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COMMENT | GROWTH

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he Spokane Home Builders Association recently urged the Spokane City Council to fill Steve Salvatori’s vacated seat with a Salvatori clone. Their spokesperson states that his group is concerned over taxes, and that they seek to reestablish the balance that existed before Salvatori resigned. This demand sits somewhere between silly and outrageous, without ever passing “GO” along the way. The Home Builders certainly can promote whomever or whatever it chooses, but surely the rest of us should wonder about what’s really going on. Here’s the rest of the story: First, the question of taxes is a red herring, as Council President Ben Stuckart has made clear by pledging not to raise them. Second, “balance,” in the vernacular, has nuthin’ to do with it. What’s really at stake is growth management — or, as the association and its allies prefer, “growth non-management.” On the one side of the issue are developers — some are homebuilders — who want to build whatever and wherever they want. Expanding the urban growth boundary is key to their plans, because UGBs put cities on the hook to provide the necessary urban infrastructure and services. On the other side we have the city, townships and various citizen groups that first want to weigh the impacts, costs and benefits and “urban effects” that the expansion of urban growth boundaries always bring. Call this “smart growth.” The issue then pits growth in the form of “sprawl” against “smart growth.” Many scholars and writers have written about the difference. Charles Montgomery, in his book Happy City, uses the term “urban blast radius” to depict sprawl where we produce a built environment that takes “up more space per person and is more expensive to build and operate than any urban form ever constructed.”

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arenthetically, this debate produces a paradox. Around here, we associate the word “conservative” with those who want to expand urban growth boundaries and the word “liberal” with those who don’t. Yet arguably, it’s the “smart growth” supporters who are the real “conservatives” — if we understand the word to refer to “conserving” what we have. To the contrary, “liberals” then become those who take the view that all growth should be supported no matter the disruption or redistribution of public resources, both social and economic, that growth may cause. It‘s a bit confusing. Just a year ago things were going quite well for our pro-growth, non-managed constituency. They controlled the Board of County Commissioners, dominated by Al French, and in

David Condon they had a politically simpatico Spokane mayor who was supported by a bare majority on the City Council. Yes, Condon first opposed French’s most recent growth boundary end run, but finally he fell into line — or, as one appalled pro-growth advocate put it, he “came to his senses.” The first bit of bad news came when Candace Mumm, regarded as “a liberal,” won a seat. The voters in District 3 elected a candidate who had chaired the Plan Commission that wrote Spokane’s “smart growth” Comprehensive Land Use Plan. So when Mumm arrived, that narrow 4-3 majority favoring growth at all costs changed to a 4-3 majority favoring “smart growth.” Trouble enough. Still, a 4-3 vote wasn’t veto-proof. But then Salvatori leaves town. Land developers love Al French, and for good reason. While Olympia recognizes that “cities are the units of government most appropriate to provide urban government services” and that “it is not appropriate that urban governmental services be extended to or expanded in rural areas,” our state continues to shuffle along with an outdated, 19th-century form of county government that shifts the balance of power to non-urban interests that need expanded urban services, always on the city’s dime. Despite the fact that French both helped to write and wholeheartedly supported the same document Mumm worked on, as the local king of “urban blast radius” sprawl, he works against the spirit of the Comp Plan. Lately it seems the City Council is the only thing stopping our county from anything-goes growth planning.

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he five finalists announced by the City Council to replace Steve Salvatori aren’t sprawl enablers by any stretch. But these same issues will be back, framing the debate in 2015, when Salvatori’s replacement will need to stand for election on his or her own. What makes the Home Builders’ interest in city politics more ominous is that business organizations always enjoy huge political advantages, as every beleaguered citizens’ and neighborhood group knows. Such organizations have money, instant mobilization, legal resources at the ready and staff support. On the “smart-growth” side, neighborhood groups, environmental groups — even small towns — are often less organized. And in our political world, “organized” trumps “unorganized,” and “wellfunded” usually beats “cash-strapped.” 


Stopping For Repairs BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

H

ere at Inlander HQ, we have a bookshelf filled with all our past issues. So as the STA Plaza has landed back in the news, I started flipping through. And there it was, Feb. 1, 1995, under a familiar byline. “The Plaza,” I wrote all those years ago, “has left so many angry business owners, public officials and private citizens in its wake, it’s unlikely that the STA’s public image will ever be able to fully recover… ” Here we are, a couple of decades later, and the STA’s public image remains a problem. Bitter memories are part of the reason business interests have asked for a delay in finalizing the STA’s plans to pour another $5 million into the Plaza. Back in ’95, it was, as one county commissioner put it, a “comedy of errors.” The STA overpaid for the land before they even had a plan. Their first idea, a 20-story office tower, was killed by a lawsuit. They had a hard time finding firms to build the Plaza, creating millions in cost overruns. Alternative ideas were ignored, and critical public officials said they were booted off the STA Board. Years later, Don Barbieri’s run for Congress was quashed by ads pinning the Plaza on him. So the Plaza probably was an expensive mistake, but as transit centers go, it’s beautiful. Still, Spokane hasn’t ever gotten over how the whole thing was shoved down our throats. But it’s time to move on. The issue of loitering and bad apples is not entirely an STA problem; it’s an all-of-Spokane problem. With a more coordinated approach, lots of progress has been made in the past year, with more queued up to start taking effect soon. And while it’s not as robust as it should be, the retail along Riverside and Post is healthier than it’s been in years. This is an urban growing pain — other successful cities grapple with the same issues, and we can, too. Moving the Plaza is a nonstarter. Adjusting the plans should focus on security for sure, but also on how to add more users — the Central City Line would be great. I’m not seeing $5 million in needs at the Plaza, but I know there’s a study backing it all up, and I do like their idea for a coffee shop facing out on the corner of Riverside and Wall. I would like to see even more accommodations for bike commuters. The STA Board’s recent decision to pause their plans was exactly the right one. In 1995, the STA simply would not listen. The 2014 STA not only can boast of moving people quite efficiently, but it’s also capable of stopping to take the time to hear from all of us. 

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COMMENT | COMMUNITY

Loitering For All

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Spokane doesn’t need fewer “vagrants” and “loiterers” downtown; we need more of everyone BY LUKE BAUMGARTEN

W

hen faced with a problem, there’s a natural impulse to look for the simplest solution. It makes a certain sense: The most direct path is probably the best, right? For example: You got riffraff in your bus plaza? Son, you better run them riffraff off! It makes sense. But if they’re still around after a decade or two of trying to scatter them, then what? By golly, we might want to move that whole darn plaza! Well, OK, but that’s a much less simple solution.

And look over there, there’s riffraff on our streets! Asking for money! Where the tourists can see! We gotta nip this riffraff thing in the bud! Or do we? What if we didn’t? Let’s leave the vagrants and the loiterers and the street kids alone for a second. Let’s stop fixating on what we don’t want downtown and take some time to think about what we do want. So what do we want? My own wish would be for a set of designated public squares with simple, inexpensive infrastructure that people could use, on a whim, to plug in their phone or a guitar amp or a light for their jewelry stand, and just have a picnic or a jam session or a pop-up shop.

As for where such squares might go, I think we could do a lot worse than those same places we spend so much time wringing our hands over. The entrances to our city. Wall Street between the STA Plaza and park. The Plaza itself. The reasoning is simple: We can either keep trying (and failing) to sweep every last corner clean of “undesirable” things, or we can flood those corners with light (and power), and invite everyone to come play. We’ve seen this work a couple of times just recently: When Huntington Park opened up earlier this summer, the surprise and delight of the place lifted people onto their tiptoes. I have future in-laws thinking about moving back to Spokane because of that damn park. It’s amazing. Same with the new part of the Centennial Trail that passes under the Monroe Street Bridge. Safety concerns aside, it’s a magical new view on our city that became a destination despite little fanfare. Both of those locations used to be hangouts for street kids and other homeless people. And you know what? They still are. They’re just hangouts for everyone else now, too. Those were both big, expensive projects, though. What if there were a cheaper way? Let’s go back to that idea of public squares. What if we begin on Wall and maybe at the Plaza, then identify three to five more places downtown where, far from discouraging loitering, we built an inexpensive infrastructure that encouraged it? What if we took the areas where we feel uncomfortable and did the opposite of restricting people’s access? What if we tried to get everyone to come? Connecting Kendall Yards to Huntington Park to River Park Square to the Plaza — that promising, troubling Plaza, which acts as a beating heart, pumping people from the core of our city to its extremities and back. How would such a scene look to the people we’re trying to attract from out of town? Like a teeming, scary mass of humanity, or like a vibrant, inviting city core in one of the most beautiful city settings in America? If we built those sorts of spaces, and invited everyone to come, would you loiter there? Personally, I can’t wait to. 

#BeINC BeINCREDIBLE 8 INLANDER AUGUST 7, 2014

ON INLANDER.COM

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— TED S. McGREGOR JR

“Abraham Lincoln, Winston Churchill and Sir Isaac Newton had mental illnesses and had to confront this deeply held stigma. Imagine if they had been deprived of the opportunity to lead or to educate because of their disability.” — MARK STROH

“We should not have to live in a world where spying robots hover above us like hawks and buzzards.”

— JIMMY TOBIAS


AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 9


10 INLANDER AUGUST 7, 2014


COMMENT | FROM READERS

GOP’S SUPPORT OF WOMEN COMICAL he “War for Women” is a farce. After voting down four times laws that

T

would’ve improved the pay levels for women, Cathy McMorris Rodgers and her Republican cohorts have come up with a play on Democratic words without really meaning it. Another obstructive, meaningless action designed to delay and obfuscate is being put forth by Rodgers and her misogynistic bedfellows. Is there any female reader out there who really thinks the men in the Republican Party respect and trust Cathy’s presence? They’re using her the same way they used Sarah Palin — she’s the token female to show female voters that they’re being respectfully considered. Send comments to Whether through ambitious calculation or naiveté, editor@inlander.com. Cathy and Sarah … [allowed] themselves to be manipulated. The Republicans have shown time and time again their disdain and contempt for women. Though there may be a few good men in that party, their good intentions are smothered in the aggressive, nasty tactics of the rest. Used to be, the Republicans were the “party of the people” — not anymore. Their aims are not those of the people, but of themselves. My dad had a saying about people like this. They think, “After me, you come first!” Is this who we want to govern us? Do you want to continue paying for them? C’mon ladies, let’s boot ’em out!

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AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 11


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Rwandan refugee Emmanuel Rucyahana, right, tries a carrot during a nutrition workshop at World Relief Spokane. Funding for workshops like this one has been redirected to address immigration at the southern border. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Trickle Down Fifteen hundred miles from the southern border, the Northwest feels the squeeze of the immigration crisis BY HEIDI GROOVER

“W

e came here because we have to save our lives,” she says, sitting next to her husband. Now, they’re tasting raw carrots from a paper boat, seated at a long table surrounded by posters about the Founding Fathers, with people chatting in four languages. Refugees like Farwah Rubab and Syed Mubashar Abbas from Pakistan come here, to World Relief’s headquarters in Spokane, for answers. Not only do they get help finding housing, schooling and jobs, but they can attend workshops on the essentials: banking, interacting

with law enforcement and today, cooking healthy food. “We like the bus, and we can take classes so we can improve our language,” Rubab says. “[But] we want to be able for everything. We are helpless. We don’t like this.” Though the much-covered influx of unaccompanied children at the southern border is 1,500 miles away from this classroom, the two are unavoidably linked by a pot of federal funding increasingly under stress. Last month, the federal government halted funding to states for “refugee resettlement assistance” — the money that pays for these classes — because it needed

that money to address needs at the border. In Spokane, World Relief, a nonprofit that helps resettle refugees, uses its $89,500 allotment to pay staff to help refugees apply for permanent residency and to organize these classes. The nonprofit Catholic Charities gets $35,500 from the contract to provide similar services. About $1 million in funding was cut for the current quarter. While President Barack Obama requested $3.7 billion from Congress to address the border crisis, lawmakers went on recess late last week without approving any extra ...continued on next page

AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 13


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“TRICKLE DOWN,” CONTINUED... funding. It’s unclear when and how fully the refugee funding might be restored. In the meantime, local organizations are in limbo as they decide whether they’re able to piece together temporary funding or should start cutting staff and programs. World Relief is not currently planning any layoffs, but Director Mark Kadel says if cuts continue, his organization would have to consider cutting staff associated with these programs. Catholic Charities is in a similar holding pattern. “If this trend continues, we’ll be faced with some decisions at World Relief,” Kadel says. “Eventually, if there isn’t a solution, there will be a trickle-down effect in the local economy.” While funding is a consistent challenge for service providers, cuts like this — where funding has already been promised and is then withheld mid-year — are rare. “It is troubling,” says Tom Medina, chief of Washington state’s Office of Refugee and Immigrant Assistance, which distributes the federal money to local groups. “These are people we invited to the U.S. … These people have been through the worst that life can give you and are on their feet. They get here and we pull services out from under them.”

T

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he influx of unaccompanied children at the U.S.-Mexico border didn’t start this year, but it has reached unprecedented levels. According to the U.S. Border Patrol, more than 56,500 children were caught at the border between October 2013 and this June, up from just 15,700 in the 2011 fiscal year. Most of the children are from Honduras, El Salvador and Guatemala, where violence and poverty have driven families to take drastic measures to get children to the U.S. in hopes they’ll be allowed to stay, according to a recent report from the Brookings Institute, a public policy think tank. Children from noncontiguous countries are treated differently than those from Mexico or Canada, who can be quickly deported. Instead, children from other countries are put under the care of the Department of Health and Human Services until family or foster care can be located. They’re simultaneously put in “removal proceedings” within the Department of Justice, where they have to prove they’re fleeing persecution or abuse and neglect by their parents to be allowed to stay. Compared to states like Texas and New York, the Northwest will see relatively few of these children: In the first half of this year, 211 have come to relatives, family friends or foster parents in Washington, 50 to Oregon and eight to Idaho, according to the federal government. Still, their needs have tried resources


Iraqi refugee Maha Almajidi, left, serves carrots to Pakistani refugees Farwah Rubab, right, and Syed Mubashar Abbas. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO at groups like Lutheran Community Services in Seattle, which matches unaccompanied immigrant and refugee children with foster homes. The group’s sister organization in Spokane is now applying for grant funding to create a similar program, but is unsure whether the program could come to fruition in time to serve the immediate need, says Ashley Sorensen, a foster home licensor and therapist at Lutheran. As the number of these children crossing the border has ballooned in recent years, the system has bogged down and children have stayed in the country for as long as 500 days before getting a hearing. That’s what’s prompted Obama to ask Congress for extra money to house the children and increase personnel in the courts tasked with hearing their cases, and what’s stoked anti-im-

“If you dehumanize them, it’s easy to say, ‘We’ve just got to get them out of here.’ It’s like an infestation of bugs or something.” migrant sentiments across the country. For Gregory Cunningham, the program director at Catholic Charities Spokane’s Refugee and Immigration Services, the ongoing debate is as much about how we treat those in need as about economic policy. “If you dehumanize them, it’s easy to say, ‘We’ve just got to get them out of here.’ It’s like an infestation of bugs or something,” Cunningham says. “If you put a human face on the other, then all of a sudden you feel an obligation to help, but if you can keep them at arm’s length, it’s easy enough to just say they’re a nuisance and deal with them only from an economic or legal perspective.” Without a guarantee that they’ll see the refugee assistance funding renewed, Cunningham says Catholic Charities is likely to look for local donations to its programs. Otherwise, both Catholic Charities and World Relief may soon start charging refugees for some of their services. “The need is not going to go away,” Cunningham says, “just because the contract did.” n heidig@inlander.com

AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

The Big News of the Past Week

PHOTO EYE YOUNG HIGHLANDERS

1.

Two American aid workers who contracted Ebola in Liberia have returned to the U.S. and are being treated at Emory University Hospital. There is no approved treatment for Ebola, but in Liberia, both had received an experimental drug that has never been tested in humans.

2.

Spokane Mayor David Condon has asked the city’s Civil Service Commission to remove the criminal history check box on city job applications. If approved, Spokane would be one of nearly 70 cities and counties across the country that have removed criminal history questions from their job applications.

3.

Another massive storm knocked down trees and power lines in North Spokane on Saturday night, causing nearly 50,000 Avista customers to lose electricity over the weekend.

4.

A Superior Court judge has ordered an injunction against the Spokane Country Club for failing to abide by the law and continuing to discriminate against its women members.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Five-year-old Londynne, left, and her 4-year old sister Keegan perform the Pas de Basques and High Cuts — a traditional Scottish children’s dance — at the Spokane County Fair during Saturday’s Highland Games. Along with Highland dancing, the Spokane Highland Games featured shortbread bake-offs, sword fighting, bagpipe performances, woolly Highland cattle and, of course, the caber toss.

DIGITS

2.75

$

Washington State University head football coach Mike Leach’s annual compensation, in millions, under his newly amended contract. He’s still not the highest-paid state employee in Washington, though. That honor goes to new University of Washington football coach Chris Petersen, who will make $3.2 million in base salary this year.

18

5.

Spokane police officers are using a live surveillance feed to monitor the Under the Freeway Skate Park on McClellan Street due to its reputation for drawing criminal activity. That’s how police arrested a 21-year-old in July, caught on camera distributing methamphetamine.

ON INLANDER.com The number of days this July during which temperatures climbed to 90 degrees or higher. Spokane had the second warmest July ever last month, with an average temperature of 75.7 degrees.

What’s Creating Buzz

NEWS: Downtown Spokane Partnership President Mark Richard on his group’s push to postpone bus plaza renovations, the city’s picks for the ombudsman commission and more news all week long on the blog.

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NEWS | BRIEFS

‘Veto Proof’

“I don’t think they represent the type of person voters intended to fill that seat until November of next year,” says Michael Cathcart with the Spokane Home Builders Association, who worries another liberal on the council could stall growth-management talks between the city and county. “You create a veto-proof majority and suddenly tactics drastically change.” The council will interview the finalists Aug. 13 from 12:30-2 pm at City Hall and vote to select one Aug. 18. — HEIDI GROOVER

Five finalists for an open council position; plus, Idaho’s GOP gets a INSANITY PLEA Almost a month after being found not guilty by reason of new chairman insanity, MURDER SUSPECT AMBER ROBERTS AND THEN THERE WERE FIVE...

The Spokane City Council likes to talk about how nonpartisan it is, but those words continue to get harder to swallow, especially for local conservatives. This week, the council announced the FIVE FINALISTS to replace Steve Salvatori, a right-leaning businessman who resigned last month to follow work demands to Texas, and the picks have some conservatives worried about the wrath of a supermajority. The five finalists are: Adrian Dominguez, an epidemiologist at the Spokane Regional Health District who emphasized equal opportunity in his application; Julie Griffith, currently employed by the financial counseling company Money Management International and formerly with the nonprofit Community-Minded Enterprises; Karen Stratton, a current city clerk and former assistant to Mayors Mary Verner and Jim West; E.J. Iannelli, chair of the Emerson Garfield Neighborhood Council and an Inlander contributor; and Kitty Klitzke, Eastern Washington program director at the growth management advocacy group Futurewise and wife of Center for Justice Executive Director Rick Eichstaedt.

remains in the Spokane County Jail despite an order transferring her to the custody of a mental health facility with the Department of Social and Health Services. Roberts, 32, faced charges of first-degree murder and intimidating a witness after strangling a fellow patient at Eastern State Hospital in November of 2012. Roberts had spent close to a decade at the Medical Lake mental hospital when she killed Duane Charley. “She wanted to help Duane because he was nice to her,” a report states. “She knew Duane wanted to get his freedom, and the only way for him to get his freedom was for him to go to heaven.” Mental health evaluators had previously found Roberts competent to stand trial, but a more recent evaluation determined she did not understand the implications of her violent actions. A judge ruled Roberts not guilty by reason of insanity during a July 9 hearing. Public defender Brooke Hagara says the case moved slowly due to the difficulty and expense of finding an appropriate expert to evaluate Roberts. After getting the latest evaluation, the case was quickly resolved. Hagara says Roberts will go to the Western State Hospital mental facility in Lakewood to avoid conflicts or

safety concerns involving patients who knew her victim. She did not know why Roberts had not transferred out of the jail. — JACOB JONES

CLEANUP AFTER THE CHAOS

Months later, and the fallout from Idaho’s disaster of a STATE GOP CONVENTION is finally quieting down. The convention, in June, adjourned without passing a party platform or electing a new chairman. “Coming out of it, some thought we didn’t have a chairman, and some thought we did,” says Cindy Siddoway, the Idaho GOP’s national committeewoman. Barry Peterson, the incumbent chair, was in the latter camp, going as far as changing the locks at the state party offices as he struggled to hang onto his chairmanship. (For “security reasons,” he explained.) But the Republican National Committee, Siddoway says, would not recognize Peterson as chair. As Siddoway and Mike Mathews moved to schedule an Aug. 2 Idaho Republican Central Committee meeting to elect a new chairman, Peterson’s allies sued to prevent it. Last week, Idaho Judge Randy Stoker ruled that Peterson was wrong — his two-year term expired at the convention — and that an election of a new chairman was cleared to go forward. Last Saturday, the Central Committee elected Steve Yates, who only recently moved to Idaho, as their new chairman. Yates’ politics is closer to George W. Bush than the Tea Party-style politics of Peterson. He was a deputy assistant for National Security Affairs to Cheney from 2001 to 2005, where he advocated a tougher approach on China. “It is a strange day when my fellow Ron Paulers support a member of Dick Cheney’s foreign policy team,” says Bjorn Handeen, a Coeur d’Alene libertarian and a delegate at the failed convention. — DANIEL WALTERS

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NEWS | COURTS

Swift Hand of Justice How two recent murder cases ended with guilty pleas in a fraction of the usual time BY JACOB JONES

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an

uan E. Sifuentez, 33, deserves little, if any, sympathy. With devil horns tattooed on his forehead and a lengthy criminal record, he has seemingly abandoned any pretense of innocence. So only his public defender Jay Ames voiced the slightest opposition last week when Sifuentez offered up a guilty plea to first-degree murder just three months after charging. “You’re talking about very serious charges,” Ames says later. “I’ve never seen anything like that happen that fast.” Justice, anchored by due process, tends to move slowly. Cases can drag on for years. Investigators question witnesses. Labs analyze forensic evidence. Attorneys build arguments. As of this week, at least six defendants in the Spokane County Jail remain in custody awaiting trial on murder or robbery charges dating back to 2012. When Ames learned that his client planned to admit to the charges, he asked Judge James Triplet to deny the plea. Ames couldn’t in good conscience support Sifuentez giving up and accepting a life sentence. When Triplet asserted that Sifuentez had the right to plead guilty, Ames asked to withdraw from the case in protest, but the judge pushed on. “He could have postponed it,” Ames says. “It’s very frustrating.” For brutally killing a 51-year-old woman, Sifuentez will now serve life in prison without the chance of parole. In a similarly short murder case, STA stabbing suspect Donald Phillips will spend more than 28 years in prison after pleading guilty in June, just three weeks after his arrest. Defense attorneys consider these cases to be extraordinary circumstances, but they also serve as reminders that due process is a process — it involves careful investigation, representation and judgment. You can’t rush justice. “There’s a possibility of more mistakes when it gets hurried,” Ames says. “Things are minimized. The case doesn’t get thoroughly worked.”

A

ttorney Tom Krzyminski has served nearly 25 years as a public defender. In December, he took over as director of the county’s Public Defender Office, and in June he took on the Phillips murder case. He acknowledged the proceedings had moved faster than he anticipated, but he says many factors aligned to make for an appropriate and rapid resolution. “I can honestly say I’ve never had a case move that quickly, that had such a serious nature,” he says. “[But] the clients are calling most of the shots. It’s their decision.” As director, Krzyminski has a smaller caseload, so he says he devoted more time to the Phillips case in the early stages. A plea bargain quickly emerged that would result in a lengthy prison sentence, but avoided a third strike that

would have guaranteed life in prison. “My client walks away satisfied with the outcome,” Krzyminski says of a successful plea deal. “Maybe not happy, nobody’s ever really happy, but a lot of times they get to the point where [they know] this is the best road.” Ames says he County Public Defender Tom would have appreciKrzyminski: “I can honestly say I’ve ated more time to never had a case move that quickly.” discuss those options with Sifuentez, who insisted the guilty plea was the “right thing to do.” Ames argues allowing for more negotiation would have undoubtedly resulted in a long prison sentence, but maybe the chance of parole in the future, a “light at the end of the tunnel.” But Sifuentez gave up. “From a human standpoint, that’s just a terrible thing,” Ames says. “It makes you sad for them, sad for everyone involved.”

S

pokane County public defenders often handle close to 150 felony cases a year, including almost all of the area’s murder cases. Krzyminski says each attorney recognizes his or her duty to provide a vigorous defense. “There’s got to be some pressure on us due to the caseload,” Ames agrees, “but I don’t think the attorneys would allow that to interfere with [their responsibilities to their clients].” In recent years, the county has increasingly negotiated low-level felonies through an Early Case Resolution program that streamlines charging, information sharing and plea offers. Supporters say the system has many benefits, including a smaller jail population and fewer trial delays. Krzyminski says those benefits must still balance against the meticulous process of building a thorough defense. The Phillips and Sifuentez cases, he says, represent outliers in which the individual personalities, circumstances and police evidence perfectly aligned. Beyond the incriminating evidence, both Phillips and Sifuentez insisted on moving forward with the pleas. In a recording of his sentencing, Phillips told the judge he wanted to take responsibility for the killing without inconveniencing the court any more than necessary. “I hope you take that into consideration,” Phillips says, “that I didn’t waste your time or anybody else’s time in this.” 


NEWS | DEVELOPMENT

Water Power A new plan to give the Spokane City Council an edge in its growth battle with the county BY DANIEL WALTERS

T

he last time the Spokane City Council tried to stop sprawl by withholding public utilities, it spawned condemnation from all three county commissioners and resulted in Mayor David Condon’s first veto. Now, the council is considering a subtler solution that would still give the city greater influence over regional growth. “It puts us more in the driver’s seat,” Councilwoman Amber Waldref says. Spokane Utilities Director Rick Romero has presented a new plan to give the council more control over where it extends water service. Under the proposal, the city would use the current Urban Growth Area boundaries to define its “retail” water service area, Send comments to highlighting where the city will extend water editor@inlander.com. service in the next six years. “The idea is you’d have to get a vote of the council, and get on the six-year water plan, to get retail water outside the retail service area,” Councilman Jon Snyder says. The city would update its plan every year, at a minimum. This latest battle over growth dates back to last year when, over the objections from the city, Spokane County widened its urban boundaries to allow denser developments. The council fired back in March, passing an ordinance that banned the city from extending water and sewer services to future properties added to the UGA until all legal challenges were cleared up. In one sense, this new plan is less restrictive than the one Condon vetoed — it doesn’t handcuff the city council’s ability to extend water services and it doesn’t apply to sewer systems. But depending on the makeup of the council, it could easily become more restrictive: Theoretically, even if the county were to legally expand its UGA, the city council would still have to vote to change the water map. If it doesn’t, developers could be waiting for a water hookup for a very long time. Initially, City Council President Ben Stuckart was skeptical, but says he’s been convinced that Romero’s strategy is a good one. Stuckart hopes that by giving the city more leverage in planning growth, the city and the county will work together better. But there still are knotty legal questions left to untangle: Is the city allowed to effectively deny water service to properties inside the UGA? And does this plan give more homeowners the right to just drill wells instead? That last one question worries County Commissioner Todd Mielke: “My concern is we’re going to have a whole bunch of individual property owners that under the law have the right to sink their own wells.” Mielke believes that could eventually have serious long-term ecological ramifications. The new plan hasn’t completely pacified developer groups either. Spokane Home Builders Association lobbyist Michael Cathcart calls it a “slightly modified version” of the ordinance vetoed by the mayor and complains that it’s still putting up roadblocks for development. “It’s a better system in that the city can vote to allow water service [for developments in legally challenged UGA expansions],” Cathcart says. “It’s still not a good system in that an anti-growth city council could say, ‘No, we’re not allowing water service.’” Besides the proposal, something else is changing: With City Councilman Steve Salvatori’s resignation, the council’s liberal bloc has the opportunity to add a fifth member for a veto-proof majority. Stuckart, at least, intends to pick up another ideological ally. “If I get to vote for who joins me on council,” he says, “I want to make sure they share my value system.” 

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By Lisa nen a n a Wa Jones

A

s the body of the city’s most famous pioneer lay silently at the Masonic Temple in 1921, the remaining old-timers and the next generation of cityshapers paid respects to the man known as the father of Spokane. “With the passing of James Glover, the truest pioneer I ever knew is gone,” said Joe Daniel, who moved

20 INLANDER AUGUST 7, 2014

to Spokane before its boom era. “He was a power and a force back in those early days, and he was a friend to everyone who ever knew him.” “He was a man of honor, strictly square in his business transactions and more loyal to his friends than any other man I ever knew,” added Edward Pittwood, the city’s first dentist. “He was generous to a fault,

er v o l es G , and m a at J o know acy h t ry ou t leg o t s s i y h The want tening ’t a didn it’s thre why

and when he had much, he shared liberally with all,” said W.C. Gray, who owned Spokane’s first hotel. “He thought always of the other person, and had a helping hand always ready to extend. A truly great man has gone with the passing of Jim Glover.” More than 90 years later, in the final minutes of a committee meeting this past April, members of Spokane

City Council decided against putting Glover’s name on the new plaza beside City Hall. The stone with Glover’s name had already been engraved for a dedication the following week, but questions had come up about whether the “Father of Spokane” deserved the honor. “I found out things about James Glover I’m quite frankly not comfortable with,” City Council


James N. Glover and Susan T. Glover around 1880 NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS & CULTURE/EASTERN WASHINGTON STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY

President Ben Stuckart said. “He divorced his wife; she’s buried out at Eastern State Hospital in an unmarked grave. This guy had some sketchy stuff going on in his past. It’s not a joke. … Is that somebody we want to honor as a city?” Others around the table agreed it would be better to open the plaza without a name and involve the community in selecting a new one.

The next Friday, the renovated Huntington Park and plaza opened to the public with live music, speeches and a new stone without Glover’s name on it.

J

ames Nettle Glover was by no means the first person to live in this place, nor was he the first white man to recognize the value of the falls. But he was the

first white settler to envision a grand city around the falls and then spend his life making it happen. In his old age, the city boosters proudly said he was the only settler in America who lived to see his land claim turn into a city of 130,000 in less than four decades. Scrub Glover from the story of Spokane, and the city as we know it ceases to exist. He once owned

all the land in Spokane’s downtown core, and he spent months in Olympia wooing legislators to establish the county’s boundaries. He laid out the downtown streets and gave them their names: Sprague for General J.W. Sprague, the railroad superintendent he dealt with most often; Howard for General Oliver O. Howard, who stopped by while ...continued on next page

AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 21


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leading troops against the Nez Perce; Stevens for the governor of the territory; Post for local mill owner Frederick Post; and the rest for the presidents. Other settlers and business partners came and left, and the only other white person to arrive in Spokane so early and stay long enough to be buried was Glover’s wife, Susan Tabitha Crump. But she is notably absent in memories of Spokane’s early days, an erasure more deliberate than the neglectful omission of many women at the time. Spokane’s first Mrs. Glover was deliberately snipped out of history — out of spite, embarrassment and ignorance — many years before she was even dead.

I

n his own telling, Glover arrived in Spokane Falls on a beautiful evening in May 1873. He’d traveled from Salem, Oregon, by rail, river and saddle with a business partner, Jasper N. Matheny, and they arrived to find a handful of wooden structures among the grass and basalt. At that time the river ran unharnessed over the falls, turning to spray against rocks later blasted to make way for industry. Two settlers, J.J. Downing and Seth Scranton, had built a sawmill, and the visitors were directed to an unfinished log cabin to spend the night. Glover fell asleep to the roar of the falls, and the next morning went to explore. “I was enchanted — overwhelmed — with

the beauty and grandeur of everything I saw,” he recalled later. “It lay there just as nature had made it, with nothing to mar its virgin glory. I determined that I would possess it.” By the end of that second day, Glover had worked out a deal to buy the land claim that encompassed all of the falls. At 36, Glover was taller than most men and assessed the world with intense, blue eyes. Later in life he walked around town as a neatly dressed elder statesman, clean-shaven with a silk top hat and gold-topped cane, but he first came to Spokane with dark hair and a beard, skin darkened by the sun and dust. He returned to Spokane a few months later, in August of 1873, with his 30-year-old wife, a slim woman with high cheekbones. In portraits, her downturned mouth and pulled-back hair give her the appearance of someone strained against an invisible wind. During her lifetime, she was described as having a look of melancholy in her eyes. Both Glovers had come from Missouri on the Oregon Trail as children. James Glover was 12 and the trip took six months and one day; Susan’s family came earlier, when she was 3, and they traveled part of the way with the ill-fated Donner-Reed Party on a grueling nine-month journey. Glover had worked an assortment of enterprises as a young man — a fruit stand in California, mining in North Idaho, a ferry busi-


ness in Salem — and said he was drawn to the Spokane area because “Oregon was becoming pretty well filled up by that time.” The land wasn’t poised for immediate success. Marcia Downing, one of the few settlers living there when Glover arrived, remembered the stony, unyielding ground many years later: “You couldn’t put the end of your little finger down without bruising it.” Glover and his business partners improved the sawmill, but there was no demand for lumber. They opened the first store, but their only customers were the Spokane and Coeur d’Alene Indians who came to trade. Only four families lived in Spokane Falls when it hosted a centennial Fourth of July celebration in 1876 that drew visitors from miles around. One of Glover’s favorite stories to tell about the early days was from the summer of 1877, when fighting between settlers and the Nez Perce put the whole region on edge. Spokane Falls had barely grown in the four years since the Glovers arrived, and news of nearby violence made them aware just how quickly their small settlement could cease to exist. One day a Nez Perce group set up on the edge of town and drummed through the night for two weeks. Glover watched them from the front of his store as the days passed and became more tense, and finally he called a meeting with some of the older Spokane Indian leaders. It had been less than 20 years since Col. George Wright had come through and slaughtered hundreds of the local tribes’ horses, and this was still a painful memory. He asked the men at the meeting if they recalled this, and told them to make the Nez Perce men leave by noon: “I am in close touch with the soldiers — the boys with the brass buttons — and if they aren’t gone by noon, I will tell the soldiers to come.” The next day, entirely by chance, an infantry regiment marched into town. ...continued on next page

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AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 23


james glover

Just west of downtown in Peaceful Valley, Glover Field was the site of many athletic events and parades after the city purchased the land in 1912. COURTESY TONY AND SUZANNE BAMONTE

“FACING HISTORY,” CONTINUED... Glover, pleased on multiple counts, lobbied for the soldiers to stay. The military decided to build Fort Coeur d’Alene, later called Fort Sherman, and the added protection drew more settlers to the area. Around the same time, work resumed on the Northern Pacific Railway, which had been slowed by financial troubles but was routed to come through near Spokane Falls. The city soon had its first school, first hotel and first newspaper, the Spokan Times. (The spelling of Spokane was debated, and publisher Francis H. Cook felt strongly that the “e” would lead people to mispronounce the city’s name.) The first train pulled into town from the west in 1881, and word got out soon that gold and silver had been found in the mountains of North Idaho. After a slow beginning, Spokane Falls became a boom town. For two years during this time, a 14-year-old niece, Lovenia, came from Salem to keep her aunt company while Glover was frequently away on business.

24 INLANDER AUGUST 7, 2014

The Glovers doted on Lovenia, and the letters she wrote back home are the only record of life in their household. She once saw her uncle turn down the covers and spank her aunt for failing to get out of bed in the morning, and she noted that her uncle did all the hiring of household help, which was unusual at a time when that was typically the wife’s dominion. But contrary to what was said later, Lovenia’s letters prove the Glovers did share joyful times — the family exchanging gifts at Christmas, Susan playing organ for a choir practice, the Glovers dancing at a Masonic Lodge dedication in 1884. “You should have seen Uncle and Aunty get around,” she wrote. “They were as light on their feet as any of the young folk.”

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hortly before the Great Fire in August 1889, the Glovers moved into their grand mansion on Eighth Avenue, the first designed by Kirtland Cutter. Their time in the

home was brief and troubled. In August of 1891, two years after they moved in, Glover had his attorney draw up “Articles of Separation,” a less formal alternative to divorce. The four-page document declared that they would live apart, that all property belonged solely to James Glover, and that he would provide his wife with a carriage, a house in Oregon and $100 a month for the rest of her life. Susan departed for Salem almost immediately. The following January, Glover filed for divorce. His complaint called the marriage “unfortunate in every respect” and accused his wife of being “wholly impotent, barren and incapable of reproduction.” It continues: “This incongeniality which existed between the parties was so extreme that it rendered cohabitation and social intercourse between them repulsive, beyond endurance on the part of either, and in fact impossible.” In April, Glover added a paragraph claiming “cruel treatment,” a way to expedite the legal process. His wife’s failure to

respond was considered by the court an admission of guilt, and a judge approved the divorce on March 31, 1892. The man remembered at his funeral for his kindness and loyalty extended no generosity to his wife of nearly 24 years. Two days later, Glover married Esther Emily Leslie, a 33-year-old woman from Maine who worked at an insurance office. With doughy features and small, dark eyes, the second Mrs. Glover was neither a trophy wife nor a vivacious socialite. When she died alone a few years after her husband, her obituary listed no civic affiliations. But their marriage must have been a more tolerable one, and the niece who grew up next door remembered “Uncle Jimmie and Aunt Ett” with admiration and fondness. At the time he remarried, Glover was a millionaire with the finest home in the city. Within a year, the United States fell into the Panic of 1893, the worst economic depression it had yet endured. Glover’s entire real estate and banking fortune evaporated when the First National Bank failed in July, and he and his new wife were forced to move out of the mansion. In an interview decades later, on the occasion of his 78th birthday, he recalled that time: “When everything seemed going from us in the early ’90s I saw some of my best friends going to the wall, men who were losing the accumulations of a lifetime, men who were broken with sorrow, and at that time I forbade my family to mention hard times and financial troubles at our home. It was one of the ways I had of sustaining the ordeal.”

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ll that was left for the first Mrs. Glover fell apart on July 1, 1899. She had returned to Spokane from Oregon just a few weeks after the divorce was finalized, and she spent


the next seven years moving from one downtown apartment to another. She decided to buy a house at 316 S. Ash St., which is now a parking lot near the Grocery Outlet store on the western edge of downtown, and moved her belongings there on the first of the month. She came home that evening to find her piano in the street. All her possessions were outside, as if the house itself had spat them out. The hotel proprietor who sold the house said he’d never received payment from Mrs. Glover and moved on to another buyer. When he heard she’d moved furniture in, he and another man went to remove it. Susan wandered down the block to the home of the McCreas, where she sat on the front steps, inconsolable, until they called the police. The Spokesman-Review reported: “Officer Beals found Mrs. Glover sitting on the steps. He tried to induce her to go home, offering to accompany her. She refused. Then the officer said he would send for a carriage and have some one in citizen’s clothes go home with her. She violently replied that she did not want to go home, or anywhere, and that she would allow no one to lay a hand on her. When the patrol wagon arrived, Mrs. Glover refused to enter it. The officers lifted her bodily into the patrol. The crazed woman was placed in a cell in the women’s department of the county jail.” A hearing was held, at which her former husband and other witnesses testified against her. Physicians filled out a form assessing her condition: Is there suicidal, homicidal or incendiary disposition? No Is there a disposition to injure others? No Is this the first attack? Yes In what way is the accused dangerous to be at large? unable to take care of her self The news that she had been declared insane and committed to the asylum at Medical Lake warranted a single sentence in the Chronicle on July 4, 1899, between items about a young lady’s sight-seeing trip to Lake Coeur d’Alene and two sisters’ departure for a summer on the coast. The Spokesman-Review noted that “the woman has given the sheriff’s deputies considerable trouble since her incarceration Sunday.”

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he never told the story, so we don’t know what Susan Glover felt when she first laid eyes on the falls. No one made speeches in her honor or interviewed her about Spokane’s early days. We don’t know whether she agreed that life in the mansion on Eighth Avenue was “impossible,” or at what point she stopped fighting the officials tasked with delivering her to the mental hospital. At the time she was committed, Eastern State Hospital was called the Eastern Washington Hospital for the Insane, and it was meant to be a self-sufficient community with a dairy, bakery, smokehouse and pleasant grounds overlooking Medical Lake. The standard of care had moved from prison-like restraints, the hospital superintendent said in 1900, to modern methods of “kindness, tact, amusements, exercise, rest of the mind and body, and the proper administration of medicine where the mental or physical health require it.” But there was no treatment for “melancholia” or other mental illnesses, and no expectation that patients would get better. People with all manner of problems — depression, schizophrenia, learning disabilities, alcoholism, erratic behavior — were put into the custody of the mental asylum with the intention that they remain apart from society. In those early decades, the vast majority of patients arrived at Eastern State Hospital on a court order, and few ever left. Susan gets no mention in most histories of Spokane, but her name is recorded in a handful of written memories of the city’s earliest holidays and in a long family history written by one of Glover’s nieces and filed with the Oregon Historical Society: “He married Susan Crump, an attractive and highly esteemed woman who from an illness fell into spells of despondency and eventually became completely deranged so that she had to be confined for many years before her death.” The daughter of the niece who once lived with the Glovers in early days of Spokane Falls recalled her mother mentioning an infant, and speculated in correspondence in the 1970s that the “ill...continued on page 28

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AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 27


james glover

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28 INLANDER AUGUST 7, 2014

No plaque or sign marks the granite monument that dedicated Glover Field to James N. Glover in 1917. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

“FACING HISTORY,” CONTINUED...

ness” may have been a miscarriage or stillbirth. Barbara Cochran, who researched the Glovers for historic portraits published posthumously as the book Seven Frontier Women, found anecdotes that suggest Susan Glover’s health may have been a reason the Glovers left Salem in the first place. Existence for the quiet wife of the ambitious James Glover must have been desperately lonely in the early years, Cochran concluded, and then rapidly overwhelming as the city grew up around them. With the perspective of many decades, the note Susan Glover wrote in an autograph book the Glovers gave their niece for Christmas in 1884 is a poignant plea: “Long may you live Happy may you be And when you think of Spokan Don’t forget your Aunty.”

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ime both conceals and illuminates, and history is filled with great men judged more critically by later generations. When the names of these men grace street signs, parks and public buildings, communities continue to grapple with the best way to live with their history: Is removing a name an act of healing, or an act of forgetting? After years of protests from parents, a school board in Florida voted this year to rename a high school named for Nathan Bedford Forrest, a Confederate general who was also an early leader in the Ku Klux Klan. In Canada, a plan to install a plaque honoring Dr. Helen MacMurchy — a leading public

health champion in the early 20th century — was scrapped at the last minute after it came to light that she was also a promoter of eugenics. In New York, a street called Corbin Place became the topic of controversy in 2007 after a new book revealed that its namesake, 19th-century developer Austin Corbin, was an outspoken antiSemite. To avoid a costly name change, the city council voted to rename the street for Margaret Corbin, a Revolutionary War heroine who took her husband’s place in battle when he was killed. Whatever Glover’s faults, they do not fall on the scale of mass oppression and systematic injustice. He was not a killer or a slaveholder. There’s no evidence he was more prejudiced than most white men of the time. The charges against him are far more intimate, and in that way more timeless — when a wealthy man leaves his mentally ill wife with nothing, there is no context of era or culture that can explain it. Glover avoided serious scrutiny in his lifetime and died with his reputation intact. But in keeping his first wife out of sight — and out of history — Glover ended up jeopardizing the honored place he worked so purposefully to attain in Spokane’s story of itself. Depending how harshly you judge his actions, it’s either pitiful or justice that what he determined to forget has come to define his official legacy in the city he cared so much about. Historian Tony Bamonte, who with his wife edited and further researched Cochran’s book, considers Glover a domineering man who used his power to banish his wife when she became an inconvenience.


ate his name more enduring than modeled bronze “His motive was to get rid of her,” Bamonte or sculptured stone.” says. “And not just to get rid of her, but to get her off the streets where people wouldn’t know lover Field, the ledge of grass beside the that she was having all these troubles and that he river in Peaceful Valley, was once lined with was leaving her penniless. And she didn’t deserve stands as the city’s finest athletic stadium. Bethat.” fore that, it was a significant gathering place Throughout his life, Bamonte says, Glover for the native people of Spokane, and the told the story of Spokane in a way that embellished his efforts and marginalized the people city has agreed to let the tribe rename the field in who helped him along the way. He helped perpeta way that recognizes the site’s longer history. uate the rumor — taught in local schools for many It’s not a deliberate ousting of Glover, and years — that the two settlers who preceded him, few people living in the city today even know the Scranton and Downing, were “horse thieves” field was named for him. But once, on an autumn in trouble with the law. (Scranton was accused, day nearly a century ago, a thousand people but found not guilty.) Glover downplayed the came to the field and cheered as a granite monument was unveiled to formally dedicate Glover influence of others who promoted Spokane in the Field as Glover himself looked on. The Chamber region, and suggested that business partners who of Commerce and the Advertising Club — the abandoned the settlement in the early years left new generation of city promoters — had made for lack of dedication and character, rather than occasion to honor him at several events when it practical concerns like money and medical care. became clear that time was running out. Bamonte has no doubt that Glover But this was the greatest honor, and the pulled the necessary strings to make Advertising Club announced plans to sure his first wife would not return to erect a full statue on the granite base so interfere with the image he was creat- Send comments to editor@inlander.com. that Glover’s figure could forever look ing of himself. Glover is a key player in Spokane east toward the falls. The Chronicle rehistory, Bamonte says, but it’s imporported that the crowd chanted — “Glover, tant that the full story be remembered when his Glover, speech” — and the old man addressed the name comes up. crowd with a tear in his eye: “Fellow citizens, I “I think the true story needs to come out,” he am always glad to meet with you.” says. “I think people need to know who he was The statue never materialized, and half a and what he stood for, and how he manipulated century later the base stood hidden in tangles things and how he sought his own recognition. … of grass, its plaque gone and its granite edges He did some things that are not acceptable today, chipped away. The Ad Club suggested it be and there’s a reason they’re not acceptable.” moved to the grounds of Expo ’74, now Riverfront Park, but parks officials deemed it inapproorty-eight years after he first arrived in Spopriately “tombstone-appearing.” kane, James Glover knew death was near. His Though most of the names Glover bestowed legs no longer held him, and he refused to go on Spokane’s streets are still used today, he never to bed because he did not believe he would named a street or any other landmark for himself. Glover Middle School was named for him get up again. He’d had Kirtland Cutter design before it opened in 1958, and will be his only a modest, cottage-style home in West Central in civic presence once Glover Field is renamed. 1909, and from there, day and night, he looked In 1931, a decade after Glover’s death, it out from his chair on the tree-covered hills to the was proposed that the recently rebuilt Grand west of Spokane. Avenue be renamed Glover Way. No one liked On Oct. 11, 1921, as Glover kept vigil over the idea. “Absolutely not!” one man commented the city he founded, his first wife died at Eastern in the Chronicle. “Grand boulevard is the grandest State Hospital just shy of 80. No family or birth name we could have for a street so fine. I’m not year was listed on her death certificate, and she a bit strong for this idea of shaking off all the old was buried in the hospital cemetery in a grave names which have meant so much to Spokane.” marked No. 746. A smaller portion of Cliff Drive was briefly conFive weeks later, on the morning of Nov. 18, sidered, and then the idea was dropped. Glover died quietly at his home. For a year and Today the Glover Field monument still a half he had stayed in his chair, and his family exists in Peaceful Valley. The lowest tier of the finally convinced him to go to bed. He died two concrete base is perched in the original place on days later. the hillside along Main, covered in matted leaves At the meeting after his death, the Spokane and littered with punctured cans. The rest of the City Council passed a resolution honoring monument stands in a pale patch of grass beside Glover’s service to the city: the community center, a pillar of anonymous “He died in the fullness of years, honored by granite without any plaque or sign to identify the his fellow citizens, and leaves behind him in the man it once honored. n city he helped to found a monument to perpetu-

G

LETTERS

F

T

Naming the Plaza

o involve the community in selecting a name for the new plaza by City Hall, the city asked for nominations that would “honor, depict and celebrate Spokane” and received several dozen submissions by the end of May. Some nominations that garnered support include John Moyer

Plaza, for the former state senator who opposed the Lincoln Street Bridge project that would have been built across the falls; Isamu L. Jordan Plaza, for the writer and musician who died last year; and names that describe the area’s native people or landscape rather than a specific person.

Those nominations are now with the Plan Commission, which will discuss them at a meeting on Aug. 13 and pass on recommendations for a city council vote. The city plans to hold a naming dedication once the name is finalized.

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Two By Two The Book of Mormon brought back the nontheatergoer’s faith in the musical, and gave a kid from South Dakota a chance at the big time BY LAURA JOHNSON

C

ody Jamison Strand had just been cast as a stand-in for Elder Cunningham in the first national tour of the hit musical The Book of Mormon, but he wasn’t sure exactly how to break the news to his father, an Assemblies of God reverend back in South Dakota. “We’ll just ease your father into this,” his mother had said upon hearing the soundtrack for the first time. The show is crass, in your face, a work people of any devout faith could take issue with. Like almost any other artistic medium, theater doesn’t adhere to strict censorship rules, so without Comedy Central holding them back, South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone, along with Robert Lopez (who co-created the adult puppet musical Avenue Q and co-wrote songs for Frozen), invented the most lovably vulgar musical of the decade. Part homage to the greatness of the American musical, part making fun of it, The Book of Mormon’s songs are ridiculously catchy, the story fast-paced and actually uplifting when it wants to be. The show follows two naïve Mormon missionaries, Elders Kevin Price and Arnold Cunningham, on their quest to convert a Ugandan village. The residents, however, are more worried about things like neighboring warlords, famine, AIDS and maggots in their scrotum than the well-being of their spiritual lives. “It’s kind of a phenomenon, because the show is just so damn good and fresh, something that people have never seen before,” says Strand from Seattle, the tour’s stop before coming to Spokane next week. Strand, now 25, had first seen The Book of Mormon as an impressionable University of South Dakota student when it opened in 2011 on Broadway. He says he remembers watching Josh Gad’s portrayal as the blundering but sweet ...continued on next page

Cody Jamison Strand as Elder Cunningham in The Book of Mormon. JOAN MARCUS PHOTO

AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 31


CULTURE | THEATER “TWO BY TWO,” CONTINUED... Elder Cunningham and thinking that he could do that too. Fresh out of college the next year, with the financial backing of his grandparents, Strand moved to New York City, got an agent, went to his first audition and landed the stand-in role in The Book of Mormon. “It’s stupid how it happened. People said, ‘Oh, we’re so happy for you,’” he recalls, using an affected fake voice of other actors who probably weren’t so happy for him. The stand-in moved to a full-time position, and then a call to the Broadway production before finally joining the Chicago-based tour group in January. After nearly two years with the Elder Cunningham role, Strand says he’s not sick of playing him yet. “I still find new things every time I go on,” Strand says. “And the audience is still eating it up, which is so uplifting. It helps that it’s a comedy.” Theatergoers aren’t tired of seeing it, either. In the three years since it hit Broadway, the musical has been sold out more often than not. Even now, a ticket for the most popular days of the week on Broadway can set you back $500. The show won nine Tony Awards, including Best Musical, and its soundtrack, spiking at No. 3 on the Billboard charts, is the highest-charting Broadway cast album in decades, cementing The Book of Mormon as the musical for people who thought they didn’t like musicals. The Mormon Church has maintained a healthy attitude about the show, but that doesn’t mean it hasn’t fought back. Strand says it’ll often take out ads in theater programs, offering people a chance to peruse the true Book of Mormon. Sometimes real Mormon missionaries, dressed just like the ones portrayed in the show, will stand outside theaters evangelizing. These days, Parker is still a director for the show;

The two missionaries in The Book of Mormon encounter their prospective converts. JOAN MARCUS PHOTO he’ll step in every six months or so to make sure things are still running smoothly. “He can examine the joke and your delivery and tell you exactly how to make it better, mostly because he wrote it,” Strand explains. It was through explaining that all of the jokes and songs had a place in the show, and moved the plot along, that Strand convinced his dad the musical was OK.

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OUTING SAILING LAKE PEND OREILLE LOCATION: Windbag Marina, Sandpoint, Idaho DATE: Thursday, July 24, 5:30 pm DISTANCE SAILED: 6

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Sailing into the sunset near Sandpoint. JEN FORSYTH PHOTO

I

t’s Thursday night. Most people are getting off work and heading home to decompress after their day at the office, looking forward to the weekend ahead. But in Sandpoint, there’s a buzz happening at the Windbag Marina, on the scenic shores of Lake Pend Oreille. At 5:30 pm, a gathering of sailors of all abilities takes place at Fred’s Deck for the Thursday night fun races. This is known as the Skippers Meeting, where representatives from the Sandpoint Sailing Association give an overview of the course for that evening and match up crew and boats. Then, quickly, the boats are off to the starting line. Once the sailboats are out of the marina, they make

their way to the starting line, where horns blow to indicate the starting sequence, a five-minute time frame that can only be described as chaotic. There’s tacking, jibing and good camaraderie, all while seamlessly gliding across the water, using only the wind. There’s no cost, though most boats encourage you to bring a frosty cold one to raise after the race is done. In addition to learning about the exhilarating sport of sailboat racing, there’s an amazing opportunity to take in expansive views of Schweitzer Mountain Resort and the Cabinet Mountain range. — JEN FORSYTH

For Your Consideration BY DEANNA PAN

WEBSITE | A deadly Ebola outbreak is unfolding in West Africa. Sunni extremists are laying siege to northern Iraq. Israel and Hamas are at war. John Boehner is suing the President. The world is a complicated, messy and confusing place — and VOX.COM is here to answer your questions. The news website, led by former Washington Post political blogger Ezra Klein, specializes in explanatory journalism for even the most uninformed reader, answering questions surrounding the day’s headlines — and not just the serious stuff. Vox’s team of writers cover politics, foreign policy, health care and education, but also entertainment and pop culture. Recent “most read” stories include “What’s really driving the Ebola outbreak” and “Why everyone is talking about Howard the Duck”.

PODCAST | Think Radiolab for color theory nerds. 99% INVISIBLE is a quirky radio show that explores the ways in which design and architecture shape our lives. It’s an unusual concept — using a medium that relies on sound to tell stories about physical objects and spaces — but it works because producer Roman Mars has a gift for finding interesting stories in unexpected subjects, like barcodes, high heels and baseball uniforms. One of my favorite episodes tells the story of the original patent troll — Josiah Bacon, whose company bought the rights to rubber dentures in 1864, and his singleminded pursuit to find and sue every dentist using this technology. You can listen to the show at KPBZ 90.3 or prx.org.

DESSERT | To put it lightly, it’s hot as balls outside. I don’t want to cook. Frankly, I do want to move. Give me a bowl of ice cream, a strong A/C and a Netflix subscription and I’m good to go. But alas, eating ice cream for dinner isn’t always a good idea, and I want to keep my dignity intact. So I rely on ARCTIC ZERO. An entire pint — yes, an entire pint — is just 150 calories. That’s because it’s basically a frozen whey protein shake. When you’re hankering for something cold and sweet without a side of shame, a bowl of this stuff — in flavors like Vanilla Maple, Chocolate Peanut Butter, and Cookies and Cream — hits the spot. Visit arcticzero.com to find it at a store near you.

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AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 33


CULTURE | BOOKS

The Final Chapter? Monkeyboy Books’ Marina Drake is caught between holding on or letting go BY E.J. IANNELLI

A

s far back as Marina Drake has been able to delve, there has been a bookstore here at 123 South Wall Street. Before she took on the business, it had been owned and operated by Jerry Thrift, a former buyer at Auntie’s. He gave it its current name, Monkeyboy Books, representing the tidy intersection of his anthropology background and a favorite line from the cult sci-fi movie The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension. Before Jerry it was Greg Delzer, who owned it for four years as Defunct Books before relocating the name and inventory to Iowa City. Sometime before that it was Suntree Books, which sat above Inland Books, also run for a time by Thrift. Prior to that it was allegedly The Yantra, owned by sisters Dorothy and Betty, votaries of metaphysics who bought it from someone called Doug.

Marina Drake, owner of Monkeyboy Books. MATT WEIGAND PHOTO With each change of hands, the oral history gets sketchier, even for Drake’s occasional employee Steel Orr, an itinerant former bookstore owner himself who has worked at Monkeyboy and its various incarnations since the 1970s. “People know that this space is almost meant to be a bookstore because it dates so far back,” says Drake. A native of Montpellier, France, she was compelled to buy the bookstore from Thrift two years ago because she was fond of its carefully curated selection of children’s literature. Now, however, that long concatenation of owners and identities is close to ending forever. Despite advertising in print and online, doing cross-promotion with nearby businesses like Interplayers Theatre, cultivating a devoted circle of repeat customers, and aug-

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menting the previous inventory of 16,000 books, Drake says that Monkeyboy’s sales have fallen to a point where they aren’t even covering essential costs. In reluctant response, she’s begun jettisoning backroom stock, selling whole genres of books for half price, and separating contemporary (post-1980) from classic fiction in a last-ditch appeal to customers’ natural preferences. Even during the store’s heyday there were haphazard piles of books hiding serendipitous finds; today those piles are being stacked for quick sale or donation. “I’m doing this now because my kids are away and I cannot sit here doing nothing. But knowing that I can’t get income from this business, I got a job teaching, and at the end of August I’m going to be very busy. So my question is, how am I going to manage and keep it open?” asks Drake. For now, then, the boxed hardcover anthologies of Dashiell Hammett, the once-read Hollywood and historical biographies, and the vintage Modern Library sets of Jane Austen will remain among and atop the wooden bookshelves, their prices penciled by hand on the corner of the flyleaf. But if the bookstore is unable to rally quickly through, say, the help of skilled volunteers or by finding a new buyer, it will most certainly close, which will result in more than just a vacant space. “Interplayers is trying hard to build a community,” says Drake, “and we are working together with the Rocket [Bakery] to tie this block together. They’re working hard to revive this neighborhood. But if Monkeyboy goes, their effort is going to be cut short.” It comes down to three possible outcomes: selling Monkeyboy outright, donating the stock to schools and locking its doors, or generating the meager average of $100 in daily sales to sustain its operation, says Drake. “There’s also the option to move it somewhere else, but I’m afraid that if I do so, Monkeyboy will never be the same. I have a feeling it’s supposed to be here and nowhere else.” 

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Ancient Libation

Hierophant is just one of three new meaderies that have popped up in the Inland Northwest. ADAM MILLER PHOTO

No longer just for medieval knights, mead is making inroads in the region BY AMY MILLER-KREZELAK

O

nce difficult to find, there are now hundreds of meaderies in the U.S. From 2012 to 2013, mead sales skyrocketed by 130 percent, a margin of growth topping the sales of beer, cider, wine and spirits. Relatively quick turnaround time — approximately two months fermentation — means that meaderies can produce seasonal releases with relative ease. The small-batch mead industry also promotes the health and well being of the honeybee population, because many meaderies use honey from local apiarists committed to sustainable beekeeping practices. Jeremy and Michelle Kyncl are resident mead makers who share an infectious passion for plant sciences, fermentation and honeybees. After experimenting with fermenting grapes, hops and honey for the past eight

36 INLANDER AUGUST 7, 2014

years, the Kyncls kept coming back to mead, and Hierophant Meadery was born. “I’m into making things go bad in a good way,” says Jeremy. “Part of the reason we went into mead was for the freedom. We can put things into mead that you could never put into wine. Unlike beer, there isn’t a brew day. With mead you let it do its thing.” “Mead is a wonderful platform to experiment with plant extracts,” adds Michelle. “Given where the craft [beer] brewing industry is in Spokane, we were worried we would be entering a saturated market, so we went with mead.” The Kyncls brew balanced, dry meads with distinctive flavors to create a delicate product, similar to white wine but much smoother.

“People think they’re going to get this gamey, syrupy mead and they’re surprised. It’s filtered and clean, with intentional flavor additions,” says Michelle. Hierophant Meadery’s current infusions include chamomile, balsam poplar, hops and Douglas fir. For purists, Chrysopoeia, a semi-dry mead, features fragrant wildflower honey from Mt. Spokane. The meadery strives to create blends that will appeal to wine drinkers, beer drinkers and everyone in between. Hierophant Meadery shares the local mead market with the newly opened Fenwyr Cellars Meadery, which celebrated its grand opening this past weekend. Daniel Jessee, the company’s mead master, isn’t new to this game; he’s been brewing mead for about 12 years. “Ever since I started looking into brewing, mead


Jeremy and Michelle Kyncl of Hierophant Meadery. ADAM MILLER PHOTO

MEAD VARIETIES

caught my attention. When I first started getting into it, BRAGGOT: Brew consisting of mead was rare. I just started honey and malted barley, and making it on my own and evoccasionally hops erybody liked it,” says Jessee. CYSER: Blended honey and apple Jessee’s finely tuned meadcider making skills earned his Sweet DRY MEAD: Brewed from honey Mead a first place and reserve and water grand champion in the wine, HIPPOCRASS: Pyment blended cider and mead category at the carefully with spices Spokane Interstate Fair in 2012 MELOMEL: Blended honey, water and 2013. Fenwyr Cellars curand fruit (other than apples or rently is featuring Sweet Mead, grapes) as well as spiced Lhug Sereg, METHEGLIN: Traditional sweet or (dry with hints of pear, kiwi, dry mead blended with complecinnamon, clove, Thai pepper mentary herbs and spices and cayenne), as well as their PYMENT: Blended honey, grape Huckleberry Dry and Hucklejuice and water berry Sweet. SWEET MEAD: Sweeter and lower Though mead is traditionalcohol than dry mead ally served at room temperature, its versatility means you can you can drink it warm or cold, or use it in mixed drinks. In summer, sweet mead is refreshing straight, on ice. Mead’s long shelf life is another strong selling point. “One of the advantages of mead is that it doesn’t oxidize. If you open a bottle you can drink it six months down the road and it will still be good,” says Jessee. But what about the morning after? The mead makers say worrying about high sugar content and hangovers is unnecessary. Practicing common sense when imbibing is recommended, but both meaderies are mindful of sugar and alcohol content. In fact, Jeremy Kyncl at Hierophant says the brewing process of mead actually helps ease the aftereffects. “We ferment at a lower temperature, so the alcohol itself is less likely to cause a hangover. Plus we use less sugar and brew drier,” he says. n

HAPPY HOUR 4-6 PM DAILY Beer sampler paddle

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AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 37


FOOD | OPENING

REAL FOOD, GREAT BEER, FINE WINE, HANDCRAFTED COCKTAILS

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50/Fifty gives you brews, burgers, poker, peanut butter and Thanksgiving BY JO MILLER

Summer Sale Thu -Sat

Fair Trade • Earth Friendly • Local

35 W. Main, Spokane www.kizurispokane.com

T

he name provides a clue as to what’s going on inside this restaurant. “The whole 50/Fifty thing is about blends of flavors,” says 50/Fifty’s general manager Keith Flaherty. The restaurant, which opened in early July at the former Hooters location in Spokane Valley, features a burger inventory ($10$11) with ground, blended-meat patties like half beef and half lamb, half bacon and half beef, and half chicken and half turkey. Perhaps the most peculiar fusion, the “jealous” peanut butter burger’s beef-bacon patty is slathered with peanut butter and strawberry jelly and topped with bacon strips on a brioche bun. The Thanksgiving feast burger only has turkey in the patty, but the toppings are quite a mixture. The mashed potatoes, stuffing, cranberry

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Waitress Summer Williamson with the massive Angry Lucy burger at 50/Fifty. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO sauce, brown gravy and Swiss cheese stacked on this mountainous burger makes for a jumble of flavors, like tossing Thanksgiving into a food processor. But instead of coming out as indigestible slop, it gives the burger a warm, gooey and enjoyable layer. The burger list maintains creativity. In the Angry Lucy, for example, cheese is injected into the beef patty before it’s cooked. Then it’s battered, breaded, deep-fried, tossed in hot sauce and covered with pepper jack and deep-fried jalapeños, onions and pickles. “I would tell people it’s not for the faint of heart,” says Flaherty. “You have to like spicy food, but it’s a nice, messy burger.” 50/Fifty’s four kinds of mac and cheese combine several flavors, including the Tortellini Quattro Mac ($11) of asiago, Parmesan, mascarpone and fontina cheese with artichoke hearts and sun-dried tomatoes. The full bar boasts 50 brews on tap and sits in the middle of the room, joining the restaurant and the Even Stevens Casino (formerly Owl Club Casino), where you can play poker, blackjack and Spanish 21 at the gaming tables and gaze at the 40-plus televisions throughout the building. If you want grub while gaming, menus from 50/Fifty and Egg It On — the breakfast restaurant next door, opened by the same owners in May — are available in the casino during the restaurants’ hours and after 10 pm, until the casino closes around 2 am.  50/Fifty • 16208 E. Indiana, Spokane Valley • Open daily, 11 am-10 pm • facebook.com/50fiftyspokane • 924-8570


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s an avid athlete and marathon runner, Keri Collins found herself with an unexpected amount of free time when she broke her foot. After driving past the “for sale” sign on the recently vacated space in Liberty Lake that housed Barlows restaurant before it moved, Collins decided to fill the building with the business she’d long been pondering. “I had all this free time, so I thought I would do something challenging,” she says. Collins and her husband, who together own Premier Manufacturing in Liberty Lake, opened CorkHouse and gave the space a new, but still homey, feel. “When you walk in, it’s like a house,” says Collins. “You feel comfy and cozy.” The stone fireplace, warmly lit chandeliers and dark wood tables and bar match the gourmet comfort food on the menu. Collins brought on executive chef Brian Hutchins, who previously cooked at several Spokane restaurants, including Luna, Mizuna, Latah Bistro and Clover. Over six weeks, Hutchins tested and wrote the recipes for the brunch, lunch and dinner menus. Classic comfort foods feature a fine dining twist, like the enchiladas ($15) with pulled chicken, quinoa, summer squash, spinach and roasted poblano cream. The mac and cheese ($18) comes as a colorful, rich-tasting mixture of grilled chicken, applewood bacon, jalapeños, sharp cheddar and cotija, topped with a satisfying crunch and a cherry tomato. A page-long wine list offers abundant choices from champagne to white blends to cabernet, and there are plenty of signature cocktails and martinis to choose from. On Saturdays and Sundays starting at 9 am, the brunch menu presents items such as a veggie hash ($12), eggs Benedict ($13), triple-decker BLT ($13) and even a few desserts, including a chai-and-honey brûlée ($6). CorkHouse also has a drive-thru coffee window — something not usually seen at a restaurant — that opens before the dining room at 6 am Mon-Fri and at 7 am Sat-Sun, with Thomas Hammer Coffee and pastries from Sweetwater Bakery. 

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www.kix961.com AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 39


UPDATE | BEER

The Inlander’s Annual

Give e d i u G

On Stands August 28th

A Bigger, Better Ale Trail inlandnwaletrail.com

Produced with support from Spokane County TPA funds.

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eading beer enthusiasts to local craft brews since the fall of 2013, the Inland Northwest Ale Trail is going big-time. The cooperative effort of the region’s craft breweries will almost double its featured breweries, adding 11 to its current 16 and expanding the geographical scope of the program as far west as Yakima. The new map encourages tasting a variety of local brews and offers a 32 oz. growler prize for collecting 12 stamps from different breweries. The revamp of the Ale Trail (inlandnwaletrail.com) comes in the middle of a regional brewery boom that has seen new tourist opportunities, thanks to visitors who come to the area for beer tastings. To kick off the updated map — which can be found

at participating breweries, Ale Trail sponsor locations, the Spokane Visitor Center and many local hotels — there are opportunities to taste new beers, win prizes and meet brewery reps at area bars. The events are scheduled for Black Diamond (Aug. 7), Post Street Ale House (Aug. 12), the Lantern Tap House (Aug. 16), Pints Ale House (Aug. 21) and Capone’s Pub & Grill (Aug. 28). Heather Brandt of Iron Goat Brewing emphasizes that the Ale Trail seeks to bring awareness to the quality of beer being produced in the Inland Northwest. “Ninetynine percent-plus of the ingredients used in all of our brews come from right here in the Inland Northwest,” says Brandt. “It doesn’t get more local than that.” — FRANNY WRIGHT

Get hooked Attention Non-Profit Organizations! This is your chance to tell readers about your organization and how to get involved. Advertising listings will be featured in the annual Give Guide issue and all year on Inlander.com.

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FOOD | SAMPLER

DESSERT NOTHING BUNDT CAKES 2525 E. 29th | 535-4864 The Bundt-cake bakery chain has about 70 locations nationwide; this is the first to open in Washington. Nothing Bundt Cakes has nine yearround cake flavors and one seasonal flavor. (From October to Christmas you can get pumpkin spice.) Each cake — whether it’s white chocolate raspberry, chocolate chocolate chip, red velvet or cinnamon swirl — is wrapped in chunky strokes of cream cheese frosting. The Bundtinis are a 12-pack of bite-sized cakes; the Bundtlets are a single serving. SWEET FROSTINGS BLISSFUL BAKESHOP 15 S. Washington | 242-3845 12501 N. Division | 368-9811 The staff at both locations of this bakery are just as sweet as the cupcakes, macaroons and no-bake cookies they sell, making a visit to either of their boutique bakeries a treat on so many levels. Red velvet, salted caramel, chocolate sugar cake, toasted coconut, lemon smoothie, Key lime pie — trying to choose just one cupcake from the

colorful display at Sweet Frostings isn’t easy, but with a super-fine crumb and magical frosting, there are no bad options. PETIT CHAT VILLAGE BAKERY 9910 N. Waikiki Rd. | 468-2720 After three years of success baking bread in their Whitworth-area location and selling it in grocery stores, owners Brenda and Kevin Gerhart expanded their business, accommodating booths, long tables and benches, bistro tables and comfortable chairs perfect for readers. The menu has been expanded, too. Petit Chat’s chocolate croissants have a semisweet chocolate interior and a light, flaky exterior. Their savory croissants are stuffed with thicksliced ham and generous amounts of Swiss cheese. SPOKANE CHEESECAKES 1420 E. Sprague | 570-0658 Spokane Cheesecakes’ miniature creations are highly addictive, and I don’t really even like cheesecake. Or at least I didn’t think I did until I tried the ginger cheesecake, spiked with spicy chunks of candied ginger on a chewy gingersnap crust. It’s incredibly light and airy, devoid of the usual cheesecake heftiness. 

AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 41


Life Itself

A young Ellar Coltrane with Ethan Hawke. age before our eyes in ways that are emotional as well as physical. And in casting his own daughter as the family’s older sister, Linklater has in a certain sense created a home movie in addition to a work of art. For a movie that was filmed in fits and starts, Boyhood’s fluidity becomes all the more remarkable. There are no title cards or fades to black to indicate the passage of time. But from the get-go, we’re placed on a course to observe a child’s ongoing experience with making sense of the world he’s inherited. From the opening sequence, in which Mason logically explains to his mother why he put rocks in his schoolroom’s pencil sharpener (much to his teacher’s consternation), to the end, in which a passion for photography and a taste of psychedelics strengthen his perceptive abilities, Mason is constantly at a time over a dozen years. The boy of the title, Mason learning about himself and the world he inhabits — as do Jr. (Ellar Coltrane), is 6 years old at the beginning of most of the other players in his life story. the film, and 18 when it concludes with him going off Not only did it take a lot of trust for Linklater to to college. The changes we see in the boy over the years undertake this project, which could have capsized in any are most remarkable: The baby fat gives way to a lanky number of ways over the years, credit must be given both young man, and Mason develops from a child with little to his cast for sticking with the film and carving control over his life into a BOYHOOD out erratic but dedicated time in their schedules to thoughtful young adult with Rated R make it happen, and to his distributor, IFC Films an artistic bent, ready to Written and directed by Richard Linklater and its president Jonathan Sehring, for the uncondiscover his life’s story. Starring Ellar Coltrane, Ethan Hawke, ventional financing, which offered no avenue for Yet Boyhood, by the very Patricia Arquette immediate gratification. nature of its 12-year apThe originality of Boyhood clearly extends proach, also allows us to witbeyond what we see up on the screen, and it’s this film ness time’s effects on Mason’s family: his mother Olivia — even more so than the career landmarks of Slacker and (Patricia Arquette), father Mason Sr. (Ethan Hawke), the Before trilogy — that will earn Linklater a place of imand older sister Samantha (Lorelei Linklater). Divorced mortality in the history books.  prior to the beginning of the film, Mason’s parents, too,

Boyhood, made over the course of a dozen years, is Richard Linklater’s masterpiece BY MARJORIE BAUMGARTEN

T

he development of personhood as it is experienced — day-by-day, year in and year out — is the subject of Boyhood. In this sense, Richard Linklater has created the ultimate coming-of-age film, one that transcends the usual constructs of the genre, which often posits one big event or trauma as the kick in the rear that propels a character toward maturation or a greater sense of the world beyond oneself. Linklater’s newest film, a true masterwork, eschews this big-bang theory of dramatics in favor of the millionand-one little things that accumulate daily and help shape who we are, and who we will become. Childhood is particularly rife with these developmental moments, but the process never stops — not really, if you’re a sentient human being. Much has already been written about Boyhood and its 12-year process of filming in small bursts of a few days

42 INLANDER AUGUST 7, 2014


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS

WHITEY: THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA VS. JAMES J. BULGER

This documentary by Joe Berlinger, who brought us the Paradise Lost series that’s credited in playing a part in freeing the West Memphis Three, doesn’t make notorious mobster, drug lord and murderer Whitey Bulger look great. But it also doesn’t do much for the reputation of the FBI, which as you see in this hard-driving film, did nothing to stop Bulger’s terrorization of south Boston for much of 30 years. In fact, they may have helped him in, among other things, escaping trial for 16 years while he was on the run. Bulger’s crimes are detailed here through his 2013 trial and they’re horrific, but so is the deep corruption that ran through the law enforcement agencies charged with stopping him. Scorsese couldn’t have even dreamed up a mob story like this. At Magic Lantern (MIKE BOOKEY) Rated R

BOYHOOD

Richard Linklater’s newest film, shot over the course of 12 years, is a true masterwork and eschews the bigbang theory of dramatics in favor of the million-and-one little things that accumulate daily and help shape who we are, and who we will become. The story focuses on Mason, who we follow from age 7 to 19 as he struggles with divorced parents and the process of learning how to navigate the world. (MB) Rated R

HUNDRED- FOOT JOURNEY

Directed by Lasse Hallstrom, The Hundred-Foot Journey is the story of Hassan Kadam and his family. After relocating from their home country, India, the Kadam family decides to open an Indian restaurant, Maison Mumbai, in their new home in the south of France. After seeing Maison Mumbai, Madame Mallory, the harsh restaurant owner across the street, senses competition and treats her new competitors with vengeance. (MAB) Rated PG

INTO THE STORM

In the small northern Oklahoma town of Silverton, a team of storm chasers — led by driven filmmaker Pete (Matt Walsh) and meteorological researcher Allison (Sarah Wayne Callies) — try to find some amazing footage for their planned documentary before their

funding runs out. Meanwhile, it’s highschool graduation day in Silverton, and vice-principal Gary (Richard Armitage) is trying to track down his missing son, Donnie (Max Deacon). Then, a massive tornado hits. (SR) Rated PG-13

I ORIGINS

While studying the evolution of the eye, molecular biologist Dr. Ian Gray becomes all consumed with his project. After years of researching, Dr. Gray and his colleague Karen make a lifealtering discovery that causes them question both their spiritual and scientific beliefs. In order to prove their findings right, Dr. Gray travels around the world while endangering everything he has ever known. (MAB) Rated R

STEP UP: ALL IN

So the first Step Up film (2006) wasn’t too terrible — it starred Channing Tatum and eventual wife Jenna Dewan — but as it typically goes, any Hollywood franchise taken too far loses originality pretty fast. We’re now on the fourth sequel to the first film, starring a few original cast members, though the Tatums have since moved on to bigger and better roles. This time, the dance crew heads to Vegas to try its luck at an America’s Best Dance Crew-esque competition. (CS) Rated PG-13.

Providence Cares The health of our community goes beyond good medicine.

In 2013, Providence offered $30 million in free and discounted care so the uninsured and underinsured could access health care. This charity care is a part of Providence’s totalcommunity community Providence’stotal benefit of $133 million.

Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital Providence Holy Family Hospital Providence Spokane Heart Institute Providence Mount Carmel Hospital Providence St. Joseph’s Hospital Providence Medical Group Providence VNA Home Health Providence DominiCare Providence St. Joseph Care Center Providence Adult Day Health Providence Emilie Court Assisted Living

To learn more about how Providence serves the communities we call home, visit phc.org

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FILM | SHORTS

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Gretta (Keira Knightley) has been dragged onstage at a bar open-mic night by a friend (James Corden) to perform an original composition; in the crowd is Dan (Mark Ruffalo), a once-hot music industry executive. But Dan hears something in Gretta’s song — we see what he hears in a cutesy bit where instruments float in the air, playing the arrangement in his head — and he becomes determined to record her work and get her a distribution deal. (SR) Rated R

ALL SHOWS ALL TIMES

X-Men: Days of Future Past Fri-Mon 12:00 7:15, Tues 12:00 Wed-Thurs 12:00 7:15

The Fault in Our Stars Fri-Thurs 2:35

PG-13

BELLE

Edge of Tomorrow Fri-Thurs 5:00

PG-13 PG-13

Godzilla

Fri-Mon 9:45pm, Tues 9:30pm Wed 9:45pm

Labyrinth

Sat Midnight Tues 7:15, Thurs 9:45pm

madagascar

Mon-Thurs 9:30am

How to Train Your Dragon Fri 9:30am

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BELLE (108 MIN PG)

Fri/Sat: 6:30 Sun: 4:30 Tue-Thu: 6:30

GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (96 MIN PG-13) Fri/Sat: 8:30 Sun: 6:30 Tue-Thu: 8:30

LIFE ITSELF (118 MIN PG 13)

Fri/Sat: 3:30 Sun: 1:45 Tue-Thu: 3:30

THE GRAND SEDUCTION (109 MIN)

Fri/Sat: 6:00 Sun: 4:00 Tue-Thu: 6:00

SNOWPIERCER (121 MIN -R)

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Dido Elizabeth Belle (Gugu MbathaRaw) has always lived her life between two worlds. The illegitimate child of Admiral Sir John Lindsay (Matthew Goode), Belle is of a higher rank than the servants, but cannot eat with her own family because of her mixed-race status. Strangled by class systems and prejudice, Belle begins to find her voice only when she falls in love with a man who wants to change the world for the better, but does not have the rank her family requires. At Magic Lantern (ER) Rated PG

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES

It’s been a few years since James Franco’s ape Caesar took smart pills and then led every other ape in the greater Bay Area on a rampage of epic proportions. Those smart pills ended up causing a worldwide epidemic, killing off much of the human race. War took care of many others. Now, the surviving humans are bristling up against the apes, led by Caesar and the two species are on the brink of war. Gary Oldman and Keri Russell lead a stellar cast. (MB) Rated PG-13

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS

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The girl has cancer, the boy is in remission from cancer; this story can only end badly. As far as teenage cancer love stories go, John Green’s recent young adult novel of the same name isn’t half bad — not nearly as sappy as A Walk to Remember. With Shailene Woodley (The Descendants, Divergent) as the lead for this film adaption, many lovesick teenage girls and their boyfriends will show up for this one. (LJ) Rated PG-13

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The James Brown story told here is less a portrait of how he became the “Godfather of Soul” and more a series of snapshots of his life, told in jumps and starts, and flashes backward and forward. The music and musical performances are exciting, and Chadwick Boseman (who played Jackie Robinson in 42) has perfectly caught the moves and moods of Brown. And there are fine turns from Nelsan Ellis as Brown’s long-suffering bandmate Bobby Byrd and from Dan Aykroyd as music agent Ben Bart. (ES) Rated PG-13

THE GRAND SEDUCTION

Taking place in the village of Tickle Cove, this film details the tiny village’s attempt to “seduce” doctor Paul Lewis to live and work in their town. Without a town doctor they are not able to open a factory, which will provide enough jobs to save their village from financial crisis.

To convince the doctor to stay, the villagers join efforts to make their town appealing — it truly is a grand seduction. At Magic Lantern (MAB) Rated PG-13

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

The titular Guardians are a ragtag, fivepronged crew of interstellar outcasts tasked with stopping Ronan the Accuser (Lee Pace), a rogue zealot bent on planetary destruction. The Guardians are led by Peter Quill (Chris Pratt), a cocky, wisecracking treasure hunter from Earth who likes to go by Star-Lord. (SS) Rated PG-13

HERCULES

Oh wow, The Rock grew a beard! Or had someone in makeup put a beard on him. Either way, that beard for some reason means that he’s Hercules, the mythological strong man who endured 12 labors and came out clean on the other side. In this take, Hercules, post labors, is essentially a mercenary and is hired to take down an evil warlord played by John Hurt. (MB) Rated PG-13

IDA

Taking place in Poland in 1962, Ida is the story of an aspiring nun, Anna. The graceful 18-year-old hopes to take her vows in the same convent she has lived in since being orphaned. But before her vows are complete, she is required to meet with an unknown family member that will change her perspective on life. Family secrets from the dark Nazi occupation are revealed and this sends Anna on a journey in hope of finding clarity. At Magic Lantern (MAB) Rated PG-13

LIFE ITSELF

This documentary, intimately detailing the last years of Roger Ebert’s life, not only inspires and entertains, but also presents a more fully realized portrait of him than I’ve ever encountered. Being a study of Ebert, it is, by necessity, also a film about movies. Eloquent, it is surprisingly moving and beautifully structured. Directed by Steve James. At Magic Lantern. (LB) Rated R

LUCY

Scarlett Johansson continues her scifi streak playing the titular character working as a drug mule in Taiwan when

a drug accidentally leaks into her system, somehow giving her access to 100 percent of her brain. Now in possession of otherworldly powers, Lucy goes on a rampage to take vengeance against those who’ve wronged her. Morgan Freeman stars, naturally, as the brainy professor who explains all the scientific stuff. (MB) Rated R

A MOST WANTED MAN

It’s tough to see these posthumously released Phillip Seymour Hoffman films and realize the talent that was lost, but here we go again with A Most Wanted Man. Hoffman plays a German intelligence officer who is trying to ferret out terrorists in Hamburg, the city where the Sept. 11 attacks were planned and where paranoia runs high. Adapted from the novel by John le Carre, the film also stars Rachel McAdams, Willem Dafoe and Robin Wright. (MB) Rated R

THE PURGE: ANARCHY

This is the sequel to last year’s sneaker hit about a future in which all crime (including murder) is legal in the U.S. for a single 12-hour period each year. This time around, the Purge is still very much happening and five people find themselves stranded on the streets of Los Angeles as night falls, making them prey for all those on the prowl in search of something to kill. (MB) Rated R

SNOWPIERCER

It’s the future and everything is super screwed up thanks to a weather control experiment gone wrong, leaving the world completely frozen. The only remaining humans live on a train that circles the globe, never stopping. On that train, there’s a strict divide between the haves and have-nots, overseen by a fierce administrator played by Tilda Swinton. When a rebellion rises, things go way, way off the tracks. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R

WISH I WAS HERE

Zach Braff plays a struggling actor who’s trying to keep a family together, but there’s no one in particular to care much about. The other performances are competent. This is a small dramatic comedy. Too bad that Braff and his coscripter brother try to make a bigger deal out of it. (ES) Rated R 

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The downside of storm chasing.

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INTO THE STORM

PG-13 Daily (11:20) (1:20) (3:20) (5:25) 7:30 9:35

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

PG-13 Daily (10:00) (1:10) (3:50) 6:30 9:10 In 2D Daily (10:30) (1:40) (4:20) 7:00 8:50 9:40

GET ON UP

Times For 8/8 - 8/14

PG-13 Daily (12:45) (3:45) 6:45 9:45

LUCY

R Daily (11:00) (1:10) (3:15) (5:15) 7:15 9:15

HERCULES

Into the Storm’s CGI tornadoes don’t have enough star power

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (2:15) (4:30) 6:45 9:00

AND SO IT GOES

PG-13 Daily (2:50) (5:10) 7:15 Fri-Sun (12:45)

PLANES: FIRE & RESCUE

BY SCOTT RENSHAW

PG Daily (11:00) (1:00) (3:00) (5:00) 7:00

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES

T

here’s something almost quaint about the their planned documentary before their funding idea that, once upon a time, the stars of runs out. Meanwhile, it’s high-school graduation disaster movies were … well, stars. In the day in Silverton, and vice-principal Gary (Rich1970s, when disaster was big box-office business, ard Armitage) is trying to track down his missing filmmakers gave their massive-scale, life-threatenson, Donnie (Max Deacon). ing scenarios a patina of respectability by casting If you were feeling generous, you could say big-name, above-the-line talent in the lead roles: that the framing structure is employed when Burt Lancaster in Airport, Gene Hackman and it proves convenient, and abandoned when it Shelley Winters in The Poseidon Adventure, Paul doesn’t. It’s certainly efficient that Donnie is Newman and Steve McQueen making video time-capsule reINTO THE STORM in The Towering Inferno, Charlton cordings that allow us to know Rated PG-13 Heston in Earthquake, Heston within a matter of moments that Directed by Steven Quale again in Airport 1975. his mom is dead and that Gary Starring Richard Armitage, Sarah Wayne Then came the 1990s and is tense and distant. And when Callies, Matt Walsh the CGI visual-effects age — director Steven Quale (Final and with it, the notion that Destination 5) occasionally would the disaster itself was the above-the-line star. So rather feature an impressive God’s-eye-view shot while Roland Emmerich (Independence Day, The of destruction? Hey, there’s no need to get doctriDay After Tomorrow, 2012) may keep that spirit naire about this whole found-footage business. alive, more common are blockbusters in the spirit Despite the leaps in CGI capabilities in the of 1996’s Twister, where the end of any given nearly 20 years since Twister, Into the Storm doesn’t storm sequence was an implicit cue to audience exactly break new ground in showing flying members that it was safe to visit the bathroom or debris and people clinging to something for dear snack bar. life lest they be swept up into the funnel. The Into the Storm continues in that tradition, adddisaster movie may still serve its primal function ing the device, now seemingly even more popuof letting us know that people forget their petty lar, of found footage. In the small northern Oklaquarrels and take care of the things (and people) homa town of Silverton, a team of storm chasers that really matter when the chips are down, but if — led by driven filmmaker Pete (Matt Walsh) and Into the Storm isn’t going to elevate the state of the meteorological researcher Allison (Sarah Wayne art in storm porn, why not stay home and watch Callies) — try to find some amazing footage for the Discovery Channel? 

TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES

PG-13 Daily (2:00) 9:00 In 2D Daily (11:45) (4:20) 6:40 Fri-Sun (10:45)

PG-13 Daily (10:45) (1:30) (4:15) 7:00 9:45

TRANSFORMERS: AGE OF EXTINCTION PG-13 Daily 9:15

EARTH TO ECHO

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TEENAGE MUTANT NINJA TURTLES

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STEP UP ALL IN

PG-13 Daily (2:30) 7:20 In 2D Daily (11:50) (4:50) 9:45

INTO THE STORM

PG-13 Daily (11:20) (1:20) (3:20) (5:25) 7:30 9:35

THE HUNDRED-FOOT JOURNEY

PG Daily (11:00) (1:40) (4:10) 6:50 9:30

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

What movie should we see? Where is it playing? When should we go?

The answer to life’s great questions.

PG-13 Daily (10:00) (1:10) (3:50) 6:30 9:10 In 2D Daily (10:30) (1:40) (4:20) 7:00 8:50 9:40

GET ON UP

PG-13 Daily (12:45) (3:45) 6:45 9:45

LUCY

R Daily (11:00) (1:00) (3:00) (5:00) 7:10 9:20

HERCULES

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (2:15) (4:50) 7:10 9:35

AND SO IT GOES

PG-13 Daily (2:50) 7:25

PLANES: FIRE & RESCUE

PG Daily (11:00) (1:00) (3:00) (5:00) 7:00

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES PG-13 Daily (10:45) (1:30) (4:15) 7:00 9:45

TAMMY

R Daily (5:10) 9:20 Fri-Sun (12:45)

TRANSFORMERS: AGE OF EXTINCTION PG-13 Daily (2:50) 6:20 9:30 Fri-Sun (11:30)

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2

PG Daily (2:50) (5:00) Fri-Sun (10:30) (12:40)

EARTH TO ECHO

PG Fri-Sun (10:45) Mon-Thu (10:00) (12:30)

Always in reach

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 8/8/14-8/14/14

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See Change Against Me! saw their frontman become a frontwoman, but the band is as loud as ever BY LAURA JOHNSON

A

singer’s voice is likely to blossom into something new as time passes. But drummer Atom Willard wondered if Against Me! frontwoman Laura Jane Grace’s (born Tom Gabel) voice would transform into that of a woman, like the rest of her body was beginning to. “She told me, ‘I love my voice, I love my singing voice, I won’t touch it,’ and for me that was done,” says Willard about the time he was asked to play with the punk-rock outfit Against Me! in late 2012. When Grace announced in a Rolling Stone interview earlier that year that she had gender dysphoria and that she would begin living as a woman, things changed. While everyone in the band said they were cool with the transition, two of the band members would eventually leave within six months of each other to focus on other things. Raising a daughter together, her wife Heather would stay by her side

(although they have recently separated). Her father wouldn’t speak to her anymore. None of it was easy, but the fans remained loyal. This change wasn’t happening to an obscure band, but rather one with a die-hard following. Formed in Gainesville, Florida, as then-Tom Gabel’s solo act in the late ’90s, then adding members and volume, the band drew much attention in the punk scene and their 2007 album New Wave was even named Spin’s album of the year. When Willard answers his cellphone for the interview last week, he pauses for a second, coughing effectively to the side. “I just coughed up a raccoon,” he says. “There it goes running off …” And so goes the conversation, rocking and rolling back and forth, sarcasm and truth. ...continued on next page

AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 47


MUSIC | PUNK “SEE CHANGE,” CONTINUED... At 40, Willard is a veteran drummer who’s played with Rocket from the Crypt, the Offspring, Angels & Airwaves and Social Distortion, among other acts. Willard heard Against Me! for the first time at a radio-sponsored show back in 2007. “I just thought, ‘What the f--- is that?’,” Willard says. “I ran to the side of the stage to hear them, and of course that was the last song.” He would meet the band that night as a newly minted fan, getting to know them even better the following year on the Warped Tour. So when there was “a drummer emergency” before an upcoming Australian tour and Grace called, wondering if he could fill in on drums, Willard already knew most of the songs anyway. “Laura’s transition didn’t affect me in any way. If you listened to her lyrics, you got that she’d been talking about it for 15 years,” Willard says. “Her voice was what I cared about. It’s the band’s driving force.” He’s wanted to find a home where he could settle, and finally, here it is. The best part, Willard says, is that the band actually likes each other, “and they all play like motherf---ers,” he says with a laugh. “Against Me! just hadn’t found the right drummer yet,” he says. The current crew lives all over: Willard in L.A., Grace in Chicago, guitarist James Bowman in New York, and the newest addition, bassist Inge Johansson, in Oslo, Norway. They don’t get

to see their homes that often anyway. They have a new record to promote, Transgender Dysphoria Blues — a booming concept album about a transgender prostitute. The record itself took more than two years to complete. The stutters and stops seemed never-ending. Once Willard was asked to stay on permanently, they had to re-record, as his exorbitantly loud style of playing didn’t fit into what was there before. New songs were added. Finally, the album was released this January. Willard describes working with Grace as organic, “in the way musicians like to use that term,” he jokes. The band keeps moving forward, playing as hard as ever, continuing to receive attention for something that doesn’t have to do with music at all. Willard says they plan to release a live album from the current tour later this year. Meanwhile, Grace is launching an AOL reality series, which documents her own transition and meeting other trans people as she tours around the country promoting the latest record. Against Me! shows haven’t changed a whole hell of a lot in atmosphere. They’re just as wild as ever, with pummeling drums and vocals and an overactive mosh pit. Only now, Grace has long hair, and sometimes wears heels. n Against Me! with Creepoid and Venus De Mars • Tue, Aug. 12, at 8 pm • $17 • Allages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

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MUSIC | ROCK You’re Invited to Lunch! Now Open at 1 1 am We’re excited to announce the beginning of a new chapter for Andy’s, we’ve surprised you with BRUNCH, filled you up with DINNER, and now we’re gonna tackle LUNCH!

Thursday Aug 7th

LOS CHINGADORES! Friday Aug 8th

BUFFALO JONES Saturday Aug 9th

THE BEAMERS Sunday FUN DAY Aug 10th

THE NEHEMIAH SHOW Happy Times for everyone!

Monday Aug 11th

TRIVIA! Starts at 7pm Tuesday Aug 12th

OPEN MIC OF OPENNESS AND THEN THE MONDEGREENS

The Gateway Bar Between Downtown & Browne’s Addition

Wednesday Aug 13th

Arcade Fire has requested concert-goers arrive in costume for their on-going tour.

Arena Karaoke Arcade Fire has been playing a hell of a tour, complete with locally inspired cover songs BY MIKE BOOKEY

A

rcade Fire’s marathon tour behind its Reflektor album has been a sort of grandiose venture full of confetti, papier-mâché masks and arena-sized dance parties that we’ve come to expect from this band. At this point in the band’s decade-long career, you’d be a bit let down if there wasn’t something utterly bizarre at an Arcade Fire show. What do you expect from a band that has requested fans arrive to the show in costume? This summer, though, Win Butler and his motley troupe of Canadian multi-instrumentalists have been doing something that’s weird, even for Arcade Fire — they’ve been playing cover songs. A lot of them, too. Playing other peoples’ songs is hardly innovative or new, but the way in which Arcade Fire has gone about it for this tour’s American shows has been worth noting. The band has been rolling out regionally relevant covers nearly every show, breaking up a set list that’s stayed mostly static from city to city. In Kansas City, they played “Dust in the Wind,” by the band Kansas (yeah, K.C. is in Missouri, but forgive the band, they’re Canadian). In Atlanta, they ripped through a take on “Radio Free Europe,” paying tribute to the Georgia boys in R.E.M. When they played in Columbus, Ohio, they dished out “Uncontrollable Urge” by Devo, which formed in nearby Akron. Two recent shows at the Forum in Los Angeles saw

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the band pay tribute to FULL a couple of L.A. heavyFILEPATH: weights from days goneAdvertising:Accounts:J-L:JonesRadiator:08.07.14 by with “Been Caught 2v:JonesRadiator_080714_2V URL LINK: Stealing” by Jane’s Addiction and a tease of Guns N’ Roses’ “Sweet Childhttp://www.inlander.com o’ Mine” one night, then a sloppy take on “Axel F,” better known as the theme to Beverly Hills Cop. Perhaps the best cover es! specials & priz so far was when Arcade Fire evoked the spirit of Dancing, drink Creedence Clearwater Revival in the Bay Area st glow gear! with a dead-on rendition of “Hey Tonight.” Contests for be A lot of tours have gimmicks like this, but it’s s& a decent one, and it’s leaving plenty of Arcade Bring your friend Fire fans wondering what cover will come out of ow! the sure-to-be-outrageous show at the Gorge Amget ready to gl phitheatre on Friday night. Obviously, it’s going to be something from a Seattle band. A Nirvana tune seems too expected, but maybe a Soundgarden or Pearl Jam cut? Or Win Butler could drop some rhymes with a Macklemore and Ryan Lewis track. Sir Mix-a-Lot, maybe? A selection Hosted by: from Heart’s catalogue? Or maybe something like “Louie, Louie,” which once was almost the official song of the state of Washington? Whatever happens, it’s going to be excellently weird. You can count on that. n mikeb@inlander.com Arcade Fire with The Antlers, Dan Deacon • Fri, Aug. 8, at 7:30 pm • $39-$85 (fees included) • Gorge Amphitheatre • 754 Silica Road NW, George, Wash. • livenation.com • 785-6262

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MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCK BORN TO BE WILD

M

aybe you own a motorcycle, maybe you don’t. On Saturday night, you can easily slip into an Easy Rider state of mind at the Born to Be Wild concert. Featuring original members of Steppenwolf (keyboardist Goldy McJohn) and Pegasus (guitarist Glen Bui), Born to Be Wild primarily plays a rock ‘n’ roll set list of Steppenwolf’s greatest hits, like “Born to Be Wild” and “Magic Carpet Ride.” The group will be fresh from playing the Sturgis Motorcycle Rally when they zoom through cycle hot spot Daley’s Cheap Shots, surely bringing a taste of Sturgis along with them. — LAURA JOHNSON Born to Be Wild • Sat, Aug. 9, at 7 pm • $20 • 21+ • Daley’s Cheap Shots • 6412 E. Trent, Spokane Valley • 535-9309

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 08/07

219 LOUNGE (208-263-9934), Truck Mills, Cryin Shame ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Performers on the Patio feat. Spokane Brass Quintet BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J BING CROSBY THEATER, Jonny Lang J COEUR D’ALENE PARK, Browne’s Addition Summer Concerts feat. Nobody Famous CURLEY’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE J FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT, The Head and the Heart, Mikey & Matty THE HANDLE BAR, Six-Strings n’ Pearls J HAYDEN CITY PARK, Strictly Business J THE HOP!, Betraying The Martyrs Adestria, and more JOHN’S ALLEY, Sweet Lillies JONES RADIATOR, Los Chingadores J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Particlehead MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE (208-265-9382), Open mic with Scott Reid O’SHAY’S, Open mic J RED ROOM LOUNGE, Soulja Boy, Benji Frankkz, J RIVERSTONE PARK, Summer Concerts at Riverstone feat. Northpoint TEMPLIN’S RED LION (208-773-1611), Rockin’ on the River feat. Sammy Eubanks J THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Photo Atlas, Banish the Echo WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, Pacific Suns ZOLA, L.O.S.

Friday, 08/08 BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn

50 INLANDER AUGUST 7, 2014

FOLK ROCK MAMA DOLL

F

or those who didn’t get to hear Mama Doll at Volume — the show’s line snaked so far down the sidewalk many never made it inside — here’s another chance to hear the four-piece indie folk act play at their upcoming album release show. Their debut album, As the Crow Flies, is a mix of melancholy, sweet harmonies and rockin’ riffs you’ve come to expect from the group. Songs like “Rumors” and “As the Crow Flies” (formerly known as “Crow Song”) have been on their website since they were just a two-piece, so getting to hear the newer songs on the album shows just how far they’ve come in the year they’ve been together — especially lovely is “Between Lovers.” This weekend’s show kicks off the group’s monthlong West Coast tour. — LAURA JOHNSON Mama Doll with Dova • Sat, Aug. 9, at 8 pm • $10/$12 day of • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

J THE BIG DIPPER, Night Nurse with Diazepam, Rot Monger and Blacktracks BOLO’S, Dragonfly BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Triple Shot CARLIN BAY RESORT, Karma’s Circle COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Ron Greene, Smash Hit Carnival, Bob Sletner Duo CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, Mumbo Jumbo CURLEY’S, Shiner FEDORA PUB, Jan Harrison Trio J FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT, Huey Lewis & The News with Miah Kohal Band [SOLD-OUT] FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Krashbox FORTY-ONE SOUTH (208-265-2000), Truck Mills FREDNECK’S (291-3880), Ken Davis GATEWAY MARINA AND RESORT (208-582-3883), Bad Monkey

J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Arcade Fire (See story on page 49) GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Nicole Lewis HILL’S RESORT (208-443-2551), Sammy Eubanks J THE HIVE EVENT CENTER (208290-3048), Dirty Dozen Brass Band with DJ Logic J THE HOP!, Natty Vibes, Facedown IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY (208-2902280), Charley Packard IRON HORSE BAR, Phoenix JOHN’S ALLEY, Wil Kinky JONES RADIATOR, Buffalo Jones THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE (3159531), Andy Rumsey LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil and Jay Condiotti, Phil Lamb THE MEMBERS LOUNGE (703-7115), Fabulous Fridays ft. DJ Wesone NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Rascal Flatts

NYNE, DJ The Divine Jewels ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S (208-6899968), Untyed J PARK BENCH CAFE (456-4349), Endangered Species J RATHDRUM CITY PARK, Barry Aiken and North Point ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Ryan Larsen Band ROCKER ROOM, YESTERDAYSCAKE J THE SHOP, Tanner Azzinnaro SILVER FOX (208-667-9442), The Usual Suspects SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT (866344-2675), Mark Holt SPIKE’S PHILLYS AND MORE (4893647), Dimestore Prophits SULLIVAN SCOREBOARD (891-0880), Slightly Committed TWISP CAFE (891-0880), AlgoRhythms THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, The Backups, Ruben & Jordan

WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, Echo Elysium ZOLA, Whack A Mole

Saturday, 08/09

J THE BARTLETT, Mama Doll album release (See story above), Dova BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Colourflies, Willow BOLO’S, Dragonfly BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Triple Shot CARLIN BAY RESORT, Karma’s Circle J CHAPS, Just Plain Darin CHECKERBOARD BAR, Von Grimorog, Amnija, Slip Stream COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Ron Greene, Smash Hit Carnival, Bob Sletner Duo COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS (208-6642336), Steven Harris CONKLING MARINA & RESORT,


Mumbo Jumbo CURLEY’S, Shiner  DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Born to Be Wild (See story on facing page)  DOWNTOWN SANDPOINT, Summer Sounds feat. Triolet  FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT, Festival at Sandpoint feat. Nickel Creek with Head for the Hills, Pear FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Krashbox GATEWAY MARINA AND RESORT (208-582-3883), Bad Monkey  GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Bruno Mars HILL’S RESORT (208-443-2551), Sammy Eubanks  THE HIVE EVENT CENTER (208290-3048), Moon Taxi  THE HOP!, Venture Crew IRON HORSE BAR, Phoenix JOHN’S ALLEY, Whiskey Syndicate JONES RADIATOR, The Beamers THE LARIAT (466-9918), Red Eye Logic LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Madeline McNeil NEWPORT EAGLES, Johnny & the Moondogs NYNE, DJ C-Mad ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S (208-6899968), Untyed PEND OREILLE PLAYHOUSE (4479900), Sane Man ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Ryan Larsen Band ROCKER ROOM, YESTERDAYSCAKE  ROCKET MARKET, Tommy Grant SPIKE’S PHILLYS AND MORE (4893647), Cross My Heart

SULLIVAN SCOREBOARD (891-0880), Slightly Committed TRINITY AT CITY BEACH (208-2557558), Truck Mills, Bright Moments  TWISP CAFE (474-9146), The Oracle’s Kitchen UNDERGROUND 15, Quarter Monkey, Dammit Jim USK BAR AND GRILL (445-1262), The Usual Suspects THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Mayfair WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, Pacific Suns WILLOW SPRINGS (235-4420), SixStrings n’ Pearls ZOLA, Raggs and Bush Doktor

Sunday, 08/10

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Concerts on the Cliff feat. Sammy Eubanks BIG BARN BREWING CO. (238-2489), Music on the Lawn feat. The Tenants THE CELLAR, Traveling Keys Dueling Piano Show COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh, Echo Elysium  COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, David Raitt & the Baja Boogie Band CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, A Box of Rocks Band CURLEY’S, Hoodoo Udu DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church  THE HOP!, Like Moths To Flames Palisades, Elitist and more JOHN’S ALLEY, Stephanie Nilles  KELLY’S IRISH PUB, Songwriter

Sundays with the Flying Mammals WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, Chris Lucas ZOLA, Bill Bozly

Monday, 08/11

 BING CROSBY THEATER, Robert Cray Band, Sammy Eubanks  CALYPSOS (208-665-0591), Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills  THE HOP!, Elektro Grave presents “Even Death May Die” JOHN’S ALLEY, Left Coast Country  RICO’S (332-6566), Open Mic ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 08/12

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, The Rub ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Stars on the Hill  THE BARTLETT, Open Mic BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BORRACHO TACOS & TEQUILERIA (822-7789), DJ D3VIN3 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN (208-292-4813), Echo Elysium  DOWNTOWN COEUR D’ALENE, Bakin’ Phat FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills  THE HOP!, Ion, Aberrance, Xingaia, Serpentspire, Abode for the Dead JONES RADIATOR, The Mondegreens  KNITTING FACTORY, Against Me! (See story on page 48), Creepoid, Venus De Mars REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Town

Mountain  ROCKET MARKET, Lyle Morse ZOLA, The Bucket List

Wednesday, 08/13 219 LOUNGE (208-263-9934), Truck Mills  THE BARTLETT, Mandolin Orange BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Reggae Night  DOWNTOWN COEUR D’ALENE, Live After 5 feat. The Maw Band EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho  FOUNTAIN CAFE (625-6656), Paul Grove  JOHN’S ALLEY, Marshall McLean Band JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop Jazz LA ROSA CLUB, Robert Beadling THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE (3159531), Open Turntables Night LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3  MOOTSY’S, Slutty Hearts  THE NEST AT KENDALL YARDS, Rock the Nest feat. The Cronkites PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, David Walsh WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, Nate Ostrander

Coming Up ...

FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, Aug. 14 THE BARTLETT, Man Man, Landlady, Aug. 14 THE BIG DIPPER, Boris, Master Musicians of Bukkake, Aug. 15

Woodinville Warehouse District

$239

October 18th-19th

per Person

$359

for Two

Trip includes: Breakfast, Lunch Snacks, Comfortable Bus Ride, and a night at the Mariott Hotel

*VISITING 30 WINERIES AND 4 BREWERIES!

Contact Radio Spokane for Reservations! 509-448-1000 SPOKANE

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 THE BLIND BUCK • 204 N. Division • 290-6229 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CARLIN BAY RESORT • 14691 Idaho 97, Harrison, • 208-689-3295 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 20 W. Jerry Ln., Worley • 208-263-6971 CONKLING MARINA • 20 W. Jerry Ln, Worley • 208-686-1151 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LIBRARY LOUNGE • 110 E. 4th Ave. •747-3371 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 456-5678 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 THE ROCK BAR • 13921 E. Trent Ave. • 43-3796 ROCKER ROOM • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 ROCKET MARKET • 726 E. 43rd Ave. • 343-2253 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 UNDERGROUND 15 • 15 S. Howard St. • 290-2122 THE VAULT • 120 N. Wall St. • 863-9597 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON • 1914 N. Monroe St. • 474-9040 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 51


THEATER BEND AND SNAP

She sings and dances, attends Harvard Law and wouldn’t be caught dead in last season’s shoes. And this time around, she’s also a young actress (Sierra Perrins) from the local community. The Spokane Civic Theatre’s production of Legally Blonde, directed by Delvone Bullis, is the culminating event of the summer’s Main Stage Performance Camp. To participate in this monthlong theater camp, youths and teenagers entering grades 7 through 12 auditioned to secure a place in the rehearsals and, eventually, the preseason musical hitting the main stage for two weeks of performances. This sassy, quotable comedy showcases the dedication that Spokane’s talented teens have put into their development as both actors and trained “bend-and-snappers.” — JENNA MULLIGAN Legally Blonde • Aug. 8-17; Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $10-$19 • Spokane Civic Theatre • 1020 N. Howard • spokanecivictheatre.com • 325-2507​

52 INLANDER AUGUST 7, 2014

THEATER HAUNTINGLY HILARIOUS

MUSIC SUMMER SOIREE

The Addams Family • Aug. 7-24; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm • $49/adults, $42/seniors, $27/kids 12 and younger • The Kroc Center • 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. • cdasummertheatre.com

Spokane Symphony Soiree on the Edge No. 1 • Wed, Aug. 13, at 7 pm • $20/lawn; $40/table seating • Ages 21+ • Arbor Crest Wine Cellars • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • spokanesymphony.org

One of the weirdest families around is welcoming audiences into their home and giving us all an urge to snap our fingers. Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre’s second production of the 2014 season is a production of the recent Broadway hit musical The Addams Family. Created by the same people who brought you Jersey Boys, this contemporary musical is anything but traditional. Wednesday Addams wants to invite her boyfriend and his family over for the evening and begs her family to act normal. They fail hilariously. — FRANNY WRIGHT

Lucky for us, many events leave their indoor environs behind during the warm summer evenings, including the Spokane Symphony. The first of two upcoming Soiree on the Edge concerts held atop the scenic bluff of Arbor Crest Wine Cellars’ estate is set for this coming Wednesday, with a second evening concert to follow on Aug. 20. The orchestra’s upcoming program of music performed in a golden sunset glow includes Mozart’s “Prague” Symphony, alongside several modern contemporaries’ compositions. — CHEY SCOTT


Any parent might be a little hesitant to turn their offspring loose on a lake in a self-propelled watercraft. Practicing smart, thoughtful water safety is something all kids should learn, and that’s what the Spokane Canoe & Kayak Club aims to do at its 3rd annual Paddle, Splash & Play event this weekend. The local paddling-enthusiast group is providing all the gear, plus experienced advice for parents and their kids to have peace of mind on the water at the event and in the future. Personal flotation devices are provided if you don’t have one, but the group suggests bringing your own if you do. Don’t miss this chance to try stand-up paddleboarding, kayaking and canoeing with local experts on a calm stretch of the Spokane River. — CHEY SCOTT Paddle, Splash & Play • Sat, Aug. 9, from 10 am-2 pm • Free, Discover Pass required • Nine Mile Recreation Area at Riverside State Park • 11226 W. Charles Rd. • sckc.ws

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

MOSCOW COMMUNITY THEATRE BIRTHDAY BASH The theater celebrates its start with a party and silent auction. Aug. 9, 7-8:30 pm. $5-$10. 1912 Center, 412 E. Third St. moscowcommunitytheatre.org (509-432-5119) STARS ON THE HILL The 4th annual event features the MasterClass Big Band, and supports the local P.E.O. chapter’s education philanthropies. Tickets include hors d’oeuvres, dessert, live music and dancing. Aug. 12, 5-9 pm. $20/person; $35/pair. Arbor Crest, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. (290-2917) DINNER UNDER THE STARS Shared Harvest Community Garden hosts its annual dinner fundraiser, with fiesta themed food from Cafe Carambola.

Proceeds benefit the garden, event also includes a silent auction from 6-8, with dinner will be from 7-9 pm. Aug. 16, 6-9 pm. $25. Shared Harvest Community Garden, 1004 E. Foster Ave, CdA. sharedharvestgarden.org (208-755-3320)

COMEDY

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. bluznews.com (483-7300) EXPEDITION A fast-paced improvised comedy show, rated for all ages. Fridays all summer, through Aug. 29, at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045)

Benefiting:

Presented by:

TICKETS ON SALE NOW SHOWCASEGOLF.COM

OUTDOORS KIDS IN KAYAKS

We’re bringing professional golf back to Coeur d’Alene, and you can be part of the gallery for just $20. Follow PGA pros and celebrities as they take on the magnificent Coeur d’Alene Resort Golf Course. All proceeds benefit the Community Cancer Fund, dedicated to raising money for cancer care and research right here in the Inland Northwest.

Festival at Sandpoint • Aug. 7-10 and Aug. 14-17 • $6-$65 • All-ages • War Memorial Field • 855 Ontario St. • festivalatsandpoint.com • 888-265-4554

AUGUST 18TH

No longer is the Festival at Sandpoint some secret live-music oasis that people bring their friends, family, blankets and bottles of wine to. This year’s 32nd annual event features one of its strongest lineups ever. The music festival kicks off with the Head and the Heart tonight at 7:30 pm, followed by Huey Lewis & the News (sold out), Nickel Creek, a family concert, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, Ray LaMontagne, Montgomery Gentry and the Spokane Symphony over a two-week period. For those who don’t want the music party to end, four “Aftival” shows (21+) will rock on at the Hive following the following festival nights: Dirty Dozen Brass Band/DJ Logic (Aug. 8), Moon Taxi (Aug. 9), Big Sam’s Funky Nation (Aug. 15) and Dr. John (Aug. 16). — LAURA JOHNSON

PGAINCDA$20

CancerCareFund_071714_12V_KE.pdf FESTIVAL SANDPOINT DELIGHT

AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 53


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess ONE QUESTION

My girlfriend of a year is really pretty and sweet, and we love all the same outdoor activities. However, I feel there’s a ceiling on our connection because she lacks a strong personality of her own. Whenever we discuss something to do, she defers to me. Also, I care deeply about politics and ideas, but she doesn’t read newspapers or books or develop her own opinions. Two days ago, I asked about something we’d just heard on AMY ALKON the news, and she basically parroted my opinion back to me. I pressed her, saying, “But what do YOU think?” She couldn’t answer. This led to my suggesting that maybe she needs to see a therapist to learn to open up more. She was pretty offended, and we haven’t talked much since.   — Politically Concerned When you say to your girlfriend “So, what are your thoughts on the Middle East?” you’d rather she didn’t respond, “Like, you mean, Philadelphia?” It is nice that you both enjoy the same outdoor activities. Having shared interests can sometimes be essential. For example, a guy who lives to sail would find it a downer to date me. As I wrote in “Good Manners for Nice People Who Sometimes Say F*ck,” I have motion sickness issues, “which is to say I get carsick on any street with more than five turns in it — for example, the winding mountain roads of Washington, DC.” But barring an obsessive attachment by one partner to a sport that, say, makes the other hurl her insides into the ocean for days, people put too much emphasis on having a lot of interests in common. You just need to have enough in common. And in addition to physical chemistry, you need to have what I call a crush on your partner as a human being. This means having respect and admiration for them and a sense of excitement about who they are and how they go about life. Respect is the opposite of contempt — the sneering disgust for a partner that marriage researcher John Gottman finds is the biggest predictor a couple will divorce. And unfortunately, respect is also the antithesis of what you, as a guy who cares about politics, have for a woman whose favorite Supreme Court justice is probably Judge Judy. The reality is, your girlfriend isn’t going to lean back on some therapist’s couch and find her opinion between the pillows — at least not any time soon. Chances are, she has little innate curiosity and has maybe spent much of her life under the mistaken impression that you can keep a man by keeping mum and nodding yes. In the future, when you meet a woman, instead of just taking stock of all the reasons you’d work as a couple, look for reasons you wouldn’t — like if her peers as political thinkers appear to be your hamster and the paperweight that fell behind your desk. A woman who’s right for you will take your thoughts, political and otherwise, and run with them and sometimes bring back something better — making you better for being with her instead of making you suspect her skull contains only a goldfish swimming around a little castle and a couple of plastic plants.

GRATE EXPECTATIONS

I am dating a guy in his early 20s who is very nice, very fun, very cute — and very much in the habit of mentioning that he went to Harvard. He finds a way to weave it into all sorts of conversations it really has no place in.  — Not Impressed He probably mentions Harvard a lot because it seems more tasteful than the alternative — having his diploma laminated and wearing it around his neck. Guys in their early 20s have it rough. Just as girls their age are coming into their prime hotitude, the guys are entering a work environment where they are the gum on the pavement that the 30-year-old successful guy runs over in his Mercedes. If your guy is feeling this way, it may explain why no subject is too far-flung or random to connect to a reminder of where he went to school. (“Pass the milk? I sometimes passed the milk at Harvard.”) Ask whether you can give him your opinion about something you’ve noticed. Assuming he says yes, say something like, “I have no doubt you’re going places, but you seem to mention Harvard a lot. This might make you sound like you need to ride on the name, which you clearly don’t.” If he’s got more than school smarts, he’ll recognize that it says something about him that he went to Harvard, but not when he advertises it so often that it starts to sound like the DeVry of the Ivy League. n ©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

EVENTS | CALENDAR OPEN MIC COMEDY Live stand-up comedy, open to newcomers and experienced comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. (475-6209) THE OVATIONS COMEDY SERIES An open-audition competition featuring comedians from around the Inland Northwest competing for chance to perform on the main stage at the Bing. Aug. 8, 10-11 pm. Free. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. facebook.com/ OvationsStandup (714-8386) GI:S:T A live comedy show, inspired by TED Talks, and featuring the comedy of David Honeycutt, Matt Dargen, Samuel Bone, Jake Sanders and Michael Glatzmaier. Ages 21+. Aug. 9, 9 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. tinyurl. com/lfrnhel (509-847-1234) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Not rated.) Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) LIVE COMEDY Live stand-up comedy shows. Sundays at 9 pm. Goodtymes, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070) OPEN MIC COMEDY Wednesdays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Brooklyn Deli & Lounge, 122 S. Monroe St. (835-4177) KIP ATTAWAY A special comedy night concert in a dinner theater format with optional dinner served at 7 pm. Aug. 15, 8:30-11 pm. $15, reservations recommended. Doc Holiday’s Saloon, 9510 Government Way. (208-449-1562)

COMMUNITY

100 HOURS OF CAMPFIRE Camp Fire Inland Northwest celebrates its 100th anniversary, with a daily, evening fire pit and smores, kids crafts, a dunk tank, car shows, live music and Camp Fire songs sung every night, Aug. 4-8. At Wandermere Center, 12400 N. Division. Free admission. (747-6191) KSPS FITKIDS DAY KSPS FitKids Day returns with special guests Curious George and Buddy from Dinosaur Train, offering fun activities for young children at the Ferris HS football field. Aug. 8, 10 am-noon. Free. ksps.org/ community (443-7700) TEEN POOL PARTIES Offering music, basketball and volleyball with food and beverages for purchase. Open to all teens ages 13-18. Aug. 15 and 18, from 7-9 pm. $2. Hillyard Aquatic Center, 3000 E. Columbia Ave. beta.spokanecity.org/recreation/aquatics (363-5415) CHILD INVENTOR LEXI GLENN Fig-

pickels Toy Emporium of CdA hosts 14-year-old Lexi Glenn, inventor of the Pumponator — a water balloon filling device — for a book signing and water balloon competition. Aug. 9-10. Free. Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. INLAND NW CAMARO OPEN The 24th annual auto show offers 32 classes for all makes of cars (reg. from 9-11 am), with judging and awards (3 pm). Event also hosts the Spokane Skyhoundz Disc Dogs competition (9:30 am). Aug. 9, 9 am-3 pm. $20/car; free to attend. Mirabeau Park Meadows, 13500 Mirabeau Parkway. (981-7480) KIDS DRAW ARCHITECTURE The 5th annual community arts event gives kids the opportunity to work with local architects, artists and designers during a sketch session in downtown CdA. Aug. 9, 8:30 am-noon. $10. Downtown Coeur d’Alene. artsincda.org (208-292-1629) WORLD RECORD ATTEMPT WATER BALLOON FIGHT An attempt to break the record for the largest water balloon fight, with live music, entertainment, bounce house and more. Water fight from 4-7 pm, events from noon-10 pm. Aug. 9, 12-10 pm. $2. Spokane County Raceway, 750 N. Hayford Rd. (315-4648) SOLIDARITY WITH ISRAEL RALLY Rally to show local solidarity with Israel. Includes Israeli music and speakers, event sponsored by Spokane Coalition for Israel, Spokane Hadassa, Chabad of Spokane County, and Temple Beth Shalom. Aug. 10, 2-3 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, Rotary Fountain. (868-8277) RIVERFRONT PARK MASTER PLAN TOURS Parks Director Leroy Eadie and Master Plan Project Manager Juliet Sinisterra give a tour of proposed future developments in the park. Aug. 13, from 4:30-6 pm. Free. Fountain Cafe, 610 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (625-6656) ROOF DECK RENDEZVOUS Greater Spokane Incorporated’s annual summer networking gala. Aug. 13, 5-7 pm. $25. Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. greaterspokane.org SPOKANE DISC DOGS CHAMPIONSHIPS The local frisbee dog group hosts its annual competition, open to all dogs/owners and spectators. Registration at 5:30 pm. Aug. 13, 6 pm. Free. Shadle Park, 2005 W. Wellesley. tinyurl. com/mz26hho GOODGUYS 13TH NW NATIONALS An annual outdoor auto show, feat. 1,500+ hot rods, customs, classics, muscle cars, trucks and more, from 1972 or older. Also includes vendors, swap meet, live music, kids’ activities and more. Aug. 15-17, Fri-Sat from 8 am-5 pm, Sun from

8 am-3 pm. $6-$15. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. good-guys.com (509-477-1766)

FESTIVAL

OMAK STAMPEDE The 81st Annual Omak Stampede starts with the Thursday morning ride-in, and includes the carnival, Indian encampment, grand parade western and Native American art show, rodeo, dances and local vendors. The highlight is Sunday’s famous Suicide Race. Omak, Wash. omakstampede.org (800-933-6625) RIVERSTONE STREET FAIR Coeur d’Alene’s Riverstone Village hosts a weekly outdoor market and street fair, hosting 200+ vendors of arts and crafts, food, live music, a farmers market and more. Thursdays from 4-9 pm, through Aug. 28. Free. riverstonestreetfair.com NINE MILE FALLS DAM DAYS The annual community event starts with a Friday night dinner and outdoor movie screening ($5/family), silent and live auctions, and a teen dance ($1). Saturday events include the Dam Days 5K ($10-$25), kids activities, vendor fair, chuck wagon and live music. Aug. 8-9, Fri from 6-10 pm, Sat from 6:30 am8:30 pm. Sontag Park. ninemilecommunityclub.org/DamDays SCHWEITZER HUCKLEBERRY FEST Annual festival featuring free kids music, hosted huckleberry hikes, huckleberry pancake breakfast, crafts and activities, wine tasting and more. Aug. 8. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555) WINGS OVER SANDPOINT Sandpoint EAA Chapter 1441 hosts breakfast and invites regional pilots to fly into Sandpoint Airport and display classic, experimental and float planes. Aug. 9. sandpoint.com (208-255-9954) BENEWAH COUNTY FAIR This year’s fair theme is “Sew it, Grow it, Show it” and features agricultural displays and competitions, entertainment, food and more. Aug. 13-17. St. Maries, Idaho. benewahcountyfair.com PEND OREILLE COUNTY FAIR Themed “Where the Wild Things Grow,” the fair features traditional events including a rodeo, ag demos, live entertainment and more. Aug. 17-14; also includes the Cusick Rodeo, Aug. 16 and 17. $2-$6. Cusick Fairgrounds, 419152 Hwy 20. povn.com/pocofair (445-1367) TOTAL FEST XIII 13th annual independent music fest featuring more than 40 bands playing rock, metal, punk, pop, dancey and other rad tunes. Aug. 14-16

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in downtown Missoula. $50/three day pass. totalfest.org (406-281-1377) GARLAND STREET FAIR & BLOCK PARTY The 12th annual community arts celebration features 4+ blocks of music, entertainment, vendor booths, food and beverages, along with kids’ art activities and games sponsored by the Spokane Art School. New this year is a farmers market. Event culminates with the Runway Renegades Fashion Show. Aug. 16, 10 am-9 pm. Free. Garland District, North Spokane. garlanddistrict.com (216-7312)

FILM

FREE KSPS MOVIES Riverfront Park and KSPS host a screening series of locallyproduced documentaries about the region. Screenings offered Mon-Thur, at 10 am. Free. Riverfront Park IMAX Theatre, 507 N. Howard St. (625-6623) KIDS’ SUMMER MOVIES The Kenworthy hosts summer movie screenings every Wed-Thur (Aug. 6-7, 13-14) at 1 pm. $3/ film; $20/summer pass. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main, Moscow. (208-882-4127) ROCKET MARKET MOVIES: NAPOLEON DYNAMITE A new outdoor movie series on the side of the market, with screenings starting at dusk. Aug. 7. Free. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd. (343-2253) MOONLIGHT MOVIE SERIES: CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 Screenings start at dusk in the outfield of Martella Ball Field. Aug. 8. Free. Sunset Park, Airway Heights. cawh.org SOUTH PERRY SUMMER THEATER: THE HOBBIT: THE DESOLATION OF SMAUG Outdoor screening, starts at dusk. Aug. 9. Free. The Shop, 924 S. Perry. (534-1647)

STAR TREK: INTO DARKNESS Outdoor film screening in the park at dusk. Aug. 9. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd, Liberty Lake. (755-6726) DOLLAR SUMMER MOVIES Screening sponsored by the Kootenai Alliance for Children and Families. Aug. 12-13, 10 am. $1. Regal Cinemas Riverstone Stadium 14, 2416 Old Mill Loop. (800-326-3264) AMERICAN MUSTANG Exclusive 1-night screening of the blended documentary/ character-driven narrative, on the wild horses of the American West. Must pre-purchase tickets at tugg.com Aug. 14, 7:30-8:45 pm. $12. AMC River Park Square 20, 808 W. Main. americanmustangthemovie.com (888-262-4386) FREE MOVIE: STAR WARS EPISODE IV Seating is on a first-come basis. Aug. 14, 1:30-3:30 pm. Free, suggested $1 donation. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org (208-667-1865)

FOOD & DRINK

CELEBRATE CRAFT BREWERIES OF IDAHO Kicking off Idaho Beer Month with a beer flight paying homage to breweries of Idaho, followed by the bar’s weekly trivia night. Aug. 7, 5-9 pm. Free Admission. Enoteca, 112 E. Seltice Way, Post Falls. corkjoy.com (208-457-9885) WINES BY THE YARDS An evening of wine tasting and food next to the Spokane River, hosted by the Spokane Winery Association and featuring more than 30 member wineries’ wines, with light hors d’oeuvres. Aug. 7, 5:30 pm. $40/person; $75/pair. The Nest at Kendall Yards, 1335 Summit Parkway. spokanewineries. net/event

A HISTORICAL WINE JOURNEY Portugal is one of the oldest and largest producers of wine in the world. Class includes tasting of 8 wines. Aug. 8, 7 pm. $20, reservations required. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) GAZPACHO SOUP & SANGRIA A class on making cool, light entrees for hot summer days, with Chef Laurie Faloon. Aug. 8, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) NATIONAL FARMERS MARKET WEEK WITH CHEF ADAM HEGSTED The Emerson-Garfield market hosts Chef Adam Hegsted for a “no-cooking” demo using ingredients from the market to create two fresh salads. Aug. 8, 4-6 pm. Free. Knox Presbyterian Church, 806 W. Knox Ave. spokaneknoxpc.com (720-7350) VINO WINE TASTING Friday’s tasting showcases Italian wines, from 3-6:30 pm; Saturday highlights Spanish wines, from 2-4:30 pm $10. Wine available by-the glass. Tastings include cheese and crackers. Aug. 8-9. $10/tasting. Vino!, 222 S. Washington St. (838-1229) SUSHI 101 Chef Joshua Martin leads a class on making traditional sushi rolls including nigiri, maki, uramaki and more. Aug. 13, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141)

MUSIC

FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT The 32nd annual summer music festival lineup includes: Montgomery Gentry, Trombone Shorty, The Head & The Heart, Nickel Creek, the Spokane Symphony and more.

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SPOKANE SYMPHONY SOIREE ON THE EDGE Director Eckart Preu and Symphony musicians perform as part of the annual summer concert series at Arbor Crest Winery. Aug. 13 and Aug. 20 at 7 pm. $20-$40. Arbor Cresy, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

ALOHA RACE SERIES Mountain Gear hosts 5 stand-up paddleboard races on Liberty Lake; race all five for the event’s Hawaiian shirt. Held Aug. 7 and 14 from 6:30-8:30 pm. $15. Liberty Lake Regional Park, 3707 S. Zephyr Rd. (340-1151) SPOKANE INDIANS VS. EVERETT AQUASOX Games held daily Aug. 7-9 at 6:30 pm. $5-$11/single game. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana. spokaneindians.com 14TH ANNUAL MOTO X Arena motocross racing event featuring local pros and amateurs, with high-flying stunts by Metal Mulisha. Aug. 8-9, events start at 7 pm; doors open at 5:30 pm. $10-$15. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Gov’t Way. northidahofair.com (208-667-8515) COEUR D’ALENE TRIATHLON This year marks the scenic race’s 31st anniversary, offering both an Olympic, sprint-distance and duathlon course. Aug. 9, 7 am. $50$90. cdatriathlon.com (877-782-9232) COLVILLE NATIONAL FOREST AUTO TOUR Celebrate Smokey Bear’s 70th birthday and the 50th Anniversary of the Wilderness Act with an auto-tour of the Salmo-Priest Wilderness. Meet at the Sullivan Lake Ranger Station near Metaline Falls. Aug. 9, 9 am-1 pm. Free.

Indoor & Outdoor Car Show Featuring Thousands of Hot Rods, Customs, Classics, Muscle Cars & Trucks Thru ‘72!

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Aug. 7-10 and Aug. 14-17. $6-$65. festivalatsandpoint.com JONNY LANG Concert by the critically acclaimed blues/gospel/rock singer songwriter. Aug. 7, 8 pm. $57-$67. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404) MEN OF RHYTHM Outdoor concert in the park, hosted by the Northwest Neighborhood Association. Aug. 7, 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. Audubon Park, 3908 N. Driscoll Bvld. spokaneparks.org SPOKANE YOUTH SYMPHONY The Sensational Summer Music Festival Orchestra performs under the direction of Dr. Philip Baldwin and Dr. Roberta Bottelli. Picnics welcome. Aug. 7, 6-7:30 pm. Free. Riverfront Park. spokaneyouthsymphony.org (448-4446) BLUEWATERS BLUE GRASS FESTIVAL The annual summer music festival offers live music, workshops, a new youth music camp and more. Proceeds benefit local charities. Aug. 8-10. $15-$50. Waterfront Park, 1386 S. Lefevre, Medical Lake. bluewatersbluegrass.org (869-0252) THE COFFEY TWINS The Coffey Twins perform a 50s and 60s-style rock-androll show in a dinner-theater format. Aug. 8-9 and Aug. 15-16. $12/show only; $25/ show and dinner. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy 211 off Hwy 2, Newport. circlemoon. webs.com (208-448-1294) COWBOY SUPPER SHOW Commemorative cowboy supper performances in celebration of the ranch’s 20th anniversary. Aug. 8-10, Sept 12-14 and Oct. 11-12; FriSat shows at 6:15 pm; Sun show at 3:15 pm. $16.50/kids; $45.95/adults. Rockin’ B Ranch, 3912 N. Idaho Rd. rockinbranch. com (891-9016)

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GREEN

ZONE GREEN ZONE | TERMINOLOGY

Weed Vocab 101 BY KATE GIBBONS rass, reefer, ganja, blunt, bong, joint — marijuana, and its accompanying paraphernalia and ways to smoke it, carry many names. The Office of National Drug Policy has compiled a brief list of lingo and other colloquial terms, but the vocabulary relating to cannabis extends far beyond it. As with most things that rise out of a subculture, street names and weed-speak are

56 INLANDER AUGUST 7, 2014

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BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 and Initiative 502). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington State, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor Control Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

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their own lexicon. It’s unclear if the decriminalization of the drug will slow the vocabulary evolution, but for now here’s some slang, jargon and terms to familiarize you.

MARIJUANA

GREEN OUT

H

SPOK AN COUN E T READ Y ERS

The number of words referring to marijuana exceeds more than 100, but in addition to the ones above, popular references include: cheeba, chronic, nugs, skunk, hash, ashes and Mary Jane.

New and popular cannabis terms

G

REAC

Similar to a blackout from alcohol, a green out occurs when one loses their sense of place and time after overconsuming marijuana. People also have been known to become paranoid or fall asleep. A green out is more likely to occur from edibles, dabs or more potent weed; going to a hospital or medical professional is advised,

but there’s not much that can be done other than waiting it out.

SHATTER

Shatter or shatter hash is an extremely potent, glasslike THC concentrate. Extracted from cannabis plants using butane gas, it is extremely dangerous to produce and often results in small- and medium-scale explosions. The practice is illegal, and problematic enough that the Drug Enforcement Agency initiated “Operation Shattered” on July 22, indicting eight people in Washington state alone.

BUBBLER

Bubblers are smoking glass pieces similar to bongs. However, a bubbler is smaller and doesn’t have a removable bowl. Some say they get a more intense high; others believe it is a lesser high.

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NAME:

EVENTS | CALENDAR

VAPORIZER

LAKE SPOKANE SLALOM & WAKEBOARD TOURNAMENT Hosted by the Inland Northwest INT, at the Lake Spokane Recreation Area (Discover Pass required, primitive camping available, reservations recommended.) Aug. 9, 8 am-5 pm. $35. intleague.com/idaho (703-3417) MORRIS CLARK SENIOR SOFTBALL increases TOURNAMENT The 10th annual softball tournament hosted by Spokane and the risk of Parks & Rec, with age-division brackets for ages 50 and up. Aug. 9-10. of school. $300/team. Dwight Merkel Sports Complex, 5701 N. Assembly. tinyurl. Turning the lit end of a blunt com/lg69j4v (625-6208) or joint into your mouth, PADDLE, SPLASH & PLAY Children and inhaling, then blowing out a youth can paddle kayaks, canoes and stream. The smoke is then GET THE FACTS at learnaboutmarijuanawa.org stand up paddle boards in a safe, superinhaled by a second person. vised setting, with all equipment provided. Aug. 9, 10 am-2 pm. Free, Discover Pass required. Riverside State Park, Nine Mile Rec. Area. sckc.ws (951-2871) Dab or dabbing refers to AD SIZE: PUBLICATION: LAZY DAY STROLL (SWAMP RIDE) dropping concentratesFILENAME: onto a WADEPTLIQUORCONTROL_080714_2H 2H INLANDER Monthly group bike ride to an undishot surface, like a skillet, and closed location; meets at 7, rides at 8 inhaling the resulting PUB vapor DATE: AE: KE MODIFIED: pm. Aug. 10, 7 pm. Free. Swamp Tavern, or smoke. 8/07/2014 DS: AB TUESDAY, 8/5/2014 - 3:42PM 1904 W. Fifth. tinyurl.com/kamwlu3

Vaporizer pens or pipes are inhalant devices that vaporize the active ingredients in the plant materials in herbs and blends. Vaporizers are also used to smoke tobacco, most commonly as e-cigarettes.

Marijuana use lower grades dropping out

SHOTGUNNING

Talk with your kids.

DABBING

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THEATER

CDA SUMMER THEATRE: THE ADDAMS FAMILY CST is the first professional regional theater to produce the new musical comedy. Aug. 7-24, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm. Thurs.-7:30 pm and 2 pm through Aug. 24. $27-$49. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasummertheatre.com AVENUE Q Performance of the hit musical comedy. Through Aug 9, Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $14-$20. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. lakecityplayhouse.org (208-667-1323) THE EMPIRE SINGS FLAT Summer season production of an original, locally-written, Western-themed melodrama. Through Aug. 24, Wed-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $16-$18. Sixth Street Theater, 212 Sixth St, Wallace. sixthstreetmelodrama.com (208-752-8871) A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM Performance of Shakespeare’s “funniest magical romantic comedy” in collaboration with EWU. Aug. 7-17, Wed-Sun, show times vary. $12-$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard. interplayerstheatre.org (455-7529) LEGALLY BLONDE The 2014 Academy music performance camp production, based on the film and novel by the same name about a sorority girl heading to Harvard. Aug. 8-17, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) EVIL DEAD: THE MUSICAL A comedic live stage show combining elements of cult horror films. Not suitable for all-ages. Shows at 6 pm and 9:15 pm. Aug. 9. $29-$34. Riverside Place, 1108 W. Riverside Ave. evildeadtour.com/spokane THE BOOK OF MORMON The 9-time Tony Award-winning Best Musical from the creators of South Park. Contains explicit language. $45-$155. Aug. 12-17, show times vary. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. bestofbroadwayspokane.com THE ODD COUPLE Staged reading fundraiser of the Neil Simon play about two monumentally incompatible roommates. Aug. 13, 7:30 pm. $25. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasummertheatre.com (208-660-2958)

VISUAL ARTS

WALKING INTO THE LIGHT:Exhibit featuring a retrospective of works by Audrey K. Barr and a celebration of her life on the Palouse. Reception Aug. 7, from 5-7 pm, runs through Aug. 21. Free. Third Street Gallery, Moscow City Hall. ci.moscow.id.us/art COEUR D’ALENE ARTWALK Monthly art showcase throughout downtown galleries and businesses. Second Friday of the month from 5-8 pm. Free. Downtown CdA. artsincda.org ROBERT GRIMES & MICHAEL HORSWILL The gallery features new works by the two local artists, with an opening reception Aug. 8 from 5-8 pm and an artist talk/demo Aug. 9 at noon. Show runs through Sept. 6. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com (208-765-6006)

WORDS

SPOKANE SHORTIES READING & SHOWCASE Meet local authors featured in the collection “Spokane Shorties,” a book from which proceeds support Get Lit!. Attending authors read, answer questions, sign copies and mingle. Aug. 7, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) LOCAL YOUTH ADULT AUTHOR PANEL Featuring authors Trent Reedy, Heather Swain, Rachel Toor and moderator Kris Dinnison. Authors talk about and read from their books, along with a panel discussion, Q&A and signing to follow. Aug. 8, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) JAMES NESTOR The journalist/author reads from and discusses his book “Deep: Freediving, Renegade Science and What the Ocean Tells Us About Ourselves.” Nestor has written for Outside Magazine, the New York Times and many other publications. Aug. 13, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) GRAMMAR WORKSHOP For instructors and teachers, offering certificate hours, focusing on new Common Core standards. Aug. 14, 8:30 am-3:30 pm. $35. Argonne Library, 4322 N. Argonne Rd. (443-5828)

ETC.

EASTSIDE OUTSIDE FREAKOUT Spokane Vintage Warehouse’s bi-monthly summer parking lot sale, hosting 20 local vendors of vintage, handmade, junked/salvaged and miscellaneous goods. Aug. 10 and 24; Sept. 7 and 21, from 9 am-4 pm. Free. Spokane Vintage Warehouse, 2226 E. Riverside Ave. tinyurl.com/od4e5zs (535-0457) THINK BIG FESTIVAL Robotics and technology experts from around the world hosts live pitch sessions, a pub crawl and public forums. Aug. 15, 9 am-4:15 pm. $10. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. thinkbigfestival. com (208-769-3300) VINTAGE FRENZIE AT FOXWOOD Outdoor sale offering 40+ vendors of vintage/antique/rustic goods, with live music and food, a beer/wine garden and more. Aug. 9, 10 am-5 pm. $4. Foxwood Tea House, 125 Foxwood Dr., Newport. treasuresonfoxwood.com n

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AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 57


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52. “’Carpe diem’ for stupid people,” as defined on 33-Across 53. Sorrowful, to Chopin 54. “A short dead dude,” as defined on 33-Across 58. One of the Jacksons 59. “Morning Edition” airer 60. Highway toll unit 61. Justice Kagan and others 62. Spanish title given to Stephen King’s “It” 63. Drink with a straw

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28. Reddi-____ (ice cream topper) 29. French city where Van Gogh painted 30. Man ____ (A.P.’s Horse of the Century) 31. Flubbing it 33. Popular website with usergenerated (and often humorous) word definitions 39. Veal serving 40. “Interesting ...” 41. “The only instrument that you cannot play a sad song on,” as defined on 33-Across 45. Always, in sonnets 46. In base 8 47. 1847 Herman Melville novel 48. Part of FWIW 49. A flat equivalent 50. “What Taz turns into when he’s mad,” as defined on 33-Across

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8. Small drum 9. Pop singer Sands 10. “Turning left in a Chevrolet for 4 hours,” as defined on 33-Across 11. Cooking agent 12. Where to conform, per an expression

13. Some ermines 18. People may get them before going to coll. 21. “The biggest ball near Uranus,” as defined on 33-Across 22. Baseball’s Matty or Moises

HIS 23. Bryn ____ College ANSW WEEK’S 24. Riyadh resident I SAW ERS ON 25. They may be vicious YOUS 28. Email, say 29. Before now 31. End of a professor’s address? 32. Minor complaint 34. USMC barracks boss 35. New York Times columnist Kristof 36. “The Thin Man” canine 37. Backside 38. Puppy’s protest 41. Nursery need 42. Unprincipled 43. Rock named after a Scandinavian country 44. “Drink to me only with thine eyes” poet 46. Nobel Peace Center site 48. Some intellectual property 49. Enter the draft, maybe 51. “Comin’ ____!” 52. Blabbers 54. Compass dir. 55. Prefix with thermal 56. Over the hill 57. Museum funding grp.

AUGUST 7, 2014 INLANDER 59


Lake Roosevelt… JUMP IN! IT’S FREE

1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday. SCAN THIS

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I Saw You

Cheers

Cheers

Cheers

To The Lady Who Likes Her Pike Street Beer I saw, or rather see, you at work. You come in for a beer, I’m always stuck in the kitchen, out of the conversation, but we smile and smile back. Perchance I’ll get to come around front and be able to capture your attention... or at the very least your number.

Jeer To Myself and Apology To You! At approximately 7:15 AM on Wednesday, July 23rd you had a too close encounter with Me: cyclist in gold jersey coming off of 57th Ave at high speed by the church at Hatch Hill. You: 2 good looking female runners coming around the corner at the same time. We were all like the proverbial deer in the headlights not knowing which way to go to avoid a very nasty collision. Please accept my apologies. I came around that corner way too fast. I promise to avoid that situation in the future. As a runner myself I know how scary that must have been for you. I also apologize for not stopping and coming back to apologize in person. My only excuse being that it was an early morning pre-work ride and I was in

My Honey MY HONEY, You read Cheers/Jeers every week, here’s one for you. August 8th will be our 33rd anniversary, cheers to you for marrying me, it was the best thing I ever did. Hope for 33 more. ILUVU. YOUR HONEY

back, but through it all you both have helped me become the person I am today and I couldn’t be more grateful for that. Here’s to you, from T2.. P.S. I lied; I did use that money I saved for a tattoo. Come look.

Lost Verizon Flip Phone You haven’t actually done this yet, but: Thanks for calling me or sending an email to: anotherherb@comcast. net about finding my lost Verizon older grey/silver flip phone that I lost Sunday 7/27 on the Centennial Trail between Center Place parking lot and Barker Road trail head ... or maybe on the rest of the Valleyfest Cycle’s 25 mile Saltese Flat bike ride route. You can’t actually call me using my phone because I’ve blocked it, but you can find my home phone by looking at the contacts list (contact #: “ Joanne “ or speed dial “2” ). The phone isn’t worth much, but I would like to have it.

Janette In the short time we have known each other, you have made me so very happy and life itself more beautiful. When I was a kid my mom told me that I would meet you someday, a woman who would make me feel both strong and weak at the same time, who would leave me breathless with just a smile and who I just couldn’t live without. And now you’re here holding my hand and making my heart melt into a big happy puddle. Thank you for helping me see how wonderful life is. Beauty you mean the world to me. All my love Don

Bare Buns Fun Run Looking for you, Red Hat Girl! We were watching the runners at the finish line, you sitting on a bench and me across the way, in front of the pool. You smiled at me several times and I responded in kind, but you disappeared after the race. I ran into your friend, Ms. White Hat, but I chicke The Muscle Man Who Parked My Car I Saw You. You were working at the Davenport Hotel. Glimmering with sweat, you walked up to my car and I was instantly nervous. Your big strong chest intimidated me at first, but your calming voice made me feel better. I think your name is Joe? I hope that is right, I would love to ask you on a date or maybe go get some drinks? I may be a bit taller than you, but that doesn’t bother me if it doesn’t bother you. My Little Joe, I Shall See You SOON! Highland Games You had a beard, kilt, and a Mario red mushroom shirt. You complimented my lanyard as I painted your face and you helped me to cross something off my bucket list. I’m upset I didn’t get your name so I could say thank you and see if you wanted to go get coffee sometime. I hope you read the Inlander and see this, If not hopefully I’ll see you at the Games next year, I’ll be at the face painting booth like always.

Cheers

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Bella Anastasi I saw you, 20 years ago and this morning. In my daydreams and in my memories. I see more pieces of your heart every time I share a piece of mine. I see you changing my soul, my perspective, and my life. I see you changing our little girls into young women. I see you growing with our son in your womb. I could never have seen how amazing our lives would become. I need you to know, that I truly saw you

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” a hurry. Too big of a hurry. Here’s wishing you more happy running in the future. Ink’dRunner Avista Stadium Staff Cheers to all the hard working people off the diamond at the Spokane Indians ballpark. I recently attended a game on the hottest day this summer so far and was amazed with all the vendors working in the steamy hot kitchens serving with a smile and happy to pass out ice water to the patrons who requested it. The roaming vendors with all heavy buckets of ice water and cold drinks -- hauling those bins up and down the stadium stairs in the heat, and the section leaders helping out with whatever was requested all with a smile or a high five. Cheers to people who enjoy their job-- even though it is seasonal! Thanks for making the game even more fun.

Celebrations Cupcake Sweet Lady I work at Linnie’s Thai Cuisine where I waited on you. You told me you worked at Celebrations. I told you how much I love cupcakes. Anyway, you came in to Linnie’s a couple of weeks ago on a Friday night and dropped off a dozen of the most delicious cupcakes for me. I was having a terrible day, and your random act of kindness made all the bad things going on that day melt away. You didn’t wait to give them to me personally, so I never got to say thank you. Now I can. Thank you so very much. You made me see that there are still kind people left in a unkind world. I did share the cupcakes with the staff, and everyone agreed that Celebrations cupcakes are simply amazing! Your are a very sweet lady. I hope the universe rewards you with the sweetness you bestowed on me. Cheers to you! Happy Anniversary! It seems like just yesterday you were throwing Skittles at me in class! I love how you tell me I’m beautiful everyday, laugh and hold hands with me, twirl me around the car before you open the door for me. I love our spontaneous road trips with no destination, and it always seems to turn out to be a trip we can talk about for years! I hope our next seven years are as wonderful as these last ones have been. Happy Anniversary Terry. Love always, Krishna

Jeers RE: Pajama Pants I still completely support your right to wear those pajama pants. They coordinate perfectly with your trashy vocabulary and gutter standards. Get a pair for your rhetorical straw man, too. In the event of a dire emergency, of course I would leave the house in whatever state I happened to find myself; your milk and laundry emergencies are probably just symptoms of poor planning and general carelessness. Grace, dignity, and self-worth are not shallow or materialistic-they are the hallmarks of culture and success. If your armchair psychology degree finds this alarming, you might want to consulting the writings of Ben Stein, Tim Gunn, or Ayn Rand. I’d

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To My Beautiful Wife I know I don’t say it enough, I just want you to know how proud I am of you. You set your goals and strive to achieve them with tireless enthusiasm no matter what circumstances you Submit your Cheers at face. You are an inspiration to inlander.com/sweet and be entered to win:1 me, our family and friends. You Good Samaritan Many thanks to know I will always be there for you Dozen “Cheers” Cupcake s Courtesy of the kind gentleman who helped and support you no matter what, me get on my feet after a fall on and yes I forgive you for being Celebrations Bakery the sidewalk of the 900 block of W. cranky when you are HUNGRY! I Winners drawn bi-weekly at random. 2nd on Thursday, July 24th around can’t wait to finish this part of your 7:15am. I hope you see this. I’m journey with you and start our next Must be 18 or older to enter. Happy 20th Anniversary Mom and very grateful for your stopping to adventure. So how do Patron shots Dad I love you both so much and help. I’m afraid I was so flustered and breadsticks sound to you? am so happy to be your daughter. I didn’t thank you properly at the 9-27-14 say 10ish? I’ts a date. I love I have put you through hell and time. you more than anything! “I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


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Jeers

Jeers

Jeers

rather share their “issues” than yours.

stay in these leagues! People used to get ejected for that kind of nonsense! It is all about being safe and having fun!

home, mixed with a chronic case of unmedicated depression, almost did me in. Perhaps it is you who does not understand the ugliness of depression or else you would not have snapped at someone who saw your post as a cry for help.

No Gas Zone Jeers to those who think it is acceptable to pollute everyone’s air space. Especially in a small office. No I am not talking about cigarettes, or E-Cigarettes (Honestly I wish that I were) I am talking about those who don’t feel it is necessary to rip it all day long in our small office space causing limited breathing capabilities. Let me suggest you go see a doctor about that or perhaps maybe step into the restroom and get it all taken care of instead of just letting them slip out every ten minutes of the day! Seriously get some medication for this or step outside for a minute. If this had happened even 10 times I would not be saying anything but since this is a daily occurrence and you CLEARLY have ZERO MANNERS, I decided to at least bring it to your attention as I feel strongly that you may just be doing on purpose and have a lack of class. Yes it’s natural to a point and yes we all do it but come on. Every day 10 times a day, let go to a GI specialist at this point. I’d rather you get less work done and spend more time in the bathroom then us all have to deal with the unfriendly odors! Sincerely That Lady Who unfortunately has to sit by you Acting A Fool Jeers to the grown bullies on the softball field! I am embarrassed that I am a part of that team. It’s sad seeing parents being horrible role models for their children over some personal (childish) vendetta that they had with an opposing player. What kind of human being are you trying to raise? Giving your kids the idea that it is ok to act like that in sports is beyond messed up. Is your life really that miserable you have to cling on to the petty stuff and look like a fool?? You do realize we play on co-ed teams for fun right? Next time try being the better person, maybe the team wouldn’t have played so bad if you guys weren’t being a bunch of idiots! And jeers to you Spokane county parks and rec for allowing such people to

Chair Hogs At Arbor Crest We arrived very early for the latest concert, only to find all the chairs taken. One group took over 30 chairs, claiming to be a reunion. I watched through the concert and at least 17 of the chairs were never used. Lots of other people were looking for chairs in vain while this group made no attempt to put back the chairs they were not using. Arbor Crest is kind enough to provide chairs for people to use for free, unfortunately, some people can’t figure out how to only take the ones they are going to use. How Stupid Do You Have To Be? Jeers to the two teenagers who went to go walk around in Petco this last Tuesday in CDA and decided that it was acceptable to leave their dog in the car in 100 degree weather. You went to the one place where it’s acceptable to bring your dogs inside, the door literally said “Please bring your dogs inside, don’t leave them in your car”. You are truly a miserable human to think that this was acceptable. Please, give your dog to someone with enough brain cells to function properly and avoid procreating, our world needs less of you, not more. RE: RE: Life, Chin Up “Your Jeers did not offend me, but it did teach me a lesson. I agree that my “”Chin Up”” To your “”Life”” was sanctimonious, Boring, cliche, and tyrannical. In the future I will keep my two cents in my pocket. Some people kill themselves when they hit rock bottom; knowing this, I was desperate to reach out and give some kind of light to your circumstances, an alternative to suicide. I myself, one year ago, was at my lowest point and ended up in the ER sipping liquid charcoal to absorb all the aspirin I had swallowed. No, living with my folks was not the worst of it, but all the events leading up to moving back

T E N N I S P O E P I N S A V A U N T R R R A R E A B I S T R O A L A D Y G A G O E C O O L J S O E D A I M E C U R A M A N D A R L E S A P I W L A R A S G ’S E R R I N THIS WEEK! O W A R A R Y N O I S T R E C I ANSW U R B A N D I S E E C U T L E T L O C T A E E R B A N J O G S H A R P S T I O O M O Y O L O T O R N A D O A P O L E O N N E T T R I S A X L E N P R L A T O Y A S O D A O S E S A E L E N AN URB

Overzealous Parking Marshal I was an instructor at SFCC. Just like my students, I was not exempt from buying a parking pass to use their parking lot. Over the last few years, I had come to accept I also had to pay to park at work. However, last Spring, my car broke down and I had to borrow a car one day to get to my class. I got immediately ticketed. You cannot appeal by talking to anyone and have to go to a link on their website to explain your circumstances. My appeal was denied and the officer is asking me to pay a fine of an equal amount as the pass, which (s)he knows I have already purchased. Worse again: one of my students is in a wheelchair; on her first day of class, she got ticketed because it took her longer to come back from the cashier’s office where she was buying a parking pass in order to display it behind her car window. Another student got a ticket because her parking pass was not perfectly straight, hanging from the rear view mirror. Does that parking officer realize that (s) he is offending not only the staff but also discouraging students from attending SFCC?? If students do not pay their fine, they cannot graduate, so they are being taken literally hostages. As for me, I chose to accept other teaching offers, so I can voice my anger freely and be my students’ spokesperson. I will wind up my letter by stating that this marshal has by far won the award of “Parking Nazi of the Year.” We Are People Too! Ok so here is the thing, I am a single mom and I work at a call center to support myself and my child as opposed to being on welfare. As part of my job I am constantly verbally assaulted by customers who call me every name under the sun. Why? Do you not understand that on the other end of the line is a real human with real feelings? Do you not understand that without this job my child and I would be dependant on your tax dollars? I don’t come to your job and scream at you, you know the nature of the call before you answer the phone because it comes up on caller ID as a 5 digit number, if you don’t want to talk to that person don’t answer the phone, it’s really that simple, I promise. What is screaming and calling that person names going to achieve? Feel free to give this some thought the next time you decide to scream at the person just trying to do their job and feed their families without having to use food stamps, you’re welcome!

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Catch and Repeat Spokane Disc Dogs hosts friendly competitions showcasing the bond between man and beast BY CHEY SCOTT

B

Walter, a Jack Russell Terrier-Border Collie mix, runs down a Frisbee during a demonstration. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

62 INLANDER AUGUST 7, 2014

unches of grass clippings burst up in tiny clouds behind Walter’s feet. Tearing across the lawn as fast as the cars cruising at 30 to 35 mph down the residential street, the little rust-orange-and-white dog suddenly springs into the air. For a split second he’s completely suspended. Then his long, narrow snout clamps down over the sailing white disc with a dull clap, and Walter touches back down again. “Whoa! Nice!” The small group of human spectators across the yard erupt in applause and praise as the Jack Russell-Border Collie mix, looking more Russell than collie, circles back to his owner, Michael Paul. The Frisbee with the dog’s name in black lettering hangs crookedly from Walter’s mouth. “Drop! Drop.” Paul orders before the panting dog releases his beloved disc. “He doesn’t really care about much unless he has his Frisbee. He will not stop,” Paul says, flicking his wrist and sending the disc across the lawn again. A few tosses later, Paul forces a reluctant Walter to take a break and drink some water. Walter and Paul have adhered to this throw-chase-repeat routine since the pup, now 2½ years old, was about four months. Right now, the man-best friend duo is prepping for several upcoming local competitions between Frisbee-dog enthusiasts and their canine companions, hosted by Spokane Disc Dogs. The next couple of events are to be Walter’s third and fourth, and Paul has his eye on the first-place trophy, as long as he can toss the Frisbee inbounds. “It’s about keeping it inbounds and not getting nervous. I have a tendency to get nervous,” he admits. For basic distance and agility disc competitions, like those hosted here by Spokane Disc Dogs, dog/thrower (throwers don’t have to be the dog’s owner) teams compete in two separate one-minute rounds. The competition field, a stretched hexagonal shape, is 50 yards long, 10 yards at each end, and widens to 20 yards at the center. Points are awarded based on which of five zones within the field the dog catches the disc. Dogs get a half-point bonus for catching a disc with all four paws in the air, and a competitor’s score is the combined point

total from each toss during the two rounds. All Spokane Disc Dog competitions are free for owners and their dogs to compete in, and for spectators to watch. That accessibility, says organizer John Barringer, is largely what drew him to the sport. His own Frisbee dog Bonnie, a 13-yearold Australian shepherd, recently retired from competition because of her age and arthritis, so Barringer now focuses more on promoting Spokane Disc Dogs’ local events. “You can tell the special bonds between the dogs and the owners, and it’s just so cool to watch,” he adds. Spokane Disc Dogs follows competition rules and regulations outlined by Skyhoundz, the international Frisbee dog competition arm of Hyperflite, a maker of competition and recreational discs. The group currently hosts four events annually, each attracting more than a dozen owner/dog teams, and an even larger number of spectators. In the coming week, on Saturday, the Frisbee-dog group is performing at the Inland Northwest Camaro Club open car show in Spokane Valley. Four days later, on the evening of Aug. 13, the Spokane Disc Dogs Championships are being held in Shadle Park. Then the big final event of the year, in September at Valleyfest. That’s where Walter and Paul got their first taste of competitive disc-throwing a year ago. This year, Walter is poised to unseat 2013’s Valleyfest champ, Kelty, a poodle-Australian shepherd mix. She’s also the daughter of Bonnie, Barringer’s champion dog. Walter may be fast and fresh, but the sport runs in Kelty’s blood. After the two dogs have cooled down on a recent Friday morning, Walter begs for another toss. Speeding out ahead of him in the yard is Kelty, her long, silver fur flowing. Before he knows it, Kelty has snatched Walter’s white disc from the air, right above his nose. n cheys@inlander.com Spokane Disc Dogs • Sat, Aug. 9, at 9 am • Mirabeau Point Park, 13500 E. Mirabeau Pkwy., Spokane Valley • Also Wed, Aug. 13, at 6 pm • Shadle Park, 4302 N. Belt • skyhoundz.com


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Inlander 08/07/2014