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COMMENT | ELECTION 2016

Smear Tactics

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he GOP doesn’t know what to do with “The Donald.” He says outrageous things about Mexicans, then unabashedly comes right back and claims that they love him. And his poll numbers rise. He makes Jeb Bush look like a boring has-been, dismisses all the other Republican candidates as numbskulls — or worse. And his poll numbers rise even higher. He smears the war record of John McCain. And you know what happens. Trump comes across as exactly what he is — a name-dropping, egotistical, uninformed, bombastic showman. But he isn’t an original. Winning by discrediting your opponent through a big smear is right there on the first page in the Republican playbook. Republicans working for George W. Bush even used the big smear to discredit McCain (considered an outsider) in 2000. Then came the Swift Boat smears directed at John Kerry in 2004. Along the way, they smeared the war records of Max Cleland (whose wounds suffered in Vietnam cost him both legs and a forearm) and John Murtha. In Republicanland, it smears, it domineers.

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hat goes around seems to be coming around. Some fun with that, yes indeed; but sooner or later, Trump will return to his charge that Hillary Clinton was “the worst Secretary of State in history.” And when it comes to smearing opponents, Trump is unique; he creates his own shifting realities. Whoever emerges, whatever their differences, the trail of smears will lead back to Benghazi. The other day I received in the mail a communication from the right-wing Judicial Watch. It came with a bumper sticker that reads: “Four Americans Died and Hillary Lied.” So what happened that night? Here is an excerpt from then-Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta’s testimony: “On that tragic day, as always, the Department of Defense was prepared for a wide range of contingencies. I remind you that the [National Counterterrorism Center] in the six months prior to that attack identified some 281 threats to U.S. diplomats, diplomatic facilities, embassies, ambassadors and consulates worldwide — and obviously, Benghazi was one of those almost 300 areas of concern. But, unfortunately, there was no specific intelligence or indications of an imminent attack on that — U.S. facilities in Benghazi. And frankly, without an adequate warning, there was not enough time, given the speed of the attack, for armed military assets to respond. That’s not just my view or General Dempsey’s view. It was the view of the Accountability Review Board that studied what happened on that day.” By contrasting how our two parties respectively deal with dire situations, we learn much. Rolling the video backward, back to when Democrats were in charge of the House — back to 1983 — we find the Gipper at the helm, resolved to

stand tall against those bad guys who were causing trouble in Lebanon. He opts for the old “banana republic” solution — send in a squad of Marines supported by a battleship. Now, unlike Benghazi, where the ambassador himself was determined to head into harm’s way, the President of the United States sent the Marines to Lebanon. Also note that Reagan’s plan was openly opposed by his Secretary of Defense, Caspar Weinberger, who told Reagan that “they had no mission but to sit at the airport in Beirut, which is just like sitting in a bull’s-eye.” Weinberger “begged the president at least to pull them back and put them back on their transports as a more defensible position.” But President Reagan stayed the course, and on Oct. 23, 1983, a suicide bomber killed 241 Marines, the deadliest day for the Marine Corps since Iwo Jima. Then Reagan made matters worse: He had the USS New Jersey shell Beirut, killing scores of civilians and heightening antiAmerican sentiments. Within six months, he pulled out all U.S. forces.

A

Presidential commission, headed up by retired Admiral Robert Long, criticized the Navy’s chain of command for not providing a clear mission. But the report did not follow the trail of criticism inside the White House. It did make a number of specific recommendations, such as pointing out that LETTERS in the future Send comments to it might be a editor@inlander.com. good idea to provide the Marine guards with loaded rifles. But it’s what didn’t happen that’s most instructive. In 1983, the House Democratic majority did nothing more. No investigations. No accusations. It was viewed as an American decision, not a Republican decision, and the tragedy was shared by all. But Republicans and Benghazi, looking at four dead instead of 241? They have, as reported by the New Yorker, “kept up a drumbeat of insinuation” with 13 hearings, 25,000 pages of documents, and 50 briefings… which have turned up nothing unexpected.” And you can count on it — there will be more to come, all with the sole intent of smearing Hillary Clinton. Yes, in Republicanland, no matter who manages to shove The Donald to the side, the GOP game plan won’t change: If it smears, it domineers. 


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

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he spectacle of a slight New Yorker, with nothing more than a quick wit, taking on all the phonies, night after night — to me, that’s America. As Jon Stewart ends his tenure on The Daily Show this week, here are a few random thoughts about his 16-year reign: HE WORE THE MANTLE WELL: Stewart is the latest in a long line of beloved American humorists who have taken aim on the pompous and powerful. There was Mark Twain, then Will Rogers and now Jon Stewart. See if you can guess which quote goes with which: “I don’t make jokes; I just watch the government and report the facts.” “Evil is rare; ignorance is epidemic.” “Loyalty to country always. Loyalty to government when it deserves it.” HE HATED PHONIES: Yes, if Holden Caulfield had a late-night talk show, he would have sounded like Stewart. And like Toto in The Wizard of Oz, Stewart pulled back the curtain on the phonies who infect so much of our political system — aptly illustrated by the timeless Will Rogers quote that “A fool and his money are soon elected.” Stewart relentlessly poked holes in the forgery of journalism that is FOX News, and he never wasted time on lame, famous-for-being-famous celebrities. HE TAUGHT US TO READ: Speaking of literary fiction and pseudo-celebrities, Stewart always played more to the New Yorker crowd than to People readers. He took books seriously. Many guests were nerdy writers of obscure tomes; the discussion was high-minded and extremely refreshing. Doris Kearns Goodwin appeared so frequently, she was practically his sidekick. HE LAUNCHED A THOUSAND LAUGHS: With both Steve Carell and Stephen Colbert getting their starts on The Daily Show, Stewart has a healthy comedy tree. Here’s hoping that Colbert will keep the edge he honed on Comedy Central, because without Stewart, the late-night landscape is looking pretty vanilla. The Jimmys — Kimmel and Fallon — are funny, but their jokes are carefully calibrated not to offend. HE WAS A WARRIOR: “The human race has one really effective weapon, and that is laughter.” That’s Twain, and for Jon Stewart — all 5-foot-7 of him — wit was a bazooka. For 16 years, he patrolled the wall for all of us, righteously calling bullshit whenever somebody had it coming. After 9/11, in particular, when the world seemed to be going crazy — “Wait, what? Now we’re invading Iraq?” — watching The Daily Show was like the French Resistance gathering around a BBC report. It sounded like… hope. Stewart did say “ignorance is epidemic,” but thanks to his inoculations, the ravages of the disease — among some, at least — have receded. 

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COMMENT | HANFORD

A Mixed Legacy

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

A new national historical park must do more than just commemorate the Manhattan Project BY PAUL DILLON

S

eventy years ago on Aug. 9, the clocks in Nagasaki, Japan, stopped at 11:02 am after a flash brighter than the sun. The United States dropped a bomb that called all life into question, essentially ending World War II. Wrapped in paradox, the darkness of the atomic age was born. More powerful than the bomb that blasted Hiroshima three days before, “Fat Man” had an enriched plutonium core, annihilating three square miles of Nagasaki and almost everyone in it. Beyond the detonation zone, there

were those who lived. Some for not very long; many wished they had not, as the agonizing, lasting effects of radiation on the human body were then unknown. It was only two years earlier that 1,500 residents of two desert towns 6 miles from the Columbia River — Hanford and White Bluffs — were ordered to leave with no explanation. The Wanapum, Yakama Nation, Umatilla and Nez Perce tribes who knew the land for generations no longer had access. Forty thousand workers converged, carrying out their war effort with no knowledge of their top-secret mission, under the most tense of all deadlines. The B Reactor was constructed, an integral part of the Manhattan Project, producing plutonium for

the “Fat Man.” Hanford — along with Los Alamos, New Mexico and Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the other primary sites — will be included in the Manhattan Project National Historical Park, memorializing the mission. In a letter to the Department of Energy, which is managing decisions related to the park, the Tri-Cities Development Council and Visit Tri-Cities set the tone: “It is a positive legacy that will do much to honor the sleepy towns that gave way for the Manhattan Project sites, the science, engineering and construction feats and the individual contributions of the many patriots who helped bring an end to World War II and usher in the atomic age.” Artifacts and historic structures will be preserved for the first full-size weapons-grade plutonium reactor in the world — but I have yet to hear a truthful discussion of the human costs and environmental impact. From 1944 through the 1970s, the downwinders, people who worked at the site or lived downwind, became sick or died from cancers due to radiation exposure. In particular, lethal Iodine-131 went up reactor smokestacks and was dispersed without warning as part of operations. Since 1990, more than 2,000 survivors experiencing common symptoms of thyroid cancer have filed federal lawsuits; many are still denied compensation or ignored. Richland Mayor David Rose sees the benefits from such a nearby tourist attraction, with new hotels, restaurants and wineries — the hard-fought designation is a cause for celebration. However, there is another designation: Hanford is the country’s most contaminated nuclear site, and is the focus of the nation’s largest environmental cleanup, with its underground tanks leaking, underfunded and way behind schedule; completion is not expected for at least 70 years. Now, it’s in the same company as Yellowstone and the California redwoods. Visitors must contemplate these tragic consequences, not simply atomic science, but I’m skeptical. The downwinders’ stories won’t boost wine sales. However, there’s time to speak up: The public has until Aug. 28 to review and comment on a draft agreement that, once finalized, will guide operations of the Manhattan Project National Historical Park. It’s an opportunity to make sure that the human cost is not ignored. If we can take an honest look at these events, perhaps we won’t be destined to repeat them. After all, the Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum doesn’t devote itself to the marvels of the nuclear age, but to the humanitarian desire for world peace, since our nuclear past is always present. n Paul Dillon is the Eastern Washington Program Director for YMCA Youth & Government, teaching democracy to youth through hands-on civic engagement. He has worked in the state legislature and currently lives in downtown Spokane.

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

Reactions to “Hopeless for Heroin” (7/30/15), on the rising number of heroin deaths around Washington state.

MEGAN EATOCK: You can’t really help someone who doesn’t want to be helped, but for those who seek help, there definitely needs to be more treatment programs that addicts can go where they will feel safe, won’t be treated like criminals, and won’t lose their kids for doing so. I think a better public understanding of the fact that addiction is a disease in which the brain is literally hijacked by drugs might help in the way we approach and treat those who need help. HEATHER ARNOLD: This story struck home for me! It sounds exactly like my struggles with my own daughter! Luckily she is in rehab again for over the tenth time, but I fear when she gets out. My heart goes out to Rachel’s father. I pray he heals.

Rachel Meyers as a child. She died at age 18 during an overdose in March.

Reactions to a blog (7/29/15) on Providence Sacred Heart’s plans to reduce the available bed count for its inpatient psychiatric hospital by two-thirds.

ALEX MARIE SMITH: This is so very sad. Especially because the father did absolutely everything in his power but he still feels guilty. I hope he can forgive himself someday and see that he isn’t to blame. What a waste of a young life. Just heartbreaking. 

VALERIE BRADY RONGEY: That is painful all around. I understand the workload issue, but man, we needed more beds, not less! AARON ROBERTS: Let’s celebrate the fact that five of our psychiatrists agreed to stay onboard. BARB LEE: This is probably the best-case scenario, as otherwise they probably would have ended with a large ward where they could not admit anyone since there were no doctors. Hopefully we will all work on and support some longterm solutions for mental health care. KELLIE VAZQUEZ: This is not just a Spokane thing. Psychologists are extremely hard to come by. Let alone persuade them and their families to move to Spokane when there are so many other facilities offering top pay in larger cities. SARAH REAMES: Let’s all remember that originally, they had all given their notice, at the same time. … From the comments I read in the original article, there were policy changes, and doctors were being overworked. Being a psychologist, who is on-call, even on days off is a hard gig. 

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Jayme Scamolla came to pay his respects to the Under the Freeway Skatepark. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

PARKS

Gnarly Nostalgia

The city demolished the skatepark under I-90, leaving local skaters without a place to skate in the winter and wondering where and when they’ll get a new park BY MITCH RYALS

W

hen Jayme Scamolla was 12, he snapped his arm in half on the blood-red quarter pipe under the freeway. He doesn’t remember a fellow skater taking him to the hospital or the doctor popping his arm back into place, but the now 29-year-old does remember the lessons he learned. First, Scamolla learned how to distribute his weight so the board wouldn’t fly out from under him again. His success taught him the value of perseverance. He started skating again the week after he got out of the hospital, his arm still in a cast. The fellow skater’s kindness taught him about camaraderie. He didn’t know the dude, but those actions showed him the importance of looking out

for one another. On a steamy afternoon in late July, Scamolla is telling the story of his first broken bone and how he learned to skate, knowing that this week the city was going to demolish the skatepark under I-90 known as the Under the Freeway (UTF) Skatepark. “I started crying the other day when I heard,” Scamolla says. “For a lot of us, it’s heartbreaking because this was the first park we skated.” The demolition started on Monday, and the city Park Board has been discussing construction of a new downtown skatepark; however, nothing is set in stone. Local skaters are bummed to see the iconic park go and

worry about where they’re going to skate in the winter. UTF Skatepark, the city’s only covered public skatepark, was a haven for bad-weather skating. However, due to its modular design, skaters didn’t use it as often as the two other parks in Spokane. Another reason that some stayed away: the crowd of non-skaters who gather there.

L

ast week, a lone skater starts from across the street to pick up enough speed for a backside ollie floater. It takes him a few tries, but eventually he nails the landing. Before he could start skating, though, he had to pick up the needles. “I’ve run over needles and caps and shit before,” says the 45-year-old man named Trevor, who declined to give his last name. “The reason people don’t come down here as much anymore is because of all this mess. Put in some more ramps and more skaters will show up and kick them out of here. I guarantee that.” Trevor is referring to the people who buy and sell drugs in the park, but not all non-skaters come for that. A lithe 42-year-old named Bobby wearing a black Spokompton T-shirt has come to the park in its final days because a friend just gave him a new BMX-style bike frame, and he needs more parts. “It sucks,” he says of the park’s impending demise. “I ...continued on next page

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 13


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spend a lot of time down here, and there’s times when this place is packed with skaters.” From the back of a van next to the park, Bobby procures the parts to build an entire bicycle, and then he does. When a woman who is working on her own bike asks him for a tool, he gladly hands it over. “We share stuff when somebody needs something,” he says. “That’s ’cause if I ever need something, it’ll come back to me.” Although he doesn’t skate, the park is a community gathering place for Bobby. He says that a lot of people sleep in the park. Its concrete perimeter walls offer protection from the wind; the freeway offers protection from rain and snow. Another reason the city is doing away with its oldest skatepark is because it sits on land leased from the state Department of Transportation. “We want to make sure we have ownership of the land so we can maintain it,” says Monique Cotton, a city spokeswoman. “We didn’t have much control over the lighting and making investments into the property because we were renting it.” Although the city’s lease isn’t up until 2021, the Parks and Recreation department started making plans in 2012 to demolish the UTF Skatepark and build a new one somewhere else. Since then, it has contracted with Grindline Skateparks, a world-renowned, Seattle-based skatepark construction company, to identify possible locations and estimate costs. Grindline’s report, which estimates that a new park

will run the city about $700,000, also identified three possible central locations: Liberty Park, A.M. Cannon Park and north Riverfront Park — the favorite among local skaters. The city has earmarked $288,000 for a possible new park, but that figure and the location still have to be approved by the Park Board. Although a new skatepark is not guaranteed, the board is committed to future discussions. “That money is still allocated to a skatepark,” says Chris Wright, president of the Park Board. “I don’t think the board would ever take it out.” If a new park ultimately is approved, the city will open discussions with the community to find out exactly what kind of skatepark they want, Cotton says. As of now, there is no timeline for when construction on a new park could begin.

S

kateparks are important. They are representative of a city’s recognition of an alternative athletic culture, one that doesn’t conform to teams, coaches and regular practices. “It seems like it’s always been the kids from the ‘wrong side of town’ who end up riding skateboards,” says Chad Balcom, a board member of Skaters for Public Skateparks, a Portland nonprofit that advocates for skatepark construction. “And those are the kids that need recreational opportunities most.” Marni Goldenberg, a professor at California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo, says skateparks go far beyond a place to exercise and a distraction from trouble. Her research

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focuses on skaters’ opinions of why they use skateparks. Among the most prevalent reasons were camaraderie, social opportunities, skill development and stress relief. Becky Beal, a professor at California State University East Bay, has been researching skateboarding culture for the past 25 years. She says that a new skatepark doesn’t necessarily guarantee a benefit to the city. “It’s really important to involve advocacy groups of skaters so their voices can be heard,” she says of a city’s decision to build new parks. “If it’s done right, they can serve as places to learn to skate and build community with each other.” Spokane will be left with two outdoor public skateparks now that UTF has been demolished; by contrast, Beal says that skatepark construction around the county is skyrocketing. Since 2002, for example, the Tony Hawk Foundation has contributed to 556 construction projects throughout all 50 states; 466 of them are now open.

L

ast weekend, skaters of all ages from Spokane and beyond came to pay their final respects. Sweat dripped from Jordon Graham’s chin as he waited in line to grind the only flat rail in the park. “This place is pretty gnarly,” he says. “I met a bunch of the homies down here, and I’m sad to see it go.” As Graham waited his turn and answered questions about what he’d like to see in a new skatepark, others launched off the quarter-pipe ramp behind him and shredded over the nearby pyramid. More people took breaks on the edges of the park and scarfed hot dogs. The scene was much different from the lone midday skater outnumbered by the homeless people and drugs just two days earlier. When the skaters showed up en masse last weekend, the non-skaters moved out. “Let skateboarders design [the new park]. Put in some flat bars and some stairs. Make it so everything doesn’t run into each other like at Joe Albi,” Graham says, referring to the skatepark in the Dwight Merkel Sports Complex in northwest Spokane. Pistole Boardshop owner Josh Yandell was there to show his support, too. He’s been involved in discussions with the city about where and how to build a replacement for UTF since 2012. “Our biggest thing is that the new one has to be covered,” he says. “These kids skateboard year-round. When they tear this one down, they won’t have any place to skate in the wintertime.” Yandell is pleased that the city is talking with Grindline. He says one of the reasons skaters don’t come here as much as other parks is because it wasn’t designed by skaters. Two of the ramps feed directly into a wall, for example. That’s something Grindline could fix. The city has used the firm to design the Hillyard Skatepark and one at the YMCA in Spokane Valley. Grindline, which has designed hundreds of parks throughout the country as well as numerous parks in Denmark, Israel, Canada and Japan, has earned a good reputation. “They build some of the best skateparks in the world,” Yandell says. “Kids will know, like, ‘Dude, that’s a Grindline park, let’s go there.’” n mitchr@inlander.com

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FEWER PSYCH BEDS | The inpatient psychiatric unit at Providence’s Sacred Heart Medical Center currently has space to treat 48 adults and 24 children, but on Sept. 6 a TEMPORARY DRAWDOWN will reduce the number of beds to 12 for adults and 12 for children. The hospital is transitioning to a new teambased care model, Providence Chief Medical Officer Kirk Rowbotham says. All seven of the hospital’s psychiatric doctors submitted letters of resignation in June, citing concerns about an excessive workload. Five have since agreed to stay; Rowbotham hopes to hire more doctors and get the bed count back up to normal sometime in October. (LAEL HENTERLY)

JAIL DEATHS | The Spokane Human Rights Commission wrote a letter to the Department of Justice last week, asking for an investigation of the Spokane County Jail in light of the RECENT INMATE DEATHS. Four inmates have died in the jail in the past three months. Another died in January. The most recent inmate, Tammy Sue Heinen, was found dead in her cell July 13. She was arrested on a parole violation while on her way to the hospital. “I felt like the Human Rights Commission should find a way to address the possible larger issues at the jail,” says Blaine Stum, chair of the commission. (MITCH RYALS)


NEWS | BRIEFS

Food and Water Idaho’s “ag-gag” law tossed out; plus, the city of Spokane takes on Monsanto UNGAGGED

When Mercy for Animals’ undercover video exposed employees at Idaho’s Dry Creek Dairy beating, kicking and jumping on cows, Idaho’s legislature took action to make sure something so terrible would never happen again — the undercover journalism, that is. One Idaho state senator, JIM PATRICK, compared such activists to roving bands of marauders, destroying crops to starve enemies. “This is clear back in the sixth century B.C.,” Patrick said last year, according to the Associated Press. “This is the way you combat your enemies.” Patrick then pushed a bill that heavily fined — and even imprisoned — activists who snuck into the facilities to record the proceedings, or who lied or misrepresented themselves on jobs applications. It passed both houses and was signed by the governor. What it didn’t pass, however, was constitutional muster. On Monday, U.S. District Court Judge B. Lynn Winmill ruled that the so called “ag-gag” law violates the First Amendment, and since it singled out animal

rights activists for special punishment, it violated the 14th Amendment as well. Winmill savaged the law as, absurdly, being designed to give more powerful, controversial industries more governmental protection. He noted how Upton Sinclair went undercover to write The Jungle, which brought reform to the meatpacking industry. “Today, however, Upton Sinclair’s conduct would expose him to criminal prosecution” under Idaho law, Winmill wrote. (DANIEL WALTERS)

BELABORED CONFLICT

The city of Spokane has filed a lawsuit challenging the WORKER BILL OF RIGHTS initiative that’s been approved for the November ballot. The initiative is the latest from Envision Spokane (now operating under an offshoot called “Envision Worker Rights”), which has mounted two unsuccessful attempts to pass its Community Bill of Rights using the initiative process. The Worker Bill of Rights would guarantee a living wage for most employees of larger companies, equal pay and the right to not be wrongfully terminated. It also contains a provision that would make “corporate powers subordinate to people’s rights” and would limit the ability of corporations to legally challenge the Worker Bill of Rights. It’s this last provision that the lawsuit, filed Aug. 3 in Spokane Superior Court, takes issue with, arguing that it falls outside of what’s allowable in the initiative process, conflicts with state and federal law and should keep the initiative off the ballot. A statement from Mayor David Condon stresses his support for the initiative process and notes that Envision Worker Rights was advised by the city hearing examiner of the initiative’s legal problems. Kai Huschke, Envision Worker Rights campaign coordinator, insists the initiative is legal and says voters

should be allowed their say. “By taking this action, the mayor is undermining the democratic rights of the people of Spokane in favor of corporate interests that oppose the measure,” he says in a statement. (JAKE THOMAS)

DIRTY WATER

The city of Spokane is suing the giant agrochemical corporation, MONSANTO, for allegedly selling chemicals the company knew were dangerous to humans and the environment, which now pollute the Spokane River, according to a complaint filed in U.S. District Court. The chemicals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), have been found in the Spokane River’s water, sediments and fish, the suit says, and have been known to play a role in causing cancer and damage to the immune, reproductive, nervous and endocrine systems. Although the complaint doesn’t say how much money the city is seeking in damages, it does say that the city expects to spend more than $100 million to remove PCBs and prevent further contamination. That’s in addition to past costs of removing the chemicals, as the city is legally obligated to do. Listed as defendants in the suit are Monsanto, Solutia Inc. and Pharmacia LLC, which were spun off from the original company, Old Monsanto, in the 1990s. In a written statement, Charla Lord, a spokeswoman for Monsanto, says the company is not liable for damages caused by the previous incarnation of the company. Between 1935 and 1979, Monsanto was the only company producing PCBs, and the chemicals found in the Spokane River have been linked to the company, says Marlene Feist, a city spokeswoman. The chemicals were used in paint, caulking, coolants, hydraulic fluids, plasticizers, sealants, inks, lubricants and other items and then “leach, leak, off-gas and escape their intended applications” before seeping into the river via stormwater runoff, the lawsuit says. (MITCH RYALS)

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NEWS | PRISON more business if there was no Correctional Industries; we’d have another 10 employees.” DOC’s Maria Peterson says the offenders who participate in these programs return to their communities as more productive citizens. “The goal is for offenders to get out better than they came in. If they have more education and job skills, they are less likely to reoffend,” says Peterson. But are the skills offenders gain working in Correctional Industries’ factories, making furniture and sewing uniforms, really valuable in the modern job market? Blumenthal doesn’t think so. “Garments are made overseas or in Mexico these days,” he says. His company doesn’t sew garments locally, and the tailoring positions he does have require skills that far surpass the rudimentary garment-making skills Correctional Industries teaches inmates. “It’s not a trade that will provide a lot of skills you can use here today; they’d be better suited with tech skills.” Donny Weaver, who oversees the license plate shop, says offenders do learn tech skills in his shop. They use software like AutoCAD and sophisticated CNC routers and fabrication equipment. But Paul Wright, executive director of the Human Rights Defense Center and the editor of Prison Legal News, says that historically, prison industry programs have been faulted for giving the most skilled jobs to inmates who won’t be released anytime soon.

I

State inmates learn job skills by sewing teddy bears for charity. LAEL HENTERLY PHOTOS

Made Behind Bars Are the skills inmates gain working inside prison factories worth the cost to businesses and taxpayers on the outside? BY LAEL HENTERLY

A

mid the clank, whir and jangle of machinery sits a man, feeding rectangular metal plates into a large industrial press. On the other side of the press another man is selecting numeral-shaped dies. Nearby, a third man stacks freshly-embossed license plates. The factory produces 3 million license plates a year — every plate issued in Washington is made here — and it looks like a typical manufacturing operation. It’s not. The employees here earn less than a dollar an hour and are inmates incarcerated at the Washington State Penitentiary in Walla Walla. “I could be sitting in a [human] warehouse or doing something useful,” says inmate employee Jeremy John, who appreciates the opportunity to get out of his cell and do something productive with his days. He’s been working here for four years while serving a six-year sentence. “I’m a couple weeks from the gate,” says John, who plans to parlay the skills he has gained while working in the prison factory into a job on the outside. Prison labor is a billion-dollar industry in the United States, with 67,000 inmate workers at 542 prisons nationwide. Washington’s Correctional Industries is the fourth largest, employing around 2,000 inmates — including 307 at the Washington State Penitentiary — and paying them between 55 cents and $1.60 per hour. Correctional Industries’ brochures declare the Washington Depart-

18 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

ment of Corrections-owned business’ mission statement: to develop prisoners’ marketable job skills, instill and promote positive work ethics and reduce the tax burden of corrections. Critics, however, question whether the program has accomplished any of those goals. Meanwhile, small business owners say they would be doing more business — and hiring more employees on the outside — if they weren’t forced to compete with Correctional Industries for lucrative state contracts. “There’s a provision that allows Correctional Industries to sell to any state agency without a formal bid process, if they go and say they can service a state agency’s uniform program, that industry is almost required to buy,” says Mitch Blumenthal of Blumenthal Uniforms, who testified before the state Legislature about shoddy workmanship in Correctional Industries’ prison guard uniforms. If agencies want to shop elsewhere, they have to extensively document issues with the prison-produced products, Blumenthal says. “They have an unfair advantage, and there’s no oversight in the pricing they’re charging.” Blumenthal says that Correctional Industries doesn’t even make some of the products they sell. “They’ll buy them from a retailer like us, add a markup and sell them to the state,” says Blumenthal. “We’d definitely be doing

nmate Keith Parkins teaches inmates how to recycle, sew and compost in the Sustainable Practices Lab at the state penitentiary. Unfortunately, he won’t be able to use the leadership skills he’s developed here in the real world: He’s serving a life sentence. Prison labor programs are often criticized for employing too many lifers, but Correctional Industries’ Lindsey Konrad says that’s not the case with her program. “We can’t have more than the percentage of [prisoners serving] life without [parole] than is at the facility; whatever that percentage is, is the max we can have in our shop,” says Konrad. But Correctional Industries has been reprimanded for violating this requirement in the past: A September 2013 internal audit found up to 12 times the allowed number of lifers working at some facilities. Washington State Penitentiary public information officer Shari Hall says that 28 of the current 307 Correctional Industries workers at Walla Walla are serving life sentences, and another 50 will be there for more than a decade. Labor and human rights advocates liken the use of this captive workforce to slavery. “When this happens in China, we call it a human rights violation,” says Wright. “But here it’s supposedly a great rehabilitation program.” Rob Branscum, who manages the Sustainable Practices Lab, doesn’t see it that way: giving prisoners — even those serving life sentences — jobs gives them a renewed sense of purpose and cuts down on conflicts. It helps the entire facility run more smoothly. Correctional Industries business manager Todd Cunnington says there are other benefits to prison manufacturing programs. “The goal is to reduce the overall tax burden,” says Cunnington. But Wright says that’s a misnomer. “The biggest losers are taxpayers: Every time prison industries programs are audited, they are losing money,” says Wright. “You’re like, ‘Gosh, they’re paying so little, how could they be losing money?’ But the bloated bureaucracy and prison staff required to oversee these programs are where they’re hemorrhaging.”

C

orrectional Industries sells as much as $70 million worth of furniture, uniforms and other goods to state agencies each year, but a 2014 investigation by the Seattle Times found that the program has


cost taxpayers more than $20 million since 2007. Some business ventures — including a tilapia farm on the coast — had lost money, and Correctional Industries had relied on the profits from their furniture and license plate businesses to gloss over the losses. Wright says prison labor programs tend to be too heavy on staff and don’t operate with the efficiency of private companies. Weaver estimates that between 35 and 40 staffers oversee the prison industry workers at Walla Walla; Correctional Industries claims to contribute “approximately $32 million per year to the Washington economy through purchases from local suppliers and payment of staff salaries.” But Konrad says that at the end of the day, the goal really isn’t profits. “We have these businesses that make things,” she says. “But our real mission is to train offenders and reduce the likelihood that they will return to prison.”

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August 22nd • 7 pm Chinook Meadow | $20 Purchase tickets at the casino or any TicketsWest outlet. Inmate Keith Parkins, who is serving a life sentence, teaches other inmates how to sew, recycle and compost in the Sustainable Practices Lab (below) at the Washington State Penitentiary.

Correctional Industries has been around since 1981, yet little data has been collected to study the program’s actual efficacy at reducing recidivism. A 2005 study by the Washington State Institute for Public Policy study found that Correctional Industries had the potential to save taxpayers $4.74 per dollar spent. The program’s actual effect on recidivism rates hasn’t been established, though. “The data on the effectiveness, there just hasn’t been a lot of research done,” says Konrad. Taxpayers end up footing the bill when state agencies are required to purchase Correctional Industries’ pricey goods. On their website, a standard-looking office chair sells for $461 to $559. Similar chairs are available for as little as $169 from retailers like Staples and Amazon.com. “State agencies can buy better quality items on the open market for less,” says Wright. “It depresses wages for furniture manufacturers on the outside, and the state pays more for inferior quality.”  laelh@inlander.com

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AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 19


HE T OF

20 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

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ABOVE: The Stimson Lumber mill employs about 100 people, many of them from Priest River. FACING PAGE: Efforts are underway to revitalize the once-bustling downtown.

DON’T TURN LEFT

MIKE BOOKEY PHOTOS

In this small timber town, more has stayed the same than has changed BY MIKE BOOKEY

PRIEST RIVER POPULATION: 1,751 in the 2010 census ON THE MAP: 22 miles west of Sandpoint ANNUAL EVENT: Timber Days, late July NOTABLE NAMES: Lucy Beardmore, one of Idaho’s first female legislators

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ighway 2 is sunbaked and choked with SUVs and pickups piloted by folks who are likely still expected to be sitting in Spokane offices at 3 pm on a Friday. As they crest the hill into Priest River, some of the vehicles slow and some turn off. Most don’t. The drivers who do get off the road crowd into a pocket-sized, Idaho-state-run liquor store, where they remark about how much cheaper the booze is here. They go to the Mitchell’s grocery store and rush through the aisles, list in hand, kids dragging their feet behind them, tossing in items with the knowledge that each one gets them closer to the cash register and closer to the road. Or maybe they stop at Burger Express and order a huckleberry milkshake. But then their husband will wave from outside, where he’s checking the tie-downs on the boat cover and amending that order to two huckleberry milkshakes. Three guys, their clothes stained with errant paint, the evidence of a day’s work in the punishing sun, will wait patiently, gazing with heavy eyes at the Elvis records on the walls and the motorcycle in the corner, waiting for their turn to order. When they get to the counter, it’s big burgers and onion rings and the sort of friendly chatter that’s exchanged only between people who’ve known each other for a long, long time. The shakes come up and are shuttled briskly out the door and into a truck that tows that freshly secured boat back onto the road and a stoplight, where they’ll turn left. That’s Highway 57, which winds through dense woods for 20 or so miles to Priest Lake. It’s the only reason a lot of people ever see Priest River. People have been making that turn for more than 100 years. In the early 1900s,

Charles Beardmore hauled vacationers, hunters and timber workers on a grueling, daylong journey in horse-powered coaches from Priest River out to the lake. By 1914, Beardmore’s operation had switched to motorized coaches, leaving from a bustling, timber-and-mining-powered Priest River that had become home to 2,000 people. Beardmore’s name looms, quite literally, over Priest River’s downtown, which is past that stoplight and down the hill a bit. The Beardmore Building occupies more than a city block. It’s been overhauled and updated with a mix of modern flourish and historical preservation by Beardmore’s great-grandson, Brian Runberg. Now a successful Seattle architect, Runberg was one of the “just turn left at the light” guys growing up in Spokane, then spending his summers working at a marina on the lake. “There’s something about history. It stirs the soul,” Runberg says. It was that family history that persuaded him to buy the building in 2006. Now he sees it as a sign of Priest River’s future. “I think it’s important for any community to have a sense of place and identity, and that’s hard to do without reaching out and touching its historical culture,” he says. On the ground floor of the Beardmore, you’ll find the sleek yet cozy Beardmore Bistro. It’s a coffee shop and wine bar owned by Jim Martin, who believes in the value of the small American town. Small towns are making a comeback, he says with full conviction. He should feel that way; he’s the mayor. “If you want to jump-start a small town, you need a downtown,” says Martin, in his 10th year leading the city. Compared to the Friday bustle up the hill, the downtown is tame — a little too quiet.

Down the street, kids swim in the river (actually the Pend Oreille River) at a park near the railroad tracks. Martin, Runberg and others are working to revitalize the waterfront so it’s more accessible — just another shot in the arm for a city that, like many others, is getting back on its feet after the recession that began in 2008 punched it in the gut and left it with a high rate of families living below the poverty line. The economy is picking up, Martin says. Small businesses are doing well and there’s an influx of new industry, including an airplane manufacturer. These are good signs, especially for the town’s young people looking for a career path. But in Priest River, more has stayed the same than has changed. You see that when you look across the river and see the steam emanating from the Stimson Lumber mill. It’s where more than 100 area folks go to work, turning trees into boards, just like they’ve been doing for more than a century. It’s the sort of place where you get a job because your father-in-law put in a good word, and you work next to a woman whose mom is also on the payroll. Where the mayor’s brother scales logs and couples ride to the site together in the morning. Plant manager Marty Kyler says the plant uses a lot of manual labor, much more than other, more high-tech plants, yet it’s able to yield about the same amount of board feet per day. That’s something to be proud of in a town where people are proud of their lumber industry, which you see every year in July when the Timber Days parade brings several thousands to the streets of Priest River. “In this small town,” says Kyler, “we like to think we’re good to our people and our people are good to us.” 

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 21


Saturday, August 8th Riverfront Park 11:00am - 5:00pm Free activities for kids of all ages including inflatables and games!

A bridge over the Palouse River leads to a lively Main Street.

PALOUSE POPULATION: 998 in the 2010 census ON THE MAP: 15 miles north of Pullman ANNUAL EVENT: Haunted Palouse, late October, with two haunted houses downtown and a haunted hayride

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NOTABLE NAMES: Doug Flansburg is in the WSU Football Hall of Fame and was a star receiver on the “Cardiac Kids” team that went 7-3 in 1965. Entrepreneur, engineer and inventor Raymond Alvah Hanson held more than 100 patents, and is perhaps best known for creating a self-leveling hillside combine harvester.

LIVING HISTORY

DAN NAILEN PHOTO

A newspaper museum keeps this town close to its roots, and serves as a community centerpiece BY DAN NAILEN

W

hen a town’s population can refer to “The Flood” and everyone knows the one they mean, you know they’ve been through something cataclys-

mic. So it is with the Palouse Flood of 1996, a freak combination of rain and runoff that buried the now-thriving Main Street under several feet of water — and came 20 years after The Fire that destroyed the town’s K-12 schoolhouse. Inside the Roy M. Chatters Newspaper and Printing Museum, Janet Barstow points at a line on the side of a old wooden case. The line is nearly invisible, and such imperfections are expected with antiques. But for Barstow and the people of Palouse, the line showing how high the water reached represents one of the most challenging periods in the history of the Whitman County community. The museum is one of the many businesses nearly destroyed by The Flood two decades after it opened thanks to history-loving locals and Chatters, a WSU engineer who collected antique printing equipment. Besides an incredible array of presses, many still in working condition, the museum is home to a near-complete collection of small Whitman County community broadsheets and periodicals stretching back to the 1800s. The Flood destroyed the wood floors of the old building, and while a nonprofit museum dedicated to print journalism and its tools might not be high on the list of small-town businesses needed to goose economic recovery from disaster, the people of Palouse came together and rebuilt the place from the ground up.


Palouse native Janet Barstow shows off the “fingersnapper,” an antique printing press. It reopened in 2003, and now serves as much more than a museum. Every morning, a crew of locals gathers for coffee. At night, it’s often used for special dinners or community gatherings. At Halloween, it transforms into a haunted house. And, of course, its original purpose endures for school tours and interested visitors. Barstow leads tours every Saturday. In an age of online archives and digital news delivery, the newspaper museum remains surprisingly popular, and its recovery is a point of pride for the locals. “I can count on one hand the number of times I haven’t had people come in on a Saturday,” Barstow says, noting that many visitors are historians and genealogy researchers delving into archived issues of The Palouse Republic, The Palouse City News or The Boomerang — the name of the first paper in town, and a later iteration that Barstow served as editor “and janitor, for that matter!” she adds. It shut down in 2009. “Palouse is a great volunteer town,” Barstow says of the museum’s recovery as she turns various printers on, including a Mergenthaler Linotype machine from the late 1800s, mind-boggling in its engineering genius. Likewise, the Platen Press from 1887 — better known by its frightening name “The Fingersnapper” — was so efficient that it remained in use until 2002, Barstow says, feeding it sheets of papers to illustrate how it got its nickname. Barstow explains the town’s rallying around the museum simply and bluntly: “There are several people who are always there to do things.” She has been one of those people, at least since 1993 when the Palouse native moved back to town with her husband, Ben, after 15 years away for work. The Barstows now live in her childhood home on the farm where five generations farmed before her. Ben’s nearly native, too; his mother grew up on a farm south of nearby Colfax, and his father went to high school in Lewiston. They grow mostly wheat, barley and peas on their land. While they’re thrilled to be able to farm and volunteer for various community causes, their kids won’t be following in their footsteps,

DAN NAILEN PHOTO

having moved on to Texas and Oregon. “They’re not into farming,” Barstow says.

T

his year’s drought means that Barstow has to scurry off after today’s tour to get started on a harvest come early. First, though, lunch at the Green Frog Cafe next door, a place that quickly lets visitors know Palouse is far from a sepia-toned small town stuck in the past. The Elvis Costello poster on one wall marks the joint as hipper than your average old-timey diner. Barstow knows almost everyone here, save for a visiting photography class whose members have been wandering Main Street all morning, taking photos of the golden hills surrounding town, the towering green pines, the Palouse River and a massive sign for tobacco and one of the old newspapers painted on the side of a two-story brick building, only revealed two years ago when a fire burned down the neighboring tavern. She greets a table of older women lunching together, then spots her husband at the front of the line and sneaks up to add her order to his. Before lunch is over, she’ll go to the kitchen and say hello to Paula Echanove, co-owner and wife of Mayor Michael Echanove. On the way out the door, she makes sure to say hello to Aaron Flansburg, a young Palouse farmer in the middle of building a skatepark in town; the early harvest might cramp his construction schedule.

T

here’s life brimming along Main Street. That burned-down tavern has been replaced by a new bar, the Palouse Caboose. The Bank Left, part art gallery, part bistro, sits at the same intersection as the Green Frog. Down the street, Open Eye Consignment Shop owner Heidi Kite chats with young customers passing through town and looking for a deal on antique china while her daughter Dottie runs Dot’s Vintage Funk just a few doors down, having a similar negotiation about a Cheers dartboard and an old United Airlines travel bag. Palouse has a lot of history, but Main Street shows that its people aren’t stuck in that past. 

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 23


CHEWELAH POPULATION: 2,600 in the 2010 census ON THE MAP: 49 miles north of Spokane ANNUAL EVENT: Chataqua, held on second weekend of July for more than 40 years, features artists, a parade and live music. NOTABLE NAMES: Musician Allen Stone; John Robert Monaghan, the son of early Chewelah and Spokane resident James Monaghan. J.R. Monaghan was one of the first 18 students to graduate from (then) Gonzaga College. He was killed in 1899 in Samoa during a skirmish between Samoan and American troops.

ABOVE: The magnesite plant closed for good in 1968; Jake Wilson and Patrick Sawyer are opening a local brewery. FACING PAGE: The town’s oldest building, built in 1868. CHEY SCOTT PHOTOS

A PLACE FOR ALL SEASONS

From a booming mining town to a small town with a family-like business community BY CHEY SCOTT

A

s cars coast around a gentle curve near milepost 201, the palms of the Colville River Valley open in warm welcome. Ponderosa-laced mountain crags cradle the valley below, bisected by the pin-straight silver ribbon of U.S. Route 395 as it reaches northward through the amber and emerald carpet of fields leading into the idyllic town.

“Welcome Home,” proclaims a roadside sign at the bend. Chewelah, a town of 2,600 — the second largest in Stevens County, Washington — beckons.

“H

ey, I’m Al,” he says, and reaches over to shake hands. An introduction is unnecessary. With wildly curly, shoulder-grazing,

blonde hair framing a pair of thick-framed, oversized glasses, anyone from Chewelah — and many fans beyond — would recognize the face of chart-topping, soulful singersongwriter Allen Stone. On a late Wednesday afternoon, Chewelah’s beloved son of the modern era has serendipitously popped in to check out the progress of the city’s first brewery since

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from Denver to work for the U.S. Forest Service; Wilson grew up just north of town in Colville, and now works as that city’s recreation coordinator — the duo say they’ve begun to appreciate the town’s idiosyncrasies and perks. “The number one thing I enjoy about Chewelah is the town spirit,” Wilson says. “It’s a very tight-knit community, and it’s small enough that everyone knows one another fairly well. It has the spirit to pull events off and to support local businesses, and it’s also recently been getting a lot more livable because all of the options for entertainment and food.”

Prohibition. Quartzite Brewing Company isn’t open yet, but Patrick Sawyer and Jake Wilson, both 26, are working to get their brewpub up and running by October, just before the start of what they hope will be a more successful ski season than last year at nearby 49 Degrees North Mountain Resort. In a brick-walled former auto shop on Main Street just off the main drag of U.S. 395, the brewery’s east-facing garage doors look out onto its namesake: the craggy, striated rock face of Quartzite Mountain. Before plans for the brewery began to materialize last fall, Wilson and Sawyer were nearly ready to pack up and leave Chewelah. “I think for both of us, we realized how cheap it is to live here versus a big city,” Sawyer recalls. “I think if you can find your niche and create a job for yourself, it’s really easy to stay.” “Something like this in Seattle and Denver and — I don’t know, even Spokane — you’d have to have a million [dollars] to do this,” Wilson chimes in. “But here, we can do it for a heck of a lot less and do it really nicely, and that counts for something.” Both avid outdoorsmen — Sawyer came to Chewelah

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n a quiet, unmarked street corner several blocks north of City Hall, the rough-hewn logs spend another day in the sun. Bees and other insects buzz in the shade of stately maples and aged apple trees, heavy with green fruit. If they could speak, the log cabin’s stone-and-brick chimney and squared timber walls could tell volumes about 147 years spent watching the land and people around it evolve from a wild, untouched wilderness to today’s tame town. A group of archeological researchers studying the historical site recently unearthed an original brass plate they figure was once nailed next to the cabin’s front door, stating the name of its first inhabitant: John A. Simms. (After their work is finished, the town has plans to restore the structure and open it as an interpretive center and museum.) Built in 1868, the cabin is the oldest structure in town, and its impact on Chewelah cannot be understated. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places back in the mid-’70s, the deeply weathered cabin was built to house the region’s Indian Agency, a resource for the area’s tribes to voice their concerns and learn modern farming techniques. Simms was the Colville Valley’s first Indian Agent, a position appointed by the U.S. govern-

9FUN

ment to smooth relations between white settlers and the region’s native inhabitants — members of the Kalispel, Colville and Spokane tribes — before they were sent off their land to reservations.

“W

hen I was growing up, mining was the most important part of the Chewelah economy,” recalls Kathy Schneider. “I was born and raised, as they say, out of the magnesite mine.” But life as she and many other Chewelah families knew it all changed in 1968, when the magnesite mine and production plant closed for good. The ghostly plant’s hulking sheet-metal skeleton still looms over Highway 395 on the south side of town. Magnesite, a mineral similar in structure to limestone and marble, was mined and burned in order to calcify it before it could be used as a lining in furnaces that produced steel. Magnesite was a crucial product during both World Wars; Chewelah was the only U.S. producer, thus vital to the war effort. Schneider and her husband Dick, also a local native, moved back to Chewelah five years ago to retire and care for their aging mothers. Kathy, 67, now manages the relicfilled Chewelah History Museum, a beige-painted former military armory that’s become a general repository for the community’s “old stuff.” She graduated from Jenkins High School two years before the mine closed. Leaning against a case of antique glassware in the museum’s front room, she fondly remembers her childhood living at the mine’s company camp, a permanent community at Browns Lake, about 7 miles southwest of town. “It was a wonderful place to grow up — we just had free rein. There was a great big spring-fed lake, and all the old mine shafts you want to dink around in. It was the best childhood in the word.” 

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Republic is the county seat of Ferry County. LEFT: A rose leaf fossil found at the Stonerose site.

STONEROSE INTEPRETIVE CENTER PHOTO

‘IF YOU WANT TO CHANGE, YOU CAN’

The grasshoppers, beer and forefathers of an unexpected Shangri-La BY MITCH RYALS

R

REPUBLIC POPULATION: 1,073 in the 2010 census ON THE MAP: 69 miles north of Grand Coulee Dam ANNUAL EVENT: Ferry County Fair, Labor Day weekend, features rodeo events, grange booths, livestock exhibits and an indoor carousel. NOTABLE NAME: Bob Whittaker, owner of the Republic Brewing Company building, is the son of Jim Whittaker, the first American to climb Mount Everest.

26 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

epublic, settled in the valley between the Wauconda and Sherman passes in northeast Washington, is a place where the deer look both ways before crossing the street, and grasshoppers spring from the grass (the first-ever Grasshopper Festival was held here July 24 and 25). Republic started as a tent city, just north of the present-day town, in 1896 when the U.S. government opened the northern part of the Colville Indian Reservation for gold mining. Overnight, it seemed, the area was flooded with men eager to stake their claim. Along with them came entrepreneurs who helped turn the canvas tents into a bona fide town. The main corridor, Clark Avenue, still carries a frontier charm. No stop lights, a corner drug store and swinging, baby-blue saloon doors are just a few of those features.

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ld men with humpbacks and rosy noses sip dark beer inside Republic’s most popular watering hole, Republic Brewing Company, as they swap stories of fish and speculate that it’ll rain soon. Alongside them are 20- and 30-somethings snacking on the complimentary peanuts and sipping beers of their own. A few more are on the patio out back. All are greeted with an inquisitive look from Adiline, the cattle dog-turned-beer dog, who hopes they drop some food. Emily Burt, co-owner of RBC with her husband, Billy, started the tiny brewing operation in 2011 after a jaunt across Europe for inspiration. The Flying Cloud Tripel, for example, is based on a beer they tried in Belgium. “We brew a fairly traditional style, and it’s all right here,” Burt says, pointing to the two silver tanks next to the bar. They make just enough to sell to one or two local restaurants, but otherwise you have to visit the taproom for a taste. “It’s totally revitalized the town,” says

Bob Whittaker, who owns the building. “There used to be tumbleweeds rolling down the street at 4 o’clock. Now loggers and miners are in there yuckin’ it up alongside environmentalists. It’s a real asset.”

F

ifty million years ago, the area of north-central Washington that Republic now occupies was completely under water. That lake has dried up and left behind a fossil bed that is home to the earliest known records of the Rosaceae (rose family), which include fossils of apple, plum, peach, apricot and hawthorn leaves, according to Travis Wellman, the operations manager at Stonerose Interpretive Center & Eocene Fossil Site. Stonerose attracts about 7,000 people (approximately the population of Ferry County) to the tiny town per year to dig for fossils. Amateur archaeologists, who are allowed to keep three fossils each, might even discover a new species. An average of two new species are found each year, and are named after the people who find them. The most recent was a new species of stick bug discovered by a 14-year-old from Seattle, Wellman says.

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s the story goes, when Dick Slagle’s father, J.W., first arrived in Republic in 1904, a man asked if the “J” stood for John. J.W. said yes, and that’s how he was known from henceforth. But his name wasn’t John, it was Jesse. “That’s one thing frontiers are useful for,” says local historian Madilane Perry. “If you want to change, you can.” J.W. Slagle was sent to Republic by a Seattle-based pharmaceutical company to liquidate a drugstore that was part of an estate. He ended up buying the drugstore and its competitor, and combined the two into what is now Republic Drug Store. He married a schoolteacher and lived the rest of his life in the town of less than 1,000, raising his family.

When J.W. could no longer run the store, two of his sons took it over. One of them still lives in Republic. As Dick Slagle stands in the kitchen of his boyhood home, a stone’s throw from the corner drugstore he used to run, he says, “Welcome to the beginning of the 20th century.” Since his mother’s death in 1969, the house and everything in it have remained undisturbed. From the giant Star Estate stove (circa 1900) that also acted as a water heater for the entire house, to the homemade Republic letterman’s sweater on Dick’s dresser to the clothes hanging in his parents’ closet, the Slagle home is like a time capsule that gives visitors a look into middle-class life during the first half of the past century. As a child, Dick says, he and his friends took the train to nearby Curlew Lake, about 10 miles north of town. It cost them 16 cents, and they usually didn’t wait at a station. The conductor would pick them up along the tracks. “It was kind of like Tom and Huck exploring the Mississippi,” says Dick, now 96. In 1937, he left for college at Washington State University (then Washington State College) and graduated in 1942, just in time for the draft. When he came back from the war, his dad was ready to retire and pass the drugstore on to his sons. The oldest, Maurice, was already working there, so Dick and his younger brother, Dave, flipped a coin. One would stay, and one would go. Dave won the right to the store, so Dick left for eight months to work in Cashmere, Washington, as a pharmacist. On a weekend trip home, the men realized the coin had misled them, so they switched. Why did Dick Slagle want to come back? “Well, I always felt like Ferry County, and especially Republic, was like ShangriLa. It’s a paradise, and beside that, it’s home.” 


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POPULATION: 424 in the 2010 census ON THE MAP: 49 miles west of Spokane ANNUAL EVENT: The Fall Festival takes place on the fourth weekend in September, celebrating the end of the harvest and beginning of the fall.

A car show in Harrington

KAREN ROBERTSON PHOTO

TIME TRAVEL

NOTABLE NAMES: George Frederick McKay, an American composer who founded the composition program at the University of Washington. Darol Froman, scientific director of the Operation Sandstone nuclear tests at Enewetak Atoll in the Pacific.

This tiny town is home to more than a century of history BY ERIN ROBINSON

I

t takes a little less than half an hour of driving through the 12,000 acres of the Big Bend wheat belt off Interstate 90 to discover the quaint, quiet town of Harrington, Washington. With a population of 424 and an area of not even half a square mile, this modest farm town may cause one to question whether it’s 2015 or 1915. Yet Harrington is not just tractors and grain elevators. The main drag is full of family-owned businesses, along with City Hall, which doubles as a library, and a tattered house that flies not one, but two, Confederate flags.

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bove the paneled, double-hung windows are the words “1904 Bank Block.” The Bank Block Building, the largest structure on the town’s main street, has been a key part of Harrington for 111 years. The red brick building originally housed a barber shop, saloon and visitor lodging. The block has seen many changes since 1904, but one thing that has remained constant is the Harrington Opera House, which sat dormant for 40 years until a group of volunteers joined forces to bring it back to life. Gordon and Millie Herron, members of the all-volunteer Opera House Society, have dedicated 23 years to refurbishing the opera house, which has never actually put on a full opera. Both agree that they have a love for old buildings and could not see this central part of Harrington be lost when the original owner thought about closing it down for good. “We were all for it. So in January of 1992, we called a bunch of people together to see if it was a viable endeavor. And it was,” says Millie. The group purchased the building for only a buck and a promise — that the historic opera

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house would become a nonprofit, and that the original owner could reside in a private apartment on the main floor. The Herrons reflect about the building with much adoration as they detail the years of fixing floorboards, updating the electrical interior and their most recent endeavor — installing an elevator that allows the house’s older attendees to be lifted to the second-floor auditorium. Though it’s been a lot of hard work, Gordon approaches it with good humor and high spirits. “Carrying a grand piano up wooden stairs is kind of a dangerous job,” he says, laughing. Fortunately, they now have an elevator do to the work for them.

S

ince 1987, Harrington librarian Marge Womach has spent her free time digging through old city documents, census reports and obituaries, learning more about the rural cemeteries in town and in other surrounding areas. Digging deep into the history of the Hillcrest Cemetery, she has compiled several 100-page information booklets of thumbnail stories and pioneer tales of those buried there. Some of the 1,681 graves date back to 1898; many remain unmarked. Some were once denoted with wood that eroded over time, while others, with no headstones, date back to hard economic times when families had to move out of the community. For Womach, it’s important to preserve these burial sites, lest these longdeparted folks — as can happen in a place like Harrington — be lost to history. “Each of the burials,” she says, “becomes important to me as I attempt to document the life, short or long, and leave an imprint for following generations to read.” 

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AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 27


The entrance to Bayview’s heart — Lake Pend Oreille — is this public boat launch.

BY THE LAKE

LAEL HENTERLY PHOTO

Hard-hit by a wildfire, this town didn’t lose its spirit BY LAEL HENTERLY

BAYVIEW POPULATION: The town has as many as 500 residents during the peak of summer; the population shrinks to 300 or so after the tourists leave and the snowbirds head south for the winter. ON THE MAP: 28 miles north of Coeur d’Alene ANNUAL EVENT: On the weekend closest to the Fourth of July, the town hosts as many as 7,000 guests for Bayview Daze. There’s a parade, pony rides and — most important — the legendary fireworks show over Scenic Bay, where each explosion adds to the cacophony of echoes off the five surrounding mountains and reflections off the glistening lake. NOTABLE NAME: Renowned botanist John Bernhard Leiberg, whose last name graces the species names of many popular plant varieties and whose specimen findings reside in many esteemed botanical collections, settled in Bayview with his wife around 1900.

28 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

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s the sun sinks in the evening, the mountains that rise up around Lake Pend Oreille on every side begin to shift colors, cycling through greens and teals and lavender. It’s quiet on the glistening cerulean lake, an unearthly kind of quiet. The lake — 1,157 feet deep, with so much water that its depths remain a steady 39.5 degrees year-round — rests between mountains, like someone poured a vast pool of icy, cold water between cliffs. The lake is deep enough to give rise to the legend of the lake monster affectionately referred to as Pondy; deep enough that some believe an underground river connects it to the ocean more than 300 miles away; deep enough to be chosen as a submarine development location by the Navy. Ospreys swoop overhead, hunting for fish as the sun sinks below the mountains in the west. A mountain goat looks on, motionless, from amid the ponderosa pines and Douglas fir trees to the east, as if he too is captivated by the beauty of it all. “This is a magic place,” says Roger Hohle, who moved here in 1999 to work at the Navy’s Acoustic Research Detachment facility. “It all revolves around that lake right there,” a man seated at the bar at JD’s Resort says. There’s a magnetism to this scrap of Lake Pend Oreille that’s hard to describe, but often murmured of in Bayview. Lore passed down among the Kalispel and Kootenai tribes mention this place. The Kootenai speak of pilgrimages made to this bay, of days spent dancing and making offerings to the spirits of the dead. The dead, they say, would go to the sun before returning here to the shores of the lake. Setting out on a boat

from the docks at sunset, you can feel what drew them, between the depth of the lake and the mountains that jut to the sky. Or maybe it’s just Pondy lurking. Bayview isn’t so far away that it’s cut off from things, but at the same time it is. Cell service is spotty. Locals speak of “going to town”; maybe not today, maybe not tomorrow, but before the dog food runs out. “Town” is Hayden or Sandpoint or Coeur d’Alene — somewhere with more than the four bars, one liquor store and one convenience store that Bayview’s sleepy downtown has to offer. Boat culture is big here: Hundreds of sailboats live at the Lake Pend Oreille Yacht Club, and many participate in the regattas that take place twice each week during the summer. More than 100 eclectic float homes perch on the docks that curve around Scenic Bay. Some are sleek and modern. Others are whimsical — one is a replica of a lighthouse — and others are collapsing into their docks.

J

D’s Resort is where the true locals go to sip vodka from glass tumblers, maybe with a splash of cranberry juice. Dozens of dollar bills line the ceiling, words and drawings scrawled across each. Regulars joke that these dollars are the owner’s retirement fund. JD’s is a fixture; it’s been here as long as anyone can remember. Sandy McGuirk has been serving up drinks here for the past three years. “This is the only place guaranteed to be open year-round,” says McGuirk. It’s 1 pm and McGuirk is issuing a friendly after-thisdrink-you’re-cut-off to one of the two men seated at the bar.

“Aw, Sandy… ” the man says. Somehow, at 8 pm, he’s still here, though, not really any more worse for wear than he was seven hours ago. He’s thinking of attending the meeting at the community center. Or maybe he’ll just wait here to hear about it.

“I

moved here when I was 9 and I’ve been here ever since,” says 32-yearold Katie Eddy, polishing glasses dry behind the bar of the recently reopened Buttonhook Inn restaurant. “Nothing really bad ever happens here.” Behind the Buttonhook, smoke rises from the scorched Cape Horn Mountain, where just today a fire crew of 500 announced they were finished fighting the blaze that ignited over the July 4th weekend, torched 2,000 acres and devoured six homes. “When things go awry, we all come together,” says Kirsten Streater. “Coming from Reno, it wasn’t like that there.”

I

n the early 20th century there were lime mines here, and the abandoned kilns still sit like forgotten castles along Scenic Bay. When the Depression hit, demand for cement in the region slacked. Then in 1941, locals say, Eleanor Roosevelt pinpointed the lake as the perfect location for the inland Farragut Naval Training Station, which closed in 1946. Commercial fishing was a thing until the 1960s. Now the only real industry in town is the Navy’s submarine test base. At JD’s Resort, it’s not unlikely that the person sitting next to you is a retired applied mathematician or someone who studies fluid dynamics; sitting there sipping their vodka cranberry and taking consolation in entropy. 


IN NEXT WEEK’S ISSUE…

We explore four more small towns of the Inland Northwest

ODESSA

Settled by ethnic Germans seeking free land and an escape from the repressive czarist government

The New

INLANDER

MOBILE

KELLOGG

Finding movie times has never been easier.

“Founded by a jackass and inhabited by his descendants”

What movies are showing? Where should we go?

COLFAX

An overlooked town on the way to Pullman wants you to stop in

When is it playing?

ST. MARIES

The answers to life’s great questions.

Where people thrive by helping one another

Know and Go

m.inlander.com

Improving Spokane streets can be disruptive to drivers and businesses. The City of Spokane is committed to keeping you informed so you can know before you go. We encourage you to continue patronizing your favorite local businesses. Thank you for being patient, and please pardon our mess during construction. For more detailed information on these and all of the city’s construction projects, visit:

KnowAndGoSpokane.com

Panorama Drive Water Main Replacement

This project will replace cast iron distribution mains and repave the entire street. Estimated end date: September

Indiana Ave from Division St to Perry St Phase I

Full depth roadway replacement. Lane configuration changing to one lane each direction with bike lanes. Estimated end date: October

Rowan Ave from Driscoll Blvd to Alberta St

CSO 33-2; 1st Avenue from Erie St to Helena St; Erie St from 1st Ave to MLK Way

Full depth roadway replacement, install bicycle lanes, fill sidewalk gaps and replace water lines. Estimated end date: October

Combined sewer overflow facility; residential grind and overlay pavement preservation and ADA ramps; new street construction. Estimated end date: October; new construction: March

Combined Sewer Overflow (CSO) Basin 6

Wall St from Spokane Falls Blvd to Main Ave Phase I

Hartson Ave from Altamont St to Fiske St

This reconstruction project will involve rebuilding the full depth roadway section of traveled way, fill sidewalk gaps, replace curbing where needed and install ADA-compliant curb ramps. The project will also include the replacement of water lines from Altamont Street to Fiske Street. Estimated end date: August

Monr oe

900,000 gallon storage facility and related improvements. Estimated end date: December

Sewer main replacement; new streetscape planning. Estimated end date: September

Ray St from 29th Ave to 17th Ave

Monroe St/Lincoln St Couplet from 8th Ave to Main Ave Phase I

This integrated project includes pavement reconstruction, CSO 20 & 24 storage facilities, storm sewer, 208 swales and water main replacement. Estimated end date: October

Apply preservation treatments that may consist of crack sealing, grind and overlay or other pavement rejuvenation techniques. Upgrades to ADA curb ramps and minor curb and sidewalk repairs are anticipated. Estimated end date: October

Hatch

Linc o ln

High Drive from Hatch Rd to Bernard St (includes CSO 20 & 24)

H igh

Completion of stormwater facility; pipe and street work; storm water, water, and street Improvements; lane restrictions; project will most likely NOT close the hill in either direction. Work will continue in 2016. Tentatively starting August

37th

Havana St Improvements (with 44th trail) from Glenrose Road to 37th Ave

Improvements include full width pavement replacement, complete sidewalk gaps and porous asphalt bicycle lanes. This project will also include installation of a 36-inch water transmission main between 37th Avenue and the Brown Park reservoirs at 57th Avenue. Estimated end date: October

CityOfSpokane_Know&Go_080615_10H_CP.pdf

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 29


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B

efore David Waters even had his college degree in hand, the explosively colorful, organized chaos of his designs had caught the eye of some huge brands: Nike, Adidas, ESPN. With that knowledge, and a quick scroll through Waters’ online portfolio, one might surmise that the 2013 graduate of the University of Idaho’s graphic design program could land a job at any creative agency he wished. But Waters doesn’t want that. “Keeping a hold on creating something I can continue to have a unique voice in, it means so much to me,” the pensive, bearded artist, 28, says from the dining room table of his parents’ home in the North Spokane neighborhood of Indian Trail. In front of him, a glossy-screened iMac is positioned behind the matte grey rectangle of his Wacom Cintiq digital tablet, an invaluable tool through which Waters’ deeply detailed designs are transferred from imagination to hand to screen. Before he takes the pointed stylus in his right hand, Waters pulls on a woolly grey glove because, he says, his hands sweat a lot. “I would much rather work a job at a gas station or stocking shelves, if I could keep my art on the side, than sacrifice creativity,” he says. “I’m pretty restless, and I don’t know what I’m going to do next. It’s more about not wanting to lose that perspective of being on the outside and being free to experiment.” That’s not to say Waters won’t take on freelance design work. Since those career-changing designs were sold — a Manchester United T-shirt, and a line of branded tees for NBA star Kevin Durant, both licensed by Nike — he’s completed other vivid, labyrinthine designs for lesser-known creative campaigns. “The stuff I’ve been interested in lately hasn’t been what clients want, but it makes me happy,” he explains.

David Waters ASCENDING ARTIST

After selling his designs to big name brands, David Waters wants to focus on pushing his creative limits BY CHEY SCOTT

Detail of David Waters’ piece, Inland Empire.

T

o begin one of his immensely detailed pieces, Waters usually starts with a single image; a photo or original sketch. Then, using Adobe Photoshop and his tablet’s stylus, he begins building, layer upon layer and stroke by stroke, to reach an ethereal, glowing finale. Many of Waters’ pieces — like a reimagined poster for Back to the Future (created and displayed as part of the Spokane Symphony’s Movie Music Spectacular concert this past January) and the Kevin Durant tee — are evocative of a solar storm on the sun, or a supernova in a far-away galaxy. Soft brushstrokes and pinpoint dots become space dust; squiggling fine lines are crackling electricity. This juxtaposition of light and dark elements is a quality seen throughout Waters’ repertoire. And ...continued on page 34

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 31


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If you have kids, this road trip offers dozens of ways to sneak history and geography lessons into their minds. If it’s an adult-only escape, be prepared to be amazed by the scenery. From Spokane to the Lochsa region of north central Idaho, you’ll pass through the place where three mighty rivers converge deep in the Clearwater National Forest. Enter for a chance to win this best drive at CarMax and plan on humming “America the Beautiful” all the way.

Amber Waves of Grain

You’ll drive through Washington along the Palouse Scenic Byway: This is wheat and lentil country. Stop for a cup of coffee and waffles at the retro Top Notch Café. Then wander over to the Codger Pole, a totem pole dedicated to the 1938 football game between Colfax and St. John. It must have been quite the game because all 51 players’ faces are carved on the pole.

No Passport Required

Cross the border between Washington and Idaho and dip down to Lewiston. At the confluence of the Clearwater and the Snake Rivers, Lewiston has the lowest elevation in Idaho at 738 feet above sea level. The Nez Perce hunted and fished here, Lewis & Clark made a stop in 1805 on their westward journey, and now 32,000 people call this city home.

Nez Perce

Just past Lewiston in the small town of Spalding, the Nez Perce National Historic Park headquarters is the gateway to the sprawling homeland of the Nez Perce Indians. For thousands of years, the Nez Perce roamed the prairies and forests in Idaho, Oregon, Washington, and Montana; 38 sites sprinkled through the area commemorate their history and way of life.

Rivers Rule

Highway 12 takes you on the 202-mile Northwest Passage Scenic Byway along the Clearwater to the confluence of the Selway and

A

Kamiah was the Nez Perce’s home and a Lewis and Clark campsite. Today it’s a jumping-off spot for guided hunting expeditions (the largest elk herd in the state roams nearby), steelhead, and salmon fishing. Murals along Main Street are worth a look, and the Kamiah Valley Museum has a wooly mammoth reproduction.

IDAHO

BACKCOUNTRY LIFE

B

The Lochsa Historic Ranger Station is a gem. The cluster of buildings was built in the 1920s and ‘30s and has dozens of artifacts from logging, mining, and homesteading. You’ll get a solid feel for what life was like at this isolated ranger station that was accessible only by pack trail until the 1950s. WATCH SALMON JUMP

C

Drive up the Selway River Road for sandy beaches and well-marked hikes. Eighteen miles up the road, Selway Falls is an awesome place to see salmon jump the falls when the water is high.

OREGON

A B

LO CH SA RIV ER

C SPOKANE to LOCHSA RIVER 3 HOURS 30 MINUTES | 196 MILES

SPOKANE, WA MERGE ONTO I-90 W 0.7 MI TAKE EXIT 279 FOR US-195 S TOWARD COLFAX/PULLMAN 0.4 MI CONTINUE ONTO US-195 S 64.2 MI the Lochsa rivers. Lochsa means “rough CONTINUE STRAIGHT TO STAY ON US-195 S 8.6 MI water” in Nez Perce, and the frothy river is TURN RIGHT TO STAY ON US-195 S ENTERING IDAHO 20.8 MI known as one of America’s most thrilling. US-195 S TURNS SLIGHTLY RIGHT AND BECOMES US-95 S 6.3 MI Outfitters well-versed in boat handling, SLIGHT LEFT TO STAY ON US-95 S 0.6 MI SLIGHT LEFT ONTO US-12 E/US-95 S 1.9 MI river lore, flora, fauna, and animal CONTINUE STRAIGHT TO STAY ON US-12 E/US-95 S 5.2 MI facts guide you through the 40 screamTAKE THE US-12 RAMP TO MISSOULA/OROFINO 0.7 MI producing whitewater rapids. Minimum CONTINUE ONTO US-12 E 85.8 MI age is 15, and that jumps to 17 during TURN RIGHT ONTO SELWAY RD LOCHSA RIVER high-water season. There are also floats

and kayaking trips for the more mellow adventurers.

Settle in for a Spell

IDAHO

Lochsa River, Idaho

This CarMax best drive leads you to the River Dance Lodge in Syringa (named for the Idaho state flower), with upscale cabins, “glamping” tents, and a great restaurant. Down the road, Three Rivers Resort has log cabins with kitchenettes on the banks of the Lochsa, A-frames under the trees, motel rooms in the main lodge, a pool, and a restaurant. To enter for a chance to win this best drive and take the test drive to a whole new level, go to carmax.com/yourbestdrive.

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 33


CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS

PastBlessingsFarm_080615_4S_JP.pdf David Waters (left) uses layer upon layer of imagery in his digital creations. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“ASCENDING ARTIST: DAVID WATERS,” CONTINUED... though he’s developed and perfected these signature elements of his style, the artist is constantly pushing through his own creative boundaries. In an effort to make his art feel more authentic, he’s experimenting with designing custom brushes in Photoshop, scanning acrylic paint strokes on canvas to his computer and then using the abstract shapes to make digital brush patterns. “Digital art is odd because it’s very well accepted in advertising and a lot of things, but from what I’ve seen when you go to sell individual pieces, it’s a different ballpark,” Waters explains. “You have to sell digital work close to the price it took to produce, which is sometimes difficult. But because of its digital nature, people seem to equate it with poster prices.”

T

he walls of the mid-’90s rancher around Waters’ makeshift workspace at the family dining table are a gallery showcasing his and his mother Joan’s artwork. Diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease more than a decade ago, Joan has continued to paint in watercolor and even took on glassworking despite the challenges presented by the illness. “She does more work than I do,” David says. “No matter if her hands are shaking, it’s something that helps her cope with the situation.”

34 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015 MoscowChamber_WineBeer_080615_4S_EW.jpg

Due to a mental health crisis, David moved back home after college to recover and has been working on his art there since. These days, he doesn’t venture outside the home too often. “It’s hard to talk about my artwork without getting personal about it. [My mental health] is not a defining characteristic of my art or identifies me, but it has shaped how I feel about creative work and how it helps me,” he says. Both Waters’ and his mother’s art have been featured at Terrain, the annual, one-night local arts showcase. He’s also participated in several poster design showcases, including last year’s Bartfest music festival, and for the aforementioned Spokane Symphony concert. In June, Waters sold framed prints at Terrain’s sister event, Bazaar, under the name Loose Germs. “That was the first time I put myself out there in person... I was definitely pretty nervous. When I like to look at art or music, I like to have a position where I can view it when someone isn’t looking back at you, so for Bazaar I tried to frame it that way,” he says. “I had my seat in the corner — I wanted to give people a space to see it and develop their own opinions.” n cheys@inlander.com Find more of David Waters’ art at loosegerms.com.


CULTURE | DIGEST

TV WET HOT AMERICAN SUMMER T

here will be nothing on television this year to match the glory of Paul Rudd jumping off a motorcycle in the first five minutes of Wet Hot American Summer: First Day of Camp. Spare me your Don Draper Coke commercials or Bloodline plot twists. The moment the jean-jacketed Rudd haphazardly ditches his bike on the grass of Camp Firewood, I knew that there was nothing crazy about an entire TV show based on a quirky 14-year-old cult classic. First Day of Camp was the right and just thing to do, not just for Wet Hot fans, but for the human race. The long-awaited Netflix original series debuted last week and managed the seemingly otherworldly task of corralling almost all of the film’s now super-famous original cast. Yes, that includes Amy Poehler, Bradley Cooper, Elizabeth Banks, David Hyde Pierce, Molly Shannon, Janeane Garofalo, Michael Ian Black and, of course, Rudd. But creators David Wain and Michael Showalter (who reprises his role as Coop and shows that 14 years changes some people more than others) didn’t stop the star wagon there. They also brought to the series Jason Schwartzman as Garofalo’s assistant, Jon Hamm as an assassin named The Falcon, John Slattery as the camp’s outsourced theater consultant, Lake Bell as, appropriately, a hot counselor and Kristen Wiig as a preppy goddess at rival Camp Tiger Claw. The movie took place on the last day of camp, so naturally, and true to its title, the series takes place all on the first day — a day crammed with romantic subplots, a sneaky government plot to inexplicably destroy the camp

Everyone is back, and that’s incredible. and a coming-of-age story, all tied together with the sort of nonsense you’d expect from Wain and Showalter. If you haven’t seen the movie? First off, what the hell is wrong with you? But fear not: First Day stands on its own, and because it’s a Netflix series, it’s all there for you to devour in one sitting, if you’re the sort of person who takes one sip of outstanding comedy, then finds yourself freebasing it until your laughed-out body is left convulsing in the corner. For those of us who saw Wet Hot in a theater of confused onlookers back in 2001 and have been waiting for more absurdity since then, there’s some joy in savoring the series at a more leisurely pace. — MIKE BOOKEY

For Your Consideration BY KATY BURGE

BOOK | Discovered by his widow in 2013, Dr. Seuss’ WHAT PET SHOULD I GET? was published last week, more than 50 years after its creation. Seuss left behind both the manuscript and finished line art for Pet, which appears to be sort of a prequel to one of his most famous works, One Fish Two Fish Red Fish Blue Fish. Pet tells of two children going to a pet store and having to decide which one animal to take home. The fun, simple story is perfect for beginning readers, while adults will enjoy reading the eight-page afterword detailing the book’s discovery and Seuss’ own love for pets.

TELEVISION | If you’re looking to spice up your Wednesday nights, check out comedian Jim Gaffigan’s new show on TV Land, THE JIM GAFFIGAN SHOW. Inspired by his real life, Gaffigan plays Jim, a man who tries to balance his comedy career with his hectic family. Jim causes full-fledged laughs in episode three when he’s forced to attend an 8 am birthday party for a 6-year-old. The only food there is a red velvet cake, which his wife banned him from due to an incident in Vegas where he ate an entire cake.

INSTAGRAM | When it comes to beautiful pictures on social media, it’s hard to beat the photography seen on THE NORTHWEST ADVENTURE (@the_nw_adventure). This Instagram account features breathtaking shots of scenery from all over Washington, Oregon, Idaho and western Canada. Not only will you be filled with wanderlust, you can keep favorite locations in mind if you ever get the hankering to go on a scenic hike or camping with the family. Be sure to take pictures when you do, because they primarily post follower submissions.

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 35


Addams Family

CULTURE | THEATER

The

FROM LEFT: Aimee Paxton, Chris Mudd and Bill Marlowe in the EWU/Modern Theater production of Twelfth Night.

DAN BAUMER PHOTO

Rock Opera and Fart Jokes Friday, August 7th

7 pm

A new co-production of Twelfth Night takes the line “If music be the food of love, play on” and runs with it

Saturday, August 8th

3 pm • 7 pm

BY E.J. IANNELLI

Friday, August 14th

7 pm

Saturday, August 15th

3 pm • 7 pm

hakespeare, like Beethoven or Wagner, is part of that rarefied constellation of entertainers associated with high culture. The mere mention of his name evokes images of actors speaking antiquated verse in dainty accents, dressed in frilly Elizabethan ruffs, holding skulls aloft and waxing philosophical about the meaning of existence. For all his putative stuffiness, The Bard liked nonsense and bathroom humor as much as anyone. This isn’t the only side of the playwright that Eastern Washington University lecturer Jeff Sanders has showcased in the past, but it’s one he certainly enjoys. Last summer, Sanders directed and performed in a joint Interplayers/ EWU performance of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, a Shakespeare comedy full of magic, mistaken identities and a dimwitted character called Bottom who’s transmogrified into an ass. This summer, Sanders is heading an even more ambitious co-production between the same theater (since reborn as The Modern Spokane) and his university in a production of Twelfth Night — a Shakespeare comedy that involves a shipwreck, mistaken identities and a wily inebriate called Sir Toby Belch. “Last year was about that first collaboration between a professional theater and our theater program, and also trying to get our work at EWU downtown, and also getting our students to work with professional actors and designers to give them that experience,” says Sanders. “It was also about that first step: Will people like what they see onstage? Doing Shakespeare, sometimes you never really know if the light’s going to be on or off in terms of audience engagement and interest.” The reception was “enthusiastic” and “very satisfying,” he says. It gave both the professionals and the students the “momentum” they needed to pursue a second outing. EWU and The Modern started planning the next co-production shortly afterward, and Sanders began applying for the necessary funding to make it happen. “I never know if the funding’s going to come through. But the motto of Eastern Washington University is ‘Start Something Big,’ so I think

BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Avenue Tickets Available Online at www.CYTSpokane.com

DATE! SAVE THE

August 12-14

BARRED! S D L O H O N

ALE! S N O G N I EVERYTH

RLY FOR COME EA SEATS! THE BEST NIGHT 10PM - MID *2016 model bikes excluded

WEDNESDAY August 12

THURSDAY August 13

South

Central

3020 S. Grand Blvd 509.747.4187

1711 N Division 509.326.3977

WHEELSPORTSPOKANE.COM

36 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

FRIDAY August 14 Valley

606 N Sullivan 509.921.7729

S

our dean was really supportive of this idea, and really believes in having Eastern be a cultural centerpoint. And to do that, we have to get out of Cheney and into Spokane,” says Sanders. Toward that same end, the participation of academic institutions has grown. William Marlowe, Director of Drama at Spokane Falls Community College, appears as Sir Toby Belch. Sara Edlin-Marlowe, his wife and fellow faculty member, plays Maria. Leslie Stamoolis of Gonzaga University’s Theatre and Dance Department is the costume designer. With Midsummer, says Sanders, “it was essentially Eastern and professional actors. That scope has widened from last year. These different educational institutions are chipping in and collaborating in their own way.” Nichole Meyer, a recent Eastern grad who played Hermia in Midsummer last year and has since gone on to perform locally in Equus and Boeing Boeing, stars as Viola. Nich Witham, another professional actor familiar to local audiences, plays Duke Orsino. Zach Baker, who’s worked as the musical director on countless area productions, has written new music commissioned expressly for this show. “It has almost a Glen Hansard [in the film] Once feel. He’ll be on a thunder guitar one second and an acoustic the next. And the singing is beautiful. It’s going to feel very modern, very now.” The result, Sanders hopes, is a production that unites the appeal of rock opera with the enduring universality of “beautiful poetry” and “fart jokes.” “We’re dealing with text that’s 400 years old. We live in an image-driven culture, and sometimes that’s a barrier. I always try to make my plays very physical, very fun, while also maintaining the balance of crisp, good text. “There are a lot of Bard lovers out there,” Sanders adds. “We want them to come out of the woodwork and come to the theater.” n Twelfth Night • Aug. 6-16; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $20-$24 • The Modern Spokane • 174 S. Howard • themoderntheater.org • 455-7529


FIND ART

and more this Friday, Aug 7th! Venues open 5 - 8 pm unless otherwise noted. For more information about the artists and an interactive map, visit downtownspokane.org

ANDY’S BAR & GRILL 1401 W FIRST

Matt Smith A Spokane Native & world-wanderer, will be exhibiting new works. The show titled MISPELT consists of various sizes & mediums, nestled under the technicolor umbrella of pop psychedelia.

AUNTIE’S BOOKSTORE 7PM 402 W MAIN

Sharma Shields 3 Minute Mic: “Remember the Word” featured reader Sharma Shields, author of “The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac.” Readers can share up to 3 minutes’ worth of poetry.

AVENUE WEST GALLERY

7077 W MAIN, SKYWALK LEVEL

All coop members and consignees Last First Friday at current location. A Grand Closing celebration with 15% off on Aug 7 and 8.

BARILI CELLARS 4 TO 9PM 608 W SECOND

Connor Simpson Spokane artist and entrepreneur Connor Simpson with whimsical and colorful paintings of puppies, pizza, and pizzazz.

BARRISTER WINERY 5 TO 10PM 1213 W RAILROAD

Artist Fabian Napolksy will showcase watercolor paintings. Plus Barrister’s award-winning wines, Beacon Hill’s bistro buffet and the acoustic blues of “Lonesome” Lyle Morse.

BISTANGO

108 N POST

Music by Tommy G. Happy hour 4-6pm, half price all EATS menu, $8 SPODIE and Spokanes best cocktails 9 years running!

BOZZI GALLERY

221 N WALL ST, SUITE 226 (OLD CITY HALL)

Kirsten Stobie specializes in acrylic, oils and mixed medium. Her inspiration comes from nature and music. Live music, catered bites and complimentary glass of wine.

BROOKLYN DELI & LOUNGE 8 TO 10PM 122 S MONROE

Nick Schauer amd friends. Live jazz music, no cover.

CHASE GALLERY AT CITY HALL WEEKDAYS 8AM TO 5PM 808 W SPOKANE FALLS

Many artists from the region, juried by Ryan Hardesty from Museum of Art at Washington State University.

EAST SPRAGUE GALLERY 1812 E SPRAGUE

Vintage collage artist Shanda Woodward and resident artists.

EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS BUILDING 331 W MAIN

James Frye. Futuristic throwback artist heavily influenced by psychedelic and vintage music - Frye creates electronic images that are transferred to canvas and other surfaces.

FIRST FRIDAY AT NORDSTROM 808 W MAIN

Tap your toes to the jazzy sounds of the BoKatz trio and the engaging sketches and watercolors of popular artist Donzell Milam.

FIRST FRIDAY AT V DU V 5 TO 9:30PM 12 S SCOTT STREET

Noted local photographer, Charles Gurche, will show his unique view of the natural world. Music by Crushpad and friends.

HILLS’ RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE 6:30 TILL 8:30PM 401 W MAIN

Kori Ailene with folksy originals and covers.

INK ARTSPACE AT SPARK CENTER 5 TO 8PM

1214 W SUMMIT PKWY

Come celebrate INK Artspace’s new home at Spark Center, see student work from Origin Stories on display, and learn about INK’s upcoming programs.

KOLVA-SULLIVAN GALLERY 115 S ADAMS STREET, SUITE A

Distending Bloom: Sculptural Works By Rebecca Hutchinson. Mixed media: paper, sticks, clay, twine are combined to form work that is alluring and inspiring.

KRESS GALLERY AT RIVER PARK SQUARE 808 W MAIN, THIRD FLOOR

You will love the vivid color and upbeat aesthetic of mixed media artist Andrea Bruse.

LABORATORY ACTIVE DUSK TO DAWN 301 W MAIN

Multidisciplinary artist Amanda Wallace’s ‘Field | House’ explores our system of visual perception to examine the limited, yet continuously perpetuated stereotyping of race its related implications of African American identity.

LEFTBANK WINE BAR 4 TO 11PM 108 N WASHINGTON, SUITE 105

Abstract paintings from Poul S. Nielsen, Professor Emeritus at Medicine Hat College in Medicine Hat, Alberta, Canada. With Spencer from El Corazon, pouring Walla Walla wines.

LIBERTY CIDERWORKS 4 TO 9PM 164 S WASHINGTON, SUITE 300

Award-winning, hand-crafted cider with multimedia compositions - employing collage, pencil drawings and transfers - by Ara Lyman.

LIVE @ THE PLAZA 6 TO 9PM

STEELHEAD BAR AND GRILLE

Joshua Belliardo, Nicholas Peter, Rylei Franks. Three amazing acoustic artists, bringing their own music and feel to the Plaza.

Tony Rosland and $6 Dreaming Tree Wine.

701 W RIVERSIDE

MAIN MARKET CO-OP

44 W MAIN SPOKANE, WA 99201

Nick Tucker with vibrant color pencil drawings of discarded robots.

MARMOT ART SPACE

1206 W SUMMIT PKWY

Marmot Boy alley party with Inlander Cover show and Mini Night Market. Fifty two amazing covers by The Inlander, printed on a large scale. Outside, enjoy games, food, music and fun.

NECTAR TASTING ROOM 5 TO 10PM 120 N STEVENS

Enjoy the fun, eclectic and talented work of Tom Norton. With the music of Dan Conrad and a winery visit from Coyote Canyon.

PATIT CREEK CELLARS 4 TO 9PM 822 W SPRAGUE

Striking, iconic photographs of Spokane by Mike Busby and Jeff Schindler, Music by Blue Canoe and Starlight Motel. Happy hour specials 4-7pm. Savory bites and artisan cheeses available all night. Live music 7-9pm.

PINOT’S PALETTE 4 TO 7PM 32 W SECOND

A variety of artwork from resident artists: Ali Blackwood, Ashley Moss, Audreana Camm, Bethany Ellifritz, Heather Hofstetter, Kyle Genther. Paint your own masterpiece for $10.

RIVER CITY BREWING 3 TO 9PM 121 S CEDAR

Liquid Art Series from the minds of Moose and Todd. A one-time beer brewed for each First Friday using a Firkin keg, cask-conditioned and fermented to be poured one day only.

SANTE RESTAURANT 404 W MAIN

Large Bold Abstract Paintings by Jimmy Magnuson.

SAPPHIRE LOUNGE 9 TO 11PM 901 W FIRST

Local jazz vocalist, Kathleen Cavender and keyboard player Gregory Loewen will be performing jazzified pop arrangements, R & B tunes and favorite jazz standards.

STEAM PLANT

159 S LINCOLN | SEEHORN BUILDING OFF OF LINCOLN STREET BY THE BOUTIQUE SHOPS.

Carol Schmauder, Bess Hardie, Kyle Koste, Patsy Pinch. Local artists with expressions through jewelry, leather, gems, rocks and other natural elements.

downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org | Brought to you by Downtown Spokane and Spokane Arts

218 N HOWARD

TAMARACK PUBLIC HOUSE MUSIC STARTS AT 6PM

912 W SPRAGUE

Doug Miller, landscape artist from Leavenworth, WA. With music by Brotha Nature, Aspen Deck, Sunny Brookbank, and Patrick Stewart.

THE BRICKWALL PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS GALLERY 530 W MAIN, SKYWALK LEVEL

Brian Deemy shows experiments and explorations in the format of instant film over the last four years. David Sams presents images of Spokane.

THE ROCKET BAKERY -- HOLLEY MASON BUILDING 4 TO 6PM 157 S HOWARD

Local artist Hara Allison tells her personal story through art.

TINBENDER CRAFT DISTILLERY 32 W SECOND

Spokane native Eric Schober’s crusty creations- Hand drawn, charcoal, tattooon-paper, one of a kind creations. With Steve Livingston, playing acoustic guitar.

TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY WEDNESDAY THROUGH FRIDAY 11AM TO 3PM

115 S ADAMS

Annual Cleaning Off The Shelves Studio Sale

VINO! A WINE SHOP 3 TO 7:30PM 222 S WASHINGTON

Austin Stiegemeier’s works focuses on people and their relationship to the modern social environment. Painter and printmaker developing layers and uses a wide range of materials from traditional to experimental media including commercial vinyl sticker and scavenged cardboard and trash.

VINTAGE HILL CELLARS 319 W SECOND

Local photography by Ken Parks featuring Spokane architecture and street scenes on metal and foil media will be on exhibit. Latest releases: 2008 Cabernet Franc and 2008 Syrah.

WINDOW DRESSING OPEN WHENEVER YOU HAPPEN TO TRAIPSE BY

1011 W FIRST

Mixed media installation featuring recent EWU BFA grads, Jessy Earle, Krystn Parmley and Ashley Vaughn. Paintings, ceramic work and a digital installation. Sidewalk viewing only.

WOLLNICK’S GENERAL STORE 421 W MAIN

New artwork by Aryn Lindsey Fields and Lisa Soranaka.

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 37


Room to Grow How one farm is providing delectable, healing mushrooms to the public BY DAISY PONGRAKTHAI

F

rom reading a mushroom book to opening a fungi farm, Arrow and Joe Flora struck the right note in fulfilling a life passion. “For me personally, to be able to dedicate myself to something, it needs to connect to the larger universal picture, and mushrooms do just that,” Arrow explains. “The patterns the mycelium form are remarkably similar to the structure of our brains and even the pathways of the Internet.” Fungimental Farm in the small community of Rice, Washington, west

38 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

of Colville, features oyster mushrooms, with room to grow additional popular edible and medicinal mushrooms such as shiitake, reishi, cordyceps and more. The Farm’s beginning required some digging to unveil the Floras’ common passion for the underground world. In 2013, the young couple watched a video featuring mushroom guru Paul Stamets in

which Stamets posed the notion that every mushroom farm should become an ecological center of healing. “At that time, Joe and I had some seed money and were searching for a niche we could fill in our community,” says Arrow. “At that moment after watching the video, we looked at each other and said, ‘That’s what we’re going to do.’” Getting started was a whole new ballgame for the Floras. Joe, an airplane mechanic, and Arrow, who has a permaculture design certificate, had to learn mush-


room farming techniques from the ground up. “We’re self-taught mushroom growers, essentially,” she says. “We just dove into books and online resources out of our passion for the venture.” Fungimental Farm has been in production for a year. They grow pearl oyster and blue oyster mushrooms, which are available at Meyers Falls Market in Kettle Falls. The Floras have high hopes of growing toward Spokane and beyond. Fungimental Farm’s mushrooms are in high demand, another reason to work toward growing the operation. “Sometimes [the market] sells out in a day, so we are working on increasing our production. We would like to expand in our product diversity as well,” says Arrow. “The king oyster is

匀栀漀眀挀愀猀椀渀最 漀甀爀 爀攀最椀漀渀✀猀 漀甀琀猀琀愀渀搀椀渀最 氀漀挀愀氀 挀爀愀昀琀 戀攀攀爀猀⸀ 䄀琀 吀栀攀 䐀愀瘀攀渀瀀漀爀琀 䰀甀猀猀漀

Fungimental Farms are almost entirely self taught when it comes to the science of fungi. another mushroom on our list, since they are the choice edible among all the oyster mushrooms. Shiitake, reishi, cordyceps, you name it.” Though oyster mushrooms are not as high on the medicinal list as shiitake or reishi, they have immune-enhancing properties and are noted to have more protein than eggs. They don’t dry well, so a popular way to eat them is in stir-fries, soups or battered and fried with tasty dips. In Asia, oyster mushrooms have been common in the diet for centuries and are sold at most every local market. Fungimental also has plans to make mushroom medicine with some of the fungi strains, as well as branch out into mycoremediation. “We really like the idea of working with fungi to clean contamination in the environment, or mycoremediation,” says Arrow. “Besides breaking down hydrocarbons, oyster mushrooms are also very good at mycofiltration, which means they can clear toxic waste and microorganisms from the water. We actually have some working in the creek on our land right now.” Another value-added byproduct of growing mushrooms is the spent straw from the fruiting medium; it is a friend to garden soil, outright killing nematodes, a type of roundworm. “We eventually look to branch out as Paul Stamets suggested, where not only do we provide the edible gourmet mushrooms, but also that we start working closely with the fungi and the earth, to the point in which we are able to educate others on the fundamental importance of fungi in our lives and ecosystems, while at the same time healing our planet and ourselves,” she says. n Fungimental Farm • 1750 Rickey Canyon Rd., Rice, Wash. • facebook.com/fungimentalfarm • 675-8896

ᰠ䠀攀 眀愀猀 愀 眀椀猀攀 洀愀渀 眀栀漀 椀渀瘀攀渀琀攀搀 戀攀攀爀⸀ᴠ ⴀ 倀氀愀琀漀

一漀眀 伀瀀攀渀 昀漀爀 䈀爀攀愀欀昀愀猀琀 㜀 愀洀 甀渀琀椀氀 挀氀漀猀攀  ∠  瀀漀猀琀猀琀爀攀攀琀愀氀攀栀漀甀猀攀⸀挀漀洀  ∠  㔀 㤀⸀㜀㠀㤀⸀㘀㤀  

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 39


FOOD | DESSERT

Pleasant Surprise Marsells is proving itself to be the little bakery that could BY KATY BURGE

The small and delectable bites found at Marsells.

A

lthough the address places them on Division Street, cake and dessert boutique Marsells is actually on Cataldo Avenue, tucked between Chipotle Mexican Restaurant and a hair salon. Still can’t think of Marsells? Owner Marcel Kopplin says that’s the problem. “I think we’re kind of a well-kept secret,” Kopplin says. “I’ve had people tell me that we are Spokane’s bestkept secret. I don’t want to be a secret anymore.” Marsells has called the location home for four years, and those who have found the shop on the busy corner aren’t disappointed, as evidenced by their strong word-ofmouth reputation and stellar online reviews. Kopplin says there are a couple of reasons for the praise. “Customer service, family-run, things other places don’t do — the petit fours, pineapple upside-down cakes, whoopie pies — that’s what sets us apart,” Kopplin

says. She says the low prices of her high-quality treats also draw people in. Cookies, gourmet brownies, and cupcakes are just a couple of dollars. Specialty cakes for all types of events start at $25, wedding cakes at $3.50 a serving, and every cake is beautifully hand-decorated and can come in flavors ranging from tried-and-true chocolate and vanilla to their top-selling flavor, lavender. “We’re known for our lavender cake and the rose petal cake,” Kopplin says. “They have a really subtle, soft, floral flavor.” Not sold? Kopplin often offers free cake samples in the store and will even send samples all over the country at no charge. She’s that confident in her cakes. “I know I’ll get a customer,” Kopplin says. “Ninetynine percent of the time, they’ll book through me.” She has the experience to back up the confidence.

Happy Hour

Kopplin taught at the Inland Northwest Culinary Academy at Spokane Community College for 22 years, has her AAS degree in baking, is a certified cake decorator and journey baker, and worked in wholesale for 10 years before opening Marsells. But she says nothing on paper matters if the passion isn’t there. “[The certificates] don’t mean a lot to me, because if you don’t have your heart in it, then it means nothing,” Kopplin says. As for her secluded little shop? She plans on keeping it small, in the family and full of heart. “I’ve got my teenage granddaughter in training,” Kopplin laughs. n Marsells Cakes and Desserts Bakery • 920 N. Division • Open Tue-Fri, 11 am-5:30 pm; Sat, 11 am-3 pm • marsellscakes.com • 448-2512

Mon - Fri 3-6 • Sat 11-5 • All Day Sun

5 Appetizers $ 3 off All Flatbreads $

2 Chips and Salsa $ 1 off all house wines, well $

drinks and draft Beer $

2 Domestic Bottles

21 W Main • 509-473-9455 • SaranacPublicHouse.com

Elegant Patio Dining

For Breakfast, Brunch, Lunch & Dinner

Late Night Appetizers & Drinks

Homemade Soups & Daily Specials

Live Rockin’ Blues • Fri & Sat • 9pm-1am Happy Hours • 3pm-6pm & 9pm-Close Daily

509.924.9000

1100 N. Sullivan Rd., Spokane Valley • www.mirabeauparkhotel.com

40 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • BREAKFAST UNTIL 2PM ON SATURDAY & SUNDAY DINNER STARTS AT 4PM

1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. | 509-924-1446


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AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 41


T

Return to Sender The Gift is a mess of a psychological thriller BY MARYANN JOHANSON

42 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

he Gift is an infuriating movie on so many levels. It can’t decide if it wants to be serious drama or a salacious thriller, so it’s nowhere near enough of either, and each aspect seems to be laughing at the other. It touches on sensitive, tangled emotional matters that could easily be the basis for either sort of movie — how the effects of bullying in childhood linger into adulthood; how stress and grief can render us unable to function in daily life; how even the most intimate of relationships can be tinged by a lack of trust, and more — but fumbles all of them so badly that it contradicts itself constantly, as if it doesn’t really understand the pain it is attempting to appropriate. It wants you to doubt who the villain is, but doesn’t have the nerve to do anything meaningful with that gambit. I’m trying not to spoil. Suffice to say that The Gift, after descending into emotional idiocy and insufficient intrigue, ends up in a disgusting place, one that presumes its audience will be horrified at the repulsive suggestion that a medieval notion about marriage has been contravened. Granted, this notion remains something that some real people in the real world still believe, and it’s an awful trope that movies like this one frequently trot out. It’s a trope that deserves to die, not be perpetuated. I can’t even say that The Gift — written, and in his feature debut, directed by actor Joel Edgerton — starts out promising. Almost from the get-go, we’re led down a path that treats Robyn (Rebecca Hall) as an appropriate battleground for a war of wills between her husband Simon (Jason Bateman), and an old school friend of his, Gordo (Edgerton). (The movie is totally on board with the idea that women are properly pawns in games men play.) The couple have just moved THE GIFT back to Los Angeles — to one Rated R of those masterpieces of midDirected by Joel Edgerton century architecture faced with Starring Jason Bateman, Rebecca huge glass windows, all the Hall, Joel Edgerton better for creepazoids to loom out of the darkness beyond into view — when they run into Gordo in a shop. Simon doesn’t remember the guy at all, except that he was a bit of an oddball, which seems proven when Gordo shows up at the house without invitation several times, bearing increasingly and inappropriately extravagant gifts, and only when Robyn is home alone. Still, Robyn thinks that while Gordo may be a little socially awkward, he seems OK... but Simon in increasingly weirded out and wants to break off the new forced friendship. There are several intriguing directions in which this basic scenario could have gone: The Gift ignores all of them and chooses one that has no ring of emotional truth at all… but which, I suspect, it thinks is incisive and subtly smart. Even though Simon was the one who didn’t want anything to do with Gordo, and rather condescendingly informs others that it’s only because Robyn is “too nice” that she struck up a friendship with the other man, Robyn is the one who gets cast in the role of the fragile irrational when she begins to see that Gordo might actually be pretty creepy after all. But of course, she’s delicate and unreasonable and probably not to be trusted! She lost a baby at some point prior to the beginning of the story, and went through a “rough patch.” We’re meant to wonder if Simon is now gaslighting his wife, trying to deflect, to prevent her from getting suspicious about his long-ago high-school relationship with Gordo. But it’s the movie that’s gaslighting Robyn, seemingly positioning her in the center of the story when what is meant to be the significant stuff is happening elsewhere. The Gift deceives the audience, too. It sets itself up in a way that seems to be a preemptive attack on detractors by borrowing hot-button and even feminist issues, then treating them in implausible ways. Of course some women suffer in the wake of a miscarriage... but not like this. Of course marriages can have trust issues... but not like this. Of course bullies deserve their comeuppance... but not like this. 


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS FANTASTIC FOUR

It’s been about a decade since the last version of the Fantastic Four came out (2005), but apparently since Marvel movies are all the rage these days, it’s already time for a reboot. This time, the new kids on the block are Kate Mara as Sue Storm, Miles Teller as Reed Richards, Michael B. Jordan as Johnny Storm/Human Torch and Jamie Bell as The Thing. The film starts from the beginning of the F4 canon, showing us how the four brainiacs got their superpowers, and immediately enters them into conflict to save the world from the despicable Dr. Victor Von Doom. (CS) Rated PG-13

THE GIFT

Robyn and Simon have just moved back to Los Angeles when they run into Gordo in a shop. Simon doesn’t remember the guy at all, except that he was a bit of an oddball, which seems proven when Gordo shows up at the house without invitation several times, bearing increasingly and inappropriately extravagant gifts, and only when Robyn is home alone. Then things get even weirder. (MJ) Rated R

RICKI AND THE FLASH

Meryl Streep plays Ricki Rendazzo, a mother of three who abandoned her family to become a rockstar. Ricki returns home to her remarried exhusband, Pete, after their daughter Julie (Streep’s real-life daughter Mamie Gummer) suffers a great heartbreak. As Ricki confronts what has become her past — children she didn’t raise, meeting the woman who became their mother and finding the responsibilities of motherhood — she seeks forgiveness and reconciliation. (MS) Rated PG-13

IRRATIONAL MAN

Woody Allen directs this mysterious drama with recognizable names like Joaquin Phoenix, Parker Posey and Emma Stone. The film stars Phoenix as a unstable philosophy professor with a drinking problem and a midlife crisis. His student-turned-lover (Stone) gives him some purpose but doesn’t fulfill him. What does is overhearing a conversation that makes him contemplate murdering a corrupt judge. (MS) Rated R

SHAUN THE SHEEP MOVIE

This is a film without words. There’s plenty of grunts, burps, squeaks, bahs and other noises, just no one talks — not even the humans, who express themselves in garbled tones. But the story, brought to life with claymation, is still well communicated. Our sheep hero Shaun must lead his flock on a rescue mission to the big city after an accident causes their farmer to leave the farm. If the animation looks familiar, it’s because it’s by the same folks who brought us Wallace and Gromit and Chicken Run. (LJ) Rated PG

TANGERINE

RATED PG-13

Shot entirely on iPhones, Tangerine gives us Sin-Dee (Kitana Kiki Rodriguez) and placid Alexandra (Mya Taylor), best friends who meet up for a donut on Christmas Eve right after Sin-Dee gets out of a 28-day stint in jail. Alexandra lets slip that Sin-Dee’s boyfriend and pimp Chester cheated on her when she was locked up. From there, Sin-Dee is understandably enraged and Alexandra tries to calm her. At Magic Lantern (DN) Rated R

THE NEST

AT IN KENDALL YARDS

NOW PLAYING AMY

Amy Winehouse only made two albums, and her chaotic personal life drew far more attention than her Grammy wins, monster hits and stunning voice. The documentary Amy puts the focus back on the singer’s artistry, at least for 90 minutes, as it tells the story of how a girl focused on the joy of music rose to fame — only to have that fame push her toward a dramatic and tragic demise at just 27. At Magic Lantern (DN) Rated R

ANT-MAN

Scott (Paul Rudd) was just released from prison and a return to a life of crime seems like the only option — until Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) shows up with a high-tech suit and a unique offer. He wants Scott to combine the suit’s abilities — communicating with and controlling ants, in addition to becoming the same size and strength as one — with his own breaking-andentering talents to shut down a sinister operation. Rated PG-13 (SR)

FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD

Bathsheba Everdeen (Carey Mulli-

gan) — an ambitious heiress who enjoys her independence — has drawn three admirers, and must navigate between her desires for love and her autonomy. “It is difficult for a woman to define her feelings,” she says, “in a language chiefly made by men to express theirs.” The story illuminates the nature of relationships, love and the value of strength through hardships. At Magic Lantern (MS) Rated PG-13

I’LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS

In a dramedy made for those of a certain age, widowed Carol (Blythe Danner) has begun to feel lonely and depressed. Her friends (June Squibb, Rhea Perlman and Mary Kay Place) attempt to help her find some love and joy. After many awkward encounters, she meets the charismatic, affluent Bill (Sam Elliott) and goes on a date with him. At Magic Lantern (MS) Rated PG-13

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Mark Ruffalo plays manic-depressive Cam Stuart, a father of two girls and a husband to Maggie (Zoe Saldana), who he is desperately trying to keep. ...continued on next page

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AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 43


FILM | SHORTS

THE MAGIC LANTERN FRI AUG 7TH - THUR AUG 13TH FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD (118 MIN) Sat: 2:00 Sun: 12:00 *last weekend!

ME AND EARL AND THE DYING GIRL (102 MIN) Fri/Sat: 6:15 Sun: 2:15 Tue-Thu: 5:00

I’LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS (90 MIN) Fri-Sun: 4:15 Tue-Thu: 3:00

AMY (128 MIN)

Fri: 8:15 Sat: 2:30, 8:15 Sun: 12:30, 6:15 Tue-Thu: 7:00

LOVE AND MERCY (120 MIN)

Fri/Sat: 6:45 Sun: 4:45 Tue-Thu: 5:30

TANGERINE (88 MIN)

Fri/Sat: 9:00 Sun: 7:00 Tue-Thu: 7:45

THE WOLFPACK

Fri/Sat: 5:00 Sun: 3:00 Tue-Thu: 3:45 25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $8 www.magiclanternspokane.com

William Shakespeare’s

THE VAMPIRE WHO LOVED IN VEIN, OR…ONE MONSTER OF A MELODRAMA! Written and Directed by Brady and Eli Bourgard

July 29th - August 23rd Wed-Sat 7:00pm | Sun 2:00pm ALL TICKETS: $10

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He does so by attempting to take care of his two stubborn, expressive and lively daughters to prove himself while his wife attends Columbia for an MBA. This upbeat comedy is the feature debut for writer-director Maya Forbes, whose 12-year-old daughter plays one of the Stuart sisters. (MS) Rated R

Aug 6th-16th themoderntheater.org

JURASSIC WORLD

Supported by the College of the Arts, Letters, and Education

MOVIE TIMES on

Bike and Kayak race to raise awareness for Youth Substance Abuse Prevention

This reimagining of the beloved trilogy features a familiar plot line but an entirely new cast, and even a new direction. Though Steven Spielberg is executive producer, Colin Trevorrow has stepped up to the role of director for this fourth journey into the Jurassic extravaganza. Set 22 years postJurassic Park, the dreamed-about, fully functioning dinosaur amusement park is finally a reality. (KA) Rated PG-13

LOVE & MERCY

This rock biopic about the life of Brian Wilson is an insightful look at two periods of the surfer boy’s life. In the midto-late-’60s segments, when Wilson was at his songwriting and producing peak as the creative genius behind the Beach Boys, he’s played by Paul Dano. In the parts set in the 1980s, Wilson, played by John Cusack, is now a drugaddled, empty shell of a man, under the “care” of psychologist Eugene Landy (Paul Giamatti), a short-tempered, delusional sociopath who seems to thrive only when he has total control. At Magic Lantern (ES) Rated PG-13

MAD MAX: FURY ROAD

A quick race for all skill levels! Kayak portion: 2 miles Bike portion: 6 miles

Sat, Sept 12, 2015

10AM Oldtown Rotary Park

$25 Includes T-Shirt with PreOrder

To register go to: Biayakathon.com

or call 509-447-5651

Waters Edge Kayak will provide rentals: watersedgekayakrental.com

44 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

Searchable by Movie, by Theater, or Time

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

Fury Road is astonishing in a way that makes you feel like you haven’t seen a true action movie in a while, underscoring how sterile the genre has been. Warlord Immortan Joe (Hugh KeaysByrne) thinks he’s sending his trusted Imperator Furiosa (Charlize Theron) on a mission to bring back fuel from Gas Town to the Citadel he rules with an iron fist, but she’s got a secret mission of her own: to free the enslaved “breeders” of Joe’s children and bring them to the Green Place far away that she remembers from her own childhood. (MJ) Rated R

MAGIC MIKE XXL

“It’s not bro time, it’s showtime,” a club owner says to the male strippers of Magic Mike XXL. That memorable quote is not quite indicative of the film, how-

VARIETY

METACRITIC.COM

(LOS ANGELES)

(OUT OF 100)

Inside Out

91

Mad Max

89

The Wolfpack

75

Ant-Man

64

Southpaw

57

Minions

56

INSIDE OUT

Pixar’s newest film (following 2013’s Monsters University) is a major “emotion” picture — it’s about how choices between conflicting emotions drive the life of a Minnesota family. Young Riley (Kaitlyn Dias) and her parents (Diane Lane and Kyle MacLachlan) struggle with joy, sadness, fear, anger and disgust — that’s Amy Poehler, Phyllis Smith, Bill Hader, Lewis Black and Mindy Kaling, respectively — and the personified emotions create their own problems inside Riley’s head. (MS) Rated PG

Twelfth Night

Newport Biayakathon

NOW PLAYING

33

Vacation DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

ever. The story starts three years after legendary stripper Mike Lane (Channing Tatum) retired at his peak. When he finds out the bros of his old crew, the Kings of Tampa, are going on a road trip for a “blow-out” finale, he can’t resist the memories — he comes along and takes it all off. (MS) Rated R

ME EARL AND THE DYING GIRL

Alfonso Gomez-Rejon’s adaptation of Jesse Andrews’ young-adult novel, this film pulled off the rare sweep of the Grand Jury Prize and the Audience Award at the Sundance Film Festival in January. The story about a teenage boy guilted into befriending a classmate suffering from cancer is touching and provides a timely look at our culture’s narcissistic ways. At Magic Lantern (SR) Rated PG-13

MINIONS

Minions opens with a grand history of the race, starting with their evolution from tiny one-yellow-celled creatures from the Despicable Me movies floating in the primordial seas through the form we see them in now. The film is overly thick with backstory about the cute little buggers and distracts from the charm they brought to the original films. (MJ) Rated PG

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE ROGUE NATION

Ethan Hunt (Tom Cruise in full Tom Cruise mode) is disavowed by the U.S. government yet again, even as he chases down a criminal organization that just needs one more MacGuffin to take over the world. Hunt and his familiar crew (Simon Pegg, Jeremy Renner and Ving Rhames) have to travel to Havana or Morocco or Minsk for reasons you won’t remember within 30 minutes of leaving the theater but will enjoy nevertheless. (PC) Rated PG-13

PAPER TOWNS

Based on the John Green novel of the same name, Paper Towns is the story of Quentin “Q” Jacobsen (Nat Wolff) and his neighbor-friend-turned-crush Margo Roth Spiegelman (Cara Delevingne). After being dragged on a night of revenge by Margo, Q goes to school the next day to find her missing. After some detective work, he discovers she has left clues for Q — as he tries to find her, he learns about himself, his neighbor and love. (MS) Rated PG-13

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

SOUTHPAW

Billy Hope (Jake Gyllenhaal), a kid raised in the foster care system, is already the undisputed, undefeated light heavyweight champion of the world when the film begins. He’s got a wife (Rachel McAdams) and a kid and things are well, at least until he finds himself responsible for an awful tragedy. He decides to get back in the ring and fight himself out of a hole. (SR)

TED 2

When Ted (a talking stuffed bear voiced by director, writer and producer Seth McFarlane) tries to have a baby with his new wife, he asks his best friend, John (Mark Wahlberg), to provide the sperm. But his help doesn’t stop there. When Ted and his wife are denied custody unless Ted can prove he is human, the two best bros team up with lawyer Samantha L. Jackson (Amanda Seyfried) and take to the courts to defend Ted’s civil rights. (MS) Rated R

TRAINWRECK

In addition to starring, Amy Schumer wrote the script for Trainwreck, casting herself as a monogamy-averse magazine writer who doesn’t know quite how to handle herself when she gets involved in a real relationship with an interview subject, a nice-guy sports orthopedic surgeon (Bill Hader). . Rated R (SR)

VACATION

Ed Helms and Christina Applegate star as Rusty and Debbie Griswold, the parents of two boys. Rusty worries about bonding with his sons and keeping his marriage alive, so he decided to break out of the monotony of normal suburban life and do what his father (Chevy Chase) did: take the whole family on a cross country road trip. The final destination? America’s favorite theme park: Walley World. (MS) Rated R

THE WOLFPACK

The Wolfpack introduces the world to the six long-haired sons raised (or held prisoner, depending on your opinion) by Oscar and Susanne Angulo in a public-housing apartment on Manhattan’s Lower East Side, their only ideas of the outside world gleaned from flicks like Pulp Fiction, The Nightmare on Elm Street or Halloween — all movies the boys gleefully reenact and film to entertain themselves in their home/prison. At Magic Lantern (DN) Rated R 


FILM | REVIEW

The doughnuts are just the beginning of a crazy night in Tangerine.

A Different World Tangerine’s unusual setup belies its essential human story BY DAN NAILEN

I

f you see only one transgender-prostitute of her singing performance that night between buddy-flick action-comedy this summer, well, encounters with johns that end both comically Tangerine is really your only choice. And it’s and surprisingly romantic. a choice worth making to experience this bold By nightfall, all parties involved — includeffort to make a 90-minute narrative fill those ing an Armenian cab driver who is one of the multiple roles. girls’ most loyal customers, and his unsuspecting We can find plenty of outstanding examples wife and mother-in-law — descend on the same of all those genres — OK, maybe not “transgendonut shop in the film’s opening to sort out der prostitute” — with a quick cruise through their allegiances and entanglements. The heart Netflix. What we can’t find as readily, though, of Tangerine, though, comes in the smaller scenes is the world where director and co-writer Sean throughout, when Alexandra faces down one Baker sets his story, the Los Angeles streets of the potentially violent john with withering insults, or transgender sex trade, where the when Sin-Dee finds the charity violence and drug use endemic within herself to help Chester’s TANGERINE to prostitution intermingle with mistress fix her makeup, or Rated R the universal human struggle of during Alexandra’s torch-song Directed by Sean Baker; starring figuring out who you are. performance of a Christmas tune. Kitana Kiki Rodriguez and Mya Taylor The manic Sin-Dee (KiIn Taylor and Rodriguez, At Magic Lantern tana Kiki Rodriguez) and placid Baker found ideal leads, remarkAlexandra (Mya Taylor) are best able considering that neither had friends who meet up for a donut on Christmas acted before he met them at the Los Angeles Eve right after Sin-Dee gets out of a 28-day stint LGBT Center. Their chemistry comes through in jail. Alexandra lets slip that Sin-Dee’s boyin Sin-Dee and Alexandra’s relationship that goes friend and pimp Chester cheated on her when from supportive to antagonistic and back on the she was locked up. whims of the mercurial Sin-Dee. Sin-Dee’s anger and her friend’s efforts to Tangerine got a lot of film festival attention calm her drive all that follows as Tangerine unfolds for being shot completely on iPhones, and for throughout one day and night, invoking at times the transgender lead roles. What makes it worth the slapstick comedy of Friday and the subtle (and seeing, though, is simply the human story of the short) character studies of Slacker. Sin-Dee spends evolving relationship between two women as her day chasing down Chester (James Ransone) they navigate a life most of us can’t even begin to and his new fling while Alexandra spreads word imagine. n

AIRWAY HEIGHTS

10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444

THE FANTASTIC FOUR

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (2:20) (4:40) 7:00 9:20

THE GIFT

R Daily (11:40) (2:15) (4:45) 7:20 9:50

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE ROGUE NATION PG-13 Daily (10:40) (1:15) (4:00) 6:45 9:30

VACATION

R Daily (12:30) (2:45) (5:00) 7:15 9:35

PIXELS

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (2:30) (4:50) 7:15 9:40

SOUTHPAW

R Daily 8:45

ANT-MAN

PG-13 Daily (1:20) (4:00) 6:40 9:10 Fri-Sun (10:45)

TRAINWRECK

R Daily) (1:30) (4:15) 6:50 9:45 Fri-Sun (10:50)

MINIONS

PG Daily (11:45) (2:00) (4:10) 6:20

INSIDE OUT

PG Daily (11:40) (1:50) (3:50) 6:10 8:30

JURASSIC WORLD

PG-13 Daily (2:00) (4:30) 7:00 9:25 Fri-Sun (11:30)

WANDERMERE

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

THE FANTASTIC FOUR

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (1:50) (2:20) (4:40) 7:00 9:20 Fri-Sun (11:20)

THE GIFT

R Daily (11:40) (2:15) (4:45) 7:20 9:50

SHAUN THE SHEEP MOVIE

PG Daily (10:40) (12:40) (2:40) (4:40) 6:40 8:40

RICKI AND THE FLASH

PG-13 Daily (10:30) (12:40) (2:50) (5:00) 7:10 9:25

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE ROGUE NATION PG-13 Daily (10:40) (1:15) (4:00) 6:45 7:10 9:30

VACATION

R Daily (12:20) (2:35) (4:50) 7:15 9:35

PIXELS

PG-13 Daily (12:10) (2:30) (5:00) 7:20 9:40

SOUTHPAW

R Daily (1:20) (4:20) 7:00 9:45 Fri-Sun (10:45)

ANT-MAN

PG-13 Daily (10:45) (1:15) (3:50) 6:40 9:10

TRAINWRECK

R Daily (1:30) (4:15) 6:50 9:45 Fri-Sun (10:50)

MINIONS

PG Daily (11:45) (2:00) (4:10) 6:20 8:40

INSIDE OUT

PG Daily (11:30) (1:40) (3:45) 6:10 8:30

JURASSIC WORLD

PG-13 Daily (1:30) (4:00) 6:50 9:30 Fri-Sun (10:50)

SPY

R Daily (4:30) 9:45 Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 8/7/15-8/13/15

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 45


8/7- Devon Allman Band

Nominated for Blues Rock Album of the Year

8/8 – Sara Brown Band – Blues & Soul 8/14 & 15 – Dodgy Mountain Men – Stompgrass 8/21 & 22 – Harliss Sweetwater – Blues,Soul & Rock n’ Roll

8/28 & 29 –

British Export – Ultimate Beatles Tribute

More Info: Facebook.com/HotelRLSummerConcerts

Have an event? GET

LISTED!

Submit your event details for listings in the print & online editions of the Inlander. • Community • Film • Food & Drink • Music

• Sports • Theater • Visual Arts • Words

Deadline is one week prior to publication Inlander.com/GetListed 46 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015


FROM LEFT: Carrie Harnishfeger, Caleb Ingersoll, Karli Ingersoll and Max Harnishfeger. BRANDON VASQUEZ PHOTO

Don’t Call it a Comeback Cathedral Pearls, poised with a new record, are ready to take this seriously again BY LAURA JOHNSON

T

hey say this is the first real album. It’s the sound they’ve been coming to for some time now — a mix between petal-soft rock, pop-laced melodies and jagged layers of instrumental and vocal harmonies. Like today, when they’ve come from various corners of Spokane to meet at Stella’s Café, Cathedral Pearls is a convergence of four musicians trying to make a push within their city’s scene — and their new record Etchings is the fulfillment of that.

“It honestly feels like starting over as far as building a fan base again,” says Karli Ingersoll, a singer-songwriter and guitarist for the group. “We got to a point where I feel like people knew about us, and then when we took a break for so long it’s hard to rebuild.” Cathedral Pearls began in 2011, and was quickly named as one of 12 Washington Bands You Should Listen to Now by Paste; a pre-The Heist Macklemore also was on that list. But the past two

years have proven hectic for Ingersoll and husband Caleb (drums/sound engineer) as they’ve gotten their live music venue the Bartlett off the ground. In that time, married couple Max (singer-songwriter/guitarist) and Carrie (keys) Harnishfeger welcomed another baby girl. As a band, they’ve performed fewer than a dozen times. But they can’t have been completely forgotten; their Volume set in May packed out nYne. Karli has played in

local bands for years, including her recent solo project Windoe. Caleb plays drums in multiple bands and produces local groups’ records, while Max’s experimental electronic two-piece Water Monster was named a 2015 Inlander Band to Watch. For those who haven’t heard their names and their solo efforts, Etchings is the place to start. This grouping of 10 songs has been in the works for about ...continued on next page

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 47


MUSIC | INDIE

The Inlander’s Annual

“DON’T CALL IT A COMEBACK,” CONTINUED...

AUG. 28-SEPT. 3, 2014

| FAMILY OWNED. COMMUNITY

SUPPLEMENT

FOCUSED.

TO T HE A INL

NDER

g the People changin est for the Inland Northw how you better — and of them one can be PAGE 27

HEALTH

A battle over Spokane ’s private ambulan ces

PAGE 18

FOOD

Hungry? It’s time Pig Out in the Parkto

PAGE 26

FILM

A sweet return to ’80s with Ghostbusthe ters

PAGE 66

On Stands August 27th

Attention Non-Profit Organizations! This is your chance to tell readers about your organization and how to get involved. Advertising listings will be featured in the annual Give Guide issue and all year on Inlander.com/give.

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a year and a half. They collectively wish that the album has been released sooner, but there wasn’t time. “When you say Cathedral Pearls, some people may think Americana or folk, but that’s not what we are,” Max says. They describe their previous release, the eight-track EP Off My Chain, as a sort of random project that ended up being a lot more folkinspired than expected. In 2013, when that disc dropped, that genre was still all the rage. Now, twentysomethings are distancing themselves from the folk pigeonhole, and Etchings, with its sonic landscapes and catchy pop hooks, couldn’t be confused with an indie folk album. With the new record’s release there’s a new sense of urgency. Between the laughs and bites of sandwiches, there are dreams to move their band somewhere beyond the confines of Spokane. “I think about the Bartlett, so much of our drive and vision is to help the Spokane scene be bigger and better and influential, get this city some wider recognition,” Caleb says. “I have drive with the band, with our music, to get some national attention but still represent this town.” While they’re here to take this seriously — “what would be the point after all these years?” Karli asks — what will always remain are their relationships. Even when the band was on its hiatus of sorts, the quartet still got together every week or so. “The difference with this band is the friendship is the most important thing,” says Max.

“It’s more important to care about each other as people if you want a band to be lasting.” Practices and recording sessions happen, when they do, in the Ingersolls’ upstairs or the Harnishfegers’ basement. Often they’ll have dinner beforehand and watch YouTube videos of musicians who inspire them. There’s a lot of goofing off, with Caleb and Max concocting wild scenarios for bands they wish they were in — one involves a group that simply sets up their truckload of equipment on stage without ever playing a note. Karli and Carrie reel them into the songs at hand, in which everyone has a say. Expect fresh tracks not featured on the record to make an appearance at their album release show on Saturday. “Caleb and I grew up being in bands with family. This feels a lot like that,” Karli explains. “I don’t think anyone is afraid to say what they think. There’s more of an open feeling. We each bring ideas, but we don’t hold tightly to them.” That translates to their shows — at which they all agree that Carrie looks the coolest — where they feel at home with each other, playing their found sound.  lauraj@inlander.com Cathedral Pearls album release show with Us Lights and Dust Covered Carpet • Sat, Aug. 8, at 8 pm • $5/$10 includes CD • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

The water is blue. The grass is too.

August 7 – 9, 2015 Waterfront Park, Medical Lake, WA Kathy Kallick & Laurie Lewis Phillips, Grier & Flinner Growling Old Men Finnders & Youngberg A Tribute to Hazel Dickens

August 6-23

(with Laurie Lewis, Eli West, Todd Phillips & Tom Rozum)

Eli West & Friends Kevin Pace & The Early Edition Top String Bluegrass Heartbreak Pass Check out our second annual BlueWaters Youth Camp! Acuff & Sherfey

Reading

Concert

Sponsored by

ERT E CONCTHE LAK

Tickets and camping passes available online now!

BY

August 19 www.bluewatersbluegrass.org

www.facebook.com/bluewatersbluegrass

48 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

August 25

CdaSummerTheatre.com (208) 660.2958


MUSIC | FESTIVAL

A SOCIALLY CONSCIOUS LINEUP

The Northwest’s FIRST Nashville Honkytonk

NAHKO AND MEDICINE FOR THE PEOPLE

Fresh off of a stint at Red Rocks Amphitheatre, this earthy “world” musical collective wants to bring everyone together in peace and harmony.

Gleason Fest raises funds for the Gleason Initiative Foundation.

Awesome Ain’t Easy Gleason Fest is back for yet another year, along with its namesake BY LAURA JOHNSON

I

t’s the show that means the most to him each year. John Blakesley coordinates multiple concerts and festivals, including Elk Fest, but once Gleason Fest comes around, it’s about more than just music — there are so many emotions attached to the benefit project. “I still remember when Kyle [Steve Gleason’s brother] called and said, ‘Let’s throw Steve a party,’” recalls Blakesley, referring to when Gleason was officially diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in 2011. “We didn’t know how long he was going to be around. Here we are four years later, and I swear he’s going to outlast some of us. He’s so positive. He gets up every day and he has a better attitude than me.” Blakesley also attended Gonzaga Prep, where Gleason was a standout football player. Gleason’s run at Washington State University and with the NFL’s New Orleans Saints was an inspiration to Blakesley as well as his hometown. Now, through the Gleason Initiative Foundation, Gleason (who is unable to breathe

or speak on his own) continues to inspire, educating the public on the specifics of his disease and raising money for medical research and assistance. This year, after moving up the fundraiser to the beginning of August to fit Gleason’s 20-year Gonzaga Prep July reunion into one Spokane trip, Gleason Fest is poised to host more people than ever. Last year’s count was 1,200; the event sold out around 5 pm. Blakesley hopes to add about 300 MORE EVENTS people to that Visit Inlander.com for total. Expect complete listings of an expanded local events. rollout grass section in the middle of Division and Main, as well as water stations, guest appearances and a whole lot of good-for-the-soul tunes. “Yeah, it’s a fundraiser, but I try to remind everyone it’s a celebration of life and love and music,” Blakesley says. n

ENTER TO WIN RASCAL FLATTS

RISING APPALACHIA

They’re just two Southern sisters working to realize the human journey through soulful, sensual and often jazzy musical collaborations.

REAL LIFE ROCKAZ

“Poncho“ Paul Flores leads his band of merry musical activists through tunes that pull from reggae, hip-hop, Afro-funk, soul and experimental.

HEY! IS FOR HORSES

It’s the fourth time that John Blakesley’s own act (all Gonzaga Prep alum) is on the bill, so feel free to think of the freestyle rockers as the house band of sorts. Blakesley plans to unveil a new song he wrote specifically for Gleason.

THE RUSTICS

COLT FORD TICKETS ON SALE $20 FRIDAY & SATURDAY

LUKE JAXON FRIDAY LADIES NIGHT! DANCE LESSONS AVAILABLE 7PM SATURDAY THE VILLE

HAPPY HOUR 8-9PM 208-457-9128 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls, ID

FREE Soup for YOU!

With any whole sandwich purchase

In the spirit of letting go and just living in the moment, these Spokane folksters are the perfect band to get the good vibes going. n Gleason Fest feat. Nahko and Medicine for the People and more • Sat, Aug. 8, from 2-11 pm • $20 • All-ages • Division Street and Main Avenue • gleasonfest.org

Open Mic

Wine Tasting Wed

Game Night 8pm No cover.

Live Music Jazz 8-10pm

8pm Geeks Who Drink Trivia Tue-Sat 11am-Close Happy Hour 4-6pm Mon-Sat 11am-8pm

W/ DEAN ALEXANDER Thursday, Aug 13th Enter at Inlander.com/northernquest

509-835-4177 • 122 S Monroe St brooklyndelispokane.com

Like Inlander, Win Tickets!

Event/Music Contact: songbirdconsultingllc@gmail.com

/TheInlander

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

INDIE FOLK THE SWEEPLINGS

I

t seems that with Cami Bradley — Spokane’s angelic hometown singer-songwriter who took sixth place on America’s Got Talent in 2013 — there’s always something new to talk about. Her band the Sweeplings, featuring Alabama native Whitney Dean, has been together a little more than a year; already, the duo has released an EP and multiple music videos, lent a song to an ABC Family commercial and played all over the country. Now the cinematic folk act releases its first fulllength album Rise and Fall this month, with a few select record release shows, including one at the Bartlett this Friday. The hauntingly forlorn lead single “Carry Me Home” was recently featured on NPR’s First Listen series. No doubt there’ll be much to talk about regarding this two-piece in the months to come. — LAURA JOHNSON The Sweeplings album release with Dylan LeBlanc • Fri, Aug. 7, at 8 pm • $15/$18 day of • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 08/06

ArBor CrEST WinE CELLArS, Ryan Larsen & Chris Blair J ThE BArTLETT, Haunted Summer, Dead Serious Lovers BoomErS CLASSiC roCK BAr & GriLL, Randy Campbell acoustic show BuCEr’S CoFFEEhouSE PuB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen CoEur D’ALEnE CASino, PJ Destiny J CoEur D’ALEnE PArK, Browne’s Addition Summer Concert Series feat. Kari Marguerite CruiSErS, The Usual Suspects ThE CuLinAry STonE (208-2774116), Son of Brad J FESTivAL AT SAnDPoinT AT WAr mEmoriAL FiELD, Arlo Guthrie, Jonatha Brooke FizziE muLLiGAnS, Kicho ThE FLAmE, DJ WesOne J hAyDEn CiTy PArK, Strictly Country John’S ALLEy, Eddie Turner J LAGunA CAFé, Just Plain Darin ThE LAnTErn TAP houSE, DJ Lydell norThErn rAiL PuB (487-4269), Open Mic with Johnny & the Moondogs J PinnACLE norThWEST, Repaid in Blood, In Death J rivErSTonE PArK, Global Summer Concert Series feat. Angela Marie Project TruE LEGEnDS GriLL (892-3077), Dan Conrad ThE viKinG BAr & GriLL, Casey Ryan zoLA, Boomshack

Friday, 08/07

J ThE BArTLETT, The Sweeplings album release (See story above), Dylan Leblanc BEvErLy’S, Robert Vaughn BLACK DiAmonD, The Diamond DJ

50 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

FOLK-ROCK BRANDI CARLILE T

he first time you see Brandi Carlile, it’s near-impossible to walk away without becoming a fan of the genredefying singer-songwriter. For me, it happened at an Indigo Girls concert a decade ago, when Carlile hit the stage as the unknown opener in front of 3,000 chattering, drinking fans and immediately silenced the crowd with her combination of charming between-song banter, catchy-as-hell songs rooted in folk and country, and a voice powerful enough to make anyone in range shut up and take notice. The Ravensdale, Wash., native has only gotten better since, as her latest album makes clear; The Firewatcher’s Daughter is a louder, more raucous affair than previous efforts, and new songs like the hard-rocking “Mainstream Kid” and kinetic “Alibi” will make great additions to what is sure to be one of the best live shows of the summer. — DAN NAILEN Brandi Carlile with Anderson East • Wed, Aug. 12, at 8 pm • $30 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 911 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279 BoLo’S, Dragonfly BrooKLyn DELi & LounGE, Nick Schauer with Friends J BuCEr’S CoFFEEhouSE PuB, The Brad Ard Jazz Trio CArLin BAy rESorT (208-6893295), Crybaby ThE CELLAr, Fur Traders J ChATEAu rivE, David Raitt & The Baja Boogie Band CoEur D’ALEnE CASino, Chris Reiser & the Nerve, Kicho ConKLinG mArinA & rESorT, JamShack CrAvE, Stoney Hawk CurLEy’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE FEDorA PuB & GriLLE, Carli Osika J FESTivAL AT SAnDPoinT AT WAr mEmoriAL FiELD, Ziggy Marley with Maw Band FizziE muLLiGAnS, Tell the Boys ThE FLAmE, DJ WesOne Ladies Night J FounTAin CAFE, Fountain Cafe

Music Series ThE FoxhoLE, DJ 3D hiLL’S rESorT (208-443-2551), Sammy Eubanks hiLLS’ rESTAurAnT & LounGE (7473946), Kori Ailene J ThE hivE, Aftival feat. Funky Meters iron horSE BAr, Coleman Underground KELLy’S rESTAurAnT & LounGE (447-3267), Scotia Road J mooTSy’S, Six State Bender, Redvolt, Whiskey Dick Mountain norThErn QuEST CASino, Lynyrd Skynyrd with Marshall Tucker Band nynE, DJ Patrick onE ShoT ChArLiE’S, The Usual Suspects PAoLA’S rAinBoW rESorT, Keith and Julie Niehenke PEnD D’orEiLLE WinEry, Wooden Sleepers

PEnD orEiLLE PLAyhouSE, Open Mic J PinnACLE norThWEST, Moonshine Bandits with Jelly Roll, Crucifix, Pruno, Sic Vicious, Havoc ThaClown, TLG, Versatile J rAThDrum CiTy PArK, Master Class Big Band rED Lion hoTEL AT ThE PArK, Devon Allman Band, Echo Elysium rED room LounGE, Jus Wright & the River City Roots, the Naturalystics and Mayfair ThE riDLEr PiAno BAr, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler SEASonS oF CoEur D’ALEnE, Son of Brad J ThE ShoP, DJ Teej TAmArACK PuBLiC houSE, Casey Ryan ThE viKinG BAr & GriLL, Left Over Soul J WATErFronT PArK, Blue Waters

Bluegrass Festival feat. Laurie Lewis and Kathy Kallick, Finnders & Youngberg and many more zoLA, Karma’s Circle

Saturday, 08/08

BArLoWS AT LiBErTy LAKE, Jan Harrison, Doug Folkins, Danny McCollim J ThE BArTLETT, Cathedral Pearls album release (See story on page 47), Us Lights, Dust Covered Carpet BEvErLy’S, Robert Vaughn J ThE BiG DiPPEr, KYRS Presents: Wartime Blues with Pine League BLACK DiAmonD, The Diamond DJ BoLo’S, Dragonfly J BuCEr’S CoFFEEhouSE PuB, Dan Maher CArLin BAy rESorT, Crybaby ThE CELLAr, Fur Traders J ChAPS, Just Plain Darin


COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Chris Reiser & the Nerve, Kicho COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, Ron Criscione CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, JamShack CRAVE, Stoney Hawk CURLEY’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE J DOWNTOWN SANDPOINT, Sandpoint Summer Sounds feat. Broken Whistle J DOWNTOWN SPOKANE, Gleason Fest (See story on page 49) feat. Nahk and Medicine for the People, Rising Appalachia and more J FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT AT WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, Vince Gill with The Barefoot Movement, Troy Bullock FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Tell the Boys THE FLAME, DJ Big Mike, DJ WesOne THE FOXHOLE, DJ 3D J GARLAND DISTRICT, Garland Street Fair feat. Star Ana, Silver Treason, Sammy Eubanks, Ticking Time Bomb and more J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Sam Smith HARRISON, Harrison Summer Concerts feat. Doghouse Boyz HILL’S RESORT, Sammy Eubanks THE HIVE, Aftival feat. Yonder Mountain String Band IRON HORSE BAR, Coleman Underground J JONES RADIATOR, Lions Beside Us EP release party, Cold Blooded J KNITTING FACTORY, Parmalee THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Twin Tow-

ers dance party THE LARIAT INN, Dude Ranch J MOOTSY’S, Down North, the Tone Collaborative NYNE, DJ C-Mad ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S (208-6899968), The Usual Suspects J PINNACLE NORTHWEST, GTS Presents: “Summer Slam Fest” RED LION HOTEL AT THE PARK, Sara Brown Band THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler RIFF (279-2921), Mookie Blake and the Certified TAMARACK PUBLIC HOUSE, Ryan Dunn TRUE LEGENDS GRILL, Carli Osika THE VIKING BAR & GRILL, Girl On Fire J WATERFRONT PARK, Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival feat. Laurie Lewis and Kathy Kallick, and more ZOLA, Karma’s Circle

Sunday, 08/09

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Sammy Eubanks BIG BARN BREWING CO. (710-2961), Steven King CHECKERBOARD BAR, Jon Emery COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kicho J COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, CdA City Park Concert Series feat. David Raitt & the Baja Boogie Band CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, PJ Destiny CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Carli Osika

CRUISERS, Dan Conrad CURLEY’S, HooDoo Udu DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church J NEATO BURRITO, Uh Bones, Panaderia, Future Single Mom, Jan Francisco PAOLA’S RAINBOW RESORT, Paloa’s Jam feat. Justin Ryan J WATERFRONT PARK, Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival feat. Phillips Grier & Flinner and more ZOLA, Soulful Max Trio

Monday, 08/10

J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic CHECKERBOARD BAR, The Deltaz EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Brit Floyd JOHN’S ALLEY, American Aquarium LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Monday Night Spotlight feat. Carey Brazil ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 08/11

315 MARTINIS & TAPAS, The Rub FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills KELLY’S IRISH PUB, Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots J PINNACLE NORTHWEST, Furlough Noir, Tyler Scruggs, Knights of Pluto, Griffey RED LION HOTEL RIVER INN, Son of Brad J SHERMAN SQUARE PARK, Bakin’

Phat SWAXX, T.A.S.T.Y with DJs Freaky Fred, Beauflexx ZOLA, Soulful Max Trio

Wednesday, 08/12

BARRISTER WINERY, Pamela Benton J THE BARTLETT, Ballroom Thieves CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Ron Greene DOWNTOWN COEUR D’ALENE, Live After 5 feat. Clumsy Lovers J KNITTING FACTORY, Brandi Carlile (See story on facing page), Anderson East LA ROSA CLUB, Robert Beadling and Friends LITZ’S BAR & GRILL, Nick Grow LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 J THE NEST AT KENDALL YARDS, Flying Spiders NYNE, Open Mic PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Bright Moments J PINNACLE NORTHWEST, Elektro Grave THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Jam with Steve Ridler SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open mic with Son of Brad ZOLA, The Bossame

Coming Up ...

FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT AT WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, Lake Street Dive Aug. 13 THE BARTLETT, Blackwater Prophet Album Release, Spirit Animals, Bullets & Balloons, Aug. 14

Come Celebrate the 21st Annual Cultural Villa

ges

r Free Activities fo s en Toddlers to Te

Interactive Children’s C enter

r Education, Caree s ir Fa & Health

Free K-8 Sch

ool Supplies

(While supp

lies last)

Art Displays

Main Stage Performances All Day

United We Live Saturday | August 15, 2015 Riverfront Park

nwunity.org

The Region’s Largest Multicultural Celebration Family-oriented and FREE

EVENT SPONSOR

AREA SPONSORS Planned Parenthood of Greater WA & North ID, CHAS, & Community Health Plan of Washington

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BROOKLYN DELI • 122 S Monroe St # 101• 835-4177 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CALYPSOS • 116 E Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208665-0591 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 CONKLING MARINA & RESORT • 20 W Jerry Ln, Worley • 208-686-1151 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • (208) 773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 THE FOXHOLE• 829 E. Boone • 315-5327 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 THE JACKSON ST. • 2436 N. Astor • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N Market St, Mead • 4669918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR• 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PARK BENCH CAFE •1976 S Tekoa St • 456-4349 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 PINNACLE NORTHWEST • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside . • 822-7938 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 ROCKET MARKET • 726 E. 43rd Ave. • 343-2253 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SULLIVAN SCOREBOARD • 205 N Sullivan Rd • 891-0880 SWAXX • 23 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 TAMARACK • 912 W Sprague • 315-4846 UNDERGROUND 15 • 15 S. Howard St. • 290-2122 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 51


FESTIVAL GROOVIN’ ON GARLAND

Dig up your favorite outfit from the 1960s or ’70s, or throw on some tie-dye and you’ll look groovy enough to fit the throwback theme at the 14th annual Garland Street Fair. This summer celebration closes off the Garland District from Monroe to Howard to fill the street with local art, hands-on activities for all ages and a car show, back this year by popular demand. Nine musicians will take center stage near the Garland Theater for an hour each, ending with Seattle-based singer/songwriter Star Anna at 6 pm. Options include eating at any of the 15plus food vendors and creating your own piece of art to take home. — KATY BURGE Garland Street Fair • Sat, Aug. 8, from 10 am-7 pm • Free • Garland Business District • West Garland Avenue • garlandstreetfair.com • 939-8970

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

52 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

FOOD NO ANIMALS ALLOWED

MUSIC PICKERS’ PARADISE

Spokane VegFest • Sat, Aug. 8, from 10 am-6 pm; music from noon-8 pm • Spokane Community College • 1810 N. Greene • inveg.org/vegfest

Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival • Fri, Aug. 7 through Sun, Aug. 9 • $55 weekend pass; $20/Fri, $35/Sat, $25/Sun • Waterfront Park • 1386 S. Lefevre St., Medical Lake • bluewatersbluegrass.org

The 2014 Inland Northwest Vegans’ Spokane VegFest, hosting 45 vendors and 1,100 attendees, proved veganism is more than a passing fad. The festival is doubling its size for year two, with a variety of more than 100 animal- and eco-friendly vendors and exhibitors, including food trucks, nonprofits, chefs and many more. This bigger and better year also features an outdoor farmers market and outdoor music stage with bands and yoga. — MATTHEW SALZANO

Since 2002, the Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival has attracted some of the biggest names in the genre to the Inland Northwest, and exposed local talent to an audience hungry for some of that old-time music. This year is no exception for the fest on the shores of Medical Lake, with the reunion of Laurie Lewis and Kathy Kallick, two founders of the Good Ol’ Persons, topping the bill, as well as the instrumental masters Phillips, Grier & Flinner, among many more. — DAN NAILEN


2829 E 29th Ave • 509.535.6464

M! Y MAYHE MS. DERB A E T Y T N CKS. TWE TWO TRA

WORDS THE KNIT GETS RELIGION

He’s the controversial pastor who famously questioned his belief regarding the traditionally held Christian view of hell in his 2011 book, Love Wins, and this Friday, Michigan megachurch founder/Oprah-approved spiritualist Rob Bell comes to the Knitting Factory. Yes, the Knitting Factory, where people often arrive wearing little, drink a bit too much and listen to music with lyrics not always compatible with religious teachings. As part of his Everything is Spiritual speaking tour, Bell uses the TED Talks approach to discuss the how and why of existence in a fascinating and inclusive way. Also note: For just $101, you can score some pre-show conversation with Bell, priority seating and a signed copy of The Zimzum Of Love, the most recent book he wrote with his wife about marriage. — LAURA JOHNSON Everything is Spiritual Tour with Rob Bell • Fri, Aug. 7, at 8:30 pm • $29.50-$101 • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

ls Spokanniba presents

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ARTS DEBUT NO. 2

INK Artspace’s humble beginnings started in a location above downtown music venue the Bartlett. But poor access for the population it sought to serve, combined with the noise that would fill the space whenever there was a show downstairs, made the spot less than ideal. Now, thanks to its partnership with the new Spark Center in Kendall Yards, offering easy access from downtown and the West Central neighborhood, INK is ready to debut for round two this Friday. The community is invited to see the new space, meet INK’s board of directors, learn about volunteer opportunities and also see work by students of INK’s recent workshops, Origin Stories. The series, created by local author Jess Walter and illustrator Sam Mills, pushes students to explore their strengths and weaknesses as they create a graphic novel telling their “origin.” — CHEY SCOTT

3 Rockin’ Bands

40 Craft Beers 20 Breweries

@ Silver Mt.

INK Artspace Open House • Fri, Aug. 7, from 5-8 pm • Free • INK Artspace/Spark Center • 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. • facebook.com/ INKArtspace

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

BE A DANCER TO BEAT CANCER The 17th annual oldies dance benefits the American Childhood Cancer Association of the Inland Northwest’s family day camp. Aug. 14, 7 pm. $30-$35. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (928-3782) DINNER UNDER THE STARS Proceeds support the Shared Harvest Community Garden; attendees enjoy dinner and bid for local artisan goods in a silent auction. Aug. 15, 6-9 pm. $25. Shared Harvest Community Garden, 1004 E. Foster Ave., CdA. kealliance.org (208-667-9093) SRAVASTI ABBEY ALMS BOWL The annual Food Fund Rummage Sale pays for the weekly groceries for Abbey residents. Aug. 15, 9 am-3 pm. Free. Runge Furniture, 303 E. Spokane Ave.,

CdA. adams.danna@gmail.com

COMEDY

GUFFAW YOURSELF Open mic comedy night; every other Thursday at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (847-1234) STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s 2721 N. Market St. (483-7300) EXPEDITION Live improv comedy show. Fridays , at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) IMPROV LAB The Blue Door players try out new material on stage, monthly on the first Friday, at 10 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (7477045)

Craft Beer & Music Festival

2015

SAT., AUG. 15

$2995

advanced

GATES OPEN @ 1PM

$ 34 95

day of

visit

silvermT.com for lodging & tickets

Photo: Matt Vielle

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 53


W I SAW U YOU

RS RS

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU IS YOUR DOOR STILL OPEN? I had the time of my life and I never felt this way before. I swear it's the truth and I owe it all to you. I miss it. I miss laughing and feeling better the second your door opened and always trying to shut your screen door! LOL. Is it still open to me... and will it still shut by itself? I miss you! BEAUTY Lisa, you are a one of a kind Beauty! We've met several times and I cannot get over you! I wish some things were different I'd take you away to some place warm! Until I see you again ;) (soon) YOUR DAD Your Dad was my cousin and you tried to get in touch with My Mom quite a while ago, and she didn't tell you anything. I know this seems lame, but I would like to get in touch with you because you are part of MY Family. Please respond to spokanevalley56@ gmail.com and we can perhaps discuss your/our family. I would love to talk with you. EASTBOUND 90 SUNDAY MORNING You veered into the stream somewhere after Freya. I liked your style, peering here, veering there, anxious to get someplace. I think you started to notice when I waved at you in your mirror. Then we did a little traffic dance all the way to Pines. I'd have invited you to have some coffee, but I had to get someplace. But don't think I didn't see where you were when I turned right. Tell me the rest and coffee is still an option. jpg37@live.com.

CHEERS JAVA JOLT MY DAY Cheers to all the Zips drive-ins if they bring back their Java Jolts. Those things are the BEST iced coffee drinks in the fast food biz. All the other fast food places' coffee drinks taste like toilet water. You don't want your customers to suffer, right? Of course not! You want to be the best year round and that means having Java Jolts year round. I know your competition has iced coffees year round. Cheers to you when you bring 'em back. VZ. ANGELS WERE OUT ON SUNDAY To the incredibly kind drivers on I-90. On Sunday morning, July 26, my son and I left home in the valley, heading to Costco. We entered I-90 at Barker Road going west. Just as we passed under the Evergreen overpass, a large 5 point buck came bounding out of the ditch on the north side of the interstate, attempting to cross the road. He leaped through the air and was right in front of us when we hit him. He completely shattered our windshield and caved in most of the front of our car. Using the right side mirror, I slowly moved to the right shoulder and coasted to a stop. We started to exit the car and before we were completely out, several cars had stopped behind us and the occupants rushed up to see if we were alright, which we were. We couldn't believe how many kind and compassionate people were out that day. After the first few left the scene, more people stopped to also check us out. Our thanks to all of you for your care and concern. Also, a special thank you to the man and his son who removed the poor deer from the traffic lane. RE: HILLYARD BISTRO Thank you for introducing me to this great little place love the food and you were right the waitress is beautiful.praises for the new Hillyard Bistro. GOOD SAMARITAN Many thanks to the woman who flagged down a cop to report a thief who had just stolen my bike the night of 7/29 at the Davenport Grand. You are a rock star my dear!!! I have yet to find my bike, but people like you make up for the people like those who stole from me. May the universe shower you with blessings! MOTORCYCLE CRASH ON I-90 I would like to thank the people who stopped to

People like you make up for the people like those who stole from me. May the universe shower you with blessings!

help me after crashing my motorcycle on I-90 Tuesday morning. If you saw it happen it probably shook you up too. This story has a good ending thankfully as my wonderful daughter was able to be there for me and as bad as it probably looked I got off miraculously easy. A broken clavicle, scapula and a couple of fractured ribs. I thank God for the outcome and for the great people in Spokane. TO "SWEET" MIKE AT DAVE'S BAR & GRILL.... Mike, you were sitting at the table next to ours. Upon leaving, you leaned towards me and remarked that my husband and I looked so sweet. I was overcome and could only respond back with, "You are sweet to say that!" After you were out the door, the waitress informed me that you had bought our lunch! At that, I was overwhelmed, and asked the waitress, "How are we going to thank him?" She replied, "He reads The Inlander." So, sweet Mike, THANK YOU SO MUCH!! You made our day! We will "pay it forward" too, by doing as you did. God bless! MOVING FORWARD Watson, cheers to being so supportive and great with this move. I’m so excited to be moving in with you, LilyPotter, and Mia. Here’s to many more nights of vegan dinners, cucumber beer growlers, and you and I together! TO THE 2 OLDER GENTLEMEN WHO DROVE US HOME FROM THE LAUNDROMAT ON 08/03 I wish we had gotten your names. You noticed us waiting for our cab and offered to take us and our laundry home, we just wanted you both to know that what you did was amazing. The fact that you went out of your way to help others regardless of your own hardships while you're dealing with being homeless speaks volumes for

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

#wtbevents

54 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

— GOOD SAMARITAN your character. I wish there were more people like you guys in the world. You're in our thoughts and prayers. God bless you both. Keep holding on to the good and throwing out the bad. MY BADASS WIFE You're strong, you're passionate, you're wicked smart and you don't mind getting dirty — for love or the revolution. Together we are stronger, up for anything. It hasn't and will never been easy, but that's okay: We don't need it to be easy all the time. We just need each other, a case of wine, bread and our doodah bear.

JEERS TO "LEARN TO READ" OP Ah, yes. Courtesy. Those of us who travel that area a lot deal with 2 kinds of people. We get over to let them on and they refuse to let us back over to get off at the next exit, so we stay in OUR lane. The rest of them feel the need to merge in to OUR lane at 30 mph and accelerate when on the freeway. That is an acceleration lane. You must be going the speed of traffic when you merge. I often merge from 195 to I-90 as well. I am doing 65+ when I hit that Yield sign and have already found the hole to get in with while coming around the curve. So many in this town are becoming entitled to every courtesy. Feel free to force your way in front of me. I use dash cameras in my vehicles and when you pull in front of me at 30 and I hit you at 65, you will get to pay for my truck, lost work, and medical bills. Of course, then my favorite part. The punitive damages. Then, you will learn the law. Driver's guide is not RCW. RCW trumps Driver's guide EVERY time. So, I say forget reading and learn to drive.

TREATED LIKE DIRT "You hired me for a temp position. I was pleased because I believed in your products. Working very hard, I accomplished the work in a timely manner each day. The other day I walked into your business hoping to find something for my wardrobe. Imagine my surprise when you treated me like dirt. You did not greet me when you saw me. I initiated your one word response when I said “Hi” first. You barely answered the 2 brief questions I asked you and kept your back to me while I was standing by you. Wow... guess I won’t have anything good to say about your store in the future when I had touted your products, previously, to every gal I knew. I hope you treat the rest of your customers better than you treated me. BAD MEDICINE There's this nurse who is having an affair with a doctor who is married. Not the worst, yet she is making judgments on who gets certain treatments and who does not based on if they are sleeping with someone or not. Isn't that hypocrisy? Furthermore, drinking on the job is strictly against the rules, yet this nurse brings alcohol to work regularly and then lies to HR when they ask about it. Do you want your nurse anywhere close to alcohol? 

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR STAND-UP COMEDY Live comedy featuring established and up-and-coming local comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. No cover. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third. (838-6688) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Not rated.) Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) STAND-UP OPEN MIC Mondays; signup at 9:30 pm, show at 10 pm. Ages 21+. No cover. The Foxhole, 829 E. Boone. facebook.com/thefoxholespokane IMPROV JAM SESSION An open-mic style improv comedy night, open to all regardless of experience. Tuesdays in August. $5. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com

COMMUNITY

KSPS FITKIDS DAY A morning of active play for kids. Meet Peg + Cat, Clifford the Big Red Dog, Stitch the Trauma Bear, Aqua Duck and the FitKids. Includes activities for every age: parachute games, gigantic beach balls, banana races, hula hoops and more. Aug. 7, 10 am-noon. Free. Ferris High School, 3020 E. 37th Ave. ksps.org (443-7700 CELEBRATE LIFE FUN RUN/WALK The annual fundraiser walk/run across Sandpoint’s Long Bridge was founded in memory of Jenny Myer, and benefits the Bonner General Hospital’s programs that support cancer patients. Aug. 8, 9 am. $20-$30. celebratelifefunrunwalk.org INLAND NORTHWEST CAMARO CLUB SHOW The club hosts its 25th annual open auto show, its “Silver Celebration.” The Spokane Skyhounds Disc Dogs also host a competition at the park, starting at 9:30 am. Aug. 8, 9 am. $20 registration; free to attend. Mirabeau Park Meadows, 13500 Mirabeau Pkwy. (688-0300) KIDICAL MASS - SOUTH PERRY Kids and their families are invited to a safe, afternoon bike ride of about 3 miles, cycling on anything that rolls. All types of bikes, trailers, Xtracycles, bakfiets, tandems, folding bikes, trikes are welcome. Aug. 8, 1:30 pm. Free. Two Wheel Transit, 817 S. Perry St. summerparkways.com KIDSDAY 2015 IHeartMedia features free kids activities including inflatables, face painting, craft projects, sports games, a photo booth and more. Aug. 8, 11 am-5 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard St. bit.ly/1HBN2vz (242-2400) SPOKANE HISTORY GEOTOUR KICKOFF Forty geocaches are hidden in historic locations in Spokane County. Event kickoff at the Northbank Shelter in Riverfront Park. (N 47° 39.885 W 117° 25.180) Aug. 8, 9 am-5 pm. Free. spokanegeotour.com (720-8382) STAR WARS CELEBRATION Includes games, food, trivia, and a costume contest with prizes. All ages are welcome from 6-8 pm; ages 16+ only from 8-9 pm. Aug. 10, 6-9 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. (893-8350) EVERY DROP COUNTS: WATER CONSERVATION TIPS Learn about small steps you can take inside and outside your home to reduce overall water consumption, including low-cost or no-cost methods. Hosted by SNAP. Aug. 11, 6-7 pm. Free. Hillyard Library, 4005 N. Cook St. (444-5331)

FESTIVAL

HILLYARD FESTIVAL The annual neighborhood celebration includes a vendor fair, carnival games, a parade and more. Aug. 7, 12-10 pm, Aug. 8, 9 am-10 pm and Aug. 9, 9 am-5 pm. Free. Hillyard neighborhood. (270-1569) NINE MILE DAM DAYS The second annual return of the Dam Days community festival, offering a car show, outdoor movie, fun run, vendor fair, food vendors, kids activities and more. Proceeds benefit the Nine Mile Falls School District PTAs. Aug. 7-8. Sontag Park. on.fb.me/1KsshFa GARLAND STREET FAIR The 14th annual Garland Street Fair is 1960s and 70s-themed, and features local artists selling their work, food vendors, a car show, kids activities, live music and entertainment. Aug. 8, 10 am-7 pm. Garland District. on.fb.me/1S9jAF2 BONNER COUNTY FAIR “Season’s Open at the Bonner County Fair” is the theme of 2015’s annual traditional county fair, offering animal and ag expos, food, carnival rides/games, a demolition derby, live entertainment and more. Aug. 11-15. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Ave. bonnercountyfair.com (208-263-8414) CHILLIN’ N CHATTAROY A three-day outdoor festival with a poker/pool tourney and live music. Aug. 12-15. Free admission. Prime Tyme Bar & Grill, 4211 E. Westwood Ave. (238-6253)

FILM

COMMUNITY MOVIE NIGHT All are invited to a free outdoor movie and popcorn night; bring blankets or lawn chairs to enjoy Ratatouille (August 6), Frozen (August 13), and Nemo (August 30). Films start at 8:30 pm. Whitworth Community Presbyterian Church, 312 W. Hawthorne Rd. whitpres.org (466-1627) INSIDE OUT Riley is guided by her emotions who live inside her mind and help advise her through everyday life. Rated PG. Aug. 6-8; show times vary. $3-$6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org MOONLIGHT MOVIES: BIG HERO SIX Outdoor movie screening hosted by Airway Heights Parks and Recreation; movie starts at dusk. Aug. 7. Free. Sunset Park, S. King St. cahw.org MOVIES IN THE PARK: RISE OF THE GUARDIANS Screening of the family friendly film begins at dusk. Aug. 8. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. pavillionpark.org (755-6726) SOUTH PERRY SUMMER THEATER: THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF FIVE ARMIES The annual summer movie series returns, screening at the parking lot of The Shop. Movies start at dusk, preceded by a fundraiser for a local charity. Aug. 8. The Shop, 924 S. Perry St. (534-1647) SWIM & A MOVIE: PLANES: FIRE & RESCUE The summer movie series at the Spokane County Aquatic Centers returns, with a two hour swim time preceding each screening at dusk. The Northside and Southside facilities screen the same movie each week. Aug. 8. $2.50-$5. Spokane County Aquatic Centers. spokanecounty.org/parks SUMMER CAMP 2015: POINT BREAK The Garland’s summer movie series returns, and includes beer specials from River City Brewing. Tuesday’s showings also include contests and prizes. Aug. 9, 11 and 13. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. garlandtheater.com (327-1050)

CHINESE MOVIE NIGHT: RED CLIFF (PART 2) In this sequel to Red Cliff, first minister Cao Cao convinces Emperor Han to initiate a battle against the two Kingdoms of Xu and Wu, who have become allied forces, against all expectations. Aug. 12, 7-9 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy. org (208-882-4127) SUMMER MATINEE MOVIE SERIES: HOME The midweek summer matinee movie series screens family friendly films through the summer. Aug. 12-13, at 1 pm. $3. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) A BOLD PEACE Dr. Matthew Eddy hosts a showing of his new documentary film telling the story of how and why Costa Rica abolished its military in 1948 and “became the happiest country on Earth.” Aug. 13, 7 pm. By donation. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (325-6283) ME AND EARL AND THE DYING GIRL 17-year-old Greg’s life changes when his mother forces him to befriend Rachel, a girl he once knew in Hebrew school who has leukemia. Aug. 13-16, show times vary. $3-$6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. (208-882-4127) MILLENIAL MEETUP: GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY Millennial Meetups, a program geared for patrons in their 20s and 30s, is offering another “Cheesy Superhero Movie Night.” Popcorn and refreshments are provided. Aug. 13, 6:30 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. (208-769-2315)

FOOD & DRINK

VINO WINE TASTING Friday, Aug. 7, features selections from Vino’s Wine of the Month Club, from 3-7:30 pm. Saturday, Aug. 8 showcases wines from Hahn Estates, of California. Vino!, 222 S. Washington St. (838-1229) SPOKANE VEGFEST The second annual expo features 100-plus vendors/ exhibitors offering healthy living and animal-friendly lifestyle products and advice, cooking demos, live music, yoga, and outdoor farmers market and more Aug. 8, 10 am-6 pm. Free admission. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. inveg.org/vegfest MAKING VIETNAMESE SPRING ROLLS Learn about the different varieties of fillings and dipping sauces, and then try your hand at rolling your own vegetarian fresh rolls. Pre-registration required, class limited to 20 participants. Aug. 11, 7-8 pm at Moran Prairie Library, 6004 S. Regal St. Also Aug. 12, 7-8 pm at Cheney Library, 610 First St. (893-8340) PICKLING SUMMER VEGETABLES Local food safety/preservation specialist Anna Kestell teaches how to safely pickle and preserve your summer vegetables. Pre-registration required; class limited to 20 participants. Aug. 11, 6:307:30 pm. Free. Argonne Library, 4322 N. Argonne Rd. (893-8260) GIRLS PINT OUT SPOKANE MEETUP The Inland Northwest chapter of the national craft beer organization for women meets on the second Wednesday of the month, from 6:30-8:30 pm. Free to attend. The Backyard, 1811 W. Broadway. girlsbeerblog.com TASTINGS ON THE TERRACE Greater Spokane Incorporated hosts an evening of networking and wine tasting featuring several Spokane wineries, and also breweries. Aug. 12, 5-7 pm. $25. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. greaterspokane.org

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AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 55


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess Lord of The rinGer

I had an affair with a married man, and we fell madly in love, and he left his wife for me. We’ve been happily married for many years, but recently, I found out that he’s still in contact with his ex-wife. I got suspicious, bought a voice-activated recorder, and tapped our landline. Lo and behold, they’re having hot phone sex while I’m visiting my elderly mother on Sundays! I can’t believe he would disrespect me like this! Especially after AMY ALKON all we’ve done (like moving across the country to get away from his psycho ex). I really love him, so I’m wondering whether I should confront him or just seethe in silence (because I know he won’t go back to her). — Shocked And honestly, I’m not even sure phone sex is really cheating. Okay then. You’ll just be having a nice big scoop of “What Comes Around Goes Around.” Cup or cone? Nuts? Sprinkles? As for your shock at his behavior — “I can’t believe he would disrespect me like this!” — it’s not like you two met while working at the ethics factory. People who cheat with you are cheaters, meaning that they can probably be counted on to cheat on you. We all know this. Yet there you are, not only suspending disbelief but driving it out to the desert and burying it in a shallow grave. You’re doing this not because you’re dumb but because you’re succumbing to a mental shortcut called “optimism bias” — a belief, fueled by ego and wishful thinking, that bad things likely to happen to other people will pass over you like a flock of birds, not leaving so much as a souvenir dropping in your hair. Optimism bias is maintained with denial — like your questioning whether phone sex is “really cheating.” Um, if some behavior by your partner, done openly, is likely to cause you to burst into heaving sobs, chances are he’s crossing the line: “Be right there, dear! Just talking dirty to my ex-wife.” As for your notion that you could just seethe in silence, wonderful idea — except for how, as resentment builds, “head in the sand” starts to feel like “head in the blender.” To stop giving in to optimism bias, give yourself a crack upside the head with how things actually are. Yes, you need to admit that your husband is cheating on you. Once you have your meet-and-greet with reality, let him know you’re onto him and then sit down together to see what you have and whether it’s fixable (and not just by making your elderly mom take the bus to your house so you can stand guard by the phone). To figure things out, spend 12 hours straight in a hotel room together. Yes, really. No books, TV, phone calls, naps, or walks outside. You can sit silently — or talk about anything regarding one or both of you. The late therapist Nathaniel Branden, who came up with this idea, called it an “experiment in intimacy.” Branden explained that when all avenues of escape are closed off, a couple can experience real breakthroughs in communication. As opposed to what you’ve been experiencing — real breakthroughs in communications devices: “Yeah, we have a very happy relationsh—…hold on, Katrina… sorry; that was just the tracking thingie telling me my husband’s going south on Oak.”

BrAGGedy Andy

I’m dating this guy. We aren’t committed, but I’d like us to be. Recently, he’s been mentioning chicks who want to sleep with him whom he shut down. I appreciate his honesty, but I guess I’m wondering why he’s telling me this stuff at all. —Earful There’s being open and honest, and then there’s bragging about your sexual options, which is the mark of a mantoddler: “Mommy, Mommy, look at the sex fort I’m making!” The guy’s spirit animal appears to be the trash can with the swinging lip. He either wants you to like him more or he is warning you that you like him too much. Time will tell. Meanwhile, just sitting there blinking as he rattles on about his harem-in-waiting doesn’t make you seem cool and easygoing; it makes you seem cool with disrespect. In other words, you actually need to say no to knowing. This doesn’t take some long, icky speech. Just a slightly singsongy “Overshare!” And if he doesn’t quite get it, maybe add, “Fascinating…but unless I’ll be needing a penicillin nightcap, TMI.” Assuming he listens and stops and is generally attentive to your feelings, you probably shouldn’t fixate on this. Even the sweetest guy may say things he doesn’t quite think through — to the point where a girl’s sometimes got to ask for tech support: “Hi…sorry, but I couldn’t find this in your FAQs. How do I log out of your penis’s news ticker?” n ©2015, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

56 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

EVENTS | CALENDAR

MUSIC

THE COFFEY TWINS A 1950s and ‘60s style rock and roll show, with a dinnertheater option. Aug. 7-8 and 14-15. $10$25. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy 211 off Hwy 2, Newport. (208-448-1294) AN EVENING OF BHAKTI YOGA An evening of storytelling and music, as author Zarna Joshi shares stories of India, accompanied by kirtan music with Shambhava. Aug. 7, 6-8 pm. Free/by donation. South Perry Yoga, 915 S. Perry St. southperryoga.com (218-0707) WALLACE ACCORDION FESTIVAL The 5th annual festival is themed “A Barrel of Fun!” and invites accordionists and fans to weekend of music, dancing, jammin’, food, workshops and a celebration parade. Downtown Wallace, Idaho. wallaceaccordionfestival.com (208-753-7151) FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT FAMILY CONCERT Sunday’s show is all about family with a concert by the Festival Community Orchestra (5 pm) and a performance by Studio One dancers. Also includes an instrument “petting zoo,” and a live animal petting zoo, along with kids activities. Aug. 9, 2:30 pm. $6. War Memorial Field, 855 Ontario St. festivalatsandpoint.com BRIT FLOYD: SPACE & TIME WORLD TOUR Dubbed “the World’s Greatest Pink Floyd Show,” the tribute band show includes performances across the band’s five decades of music. Aug. 10, 8 pm. $42.50-$52.50. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200) SYMPHONY PETTING ZOO What does it feel like to play the drums? Blow on a saxophone? Come find out at the Spokane Symphony Petting Zoo, which offer children a hands-on introduction to the uniqueness of the different instrument families. Aug. 11, 10-11:30 am. Free. Spark Center, 1214 W. Summit Parkway. sparkwestcentral.org

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

COEUR D’ALENE TRIATHLON Races include an Olympic-distance tri (includes relay team option), scenic sprint and a duathlon. Aug. 8. $50-$90. cdatriathlon.com MT. SPOKANE HUCKLEBEARY EPIC Choose from 20-, 40-, or 60-mile mountain bike route options. $5 of each registration supports trail building and maintenance in the Mt. Spokane trail system. Aug. 8, 8 am-5 pm. $55-$75. Selkirk Lodge, N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokanehucklebearyepic.com ‘SUP SPOKANE Spokane Riverkeeper and the Spokane Paddleboarding host a morning of paddleboard yoga, river touring and litter clean up. Bring your own board or reserve one. Aug. 8, 9 am-noon. $15-$35. on.fb.me/1IP6zyD (232-1950) SPOKANE INDIANS VS. TRI-CITY DUST DEVILS: Three-game series, Aug. 9-11, starting at 6:30 pm each night. $5-$20. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. spokaneindiansbaseball.com (535-2922) IMPROVE YOUR GOLF GAME PGA-certified instructors discuss the fundamental of putting, chipping, the full swing, and provide an on-course golf rules and etiquette clinic. Pre-registration required; limited to 20 participants. Aug. 11, 6-8 pm. Free. The Fairways Golf Course, 9810 W. Melville Rd. (893-8280) SPOKANE INDIANS VS. SALEM-KAI-

ZER VOLCANOES Five-game series, Aug. 12-16, Wed-Sat at 6:30 pm, Sun at 3:30 pm. Aug. 14 is $1 family feast night, with select $1 concessions. $5-$20. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. spokaneindiansbaseball.com (535-2922)

THEATER

ASSASSINS A controversial musical juxtaposing the American Dream with dark motives. Through Aug. 9; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. The Modern Theater Coeur d’Alene, 1320 E. Garden Ave. themoderntheater.org (208-667-1323) SHREK: THE MUSICAL CST presents the funny and charming un-fairytale about an ogre, a princess, a donkey, and whole lot of fairytale creatures. Aug. 6-23, Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm. $49/adult; $42/senior, $27/children. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasummertheatre.com (208-660-2958) TWELFTH NIGHT A performance of the Shakespeare classic. Aug. 6-16; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20-$24. The Modern Theater Spokane, 174 S. Howard. themoderntheater.org (455-7529) THE VAMPIRE WHO LOVED IN VEIN OR ONE MONSTER OF A MELODRAMA! Will Count Guano infiltrate the Frankenbein’s castle, stealing the family secret (and the girl) while he’s at it? An original play written and directed by Eli and Brady Bourgard. July 29-Aug. 23; Wed-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Sixth Street Theater, 212 Sixth St. sixthstreetmelodrama.com (208-752-8871) CCT PRESENTS: THE ADDAMS FAMILY Performance of the new musical comedy. Aug. 7-8 and 14-15 at 7 pm. Also Aug. 8, 15-16 at 3 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (509-227-7404) CDA MURDER MYSTERY THEATRE A dinner-theater style production of “The Mafia Murders,” set in a speakeasy, circa 1920’s. Someone in the family is out to destroy the “Godfather.” Vintage attire suggested. Aug. 7 and 14, from 6-8:30 pm. $35. Coeur d’Alene Cellars, 3890 N. Schreiber Way. cdamurdermysterytheatre.com (208.664.2336) THE LITTLE PRINCE: The Idaho Repertory Theatre performs a stage adaptation of Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s beloved classic. Aug. 7-8 at 7:30 pm. $5-$10. University of Idaho Hartung Theater, 6th & Stadium Way. uidaho. edu/class/theatre (208-885-6465) A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM Idaho Repertory Theatre for Youth (IRTY) performs this Shakespeare classic as the culmination of a three-week summer drama camp for youth. Aug. 8, 6 pm. Free. University of Idaho Hartung Theater, 6th & Stadium Way. idahorep. org (208-885-6465)

VISUAL ARTS

FIRST FRIDAY Art galleries and businesses across downtown Spokane and beyond host monthly receptions to showcase new displays of art. Aug. 7, 5-8 pm. For complete event details, visit Inlander.com/FirstFriday. INK ARTSPACE OPEN HOUSE Come celebrate INK Artspace’s new home at the Spark Center. Aug. 7, 5-8 pm. Free. Spark Center, 1214 W. Summit Parkway. on.fb.me/1Kwu64J (466-0376) RIC GENDRON The Spokane-based artist interprets subjects familiar to the Inland Northwest with his original perspective, and in distinct colors and

style. Aug. 7, 4-9 pm and Aug. 8, 11 am-6 pm. Manic Moon & More, 1007 W. Augusta Ave. manicmoonandmore.com POAC ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR The 43rd annual event runs during weekend one of the Festival at Sandpoint, and hosts artist booths, food vendors, live entertainment, youth arts activities and more. Aug. 8-9. Free admission. Downtown Sandpoint. artsinsandpoint.org ORIGIN STORIES A four-session INK Artspace playshop explores students’ inner strengths and weaknesses through character creation and graphic novel-style storytelling. Aug. 11-14, from 1:30-3 pm each day. Free, register to save spot. Indian Trail Library, 4909 W. Barnes Rd. spokanelibrary.org

WORDS

CALEB MANNAN BOOK RELEASE The author and a musical crew bring their American folktale tour to Spokane for the release of the book of the summer, “Bust it Like a Mule.” Aug. 6, 7-8 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. on.fb. me/1h31iHk (206-664-1021) KRIS RUNBERG SMITH The author of the new book, “Wild Place: A History of Priest Lake, Idaho,” presents a program on the book including photos of the historic community. Aug. 6, 7 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. (208-769-2315) 3 MINUTE MIC Auntie’s first Friday poetry open mic continues, with “Remember the Word” featured reader Sharma Shields. Open mic poets can share up to 3 minutes’ worth of poetry. Open to all, though this is a free speech event, so content is not censored. Aug. 7, 7-8:15 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) ROB BELL: EVERYTHING IS SPIRITUAL TOUR Live show featuring one of TIME Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People in the World and a New York Times bestselling author. Aug. 7, 8:30 pm. $25-$100. Knitting Factory, 919 W. Sprague Ave. (244-3279) DAN GEMEINHART The debut middlegrade author reads from his book “The Honest Truth,” a story is of a boy who is sick and tired of being sick. Aug. 8, 1 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) URBAN POET’S SOCIETY A new group of young and enthusiastic spoken-word performers have brought this event over from the Tri-Cities. Come read your own poem or cheer on a new favorite local poet. Aug. 8, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (509-838-0206) STEPHANIE KALLOS The Seattlebased author reads from her third novel, “Language Arts.” Aug. 10, 7 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. bookpeopleofmoscow.com MEET THE AUTHOR: CINDY HVAL The local writer discusses her new book, “War Bonds: Love Stories from the Greatest Generation.” Aug. 12, 7-8 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. (893-8350) STEPHANIE KALLOS The Seattle fiction writer and bestselling author reads an excerpt from her newest novel, “Language Arts,” a tale about rewriting and reinventing yourself. Aug. 12, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) n


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SPONSORED BY: AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 57


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BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 and Initiative 502). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington State, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

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obert Vernon is fulfilling his lifelong dream to be a farmer. “Some of my first memories were watering marijuana plants with my mother… we’re talking 3 or 4 years old,” he says. “I’ve been around it my entire life. I made myself a promise when I was young that when this became legal, I would grow and sell it.” Vernon founded BBB Farms – short for Bobby’s Bodacious Buds — in 2014. The family-owned business in the rural town of Elk, Washington, operates on about 1,500 square feet. Pending a recent inspection by the state, the farm will expand with another 5,000 square feet outdoors, adding about 250 plants to their harvest. The farm produces upward of 32 strains, including Dutch Treat, Cotton Candy and Cherry Pie, all sold through recreational outlets like Satori, 4:20 Friendly and Henderson Distribution Bakery. Some of their most popular strains — Onion Creek and Cloud Nine — pay homage to black-market strains grown throughout Spokane in the 1980s and ’90s. “If you smoked marijuana in the ’80s, most of these strains came from here up north,” he says. Vernon hopes to crowd out that very same black market, enticing consumers to buy locally, and legally, through a growers co-op. “I know we’re only reaching about 10 percent of

58 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

smokers,” he says. “There is no excuse why dispensaries don’t sell out every day. I mean, we’re selling legal marijuana!” A co-op, Vernon argues, would create a centralized process for farmers, which would cut growing and distribution costs through use of a purchasing bloc for expensive materials including fertilizer and soil. He envisions a co-op representative traveling across the state, sharing with dispensaries a catalog of local growers and hundreds of strains. “A co-op of farms could really start something big for Eastern Washington,” he says. “We have the opportunity, the weather and the support of the people to grown tons and tons of marijuana for the state.” Although nothing has been formalized, Vernon meets regularly with local retailers and a handful of growers. Today, it’s business as usual, tending flowers and cutting buds in the greenhouse they call the “glow worm” — a structure that lights up the night sky. Some days his mother helps tend the plants, bringing operations full circle for Vernon. “It’s a little surreal,” he says. “There was a time when my family was sitting on a bench in a federal courthouse getting ready to be indicted… today I’m growing marijuana openly, freely, and full time.” n

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AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 59


Health in the

Your local resource for beauty, fitness, and total well being. TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SPECIAL HEALTH SECTION: (509) 444-7355 or Sales@Inlander.com

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A migraine is coming. You feel that first pang in your head and you inwardly scream: what will you do? Seek a dark, calm, quiet place. TIP OF THE WEEK Use heat or ice to reduce pain. Massage areas which are paining you. Try a caffeinated drink — a small amount can relieve pain and enhance medicine like Tylenol. To make sure it doesn’t happen next time, check your sleep schedule and your diet: make sure they are consistent and be mindful of things that may trigger migraines (alcohol or fast food, for example). (Mayo Clinic)

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Northern Rail Pub 5209 N Market St - We Extended! New larger Beer Garden Karaoke every Friday. Saturday Aug 8th The Ghost Riders will be playing in the garden 7-11pm. Hillyard Days are here

ACROSS 1. Some lose it in their teens 4. “Property Virgins” cable channel 8. Nocturnal African primate 12. Yaks and yaks 13. Jai ____ 14. Some Summer Olympics gear 16. Govern 17. Itchy dog’s woe 18. Statue of Liberty feature 19. “It’s ____-brainer” 20. With 36- and 52-Across, #98 on AFI’s 100 Greatest Movie Quotes of All Time (and the reason why four black squares are keeping you from completing this puzzle) 22. Defense grp. formed in 1949 23. Actress Watts 25. Arctic fishing tool 27. Not just ask 29. “The Flintstones” pet

AFFORDABLE HOUSING COMMUNITY FOR SENIORS‚ Income Limits Apply‚ APPLEWAY COURT II 223 S. Farr Road, Spokane Valley Two units available: 1 bed/1ba unit and 1bd/1ba ADA unit. Nonsmoking building with washer/ dryer hook-ups, air conditioning, City View Large 1 Bedroom, Heat paid, newly laundry room, community room, computer center, exercise room, renovated, hardwood floors, dishwasher, Laundry, secure non- beauty salon, coffee area, on-site management, off-street parking. smoking bldg, Pets (no dogs) Community is located close to 1324 W 5th $560 509-747-7630 transit, shopping and restaurants. Please contact Kiemle & Hagood Co. at (509) 838-6541, khco.com. An equal opportunity housing e: is rt ve ad to provider.

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Equal Housing Opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Law which makes it illegal to advertise any preference to, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for our real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain on discrimination call HUD free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

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Media Relations Manager University Communications Office Hiring Range: $16.77 to $17.76 Per Hour Reporting to the Director of Communications, the Media Relations Manager works with campus constituents to publicize all aspects of the university through media outlets, the Whitworth website and social media sources. Bachelor's degree in journalism, public relations, English or related field required and minimum of 3 years related professional experience. Thorough understanding/ knowledge of news-media processes. Background check required. For more information please go to www.whitworth.edu/ jobs. With our commitment to building a diverse community, the university encourages applications from populations underrepresented at Whitworth including members of racial/ ethnic communities, women, and persons with disabilities

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31. Before, to Byron 32. Kind of tank 34. Electrician, at times 36. See 20-Across 38. Sympathetic words 40. Marzipan ingredient 41. Bamboozle 42. Drops the ball 44. Golf’s Sam and J. C. 48. Valley Girl’s home, perhaps 50. Like Valerie Plame 51. Southern hwy. 52. See 20-Across 57. Mantel piece 58. Terra ____ 60. Have a hunch 61. Editor’s retraction 62. Some Deco collectibles 63. “Suicide Blonde” band 64. “Waiting to Exhale” actress Rochon

Haunted House Volunteers Wanted more info at faceboo k.c thekingfamilyhaunte om/ dhouse

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65. “Goo goo gaa gaa,” for example 66. Gift for many a PBS donor 67. 1990 Johnny Depp movie DOWN 1. Zoological groups 2. Flowering 3. Mao ____-tung 4. Sign of virtue 5. Smooth-talking 6. Word before Bell or shell 7. Competed 8. Network that airs the Soul Train Music Awards 9. Barely ahead 10. Words after “Que” in a fatalistic sentiment 11. 10,000 square meters 12. Piano bar piano, often 15. Party that might include

“BABY”

blindfolded diapering 20. Sophomore’s age, maybe 21. Half of a familiar Chinese duo 24. Conductor Kurt 26. Sharer of a prize

28. Baseball “twin killings,” for short 29. Cockpit features 30. Weapon with a warhead, in brief 33. Skier’s transport 35. Reference book feature

36. Italian bacon 37. Casual greetings 38. 1990 rap hit 39. Get out of shape? 43. Mythical bird of prey 45. More severe 46. With desperation 47. Song whose subject is encouraged to “hurry down the chimney tonight” 49. What spies collect 53. “Think nothing ____!” 54. Clinton cabinet member 55. On deck 56. “If all ____ fails ...” 59. “Shoot!” 61. 2002 Winter Olympics host: Abbr.

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 61


Last Woman Standing Local comics and nationally known performers like Amy Schumer are rebranding “female comedy” BY JORDY BYRD

G

inny Isbelle has perfected a deadpan stare. The 39-year-old nursing student and mother moonlights as a stand-up comedian, sharing stories from her life that are like episodes of The Jerry Springer Show, “but trashier and more pathetic.” Isbelle has performed throughout Spokane for the past two years, honing her voice at places like the Checkerboard Tavern, sometimes to mixed reviews. “I’ve had men say straight to my face, ‘Wow, you’re really funny for a woman,’” she says. “I haven’t really figured out how to respond to the horrifically awesome things that people say. It’s like saying ‘You’re really smart for a woman.’” Even as Spokane’s comedy scene explodes, with upward of 75 regular performers — about 10 of them female — and open mic nights expand to seven days a week, female comics like Isbelle struggle to find their voice and push beyond the stereotype that “women aren’t funny.” Nationally known comics like Amy Schumer have broken the glass ceiling of comedy, proving that material about vaginas are just as funny as dick jokes. Female comics like Schumer and Isbelle are rebranding “female comedy,” walking a fine line between being funny and sounding “too much like a woman” — as if that’s a bad thing.

V

anessa Pugh dabbles in self-deprecation. The 31-year-old performer started doing stand-up and sketch comedy almost two years ago at places like Neato Burrito. A barber by day, she shares stories about her life, dating and tales of “dying alone and getting eaten by my cat” — a creature she describes as a pirate lord with one eye and a snaggletooth. “Comedy is traditionally a boys’ club,” she says. “We’ve been really fortunate in Spokane that the male performers have really embraced women and diversity in our scene.” Despite the sense of community, both Pugh and Isbelle say that when crafting jokes, they’re conscious of their gender, aware that the sound of their voice, the clothes that they’re wearing and the fact that they’re female affect how the joke will land. “I don’t think this registers with most male comics; it’s just different for women,” Pugh says. “I like to talk about dating, and all the fun double standards and bullshit that comes with that. All the while, I don’t want it to sound like I’m just whining about men.” Comic Mika Lahman, 30, understands the sentiment. Lahman’s jokes skew toward social commentary, though she fears sounding “bitchy.” She runs an open mic comedy night at the Checkerboard Tavern and performs throughout town at Uncle D’s Comedy Underground and Chan’s Dragon Inn.

62 INLANDER AUGUST 6, 2015

“Ever since I started writing jokes, I have been aware that men don’t want to listen to us bitch,” Lahman says. “I don’t pander when I write… but I don’t think male comics question if they are annoying their audience with quote, unquote bitching.” Timing is everything for stand-up comedians, and for Lahman, that means burying jokes about being a mother in between jokes about “Jesus talking to a crackhead.” She looks to comedians like Roseanne Barr, Natasha Leggero and Schumer, who have not only set the stage for other performers, but redefined women’s roles. “Women are perceived differently in society,” Lahman says. “Growing up as a little girl, you are taught not to be loud, not to talk too much, not to be funny... “Amy Schumer came along at a time when there was a need for her to speak on social issues. That’s why men and women both love her, because she fills a void, saying the things that need to be said.”

C

omedy rooms are slowly changing. Isbelle and her fellow comedians see more women performing — even if just once — and in the crowd. The change in demographics opens the doors to more jokes about “waxing” and the trials of motherhood, Isbelle says. Women have always known they can be funny. The challenge, performers say, is finding the balance between telling only “female jokes,” being considered a bitch — or worse, just not funny. “You don’t want to get pigeonholed by jokes about kids because then you’re just a mom, or jokes about your husband, because then you’re just a housewife,” Isbelle says. “Whereas a male comedian can do jokes about anything.” n

Amy Schumer


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C. Two full-service bars onsite serving beer, wine and mixed drinks, at affordable prices!

D. You can bring your own cooler from home with food and beverages (including alcohol) if you want to!

AUGUST 6, 2015 INLANDER 63


COOKING DEMONSTRATION AND FOOD TASTING

By “Top Chef” Judge

Chef Hugh Acheson August 16th • Chinook Meadows Farmers Market • 10 am - 2 pm Cooking Demonstration • 3 pm |$10

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