.org 1950S-STYLE ICE CREAM SOCIAL Enjoy a sampling of ice cream sundaes, root beer floats and other dairy and non-dairy ice cream treats with your friendly Natural Grocers “soda shop” cool cats. Aug. 17, 4-6 pm. Natural Grocers, 4603 N. Division. (489-9900) ACID TRIP Firestone Walker Barrelworks Barrelmeister Jeffers Richardson presents an educational tasting focusing on acidity in sour beers. Attendees get to taste four different sours. Call to reserve a spot. Aug. 17, 6-8 pm. $25/ person. The Blackbird Tavern + Kitchen, 905 N. Washington. bit.ly/2vC4pRw SANGRIA GRILL Enjoy making taqueria-style tacos and the ultimate homemade Sangria. Ages 21+. Aug. 17, 6-8 pm. $59. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy, 1810 N. Greene St. spokaneparks.org (533-8141)

MUSIC

FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT The 35th year of the concert series features headliners including Pink Martini, Jake Oen, The Head and the Heart, Iration, The Wailers, George Thorogood and the Destroyers with White Buffalo and the Spokane Symphony. Aug. 3-13. $6-$84/ concert. Memorial Field, 801 Ontario Street. festivalatsandpoint.com FIDDLE VIRTUOSO MARTINE KRAFT The Hardanger fiddle player from Norway performs for a special benefit concert with internationally-acclaimed singers, songwriters and musicians Martine and Nils Kraft for a night of intercultural musical collaboration. Aug. 10, 7-9 pm. $10. Salish School of Spokane, 4125 N. Maple. (218-1929) MUSIC UNDER THE OAKS FEAT. MUSHA MARIMBA The Bemiss Neighborhood Council’s second annual community summer concert series. Aug. 11, 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. Hays Park, Crestline and Providence. WALLACE ACCORDION JUBILEE Accordion players convene in the North Idaho town for three days of jamming, parades and concerts. Aug. 11-13. wallaceidahochamber.com

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

KIDS’ OFF-ROAD TRIATHLON A first triathlon for grades K-7, featuring a lap swim in the outdoor pool, a mile bike ride and a .75 trail run. Aug. 10, 5:30-7:30 pm. $25-$30. Camp Dart-Lo, 14000 N. Dartford Dr. campfireinc.org

SUMMER WORKOUT SERIES Get fit with four nights of activity each week through August. All activities kick-off at 7:15 pm and last between 45 and 60 minutes. Free. Spokane Tribal Gathering Place, 347 N Post. bit.ly/2veZ2Vk ARENACROSS Riders of all ages compete in various categories. Aug. 11-12. $10-$15. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Gov’t Way. northidahofair.com PROVING GROUNDS A mixed martial arts event featuring local athletes, organized by Warrior Camp MMA. Events on July 14, Aug. 11 and Sept. 8; doors at 6:30, fights at 7 pm. Aug. 11 and Sep. 8. $20-$30. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. hubsportscenter.org DOWNHILL ENDURO JAM Participants can race on three lift-accessible courses, which all finish in the Schweitzer Village. Courses are open all day, and riders can go as many times as they like to get their best time. Aug. 12-13. $20$30. Schweitzer Mountain, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer.com SILVER VALLEY SHOWDOWN The annual mountain top amateur boxing event featuring teams from Idaho, Montana, Utah, Washington, and Canada. Aug. 12. Silver Mountain Ski Resort, 610 Bunker. silvermt.com YOUTH LUNCH WITH MARK RYPIEN Kids can enjoy lunch with the NFL quarterback and Super Bowl MVP, with all proceeds supporting the Rypien Foundation. Events at 10:30 am and 12:30 pm. Aug. 13. $30. Harvest House, 9919 E. Greenbluff Rd. becksharvesthouse. com/rypienlunch (238-6970) MT. SPOKANE 20TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY In 1997, community volunteers joined to incorporate the ski area as a nonprofit organization. This pre-season event includes prizes, swag, beer and food specials. Aug. 16, 5-8 pm. Free. David’s Pizza, 803 N. Post. (483-7460) SPOKANE INDIANS VS. VANCOUVER Four game home series; Aug. 16-19 at 6:30 pm. $5-$20. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana. spokaneindiansbaseball.com

THEATER

FROM WALLACE WITH LOVE Can Secret Agent Quintuple-O-Seven thwart the deplorable penny-counterfeiting plot of the boisterous Blohard Copperfinger? Aug. 2-27; Wed-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Sixth Street Theater, 212 Sixth St. sixthstreetmelodrama.com MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET A musical recapturing of the famous recording session between Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins. Aug 10-27; Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $27-$49. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasummertheatre.com PLUNDER & MURDER A pirate-themed murder mystery performance, by CdA Murder Mystery Theatre. Aug. 11 and 18, at 7 pm. $40. Coeur d’Alene Cellars, 3890 N. Schreiber Way. cdamurdermysterytheatre.com (208-664-2336) ALL SHOOK UP A performance of the rockin’ Broadway musical comedy inspired by and featuring songs of Elvis Presley. Aug. 17-27, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 1:30 pm. Also Sat, Aug. 19 at 1:30 pm and Wed, Aug. 23 at 7:30 pm. $12$20. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N. Grand Ave. rtoptheatre.org GARRISON KEILLOR’S PRAIRIE HOME “LOVE AND COMEDY” TOUR A twoplus hours performance of stories, love duets, Guy Noir, Cowboys, poetic

outbursts, and the famous Singing Intermission at which the Eager & AbleBodied stand and sing around the campfire. Aug. 18, 7:30 pm. $50-$85. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200)

VISUAL ARTS

DAN MCCAW & SONS Lauded by Southwest Art as one of America’s most respected contemporary impressionists, McCaw has traversed a multidimensional journey as a professional artist. This show features his work along with his two sons John and Danny, who work together as a family of artists in their Torrance, Calif. studio. Aug. 11-Sept. 2; gallery open Sun-Tues, 9 am-6 pm; Wed-Sat 9 am-7 pm. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman. theartspiritgallery.com SANDPOINT ARTIST’ STUDIO TOUR Tour the working studios of local painters, sculptors, jewelers, potters, glass artists and more. Aug. 11-13 and Aug. 1820, from 10 am-4 pm. Free. Sandpoint, n/a. arttourdrive.org (208-263-2161) INK! PRINT RALLY The art center’s print fest features a steamroller to print oversized wooden panels, along with the opportunity to learn about printmaking processes from Millwood Print Works and Typebee Printshop. Also includes live music, a beer garden and artists making prints on the spot. Aug. 12, 11 am-4 pm. Free admission. Emerge, 208 N. Fourth. emergecda.org MUDSLINGING EXTRAVAGANZA An event to benefit the new kiln shed for the ceramic studio at the Dahmen Barn. Includes a wheel-throwing competition, a barrel fire demonstration, silent auction wine, beer, food and music. Aug. 12, 5-9 pm. $5. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org POAC ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR The 45th annual fair includes artist booths, food vendors, live entertainment, and a youth art arena. All proceeds directly support POAC’s programs in visual/ performing arts and art education. Aug 12-13. Sandpoint City Beach. Free. artinsandpoint.org

WORDS

READING: HEATHER BRANSTETTER The author’s book “Selling Sex in the Silver Valley: A Business Doing Pleasure” delves into the history of Wallace, Idaho and the Silver Valley region huddled in the Coeur d’Alene Mountains. Aug. 10, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com SIGNING: KIMBERLY STARR “457 Days: A Mother’s Journey Along Grief’s Path” is an intimate portrayal of grief and anguish that will touch anyone with a loved one experiencing mental illness and suicidal ideations. Aug. 12, 1:30-3:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com AUTHOR STAN PARKS The local author discusses his novel “Jakob’s Ladies,” a story is about a young man who seeks adventure by moving to Wyoming in the early 20th century. Aug. 15, 6:30 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series, open to all readers and all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. spokanepoetryslam.org (847-1234) n


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AUGUST 10, 2017 INLANDER 61


Reinaldo Gil Zambrano, left, an art instructor, created prints using a steamroller last fall.

JOSEPH PALLEN/UNIVERSITY OF IDAHO PHOTOS

FLAT-OUT COOL A steamroller, plus a little help from friends, equals one massive art event BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

A

rtists use a lot of unusual tools, but at 44,000 pounds with the maneuverability of a Zamboni, a steamroller is not your run-of-the-mill tool. It is, however, so radical an idea it’s got artists at Coeur d’Alene’s Emerge artspace buzzing about INK! Print Rally, a one-day interactive festival of printmaking featuring a big yellow steamroller. The event is so monumental, Emerge had to move it outdoors to accommodate the beer garden, live entertainment by DJ Sterling and Tangled Roots, hands-on activities by area printmakers and the much-anticipated steamroller. See, printing can be as easy as painting your hand and pressing it to a surface: make, ink and print the “plate” (in this case, your hand), creating a mirror image (a print) of raised and recessed areas on your hand. Typical printing plates can be carved stone, metal or wood and either pressed along the back or run through a mechanical press to create the print, depending on the plate size. At 4 by 5 feet, however, a different method is needed to ensure that the image prints successfully. Enter the steamroller. For Emerge Executive Director Jeni Hegsted, building a printing festival around the steamroller was a distant notion that, well, steamrolled into possibility through a network of printmakers. Emerge printmaking instructor Hanna Kuhns told Hegsted about the Missoula-based Steamroller Print Project, which commemorates the city’s Day of the Dead Parade, marking its 25th year in November. That struck a chord with Hegsted, who has organized Emerge’s popular Day of the Dead fundraiser for several years.

62 INLANDER AUGUST 10, 2017

Millwood Print Works, a new Spokane-based arts nonprofit, offered to help and put Emerge in touch with the University of Montana’s Jim Bailey, co-founder of the Steamroller Print Project. Then through the Art Spirit Gallery, Hegsted met Reinaldo Gil Zambrano, an art instructor at the University of Idaho. Gil Zambrano, who was also familiar with the Steamroller Printing Project, organized a similar event at the University of Idaho last October. Gil Zambrano offered to help coordinate steamroll printing at the Print Rally and more printmakers, including Typebee Printshop, have recently joined the Rally, too.

“It’s an awesome community,” says Hegsted. The community aspect of steamroller printing also appeals to Gil Zambrano, who figures it takes two people each to ink the plate, prepare the plate, ready the fabric for printing, and pull the print from the inked plate. Of course, someone has to drive the steamroller, too. Gil Zambrano also likes the immense size of the artworks that steamroll printing can produce: “There is something amazing about large pieces of art, because they have the ability to immerse the viewer.” About a dozen artists — including Abby Henning, Alexandra Gnome, Chelsea Cordova, Chelsea Hendrickson, Daren Smith, Emma Johnson, Kelly Burton, Tarin Leach and Tiffany Patterson — have spent the past few weeks carving wooden printing plates in preparation for the Print Rally. Henning, who works at River City Fabrication and typically works in mixed media, was inspired to participate in the steamroller project after taking an Emerge printmaking class. She has spent several weeks carving the flexible MDF (medium-density fiberboard) board to create her image combining a sugar skull, birds and a bird’s nest. She’s excited to find out how it will look as a print, she says, yet worried the steamroller might crush the printing plate she’s worked so hard on. “I’ll just have to have faith,” she says. n arts@inlander.com INK! Print Rally • Sat, Aug 12 from 1-7 pm • Free • Emerge • 208 N. Fourth St., Coeur d’Alene • Facebook.com/emergecda


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