Inlander 06/30/2022

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JUNE 30-JULY 6, 2022 | BRINGING THE HEAT SINCE 1993

STICKER SHOCK PROPERTY ASSESSMENTS RISE IN SPOKANE PAGE 8 BROADWAY BUZZ THE TONY-WINNING HADESTOWN ARRIVES PAGE 29 LIFELONG EARWORM HOW TO STAY SANE AT BABY SHARK LIVE! PAGE 34

t e h h g t i t N a A

k r a p ll a B es us k a t y e ck Dox i r E adium t y S b a y t a s i s es 6 t Av PAGE 1 A photo d the scenes a behin


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here are few things that scream summer more than a night at the ballpark. Watching young pros at Avista Stadium trying to move up toward the major leagues is always a treat, and the SPOKANE INDIANS consistently put an entertaining squad on the field even as the players change year to year. In this week’s cover photo essay, we decided to point photographer Erick Doxey’s camera lens toward all the action off the field that makes spending a few hours at Avista Stadium fun for the whole family (yes, even for you baseball haters). So much work goes into making each of the 66 home games feel special, from the concession workers to the ushers to the umpires, from the public address announcers to the fans to the array of mascots. Just in time for the Indians’ return to Spokane for a July 4 tilt against Tri-Cities, you’ll enjoy this unusual look at one night at the ballpark. In our news section this week, reporter Nate Sanford digs into those dramatic property-value jumps you might have received in the mail recently (page 8). In our Culture section, E.J. Iannelli previews Hadestown (page 29), the latest Broadway sensation to make its way to Spokane. And in music, Andrew Hall explores possibly the biggest earworm of all time, “Baby Shark” (page 34). Please have some other music handy as you read that one. — DAN NAILEN, editor

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I grew up in Coeur d’Alene. I was in the sixth grade at Trail Creek — it was like a camp that they would send us to. I remember learning it then. Then, I was a camp counselor for Idaho Drug-Free Youth, and we learned it then, too. So I’ve known the song for my whole life! I know all the verses. And my nephew, now, it’s his favorite. Doo-doo!

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My kids really like “Bluey,” from the animated TV show.

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Where did you first learn Baby Shark? At the [Tri-City] Kart Club.

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Did you learn all the verses? (Nods) Which one was your favorite? The baby! And what is your favorite song right now? Um, Kenny Chesney?

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I’m a preschool teacher! “Baby Shark” was definitely popular for a long time. I feel like now all the kids just want the Encanto soundtrack.

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“Baby” was the first song we introduced to our daughter. She really liked it. How old was she when you played it for her? Oh, she was little. Maybe like eighteen months?

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“Did you hear what Alexander Hamilton said about cryptocurrency?”

NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION

Cherry-picking quotes from Founding Fathers has become another insidious form of misinformation BY LAWRENCE B.A. HATTER “The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.” – Thomas Jefferson

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xcept Jefferson never said that. Politicians, pundits and angry uncles all enjoy sharing quotes from the Founders. But they often don’t particularly care if Jefferson, Madison or others actually wrote what they claim they did. Invoking the words of key figures from the Founding period is a rhetorical strategy that aims to mobilize the intellectual giants of American history to support modern-day political positions. It is the very opposite of what history should be. Serious scholars begin with questions and then seek answers in historical sources. Politicians (both the professional and the amateur variety) do the opposite. They begin with answers — their preferred political positions on an issue of the

present-day — and then seek out a short, pithy quote from the Internet to help bolster their argument. The Internet, I think we’ve all learned over the past few years, is not the most reliable source. Cyberspace is awash with bogus quotations from the Founders and other key historical figures, like Abraham Lincoln. You can easily shop around to find Washington or Theodore Roosevelt espousing a 21st century political cause that would have been completely unimaginable to them in their own time; Alexander Hamilton did not go on the record about his views on cryptocurrency. The danger to our political discourse, though, is that many of these fraudulent quotes are all too easy to believe when you’re looking to confirm what you’ve already decided.


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ow do we guard against the spread of historical misinformation? First, be suspicious. If a politician invokes an authority from the past, be skeptical. Second, do some homework. There are bona fide resources that are easily accessible online that track false quotations. A librarian at Thomas Jefferson’s Monticello, for example, has maintained a website of “spurious quotations” attributed to Jefferson for well over a decade. The false quote above, for example, first appeared in print in 1989 and took on a life of its own in the 1990s. (You can read the entry about it here: monticello.org/site/research-and-collections/strongest-reasonpeople-retain-right-keep-and-bear-arms-spurious.) Why do we care so much about what the Founders said over two centuries ago? Hot button political issues are usually wrapped up in questions about the meaning of the Constitution. One legal philosophy in constitutional law is the concept of “original intent” — what did the Founders mean when they wrote the Constitution? Original intent draws a straight line from the founding period to the present in ways that invest the Founders’ words with significant power to shape the future. Cherry-picking quotes to work out the original intent of the Founders is a different kind of historical misinformation. One of the potential pitfalls of original intent is that it can view ideas as timeless and unchanging. Historians, however, are all about context. We see ideas as the product of their time and place. While there is both continuity and change over time, historians tend to agree with the writer L.P. Hartley who wrote (honest!), “the past is a foreign country; they do things differently there.” It is important to understand quotes in their historical context. For example, a quote from Washington in 1754 is likely to be different to one from 1789. In 1754, Washington was in his 20s, fighting in the Seven Years War as a loyal subject of King George III. In 1789, he was 57, a global celebrity, and the first president of the United States. So, the question is, which Washington should we listen to in 2022? The one from 1754, or the one from 1789? Sadly, the answer, all too often, is the one who agrees with us.

It is important to understand quotes in their historical context. For example, a quote from Washington in 1754 is likely to be different to one from 1789.

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uotes, then, offer a very narrow window on the past. So what can we do to try to understand the views of the Founders? Do some research in primary sources. While the Internet has created serious problems for finding reliable information, it has also provided unprecedented access to verified historical documents. You can access the papers of Washington, Jefferson and others for free through the Library of Congress website. The National Archives “Founders Online” does the same for over 185,000 documents from figures like Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton and James Madison. That is a lot of reading. So the second-best thing to do is to read the work of historians, who have dedicated decades of their professional lives poring over these documents. Bona fide historical writing goes through a rigorous blind, peer-review process to ensure that scholars adhere to ethical and professional standards in their use of evidence, but it is always a good idea to be a critical reader. While quotes represent a moment, frozen in time, the best historical studies offer a broader picture of the past that helps to explain how and why the Founders’ differed in their interpretations of the Constitution and, importantly, why these ideas changed over time. Last, never trust a politician quoting Jefferson. n Lawrence B.A. Hatter is an award-winning author and associate professor of early American history at Washington State University. These views are his own and do not reflect those of WSU.

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p U g The Arrow Keeps Goin HOUSING

Spokane home values just officially skyrocketed, and not everyone is happy about it

W

hen property assessments were mailed to Spokane County homeowners earlier this month, the average home was valued a whopping 31 percent higher than the year before. It’s a record-breaking jump in value. For many, it’s also a source of concern. Spokane County Assessor Tom Konis says the phone calls to his office after this year’s assessments went out were “very, very heated.” Things have since cooled down a bit. For Konis and many homeowners, the massive increase was a lot to process. Konis says he was “scared to death” when he saw the final numbers. Konis has been working in the Assessor’s Office for almost 30 years. When he started the job in the early ’90s, year-to-year changes in property values generally stayed in the lower single digits. There have been a few outlier years, like 1993, which saw a 26 percent increase because of a moratorium lifting. The percent change in average value dipped into the negative for a few years following the 2008 crash. The percent change in value was 11.5 percent last year. This year, the average home has an assessed value of $418,800, compared with $320,900 last year. And among high-end properties, some increases are hitting

Terry Horne, whose property is prone to flooding, will be appealing the new assessment of her home near Cheney. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

8 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

BY NATE SANFORD $500,000 above last year’s assessments. This rise in values is dramatic, but Konis says he wasn’t surprised. Spokane’s crazy-hot housing market has been in the spotlight for a while now. Each year, the county Assessor’s Office sends out dozens of appraisers to physically inspect one-sixth of the county properties. The inspections are done from the street and usually take three to four minutes per home, Konis says. Appraisers will take pictures and make notes about the home and any new additions that might affect the value. Back at the office, they’ll figure out the exact value and apply it to similar properties in the neighborhood. Because the assessments are done entirely from the street, it’s possible for them to miss things on the inside that might change the value. If a homeowner feels the assessment is inaccurate, they can file an appeal with the Spokane County Board of Equalization. While some homeowners are happy to see their equity rise, other’s have a more immediate question: What will this do to my taxes? “That’s what everyone wants to know,” Konis says. “If it was just raising assessed values, it’s no big deal. But there’s some monetary consequence to it.”

TAXES ARE COMPLICATED

Home assessments help determine how much people pay in property taxes. Like all things tax-related, it can get contentious. “I had a big argument with my mother-in-law on Father’s Day because of that,” Konis laughs, “because she kept saying I raised their taxes 30 percent.” Konis stresses that a 31 percent increase in home assessments does not translate to a 31 percent increase in property taxes. It’s a common misconception, he says. Konis has tried to get the word out and help calm people’s nerves, but it’s still tricky. “I’m called the tax assessor, which I’m really not,” Konis says. “I’m just the assessor. We appraise properties.” But while homeowners won’t be seeing a 31 percent increase in property taxes, the high values this year will likely cause taxes to increase by some amount. Just how much is hard to predict. Unless voters decide otherwise, cities and counties are limited to a 1 percent property tax increase each year. But other entities like schools and emergency services also collect property taxes and aren’t limited that way. The biggest uncertainty has to do with a number of voter-approved ...continued on page 10


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NEWS | HOUSING “THE ARROW KEEPS GOING UP,” CONTINUED... levies that won’t be decided until the election this fall. Konis says he’s not sure if the sky-high home assessments will make people reluctant to vote for the levies in November. “I hope they’re still voting for what they need, but I would understand if somebody didn’t feel that way,” Konis said.

CONTESTING THE VALUE

Terry Horne bought her home in the West Terrace Heights neighborhood near Cheney in 2016. She didn’t know at the time that the home was built in a high-risk drainage area. Her home flooded twice in 2017, causing lasting damage to the foundation. She hasn’t taken a vacation in five years, she says, because she’s worried about what would happen if the water pumps in her house are left unmonitored. It’s a really tough situation for a homeowner, which is why Horne was so surprised when she got a notice in the mail saying her home value was being assessed at 40.1 percent higher than it was last year. She was stunned — and frustrated. “With good conscience, I physically cannot sell my home for $391,000 in which I’m being assessed for,” Horne says. “It’s not worth that much.” Horne has successfully appealed her home assessment in the past. She’s planning to do it again this year, but this time she’s working collaboratively with other neighbors whose flood-prone houses were also assessed at values they believe are way too high. She says more than half a dozen neighbors are already on board to file appeals together. They’re all frustrated too, she says. “None of us expected to do this,” Horne says. “I didn’t think that in the spring melt I would have waterfront property.” Horne is a disabled Navy veteran, so she gets an 80 percent reduction on property taxes. Even though the new assessment won’t necessarily translate to exorbitant taxes for her, Horne still plans to fight it.

10 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

“The fact of the matter is that if I sell this home, the individuals who buy this home may not be exempt and have to pay those taxes,” Horne says. Horne says she feels like the county just wants to make as much revenue off property taxes as possible. The flooding is a longstanding issue that the county has been aware of for a while. This spring, the Spokane County commissioners agreed to spend $5.5 million of American Rescue Plan funds on a stormwater project to address the flooding issue. Horne is skeptical, but if the plan works as intended and prevents flooding, she’s willing to accept a higher assessment. Until then, she says the county’s assessment feels way out of line. Horne and her neighbors aren’t alone in wanting to challenge the county’s assessment. As of June 24, the Spokane County Board of Equalization said 287 appeal forms had been accepted for review, with an additional hundred or so still being processed. The number will likely rise, since the 30-day window to submit an appeal has yet to pass for most homeowners. Konis says there were around 800 appeals last year, roughly 70 percent of which were settled before going to a hearing. Settling an appeal means the homeowner either agreed to a new value or withdrew after the Assessor’s Office presented their case. Marcy Martin, a real estate agent in Spokane, says she thinks many people will be fighting to change the assessed value of their homes. She says she’s already had three clients ask for help pulling comparables in an effort to contest their home valuations.

RIPPLE EFFECTS

The rise in home values isn’t all bad news. Kris Morehouse saw the assessed value of her house in the Corbin Park neighborhood increase by more than $100,000 this year — far beyond what she was expecting. She’s a bit conflicted about the sudden jump in her home’s

“Out of Reach” is the Inlander’s occasional series investigating why finding a home, or even an affordable rental, has increasingly become out of reach in the Inland Northwest — and what we can do about it. Follow the series at inlander.com/housing.


value. Spokane has been overlooked for a long time and she’s glad to see it getting the value it deserves, but at the same time she worries about what the increase in valuation will mean for property taxes. She’ll be able to make it work, but what about people who are retired and living on a fixed income? Will people without a steady source of income be priced out of their own homes? “I have so much equity in my home, and clearly people are seeing the value, but at the same time, where does it stop?” Morehouse says. If you’re on a fixed income, rising property taxes can be a serious burden. People who are older than 61 or have a disability can apply for an exemption program to alleviate some of the cost, but the maximum income limit is $40,000. Konis says he’d like to see the income limit increase, but it’s controlled by the state Legislature and won’t be adjusted again until 2025. One Spokane Valley homeowner, who asked not to be named because he doesn’t want to draw attention to his financial situation, told the Inlander he makes just a bit more than the $40,000 required to qualify for the senior exemption. He wishes it were higher. He’s 75, semi-retired and on a semi-fixed income. With gas prices, interest rates and the cost of pretty much everything else rising, the homeowner says he worries about managing higher property taxes. A historic rise in home values doesn’t just impact homeowners. When property taxes go up, landlords typically pass on the costs to renters, Konis says. Spokane has already seen some of the highest rent increases in the nation, and the new home assessments are unlikely to slow things down. For young people looking to buy their first home, the news isn’t great either. With interest rates rising and the tax portion of your payment factored into what type of house you can afford, the market isn’t what it was just a couple months ago, Konis says. “They’re probably not going to get as much of a house as they had hoped,” Konis says. n nates@inlander.com

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NEWS | HEALTH

Closing Doors Multiple Inland Northwest behavioral health options are shutting down, leaving fewer options for patients BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

O

ver the last month, at least three Inland Northwest behavioral health options closed on what health providers hope will be a temporary basis, but there’s no plan for when or whether they may reopen. Providers at Kootenai Health in Coeur d’Alene and Frontier Behavioral Health in Spokane announced they were shuttering behavioral health units in May and June due to staffing shortages, funding issues and, in one case, low patient demand. At Kootenai Health, an inpatient addiction recovery unit closed along with outpatient adult behavioral health services. At Frontier, a 16-bed voluntary inpatient stabilization unit has closed. “We ceased taking admissions in late May and closed the first few days of June,” Frontier Behavioral Health CEO Jeff Thomas says of the 16-bed unit at 1401 N. Calispel Street. “We announced it as a temporary closure but, that said, we don’t know when or even if it will reopen.” At Kootenai Health, the inpatient addiction recovery center provided about 200 patient stays per year. Kootenai Health spokeswoman Kim Anderson says they can’t give an accurate count of how many patients were seen in the outpatient psychiatry practice because patient care had already been transferred out to other options such as telehealth by the time media started asking about the closure in May. However, the Northern Idaho Crisis Center housed on Kootenai Health’s campus serves 640 people per year, and the hospital will further subsidize that center in the wake of severe demand for mental health services and reduced funding from Idaho. While other options in the area remain open, some are concerned about the closures, including former patients. Sasha Fisher, a 27-year-old Coeur d’Alene man who went through alcoholism treatment at the addiction recovery center at Kootenai Health in May, says the closure boggles his mind. “It feels like you’re telling the firefighters we don’t need them and here we have fire season right around the corner,” Fisher says. “If we shut this down, the next chemical dependency service is going to be the emergency room which is already overflooded, and we’re going to be hopping the state [line] to another emergency service.”

STAFFING AND FUNDING

At Frontier’s 16-bed voluntary stabilization unit, patients with mental health needs could voluntarily receive treatment for typically two to three days. They were referred by other providers and evaluated before being admitted, Thomas says. The unit, which opened in 2013, usually saw 14 or 15 of its beds full in 2017 and 2018, with a dip in patients starting in 2019, Thomas says. Then, during the first part of the pandemic, the unit was limited to eight patients. But surprisingly, when the unit fully reopened in January 2021, the patient census continued to hover around seven people, Thomas says. That low count was not bringing in enough money to make the facility pencil out, Thomas adds. “It’s economically not viable because you don’t get paid unless somebody’s there, and you have certain staffing structures in place and costs,” Thomas says. It’s hard to say whether the numbers declined in part due to the opening of more inpatient psychiatric beds in the region, including Inland Northwest Behavioral Health hospital and the Spokane Regional Stabilization Center where Spokane police may take people having mental crises, Thomas says.

12 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

“Does that perhaps create less need for a stabilization unit?” Thomas says. “We can’t speak definitively to that, but one could speculate it could have an impact.” Frontier’s unit was also affected by an ongoing staff shortage, with a roughly 30 percent vacancy in staff positions, Thomas says, mirroring the situation at other Frontier facilities. With the closure, staff were given offers to work in similar positions at other Frontier locations and thankfully many accepted, potentially reducing the shortage in those programs, he says. Staffing shortages are similarly impacting other organizations around Washington and the country. Thomas also serves on the Washington Council for Behavioral Health, and he says other member organizations recently reported similar shortages in a survey. Kootenai Health, via printed talking points, also blamed its closures in part on reduced staffing, saying providers were either retiring, burned out from the pandemic, opting for telehealth work or leaving for higher paying jobs. To pay just one specialized physician to run the addiction recovery unit, Kootenai says it would need to come up with $1 million because those experts are in such high demand.

The outpatient psychiatry practice at Kootenai Health was shut down in May, and it’s not the only one. ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

“If we shut this down, the next chemical dependency service is going to be the emergency room.”


Kootenai also points to chronic underfunding in health care, noting Idaho could send some of a $119 million national opioid settlement its way, or perhaps draw from the projected state budget surplus of $1.9 billion. “Kootenai Health agrees with those who are upset about the closure of this program. However, the current model of funding with the current model of services is simply unsustainable,” the hospital’s talking points state. “We look forward to the opportunity to seek creative solutions on a state and federal level with the support of all who care about these programs.”

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For patients like Fisher, the closures at Kootenai are concerning. Fisher was offered care in the addiction recovery unit after landing in the emergency room with suicidal thoughts in early May. A nurse told him they could help, but he wouldn’t be able to go home before going directly to the inpatient recovery unit. “I realized I wanted it and needed it,” Fisher tells the Inlander. “It probably platformed me towards the direction of success more than any other decision I’ve made in my life.” Fisher says the 21 days he spent there taught him a lot. Learning about the biology, psychology and societal pressures around alcoholism was instrumental. He also says medication-assisted treatment helped slow his thinking and allowed him to process the classes and counseling. “It helped to understand that, first of all, it’s a disease. I never knew that,” Fisher says. “I always got told it’s just a matter of choice.” Fisher says he was orphaned in Russia and started drinking at just 5 years old with his then-caregivers before being adopted at 7. He learned he was predisposed to substance use issues. He says being around peers from all walks of life also showed him how his assumptions of other “addicts” were misinformed, and how close he was to some of those situations himself. “There were so many various people — military, nurses, teachers and people like me, in the hospitality industry — and all of a sudden I had this epiphany,” Fisher says. “These are some of the strongest-willed people you’ll ever meet. If they didn’t have enough strong will to quit themselves, there must be more to it than just the power of will.” Fisher says he had asked for additional time in the unit, but because of the closure that was denied. However, he says he feels his time there set him on the right path to recovery. Since learning of the closure, he’s expressed his frustration to politicians, even writing a letter to President Joe Biden. It’s frustrating, he says, to hear the decision was apparently financial. “The gap in accessibility and availability in health care services was already pronounced, then came the pandemic and this chasm was created, and now it’s further extended by policy creators,” he says. Some in the community are working on alternatives. Chris Wright, a licensed counselor in Idaho, is working to form a spiritually based recovery program in the Coeur d’Alene area. While the program is still being developed, Wright says they hope to offer a seamless transition from the initial days of recovery to the continued counseling and treatment people may need. “We are identifying each individual’s needs with the goal to provide individualized care at the lowest possible cost,” Wright says. “We will have providers in the community providing services as needed at the center or in their place of business for those who need it.” Frontier’s Thomas says other options to help address the worker shortage include things like student debt forgiveness and loan repayment programs, changing funding mechanisms to offer more competitive pay structures, and perhaps using people with less training for some work. “Part of it is seeing if there’s more ways to increase the traditional workforce, but also to tap individuals of different grades to fortify the workforce,” Thomas says. “Because we’re not going to catch up to this and resolve all the behavioral workforce crisis by waiting it out.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

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NEWS | CITY HALL

City Attorney Mike Ormsby (pictured) left his post this month and is being replaced by Interim City Attorney Lynden Smithson, who has two decades of city legal experience.

Who Needs an Attorney? Spokane’s mayor just named a new city attorney, but the City Council president wants to change who makes the pick BY DANIEL WALTERS

A

couple of months ago, Lynden Smithson, a Spokane municipal prosecutor for about two decades, says he got a call from the mayor. Smithson knew City Attorney Mike Orsmby was planning to step down from his position this summer. What he didn’t expect was that Mayor Nadine Woodward had him in mind as Ormsby’s replacement when Ormsby left the role in June. “It was a complete surprise,” Smithson says. “I had no grand designs; I was not jockeying for the position.” Being asked to take on such an important position was incredibly flattering, he says. But while he happily took the job, he doesn’t necessarily expect the City Council to confirm him for the position. “I don’t know that they have any intention to the point of confirming anybody as city attorney,” Smithson says. “That’s kind of why the ‘interim’ is on my name.” Indeed, City Council President Breean Beggs, who says he thought until recently that Ormsby was going to stay through the end of the year, tells the Inlander he’s planning to resurrect an idea he’s been floating for a long time. “It’s something that I have been aware of before I joined City Council,” Beggs says. “The city attorney serves at the pleasure of the mayor. They’re in an awkward position. They can be fired at any time.” Beggs argues that, while the city attorney is supposed to be representing the interests of the public, the

14 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

mayor’s hiring and firing power makes the attorney more beholden to a mayor’s agenda. The ballot measure he’s considering putting before the voters, however, would not only provide the city attorney with more job security — giving a seven-year term to the post — it would shift control over hiring the role away from the mayor and into the hands of the City Council. “I’ve been thinking this would be a really big improvement for government,” Beggs says. The change would also mark a limitation on the power of the mayor in Spokane; citizens chose to give mayors more power more than two decades ago, when voters switched the city to a “strong mayor” form of government in 2000.

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unicipal Court Administrator Howard Delaney knows how challenging the city attorney job can be. When he was city attorney for former Mayor Mary Verner a decade ago, he describes getting phone calls at 3 am from police officers facing a complicated and immediate choice with considerable legal consequences. “You’ve got to make an instant call — you might have a minute or so to talk to your subordinates,” says Delaney. “To get the good advice and give it in a split second is tough.” The wrong call can cost the taxpayers millions in

DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

lawsuits. In the past, city attorneys, for example, have come under fire for how they handled public records in the River Park Square and Police Chief Frank Straub controversies. City attorneys also give legal advice on the ramifications of court cases like Martin v. Boise — a precedent that says that homeless people generally can’t be kicked off public property unless there are enough shelters available. Sometimes the kind of guidance they give can clash with the political goals of an administration. You don’t have to speculate on whether Ormsby was willing to push back against the Woodward administration behind the scenes: City Administrator Johnnie Perkins said as much at a June 6 council meeting. “A couple times, I got out ahead of myself and he comes into my office and says, ‘Johnnie, you probably need to tack differently or take another approach. We always want to make sure we’re implementing the council’s policy within the legal framework,’” Perkins said in a speech before council, also calling Ormbsy the best municipal attorney in the entire country. But Delaney, like Beggs, believes that the role needs extra protections. Asked whether, while serving as city attorney, he thought much about the fact that the mayor could fire him, Delaney says, “I not only thought about it, I experienced it.” The city attorney’s office came under fire during Delaney’s tenure in part because of the Otto Zehm scandal, when a developmentally disabled janitor died after being beaten by a Spokane Police officer. During the 2011 campaign, mayoral candidate David Condon promised to fire Deputy City Attorney Rocky Treppiedi, who had been criticized by the Justice Department for the aggressive tactics he used defending the police after the incident. Shortly into his first term, Condon fired Delaney, and the new city attorney fired Treppiedi. That kind of scenario makes it harder to recruit good attorneys for the position, Delaney argues.


“Why am I going to fold up my law practice when it may only be 24 months or 36 months — and then, because a new mayor comes in, you’re gone?” Delaney asks. By giving city attorneys guaranteed seven-year terms, Beggs says it would give them enough time to qualify for city pensions. And it would make them much more difficult to fire. “To terminate for cause, both the mayor and the council would have to agree,” Beggs says. While the mayor would be consulted as part of the hiring process, Beggs’ proposal would have the City Council, the group he leads, get the final say over who gets picked. (Any mayor, within their own budget, would still be able to hire an attorney for advice on their policy priorities.)

City attorneys also give legal advice on the ramifications of court cases like Martin v. Boise — a precedent that says that homeless people generally can’t be kicked off public property unless there are enough shelters available. “My thinking is that it would be seven appointing instead of one,” Beggs says. But Delaney worries under that policy the council could think that the city attorney was their personal attorney, in the same way mayors can now. Smithson argues the mayor picking the attorney makes more sense. “The departments I advise on the day-to-day operations are all appointed by the mayor. They’re all hired and fired by the mayor,” Smithson says. “These department heads answer to the mayor and not the City Council.” No matter who hires him, he’ll have to keep confidences and represent multiple groups that are sometimes fighting with each other. “It puts me in a weird situation, but it is what it is,” Smithson says.

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ut there’s another way that who picks the attorney matters. Woodward is a conservative, while the City Council has a majority of progressives. While Ormsby’s brother, Timm Ormsby, is a longtime Democratic state representative in the area, Smithson’s sister-in-law, meanwhile, held a Loren Culp for Governor campaign fundraiser at her house. Though Smithson says he did not think Culp “was a viable candidate,” he describes himself as “definitely a Republican.” “But I’m pretty middle of the road,” he says. “Fiscally conservative, but definitely socially more liberal.” Woodward, for example, has complained that the city’s Community Court, an evidence-backed program that connects lowlevel offenders with services instead of jail time, was a “revolving door” that was too soft on criminals. Already, Smithson says, he’s talked with city prosecutors about adding a little more stick to the bushel of carrots offered by Community Court — assigning offenders to work crews or community service if they aren’t willing to get treatment. “No one should go to jail for a long time, but at the same time, let’s not have them continue to commit these crimes,” he says. At the same time, Smithson adds, “I do not want to be in the policymaking business. I’m in the advising business. I will give the best advice to the mayor and City Council that I can come up with.” Of course, that’s only if the mayor and the City Council continue to let him. n danielw@inlander.com

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More Than a Game

A night at the ballpark offers America in microcosm PHOTOS BY ERICK DOXEY

16 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022


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irector Jim Jarmusch reportedly once extolled the virtues of baseball by calling it “one of the most beautiful games. It’s a very Zen-like game.” No doubt many baseball fans would agree. When you see professional players displaying their athleticism and skill on a vibrant green diamond under blue skies, it’s a visual pleasure. And the leisurely pace that shifts game to game, even pitcher to pitcher, requires accepting a certain amount of unpredictability when you go through the gates and take a seat. You have to get Zen. A night at Avista Stadium watching the Spokane Indians play offers a sensory experience unmatched by any other entertainment in town. From the smells wafting from the concession stands to the sounds emanating from the press box to the sights of the action both on the field among the players and off the field among the fans — combine it all and it’s one of the best places to be on a given night in the Inland Northwest. We sent photographer Erick Doxey to capture it on Friday, June 24, as the Indians took on the Everett Aquasox. The team will be back in action at Avista on Monday, July 4. — DAN NAILEN, editor

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The first fans in on June 24 got first crack at the Hoopfest poster giveaway. Tools of the trade: Players' gear sitting in the dugout before the game. A basket of balls at the ready for pregame batting practice. Hunter Woltering, part of the Spokane Indians grounds crew, nails the cleat cleaner to the back of the mound as part of his daily preparation. The heads of Otto and Doris, two of the mascots for the Spokane Indians, sit in storage waiting for action.

JUNE 30, 2022 INLANDER 17


Tony Lee, director of the grounds crew, waters the infield to keep the dust from flying.

Joey Scott, the clubhouse manager, rubs mud on the baseballs to help players get a better grip. Scott likes to let the baseballs "cure" for at least one day after mudding before allowing them to be used in a game.

Larry Blumer, who 's worked for the Indians since 1985, cleans part of the concourse before the game.

Lee applies chalk to baselines, a job that gets erased quickly most nights. Players eat dinner in a makeshift tent outside their clubhouse. Home games mean better food for the young pros.

18 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

Spokane Indians pitcher Will Ethridge warms up in the bullpen.


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Umpires Sean Sparling (left) and Hector Cuellar prepare for the game in their private domain.

20 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

Most of the taps in the stadium are fed by the kegs stored in this walk-in refrigerator.


Ribby the mascot greets Maisy and Finley Brown as they enter. They'll have to wait six innings to see the Redband trout again, a highlight of every game.

Foul balls from past games lie on top of the concession stand roof.

A wide view of the field from the press box.

Jaxson Brown (left) and Lincoln Mackenzie enjoy some cotton candy.

Spokane Indians pitcher Adam McKillican signs an autograph for a fan on the field before Friday's game.

JUNE 30, 2022 INLANDER 21


Spokane Indians players Zac Veen (left) and Bladimir Restituyo smile for the camera.

Spokane Indians Bench Coach Julio Campos (left) and Everett AquaSox Coach Jose Umbria exchange lineup cards just before the game starts.

Grant Wagner competes in the towing races in between innings on Friday.

The view of the game from the Coors Light Caboose in right field at Avista Stadium.

Online For even more behind Fireworks are a popular feature after select Indians games through the summer.

22 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

the scenes photos of the Spokane Indians visit Inlander.com/slideshows


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The Monuments Men rescuing Michelangelo’s Madonna and Child from Altaussee, Austria in 1945. ARCHIVES OF AMERICAN ART, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION

ART HISTORY

MONUMENTAL UNDERTAKING A North Idaho man joins unique U.S. military-led effort to protect and preserve global sites and objects of cultural significance BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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he loss of human life may be the most visceral casualty of war, but it’s not the only one. When things we value are damaged — places of learning or worship, family heirlooms — the aftermath is long lasting and insidious. We lose heart, especially if the damage is tied to who we are or our heritage so often expressed through art or architecture. We do not need to be in the battle zone to recognize this loss; indeed, our ability to overcome — and to help others enduring it elsewhere — is a hallmark of humanity at its finest. But who would be willing to be the bulwark against threats to paintings, rare books or sacred buildings? The answer: the Monuments Men and Women, formally known as the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives program, created by the U.S. Army Civil Affairs division in 1943. And Tyler Douglass Lowe, a Post Falls native who recently joined the Army’s modern-day version of the Monuments Men.

24 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

“This is my chance to get hands-on with [cultural preservation] and actually make a difference,” said Lowe in 2019, when he was first notified of his acceptance into the program. The Inlander interviewed Lowe again in 2021 and 2022, when Lowe’s official confirmation finally came through.

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he original Monuments program included 400 mostly military members with expertise in art, architecture, history and related fields who were tasked with securing culturally significant items during World War II. This intrepid force protected and later recovered an estimated 5 million artworks, religious texts and other items, mostly stolen by the Nazis from predominantly Jewish citizens and organizations across Europe. Although disbanded after World War II, the Monuments program has been reanimated in the last decade and recently gained momentum. Since 2015, the Army (specifically its Civil Affairs &

Psychological Operations Command-Airborne division) has been collaborating with the Smithsonian Institution to recruit people willing to dedicate eight years — potentially risking their lives — to saving art, architecture and related items imperiled by war. Given the current worldwide conflicts, that’s not just a big ask — it’s monumental. The 30-year-old Lowe, who goes by both T. Douglass and Tyler, is up to the task. Both his pre- and postcollegiate life has been steeped in art, architecture and entrepreneurship. In college, Lowe studied the medieval and Renaissance eras and Hellenistic Greek language, earning master’s degrees in antiquities and ancient cultures. Lowe was invited to interview for the Army’s cultural heritage preservation program in late fall 2019 and preliminarily accepted. The plan: Lowe would receive training, be formally commissioned, given a gun and sent overseas, which could be anywhere experiencing conflict. ...continued on page 26


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North Idaho’s Tyler Douglass Lowe is off to join the modern Monuments Men and Women to save cultural artifacts. COURTESY PHOTO

“MONUMENTAL UNDERTAKING,” CONTINUED... In November 2019, Inlander interviewed Lowe, preparing for what he thought was a rapid deployment. “There were a lot of problems faced in the European theater that could have been mitigated with better communication,” Lowe said at the time, “so a lot of what I’m doing now is reading about those issues while trying to think of better solutions in the 21st century.” Lowe was also hitting the gym, he said, with the enthusiasm of his youthful days as an Eagle Scout. “All descriptions point to this being a physically demanding role in sometimes really stressful environments,” Lowe said. “We kind of joke about it, but we are having to prepare ourselves to be nerdy Rambos.”

C

OVID-19 put Lowe’s plans on hold until 2021. By November 2021, Lowe had completed initial training. Last fall the Inlander spoke with U.S. Army Reserve Maj. Dale Kooyenga, who leads recruiting efforts for the program and also spent time overseas doing cultural preservation work. He said Lowe was a good fit. “We’re looking at people that can operate at a strategic level and do analysis at a very high level and speak the language… of the profession,” Kooyenga said. Although Kooyenga could not provide specifics — the size of the program, its participants, regional deployment — he was authorized to speak generally about what Lowe might be doing as a cultural preservation specialist. “He may be doing assessments as far as what is going on around the world, as far as some of the nations and great power competitions, and what they’re doing to suppress minorities through their cultural heritage,” Kooyenga said, noting that Lowe may also be part of rebuilding goodwill. The Army’s Civil Affairs division is about healing communities, Kooyenga added. “And cultural artifacts and art are a big part of healing communities.” U.S. support for cultural preservation is a mixed bag. After World War II, the U.S. signed the 1954 document in which member states

agreed not to destroy religious sites or historically significant artifacts, including “as a means of intimidating people under occupation or as a reprisal.” But the U.S. didn’t actually ratify the convention’s doctrine until 2009, finally committing to the second part of the agreement: incorporating cultural preservation and protection into military actions. By 2014 and 2015, when civil wars raged in places like Syria, where the Islamic State obliterated ancient cultural sites, if the U.S. military got involved, it would be compelled to address cultural preservation, too. “There’s no doubt enemies want to kill, but they also want to kill cultural heritage and signs that those people ever existed in the first place,” Kooyenga noted.

A

wareness of cultural preservation got a Hollywood boost not long ago. In 2014, The Monuments Men movie revived the narrative for modern audiences, while the 2015 film Woman in Gold depicted a descendant of Adele Bloch-Bauer fighting for and winning the return of Gustav Klimt’s painting by the same name, a work valued at $135 million. That points to a secondary function of the Monuments program: economics. The sale of ill-gotten items can be used to fund terrorism on the black market. At the end of the day, however, cultural preservation is not about artifacts, Lowe said. It’s about people. His mission was “preserving the past for the sake of the present.” And on March 17, 2022, nearly three years after his acceptance to the program, this former scout whose oath was “to help other people at all times” finally got some monumental news. Lowe would be — officially, finally — an Army Reserves cultural heritage preservation officer. Speaking by phone as he and his wife (pregnant at the time with the couple’s third child) were busy moving into a new home and preparing for his imminent departure, he did not know exactly what the future held. But as for stepping into the legacy of the Monuments Men and Women, Lowe was ecstatic. “I can’t wait,” he said. n


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CULTURE | DIGEST

THE BUZZ BIN

IN THE BLOOD As a proud loudmouth fan of the criminally underseen Lodge 49, I’m already pretty hype on Wyatt Russell’s screen presence. The offspring of Kurt Russell and Goldie Hawn has been the best thing in a lot of projects, but on Hulu miniseries UNDER THE BANNER OF HEAVEN, he’s striking me, probably for the first time, as a Serious Actor. Playing Dan Lafferty, one of a set of true-life, scary fundamentalist Mormon brothers, Russell transforms physically and as a character in impressive ways. Early in the seven-episode murder mystery, he’s a schlubby dumbass clearly in over his head in the family business, but Russell’s Lafferty soon evolves into a pseudointellectual anti-government activist and religious scholar. Russell makes what could have felt like cartoonishly abrupt evolution feel utterly and frighteningly natural, and he stands out among an overwhelmingly excellent cast that also includes Andrew Garfield, Sam Worthington and Daisy Edgar-Jones. (DAN NAILEN)

These games show there’s joy sometimes in opening Pandora’s box.

SOME DISASSEMBLY REQUIRED Unpacking, shipbreaking, and other spiritually satisfying tasks BY DANIEL WALTERS

S

tart with a pile of cardboard boxes, sitting on the floor of a bare apartment. Or, start with an Atlas Roustabout Tug spaceship, hovering silently in the center of a galactic salvage yard. And then get to work: cracking open the shell, going from order to chaos and back to order again. In one sense Unpacking and Hardspace: Shipbreaker — both available for free with an Xbox for PC’s GamePass subscription — are different games. In Unpacking you’re a girl at different stages of her life, opening up her moving boxes and trying to get organized in each new home. In Shipbreaker you’re a blue-collar spaceman, working off your debt to the Lynx Corporation by chopping apart old spaceships. One’s a 3D first-person floater, the other is a 2D click-and-drag pixel-art indie game. And yet, they scratch the same sort of itch. The tasks aren’t particularly difficult. Sure, there are the irritations. An ill-considered laser slice goes awry, explosively decompresses an airlock, and kicks you spinning out into space. Or you move in with your boyfriend, and he is more of the gamer/Dungeons and Dragons type of boyfriend, not the tidy iron-pressedshirts type of boyfriend, so there is not a lot of room for your stuff amid the clutter. But the satisfaction from these games don’t come from overcoming challenges. It comes from the ritual. Everything has a place. You can be methodical. Ball the underwear up and put it in the top drawer. Fling the nanocarbon sheets and thruster caps into the processor bay. The toothbrush goes in the cup on the bathroom sink. Tether the aluminum skeleton of the

28 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

ship to be pulled toward the furnace and melted down into slag. Collect all your stuffed animals and arrange them just so on your bed, as befits your backstory. Grab the computer terminals, depressured airlocks and — careful now — the currently melting-down reactor core and fling them into the stasis field of the salvage barge. There’s a moment when you’ve finally sliced away all the bolts and girders holding a panel into place and an entire metal bulkhead simply releases, gliding slowly, silently, weightlessly in space. There’s a moment when you set down a T-shirt and it automatically folds a neat square with a fwooomp, or you drop a video game cartridge on a stack in your living room with an almost tactile click. There’s the sense of discovery in popping open a new cardboard box or bobbing through the first airlock of a brand new research vessel to see what treasures await. At first, you make things worse — littering your living room floor with shampoo bottles, towels and tchotchkes. Or the zero-gravity salvage yard becomes something like a man-made asteroid field of half-disassembled engine rooms and cargo holds. But slowly you whittle your tasks down, room after room, compartment after compartment. Until the last spatula is in the drawer and the last titanium keel is discarded. Initially I outright laughed when Gamepass added another game called Lawn Mower Simulator to their service. But on second thought, it makes total sense. Because mowing your lawn in real life is satisfying for some of the same reasons as Unpacking and Shipbreaker. You take hold of the jungle and you tame it. Sometimes it’s worth opening Pandora’s box just for the joy of organizing the chaos it unleashes. n

THE PROOF IS IN THE PUDDING After nine years as an active K-Pop group, BTS released their longawaited (at least for me) 35-track anthology. PROOF, arriving just three days shy of the band’s ninth anniversary, features well-loved songs and three new tracks that fans have been eating up and streaming since midnight the day of the drop. The seven-piece band sprinkled in demos and unreleased tracks as gifts to their supporters and, let me tell you, I’ve been looping the demo version of “DNA” for hours now. As a longtime stan, the album reminds me why I’ve stuck around for so long, but also serves as a great jumping off point for those interested in learning more about the group and diving into the chaos of the BTS-sphere. (MADISON PEARSON) THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Noteworthy new music arriving in stores and online July 1: IMAGINE DRAGONS, MERCURY — ACT 2. The somewhat inexplicable modern rock powerhouse releases the Rick Rubin-executive produced companion to 2021’s first act. MINIONS: THE RISE OF GRU (ORIGINAL MOTION PICTURE SOUNDTRACK). This Jack Antonoff-produced compilation gathers modern artists to cover ’70s songs (matching the film’s retro era). Think St. Vincent playing “Funkytown,” Thundercat flying like an eagle, Phoebe Bridgers doing the Carpenters, etc. GUIDED BY VOICES, TREMBLERS AND GOGGLES BY RANK. Reasonably sure that Guided by Voices’ prolific nature is mostly a bit at this point. (This is the indie rock band’s 36th album, the second one in 2022.) (SETH SOMMERFELD)


CULTURE | THEATER

To Hell and Back Hadestown updates an ancient romantic tragedy with current themes and genre-spanning music BY E.J. IANNELLI

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ou could say that Hadestown, singer-songwriter Anaïs Mitchell’s multi-award-winning musical, began life in 2006. That was the year it debuted as a small-scale, limited-run production in New England. Then again, you could also argue that it got its proper start in 2010, when Mitchell distilled her musical and dramatic ideas into a concept album of the same name. The critically acclaimed LP featured the likes of Ani DiFranco and Bon Iver’s Justin Vernon, and its 20 tracks would form the core of the version of Hadestown that Broadway audiences recognize today. But to trace the true origins of Hadestown, you’d need to go back a couple thousand years to a time when the ancient Orphic myth was still in active circulation. Orpheus, as the legend goes, Hades (Kevyn Morrow, left) and Persephone (Kimberly Marable) have a complex relationship in Hadestown. T CHARLES ERICKSON PHOTO was a divine lyrist who fell in love with and married the incomparabalance, things can be out of whack, like enhanced by music. Mitchell’s songbook inbly beautiful Eurydice. Her sudden death the seasons,” she says. That gives Hadestown corporates multiple genres — folk, ragtime, ultimately compelled him to descend to a “hint of climate-change discussion,” somejazz, blues and gospel — which was a recurthe underworld, where he appealed to its thing that director Rachel Chavkin has also ring point of praise for the concept album. ruler, Hades, and Hades’ wife, Persephone, previously acknowledged. Music is so central to Hadestown that six of to release Eurydice back to the world of Weaving in current watercooler themes the seven band members appear onstage the living. Hades agreed, but on the sole like climate change or economic uncerthroughout. Only the drums remain out of condition that Orpheus could not look back tainty is how Hadestown has sought to put sight, and that has more to do with physical to confirm that Eurydice was following a contemporary spin on a millenia-old constraints than anything else. him out of the depths. Tragically, Orpheus’ tale. Marable also says that the show’s “I love the music,” says Marable. “It’s resolve didn’t hold out. characters, though rooted in myth, have such a delight to sing to, to listen to and to “The musical actually follows the myth been given added dimensions. Her own dance to. It is unlike anything else in the pretty closely. There are very small details character, Persephone, operates a speakeasy musical theater canon. And the fact that it that differ, but the broad strokes are very without her husband’s knowledge as a way is pretty much sung through is also unique, much the same,” says Kimberly Marable. of clinging to the world of sunlight and because the music really does have to drive She starred in the original Broadway comseasons that she once knew. the story.” pany and continues her role as Persephone “All of the characters in this musical are Persephone’s own signature number, in the nationally touring production of multifaceted because they are not caricaa sultry entr’acte titled “Our Lady of the Hadestown arriving in Spokane July 5. tures. There is definitely a humanization, Underground,” is one way that she gets to One change Marable deems important which makes it more interesting. It really tell her personal side of that story. is that Hadestown’s Eurydice actively chooses allows the audience to engage in this story “The Fates were in my favor when I to leave Orpheus and descend to the underfrom anybody’s viewpoint,” Marable says. was given the opportunity to play this role. world. She does so out of economic necesEven the antagonist Hades, played by ‘Our Lady of the Underground’ is by far sity, but it’s her own volition — “agency,” as Kevyn Morrow, isn’t depicted as an outmy favorite song to sing. It’s an opportunity Marable succinctly puts it — that brings her and-out monster. for me to engage with the audience and reto this subterranean labor camp where she “He’s misunderstood. He’s a businessally get down and dirty,” she says. exchanges the precarity of freedom for the man, as Kevyn likes to say. He wants so “I’m biased, of course, but all of the security of servitude. much for his wife to be there, and the deal music will speak to your soul. There will be That’s where Eurydice meets another that they made is that she gets to spend six songs that you won’t be able to get out of pair of lovers, Hades and Persephone, months above [ground]. What does that your head for days.” n whose relationship to each other and the do to you, whether as a god or person? world around them is very different. Equally, you have Persephone, who loves Hadestown • July 5-10; Tue-Sat at 7:30 “Persephone is the goddess of the being above ground but also loves her pm, Sat at 2pm, Sun at 1 pm and 6:30 seasons, of nature and the harvest, of life, husband. It’s complex.” pm • $52-$100 • First Interstate Center whereas Hades is the god of industry and Fittingly for any show with Orpheus for the Arts • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. wealth. And when those things are not in in its central cast, Hadestown’s storytelling is • broadwayspokane.com • 509-279-7000

JUNE 30, 2022 INLANDER 29


Beer bats are a fun way to get your drink on and support a local cause. ERICK DOXEY PHOTOS

CONCESSIONS

CROWD PLEASERS The Spokane Indians offer a tasty lineup of new food items at the ballpark BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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oing to a Spokane Indians game is as much about the sensory experience at the ballpark as it is rooting for your favorite team. The roar of the crowd when someone knocks one outta the park. The inter-inning activities, from kids’ games on the infield to the shenanigans of the team’s mascots: OTTO, Ribby the Redband Trout, and Doris the Spokanasaurus. Then there’s the stadium food, which this year has been revamped to fill your tummy and make you smile. New on the menu, for example, are the Tanker Nachos ($20) served in an 85-ounce batting helmet filled with corn chips, queso, ground beef, salsa and jalapeños. A play on words — they’ll really fuel you up! — the nachos honor the squadron of KC-135 refueling tankers at Fairchild Air Force Base. They’re part of the ball club’s support for veterans and veterans groups, says Otto Klein, the team’s senior vice president. “It amazes me how many people put those [helmets] on their heads,” says Chayton Roberts, concessions and hospitality manager for the Indians. That silliness is A-OK with them, Klein says. “Our job is to have the hot dogs hot and beer and Pepsi cold, and if we can put some fun in the experience, that’s good, too.”

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nother new item is tied to the Spokane Indians’ community involvement efforts. Beer “bats” ($22) are 25-ounce bat-shaped vessels filled with

30 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

No-Li Redband Tangerine Wheat and available along the first-base line in the Redband concession area. One dollar from each sale helps promote awareness of native Redband trout and the need for maintaining the health of local rivers. Some food menu items aren’t so much new as they are newly revamped, such as the hot dogs which, next to peanuts, are probably the food item most identified with baseball games. This year, Spokane Indians’ concessions are giving you more dog for your dollar in two ways. First, the basic steamed hot dog ($4) is 17 percent larger than those served in 2021 but remains the same price, Roberts says. “Instead of increasing the size and then increasing the price of it, we wanted to just give more value to fans,” he adds. Second, in the Champions seating section, three breeds of foot-long dogs ($13.50) are available: a Reubenstyle dog with American cheese, Thousand Island dressing, sweet relish and sauerkraut; a Chicago-style dog with chopped white onions and tomatoes, sweet relish, a dill spear and celery salt; and a hot dog smothered in macaroni and cheese (which replaced a planned Hawaiian dog with zesty pineapple salsa). Burgers have also gotten a makeover. Instead of the frozen, 3-ounce burger the park used to serve, says Roberts, the burger ($11.50) is now a third of

a pound of fresh beef cooked on site and served on a brioche bun with lettuce, tomato, cheese and a side of fries. Those fries are larger, too. Instead of a quarter-inchwide french fry, concessions has increased fries to threeeighths of an inch so that they stay hotter longer, says Josh Roys, vice president of concessions and hospitality. “The fry was actually developed especially for takeout, to hold heat a little bit longer, which, with this variable weather and outdoor setting, that’s proven to really help maintain the quality of the french fries for us,” Roys says.

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here are numerous ways to get all these good eats, depending on where you sit at Avista Stadium, like mobile ordering for 100- and 200-level seats. The system debuted last year and worked well, so management kept it. These changes are a hallmark of the ballpark’s concessions program, says Roberts, as staff are always looking for ways to improve and expand food offerings. “I have a strong feeling that we will be producing or changing menus all the way through September,” he adds, noting that the team typically plays 66 home games in a season. “I mean, I know if I had season tickets, I certainly wouldn’t want to eat the same thing all 66 games,” Roberts says. “And it keeps it fresh for us, keeps it entertaining for everyone and looking forward to coming to the ballpark.” n


FOOD | TO-GO BOX

TASTE TEST Baseball is a team sport, so when we heard through the grapevine that new foot-longs were on the menu at the ballpark, the following three Inlander writers trekked out to Avista Stadium and did a little market research.

FULL COUNT

Hot dogs don’t need to be fancy to be good. On the rare occasion I’ve gotten one from a street vendor or at a sporting event, taste is dependent upon a properly steamed dog in a soft, slightly warmed bun. That said, the faintly sweet, brioche-style bun on both the Reuben and Chicago dogs was a nice variation and sturdy enough to hold up to sloppy toppings, but the dog itself was not hot enough. Visually, the Chicago dog appealed most with its combo of red, green and white. I also liked the tangy dill spear and white onion against sweet relish, although the missing sport peppers would add the punch you’d expect from a dish named after Al Capone’s hometown. I have no problem with ham and pineapple cohabitating, e.g. on my pizza, so I’d be willing to give the Hawaiian dog a go if it reappears on the menu. In the meantime, the $4 regular dog was priced right and fulfilled my once-every-blue-moon craving, especially when slathered in ketchup, relish and mustard. (CARRIE SCOZZARO)

NOT A GAME CHANGER

The Indians’ hot dog offerings come down to a value discussion for me. While the Reuben dog is immediately forgettable (the sweet dressing is interesting, but its kraut and cheese are almost flavorless), the Chicago dog is a very good food offering for a minor league park. While not exactly a true Chicago dog (I’ve had those at Cubs and White Sox games), it’s a quality bun loaded with toppings without feeling messy, and the flavor gets fully unlocked when you add mustard. But that said, neither are worth $13.50 to me. So on return trips, I’m much more likely to get the unremarkable but half-decent concession stand hot dog, since it’s priced perfectly ($4) to be an easy ballpark snack. (SETH SOMMERFELD)

They go through a lot of hot dogs at a typical Indians game.

WINDY WINNER

Give me a standard-issue ballpark hot dog, some onions and mustard (and maybe an Altoid for later), and I’m happy. With some of their new supersize specialty dogs, the Indians are reaching for snack-game greatness. Having sampled both the Chicago dog and the Reuben dog, the Windy City wiener is the clear preference, even as it lacked the electric green relish, sliced tomatoes, tiny peppers and poppy seed bun that a Chicago native would expect. The bun was soft and pleasingly crusty, and there was a great dog-to-bun ratio. I’d add mustard if I ordered it again — and bring a friend to help finish. My first Reuben dog experience was mostly perplexing. The sauce — maybe a Russian dressing? — had a nice flavor, but the sauerkraut made the bun soggy, and the slices of cheese would be more appealing if they were melted. I’ll save my Reuben consumption for the Irish pubs going forward. (DAN NAILEN) n

Gold Standard Spokane-area wineries bring home medals, plus restaurant openings and transitions of note BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

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s many admirers of the Craftsman style know, the moniker implies the very pinnacle in handcrafting, from the utmost attention to detail to extreme depth-of-knowledge about materials and process. That’s the philosophy behind Spokane-based CRAFTSMAN CELLARS (1194 W. Summit Pkwy.), which recently took home two double gold awards in the 2021 Seattle Wine Awards. “We’re pretty excited about this since we only submitted three wines, and two of them were awarded double golds,” says Margo Shelman, who coowns Craftsman Cellars with husband and winemaker Greg Shelman. Craftsman’s 2017 cabernet sauvignon and 2017 malbec are those award winners in the annual competition, which is open to any wine — including fruit wine — or mead produced with grapes from a Washington American Viticultural Area (AVA). Additional Spokane-area wineries recognized include Arbor Crest, Barili Cellars, Cougar Crest Estate Winery, Liberty Lake Wine Cellars, Maryhill Winery, van Loben Sels Cellars and Winescape. Awards were also presented to Sandpoint-based Pend Oreille Winery, as well as Hierophant Meadery. Visit seattlewineawards.com/ results.

Craftsman Cellars wines took double gold medals recently.

OPENINGS

TRANSITIONS

The lights are on at NEON PIZZA, Northern Quest Resort & Casino’s newest eatery located at the complex’s north family entrance. Look for New York-style pizza — cheese, pepperoni, supreme or margherita — as well as a handful of burgers and other classic American fare. The vibe is ’80s music, complete with a retro video game arcade. BOIADA BRAZILIAN GRILL (245 W. Spokane Falls Blvd.) introduces diners to what is traditionally a lengthy meal of all-you-can-eat dishes. The rodizio churrasco ($40.95/lunch; $57.95/dinner) features a rotating selection of proteins from lamb chops to filet mignon to bacon-wrapped chicken, carved and plated at your table. It also includes an all-you-can-eat assortment of vegetable and fruit salads, starches like bread and mashed potatoes, soup, and traditional Brazilian fare like feijoada (black bean and pork sausage stew). The new restaurant, located in the former home of Maracas Mexican Restaurant, offers a full bar with wine, beer, cocktails, including Brazilian drinks like the caipirinha with rum-like cachaça, lime, and passion fruit ($12.95). Visit boiadabraziliangrill. com/menu-spokane.

COURTESY PHOTO

The Pizza Co. North Spokane (9225 N. Nevada St.) has rebranded to THE MANGO TREE - NORTH SPOKANE. The new North Side eatery offers the same menu as its downtown location, featuring Indian and Pakistani cuisine and offering daily lunch specials ($15). This is the third Mango Tree restaurant in the region since 2018, when Rakesh Kaushal opened the first Mango Tree in Coeur d’Alene. Info at facebook.com/themangotreeNS. You heard correctly: STELLA’S CAFÉ (19 W. Main Ave., inside Saranac Commons) has brought back its popular McRuins menu. On Mondays, when many other places are closed, Stella’s serves up restaurateur Tony Brown’s spin on, well, whatever he’s got a mind to that day. Expect the unexpected: fishwiches ($13), Taco Bell-like soft tacos ($7), Northern Thai poutine ($12), Twix bars deep-fried in Dr. Pepper batter ($6). Visit instagram.com/_stellasrestaurant. n To-Go Box is the Inlander’s regular dining news column, offering tasty tidbits and updates on the region’s food and drink scene. Send tips and updates to food@inlander.com.

JUNE 30, 2022 INLANDER 31


ALSO OPENING MINIONS: THE RISE OF GRU

The latest entry in the smash hit CGIanimated Despicable Me franchise follows the yellow pill-shaped creatures trying to save their 12-year-old wannabe supervillain boss Gru after he gets on the wrong side of an actual supervillain team. Rated PG

REVIEW

REGENCY

REDO The Austenian romance Mr. Malcolm’s List provides a pleasantly familiar experience BY JOSH BELL

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he book that provides the source material for Mr. Malcolm’s List was first published in 2009 rather than 1809, but director Emma Holly Jones convincingly creates the impression that she could be adapting a long-lost Jane Austen work. She’s actually adapting Suzanne Allain’s far more recent novel (utilizing a screenplay by Allain herself), and delivering an entertaining Austenian pastiche with sumptuous scenery and costumes. It doesn’t reach the heights of the best genuine Austen movies, but it should provide fans of Regency-era romances with a thoroughly diverting two hours. The title character (Sope Dirisu) is one of 1818 London’s most eligible bachelors, pursued by all the young ladies of a certain social class. Among them is Julia Thistlewaite (Zawe Ashton), a vain and somewhat ignorant socialite who is reaching the limit of her allotted time to find a proper husband. When the reserved, imposing Malcolm takes her out to the opera and then never calls on her again, she feels gravely insulted. She enlists her cousin Lord Cassidy (Oliver Jackson-Cohen) to find out why he has rejected her, and discovers that Malcolm has a list of requirements for what he seeks in a wife, which she hasn’t met. So Julia concocts a scheme to beat Malcolm at his

32 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

He’s making a list, checking it twice...

own game, inviting her childhood friend, a country Pinto gives Selina a gentle manner and a lovely smile, vicar’s daughter named Selina Dalton (Freida Pinto), to but she’s by nature a bit bland, having always lived in the join her in London. Julia plans to transform Selina into shadow of her wealthier, more outgoing friend. Malcolm’s perfect woman, fulfilling every item on his list, Given that the entire movie rests on his power to so that he’ll fall madly in love with her, only for him to be bestow prestige and comfort on the woman he chooses, presented with Selina’s own list of qualifications and told Malcolm is also a bit bland, or at least so emotionally that he fails to live up to it. distant that it’s hard to envision him truly opening his Of course, in the manner of romantic comedies for heart to Selina, or anyone. The supporting cast often hundreds of years, Selina and Malcolm fall in love for makes up for the sedate central duo, and with so much real, and Julia must face the consequences of her decepcraziness surrounding them, perhaps it’s better for them tion. It helps that there’s a handsome military officer, to be grounded and sensible. Capt. Henry Ossory (Theo James), with his eye on Julia, Like Netflix’s hugely popular Regency-set series even though she claims that she would never consider Bridgerton, Mr. Malcolm’s List features a diverse cast that such a lower-status suitor. brings actors of color into the kind of story they’ve previThe fate of both couples is entirely preously been largely excluded MR. MALCOLM’S LIST dictable, but in a movie like this, the pleafrom, and that offers a fresh Rated PG sure is in the journey, and Allain comes up approach to material that could with some memorable characters and amus- Directed by Emma Holly Jones come off as a little stale. It Starring Freida Pinto, Zawe Ashton, Sope Dirisu sometimes seems like Allain ing dialogue, even if her wit isn’t nearly as sharp as Austen’s (or others who’ve adapted and Jones are ticking items off Austen). Ashton in particular nearly steals the movie as their own Regency-romance list, from the masquerade the ostensible antagonist, presenting a more kindhearted ball to the drawing-room teatime, but there’s a reason that version of Kate Beckinsale’s wicked schemer in Whit Stillthose lovely, charming rituals have appealed to audiences man’s brilliant 2016 Austen adaptation Love & Friendship. for centuries. n


SCREEN | REVIEW

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Sorry, But Your Princess Is Pulverizing Another Castle

Certainly not a damsel in distress.

a castle. Only this time, the man she is meant to marry is Dominic Cooper’s sociopath Lord Julius, who is very much the villain of this story and is looking to seize power for himself by taking over the kingdom. With no one coming to rescue her, the princess will have to take matters into her own hands, fight off an invading army of goons and rescue her family. Fighting alongside her is her friend and fellow master of the sword Linh, played with a fierce grace by Veronica Ngo (Star Wars: The Last Jedi) who steals every scene she gets. The film smartly wastes no time in throwing us into the action though it does take a bit to fully find its footing. Early scenes can fall into being overly reliant on cuts, though it settles into a rhythm that allows for more fluid fights that are rather well-staged. One standout sequence sees King needing to battle swarms of enemies from all sides as she makes her way down winding stairs. While it does fall into the trap of having her foes often wait to attack one-by-one, the way the film doesn’t pull any punches in seeing the blows land makes up for this. BY CHASE HUTCHINSON While this is an R-rated film and packs a series of action set pieces loosely held respectable amount of gore, it won’t be anything together by a self-aware fantasy story, The that you haven’t seen before in an action film. If Princess doesn’t reach the full heights of its anything, it could have benefitted from more inpremise, though it still proves to have plenty of ventiveness in its action. It would have done well fun along the way. It sees The Kissing Booth’s Joey to more fully embrace flashes of kinetic chaos, King portray the titular princess, her like the scene where our heroes lack of a name serving as a clear sign literally throw the kitchen sink THE PRINCESS at their enemies. Seeing the that rich characterization is not the film’s Rated R priority. This is all about action. Reprincess and Linh have to think Directed by Le-Van Kiet sembling a video game, there are a few quickly on their feet by using conversational cutscenes and flashbacks, Starring Joey King, Dominic what’s around them is the film but really it’s all about getting to the next Cooper, Veronica Ngo at its best. Other drawn-out, battle. There are even distinct boss fights Streaming on Hulu repetitive sword fights lack the with rather ridiculous stunts, making same thrill and tension. While it also feel like a wrestling match in the way it it clearly draws inspiration from films like The practically winks to the audience and never takes Raid series, it doesn’t have the same imagination. anything all that seriously as it throws itself from There are also some particularly clunky the top ropes. effects that make the danger to King’s character King brings this to life all rather well, taking feel less real, especially when she has to make on a charming and committed sensibility that a run along an outside wall after nearly being grounds the story in her fight for survival. Many overwhelmed. When paired with an occasionally of the projects in her career thus far haven’t obtrusive soundtrack that seeks to make you feel known entirely what to do with her. She has gone excitement even when the scene doesn’t earn it, from being nominated for an Emmy in the series the film often buckles under the weight of these The Act one moment to somehow making three flaws (cheap jokes don’t help either). Still, it is Kissing Booth movies that offered progressively able to power onward and find its way to the next diminishing returns. The Princess sees her taking fight sequence with enough vigor that it makes on an action role for the first time, and — even for a bloody good time where you are able to with minimal characterization — really rising to forgive its missteps. The Princess doesn’t reinvent the occasion. the wheel as much as it seems to think it does, The story is a reimagining of the classic fairythough it crashes along with a speed and spectale trope where a princess is trapped in a tower in tacle that’s still worth getting swept up in. n

INLANDER A DAY EARLY

July 6th Indians vs.

Tri-City Dust Devils AVAILABLE AFTER THE GAME AT BALLPARK EXITS

The medieval spectacle of The Princess provides a solid action twist on an old story

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JASON PERRY • JULY 2 • BRICK WEST BREWING CO

PAGE 36

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JUNE 30, 2022 INLANDER 33


KIDS

Jumping the Shark While shark attacks might be exaggerated, Baby Shark’s attack on adult psyches is not

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fter a long delay, Baby Shark Live! is finally making its way to the Pacific Northwest… in 2022. In some ways, it feels like it’s too late. “Baby Shark” has been with us as a campfire song for perhaps over four decades, but the version that drilled a hole directly from the internet to your brain was released in 2016 by Pinkfong, a South Korean children’s edutainment brand (and the conglomerate taking Baby Shark on tour). Two years after that upload, the Kids’ YouTube algorithm, memes, and the power of monoculture beamed “Baby Shark” into the ears and brains of anyone with a working internet connection. By early 2019, it broke the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at 32. As of this writing, the YouTube video has nearly 11 billion views, which has likely generated at least $75 million in revenue for Pinkfong. Its 431 million Spotify plays, on the other hand, are worth a paltry $1.7 million (and if you think that number actually seems low, you’re not alone! Thanks, Spotify!). Baby Shark’s Big Show! just wrapped its first season on Nickelodeon. The cultural phenomena has been covered by the Wiggles (makes sense), Céline Dion, K-pop group Red Velvet, folk singer-songwriter Janis Ian, unlistenable alt-band Judah & the Lion, and Wilco frontman Jeff

34 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

BY ANDREW HALL Tweedy, among quite a few others. You can still buy Baby Shark cereal (berry loops with marshmallows) wherever Kellogg’s products are sold, as well as pretty much any Baby Shark children’s toy you can imagine. But despite all of this, Baby Shark’s cultural ubiquity still feels like it’s waning. At the height of its power, a parent friend with a 1-year-old told me about a cab ride he took across San Francisco early that year. His baby started crying mid-ride; their driver put on “Baby Shark,” silencing her in a matter of seconds. “I’m a parent too,” the driver said. “It always works.” I can’t imagine how many times any given parent heard “Baby Shark” in 2019. I say this because I have no children, yet “Baby Shark” was inescapable. It poisoned my brain like few weapons-grade earworms ever have. It took a global pandemic and two years to erase its psychic damage — and the moment I was tasked with writing about it, it was just waiting to reassert itself, echoing through my skull into infinity.

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ut my obsession didn’t start with “Baby Shark.” On some late summer day in 2018, I came across “Johny Johny Yes Papa”, as originally uploaded by BillionSurpriseToys. At this point, I’d never heard

either “Johny Johny Yes Papa” or “Baby Shark.” The combination of incessant vocal melody, heavy Autotune and the weird 3-D animated dad’s “Single Ladies” dance was a perfect storm of digital z-tier meme hell garbage. I felt an unstoppable compulsion to share it with everyone I knew. This is how I learned that a little song about eating sugar and telling lies is an English-language nursery rhyme better known in India than anywhere else in the world. This is also how I learned that it’s normally sung to the tune of “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star,” and that BillionSurpriseToys devised an especially potent mutant strain — the “Johny Johny” nursery rhyme rewritten to the tune of “Baby Shark” — for maximum impact. This is also how I’m now learning that even though a ton of the wildest content uploaded to YouTube Kids was vaporized in a scandal best known as Elsagate, a search for “Johny Johny No Papa” on YouTube today will still return hours upon hours of pure nightmare fuel. Now, three years later, my friend’s daughter has grown up into a 4-year-old full of personality, and the song no longer has the same magnetic pull on her it once possessed. Baby Shark’s Big Show! never once has shown up on the televisions of my friends who are young par-


SPOKANE YOUTH FOR CHRIST’S INAUGURAL MUSIC BENEFIT CONCERT

THURSDAY, JULY 14, 2022

Bing Crosby Theater • 6PM – 9:30PM 901 W. Sprague Ave., Downtown Spokane

GET $ TICKETS:

12

Spokane Youth For Christ’s inaugural music benefit concert.

Proceeds will primarily support YFC’s Music Studio at its Hillyard Youth Center, providing a safe, healthy and creative activity for at-risk youth in Spokane. (509) 327-7721

Baby Shark Live! is nothing if not colorful. ents, who adore Bluey and have seen Frozen literally hundreds (or thousands) of times. But your experience is not mine, and perhaps Baby Shark still holds a special place in your (kid’s) heart! So, what can you (and, I’m assuming, your children — hopefully) expect from Baby Shark Live! when it rolls into Spokane’s First Interstate Center on July 2? The premise is simple: Pinkfong (the pink fox, not the corporation — kind of like how Lightyear is about Buzz Lightyear the man, not the toy) and Baby Shark (the shark, not the title of the song — kind of like, how, y’know…) take audiences on a “journey into the sea to sing and dance […] to explore shapes, colors, numbers, and so much more!” Over the course of two sets that span 80 minutes (with an intermission, mercifully giving you an opportunity to, well, do something that doesn’t involve having Baby Shark and friends occupying the whole of your peripheral vision), you (and, again, for your sake, I hope, your children) will hear select hits including “S-H-A-R-K” (B-I-N-G-O), “The Wheels on the Bus,” “Jungle Boogie,” “5 Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed,” and — of course — multiple renditions of “Baby Shark” itself. If this doesn’t sound exhausting, you’re made of stronger stuff than I am (and I sat through the Yu-Gi-Oh! movie in theaters when I was 16 having never seen an episode of the show or played the game). However, consider this: What if taking your kids to Baby Shark Live! instills a genuine love of live music in your kids? What if this means they’ll be excited to see more shows, perhaps featuring artists you love, in the future? What if seeing the show means your Baby Shark-loving child achieves peak Baby Sharkdom, and never asks to hear it again? The possibilities are endless. All you have to do is see Baby Shark Live! and endure experience it for yourself. n Baby Shark Live! • Sat, July 2 at 2 pm • $27-$67 • All ages • First Interstate Center for the Arts • 334 W. Spokane Falls • firstinterstatecenter.org • 509-279-7000

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JUNE 30, 2022 INLANDER 35


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ELECTROPOP POLIÇA

I

t’s easy to become unmoored from reality when listening to Madness, the new album from Minneapolis-based electropop group Poliça. The instrumentation focuses primarily on texture, creating a sprawling soundscape that can feel infinite in every direction. Singer Channy Leaneagh uses this as a backdrop to deliver shimmering, abstract and emotive vocals. The sound of her (oft-distorted) voice sometimes feels like the only thing keeping us from floating away into the vast nothingness — a slack tether to humanity. If you’re seeking a counterbalance to warm summer vibes, Poliça’s stop at Lucky You might be right up your alley. — SETH SOMMERFELD Poliça, Wilson • Wed, July 6 at 8 pm • $15 • 21+ • Lucky You Lounge • 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. • luckyyoulounge.com • 509-474-0511

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

FOLK ROCK ANI DIFRANCO

Thursday, 6/30

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Kosh BOLO’S BAR & GRILL, Ed Shaw BRICK WEST BREWING CO., Kyle Richard COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Casey Donahew HAYDEN CITY PARK, Coeur d’Alene Big Band IDAHO CENTRAL CREDIT UNION ARENA, The Rub THE LODGE AT CARLIN BAY, Keanu NIGHT OWL, Thirsty Thursdays with Storme NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), American Bonfire PINE STREET PLAZA, Music on Main: MBB POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Kyle Swaffard J QQ SUSHI & KITCHEN, Just Plain Darin THE STEAM PLANT, Son of Brad ZOLA, Desperate8s

Friday, 7/1

AK ASIAN RESTAURANT, Gil Rivas CHAN’S RED DRAGON ON THIRD, Rusty Jackson and the Spokane River Band CHINOOK CRAFTED BY ADAM HEGSTED, Nate Ostrander CURLEY’S, Dangerous Type HONEY EATERY AND SOCIAL CLUB, Son of Brad J IRON GOAT BREWING CO., B Radicals IRON HORSE (CDA), Zach Cooper Band THE LODGE AT CARLIN BAY, Kyle Swaffard LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, EMO 2000 Summer Party MILLIE’S, The Happiness MOOSE LOUNGE, Chasing Eos NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Rock Candy

36 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

A

ni DiFranco isn’t folk because most of her singer/songwriter tunes center on acoustic guitar strumming. Ani DiFranco is folk because she embodies the characteristics that the genre’s forebearers possessed. She’s an activist, trailblazer, queer icon, truthseeker and independent spirit. She fits in with the early revivalist pioneers like Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie, the stars of the ’60s folk boom like Joan Baez and Bob Dylan, her ’90s Lilith Fair contemporaries, and the songwriters she influenced. Her distinctive rhythmic playing and poetic lyrics still ring true 20 albums into her career, but truth be told she’s always been timeless. — SETH SOMMERFELD Ani DiFranco, Abraham Alexander • Sat, July 2 at 8 pm • $28-$45 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com • 509-227-7638

PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Zach Simms REPUBLIC BREWING CO., The Pine Hearts THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Just Plain Darin SILVER MOUNTAIN RESORT, Ron Greene J ST. MARIES, PJ Destiny TRANCHE, Wasteland Kings

Saturday, 7/2

BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE, Rusty and Ginger J J BING CROSBY THEATER, Ani Di Franco J BRICK WEST BREWING CO., Jason Perry CHAN’S RED DRAGON ON THIRD, Cary Fly CHINOOK CRAFTED BY ADAM HEGSTED, Nate Ostrander J COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS, Just Plain Darin CURLEY’S, Dangerous Type

DAHMEN BARN, Triple Xtra Wide IRON HORSE (CDA), Zach Cooper Band J LEBANON RESTAURANT & CAFÉ, Safar LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Hot Club of Spokane MILLIE’S, The Happiness MOOSE LOUNGE, Chasing Eos NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Rock Candy NOAH’S CANTEEN, Son of Brad PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Truck Mills, Carl Rey POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Eric Neuhauser J STAGE LEFT THEATER, Daniel Champagne ZOLA, Blake Braley

Sunday, 7/3

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, One Street Over BECK’S HARVEST HOUSE, Kevin Shay Band

BEDROOM GOLDMINE BAR, The Black Jack Band J COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Beatles vs. Stones COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, The Bobby Patterson Band CURLEY’S, Loose Gazoonz THE CUTTHROAT RESORT, JamShack IRON HORSE (CDA), Rusty Jackson & the Spokane River Band MILLIE’S, The Happiness MOOSE LOUNGE, Chasing Eos NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Rock Candy J SOUTH HILL GRILL, Just Plain Darin

Monday, 7/4

J EICHARDT’S PUB, Monday Blues Jam with John Firshi PAVILLION PARK, Too Slim & the Taildraggers RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic Night

Tuesday, 7/5

COEUR D’ALENE CITY PARK, Stage-

coach West OSPREY RESTAURANT & BAR, Ron Greene J ROCKET MARKET, Indy ZOLA, Lucas Brown & Friends

Wednesday, 7/6

BARRISTER WINERY, Stagecoach West J KENDALL YARDS, Dawna Stafford, Ian Gaddie, Dean Smith J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Poliça, Wilson MCEUEN PARK, Live After 5: Fortunate Youth OSPREY RESTAURANT & BAR, Son of Brad PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Dwayne Parsons PRINCE OF PEACE LUTHERAN, Pamela Benton RED ROOM LOUNGE, The Roomates J SALT AND PEPPER RESTAURANT, Just Plain Darin ZOLA, Runaway Lemonade


MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208263-5673 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 509-847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 509-924-1446 BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens St. • 509-315-5101 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 509863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 509-467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague Ave. • 509891-8357 BOLO’S BAR & GRILL • 116 S. Best Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-891-8995 BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR • 18219 E. Appleway Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-368-9847 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main St., Moscow • 208-596-0887 THE BULL HEAD • 10211 S. Electric St., Four Lakes • 509-838-9717 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw, Worley • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-292-4813 CRAVE • 401 W. Riverside Ave. • 509-321-7480 CRUISERS BAR & GRILL • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-446-7154 CURLEY’S HAUSER JUNCTION • 26433 W. Hwy. 53, Post Falls • 208-773-5816 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • 509-279-7000 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-6241200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-4572392 HONEY EATERY & SOCIAL CLUB • 317 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-930-1514 IRON GOAT BREWING • 1302 W. Second Ave. • 509-474-0722 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-926-8411 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 509244-3279 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington St. • 509-315-8623 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 509-456-5678 LUCKY YOU LOUNGE • 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. • 509-474-0511 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 509747-2605 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy. • 509-443-3832 THE MASON JAR • 101 F St., Cheney • 509-359-8052 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-922-6252 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-838-1570 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 877-871-6772 NYNE BAR & BISTRO • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-474-1621 PACIFIC PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 509-443-5467 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 POST FALLS BREWING CO. • 112 N. Spokane St., Post Falls • 208-773-7301 RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL • 10325 N. Government Way, Hayden • 208-635-5874 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 509838-7613 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 509-822-7938 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-8008 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 509-459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • 509-2797000 STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON • 12303 E. Trent Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-862-4852 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 509-624-2416

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JUNE 30, 2022 INLANDER 37


YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

COMMUNITY LET FREEDOM RING

Don your red, white and blue and head downtown for a daylong celebration of the good ol’ US-of-A at Riverfront Park. The day’s festivities kick off at noon when local food trucks and a vendor market open, along with attractions in the park, including the SkyRide, Skate Ribbon and Looff Carrousel. After soaking up some sun, settle in and snag a seat at the Pavilion, which opens at 6 pm, offering plenty of time to enjoy an evening picnic on the grass (outside food is permitted, but not booze; alcohol concessions are available) before the Spokane Symphony’s special Patriotic Pops concert at 9 pm. Then, at 10 pm, the city’s fireworks display is set to delight and dazzle, with pyrotechnics launched near the Clock Tower and viewable from the Pavilion and vantage points around town. Not staying in town for the holiday weekend? Check out other Fourth of July festivities around the region at inlander.com/events. — CHEY SCOTT Fourth of July Celebration • Mon, July 4 from noon to 10 pm • Free • All ages • Riverfront Park • 507 N. Howard St. • riverfrontspokane.com • 509-625-6200

38 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

SPORTS SPO-KARATE

THEATER GIMME! GIMME! GIMME!

USA National Karate Championships & Team Trials • Thu, June 30-Sun, July 3, daily from 8 am-5:30 pm • $20-$65 • The Podium • 511 W. Dean Ave. • thepodiumusa.com/events • 509-279-7000

Mamma Mia! • July 1-10; Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm • $45-$60 • Schuler Performing Arts Center • 880 W. Garden Ave., Coeur d’Alene • cdasummertheatre.com • 208-660-2958

Kiai! Some of the nation’s best athletes are coming to Spokane for the four-day USA Karate National Championships. Two thousand competitors from all over the country are competing for medals as well as their shot to be on the U.S. Junior or Senior National Teams, representing the U.S. in world championships and the Olympic Games. Hosted inside The Podium, this is the first major karate competition in Spokane. Spectators are allowed to come watch elite kata sparring as well as para-karate divisions, weapon divisions and non-elite competitions. Pick a day to come watch, or snag a four-day pass to catch all the action. An elimination-style tournament means that competition intensifies until Sunday evening. Or, if you can’t see the combat up close, just keep an eye out for a future Olympian strolling through Riverfront Park. — ELIZA BILLINGHAM

If a Greek getaway narrated by ABBA hits sounds like the perfect way to spend summer, then Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre has you covered with their production of the beloved jukebox musical, Mamma Mia! After a six-season residence at the Kroc Center and a two-year COVID pause, Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre is back. This season, the group takes residency at North Idaho College’s Schuler Performing Arts Center, bringing a season of favorite, familiar tunes, timeless writing, and incomparable humor. Their first show of the summer centers on Donna and her spunky, soon-to-wed daughter, Sophie. Sophie wants her father to walk her down the aisle, so she invites three men she reads about in her mother’s diary to the wedding, in hopes of discovering who her dad is. This smash-hit of a show ensures a super (trouper) time for all. — LAUREN RODDIS


GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

Join Us for a Summer of Laughs LIVE IMPROVISED COMEDY SHOWS Friday Nights at 7:30 pm July - BUCKET LIST August - SUMMER IMPROV CHAOS Every Saturday Night at 7:30 pm

RIDE THE RAILS THIS SUMMER!

SAFARI

(NO SHOWS ON JULY 1 & 2)

KIDS IMPROV CLASSES Ages 10 to 13 July 25th - July 29th with Monday - Friday 1pm - 4pm Heather TEEN IMPROV CLASSES Ages 14 to 18 with Session 1 July 18th - 22nd and Brigid Session 2 July 25th - 29th Michael Monday - Friday 10am - Noon

MUSIC HAPPIEST HOUR

Hard to beat quality time in a beautiful park, and now that summer is making itself felt in the Inland Northwest, it’s hard to beat reggae providing the soundtrack for the season. Coeur d’Alene’s Live After 5 concert series turns McEuen Park into the most happening place in town every Wednesday through the summer, and next up welcomes Fortunate Youth. The SoCalbased sextet keeps its sound close to roots reggae, and they’ve found a significant audience since forming at a buddy’s birthday party in 2009 — three of their albums have topped Billboard’s reggae chart. A little ska and blues might sneak in, but these guys are definitely focused on reggae and, predictably, saying things about having a “mission to spread peace, love and unity with music.” Hey, we have to start somewhere, right? — DAN NAILEN Live After 5: Fortunate Youth • Wed, July 6 at 5 pm • $15; ages 12 and under free • McEuen Park • 420 E. Front St., Coeur d’Alene • liveafter5events.com

MUSIC THE SOUNDS OF BROWNE’S

On its own, Browne’s Addition is one of the most gorgeous neighborhoods in the Spokane area. Now, imagine music emanating through the tree-lined streets as you sit beneath the warm summer sun. Well, you won’t have to imagine for much longer because the Browne’s Addition Summer Concert Series is back. The 2022 lineup consists of fan favorites from last year and newcomer musicians who are ready to celebrate the series’ 25th year alongside spectators. The kick-off concert features the 133rd Washington Army National Guard Band, The Full Metal Racket Rock Band, General 7’s Traditional Jazz Band and the Brass Patriots Band. Concerts continue every Thursday from 6-8 pm through Aug. 25 in Coeur d’Alene Park. — MADISON PEARSON Browne’s Addition Summer Concert Series Kick-off • Thu, July 7 from 6-8 pm • Free • Coeur d’Alene Park • 2195 W. Second Ave. • Facebook: Browne’s Addition Concert Series

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Washingtonions will have, as Sen. Murray stated, “No more dark afternoons in winter. No more losing an hour of sleep every spring,” among other benefits associated with the passing of this bill, as reported by MyNorthwest publication. So thank you, Sen. Murray, for your help in writing this bill. “We” hope the House of Representatives also passes this bill before Washington’s winter weather is upon us.

I SAW YOU ANIMA LEGATAVI would never do anything to cause you problems. But after all this time, I’m simply not going anywhere, and I plainly hope that there’s a path for us at some point. Whomever is running this simulation may just take pity on this hopeful simp (it’s you, you’re running it). Until then, catch you on the plane. Drink your water. Ciao, bello. CRAFT AND GATHERING CHANGE.... We had a long wait for our food. You stood next to us in line with friendly conversation, a great smile, and even made my daughter 52 cents. We failed to ask for the handle on your friend’s Instagram page where she posted all her found money in NYC! We want to follow lol! You brightened our day... no doubt you do that everywhere you go, but thought you deserved a “cheers” in the I Saw You section. Happy change hunting! Find me @tangerinetendencies.

CHEERS THANKS TO SEN. PATTY MURRAY When the House of Representatives approves the daylight savings bill, also known as the Sunshine Protection Act, co-sponserd by Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., we

ROCKY HORROR FUN Cheers to the Garland Movie Theater for being better than ever! And hanging in through the Covid dark age. Thank you for making movie watching affordable ($5 tickets), yummy snacks, friendly staff. I could go on and on.! Namely, thank you for the Rocky Horror Picture Show Saturday night at midnight. Lively audience, cult classic, dedicated fan base. And a thoroughly trashed theater after 2:30 am when it ended. T.P. Rolls, toast, playing cards everywhere for staff to clean up! And I saw staff members still smiling. Thank you G.M.T. SUMMER PARKWAYS - PERFECT Cheers to the organizer, sponsors, and participants of this year’s Spokane Summer Parkways. The event was amazingly fun. The sense of community was palpable. A great start to the summer. Please continue to hold this event! EMPATHY FOR BIG LIE VOTERS Having watched every hour of the Jan. 6 hearings so far, a thought occurred about the frustration of the pro-Trump crowd, or I could call it the losers-of-presidentialelections crowd. Because of the Electoral College system of electing presidents, roughly half the votes every election do not count. Only the majority winners of each state can feel that their vote counted. This has got to feel a little unfair to the electoral losers who would probably get 40 percent of their state’s electoral votes otherwise. So, let’s change the Constitution to allow for proportional electoral voting for

president. Or better yet, get rid of the Electoral College altogether and have Ranked Choice Voting so that I can vote for my preferred “radical” choice as well as vote for a likely more moderate choice if my “radical” choice doesn’t win.

LITTLE BIRD To the human who called out the little bird that chirps, starting at 4 am, every morning... so beautiful. Cheers to seeing and appreciating the beauty and positivity that exists everywhere always!

JEERS PIERCING STORE JERK My wife and I took our daughter to get her ears pierced for her birthday. While I was in the back with our daughter, you decided to start yelling at my wife for “cutting in line.” My wife tried to explain to you that we’d already waited in line, made an appointment, and then been told by the workers that when they called to let us know it was her turn we didn’t need to stand in line a second time and could just come in (which we doublechecked on when we got there). Instead of admitting your mistake and apologizing like an adult, you continued yelling that my wife was still rude for not saying “excuse me” (Which. She. Did.). Thanks for casting a shadow on what should have been a fun, happy day! It’s self-righteous, entitled, “attack first, ask questions later, apologize never” people like you who are dragging society into the sewer.

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

ENTER TO WIN 1 PAIR OF TICKETS TO SEE

AVETT BROTHERS J15ULY ENTER AT

Inlander.com/freestuff 40 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

the linchpin to all of it, eviscerating voting rights to make sure nobody who disagrees with them can cast a ballot. They’ve only just begun. MAYOR WOODWARD 0/10 WOULD NOT RECOMMEND Jeers to Mayor Woodward. Your record on the

Cheers to seeing and appreciating the beauty and positivity that exists everywhere always!

SOUND OFF

WITH CALDER ALLEN

JEERS TO BLACK DIAMOND PAVING COMPANY PARKING ON PRIVATE PROPERTY I awoke this morning to a Big White Pickup Truck and small white car parked on my private property at the end of my driveway. This probably wouldn’t be so odd, but they were parked directly in front

TH

of six NO TRESPASSING, PRIVATE PROPERTY signs. The men walking around had on light green T-shirts with [a paving company name] written on the back, although when I asked who they worked for none of them would say. When I spoke with the flagger that was standing in the middle of the road, I pointed out the signs and asked who the vehicles belonged to. He said that they were employee vehicles and said, “So, do you want them moved?” An older man that identified himself as Spokane County traffic control, then came over and seemed surprised that I wouldn’t want other peoples vehicles parked on my private property. He again said, “So, do you want them moved?” WELL, OF COURSE, I wanted them moved. Please learn to read and respect the property owners’ NO TRESPASSING signs. THE SUPREMES SHOW THEIR FANGS There is no longer any doubt about the radical political agenda of the majority of our Supreme Beings on the High Court. Who are they? So what’s next on the program? Banning interracial marriage (except when your wife is named Ginni) and gay marriage and access to contraception and LGBTQ rights and of course

treatment of people experiencing homelessness is abhorrent. You displace people according to you and your cronies’ NIMBYism without even trying to collaborate with the community to devise suitable options for people experiencing homelessness. You’re not a mayor of the people; you’re the leader of rank capitalism in the city. Shame on you. PRO-WHAT EXACTLY? Ah, me, nothing so exemplifies the sincerity, compassion, and faith of Pro-Birth advocates like calls for organized harassment at clinics, stalking individual Pro-Choice demonstrators, and using your truck to run down people you don’t like. Amen, and pass the hypocrisy. n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS C H A M B E R

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A D E X E C S

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L A D P R I N S M U G R O H A N S U V A G A L

S G L O U F A S T R A E L I D I J I S O R C E S

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L F O L R S I I K E I S L M A Y T N G N E W L O S M E R A T A N T I L E L Y

A T I E D E E E N N O T D A I L I E S

O D D S A R E

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMEDY

CASEY MCLAIN Live show by the standup comedian from Tacoma. July 1-2, 7:30 & 10:30 pm, July 3, 7:30 pm. $20-$28. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com SAFARI A fast-paced, short-form comedic improv show. Saturdays from 7:30-9 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com MARGARET CHO Since opening for Jerry Seinfeld at age 14, Cho has starred in her own sitcom, All-American Girl, her offBroadway one-woman show and participated in season 11 of Dancing with the Stars. July 7, 7:30 pm, July 8-9 at 7 & 9:45 pm $25-$40. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com

COMMUNITY

GRAND COULEE DAM LASER LIGHT SHOW The light show theme is “One River, Many Voices.” May 28-July 31 at 10 pm, Aug. 1-31 at 9:30 pm, Sept. 1-30 at 8:30 pm. Through Sep. 30. Free. Grand Coulee Dam Visitor Center. usbr.gov STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL The yearly festival offers U-pick strawberries, craft and food vendors and live music. Through July 9, daily from 9 am-6 pm. Siemers Farm, 11125 E. Day-Mt. Spokane Rd. siemersfarm.com THE RUM REBELLION: PROHIBITION IN NORTH IDAHO This exhibit tells the story of how the Idaho Panhandle was anything but dry during Prohibition.Open daily 11 am-5 pmthrough Oct. 29. $2-$6. Museum of North Idaho, 115 Northwest Blvd. museumni.org/whats-on WEST WALLACE FLEA MARKET An oldfashioned, small-town market featuring 40+ vendors. July 2-4, 9 am-5 pm. Wallace, Idaho. wallaceid.fun COEUR D’ALENE CASINO FIREWORKS SHOW Celebrate Independence Day with a fireworks show. July 4, 10 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S. Nukwalqw. cdacasino.com (800-523-2467) FESTIVAL OF AMERICA Grand Coulee’s 4th of July celebration featuring live music, a laser light show and fireworks over the dam. July 4, 2-10:30 pm. Free. Grand Coulee. grandcouleedam.org LIBERTY LAKE SUMMER FESTIVAL: 4TH OF JULY The community celebration includes a parade (11 am) and a fireworks display (10 pm). July 4. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. pavillionpark.org PULLMAN’S 4TH OF JULY CELEBRATION A community-funded, familyfriendly event featuring kid’s activities, live music, food trucks and a fireworks display. July 4. Free. Sunnyside Park, 147 SW Cedar. pullmanchamber.com SANDPOINT 4TH OF JULY CELEBRATION The Sandpoint Lions club hosts the One Nation Together parade at 10 am and fireworks later in the night. July 4. Free. Sandpoint. sandpointchamber.org SILVER MOUNTAIN 4TH OF JULY FIREWORKS SHOW Kellog’s annual fireworks show. July 4, 9:55 pm. Free. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. silvermt.com SPOKANE 4TH OF JULY FIREWORKS Riverfront’s annual fireworks show. July 4, 10 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org

FILM

DREAMWORKS ANIMATION: THE EX-

HIBITION — JOURNEY FROM SKETCH TO SCREEN From the makers of Shrek, Madagascar, Kung Fu Panda, How to Train Your Dragon and Trolls, comes an extraordinary exhibition celebrating over 25 years of DreamWorks Animation. Through Sept. 11; Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm (third Thursdays until 9 pm). $15$20. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org TROLLS WORLD TOUR Part of the Garland’s free kids summer movies series. June 30-July 1 at 9:30 am. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. garlandtheater.com HOOK Part of the Garland’s family friendly series. June 30-July 1 at 12 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com (509-327-1050) SUMMER CAMP: THEY LIVE Part of the Garland’s summer cult classic filmsseries. June 26-30, Sun at 5 pm, Tue at 7:10 pm and Thu at 10 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com MOVIES IN THE PARK A family friendly summer movie series, Fridays at Sally’s Park. All movies begin at sundown. Bring blankets and lawn chairs; snacks and drinks are available, benefiting Salvation Army’s local youth programs. Free. The Salvation Army Spokane, 222 E. Indiana Ave. salvationarmyspokane.org SUMMER MOONLIGHT MOVIES: SPACE JAM Bring a lawn chair, blankets, snacks and enjoy an outdoor movie. July 1, starts at dusk. Free. Sunset Park, 924 S. Lawson St. airwayheightsparksandrec.org SATURDAY CARTOONS AT THE FARMERS MARKET Showings of cartoons during the Moscow Farmers Market. Sat through Oct. 31 from 8 am-1 pm. Free. Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. kenworthy.org MOVIE IN THE PARK: RON’S GONE WRONG Shown as part of the Liberty Lake Summer Festival. July 3, starts at dusk. Free. Pavillion Park, 727 N. Molter Rd. pavillionpark.org (509-755-6726) ANGRY BIRDS 2 Part of the Garland’s free kids movies series. July 4-8, daily at 9:30 am. Free. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com KARATE KID Part of the Garland’s family friendly summer film series. July 4-8, daily at 12 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com SUMMER FAMILY MATINEE SERIES Weekly showings of family-friendly films. June 14-Aug. 3, Tue and Wed at 1 pm; see website for complete schedule. $3. Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org MOVIES AT THE PAVILION Watch some classics, summer favorites and recent blockbusters under the Pavilion. July 6: Cruella; July 20: Encanto; July 27: Ghostbusters Afterlife; Aug. 3: The Princess Bride. All movies start at dusk. Free. Pavilion at Riverfront, 574 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org (509-625-6000)

FOOD

CANINES & COCKTAILS Bring your dog onto the patio and enjoy dinner, drinks and treats for you and your furry friend. Fridays from 2-7 pm. South Perry Lantern, 1004 S. Perry. lanternspokane.com FOOD TRUCK FRIDAY This year’s food selection includes Mixed Plate, Skewers, One Night Stand, Tacos Camargo, Good Dilla and more. Fridays from 11 am-2 pm through Aug. 26. Downtown Spokane on S. Wall St. downtownspokane.org PINTS FOR PAWS A fundraising event featuring live music, raffle prizes, lawn games and beer. All proceeds benefit

the Better Together Animal Alliance. July 1, 5-7 pm. By donation. Laughing Dog Brewing, 805 Schweitzer Plaza Dr. laughingdogbrewing.com (208-263-9222) RIDE & DINE A scenic gondola ride, live music and a mountain-top barbecue dinner. Fridays from 3-8 pm through Sept. 2. $8-$58. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave. silvermt.com (208-783-1111) SUMMER PARTY This year’s party celebrates the winery’s 30th year producing “the healthiest wines on the planet,” and includes live music on outdoor stage, dancing, gourmet food and more. July 2, 12-7 pm. $10. China Bend Winery, 3751 Vineyard Way. chinabend.com RIVERFRONT EATS Riverfront Park’s local food truck series. Tue from 11 am-2 pm through Aug. 30. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org POURS & PICKS Enjoy $6 wine by the glass and $4 charcuterie picks in the Cafe, every Wednesday from 4-6 pm through Aug. 31. The Culinary Stone, 2129 N. Main St. culinarystone.com (208-277-4166)

MUSIC

OPERA-TUNITIES: CARMEN & THE BULL The beloved children’s story Ferdinand the Bull is set to the music of Bizet’s famous opera, Carmen. June 30, 3-4 & 5-6 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. inlandwopera.com NEW YORK POLYPHONY A four-piece vocal chamber ensemble. July 1, 8:30 pm. By donation. St. Thomas Catholic Church, 919 E. Indiana Ave. stthomascda.org OPERA-TUNITIES: CARMEN & THE BULL The beloved children’s story Ferdinand the Bull is set to the music of Bizet’s famous opera. July 1, 5:30-6:30 pm. Free. IEL Adult Education Center, 2310 N. Monroe St. inlandwopera.com PAMELA BENTON: STRINGZONFIRE! Pamela performs blues, indie folk rock, jazz and originals. July 1, Aug. 5, and Sept. 2, 6-9 pm, Free. The Bee’s Knees Whiskey Bar, 324 W. Lancaster Ave. pamelabenton.net (208-758-0558) BABY SHARK LIVE! An immersive experience for all ages with Baby Shark and friends. July 2, 2 pm. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. firstinterstatecenter.org PATRIOTIC POPS Celebrate America’s 246th birthday with a free outdoor concert by the Spokane Symphony before the city’s firework display. July 4, 9 pm. Free. Pavilion at Riverfront, 574 N. Howard St. spokanesymphony.org

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

2022 USA KARATE NATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS The four-day championships are the first major karate competition hosted in Spokane, hosting 2,000 of the nation’s top karate athletes. June 30-July 3. See website for full schedule. $20-$50. The Podium, 511 W. Dean Ave. thepodiumusa.com (509-279-7000) SPOKANE INDIANS VS. TRI-CITY DUST DEVILS Promo events during the sixgame series include 4th of July Fireworks (July 4), Christmas in July Night (July 6), College Alumni Night (July 7), Family Feast Night (July 8), Star Wars Night (July 9) and Native Culture Day (July 10). July 4 and July 6-9 at 6:35 pm, July 10, 1:05 pm. $8-$22. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. milb.com/spokane

THE GREAT FAMILY CAMPING CHALLENGE Work as a family or with a team to complete camping-themed activities, including creating and presenting something to eat. All ages. Registration required. July 5, 2-3:30 pm. Free. Fairfield Library, 305 E. Main St. scld.org RIVERFRONT MOVES: YOGA WITH BEYOUTIFUL HOT YOGA An outdoor Vinyasa class with attention placed on linking breath with the movement between postures. July 5 and July 12, 6-7 pm. Free. Pavilion at Riverfront, 574 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.org (509-625-6000) THE GREAT FAMILY CAMPING CHALLENGE Work as a family or with a team to complete camping-themed activities, including creating and presenting something to eat. All ages. Registration required. July 6, 2-3:30 pm. Free. Deer Park Library, 208 Forest St. scld.org RIVERFRONT MOVES: BARRE ON THE BRIDGE Strengthen and tone your entire body with emphasis on core stability and balance, and low impact/high intensity cardio bursts. July 7 and July 14, 7-8 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. spokaneriverfront.org (509-625-6600) MRP MOTOCROSS A summer motocross racing tradition in Coeur d’Alene. July 8-9 7-10 pm. $15-$20. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. mrparenacross.com (208-765-4969) HISTORIC WALKING TOURS Join local historian Chet Caskey for a free walking tour of Riverfront Park, where the city’s past and present merge in unique ways. July 9, July 23, Aug. 13 and Aug. 27, at 10 am and noon. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard. riverfrontspokane.org

THEATER

MAMMA MIA! The story-telling magic of ABBA’s top hits propel this enchanting tale of love, laughter and friendship. July 1-10; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $50-$153. Schuler PAC, 1000 W. Garden Ave. cdasummertheatre.com HADESTOWN The Broadway show intertwining two mythic tales — that of young dreamers Orpheus and Eurydice, and that of King Hades and his wife Persephone. July 5-10; Tue-Fri at 7:30 pm, Sat at 2 and 7:30 pm, Sun at 1 and 6:30 pm. $52-$100. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. broadwayspokane.com (509-279-7000)

VISUAL ARTS

CLAY JEWELRY WORKSHOP FOR KIDS Create a pair of clay earrings. All supplies and tools provided. A clip-on earring option is also available. Ages 8-16. July 1, 10 am-noon. $40. J Bones Musicland, 2204 E. Mallon. clayjewelryspokane.square.site EMERGING ARTISTS: EXPANDING HORIZONS Featured emerging artists are showcasing their best work in this gallery show dedicated to supporting growing artists in the community. July 1-30, WedSat from 11 am-5 pm. Free. New Moon Art Gallery, 1326 E. Sprague. newmoonartgallery.com (509-413-9101) FIRST FRIDAY Art galleries and businesses across downtown Spokane and beyond host monthly receptions to showcase new displays of art. July 1 from 5-8 pm. Details at firstfridayspokane.org FIRST FRIDAYS WITH POAC First Friday arts events in Sandpoint, organized by the Pend Oreille Arts Council. July 1 from 5:30-7:30 pm. Pend Oreille Arts Council Gallery, 110 Main St. artinsandpoint.org

INADEQUATE VISIONS New works by Mariah Boyle (drawings that reflect her daily travels in and around Spokane) and Bradd Skubina (new colored pencil and collage work). July 1-30, Fri-Sat from 12-8 pm. Free. Saranac Art Projects, 25 W. Main Ave. (509-350-3574) JAN SCHNURR: JUBILEE The new mixed media collection features a child-like expressive manor of art created with cut paper, tissue, newspaper magazines and maps. July 1-29, Fri from 5-8 pm. Free. Kolva-Sullivan Gallery, 115 S. Adams St. kolva.comcastbiz.net (509-458-5517) OBJECT/ARTIFACT Sculptors Rob McKirdie, Tybre Newcomer and Cozette Phillips present a collection of work that reflects on their past explorations and how materials preserve and shape perception. July 1-Aug. 26, Mon-Fri from 10 am-5 pm. Free. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland Ave. spokaneartschool.net KAY WEST July’s guest artist showcases her mixed media art inspired by global warming and how it affects lakes, streams, oceans, fish and people. July 1-30, daily from 11 am-7 pm. Free. Pottery Place Plus, 203 N. Washington St. potteryplaceplus.com (509-327-6920) MARY PAT KANALEY: PONIES IN THE PARK Art by the co-recipient of a 2021 Spokane Arts Grant Award for the upcoming picture book “Ponies In The Park” with author Mary Louise Carpenter. July 1-30, daily from 9 am-9 pm. Free. Liberty Building, 402 N. Washington. spokanelibertybuilding.com (509-385-2369) BEAUTY IN HAND: CERAMICS SHOW CURATED BY PETER HELD: Beauty In Hand is brought to you by The Art Spirit Gallery in conjunction with appraiser and curator, Peter Held. This exhibition brings together eminent artists from across the country in a celebration of ceramics. July 2-Aug. 1, daily from 11 am-6 pm. July 2-Aug. 1, 11 am-6 pm. Free. The Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com/ (208-765-6006)

WORDS

3 MINUTE MIC Auntie’s long-running first Friday poetry open mic. July 1, 7-8 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (509-838-0206) CAROLINE PATTERSON: THE STONE SISTER A book reading and discussion. July 2, 4 pm and July 3, 6 pm. Free. Memorial Community Center, 415 Wellington Place, Hope, Idaho. memorialcommunitycenter.com SIGNING: ROBERT PERRET & AMY THOMPSON The authors of Camas Prairie Railroad sign books during the farmers market. July 2, 10 am-noon. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. bookpeopleofmoscow.com BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm; Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. bit. ly/2ZAbugD (509-847-1234) LEAH SOTTILE: WHEN THE MOON TURNS TO BLOOD Leah Sottile’s new book examines the culture of end times paranoia and a trail of mysterious deaths surrounding Lori Vallow and her husband, Chad Daybell. July 6, 7-9 pm. $6$45. Montvale Event Center, 1017 W. First. spokesman.com/northwest-passages ALKA JOSHI: THE HENNA ARTIST As part of the SCLD Online Authors Series, Alka Joshi discusses her book “The Henna Artist.” July 7, 6 pm. Free. scld.org/ authors-series n

JUNE 30, 2022 INLANDER 41


HISTORY

Red, White, Blue and Green Three ways to look at the United States’ relationship with cannabis BY WILL MAUPIN

T

he Fourth of July is a celebration of all things red, white and blue. When it comes to green, however, the United States of America doesn’t have too much to celebrate. Our country’s relationship with cannabis has been fraught and frustrating, even now as legalization spreads and past wrongs are starting to be righted. This long weekend is a perfect time to take a dive into the contentious, complicated history of cannabis in the United States.

HISTORY ILLUSTRATED

Cartoonist and writer Box Brown’s 2019 graphic novel, Cannabis: The Illegalization of Weed in America, takes a look at

the history of cannabis in the Americas. Brown takes readers through hundreds of years, from the plant’s first arrival in the New World in the 1500s to the often outright racist regulations of the drug in the 20th century. Over 256 pages, simple but bulky characters, reminiscent of old newspaper comic strips, illustrate the stories written on the page. Versions of the book are available in hardcover and for e-readers.

MOVIE NIGHT

If you’re looking for something a little lighter, perhaps spend an evening watching a film widely considered to be among the very worst ever made: Reefer Madness, the infamous 1936 propaganda film on the perils — highly exaggerated — of cannabis consumption. Whether it’s

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factual information about cannabis or an attempt to make a quality film, Reefer Madness gets just about everything wrong, but that’s what makes it fun. It is more than just a film to laugh at as you watch, though. Perhaps the only thing it does well is to shine a light on the absurdism of the moral panic that once surrounded cannabis and cannabis users. Reefer Madness is in the public domain and available free, in full, on websites like YouTube and Wikipedia.

POTCAST

Journalist Ann Marie Awad worked with Colorado Public Radio and PRX to create three seasons and 30 episodes of On Something, a podcast exploring life and society after legalization. Awad explores how cannabis connects to all aspects of American culture, from minority communities to celebrities to the pharmaceutical industry and beyond. On Something leads listeners through stories that show there’s a lot more to legalization than dispensaries being opened and joints being sparked. Like its pre-legalization history, the post-legalization landscape of cannabis in America is complex and convoluted. On Something is available on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, and others. n

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GREEN ZONE

BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

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Readings By Appointment $25

Language Camps for Kids

Available at more than 1,000 locations throughout the Inland Northwest.

3908 North Lincoln Open 10-4 Fri & Sat 509.747.0800

Spanish Immersion 2022

Fluent Spanish Speaking Counselors for a true immersion experience!

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Come join LEOlingo 2022 for a week of fun - in Spanish!

TOTAL PEST MANAGEMENT PROGRAM WORRY FREE PEST CONTROL AS LOW AS $19.95 PER MONTH

LEOlingo camps offer children between 5 and 12 full Spanish Language immersion. Native Spanish speaking counselors share culture and language through games, songs, crafts, theater & more! Located in the South Perry District. No previous Spanish experience necessary.

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ENERGY HEALING SESSIONS

Four sessions available - book your spot now! 6/27-7/1 | 7/11-7/15 | 7/18-7/22 | 7/25-7/29

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BUYING Estate Contents / Household Goods See abesdiscount.com or 509-939-9996

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DOWN 1. ____ music 2. It’s good for your health 3. Ones arranging spots 4. Big night for a high schooler 5. To date 6. Squatting muscles 7. Surrealist Magritte 8. It might end in a ZIP code: Abbr. 9. Thingy 10. Model Harvey whose dad is Steve Harvey 11. Charges 12. FEMA offering 13. Buttonless garment 19. 1% alternative

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THIS WE ANSWER EK’S S I SAW YO ON US

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21. “Blueberries for ____” (classic children’s book) 25. Obie-winning playwright Will 26. Sinus doc 28. Bagel topper

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Miner’s Daughter” 35. Hockey puck, e.g. 36 37 39. Average guy 40. It awaits your return, in brief 41 41. It’s hair-raising 42. Vinyl records, for short 46 47 48 49 43. Vaccine target 44. Active during the day 54 52 53 47. Feminine 56 57 58 48. New York Times and Washington Post, e.g. 63 64 49. “Most likely ...” 51. Doctors Without Borders and 67 others, in brief 52. Applied, as face paint 70 53. Creator of Watson on “Jeopardy!” 73 57. Quattro + tre “ROMAN NUMERALS” 60. Slam-dance 61. Snowballs, in a snowball fight 30. Transports for Tarzan 62. Police procedural beginning in 2003 31. One whose calling is making calls? 63. Polling expert Silver 32. Francis ____, “Love Story” 64. Public transit option composer 65. What an “O” means in XOXO 33. Loretta with the #1 country hit “Coal 66. Filmmaker DuVernay 30

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72. Cleaned with water, as a sidewalk 73. “Family Ties” mother

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38. The world’s most powerful person, per a 2018 Forbes list, who never looks a day over 11? 42. Young fellow 45. Aching 46. Makeover result, maybe 50. British royal who never looked a day over 501? 54. Laundry basketful 55. Cocksure 56. They’re used in a crunch 58. Prefix with life or wife 59. Features that help 20-, 29-, 38and 50-Across show their age? 65. Central Park vehicle 67. Actress Raymonde of “Lost” 68. Sch. founded by Thomas Jefferson 69. Strike from the Bible? 70. Backsplash installer 71. Actress Gadot

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ACROSS 1. Rodeo wear 6. Object of a knight’s quest 11. Budgetary excess 14. Green power option, informally 15. Brought about 16. Bit of baloney 17. Words before Reason or Aquarius 18. Belly 20. Longtime Beastie Boys collaborator who never looks a day over 1,009? 22. Prey of a murder hornet 23. Issa of “Insecure” 24. “Hmm, OK” 27. Env. within an env., perhaps 29. Two-time Oscar-nominated actress who never looks a day over 54? 34. Fix, as a lawn 36. “It’s a possibility for me” 37. Young fellow

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JUNE 30, 2022 INLANDER 47


Play where the big winners play.

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Fireworks Show

MONDAY, JULY 4 TH | 10 PM Our parking lot can easily accommodate large crowds. Join us for one of the most spectacular fireworks shows in the Inland Northwest.

FOOD AND BEVERAGE SPECIALS ARE AVAILABLE ALL 4 TH OF JULY WEEKEND

W E LC O M E H O M E .

48 INLANDER JUNE 30, 2022

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