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POWER TO THE PEOPLE JULY 6-12, 2017 | INDEPENDENT. FREE. REAL.

BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

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HOW THE SPOKANE TRIBE PLANS TO LIGHT UP ITS FUTURE

NEWS

FOOD

FILM

PAGE 18

PAGE 31

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How ISIS hacked the state of Idaho

Throw the perfect summer cocktail party on a budget

Spider-Man: a smart, funny blockbuster


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INSIDE VOL. 24, NO. 38 | COVER DESIGN: DEREK HARRISON

COMMENT NEWS COVER STORY CULTURE

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EDITOR’S NOTE

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homas Jefferson — the guy who wrote the Declaration of Independence, with chestnuts like “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” — argued that one thing, above all, was essential to freedom: Not high-powered, modern weaponry, but the free press. That view stands in stark contrast to our more modern leaders. The Obama administration, for one, prosecuted and jailed more “leakers” than all other presidencies combined. Under President Trump, attacks on the press now come with a Twitter hashtag: #fakenews. To be fair, Jefferson slammed the press coverage he received as our third president — he too probably fantasized about delivering a WWE-style smackdown — but knowing war and the sacrifice required for liberty, he continued to believe in the press as a check on power, famously saying, “The only security of all is in a free press.” Far from the enemy of the people, he argued, the press — flawed as any human enterprise — ensures that we remain free, preserving the principles we celebrate every Fourth of July. — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. It’s printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x213 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email justinh@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2017, Inland Publications, Inc.

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Slipknot. Slipknot was lame because they just didn’t have the energy of the opening band, Lamb of God. They were kind of dull compared to what you’d expect, and I got slammed on the ground by a bouncer, and elbowed in the eye and kicked out of the concert. It could have been cooler.

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BELINDA STADTMUELLER

It wasn’t in Spokane, but it was Cheap Trick. They didn’t interact with the audience. They just sang their songs and were dead. I was bummed. What would make a good concert? Interaction and personal experiences with the performers to make it feel special.

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Garth Brooks, because I was 9 years old and his music was terrible. I think it would be better if I could go see his punk-rock alter ego concerts. I think that would be fun to go to and see how terrible it is.

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DAVE CROCKET

The worst one I’ve ever been to was a Willie Nelson concert when he was 65 years old and he was lousy. What makes a good concert? The positive personality that the [performer] gives to the people in the audience.

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CAITLIN DEAN

The worst concert I’ve ever been to was probably Green Day, because it was outdoors, really hot and overcrowded, and the speakers weren’t set right, so we got a lot of feedback from the amps. What makes a good concert? The venue has a lot to do with it. The size. I like venues that are a bit smaller, so the concert can feel more intimate.

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COMMENT | AMERICA

Freedom Still Rings We can educate ourselves into being better citizens BY GEORGE NETHERCUTT

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W W W. K O O T E N A I U R G E N T C A R E . C O M

6 INLANDER JULY 6, 2017

A

s Americans celebrate the anniversary of our independence this week, many are asking how America can revive the spirit of 1776 and reestablish patriotic principles instead of the American polarization we all see. Here are a few suggestions: Recently, noted columnist, author and television personality Charles Krauthammer opined that a lack of civics education partly explains the national pessimism many Americans feel. FOX News celebrity Jesse Watters has touted his man-on-the-street interviews as evidence that too many Americans are ignorant of basic American history. Former Justice Sandra Day O’Connor’s iCivics nonprofit organization is an antidote of sorts to this widespread lack of civic learning throughout the United States, since it seeks to help junior high school students and teachers know more about American government — especially the American justice system. Here in Spokane, the Mead School District has adopted a program called Senior to Senior, placing high school seniors with senior citizens for interviews, thereby allowing each to learn from the other, hopefully helping to bridge the generation gap. Numerous surveys graphically illustrate the ignorance of too many Americans about basic U.S. history, economics, government and foreign policy. So what’s the answer to this civics gap? As Krauthammer recommends: More civic learning — in our schools and workplaces. Spokane’s Garco Construction, under the tutelage of owners Tim Welsh and Frank Etter, for a time accepted — at no charge — a series of basic civics questions and answers, provided by my nonprofit, the Nethercutt Civics Foundation. They proffered the questions to staff at weekly staff meetings in order to help educate the working population about current and past events, so the employees would become better civically educated. They still quiz employees about current events. It takes no more than 10 minutes of staff meeting time, yet yields untold benefits each week, in some cases encouraging individuals to seek public office where a dearth of long-term talent exists. Mead and Garco both provide possible answers to Americans’ lack of basic civic knowledge and political polarization, since evidence exists that civically engaged families are stronger — they volunteer more in their communities, vote more often and are part of community solutions.

weather and leisure, July 4 is a day that all Americans should cherish, as we too often take our freedoms for granted. A Spokane Uber driver from Saudi Arabia recently expressed a celebratory attitude when he told me he’s thankful for America, because it affords one the freedom to become anything one desires. In Saudi Arabia, where he grew up, there’s a lack of appreciation for freedom, where succession to kinghood is all-important, where the freedom to enjoy music is restricted, and women are not accorded the respect and freedom experienced in other nations. This man, a husband and father of two daughters, has made Spokane his home so that he and his wife can raise their daughters in freedom, allowing them to become whatever they desire, opening up possibilities not available to them in the country of his birth. He’s not alone. Millions of others throughout America appreciate their freedoms, none more

Millions of others throughout America appreciate their freedoms, none more than recent immigrants who earned their citizenship.

A

s Americans enjoy the week of July 4, it’s advisable that we reflect on why we celebrate Independence Day. More than just a day off or a relaxing time to enjoy summer

than recent immigrants who earned their citizenship, or those who fought for America, its values and the freedoms we all enjoy. Take a moment to thank a veteran or a new citizen for reflecting the values we all cherish, and the patriotism they personify.

P

atriotism. It’s an old word, but a lasting one, reflecting American values, America’s goodness to others, its commitment to more freedoms, and continuation of the belief that anything is possible for those who educate themselves well, work hard and believe in their dreams for success. This week is a time to celebrate America’s heritage by appreciating those who sacrificed for later generations, giving their all so the future could remain free. Though America is polarized by our differing beliefs, and the U.S. is experiencing political upheaval — in Congress, the presidency and the mass media — there’s still room for optimism and the belief expressed throughout history that America is a beacon for freedom. The U.S. exists to help others, and our Constitution still provides the greatest opportunity for men and women to succeed throughout the world. That’s a message to tout loudly this week, and beyond. n


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LEARN ABOUT SCRAPS

Join presenters from Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service to learn about what SCRAPS does, how to become a volunteer, how to approach a stray, and what to do if your pet is lost. Young children should be accompanied by a caretaker. Free. Wed, July 12; sessions at 2 and 3:30 pm. Indian Trail Library, 4909 W. Barnes. (444-5331)

VOLUNTEER WITH THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY

Volunteers are needed at the American Cancer Society Discovery Shop in Spokane (805 W. Garland) to help accept, sort and price donations, as well as to operate registers and offer customer service. Volunteers should ideally be available at least once per week, for four hours at a time. For more information, email michael.osullivan@cancer.org or call 328-9373. n Tell us about your event or other opportunities to get involved. Submit events at Inlander.com/getlisted or email getlisted@inlander.com.

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COMMENT | POLICY

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

The Real Danger It’s not trans people you should fear, but backers of an exploitative initiative that would roll back protections BY PAUL DILLON

I

n a few days, we’ll know if discrimination will be on the ballot this November in Washington. This week, signatures will be submitted for Initiative 1552, the firstever statewide ballot measure in the country that would repeal decadeold nondiscrimination protections for transgender people. After failing last year, a well-funded group with extreme and baseless views of transgender individuals returned with a much more confusing proposal, one that mandates public schools segregate bathrooms and that trans students stay out of bathrooms that correspond

with their gender. Like last year’s proposal, this year’s initiative allows students and their families to sue public schools if trans students are allowed to use the bathrooms where they feel safe. However, this time the fine per incident has been increased to $5,000. The proposed legislation also repeals state protections by allowing businesses to refuse to let trans people use the bathroom. The Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs notes there’s been a zero increase in assaults related to transgender people using facilities since the law went into effect. Not a single damn one. (Conservative politicians who’ve been arrested for misconduct in bathrooms? Well, that’s another story. ) The Washington

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Student Association, law enforcement officials and clergy also oppose this measure because it does not make us safer. Instead, it would do the opposite by infringing on everyone’s right to bodily privacy, requiring anyone who doesn’t look the part to prove their gender. Yet opponents continue look for a problem that doesn’t exist to score political points. The truth is not stopping the oxymoronically named Just Want Privacy, the campaign behind I-1552, and initiative backers from playing dirty: They are attempting to buy the ballot with an anonymously received $50,000 donation to boost signature gathering, which violates campaign finance regulations. They were recently caught illegally circulating petitions without the actual ballot language included and hurling abuse outside grocery stores with misleading signs like “Stop Co-Ed Bathrooms,” as if gender and genitalia were synonymous. None of which topped the incident last March: Kelly Herron was in a restroom in a Seattle public park when a man attempted to rape her. Herron later posted on Instagram that she was “clawing his face, punching back, and desperately trying to escape his grip,” screaming “Not today, motherf---er!” when she got away. Just Want Privacy seized the story to use the photo Herron had posted of her injuries in an email fundraiser. When Herron discovered her experience had been co-opted, she responded to the group with the same language she used to try to scare her assailant: “To the people behind I-1552... I refuse to allow anyone to use me and my horrific sexual assault to cause harm and discrimination to others.” No ballot initiative would have prevented the attack, because assault is already illegal. Her attacker also didn’t decide to use antidiscrimination laws to pretend to be a trans woman so he could sneak into the women’s restroom. Using someone else’s tragedy to push for discrimination is a common strategy of groups with hateful agendas, and Just Want Privacy succeeded in creating and exploiting the same violence they claim to be trying to prevent. The demonization has to stop. Extremists are reinforcing a narrow definition of gender and sexuality, instead of focusing on the real problem: Working to stop men from committing rape, and addressing rape culture. Safety is a basic human need we all share. In this case, safety means acceptance and understanding, not punishing innocent people over imaginary evils.  Naturally, real acceptance and understanding makes things better for all. The fear driving I-1552 doesn’t exist, but the dangers of these misguided policies passing are real. n Paul Dillon manages public affairs for Planned Parenthood of Greater Washington and North Idaho.

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Northern Quest is committed to supporting responsible gaming. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call the Washington State Problem Gambling Helpline at 800.547.6133 or Camas Path at 509.789.7630.

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“Trombone Shorty takes in a century-plus worth of sounds—ragtime and jazz and gospel and soul and R&B and hip-hop…” – New York Magazine “New Orleans’ brightest new star in a generation,” – NPR

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

URGENT CARE aregiving can be an emotionally, physically and financially draining

C

role. Across Washington state, there are more than 335,000 people providing unpaid care for people with Alzheimer’s or other dementias. In 2016 alone, those caregivers provided an estimated 382 million hours of care, valued at $4.8 billion. Our family served as caregivers for my dad, who suffered from Alzheimer’s disease for at least five years. I am proud to advocate for the Recognize, Assist, Include, Support and Engage (RAISE) Family Caregivers Act, now moving through the U.S. Senate as Senate Bill 1028. This bipartisan LETTERS bill would provide much needed supSend comments to port to our nation’s caregivers. editor@inlander.com. The RAISE Family Caregivers Act is consistent with the National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease, which seeks to expand and enhance training, education and support for caregivers of people with Alzheimer’s and other dementias. Not all caregivers have the education and training necessary to ensure high quality of care to Alzheimer’s patients, as was the case with my dad during the last six months of his life. Please join me in thanking Senator Patty Murray for voting for the RAISE Family Caregivers Act in committee, and in urging Senator Maria Cantwell and Representative Cathy McMorris Rodgers to support this needed legislation in the coming months. MARK NEWBOLD Spokane, Wash.

FLO RIDA JUL 20

WITH SKY (FORMERLY OF LMFAO) CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Readers respond to “Meaning is Malleable” (6/22/17), one writer’s thoughts on feelings of meaninglessness upon turning 30:

SUBLIME WITH ROME & THE OFFSPRING JUL 6

ERIC BLAUER: This is a profoundly sad article and its worldview, as expressed, motivates me to live my life more intentionally, expansively and deeply for the sake of the waymakers ahead. For me, I have found light that darkness cannot overcome.

DONNY & MARIE JUL 16

SALYNN WILLIAMS: Meaningless is being 30 and believing you’ve figured anything out.

BOZ SCAGGS & MICHAEL MCDONALD AUG 11

MJ WILDE: Stereotyping millennials is as pointless and rude as stereotyping any other age group. Not everyone hates millennials, not all millennials think and feel like the writer, or at least not for as long a time. Some people are out here living their lives as the unique individuals they are. They get past their normal self-doubt, look at what they have going for them and try out things they want to do. They ignore the rubber stamp versions laid on them from the outside. Every generation has people like that, people who will read that article and not see themselves. n

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Walk the course with celebrities. Eat the food. Sip the beverage. Help us fight cancer. Come watch Mark Rypien* and other celebrities in a fun day of golf at the Coeur d’Alene Resort Golf Course on July 29. $20 entry fee gets you access to celebrity golf, great music, gourmet food trucks and more. For complete event details, a full list of celebrities, and to see how we’re fighting cancer locally, visit showcasegolf.com. *

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SPOKANE VALLEY

Power Over Police Spokane Valley may want its own police force someday, but for now it will settle on the appearance of one BY WILSON CRISCIONE

B

y the end of February 2016, the rumors were out of hand. Spokane Valley Mayor Rod Higgins and Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich called a press conference and stood together for a common cause: asking everyone to stop talking about the police contract. The Valley was not — contrary to what people were thinking — ending its contract for police services with the county to form its own police department, they said. “That’s just not true,” said Higgins.

Spokane Valley councilmembers want to make sure all police cars say “Spokane Valley Police.” YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

The theory was floated weeks earlier, after the four-person Spokane Valley council majority, including Higgins, fired City Manager Mike Jackson. With no explanation given, some — including then-Councilman Dean Grafos — suggested it was because Jackson stood in the way of the council majority forming its own police department, instead of contracting with the sheriff’s office for police services. But the council never did terminate the contract. Rather, they sought to make changes to it which gave the appearance that Spokane Valley had its own police

force, without actually paying for its own police department. Today, changes in the contract for police services in the Valley are nearly ready to be finalized, those involved with the negotiations tell the Inlander. Still, the negotiations center around a point of contention. Spokane Valley police are, in fact, sheriff’s deputies who ultimately answer to Knezovich (who did not respond to multiple requests for comment on this article). But should the city have more control over its police force? Councilman Ed Pace says so. “It is our police department,” says Pace. Other members of the Valley city council, including Mayor Higgins, may not be such strong proponents of more city oversight of the police. But Higgins still hopes for a contract which makes clear that the police in the Valley belong to the Valley. “We want to exercise as much control as we possibly can for the money we’re paying,” Higgins tells the Inlander. “Our stance when we’re going into this is that we would like to have a separation between being a part of the sheriff’s department and our city.”

SEEKING AN IDENTITY

When the Spokane Valley Police Department formed ...continued on next page


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The Spokane County Sheriff’s Office provides police services for the Valley.

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“POLICE IDENTITY,” CONTINUED... 14 years ago, the idea was that it would be a “sub agency that looks and feels and tastes like its own department, but will be connected to the sheriff’s,” Captain Cal Walker told the Inlander at the time. On the outside of the police car, it would say “Spokane Valley.” Inside the car would be a sheriff’s office deputy. It made sense for a city just forming, like Spokane Valley, to contract with the sheriff’s office, because it saved millions of dollars, compared to the cost of starting another police department. It’s not the only city to do so. Smaller cities like Medical Lake and Deer Park both contract with the sheriff’s office for dedicated police officers. Neither, however, have cars or uniforms suggesting they are the city’s police force. Though the Valley saves money by contracting with the sheriff’s office, in 2017, the budgeted amount for police services was more than $20 million, says City Attorney Cary Driskell. That’s nearly two-thirds of the city budget. Because of that, some on the current Spokane Valley City Council think more could be done to make the Valley police look and feel like its own department. In May 2016, the Spokesman-Review reported that Higgins had forwarded an email to three other councilmen. The email was from former Spokane County Undersheriff David Wiyrick,

who was suggesting hiring a public safety director so the Valley could gain more control of its police force. “Perhaps another way to skin our cat,” Higgins wrote to the councilmen — Pace, Arne Woodard and Sam Wood. “Would require a significant contract change.” Pace says the city manager should have “more authority” over Valley Police Chief Mark Werner. He has also advocated for a public safety oversight committee for Spokane Valley, specifically, in addition to the Spokane County Citizen Advisory/Review Board. Councilman Ed Pace But that could cause liability issues. Higgins, for his part, says that Pace’s goals are not necessarily those of the council. This is not a contest for control of the police department, he says. Rather, it’s about creating “an identity.” “We’re a city of nearly 100,000 people,” Higgins says. “I think what we’re trying to establish is that, yes, we have our own police department. And appearances matter.”


In 2016, the council approved a set of goals to be taken into negotiations on a new contract. Those goals included marking all vehicles in Spokane Valley’s signature light blue metallic color, creating unique Spokane Valley uniforms, and having a dedicated and fixed number of investigative officers in the Valley. Additionally, when an incident occurs that would be in the public’s interest, the Valley council wanted the Spokane Valley Police Chief to act as a spokesperson for the city.

“It’s a control thing, and it doesn’t come down to a lot of sense. It comes down to more of a feeling of control of something.” The Valley has been negotiating those goals with the county since November. Spokane County Undersheriff Jeff Tower says the negotiated contract, as it stands now, won’t represent much of a change in police services overall. The sheriff’s office will make sure any cars that go out to the Valley will have a Spokane Valley logo. The uniforms will stay the same, though they will say “police” on their backs, he says. Tower adds that the Valley wanted their own separate major crime investigative unit assigned to the city, but that it didn’t make sense to take those investigators from downtown. Instead, Tower says the sheriff’s office will provide more performance measures to report to the Valley what crimes are being investigated. An update on the contract will be presented to the Valley on July 11. “We’re in this together,” Tower says. “They’re still residents of the county, whether they contract with us or not.”

RELIANT ON EACH OTHER

Not everyone in the Valley sees a problem with the Valley deputies’ current identity. Mike Davisson, who is on the county’s Citizen Advisory/Review Board, says there are no issues at all with identifying Spokane Valley officers by police car or uniform. He sees no purpose in the city council requesting changes. “It’s a control thing, and it doesn’t come down to a lot of sense,” Davisson says. “It comes down to more of a feeling of control of something, when actually pushing down to hard facts.” From his point of view, members of the council pushing for changes in police services are engaged in a power play with the sheriff. “The bottom line is, you have a sheriff who likes total control and a city council that wants total control,” he says. “So you’re gonna have conflict.” At least one current member of the council doesn’t want any changes to the police contract. Councilwoman Pam Haley says the Valley, as a contract city, shouldn’t have any direct oversight of the officers. “I honestly don’t have any interest in starting our own police agency,” she says. “I think it’s well-run now, and it would cost us an unbelievable amount of money [to start a new department].” Terminating the contract altogether would have consequences on combating crime in the county as well, Tower says. About half of the sheriff’s office employees work in the city of Spokane Valley or provide services there directly. Without the contract, the police force would be cut in half. Having specialized units like a SWAT team or an explosive disposal unit might be difficult if half of the police force is cut. “It would be a loss of service both to Spokane Valley and to Spokane County,” Tower says. When Higgins is asked if, ideally, he would want the Valley to have its own police department, he says it won’t happen anytime soon. For now, it costs too much money. In about 10 years, he says, it could be a different story. “Is it something that’s going to happen in the future?” Higgins says. “I wouldn’t be surprised.” n wilsonc@inlander.com

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JULY 6, 2017 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

On Inlander.com MORE INLANDER NEWS EVERY DAY

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DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

MARMOTS Last week, our Outdoors Issue tackled the marvelous spectacle of URBAN WILDLIFE, including marmots. In most cities across the United States, marmots are unheard of. But in Spokane, the creatures have presumably been attracted enough by our low cost of living and thriving downtown to move to the city. The best places to look for marmots are near rivers, by big piles of rocks. We have a few favorite marmot-spotting spots near downtown Spokane, and the photos to prove it: The Kendall Yards lot just east of the Inlander, Glover Field in Peaceful Valley, the Burlington Northern tracks near Sprague Pest Solutions, the trail on the north side of the Spokane River near Gonzaga, and the Sunset Highway bridge over Latah Creek. (DANIEL WALTERS)

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PUBLIC SAFETY A 22-year-old man who’s watching Netflix in his basement sees someone shining a flashlight into his home on North Five Mile Road and goes to investigate. When he cracks the front door, he’s met with the sight of a gun, screams and slams the door. On the other side, with their guns drawn, are two SPOKANE COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPUTIES, who order the man out of the house and put him in handcuffs. They’ve been sent to a report of a suspicious car in a driveway — the only problem is, this isn’t the right house. After deputies see that the man’s ID shows he lives there, they let him go and deputy Robert Brooke tells the man, “You’re lucky I didn’t f--in’ shoot you,” according to court documents. The man sued, and a judge recently ruled that the deputies used excessive force and had no right to arrest him. (MITCH RYALS)

EDUCATION Last week, the Spokane Public Schools board decided that SIXTH GRADE will no longer be in elementary schools. Instead, sixth grade will be part of middle school — a shift that will help the district meet the demands of growing student enrollment. Currently, elementary schools in Spokane are kindergarten through sixth grade, with middle schools hosting seventh and eighth grades. But a committee tasked with examining ways to reconfigure grades this year, in order to alleviate overcrowding in elementary schools, determined that moving sixth grade to middle school would be the cheapest and most logical way to solve the problem. Parents and staff overwhelmingly supported the idea over others, like eliminating middle schools entirely and having a K-8, 9-12 model. The transition will be implemented between 2021 and 2027. (WILSON CRISCIONE)


NEWS | BRIEFS

The 11th Hour State lawmakers finally agree to a budget; plus, donations wanted for homeless youth SHUTDOWN AVERTED

Last week, it looked like Washington could be headed for a government shutdown, with lawmakers unable to reach an agreement on how to FUND EDUCATION. At the last minute, however, the Washington State Legislature came through. A budget deal signed by Gov. Jay Inslee on Friday adds $7.3 billion in state funding to schools over the next four years. “I am proud to sign a historic budget that fully funds our schools for the first time in more than 30 years,” Inslee said in a statement. The legislature was tasked with providing ample funding education as mandated by the McCleary court ruling. That meant ensuring school districts could no longer rely on local property tax levies to pay employee salaries and basic expenses. The budget addresses that with a plan hatched by Senate Republicans: hiking state property taxes while capping local property tax levies. That plan makes up most of the new revenue from the state. Additional revenue is raised by expanding an online sales tax and eliminating tax breaks on bottled water and extracted fuels — ideas favored by Democrats. The result is a shift from local funding to state funding. The $7.4 billion in state funds added in the next four years is offset by about $3 billion lost in local levy funds. “This budget, at long last, meets our constitutional obligations to fully fund basic education, and addresses the responsibilities we have under the McCleary decision to equitably fund our schools,” Inslee said. Others aren’t as enthusiastic. Superintendent of Public Instruction Chris Reykdal offered a modest endorsement of the deal, saying the legislature has “now made the important turn to go beyond the bare minimums called for by the state Supreme Court.” The Washington Education Association — the state’s largest teachers union — said in a statement that the budget was “progress,” but falls short of fulfilling the McCleary mandate. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

*

MOVE-IN READY

As Spokane and partner agencies work to find housing for 100 HOMELESS YOUTH in 100 days, they’re collecting donations for move-in kits during the final stretch of the challenge, which ends July 31. For the kits, they’re looking for things that someone might need if they’re getting their first apartment or going off to college. Some of the new/unused things they hope to collect include: toilet paper, plungers, cleaning supplies, soap, shampoo, conditioner, shower curtain and rings, plates, cups, silverware, pots and pans, can openers, hangers, single-sized bedsheets, pillows, laundry baskets, towels, basic food staples, and things like books. “When my kids get keys, it’s a monumental day,” says Mary Stanton, the Education, Employment and Housing Youth Representative from Career Path Services, in a news release about the drive. “But the excitement quickly dissipates when they have no fork to eat with or no towel to dry off with. That’s why this drive is so important.” Drop-off locations include: City Hall, Downtown Spokane Partnership, the Downtown Public Library, Shadle Library, Fire Station #1, Mobius, Volunteers of America, SNAP, Excelsior Youth Center, Salvation Army, Providence Health Care Foundation, United Way of Spokane, Next Generation Zone, WorkSource Spokane, Care Path Services, Spokane Housing Authority, Hayden Homes, Inspirus Credit Union, Numerica Credit Union downtown branch, STA Plaza Customer Service, Radio Spokane and KPBX-FM. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

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JULY 6, 2017 INLANDER 17


NEWS | CYBERSECURITY

Hard Cyber How does a state like Idaho gird itself against the international scourge of hackers? BY DANIEL WALTERS

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or the record, most Idaho state treasurer messages don’t start with the black flag of ISIS. And as a general rule, the message on the page uploaded to the Idaho State Treasurer’s Office website last month wasn’t the sort endorsed by Idaho State Treasurer Ron Crane. “You will be held accountable Trump, you and all your people for every drop of blood flowing in Muslim countries,” it said. “I Love Islamic state.” The hackers didn’t need a password. They didn’t need a big network of bots to breach the firewall. All they needed was the knowledge of a flaw in the system: A vulnerability in the state’s third-party content management system allowed files to be uploaded directly to the site without permission. And it wasn’t just Idaho. The hackers hit Washington state’s Department of Health, as well as sites for Maryland’s Howard County and the town of Brookhaven in New York. Idaho’s treasury department managed to prevent the hack from automatically taking over its home page. Most visitors to the site wouldn’t even know it was there. But others, like the state of Ohio, weren’t so lucky. “Wake up freedom-loving Americans,” Ohio Treasurer Josh Mandel wrote after the hackers publicly hit the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Corrections’ website with the pro-ISIS message. “Radical Islam infiltrating the heartland.” But Lance Wyatt, acting chief information security officer for the state of Idaho, says that as hacks go, this one was unsophisticated. “It was the equivalent of digital graffiti,” says Wyatt. “It’s pretty minimal. No data was exposed or harmed.” Two years ago, Idaho Gov. Butch Otter created a cybersecurity task force — including Lt. Gov. Brad Little — to examine the state’s existing vulnerabilities to hacks and cyberattacks and figure out ways to fix them. In January, Otter issued an executive order to implement the recommendations. In the meantime, hackers are getting more sophisticated. The barbarians, so to speak, are always pounding at the gates.

SWORDS AND SHIELDS

“On a regular basis, moment by moment, we experience several hundred thousand attacks that hit our firewall,” Wyatt says. After all, he says, the entire internet knows where the state of Idaho is. And there are plenty of potential threats. There are distributed denial-of-service attacks, where hackers summon an army of infected computers — and sometimes internet-connected DVRs, digital cameras or smart fridges — and use it to flood a network with enough traffic

Hackers hit government websites in Idaho, among other places, with messages in support of the Islamic State. to bring it to its knees. Then there’s credential harvesting. Say, instead of replacing a government home page with grammatically suspect ISIS propaganda, a government login page is replaced with what appears to be a government login page. When you enter your personal information, a hacker gets it instead of the government. Wyatt says that Idaho is able to combat some of these sorts of attacks on its websites by replacing the sites continually; malicious manipulations are swept away in the reset. Security technology is getting better as well. “Next-generation firewalls are getting sophisticated enough where these smarter firewalls don’t even acknowledge the [dangerous] traffic,” Wyatt says. But the best firewalls can be very expensive, and Wyatt is well aware that in the battle between hacker and security, security experts are behind the curve. “We’ve had 40 years of the internet, [where] it’s all about making it accessible and making it something people can use,” Wyatt says. The internet has been about openness and connection, not protection. Idaho has to worry about more than its own servers. Last year, hackers broke into Active Network, a third-party vendor used by Idaho Fish and Game, potentially compromising the information of 780,000 people who bought Idaho fishing licenses before July 2007. In the future, Little says, it’s crucial that


Idaho mandates data protection in any contracts with third-party vendors. Cities and counties are also vulnerable to attack. Take a small Idaho county of about 45,000 just north of Pocatello. Writing for EastIdahoNews.com, Stephan Rockefeller lays out how, in February, Bingham County was hit with a hack from servers in the Netherlands, Germany and Russia. The hackers encrypted large amounts of county data on their own servers. It wasn’t just the county’s website that went down — it wreaked havoc on the county’s computer system that helped dispatch police officers to emergencies. The hackers littered the county’s servers with links to a ransom note. Want your files back, it said? Pay $28,000 — in hard-totrack cryptocurrency Bitcoin — in exchange for the password to decrypt the files. Think of a burglar who, instead of making off with your TV and jewelry, changes the locks on your house, then makes you pay for the key. “Ransomware is one of the bigger concerns, because it’s one of the largest attack vectors right now,” Wyatt says. Ideally, there’s an easy way to combat ransomware. Keep backups of everything, and make sure that your backups remain protected from the virus. “There’s a whole procedure that you follow to maintain a healthy backup environment,” Wyatt says. Ideally, all you have to do is a flip a switch, and the infected files are flushed away and replaced by clean copies. But as a small county, Bingham couldn’t afford to pay for the storage space to keep all its data backed up. So the county decided to pay a partial ransom to unlock data that hadn’t been backed up. In this case, the key Bingham County received was valid and its data was released. (Some ransomware hackers take the money and run, leaving data encrypted.) But the choice to pay up could put Bingham County at greater risk in the future. “If you pay it, you get marked as someone who pays,” Idahobased Computer Arts contractor Adam Michaelson told Rockefeller. “And so you start becoming a target for other people. Or the same people.”

DEFENSE GRID

Part of the state’s new cybersecurity strategy, Little says, is to help assist Idaho’s cities, counties, school districts — even public utilities — secure their systems. Protecting locally owned utilities is a particularly high priority. “If you have one of these tough winters and you have the grid blow up somewhere, that’s serious, serious stuff,” Little says. Stephen Heath, vice-president of Security Services with Spokane-based IT consulting group Intrinium, says the risks to industrial control systems is one of the things that concerns him the most about hacking. “Like water, power, those types of things,” Heath says. “Data gets stolen? People’s data has gotten stolen a lot. If the water doesn’t work for a few days, that’s a catastrophe.” At the end of the month, Idaho is bringing in retiring Air Force Col. Jeff Weak to serve in the state’s newly created role of Director of Information Security to help bring about changes statewide. “He did cybersecurity for NATO,” Little says. The governor’s plan will force agencies to adopt nationally recognized security control, create a central cybersecurity website for sharing intelligence, and conduct annual tests that attempt to breach the state’s defenses. Crucially, it will put every Idaho state employee through a new, annual cybersecurity training regimen tailored to their specific roles. “Anyone who logs on to a state computer is a risk if they’re not trained properly,” Little says. “Most of the cyber intrusions are the result of somebody clicking on a phishing expedition or something else.” Ultimately, the fact that the government interacts with the public makes it vulnerable. “It’s equivalent to leaving your car parked out on your street overnight,” says Wyatt. “Just the fact that it’s out in the public, someone could do something to it.” n danielw@inlander.com

JULY 6, 2017 INLANDER 19


Maria Cullooyah, planning manager for the Spokane Tribe, is helping the tribe move toward renewable enery, like the community solar array behind her. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

20 INLANDER JULY 6, 2017


N AT I O N BUILDING The Spokane Tribe is tapping into renewable energy as it reimagines the town of Wellpinit BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL AS FIELDS THAT WILL SOON BE FILLED with canola and grain fade from view and stands of conifers gain in number, Jason Campbell points his truck down a straight road where about a dozen homes are spread out on the east end of the Spokane Indian Reservation. With large lots and little to connect one house with the next, the tribal housing neighborhood feels disjointed — “boxes on the landscape that aren’t reflective of our cultural values at all,” Campbell says. This European-style grid is nothing like the circular, community-oriented design the tribe might have chosen in the past, explains the 45-year-old, who spent part of his childhood living with his father miles from here, near Wellpinit, at the heart of the reservation. It’s March, and with the windshield wipers sporadically clearing rain from the glass, Campbell stops his truck outside one of the homes. There’s an unlikely roof covering here: solar panels. Campbell helped lead the team that put them there, working with the nonprofit GRID Alternatives to train tribal members in solar installation and bring solar power to four low-income families. The work represents just a taste of the overhaul he envisions for the reservation. Where others see rooftops, Campbell sees skilled solar jobs. Where others see “slash” — the leftover woody

debris from timber harvesting on the reservation — he sees the potential to heat communities cheaply and efficiently. Where others see the massive cleanup of a former uranium mine-turned-Superfund site, he sees equipment that’s going to need millions of gallons of fuel that the tribe could provide in the form of biodiesel. In the middle of it all, he sees the opportunity to strengthen the tribe’s sovereignty, create jobs, reduce poverty and build the nation. It’s why Campbell came back to the reservation to Jason Campbell help. These aren’t just dreams. Big things are already happening. The tribe is working on plans to reinvent Wellpinit, the main town on the roughly 160,000-acre reservation, from the ground up. The tribe sees potential to revitalize the community with cutting-edge buildings and intentional planning that will center on making a more livable community. Soon, solar panels will be installed to provide power for elders’ homes and other tribal government buildings

there. Engineering work is nearly complete on a biomass heating project that will use wood waste to heat buildings in the town core. The tribe’s work toward building a healthier, more sustainable town and nation earned them a Promise Zone designation in 2016 that comes with extra government support. The plans are being pushed forward with leadership from Spokane Tribal Chairwoman Carol Evans, the first woman to be chair; from Campbell, CEO of the tribe’s energy company Sovereign Power; and from key players in and outside the tribe who want to set the reservation up for a brighter future. “One of our very core traditional values is stewardship, and commonly that stewardship is communicated in tribal communities as the principle of taking care of seven generations,” Campbell says. “How do we do this in a way that promotes self-determination, that promotes sovereignty?”

‘YOU NEED SOME HEALING’

The Spokane Tribe used to hunt, fish and live off more than 3 million acres of territory across northeastern Washington. Salmon — the lifeblood of the Salish people — were bountiful in the Columbia and Spokane rivers. ...continued on next page

JULY 6, 2017 INLANDER 21


ENERGY “NATION BUILDING,” CONTINUED... Then white settlers pushed the Native Americans off their traditional lands. There were wars and hangings, treaties and sickness. In 1881, eight years before Washington became a state, President Rutherford B. Hayes signed an executive order establishing the Spokane Tribe’s reservation on a fraction of their historic land. By 1887, all three bands of the tribe had moved there. By the time of a 1906 newspaper account, the tribe, once 3,000 members strong, had dwindled to about 600, largely due to illness. Then came the dams. Along came cheap electricity and irrigation, and away went the fish. The Little Falls Dam on the Spokane River, built in 1910, and the Grand Coulee Dam on the Columbia, built in the ’30s and ’40s, killed the salmon runs that had sustained the nations for generations. “All of our traditions, our practices, our lifestyles, evolved around the salmon,” says Evans, the tribal chairwoman. “Then you can take that salmon away from a people, it’s like you put them in shock. It’s like trauma. And after generations of trauma, you need some healing.” The trauma didn’t stop with the dams. With the discovery of uranium on the reservation, the Midnite Mine was opened, operating from 1955 to 1981 and leaving behind radioactive pits, contaminating water wells, and adversely affecting the health of the tribal members who’d jumped at the opportunity to work there. It was reading a news article about the Midnite Mine, and its lasting impacts, that prompted Campbell to come home. He’d been working in Boston, researching portfolios for a socially responsible investing entity, scrutinizing companies for their business practices and environmental compliance, when his sister sent him a story about the mine. “In the Spokesman-Review was a multiple full-page article on the Spokane Tribe and the legacy that the Midnite Mine had left in the community,” Campbell says. “I’m a Spokane Tribal citizen. Obviously it’s near and dear to me what’s going on. So I reached out to our tribal chairman at the time, and just let him know there are alternative ways to getting traction with global companies like that than just trying to meet ’em head to head.” He explained that by leveraging socially responsible investors through shareholder activism, the tribe could get a collective voice to use with Newmont, the company that now owns the mine and is working on the cleanup. “From that point forward, I started serving as a special adviser to the tribal council on all things socially responsible and sustainable, and really what that morphed into is helping the tribe create a lens of nation building, in a socially responsible and sustainable way,” Campbell says. “How do we approach nation building in a way that’s reflective of our historic cultural values of sustainability and stewardship and all those things?” In 2016, Campbell, who splits his time between Missoula and the reservation when he’s not traveling for work, took over as CEO of Sovereign Power, the tribe’s power enterprise. Sovereign Power is focused on developing a renewable energy model for the tribe that could include producing, transporting, marketing and selling power. Importantly, the renewable projects that Sovereign Power is spearheading are meant to bring the tribe more independence, free up cash currently spent on utility bills, and create work for some of the roughly 2,000 people who live on the reservation, where there’s a 41 percent unemployment rate. While solar has been the easiest entry place for the tribe, they’re “technology agnostic,” Campbell explains. “Right now, because the incentives around solar are so good, and because it’s so readily deployable, it makes sense for us to do that residentially, governmentally, in schools,” he says. “If it turns out that wind is a viable option, that’s the next place we’ll look. If it turns out it makes sense for us to do geothermal, that’s the next place.” If they’re ultimately successful, they’ll be able to dramatically rewrite the story of Wellpinit.

CREATING A BETTER WELLPINIT

The Bureau of Indian Affairs first opened its office in Wellpinit in 1913, and built up a grid of homes around its office in the core, most-

22 INLANDER JULY 6, 2017

ly for federal workers to live in. For the most part, tribal members lived (and still live) in homes spread out across the reservation. In 1951, the tribe ratified its constitution and established its council and self-governance. Over time, the tribal administration, also located in Wellpinit, has taken control of many of the activities the BIA controlled for decades: forestry, the range, fisheries, health and social programs. Over the decades, buildings popped up around Wellpinit’s small core with little to no consideration for the people who would be using the space. Part of the tribe’s college shares space inside a “blue pile of tin” that’s also a road maintenance garage, says Maria Cullooyah, current planning manager for the tribe, as she walks through the core, pointing out some less-than-ideal buildings. When the tribe needed to open a Head Start school for pre-kindergarten kids, modular/portable buildings were placed in the center of Wellpinit, just across the street from the BIA jail. With a limited-selection Trading Post, most tribal citizens take a more than 45-minute drive or bus trip away from the food desert to go to Walmart or another store in Airway Heights to buy groceries. Kids walk about a mile to school on the edge of a highway leading out of Wellpinit. There’s no sidewalk, and barely a shoulder. To change that, the tribe is taking on something that was never done in Wellpinit: nation building in an intentional way. Around 2011, the tribe received $1.5 million from the federal Department of Housing and Urban Development to create a Sustainable Community Master Plan, and spent four years developing a plan with input from tribal citizens, looking at the nexus between housing, transportation, infrastructure and environmental goals, and how they might align to increase prosperity. From there, the Spokane Tribe partnered with the Make It Right Foundation to redesign the Wellpinit core. Make It Right, founded in

“IT’S KIND OF LIKE THE MOMENTUM IS PICKING UP AND PEOPLE ARE STARTING TO GET WIND OF IT.” part by Brad Pitt in 2007 in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, helps communities in need design, plan for and build more resilient and efficient places. Its staff has helped the tribe draw up new plans for the town core. While some pieces aren’t yet finalized, and implementing the plan will likely take more than a decade, the Wellpinit redesign sets out to move buildings so they’re located where they make sense. The entire town will be more walkable and community-oriented. The tribe plans to move the jail near the public safety building, and put a new Head Start building closer to the elementary school. They’d like construction of new buildings to follow LEED certification, making the buildings higher quality, more efficient and better for the environment. In the draft version of the plan, new housing is aligned along solstice lines — a suggestion that was made by a tribal citizen at an idea-gathering session. “It’s kind of like the momentum is picking up and people are starting to get wind of it and come together more,” Cullooyah says. “A sense of belonging is what we want to bring back.” Infrastructure is being designed to include pipes in place, so new buildings can get steam heat from a new biomass plant the tribe is designing with Wisewood Energy, a Portland-based business. The plans also call to move the BIA offices out of the core. Cullooyah says she remembers seeing people in suits walk into the BIA office when she was younger and being curious. “As a kid I thought it was something awesome and great that we

Carol Evans, tribal chairwoman, looks up at a picture of her mother, Pauline Stearns, the first woman to serve on the tribal council. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO


SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL covers social services and the environment for the Inlander. She came to Spokane from Bellingham, where she worked as a political reporter for the Bellingham Herald. Contact Wohlfeil at samanthaw@inlander.com or 509-325-0634 ext. 234.

had,” she says. “But as I grew up and learned about the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the meaning of why it was created, I was like, ‘Oh, that needs to go — this group of people sent in here to manage us.’” To realistically achieve these goals, they will need funding. The tribe set itself up for success by achieving the Promise Zone designation, which comes with preference for federal grants and access to networks of partners who can help achieve their goals. In 2016, the tribe became one of only 22 Promise Zones around the country under a federal program started under former President Barack Obama. The program aims to help break generational poverty by focusing investment in areas that are working to change. The reinvention of Wellpinit was a key piece of the Spokane Promise Zone application. With the designation, the tribe is afforded two federal employees who work to advocate for them within agency offices in Washington state and Washington, D.C. They won the status in the nick of time: They’d been rejected the year before, and according to the HUD website, the tribe was one of nine zones named in the third and final round of the program. Although elements of the core revitalization are still being planned, small but meaningful changes are getting started. The tribe received a Safe Routes to School grant to install a side-

walk from the town core to the high school, so pedestrians won’t have to walk in the road or the mud anymore. Another grant will help install more than a dozen bus shelters around the reservation, so riders don’t have to wait in the rain and snow. Both will be installed in the next construction season or two. The Trading Post has partnered with Whole Foods to get guidance on how to better run the store. Since last year, old, inefficient coolers were replaced with new refrigeration. An entire aisle is now dedicated to fresh produce. The tribe also has several companies that are planning to expand and add jobs. There’s a construction company to build new structures. A solar team will receive training this week on how to maintain solar projects the tribe already has. Another team is looking at bringing broadband and better phone service to the community. Sovereign Power is exploring the feasibility of getting into biodiesel manufacturing and other renewable ventures where the tribe might compete on the open market. “What’s exciting to me is we’re looking at creating jobs for our people and looking at projects that are good for the environment,” Evans says. “If we can build that model and always remember to keep our ...continued on next page

JULY 6, 2017 INLANDER 23


ENERGY

“NATION BUILDING,” CONTINUED... language involved, our traditions, that’s going to help, well, it’ll help us heal.” People like the tribe’s Planning and Economic Development Director Mike Tedesco hope to help the tribe do just that. “How do you cure generational poverty in a way that’s responsible and sustainable, and really does build a nation and build sovereignty?” Tedesco asks. “There are not necessarily easy answers to that, but what we agree on, what Jason and I and the tribal council agree, is finding those market-driven approaches where we’re not just asking for another grant or partnership with a foundation.”

CHILDREN OF THE SUN

When wildfire swept through the reservation in August 2016, threatening to reach up the hill to Wellpinit, parts of town were left without power for almost a week. For

24 INLANDER JULY 6, 2017

vulnerable elders who need to refrigerate their medication or use power to run oxygen machines, that can be a significant risk, Campbell says. More than 14 homes and 20,000 to 30,000 acres were lost, says Tim Horan, executive director of the Spokane Indian Housing Authority. That followed a fire in 2015 that burned more than 50,000 acres on the reservation. “When you have two fires like that back to back, you want to prepare,” Horan says. So the tribal housing authority applied to install a community-scale solar project that could provide power to elder housing, the senior center and the SIHA offices. The tribe learned June 22 that it had been awarded a $1 million grant from the U.S. Department of Energy for what Horan says they’ve been calling the “Children of the Sun” project, named after the meaning of “Spokane.” As part of that work, the housing authority will install an approximately 637-kilowatt system to serve

14 community buildings and provide an estimated 24 percent of the community’s total energy load, Campbell says. The system is projected to reduce energy costs for those buildings by at least $2.8 million over the 35-year life of the project. As the tribe looks at installing more solar, they could plan what’s known as a microgrid, which is a system that generates power and can provide power parallel to the current grid (using power from the utility company when needed), or without hooking into it at all. “We’re looking for better than run-of-the-mill solutions,” Campbell says. In June, Campbell traveled to the Blue Lake Rancheria reservation in Northern California to learn from their work building a 500-kilowatt microgrid the community just brought online in April that ties into a 950 kilowatthour Tesla battery storage system. (A battery that size could provide roughly enough energy to power about 30


to 50 California homes for a day.) Even if the Spokane Tribe were to tie a bunch of solar projects into the grid that exists, as the residential installations have done, that might not help in the event of a natural disaster. A microgrid, on the other hand, set up with power backups such as generators or battery storage, could be used to maintain service. “It allows you to produce the power where you’re using the power, which creates a higher level of efficiency within the system,” Campbell says. “It also allows for a layer of energy resilience.”

“WE’RE LOOKING FOR BETTER THAN RUN-OFTHE-MILL SOLUTIONS.” Eventually, if they develop enough energy production to provide power to everyone within the bounds of the reservation, Campbell says there’s another major benefit they would be able to consider that a utility company wouldn’t: They could move toward providing power for free. “Some of our low-income families on the reservation are in aged housing stock — they’ll have $600-a-month utility bills to heat their houses,” Campbell says. “I mean, it’s unreal.” It’s important to mitigate those monthly bills, but it’s also important to build smarter, he says. “It’s all connected,” says Campbell. “If you incorporate appropriate design practices, woven with cultural values and using cutting-edge materials around sustainability and efficiency, that’s where you really get to overall sustainability and independence of the tribal nation.”

METRICS OF SUCCESS

A $1 million grant will help the tribe install solar panels to power elder housing shown here. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

In March, the waters of the Spokane River are roaring through the Little Falls as Campbell takes in the view from a bridge above the dam. A little downstream is the spot where he used to go swimming on hot summer days. His dad built a house up on a flat stretch of land above the river, and Campbell remembers taking off during the summer with his stepbrothers to ride motorbikes and camp around the reservation for days at a time. “He’d come looking for us after a few days and make sure we had food,” he says, smiling. He points out that the same dams that took away the tribe’s way of life have a monopoly on the power system from which they’re trying to free themselves. It won’t be easy. To build new infrastructure in Wellpinit, the tribe first has to figure out new sewage and wastewater treatment, because their lagoon is at capacity. And the way forward seems to constantly shift as, say, fuel prices plummet, making investments in biodiesel hard to justify the cost. But there’s more at stake here than just money, Campbell LETTERS says. There are other metrics to Send comments to consider: air quality, employeditor@inlander.com. ment, environmental stewardship, and setting up future generations to be successful. The tribe has the opportunity to be a leading example of how to plan and build a more sustainable, independent community. There are a lot of projects he can’t talk about yet because they’re not finalized, but Campbell’s excitement is palpable. His phone has been blowing up as he’s been exploring how the tribe might get into large-scale power development. If the tribe were to show an interest in large-scale solar power, he says, the south-facing hills above the river here, the same ones he grew up on… they’d be great for harnessing the sun. n

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Fred Armisen, who performs at the Bing on Friday, as bookstore owner Candace on Portlandia, pictured with series co-creator Carrie Brownstein.

IFC PHOTO

COMEDY

Quite a Character To prepare for his first Spokane appearance, we’re thumbing through comedian and actor Fred Armisen’s Rolodex of weird, offbeat characters BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

F

red Armisen is a man of many talents. And voices. And identities. As a cast member on Saturday Night Live, and later as a creative force behind the cult series Portlandia and Documentary Now, the comedian and actor has racked up an impressive catalog of alter egos. Armisen, currently on tour, hits Spokane this Friday, and reviews from other cities make it sound like his performance will include a mix of stand-up, improv, music and audience Q&A. Here are a handful of Armisen’s weirdest and most memorable characters, and some of the bits you should

brush up on before heading out to the Bing.

“THE PRINCE SHOW”

Armisen currently holds the third longest tenure of any cast member in the history of Saturday Night Live, so it’s no surprise that he developed countless recurring characters during that stint. I’m particularly fond of his ever-smirking riff on the late, great rock legend Prince, who, in this recurring series of sketches, is the host of a bizarro-world talk show, shot at Paisley Park deep into the night. Prince is often vanishing into thin air and

whispering strange requests of his guests into the ear of his co-host and interpreter Beyoncé, played by Maya Rudolph. (Example: “Prince wants you to go back there and sit on that giant cupcake.”) Now that Prince is gone, these sketches take on an almost bittersweet quality.

PORTLANDIA

It’s pretty much a requirement that anyone living in this corner of the country has seen (and begrudgingly related to) Armisen’s IFC sketch show, which he co-created with ...continued on next page

JULY 6, 2017 INLANDER 27


CULTURE | TOPIC

IFC PHOTO

NETFLIX PHOTO

Armisen and Bill Hader as members of the Blue Jean Committee on Documentary Now (left); Armisen as Robert Durst on Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt.

“QUITE A CHARACTER,” CONTINUED... Sleater-Kinney guitarist Carrie Brownstein. There are too many memorable, dead-on character pairs residing in the series’ just-barely-through-the-looking-glass version of Portland, but here are some of the best: Peter and Nance, who are so well-intentioned when trying new things that they’re instantly susceptible to all the dangers of the world; Bryce and Lisa, whose entrepreneurial endeavors include pickling un-pickleable objects and putting illustrations of birds on everything; and, of course, Candace and Toni, the militantly feminist owners of the Women and Women First Bookstore (which is based on In Other Words, a real bookstore in Portland).

THUNDER ANT

Even before Portlandia, Armisen and Brownstein were skewering white, liberal entitlement and first-world problems in short internet videos under the name ThunderAnt. Some of the sketches still available on YouTube: Two wildly incompetent restaurateurs respond to their negative Yelp reviews (to a customer who got food poisoning: “At least you’re not dead”), a Portland pet adoption agency with remarkably high standards (of one dog, Armisen says, “She wants to live in a home with no children and no adults”), and a public access music show called Boink! Candace and Toni also made their debut in a ThunderAnt short.

ROBERT DURST

On the Netflix comedy Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, Armisen pops up in an almost inexplicable supporting role as certified weirdo and suspected murderer Robert Durst, the real-life subject of the once buzzed-about documentary series The Jinx. It’s one of the stranger comic touches in a show that revels in strangeness, but Armisen finds a way to make the character into something more than just a straightforward impression. I plan to check back on the show to see if his performance is still funny long after everyone has forgotten who Durst is.

HIS FAKE BANDS

If you haven’t seen Documentary Now, the brilliant Independent Lens parody series that Armisen co-created with fellow SNL alums Seth Meyers and Bill Hader, you need to. (Its two seasons are currently streaming on Netflix.) Each episode intricately spoofs a specific documentary — Errol Morris’ The Thin Blue Line, for instance, or the Maysles brothers’ Grey Gardens — and some of the series’ highlights focus on Armisen’s jokey musical endeavors. Consider the Eagles parody act the Blue Jean Committee, whose smooth, yacht-rock sounds belie their vicious backstage drama. Or Test Pattern, a nod to Talking Heads and the band’s high-concept film Stop Making Sense, directed by the late Jonathan Demme. Also deserving of a shout-out:

“WEEKEND UPDATE”

Armisen developed a slew of characters on SNL’s “Weekend Update” news segment, usually with other performers — he and Kristen Wiig as perpetually unprepared singing duo Garth and Kat; he and Vanessa Bayer as the childhood friends of various third-world dictators; he and Will Forte as another singing duo, Gunther WEEKEND and Patrick, whose C O U N T D OW N songs were defined by Get the scoop on this Forte’s hilarious falsetweekend’s events with to singing. Particularly our newsletter. Sign up at memorable was ArInlander.com/newsletter. misen’s improvisational political commentator, the indifferently named Nicholas Fehn, who would riff on the day’s biggest headlines without ever completing a coherent thought, let alone getting to his punch line. Hopefully Armisen’s actual show doesn’t follow suit. n Fred Armisen with Jacqueline Novak • Fri, July 7 at 8 pm • $27-$32 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638

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Ian Rubbish, a Johnny Rotten-style punk icon Armisen trotted out during his final SNL season.

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CULTURE | FIRST FRIDAY

Summer Stroll July’s First Friday arts showcase includes several shows paying artistic tribute to the Lilac City BY CHEY SCOTT

S

pokane means something different to all of us, whether we’ve lived here all our lives, or have newly arrived. A new summer-long exhibit at the Terrain gallery inside the Washington Cracker Co. Building aims to capture these sentiments from as many viewpoints as possible. “Our hope is to capture images of this moment in the life of our city from many angles, so that we can see, as comprehensively as possible, the way Spokane looks to all of its people,” explains the exhibit statement for “Snapshot: A Look at Spokane Right Now.” Local professional photographers — including the Inlander’s Young Kwak, along with Rajah Bose, Kristen Black, Robert Lloyd, Grace Lindsey and Laree Weaver — have contributed some of their most iconic images of the city and its people for display in the collective showcase. To complement

their work, Terrain has asked the public, with a focus on populations whose perspective is not as often captured on film, to contribute their own Spokane snapshots to the exhibit. Budding mobile photographers are also encouraged to share their scenes for consideration using the hashtag #spokanesnapshot. New images from both underserved groups and those that are shared on social media channels will be added to the exhibit over the course of its three-month run. Terrain also plans to host several side events to supplement Snapshot’s art, including a public reading of works created during a recent writing workshop facilitated by Spokane Poet Laureate Laura Read, set for July 12. Snapshot: A Look at Spokane Right Now • Fri, July 7 from 6-7 pm • Terrain • 304 W. Pacific • terrainspokane.com/events

This portrait of local baker Shaun Thompson Duffy is featured in Snapshot.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

RECEPTIONS ON FRIDAY, JULY 7 FROM 5-8 PM, UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION, VISIT FIRSTFRIDAYSPOKANE.ORG. 4 Degrees Real Estate, 1209 W. First Various visual and performing artists are featured. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main The store hosts its first Friday poetry open mic with “Remember the Word” featured reader Jeff Dodd. Guest poets can also share up to 3 minutes’ worth of material. Avenue West Gallery, 907 W. Boone “Remembering Dads,” by artist Bari features watercolor and ink inspired by fathers. Barili Cellars, 608 W. Second Unique mixed wood wall pieces by Rebeca Abdala. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. Patti Simpson Ward presents her Americana-style paintings in “Heart of Spokane.” Bellwether Brewing Co., 2019 N. Monroe Mixed media by Ryan Johnson. Bistango, 108 N. Post Music by Kori Ailene. Bloem Flowers, Chocolates & Paperie, 808 W. Main Medieval-style illuminated manuscripts by Hannah Charlton. Boutique Bleu, 1184 W. Summit Pkwy. Ceramics by local artist Liz Bishop. Bozzi Gallery, 221 N. Wall “Exodus” features original batiks by Spokane-based Maasai artist Nicholas Sironka. Core Pilates & Wellness,

30 INLANDER JULY 6, 2017

1230 W. Summit Pkwy. Photography by Stuart Danford and metal sculptures by Paul Kuhlman. Craftsman Cellars, 1194 W. Summit Pkwy. Paintings by internationally recognized watercolor artist Stan Miller, with music by Wyatt Wood from 6:30-8:30 pm. Hills’ Restaurant & Lounge, 401 W. Main Live music by the Front Porch Trio, from 6:30-9:30 pm. Iron Goat Brewing Co., 1302 W. Second “Better Spokane Headlines” featuring wacky artwork by Clancy Bundy. Keith Powell Gallery, 123 E. Second Featuring art by Caroll Vrba, Keith Powell and David McMillan. Kolva-Sullivan Gallery, 115 S. Adams A juried group show curated by Jennifer LaRue, featuring more than a dozen local artists whose work reinterprets the concept of “reclaiming.” Reception July 8 from 4-8 pm. LeftBank Wine Bar, 108 N. Washington Oil on canvas paintings by Spokane artist Amanda Richard. Marketplace Winery, 39 W. Pacific Live music by the Spare Parts Duo, from 5:30-9 pm. Marmot Art Space, 1206 W. Summit Pkwy. “Nerd,” a multimedia exhibi-

“The One That Got Away” by Melanie Lieb can be seen at the Kolva-Sullivan Gallery. tion by SFCC professor Carl Richardson, which also features collaborative pieces by Riverpoint Academy Students and local digital firm Gravity Jack. Nectar Catering & Events, 120 N. Stevens Art by Mark Addy, along with live music by Jamison Sampson, from 5-10 pm. Object Space, 1818½ E. Sprague “Empty Playgrounds” by Dario Ré features 55 photographs, alongside an interactive sculpture and sound installation. Overbluff Cellars, 304 W. Pacific Selections from members of the Inland Outlook Photo Club.

Pottery Place Plus, 203 N. Washington Paintings by Charleen Martin and handmade soaps by Genae Millar in a guest show titled “All the Pieces of Our Lives.” Richmond Gallery, 228 W. Sprague “Hypothesis” features new works by the Richmond Art Collective’s resident Spokane artists Brian Deemy, Julie Gautier-Downes, Ira Gardner, Hannah Koeske, Alex Mann and Mallory Ware. River City Brewing Co., 121 S. Cedar Art by local artist Chere Perrigo. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Live music by Ken Davis and friends in the third floor food

court, from 5-7 pm. Saranac Art Projects, 25 W. Main The gallery features new works by member artists: an installation by Dan McCann and works on paper by Tobe Harvey. Spokane Public Library, 906 W. Main Live music by Troubadour with Celtic Cross, from 6:30-8 pm. STA Plaza, 701 W. Riverside Visual art by Patrick Welker and live music by singer-songwriter Joshua Belliardo, from 4-6 pm. Steelhead Bar & Grille, 218 N. Howard Landscape photography by Nick Nelson. Terrain, 304 W. Pacific “Snapshot: A Look at Spokane Right Now” features personal views of Spokane from professional and community photographers. V du V Wines, 12 S. Scott Original watercolors and pastels by local artists Marlee Griffith and Tami Goolie, and live music by Crushpad from 5:30-9:30 pm. William Grant Gallery and Framing, 1188 W. Summit Pkwy. Myron G. Bursell’s photography project “Courage: Spokane Heroes” honors retired and active duty members from all branches of the military. Wollnick’s General Store, 421 W. Main Live music by Kevin Dorin, from 5:30-7:30 pm, in the store’s newly remodeled space.


Summer Sippin’ A local cocktail expert shares how to throw a summer cocktail party that won’t break the bank BY CARA STRICKLAND

T

he thought of hosting a cocktail party can be intimidating — after all, most of us aren’t bartenders, and won’t it be expensive? Never fear! Renee Cebula, a local cocktail historian and owner of Raising the Bar vintage barware, is here with tips to make your party a (whiskey) smash. Cebula puts in a lot of the work for her parties long before guests arrive. “The more organized you can be, the more likely you are to have an enjoyable time and stay within your budget,” she says. She recommends choosing three signature cocktails to start, each with a different base spirit. You’ll also want to check the recipes and make sure nothing is too complicated or expensive. ...continued on next page

Local cocktail expert Renee Cebula suggests serving the classic Hemingway Daiquiri. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO


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“Nobody wants to be stuck bringing the $80 bottle of green Chartreuse,” she says. Remember that mixed drinks aren’t the time for top-shelf liquor; one step up from the bottom shelf will be fine. And don’t forget to be mindful about how your cocktails are made — if each one requires shaking and you have only one cocktail shaker, it might take a while for people to get drinks. Speaking of equipment, don’t forget the glasses! Cebula says that while they shouldn’t be plastic, they don’t have to match. And if you’re running low, someone is usually happy to help wash a few to put back in circulation. Before the party arrives, make sure to create a dedicated bar station with plenty of ice, towels, and some water for quick rinses. “Any cocktail party should begin with a punch,” Cebula notes. Not only are they easy to make in advance (and a perfect starter for the party’s early birds), but you don’t have to make each drink individually. Don’t let the name put you off — if you don’t have a punch bowl, you can use a pitcher or a drink dispenser, she says. Kicking off a party with punch is a historically accurate move as well, Cebula says: “Punch was the first mixed drink, so why not start where mixed drinks sprang from?” Besides your signature cocktails, Cebula recommends setting out a few mixers (soda, tonic water) for guests who might like a weaker drink. On that note, don’t forget to plan a water station, and consider a basket of water bottles at your front door for guests to take on their way. “If people aren’t quite ready to drive, just let them stay a while,” Cebula suggests. (Or be on the safe side and request a ride share.) To go with your drinks, you’re also going to need food. “Breads and cheeses are pretty inexpensive; you can do those in bulk and not break the bank,” Cebula says. “They’re also really satisfying when you’re drinking. I think if you’re new to hosting a cocktail party, just keep it simple.” For her parties, Cebula also creates an editable list so that each person can sign up for their preferred contribution, whether that’s food or booze. “People usually ask ‘Can I bring something?’ or if they don’t ask, typically your guests will arrive with a bottle of wine. Why not just ask everyone to bring one ingredient for the cocktails?” she says. “I like to have a variety of things, so that if somebody is able to bring a $30 bottle of spirits, great. If someone’s budget is more like bringing some limes and lemons, or a bottle of bitters, that’s good too. All of these are important ingredients.” Even Cebula was nervous about throwing throw her first cocktail party. “I thought it would be really complicated — I went with that and was very organized,” she recalls. “It wasn’t that complicated at all, and it was so much fun. I wish that we had done them earlier, and not been intimidated by it.” n

RENEE’S PICKS FOR A SUMMER COCKTAIL PARTY HEMINGWAY DAIQUIRI 1½ oz. white rum ¾ oz. fresh lime juice ¼ oz. fresh grapefruit juice ¼ oz. Luxardo maraschino liqueur (other brands exist, but none taste quite like this one) Shake ingredients with ice, strain into a chilled cocktail glass and garnish with a lime wedge. GIN FIZZ 1 oz. club soda  2 oz. Plymouth gin (Plymouth is a regional style of gin, but is now home to only one brand) 1 oz. fresh lemon juice ¾ oz. simple syrup 1 egg white (about ½ oz.) Pour the club soda into a Fizz or Collins glass and set aside. Add the remaining ingredients to a shaker and shake without ice for about 10 seconds. Add 3 or 4 ice cubes and shake very well. Doublestrain into the prepared glass. WHISKEY SMASH Half a lemon, cut into wedges 4 mint leaves ¾ oz. simple syrup 2 oz. bourbon   1 mint sprig (for garnish) In a shaker, muddle the lemon. Add the remaining ingredients and fill with ice. Shake, and doublestrain into a rocks glass filled with crushed ice, or one large ice chunk. Slap a mint sprig between your hands and use as garnish. Serve with a straw.


FOOD | FARMING

FOOD | BOOK

The Same, but Different How Coeur Greens grows nutritious greens yearround in a self-contained indoor farming system BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

W

hile it’s hard to imagine cold, wet winter arriving anytime soon, planning for the inevitable change in weather is a fact of life for most farmers. At Coeur Greens, however, the changing weather is a non-issue, unless there’s a power outage. That’s because Coeur Greens, in Hayden, grows microgreen and lettuce varieties hydroponically inside a Freight Farm, a branded shipping container modified to address plants’ every need: nutrients, in the form of liquid fertilizer; sunshine, provided via LED lights; air circulation and an appropriate growing medium for every stage of the plant’s life cycle. It’s 80 degrees in the farm’s prep room, but a pleasant 63 degrees inside the container where Kelly Lattin, Coeur Greens’ operations manager, demonstrates the process for growing lettuce. First comes the varietal selections, which Coeur Greens is still experimenting with. Currently, they’re The container farm has about 2 acres growing green and red butterhead worth of space. CARRIE SCOZZARO PHOTO lettuce, and have tried oak leaf and romaine. Seeds are planted into peat moss pods and fed nutrients in water that Coeur Greens trucks in from land it owns above the Rathdrum Prairie Aquifer. The vertical farm’s hydroponic system allows it to use up to 90 percent less water than a conventional farm of its size; equivalent to about 2 acres. After about three weeks, the 1-to-2-inch high seedlings are ready for transplanting to vertical towers, with 10 to 12 seedlings per tower. They’re hung on a rack system, where high-efficiency LED lights cycle on and off, simulating sunlight. Throughout the process, temperature, water and other factors must be monitored, and there’s considerable cleaning involved, says Lattin, who’s outfitted in a hairnet and booties. The whole system is capable of holding up to 2,500 plants and can be controlled by a mobile app. To harvest the lettuce, says Lattin, employees twist it off at the root, keeping some of that portion intact for a yield of around three ounces. Coeur Greens sells three-bag heads for $5 at both the Wednesday and Saturday Kootenai Farmers Market. Local restaurants using its produce so far include Fire Artisan Pizza, with locations in Spokane and Coeur d’Alene. In addition to lettuce, Coeur Greens produces microgreens, such as lemon basil and radish, in 3-ounce containers ($5). Without exposure to non-artificial sunlight and weather, what’s missing from their lettuce and microgreens? Nothing, says Lattin, noting that not only is the lettuce ultra-local, there are no pesticides used, because there are zero bugs inside the growing facility. “It actually has flavor,” she says, holding out a plump, verdant head of lettuce. n Coeur Greens • 10145 N. Aero Dr., Hayden • coeurgreens.com • 208-916-5068

Living Large Locally Seattle food writer Jess Thomson writes a love letter to the great nearby in her new memoir BY CARA STRICKLAND

J

ess Thomson has always been an adventurer, especially when it comes to food. But she always assumed she had to travel to do it. A visit from a friend changed her mind. “I watched her traipse through Seattle with this overwhelming sense of excitement. She posted everything she was doing on Instagram, and I watched her thrill unfold with a mix of jealousy and surprise,” says Thomson. “I was jealous that she was on a big adventure, but I was also surprised — there was sort of this blinding flash of the obvious — to realize that she could do it in my neighborhood, which meant that I could, too.” She continues: “I had blindly passed the docks in Seattle where you can buy fresh crab so many times. I know exactly where the farmer’s markets are and what they sell, but I’m somehow able to forget that I can make rhubarb jam one Sunday, all day, if I want to. I had become so accustomed to living my daily life — like I think we all do — that I had failed to recognize that the adventures I was searching for elsewhere were available here.” That realization planted the seed for her recently released book, A Year Right Here: Adventures with Food and Family in the Great Nearby, consisting of essays which all take place within a day’s driving distance of Seattle. Thomson’s journey takes her razor clamming on the Washington coast, truffle hunting in Oregon, and wine tasting through British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley. Even closer to home, she adopts backyard chickens and tries her hand at brewing her own cider. But there’s more to this book than food. “At the beginning, it was a book about food told through the lens of my family,” she

says. “What happened as I was writing is that it morphed into a book about my family told through the lens of food,” the author says. While Thomson is a food writer and frequent restaurant cookbook ghostwriter, she’s also a mom to a young son with cerebral palsy. The book is filled with evocative food descriptions and enviable trips, but also encompasses the uncontrollable stuff of everyday life and explores the limits of physical ability, both for her son and for herself. When Thomson’s son Graham needed to have surgery, her plans for a completely local adventure year needed to be adjusted. Her editor weighed in with a suggestion. “She said, ‘Many writers just stop what they’re doing and wait a year, and start up again if they need some sort of personal time. We could consider that. Or you could make this part of the story.’” Thomson chose the latter. “Ultimately, I was much happier with the final structure, because it did a better job of showing what my life is: this crazy combination of wild, fun, sexy-sounding adventure and tough parenting.” Thomson’s book encourages readers to be curious about their natural habitats in a new way, and allows them to shape food and drink choices. “I think just the willingness and eagerness to find out something new can guide what ends up on your plate,” she says. That’s an invitation to adventure anyone can embrace. n Find A Year Right Here at Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main, for $28.95.

JULY 6, 2017 INLANDER 33


BACK TO SCHOOL Spider-Man’s first stand-alone film in the Marvel Cinematic Universe is a smart, funny and grounded summer blockbuster BY ERIC D. SNIDER

S

ome superhero movies have subtitles referring to sometimes just means giving people street directions. the dramatic events or villains featured therein: “The Spider-Man,” as he’s called, is a YouTube celebrity, Apocalypse; Age of Ultron; Civil War; The Last Stand. loosely identified with the Avengers and included with Then there’s Spider-Man: Homecoming, which refers to a them when Peter’s female classmates play F---, Marry, dance at Peter Parker’s high school. Yes, the new incarnaKill. But he wants to be an official Avenger, pestertion of the web-slinger is a scrawny 15-year-old who’s at ing Tony Stark’s right-hand man Happy Hogan (Jon least as concerned about the perils of adolescence as he Favreau) for an invitation. is about using his great power with great responsibility. Meanwhile, Peter wants to impress Liz (Laura HarHe has to save the world, but there’s a rier), a pretty senior at his school, and do Spanish quiz today! well at the academic decathlon, and to SPIDER-MAN: Taking Peter back to high school is continue perfecting his web-fluid formula HOMECOMING one of several things Homecoming does (which he works on in science class Rated PG-13 to distract us from the fact that this is when the teacher isn’t looking). Soon he Directed by Jon Watts the sixth Spider-Man movie and third has a new goal, too: keeping his nerdy Spider-Man actor since 2002. (If the new Starring Tom Holland, Michael Keaton, best friend Ned (Jacob Batalon), Robert Downey Jr., Marisa Tomei Peter Parker is 15, he was born the who has discovered his Spider year Tobey Maguire’s Peter Parker first secret, from revealing it to appeared.) But the main trick employed to keep us from the world. Ned proves crucial to the film, feeling exhausted by the repetition is to make Homecoming grounding it, acting the way we suppose we exhilarating, hilarious, fast-paced, and grounded in realwould if we found out that our friend was a ity. It’s the funniest chapter yet in the Marvel Cinematic superhero. Between that and the authenticUniverse, directed by Jon Watts (Cop Car — see it) with feeling Queens locations, this might be the an eye for humorous details and recognizable teen angst. Marvel film that seems most like real life. It Imagine if John Hughes had made a Spider-Man movie, conveys what has always been the selling point using a script punched up by Saturday Night Live writers for Spider-Man: he’s just a regular kid, with the (the good ones, that is). powers of a superhero but the brain of a teenager. Played with endearing eagerness by baby-faced Tom Like any kid, Peter pushes against the boundarHolland (now 21 years old), this Spider-Man memorably ies established by the adults in his life. In his case, that made his debut in last year’s Captain America: Civil War, means pursuing a potentially very dangerous villain, helping Tony Stark (Robert Downey Jr.) sort out the one Adrian Toomes (Michael Keaton), who’s been using intra-Avengers problems. Homecoming is set two months stolen alien technology to develop high-tech weapons after that, with Peter back in Queens, New York, waiting that he sells on the black market. As Spider-Man, Peter for Stark to call again. gets in over his head more than once and has to be huKeeping his secret from his worried Aunt May miliatingly rescued by Iron Man, which only makes him (Marisa Tomei), Peter spends his non-school hours doing more determined to prove himself. He’s frustrated by the whatever heroics he can in his neighborhood, which “training wheels” limitations built into the high-tech Spi-

dey suit Tony Stark made for him, and he feels stifled by his geographically small sphere of influence. (When was the last time a movie superhero worried about something as mundane as how he was going to get from New York to Washington, D.C.?) Watts, credited along with five (!) other writers for the screenplay, marvelously keeps the story clear and cohesive, and manages to pull off a few delightful narrative surprises. He has also conscientiously inserted humor wherever he could, never in a jokey, set-up/punch-line kind of way, but naturally: a bored Washington Monument tour guide; a nihilistic classmate (Zendaya); a poster warning against identity theft in the background when Spider-Man fights bank robbers impersonating the Avengers; Captain America (Chris Evans) doing educational PSAs for public schools. For all the hoopla over Tomei being significantly younger than Aunt May has been in past Spider-Man versions, she’s sadly underused here. Apart from a running joke where every male in Peter’s life has the hots for her, she doesn’t serve any purpose in the story. Little else is wasted, though. Watts makes every one of the film’s 133 minutes count (including the post-credits scenes), relying on Holland’s relentless enthusiasm to carry us through. Let’s hope there are more bright adventures to come before they reboot the character all over again. n


FILM | SHORTS

PRESENTED BY DOWNTOWN SPOKANE

— Your neverending story —

Spider-Man: Homecoming

How to totally nail this first friday thing.

OPENING FILMS SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING

After being mistreated in his last few movies, Peter Parker and his webslinging alter ego finally get another feature worthy of the character’s long history. (Let’s just forget the Andrew Garfield version, shall we?) Now that fresh-faced Tom Holland is donning Spidey’s spandex, the Spider-Man

franchise feels more grounded and human than it did in earlier installments, with Peter’s high school drama taking just as much precedence as the largescale superhero set pieces, and the script is fleet and funny in unexpected ways. Let’s hope there are more bright adventures to come before they reboot the character all over again. (ES) Rated PG-13

NOW PLAYING 47 METERS DOWN

On vacation in Mexico, two sisters (Mandy Moore and Claire Holt) are convinced by some locals to go on an impromptu diving expedition. But as soon as the women are submerged in a shark cage, the rope breaks and sends them down to the ocean floor, where they’re menaced by some Great Whites. That’s a decent premise for a B-movie, and it works for a bit, but it’s eventually undone by dull characters, thudding dialogue and a lack of visual clarity. (NW) Rated PG-13

A QUIET PASSION

Emily Dickinson’s final years are examined in the latest from writer-director Terence Davies, a patiently paced, empathetic character study that avoids many of the pitfalls of traditional artist biopics. Cynthia Nixon delivers a terrific performance as the troubled but brilliant poet, who challenged the status quo and whose work wasn’t fully appreciated until after her death. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

ALL EYEZ ON ME

Tupac Shakur was one of the most influential and controversial voices in ’90s hip-hop, so it’s a shame that the first major narrative feature about his short, turbulent life turns out to be an uninspired, formulaic biopic that lazily covers much of the same ground as earlier hip-hop history lessons Notorious and Straight Outta Compton. Tupac fans won’t find anything enlightening,

and those unfamiliar with his work won’t really get a sense of the rapper’s legacy. At least newcomer Demetrius Shipp Jr. is perfectly cast as Shakur, and Danai Gurira is deeply effective as his mother Afeni. (NW) Rated R

BABY DRIVER

The latest genre deconstruction from writer-director Edgar Wright is a high-energy heist thriller starring Ansel Elgort (The Fault in Our Stars) as a for-hire getaway driver who scores all of his jobs to personal playlists. Just as he’s settling into a relationship with a charming waitress (Lily James), he’s pulled deeper into the criminal underworld, getting wrapped up in a plan that’s destined to self-destruct. The car chases are stellar and the soundtrack is fully loaded; no surprises there. But the key to Baby Driver’s success turns out to be its deceptively sweet love story. (SS) Rated R

out of bed sometime between 6am and 3pm. 1 Get Go to work if that’s your thing. your friends at 5pm. Not literally, of course— 2 Grab that’s just rude. a gallery for free food and free fun. Repeat…oh, 3 Hit a couple dozen times before 8pm.

Don’t miss the next First Friday: July 7th, 2017

BEATRIZ AT DINNER

Salma Hayek stars as a lower-middleclass masseuse who’s invited to a wealthy dinner party out of kindness, only to find her ultra-liberal beliefs clashing spectacularly with one of the guests, a boorish real estate magnate played by John Lithgow. Although well-acted and tightly paced, the film’s jabs at class disparity and racial intolerance are a bit mealy-mouthed, and the ending is frustrating in its moral ambiguity. (NW) Rated R ...continued on next page

For event listings visit: www.firstfridayspokane.org Most venues open 5-8pm

JULY 6, 2017 INLANDER 35


e n o r i Pe ize Pr

N ATIO N I M NO

S NOW OPEN

Help us honor local excellence! We’re accepting nominations for our eighth annual Peirone Prize, an award recognizing passionate local people under the age of 40 who have dedicated their lives to service. Send your nominations to: www.inlander.com/give2017 by August 3rd, telling us why they deserve recognition. Winners will be featured in our Give Guide issue on August 24th.

2016 Peirone Prize Winners

Dylan Stiegemeier “I just want people to feel engaged.”

Ryan Oelrich

“The most powerful thing is making that choice to care.”

Teri Koski

“A very good counselor told me once, ‘It doesn’t matter what you call it, it matters how you deal with it.’”

FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING THE BEGUILED

Sofia Coppola’s adaptation of Thomas Cullinan’s pulp novel, previously filmed in 1971, is a humid, slow-burning Southern gothic tale set in an isolated all-girls boarding school during the Civil War. When a wounded Union soldier comes upon the place and is allowed to recuperate there, his presence sets all the women on edge, and the sexual tension soon devolves into violence. The film smolders with a dark slowness, and nearly every shot is perfectly placed, but the lovely veneer can’t disguise the story’s genuine cheesiness. (SS) Rated R

CARS 3

Pixar’s franchise set in a universe of sentient automobiles has always been a bigger hit with kids than critics, and this third installment is unlikely to reverse that trend. This time, the once-great Lightning McQueen (again voiced by Owen Wilson), consistently outpaced on the track by newer, faster cars, throws himself into one last Big Race. Parents: Be prepared to shell out for even more tie-in merchandise. (NW) Rated G

CHURCHILL

It’s almost hard to believe that Brian Cox has never before played Winston Churchill, but here he is embodying the irascible British Prime Minister in a stately biopic set in the four days before D-Day. Miranda Richardson is Mrs. Churchill, Mad Men’s John Slattery is Gen. Dwight Eisenhower and James Purefoy is King George VI. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG

DESPICABLE ME 3

The hugely popular animated series, which also spawned those inescapable Minions, continues unabated, and this time reformed bad guy Gru (voiced by Steve Carell) has just been kicked out of the Anti-Villain League. Enter his longlost identical twin brother Dru, who convinces Gru to go back to his evilcausing ways. (NW) Rated PG

THE HERO

I think we can all agree that Sam Elliott, he of the mile-wide mustache and soothing baritone, deserves more starring roles, and he has one here as a faded Western actor who finds his career on the upswing as his personal life spirals out of control. This Sundanceapproved drama co-stars Laura Prepon, Nick Offerman, Krysten Ritter and the great Katharine Ross. (NW) Rated R

THE HOUSE

Will Ferrell and Amy Poehler play a couple of empty nesters who discover that they’ve accidentally blown their daughter’s college fund through sheer stupidity. So they do what any sensible parents would do: They open an illegal casino in the basement of their subur-

36 INLANDER JULY 6, 2017

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

NEW YORK TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Baby Driver

85

Wonder Woman

76

The Beguiled

76

Spider-Man: Homecoming

73

Beatriz at Dinner

67

47 Meters Down

56

All Eyez on Me

38

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

ban home. Hilarity supposedly ensues. (NW) Rated R

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2

Summer movie season officially kicks off as Star-Lord and company blast back into theaters, and this brightly colored, exuberantly paced sequel turns out to be just as funny and flashy (if not quite as fresh) as its predecessor. The story this time around — as the Guardians are pursued through space, the ever-smirking ruffian Peter Quill is reunited with his swashbuckler father — is secondary to the action set pieces and the soundtrack of ’70s pop hits, but that’s just fine with us. (SS) Rated PG-13

THE MUMMY

The remains of the 1932 classic starring Boris Karloff again rise from the tomb, this time with a vengeful Egyptian princess shaking off her cobwebs and wreaking havoc on humanity — and Tom Cruise. The movie works in fits and starts as a gleefully dumb monstermovie matinee, but it’s awkwardly paced and tonally inconsistent, an obvious attempt at setting up a franchise that may never see the light of day. (NW) Rated PG-13

NEITHER WOLF NOR DOG

A white writer is contacted by a 95-year-old Native American man wanting his life story documented before he dies, and though skeptical, he soon finds himself ferried about the Lakota reservation on a task he feels illequipped for. This sensitive indie comedy-drama, adapted from a beloved novel by Kent Nerburn, creates a trio of vivid characters — the author, the elder and his nephew — and allows them to explore their cultural and generational differences without ever coming across as preachy or condescending. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

PARIS CAN WAIT

Documentarian Eleanor Coppola’s narrative debut stars Diane Lane as an American woman who’s on a vacation in Cannes with her overworked husband (Alec Baldwin). When he has to attend to business, she embarks on a road trip to Paris with one of his charming French associates (Arnaud Viard), sampling the region’s finest food and wines along the way. Care to predict what happens next? At the Magic Lan-

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

tern. (NW) Rated PG

PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES

There was a time when Johnny Depp’s Jack Sparrow could enliven any tired script, but that ship has long since sailed. The bloated Disney behemoth splashes back into theaters, and this fifth big-budget adventure involves a zombie pirate hunter and a magical trident… or something. It’s about as much fun as waiting in an endless amusement park line on a 100-degree day. (MJ) Rated PG-13

ROUGH NIGHT

A drug- and booze-fueled bachelorette party goes horribly wrong when a male stripper winds up dead, and the soon-to-be-married Scarlett Johansson and her four college friends — Kate McKinnon, Jillian Bell, Ilana Glazer and Zoë Kravitz — do their best to cover it up. The plot of this comedy from the Broad City crew bears an uncanny resemblance to the (deservedly) forgotten 1998 comedy Very Bad Things, but here’s hoping that terrific cast can sell the material. (NW) Rated R

TRANSFORMERS: THE LAST KNIGHT

For a franchise that has claimed to be “more than meets the eye,” the Transformers movies don’t seem to have much more to offer: They’re reliably big, loud and dumb, and they never seem to end. In fact, if you were to sit through all of the live-action features, including this fifth installment, you’d have devoted more than 12 hours of your life to Michael Bay’s clanging, chauvinistic robot-bro saga. Not to worry: They’ll just keep cranking ’em out. (NW) Rated PG-13

WONDER WOMAN

On the heels of the lackluster Batman v. Superman and Suicide Squad, DC’s latest actually does justice to one of its longest-running and most beloved characters, and it turns out to be one of the better superhero origin films. Gal Gadot announces herself as a major new star, playing the Amazon princess and Lasso of Truth-brandishing warrior who saves the life of an American spy (Chris Pine) and finds herself on the front lines of the first World War. (MS) Rated PG-13 n


FILM | REVIEW

NTERN THEAT GIC LA ER MA FRI, JULY 7TH- THU, JULY 13TH TICKETS: $9 NEITHER WOLF NOR DOG (110 MIN) FRI/SAT: 2:45, 7:00 SUN: 12:45, 5:00 WED/THU: 2:30, 6:30

www.SpokaneMovies.com

PARIS CAN WAIT (90 MIN) FRI/SAT: 5:00 SUN: 3:00 WED/THU: 4:30

CHURCHILL (100 MIN)

LAST WEEK

FRI/SAT: 6:30 SUN: 4:30 WED/THU: 6:00

A QUIET PASSION (120 MIN)

LAST WEEK

FRI/SAT: 4:15 SUN: 2:15 WED/THU: 3:45 (509) 209-2383 • 25 W Main Ave MagicLanternOnMain.com • /MagicLanternOnMain

In Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled, the Southern belles are hardly prim and proper.

Southern Discomfort

AirwAy HeigHts

The Beguiled revels in Gothic romanticism at the expense of substance

10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444 SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING

PG-13 Daily (10:00) (3:30) 9:00 In 2D Daily (12:45) (1:15) (4:00) 6:20 7:00 9:45 Fri-Sun (10:30)

BY SETH SOMMERFELD

F

ew modern directors can match Sofia Copnovel steaminess. Farrell’s McBurney radiates pola’s sense of style. Unlike many of her sly, flirtatious zeal, charming each visitor to the stylist peers, her direction creates ever-preslocked music room-turned-infirmary and pseudoent moods that hang over each shot, without the holding cell. He softens Miss Farnsworth’s tough flashy bravado or quirky flair that can sometimes exterior, sweet-talks Miss Dabney during her make others’ films fall dangerously close to the frequent visits, and never misses a chance to realm of egotistical self-parody. exchange side-eyed glances and grins with Alicia The Beguiled continues this path for Coppola, (Elle Fanning). who won the Best Director award at Cannes for Coppola does an excellent job portraying the this film. Her adaptation of Thomas Cullinan’s reserved but knowing romantic passes in ways 1966 book, set in 1864 Virginia in that seem genuine — through the throes of the Civil War, smolcasual looks, changes in attire, THE BEGUILED ders with a dark Southern languor Rated R or the way that every female and the visible humidity of a place Directed by Sofia Coppola in the house gussies up for Mr. where the roads are sheltered from Starring Colin Farrell, Nicole Kidman, McBurney’s first dinner outside the sun by dense canopies of oaks. Kirsten Dunst, Elle Fanning of his room. Slowly and deliberYet no matter how beautifully ately (perhaps a bit too much, as the proceedings are presented, a pulpy romance the pace sometimes crawls), things heat up to a novel is still a pulpy romance novel. Southern Gothic boiling point. The film centers on the all-girls boarding When that boiling point is reached, though, school run by Martha Farnsworth (Nicole KidThe Beguiled suddenly turns into a totally different man), with aid from Edwina Dabney (Kirsten film. The stakes are raised to the point of becomDunst). It’s their own little slice of wooded ing a period-piece thriller. The shift is abrupt and seclusion. Confederate troops occasionally pass relatively effective, but it comes so late in the film by the property, but for the most part, the ladies that it feels a bit too dramatic. (It should also be are separated from men and the war in general. noted that the trailer for this movie is hot garAnyone looking for a commentary on the era bage that manages somehow to be both tonally should look elsewhere: The Beguiled doesn’t come misleading and too much of a spoiler.) anywhere near any discussion of politics or All the leads turn in strong performances, even a passing allusion to slavery. The lily-white but even Coppola’s lovely veneer can’t disguise school is isolated in every sense of the word. the story’s genuine cheesiness. Her interpretaThings get upended when one of the five tion of Cullinan’s novel, previously made into a students, Amy (Oona Laurence), comes upon an 1971 film starring Clint Eastwood, smartly plays injured Union soldier named John McBurney some of the prim sexual repression for a few (Colin Farrell) while she’s out picking mushlaughs, but it’s still a plot you’d expect to find in rooms. She decides to help him back to the a paperback book with a shirtless hunk on the school, where Miss Farnsworth, in the name of cover. It’s also not really a feminist film, as the Christian charity, treats his wounded leg. As he ladies basically let their little all-female colony recovers, Miss Farnsworth must determine what come unraveled just because of one handsome to do with this enemy in their midst as all the and mildly cunning man. ladies grow increasingly fond of their visitor. The sheer talent assembled carries The From there, things morph into an era-approBeguiled, but it also makes the whole package feel priate, buttoned-up version of schmaltzy romance like a miss. n

DESPICABLE ME 3

PG Daily (10:20) (4:40) 8:50 In 2D Daily (12:25) (1:00) (2:30) (3:10) (5:15) 6:45 7:15 9:20 Fri -Sun (10:30)

THE HOUSE

R Daily(11:30) (1:30) (3:30) (5:30) 7:30 9:40

BABY DRIVER

R Daily (11:40) (2:10) (4:40) 7:10 9:35

RESTAURANT OPEN DAILY AT 8AM FOR BREAKFAST LUNCH AND DINNER!

TRANSFORMERS: THE LAST KNIGHT PG-13 Daily (12:15) (3:20) 6:25 9:30

CARS 3

G Daily (11:20) (1:40) (4:00) 6:20 8:40

WONDER WOMAN

LIVE SUMMER MUSIC LINE-UP July 14 & 15

Stagecoach West July 16

Riverboat Dave Band July 21 & 22

Charlie Butts & the Filter Tips July 23

Kicho

July 28 & 29

The Cronkites! July 30

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Aug. 4 & 5

The Cronkites! Aug. 6

Jeff Rowe Aug. 11 & 12

Dan Conrad Band (208)

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Shana Cleveland, second from right, channels the vastness of Los Angeles on La Luz’s upcoming third record.

CALIFORNIA DREAMING Surfy Seattle quartet La Luz moved to L.A., and the change of scenery rubbed off on their latest batch of songs BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

ANDREW IMANAKA PHOTO

A

lot has happened since La Luz released their most recent full-length album, 2015’s Weirdo Shrine. They pulled up their roots in Seattle and set them down again in Los Angeles, and finished recording their third album at the end of last year. That record’s release date, title and track listing have yet to be announced, but it should be out sometime this year, and it explores what La Luz songwriter and guitarist Shana Cleveland describes as themes of “love and lust and extreme darkness.” The band hits the Bartlett on Friday night, their first time in Spokane since the venue’s 2014 music festival, and Cleveland spoke to the Inlander in the week leading up to the show. (Responses have been condensed for space.) INLANDER: What necessitated the move from Seattle to L.A.? CLEVELAND: We all met in Seattle, and we had all been there for a really long time. I think [keyboardist Alice Sandahl] and I had ...continued on next page

JULY 6, 2017 INLANDER 39


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MUSIC | SURF POP been there for 10 years; [drummer Marian Li Pino] more or less grew up there. So I think we were all just ready for a change of pace, and California seemed like the natural move to me. And I was kind of tired of the weather of the Northwest.

saying all the time, but the guitar tones and the unexpected take on American rock and roll is something that’s always appealed to me. There’s this one band called Yanti Bersaudara, an Indonesian girl group from the ’60s, that has the most beautiful harmonies and killer guitar tone.

How would you say the respective music scenes of the two cities compare? It’s just bigger here; that’s the main thing. And that really appeals to me. I was starting to feel a bit claustrophobic [in Seattle]. L.A. is so massive, it can be whatever you want it to be, musically and in every other way. That kind of openness, those endless possibilities; you never know what you’re going to get when you go a show here.

What specifically influenced this next batch of songs? I feel like I say this for every album, but it was a bunch of Mississippi Records compilations. They make the best tapes. For anybody that doesn’t know, they’re a Portland-based record store and label, and I think they’re the best thing going on in music. They MORE EVENTS have a knack Visit Inlander.com for for picking the complete listings of most inspiring local events. tracks that I’ve never heard before. I always go back to those. It’s really about the sound of vocals from that era, from the early ’60s, the doo-wop bands and garage rock bands. Everyone was so great at vocal harmonies then.

What has the band been up to since the last album? We’re very off-cycle right now. We’re just trying to stay sane, I guess. You start to feel crazy if you don’t do your job for too long. And we haven’t played Spokane in what feels like forever. After we did the bulk of the touring for Weirdo Shrine, we started working on new songs. In November we recorded it, and we finished all the mastering in December. It’s just taking forever to come out. You’ve established a distinct style on your last few records, so what will a third La Luz album sound like? The main parts of our sound haven’t changed. It’s still sick with harmonies, and everybody’s taking solos now and then. Overall, it feels a little more lush. On the last album, we were trying to capture what we sounded like live. We wanted to make an album that had the energy of a live performance. With this one, we concentrated on overdubs and fleshing it out, exploring the possibilities of what a record can be. Your surf rock and ’60s pop influences come through loud and clear on those earlier recordings, but are there artists you admire that people might be surprised to know about? I don’t want to put words in anyone’s mouth, but I know Marian and Alice are into Dusty Springfield. I’ve been mostly listening to a lot of rock and roll from Asia and Latin America. I don’t know if that’s because it feels more mysterious because I can’t understand what they’re

Are there any themes connecting the songs on the upcoming album? It feels like an L.A. record to me, in sort of a weird way. It’s very much a new-to-L.A. record. It’s just discovering a place that feels full of mystery and potential, and a bulk of the songs are based on dreams I had last year. Your music, as you’ve said, has some dark undertones, but I’ve heard your live shows are super upbeat and high-energy. Is that accurate? Yeah, I think it is. We all have our weird style on stage. We have a ritual where we go completely insane for a full minute before we go onstage, and it brings you to a place where you’re not self-conscious anymore, and you’re connected with each other. You can give as pure and weird a performance as possible. If you’re not up there acting cool, it’s easier for people to relate to what you’re saying. That’s kind of what we’re going for. n La Luz with Runaway Octopus • Fri, July 7 at 8 pm • $12/$15 day of • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174


MUSIC | ROCK

Counting Crows (left) and Matchbox Twenty want you to party like it’s 1995 during their co-headlining show at the Arena.

Alt-Rock Showdown

Two ’90s radio favorites hit the Arena; we explore their respective merits

W

ho’s better: Counting Crows or Matchbox Twenty? A ridiculous subject for debate, to be sure, but it’s one that came up in the Inlander offices upon the announcement that both bands would be co-headlining a tour heading to the Arena. Dan Nailen and I decided we’d each go to bat for one of the two ’90s stalwarts, both of whom burned especially bright two decades ago, defending the merits of a couple of bands that aren’t everyone’s definition of cool. — NATHAN WEINBENDER

TEAM COUNTING CROWS

There was a moment in the mid-’90s when Counting Crows eclipsed Nirvana as the hottest band on the planet. Granted, it was right around when Kurt Cobain eclipsed himself, so we’ll never know how things might have been different. What we do know is that after the flush of Seattle bands got hugely popular in Nirvana’s wake, America’s next favorite thing was this band of San Francisco coffeehouse poets and roots-loving folk rockers. The ’90s were weird like that. Adam Duritz, Counting Crows’ primary songwriter, has a genuine knack for crafting sing-along pop hits that always seem a little deeper — a little more poetic — than the bands that arrived around the same time as the

Crows’ debut, 1993’s August and Everything After. The first time I saw them, opening for Cracker at a bar, it was just as that album arrived in September. By December, MTV had the single “Mr. Jones” in heavy rotation. The album went platinum (1 million albums sold) by January ’94, double platinum a month later, triple platinum by midsummer and five times platinum by December of that year. By the end they were arena headliners and opening stadiums for the Rolling Stones. The band hasn’t been as commercially successful in the intervening years, but they’ve released six more studio albums, and still play to adoring crowds of Gen Xers. I’ve seen them several times, and they put on a winning show, full of excellent musicianship and a whole lotta hits that were inescapable for about five years of my life. (DAN NAILEN)

TEAM MATCHBOX TWENTY

Up to a certain point in your life, your musical taste is defined almost exclusively by what your parents, grandparents or older siblings listen to — in my case, a lot of late-’50s doo-wop and mid-’80s hard rock. But Matchbox Twenty was one of the first bands I liked on my own terms, and my casual fandom represented that intangible moment where you began to cultivate your own personal taste.

In retrospect, that’s sort of embarrassing. I wasn’t a die-hard, by any means: I didn’t own any of their records beyond their 1996 debut Yourself or Someone Like You (the one with the sad, shirtless guy in what looks like an aviator’s cap on the cover). I didn’t download their newest singles on Napster. I never saw them live. By the time their next batch of songs dropped, I’d moved onto more sonically adventurous stuff. But relistening to that first album today, I was transported back to that specific, not-too-long-ago era of popular music when alt-rock was getting less and less “alt-” and someone like Rob Thomas could become a genuine heartthrob (before he warbled his way onto that inescapably awful Santana track “Smooth,” that is). The six singles on Yourself, four of which charted, still hold up as reliably catchy pop tunes; don’t pretend like you can’t belt out the words to “3 AM” from memory. Look, I’m not trying to argue that Matchbox Twenty is an important band. Their music doesn’t really take any chances, stylistically or otherwise, and Thomas’ vowelstraining vocal stylings have been rightfully goofed on. But it’s not necessarily a bad thing for artists to stay in the lane where they’re most comfortable, especially when it gets them headlining arena tours. I recommend that you dive back into the Top 40-friendly pleasures of Yourself or Someone Like You: Used copies are available for just a penny on Amazon. (NW) n Matchbox Twenty and Counting Crows with Rivers and Rust • Wed, July 12 at 6:45 pm • $35-$85 • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon • spokanearena.com • 279-7000

Photo: Peter Serko

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JULY 6, 2017 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ALT-COUNTRY COWBOY JUNKIES

S

ince the mid-’80s and over the course of more than 15 studio albums, Canadian rock traditionalists Cowboy Junkies have established themselves as a band of nifty contradictions: They’re rustic but polished, soft-spoken but commanding, crafting intimate songs that express, to quote curmudgeonly critic Robert Christgau, a “vague specificity.” That observation was intended as a barb, and it’s not entirely inaccurate, but it’s also not a bad thing. The quartet, fronted by expressive singer Margo Timmins, had hits in their native country with memorable singles like “A Common Disaster,” “Angel Mine” and “Anniversary Song,” but they’ve mostly remained a cult property in America, due partly to their inclusion on the soundtracks of Pump Up the Volume and Natural Born Killers. Perhaps it’s time for you to discover them if you haven’t already. — NATHAN WEINBENDER An Evening with Cowboy Junkies • Sat, July 8 at 8 pm • $38 • Panida Theater • 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • panida.org • 208-263-9191

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 07/6

12 TRIBES CASINO, David Hernandez ARBOR CREST CELLARS, Bill Bozly BEEROCRACY, Open Mic BOOTS BAKERY, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen J COEUR D’ALENE PARK, Chris & Jay COEUR D’ALENE RESORT, The Kelly Hughes Band CORBY’S BAR, Open Mic and Karaoke CRAFTED TAP HOUSE, Echo Elysium CRAVE, DJ Freaky Fred CRUISERS, Open Mic Jam Slam THE CULINARY STONE, Wyatt Wood FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Kyle Swaffard THE JACKSON ST., Shaiden Hutchman J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin J THE LOCAL DELI, Devon Wade MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Jake Robin J MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE, Open Mic Hosted by Scott Reid NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), PJ Destiny J J NORTHERN QUEST, Sublime with Rome, the Offspring THE OBSERVATORY, Vinyl Meltdown J THE PIN!, Shallow Side, VYCES, One Steel Wound, Transcend Realm POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Son of Brad REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Scotia Road THE RESERVE, Safar RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos J THE WELL, Andy Rumsey ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 07/7

1210 TAVERN, 3D Band J BABY BAR, Gen Pop, Outercourse,

42 INLANDER JULY 6, 2017

HIP-HOP SAMURAI DEL

S

amurai Del is the stage moniker of Alex Lawrence, a producer who’s originally from Spokane but currently resides in Seattle. Lawrence founded the Seattle hip-hop collective Northern Natives, featuring such independent artists as Zach Taylor and MistaDC, who will be performing with him at Terrain on Saturday night. (This will apparently be Lawrence’s first full set in his hometown.) Scanning through Lawrence’s SoundCloud profile, you can hear the sheer breadth of his influences: The hip-hop track “Safe Travels” sprinkles airy electronics atop thick, bottom-heavy beats; “Cold Hearted Killa” is a pulsing, energetic disco tune; “No Time” is a sultry, saxophonetinged R&B song that recalls early TLC. And true to his name, Samurai Del does give the occasional nod to traditional Japanese music. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Samurai Del with Zach Taylor, MistaDC and Julien Vela • Sat, July 8 at 9 pm • All-ages • $7/$10 day of • Terrain • 304 W. Pacific • brownpapertickets.com

Salve J J THE BARTLETT, La Luz (see page 39), Runaway Octopus BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BISTANGO, Kori Ailene BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Sterling BOLO’S, Slow Burn CHECKERBOARD BAR, Ragbone, Itt’s Cuzzen CHENEY BI-MART ARENA, Raised in a Barn Band CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Tommy G J CONKLING MARINA, Cary Fly CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke

CRAFTSMAN CELLARS, Wyatt Wood CURLEY’S, Nightshift J DOWNTOWN SPOKANE LIBRARY, Troubadour feat. Celtic Cross FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Donnie Emerson HILLS’ RESTAURANT, Front Porch Trio J HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, Garrett Bartley Band IRON HORSE BAR, JamShack JOHN’S ALLEY, Bottleneck Blues Band LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow LIBERTY LAKE WINE CELLARS, Mark Ward MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Tennis

MOOSE LOUNGE, Haze MULLIGAN’S, Ron Greene NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NORTHERN QUEST, DJ Patrick PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Doug and Marty PEND OREILLE PLAYHOUSE, Open Mic J THE PIN!, Red, White & Boom Party Q’EMILN PARK, Donnie Emerson and Nancy Sophia (noon), Dangerous Type (7:30 pm) REPUBLIC BREWING, Chet O’Keefe THE RESERVE, DJ Dan RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos

J THE ROADHOUSE, The Fabulous Miss Wendy, Itchy Kitty, Heroes for Ghosts, Casey Rogers SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT, Just Plain Darin SLATE CREEK BREWING, Anthony Hall SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES, Stagecoach West ZOLA, Chris Rieser and the Nerve

Saturday, 07/8

219 LOUNGE, Flying Mammals BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE, Jan Harrison J J THE BARTLETT, R.LUM.R


BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Stud BOLO’S, Slow Burn CHENEY BI-MART ARENA, Raised in a Barn Band CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Tommy G J CLEARWATER RIVER CASINO, Neal McCoy J COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, Arvid Ludin & Deep Roots J CONKLING MARINA & RESORT, Cary Fly COUNTRY PLACE BAR & GRILL, Sunny Ledfurd, Corey Peterson Band CURLEY’S, Nightshift J DAHMEN BARN, Bridges Home FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Keanu & Joey FLAME & CORK, Son of Brad J THE FLAME, Lil Debbie feat. Demon Assassin, BKL, C-W GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Yesterdayscake J HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, Working Spliffs HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET, Abe Kenney IRON HORSE BAR, JamShack THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke w/James LA ROSA CLUB, Open Jam

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LANTERN TAP HOUSE, The South Hill J THE LOCAL DELI, Jacob Maxwell MOOSE LOUNGE, Haze MULLIGAN’S, Echo Elysium NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NO-LI BREWHOUSE, Dylan Hathaway NORTHERN QUEST, DJ Patrick THE OBSERVATORY, Six State Bender, Lucky Chase, APCO J J PANIDA THEATER, Cowboy Junkies (see facing page) J THE PIN!, Celly Cell POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Ron Greene J RESURRECTION RECORDS, Maidenhair RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Just Plain Darin STIX, My Own Worst Enemy J J TERRAIN, Samurai Del (see facing page), Zach Taylor, MistaDC, Julien Vela THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave TRINITY AT CITY BEACH, Tennis ZOLA, Chris Rieser and the Nerve

Sunday, 07/9

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Rhythm Dawgs CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), KOSH CRAFTED TAP HOUSE, Wyatt Wood CURLEY’S, FM LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam O’DOHERTY’S IRISH GRILLE, Live Irish Music Q’EMILN PARK, Gladhammer

REPUBLIC BREWING CO., The Crow and the Canyon RIDLER PIANO BAR, Sunday Karaoke Night THE ROADHOUSE, Steve Livingston ZOLA, Whsk&Keys

Monday, 07/10

J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills J THE PIN!, The Munsens, Bruja, Tsuga, the Uninspired RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 07/11

BABY BAR, Fear Dog, Needle Spiders J THE BARTLETT, Northwest of New Orleans feat. Hot Club of Spokane, Ben Klein, Delta G, David Larsen THE EMPEROR ROOM, T.A.S.T.Y with DJs Freaky Fred, Beauflexx LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Open Mic MIK’S, DJ Brentano J THE OBSERVATORY, North by North, Summer in Siberia RED ROOM LOUNGE, Tuesday Takeover with Storme RIDLER PIANO BAR, Open Mic/Jam Night RIPPLES RIVERSIDE GRILL, Son of Brad UP NORTH DISTILLERY, Devon Wade ZOLA, Dueling Cronkites

Wednesday, 07/12 BLACK DIAMOND, Wyatt Wood CAPONE’S, John Kadlecik GENO’S, Open Mic w/Travis Goulding LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 J MCEUEN PARK, The Rub J THE NEST AT KENDALL YARDS, Flying Mammals J PARKSIDE EVENT CENTER, The Stepbrothers feat. Peter Rivera POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE, Nick Grow RED ROOM LOUNGE, Blowin’ Kegs Jam with the Soul Contributors RIDLER PIANO BAR, Live Piano RIVELLE’S RIVER GRILL, Jam Night SLATE CREEK BREWING, Diamond Joe SOUTH PERRY PIZZA, Son of Brad J J SPOKANE ARENA, Matchbox Twenty and Counting Crows, with Rivers and Rust (see page 41) THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave ZOLA, Donnie Emerson Band

Coming Up ...

J CHATEAU RIVE, Chatham County Line, July 13 J MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Lyle Lovett, July 14 BABY BAR, Puzzlehead, Outercourse, Salve, July 15 J THE BIG DIPPER, Nic Armstrong & the Thieves, Pine League, July 15 J THE BARTLETT, Stef Chura, Soccer Mommy, July 16 J KNITTING FACTORY, Ben Harper and the Innocent Criminals, July 19

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MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 DIAMS DEN • 412 W. Sprague • 934-3640 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE EMPEROR ROOM • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOTEL RL BY RED LION AT THE PARK • 303 W. North River Dr. • 326-8000 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208667-7314 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N. Market St. • 466-9918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 242-8907 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RESERVE • 120 N. Wall • 598-8783 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

JULY 6, 2017 INLANDER 43


The Cheney Rodeo celebrates 50 years this weekend.

MATT WEIGAND PHOTO

COMMUNITY WESTERN TRADITION

A staple of summer in the town of Cheney continues for the 50th year when gates for the first night of the annual Cheney Rodeo open this Friday. Each evening features a mix of classic rodeo events, including barrel racing, steer wrestling and bull and bronco riding. Cheney Events Association’s Heidi Monter says the public can also watch competitions on Friday starting at 1 pm for just $5, because there were too many competitors to fit in the two main events. A dance follows the rodeo on both Friday and Saturday night, featuring local country and classic rock quintet Raised in a Barn Band. Downtown Cheney also hosts the Cheney Rodeo parade at 11:30 am Saturday. For those looking to get a little closer to the action, anyone over 18 can sign up to saddle up and ride a bull. Monter says the six bulls available are the same as those the professionals ride. You only get one shot, so make it count. Applications and waivers are online. — FORREST HOLT 50th Annual Cheney Rodeo • Fri and Sat, July 7 and 8 at 7:20 pm, Sun, July 9 at 2 pm • $14-$20 adults; $7/kids 4-12, age 3 and under free • Cheney Bi-Mart Arena • 14310 S. State Route 904 • cheneyrodeo.com

FESTIVAL GET MOVIN’

The tagline for the third annual community movement festival from Coeur d’Alene’s education and maker’s space Gizmo is “be outrageous at GizMotion.” So don’t be afraid to go all out. If you didn’t have time to build your own kinetic (i.e. human-powered) vehicle for this year’s festival, there’s still time to deck out your bike in whatever fun and flashy way you can think up before the festival, which includes the kinetic vehicle parade at 2 pm. Make sure to register your vehicle or bike online for a small fee before showing up for the parade. Awards wil be handed out at 4 pm to recognize the craziest contraptions and most creatively decorated vehicles. The midday community gathering in Coeur d’Alene City Park, along the waterfront, also includes live music, food vendors, a beer garden and plenty of activities to keep young tinkerers’ minds and hands busy. — CHEY SCOTT GizMotion • Sat, July 8 from 11:30 am-4 pm • Free to watch; $5$25/parade entry • All-ages • Coeur d’Alene City Park, downtown CdA • gizmo-cda.org • 208-651-6200

44 INLANDER JULY 6, 2017

MUSIC TORCH & TWANG

Chatham County Line started nearly 20 years ago as a bluegrass project spearheaded by singer/songer Dave Wilson, who’d been inspired by some of the hot-shot players who would cycle through the Raleigh, North Carolina, musician crash pad he called home. A few gigs with fiddle/mandolin man John Teer, banjo player Chandler Holt and multi-instrumentalist Greg Readling and the new band was quickly impressing listeners, landing themselves a record deal and launching a career that’s taken them across the country and back again many times. They sound great gathered around one microphone, playing and singing songs like those that landed their 2016 album, Autumn, at No. 1 on the Billboard bluegrass charts. — DAN NAILEN Chatham County Line • Thu, July 13 at 7:30 pm • All-ages • $20 general admission/$25 reserved seating • Chateau Rive at the Flour Mill • 621 W. Mallon • performanceplease.com


Art on the Street with Karen Mobley • Sat, July 8 from 1-3 pm • Free • Spokane Art School • 811 W. Garland • spokaneartschool.net

July 10 -14

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Make art with a celebrated local artist during Spokane Art School’s returning community series that invites artists of all ages and skills to contribute their creativity to one of several easels placed along sidewalks of the Garland District. The summer series kicked off last month, but includes weekly events through all of July, starting with this Saturday’s event hosted by well-known local artist and arts leader Karen Mobley. As the city of Spokane’s former art director, Mobley continues to be active in the arts community, and her recognizable charcoal and watercolor abstracts are frequently displayed around the city. Upcoming Art on the Street events this summer include sessions with Tom Quinn, Tiffany Patterson, Tom O’Day, Derrick Freeland and Darcy Lee Saxton. — CHEY SCOTT

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OUTDOORS EXPLORE IT ALL

As the summer season nears its peak, the third annual Spokatopia Outdoor Adventure Festival is here to give locals a chance to sample all sorts of outdoor activities possible in the Inland Northwest. Participants can try out paddleboarding, rock climbing, kayaking, slacklining, disc golf, geocaching, demo the latest mountain and road bikes, and much more. There’s also a pine-tree-shaded beer garden where you can watch mountain bikers fly through the air at the Spokatopia Mountain Bike Jump Jam. Additionally, this year’s daylong fest features a free outdoor yoga session (10 am), live music and more than 40 outdoor recreation-oriented booths with free samples and demos. General admission is free, although there’s a modest cost to sign up for some of the activities. — BRAD BROWN

1 APR = Annual Percentage Rate. Rates and terms are subject to approval and determined by the applicant's credit. Offer valid on Visa Diamond Cash Back and Visa Platinum credit card accounts. For qualifying new accounts, introductory rate is valid for all transactions for 6 months from the date the account is opened. For existing accounts, balance transfer rate is valid for 6 months from the date of the first qualifying balance transfer on the account. After introductory or balance transfer periods have concluded, APR is a variable rate that is based on the Prime Rate as published in the Wall Street Journal. The range is currently 9.00%-18.00% for Visa Platinum and 13.00-18.00% for Diamond Cash Back. Offer available at Spokane Valley, North Spokane and Moses Lake Service Centers only. For additional information about rates and fees associated with the use of the Visa Platinum and Visa Diamond Cash Back credit cards, please visit gesa.com. 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Spokatopia Outdoor Adventure Festival • Sat, July 8 from 10 am-6 pm • Free admission; demos and activities from $10-$20 • Camp Sekani Park • 6759 E. Upriver Dr. • spokatopia.com

JULY 6, 2017 INLANDER 45


W I SAW YOU

S S

CHEERS JEERS

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I SAW YOU LATE NIGHT AT THE ER I saw you at the Sacred Heart Emergency Room late at night on the 26th, or perhaps it was the 27th. I was there on business, so to speak, and was assisting another individual with seeking care. You were cuddling a hospital pillow and a blanket when you alerted me to available seats. I was compelled to ask what brought you to the ER and you said that you were experiencing pain on the left side of your chest, and that you were in the waiting room for several hours. I was relieved for you when they finally called your name. You turned towards me as you walked away to greet an attending nurse and said “good luck.” — I hope you were given a clean bill of health. VISCERAL CYCLE The Spokane County Republican Party: “Our political views, which were derived largely from our religious views (because this separation of church and state is just a ridiculous suggestion) prevent us from condoning the termination of ANY unintended pregnancy however, these same beliefs prevent us from endorsing a middle school sex education program which would prevent unintended pregnancies. So we’re stuck between a rock and a hard place. Only the rock is crushing irony and the hard place is our shameful, unprecedented inflexibility.” OK, PERSISTENT RED SWEATSHIRT GUY... I’ve been your waitress a few times recently, and you’ve left behind little notes for me on your receipts. The last one was

Saturday night, 6/24. It was busy, and I neglected to go back at the end of the night and take a peek at the number you provided, or your name. (I feel like it was Tyler?) Anywho, I would just count on seeing you again on your next dining voyage — but I’m no longer working there. So this is my first creepy article submission, a little out of my element, but there was just something about you. I am realizing as I’m typing this that I haven’t made another email address to put on here (see how bad I am at this creepin’ thing?)... sooo I guess if you end up seeing this, feel free to proceed with the Inlander’s counter-creepin’ option provided and we can get in cahoots or something. SUSHI MARU SATURDAY 7/1 You: the beautiful brunette with shorter hair out for sushi with a friend. Me: the guy trying to look cool in his green motorcycle gear eating alone. OK so I’m a little slow to pick up on interest, but when I saw you both afterwards and you were like, “there he is” I kicked myself for not asking you for a date. If you want to go for sushi again, and maybe have a drink, I promise to be a little more forward. Hoping to see you again downtown. shane0312@hotmail.com

CHEERS GREAT SUMMARY! The (I’m guessing) gentleman that responded to the “Spokane Speeder” of the previous week diatribe covered the subject splendidly! My only concern is that the people that so desperately need to read his fine summary are probably either illiterate or wouldn’t understand he was talking about them. However to those of us that drive a lot of the day — Well Done! SOCCER FOR KIDS Cheers to Spokane Junior Soccer (www.SpokaneSoccer.org) for offering HALF price to anyone with financial need... no restrictions. They allow lower income families to participate and fulfill their stated goal of “more soccer, less cost”. THANK YOU CHAS!!! A true cheers to Dr. Bass and the helpful and supportive staff at the Denny Murphy clinic. I went in to get all four wisdom teeth pulled and even though I was awake for the whole thing he was very calming and professional in his movements and confidence which put

me at ease. The staff that put in their time at said clinic are also really nice and really made me relax. Once again thank you so much! My life is much better because of people like you and Chas! Cheers!!! RE#3 SPEEDERS/ PLEASE DON’T MOVE AWAY I’ll be forthcoming, I’ve not read the original jeers but I’ve deduced that it

JEERS PRIORITIES We all have priorities. Someone has been marking potholes with large spray painted phallic symbols. There is no high art here. A friend had to point out what they were because … well, they weren’t particularly well done. The city,

tile is going on vacation, or the fact you ordered too close to your installation date with no wiggle room. The next time you call anyone person in a sales position or service industry a mother-f**king moron to their face in front of other customers, or begin issuing demands, just remember you are not that entitled and you are lower than the tile on top of the foundation on

“You are lower than the tile on top of the foundation on top of the dirt on which you stand.

was a complaint about Spokane’s drivers. The reply is what I’m here to critique. This trend of suggesting that people who complain about anything or want to improve anything should “just move” is absolutely ridiculous. And I sincerely hope that next time you drop something the person standing nearest to you pipes up and says, “Hey if you don’t like gravity why don’t you get in a space ship and move to the moon. Otherwise, stop complaining about how hard it is to get red wine out of your carpet.” Your suggestion is that of someone who struggles with empathy and understanding. You confirmed this with your petty remarks about the grammatical errors in the original jeers. At this point you were clearly attempting to discredit this person by attacking his/her intellect. Reprehensible. Furthermore, I too have a problem with Spokane drivers. And I don’t think that it’s just plain bad luck that Spokane has such a high concentration of poor drivers. I would suggest that the curriculum taught in drivers’ courses, and the materials used for testing, be severely scrutinized. DINNER WITH ROSIE & CAROL W Dinner with these lovely ladies at Cathedral Plaza, Sat. night was lively, & fun! Carol 93 & Rosie a 30+ year tenant love living here just as Grama Fran does! lively talk and lots of fun!

here comes the priorities part, sent out a crew(s) to paint out the offending illustrations. The potholes stayed. Spokane, what if you repaired the potholes and eliminated the fuel that inspires the mad graffiti artist? INB USHERS I went to see Phantom of the Opera for my 50th birthday. I was having a great time when after intermission a usher came to me and told me i had to be quiter. I was not loud but excited to see the show. I was upset and embarrassed so i almost left. The people around me supported me and said they never heard me. Maybe the stafff should have got onto the people that were on their phones the whole time the show was goimg. I was upset because the staff could have talked to me in private not in front of people. The inb should post their policy on the theater i heard more people louder than me but no one talked to them. Also there was people next to me talking all the time and people were coming in late. EN-TILED Jeers to the lady at the Spokane Valley Great Floors on 6/30/17. I was behind a display when you viciously and mercilessly belittled and degraded the young sales representative because you so carelessly ordered tile to be enstalled by the holiday weekend. It’s not his fault the installer you contracted with to install your

top of the dirt on which you stand.

RE RE SPOKANE SPEEDERS Here is a message for the response to Spokane Speeders in language you may be able to understand. Less of people like you in the area would be an improvement. Perhaps another area of the country could use your pea brain because “your” not very smart. Duh! HOME DEPOT CUSTOMERS Jeers to the customer at North Spokane Home Depot who walked in the door, cut the line I was waiting in, then yelled at the guy and girl processing returns that he needs service. We all need service and that’s why we’re in line! n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS S T U F S T A C H E T W O

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

46 INLANDER JULY 6, 2017

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NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

ART FOR THE ANIMALS The annual silent and live auction event to benefit the sanctuary includes live music, a catered vegan dinner, dessert and non-alcoholic beverages, with wine/beer for purchase. July 8, 6-9:30 pm. $15-$30. River’s Wish Animal Sanctuary, 11511 W. Garfield Rd. riverswishanimalsanctuary.org BARBECUE & BOCCE BALL Liberty Park Kids in the Perry District hosts its second annual summer event with proceeds supporting its after school programs for low income students living in the Perry District. Event includes food, drink, silent auction and competitive bocce ball tournament. July 8, 12-5 pm. $15/person; $50/team of five. Big Barn Brewing Co., 16004 N. Applewood Ln. (509-534-0142) RIDE THE BASES The annual motorcycle ride benefiting the Rypien Foundation starts at the Lone Wolf Harley-Davidson dealership and finishes at Avista Stadium for a barbecue dinner and bikes on the field for the National Anthem. July 9, 9 am. $35. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana. spokaneindiansridethebases.com

COMEDY

GRANT LYON Starting his career in the San Francisco comedy scene, San Francisco Weekly described Grant as “a hilariously sharp observer, not one of those tired white-guy bellyachers.” July 6-8 at 8 pm, July 8 at 10:30 pm. $10-$22. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998) GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open mic comedy night hosted by Casey Strain; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (847-1234) EXPEDITION A game-based show with a few BDT twists and turns thrown in for laughs. Fridays at 8 pm, July 7-Aug. 11. For all ages. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com FRED ARMISEN A live show by the Emmy Award-nominated writer, musician, comedian and actor known for his roles on Saturday Night Live and Portlandia. He’s joined by Jacqueline Novak, a NY-based standup comedian and writer. July 7, 8 pm. $27-$32. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404) NERVE DAMAGE An all-improvised show in which BDT players test their nerves for audience laughs. July 7, 10 pm. For mature audiences. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com STAND-UP COMEDY Live comedy fea-

turing established and up-and-coming local comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. No cover. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. reddragondelivery.com SAFARI The fast-paced, short-form improv show relies on audience suggestions for each scene. For mature audiences. Saturdays at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com DEREK SHEEN The comedian has toured with Patton Oswalt, Brian Posehn, Janeane Garofolo and Rory Scovel. July 9, 8 pm. $10-$16. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com PAT HOUSE The stand-up comedian from Philadelphia has travelled opening for Sebastian Maniscalco and Tom Segura. July 13, 8 pm. $10-$16. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998)

COMMUNITY

THE SOLAR ECLIPSE FOR KIDS On the morning of August 21 there will be a solar eclipse in Spokane, with 90 percent of the sun covered by the moon. Kids grades K-5 can learn about eclipses, how to view them safely, and can make their own solar eclipse viewers. July 7, 3 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org (509-444-5390) UNCONDITIONAL HAPPINESS: THE POWER OF MEDITATION A talk by Orgyen Chowang Rinpoche, author of “Our Pristine Mind, A Practical Guide to Unconditional Happiness.” July 7, 7-8 pm. By donation. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. uuspokane.org (993-0128) GIZMOTION Gizmo Coeur d’Alene’s third annual kinetic vehicle festival features a parade, awards ceremony, live music, food and beer vendors plus an array of kids activities at 30 vendor and activity booths. July 8, 11:30 am-4:30 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene City Park, 415 W. Mullan Rd. gizmo-cda.org FAMILY FUN FEST & HEALTH FAIR A festival featuring activities and games for family, including obstacle courses, bounce houses, a maze and more. Spokane Valley Seventh Day Adventist Church, 1601 S. Sullivan. July 9, 3-7 pm. Free. dustylborders4.wixsite.com/fair SHARING THE DHARMA DAY Compassionate living is the theme for a series of Sharing the Dharma Day talks at Sravasti Abbey, the Tibetan Buddhist monastery near Newport. July 9, 9:45 am-3 pm. Donations accepted. Sravasti Abbey, 692 Country Lane Rd. sravastiabbey.org

I AM ENOUGH Equip your middle schooler to be ready to “launch” into the school year armed with character building, life affirming sexual integrity. July 12 and Aug. 31, from 7-8 pm. Free (suggested $5 donation). Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org SCRAPS INFO SESSION Join presenters from Spokane County Regional Animal Protection Service to learn about what SCRAPS does, how to become a volunteer, how to approach a stray, and what to do if your pet is lost. Young children should be accompanied by a caretaker. Sessions at 2 and 3:30 pm. July 12, 2 pm. Free. Indian Trail Library, 4909 W. Barnes Rd. (444-5331) HERITAGE GARDENS TOURS A guided tour of the gardens, restored in 2007 to look as they did when in use in 1915. Learn about the discovery, the restoration and the two influential families of early Spokane who enjoyed them. Upcoming tours (see site for times): July 13, 16, 20, 23, 27 and 30; Aug. 31. Free. Moore-Turner Heritage Gardens, 507 W. Seventh. heritagegardens.org PJALS POSTCARD HAPPY HOUR An opportunity for the public to communicate a short message to Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers and Senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell. Post cards will then be delivered to these elected officials. Event on the second Thursday of the month, from 4:30-6:30 pm. Saranac Commons, 19 W. Main. (838-7870)

FESTIVAL

EARLY FORD V-8 SWAP MEET The annual swap meet features antique and street rod cars, parts, literature, tractors, farm and transportation collectibles, old toys, antiques and more. July 7-9. $5/ on Fri-Sat. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. earlyfordv8ie.org (994-4924) SANDPOINT SUMMERFEST A family weekend retreat offering music, arts and culture, with a focus on sustainability and locally-made goods. July 7-9. Tickets offered by day ($15+) or for the full weekend ($150+). Eureka Institute, 513 Oak St. eureka-institute.org (208-265-4000) ANTIQUE & CLASSIC BOAT SHOW Most entries in the show represent all eras of wood boat construction along with classic fiberglass entries. July 8, 10 am-4:30 pm and July 9, 10 am-3 pm. Free and open to the public. Sandpoint. inlandempireacbs.net 62ND ANNUAL PORSCHE PARADE The Porsche Club of America’s annual, week-

long event; participants enjoy driving tours and a “Gimmick Rally” to explore eastern Washington’s mountain vistas and high desert, the Concours at Riverfront Park, an autocross, a time-speeddistance rally and a technical/historical quiz to test your competitive spirit. July 9-15. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. parade2017.pca.org CHEWELAH CHATAQUA One of the oldest and longest-running festivals in Eastern Washington, the event features carnival rides, a parade, food and craft vendors, live entertainment, sports and more. July 14-16. chewelahchataqua.com

FILM

SCREEN ON THE GREEN: MOANA The UI Dept. of Student Involvement’s family summer movie series is held on Thursdays at the Theophilus Tower Lawn. July 6, 8:45 pm. Free. University of Idaho, 709 S Deakin St. uidaho.edu (208-885-6111) Z NATION: BEHIND THE CAMERA During summer 2017, the MAC becomes a working TV studio and a celebration of the dozens of local artists behind the hit Syfy series Z Nation. Visitors can watch scenes being shot for season 4, learn how a TV series is made, and about the local crew members working on the show. The exhibit also features props, costumes and other items used in the show. June 10Sept. 10; open Tue-Sun, 10 am-5 pm. $5$10/admission. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) SENSE THE WIND A documentary about blind sailors, with a Q&A led by the film’s director after the show. July 7, 7-9 pm. $5. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. sensethewind.com (208-255-7801) FANTASTIC BEASTS & WHERE TO FIND THEM A family movie night on the lawn of the park; starts at dusk. July 8. Free. Half Moon Park, Holl Blvd. & Indiana Ave. SATURDAY MARKET CARTOONS Screenings every Saturday through Sept., 9 am-noon. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) SWIM & A MOVIE Enjoy a two-hour swim, then throw down a towel and enjoy a family-friendly movie (The Secret Life of Pets) on the big screen. At Spokane County’s Northside and Southside Aquatics Centers. July 8, 6 pm. $2.50-$5. spokanecounty. org/1657/Swim-and-a-Movie SECRET LIFE OF PETS Catch this new animated favorite about what our pets do when no one’s looking. July 10-14, at 9:30 am. Free. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com

MONDAY NIGHT MOVIES: WHO FRAMED ROGER RABBIT This Robert Zemeckis film returns to the big screen, with a brief introduction by Inlander music and film editor Nathan Weinbender. July 10, 7 pm. $7-$10. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404) THE GREAT OUTDOORS A screening as part of the Garland’s 2017 summer film series. July 11, 7 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. (327-2509) MOANA The BECU outdoor movie series features pre-show live entertainment, trivia and local food vendors. Seating opens at 7 pm; movies start at dusk. July 12. $5. Riverfront Park. epiceap.com/ spokane-outdoor-movies SCREEN ON THE GREEN: BEETLEJUICE The UI Dept. of Student Involvement’s family summer movie series is held on Thursdays at the Theophilus Tower Lawn. July 13, 8:45 pm. Free. University of Idaho, 709 S Deakin St. uidaho.edu

FOOD

FOOD TRUCK FRIDAYS A weekly summer event featuring regional food trucks each week parked along the North 200 block of Wall. Fridays, 11:30 am-1:30 pm, through August. Downtown Spokane. downtown.spokane.net MIDSUMMER ROSÉ TASTING Drop in to The Lounge to sample dry pink wines from France and Washington and food to complement from Masselow’s Steakhouse. July 7, 4-7 pm. $20. Masselow’s, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com RED, WHITE & BREW PUB CRAWL A ‘Merica-themed pub crawl around downtown Spokane as you play bingo along the way. Participants get a finisher tank top. Open to individuals and teams. July 8, 5 pm. $20. Downtown Spokane. spokanepubcrawls.com SANDPOINT BEERFEST The fourth annual event features more than 32 beers on tap, plus live music, activities, food and more. July 8, 12-5 pm. Free admission. Trinity at City Beach, 58 Bridge St. bit.ly/2rRwQXw (208-255-7558) PALOUSE ICE CREAM SOCIAL The annual community event is open to visitors and locals. July 9, 12-3:30 pm. Palouse, Wash. visitpalouse.com SUMMER CELEBRATION Celebrate summer with a 4-course farm-to-table meal, cocktails, acoustic live music, and guest speakers. July 9, 4:30-7:30 pm. $55 ($25/ kids under 12). Mont Lamm Events, 7501 Enoch Rd. bit.ly/2sw3RKG ...continued on page 52

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Sin City Goes Green Nevada’s recreational cannabis market has gone live — here’s how it compares to Washington BY MIKE BOOKEY

Y

ou’d think that Nevada, a state that’s home to Las Vegas, where both drinking on the street and prostitution are legal, would be cool with a little weed. Well, that hasn’t historically been the case for the state, which had some harsh cannabis laws on the books for years. But in November, Nevada voters approved a law that allows adults 21 and older to purchase cannabis at state-approved retailers. Nevada joins Colorado, Alaska, Oregon and, of course, Washington (as well as the District of Columbia) as states that have legalized cannabis. California, Massachusetts and Maine also approved recreational pot, but have yet to open stores. Before you add dispensary tours to the itinerary for

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PUBLIC USE

As in Washington, public use of cannabis is forbidden under Nevada’s new laws, with violators being slapped with a $600 fine. So you won’t be toking up while walking down the Strip. In fact, the law prohibits marijuana consumption on any casino property.

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Nevada’s law allows an individual to possess an ounce of cannabis. This is the same as in Washington. The two states’ laws have a few differences when it comes to concentrates and edibles, however.

One of the most appealing aspects of recreational weed markets has been the taxes they generate for the state. Nevada’s taxes vary depending on county, but in Clark County, where Las Vegas is located, the total tax markup is about 32 percent when everything is figured in. Taxes in Washington are 37 percent. The Evergreen State is expected to bring in $730 million in cannabis taxes in the next two years.

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Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a fiveyear sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

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BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

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RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess PLENTY OF DEAD FISH

My girlfriend and I broke up recently, so I’m back in the dating pool. Do you think online dating is a good way to meet people? If so, which are the best dating sites? —Diving In Asking “Which dating site is best?” is like asking, “Is pro basketball a viable career?” That question can only be answered by asking other questions, such as: “Aren’t you a 47-year-old, 5’2” Ashkenazi Jewish woman with 20/80 AMY ALKON vision and bad knees?” To put this another way, context matters — which isn’t what they tell you in Datingsiteville. Save for specialty sites — like those for farmers, the disabled, and people who relish a good flogging — the advertising for these venues tends to be contextfree: “Hey, everybody in the entire galaxy, get your lasting love here!” Annoyingly, though most of us have a sense of what context is, nobody’s done a very good job of defining it — either in the dictionary or in Researchville, where I found a herd of dueling definitions, all so unhelpfully worded that they seem to be in secret code. So here’s my definition: Context is a combo platter of the particular situation at hand — like pro basketball, online dating, being a bad dancer, or being sexually attracted to woodchucks — plus the details relevant to it that affect how you understand or experience the situation. In the context of online dating, the relevant details include age, sex, the quality of the competition, and one’s desired situation, as in: Do you just want casual sex, or are you holding out for something a little more, uh, black tie. There are sex differences in when people are at their most appealing, because men and women tend to be at their highest “mate value” at different ages. This comes out of how male sexuality evolved to be visually driven (because the features men find beautiful — youth being the biggie — are associated with fertility). Women, however, evolved to go for “providers” — men with high status and earning power. So, online dating tends to be more fruitful if you’re a hot 23-year-old female espresso jockey or a 43-year-old male VP of a successful startup, but it can have some challenges for the 43-year-old female startup star or the 23-year-old dude who’s the senior vice barista. So the question is not whether dating sites work but whether the qualities you have and the situation you’re seeking add up to more than a few tumbleweeds blowing around in your inbox. Because online dating success is shaped more by personal context (and plain old luck) than by the particular site you’re on, you might experiment with two or three. If things go poorly, use online dating as a supplement to meeting women the retro way, like at cocktail parties, where you won’t be competing with the 362 more genetically blessed males within a 35-mile radius. This vastly increases your chances of dazzling the ladies with your personality — distracting them from how Mother Nature zoned out when she was handing out necks to your family.

MAN ON THE FLAKE

This guy asked me out and suggested we meet up after his dentist appointment. He said he’d call around 2 p.m. Well, at 9:30 p.m., I got a “Hey” text from him and didn’t respond. A friend said I shouldn’t write him off so fast. Am I being too harsh? —Dependability Fan Individual bits of behavior are like cockroaches. You might see just one lonely roach twerking atop the toaster oven, but its presence suggests a whole colony of the buggers…gluing sequins to their exoskeletons and practicing their moonwalk behind the baseboard. No, you can’t always judge someone by a single thing they do, but this guy’s oneword text — seven hours after he said he’d call — speaks volumes: “Holy moly, wouldya look at the time. It’s 9:30, and I could use some sex.” How a person behaves is driven by their personality traits, which social psychologist Brent Roberts describes as habitual patterns of thoughts, feelings, and behavior that are relatively consistent across time and situations. Granted, there are occasions when impulse gets the best of us, and we’ll say something like, “That wasn’t really me.” But, at least in some way, it really was, because even impulsivity is part of personality. A person can resolve to act more conscientiously, but personality has a strong genetic basis, so they’re unlikely to be as motivated to be conscientious as someone whose genes make them feel icky when they aren’t. In other words, you were probably wise in nixing this guy, who couldn’t even be bothered to fake respect for your feelings by supplementing that “Hey” with “Carjacked!” “Carried off by a raptor!” or “Still high on anesthesia in my blanket fort, having a tea party with G.I. Joe and my dog, Steve.” n ©2017, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

52 INLANDER JULY 6, 2017

EVENTS | CALENDAR CRAB BOIL Clover in Spokane hosts its third annual summer crab boil. July 11, 6:30-8:30 pm (details TBA). Clover, 913 E. Sharp. cloverspokane.com FORAGING FOR WILD EDIBLES Wild, edible plants provide an abundant, nutritious food source right outside our doors. July 11, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. East Side Library, 524 S. Stone. (444-5331) HEALTHY JAMS & JELLIES Spokane County food preservation expert Anna Kestell teaches how to make jams and jellies, and compares sweeteners available. July 11, 6 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley. spokanelibrary.org SAVING SEEDS Learn how to save seeds from heirloom varieties of vegetables and flowers to grow next year. July 11, 6:30 pm. Free. Hillyard Library, 4005 N. Cook. (444-5331) FRIED CHICKEN & LOCAL BEER The monthly event from Chef Adam Hegsted features fried chicken paired with beers from a local brewery. Second Wednesday, 6-9 pm. $35 (tax/tip included). The Wandering Table, 1242 W. Summit Pkwy. thewanderingtable.com SUMMER SALAD PARTY In this handson cooking class, make salads that can liven up any party. Includes complimentary coolers to quench your thirst. Ages 21+. July 13, 6-8 pm. $59. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene. (533-8141)

MUSIC

WALLACE BLUES FESTIVAL Bluesmen and women from around the country and continent draw huge crowds to party, dance and listen to music on the downtown streets. July 7-9. Downtown Wallace. wallaceidahochamber.com CLASSICAL GUITAR FEAT. JOHN PAUL SHIELDS Relax and listen to a blend of classical guitar repertoire, Peruvian folklore and original compositions. July 8, noon. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley (Shields also performs at the South Hill branch, 4 pm.) spokanelibrary.org CAROLE KING: TAPESTRY, LIVE AT HYDE PARK LONDON See Carole King’s critically acclaimed 2016 London concert on the big screen. Showing at Regal Northtown and Riverstone (CdA). July 11, 7 pm. $16. fathomevents.com POP SUMMER CONCERTS FEAT. THE CHRISTY LEE BAND A summer concerts on the hillside lawn of the Indian Trail church. This show is preceded by a “Show and Shine” car show ($5 entry). July 12, 7 pm. Free. Prince of Peace, 8441 N. Indian Trail Rd. (465-0779)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

LANDS COUNCIL OPEN HOUSE Meet staff and board members, and learn more about programs and work protecting and revitalizing the Inland Northwest forests, water, and wildlife. Light refreshments provided. July 6, 5-8 pm. Free. The Lands Council, 25 W. Main Ave. bit.ly/2s2JTaS (838-4912) SPOKANE INDIANS VS. HILLSBORO Home series; July 6-8 and 10 at 6:30 pm; July 9 at 3:30 pm. $5-$20. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana. spokaneindiansbaseball.com (535-2922) 50TH ANNUAL CHENEY RODEO Events include a parade through downtown Cheney (July 8 at 11:30 am), followed by two days of rodeo action. July

7-9. $7-$20. Cheney Bi-Mart Arena, 14310 S. Route 904. cheneyrodeo.com ARENACROSS Riders of all ages compete in various categories. Events on July 7-8 and Aug. 11-12. $10-$15. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. northidahofair.com THE DIRTY DASH The annual mud-run obstacle course. Kids ages 12 and under can also sign up for the “Piglet Plunge” ($20). At the ORV Park, 9412 Inland Rd., Nine Mile Falls. July 8, 9 am. $20-$44. Riverside State Park. thedirtydash.com LIBERTY LAKE LOOP RUN The yearly community fun run around the park. July 8, 8 am. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. (755-6726) SPOKANE SHADOW All three teams, the Men’s First (7 pm), Women’s First (4:30 pm) and Men’s Second (2 pm) compete. July 8. $5-$7. SFCC, 3410 W. Ft George Wright Dr. spokanesoccerclubshadow.org SPOKANE SUMMER CLASSIC A 7-v-7 adult soccer tourney, with a beer garden, food trucks, lawn games and live DJs. July 8-9. $250-$350/team. Plantes Ferry Sports Complex, 12308 E. Upriver Dr. spvjsa.org/home.php SPOKATOPIA The annual outdoor festival features activity demos, a beer garden, live music, vendors, mountain bike jump jam, trail walks and more. Free admission; most demos are $10$20. July 8, 10 am-6 pm. Camp Sekani, 67070 E. Upriver Dr. spokatopia.com WRESTLERAVE XI Inland Pro Wrestling’s championship tournament finals featuring “Dynamic” Rook Kelly vs. “Your Canadian Hero” Shane McLane. Details TBA. July 8, 6 pm. Riverside Place, 1108 W. Riverside. bit.ly/2so15Fj JACEY’S RACE A timed 5K race/walk and 1K kids fun run benefiting local families with children who are currently being treated for cancer or other life-threatening illness. Starts/ends at Sandpoint High School, 410 S. Division. July 9, 8:30 am. jaceys-race.com SIPS & SERENITY YOGA AND WINE A yoga class appropriate for all levels; includes a glass of wine. July 9, 5-7 pm. $20. Nectar Catering and Events, 120 N. Stevens St. nectartastingroom.com SUMMER SERIES 5K FUN RUN A threeweek 5K series, with a one-mile option for all ages. July 11, 18 and 25, at 6 pm. Includes post-race pizza and kid’s activities. $10/adults; free/kids. U-District PT, 730 N. Hamilton St. udistrictpt.com RAIN BARREL WORKSHOP Learn how and why to use a rain barrel and go home with a completed rain barrel. Preregistration required. July 12, at 3:30 and 5:30 pm. $20. Spokane Conservation District, 210 N. Havana St. sccd.org

THEATER

BAD BUSINESS AT THE BREWERY, OR...WHO BOTCHED BESSIE’S BREW? Bessie’s husband is away at war and the landlord is threatening to take the brewery. Through July 30, Wed-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Sixth Street Theater, 212 Sixth St. sixthstreetmelodrama.com (208-752-8871) THE PHANTOM OF THE OPERA Cameron Mackintosh’s spectacular new production of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s story. Performing Through July 9; show times vary. $32.50-$77.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. wcebroadway.com

SPOKANE VALLEY SUMMER THEATRE: ALWAYS, PATSY CLINE A staged musical based on the live of the famous musician. Through July 8; WedSat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20-$38. Central Valley High School, 821 S. Sullivan Rd. svsummertheatre.com THE BAKER STREET IRREGULARS A story based on the savvy street urchins who often helped Sherlock Holmes solve mysteries. July 7-8 and July 13-15 at 7 pm; July 8 and 15 at 2 pm. $7. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway Ave. (342-2055) JAMES & THE GIANT PEACH A staged performance based on the beloved story by Roald Dahl. July 7-9 and July 13-16. Pullman Civic Theatre, 1220 NW Nye St. (509-332-8406) THE PEOPLE’S ORDERS PJALS presents a political theatre on the federal courthouse steps. Join us in the presentation and signing of the People’s Orders on the plaza at the Thomas J. Foley Federal Courthouse. July 7, 4-5 pm. Free. Thomas S. Foley U.S. Courthouse, 920 W. Riverside Ave. pjals.org

ARTS

DISLOCATED MEMORIES An installation by Julie Gautier-Downes; the entire gallery is occupied by a room recreated from the artist’s childhood. July 5-Sept. 29; Mon-Fri 8 am-5 pm. Free. Chase Gallery, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanearts.org FIRST FRIDAY Art galleries and businesses across downtown Spokane and beyond host monthly receptions to showcase new art. July 7, 5-8 pm. Free Details at firstfridayspokane.org. Free. SIGNING: GREAT NORTHERN RAILWAY IN MONTANA’S MARIAS PASS Dale Jones hosts a book signing for his new 128-page book about the Great Northern Railway’s historic Marias Pass in the Montana Rocky Mountains. July 7, 1:30-3:30 pm. $25. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com 3 MINUTE MIC Auntie’s first Friday poetry open mic with “Remember the Word” featured reader Jeff Dodd. Poets can share up to 3 minutes’ worth of material. Free. July 7, 8-9:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) ART ON THE STREET A community art-making event featuring several easels in front of the Art School with local artist Karen Mobley facilitating an impromptu art session. July 8, 1-3 pm. Free. Spokane Art School, 809 W. Garland Ave. spokaneartschool.net SPOKANE FICTION WRITERS GROUP The local writing group’s six contributors release their new paranormal anthology, “It Gets Darker As You Go.” July 8, 1:30-3:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) READING: MATTHEW SULLIVAN & MARY CLEARMAN BLEW The Goodreads Debut Author of the Month Sullivan speaks on his book “Midnight at the Bright Ideas Bookstore.” Clearman Blew also reads from her 2008 book “Jackalope Dreams.” July 8, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) ARABESQUE Northwest Bellydance Co. presents an evening of classic belly dance, tribal fusion, Bollywood, with live accompaniment by pan-Arabic band Safar. July 8, 7-9 pm. $15. Trent Elementary School, 3303 N. Pines. northwestbellydance.com/arabesque n


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355 nder.com 09) 444-7 la PHONE: (5BulletinBoard@In mit Parkway : IL u A S M t Ee s m 01 2 N: 1227 W IN PERSO Spokane, WA 99

Between Huckleberry’s & Ace

28. Jackson, Lincoln and Madison, for three 29. End-of-semester handout 31. Shaw of the big band era 32. It’s picked up in bars

THIS W ANSWE EEK’S I SAW RS ON YOUS

33. “Thanks, but I already ____” 34. Played the first card 39. State with a peninsula: Abbr. 40. :-D alternative 41. “The only way to run away without leaving home,” per Twyla Tharp 45. Put away, as a sword 47. Cry with “humbug!” 48. Get an ____ (ace) 49. Keeps under wraps 52. Not one’s best effort, in coachspeak 54. Word that comes from the Greek for “indivisible” 55. “Fuhgeddaboudit” 56. Olympian Louganis 57. + and - particles 58. “Kapow!” 59. “American Pie” actor Eugene 60. Peer group? 61. Derek Jeter’s jersey number 62. Glob of gum

JULY 6, 2017 INLANDER 53


Different Strokes On the Spokane set of Z Nation, talented makeup artists create both horror and beauty BY FORREST HOLT

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akeup is a fickle thing. Heat can melt it and cold can crack it. Slightly too much of one chemical and it runs right off; too much of another and it sits in a glob on the skin’s surface. Creating something beautiful with makeup is a special kind of art. Creating something horrifying with makeup is another thing entirely. A television show like Z Nation demands that makeup artists create elegant, abominable and everything in between. Each artist has their focus, but at polar opposites of the spectrum are Logan Tobia and Kelly Thorpe. Tobia is the head of the makeup department; his experience from other zombie productions and crime shows means he is in charge of bringing the dead to life. Thorpe is the key makeup artist; her experience in pop music videos and advertising means she is in charge of making sure that everyone looks naturally beautiful amid the apocalypse. Usually, Tobia’s creations feast on flesh, but in one recent filming session, Thorpe’s creations were feasting on Tobia’s. The scene — filmed in Browne’s Addition — takes place in an old-timey neighborhood full of billionaires,

54 INLANDER JULY 6, 2017

Logan Tobia, left, is the head of the makeup department for Z Nation. leisurely strolling around. They wear white sweaters, white shorts, white shoes. The men’s white mustaches are waxed at the ends and the women carry white parasols. Thorpe created them with the help of others in the makeup department. Tobia’s art lays crumpled up on the ground in the middle of First Avenue. It’s a man in a black button-up shirt tucked into black slacks, both of which are drenched in blood. Tobia, wearing black latex gloves, approaches and the dead man openes his mouth. Tobia turns a red bottle upside down over his face, squeezing red ooze into his mouth until it overflows and trickles down his face, alongside another stream of blood running from his nose. A group of billionaires kneel over him for a second, then begin devouring him. Tobia winces and gnashes his teeth, worried that the actors will smear his particular brushstrokes in the frenzy. They have to do a few takes. “More violent, really tear into him,” one of the directors on set says.

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espite the obvious differences between grotesque and graceful, Tobia and Thorpe have at least one thing in common; they didn’t always want to be makeup artists. Tobia says he was interested in traditional art. His first experience with makeup just fell into his lap when he was in college. Two of his friends needed makeup done for a final project in a theater production class, and they knew of his skill in painting and drawing. “Until that point, I never realized that was a job that someone did. You see it on TV, but it never really clicks

STUART DANFORD PHOTO

that someone had to make all those things,” he says. “It tied everything together for me.” Tobia says monster makeup artist Steve Wang is his biggest influence. The Creature from the 1987 movie The Monster Squad is his favorite work of Wang’s. In contrast to Tobia’s passion for things otherworldly, Thorpe draws influence from the simplistic elegance of Kevyn Aucoin. He was a creative director for Revlon and his work was featured on many covers of Vogue, Cosmopolitan and Allure magazines in the ’80s and ’90s. Thorpe’s mom bought her new makeup brushes one year when she was in college. “That basically turned the tide,” she says. After hating her marine biology homework and working at a makeup store just a few hours a week, she fell in love with the art, switched careers and read all of Aucoin’s books. Thorpe says her dream job is one where she can be a positive influence in the makeup world and a positive influence in people’s lives. “I’m all for the gore,” Tobia says. He says he’s particularly looking forward to this season of Z Nation because it’s his first as head of the makeup department, which means he can influence how gory the show gets. Still, like Thorpe, Tobia doesn’t want his makeup to look like makeup, and he must keep their common principles in mind. “[When] you are doing a zombie to make them look dead and decrepit, you follow the bone structure,” Thorpe explains. “That is the same thing with beauty. To make a really beautiful image, we have to follow the map that is underneath the skin.” n


Greetings, Inland Northwest. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re excited to be here. Rockwood Clinic, Valley Hospital and Deaconess Hospital are now a part of the MultiCare family. MultiCare is a not-for-profit health care system dedicated to the health and well-being of the communities we serve. Thank you for welcoming us into your hospitals, clinics and homes.

multicare.org JULY 6, 2017 INLANDER 55


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Inlander 07/06/2017  

Inlander 07/06/2017