Inlander 08/04/2022

Page 1

COOL OFF

VOLUNTEERS STEP UP DURING HEATWAVE PAGE 12

COMING HOME

COME FROM AWAY ARRIVES IN SPOKANE PAGE 18

CHEFS FOR HIRE A RESTAURANT EXPERIENCE AT HOME PAGE 28 AUGUST 4-10, 2022 | ANIMAL LOVERS SINCE 1993

a u o y e Ar n?’ o s r e ‘Dog p t inside… u Find o

PLUS! CHICKENS, CATS AND MORE! PAGE 20

“Who’s a good Girl?”


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ne of my best pandemic-era purchases was a Wi-Fi-linked home security camera for the living room. Not because I’m super worried about break-ins, but because ever since transitioning, about a year ago, from a solely work-from-home setup, I developed a serious case of separation anxiety from our cat, Dellie. I worried she would miss me, too, but most of the time when I log in to the “Dellie Cam” on my phone, she’s simply snoozing away in her favorite bed. I share this because I know I’m not alone in wanting to be around my best furry friend all the time. Pets are important members of countless families, which brings us to the fourth ever Inlander PET ISSUE! Inside is an update on a statewide rules change allowing canine companions on restaurant patios, how backyard chickens provide so much more than fresh eggs, reflections on becoming a “dog person” and a look at the heartbreaking recent surge in surrenders to the region’s animal shelters and rescues. Plus, meet some joy-spreading, Insta-famous local pets! Also in this week’s issue, I introduce a new size- and gender-inclusive fashion company in Spokane (page 14), Nate Sanford checks up on efforts to keep the city’s homeless community cool during the heat (page 12), and Seth Sommerfeld chats with Built to Spill’s bandleader, Doug Martsch (page 34). — CHEY SCOTT, associate editor

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INLANDER

SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO • INLANDER.COM THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. Please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x210 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email frankd@ inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia and is published at least twice per month. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2022, Inland Publications, Inc.

QUARANTINED: A DRAMATIC CONCERT VERSION

August 5th - 7th Bing Crosby Theatre

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

Jer McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Dan Nailen (x239) EDITOR

Chey Scott (x225) ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Derek Harrison (x248) CREATIVE DIRECTOR

IF YOU COULD HAVE ANY ANIMAL FOR A PET, WHAT WOULD YOU HAVE? CLAIRE MENZER Definitely a possum. They’re just good animals. Aren’t they gross? No. They get a bad rap, but they are a very good animal for the environment. They eat ticks at a super high rate, and they’re good for the little other tiny bugs. And they can’t get rabies — their body temperature is too cool. So, they aren’t gross. They just look mangey and weird.

Samantha Wohlfeil (x234) BREAKING NEWS EDITOR Daniel Walters (x263) SENIOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER Seth Sommerfeld (x250) MUSIC & SCREEN EDITOR

Nate Sanford (x282), Carrie Scozzaro (x232) STAFF WRITERS

Madison Pearson (x218)

RUNAR CAMP It would have to be like a bear or a lion because they just look so cozy, you know? Wouldn’t it be lovely? You see lions lying out on huge rocks in the sun — wouldn’t it be so nice to just snuggle up with that? I just don’t want to die, though. That’s the main issue.

LISTINGS EDITOR

Chris Frisella COPY CHIEF

Young Kwak, Erick Doxey PHOTOGRAPHERS

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Jason Baxter, Josh Bell, CMarie Fuhrman, Will Maupin CONTRIBUTORS

ADVERTISING Kristi Gotzian (x215) ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

MAGGIE THUNSELLE A tiger would be really cool. Is it because you would cuddle with it or because it would protect you? Both. It’s the best of both worlds.

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Kristina Smith (x223) EVENT & SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER Colleen Bell-Craig (x212), McKenna Fuhrman (x242) ADVERTISING ASSISTANTS

PRODUCTION Tom Stover (x265) PRODUCTION MANAGER

ASHLEY WALKER An elephant! To ride? To cuddle with? To cuddle, like to love on, because they’re so intuitive and they’re loving and kind. If you love on them, they will love on you back— they’re precious!

Todd Goodner (x231) GRAPHIC DESIGNER

OPERATIONS

AMBER JOHNSON

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I like the little baby monkeys, the tiny ones that will just sit and chill on your shoulder. Or a turtle… that’s gonna be my next tattoo!

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COMMENT | HISTORY

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Blast from the Past Penning a perfect “postcard narrative” from Spokane’s past BY INGA LAUREN

S

pokane is adding a new building to its skyline — The Warren — a 139-unit multifamily residential apartment building in the heart of downtown at the corner of Riverside and Browne. Edlen & Co, along with deChase Miksis, are the developers of this exciting new project. They see their goal of rooting the building in the surrounding neighborhood with a strong connection to past, present and future residents. The Warren has engaged Terrain to create, cultivate and curate the space through a variety of unique artist collaborations. One of these projects involves commissioning local writers from a variety of backgrounds, cultural identities and perspectives to write postcard narratives — short stories of historical fiction and nonfiction that draw connections between past, present and future inhabitants. As a writer, I thoroughly enjoyed and was challenged by the opportunity to compose one of these postcard narratives. I struggled with the word count (a mere 300ish) and embodying a character that’s distinct from myself yet

with whom I share some crossover and universal similarities. I hope you enjoy Nettie’s story, and I hope you forge your own connections to the feelings it evokes and to the land, city and people it’s meant to honor:

The 21st of June, 1898

Dearest William, I wish I was writin’ this whilst sipping piping hot tea, glancing out them fancy Pericord windahs, but things ain’t THAT different “out west.” Same fools sewing discord and division back home exist here too. Truth be told, at times I’m tickled by their mighty ignorance. As a midwife, who’s brought damn near 1000 souls of every hue into this world, I know that we enter and exit alike.


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I stay due west of downtown. Sure is nice to escape the noise and those causing it. Greedy desperate speculators trying to grab and gussy up land that ain’t theirs and that’s already gorgeous. The constant churn of expansion and extraction kicks up endless dirt, grit and dust. Those heathens are far too close to the crystalline river that flows right through this city. Spokane — the immemorial inhabitants tell me it means “Children of the sun,” and Will, I mean to tell ya that name is as beautiful as it is apt. Summer days stretch out long enough to make the night almost useless, since morning arrives smack dab in the dead of it. Deep gray slivers dominate the sky. Slowly, in the east, the sun rises in blazing auburn, orange, and crimson, spilling over dried grasses. Around mid-day, the heavens become an electric blue expanse, dappled with white puffs jutting up against jagged evergreen horizons. Evenings are near perfect. “The golden hour” hazily blankets us in warm molten copper that coats the hillside and houses overlooking the bluff. I swear, the sight is enough to stun anyone into some sacred kinda silence. And every now and again, we’re treated to a deliciously sweet sherbet swirled finale. When the day finally fades into inky darkness, I stop and think of you and the stories you once told me about them stars that come out just to twinkle. Then, I take solace in the knowledge that at least for a while, we shared the same sky. Love, Nettie

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HEALTH

Peer coaches with Peer Spokane can help people get on track. James Tillett is second from left. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

DETOX OPTIONS DWINDLING Addiction treatment in Spokane is growing less accessible BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

G

etting to the point where someone struggling with addiction is ready to seek treatment can be difficult. It can be even harder if withdrawal or detox treatment isn’t available to them once they’re ready to get sober. For those who need a bed while they’re assisted with withdrawal from substances, and who receive insurance through Medicaid (for those with low income), as many unhoused people do, Spokane currently has fewer bed options than it once had. Spokane Treatment and Recovery Services (STARS) had long operated 16 “sobering” beds where people could be brought in downtown while in crisis or in any state of inebriation, be given the chance to sober up, and then have a conversation with staff there about possible treatment options such as inpatient withdrawal management, says Ryan Kent, now the operations manager for STARS,

8 INLANDER AUGUST 4, 2022

and who worked with the sobering unit for at least 10 years. But insufficient funding from insurance companies made those beds financially unfeasible to keep staffed, Kent says. The 16 sobering beds at STARS’ downtown location at 105 W. Third Ave. were closed around September 2021. Compounding issues further, by May, STARS’ more intensive and financially feasible withdrawal management beds for detox, which were housed in a Spokane Countyowned building on Eighth Avenue, were closed. The rent from the county had gotten too high, Kent explains, so STARS has instead set to work remodeling its Third Avenue location to ultimately house those 16 withdrawal management beds. In the meantime, there are some beds available for sobering or withdrawal management at two treatment

houses STARS operates in other parts of the city (one for men, one for women), but particularly for those who need to sober up before deciding which treatment they want, there may be few options, Kent says. “We don’t want to have somebody who’s highly intoxicated around somebody who’s been sober three months,” Kent explains. “We try our best if we have a room we can isolate that person in, we will bring them in and they will be a sobering patient, basically, until we can get them into other services.” If those isolated beds aren’t available, people may be left to go through diversion services with police officers or hospitals. It can be tough to get people into detox when those options are limited, says James Tillett, a peer coach and peer services specialist for Peer Spokane, which pairs ...continued on page 10


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NEWS | HEALTH “DETOX OPTIONS DWINDLING,” CONTINUED... people with lived experience together with those who need help as they get sober, deal with mental health issues and sometimes cope with lifelong medical conditions. “That’s honestly a huge barrier right now,” Tillett says. “I’m only 18 months into recovery, so I have friends I run into in active addiction, and they’re like, ‘How do I get to where you are?’ The detox seems to be a big hindrance.” But while STARS works to build out its 16-bed withdrawal treatment unit, there are other forms of help available, including peer coaching, and by this fall, another large outpatient medication assisted treatment facility could open.

IMPORTANCE OF LIVED EXPERIENCE

Tillett says he understands some of the challenges of getting treatment firsthand. As someone who struggled with addiction for many years, relapsing after his mother passed away just as he was going to college for a psychology degree, he says he tried at various times to seek treatment but wound up being pushed away. For instance, there’s the time he tried to check in with a treatment facility when he was on work release, but when they asked who he was supposed to check in with and learned that he wasn’t ordered by the courts to be there, they told him he didn’t need to show up. “This was a person who had never done drugs and didn’t understand it. … She said, ‘You don’t have to be here,’ instead of being a former addict and realizing the person who wants to be there is who you probably hold onto instead of letting them go,” Tillett says. “It was a big miscalculation, and it was probably another 10 years after that before I actually got clean.” Through Peer Spokane, Tillett helps coordinate a network of peer coaches who can help those going through recovery, utilizing a harm reduction model. The idea is to keep people on the positive path of reducing and ultimately eliminating their substance use.

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“It’s working away from that everyday usage, and if you do have a slip up,” Tillett says, “that doesn’t mean you end a year’s worth of hard work.” For those who are looking for treatment to help with the first days of detox from drugs, it can be a challenge, Tillett says, because the only 24-hour option that appears available to most people is the hospital, where they may face stigma. “I know firsthand hospitals are very rude to a lot of people coming in off their drugs. They’re not trauma informed about how they talk to them and what they say to them,” Tillett says. “That causes this negativity around it to make it harder for individuals to be willing to go through that step.” People can also flag down police officers and get referred to treatment through Pioneer Human Services, he says, but that route can also look less appealing to some struggling with addiction. STARS does offer intake 24/7 for their withdrawal treatment beds that are operating out of their two residential houses, Kent says. People can call their main line at 509-570-7250 and select the option for withdrawal to start that process. Once the 16-bed withdrawal treatment unit is up and running on Third Avenue, Kent says that those beds, plus the ones currently operating in the residential units, will be able to fluctuate and provide some sobering options. For example, if only 10 beds are currently being used for detox, he says, the others could accept sobering patients. “It’s a vital service that we want to make sure we can provide as soon as possible,” Kent says. “We’re doing the best we can now to provide it with what we have.” Peer Spokane can also help people with other stages of regaining power in their life, Tillett says, from free assistance building

“I am so passionate because I utilized these services when I first got out of treatment myself. When we are isolated and going through our darkest times we think we’re the only ones going through these issues.”

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their résumé and applying for jobs to seeking help with housing and getting signed up for insurance and other services. Intake can be started online at PeerSpokane.org. “I am so passionate because I utilized these services when I first got out of treatment myself,” Tillett says. “When we are isolated and going through our darkest times we think we’re the only ones going through these issues. But as we interact with others that have very similar stories, we’re able to see we’re not as alone as we thought we were, and to develop that sense of community.”

OTHER OPTIONS

At 4:30 pm on Aug. 16, a virtual public hearing will be held by the Washington State Department of Health to accept public comments on the proposed “Spokane Treatment Center” at 82 E. Francis Ave. The center, which will be run by Oregon Recovery and Treatment Centers (ORTC), will offer an outpatient medication assisted treatment program for those dealing with opiate addiction. Depending on staffing, the goal would be to help between 300 and 500 patients at a time, says Kirsi Kirk-Lewis, director of systems management for ORTC. “We have been speaking with local business people and universities and realized there is a need,” Kirk-Lewis says. “We do operate a center in Richland, and through our contacts in the TriCities we became aware there was a need for additional treatment in Spokane as well.” People can participate in the public hearing online or public comments can be sent to OTPComments@doh.wa.gov before 5 pm Aug. 16. If all goes according to plan with licensing, the facility could be up and running by the end of October, Kirk-Lewis says. Compassionate Addiction Treatment of Spokane also offers medication-assisted treatment to people regardless of their housing situation, along with a slew of other peer and community-building resources. More information can be found at CATSpokane.org. n samanthaw@inlander.com

The Smithsonian Traveling Exhibit is Available to view through Saturday, August 20th

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NEWS | HEALTH

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Sweltering in Spokane During a week of brutal heat, community volunteers came together to fill gaps in the city’s emergency plan

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BY NATE SANFORD

L

ast year’s heat wave saw record-breaking temperatures of 109 degrees and at least 20 confirmed deaths in Spokane. To avoid a repeat of the suffering, the city adopted a new emergency ordinance that requires cooling shelters to be opened anytime temperatures are projected to be 95 degrees or higher for two or more consecutive days. In many ways, last week’s heat wave was the first test of the plan. On Monday, July 25, the city extended the hours of four libraries so people could use them to take refuge from the heat. The Spokane Transit Authority said people could ride for free if they told the driver they were on their way to one of the library cooling stations. The city also directed people to use the 19 splash pads and six pools located throughout the city. “We are fortunate to have fantastic public facilities that can stretch to meet the needs of our residents quickly when weather conditions become extreme,” Mayor Nadine Woodward said in a news release. But as temperatures began to climb, many community groups grew worried that the city’s response wouldn’t be enough. A number of nonprofit and community groups, including the Music, Art, Creativity (MAC) movement, Spokane Community Against Racism, Latinos in Spokane, the Spectrum Center and others, started working together under the name Cool Spokane to take matters into their own hands and keep people cool. The group put out calls for volunteers and donations on social media and began planning pop-up cooling stations across the city. One of the biggest problems with the libraries is that many unhoused people simply didn’t know they were an option, says Hadley Morrow, who volunteered with Cool Spokane during the heat wave. “It was shocking how many folks we ran across on the street who had no idea that libraries were available,” Morrow says, adding that those same people often told her they wouldn’t have wanted to go anyway. Many folks have pets, a large number of belongings or a deeply ingrained distrust that prevents them from using the libraries, Morrow says. Veronnica Hawkins volunteered to help Cool Spokane after seeing a call for help on social media. She worked for six days straight in brutal heat and says the tight-knit community made the experience incredibly worthwhile. Every morning, Hawkins and the other volunteers would show up to a spot on Martin Luther King Jr. Way and Division Street to start setting up the canopy and coolers. Throughout the day, various nonprofits and community groups would drop off supplies. The group passed out water bottles, food and spray bottles

so people could mist themselves down. Hawkins became known to people as the “famous peanut butter and jelly sandwich maker.” “It was really just a place where they could come get hydrated, eat some food, and really get some shade and get out of the heat,” Hawkins says. Hawkins estimates that the tent served between 300 and 500 people over the course of the week. The majority were unhoused or otherwise vulnerable to the heat. Many unhoused people ended up volunteering to help run the cooling station, Hawkins says. Hawkins says her tent didn’t see any serious medical emergencies, but they did see a lot of people who were suffering from dehydration or who hadn’t eaten in days. She’s not sure what they would have done if it wasn’t for Cool Spokane. During the week, Cool Spokane ended up raising around $5,000, which allowed them to operate five cooling stations daily in various parts of the city. Morrow says Cool Spokane ended up distributing over 6,000 pounds of ice, 7,000 water bottles, and hundreds of sandwiches and snacks.

A

t Camp Hope, a homeless encampment in the East Central neighborhood with more than 600 residents, volunteers also took matters into their own hands. On Tuesday, organizers with Jewels Helping Hands, a nonprofit that isn’t directly affiliated with Cool Spokane, began building a large cooling shelter with fans, swamp coolers and space for 150 people. Camp Hope is a mile away from the nearest library. Julie Garcia, executive director of Jewels Helping Hands, says that even with free bus fare, most residents aren’t willing to make the trip because they’re worried about theft if they leave their tents unattended. The city’s plan for unhoused people to travel to libraries doesn’t make sense, Garcia says, adding that setting up a cooling shelter at Camp Hope was the only logical solution. “When you have this many of your citizens experiencing homelessness, there has to be a better plan,” Garcia says. The cooling shelter became a contentious issue on Thursday last week, when the city ordered the Washington State Department of Transportation to take the shelter down because it was unapproved and presented liability risk. WSDOT owns the land occupied by both Camp Hope and the shelter. The state agency hasn’t approved either, and both are technically illegal. In a joint statement released Friday, WSDOT and the Washington State Department of Commerce said they would not comply with the city’s order because they were more concerned about keeping people safe and would continue to let nonprofit organizations help people in need. Karen Potter, a Camp Hope resident, tells the


This cooling tent at Camp Hope was a “godsend” for many.

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

Inlander that the cooling shelter has been an essential resource. She has two dogs and isn’t able to make the trip to the library. “I knew if I wasn’t able to get into some place where there was air conditioning — or at least fans and water — my whole entire system would be screwed,” Potter says. The city had said WSDOT could face a daily fine of $536 if the tent was still up by 9 am Monday. But late Monday morning, the tent was still up and running and about 10 people were using it to cool off. In an email, Brian Coddington, the city’s director of communications and marketing, told the Inlander that no fines were issued and that the city was continuing efforts to discuss a solution to the situation. Potter says the cooling tent has been a “godsend” and that she’s happy it’s still up. “I’m so glad DOT went and told the city, ‘We ain’t taking it down,’” Potter says, holding up a middle finger to illustrate the tone of WSDOT’s response. On Monday, the City Council moved to allocate $120,000 toward “providing shelter during extreme weather events, including but not limited to extra staffing hours at libraries during extended cooling center hours and operation of standalone cooling centers.” The council also made plans to hold a special meeting on Thursday to discuss WSDOT potentially leasing the land occupied by the Camp Hope cooling shelter to the Empire Health Foundation or the city itself.

C

ity Council member Zack Zappone says he doesn’t think the city’s cooling center plan has been adequate, and that asking the 600-plus residents of Camp Hope to seek out the libraries is unrealistic. The ordinance adopted by the city last summer requires cooling centers be opened anytime temperatures get above 95, but it doesn’t specify what a “cooling center” has to actually look like. Zappone thinks extending the hours of libraries and calling them “cooling centers” isn’t in line with the intent of the law. “I think there’s a general frustration — what’s the point of continuing to change the ordinances if they’re going to be ignored?” Zappone says. On Monday evening, Alexis Gallaway Conasket was working a tent outside City Hall distributing water bottles. They spent about 20 hours working at cooling stations during the heat wave; on Saturday, the heat was so intense they actually passed out. “It really makes me concerned for the people that are stuck out here,” Conasket says. Conasket says they wish the city would find more locations to open cooling shelters and would make more of an effort to work with the many community groups who stepped up during the heat wave. Morrow agrees. Nobody expects the city to do all of this work by itself, she says. “I think what we proved over the Cool Spokane week is that there’s a lot of folks willing to help,” Morrow says. n nates@inlander.com

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New Spokane-based clothing brand dom+bomb focuses on sustainbility, inclusivity and personal expression

BY CHEY SCOTT

Dom+bomb’s fashionable founders, Kim Blessing (left) and Delena Mobley. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

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any consumers and industry experts agree that the modern fashion industry is in need of a major reckoning, and now, a new Spokane company is helping lead the charge. Founded by Kim Blessing and Delena Mobley, dom+bomb launched in spring 2022 with a small selection of basic separates for its still-growing collection of sustainably made clothing that’s size and gender inclusive. Their goal is to inspire and empower others and build a welcoming, judgment-free community around fashion. “We did a lot of market research looking at what’s available here and just talking to people and hearing how it’s hard to find cute stuff that fits, especially in the larger sizes,” Blessing says. “There’s just nowhere to go. “One of the big things we wanted to focus on, and why we have a full size range, is that it’s so hard to go shopping with friends when you’re all a different size. We really want to build a place where people can come together,” she adds. Because the design, production and quality testing process is lengthy — many pieces are currently in development — dom+bomb launched the first of its “essentials” collection with a skirt ($85) and two tops, a crop top ($60) and a boatneck T-shirt ($65). A body chain ($59) made by local jewelry artist Blue Owl Handicrafts is the first piece in dom+bomb’s accessories line. Made from a soft drapey fabric, each piece was designed by the duo to flatter any body type and can be paired with other dom+bomb clothes or with what’s already in a customer’s closet. The two founders both grew up inspired by women in their families who sewed and passed those skills on to them. Mobley recalls saving money she earned babysitting during her middle school years to buy fabric and making herself a plaid romper to avoid being teased by her peers for not having trendy, expensive clothing. As life went on, however, her focus shifted to college and a career, and she only recently reconnected to those garmentmaking roots while dreaming up dom+bomb with Blessing.

The two met and became friends while working at a local communications firm. They each decided to leave that industry during the pandemic to focus on more creative work and something they’re both deeply passionate about: fashion. Dom+bomb was born. The name is a combination of Mobley’s initials, DOM, and Blessing’s social media handle, @bombthetiara. “We started making masks [for COVID], and that just kind of started getting me to fall back in love with textiles,” Mobley says. “And just tapping back into the self that I had kind of given up so I could take care of serious business for a while.”

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ith backgrounds in marketing and communications, branding for dom+bomb came naturally. Now that the project has gained a solid foundation, Mobley and Blessing have been focused on perfecting their skills in pattern making and finer garment construction. They’ve also been working with a group of local models to accurately scale each piece of clothing for dom+bomb’s inclusive size range. “We create the designs and then I do all the patterning, and then we sew up samples and we try them on our fit models,” Blessing says. “And our fit models are really one of the most exciting things that we’ve discovered.” When dom+bomb put out a call for models, the duo weren’t sure how many responses they’d get, but currently they have 50 people on their roster. “What’s been so beautiful is all of our fit models have a story,” Blessing continues. “They come to us for a reason, you know, whether it’s because their gender nonconforming and they want a safe and fun place to come, or whether they’re larger and they can’t find something that fits.” All dom+bomb clothing is available in sizes extra small through 5XL. Current fabric choices are bold, vibrant hues of yellow, fuchsia and teal, plus basic black.


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Working with dom+bomb’s fit models has helped the duo make small tweaks to a piece that might need, say, more or less length in the bust or hips from one size to the next. “We have models try on our clothes from the smallest size to the largest size, and then do whatever alterations we need to make the patterns suit all bodies,” Mobley says. “We take pictures, and we pay very close attention to the hem, where it falls, and how [a piece] drapes the body.” Dom+bomb’s essentials collection consists of simple pieces, but the duo plans to expand with more tailored garments like pants and button-up shirts. Currently, they’re finalizing a T-shirt dress that’s set to launch soon.

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hile a dom+bomb boutique is planned to open locally within the next year, currently the brand’s products are only available online at domandbomb.com, and each piece is made to order. “We really want to make sure that our stuff does not end up in landfills, so we are only making what we sell,” Blessing says. “And we also really want to make sure our stuff lasts, and down the road, we’re looking at the circularity piece” — i.e., how to recycle an item at the end of its use. Blessing and Mobley spent months looking for a clothing maker in the U.S., finally landing on a small garment factory in Southern California that fairly pays its workers. Fabrics are sourced from a company in British Columbia and meet the duo’s high standards for being ethically made and long-lasting. “We really wanted to make sure we were taking care of people, not just here in Spokane, but anything we outsource, because the fashion industry is just absolutely terrible when it comes to the exploitation of workers,” Blessing says. “We knew very early that we should focus on operating domestically as much as possible, and we did that,” Mobley adds. In addition to the dom+bomb clothing collection, the company also offers tailoring and mending, as well as upcycling and styling services, which all tie back to their focus on sustainability. “A really important aspect of what we do is our styling services,” Mobley says. “I virtually go into people’s closets, help them kind of cull out what doesn’t work anymore, and give them ideas on how to recycle it. But it’s also helping them think about how they could maybe revitalize some pieces, bring something in for mending, or maybe change out the buttons or hardware on something.” Customers can make appointments for styling or tailoring services on dom+bomb’s website. “We’ve learned that sustainability means something different for everyone we talk to, and we don’t want to prescribe any way of living,” Mobley says. “But if you have questions, we want to be able to answer them.” n

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AUGUST 4, 2022 INLANDER 15


CULTURE | DIGEST

THE BUZZ BIN

Fraiser is returning after almost 20 years.

DÉJÀ VU

CHEW YOU UP So authentic it often feels like a documentary, Hulu’s THE BEAR is a raw, albeit fictional, peek into the restaurant industry’s gritty reality. Set in 2022, the series centers on chef Carmen “Carmy” Berzatto, who’s returned home to Chicago after the suicide of his older brother, Mikey. Despite the brothers’ estrangement, Mikey leaves the family’s Italian beef sandwich joint to Carmy. His new focus — helping numb the grief of Mikey’s death and years of emotional trauma from working in the toxic kitchens of some of the best restaurants in the world — becomes turning the inefficiently run restaurant around. In between the characters’ constant yelling, The Bear shows what it’s really like to work in food: high stress, low margins, rampant substance abuse, poverty, the relentless pursuit of perfection and more. Already renewed for a second season, it’s a must-watch for anyone who loves to eat. (CHEY SCOTT)

Seven upcoming TV reboots BY BILL FROST

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ew versions of old TV shows aren’t always a bad idea — have you seen the Kids in the Hall reboot? Perfection. But mostly, it’s just media conglomerates throwing rehashed intellectual properties at the wall to see what sticks. Who asked for CSI: Vegas? Bel-Air? Walker? You, if you’re a CEO reading this on your third yacht — congrats on having some modicum of taste. Here are seven reboots currently in the works that will either be supreme wastes of time and money or mildly watchable, maybe even — dare to dream — good.

cast for a “limited series” nostalgia wallow. Good luck getting Ally McBeal alum Robert Downey Jr. back.

MIKE JUDGE’S BEAVIS & BUTT-HEAD (PARAMOUNT+)

Southern gothic vampire soap opera True Blood produced maybe three decent seasons, even though it ran for seven. HBO announced a reboot almost two years ago but has imparted little new info since. If the True Blood reboot does happen, it should really return as a wacky vampire comedy, a la What We Do in the Shadows. I’d watch the hell out of that, and so would you.

This one has already happened. Following up the Beavis & Butt-Head Do the Universe movie from earlier this year (which didn’t suck — take note, South Park), Paramount+ rolled out the all-new-ish Mike Judge’s Beavis & Butt-Head on Aug. 4. They’re the same moronic teens, but now they have hot takes on current pop culture and music videos. B&B won’t survive “WAP.”

CRIMINAL MINDS (PARAMOUNT+) CBS’ Criminal Minds ended after 15 seasons and 324 episodes just two years ago — the dismembered body in the Chick-fil-A dumpster isn’t even cold yet. Most of the cast and creatives are back for the reboot; this time around, they’ll be tracking a serial killer who’s set up a chop-shop network during the pandemic (again, too soon). Yeah, I’ll probably watch it.

ALLY MCBEAL (HULU) Ally McBeal, which ran from 1997 to 2002 on Fox, was a “quirky” and “sexy” legal dramedy that would probably be viewed as “problematic” and “hypercringe” today. Still, that’s not going to stop the IP-owning studio from dusting off Calista Flockhart and the rest of the

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FRASIER (PARAMOUNT+) Star Kelsey Grammer is all over it, but the rest of the cast of 1993-2004 comedy Frasier is completely in the dark about the reboot. Can Frasier be (re)done without Niles (David Hyde Pierce), Roz (Peri Gilpin) and Daphne (Jane Leeves)? Hell to the no. The reason the 2017 Will & Grace reboot worked so well was the O.G. ensemble. Can you name a solo Grammer hit? Nope.

TRUE BLOOD (HBO)

MAX HEADROOM (AMC) WTF? The original Max Headroom ran for two midrated seasons in the late ’80s, but it’s been far off the pop-cultural radar for over 30 years — why a reboot now? Old Max Headroom episodes aren’t exactly blowing up on Tubi, but since we’re now living in a dystopian future populated with artificial intelligence TV personalities — the Kardashians aren’t real — why not?

PARTY DOWN (STARZ) Speaking of getting the cast back together, the reboot of the 2010–2011 cult comedy Party Down has miraculously retained stars Adam Scott, Ken Marino, Jane Lynch, Martin Starr, Ryan Hansen and Megan Mullally — but not Lizzy Caplan. The Hollywood cater-waiter satire still has Kids in the Hall comeback potential, even without Caplan … I’m not crying, you’re crying. n

MAKE IT BIG I’m still processing Jordan Peele’s latest feature NOPE. The sci-fi creature feature is a box office hit, with good reason as it’s full of outstanding performances (especially Daniel Kaluuya and Keke Palmer), some genuinely thrilling action sequences and some incredible visual effects. I didn’t like it as much as I did Peele’s previous movies (Get Out, Us), but those set a pretty high bar. And if you’re considering waiting to see Nope at home — nope. You need to see it on the big screen, and I’d recommend checking it out either in AMC’s IMAX or Dolby formats while you can. I saw it in Dolby, and the care Peele put into the film’s sound design is pretty incredible. It definitely lends to the creepy vibes. (DAN NAILEN) THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Noteworthy new music arriving in stores and online Aug. 5: CALVIN HARRIS, FUNK WAV BOUNCES VOL. 2. The Scottish EDM DJ again taps into his nextlevel rolodex with tunes featuring Justin Timberlake, Snoop Dogg, Halsey, Pharell, and more. AMON AMARTH, THE GREAT HEATHEN ARMY. Tapping into their Nordic heritage, this Swedish melodic death metal band plays a style of manly heaviness often called “Viking metal.” PAUL McCARTNEY, McCARTNEY I II III. Sir Paul’s eponymous solo albums span 1970-2020. They’re now finally collected together in this new box set, a must-own for Beatlemaniacs. (SETH SOMMERFELD)


Opportunity knocks. STCU is hiring. We’re looking for people who want to work hard and serve others. Love where you work.

Scan the QR code below or apply today at stcu.org/careers.

AUGUST 4, 2022 INLANDER 17


CULTURE | THEATER

Stranded in Canada Broadway producer Laura Little calls Coeur d’Alene home; her “all-time favorite” project, Come From Away, is finally landing in Spokane BY E.J. IANNELLI

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ithin minutes of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, America closed its airspace as a protective measure. Canadian officials responded to that decision with a massive logistical effort that became known as Operation Yellow Ribbon. As part of that effort, they rerouted 38 airborne flights to Gander International Airport, a transatlantic refueling hub on the island of Newfoundland. By late afternoon that fateful Tuesday, all 38 of those planes sat waiting for further instructions on the tarmac at Gander International. Together they carried more than 6,500 passengers and crew — almost as many people as the nearby town of Gander itself. But the inhabitants of Gander weren’t about to let those overwhelming numbers dampen their hospitality. They rallied and welcomed the thousands of strangers who had, in the local parlance, “come from away.” The stranded travelers and crew members were soon ferried to community centers, churches and schools, where they were sheltered and fed until the last diverted flight departed five days later.

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Come together for Come From Away. The generosity of the townspeople and the gratitude of their guests makes for an inspiring real-life tale, one that highlights a remarkable capacity for humanity in the face of adversity. When it was later brought to the attention of husband-andwife creative team Irene Sankoff and David Hein, they headed to Gander to attend the 10-year reunion of the event. The touching memories and amusing personal stories they heard there became the basis for the musical Come from Away.

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aura Little came across Sankoff and Hein’s musical in its very early stages. At the time, the Coeur d’Alenebased producer was in New York scouting for new shows. Little is well-known in local theater circles as past executive director of both Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre and CYT Spokane; she has produced the Traditions of Christmas show at the Kroc Center every holiday season since 2012. In New York, Little was scheduled to sit in on several readings to see which had promise and which merited a pass. “I almost skipped the reading of it,” she says. “But within five minutes, I knew that somehow I needed to be part of this production.” One of the things that impressed her was how the show’s cast of 12 played “many, many different” characters. To represent the broad scope of experience for so many people, Sankoff and Hein had written things so that the individual actors performed multiple parts. That explains why everyone on the playbill has “and others” after their primary role. She also found it to be surprisingly funny. “That’s what I adored most about it, is how much we laughed. We didn’t expect to laugh, and that just made it very heartwarming.” So Little eagerly signed on as a co-producer with the hope of championing Come

MATTHEW MURPHY PHOTO

from Away as strongly as she’d championed previous award-winning shows like Peter and the Starcatcher and All Is Calm. As a producer, she’s responsible for high-level tasks such as raising capital as well as hiring artistic and marketing teams. “There are producers who get involved because there’s a movie star connected to it or because they owe a favor to somebody,” she says. “I absolutely adore every show that I produce. And, in particular, Come from Away is my all-time favorite.”

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udiences everywhere might agree. Come from Away has proven to be a critical and commercial darling the world over. In October 2018, it became the longest-running Canadian musical in Broadway history. The nationally touring production launched in Seattle at the same time, but its February 2021 Spokane run had to be rescheduled; now is the first time Inland Northwest audiences will have had the chance to see it locally. “I’m ecstatic because people have been hearing me talk about it for years,” says Little. “A lot of our friends did make the trek over to Seattle. But to see it in your hometown with your closest friends and also your ancillary friends is just thrilling to me.” Little says that the timing is unusually apt, too. She sees clear parallels between the displays of solidarity that followed 9/11 and those that have emerged during the COVID-19 pandemic. “We know that when a crisis takes place, we all hope for the same thing: We hope that a kinder, gentler side of society rears its head. During coronavirus, I have certainly seen signs of unity, which is exactly what happens in Come from Away.” n Come From Away • Aug. 9-14; Tue-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat 2 pm, Sun at 1 and 6:30 pm • $42-$100 • First Interstate Center for the Arts • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • broadwayspokane.com


There isn’t a word for “marijuana” in my language. And if I can’t speak it, I would rather not do it.

iʔ sqəlxʷčáw̓tət. iksčk̓ʷín̓. (My Culture. My Choice.) For more info, visit www.culturechoicerespect.com

AUGUST 4, 2022 INLANDER 19


Eggs-cellent

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Friends With backyard chickens, a pet can produce love, life lessons — and breakfast BY LAUREN RODDIS

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o a kid, chickens are fascinating creatures. Especially when they’re living at someone’s house. They’re certainly outside of the traditional pet realm for most people. Going over to a friend’s house and seeing chickens running around outside was always exciting when I was little. While I was definitely too scared to pick one up, admiring them from a distance suited me well. I have fond memories of giggling at their strange movements and hearing them make funny noises as if speaking to one another. They truly piqued my interest in a way no other pet did. Elsa Oxford, a friend since elementary school, had chickens in her yard in Spokane’s Rockwood neighborhood when we were little, and still does to this day. Her mom, Dana Oxford, says her family initially got chickens for their kids and that she will always have them. They’ve had chickens in their yard for 15 years now. “Chickens are fun — they’re cute, they’re funny, and they have personalities,” Dana says. Monica Bertucci, a chicken wrangler for 11 years in Spokane, says her family first got chickens for the novelty but quickly grew attached to having more living things around. She also says that the chickens were good teachers of animal stewardship for her daughter. “[Owning chickens] keeps us connected to where we live and a world beyond ourselves,” she says. Beyond their role as pets, of course, chickens provide some ecological benefits for a household and help reduce one’s carbon footprint. According to the EPA, the agriculture industry contributed 11.2 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in the United States in 2020. Factory farms, including those for large-scale egg production, create tons of manure every year, contributing to harmful water pollution. With backyard chickens, their waste can be handled in an eco-friendly way, and receiving eggs from them as opposed to factory-produced eggs is an excellent benefit for the environment. Beth Labar and her family, who I’ve known for most of my life, have provided my family with many things, including eggs every once in a while. A South Hill resident, Labar says on top of the benefits of providing her family eggs, backyard chickens give her good compost material that ultimately helps her garden. Even when they just walk around, chickens positively impact her yard. “They are natural little rototillers,” she says. Bertucci says the most rewarding part about having chickens is having a protein food source right in her backyard. It allows her family to feel connected to their food — something lost in buying factory-produced eggs at the grocery store. Backyard chickens are also great when it comes to food waste. Dana Oxford has a composting container in her kitchen, and when it’s full, she’ll bring it to her chickens, who gobble it up.

FACING PAGE: Beth Labar and a member of her backyard flock. ABOVE: Chickens each have unique personalities. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS “They love it. They eat everything,” Oxford says. Backyard chickens are also a great source of entertainment. “I’ve always had one out of every batch that has been extra friendly,” Oxford says. “I used to have one that I could put in my lap and pet her like a cat and she would fall asleep.” In terms of entertainment, Oxford says there’s nothing funnier than a chicken running toward you. She also describes a time when she saw the chickens in her yard chasing another chicken and making a lot of noise, and when she looked outside, she saw the chicken up front with a mouse’s tail hanging out of its mouth. She watched the chicken stop and swallow it whole. “I’ve seen that happen twice,” she says. Early in quarantine when everyone was seeking new forms of entertainment, Bertucci’s family set up a race course for her chickens. They did different heats and placed bets on who would win. She shares the belief that chickens are funny runners. She also says that whenever she goes into her yard, her chickens happily run to see her, which is always fun. She finds a lot of comfort in the additional life that her chickens bring. “They’re part of our family,” she says. n

AUGUST 4, 2022 INLANDER 21


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l The Lands Councir Executive Directo AmandaTOParrish THE INLANDER SUPPLEMENT

GIVE GUIDE

COUNT US

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COME TO TOWN

YOU VAXX

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AUGUST 26 - SEPTEMBE R 1, 2021 | FAMILY OWNED.

COMMUNITY FOCUSED.

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GIVE GUIDE

Gi ve G ui de Celebrating the people making a differ ence in the Inland North west

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GUIDE 21 AUGUST 26, 2021 GIVE

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GET INVOLVED AND GIVE BACK! This annual issue highlights many of the region’s non-profit organizations, and the difference they are making in our community.

GET YOUR NON-PROFIT NOTICED! Reserve your Give Guide listing by August 18th

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PET ISSUE

Patio Pups

Recent changes to state health codes makes it easier for you and your canine pals to enjoy outdoor dining together BY SUMMER SANDSTROM

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ne of summer’s many perks is patio dining at a local eatery. The ambient lighting, cool breeze and ability to be outdoors makes it one of the most fun and enjoyable things you can do during the season. Until recently, due to the Washington State Retail Food Code, dogs weren’t able to join in that al fresco fun because they weren’t allowed on restaurant premises unless they were a service animal. But on March 1, the state made some changes to those rules, and it’s now possible for canines and their companions to enjoy a meal out together, outdoors. “Food establishments [are] now allowed to have pet dogs on their outdoor patios if they submit their plans to the health jurisdiction,” says Lisa Breen, manager of the Spokane Regional Health District’s Food Safety Program. While dogs can be on patios, they’re still not allowed inside restaurants unless they’re service animals, so food establishments must have outdoor access to patio seating to be in compliance with the regulations. Restaurants also must fill out a form with the health district that outlines plans for things like dealing with customers who aren’t maintaining control of their dogs, as well as the restaurant’s cleanup plan. Those plans must be reviewed and approved by the health district before dogs are allowed on the premises. Meanwhile, for establishments that have

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Washington restaurant patios are now pup friendly. little to no food preparation occurring on site, such as tasting rooms and some breweries, rules regarding dogs, specifically inside of the building, changed even more. “Legislation passed an allowance for those types of facilities to provide notification to the local health jurisdiction if they wanted to have pets allowed inside the establishment,” Breen says. “There still needs to be signage on the door that [the] establishment allows for pet dogs, and then there’s other criteria they should have a plan for, but they don’t require the same preapproval for it because the food preparation activity is limited.” These changes so far have been well received by local businesses with outdoor seating as summer has spurred more diners onto patios. “As a rescue animal-focused restaurant, we are grateful that the regional health departments reviewed their stance on having dogs on patios,” says Josh Wade, co-owner of Bark, A Rescue Pub. “The public has embraced this change, and it is not uncommon to visit Bark and see a dog accompanying every patio table,” he adds. Some restaurants like Bark not only provide water for dogs, but also have treats to make the dining experience special for its four-legged customers, too. “Our animals are like family members and being able to enjoy outdoor life with them is a part of living in the Northwest,” Wade says. n


Happily Furever After

Starts Here

PAWSITIVE DIFFERENCE

DID YOU KNOW? Humane Society simply refers to a group that aims to stop cruelty to animals. We are one of two humane societies in Spokane County. Like most humane societies, we are an independent, nonprofit shelter, funded by public donations.

To keep pace with the dynamic world of animal welfare, we depend on pawsome partners. For example, to make pets more accessible for adoption, you’ll find us at Petco and PetSmart stores. Does it work? Well, in 2020, we had the fifth highest adoption rate at PetSmart Charities Adoption Centers in the nation!

What many folks don’t realize is that, by law, local humane societies cannot accept stray/found pets, but as space allows, we do accept owner surrendered pets. Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service (SCRAPS), the municipal animal control agency, is responsible for stray pets, for protecting the public from aggressive or dangerous animals, as well as for protecting and defending animals from abuse and neglect. SpokAnimal works hard to operate cost-effectively. So when you want to maximize the number of animals helped by your contribution, choose SpokAnimal!

TRANSFORMING ANIMAL WELFARE

And we partner with Kitty Cantina - the city’s first food service provider to host pets available for adoption. Its interactive lounge experience helped over 500 felines find homes within its first year of operation! That’s purr worthy!

SpokAnimal has been helping animals throughout the Inland Northwest find loving homes since 1983. Today, we facilitate over 3,000 pet adoptions annually, making us the area’s largest humane society!

There’s also a host of other friends that make it possible for us to help over 3,000 animals annually: volunteers, donors, transport partners, grant funders and national foundations, just to name a few. To each and every one: THANK YOU!

Our Dorothy Clark Animal Center opened in 2010, and what an impact it’s made! We preform over 3,200 surgeries annually - for shelter pets, public animals, and community (feral) cats. We never euthanize because an animal has been here too long, or because we lack space. In fact, we’re nationally recognized as a “no kill” shelter and have over a 97% annual save rate for dogs and cats.

SHELTER PROGRAMS

CLINIC PROGRAMS

COMMUNITY SERVICES

Adoptions Cruisin’ Critters Transport Program Foster Care Pets 2 Vets Farm Livin’ Barn Cat Program

Low-Cost Spay/Neuter Clinic Vaccines Microchips Dentals Feral Cat TNR (Trap, Neuter, Release)

Emergency Pet Food Bank Guardian Angel Program SpokAnimal’s Dog Park at High Bridge Bark It Market Thrift Store Red Cross Partner During Local Disasters

RESOURCE CENTER 715 N. Crestline St., Spokane WA 99202 Shelter: (509) 534-8133 • Clinic: (509) 534-4253 Tax ID: 91-1223929 • www.Spokanimal.org AUGUST 4, 2022 INLANDER 23


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PET ISSUE

Paul in the Family

Paul, the goodest boy!

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

Oh no, have I turned into a dog person?

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t the moment, while I work on my laptop, my puppy is prancing around the front yard, pausing every 30 seconds to dig a hole or chew a stick in a desperate play for attention. I must resist giving it to him, because if I play with him, he’ll forget that he actually has to poop. So I’m sitting here waiting for that triumphant moment when he squats down, stiffens his tail and lets loose. Then I’ll say, “Yes! Good Boy!” in a high voice that I only recently discovered I was capable of. Afterward, feeling a sense of relief, I’ll grab a poop bag and scoop up the mushy mess. I’ve learned a lot since my wife and I brought home Paul, our 4-month-old golden retriever and the first dog I’ve owned as an adult. I’ve learned that a dog relieving himself is not something to recoil at, but something to celebrate. I’ve learned that my backyard is filled with a specific type of weed that could kill Paul if he eats it. I’ve learned that puppies will do literally anything for a treat made from beef liver. But most of all, I’ve learned something about myself — something that, just six months ago, I would’ve rather buried my face in dog poop than say out loud. I’m a dog person now.

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arlier this year, my wife and I decided that if we were ever going to get a puppy, now was the time to do it. We are both working from home. We have a yard and no kids. We love animals. If anyone was

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BY WILSON CRISCIONE ready for a dog, it was us. My main hesitation, however, was that I didn’t want to become what I am now, a dog person. I considered myself a cat person. I’ve had a cat my entire life. More than that, I feel like I understand cats and they understand me. Just like my cats, I’m introverted and a little skittish. I prefer not to listen to authority. I, too, love nothing more than looking out the window at the birds. Dog people were different. They were always calling their dog doggo. They’d go out to the park and meet other dog owners who were otherwise complete strangers — an activity that was unfathomable to me. They’d bring their dog along with them to the Home Depot while shopping for some new vinyl flooring. They’re the worst! But we wanted a dog anyway. Maybe, I thought, it’s possible to own a dog and not become a dog person. I was wrong.

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aul changed everything. Everyone told me that raising a puppy is a huge commitment, and they were right. It’s the constant potty breaks, the constant playing, the constant training. It’s not just mentally shifting your attention to raising a puppy. It’s transforming the physical space, too. I must now step over a baby gate every time I go into the kitchen. If I lean back my recliner, I hit a play pen that we use to block off our plants from the puppy. Toys are strewn all over the living room and the front yard.

But you know what? It’s fine. Really. None of this bothers me at all. Ever since we brought that chunky, fluffy puppy home, I was ready to do whatever it takes to keep him safe and happy. The other day, my wife and I went to the pet store and found some things for Paul to chew. As we left the store, we were giddy about bringing them home, solely because we knew it would make him happy. This would have been unthinkable to my former self. And I came to a sickening realization: This is the behavior of a dog person.

I pick up his poop with a smile on my face. My entire personal life now revolves around what’s good for Paul. I pick up his poop with a smile on my face. I talk to strangers on walks because it helps Paul socialize with others. And the other day, I thought I’d take him with me to the Home Depot so he could meet other dogs. I’m a new person now. A dog person. If you’re a dog person, too, maybe one day I’ll meet you in the dog park and we can chat as Paul runs around with a ball in his mouth. Just don’t ask me to call him “doggo.” n Wilson Criscione is a former Inlander staff writer. He's now a reporter for Investigate West.


Scroll for Cuteness

Meet four local pets bringing joy to Instagram followers around the world

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BY CHEY SCOTT

t’s not the recipe demos, hair tutorials, outfit-of-the-day inspo or even silly memes that make Instagram still relevant in a time when our attention spans are as fleeting as the next reel. It’s adorable animals, and, if you ask us, they’ll always be the best thing to ever grace social media, fostering connection and spreading joy. Your feed may already be filled with cute animals, but make sure to give these local pals a follow, too.

LENY

@leny_the_retriever “Sliding down hills, and into your hearts” is Leny’s motto, and how this 4-year-old golden retriever has gained more than 57,000 followers. Leny’s go-to spot is the big grass-covered Rockwood Reservoir near the South Perry District, where steep hills make for prime slides. “He also loves to run and somersault and wiggle on his back,” says Leny’s mom, Jackie Caro. “​We get messages from all around the world from people telling us how much joy Leny’s slides bring them. How could a dog sliding down a hill not make you smile?”

TINKERBELL

@persian_tinkerbell This sassy, pint-sized Persian loves three things best: Cheerios, licking plastic and hanging out in her tiny green camping tent. The 14-year-old, silvery-gray floof was adopted by her owner, Candace, back in 2014 and has been living a life of luxury since, while gaining a following of 16,800 on her account, to which she posts almost daily. “People really love cats on the internet,” Candace says. “I like that followers get to share in her life and her adventures. Plus, it’s a fun outlet where I can be a little creative.”

BANKS

@banksthepig From knocking over the dining room chairs to show his displeasure when dinner’s late, to daily snuggles with his family, Banks the pig’s updates are a mix of adorably naughty and nice. The 3-year-old, 65-pound pig also loves to sleep and, of course, eat, says owner Julie Adams. Besides healthy fruits and veggies, Banks enjoys occasional treats from spots like Hello Sugar and The Scoop. “[Instagram] has been a great way to get advice from other pig owners, and make some ‘friends,’ plus we wanted to help support our local community by tagging places Banks visits, foods he tries, people he meets, etc.,” Adams says.

LEON AND ARTHUR

@leonadventurecat Inlander readers may recall meeting Leon in our first Pet Issue, back in 2018. Leon is still adventuring throughout the Inland Northwest, sauntering down trails on the end of his leash, and, when he gets tired or bored, lazily looking out from the backpack carried by his owner, Megan Ferney. Tagging along on these many adventures now, however, is “little brother,” Arthur, adopted in late 2020. The contrasting ginger orange and smokey blue duo make for an even more delightful sight, whether snuggled up at home on their days off or perched on the end of a paddleboard. n

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AUGUST 4, 2022 INLANDER 25


Tʰe

PET ISSUE

Kennel Crisis

Spokane area shelters are over capacity with animals and need more residents to foster, adopt, donate or volunteer BY ELIZA BILLINGHAM

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n Saturday night, July 23, a pair of abandoned newborn kittens were found near Deaconess Hospital. The discoverers weren’t sure what to do, so they brought them into the hospital’s emergency room. Confused but compassionate, the ER reception staff contacted the Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service, or SCRAPS, to come get the kittens. But SCRAPS couldn’t come. SCRAPS is responsible for stray intakes in Spokane County but has been filled to capacity since the beginning of July. So instead, with the help of Murci’s Mission, a local nonprofit that specializes in rehabilitating and rehousing high-need animals, the ER staff connected with a foster family who were willing to take the kittens home.

Many shelters around Spokane are experiencing a significant increase in animals needing their care. Shelters in denser urban areas are seeing more pet surrenders, possibly due to rising living expenses that compete with an owner’s ability to pay for a pet, or landlords not allowing animals or requiring expensive deposits. Owners are also not consistently accessing spaying, neutering and vaccine services, maybe because of vet unavailability or cost. Spokane has a citywide no-kill policy, meaning that shelters cannot euthanize animals just because there is no kennel or cage for them. As more and more animals compete for space and vet care, however, the animal welfare system needs more support from the community to care for vulnerable animals.

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atie Schmidlkofer operates Murci’s Mission and has tried to help SCRAPS place animals as it struggles with capacity. For her, the most notable intake increase is the number of dogs from 1 to 4 years old, presumably brought home during the pandemic. “A lot of people who wouldn’t have otherwise gotten a dog went ahead and did it,” Schmidlkofer says. About 23 million American families added a dog or cat between March 2020 and May 2021, according to data from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. In May 2021, about 90 percent of dogs and 85 percent of cats were still in those homes. But a third of pet owners were already concerned about their financial security. As costs of living continue to increase, the expense of owning an animal can become less feasible. “Apartments cost a lot more if you have pets,” says Kevin Squires, hospital manager at Pet Emergency Clinic in Spokane.

Pet fees and rent increases also affect an owner’s financial flexibility. “If rent is $500 more a month,” Squires posits, “can you afford dog food? Can you afford vet bills?” Not only are veterinarians often expensive, but they are increasingly booked up. Routine operations and vaccine appointments that previously could be scheduled within days now have to be scheduled at least a month in advance, according to Schmidlkofer.

“If rent is $500 more a month, can you afford dog food? Can you afford vet bills?” The recent nationwide increase in pet ownership also coincided with veterinarian burnout and shortage, according to Squires. The Pet Emergency Clinic is “outrageously busy every day,” he says, partly because they can’t refer owners back to nonemergency vet care. Local vets don’t have enough appointments, leaving the clinic to do non-urgent work like taking out stitches or after-wound care. Squires says the clinic is also seeing an uptick in canine parvovirus, or “parvo,” cases, a contagious virus that spreads quickly from dog to dog. Puppies should receive a parvo vaccination between 14 and 16 weeks old and be kept up to date as adults. But some dogs are not being vaccinated in time, possibly due to lack of owner education, ability to pay or vet availability. Squires says most of the pets the clinic sees now aren’t up to date on their vaccinations.

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Local animal rescue operators like Jamie McAtee of Rescue4All are being pushed to their limits by the current rise of pet surrenders.

amie McAtee runs Rescue4All, a nonprofit that typically rehomes higher need dogs. This summer she’s getting five to 10 calls a day from people trying to surrender their pets. McAtee is exhausted by the number of people who have not fixed and vaccinated their dogs or trained them in basic skills. “Everyone is making it out to be a housing issue, but that’s not what I’m seeing,” McAtee says. She sees the “horrific overpopulation” of dogs in the area as a direct result of human irresponsibility. She blames owners who were not prepared for the responsibility they took on when they chose to get a dog. “We all know that there are going to be hiccups in our lives,” McAtee says. “If you gave a shit about that animal, you would have a plan for them if things go awry.”

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

There are exceptions in extreme cases, she says, but that is not how she would describe most of the surrenders she sees. Better Together is a nonprofit in Sandpoint, Idaho, that focuses on keeping animals with their owners or at least out of kennels and cages. In 2016, Mandy Evans founded its Home to Home program. In this system, the shelter acts as a liaison instead of a kennel, connecting an owner who needs to rehome their pet directly with a potential adopter, all without forcing the animal to stay at the shelter itself. “My personal mission,” Evans says, “is that shelters act more like community resource centers.” In Evans’ experience, people needing to rehome their pets are very apologetic and don’t want to have to give up

their animals. Better Together first tries to provide alternatives to surrendering pets. But if relocation is necessary, Home to Home empowers the surrenderer to find a good new home for their furry friend. Home to Home partners with over 100 shelters in North America. Owners can go through the site directly without shelter oversight, too. In 2021, North Idaho alone rehomed 667 pets through Home to Home. The program served over 7,600 pets across North America that same year. SCRAPS and SpokAnimal C.A.R.E. both partner with Home to Home. The program frees SpokAnimal to serve animals who need specialized attention or medical care, according to Randi Oien, SpokAnimal’s director of customer relations. In addition to Home to Home, SpokAnimal relies on foster parents to care for and socialize pets while they wait for adoption. This avoids the stress and physical toll on animals staying at a shelter. “Foster homes really are the key to help us help more animals,” Oien says. SpokAnimal is currently sheltering 535 pets, almost 70 more than at the same time a year ago. The organization has over 200 more animals in need of foster care now compared to last year. Local animal lover Daniella Martin has been fostering kittens for over a decade. She says it’s the best way for animals to be taken care of and socialized before they’re adoptable. And it’s a lot easier than many families realize. “Most people think they don’t have space for it, and people don’t realize that it will be no cost to them,” Martin says. The shelter provides all the supplies, and three or four kittens don’t take up much space. “It’s an amazing way to volunteer and help the community that doesn’t require too much on your part,” Martin says. “If you love animals, it’s so worth it.” n

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Eric B. Nelson plates shrimp piccata in his home kitchen. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

COOKING

The Personal Touch Private chefs in the Inland Northwest can bring a special restaurant experience right to your home BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

T

he reasons for hiring a personal chef are as varied as the reasons chefs choose to work as a personal chef. On the client side, people might lack time, cooking skills or adequate culinary equipment. Sometimes, especially for a special event, the host whose task it is to cook for the event would prefer to be with guests versus in the kitchen. Chefs are motivated by a variety of reasons, too: earning extra money, having a more flexible schedule, or wanting to grow their range. For Eric B. Nelson, being a personal chef is all about the opportunity to interact with people. “I look forward to it,” says Nelson, who has several side gigs as a personal chef in addition to his regular job as executive chef for the Davenport Grand’s restaurants. Nelson enjoys the live theater aspect of private events, similar to working in open kitchens, he says. “I have no problem being somewhat of a card and having a great time.” More than in his corporate job, cooking for a small group allows him to focus on relationships “with purveyors, with people that you’re gonna cook for, [even]

28 INLANDER AUGUST 4, 2022

relationships with the earth,” Nelson says. His sweet spot is cooking for between 15 and 18 people, which ensures all the meals come out perfectly. Nelson tries to stay within a client’s comfort zone on both the menu and the price per plate. When he works through the local startup Bookoo Chef, for example, Nelson charges $115 per person for an egg-centric five-course meal he calls “Yolking It Up” that includes smoked egg yolk on pan-seared trout and jazzed-up deviled eggs. Nelson is one of nine chefs on the roster for Bookoo Chef, a Spokane-based clearinghouse conceived in response to rising demand for personal chefs, says Justin O’Neill, who co-founded the company with local restaurateur Matt Goodwin. “After talking with some friends, we realized that there is no central booking app — like airbnb or Uber — that connects hosts with private chefs,” says O’Neill, who’s also a chef and Spiceology account executive. Since launching in March 2022, Bookoo (bookoochef. com) has completed 12 bookings and is now into the 2023 calendar, O’Neill says.

“The most common event seems to just be people and families having a get-together,” he adds. O’Neill says he’s been surprised that the demand for private chefs has increased post-pandemic, even though restaurants are open again. “Clearly people’s eating habits were changing and have changed,” says O’Neill, also explaining that people seem to want something experiential beyond restaurants or takeout. Bookoo’s platform features many notable chefs in the region, including O’Neill, Eat Good Group’s Aaron Fish and Cochinito Taqueria’s Travis Dickinson. Each chef offers between a three- and seven-course experience at a fixed price per plate, such as Modernist Cooks’ Amanda Hillman, who resurrects her first cooking job at Sala Thai to provide a five-course “Trip to Thailand” ($160/person) including lemongrass chicken and sweet mango rice for dessert. Meanwhile, Isaac Cunnington, who created his business My Sushi Sensei (mysushisensei.com) after a pandemic-related layoff, offers hands-on cooking experiences. He teaches clients to make sushi: temaki or hand rolls ($75/person) and makizushi or rolled and sliced sushi ($100/person).

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ike the sushi chef Cunnington, Nelson’s increased private chef work resulted from a pandemic pivot. Until spring 2020, Nelson was busy running the Davenport Grand’s six dining venues and occasionally teaching classes at his alma mater, Spokane Community College’s Inland Northwest Culinary Academy. ...continued on page 30


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FOOD | COOKING “THE PERSONAL TOUCH,” CONTINUED... Then — bam! — the doors closed on the region’s culinary and hospitality industry, and Nelson found himself more-or-less alone in a 718-room hotel, the only kitchen employee not furloughed. And while it wasn’t quite as scary as that Jack Nicholson scene in The Shining, Nelson was going a little stir-crazy. “I had a lot of time to think, and I didn’t have any employees,” says Nelson, who started planning day trips. Joined by Maggie, his lovable 160-pound St. Bernardmastiff mix, Nelson drove to Missoula, Lewiston, Sandpoint, Yakima and even Canada, where they were turned away because the border was closed. Although the trips helped his mental health, it was a drain on his pocketbook until a colleague suggested Nelson monetize all his “gallivanting.” Thus, Gallivanting Chef was born. “At first I didn’t think it was going to be anything,” says Nelson, who parlayed his writing background into a blog portion of Gallivanting Chef (thegallivantingchef. com). “I thought it was going to be a fun little avenue to write [and] have something creative to do,” he adds. But it opened the door to more work as a private chef, including for Bookoo Chef. And the Instagram Nelson made for Maggie was a hit (@maggiemoostbernard),

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event, or a lot of people [are] on vacation and want to have someone cook for them after being at the lake all day instead of going out.” Always a self-starter whose past gigs included working as a nanny and bookkeeper, Walker didn’t intend to start a private chef company. A few years ago, she responded to an advertisement for someone to do specialized The Gallivanting Chef and his creations. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO weekly meals similar to prompting one company to send so many the keto-based diet to which she was adherfree doggie toys he had to ask the company ing. Walker had always enjoyed cooking, to stop sending them. liked the flexible schedule, and soon found herself with more and more clients. hittnie Walker was also looking In 2017, Walker launched her company, for a creative (and moneysteadily building a client base and repertoire making) outlet when she started of 200 recipes. She charges $50 an hour Personal Chef Northwest (personalchefnw. (more during the holidays) with a four-hour com). Based out of Post Falls, the self-taught minimum, and not including food. cook specializes in providing both eventWalker figures it’s a better deal than based and weekly, personalized meals. meal service kits, which still have to be For weekly meals, says Walker, clients cooked and cleaned up after, she says. And are typically busy — working parents, it’s just as affordable, she says, especially for people traveling — or they have health isher clients who are definitely not rich. sues or just don’t like to cook. “All of our clients are pretty much The other part of her business is more middle class, just busy working families,” event-based. Walker says. “And who wants to cook “People are usually wanting to bring when you come home after working nine the restaurant to their house to celebrate an hours?” n

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REVIEW

BRAD PITT GOES off the RAILS

You’ll wish you could get off Bullet Train at the first stop BY CHASE HUTCHINSON

A

n ostensible action film that is so light on wellof their time bickering about how to handle their own crafted fights one hesitates to even classify it mission. Then there is Joey King as Prince, a manipulaas such, Bullet Train can best be described as a tive young girl with her own mysterious agenda, and Bad low-rent Quentin Tarantino imitation though without Bunny as Wolf, a heartbroken hitman out for revenge. anything of its own to stand on. The film is oddly grating They aren’t the only ones as there are plenty of unexand increasingly one note to the point of being obnoxpected appearances from familiar faces who leap into ious. Most egregiously, it just isn’t all that fun. What little the fray. Some are mere cameos, inserted for lackluster joy there is to be had with some of the committed cast throwaway jokes, while others become more central to soon fades into the background when buried under a the experience. mountain of superficial schtick. It succeeds only at being Directed by David Leitch, a veteran stunt coordinator the summer’s biggest missed opportunity. whose work on the original John Wick and 2017’s Atomic Based on the 2010 novel Maria Beetle by mystery Blonde would lead one to believe this new film could pack writer Kōtarō Isaka with a screenplay by Fear Street 1978 similarly kinetic action. Not only does it not rise to that co-writer Zak Olkewicz, the story centers on a former level, it seems to actively undercut and even downplay assassin named Ladybug who is trying to reform himself. the action elements. Whenever a fight sequence will get He is buffoonish man with a bucket going, the film will either dilute it with hat besought by either good or bad another so-so joke or sometimes just BULLET TRAIN luck, depending on how you look at it. cut away entirely. Each battle becomes Rated R Played by Brad Pitt in rare, though not more about hollow slapstick than Directed by David Leitch necessarily good, form as he coasts on Starring Brad Pitt, Sandra Bullock, Joey King well-crafted stunts, failing to craft any making the same version of a joke about memorable moments. If you were self-help ad nauseum. When Ladybug gets drawn in for looking for the ballet of brutality of John Wick or anything what may be one last job that requires him to steal a resembling the stunning one-take stairway fight of Atomic briefcase from a high-speed train, he’ll soon discover that Blonde, you best look elsewhere. he is essentially trapped in the confines of the cars with a The actors are the only saving graces, some of whom quirky cast of killers. manage to keep things moving despite the shoddy story There is the duo of Aaron Taylor-Johnson’s Tangerthey’ve been saddled with. Henry in particular could ine and Brian Tyree Henry’s Lemon who spend most read a phonebook and still be a magnetic screen pres-

32 INLANDER AUGUST 4, 2022

ence. Most known for his role in the hit show Atlanta, he is both comedic and heartfelt even when the rest of the film is not. Unfortunately, the cast’s talents are often left underutilized. Most bafflingly, there is the blink-and-youmiss-it presence of Karen Fukuhara (The Boys), who never gets anything to do despite her dynamic screen presence in past projects. By the time the story coalesces and we learn that this ensemble cast of characters have more in EASTER SUNDAY common than they realBased loosely on star Jo Koy’s ize, the revelation lands own experiences, this family comwith a thud. Even with edy finds the stand-up comedian some flashes of flair, the sussing humor out of the quirks Bullet Train experience is and tensions that exist in FilipinoAmerican families in order to gensurprisingly tame, never erate laughs and heartwarming embracing the possibility connections. Rated PG-13 of its premise or setting. There are good films that show how to make use of the confined space of a train to their advantage like Train to Busan or Snowpiercer. Those films felt bold whereas this just goes through the motions on its belabored and far too long journey to nowhere. Even with all the potential to really go wild, Bullet Train ends up being a mishmash of superior movies that never offers anything remotely exciting of its own. n

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That makes it a bit jarring when the movie suddenly shifts focus to the life of Jeff Buckley, before veering back to Cohen. Once Geller and Goldfine start digging into the particulars of how “Hallelujah” metamorphosed from a deep cut on a failed Cohen album (which was initially rejected by his U.S. record company) into a cultural touchstone, Hallelujah asserts a more distinctive cinematic identity. The filmmakers trace every step of the song’s evolution, starting with Cohen’s lengthy composition process, which stretched over a period of years and included, according to one interviewee, more than 150 potential verses. Cohen himself reworked the song in live versions after the studio recording was essentially buried, and Bob Dylan was the first of many artists to take it up as a favorite Cohen tune to cover. The song’s later, higher-profile evolution includes Buckley, the Shrek soundtrack, many questionable auditions from shows like American Idol, and eventual pop-culture saturation. Hallelujah doesn’t give all of these unlikely developments BY JOSH BELL their full due, glossing over the reality shows in ven if you’ve never heard of Leonard a single, cringe-inducing montage, and allowing Cohen, you’ve almost certainly heard his major artists like Eric Church, Regina Spektor song “Hallelujah.” Maybe you’ve heard and Amanda Palmer only brief snippets of comthe version by Jeff Buckley, or John Cale, or mentary. After a relatively short but illuminating Rufus Wainwright, or a contestant on a TV singdetour, Hallelujah returns to Cohen, highlighting ing competition. Maybe you don’t even realize his late-life resurgence in popularity that owed that you’ve heard it, because it was playing at the quite a bit to the rise of “Hallelujah.” grocery store or in a movie or TV show. It’s one There are a lot of valuable insights in Halof those songs that’s become so ubiquitous that lelujah, about the sometimes arbitrary ways that it’s transitioned into background noise. art can find its way into the popular consciousFilmmakers Daniel Geller and Dayna ness and about how songs can take on different Goldfine aim to unpack that phenomenon meanings when HALLELUJAH: LEONARD interpreted by in their documentary Hallelujah: Leonard COHEN, A JOURNEY, A SONG Cohen, a Journey, a Song, inspired by the different artists. book by Alan Light. They’re only partially Rated PG-13 Anyone whose prisuccessful, though, delivering a sometimes Directed by Daniel Geller and Dayna Goldfine mary experience of At the Magic Lantern awkward mix of biography and cultural “Hallelujah” is as anthropology. The movie opens with the a now-clichéd bit late Cohen performing “Hallelujah” at his final of shorthand for mournful regret will likely gain concert in 2013, and spends the next hour or a new appreciation for the deep, personal soulso giving a summary of Cohen’s life and career, searching that Cohen put into its composition. leading up to the release of the original version of The problem is that those insights take up “Hallelujah” on his 1984 album Various Positions. only about a third of the two-hour movie, which is Cohen, who was a successful poet before otherwise a perfectly serviceable musical biograbecoming a singer-songwriter, had a fascinating phy about a landmark singer-songwriter. Cohen and varied career, but there’s nothing particularly was far more than just the man behind “Hallelucompelling about the way that Geller and Goldjah,” and the movie provides a good jumping-off fine lay out those details, employing standard point for exploring his other work. That’s what talking heads and archival footage. By the time any decent music documentary ought to do, Hallelujah gets to the recording of “Hallelujah,” though, and in its best moments Hallelujah is much it’s easy to forget that this isn’t just meant to be more expansive than that. It reaches for grand a straightforward Cohen career-overview piece. statements, but pulls back into the mundane. n

Hallelujah: Leonard Cohen, a Journey, a Song charts the evolution of an omnipresent hit

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The Song Remains the Same

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INDIE ROCK

Spilling the Tea Indie rock legend Doug Martsch chats about Built to Spill’s new album, When the Wind Forgets Your Name BY SETH SOMMERFELD

D

espite the inherent independent spirit evoked simply by its nomenclature, it’s not easy for indie rock to thrive just anywhere. Even in the age of internet democratization, most of the bestknown bands the genre has turned out either hail from major metroplexes or relocate to one in order to find a consistent audience and comparatively stable music scene. That fact makes Built to Spill’s decades of wildly influential success even more astounding. Bands like this aren’t supposed to be able to survive and thrive out of a place like Boise, Idaho. But since debuting in the early ’90s, the band led by singer-songwriter and guitar wiz Doug Martsch has put Idaho on the musical map. The group cemented its legacy with the late ’90s releases of the indie rock classics Perfect From Now On and Keep It Like a Secret, and has continued to maintain a level of excellence ever since. Martsch (and the rotating crew of bandmates around him) never focuses on flash or pizzaz, making Built to Spill a sort of reliable, working-person’s indie rock band.

After seven years without a new album (but plenty of touring during that time), Built to Spill is ready to unleash fresh tuneage to the world in the form of When the Wind Forgets Your Name, the band’s first LP for Sub Pop Records. Martsch largely crafted the new album at home with help from his pals in the Brazilian band Oruã (who served a stint as Built to Spill bandmates). The collection of sprawling, guitar-driven tracks should please Built to Spill diehards who’ve been clamoring for new songs. Before Built to Spill swings through Spokane, we caught up with Martsch to talk about keeping the band going with different members, his affinity for Spokane band Itchy Kitty, and creative struggles during pandemic times. INLANDER: What’s your favorite aspect about When the Wind Forgets Your Name? MARTSCH: My favorite thing, most exciting to me, was the artwork. Alex Graham’s [album cover]. I took a long time to try to figure out who to hire to do the art, and really she was just the perfect pick. I was a big fan of her comics. Basically I just let her do what she wanted, and she really killed it.

What did the guys in Oruã bring to table when making this new album? They’re Brazilian guys, but they grew up listening to a lot of kind of lo-fi alternative music from the U.S. So they kind of bring a little bit of both of those things. They keep things pretty simple, but they also have a little bit of the Brazilian music. I was big fan of the production they had done on Oruã, [singer Lê Almeida’s] solo stuff, and other bands that they’ve produced — weird lo-fi stuff, but doing things with filters or speeding up/slowing down tape — experimental, almost like collage kind of productions. So they brought some of that. Over the past decade, the Built to Spill band member lineups have changed frequently around you. Is that a purposeful decision to keep things fresh or more a case of availability of certain musicians? It’s a little bit of both. The Brazilians were [a case where] I needed some people to play with and I’d already

An unsually animated Martsch (center) and the Oruã guys. ALEX GRAHAM ILLUSTRATION

34 INLANDER AUGUST 4, 2022


booked these shows in Brazil. And I couldn’t find someone that was ready to learn the songs and go down there in time. So I reached out to these guys who I’d just met through this Brazilian woman, Isa, who was our tour manager in 2019. And she introduced me to them, and we just practiced for a couple of days then played the South American shows. And I just liked playing with them so much that we played together for the year. But they had to go back. Before I started playing with them, I’d spoken with Melanie [Radford] about playing [bass]. And we played a couple of gigs with a different drummer, and then I met Teresa [Esguerra] and fell in love with her drumming. And then we added her to the group, right around the time that the Brazilians headed back to Brazil. Part of being a successful band... a lot of it is just sticking it out and just managing to exist for a long enough time that enough people have heard about you. I’ve been fortunate to just be able to find people to play with and keep this thing going for a long time. How did you handle the creative struggles of COVID shutdown times? Well, creatively, I didn’t feel inspired at all; I felt a little bit shut down and didn’t really have much creative juices flowing. But we had begun the record right before COVID, and my plan all along was to make the record at home on my computer. So, you know, it kind of worked out well, but it was a little bit like pulling teeth. I didn’t have a lot of fun making the record. It wasn’t fun being in a vacuum working on it by myself. I didn’t feel a ton of inspiration, but did the work and got it done.

“I’ve been fortunate to just be able to find people to play with and keep this thing going for a long time.” It seems you remain pretty engaged in new music compared to some of your peers. For example, you stumbled across Spokane’s own Itchy Kitty and took them on tour. Are there certain things about new younger bands that tend to catch your attention? I don’t think there’s any one specific thing. I dunno, maybe just some soul or something. Itchy Kitty, to me, they were just so fun. They covered a lot of bases for me. For one thing, they’re just so powerful sounding. And they were just so scary and cool to look at. And they were funny. And their songs are short and cool. They just checked a lot of boxes. We’ve played with them a couple of times over the years, but never really had a chance to hang out with them. And then on these last couple of [tours] that we’ve done together in the winter and spring, I finally got a chance to hang out with them and get to know them a little bit. And they’re just some of my favorite people in the world, too. That’s a really special band. I do like a lot of new bands, but those guys are kind of next level. As maybe the most nationally respected musician from the Inland Northwest area, do you feel like you feel any obligation to champion music from this area? I guess I don’t really feel like the regional part of it is very important to me. It seems coincidental. The same with Boise. If there were no good bands in Boise, then we wouldn’t be going out on tour with bands from Boise, you know? To me that doesn’t matter. I don’t have much regional pride or feel any responsibility. There just happens to be killer bands in our own backyard. It’s not a regional thing, it’s just good music to me. Since there are so many great bands from this area, I do feel a pride about it now, but only because there happens to be those great bands. n Built to Spill, Prism Bitch, Pappas, Itchy Kitty • Thu, Aug. 11 at 8 pm • Sold Out • 21+ • Lucky You Lounge • 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. • luckyyoulounge.com • 509-474-0511

WEDNESDAY, AUG 10

RICK ESTRIN & THE NIGHTCATS

SATURDAY, AUG 27

PAULA FUGA

SUNDAY, SEP 25

MONOPHONICS

FRIDAY, OCT 28

WHO’S BAD: THRILLER NIGHTS

SUNDAY, OCT 30

LEONID & FRIENDS: WORLD’S GREATEST CHICAGO TRIBUTE

WEDNESDAY, DEC 14

JAKE SHIMABUKURO

SEE OUR OTHER EVENTS AT SBLENTERTAINMENT.COM AUGUST 4, 2022 INLANDER 35


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

COUNTRY DWIGHT YOAKAM & EMMYLOU HARRIS

W

hen it comes to authentic, rootsy country, it’s hard to beat this double bill. Dwight Yoakam’s built a career crafting a catalog that bounds easily from hardcore honky tonk to bluegrass to radio-friendly country-rock, and he might be the only country artist as comfortable covering Queen or Cheap Trick as he is Buck Owens. His show last fall in Spokane showed the man and his killer band are still excellent live performers. Emmylou Harris is quite simply a legend. From her early years performing with Gram Parsons to her collaborations with Linda Ronstadt, Dolly Parton, Neil Young and others, and her lengthy solo career that includes must-own albums like Red Dirt Girl and Wrecking Ball, Harris is a creative free spirit. She also happens to have one of those voices that cuts through the din and brings noisy showgoers to an awestruck stand-still. Let’s hope Yoakam and Harris find a reason to duet on Friday. — DAN NAILEN Dwight Yoakam, Emmylou Harris and the Red Dirt Boys • Fri, Aug. 5 at 7:30 pm • $59-$109 • All ages • Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com • 509-481-2800

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 8/4

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Current Flow BRICK WEST BREWING CO., Kyle Richard COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Blues Traveler COEUR D’ALENE PARK, Villa Blues ‘N Jazz HAYDEN CITY PARK, Zonky IDAHO CENTRAL CREDIT UNION ARENA, Justin James Band THE LODGE AT CARLIN BAY, Keanu J THE NEST AT KENDALL YARDS, T.S. The Solution PINE STREET PLAZA, Blaine Ross POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Sam Leyde J QQ SUSHI & KITCHEN, Just Plain Darin J REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Hillfolk Noir SHERMAN SQUARE PARK, What About Bob J SOUTH PERRY LANTERN, Gil Rivas J J WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, Festival at Sandpoint: The Beach Boys ZOLA, Desperate8s

Friday, 8/5

AK ASIAN RESTAURANT, Gil Rivas J THE BIG DIPPER, Coaster, Eazz, Nathan Chartrey, The Flynn Effect, Kaleb J., Ju, DJ Sacks Goldman BOLO’S BAR & GRILL, Chasing Eos CHAN’S RED DRAGON ON THIRD, Usual Suspects CHINOOK CRAFTED BY ADAM HEGSTED, Kyle Swaffard CURLEY’S, Haze

36 INLANDER AUGUST 4, 2022

DARK FOLK STEVE VON TILL

A

s a guitarist and singer for the beloved and nebulous metal band Neurosis, Steve Von Till and his bandmates helped create music that was both atmospheric and heavy as it blended hardcore, sludge and industrial in an experimental painter’s palette of sounds. Von Till’s solo work is equally difficult to pin down as he mixes bleak heavy avantgarde instrumentals that hang like thick clouds of smog with growling low bellows of poetic expression to create songs whose menacing edge belie their tender beauty. — SETH SOMMERFELD Steve Von Till, Helen Money • Fri, Aug 5 at 8 pm • $15 • 21+ • Lucky You Lounge • 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. • luckyyoulounge.com • 509-474-0511 IRON HORSE (CDA), The Happiness J KNITTING FACTORY, Whitey Morgan THE LODGE AT CARLIN BAY, Carli Osika J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Steve Von Till, Helen Money LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Ladies Night: DJ Priestess J MAJESTIC PARK, Soul Proprietor MILLIE’S, The Shift MOOSE LOUNGE, Whack A Mole NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Pastiche J J NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Dwight Yoakam, Emmylou Harris, The Red Dirt Boys OLD MILL BAR AND GRILL, Ed Shaw J ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, Laketown Sound

PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Bright Moments THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Just Plain Darin SILVER MOUNTAIN RESORT, Sam Leyde TRANCHE, The Knockdowns J J WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, Festival at Sandpoint: Gregory Alan Isakov, Shook Twins J WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY, Fridays at the Clock Concert Series

Saturday, 8/6

BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE, Carly Rogers BERSERK, Alex Lightspeed, Sylvain J THE BIG DIPPER, Scatterbox, Dehiscent, DarkMysticWoods, Dazer BOLO’S BAR & GRILL, Chasing Eos

CAVE B ESTATE WINERY, Billy Prine and the Prine Time Band present The Songs of John Prine CHAN’S RED DRAGON, Papa D and Studebaker Road CHINOOK CRAFTED BY ADAM HEGSTED, Kyle Swaffard CURLEY’S, Haze D-MAC’S AT THE LAKE, The Black Jack Band DAHMEN BARN, Paradox J HILL’S RESORT, Gil Rivas IRON HORSE (CDA), The Happiness J LEBANON RESTAURANT & CAFÉ, Safar J LIVE AT ANDRE’S, Steve Azar LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Hot Club of Spokane LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Tim Snider & Wolfgang Timbers

MCINTIRE FAMILY PARK, Pastiche MILLIE’S, The Shift MOOSE LOUNGE, Whack A Mole NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Pastiche NOAH’S CANTEEN, Son of Brad NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Brett Young J ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, Laketown Sound PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Zach Simms J PONDEROSA BAR AND GRILL, Lyons and King POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Okay Honey Q’EMILN PARK, The Jesse Quandt Band J ROCKET MARKET, Betsy Rogue TRANCHE, Dead Lee


J J WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, Festival at Sandpoint: Lindsey Stirling, Carmen Jane ZOLA, Blake Braley

Sunday, 8/7

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, David Raitt & The Baja Boogie Band BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE, Carly Rogers J THE BIG DIPPER, Supersuckers, Speedealer CURLEY’S, Coleman Underground IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Rusty Jackson & the Spokane River Band J LIVE AT ANDRE’S, Freddy Jones Band J ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, Mel Dalton J SOUTH HILL GRILL, Just Plain Darin J J WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, Festival at Sandpoint Grand Finale: The Spokane Symphony

Monday, 8/8

J COEUR D’ALENE PUBLIC LIBRARY, Rusty Jackson Trio J EICHARDT’S PUB, Monday Blues Jam with John Firshi RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic Night

Tuesday, 8/9

COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, Zonky J KNITTING FACTORY, August Burns Red, We Came As Romans, Hollow Front, Void of Vision LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Kiltro, Nic Vigil ZOLA, Lucas Brown & Friends

Wednesday, 8/10

BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE, Wine Wednesday: Okay Honey BING CROSBY THEATER, Rick Estrin & the Nightcats FALLS PARK, Market & Music Summer Concert Series: Justyn Priest Band J KENDALL YARDS, Ben Clark, Suhanna Jens, Jona Gallegos LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Haunted Summer, Scott Ingersoll J MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Amos Lee, Danielle Ponder ONE TREE CIDER HOUSE, The Hanks PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Dwayne Parsons RED ROOM LOUNGE, The Roomates ZOLA, Runaway Lemonade

Coming Up ...

J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Built to Spill, Prism Bitch, Pappas, Itchy Kitty, Aug. 11, 8 pm J J LATAH COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, Moscow Mountain Music Fest, Aug. 13, 12-11 pm J J PAVILION AT RIVERFRONT, Iration, Atmosphere, Katastro, The Grouch with DJ Fresh, Aug. 13, 7 pm J J KNITTING FACTORY, Lukas Nelson & Promise of The Real, Aug. 13, 8 pm J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Hurray For the Riff Raff, Aug. 13, 8 pm J J KNITTING FACTORY, Sum 41, Simple Plan, Aug. 14, 7 pm

Health

Home

Food

Family

People

Etc.

August/September Issue ON STANDS NOW! Pick up your copy at area grocery stores and Inlander stand locations For information on advertising in the next edition, contact: advertising@inlander.com

AUGUST 4, 2022 INLANDER 37


COMEDY RHYMES WITH “LAUGH AGAIN”

Jim Gaffigan is truly an everyman’s comedian. Sure, his clean style and relatable riffs on family and food play incredibly well for generalist Middle America audiences, but his sharp joke craft (honed with the aid of his wife, Jeannie) also makes him a beloved comic’s comic. Even when musing about topics as broad as camping, seasons, or Hot Pockets, there’s an underlying cynicism that cuts through the mundanity. Basically, he can kill whether he’s in a hip comedy club in New York or performing to an arena full of people because his wit has mass appeal in a way that very few stand-ups can match. Join the legions filling Spokane Arena with laughter as Gaffigan’s “The Fun Tour” swings through town. — SETH SOMMERFELD Jim Gaffigan • Tue, Aug. 9 at 7 pm • $40-$100 • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • spokanearena.com • 509-279-7000

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

38 INLANDER AUGUST 4, 2022

FESTIVAL AT THE HEART

THEATER SECOND STAR TO THE RIGHT

Plein air artists paint out-of-doors so it’s definitely fitting that Coeur d’Alene’s annual three-day art extravaganza features a new outdoor painting event. Art on the Green is one of three festivals taking place this weekend in the heart of downtown Coeur d’Alene and the only featuring all things arts related. Located throughout North Idaho College’s shaded campus, enjoy the cooling lake breezes and as you check out local and regional artwork, listen to live music, and see the judges’ picks for the juried art show. Have a bite at the food court, watch this year’s sand sculpture constructed right before your eyes — an annual tradition — and don’t miss the clothesline for bargain-priced art. — CARRIE SCOZZARO

There’s something magical about nostalgia. Nothing can ever quite replace the feeling of remembering something from your childhood, and being so overcome with the memories associated with it. Peter Pan is a perfect example of this phenomenon. I remember sitting longingly by my window at night, hoping I would see a star twinkle and then be whisked off to Neverland. It never happened, but a girl can dream. If you’re looking to capture that magical feeling, join the Lake Pend Oreille Repertory Theater for its summer camp performance of Peter Pan and adventure with Wendy, Tink, Peter and company as they try to escape Captain Hook. All you need is faith, trust and a bit of pixie dust! — MADISON PEARSON

Art on the Green • Aug. 5-7, Fri from 11 am-7:30 pm, Sat from 10 am-7:30 pm, Sun from 10 am-4 pm • Free • All ages • North Idaho College • 495 N. College Drive, Coeur d’Alene • artonthegreen.org • 208-667-9346

Peter Pan • Fri, Aug. 5 at 5 pm and Sat, Aug. 6 at 2 pm • $10 • Panida Theater • 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • panida.org • 208-263-9191


PRESENTED BY: PULLMAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, CITY OF PULLMAN + WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY

August 19-20, 2022 | Pullman, WA Featuring

Tyler Rich

August 20 on the Hometown Chevy Main Stage FREE TO ATTEND!

SPORTS GOOD CRAIC

Maybe you’re one of the 3 percent of Spokanites with Scottish heritage. Or maybe you’re part of the 97 percent who love Scotch, shortbread and fuzzy cows. Either way, “we’re a’ Jock Tamson’s bairns,” (translated: we’re all created equal) and everyone is welcome at this year’s Scottish Highland Games. For one day, the fairgrounds are dedicated to preserving and celebrating Scottish culture. Take a gander at hulking feats of athleticism, country dancing demonstrations, baking competitions, Robert Burns poetry readings, and a shepherding exhibition. Be aware that all athletes must compete in kilt and long hose to be eligible for awards. See beautiful “heilan’ coos” (Highland cows) and Clydesdale horses while you listen to traditional bagpipe marches and piobaireachd. The Games open with the most deeply entrenched ritual: a Scottish vs. Irish tug of war. But all is fun and games, and no matter what you’ll be able to turn to your neighbor at the end of the day to wish them good fortune: “Lang may yer lum reek!” — ELIZA BILLINGHAM Spokane Scottish Highland Games • Sat, Aug. 6 from 9 am-5:30 pm • $5$10 • All ages • Spokane County Fair & Expo Center • 404 N. Havana St. • spokanehighlandgames.net

Thanks to All Our Superheroes!

Last month’s Superhero for Kids event at Providence Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital raised more than $55,000 to help our region’s ill and injured children. It’s not too late to be a superhero!

at give.providence.org/inw/CMNH-Superheroes or scan the QR Code.

COMMUNITY HI-JINX ENSUE

Spokane is filled with unique, historic neighborhood pockets, but there’s something special about Hillyard in the city’s northeast corner. Neighborhood pride there runs strong and deep, and so does the history of the annual Hillyard Festival, celebrated every summer (always the first weekend of August) for over a century. Of course, you don’t have to be a resident to come out and enjoy all the fun, history and community pride Hillyard has to offer. Weekend-long events include a bingo and beer garden, plus local vendors and daily entertainment in Harmon Park. The famous Hillyard Hi-Jinx Parade along Market starts moving at 10 am Saturday, with a fireworks show (weather permitting) later that night. The Roll ’n’ Hillyard Car Show is a Sunday highlight, and opens at 11 am. Find a complete schedule and entertainment lineup online. — CHEY SCOTT

Special thanks to these community superheroes for making this event possible:

Hillyard Festival • Aug. 5-7; Fri from noon-10 pm, Sat from 9 am-10 pm, Sun from 10 am-5 pm • Free • All ages • Harmon Park • 6018 N. Regal St. • hillyardfestival.com

AUGUST 4, 2022 INLANDER 39


CHEERS TO ME, A BICYCLIST! Yea! I don’t have to stop at stop signs and can treat them as if they’re yield signs. Neener neener! Seriously it’s true see rcw 46.61.190. Sorry, motorists, you still have to stop and I wish more of you would (red lights too). And try stopping behind the crosswalk, not in the middle of it.

I SAW YOU YELLOW BIKINI I saw you on the Harrison (ID) public dock Saturday (7/23) afternoon. You walked off the dock with cutoff jeans shorts & a yellow bikini top, I think went for a swim, and came back on the dock when we made eye contact, with you wearing just the bikini set (sans shorts). A sight to behold! I was on the dock tending to watercraft. Like to connect while still summer:) KENDALL YARDS KUTIE YOU: Shorthaired brunette on bike Wed (7/27) around 8 am on trail junction at Kendall. You were riding downriver, short, loose black shorts. Me: Turned off at Kendall, Tux jersey, lights on bike. We exchanged smiles. I’ve seen you b4 up near Petit Dr couple years ago; would like to see more of you. Lol. Maybe meet for vino?? Ride safe!

CHEERS CYCLIST CAN USE STOP SIGNS AS YIELD SIGNS Hi to DD and all other motorists, the governor signed into law in 2021 a ruling that bicyclists can regard STOP signs as YIELD signs. So many of us do blast thru STOP signs because it is approved by those in charge. Thanks for reading and understanding. RDA

Yes, that’s right! At the time you could have sent them to Harvard University for that. So WHERE are you going to store their stuff as you are sending them to Harvard? SECOND TERM, NADINE? Are You high? You have done Nothing!, except turn

CATHEDRAL PLAZA LADIES Before my 84-year-old Mom passed away, she said, “Being old is not for wimps.” I laughed at that time, and I now know at age 86 how right she was. I’d like to praise three lovely & wonderful ladies (who are in their 80s-90s) living at Cathedral Plaza for their sturdiness & willingness to go on with smiles on their beautiful faces, in spite of their painful aging disabilities. So Sharon, Annie & Adrienne, let me proudly say that all of you are loved & deeply admired. We are not “wimps,” we still think & speak intelligently & enjoy hearing a funny story now & then.

YOU READY TO PAY FOR DIGNITY? The fastest route to I-90 west from Freya south of Sprague is NOT to go to the light but turn on Riverside and jog over Sprague to Second then onto the freeway. Which takes one right past the encampment at Second and Ralph/ Ray. If you’ve driven past (and you should) you will see a VAST collection of stuff. With the intense interest in the Dignity of housing the people there in New Facilities, EXACTLY what is going to happen to ALL of their stuff? You think the people there are just going to grab a toothbrush and a clean pair of underwear and waltz off to their new dorm room lodgings? OH! The indignity! Would you Leave ALL of your stuff behind? The experiment over the winter at the convention center I’m guessing educated NO ONE! Lots of money spent. Lots of damage done. Little gained. If I remember right (and this has been YEARS ago) to house an incarcerated person in the prison system in the US was something like 35-50 THOUSAND a year.

annoyed because I couldn’t tell what race he was-----seriously?! It shouldn’t matter if he’s from Mars; the dude was out & I didn’t know if he was dead, sleeping or what, and I’m too scared to investigate. That’s why you’re here supposedly. Why does it matter what race the person is? Once I called because

Somehow people don’t get that their freedom ends where it takes away another’s.

Spokane into an embarrassment! The Homeless are the fastest-growing part of our city! Crime is out of control! There are no police for stopping speeders, road ragers, under the influence drivers! Our streets are an ever-growing danger and embarrassment! Look at Jewels Helping Hands, Spokane Catholic Charities, the City Council — they all have momentum, you are a roadblock! One term has been all we can stomach!

JEERS

“represents” are some of the mosttalented, highly experienced, creative broadcast and digital production professionals in the country. Your constituents actually make movies here, with real Hollywood stars! And Spokane/ Eastern Washington advertising firms have extensive experience and expertise

BE A GOOD NEIGHBOR — OR ELSE! If everyone kept an eye toward being a good neighbor and keeping their front yard nice-looking, meaning no junk cars or RVs, old refrigerators, toilets, trash and etc, the city of Spokane Valley would not have to legislate it. Drive around the valley and there’s some properties so bad there’s trash, junk and clutter spilling out into the street. Somehow people don’t get that their freedom ends where it takes away another’s. THERE’S NO PLACE LIKE HOME Who does Rep. Cathy M. Rodgers really represent? She is easily spending a Million Plus on her umpteenth re-election campaign, using a high-priced Eastern Washington (DC) company to produce very unnecessarily expensive commercials and purchase huge amounts of broadcast, print and digital media throughout our Eastern Washington. Among the people she

SOUND OFF

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

in all media, as well as highly skilled creative experts to craft your message. Next time you run a campaign, Rep. Rodgers, please remember who you are supposed to represent and come home to spend your money. There IS no place like Home. PROTECT YOUR FURRY FRIENDS This Jeers goes to everyone who does not keep their dogs on a leash in public. Spokane leash law WAC-35232060 says your dog must be either on a leash, harness, or in a container when you take the pets in public. Obvious exceptions of course are pet parks and pet stores where free roaming is allowed. I keep seeing people with dogs not on a leash, & when I mention it to the dog owner I’m called “dog hater.” I love dogs which is why I’m writing this. The leash law is for everyone’s safety, including yours and your dogs. If your little dog is not on a leash, anyone can scoop up your dog & run. What if your dog runs out in the middle of traffic & causes a wreck? Think about it. Also, a big BOO-HISS to people who put their dogs in truck beds. So many of them are terrified & want to leap out. DD CHECK UP ON CRIME CHECK Hey Crime Check, I called 7-30-22 to report a guy passed out in his car. You passed me around three times, and you were all

of domestic violence across the way from me & what color the perp’s eyes were!! Really? Someone needs to check up on Crime Check. I had the car description, license number and basic description of the guy; it should have been enough for you. With my luck he probably moved on before SPD even got there. CAPITALISM It looks like more PGA golfers have decided that a little backlash from civil right groups is well worth the money LIV Golf (Saudi backed) is forking out. I don’t blame them because capitalism is an American way of life. But when the ex-president’s son-in-law and secretary of Treasury each receive billion-dollor loans from said Saudis, it stops being based on capitalism and becomes quid pro quo. n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS I F I M A L P E T O O L O D O U R N L S A T T I N A T O B K M C G E T O N Y E M E T B I L N O S A A S S E

C E B E U L T O

H O A U L T

M I A L E C O Y L A E B E N A A A L S L E S S

P R I B O B E R L L E M N T I D I X I L N E T R T O O E D U N E T

L I N K E D I N

E A D S P S O N S I D E A G E N G E R O O R S C U E D T G I F S O A R I B O T E A D E K B E T S B A I O A L C S

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Wands & Wizards Night! Saturday Aug 6th - 6:35PM

vs.

Come dressed as your favorite witch or wizard and prepare yourself for other magical surprises throughout the night. Plus Dairy Queen Circle the Bases after the game. Presented by:

Visit 40 INLANDER AUGUST 4, 2022

for Tickets

Games Through Sunday 8/7

FREE PARKING


EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMEDY

RAANAN HERSHBERG The musical comedian’s album Self-Helpless has been featured on the Late Show. Aug. 4, 7:30 pm and Aug. 5, 7:30 & 10 pm. $12-$26. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com SUMMER IMPROV CHAOS The Blue Door Theater players turn you summer mishaps into laughs and better memories. Fridays at 7:30 pm through Aug. 26. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheater.com SAFARI A fast-paced, short-form comedic improv show. Saturdays from 7:30-9 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com STEVE HOFSTETTER Hofstetter is the host of Finding Babe Ruth on FS1. His book, Ginger Kid, is a top five pick on Amazon. Aug. 6, 7 & 9:30 pm. $25$100. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com CARLOS MENCIA The Honduran-born American comedian, writer and actor’s style is often political and involves issues of race, culture, criminal justice and social class. Aug. 7, 5 & 8:30 pm. $25-$40. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com JIM GAFFIGAN The “clean” comic is known for his unique style based off of his observations about life. Aug. 9, 7 pm. $39.75-$99.75. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com MICHAEL WINSLOW The actor, comedian and beatboxer is billed as “The Man of 10,000” sound effects. Aug. 11, 7:30 pm, Aug. 12, 7 & 9:45 pm and Aug. 13, 6:30 & 9:30 pm. $20-$35. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com

COMMUNITY

THE RUM REBELLION: PROHIBITION IN NORTH IDAHO Featuring historical photographs, newspaper articles and artifacts, this exhibit tells the story of how the panhandle of Idaho was anything but dry during Prohibition. Daily 11 am-5 pm through Oct. 29. $2-$6. Museum of North Idaho, 115 Northwest Blvd. museumni.org WORKSOURCE SPOKANE VIRTUAL JOB FAIR Hear from local businesses about their company’s culture and current job openings. Aug. 4, 1-3 pm. Free. bit.ly/3Jb9ZOc (509-532-3186) HILLYARD FESTIVAL The annual festival features food trucks, a beer garden, a

parade and live entertainment. Aug. 5-7. Free. Harmon Park, 6000 N. Market St. hillyardfestival.com COEUR D’ALENE STREET FAIR Featuring food, fine art, crafts, clothing and more. Aug. 5-7; FriSat from 10 am-8 pm, Sun from 10 am-4 pm. Downtown Coeur d’Alene. cdadowntown.com CHEWELAH CASINO CRUISIN’ CAR SHOW The annual car show features a barbecue, beer garden and live DJ along with this year’s selection of cars from community members. Aug. 6, 3-8 pm. Free. Chewelah Casino, 2555 Smith Rd. chewelahcasino.com CHIC & SHAB / PAINT IN MY HAIR OUTDOOR SALE The third annual sale includes discounted furniture and home decor as well as food and beverages for customers. Aug. 6, 9 am-5 pm. Chic & Shab, 2321 N. Monroe. chicandshab.com DROP IN & RPG Stop by and explore the world of role playing games. Build a shared narrative using cooperative problem solving, exploration, imagination and rich social interaction. First and Third Sat. of every month, 1-3:45 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org LIBERTY LAKE SUMMER FEST: BAREFOOT IN THE PARK This community car show features a beer garden, food vendors and familyfriendly activities. Aug. 6, 9 am-9 pm. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. pavillionpark.org (509-755-6726) NATIONAL NIGHT OUT Celebrate uniting the community with first responders and businesses to help get crime and drugs out of neighborhoods. Free activities include exploration of SWAT vehicles, face painting, vendors, food and raffles. Aug. 6, 3-7 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Mall, 14700 E. Indiana Ave. natw.org (509-477-3305) OPEN BARN: FREE REIN THERAPEUTIC RIDING An open house for the new location of Free Rein. Includes light refreshments, riding demos, barn tours, a raffle and more. Aug. 6, 2-5 pm. Free. Free Rein Therapeutic Riding, 6919 N. Walnut Road. freereinspokane.com PANIDA THEATER OPEN HOUSE Stop in for a tour, a cold brew or just to check out classic Charlie Chaplin shorts. Saturdays from 12-4 pm through Aug. 20. Free. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-263-9191) PACIFIC ISLANDERS ASSOCIATION SUMMER GATHERING A gathering for long-time and first-time attendees

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FILM

DREAMWORKS ANIMATION: THE EXHIBITION From the makers of Shrek, Madagascar, Kung Fu Panda, How to Train Your Dragon and Trolls, comes an exhibition celebrating over 25 years of DreamWorks Animation. Through Sept. 11; Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm (third Thursdays until 9 pm). $15-$20. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org THE TERMINATOR Presented by the Moscow Film Society as part of its “Retro Macho Action Hero” series. Aug. 4, 7-9 pm. $5. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) FIRE OF LOVE Intrepid scientists and lovers Katia and Maurice Krafft died in a volcanic explosion doing the very thing that brought them together: unraveling the mysteries of volcanoes by capturing the most explosive imagery ever recorded. Aug. 5, 7 pm, Aug. 6, 4 & 7 pm and Aug. 7, 4 pm. $7. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org MOVIES IN THE PARK The Salvation Army Spokane’s family friendly summer movie series, Fridays at Sally’s Park. All movies begin at sundown. Bring blankets and lawn chairs; snacks and drinks are available. Free. The Salvation Army Spokane, 222 E. Indiana Ave. salvationarmyspokane.org SUMMER MOONLIGHT MOVIES: ENCANTO Bring a lawn chair, blankets, snacks and enjoy a movie under the moonlight. Movie begins at dusk. Aug. 5. Free. Sunset Park, 924 S. Lawson St. airwayheightsprksandrec.org SUMMER CAMP: THE OUTSIDERS Part of the Garland’s cult classic series. Aug. 7, 5 pm, Aug. 9, 7:10 pm and Aug. 11, 10 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com

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AUGUST 4, 2022 INLANDER 41


EVENTS | CALENDAR

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INDULGE & INSPIRE: WINE DINNER & ART DISPLAY This experience offers a glimpse into local artist Wilson J. Ong’s personal collection with a wine-pairing dinner menu inspired by his work. Aug. 4, 6 pm. $175. Beverly’s, 115 S. Second St. beverlyscda.com (208-765-4000) TASTE OF COEUR D’ALENE The annual festival features a beer garden with local microbrews, food vendors, live music and arts/crafts vendors. Aug. 5-7. Free. Coeur d’Alene City Park, 415 W. Mullan Rd. panhandlekiwanis.org DRAG BRUNCH Watch Nova Caine and the cast of Runway perform while enjoying a full breakfast menu and mimosas. Sundays from 10 am-2 pm. Globe Bar & Kitchen, 204 N. Division. globespokane.com (509-443-4014) RIVERFRONT EATS Riverfront Park’s local food truck series. Tuesdays from 11 am-2 pm through Aug. 30. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.org GRAINMAKER BEER & GRAIN FESTIVAL Celebrate beer and grain culture throughout the Inland Northwest with special one-off brews, unique beers, conversations with brewers from around the region and more. Aug. 12, 4-9 pm. $50. YaYa Brewing Company, 11712 E. Montgomery Dr. yayabrewing.com

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SPOKANE INDIANS VS. EUGENE EMERALDS Promos during the sixgame series include $100 Strikeout Night and Lawton Team Photo Giveaway (Aug. 4), Marvel Super Hero Night (Aug. 5), Wands and Wizards Night (Aug. 6) and AugtoberFest Day (Aug. 7). Aug. 4-6, 6:35 pm and Aug. 7, 1:05 pm. $8-$22. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. milb.com/spokane SCRAMBLE FOR HOSPICE GOLF TOURNAMENT A scramble-format golf tournament that supports northeast Washington’s only nonprofit hospice. Aug. 5, 8:30 am-1 pm. $125. Indian Canyon Golf Course, 4303 W. West Dr. hospiceofspokane.org LAKE CITY JUNIOR RODEO The 8th annual rodeo hosted by the Gem State Stampede Rodeo Committee invites young adults and children to participate in various events. Free to spectate. Aug. 6, 11 am and Aug. 7, 9 am. $20-$30. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. kcfairgrounds.com THE LONG BRIDGE SWIM This 1.76mile swim across Lake Pend Oreille offers the chance for friends and family of swimmers to follow along the course from the bridge. Aug. 6, 9 am. $55. Sandpoint. longbridgeswim.org SPIKE & DIG An outdoor, co-ed, sixon-six volleyball tournament with over 200 teams competing. Aug. 6-7. $210$300. Dwight Merkel Sports Complex, 5701 N. Assembly St. spikeanddig.com SPOKANE MIDNIGHT CENTURY A 100-mile bike ride through Spokane, to Liberty Lake, the Palouse, into Spangle and back. No registration required. Aug. 6, 11:59 pm. Free. The Elk Public House, 1931 W. Pacific Ave.

midnightcentury.com SPOKANE SCOTTISH HIGHLAND GAMES A day of entertainment, traditional Highland competitions, dancing and merchant booths. Aug. 6, 9 am-5:30 pm. $5-$10. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. spokanehighlandgames.net WALK, RUN, READ! In addition to a 5k and Kid’s Dash, the event also features a a book swap/sale and activities including a scavenger hunt. All proceeds support The Literacy Project of North Idaho, an adult literacy program helping adults to learn more, earn more and do more. Aug. 6, 8 am. $10-$25. Black Bay Park, 1299 E. 3rd St. theliteracyprojectni.org AUTHENTIC INDIAN YOGA Devika Gates leads an authentic Indian Yoga session. Wear loose clothing, bring a yoga mat and come prepared for gentle exercise. Aug. 7, 3:30-4:30 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org RIVERFRONT MOVES: PILATES IN THE PARK Precision Pilates classes welcomes all levels. Aug. 9 and Aug. 16, 6-7 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.org FLAT TRACK MOTORCYCLE RACING Watch national professionals go up against local racing pros. Includes amateur racing for riders of all ages. Aug. 10, 6-10 pm. $8-$15. Spokane County ORV Park, 12402 Sprague Avenue. (630-217-9132) DAN KLECKNER’S GOLF CLASSIC All proceeds from the two-day tournament support wounded warriors and local veterans. Aug. 12-13, 7 am-8 pm. $160. Downriver Golf Course, 3225 N. Columbia Circle. northwestgolfersforwarriors.org

THEATER

THE ADDAMS FAMILY A new spin on the Addams Family story. Aug. 5-7, Fri-Sun at 7 pm, Sat at 3 pm. $14-$18. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com PETER PAN The Lake Pend Oreille Repertory Theater’s summer camp performance. Aug. 5, 5 pm and Aug. 6, 2 pm. $10. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org SISTER ACT A woman in a convent helps her fellow sisters find their voices as she rediscovers her own. Aug. 5-21, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $25$41. University High School, 12320 E. 32nd Ave. svsummertheatre.com A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM Performed by the Idaho Repertory Theatre Summer Drama Camp for Kids. Aug. 6, 3 pm. $10. Hartung Theater, 875 Perimeter Dr. uidaho.edu/theatre COME FROM AWAY This New York Times Critics’ Pick takes you into the heart of the remarkable true story of 7,000 stranded passengers on 9/11 and the small town in Newfoundland that welcomed them. Aug. 9-13 at 7:30 pm; also Aug. 13 at 2 pm and Aug. 14 at 1 and 6:30 pm. $42-$100. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. broadwayspokane.com SPOKANE VALLEY SUMMER THEATRE RISING STARS This second annual showcase features talented teens and young adults pursuing musical theatre and studying in training programs across the nation. Aug. 9, 7:30 pm. $20-$30. University


High School, 12320 E. 32nd Ave. svsummertheatre.com

— FEATURING —

VISUAL ARTS

ART ON THE GREEN This year 120 artists, musicians and performers come together to provide art and entertainment. Aug. 5-7, Fri 11 am9:30 pm, Sat 10 am-9:30 pm and Sun 10 am-4 pm. Free. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. artonthegreencda.com THE ARTWORK OF BETTY BRADLEY The watercolorist and longstanding member of the FSPA showcases paintings created throughout her life. Fri, Aug. 5 from 3-7 pm and Sat, Aug. 6 from 11-5 pm. Free. New Moon Art Gallery, 1326 E. Sprague. manicmoonandmore.com CARL RICHARDSON & GARRIC SIMONSEN Collage by Carl Richardson and drawings by Garric Simonsen. Reception Fri, Aug. 5 from 5-8 pm. Gallery open by appointment through Aug 31. Free. Kolva-Sullivan Gallery, 115 S. Adams St. kolva-sullivangallery.com CLEANING OFF THE SHELVES SALE The annual sale features $25 grab bags with four ceramic pieces, plus various discounted pieces. Aug. 5, 5-8 pm and Aug. 6-31, 12-4 pm. $25. Trackside Studio, 115 S. Adams St. tracksidestudio.net FIRST FRIDAY Art galleries and businesses across Spokane host receptions to showcase new displays of art. Aug. 5, from 5-8 pm. Details at firstfridayspokane.org n

WORDS

POETRY PRELUDE: CHRIS COOK A poetry reading before music by Villa Blues. Aug. 4, 6 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Park, 300 S. Chestnut St. KORREKTIV PRESS POETS An evening with regional poets Jonathan Potter, Chris Cook, Mark Anderson, Thom Caraway and Brian Jobe. Aug. 4, 7-8 pm. Free. Wishing Tree Books, 1410 E. 11th Ave. wishingtreebookstore.com SPOKANE AUTHORS & SELFPUBLISHERS Brooke Matson of Spark Central speaks about its Drop-In & Write events, volunteer opportunities and more. Aug. 4, 11:30 am-1 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley. spokaneauthors.org 3 MINUTE MIC FEATURING CARA LORELLO The Spokane journalist and writer reads from her debut poetry collection, “But At Least You’re Beautiful.” Aug. 5, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com AUTHORS WRITING MYSTERY IN SPOKANE Authors Patricia Meredith (Spokane Clock Tower Mysteries), Chris Bieker (Rex Begonia Mysteries) and Dave Reynolds (Not Forgotten) share how they were inspired by Spokane to write mysteries in three separate genres. Aug. 6, 5-6 pm. Free. The Well-Read Moose, 2048 N. Main. wellreadmoose.com NORTHWEST PASSAGES: JIM DEFEDE A event with the former Spokesman-Review reporter whose book tells the true stories that inspired the musical “Come From Away.” Aug. 8, 7-9 pm. $7-$30. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. s p o k e s m a n . c o m /n o r t h w e s t passages (509-227-7404) n

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UPDATES

Evaluating Impacts

91.6 percent of cannabis users partake in other substances, like the occasional glass of wine.

Nearly a decade into legalization, July saw a flurry of reflection on what it’s meant BY WILL MAUPIN

A

mericans took a good look at their relationship with cannabis over the final days of July. These stories show that we’re learning more about how we consume the drug, how we feel about its presence in our society and how our legal system has failed at it in the past.

WE’RE CONSUMING MORE THAN JUST CANNABIS

A study by researchers from the University of Washington published July 22 in the Journal of Cannabis Research took a look at substance consumption patterns among Americans who use cannabis. They found that among Americans who reported consuming cannabis within the past 30 days, only 8.4 percent consumed no other psychoactive substances, which includes illicit drugs, alcohol, tobacco and prescription medications used in a way not prescribed by a doctor. These results might seem to paint a picture that cannabis users are substance-abuse fiends. However, the methodology employed means that someone who

44 INLANDER AUGUST 4, 2022

reported smoking a joint within the past month, and also reported enjoying a glass of wine with dinner on occasion, falls in the 91.6 percent of cannabis users who use more than just cannabis.

NATIONAL NEWSPAPER ENDORSEMENT

In editorials published in 2012, 2014 and 2018, the USA Today Editorial Board gave its opinion on legalization, and each time the board came down against it. This past weekend, however, the board reversed course and expressed its opinion that federal prohibition does more harm than good. In its 2022 editorial, the board cited the economic impact, the dramatic shift in public opinion from split to overwhelmingly in favor, the racial inequities of prohibition and the declining use among minors in legal states — which was a concern the board had worried about in previous opinions against legalization — as reasons why it’s time to end the federal ban.

CAPITOL HILL COMMOTION

Just a week after a legalization bill was introduced in the Senate, U.S. Reps. Troy Carter, D-La., and Rodney Davis, R-Ill., introduced the bipartisan Marijuana Misdemeanor Expungement Act in the House. While it would not go so far as to legalize cannabis, this legislation would open up a process for those charged with federal cannabis-related misdemeanors to have their records expunged. “These misdemeanors — even without a conviction — can result in restrictions to people’s ability to access educational aid, housing assistance, occupational licensing and even foster parenting,” Carter said in a statement. “We must ensure that our criminal justice system keeps pace so that individuals with low-level misdemeanor violations related to its use does not preclude them from getting jobs and participating in society,” Davis added. n


BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

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AUGUST 4, 2022 INLANDER 45


GREEN ZONE

NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a five-year sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

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AUGUST 4, 2022 INLANDER 47


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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8 TH 7 PM | $50 & UP

Must be age 18 or older to attend concerts. Purchase tickets at cdacasino.com, the Casino Box Office, or through the CDA Casino App. Call 1 800-523-2464 for more details. For full lineup and details scan QR Code.

W E LC O M E H O M E .

48 INLANDER AUGUST 4, 2022

CASINO

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HOTEL

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DINING

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SPA

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CHAMPIONSHIP

GOLF

3 7 9 1 4 S O U T H N U K WA LQ W • W O R L E Y, I D A H O 8 3 8 76 • 1 8 0 0 - 5 2 3 - 2 4 6 4 • C D A C A S I N O . C O M