Inlander 07/07/2022

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JULY 7-13, 2022 | PACK IT IN, PACK IT OUT

WATCH OUT!

IS SPOKANE GETTING SAFER FOR BICYCLISTS? PAGE 10

WORDS ON FIRE SPOKANE AUTHOR LEYNA KROW’S NEW BOOK PAGE 28 THUNDERSTRUCK THOR: LOVE AND THUNDER HITS THE SCREEN PAGE 38

, g n i d n u o h k c o R ! e , r o e m g & m page 16 i T e n i e z r T rga Sta


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INSIDE VOL. 29, NO. 39 | COVER PHOTO: YOUNG KWAK

COMMENT NEWS OUTDOORS CULTURE

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here were points as recent as two weeks ago that we wondered if the weather would ever get nice enough for us to play outside this summer. Then, of course, Mother Nature came through, as she tends to do. And just in time for our annual OUTDOORS ISSUE, too! Whether you’re a hardcore mountaineer or a leisurely backyard sunbather, you’ll find something to enjoy in our stories inviting you to get into stargazing, rockhounding, electric-biking and more. Take this issue to your favorite shady spot outside and get into it, starting on page 16. Also this week, Eliza Billingham explores bike safety in Spokane (page 10), Spokane author Leyna Krow discusses her new book (page 28), and we delve into some changes happening at Green Bluff farms this summer (page 34), and review the latest Marvel entry, Thor: Love and Thunder (page 38). — DAN NAILEN, editor

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BE AWARE! AWARE!

Or Scan me!

Planning some D.I.Y. projects that involve digging?

TIME TO TALK? PAGE 14

ON WITH THE CHO! PAGE 33

DON'T DIG INTO TROUBLE! In Spokane County? Visit www.callbeforeyoudig.org In Kootenai County? Visit kootenaicounty811.com Two business days before to alert utilities.

Spokane County

Know what’s below. Kootenai County Click or Call before you dig. GREEN THUMBS PAGE 34

GOT THE BEAT PAGE 40

INLANDER

SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO • INLANDER.COM

1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, SPOKANE, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 | EMAIL: INFO@INLANDER.COM THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. Please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x210 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email frankd@ inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia and is published at least twice per month. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2022, Inland Publications, Inc.

Meet one of the film industry’s leading animation artists at the MAC! DreamWorks Animator Workshop Friday, July 8, 5:30-8 pm $35 members, $40 non-members Learn the basics of animation character development in this fun “how-to” with DreamWorks’ Head of Animation, animation director and artist JP Sans, whose work includes the new movie The Bad Guys as well as Trolls World Tour, Rio and Rise of the Guardians. In conjunction with

How They Make It: Creating Characters for DreamWorks Animated Films Saturday, July 9, 1 pm $10 suggested donation at the door Enjoy a behind-the-scenes presentation about the making of animated films and a private screening of the new DreamWorks Animation film The Bad Guys, led by it’s Head of Character Animation, JP Sans. Question-and-answer session follows the film. Get more information and workshop tickets at the northwestmuseum.org calendar. DreamWorks Trolls © 2022 DWA LLC. All Rights Reserved.

JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 3


THE MASKED SINGER NATIONAL TOUR Thursday, July 21 First Interstate Center for the Arts

4 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

JIM GAFFIGAN THE FUN TOUR Tuesday, August 9 Spokane Arena

CHICAGO LIVE IN CONCERT Wednesday, August 31 First Interstate Center for the Arts


COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

Jer McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Dan Nailen (x239) EDITOR

Chey Scott (x225) ASSOCIATE EDITOR

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE SUMMER OUTDOORS ACTIVITY? CAROLYN HOLMES

I would say hiking. That’s something I can still do at 78. What got you into hiking? Having three sons that grew up in this part of the world and the beauty of getting out into the outdoors, the healthiness of it.

Derek Harrison (x248) CREATIVE DIRECTOR Samantha Wohlfeil (x234) BREAKING NEWS EDITOR Daniel Walters (x263) SENIOR INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER Seth Sommerfeld (x250)

SHELBY McVAY

Let’s say sitting on the dock at the lake house in Bayview, Idaho, having a beer with my dog.

MUSIC & SCREEN EDITOR

Nate Sanford (x282), Carrie Scozzaro (x232) STAFF WRITERS

Madison Pearson (x218) LISTINGS EDITOR

Chris Frisella COPY CHIEF

Young Kwak, Erick Doxey PHOTOGRAPHERS

Eliza Billingham, Lauren Roddis INTERNS

Josh Bell, Chase Hutchinson, John Hagney, Will Maupin, Summer Sandstrom

JOHN KNECHT

I love bicycling. I love riding on the Centennial Trail. I like getting my kids out and doing that.

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ADVERTISING Kristi Gotzian (x215) ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Carolyn Padgham (x214) SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Jeanne Inman (x235), Tracy Menasco (x260), Autumn Adrian Potts (x251), Claire Price (x217), Skyler Strahl (x247), Stephanie Grinols (x216), Wanda Tashoff (x222) ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

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How did you get into biking? I had friends that really, really, really liked it, and we lived in a community that had a nice bike trail around, and it was just like something I did every evening. It’s meditative, something you can do by yourself. It’s also fun to do with a group too.

EMELIA OUDES

Definitely backpacking and camping for weeks on end. Where do you like to do it? We’ve gone to the Colville National Forest, we’ve gone to Farragut State Park, we’ve gone to Riverside, just a ton of places around the area.

SHIRLEY PERRIGO

Todd Goodner (x231) GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Kayaking. I love kayaking.

OPERATIONS

What got you into kayaking? Actually, working at REI because I was renting kayaks and now I own three kayaks.

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Kristin Wagner (x210) ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

CIRCULATION Frank DeCaro (x226) CIRCULATION MANAGER Travis Beck (x237) CIRCULATION SUPERVISOR

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COMMENT | DRUGS

FAMILY LAW Divorce Spousal Maintenance / Alimony Child Support Modifications Parenting Plans

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aron Burr’s pistol blasted into Alexander Hamilton’s body, shattering ribs, perforating his liver and lodging into his spine. Bile in his abdominal cavity caused agonizing peritonitis. Opium was administered to relieve Hamilton’s excruciating pain. Washington State’s recent $518 million settlement with opioid distributors and the federal government’s paltry $3.5 billion criminal fine of Purdue Pharma for its culpability in 500,000 OxyContin deaths are reminders of an insidious scourge. With a $1.3 trillion economic gut punch, a record 107,000 overdose deaths in 2021 and 841,000 deaths since 1999 (along with nefarious profits for Big Pharma and illicit dealers), the opioid epidemic is a massive, far-reaching tragedy. This epidemic has roots in past medicinal uses of opium to relieve pain and treat common maladies. The history of opium and its derivatives (morphine, heroin) and synthetic opiates (hydrocodone, oxycodone) reveal a pernicious circle of legal use, addiction, prohibition and criminalization, leading to new, legal drugs marketed as safer and less “habit-forming.” Homer extolled opium for “banishing painful memories.” Ancient Romans venerated Morpheus consuming an opium-based wine inducing the god’s gift of sleep and dreams. Queen Elizabeth I chewed opium gum. Queen Victoria took opium in her Earl Grey. The British East India Company — the Sack-

lers of the 19th century — exchanged Indian opium for Chinese tea, addicting millions of Chinese. The original “hipsters” might have been Chinese who smoked opium reclining on a hip; in the 1950s it became a reference to jazz musicians and Beat writers who used heroin. In the mid-19th century’s Opium Wars, English “foreign devils” subjugated the Chinese. Chinese history is defined by this humiliation and China’s subsequent fracturing by French, German, Japanese and American imperialists. Perhaps there is a dark avenging reciprocity as the fentanyl that inundates our streets is manufactured with ingredients made in China.

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he Civil War Union issued 10 million opium pills to soldiers. Injured veterans were requisitioned unlimited supplies of opium and hypodermic needles, introduced in 1856. In 1888, opiates constituted 15 percent of prescriptions written in Boston. And in the antebellum South, Whites had one of the highest opium addiction rates in the world. By the early 19th century, opium’s addictive properties were well known, as illustrated in Thomas de Quincey’s 1821 Confessions of an English


Opium Eater. Legal and pervasive, vogue in artistic circles, opium inspired Mary Shelly’s Frankenstein and Berlioz’s hallucinogenic “Symphonie Fantastique.” And recall the Wicked Witch’s poppies that impeded Dorothy’s passage to the Emerald City and the eccentric, morphine-addicted Mrs. Dubose in To Kill A Mockingbird. Today, Afghanistan supplies 75 percent of the world’s opium. In 1905, five years after the publication of The Wizard of Oz, Congress outlawed opium, by which time morphine (called “God’s own medicine”) and heroin, both more potent than opium, had become common household remedies. Following World War I, morphine addiction was called “soldier’s disease.” Nazi Hermann Goring was a morphine addict. A chemist working for the German company Bayer in 1874 synthesized heroin, twice as powerful as morphine and 10 times stronger than opium. Heroin was marketed as a nonaddictive substitute for morphine and a cure for alcoholism. Early 20th century heroin was used for many ailments. Dorothy’s Aunt Em could go into any rural Kansas pharmacy and without a prescription acquire a heroin-based medicine. For the addict, nonmedicinal heroin offered a delusional escape from beige Kansas to kaleidoscopic Oz. In 1924, the U.S. government banned heroin.

Queen Elizabeth I chewed opium gum. Queen Victoria took opium in her Earl Grey.

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hen OxyContin was introduced in 1996, the medical mantra was “pain management.” Purdue engaged in a marketing blitz, incentivizing reps who pushed the most pills with bonuses, one year totaling $100 million. Some physicians, pliant from rep gifts, made Faustian bargains with Purdue and overprescribed. The company claimed that only 1 percent of patients would be addicted. A CDC study suggests the real figure was 16 percent. Initially OxyContin addiction was a “disease of despair,” afflicting mostly working class, rural Whites. OxyContin was even called “Hillbilly Heroin.” In one tiny, rusting West Virginia town, like the one eulogized in Iris Dement’s lament “Our Town,” Big Pharma dumped 9 million hydrocodone pills into its single pharmacy. In 2012, United States health care providers wrote 255 million opioid prescriptions, an average of 81.3 prescriptions per 100 persons. Statistics show that physicians tended to more cautiously prescribe the drug to African Americans, perhaps believing that Blacks were more prone to addiction than Whites. Eventually OxyContin infested even affluent White communities, as prescription drugs are socially acceptable and less stigmatized than something bought on the street like heroin. White suburban addiction, overdose casualties and denial proliferated. For bourgeois America, OxyContin gentrification was like the hissing, rapacious insects under David Lynch’s halcyon Lumberton manicured lawns in Blue Velvet. In 2014, when OxyContin was belatedly changed to a more restrictive classification, heroin became the default drug. Then illicit OxyContin hit the streets, and dealers diluted the product to increase revenue. Then addicts needed more cash to buy more, more often resorting to crime to get it. Public policy prioritized criminal penalties not recovery. Consequently, 60 percent of the federal prison population was serving time for mostly nonviolent drug offenses. If history is instructive the OxyContin epidemic will dissipate, but the cycle will repeat. Then a new favorite opioid, perhaps Soma, will be hustled as a safe pain panacea. For some Americans, the blue spark of the dopamine pleasure surge will be doggedly chased by the braying black hounds of addiction. n John Hagney is a retired history teacher, spending 45 years at Lewis and Clark High School. He was named a U.S. Presidential Scholar Distinguished Teacher and published an oral history of Mikhail Gorbachev’s reforms that has been translated into six languages.

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JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | FROM READERS

THE NORTHWEST’S BEST CELEBRITY GOLF TOURNAMENT & CHARITY EVENT

Terry Horne, whose property is prone to flooding, will be appealing the new assessment of her home near Cheney. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

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Readers react to our story “The Arrow Keeps Going Up” (June 30, 2022), which covered the recent dramatic jump people saw on their recent Spokane County property assessments:

HEATHERANN FRANZ WOODS: Saw it coming. But when the assessor’s valuation is higher than market value or recent third-party appraisal, there’s something wrong in the numbers. JOE FARRELL: How is it that the entity that benefits from increased tax revenue gets to be in charge of assessing the “value?” It’s worth what you pay for it! Taxation is theft. GLEN MOWBRAY: Stop all of your developer-driven b.s. This county can’t manage anything. Plow and maintain what we have and then think about raising taxes 1 cent. ALEX COX: What the hell is even the point? Better to go full on communist and abolish private property if 90 percent of us will never be homeowners. This isn’t the American way. PAT HALLAND: When the bottom falls out of the housing market and these houses are assessed for more than the market worth, will the tax assessment then be lowered? It is nuts what these homes are selling for and especially many of the older ones that have not been cared for. LAURELLE WALSH: Funny how it is: When you are selling your home you want it appraised as high as possible; when it comes to tax assessment you want a low value. YOU CAN’T HAVE IT BOTH WAYS. SHERI CHIN: My valuations have gone up more than $150,000 in the past two years. That is insane, and I live on a dirt road. TERRY PARKER: The result of collusion between GOP county commissioners, realtors and developers. This is how they raise taxes without having to raise taxes. LINDA ASLESON: I think senior citizens on fixed income need a break on this. n


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JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 9


TRANSPORTATION

TWO-WHEEL DRIVE Can new downtown bicycle lanes make Spokane more bike-friendly? BY ELIZA BILLINGHAM

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n May 3, celebrated author Jess Walter biked to a meeting in downtown Spokane. Afterwards, he decided to go for a leisure ride along the Centennial Trail. To get there, he headed east on Main Avenue. He used the bicycle lane until he got to Browne Street. He knew that cars often turn into the bike lane when they turn right, so he took his bike to the crosswalk to wait for the signal. When the light turned, Walter watched a plumbing truck in the right lane go straight and two pedestrians start crossing. Then, he started pedaling across the intersection. Suddenly, he heard brakes squealing and the roar of an engine that was way too close. Something smacked into his bike, and he flew shoulder first onto the asphalt. The plumbing truck had slammed on its brakes when a rusted gray Chevrolet Silverado blew through the intersection, running the light five seconds after it turned red. The pickup was heading south on Browne Street at 40 mph. It didn’t slow at the intersection. If the pickup hadn’t swerved to miss the plumbing truck, it would have hit Walter full on. Instead, it swiped Walter’s front tire and sent him sprawling. “There are so many things you can do wrong as a bike [rider]. But when you do everything right and still get crunched, it’s really frustrating,” Walter says. Walter is currently undergoing physical therapy for a separated shoulder, but he mentions repeatedly how fortunate he is. Not many people walk away from a collision with a two-ton steel frame.

10 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

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he total number of traffic collisions in Washington involving bicyclists and pedestrians decreased during the pandemic. But the percentage of serious or fatal collisions increased in 2021 compared to the average from 2016 to 2020, according to Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) data released at the end of last year. Most bicycle collisions in Spokane result in minor injuries, but many Spokanites still don’t feel comfortable biking around the city. With that in mind, city planners are trying to build a better system of bicycle infrastructure to promote safe biking for residents and visitors. There are a lot of advantages in getting people out of their cars and onto their bikes, for citizens and cities alike. The rider benefits from physical exercise, more flexible parking, a deeper connection to neighbors and nature, and freedom from skyrocketing gas prices. For cities, more bikes on the road mean less noise pollution, less physical stress on roads, fewer parking requirements and cleaner air. Despite the benefits, Spokane does not make it convenient to bike. The city’s transportation infrastructure assumes that everyone drives a car. Roads are built on this assumption, and the prophecy fulfills itself. Increasing mobility has meant creating larger arterials with higher speed limits, which are the enemy of bike safety. Most bicycle fatalities occur on roads with a speed limit of over 25 mph, according to the WSDOT Active Transportation Plan

Spokane author Jess Walter was struck by a truck while riding downtown in May. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO


for 2020 and Beyond. The plan says that if a bicycle is hit directly by a motorist going 20 mph, the rider has a 90 percent chance of survival. But if the motorist is going 40 mph, like the Chevy that barely missed Walter, the chance of surviving drops to 10 percent. Lauren Pangborn is a member of Spokane’s Bicycle Advisory Board, a group of community members advocating for better bicycling in Spokane. Pangborn has been biking in Spokane for seven years. A “reasonably confident cyclist,” she feels comfortable crossing high-traffic roads or taking the whole car lane when she needs to. But her extended family doesn’t feel the same way. “I feel for people who are too scared to ride,” says Pangborn. “We are victim to this city’s land use policy.” Pangborn doesn’t think there is enough infrastructure connecting the city for most people to meaningfully replace car trips with biking. “The ability to use a bicycle is hugely dependent on the built environment,” says Pablo Monsivais, a public health scholar and associate professor at Washington State University who is also a member of the Bicycle Advisory Board. But instead of creating a safe environment, bike safety education often centers on wearing a helmet or proper clothing. This places a “disproportionate responsibility” on the bicyclist for their own safety. “It doesn’t matter how safely you’re biking,” Monsivais says. “If you meet hazardous roads, you’re still eventually going to lose.”

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icycle collisions in downtown Spokane happen most frequently at intersections with Browne and Division between I-90 and the river, as well as at corners in the neighborhood between the Maple Street Bridge and the interstate, according to collision data mapped out by the Inlander. Most of the roads in these areas are shared by cars and bikes without any separation. Rhonda Young, professor and chair of the civil engineering department at Gonzaga University, says it’s an ethical responsibility to create better road systems that present little to no opportunity for serious injury, even if something goes wrong. “Sometimes humans make mistakes,” Young says. “But those mistakes shouldn’t end in death.” Bike lanes are often the initial solution promoted for road safety. For example, construction began on Monday, June 14 on Riverside Avenue, and the redesigned street will include a bike lane between Division and Monroe. Bike infrastructure usually gets tacked on to other construction projects, like when a street is scheduled for resurfacing. As the city plans road maintenance, the Bike Advisory Board watches for opportunities to advocate ...continued on next page

JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 11


Bath By Bex

NEWS | TRANSPORTATION

2020-22 REPORTED CAR-ON-BIKE COLLISIONS IN SPOKANE

Come visit ou r air conditioned store this su mmer or See us Ever y Friday from 4pm - 8pm at the Spokan e Valley Farmers Ma rket

FREE WEBINAR ON BODY AND BRAIN HEALTH TUESDAY, JULY 26 Physical activity in older adults isn’t just good for our bodies, it helps our brains too. There’s a correlation between physical health and cognitive health, and at Sullivan Park Assisted Living Community, our wellness program Celebrations uses the latest research to help us design activities and events that activate both body and brain. To learn more about the connection between physical and cognitive health, we encourage you to join us on Tuesday, July 26 at 2 p.m. Pacific time for a free webinar with Dr. Rob Winningham, a neuroscientist with Western Oregon University. During the webinar, Dr. Winningham will discuss the topic of physical and cognitive wellness in older adults.

Sign up for the free webinar at PrestigeCanHelp.com. For more on our Wellness Programming, contact our team at (509) 924-5555. Sullivan Park Assisted Living Community 421 South Adams Rd. Spokane Valley, WA 99216 (509) 924-5555

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SOURCE: WSDOT

“TWO WHEEL DRIVE,” CONTINUED... for biking projects. The process is slow and often results in scattered bike lanes that don’t connect the city well. Also, bike lanes sometimes squeeze bicyclists between fast traffic and parked cars. The lane then becomes an obstacle course, making bicycles watch for swerving motorists on the left and car doors opening on the right. The bike lane on Riverside, however, will try to solve this issue by segregating the bike lane, putting parked cars between motor traffic and bicycles. Zac Fairbanks of Spoke N Sport, a bicycle repair shop that sees lots of bikes after collisions, isn’t convinced that bike lanes, even segregated ones, will make Spokane more bike friendly. It’s not clear that bike lanes mean fewer collisions. According to Fairbanks, the main issue is driver negligence and animosity toward bike riders. The bike lane on Main did nothing to protect Walter from an irresponsible driver. Bikes are no match for sedans, SUVs or antagonistic drivers. As long as cars and bikes are close to each other, bicyclists are at risk. If Spokane wants to get serious about improv-

Give Guide COUNT US IN COUNTING CROWS COME TO TOWN PAGE 76

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WEEK RESTAURANT IT’S NOT TOO LATE TO GET OUT THERE PAGE 70

AUGUST 26 - SEPTEMBER 1, 2021 | FAMILY OWNED. COMMUNITY FOCUSED.

GIVE GUIDE

The Lands Council Executive Director Amanda Parrish

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ing bicycle safety, the city has to reimagine what mobility means. Society has “equated mobility with speed,” says Young. People think good movement around the city means they can go fast in their car to wherever they want to be. But Monsivais and Pangborn imagine a city that carefully combines residential, commercial and green spaces. Monsivais calls this “thoughtful density,” a growing city that empowers people to walk or bike to local conveniences instead of driving far away to run errands. A similar vision of mobility helped modern cities in the Netherlands and Sweden decrease the need for cars and high speed traffic. Walter wonders if some streets in Spokane could be reserved for only bicycles and pedestrians. He’s wary of interacting with any more motor vehicles after a negligent driver almost killed him. “I kept hearing the sound of his motor and the screeching brakes,” Walter says. Until something changes, Walter has decided “it’s not really worth it [to bike] downtown.” n

GET INVOLVED AND GIVE BACK! This annual issue highlights many of the region’s non-profit organizations, and the difference they are making in our community.

Celebrating the people making a difference in the Inland Northwest SPECIAL PULLOUT SECTION

Jennyfer Mesa, founder of Latinos En Spokane

SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

ON STANDS AUGUST

12 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

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JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 13


NEWS | CRIMINAL JUSTICE

As Big as Bezos Umpqua Bank wants Washington’s Supreme Court to agree its executives are too important to be deposed BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

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he Washington State Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case that could give high-level executives an easier path than other citizens to avoid answering questions in court. Oregon-based Umpqua Bank requested that Washington’s highest court take up the issue after a Spokane Valley couple’s attorney asked to question the bank’s CEO, its head of human resources and the home loan department manager under oath. Umpqua’s legal team argued those three individuals are too high up in the company to be dragged into the lawsuit. In fact, the lawyers argued in court filings, requiring Umpqua CEO Cort O’Haver to testify would be something like subjecting Amazon founder Jeff Bezos to “timeconsuming depositions every time an Amazon truck is in a fender-bender, because he might know something about a safety policy.” On the flip side, Spokane attorney Kevin Roberts, representing Heather Stratford and her husband, Bill Geibel, in their civil case, argues that Umpqua’s request

14 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

Bill Geibel and Heather Stratford say their lawsuit against Umpqua Bank feels like a David and Goliath situation. to apply what’s known as the “apex doctrine” would create an unfair, class-based system with different standards for everyday people and those at the top of the corporate food chain. “They’re asking Washington to create an aristocracy, a class of people that gets treated differently simply because of the amount of money or power they have,” Roberts tells the Inlander. “The irony is this bank claims to have a priority on people and community at the same time they’re acting like an 800-pound gorilla in terms of turning lawyers loose on customers that dared to question them.” While many states do apply the apex doctrine when deciding whether an executive truly needs to be dragged into a deposition, Washington doesn’t use this standard, Roberts says. Now that the question is before the Supreme Court, citizens could learn this year whether Washington will stick with its current system or give special status allowing certain people to avoid depositions.

THE CASE

The case stems from a home loan that small-business owners Stratford and Geibel sought in late 2016 to build their Spokane Valley home. They came to Umpqua with a builder in mind, but then-loan officer Bryan Jarrett told them that they should instead use a builder he knew to get a better deal, Stratford says. Stratford asked how many projects that builder was doing with the bank, and she says Jarrett told her he had eight to 10 projects, and they were all on time and on budget. “Every question we asked, he had the perfect answer, and they were all lies,” Stratford says. Things went horribly wrong with their build. Stratford says all their doors and windows were framed wrong, and they say they later learned the builder had pocketed the first draw of money from the loan rather than putting it toward their construction project. Left with a house

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

“that should be torn down,” Stratford says, they fired the builder, sued him and ultimately won a judgment. “We had to say, ‘Are we going to declare bankruptcy … or are we going to fight through this?’” Stratford says. “We made the decision to fight.” But they’re unlikely to collect that judgment, she says, because the builder had issues with other projects, too. During that lawsuit, the couple learned more about their loan officer, Jarrett, including that state investigators had determined he’d forged insurance applications before he worked at Umpqua. The Washington state Office of the Insurance Commissioner investigated Jarrett in 2012, and by 2014 he admitted to forging several applications for which he received commissions from Farmers Insurance Group (the commissions were later reversed). Jarrett was hired by Umpqua in 2015. As the couple hired another contractor and picked up their own tools to finish their home over the next few years, they reached out to Umpqua and modified their loan multiple times as the project stretched on. Later, they wanted to know, why had the bank hired someone with a history of fraud? And would the bank agree to mediation to make them whole? “All we wanted for Umpqua to do is help us stay in our house that we had to finish ourselves. The cost doubled from what we originally had taken,” Stratford says. “Why don’t you just own the fact you hired wrong, clean up your mess, put new policies in place and be a good bank? That’s what we’re asking for, which I think is reasonable.” Umpqua did not respond to the mediation request. The couple sued in May 2021 and then offered to settle multiple times, but without a response, the lawsuit moved forward in Spokane County Superior Court. (Jarrett started working at Numerica Credit Union in 2017, according to a Spokesman-Review article. Jarrett’s license to originate mortgage loans was revoked in Washington on June 4, 2021, according to a filing from the state Department of Financial Institutions.)


During discovery, Roberts requested Zoom depositions with Umpqua CEO O’Haver, Chief People Officer (human resources head) Sheri Burns, and Kevin Skinner, the head of home lending. But Umpqua sought a protective order to prevent those legal interviews, claiming none of the three high-level executives had any direct knowledge of the situation, and therefore shouldn’t have to face the burden of being interviewed virtually. “When our lawsuit is over human resources, how in the world can we not be able to ask the human resources director about it?” Roberts asks. “How can we not ask the home mortgage guy about what qualifies someone? That really makes little sense.” The judge sided with Roberts, saying the three could be deposed. Umpqua then directly asked the state Supreme Court to take up the case and recognize the “apex doctrine.”

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In Washington, people who are ordered to sit for a deposition can ask for a protective order from the court. They have to show why they shouldn’t be interviewed, whether that’s because they don’t have direct knowledge of the situation or it would cause them undue burden. High-level executives can make the same request. But after the court denied their request, Umpqua’s lawyers argued that the apex doctrine, regularly used in federal courts, should be applied here. Roberts says the doctrine originally prevented high-level government officials from harassing lawsuits that could force them to spend all their time in court. Instead, lower level employees should be deposed first or instead. Rather than the CEO showing why they shouldn’t be interviewed, the plaintiff must make an argument why they should be, which at times means showing their hand by sharing questions that a specific executive would be able to answer, Roberts says. The burden is flipped from what a single mom or small-business owner would have to do to prevent a deposition, and gives the executives a preview of what they’ll be asked, while others don’t get that, he says. In their request for the state Supreme Court to hear the case, Umpqua’s lawyers argued the court “should take this opportunity to bring Washington law into alignment with other jurisdictions, while also harmonizing it internally, by explicitly adopting the Apex Doctrine — which balances parties’ need for discovery against the unique vulnerability of high-level executive officers.” Roberts, meanwhile, argues it’s a great chance for the court to maintain the system that treats all people the same. “It’s really an opportunity I think for the Supreme Court to send a message that, in Washington, our courts don’t have different standards for citizens and corporations,” Roberts says. Georgia’s Supreme Court ruled in June that courts could not apply the apex doctrine, which puts a “thumb on the scale” for executives from companies such as GM, Coca-Cola, Delta Airlines and the United Parcel Service, Reuters reports. When the apex doctrine is applied, judges consider “the corporate official’s rank and responsibilities; her personal knowledge of facts relevant to the litigation; the extent to which LETTERS those facts can be obtained in Send comments to discovery; and the possibileditor@inlander.com. ity of obtaining the information from a different source,” Reuters reports, noting several other states have also refused to adopt the doctrine, including Colorado, New York, Connecticut and North Carolina. In response to requests for comment, Umpqua stated, “We do not comment on cases in active litigation.” Stratford, meanwhile, says she and her husband are appalled that the bank may have spent more on legal fees than the couple even asked for in settlement pitches. It feels like a David and Goliath situation, she says. “I have about seven employees, and my husband has a company of 20. He’s as busy as a CEO of a major bank. I’ll tell ya, he’s probably even more busy,” Stratford says. “Why are your people exempt? Because they have money? It’s a double standard.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

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5-year-old Gabriel Edwards plays among the trees and creeks at Finch Arboretum. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

16 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022


Stargazing Mountains Rockhounding Electric Bikes Camp Cooking

19 20 22 24 26

Identification Station Get closer to nature by identifying trees around the Inland Northwest By Madison Pearson

A

few years ago, I made a promise to myself that I would spend more time outside admiring this “nature” that everyone raves about. Quickly, I found out that there was way more to the outdoors than I ever imagined and fell head over hiking boots for plants, rivers and fresh air. My newfound love was kindled and set ablaze by reading books about trees that reside in the Northwest, taking short day trips to go find said trees, and spending the rest of the day lounging in their shade. Identifying trees soon became my go-to summer hobby and my preferred outdoor activity. Jasmine Vilar, development director for the Lands Council, recommends that beginner tree identifiers start in the comfort of their own backyard. Spokane’s city government has a full list of street trees — trees approved to line the streets of the city — on their website (my.spokanecity.org/urbanforestry). A quick gander through the list of trees and a five-minute walk might lead you to a new species that you’ve yet to discover for yourself. “I’m a big fan of neighborhood nature,” Vilar says. “You shouldn’t have to go too far in order to connect with nature and the outdoors. This is one of those fun activities that you can do without spending a dime.” Getting started in tree identification is as easy as looking out of a window and Googling some of the characteristics you can see for ...continued on next page

JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 17


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Jasmine Vilar, development director at The Lands Council, gets up close and personal with trees. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

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yourself. But Vilar says that getting up close and personal with the trees is highly recommended. “You should use all of your senses when you’re out there,” she says. “Touch the leaves, smell the sap, bark and flowers — maybe don’t taste anything unless you’re sure that it’s edible, that could lead to disaster.”

Branching Out

Along with the trees you can find in your backyard and in your neighborhood, a short car ride will take newbie outdoor hobbyists to vast areas filled with various tree species ripe for identification. In the Spokane area specifically, there’s no place better for practicing tree identification than the John A. Finch Arboretum. Located just off of Sunset Highway, the 56-acre natural area houses over 2,000 trees and shrubs. The arboretum’s website offers self-guided walking tour maps and guides that help visitors easily identify just what botanical masterpieces they’re looking at. “There are tons of nonnative species at Finch that are neat and totally interesting,” Vilar says. “It’s a great place to start if you’re looking to get familiar with more species. The street tree exhibit there is extremely accessible, and all of the trees are labeled for ease of identification.” If you ever find yourself near Moscow, the University of Idaho Arboretum and Botanical Garden is a vibrant, expansive area located just southwest of the city’s downtown. The arboretum is divided into four sections based on the plant’s geographical origin: Asia, Europe, Eastern North America and Western North America.

Hemlock Holmes

Tree identification is a lot like detective work. You have to put together a set of clues in order to come to your conclusion. Vilar notes that tree and plant identification is a lifelong practice — you get better and can put clues together with ease the longer you’ve been doing it. Some of the clues to look for are foliage type (are there needles or leaves?), the silhouette of the tree, the flowers and fruit that may or may not appear on the tree, and the texture of the bark. All of these attributes can help narrow the possibilities species-wise. “Guidebooks are a great place to start,” she says. “Grab yourself a book that focuses on your region’s native species and then go from there. I recommend Plants of the Inland Northwest & Southern Interior British Columbia by Parish, Coupé and Lloyd. You can look up certain attributes of the tree and go from there.” If books aren’t your style, there are plenty of plant/tree identification apps available for your smartphone. PlantNet lets users snap a photo of the tree or plant in question; then, voila, you’ve got your answer. Though a broad and daunting topic, tree identification doesn’t have to be strenuous or challenging. Vilar says that it’s important to stay curious about and protect our nonhuman neighbors surrounding us. “Before you start learning about all of the nature around you, it can start to feel a bit like a big, green wall,” Vilar says. “Once you start breaking down that wall, it’s like you’re living in a world of new friends that stay with you wherever you go.” n


Looking Up

Local experts share tips and tricks for entering the world of stargazing

O

By Summer Sandstrom

ne of the many wonders of the Inland Northwest is its location in the world for stargazing. It lies in a spot where the occasional aurora borealis can be observed, plus a plethora of meteor showers and any lunar or solar eclipse that reaches the gaze of the region. While stargazing can feel like a relatively self-explanatory thing to get into, there’s much more than meets the eye to the astronomical world. Your experience with stargazing depends mainly on your chosen location. While you can see a decent amount of stars and astronomical objects in the city, light pollution from all of the street and house lights greatly affects one’s experience gazing up at the night sky. A local stargazing group called the Spokane Astronomical Society holds star parties at the Fishtrap Lake Recreation Area about 30 miles southwest of Spokane, which provides a super dark sky free of city lights. “The star parties are held on a weekend closest to the new moon,” says Spokane Astronomical Society member Paul Yost. “The full moon produces a lot of light in the sky, and so does any phase of the moon, but when the moon’s new it’s not in the sky, it’s on the day side of the Earth all night long, which is nice and makes for really dark skies. We want the sky to be as dark as it can get so that we can see the things that we like to look at, which are nebula, galaxies and different structures in the sky.” John Whitmer, an astronomy professor at Spokane Falls Community College, recommends people avoid buying a telescope when starting out in their stargazing journey. “I would suggest starting with a good pair of 10x50 binoculars and a good star chart,” Whitmer says. “It is much easier to view the sky with binoculars compared to a tele-

scope, and from a dark site you can see an amazing amount of detail with binoculars.” Whitmer also recommends getting involved with the Spokane Astronomical Society to learn more about stargazing and to determine if it’s something you want to devote more time and money to. “Getting involved with this club would be a great way for the beginning stargazer to learn more about astronomy and telescopes, and give them a chance to look through a variety of scopes before purchasing one,” he says. At the society’s star parties, anyone can look through telescopes brought by the club and its members to get a feel for stargazing. Members who join for a $25 yearly fee can borrow the club’s telescopes and other equipment for personal stargazing endeavors. And if you can’t make it to one of the star parties or sign up for a club membership, the Spokane Public Library offers rentable telescopes through its Library of Things — library cardholders can check out a high-quality telescope without committing to the cost. Another resource Yost recommends amateur astronomers and stargazers check out is the Messier Catalog, a set of deepsky astronomical objects that aren’t comets, first observed by French astronomer Charles Messier in the late 1700s during his search for comets. “That’s a great one to get started with,” he says. “There’s about 100 items on it, and if you’re really fast you can do it in one night.” The Spokane Astronomical Society resumes monthly meetings on the first Friday of the month starting in August. More information about the group, its star parties, membership fees and benefits is at spokaneastronomical.org. n

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JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 19


No Snow, No Problem

An epic gondola ride leads to epic mountain biking and hikes at North Idaho's Silver Mountain.

The region’s five major mountain ski resorts have something fun for everyone this summer

By Lauren Roddis

20 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

H

RYAN ZIMMER/SILVER MOUNTAIN RESORT PHOTO

aving a favorite mountain pastime is one way to make long Inland Northwest winters a little more bearable. Skiing, snowboarding, sledding and snowshoeing are moodlifting reasons to venture outdoors when everything’s frozen. But once that snow melts and the sun returns again, the region’s mountain resorts reopen for some of summer’s best activities like hiking, wine-drinking and huckleberry picking, just to name a few.

Mount Spokane

Providing the Inland Northwest with great snow to shred in winter, the massive Mount Spokane State Park — home to Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park — also hosts plenty of summertime activities, like the Brews & Views series at the historic Vista House, which launched last year. In winter, Vista House keeps recreationalists warm with a cozy fire, beer and hot cocoa, but on select Saturdays this summer, ski resort staff will serve refreshing selections from local breweries. It’s a great spot to hang out after a long day of hiking, mountain biking or huckleberry picking, and you can even drive up to the summit. Brews & Views begins July 23 and happens each Saturday from noon to 5 pm through Aug. 27. Remember, you’ll need a state parks Discover Pass ($10 for single day access; $30 for a year) to visit the mountain. Find event details at mtspokane.com.


Come Wander With Us!

Chewelah Peak

It’s no secret that the Inland Northwest’s huckleberry obsession is on another level. When it’s hot outside, few things sound better than a cold glass of huckleberry lemonade or a big scoop of huckleberry ice cream. With killer slopes to ski and snowboard in the winter, Chewelah Peak, home to 49 Degrees North Ski & Snowboard Resort, turns into a huckleberry haven in summer. Huckleberry season runs from mid-July through early August. Under Forest Service rules, as the mountain is part of the Colville National Forest, pickers can collect up to 3 gallons of huckleberries per day. Have a fabulous time taking in the peak’s incredible views, then come home and make some pancakes, pie or any other sweet treat that calls for a tasty, tart berry. Know before you go at fs.usda.gov/colville.

Silver Mountain

Skiing and snowboarding quickly transforms to hiking and biking once summer starts at Kellogg, Idaho’s Silver Mountain Resort. Silver’s beautiful scenery demands to be experienced in one way or another, and the mountain’s many miles of trails (which actually spread across two mountains, Kellogg Peak and Wardner Peak) allows for any and all to see it themselves. Each summer Friday through Sept. 2, the resort hosts its Ride & Dine series. Buy a ticket ($8-$58) for a scenic gondola ride — the longest in North America — to enjoy live music and a barbecue dinner on the mountaintop. Mountain bikers can also upgrade their tickets to access the fun. Find out more at silvermt.com. Right on the Idaho-Montana border lies Lookout Pass, where sweeping peaks meet the big sky. In winter, the slopes around Lookout beg to be skied or snowboarded down, but in summer, the neighboring Hiawatha Trail is the must-try mountain bike trail of the Inland Northwest. The 15-mile trail is family-friendly and mostly downhill, boasting beautiful views of the Bitterroot Mountains, plus tall trestles and cool tunnels once used by trains traveling the historic Milwaukee Railroad. Famous for the 1.66-mile Taft Tunnel that cuts deep through the mountain, the Hiawatha Trail is a truly phenomenal experience. Find out more at ridethehiawatha.com.

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Let’s Rock

Professional rockhounder Jared Goguen shares his favorite spots via YouTube and a podcast. COURTESY PHOTO

Spokane-based project Currently Rockhounding helps anyone get into rock hunting By Chey Scott

G

rowing up, rocks were a big deal in our family. As members of Spokane’s Rock Rollers Club, my grandparents won dozens of awards for their pristine petrified wood specimens displayed at the club’s annual Gem, Mineral & Jewelry Show at the fairgrounds. Every summertime family road trip was peppered with pit stops at geological sites across the region, and one of our favorite places to play outside was simply called “the rock pile.” Since college, however, when I swiftly completed a Geology 101 assignment to find and identify examples of geologic activity (easy thanks to all that childhood exposure), I’ve hardly had a thought about rocks, crystals or fossils. Yet, as I recently rediscovered, rockhounding — that funny term for folks who like to “sniff out” amazing natural specimens born from the Earth’s crust — is alive and well in the Inland Northwest. And helping guide amateur and experienced rockhounders

alike to the area’s best rock-hunting spots and more is the guy behind the growing YouTube channel, website and podcast series, Currently Rockhounding. Like many of his fellow rockhounds, Spokane's Jared Goguen got into the hobby after a casual encounter. He was on vacation at the Oregon coast about six years ago when he and his wife decided to look for agates on the beach. “After that I was hooked on the idea of finding rocks and wondered what else could be found,” Goguen says. “With thousands of different rocks and minerals to learn about, locate and collect, no one person can know or find it all in a single lifetime, and this is what makes it the ultimate hobby — you will never master it and you will never do it all, so to speak.” Teaching others how to rockhound proved so successful that Goguen transitioned to running Currently Rockhounding’s YouTube and website full time in spring 2020. He also has a podcast series called Previously Rockhounding that explores the hobby’s history.

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Rockhounding 101

Check out Goguen’s guides on everything rockhound related, from where to go for the best gem and mineral hunting to how to clean and showcase your finds. Visit the Currently Rockhounding hub at currentlyrockhounding.com. To learn more about the Spokane Rock Rollers Club, the nonprofit runs a group on Facebook (anyone can join by requesting access). Its clubhouse is at 3915 E. Francis Ave., and is open Monday through Friday from 5-8 pm.


G

oguen’s foremost advice to newbie rockhounds is to simply enjoy being outside. “It’s important not to get too hung up on finding the very best things,” he says. “Enjoy the process of exploring an area.” Fortunately for residents of the Inland Northwest, finding publicly accessible rockhounding sites is the easy part. From rocky mountains to desert scablands, the greater Pacific Northwest offers significant geologic diversity, and dozens of tried-andtrue rockhounding sites are less than a day’s drive from Spokane’s urban core. While finding a prize-worthy specimen isn’t guaranteed, that’s what makes rockhounding fun. One of Goguen’s top local spots is the Colville National Forest, spanning 1.5 million acres across northeast Washington. Among the massive variety of rocks and minerals there are garnets, opal, calcite, pyrite, malachite, azurite, quartz crystals, serpentine and fossils, “to name just a few,” he says. Before setting out with a chisel and bucket, Goguen advises some key rockhounding etiquette. To make sure you’re not trespassing onto private property, he recommends using an app like GaiaGPS to determine land ownership. If you’re looking for cool finds on public land, rules still apply on what you can take and methods used to harvest, which vary based on the agency managing it. “The best thing to do is to check their website first,” he says, adding that rockhounds “should never take more than what you really need. Just because something is abundant doesn’t mean you need buckets full of it.” Setting out on your own to find rockhounding sites isn’t the only way to get into the hobby. Goguen also recommends some of the region’s numerous fee-based dig sites open to the public and “pretty much a guarantee that you’ll be going home with some amazing specimens.” Stonerose Fossils in Republic, Washington, is home of an ancient shale lake bed with 50-million-year-old fossils of plants, fish and insects. The Wild Turkey Mine in Valley, Washington, offers seasonal public access to its electric-green serpentine. And in Clarkia, Idaho, the Emerald Creek Garnet Area is a Forest Service-run site (reservation only) to harvest star garnets, a gem found only there and in India. For those looking to dive deeper, head to Currently Rockhounding’s website for guides on everything from tools, sites, safety tips, recommended books and much more. Goguen’s YouTube channel — with a cumulative 2.1 million views — offers more than 350 videos and several curated playlists. Rockhounding is accessible to essentially anyone, but Goguen also recognizes that it may feel a little overwhelming. “If driving off into the mountains alone isn’t the thing for you, then perhaps joining a rock and mineral club is the next step,” he says. “Here in Spokane, our local rock club is the Spokane Rock Rollers, which has monthly meetings, a full lapidary shop for cutting and polishing rocks, and programs for people with kids. During the summer months they have organized rockhounding field trips, which members can go on and do some rockhounding with more experienced rockhounds.” n

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Effortlessly Electric The bikes of the future are here By Eliza Billingham

W

hen Lauren Pangborn became a member of Spokane’s Bicycle Advisory Board, a volunteer group that advises the city on all things biking, she mentioned at a meeting that she finally replaced her car with an electric bicycle. That made fellow member Michelle Sidles think: “Could I do that?” “More than eliminating a car, I just wanted to drive so much less,” says Sidles, who’s had a car since she was 16. Then Sidles’ husband got an e-bike and took her for a ride. The experience was “pure joy,” and Sidles was sold. “I think I ordered [my e-bike] in, like, one minute, which is definitely not my nature,” she says. Electric bicycles, or e-bikes, are gaining traction in recreational and commuter circles alike. They provide the same freedom from parking and gas stations as a pedal bike, but their motors help eliminate sweaty pits and burning quads of an analog commute. Sidles began riding her e-bike so often she realized she no longer needed her old Subaru. So she sold it to a man who was downsizing from a large truck. When it comes to choices like driving or riding or walking, she says, “I think we can all be a little more thoughtful. Just stopping and thinking, ‘Is this necessary?’” If you’re also looking to dodge gas prices, soften your environmental footprint or add some fun to your lifestyle, here’s what you need to know when considering an electric bike.

Prep

The best thing about prepping for an e-bike is: There is no preparation required! You don’t need a special license to ride an electric bike, just like you don’t need one to ride a pedal bike. E-bikes are typically accepted anywhere a traditional bike is allowed, including in car lanes if no other bike provisions are available. Since e-bikes go at least 5 mph faster than traditional bicycles, they may be safer to ride in car lanes (and less annoying to the car behind you). Still, make sure to scope out routes for bike lanes, separated paths or other bike-friendly infrastructure. Try to avoid wide one-way streets and main arterials where cars are tempted to speed. For example, Sidles won’t ride down Monroe Street, where cars are practically flying.

Types

E-bikes are divided into three classes: Class 1, Class 2 and Class 3, for easy reference. Classes 1 and 2 have a top speed of 20 mph (the typical biker is pedaling 12-15 mph). Class 1 is pedal-assisted,

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which means you have to be pedaling for the motor to kick in. Class 2 has a throttle, much like a motorcycle, and you can pull back the handle and go without any leg work. Class 3 has a top speed of 28 mph, which is about as fast as most cars are going downtown. Class 3 is also pedal-assist, because if you want to go that fast and be lazy, just get a scooter. Some models in each category are also cargo bikes. Cargo bikes have an extended platform over the back wheel that can carry passengers, child seats, groceries or other precious parcels. These bikes make it much more possible to run errands that require goods other than yourself.

Where To Buy

There are two ways to get your hands (and butt) on an e-bike. Direct-to-consumer platforms like Rad Power Bikes ship bikes to buyers without a middleman. But this leaves some assembly up to the customer. So if you consistently tap out from assembling Ikea furniture, look for a local store that sells e-bikes assembled by professional mechanics. The Bike Hub, Spoke N Sport, North Division Bicycle and Wheel Sport Bicycles, among others, all sell ready-to-go e-bikes in their brick and mortar shops.

Cost

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An e-bike can cost anywhere from $1,500 to $15,000. The most expensive bikes are usually electric mountain bikes, which have a whole host of accessories that are irrelevant to a city commuter. Models that interest most riders run from roughly $1,700 to $5,000. The sticker price can be staggering to a hesitant convert, but it all hinges on perspective. If this bike can actually replace your small sedan, or meaningfully replace car trips, it could fatten your wallet over the long term.

What’s Best For You?

Most commuters and recreational riders buy Class 1 e-bikes from brands like Rad Power, Momentum (made by Giant) and Trek. They’re easily customizable and provide all the power and speed that most bikers need. Noah Smith at Bike Hub says that responsible riders can get up to 100 miles on an overnight charge, though a reliance on turbo could bring it down to 30 to 50 miles. Only commuters covering lots of distance on good infrastructure may want to consider the extra speed of a Class 3 bike. Pangborn, Sidles’ inspiration to become an e-bike convert, loves that her Class 2 e-bike has a throttle, which makes it easier to get up to speed through an intersection as fast as the surrounding car traffic. Ultimately, it may not be realistic to ditch your car entirely. But e-bikes could be the first step toward decreasing consumption or adding daily exercise to your life. These steps count. “As you start making these changes,” Sidles says, “they start to snowball!” n

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JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 25


Camping Cooking Hacks A little prep goes a long way to make cooking outside enjoyable and delicious

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By Samantha Wohlfeil

he great thing about cooking while camping is you can go as simple or as gourmet as you’d like. On a budget? Ramen soup with some added carrots, onion and celery can feel fancy and filling. A can of chili reheated in a pot can taste wonderful. But if you’re feeling a little fancier and have the space for either a fire or a stove with a couple of burners, you’ll be able to pull off some amazing meals to fuel your hiking, swimming, or even just relaxing day in the woods. Here are some of the best camping cooking tips I’ve learned over the years.

Eggs in a Bottle

Probably the best camp cooking “hack” I ever learned helps make breakfast a breeze. Before leaving home, crack a dozen or more eggs into a cup or bowl with a pour spout and whisk, adding a couple tablespoons of water. Pour that mix into a cleaned “disposable” 1-liter water bottle or coffee creamer container (or multiple containers if you need more eggs). Not only does this make spaceplanning in the cooler more convenient, you won’t be dealing with soggy egg cartons or worrying that your eggs will get crushed the whole trip. While you’re at it, par-bake a couple pounds of bacon (depending on how many people are joining you, this may need to be done

26 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

in batches) at 350 degrees on a baking sheet to roughly an 80-percent-crispy factor. Save the bacon grease in a small airtight container — I like to strain mine to remove any bacon bits — and bring the grease in the cooler to use as cooking fat. Put the bacon slices into another airtight container or zipped baggie. When breakfast rolls around, heat your burners and use the bacon grease in a large skillet to help make some delicious scrambled eggs on one side while you reheat the bacon in a pan or on a griddle on the other burner. When it’s empty, toss the eggy bottle in your trash bag (pack it in, pack it out) for easy cleanup.

Fire Burritos

A friend once premade a bunch of breakfast burritos that ultimately came in clutch for nighttime munchies around the fire. Before your trip, make a bunch of scrambled eggs, cook up some ground sausage and veggies, then add cheese, salsa, hot sauce or whatever suits your personal taste, roll them up in soft tortillas, and wrap tightly in foil. Put those into a Ziploc bag and freeze. Then toss them in the cooler on your way to camp and when needed, pull them out and rest the foil-wrapped burritos on a grill over or near the fire when you’ve got some good coals, making sure to turn them every few minutes until they’re hot and ready to eat.


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Prep

Bring a bucket and a 2-gallon jug of water with a pour spout for easier handwashing and dishwashing. Use biodegradable dish/ hand soap as you wash and rinse, collecting the dirty water in the bucket under the jug. Setting this up on the edge of a picnic table works wonderfully, and don’t forget to create an air release by poking a hole in the top of the jug when it’s set up. Use the dirty water to put out the fire at the end of the night.

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In general, if you know you want to make something like chili, tacos, or another dish with several ingredients or seasonings, you can often do the prep in the comfort of your kitchen at home. Preslice green onions and keep them in an airtight container. Same thing for diced tomatoes, and even sliced lettuce if you put it in a container with a moist paper towel and plan to use it within about a day or two. For something like chili or the taco seasoning, only bring as much seasoning as you need in a small container or bag rather than packing a ton of spice jars. You’ll feel much better when the main work comes down to browning up some ground beef and all the other elements are ready to go right into the pot or into individual bags of chips for those walking tacos.

Inlander.com/books

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Food is always good around a campfire, but knowing what you're doing can make it great.

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12-2022

Going Fancy

For the very ambitious, it’s possible to bake a cake in the woods if you’ve got a dutch oven. Dump cakes are some of the easiest around, and they’re customizable. For a peach dump cake, line your dutch oven with foil (to make cleanup easier), dump in two 29-ounce cans of peaches including the juice/syrup, sprinkle one box of yellow cake mix over the peaches, sprinkle pats from an entire stick of salted butter around the top, and pour a 12-ounce lemon-lime soda over the top. Put the lid on and bake over hot coals, making sure to put some hot coals on the top as well using proper safety (tongs and/or a heat-safe glove). Let that bake over the coals for about an hour for an ooey gooey dessert. Not a fan of peaches? Try swapping in another canned fruit or pie filling for similar results. Pie filling has less liquid content so you may need to keep a closer eye to prevent it from burning. n

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JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 27


Early Spokane is the epicenter of Leyna Krow’s new book. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

WORDS ON LITERATURE

FIRE

Leyna Krow’s Fire Season is a magic-laced tale set during Spokane’s founding days

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hough it’s bookended by major historic disasters and set over 130 years ago, Leyna Krow’s debut novel feels at once familiar and fresh, an engaging page-turner reimagining the past with a touch of the supernatural. Fire Season opens just before one of the most impactful events of Spokane’s history: The Great Fire of 1889. More than 30 blocks of downtown were decimated as hot August wind fanned the flames across the city’s mostly wooden infrastructure. While devastating to residents and business owners, cleanup and reconstruction of the city began almost immediately, this time with more fireresistant brick and stone. In Fire Season, the Great Fire also sets off a chain reaction of deceptive schemes as the lives of its three main characters intertwine. While each lands somewhere along the spectrum of questionable morals, their self-serving motives and troubled backstories still elicit empathy via

28 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

BY CHEY SCOTT Krow’s masterful character development. For Krow, who previously established her placefocused writing style — usually with an unusual twist — in her 2015 short-story collection I’m Fine, But You Appear To Be Sinking, the pivotal moment setting the tone for Fire Season was partly inspired by a past summer job guiding walking tours of downtown Spokane. “I always started with a brief history, and you know, the Great Fire is such a pivotal part of Spokane’s history, but there’s no consensus of how it started,” Krow says. “And I told that story over and over and over again, and I just felt like I wanted to write something about that because it’s both strange and it just feels like a very Spokane problem to have a major element of history where nobody can agree how it began.” Historians do agree that the fire started in a boardinghouse and restaurant on Railroad Alley called Wolfe’s Hotel (on today’s city map, it would have been located

around Howard and Spokane Falls Boulevard). As to whether it was caused by a kitchen fire or an overturned kerosene lamp, the verdict’s less clear. “I just thought that was a really cool entry point to a story, so I started working on it,” Krow says. She began writing early drafts in winter 2015, originally as a short story from just one character’s perspective, the delusional banker Barton Heydale, who’s disliked by almost everyone around him and thus plots his revenge on all of Spokane Falls, as the city was then named. Heydale leverages his job at the bank to scam residents out of disaster relief funds, his story unfolding in the novel’s first third. “It’s a fine line to walk with unlikable characters because if you make them too unlikable, readers don’t want to be with them,” Krow says, adding that readers of early drafts “couldn’t deal with Barton,” so she had to revise. ...continued on page 30



CULTURE | LITERATURE “WORDS ON FIRE,” CONTINUED... Though Fire Season doesn’t transition to its sole female character’s perspective until the final third section, Roslyn Beck is there from the start as a resident of Wolfe’s Hotel. An alcoholic prostitute, Roslyn has another big secret she’s hiding from the world. Then there’s Quake Auchenbacher, a charismatic con man who’s managed to hoodwink officials in two other Washington cities that also suffered major fires that year — Seattle and Ellensburg — into believing he’s a fire investigator sent by the feds. “Fiction at its core is about evoking empathy to some degree,” Krow says. “It doesn’t have to be that you like somebody, but can you feel that they’re human? Barton was the biggest challenge because he is pretty monstrous in what he winds up doing, and then Quake’s not a good dude, but he’s fun, sort of a joyful criminal.” “I feel like with Roslyn, it’s sort of flipped,” she continues, “She’s a likable character but who does some unlikeable things, or some difficult things. She’s largely a product of her time and place, and she’s struggling to get out of that.”

K

row thoroughly researched local historical records of Spokane’s Great Fire, but acknowledges that she also took plenty of creative liberty with the facts. The fires that also happened that year in Seattle and Ellensburg were real, but there was no scammer posing as a fire inspector, she says. In the book, Barton is manager of the city’s only bank, but in reality there were several banks in Spokane Falls at that time. “It was sort of back and forth. I would go and gather information as I felt like I needed it, but it’s been so long that there are parts of the book, I’ll be honest, I don’t remember if they’re accurate or if I made them up,” Krow says, laughing. “I worked really hard to get the setting and the feeling,” she adds. “And then I felt like I had license to do a lot of other things.”

Further embellishing Fire Season’s historical setting is Krow’s introduction of women in this version of the world who possess special powers. Breaking up the main sections following Barton, Quake and Roslyn are two “interludes,” plus the prologue and epilogue, which set the tone for these witch-like abilities of select women: flying, pyrokinesis, telepathy, mindbody transcendence. “I wanted to have something early on that would let readers know that, hey, there are people in this story who have abilities that we do not have in the real world,” Krow says. “You don’t get to Roslyn until the third section and to have read 200 pages of a book and then all of a sudden you’re like, ‘This bitch is magic?!’ That’s not fair to readers.” Roslyn also challenged Krow in ways more related to current events. While writing Fire Season, Krow’s daughter was born. That life-altering moment for her, paired with turmoil surrounding the 2020 presidential election, spurred some deep reflection she couldn’t ignore. “I felt like I had this third chunk that didn’t fit with the first two because I returned [to writing] a different person,” Krow says. “And the more I worked on it, the more I had this desire to show that.” “Roslyn is a female character in a time and a place that’s super not friendly to women, and rising above all of these dudes who do not take her seriously in the slightest,” she continues. “I think part of that was a reaction to the current political climate, and to having a daughter; thinking about what it means to be a woman in the world.” n Fire Season Book Release with Leyna Krow + Friends • Tue, July 12 at 7 pm • $27 (includes book); students free with ID • The Hive • 2904 E. Sprague Ave. • auntiesbooks.com • 509-838-0206

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CULTURE | DIGEST

THE BUZZ BIN

Westworld is more complex than its robo-cowboys origin.

SMART TV?

PRETTY VACANT Director Danny Boyle (Trainspotting) was a natural choice to direct PISTOL, the Hulu series depicting the Sex Pistols’ history. But even with a talented guy behind the camera, and misadventures straight from guitarist Steve Jones’ autobiography, there’s no way to inject the punk energy of the Pistols’ music into six hours of storytelling, no matter how cool the clothes or loud the soundtrack. It’s all entirely too glossy and pretty (duh, it’s a TV show), but it’s also just not very compelling — too bad given the band’s story is super interesting! (See the excellent doc The Filth and The Fury). A better show is right there in Pistol, though. Future Pretenders leader Chrissie Hynde (Sydney Chandler) is a major character through her romance with Jones and job at manager Malcom McLaren’s clothing store — a show about an Ohio girl who ends up in London during punk rock’s creation and eventually leads her own band to stardom is something I’d watch. (DAN NAILEN).

Seven artificial intelligence series to stream right now BY BILL FROST

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he past few years have proven that human intelligence has failed us big time. It’s an insult to the term intelligence to even call it intelligence. Does that sentence make any sense? I don’t know — I’m becoming increasingly dumber just being around y’all. Maybe artificial intelligence is the answer, even though movies from Blade Runner to The Matrix to Ex Machina have served up mixed outcomes for humanity. Here are seven AI television series that also don’t offer easy solutions to The Human Problem, but you’ll at least be distracted from your meat-sack self while streaming them.

WESTWORLD (SEASONS 1-4, HBO MAX)

An Old West-themed amusement park populated with lifelike android “hosts” to fulfill your every sicko human whim — rape ’em, kill ’em, do whatever you want, they’re just robots. When they become sentient and escape into the real world, Westworld transforms into something far more complex than its robo-cowboys origin. Trust the science … until it comes for you.

HUMANS (SEASONS 1-3, PRIME VIDEO)

In the near (and very British) future, “Synths” (humanlike androids) are everyday household accessories, like microwaves, dishwashers and the Martha Stewart Collection Artisanal Bong™. Humans is less fantastical than Westworld but just as psychological — an androidsattain-consciousness thriller that’s also emotionally raw. It’s a sci-fi soap opera, upgraded.

WEIRD CITY (SEASON 1, YOUTUBE)

Before he produced a Twilight Zone TV reboot, Jordan Peele co-created Weird City, a future-set anthology for YouTube Premium (yes, it’s a thing). The AI-driven burg of Weird City is divided in half: Above the Line (rich people) and Below the Line (poor folk). Weird City is smart, funny and, uh, weird, with a few hot jabs at Woke Culture — too bad it’s not on a real streamer.

32 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

PERSON OF INTEREST (SEASONS 1–5, HBO MAX)

High-concept and plot-dense, Person of Interest somehow ran 103 episodes on CBS(!). Billionaire computer genius Harold Finch (Michael Emerson) creates an AI program that scans all — literally, all — electronic communications to predict crimes before they happen — he’s digital Batman. Person of Interest is a deep dive on tech, morality and the limits of Jim Caviezal’s “acting.”

NEXT (SEASON 1, YOUTUBE)

CSI: Cyber set the bar for dumb cyber-crime dramas, and Next (or neXt, but I’m not playing that) cleared it in two episodes before being canceled by Fox in 2020. A rogue, quickly-evolving AI program is loose on the internet, and only the former CEO of the company that created it (John Slattery) can stop it — if a degenerative brain disease doesn’t kill him first. Yeah, Next is extra.

TERMINATOR: THE SARAH CONNOR CHRONICLES (SEASONS 1–2, HULU)

Set four years after Terminator 2, Terminator: The Sarah Connor Chronicles finds Sarah and son John (Thomas Dekker) still on the run when another Terminator (Summer Glau) arrives from 2029, and the trio takes a time trip from 1996 to 2007 … whew. TSCC was a sharp, action-packed sci-fi series that could have spanned several seasons, but Fox canned it after just two.

ROBOCOP: PRIME DIRECTIVES (SEASON 1, FREEVEE)

A RoboCop TV series that retains the snark and violence from the glorious original movie? I’d buy that for a dollar. Canadian series RoboCop: Prime Directives is set 13 years after the film franchise, and RoboCop is now considered as dated and useless as an iPhone 4. But, when an OCP exec murders his board of directors and unleashes a nefarious AI on Delta City (formerly Detroit), Roboy’s back in action! Eh, the real Detroit’s seen worse. n

PRIMAL SCREEN What is it about the woods of North Idaho that makes for intrepid survivalists? Find out watching Sandpoint’s KARIE LEE KNOKE in season nine of the TV show, Alone, currently running on the History Channel. The survivalist series follows 10 contestants documenting their way through the remote Canadian wilderness with scant provisions. When Knoke is not teaching wilderness and primitive living skills or pursuing outdoor sports like snowboarding and backpacking, the 57-year-old former systems analyst consultant lives in an off-grid yurt where she practices wildcrafting, perfects her archery skills, and sews buckskin hides. If she outlasts her competitors, Knoke will be the second person with ties to Sandpoint to do so; in 2019, Jordan Jonas survived 77 days to win $500,000. (CARRIE SCOZZARO) THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Noteworthy new music arriving in stores and online July 8: METRIC, FORMENTERA. The Torontonian indie synth-rock stalwarts still know the sweet spot between propulsive pop and rocking out, carried the whole time by Emily Haines’ crystalline vocals. NEIL YOUNG WITH CRAZY HORSE, TOAST. Originally slated for release in 2001, Young initially shelved Toast because it was “so sad that [he] couldn’t put it out.” C’mon, Neil! That was peak emo era! AESPA, GIRLS. The rapidly rising K-pop girl quartet looks to parlay their catchy choruses into a chart-topping album with their sophomore EP. (SETH SOMMERFELD)


CULTURE | COMEDY

I Cho-ChoChoose You Margaret Cho remains a fiercely funny stand-up trailblazer BY SETH SOMMERFELD

I

f you’re one of the legions of men who say that it’s so difficult to do comedy in today’s climate, Margaret Cho would rightfully laugh in your face. As a woman, Asian American, and bisexual, she’s been proudly part of the marginalized groups that often get punched down at since she started doing stand-up, and she’s still here and thriving. A fixture in the stand-up scene since the mid-’90s, Cho has never been demure when comedically attacking issues of politics, race or sexuality. There aren’t a lot of comics who won awards from GLAAD and the ACLU, and Rolling Stone named her one of the “50 Best Stand-Up Comics of All-Time” for a reason. She’s also been a blast adding comedic spice in acting roles, whether it be her Emmy-nominated turn as Kim Jong-il in 30 Rock or being the lesbian matriarch for the vacationing crew of gays guys in the excellent Hulu rom-com, Fire Island. In anticipation of Cho’s three-night stint at Spokane comedy club (July 7-9), we caught up with the iconoclast to chat about how stand-up has shifted since she started, drag queens, and being a matriarch of the comedy community. INLANDER: One of things you talk about in the new special is the differences between being gay in the 1980s and being one currently. How have those cultural shifts impacted your approach to comedy? CHO: I definitely don’t have to explain myself as much. There’s less, like, introduction. I mean, that also comes with doing comedy for a long time, and then a lot of people are coming to see me, as opposed to going out to, like, a night of comedy. That used to sort of happen. Now people who are fans of comedy go to see the comedians they like, and it’s less about going to a comedy club — “Oh, we just want to laugh” — that kind of thing. So there’s less of an introduction, and there’s also less of a sort of a caution. Like, “Oh, how do I present this?” And there’s a lot more to talk about, as well. Generally, in comedy, we know so much common ground, there’s less explaining about everything. So there’s more that we know about the world together at once with social media, and the way that we understand common things. I think that’s what’s really remarkable. Do you miss the ’80s thing of having to win over a comedy club audience that doesn’t know you? No! I love having a familiar audience. To me, it’s really special to get to perform for [people with] a similar sensibility, and also similar history. People that I’ve seen before. That’s a huge honor. They just keep coming back and back. Yeah, I love it. I think that’s really a vote of confidence. “Oh, you’re going to see me again. You like what I’ve done. And so you want to see this show again.” Over the years, they’ve had a good time with you. That’s really special.

The legendary Margaret Cho enjoys the comedic shorthand she shares with modern audiences. I really enjoyed Fire Island and loved how you were the “mom” for the gay friend group. It felt like a perfect fit because in a way you were sort of that motherly figure for that younger generation of comedians like Joel Kim Booster and Bowen Yang. You were someone they could look up to when they were growing up and not seeing hardly any queer or Asian American comedy representation. It’s very symbolic to our lives of being comedians, and also their journey through comedy and seeing me [and] realizing, oh, they could do this too. That I was their inspiration is my greatest, greatest achievement — that I was able to inspire incredible comedians like them to pursue stand-up. What sort of things in the comedy world really hit your comedic sweet spot these days? It’s a lot of drag. Like the drag that was in Stand Out, whether it’s Bob the Drag Queen or Trixie Mattel. It’s comedians like Joel. It’s sort of all of the things that Bowen got to do on SNL. It’s really exciting. Comedy’s in a really great place where we’re seeing a lot of different kinds of representation. And it’s so fun.

SERGIO GARCIA PHOTO

While there’s certainly a lot more accepting forums these days, what’s your artistic way of dealing with the other end of the spectrum — the people who feel more emboldened to be openly hateful in the modern climate? Well, I think it’s really just about trying to look at how ludicrous it is. Like this idea that we’re trying to stop gun violence against children, whereas there’s a whole faction that thinks drag is the problem. And that’s like… MORE EVENTS [bursts out laughing]… drag is Visit Inlander.com for the most harmless, safe kind of complete listings of community! It’s the most ridiculocal events. lous, silly, funny, ludicrous part of our community. The diversion tactic of trying to avoid talking about gun violence by talking about drag is really ridiculous and inherently hilarious. n Margaret Cho • Thu, July 7 at 7:30 pm; Fri-Sat, July 8-9 at 7 & 9:45 pm • $25-$40 • 18+ • Spokane Comedy Club • 315 W. Sprague Ave • spokanecomedyclub.com • 509-318-9998

JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 33


NEWS

Growing

Season Green Bluff’s 2022 season offers more of everything for visitors to enjoy, from farm produce to fun events BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

C

hange is a constant at Green Bluff, from the weather, events and crops available for picking or purchase, to the farms, orchards and artisans of this cherished 12-squaremile area north of Spokane’s urban core. For one longtime Green Bluff resident, the 2022 season has brought tremendous change and a departure from decades as a family-run winery. Moving into the former tasting room and production facility for Townshend Cellars and still the home of Green Bluff Tree Farm, Wildland Cooperative is a multifunctional venue, located at 8022 E. Green Bluff Rd. in Colbert, featuring regionally produced food items, local artists’ work, plant starts and produce grown on site, and evergreen trees during the winter. Find more information at wildland.coop. Wildland also makes its own wine, separate from the Townshend label, and beer in the former Townshend production facility, which is also where you’ll find live music on select days. A modest food menu is in the works, too. “It was a good way for us to start a new vision for what we wanted this property to be,” says Michael Townshend, who started Wildland Cooperative with his wife, Vanessa Swenson, and Jake Losinski, who ran Green Bluff Tree Farm. Townshend, whose father, Don Townshend, started the winery in 1998 and whose brother Brendon Townshend now operates its location at 1222 N. Regal St., adds that the cooperative model also allows them to bring in new people who have a vision for the future.

Beer, wine, art, food, live music and more are on tap at Wildland Cooperative at Green Bluff. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

MORE CHANGES AND EVENTS AT GREEN BLUFF

BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE 9919 E. Green Bluff Rd., Colbert, greenblufffarms.com, 509-238-6970 Beck’s is celebrating 35 years as a multifunctional destination, with live music on weekend afternoons (times vary). Its fourth annual Food Trucks and Fruit Festival takes place Aug. 20-21. BIG BARN BREWING 16004 N. Applewood Ln., Mead, bigbarnbrewing.com, 509-710-2962 The Deitz family hosts food trucks, Friday through Sunday, at their dual-purpose farm and taphouse. Bring your own seating for live music on Friday evenings (5:30-7:30 pm) and Sundays (2-5 pm), and help celebrate the brewery’s 10th anniversary.

34 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

FROM LEFT: Woodland Cooperative team members Caitlin Mahoney, Michael Townshend, Vanessa Swenson, Jake Losinski and Anna Canfield.


CHERRY PICKER’S TROT & PIT SPIT 9809 E. Green Bluff Rd., Colbert, grange.org/greenbluffwa300, 509-710-2962 Earlier this spring the Green Bluff Grange rescued this unusual but popular event, which has individuals or teams traversing 4 miles through orchard terrain on Thursday, July 21 ($10-$20 entry fee). A cherry pit-spitting contest is also part of the festivities, which includes food trucks, live music and — let’s face it — the giggle-inducing spectacle of cherry-spitting.

THE

INSIDER’S GUIDE

COLE’S CERTIFIED ORGANIC ORCHARD 18423 N Green Bluff Rd., Colbert, facebook.com/colesorchard, 509-238-4962 In addition to 30 varieties of organic tree fruit and assorted tomatoes, Cole’s has added tomatoes of the Citrine, Cipolla’s Pride, Blue Beech and Amish varieties. HALBIG FAMILY FARM 17909 N. Dunn Rd., Colbert, amateurartisans.com, 509-795-4604 In addition to its scratch-made candies, which it sells on-site through its Sweet Stuff Creations business, Halbig Family Farm has expanded its evergreen tree and garden area. HIDDEN ACRES ORCHARDS 16802 N. Applewood Ln., Mead, hiddenacreswa.com, 509-238-2830 New this year are expanded U-pick watermelon and garlic areas, as well as a convenient “salsa patch” of vegetables, all of which are free of chemical sprays. HIGH COUNTRY ORCHARD 8518 E. Green Bluff Rd., Colbert, highcountryorchard.com, 509-238-9545 High Country has added a U-pick flower field, and upgraded its facilities, which are also available for rent, as well as farm animals and a small racetrack for kids to pedal go-karts. KNAPP’S U-PICK FARM 7722 E. Ballard Rd., Colbert, knappsupickfarm.com, 509-219-0030 Knapp’s new online system lets you preorder berries, get notified when fruit is available to pick yourself, and arrange for delivery. PRIDDY GOOD FRUIT 8903 E. Green Bluff Rd., Colbert, priddygoodfruit.com, 509-703-3470 Priddy Good Fruit is adding a new, Scottish-themed nano-brewery, New Maitland Brewing, which is expected to open this July. SIEMERS FARM 11125 E. Day Mt. Spokane Rd., Mead, siemersfarm.com, 509-238-2548 This third-generation family farm hosted its first strawberry festival this year (it ends July 9, so put it on your calendar for next year), and U-pick berries are coming on strong. Up next: cherries!

to the INLAND NORTHWEST

MAKING THE MOST OF GREEN BLUFF Mother Nature still sets the tone when it comes to agricultural availability, so check not only greenbluffgrowers. com (or social media), but also individual venues’ websites for the most up-to-date event and crop information. Check the Green Bluff map, and make a plan for which of the 30-plus venues you might want to visit. If you’re planning to pick your own fruit or produce, be prepared with appropriate clothing, water, snacks and whatever else you might need to be outdoors for any extended time in weather that can change unexpectedly. As per Washington law, bags cost 8 cents each, so bring your own and save.

Inside the guide:

ANNUAL REPORT • EDUCATION ARTS • FOOD AND DRINK • NIGHTLIFE SHOPPING • RECREATION • GREEN ZONE

and more!

SUNSHINE FARM LLC 6312 E. Rae Ln., Colbert, sunshinefarm.org, 509-904-5731 Michael and Ginger Kulpit are excited to reopen their veteranowned farm after being closed through the 2021 season. Look for a variety of fruit, as well as chicken and duck eggs. THE RIDGE AT GREEN BLUFF 7607 E. Green Bluff Rd., Colbert, theridgeatgreenbluff.com, 509-238-3030 In addition to Honeycrisp, Gala, Fuji and Red Delicious apples, the Ridge has added late blooming apricot and peach varieties. n

Advertise your business in Annual Manual advertising@inlander.com 509.325.0634 ext 215

JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 35


FOOD | TO-GO BOX

Lilac City Legend Chicken-N-Mo celebrates 30 years, an iconic Spokane eatery closes, plus more updates to the restaurant scene BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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hree generations of the Hemphill family were working the other day at Chicken-N-Mo (414 W. Sprague Ave.), which has received considerable attention from local media. On July 1, Chicken-N-Mo celebrated 30 years in business with founder Bob Hemphill, who started the restaurant just shy of his 50th birthday, and turned 80 on July 6. After running several non-food businesses, in 1992 Hemphill saw and filled a niche for Southern-style cooking in Spokane. The menu at Chicken-N-Mo includes such staples as fried chicken and catfish, and barbecue ribs and chicken, as well as sides like stewed greens and hush puppies (fried dollops of cornmeal). Hemphill also makes and sells his own Old South BBQ Sauce, which is also available at several local grocery stores (Egger’s Meats, Huckleberry’s Natural Market, Sonnenberg’s Markets; and select Yoke’s Fresh Markets, URM Stores, and Rosauers).

Chicken-n-Mo’s Bob Hemphill and his family are celebrating 30 years of serving killer fried chicken (and more) this month. The current location has all the feel of a beloved hole-in-the-wall, with wooden benches and tables, assorted plants, and counter-service ordering. The vertical, wood panel walls are covered in license plates from around the country, plus banners, posters and other paraphernalia supporting local sports and schools, and various items testifying to the pioneering achievements of Black Americans. Count Hemphill among them. “There’d never been a Black-owned business [in Spokane] before,” he says from his perch near the counter, where he greets many customers by name. A giant of a man with a stoop as faint as his Southern accent, Hemphill describes how the menu and business evolved. “We started out with nothin,’” he says. “And now… this.”

OPENINGS

If you’re looking to bliss out on ice cream and other sweet treats in the Nine Mile Falls area, check out CHILL OUT ICE CREAMERY ( 5919 Hwy. 291). The new eatery takes the place of MadLo’s Ramen House, whose owners will continue to offer boba tea drinks ($4.25/16-ounce; $5/24-ounce) in the new creamery. Look for 20-plus flavors of ice cream imported from Wisconsin, handcrafted waffle cones and other sweets like cotton candy ($3). Try a signature sundae like the Nirvana ($4.25/ small; $5.75/large) with caramel ice cream, a chocolate chip cookie, caramel sauce, whipped cream, almonds slivers and a cherry. More at chillouticecreamery.com. TORO VIEJO (117 N. Second St., Coeur d’Alene)

ENTER TO WIN 1 PAIR OF TICKETS TO SEE

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Inlander.com/freestuff 36 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

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YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

recently reopened with a limited menu after intermittent pandemic-related closures since 2020 (the Lakeside Avenue entrance of the restaurant is still closed). Currently rebranded as Toro Borracho Tacos and Tequila Bar, it is the third Mexican restaurant in North Idaho for Ruben Briseno, who in 1992 opened the original eatery in Hayden (9075 N. Government Way). A third Toro Viejo exists in Post Falls (3960 W. Fifth Ave.). Visit toroviejo.com.

TRANSITIONS

The rumors are true. MONARCH RAMEN (1401 N. Fourth St., Coeur d’Alene) closed this week after nearly three years in business. In Spokane, DOLLY’S CAFÉ (1825 N. Washington St.), which Dolly Mueller established in 1958, has also closed. The business is listed for sale. Fingers crossed, someone will purchase it and keep the iconic local eatery alive. The New York City Piano Bar (313 Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene) has changed its name and format to DUELERS PIANO BAR. If you’re expecting pistols at 10 paces, think again; this is dueling pianos, as in two piano players playing simultaneously. The subterranean space in the former Wine Cellar location also serves craft beer, wine and canned cocktails, and a few simple snacks. Visit duelerspianobar.com. n To-Go Box is the Inlander’s regular dining news column, offering tasty tidbits and updates on the region’s food and drink scene. Send tips and updates to food@ inlander.com.


There isn’t a word for “marijuana” in my language. And if I can’t speak it, I would rather not do it.

iʔ sqəlxʷčáw̓tət. iksčk̓ʷín̓. (My Culture. My Choice.) For more info, visit www.culturechoicerespect.com

JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 37


HEROES WITH HEART REVIEW

Humor and emotion carry Marvel’s Thor: Love and Thunder BY JOSH BELL

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hen director Taika Waititi took over the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s Thor movies with 2017’s Thor: Ragnarok, he deliberately distanced the series from its first two entries, which are often considered weak spots in the monolithic MCU. With the new Thor: Love and Thunder, Waititi reaches back to those earlier Thor movies, putting his own spin on some of their major plot elements. Primarily, he brings back Natalie Portman as Thor’s scientist ex-girlfriend Jane Foster, who was a somewhat bland presence in the first two movies, but here she takes a more proactive role in Thor’s superheroic adventures. That’s because Jane becomes a superhero herself, a version of the Norse thunder god who goes by the title of Mighty Thor. The original Thor (Chris Hemsworth) is still feeling a bit lost, processing the events of the last several MCU movies and their multiple universethreatening catastrophes. At the end of 2019’s Avengers: Endgame, Thor joined up with the spacefaring Guardians of the Galaxy, but Waititi dispatches with them fairly quickly, glossing over a series of offscreen adventures via narration from Thor’s buddy, the goofy rock-covered alien Korg (played by Waititi). The unwieldiness of the MCU necessitates a lot of recapping, but Waititi eventually streamlines the movie down to Thor, a few allies and

a villain who threatens the existence of Thor’s home and his people. Although Thor’s realm of Asgard was destroyed in Ragnarok, the Asgardians are thriving in their new home on Earth, until they’re threatened by the sinister Gorr the God Butcher (Christian Bale), who seeks vengeance on all gods for forsaking him and his late daughter in their hour of need. Bale makes Gorr both menacing and tragic, but his seriousness is a bit out of place in the lively, joke-filled style that Waititi established with Ragnarok and continues here. The tonal imbalance is one of Love and Thunder’s biggest issues, as it lurches from heavy discussions about death to wacky banter, sometimes within the same conversation. That makes Gorr seem like less of a threat, even though he’s on the verge of annihilating all gods. Thor recruits Jane, Korg and Asgardian leader Valkyrie (Tessa Thompson) to help him defeat Gorr and rescue a group of kidnapped Asgardian children, but their downtime is often more compelling than the big action sequences. Waititi retroactively makes the romance between Thor and Jane more interesting, with flashbacks that fill in the gaps between movies.

Portman’s physical transformation into a musclebound action hero is impressive, but it’s only one aspect of Jane’s journey as a character. A detour to a city filled with gods (including Russell Crowe and his bizarre Greek-ish accent as Zeus) comes off as filler, although the tossed-off vibe of Love and Thunder is mostly appealing. When every movie is about the potential end of existence, the MCU can feel exhausting, and Love and Thunder tells a story that is vitally important to its particular characters without having to encompass the entirety of Marvel’s superhero lineup. Gorr continues the MCU tradition of underwhelming villains, especially in the finale, but the movie isn’t really about him anyway. Visually, Love and Thunder doesn’t deviate from the established MCU template, although Waititi adds creative touches where he can, aiming for a sort of 1980s hard rock aesthetic (reflected in a soundtrack filled with Guns N’ Roses songs). At this point, the special effects, costumes and set design in these movies are largely interchangeable, and the various intergalactic and mythological locations have the same bright, slightly plastic look. The variations within the MCU remain minimal, but Love and Thunder finds a fun approach within its limited scope. n

THOR: LOVE AND THUNDER

Rated PG-13 Directed by Taika Waititi Starring Chris Hemsworth, Natalie Portman, Christian Bale

ALSO OPENING APPLES

A fruit on the tree of the Greek Weird Wave cinematic movement, this film blends absurdity, drama and whimsical existentialism to tell the story of a man trying to start life over and find some sense of normality (and possibly a relationship) after losing his memory as part of a worldwide amnesia pandemic. Rated R. At the Magic Lantern

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Billy Prine & the Prine Time Band present

Oh, the krakens have fully been unleashed.

How to Train Your Sea Beast Though its animation style can be hit-or-miss, The Sea Beast’s oceanic adventures makes a splash

probably seen the lovely 2010 film How to Train Your Dragon, where a group of characters reconsider their relationship with the mythical beasts they’ve demonized (the film executes that story as well as can be imagined). While The Sea Beast isn’t quite as inventive, it still hits many of the same notes with enough heart to make it all BY CHASE HUTCHINSON work. The central relationship between Jacob hen evaluating a work of animation, and Maisie is an engaging one that the movie the devil is always in the details. From can mostly call its own even though many similar the manner in which a face changes stories have built their narrative around an adult expression as a character makes a crucial decihaving to step into an unexpected parental role. sion to the way the vast horizons of the ocean exWhat sets The Sea Beast apart is the imagitend out before you as a magnificent sea creature native world that the two experience over the travels across it, these are the things that immerse course of the film. A detour to an island of you in its world. In the largely immersive The Sea unexpected creatures is a high point as we see evBeast, there is a whole lot to admire in the design erything from a giant crab-like beast to a buried of its creatures even if the people themselves can nest of babies magnificently bursting open. The feel a little stiff. Thankfully, the film is able to care given to animating shine through in its grander vision, one that THE SEA BEAST these scenes is felt in offers a reflective take on a familiar story. every frame, creating an Rated PG This all begins with Jacob, a monster enduring and unfulfilled Directed by Chris Williams hunter voiced by an appropriately charisdesire for the entire Starring Karl Urban, Zaris-Angel matic Karl Urban (The Boys), who spends film to be based around Hator, Jared Harris his days on the high seas. With a committed exploring what could be Streaming on Netflix crew of distinct characters that spend much found there. of their time shouting out various ship phrases Still, the film makes the most of its vibrant with glorious vigor, he doggedly hunts down visuals, a treat for viewers young and old. There the supposedly dangerous beasts of the sea. is a genuine sense of scale and scope to the way However, time may be running out for the crew everything is brought to life which proves rather as a stuck-up king and queen are threatening to impressive. The main attraction — Red Bluster replace them with a ship run by their own lack— feels like a creature that is truly alive. A more eys. Thus, Jacob and the crew will set out to hunt patient journey atop the creature’s back across down the ultimate prize: the enormous sea beast the sea is a nice change of pace that proves to that is known as the Red Bluster. be most enthralling. Even just seeing Jacob and Little do they know, this voyage will be Maisie go about various tasks with Red in the unlike any they’ve undertaken. The primary vast ocean is mesmerizing. reason for this is that they have a stowaway on Of course, it does then shift into a more board. The precocious youngster Maisie, voiced conventional conflict toward the end that lacks by relative newcomer Zaris-Angel Hator, has the same charm of what proceeds it. What makes snuck aboard, drawn to adventure and a familial it still engaging is that it grapples with the history connection to hunting. Through an unfortunate of the world and — again, like How to Train Your series of events, she and Jacob will have to band Dragon before it — how the beings people have together to survive when they get separated from come to call “monsters” may be more than that. the rest of the crew. Along the way, they’ll think It is in these moments where The Sea Beast is both more deeply about whether these monsters are joyous and melancholy, instilling the experience really as dangerous as they’ve been told. with a multilayered sense of emotion that can be If this all sounds a bit familiar, then you’ve wonderful to behold. n

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JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 39


INSTRUMENTS

Literal Beatmakers Cask Drum Craft is making sure Spokane keeps the beat BY SETH SOMMERFELD

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e’ve all got hobbies. They’re essential aspects of our lives which keep us mentally engaged and enthusiastic. Some folks like tinkering around in their garages and building things. Some folks like playing music with their pals. Micah Doering fits into the Venn diagram overlap of those two sectors, and it has led him to become Spokane’s drum-making master. Appropriately growing up in Rathdrum, Idaho, Doering grew up doing carpentry projects with his dad at home while also fostering a love of music, beginning drumming in school ensembles starting in sixth grade. At one point, Doering wanted a new snare drum, and rather than pick one up at a music shop, he and the old man built one wine-barrel-style out of 20 pieces of glued-together wood. That was the first drum that Doering built, but it wouldn’t be his last. While he plied his trade as an electrician, about seven

40 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

years ago Doering started making drums in his Post Falls garage as a side hustle. Cask Drum Craft was born.

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hat sets Doering’s drums apart is his throwback process. He’s not a kid gluing together drums anymore, he’s using a highly specialized process to bend the wood into the needed circular pieces with the power of steam. “What we’re doing here is building a steam drum shell. There are only around five companies left in the nation that still do it like this,” says Doering. “Originally, all drum shells were built like this back in the 1900s. It’s just a more stable way of building a drum, they sound better. The problem is it’s very time consuming, so it kinda got replaced by plywood drums. That’s what 99 percent of all drums are nowadays. So we’re kind of resurrecting it. There’s still a big demand for it, we’ve found.” On a sonic level, steam-bent drums are far easier to

tune to specific notes and have a broader tuning range. Clear notes ring out of them, often with true low-end sounds. A steam-bent tom drum can sometimes sound as low as a plywood bass drum, making them ideal for that stadium rock thump. Steam-bent drums are also much more durable than plywood. As Doering jokes, “Your guitar player could stand on the bass drum and not fall through it.” Three and a half years ago, Doering took the plunge into making Cask his full-time job. He crossed the Idaho border and set up shop in the Old Trolley Barn in East Central Spokane. The space offers plenty of room for specialized machinery needed to efficiently make the drums, as well as store them during the many steps of the steam-bending process. Said process begins by Doering procuring big slabs of wood from local sawmills. Getting it fresh makes it easier to steam, but each wood species is different. Oak, maple,


A cherry, walnut and ash are Cask’s bread-and-butter wood varieties, but expensive custom orders can use rarer, super brittle African hardwoods. The costs with these woods not only jump because of the comparative scarcity, but because of how unforgiving and difficult they can be to steam-bend without cracking. While black walnut has essentially a 100 percent steam-bending success rate, maple drops to about 75 percent, before nosediving for exotics like bubinga and purpleheart to a scant 25 percent steam-bending success rate. (Looking up at the shop’s ceiling you, one can see the rejects in the “hanging graveyard.” Every four or five months, Doering just takes a stack of unusable drums and throws them in the garbage or burns them to clear out space in the rafters.) Once in the shop, Doering cuts the wood into strips and soaks them in tanks of a water and fabric softener solution to improve their bendability. The steam-bending is then done by hand using a specified machine to assist, and is actually the fastest step in the process, only taking about five minutes. The newly circular wood rings are clamped and left to dry for three to four weeks as part of the curing process to make sure they don’t crack. Along with other hand-done detail work like sanding, diameter adjustments and milling are then done to transform the products from rings of wood to actual drum shells. Not only do Cask Drum Craft’s products blow the run-of-the-mill products out of the water in terms of tone, they can also be gorgeous works of art. Be it intricate striped designs or lovely natural finishes, some of the high-end products look almost too good to play... almost.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Cask Drum Craft’s custom drums look as good as they sound; rows of steam-bent OEM shells cure; Michah Doering in his shop. ERICK DOXEY PHOTOS

“I found [business] really took off during the pandemic,” says Doering. “People, they had the residual income, they wanted to buy something new, they wanted to play drums more.” The absolute quickest a custom Cask drum can be turned around is six to 10 weeks, but some drum sets have taken well over a year. Most of Cask’s custom work isn’t commissioned by locals — his new carbon snare drums for example have been bought by players in China, Japan and the Netherlands. There isn’t a wild market for the people who want to spend $600 for an bubinga snare drum shell (before it’s even fitted with hardware and becomes playable), but Doering emphasizes that he’s not only making $6,000 drum sets for obscenely wealthy drummers. “We’re not just high end, we can build a drum for anybody at any price,” he says. “A lot of our stuff is higher-tiered pricing. But you know, if there’s a local drummer who’s looking for a snare drum for three or four hundred bucks, we can do that too. We focus on the high end, but we’ve got a drum for everybody.”

fter initially resisting, Doering has also dipped into the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) market; in other words, making steam-bent drum shells for the big-name drum companies. It’s now 95 percent of the shop’s work (the upstairs of the shop is strewn with dozens of clamped OEM shells curing). If you buy a new steam-bent drum from a major drum maker, there’s a decent chance you’re unknowingly playing one of Doering’s drums (the large companies don’t like to disclose their use of OEM products — though Luft, which makes high-end tambourines for orchestras and such, is happy to say they get OEM products made by Cask). The company’s output is around 40 OEM drum shells per month. Additionally, Doering makes about 20 to 25 custom snare drums and three or four drum sets over the course of a given year. Cask faces many of the same problems any small business does these days: material costs, trouble finding good help, etc. Doering has hired three employees to help build the drums since the Spokane move, and for them, the process of making musical instruments still offers a sense of wonder. “I’m a drummer, too, but I did not know anything before I came in,” says Joe Anyon, who has been working at Cask for a year. “Like, I had no idea the difference between the steam-bent and normal drums. The learning process for me is pretty much my favorite thing. And just being a part of something that is like, you know, a lost art.” In addition to his band Somatic Tribe (which can be found playing house parties and venues like Cruisers Bar & Grill in Post Falls), Cask Drum Craft has become Doering’s creative outlet. It’s rewarding because it’s creativity that then fuels even more musical imagination once the drums are out the door. “I couldn’t be happier,” says Doering. “I’m glad I quit my job to do this.” And the beat goes on... and the beat goes on... n Find more about Cask Drum Craft at caskdrumcraft.com and steambentdrum.com.

JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

COUNTRY? ROCK? FOLK? ZACH BRYAN

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he — extremely small — Spokane Pavilion 2022 concert season is finally upon us! While we certainly wished for more summer shows in the newish Riverfront Park concert spot, at least we’re starting with a chart-topper. Singer-songwriter Zach Bryan made history in June when his new album, American Heartbreak, debuted at No. 1 on Billboard’s Country charts and the Rock charts and the Folk/Americana charts. Is this a sign that Bryan is the new king of music or the weird way charts operate in the fragmented world of streams where people rarely buy music? (It’s definitely the latter.) Still, it shows that he’s a voice on the rise, and one that’s hard to shove neatly into one genre box. If you can find a ticket to the sold-out show on the secondary market, it might be the ideal way to kick off your summer concert season. — SETH SOMMERFELD Zach Bryan, Jonathan Peyton • Wed, July 13 at 8 pm • Sold out • All ages • Riverfront Pavilion • 574 N. Howard St. • spokanepavilion.com

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

RAP JARREN BENTON

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ailing from the Southern hip-hop capital of Atlanta, Jarren Benton makes the abrasive go down smooth. Labeling him a shock rapper would be overstating it, but he certainly pushes the edge of tact (often with a knowing, Eminem-esque comedic style). But whether getting frantic about his schizophrenic personality or rapping over slow Nirvana samples, the combination of bouncy vocals and a flow that never seems fully out of control make even the edgier turns of phrase immensely listenable. Benton is on tour to celebrate the 10-year anniversary of his mixtape Freebasing with Kevin Bacon, making Lucky You the spot to get six degrees of musically strung out. — SETH SOMMERFELD

Thursday, 7/7

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Current Flow J BOTTLE BAY BREWING CO., Echo Elysium BRICK WEST BREWING CO., Kyle Richard COEUR D’ALENE PARK, Full Metal Racket Rock Band HAYDEN CITY PARK, The Hankers IDAHO CENTRAL CREDIT UNION AMPITHEATER, What About Bob J KNITTING FACTORY, Zoso: The Ultimate Led Zeppelin Experience J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Mary Lambert J J THE NEST AT KENDALL YARDS, Milonga Latin Band PINE STREET PLAZA, Jon & Rand Band J QQ SUSHI & KITCHEN, Just Plain Darin SHERMAN SQUARE PARK, Sammy Eubanks Band ZOLA, Desperate8s

Friday, 7/8

AK ASIAN RESTAURANT, Ed Shaw J BRICK WEST BREWING CO., DJ Unifest CHAN’S RED DRAGON ON THIRD, The Usual Suspects IRON HORSE (CDA), JamShack J IRON PIZZA ATHOL, Gil Rivas J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Jarren Benton, Oswin Benjamin OLD MILL BAR AND GRILL, Wild Wooly Duo J ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, Heather King Band PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Scott Dodson

42 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

Jarren Benton, Oswin Benjamin • Fri, July 8 at 8 pm • $18 • 21+ • Lucky You Lounge • 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. • luckyyoulounge.com • 509-474-0511 TRANCHE, SkyDogs J J WALLACE, Historic Wallace Blues Festival

Saturday, 7/9

BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE, Jesse Quandt Band CHAN’S RED DRAGON ON THIRD, Bobby Patterson & the Two Tones DAHMEN BARN, The Lukenbills HUNTERS BAR AND GRILL, Black Jack Band IRON HORSE (CDA), JamShack LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Jango, Elvis Batchild MCINTIRE FAMILY PARK, Coeur d’Alene Big Band J THE NEST AT KENDALL YARDS, The Latrice Experience

J ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, Heather King Band PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Nick Wiebe J PONDEROSA BAR AND GRILL, Rhythmic Collective J REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Yogoman Burning Band RITZVILLE, Music on Main J ROCKET MARKET, Tango Cowboys TRANCHE, Wayne Worthen J J WALLACE, Historic Wallace Blues Festival ZOLA, Blake Braley

Sunday, 7/10

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Sara Brown Band BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE, Okay Honey

COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, Spare Parts IRON HORSE (CDA), JamShack J ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, The Ronaldos J SOUTH HILL GRILL, Just Plain Darin

Monday, 7/11

J COEUR D’ALENE PUBLIC LIBRARY, The Matt Renner Band J EICHARDT’S PUB, Monday Blues Jam with John Firshi

Tuesday, 7/12

COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, Northbound Bluegrass Band J KNITTING FACTORY, As I Lay Dying, Whitechapel, Shadow of Intent, Brand of Sacrifice

J ROCKET MARKET, Sadie Sicilia SULLIVAN SCOREBOARD, Heather King Duo ZOLA, Lucas Brown & Friends

Wednesday, 7/13

BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE, Just Plain Darin FALLS PARK, The Rhythm Dogs J KENDALL YARDS, Jason Evans, Suhanna Jens, Olivia Vika J J PAVILION AT RIVERFRONT, Zach Bryan PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Bob Beadling PRINCE OF PEACE LUTHERAN, POP Summer Concerts: The Cronkites RED ROOM LOUNGE, The Roomates ZOLA, Runaway Lemonade


MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208263-5673 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 509-847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 509-924-1446 BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens St. • 509-315-5101 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 509863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 509-467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague Ave. • 509891-8357 BOLO’S BAR & GRILL • 116 S. Best Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-891-8995 BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR • 18219 E. Appleway Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-368-9847 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main St., Moscow • 208-596-0887 THE BULL HEAD • 10211 S. Electric St., Four Lakes • 509-838-9717 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw, Worley • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-292-4813 CRAVE • 401 W. Riverside Ave. • 509-321-7480 CRUISERS BAR & GRILL • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-446-7154 CURLEY’S HAUSER JUNCTION • 26433 W. Hwy. 53, Post Falls • 208-773-5816 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • 509-279-7000 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-6241200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-4572392 HONEY EATERY & SOCIAL CLUB • 317 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-930-1514 IRON GOAT BREWING • 1302 W. Second Ave. • 509-474-0722 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-926-8411 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 509244-3279 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington St. • 509-315-8623 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 509-456-5678 LUCKY YOU LOUNGE • 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. • 509-474-0511 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 509747-2605 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy. • 509-443-3832 THE MASON JAR • 101 F St., Cheney • 509-359-8052 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-922-6252 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-838-1570 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 877-871-6772 NYNE BAR & BISTRO • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-474-1621 PACIFIC PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 509-443-5467 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 POST FALLS BREWING CO. • 112 N. Spokane St., Post Falls • 208-773-7301 RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL • 10325 N. Government Way, Hayden • 208-635-5874 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 509838-7613 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 509-822-7938 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-8008 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 509-459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • 509-2797000 STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON • 12303 E. Trent Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-862-4852 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 509-624-2416

July 23rd & 24th A FUN FILLED WEEKEND OF EVENTS CELEBRATING 150 YEARS OF LOCAL HISTORY AND COMMUNITY. VENDOR MARKET, MUSIC, FOOD, WINE & BEER FESTIVAL, KID ZONE, CORNHOLE TOURNAMENT AND MORE!

explorecolfax.com

ANNUAL

FUNDRAISER

15

$

and up!

BUY A HANDMADE BOWL & GET AN ICE CREAM!

CASH N’ CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

JULY 9  10AM4PM

MANITO PARK

UrbanArtCoop.org

JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 43


MUSIC MAKE YOURSELF AT HOME

If you haven’t wandered through Kendall Yards lately, you might not know the Powers That Be have been sprucing up “The Nest,” the mini amphitheater located just off the Centennial Trail and just west of Molé (formerly Central Food). While there’s been live music during the Wednesday farmers market, the newly configured (and shaded!) stage means The Nest is ready for its closeup as a summertime music venue. Enter this summer’s “Rock The Nest” Thursday night concert series, kicking off July 7 with Spokane’s favorite Latin-rock band, Milonga. That shade might come in handy as the band bounds from flamenco to Afro-Cuban rhythms, because there’s a pretty good chance you’re going to need to stand up and move your body. Later in the summer, you can catch the likes of Soul Proprietors (July 21), T.S. The Solution (Aug. 4), Blue Canoe and Starlite Motel (together Aug. 18) among others. — DAN NAILEN Rock The Nest: Milonga • Thu, July 7 at 6 pm • Free • The Nest Plaza at Kendall Yards • 1335 W. Summit Pkwy • facebook.com/kendallyards

44 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

MUSIC YOUR BLUE WORLD

ARTS SUMMER STAPLE

Historic Wallace Blues Festival • Fri, July 8 from 7-11:30 pm and Sat, July 9 from 11:30 am-midnight • $25-$50 • Wallace, Idaho • wallaceblues.com • 208-661-5748

Scoops and Bowls • Sat, July 9 from 10 am-4 pm • $15-$40 • Manito Park • 1702 S. Grand Blvd. • urbanartcoop.org • 509327-9000

Music is at the center of many a memorable gathering, so what better place than Wallace, Idaho — which bills itself as “the center of the universe” — to hold a town-wide music festival? Back after a two-year hiatus, the Wallace Blues Festival takes place across three venues, plus a VIP garden, with 12 acts performing over two days, including local faves like the Doghouse Boyz and the hard-workin’ fellow voted Washington’s best male vocalist a dozen times: Sammy Eubanks. Bring the RV (it’s free to park in designated areas) or pony up for a motel room and make a weekend of it, with plenty to do in between sets. Discover why the festival is an Inland Empire Blues Society hall of fame inductee and the center of all things blues, at least for this weekend. — CARRIE SCOZZARO

On a Saturday in July, the simple pleasure of enjoying a scoop of ice cream in the park sounds just about perfect. This weekend at Manito Park, Urban Art Co-op is hosting its annual Scoops and Bowls fundraiser, and fulfilling this summertime dream in the process. Beautifully designed, handmade bowls crafted by local artists are for sale, and a free scoop of ice cream comes with each purchase. Since 2015, Urban Art Co-op has been operating a community pottery studio dedicated to providing a safe space for artists to practice and grow their passion. Find your new favorite bowl, chow down on a cold treat, and give back to a great local arts nonprofit. — LAUREN RODDIS


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Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

OUTDOORS HEAVEN ON EARTH

What is perfection? Mountain biking, trail running, kayaking and a beer garden, probably. Spokatopia is paradise for the athlete or outdoors enthusiast, bringing together gear demos, friendly competitions, live music, a hammock garden and free swag for the perfect day of play. Test drive a Pivot mountain bike, pedal a new Hydrofoiler on the Spokane River, join a morning yoga class or shuttle to the top of Sekani. A beginner-friendly 5k trail run races before the festivities — all runners get extra goodies plus access to every activity the festival offers. Attendees who bike to Spokatopia (via the Centennial Trail) can store their bicycles in a safe corral and are entered for extra prizes throughout the day. Loungers are especially welcome and encouraged to test out camping gear and yard games set out by REI. However you define a good place, you can probably find your spot at Spokatopia. — ELIZA BILLINGHAM

OUR DOORS ARE OPEN! • Schedule appointments quickly online • View test results securely via Patient Portal • Medication and procedural abortion available

ppgwni.org 1-866-904-7721

Spokatopia • Sat, July 9 from 9 am-6 pm • $5-$25 • All ages • Camp Sekani Park • 6707 E. Upriver Dr. • spokatopia.com • 509-822-0123

SPOKANE YOUTH FOR CHRIST’S INAUGURAL MUSIC BENEFIT CONCERT

THURSDAY, JULY 14, 2022 FOOD & DRINK LAKESIDE SIPS

Coeur d’Alene is always bustling in summertime, with locals and tourists alike traipsing through the resort town in their flip-flops, tank tops and sun hats. It’ll be no different during this annual summertime celebration of all things beer (and cider!), held lakeside at McEuen Park. The Coeur d’Alene Downtown Association event features more than 30 breweries, including locals like Radio Brewing from Kellogg and Coeur d’Alene’s own Paragon Brewing, alongside many regional favorites from Montana, Oregon and Washington. Head online for the full list of participating breweries and cideries, and food vendors on site that day. There’s also live music and yard games happening on the grass to keep everyone entertained. Tickets include six 5-ounce pours and a commemorative pint glass, with extra pours available for $2 each. — CHEY SCOTT Coeur d’Alene Brewfest • Sat, July 9 from 1-7 pm • $30-$35; free for kids and designated drivers • All ages • McEuen Park • 420 E. Front Ave. • cdadowntown.com

Bing Crosby Theater • 6PM – 9:30PM 901 W. Sprague Ave., Downtown Spokane

GET $ TICKETS:

12

Spokane Youth For Christ’s inaugural music benefit concert. Proceeds will primarily support YFC’s Music Studio at its Hillyard Youth Center, providing a safe, healthy and creative activity for at-risk youth in Spokane. (509) 327-7721

• spokaneyfc.org

JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 45


YOU GOT CAUGHT To the pizza co-worker who likes to switch tags, if your antics at work leaves others looking bad and costing the company money, do you really think you will continue to get away with it? YOU GOT CAUGHT TONIGHT, AND IF YOU DO IT AGAIN, I WILL NOT BE VENTING TO THE INLANDER. I may be new, but at least I am nice with sincerity, unlike your fake ass smiles.

I SAW YOU HELPING SOMEONE ROAD RAGE You, lady in white minivan helping a person in white Ford SUV who was road raging, tailgaiting and cutting off many other cars. Francis between 3:30-4. Hope you’re not in an abusive relationship; why else would you help? I’m a home health worker trying to get to my client. You blocked traffic so the sicko could follow me. What up, girl? RE: YOU ARE MAGNETIC TO ME Whenever we get the chance to chat it just feels so natural, and sitting with you outside recently was picturesque. Are we both just unsure? I personally find it very difficult to express myself around others, especially since covid made me a veritable shut-in, my bad. I think my face has forgotten how to emote, and busy places put me on edge. I’m assuming both of us are going in the same direction, why would this be so awkward otherwise? Even a simple greeting is apparently impossible outside forced interactions; it would be funny if it wasn’t so frustrating. I probably should’ve responded sooner, but every time I see you I learn something new, and it gets even more difficult. Perhaps we just need another avenue to communicate? Here’s an ancient email address lurkingbunny@ hotmail.com. In any case I’ll see you again soon, maybe we can even say hi :P

HANDSOME MAN AT THE CAR WASH I was at the Coeur d’Alene Metro car wash when I saw you in your work pickup that had “Airway Service Inc.” on the side. I don’t know who you are, but you are very handsome and struck my attention. You had Texas plates, so hopefully by chance you run across this.

YOU SAW ME NEAR THE DELI AT NORTHSIDE COSTCO… You approached me to compliment my tattoos, and I was immediately captivated by your kind and warm demeanor. When you shook my hand to introduce yourself, I melted as both of your hands cupped mine. I’ve been kicking myself for not asking for your number... so if you’re out there, Robert, know that this tattooed babe has been thinking of you! You can email me at CostcoMissedConnection@ gmail.com. HIT WITH A COCONUT You saw me cooking dinner, and the strangest thing happened. A coconut bonked you on the noggin, and suddenly a sensational truth came to you. We loved each other. We can be really happy together. I still have the coconut you gave me after that night. I still love you, doubly so since then. Nikita, I want you to marry me, will ya? -C NO LIFE: HILLYARD CAR WASH Me washing my Delta 88, you saw me. You caught my eye when you pulled up next to me by the vacuums checking me out. I could not help but notice how sexy you are, waiting patiently. When I walked around to sit at the wheel you was looking hard; smiling, you said hello I

am Michael, and I said hello I am Melissa. You looked into my soul, melting me like butter. You persistent, me so flustered, I gave you the first three numbers wrong. So if you’re out there and you read this, the first three numbers are 558 NOT 588. Michael, call me or see me at the car wash. Melissa (youwantmetositwhere@ gmail.com)

CHEERS REAL AMERICANS MATTER How many “Black” faces were seen at the attack on the Capitol on January 6th? After watching this horrendous act, I saw only one. I’m not praising Black people for

couldn’t have gotten out without hitting something without you! Appreciate you!

JEERS RE: RE: ACTUAL DAMAGES Clearly you have never been in the military nor do you know as much about firearms as you think if you really believe that the M-16 is fully automatic. It has three settings: safe; semi, which fires one round at a time; and burst, which fires in bursts of three. I know this because I was in the U.S. Army and graduated basic rifle marksmanship with one. Educate yourself before making comments like this.

Whoever that was, you are the worst kind of person, and you will get yours. BAD PARENT ALERT AT DISHMAN HILLS Was with my Adventure Dog Class ... at Dishman Hills in the Spokane Valley around noon, and we were very shocked when a toddler started running at us totally naked!! She was with several other kids, and they had their clothes on. No parents around! Asked the kids where their parents were, and they said they were in the forest. This happened on the paved trail by the grass area. Minutes later four adults came down the trail, and our dog instructor asked if one of them was the naked child’s parent? One, laughing, said yes. Meanwhile there

...Real Americans were not willing to disrespect our democracy.

staying away, I’m posting to say that real Americans were not willing to disrespect our democracy. GOOD WEEDS Not once but twice within a month I have been thought of by two extremely honest people. The first time was when I left my purse on a bench & it was found & taken into the Rite Aid on 29th street & last Saturday when I laid my pink frozen food bag down on the cement by the Shadle Safeway. I haven’t an explanation for why all of “this” took place, good luck or divine intervention? What I do know is not only was I saved heartache twice, but the two thoughtful & honest souls must have felt proud for their kind actions. Thanks & best wishes go out to both of them. HELPED ME BACK OUT To the kind young lady that was wearing a MUV fitness jacket that helped me back out of my tight parking spot at Riverfront Square parking garage, thank you!!!! I

SOUND OFF

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

CROSSWORD CORRUPTION I know there are more important issues, but this Crossword is out of control with foreign words. This is an English language puzzle. I don’t speak French or Spanish. I have a good grasp of German, but it shouldn’t be necessary to solve the puzzle. I counted no fewer than six foreign words last week. It’s no longer enjoyable. BEWARE OF THIS BIKER To the people who apparently have no power in their regular lives and decide to try an take some of that back by driving aggressively toward bicyclists, be warned I have had enough. To the asshole that intentionally drove closer to me while I was riding shoulder to scare me or intimidate me, you ran me into a street sign so hard it broke out of the concrete. I’m done. We have just as much right to be out there on the road as you do, and I am here to start educating people on that. Now to go get checked for that concussion...

are probably 30 kids and only a few adults in the large play field. I just don’t understand how any parent would think that would be OK? That park is known for having a homeless problem, and the child had no shoes on. God knows what she could of stepped in. The park playground grass area had about 30 kids in it, and not many adults supervising. Wondering if this was some day care gone wild or what. It sure gave our little dogs are startle. n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS A R A B S E P O C H

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A I R H O C A K R E M Y

H A I F F A G S T R A E L A F T A F B A L I E R

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I D T H E U R F G E T H A S T C H I I I T C H A P D O A O

L J U O U T U D I I V A L S A I E T C H A A R T D K E E A L L A S O T C H N E A E R R K A Y

Saturday July 9th - 7:05PM

Star Wars trivia, character appearances, and a special Star Wars jersey auction benefiting Spokane Indians Youth Baseball. Stick around after the game for a spectacular fireworks show! Presented by:

Visit 46 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

for Tickets

P L A Y S N I C E

Y E T A G L O W

A K E R S

F E T C H

E S S A Y

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Star Wars & Fireworks! vs.

M I G R A I N E S

Games Through Sunday 7/10

FREE PARKING


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

BREAKFAST BENEFIT PERFORMANCE A breakfast benefitting the Spirit of Spokane Chorus. July 9, 11 am-noon. By donation. Iron Horse (Valley), 11105 E. Sprague Ave. spokaneironhorse.com SCOOPS & BOWLS Purchase a handmade bowl and get free ice cream. All proceeds support Urban Art Co-op. July 9, 10 am-4 pm. $15. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. urbanartcoop.org A WOMAN’S WORTH FUNDRAISER GALA An event for the women in the Spokane community featuring silent auctions, crafts, dance, influential speakers and vendor tables. July 9, 3:30-5:30 pm. By donation. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. womansclubspokane.org FALLEN POLICE OFFICERS JACKED UP BIG SHOW Programming includes live bands, food trucks, 50+ local vendors, raffle items, 200+ vehicles and trophies to follow. July 16, 11 am-4 pm. Free. Lone Wolf Harley-Davidson, 19011 E. Cataldo Ave. (509-426-3854)

COMEDY

MARGARET CHO Since opening for Jerry Seinfeld at 14, Cho has starred in her own sitcom, her off-Broadway one-woman show and participated in season 11 of Dancing with the Stars. July 7, 7:30 pm, July 8, 7 & 9:45 pm and July 9, 7 & 9:45 pm. $25-$40. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com BUCKET LIST An improvised comedy show based on the places you’ll go and the things you’ll see. Fridays in July at 7:30 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com COMEDY NIGHT WITH MYLES WEBER Myles Weber’s Dry Bar Comedy Special was voted 8th best in 2021. July 9, 5 pm. $20-$35. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. merlinscomedyclub.com SAFARI A fast-paced, short-form comedic improv show. Saturdays from 7:30-9 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com PETER ANTONIOU Peter has appeared on America’s Got Talent performing his comedy and mind tricks. July 10, 7:30 pm. $15-$20. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com NEW TALENT TUESDAYS Watch comedians of all skill levels work out jokes together. Tuesdays at 7 pm (doors at 6 pm). Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com JASON BANKS Jason has been featured

SLEEP STUDY

on Tru TV, Sirius Satellite Radio and Kevin Hart’s LOL Network. July 14, 7:30 pm, July 15-16, 7:30 & 10:30 pm. $30. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998)

COMMUNITY

BACKPACKS FOR KIDS For the 13th consecutive year, the Salvation Army Spokane, in collaboration with NomNom Convenience Stores, has a goal of distributing 4,000 new backpacks with school supplies to local kids, grades K-12. NomNom is collecting funds at its local stores in July. See website for more info. spokane.salvationarmy.org (509-325-6810) GRAND COULEE DAM LASER LIGHT SHOW The 2022 show theme is “One River, Many Voices.” Through July 31 at 10 pm, Aug. 1-31 at 9:30 pm and Sept. 1-30 at 8:30 pm. Free. Grand Coulee Dam Visitor Center. usbr.gov (509-633-9265) STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL The yearly festival includes U-pick strawberries, craft and food vendors and live music. Through July 9. Siemers Farm, 11125 E. Day-Mt. Spokane Rd. siemersfarm.com THE RUM REBELLION: PROHIBITION IN NORTH IDAHO This exhibit tells the story of how the panhandle of Idaho was anything but dry during the nationwide prohibition. Open daily 11 am-5 pm through Oct. 29. $2-$6. Museum of North Idaho, 115 Northwest Blvd. museumni.org VIRTUAL JOB FAIR Meet with local employers from various industries using your computer, laptop, smartphone or tablet. July 7, 1-3 pm. Free. bit.ly/3OBf0Bt THE WAY WE WORKED An exhibit that celebrates the history of work in America and explores the places that Americans worked, from farms to factories and mines to restaurants, as well as in homes. Wed-Sat from 11 am-4 pm through Aug. 20. $3-$6. Spokane Valley Heritage Museum, 12114 E. Sprague Ave. spokanevalleymuseum.com (509-922-4570) FRIENDS OF THE DEER PARK LIBRARY SUMER BOOK SALE Thousands of gently-used books of all genres, with new books added daily. All proceeds support the Deer Park Library and community. Every second Fri and Sat of each month from 9 am-4 pm. Deer Park Auto Freight, 2405 E. Crawford St. (509-555-1212) GARDEN OF WONDERS NIGHT MARKET & STREET FAIR A night market featuring a vendor faire, live music, immersive arts experiences, tarot readings, fire dancing and more. Every night varies in theme and includes beer gardens, food vendors and more. Second Friday of the month

W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org RATHDRUM DAYS The two-day community event includes live music, a beer garden, kids activities, parade, car show, vendor fair and more. July 15-16. Rathdrum, Idaho. rathdrumchamber.com DROP IN & RPG Stop by and explore the world of role playing games. Build a shared narrative using cooperative problem solving, exploration, imagination and rich social interaction. First and third Saturday of the month from 1-3:45 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (509-279-0299) SIKOTIKK MEET & GREET Meet TikTok star Sikotikk as he celebrates hitting 300,000 followers on the app. July 16, 12-3 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. spokaneriverfrontpark.com THE SOLAR SYSTEM Explore our solar system, find out what it would be like to live on distant stars and see what the brave adventurers experienced decades ago on that first trip to the moon. Grades K–5. Registration required. July 16, 2-4 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8350) SOUTH PERRY STREET FAIR Following a two-year hiatus, the 21st street fair is back and features a Kids Zone, 125+ vendors, food trucks, beer gardens and live music. July 16, 10 am-10 pm. Free. South Perry Business District. facebook.com/ SPBNA

FILM

DREAMWORKS ANIMATION: THE EXHIBITION — JOURNEY FROM SKETCH TO SCREEN From the makers of Shrek, Madagascar, Kung Fu Panda, How to Train Your Dragon and Trolls, comes an extraordinary exhibition celebrating over 25 years of DreamWorks Animation. The show includes more than 400 items including rare and never-seen-before concept drawings, original artifacts, interactives, film clips, and more. Through Sept. 11; Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm (third Thursdays until 9 pm). $15-$20. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org GARLAND FREE KIDS MOVIES: ANGRY BIRDS 2: Part of the Garland Theater’s free kids movies series. July 4-8, daily at 9:30 am. Through July 8, 9:30 am. Free. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com/ (509-327-1050) KARATE KID: Part of the Garland’s family friendly series. July 4-8, daily at 12 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com (509-327-1050)

SKY HOPINKA: LORE An experimental work that weaves together family, myth and trauma with traces of nostalgia articulated in terms of lore. Tue-Fri from 1-4 pm, Sat from 10 am-4 pm through Aug. 6. Free. Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU, 1535 NE Wilson Rd. museum.wsu. edu (509-335-1910) MOVIES IN THE PARK The Salvation Army Spokane’s family-friendly summer movie series, Fridays at Sally’s Park. All movies begin at sundown. Bring blankets and lawn chairs; snacks and drinks are available, benefiting Salvation Army’s local youth programs. Free. The Salvation Army Spokane, 222 E. Indiana Ave. salvationarmyspokane.org (509-325-6810) SATURDAY CARTOONS AT THE MARKET Showings of cartoons during the Moscow Farmers Market. Every Sat through Oct. 31 from 8 am-1 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) TDS MOVIES IN THE PARK: ENCANTO In addition to the movie, the event also features face painting, lawn games and giveaways. July 9, 6 pm; movie at 8 pm. Free. Sky Prairie Park, 8501 N. Nettleton Ct. TDSfiber.com DREAMWORKS MOVIE MATINEES: THE BEE MOVIE Visit the DreamWorks Animation Exhibition — Journey From Sketch to Screen and then watch a screening of The Bee Movie. July 10, 2 pm. $15-$20. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org (509-456-3931) SUMMER CAMP: STAND BY ME Part of the Garland’s summer series where an array of cult classic films are shown. June 10-14, Sun at 5 pm, Tue at 7:10 pm and Thu at 10 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 2 Part of the Garland’s free kids movies series. July 1115, daily at 9:30 am. Free. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. garlandtheater.com DETECTIVE PIKACHU Part of the Garland’s family-friendly series. July 11-15, daily at 12 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com THE STORY OF PLASTIC Join Spokane Zero Waste and 350 Spokane for a viewing of the documentary The Story of Plastic (2019) and discussion to follow. July 12, 6-8 pm. Free. Liberty Park Library, 402 S. Pittsburgh St. spokanelibrary.org SUMMER FAMILY MATINEE SERIES Weekly showings of family-friendly films. June 14-Aug. 3, Tue and Wed at 1 pm; see website for details. $3. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org

SERVING BREAKFAST LUNCH AND DINNER • SEVEN DAYS A WEEK

WSU Spokane Sleep & Performance Research Center

4-day/3-night in-laboratory sleep study, pays up to $920

on our Patio! HISTORIC WALLACE BLUES FESTIVAL

HISTORIC WALLACE BLUES FESTIVAL • JULY 8-10

Must be healthy, non-smoker, 18–40 years old with normal sleep schedule.

Call (509) 358-7751

from 5-9 pm. Runge Furniture, 303 E. Spokane Ave. thewavybunch.com HORSE & CARRIAGE RIDES Take a carriage tour of downtown Spokane and Riverfront Park. Fridays, 5-9 pm through July 29. Free. downtownspokane.net KALISPEL TRIBE ATV/UTV POKER RIDE A scenic ride through Pend Oreille County. Collect playing cards at different checkpoints along the route and build your best poker hand, then finish at Kalispel RV Resort for awards and a prize giveaway. Registration required. July 9, 9 am-noon. Free. Kalispel Park & Casino, 420 Qlispe River Way. kalispelcasino.com KARAOKE, DANCE & SKATE NIGHT DJ Seamus hosts the ‘skate and aoke’ event and DJ Azul Amor hosts a dance party afterward. BYO skates. July 9, 7-10 pm. Free. Pavilion at Riverfront, 574 N. Howard St. spokaneskate.org PANIDA THEATER OPEN HOUSE Stop in for a tour, a cold brew or to check out classic Charlie Chaplin shorts; Behind the Screen, Vagabond, Fireman and more. July 2-Aug. 20, Saturdays from 12-4 pm. Free. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-263-9191) U-PICK LAVENDER FESTIVAL Pick lavender, browse vendor booths and listen to live music. July 9-10, 10 am-5 pm. $8$36. Evening Light Lavender Farm, 5552 S. Wallbridge Rd. eveninglightlavender. com (509-939-0313) 24TH COEUR D’ALENE GARDEN TOUR: Tour gardens in the Coeur d’Alene area. Addresses provided upon purchase. Proceeds benefit local charities. July 10, 11 am-4 pm. $17. cdagardenclub.com CENTRAL LIBRARY GRAND REOPENING After two years of renovations, the Central Library (downtown) branch is reopening to the public with an event featuring food trucks, informational sessions and a ribbon cutting. July 11, 9 am-3 pm. Free. Central Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org (509-444-5308) OCEAN EXPLORATION STEAM ACTIVITIES Kids are invited to dive into the depths of the ocean blue with hands-on exploration and experiments. During the hour-long program, elementary age kids learn about ocean geography, deltas, density, buoyancy, adaption and more. July 12, 12-1 pm. Free. Palouse Library, 120 E. Main St. whitcolib.org KERNEL During the Kendall Yards Night Market, kids are encouraged to drop in and participate in activities to win a voucher to purchase fresh fruits and vegetables. Wednesdays from 5-7 pm through Aug. 24. Free. Spark Central, 1214

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JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 47


EVENTS | CALENDAR CATVIDEOFEST A compilation reel of the latest and best cat videos culled from countless hours of unique submissions and sourced animations, music videos and classic internet powerhouses. A percentage of the proceeds from each event supports local animal shelters and/or animal welfare organizations. July 15-21, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun-Thu at 6:30 pm. $10-$11. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main. catvideofest.com (509-209-2383) AN EVENING WITH JOE BOB BRIGGS: HOW REDNECKS SAVED HOLLYWOOD Spend two hours with America’s drive-in movie critic as he uses over 200 clips and stills to review the history of rednecks in America as told through the classics of both grindhouse and mainstream movies. July 15, 8 pm. $40. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org MOVIE IN THE PARK: VIVO Part of the Liberty Lake Summer Festival series. A music-loving kinkajou embarks on the journey of a lifetime to fulfill his destiny and deliver a love song for an old friend. Movie starts at dusk. July 15. Free. Orchard Park, 20298 E. Indiana Ave. pavillionpark.org SUMMER MOONLIGHT MOVIES: HARRY POTTER & THE SORCERER’S STONE Bring a lawn chair, blankets, snacks and enjoy a movie under the moonlight. Movie begins at dusk. July 15. Free. Sunset Park, 924 S. Lawson St. airwayheightsparksandrec.org (509-244-4845)

FOOD

PAIRINGS IN THE PINES A progressive tasting event through Pine Street Woods while enjoying locally crafted food and

wines. July 7, 5-7:30 pm. $125. Pine Street Woods, 11915 W. Pine St., Sandpoint. kaniksu.org CANINES & COCKTAILS Bring your dog to the patio and enjoy dinner, drinks and treats for you and your furry friend. Every Friday from 2-7 pm. South Perry Lantern, 1004 S. Perry St. lanternspokane.com FOOD TRUCK FRIDAY This year’s selection includes Mixed Plate, Skewers, One Night Stand, Tacos Camargo, Good Dilla and more. Fridays from 11 am-2 pm through Aug. 26. Downtown Spokane. downtownspokane.org POUR COMPANY’S ARTISAN GRAIN BEER FEST Local breweries compete to brew the best beer with local grains. Taste a wide selection of beer, cider and seltzer, and enjoy food, music and more. Participating vendors include Pour Company, Micropolis Brewing, Hunga Dunga Brewing Co., Moscow Brewing Co., Moscow Alehouse, Paradise Creek Brewing and Patty’s Mexican Kitchen. July 8, 4-9 pm. $20-$40. Latah County Fairgrounds, 1021 Harold St. fb.me/e/1WoY643nR RIDE & DINE This summer series includes a scenic gondola ride, live music and a mountain-top barbecue dinner. Fridays from 3-8 pm through Sept. 2. $8-58. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. silvermt.com (208-783-1111) WINE TASTING Taste a selection of wines from Oregon’s Del Rio Vineyards. Includes cheese and crackers. July 8, 3-6:30 pm. $10. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington St. vinowine.com BREWFEST Sample a variety of 30 beers and ciders, and enjoy a wide selection of food, yard games and live music. July 9,

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12-7 pm. $25. McEuen Park, 420 E. Front Ave. cdadowntown.com (208-415-0116) SANDPOINT BEERFEST Enjoy craft beers, ciders and seltzers from local and regional breweries. Other activities include live music, cornhole, trivia and a chance to win prizes. July 9, 12-5 pm. $50-$60. Trinity at City Beach, 58 Bridge St. visitsandpoint.com (208-255-7558) WINE TASTING Taste the wines of Shannon Ridge and Steele Wineries. Includes cheese and crackers. July 9, 2-4:30 pm. $10. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington St. vinowine.com (509-838-1229) PICKLING 101 Join certified food safety and preservation specialist Anna Kestell for this class about pickling using acetic acid for fruits, vegetables and eggs. July 10, 2-3 pm. Free. Liberty Park Library, 402 S. Pittsburgh St. spokanelibrary.org RIVERFRONT EATS Riverfront Park’s local food truck series. Tue from 11 am-2 pm through Aug. 30. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org POURS & PICKS Enjoy $6 wine by the glass and $4 charcuterie picks in the Cafe, every Wednesday from 4-6 pm. The Culinary Stone, 2129 N. Main St. culinarystone.com (208-277-4166) WINE WEDNESDAYS Enjoy wine specials, food and live music while watching the sunset over the orchard. See website for live music lineup. Wednesdays from 5-8 pm through Aug. 24. Free. Beck’s Harvest House, 9919 E. Greenbluff Rd. becksharvesthouse.com (509-238-6970) CRAVE! NORTHWEST Crave! is dedicated to uplifting the regional culinary scene. This year, the 3-day food festival

is chef-focused, showcasing the creative talents of chefs and tastemakers from around the region. July 14-16 from 6-9 pm. $49-$75. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. cravenw.com (509-869-0344)

MUSIC

GR8TER VETERANS SUMMER CONCERT SERIES A local music festival featuring artists such as Echo Eslyium, The Sam Leyde Band, Okay Honey and more. July 9, 16, 30 and Aug 6, from 5-10 pm. See website for complete schedule. Free. Mix Park, 301 W. Fourth Ave., Deer Park. gr8terveterans.org (509-953-3515) PAMELA BENTON: STRINGZONFIRE! Pamela performs blues, indie folk rock, jazz and originals. July 9, 7-10 pm. Free. Noah’s Canteen, 610 Bunker Ave. pamelabenton.net (208-783-2440) SUMMER BREEZES & SWEET SOUNDS A free concert in the University of Idaho arboretum with performances from local musicians. July 11, 7-8:30 pm. Free. University of Idaho Arboretum and Botanical Garden, 1200 W. Palouse River Dr. uidaho.edu/class/music (208-885-6231) SPIRIT OF SPOKANE CHORUS A fourpart harmony barbershop chorus. Rehearsals are held every Tue from 6:30-9 pm. Free. Opportunity Presbyterian Church, 202 N. Pines Rd. opportunitypresbyterian.org (509-924-9750) BRING THE NOISE Spokane Youth For Christ’s first annual music benefit concert. Proceeds primarily support YFC’s Music Studio at its Hillyard Youth Center, providing a safe, healthy and creative

activity for at-risk youth in Spokane. July 14, 6-9:30 pm. $12. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater. com (509-327-7721)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

RIVERFRONT MOVES: BARRE ON THE BRIDGE Strengthen and tone your entire body with emphasis on core stability and balance, and complete with low impact/ high intensity cardio bursts. July 7 and July 14, 7-8 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. spokaneriverfront.org SPOKANE INDIANS VS. TRI-CITY DUST DEVILS Promo events during the six-game series include College Alumni Night (July 7), Family Feast Night (July 8), Star Wars Night (July 9) and Native Culture Day (July 10). July 7-9, 6:35 pm, and July 10, 1:05 pm. $8-$22. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. milb.com/spokane (535-2922) YOGA & MIMOSA CRUISES Tickets include a 45-minute on-board yoga class with CDA Power Yoga, and a mimosa (or sparkling cider). Snacks, cocktails, mimosa flights and more available for purchase on the boat. Thursdays at 9 am in July and August. $29.50. Coeur d’Alene. cdacruises.com (209-292-5670) ANCHORING YOGA WITH LESLIE SENA A yoga style based on centering yourself and your body in the present moment. July 8, 6:30 pm. Suggested donation of $5. Palouse Community Center, 220 E. Main St. whitcolib.org (509-878-2301) MRP MOTOCROSS A summer motocross


racing tradition in Coeur d’Alene. July 8-9 7-10 pm. $15-$20. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. mrparenacross.com (208-765-4969) THE GREAT FAMILY CAMPING CHALLENGE Work as a family or with a team to complete camping-themed activities. All ages. Registration required. July 9, 2-3:30 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8350) HISTORIC WALKING TOURS Join local historian Chet Caskey for a free walking tour of Riverfront Park, where the city’s past and present merge in unique ways. July 9, July 23, Aug. 13 and Aug. 27 at 10 am & noon. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontspokane (509-625-6600) NPOV LIONS CLUB RAILRIDERS Enjoy the unique experience of a four-seated, pedal powered, railroad bicycle along the beautiful, scenic Pend Oreille River in Ione, Washington. July 9-10, July 30-31, Sept. 17-18, Oct. 1-2 and Oct. 8-9. Times vary, see website for tickets. $12/$24. Ione, Wash. lionsrailriders.com OUTDOOR TAI CHI Tai Chi Chuan is the ancient Chinese exercise of simple, easy-to-learn postures and movements that support balance and relaxation. For adults only. July 9, 9-10 am. Free. Otis Orchards Library, 22324 E. Wellesley Ave. scld.org (893-8390) SIDEHILL SCRAMBLE Put together a foursome to compete in this annual scramble. July 9, 8 am & 2 pm. $400. Circling Raven Golf Course, 27068 S. Highway 95. cdacasino.com (800-523-2464) SPOKATOPIA The outdoor adventure festival features opportunities to try new sports, bike the Centennial Trail, try new outdoor gear and participate in friendly competition. July 9, 9 am-6 pm. $5-$15.

Camp Sekani, 67070 E. Upriver Dr. spokatopia.com (625-6200) THE KAN Explore alpine meadows, huckleberry groves and old pine forests as you weave through Mt. Spokane Ski and Snowboard Park and the best trails the State Park has to offer. 50k, 25k and 10k options. July 9, 7 am-noon. $49-$119. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. ponderosaracing.com YOGA AT THE BAKERY Yoga on the patio with Danielle Stuffing. Includes a onehour class, cookie, and a Made With Love water bottle. Registration required. July 10 and Aug. 14, 3:30-4:30 pm. $40. Made With Love Bakery, 2023 W. Dean Ave. mwlbakery.com (509-919-0041) ANCHORING YOGA WITH MEGGIE CAFFERTY A yoga style based on centering yourself and your body in the present moment. July 11, 6 pm. Suggested donation of $5. Lookout Park, 822 E. Valleyview Ave., Colfax. whitcolib.org RISE ABOVE SPORTS FEST A sports clinic for youth featuring current and former professional athletes and guest speakers. July 11, 12-3 pm. Free. Rogers High School, 1622 E. Wellesley Ave. NativeYouthRiseAbove.org (509-324-1995) THE GREAT FAMILY CAMPING CHALLENGE Work as a family or with a team to complete camping-themed activities. All ages. Registration required. July 12, 2-3:30 pm. Free. Cheney Library, 610 First St. scld.org (509-893-8280) RIVERFRONT MOVES: BEYOUTIFUL HOT YOGA An outdoor Vinyasa class with attention on linking breath with the movement between postures. Beginner friendly. July 12, 6-7 pm. Free. Pavilion at Riverfront, 574 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.org (509-625-6000)

ROOFTOP SUMMER YOGA Each week of the donation-based class brings a different feel and practice. July 5-Aug. 30, Tues from 6-7:15 pm. By donation. Saranac Building, 25 W. Main Ave. rootedyogapnw.com (509-315-8862) ACTIVE SENIORS WALK After the threemile walk, the library provides a socially distanced tailgate party of breakfast snacks. Adults 55+. Registration required. July 13, 8:45-10:30 am. Free. Waterfront Park, 1386 S. Lefevre St., Medical Lake. scld.org (869-0252)

THEATER

HADESTOWN Intertwining two mythic tales— that of young dreamers Orpheus and Eurydice, and that of King Hades and his wife Persephone. July 5-10; Tue-Fri at 7:30 pm, Sat at 2 and 7:30 pm, Sun at 1 and 6:30 pm. $52-$100. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. broadwayspokane.com MAMMA MIA! The storytelling magic of ABBA’s top hits propel this enchanting tale of love, laughter and friendship. July 1-10; Fri and Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $50-$153. Schuler Performing Arts Center, 1000 W. Garden Ave. cdasummertheatre.com (208-769-7780) NEWSIES This Disney film turned Tonywinning Broadway hit inspires all to fight for what’s right and seize the day. July 8-24, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $25-$41. University High School, 12320 E. 32nd Ave. svsummertheatre.com

VISUAL ARTS

BEAUTY IN HAND This exhibition brings together eminent artists from across the country in a celebration of ceramics. July

2-Aug. 1, daily from 11 am-6 pm. Free. The Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com (208-765-6006) LIVING LABORATORY OF ART & ECOLOGY An art project that integrates art into school science curricula by illustrating ecological interdependence using arts exploration to encourage self-awareness, a richer sense of connection with peers and our surroundings. July 7-31, daily from 4-7 pm. Free. Terrain Gallery, 728 N. Monroe St. terrainspokane.com THE PRE-PARTY AT EMERGE Preview Emerge’s 2022 Block Party event featuring over 100 artists, live music and more. July 7, 6-9 pm. $15. Emerge, 119 N. Second St. emergecda.com (208-930-1876) EMERGE BLOCK PARTY The 9th annual block party features 145+ local artists selling their art and goods, plus film and performance artists. July 8, 5 pm-midnight. Free. Emerge, 119 N. Second St. emergecda.com ARTING AROUND! Artists of all ages are invited to explore distinct art styles. July 9, 11 am-2 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org SUNDAY ART MART An opportunity for local, emerging artists and crafters to exhibit and sell work in a casual environment. July 10-Aug. 28, Sun from 12-4 pm. Downtown Spokane. downtownspokane. org

WORDS

HOW THEY MAKE IT: CREATING CHARACTER AT DREAMWORKS DreamWorks Animation Films Character Artist JP Sans discusses how DreamWorks creates its animated characters. After his talk is time for questions and a special movie screening. July 9, 1-4 pm. $10. Northwest Mu-

Sandpoint Beerfest EIGHTH Annual

on the lawn of Trinity at City Beach

artner Event P

58 Bridge Street

Enjoy craft brews, ciders and seltzers from three Sandpoint’s local Breweries plus breweries from across the region. Live music with local favorites Right Front Burner (RFB), along with corn hole, Beer Trivia and Prizes! Let’s spend some time together at the Beer Bash at the Beach.

$

50

Before July 1st

$

60

s

seum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org LEYNA KROW: FIRE SEASON A celebration of Spokane author Leyna Krow’s new novel, along with fellow local writers. $27 (book purchase as ticket). The Hive, 2904 E. Sprague Ave. auntiesbooks.com ARTIST TALK: TAMALIN BAUMGARTEN A talk with artists-in-residence, Tamalin Baumgarten on her art process and inspiration. July 13, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. The Hive, 2904 E. Sprague Ave. spokanelibrary.org (509-444-5300) BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s weekly open mic series. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm; Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. bit.ly/2ZAbugD (509-847-1234) HERMAN DALY’S ECONOMICS FOR A FULL WORLD The former senior economist at the World Bank and founder of ecological economics discusses his book, Beyond Growth. July 13, 4:30-5:30 pm. Free. Online: gonzaga.edu/ClimateCenterEvents HOMELESSNESS & HOUSING: AN ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION Join city data scientist Daniel Ramos, library community data coordinator Dr. Shiloh Deitz and EWU researcher Dr. Matt Anderson for a presentation of this year’s count and contextual factors in Spokane. Followed by a panel discussion and Q&A. July 13, 3-5 pm. Free. Central Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org JESS WALTER: ANGEL OF ROME Spokane author Jess Walter discusses his new collection of short stories. July 14, 6 pm. $43. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org n

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JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 49


Edibles are legal in Minnesota — for now.

GRAY AREA

Delta Daze The relationship between hemp and cannabis continues to confuse BY WILL MAUPIN

F

our years after the legalization of hemp at the federal level, unforeseen ramifications of the 2018 Farm Bill continue to expand the scope of the legislation. Cannabis is illegal in Minnesota, but as of July 1, edibles containing up to 5 milligrams of THC are not. That seemingly contradictory statement is the result of a massive loophole in the federal government’s definition of hemp, which it considers to be cannabis that contains less than 0.3 percent THC by weight. Specifically, 0.3 percent delta-9 THC — the chemical commonly referred to simply as THC. ...continued on page 54

50 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022


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NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a five-year sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

“DELTA DAZE,” CONTINUED... Other cannabinoids, like CBD, were not mentioned in the law. Meaning cannabinoids other than delta-9 derived from legal hemp were legal as well. Beyond just non-intoxicating CBD, that definition opened the door for intoxicating chemicals like delta-8 THC. Delta-8 exploded onto the scene in 2021, becoming essentially a legal alternative to illegal delta-9. The two chemicals produce similar effects, though delta-8 produces a high roughly half as potent as delta-9. The sudden legality of a high-producing chemical set off a cascade of contradictory legal statements. In 2021, the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board affirmed that delta-8 products were illegal in the state. In May of this year, however, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals went the other direction, ruling that delta-8 products derived from hemp, just like CBD products derived from hemp, were legal.

OIL DAY 25% JULY 10

Other states are expected to regulate delta-8 like Minnesota. Minnesota lawmakers’ attempt to sort out this situation in their state instead raised a novel legal precedent. Delta-8 can be derived from legal hemp, but so can delta-9. The result is that, under the wording of the 2018 Farm Bill, “hemp derived” delta-9 products can be considered legal as well. In Minnesota, they are now not only legal, but regulated. Other states will certainly follow suit and attempt to regulate delta-8 and similar products, just like Minnesota has done. This is because delta-8 products fall in a legal gray area, where testing requirements and quality control procedures are lax compared to, say, products on shelves at licensed dispensaries in Washington. If you’re confused, you’re not alone. Minnesota Republican state Sen. Jim Abeler, who voted for the legislation, is confused, too. “I thought it was more of a technical fix to the delta-8 problem, and it had a broader effect than I expected,” Abeler told Minnesota Reporter. n

54 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

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66. Record label for D’Angelo or Doja Cat 67. Mike of “Shrek” 68. Hunky-dory 69. Prone to blushing, say DOWN 1. About 5% of the world’s population 2. Declare invalid 3. Mediterranean port 4. S-shaped molding 5. Hall-of-Fame college swimming coach ____ Thornton 6. Big Apple mayor Adams 7. Crime after a data breach, perhaps 8. Thelma’s road trip partner 9. Pertaining to the Torah 10. Electricity or water, e.g.: Abbr. 11. They’re major headaches

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38. 1980s sitcom character who went to high school for 122 years 39. Wanted poster letters 39 40 41 40. Seminary subj. 41. ____ Aviv 43 44 43. Fluffy mixed-breed dog 46. Turns outward 49 47. ____ for tat 52 53 54 55 48. Insect whose buzz can reach 106.7 decibels 58 59 60 49. Volcanic emission 53. Michelle who was FIFA’s 63 Female Player of the Century 54. “Stop trying to make ____ 66 happen” (classic “Mean Girls” line ... and advice ignored by 69 20-, 27-, 45- and 56-Across) “FETCH” 55. David Sedaris piece 29. [That smells terrible!] 57. Event with deep-fried food 30. “The Crying Game” star Stephen 58. Short race, for short 31. Tricked 59. Giga : billion :: ____ : trillion 32. Period of geological time 60. “As You Wish” author Elwes 33. Table game in a rec room 61. Quarterback’s asset 34. Like diabetes 36

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1. “That feels so good!” 4. “The Soul of Baseball” subject Buck 9. Skittish 14. Vaccine molecule 15. Astronaut Cooper as portrayed in “The Right Stuff” 16. Scrabble piece used in many Q words 17. Singer DiFranco 18. Classic aria from Verdi’s “Un Ballo in Maschera” 19. Try to unearth 20. Respectful behavior at a selfservice meal? 23. Smelting byproduct 24. Morales of “La Bamba” 25. The “A” in A. Philip Randolph 27. Certain artwork that depicts Papa or Brainy? 32. Have a bite 35. “Oh, now ____ it!”

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For more information or to book a session go to:

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JULY 7, 2022 INLANDER 55


Play where the big winners play.

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W E LC O M E H O M E .

56 INLANDER JULY 7, 2022

CASINO

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DINING

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CHAMPIONSHIP

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