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SELLING SEX NEW DETAILS IN THE ONGOING PROBE PAGE 13

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INSIDE VOL. 25, NO. 37 | COVER PHOTO: JAMES NISBET

COMMENT 5 NEWS 13 COVER STORY 22

CULTURE 35 FOOD 41 FILM 46

MUSIC 51 EVENTS 56 GREEN ZONE 60

EDITOR’S NOTE

G

rowing up in the Valley, I could almost hear the SPOKANE RIVER from our back door, calling to me. Along its banks, we fished, swam, invented games, rode bikes, spotted birds, picked wildflowers and delighted in how each season brought new adventures. Later, when my mother died, we poured ashes into its shimmering waters, knowing they’d eventually deliver her to the Pacific. Incredibly, a river like the Spokane can connect an entire community and yet also touch individual people in profound, personal ways. Don’t miss this week’s river-inspired stories, beginning on page 22. Also this week: Staff reporter Daniel Walters profiles two local political candidates whose lives, careers and faith were transformed by their own experiences being homeless (page 18). — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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INLANDER SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO • INLANDER.COM 1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, SPOKANE, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 | EMAIL: INFO@INLANDER.COM

THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. It’s printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x210 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email justinh@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2018, Inland Publications, Inc.

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com)

WHAT’S YOUR FONDEST RIVER-RELATED MEMORY?

PUBLISHER

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

Dan Nailen (x239) ARTS & CULTURE EDITOR Chey Scott (x225) FOOD & LISTINGS EDITOR

MICHELLE SEALS I love to kayak on the river. There’s so many put-in points. Where’s your favorite place to start? That’s a tough one. You have a really cool trip from the downtown put-in point, and you can go to No-Li [Brewhouse] and come on back, and that’s a great after work kind of trip.

Nathan Weinbender (x250) FILM & MUSIC EDITOR

Derek Harrison (x248) ART DIRECTOR

Quinn Welsch (x279) COPY EDITOR

Wilson Criscione (x282), Mitch Ryals (x237), Daniel Walters (x263), Samantha Wohlfeil (x234) STAFF WRITERS

KIRSTIN BIANCHI I have so many. I have memories from the Valley and memories from downtown. I love the waterfalls downtown and going across the bridges. Having lunch at Clinkerdagger, sitting outside on the veranda looking at the falls.

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DIANE HUBBARD A river rafting trip on the Salmon River in Idaho. Was that scary? There were probably some class-three [rapids]. It was not a death-defying experience, but it was exciting. It was a three-day thing and we camped.

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CLARK HUBBARD I enjoyed a river trip on the Danube River going up from Budapest up to Germany. It was a really interesting trip into the past.

Emily Guidinger Hunt (x247) EVENTS & PROMOTIONS

PRODUCTION & SUPPORT Wayne Hunt (x232) PRODUCTION MANAGER Alissia Blackwood Mead (x228), Derrick King (x238), Jessie Hynes (x205), Tom Stover (x265) GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

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REBECCA LONG When I graduated college, my family came to visit. I didn’t know what to do with people after graduation so we walked across the little walking bridges and watched the waterfalls. It was peaceful, and I had actually never done it before.

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BY TOM SIMPSON

I

n a near unanimous vote, the House recently passed the JOBS and Investor Confidence Act of 2018. The bill contains provisions to: 1) create a new stock exchange, 2) evaluate reducing the cost of an initial public offering (IPO) and compliance expenses associated with being a public company, 3) improve investment research, 4) broaden the definition of an accredited investor and 5) provide startups more flexibility in pitching their plans to prospective investors. Many of today’s regulations were conceived in the 1930s, when a telephone was cuttingedge innovation and public information was a scarce commodity. If the United States wants to compete and win in a 21st century global marketplace, we need to modernize our capital markets. Following is a summary of the compelling provisions of the package approved by the House: The Main Street Growth Act allows for the creation of a stock exchange tailored to the needs of small and emerging companies. With more companies opting for private fundraising over the hassle of public markets, the number of public companies has fallen to levels not seen since the 1980s, when the economy was half the size it is now. Everyday investors are missing out on opportunities to invest in the next Microsoft, Amazon or Google. As recently as 2016, U.S. startups were near a 40-year low and the number of domestic IPOs — although making a solid comeback — remained merely half of what they were 20 years before. By comparison, China produced more than one-third of the world’s IPOs in 2017, compared to 11 percent by the U.S. A new stock exchange for the United States — similar to Nasdaq’s European growth market First North, Canada’s TSX Venture and the U.K.’s Aim Market — would provide an avenue for small-cap companies to obtain capital that the IPO process has traditionally provided. The Middle Market IPO Underwriting Cost Act requires a study of the expenses small and medium-sized companies incur to complete an IPO. The average cost of going public has more than doubled over the last 25 years to $2.5 million. The high price tag is a major factor in the decline in the number of IPOs. This legislation requires the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to study underwriting fees, compliance with federal and state securities laws and other expenses. The requisite recommendations would be used to consider reforms. The Modernizing Disclosures for Investors Act directs the SEC to report to Congress with recommendations for decreasing costs, increasing transparency and streamlining quarterly financial reporting for Emerging Growth Companies (EGCs), which are public companies with annual revenues of less than $1.07 billion. Public companies spend an average of $1.5 million annually

to comply with securities laws. This bill includes a particular focus on alternative formats for quarterly reporting by EGCs, such as through press releases. The Improving Investment Research for Small and Emerging Issuers Act requires the SEC to evaluate the issues affecting the provision of and reliance upon investment research on pre-IPO companies and EGCs. Credible, unbiased and plentiful investment research is essential to securing investor interest. Factors to be studied include the demand for research, the availability of research, conflicts of interest relating to the production and distribution of research, the costs of research and the impacts of different payment mechanisms for investment research. The Fair Investment Opportunities for Professional Experts Act modernizes the definition of an accredited investor so those who do not have high incomes or net worth, but do have the education and job experience to evaluate investment risks and merits, can invest in startup companies. This change would increase the pool of potential investors in private offerings. The Helping Angels Lead Our Startups Act ensures startups have the opportunity to make presentations to interested parties without running afoul of securities laws. Regulations currently restrict startups from pitching investment opportunities to audience members who do not meet the financial requirements of an accredited investor. This legislation creates a new statutory definition of groups of accredited investors, and directs the SEC to revise regulations to permit such organizations to sponsor events where issuers could pitch investors.

R

ep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers voted in favor of the overall package and commented, “After years of sluggish growth and stagnant wages, the economy is booming and better off now thanks to our work to cut taxes and rein in harmful regulations. We want to keep that momentum going. The JOBS and Investor Confidence Act of 2018 will empower our nation’s startups, small businesses, and entrepreneurs to innovate and take risks so they can succeed in a 21st century economy built for growth.” The legislation must now be returned to the U.S. Senate. America’s capital markets are the key to our long-term economic growth. In order to achieve sustained 3 percent economic growth, we cannot rely solely upon tax reform and Dodd-Frank relief. We must also enact pro-growth reforms that make it efficient for startups to access capital and invest in innovation. n


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Right at the start of 2007, Apple CEO Steve Jobs announced this new thing called the iPHONE, Beyoncé told a certain someone not to think he’s “IRREPLACEABLE” and Rihanna kindly offered to share her “UMBRELLA.” Movies like JUNO and THERE WILL BE BLOOD moved us, and others, like SUPERBAD, well… they introduced us to characters like McLovin. And mourners from around the Pacific Northwest laid to rest daredevil EVEL KNIEVEL, who died at 69.

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At the start of 2007, we started publishing in FULL COLOR on every page, every issue. Publisher Ted S. McGregor Jr. announced the change in a column in the first January issue of the year, where he thanked readers and reminisced on the paper that had grown from the business plan he made in college to the thriving weekly on stands around the Inland Northwest. All the growth had come despite painful industry cuts that were only set to get worse nationwide. “If you’re an Inlander reader — an Inlander if you will — you’re participating, you’re creating a sense of togetherness, of common experience and, hopefully, of fun,” he wrote.

PAYING FOR ABUSE

Early in the year, the Catholic Diocese of Spokane announced a $48 million settlement to be divided among more than 140 victims of clergy sex abuse and meant to resolve a bankruptcy The January 11, 2007, issue COVER PHOTO: DON HAMILTON filing on the part of the diocese. It’d take years for the case to finally wrap up, after the diocese had issues with its law firm over this 2007 settlement agreement.

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The massive restoration of the Fox Theater was completed by November, with millions of dollars spent and countless hours’ worth of structural and aesthetic work completed to restore the building to its full art-deco splendor. From paintings, to gold leaf, to carpet, the theater received a complete overhaul and quickly started booking shows.

PEOPLE WE MET

In September, we met five residents of the OTIS HOTEL who were soon to be evicted, and represented the diverse mix of people living there: Some struggled with mental health, some were sex offenders and others were simply living in poverty. One day earlier in the summer, we met CHRYSTAL ALDERMAN as she touched base with homeless individuals who’d missed appointments, helping them stay connected with services. And we met LEONID BERGOLTSEV, a world-class photojournalist during his time in the U.S.S.R., who moved to Spokane in the ’90s and turned his lens on his new home. (SAMANTHA WOHFEIL)

AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | CULTURE

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

The Martian Diet Comfort food in the summer of our discontent BY ZACH HAGADONE

A

long with rapidly sprouting ear hair and increasingly creaky knees, approaching middle age has also brought me backyard astronomy. About a year ago I bought a modest GeoSafari Omega Refractor. Since then I’ve upgraded to a Celestron AstroMaster 114, both of which have allowed me to track Saturn and Jupiter, spy on the lunar landscape and seek, so far in vain, to sneak a peek at a galaxy. The deep space objects have eluded me, as had Mars until recently. Beginning in late June, Mars became visible from our vantage in the Inland Northwest. I saw it first as an

angry-looking red dot in the south, rising alongside the moon. Turns out the red planet passed closer to Earth this summer than it has since 2003, when it was closer to us than it had been for 60,000 years — around the time humans spread to Asia and started making permanent drawings. In ’03, Mars was 34.7 million miles away. On July 31, at 1 am Pacific Time, our ships in the night passed within a mere 35.78 million miles. Contemplating the red planet ahead of the perigee, the nearness of the God of War felt portentous. Not that I subscribe to astrological omens, but it’s hard to deny there’s a martial tinge to our season of discontent. But Mars was also the protector of agriculture, and I’ve been unusually hungry.

Cooking, like backyard astronomy, has become a middle-aged defense mechanism for me. Rockfish with garlic and simmered in squid ink and olive oil; risotto with cremini mushrooms; quinoa and kale sautéed with red onions and butter and topped with chevre. Everything has been improved with herbs from our garden in Pullman — defiantly healthy despite extended periods of neglect as we’ve taken advantage of a rare summer off to travel from North Idaho to upstate New York and Montreal, Quebec. With Mars’ steady gaze above, we’ve indulged in the kinds of meals that are remembered. In Sandpoint it was the 2-pound smallmouth reeled in by my 6-year-old son. We pan-fried it with garlic, sage, lemon and LETTERS parsley and served it Send comments to on a bed of garden editor@inlander.com. lettuce. In Albany, New York, it was oysters and lobster, clams and filet mignon, fresh-caught cod and red potatoes, Belgian beers, dry martinis and chilled Pernod. In Montreal we dined on anchovy and spinach sandwiches, snail pasta and delicately sliced jambon topped with lace-like curls of cheese. Later we paired local mead and sauvignon gris with eight courses that included sturgeon and zucchini flower with basil. The only bad food we had was subpar antipasto at a faux Italian place in Schoharie, New York. It was just as well. I’ve never been an extravagant eater, much less a cook; but, for at least the past 18 months, thinking of Donald Trump farting and tweeting away his evening hours with a gut full of fast food has made the act of eating well feel almost defiant. (His immense appetites extend far beyond junk food and cost a lot more than my sturgeon and onions.) That may sound silly, but the Martian relationship between food and conflict is strong. In the Schoharie archives I came across Johannes Ferster, a scout and courier for the Schoharie militia, who was killed May 30, 1778, during a British raid aimed at destroying the local wheat fields and thus starving the rebels through the winter. According to the records, “his body was not found until a field of wheat on which he fell was harvested.” A double reaping. As Mars shines above and fights break out around Trump’s shattered chunk of the Hollywood Walk of Fame below, it’s tempting to think the fault might literally be in our stars. I’m not so sure what it all means, but in this climate, sustenance should be taken wherever it’s to be had. n Zach Hagadone is a former co-publisher/owner of the Sandpoint Reader, former editor of Boise Weekly and current grad student at Washington State University.

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10 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018


COMMENT | FROM READERS

THEY ARE NOT CRIMINALS urrent immigration policy at our southern border is outrageous and

C

does not even follow U.S. immigration law. Title 8 U.S. Code 1225 grants that any person may arrive at a U.S. port of entry and seek asylum. According to law, they should then be allowed a credible fear interview and be put in proceedings before an immigration judge. Instead, refugees sit in 100-degree-plus temperatures on the Mexican side of the frontier and are told there is no room. When and if they are allowed to enter, they are denied parole and bond, and are instead incarcerated indefinitely. People are fleeing very real violence, very real fear and very real poverty. I have lived and worked in Guatemala and know first hand the terror and poverty from which people in Guatemala, Honduras and Él Salvador are fleeing. They are not criminals. They are the victims of criminal gangs and victims of corrupt governments that refuse to act on behalf of their own citizens. LETTERS We are a nation of immigrants. Send comments to Except those of us who are 100 editor@inlander.com. percent Native American or of 100 percent African ancestry, every one of us shares the ancestry of someone who arrived in this country seeking a better life, because life in Europe or wherever else had become intolerable. So let us embrace the refugees and immigrants crossing our southern border. Allow them to follow the same dream our ancestors followed. Stop the dehumanizing name calling. Stop incarcerating them. Stop incarcerating and traumatizing their children.

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Readers respond to an article about Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers using misleading ads to portray her opponent Lisa Brown as sympathetic to sex offenders (7/26/18):

JOAN JETT AND THE BLACKHEARTS & CHEAP TRICK SEP 18 Cathy McMorris Rodgers LYNE NAGELE: I’m saddened that this tactic is being used. Have we not had enough name calling, childlike tantrums in government and lies? Elected officials work for us the people. If I carried on at my job in this manner, I’d be fired and rightly so! NICK STALEY: We’ve gone full circle to the old days when political opponents could accuse each other of anything, true or not. We’re living in Idiocracy. TERRY PARKER: Using the horrific tragedy of sexual child abuse to gain votes is about as low as you can stoop. The commercial even shows a frightened child running away from a supposed predator inside of a car. It shows the face of a convicted sex offender so that every time one of his victims or their family member sees the commercials they are reminded of the horrible crimes he committed on their children. That’s today’s GOP. They know if the Democrats get in charge of the investigation committees that they’re all going down. n

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CRIME

HOW FAR DOES IT GO? Detectives are digging deeper into alleged sex trafficking in Spokane after raiding three massage parlors last month BY WILSON CRISCIONE

T

he door chime gives a loud screech before you enter the dark lobby of Space Oil Massage, located just off Interstate 90 in Spokane Valley. A faint, sweet smell of lotion hangs in the air. A sign on the wall reminds customers that there is “No sex, no touching and no harassment.” It’s been weeks since law enforcement raided Space Oil on July 12 looking for evidence of sex trafficking and prostitution. Yet with no arrests, the businesses are still open. Inside, a camera points at

the entrance. Sounds of running water and chirping birds play on a loop. A woman, who speaks little English, rushes from the back to set up a massage. When the Inlander asks if the owner is available to speak about the police investigation, the woman hands over a card that was buried at the bottom of a binder. “Coco doesn’t work here anymore,” it says. Coco, owner Kelan Johnson later explains, was “the most popular” girl in the shop. Now, Johnson

says, she’s in California, “just taking personal time off.” From April through June, law enforcement — including the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office, FBI, Homeland Security Investigations and Washington State Patrol — received multiple anonymous tips that the women working at Space Oil sought help from authorities because they were being forced to perform sex acts for money, according to search warrants. ...continued on next page

Law enforcement officials raided Space Oil Massage on July 12, but the spa remains open for business. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 13


NEWS | CRIME

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On July 12, an agent with Homeland Security conducted an undercover operation at Space Oil. He reported that a woman touched his genitals and offered sexual acts for money. Later that night, authorities raided Space Oil, seizing cash, cell phones and taking pictures of a large trash can filled with tissues of what appeared to have dried semen, according to a warrant filed in Spokane County Superior Court. Johnson denies that any of his massage parlors — Space Oil, Crystal Sea and 3 Pier Oil — are involved in any kind of prostitution. But court documents from the investigation paint a different picture: Not only are Johnson’s three businesses allegedly involved in criminal activity, but investigators believe they could be part of a larger network of illicit massage parlors trafficking women. Washington State Patrol Lt. James Mjor, who’s overseeing the investigation, confirms to the Inlander that officials believe the case is bigger than those three businesses. “We haven’t ruled out that they’re linked nationally,” Mjor says.

advertisements feature pictures of Asian women. In one picture, a woman is winking and puts her index finger up to her mouth as if to tell someone to be quiet. “My time is 9 am - 10:30 pm,” it reads. Another photo shows a woman called Coco making a heart with her hands. It says she’s from Shanghai, China. The same picture advertises “two girls” at $120 per hour. But ads for their businesses also showed up

“It’s actually a pretty large business that typically goes unnoticed and unsighted.”

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“HOW FAR DOES IT GO?” CONTINUED...

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ohnson leans back in his chair on the patio at Crystal Sea Massage, located on Division Street in Spokane. He sits by his wife, Aiming Yang-Johnson, whom he married last year. She was involved in massage parlors and spas before, in China, before coming to the U.S., he says. In 2016, court records show, Aiming Yang spent a night in jail for prostitution in Twin Falls. “When I met her a year ago, she asked me if I would ever be interested in running one of these shops. She said the real money is in owning the shop,” Johnson says. The couple was aware that eight illicit massage parlors were raided in a Spokane sting operation in 2012. That’s why they put up “house rules” so as to “deter the girls from ever going down that avenue,” he says. They opened Crystal Sea Massage on Jan. 19, 2018. Meanwhile, the very same day, Jan. 19, Homeland Security received a tip about a “suspicious” massage parlor in Spokane. The parlor was located at 319 Indiana Ave., according to court documents. That’s the location of Evergreen Massage and Aromatherapy, a business not owned by Johnson. The tip triggered an investigation. Homeland Security, “using open source media, physical surveillance, and law enforcement databases … linked several massage businesses and the respective employees together,” court documents say. The night of Feb. 18, Washington State Patrol Detective Sgt. Dan McDonald kept a watch on Crystal Sea, having found a post on backpage. com advertising new girls who would be arriving that night. He saw multiple women who wore fur coats and no pants walk in and out of the spa, loading stuff into a car and driving to a warehouse. The next day, Feb. 19, Space Oil Massage opened. (Johnson and Yang-Johnson would later open a third parlor, 3 Pier Oil, on July 9.) Johnson claims the only advertising they ever did was on Yelp, Google and Yahoo. The Yelp

on websites like backpage.com before authorities seized it over sex trafficking ads, court documents say. They also appeared on similar websites like adultlook.com where “johns” find where to pay for sex. At least seven other Spokane-area massage parlors had advertisements on either adultlook. com or rubmaps.com, the Inlander has found. Mjor, speaking generally, says appearing on those websites is a red flag that could indicate an illegitimate business. On July 12, when an agent went undercover into Space Oil, asking for a massage, the masseuse at one point touched his genitals. She offered oral sex by acting out the motion to the undercover agent, and the two made arrangements to meet up later in the evening. Instead, that evening, law enforcement raided the establishment, court records say. Detectives interviewed Yang-Johnson during the raid. When they asked for Yang-Johnson’s phone, she deleted a text thread before handing it over, court documents say. On her phone, they found a video of a topless Asian woman performing oral sex on a man. Yang-Johnson told investigators she recruits girls through WeChat, a messaging app that’s been used in other cases for human trafficking and child exploitation. Throughout the interview, detectives found Yang-Johnson to be “deceptive,” records state. She withheld information or pretended she didn’t understand English, investigators say. Still, Johnson denies any such activities have taken place at his businesses. Rather, he refers to “bullying” from customers who ask for sexual favors from women. This entire investigation, he says, was brought on by undercover officers “trying some of this bullying to see how far it would go.” Then, on July 25, the Washington State Patrol obtained a second search warrant.

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ven when law enforcement arrests massage parlor owners for promoting prostitution or trafficking, they can get off with little-to-no time in jail. In 2012, a yearlong operation conducted by local and federal law enforcement ended with several arrests of spa owners. But none of them served more than two days in jail. That includes


Chin Sim Day, who owned Oriental Spa North, and who had a previous conviction of promoting prostitution from the 1980s, according to Department of Corrections records. Day also had the cash and other property taken in the raid returned to her. It’s why Mjor says the State Patrol’s focus is on nailing people with charges of human trafficking and money laundering that carry stiffer penalties. “You can rescue women, and you can put criminal charges on suspects and get a couple months, maybe years in prison. But the more we can prove money laundering and have that taken away and put into victim advocacy, that’s where we’re gonna make the most impact,” he says. “And that’s very time consuming.” Sex trafficking in massage parlors is widespread across the country, Mjor says. It’s a hard thing to track, but a report released earlier this year by Polaris, an anti-human trafficking organization, estimates that there are more than 9,000 illicit massage parlors currently open for business in the U.S. But, Mjor says, law enforcement devotes minimal resources to it. Spokane, he says, is “no different than any other metro area” when it comes to sex trafficking. “It’s actually a pretty large business that typically goes unnoticed and unsighted,” he says. That’s why, on Jan. 1, the Washington State Patrol launched a new effort to help local law enforcement agencies proactively go after labor and sex trafficking. Whether it’s sex trafficking or labor trafficking, the pattern is the same, Mjor says. Women are recruited to the U.S. and promised a good life, intending to seek citizenship. When they get here, it’s not what they expected, and they are isolated and manipulatVictims of sex trafficking ed into working or performing or sexual assault can sex acts for money. An analysis call the Lutheran by Polaris found more than Community Services 17,500 Mandarin-language webcrisis line at 624-7273. sites ads fraudulently recruiting women into massage jobs in Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York. From cases he’s worked on in Western Washington, Mjor says massage parlors are often linked to those in California. The women are moved around, staying at one massage parlor for a few months before being sent to the next place, so they’re never comfortable. Women being exploited don’t always outwardly show signs of it, says Erin Williams Hueter, Inland Northwest director of Lutheran Community Services, which helps victims of sexual assault and trafficking. When the women find out they’re expected to perform sexual acts, they fear consequences for speaking out, she says. They might be told they’ll be the ones arrested or deported. They might be told their family at home will be harmed if they run away. “And where are they gonna go? They don’t speak the language. They don’t know the area,” Williams Hueter says. “Those natural fears are being played up by the people exploiting them.”

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he parking lots at Space Oil and Crystal Sea are usually empty. Employees in businesses nearby typically avoid the massage parlors. But business hasn’t totally died, Johnson

says. Coverage from local TV stations has helped, he says. Shortly after the first raid on Space Oil, the spa had zero customers one day. After KXLY aired an interview with Johnson, that changed. “We picked back up to 18 or 20 people,” he says. “It propped us back up.” He maintains he has nothing to hide. But he can’t explain why several people called Crime Check to report that women were being forced to perform sex acts. He says there’s an in-house investigation on who said those things. And when the Inlander asks to interview one of the women working at Crystal Sea, his mood turns. He doesn’t want any negative news coverage. If there is? “We will find ways to deal with you people,” he says. n wilsonc@inlander.com

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AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 15


NEWS | BRIEFS

Something’s Phishy Concertgoers get smashed, but not in a good way

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hen two men were attacked and beaten in the head with rocks last weekend during a PHISH CONCERT at the Gorge Amphitheater, the internet blew up with theories. Some thought the attackers were neo-Nazis. Some thought they were the same neo-Nazis who were caught selling nitrous earlier that weekend. And some even thought Live Nation security called in neo-Nazis for help with enforcement. There’s no evidence of any of that, says Grant County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Kyle Foreman. What they do know is that two men suffered severe head injuries in the attack and had to be hospitalized. The attacks happened around the same time at night, but in locations far away from each other at the venue. The victims, Samir Poles and Joe Allen Jr., both are still recovering. But neither victim could identify who attacked them. It is true that white men with swastika tattoos were sent away from the concert, which was a three-day event.

16 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

Those men were selling nitrous cylinders, but they were not arrested. Neither was a group of black men also caught selling nitrous that same weekend. Nitrous sales are not uncommon at Phish concerts, Foreman says. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

well as the Valley office, moms are invited to feed their kids as part of the WORLD BREASTFEEDING WEEK event, and get the chance to win a raffle and get gifts to help them with their early stages of motherhood. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

BIG LATCH ON

ALT-WRIGHT LEADER

In Washington state, more than 90 percent of babies have been breastfed at some point, but that quickly drops to about 67 percent at the six-month mark, according to the Centers for Disease Control. Those rates are lower for families eligible for the Women, Infant and Children (WIC) Nutrition Program in Washington, with 89.2 percent of babies breastfed at birth, dropping to 50.7 percent at the six-month mark. “I think a lot of our lower income moms have to go back to work really quick after the babies are born,” says Kristine Brewer, WIC Breastfeeding Peer Counselor Lead for the Spokane Regional Health District. Despite state and federal protections for breastfeeding in the workplace, many moms may not be able to find the time or space to take breaks in private to pump milk, Brewer says. “A lot of them are working at fast food or lower wage jobs where they don’t even have a break room,” Brewer says. “A lot of our moms actually pump in their cars. They actually feel like that’s a safer place to do it than some of their workplace environments.” So to promote the health and cost benefits of breastfeeding, to offer moms support from WIC peer counselors and to generally celebrate breastfeeding, local moms and their infants are invited to attend the Big Latch On this Friday morning, Aug. 3. In events starting around 10:25 am at the downtown and north WIC offices, as

In June, Spokane GOP Chair Cecily Wright joked with the Inlander that she wanted to punch former Washington State University College Republicans President JAMES ALLSUP — a member of the white supremacist Identity Evropa group — in the nose. But in July, she welcomed him with open arms. In June, she issued a statement, condemning Allsup’s past statements as out of step with the Republican Party. In July, she argued he had been the victim of unfair media labeling. Can you imagine, she told the Inlander in June, if somebody came to one of her conservative Northwest Grassroots movie nights and started saying racist things? “They’d be probably pummeled,” Wright said. But when Wright introduced Allsup at the Northwest Grassroots Movie Night on July 11, Allsup wasn’t pummeled. He was applauded. In a Northwest Grassroots video, Wright stands before a group of Spokane Valley conservatives and portrays Allsup as a victim. “I have a gentleman here, who has been labellynched,” Wright says. “People’s lives are destroyed with their labels that are being hung on them.” In the past, Allsup has personally praised and thanked white supremacist Richard Spencer. He’s tweeted that blacks simply have lower IQs than whites. He’s been the guest on multiple white-supremacist podcasts.


James Allsup

WILSON CRISCIONE PHOTO

But in Allsup’s remarks to the Spokane County GOP, he argued that the media had unfairly portrayed him as a racist. In response to the Spokane GOP chair’s decision to give Allsup a platform, a coalition of groups in Spokane called for local organizations to rally in front of the courthouse to unite the Spokane community against white nationalism on Thursday at 5:30 pm. “I consider this a serious mistake in my judgment,” Wright said in a statement on Tuesday. While she denied that she had praised Allsup, in the video she can be heard thanking Allsup and telling him, “I really appreciate you.” “How’d you like to have a couple hundred more people like James in Spokane,” Wright’s husband, John Charleston, asks at the movie night. The crowd applauds. “Let’s make some stuff happen, and this is the start of it.” (DANIEL WALTERS)

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AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 17


NEWS | POLITICS So he tries to kill himself. Instead, he ends up in a Phoenix hospital, where calls his parents again. This time, Mom comes to the rescue: She buys him a Greyhound ticket, sends him to Spokane to live with his biological dad, a drug and alcohol counselor. “My dad whipped my butt back into shape,” Bonneau says. “I got clean, sober, got off everything. Got a job.” His family had given him back what he’d lost on the streets: hope.

PORTLAND

Jered Bonneau and Jessa Lewis

From Homelessness to Politics

DANIEL WALTERS PHOTOS

How two local candidates’ experiences with homelessness shaped their lives in radically different ways BY DANIEL WALTERS

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t’s 2005 in Portland, Oregon. Jessa Lewis is homeless and trying to fall asleep. She’s in her used Mazda outside the Widmer Brothers Brewery, seat tilted back, unzipped sleeping bag over her eyes. The lights make it a safer place to rest, but a more difficult spot to slumber. Her 2-year-old daughter lies in the seat beside her. It’s 2007 in Phoenix. Jered Bonneau is homeless and trying to fall asleep. There are homeless shelters in Phoenix, but they require him to be sober — he’s addicted to drugs — and won’t let him stay with his girlfriend. So, he sleeps on the streets. But in Arizona, you can’t escape the sweltering heat, even at night. He wanders around, lies down on a grassy, freshly watered drainage ditch. Perfect, he thinks. He wakes up with hundreds of ant bites covering his body. They take weeks to heal. It’s 2018 in Spokane County. Lewis and Bonneau are both running for political office. Lewis is competing for state Senate in the 6th District, while Bonneau is a longshot primary contender challenging Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers for her congressional seat. Today, Bonneau is a far-right Trump fan and a Second Amendment absolutist. Lewis, a former Bernie Sanders delegate, is the Eastern Washington field director for Health Care for All, a lobbying organization advocating for single-payer health care.

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The two candidates both started as conservative Christians, and both saw their trajectories altered by their own homelessness and poverty. How they interpreted those times, though, sent their beliefs in opposite directions.

PHOENIX

Bonneau grew up a Seventh Day Adventist, soaking in a right-wing marinade of caustic talk-radio rhetoric from hosts like Michael Savage. His stepdad buys placemats featuring the Bill of Rights and a list of American presidents. Before he’d leave the dinner table, Bonneau is often challenged to recite them from memory. He watches war movies. He cheers on the Iraq War. “I was all about, ‘Yeah, we need to bomb those people, they bombed us,’” Bonneau says. He joins the Army, only to be discharged after failing a drug test. That’s how he ended up spending nearly a year homeless in Phoenix. Snorting meth. Sleeping outside. Lying to people outside a gas station that he needed a little extra cash for gas. “I had nothing,” Bonneau says. “My family wasn’t talking to me. Nowhere to go. Sick of being on the streets. Sick of being addicted to drugs. I had no hope, no reason to survive anymore.”

Lewis grew up a conservative Christian, too. She’s fed an ideology of self-reliance. She voted for George W. Bush and for Dino Rossi. She got deeply involved with evangelical churches. But the floor falls out from under her at the age of 21. On vacation, she had a drink on St. Patrick’s Day and wakes up in bed with a man she doesn’t remember having sex with. He gets her pregnant. Lewis does what she feels is the right thing. She doesn’t have an abortion. But to some in her community, that wasn’t enough. “I was encouraged to pursue a relationship with the man who assaulted me, so my daughter wouldn’t be illegitimate,” Lewis says. The feeling of judgment everywhere makes Spokane feel claustrophobic. So the moment she sees an opportunity to take a booking agent job for a Portland music venue, she leaps at the chance. She bets it all on a fresh start and moves to Portland. But she’s a single mom. The music venue wants her free every night, and that’s not an option. The job falls through. “I was stranded in Portland with no job, no real friendships, and that was how I ended up in my car,” Lewis says. The local faith community helps rescue her. A woman studying to be a pastor takes Lewis and her daughter in until she can find a job and get an apartment. “I learned through that process, how hard it is,” Lewis says. “It doesn’t matter how hard you work if you don’t have stable access to food, if you don’t have a roof over your head.”

STREETS DIVERGE

Lewis’ political views don’t change in an instant. But as she pursued college degrees and raised her daughter, contradictions begin to weigh on her. “Republicans were more likely to vote against the very programs that made it possible for my daughter and I to get back on our feet,” Lewis says. “It’s one thing to be against abortion. It’s another to actually help support single moms to ensure that the kids have a path to be successful.” Her politics were saying one thing, her faith was saying another. “I couldn’t reconcile how I read the scripture and my view of faith with taking money away from children and the elderly and people who were vulnerable,” Lewis says. But as Lewis evolves toward becoming a progressive Democrat, Bonneau shifts in a different direction. In 2009, his friend shows him a 9/11 conspiracy video on YouTube called “Loose Change.” While the video has been thoroughly debunked by publications like Popular Mechanics, the questions it raised piqued Bonneau’s curiosity. He gets sucked into the world of Alex Jones and Infowars. He becomes disillusioned with George W. Bush and grows to despise the PATRIOT Act. “It’s a very unconstitutional piece of legislation,” Bonneau says. “It’s infringing on our rights and our freedoms.” Amid the Tea Party movement, he starts his own militia called the 42nd Freedom Fighters Battalion. He cheers on rancher Cliven Bundy’s standoff against the federal


government in Nevada. He doesn’t join the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge occupiers in Oregon, but gets a tattoo lamenting the shooting death of refuge-occupier LaVoy Finicum. Today, Lewis is 37. Bonneau is 31. As they look back on their experience with homelessness and poverty, they take away different lessons. “I saw the positive role that government could play,” Lewis says. “I would not be here without the social safety net. That’s what I’m interested in fixing.” It wasn’t just food stamps and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families that helped her, she says. It was the affordable housing units in downtown Vancouver that let her live in a walkable neighborhood close to her work. It helped give her a sense of self-worth. “We live in culture that throws people away,” Lewis says. “That blames them for their poverty.” LETTERS But to Bonneau? His Send comments to experiences are proof of how editor@inlander.com. government is a failure. “Policies don’t help,” Bonneau says. “It falls on deaf ears on the streets.” Homeless shelters are fine for some people, he says, but they don’t solve the root of the problem. “There is no place to go to get the actual help,” Bonneau says. “To get back into a home. To get back into society. To get a job. Who wants to take a homeless person, you know?” He looks at the promises of government — with all their job training programs and housing programs and homeless shelters — and scoffs. “Government needs to get the hell out of it,” Bonneau says. The way forward, he says, is through private enterprises to build housing with private funds and private donations. The role for the government, if any, he argues, is through tax incentives. Mostly, Bonneau believes that Republicans like McMorris Rodgers are too soft — not supportive enough of Trump, not tough enough on illegal immigrants. He argues that massive swaths of the government should be dismantled. Abolish the Bureau of Land Management. Abolish the NSA, too. The FBI is unconstitutional, he says. He still listens to Infowars and still has doubts about 9/11. And yet, in a few areas, he shares views of some on the left. For example, he doesn’t believe that minor drug crimes should be a felony. “You arrest someone for a half a gram of meth,” he says. “They come out, now they can’t get a job at all. Now they’re on the streets. Now they’re doing more crimes.”

SCARS AND MEMENTOS

For how radically different their views are today, both candidates share a realization: The worst parts of their lives led to the best parts of their lives today. “It taught me humility,” Bonneau says. “Gave me a new purpose.” If it weren’t for his homelessness, he never would have worked at the Rite Aid where he met his wife. He wouldn’t have had his two kids. He probably wouldn’t have run for office. Bonneau pulls up his suit jacket sleeve to show his forearm, where he has a Join or Die snake tattoo and a Bible verse in Latin. It’s just inches above the scar that remains from his suicide attempt over a decade ago. You can’t really understand homelessness, he says, unless you’ve lived it. Lewis says the same thing. “I still have my food stamp card. I keep it,” Lewis says. “It’s a reminder of how I got here.” She says sometimes she still fights the feeling of shame that comes with her past. But she says it all gives her a window into the lives of countless others in Spokane. It teaches her the lesson that cuts to the safety net, to save money, cost us all in the long run. “I’m running to be the person that I needed back then,” Lewis says. n danielw@inlander.com

AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 19


NEWS | JAIL

Open for fun Start your adventure in Riverfront! We’re still at work here at Riverfront, so there’s still some construction underway. But you’ll already see completed improvements, which are open for you to enjoy. Looff Carrousel 10am – 7pm Daily Our historic treasure has a new home! Whirl around on the carrousel. Throw a birthday party. Stroll the shoreline boardwalk. Skate Ribbon 10am – 9pm Daily The first skate ribbon on the West Coast provides fun in every season. FREE admission FREE helmet rental Roller skate rental: $6.50/hour Scooter rental: $8.50/hour SkyRide 10am – 9pm, Closed Mon & Tues SOAR over the falls on the SkyRide! SkyRibbon Café Enjoy the patio of downtown’s newest café. Take a fresh wrap, sandwich or salad from the grab-and-go case or order a signature menu item. Monday Special – $1 Gourmet Hot Dogs. Friday & Saturday Happy Hour $4 Draft beer and wine, 7–9 pm Berry-Go-Round This classic Riverfront ride is open for fun at the Skate Ribbon pond. For the latest details visit:

RiverfrontSpokane.org

20 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

A Light in Dark Places Cambrea Bishop’s death inside the Spokane County Jail has left family and friends searching for answers BY MITCH RYALS

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oon after she is booked into the Spokane County Jail before sunrise July 14, Cambrea Bishop calls her mom. “She told me she loved me and asked if I would give her son a hug and a kiss,” says Kelly O’Connor, adding that her daughter, who she calls Cami, sounded like her normal self. She wanted to serve her time and move on with her life after a recent drug relapse, O’Connor says. Three women in jail with Cami say she was sick from drug withdrawal for the first few days, but by Tuesday, July 17, they noticed she was feeling better. Around 9 am that day, Cami calls her mom again, but O’Connor is at work and unable to answer. By 1 pm, just four hours later, Cami was found dead in her cell. She is now the sixth person to die in the facility since June 2017. Spokane County Sheriff’s detectives are investigating Cami’s death and jail officials say they can’t comment during the investigation. Meanwhile, family and friends cling to memories of the imposing 26-year-old, who stood every bit of 6-foot-1 and, her family says, “loved big” but didn’t take shit from anybody. “She often gravitated toward dark places,” says her mother, who is in recovery herself. “Because she was a light, even when she was struggling.”

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he same Tuesday morning that Cami tries to call her mom, she also takes a shower and asks for some food — both signs that she was feeling better from the drug withdrawal, says Cheryl Sutton, a friend who is also in jail. For the previous three days, Cami slept a lot and had almost no appetite, she says. That day, after her shower, Sutton braided Cami’s hair during morning recreational time. They returned to their cells just before lunch. Cami’s cellmate, Tanessa Wilturner, says Cami only took a couple bites of the Salisbury steak and mashed potatoes. After lunch, the two laid on their bunks while Wilturner read aloud from a book of daily devotionals and then a few chapters from a book. Around 12:20 pm, Wil-

turner put the book down to take a nap before the next rec time at 1 pm. “She said, ‘I’m tired, too,’” Wilturner recalls, and she fell asleep. About 40 minutes later, Wilturner wakes to the sound of guards unlocking their cell door. When Cami doesn’t respond, Wilturner nudges her. “I saw her arm was purple, and I walked out and told them ‘I don’t think she’s breathing,’” Wilturner says.

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his past Saturday, more than 100 people gathered at Mission Park to remember Cami. Cami’s brother, Mitch Bishop, tells about the time he yanked her front tooth out as part of a scheme to get some extra cash from the tooth fairy. She had a gap for several years, he says with a grin. Brandie Brewster tells about the Valentine’s Day when Cami showed up at her house with pink roses and a card. “That’s the type of heart she has,” Brewster says. “She could have been hanging out with her friends or her boyfriend, but she spent Valentine’s Day with me.” Jeffry Finer, a local attorney who defended Cami in a recent federal firearms case, recalls her statements to the judge during a Cambrea Bishop sentencing hearing last year — a monologue he’s heard clients deliver several times before. But this one stood out for its maturity and sincerity. Cami talked about her mom as a role model for recovery, Finer says, and of her desire to stay clean for her son. “We know people backslide in recovery,” he says. “It happens, sometimes six or seven times, but losing this chance to really recover and to be the person who I know she was, and who her family knew she was, that’s very bitter.” O’Connor, Cami’s mother, has heard rumors that Cami died of an overdose. Although three women who were in jail with Cami say she was sick from a drug withdrawal, none of them, including her cellmate, believe she OD’d. Each of them, however, say Cami wasn’t given any medication to help cope with the withdrawal symptoms. The jail has a program to continue treatment for inmates who are already enrolled in the Spokane Regional Health District’s opioid treatment program, Sgt. Tom Hill says. But those not enrolled when they’re booked are essentially forced to go cold turkey. Hill says the jail is now close to adding the drug buprenorphine to its withdrawal treatment plan. “This happened on their watch,” O’Connor says. “There’s a young child who will spend the rest of his life without his mother. That’s their only job, to supervise and keep people safe in the jail, and they failed to do it. I’d like some answers.” n


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o w T n r e v i R

22 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018


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ater is power, and it’s the heart of our region. We’re mesmerized by the river’s falls and we play in its currents. We bridge it, we dam it, we try to harness its power. The river gives life; it also takes it. As it roars and trickles, the 111-mile Spokane River sustains us. From its origin at Lake Coeur d’Alene to its mouth at the Columbia River near Fort Spokane, the river brings fond memories, and it brings tragedy. Some dump trash here. Others take away treasure. Inside, we’ve compiled the stories of several

people for whom the river holds special significance. We tried to capture a breadth of perspectives: from the artist to the tribe to the first responders. You’ll read about its quirks, its beauty and its danger. You’ll meet a Kokanee-drinking pirate, a prolific painter, two young anglers and even the man who controls the river’s flow with a computer. The river runs through the Inland Northwest, and through each one of us. Almost everyone has a river story. Here are just a few. — MITCH RYALS, section editor

TRIBAL CONNECTIONS 24 RIVER PIRATE 26 LANDSCAPE ARTIST 28 SIGHTS AND SOUNDS 30 LIVES SAVED AND LOST 32 JAMES NISBET PHOTO

AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 23


THE SPOKANE RIVER 8,000 YEARS AGO

Prehistoric civilizations camp at the river The oldest known archaeological evidence from an area at the confluence of the Spokane River and Latah/ Hangman Creek, called the Spokane Site, shows that prehistoric groups regularly camped there thousands of years ago while hunting, fishing and gathering native plants. Other artifacts — hearths, stone tools, animal bones — uncovered in the area date back to 3,500 years ago. Due to layers of sand deposited over these prehistoric campsites each spring, the Spokane Site was naturally preserved in archaeological “layers.”

1810

Spokane House established On the orders of North West Company agent and surveyor David Thompson, Jaco Finlay began construction on a rustic outpost for the fur trading company where the Spokane and Little Spokane rivers meet. For the next decade, the Spokane House served as both a cultural and commercial center for white explorers, fur trappers and traders and Native tribes across the Inland Northwest. The Spokane House was abandoned as a trade outpost in 1925 in favor of a post at Kettle Falls called Fort Colvile.

1873

James Glover sees the Spokane Falls Pioneer and businessman James Glover arrived on horseback from Oregon to an area surrounding the Spokane Falls in May 1873. He encountered shacks and squatters and slept that first night in a roofless log cabin near the riverbank. After waking the next morning, Glover recalls being immediately “enchanted” by the roaring falls, setting out to explore the tributary that would become the centerpiece of his envisioned Western city. By the end of his second day here, he’d purchased the land claim encompassing the falls, later writing: “It lay there just as nature had made it, with nothing to mar its virgin glory. I determined that I would possess it.”

24 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

Margo Hill: “If the tribes have higher water quality standards, it’s really better for everybody.”

Changing Way of Life

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Generations after water quality and fish plummeted, Native Americans are fighting to restore a sacred resource BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

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argo Hill’s great-grandmother, Sadie Boyd, who lived to be 103, remembered how the Spokane River’s mighty waters once rushed untamed by man-made dams. She remembered the salmon for their sustenance, the living water for its help with trade. Life for the three bands of the Spokane Tribe was so connected to the river that they were called the “salmon eaters” or another name in their native dialect that roughly translates to “pink-cheeked people,” Hill says. “Our identity, everything was connected to the river,” says Hill, who served as a lawyer for the Spokane Tribe for more than 10 years, fighting for water quality and the right to a clean river. She now teaches urban and regional planning at Eastern Washington University. “The river, it gave us not only food, like the salmon and the eels and everything we needed for our sustenance, but it was also our trading.” The tribes traded clear to Montana, used reeds along the river bank to build homes, wore otter furs in wraps and braids and used shells for earrings, Hill says. Then, the dams went in with a promise to provide power. But for members of regional tribes, they took power away. As Hill’s great-grandmother would tell her, the women wondered how they would feed their children after the fish runs all but stopped. Rations were sent to members of the Spokane Tribe, but early batches were filled with maggots. Now, generations after the dams went in, after mining efforts in North Idaho and Eastern Washington dumped toxins straight into the river system and created cleanup projects that’ll take more generations to finish, Hill and others continue to find meaning at the river’s sacred places. The water is worth the fight. “We’re doing what we can to have higher water quality

standards and protect habitat,” Hill says. One of the efforts she helped fight for as an attorney was the tribe’s right to set its own water quality standards under the Clean Water Act. “People get crabby with us because we have high water quality standards and we’re downriver,” Hill says. “You know, we all want to recreate on the river, and we all want to take our kids and grandkids fishing, but we can’t eat the fish anymore, it’s not safe. If the tribes have higher water quality standards, it’s really better for everybody.” For Hill, who has studied the history of her Spokane Tribe, and grew up speaking some of the language, what has been lost at the river is about more than food or water quality. “It’s very sad that with the salmon gone, our culture and our whole way of life was taken away,” Hill says. “Our leaders would ask one young man to sing the salmon song to call those salmon home. It was an opportunity for leadership, an opportunity for this young man to be selected to sing that song.” But now, for kids like her 19-year-old son, that opportunity isn’t there any more. Still, her children are picking up their own efforts to connect with the river and their history. “I take them to the river to camp and that is really important,” Hill says. “My kids just recently did a canoe journey, where they travelled in a canoe with the [Upper Columbia United Tribes].” The six-day journey, in cedar canoes, was undertaken by members of the Spokane, Coeur d’Alene, Confederated Colville Tribes, Kalispel and Kootenai. “They paddled up to Kettle Falls, which is where they had the Ceremony of Tears, where they commemorated how we used to fish there hundreds of years ago,” Hill says. “We have hopes that, one day, maybe we can have salmon again.” n


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AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 25


THE SPOKANE RIVER 1911

Little Falls Dam opens, with others to follow The first hydroelectric dam to block annual salmon runs on the Spokane River, located 29 miles downstream from the river’s mouth at Lake Coeur d’Alene, went online in 1911. Without an effective fish ladder, all salmon runs above the dam thus ceased, preventing the Spokane Tribe and other tribal groups in the region from harvesting the fish that sustained their people for centuries. The final devastating blow to inland tribes’ reliance on salmon runs came with the opening of Grand Coulee Dam in 1942, blocking salmon and steelhead from 1,140 miles of upstream rivers, including the Spokane. Today, seven total hydroelectric dams exist on the river, spanning from the Post Falls Dam to Little Falls in Lincoln County.

1958

Wastewater treatment plant goes online For more than the next three quarters of a century after the city’s founding, the river served as an unlimited garbage dump for trash, sewage, chemical runoff and industrial waste. By the 1920s, the river’s dismal state was not only an embarrassment to the city bearing its name, but a major health and environmental hazard. Residents finally were beginning to see the need to do something about it. An order was issued by the state in 1931 for Spokane to stop using the river as its sewer, yet city leaders and residents fought a need to increase taxes to fund a sewage treatment plant for more than a decade to follow. Due to that pushback, among other factors, the Riverside Park Wastewater Treatment Plant (now called the Riverside Park Water Reclamation Facility) didn’t go online until 1958.

26 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

Shain McPherson floats the river nearly everyday to escape his “dry land” problems.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Going With the F low Meet the Spokane River Pirate, the man who floats the river almost every day BY WILSON CRISCIONE

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nyone who spends much time floating the river knows the Spokane River Pirate. Maybe you just know him as That Guy With a Flag — a black flag with a skull and bones that sticks up from his inflatable kayak. But many know his real name: Shain McPherson. He’s been floating the river for decades, and lately he’s gone out just about every day. Of course, he’s not actually out there to pirate — the pirate thing was always a joke. He’s there to escape. “Coming down here, all my dry land problems stay up there on dry land,” he says. “It doesn’t feel like you’re in the city, it just feels like you’re out in nature.” That, and his longtime girlfriend only lets him drink while he’s on the water, he says. On a hot, 90-degree day, McPherson, 40, pulls up to his favorite launching point in Peaceful Valley in his old Jeep Wrangler. He wears water shoes, dark green shorts and no shirt. The hood of his car creaks as he lifts it up and connects his kayak pump to the car battery. Some friends meet him at the launch point — they’ve been floating with him for years, though nowhere near as often as he does. Just about every time he goes out on the river, he sees people he knows. Four years ago he started a Facebook group called “Spokane River Pirates.” It’s grown to nearly 400 people today. Most of the people he meets out on the water are good people, he says. Others throw their bottles and cans in the bushes or in the water. He hates that. In his cooler, the Pirate stuffs in Kokanee, Powerade and Smucker’s UnCrustables. His dog, a deaf Boston Terrier named “Sweet Pea,” hops in the kayak with him, standing next to a 2-foot-tall speaker. This summer, he’s floated the river almost every day. But it never gets boring, he says.

“I’ve never floated the same river. It’s never the same water,” he says. In the winter, he wears a dry suit to keep warm. His favorite time of year might be spring, when the water is high, because the water “makes you feel real small,” he says. Depending on the day and the time of year, he spots all kinds of wildlife — deer, otters, eagles and moose. As he moves toward some rapids on a sunny afternoon, an osprey perches in a tree nearby. He flows past homeless camps. He waves at people on the shore playing with their dog. “This logjam up here is the first time I’ve ever seen a body,” he says. It was a few years ago. He hasn’t seen another dead body since. He continues on and marvels at the waterfront properties in Peaceful Valley. Through the years, he’s seen new owners buy and renovate the same places. “But I hardly ever see any of the people actually use their waterfront,” McPherson says, taking a sip from his Kokanee. McPherson doesn’t work anymore, which is why he has so much time to spend on the river. Three years ago, he had a stroke on the beach after a float. He remembers how, that day, he couldn’t use his legs properly. At first he thought it was a shot of whiskey he’d had earlier. But soon he realized he needed to get further down the river to a place he could get help. So he left his fate up to the river: He sprawled out in the water and let it carry him to safety, he says. The river takes care of people like that, he says. In all his years, he hasn’t seen anyone get seriously injured. Even the guys floating through the rapids on inflatable “giant f---ing flamingos” make it down OK, he says. “Usually the river takes care of people,” he says. “I guess she likes people.” n


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AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 27


THE SPOKANE RIVER 1971-1974

Expo ’74 spurs downtown riverside cleanup The late construction of a wastewater treatment plant didn’t, however, solve all the Spokane River’s woes — pollution included. The city’s famous falls and roaring rapids coursing through downtown were still obscured by bridges, train tracks and other industrial operations. Local efforts to revitalize Spokane’s natural centerpiece culminated in a grand plan for Spokane to host the 1974 World’s Fair, themed around protecting and preserving the environment. After some struggles, city leaders and Expo ’74 backers secured funds to remove the Great Northern Railroad Depot and train tracks from along the Spokane River, on Havermale Island and around the falls to create the 100-acre Expo ’74 site, and what’s now Riverfront Park.

1991

Spokane River Centennial Trail opens Continued renewal of and focus on the Spokane River as an irreplaceable feature of the region also led a group of passionate residents to propose, in 1986, a multipurpose recreational trail along its banks, spanning from Lake Coeur d’Alene to the Little Spokane River. Local and federal funds supported the trail’s construction, which was completed in 1991 and connected Washington’s now 39-mile side of the trail with Idaho’s own 21-mile Centennial Trail. A missing piece of the trail, between Spokane’s West Central neighborhood and downtown Spokane, was added through Kendall Yards and under the Monroe Street Bridge in 2013. Another 2-mile extension in Nine Mile Falls was completed in 2016.

2009

Spokane Riverkeeper program launches Seeing a need to legally protect this precious natural resource of our region, the Spokane Riverkeeper program was founded by a group of local attorneys in 2009. For nearly a decade now, the Riverkeeper program has worked to ensure equitable access, to protect the river from pollution and to restore and conserve its watershed for future access. Bart Mihailovich served as Spokane’s first Riverkeeper until leaving in 2014, when current Riverkeeper Jerry White took over, and who’s still serving in the position. — CHEY SCOTT Timeline information was largely sourced from chapters in The Spokane River, edited by Paul Lindholt, along with past Inlander features.

28 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

Painting on the Water L.R. Montgomery has a lifelong love of the river, and it comes through in his art BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

T

he Spokane River is more than just a subject for artist L.R. Montgomery: It’s an inspiration. “It has so much history and so many spiritual callings,” Montgomery says. “It’s always changing. You’ll never see the same piece of water there again. “You never run out of things to paint at the river.” The local landscape painter grew up in Spokane the son of a machinist, and one could say he produces his work with the efficiency of a machine. Montgomery probably completes a couple hundred paintings each year, colorful and impressionistic depictions of Inland Northwest nature that range from 5-by-7-inch postcards to much larger canvases. He typically times himself, he says: He’ll decide, for instance, that this is going to be a “one-hour painting,” and once he reaches the 60-minute mark, then the painting is finished. “A lot of times, your subconscious takes over and you can get it done,” he explains. Montgomery has been painting professionally for about 30

years, having dabbled in woodblock prints, drawings, etchings and sculpture along the way. He mostly works on canvas, but he sometimes uses old door panels, painting the surface black and then creating his landscapes on top of that. He and his wife Carole sell his work out of their South Hill home — “she’s the left brain of our business,” Montgomery says — and prices for his pieces range from $50 to $5,000. Sitting in a rocking chair in his living room, Montgomery is surrounded by his own art: dozens of paintings hanging on and leaning against the walls, most of them depictions of the Spokane River from every angle imaginable. He’s now 70, though he doesn’t feel it. “There’s your chronological age, and then there’s the age you think you are,” he explains, “and I think I’m 12.” Montgomery works from his home studio or in his driveway, but much of the time he actually takes a portable easel out into nature — in People’s Park, on the Little Spokane, in the Turnbull wildlife preserve — and simply paints what he sees.


Artist L.R. Montgomery and his paintings of the Spokane River.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

He has a “viewfinder,” a rectangular cardboard frame broken into quadrants, and he holds it up and captures what appears inside its border. People frequently stop and talk to him while he’s working, he says, and he often sells paintings on the spot. It’s a story his customers can tell their friends, Montgomery explains: It’s not merely a piece of art they found hanging in a gallery. “I’ll be at Dishman Hills,” Montgomery says, “and somebody will come along and they’ll say, ‘What are you doing?’ And I’ll say, ‘Well, I’m painting.’ And they say, ‘Why are you doing that?’ And it’s because I can, and I don’t know how to do anything else. “A lot of artists don’t know how to stick out their hand and meet their customer, but I love meeting these people.” The river, Montgomery says, has always held a fascination for him. He began his career as a wildlife painter, but his focus eventually shifted to more pastoral subjects, and the river just naturally became a centerpiece. “People are awed by it,” Montgomery says. “You can’t hardly go anywhere where you don’t have to cross the river.” Montgomery was named the resident artist of Dishman Hills, and a large collection of his paintings of the conservancy area was recently featured at Dodson’s Jewelers. The sales from that show benefited the Dishman Hills, and Montgomery says he wants his paintings to impart a message of respect and love for the river. “I always say I’m the luckiest person around because I get to do what I want to do every day, and I don’t have to go a million miles,” Montgomery says. “I love to be outside and painting, and looking at the mysteries of the reflections. To me, it’s almost like an opiate. The water always knows where it’s going.” n

AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 29


THE SPOKANE RIVER

LEFT: Brander Castle recounts his family’s harrowing inner-tubing. RIGHT: Spokane County Sheriff Deputies Brad Humphrey and Jim Ebel conduct life-jacket emphasis patrols on the river last month.

Teeming with Life

DANIEL WALTERS PHOTOS

Sights and sounds from the river’s edge BY DANIEL WALTERS AND QUINN WELSCH

THE CASTLES’ CONQUEST

It’s been two summers since 12-year-old Brooklynn Castle went tubing. That time, she says, she almost died. Her whole family set out on one of those guided rafting trips. They rented tubes, got a short spiel from the guide, and then set off onto the Spokane River. The tubes were the wrong size for their body types. They kept tipping over. They weren’t remotely prepared. “The guides basically just did a five-point, threeminute conversation on ‘this is what these things are called,’” Brooklynn’s dad, Brander, says. “We didn’t feel like we got educated about how to survive the trip.” And for Brooklynn, the most intense moment was between the Peaceful Valley neighborhood and T.J. Meenach Bridge. She tips over in a spot that — despite her life jacket — plunges her underneath the rapids. And then, a second later, a hero comes to her rescue: Her older brother jumps off his own tube to save her and brings her to safety. “He saved my life,” Brooklynn says, laughing with the intensity of it all. “He grabbed me. It was awesome.” It’s the sort of thing that, for some people, would put them off tubing ever again. “We all almost drowned,” Brooklynn’s mom, Jami, says. But the Castle family won’t be dissuaded, they say on a recent Sunday on the banks of the river near Upriver Dam. They’re about to scout out another rafting trip. Brander’s been doing a lot of research online about how to handle tipping over in rapids. Look downstream so the current doesn’t push your face in. Float on your back. Keep calm. Of course, planning can only take you so far: Brander’s wearing a T-shirt with that famous Mike Tyson quote: “Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.”

30 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

But risk is half the fun. When Brooklynn talks about her near-death experience, she doesn’t use the vocabulary of fear or trauma. She uses the vocabulary of adrenaline. “Thrilling,” she says, describing her moment in the rapids. “And, like, exhilarating.” (DW)

FASHION POLICE

It’s a hot Sunday afternoon as five inner-tubers lug their equipment up from the Spokane River and past the Centennial Trail. They don’t look happy. This Spokane Valley apartment complex was not their intended destination. They’re clad in bikinis and boardshorts and latesummer tans — but no life jackets. And that, it turns out, was the problem. The crew floated right into the path of two Spokane County sheriff’s deputies in the midst of life-jacket emphasis patrols. Deputy Jim Ebel, head of the Spokane County Sheriff Marine Enforcement Unit, stands at a rock on the shore, gazing out at the water. An osprey flaps overhead and lands on a branch of a towering evergreen on the other side. Deputy Brad Humphrey sits nearby, with a heavy duty police computer on his lap. In Spokane County rafting without a life jacket will get you either a civil infraction — a $76 ticket — or a misdemeanor charge that results in an arrest. It’s up to Ebel’s discretion. In his five years on the marine unit, he’s only recovered one dead body that was wearing a life jacket. “They work when you wear them,” Ebel says. “That’s a good quote.” Just having a life jacket on the raft beside you, Humphrey adds, is a little bit like having your helmet on the back of your motorcycle. Not very helpful when you crash. Most of the main entrances to the river have signs reminding rafters and tubers that life jackets are required. At least, they’re supposed to. “About every week I check them and someone

has taken them and thrown them in the river or something,” Ebel says. Apparently, not everyone likes the message. But all the ticket writing and signs and educational programs have been working. The deputies have seen 100 rafters glide by on this sweltering Sunday afternoon in July, and the vast majority have been wearing life jackets. A few years ago, few rafters bothered. “You’d sit here and write 100 tickets a day,” Ebel says. Today, their ticket writing tally is usually down to single digits. And, indeed, as another flotilla of floaters glides past, they’re all in compliance. One paddle boarder, Jake Bohn, explains that the woman in front him told him he couldn’t get in if he didn’t have one. “She saved you an $80 ticket,” Ebel says. (DW)

CASTING CALL

The line soars across the Falls Park fishing pond with vwiiippp. Not bad for a 10-year-old newbie. “First time they’ve been fishin’. Ever,” Jim Bennett says about his granddaughters Rian Gutterud and 6-year-old Parker. “Got them some Zebco reels.” Like Riverfront Park, Falls Park in Post Falls turns a stretch of the Spokane River into a wonderland: If Riverfront Park is the gem of Spokane, Falls Park is the gem of Post Falls: osprey nests, raging waterfalls, hydroelectric dams, tranquil ponds filled with ducks and — supposedly — fish. The pond is stocked with hundreds of trout every year — though the water is likely too hot for the trout right now. But that hasn’t stopped this crew from trying. “I’ve almost caught some of them, but when I try to reel them in, they let go,” Rian says. Maybe the bait is the problem. Bennett turns around a little canister filled with a rubbery pink substance. PowerBait. But, apparently, the wrong kind. “This other guy says I need rainbow PowerBait here. I don’t know the difference,” Bennett says. “He


Our Mission Statement Jule Schultz, with the Spokane Riverkeeper, organizes interns during a cleanup effort. said garlic PowerBait really works.” But for the kids, with every cast there’s still hope. Rian reels in her line and takes a hold of her latest catch in front of her eyes. It’s seaweed. But she isn’t discouraged. Far from it. There’s no bait on the hook. Her theory? Must have been eaten by a fish. (DW)

SCIENCE AS ADVOCACY

Jule Schultz has found a lot of stuff in the Spokane River. Weird stuff: wagon wheels, solid rubber tires, an old metal boiler used for heating. When the river was commonly used as a dump, people would throw all kinds of things in it without so much as a second thought. Pollution in the Spokane River can pile up, and it’s part of Schultz’s job to make sure it stays at a minimum. On a hot afternoon in Peaceful Valley, he prepares to take a handful of college interns onto the river for a tour and some light garbage cleanup. He leads similar groups with volunteers, travelling downstream, using grabbers to collect trash on the riverbank for the Spokane Riverkeeper’s office, where he works. A couple weeks back, he hauled 400 pounds of trash out: “Just a massive pull,” he says. “A lot of these garbage issues are essentially massive piles of clothes and sleeping bags that get brought down to the river and left there and the only way to get it out is by raft — or by a flood,” he says. Homeless camps are one of the sources of the problem, but he says the Riverkeeper’s outreach interactions with those communities are generally positive. Schultz has worked with the Spokane Riverkeeper’s office for the last four years as a field scientist. In addition to the cleanups and outreach, he also analyzes the river’s characteristics, such as its ecology and natural history. “It’s using science as an advocacy tool,” he says of his job. “We’re trying to use science as an outreach tool for people making decisions about the river and for the public.” (QW)

MASTER OF THE EBB AND FLOW Darren Young controls the Spokane River the same way you might control the water faucets in your home. His job is more complicated than that, and the consequences are overwhelmingly bigger, but it’s essentially true. From a suspension bridge over the river in downtown Spokane, he overlooks his domain.

QUINN WELSCH PHOTO

As Avista’s chief journeyman operator for the downtown area, Young is responsible for how much water is flowing through the river downtown. He controls this from inside the dimly lit, low-ceiling, concrete interior of the Upper Falls plant, managing everything from energy generation, to recreational and aesthetic water flow, to flood control. “The mountains is where my job starts,” he says. “I keep track of snowpack, river-flows up stream, the lake level. I keep track of what water is being passed at Post Falls in the Upriver Dam, because it all affects me here. “This time of year I would get just over 10 megawatts of electricity between [Upper Falls and Post Street]. I need about 18 to run downtown on any given day.” It’s a balancing act not only because he must divert river flow into various channels to keep the current moving, but because seasonal and environmental impacts can also dictate how much electricity is generated. (QW)

LAUNDRY ON THE RIVERBANK

It’s a hot day, late in the afternoon near Spokane’s Chief Garry Park Neighborhood. There are makeshift campgrounds scattered along the riverbank, just a stone’s throw from the brand new Riverview Lofts apartment complex, still partially under construction. A couple carrying a giant plastic bag filled with laundry march along South Riverton Avenue to a clearing in the bushes that leads to an overgrown trail along the Spokane River. They don’t respond when approached. Along the trail, signs of human activity are relatively sparse at first: cigarette butts, a couple sun-bleached cans and other forgotten trash. But look closer around the trail, and it becomes obvious that the area is a well established camp. There’s a blanket stuffed in between a tree’s branches. A sock here. Two socks there. There’s garbage, too, but the riverbank is relatively clean. The water is clean, clear and still. The heat, reaching 90 degrees, is blocked by a thick layer of bushes and trees. Some of the leantos and tents almost blend in with the natural surroundings. A few teenagers with fishing poles and a dog walk down the trail. A construction worker from the nearby apartment complex bounds down to the riverbank to pee. The laundry-carrying couple have disappeared. (QW) n

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AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 31


THE SPOKANE RIVER

Members of the Spokane Fire Department’s swift-water rescue team train with the technical rescue team, which uses ropes to rescue people in hard-to-reach places.

Two Falls

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

In one day on the Spokane River, one man tries to die but survives. Hours later and 4 miles away, one woman tries to survive but dies BY MITCH RYALS

A

man clings to the outside of the railing on the T.J. Meenach Bridge early on the morning of July 3. He appears determined to end his life. Some members of the Spokane Fire Department’s swift-water rescue team wait in the water below and others wait behind trees and bushes — out of sight so as to not agitate the man in crisis. Waiting is all they can do now. As the morning sun beats down, police talk to the man for more than an hour, recalls Jason Keen, a member of the swift-water rescue team, who was waiting on shore. And then, as if without warning, the man lets go. He hits the water, and within seconds the water rescue team swarms the man. His purposeful movement, as if he’s trying to swim, indicate that he’s still conscious, Keen says. Firefighters paddle in kayaks and grab the man’s arms as he flails. It takes only minutes to ferry him to the shore where Keen is waiting with other first responders. As paramedics assess the man for injuries, he complains of trouble breathing, Keen recalls. They’re concerned that he may have broken a rib and punctured a lung. But tests initially show that the cuts on his head are the man’s only injuries. “He lived,” Keen says. “From the perspective on the shore, everything went like it should. He hit the water, he was

32 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

in the boat and in an ambulance in minutes. That’s the best we can ask for. But it doesn’t always go so lucky.” For most, the Spokane River elicits pleasant memories. It’s a place to float with friends, maybe it sparks creative juices, and the natural beauty has come to define this region with a river running through it. But for those select few — the first responders who are called to its banks, its rapids, its bridges — the river is a symbol of tragedy and a reminder of the painful randomness of life itself.

A

round midday, Kelsey Groff, her boyfriend, Derek Garcia, and their kids pack up for a picnic by the river. They take a hammock, too, and head to Bowl and Pitcher in Riverside State Park. The foursome cross the main bridge over choppy water and hike north along the river for about a mile, Groff says. From the bank, they see a woman floating, face down, wearing a life jacket and holding an oar. Groff thinks she must be swimming. They continue along the river and so does the woman. But when Groff looks again, the oar had floated away, and a man runs from behind yelling, “She needs help! She needs help!”

AQUA SQUAD

Approximately 40 Spokane firefighters make up the swift-water rescue team, split between station Nos. 2 and 16. The team trains on a weekly basis, says Jason Keen, the water rescue training coordinator. “The river is super dynamic,” says Keen. “The water flows are different every day, and even throughout the day. It’s so important that we train every single week, 12 months a year because it’s never the same.” Keen says the most common calls the team responds to are potentially suicidal people on the Monroe Street Bridge. So far this year, the team has responded to 28 water rescues altogether, according to the department’s internal numbers, compared to 36 in 2017, 25 in 2016, 20 in 2015 and 19 in 2014. (MITCH RYALS)


That man, Kyle Murphy, dives into the freezing water and swims to the floating woman. Her life jacket had slipped so far up that her head is underwater, Murphy recalls. She isn’t breathing and does not have a pulse when he reaches her in the middle of the river. Murphy swims back to shore, where Garcia is waiting. Groff calls 911 and takes the kids, ages 9 and 11, back to the main bridge to wait for first responders. The bank is too steep to pull the woman, who has been identified as Deise Nagle, of Colorado, all the way to shore, Murphy says. So Garcia performs CPR while Nagle’s legs hang in water. Murphy feels sick after he climbs onto land. He throws up on the shore. Nagle was on a guided rafting trip with a group of 12, according to news reports at the time. The rafting service, Pangaea River Rafting, advertises tours in Washington, Idaho and Montana, on its website. One of them is a two-hour “beginner” level whitewater course on the Spokane River. Murphy says he saw one of the two rafts flip, but he’s unsure if Nagle was already in the water. Spokane Fire Chief Brian Schaeffer told reporters that Nagle hit her head on the rocks beneath the water and floated three quarters of a mile down the river. First responders took two members of that group to the hospital. Nagle was pronounced dead by the river. Original reports stated that the rafters were wearing cold water gear, but Murphy says that was not the case. Spokane County Sheriff’s Deputy Jim Ebel, a part of the marine enforcement unit, says “there’s no reason that three or four of them should have been on that boat. Age-wise, size-wise, intellect-wise, a lot of things went wrong.” The often-repeated advice from firefighters to people having fun on the river is that they’ve never done CPR on a person wearing a life jacket. So for Keen, Nagle’s death emphasizes the river’s awesome power and unpredictability. “Most of our calls are for people not wearing life jackets,” he says. “It makes a difference.” n

AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 33


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Find us downtown, in the Valley, and at our new location in North Spokane. 34 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018


FESTIVAL

COMMUNITY AND CREATIVITY As Coeur d’Alene’s Art on the Green turns 50, meet some of the people inspired by its mission BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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oug Fagerness remembers his initial impressions of Art on the Green, the annual three-day visual and performing arts festival at Coeur d’Alene’s North Idaho College. “Here was a festival that was completely free,” says Fagerness, who had come down from Careywood for the day, and couldn’t get over the artwork and stage performers. “I think they had ballet that year,” he recalls. It was 1975 or ’76 and Fagerness had just started as director of NIC’s Head Start program, a position he’d hold for 33 years. Coeur d’Alene was a modest-but-growing tourist destination; predating the Coeur d’Alene Resort, the North Shore Motor Hotel had recently expanded with a seven-story tower topped by the swanky Cloud 9 restaurant. Coeur d’Alene was still a working-class town for most of the 16,000 or so inhabitants, where dominant industries were tied to natural resources. And yet it’s also where seeds of a thriving arts community were beginning to take root. After attending Art on the Green his first year in town, Fagerness knew he wanted to be a part of the event, so the following year he arrived in full clown costume, returning annually for 13 years. Then he ran the beverage booth and helped with ArtShop classes for kids, a former weeklong arts camp especially targeting at-risk populations. He loves the festival for what it offers all ages, especially kids,

says Fagerness. “Coming and seeing the wonder and things put together in ways [kids] haven’t seen before is a trigger for the creative spirit.” Although he stopped volunteering in 2008, Fagerness still attends Art on the Green, which he sees as a community-wide homecoming. This year, the festival celebrates 50 years with 190 artist booths, live music on two stages and plenty of food options, all kicking off with a blessing from the Coeur d’Alene Tribe Friday morning at 11 am. Formerly a Coeur d’Alene resident, Christine Marie Larsen will be making the trek from Seattle with her son, who loves the sandcastle, she says. Larsen began volunteering at age 11 or 12 in the corn booth with her father, David Larsen, alongside co-founder Pat Flammia (Pat and Sue Flammia created the Citizens Council on the Arts, which produces Art on the Green). Larsen has won the poster contest twice, participated in the juried exhibition, helped with ArtShop, and continues to volunteer with both the website and booth-selection committee. “I stay involved because it’s fun,” says Larsen. “It’s a great opportunity for me to see friends and family over the weekend, and I appreciate the mission of the organization to create a marketplace for artists, to promote arts in the community and to support art education.” ...continued on next page

NOTEWORTHY EVENTS IN ART ON THE GREEN HISTORY 1961-68 Coeur d’Alene Art Association formed, holding various art festivals. They also created the “clothesline” art sale. 1968-69 Pat and Sue Flammia formed Citizens Council for the Arts and produced their first two-day, midsummer Outdoor Arts & Crafts Festival in McEuen Park. 1970 CCA’s arts and crafts festival moved to North Idaho College, eventually leading to the event’s new name, according to Fay Wright, who wrote Art on the Green: A Celebration of Art and Community in the West.

AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 35


CULTURE | FESTIVAL

NOTEWORTHY EVENTS IN ART ON THE GREEN HISTORY 1972 First event poster, by printmaker Jeanne Holmberg. 1975 Art on the Green expands to three days. 1981 ArtShop, offering week-long classes, debuts and lasts until 2015.

The festivals always offered fun for all ages, from kids to experienced artists like Harold Balazs (right).

“COMMUNITY AND CREATIVITY,” CONTINUED... Larsen, a visual designer and illustrator, credits Art on the Green with her becoming a working creative. “I saw that there were so many ways for people to integrate and support creativity,” says Larsen. “Art on the Green also exposed me to people who are passionate about their patronage of the arts and making sure everyone has access to seeing and learning about art,” she says. Yvonne Benzinger was an established commercial artist and screenprinter the late ’70s when she joined Coeur d’Alene Art Association, another longtime local arts organization dating to the mid’60s. “Over my years involved with CAA, looking through their old scrapbooks and notes,” says Benzinger, “I discovered [CAA’s] history with Art on the Green.” First she helped with CAA’s “clothesline” art sale, then printed T-shirts from the annual poster design, working with veteran Art on the Green organizer Allen Dodge, his wife Mary Dee, and his brother Mike Dodge, who collectively took over t-shirt duties for

AVAILABLE HERE

36 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

1991 CAA member and longtime Art on the Green volunteer Yvonne Benzinger wins first poster contest.

many years. Benzinger’s been involved ever since, winning the first poster contest in 1991, then winning again in 1996 and 2003. She has also served as a juror and continues to volunteer. Benzinger never tires of what Art on the Green offers: “The glorious color and art of which there’s more and better every year!” She loves the people, music, dancers, performers, kids making art, and volunteers, she says, as well as new ventures every year, like hands-on classes during the festival. And, she says, even though it’s a small thing, her personal favorite is wearing the volunteer badge that entitles her to a free ice cream cone. “What more could I ask!” n

1998 Scott Dodson’s sandcastles debut, remaining a staple attraction.

Art on the Green • Fri, Aug. 3, noon-7:30 pm; Sat, Aug. 4, 10 am7:30 pm; Sun, Aug. 5, 10 am-5 pm • Free • North Idaho College • 100 W. Garden Ave., Coeur d’Alene • artonthegreencda.com

2018 Debbie McCulley is the featured poster artist for the 50th anniversary.

2011 Dennis Young and Jeff Harris mesmerized audiences by firing pottery onsite using the “raku” technique. Young passed away, but Harris is still doing pottery at the fest. 2013 The 45th anniversary poster was done by Harold Balazs, an early supporter.


CULTURE | DIGEST

BLED DRY Even the name, “Theranos,” makes the company sound like a supervillain organization. That should have been the first clue that something was amiss at the Silicon Valley startup that claimed to have developed portable, just-a-finger-prick blood-testing technology. And yet profile after profile cooed about the brilliance of Elizabeth Holmes, its young founder. That is, except for Wall Street Journal reporter John Carreyrou, who launched the reporting that exposed the fraud and took down the company. Carreyrou’s expansive book Bad Blood yanks the curtain open even further to expose not only Theranos, but its many enablers. As a journalist who dug into Spokane’s closest equivalent — the fraudulent Blu-ray company Bluestar — it’s a bit maddening to behold just how much detail Carreyrou gleaned despite Theranos’ thicket of nondisclosure agreements. (DANIEL WALTERS)

Kyle Ryan

Five Shows from Oh! Canada

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BY BILL FROST

e all have friends who’ve threatened to “Move to Canada!” and they’re not going to shut up aboot it. Cool, because Canada has some damned fine TV. Crack a Molson and stream these Canadian series while filling out your passport application. LETTERKENNY (Seasons 1-2 on Hulu) Neckless redneck Wayne, his buds and a cavalcade of characters fight, drink and generally laze about in hick town Letterkenny, trading verbally dense rants and takedowns with the hyper-speed virtuosity of an Eddie Van Halen solo (or, to keep it Canadian, Alex Lifeson). Letterkenny is like a flannel-shirted meld of It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia and a live-action South Park, but wholly original, and a decidedly love-it-or-hate-it kerfuffle. TRAILER PARK BOYS (Seasons 1-12 on Netflix) I couldn’t stand Trailer Park Boys at first — and nearly avoided Letterkenny due to comparisons. Now… I’m not completely sold, but the series has its charms. The

THE BUZZ BIN mockumentary about a group of Nova Scotia trailer park screw-ups and their perpetually doomed money-making schemes strikes a consistent balance of hilarity and cringe, but, should you find yourself relating to any of these characters, discontinue watching immediately.

TERRAIN TIME The time has arrived once again! Local artists, send in your awesome work to be considered for Terrain! The annual, one-night juried multimedia showcase, this year happening Oct. 5, features work by emerging local artists across all media: sculpture, 2D art, film, installation, fiber art, performance and more. This year marks Terrain’s 11th year; submissions are due by Aug. 17 at midnight at submit.terrainspokane.com. (CHEY SCOTT)

SMALL SCREEN KING Hulu’s newest series Castle Rock is essentially a Stephen King Easter egg hunt, a serialized mystery set in the sleepy Maine hamlet (and likely supernatural gateway) that links the events in many of the prolific author’s novels. Revolving around strange occurrences at the infamous Shawshank Prison, the four episodes now streaming feature nods (both explicit and blink-and-you’llmiss-’em) to entries in King’s vast bibliography: Needful Things, Cujo, The Shining, It, the Dark Tower saga. As a King diehard, I’m curious to see what other lore this show digs up. (NATHAN WEINBENDER)

SCHITT’S CREEK (Seasons 1-3 on Netflix) Schitt’s Creek isn’t a Netflix original, nor is it even ’Merican. Like Arrested Development a la Canada, Schitt’s Creek pits dumb ex-wealthy folk against small-town rubes with ridiculously funny results: Johnnie and Moira Rose (comedy treasures Eugene Levy and Catherine O’Hara) are forced to live in the dump town of Schitt’s Creek, which they once purchased as a joke. More so than Arrested D, Schitt’s Creek is a stealth heart-warmer. WHAT IS AND WHAT SHOULD NEVER BE Nearly every episode of director Jean-Marc Vallée’s Big Little Lies had me Googling to find out the artists behind the show’s soundtrack, so it’s no surprise that his latest work — the incredibly dark and highly entertaining Sharp Objects, also on HBO — is packed with musical wallpaper just as thrilling. The story of a damaged newspaper reporter (Amy Adams) returning to her hometown to investigate the murders of young girls is set to the sounds of Hurray for the Riff Raff, Sylvan Esso, M. Ward and more, but most notable is the consistent stream of Led Zeppelin classics Adams listens to. Zep’s constant presence is explained in the third episode of the show, now halfway through its eight-episode run. (DAN NAILEN)

ORPHAN BLACK (Seasons 1-5 on Amazon) In cult sci-fi series Orphan Black, a small-time criminal (Tatiana Maslany) assumes the identity of a dead detective she eerily resembles, only to learn she’s a clone and that there are more versions of herself out there. And then it gets crazy. Maslany’s performance — multiple distinct performances, to be exact — is stunning. MARY KILLS PEOPLE (Seasons 1-2 on Hulu) Canadian actress Caroline Dhavernas has starred in U.S. series like Wonderfalls and Hannibal, but Mary Kills People is the first to fully realize her chilly, sexy potential. Dr. Mary Harris (Dhavernas) kills people — specifically, the terminally ill who want to die on their own terms. Her secret Angel of Death gig spills over into her life, echoing dark-side classics like Weeds and Dexter, and Dhavernas’ complex Mary is a near-equal to Nancy Botwin and Dexter Morgan. n

THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music arrives online and in stores Aug. 3. To wit: AMANDA SHIRES, To The Sunset. The fiddlin’ Texan is on a hot streak with her solo albums, and this one pushes the boundaries of “country.” LUCERO, Among the Ghosts. The Memphis roots-rockers remain sadly underappreciated. MAC MILLER, Swimming. Will this be an entire album of songs about Ariana Grande and her new beau? It’s possible. (DAN NAILEN)

AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 37


CULTURE | BASEBALL

Grit and Guile Former Gonzaga pitcher Marco Gonzales is a big reason the Mariners might see playoff baseball for the first time since 2001 BY HOWARD HARDEE

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arco Gonzales has played baseball with a chip on his shoulder for as long as he remembers. As an undersized pitcher who’s never thrown exceptionally hard, he’s viewed himself as an underdog with something to prove at each level, from prep school to becoming an All-American for Gonzaga University. Nothing has changed about his attitude. It’s just that now, at 26 years old, he’s carving up Major League Baseball lineups as a starting pitcher for the Seattle Mariners. “I think it’s all about mentality,” he says of his recent success. “It’s just staying focused in those tough situations, trying to remain in the moment. Earlier in my career, and especially last year, I’d get some traffic on the basepaths and I’d try to amp up and, you know, kind of muscle through it. Now I’m trying to remain calm and make my pitch.” Gonzales has been a surprisingly steady presence all season, bolstering a starting rotation that has been largely responsible for keeping the Mariners’ playoff hopes alive. But his tenure with Seattle didn’t start smoothly. Just a little over a year ago, he was one half of an unpopular trade that sent burly, power-hitting minor league outfielder Tyler O’Neill to the St. Louis Cardinals, and his subsequent struggles did little to endear him to the fanbase. Speaking with the Inlander by phone from Safeco Field, Gonzales reflects on his path to the majors and how he seems to be sticking in Seattle’s starting rotation. “I’ll continue to do everything I can to stay here,” he says. “Obviously, there are some things I can’t control, but hopefully I do play here long term.”

future wife, Monica. While they were dating, they dreamed he’d get drafted by the Mariners and stay in the Northwest. “She’s originally from Seattle, so we always thought that would work out pretty well,” he recalls, “but once I got drafted by the Cardinals we kind of gave up on that idea.” St. Louis selected Gonzales with the 19th pick of the 2013 MLB amateur draft and fast-tracked him to the majors, calling him up late in the 2014 season and using him out of the bullpen in the playoffs. He was 22 years old.

“I’ll continue to do everything I can to stay here. Obviously, there are some things I can’t control, but hopefully I do play here long term.”

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onzales was recruited by Gonzaga out of Rocky Mountain High School in Fort Collins, Colorado. He was a two-way star for the Bulldogs, impressing MLB scouts as both a hitter and a pitcher. During his time in Spokane, he also met his

38 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

“In retrospect, I think it all happened really quick — maybe too quick,” he says. “You try to handle the moment and compete and stay at that level. I had to hit the ground running and learn some things at the big-league level that I maybe should have learned in Triple A [minor leagues].” That postseason, he picked up two wins against the Chicago Cubs, but then he coughed up three runs in a loss to the San Francisco Giants as the Cardinals were eliminated. Things got worse before they got better: Gonzales felt a pinching sensation in his elbow during spring training the next year, but pressed forward with an ill-fated rehab attempt. He pitched fewer than three innings in the majors in 2015. In April 2016, he underwent Tommy John surgery, the increasingly common procedure to repair the ulnar collateral ligament (UCL). Sidelined for the entire season, he confronted the reality that he might never pitch in the majors again. “That’s always the fear with surgery, that you might not make it


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Marco Gonzales back in his college days. TORREY VAIL PHOTO back to where you were, or even get close,” he says. “But I had a lot of friends that had gone through [Tommy John], a lot of teammates who had advice on what kind of mentality to have through the process.” The off time allowed Gonzales to reset himself, but he wasn’t in peak form when he returned to the majors in June 2017. “I don’t think I was delicate or anything, but mentally, being able to compete at that level takes some time,” he says. “That takes some innings under your belt.” He was struggling when he was traded to the Mariners on July 21, and the early returns did not look good for Seattle: In about 40 innings between the two teams, his earned-run-average (ERA) was more than 6.00 (meaning he gave up more than six runs per nine innings pitched).

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his season has been an entirely different story. In spring training, Gonzales was throwing all of his pitches at full strength for the first time in years, including a cut fastball he had shelved after getting hurt. He felt like he had a new arm. “Grip strength was a huge factor in coming back from surgery,” he says. “I feel like it’s made my curveball better, and certainly taking time off from the cutter and then bringing it back this year, that’s been a huge weapon for me.” He earned a spot in the rotation with a strong spring training, and now he leads the Mariners in wins with a 12-5 record as of July 30, and he owns the 10th-best ERA (3.37) in the American League. With a fastball sitting around 92 mph, he’s thrived by mixing up his pitches, keeping batters off balance and inducing weak popups, dinky ground balls and swinging strikes. He’s gaining more confidence with each start amid Seattle’s unlikely playoff race, and Safeco Field feels more like home with each outing. He’s had to adjust his approach, but he says he still plays with that chip on his shoulder: “I feel like I’m a different pitcher, with shades of the old me.” n

AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 39


CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS

August Art-ventures Where to see, hear and experience firsthand the region’s thriving arts community this First Friday

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pokane’s monthly arts showcase features events, including gallery receptions, live music and a chance to meet local artists, across the downtown core and beyond. Receptions for this month’s event happen on Friday, Aug. 3, from 5-8 pm, unless otherwise noted below, where events are listed alphabetically by venue. These listings were compiled from information provided by First Friday’s organizer, Downtown Spokane Partnership, as well as host venues and artists. Red stars denote Inlander staff picks; for additional information visit firstfridayspokane.org. (CHEY SCOTT) 1900 HOUSE & HOME, 114 W. Pacific Featuring the art of Lily Booth, Laurie Ann Greenberg and Kayla Baker. AVENUE WEST, 907 W. Boone Ave. Abstracts and metal sculpture by Jim Bauer. BARILI CELLARS, 608 W. Second Manipulated photography by Jessica Bloom. Reception 4-9 pm. BARRISTER WINERY, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. Jim Dhillon’s abstract surrealism is on display. Reception from 5-10 pm with appetizers and music by Maxie Ray Mills. BERSERK, 125 S. Stevens Fragmented, gestural portraits by Sierra Dawson. Reception 6 pm-2 am. BISTANGO, 108 N. Post Live music by Ray Vasquez, from 4-9 pm. J CHASE GALLERY, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. A showcase celebrating the 70th anniversary of the Spokane Handweavers’ Guild.

COMMUNITY PINT, 120 E. Sprague Featuring the art of Megan Perkins from her Artist’s Eye on Spokane series. Reception 6-11 pm. CORE PILATES AND WELLNESS, 1230 W. Summit Pkwy. Watercolors by Chris Cuddy. COUGAR CREST ESTATE WINERY, 8 N. Post Creative photography, paintings and mixed media by members of the Collective (Spokane). CRAFTSMAN CELLARS, 1194 W. Summit Pkwy. Nature-themed watercolors by Stephanie Sarro. Reception 2-9 pm. FELLOW COWORKING, 304 W. Pacific Double Dose features art by mother-daughter duo Louis and Chemyn Kodis. HILLS’ RESTAURANT & LOUNGE, 401 W. Main Music by the Front Porch Trio: Steve Simmons, Rick Singer and Phil Kleinman, from 6:30-9:30 pm.

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A piece of wood-burned art by Jerry White at Pottery Place Plus. J KOLVA-SULLIVAN GALLERY, 115 S. Adams St. Body’s Memory by Kurdistanborn architect, activist and artist Alan Abdulkader. LEFTBANK WINE BAR, 108 N. Washington Watercolors by Kate Lund, with music by Kori Ailene from 7-10 pm. J LIBERTY CIDERWORKS, 164 S. Washington Limited edition prints of Spokane landmarks by Chris Bovey. Reception 4-9 pm. MARMOT ART SPACE, 1202 W. Summit Pkwy. Acrylic paintings by rising artist Haley Waddington, alongside the gallery’s regularly featured artists. MARYHILL WINERY SPOKANE, 1303 W. Summit Pkwy. Photography by Daniel “Garth” Kinney, with live music by Eric Neuhausser. Reception 5-8:30 pm.

NEW MOON ART GALLERY, 1326 E. Sprague A showcase of paintings by Charleen Martin and Diane Sherman. Reception noon-6 pm. POTTERY PLACE PLUS, 203 N. Washington Wood-burned art (pyrography) by Jerry White. RIVER CITY BREWING, 121 S. Cedar August’s garage party features music by the South Hill, ice cream, beer and food and a pop-up shop from Fringe & Fray. Events from 4-10 pm. J SARANAC ART PROJECTS, 25 W. Main Immersion: Dance Among Paintings features a silk installation, dance film and paintings by Suzanne Ostersmith and Grace Barnes, with water-inspired performances by Vytal Movement Dance Company on the half hour. SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, 117 N. Howard Art by Chris Erickson.

SPARK CENTRAL, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. Virtual Reality First Friday is a drop-in program to experiment with games and create tools in a virtual 3D space. SPOKANE PUBLIC LIBRARY, 906 W. Main Music by Freetime Synthetic, from 6:30-8 pm. TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY, 115. S Adams The gallery’s annual August Studio Sale and Exhibition offers discounted handmade ceramics, including the popular $25 grab bag event. WILEY’S DOWNTOWN BISTRO, 115 N. Washington Best of Wiley’s, a collection of art featured in the restaurant over the past year. Reception 11 am-9 pm. WILLIAM GRANT GALLERY & FRAMING, 1188 W. Summit Pkwy. Florals & Landscapes by Bobbie Wieber. n

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BAKING

Christine Leaming transforms sugar into works of sweet art. ALICIA HAUFF PHOTO

The Cake Master Christine Leaming draws upon artistic skills to create detailed, lifelike cakes for her Spokane bakeshop Sweets Geeky Cakes BY CHEY SCOTT

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hristine Leaming has always been artistic. Instead of paint or clay or other traditional materials, her chosen media these days are buttercream icing, fondant, modeling chocolate, food dyes and cake batter. Even so, many techniques that go into crafting Leaming’s pastry masterpieces, made for her Spokane-based bakery Sweets Geeky Cakes, are the same as those she’d use when sculpting a lump of clay or brushing oil paint onto a canvas. Rather than a baker or a pastry chef, Leaming considers herself a cake artist. “I went to school for art, and was working coffee in the morning while going to school,” she recalls. “One of the [pastry] decorators walked out, and they were like, ‘Hey, you do sculpting, do you want to try?’ … It wasn’t wonderful but I could do it, and I kind of surprised myself.” Leaming has been crafting edible art from sugar, butter and flour for 13 years now, and through Sweets Geeky Cakes for the past three. She bakes and decorates lots of kids’ birthday cakes, often themed after popular video games, movies and other cultural trends — unicorns, kitties and llamas are also very popular, she notes — as well as tiered wedding cakes wrapped in elegant motifs and textures painted and sculpted in icing. She often uses sugar crystals to create geode-inspired designs, and marble patterns in frosting are a favorite, trending technique. Sweets Geeky Cakes’ elaborate work has been featured in numerous wedding and cake-decorating publications, both online and in print. Leaming’s been invited to teach at industry conventions and aspires to travel and teach fellow artists around the world. “I’ve always been attracted to clay, and that is something I’ve been easily able to transform into edible art,” she explains. “The other thing I do a lot is painterly — I take my palette knife set and transform that into my buttercream [tools]. I can sculpt and layer just like oil paint.” Unlike clay or canvas, however, cakes can’t be worked on and set aside to come back to later. “There’s very little downtime because of freshness, which is huge. It doesn’t matter what it looks like if it doesn’t taste good,” Leaming says. “That’s something that’s hard with sculpted cakes. Sometimes it doesn’t go the way you planned, ...continued on next page

AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 41


FOOD | BAKING “THE CAKE MASTER,” CONTINUED... and if you’re frustrated you can’t walk away like with a clay sculpture.” To speed up the process, Leaming usually bakes in the evening and freezes the cake overnight before waking up to stack and carve the layers into a base form she’ll then cover with chocolate ganache, fondant and buttercream icing before perfecting her design. These expedited timelines also mean Leaming has to problem solve on the spot and is often under pressure to finish projects under tight deadlines. Most cakes are finished in less than two days, sometimes just one. “I have a lot of people when I deliver, they’re like ‘Oh my gosh, this must have taken forever!’ and I just kinda laugh. The procrastinator in me is like ‘Yeah, you’d be surprised,’” she says. “I think that comes to having a passion for it.”

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ome of Leaming’s more elaborate cake creations include a 4-foot-tall sculpture of the comic book character Deadpool, made for 2017’s Lilac City Comicon, among plenty of other pop and nerd culture-inspired cakes from franchises like Star Wars, Marvel, DC, Harry Potter, Disney and more. She’s sculpted intricate cakes resembling Yoda, the tentacled face of Davy Jones from the second Pirates of the Caribbean movie and plenty of rotten-faced zombies. Leaming’s personal passion for nerd and comic book pop culture is often showcased in her work, and is reflected in the “Geeky” part of her bakery’s name. “Sweets” is a nickname from her husband, Ben, but also represents Leaming’s own love of cake and all things sweet. While she enjoys the challenge of sculpting lifelike representations of popular characters, Leaming also ap-

Yoda comes to life in sugar form for this sculpted cake.

preciates when clients allow her the freedom to innovate and experiment with an order. “My end goal is for people to bring me ideas and not photos. I want to build trust in my clients — they just give me an idea and it’s an explosion of cake!” she says, laughing. Leaming also strives not to duplicate cake designs she’s made in the past. “I want all my cakes to be my own, in a sense. I like to put my own spin on it, and I think that makes the client feel better — you’ve taken the time to make a cake for them, not just cranking something out like everyone else has.” Beyond a custom visual look for her cakes, Leam-

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ALICIA HAUFF PHOTO

ing offers several flavor and filling options to customers, including her own recipe for a snickerdoodle custard filling, as well as traditional vanilla bean. Cake batter options are vanilla, chocolate, lemon, snickerdoodle, spice, strawberry and more, including seasonal flavors. Cake prices vary by design, with a minimum serving size of 15 people, starting at $4.50 per person and increasing based on design complexity. A single-tier unicorn cake, for example, ranges between $80 and $100, Leaming says. Sculpted cakes with detailed outer layer decorations (versus buttercream icing designs), start at $150 each. Still, Leaming says each cake varies by order requests, so it’s hard to list base pricing. She prefers working with customers to figure out a vision that fits their budget. Most of Sweets Geeky Cakes’ local following grew from word of mouth, since Leaming admits she doesn’t spend much time marketing herself. She’s the sole baker and cake artist, after all, working from her home kitchen, which is allowed by Washington state’s cottage food industry laws. Still, Leaming hopes to keep it that way, both to maintain artistic freedom and so she can focus on raising her 4-year-old son, Jackson. To prevent overloading herself and getting burned out, Leaming limits how many orders she can take on each week. “It’s important to me to keep the art alive and still be doing what I’m doing,” she says. “I don’t want to pump out cakes production-wise; some weeks I can take off and do whatever and sometimes I have a couple of cakes a week.” n cheys@inlander.com Find more of Christine Leaming’s work for Sweets Geeky Cakes at facebook.com/bakedlife509.


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FOOD | RURAL EATS

Ain’t Messin’ Around Messy’s Burgers serves up classic American fare of burgers, dogs and more in Spirit Lake, Idaho BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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esse Keller figures he was the only kid in Clark Fork, Idaho, who had a subscription to Bon Appetit magazine. Encouraged by family, he taught himself the basics of cooking and, although he wanted to join the Navy, he attended North Idaho College’s culinary program. Two restaurant gigs later, he’s incorporated the nickname his mother gave him, “Messy Jesse,” into his first eatery, Messy’s Burgers, opened in June of 2017. Located in Spirit Lake, along Kootenai County’s northern lip, Messy’s Burgers is a classic roadside joint with an Americana theme. Burgers, dogs, onion rings, fries, ice cream cones, shakes, malts and floats load the menu. Keller incorporates his appreciation for service members — police, emergency medical, fire and military — wherever he can, offering discounts and a decor that

The Drunken Cowboy burger is topped with bacon, fried onions, pepper jack cheese and house bourbon barbecue sauce.

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includes American flags and photos of service members on the walls. Keller’s father, grandfather and son all have military connections. Keller puts his culinary spin on Messy’s massive menu with things like the “Ripper” dog ($5), so named because the succulent skin pops open when kissed by the deep fryer. “Kenzie” fries, loaded with garlic and butter, are served in half-pound ($5) or 1-pound batches ($8). The “Frychos” marry crinkle-cut fries with nacho toppings, including house-made salsa and taco meat ($7). Then there are the fresh-pressed, never-frozen and cooked-toorder Angus chuck burgers: “Mini Messes” are an eighth ($3.50$3.75) to a quarter-pound ($5-$6.50), while “Big Messes” are a third ($6.25-$8) to a half-pound ($12-$13.50). Signature burgers get toppings like blue cheese ENTRÉE and mushrooms, bacon and an Get the scoop on local egg, red peppers, cheese, carafood news with our weekly melized and fried onions both. Entrée newsletter. Sign up Keller’s namesake meal, at Inlander.com/newsletter. which includes fries and a soda, is the 1-pound “Messy Jesse” burger ($25) topped with four slices of cheese, six bacon strips and lettuce “for the health-conscious eater,” he says. Having survived a critical first year in business, Messy’s has since gained quite a following. “I eat there once a month,” says Gary Lee Solis Jr., a longtime chef and restaurateur who runs Kyoko Sushi in Sandpoint. “It starts with a great handmade burger in a good bun with quality ingredients and toppings,” says Solis Jr., who won Messy’s recent slogan contest with “You’ve tried the rest, now try the mess!” n Messy’s Burgers • 6285 W. Maine St., Spirit Lake • Open daily 10 am-10 pm (summer hours) • facebook.com/ messysburgers • 208-623-4298

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Growing Pains Eighth Grade authentically and artfully captures modern awkward adolescence BY SETH SOMMERFELD

A

s Kayla begins recording this edition of her barely-viewed YouTube vlog via her fuzzy webcam, you can, like, totally tell that she’s less than, like, 100 percent confident in her delivery of this motivational poster-esque monologue about how to, like, just be yourself. Twitches of anxiety cross her acne-blotched face as she checks her notes and insists that while some people at her middle school might think she’s, like, totally shy, she’s actually, like, super talkative when given the chance. Once she gives her signature sign-off (“Gucci!”), you can feel the full-soul exhale of making it through another performative moment. Eighth Grade follows Kayla (Elsie Fisher) on the bumpy road of the last days of middle school — that unpleasant phase between childhood and young adulthood — in the hyper-connected modern world. Unlike many musings on contemporary teens, every moment of the film feels real — authentic and grounded. That’s all thanks to a next-level naturalistic performance by Fisher as Kayla. You believe every moment of shyness she bluffs away, the joy she experiences when she sings karaoke, the internal squirm when her overly caring dad tries to talk to her at the dinner table, the heart-stopping mental scramble when her crush notices her and the difficulty of being performatively upbeat for social media when she’s down in the dumps. The movie avoids the ubiquitous trap of getting technophobic. Instead of making Kayla’s social media

46 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

Elsie Fisher beautifully communicates the social horrors of adolescence in comedian Bo Burnham’s terrific directorial debut Eighth Grade. obsession seem like a ruinous evil, it’s treated like the relatively normal thing that all kids her age actually do without thinking. Perhaps this treatment shouldn’t come as a surprise, as Eighth Grade is the feature writing and directorial debut of Bo Burnham, one of YouTube’s earliest stars. The filmmaking on display here belies the young writer/director’s experience: There EIGHTH GRADE are gorgeous framings, Rated R impressive long shots and Directed by Bo Burnham challenging juxtapositions Starring Elsie Fisher, Josh Hamilton, (like placing one of the Emily Robinson raciest flirtation scenes in the middle of an active shooter drill, because the kids are numb to the horror of such a thing). While Fisher’s Kayla does the heavy lifting, the entire cast consistently hits the right notes. Josh Hamilton excels as Mark, Kayla’s unintentionally goofy, overly supportive father. His likeability is off the charts, as his love somewhat blinds him to his daughter’s awkwardness. Burnham doesn’t try to tell the family’s full life story in the short time frame, but the performers’ moments of pause and wheels-turning-in-the-brain looks tap into the unspoken pathos of things that happen off the screen (like the lack of a maternal figure) making Mark and Kayla rich with depth. Kayla’s peers all fit their roles without feeling like clichés: There’s Kennedy (Catherine

Oliviere), the stuck-up popular girl whose face is awash with disgust at the very idea of Kayla; the completely vapid sext-driven hunk, Aiden (Luke Prael); and Gabe (Jake Ryan), the spaztastic oddball who makes Kayla look chill by comparison. Given Burnham’s musical background, it shouldn’t be a shocker that Eighth Grade expertly employs its soundtrack and sound mixing. Electronic composer Anna Meredith’s catchy score captures a bounding modern energy without feeling like it’s too hard to capture the current moment, and the jarringly blaring dubstep-esque drops that accompany Kayla’s first person slow-motion oglings of Aiden are masterful. What sets Eighth Grade apart from its coming-of-age cinematic peers is Burnham’s uncanny ability to convey empathy in every frame. It’s a pure slice of life, where even the jokes seem unforced. As viewers tag along with Kayla’s restrictive narrative, her classmates may be ignoring or dismissing her, but the film itself is never casting judgement. When Kayla finds herself in a perilous situation in a vehicle that seems like it’s slowly going in a horrific, skin-crawling direction, the audience feels the same epic “oh please, no” discomfort as the protagonist. When Kayla bemoans, “I could be doing nothing and I’m just nervous,” you just want to give her a supportive hug and tell her things are going to be OK. Eighth Grade is the best because it fully captures how eighth grade is just the worst. n


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS CHRISTOPHER ROBIN

Winnie the Pooh tracks down his former owner, now an adult and played by Ewan McGregor, to help him search for his missing friends in the Hundred Acre Wood. (NW) Rated PG

THE DARKEST MINDS

Another young adult sci-fi yarn, which imagines a near future wherein teenagers with unexplained powers are labeled a threat and detained by the government. A group of rebels aim to break free. (NW) Rated PG-13

DEATH OF A NATION

Convicted felon, certified crackpot and occasional documentarian Dinesh D’Souza here asserts that Hitler was a liberal, and interviews Richard Spencer

Christopher Robin

about how Donald Trump is the next Abraham Lincoln. (NW) Rated PG-13

EIGHTH GRADE

The directorial debut of comedian Bo Burnham is an empathetic comingof-age story about a teenage social outcast and how she navigates adolescence in a hyper-connected world. A pure slice of life, featuring a knockout central performance by Elsie Fisher. (SS) Rated R

THE SPY WHO DUMPED ME

In this action comedy, Mila Kunis discovers her most recent ex-boyfriend is a secret agent and, along with her BFF Kate McKinnon, is chased through Europe by assassins. (NW) Rated R

NOW PLAYING

ANT-MAN AND THE WASP

Marvel’s third feature this year is the least essential of the bunch, but it’s still a breezy, mostly fun adventure. This time out, microscopic superhero Scott Lang (Paul Rudd) ventures into a so-called “quantum zone,” teaming up with scientist Hope Van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly) to rescue her long-lost mother. (JB) Rated PG-13

THE EQUALIZER 2

Denzel Washington returns to the role of a former assassin who just can’t shake his violent instincts, seeking vengeance on the mercenaries who killed his friend. (NW) Rated R

HOTEL TRANSYLVANIA 3: SUMMER VACATION

The popular animated series contin-

ues, with Count Dracula and his monster pals going on a cruise where the fanged one falls in love. The voice cast includes Adam Sandler, Selena Gomez, Steve Buscemi and Mel Brooks. (NW) Rated PG

INCREDIBLES 2

The long-awaited sequel to the 2004 Pixar hit is pretty fun, but it’s hardly in the upper tier of the studio’s work. Explosive action ensues as the superhero family is called out of retirement, fighting a mind-bending supervillain who’s targeting their colleagues. (JB) Rated PG

JURASSIC WORLD: FALLEN KINGDOM

The Jurassic juggernaut lumbers on, with Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas How...continued on next page

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FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING CRITICS’ SCORECARD ard returning to the prehistoric island as a volcano threatens to wipe out the dinos. It’s slightly better than its immediate predecessor, but it still doesn’t deliver on the potential of its premise. (MJ) Rated PG-13

MAMMA MIA! HERE WE GO AGAIN

A new and improved ABBA film musical, both a prequel and a sequel to the 2008 original, linking the past and the present on that idyllic Greek isle. Corny? Most definitely. But it still works. (NW) Rated PG-13

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE — FALLOUT

Who would have thought a ’90s film inspired by a ’60s TV show would still be cranking out solid sequels? As convoluted as the plot of this sixth installment may be, the action sequences are as jawdropping as ever. (JB) Rated PG-13

RBG

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Community

Health

Hagiographic but enlightening documentary chronicling the extraordinary life and trailblazing career of longtime Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, detailing her roles as a women’s rights advocate and feminist internet meme. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG

THE INLANDER

NEW YORK VARIETY (LOS ANGELES) TIMES

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

ANT-MAN AND THE WASP

70

EIGHTH GRADE

90

MAMMA MIA! HERE WE GO AGAIN

60

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE – FALLOUT

86

SORRY TO BOTHER YOU

80

THREE IDENTICAL STRANGERS

81

WHITNEY

75

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

mately heartbreaking documentary. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

WHITNEY

Kevin Macdonald’s latest documentary focuses on singer Whitney Houston, chronicling her troubled life, her musical impact and the sad circumstances that led to her death at 48. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

WON’T YOU BE MY NEIGHBOR?

Fred Rogers, the Presbyterian minister and groundbreaking children’s TV show host, gets the biographical documentary treatment. Yes, it’s as heartwarming as you might expect, but it’s also a much-needed ode to gratitude and compassion. At the Magic Lantern. (JB) Rated PG-13 n

SKYSCRAPER

The potential for a fun, action-packed disaster flick is lost along with Dwayne Johnson’s charisma and sense of humor in this incoherent mess in which he has to save his family from a burning hightech Hong Kong high-rise. (DN) Rated PG-13

YOU

SORRY TO BOTHER

Subversive, surreal and completely unexpected, rapper Boots Riley’s directorial debut imagines an alternate-reality Oakland where a black telemarketer rises in the ranks of a shady corporation by putting on a so-called “white voice.” Race relations, capitalism and the art world are skewered. (NW) Rated R

TAG

Nature

People

Pleasant but forgettable comedy about a quintet of adult friends who pick up the epic game of tag they started as teenagers. No surprise, they take things way too seriously. Not as entertaining as the true story that inspired it. (JB) Rated R

TEEN TITANS GO! TO THE MOVIES

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The adolescent superheroes of the popular Cartoon Network series get a big-screen spinoff, and it’s little more than an extended episode of the original show. Scatological jokes for the kids, pop culture references for the adults. (JB) Rated PG

THREE IDENTICAL STRANGERS

The remarkable tale of New York triplets who were separated at birth and reunited as adults, and the troubling secrets behind their estrangement. A fascinating, unpredictable and ulti-

48 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

NOW STREAMING OH, LUCY! (HULU)

Shinobu Terajima stars as a timid Japanese office worker who, along with her perturbed sister, jets to California in pursuit of her young

niece and the hunky English instructor (Josh Hartnett) she’s run off with. An undeniably strange but compulsively watchable fish-outof-water story. (NW) Not Rated


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WHITNEY (120 MIN) FRI-SUN: 4:15 MON-THURS: 6:00 (509) 209-2383 • 25 W Main Ave MagicLanternOnMain.com • /MagicLanternOnMain

Think you’re too cool to enjoy a cheesy ABBA musical? Take a chance on it.

How Can I Resist You? Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again is the corniest movie of the year, and that’s a good thing BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

M

amma Mia! Here We Go Again — rarely And this is all before Cher, playing the Streep has a title been more apropos. character’s mother (despite being just three years It is, of course, a follow-up to the her senior in real life), steps off a helicopter in 2008 film musical, itself a big-screen version of rhinestone-encrusted platforms and sings “Ferthe Broadway show that plundered the ABBA nando” with Andy Garcia. Don’t ask. songbook to unbelievable success. This sequel At the center of it all are those great ABBA is more of the same, but now they’re using the tunes, which remain bulletproof after all these tunes they didn’t include last time, and even a years, even when someone as tone deaf as Pierce few they did. And why not? Are you really going Brosnan is warbling along to them. The first to complain about hearing “Dancing Queen” Mamma Mia checked off every huge ABBA hit, so again? Here We Go Again pulls out some less recognized The first Mamma Mia opened with a young classics — “Knowing Me, Knowing You,” “One of woman named Sophie (Amanda Seyfried) Us,” “The Name of the Game” and “My Love, discovering that her single mother Donna (Meryl My Life,” all lustrous pop gems — and a handful Streep), a rock star-turned-hotel of tracks (like “Andante, Andante” manager, had back-to-back-to-back MAMMA MIA! and “Angel Eyes”) that nobody was flings with Colin Firth, Pierce Brosreally clamoring to hear. HERE WE GO AGAIN nan and Stellan Skarsgard, any of Director Phyllida Lloyd has Rated PG-13 whom could be her father. been replaced this time by Ol Directed by Ol Parker It’s been a decade since, and the Parker, and his approach is more Starring Lily James, Amanda sequel returns us to the ceruleanelastic, more stylized and more (dare Seyfried, Pierce Brosnan, Cher tinted Greek isle of the original. I say) cinematic. Just look at the Donna has died (she came down film’s first musical number, a lively with a bad case of scheduling conflict), and Sotake on “When I Kissed the Teacher,” and pay phie has renovated that old hotel in her mother’s attention to how nimble the camera is, how playhonor. Everyone returns for the grand opening, ful the colors are, how well the editing enhances and while that’s going on, we get flashbacks to the song. It’s a big improvement to the stiff visual 1979, when 20-something Donna (Lily James) style of its predecessor. first meets each of her three suitors, visits the There’s a spectrum of absurdity, and Mamma island where she’d spend the rest of her life, and Mia! Here We Go Again occupies all of it. And yet learns she’s pregnant with Sophie. the movie is also in on its own joke, and it allows The plot really doesn’t matter, though, as you to laugh with it and at it simultaneously. It it never does in jukebox musicals. It’s all about knows exactly what it is, and it is unabashedly the set pieces, and they’re equal parts inspired itself: gangly, dorky and sometimes embarrassing. and nutty this time around. There’s the version Is it much more than A-list actors performof “Waterloo” set in a French restaurant where ing ABBA karaoke? Arguably, no. But like any the maitre’d is dressed like Napoleon, and that above-average karaoke performer, it’s so good“Dancing Queen” reprise, in which Firth and natured and so aware of its own limitations that Skarsgard recreate a famous moment from Titanic you’re won over, even if you really don’t want to and gyrate amongst a traffic jam of extras. be. You can either go into the theater with your Can they dance? Can they jive? Does it rearms crossed, or you can submit to its admittedly ally matter? chintzy charms. n

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Craft Beer & Music Festival Saturday, August 18

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R&B

Old Soul Ural Thomas started making music 50 years ago, and his band the Pain will take you right back to the ’60s BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

A

t 78, Ural Thomas has seen some things. A conversation with the Portland-based soul singer about his storied career plays out like a roll call of the music industry legends Thomas recalls opening for or working with. Otis Redding, James Brown, Mick Jagger, Stevie Wonder — they all get name-checked. He’s signed one or two bum record deals. He’s performed at the Apollo. He hosts musical workshops for at-risk kids. He’s done it all. But Thomas is a legend in his own right, even if you don’t immediately recognize his name. Having made music for most of his life, Thomas recently rejuvenated his career with a seven-piece backing band dubbed the Pain, which gets its name from a song Thomas recorded some 50 years ago.

Thomas was born into a large family in Meraux, Louisiana, and he recalls a childhood filled with music. His father was a minister whose sermons were heavy on gospel, and his mother often played guitar around the house. The family relocated to Portland in the early ’40s, and Thomas has — barring a few short sojourns to Los Angeles and New York — never left. Asked when he realized that he could turn being a musician into an honest-to-god job, Thomas says he’s never considered it a career. It’s just what he does. “Ever since I can remember I’ve been in music. It’s just a part of me,” Thomas says. “You know how you get that feeling when whatever you’re doing in life, that’s where you belong? That’s what ...continued on next page

Ural Thomas (center) is a music industry veteran whose retro R&B sound is the real deal.

AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 51


PRESENTED BY DOWNTOWN SPOKANE

MUSIC | R&B “OLD SOUL,” CONTINUED...

— Your neverending story —

First Friday Noob? We’ve Got You.

1. Scan See participating locations at firstfridayspokane.org.

2 . plan Get your peeps together and start hitting locations at 5pm.

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Don’t miss the next First Friday: August 3rd, 2018

For event listings visit: www.firstfridayspokane.org Most venues open 5-8pm

52 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

I feel, especially when I’m performing for people that are having a good time with me.” He began his career in the late 1950s, when doo-wop was the biggest thing going. He was most notably a member of an R&B vocal quintet called the Monterays, and Thomas remembers the early days of touring, five guys all crowded in the same car and bouncing around the Northwest supporting the Kingsmen and the Vikings. Thomas later branched out as a solo artist, cutting singles with titles like “Deep Soul,” “Can You Dig It?” and “Pain Is the Name of Your Game.” None of them stormed the charts at the time, but they should be considered classics of the genre, the kinds of songs that’ll have you asking yourself, “Why is it I’ve never heard this until now?”

“You know how you get that feeling when whatever you’re doing in life, that’s where you belong? That’s what I feel, especially when I’m performing...” Before the Pain came together in 2012, Thomas was performing the occasional one-off show, typically called in to play with an already-established group. But then he struck up a friendship with Eric Isaacson, the owner of Portland vinyl shop and retro label Mississippi Records, who re-released a handful of Thomas’ long out-of-print singles from the ’60s. Isaacson introduced Thomas to local drummer Scott Magee, who loved Thomas’ stuff and worked with the singer to assemble a 10-piece band for a showcase of Mississippi’s catalog of overlooked R&B and blues. And with that, the Pain was born. “The plan was just to do a one-night show, and the next thing we know … this is going to be our sixth year,” Thomas says. “It was like it was meant to happen. I can’t explain it any other way than that. We got along so well. … Everybody in the band loves different music and different ideas. We’ve got little pinches of music from all over the world in all of us.” The Pain aims to replicate the look, sound and feel of the bands that Thomas himself performed with back in the ’60s; it’s solid, old-school R&B, complete with horn section, but it has a knowing contemporary edge to it. An album released in 2016 by Seattle’s rarities label Light in the Attic features new recordWEEKEND ings alongside songs from C O U N T D OW N Thomas’ back catalog, and it all Get the scoop on this sounds of a piece. weekend’s events with “We really cared about our newsletter. Sign up at each other, and we really cared Inlander.com/newsletter. about how the audience accepted us,” Thomas says of his band. “It really made a difference when we found out they cared about what we were doing as much as we did.” Watching Thomas live, it’s obvious that the audience is important to him, and even though the stage is crowded, your eyes never leave him. He’s in the mold of all the great showmen from the heyday of Motown and Stax, a ball of unflagging energy. It’s hard to believe he’s pushing 80. It’s really something to see. “I look forward to being able to give to people what I’ve been blessed with,” Thomas says. “If there’s 10 people out there, I’m going to work like it was 10,000. There’s too much negativity in the world; we don’t need anymore. My purpose is to always bring positive music, bring positive thoughts, and be a positive person. “It never gets old. It just keeps on being wonderful.” n Ural Thomas and the Pain • Sat, Aug. 4 at 8 pm • All ages • $10 • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174


MUSIC | FESTIVAL

Smorgasbord of Sounds

AUG 2ND - 5TH

The Festival at Sandpoint brings rock, folk, country and bluegrass to the banks of the Pend Oreille River

MAGNUSON THEATRE AT

GONZAGA UNIVERSITY

BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

502 E. BOONE AVE

A

s other festivals in the Inland Northwest come and go, we wait with bated breath for the lineup of the Festival at Sandpoint every year. It always offers a nice surprise or two. What began as a strictly symphonic festival in 1983 has morphed into a haven for rock and country fans. Many legends have performed in Sandpoint’s War Memorial Field over the years: Johnny Cash, Smokey Robinson, Etta James, B.B. King, Willie Nelson, Tony Bennett, Loretta Lynn… the list goes on. Here are the major headliners you can look forward to this year.

www.cytspokane.org

AUG. 2

Big Head Todd and the Monsters From the wilds of Colorado, Big Head Todd and the Monsters built a cult following in the early ’90s with a sound that’s difficult to describe in simple terms: It’s a blend of classic blues, hardrock and maybe a little grunge, with the occasional jammy freak-out. They’re best known for their cover of John Lee Hooker’s “Boom Boom” (featuring Hooker himself) and originals like “Resignation Superman” and “Broken Hearted Savior.” $44.95; 7:30 pm.

AUG. 3

Amos Lee Singer-songwriter Amos Lee has navigated numerous genre pathways throughout his career, tender and empathetic lyrics about heartbreak, spirituality and the euphoria of new love. His next album, titled My New Moon, is set to be released at the end of the month, and its two singles — “No More Darkness, No More Light” and “Hang On, Hang On” — are cathartic examinations of the tumultuous state of the modern world. $59.95; 7:30 pm.

AUG. 4

ZZ Top When it comes to ZZ Top, the litany of iconic songs speaks for itself. “Sharp Dressed Man.” “Legs.” “Tush.” “Gimme All Your Lovin.” “La Grange” (which, coincidentally, also reworks “Boom Boom”). Complete with spinning guitars and extravagant beards, duo Billy Gibbons and Dusty Hill — alongside clean-shaven drummer Frank Beard — went from blues-bar boogies to arena-ready synth-rock that made them unlikely MTV stars. $79.95; 7:30 pm.

AUG. 9

Greensky Bluegrass The name says it all, really. The Kalamazoo quintet twists the classic bluegrass sound into a fusion of genres that is sometimes labeled progbluegrass, and primary songwriters Paul Hoffman and Dave Bruzza always keep listeners on their toes. The band adopts the credo of many a jam band: You’re welcome to record their shows,

(509) 487-6540

14 Annual TH

GOLF TOURNAMENT The Festival at Sandpoint ends with the Symphony and fireworks. they never play the same set twice, and you’re going to hear one or two unexpected cover songs. $39.95; 7 pm.

AUG. 10

Sublime with Rome By the time ’90s ska-rock band Sublime became hitmakers, their frontman Bradley Nowell was dead at 28. Much of their career has been a postscript to that shocker, but Sublime has remained hugely popular on the nostalgia circuit, and people still stick those sunshine decals to their cars. The band tours relentlessly — they performed just last year at Northern Quest — with new vocalist Rome Rodriguez, who captures Nowell’s spirit without copying him outright. $64.95; 7:30 pm.

August 9, 2018 Downriver Golf Course

AUG. 11

Gavin DeGraw and Phillip Phillips The final co-headlining show of the festival features two artists with similar sounds coming from very different places. In the early 2000s, Gavin DeGraw broke out of New York’s cutthroat singer-songwriter scene with singles like “Chariot” and “I Don’t Want to Be” (also the theme song for the teen drama One Tree Hill), both of which were inescapable radio hits. Phillips, meanwhile, gained national attention after finishing first in the 11th season of American Idol, and his winning single “Home” is the most successful in the show’s history. $74.95; 7 pm. n Festival at Sandpoint • Thu-Sun, Aug. 2-5 and 9-12 • War Memorial Field • 525 Pine St., Sandpoint • festivalatsandpoint.com • (208) 265-4554

Register today at www.CCNWF.org! AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 53


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

SKA-PUNK BLACK HAPPY

I

t’s one thing to sell out a venue the size of the Knitting Factory, but it’s another selling out two nights in a row. That’s just what Black Happy has done. The beloved ska-grunge band, which formed in Coeur d’Alene in the early ’90s and broke up after only a few years, has played a handful of gigs since officially reuniting in 2010, and every one has been a convergence of Gen Xers looking to unleash their inner punk kid. And once they’ve finished their stint at the Knit, the band is heading to another sold-out show in Seattle. People are obviously excited to skank like it’s 1994 again. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Black Happy • Fri and Sat, Aug. 3-4 at 8 pm • All ages • Sold out • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 08/2

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, One Street Over J THE BARTLETT, Lemuria, Katie Ellen, DUSK BERSERK, Vinyl Meltdown BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen CHECKERBOARD BAR, DeepDrain, Operation Mockingbird and Friends J J COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, The Isley Brothers CORBY’S BAR, Steve Fleming CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Donnie Emerson CRUISERS, Open Jam Night DARCY’S, Old School Dance Music and Karaoke w/DJ Dave THE JACKSON ST., Zaq Flanary and the Songsmith Series J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Steve Rush J MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE, Open Mic Hosted by Scott Reid NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), PJ Destiny PALOUSE BAR & GRILL, Wyatt Wood POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Ron Greene J PROVIDENCE CENTER FOR FAITH & HEALING, The Weddle Twins RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler RIPPLES RIVERSIDE GRILL, Son of Brad J RIVERSTONE PARK, Summer Concert Series: North Point Jazz THE ROADHOUSE, Karaoke THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, The Rock Jam Series SLICE & BISCUIT, Bluegrass Jam J J WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, Big Head Todd and the Monsters (see page 53) ZOLA, Blake Braley

54 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

POWER-POP SUPERCRUSH

T

he sounds of ’90s power-pop are alive and well with Supercrush, complete with the sugar-sweet hooks, sun-dappled harmonies and disarmingly badass guitar solos you expect from the genre. They’re clearly reverent disciples of that era’s great pop practitioners — Teenage Fanclub, the Posies, Redd Kross — and if you’ve ever blissed out to any of those artists, Supercrush will be right up your alley. But make no mistake: This is no mere pastiche act. The Seattle quartet’s originals are little masterpieces of melody, and if you didn’t catch them during this year’s Volume festival, don’t miss ’em this time. — NATHAN WEINBENDER

ERICK DOXEY

Friday, 08/3

219 LOUNGE, Adrian Xavier J BABY BAR, VASAS, Laminates, Andy Cigarettes BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J J THE BIG DIPPER, Ragtag Romantics: A Farewell Celebration BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Sterling BOLO’S, The Happiness J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Heather and the Soulmotions CARLIN BAY RESORT, Ron Greene J CENTENNIAL HOTEL, Trego THE COEUR D’ALENE RESORT, Bands on Boats feat. The Powers CONKLING MARINA, The Cronkites CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke CRUISERS, Karaoke with Gary CURLEY’S, Pastiche DARCY’S, Karaoke w/DJ Dave J DOWNTOWN SPOKANE LIBRARY, Freetime Synthetic FARMHOUSE KITCHEN AND SILO BAR, Tom D’Orazi and Friends J FORZA COFFEE CO., Sean McGrath J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Watershed Festival

HILLS’ RESTAURANT & LOUNGE, Front Porch Trio J THE HIVE, Anders Osborne IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Marty Perron and Doug Bond J IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Dario Ré with Michael Starry IRON HORSE (CDA), The Rub THE JACKSON ST., Into the Drift J KLINK’S LAKESIDE, Nick Grow J J KNITTING FACTORY, Black Happy (see facing page) LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Kori Ailene MARYHILL WINERY, Eric Neuhausser MAX AT MIRABEAU, Tuck Foster and the Tumbling Dice MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Devon Wade MOOSE LOUNGE, Mojobox MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Pat Coast NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Gigawatt J J NORTH IDAHO COLLEGE, Art on the Green feat. Tuxedo Junction, Milonga & more J J NORTHERN QUEST, Willie Nelson and Family, Alison Krauss

Supercrush with BaLonely, Fun Ladies and Empty Eyes • Thu, Aug. 9 at 9 pm • 21+ • $5 • Baby Bar • 827 W. First • 847-1234

J OUTLAW BBQ & CATERING, Shaiden Hutchman PALOUSE BAR & GRILL, Wyatt Wood PARAGON BREWING, Norman Baker J PARK BENCH CAFE, Michael Keleren PEND OREILLE PLAYHOUSE, Open Mic J THE PIN!, The Wanderers, Napoleuhn, CCB Krew, Dre 808, Youngsmoke, Nikolai Rya QUARTZITE BREWING CO., Dylan Hathaway RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler SARANAC ROOFTOP, Floating Crowbar with Bodhi Bill Miller SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Son of Brad SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT, Rusty Jackson; Sam Leyde (at Noah’s) SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Ashley Pyle, Kaylee Goins J ST. MARIES, PJ Destiny THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ WesOne & DJ Big Mike J J WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, Amos Lee ZOLA, Sammy Eubanks

Saturday, 08/4

219 LOUNGE, Zach Cooper BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE, Sam Leyde J J THE BARTLETT, Ural Thomas and the Pain (see page 51) BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Summer Nights feat. Kev, Q Dot, Square Bizz, Ceez Carter, Anthony Naseeb BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Kevin BOLO’S, The Happiness J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Dan Maher CARLIN BAY RESORT, Kicho COEUR D’ALENE EAGLES, Theresa Edwards Band COLBERT TRADING CO., Dylan Hathaway CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, The Cronkites CURLEY’S, Pastiche EICHARDT’S, John Firshi J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Watershed Festival J HARRISON CITY PARK, Justin Sherfey


THE HIVE, Sam Bush HOGFISH, Rusty Jackson HOUSE OF SOUL, Cary Fly J HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET, Into the Drift IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Justin Lantrip IRON HORSE (CDA), The Rub THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke J J KNITTING FACTORY, Black Happy (see facing page) LAUGHING DOG BREWING, Ron Greene LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Karrie O’Neill LOST BOYS’ GARAGE, Pamela Jean MARYHILL WINERY, Kyle Richard MAX AT MIRABEAU, Tuck Foster and the Tumbling Dice MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Molly Starlite & the Sputniks MOOSE LOUNGE, Mojobox MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Jody Piper NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Gigawatt J J NORTH IDAHO COLLEGE, Art on the Green feat. Hot Club of Spokane, Trego & more

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NORTHERN RAIL PUB, William Nover PALOUSE BAR & GRILL, Nate Ostrander J THE PIN!, J. Stalin POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Son of Brad J RED ROOM LOUNGE, MAE.SUN, Vernita Avenue REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Hillfolk Noir RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT, Maxie Ray Mills (at Noah’s) J WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, ZZ Top WESTWOOD BREWING, Robby French ZOLA, Sammy Eubanks

Sunday, 08/5

219 LOUNGE, Bum Jungle ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Luke Jaxon Band CARLIN BAY RESORT, Robby French CRAFTED TAP HOUSE, Tommy G CRAVE, DJ Dave CRUISERS, The Adarna, Undercard CURLEY’S, Dangerous Type J DAHMEN BARN, The Hankers DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Watershed Festival IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Echo Elysium LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam MARYHILL WINERY, Austin Hagel & Cory Cogley J J NORTH IDAHO COLLEGE, Art on the Green feat. Soul Proprietor, Sara Brown Band & more O’DOHERTY’S, Live Irish Music

ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, William Nover PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Annie Welle J THE PIN!, Extortionist, Filth, VCTMS J J WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, Festival at Sandpoint Family Concert ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 08/6

THE BULL HEAD, Jackson Neal J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic CRAVE, DJ Dave EICHARDT’S, Jam with Truck Mills NORTHERN RAIL, Music Challenge RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown J STELLA’S ON THE HILL, Ethereal in E ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 08/7

219 LOUNGE, Karaoke with DJ Pat 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS, Ethereal in E THE BACKYARD PUBLIC HOUSE, Fox and Bones J THE BARTLETT, The Urban Renewal Project CHATEAU RIVE, Max Gomez, Starlite Motel CRAVE, DJ Dave GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday J THE PIN!, Lung, Dust Fuzzz, Insubordinary, Ceòl Roc, For Your Health POST FALLS BREWING, Devon Wade RAZZLE’S, Open Mic Jam RIDLER PIANO BAR, Open Mic/Jam

THE ROADHOUSE, Karaoke SWEET LOU’S, Ron Greene ZOLA, Dueling Cronkites

Wednesday, 08/8

J J THE BARTLETT, Valley Queen, Mama Doll BELLWETHER BREWING CO., TONYA J BLACK DIAMOND, Shaiden Hutchman CRAVE, DJ Dave CRUISERS, Open Jam Night GENO’S, Open Mic w/Travis Goulding HILLYARD LIBRARY SPORTS BAR, Steve Starkey HOUSE OF SOUL, Jazz & Whiskey THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LOST BOYS’ GARAGE, Jazz Weds. LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 MILLWOOD BREWING CO., Kori Ailene POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE, Cronkites RED ROOM LOUNGE, Blowin’ Kegs Jam Session RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROADHOUSE, Jesse Quandt Band SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open Mic THE THIRSTY DOG, Karaoke J TRUE LEGENDS GRILL, Just Plain Darin ZOLA, Whsk&Keys

Coming Up ...

J J WAR MEMORIAL FIELD, Festival at Sandpoint, Aug. 9-11 J BABY BAR, Supercrush (see facing page), Balonely, Fun Ladies, Aug. 9 J RIVERFRONT PARK, Gleason Fest, Aug. 11

AUGUST 2018

10

TH THRU

12

MEDICAL LAKE, WA

TH

MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-2639934 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens • 714-9512 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-457-2392 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOLLYWOOD REVOLVER BAR • 4720 Ferrel, CdA • 208-274-0486 HOUSE OF SOUL • 120 N. Wall • 217-1961 IRON HORSE BAR • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., CdA • 509-926-8411 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy, Ste. 100 • 443-3832 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 598-8933 OMEGA EVENT CENTER • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 55


This year’s Spokane Brewers Festival is going indoors for a one-day-only beer extravaganza.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

FESTIVAL BEER, BEER AND BEER

The Spokane Brewers Festival is moving inside the Spokane Arena this year, but still plans to provide the same great energy and dedication to local breweries as in past years — this time with air conditioning. More than 30 breweries and cideries are pouring at the festival, ranging from local favorites to breweries further afield in the Pacific Northwest. Tickets include a commemorative tasting glass and 13 tokens to redeem for 2-ounce pours, with additional tokens available for $1 each. There will be plenty of food trucks on site, along with live music throughout organized by the Inlander, including Seattle’s Smokey Brights taking the stage at 7 pm after sets by locals Chris Molitor (11:30 am), Blake Braley (1 pm), Misty Mountain Pony Club (2:30 pm), Feral Anthem (4 pm) and the South Hill (5:30 pm). Proceeds from the fest go towards the Wishing Star Foundation, the oldest wish-granting organization in Washington. — SEAN PRICE Spokane Brewers Festival • Sat, Aug. 4 from 11 am-8 pm • $25/advance, $30/door; $5/designated drivers • All ages • Spokane Veterans Memorial Arena • 720 W. Mallon • spokanebrewfest.com

FESTIVAL BRUTE STRENGTH

If you’re looking to get in touch with your Scottish heritage, or maybe just really into kilts, head to the 62nd annual Spokane Scottish Highland Games for a celebration of all things Scotland. The day features traditional battles of strength and skill in athletic events, most of which include chucking some sort of heavy object through the air. Other attractions include Highland dance and piping and drumming competitions, Celtic storytelling, blacksmith demonstrations and more. And yes, they will have haggis, a traditional dish containing sheep liver, heart and lung minced with other ingredients encased in an animal’s stomach. But don’t worry — haggis tasting isn’t required. — BROOKE CARLSON Spokane Highland Games • Sat, Aug. 4 from 9 am-5:30 pm • $10/ adults, $5-$8/kids • Spokane County Fair and Expo Center • 404 N. Havana St. • spokanehighlandgames.net

56 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

FILM SUBMARINE ON SCREEN

Set sail to sea and see John, Paul, George and Ringo on the big screen during a special 50th anniversary screening of the Beatles’ animated classic Yellow Submarine, hosted by Spokane Public Radio. Fans of the film adore its fun, meandering adventure as the Fab Four explore the many seas — of time, science, holes, monsters and green — before heading to the magical Pepperland to help defeat the love-crushing Blue Meanies. Beyond its psychedelic story, the film is still recognized for its groundbreaking work in art and animation inspired by 1960s pop-art. The Movies 101 trio, including the Inlander’s own Nathan Weinbender, are also hosting a live pre-show taping to discuss the film’s lasting impact and the Beatles’ legacy. In the lobby, make sure to check out 4000 Holes’ Beatles and Yellow Submarine memorabilia display. — CHEY SCOTT Yellow Submarine • Wed, Aug. 8 at 6:30 pm • $15 • All ages • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com or spokanepublicradio.org


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BEER FUN FOR ONE

Community Pint, the craft beer bar on East Sprague that quickly became a local favorite, is turning one year old this month, celebrating with a four-day showcase of rare craft beers, in-house specials and more. The bar’s first anniversary happens to coincide with National IPA Day on Thursday, Aug. 2, so co-owner TJ Wallin is bringing out seven new IPAs, including first-time arrival to Spokane, Block 15 Brewing, from Corvallis, Oregon. Other beers include Fremont Brewing’s “Nelda” and “Deluxe” IPAs, along with a beer from Crux Fermentation Project made with the high-end Australian hop Vic Secret. Friday’s festivities include tappings of four barrel-aged sours and one stout. Beer lovers can purchase a commemorative 20-ounce anniversary mug to get filled throughout the month at the 16-ounce pour price. Community Pint also recently debuted an in-house crowler machine, offering beer to-go in 32-ounce cans. — CHEY SCOTT Community Pint’s First BEERthday • Wed, Aug. 1, to Sat, Aug. 4 • Free to attend • 21+ • Community Pint • 120 E. Sprague • facebook.com/communitypint •  624-1631

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

HOSPICE OF SPOKANE GOLF SCRAMBLE: This fundraiser supports northeast Washington’s only nonprofit hospice in its mission to provide customized care and support to patients diagnosed with a terminal illness and their families. Aug. 3, 8:30 am-3 pm. $100. Indian Canyon Golf Course, 4303 W. West Dr. hospiceofspokane.org (456-0438) HOT AUGUST NIGHTS: AN ALL-WHITE AFFAIR The Pi Xi Zeta Chapter of Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. hosts an evening of Southern inspired cuisine, dancing and more. Proceeds support student scholarships and community service. All white attire encouraged, not required. Aug. 4, 7-11:30 pm. $35/single; $60/couple; $20/student; $230/table of 8. Montvale Event Center, 1017 W. First. squareup.com/store/pixizeta RIDE FOR ALICE A fundraiser for United Way of North Idaho, for a fund to help improve daycare quality and scholarships for families. Ride kicks off with coffee at Longboard Coffee (5417 N. Government Way), and proceeds south of Coeur d’Alene to end at Curley’s Hauser Junction. Aug. 4, 8 am-1 pm. $20. Coeur d’Alene, n/a. unitedwayofnorthidaho.org/ride (208-667-8112) SCRAPS PAW-ART IN AUGUST: Brush up on your artistic skills and join SCRAPS for Paw-art in August. Every Saturday, two of nine selected artists are at SCRAPS working on their latest animal-themed creation. Express your own creative side by taking part in our community art project or have your pet “paint.” Paintings by each week’s artists will be on sale and a portion of the proceeds benefits SCRAPS Animal Medical Fund. Free. SCRAPS, 6815 E. Trent. spokanecounty.org/SCRAPS WALK FOR PARKINSON’S The Walk for Parkinson’s brings everyone affected by Parkinson’s together to build community, increase solidarity, and raise funds for the Northwest Parkinson’s Foundation. Aug. 4, 9:30 amnoon. Free. Mirabeau Meadows, 13500 Mirabeau Pkwy. walkforparkinsons.org PAINTING IT FORWARD A fundraiser for the Spokane Veterans Forum, a nonprofit providing mentoring, educational, therapeutic and life enhancing services to military veterans referred from regional Veterans Enhanced Treatment Courts. Aug. 8, 6-8 pm. $35. Pinot’s Palette, 319 W. Sprague Ave. spokaneveteransforum.org/fund-raisers/

COMEDY WORDS TASTE THE FUN!

If you’ve seen Aileen Keown Vaux host a reading or Get Lit! event, you know the local poet and nonfiction author has a sharp sense of humor along with a playful way with words. That certainly comes through in Consolation Prize, her new poetry chapbook in which each piece’s title is taken from a recent Central Washington State Fair theme; selections include “Who Let the Hogs Out!,” “FairN-Dipity!” and “Taste the Fun!” It’s not all fun and games, but reading this, the first selection for the Scablands Books Channeled Chapbook Series, takes you on a pretty thrilling ride over the course of 20 pages. Fellow Spokane writer Leyna Krow joins Keown Vaux at this celebratory reading. — DAN NAILEN Consolation Prize Release Party • Sat, Aug. 4 at 7 pm • Free and BYOB • Interpunct Press • 2618 W. Sinto Ave. • scablandsbooks.org

2.0PEN MIC Local comedy night hosted by Ken McComb. Thursdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The District Bar, 916 W. First Ave. facebook.com/districtbarspokane/ CORY MICHAELIS A teacher by day and comic by night, Cory Michaelis keeps his act edgy enough to keep the audience from feeling like they’re in his 10th grade history class. Aug. 2-3 and 5 at 8 pm. $8-$14. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com 50/50 A mix of favorite improvised games and show formats. Fridays at 8 pm, July 6-Aug. 10. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) LATE LAUGHS An improv show featuring a mix of experiments with duos, teams, sketches and special guests. Events on the first and last Friday of the month at 10 pm. Rated for mature audiences. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W.

Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com STAND-UP COMEDY Live comedy featuring established and up-and-coming local comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. No cover. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. reddragondelivery.com AFTER DARK A mature-rated version of the Blue Door’s monthly, Friday show; on the first and last Saturday of the month, at 10 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) JOSH BLUE Perhaps best known as the comedian who puts the cerebral in Cerebral Palsy, Josh Blue centers much of his self-deprecating act around his disability. Shows at 7 and 9:30 pm. Aug. 4. $20-$30. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com WILLIAM LEE MARTIN: LIVING IN THE MIDDLE COMEDY TOUR Martin pours his heart out with his personal, original and relatable material on family, love and the frailty of life. Aug. 4, 8 pm. $25-$42. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com THE SOCIAL HOUR COMEDY SHOWCASE Featuring comics from the Northwest and beyond, and hosted by Deece Casillas. Sundays, from 8-9:30 pm. Free. The Ridler Piano Bar, 718 W. Riverside Ave. socialhourpod.com IMPROV JAM SESSIONS An informal, open-format improv session led by a BDT troupe member. No cost to attend, but participation is required. Mondays from 7-9 pm through Aug. 27. 18+. Free. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) GABRIEL “FLUFFY” IGLESIAS Gabriel Iglesias is one of the most-watched comedians on YouTube with over 350 million views. With a mix of storytelling, parodies, characters and sound effects, his style makes him popular among fans of all ages. Aug. 9, 7:30 pm. $39$75. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com

COMMUNITY

HERITAGE GARDENS TOUR Step back to Spokane in 1915. The city has changed but the gardens have been restored to look just as they did more than a century ago. Aug. 2 at 2 pm and Aug. 5 at 11 am. Free. Moore-Turner Heritage Gardens, 507 W. Seventh Ave. heritagegardens.org DOG PEOPLE CELEBRATION Rover is celebrating the opening of its new office in downtown Spokane with a free dog and family-friendly party featuring the Spokane Humane Society, free ice cream from The Scoop, and a variety of food trucks. Dogs welcome! At 201 N. Wall St. during Food Truck Friday. Aug. 3, 11 am-4 pm. Free. rover.com FAMILY NIGHTS AT THE POOL An exclusive pool party open only to families and their friends. Bring a snack or dinner, but leave glass, alcohol and barbecues at home. Offered at AM Cannon (8/3) and Comstock (8/17) from 6:30-8 pm. Free. spokaneparks.org KSPS FITKIDS DAY Enjoy a variety of activities, from giant inflatable balls to mini soccer, parachute games, kites, giant bubbles and more. Also meet characters like Curious George, Clifford and Aqua Duck. Aug. 3, 9 am-noon. Free. Ferris HS, 3020 E. 37th Ave. ksps.org LATE NIGHT NERF BATTLE After the library closes, come by for a Nerf battle between the stacks. Bring your own, or use the library’s. Grades 3-5. Aug. 3,

7-10 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. (893-8400) REBA HURN MONUMENT DEDICATION A hero of Spokane history, Reba Hurn became the first woman in Spokane to become a lawyer in 1913. Aug. 3, 2 pm. Free. Greenwood Cemetery, 211 N. Government Way. fairmountmemorial.com (509-838-1405) GENERAL STORE PET ADOPTION EVENT Featuring adoptable animals from several local rescues, along with a dog kissing booth and other carnival fun. Aug. 4, 10 am-2 pm. Free. The General Store, 2424 N. Division. bit. ly/2sNHXBG (509-444-8005) SCENIC PEND OREILLE TRAIN RIDES The train runs north from Newport to the little whistle-stop at Dalkena. Aug. 4-5; departs at 11 am, 1 pm and 3 pm daily. $15-$20. Newport, Wash. sporttrainrides.com GREAT MOSCOW FOOD DRIVE The Latah County Human Rights Task Force and the City of Moscow Human Rights Commission sponsor the food drive at the Farmers Market, next to the bus stop by the Moscow Hotel, and at Moscow Safeway and Rosauers. Aug. 5, 8 am-1 pm. Friendship Square, Fourth and Main. (208-883-7036) NORTH MONROE FLEA MARKET Shop from local vendors in the parking lot of 1889 Salvage, enjoy drinks from the Wander Bar and bring donations to benefit Washington Basset Rescue. Aug. 5, 11 am-4 pm. 1889 Salvage Co., 2824 N. Monroe. bit.ly/2JOXwPN WALKING TOURS OF THE HAUNTED CEMETERIES Join Spokane historian and cemetery preservationist Chet Caskey for a Sunday afternoon stroll through Greenwood and Riverside cemeteries as you learn about the colorful, funny and sometimes haunting history of Spokane. Aug. 5 from 1:303:30 pm. $15. Greenwood Cemetery, 211 N. Government Way. spokaneparks.org DISNEY CELEBRATION A celebration of Disney movies old a new, from Snow White to the Incredibles. Come by for games, costume contests, trivia, and snacks, and get a photo taken with your favorite character. Aug. 6, 6-8 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. (893-8350) NATIONAL NIGHT OUT AGAINST CRIME Neighborhoods, community and youth organizations, churches, apartment properties and businesses throughout Spokane are being invited to join forces with communities nationwide to give crime and drugs a going away party. Aug. 7. Free. spokanecops. org/national-night-out-registration

FESTIVAL

ART ON THE GREEN The 50th annual market, performance space and a gathering place for community is host to 190-plus artists, a variety of musicians and performers, and is made possible by more than 500 volunteers. Aug. 3-5; Fri noon-7:30 pm, Sat 10 am-7:30 pm, Sun 10 am-5 pm. Free. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. artonthegreencda.com (208-769-3300) COEUR D’ALENE STREET FAIR The 28th annual community celebration is host to more than 250 vendors of food, fine arts and crafts and more. Includes free shuttles between Art on the Green and A Taste of the CdA’s happening the same weekend. Aug. 3-5. Downtown Coeur d’Alene. cdadowntown.com

AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 57


or hesitation and transported him to the paramedics swiftly and calmly on 7/28. Thank you for your unbelievable compassion and reassurance. Cheers also to the amazing Spokane Fire Department and the ER staff at Deaconess, especially Jody, Frank and Anthony. Everyone kept me smiling while I thought I was dying!

I SAW YOU COSMIC SYNCHRONICITY I saw you at the Perry St. Thursday Market and your tattoo really hit me with some cosmic synchronicity. I’ve been kicking myself ever since because I didn’t ask you about the highly specific symbolism of the body art. CAROLYN SUE I know you are still in Spokane. Would you like to reconnect? Please give me a call, or send a message. RGS COSTCO CUTIE I saw you you walking the isles of the new North Costco on Saturday July 28. You were wearing a polo and dark shades and you picked up Kinder eggs and pizza. My kind of guy. I was in the blue patterned outfit and commented about the new store set up. Maybe we can shop jointly sometime?

CHEERS STUNG BY KINDNESS Cheers to Erica, the kind woman who picked up a frantic and highly allergic stranger covered in yellow jackets on the Cheney/ Spokane highway without question

PHO REAL I really enjoyed our Pho date last night - July 29. It’s wonderful knowing that I have someone I can count on no matter what, who enjoys the same foods and shows as I do. I am so grateful that we can share moments like that to reconnect. I love you more. RIDE THE GOAT WAVE Last weekend at the closing of the Observatory (RIP) I was meeting up with a total babe for your show. She arrived to the venue and bailed before you guys took stage. Rather than being heartbroken my stoke was unphased as I waited for my favorite rock duo electrify a packed venue once again! It wasn’t until I got home I even thought about how she dipped pre IG. Even then I was riding the energetic wave of the concert. Thanks for the killer night! OUR WONDERFUL BUS DRIVERS Cheers to the wonderful bus drivers in Spokane! They put up with a lot of crap, yet they greet us with a smile on their faces and when you leave the bus they always wish you a great day - even if it’s snowing, raining, or you yourself are having a crappy day. They’re waving to fellow bus drivers and I think that’s awesome. Being a bus driver is hard work and I have a deep respect for them. YOU GOT THIS GIRL!! “Grasshopper/ MSF, I know that life has been dealing you a lot of tough stuff... I am here to tell you that YOU’RE KILLIN’ IT! 1) All

A’s and B’s as a Freshmen at Eastern (Check) 2) Cozy 1 bedroom apartment (Check) 3) Beyond beautiful and precious daughter(check) 4) P/t job at KFC (check) Love you always - JSF”

Ms. McMorris Rogers congressional record for the past 14 years. Do you really feel your needs/interests are being represented? Besides, when you steal my sign on a Sunday morning you make the baby Jesus cry.

experience last Sunday night. It’s no fun to have sweat running down your back from simply standing and listening. God only knows how hot it was under the stage lights. I won’t be back for a summer show ever.

I saw you at the Perry St. Thursday Market and your tattoo really hit me with some cosmic synchronicity.

JEERS CONSERVATIVE CATHY Your hate ads aimed at your opponent make me wonder what you’re hiding. Using “liberal” like a four letter word is childish. She’s liberal so she might help those other than rich white people? (Yes, I’m white). Try running an honorable race, and watch out for those “dangerous liberals!” JEERS TO EVERYONE ON THE ROAD! Drivers, jeers to you for turning through crosswalks before pedestrian’s are through! Cyclist, jeers to you for acting like traffic laws don’t apply to you i.e., a red light means STOP! Pedestrians, jeers to you for staring into your smartphones oblivious to traffic. And jeers to jaywakers who know that the police won’t cite them and to red-light walkers just to list afew. I see why we’ve had so many driver pedestrian/cyclist accidents. STICKY FINGERS To all those Trumpanzees out there who feel compelled to keep stealing my Lisa Brown signs here in Colbert, I suggest a better use of your time would be to research

SHADE WHERE IT’S NEEDED Sunday, July 29, 1 pm Northwest Blvd Safeway, white GMC pickup with a black bed liner parked on the far west slot in front of the store. 91 degrees with no shade in sight and your sweet brown dog in the back of the pickup. I went into the store and when I came out he was panting as hard as a dog can pant. I wrote down your license and reported it to Safeway. I had to leave as I was picking up my mother at Walgreens. I came back and the information lady was verifying the info I had written down. I told her time was of the essence and she needed to get on the microphone soon. What is wrong with a person who would leave an animal in 91 degree heat with no shade? At least he wasn’t in the truck... I would have broken a window to get him out. Are you really that clueless? PLEASE for the sake of all things holy. Do not leave your animals to suffer in this heat... NO WHERE, NO HOW. He was a sweet little dog who was needlessly suffering because you left him to suffer. I hope you see this jeers and learn something. HEATSTROKE AT THE SHOW Jeers to a popular music venue for a sweltering

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS C L A M S

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1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

DO NOT CALL I recently received a political solicitation on my cell phone via text message from someone from Lisa Brown’s campaign! This person addressed me by name which I find quite disturbing as my number is listed on the do not call website. Shame on them for not respecting private citizens and for harassing us from every avenue. Ugh. I would never vote for her and now I will pass the word about her methods of campaigning to everyone I know. n

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EVENTS | CALENDAR COLVILLE RENDEZVOUS DAYS The annual community fest features two stages of live music and entertainment, food and artisan vendors, a baseball tourney, classic car and bike show, a historic encampment and more. Aug. 3-5. Colville, Wash. colvillerendezvous.org KURONEKOCON Spokane’s first and only anime, Japanese culture, and gaming convention, featuring vendors/ exhibitors, cosplay contests, panels and more. $25-$45. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. kuronekocon.com (279-7000) HILLYARD FESTIVAL & HI-JINX PARADE This annual celebration began in 1911 and features a parade, vendors, food, entertainment and more. Aug. 4, 10 am. Free. facebook.com/HillyardFestival/ BONNER COUNTY FAIR This year’s theme is “Good Old Days, Country Ways,” and includes a lineup of entertainers, bands, specialty acts, exhibitors and contests. Aug. 8-11. Bonner County Fairgrounds, 4203 N. Boyer Rd. bonnercountyfair.com

turing Gigi Spott and her cast of entertainers who perform unabashed comedy, aerial skills and more. 18+. $15-$25. Wiley’s Downtown Bistro, 115 N. Washington. bit.ly/2L5qaSt (838-4600) SPOKANE BREWERS FESTIVAL The third annual event returns to feature dozens of local craft brews and ciders. A portion of proceeds benefit Wishing Star Foundation. Aug. 4, 11 am-8 pm. $25; $50/VIP. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanebrewfest.com BREWERS DINNER A four-course meal with Northwest beers, prepared by Chef Steven Hill. Reservations required. Aug. 5, 6 pm. $55. Hills’ Restaurant & Lounge, 401 W. Main. (747-3946) KIDS DESSERT CLASS A sugar-filled afternoon learning techniques to master fresh fruit galettes and no-bake cookies. Ages 7-12. Aug. 8, 2-4 pm. $20+tax/fees. My Fresh Basket, 1030 W. Summit Pkwy. myfreshspokane.com

FILM

POLYPHONY MARIMBA On their national tour the group is joined by Spokane’s Musha Marimba to present Zimbabwean style marimba music. Aug. 5, 7-9:30 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main Ave. polyphonymarimba.com (505-204-8960) LIBRARIES ROCK! WITH SPRING TONIC Bring a picnic and enjoy some old time Bluegrass music by Spring Tonic. Aug. 6, 5-7 pm. Free. CdA Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org SIDETRACK The local six-piece dance band plays a mix of country, rock-n-roll, swing, folkabilly and more. Aug. 7, 6-7 pm. Free. Southeast Sports Complex, 2700 E. 46th Ave. spokaneparks.org A BLESSINGS BBQ BASH Country music entertainers Christie Lee and Aaron Crawford perform at this poolside concert and fundraising event benefiting Blessings Under the Bridge. Aug. 9, 6-10 pm. $30. Centennial Hotel, 201 W. North River Dr. btub.org (869-6697)

SCREEN ON THE GREEN: STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI Family-friendly screenings hosted by the U of Idaho Dept. of Student Involvement. Blankets and chairs welcome. Aug. 2. Free. University of Idaho, 709 S Deakin St. facebook. com/UIgetinvolved (208-885-6111) SOUTH PERRY SUMMER THEATER: WONDER WOMAN Movies begin at dusk, with open seating in the parking lot of the Shop. Aug. 4. Free. The Shop, 924 S. Perry St. (534-1647) SWIM & A MOVIE: CARS 3 Enjoy a twohour swim, grab some concessions, throw down a blanket or chairs in the park and enjoy a movie. At the Northside and Southside facilities. Aug. 4, 6 pm. Free. spokanecounty.org/parks SUMMER CAMP: JUMANJI The Garland’s summer movie series returns on Tuesday nights; spend $10 in Bon Bon before the show to get in free. Aug. 7, 7 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com SPR PRESENTS: YELLOW SUBMARINE A special one-night showing of the visually stunning Beatles’ film in this celebration of its 50th anniversary. Aug. 8, 6:30 pm. $15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. spokanepublicradio.org UI CONFUCIUS INSTITUTE: CHINESE MOVIE NIGHT The monthly series is preceded by a brief intro of each film and its cultural significance. Aug. 8, 7 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127)

FOOD

RCB GARAGE PARTY August’s event includes beers, live music by The South Hill, ice cream from The Scoop and food from D. Lish’s Hamburgers. Fringe & Fray also hosts a pop-up shop in the brewery. Aug. 3, 4-10 pm. Free. River City Brewing, 121 S. Ceda. (263-7983) TASTE OF COEUR D’ALENE The annual celebration features more than 100 vendors of food, arts and crafts, along with live music, a beer garden and free kids’ activities. Aug. 3-5; Fri noon-8:30 pm, Sat 10 am-8:30 pm, Sun 10 am-5 pm. Coeur d’Alene City Park, 415 W. Mullan. panhandlekiwanis.org BOTTOMS UP!: SUMMER BRUNCH A lively summer brunch performance fea-

MUSIC

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

BAREFOOT 3V3 SOCCER TOURNAMENT The all-ages, co-ed community tournament, hosted by the HUB. Aug. 3-4. $100-$120/team. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. (509-755-6726) WAR AT THE WOLF MMA Fight Night. Doors open at 5 pm; first fight kicks off at 7. Aug. 3, 5-9:30 pm. Free. Lone Wolf Harley-Davidson, 19011 E. Cataldo Ave. (927-7433) HYDROPLANE BOAT RACES Hosted by the State Line Outboard Racing Association (S.L.O.R.A.), a nonprofit with the goal to bring together and organize racing enthusiasts in the Inland Empire region. Aug. 4-5. Newport, Wash. newportareachamber.com LONG BRIDGE SWIM The annual, open water swim is a 1.76 mile trek across Lake Pend Oreille along the bridge. Proceeds support the promotion and delivery of swim lessons to youth and adults in North Idaho. Aug. 4. $35. Sandpoint. longbridgeswim.org SPIKE & DIG One of the world’s largest co-ed, outdoor 6-on-6 volleyball tournaments, with more than 300 teams and 2,200 players each year. Aug. 4, 10 am-7 pm. $190-$220/team. Dwight Merkel Sports Complex, 5701 N. Assem-

RELATIONSHIPS

bly St. spikeanddig.com SPOKANE SCOTTISH HIGHLAND GAMES Traditional features of the games include pipe bands, heavy athletics, highland dancing, a highland cattle exhibition, competitions and clan tent displays. Aug. 4, 9 am-5:30 pm. $5-$10. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. spokanehighlandgames.net (509-477-1766) HUCKLEBERRY COLOR FUN RUN & WALK Runners and walkers are showered in colorful powdered dye as they run along the scenic course. Aug. 5, 11 am. Schweitzer Resort, 10,000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer.com

Advice Goddess SEIZE THE MEH

AMY ALKON

I’m a 31-year-old guy who got really hurt after a relationship ended a few years back. Now I just don’t date women whom I’ll ever really care about because I don’t ever want to feel how I felt when my previous relationship ended. My friends say I’m being a coward and missing out, but, hey, I’m not depressed over any chicks. I think I’m being smart in protecting myself. Maybe more people should take this approach. —Comfortably Numb

THEATER

These days, your relationships probably start when you eyeball a woman on the street: “Whoa! I bet she’d be seriously mediocre in bed!” Next, you discover that she’s a real yawn out of the sack, too — and you’re in! Now, it’s possible that you’re way more emotionally sensitive than most people, to the point where a loss that others would eventually recover from hits you like a neverending colonoscopy (with, um, artisanal anesthesia: “If you’ll just bite this stick...”). Even if you are super sensitive, avoiding the pain comes at a substantial price: living a gray goulash of a life, spending every day with some uninspiring somebody you don’t really care about. But consider that we evolved to be resilient — to heal from emotional injuries as we do physical ones. However, in order for you to do this — and to see that you might actually be able to stand the pain of loss — you need to view resilience not as some mysterious emotional gift but as a practice. Resilience comes out of what clinical psychologist Salvatore Maddi calls “hardiness.” He writes that “hardiness ... provides the courage and motivation to do the hard, strategic work of turning stressful circumstances from potential disasters into growth opportunities.” His research finds that hardiness is made up of three “interrelated attitudes,” which he calls the three Cs: Commitment, Control, and Challenge. Commitment is the desire to engage with people and life instead of pulling away and isolating yourself. Control is the motivation to take action to improve your life “rather than sinking into passivity and powerlessness.” Challenge is the willingness to face the stress life throws at you and use it as a learning experience “rather than playing it safe by avoiding uncertainties and potential threats.” These attitudes might not come naturally to you. But you can choose to take them up, same as you might other “unnatural practices,” like monogamy and wearing deodorant. Understanding that there are steps you can take to recover from heartbreak might give you the courage to go for a woman you really love. Sure, that woman might leave you — causing you big-time pain. But consider that risk avoidance — like by being with a woman you don’t really care about — isn’t pain avoidance. The pain is just different. It’s low-dose extended-release — like frequently experiencing the post-sex horror that leads you to want to grab your clothes and make a run for it before the woman next to you wakes up. And then you remember a couple of essential points: She’s your wife, not some Tinder rando, and it’s your apartment.

ARTS

GIVE PIZZA A CHANCE

SALLY’S VIRTUE -OR- “PLAYING GAMES AT THE SNAKE PIT” Can Jack and Sally work together with the local sheriff to win back the deed to the Snake Pit during a very special game of cards? Aug. 1-26; Thu-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Sixth Street Theater, 212 Sixth St. sixthstreetmelodrama.com WINNIE THE POOH Christopher Robin’s fat little “bear of very little brain” finds himself in all sorts of frantic adventures. Aug. 2-4 and 9-11 at 7:30 pm. $10-$12. Pullman Civic Theatre, 1220 NW Nye St. (509-332-8406) CCT NORTH IDAHO: NEWSIES Christian Community Theater (CYT NI) presents the Broadway musical based on the 1992 Disney film, inspired by a true story. Aug. 3-4 and 8-11 at 7 pm; Aug. 405 and 11-12 at 3 pm. $15-$24. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. cytnorthidaho.org (208-762-9373) LEGALLY BLONDE THE MUSICAL This award-winning musical follows sorority girl Elle Woods as she tackles stereotypes, snobbery and scandal in pursuit of her dreams. Aug. 9-26; Wed-Sun, show times vary. $27-$49. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasummertheatre.com (208-660-2958) THE PIED PIPER The Missoula Children’s Theatre presents this original musical adaptation of the classic tale. Aug. 11, 3-4:30 & 5:30-7 pm. $5. Prairie Avenue Community Church, 3639 W. Prairie, Hayden. (208-209-1082)

FIRST FRIDAY Art galleries and businesses across downtown Spokane and beyond host monthly receptions to showcase new displays of art. Receptions held the first Friday of the month, from 5-8 pm. Free. Additional details at firstfridayspokane.org. THE SHAPE OF WOOD Twenty woodworkers from the Inland Northwest exhibit woodworking from the traditional to the avant-garde. Aug. 4-Sept. 2, Thu-Sun 10 am-6 pm. Free. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org BOOK LAUNCH: THE PEACEKEEPER Spokane Valley author Jess Steven Hughes signs the newest historical novel in his Britannia Romanus series. Aug. 4, 11 am-5 pm. Free. Barnes & Noble, 15310 E. Indiana Ave. (922-4104) BOOK RELEASE: CONSOLATION PRIZE Scablands Books and Interpunct Press celebrate the release of Aileen Keown Vaux’s new poetry chapbook Consolation Prize. Aug. 4, 7-9 pm. Free. Interpunct Press, 2618 W. Sinto Ave. bit. ly/2JNZMa5 (615-481-4950) n

I’m a straight 36-year-old woman, and I recently lost a lot of weight. My doctor’s happy. My girlfriends think I look great. They’re all “How’d you do it?” “You look like a model!” However, my male friends think I’m too skinny now. Is there a big difference in what the sexes consider a good body? —Slim Though women assume that men think the ideal female body shape is modeliciously skinny, consider that construction workers rarely yell out, “Hey, Hotstuff! Great set of ribs!” In studies exploring men’s and women’s ideas of the ideal female body weight, women consistently “perceive men as being attracted to thinner female figures than is true in reality,” writes social psychologist Viren Swami. And it isn’t just North American men who like fleshier women. Swami ran a massive survey — of 7,434 men and women in 26 countries, across 10 world regions — and “men across all world regions except East Asia selected a significantly heavier figure as being most physically attractive compared to what women believed was most attractive to men.” Swami and his colleagues speculate that “women exposed to magazines marketed to women may form skewed perceptions of what body types are most appealing to men.” But don’t despair. Swami’s study and others measure the preferences of the “average” man. There is no such person. Or, as an epidemiologist friend of mine often reminds me, there are “individual differences” -- meaning individuals’ preferences vary. In other words, there are men out there who will be seriously into a woman like you -- a woman who can do amazing feats in the bedroom, like removing a pair of skinny jeans without calling 911 and asking for firemen to come over with the Jaws of Life. n ©2018, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 59


SCIENCE

Scientists found that, in mice, THC enters the receptors of the brain’s olfactory bulb, greatly increasing their ability to smell and taste food.

Hungry for Knowledge Why do we get the munchies? BY TUCK CLARRY

I

t happens to all of us. A handful of tokes and we turn into our own worst enemy, stocking the pantry and refrigerator to fill the call of the id once red and bleary eyed. Half the time it’s an excuse not to indulge, where you have to explain you don’t like the gluttonous monster you turn into if you simply puff on a joint. But what is the science behind the munchies that derailed Scooby and Shaggy from solving the case or makes me feel like an up-and-coming fusion chef with the haphazard condiment mixing that I conduct in my kitchen at 1 am? In a study published in Nature Neuroscience, scientists

60 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

found that in mice, THC would enter the receptors of the brain’s olfactory bulb, greatly increasing their ability to smell and taste food, thus eating more of it. THC also unlocks receptors in the nucleus accumbens, which release the pleasure neurotransmitter dopamine. So not only are users’ experiencing an elevation in taste and smell, but they are also experiencing euphoria. Further research has shown that the effect on other receptors related directly to the gut could hold new potential in how we can control our appetites moving forward. Washington State University’s Jon Davis, assistant professor in integrative physiology and neuroscience, has

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

begun to unlock the potential of THC not only promoting appetite but also suppressing it. “We discovered that when you do weight-loss surgery or bypass surgery on people, someone who previously never drank alcohol [may] turn into an alcoholic,” Davis tells Leafly. “It actually clued me in to this very powerful communication between the gut and the brain.” That major discovery comes in the relationship between glutamate, a neurotransmitter that primarily affects feeding, and ghrelin, a hormone found in the stomach. It’s the activity of glutamate bonding with LETTERS THC that can increase Send comments to the amount of food we editor@inlander.com. eat when we experience the munchies. But without that glutamate activity, the ghrelin levels actually promote a suppression of appetite. The suppression appears to be the counterbalance that our body and the plant naturally display. And major breakthroughs can occur once we learn how to control the balance between THC, our gut hormones and the transmitters that communicate between the two. n


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NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a fiveyear sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

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62 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

WWW.SPOKANEGREENLEAF.COM | 9107 N COUNTRY HOMES BLVD., SPOKANE, WA 99218 (509) 919-3467 | OPEN DAILY SUN-THU 9A-10P & FRI-SAT 9A-11P This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one years of age and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

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Warning: This product has intoxicating effects & may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, & judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults 21 years or older. Keep out of reach of children.

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AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 63


GREEN ZONE

BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

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AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 65


COEUR D ’ ALENE

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

The coeur d’alene

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sunday August 5

Three simultaneous festivals take over the Lake City, creating one of the most anticipated weekends of the summer

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Festival Extravaganza hree summer festivals collide this weekend in downtown Coeur d’Alene in a three-day extravaganza of food, shopping, music and art. Over 400 vendors will congregate in the city by the lake during ART ON THE GREEN, TASTE OF COEUR D’ALENE and the COEUR D’ALENE STREET FAIR on Aug. 3, 4 and 5.

to see more creativity on display at the 28th annual DOWNTOWN STREET FAIR. Retailers will take over the street with an endless display of tents and tables. If you don’t see what you like at the first couple booths, keep walking — there will be 250 of them. Fri-Sat, 10 am-8 pm; Sun, 10 am-5 pm; Sherman Ave.; downtown Coeur d’Alene.

ART ON THE GREEN, a festival of all things creative, turns 50 this year. This annual celebration of the arts showcases the work of hundreds of artists and musicians on the North Idaho College campus. Browse booths featuring handcrafted works in glass, clay, leather, wood and metal, not to mention a multitude of beautifully colored canvases. Children will appreciate making their own works of art (materials and instruction provided) and adults can test out the “liquid” art at the beer and wine garden on site or listen to music at one of the many outdoor stages. Fri, noon-7:30pm; Sat, 10 am-7:30 pm; Sun, 10 am-5 pm; North Idaho College.

When it’s time to eat, then head to City Park and the TASTE OF COEUR D’ALENE festival, where you can choose from over 100 different vendors offering food and drink. Whether you’re in the mood for a good ol’ fashioned funnel cake or something more gourmet, this festival has you covered. Live music and beer garden featuring local brews are also on tap. Fri, noon-8:30 pm; Sat, 10 am-8:30 pm; Sun, 10 am-5 pm; Coeur d’Alene City Park.

Head to Sherman Avenue and you’re sure

There are no admission fees to all three festivals. All events are within walking distance, but a free shuttle is also available for those who want stress-free travel between them.

D ’A L E N E

Upcoming Events

COEUR D’ALENE

The Isley Brothers AUGUST 2

Come twist and shout as the Isley Brothers make way to the Coeur d’Alene Casino stage. The group, known for their songs “Twist and Shout” and “This Little Heart of Mine,” boasts 10 songs that hit the top Billboard charts and 16 albums that hit the top 40. Tickets $35+, 7-9 pm,

Bands on Boats Summer Concert Series AUGUST 3

The Powers rock the boat this week during the Bands on Boats summer concert series on Lake Coeur d’Alene.

Tickets $25, ages 21+, 7-8:30 pm, depart from the Coeur d’Alene Resort.

Coeur d’Alene Casino.

Ales for the Trail AUGUST 11

A good time is brewin’ at McKeuen Park when more than two dozen breweries and cideries take over the park to support the North Idaho Centennial Trail Foundation. Enjoy live music by the Rub, while you sample some of the region’s best craft beer. Tickets $30 include six

sample pours (5 oz.); 2-8 pm; McKeuen Park; alesforthetrail.org.

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

66 INLANDER AUGUST 2, 2018

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AUGUST 2, 2018 INLANDER 67


Entertainment

THE ISLEY BROTHERS

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Don’t miss this Grammy award-winning group with songs like “Groove With You,” “Fight the Power,” Brother, Brother,” “You Are Love” and more!

THURSDAY, AUGUST 2ND

THURSDAY, AUGUST 16TH LONESTAR Event Center | 7 pm Tickets from $25 Known for merging their country roots with strong melodies and rich vocals, Lonestar achieved ten #1 country hits including “No News,” “Come Crying To Me,” and their crossover smash “Amazed.”

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30TH

SATURDAY, SEPT. 8TH

THE FAB FOUR: THE ULTIMATE TRIBUTE

SCOTTY MCCREERY

Event Center | 7 pm Tickets from $25 The Emmy Award Winning Fab Four is elevated far above every other Beatles Tribute due to their precise attention to detail. It’s one night you won’t want to miss.

Event Center | 7 pm Tickets from $50 After winning Season Ten of American Idol in 2011, McCreery made history with his debut album. Don’t miss greatest hits like “Five More Minutes”, “The Trouble with Girls”, “Feelin’ It” and much more!

A L L R E S E RV E D S E AT I N G | P U R C H A S E T I C K E T S AT C A S I N O O R A N Y T I C K E T S W E S T O U T L E T Hotel & ticket packages available | Call 1 800 523-2464 for details

1 800 523-2464 | CDACASINO.COM | Worley, Idaho | 25 miles south of Coeur d’Alene

Inlander 08/02/2018  
Inlander 08/02/2018