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COMMENT | THE BORDER

FAMILY LAW

Eyes in the Sky

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With little fanfare, the United States Department of Homeland Security has deployed drones high above Washington, Idaho and Montana

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hen I think of Canada, I picture caribou herds, universal health care and the occasional hockey brawl. Officials at our Department of Homeland Security, however, seem to think the neighbors up North pose a serious security threat. After all, the department has spent the past five years quietly building a fleet of unmanned aerial vehicles — also known as drones — to keep constant watch on the United States’ northern border. New details of drones in the North emerged only recently, thanks to the California-based Electronic Frontier Foundation. Last summer, the organization obtained a cache of documents about drone flights in America in response to its public-interest lawsuit against the Department of Homeland Security. These documents reveal that the department, through its Customs and Border Protection Division, has deployed at least two Predator B drones to an operating base in Grand Forks, North Dakota. The drones make frequent surveillance flights along the U.S. border with Canada, using advanced radar and video systems to survey the expansive landscape. The documents also outline the agency’s efforts to grow its fleet. The Customs and Border Division, according to a 2010 report, plans to station seven drones along the northern border by the end of 2016. Moreover, by 2025 the agency wants a permanent fleet of 10 drones to monitor the border “seven days/week, 24 hours/day” from bases in North Dakota, Montana, Washington and elsewhere. The goal, in other words, is nonstop surveillance.

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redator B drones are the same machines our government has used in its bombing campaigns in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Operated by deskbound pilots protected in a bunker somewhere, the drones can fly for 27 hours without refueling and reach an altitude of 50,000 feet. With a wingspan of 66 feet, they can carry nearly 4,000 pounds of equipment, from infrared technology to missile systems. Though drones operated by Customs and Border Protection are not yet armed, the “Concept of Operations” report indicates that the agency has considered fitting them with “non-lethal weapons designed to immobilize” enemies. This growing drone fleet is not used exclusively for border surveillance. Local, state and federal entities, from the Coast Guard to the North Dakota Bureau of Criminal Investigation, can borrow these machines from border officials to conduct domestic policing. According to flight logs obtained in the lawsuit, the Customs and Border Division performed more than 700 surveillance flights in support of other law enforcement agencies between 2010 and 2012 alone. Where, how and why these drone flights occurred remains a mystery; the flight logs are heavily censored.

Along our Southern border, Predator B drones have been in use since 2004, when our Customs and Border Division first began its experiment with these machines. Today, the agency has stationed at least four drones in Arizona, and it regularly loans them to organizations such as the Arizona Department of Public Safety and numerous county sheriffs’ departments across the Southwest. The likelihood of civil liberties violations seems not to concern federal officials. Drone surveillance in this country started in the West, probably because government security officials view its vast open spaces, remote mountains and dense forests as a weak link in America’s armored exterior. It takes invasive technologies to control such unruly terrain, and drones must seem like the perfect tools. These airborne security cameras are able to accomplish in rural America what the standard security camera achieves on the streets of Los Angeles or Chicago. The problem is that federal security officials have introduced these drones under a fog of secrecy and with little public oversight. They have counted on our ignorance as drones became a tool for warrantless domestic surveillance along our borders. As they plan to expand their fleets, they count now on our apathy. That doesn’t sit well with most Westerners I know.

T

he people I know respect privacy and individuality. They trust their neighbors and they cherish open land. They maintain a live-and-let-live ethic, or at least that’s what they strive for. The surveillance machines polluting our skies threaten these basic values. They further empower national security bureaucrats, while we are forced to foot the bill for this infringement of our own protected liberties. That’s why states like Montana and Oregon have placed stringent limitations on drone surveillance within their jurisdictions. They recognize a threat when they see one. We should not have to live in a world where spying robots hover above us like hawks and buzzards. Those who value privacy — from civil libertarians, tribal nations and wilderness advocates, to ranchers and Ron Paul Republicans — have a major stake in stopping this surveillance from spreading before it becomes the norm. n Jimmy Tobias is a freelance journalist and former trail worker with the Forest Service in Idaho. This column first appeared in High Country News (hcn.org).


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Defending the Core BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

S

chools in Louisiana start in less than a month, but teachers still don’t know what they’ll be teaching. That’s because their governor, Bobby Jindal, wants to run for president, so he has turned his back on Common Core, the educational standards he championed two years ago. Now Jindal and the teachers are stuck in court. Good luck to the children of Louisiana, whose education system ranks among the worst in the nation. Common Core is a broad-based educational reform created by academics, business leaders and America’s governors — the majority of them Republicans like Jindal and Chris Christie. America’s been failing at public education, and they felt it was time to fix it. But then President Obama agreed with them, and now Common Core has become just another communist plot. The Republican National Committee has contradicted its own governors and called for the abolition of the standards. And on July 22, Glenn Beck took over 700 movie theaters nationwide to induct an army of Common Core fighters. Washington state is securely behind Common Core, but in Idaho, where Gov. Butch Otter supported the reforms, it could be short-lived. State Sen. John Goedde, who supported Common Core, was defeated by Mary Souza, who wants to kill it. This in a state that actually has a media campaign called “Don’t Fail Idaho,” paid for by business interests alarmed at the state’s failing grades — 50th in the nation, for example, for having the fewest high schoolers going on to college. Common Core aims to measure achievement, so that students in Idaho can compete with students in Washington, Louisiana and even Hong Kong. Bailing out is like saying Idaho doesn’t want its kids to compete. We have to measure achievement and set standards that will prepare our kids for this competitive world. I’m still not sold on the testing side of the equation, however. There’s too much secrecy and money in it; tests are too stressful for kids and take up too much time. Still, smart, devoted educators can improve the testing process, as should be happening in Spokane Public Schools as they prepare to go live next spring. But with Beck (a Washington state high school graduate who did not go on to college) and his kind apparently bored by the D.C. they have helped grind to a halt, now they’re messing with our schools and our kids’ lives. Reform is going to be hard enough without a bunch of political grandstanders heckling the process. Or, as Sen. Goedde told us after his loss in May: “Raising standards students must meet to graduate is important, and rejecting those standards is asinine.”  JEN SORENSON CARTOON

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COMMENT | GUEST EDITORIAL tic.” Together, we could remove the stigma of mental illness and the resulting negative reactions. The Inlander’s ongoing series “State of Mind” is an excellent example of what it looks like when our media institutions reject stereotypes associated with mental illness and focus on facts. The Inlander features voices of those with mental illness from state hospitals, jails and in our community.

Abraham Lincoln, Winston Churchill and Sir Isaac Newton had mental illnesses and had to confront this deeply held stigma.

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Beyond Labels

The final frontier of the civil rights movement: mental illness BY MARK STROH

S

exism, racism and homophobia exist. are routinely used to justify segregating or Nowadays, most people agree that they mistreating individuals with mental illness. are bad. It took work to create a culture We can fight against sanism, if, as was that rejects these bigoted views, and there done with racism, sexism and homophobia, are certainly holdouts who continue to resist people with mental illness and their allies replacing stereotypes with more collectively reject sanist practices by accurate, fully developed, individuour social institutions and expect alized pictures of the lives of people Find the Inlander’s more from our fellow commuwith life experiences different from nity members. The U.S. Substance “State of Mind” their own. Abuse and Mental Illness Services series at Inlander. There is a great need to stand com/stateofmind. Administration reports that more up against another form of biased than 20 percent of Washington thinking. Similar to racism or other residents experience a mental illness “isms,” sanism is a term used to describe every year. There is strength in numbers. bigoted generalizations about someone’s sanPeople with mental illness can take a stand, ity or mental health status. Our culture is full along with their families, friends, co-workers of stereotypes about what it means to have and neighbors who know they are not some a mental illness. Those sanist stereotypes characterization of a “crazy,” “insane” “luna-

ONLINE

The Inlander’s coverage has deviated from a typical portrayal of individuals with mental illness as those who need to be feared, or locked away to keep themselves or others safe. We should expect all of our media outlets to do the same. Disability Rights Washington has been working on fighting against sanism for decades. We have seen sanist disregard for people with mental illness as they are incessantly bullied at school or find themselves restrained in emergency rooms without appropriate treatment because inpatient psychiatric beds are unavailable. There are also those waiting indefinitely in jails for mental health evaluations, or those who have their fitness to practice their chosen profession called into question simply because they sought treatment for a mental illness in the past. We have seen media frenzies that lead to laws disregarding the rights of those one in five Washingtonians with mental illness. Influential individuals like Abraham Lincoln, Winston Churchill and Sir Isaac Newton had mental illnesses and had to confront this deeply held stigma. Imagine if they had been deprived of the opportunity to lead or to educate because of their disability. Imagine also the number of bright leaders who will emerge from the closet once we reject the sanist beliefs that have been restraining them for so long. n Mark Stroh is executive director of Disability Rights Washington.

ON INLANDER.COM

“We’ve had a wave of new energy roll through our city. It’s a breath of fresh air. They were also getting things done.” — TED S. McGREGOR JR.

“We should never forget the importance of keeping public land in public use. The value of the commons, set aside for all to enjoy, is still very much alive here in our city by the lake.”

— MARY LOU REED

“The message that’s been reinforced over these months is a disturbing one that echoes across the globe and through time: Some lives matter more than others.”

— TAYLOR WEECH

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JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 9


10 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014


COMMENT | FROM READERS

Readers on “Thinking About His Future” (7/24/14) about a fatal bike accident on the Centennial Trail, beneath the Monroe Street Bridge

JUDY McGRATH CUNNINGHAM: We walked through there yesterday. It does not look safe at all for bikers that don’t know the area. Plus someone could also plummet down the hill. Warning signs at the very least are needed. BO SNYDER: I feel bad for the kid but honestly, it was probably his fault. I ride through that area ALL the time on my bike rides through the upper Centennial trail and never had any problems with that section. However I am older and I know that I’m supposed to slow down through that section. I really REALLY hope they don’t put those awful bollards (posts) in the trail to slow people down. I have a balance issue and going through those is a nightmare for me. I feel like I’m going to crash into them all the time. DOUG NICOL: Very sad. A little input from the local cycling community is needed. Don’t let non riders make the decisions.

Quintin Horseman, 18, had been turning around his life before the accident.

KIMBERLY MARIE LAWRENCE: I ride this part of the trail a couple times a day and while people can get going really fast, it is very easy to manage your speed safely as a cyclist. Because of the pedestrians in the area and the low visibility around the pillars, everyone should be slowing down and keeping one ear to the traffic (walkers with headphones.) Signs might be a good way to remind people but please no bollards! That would make this area very dangerous.

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GINA ANGELO-RUBENDALL: This story was wonderful and had me crying for an hour. NICOLE COLBY PAULS: I don’t know if wearing a helmet would have saved his life, but even the trail isn’t safe from obstacles that make wearing one a good idea on a bicycle regardless of why you’re using it. Even if the posted speed limit is 15 mph, heck even at 10 mph, a fall to the ground due to unexpected circumstances in a congested area (like near the Valley Mall, or Riverfront Park) could do a lot of damage. SHAUN PETERSON: I ride through there all the time. It’s some quick sharp turns and usually busy, but that’s why you slow down. Feel sorry for the family. GENE BRAKE: Every effort should be made to make it safer: add lighting, guardrails or signage, whatever it calls for. 

JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 11


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Room for Compromise Why the city could clear the way for Uber and Lyft, but not Airbnb BY HEIDI GROOVER

Airbnb host Mari-Pat Corrigan says being required to add a fire sprinkler system to her home would put her out of business. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

U

nder tall pine trees in a quiet South Hill neighborhood, MariPat and Steve Corrigan are inviting strangers into their home. Through an entrance on the side of the house and down a narrow stairway, they’re welcome to make themselves comfortable. Netflix and Wi-Fi are available, and a map dotted with pushpins directs guests to Huckleberry’s and the Rocket Bakery. “If you go to Spokane and stay downtown, you get Starbucks and chain restaurants,” Mari-Pat says. Instead, spaces like this two-bedroom apartment allow visitors to “come into your family and your neighborhood and see what Spokane looks like from a neighborhood perspective.” Spooled inside that sentiment are many of the threads of the controversy surrounding rentals like this spot offered on Airbnb, one of the most popular websites allowing people to rent out rooms or houses to visitors. Their appeal — that they feel like home because they are in someone’s home — is also their potential downfall. If money changes hands, should rentals like this be considered a business? Once a home becomes a business, does it demand more regulation? Does it change the identity of the neighborhood around it? This spring, after Spokane’s code enforcement department warned Airbnb hosts they could be breaking the law, the city put a halt to any further action while it convened a group to discuss how they should be regulated. Now that group is nearing the time it had planned to take the discussion public, and major questions still remain. While Airbnb hosts say they’re willing to pay taxes, they say other regulations could cause them to shut down. Most notably, state building codes require buildings rented for less than 30 days at a time to be equipped with fire sprinklers, and federal law requires them to be accessible for those with disabilities. (The sprinkler requirements aren’t in place for homes rented by the month because longer-term residents should be more familiar with how to get out of the building in the case of an emergency.) Meanwhile, in another so-called “sharing economy” upheaval, Spokane City Council President Ben Stuckart is looking at ways to relax regulations for taxi drivers in order to allow fast-growing startups Uber and Lyft, which allow people to offer and find rides through a smartphone app, into the local market. His proposal would require Uber and Lyft to pay the city 10 ...continued on next page

JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 13


NEWS | SHARING ECONOMY “ROOM FOR COMPRIMISE,” CONTINUED... cents per ride, but would exempt drivers from getting the city business licenses taxi drivers must have. “We’re not able to do as much [for Airbnb] at all,” Stuckart says. “Our hands are pretty tied.”

P

lenty of trends and fights come to Spokane late, but this is not one of them. Across the globe, local governments are scrambling to regulate new peer-to-peer services, with ride-sharing and room-renting among the most popular. Amid concerns about regulations, competition and decreasing access to affordable housing, governments from New York to San Francisco have warned Airbnb hosts they’re likely breaking local laws. In New York, officials and Airbnb have clashed over a state law barring people from renting out their apartments for less than 30 days. Airbnb has now given the state some anonymized host data and begun warning hosts they may be breaking state law if they rent in New York. San Francisco, where Airbnb got its start, has also begun enforcing its ban on short-term rentals operating without a special permit. The argument over both short-term rentals and In the Northwest, Seattle hasn’t yet taken on shortride-sharing services focuses on creating a “level playing term rentals directly, but recently put a cap on how many field.” As a taxi company owner told the Inlander in May Uber and Lyft drivers could operate there. for a story about Uber and Lyft: “If I didn’t The city council then backtracked and crafted have to pay all these fees, I could do it for a regulations that allow them to operate. In Portdollar a mile too.” Send comments to land, regulators are cozying up to short-term “We put a lot of money into things like fire rentals as the city’s taxi board blocks Uber and editor@inlander.com. alarms, sprinkler systems, exit signs, emergency Lyft. The city council looks poised to pass new lighting,” says Spokane Hotel Motel Associarules legalizing and taxing Airbnb rentals in tion President Travis Tramp. “Currently none Portland’s houses (the mayor reportedly wants to include of these people have gone through any of that. They’re apartments and condos too). not getting inspected by the health or fire department.”

LETTERS

14 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

Mari-Pat Corrigan rents an apartment in her house on Airbnb.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

While Airbnb hosts argue they’re offering a different type of service, a search of Airbnb and another popular site, Vacation Rentals By Owner, returns about 85 offerings in the Spokane area. “That’s a small hotel we’re competing with, basically,” Tramp says.

C

ity Councilman Jon Snyder has called it “sprinkler creep,” impacting more and more people. The code in question — requiring fire sprinklers in buildings rented for less than 30 days — was added in 2012 and adopted last year, and has some local


leaders worried about an unreasonable burden on homeowners and builders. Yet when the state received a proposal to remove the rule last year, nobody showed up to support the move during public testimony, says Dave Kokot, a fire protection engineer with the Spokane Fire Department and a member of the state council that sets building codes. The discussion over how to regulate short-term rentals will continue, with zoning changes likely to come up for a council vote later this year, but a change to state sprinkler code could require a multi-year process. “Once a life-safety system is in the codes, it’s usually very difficult to pull it out,” Kokot says. Since discussions started, local Airbnb hosts have held out hope that the city would find some flexibility in how it enforces these requirements. That now appears unlikely. Jan Quintrall, head of the city’s Business & Developer Services Division, says the city can work with Airbnb renters on how much time they have before installing sprinkler systems and elements to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act, but can’t waive the requirements altogether. “ADA is a federal law and fire suppression is a state law,” she says. “Our hands are always tied with federal and state law.” The costs of installing sprinkler systems can vary based on factors like the age and size of the house, but can start at $5,000 to $10,000. Quintrall says the city knows “people can’t just flip a switch and come up with this money. “But we can allow them to phase in,” she says. “We need to sit down … and talk about how can we phase this in and what looks like a reasonable phase-in. We haven’t gotten there yet.” Local Airbnb hosts say that’s not enough, and some may close by the end of the year. “It’s just not something that can happen,” says Mari-Pat Corrigan. “Why are we even sitting at the table anymore?”  heidig@inlander.com

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NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

The Big News of the Past Week

1.

The Israeli military has intensified its assault on the Gaza Strip as international pressure for a cease-fire mounts. Last week, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry failed to negotiate a truce between Israel and the militant group Hamas. In Gaza, the death toll has climbed to more than 1,100 Palestinians, most of whom are civilians. In Israel, 53 soldiers and three civilians have been killed.

PHOTO EYE HOG WILD

2.

The world’s deadliest Ebola outbreak has spread to four countries and killed nearly 700 people in West Africa since the first cases were reported in February of this year. A highly infectious virus, Ebola is fatal in up to 90 percent of cases and there is no proven vaccine.

3.

Caving to pressure from the Downtown Spokane Partnership and Greater Spokane Incorporated, the Spokane Transit Authority board voted to delay renovations to the downtown bus plaza.

4.

Convicted murderer Joseph Wood, sentenced to lethal injection in Arizona, took nearly two hours to die, prompting more debate surrounding the death penalty.

MATT WEIGAND PHOTO

Hundreds of leather-clad bikers and motorcycle enthusiasts gathered for the first Pacific Northwest HOG Rally the past weekend at Lone Wolf Harley-Davidson in Spokane Valley. Organizers report that more than 1,600 bikers from all across the region registered for the rally’s four days of motorcycle showcases, group tours, riding competitions, live music and other events.

ON INLANDER.com

DIGITS

22

The number of people who have applied to fill outgoing Spokane City Councilman Steve Salvatori’s seat.

Fresh WITH

5.

A brief yet brutal storm last Wednesday left 40,000 homes in northern Spokane County without power. By Saturday evening, most homes had their electricity back.

50

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16 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

MUSIC: Check the blog every Friday to find the don’t-miss shows of that weekend. TV: We recently wrote about Spokanite Hazen Audel’s new reality show Survive the Tribe. Watch clips from the show at Inlander.com.


NEWS | BRIEFS

marketplace, wahealthplanfinder.org, have agreed to work together to identify and correct the problem by the end of August. Meanwhile, Marquis says her office has received 1,200 calls since March from Exchange customers complaining about these technical glitches. The next open enrollment period under the health reform law begins in mid-November. — DEANNA PAN

Don’t Give to the Poor Spokane and DSP launch “Give Real Change”; plus, Spokane deputies test body cameras DSP: JUST SAY NO

The city of Spokane and the Downtown Spokane Partnership will launch a “GIVE REAL CHANGE” campaign Friday encouraging residents to stop giving money to panhandlers and instead donate to local service providers. The campaign cost $25,000, with half funded by DSP and half by the city. On realchangespokane.org, the groups have provided a list of local shelters and other organizations to which they encourage people to donate. They also plan to launch a campaign on Crowdswell (a sort of Kickstarter for community projects). The money raised there would benefit three initiatives identified by a task force convened by the mayor, including job training for young people and new resources to help homeless adults connect with housing and apply for federal benefits. “It’s about changing the behavior of the person inclined to give,” says DSP President Mark Richard. Along with business interests, some service providers agree that giving to organizations can be more beneficial than handing cash to panhandlers. Spokane Homeless Coalition Chair Rob Bryceson says his group is supportive of raising awareness of local nonprofits (they also have a list of organizations at spokanehc.org). In a state-

DEPUTIES TEST BODY CAMS

ment about the campaign, Catholic Charities Executive Director Rob McCann says, “In reality, when we give money to panhandlers we are actually doing a disservice. Each dollar handed out a car window marches the recipient closer to a life of chaos, addiction, suffering, and even death.” — HEIDI GROOVER

KREIDLER TO THE RESCUE?

Software glitches on Washington’s insurance exchange website have prevented 6,000 customers from making payments on their plans, leaving thousands without coverage or care. Now, state Insurance Commissioner MIKE KREIDLER says he may step in and offer affected customers a special enrollment period to purchase health insurance outside the exchange if these issues aren’t resolved by the end of next month. “He doesn’t have authority over the [Washington Health Benefit Exchange], but he does have the ability to open a special enrollment,” says Stephanie Marquis, a spokeswoman for the Insurance Commissioner. Health insurers, Exchange staff, and Deloitte, the contractor responsible for creating the online insurance

As many other law enforcement agencies have moved toward implementing officer-worn body cameras, the SPOKANE COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE recently completed a multi-week pilot program to test out the new technology, allowing officials to weigh costs and equipment options. Department spokesman Deputy Mark Gregory says about 20 to 25 deputies volunteered for the program, wearing Taser Axon Body chest-mounted cameras on duty for about two months. He says the trial period just finished up. “This is the very first, preliminary, baby-step kind of thing,” he emphasizes. “We don’t even have funding.” Gregory says deputies tested out functionality, work flow, data storage equipment and other aspects of the body cameras. The department will review feedback from the deputies before moving forward with any implementation or funding plans. No initial cost estimate was available. Gregory says outfitting the department could vary based on the camera model, data storage needs and maintenance fees. The Spokane Police Department plans to roll out body cams on its officers by September. Police accountability advocates have strongly supported the use of body cameras to improve officer oversight, but many have also questioned whether policies can protect against misuse. — JACOB JONES

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NEWS | ELECTION 2014

ThreeWay Race Eying a second term, Rep. Marcus Riccelli faces two primary challengers BY DEANNA PAN

S

tate Rep. Marcus Riccelli faces a familiar challenger heading into the Aug. 5 primary: Tim Benn, a lifelong Spokanite and daycare owner, ran unsuccessfully against Riccelli in 2012. Also in the ring is Libertarian Randy McGlenn, a recently laid-off information technology worker, in the fight to represent Washington’s 3rd Legislative District. Both of Riccelli’s opponents face strenuous odds against the well-funded incumbent. The 3rd District, stretching from the South Hill to the Northside and covering the heart of downtown Spokane, is among the poorest in the state and the only staunchly Democratic district east of the Cascades. In the 2012 election, Riccelli, a Democrat, beat Benn by 25 points. In his first term, Riccelli passed a bill to improve transparency by making the capital and transportation budgets available online. He also passed legislation to reduce delay times for families waiting for newborn screening results. He touts his commitment to protecting “our most vulnerable” and saving social service programs from the budgetary chopping block. “Two years ago, I promised to hit the ground running for this community, and I believe I’ve delivered on this promise,” Riccelli says. Benn is once again running to the right of Riccelli, but this time as an “Independent” Republican. His philosophy, he explains, is “people before party.” After clashing with inspectors at

the Department of Early Learning, Benn, who co-owns a home day-care service in North Spokane with his wife, advocated for a bill this year to limit the agency’s regulatory power. He wants to reduce Olympia’s “burdensome regulations” on small businesses like his own. “I agree with the fiscal responsibility of the Republican Party, but I’m not a huge fan of topdown policies,” Benn says. “I’m not diverging fully from the Republican Party, but I think we need to represent the people of our districts, and not be coerced to make special deals on either side of the aisle.” McGlenn, who grew up in Spokane Valley, also promises voters he’ll maintain an “independent viewpoint” as a Libertarian. After losing his IT job at SKILS’KIN, a nonprofit serving people with disabilities, earlier this summer, McGlenn says he grew frustrated with Spokane’s lack of good jobs and slow economic growth. If he heads to Olympia next year, he says he wants to pore through the state budget and identify wasteful programs in hopes of saving taxpayer dollars. “[In] my experience Rep. Marcus Riccelli as an IT person, we constantly have the mantra of doing more with less,” McGlenn says. “I feel the government could use a good dose of that.” Riccelli has vastly outraised his opponents, Tim Benn with $78,500 so far in campaign contributions. His donors include Avista, Boeing, tribal governments and many health care-related companies and political action committees. Benn, Randy McGlenn by comparison, has raised $3,875 in private contributions from roughly two dozen people. McGlenn, who hasn’t reported any contributions to the Public Disclosure Commission, says he’s gotten about $2,000 from supporters and spent almost all of it. 

ON THE ISSUES We asked the candidates about issues making headlines today. Here’s a sampling of what they said. To read more of their responses, visit Inlander.com.

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18 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

Washington state faces a looming doctor shortage as more people become insured. What’s your plan for filling this growing need in our health care industry? Marcus Riccelli (Democrat): We want to deliver more graduate medical education right here at the Riverpoint campus in Spokane. We need to grow that program. I think it’s fair to consider whether we need a medical school here in Spokane. … I think we should incentivize [medical students] through loan forgiveness.

The legislature is obligated under the state Supreme Court to fully fund education. How should lawmakers keep good on their promise to invest billions of dollars into education? Tim Benn (Independent Republican): We have top-heavy administration and we have a lot of education dollars that are spent in areas that don’t actually educate our children. … We need to address that before we ask these low-income residents in the 3rd District to pay more on their house payment and pay more in taxes.

How should lawmakers fund a transportation package that would complete the long-awaited NorthSouth Freeway? Randy McGlenn (Libertarian): We’ve passed tax levies time and time again to fund this project. How many times are we going to fund this project over and over again? I think it’s time we start steering some dollars toward this project, get it done and make sure that dollars like the gas taxes we’ve already passed aren’t getting put into the general fund, and they go specifically to the transportation fund.


NEWS | MEDIA

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August ! L A I C E P S SPA

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ournalists work for readers, not the awards, but it’s still nice to get a pat on the back from time to time. This year, competing against weeklies in the region and across the country, Inlander writers took home honors for stories in several categories, including health, sports, business and economic inequality reporting. The paper also placed in cover design and editorial layout. Check out all the details below; you can also revisit these stories at Inlander.com.

FROM THE ASSOCIATION OF ALTERNATIVE NEWSMEDIA

 First Place, Economic Inequality Reporting: Deanna Pan, for a series of stories, including one covering cuts to food assistance (“Down to the Dollar,” 11/7/13).  Third Place, Long-Form News Story: Daniel Walters, for his cover story (“It Gets Worse,” 4/11/13) examining school bullying in the Internet era.  Third place, Cover Design: Chris Bovey, for his innovative illustrations, including one (8/11/13) depicting the disappearing populations of bees.  Third place, Editorial Layout: Chris Bovey, for the design of our Volume Music Festival Guide (5/23/13).

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 First Place, Health Reporting: Heidi Groover, for her cover story about organ donation and the gifts of a young girl (“17 Lives,” 3/28/13).  Second Place, Business Reporting: Daniel Walters, for his cover story about the growing aerospace sector in the Inland Northwest (“Turbulence Ahead,” 12/5/13).  Third Place, Sports Reporting: Mike Bookey, for his cover story about the Gonzaga men’s basketball team (“America’s Team,” 3/7/13).  Third Place, Editorial & Commentary: Ted S. McGregor, for a series of columns, including one on the legacy of Tom Foley (“The Old School,” 10/31/13). 

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NEWS | ELECTION 2014

Manager or Activist? How political should the county treasurer’s office be? BY DANIEL WALTERS

O

n a freezing February day outside the Federal Building, Republican Spokane County Treasurer Rob Chase gives a speech before Spokane Moves to Amend the Constitution, a group pushing for a constitutional amendment to weaken corporate rights and get big money out of politics. The staunch Ron Paul libertarian condemns “crony capitalism” and calls for less partisanship when fighting against money in politics. “As long as we are divided based upon labels and misconception, we will be controlled,” he says. The speech, says former Washington State Auditor Mary Kuney, was what convinced her to run for county treasurer against Chase. Chase’s political activism, and his relative professional experience, have become central to the debate in the three-way county treasurer race, which pits Republicans Chase and Kuney against Democrat Amy Biviano, the accountant who unsuccessfully ran against state Rep. Matt Shea two years ago. It’s quickly become Washington state’s most expensive treasurer race this year. Kuney has raised more than $34,000, double the amount of Chase or Biviano. Chase, despite being the incumbent, lags behind both.

20 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

Rob Chase

Mary Kuney

“I’m sort of a grassroots person,” Chase explains. He beat Skip Chilberg in the treasurer race four years ago after being a write-in candidate in the primary. “You don’t get the donations for corporations or businesses or lobbyists that other people seek.” The job is more technical than political: A treasurer manages the county’s investments — including low-interest loans to small cities and school districts — and reviews

the finances of local municipalities. “This is not a policy-setting position, in terms of social policy or in terms of budgeting,” says Biviano. Both Biviano and Kuney like to point out that Chase isn’t a certified public accountant, and they are. “Having the financial experience and the auditing experience, I think I can lead rather than let the employees lead me,” Kuney says. “I think it’s really about qualifications and experience, and not about the philosophical differences.” Biviano showcases her Yale education and her Gonzaga MBA, while Kuney points to her experience running two small businesses and her 10 years in the Washington State Auditor’s office. “MBAs do a lot of case studies,” Kuney says. “I’ve lived a lot of case studies.” Biviano says her education would help her identify more opportunities to offer loans to school districts or, say, the city of Spokane Valley to repair Sullivan Bridge, while Kuney believes her experiAmy Biviano ence will help the county get a better return on its investments. Chase has plenty of experience too. He doesn’t have a CPA, but is certified in production and inventory management and has two CPAs who work for him. He’s also the only candidate in the race who has a record as county treasurer. Chase says he’s made $55 million in short-term loans to districts and the county, far more than his predecessor did in four years, and that Spokane’s investment


yield is the second best in the state. During his term, he says, his office reduced banking fees, stayed under budget and passed every audit with flying colors. He lobbied the legislature hard for a bill to allow counties to give property owners far more flexibility in making partial payments. The bill passed by a large margin. If re-elected, Chase says, he may lobby for more personal property-tax exemptions and less punishing interest rates on unpaid property taxes. But Chase’s lobbying has also dipped into a pool frequented by a particular sect of constitutional libertarians: He supported a Shea bill to recognize gold and silver as legal tender and raised the idea of changing state law to allow investing in gold and silver. Both efforts went nowhere. “A lot of central banks and governments and pension funds invest in gold,” Chase says. He says he’s personally made money on gold. Still, gold and silver prices have fallen significantly over the past two years. Chase’s opponents don’t disagree with everything he’s lobbied for, but they also see his activism in the legislature as a weakness. “I think he’d really like to legislate,” Kuney says. “I think I’m more concerned with doing a great job as treasurer than being an activist.” (Chase has previously run for state senator, U.S. House and county commissioner.) Despite her past as chair of the Spokane County Democrats, Biviano says she doubts she’ll get involved in partisan politics as treasurer. “Rob already has made enemies with his other county elected officials in being overly partisan in his job,” Biviano says, citing how Chase’s Spokane Moves to Amend speech earned him opposition from County Commissioner Al French. But Chase says that his willingness to disagree with the county commissioners just shows how independent he is. After all, Chase’s speech that angered French pushed for less partisanship. “You don’t work for the commissioners,” Chase says. “You work for the residents of Spokane County.”  danielw@inlander.com

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TRIAL

DISPLACED RESIDENTS START THE LONG ROAD OUT OF “HELL” IN THE

BY FIRE WAKE OF THE LARGEST WILDFIRE IN WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY STORY AND PHOTOS BY JACOB JONES

22 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014


T

wo brick chimneys, crooked and lonesome, rise over the charred wreckage of Brad McGaha and Kelley Ralston’s former home. Along Old Highway 97, south of Malott in north-central Washington, other solitary chimneys mark other missing houses like fresh graves in an immense cemetery. Fast-moving fire has stained the hills, blackening miles upon miles of forest and grassland, flashing homesteads out of existence, recasting a valley in destruction. Smoke still hangs on the ridges, flavoring the air with ash. Downed power lines crisscross the barren fields. For 82 years, the McGaha home stood amid a small orchard overlooking the Okanogan River and surrounding valley. Ralston says it burned in a matter of hours. “The house just went up,” she says. “It was so chaotic. It was awful.” McGaha, 50, says he has lived in the house most of his life. His grandfather built it in 1932. Ralston, 47, a nurse from Seattle, moved into the home last year after they got engaged. While they had closely watched for updates on the approaching fire, the flames crested the nearby ridge with little warning. “At least we were able to grab a few things off the wall,” McGaha says of their hurried evacuation. “I didn’t have much hope that anything would be there the next day.” McGaha says he watched the fire burn from across the river. With roads still closed the following morning, he surveyed the property using a pair of binoculars. Only the chimneys remained. The house, a shop, a barn and four other buildings were destroyed. “It was just overwhelming,” he says of the fire. “The sheer power and ferocity of it. … It’s pure fury. It’s just hard to explain.” Harsh scars now cleave the landscape, hills beyond hills gone black, bearing witness to an unholy spectacle of consumption. Ralston says the

community endured a “week from hell,” but McGaha notes he has also seen neighbors coming together, tremendous generosity and kindness from strangers. As residents take stock of the damage, many moments have proven both painful and humbling. “I’m just trying to take it day by day,” he says. “It’s devastating.”

FIGHTING FIRE

Screaming chainsaws drown out chatter along the fire line last week. Branches crack and snap as a yellow-clad fire crew patrols the line, cutting out trees and clearing back brush. The firefighters keep their heads down, their eyes on their work as crew boss Virgil Talks Different walks behind them, calling out directions for widening the remote trail at the base of a yet unburned ridge. “We are getting rid of the ladder fuels,” he explains, removing small brush that allows a fire to spread up into treetops. Talks Different and his crew hail from the Fort Belknap reservation in Montana, home to the Nakoda and People of the White Clay nations. They serve as one of 96 crews working the Carlton Complex Fire. With the arrival of last week’s rain, crews were taking advantage of the milder weather to reinforce the existing fire perimeter. As of Tuesday, the fire was 67 percent contained. Crews still have a lot of work to do. “Let’s go!” he shouts. No fire in the state’s history has burned as far and wide as the Carlton Complex Fire, first sparked on July 14 by a passing lightning storm. The immense blaze has now charred more than 250,000 acres in a misshapen, 400-square-mile diamond between the Methow and Okanogan rivers. ...continued on next page

Little remains of the McGaha home along Old Highway 97 after the Carlton Complex Fire swept through earlier this month.

JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 23


C O V E R

S T O RY

|

W I L D F I R E

Richard Mathews inspects a decorative metal cutout his son made for him years ago. It’s the only keepsake that survived the fire.

“TRIAL BY FIRE,” CONTINUED... Glenn Kohler, a wildfire spokesman with the Department of Natural Resources, explains that the Carlton Complex summoned its fury from four separate fires — the Cougar Flat Fire, French Creek Fire, Gold Hikes Fire and Stokes Fire. “It was four little ones,” Kohler says, “and then it turned into one big one.” Authorities ordered the evacuation of more than 1,000 homes as well as the small communities of Pateros, Brewster and Carlton. As residents have returned in recent days, about 300 families have found their homes destroyed. Countless miles of charred cars, burnt power poles and scorched orchards line roadways. Despite the unbelievable destruction,

just one fatality has been confirmed. Retired state trooper Robert Koczewski, 67, succumbed to a heart attack while trying to save his home. It’s been 112 years since the state has suffered such a massive fire. Records show the Yacolt Burn of 1902 killed 38 people, destroyed at least 146 homes and blackened 238,920 acres of southwestern Washington. President Obama signed an emergency declaration last week providing federal aid for regional firefighting efforts. The Federal Emergency Management Agency announced it would provide disaster funding to field camps, equipment, tools and mobilization expenses.

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Officials estimate the fire has already cost at least $23.3 million. Authorities have rallied resources from all across the western U.S. to fight the Carlton Complex, with more than 3,100 firefighters and support workers operating out of three camps on opposite sides of the fire. Separate incident command centers work out of the camps in Omak, Winthrop and Chelan. At the end of each shift, yellow school buses carry fire crews back to their camps. Exhausted men and women shoulder their gear and shuffle to their tents, which pack the lawns surrounding each camp. Some will meander over to mess tents for food. Many will collapse in their sleep-

6:30 PM Join us for a spectacular fireworks show after the game.

S A LVA G E

Beneath the skeletal branches of a blackened tree in the riverside town of Pateros, Richard Mathews scratches through the ashes of his home with a borrowed rake. A charred oven unit rests by a toppled water heater. Everything else has burned down flat to the foundation. Mathews, 53, bends and picks out a scrap of debris. He examines it briefly and drops it. “That fire was hot,” he says. “You know it was hot.” Mathews’ home once stood at the center of a family neighborhood in Pateros,

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SATURDAY 8/2 FIREWORKS NIGHT

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population 667, where about 20 adjacent homes went up in flames. Only a tornado could compare to such complete and total devastation. Entire rows of homes lay in waste, reduced to jagged ruin and fine ash. Burnt-out cars line the nearby driveways. An aluminum boat sits melted inside a garage. Smashed porcelain dishes are scattered amid the wreckage. Yet just across a narrow street, the United Methodist Church remains intact — encircled in scorched earth, but untouched. Mathews has started over five or six times in his life, including one previous house fire. He moved to Pateros a year ago, finding a modest house amid a block of family homes, just a stone’s throw from the mayor’s house, which also burned. He says he had found a new job and settled into a new routine. On July 17, a Thursday, Mathews came home from a long shift at work and quickly went to sleep. He says his neighbor started pounding on his front door about an hour later, around 6 pm. She “almost knocked the door down,” he says, and he awoke to find a wall of fire descending rapidly on the town. He grabbed some clothes and photos of his grandchildren, and fled. “I almost got crispy fried,” he jokes later, explaining he had just 10 minutes to escape. Residents say they can barely fathom the destruction. So much went to the flames. As media have swarmed the area, neighbors say they have also chased off trespassers caught picking through what little remains in the ashes. Despite the fire’s toll, Mathews considers himself lucky. “I didn’t lose much,” he says, “just a house.” In the days since, Mathews says, a stranger from Tacoma gave him a free motorhome to live in after hearing about the fire damage. So he now has a bed for the foreseeable future, he says, but otherwise he’s not sure what’s next. He will probably just have to start over again. Mathews came back for one thing — a circular metal cutout of an elk on a mountainside. One of his grown sons made the decorative ring for him in shop class as a teenager. It was the first thing Mathews put up on the wall when he moved into his new home last year. Now, he paces back and forth, raking the wreckage along the wall where the ring once hung. A moment later, he pauses and kneels again. “I found it,” he calls in quiet triumph. Melted debris cakes the sides of the blackened ring. Mathews brushes off the cracked and warped edges of the salvaged keepsake, holding it up with soot-stained fingers and a resigned smile. At least he has one small comfort to carry over into his next life. “It’s the only thing I could find,” he says. “It’s not much.”

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In the darkened Pateros High School gym, dozens of volunteers stock makeshift shelves by the light of emergency halogen lamps. Several crowded racks hang heavy with donated clothing. Packages of toilet paper line nearby rows of bleachers. Canned food and ...continued on next page

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JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 25


C O V E R

S T O RY

|

W I L D F I R E

“I don’t think I slept We d n e s d a y, Thursday or F r i d a y. ”

A plywood sign reads “No looters” along Highway 153 in the Methow Valley, where many homes were destroyed by the Carlton Complex Fire.

BOTTOM LEFT: Jeff Lyman fills up fuels cans with diesel to run his store’s generators. CENTER: Volunteers sort and inventory donations at a relief center at Pateros High School for area residents displaced by the Carlton Complex Fire.

“trial by fire,” continued... camping gear stack high. People hustle through the unlit hallways pushing hand trucks loaded with Gatorade or 40-pound bags of dog food. A mural of the school’s mascot, a billy goat, stands sentry over the commotion. Suzette Ellis of nearby Bridgeport welcomes displaced residents, workers and donations at the front of the building. Some volunteers tend massive barbecue grills, cooking for hundreds at each meal. Others inventory and organize the stream of supplies. A few provide childcare or help people charge their cellphones at a temporary power station. “There’s about everything in here you could need,” Ellis says. Relief operations started Saturday, July 19, taking over the school as donations poured into the small community. Neighbors have quickly rallied around the homeless, Ellis says, collecting con-

26 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

tributions from across the state to help residents recover. “We’re doing a lot of basic supplies,” she says, like food and blankets. As people get settled, services will shift toward reestablishing homes with donated dishes, linens and children’s toys, Ellis says. For now, they’re just trying to get people back to some kind of normalcy, trying to provide some light amid all the darkness. In neighboring Brewster, seven miles north, the American Red Cross operates an overnight shelter. Based in the town high school, the shelter invites residents in to eat, shower or use the electricity. It also staffs a nurses’ station and mental health counselors to help people process their grief or trauma. Shelter supervisor Lynn Ray walks through the high school halls, peeking into the dark gymnasiums that will likely

fill with cots in the coming days. A man already sleeps in the corner of one room. Red Cross workers will rest in shifts, keeping the doors open 24 hours a day. An experienced emergency responder from Santa Clara, California, Ray explains that in most cases, Red Cross arrives after a disaster like a tornado or hurricane has already done its damage and disappeared. She finds it strange to be on-site as the fire continues to burn, still destroying homes and upending lives. Red Cross volunteers have stocked supply stations at churches and schools throughout the burn zone. Volunteers also help provide information updates to passersby. In Winthrop, workers cook up a fresh meal for weary residents, serving taco salad and peach cobbler. One volunteer hands out stuffed animals to the younger children. Once the fire finally stops, Ray and others will shift into “client

casework” to help families with recovery, rebuilding and healing. “We’re here to serve,” she says.

PERSEVERANCE

Heading north into the Methow Valley on Highway 153, the firestorm has long since passed, but the smoldering hillsides still put off intense heat. Blackened trees form scattered ranks atop the scorched ridges along either side of the Methow River, a glistening current now winding through a smoking wasteland. Wooden fence posts and power poles dangle in the air, suspended by their drooping wires. Deep within the remote heart of the valley rests the namesake and epicenter of the Carlton Complex Fire — the unincorporated hamlet of Carlton, a mountain rest stop with little more than a post office. Jeff Lyman, the 37-year-old owner of the Carlton General Store, stands out


The Inlander’s Annual

e v i G e d i u G

On Stands August 28th

LEFT: Dozens of tents shelter wildfire crews at a temporary fire camp at the Omak Stampede fairgrounds. At least 96 fire crews have operated out of three camps near the Carlton Complex Fire. BOTTOM RIGHT: Suzette Ellis, a local relief volunteer, takes stock of the donations streaming into Pateros High School to help displaced residents recover from the fire.

Attention Non-Profit Organizations! Scorched sections of grassland stripe the hills above the Okanogan River south of Malott. front, patiently filling a set of fuel canisters with diesel. “It just started right down the road,” he says, pointing south. Lyman says he and his neighbors watched the fire swarm the surrounding hills as dozens of crews staged out in front of his store, packing the highway with fire engines. Hundreds of firefighters flooded the town. Helicopters and tanker aircraft buzzed overhead. Despite a mandatory evacuation notice, Lyman and others stayed to watch over their homes and their friends. “I don’t think I slept Wednesday, Thursday or Friday,” he says. “We’ve all been here helping each other.” Without reliable power or cell service, residents follow updates on a plywood bulletin board in front of the store, posted with weather forecasts, road closures and a large map charting the size of the fire. Lyman says he has never seen anything

like the “crazy” whirlwind of chaos and human perseverance he witnessed in recent days. He says he probably won’t ever see anything like it again in his life. “It was …” he pauses, and gives up. “Speechless. It was unbelievable.” In the days since, Lyman has driven the valley to survey the damage. He helped friends take stock of their burned homes. It makes him want to cry. So much beauty turned black, so many lives scarred. But those friends have already started talking of newer, better homes. In the coming weeks, the smoke will clear. The fire crews will head home. The other residents — Kelley Ralston, Brad McGaha and Richard Mathews — will rebuild. And the valley will bloom back up around their homes, new and bright and full of life. “I’m really excited to see what it looks like,” Lyman says. “We’re not going to leave. It’s still our valley. … We’re all going to be pretty busy for the next few years, but it’ll be back.” n

This is your chance to tell readers about your organization and how to get involved. Advertising listings will be featured in the annual Give Guide issue and all year on Inlander.com.

Reserve your space today! sales@inlander.com 509-325-0634 ext. 215

JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 27


28 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014


profile

Fiddle in the Family After 30 years of teaching, JayDean Ludiker continues to inspire new generations of musicians By Laura Johnson

B

ack and forth, their bows glide across violin strings; hands noodle over fingerboards. But for all the effort, the students can’t quite keep the rhythm. “I can tell we’ve had two weeks off. That was terrible,” a smiling JayDean Ludiker tells the semicircle of kids in her home’s sunny basement. “Let’s try that again.” The group of a dozen preteens and teens, clad in shorts and flip-flops, take another stab at the fiddle tune “Swallowtail Jig.” Ludiker keeps the tempo, strumming along with her guitar. This time, they play steady. “Good job, you guys!” she exclaims, flipping her long, chocolate-brown hair behind her back. “Who wants to play a solo?” That’s how Ludiker’s group classes tick — perpetual motion. Sometimes the students clamor to play a solo in the middle of the group; next they’ll start singing midway through a group number like “Edelweiss.” There’s fidgeting, giggling, and most important, no parents allowed. Practicing in groups, Ludiker says, instills the collegial nature of fiddle playing. Ludiker, a national fiddle champion, has been teaching group and private lessons like this for decades, producing national champion-caliber players and casual fiddlers alike. In the fiddle world, the Spokane area is known as a hotbed of talent, and much of that has to with what Ludiker’s family started. Her father taught her how to play, her grandfathers played before him and now her children have left the nest, establishing bluegrass bands of their own. After 30 years as a teacher, Ludiker continues to inspire new generations of kids to take up the fiddle.

FIRST TEACHER

“I suppose you’ll want the tour,” Ludiker, 50, says, not a minute after opening the door of her Spokane Valley home and

studio, where more than 100 students take lessons in any given week. Almost everything in the house is somehow fiddle-related — violins of varying ages and lengths adorn the walls and a blanket-sized tour poster for her daughter Kimber’s bluegrass band, Della Mae, hangs in the stairwell. The basement is lined with fiddle records, family photos and Austin, Texas, memorabilia. So much of the split-level house has been overtaken by her business, Ludiker Music, that only a bedroom and bathroom are hers alone. What once were spare bedrooms have been transformed into storage space for lessons and rental instruments. The dining room holds the inventory of the six fiddle books she’s written. She’s considered getting a separate storefront, but this is the way she likes it. Ludiker dedicates four 10-hour days to teaching, with Friday reserved for a business catchall day. On the weekends she’s either gigging, jamming, judging or attending some sort of fiddling event. If you know where to look, she says, you can find a fiddle engagement almost every night of the week in the Inland Northwest. While people definitely played fiddle in the region, Ludiker says she was the first fiddler to take up teaching in the area back in the 1980s. The goal, she says, was never to be the most influential fiddle teacher in the region; it was something she started out of necessity. Marrying young at 19, to five-time national fiddle champion Tony Ludiker (they divorced 12 years ago), she soon realized that being a stay-at-home mom wasn’t feasible. She started teaching out of her home, creating her own method using a series of tablatures — similar to guitar tabs — that allow a person of any age to learn the fiddle (she has students aged 3 to 78). Thumbing through her instructional books, each piece is written ...continued on next page

JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 29


CULTURE | PROFILE “FIDDLE IN THE FAMILY,” CONTINUED... out as sheet music as well as tabs. An accompanying CD allows students to listen to a song incessantly until they hear the correct rhythms and melody in their heads. As word of mouth spread, she couldn’t keep up with the demand of people wanting to learn fiddle, even when classical teachers were skeptical of her method. But Ludiker insists that she teaches proper classical bow holds, hand and wrist placements. “It’s not like that stereotypical old man hunched over a fiddle,” she says. “My players are taught to hold the instrument correctly.” She first learned to play fiddle from her father Lloyd J. Warner, who was mostly self-taught and learned playing by ear. The 11th of 13 kids, she didn’t start until age 10, but was immediately obsessed. She’d practice until her fingers bled, building up tough calluses. “I showed my mom my fingers once, and she told me I maybe shouldn’t practice so much,” Ludiker remembers. But all of that practicing paid off when she won the national junior title at 17 and women’s national fiddle title the next year (the women’s category has since been combined with the men’s). Even coming from such a prestigious lineage, she wasn’t sure her children,

JayDean Ludiker leads a group lesson at her studio in Spokane Valley. SARAH WURTZ PHOTOS

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Cedric Bidwell Williams, 13, takes a fiddle lessons at Ludiker’s studio. Kimber and Dennis, should start playing fiddle until they were older, but after Grandpa Warner saw them trying to play their parents’ instruments, he gave them each their own — at age 3. The siblings can’t remember a time when they didn’t play the fiddle.

FOURTH GENERATION

The night before his first day of kindergarten, 5-year-old Dennis gathered his essentials — his fiddle and a backpack stocked with crayons and markers — and placed them near the door. It was then that his parents had to sit him down and break the news that not every other child in class would know how to play the fiddle.

“You should have seen the look on his face when he realized that he wouldn’t be able to jam with everyone else,” Ludiker recalls. Who could blame the kid? He grew up in a house where the instrument was king. When the family stepped out of their front door, they brought their fiddles, whether it was to family gatherings or weekend fiddle festivals with friends. That’s why friendships at the National Oldtime Fiddlers Contest & Festival in Weiser, Idaho, every June were so important. Here was a place where everyone understood wanting to play fiddle all the time. Three of the four members of Dennis’ jazz-grass band MilkDrive — he plays mandolin — first met as fellow competitors at the contest. Now 30 and living in Austin, his first fiddle partner will always be his sister Kimber, just 14 months younger. Even though they grew up in a fiddle family, they had to choose for themselves if they wanted to pursue music. “It’s important to note our parents never pushed us,” says Kimber, on a lunch break at the RockyGrass bluegrass festival in Lyons, Colorado, last week. If anything, over the past 10 years, Ludiker says her kids are the ones pushing her. Dennis, as a non-native Texan, has won

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the Texas state fiddle championships three times in the past eight years. In January, Della Mae was nominated for a Grammy in the Best Bluegrass Album category. As her daughter’s date to the event, Ludiker got to walk the red carpet. “It was crazy, unbelievable,” she says. Although Della Mae didn’t win, Kimber’s boyfriend’s group, the Del McCoury Band, did. “I’ve never been more proud to have my mother as a guest,” Kimber recalls. Kimber, who now resides in Nashville, says that throughout her travels — Della Mae played more than 200 dates last year — even if fiddlers haven’t heard the Ludiker name, they usually know that a bevy of fiddle players have come out of the Spokane area.

EXTENDED FAMILY

In the Ludiker family, it’s known as Christmas. The Oldtime Fiddlers Contest & Festival is so much of a family affair, fiddlers from all over the nation arrive on Wednesday for an event that will begin on Sunday, to stake out campsites, reunite with old friends, rekindle romances and rivalries and most of all, jam together. This is the place where over the course of six rounds, playing three songs at a time, a fiddler can become a champion. Ludiker was a junior champion at just 17. ...continued on next page

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is a fiddle. It’s the technique that makes someone a fiddle player rather than a classical violinist, although they can be both. Fiddle music accentuates the upbeat, while classical music emphasizes the downbeat. Also, many fiddle players learn by ear rather than from written music. There are many genres of fiddle playing: Celtic, Western swing, Texas, Cajun, blues, Klezmer style; the list goes on, describing regions of the world where they originated. Much of the fiddle repertoire is dance music, often embellished with improvisation. (LJ)

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culture | profile

GOT FIDDLE? Six upcoming gigs featuring fiddle players: Aug. 1-2: Five Suns Bluegrass Festival feat. Della Mae with Kimber Ludiker, McCosh Park, Moses Lake Aug. 2: Scenic 6 Fiddle Show, Potlatch High School, Potlatch, Idaho Aug. 5: Della Mae concert, Chateau Rive at the Flour Mill Aug. 8-10: Blue Waters Bluegrass Festival feat. MilkDrive with Dennis Ludiker, Medical Lake Aug. 8-10: Riders of the Rockin’ B concert feat. JayDean Ludiker, Rockin’ B Ranch, Liberty Lake (playing the second weekend of every month through October) Aug. 9: Nickel Creek concert, Festival at Sandpoint at War Memorial Field, Sandpoint

The Kroc Center, Coeur d’ Alene

Grammy-nominated Della Mae, which features JayDean Ludiker’s daughter, Kimber (seated on the floor).

“fiddle in the family,” continued... Her daughter would win that award at 16. Kimber would go on to beat out her own father, winning the overall national grand championship in 2009 and 2010. Year after year, area students of Ludiker or one of her protégés make the trek down to Weiser to go for the win. Often, they’re successful. Cindy Campbell, judging chairman for the Weiser fiddling contest who has known the Ludikers for more than 30 years, says the reason Spokane has been so successful for fiddlers is because of the encouraging atmosphere. “I think community has really made

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the group what they are in Spokane. They aren’t bickering with each other, and other groups do,” Campbell says. When Ludiker turned 50, she didn’t have a birthday party. Instead, she threw an anniversary party and carnival for the 40 years she’s been playing the fiddle at Rockin’ B Ranch in Liberty Lake. Fiddlers from all over the nation came to help celebrate. These days, she says, the word “fiddle” is becoming far more acceptable to the classical world, as is the influence of bluegrass and folk music in pop culture. People are understanding that the fiddle is a tool to play many different genres, classical in-

cluded. For Ludiker, the educational process isn’t over. “I haven’t learned enough fiddle tunes yet,” she says. “This music is contagious; you’re playing what you’ve put your heart and soul into. You cannot buy this kind of entertainment.” And with her first grandson, Mason, newly born to Dennis and his wife Heidi, she has a new student to teach. She whips out her cellphone to show off a photo of a pint-sized violin. “First fiddle? Check,” she says proudly. n lauraj@inlander.com


CULTURE | DIGEST

SPORTS 4-MINUTE MILE H

erm Caviness would really like to see someone run a sub-four-minute mile in Spokane, and he’s doing his best to make it happen this weekend. Caviness, a legendary high school track coach, isn’t planning on running it himself, but he’s helped revive the Spokane Summer Games so someone can achieve something that’s never happened in Spokane County. The invitation-only event is tailored for the fans, with just nine events, including the 100- and 400-meter sprints, hurdles, the 800 meters, pole vault, high jump, hammer throw and the mile, which closes out the meet. There’s also an open 8K road race. Caviness feels that although Spokane has produced a ton of ultra-talented track stars, they rarely, if ever, get to run at home. “No one gets to see these stars and Olympians. We want to showcase the best athletes we can find for our track,” says Caviness, explaining why the Summer Games, popular in the 1970s, are returning this weekend to Spokane Falls Community College. The mile race will be the highlight, just at it was in the heyday of the Summer Games, when Jim Johnson came tantalizingly close to eclipsing four minutes with a time of 4:02.4 in 1975. Two years later Bob Maplestone ran a second faster at Eastern Washington University. But no one has run under four minutes on a Spokane County track.

CCT PRESENTS

Spokane track star Randy James running in the late 1960s. “It’s a magic thing in track,” says Caviness of the mile. Coming to SFCC on Saturday with a good shot at being the first Spokane sub-four-minute-milers are former University of Oregon star A.J. Acosta, NCAA champion Garrett Heath and former All-American Riley Masters — all have previously run the mile in under four minutes. Caviness is hopeful that this event will get Spokane re-energized regarding track and field. “With the quality we have, there’s no way this isn’t going to be entertaining,” says Caviness. — MIKE BOOKEY Spokane Summer Games • Sat, Aug 2, at 5 pm • $5, free entry to active/retired military and their families • Spokane Falls Community College • spokanesummergames.com

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MAGAZINE | From its recycled, non-glossy paper to the columns of multilingual text on each page, COLORS is hardly a typical magazine. The creative team that formed this publication back in the early ’90s decided to print in not one, not two, but five different languages, driven to connect with readers from around the globe. This databank of a magazine, published quarterly, approaches a new theme every issue, using everything from anecdotes to cartoons to explore each topic. The most recent issue, coinciding with the World Cup, focuses on the recently obsessed-over sport of soccer. It shares stories of young street teams, pictures of the Nigerian amputees who formed a disabled league, and tips on how to play with a flaming coconut rather than a soccer ball. COLORS seems able to approach any subject, from serious to trivial, and personalize it into something genuinely interesting to the reader.

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FIND ART

and more this Friday, August 1st!

Venues open 5 - 8 pm

WEST DOWNTOWN AREA MAC, NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS AND CULTURE 2316 W. FIRST AVE.

Live Music by Adita Gerbhart Experience the MAC exhibits, 100 Stories – A Centennial Exhibition and Meet Me at the Spot: The Art of Patrick Siler. Stop in at the Café MAC.

ADAMS STREET AREA TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY 115 S. ADAMS ST.

Cleaning Off the Shelves Summer Studio Sale Trackside Studio’s summer sale features wonderful ceramics at amazing prices, all to make room for new exhibitions this fall.

KOLVA-SULLIVAN GALLERY 115 S. ADAMS ST., SUITE A

Artist Jared Anderson Jared Anderson is a Spokane based visual artist who lives to paint. His subject matter ranges from landscape, still life, people and animals. Jared studied at Spokane Falls Community College and is currently working in a studio in downtown Spokane.

BARRISTER WINERY

1213 W. RAILROAD AVE.

Vicki Cavin “Whimsical Dreams” an exhibit of original pastel and mixed media paintings by Spokane Artist, Vicki Cavin. Artist’s reception at 5 pm with Beacon Hill’s Bistro Buffet from 6 - 8 pm. “Lonesome” Lyle Morse plays acoustic blues from 6:30 - 10 pm. 465-3591 to reserve a table.

emotion, and his August show will deliver! Find a preview of his work at bfgart.com. 4 - 9 pm.

SAPPHIRE LOUNGE 901 W. FIRST AVE.

The Yearlings Dry and Dusty (Ruthie and Sally Jablonsky) is an old-time sister duo from Spokane, Washington, who grew up hiking around in the desert singing cowboy ballads and learning crooked tunes and country songs at festivals and camps. Their beautiful, folksy sound is a throwback to a simpler era. Happy hour from 5 - 7 pm includes $3 draft beers, $4 premium well liquors, $5 wine glasses and $5 flatbreads.

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Carl Bodenstein, Doug Eaton, John Altberg, Patrick Hickey and Ron Gooley The Art of Wood. A collection of artisans working in wood present a variety of work using unique and rare woods with techniques that are truly sculptural. Sample Steam Plant brews while you enjoy the work.

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Mighty Squirrel Eclectic world-time folk and blue grass fiddle. Complimentary appetizers. 6 - 9 pm.

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Karrie O’Neil Happy hour from 4 - 6 pm, half price all EATS menu 5 - 8 pm and Spokane’s Best Cocktails 9 years running. With entertainment by Karrie O’Neil.

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Member Artists Preview donated work by Member Artists for the “Gala on a Summer Evening” Auction on August 14. Refreshments will be served from 5 - 8:30 pm.

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Brendan Genther Barili is featuring the works of artist Brendan Genther throughout August. Genther’s work is about color, texture and downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org

707 W. MAIN AVE., CRESCENT COURT LEVEL

RIVER PARK SQUARE NORDSTROM 2ND FLOOR 808 W. MAIN AVE., FIRST FLOOR

Enjoy the original acrylic paintings, mixed media and found object visual art by Jo Fyfe and the upbeat music from 5:30 to 7:30 pm by Scott Linklater on vocals/acoustic guitar and Pete Cowger on Cajon. All Day.

RIVER PARK SQUARE NORDSTROM CORRIDOR 808 W. MAIN AVE., FIRST FLOOR

unless otherwise noted.

RIVER PARK SQUARE KRESS GALLERY 808 W. MAIN AVE., THIRD FLOOR BEHIND THE FOOD COURT

First Night Rising Stars Nostalgia: Travelling back through time, artist H.M. Lloyd has recreated that ‘Old Time’ feel. Her artwork also consists of contemporary, still life’s, and portraits through mixed media, pen and ink, watercolor, oils and pencil. 5:30 - 7:30 pm.

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS RIVER PARK SQUARE TASTING ROOM 808 W. MAIN AVE., THIRD FLOOR

Irene Dahl, painter Like some of the old Masters - Jan Bruegel the Elder,Frans von Miers,El Greco - Irene takes copper as painting ground because of its luminous shine. Her painting style is expressive and free with quick and spontaneous brushstrokes.

BOZZI GALLERY

221 N. WALL ST., STE 221

Elena Gutierrez, abstract artist Elena began her career in the fine arts as an artist in 1994 and focused on abstracts as her means of self expression. Her paintings are intense, sublime and sensitive. Regional musicians, Luke Yates and Christy Lee, will perform.

CHASE GALLERY

808 W. SPOKANE FALLS BLVD.

Legacy of Expo 74 This exhibition includes art works by artists whose work was exhibited in Expo 74, historical photographs from the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture and Northwest Room, and artifacts from the time.

DOWNTOWN SPOKANE PUBLIC LIBRARY 906 W. MAIN AVE., MAIN FLOOR LOBBY

Bill Kostelec and Kathy Kostelec East of the Cascades: A Photographic Sketchbook. Black and white prints of Eastern Washington, an ongoing project to capture images of this geographically historic region. Shaped by the Glacial Lake Missoula Floods, and includes the human element – how we use and sometimes transform, this great land. 5 - 9 pm.

RIVERFRONT PARK SPOKANE RIVERFRONT PARK

Sante Chef Jeremy Hansen with music by Floating Crowbar Experience fine dining outdoors at Riverfront Park With seating at Riverfront Park Fountain Café and along the Spokane River. Tickets are $100 and feature a 6 - course meal paired with wine for each course. A limited number of premium tickets at $150 are loaded with extras. 5:30 - 8:30 pm.

First Night Spokane and Polka Dot Pottery STCU HORSE AND CARRIAGE RIDES Pint Size Picasso’s Painting Class. WALL ST. NORTH OF MAIN AVE. Ages 10 and older, $10 fee, Register at Spencer’s Carriage Rides polkadotpottery.com. 5:30 pm and 6:30 pm Enjoy Summer Horse and Carriage Rides, – Two sessions only. | Brought to you by Downtown Spokane and Spokane Arts

First Friday on Wall Street. Experience a tour of downtown Spokane from the vantage point of a horse-drawn carriage. Presented by Downtown Spokane and Sponsored by STCU. 5 - 9 pm Fridays through August.

WALL STREET

BETWEEN MAIN AVE. and RIVERSIDE AVE.

Food truck rally for First Friday. Sample some of Spokane’s best roving cuisine!

STA PLAZA

701 W. RIVERSIDE AVE.

Music by Ken Davis and 2E of In-Transit and portait artist, John Thamm. Seating and live music courtesy of Spokane Tranist Authority while you enjoy samplings from the nearby Food Truck Rally. Portrait artist, Thamm, will be exhibiting “Vets – 50 Portraits of Veterans and their Stories,” in the main floor rotunda of The Plaza. 5 - 9 pm.

STEELHEAD BAR and GRILLE 218 N. HOWARD ST.

Emily Travis Local artist, Emily Travis, will be displaying her original abstract acrylic paintings. She creates an array of pieces from wine bottles to abstract landscapes on canvas.

BRICKWALL PHOTOGRAPHIC GALLERY 530 W. MAIN AVE., SKYWALK EAST OF MACY’S

Mike Busby, Lisa Zamora and Adrian Curtet Zamora and Curtet both explore the imaginative world of composite photography - evoking dreams and other worlds. Busby works in beautiful black and white images from Spokane and surrounding areas.

NECTAR TASTING ROOM 120 N. STEVENS ST.

Rebecca Lloyd with music by Evan Denlinger Rebecca’s work presents bold colors with abstract design and will impress you. Joining Rebecca is musician Evan Denlinger. Nectar welcomes Lake Chelan winery Hard Row to Hoe. Food and wine are available so come early and stay late. Open until 10 pm. Call to reserve a table. 509.869.1572.

EAST DOWNTOWN AREA EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS 331 W. MAIN AVE.

Zambia Gold Zambia Gold is a student led, free-trade, non-profit business, in connection with Gonzaga University, working with the people of Zambezi, Zambia. Product sales help support economic justice and community projects in Zambezi. Stop in for $10 Bags of Honey, $12 Chitenge Bags, $15 Yoga Bags, $8-$15 Baskets and Jewelry.


Mixing in the rustic and industrial to show what she loves about her art.

PINOT’S PALETTE 32 W. SECOND AVE.

Showcasing Pinot’s Palette Artists: Ali Blackwood, Andriel Scharff, Ashley Moss and Heather Hofstetter Check out amazing artwork from studio artists and sip local wine. Mini self-guided paintings are optional for $10 and are offered on a first-come, first-served basis.

THE LIBERTY BUILDING

INK ART SPACE

Lavender Dreams Farm and Donkey Rescue Benefit ~ Juried Show A unique and fun juried show with pieces featuring donkeys and burros. Entrants in the children’s division, from Pre-school to 12th Grade, and adults of all ages.

Origin Stories from students of the Native Project The works from a four day visual and literary arts workshop at the Native Project. The students used comic books and illustrated novels to create their own superheroes and their Origin Stories. 7 pm.

402 W. MAIN AVE.

AUNTIE’S BOOKSTORE 402 W. MAIN AVE.

3 Minute Mic : An Open Mic Poetry Event Come read your newest poem, an old favorite or just support those who are. Chris Cook will host and Nathan Weinbender, writer for the Spokesman-Review and movie critic for Spokane Public Radio, will be the guest with “Remember the Word.” Sign-up at 6:30 pm, readings at 7 pm.

SANTE RESTAURANT and CHARCUTERIE 404 W. MAIN AVE.

Tom Norton A self-taught artist working ink and colored pencils, pastels, watercolors, clay and acrylics, Tom doesn’t settle on one particular style of drawing or painting which creates a treat for the viewer.

POTTERY PLACE PLUS 203 N. WASHINGTON ST.

Shawfan Khan and Saju Kobayashi Kelch Khan and Kelch are inspired by and express their artistic views of the world two dimensionally but in different and interesting ways. Shaw likes to paint fun, lighthearted subjects and is currently inspired by cats. Saju’s illustrations (a combination of ink drawing and graphic painting) are inspired by paper cutouts, Japanese Ukiyo-e and comics. 5 - 9 pm.

HILLS’ RESTAURANT AND LOUNGE 401 W. MAIN AVE.

Madeline McNeill McNeill plays a wide variety of musical styles, opera, jazz, blues and blue grass. 6 - 8 pm.

VINO! WINESHOP

228 W. SPRAGUE AVE.

SOUTH DOWNTOWN AREA INTERPLAYERS

174 S. HOWARD ST.

Intricate paper masks by The Fellers with music from Sweet Wednesday A collection of ornate sculpted paper masks by Ron and Marsha Feller. Sweet Wednesday is out of Boston, MA and touring the Northwest.

ROCKET BAKERY HOLLEY MASON 157 S. HOWARD ST.

Rachel Nichols Rachel Nichols will be displaying artwork from 4-6 pm. Then enjoy music by the band “Evidence of the Unseen” from 6 - 8 pm. Evidence of the Unseen continue to inspire audiences by focusing on all aspects of life in their relevant, hope-filled lyrics. Enjoy a pastry, dinner, coffee or tea while experiencing Spokane’s local artists. First Friday coffee specials start at 4 pm.

LIBERTY CIDERWORKS

164 S. WASHINGTON ST., STE. 300

David Wang Impressionistic oil pastel and pen and ink drawings by David Wang, featuring landscape and architectural subjects. Mr. Wang is a professor of architecture at Washington State University.

VINTAGE HILL CELLARS 319 W. SECOND AVE.

Photographer Callie Sobosky Sobosky uses everyday items to show a whole new way to view her photography.

222 S. WASHINGTON ST.

Toby Harvey SFCC Fine Arts Faculty member, Toby Harvey, works in mixed media, water color and digital media collage. Artist’s reception 5 - 8 pm. Plus $10 wine tasting of Wine of the Month Club selections.

THE BIG DIPPER

171 S. WASHINGTON ST.

Square Revolution A new and unique brass combo will perform its first local club date on First Friday. Drinks and munchies will be available in the newly remodeled Big Dipper. Expect a group that loves to play all kinds of music so much that it refuses to be pigeon-holed or even to sound like a brass quartet. 8 pm.

ROBERT KARL CELLARS 115 W. PACIFIC AVE.

Marilyn Meyers Release of the 2010 Gunselman Bench Cabernet and 2010 Phinny with fantastic animal paintings by local artist, Marilyn Meyers.

MARKETPLACE WINERY 39 W. PACIFIC AVE.

Musician Kari Marguerite and artist Larry Petrey Happy hour 4-6 pm, half-off flat breads and $1 off 600, Veba Rouge, Rose and Riesling. Enjoy tastings in the Fermentation Foom and Patio, enter on the corner of Browne and Pacific. 6 - 9 pm.

UNIVERSITY DISTRICT

“effects of the memories and experiences of childhood past and how that shapes adults, who then shape future adults.”

THE COMMUNITY BUILDING 35/25 W. MAIN ST.

Up on the Roof Community Minded Enterprises presents, Up on the Roof: A Taste of Unity. This annual fundraising event includes a sampling of local ethnic foods, music, raffle and silent auction from local businesses. One hundred percent of the proceeds will benefit the 20th anniversary of Unity in the Community on August 16. 5:30 - 10 pm.

V DU V WINES 12 S. SCOTT ST.

Kate Mandley with music by Crushpad Local, hand-crafted Columbia Valley wines at V du V Wines, with original oils by Spokane artist Kate Mandley and music by eclectic Spokane musicians, Crushpad.

RAMBLIN’ ROAD BREWERY 730 N. COLUMBUS ST.

Valerie Ann Lindberg A full-time Spokane-based fine artist working in a variety of media including: oil, acrylics, watercolor and mixed media on canvas, sculpture, stained glass and cast stone mosaics. Her work is characterized by a sense of playfulness and exhibits highly varied subjects including: landscapes, popart, abstract expressionism and symbolic abstraction. Live music 5:30 - 8:30 pm and Couple of Chefs food truck.

NORTH BANK AREA THE NEST IN KENDALL YARDS 1335 W. SUMMIT PKWY

Musician Wallace Hound The documentary “Growing Cities” goes coast to coast to tell the inspiring stories of intrepid urban farmers, activists, and everyday city-dwellers who are challenging the way our country feeds. Lite food and beverages will be served. 6 - 8 pm.

SARANAC ART PROJECTS

PROJECT 2:24

Mariah Boyle and Connie Pierson New artwork by Saranac Member Artists, Mariah Boyle and Connie Pierson through August 30. Boyle’s mixed-media drawings respond to a recent relocation to Eastern Oregon while Pierson’s artwork explores the

Jimmy Magnuson, acrylic painting and Hannah Pierce, photography Live art demonstration from 5 - 8 pm. “All You Can INK” tattoo specials, reservations first come, first served. Questions? Call 509-919-0868.

25 W. MAIN AVE.

626 N. MONROE ST.

Downtown business who would like to be included in future First Friday events, please contact info@downtownspokane.net

AMERICAN MUSTANG

Blue Moon® Summer Honey Wheat Brined Pork Chops INGREDIENTS 4 Bone-in pork chops (the thicker, the better, boneless works as well)

The Story of a Girl, A Cowboy and a Wild Horse

THURSDAY AUG 14TH | 7:30PM AMC RIVER PARK SQUARE 808 West Main Spokane

$12 General

BRINE: 1 bottle Blue Moon® Summer Honey Wheat 1 cup Apple cider vinegar ½ cup Clover honey 1 Orange, squeezed juice and rind ¼ cup Kosher salt 2 cups Water Apple slices (as garnish)

SERVES: 4 | PREP TIME: 5min + 24 Hour Marinade Time COOK TIME: 15-20 min | DIFFICULTY: Easy INSTRUCTIONS Mix ingredients in a large saucepan over medium heat until salt is dissolved; then cool mixture to room temperature. Submerge pork chops in brine overnight (ideally). Place on a hot grill and cook for five minutes per side or more, depending on thickness. Serve with Mustard-Ale Sauce. Garnish with apple slices.

Reserve Tickets by Aug 7th

www.tugg.com/events/10202 downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org | Brought to you by Downtown Spokane and Spokane Arts


I

Huckleberry Heaven Meet the people who hunt down the elusive Northwest treat By Amy Miller-Krezelak adam miller photo

36 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

t’s mid-morning on a late July day. The sun has yet to blaze above, but it will. For now, the cool breeze is inviting and the smell of warm pine intoxicating. A cluster of cars has gathered at a trailhead on Mt. Spokane. Off in the low brush of woody, delicate shrubs, pickers of all ages are moving deftly along, collecting huckleberries in mini coolers, rinsed-out milk jugs and plastic bags. When you move to or visit the Inland Northwest, you are quickly initiated into huckleberry culture. From drive-throughs to fine dining, huckleberries feature prominently on menus in the summer months. The variety of huckleberry products available year-round at country markets and groceries is vast, if not a little obsessive. Tea, taffy, barbecue sauce, gummy candy, jams, jellies, syrups, all varieties of baked goods and even lip balm line shelves, providing huckleberry fans with accessibility to the popular and distinctively local berry any time of year. Becoming a huckleberry devotee takes little effort. The perfume and flavor of huckleberries are like no other, and the enigmatic nature of the shrubs — they require specific soil conditions, temperatures and elevations to thrive — give them a certain mythical status. Late spring freezes can destroy entire huckleberry stands, and domesticating the bush has been virtually impossible. Lucas Henderson is one of many pickers who participates in the yearly ritual of huckleberry gathering: following the ripening patterns, waiting for the berries to turn and delighting in finding immense stands. Henderson has been honing his foraging skills for more than 20 years, observing seasoned foragers and spending countless summers at Priest Lake. “I started out just seeing where other people were picking. I’ve had bad luck intentionally scouting, but sometimes I’ll come upon them. Then I have to remember where they are or mark it on a GPS to remember,” says Henderson. Karen McKinney, a


fellow long-term picker, has been foraging for huckleberries since she moved to Spokane in the early 1970s. McKinney and her husband, David Moershel, are dedicated outdoorspeople who enjoy bringing out-of-towners into the huckleberry fray. Hikes in the Idaho panhandle not only work up an appetite, but also give McKinney and Moershel a chance to introduce friends to the art of picking huckleberries without harming the bushes. “If you find a bush or branch, don’t use your hands to strip it all off. Pick gently. Don’t break branches,” advises McKinney. Henderson, McKinney and Moershel incorporate their huckleberry harvests into culinary delights throughout the year — huckleberries freeze well — by experimenting with classic huckleberry recipes like pancakes, muffins, ice cream, salads and pie. Henderson is constantly looking for new ways to consume his huckleberry haul.

$17.95

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Salad Entrée Dessert

Allie Rawlins (left) and Bre Romine picking at Mt. Spokane.

adam miller photos

Grilled Kobe Meatloaf with Chipotle BBQ

“How many berries we get dictates what we make. I use them in sauces as well. I make huckleberry kombucha, too,” says Henderson. As an increase in foraging for wild food has risen among the general population, so has the curiosity in picking huckleberries. At Mt. Spokane, Bre Romine and Allie Rawlins have ventured into the woods for the first time this summer to try their hands at picking. Much to their pleasure, they’ve experienced a successful first run, finding the lower elevations abundant with shrubs of ripe huckleberries. “You read about how people have their own secret spots, but it’s looking like you can go off the road and get some. I’m sure that the big, juicy ones are in those secret spots, but it will be an adventure over time to find your own,” says Romine. Romine and Rawlins’ excursion isn’t without a learning curve, however. Rawlins has experienced the folly of many beginners who’ve gone before her. “The hardest part about picking huckleberries is keeping the ratio even between the ones that end up in your bucket and the ones that end up in your belly,” she says. n

509 789 6848 • palmcourtgrill.com Historic Davenport Hotel 10 S. Post St., Downtown Spokane

JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 37


FOOD | OPENING

Q: Why Patrick? “We plan on printing an I WOULD RATHER BE HOUSE HUNTING WITH PATRICK bumper sticker, seriously. Patrick made the process simple and exciting, as it should be.”

Brenden & Mariah

“Patrick has been an asset to Spokane for years, let him help you buy or sell your home. A portion of his commission goes back into our community!”

Ben Stuckart

City Council Pres.

Steve & Cara

“Working with Patrick on the purchase of our home was seamless. He was attentive, fun, and persistent in all of the right areas. I never felt pressured to buy a home immediately or that the homes he showed us were out of our league. Plus, you get to meet for beers to sign paperwork!”

Patrick Kendrick

(509)991-2470

patrick@509properties.com

#pkgivesback

I donate a percentage of every commission to my clients’ favorite local charity

The restored bar at Ruins. MATT WEIGAND PHOTO

Rising from Ruins Craft cocktails and small plates by the Stella’s crew are now just down the street BY CHEY SCOTT

T

he tiny building on the corner of Monroe and Mallon was actually pretty close to ruins when local chef Tony Brown took on the task of reviving it earlier this year. There were leaks in the roof, holes in the walls and eyesores throughout, like a the buffet line from the previous tenant, a Mexican lunch spot, where the original maple-topped bar stood. But to those who stopped by Ruins during its quiet opening a couple of weekends ago, nothing would indicate the historic building’s former deterioration. Paying homage to its late Art Deco style, Brown’s family and friends broke out the elbow grease to refurbish the 36-seat eatery. The exterior now boasts a rich brown color, a bright, teal-colored door and inside, dark but inviting navy-colored walls. Original tile and woodwork is complemented by plush booths lining the

FREE Teeth Whitening

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perimeter walls. A cozy cocktail bar headed by Crystal Bertholic, formerly of Bon Bon, offers views of Brown at work in the kitchen through a pass-through. Just as when Brown and mom Marti opened their nearby sandwich shop Stella’s Café more than two years ago, word of Ruins’ opening was spread quietly but quickly by friends, family and faithful followers of the Browns’ concept at Stella’s. “I always have a fear of things not working, and that no one likes it,” Tony Brown confesses. “If it was to fail, I’d rather it be with friendly faces than on a large scale.” Early signs show otherwise. Though a sign at the entrance was waiting to be hung, on a Wednesday evening Ruins’ intimate dining room felt like an episode of Cheers — friends and casual acquaintances greeting each other warmly and eagerly, inquiring what to sample first. To dine at Ruins the way Brown intends, you’d order a dish from each section of the brief, continually changing menu. “I hate the word tapas,” he says. “This is in between an entrée and tapas, and the idea is for people to try a little bit of everything. It’s also geared toward that we’re a bar, and it offers snacks rather than a full dinner.” Sharing, snacking, eating a full meal or not, Ruins’ locally sourced, seasonally rotating plates are ideal for all. For now — Brown already has swapped a few items in and out — the menu is organized by salads, small plates, sides and dessert. Small plates, like Andouille sausage with toast and mustard ($7) and barbecued tofu with succotash ($6), offer heartier portions, but are small enough to not overfill with a complementary side — some sautéed kale ($4) or potato croquettes ($5). Save room for the day’s featured dessert item ($5), which could be a glass of milk with one of Marti Brown’s homemade cookies, or some homemade peanut butter ice cream sandwiched between two. Skipping food would be regrettable here but not unwelcome, as Ruins operates during traditional bar hours. Its intricate craft cocktail menu ($8-$12) is just short enough to maintain variety and make ordering less indecisive. Three taps are set to rotate local brews and ciders, and bottled beer, wine and well drinks ($5) round out the bar offerings. n Ruins • 825 N. Monroe • Open Wed-Sat from 4 pm-midnight • tinyurl.com/RuinsSpokane

New American Casual Fine Dining Mon 4:30 to close Tue-Sat 11am to close 309 E Lakeside CDA Idaho (208) 292-4392 theForkatLakeside.com one block off of Sherman in Downtown CDA

Live Music on Wednesday & Thursday evenings

Like for up us specia dates, ls & line-upmusic s


FOOD | OPENING

Check Us Out

Creating Comfort Baxters on Cedar brings an eclectic elegance to Sandpoint

“LAW SHARK” I am the

spokane bicycleclub .org

BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

Y

ou might say Baxters on Cedar has been decades in the making. Owners Tommy Dageford and Richard Curtis picked up a few tips over the years spent working in restaurants, and other careers like construction and landscaping. They know what kind of bar towels work best, what sort of music to play, that great meatloaf will sell and that a bathroom can never be too clean. “We are hands-on owners that really care about everything we do,” says Curtis, who progressed from cooking school to restaurant owner/operator for 13 years before moving to Sandpoint in 2005. Prior to that, he worked at Nicollet Island Inn in Minneapolis, where he and Get the scoop on the local food scene Dageford met. Dageford also worked at Minneapolis’ Zagat with our Entrée newsletter. Visit award-winning La Belle Vie. Inlander.com/newsletter to sign up. High standards are a driving force at Baxters in Sandpoint, says Curtis. The turkey in the soup with rosemary and wild rice ($4.50/$6) or in the artisan-bread sandwich with cranberry, sweet onion and extra-sharp white cheddar ($8.50)? It’s roasted in-house. They overnight seafood for the daily fresh catch and Dungeness crab cakes ($15), use local ingredients like Wood’s bratwurst, which they serve with sautéed onions and peppers ($6). And they break down all their own meat, like in the duck confit sandwich with hoisin sauce ($9.50). Named for a puppy Curtis adopted from Sandpoint’s Panhandle Animal Shelter, Baxters has an eclectic, nostalgic feel to it. The banh mi sandwich ($9), for example, is a take on one served at a Vietnamese deli near where Curtis lived in Minneapolis. Look for salads, sandwiches, burgers and comfort-oriented entrées, nothing over $20, with beer and wine service. The decor mixes old and new: industrial drop lighting, postersized framed photos of 1930s Sandpoint, the original tin stamp tiles on the ceiling and exposed brick walls. Facing you as you enter from Cedar Street is a gorgeous, U-shaped bar made from repurposed church pews. “It’s all about the vibe and being nice to people,” says Curtis. n

ENTRÉE

Baxters on Cedar • 109 Cedar St., Sandpoint • Open Mon-Sat, 11 am-3 pm and 5-9 pm • baxtersoncedar.com • 208-229-8377

N I W O T R E T N E A Pair of VIP Tickets to

Rascal Flatts

Friday, August 8th

Enter at Inlander.com/freestuff Like Inlander, Win Tickets!

/TheInlander

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner In Downtown’s newest neighborhood, Kendall Yards

eatCENTRALFOOD.com

JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 39


haute /öt/ (adj.) Elegant or high-class

FOOD | UPDATE

HAUTE DESIGNER LOOKS ON SALE FOR THE COMING SEASON!

The steelhead eggs Benedict is just one of the items on The Cellar’s new breakfast menu. CARRIE SCOZZARO PHOTO

THE CELLAR

317 Sherman Ave. | Coeur d’Alene (208) 664-9463

www.TheHanleyCollection.com

17 27 E S P R AG U E AV E | 5 0 9 . 5 3 5 .1 1 1 1

40 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

B

reakfast options in Coeur d’Alene just expanded with The Cellar’s new breakfast service (8-11:30 am). Try steelhead Benedict with lemon hollandaise ($14), an Italian omelet with salami, soppressata, prosciutto, basil and mozzarella ($13) or the brunch salad with potatoes, poached eggs and a honey-bacon vinaigrette ($12). Add a steaming cup of hot coffee or Bloody Mary at one of their outdoor tables to make even an ordinary weekday feel like a weekend treat. Check out new $10 lunch specials — BLT on garlic-toasted sourdough, quiche of the day or chicken wrap — as well as house specialties like beef tacos with artichoke and

roasted red pepper ($9). The new menu coincides with the arrival of chef Matt Curmi. Formerly with Bistro on Spruce, Curmi actually hails from across the pond. “I am originally half English and half Maltese,” says Curmi, who grew up on a 40-foot sailboat touring the Caribbean, North Sea, Mediterranean and Atlantic Ocean. “I am very focused on keeping The Cellar’s menu current, with frequent seasonal changes and fresh ideas,” he says. — CARRIE SCOZZARO


FOOD | SAMPLER

SEAFOOD CEDARS FLOATING RESTAURANT 1514 N. Marina Dr. I Coeur d’Alene (208) 664-2922 This isn’t lakeside dining — when you eat at the Cedars Floating Restaurant, you’re dining on the water at the confluence of the Spokane River and Lake Coeur d’Alene. Seafood is the specialty here and the smoky, cedar-planked, wild-caught salmon is consistently good. The patio is the place to be. You can even arrive by boat and tie up at one of Cedars’ docks. CLINKERDAGGER 621 W. Mallon I 328-5965 With excellent food, service and view of the river, Clinkerdagger sets the standard for reliable fine dining in Spokane. The restaurant’s pea salad, rock salt prime rib and crème brûlée have become beloved favorites since the restaurant opened during Expo ‘74. Want to try something new? Order off the seasonal menu, featuring fresh and locally grown ingredients. CRICKETS RESTAURANT 424 E. Sherman Ave. I Coeur d’Alene (208) 765-1990 Crickets has stood the test of time

on Coeur d’Alene’s Sherman Avenue. Maybe it’s because Crickets is the only game in town for oysters. Or maybe it’s their vast menu that spans from build-your-own pizzas to steaks and sandwiches. Or maybe it’s their prime people-watching location, right on the avenue. Whatever it is, it’s working. THE FLOATING RESTAURANT 47394 Idaho 200, I Hope, Idaho (208) 264-5311 Floating on Ellisport Bay in Hope Marina with views of Lake Pend Oreille and the Schweitzer Basin, this popular seafood restaurant offers several different areas of cuisine. Boat or drive up for a meal with fresh seafood and soups, sauces, breads, and desserts made on-site from scratch. The seafood mixed plate has scallops, prawns and a tender calamari steak over angel hair pasta with a tomato basil cream sauce. Reservations are recommended. MILFORD’S FISH HOUSE 719 N. Monroe I 326-7251 This iconic restaurant and bar has led a luxurious life. The original tavern opened in 1911 and was turned into a

cigar store, market and barbershop. Original cigar cases, an antique mahogany bar, pin-up girls and stamped-tin ceilings exude a dark, masculine atmosphere. The finedining menu features modern fish and seafood dishes for a hefty price. Open for dinner only.

’t have Well, at least I don butt! a giant stick up my

RESTAURANT FINDER

Looking for a new place to eat? Visit Inlander.com/places to search the region’s most comprehensive bar and restaurant guide.

TRINITY AT CITY BEACH 58 Bridge St. I Sandpoint (208) 255-7558 Trinity’s patio is practically on City Beach, offering picturesque views of Lake Pend Oreille. No room outdoors? No worries. The entire back wall is made of glass, allowing a view from any seat. The menu, featuring choices like steamed mussels, filet mignon and Portobello mushroom ravioli, is complemented by the extensive wine list. n

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North 509.777.8424 | South 509.232.8424 | Valley 509.444.8424 | CDA 208.667.5300 JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 41


Space Laughs

Guardians of the Galaxy isn’t Marvel’s ‘A’ squad, but they get the job done BY SETH SOMMERFELD

G

uardians of the Galaxy is not a superhero movie. Yes, it’s a part of the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Yes, characters cross over to the Avengers franchise. And yes, it’s got the budget and advertising push of a Marvel superhero movie. But Guardians of the Galaxy is actually a throwback, pulpy science-fiction flick. Oh yeah; it’s also a comedy. The titular Guardians are a ragtag, five-pronged crew of interstellar outcasts tasked with stopping Ronan the Accuser (Lee Pace), a rogue zealot of the Kree alien species bent on planetary destruction with the aid of future Avengers foe Thanos. The Guardians are led (or rather wrangled) by Peter Quill (Chris Pratt), a cocky, wisecracking treasure hunter from Earth who likes to go by Star-Lord (though no one else is on board with this nickname). He’s joined by two mercenaries: Gamora (Zoe Saldana), a green-skinned Zen-Whoberi, and Drax the Destroyer (WWE wrestler Dave Bautista), a musclebound criminal who only communicates in literal speech.

42 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

The team is rounded out by the CGI bounty-hunting Your Love,” but it’s actually more effective when played team of Rocket Raccoon (voiced by Bradley Cooper), as straight character development for Quill (as it’s all that a quick-talking, genetically modified creature, and his remains from his Earth days). Thanks to Gunn’s rapidmuscle/sidekick Groot (voiced by Vin Diesel), a humanfire approach with both humor and action, there’s no oid tree who can only say “I am Groot.” dwelling on the misfires. The comedy has writer/director James Guardians of the Galaxy fills an underGunn’s (Slither, Super) fingerprints all over served moviegoing niche: The pure, fun, GUARDIANS OF it, for better and for worse. He revels in sci-fi blockbuster. In recent years many of THE GALAXY weirdness, continually swings big with the biggest science-fiction films have been Rated PG-13 his ideas and takes the strikeouts that destruction-fests and/or star vehicles with Directed by James Gunn accompany this style. His directorial voice Starring Chris Pratt, Zoe Saldana, dark tones: Pacific Rim, Elysium, Gravity, the is much more at the forefront than in the Transformers franchise, etc. Guardians sets aside Lee Pace, Bradley Cooper Avengers-based Marvel films. While there’s any darkness or deep social messages and plenty of action throughout Guardians — basks in the carefree space-opera bliss once from prison breaks to spaceship dogfights — the comedy found in Flash Gordon, Buck Rogers or Star Wars (Return of is the constant thread throughout the movie. Sometimes the Jedi is probably the best tonal fit). Sometimes it’s more the jokes hit, but there are also plenty of whiffs (like Quill enjoyable to shut off any critical thinking synapses and bragging about alien hookups). The kitschy soundtrack just enjoy interstellar adventures. Guardians of the Galaxy tries playing for laughs with tracks like “Come and Get allows for that gleefully spacey experience. 


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FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING 22 JUMP STREET

The last time we saw officers Jenko (Channing Tatum) and Schmidt (Jonah Hill), they were posing as high school students to bust a teenage drug ring. In 22 Jump Street (they moved across the street), the duo is back, but what could they possibly do to top their last assignment? Duh. Enroll in college. Again, the assignment is to stop a drug ring, but now at a college, while keeping their focus on fighting crime. (MB) Not yet rated

AND SO IT GOES

Oren (Michael Douglas) — a veteran realtor in coastal Connecticut — owns a small apartment complex where he’s living while trying to sell his house after the death of his wife. Among those residents is Leah (Diane Keaton), herself recently widowed and still prone to bursting into tears while singing standards at a local restaurant. The two meet and Leah begins caring for Oren’s granddaughter, who is left at the apartment when her father heads to prison, leading to a story of redemption and moving on in the wake of tragedy. (SR) Rated PG-13

BEGIN AGAIN

Gretta (Keira Knightley) has been dragged onstage at a bar open-mic night by a friend (James Corden) to perform an original composition; in the crowd is Dan (Mark Ruffalo), a oncehot music industry executive. But Dan hears something in Gretta’s song — we see what he hears in a cutesy bit where instruments float in the air, playing the arrangement in his head — and he becomes determined to record her work and get her a distribution deal. (SR) Rated R

BELLE

Dido Elizabeth Belle (Gugu MbathaRaw) has always lived her life between two worlds. The illegitimate child of Admiral Sir John Lindsay (Matthew Goode), Belle is of a higher rank than the servants, but cannot eat with her own family because of her mixed-race status. Strangled by class systems and prejudice, Belle begins to find her voice only when she falls in love with a man who wants to change the world for the better, but does not have the rank her family requires. At Magic Lantern (ER) Rated PG

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES

It’s been a few years since James Franco’s ape Caesar took smart pills and then led every other ape in the greater Bay Area on a rampage of epic proportions. Those smart pills ended up causing a worldwide epidemic, killing off much of the human race. War took care of many others. Now, the surviving humans are bristling up against the apes, led by Caesar and the two species are on the brink of war. Gary Oldman and Keri Russell lead a stellar cast. (MB) Rated PG-13

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS

The girl has cancer, the boy is in remission from cancer; this story can only end badly. As far as teenage cancer love stories go, John Green’s recent young adult novel of the same name isn’t half bad — not nearly as sappy as A Walk to Remember. With Shailene Woodley (The Descendants, Divergent) as the lead for this film adaption, many lovesick teenage girls and their boyfriends will show up for this one. (LJ) Rated PG-13 ...continued on next page

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The titular Guardians are a ragtag, fivepronged crew of interstellar outcasts tasked with stopping Ronan the Accuser (Lee Pace), a rogue zealot bent on planetary destruction. The Guardians are led by Peter Quill (Chris Pratt), a cocky, wisecracking treasure hunter from Earth who likes to go by StarLord. He’s joined by two mercenaries: Gamora (Zoe Saldana), and Drax the Destroyer (WWE wrestler Dave Bautista), a muscle-bound criminal who only communicates in literal speech. The team is rounded out by the CGI bounty-hunting team of Rocket Raccoon (voiced by Bradley Cooper), a quicktalking, genetically modified creature, and his sidekick Groot (voiced by Vin Diesel), a humanoid tree. (SS) Rated PG-13

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Directed by Don McKellar, The Grand Seduction is a Canadian comedy based off of the 2003 French-Canadian film La Grande Séduction. Taking place in the village of Tickle Cove, this film details the tiny village’s attempt to “seduce” doctor Paul Lewis to live and work in their town. Without a town doctor they are not able to open a factory, which will provide enough jobs to

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY

We’re bringing professional golf back to Coeur d’Alene, and you can be part of the gallery for just $20. Follow PGA pros and celebrities as they take on the magnificent Coeur d’Alene Resort Golf Course. All proceeds benefit the Community Cancer Fund, dedicated to raising money for cancer care and research right here in the Inland Northwest.

THE GRAND SEDUCTION

save their village from financial crisis. To convince the doctor to stay, the villagers join efforts to make their town appealing — it truly is a grand seduction. At Magic Lantern (MAB) Rated PG-13

AUGUST 18TH

GET ON UP

The James Brown story told here is less a portrait of how he became the “Godfather of Soul” and more a series of snapshots of his life, told in jumps and starts, and flashes backward and forward. The music and musical performances are exciting, and Chadwick Boseman (who played Jackie Robinson in 42) has perfectly caught the moves and moods of Brown. And there are fine turns from Nelsan Ellis as Brown’s long-suffering bandmate Bobby Byrd and from Dan Aykroyd as music agent Ben Bart. But the structure of the film is a jumbled mess, and the picture it presents of Brown is out of focus. (ES) Rated PG-13

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JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 43


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SNOWPIERCER (120 MIN- R)

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IDA (80 MIN)

Fri/Sat: 4:00 Sun: 1:15 Tue-Thu: 3:15

BELLE (104 MIN PG)

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LIFE ITSELF (120 MIN) *last week!

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FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING

THE FLUFFY MOVIE

Comedian Gabriel Iglesias (aka Fluffy) tours hard. Now with The Fluffy Movie he’s finally getting his own concert film. But it’s more than just that, it’s a backstage look at how the funnyman — known for using the phrase “Oh, I’m not fat, I’m fluffy” — rose from humble beginnings in California to become a breakout standup star. And at a PG-13 rating, the comedy/inspirational tell-all is actually pretty family-friendly. (LJ) PG-13

GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL

Wes Anderson’s latest features a narrative structure in which the central story isn’t merely a flashback, but a flashback nesting in a flashback nesting inside another flashback. A woman visits a memorial for a writer; that writer (Tom Wilkinson), circa 1985, describes his encounter as a young man (Jude Law) in 1968 with Mr. Zero Moustafa (F. Murray Abraham), owner of the once-glorious Grand Budapest Hotel in the “former republic of Zubowka.” At Magic Lantern (SR) Rated R

Fri-Thurs 5:00

Godzilla

Fri-Mon 9:10pm, Tues 9:25pm PG-13 Wed 9:10pm

The Goonies

Sat Midnight Tues 7:00, Thurs 9:10pm

Kung Fu Panda Fri 9:30am

HERCULES

How to Train Your Dragon

Oh wow, The Rock grew a beard! Or had someone in makeup put a beard on him. Either way, that beard for some reason means that he’s Hercules, the mythological strong man who endured 12 labors and came out clean on the other side. In this take, Hercules, post labors, is essentially a mercenary and is hired to take down an evil warlord played by John Hurt. (MB) Rated PG-13

Mon-Thurs 9:30am

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HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2

Hiccup’s father Stoick, the isle’s Viking chieftain, is ready to cede power to his dragon-master heir, Hiccup’s focus lies elsewhere, as he and his dragon best friend Toothless chart the previously unexplored world beyond Berk. Unfortunately, these travels lead to some unwanted discoveries, including the existence of dragon poachers and the tyrant Drago, who controls a dragon army. (SS) Rated PG

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44 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

L A S T I N G VA L U E .

Taking place in Poland in 1962, Ida is the story of an aspiring nun, Anna. The graceful 18-year-old hopes to take her vows in the same convent she has lived in since being orphaned. But before her vows are complete, she is required to meet with an unknown family member that will change her perspective on life. Family secrets from the dark Nazi occupation are revealed and this sends Anna on a journey in hope of finding clarity. At Magic Lantern (MAB) Rated PG-13

LIFE ITSELF

This documentary, intimately detailing the last years of Roger Ebert’s life, not only inspires and entertains, but also presents a more fully realized portrait of him than I’ve ever encountered. Being a study of Ebert, it is, by necessity, also a film about movies. Eloquent, it is surprisingly moving and beautifully structured. Directed by Steve James. At Magic Lantern. (LB) Rated R

LUCY

Scarlett Johansson continues her scifi streak playing the titular character working as a drug mule in Taiwan when a drug accidentally leaks into her system, somehow giving her access to 100 percent of her brain. Now in possession of otherworldly powers, Lucy goes on a rampage to take vengeance against those who’ve wronged her. Morgan Freeman stars, naturally, as the brainy professor who explains all the scientific stuff. (MB) Rated R

MALEFICENT

As one of the most terrifying and iconic Disney villains, Maleficent (Angelina Jolie) has had many questions surrounding the origins of her background. This newly re-imagined flick seeks to explain exactly how the fallen fairy became so evil, and why she chose to act out against innocent Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). (ER) PG

A MOST WANTED MAN

It’s tough to see these posthumously released Phillip Seymour Hoffman films and realize the talent that was lost, but here we go again with A Most Wanted Man. Hoffman plays a German intelligence officer who is trying to ferret out terrorists in Hamburg, the city where the Sept. 11 attacks were planned and where paranoia runs high. Adapted from the novel by John le Carre, the film also stars Rachel McAdams, Willem Dafoe and Robin Wright. (MB) Rated R

THE PURGE: ANARCHY

This is the sequel to last year’s sneaker hit about a future in which all crime (including murder) is legal in the U.S. for a single 12-hour period each year. This time around, the Purge is still very much happening and five people find themselves stranded on the streets of Los Angeles as night falls, making them prey for all the wacko’s on the prowl in search of something to kill. (MB) Rated R

SEX TAPE

Jason Segal and Cameron Diaz star as a couple who has found things a little boring in the bed as of late. To spice it up, they get out the video camera and film themselves, ya know, doin’ it. Then, wouldn’t ya know, the damn video gets uploaded and sent out to all their

friends and they have to go on a wild escapade to keep the documentation of their coital session from going before even more eyeballs. (MB) Rated R

SNOWPIERCER

It’s the future and everything is super screwed up thanks to a weather control experiment gone wrong, leaving the world completely frozen. The only remaining humans live on a train that circles the globe, never stopping. On that train, there’s a strict divide between the haves and have-nots, overseen by a fierce administrator played by Tilda Swinton. When a rebellion rises, things go way, way off the tracks. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R

TAMMY

The titular Tammy is a perpetual screwup, and when she loses her job, her car and her husband in one day, she decides to take the radical step of leaving her Illinois hometown. So it’s time for a road trip, requiring the car — and the accompanying presence — of her alcoholic, diabetic grandmother Pearl (Susan Sarandon). At the outset, Tammy feels like familiar territory for McCarthy, especially as she fumbles her way through that initial crappy day. (SR) Rated R

TRANSFORMERS: AGE OF EXTINCTION

Time for the Autobots to roll out again as Michael Bay brings us the fourth installment in his Transformers franchise. This time, Mark Wahlberg and his daughter have discovered something that could threaten both forces of shape-shifting robots, and even the entire world. (PS) Rated PG-13

WISH I WAS HERE

Zach Braff’s starring and directing and co-writing follow-up project to his decade-old art house hit Garden State feels too much like a retread of that film. Braff again plays a struggling actor who’s trying to keep a family together, but there’s no one in particular to care much about. The other performances are competent. This is a small dramatic comedy. Too bad that Braff and his coscripter brother try to make a bigger deal out of it. (ES) Rated R 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

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METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Life Itself

86

Snowpiercer

83

Planet of the Apes

79

Guardians/Galaxy

75

Maleficent

55

Wish I Was Here

43

Tammy

39

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FILM | REVIEW

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(300 PM) 1000 PM GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1200 100 355) 630 700 910 GET ON UP [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1230 330) 640 930 HERCULES IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1150 AM) 500 PM 750 PM HERCULES [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(220 PM) 1015 PM LUCY [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1210 230) 450 710 920 SEX TAPE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(110 350) 715 935 THE PURGE: ANARCHY [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(120) 410 730 1025 PLANES: FIRE AND RESCUE [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1240 PM 325 PM) 530 PM DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(340 PM) 650 PM DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1220 PM) 1010 PM TRANSFORMERS: AGE OF EXTINCTION 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1140 AM) 940 PM TRANSFORMERS: AGE OF EXTINCTION [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(310 PM) 635 PM

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Chadwick Boseman as James Brown.

Feel (Kinda) Good

Get on Up isn’t the James Brown biopic you’ve been waiting for BY ED SYMKUS

W

hen a movie poster boldly claims Get and alienated the musicians in his band. But the on Up to be “the James Brown story,” script completely ignores the younger viewers there’s a responsibility to tell that that it should go out of its way to educate and story in a manner that lets you begin to underinform. No one under 30 is going to realize that stand what made James Brown tick. the man named Richard (Brandon Smith), who That doesn’t happen here. Yes, the tale for a very brief period takes young James under stretches from his poor-as-dirt days, growing up his wing and offers him advice, is Little Richard, in a dysfunctional backwoods family, and it goes as beyond the performance of a song, he’s never right up to the period when the international even introduced. And the scriptwriters’ presentastar begins to lose his mind. But the film is tion of significant events right after the 1968 asconstructed in a scattershot matter. sassination of Martin Luther King is It jumps around in time, visiting completely misconstrued here. King GET ON UP and revisiting different points in his was killed on April 4, and Brown Rated PG-13 life, without letting us comprehend had a concert scheduled at the BosDirected by Tate Taylor what’s going on in his head at any ton Garden on April 5. The day was Staring Chadwick Boseman, given time. saved, and violence was avoided not, Nelsan Ellis, Dan Aykroyd Chadwick Boseman, who hit as the film purports, because Brown gold embodying Jackie Robinson last calmed down the crowd, but because year in 42, doesn’t really look much like James Boston Mayor Kevin White got a local television Brown in any of his various hairstyles. But he’s station to broadcast the concert live, keeping got both the moods and the moves of the man people at home watching it on TV, rather than down. And he adds a tremendous excitement to being out in the streets. the surroundings, both in line delivery and in There are plenty of other less important, songs. underdeveloped events tossed in that pad the film But this should have been a film that dug rather than propel the story. Despite a lengthy deep into Brown’s life, and pulled out moments 138-minute running time, we get only a series of that led to him becoming as successful and snapshots rather than a cohesive picture of the influential as history says he was. We learn that man’s life. After watching the film, I still don’t he made a lot of money, could pump up a crowd, know the James Brown story. 

PG-13 Daily (10:00) (1:10) (3:50) 6:30 9:10 In 2D Daily (10:30) (1:40) (4:20) 7:00 8:50 9:40

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2 [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1130 210) 440 725 950 22 JUMP STREET [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.740 PM 1030 PM MALEFICENT [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1250 315) 620 900

GET ON UP

PG-13 Daily (12:45) (3:45) 6:45 9:45 R Daily (11:00) (1:10) (3:15) (5:15) 7:15 9:15

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(100) 415 715 1010

PG-13 Daily 9:00 In 2D Daily (11:50) (2:15) (4:30) 6:45

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(345 PM) 1000 PM

PG-13 Daily (2:50) (5:10) 7:30 9:35 Fri-Sun (10:45) (12:45)

GET ON UP [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1135 255) 615 935

LUCY

HERCULES

AND SO IT GOES

PLANES: FIRE & RESCUE

PG Daily (11:00) (1:00) (3:00) (5:00) 7:00

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES PG-13 Daily (10:45) (1:30) (4:15) 7:00 9:45

THE PURGE: ANARCHY R Daily (5:10) 9:35

SEX TAPE

R Daily (3:00) 7:20 Fri-Sun (12:15)

TRANSFORMERS: AGE OF EXTINCTION PG-13 Daily (11:30) (2:50) 6:20 9:30

EARTH TO ECHO PG Daily (10:45)

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PG-13 Daily (10:00) (1:10) (3:50) 6:30 9:10 In 2D Daily (10:30) (1:40) (4:20) 7:00 7:15 8:50 9:40 10:00

GET ON UP

Big Screen: GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1230 330) 400 700 955 1015 Big Screen: GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(100 PM) 720 PM GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1205 300) 630 925 GET ON UP [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1210 320) 635 945 AND SO IT GOES (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(110 350) 650 920

PG-13 Daily (12:45) (3:45) 6:45 9:45

HERCULES IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1200 PM) 500 PM 730 PM

R Daily (11:00) (1:00) (3:00) (5:00) 7:10 9:20

HERCULES [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(230 PM) 1000 PM

LUCY

HERCULES

PG-13 Daily (4:25) 6:40 9:00 In 2D Daily (11:50) (2:15) (4:50) 7:10 9:35

LUCY [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1220 245) 510 735 1010

PG-13 Daily (10:45) (12:45) (2:50) (5:10) 7:25 9:20

AND SO IT GOES

SEX TAPE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(115) 410 725 1005

PG Daily (11:00) (1:00) (3:00) (5:00) 7:00 Fri-Sun (10:40)

PLANES: FIRE & RESCUE

THE PURGE: ANARCHY [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(120) 415 655 935

PG-13 Daily (10:45) (1:30) (4:15) 7:00 9:45

PLANES: FIRE AND RESCUE [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1240 250) 505 715

R Daily (3:00) (5:15) 7:25 9:30 Fri-Sun (12:15)

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1215 PM) 645 PM

R Daily (5:15) 7:20 9:40 Fri-Sun (11:00) (1:10)

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(310 PM) 940 PM

DAWN OF THE PLANET OF THE APES THE PURGE: ANARCHY SEX TAPE TAMMY

R Daily (2:45) (5:00) 7:20 9:35

TRANSFORMERS: AGE OF EXTINCTION PG-13 Daily (11:30) (2:50) 6:20 9:30

AMERICA

AMERICA (PG-13)

Fri. - Sun.930 PM

TAMMY [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.710 PM 950 PM

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2

TRANSFORMERS: AGE OF EXTINCTION [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1250 PM) 430 PM 800 PM

EARTH TO ECHO

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2 [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(105 PM 340 PM)

PG-13 Daily (2:40) (3:10) Fri-Sun (12:30) PG Daily (10:30) (12:40) (2:50) (5:00) PG Daily (10:45) (12:45) Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 8/1/14-8/7/14

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JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 45 Regal_073114_4V.pdf


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Songs by the Mile The road-seasoned Head and the Heart open up the Festival at Sandpoint season

T

he Head and the Heart’s drummer, Tyler Williams, is in Australia with the band when he’s tracked down via email last week. He’s been there before, because the band has been just about everywhere over the past five years. In that time, the sextet of Seattle natives and transplants saw their self-released, self-titled debut record land them a re-release with legendary Sub Pop Records in 2011. Their star rose quickly and they kept on the road for most of two years following that. So it made sense that their sophomore effort, which dropped last October, was titled Let’s Be Still. “I think the title was a reaction to being on the road so much, but it also has a more universal appeal for the

By Mike Bookey times we live in. We definitely love being on the road but like anything else in life, balance is necessary. Maybe just slow it down a little,” says Williams, who followed guitarist and co-vocalist Jonathan Russell out from Richmond, Virginia, after he heard some of the early recordings of what would eventually become The Head and the Heart. The debut was full of poppy power-folk numbers about leaving home and working hard that the band, behind the lead of Josiah Johnson, could ratchet up in concert, making for something a lot more rock than folk. But Let’s Be Still put forth a sound that reflected the miles they’ve traveled and the sounds of the acts they’ve shared festival stages with. The soft acoustic numbers are still there, but then there’s stuff like the high-energy

rocker “Shake” and the synth-pop “Summertime,” which features violinist Charity Rose Thielen’s delightfully oddball vocal stylings. It’s far from folk, and Williams says they’re fine with that. “I never really had a concern of what this band was or could be. Limitations were never placed to say, ‘Oh, we have to be a folk band’ or whatever,” says Williams. “The sounds of our albums are dictated by what we’re going through personally and whichever musical influences we’re digesting. I think it’s incredibly disingenuous for a band to stick to a formula for how they found success.” The band returns from Australian time for a gig at ...continued on next page

JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 47


Anjelah Johnson

MUSIC | INDIE

an evening of stand up comedy with

“SONGS BY THE MILE,” CONTINUED... Lollapalooza in Chicago, and then they’re off to and spent some time eating Hudson’s HamburgNorth Idaho for the opening night of the Festival ers and looking out at the lake. at Sandpoint. Along the After another 30-plus way, they’ll probably pass dates of touring this summer through Coeur d’Alene, and fall, the Head and the 8/7: The Head and the Heart, Mikey & Matty which is also the title of a 8/8: Huey Lewis & The News, Miah Kohal Band Heart is going to finally take track off the Head and the 8/9: Nickel Creek, Head For the Hills some downtime, their first real Heart’s debut record. 8/10: Spokane Youth Symphony Family Concert break in a long, long while, “Jon [Russell] and I Williams says. 8/14: Trombone Shorty, Galactic had passed through Coeur 8/15: Ray LaMontagne, Belle Brigade “We’re all really happy d’Alene as I was drivwith the way the first two 8/16: Montgomery Gentry ing out from Virginia to 8/17: Grand Finale with the Spokane Symphony albums have turned out, but Seattle, and it was just so you always want to evolve For more information, go to epic. I hadn’t really seen and move forward,” he says. festivalatsandpoint.com that much beauty around “The only way for us to do a corner the whole drive up to that point and it that is to step back and dive into a life away from stuck with me,” says Williams, adding that the the band.”  band returned to Coeur d’Alene on another tour mikeb@inlander.com

THE FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT

saturday september 13 martin Woldson theater at the Fox 1001 w. sprague ave · spokane, wa 7:30pm show · all ages tickets at ticketswest charge By phone 800-325-seat

dave rawlings machine

featuring: gillian welch · John paul Jones · willie watson · paul kowert

tuesday sept 23 bing Crosby theater 901 west sprague ave · spokane, wa · 7:30pm show · all ages tickets at ticketswest · charge By phone 800-325-seat tickets also at Bing crosBy theatre Box office, the spokane arena Box office & the opera house Box office

and raining Jane Wednesday oCtober 22 inb perForming arts Center 334 w. spokane falls Blvd spokane, wa 8:00pm show · all ages tickets at ticketswest charge By phone 800-325-seat

THE FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT EVOLVES

I

n her 15th season at the helm of the Festival at Sandpoint, Dyno Wahl knows she needs to keep the charm of the lakeside summer event, but she can’t ignore the fact that the festival is growing and evolving. Some things have stayed the same — you can still, remarkably, bring in your own beer and wine — but the everybody-needs-to-sitdown policy that can make for some awkward fan interactions is finally

gone. “We went and researched other venues and other festivals. We’re respecting the tradition, but when ‘The Power of Love’ comes on at Huey Lewis, no one is going to sit down. It’s just going to be dictated by the music,” says Wahl. The festival raised the stage a foot to an industry-standard 5 feet, giving those in the back a better view, and have hired security guards to help keep the aisles clear, making

THU AUG 7

JONNY LANG

FRI AUG 8

NATTY VIBES

BING CROSBY THEATER

saturday november 8 inb perForming arts Center

AT THE HOP

MON AUG 11

ROBERT CRAY BAND

334 w. spokane falls Blvd spokane, wa 8:00pm show · all ages tickets at ticketswest charge By phone 800-325-seat

BING CROSBY THEATER

TUES AUG 26

EST 1910 CABIN RENTALS RV HOOKUPS PUBLIC DOCKS BOAT MOORING

GREAT FOOD DRINK SPECIALS LIVE MUSIC DANCING

20 W Jerry Ln, Worley, ID | (208) 686-1151

48 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

sure the 3,500-capacity festival remains without a bad seat. Wahl says her nonprofit has realized the magnitude of the festival — a recent University of Idaho study found the event brings in $1.8 million to the local economy — and knew it was time to make some changes. “We’ve had some growing pains and part of that is understanding that we’re no longer a secret,” she says. (MIKE BOOKEY)

HAWTHORNE HEIGHTS RED JUMPSUIT APPARATUS AT THE HOP

TICKETS ONLINE AT WWW.SBLENTERTAINMENT.COM

SAT AUG 16

ZOSO

(Led Zeppelin Tribute)

BING CROSBY THEATER

SUN OCT 12

CARBON LEAF BING CROSBY THEATER

FOR SHOWS AT BING, ORDER BY PHONE 800-325-SEAT


MUSIC | INDIE You’re Invited to Lunch! Now Open at 1 1 am 3RD PLACE BEST BEER BAR!

We’re excited to announce the beginning of a new chapter for Andy’s, we’ve surprised you with BRUNCH, filled you up with DINNER, and now we’re gonna tackle LUNCH!

Thursday July 31st

LOS CHINGADORES! FIRST FRIDAY Aug 1st Artist: LAURA WHITE GORILLA RABBIT CHICKEN CASEY MOTHER F’ING ROGERS

Saturday Aug 2nd

HAINTS IN THE HOLLER Sunday FUN DAY Aug 3rd

THE NEHEMIAH SHOW

Happy Times! Yes! So Happy!

Monday Aug 4th

TRIVIA! Starts at 7pm Tennessee-born Valerie June brings her haunting voice to the Bartlett Monday.

Working Girl

Valerie June always knew how to work hard for what she wanted; she just didn’t know it would pay off so well

Tuesday Aug 5th

OPEN MIC OF OPEN-NESS

The Gateway Bar Between Downtown & Browne’s Addition

Wednesday Aug 6th WHISKEY WEDNESDAY & SALLY BOP JAZZ

509.747.0304 1401 W. 1ST AVE

COCKTAILS & 25 CRAFT BEERS

120 E. Sprague Ave.

BY LAURA JOHNSON

V

alerie June has worked her ass off to make it. Not that the self–described “organic moonshine roots” musician is complaining about it. “My parents taught their children that we had to make our own way in this world, that no one was going to give us anything,” says June earlier this week from her home in the Williamsburg section of Brooklyn, New York. As a kid growing up in Jackson, Tennessee, she cleaned bricks for her father’s construction business. Later, she passed out flyers for his music promotion company. Moving to Memphis days after graduating from high school, she hawked caffeine at competing coffeehouses and worked as a clerk at an herb store called Maggie’s Pharm. Meanwhile, she was always singing and writing and teaching herself to play the guitar, which she never had the luxury of learning during her childhood. “I wanted to get to a place where I could afford to just sit with my guitar and learn,” she says in a breathy Southern drawl. For years, she would wait for that day to come. “One of my biggest challenges is getting over myself. That’s why it’s so good to be on the road,” admits June, who has been touring almost nonstop for two years. “You might say to yourself that you can’t perform that day, but you have to do it. I’m constantly reminding myself I’m following my dream.” She says that from a young age, singing always made her “feel good,” even when she knew she sounded like no one else.

“Growing up, when people heard me singing, they wondered, ‘When can she wrap that up?’” June remembers. But once she got ahold of some old roots records, she realized there were other women out there who sounded like her, with that nasally, profoundly affected and haunted voice; they were just from the 1920s and ’30s. Now in her early 30s (she wouldn’t specify her age, but she was born in 1982), her voice has caught on with enough folks that she was able to raise $15,000 through Kickstarter in 2011. That resulted in her first album as a signed artist, 2013’s Pushin’ Against a Stone, which Dan Auerbach (Black Keys) and Kevin Augunas (Lumineers, Cold War Kids) co-produced and Auerbach helped write. Recently, June opened for soul musician Booker T. Jones in Australia. “His wife told me that every time they’re at an airport they tell each other, ‘Welcome home, honey,’” June recalls. As she’s been on the road for so long, the joke caused June to contemplate the situation of her own home. “And then it came to me,” she says. “My home is on stage. It took a long time to get there, but now I know it’s where I belong.” n lauraj@inlander.com

Featuring Inland NW craft beers on draft. Meet brewery reps, taste new beers, win swag and celebrate local beer!

Black Diamond 9614 East Sprague Ave, Spokane Valley

Post Street Ale House 1 North Post St, Spokane

5pm-8pm

AUG 12 5pm-8pm

The Lantern Tap House 1004 South Perry St, Spokane

AUG 16 5pm-8pm

AUG 21

Pints Ale House 10111 North Newport Hwy, Spokane

5pm-8pm

Capone’s Pub & Grill 751 North 4th Ave Coeur d’Alene

AUG 28 6pm-9pm

Get a 32oz Mini-Growler by visiting 12 breweries on the Ale Trail. Get your map and get started!

INLAND NW CRAFT

Valerie June with Jenn Grant • Mon, Aug 4, at 8 pm • $10/$12 day of • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

AUG 7

BREWERS ASSOCIATION

INLAND NW CRAFT

BREWERS ASSOCIATION

INLAND NW CRAFT

BREWERS ASSOCIATION

/inwaletrail inlandnwaletrail.com

JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 49


music | sound advice

PUNK TIM BLOOD & THE GUTPANTHERS

J = the inlander RECOMMENDs this show J = All Ages Show

Thursday, 07/31

Arbor Crest Wine Cellars, Performers on the Patio feat. Pink Tango Trio Beverly’s, Robert Vaughn The Cellar, Riverboat Dave Coeur d’Alene Casino, PJ Destiny J Coeur d’Alene Park, Browne’s Addition Summer Concerts feat. Chris Rieser & Jay Rawley Curley’s, The Usual Suspects J Hayden City Park, Barry Aiken and North Point J The Hop!, Deviance (final performance), Ashylus, Vessels Jones Radiator, Los Chingadores J Laguna Café, Just Plain Darin LeftBank Wine Bar, Wyatt Wood J Luxe Coffeehouse, Particlehead J Mezzo Pazzo Wine Bar, Dirk Swartz Monterey Cafe (868-0284), Likes Girls, DJ Q O’Shay’s, Open mic Pend d’Oreille Winery, Steve Neff J Riverstone Park, Summer Concerts at Riverstone feat. West Side Cobras J Sutton Park, Kären McCormick Templin’s Red Lion Monterey Cafe (868-0284), Rockin’ on the River feat. Sammy Eubanks The Viking Bar and Grill, Carli Osika, Jordan Collins Webster’s Ranch House Saloon, Pacific Suns

Friday, 08/01

Baby Bar, DJ Snuggs, DJ Kain Bridge One J The Bartlett, Hayes Carll, Travis Linville Beverly’s, Robert Vaughn J The Big Dipper, Square

50 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

ROCK WOLFMOTHER

T

im Blood & the Gutpanthers are billing Saturday’s show at Mikey’s Gyros as their final reunion. Is it their final show together ever? We can’t predict the future, but you might as well show up to this one just in case — they were named an Inlander Band to Watch back in 2012, after all. Back then, the five-piece was so punk rock that three of them were even accused by Time magazine of being “inept” terrorists for egging an auto dealership. After more than a year away from performing, who knows what might happen at this show? — LAURA JOHNSON Tim Blood & the Gutpanthers final reunion feat. Nailbastard and Mysterious Skin • Sat, Aug. 2, at 8 pm • $5 • Mikey’s Gyros • 527 S. Main St., Moscow • 208-882-0780

L

ast April, Wolfmother frontman Andrew Stockdale announced that the band was done. After more than a decade together — albeit with multiple lineup changes — the Australian psychedelic-rock three-piece was over. In its place was Stockdale’s solo project, with the same personnel as Wolfmother. It’s not clear exactly what put the pieces back together again, but in December Wolfmother announced the band would put out a new album, resulting in the self-released New Crown. After all the drama, we’re just glad they’re back on the road touring. — LAURA JOHNSON Wolfmother with Electric Citizen • Fri, Aug. 1, at 8 pm • $25 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 866-4687623

Revolution Bolo’s, YESTERDAYSCAKE Boomers Classic Rock Bar & Grill, Swamp Dog Carlin Bay Resort, Johnny Qlueless The Cellar, Bakin’ Phat Checkerboard Bar, Beats for Eats feat. DJ Eddie P, Babelonius Thunk, Stitch Jones, Beauflexx, MESCA, Sam Thomas, Team Growl and more Coeur d’Alene Casino, Kosh & the Jazz Cats, Strictly Business Conkling Marina & Resort, The Cronkites Curley’s, Hollow Point Fedora Pub, Kicho Fizzie Mulligans, Shiner Gateway Marina and Resort,

Whack A Mole J Gorge Amphitheater, [Soldout] Watershed Music Festival feat. Tim McGraw Grande Ronde Cellars, Barry Aiken & North Point Hills’ Restaurant & Lounge (7473946), Madeline McNeill J The Hop!, Soulfly, Lody Kong, Soblivios, The Steven Jaimz Project Idaho Pour Authority (208-2902280), Charley Packard Iron Horse Bar, Bad Monkey J Jones Radiator, Gorilla Rabbit Chicken, Casey Rogers J Knitting Factory, Wolfmother (See story above), Electric Citizen J Laguna Café, Diane Copeland LeftBank Wine Bar, Carey Brazil

and Jay Condiotti J Liberty Lake, Pocket Park Concert Mezzo Pazzo Wine Bar, Nick Grow J Moses Lake McCosh Park, Five Suns Bluegrass Festival feat. The Downtown Mountain Boys, FarmStrong, Front Country, Pearl Snaps, Della Mae J Northern Quest Casino, Train nYne, DJ The Divine Jewels J Park Bench Cafe (456-4349), Kevin Schibel Pend Oreille Playhouse (4479900), Bridges Home J Rathdrum City Park, NativeSun Red Room Lounge, DJ D3VINE Rocker Room, Karma’s Circle J The Shop, DJ Teej

Soulful Soups and Spirits, DJ Q Spike’s Phillys and More (4893647), Carli Osika, Jordan Collins Spokane Transit Plaza (4567277), In-Transit The Viking Bar and Grill, Carli Osika Webster’s Ranch House Saloon, Echo Elysium Whitestone Winery Tasting Room (838-2427), Mighty Squirrel Zola, Eclectic Approach

Saturday, 08/02

315 Martinis and Tapas, Truck Mills J The Bartlett, Kate Tucker & the Sons of Sweden, Liz Rognes Beverly’s, Robert Vaughn


BOLO’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Swamp Dog BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Likes Girls CARLIN BAY RESORT, Johnny Qlueless THE CELLAR, Bakin’ Phat CHECKERBOARD BAR, Kickin’ Krotch COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh & the Jazz Cats, Strictly Business COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS (208-6642336), Ron Criscione

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, The Cronkites CURLEY’S, Hollow Point  DOWNTOWN SANDPOINT, Summer Sounds feat. the Hoodoo Two ENGLISH SETTER BREWING (9286063), Keith Milligan FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Shiner GATEWAY MARINA AND RESORT, Whack A Mole  GORGE AMPHITHEATER, [Soldout] Watershed Music Festival feat. Tim McGraw  HAYDEN EAGLES LODGE, Diamond Creek, The Jukers IRON HORSE BAR, Bad Monkey JOHN’S ALLEY, World’s Finest JONES RADIATOR, Haints in the Holler THE LARIAT (928-6063), Red 21 LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow MAX AT MIRABEAU, Ticking Time Bomb  MIKEY’S GYROS, Tim Blood & the Gutpanthers final reunion (See story on facing page) feat. Nailbastard, Mysterious Skin  MOSES LAKE MCCOSH PARK, Five Suns Bluegrass Festival feat. Topstring, FarmStrong, The Downtown Mountain Boys, Front Country, Chatham County Line NYNE, DJ C-Mad RED ROOM LOUNGE, DJ D3VINE ROCKER ROOM, Karma’s Circle SPORTSMAN’S BAR & GRILL (9356309), Cary Fly & Chris Rieser THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Emeris WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, Pacific Suns ZOLA, Eclectic Approach

Sunday, 08/03

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Concerts on the Cliff feat. David Raitt & the Baga Boogie Band BIG BARN BREWING CO. (935-6309), Music on the Lawn feat. Chuck Burris THE CELLAR, Traveling Keys Dueling Piano Show CHECKERBOARD BAR, John’s Daughter COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh, Echo Elysium CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, PJ Destiny DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church  GORGE AMPHITHEATER, [Sold-

out] Watershed Music Festival feat. Tim McGraw  THE HOP!, Exhausted Prayer, Losing Skin, Odyssey, Xingaia JOHN’S ALLEY, Fly Paper  KELLY’S IRISH PUB (208-6671717), Songwriter Sundays with the Flying Mammals  NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Foreigner, Styx, Loverboy WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, Chris Lucas ZOLA, Son of Brad

Monday, 08/04

 THE BARTLETT, Valerie June (See story on page 49), Jenn Grant  CALYPSOS (208-667-1717), Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills JOHN’S ALLEY, Jared James Nichols  RICO’S (332-6566), Open Mic SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, DJ Q ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 08/05

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, The Rub  THE BARTLETT, Open Mic BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn  THE BIG DIPPER, Jordan Piper with Kevin Woods, Scott Steed, Dru Heller BORRACHO TACOS & TEQUILERIA (822-7789), DJ D3VIN3  CALYPSOS, Jesse Brewster  CHATEAU RIVE, Della Mae CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN (208-292-4813), Kosh

 DOWNTOWN COEUR D’ALENE, Coeurimba FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills  THE HOP!, Foxy Shazam, Stop Light Observations, The Static Tones JOHN’S ALLEY, Too Slim and the Taildraggers JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Open-ness  MOOTSY’S, Love as Laughter, Love of Everything TRINITY AT CITY BEACH (208-2557558), Tuesdays with Ray Allen

Wednesday,08/06 BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Reggae Night feat. DJs Tochanan, Poncho, Tara and MC Splyt  DOWNTOWN COEUR D’ALENE, Live After 5 feat. Sammy Eubanks EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho  FOUNTAIN CAFE (625-6656), Maxie Ray Mills GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Cheryl Branz CD Release Party  THE HOP!, Olyghost, Enfeeble Ataxia, Hounds of Hell IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Open mic JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop Jazz LA ROSA CLUB, Robert Beadling and Friends THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Open Turntables Night with DJ Lydell LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3  THE NEST AT KENDALL YARDS, Rock the Nest feat. Silver Treason

PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Gorden Roland SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, Nate Ostrander

Coming Up ...

RED ROOM LOUNGE, Soulja Boy, Aug. 7 THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, The Photo Atlas, Aug. 7 COEUR D’ALENE PARK, Browne’s Addition Summer Concerts feat. Nobody Famous, Aug. 7  SANDPOINT, Festival at Sandpoint feat. The Head and the Heart (See story on page 47) with Mikey & Matty, Aug. 7 BING CROSBY THEATER, Jonny Lang, Aug. 7 THE BIG DIPPER, Goodnight Nurse, Aug. 8 GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Arcade Fire, Aug. 8 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Rascal Flatts, Aug. 8 SANDPOINT, Festival at Sandpoint feat. Huey Lewis & The News with Miah Kohal Band, Aug. 8 THE HIVE EVENT CENTER, Dirty Dozen Brass Band with DJ Logic, Aug. 8 THE BARTLETT, Mama Doll album release, Dova, Aug. 9 GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Bruno Mars, Aug. 9 THE HIVE EVENT CENTER, Moon Taxi, Aug. 9

The water is blue. The grass is too.

August 8 – 10, 2014 | Waterfront Park, Medical Lake, WA

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Rook

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Mou

ntain

Milk

Drive

John

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Eleven bands in all, including: The Rambling Rooks | Town Mountain | Milk Drive John Reischman & Kenny Smith Sponsored by

Tickets and camping passes available online now!

www.bluewatersbluegrass.org www.facebook.com/bluewatersbluegrass

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 THE BLIND BUCK • 204 N. Division • 290-6229 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CARLIN BAY RESORT • 14691 Idaho 97, Harrison, • 208-689-3295 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 20 W. Jerry Ln., Worley • 208-263-6971 CONKLING MARINA • 20 W. Jerry Ln, Worley • 208-686-1151 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LIBRARY LOUNGE • 110 E. 4th Ave. •747-3371 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 456-5678 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 THE ROCK BAR • 13921 E. Trent Ave. • 43-3796 ROCKER ROOM • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 ROCKET MARKET • 726 E. 43rd Ave. • 343-2253 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 UNDERGROUND 15 • 15 S. Howard St. • 290-2122 THE VAULT • 120 N. Wall St. • 863-9597 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON • 1914 N. Monroe St. • 474-9040 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 51


COMMUNITY RUN IN COLOR

Show up in all white, but prepare to leave in a rainbow of colors. Beginning the day with music, dancing and warmup stretching downtown, the Color Run brings together first-time runners and seasoned athletes for an untimed 5k focused on fun, with participants getting sprayed in colored cornstarch dye at every kilometer mark. Winding through historic Browne’s Addition and back, the Spokane event ends with a “Finish Festival” of powdered dye tossed into the air. The internationally touring event has chosen to partner with the YMCA of Spokane for this race, making a post-race donation to the organization. If you haven’t experienced one of these incredibly popular nontraditional 5Ks yet, the Color Run is one of this year’s last opportunities to do so in the Inland Northwest. — FRANNY WRIGHT The Color Run • Sun, Aug. 3, starting at 8 am • $45/person; $40/person for teams of 4+ runners • Riverfront Park • 507 N. Howard • thecolorrun.com

52 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

PERFORMANCE CIRCUS THROWBACK

CULTURE SCOTTISH FUN

The New Old Time Chautauqua • Sun, Aug. 3, at 7 pm • $15; kids under 12 free • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • ticketswest.com • 747-3012

Spokane Highland Games • Sat, Aug. 2, from 9 am-5:30 pm • $5-$10 • Spokane County Fair & Expo Center • 404 N. Havana • spokanehighlandgames.org • 927-0023

Combine musicians and cultural performances with intellectual discussions, and you’ve appealed to the fundamental interests of hipsters everywhere. The Chautauqua circuit, touring tent shows hosted in rural communities across the country, flourished in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Some 150 years later, the Seattle-based New Old Time Chautauqua is the only such show in the U.S. The performance lights up the stage with everything from acrobatics to comedy, and features the Flying Karamazov Brothers. — JENNA MULLIGAN

Though the various clan tents let you discover if you’re of true Scottish ancestry, you don’t have to be Scottish to enjoy the annual Spokane Highland Games. Bagpipe performances and heavy athletics — including hammer throws, stone throwing and the caber toss — along with highland dancing are just some traditional features of this local cultural celebration. Sheepdog herding and blacksmith demonstrations, along with tug-of-war competitions and medieval re-enactments, also take place throughout the day. — FRANNY WRIGHT


INLAND NORTHWEST STUDENTS...

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

THIS COULD BE YOU.

MAY THE FARCE BE WITH YOU

OR... THE EMPIRE SINGS FLAT

Written and Directed by Brady and Eli Bourgard

July 30th - Aug 24th Wednesday-Saturday at 7:00pm Sunday at 2:00pm Adults: $18 Students/Seniors $16

1-877-SIXTHST (208) 752-8871

sixthstreetmelodrama.com

Sunday, Aug 3rd America’s Burkas: The Blurred Line Between Church and State

VISUAL ART HOT SUMMER NIGHT

While last month’s First Friday was coincidentally overshadowed by a much larger event — our country’s independence — August’s lineup of participating artists and venues is set to make up for it. Don’t let the sticky, hot forecast keep you from enjoying cool art in the equally cool, air-conditioned galleries. Many are serving cold refreshments, like River City Brewing, which is bringing back its Liquid Art Series, featuring a one-time pouring of a cask-conditioned beer. This month’s schedule also offers something for the kids, with Polka Dot Pottery’s “Pint Size Picasso” painting class ($10; registration required), for ages 10 and up. Local foodies shouldn’t miss the chance to enjoy a sixcourse benefit dinner prepared by Chef Jeremy Hansen of Santé in Riverfront Park, along the river. Tickets for the dinner are $100-$150 (call 625-6601), and proceeds benefit the Salvation Army. — CHEY SCOTT First Friday • Fri, Aug. 1, artist receptions from 5-8 pm • Gallery receptions free • Downtown Spokane • Event map and show descriptions at Inlander. com/FirstFriday

Rev. Dr. Todd Eklof, UUCS Minister

Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane

4340 W. Ft. Wright Drive 509-325-6383 www.uuspokane.org

Sunday Services

Religious Ed & Childcare

9:15 & 11am

2015

Sand tobogganing

STUDENT TRIP TO

AUSTRALIA Local meeting: August 7th For details and to RSVP: 800.669.7882 PeopletoPeople.com/InlandNW

Epic adventures

Welcome t o Idaho’s wilderness paradise.

Experience Hells Canyon with the deepest river gorge in North America or take a dip in the Salmon River “of no return”. Blast down rapids aboard rafts or kayaks and then go back up by way of jet boat. If biking is more your speed, choose from leisure-paved trails along creeks and rivers to 5,400-foot climbs. Wind down your trip on a leisurely “top ten scenic drives” through our natural wonderland. Find out more and plan your visit to this hidden paradise.

VISUAL ART SCENE ON THE GREEN

East of the state line, another summer arts tradition arrives as North Idaho College gears up to host the 46th annual Art on the Green festival. Held on the tree-shaded campus overlooking Lake Coeur d’Alene, the event showcases work by more than 135 artists from the region and beyond. Local live music and family entertainment on two stages at the festival are also scheduled all weekend. Splash in the water on the city beach after perusing festival tents of handcrafted wares in all types of materials. If you’re still hungry for a local culture fix, or a reason to get out to the lovely Lake City this summer, the downtown Coeur d’Alene Street Fair coincides with Art on the Green. — CHEY SCOTT Art on the Green • Aug. 1-3: Fri, noon-7:30 pm; Sat, 10 am-7:30 pm; Sun, 10 am-5 pm • Free admission • North Idaho College • artonthegreencda.com

Explore the beauty and fun today at: www.visitnorthcentralidaho.org 208.507.1904

JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 53


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess CHEAT EXHAUSTION

My girlfriend and I are mostly happy together, but we have this ongoing fight where she accuses me of wanting to cheat whenever I so much as glance at a woman she perceives to be my “type” (any woman roughly her age and ethnicity). Even flipping through a magazine that shows a woman in an ad is enough to set her off. She says I need to eliminate all contact with other women, or I’m being unfaithful. But I don’t see how I AMY ALKON can stop doing things like talking to the checker at the supermarket or looking at someone crossing the street. -Blamed It’s normal for a girlfriend to expect her boyfriend to “keep it in his pants.” Only yours wants your eyeballs in there, too, as she considers crossing the street with your eyes open a form of cheating. When you love somebody, it isn’t exactly outrageous to fear losing them. And the suspicion that a partner is cheating can often be an instinctive response to subtle signs that they are. But such signs include flimsy excuses for working late or ducking into the hall closet to take phone calls — not merely daring to open a magazine that includes pictures of females who lack beaks, paws, and tails. There’s a good chance your girlfriend behaves this way because she has a giant crater where her self-worth is supposed to be. As for her paranoia, to be human is to have a tendency toward ridiculous, overblown fears, but we also have the capacity — gone unused in your girlfriend — to follow them up with a chaser of reason. The sad thing is, you might have compelled her to work on changing if only you’d told her “enough is enough” instead of just wagging your tail while she tightened your choke collar. Thanks to your enabling, there are now 300 of you in the relationship — you, your girlfriend, and her 298 fears. If you’d like to change that, wait for a moment when you aren’t being prosecuted for something and ask to talk about the relationship. Explain that you love her and want to be with her but that she’s increasingly pushing you away with her irrational (and, frankly, insulting) accusations and behavior. Tell her that she’ll need to see a therapist and show meaningful improvement if she wants to keep you around. (Cognitive behavioral therapy, which helps people use reason to solve emotional problems, is probably the best bet.) Give yourself a deadline, and reassess — maybe at the three-month mark — so you don’t keep getting used to crazy little by little until crazy becomes the new normal. That’s how a guy ends up being the one apologizing when he comes home to a bonfire of his clothes, computer, and Xbox after his girlfriend catches him in the act — smiling and thanking the supermarket checkout lady instead of staring at his shoes and wordlessly extending his palm for his change.

FLING THEORY

I’ve been casually seeing a woman for a year. Early on, I told her I wasn’t looking for a girlfriend. I think she was disappointed, but we continued seeing each other nonexclusively. She never pressures me for more commitment, but I suspect she’s getting more attached. I’d like to keep seeing her, but is it on me to break this off? Maybe she should be trying to find a real relationship with another guy. -Informal Maybe she hopes you’ll eventually come around — at least to the point where you’re standing beside her at the altar, sliding her wedding ring on, and saying, “Hey, don’t read too much into this.” Still, even if she does want more from you, she might prefer having less to having nothing at all. Also, if she is looking for something “real,” this thing with you can help her avoid coming off hungry and desperate, much like snacking before grocery shopping can help you avoid waking up next to a bunch of empty doughnut boxes. Let her know you’re still up for less, simply by saying you want to make sure she’s still okay with how you want to keep things casual. If it’s too painful or unrewarding for her to continue, it’s on her to break it off. The thing is, though “serious” relationships are supposedly the only “real” relationships, there are people out there — women, too — who are most comfortable with a less intense form of togetherness. This kind of slimmed-down relationship can end up lasting for years — even decades. In other words, 50 years from now, when you’re reserving side-by-side burial plots, you could find yourself whispering to the cemetery guy, “Wouldja do me a favor and bury me a few extra feet from her? I don’t wanna give her the wrong idea.” n ©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

54 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

UP ON THE ROOF: A TASTE OF UNITY 6th annual benefit event for Unity in the Community, featuring a silent auction, local cuisine, wine bar, live entertainment and music. Proceeds support the purchase of school supplies given out to local kids in need. Aug. 1, 5:30-10 pm. Free. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. nwunity.org (209-2625) FOOD WITH BENEFITS An event benefiting Communities in Schools of Spokane County, with 20 percent of proceeds donated to the organization to help local students. Aug. 4, 5-7:30 pm. Perry Street Brewing, 1025 S. Perry St. perrystreetbrewing.com (413-1436)

COMEDY

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. bluznews.com (483-7300) EXPEDITION A fast-paced improvised comedy show, rated for all ages. Fridays all summer, through Aug. 29, at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) OPEN MIC COMEDY Live stand-up comedy, open to newcomers and experienced comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. (475-6209) SHORT STACKS The BDT Players & Friends try out new material, rework ideas, and share comedic talents in stand-up, sketch, music, film and more. First Friday (Aug. 1) of the month at 10 pm. $5. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Not rated.) Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) OPEN MIC COMEDY Wednesdays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Brooklyn Deli & Lounge, 122 S. Monroe St. (835-4177)

COMMUNITY

DEER PARK CITY-WIDE GARAGE SALE The community hosts yard sales throughout the city, with more than 100 sale sites within city limits. Aug. 1-3. Deer Park, Wash. (279-8802) MEALS ON WHEELS ICE CREAM SOCIAL To thank the community for its support and donations of 60 fans to keep Meals on Wheels’ clients cool this summer. Aug. 1, 10 am-2 pm. Free. Silver Cafe, 4803 N. Nevada. gscmealsonwheels.org (924-6976) TEEN POOL PARTIES Featuring music, basketball and volleyball with food and beverages for purchase. Open to all teens ages 13-18. Aug. 1, 15 and 18, from 7-9 pm. $2. Hillyard Aquatic Center, 3000 E. Columbia Ave. (363-5415) KURONEKOCON 6th annual anime and Japanese culture convention. August 2-3. $20-$30. Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. kuronekocon.com SPOKANE HIGHLAND GAMES The annual Scottish culture celebration features live entertainment, heavy athletics, dancing, kids’ games, clan tents, cultural demos and more. Aug. 2, 9 am5:30 pm. $5-$10. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. spokanehighlandgames.org (927-0023) WANDERMERE COMMUNITY FAIR Community festival showcasing lo-

cal food and fresh produce, art, music, a kid’s zone and more. Aug. 2, 9 am-1 pm. Free. Numerica Credit Union, 405 E. Farwell Rd. numericacu.com/events/ (535-7613) 100 HOURS OF CAMPFIRE Camp Fire Inland Northwest celebrates its 100th anniversary, with a daily evening fire pit and smores, kids crafts, a dunk tank, car shows, live music and Camp Fire songs sung every night, Aug. 4-8. Free. Wandermere Center, 12400 N. Division. (747-6191) SPOKANE’S FAMILY FARM TOUR Learn about a working dairy farm, including the modern technology and safety skills to milk cows. Aug. 4 and 13, from 3:30-5 pm. $3/person. Spokane Family Farm, 21715 W. Coulee Hite Rd. exploringfamilies.com NIGHT OUT AGAINST CRIME An annual celebration with neighborhood events held around the U.S. to strengthen neighborhood spirit and police–community partnerships in the community. Aug. 5. Find events at spokanecops.org (835-4572) KSPS FITKIDS DAY KSPS FitKids Day returns with special guests Curious George and Buddy from Dinosaur Train, offering fun activities for young children at the Ferris HS football field. Aug. 8, 10 am-noon. Free. ksps.org/community (443-7700)

OMAK STAMPEDE The 81st Annual festival starts with the Thursday morning ride-in, and includes a carnival, Indian encampment, grand parade western and Native American art show, rodeo, dances and local vendors. The highlight is Sunday’s famous Suicide Race. Omak, Wash. omakstampede.org (800-933-6625) NINE MILE FALLS DAM DAYS The annual community event starts with a Friday night dinner and a a screening of “Footloose” ($5/family) under the stars, a silent and live auction, and a teen dance ($1). Sat events include the Dam Days 5K ($10-$25), kids activities, vendor fair, chuck wagon and live music. Aug. 8-9, Fri from 6-10 pm, Sat from 6:30 am-8:30 pm. Sontag Park. ninemilecommunityclub.org/damdays ROCKIN’ THE RIVERS Three-day rock music fest. Lineup includes The Pretty Reckless, Hinder, Lita Ford, Jefferson Starship and more. Aug. 8-10. Three Forks, Mont. rockintherivers.com SCHWEITZER HUCKLEBERRY FEST Annual festival featuring free kids’ music, hosted huckleberry hikes, huckleberry pancake breakfast, crafts and activities, wine tasting and more. Aug. 8. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, Sandpoint. schweitzer.com (208-263-9555)

FESTIVAL

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS Drama about two teens who meet and fall in love at a cancer support group, based on the novel of the same name. Showing July 31-Aug. 3; times vary. $3-$6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main, Moscow. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) FREE KSPS MOVIES Riverfront Park and KSPS host a screening series of locally-produced documentaries about the region. Screenings offered MonThur, at 10 am. Riverfront Park IMAX Theatre, 507 N. Howard St. (625-6623) SELKIRK INTERNATIONAL FILM FEST The 5th annual screening of 10 short films from the US and Canada with connections to the local or regional area, including comedy, drama, documentary and experimental films. July 31, 7-9 pm. $5. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park, Metaline Falls. tinyurl.com/o29vadp THE PRINCESS BRIDE Outdoor film screening in the park at dusk. Aug. 2. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd, Liberty Lake. (755-6726) SOUTH PERRY SUMMER THEATER: RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK Outdoor movie screening, starts at dusk. Aug. 2. Free. The Shop, 924 S. Perry. (534-1647) SWIM & A MOVIE: THE LEGO MOVIE The Spokane County aquatic centers (North & South) host a 2-hour swim followed by a family-friendly film screening at dusk. Aug. 2, 6 pm. $2-$4. Spokane County Aquatic Centers. spokanecounty.org/parks DOLLAR SUMMER MOVIES Screenings sponsored by the Kootenai Alliance for Children and Families. Aug. 5-6, 10 am. $1. Regal Cinemas Riverstone Stadium 14, 2416 Old Mill Loop, CdA. (800-326-3264) THE HUNTING FILM TOUR The touring festival highlights conservation-minded adventures through outdoor films about archery, muzzleloader and rifle hunts for Big Game, wingshooting, waterfowling and more. Aug. 5, 7 pm. $14. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7404)

RIVERSTONE STREET FAIR Coeur d’Alene’s Riverstone Village hosts a weekly outdoor market and street fair, hosting 200+ vendors of arts and crafts, food, live music, a farmers market and more. Thursdays from 4-9 pm, through Aug. 28. Free. riverstonestreetfair.com COEUR D’ALENE STREET FAIR The annual community festival features 250+ vendors of arts, crafts, food and live entertainment, and coincides with Art on the Green and Taste of the CdA weekend. Aug 1-3. Free. cdadowntown. com (208-415-0116) COLVILLE RENDEZVOUS DAYS The Northeast Wash. town’s annual community celebration features live music and entertainment, arts and crafts, kids activities, an encampment, Battle of the Bands and more. Aug. 1-3. Free. Colville, Wash. colvillerendezvous.org FIVE SUNS BLUEGRASS FESTIVAL A two-day, live music festival with free camping, instrument workshops, band jams, a barbecue and more. This year’s headliners include the Pearl Snaps, Della Mae and Chatham County Line. Aug. 1-2, music events start at 4 pm daily. Free. Moses Lake McCosh Park, 401 W. Fourth Ave. fivesunsbluegrass.com HILLYARD FESTIVAL & HI-JINX PARADE The annual neighborhood celebration includes a festival in Harmon-Shipley Park, with local vendors, food, live music, a beer garden, games, car shows and fireworks (Sat.) Parade starts at 9:30 am on Sat, Aug. 2 on North Market St. Aug. 1-3. Free. tinyurl.com/ncgms6v MYSTERIUM The 15th annual celebration and meet-up for fans of the game Myst, created by Cyan Inc., based in Spokane. Aug. 1-3. Comfort Inn University District, 923 E. Third Ave. mysterium.net (509-535-9000) MYST OPEN HOUSE In conjunction with Mysterium event, Cyan, Inc. hosts an open house. Events will include presentations, tours, and a Q&A by Myst creators. Cyan is at 14617 Newport Hwy. Aug. 2, 10 am-noon. Free. cyan.com

FILM


FOOD & DRINK

FIRST FRIDAY: DINNER WITH SANTÉ Sante hosts a 6-course dinner in the park, benefitting the Salvation Army. Includes live music by Floating Crowbar, wine pairings by Overbluff and Treveri Cellars. Seating is along the Spokane River. $100/ person; with a limited number of premium tickets at $150. Aug. 1, 5:30-8:30 pm. Riverfront Park. (625-6601) SUNSET DESSERT TRAIN TOUR The annual, one-night event returns, featuring wine and desserts from Celebrations Bakery during a sunset tour of Riverfront Park. Ages 21+ only; pre-registration required. Aug. 5, 7:30-9:30 pm. $35/person. Riverfront Park. spokaneparks.org (625-6601) COOKING CLASS WITH CHEF HEGSTED Adam Hegsted of The Yards Bruncheon and the Wandering Table leads a class focusing on his philosophy of using locally-sourced ingredients to make brunch-style comfort food. Aug. 6, 5 pm. $50. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org NEIGHBORHOOD BARBECUE SERIES Central Lutheran Church hosts weekly neighborhood barbecues every Wednesday at 6 pm, through Aug. 27. Free. Central Lutheran, 512 S. Bernard. (624-9233) SENSATIONAL SALMON Learn new ways to prepare the Northwest’s favorite fish, including a salmon cheviche with mango, lime and cilantro; steamed salmon and Korean salmon meatballs with kimchi mayo. Aug. 6, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) WINES BY THE YARDS An evening of wine tasting and food next to the Spokane River, hosted by the Spokane Winery Association and featuring more than 30 wines, with light hors d’oeuvres. Aug. 7, 5:30 pm. $40/person; $75/pair. The Nest at Kendall Yards, 1335 Summit Parkway. spokanewineries.net/event

MUSIC

ALEX & THE KALEIDOSCOPE BAND: Family/world music concert. Aug. 1, 7:30 pm. $5-$15. The JACC, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) KASLO JAZZ FEST The 23rd annual music festival. $15-$66/youth; $35-$161/ adults. Aug. 1-3. Kootenay Lake, Kaslo, BC. kaslojazzfest.com SCENIC SIX FIDDLE SHOW The annual show features regional fiddlers and folk musicians, including the Potlatch Junior Jammers (ages 8-18). Aug. 2, 6 pm. $5; kids 18 and under free. Potlatch High School. (208-875-0947) SOLO PIANO FEAT. LOUIS LANDON Solo performance by the renowned pianist, who’s traveled the world to perform. Aug. 2, 7 pm. Free. Steinway Piano Gallery, 13418 E. Nora Ave. (327-4266) TRA LE GAEL CELTIC ENSEMBLE The ensemble performs energetic jigs, reels and ballads during the Spokane Highland Games. Aug. 2, 2-3 pm. $8-$10. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. spokanehighlandgames.org THE NEW OLD TIME CHAUTAQUA A vaudeville-style show by the traveling performance troupe. Aug. 3, 7 pm. $15/adults; kids under 13 free. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. chautauqua.org (747-3012) ADAM MILLER Performance by the award-winning folksinger, storyteller, and autoharp virtuoso. Aug. 4, 6 pm. Free. CdA Library, 702 E. Front. (208-769-2315)

Thank you. Avista would like to thank the many local citizens and businesses we serve for their patience while our crews restored power knocked out by the fierce wind storm that swept through our region on July 23. The storm affected nearly 40,000 customers. Avista crews and enlisted subcontractors worked around-the-clock, replacing more than 120 transmission and distribution poles downed by high winds, falling trees and other debris. It was the worst storm damage to our electric system since Ice Storm in 1996. We appreciate the kind words that many of you offered. We’re committed to providing you with safe and reliable power.

Thank you, from all of us at Avista.

Avista_073114_12H_CP_NEW.pdf

JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 55


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56 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

EVENTS | CALENDAR PLAZA CONCERT SERIES FEAT. JEANNE MCHALE The Plaza opens to the public at 5:30 pm with beer, wine and other beverages available. Music starts at 6:30 pm. Aug. 4, 5:30-8 pm. Free. 1912 Center, 412 E. Third, Moscow. 1912center.org (208-669-2249) OPERA ON A SUMMER’S EVE Opera performance featuring local vocalists, including Jadd Davis, Kimberly Monzon, Heather Parker, Carlos Monzon and Derrick Parker. Aug. 5, 7:30 pm. $20-$25. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

ALOHA RACE SERIES Mountain Gear hosts 5 stand-up paddleboard races on Liberty Lake. Aug. 7 and 14 from 6:308:30 pm. $15. Liberty Lake Regional Park, 3707 S. Zephyr Rd. tinyurl.com/ mekaedl (340-1151) BACKPACKING BASICS II REI hosts a small group session on how to cut weight and tailor your gear to best suit your needs for a backpacking trip. July 31, 7 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe (328-9900) SPOKANE INDIANS VS. HILLSBORO HOPS Games daily July 30-Aug. 3, WedSat at 6:30 pm, Sun at 3:30 pm. $5-$11/ single game. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana. spokaneindians.com (535-2922) THURSDAY NIGHT PADDLES The CdA Canoe & Kayak club hosts weekly paddles, open to the public, Thursdays from 5:30-7:30 pm. See website for details. Free. cdacanoekayakclub.com EIGHT LAKES LEGS ACHE 16th annual bike ride, offering routes of 15, 30, 45 or 75-miles, with the longest routes passing by eight area lakes. Proceeds benefit Lutheran Community Services NW. Aug. 2. $45-$55. Start/finish at Group Health, 5615 Sunset Hwy. lcsnw. org (343-5020) GEOCACHING ON THE PACK RIVER DELTA This family-oriented activity introduces hikers to the popular sport of geocaching. Aug. 2, 10:30 am-3 pm. Free. Sandpoint. idahoconservation. org/events (208-265-9565) KIDS’ GOLF TOURNAMENT Ninehole, scramble-style tournament for kids ages 6-12, open to teams of 3-5. Registration includes lunch; parents must caddy. All levels welcome. Aug. 2, 9 am-5 pm. $25. Eagle Ridge Short Course, 5840 S. Meadow Lane Rd. kidsgolftournament.com (990-6088) LILAC CITY CHARITY KICKBALL TOURNAMENT Kickball tournament hosted by Dan Dickau, benefiting local charities in the Spokane area. Co-ed, 10 players min/team; with competitive and friendly divisions. Also includes a beer garden, food vendors and raffle. Aug. 2. $350/team. Franklin Park, 302 W. Queen. idolsports.com (328-2402) LONG BRIDGE SWIM Swim 1.76 miles across Lake Pend Oreille in Sandpoint in the 20th annual open-water event which helps fund swimming lessons for local children and adults. Aug. 2, 9 am. $20-$30. longbridgeswim.org MIDNIGHT CENTURY An annual, informal and unsupported 100-mile nighttime bicycle ride on dirt roads through rural areas around Spokane. Aug. 2, 11:59 pm. Free. Elk Public House, 1931 W. Pacific Ave. midnightcentury.com (509363-1973)

REI GARAGE SALE Shop slightly-used or returned gear and clothing at deep discounts. Quantities are limited, items are sold as is, and all sales are final. Access to REI members only. Aug. 2, 8 am. REI, 1125 N. Monroe. (328-9900) WASHINGTON TRAILS ASSOC. WORK PARTIES Register online to spend a day giving back to trails at Mount Spokane State Park. Projects are to improve trails for all user groups; 24 hrs. of volunteer service on State Park trails earns a Discover Pass. Upcoming work parties: Aug. 2-3, 14, 16-19, from 8:30 am-3:30 pm. Mt. Spokane State Park. wta.org (921-8928) THE COLOR RUN The 5K, un-timed race douses runners in eco-friendly powdered dye and includes an after-run “Finish Festival.” Aug. 3, 8 am. $35-$45. Downtown Spokane. thecolorrun.com/ spokane PITCH FOR THE CURE The 8th annual breast cancer awareness event hosted by the Spokane Indians includes a 1-mile walk around the stadium and a pre-game ceremony before the Indians play the Hillsboro Hops. Proceeds benefit the E. Wash. chapter of the Komen Foundation. Aug. 3, 3 pm. $15/kids, $25/adults. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. (343-6811) HANDS-ON BIKE MAINTENANCE REI bike techs share tips and tricks for fixing a flat, changing a bike tube and getting back on the go. Participants should bring their own wheel, tire and tube to work on during the class. All necessary tools and equipment are provided. Aug. 7, 7 pm. Free/members; $20/nonmembers. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. (328-9900) SPOKANE INDIANS VS. EVERETT AQUASOX Games held daily Aug. 7-9 at 6:30 pm. $5-$11/single game. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. spokaneindians.com (535-2922) 14TH ANNUAL MOTO X Arena motocross racing event featuring local pros and amateurs, with high-flying stunts by Metal Mulisha. Also on site are local vendors, food, and a beer garden. Aug. 8-9, events start at 7 pm; doors open at 5:30 pm. $10-$15. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. northidahofair.com (208-667-8515)

THEATER

AVENUE Q Performance of the hit musical comedy. Through Aug 9, Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $14-$20. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. lakecityplayhouse.org (208-667-1323) THE EMPIRE SINGS FLAT Summer season production of an original, locallywritten Western-themed melodrama. July 30-Aug. 24, Wed-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $16-$18. Sixth Street Theater, 212 Sixth St., Wallace. sixthstreetmelodrama.com (208-752-8871) GOLDILOCKS & THE THREE PIGS A comedic mash-up of the fairytale characters from the “Three Little Pigs” and “Goldilocks & the Three Bears.” Through Aug. 2, Thur-Sat at 7 pm and Sat-Sun at 3 pm. $8-$12. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway Ave., Ste. 1. (342-2055) LET’S MURDER MARSHA A dinner theater event performed by the Empire Theatre Co., telling the comedy of Marsha Gilmore as she tries to stop what she believes to be her own murder. Aug. 1 at 6:30 pm. $25. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln. etcspokane.com (3278000)

TOMATO PLANT GIRL Outdoor theater performance on the Hartung lawn geared toward young audiences. Picnics welcome. July 31-Aug. 2, all shows at 7 pm. $5/youth, $15/adults. University of Idaho Hartung Theater, 709 Deakin Ave, Moscow. uidaho.edu/class/irt (208-885-6465) SINGING IN THE RAIN CYT Spokane performs a stage adaptation of the classic musical film. Aug. 1-9, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, also Sat at 3 pm. $13-$14. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. cytspokane.com (227-7404) SYLVIA Performance of the play about a dog, written by A.R. Gurney, and performed by the Unknown Locals. Aug. 1-2 at 7:30 pm. $10-$12. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave, Sandpoint. panida.org (208-255-7801) CDA SUMMER THEATRE: THE ADDAMS FAMILY CST is the first professional regional theater to produce the new musical comedy, a recent Broadway hit. Aug. 7-24, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm. Thurs.-7:30 pm and 2 pm through Aug. 24. $27-$49. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasummertheatre.com MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM Performance of Shakespeare’s “funniest magical romantic comedy” in collaboration with EWU. Aug. 7-17, Wed-Sun, show times vary. $28/adults; $22/senior, military; $12/students. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. (455-7529)

VISUAL ARTS

ART ON THE GREEN The 46th annual arts festival hosted by the Citizens’ Council for the Arts features more than 135 professional artists selling their work, along with local performers, hands-on art activities, food and more. Aug 1-3, Fri noon-7:30 pm, Sat 10 am-7:30 pm, Sun 10 am-5 pm. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. artonthegreencda.com (208-667-9346) CLEANING OFF THE SHELVES The gallery hosts its annual studio sale, offering pottery pieces for sale by local artists to make room for this fall’s exhibitions. Aug. 1 from 5-8 pm, Aug. 2 from noon-4 pm. Free to the public. Trackside Studio, 115 S. Adams St. tracksidestudio.net (981-9916) PRIEST LAKE INTERPRETATIONS & MORE The work of local artist JoAnne M. Hungate is on display through the month, featuring acrylics and watercolor reflections of Priest Lake. Reception Aug. 3, from 1-3 pm. Show runs through Aug. 31. Free. Entree Gallery, 1755 Reeder Bay Rd. entreegallery.com (208-443-2001) DROP IN & DRAW Drop into INK for 2 hrs. of creativity, with paper, crayons, pencils, and a creative challenge provided for inspiration. Grades K-12. Please register so we can make sure we have room for everyone. Aug. 2, 10 am-noon. Free. INK Art Space, 224 W. Sprague Ave. inkspokane.org JAPANESE FLOWER ARRANGING CLASS Learn how to make Japanese floral arrangements called Ikebana. Classes start Aug. 4 and are held Mondays at 4 pm through Oct. 20. Registration required. $7/class or $35/five classes. Japanese Cultural Center, 4000 W. Randolph Rd. mfwi.edu/JCC (3282971 x 223) MIDWEEK MONET A class designed to let participants relax over a glass of wine while an experienced local artist gives a step by step introduction to


acrylic painting. Offered Aug. 6, Aug. 20 and Sept. 3 at 5:30 pm. $40/class. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. thejacklincenter.org (208-457-8950)

WORDS

3 MINUTE MIC Auntie’s monthly poetry open mic. August’s “Remember the Word” featured reader is Nathan Weinbender, from “Movies 101” and the S-R. Hosted by Chris Cook. Aug. 1, 7-8:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) BOOTSLAM SPS’s usual all-comers performance poetry throw-down with a $50 grand prize. “New Poem New Year” continues, so world premiere poems in the

first round earn you one extra point. Aug. 3, 7:30-10:30 pm. $5. Boots, 24 W. Main. spokanepoetryslam.org SALISH SCHOOL OF SPOKANE Students and staff from the Salish School of Spokane share the rich cultural heritage of the first people of the Spokane region. Learn common Salish words and phrases, hear traditional stories and more. Aug. 5, 6:30 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley St. (444-5390) YOUTH WRITING WORKSHOP With the help of an experienced author, explore a variety of strategies and resources for generating writing ideas. Grades 7-12. Aug. 5, 1:30-3:30 pm. Free. INK Art Space, 224 W. Sprague. inkspokane.org

ETC.

BUILD NIGHT An evening of electronics building co-hosted by instructables.com Youth ages 10+ may participate with an adult. Preregistration required. Aug. 4, 4-7:30 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley St. (444-5331) SPOKANE MOVES TO AMEND THE CONSTITUTION The local activist group meets on the first Tuesdays of the month (Aug. 5). at 6:30 pm. Donations accepted. Liberty Park Methodist Church, 1526 E. 11th Ave. (844-1776) HOMESCHOOL WORKSHOPS Offering 28 workshops in 7 hours, including sessions on considering homeschooling,

GREEN

ZONE GREEN ZONE | PARENTING

‘Only Risk’ Why pregnant or breastfeeding mothers should avoid cannabis BY KATE GIBBONS

I

s it safe to smoke pot while breastfeeding? This question has been trending across mommy blogs, health sites and through cannabis culture lately as marijuana continues to be decriminalized. Some argue that marijuana can lead to sudden infant

getting started, pulling your kids out of school, help for burnout, homeschooling teens, local support groups & co-ops, field trips, blogging and more. Aug. 6, 10 am-5 pm. $5-$10/adult. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo, Liberty Lake. exploringfamilies.com (999-7614) PICKER’S PARADISE FLEA MARKET Vendor market offering collectibles, crafts, repurposed goods, furniture, produce, plants and more. $10/vendor space. Held the first Sat. of the month (Aug. 2, Sept. 6, Oct. 4) from 9 am-4 pm. Newport, Wash. tinyurl.com/kno29oc ST. JOHN’S CATHEDRAL TOURS Guided tours of the cut-stone, English Gothic Revival cathedral designed by Spokanite

REAC

164,0

H

00

SPOK AN COUN E T READ Y ERS

Harold C. Whitehouse, featuring a unique collection of Medieval-style French stained glass by Charles J. Connick and William Willet & Sons, a 4,100+ pipe organ, and a 49-bell carillon. Offered Wed, Fri and Sat from 11 am-2 pm. Free. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th. (838-4277) FULLY-INFORMED JURORS SEMINAR The Fully Informed Jury Association and The Human Solution lead a workshop on jurors’ right of conscientious acquittal and how jury nullification can be used to protect peaceful people from unjust prosecutions in marijuana-related cases. Aug. 2, 1-2:30 pm. Free. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main. aji@fija.org (406-442-7800) n

BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 and Initiative 502). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington State, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor Control Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

CALL 325-0634 xt. 215 EMAIL sales@Inlander.com

death syndrome, attention deficit disorder and other serious medical issues, but many believe that it is a natural herb that if used properly is harmless. For ethical reasons, research on the subject is limited — a scientific study would require one half of a pool of breastfeeding mothers to smoke weed — and gleaned from retrospective studies or inferred from studies of adolescents. “Honestly, the answer is we don’t know,” says Dr. Douglas Barber, director of the Sacred Heart Center for Maternal Fetal Medicine. “But this is a scenario where there could only be harm. No benefit.” According to Barber, what is known is that THC, the active ingredient in marijuana, is a soluble lipid that can be passed to babies through breast milk, and that THC in adolescents and adults has been proven to cause visual impairment and negative impacts on short-term memory, among other effects. In addition, THC also stays within the body for 20 to 36 hours, rendering ineffective the “pump and dump”

practice many new moms use with alcohol. Beyond transference, Barber also warns that smoking marijuana puts babies at the same secondhand smoke risks as tobacco smoking and could negatively impact a mother’s ability to care for her child. “You could certainly see respiratory disorders from secondhand smoke,” Barber says. “And you never know how it could affect the mother functionally.” There are no known ongoing large or slated studies to research the effects of marijuana on breastfeeding mothers, but Barber suspects that with legalization, women will be more willing to disclose their use, effectively adding more information to the proverbial pot of information on the topic. In the meantime, Barber advises his patients to abstain. “We don’t recommend that women actively use marijuana while pregnant or breastfeeding,” Barber said. “This drug in particular probably only carries risk.” n

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44. Ace 48. Triangular sail 50. Make stand out 51. Kennedy Center event 53. Zero 54. Sykora of the NHL 55. Dazes 58. “Zorba the Greek” setting 60. “Piece of cake!” 64. When dinner may be served 65. Street ____ 66. Buffalo’s lake 67. “Soap” family 68. Company with toy trucks 69. TV anchor Brockman of “The Simpsons” DOWN 1. “I did NOT need to hear that!” 2. Have something

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JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 59


WE’VE GOT YOU COVERED!

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Deadline is one week prior to publication Inlander.com/GetListed

60 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

I Saw You

You Saw Me

Cheers

Jeers

Hardware Store I think I saw you Marty! Did you see me? We worked at the Flying J/Subway at Geiger. I have good memories of you. Then I thought I saw you at the hardware store were I work in the South Hill. I was busy with a customer and I glanced over and I thought it was you. You stepped outside and you stopped and looked at me through the front door and I was busy with the customer and then you were gone. Wish I hadn’t been busy with the customer. Wish you had said hi. Next time you are in the area drop in and say hi or drop me an email at Belovedgypsy@hotmail.com.

Birthday Sara Beara! Love Banana Boat

a friend the other week when I asked why he was wearing pajamas in Atilanos, I discovered what I thought were pajamas, were his clothes in which he played frisbee golf in the cold winter mornings back in March. To be sure they were flannel pants with a drawstring. But these were not pajamas. They were sports pants! Also, sometimes, to all the people who can’t do much more than wear pjs because they are ill and are just waiting at the pharmacy for medicine, I salute you for making out when you feel so horrible. When I was in high school, when things were a lot more fun, your friends showed up early before school and kidnapped you and made you dress in silly clothes, including your pajamas to wear to school. This way you could lounge and be comfy for one day without having to worry about what to wear in that scene and be silly. Maybe, too, wearing pajamas is some kind of protest of a world which values wearing 100 dollar jeans or 300 dollar shoes most people can’t afford and saying, you know what. There are more important things in life, like a monk or a nun does when they join a religious order. After all, there are times when nuns and priests in certain orders go without care for worldly definitions of personal worth. Kudos to you for seeing beyond this materialistic veneer, and for daring to be comfortable, pajama wearers! College students, studying hard for finals can be found in their pajamas. Time to look hard at what people assume just because someone might wear pajamas. Like maybe they’re depressed or lazy. When that judgement is far from the truth, and really, you just can’t know until you walk in that person’s shoes.

over our balding heads. Cheers to you and the high likelihood that your offspring will follow in your compressed and enlarged footsteps.

Cheers Jeanette. I Will Always Miss You! No you’re not dead, but I think your feelings might be. I’ll always love you. Hope this gets you thinking of me. TNT RE: Life I’m glad you found a place to vent in last week’s Inlander, but you said it all when you said you feel… empty. Not a lot of fun or joy in the life you described. But be of good cheer! I think we all go there from time to time, but comparing yourself to others is no way to live; as Styx said so long ago, remember that life can be a grand illusion, and deep inside we’re all the same. And deep inside you have a big hole crying out to be filled. Without knowing anything else about you I can offer you the one sure answer for the darkness you’re in: You need Jesus, my friend. Dismiss me for a freak if you will, but as an unemployed 29-year-old still living at home with few if any close friends, the world will tell you you’re a loser; Jesus won’t. Maybe you’ve never been told that you have value because you were created in the image of a loving God. Maybe you’ve never been told that your life has meaning and purpose, and you are loved beyond all comprehension by an infinite, personal Savior who longs to have a relationship with you. He loved you so much that He was willing to die in your place to set you free. And He has a plan for your life that is good, and right, and true. Take a chance and get to know Him. There are plenty of great churches in this town that will welcome you and help you understand what it means to follow Jesus. I wish I could talk with you in person, but since I can’t, if you do nothing else go to needhim.org. I promise you someone will really listen and help you find joy in the only place it can really be found. Er Mer Gerd, Herpy Berthder! To my bestest friend in the world!!!!! We’ve been friends for so frickin’ long and I think you deserve a thing in The Inlander. So here. Happy

Out of Gas To the gentleman named John who works at the strip mall by Applebee’s off of the Pines exit, you are such a kind man! Thank you so much for helping me out when I ran out of gas on my way to work and had to run up the Pines exit to the nearest gas station. I was utterly embarrassed but you paid it no mind. You just helped me out like the good Samaritan that you are. Thank you so much and may all of our cars run smoothly (including your daughter’s who got stranded downtown near the Opera House. Hello Batman I love you. Further frustration on both ends but I understand where you are. I hope it won’t be long until we gaze upon each other again. I love you until the end of the world and will wait forever. You are my only true love. I await the next meeting

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” with rapt anticipation. Remember the Batcave is always open and ready to accept you. Life is too short for unhappiness. We belong together for eternity. I will extend my previous offer for a haven for both you and your daughter. She can get on her feet and you can feel happiness in your life again. Please consider seriously. I love you, your Batgirl. Good Samaritan I’d like to give a heartfelt Thank You to the wonderful silver haired gentlemen who so kindly helped me when lost on north side of Spokane, Monday, July 21, 2014 while trying to donate car full of donations to Washington state fire victims. Your genuine caring nature was so appreciated. After stopping and asking for directions on Adams Street you very kindly offered to let me follow you to KHQ. I wanted to thank you in person, but after getting me there you waved and continued on after going out of your way to help a stranger. Thank you very much sir. The world is truly a better place having people like you in it. Lady from Twin Lakes, Idaho. Cheers To Wearing Pajamas In Public Hey! I want to say cheers to everyone who wears pajamas in public, because there’s so many great reasons for it, sarcasm free. Sometimes, pajamas aren’t just pajamas, as I learned from

My Wonderful Kids JJ, I am very proud of you. You are the most amazing boy. I’m proud of how well you did in kindergarten and how fast you learn and how you use your manners. You are doing so good at reading and I just love how you LOVE reading. You will be 6 soon and it seems just yesterday you were in diapers wearing cowboy boots. You can sure make me and your dad laugh.... I love how you are shy and so interested in learning new things. You are so smart and such a kind loving caring boy. I’m so proud, I just can’t say that enough. I love our little special moments from going to the pet store and looking at the pets to playing with trucks and cars and setting a trap for the big T-REX or watching you run your little butt off on the rogers track or how much you love our family vacations and staying in a motel, its just so simple with you... You my little cowboy need to seriously stop growing, you will never be to big for my hugs and kisses. I love you, oh and hey look in the treasure box for something special, Eastside 151 Girl U know who this is, so just want you to know how much I miss you and love you my 151 and whiskey girl from the eastside! Too bad for all your lies and drugs babe, but still m thinking of you all the time. Hope all turns out well for you WTB. Love from you know you RE: Cyclist On Centennial I am glad to have made your day and you made my day as well, (I ride a gray and white SCOTT mountain bike) when I saw that big beautiful smile break out onto your face it totally washed away the rough day I was having. Maybe we will see each other again in passing and give each other a high five for the day.

RE: Obesity Cheers to the Obese members of our society. You know who you are and we in medical community appreciate your adherence to poor eating habits combined with a lack of exercise. Continue with your poor judgement, lack of impulse control and lack of self-discipline as I and others attempt to put our kids through college. As your odds of diabetes, stroke, heart attack, knee and back problems, Tyler C. is this week’s winner of the etc. continue to worsen we as a “Say it Sweet” promotion! group reap the Send in your CHEERS so you too can financial rewards to better support our be entered to win 1 dozen families and a desire for a “Cheers” cupcakes at new sports car. Why change Celebrations Sweet your behavior now when you can deny, rationalize and Boutique. generally blame others for your Valid for 30 days. poor choices. Continue to blame Call to Redeem 509-327-3471 all of these issues on your “body or 509-315-5973 type” as we continue to enjoy the convertible high-speed breeze

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“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


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Cheers

Jeers

Jeers

Eedee Darling, you’ve made me so happy for the past 6 1/2 years. I’m such a lucky man, you are my world. I plan on spending the rest of my life with you. Love, Teedee

relieve my pain, while shortening the line for elitist urinators. But perhaps some are in line to move their bowels. On that note, rest assured, I don’t condone human public defecation. The difference is that feces doesn’t disappear into the ground, and it is rife with harmful bacteria. It is just as disgusting as dogs leaving their feces in our parks and sidewalks. So, my friends (and critics), in our drought stricken area, why not save plumbing water, reduce the need for toxic blue chemical toilets, and improve your personal health and comfort by doing your part: water a tree...or don’t...just leave me be to pee free.

adopt an animal unless you plan to care for it and love it like one of your own children!

My Beautiful Indian Girl To the love of my life, I’m sorry for being crazy and the actions that follow, I’m sorry for not coming through in the clutch. I will always love you and respect you for you’re the only one that knows me and what makes me tick and what makes me truly happy. So with this sorry please forgive me of my stupid actions and love me, guess what ? .......I Love You Tyla Buckels. I %&$#(*$ love you Tyla. Welcome Back! A big welcome back cheers to Cheddar Chad on the corner of Riverside and Howard! It is refreshing to see a downtown icon return to his rightful roots in order to serve all the hot doghungry connoisseurs. Stay put Chad until the next overseas trip! Give him a visit bikers and walkers.

Jeers Public Irrigation Jeers to a society that condemns me for public urination, while not batting an eye as dogs sprinkle our parks, alleys, and sidewalks. Why is it a crime for me to water a tree? The issue is not public indecency. I am careful to shield myself should I need to expel this bodily poison in the absence of bathroom facilities. Yes, it’s poison in my body, but nutritional irrigation for plants. It’s a win-win situation. How is dog urine any less vulgar than mine? Is it because dogs are “uncivilized”, so that’s their excuse? Well, my friends, I’ve met many people who are less civilized than dogs. True, I tend to avoid urinating in a concrete environment, but hey - ever try to run Bloomsday well hydrated, only to have to stand in line 20 minutes just to have your mostly water filled urine deposited in the disgusting, germ infested port-a-john? Not me. I opt to find a quiet alley, and

Raised by Meanies Jeers to the bearded driver of the blue car that I allowed to turn left in front of me onto a side street from Freya around 3 pm on 7/21. After I let you turn in front of me you gave me the finger! The only explanation I can come up with for your bad behavior is that you were raised by meanies. The polite thing to do when someone does you a kindness on the road is to wave and smile. Now that you know better, I hope that in the future you will also do better. Pets On Craiglist Jeers to those countless people who are trying to ‘re-home’ their animals on Craigslist. Why did you adopt an animal in the first place if you didn’t plan to keep it, even when things get tough? All the excuses from ‘I’m moving’ to ‘I’m having a baby’, please. These poor vulnerable animals trust you to care for them, even if life circumstances change. Yes, there are extreme circumstances, but I find it hard to believe that none of these people could keep their pets if they weren’t so selfish. And an extra jeers to those who charge a ‘re-homing’ fee. Now you are trying to take money from the kind soul who is graciously taking your animal off your hands? That money could go towards pet-food or vet exams for the animal that you ‘can’t’ take care for. Makes me sick. Don’t

’S THIS WEEK! S R E ANSW

Valleyboy Just askn eastside 151 girl why all the lies and coverups when all you had to do was come to me and talk? I was there for you as your lover, boyfriend and person that cared the most for your well-being. Will miss the hell out of you, but not your lifestyle! RE: RE: Pajama Pants Hmm, I never realized that being “raised modestly” entailed wearing pajamas in public- who knew?? Your excuses for being clad in pajamas when you leave your home are pretty telling of who you are. Do you really let all of your clothes get dirty before you do laundry? Don’t want to change before a job interview to get milk at the store? Guess you’re unemployed- shocker. You went off on last week’s writer, who simply stated she took a moment out of her morning to put on a bit of makeup and jewelry and bothered to change out of what she slept in as an effort to look presentable and take pride in herself, and equated her with someone who is materialistic and petty. You have pretty much dug you’re own grave with the defensive gibberish you so carelessly spewed out, and have presented yourself as uneducated and ignorant. It’s mindsets like yours that continue to contribute to making Spokane the ghetto that it is, and perhaps if you and those just like you spent more time educating yourself and becoming a productive member of society and less time making a fool of yourself in the Inlander, you could actually start becoming a part of the minority of people in this city that strive to make it a better place. Re: Life, Chin Up! While I agree that we need to count our blessings, your “Cheers” glurge about all of our little funks comes across as sanctimonious and tyrannical to us depressed folks. Depression does not need a reason. I’m happy that jogging fixed you at a time of great darkness (living at home?). But for many of us, this isn’t about weighing life circumstances and choosing to be sad. Your smiley exhortations are, frankly boring and cliche, yet amazingly destructive.

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– A NIGHT TO GIVE AND ROCK OUT

idence Health Care dians Foundation And The Prov

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Doors open at 5pm Tickets: $5 ADV / $7 Door

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JULY 31, 2013 INLANDER 61


The author’s father, Brian Bookey (left), in 2013 and the author and his brother in the mid 1980s (top). A 1969 ad for Jolly Roger boats (above). RENEE BOOKEY PHOTOS

About a Boat

Forty years ago, a boat was made in Spokane — it’s purple and runs great BY MIKE BOOKEY

I

t felt like someone had died. My dad had traded in the family boat, a 1974 Jolly Roger ski boat, and my brother was not handling the loss well. It was impractical to keep it, though. We were a family of five kids, all in their teens, and a seating area comparable to that of a Honda Civic wasn’t cutting it, but that didn’t keep him from welling up with tears when he said goodbye. After about a day it seemed like he’d come to terms with what had happened, but by the end of the week he and my grandfather came back to Priest Lake from Spokane with the Jolly Roger in tow. I remember the whole affair having a very Lazarus feel to it. I wasn’t sure how or why it came back, but he’d wrangled up some cash and there it was, back from its tomb. It’s been almost 20 years since that afternoon when the already 20-plus-year-old boat cemented itself as a family touchstone, and you still might see it on Priest Lake. You’d know if you did. It’s not just purple, but also sparkly, thanks to a metalflake finish the original bill of sale prices at $450. The boat was made in Spokane in a time when Spokane made, among other things, boats. Jolly Roger boats experienced a brief popularity, along with other, similar styles made locally, like American Eagle and Apollo boats. You can dig and dig for more on the Jolly Roger Boat Company, and you’ll find a 1969 newspaper ad that promised top speeds of 70 mph (for the jet model) and featured a gratuitous image of a woman in a bikini. You’ll find the company listed as residing in the Spokane Indus-

62 INLANDER JULY 31, 2014

trial Park, owned by a guy named Charles E. Walters, and, according to the Spokane Daily Chronicle, sold in 1970 to the Pacific American Marine Corp. You can reminisce with veteran marina owners who remember the Jolly Rogers, but not exactly what became of them after they rolled out their final models in 1974. A lot of people think the company was absorbed by Apollo Boats, but the son of that company’s late owner, who folded the boat operation to make hot tubs, will tell you that wasn’t the case. My dad first saw his Jolly Roger at the Spokane Boat Show in the winter of 1975. It was propped up at an angle, like they transport hydroplanes. He had graduated from college and was working for his family’s egg farming business, building chicken houses and caring for the first flock of birds. The pay wasn’t great, but he was splitting a converted garage with a friend and had a little cash in his pocket when he walked into Ike’s Marina on Division Street. He was in his 20s and had the opportunity to own a boat, a sparkly purple one at that. It was 1975. This was not a difficult decision. Along the way, my dad found his way to law school and then married my mom, and the boat circulated through his family. It was in the front yard of one of his brothers when ash from Mount St. Helens rained down. Another brother got his finger stuck in a hole in the steering wheel while it was parked at a dock at Priest Lake and required volunteer paramedics to extricate the jeopardized digit. Everyone in the family seems to have some story like this that ties them to the Jolly Roger. Summers passed, and that 140-horsepower, four-

cylinder Mercruiser engine pulled my mom and my dad and all their friends and family members water-skiing. My brother was born, and then me, and then the Jolly Roger blew a piston somewhere near Coolin on Priest Lake. A complete engine rebuild later, the boat was back on the water, but our family moved to the Seattle area and expanded by one when my sister came along. We all learned to ski behind the purple Jolly Roger, mostly during too-short summer vacations at our grandparents’ place on Priest Lake. I returned to Priest for a couple of summers as an adult, the mountain air an antidote to college in Los Angeles. The Jolly Roger was my primary transportation to a job collecting garbage and stacking firewood that would have been a lot more horrible had I not had a boat ride home to look forward to. It broke down a few times, but nothing a call to my dad or brother couldn’t fix. Some folks bitch about spending more time repairing their boats than driving them, but if that’s something you’re complaining about, your life is going pretty good, I’d say. One night upon leaving a resort bar, I found a boat window smashed out and the interior covered in blood. The next day a bartender at the resort heard a guy talking about his buddy’s severely cut hand. A few hours later I had an envelope full of cash for repairs. I’d end up marrying that bartender. The boat still gets out most summers. It could use a little work — that metalflake doesn’t sparkle like it once did and the black interior, even protected by my mother’s custom-made covers, has seen better days — but it runs nice if you treat it well, and we do. When we tie it up at a public dock, we’re stopped by guys who say they remember when their friend had a boat like that. Or maybe they even had one. They can never quite remember how the Jolly Roger fit into the picture, with all those other boats coming out of Spokane in those heady post-Expo years, but they always say it’s a nice boat and that they don’t make them like that anymore. No, they sure as hell don’t. 


Thursday, August 14th

The Head And The Heart

Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue With Special Guest Galactic

With Mikey & Matty Brew Tasting and Fireworks

All Tickets $39.95/Brew Tasting $10

All Tickets $39.95

Friday, August 8th

T HueyS Lewis News O&U The OLD

With

Friday, August 15th

Ray LaMontagne

Miah Kohal Band

All Tickets $59.95

With

Saturday, August 9th

Nickel Creek

With

Head For The Hills and

Pear

All Tickets $54.95

Montgomery Gentry

With Wade Bowen and Chris Webster

All Tickets $54.95

Family Concert

Sunday, August 17th

“Musical Magic” Spokane Youth Orchestra

All Tickets $6.00

All Tickets $64.95 Saturday, August 16th

& Nina Gerber

Sunday, August 10th With

The Belle Brigade

Grand Finale

SANDPOINT, IDAHO

Thursday, August 7th

FESTIVAL ATSANDPOINT AUGUST 7 - 17, 2014

Week Two

THE

Week One

“Solo Spotlight” With The Spokane Symphony Complimentary Taste of the Stars Wine Tasting and Fireworks

All Tickets $39.95

For more information or to order tickets visit us online:

www.festivalatsandpoint.com Or Call: (208) 265-4554 JULY 31, 2014 INLANDER 63



Inlander 07/31/2014