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AUGUST 5-11, 2021 | BUILDING COMMUNITY SINCE 1993

‘Spokane’s Back Porch’

The rise, fall and resurrection of our city — and the pioneering restaurant in the middle of it all BY KATE LEBO

PAGE 16

AVIAN ABUSE 11 GARLAND’S NEW BREWERY 28 SUICIDE SQUAD SOARS 32


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INSIDE VOL. 28, NO. 43 | COVER PHOTO: ERICK DOXEY

COMMENT NEWS COVER STORY CULTURE

5 11 16 24

FOOD FILM MUSIC EVENTS

28 32 36 38

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40 42 43 47

EDITOR’S NOTE

I

f you were to create a whole NEW NEIGHBORHOOD from nothing — from a neglected patch of dirt and rocks overlooking a river — which pioneering business would you build first when it was still mostly rocks? For Jim Frank, the developer of Spokane’s now-booming Kendall Yards, it was a no-brainer: It had to be a restaurant — and not some soulless chain, either. “Food was really important for the whole project,” Frank tells author Kate Lebo, “because food creates social fabric within a neighborhood.” And so it was that David Blaine would come to open his groundbreaking restaurant Central Food, which for nearly a decade brought people together as Kendall Yards slowly sprouted around it. But nothing lasts forever, not with such razor-thin margins and a pandemic to contend with. In her must-read essay (page 16), Lebo mourns the loss of a beloved institution in a wider exploration of food, community, growth, gentrification, the things that connect us and why sometimes they don’t pencil out. — JACOB H. FRIES, editor

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HAS YOUR RENT INCREASED RECENTLY? IF SO, BY HOW MUCH? CASANDRA THOMPSON: My rent went up by 62 percent. They said it’s because I haven’t gotten a rent increase in three years. I thought they owed me for taking two years to get rid of my problem neighbors.

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GENI BECKHAM: Before I moved to Idaho my rent was increased by $50. Not much you say? Try living on social security, and rent and food prices go up.

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Every week, we ask our followers on social media to share their thoughts.

TRISH MCFARLAND: My sister’s went up $800 per month! When on fixed income, where is that $$ coming from? They never missed a month! They want to move… but where? HOLLY OLSEN: $1,100 to $1,695 starting August 1st. I never missed a payment during COVID; been here eight years. ERIK MASON: I’ve heard from a couple people that their rents were going up by 50 percent or more. It is outrageous! I don’t know how single parent families are supposed to do it. I am sure there are many factors; increasing property values = increasing property taxes; even for those who have paid their rent on time, etc., the missed rent of others is being passed along. I wish I knew how to fix it. LEESANDRO CHAPA GARCIA: Mine has been creeping up little by little. It usually goes up $50 every other year. Last time it was in 2018; got a letter yesterday it is going up $100. Funny how my salary doesn’t go up to supplement that. TONY LUCAS: Supply NEEDS to outpace demand. Landlords are in a position to be able to be greedy and evidently they are. Get them out of that position. BETH STICKELMEYER: Mine only went up $100. Thank God! I was expecting worse.

JAN, THE TOY LADY, HAS NOTICED THAT KIDS OF ALL AGES ARE STILL CRAVING THE COMFORT OF A PLUSH ANIMAL: Group Hug?

CAITLYN LEE: Rent went up by $400. Never paid late or missed payments, EVER. MELODY L. WRIGHT: Thank God, only going up $25 dollars, $750 to $775. So thankful. MARIE ANDERSON: $775 to $1,075 in four years. n

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The Meaning of Maps Maps tell us where we are, and who we are BY CMARIE FUHRMAN

O

n the first day of class, I asked the students why we use maps. I was teaching nature writing at Western Colorado University. I had taped a dozen maps to the walls. I was hoping to show how maps help us tell our stories. As the students called out answers, I wrote them on the board. The obvious, such as direction, geography, boundaries, trails. Then, the more complex: context, politics, safety, memory. We then drew maps for poems and stories we had read. Each group presented their map and walked us through the translation. Before we parted, I gave them an assignment. They would map their childhood homeplace. They left the classroom with large sheets of white paper and walked into the damp afternoon. Earlier, I had shown them my map of the Payette National Forest. It is worn; various colors of highlighter mark trails I have walked, and x’s show the places I have camped. I pointed out where I live. The lake that attracts tourists. The forest and wilderness surrounding our mountain town. Before they could ask about the thick black lines that covered specific place names, I refolded the map and set it aside. Taking up an entire wall in my home is a map of Idaho. When I moved to the state in 2011, I studied it daily. I am here, I would say,

6 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

a declaration and assertion, my finger covering the town where I live. I’d hold it there as if doing so created belonging, as if by leaving my fingerprint, I would see myself there. I would say Idaho. Then, I live in Idaho. It has taken me years to understand what

that means. The black lines on my forest map tell a story. The story of a meadow and peak that lie an inch away from my home on the map. I can see this area perfectly in my mind; I could re-create it if asked. It wouldn’t perfectly reflect the USGS version. It would show the blue line of the Northfork of the Payette. How it meanders across a meadow where a month earlier my partner, dogs, and I lay listening to a winnowing snipe as it made circles, singing its feathers in hopes of a mate. I could then draw the trail and contour lines to a peak where I had, late last spring, scooched to the edge of a snow cornice to look down into beautiful Josephine Lake. These places I know, as it is said, by heart. And to that extent love them as well. And though I might write Josephine Lake and North Fork of the Payette on my map, I would not spell out the names used


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Maps tell us so much more than simply where we are.

by the government mapmakers. Squaw Peak. Squaw Meadows. I would instead use the name Pikeminnow, following the American Fisheries Society, which changed the similarly named fish in 1999. The thick black lines on my USFS map assert that though I live here, I still do not fully belong here. The next day, before unveiling personal maps and stories, I asked the students another question, “What do maps tell us?” They stared into the maps and then started offering answers. “Cultural values,” one student said. Then, “What it means to live here.” How we see the world. Where we have been and where we are going. Story of the land. What we value. How we see the world. Who we are. After the students’ maps were shared and the tears and laughter subsided, I asked another question. I was thinking about the map that lay folded on the desk. Of the peak and meadow. I was thinking of Native women whose ancestors have lived here for thousands of years. Women who would look for themselves and find the original colonial ideals and words that still create fear and evoke stereotypes. Instead of ourselves, we see the reflection of cruel cartographers. I unfolded my map, pointed to the black lines I had made, told their story, and asked the question again. “Can maps be mirrors, and if they can, do they reflect who we truly are?” “Only if all people are given agency,” one student answered. “Only if we are ready to tell a new story.” n

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CMarie Fuhrman is the author of Camped Beneath the Dam: Poems and co-editor of Native Voices. She has forthcoming or published poetry and nonfiction in multiple journals, as well as several anthologies. CMarie is the Translations Editor for Broadsided Press, Non-Fiction Editor for High Desert Journal, and Director of the Elk River Writers Workshop. She teaches at Western Colorado University and is the 2021-2023 Idaho Writer in Residence. CMarie resides in the mountains of West Central Idaho.

AUGUST 5, 2021 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | FROM READERS

Readers react to guest columnist Ben Stuckart’s column on the Spokane area’s urgent housing crisis:

TOM SAHLBERG: Good article ... too many NIMBY low-income housing haters that believe their precious neighborhoods would be devalued… That isn’t even supported by the facts… STEVEN KALE: Eagle Ridge is a case in point. It’s monotonous, with virtually no variation in houses and no commercial zones. LORNA HARTMAN: I like the proaction, but I personally like singlefamily homes and would like to see more families be able to buy them rather than cramming more people into small spaces. J A BUZZ DAUM: There are thousands of acres of derelict property, vacant lots and underused properties inside the city limits. The city and county must start giving building permits and doing all it can to spur the development of the available land.

In his column, Stuckart states we must allow for more diversity of housing in single-family zones. Think Kendall Yardsstyle housing variety. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

GERALD HETLAND: We need to find a solution to the housing crisis but allowing apartments and housing to be built in urban areas is not the answer… Here is just one example of a new house being allowed to be built in someone’s backyard on North A Street in Spokane. The house is being built in the backyard only about 30 feet from the main house. The neighbors must love that. That could happen to any neighborhood [homes] that have a few extra feet of yard out back. Thanks, Ben Stuckart. CHAR SMITH: You can either do as Stuckart suggests, or clutch your pearls all the way up to getting displaced by Californians and Seattlites. It’s up to you whether you want to be able to afford to live in your city in the future. If you don’t act now, you will not have a chance down the road.

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MIA ROSE: The bias toward poor people is tiresome. I have many friends who have experienced homelessness, and all they needed was a spark of love and a helping hand to raise them up. If you help a person feel loved rather than marginalize them they are likely to prosper. They need the tools. A home to have pride in is an excellent starting point. Our society will only be bettered by love of diversity. BRENDA CORBETT: Cannot believe how selfish folks can be... This town and our citizens deserve better. Time to honestly work together for our community and our homeless population. n


AUGUST 5, 2021 INLANDER 9


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ANIMALS

SPARKED BY

TRAGEDY At Sparky’s Bird Store, a parrot’s death and a SWAT standoff stir up claims of animal abuse and sexual harassment BY WILSON CRISCIONE

A

s a regular customer, Amanda Brown felt safe bringing her parrots Rio and Tobias into Sparky’s Bird Store last month. She never expected that, minutes after arriving, she’d be rushing out of the store covered in blood, clutching her bird who had just been killed by the store’s owner. That morning, July 6, started like any other for Brown and her birds. She made them a breakfast of scrambled eggs, toast and fresh fruit. They hopped around on their porch. And like Brown did once a week, she brought them to Sparky’s to socialize with other birds. Store owner Mark Settle, or Sparky, as he’s affectionately known to bird lovers, came to greet her and the parrots. But then Settle, 61, took Tobias and began to manhandle him, telling Brown that he was demonstrating “dominance” over the bird by flipping the macaw upside down onto the floor, according to a lawsuit Brown recently filed against Settle. The bird bit back, drawing blood and forcing Settle to release it. As Brown began tending to the distressed parrot, her other bird Rio, a 14-year-old umbrella cockatoo, got scared and jumped off the counter. Then began a flurry of flapping wings, frantic screeches and desperate cries for help. Settle chased Rio around the store with bloody, outstretched hands. Rio, who never learned to fly, ran to the window. “Oh my God!” Brown screamed, trying to get it to stop, according to the lawsuit. “These are my babies!” Settle scooped up Rio, who struggled to escape. Settle gripped harder. He lifted the bird over his head, but Rio bit, and Settle dropped the 14-year-old bird to the ground. Rio began hyperventilating, then moments later went limp and died. Brown cried uncontrollably. A necropsy later found that the bird died from liver fracture and hemorrhaging of the bird’s air sacs and lungs. ...continued on next page

Amanda Brown, pictured here with Tobias and the ashes of Rio the cockatoo, says she’s still grieving over Rio’s death at Sparky’s Bird Store. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

AUGUST 5, 2021 INLANDER 11


NEWS | ANIMALS “SPARKED BY TRAGEDY,” CONTINUED... Now, Brown is suing Settle for the wrongful death of Rio. But the allegations of erratic, dangerous behavior by Settle don’t end there. Several former employees at Sparky’s Bird Store tell the Inlander that Rio was far from the first bird that Settle had killed or severely harmed through recklessness or retaliation. They also say he sexually harassed members of the staff and threatened to kill one of them, a teenage girl. Settle, when reached by phone this week, declined to comment. “This was not an unexpected break with reality by Mr. Settle,” says Adam Karp, an animal rights lawyer representing Brown in the lawsuit. “It was part of a history of abuse and lack of temperament.” The death of Rio the cockatoo, as it turns out, didn’t just prompt a wrongful death lawsuit. It sparked a worker uprising against the shop’s allegedly abusive owner, an investigation into animal cruelty, and a sequence of events that ended with a SWAT team standoff and the man they call Sparky in handcuffs.

‘SOMETHING CATASTROPHIC’

Six days after Rio’s death, Spokane police have surrounded Sparky’s Bird Store. Armored vehicles block the street. A SWAT team, hostage negotiators and mental health professionals stand by, just south of the NorthTown Mall in Spokane. Settle lives where he works at Sparky’s Bird Store, employees say, and he has locked himself in his bedroom in the back. Meanwhile, employees from Sparky’s Bird Store tell police what happened: Settle had told one of them, Samantha Kopelson, that he wanted to kill Paige, then a 17-year-old worker at Sparky’s. And as Kopelson told police, he didn’t just want to kill Paige, but “wring her neck, watch her squirm on the ground, and watch the blood come out of her face.”

The Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service (SCRAPS) is investigating Sparky’s for animal cruelty following Rio’s death. Sarah Balandis, an employee there from 2016 to 2018, saw the same kind of thing: Settle would spray birds with water when he got mad at them, or he’d hold them too tight during feather trimmings. “The more the bird struggled, the more upset he would get,” Balandis says. Once, in 2018, Balandis says Settle squeezed a baby bird to death while she was trimming it because he wasn’t paying attention. In the two years she worked there, she says about a half dozen birds were killed in a similar manner, either by Settle or other employees — though she says most of them had underlying conditions as well. “He sort of played it off like it just happened sometimes and you can’t control it,” Balandis says. As new employees, they were expected to cut off toe nails, remove feathers and cut away bands on the birds if needed. The employees were often uncomfortable doing so, but if they defied Settle, he would lash out. At one point, Balandis says she was asked to amputate a bird’s toe with dog nail clippers. But with nothing to cauterize the wound, the bird bled for an hour. Settle also told employees he used ether, a potent chemical once used as an anesthetic, in the store to euthanize injured birds if customers needed to put a bird down. They say that although they never personally witnessed it, he would put ether on a towel and stuff it in a plastic bag with the bird. He did so to Balandis’s injured bird, she says. The American Veterinary Medical Association does not consider ether as an acceptable chemical for euthanasia. Marcie Logsdon, a veterinarian at Washington State University working with small companion birds, says she would recommend seeing a veterinarian to amputate toes or to euthanize a bird. Beyond that, while she says birds are extremely fragile and generally need to be handled with caution, it should be “extremely uncommon” that a bird dies during a restraint. If a bird is biting, then generally it’s “biting for a reason,” she says. It may be scared or conditioned to think that biting will make humans leave it alone.

“A dominant display is going to be perceived as aggression, and that’s going to cycle and make a bad situation worse.” Settle’s three employees — Kopelson, Paige and Alex Colbert — had rebelled in the days following Rio’s death. Before the SWAT team came July 12, they’d all planned to resign in protest, considering Settle to be dangerous. As former Sparky’s employees tell it, Settle’s dangerous behavior started years earlier, gradually becoming more violent and more troubling until it reached a breaking point. Until now, they say, the worst of it was kept out of the public eye. Customers saw Settle as a warm, friendly bird lover. At least, that’s how Jade Ellsworth thought of him when she first started working at Sparky’s in 2018. “I was a longtime customer of Sparky’s before I got the position. It was always somewhere I had wanted to work,” Ellsworth says. Soon after starting, she grew concerned. He was too aggressive with the birds and at times would get frustrated with them and throw them against the cage, Ellsworth says. Ellsworth brought her own bird to work with her, but one day it bit Settle, and he threw the bird onto the ground, she says. The bird went into shock and nearly died. “It was a disturbing overreaction to being bitten by a parrot,” Ellsworth says.

12 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

WILSON CRISCIONE PHOTO

The idea that humans need to show dominance over a bird is outdated, she says. “A dominant display is going to be perceived as aggression, and that’s going to cycle and make a bad situation worse,” she says. But Settle, according to several employees, continued his aggressive behavior both to birds and his own employees. And things got scarier: Workers say Settle more frequently made remarks about taking his own life — and possibly taking the store, and everyone in it, with him. “I had been thinking for a while that something catastrophic would happen if he didn’t get help for himself,” Ellsworth says.

DEADLY THREAT

Paige, whose last name is being withheld from this article, has known Settle since she was 10. But since working there starting last year, she says she had to endure constant sexual harassment from her boss. Most frequently, Settle would tell the then-17-year-old that she was attractive and looked like his ex-wife — all in front of customers. “It’s not like, ‘Oh, you look like my wife.’ It’s like, ‘You look like my wife and I want to touch you,’” she says. Kopelson and Colbert both tell the Inlander they witnessed Settle saying that to Paige and they could see it made her uncomfortable. Whenever they told Settle it was inappropriate, he’d cast it off as a joke, they say. But nobody was laughing, and the harassment continued toward both Kopelson and Paige, they allege. He’d look down their shirts during bird trimmings, or make suggestive comments about their bodies, they say. In private, Paige says Settle would turn every conversation into something sexual and ask when she was turning 18. He’d act like he wanted to “wrestle” with her, forcing Paige to fight him off, she says. Kopelson says she witnessed at least one instance of Settle grabbing Paige against her will. When one of Settle’s birds died in April, his behavior became more concerning, the employees say. He’d snap at them and cuss them out. “He was so aggressive and mean, and he would yell


at me and say he wants to strangle me or punch me,” Paige says. “He’d do the motion of it and punch a wall behind me or next to me.” Days before Amanda Brown came into the store with Rio, the employees say Settle severely hurt a baby quaker parrot that bit him when he was feeding it. He told the workers he threw the bird against the cage, but based on the injuries to the bird’s face, the employees suspected Settle struck the bird with his hand. “We were very upset about it,” Paige says. So by the time Rio was killed on July 6, they’d had enough. Kopelson witnessed the entire incident, and she fully backs up Brown’s account of what happened. Kopelson didn’t work the day after Rio’s death, and Settle demanded that Paige tell him where Kopelson was. Paige refused. Settle allegedly told her he was going to “burn the whole place down with everybody inside.” On July 12, Kopelson came to the store to formally quit along with the two others. Settle took Kopelson downstairs, where he told her repeatedly he’d been considering taking his own life. Then, she says, he told her several times that he “really wanted to kill” Paige for not telling him where Kopelson was the other day. Kopelson says he got in her face and vividly described exactly how he wanted to hurt Paige. “He was acting out what he wanted to do. And he kept saying it and kept saying it,” Kopelson says. They reported the threat. Police rushed to the store. Settle went to his bedroom in the back of the store and locked himself there. The standoff lasted more than an hour before Settle was arrested and charged with felony harassment. He’s been released from Spokane County Jail on bail. Settle later claimed that he fell asleep when police were there and came out when he heard “weird noises” outside.

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WHAT THEY DON’T SEE

Settle didn’t respond to several Inlander text, Facebook and phone messages seeking comment for this article before he declined to comment when reached on his cell phone. But in a since-deleted post on the Sparky’s Bird Store Facebook July 14, Settle admits that “my actions caused” the death of Rio. He says he’s been exhausted and couldn’t understand why his employees didn’t want to work after Rio died. He lists his physical health problems, and then says he’s been taking depression and chronic pain medication for 30 years. “I try not to burden people too much, but I’m a quickly degrading mess, and I’m gonna die one of these days,” he says in the post. But the post skips over what he allegedly said to threaten Paige. He says that when police confronted him about the threat, he told officers, “Yeah, I probably threaten to kill my birds every day, it’s just a saying out of frustration.” In the more than 600 comments on the post, a majority of commenters defend Settle, or as he’s known to them, Sparky. Many refuse to believe he’d hurt any bird, and they cast doubt on the “Gen Z brats,” as one commenter put it, who they think are just trying to ruin his life and don’t want to work. Though the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service is investigating the business for animal abuse, Settle is back to running Sparky’s. Brown, still mourning the death of Rio, says she hopes Settle won’t hurt another bird. “Supposedly I’m not the only one. If I can save another bird from dying a horrible death like this, this lawsuit is worth it,” Brown says. Sparky’s now-former employees, meanwhile, want Settle to be held accountable, even if part of them still thinks he’s a good guy who just needs some help. If there’s one thing they’re sure of, however, it’s that Settle shouldn’t be running the business. “He’s not himself. Nobody sees how he would treat the birds when customers aren’t there, how he would treat us, what he would say to us,” Kopelson says. “They don’t know what happens behind the scenes.” n wilsonc@inlander.com

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NEWS | BRIEFS

The Terminator

Former Spokane Regional Health Officer Dr. Bob Lutz has maintained that he was terminated by SRHD administrator Amelia Clark.

Lawyer told Spokane Board of Health that Clark fired health officer full week before board vote

F

or months, SPOKANE REGIONAL HEALTH DISTRICT Administrator Amelia Clark and the district have insisted she didn’t improperly fire health officer Dr. Bob Lutz in a conversation on Oct. 29, 2020. Lutz has maintained she fired him that day. As administrator, Clark could ask the local board of health to fire Lutz, but that had to take place during a public meeting with a public vote, which didn’t happen until a full week later. But an email obtained by the Inlander from SRHD Board of Health attorney Michelle Fossum to health board members confirms that at 5:40 pm on Oct. 29, Fossum told the board “Please be advised that Amelia has terminated Dr. Lutz’s employment. If you have any questions, please feel free to reach out to her or to me, but do not ‘reply all’ to this email.” In the months since that email was sent, board members and the health district have worked to deny that Clark fired Lutz before a board vote could take place on Nov. 5, when members voted 8-4 to fire Lutz. Fossum sent the state Board of Health a letter around that time stating, “Administrator Clark did meet with Dr. Lutz on Thursday, October 29. She gave Dr. Lutz until Friday, October 30 at 4:00 to resign or she would seek his termination. She did take SRHD property from him. Because Dr. Lutz did not resign, he was placed on paid administrative leave pending meeting and decision of the SRHD Board of Health.” Fossum did not respond to multiple phone messages seeking comment. Clark has not been available for comment since October, citing potential litigation. Officially, Clark has maintained she put Dr. Lutz on paid administrative leave Oct. 30; however, an investigator hired by the state health board says that move was made retroactively on Nov. 2, only after community backlash. “Ms. Clark states she put him on paid leave Oct. 30. The thing is, though, there isn’t any evidence other

14 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

than her saying so to support that,” report author Karen Sutherland told the state health board in July. “Making it retroactive didn’t somehow unfire him.” Clark could testify before the state board at a future hearing with an administrative law judge. The board would then decide whether and how to discipline her. Meanwhile, the official message continues to be that Lutz couldn’t have been fired that day because Clark doesn’t legally have that authority. Current SRHD health board chair Mary Kuney, a Spokane County commissioner, sent out a public statement on May 12 stating, “To be clear, the SRHD Board, as stipulated by Washington law, and only the SRHD Board, terminated the employment of Dr. Bob Lutz with SRHD. Dr. Lutz could not have been terminated on October 29, because he continued to receive his full pay and benefits until termination by the SRHD Board on November 5, 2020.” (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

FOUNTAINS HAVE WANED

In the midst of another sweltering heat wave, a cool sip of water can save your day — and even your life. And yet, even at Spokane’s most central and recently upgraded park, Riverfront, many of the DRINKING FOUNTAINS are completely inoperable. During much of the COVID pandemic, most of the park’s drinking fountains were turned off, Spokane parks department spokeswoman Fianna Dickson says, because they didn’t have enough staff to clean them. By now, Dickson says, “we have all working fountains turned on,” but plenty of them aren’t working. “We always have damage to water fountains in the winter, but we’re seeing more damage to water fountains this year,” Dickson says. Some of that’s from vandalism; some of it’s just from worn-out drinking fountain infrastructure. The biggest problem? The department doesn’t have nearly enough staff to fix the fountains. Until June, there was essentially a hiring freeze on temporary and seasonal

DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

parks workers, and now that it’s lifted the city is having the same trouble recruiting new employees as many local businesses. “We just can hardly get enough people to apply,” Dickson says. They’ve hired a few, but lost others because of turnover. On top of that, there’s a shortage of some plumbing parts needed to repair some of the fountains, a side-effect of the way supply chains were thrown wildly off-kilter by the pandemic. All these factors trickle down to local parks, resulting in fountains that don’t trickle at all. (DANIEL WALTERS)

A BLURRY LINE IN THE SAND

When City of Spokane human resources director Amber Richards suddenly resigned at the end of June, both Mayor Nadine Woodward and city spokesman Brian Coddington denied that Richards had offered any sort of explanation for why she decided to quit. Now, thanks to a recently fulfilled Inlander records request, we know that Richards had portrayed her resignation as a kind of ethical necessity. “I can no longer perform the functions required of my position in good faith or with GOOD CONSCIENCE,” Richards wrote in a short resignation letter on June 28. “As a matter of principle, I am resigning my position with the City of Spokane.” The letter, however, does not go into any detail on why she came to that conclusion. Asked about how the Woodward administration interpreted her statement, Coddington says he has no additional information. “She did not provide any context around that, so I couldn’t begin to speculate,” he says. The Woodward administration, according to Coddington, did not hold an exit interview or ask their HR director to elaborate on her concerns. City Council President Breean Beggs, however, did meet with Richards after she resigned, and says that, while she didn’t get into details, she was concerned that city employees were being mistreated. Beggs says she was particularly concerned with the way the administration had treated Cupid Alexander, the city’s Neighborhood, Housing, and Human Services director who resigned two weeks before Richards did. Alexander had forwarded a number of scathing emails to the City Council, alleging he’d been a victim of mismanagement, stonewalling and racism. (DANIEL WALTERS) n


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AUGUST 5, 2021 INLANDER 15


A Place You Went to Eat It was no accident that a restaurant called Central Food was the first business to open in Spokane’s now-bustling Kendall Yards neighborhood BY KATE LEBO

David Blaine, chef and owner of Central Food, looks out on a mostly unfinished Kendall Yards neighborhood in 2012. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

16 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021


When I began thinking about the relationship between

neighborhoods and food in Spokane, we were still in COVID lockdown and I hadn’t been out to eat in over a year. A persistent memory of forever afternoon on Central Food’s patio was driving me crazy and keeping me halfway sane: the toasted sourdough, the rhubarb jam, coffee in hand, brunch on the way, my family and I just sitting there, drenched in sun and cooled by the breeze off the Spokane River while people below strolled the Centennial Trail. I won’t say I was sick of my own cooking (I was sick of my own cooking), but I was worried my favorite places were all going to go out of business. I’d begun to wonder if, once the pandemic was over, Olive Garden would slink through town, bodysnatch all the empty restaurant spaces, and breadstick Spokane’s culinary culture back to the early ’00s, when my husband was advised upon moving here that the best restaurant in town was Red Robin. Chef-owner David Blaine temporarily closed Central Food in July 2020 due to the pandemic and permanently closed it by the end of that year. None of us will have coffee or jam or a Korean pork sandwich on that patio again. Of course, the Kendall Yards neighborhood is still there. The patio is still there. We will be able to enjoy a seat in the sun by the Spokane River when Molé Mexican opens there this summer. But before that happens, before we get back to normal, and before we forget that there was ever anything besides an excellent Mexican restaurant in that space, I want to remember what it was about Central Food that made that restaurant feel like Spokane’s back porch. Central Food anchored Kendall Yards when the neighborhood was still just a story that Greenstone Homes was telling about a derelict railyard. What role did it play that only a

restaurant could play in making a former brownfield seem like a fine place to spend happy hour? And is there something particularly Spokane about the way Central Food helped establish Kendall Yards? If you, like me, moved to Spokane after 2012, it’s impossible to see and almost as hard to imagine that all the land from the Centennial Trail to Bridge Street was once a “post-apocalyptic hellscape,” as Blaine calls it, remembering the “bunny hills” he and his friends used to ride their bikes over when they were kids. There was “dirt, copper, and not much else happening,” he says. The 78-acre property had once been a thriving part of the West Central neighborhood. In the first decades of the 20th Century, the Union Pacific and Great Northern Railroads carved through the community’s south flank and cut it off from the Spokane River Gorge, after which West Central experienced decades of disinvestment and poverty while trains leaked cadmium and arsenic nearby. The railroads abandoned their West Spokane Yard in 1955. Trains still used the West Central tracks until 1973, when the railroads abandoned them, too. The site wasn’t included in riverside improvements for Expo ’74. In the 1990s, Metropolitan Mortgage bought the land parcel by parcel, consolidating the property in hopes of developing it. In 2004, they went bankrupt. In 2005, developer Marshall Chesrown bought the brownfield with the same hopes, called it Kendall Yards, and completed the environmental cleanup — removing over 200,000 tons of contaminated soil — before also going bankrupt. After decades of slow improvements to the land and spectacular failures to develop it, Greenstone bought the project and brought it to fruition, breaking ground in 2012. ...continued on next page

AUGUST 5, 2021 INLANDER 17


“A PLACE YOU WENT TO EAT,” CONTINUED... I know this story well, but I still can’t imagine what 78 abandoned acres in the heart of Spokane looks or feels like. Even with photographic evidence from 2012, where I can see the partially constructed Central Food building — no grapevines, no herb garden, no plaza, no trail, no road — the nothing that is now a neighborhood is still hard for me to fathom. I know the change to the landscape has been monumental, but I experience that change only through a thicket of buildings and time. I can see markers of this change — but not the change itself — in early reports on Central Food. They oriented Spokanites to the restaurant’s location by saying it was near the Spokane County Courthouse, as if one might stop by for a plate of Idaho trout after applying for a marriage license or copping a plea. When Central Food opened, was the courthouse really the most useful landmark to a neighborhood that barely existed? Or was this a backhanded reference to West Central? Hard to know, but given the continuing and usually tense conversation about gentrification, I do wonder. Greenstone connects greater West Central to Kendall Yards with roads, greenways, architecture and community initiatives, but the difference between new development and old — and the average incomes of their residents — remains stark. A reference to the courthouse or a sentence like, “Finding Central Food was like stumbling across an oasis after a trip through an area we didn’t want to get lost in,” written in a June 2013 restaurant review, reminds me of that disparity, regardless of the original intent. It’s equally hard to imagine why elevated comfort food in a beautiful location seemed like a new thing, but in 2012, in Spokane, it was new. So new that some people didn’t quite know what to make of it. Early criticism included a review that scolded Blaine for not using white tablecloths or serving cuisine worthy of the panoramic view; some diners dismissed it as a “hipster restaurant” (because we use Mason jars? Blaine wondered); more than one article opened with a critique not of the restaurant’s food, but of its name. “Maybe the weakest,” wrote the same reviewer who worried about getting lost. A headline from 2012 was “What’s in a name? Chef Blaine’s cautious restaurant moniker.” Central Food was the first business to open in Kendall Yards; “cautious” isn’t the word I’d use. “Pioneer” is the word Blaine used for himself back then. “Pioneer” is the word Jim Frank, Greenstone’s founder, uses today

18 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

ABOVE: The future home of Kendall Yards as seen in 2009. RIGHT: Central Food under construction. COURTESY DAVID BLAINE

to describe what made Blaine different from the others he approached to develop businesses back in 2010. Most people “don’t like being the first one in,” Frank says. Most people wait to see what happens before taking the substantial risk of opening a business — especially a restaurant.

When I ask Blaine if he’ll comment on the dynamic between the neighborhoods, I get the impression he’s been asked this question a lot. “We had clientele from the greater West Central neighborhood and the Kendall Yards neighborhood,” Blaine says. “The conversations I had with them weren’t any different. Over time it’s not about Kendall Yards gentrifying West Central. It’s about how Spokane’s changing.” “The two-way interaction between David But why was the first business in and the neighborhood started the process Kendall Yards a restaurant? Why not a gym or boutique or art gallery? “Food of building that social fabric. Which takes was really important for the whole projtime. It takes years to get enough mass ect,” Frank explains, “because food cresocial fabric within a neighborhood.” and depth-of-connection to grow. But it has ates Before Central Food, if you were exploring Kendall Yards, it was hard to imagine to start someplace. It started with David.” what the neighborhood would be like. After Central Food it was still hard, but Once Blaine finally said yes (“‘no’ is my default the restaurant drew people in and made it easier for them position”), he was able to ask Greenstone to customize to see what was coming. Blaine and his now ex-wife, elements of the building so they fit with his vision for the Erica, who helped open Central Foods, “helped people restaurant. “If that conversation was taking place today, understand what was happening in Kendall Yards,” Frank my strategy of nitpicking the original concept wouldn’t says. “David became a presence. People knew him. They have been as successful,” says Blaine. Frank could have knew Latah Bistro, the restaurant he worked at before. moved on, perhaps to someone who said yes first and Then people in the neighborhood who didn’t know asked for nicer awnings later. Frank also probably could David started to know him. The two-way interaction have gotten a Starbucks in there on day one. Instead, says between David and the neighborhood started the process Blaine, “every business there is owned by someone in of building that social fabric. Which takes time. It takes Spokane who operates that business. When people want years to get enough mass and depth-of-connection to to have that culture war about Kendall Yards and West grow. But it has to start someplace. It started with David.” Central, I think that’s overlooked.” ...continued on page 20


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“A PLACE YOU WENT TO EAT,” CONTINUED... Food creating social fabric is not a new idea, but I haven’t heard any other neighborhood and restaurant people in Spokane articulate that idea so clearly and so often. I hear it in something Blaine said repeatedly to interviewers when his restaurant opened: “This is a place you go to eat,” he’d say, “not to dine.” It’s a good line — welcoming, yet opinionated. I can hear Blaine’s culinary and social values, and I imagine I can trace how growing up in Spokane influenced his cooking. He’s a proud “apple maggot” who, when describing the “hellscape” his restaurant was built on, calls it “a perfect place for kids to play.” He loves the way “Spokane developed, in our isolation, into a truly unique place,” and how “our uniqueness is shown through the success of businesses that look incomprehensible to an outsider” — like the White Elephant (RIP), locally famous for selling guns and toys. Central Food’s fare wasn’t incomprehensible to an outsider (“the menu, especially in Spokane, has to appeal to a lot of people; it’s not primarily the vision of the chef”), but it came with a point of view. The food was ambitious but accessible, locally sourced whenever possible, and affordable despite the fancy riverscape. Everything Blaine’s staff could make better from scratch, they made from scratch, and they didn’t brag about it. “The menu would have been a Russian novel of description” if they had, says Blaine. It was impossible to explain to customers how much they were making in-house. And only necessary to explain because the Inland Northwest is still emerging from a food culture where, for casual restaurants, “from scratch” isn’t the norm. When I interviewed Blaine in June 2021, he gave me a new version of “eat, not dine”: “I believe that food brings people together,” he said, “but that it shouldn’t be the subject matter.” In other words, his restaurant was never going to be a place where people paused reverently over cooling plates while a chef flattered them with stories about their food. It was never going to be an anniversary or birthday joint. Nor was it the capitol of a restaurant empire. It was a place to tuck in — to plates, to conversations, to a comfortable chair on the patio. It served three meals a day in a simply appointed room, with thick-lipped diner mugs and no diet soda on the menu, though you could have a can of Diet Coke if you asked. There was chèvre until Blaine was teased about it, and then there was goat cheese. Cassoulet remained cassoulet (“calling it pork and beans would be misleading”), but when Blaine realized that customers would be more comfortable if he put a burger on the menu, he put a burger on the menu. They had a rough first year when people were still trying to figure out where and what Kendall Yards was, but once Greenstone “We were spending built more restaurants and retail and housing, Central Food quickly became the money to be the kind of sort of place you’d find yourself when you restaurant we wanted wanted good food without fuss. Local ownership comes with its own to be. But eventually the set of challenges. “They don’t necessarily have the financial resources,” says Frank. graph was going to show “David was a chef, but he’d never owned that even with the volume a restaurant before. It takes a lot more personal commitment and risk to open a we were doing, it wasn’t restaurant than it does to just go to work going to be sustainable.” every day.” Central Food had served breakfast, lunch and dinner for nine years when the COVID pandemic shut indoor dining down across the state. At the time, Blaine had already wanted to do something different, something that wasn’t such a “Queen Mary” of a restaurant. The week he temporarily closed Central Food, he’d been in talks to sell. “Restaurants like Central Food probably won’t exist in the future,” Blaine says. “We were open 16 hours a day. The amount of effort we put into the bread, or put into the bacon — it took 10 days to make bacon! In the end, I think it made us unique, but I don’t think ‘Spokane’s Back Porch’ it benefited us economically. We were spending money to be the kind COURTESY DAVID BLAINE of restaurant we wanted to be. But eventually the graph was going to show that even with the volume we were doing, it wasn’t going to be sustainable.” ...continued on page 22

20 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021


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Molé Mexican is set to open in the Central Food space this summer.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“A PLACE YOU WENT TO EAT,” CONTINUED... Central Food’s investment in ingredients and time weren’t the only threats to sustainability. “When I was doing research for the restaurant in 2010, the median income of 99201 (which is downtown and greater West Central) was just over $17,000. To survive, we needed a lot of people to drive down from the South Hill and eat a sandwich.” That made Central Food vulnerable to the seasonality of the Spokane restaurant scene. “You know what it’s like on the first day it snows three inches? You stay home. You know what it’s like when you get home from work and it’s dark? You stay home. If you were living a block away from that restaurant, it’d be different.” But also, “This town is obsessed with eating outside for the short months it’s possible. We’d get people in the fall telling us, ‘See you in the spring…’ I was locked into a kind of seasonality. It wasn’t just the patio. All of Kendall Yards experiences that seasonality. That’s somewhat true of every restaurant in this town.” The support from Greenstone that made Blaine say “yes” to opening a restaurant also helped him close that restaurant. Rather than see the business sold to the buyer Blaine had found, Greenstone stepped in and bought Central Food themselves. “We wanted to be able to vet who owned the restaurant,” Frank says. They wanted someone who was as committed to the neighborhood as Blaine was. Someone like the owners of Umi Kitchen & Sushi Bar, who will open Molé Mexican this summer. On the importance of locally owned businesses, Frank isn’t effusive and he isn’t sanctimonious. He’s practical. Quiznos and Olive Garden don’t care about the neighborhood the way locals care about the neighborhood. Local businesses knit stronger social fabrics, which creates a place more people want to be, which makes the housing and businesses within that neighborhood more valuable. Diversity in all things — from resident demographics and income to the types of housing and commercial spaces — helps sell houses, sure. But it’s also a deeply held belief that when bad things happen (like, say, a global pandemic), the diversity of housing stock, businesses and people will shelter the neighborhood

from the worst consequences of bad fortune. It’s the hope that, with thoughtful and purposeful encouragement of tight-knit relationships between people and place, we can build something new from the destruction of something old, and help that new neighborhood feel like there’s a “there” there. Or at least a “there” that’s developing. I doubt any individual or company or government can plan for a neighborhood to have a real personality, a real heart. Ultimately there must be something unsellable and undeedable, something that people create together beyond the dreams of developers. Ideally, these relationships carry “thereness” forward long after the present builders and owners and renters and coffee drinkers and runners and pizza eaters are dead and gone and a new generation of Spokanites is telling stories about how Kendall Yards and West Central came to be. Maybe by then both neighborhoods will be even more livable and vibrant in their own ways and in the ways they are connected. But shit happens. Maybe a railroad plows through your front yard. Maybe a housing bubble turns your street into a playground for the rich that the gentrification critics feared, and you can’t make rent or pay your property taxes. In less than a decade, a restaurant like Central Food can be a city favorite and yet go out of business. What Blaine and his staff added to the neighborhood is being absorbed by the neighborhood right now. What Central Food used to bring to the table, some other restaurant will bring to the table. Or not. We don’t know the future. I only hope that when it arrives, someone like Blaine will have gotten there first, and have dinner waiting. n Kate Lebo is the author of the essay collection The Book of Difficult Fruit, the cookbook Pie School, and the poetry chapbook Seven Prayers to Cathy McMorris Rodgers. On behalf of the Washington Center for Cultural Traditions, she is conducting a survey of food traditions in the Spokane area. This piece is the first in a series of food stories.


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AUGUST 5, 2021 INLANDER 23


Chad Herrmann (Lysander) and Sarah Plumb (Hermia) rehearse the Spokane Shakespeare Society’s production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

THEATER

DREAMING

BIG

A new Shakespearean theater troupe is launching with A Midsummer Night’s Dream BY E.J. IANNELLI

24 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

N

ot long after Amanda Cantrell and her husband, Scott, moved to Spokane in August 2019, they surveyed the theater landscape and felt like something was missing. What it needed was a little more Elizabethan English rendered in iambic pentameter, preferably amid the natural backdrop of the city’s parks. “When we got here,” Amanda says, “we found out that there wasn’t already an outdoor summer Shakespeare theater. And we were surprised, because Spokane is an arts community and has some established theaters here. But this wasn’t something that was really being tapped into. So we saw this, and we were like, “We could do that. Why don’t we do that? Let’s do that!’” On the face of it, few people would be better equipped for exactly this sort of venture. The peripatetic couple, most recently transplanted from Anchorage, Alaska, had a combination of skills perfectly suited to launching a troupe dedicated to performing the Bard’s works. Amanda was completing her doctorate in nonprofit leadership at the time, and Scott is a longtime Shakespeare actor and scholar. “He loves Shakespeare. If he could do Shakespeare for the rest of his life, he’d be a happy man,” she says. “That’s his passion. I tease him that it’s a level of dorkdom, because he has lexicons and all sorts of academic papers on interpretations.” Furthermore, both had worked extensively in other theater communities — in Dallas and Atlanta, to name just two — and therefore had valuable firsthand experience on either side of the curtain. They’d even leaped right into Spokane’s own theater scene. Scott, who goes by R. Scott Cantrell for his acting gigs, played Hugo Lyppiatt in the

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Spokane Civic Theatre’s early 2020 production of Noël Coward’s Present Laughter. Meanwhile, Amanda began helping Stage Left with fundraising initiatives as part of her Ph.D. coursework. Then came the pandemic lockdowns. All live performances, in- or outdoors, went on indefinite hiatus. But rather than put things on hold, the Cantrells concentrated on solidifying the groundwork. “We spent the rest of 2020 writing the business stuff, like our bylaws, and researching what we needed to do to become incorporated and get our 501(c)(3) status,” she says. That involved things like assembling a board of directors and filing the right forms with the IRS. “And then in January 2021, we pulled the trigger.” The freshly launched organization, appropriately titled the Spokane Shakespeare Society, or S3 for short, was ready to get the show on the road, even if the rest of the world was still a little apprehensive. “We were originally planning to ask the Friends of Manito if we could perform in the rose garden, and they were understandably concerned about how they would deal with any COVID restrictions. So they forwarded our request to the city parks department. They reached out, and we were able to connect, which led to this partnership with the city’s parks and rec department — and Riverfront Park specifically — to bring our performances to the Pavilion and the Lilac Bowl this summer.” S3’s inaugural outing is a full-cast production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream, one of the most oft-performed plays from one of the world’s (still) most oft-performed playwrights. ...continued on page 26


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Spokane Shakespeare Society Executive Director Amanda Cantrell (center) speaks with Jared McDougall (Puck) and Sarah O’Hare (Moth). YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

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509 624 1200 • SPOKANESYMPHONY.ORG

26 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

“We decided to do Midsummer because it’s such a well-known show. It’s a family-friendly comedy. This will also probably be the 10th time that I’ve performed in Midsummer, so I’m quite familiar with it, which helps. And that means I can help the rest of the cast that may not be as familiar with it,” Scott says. In this production, under his wife’s direction, Scott is reprising the role of Bottom, one of the amateur actors known as the mechanicals, who’s transformed into a donkey by the impish fairy Puck (played by Jared McDougall). “Just bringing humor and entertainment is my goal. [Bottom] is kind of an arrogant, pompous character. It brings a lot of laughs because he’s so into himself but is oblivious to the fact that he’s not as great as he thinks he is,” he says. “The first couple of times I played the character, I tried to do something different. But now I’ve played it enough that I can pick and choose from each prior performance. You find out what works the best and get rid of what doesn’t work.” Casting the rest of the production took place largely through pandemic-safe Zoom videoconferencing. The principals include Abby Constable and Craig Hirt as fairy rulers Titania and Oberon, Kevin Connell and Deborah Marlowe as the engaged royal couple Theseus and Hippolyta, and Sarah Plumb and Chad Herrmann as the young lovestruck couple Hermia and Lysander. “I know that we have some younger people that have never done Shakespeare before, and then established, older actors who have done lots of Shakespeare,” says Scott. “I think it’ll help because the people that have maybe gotten jaded doing Shakespeare are going to get new energy from the people who haven’t done it before, and those who haven’t done it before are going to learn a lot from those of us who have been doing it for 20 or 30 years.” That intergenerational exchange dovetails nicely with S3’s broader mission to bring new actors into the Shakespearean fold. And, like all of S3’s shows, Midsummer will be based on a pay-what-you-can model. That means audience

members are certainly free to donate as much as they like, but admission fees aren’t a requirement, which will help eliminate some of the traditional barriers to Shakespeare’s work and theater in general. In mid-September, directly following Midsummer, S3 plans to move straight into public performances of the Reduced Shakespeare Company’s The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged), directed by Jessica Loomer and featuring a threeperson cast that includes Scott as well as Kaylan Martin, who also appears in Midsummer. That might seem like an ambitious pace for a brandnew nonprofit, but both Cantrells are excited by the prospect of providing long-absent live entertainment and additional community outreach. “We as an organization have already talked about potentially doing shows in other parks,” Amanda says. “Especially since we’re outside and we’re going to have a set that goes up and comes down in a single night, we are really portable. “I know we’re also planning to do some of the community events that happen in the fall and the winter,” Amanda adds, naming seasonal markets and craft shows as examples. “We would maybe do mini-performances of scenes, some activities with kids. We’re really looking to be out in the community that way.” Additionally, and importantly for the theater community in particular, S3 is remunerating its cast and crew in an effort to create more professional opportunities for artists in the region. “We are establishing ourselves as a theater that pays a stipend to every artist,” Amanda says. “All of our actors are receiving one, all of our directors — except me — are receiving one, all of our designers are, too. We can’t pay equity rates, but we want to set that standard that we recognize that theater is an art form. It takes education and experience, and it has value.” n A Midsummer Night’s Dream • Aug. 6, 7, 20, 26, 27 at 6:30 pm, Aug. 8, 22, 29 at 2 pm • Free (pay what you can) • Pavilion at Riverfront Park • 507 N. Howard St • spokaneshakespearesociety.org • 379-8377


CULTURE | DIGEST

THE IMPORTANCE OF SMALL MOMENTS

THE BUZZ BIN

John Green’s first nonfiction book The Anthropocene Reviewed shows the power of humankind BY LILLIAN PIEL

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here are many books that hold a special place in my heart, but every so often I come across one so good I don’t want to put it down until I read the whole story. One of those books was John Green’s The Fault in Our Stars. The title and the author’s name might ring a bell — the book was hugely popular back in 2014, when a movie based on the story was also released. I’ve grown up a lot since 2014 — I attended and graduated from high school, and I’m now more than halfway through college, but I still think of Green’s books as some of the best I’ve read. I love how the characters draw me in, how he writes emotions in a raw and unfiltered way, and how his stories are always a bittersweet blend of loss and hope, loneliness and connection, a balance that describes how I too feel about life and love — two major themes of his books. I was beyond excited when Green recently published The Anthropocene Reviewed. I was also intrigued, since it’s his first nonfiction book. Green wrote it over the course of quarantine, so he lets the reader in on his thoughts, his hopes and his fears at a vulnerable and uncertain time. The book is a series of reviews of a seemingly random assortment of objects, phenomena and places, all are products of the anthropocene — “the current geological age in which humans have profoundly reshaped the planet and its biodiversity,” according to the book. Green also ties in the history of each thing he reviews, as well as his own personal connection. He also ends his reviews with a rating on the five-star scale. Don’t be fooled into thinking this is some run-of-the-mill review book. Green’s reviews seamlessly incorporate facts, feelings, and lessons learned or moments he holds onto. Everyone is guaranteed to learn something new from it. A few of my favorite reviews include the academic decathlon, sunsets, Super Mario Kart, Hiroyuki Doi’s circle drawings, the world’s largest ball of paint, and the song “New Partner” by Palace Music. I love it when writing sparks a glimmer of hope or empathy through the author’s own vulnerability, and reading this book and getting to see that from one of my favorite authors was a treat. Since the book is from his perspective and not a character’s, it was even more impactful. As someone who also feels like their future is just out of reach, a feeling both thrilling and terrifying, I appreciated the

way Green’s book reminds me to look forward with cautious optimism. Throughout the book, Green examines the way humans just keep pushing through difficult circumstances, finding hope in the midst of the pandemic. The first part has a more nervous tone as Green writes about feeling helpless, and it isn’t until almost the halfway point that Green gives out his first five-star review, for sunsets. The tone shifts and he starts to find the beauty and wonder in small but meaningful things he reviews, which help him reframe his thoughts. “You cannot see the beauty which is enough unless you make yourself vulnerable to it … this whole thing you’ve been doing where nothing gets five stars because nothing is perfect? That’s bullshit. So much is perfect. Starting with this.” I give The Anthropocene Reviewed four and a half stars. It’s not perfect, but the emotions and vulnerability and hope I found in it are pretty close. n

THE STACHE IS BACK The pandemic’s cuddliest TV hit is back. Ted Lasso’s second season is rolling out one episode per week (so old school!) on Apple TV+, and the new ones have lost none of the charm that made the story of an optimistic American football coach making his way in England such a refreshing one. The side characters to Jason Sudeikis’ title role are being fleshed out, and winningly so. Retired roughneck Roy is navigating life after football (and with girlfriend Keeley) with good humor and a job coaching preteen girls, new assistant coach Nate is letting power go to his head, star player Rojas is having a crisis of confidence, and a sports psychologist in town has Ted a little off his typically upbeat game. Like the first season, hints of darkness in Ted’s past make the bright moments shine all the more, and the cast as a whole is easily one of the most likeable on television. If you’re sick of hearing the Ted Lasso hype, be forewarned, it’s probably not going to let up soon. (DAN NAILEN)

WORTH THE REVISIT Years ago I reviewed an Eric Clapton concert in which a member of his touring band, guitarist Derek Trucks, pretty much wiped the floor with ol’ “Slowhand.” Now Trucks and his wife, Susan Tedeschi, have teamed with Phish’s Trey Anastasio to tackle Clapton’s best recorded work, Layla and Assorted Other Love Songs. The resulting album Layla Revisited (Live at LOCK’N) was recorded live in concert in 2019, and it’s a scorcher. Any fans of Clapton’s work (released under the guise of Derek and the Dominos) should give this hot live set a listen. (DAN NAILEN)

THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST There’s noteworthy new music arriving in stores and online Aug. 6. To wit: COLIN HAY, I Just Don’t Know What To Do With Myself. The singer/songwriter and Men At Work lead singer tackles covers by the Beatles, Kinks and more. LIARS, The Apple Drop. First single “Sekwar” is a jumbly experimental wonder from leader Angus Andrew. BARBRA STREISAND, Release Me 2. Ya, pretty slow week on the new releases when Streisand makes an appearance. (DAN NAILEN)

AUGUST 5, 2021 INLANDER 27


Brewer Adam Boyd is managing Garland Brew Werks’ five-barrel system. DEREK HARRISON PHOTO

OPENING

‘Beer Is Art’ The Garland District finally welcomes its own neighborhood brewery, Garland Brew Werks BY CHEY SCOTT

A

t long last, Spokane’s historic Garland District has a craft brewery of its own. Last week, Garland Brew Werks opened to the public as a family-friendly spot anchoring the business district’s east end, serving a variety of craft beer, plus house-made root beer, gourmet bratwursts, flatbreads and more. Owned by TJ and Sarah Wallin, who previously operated Community Pint beer bar in downtown Spokane for four years, Garland Brew Werks also has Adam Boyd at the brewing helm. Boyd last brewed at Iron Goat Brewing Co. before taking on Brew Werks’ five-barrel system.

28 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

“We jumped at the opportunity to be in the neighborhood,” TJ Wallin says. “It’s what we always wanted, to be a neighborhood brewery, but we struggled before to find a perfect location. We’re excited to be a part of the Garland neighborhood.” Garland Brew Werks’ home is a building that last housed a sewing supply shop and that it now splits with Giant Nerd Books. Wallin anticipates the two businesses will host a dual grand opening celebration sometime in August. Upon its public debut last week, the brewery had six of its own beers on tap, plus a single guest tap of hard seltzer from local Humble Abode Brewing. Soon, Boyd

expects to have all 14 tap handles pouring Garland Brew Werks’ recipes, including one nonalcoholic kombucha, two hard seltzers and a nonalcoholic root beer he and his daughter Lyric co-created. “We have been making soda at home for a long time, since she was little, and when TJ said, ‘I want root beer,’ well, we had a recipe,” Boyd says. “The root beer fame has already gone to her head,” he jokes. “She thinks she is the root beer baroness of Spokane.” Lyric’s Root Beer is served in mugs specially etched with that official name, and is also showcased in a root beer float ($7) on the brewery’s dessert menu. ...continued on page 30


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FOOD | OPENING

“‘BEER IS ART’,” CONTINUED... Ten of the Brew Werks’ taps are totally dedicated to the ever-rotating output of beer made on its five-barrel system. “We’ll always have a Northwest IPA, a hazy, a sour, probably something fruit-oriented, a lager, and we’ll try to have at least one dark option,” Boyd says. The only non-rotating beer planned to be a tap mainstay is the OG — Original Garland — IPA. “It’s a big thing with the beers I’m making to really fold the neighborhood into the spirit of Garland Brew Werks,” Boyd says. “The history and social nature of this neighborhood, we want to try and make it a fabric of what we do here.”

H

eading up the brewery’s kitchen is chef Sheila Clifford, who’s worked in the food industry since she was 16 in roles from server to cook. Clifford joined Garland Brew Werks after hearing through Boyd, her partner, that they needed someone to run the kitchen. So, she compiled a menu of beer-complementing food that’s all $12 or less, including four specialty bratwursts ($10 each) and six flatbread pizzas ($12 each), plus shareable snacks like stout-roasted pecans, tater tots featuring all scratch-made sauces and a couple of kid-friendly snacks ($5). “Sauces were a big push for me,” Clifford says. “It’s all about the flavor, and what better way than a condiment to do that.”

30 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

The kitchen showcases the brewery’s beer in numerous ingredients and dishes, from beer cheese and beer mustard condiments to red onions pickled in beer, a house hot sauce, and more. The bratwurst sausages are also cooked in a stout-style beer. Many of Clifford’s recipes were created and perfected at home along Owners TJ and Sarah Wallin (top) and an elote bratwurst. DEREK HARRISON PHOTOS with Boyd. outdoor patio on the building’s east side “A big push for us was to find ways to that’s perfectly shaded from the late day incorporate the beers,” he says. “There is sun. Inside, the taproom features a massive a brewery and restaurant in Hood River, wrap-around bar top and a long, comOregon, and the beer and food are marmunal bar-height table down the space’s ried so well there, it creates such a unique center. On one wall, a focal mural of the experience, and we needed something like phrase “Beer is Art” captures Garland Brew that here.” Werks’ focus. The most popular flatbread so far is “It’s handcrafted — it’s somebody’s Clifford’s seasonal summer Margherita, craft,” Wallin says. “Not all beer is art, but with lemon ricotta, mozzarella, herbwhen you come down to have some locally marinated tomatoes, arugula and a balsamic made craft beer, someone put their heart glaze. The elote bratwurst is also an early and soul and labor into it, just like chiseling favorite, pairing the flavors of classic Mexia piece of rock into a statue.” n can-style street corn with the German-style cheys@inlander.com sausage in the form of toppings: roasted corn salsa, cotija cheese, cilantro, mayo and Garland Brew Werks • 603 W. Garland the Brew Werks’ house hot sauce, made by Ave. • Open Wed-Thu 3-9 pm, Fri-Sat Boyd. noon-10 pm, Sun noon-8 pm • Facebook: In addition to its open, EuropeanGarland Brew Werks • 509-863-9419 style taproom, the brewery boasts a large


FOOD | OPENING

Happy Camper The tiny pop-up beer bar Camp Taps debuts in the North Monroe Business District BY CHEY SCOTT

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with beer and this big deck and a yurt out here for all-year use that was heated, but we went to the city and they listened to our idea, and it ended up being unfeasible,” Barshaw says. While Camp Taps is theoretically mobile, the couple plan to operate it seasonally at its current spot from April through mid-fall. When the trailer’s front end is filled with kegs, it can’t easily be moved anyway, and due to the restrictions of their operating licenses, it also can’t travel around like a food truck can.

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hen Camp Taps is operating most afternoons and evenings, drivers along North Monroe may notice Barshaw’s hand-painted sandwich board signs out on the sidewalk with a red stop sign symbol and the word BEER in the center. He also designed the trailer’s logo, which is featured on screen-printed T-shirts for sale in Camp Taps’ tiny “gift shop,” along with 16-ounce, cup-sized koozies, stickers and postcards to “send from camp,” Greenberg says.

hen Blaise Barshaw and Laurie Ann Greenberg approached local and state government agencies with the proposal for their seasonal beer trailer, Camp Taps, they were mostly met with skepticism and hesitation. It took months to get clearance for the idea at various phases of construction and implementation, but Camp Taps in the North Monroe Business District finally got the nod of approval from the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board, and opened last week. “I called Liquor Control, and talked for like an hour explaining what I wanted to do with the beer trailer, and they were having a hard time wrapping their brain around it,” Barshaw says. “No one had ever done this before.” Located in the back corner of the parking lot for local vintage and Laurie Ann Greenberg and Blaise Barshaw in the beer trailer. LAUREN REY PHOTO antique shop 1889 Salvage Co., Camp Taps is a cozy, intimate bar, with capacity Each of the trailer’s tap handles is made from for only 12 people in its tiny enclosure, which is repurposed finds from some of the many antique open to ages 21 and over. shops along Monroe Street, including a 1920s The bar itself is a 1969 camp trailer the flashlight, and badminton and croquet racket couple completely gutted and retrofitted, with a handles. The seating area around the beer trailer space in the front end to cool and store kegs for is mostly covered and walled off to create a shady its eight tap handles. hangout, with bar stools that pull right up to the All of those taps showcase regional craft trailer’s two windows. beers, and everything is $6 a pint. Upon its Customers can bring in their own food, but opening, featured breweries included nearby must follow the camp rules to “pack it in, pack it Bellwether, plus Mountain Lakes, Lumberbeard, out,” as well as to be kind, make friends and not YaYa, Humble Abode and the Golden Handle smoke. Project, and a regional guest tap with Coin Toss Since the trailer is too small to hold a Brewing in Oregon. dishwasher for pint glasses, beer is served in “All the microbreweries around here, compostable single-use cups, which the couple everyone has been so nice to us and so helpare currently trying to figure out how to recycle ful,” Greenberg says. “That is what is really locally, since they can’t go into the city-issued nice about the beer community and craft beer. yard waste bins. Camp Taps’ owners hope next Everyone is on each other’s side.” year to offer some version of a mug club, perhaps Barshaw and Greenberg, both professional by selling reusable aluminum vessels that customartists, say their initial plan was to open a permaers can bring back to use and get a discount on nent venue that paired craft beer with arts and beer in return. served as more of a community creative center. “There is something for everyone,” GreenBut finding a location that didn’t need extensive berg says. “It’s kind of fun. It’s different and and expensive renovations proved difficult. After unique and is like coming around the campfire. both lost their part-time jobs in retail and the serYou can’t get lost here.” n vice industry when the pandemic hit last spring, they had more time to focus on retooling their Camp Taps • 2824 N. Monroe St. • Open vision into the beer trailer concept. Wed-Sat 3-8 pm, Sun 3-7 pm • facebook.com/ “We originally thought of having the trailer CampTaps

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AUGUST 5, 2021 INLANDER 31


REVIEW

LETTING LOOSE Director James Gunn’s new take on The Suicide Squad succeeds in gloriously gory fashion where its 2016 predecessor failed BY MARYANN JOHANSON

​​I

hated 2016’s Suicide Squad ... and I love this brandspankin’-new The Suicide Squad. Like the 2016 movie, this one is based on the comic books about literal psychopaths let loose to do as much damage as possible in the putative name of freedom and democracy. About the previous movie, I said it “should be grim, bitter, and as horrifyingly alluring as Hannibal Lecter.” But it wasn’t. This one? Well, perhaps love is too pleasant a word. For this movie is all those things, and more. It is incredibly gory, positively reveling in the sort of extreme violence that does massive bodily harm to anyone who gets in the way of it. It’s funny, but only in a bleak way. It is utterly lacking in sentiment (the first one drenched us in it), and yet it engages you with its psychopaths in ways that you may find disturbing. That The in the title? That is writer-director James Gunn’s way of spanking the 2016 film and sending it off to the corner to think about what it did. This one is the

32 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

definite article. Gunn keeps only those members of the team worth telling another story about. Viola Davis is back as Amanda Waller, the prison warden who runs this dubious secret program, offering the monsters in her charge years off their sentences in exchange for accepting missions from her. But this time Davis is allowed to go full bore, her immense screen presence and power fueling the suspicion that Waller is as much a psychopath as her prisoners. Joel Kinnaman is back as Colonel Rick Flag, the soldier who has to wrangle the monsters in the field. He’s not a psychopath, and this time around he is much more our stand-in for how he inevitably gets caught up in concern for their well-being. Also returning is punky social irritant and force of nature — like a tornado is a force of nature — Harley Quinn (Margot Robbie, who steals the movie). Gunn has hardly been the most feminist of filmmakers in

the past, but he manages not to shoot Quinn like he’s drooling all over her, and has written her a subplot about bad boyfriends and the romantic fantasies that are fed to women that lead some of us to get involved with the wrong sort of guy. (Princess tropes will come in for heavy snarking.) The mission this time involves a coup on the fictional South American island nation of Corto Maltese, where a secret military weapons project has fallen into hands not friendly to the United States. So the Squad is being sent in to destroy it. Along for the ride with Quinn and Flag are absolute lunatics Peacemaker (John Cena), who isn’t kidding when he says he believes in “peace at any price,” and assassin Bloodsport (Idris Elba), whose unloving relationship with his teenage daughter (Storm Reid) would appear to be a smack at a similar dynamic in the 2016 movie that was portrayed with absurd schmaltz.


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If you were tasked with saving the world, wouldn’t you bring a CGI shark along?

But the other members of the Squad don’t morality, even given its protagonists. It’s not subseem to be actual psychopaths. Dangerous, tle, but Gunn shivs in pointed commentary on yes, but for reasons understandable and full of American military adventurism and its carceral pathos. Ratcatcher 2 (Daniela Melchior) controls state: Shouldn’t we consider this psychopathic, rats, a pretty useful superpower, as we see. Polkatoo? But this is mostly a movie about style: Dot Man (David DastThe energy here is feverish and malchian), who bears the anarchic, winkingly aping convenTHE SUICIDE SQUAD burden of an unlikely tions of the 1970s grindhouse flicks Rated R superpower, is a deeply it has more in common with than Directed by James Gunn damaged survivor of exmost superhero movies. This is not Starring Idris Elba, Margot Robbie, Viola Davis a movie for children. This is not a treme child abuse. King Shark, who is a sharkmovie for many adults, either. Its man (CGI, with the voice of Sylvester Stallone), cynicism is exhausting. I wonder if we will look is merely very lonely and always hungry. He has back 10 years from now and mark this as the bea taste for human flesh, it’s true, but it doesn’t ginning of the end of the current cycle of comicappear he has a lot of other dietary options. And book movies as bombastic cinematic explosions. he doesn’t chow down indiscriminately. Because it’s difficult to see where they can go The Suicide Squad is not without a sense of from here except smaller, quieter and kinder. n

PR IZ

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FOOD & DRINK SPECIALS

inlander.com/PartyonthePatio AUGUST 5, 2021 INLANDER 33


FILM | REVIEW

Beautiful Isolation

Emma (Zazie Beetz) is key to the soulful Nine Days.

First-time filmmaker Edson Oda delivers a masterful drama with Nine Days BY CHASE HUTCHINSON

E

very once in a while, there is a film that is just soul shatteringly good. It creates a powerful vision all its own and breathes life into a world that is wholly unique, from its acting to its direction. It demands your attention, earning both your intense awe and overwhelming respect in every moment you spend with it. It is a film that expands what cinema can be. Nine Days is one of those films. With a command of craft that is methodical yet measured, it is an outstanding feature debut from writer-director Edson Oda. It follows Winston Duke’s Will, a lonely recluse who is tasked with selecting souls to be born into life on Earth. In order to do this, he must interview a group of hopeful candidates over the course of nine days and select only one to be given a chance at life. The five souls are all different, even deeply flawed, though they all must undertake the same journey that Will has laid out for them. The impetus for the interviews is that one of Will’s previous selections, a young woman named Amanda, has died. Will is devastated as it was he who served as a watchful eye over Amanda and the other souls he selected through small television screens. That means he got to see the very moment Amanda met her end in a car accident, a loss that he will spend the rest

34 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

of the film seeking to understand. Duke is moments. There is a deep sense of looming utterly riveting in this role as he expertly sorrow hanging over everything, as it is balances playing the caring protector who clear most of the souls Will interviews will only wishes to help those he is interviewing not be selected, though there is also a prewhile also working through his own loss. vailing sense of joy. As the characters spend However, he will soon find a connection their days watching the lives of others on with the interviewee Emma (Zazie Beetz), the screens before them, it reveals how who defies all his understanding and rules much of our life is a mixture that is equal about what it takes to be given the gift of parts pain and jubilation. There is mundanlife. ity, yes, but there is also triumph. It is much Their dynamic serves as the heart of like the film itself which is built around the film. Will is closed off, living alone in an deceptively simple scenes of characters talkethereal desert where he spends his days obing with each other. As the story progresses, serving his visually striking panoply it is these scenes that begin of screens. He lives a one-way relaNINE DAYS to overflow with glorious tionship, detachedly watching the wondrous reflections on life. Rated R lives of others in what feels like a To say more would be Directed by Edson Oda reverse version of The Truman Show. Starring Winston Duke, to rob one of the experience His only friend is Kyo (Benedict Zazie Beetz, Benedict Wong of watching this film with Wong), who sees how Will is strugas fresh and open a mind as gling yet is unable to help him. It possible. It is a truly out of will be Emma who holds the key to breakthis world film that is epic in ambition while ing through the cage of isolation that Will being laser focused in crafting its characters. has built around himself. This cage comes Oda has delicately revealed what it means in the form of the aforementioned desolate to be alive in a masterpiece of filmmaking. desert whose vast beauty is captured perBy looking at the trials of a select few who fectly by Oda, revealing how haunting this would like nothing more than to take part empty world is. It is in a single home in that in the multifaceted experience that is life, landscape where most of the film is set. he has held a mirror up to our very souls. While certainly a slow burn of a film, For a first-time filmmaker to create so much Oda instills every moment of stillness with profound beauty with such a humble story a vibrant light that shines in even the quiet is an outstanding triumph of cinema. n


FILM | SHORTS

IC LANTERN THEATER MAG

OPENING FILMS

FRIDAY, AUG 6TH - THU, AUG 12TH

TICKETS: $9 NINE DAYS (124 MIN) FRI-SUN: 1:50, 6:00 MON-THU: 6:00 THE GREEN KNIGHT (130 MIN) FRI/SAT: 8:20 SUN-WED: 6:10

AILEY

AILEY (93 MIN) FRI/SAT: 1:00, 4:05 SUN: 12:00, 4:05 MON-THU: 4:05

This documentary on dance pioneer Alvin Ailey shines the spotlight on how his choreography reflected his Black American experience. At the Magic Lantern. (DN) Rated PG-13

NO ORDINARY MAN: THE BILLY TIPTON DOCUMENTARY (84 MIN) FRI-THURS: 4:20 FANTASTIC FUNGI (78 MIN)

FRI/SAT: 2:45 SUN: 11:30AM, 2:45 MON-THU: 2:45

FANTASTIC FUNGI

PIG (93 MIN) FRI/SAT: 8:35 SUN: 1:00 MON-THU: 2:15

A visually stunning documentary about fungi’s contribution to life on Earth. At the Magic Lantern. (DN) Not Rated

25 W Main Ave #125 • MagicLanternOnMain.com

NINE DAYS

Winston Duke stars as a mysterious figure tasked with determining which souls deserve a trip to live on Earth. (DN) Rated R

THE SUICIDE SQUAD

Director James Gunn (Guardians of the Galaxy) takes the realm of this team of violent ex-con supervillains including Harley Quinn, Bloodsport, King Shark and more on a mission to save the world. (DN) Rated R

Ailey

NOW PLAYING BLACK WIDOW

A flashback in the Marvel Universe in which the title character (Scarlett Johansson) is overshadowed by her spunky sister (Florence Pugh) in an action-packed affair. (DN) Rated PG-13

THE BOSS BABY: FAMILY BUSINESS

The boss baby (Alec Baldwin) and his big brother (James Marsden) are all grown up in this sequel, and they’ve drifted apart only to come back together when a new boss baby shows up in their lives. (DN) Rated PG

THE CONJURING: THE DEVIL MADE ME DO IT

The latest chiller about supposed paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren, investigating a murder suspect who claims to be possessed by a demon. (NW) Rated R

ESCAPE ROOM: TOURNAMENT OF CHAMPIONS

The original Escape Room movie was a lot less fun than actually going to an escape room, but was enough of a hit to warrant watching six new contenders try their luck. (DN) Rated PG-13

F9 THE FAST SAGA

The long-awaited ninth episode finally hits theaters, bringing Vin Diesel’s Dom back into action to foil a plot hatched by his long-forsaken brother Jakob (John Cena). (DN) PG-13

THE FOREVER PURGE

On the morning after the annual bloodletting purge, a masked gang attacks a wealthy ranch family in Texas, and the family of ranch hands who work for them, forcing the two families to band together and fight. (DN) Rated R

THE GREEN KNIGHT

Dev Patel stars in a twist on King Arthur’s story as the king’s nephew who adventures to confront a giant greenskinned knight and prove his character. (DN) Rated R

THE HITMAN’S WIFE’S BODYGUARD

Ryan Reynolds and Samuel L. Jackson are an odd couple hitman and bodyguard combo back for another actionpacked adventure, this time with Salma Hayek in the mix as a world-class con artist. (DN) Rated R

JOE BELL

Mark Wahlberg is the incredibly unlikely choice to play an Oregon father who walks across America to bring attention to the dangers of bullying in honor of his gay son. (DN) Rated R

JUNGLE CRUISE

Disney taps Dwayne Johnson and Emily Blunt for a river adventure based on the famous ride in which they journey down the Amazon and search for an ancient tree with healing powers. (DN) Rated PG-13

NO ORDINARY MAN: THE BILLY TIPTON DOCUMENTARY

This documentary explores the complex life of Spokane jazz musician Billy Tipton, a trans pioneer whose life was largely misrepresented after his death revealed he was born a woman. At the Magic Lantern. (DN) Not rated

OLD

M. Night Shyamalan is back, this time with a tale of a secluded beach that makes its visitors age rapidly, reducing their entire lives to one day. (DN) Rated PG-13

Fall Arts Preview

PIG

Nicolas Cage plays a truffle hunter who has to leave the wilderness and head to Portland to find the person who stole his beloved pig. A recipe for some John Wickish fun. (DN) Rated R

A QUIET PLACE PART II

A sequel to the hugely popular 2018 horror hit, following the original film’s family as they continue to evade monsters with hypersensitive hearing. (NW) Rated PG-13

ROADRUNNER: A FILM ABOUT ANTHONY BOURDAIN

If you’re already a fan of the chefturned-TV personality and travel host, this documentary on Bourdain’s life should be pretty satisfying. (DN) Rated R

THE ARTS! SEPTEMBER 24-30, 2020 | SUPPORT

Creativity Through Chaos Art or Die! Hoit Meet artist Amber

era... Lights, Cam gets sleek Livestreaming

iration Seeking Insp lovers are What local art pandemic turning to during the

PAGE 19

SNAKE EYES: G.I. JOE ORIGINS

Henry Golding plays a loner who finds a home in Japan, where he learns the ways of the ninja, only to have his past catch up with him, potentially costing him everything he’s found in his new home. (DN) Rated PG-13

SPACE JAM: A NEW LEGACY

Hey look, it’s another reason for people to argue over who is better, the Michael Jordan of the original Space Jam or Lebron James in this new version. (DN) Rated PG

STILLWATER

Matt Damon plays a working-class Oklahoman who has to travel to France in hopes of exonerating his daughter from a murder charge while navigating the obvious cultural barriers. (DN) Rated R n

BIG SCR EEN 43 CHIN G YOU 14 THE S 11 COP S ARE WAT POP -UP CLASSR OOM

Your guide to this fall’s arts events & activities

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PRIMER

AN

ESSENTIALS PLAYLIST

Sleater-Kinney’s Corin Tucker (left) and Carrie Brownstein.

KAREN MURPHY PHOTO

Before Sleater-Kinney plays Spokane with Wilco, binge the Northwest legends’ best tunes BY SETH SOMMERFELD

C

oming out of Olympia’s famed early-1990s riot grrrl movement, Sleater-Kinney helped the underground scene gain worldwide acclaim alongside groups like Bikini Kill and Bratmobile. But there’s no debating that Sleater-Kinney is the most enduring group of the lot. With Corin Tucker and Carrie Brownstein both handling singing and guitar duties, and Janet Weiss (who joined the group in 1996) serving as one of the best drummers in indie rock history, the group carved out its own niche. After breaking out with the touchstone 1997 album Dig Me Out, they continued making acclaimed records until going on hiatus in 2006. After 10 years between albums, Sleater-Kinney came back with a vengeance with 2015’s No Cities to Love. The band’s 2019 St. Vincent-produced album, The Center Won’t Hold, felt like a synthetic sonic departure, causing a rift resulting in Weiss unfortunately leaving the group. But Tucker and Brownstein soldiered on, releasing the 10th Sleater-Kinney record — Path of Wellness — in June. With Sleater-Kinney entering a new phase as a core duo — and with the band joining Wilco at the First Inter-

36 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

state Center for the Arts on Aug. 5 — it felt like a good time to give newbies a taste of the best of Sleater-Kinney via a chronological playlist featuring at least one song from all 10 albums.

band’s best tune. The contrast between the untethered wildness of the verses and the coy chorus masterfully inverts the quiet-loud formula to maximize S-K’s rock and roll allure.

“A REAL MAN” On the band’s self-titled debut LP, the grrrls are at their most riotous. “A Real Man” best embodies this spirit via a two-minute burst of sly, screaming rejection of heteronormative female submission to male sexual wills (“I don’t wanna join your club! I don’t want that kind of love!”).

“ONE MORE HOUR” Consider this the ultimate testament to Tucker and Brownstein’s musical chemistry, as it’s a heart-wrenching tune Tucker wrote about the two of them breaking up after a brief romantic relationship.

“CALL THE DOCTOR” On the titular first track of SK’s second album, the band hits on what would begin its signature sound: Tucker belting out howling vocals that clash against the simultaneous delivery of Brownstein’s almost spoken-word delivery. It’s a sound that always feels urgent, propelling this tune about women being terrorized by the male-driven medical field. “DIG ME OUT” Dig Me Out is easily Sleater-Kinney’s most iconic album, and the titular opener might be the

“LITTLE BABIES” The bouncier, more fun counterpoint to the Rolling Stones’ “Mother’s Little Helper.” “GET UP” The Hot Rock’s best track also serves as one of the most unique in Sleater-Kinney’s entire discography. Essentially an up-tempo spoken-word musing on transcendentalism, “Get Up” is propelled by Weiss’s perfect drumming and arguably Brownstein and Tucker’s best combo guitar riff. “IRONCLAD” An essential from All Hands on the Bad One, “Ironclad” is the S-K song that sounds the most like


an absolute knock-down-drag-out rumble. Plus, how can you argue against any tune built around a core metaphor of the battle between the Monitor and the Merrimack? “OH” As One Beat’s standout track proves, sometimes you just need a shame-free rocker about… umm… loving yourself. (Hey, at least it’s way more subtle than “I Touch Myself.”) “JUMPERS” Led by Brownstein laying down one of S-K’s most recognizable guitar riffs — a small high staccato bounce during the verses — The Wood’s “Jumpers” lyrically wrestles with bouts of depression and hits with an absolute wallop when the chorus kicks in full force, boasting Tucker’s vocals at their bellowing best. “MODERN GIRL” One of the absolute best SleaterKinney songs, “Modern Girl” finds the band in rare sonic territory: the realm of the pretty, laid back and dreamy. But it’s a somewhat false front, as the chipper plucking and Weiss’ harmonica tones are the groundwork for subversion, as the song details how the idyllic exterior veneer of modern womanhood can mask a fuming anger and frustration with the world. As Brownstein repeats the refrain of “My whole life / is like a picture of a sunny day,” listeners feel all of that tension, teeth-gritting and the faint hope that one of these days the words will ring true. “PRICE TAG” No Cities to Love has a strong claim to be recognized not only as Sleater-Kinney’s best album, but one of the best comeback albums ever. “Price Tag” kicks things off with Tucker snarling about the cost of being a cog in the relentless capitalist system with Weiss providing the track’s ominous and relentless thumping heartbeat. “A NEW WAVE” A counter to the album’s proceeding cynicism, “A New Wave” is a rallying cry to get up and buck the system (to, as they put it, “Invent our own kind of obscurity”). The song soars thanks to a swirling lead riff and Tucker and Brownstein’s vocals linking up in the chorus for a simultaneous burst of frustrationexpelling endorphins. (Does it help that the song has a Bob’s Burgers music video? It certainly doesn’t hurt!) “BURY OUR FRIENDS” A clenched fist hymn for defiant survivors, “Bury Our Friends” works both as a cry for the scarred survivors who refuse to let society bury them and as a fitting summation of Sleater-Kinney coming back from the ashes, battle-worn but not ready to give up the fight just yet. “HURRY ON HOME” Honestly, The Center Won’t Hold seems like a misstep. The band seems to be trying to sound like the album’s producer, St. Vincent, but the result is an album where the main vibe is sterile and synthetic (it’s certainly not a collection of songs worth losing Weiss over). Since the playlist needs a track from every album, “Hurry on Home” gets the closest to actually sounding like peak St. Vincent, so it’s the pick. “WORRY WITH YOU” An easy comedown for this playlist, “Worry With You” fits with the lighter tone of Path of Wellness and extols the virtues of staying true to your partner even when you inevitably take some wrong turns. It’s a fitting encapsulation of this new duo era of Sleater-Kinney for Tucker and Brownstein: “If I’m gonna mess up, I’m gonna mess up with you.” n Sleater-Kinney and Wilco · Thu, Aug. 5 at 7:30 pm · $37-$91.50 · First Interstate Center for the Arts · 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. · firstinterstatecenter.org · 509-279-7000

UPCOMING SHOWS ITCHY KITTY, GOTU GOTU, THE DILRODS Sat., Aug. 14, 8 pm Big Dipper $10 NATHANIEL RATELIFF & THE NIGHT SWEATS WITH DELTA SPIRIT Sun., Aug. 15, 7 p.m. Pavilion at Riverfront $49.95-$55 NICOLE ATKINS Thu, Aug. 19, 8 p.m. Lucky You Lounge $18 ATMOSPHERE, CYPRESS HILL AND DJ Z-TRIP Sat., Aug. 21, 6 p.m. Pavilion at Riverfront $40 MODEST MOUSE, THE DISTRICTS Wed., Aug. 25, 7:30 p.m. Knitting Factory $49.50

Bully BULLY/LIGHTNING BUG Fri., Sept. 3, 8 p.m. Lucky You Lounge $15 WARREN G, MACK 10, THE DOGG POUND Thu., Sept. 9, 8 p.m. Knitting Factory $50-$60 ANA POPOVIC Sat., Sept. 11, 7 p.m. Bing Crosby Theater $27 KADABRA, VON THE BAPTIST, SUGAR COLT Sat., Sept. 18, 7 pm Big Dipper $10 MADELEINE PEYROUX Sun., Oct. 10, 8 p.m. Bing Crosby Theater $41-$68

DELIVERED TO YO U R IN BOX

Our top 5 picks for weekend entertainment EVERY FRIDAY

Sign uwp now at Inlander.com/newsletters AUGUST 5, 2021 INLANDER 37


ARTS SHOPPING SPREE

A year-plus of canceled events was hard on most of us, but one group hit especially hard by public gathering bans is the local artists who rely on many summertime festivals and events for their livelihoods. One of those events with a huge, annual economic impact for local artisans is Terrain’s flagship arts marketplace, Bazaar, which saw just over $119,000 in sales in 2019. Thankfully, it’s almost here again. The daylong party and arts fair shuts down two blocks of West Main Avenue to become “a locally handmade haven” with more than 80 artists, craftspeople and makers. Bazaar this year also includes a beer garden hosted by Flatstick Pub, a full slate of live music and family activities with the Botanical Alchemists at and around River Park Square. After being starved of in-person shopping throughout 2020, too, it’s a good chance Bazaar attendees are also ready to make the cash rain down on this year’s featured creators. — CHEY SCOTT Bazaar • Sat, Aug. 7 from 11 am-9 pm • Free • All ages • Downtown Spokane • Main Avenue between Lincoln and Wall Streets • bit.ly/Terrain-Bazaar

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

38 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

COMEDY MAKING MOVES

Comedian Taylor Tomlinson has covered a lot of ground in the comedy field even though she’s only 27. She finished in the Top 10 of Last Comic Standing when she was just 21. She’s landed spots on Conan, The Tonight Show and Comedy Central. Her own Netflix hour debuted last year, she’s toured with Whitney Cummings, and she’s the co-host of the Self-Helpless podcast alongside Delanie Fischer and Spokane’s own Kelsey Cook. She started doing standup at 16 when she took a class with her dad, and she’s worked everywhere from church basements to school fundraisers on her way to professional comedy stages, where she delves into relationships and more with jokes like: “I want to be the one. Doesn’t matter which one, there’s a lot of ones you can be. You can be the one they marry, the one who got away, or the one that set their car on fire. It doesn’t matter.” — DAN NAILEN Taylor Tomlinson • Thu, Aug. 5 at 7:30 pm; Fri-Sat, Aug. 6-7 at 7:30 pm and 10:30 pm • $25-$35 • 21+ for 10:30 shows • Spokane Comedy Club • 315 W. Sprague • spokanecomedyclub.com • 509-318-9998

OUTDOORS SUMMIT SIPS

Hike to the summit of Mount Spokane and enjoy breathtaking, 360-degree views of the region as your reward, along with an ice beverage to cool you off after all that physical exertion on a hot day. For the first time ever, staff at Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park are offering a pop-up bar at the historic Vista House every Saturday afternoon in August. The rock-walled structure, listed on the Spokane and the National Register of Historic Places, was completed in 1933 and is accessible from summit trails and by car, but whichever transport mode you take, don’t forget your Discover Pass. During the event’s kickoff this weekend, featured brews are No-Li Brewhouse’s Threezy Does It, a low-calorie hazy IPA, and its Day Fade huckleberry lemonade seltzer (PSA: Huckleberries are ripe now all over the mountain, so bring your buckets!). Sixteen-ounce pours of either are $6, and other options include $6 microbrew cans, $5 canned domestics, plus water, soda, Gatorade and light snacks. — CHEY SCOTT Vista House Beverage Service • Saturdays in August from noon-6 pm • Free admission • Mount Spokane State Park, Vista House • 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. • mtspokane.com


MUSIC HAPPY DAYS

Lucky You Lounge has navigated the pandemic with fits and starts to its restaurant, and with the shutdown of live performances that every arts venue faced starting back in March 2020. Happily, the place is still here (with a new improved backyard, and newly closed off performance space on the main floor) and ready to bring the live jams back into the mix. Huzzah! While there have been some DJ-driven dance parties in the basement, Friday’s show featuring the Smokes (pictured), Cathedral Pearls and BaLonely marks the first bands to hit the Lucky You main stage with an audience in far too long. Getting three of the town’s best bands together on one bill for that grand reopening of live music at the Lucky You is a smart move, and getting there to celebrate with them is even smarter. — DAN NAILEN The Smokes, Cathedral Pearls, BaLonely • Fri, Aug. 6 at 8 pm • $10 • 21+ • Lucky You Lounge • 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. • luckyyoulounge.com • 509-474-0511

COMMUNITY LIVE LOVE LOCAL

Looking for some local summer fun? Look no further than the second annual Inland Northwest LocalFest, a celebration of the region’s wide range of local culinary, musical and artistic talent. The festival features more than 100 local vendors, plus live music and food trucks. Among those vendors, you can shop for anything from hand-sewn clothes to gourmet pepper sauce; fine art to jewelry. Among the live music performances are River City Roots, DJ Daniel Royal, Loose Gazoonz, and Gin, Smoke & Lies. If you’re looking to satisfy a craving for either some classic fair food or some international cuisine, you’re in luck, too: LocalFest has tons of options, so there’s something for everyone, whether it’s Polynesian shrimp skewers or snow-cones. For the kids, there will be an obstacle course, bounce house, balloon artists, face painting and trampoline basketball. Come have some food and fun at LocalFest and celebrate everything local. — LILLIAN PIEL Inland Northwest LocalFest • Sun, Aug 8, from 11 am-8 pm • $5/advance, $7/door • All ages • Greyhound Park & Event Center • 5100 Riverbend Ave., Post Falls • localfest.ticketleap.com

Have an event? GET LISTED! Submit your event details for listings in the print & online editions of the Inlander.

• Community • Film • Food & Drink

• Music • Sports • Theater

• Visual Arts • Words • Etc.

Deadline is one week prior to publication Inlander.com/GetListed

AUGUST 5, 2021 INLANDER 39


friend showed up. I did not want to be annoying. So if you want to meet an anarchopunk, a response would be a pleasant break from my vacuous life. Or just go to Facebook and search for local anarchists; you’ll find me.<333 O’DONNELL’S CUTIE! You were waiting for someone who didn’t arrive; I was enjoying a Guinness and the view! We chatted about the COVID restrictions finally being lifted. I was in a blue shirt and jeans, and a bad haircut! The owner chatted us up and said he was dating someone new, and I got too shy to ask you out! Happy early or late St. Pat’s Day!

I SAW YOU I KNOW YOU SAW ME BUT DID YOU “SEE” ME? I saw you, and you saw me a few times, but it’s been a long time. Did you see me, or was the drunken distraction of group outings too dense to actually see me? I was mad crushing…New Year’s Eve I know you saw me, but ultimately we were “robbed” of anything more in our future. You’ve moved on, I’ve moved on, we are happy. This note is to thank you for your ability to pull me out of my shy demeanor and truly show me what having fun and putting the “blue spark” in college is supposed to be. I hope you saw me. Are my hints enough? You used to work for the Inlander, so I think you’ve got this figured out. SHORT ADORABLE PUNK I saw you several times downtown at riverfront. You had on black jeans, black platformlike shoes, tanktop and black hair. You with your friend who was also quite into punk anesthetics. I had on blanat far left, anarchist/anti-capitalist slogans and images on my shirt, political theory and philosophy badges on my pack and hat, enby colored bracelets, and black pants with black pf flyers. I generally do not experience such nervousness. We made eye contact several times, and I debated saying hi, however concluded it was too late by the time your

SHORT GIRL — SACRED HEART DOCTOR’S BUILDING 7/20 I got the elevator on the fifth floor. You, short girl, came from the upper floors. You asked me what floor? I said, “main floor.” You said, “Good, that’s where we are going.” You sounded cute under your mask. You told me to “have a good day” as you got off the elevator. I said, “you too.” Do you want to continue this awkwardness over coffee? Leave me a message at my Google voice — 509720-7612 — or email tcmang@live.com.

CHEERS SURPRISE FLOWERS Cheers to Evergreen Florist on Monroe for the most gorgeous floral arrangement I’ve ever seen. Also, apologies to the delivery person for my less than friendly reception. I still haven’t recovered from pandemic-induced anxiety about strangers approaching my front door, even those who carry beautiful blossoms. Your flower bouquet was truly lovely. LOVE OF MY LIFE Cheers to my man for being so strong and wonderful. You’re so handsome with your chocolate skin and honeysuckle eyes. I miss you so much and can’t wait for you to come home. Life isn’t the same without you, Papa Bear! FIREFIGHTERS ARE HEROES A big

thank you to all the firefighters from the West Plains, as well as the multiple surrounding communities and states for responding to the Andrus fire and saving our homes. I cannot put into words how thankful I am for all the hard work you are putting in this summer. You are truly heroes.

URGENT CARE PROSELYTIZING Ma’am, when you’re done praying to your personal savior for “every one of you all,” take a moment and teach your teenage daughter that it’s rude to take pictures of strangers to post online as their kill of the day, or whatever that was. CONSTITUTIONAL CHERRY-PICKING SHERIFFS OF THE INLAND NORTHWEST Dear Ozzie, am comforted to know you’ll zealously enforce 3.70% of the 27 amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Immediately upon the U.N. black helicopters, or the Illuminati, or whoever showing up to confiscate my guns you’ll gat a speed-dialed call from me. Oh, by the way, I too am unconcerned or unaware of the “A well regulated militia” part. MONOTONE MORRISON What is with everyone backing this guy?? Sorry, but he had his season, got drafted and tanked. Then he is the “color guy” for the Zags and stinks at that, too. Hudson is so much better and Adam adds... yea that was a great pass:( Now...this Perimeter podcast is trash! Again...”yea, yea”...nothing to add! DULL, BORING and completely monotone. He needs a new gig...OFF the air.

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

G iv eGuide PEOPLE NATURE COMMUNITY HEALTH

40 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

using a boat trailer (which requires a bit of skill even without people lingering about the launch). True, some of these dullards continue swimming and fishing, letting their toddlers play within feet of my moving trailer, but they are not likely to read this, so that’s that. It’s you, my fellow outdoors people,

You spread and repeated disinformation, fan-girled Gym Jordan and MTG, and lied about wind and solar power.

JEERS

SOUND OFF

QATHY MCMORRIS RODGERS AND HER FAKE TOWN HALL I was at your staged “town hall” on 08/02. You gave Spokane two days notice; however, you emailed your MAGA/Q cult and private donors weeks ago, to fill the limited seats. You raffled the questions, knowing they’d be rhetoric and lots of

asspats. YOU DIDN’T: encourage vaccination and masks, or correct disinformation about The Big Lie. You spread and repeated disinformation, fan-girled Gym Jordan and MTG, and lied about wind and solar power. When I heard your rendition of HR1 and Section 230, I was floored. I was the only person in Spokane that asked you about opposing the bipartisan 1/6 commission and if you are vaccinated. I’m not the only person that finds your seditious cult insanity disgusting. The proud boys sitting behind me were truly pleased with your performance. BONUS JEERS to Dr. Velazquez, the simp who sat front row and didn’t correct any of the hourlong Q-palooza. He was unmasked and quiet as a mouse. What a turd. BOAT LAUNCH ETIQUETTE OK, it’s quite apparent that kayaking and paddle boarding are increasingly popular pastimes, bringing hundreds more people to area waters. That’s awesome. But with this influx comes the issue of knowing the procedure for putting your watercraft in and taking it out of a lake or river while using an official launch. There have always been people who ignore the “No Swimming / No Fishing” signs at these sites. Despite these scofflaws, they usually get the hell out of the way when I’m trying to put in or take out my small fishing boat

who I’m addressing. The most common behavior I’ve dealt with is kayakers who bring their vehicle to the launch (which is fine — I get it — some people don’t have the strength to carry the kayak to the water), but then basically set up their whole goddamed day right there! I’m talking bags, coolers, paddles, flotation devices, fishing gear...whatever floats their boat! People! Do that shit on the side, not ON the boat ramp when you clearly see another person waiting to put in or take out! That is incredibly inconsiderate. The launch is for launching and taking the boat out of the water — not strapping down your shit, not reminiscing on how great the day was, not eating lunch (yes, I’ve seen you do this too). Plan ahead, have all your gear in place, carry what you can, move quickly and safely, but GET THE HELL OUT OF THE WAY! n

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NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Get involved and give back! This annual issue highlights many of the region’s non-profit organizations, and the difference they are making in our community. GET YOUR NON-PROFIT NOTICED! Reserve your Give Guide listing by August 19th

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EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

CARING FOR KIDS The annual Caring 4 Kids fundraising dinner supports the many children in Morning Star’s residential, foster care, case aide and in-home care programs. The event features a night of wine by El Corazon paired with dinner, plus live music, and dessert. Aug. 6, 5:309:30 pm. $150. Historic Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. morningstarboysranch.org CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION Join Orchard Ridge to celebrate 100 years in Coeur d’Alene. Boarding begins at 1:30, with a 1:45 departure for the Historic J.C White House. The cruise features entertainment by Kathy Colton. Call 208-6648119 to purchase your tickets. Aug. 8, 1:30-4 pm. $100/person. (208-664-8119) POOLSIDE YOGA ON THE FARM Enjoy an hour long, all-levels welcome, outdoor yoga class overlooking Higher Ground Animal Sanctuary. Pre-registration required. Ages 7+. Aug. 8 and Aug. 22, 9 am. $15. Higher Ground Animal Sanctuary, 16602 N. Day Mt. Spokane Rd. highergroundanimalsanctuary.org

COMEDY

BILL ENGVALL Comedian, actor and writer Bill Engvall, best known for his work on Blue Collar Comedy Tour and Them Idiots Whirled Tour, returns to Coeur d’Alene Casino. Aug. 5, 7 pm. $40+. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S. Nukwalqw. cdacasino.com TAYLOR TOMLINSON When Taylor’s new hour-long Netflix special, “Quarter Life Crisis,” debuted in February 2020, she added another red-letter win to her already impressive comedic resume. Aug. 5, 7:30 pm, Aug. 6, 7:30 & 10:30 pm and Aug. 7, 7:30 & 10:30 pm. $25-$35. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998) RODNEY CARRINGTON As one of the top 10 highest-grossing touring comedians for the past 10 years, Carrington’s mingling of comedy and country music has him on track to continue that trend. Aug. 6, 7:30 pm. $49/$59/$79. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (509-242-7000) SAFARI Blue Door’s version of “Whose Line,” a fast-paced improv show. Ages 16+. Reservations recommended. Saturdays from 7:30-9 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (509-747-7045) BOBCAT GOLDTHWAIT Bobcat’s stand up features hilarious riffs on politics, divorce and his career as a writer and director of film. His show is a wild ride of fun finding the funny no matter what the situation. Aug. 13, 7:30 & 10:30 pm and Aug. 14, 7:30 & 10:30 pm. $20-$28. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998)

COMMUNITY

ROOTS OF WISDOM Children and families can discover the unique partnership between cutting-edge western science and traditional knowledge of indigenous peoples. Exhibit designed and produced by the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. Through Sept. 5; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm. $5-$12. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (509-456-3931) 76TH ANNIVERSARY OF HIROSHIMA AND NAGASAKI: GATHERING FOR A NUCLEAR FREE WORLD Meet on the steps on the north side of the First Interstate Center for the Arts for an open-

mic format for this annual remembrance event. Aug. 6, 5-6 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. spokaneriverfrontpark.com (509-389-5965) FIRST FRIDAY LAWN PARTY Each First Friday, the Longshot hosts DJs, local vendors, artists and makers on the front lawn. There’s also an outdoor camper bar with beer and wine. First Fridays from 4-11 pm. Free. The Longshot, 102 S. Boyer Ave., Sandpoint. longshotsandpoint.com HILLYARD FESTIVAL The three-day community event features the 109th HiJinx Parade, live entertainment, a beer garden, vendor fair, fireworks, a car show, wrestling and more. Most events are in Harmon Park. This year’s parade theme is “Hillyard Rocks.” See complete schedule and lineup on event website and/or Facebook page. Aug. 6-8. Free. hillyardfestival.com BAZAAR In addition to hundreds of locally made goods available at this annual arts mark, this year’s Bazaar includes a beer garden from Flatstick Pub and kids activities by the Botanical Alchemists inside at River Park Square. Aug. 7, 11 am-9 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane terrainspokane.com/bazaar KIDS ART IN THE PARK The Rotary Club of Colville is hosting four 20-min. classes: drumming, rock art, clogging and clay. One of the classes will produce a group art project gifted to the city for display. Aug. 7, 10 am. $6.24. Yep Kanum Park, 356 E. Dominion Ave. (509-684-3086) STEPS FOR AUTISM This annual event brings the community together in support and celebration of those touched by autism and their families. The event is hosted by the The ISAAC Foundation, Northwest Autism Center and Autism Society of Washington Spokane Chapter. Proceeds help support those touched by autism in the local area. Aug. 8, 11 am-2 pm. Free-$15. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. stepsforautism.org MONDAY FUNDAY Riverfront Park is hosting fun activities for kids every Monday all summer. The full summer schedule is as follows: Storytime at the North Bank (Aug. 9 from 10-11:30 am); Chalk Walk at the Central Promenade (Aug. 16, 11 am-2 pm). Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontspokane (509-625-6600) MONDAY FUNDAY: STORYTIME AT THE NORTH BANK Join your favorite librarians for storytime at the North Bank Shelter across from the Ice Age Floods Playground. Aug. 9, 11 am. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. (509-444-5300) SPOKANE COUNTY INTERSTATE FAIR JOB FAIR Fill out an application at interstairfair.org, then grab your ID and Social Security card and head to the fair office for an in-person interview. The 2021 fair is Sept. 10-19. Aug. 9, 2-6 pm. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. spokanecounty.org (509-477-1766) BIRDS OF A FEATHER DAY A special summertime family day at the MAC, with programming in support of the museum’s current traveling exhibit “American Original: The Life and Work of John James Audubon.” Activities include a live falcon presentation, bird sketching with artist Megan Perkins, and information on local birds from the Spokane Audubon Society. Aug. 12, 11 am. $5-$12. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) WALLACE HUCKLEBERRY FESTIVAL The annual community festival celebrating all things huckleberry includes a 5K fun run, vendor fair, live music, activities, a pancake breakfast, pie eating contest

and more. Aug. 13-14. Wallace, Idaho. wallacehuckfest.com 90S/Y2K MURDER MYSTERY When the clock strikes midnight at the turn of the millennium, experts have warned that computers will misread the year and kill us all – or at least something along those lines. Tensions are high, moods are foul, and the end of the world might be on the horizon. Optional social hour at 5 pm. Aug. 14, 6-10 pm. $29-$79. Crime Scene Entertainment, 1701 N. Fourth St, CdA. (208-369-3695) ATOMIC THREADS BOUTIQUE GRAND RE-OPENING Visit the local shop’s new storefront and enjoy entertainment from local performers, including live music from Molly Starlite, The Sputniks and Touch of Evil, as well as a car show with the Miss Shifters Car Club. The Bombshell Revue also provides live entertainment from 2:30-4 pm. Aug. 14. Free. Atomic Threads Boutique, 1905 N. Monroe St. fb.me/e/EM37HUgr (5099544757)

FESTIVAL

DEPARTURE FESTIVAL A live music event in a safe environment for all, while supporting the health of our planet and encouraging social consciousness and responsibility. Lineup includes: Nattali Rize, Tim Snider & Wolfgang Timber, Amber Lily, Jus Wright, The Shift River City Roots, Dead Man’s Gold, Whensday, Anthony Ray and more. Camping is included with weekend pass; children 14 and under are free. See website for more information. Aug. 6-8. $65. Happy Meadows Venue, 5470 Hwy. 231. musicbytheshift.com/departurefestival LOCALFEST LocalFest celebrates the talent of the Inland Northwest by bringing together a diverse group of vendors, musicians, food trucks and more. Highlights include 100+ vendors, all day music, international cuisine, fair food, lawn games, beer garden, inflatables and more. Aug. 8, 11 am-8 pm. $5. Greyhound Park & Event Center, 5100 Riverbend Ave. gpeventcenter.com

FILM

IN THE HEIGHTS A film version of the Broadway musical in which Usnavi, a sympathetic New York bodega owner, saves every penny every day as he imagines and sings about a better life. Aug. 5-7 at 7 pm, Aug. 8 at 4 pm. $3-$7. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy. org (208-882-4127) DRIVE-IN SUMMER MOVIES: CARS Two summer movies, sponsored in part by WSECU. Parking available 90 minutes before sunset. Aug. 6; showtime at sunset. $5/car. Valley Mission Park, 11123 E. Mission Ave. spokanevalley.org/driveinmovie MOVIES IN THE PARK A family-friendly event every Friday through Aug. 27, in Sally’s Park. All movies begin at sundown. Bring blankets and lawn chairs. Snacks and drinks are available for a modest price, all proceeds benefit The Salvation Army’s local youth programs. Free. The Salvation Army Spokane, 222 E. Indiana Ave. salvationarmyspokane.org VANDAL SUMMER CINEMA SERIES Classic throwbacks, suspenseful action and comedies are center stage for the University of Idaho’s Summer Cinema series. Half of this year’s movies are part of the Screen on the Green series on the Theophilus Tower Lawn; the other half are at the Moscow Drive-In at the ASUIKibbie Activity Center parking lot (Lot

57). Each movie starts at approximately 9 pm, primarily on Fridays through Aug. 20. Free. uidaho.edu/summercinema YOUTH V GOV: FILM SCREENING & PANEL DISCUSSION YOUTH v GOV is the story of America’s youth taking on the world’s most powerful government. Armed with a wealth of evidence, 21 courageous leaders file a ground-breaking lawsuit against the U.S. government, asserting it has willfully acted over six decades to create the climate crisis, thus endangering their constitutional rights to life, liberty, and property. If these young people are successful, they will not only make history, they will change the future. Aug. 9, 5:30-8 pm. Free. facebook.com/ events/852177895720897 ICE AGE MOVIE MARATHON Join Riverfront Park for a movie marathon featuring the five-movie animated series. Movies show on Wednesday evenings at the Ice Age Floods Playground. Aug. 11, 8-10 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontspokane MET LIVE IN HD: TOSCA (2018) Soprano Anna Netrebko, whom the New York Times hailed as “magnificent” when she made her role debut as Tosca in 2018, returns to cinemas in this filmed performance as Puccini’s explosive diva. This live cinema transmission is part of the Met’s award-winning Live in HD series, bringing opera to more than 2,200 theaters in more than 70 countries worldwide. Aug. 11, 6-9 pm. $12. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org

FOOD & DRINK

FOOD TRUCK FRIDAYS: Head to Wall Street every Friday this summer to enjoy a variety of local food trucks and entertainment. Appearances by: Mixed Plate, Skewers, Crate, One Night Stand, D. Lish’s, Mangia, Mac Daddy’s, Toby’s BBQ, Tacos Camargo, Crepe Cafe Sisters, Daily Bread, Farmer’s Daughter, Ben & Jerry’s and Bombshell Sweets. Fridays from 11 am-2 pm through Sep. 24. Downtown Spokane. downtownspokane.org RIDE & DINE Every Friday in July and August, enjoy a scenic gondola ride, live music and a savory mountaintop barbecue. Lift ticket is included in the price; also includes an option to mountain bike back down the mountain. Fridays from 3-7 pm through Aug. 27. $8-$55. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. silvermt.com (208-783-1111) ROCKET WINE CLASS Rocket Market hosts weekly wine classes; sign up in advance for the week’s selections. Fridays at 7 pm. Price varies. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com WINE TASTING Taste August selections from Vino’s Wine of the Month Club. Includes cheese and crackers. Aug. 6, 3-6:30 pm. $10. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington St. vinowine.com VISTA HOUSE BEVERAGE SERVICE Enjoy the views from the historic Vista House while sipping a beer for this first-ever summer event. Each Saturday in August, staff from Mt. Spokane provide beverage service at the summit, featuring seasonal selections from local breweries, plus snacks. Saturdays from 12-6 pm through Aug. 28. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (509-238-2220) WINE TASTING Taste six biodynamic wines from around the world. Includes cheese and crackers. Aug. 7, 2-4:30 pm. $10. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington St. vinowine.com (509-838-1229) AMONG THE PINES BEER FESTIVAL A

beer festival in the woods at Precious Things Fermentation Project’s property. All ticket proceeds support the LiveLikeLara Foundation and include a 500ml bottle of a barrel-aged collaboration wild ale from YaYa Brewing and Precious Things, unlimited small pours from 10+ local breweries, a branded 13-oz Belgian beer glass, access to food trucks and live music from Buffalo Jones. Aug. 8, 12-4 pm. $60. livelikelara.org/events THE UNION PRESENTS: YOGA & MIMOSAS This summer event series includes a one-hour vinyasa flow followed by mimosas of choice. Meet us on the Brick West patio across from the new Union West location. Pre-registration required. 21+. Upcoming events on Aug. 8 and Aug. 22, 10 am. $20. Brick West Brewing Co., 1318 W. First. brickwestbrewingco.com RIVERFRONT EATS FOOD TRUCK SERIES The outdoor food truck series in the park happens Tuesdays through Aug. 31 from 11 am-2 pm. Each week features a new lineup of locally owned food trucks. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontspokane CHEERS FOR KIDS A four-course beer pairing dinner to raise funds for Vanessa Behan, a safe shelter for kids in crisis situations. This year’s event has transformed from an in-person gathering into an athome tasting experience complete with a gourmet four-course meal and 32-ounce beer “crowlers.” The meal is a collaboration by local restaurateur Ricky Webster of Rind & Wheat, Noreen Hiskey of Inland Curry and Sysco’s culinary expert Dane Rice. Each course is paired with local brews from Perry Street Brewing. The event begins with curbside meal pick-up at 2230 E. Sprague Ave., in the Vanessa Behan parking lot. Ticket sales close Aug. 5 or until sold out. Aug. 12. $75-$100. vanessabehan.org/cheers PARTY ON THE PATIO Monthy summer parties on the patio, co-hosted by the Inlander and Three Peaks Kitchen with live music, lots of food and drink specials, giveaways and more. Aug. 12, 5-8 pm. Free. Three Peaks Kitchen + Bar, 14300 W. SR Highway 2. inlander.com/PartyonthePatio (509-818-1547)

MUSIC

BROWNE’S ADDITION SUMMER CONCERTS: RUSTY & GINGER A series of three summer concerts, presented by the Browne’s Addition Neighborhood Council. Aug. 5, 6-8 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Park, 300 S. Chestnut. facebook.com/ BrownesAddition OPERA NIGHT AT THE MAC Inland Northwest Opera (INO) performs selections from the opera and musical theatre repertoire on the MAC lawn. Featuring internationally acclaimed performers, this one-night-only event brings back a treasured annual tradition to the Museum with a twist: Inland Northwest Opera’s newly debuted Opera Truck, a mobile music venue. Bring a face mask, and lawn chair or blanket to sit on, and come early to visit the museum galleries (admission applies) or store. Aug. 6, 7 pm. Free; donations accepted. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. sales. northwestmuseum.org FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT: FAMILY MATINEE & GRAND FINALE The Festival at Sandpoint’s grand finale (7:30 pm) and family matinee (1 pm) with performances by the Spokane Symphony and special guest Broadway singer Whitney Claire Kaufman. Aug. 8. $10-$40. War Memorial Field, 855 Ontario. festivalatsandpoint.com/grand-finale

AUGUST 5, 2021 INLANDER 41


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess BRAWL STRAPS

AMY ALKON

I’m a woman in my early 20s. The guy I’m dating brought me to meet his friends. His male friends were warm and friendly. The women were awful. One deliberately kept saying my name wrong (it’s not exactly exotic), and two others glared at my miniskirt. Another said something about how low-cut my top was. She made it sound like a compliment, but it was a mean dig. How can these women be so nasty when they don’t even know me? How do I diffuse situations like these? — ­ Upset

Nothing like women celebrating other women: “Way to go, girl! Showing everything but your areolas.” When a man has a beef with another man, he’ll be direct about it: hurl insults at the guy’s face and maybe try to renovate his jaw with a barstool. Women fight sneaky-dirty with other women, using covert tactics, explains psychologist Anne Campbell. These include mobilizing a group of women to ostracize a woman, talking trash to men about her looks and how “loose” she is, and offering “compliments” that are actually nasty digs. Give a woman’s confidence a beatdown and she might dim her shine (cover her miniskirt with a shawl and wipe that sexy red lipstick off on her sleeve). Psychologist Tracy Vaillancourt separated female research participants into random groups. She compared one group’s reactions to a 20-something woman walking into a classroom dressed “conservatively” (in a loosely fitting shirt and khaki slacks) with the other group’s reactions to the same woman dressed “provocatively” (in a very short skirt and a tight, low-cut shirt). Dressed conservatively, she was “barely noticed by the participants.” When she entered in skin-baring sexywear, almost all the women “aggressed against her.” They rolled their eyes at her, gave her “once-overs,” and shot her “death stares.” After she left, many laughed at her, ridiculed her appearance, and/or suggested she was a man-hopping sleaze. You’re a target for the she-hyenas whenever you wear sexy clothing and makeup (like an intense smoky eye with winged eyeliner). Decide whether you have the emotional strength and social capital to bear the glares and backbiting, or whether you need to, say, stock up on some floor-length prairie dresses. This isn’t to say you should immediately assume the worst of all women. However, understanding what you can expect from some might help you stand tall in the face of an attack ­— remembering that it’s about them, not about you, when they imply that your bedroom’s visitors log rivals Ellis Island’s.

QUARANTINE WOLF

I’m a guy in my 30s. Before COVID, I used Tinder to hook up with different women a few times a week. I don’t recognize myself anymore. Yesterday, I was on a date, and the girl was really hot and wanted to go back to my place to have sex. I was weirdly turned off by the idea and called her an Uber home. This isn’t like me, but it keeps happening. Why am I suddenly like this? ­—Worried If we hadn’t gotten vaccines, we might’ve seen a whole new category of lingerie, a la Victoria’s Crotchless Hazmat Suit. Our body’s immune system protects us by mobilizing warrior cells to fight off invaders like bacteria, parasites, and viruses that cause infectious diseases. However, war is costly — ­ whether between nations or inside us. Psychologist Mark Schaller notes that our body’s effort to surround and kill “pathogenic intruders” sucks up calories needed for important bodily functions. It can also be “temporarily debilitating” due to “fever, fatigue, and other physiological consequences of an aggressive immunological response.” (You sometimes have to boil the village alive to save the village.) To avoid these costs, we need to avoid being exposed to disease in the first place. Helping us do that is the job of our “behavioral immune system.” This is Schaller’s term for a suite of psychological mechanisms that function as our early warning system, helping us identify signs of pathogens in our social environment and motivating us to feel, think, and behave in ways that keep us from getting invaded by the buggers. For example, social psychology grad student James B. Moran and his adviser, social psychologist Damian Murray, find that reminding research participants of the looming threat of infectious disease puts a damper on the appeal of casual sex and their inclination to have it down the road. Chances are this response explains your own psychological and behavioral shift: stud-turned-monk of COVID-19. There’s no clock on exactly when you’ll be back to your sexual-Wild West self. Should you get nostalgic, keep in mind that you can still dip into some elements of the hookuppy old days, such as “the walk of shame” ­— though, these days, that’s what we call it when you get yelled at by the old lady down the street for taking out the trash unmasked. n ©2021, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

42 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

MUSIC ON MONDAYS CONCERT SERIES: CROOKED KILT An outdoor concert at the library featuring the band Crooked Kilt. Bring chairs, snacks, and enjoy some music. Crooked Kilt performs a rich blend of tightly woven harmonies, interspersed with strands of harp, bagpipes, accordion and fiddle. Aug. 9, 6-7:30 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org (208-769-2315) SPOKANE SYMPHONY @ BRICK WEST Hang out on the West End Plaza at Brick West Brewing Co. with friends, a cold one and the Spokane Symphony. Featuring John Church & Friends, an ensemble of Spokane Symphony musicians. Aug. 11, 7 pm. $18; 18 and under free. Brick West Brewing Co., 1318 W. First Ave. spokanesymphony.org

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

RIVERFRONT MOVES: YOGA IN THE GARDEN Join BEYOUTIFUL Hot Yoga in the Sister Cities Garden (located NW of the orange bridge) for their free Yoga series in Riverfront Park. Thursdays from 8:30-9:30 am through Aug. 19. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.com COUPLES DATE NIGHT Tee up for date night with an option to stay the night at the resort and play again on Saturday. Come early to hit some balls and stay late for dinner. Aug. 6 and Aug. 20, 5 pm. $100. Circling Raven Golf Course, 27068 S. Highway 95. cdacasino.com SANDPOINT / BONNER COUNTY RODEO The PRCA Rodeo weekend at the Bonner County Fairgrounds. Aug. 6-7 at 7:30 pm, gates open at 6:30 pm. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Rd. bonnercountyfair.com COEUR D’ALENE TRIATHLON Options for the annual race include an Olympic distance triathlon, the scenic sprint and a duathlon. Race starts/ends in downtown Coeur d’Alene on the city beach. Aug. 7. $95+. Downtown Coeur d’Alene, Sherman Ave. cdatriathlon.com LONG BRIDGE SWIM The 26th annual event is back, after a one-year pause. The 1.76 mile swim goes from the south end of Sandpoint’s historic Long Bridge to the north end. Spectators can watch swimmers progress as they make their way across Lake Pend O’Reille. The swim raises funds to support swim lessons in the greater Sandpoint Area. Aug. 7. $55. longbridgeswim.org SPIKE & DIG Founded in 1992, Spike & Dig has grown into one of the world’s largest outdoor co-ed, 6-on-6 volleyball tournaments with over 360 teams and 2,500 players. Aug. 6-7. $200$230/team. Dwight Merkel Sports Complex, 5701 N. Assembly St. spikeanddig.com SPOKANE MIDNIGHT CENTURY The annual unsupported, 100-mile midnight bike ride departs from the Elk. No registration, no swag, no support. See complete details at link. Aug. 7, 11:59 pm. Free. The Elk Public House, 1931 W. Pacific Ave. midnightcentury.com BRITBULL The Inland Northwest’s largest All-British car and motorcycle show with trophies awarded in 19 categories. One hundred classic vehicles are displayed at Grant Park, with food shops nearby. Registration is $20/car. Aug. 8, 9 am-3 pm. Grant Park, 1015 S. Arthur St. northwestbritishclassics.com HUCKLEBERRY COLOR FUN RUN & WALK Run or walk through the forest around the mountain and get covered

with color tossed by the forest urchins. This family event offers a 2.5K or 5K course. All participants receive a custom multi-use bandana/face covering, gourmet hotdog lunch, sunglasses, powder pack for the color toss and a complimentary lift ticket for after the run. Aug. 8, 10 am. $32-$45. Schweitzer, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555) CIRCLING RAVEN FAMILY DAY Bring the whole family out for a round of nine or 18 holes of golf. Juniors play free with a paying adult and are entered into our drawing for a free golf lesson. Aug. 9, 12-4 pm. Circling Raven Golf Course, 27068 S. Highway 95. cdacasino.com CLASS & A GLASS A guided yoga class for any skill level, held outdoors under the vineyard tent. Also includes live music, bottled water, keepsake glass and one glass of wine, with food available to purchase on site. BYO yoga mat. Attendees must pre-register. 21+ Aug. 10, 5:30 pm. $38. Arbor Crest Wine Cellars, 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. arborcrest. com/class-and-a-glass (509-927-8571) RIVERFRONT MOVES: PILATES AT THE CLOCK TOWER Pilates is a whole-body workout focusing on core integration, shoulder stability, lower body strength and power and joint mobility. Tues. days from 10-11 am through Aug. 24. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontspokane WEDNESDAYS IN THE WOODS A sixweek series of outdoor learning events hosted by the Riverside State Park Foundation, including sessions on cycling (Aug. 4), minimum impact recreation (Aug. 4), plants and animals in the park (Aug. 11), hiking in the Inland NW (Aug. 18) and music and horses in the park (Aug. 25). Wednesdays from 6:308:30 pm, July 21-Aug. 25. Event locations vary, details and registration at rei.com/learn. Discover Pass is required to visit the park. Riverside State Park, Spokane. Register at rei.com/learn

THEATER

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM Spokane Parks & Rec is partnering with the Spokane Shakespeare Society to bring the inaugural season of Shakespeare in the Park to Riverfront this summer, featuring free, family-friendly performances. Shows are Aug. 6-29; Thu-Sat at 6:30 pm and Sun at 2 pm. Seating begins 30 minutes prior to showtime. Free. Pavilion at Riverfront, 574 N. Howard St. spokaneshakespearesociety.org LITTLE RED RIDING HOOD: A CHILD’S OPERA This adaptation of the children’s classic features a reimagining of the Big Bad Wolf as a lovable character who hates sweets, as well as the everfamiliar Little Red who just wishes she had listened to her mother. Performed by Inland NW Opera. Aug. 9, 3-4:30 & 6-7:30 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontspokane (509-625-6600) AUDITIONS: INTO THE WOODS Audition for a role in Theater Arts Center at the Lake’s fall production of “Into the Woods,” directed by Dominique Betts. Open to all ages, come prepared with a one-minute song with accompaniment track or sheet music (no vocals on tracks). Aug. 15-16 at 6:30 pm. TAC at the Lake, 22910 E. Appleway Ave. facebook.com/TACatthelake/ MUSIC VALLEY A new musical with jazz and opera by Madeline McNeill, and lyrics by Ellen Welcker. Bring a picnic to Olmsted Brothers Green in Kendall Yards. Music Valley is performed by

an all-female ensemble of singers, a double bass player, a marimbaist and a dancer. Aug. 15, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Olmsted Brothers Green, N. Nettleton St. and Summit Pkwy. kendallyards.com

VISUAL ARTS

FIRST FRIDAY Art galleries and businesses across downtown Spokane and beyond host monthly receptions to showcase new displays of art. Aug. 6 from 5-8 pm. Additional details at firstfridayspokane.org. CARICATURE WITH TOM QUINN In this workshop, learn ways to exaggerate and simplify an individual’s distinctive features to depict someone in a way that’s both funny and instantly recognizable. Aug. 7, 9-11 am. $40. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland Ave. spokaneartschool.net (509-325-1500) ART, ANIMALS AND GARDEN WITH KIT JAGODA This class allows students to explore a variety of art techniques and media in the presence of the rescued animals who call River’s Wish home. Session meet Mon-Fri from 9 am-noon and begins Aug. 9. $165. River’s Wish Animal Sanctuary, 11511 W. Garfield Rd. spokaneartschool.net MEDIEVAL ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPTS: BESTIARY WITH HANNAH CHARLTON Join artist Hannah Charlton to create tiny medieval-style paintings using gouache and plant-based parchment. Meets Aug. 10 and 17 from 9-11:30 am. $65. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland Ave. spokaneartschool.net

WORDS

SPOKANE AUTHORS & SELF-PUBLISHERS MEETING Join local authors of all ages and various levels of accomplishment to network, learn about publishing and promotion, and make new friends who understand the writing life. Aug. 5, 2-4 pm. Purchase of buffet lunch or drink required. Golden Corral Buffet, 7117 N. Division. spokaneauthors.org (509-468-1895) 3 MINUTE MIC Auntie’s long-running first Friday poetry open mic continues via Zoom. Readers can share up to three minutes’ worth of poetry. Open to all ages, though this is a free speech event. Zoom link information available one hour prior on Auntie’s website and on Facebook. First Fri. of every month, 7-8 pm. Free. auntiesbooks.com GROW WILD WITH KATY BOWMAN l. If you’ve coped with looking at devices all year, Katy Bowman’s “Grow Wild” will strike you as a gentle, cautionary guide about kids’ “super-sedentary” environments, and how it’s countercultural, yet urgent, to start changing these. Come with a blanket/camp chair and a face mask. Aug. 9, 7-8 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Park, 300 S. Chestnut St. auntiesbooks.com BROKEN MIC Spokane’s longest-running weekly poetry open mic, makes its live return to Neato Burrito. All ages, however, this is a free speech event. Wednesdays from 6:30-9 pm. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. (509-847-1234) QUARANTINE LIFE FROM CHOLERA TO COVID-19 For this virtual event with local author Kari Nixon, we’ll be discussing her book “Quarantine Life from Cholera to Covid-19: What Pandemics Teach Us About Parenting Work, Life, and Communites from the 1700’s to today.” Register online. Aug. 12, 7-8 pm. Free. auntiesbooks.com (509-8380206)


DRINKS

Too Much To Ask? Cannabis-infused beverages have yet to make the leap into shareable sizes BY WILL MAUPIN

I We can make this easier for everyone.

nfused beverages have quickly become my favorite way to consume cannabis, especially during this sweltering, smoky summer. That said, there’s something missing in Washington’s cannabis market, and it bums me out. Once upon a time, in the not so distant past, there weren’t cannabis products like there are now. There was the weed you could get from a black market dealer, and that was about it. Legalization has led to an explosion of cannabis products, so this bit of complaining is quite ...continued on next page

AUGUST 5, 2021 INLANDER 43


DRINKS

GREEN ZONE

NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a five-year sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

44 INLANDER AUGUST 5, 2021

“TOO MUCH TO ASK?,” CONTINUED... possibly the result of being spoiled by an ever-expanding marketplace. Regardless, I want to be able to consume cannabis beverages the way we consume alcoholic beverages like beer, wine and cocktails. Shop around any dispensary in the region and you’ll find countless beverages, in all kinds of flavors and forms, but there’s one giant hole in the offerings. They’re all incredibly strong, or they’re on the opposite end of the spectrum and will produce a microscopic high at most. You can grab a six pack of beers or a bottle of wine on your way home from work and split it with some friends over the course of an evening. You can get a nice, relaxing buzz without getting overwhelmingly intoxicated. As far as I’ve been able to find, looking far and wide around the Inland Northwest, there aren’t any cannabis products that allow for the same. You can find plenty of 12-ounce bottles with 100 milligrams of THC, but that’s not something to sip on over an evening. For a casual user, you’re getting pretty stoned off a one-ounce mini-gulp. You can walk into a grocery store and walk out with a $3 can of 50-milligram CBD seltzer — I’m drinking one as I write this story — but throw back the whole thing and your achy muscles might ease up, but you won’t get high in the slightest. There aren’t many, if any, options available that are built to be slowly sipped with friends around a backyard barbecue. What I want is a six pack of infused beverages with, say, three milligrams of THC per can. Or a wine-bottle sized product with 30 milligrams that can be poured and shared around a meal. Something you can enjoy a few servings of while catching a mild, easy high and avoiding feeling like one of those “when the edible hits” memes. Maybe I’m a spoiled consumer, but I think that would be great. n


NEW!

GREEN ZONE

Marijuana use increases the risk of lower grades and dropping out of school. Talk with your kids.

GET THE FACTS at learnaboutmarijuanawa.org

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AUGUST 5, 2021 INLANDER 47


Cultural Tours & Events

Experience one of our cultural tours or workshops to learn about the language, stories and traditions of the Coeur d’Alene tribe all while being surrounded by the stunning beauty and serenity of our premier resort. For more information and to view upcoming events, scan the QR Code or visit us in person at our new Cultural Tours & Events office, located in the walkway between Chinook Crafted by Adam Hegsted and Spa Ssakwa’q’n.

Lifeways Workshop “Make Your Own” Bead Wrapped Rope Necklace OR 2 Bracelets

Kayaking & Canoeing Tour WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 18 TH | 9 AM – 3 PM | $60 PER PERSON On this tribal-guided tour, you will depart Chatcolet Day Use Area and paddle up to Plummer Marsh. You’ll enjoy wildlife viewing and bird watching while learning the history of the Coeur d’Alene Tribe, Trail of the Coeur d’Alenes and Heyburn State Park. Vessels, life jackets and lunch included.

FRIDAY, AUGUST 6TH | 2 PM – 8 PM | $45 PER PERSON This is a 6 hour hands-on workshop that is guided by Coeur d’Alene Tribal member artist Leanne Campbell. You will “make your own” bead wrapped rope necklace or 2-bracelets. Leanne will instruct you through this authentic Coeur d’Alene Tribal traditional art workshop. All materials are provided and dinner is included.

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