__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

JUNE 10-16, 2021 | SWIMSUITS, NOT SWEATPANTS

SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER


1

2

3

4

5

6

4

3

6

Post Falls Coeur d’Alene Spokane

2

1

THE EATGOOD

5


Photo ©Northwest Media

PACIFIC NORTHWEST WINERY OF THE YEAR Clearwater Canyon Cellars, 2020

IDAHO WINERY OF THE YEAR

Vine 46, 2021 Colter’s Creek, 2020 Clearwater Canyon Cellars, 2015

COME FOR THE WINE, STAY FOR THE

e r u t n e adv Photo ©Brad Stinson

Escape the crowds and taste the Northwest's best kept wine secret — Lewis-Clark Valley AVA wines in the unique canyons of the Clearwater and Snake Rivers. Explore Hells Canyon, North America’s deepest river gorge aboard custom built jet boat or whitewater rafting excursion. Experience summer in our region full of award-winning wine, eclectic dining experiences, outdoor recreation, historic downtowns, culture and history. We think you’ll find more than a few adventures, and wines, to fall in love with. Photo ©Brad Stinson

Photo ©Jennifer Rapoza

LEWISTON, ID • CLARKSTON, WA www.visitlcvalley.com | (509) 758-7489


INSIDE VOL. 28, NO. 35 | COVER ILLUSTRATION: SHELBY CRISWELL

5 COMMENT 8 NEWS 16 CULTURE SUMMER GUIDE 18

FOOD FILM MUSIC EVENTS

19 21 23 25

BULLETIN BOARD GREEN ZONE ADVICE GODDESS I SAW YOU

27 28 33 34 DE AT PAPAMU PHYS.COM

EDITOR’S NOTE

W

e’ve been biding our time for far too long. We’re tired. We’re bored. We’ve watched everything there is to watch. We’ve baked more sourdough than we could stomach. We’ve drained every bottle in the house and Marie-Kondo-ed the crap out of our closets. We’ve Zoomed to hell and back. We’ve been endlessly patient patriots, and now comes our reward: a big fat juicy SUMMER GUIDE! Hallelujah. Now, in the half light of the pandemic, dread behind us, hope ahead, let it ring across this great land of ours: We’re back, summer is back, and we’re hellbent on making up for lost time. We will linger later, hug harder, laugh, dance, drink, celebrate. For whatever comes next, this moment is ours. — JACOB H. FRIES, editor

No substitution s. Additiona l charge for additiona l toppings . Availabl e at participating

ENJOY EATING OUT THIS SUMMER WITH THE

Summer Guide SUMMER DEALS FOR THE WHOLE GANG AT EVERY RESTAURANT! SCAN TO CHECK IT OUT

SUMMERTIME STYLE FROM THE PATIO TO THE KITCHEN TO THE CLOSET

MANUFACTURING MESS PAGE 12

THE MISSION NEVER ENDS PAGE 16

FAIR TRADE - LOCAL - EARTH FRIENDLY

VIRTUAL SHOPPING NOW AVAILABLE

SHOPKIZURI.COM

CURBSIDE PICKUP AVAILABLE 35 W. Main, Spokane | Mon-Sat 10-5:30 | (509) 464-7677 •

NOD TO NOLA PAGE 19

VINYL DAYS PAGE 23

INLANDER

SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO • INLANDER.COM

1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, SPOKANE, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 | EMAIL: INFO@INLANDER.COM THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. It’s printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x213 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email frankd@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2021, Inland Publications, Inc.

spring prin pring

INTO A NEW HAYDEN HOME NEW HOMES AVAILABLE THROUGHOUT THE INLAND NORTHWEST | Visit HAYDEN-HOMES.com

Hayden Homes are marketed by New Home Star Idaho, LLC., New Home Star Washington, LLC., and Coldwell Banker Schneidmiller Realty WA-HAYDEHL937BH ID-RCE-29144

JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 3


P O LL S R E D REA TO ADVERTISE IN THIS ISSUE, CONTACT:

advertising@inlander.com, 509.325-0634 ext. 215

Best Daytrip

JUNE - JULY 2021

FREE

Best Pandemic Hero

LAST

Restored mid-century campers and their devoted fans PAGE 18

FOOD Summer Picnic Essentials 34 People Professor of Prefab 46 SUPPLEME NT TO THE

indd 1

INLANDER

5/27/21 11:58 AM

Living Well in the Health

Home

Inland Northwest Food

Family

People

JUNE ISSUE ON STANDS NOW! Pick up your copy at area grocery stores and Inlander stand locations For information on advertising in the next edition, contact: advertising@inlander.com

4 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

Best Takeout Food

The The sun sun is is out, out, businesses businesses are are open open and and itit is is time time to to vote vote for for your your favorite favorite people, people, places places and and things things that that make make

NCE! A Polls Open CH th TE VOMay 26

the the Inland Inland Northwest Northwest an an amazing amazing place place to to live! live!

ppy Happy Ha s ails Trail Tr CVR_HH_060721.

HERE COMES THE BEST OF THE BEST

NOW!

Best Local TikTok Star

Best Farmers Market

Best Outdoor Dining

POLLS CLOSE SUNDAY JUNE 13

BestOf.Inlander.com


COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

Dan Nailen (x239) MANAGING EDITOR/ARTS & CULTURE Chey Scott (x225) FOOD & LISTINGS EDITOR Nathan Weinbender (x250) FILM & MUSIC EDITOR

Derek Harrison (x248) ART DIRECTOR

Chris Frisella COPY CHIEF

Wilson Criscione (x282), Daniel Walters (x263), Samantha Wohlfeil (x234) STAFF WRITERS

Young Kwak PHOTOGRAPHER

Amy Alkon, Michael Allen, Will Maupin CONTRIBUTORS

Lillian Piel INTERN

ADVERTISING Kristi Gotzian (x215) ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Carolyn Padgham (x214) SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE Jeanne Inman (x235), Autumn Adrian Potts (x251) Claire Price (x217), Wanda Tashoff (x222) ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Kristina Smith (x223) MARKETING DIRECTOR Houston Tilley (x247) EVENTS & PROMOTIONS ASSISTANT

PRODUCTION & SUPPORT Tom Stover (x265) PRODUCTION MANAGER

WHAT ARE YOU LOOKING FORWARD TO MOST THIS SUMMER THAT YOU DIDN’T GET TO DO LAST YEAR BECAUSE OF COVID? EDITOR’S NOTE

Normally, we ask our question of the week of people we randomly encounter on the street. But with the coronavirus pandemic, we instead asked our followers on social media to share their thoughts.

COLLEEN FRIEND: Traveling to see family including newest grandson! TYLER MAGEE: Watching all my favorite bands go back on tour and NOT come to Spokane. JAMIE STORM: Not crowded indoor concerts. Maybe outdoors, it’s still gonna be weird for a while.

Derrick King (x238) SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Wayne Hunt (x232)

Travis Beck CIRCULATION SUPERVISOR

Jess Kennedy (x212) ADVERTISING SUPPORT

OPERATIONS Dee Ann Cook (x211) BUSINESS MANAGER

Kristin Wagner (x210) ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

booking online at hankshatchets.com

IAN NORDSTROM: Live music and sports. CAYA BERNDT: Honestly, just breathing easy. We’re fortunate in the Pacific Northwest, in that we have an abundance of nature to keep us occupied during the summer. I’m already an outdoors person, so I didn’t feel like I was missing out on many of my favorite activities, like hiking… Now, a year in and fully vaccinated (thank medicine!), it will be nice to just go to Riverfront and not feel a jolt of panic and disappointment when there’s a crowd. ALAN GANGER: Getting the vintage hydroplane back on the water. Been getting it ready for an event at the end of June.

CONSULTANT

Frank DeCaro (x226) CIRCULATION MANAGER

Spokane 509-309-2722 3904 N Division St CDA 208-930-1476 2506 N. 4th St

DUSTY WILLIAMS: Socially distance myself from people...oh wait.

Ali Blackwood (x228) CREATIVE LEAD

Axe throwing is great fun even in sunny weather!

MATTHEW WEAVER: Hugging my mom, dad and brother. TOM SANDERSON: Two words. Base. Ball. NICOLE MILES: Watershed. NEAL SCHINDLER: Out-of-town summer vacation. ROCCO ALTOBELLI: Going to Canada. n

Have an event?

GET LISTED! SUBMIT YOUR EVENT DETAILS for listings in the print & online editions of the Inlander.

Inlander.com/GetListed Deadline is one week prior to publication

JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 5


COMMENT | CULTURE

FAMILY LAW Divorce Spousal Maintenance / Alimony Child Support Modifications Parenting Plans

Craig Mason

AUTO INJURY • CIVIL LITIGATION

W. 1707 BROADWAY, SPOKANE, WA | 509443-3681

A weekly email for food lovers Subscribe at Inlander.com/newsletter

MORE FINANCIAL HELP is available now The american rescue plan ACT Means Washingtonians qualify for more cost assistance to reduce the price of premiums of health plans sold through the Washington Healthplanfinder!

www.wahealthplanfinder.org Uninsured? Shop for health insurance

plans on Healthplanfinder and see the NEW lower premiums you’re eligible for.

Need Help? Call our Navigators to shop and enroll for health coverage! (509) 340 - 9008 6 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

Toward a More Lasting Union We have met the enemy, and it is not compromise BY MICHAEL ALLEN

A

s we emerge from the pandemic, America has a lot of work to do, and it can only get done together. Even when that seems impossible right now, just know we have seen periods like this before. The late 1960s and early ’70s come to mind: racial divide, war, and political and economic strife threatened to tear our union apart. Let’s focus on some critical issues together and strive for a more lasting resolution. Turn off the media, and go visit your neighbors. It seems today you can find a media outlet that will reinforce any echo chamber you are looking for, factual or not. Then social media amplifies it, and faceless folks who do not even know each other fight about it. Now that we can, let’s get back to breaking bread together and having real conversations about real issues… and realize that we can like each other and still have different opinions. We desperately need political leadership that is results oriented and not re-election oriented. Compromise is not the enemy. As historian Shelby Foote wrote about the Civil War: “It was

because we failed to do the thing we really have a genius for, which is compromise. Americans like to think of themselves as uncompromising. Our true genius is for compromise. Our whole government’s founded on it. And, it failed.” Our national debt is out of control and neither party seems to care. As I write this, if each active taxpayer in the United States were allocated an equal portion of the overall debt, we would each owe $226,113. More alarming is that our national debt to gross domestic product output is at 129 percent. This is higher than even our funding of World War II. As a reference in 1982 it was 32 percent. This might be the hardest lift. It will take political leadership to cut funding and increase taxes/revenues until we can get back to a more sustainable financial level, yet keep the economy growing.


REPLACE WORN OUT FURNITURE, SHOP OUR FULLY STOCKED SHOWROOM!

Now that we can, let’s get back to breaking bread together and having real conversations about real issues. Immigration policy needs reform. As our birthrate continues to fall, we need to keep growing our population. We don’t want to find ourselves in the stagnation issue that has faced Japan with falling birthrates and an asset bubble. Sound familiar? Open borders is not a solution, but a more aggressive reform would benefit our country in the long run. And both parties need to stop using the DACA kids as a political football while doing nothing about it. Give them a pathway. Climate change is a real thing, and I am exhausted by both (1) the folks who preach about it, then drive off in an SUV, and (2) the folks who deny it. The simple goal is this: We want to do what is best for our planet, and to connect that to our actual behaviors to reduce greenhouse gases. Moving to extremes like the proposal to ban all new natural gas lines into homes and businesses as an energy source, regardless of actual impact on lives, is the type of policy that inhibits ever getting to a real solution. The Cold War is back. While we are bickering with each other, foreign countries are expediting their efforts to destabilize both our political and infrastructure systems. And they are getting pretty good at it. Just in the past month hackers have shut down an energy pipeline, meat processing facility and other large institutions. This is a real threat and needs to be addressed immediately. These are just some of the big issues. We must move away from this blame game and looking back in history to find some injustice to be mad about. Hot tip, all human history has injustice in it. Let’s stop looking for reasons to be mad or canceling someone we disagree with. Let’s own up when we err, not blame someone as being worse. Let’s learn from the past and keep moving forward and finding solutions for each other. Now go break some bread with your neighbors. n Michael Allen, a business and entrepreneurship professor at Spokane Community College, is a former associate athletic director at Eastern Washington University. A longtime Republican, he previously served six years on the Spokane City Council.

SAVE 10-50%

EVERYTHING IS ON SALE!

HURRY! HUNDRED’S OF ITEMS REDUCED!

F R E E LO CA L D E L I V E RY • F I N A N C I N G AVA I L A B L E • LOW P R I C E G UA R A N T E E

303 Spokane Ave, Cd’A • 208 664-2131 rungefurniture.com

BE AWARE! AWARE!

Planning some D.I.Y. projects that involve digging?

DON'T DIG INTO TROUBLE! Click www.callbeforeyoudig.org two business days before to alert utilities.

Know what’s below. Click before you dig. JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 7


Former NAACP President Kurtis Robinson worked with Spokane Police Chief Craig Meidl to discourage violence during last year’s protests, but they have starkly different views about race and policing.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Yet Another Conversation About Race Will the latest round of discussion between the Spokane Police Department and communities of color be different from the others?

T

he first meeting of a new, still unnamed Spokane coalition dedicated to discussing police reform lasted seven hours, and the conversation didn’t really get to police reform. Instead, the two facilitators kicked off the May 18 discussion — nearly a year after George Floyd’s death sparked national protests — with a particularly heavy icebreaker question: What was their own experience with the cops? One by one, people spoke, including the police chief, Spokane’s mayor, and Black, Hispanic and Indigenous leaders. Kurtis Robinson, former president of the Spokane NAACP, talked about a sense of betrayal. He wanted to be a police officer when he was growing up, but after being arrested for robbery to support his cocaine addiction, he found himself being further traumatized by the profession he’d once considered heroic. City Council President Breean Beggs remembered watching the news as a kid and seeing police officers

8 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

BY DANIEL WALTERS beating Berkeley college students who were demonstrating for free speech. And Black Lens publisher Sandy Williams talked about the police pulling her over for no reason, saying her short hair and masculine clothes got her mistaken for a Black man. “There was no justification or reason” for the stop, she says. And she noticed something during this inaugural meeting: All of the minorities in the group had painful personal experiences with law enforcement, while the White members’ direct experiences were largely positive. “It was a microcosm of the gulf between our two communities,” Williams says. But many of the people there have shared these experiences before. To Spokane Police Chief Craig Meidl — who attended via video conference due to a recent shoulder surgery — the statements largely reinforced a message he’s already heard. “We’ve had these conversations for the last five years,” Meidl says.

Yet while this first discussion represented the beginning of a new chance for police reform, some of those, like Robinson and Williams, tempered their optimism for yet another big conversation about race and policing with a kind of wariness. There was a sense that they’ve been here before. “The intentions of the people in the room seem genuine, but they have in the past, too,” Williams says. “Every one of them starts out with great hope, and somewhere along the way we don’t get to the goal.”

TWO DIFFERENT WORLDS

Even though it happened more than a thousand miles away, Meidl says, the death of George Floyd last year “really ripped off the scabs” of injuries that local people of color had experienced at the hands of the law enforcement. His department didn’t kill George Floyd, but he knew it was still a massive blow to his efforts to build trust with those communities. ...continued on page 10


IT’S WORLD’S GREATEST DAD MONTH! Celebrate Dad all month long with loads of father-friendly fun. • $44,000 Concerts and Cash Giveaway • Stay & Play Kalispel Golf and Country Club golf package • Great gear and a special offer at Windfall • La Rive Spa specials to pamper papa • And gift cards for any other way he wants to play Sure beats the pants off another bad tie.

NORTHERNQUEST.COM | 877.871.6772 | SPOKANE, WA

JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 9


NEWS | CRIMINAL JUSTICE “YET ANOTHER CONVERSATION ABOUT RACE,” CONTINUED... But Beggs, a longtime police reform advocate, saw an opportunity for real reform in the aftermath. He put together a list of 17 potential reforms the City Council could pass, including mandating more transparency, deploying more behavioral health specialists, and restricting the department’s use of dogs, rubber bullets and armored vehicles. But Beggs says then-City Administrator Wes Crago warned him that if he just tried to push it through the council, “there’ll be a fight,” and suggested they instead sit down with the chief and other community members and find reforms they could all support with “full-throated enthusiasm.” Beggs agreed. By August, city spokesman Brian Coddington says, they had an outside location at the convention center booked, planning on kicking off a 100-person community police reform discussion. Another spike in COVID cases killed the plan. Nine months passed. Crago resigned for still-not-fully-explained reasons. The Spokane Police Guild and the city agreed on a new contract. Gov. Jay Inslee signed into law the Legislature’s own slew of police reforms. And when Spokane’s police reform group finally held its first meeting last month, the group had been whittled down to 17 members and two facilitators — and met behind closed doors. Coddington even sent out a nondisclosure agreement and asked attendees to sign it — an initial attempt to create a “safe space” for attendees to talk, he says. Ultimately, the NDA was abandoned. While Mayor Nadine Woodward says future conversations may be more open, the private nature of the first conversation was critical for everybody to get to know each other “at a personal, raw, honest level.” “We don’t want the light on,” Woodward says. “To have that in the public, those conversations really won’t be authentic.” But even in that first meeting, the challenge for coming to an agreement was clear. On one side you had community members like Robinson who wanted the police department to acknowledge that “race is the issue.” Fixing the problem, he thinks, will take more than just policy tweaks. “Brother, let me just be very blunt about this: I’m not calling for this [police department] to reform,” Robinson tells the Inlander. “I’m not calling for it to re-construct. I’m calling for it to transform.” But on the other side, you had Chief Meidl. He says that it’s important to keep an eye out for bias and prejudice, but he’s just not seeing it widespread in his department. “With all of the body cameras, and all of the cellphones, all of the surveillance cameras ... there is nothing to show systemic racism by the Spokane Police Department,” Meidl says. Three reports on race in the Spokane Police Department over the last half-dozen years have all found major racial disparities. For example, Black people only make up about 2-4 percent of the population, but according to the most recent report by a consulting firm called Police Strategies, they make up 11 percent of the arrests and police stops. “The data shows disproportionality all over the place,” Robinson says. “Period.” But Meidl points to other data points in the report — about 12.5 percent of the suspects accused of crimes in Spokane are Black, for instance — to argue that some

FROM LEFT: Mayor Nadine Woodward, Council President Breean Beggs and Police Chief Craig Meidl. racial groups are being stopped and arrested more often because the crime rate is higher for those groups. Meidl stresses that he’s not saying that skin color causes people to commit more crime, but rather that differences in other factors that drive crime, like “poverty, education, home life” and “who you associate with” were to blame. “The data will show you that African Americans have a lower median household income, lower graduation rates and all of these other things,” Meidl says. “Are we causing the problem? Or are we dealing with a symptom of another problem?” Meidl says the goal of these community conversations is to respectfully seek out common ground. “Let’s talk about experiences and feelings and history and past transgressions,” he says. “Let’s also talk about the current data. What does the data show?” But Beggs pushes back hard against Meidl’s analysis, sending over a lengthy Seattle University School of Law paper rebutting a similar claim made by two state Supreme Court justices about the disproportionality in Washington state’s prison system. Less than 4 percent of those in poverty in Spokane are Black. Income alone can’t come close to explaining the disproportionate number of police stops, Beggs argues, much less the fact that Black people are far less likely to actually get a ticket after being pulled over than White people. “The reason they didn’t get a ticket is because they didn’t do anything wrong!” Beggs says. Robinson comes closer to agreeing with Meidl’s premise. But he says there’s a reason for that “tough truth” about higher crime rates in some communities: Systemic racism — decades of disenvestment and discrimination, including from law enforcement — has done serious damage to the Black community. And Williams says that this kind of debate has effectively derailed reform efforts in the past. “You never get to doing anything because you’re always having that conversation — that we’re not all getting stopped because we’re criminals,” Williams says. “You spend so much time there that you don’t get to the real work.”

“We don’t want the light on. To have that in the public, those conversations really won’t be authentic.”

10 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

THE REAL WORK

Meidl stresses that the department has already done a lot of real work to reform in the last decade. They’ve adopted body cameras and studied use of force. They’ve mandated implicit bias training, de-escalation training

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

and crisis intervention training. They’ve explicitly tried to recruit more minority police officers. And, now, thanks to the state Legislature, they’ll be implementing additional reforms in the months ahead. This last session, the Legislature imposed restrictions on the police use of tear gas, neck restraints, car chases and no-knock police raids. It strengthened rules requiring officers to report bad behavior they witness from fellow officers and intervene to stop it. Most crucially, Beggs says, the state passed a law requiring all appropriate de-escalation tactics to be exhausted before deadly force is used, including creating physical distance, negotiating verbally, and calling in mental health specialists. Beggs still has reform items on his wishlist. He wants to pare back the special “qualified immunity” protections that make it impossible to sue police officers in many circumstances, a stance that is likely to face fierce opposition from the police unions. Then again, contrary to their reputation as the “big, bad Guild” opposed to reform, Guild Vice President Tim Schwering notes that they were the ones who invited Beggs to the table to help negotiate the police contract earlier this year. “What this city needs is actually more oversight,” Schwering says. “My idea is that we should really have an inspector general [providing oversight] for the entire city.” Schwering calls for the reform discussions to be more open and encourages the Inlander to request to attend the next still-unscheduled meeting. The idea of having an independent inspector who could scrutinize issues throughout the entire city is one that Beggs himself publicly championed. Beggs believes the shift in strategy from the Guild is genuine. “I think it’s an evolution,” Beggs says. “The old way wasn’t working for anyone.” For her part, Woodward says she thinks the police department is“doing a really good job,” but also says, “I think we’re at a place where people want to see some action, to be honest with you. … That’s not going to happen overnight.” Neither is healing the rift between law enforcement and communities of color in Spokane. Meidl says it’s a “generational thing that will take many generations.” And while Robinson deeply disagrees with Meidl’s view that there’s no systemic racial bias in the police department, he says he sees a “quality of character” in the police chief, and he’s choosing to believe that, with time, he can convince Meidl to come around to his way of thinking. “I am fighting for my hope,” Robinson says about transforming the police department. “If I was to rely on them to give me hope, I would be hopeless.” n


NEWS | HAZING

‘It is Not Justice’ Fifteen WSU fraternity members charged following death of pledge in 2019 BY WILSON CRISCIONE

A

year and a half ago, Sam Martinez, a pledge at the Alpha Tau Omega fraternity at Washington State University, was told to finish a half-gallon of rum with another pledge. Within hours, Martinez lost consciousness, and the next morning, he was found dead from alcohol poisoning. Now, Whitman County prosecutors are charging 15 fraternity members involved that night with furnishing liquor to minors, a charge that carries a maximum sentence of a year in jail and a $5,000 fine. But despite existing evidence of hazing, the fraternity members won’t be charged with hazing because the Pullman Police Department allowed the statute of limitations for that charge to expire before handing evidence to prosecutors. Pullman Police Chief Gary Jenkins has previously told KREM that the investigation took so long because of the large number of witness interviews and challenges accessing cellphone records. Martinez’s family says in a statement that they are Sam Martinez COURTESY PHOTO “deeply disappointed” no one will face a hazing charge. “While the charges may lead to some level of accountability, it is not justice,” the family says. “It does not bring us closure.” Washington’s anti-hazing law defines it as “any method of initiation into a student organization or living group” that “causes, or is likely to cause, bodily danger or physical harm, or serious mental emotional harm” to a student. The family last year filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the university and the fraternity, with a trial date set for March 2022 in King County Superior Court. The week before Martinez’s death, Alpha Tau Omega put pledges like Martinez, 19, in a room where they were handcuffed to a sorority pledge, then told that the key to the handcuffs was at the bottom of a fifth of hard alcohol and that they had to finish the entire bottle before they would be released, according to the lawsuit. The night of Martinez’s death, Nov. 11, 2019, Martinez and other pledges were told to finish bottles of hard alcohol as fraternity brothers cheered them on, court records state. Martinez and one other pledge were supposed to finish a half-gallon of rum. By 10:30 pm, Martinez lost consciousness and was taken to a bathroom where frat members tried to force him to throw up. They then brought him downstairs at 11:30 pm and laid him on his side, the lawsuit states. The next morning, according to the lawsuit, other pledges noticed Martinez turning blue and told Alpha Tau Omega members but it wasn’t until half an hour later that paramedics were called — too late to save Martinez’s life. His family notes that WSU had admonished Alpha Tau Omega for hazing years earlier. “If our family had known the truth about Alpha Tau Omega’s track record at WSU, we believe Sam would still be alive today,” they say in the statement. n

HEALTHCARE COVERAGE FOR

Did you know?

GROWING FAMILIES

Adding a new member to your household through birth, adoption, fostering, or marriage may qualify your family for free or low-cost Washington Apple Health coverage. Call Healthy Kids Together to see if your family qualifies and get help enrolling your new family member in a health plan.

CONTACT US TODAY! (509) 340-9008 healthykids@betterhealthtogether.org www.BetterHealthTogether.org/HealthyKids

healthy kids together

This printed material is supported by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) as part of an award totaling $250,000. The contents are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily represent the official views of, nor an endorsement, by CMS, HHS or the U.S. Government.

JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 11


NEWS | BUSINESS

Tech-Style Fail

Katerra’s factory in Spokane Valley was the largest capacity cross-laminated timber manufacturing site in North America. SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL PHOTO

A year and a half after opening its Spokane Valley timber factory, Katerra suddenly shuts its doors BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

W

hen Katerra was preparing to build its massive timber factory in Spokane Valley in 2017, the company bragged that using tech-company-style vertical integration would improve the building process and make projects more affordable. The idea was that Katerra would disrupt the construction industry and provide a one-stop shop for projects. That would free customers from hiring an architect, an engineer, a contractor, an electrician, a plumber, an HVAC installer, as well as vendors for timber, sinks, cabinets and faucets, and other contractors. “Katerra is intended to be one throat to choke for the entire construction process,” one of the company’s three co-founders, Spokane-based Fritz H. Wolff, told the Inlander in September 2017. “It’s owning everything in the construction process and minimizing the amount of handoff that has traditionally happened.” The company’s Spokane Valley factory opened with great fanfare in late 2019 and has the largest capacity to produce cross-laminated timber, or CLT, in North America. The material, created by gluing smaller boards together in a perpendicular pattern, has been lauded for its environmental sustainability and for its beauty. But it appears the tech-inspired approach, involving aggressive acquisitions in the construction industry, ultimately led to an epic failure, as Katerra abruptly told its employees across the country on June 1 that nearly

12 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

everyone would lose their jobs by June 4. The company told staff that it wouldn’t be able to pay out accrued leave or severance as it had with previous layoffs. “As you learned yesterday, Katerra has determined it must wind down the majority of its U.S. business operations,” a June 2 email to employees provided to the Inlander states. “As a result, your employment with Katerra will be ending on June 4, 2021.” Roughly 55 Spokane Valley employees lost their jobs. Katerra also told the Washington Employment Security Department it was terminating 117 employees in Seattle. The company did not respond to requests for comment. But company leadership admitted in previous news reports that they may have taken on too many projects too fast. With the sudden closure, many of those projects may be left in the lurch.

TIMBERRRRR

Had the Spokane Valley mass timber facility been its own company, it could have been thriving due to a high demand for construction materials right now, says a now former Katerra employee who served in a leadership position within the company’s mass timber division. The company’s partnership with Avista and McKinstry to build the cutting-edge, net-zero Catalyst Building in Spokane’s University District received great praise,

and industry leaders have started designing more projects with CLT throughout the region. The Valley plant was ready to supply several projects. But others in the timber industry say that between lumber prices soaring over the last year and a glut of CLT-producing factories opening in recent years, it’s actually hard to turn a profit with CLT at the moment. Russ Vaagen, CEO of Colville-based Vaagen Timbers, which produces CLT and other mass timber products such as glulam, says that while he wasn’t exactly expecting Katerra to shut down last week, he wasn’t necessarily surprised due to other things that have happened over the past few years. He finds it hard to believe that the Valley factory was profitable. “We have record high lumber prices, and that’s by far the biggest factor right now in mass timber,” Vaagen says. “A company trying to do something as disruptive as Katerra was, it put them in a really rough spot.” While Vaagen agrees there is plenty of room to change the construction industry, his initial impression was that Katerra leaders didn’t have the right type of experience. “That’s really exciting, the idea that tech would come in and modernize the building industry and CLT was part of it,” Vaagen says. “I just think their plan was, like tech, they were going to figure it out as they go. But there’s real cost implications to some of this stuff.” Before Katerra was really a functioning company, Vaagen says some of the people involved told him they planned to “own the forest.” “The audacity to me, when I heard that, was that they just didn’t know enough about the industry and about how it’s made up,” he says. Over decades in the timber industry, Vaagen says, his family has acquired about 50,000 acres of forestland. But it still only provides about 10 percent of the Colville Vaagen Brothers mill’s needs. If you want to own every stage of the process, you’d need about half a billion dol-


lars just to buy enough forest to supply a mill like that, he says, before you’ve even built the mill. Aside from the price of lumber tripling from about $500 for 1,000 board feet to about $1,500 in just the last year, Vaagen says Katerra also brought its plant online at the same time as several other CLT manufacturing plants around North America, including Vaagen Timbers. The result was that rather than getting on yearlong waiting lists as had been the case around 2015, people were readily able to buy CLT for their projects, as the ability to produce it was suddenly higher than demand, Vaagen says. He sympathizes with the many employees who’ve been laid off, some of whom might be brought on at Vaagen Timbers as they grow, and he says he’s fielding calls already from clients whose projects need a new supplier. “I think there’s a lot of great people there,” Vaagen says. “We’re gonna do our best to help their clients that are left in the lurch.” One of the projects that could be impacted by the sudden closure of the Valley location is Founders Hall, a new building that’s about halfway completed on the University of Washington’s Seattle campus. UW is working with Hoffman Construction to assess the impact of Katerra’s announcement on the project, according to a UW spokeswoman. Other projects that planned to use CLT from Spokane Valley haven’t started yet, the former Katerra employee tells the Inlander, so they can potentially use another supplier.

Weddings & Banquets Celebrate your Special Day at Coeur d’Alene Casino Resort! BEST IDAHO WEDDING VENUE Nestled in the outdoor beauty of Northern Idaho, Coeur d’Alene Casino Resort offers premier amenities and lodging for your big day. Discover the best Coeur d’Alene wedding venue and book with us today.

TECH FUNDING AND LEADERSHIP

Katerra’s business structure included consolidation and tech-style fundraising. In addition to creating products like CLT and panels with wiring and plumbing in them already, Katerra acquired architectural and engineering firms, contractors, and other businesses to streamline the process of building apartments and office buildings. Founded in Silicon Valley in 2015, Katerra had raised more than $2 billion since its inception, including large investments from Greensill Capital and SoftBank, a venture capital firm that has backed other failed “unicorn” startups including WeWork, which rents out all-inclusive office spaces but has lost billions and failed to go public. SoftBank also backed Greensill. Katerra co-founder Wolff, who didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment Monday, June 7, stepped down from Katerra’s board in late 2019. His family’s construction business, Wolff Company, was one of the first large Katerra customers, and there were reportedly issues with some of those projects. More apparent money and leadership issues would follow. In May 2020, CEO and co-founder Michael Marks was fired due to few signs of turning a profit despite spending the billions they’d raised, tech news organizations reported. In September 2020, Spokane’s Wonder Building owners sued Katerra for suddenly removing all their stuff from their office there and backing out on a lease meant to go through 2026, the Spokesman-Review reported. To avoid going into bankruptcy proceedings in late 2020, Katerra restructured its debt, with Greensill (a London tech startup) forgiving $435 million in debt in December in exchange for a 5 percent stake in Katerra, the Silicon Valley Business Journal reported. But Greensill, which was owed $4.6 billion by companies around the world, filed for bankruptcy in March, the New York Times reported. Without money to back new loans for construction projects, Katerra couldn’t go forward, according to a company email provided to tech news site the Information. “The impact has been severe — with cash reserves reduced to the point where the current business model can no longer be sustained,” the Information reports the email said. The Spokane Valley facility will be mothballed, so it could be sold to another company, the former Katerra mass timber employee tells the Inlander. The company filed for bankruptcy on Sunday, June 6, the Wall Street Journal reported, noting that it has $1 billion to $10 billion in liabilities, with up to $1 billion in assets. The international portions of the business may continue. n

Catering & Banquets BOOK YOUR EVENT We offer specialized packages for groups from 12 to 1,200 to suit all of your needs! For more information or to book your event, call 1 800-523-2464.

W E LC O M E H O M E .

CASINO | HOTEL | DINING SPA | CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF 3 7 9 1 4 S O U T H N U K WA LQ W • W O R L E Y, I D A H O 8 3 8 7 6 1 800-523-2464 • CDACASINO.COM

JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 13


NEWS | EDUCATION

Cotton Classroom Black Spokane twins say they were humiliated by middle school lesson asking them to clean cotton BY WILSON CRISCIONE

T

An eighth-grade social studies class at Spokane’s Sacajawea Middle School asked kids to clean cotton.

wins Emzayia and Zyeshauwne Feazell couldn’t believe what was happening in their eighth-grade social studies class at Sacajawea Middle School. The class was going to do a “fun activity,” Emzayia recalls their teacher saying. Then the teacher brought out freshly picked cotton for the entire class. “When she gave it to us, I was like, ‘This is not right,’” Emzayia tells the Inlander. All of the students were asked to clean cotton as part of an assignment on May 3. Spokane Public Schools spokesperson Sandra Jarrard says the lesson was about the Industrial Revolution and discussed the cotton gin, but the school district has refused to offer any more information about the lesson. She says a third party is conducting an investigation into the incident. The 14-year-old twin girls, meanwhile, say they felt alienated and humiliated. They were two of three Black students in the entire class, and they say they were made uncomfortable by other students’ remarks that they couldn’t believe Black people had to clean cotton as slaves. The controversy comes at a time when Spokane Public Schools is working on its “equity policy,” as a result of a racial equity resolution passed last year by the school board. Emzayia tells the Inlander that during the lesson, the teacher explained how the cotton gin increased the demand for slaves. The teen says she was offended by having to actually clean the cotton, and she was upset that the teacher didn’t do anything about the other students making comments about it. The twins’ mom, Brandi Feazell, tells the Inlander that when she called the school and talked to a principal assistant, Taylor Skidmore, he was dismissive and defensive. “He incited the situation to be worse and defended the actions of the teacher,” Feazell says. “He called me back later and said the best that he could do for me and the girls was that he could ‘segregate’ my daughters out of the classroom into a room all by themselves so they would not be around the White teacher anymore.” Brandi Feazell is asking for Skidmore to be removed from his position, and for the teacher and other school administration to face discipline for not taking the incident seriously. The family also wants a formal, public

apology from the school district, along with anti-racism training to be implemented. She adds that the racial equity resolution needs to be implemented districtwide now. “There needs to be curriculum changes within the district,” Brandi Feazell says. “That needs to be more than just a conversation. That needs to be implemented.”

S

acajawea — a school with a Black student population of just 3.3 percent — isn’t the first school in recent years to be criticized for asking students to pick or clean cotton. In 2019, parents in South Carolina were enraged when a class was asked to pick cotton and sing slave songs while on a field trip. In New Jersey last year, a teacher was cleared of any wrongdoing after allegedly asking eighth-grade students to pretend to be slaves picking cotton as he made whip-cracking noises in the classroom. In Flint, Michigan, a parent successfully forced a middle school to remove a cotton picking lesson from an eighth-grade class in 2019. That exercise was based on a lesson called “Cotton Classroom,” a lesson plan from a website called cottonclassroom.com that said it was a “hands-on lesson” that is a “unique approach to teaching about the Industrial Revolution, the importance of Eli Whitney’s cotton gin, and the difficulty of slavery.” The lesson has since been removed from the website, and the teachers who designed it offered an apology saying that “Cotton Classroom recognizes the unintended harm done from a previously posted lesson outline,” and they encouraged educators to “engage in a robust dialogue about how history is taught and how it affects people today.” Jarrard, the district spokesperson, repeatedly declined to say whether the lesson has been taught before in Spokane Public Schools. She instead repeatedly said simply that the students were learning about the Industrial Revolution and that the cotton gin was discussed. The eighth-grade Sacajawea teacher who taught the lesson didn’t return an Inlander message seeking comment, nor did Skidmore or the Sacajawea principal, Jeremy Ochse. Jarrard said there were “conflicting reports” about what took place in the classroom and that the school district “looks forward to sharing the outcome” of the

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

third-party investigation. She says the investigation started May 17, two weeks after the incident. Brandi, however, was first contacted by the thirdparty investigator on May 28, just after media members called Spokane Public Schools about the incident, says Dan Ophardt, an attorney with child advocacy group TeamChild. Ophardt provided the Inlander with an email sent to Brandi on May 28 in which the investigator introduces herself. Another email on June 2 suggests the investigation hadn’t begun yet: “I know the Spokane School District is eager to begin the investigation process, but I would prefer to interview you and your daughters first before moving on to other witnesses.” Ophardt says he’s surprised it took the district this long to begin the investigation. “I welcome transparency, and I am glad that Brandi and the girls got it, but it appears to be from the media pressure the district was feeling,” Ophardt says. “If the district was doing something internally [before that], that wasn’t transparent.”

J

arrard, with Spokane Public Schools, would not say whether any teacher or administrator has been disciplined or put on paid leave while the third-party investigation is underway. She instead referred the Inlander to the online staff directory for Sacajawea Middle School. Skidmore’s name appears to have been removed last week from the Sacajawea and school district websites. The twin girls, meanwhile, haven’t been back to school since the cotton lesson. “My daughters currently would like an actual safety plan — emphasis on the safety — in order for them to return to school,” Brandi Feazell says. She says she remains disappointed with the way Sacajawea and the school district have responded to her complaint. “I was really hoping that it wasn’t going to be just dismissed,” she tells the Inlander. “I was hoping they would say, ‘This is unacceptable, period, and we as the district are taking action with the teacher, directly,’ and then start some momentum on other action being taken — not for it to fall on deaf ears.” n

‘SOMEONE LIKE YOU’ This isn’t the first time Taylor Skidmore, most recently Sacajawea’s principal assistant, has been accused of being racist toward a student. Quincy Marin, 24, says that in 2015 he tried to enroll at Lewis and Clark High School, where Skidmore was an administrator at the time.

14 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

Marin, who is Black, says the administrators initially told him he couldn’t enroll there. They later changed their mind, but Marin says Skidmore commented on his clothes — a hooded parka and boots — and told him that he was initially stopped because “when someone like you comes into

the building nothing ever goes right.” Marin tells the Inlander that he never experienced “such a bold presence of racism” before that day. Weeks later, Skidmore expelled Marin during the homecoming dance following a verbal dispute with other students, according to court docu-

ments in a lawsuit against the district challenging the expulsion. Skidmore alleged that Marin threatened him, but Marin says he only threatened to report Skidmore to the school board if he “put hands” on him. Marin argued in court that the school district violated state school

discipline rules and violated his right to free speech by suspending him for protected speech. Spokane Public Schools eventually agreed to pay $10,000 to settle the case, says Dan Ophardt, Marin’s attorney. — WILSON CRISCIONE


ENJOY LIVE ENTERTAINMENT & $2 DRAFTS! Join us for $2 Drafts, all day every day on the Patio! You’ll love our selection of draft beers as well as the great live entertainment we have lined up for the summer. See you soon!

INLANDER PARTIES ON THE PATIO Free Entertainment! ` ` ` `

June 10 | Wiebe Jammin July 8 | Christy Lee August 12 | Wiebe Jammin September 9 | Christy Lee

spokanetribecasino.com

#YouJustWinHere

JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 15


LITERATURE

The Mission Never Ends

Trent Reedy, co-author of Enduring Freedom, signs copies at Wishing Tree Books. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

In their new book Enduring Freedom, Spokane and Afghan authors show importance of friendship, education BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

J

oe Killian is a high school senior who has already enrolled in the National Guard to earn money for college when he and his classmates watch in horror on 9/11 as reports roll in of multiple attacks on American soil. Killian’s first reaction is that he needs to call in to see if he’s being called up for duty. Meanwhile, halfway around the world, Baheer is a younger teen boy living in Kabul, Afghanistan, with his family. They regularly cover their windows and keep the volume incredibly low when risking simply watching a movie together, for fear that their Talib neighbor will report them to the Taliban, which for years has banned television, music and many forms of art. Baheer’s family learns about the events of 9/11 through a VHS recording smuggled to them wrapped up in a rug. The family soon moves to Farah in western Afghanistan, fearing America’s revenge may primarily target Kabul, the capital. It’s in Farah where the two young men later meet as one is deployed on a reconstruction mission (not exactly the terrorist-fighting effort he had imagined) and the other is trying to go to school while helping his family make ends meet. They learn of their mutual hatred of

16 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

Taliban tactics and develop an unlikely friendship as they navigate wartime. The story of Baheer and Joe, as told in the young adult novel Enduring Freedom, is very close to the real life experiences of Jawad Arash, an Afghan man who teaches English there, and Trent Reedy, now an author based near Cheney. “Enduring Freedom is as close as any reader is going to get to 9/11 and the war in Afghanistan that 9/11 triggered,” Reedy tells the Inlander. “Most of these things happened, for good or for worse. There are funny things, horrific things, and I’m particularly grateful that we were able to get the Afghan perspective from Jawad, which is something we don’t get in a lot of books.”

20 YEARS LATER

It doesn’t escape either author that the timing of their retelling of Operation Enduring Freedom’s early years aligns with the 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks this year, or that President Joe Biden has announced the U.S. will fully pull out its remaining troops in Afghanistan by Sept. 11. One of the first things Arash mentions when asked

for his thoughts on the withdrawal is a bombing that happened May 8 at an Afghan school for young girls. It’s estimated that as many as 90 people were killed, many of them young girls who were caught in secondary bombs set off after an initial suicide bomb. When the U.S. first arrived in Afghanistan, the Taliban had not allowed girls to go to school for years, and attacks were frequent. (The Taliban has denied involvement in the May 8 attack). That’s changed over the past two decades, with much wider acceptance of girls’ education. Still, terrorist threats linger as kids simply try to go to school. “These are the things we are going through,” Arash says. “The decision [to pull out] has made lots of confusion among people because [the U.S.] partial presence and support was quite important to the Afghan people.” Reedy says one of the goals of their book is to show the many American families who’ve lost loved ones to the war that their efforts were not in vain. The reconstruction efforts, particularly to support education, are a key part of preventing history from repeating in that region. “It’s kind of like doing heart surgery, I think. … If [the surgeon’s] not gonna finish the surgery, it’d be far


better if he never started at all,” Reedy says. “So I am worried about my friends in Afghanistan.” The uncertainty in the region and the continued attacks are also reasons why Arash does not show his face even when the two authors have spoken to American schoolchildren via Zoom presentations about their book. He has a young child and fears revealing where he lives.

EDUCATION

One of the biggest developments throughout the book is the evolution of the perspectives of each young man, particularly Joe, who has hateful thoughts about Afghans at the start of his tour. “I’m very conscious of being a veteran of war who writes war stories for children that don’t want to make it sound like a video game or fun and games or some quest for honor,” Reedy says. “I had terrible ideas about Afghanistan.” Indeed, the description of Joe’s deployment focuses a lot on the many mundane tasks the soldiers are asked to do: stand guard atop the wall of their compound for hours in the hot sun, stir a bucket of poop until it dries out to prevent diseases while they wait for a sewage system to be installed, unload trucks of supplies that will keep them doing the other tasks until another assignment arrives. But through the nervousness of the action scenes, and despite the wariness with which Joe first speaks with Baheer, the authors show how both young men ultimately learn they’re more similar than they thought. “There are still plenty in America today who still harbor these terrible ideas about Afghanistan,” Reedy says. Reedy worried at first about including some of the stereotypes and negative outlooks that he himself held, but they represented a truth that both men found important to highlight, and Arash says misconceptions exist on both sides. It was important, they felt, to highlight the two young men overcoming that distrust to form a friendship. “The people who need to hear it most are those who have the same thoughts,” Reedy says. “They’re more likely to be convinced by ‘I was in your exact same position.’ I think that has a lot more potential for education.” Ensuring access to a formal education is also a major priority throughout the book, as Baheer works to finish school and pushes his family to allow his sister to attend. As the real-life bombing just last month indicates, simply going to school can still be dangerous for girls, as Afghanistan continues to root out those who would repress education and discourage people from learning more about the world. “If there’s any hope of Afghanistan offering to its children a better life, anything like peace, it’s going to come through people like Jawad Arash who are dedicated to education, to free thought,” Reedy says of his co-author. It’s up to civilians and soldiers alike to keep the mission of the last 20 years alive and fight those who would suppress knowledge, Reedy says. “Forget politics, and whatever your religion, it’s about forces that want to control how you think, what you say, how you communicate — that want to control how you live your life,” Reedy says. “Against the people who want to be able to sing or want to be able to express a point of view, who want to be able to question, or talk or laugh together.” He knows it might sound melodramatic, but so long as there’s a threat against those freedoms, “this mission never ends.” Reedy and Arash make sure to thank educators, librarians and all those who work to empower education despite the risks that may exist in their political environment or in their country. “They are actually the front-runners for changing the world,” Arash says. “And I also want to make sure I never forget to thank all the servicemen and women of the United States who served in Afghanistan. I really thank specifically those who didn’t get the chance to go back to their families and lost their lives saving ours.” n Enduring Freedom is out now and can be found locally at Auntie’s Bookstore and Wishing Tree Books.

JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 17


CULTURE | DIGEST

THE BUZZ BIN

How to use THIS

PULL-OUT SECTION ON THE HOUSE The wacky world of vaccine incentives keeps getting more strange. West Virginia is actually offering free guns to some winners of their “vaccine lottery.” I prefer the moves of Spokane brewery Humble Abode, offering a free pint through the month of June to anyone who shows their vaccination card and proof of getting either their Johnson & Johnson one-shot shot or their second Modern or Pfizer jab this month. Find out more about their “Pints for Pokes” at facebook.com/ humbleabodebrewing. (DAN NAILEN)

Pull down then out

Kacey Musgraves delivered the author’s fave album since 2017.

A FAREWELL TO ARTS A BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

ll good things must come to an end, and this column marks my last as the Inlander’s film and music editor, a position I took up in late February 2017. It’s been a great run, and I’ve decided to commemorate the last four years with a look back at the music and movies that made the biggest impression on me, and which will likely define this tumultuous time in the decades to come.

KENDRICK LAMAR, DAMN. (2017)

As if his Pulitzer wasn’t enough of a gauntlet throw, Lamar’s recent trifecta of albums is a remarkable achievement unto itself. After the revelatory brashness of 2012’s good kid, m.A.A.d city and the structural poetry of 2015’s To Pimp a Butterfly, DAMN. was a riveting snapshot of life as a Black man in America.

KACEY MUSGRAVES, GOLDEN HOUR (2018)

A rising country star transforms into a glam-pop princess, becoming a pariah within the honky-tonk crowd and delivering a stellar set of songs in the process. Golden Hour is not only my favorite album of the last four years, it’s one of the most exciting career pivots in ages.

FIONA APPLE, FETCH THE BOLT CUTTERS (2020)

Future art historians will no doubt enumerate the works that best captured the weirdness of 2020, and no list would be complete without this thrilling comeback

18 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

LP. Released mere weeks after national lockdowns took hold, Fetch the Bolt Cutters remains the most exhilarating album of the pandemic era.

GET OUT (2017)

Jordan Peele’s horror satire was the big new release during my first week as film editor, which would be reason enough to include it. But it’s also a movie that will be studied for a long time, not only for what it says about 21st-century racism but for how tightly and intelligently it’s constructed.

ROMA (2018)

The best movie I saw between 2017 and now was Alfonso Cuaron’s gorgeous, dreamy, deeply sad period piece about an indigenous housekeeper and her wealthy employers, set against the political upheaval of 1970s Mexico. A profound moviegoing experience, and an instant classic.

PARASITE (2019)

Bong-Joon Ho’s Parasite isn’t just a twisty thrill ride about con artists and marks; it’s also a blistering commentary on class disparity that is so distinctly about right now. It was also the first non-English language film to win Best Picture, suggesting the Hollywood elite didn’t realize they were the villains of the piece. On the flip side — the worst movie I saw in all this time? Easy: 2018’s The Happytime Murders, starring Melissa McCarthy and a bunch of R-rated Muppets. A crime against both humanity and puppetry. n

WESTWARD, HO! One of the most-played games of my childhood was Oregon Trail 2 on CD-ROM. So I was pumped to learn there’s a new update — in gameplay and cultural representation of Native Americans — now out via the Apple Arcade subscription service. This new version brings all the nostalgia for fellow ’80s and ’90s kids who journeyed the Trail (Hunting! Caulk the wagon and float! Dysentery!) with modern resource management and decision tree mechanics. While some reviewers in the Apple store complained it’s too hard, I almost made it to Oregon in a couple of hours before I messed up and accidentally gave all my food to a wayward traveler... and then my party died. That said, I think this remake is just challenging enough to be interesting and engaging. The music and graphics are also top-notch. (CHEY SCOTT)

NOT a paddle NOT aboard phone. NOT a drink on the patio

YES! A handy guide to plan your summer and share with friends!

THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST There’s noteworthy new music arriving in stores and online June 11. To wit: MAMMOTH WVH, Mammoth WVH. Eddie Van Halen’s kid Wolfgang debuts his own band. LUKAS NELSON & PROMISE OF THE REAL, A Few Stars Apart. Willie’s kid and his ace band knocked out 11 new songs during the pandemic. SLEATER-KINNEY, Path of Wellness. No famous parents here. Expect to hear a few of these tunes at their Spokane show Aug. 6. (DAN NAILEN)

Now you know how!

PULL-OUT & KEEP!

SUMMER GUIDE


SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 1


All the fun you can handle. Hit the road — or the water — with an RV loan from STCU. Competitive rates and 100% financing available.* Apply today at stcu.org/rv, or call us at (800) 858-3750. All loans subject to approval.

*


… R E M SUM

Y L L A FIN

y to make d a re e ’r e w s, e in c Thanks to vac summer right o d d n a e m ti st up for lo

S

ummer 2020 was unforgettable for all the wrong reasons. Road trips not taken. Summer camps not visited. Family reunions, weddings and birthday parties delayed to some unknown future date. No Hoopfest, no summer concerts, no baseball, no Pig Out in the Park, no swimming pools. A whole lotta “no” when we normally fill our summers with “hell yes!” A year later, it seems like a miracle that we’ll get to experience the kind of summer we want to after 12 months of tragic losses. It won’t be “normal” and some COVID-fighting restrictions are still in place, but as you’ll see in this year’s Inlander Summer Guide, there’s plenty of fun to be had. Whether you’re looking to splash in local swimming holes, bike to your heart’s content, eat your weight in huckleberries and ice cream, or catch up with all the live music you missed out on last year, you’ll find options in the following pages. There are suggestions for family fun and for road trips, even for staying home and staying safe and out of the wildfire smoke we hope doesn’t come. So put on some sunscreen, fill your cooler, and kick up your heels with this year’s Summer Guide. And get ready to do summer again, and do it right. Finally. — DAN NAILEN, MANAGING EDITOR

EDITOR

Jacob H. Fries

MANAGING EDITOR Dan Nailen

ART DIRECTOR Derek Harrison

COVER ARTIST Shelby Criswell

COPY EDITOR Chris Frisella

LISTINGS EDITOR Chey Scott

CONTRIBUTORS Wilson Criscione E.J. Iannelli Will Maupin Carrie Scozzaro Daniel Walters Nathan Weinbender Samantha Wohlfeil

CONTENTS FOOD & DRINK 4 MUSIC 12 SPORTS 20 ROAD TRIPS 28 WATER 36 BIKES 50 ARTS 56 SMOKE 68 KIDS & FAMILIES 74 CALENDAR 82

OLIVE OILS BALSAMIC VINEGARS SPICES & HERBS LOOSE LEAF TEAS

formerly Spice & Vine Mercantile

328 N. Sullivan, Suite 2 • Spokane Valley 509-315-4036 • tasteandtea.com • @tasteandtea

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 3


FOOD & DRINK

Crave! is back for a grand tasting Aug. 27.

With pandemic restrictions lifting, let’s call it a “foodie summer” BY CHEY SCOTT

CRAVE! NORTHWEST FOOD & DRINK CELEBRATION

After last year’s postponement, Crave! is back to fulfill all our cravings for locally crafted bits and bites enjoyed outdoors on a warm summer night. The Spokane Valley food fete, co-created by chef Adam Hegsted, is held on the grassy lawn of CenterPlace Event Center, which is also just yards from the Spokane River and Centen-

4 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

nial Trail. This year’s event is taking shape in an abbreviated form (compared with previous multiday iterations), with a grand tasting event set for Friday, Aug. 27. Tickets are $65 and all-inclusive; eat as much as you want, and come back again and again for more of your favorite chef-made dishes prepared fresh on site. There’s

DOYLE WHEELER PHOTO

A

fter a year of pandemic restrictions on big events, dining out and just hanging out with friends, we now declare 2021 as “foodie summer.” All our favorite regional food festivals are back to sate our pandemic-repressed appetites for everything from fair-style concessions food to world-class barbecue and much, much more.

also plenty of opportunities at Crave! to sample your way around the region’s many local purveyors of beer, wine, cider and spirits. Details are still coming together for this year’s event, with updates to this year’s guest chef lineup and tickets released at cravenw.com.


PEOPLE WATCHING, GETTING DRESSED UP, AND ENCORES. WHAT ARE THINGS WE MISSED IN 2020? We also would’ve accepted, “Things we’re looking forward to in 2021.” So round up your friends and make some plans for a fun-filled summer of live outdoor entertainment and good times at Northern Quest Resort & Casino.

Jeff Dunham Jul 10 Ice Cube Jul 22 Smokey Robinson Jul 24 Dierks Bentley Jul 30 Rodney Carrington Aug 6 Billy Idol Aug 12 Brantley Gilbert Aug 13 with Jackson Dean

Roger Daltrey Sep 1 with Dan Bern Foreigner Sep 16 Sublime with Rome & Lifehouse Sep 19 Darius Rucker Sep 24 Old Dominion Sep 25 with Caitlyn Smith

Collective Soul and Better Than Ezra Aug 20 with Tonic Sammy Hagar & The Circle Aug 22

GET TICKETS AT NORTHERNQUEST.COM LINEUP SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

NORTHERNQUEST.COM | 877.871.6772 | SPOKANE, WA

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 5


FROM THE ASHES IDAHO

Ashes to ashes… raw meat to tasty barbecued treats. OK, maybe it doesn’t have the same ring to it, but wood-fired barbecue is the main attraction of North Idaho’s From the Ashes, An American Smoked and Fired Foods Adventure. Last year’s event was yet another COVID-19 postponement, but From the Ashes is back for Father’s Day weekend, on Saturday, June 19. Held at Settlers Creek event venue just outside Coeur d’Alene, the barbecue bonanza showcases nationally recognized pitmasters from around the U.S. alongside some of the Northwest’s top talent. For the event’s third occasion, pitmasters from past lineups have been invited back to share their favorite smoky proteins — whole hog, chicken, ribs, brisket, tri-tip, ribeye, etc. — along with classic barbecue sides. Those featured pitmasters are Anthony DiBernardo (Swig & Swine in Charleston, South Carolina) Porter Kinney (Porter’s Real Barbecue in Kennewick, Washington) and Spokane’s own Colin Barker, pitmaster at TT’s Old Iron Brewery and BBQ. To complement the savory, smoky mains coming off Settlers Creek’s massive on-site smokers and grills, other local culinary experts lead “Application Stations” to showcase how the rest of us can incorporate barbecue techniques, flavors and ingredients into home-cooked summer meals. This event has sold out before, so don’t wait to get tickets: $50 for adults, $25 for ages 5-13 and $140 for a family-of-four package. A portion of proceeds from the event support the Wishing Star Foundation, and all tickets include a free shuttle to and from the venue from downtown Coeur d’Alene. Details at fromtheashesidaho.com.

PIG OUT IN THE PARK

If you’ve been hankering and hungering for all the indulgence and variety of Pig Out in the Park, fear not: It’s also back for 2021 for its 41st happening after skipping a year. Returning during its usual Labor Day weekend run, Pig Out 2021 is Sept. 1-6 in Spokane’s newly shined-up gem, Riverfront Park. It’s looking good that by then the outdoor food fest won’t be hindered by restrictions, meaning you can shoulder up with strangers while waiting to order deep-fried Oreos, bacon-wrapped hot dogs and whatever else your taste buds desire. More than 50 food booths totaling 200-plus menu items are on the docket, plus beer/wine gardens, live entertainment and more. Details at pigoutinthepark.com.

YOGA + DRINKS AT ARBOR CREST

This is the proper technique for doing Pig Out in the Park. STUART DANFORD PHOTO

6 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

The views, the moves, the booze — all three combined make for one ultra-relaxing summer morning at Arbor Crest Winery during an outdoor yoga series under its big vineyard tent. This year’s offerings expand upon the winery’s popular annual “Class & A Glass” Pilates-plus-wine event, which is also set for the evening of Aug. 10. The new “Yoga & Mimosa” series has classes scheduled for June 27; July 11; and Aug. 1, 15 and 29, all starting at 10 am. Haven’t used that yoga mat in a while? You’ll be just fine. All sessions are appropriate for any skill level. Make sure to preregister, as tickets ($38/class) aren’t available at the gate. Included is bottled water and one beverage. Details at arborcrest.com.


Start your summer adventures along the river, or in it! Whether you’re biking with your friends along the Centennial Trail, or kayaking to Boulder Beach, the Spokane River is sure to offer you Room to Roam.

visitspokane.com

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 7


taqueria

voted spokane's best tacos!

full bar dine in takeout delivery Happy hour 3-6 daily and all day tuesday! 10 n post, spokane (509) 474-9618

+

Now on Inlander.com: National and international stories from the New York Times to go with the fresh, local news we deliver every day

8 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

MAKING UP FOR LOST MEALS A

mong so many activities missed during the pandemic’s lockdown on life last summer, dining out makes the top of my list. Between the on-and-off restrictions that kept many of us from dining in person (but ordering lots of takeout) and my unwavering commitment not to interact with anyone outside my household to avoid catching and spreading COVID-19, there are several recently opened restaurants I’ve still not checked out in person. Plus, many more favorite dining rooms that I’ve not visited in well over a year. First up, an existing favorite: Gander & Ryegrass. My partner, Will, and I both missed birthday dinner outings during the pandemic. So to treat each other and make up for those postponed celebrations, we’ve made reservations at the downtown eatery to enjoy the multicourse chef’s tasting menu. Next is summer 2020 newcomer Wooden City Spokane. The downtown branch of an eatery with Tacoma roots has since generated plenty of local buzz as one of the best new spots to open


SUMMER FUN IS ON THE PATIO! ` June 12 | Craft Fair

INLANDER PARTIES ON THE PATIO | 5PM – 8PM Gander & Ryegrass is on the list for a long-delayed visit.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

last year. Having caught glimpses of the dining room and bar when I picked up takeout, I was quickly charmed by an open floor plan (and that mezzanine!) and style blending modern touches with a historic brick building. Magnolia American Brasserie inside the new Hotel Indigo on downtown’s west end is also on my summer dining bucket list. Like Wooden City, the restaurant’s dining room blends elements of old Spokane with the new for a contemporary vibe, striking a careful balance between casual and upscale. Sepia-toned scenes of old timey revelers by local artist Daniel Lopez are complemented by sparkling chandeliers. I could keep going with this list. Will and I don’t have any major out-of-town getaways planned, so I’m expecting a fairly low-key — but busy! — summer catching up with friends and family and enjoying some amazing meals in great company. — CHEY SCOTT

` June 10 | Wiebe Jammin ` July 8 | Christy Lee ` August 12 | Wiebe Jammin ` September 9 | Christy Lee

spokanetribecasino.com

#YouJustWinHere

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 9


FARMERS MARKET MOMENTS

While we thankfully didn’t lose out on opportunities to shop from local growers and food producers last season, restrictions at the time discouraged many of the communal activities that make farmers markets special: live music, food vendors, fun side activities, and just the chance to linger and mingle with friends and neighbors. Thankfully those social elements are mostly back on the table for 2021, and it’s even OK to take off your mask if you’ve been vaccinated! While the area’s longest running and largest farmers markets have all returned in full force, one newcomer is now happening in the Garland District. The Garland Summer Market happens Tuesdays from 3-7 pm through Sept. 14, hosted in two parking lots, one at Garland and Post and the other at Post and Providence. More at facebook.com/GarlandSummerMarket.

GET UP TO GREEN BLUFF

In addition to the many farmers markets we’re so fortunate to have in the Inland Northwest, locals can go straight to the source and pick fresh summer produce with their own hands at Green Bluff’s farms. The Green Bluff Growers Association — established way back in 1902! — makes it easy not to miss your favorite fruit with a handy guide to growing seasons on its website. You can also keep these general timelines in mind: June and July is strawberry season, July is all about cherries, peaches are ready in August, and apple harvest runs from late September into October. Find all the details to make the most of your next Green Bluff visit, including where to grab a bite to eat or a glass of beer or wine to sip, at greenbluffgrowers.com.

South Perry Thursday Market is one of summer’s highlights.

THE REGION’S MARKETS

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Here are dates, times and locations for each of the region’s markets, all filled with local vendors of fresh produce, handmade and artisan goods, food trucks, entertainment and more.

KENDALL YARDS NIGHT MARKET Wednesdays from 5-8 pm through Sept. 22. On West Summit Parkway between Cedar Street and Adams Alley, downtown Spokane. KendallNightMarket.org

SANDPOINT FARMERS MARKET Saturdays from 9 am-1 pm and Wednesdays from 3-5:30 pm through Oct. 16. At 231 N. Third Ave. (lot across from Joel’s Mexican). SandpointFarmersMarket.com

ATHOL FARMERS MARKET Fridays from 2-6 pm through Sep. 24. At 30355 Third St. (next to community center and library) Facebook: AtholFarmersMarket

KOOTENAI FARMERS MARKET Saturdays from 9 am-1:30 pm through October 30 (Highway 95 and Prairie, Hayden) and Wednesdays from 4-7 pm through Sept. 29. At Fifth and Sherman, downtown Coeur d’Alene. KootenaiFarmersMarkets.org

SOUTH PERRY THURSDAY MARKET Thursdays from 3-7 pm through Oct. 28. At Perry St. and Tenth Ave., Spokane. ThursdayMarket.org

CHEWELAH FARMERS MARKET Fridays from 11 am-3:30 pm through Oct. 15. At Chewelah City Park. Chewelahfarmersmarket.com CLAYTON FARMERS MARKET Sundays from 11-4 pm, June 6 through Sept. 26 (except during the county fair). At the Clayton Fairgrounds, 4616 Wallbridge Rd. Facebook: Clayton Farmers Market and Small Farm Animals

LIBERTY LAKE FARMERS MARKET Saturdays from 9 am-1 pm through Oct. 9. At Town Square Park, 1421 N. Meadowwood Ln. Llfarmersmarket.com MILLWOOD FARMERS MARKET Wednesdays from 3-7 pm through Sept. 29. At Millwood Park, 9103 E. Frederick Ave. FarmersMarket.MillwoodNow.org

SPIRIT LAKE FARMERS & FLEA MARKET Thursdays from 3-6 pm through Sep. 16. At 82 Industrial Park (Spirit Valley Christian Fellowship). Facebook: Spirit Lake Farmers and Flea Market ST. MARIES FARMERS MARKET Fridays from 4-7 pm, June 4 through Sep. 24. At Mullan Trail Park (across from cemetery). facebook/stmariesfarmersmarkets SPOKANE FARMERS MARKET Saturdays from 8 am-1 pm through Oct. 30; Wednesdays from 8 am-1 pm, June 9 through Oct. 27. At 20 W. Fifth Ave. SpokaneFarmersMarket.org

EMERSON-GARFIELD FARMERS MARKET Fridays from 3-7 pm, June 4 through Sept. 24. At the IEL Adult Education Center, 2310 N. Monroe St., Spokane. Market.emersongarfield.org

MOSCOW FARMERS MARKET Saturdays from 8 am-1 pm through Oct. 30. At Friendship Square, Fourth Avenue and Main Street. Ci.moscow.id.us

FAIRWOOD FARMERS MARKET Tuesdays from 3-7 pm through Oct. 12. At the Fairwood Shopping Center, 319 W. Hastings Rd., Spokane. Fairwoodfarmersmarket.org

N.E.W. FARMERS MARKET Wednesdays and Saturdays from 9 am-1 pm through Oct. 30. At 121 E. Astor St., Colville. NewFarmersMarket.org

SPOKANE VALLEY FARMERS MARKET Fridays from 4-8 pm, June 4 through Sept. 17. At CenterPlace Regional Event Center (near Discovery Playground), 2426 N. Discovery Place. SpokaneValleyFarmersMarket.org

GARLAND SUMMER MARKET Tuesdays from 3-7 pm through Sept. 14. At Garland and Post (parking lot). Facebook: Garland Summer Market

NEWPORT FARMERS MARKET Saturdays from 9 am-1 pm through Oct. 30. At 236 S. Union Ave., Newport. Facebook: NewportFarmersMarket

WEST CENTRAL FARMERS MARKET First Tuesday of the month from 4-7 pm through Oct. 5. At the West Central Abbey, 1832 W. Dean Ave. westcentralabbey.org/farmers-market

HILLYARD FARMERS MARKET Mondays from 3-7 pm, June 7 through Oct. 25. At 5102 N. Market St., Spokane. Facebook: HillyardFarmersMarket

PULLMAN FARMERS MARKET Wednesdays from 3:306:30 pm, May 26 through Oct. 13. At Brelsford WSU Visitors Center, 150 E. Spring St., Pullman. facebook.com/pullmanmarket

WONDER SATURDAY MARKET Saturdays from 9 am-1 pm through Oct. 30. At the Wonder Building, 835 N. Post St. WonderSaturdayMarket.com n

10 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021


summer

activityguide

New Summer Adventures!

Aquatics Little Spokane river shuttle service Wide Variety of Summer Camps Kayaking Summer Disc Golf League Stand up Paddle boarding Tons of Adaptive Activities

AVAILABLE NOW AT SPOKANEParks.ORG

SpokanePARks.org | Call 311 or dial 509-755-2489

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 11


MUSIC

The sound of live music’s return is one of the clearest indications the world is getting back to normal

12 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

BY DAN NAILEN

Y

ou don’t have to be emerging from a disastrous and deadly pandemic of global proportions to get excited about summer concert season. But it sure doesn’t hurt. Live music was one of the myriad victims of COVID-19, and summer 2020 was brutal for concert lovers who typically spend months (and a good amount of hard-earned cash) traipsing from amphitheaters to festival grounds to arenas to clubs. I’m talking about the people who wallow in as many shows as possible year-round, but especially in the sunshine of summer when outdoor shows take center stage. Summer 2021 is going to look a lot different, thankfully. Rescheduled shows from the lost last year and new tours by artists who, like most of us, have been stuck at home for over a year means plenty of live music to choose from, and most of it outside — which just happens to be the safest way to see a show right now. Concert announcements have been coming in fast and furious the past few weeks, so keep an eye out all summer for new gigs. In the meantime, here are some of the best concerts that summer in the Inland Northwest has to offer as of press time.


NorthEast Washington Educational Service District 101 partners with the Mead School District (Creekside Elementary) and Green Gable Children’s Learning Center North & Waterford Court (South Hill) to provide

FREE ECEAP Preschool

ECEAP provides high quality preschool curriculum, healthy meals and snacks, parent activities, and family support services for families who qualify.

WHO IS ELIGIBLE?

Children who are 3 or 4 years old by August 31, 2021 who are: • From a family with a low annual income (i.e. family of 4, $29,150 or less); and/or • In Foster Care or Kinship Care; and/or • Qualified for school district special education services (IEP); and/or • Have developmental or environmental qualifying factors that could affect school success.

Apply Online Today

www.esd101.net/learning/early_childhood/ECEAP

Gladys Knight plays Festival at Sandpoint.

THE LIVING LEGENDS

Some artists bring a multigenerational appeal with them when they tour, thanks to some combination of deep catalogs and historical significance. There are several examples headed our way this summer, starting with the legendary SMOKEY ROBINSON, playing Northern Quest Resort & Casino on July 24. Whether leading the Miracles or as a solo artist, Robinson helped build the Motown record label into a household name on the strength of songs like “Shop Around,” “I Second That Emotion” and “Tears of a Clown.” The Festival at Sandpoint likewise is welcoming a Motown veteran in GLADYS KNIGHT, although she earned her greatest fame fronting the Pips after moving to a new label and promptly topping the charts with “Midnight Train to Georgia.” Like Robinson, Knight is in the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, and she’ll be bringing a slew of R&B classics (but no Pips) to her show in Sandpoint Aug. 5.

The Who dubbed their bombastic rock “maximum R&B” on a box set of their work, but frontman ROGER DALTREY isn’t in the same soulful realm as Robinson and Knight. He’s one of rock’s legendary lead singers, with a howl that could peel paint off a wall. He’ll be accompanied by members of the Who’s touring band, and doing some of that band’s biggest hits, as well as some solo tunes Sept. 1 at Northern Quest. You might have thought the MONKEES ceased to be when their TV show went off the air, or with the passing of Davy Jones and Peter Tork. Nope, Michael Nesmith and Micky Dolenz have forged on, creating some genuinely great music through the years. Their show at First Interstate Center for the Arts Sept. 10 is billed as part of their “farewell tour,” and will include everything from hits from the TV show to deep cuts from their psychedelic classic movie, Head.

GET YOUR LIFE BACK ON TRACK! Social Security Disability 50% OFF Wills • Chapter 7 Bankruptcy Spokane County, WA

509-462-0827

1707 W Broadway Ave, Spokane, WA 99201

DeissnerLaw.com SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 13


TOURS DEPART EVERY 30 MIN & LAST 1 HR AND 15 MIN

Old Fashioned Ice Cream Learn about the world of hard-rock Parlour

The most popular, educational and fun tour in the Northwest! silver mining in the richest mining district on earth!

Open 7 Days a week May 1st - Oct 15th

208-752-5151 509 Cedar St, Wallace, ID SilverMineTour.org

GOLD AND GEMSTONE PANNING!

MAY-SEPT-OCT 10 TO 2 • JUNE-JULY-AUG 10 TO 4

OPENING SUMMER 2021

EXPANDED TASTING ROOM & BOTTLE SHOP DELICIOUS FOOD PRIVATE EVENT SPACE FOR PARTIES UP TO 50!

Bully leader Alicia Bognanno

THE COOL KIDS

[drink responsibly]

A bunch of the shows heading our way feature artists who are critical darlings and festival favorites, the kind of gigs that indicate Spokane isn’t just a classic rock and country-loving town. ICE CUBE offers a good example. Sure, he’s an older hip-hop artist at 51, but he’s a true pioneer thanks to his work as part of N.W.A. and as a solo artist, and he remains a ferocious MC even as his career’s taken him into filmmaking, television and sports management. He headlines Northern Quest July 22. The Festival at Sandpoint is going to have people dancing up a storm courtesy of ST. PAUL AND THE BROKEN BONES, a young Alabama-based crew that delivers a seriously energetic brand of soul with its eight-piece, horn-laced lineup. They headline the fest July 29, and two days later SHAKEY GRAVES takes the stage to deliver one of the more mesmerizing live shows around. Graves blends rock, country and blues moves and has expanded his sound significantly since moving from

Follow us on Facebook for updates on the move, new product releases and Grand Opening Party.

LOCALLY OWNED | LOCALLY MADE | LOCAL INGREDIENTS

CURRENT HOME: 1003 E. Trent #200 | SPOKANE | 509.489.2112

14 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

a one-man band and adding other musicians, growing in popularity by leaps and bounds. The Spokane Pavilion’s first summer of shows (thanks again, COVID) includes a slew of dance-friendly artists, including the irie vibes of REBELUTION Aug. 25 and the DJ and production duo LOUIS THE CHILD Sept. 15. And Pacific Northwest alt-rock royalty arrives Sept. 8 with DEATH CAB FOR CUTIE and DEEP SEA DIVER. WILCO and SLEATER-KINNEY are teaming up in 2021 for what was going to be one of the mostanticipated tours of 2020, and they’re stopping at the FIC Aug. 5, and the Lucky You Lounge is dipping back into live shows including BULLY and LIGHTNING BUG Sept. 3. The Gorge is bringing in modern alt-rock heroes like TAME IMPALA (Sept. 10), as well as some serious electronic music party starters at the BASS CANYON FESTIVAL (Aug. 20).


SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 15


Dave Matthews Band returns to the Gorge for their regular Labor Day weekend run.

THE ROCKERS

Classic rock never really goes out of style, and Inland Northwest rock fans have plenty of gigs to fill their calendar. At Northern Quest, BILLY IDOL (Aug. 12) and SAMMY HAGAR (Aug. 22) will bring the ’80s rock vibes with shows full of familiar hits. REO SPEEDWAGON will do the same at Festival at Sandpoint Aug. 7. Psychedelic oddballs PRIMUS are

doing a tribute to Rush when they play the Spokane Pavilion Aug. 13. Les Claypool and Co. will be covering the Canadian legends’ A Farewell to Kings album in its entirety; WOLFMOTHER and BATTLES open the show. The Fox Theater is coming back to life this summer, too, and the ALLMANBETTS BAND brings the sons of Gregg Allman and Dickey

Betts together for a Southern rock showcase. Over at the Gorge, you can jam for three shows with PHISH (Aug. 27-29) or celebrate the return of regular favorite DAVE MATTHEWS BAND (Sept. 3-5). But maybe you just want to put on a costume and say farewell to KISS (again) at their show at the Gorge Sept. 18.

LET’S TURN A RETIREMENT DREAM INTO A RETIREMENT PLAN. Work with a trusted Financial Advisor at BECU Investment Services for financial guidence. Schedule an appointment today. Visit becu.org/retire or call 509-321-2602

Financial Advisors are registered with, and Securities and Advisory Services offered through LPL Financial, a Registered Investment Advisor, Member FINRA/SIPC. Insurance Products offered through LPL Financial or its licensed affiliates. BECU and BECU Investment Services are not registered broker/dealers and are not affiliated with LPL Financial. Investments are: Not NCUA/NCUSIF Insured

16 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

Not Credit Union Guaranteed

Not Obligations of BECU

May Lose Value


FROM LEFT: Dierks Bentley, Ashley McBryde and Nathaniel Rateliff all arrive this summer.

THE COUNTRY CATS

You’re not going to make it through a Spokane summer without a little boot-scootin’ to go between songs that bring a tear in your beer. There are plenty of top-notch country stars heading to the Inland Northwest. DIERKS BENTLEY headlines at Northern Quest July 30, and the same night you can catch JAKE OWEN at the Festival

at Sandpoint. The Coeur d’Alene Casino is back with live music this summer, too, including a couple of badass ladies in PAM TILLIS and LORRIE MORGAN, playing together Aug. 19. One of the hottest rising stars in the country scene is ASHLEY MCBRYDE, who got her start playing in rural biker bars. Now she’s a Grammynominated up-and-comer playing the beautiful Fox Theater Sept. 23.

And while I wouldn’t necessarily call NATHANIEL RATELIFF AND THE NIGHT SWEATS straight-up “country,” their blend of Americana, folk and retro-tinged R&B has cross-genre appeal for both cowboy-hatted and non-cowboy-hatted fans. These are just a few of the shows happening this summer, so keep an eye on inlander.com for new announcements still to come. n

Reading COLORS Your World! Epic mythological tales, magical feats and stories, and mind-blowing adventures await you. Registration is required for most online programs. Some will fill up fast!

www.scld.org/events

FOR KIDS & FAMILIES

FOR TWEENS & TEENS

Traveling Lantern Theatre

30-Day Teen Poetry Challenge

For kids grades K–5+ ONLINE & ON DEMAND Sherlock Holmes Takes the Case: Jun 13–20 Legends & Myths from Mount Olympus: Jul 11–18

Astounding Feats & Lessons from The Zaniac

For kids grades K–5+ ONLINE Monday, Jun 21, 2–3pm & Tuesday, Jun 22, 7–8pm

West Valley Outdoor Learning: Animal Camouflage

For kids grades K–5+ ONLINE Monday, Jun 28, 2–3pm & Tuesday, Jun 29, 7–8pm

Plus, magic, stories, trivia, cupcakes, and extreme science in July and August.

For teens entering grades 9–12 ONLINE Starting Friday, Jun 18

Tween Art Camp

For tweens entering grades 5–8 ONLINE Monday–Thursday, Jun 28–Jul 1, 10–11:30am

FOR ADULTS Be Smoke Ready: Preparing Your Home & Protecting Your Lungs from Wildfire Smoke

Online Summer Reading with Beanstack For all ages Track your reading minutes, earn badges, complete challenges. Let your imagination run wild with Page Turner Adventures: virtual field trips, comedy shows, craft projects, recipes, and more. Get started at scld.beanstack.org Illustrations by Oliver Jeffers for iRead

Registration required ONLINE Tuesday, Jun 15, 6–7pm www.scld.org

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 17


Have hugs, will travel.

HUG IT OUT T

much everyone I run into. Whether they’re casual acquaintances, co-workers or people I only “know” from Facebook. They might be restaurant servers, essential grocery workers, bartenders or librarians. Hes, shes or theys, it doesn’t really matter. I’m in a huggy mood, and the world is my embraceable oyster thanks to being vaccinated. I could even hug someone in North Idaho! I won’t, but you get my meaning. I’m not advocating touching anyone without asking first, and I’m certainly not advocating watching that Dave Matthews Band video to understand where I’m coming from — we’ve all been punished enough by the pandemic. I’m just saying if you see me on the streets of Spokane this summer, you just might see me in a Friedlander-style trucker hat that says “free hugs” on it. And I’ll be dead serious. — DAN NAILEN

wenty years ago, Dave Matthews Band put out a video for their song “Everyday” that starred a relatively unknown comedian walking around hugging people randomly on the street. That comic, Judah Friedlander, would go on to some fame playing filthy comedy writer Frank Rossitano on 30 Rock. That music video that made Friedlander sort of famous was a reminder of Americans’ willingness to embrace a nice stranger in the aftermath of the 9/11 terrorist attacks. And it keeps popping in my head as the country again emerges from a deadly, scary situation. I’m feeling the pull to follow Friedlander’s lead in the summer of 2021. After a year-plus of avoiding touching things and not shaking hands or hugging my friends and family, I have the urge to hug pretty

OPENING THIS SUMMER

SPOKANE’S

BEST

HOCKEY BAR

EVERY NHL GAME (and other sports too!)

full bar

Ten 70” TVs Six 65” TVs 165” HD projector screen

great food

Make sure your favorite team is represented! Loan or donate your memorabilia thatʼs collecting dust in the closet. If we respect your team, weʼll proudly display it in the bar.

108 N Washington St #101, Spokane • LordStanleysSpokane.com 18 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021


A million things to see from 25# to $25,000!

Jewelry • Beads • Artifacts • Sculptures • Minerals • Fossils • Meteorites Ethnic Art • Chimes • Tarot Cards • Books • Collectibles • Toys

Bring in this ad or a photo of this ad on your phone for

20% Off

Any one item or total bead purchase.

WONDERS OF THE WORLD One of a kind world import shop

In the Flour Mill | 621 W. Mallon, Spokane, WA 99201 | 509 328 6890 SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 19


SPORTS & The season started May 4 and will continue through early September.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

RECREATION

Whether you’re a spectator or a competitor, sporting events are back this year 20 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

BY WILSON CRISCIONE


F

or many, the cancellation of sports last March was the first “holy crap” moment that convinced them the pandemic was here. Games were canceled not only in major national leagues, but at your local gym. The good news? Sports are back. You can go out and play a game with some friends, or run a marathon, or play Hoopfest, then come back and turn on the game with a nice cold beer.

GO TO AN INDIANS GAME

The Spokane Indians have leveled up since the pandemic. They’re now a “high-A” affiliate of the Colorado Rockies, which basically means more, higher quality baseball in Spokane. In fact, they’re about to play twice as many games at Avista Stadium as they usually do. After a year of isolation, a casual night out at the baseball park might be exactly what you need to ease yourself into being around crowds again. The season started May 4 and will continue through early September. Check out spokaneindians.com for tickets and more information.

The Shock are back!

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

GO TO A SHOCK GAME

Baseball not your thing? Then maybe football is. The Spokane Shock are back playing football for the Indoor Football League, and in June they plan to welcome back fans once again. It’s a great time for those hot summer days when you want to have fun, but maybe you want to stay indoors with some air conditioning. Tickets must be purchased online at www.thespokaneshock. com or call (509) 934-2255.

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 21


NOTHING IS NORMAL WITHOUT HOOPFEST I

n March 2020, I still had some hope. For Hoopfest, that is. We were told this lockdown would only be a couple weeks. That we would flatten the curve. That we could bring cases down to the point where we could return to normal. And normal, to me, means Hoopfest. Hoopfest is like Christmas to me. I look forward to it every year — the competitiveness, the walks around the beautiful city, the random encounters with people you haven’t seen in years. As I get older, it’s harder to have the required energy for all the games, and last year I was training harder than ever before so I’d be ready. It was going to be the year my team won, I was sure. But then, as the pandemic raged on, they said Hoopfest was delayed. At that point, I still had some hope it would actually happen, but not much. I’d read

22 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

We need Hoopfest. enough to realize that this pandemic would be with us at least until we had a vaccine — and we didn’t know when that would be. Some friends half-heartedly asked if I’d play Hoopfest with them. Sure, I said, but you’re fooling yourself if you think it’s actually happening. Then it was canceled. That makes sense, I thought. If they didn’t cancel it, I wouldn’t have done it anyway because it was too unsafe. So at least I can say that the first year in decades I didn’t play Hoopfest wasn’t because I skipped it, but because it didn’t happen.

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

When the vaccine news came, I had hope again. Lives would be saved, the pandemic could come to an end, and yes, I thought, maybe Hoopfest would be back. Optimistically, I guessed we’d have enough shots in arms by June for it to happen on schedule. Then I found out again it’s delayed. Now, it’s scheduled for Sept. 11-12. Will it be the same? Will wildfire smoke cancel it? Will a new virus variant keep it from happening? I don’t know. All I know is that it won’t feel like a normal summer unless there’s a Hoopfest in Spokane. — WILSON CRISCIONE


GO PLAY SOME BASKETBALL

They say basketball is a non-contact sport, but we all know that’s a lie. And maybe sweating and breathing around a bunch of other people wasn’t enticing with an airborne virus raging across the country. But now? Outside? With people vaccinated? Basketball is back. Hoopfest — everyone’s favorite 3-on-3 tournament — won’t be until Sept. 11-12 this year, but hoopers can get their fix in with an outdoor Hooptown USA league, presented by Spokane Hoopfest Association and Riverfront Park this summer. This summer league is a 5-on-5 game on weeknights so, no, you won’t miss any lake weekends. Games will be played at a beautiful new court on the North Bank of the park starting in early July, once a week. That means after the games, maybe you can go on a nice walk around the park. The deadline to register is Sunday, June 20. Visit hooptownusa.com for more details.

WATCH IRONMAN

The Ironman returns June 27.

It’s hard to imagine actually doing an Ironman event. I much prefer to watch athletes heroically power through the pain as I casually watch and cheer them on. Luckily, if you’re like me, there’s one last chance to watch Ironman in Coeur d’Alene, or at least hang out in the Lake City with a general idea of the inspirational athletic feats happening in the vicinity. The last full Ironman Coeur d’Alene — including a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike ride and 26.2-mile run — happened in 2017. The two years after that, they did a smaller Ironman Coeur d’Alene before the entire race was canceled in 2020 because of the pandemic. But this year, the epic triathlon is back — and no half-measures this time. It’s the full thing. And sure, it may be a special, one-time-only deal, but this is your chance to go back in time not to the pandemic, but before the pandemic, and see what things were like then. Registration for the June 27 event is sold out, but there is still a chance to watch the incredible athletes in action. Visit ironman.com/im-coeur-dalene. MATT WEIGAND PHOTO

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 23


GO ON A NATURE RUN

OK, so maybe you are one of those people who enjoys going on runs. I may never understand it fully, but I may understand it a little bit more if the run is out in nature on a beautiful day. Race the Wolf is holding an ultramarathon and trail race series on June 27 at Schweitzer Mountain. You can choose from three distances: a 52k ultramarathon, or smaller trail races. It’s a tough run, but as a bonus you get the always incredible views of Lake Pend Oreille. Negative Split, meanwhile, is putting on a “back to nature” series, featuring three runs in select Inland Northwest locations. The first event is taking place June 13 on the Hiawatha Trail in Idaho, and you can register for a live or virtual option. Runners can park in the ghost town of Taft, Montana, and choose between a four-mile, 15k or 25k distance option. You run through railroad tunnels and past forests, waterfalls and wildlife. You also can get some shirts, wooden medals and food for your troubles. The second run is Aug. 22 at Silver Mountain, where runners can choose a 6k, 9k or 18k course at Silver Mountain and receive a full-day gondola lift ticket, shirts and custom slate rock medals. And to end the summer, the third run will be at Mt. Spokane on Sept. 12. Enjoy views from the top of a mountain and finish the summer with that feeling of accomplishment that always comes after a good run (or so I hear). Visit nsplit.com to sign up for these runs.

GO SWIM ACROSS THE LAKE

Chances are the thought has crossed your mind. If you’ve gone to Lake Coeur d’Alene, you might wonder how long it would take to swim across the lake. Well, this is your opportunity to find out. On Aug. 15, Parker Subaru is presenting the Coeur d’Alene Crossing. Swimmers can register for $50 or $60 and choose between a 1.2-mile open water swim or a 2.4-mile swim. It starts around the Coeur d’Alene Resort Golf Course, and if you go for the shorter swim, they take you out on a boat to the middle of the lake instead of making you swim the full distance. And don’t worry — paramedics and law enforcement will be there to make sure everybody is safe. But maybe wear a wetsuit.

IS IN THE AIR

YOUR LAWN & GARDEN AWAITS!

Desert Jewels Nursery • Drought Resistant Landscape Design •Hardy, Native Plants • Bee & Butterfly Pollinator-Friendly • By-Appointment Only or Curbside Pickup

9809 E. Upriver Dr. (509) 893-3771

desertjewelsnursery.com

Visit our new Shade Pavillion!

All Shade Perennials 20% Off

Hostas, Astilbe, Ferns, Grasses, Heuchera, Ligularia, Foxglove and more!

COUPON REQUIRED

208-684-5952 • Hours: M-Sat 9-6pm, Sun 10-5pm Behind Super 1 Foods in Rathdrum • 15825 N Westwood Dr

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

GO PICK A PLACE FOR PICKLEBALL

Even before the pandemic, pickleball was taking off as a sport. Tyson McGuffin, a local who was the 2017 and 2018 Men’s Singles national champion in pickleball, called it the “fastest-growing sport in America” in an interview with the Inlander in 2018. There’s a good reason: It’s easy for anyone to play casually, but just as easy to make it competitive. All you need is a couple paddles, a ball and a partner, and you have a game. Plus, it’s fun to see the look of bemusement on someone’s face when you tell them you are a regular pickleball player. At least it’s a conversation starter. The pandemic seemingly helped the sport take off even more. Like tennis, it’s a good way to stay active while staying socially distanced, and it’s a great outdoor activity. There’s also a ton of places to play around the Inland Northwest — Cherry Hill Park in Coeur d’Alene, Comstock Park in Spokane, Hill’s Resort on Priest Lake are just a few of the many parks with a pickleball court. Give it a try! n

24 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

50% Off Select Pottery While supplies last - hurry for best selection 2 Locations • nwseed.com 2422 E. Sprague - 534.0694 U 7302 N. Division - 484.7387

Lawn, Garden, Pets, Fish, Ponds, House Plants & Wild Birds


FIRE IN MOTION

509 325-8800 accentspokane.com 1622 N Division St • Spokane, WA

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 25


All farms operate independently and seasonal hours may differ. Contact information for each farm can be found at www.greenbluffgrowers.com

U-Pick & Picked

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES FARM FRESH EGGS LOCAL HONEY FARM DÈCOR SHOP PETTING ZOO CAMPING U-PICK FLOWERS & MUCH MORE

Open everyday 8–5 Same Family Same Location Since 1970

16802 N Applewood Ln, Mead, WA hiddenacreswa.com 509-238-2830

26 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

OPENING IN JULY

7019 E Day-Mt. Spokane Rd, Mead, WA

509-290-3874 • #28 #28


NOW OPEN FOR FUN!

CHECK FACEBOOK FOR DAILY UPDATES AND DEALS • 509-238-4709 • WALTERSFRUITRANCH.COM Certified Naturally Grown Produce, U-pick, Vintage Shop

Open Friday, Saturday & Sunday 10am - 5pm or by appointment

509-701-1252

17501 N Sands Rd. Greenbluff Foundbarnfarm.com foundbarnfarm@gmail.com

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 27


The smart folks in the Walla Walla Valley have created a self-guided scavenger hunt with 12 reasons to drink wine.

28 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021


ROAD TRIPS Whether a quick weekend or epic adventure, a summer road trip is always worth it BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

W

hether you’re looking to escape for a day or you’re happy to hit the open road for a longer trip, adventure awaits throughout the Pacific Northwest. From beautiful day hikes and camping, to cities that’ll have you enjoying food and wine, try one of these reasonable road trips this summer and get to know the areas around the Inland Northwest a whole lot better.

WINE, WINE FOR ANY TIME

You’ve wanted to go to Walla Walla for its renowned wineries, but maybe you don’t know where to start as you collect a case of wine on your visit. Problem solved: This summer you can head about three hours southwest of Spokane and participate in the Walla Walla 12, which gives you ideas for a dozen occasions when you might want to enjoy some wine. From a steak dinner to Taco Tuesday, the smart folks in the Walla Walla Valley have created a self-guided scavenger hunt with 12 reasons to drink wine. The idea is that with your handy sticker sheet in hand you can get help from the pros at a tasting room or winery discovering the perfect wine to drink on that occasion. Slap the sticker onto the bottle you buy so you can remember which is which later. You can order a sheet ahead of time at wallawallawine.com/walla-walla-12 or pick one up at a participating winery. “In the Walla Walla Valley, we believe that wine pairs best with life,” Robert Hansen, executive director of Walla Walla Valley Wine, says in an announcement. “Whether you are casually sipping on your patio or pulling out a bottle for a special steak dinner, the Walla Walla Valley has a wine for that.”

STAR GARNET HUNTING

The Inland Northwest is full of beautiful finds for gem hunters, including opals, agates and jasper. But perhaps the most special regional treasures are star garnets, which are found in only two places in the world: India and the Idaho Panhandle National Forests. For $15 for visitors 13 and older and $5 for kids, you can sift through piles of rocks at the Emerald Creek Garnet Area and take home up to five pounds of the gems yourself. Registration costs an extra dollar and must be done in advance online at recreation.gov. The area has designated rock piles to sort through and a sluice box area to assist garnet seekers and is only about a two hours’ drive from Spokane. It’s also very close to the Emerald Creek Campground if you want to spend additional time enjoying the beautiful national forest area.

ADVENTURE IS

ALWAYS IN SEASON. Whether you’re into hiking, boating and ATVing, or dining and gaming at the on-site casino, look no further than Kalispel RV Resort in Cusick, WA. Check out all the summer events at kalispelcasino.com/happenings Ask about our government and Camas Club member rates. kalispelrvresort.com | 370 Qlispe River Way | Cusick, WA

HAVE YOU EVER DREAMED OF A FUTURE IN FILM OR WISHED YOU COULD LEARN HOW TO MAKE HOLLYWOOD-WORTHY VIDEOS? The Community-Minded Television (CMTV) Academy Camp is a hands-on training program. Produce videos and make connections with the other teens (ages 13-17). Learn and practice the latest tools, technology and techniques. At CMTV’s downtown state-of-the-art studio Taught by a professional team of production experts.

CMTV ACADEMY CAMP SCHEDULE 10AM-1PM OR 2PM-5PM EACH DAY

10 students per session

10 students per session

TOPICS COVERED

Monday: Basic Camera, Audio Tuesday: Advanced Camera Lighting Wednesday: Introduction To Editing Thursday: Script Writing, Pre-Production, Distribution Friday: Project Assignments Overview, Career Paths JUNE 21ST - JUNE 25TH

$159

JULY 12TH - JULY 16TH

$159

Questions? Visit and Register at cmtvspokane.org/camp. All programs will align with COVID-19 guidelines at the time of the program or be postponed/cancelled. In partnership with Career Connect Washington and Spokane STEM.

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 29


S H O P . E A T . D R I N K . P L A Y .

KENDALL YARDS Summer Family Deals! FULL BREAKFAST FOR 4 CHORIZO N’ EGG TACOS FOR 4 ONLY $24.99 EACH see all deals at eatgoodgroup.com/summer-guide

Summer Guide

ChefAdam_YardsKYGroup_061021_3H_AP.pdf

30 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021


Brilliant agents with a strong set of resources and knowledge for today’s housing market. Are you ready to buy or sell?

Blythe Thimsen (509) 290-3824

Brigette Murphy (509) 993-0969

Cathey Wells (509) 768-7400

Cathy Dernbach (509) 220-0444

Chris Reis (509) 481-0547

Clarie Peterson (509) 499-6430

Cody Craig (509) 795-4384

Darren Lawson (509) 362-4126

Desiree Renshaw (208) 447-8140

Dianna Carpenter (509) 599-3667

Don Hay (509) 624-3644

Erik Dordal (509) 939-7647

Heidi Bollum (509) 998-7287

Jamie DeHaven (509) 710-2552

Jamie Mann (509) 638-5383

Jessica Clark (509) 828-5820

Joe Garst (509) 218-1231

Joelle Chester (509) 998-6453

Joey Duris (509) 869-6546

Jon van Anrooy (509) 939-9060

Kathryn McInturff (206) 755-6516

Kolby Schoenrock (509) 710-0675

Kristina Stolp (509) 671-1901

Lisa Lembeck (509) 220-7482

Marilyn Amato (509) 979-6027

Meaghan Leech (509) 953-9396

Patti McKerricher-Boyd (509) 710-5240

Randy Wells (509) 979-7400

Rick Welch (509) 710-2604

Riley Bogue (509) 795-1984

Riley Elmer (208) 691-0011

Robert Johnson (509) 270-7000

Scott Heyamoto (509) 868-8210

Stephanie Peterson (509) 385-7039

Terry & Sue Jordahl (509) 701-3846

Susan Denny (509) 951-0035

Teresa Jaynes (509) 714-5284

Tina Craig (509) 977-2002

Tyler LeMasters (703) 341-9184

Wendy Kennedy (509) 994-4055

(509) 323-2323 | windermerecitygroup.com Kendall Yards | 1237 W. Summit Pkwy, Ste B | Spokane, WA 99201 SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 31


S M T W T

F S

2 3 4 5 6

7 8

1

H CK T E NES RO

KENDALL YARDS

T

S H O P . E A T . D R I N K . P L A Y .

30 31 5-8PM

S M T W T F S

2021 EVENT SCHEDULE

2 3 1

2

6 7 8

9 10 11 12

3 4 5

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

5/19

Opening Night of Night Market!

5/26

Night Market

S M T W T F S

6/2

Night Market

4 5 6

6/9

Night Market

6/16

Night Market

6/23

Night Market

6/30

Night Market

7/7

Night Market

7/14

Night Market

7/21

Night Market

7/28

Night Market

8/4

Night Market

8/11

Night Market & Rock the Nest: Jason Perry Band

8/18

Night Market

8/25

Night Market and Girls Rock Lab

9/1

Night Market

9/8

Night Market

9/15

The Princess Show at The Night Market

9/22

Closing Night of Night Market

1335 W. Summit Parkway • kendallnightmarket.org

32 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

1 7

2 3

8 9 10

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

S M T W T F S 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31

S M T W T F S 5 6 7

1

2 3 4

8

9 10 11

12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30

Night Market Night Market + Rock the Nest Night Market + Special Event


Now n Open i ll Kenda Yards next to Olmstead

441 N. Nettleton St.

crepecafe.sisters@gmail.com • 509-991-7532 •

This summer is essentially a make-up year for music.

We offer vegan & gluten free options

CrepeCafeSisters.com

LET THE MUSIC PLAY I

was going to attend SO MANY EPIC CONCERTS in 2020. In April, Steve Aoki was coming to the Knitting Factory; then in June, Louis the Child was going to open up the new Pavilion venue. A week later I’d spend two EDM-packed days dancing in the sunshine at Beyond Wonderland at the Gorge. In August, Tame Impala and Perfume Genius were going to let their magic echo over that Columbia River canyon. In October, two friends and I had big plans to fly to Austin for the epic three-day Austin City Limits Music Festival. Then everything shut down last March, and it felt weird to even hang out in a living room with a handful of people. More than a year later, we still don’t have this dang virus totally under control, and large concerts continue to seem like a dream. But thanks to vaccines, we’re set to have a late summer packed with events that resemble the shared human experiences we took for granted in the past. Many of the shows I mentioned have now been crammed into September and October, but I can hardly wait for that time to come. I feel like a kid counting down the days to Christmas as I impatiently bide my time until I can again experience the magic that only happens when you’re in a massive crowd of fans loving every minute of the music. The arts often fall to the bottom of our priority list when we go into survival mode, as the pandemic forced most of us to do for a while. But they’re an essential part of being human and feeling fulfilled. So this summer, I’m most looking forward to feeling “whole” again, as we can once again allow the arts to thrive. — SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 33


GLACIER NATIONAL PARK

Whether you chill in a raft up on Bowman Lake or spend your days seeking out hikes along the Going-to-the-Sun Road, Glacier National Park offers a huge variety of places to access nature and see some of the few remaining glaciers before they disappear forever. This road trip will take about five hours to reach the park’s west entrance, and plan on driving another hour or more to reach your campsite. This year the park is also requiring a $2 Going-to-the-Sun Road entry ticket, which you need to reserve online at recreation. gov, on top of the national park vehicle pass. Most of the early reservations have already been swept up for the summer, but the park reserved a quarter of available permits to be released two days in advance of the date they’re good for, so you can try to snag a lastminute ticket. The extra planning will be worth it to access the views of impressive mountain peaks, swim in one of the refreshing lakes and get up-close views of wildlife like mountain goats and grizzly bears (hopefully not too up close!).

SUMMER

SPECIAL 40% OFF

Most Brands We do all the work, you enjoy the result!

FREE Consultation | FREE Installation

509-327-9637

ALL MAJOR BRANDS Blinds | Shades | Shutters | Drapery | Romans | Solar Rollers Motorization | Exterior Sun Control Screens and Awnings

Call Now for in-home appointment. We bring our showroom to you! 34 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

FactoryRepBlinds.com | BBB Rating A+


The Huckleberry Color Fun Run & Walk returns to Schweitzer Aug. 8.

WONDERFUL WENATCHEE

Have a taste for the sweeter things? Take a trip to the Wenatchee Valley and check out the bounty of Washington along the way. Travel here midsummer and on the way you’re likely to find roadside stands and farms offering cherries, apricots, peaches and other fruit, while later in the season you’ll find those famous apples. Need dining ideas? Try Anjou, an incredible bakery in Cashmere that serves delicious pastries and sandwiches made with their fresh-baked bread. Word to the wise: For the best odds of trying what you want from their limited daily selection, stop by early in the day, and remember they’re only open Thursday to Sunday. Another great stop in Wenatchee is Pybus Market, where you’ll find a huge selection of artisan foods and goods. We hear that at the end of September, the market is also transformed into one of the largest dahlia displays around with the North Central Washington Dahlia Society bringing in their best flowers for the public to admire.

CHOOSE YOUR WATERFALL

Who doesn’t love staring at a good waterfall and listening to the roaring power that encourages an almost meditative state? With a little bit of effort and gas money, you can see some of the best falls around. Washington’s official state waterfall, Palouse Falls, plunges 200 feet over an Ice Age flood-carved landscape, making it officially taller than Niagara Falls by more than 30 feet. Palouse Falls State Park is about a two-hour drive from Spokane and offers interpretive signs, walking trails, and a picnic area where you can safely view the power of nature. About three hours south of Spokane/Coeur d’Alene there’s more beauty at Elk Creek Falls, where you’ll find the tallest waterfall in Idaho among the three falls there. Take a nice 2- to 3-mile hike through this area and enjoy a picnic lunch with a view of the falls while tucked in the shade of the forested path.

ATTENTION BOATERS THIS IS A GREAT TIME OF YEAR TO TAKE A BOATING SAFETY CLASS!

VISIT BOATIDAHO.GOV FOR OPTIONS ON HOME STUDY, ONLINE LEARNING, AND IN-PERSON CLASSES.

SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT PHOTO

MOUNTAIN COLOR RUN

If you’re up for some colorful time outdoors, drive on up to Schweitzer this summer for the Huckleberry Color Fun Run & Walk on Aug. 8. The run costs $35 to $45 depending on when you register, and you can opt for either a 2.5k or 5k course. “Run or walk through the forest and get covered with color tossed by the forest urchins,” event organizers say. “All participants will receive a custom multi-use bandana/face covering, gourmet hotdog lunch, sunglasses, powder pack for the color toss, and a complementary lift ticket for after the run, valid Aug. 9 only.” n

STAY SAFE ON 0N THE WATER ETS K C A J LIFE

! IVES L E SAV

HAVE A BOATING QUESTION? VISIT BOATIDAHO.GOV TO GET ANSWERS TO COMMON QUESTIONS OR GET A LIST OF REQUIRED EQUIPMENT YOU NEED TO HAVE ON YOUR BOAT! SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 35


WATER 36 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021


This summer, why not get on the water and exercise? The Coeur d’Alene Rowing Association puts on learn-to-row classes open to high schoolers and older.

Join CYT Spokane as we “Come Together” to dance, sing and act our way through what is sure to be an unforgettable summer! You don’t want to miss out on this high energy week filled with CYT fun!

Cool ways to get in, on or around the water this summer BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

W

hether it’s frozen into a cube and clinks in your glass, falling over your head in a rush, or surrounding you with blessed coolness, water is on everyone’s mind during the hottest parts of the summer. Where can you go to get relief from the heat, make a big splash, or just rejuvenate mind and body? Fortunately, plenty of places — as close as your backyard — in the Inlander Northwest, which benefits from an abundance of aquatic opportunities.

July 12-16 July 26-30 www.cytspokane.org/camps

We have over 900 square miles of public land for year round use!

AMUSE YOURSELF

Silverwood Theme Park’s Boulder Beach waterpark opened June 5 for weekends only, then reopens and runs daily June 12-Sept. 6. Ride, slide and glide your way to cool summer fun with nine different-intensity rides for all sizes and ages. Tickets range from a one-day reservation ($36 children and seniors, $59 general, valid for reserved date only, although cancellations/ changes are allowed) to multiday “any day” passes ($76-125). Tickets include access to both Boulder Beach and the main park. Visit silverwoodthemepark. com for special events, ticketing and other information.

Visit Republic where you can enjoy Washington's only public fossil site!

JOIN THE CLUB

The woman tasked with helping promote water conservation, preservation and restoration via the Kootenai Environmental Alliance has spent a lifetime on Fernan Lake, mostly fishing with her father. Shelley Austin, KEA’s new executive director, recalls a particularly magical moment while sitting on the dock one day. “A whole bunch of rowing boats go sliding right past me!” says Austin, who happened to be reading The Boys in The Boat, about UW rowers in the Olympics. “The rowing club uses the public dock at Fernan as a base, and they row up and down. Made me want to join the club!” If you’re interested in joining the Coeur d’Alene Rowing Association, consider learn-to-row classes for both high school age and 19 and over. Visit cdarowing.org.

KEEP IT CLEAN

Continuing with the theme of environmental protection, join the Spokane River Forum for one of three possible ways to keep Spokane’s waterways clean. Get your group together — school kids, church groups, co-workers, families — and either schedule a private cleanup or get an assist from Spokane River Forum, which provides supplies and basic operational guidance. Or sign up for a regularly scheduled public cleanup and join like-minded others in picking up trash. Last year, that amounted to more than 12,000 pounds of junk kept out of the Spokane River over the course of the season. Visit spokaneriver.net to sign up and learn more.

Bike, Hike, Fish, ride ATV's, Horses and Snowmoblies on hundreds of miles of trails. Fish, Swim, Kayak, Camp or Stroll around one of our pristine lakes! This ad is paid for by Republic Regional Visitors and Convention Bureau.

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 37 RepublicRegionalVisitorsConBureau_SummerGuide_061021_9S_WT_NEW.pdf


Lakes Guide

A C ANAD Moyie R.

Ore

Kootenai R.

ille .

an e

R.

Spokane

Lake Pend Oreille

e n e l A ’ d Coeur

90

R. ene

d’A l

ok

IDAHO TON

G WA SHIN

oil R .

Sanp Sp

NA

Priest R

t n i o p d n a S

MONTA

R.

R. lville Co

Presented by Spokane Boat Show

.

kR

a Ya

Priest Lake

d Pen

Okanogan R.

Columbia River

2021-2022

Coeu r

Lake ’Alene Coeur d

Lake Roosevelt

W

e’re blessed to have so many am azing lakes and rivers in our reg ion to enjoy swimming, fishing, boatin g and watersports. The 2021-22 Inlander Lakes Guide, presented by your friends at the Spokane Boat Show , is a great way to get familiar with some of our reg ion’s bigger lakes and help get you out on the water. Make sure to plan on attending the 2022 Spokane Boat Show in the first week of February. It’s a perfect break from winter to get you started ma king your warmer weather plans. You’ll find the reg ion’s top dealers on hand to tak e care of all your boating needs, and so much more.

e Rive

k r Come join us as we cel naebr ate our 68t

S

arw

Cle

Spok ane Boat Show Manager

h year ser ving the Inland North west!

.

38 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

rR

Contact Scott at SpokaneBoatsh ow

ate

Scot t Thompson

@outlook.com

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

R. nde

Salmo


Lake ROOSEVELT 3

CANADA

22 LAKE MAPS PRESENTED BY 22

U.S.

Sidley Lake

Osoyoos Lake

GRAND FORKS, B.C.

3

25

21

251

Blue Lake

50 Wannacut Lake

NORTHPORT

Pierre Lake

CURLEW

9495

7

ORIENT

Deep Lake

25

cle Whitestone Lake

China Bend U.S. Mountain

BARSTOW Snag Cove Napoleon Bridge

21

REPUBLIC

Marcus Island

MARCUS

Kings Peak

Columbia Mountain

Haag Cove

SPORTSMAN ACCESS BOAT RAMP PUBLIC TOILET

BOAT FUEL CAMPGROUND

OVERNIGHT PUBLIC MOORAGE/DOCKS BEACH

Floating Restroom

Bald Mountain

Mingo Mountain

White Mountain

Lake Ellen

COLVILLE

Bradbury Beach

20

Paradis Peak

Monumental Mountain

French Rocks

Elbow Lake Barnaby Island Grizzly Mountain

ORIN

Granite Mountain

25

RICE

Barnaby Creek

Omak & Okanagan

Addy Mountain

155

Daisy

Lynx Mountain

DAISY

ADDY

Old Baldy

Inchelium–Gifford Ferry

Twin Lakes

China Bend Winery

GIFFORD

INCHELIUM Omak Lake

Cloverleaf Gifford

On Lake Roosevelt

CHEWELAH

Quartz Mountain

AA Encampment

Owhi Lake

Huckleberry Mountain

25 21

CEDONIA

Sasheen Lake

Jump Off Joe Lake

HUNTERS 155

Buffalo Lake

ER Rebecca Lake

ELMER CITY

Grand Coulee Dam Visitor Arrival Center (Bureau of Reclamation) Crescent Bay

174

GRAND COULEE ELECTRIC CITY

Keller Butte

KELLER

McGinnis Lake

Rogers Bar

Sanpoil River Arm

Loon Lake

Keller Ferry

Crystal Cove

Eloika Lake

Columbia Goldsmith Penix Canyon

Tasting Room

Jones Bay

McCoys

Ponderosa Detillion

Johnny George Mountain

174

FORD

WELLPINIT

Porcupine Bay

231

Sterling Point

21 155

Lincoln

Hawk Creek

7 Bays Marina

COLBERT

291 Little Falls Dam

Open Mon-Sat • Noon-5pm

25

WILBUR HARTLINE

SPRINGDALE

Pierre

Hanson Harbor

Plum Point

Crescent Bay Lake (non-motorized craft only) Spring Canyon

17

292

FRUITLAND

ENTERPRISE

COULEE DAM

Devil’s Punch Bowl

CRESTON

ALMIRA

291

21

Dry Falls Dam

SPOKANE

REARDAN

DAVENPORT COULEE CITY

17

28

Making plans for

Horseshoe Lake

Deer Lake

231

Enterprise

Grand Coulee Dam

BA LA NK KE S

Wilmont Creek

Sanpoil Campground

231

21 EDWALL

Vacation? Ô ODESSA

100% Organic No Sulfites No Headache No Hangover No Kidding!

Waitts Lake

Stensgar Mountain

Hunters

Rufus Woods Lake

The Healthiest Wines on the Planet! Calispell Lake

Wellington Peak

NESPELEM

V

PUMP OUT STATION

Paradise Peak

Snow Peak

17 Mile Mountain

KETTLE FALLS

Kettle Falls Information

Sherman Peak

Fire Mountain

Site of Fort Colvile

Hoodoo Mountain

Graves Mountain

20

Edd’s Mountain

Evans Summer Island

Kamloops Island

Wapaloosie Moutnain Jungle Hill

EVANS

Kettle River

BOYDS

Jackknife Mountain

Copper Butte

Scar Mountain

20

• Grand Coulee Dam is the largest producer of hydroelectric power in the U.S. and the third largest hydroelectric facility in the world.

North Gorge

Curlew Lake

20

TONASKET

LEGEND

Profanity Peak

Mount Leona

Bonaparte Lake

Midnight Mountain

RI

3B 3B

TRAIL, B.C.

ROSSLAND, B.C.

OOS, B.C.

A

22

3B

ODESSA Ô

Ô SPRAGUE

3751 Vineyard Way, Kettle Falls, WA (509) 732-6123

www.chinabend.com

902

MEDICAL LAKE

Boat In or Drive In

FOUR LAKES

904

CHENEY

It doesn’t get much better than this! LakeRooseveltandMore.com SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 39


Lake Coeur d’Alene

LAKE MAPS PRESENTED BY

Ó SPOKANE

- 20 MILES

POST FALLS

LEGEND

East Canfield Butte

Õ HAYDEN - 5 MILES

COEUR D'ALENE

PUMP OUT STATION

Treasure Mountain

Fernan Hill Cherry Hill

SPORTSMAN ACCESS BOAT RAMP

Blossom Mountain

PUBLIC TOILET

BOAT FUEL CAMPGROUND

Fernan Lake

Cougar Bay

K|e|r|n Butte

Mica Peak 1597m

OVERNIGHT PUBLIC MOORAGE/DOCKS

CATALDO Ç

Arrow Point

Rich Hill

BEACH

Wolf Lodge Mountain

Kelly Mountain

18 Miles

Neachen Bay

Echo Bay

• 'Coeur d’Alene' is French for "Heart of an awl"

Cable Peak

Mica Bay

Toad Rock

Beauty Bay

Wolf Lodge Bay Elk Mountain

Gotham Bay

Mount Coeur d’Alene

Killarney Peak

Turner Peak

• Lake Coeur d’Alene is 185 feet deep, 25 miles long and has 125 miles of shoreline

Turner Bay

Carrill Peak

Cottonwood Peak

EN E

Twin Peaks

The Fish of Lake Coeur d’Alene*

D’A L

Carlin Bay

Kilarney Lake

Largemouth Bass

Half Round Bay Powderhorn Bay

LA

KE

Rockford Bay

C

O

EU

R

Black Rock

Smallmouth Bass Windy Bay

Rainbow Trout Crappie Pumpkinseed Sunfish

Anderson Lake

HARRISON

Mowry Point

Blue Lake

Initial Peak

Cave Lake

Lambs Peak

Spokane Point

Eagle Peak

Chinook Salmon

Talbo Hill Warners Mountain

McCarney Butte Worley Mountain

Hidden Lake Mason Butte

Bull Trout (Catch & Release Only) Westslope Cutthroat *Not a complete list of all species in Lake Coeur d’Alene.

40 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

PLUMMER

Plummer Butte

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Chatcolet Lake

Round Lake

PARKLINE

Kokanee Salmon

Medicine Lake Petit Peak

Black Lake

Yellow Perch Northern Pike

8 Miles

Swan Lake

Harrison Slough

Bell Bay

Swan Peak Thompson Lake

Benewah Lake

St. Joe River

ST. MARIES


Shop the area’s largest inventory of fishing and pontoon boats. www.marksmarineinc.com | (208) 772-9038 | (888) 821-2200

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 41


PRIEST LAKE SERVING NORTH IDAHO • Docks - New & Rebuild • Dock Removal • Pile Driving • Waterfront Enhancement

• Huckleberry picking is a favorite pastime for both humans and the local bear population.

Joe Peak (6748ft) Green Bonnet Mountain (5991ft)

Phoebe Tip (6600ft)

Gold Peak

Caribou Hill (4592ft)

Plowboy Mountain

UPPER PRIEST LAKE

Kevin Hansen (208) 428-0505 • (208) 290-2319 • nldock@frontier.com • Lic # RCE-4625

Huckleberry at Priest Lake

Granite Mountain (4780ft)

IDAHO

hidden

44 Miles

WASHINGTON

North Idahenog’sem!

Klootch Mountain (6048ft)

Black Tail Mountain

Dusty Peak

Ó IONE

Lookout Mountain (6727ft)

Thoroughfare (2 mi.)

Boulder Mountain

Come play

Bugle Ridge (6403ft)

Distillery Bay

Reeder Mountain (4729ft)

Huckleberry Bay

Watson Mountain

Granite Creek Marina

Nickelplate Mountain

Elkins Resort

NORDMAN Lakeview Mountain (4074ft)

Bismark Mountain

Indian Creek

Cape Horn

Horton Ridge (5640ft)

8 MILE ISLAND

Priest Lake Marina State Launch Ramp

• Priest Lake is over 300 feet deep and 25 miles long with over 80 miles of shoreline

KALISPELL ISLAND

PRIEST LAKE

BARTOO ISLAND

Hill's Resort

Blue Diamond Marina

4 MILE ISLAND

Priest Lake Golf Course Binarch Mountain

Outlet Bay Tola Point Outlet Mountain

COOLIN

Sundance Mountain (6298ft)

Chase Lake

PRIEST RIVER 25 MILES

s Tee time le availab over online & ne! the pho

County Docks & Ramps

PRIEST RIVER 25 MILES

152 Fairway Dr., Priest Lake, ID • 208-443-2525 • plgolfcourse.com

MOTEL RV PARK BAR STORE RESTAURANT LAUNDRY MAT

– 18 HOLE PAR 72 CHAMPIONSHIP COURSE –

36442 ID-57, NORDMAN, ID

Jasper Mountain

Gisborne Mountain

MILE MARKER

27 ON

HWY 57

Featuring SANDBAGGERS BAR AND GRILL

NORDMANRESORT.COM 208-443-2538

NOW OPEN UNTIL 9PM FOR DINNER!

42 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


LAKE MAPS PRESENTED BY

Check out our new boats!

Serving Priest Lake boaters for 31 years!

LEGEND PUMP OUT STATION

West Fork Mountain

SPORTSMAN ACCESS Pyramid Peak BOAT RAMP

Abandon Mountain

Best Value on the Lake Starting as low as $79/night Free use of canoe with lodging Includes: Kitchenette, Fireplace, Dining Area

PUBLIC TOILET

BOAT FUEL Lions CAMPGROUND Head

OVERNIGHT PUBLIC Lions Head Ridge MOORAGE/DOCKS BEACH

Temple Mountain

Myrtle Peak

958 Blue Diamond Road • Coolin, ID 83821

Daily and Weekly  Rentals  Newer ski bluediamondmarina.com boats with towers and sun shades  Tubes  Kayaks Kneeboards  Wakeboards Stand Up Paddleboards  Canoes Water Skis

Kent Peak

Goblin Knob (6606ft)

Check availability by phone, online or email info@bluediamondmarina.com

Twin Peaks (2316m)

Eddy Peak (6725ft)

Explore Upper Priest on our: Pontoon Party Boat Tandem Kayaks Canoes

Silver Dollar Mountain (7181ft) Mount Roothaan (7326ft)

Plan a Trip & Discover IDAHO’S CROWN JEWEL

Flat Top

Mount Casey

WWW.PRIESTLAKE.ORG • 888-774-3785 SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 43


Blue Mountain

Lake PEND OREILLE

LAKE MAPS Lightning PRESENTED BY

Moose Mountain

Peak

200

PONDERAY

Bald Mountain

Lunch Peak

Oden Bay

SANDPOINT NEWPORT

Trout Peak

Sunnyside Mountain

Sunnyside

Contest Point

29 MILES

Round Top Mountain

DOVER

HOPE

Anderson Point Springy Point

Trestle Peak

Bottle Bay

Gold Mountain

EAST HOPE

WARREN ISLAND

Fry Creek

Hope Point

Gamlin Lake

Comeback Bay

Bee Top Mountain

Piccard Point

SAGLE Shepherd Lake

GARFIELD BAY Green Bay

Grouse Mountain

ROUND LAKE STATE PARK Black Pine Mountain

Goat Mountain

Denton Slough

Mineral Point

Long Point

Mirror Lake

MEMALOOSE ISLAND

Elliot Bay

LAKE PEND OREILLE

Howe Mountain

200

CLARK FORK

Talache

Cocolalla Lake

Windy Point

Butler Mountain Black Tail Mountain

COCOLALLA Huckleberry Mountain

Indian Point

Kilroy Bay

Maiden Rock

Johnson Peak

Granite Point

LEGEND

Tom’s Ridge

Little Black Tail

Minerva Ridge

BOAT RAMP PUBLIC TOILET BOAT FUEL

Evans Landing

Whiskey Rock

CAMPGROUND OVERNIGHT PUBLIC MOORAGE/DOCKS

Packsaddle Mountain (1951m)

BEACH Three Sisters Peak

Cedar Creek

COEUR D'ALENE 25 MILES

Cape Horn Peak

Athol

Cape Horn

Green Mountain

Scenic Bay KOOTENAI COUNTY

ATHOL

BONNER COUNTY

LAKEVIEW

Spruce Mountain

Buttonhook Bay Bernard Peak

– Call for Special Summer Discounts –

• Lake Pend Oreille is the largest lake in Idaho at 43 miles long, and up to 1,150 feet deep — making it the fifth-deepest in the nation.

44 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

Your place at the LAKE!

Minerva Peak

PUMP OUT STATION Mountain SPORTSMAN ACCESS

BAYVIEW

Deadman Point

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

Lakeshore Vacation Rental Cabins

• Complimentary Paddle Boards and Kayaks • 31 Sleep’s Cabins Lane, Sagle, Idaho • 208-255-2122 • SleepsCabins.com


Beer Fest 8th Annual Beer Bash at Trinity at City Beach. Saturday, July 10 12p – 5p. City Beach downtown. 30+ craft beers on tap! For ticket information go to ‘Sandpoint Beerfest!’ On Facebook.

Mountain Magic There are spectacular walks, hikes and drives in the Cabinet and Selkirk mountains - and an excellend and growing mountain bike trail system.

Music & More Year-round, Sandpoint is renowned for its packed entertainment schedule, with concerts and live music, art openings and events of all stripes.

Wine & Dine Sandpoint’s historic downtown is home to galleries, unique shops, top-notch restaurants - and an award-winning winery and four stellar breweries.

Get Visitor Information at 800-800-2106 • www.visitsandpoint.com SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 45


WHEREVER YOU GO (ON THE WATER), THERE YOU ARE

You could camp by the water. And you can rent a boat and get out on the water. Or you could do both. Rent a houseboat and spend a blissful couple of days in northeastern Washington in one of two available models through Lake Roosevelt Houseboat Vacations. Bliss ain’t cheap, though; a three-day/two-night stay on their SuperCruiser starts at $2,595 for the “value” season (through June 28 and after August 23). A week’s stay in July? $5,995. But consider the amenities of the 62-foot SuperCruiser: a boat-wide entertainment system, two refrigerators and a full kitchen, two full bathrooms, a hot tub, and a slide. It accommodates 13 people with private staterooms and convertible sleeping areas, so if everyone chipped in (and didn’t mind sleeping on the couch), this could definitely be a summer water vacation to remember. Visit lakeroosevelt.com.

CATCH THE WIND

If learning to sail is on your bucket list, look no further than Sandpoint, where the Sandpoint Sailing Association offers a range of camps and classes for all ages. Sessions vary in price from the Mommy/Daddy & Me for youths aged 5-8 or 8-12 ($175) to one-

46 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

If learning to sail is on your bucket list, look no further than Sandpoint, where the Sandpoint Sailing Association offers a range of camps and classes for all ages. on-one lessons for teens ($395). And if you’d rather watch, there’s plenty to see in Windbag Marina on Lake Pend Oreille where the SSA hosts a variety of events, including the annual Spud Cup Sailing Regatta, Sept. 4-5. Visit sandpointsailing.org.

SANDPOINT SWIM

Speaking of Sandpoint, the 26-year tradition of swimming the 1.76 miles in open water along the Long Bridge is on for 2021. Participation in the Aug. 7 event helps support swim lessons for local youth and keeps the cost of organizing the event down. Spectators welcome. Visit longbridgeswim.org.

DOUBLE DIP

Spokane’s extensive park system includes six municipal swim facilities in various neighborhoods — Cannon, Comstock, Hillyard, Liberty, Shadle and Witter — scheduled to open June 21, with open swim (reservations required) beginning July 5. Register for a no-cost Splashpass, which allows you (again, free) access to all Spokane aquatic centers, and stay tuned for reopening of select splash pads later in June. Learn to swim, save a life with American Red Cross courses, get or stay fit with water workouts, or just hang out by the pool and keep it cool this summer. City of Spokane pools

are also available for private rental — how cool is that?! — and, yes, there’s even a time for Fido. The last day of the swim season (dates TBA) is reserved for the dogs, whose owners need to bring $10 and proof of current rabies vaccination the day of. Visit my.spokanecity. org/recreation/aquatics.

RAINMAKING MAGIC

Spokane’s aquatic parks are only part of the big picture when it comes to getting and staying cool. The Lilac City boasts more than 100 landscaped parks, all of which require watering, including the venerated Manito Park, which inspired this suggestion for water fun. The next very hot day, pop over to the park earlier in the day and plan on participating in the massive undertaking keeping the park hydrated. Meander through the lilac grove and enjoy the fragrance, the beauty of the blooms, and the likelihood of getting doused by the sprinklers. Or wait until one passes and stand under a nearby evergreen to emulate rainforest mist. You can even recreate the experience at home, although maybe not with the same picture-perfect garden backdrop. Next time the lawn or bushes need watering, make a time of it and set up your lawn chair to catch the intermittent sprinkle, then close your eyes and imagine yourself cool and refreshed. n


VISIT

LIBERTY LAKE Time to warm up this house.

MORE OF THE SAME, ONLY DIFFERENT F

or me, it’s Groundhog Day all summer: Things I avoided last summer like long-distance travel and undistanced social events are still on the “no” list, but for different and mostly nonpandemic reasons. Expensive travel when you’re underemployed and people you’d like to visit can’t host you? Nope. Ditto for large events that require large dollars. And, truth be told, I don’t like very crowded events — indoors or outdoors. But there is one thing I am looking forward to: a housewarming party (a year-and-a-half overdue) that has since morphed into a solstice/ graduation/Father’s Day-type shindig. Whatever it’s called, it’s a cautious embrace of normalcy, a celebration of having persevered, and a reward for having done what I hope was my part to stay well and, more importantly, not sicken someone else. Did I want to wear a mask this past year? Curtail nearly all socializing? Or get injected with something that might have repercussions somewhere down the road? Hell, no. But it’s what was asked of the citizenry during this extraordinary time, and I believed it necessary. So did most of my social set. And while some had other ideas about what was right and necessary, I recognize that we can disagree on that (and on politics, religion, whether or not it’s acceptable to eat meat cooked medium-well or at all, etcetera) and still agree on the value of our relationship. So I’m going to have a party and focus not on the past, but on the future. I’m going to cherish hugs, handshakes, and maskless smiles of my friends, business acquaintances, co-workers and others, all of whom have plenty to celebrate just by making it through this past year. With any luck — and continued efforts to respect health protocols — we’ll get to celebrate in similar fashion again in summer 2022. — CARRIE SCOZZARO

FARMERS MARKET L i b e r t y

L a k e

Every Saturday 9am -1pm

SHOP | EAT | CONNECT

LLFarmersMarket.com or find us on facebook

Liberty Lake's Best! • 21 CRAFT BEER AND CIDER TAPS • LOCAL WINE • OUTDOOR PATIO • KID AND DOG FRIENDLY • LIVE MUSIC • TRIVIA TUESDAY • FUN EVENTS ALL SUMMER!!

2325 N MCKINZIE LANE || 509-862-6954 || SNOWEATERBREWINGCOMPANY.COM SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 47


C C O O N N C C E E P P T T

K K II T T C C H H E E N N

LL II B BE ER RT TY Y LL A AK KE E LL O OC C AT AT II O ON N

S SW WE EE ET T & & SA AV VO OR RY Y M ME EN NU U S

F FR R II D D AY AY S S & & S AT U R D S AT U R D AY AY S S

5 5 -- 9 9P PM M

FIND OUT MORE FIND OUT MORE @HELLOS UGAR @HELLOS UGAR

48 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

B BE EE ER R ,, W W II N NE E AN ND D C C II D DE ER R A


SEE WEBSITE FOR UPDATED INFORMATION

FESTIVAL WWW.PAVILLIONPARK.ORG

AUG

J ULY

LIBERTY LAKE 2021 03 16 24 07 20 22 28

THE CROODS A NEW AGE PAV I L LI O N PA R K AT D USK

SONIC THE HEDGEHOG ORCHARD PA R K AT D USK

ONWARD PAV I LL I O N PA R K AT D USK

FROZEN 2

PAV I L LI O N PA R K AT D USK

HARRY POTTER AND THE CHAMBER OF SECRETS PAV I LL I O N PA R K AT D USK

SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARK “A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM” PAV I L LI O N PA R K AT 5 PM

LIBERTY LAKE THROWDOWN

04 17 30 14 21 27

FIREWORKS PAVIL L ION PA RK AT D USK

STAR WARS: RISE OF SKYWALKER PAVIL L ION PA RK AT D USK

TOY STORY 4 ORCHARD PA RK AT D USK

AVENGERS ENDGAME

PAVIL L ION PA RK AT D USK

RAYA AND THE LAST DRAGON PAVIL L ION PA RK AT D USK

ABOMINABLE

PAVIL L ION PA RK AT D USK

ORCHARD PARK ALL DAY

SEPT 04

SPOKANE SYMPHONY PAV I L LI O N PA RK AT 6 PM

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 49


BIKES

Riding a bike is a bit like, well, riding a bike. It’s something you can pick up again instantly.

The bicycle was the ultimate safe recreation choice during the pandemic — and it’s perfect for this summer too 50 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

BY DANIEL WALTERS

T

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

he shelves of local bike shops were bare last summer for a good reason: Even when we didn’t know how rare it was for COVID to spread outdoors, bicycles were one of the few obvious safe activity choices during the pandemic. And so there were a lot of people who rediscovered the majesty of biking last year. They dug around the dingy corners of their garages for their old Schwinn, dropped a few glugs of oil on the creaky chain, and once again experienced the thrill of cycling — the way the pedals respond to the pavement, the way wind whips across your face, the way your stomach lurches as you careen down a hill. After all, riding a bike is a bit like, well, riding a bike. It’s something you can pick up again instantly, no matter how long ago you set aside the hobby. So whether you’re a wide-eyed ingenue who just ditched your training wheels or a disgraced Tour de France winner bitter in your old age, we have some cycling ideas for you this summer.


BIKE TO ZIP’S IN CHENEY AND GET A CORN DOG During the depths of the pandemic last year, my father and I — in a bout of Harold-andKumarian ambition — decided to pursue something grand: a corn dog from Zip’s, the beloved regional fast-food chain. Sure, we could have just swung over to Zip’s downtown location. But where’s the challenge in that? We wanted to channel the pure Zip’s-loving

essence of an Eastern Washington University sophomore, both in the sense of heading to the Zip’s in Cheney and in the not-having-a-car sense. We decided to ride. The Centennial Trail gets all the love, and for good reason: Until it just sort of gives up around the Idaho state line, the Centennial is one of the most gorgeous features of our region. The Fish Lake Trail, by contrast, at first appears to be the treadmill of bike trails — flat and samey. But it gets better the farther you go. And while the unfinished Fish Lake route requires an obnoxious two-mile detour around the railroad tracks, just when you’re ready to give up you’re back on the Columbia Plateau section of the trail. From there it’s only a short jaunt to Cheney, where your reward of corn dogs and milkshakes await. Just make sure to let your food settle before you start biking back. Last time, I left a bit of corn dog and banana milkshake puree on the ride home.

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 51


GO BIKE CAMPING AT DRAGOON CREEK

Camping is fun. Paying to park at a campsite isn’t. Yet even a statefunded campground like Riverside State Park makes you shell out for a Discover Pass to park. The solution is bike camping, says Spokane Active Transportation founder and avid cyclist Jessica Engelman. Think car camping, but you carry your stuff on your bike. With a little bit of practice and the right equipment, it’s actually not that hard to carry some basic camping gear. After all, you don’t have to fret over every gram of weight like you do when backpacking, and you can get a lot farther a lot faster. “I just use the old sleeping bag I got from my parents 20 years ago,” says Engelman. “I bungee-cord them on the back of the bike and it works out.” As for a natural first bike camping adventure, she recommends Dragoon Lake State Park. It’s about a 20-mile ride one-way from Spokane. You’ll start on the Children of the Sun trail in Hillyard and be treated to a lot of scenic country roads — and a few steep hills — along the way. Give the Natural Resources Northeast Office a call to make sure the campsite is open before you head out: 509-684-7474.

With a little bit of practice and the right equipment, it’s actually not that hard to carry some basic camping gear.

BUILD A SICK JUMP OUT OF PLYWOOD AND SEE IF YOU CAN GET AIR

Yeah, Dad says that wood is, like, super-expensive right now, but that big sheet of plywood has just been laying around the garage for two years doing nothing. It’s not like he’s going to notice if you borrow it for just one afternoon. Then all you have to do is prop it up on some cinder blocks below that big hill near Linwood Elementary. Hop on your BMX and pedal as hard as you can and don’t wuss out. Mason says he did that at his house over at Indian Trail last summer, and he got going so fast he got like 6 feet of air and all his friends wrote “total badass” on his cast after he got home from the hospital.

BRAVE THE SNAKE PIT

The Snake Pit, Enaville’s iconic restaurant and bar in northeast Idaho near Kellogg, does not include an actual pit full of snakes, so even the most ophidiophobic archaeologist should feel comfortable joining in on the summer solstice Ride the Wall bike ride. The 13-mile loop departs from the Snake Pit around 4 pm, heads to Cataldo and then rides along CCC and Wall roads, overlooking the Coeur d’Alene River. The route can be steep, but after you’re finished, you’ll be able to treat your burning quads to a barbecue buffet. The ride costs $40, but that’s to raise money for the Silver Valley Fuller Center for Housing, a Christian nonprofit that helps low-income people build and repair their homes.

9

232 W Sprague Ave, Spokane • nynebar.com • 474-1621 52 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

8


HITCH A GONDOLA AND GO MOUNTAIN BIKING

Kellogg may be even better for mountain bikers than road bikers. The same gondola that takes skiers up Silver Mountain in the winter takes mountain bikers to the Silver Mountain Bike Park in the summer. That includes insane downhill trails for experts with names like “Hammer,” “Hot Mess” and “Frankenbeans” and comparatively chill beginner trails with names like “Payday” and “Cool Neatness.” All in all, you can drop more than 3,400 vertical feet, before hopping back on the lift and starting the ride all over again.

CRUISE TO THE MUSIC WITH THE SHACKTOWN CREW

At Silver, you can drop 3,400 vertical feet, before hopping back on the lift and starting the ride all over again. SILVER MOUNTAIN RESORT PHOTO

OK, so you’re sick of group rides filled with try-hards, like that time you joined a group in Europe and a total tool in the group named Lance insisted on blasting up every hill. Join the chill crowd of 20 to 50 riders who head out from Shacktown Community Cycle every week from 6 to 7 pm and just let the momentum of the enthusiasm for cycling carry you. Shacktown owner Roger Hernandez helps lead the rides, blasting music from the boomboxes strapped to his bike. Sometimes there are themes — like Prince v. Bowie or Run DMC vs. the Beastie Boys — that serve as an excuse for the crowd to dress themselves and their bikes up in costumes. The route, usually 7 to 12 miles long, isn’t fixed. Hernandez just follows his heart. “I’m taking people to parks, through neighborhoods. … I never have a set route. I ride bikes all day, every day for decades now,” he says. “When we roll through downtown, that’s usually pretty fun. We go through the Pavilion and ride circles in there, and everyone loves it.” Don’t worry if you’re nervous about traffic. They have assigned “corkers” to stop the flow of traffic when you’re crossing the street. And don’t worry if you’re slow and out of shape. The entire crowd will wait for you. It happens almost every week of the year. “Sometimes I’m like, I don’t want to do it,” Hernandez says. “But I see everyone’s joy, and it gets me back there.” n

WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL RETURNS! Scan the QR code below to order your tickets for 6/30 @7-9pm or visit our website: spokaneriverkeeper.org

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 53


EXTREMELY ONLINE I hate “online dating” in the way that only someone who’s never tried something can hate that thing. To be clear, my principle objection has nothing to do with being offended by the idea of giant tech companies or cynical commodification of human relationships. But I’m offended as a storyteller. I’ve always wanted to tell my future children the grand story of How I Met Their Mother, but with a finale much less disappointing than the version on CBS. A great romantic story is about destiny shrouded in the pauper’s disguise of coincidence: Maybe a wild Ultimate Frisbee throw of mine would skid to rest at her feet. Maybe I’d be biking and she’d hit me with her car. Maybe we’d both be pawns in a high-stakes game of international intrigue between our two feuding families.

But online dating? I didn’t want to tell my kids about connecting with my wife because of some dating site computer algorithm. Algorithms are math, and math is the exact scientific opposite of romance. Even “we got shitfaced and hooked up in the Swackhammer’s bathroom” is a better story than Love At First Swipe. Yer for more than a decade I’ve tried practically everything else: Quietly pining for unavailable women; posting witty comments on all of a crush’s Facebook photos; brooding soberly in the corner at parties while thumbing through Twitter; showing attractive women my killer impression of Vox podcaster Matt Yglesias, everything. Hell, I spent four years as a student at a small, Presbyterian college and — despite

Our journalism makes a difference, and so can you.

Learn more at Inlander.com/Insider 54 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

This should make for a good story.


9.99 Quick Lunch Specials

$ the implicit promise of the brochure — ended up without a single wedding ring to show for it. So gradually, like a picky eater being encouraged to expand his palette by the other members of the Donner party, my desperation started to chip away at my resolve. In a foolish fit of foreshadowing years ago, I made a dark vow that, if I turned 35 and somehow I still wasn’t married, I would cast aside my pieties and descend into the snarling online hellscape of the horny and the damned. But then, on my 34th birthday, the COVID-19 pandemic shut down America. Dating, as a particularly gruesome slideshow in ninth-grade health class taught me, has always been a bit epidemiologically risky. But COVID was another level. Women, I hear, don’t like it if you give them a disease that kills their grandparents. For over a year, even if I wanted to try dating a bunch of people, I couldn’t. Limitations can clarify things. Prison makes you more likely to take chances when you get out, not less. And so this is a moment, in this one summer, when the entire online dating field is rusty. Yes, I have no idea what I’m doing, but everyone is out of practice. Everyone is ready to take stupid risks. And ultimately, here’s the best part: Any love story, even one that involves online dating, is pretty grand when it starts with “we were just emerging from the worst pandemic in a century.” —DANIEL WALTERS

Secret Flavors Revealed weekly

Monday - Friday 11am-3pm

2-pc Fish & Chips Reuben w/Fries Shepherd’s Pie Chicken Pot Pie Guinness Beef Stew

BLE SID EWALK SEATIN G NO W AVA ILA

719 N MONROE ST. • SPOKANE •

509

326-7251

ADWAY

CORNER OF MONROE AND BRO

2021 Concert Season JUL

1 JUL

8 JUL

15 6-8 PM EVERY THURSDAY IN JULY AND AUGUST

JUL

22

plus a special Saturday concert

JUL

29 AUG

5 AUG

12 AUG

19 AUG

Thank you to our sponsors!

21 AUG

26

The Rub ROCK

Opener: Hanna Rebecca

CeCe Curtis BLUES/JAZZ

Opener: Pamela Benton

Last Chance Band COUNTRY ROCK

Opener: Ally Burke

Macey Gard Band

ROCK/POP/SOUL/ATTITUDE

Opener: Jackson Roltgen

P.B. & Jam

CONTEMPORARY JAZZ

Opener: Renei and Davis

Northwest Breeze

INDIE/ALTERNATIVE REGGAE

Opener: Keanu Shioya

Soul Proprietor

FUNK/SOUL/BLUES/MOTOWN

Opener: Scotty Dodson

Lake Town Sound ROCK

Opener: Jonathon Tibbetts

special saturday concert! CDA Symphony Opener: The Weddle Twins

Kelly Hughes COUNTRY

Opener: Brady Campbell

Roberta Larsen and Otis

Hand-crafted • Made-on-Site Premium • peanut & tree-nut free 112 n. 4th st. • cd’a, ID 208.930.0699 abisicecream.com

Radio

artsandculturecda.org SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 55


Bazaar returns on Aug. 7.

56 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021


ARTS From local marketplaces to theatrical performances, here’s how to give your summer some artsy flair

WarehouseAthleticFacility_SumerCap_061021_3H_MB Meet, Eat and Have Fun

BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

T

he arts community was hammered by the pandemic like few others, with gallery shows and live performances canceled and postponed in droves. This summer marks the first chance for many artists to get back to work, and there are plenty of ways you can explore what they’re doing.

HOW BAZAAR

Speaking of local arts marketplaces, you won’t want to miss Bazaar, the annual pop-up shopping experience that’s set to take over downtown Spokane on Aug. 7. Courtesy of the Spokane arts organization Terrain, Bazaar offers dozens of booths that sell local artisanal works in every medium imaginable — paintings, sculpture, beadwork, embroidery. Need to hang something on your wall that’ll bring a pop of color, or find a decorative throw pillow to really tie your living room together? Bazaar will have you covered. And bonus: You’ll be supporting a local artist. Warm weather doesn’t stop them, either: Keep your eyes peeled this winter for possible details on Brrrzaar, which brings back the Bazaar concept during the winter months, only in the cozy environs of River Park Square. Visit terrainspokane.com.

Breakfast Served All Day!

POP-UP CINEMA

Movie buffs found refuge last summer at the drive-in after the pandemic closed indoor theaters. In some cases, those drive-ins were actually parking lots or sprawling lawns converted into outdoor theaters, and one of the best of the bunch was hosted by the HUB Sports Center in Liberty Lake (19619 E. Cataldo). It was one of last year’s go-to pop-up cinemas, and it’s continuing the tradition this year with a diverse roster that features something to appeal to any cinematic taste. Load the kids into the car for such live-action family faves as the 1998 remake of The Parent Trap (June 18) and The Sandlot (Sept. 25) and animated hits like WALL-E (July 16) and Happy Feet (Aug. 20). And if your little ones aren’t so little anymore, consider introducing them to the intergenerational classics Dirty Dancing (Aug. 20) and Jurassic Park (Sept. 11), both of which hold up pretty well in the decades since they were theatrical hits. Entry per carload is just $20. See the full schedule at hubsportscenter.org.

Happy Hour Every Day 3pm to 6pm

Locally Owned & Operated For 40 years

1018 W Francis, Spokane, WA (509) 326-6794 theswingingdoors.com

ARIA ON THE LAKE

Is there a classier outing than a night at the opera? And is there a more majestic location than a boat on Lake Coeur d’Alene, right as the sun sets? Well, you’ll be able to get the best of both worlds with Inland Northwest Opera’s upcoming cruise, which will allow you to enjoy both a boat ride around the lake and an open-air performance of G.B. Pergolesi’s 18th-century musical farce The Maid Turned Mistress. It’s the perfect show for a socially distanced outing, too, because the cast is made up of just two performers, and the plot involves the cantankerous relationship between an old man and his domineering maid. What are the odds, you think, that they might fall in love, despite their initial objections? The cruise will begin boarding at the Coeur d’Alene Resort starting at 6:30 pm on July 18 and 19, with the performances beginning a half hour later. For safety purposes, groups will be limited to no more than six people. See inlandnwopera.com.

A weekly email for food lovers Subscribe at Inlander.com/newsletter SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 57


n the first few weeks of 2020, when the threat of the coronavirus had yet to rear its head, I began researching a story about Spokane’s growing community of pinball aficionados. That research involved playing a lot of pinball with people who were way better at the game than I. As my deadline loomed, I spent more and more time hunched over various pinball cabinets at the downtown bar Berserk or at the retro arcade Jedi Alliance. Again, for research purposes. My pinball technique was pretty pathetic when I started out, but countless rolls of quarters later, I started to feel, like Tommy from the Who rock opera, that I might soon have crazy flipper fingers. Maybe with a little more practice, I could join Berserk’s pinball league, where the city’s most diehard players go head-to-head. That was in early March. Everything began

58 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

shutting down soon thereafter. The last thing I did in public before quarantine came down like a hammer? A couple of co-workers and I played pinball at Berserk, when our main concern was, Can touching the same pinball cabinet give us coronavirus? Just last week, I played pinball again for the first time since early 2020. Reader, it was not pretty. All of those skills I’d cultivated in the previous year — gone. Or maybe I had been kidding myself, and I’d never had that dexterity in the first place. Either way, my goal for summer 2021 is to get my pinball chops back. Yes, I know it’s an indoor activity, but it’s also a communal activity, and one that just about everyone seems to enjoy. Plus, now that the worldwide coin shortage appears to be over, there are so many quarters in between couch cushions and stuck to the bottom of your car’s ashtray that are just begging to be spent. See you at Jedi Alliance. —NATHAN WEINBENDER

GOLF

ADD A BALL I

Let’s grab some loose change and go!


Four incredible courses

10 minutes from downtown

but far enough away

from everything else

Dads & Grads Deal

One round at each course – $129 ($47 savings)

Purchase by June 20, use in 2021.

James Richman – Downriver

Aaron Theisen – Indian Canyon

Aaron Theisen – Esmeralda

Aaron Theisen – The Creek at Qualchan

Affordable Tee Times at SpokaneGolf.org

Book Your Tee Time!

PACKAGES FOR TWO STARTING AT

$269

Stay & Play

CALL 1 800-523-2464 TO BOOK YOUR PACKAGE TODAY

W E LC O M E H O M E .

Make your getaway this summer with our Stay & Play Golf Package. You’ll enjoy golf for two at our scenic, championship golf course plus a one-night stay at our premier resort.

HOME OF THE CIRCLING RAVEN CHAMPIONSHIP PRESENTED BY K XLY NEWS 4

AUGUST 23 RD – 29 TH , 2021 All packages and offers subject to availability. All rooms incur a 7% Tribal tax. Stay & Play packages available throughout the season. The Coeur d’Alene Casino Resort reserves the right to modify or cancel this promotion at any time.

CASINO

|

HOTEL

|

DINING

|

SPA

|

CHAMPIONSHIP

GOLF

3 7 9 1 4 S O U T H N U K WA LQ W • W O R L E Y, I D A H O 8 3 8 7 6 • 1 8 0 0 - 5 2 3 - 2 4 6 4 • C D A C A S I N O . C O M

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 59


The Shen Yun Performing Arts group comes to Spokane on Aug. 3.

GREEN DAYS

A marketplace, a pop-up gallery, a performance space — Art on the Green is all of those things, and it’s been an annual tradition for countless local art aficionados for more than five decades. Following a virtual 2020 edition, it’s back in its regular spot on the campus of North Idaho College, and between the dates of July 30 and Aug. 1, you can take your time admiring (and even purchasing) the work of over 160 individual artists, and the festival will also be offering a full schedule of live local music and a selection of food trucks. It’s a family-friendly affair, too: The children’s art garden provides the materials for your kids to make their own masterpieces, and maybe they’ll be selling their own wares in the future. For more: artonthegreencda.com.

BIG LAUGHS

We all need a good belly laugh every now and again, and the Spokane Comedy Club is set to populate the stage with megawatt comedians who know how to split your sides. One of the biggest names on the club’s summer roster is Mike Epps, who will perform a run of Inland Northwest sets July 9-11. Epps cut his teeth within the ranks of the urban stand-up collective Def Comedy Jam, becoming a breakout star behind the mic before transitioning into his role as a regular scene-stealer in comedy films. Perhaps you recognize him from All About the Benjamins alongside Ice Cube, or as the laconic drug dealer in two of the Hangover movies, or as Day-Day Jones in the cultishly adored Friday franchise (also featuring Mr. Cube). You won’t want to miss his big screen-approved charisma. Visit spokanecomedyclub.com.

perienc er camping ex m m su d se a , Christian-b r forget! An affordable) that your child will neve 17 (for ages 7imming, e: boating, sw Activities includl, miniature golf, a climbing wald so much more! camp fires, an 30

ugh July

June 21 thro

tion: Info & Registra 759 -2 29 -3 9 0 5 l rd.org Cal at CampGiffo or visit online Also offering Retreat & Conference Facilities If you’re seeking a church home, visit Makingspokanebetter.org

60 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

ANCIENT DANCE

There’s something special about groups who dedicate themselves to keeping a specific heritage alive, and the Shen Yun Performing Arts group has done just that, preserving the history of classical Chinese dance as it has evolved over thousands of years. The troupe, founded in 2006, is based in New York, but they’ve been taking their eyepopping stage show on the road for several years, and they’ll bring their ancient acrobatics to the First Interstate Center for the Arts on Aug. 3. It’s designed to be an immersive experience, a feast for the eyes as well as the ears, and it sets out to bring an ancient artform to life and into the 21st century. Visit firstinterstatecenter.org.

e

Dynamic Athletic Center is a fun and exciting place where talent and integrity meet. With programs from recreational to competitive gymnastics and cheer, we have something to keep your kids active and busy year round!

Summer camps and classes start July 5 and run through the end of August! 509-489-5867 | 5512 N. Havana Spokane | www.dynamicathleticcenter.org


s

THE PLAY’S THE THING

If you’ve ever found yourself watching a great performance on the stage of the Spokane Civic Theatre and thought to yourself, “I’d like to do that,” consider enrolling in one of the many upcoming courses taking place during Summer in the Park with the Civic. From the forestry shelter inside Riverfront Park, you can enroll in various classes that teach you the basics of the theater, getting tips and tricks from actors, directors and behind-the-scenes folks who make sure the show goes on. Maybe you want to memorize an entire play and perform it within a week. Or maybe you want to get a handle on the ins and outs of playwriting. Perhaps you’d like to brush up on your dramatic monologue delivery or your comic pratfall skills, or get a crash course in the specific gravitas it takes to pull off Shakespeare. Whether you’re still an aspiring stage performer or a seasoned theater veteran who simply wants to learn a new trick of the trade, these fun classes will get you stage-ready. For more: spokanecivictheatre.com. n

Introducing GRAZING PLATTERS

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 61


TH INK LOCAL • LI V E LO CA L

Purchase With Purpose • Style Made Sustainable

Bartlett Gallery & Framing

Creative Design & Quality Custom Framing

Ron & Jen Garrity

(509) 535-4616 | bartlettframing.com | Garland Resale Boutique • TEMPORARY HOURS TIL 7/1: Thurs-Sat 11:00-6:00

/bartlettgallery

2525 E. 29th Ave., Suite #5 | Spokane | Serving Spokane for over 20 years

Located at 11 S. Howard St. in Spokane WA • garlandresale.com

Visit Us in our New Home in The Boulevard Building!

1905 N Monroe St • Spokane | 62 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

(509)

598-8755 | wWw.atomicthreadsinc.com


AFTER OUR EARLY BLAST OF SUMMER WEATHER, JAN, THE TOY LADY, IS STOCKING UP ON HOT WEATHER TOYS:

PAMPERED CAMPER

Watch Out!

OUR BUG-OFF SOAP WITH CITRONELLA & OTHER ESSENTIAL OILS

BITE RELIEF

BOO RADLEY’S HOWARD STREET • DOWNTOWN SPOKANE

JUMBO ROLLER BALL WITH SOOTHING ESSENTIAL OILS

SCRAM!

OUR ALL NATURAL” SKEETER BEATER” SPRAY GREENCASTLESOAP.COM 466-7223 | 203 N. STONE | SPOKANE

River Park Square (509) 456-TOYS

The Best Summer Sandals for All Day Comfort Find what you need in spices and seasonings at our Spokane store, or find us online at spokanespice.com

NORTHTOWN MALL • 5094824515 • 4750 N DIVISION #260

Look for the

SHOP LOCAL GUIDE 130 N. Stone St., Spokane, WA

one block west of Altamont, two blocks north of Sprague

509-624-1490 • spokanespice.com

IIIIII RUSH ORDER — NEED IT FAST? — Those Hard-To-Find & Collector Items VINYL • CDS • DVDS

THIS FALL

T-shirts • Posters & more Best music store in Eastern Washington

1610 N. Monroe St • 509.325.1914

We are ready to help you shop for the perfect summer gift monday-saturday 11-5:30pm 319 west second avenue • spokane • 509.747.2867 lolospokane.com

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 63


40% OFF JUNE TO SEPTEMBER*

Unique. Handmade. Local.

BLOEM SUMMER SALE

THINK LOCAL • LIVE LOCAL

chocolates-flowers.com (509) 456-8466 info@bloemspokane.com

WE’VE MOVED!

Our new location is in the Spokane Valley, on the corner of Pines & 9th.

To celebrate our new shop, we are offering HOT SUMMER SPECIALS on both deliveries and pickup orders from June to September. All offerings are only available for phone-in orders, so give us a call today!

DELIVERY SPECIALS p All delivery fees are p For all floral deliveries above 40% OFF! $50: Add on a 2 or 4 layer box of p New delivery minimum: $25 Chocolates at 20% off

Shop Online 203 N. Washington Next to Aunties Bookstore 509-327-6920 • Shop Online potteryplaceplus.com

LIBERTY BUILDING NEW SUMMER HOURS

LOCAL LIBERTY

Now open until 9pm Fridays and Saturdays

Come enjoy Spokane’s best local bookstore, gift shop, game store, eats, beauty services, wine, and art!

Corner of Washington and Main | spokanelibertybuilding.com

64 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021


Politically Correct & Incorrect Eyewear

EVERYTHING IN SIGHT OPTICAL BOUTIQUE Designer Eyewear & Contact Lenses Eye Examinations

Debbie Cozza, L.D.O. Professional Frame Consultant

509.742.9275 | everythinginsight.biz

The Time w o N i s

Advertise your business in Annual Manual, the Insider’s Guide to the Inland Northwest

Most Insurance Accepted

FARM

Salvation M E D I C A L L A K E , WA

An eclectic variety of unique finds & special gifts. Always on the hunt for the unusual. Tue - Thur 10am - 4pm | Fri & Sat 10-5pm • 509.933.1723 farmsalvation.com

106 S Lefevre, Medical Lake • 15 minutes West of downtown Spokane on I-90

ANNUAL REPORT ARTS RECREATION FOOD & DRINK EDUCATION SHOPPING GREEN ZONE advertising@inlander.com | 509.325.0634 ext 215 SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 65


thrift store

Windfall

Shop Vintage

CuratedVintage Clothing& Accessories

upscale thrift

clothes  handbags  shoes housewares & much more! A Neighborhood Ministry of St. John’s Cathedral Service League

In the beautiful Perry District

1024 S. Perry Street  Spokane, WA  509.534.3888

Scrumptious Junque OUTSIDE MARKET

IN OUR PARKING LOT!

1889SalvageCo.com 2824 N MONROE ST, SPOKANE, WA 99205

June 27 July 18 September 19

Sustainable • Unique Stylish • Head-Turning Slow Fashion

AVAILABLE HERE WE FEATURE 6,000 SQ. FT. OF THE BEST VINTAGE & ANTIQUE GOODS THE AREA HAS TO OFFER. + MID-CENTURY + INDUSTRIAL + VINTAGE CLOTHING + UNIQUE FINDS + FURNITURE

1012 N WASHINGTON • SPOKANE

66 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

RED LEAF

VINTAGE Located inside

Boulevard Mercantile 1012 N Washington & Teleport Vintage 917 W Broadway followusfornewmerchdrops &vintagefashioninspiration


Tue 12-6

Wed 12-7

Thu 11-6

Fri/Sat 11-7

Sun 12-6

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 67


SMOKE &

SELF-QUARANTINE

Smoke and crowds might keep you stuck inside, but they shouldn’t keep you from enjoying summer

68 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

BY WILL MAUPIN


Catering 7 days a week. You can even rent out the entire train! Call or email for a custom quote.

OPEN FOR DINE IN:

Thu-Sat 11am-8pm

CALL FOR TAKE-OUT

11027 E Sprague, Spokane Valley • 509-710-3426 • SmokeRidgeBBQ.com

Colville, Washington

Our Good Nature

L

Local artist Megan Perkins’ lecture “Paintings of Manito and Other Spokane Scenes” is scheduled for July 17. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

ast summer, being stuck in the house wasn’t a choice for most of us. But even before COVID, the smoke-filled August and September skies in recent years forced many indoors for days or weeks at a time when they’d rather be out and about enjoying every ounce of summer. After a year-plus of lockdown, some folks will be slow to embrace crowds this summer, and we all need to worry about those fires again, so we have some suggestions on how to keep yourself entertained when you’re most comfortable right at home.

PAINT THE PARK, FROM HOME

Local artist Megan Perkins is well known for her colorful, vibrant watercolors of landscapes and landmarks around Spokane. She’ll be giving a lecture July 17 at 11 am titled “Paintings of Manito and Other Spokane Scenes” in which the artist and teacher will explain her process of painting en plein air, the fancy French way to say “outside.” Fear not, though, you can stay safely indoors. The lecture will take place over Zoom, so whether you’re dodging smoky skies or crowds and coronavirus, you and your lungs can rest easy. Perkins will also give tips on how to paint your own garden or, when the skies and crowds clear, to paint Manito Park just like she does. Register for free at thefriendsofmanito.org.

Just 70 miles North of Spokane, surrounded by National Forest and minutes from Lake Roosevelt. 27 Campgrounds at Lake Roosevelt National Recreation Area. Don’t miss our Annual Sidewalk Sale & Street Faire

Blazing Saddles Bike Ride

JULY 15, 16 & 17 2021

AUGUST 7, 2021

• Camping

• Hunting

• Road cycling

• Fishing

• Wildlife watching

• Scenic drives

• Hiking

• Mountain biking

986 South Main St, Ste B Colville, WA 99114 (509) 684-5973 Visit us online for trail maps & outdoor recreation information:

www.colvillechamberofcommerce.com SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 69


JUST ONE MORE I

This summer, let’s linger a little longer.

HECTOR AIZON PHOTO

n summer there’s nothing abrupt about the days. They’re long. They take their time coming in, and take even more time to fade away. By August, when the sun starts dropping below the horizon noticeably earlier than it had only a month prior, it’s the afternoon heat that lingers long past the evening and into the night. It’s the season for simply staying out because you can, or because the sun and the warmth fooled you into forgetting that you’re suddenly out late on a Tuesday. Last summer, though, wasn’t that. There was summer, sure, but there was no staying out. Last summer I knew every day would come to an abrupt close. My plans, normally involving just me, would end and I’d go home. This summer I’m looking forward to what I don’t have planned. To whatever happens to happen after the plans are in place. Like leaving work early to cool off by the river only to be inter-

rupted by a text from a friend heading to get an after-work slice. Or the afternoon pick-me-up at a downtown coffee shop where I’m planning to get some work done but end up sitting with an acquaintance I haven’t seen since 2019 — the before times, if you can remember those. I’m looking forward to not getting a seat on the patio because of the farmers market, or trivia night, or live music that I somehow forgot happens there every single Wednesday and by now I should know better but also whatever, it’s more fun like this. These are all things that start with me having a plan to do something. Something seasonally appropriate, something summery, only to be replaced by something even more appropriately seasonal. They’re plans that get derailed by people in the best way possible. They don’t end abruptly, like they did last summer, with the “Well, it was good to see you” through a mask at the grocery store from 6 feet apart. They’re plans that end with, “It’s actually not that late, and I bet my apartment is still sweltering so, sure, I’ll stay and hang out for one more.” —WILL MAUPIN

11th ANNUAL

Art fora starry thenight Animals online auction Amazing art, collectibles, and gifts from local, regional, and national artists and makers July 7-10, 2021 | Online Bidding riverswishanimalsanctuary.org 70 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021


A thorough cleaning session inside your home has multiple benefits to help you make it through the cabin fever that comes with smoke season.

CUISINE TO COOL

To many, the grill is the champion of summer cuisine, and the tomato is nothing more than a sliced up sidekick. This year it’s time we elevate these fruits masquerading as vegetables to their proper place at the top of the summer food pantheon. Turn to the tomato on those days when it’s too hot for the oven and too smoky to take your cooking outside. Peak tomato season overlaps almost perfectly with the worst days of wildfire season. From July through September, farmers markets all over the region will be overflowing with bright red beauties and those odd-looking but honorable heirlooms. At peak ripeness, tomatoes can shine as the centerpiece of meals that require more making than cooking. From salads to sandwiches there are countless recipes online in which tomatoes star in produce-forward meals that are surprisingly filling. Sure, you can eat tomatoes any time of year, but like the grill, they’re just better in the summer.

PRETEND WITH A PUZZLE

Maps of Washington from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration show the vast majority of the state as ranging from “abnormally dry” to full-blown drought. Which is bad news when you think about the now-annual tradition of a late summer smoke season. It’s almost assured that some morning over the coming months you’ll look out the window and see a gray haze obscure your view of the sun and the trees and everything else that makes Spokane a natural wonderland. When that time comes and the view from your window goes from gorgeous to gross, be ready to trick your eyes with a puzzle. A 500-piece jigsaw with palm trees and sandy beaches? That’ll kill an afternoon stuck indoors. A thousand pieces showing Spokane in full, smokeless glory? That can keep you busy inside for a few days. Uncle’s Games, with locations in downtown Spokane and at the Spokane Valley Mall, has a massive selection of jigsaw puzzles.

CLEAN YOUR HOME FOR YOUR HEALTH

Just because there’s a thing called spring cleaning doesn’t mean you can’t do some summer cleaning. A thorough cleaning session inside your home has multiple benefits to help you make it through the cabin fever that comes with smoke season. First, and most obvious, when everything outside is acrid and disgusting, it’s nice to have a clean and tidy living space to take refuge. Second, while it’s not quite a workout, a full deep clean is a pretty solid way to get moving while stuck indoors. Brooms and vacuums help you get those steps in while scrubbing and dusting keep your arms active, especially if you use some elbow grease. No, you won’t turn into a muscle-bound fitness model after a day of cleaning, but you sure won’t feel like a couch potato either.

ADVANCING NEUROSCIENCE RESEARCH IN THE INLAND NORTHWEST AND AROUND THE WORLD

Do you or a loved one have:

Parkinson’s Disease (PD) • PD Genetic Testing Huntington’s Disease • Essential Tremor • Multiple Sclerosis

We also have genetic screening for many neurological diseases Please call: 509-960-2818 to learn more about our clinical research trials

• SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 71


STAY INSIDE THE LINES, OR NOT

When you’re stuck inside alone it can be all too easy to veg out in front of the TV for hours on end, but that’s a recipe for some serious brain fog. As is the case with the body, it’s important to keep your brain active even when you’re cooped up at home. Getting your creative juices flowing is a great way to do that, and coloring books make it easy. They’re not just for kids anymore, either. Auntie’s Bookstore at 402 W. Main has a great selection of coloring books for adults. There’s the beautiful, floral-themed Botanicum from illustrator Maria Trolle or the soothing experience of The Bob Ross Coloring Book, among many others available in store, as well as the online-only, appropriately inappropriate F--- Off, Coronavirus, I’m Coloring: Self-Care for the Self-Quarantined, A Humorous Adult Swear Word Coloring Book During COVID-19 Pandemic. Each of those will land you around 100 pages to color while setting you back less than 20 bucks.

“GO” TO THE MOVIES “WITH” FRIENDS

After a year spent living in varying levels of isolation, jumping back into the public world of crowds can be a daunting proposition. Why not dip your toes in first with some socialization from the comfort of your couch? Over the past year I’ve stayed in touch with a friend from Montreal by watching movies together, even though more than 2,000 miles and a closed international border lie between us. Netflix has a service that allows multiple users to sync up their viewing and talk to each other in a group chat. Other streaming services without those features can be jury-rigged by getting on the phone with your watch party and having everyone press play at the same time. Put on a mediocre rom-com and share some eye rolls and groans with your friends as you watch. Plus, since you’re home alone, nobody will complain as you loudly complain about how unrealistic these movie meet-cutes are. Nobody falls in love like that in real life! n

72 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

s r w e t m e e m S Su

Coloring books can get your creative juices flowing.

Enjoy Inside & Outside Seating

Summer Hours Beginning July: Mon 6AM-1PM Tue-Fri 6AM-4PM • Sat 8AM-2PM 1612 N Barker Rd • Spokane Valley • 509-242-3189 www.blissfulwhisk.com •

@theblissfulwhiskspokane

sweeter

MAKE YOUR SUMMER

Use code TREATYOSELF for 15% off your order sweetfrostingsbakeshop.com

509.242.3845


Hello Summer!

ats Cool Drinks, Icy Tre

and Yummy Sweets to Help You Beat

the Summer Heat!

hallettschocolates.com 1419 E Holyoke Ave | 509 484-6454

Dole Whip

(South Hill Location Only)

Bubble Waffles (Kendall Yards Location Only)

Kendall Yards 509-703-7042 • 1238 W Summit

South Hill 509-535-7171• 1001 W 25th

thescoopspokane.com SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 73


74 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021


KIDS &

FAMILIES How to entertain the young — and young at heart — all summer long BY E.J. IANNELLI

H

ow do you keep grandparents, parents, teens, tweens, kids and toddlers entertained simultaneously? The answer may lie in those uniquely intergenerational activities dubbed “family friendly.” Spend a day climbing, skating, splashing and sliding without leaving the same patch of ground. Find a spontaneous, shared path to creative expression. Or pass an afternoon beautifying your backyard or balcony with flowers. And best of all, having fun and making memories together doesn’t have to cost a fortune. All but one of the activities suggested here require minimal to no outlay.

EXPERIENCE THE REVITALIZED RIVERFRONT PARK

Just in time for summer, Riverfront Park has unveiled a North Bank area that’s been transformed into a one-stop activity complex. Key elements of the 40,000-square-foot complex take their design cues from the Ice Age floods that transformed the regional landscape somewhat more dramatically 14,000 years ago. “There’s a three-story play structure, a climbing wall, an inclusive playscape, a sandpit, a splash pad, a signature basketball court as well as a skate and wheels park. It’s for basketball players, for skaters, for children who want to run through the fountains or play in the sand,” says Riverfront Park Director Jonathan Moog. “This is the final keystone in making Riverfront Park a fun, must-visit downtown destination — and not just for tourists. The North Bank improvements make Riverfront a neighborhood park. And just like your neighborhood park, this is entirely free. It’s really just a great way to spend family time together downtown.” Of course, the arrival of the glacially themed play equipment doesn’t mean that the traditional favorites have gone away. The Looff Carrousel recently reopened and will be operating — along with the skyride — on extended summertime hours starting in mid-June. Should pandemic public health guidelines start to relax a little further, more in-person group events will start to pop up on the schedule. Moog says that the park has already begun hosting smaller, family-oriented activities like Riverfront Moves, a free fitness series that caters to all ages and abilities. Keep an eye on my.spokanecity.org/riverfrontspokane for news along those lines.

DROP IN AT SPARK CENTRAL

Riverfront Park’s North Bank is now a onestop activity complex. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

True to its name, Spark Central’s Drop In program encourages anyone from the Spokane community to simply show up and take part in anything from crafts to card games, writing, drawing, science experiments and coding — completely free of charge. The evening and weekend events are geared more toward families, but that doesn’t mean the morning programs are age restricted. In fact, the only limit is capacity. As of this writing, the center has mask and social distancing mandates in place, which cap the number of guests at 30 for now. Fortunately, some Drop Ins, like the creative writing session, allow Zoom participation. “Drop In is a program of free activities that are run by our talented volunteers,” says Programs Manager Wilson Faust. “Each one has a different creative focus. They’re open to all different age groups to come in and do something together. It’s a casual opportunity for folks who have shared interests to gather, learn something new and leave with a shared experience.” Later in the summer, Spark will also likely be adding a Minecraft club to its programming. That will give kids an “art prompt” to build something of their own imagining in the block-based construction game. There will also be a digital art club that will help participants hone their skills in graphic design software like Procreate or Photoshop. And even though the center offers its Drop In events and clubs at specific times during the week, Faust stresses that families are truly welcome to drop in whenever they like. “Even when a Drop In program isn’t happening at Spark Central, we have 31 creative kits that kids can use. Each one provides an activity in a box with instructions written up for a parent or one of our volunteers to walk kids through the activities step by step,” he says. Be sure to check the Spark website at spark-central.org for new events, updated public health guidelines and which creative kits are currently on offer.

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 75


Summer Parkways is back, but with more flexibility. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

SUMMER PARKWAYS

Summer Parkways says it’s gone “virtual” again due to COVID-19 restrictions, but that’s only half true. This annual celebration of self-powered locomotion is still taking place in person; it’s just that it offers a lot more flexibility in how you participate. Feel free to assemble the fam anytime between June 14 and 20 and have them take their preferred mode of transport — walking, running, biking, skating or scootering — along the event’s usual four-mile course through the Manito/Cannon Hill and Comstock neighborhoods. You can consult the route online ahead of time at summerparkways. com as well as the details on how to win prizes in the “Summer Parkways Search & Spot” scavenger hunt.

CLIMATE SCIENCE SATURDAY

Sure, we know that science is real. But did you also know it can be real fun? Climate Science Saturday on June 19 is a free, all-ages event that gathers a wide range of community partners — and where else but at the Spokane Tribal Gathering Place on the western edge of Riverfront Park? — to provide entertaining and educational activities on things like composting, the carbon cycle, food waste and ecological stewardship. Mobius Discovery Center will be there along with environmentally minded organizations like Growing Neighbors, Spokane Riverkeeper, Inland Northwest Nature Connection, The Lands Council and more. Runs from 11 am to 3 pm; mobiusdiscoverycenter.org has more info.

BACKYARD GARDENING

Whether you’re doing it for food, aesthetics or a little bit of both, few activities are more inclusive, relaxing, rewarding or closer to home than backyard gardening. All it takes is a few seeds or starts. Stumped for ideas? Several farmers markets across the Spokane area offer a free weekly kids’ activity where families can learn about pollinators or companion planting and maybe even take home a plant or two. It’s called Kids Eating Right: Nutrition and Exercise for Life — or KERNEL for short. Stop by your neighborhood market and ask about it.

76 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

LEGENDS & MYTHS FROM MOUNT OLYMPUS

Join your K-5+ children as they’re introduced to the myths of ancient Greece through this virtual performance from Portland’s Traveling Lantern Theater. The troupe will act out classic stories like the tale of Icarus, who flew too close to the sun with wings made of wax, as well as brave Perseus, who cleverly defeated the hideous serpent-coiffed Gorgon known as Medusa. This online, on-demand event will be available between July 11 and 18. Families can gain access through the Spokane County Library District’s Beanstack Summer Reading Challenge or by registering on the SCLD website. Details and signup instructions are available at scld.org

COEUR D’ALENE STREET FAIR

To mark its 29th year, downtown Coeur d’Alene’s annual community street fair is hosting over 250 vendor booths with a variety of food, live music, crafts, outreach and much more. Because the festival takes place along the main thoroughfare on Sherman Avenue, it’s fully wheelchair and stroller friendly while also being just a stone’s throw from the lake. As luck would have it, the event is the same July 30-Aug. 1 weekend as Art on the Green at North Idaho College. A free shuttle bus will ferry you between the two events. Find out more at cdadowntown.com/streetfair.

SILVERWOOD THEME PARK

A reliable destination for a family outing and something of a rite of passage in any local childhood, Silverwood’s 413-acre facility offers a huge choice of rides and entertainment for everyone. Depending on your preferred adrenalin levels, you can take a leisurely ride on the puppy-go-round or rocket through the unrelenting daredevil twists and barrel rolls of Stunt Pilot, the park’s all-new coaster. When the summertime temperatures start to rise, the whitewater raft experience of Thunder Canyon or the superfast waterdrop known as Velocity Peak offer a fun and occasionally heart-pounding way to beat the heat. Check out silverwoodthemepark.com for more info plus current deals and events. n

AVAILABLE HERE


on the

y t r a P o i t a P The Patio Is Waiting!

• 21 CRAFT BEER AND CIDER TAPS • LOCAL WINE • OUTDOOR PATIO • KID AND DOG FRIENDLY • LIVE MUSIC • TRIVIA TUESDAY • FUN EVENTS ALL SUMMER!!

2325 N MCKINZIE LANE, LIBERTY LAKE || 509-862-6954 || SNOWEATERBREWINGCOMPANY.COM

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 77


on the

Party Patio

Southern Inspired Menu • craft cocktails 928 SOUTH PERRY • 315-4153 • CASPERFRY.COM || TUE–THU 4-8PM • FRI-SAT 4-9PM

DAY

NIGHT

madeleinesspokane.com 624-2253

durkinsliquorbar.com 863-9501

VOTED SPOKANE’S #1 BEST WINE TASTING ROOM AND #3 BEST LOCAL WINERY

78 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

1914 N Monroe, Spokane • 474-9040

ProhibitionGastropubSpokane.com


ALL AGES AND DOG FRIENDLY

y a d s r u Th th June 10 5-8PM

24 ROTATING CRAFT BEERS

LIVE Music

INCLUDING LOCAL, REGIONAL, GLOBAL IMPORTS

GREAT PUB-STYLE MENU HAND-CRAFTED COCKTAILS

1221 N. Stevens • 326-6241 • SpokaneViking.com

Ramen Al Fresco on our Northside patio! PR IZ

ES

DRINK SPECIALS

Open Daily | Full Bar 818 W. Sprague Ave | 476-0650 9602 N. Newport Hwy | 467-0292 NudoRamen.com

inlander.com/PartyonthePatio SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 79


DAILY SPECIALS:

WED Half Off Bottles of Wine THU Burger & A Pint $15 • FRI Happy Hour ALL day SAT & SUN AM Brunch, Bottomless Mimosas $12 - 9 to 3pm

Happy Hour Every Day 2 to 5pm

on the

Party Patio Wine, Beer and Friendly Sharables from the the.. Supper club

Open Thursday–Saturday 4p–10p

WED -THURS 11am to 9pm • FRI 11am to 10pm • SAT 9am to 10pm • SUN 9am to 9pm 2408 W Northwest Blvd, Spokane • In the Audubon Neighborhood www.brandywinespokane.com • 509-309-3962

(Brunch served weekends 9 to 3)

726 N 4th Street • Coeur d’Alene • (208) 930-0930 • izzyscomfortkitchen.com

y t r a P e l t it L T S The BIGGE Spot in North Idaho

WITH EVERY VISIT YOU’LL EXPERIENCE SOMTHING NEW EACH TIME IN OUR ADORNED VINTAGE RUSTIC INTERIOR.

Just over the border in Idaho

curleys.biz • 208-773-5816 • 26433 W. Hwy 53, Hauser, ID Daily posting of weekly happenings and a daily happy hour • 80 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

/Curley’s Hauser Junction •

/curleys_bar


SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 81


SUMMER

CALENDAR You deserve this. We all deserve this: a fun-filled summer packed with the best that the Inland Northwest has to offer — festivals, sports, food, comedy, music, all of summer’s signature events from Pig Out to Hoopfest. Thankfully, you’ll find no better resource to help you make up for lost time than the one in your hands! STARTS ON PAGE 84

Upcoming Events 6/10

7pm

David Larsen Jazz Quartet

6/17

6:30pm

Wine Tasting on the Patio

7/1

7pm

PB & Jam in Concert

7/6

6:30pm

“Thrill of the Grill” w/Chef Bob Black

7/10

11-5pm

100th Anniversary Celebration

7/13

6:30pm

Sangria Summer w/Chef Aaron Fish

7/15

7pm

Colby Acuff in Concert

7/16

5pm

Fiber Arts Exhibit Opening Reception

7/19 – 7/23

Theater Arts Camp (youth)

8/2 – 8/6

Art Around the World Camp (youth)

8/13

5pm

Art Exhibit Opening – Animal Friends

www.thejacklincenter.org | 208.457.8950 | 405 N. William St. Post Falls

82 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

EveningLightLavenderFarm_SummerGuide_061021_Qtr_WT.pdf


AT SANDPOINT

20 21

JULY 29 - AUG 8

St. Paul & the Broken Bones Jake Owen Shakey Graves Keb’ Mo’ & Band Gladys Knight Young the Giant REO Speedwagon Family Matinee Grand Finale

JUL 29 JUL 30 JUL 31 AUG 1 AUG 5 AUG 6 AUG 7 AUG 8

feat. Spokane Symphony and Whitney Kaufman

Visit festivalatsandpoint.com to buy tickets and view the rest of the lineup!

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 83


J The Inlander recommends this event 6/13 Art, Nature and the Voice of the

BENEFIT

6/13 Animal Poems: A Kids Poetry

Workshop, River’s Wish Animal Sanctuary 6/18 Liberty Lake Yard Sale, Pavillion Park 6/20 Dad’s Day Dash, Spokane / online 6/25 J Pride on the Runway, The Hive 6/26 Brews, Blues, BBQ & Blessings, Spokane Tribe Casino

COMEDY

6/10-12 Trey Kennedy, Spokane Comedy Club

6/10 Comedy Night ft. Cameron

Mazzuca, Ruby River Hotel

6/13 Fresh AF Comedy Tour, Spokane Comedy Club

6/18 Phillip Kopczynski: Freed and

Vaccine’d Back Yard Comedy Show and BBQ, Colville 6/18-19 J Shawn Wayans, Spokane Comedy Club 6/23 Elliott Morgan, Spokane Comedy Club 6/24-26 John Crist, Spokane Comedy Club

COMMUNITY

6/10-30 Roots of Wisdom, Northwest

Museum of Arts & Culture (through Sept. 5) 6/10-24 Drop In and Play, Spark Central (Thursdays) 6/10-24 Drop In & Craft, Spark Central (every other Thursday) 6/12 32nd Annual Cow Plop, Trinity Catholic School 6/12 J AAPI Heritage Day, CenterPlace Regional Event Center

River, People’s Park 6/13 J TPG Market, Resurrection Records 6/14-28 Online Pajama Story Time (Mondays) 6/15-29 Drop In and Write, Spark Central (Tuesdays, online) 6/15 J Be Smoke Ready: Preparing Your Home & Protecting Your Lungs from Wildfire Smoke 6/15 J June What? Why African Americans Celebrate Juneteenth (online, spokanelibrary.org) 6/16-19 Gyro Days & Lead Creek Derby, Wallace 6/16 J Vaccination Happy Hour, Spokane Arena 6/16-30 Drop In & Draw, Spark Central (every other Wednesday) 6/16 Learn To Skate at Eagles Ice Arena!, Eagles Ice-A-Rena 6/16 J Pride Night Out: Arts & Culture Crawl, Human Rights Education Institute 6/17 J Thursday Night Live (TNL), Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 6/17 J Let It Not Happen Again: Lessons of the Japanese American Exclusion (online, humanities.org) 6/17 Virtual Kids Book Club, ages 6-12, (spokanelibrary.org) 6/18-19 J Car d’Lane, Downtown Coeur d’Alene 6/18 Dungeons & Dragons for Teens (online, spokanelibrary.org) 6/19 J Juneteenth: A Celebration of Resistance, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 6/19 Metaline Falls Bigfoot Festival 6/19 J Climate Science Saturdays, Riverfront Park

ONLINE

Visit our website Inlander.com/events to search the most definitive, exhaustive calendar of events for all of the Inland Northwest. Filter by date, event type, neighborhood and more.

Kitchen (Wednesdays)

6/18 Drive-In Movie Nights: The Parent Trap, HUB Sports Center

6/22 Disney Villains Trivia, Spokane Comedy Club

6/25 J Trivia: Medieval Movie Hijinks (online, scld.org)

6/29 Step Brothers Trivia, Spokane Comedy Club

6/30 Wild and Scenic Film Festival (online)

FOOD

6/10 Party on the Patio, Three Peaks Kitchen + Bar

6/11 Sticky Subject: The History

Catch Shawn Wayans at the Spokane Comedy Club June 18-19. 6/19 CDA4Pride Games & Social,

Ramsey Park 6/19 Kids Code Online with Spark Central 6/19 Drop In & RPG, Spark Central 6/19 J Neon Nights Dine & Drive, Garland District 6/19 Drop In & Science, Spark Central 6/19 Dads & Dudes Night, HUB Sports Center 6/20 Father’s Day Show & Shine Auto Show, Wendle Ford 6/20 Fathers Day at the Museum, Inland Northwest Rail Museum 6/21 Astounding Feats & Lessons from The Zaniac (online, scld.org) 6/21 Game On: Among Us & Fortnite (online, spokanelibrary.org)

Living!

HISTORY WALKING TOURS

TUESDAY 11am for OLD FORT SHERMAN -THRUSATURDAY 1:30pm for DOWNTOWN CDA

Exhibits, Tours, Events & Gifts at

www.museumni.org

Come see us!

OPEN DAILY through Labor Day! 11am-5pm

115 Northwest Blvd • Coeur d’Alene, Idaho

84 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

Comedy Club

6/16-30 Dinner & A Movie, Globe Bar &

6/22 Storm Warning: Historic Weather

in the Evergreen State (online, humanities.org) 6/23 Summer Gardening with a Master Gardener (online, scld.org) 6/28-29 Animal Camouflage, West Valley Outdoor Learning 6/29 Comic-Book Reality: Superheroes and the Power of Representation (online, humanities.org)

FILM

6/10-30 J Hollywood of the North:

North Idaho and the Film Industry, Museum of North Idaho. 6/10 You Can’t Take it with You - A TCS Film, Shadle Park High School 6/15 J Mean Girls Trivia, Spokane

and Culture of Sugar (online, humanities.org) 6/11-25 Wine Class, Rocket Market (Fridays) 6/14 Blind Beer Tasting, Idaho Pour Authority 6/15-29 Riverfront Eats Food Truck Series, Riverfront Park (Tuesdays) 6/15 Cooking Class: Filet Mignon, The Culinary Stone 6/16 Cooking Class: Yucatan Pulled Pork Tacos, The Culinary Stone 6/19 J From the Ashes Idaho, Settlers Creek 6/22 Cooking Class: From Tuscany to Sicily, The Culinary Stone 6/23 Cooking Class: It’s Five o’ Clock Somewhere, The Culinary Stone 6/24 Yappy Hour, Ponderay Petsafe Dog Park 6/27 J The Union Presents: Yoga & Mimosas, Brick West Brewing Co. 6/27 Yoga & Mimosa, Arbor Crest 6/29 Cooking Class: Japanese, The Culinary Stone


MUSIC

6/10 Live Music with Wiebe Jammin &

Miz Fiddlah, Spokane Tribe Casino

6/10 Son of Brad, Arbor Crest 6/10 Rhys Gerwin, Post Falls Brewing 6/10-24 J Music on Main, Downtown Pullman (Thursdays)

6/11 Triple Threat, Bridge Press Cellars 6/11 Mike Wagoner, Utah John and

Jack-O, Pend d’Oreille Winery 6/11 Pamela Benton, Ruby River Hotel 6/11-30 Music at the Winery, Barrister Winery (weekly) 6/12 Soul Proprietor, Bridge Press Cellars 6/12 Daniel Hall, Pend d’Oreille Winery 6/12 Just Plain Darin, Ruby River Hotel 6/12 Son of Brad, Post Falls Brewing Company 6/12 Turn Spit Dogs, Idaho Pour Authority 6/12 Sam Leyde, Post Falls Brewing 6/12 DJ Fendiplex, The Longshot 6/13 Rewind, Arbor Crest Wine Cellars 6/16 Cash’d Out, Cruisers Bar & Grill 6/16 Wiebe Jammin, Idaho Pour Authority 6/17 Spare Parts, Arbor Crest 6/18 Nu Jack City, Bridge Press Cellars 6/18 Mike Thompson Duo, Pend d’Oreille Winery 6/19 Truck Mills Duo, Pend d’Oreille Winery 6/19 A Tribute to the Highwaymen, Lake City Center 6/19 LoGee, Idaho Pour Authority 6/20 Nu Blu, Dahmen Barn 6/20 Dwayne Parsons, Pend d’Oreille Winery 6/20 J Coeur d’Alene Big Band, Arbor Crest Wine Cellars 6/21 Music On Mondays Concert Series: Four Peace, Coeur d’Alene Public

Library

6/23 Jake Robin, Idaho Pour Authority 6/24 Swing Set, Arbor Crest Wine

Cellars 6/25 Berx Records Duo, Pend d’Oreille Winery 6/25 Hoodoo Udu, Bridge Press Cellars 6/25-26 J Jackalope Jamboree, Happy Canyon Arena 6/26 Zachary Simms, Pend d’Oreille Winery 6/26 Maya & Alex, Idaho Pour Authority 6/26 Deez Nuts ft. Chris Kidd and Dee Senese, Fredneck’s Saloon 6/26 Cancer Awareness Benefit Show, Lake City Center 6/26 10 Piece Jazz Concert: Mike Johnson Nonet, The Longshot 6/27 Violin with Max Reed, Pend d’Oreille Winery 6/27 Grand Avenue, Arbor Crest 6/28 Music On Mondays Concert Series: Old Plank Road, Coeur d’Alene Public Library

PERFORMANCE

6/12 PRIDE 2021 with Plastique Tiara, Globe Bar & Kitchen

6/12-26 Runway: Spokane’s Premier

Drag Experience, Globe Bar & Kitchen (Saturdays) 6/16-17 Artistry in Motion: Live On Stage!, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox 6/18 The Men of Exotic Legends, Marandos Bar & Restaurant

SPORTS &

OUTDOORS

6/10 J Riverfront Moves: Barre at the Pavilion, Riverfront Park

6/10-13 Spokane Indians vs. Vancouver Canadians, Avista Stadium

6/11 Couples Date Night, Circling Raven

Golf Course 6/11 Proving Grounds MMA Fights, HUB Sports Center 6/12-13 J Washington State Parks Free Day 6/12 J Spokane Bike Swap, Spokane County Fair & Expo Center 6/13 Back to Nature Trail Run, Lookout Pass Ski & Recreation Area 6/14-20 J Summer Parkways, South Hill neighborhoods 6/14 Family Day, Circling Raven Golf Course 6/18-20 Senior Indian Golf Invitational, Circling Raven Golf Course 6/19 Sprint Boat Races, Webb’s Slough 6/19-20 Stix and Stones Xtreme Challenge, Silver Mountain Resort 6/19 The Joy of Bird Feeding: Five Steps to Bird Feeding Mastery (online, thefriendsofmanitor.org) 6/19 Virtual Trailblazer Triathlon, Duathlon/5K 6/19 Spokane Shock vs. Northern Arizona Wranglers, Spokane Arena 6/21 Summer Solstice Ride the Wall Bike Ride, The Snake Pit 6/25 Circling Raven Couples Date Night + Wine Tasting, Coeur d’Alene Casino 6/26 Mountain Magic Trail Run & Marathon, Mt. Spokane State Park 6/26 Jim Anderson Memorial Vandal Scramble, U of Idaho Golf Course 6/27 Coeur d’Alene Ironman 6/27 Race the Wolf, Schweitzer 6/27 J Bike and Boat Tour, Coeur d’Alene Casino 6/29-30 J Spokane Indians vs. Tri-City Dust Devils, Avista Stadium

THEATER

Vestitus, Spokane Art School

6/12 Trailer Park Tragedy, Crime Scene

6/10-30 Shelle Lindholm, The Art Spirit

6/13 Traveling Lantern Theatre:

6/10-26 A Walk in the Garden, New

Entertainment

Sherlock Holmes Takes the Case (online, scld.org) 6/19 Murder at the Hop, Crime Scene Entertainment 6/23-27 J Under the Stars, CenterPlace Regional Event Center 6/25 Murder at the Deadwood Saloon & Jailhouse, Old Kootenai County Jail Museum 6/25-27 Art as Theater, Panida Theater 6/26-27 J SVST: Rising Stars, CenterPlace Regional Event Center

ARTS

6/10-30 J Lions and Tigers and Bears, OH MY!, Trackside Studio

6/10-30 World Without Reason: Goya’s Los Disparates, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU (through Aug. 14) 6/10-30 Seven Years of Acquisitions, 2013-2020, Jundt Art Museum (through Aug. 13) 6/10-30 J Follow the River: Portraits of the Columbia Plateau, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU (thorugh Aug. 14) 6/10-30 Glen Alps: from the Collection, Jundt Art Museum (through Aug. 13) 6/10-30 Justin Gibbens: Birds and Beasts, MAC (through Sept. 19) 6/10-30 J Figure, Chase Gallery 6/10-30 J American Original: The Life and Work of John James Audubon, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture (through Sept. 19) 6/10-25 Lisa Soranaka: Pleurotus

Gallery (through Aug. 31) Moon Art Gallery

6/11-26 Roger Ralston & Harry

Mestyanek, Saranac Art Projects

6/11-25 Easy World, Kolva-Sullivan Gallery

6/11 Second Friday Artwalk, Downtown Coeur d’Alene

6/12-30 What We Make: Nature as

Inspiration, The MAC (through Jan. 2022) 6/12 Bookbinding: Gilded Leather Book, Spokane Print & Publishing Center 6/12 Second Saturdays & Art Walk, Palouse, Wash 6/12 New Moon’s Annual Garden Show, New Moon Art Gallery 6/17 J Moscow Artwalk 2021 6/18-30 POAC Artwalk, Sandpoint 6/19 Intro to Drypoint Intaglio, Spokane Print & Publishing Center 6/25 Native American Sip ‘n’ Paint, Coeur d’Alene Casino 6/28 Art, Animals and Garden with Kit Jagoda, River’s Wish Animal Sanctuary

WORDS

6/10 From Mexican to Mexican-

American: A Family Immigration Story (online, humanities.org) 6/14 J Daniel James Brown: Facing the Mountain (online, auntiesbooks. com) 6/17 J Pivot: I Got You, Washington Cracker Co. Building 6/26 J Palouse Writers Festival, 1912 Center

Bring your flock to the MAC this summer.

Let your creativity take flight. Draw. Make. Explore . . . with nature. American Original: Life and Work of John James Audubon See amazing wildlife illustrations and artifacts from the famous artist and naturalist. Sketch a real bird from our collection at a drawing station inside the exhibit.

Justin Gibbens Get inspiration from a Central Washington artist’s imaginative watercolor drawings of birds and beasts that celebrate the beauty and strangeness of the natural world.

Roots of Wisdom Hear the stories of four indigenous communities brought to life through clever interactives and video games that show how traditional knowledge and Western science can join together to solve modern problems.

DON’T MISS Wild Things – fashions of fur, leather and feathers at Campbell House starting in July. Birds of a Feather Day on Aug 12. Family Movie Nights on Aug 27 and Sept 10.

What We Make Discover how nature inspires art and invention and explore our love of “making” in this interactive family exhibit featuring Northwest art, hats, airplanes, Plateau Indian culture, and creative hands-on projects.

Visit our calendar at northwestmuseum.org for more fun summer events.

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 85


(Mondays, spark-central.org)

COMEDY

7/8 Jeff Allen, Spokane Comedy Club 7/9-11 Mike Epps, Spokane Comedy Club

7/9-10 Wok of Shame Comedy Tour

with Jimmy Shin, Honey Eatery and Social Club 7/10 J Jeff Dunham, Northern Quest Resort & Casino 7/15-17 Michael Rapaport, Spokane Comedy Club 7/18 Steve Hofstetter, Spokane Comedy Club 7/29-31 Chris Porter, Spokane Comedy Club

COMMUNITY

7/1-31 Roots of Wisdom, Northwest

Museum of Arts & Culture (through Sept. 5) 7/1-4 Military Weekend at the Museum, Inland Northwest Rail Museum 7/1-29 Drop In and Play, Spark Central (Thursday) 7/1-8 Entertainment in the Park, East City Park, Moscow 7/2 First Friday Lawn Party, The Longshot 7/3-17 Drop In & RPG (online, sparkcentral.org) 7/3 Idaho Statehood Day Parade, Wallace 7/4 J Fourth of July at the Coeur d’Alene Resort, The Coeur d’Alene Resort 7/4 Pullman Fourth of July Fireworks, Sunnyside Park 7/4 Sandpoint Fourth of July Celebration, City Beach 7/5-26 Online Pajama Story Time

7/5-18 Extreme Science with Radical

Rick: Let’s Make Cartesian Divers (online, scld.org) 7/8-22 Drop In & Craft, Spark Central (every other Thursday) 7/9-11 J U-Pick Lavender Days, Evening Light Lavender Farm 7/9-11 J Post Falls Festival 7/10 J Great Spokane Road Rally, Airway Heights Recreation Center 7/14-28 Drop In & Draw, Spark Central (every other Wednesday) 7/15 J Thursday Night Live (TNL), Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 7/15 Virtual Kids Book Club, ages 6-12 (online, spokanelibrary.org) 7/16-18 J Vintage Market Days of North Idaho: “Hello There Coeur d’Alene,” Kootenai County Fairgrounds 7/17 J Scoops and Bowls, Manito Park 7/17 3D Printing Demonstrations Airplanes, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 7/17 Kids Code Online with Spark Central 7/17 Drop In & Science, Spark Central 7/19 Extreme Science with Radical Rick: Let’s Make Robobugs (online, scld.org) 7/20 Science for Kids in Spanish: Wind Workshop (online, scld.org) 7/24 J Parade of Paws, Spokane Humane Society 7/26 Jeff Evans: Amazang Virtual Magic Show (online, scld.org) 7/30-31 J Coeur d’Alene Street Fair, Downtown Coeur d’Alene 7/30-31 J Art on the Green, North Idaho College

FILM

7/1-31 J Hollywood of the North: North Idaho and the Film Industry, Museum of North Idaho 7/7-28 Dinner & A Movie, Globe Bar & Kitchen (Wednesdays) 7/7 Filmed In North Idaho Movie Night: Dante’s Peak, Hayden Discount Cinema 7/16 J Drive-In Movie Nights: Wall-E, HUB Sports Center 7/16 J Drive-In Movie Nights: Independence Day, HUB Sports Center (late show)

FOOD

7/2-30 Ride & Dine, Silver Mountain Resort (Fridays)

7/2-30 Wine Class, Rocket Market (Fridays)

7/4-25 Drag Brunch, Globe Bar &

Kitchen (Sundays) 7/6-27 J Riverfront Eats Food Truck Series, Riverfront Park (Tuesdays) 7/8 Party on the Patio, Three Peaks Kitchen + Bar 7/10 J Sandpoint Beerfest, City Beach 7/11 J The Union Presents: Yoga & Mimosas, Brick West Brewing Co. 7/11 Yoga & Mimosa, Arbor Crest Wine Cellars 7/12 Blind Beer Tasting, Idaho Pour Authority 7/17-18 J Northwest Wine Fest, Schweitzer 7/22 Flip Flops & Wine, Merry Cellars Winery 7/29 Yappy Hour, Ponderay Petsafe Dog Park

MUSIC

7/1 J P B & Jam, Jacklin Arts Center 7/1-29 Music on Main, downtown

EAT. DRINK. REPEAT. 86 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

J The Inlander recommends this event Pullman (Thursdays)

7/1-29 Thursdays at the Clock, Bryan Hall Theatre WSU

7/1 Riverstone Summer Concerts: The Rub, Hanna Rebecca, Riverstone Park

7/1 J Lee Greenwood, Coeur d’Alene Casino

7/2-30 Music at the Winery, Barrister Winery (weekly)

7/3 Crooked Tooth, The Longshot 7/8 Riverstone Summer Concerts:

Cee Cee Curtis, Pamela Benton, Riverstone Park 7/9 Sara Brown Band, Bridge Press Cellars 7/12 Music On Mondays Concert Series: Kathy Colton & the Reluctants, Coeur d’Alene Public Library 7/15 Riverstone Summer Concerts: Last Chance Band, Ally Burke, Riverstone Park 7/15 J Colby Acuff, Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center 7/19 Music On Mondays Concert Series: Lake City String Quartet, Coeur d’Alene Public Library 7/20-21 Mozart on a Summer’s Eve, Manito Park 7/22 J Ice Cube, Northern Quest Resort & Casino 7/22 Riverstone Summer Concerts: Macey Grand Band, Jackson Roltgen, Riverstone Park 7/23 Kenny James Miller Band, Bridge Press Cellars 7/23 Bart Budwig & Jen Borst, The Longshot 7/24 J Smokey Robinson, Northern Quest Resort & Casino 7/24 Rosie Cerquone and Co, The Longshot 7/29 J Festival at Sandpoint: St. Paul and the Broken Bones, The Dip,

War Memorial Field

7/29 Riverstone Summer Concerts:

PB&Jam, Renei and Davis, Riverstone Park 7/30 Robin Barrett and the Coyote Kings, Bridge Press Cellars 7/30 Dierks Bentley, Northern Quest Resort & Casino 7/30 Festival at Sandpoint: Jake Owen, Colby Acuff, War Memorial Field 7/30-31 Watershed feat. Tim McGraw, Dierks Bentley, Thomas Rhett, Kelsea Ballerini and more, Gorge Amphitheater 7/31 J Festival at Sandpoint: Shakey Graves, Tre Burt, War Memorial Field 7/31 Diego Romero Band, Bridge Press Cellars

SPORTS &

OUTDOORS

7/1-4 Spokane Indians vs. Tri-City Dust Devils, Avista Stadium

7/3-17 Practical Centering: Yoga,

Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 7/4 Fourth of July Shotgun Tournament, Circling Raven Golf Course 7/9 Couples Date Night, Circling Raven Golf Course 7/10-11 The Shootout at Silver Mountain, Silver Mountain Resort 7/10 Side Hill Scramble, Circling Raven Golf Course 7/10 Spokane Shock vs. Sioux Falls Storm, Spokane Arena 7/11 J Family Fun Fundraiser Poker Ride, Riverside State Park Equestrian Area 7/13-18 Spokane Indians vs. Eugene Emeralds, Avista Stadium 7/17 Matt’s Place Foundation ALS

RESTAURANT WEEK Presented By

august 19-28 iNLANDERRESTAURANTWEEK.COM

3 Course Dinners | $22 or $33


ARTS

7/1-31 Under the Same Sun and Moon:

St. Paul and the Broken Bones play Festival at Sandpoint on July 29. Golf Classic, The Highlands Golf Course 7/17 Spokane Shock vs. Tuscon Sugar Skulls, Spokane Arena 7/23 Date Night + Stay and Play Again, Circling Raven Golf Course 7/25-26 July Live Well Retreat: Yoga in the Sand, Mimosa in Your Hand, The Coeur d’Alene Resort 7/27-31 Spokane Indians vs. Vancouver Canadians, Avista Stadium 7/29-31 J Community Cancer Fund

Showcase, Coeur d’Alene Resort and Golf Course 7/30 Liberty Lake Kiwanis Foundation Golf Tournament, Liberty Lake Golf Course 7/31 J Spokane Shock vs. Massachusetts Pirates, Spokane Arena

THEATER

7/3-31 Runway: Spokane’s Premier Drag Experience, Globe Bar & Kitchen

7/18-19 J Opera on the Lake: The

Maid Turned Mistress, The Coeur d’Alene Resort 7/11 Traveling Lantern Theatre: Legends & Myths from Mount Olympus (online, scld.org) 7/23-31 J Little House on the Prairie, CenterPlace Regional Event Center 7/29-31 J William Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture

New Acquisitions from the Collection, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU (through Aug. 14) 7/1-31 World Without Reason: Goya’s Los Disparates, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU (through Aug. 14) 7/1-30 J Figure, Chase Gallery (online) 7/1-31 J Follow the River: Portraits of the Columbia Plateau, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU (through Aug. 14) 7/1-31 Seven Years of Acquisitions, 2013-2020, Jundt Art Museum (through Aug. 13) 7/1-31 Glen Alps: from the Collection, Jundt Art Museum (through Aug. 13) 7/1-31 Art & Healing: Works by Jim Dine and Corita Kent, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU (through Aug. 7) 7/1-31 Justin Gibbens: Birds and Beasts, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture (through Sept. 19) 7/1-31 POAC Artwalk, Downtown Sandpoint 7/1-2 Silver & Gold, Third Street Gallery 7/1-31 Guest Artist Kelsi Kimura, Pottery Place Plus 7/1-31 J American Original: The Life and Work of John James Audubon, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture (through Sept. 19) 7/1-31 J What We Make: Nature as Inspiration, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture (through Jan. 2022) 7/1-31 Shelle Lindholm, The Art Spirit

Gallery (through Aug. 31)

7/1 Moscow First Thursday 7/2 J First Friday, Spokane 7/2-31 Tracy Fowler and Sam White, Avenue West Gallery

7/2 First Fridays with POAC, Pend Oreille Arts Council Gallery

7/7 Kid’s Wheel Throwing Pottery Class, Emerge

7/8 Kid’s Hand Building Pottery Class, Emerge

7/9 Second Friday Artwalk, Downtown Coeur d’Alene

7/10 Mimosa Morning Painting Class:

Proud Peacock, Nectar Wine and Beer 7/10 Second Saturdays & Art Walk, Palouse, Wash. 7/12-26 Art, Animals and Garden with Kit Jagoda, River’s Wish Animal Sanctuary 7/17 J Paintings of Manito and Other Spokane Scenes (online, thefriendsofmanito.org) 7/22 Waves at Sunset Painting Class, Bark, A Rescue Pub

WORDS

7/2 3 Minute Mic, Auntie’s Bookstore (online)

7/7-20 J Book-Talk Teasers (online, scld.org)

7/10-31 J Gossip Girls Living History

Program, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 7/13 Tuesday Gallery Talk, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 7/15 Twice Heroes: Nisei Vets of WWII & Korea, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 7/16 Trivia: The Rick Riordan Mythology Universe (online, scld.org)

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 87


J The Inlander recommends this event (Tuesdays, online)

8/5-26 Drop In and Play, Spark Central (Thursdays)

BENEFIT

8/21-21 Bingo & Burgers, Hayden Senior Center 8/22 J Moonlight Rendezvous: Inland Northwest Opera Gala, Hayden Lake Country Club 8/28 Lazy A .08K, MickDuff’s Beer Hall

COMEDY

8/5 Bill Engvall, Coeur d’Alene Casino 8/5-7 Taylor Tomlinson, Spokane Comedy Club

8/6 Rodney Carrington, Northern Quest Resort & Casino

8/13-14 Bobcat Goldthwait, Spokane Comedy Club

8/14-14 Nate Bargatze, Bing Crosby

Theater 8/15 Dustin Nickerson, Spokane Comedy Club 8/19-21 Trevor Wallace, Spokane Comedy Club 8/27-28 J Chelsea Handler, Spokane Comedy Club

COMMUNITY

8/1 J Art on the Green, North Idaho College

8/1 Jeff Evans: How to Do Paper Magic Tricks (online, scld.org)

8/1-31 Roots of Wisdom, Northwest

Museum of Arts & Culture (through Sept. 5) 8/1 J Coeur d’Alene Street Fair, Downtown Coeur d’Alene 8/2-30 Online Pajama Story Time (Mondays, spark-central.org) 8/2 Extreme Science with Radical Rick: Tumble Toys (online, scld.org) 8/3-31 Drop In and Write, Spark Central

8/5-19 Drop In & Craft, Spark Central (every other Thursday)

8/5 J The 24-Hour News Cycle &

How It Created a World of News Junkies (online, humanities.org) 8/6-8 J Hillyard Festival, Hillyard 8/6 First Friday Lawn Party, The Longshot 8/7 J Bazaar, Downtown Spokane 8/7 3D Printing Demonstrations Airplanes, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 8/7-21 Drop In & RPG (online, sparkcentral.org) 8/11-25 Drop In & Draw, Spark Central (every other Wednesday) 8/12 J Birds of a Feather Day, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 8/13-14 J Wallace Huckleberry Festival, Wallace 8/14-15 J POAC Arts & Crafts Fair, Downtown Sandpoint 8/16 Extreme Science with Radical Rick: Wobblebots, New & Improved! (online, scld.org) 8/18-21 Bonner County Fair, Bonner County Fairgrounds 8/18 Science for Kids in Spanish: Light Workshop (online, scld.org) 8/19-22 Pend Orielle County Fair, Pend Oreille County Fairgrounds 8/19 J Thursday Night Live (TNL), Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 8/19 Virtual Kids Book Club, ages 6-12, (spokanelibrary.org) 8/19 Spokane County Master Gardeners Present: Conversations on Nature (online, mgfsc.org)

The Farm Chicks Vintage & Handmade Fair returns on Aug. 21-22. 8/20 J Trivia: Avatar: The Last

Airbender & The Legend of Korra (online, scld.org) 8/20-29 North Idaho State Fair, Kootenai County Fairgrounds 8/21-22 J The Farm Chicks Vintage & Handmade Fair, Spokane County Fair & Expo Center 8/21 J Unity in the Community, Riverfront Park 8/21 Drop In & Science, Spark Central

FILM

8/1-31 J Hollywood of the North: North Idaho and the Film Industry, Museum of North Idaho 8/4-25 Dinner & A Movie, Globe Bar & Kitchen (Wednesdays) 8/4 J Filmed In North Idaho Movie Night: Smoke Signals, Hayden Discount Cinema 8/13 Movie Night in City Park: Ferris

Bueller’s Day Off, Coeur d’Alene City Park 8/20 Drive-In Movie Nights: Happy Feet, HUB Sports Center 8/20 Drive-In Movie Nights: Dirty Dancing, HUB Sports Center (late show) 8/27 Family Movie Night: Night at the Museum, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture

FOOD

8/1-29 Drag Brunch, Globe Bar & Kitchen (Sundays)

8/1-29 J Yoga & Mimosa, Arbor Crest Wine Cellars

8/3-31 Riverfront Eats Food Truck

Series, Riverfront Park (Tuesdays)

8/6-27 Ride & Dine, Silver Mountain Resort (Fridays)

8/6-27 Wine Class, Rocket Market (weekly)

8/7 The Office Trivia Bar Crawl, Downtown Spokane

8/8-22 J The Union Presents: Yoga &

Mimosas, Brick West Brewing Co.

8/9 Blind Beer Tasting, Idaho Pour Authority (ongoing)

8/11 Nailed it! Cupcake Edition (online, scld.org)

8/12 J Party on the Patio, Three Peaks Kitchen + Bar

8/19-28 J Inlander Restaurant Week, various regional restaurants

8/27 J Crave! Food & Drink Festival,

CenterPlace Regional Event Center

MUSIC

8/1 Watershed feat. Tim McGraw,

Dierks Bentley, Thomas Rhett, Kelsea Ballerini and more, Gorge Amphitheater 8/1 J Festival at Sandpoint: Keb’ Mo’ and Band, War Memorial Field

VOLUNTEER at Celebrating

30 YEARS!

VOLUNTEER & INTERNSHIP POSITIONS AVAILABLE: • Guest Services Ticket Booth Attendant • Gift Shop

• Administration Work

Tracking adoptions • Sponsorships Scheduling • Social Media

• Landscaping and Grounds Maintenance

• Food Prep

• Construction, Welding & Carpentry

• Animal Care

Building and maintaining: Habitats • Platforms Dens • Enrichment Areas • And More

Equine Donation Processing For those who are a good fit

And Much More!

Cat Tales Wildlife Center is a 501(c)3 registered nonprofit Big Cat Sanctuary and Wildlife Rescue

17020 N Newport Hwy, Mead, WA • www.CatTales.org 88 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021


8/4-27 Music at the Winery, Barrister

Winery (weekly) 8/5-26 Music on Main, downtown Pullman (Thursdays) 8/5 J Festival at Sandpoint: Gladys Knight, War Memorial Field 8/5 J Wilco & Sleater-Kinney, First Interstate Center for the Arts 8/5 Riverstone Summer Concerts: Northwest Breeze, Keanu Shioya, Riverstone Park 8/5 The Dead South, Knitting Factory 8/6 J Festival at Sandpoint: Young the Giant, War Memorial Field 8/6 J.W. Scattergun ft. Chris Kidd, Cruisers 8/6 J Opera Truck: A Night at the MAC with the Inland Northwest Opera, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 8/7 Empire Alt-Fest presented by Devin Butler and TDK, Cruisers 8/7 Festival at Sandpoint: REO Speedwagon, War Memorial Field 8/8 J Festival at Sandpoint: Family Matinee and Grand Finale, War Memorial Field 8/9 R.A. The Rugged Man - All My Heroes Are Dead Tour, Lucky You Lounge 8/10 Birds of Play, Dahmen Barn 8/12 J Billy Idol, Northern Quest Resort & Casino 8/12 Riverstone Summer Concerts: Soul Proprietor, Scotty Dodson, Red Robin 8/13 J Primus with Wolfmother, Battles, Riverfront Park 8/13 Brantley Gilbert, Northern Quest Resort & Casino 8/13 Penn Johnson, The Longshot 8/13 GS3, Bridge Press Cellars

100 Mile 68 Miles 45 Mile

8/14 Echoes Through the Canyon with

8/29 Girls Night Out The Show, Spokane

Brandi Carlile, Sheryl Crow & Yola, Gorge Amphitheater 8/15 J Nathaniel Rateliff and the Night Sweats, Delta Spirit, Pavilion at Riverfront 8/19 Riverstone Summer Concerts: Lake Town Sound, Jonathan Tibbetts, Riverstone Park 8/19 J Grits and Glamour: Lorrie Morgan & Pam Tillis, Coeur d’Alene Casino 8/20 Bakin Phat, Bridge Press Cellars 8/20 Collective Soul & Better than Ezra with Tonic, Northern Quest Resort & Casino 8/20-22 Bass Canyon, Gorge Amphitheater 8/21 Riverstone Summer Concerts: Coeur d’Alene Symphony with The Weddle Twins, Riverstone Park 8/21 Beartooth: The Below Tour, Knitting Factory 8/21 J BaLonely, The Longshot 8/22 Sammy Hagar and the Circle, Northern Quest Resort & Casino 8/25 Rebelution w/ Steel Pulse, The Green, Keznamdi, DJ Mackle, Riverfront Park 8/25 J Backstreet Boys: DNA World Tour, Spokane Arena 8/26 Riverstone Summer Concerts: Sway Wild, Brady Campbell, Riverstone Park 8/27-29 Phish, Gorge Amphitheater

Comedy Club

Devils, Avista Stadium

SPORTS &

THEATER

OUTDOORS

8/1 Spokane Indians vs. Vancouver

8/1 J Little House on the Prairie,

8/6-20 Couples Date Night, Circling

8/1 J William Shakespeare’s Twelfth

CenterPlace Regional Event Center

Canadians, Avista Stadium Raven Golf Course

8/6-7 Sandpoint / Bonner County

Rodeo, Bonner County Fairgrounds 8/7 Blazing Saddles Bike Ride, Colville 8/7-8 J Spike & Dig, Dwight Merkel Sports Complex 8/7 Long Bridge Swim, Sandpoint 8/7 Coeur d’Alene Triathlon 8/7 J Spokane Midnight Century, The Elk Public House 8/8 Britbull, Grant Park 8/8 J Huckleberry Color Fun Run & Walk, Schweitzer 8/9 Family Day, Circling Raven Golf Course 8/10 J Class and a Glass, Arbor Crest Wine Cellars 8/13 Spokane Shock vs. Arizona Rattlers, Spokane Arena 8/14-15 Speelya Tournament at Circling Raven Golf Club, Circling Raven Golf Course 8/15 The Coeur d’ Alene Crossing 2021, The Coeur d’Alene Resort 8/20-21 Spokane to Sandpoint Relay 8/21 Spokane Shock vs. Louisville Xtreme, Spokane Arena 8/22 Back to Nature Trail Run, Silver Mountain Resort 8/23-29 Circling Raven Championship, Circling Raven Golf Course 8/25 J Washington State Parks Free Day 8/28 Sprint Boat Races, Webb’s Slough 8/30 Play Like a Pro at Circling Raven,

PERFORMANCE

8/7-28 Runway: Spokane’s Premier

Drag Experience, Globe Bar & Kitchen (weekly) 8/27 Girls Night Out: The Show, The Bull Head

Circling Raven Golf Course

8/31 Spokane Indians vs. Tri-City Dust

Night, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 8/3 Shen Yun, First Interstate Center for the Arts 8/15-16 Auditions: Into the Woods, TAC at the Lake 8/21 J Shakespeare in the Parks: Cymbeline, War Memorial Field 8/22 J Shakespeare in the Parks: A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Pavillion Park

VISUAL ARTS

8/1-31 Justin Gibbens: Birds and Beasts,

Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture (through Sept. 19) 8/1-31 POAC Artwalk, Downtown Sandpoint 8/1-31 J American Original: The Life and Work of John James Audubon, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture (through Sept. 19) 8/1-31 What We Make: Nature as Inspiration, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture (through Jan. 2022) 8/1-31 Shelle Lindholm, The Art Spirit Gallery (through Aug. 31) 8/2-13 Seven Years of Acquisitions, 2013-2020, Jundt Art Museum (through Aug. 13) 8/2-13 Glen Alps: from the Collection, Jundt Art Museum (through Aug. 13) 8/3-14 Under the Same Sun and Moon: New Acquisitions from

the Collection, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU (through Aug. 14) 8/3-14 World Without Reason: Goya’s Los Disparates, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU (through Aug. 14) 8/3-14 J Follow the River: Portraits of the Columbia Plateau, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU (through Aug. 14) 8/3-7 Art & Healing: Works by Jim Dine and Corita Kent, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU (through Aug. 7) 8/4 Kid’s Wheel Throwing Pottery Class, Emerge 8/5 Kid’s Hand Building Pottery Class, Emerge 8/5 Moscow First Thursday, Moscow 8/6 J First Friday, Spokane 8/6 First Fridays with POAC, Pend Oreille Arts Council Gallery 8/9 Art, Animals and Garden with Kit Jagoda, River’s Wish Animal Sanctuary 8/13 Second Friday Artwalk, Downtown Coeur d’Alene 8/14 Second Saturdays & Art Walk, Palouse, Wash. 8/28-31 Staying Home: Interior Views from the Collection of the Jundt Art Museum, Jundt Art Museum 8/28-29 J Artist Studio Tour, Coeur d’Alene

WORDS

8/4-18 J Book-Talk Teasers (online, scld.org)

8/6 3 Minute Mic, Auntie’s Bookstore (online)

8/10 Tuesday Gallery Talk, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture

and a Family Fun Ride

BIKE RIDE BLAZING SADDLES SUPPORTED RIDES AUG.7 START AND END AT YEP KANUM PARK • COLVILLE, WA

VIRTUAL RIDE JULY 4- AUG. 7 MORE INFO AT BLAZING100.ORG • ACTIVE.COM

AUGUST 14 & 15, 2021 WELCOME TO THE HUCKLEBERRY FESTIVAL!

An event that showcases handmade craft and artisan items.

You will surely find something unique and special from our many wonderful vendors. The Festival also includes a variety of fun events, activities and entertainment for everyone.

Æ Visit Us Online For A Full Listing Of Events And Craft Vendors

FREE ADMISSION

COME AND ENJOY GREAT FAMILY FUN IN TROUT CREEK, MONTANA!

www.huckleberryfestival.com SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 89


J The Inlander recommends this event Amphitheater

9/8 J Death Cab for Cutie, Deep Sea Diver, Pavilion at Riverfront

COMMUNITY

9/10 J The Monkees Farewell Tour,

9/1-3 Roots of Wisdom, Northwest

Museum of Arts & Culture (through Sept. 5) 9/2-16 Drop In and Play, Spark Central (Thursdays) 9/2-16 Drop In & Craft, Spark Central (every other Thursday) 9/3 First Friday Lawn Party, The Longshot 9/4-5 Coaster Classic Car Show, Silverwood Theme Park 9/4-6 Under the Freeway Flea Market, Wallace 9/4-18 Drop In & RPG (weekly) 9/6-20 Online Pajama Story Time (Mondays, spark-central.org) 9/7-21 Drop In and Write, Spark Central (Tuesdays, online) 9/8 Drop In & Draw, Spark Central (every other Wednesday) 9/10-19 J Spokane County Interstate Fair, Spokane County Fair & Expo Center 9/11 Spokane Women’s Health & Beauty Expo, CenterPlace Regional Event Center 9/16 J Thursday Night Live (TNL), Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 9/16 Virtual Kids Book Club, ages 6-12, (online, spokanelibrary.org) 9/18 J Center of the Universe ReDedication & Raffle, Wallace

FILM

9/7-11 J Hollywood of the North: North Idaho and the Film Industry, Museum of North Idaho 9/1-15 Dinner & A Movie, Globe Bar &

90 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

First Interstate Center for the Arts

9/10 J Tame Impala, Gorge Amphitheater

9/10 OverTime: Divided We Fall Tour, Brother’s Bar

9/10 Smells Like Nirvana (A Tribute to Nirvana), Knitting Factory

9/11 The Allman Betts Band, Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

9/15 J Louis the Child w/ Jai Wolf and Evan Giia, Riverfront Park

9/16 J Foreigner, Northern Quest Resort & Casino

9/16 Jason Aldean with Hardy, Lainey

Wilson & Dee Jay Silver, Spokane Arena 9/18 KISS, Gorge Amphitheater 9/18 Wallace Blues Festival, Wallace 9/19 J Sublime with Rome & Lifehouse, Northern Quest Resort & Casino

SPORTS &

Spokane County Interstate Fair runs Sept. 10-19. Kitchen (Wednesdays) 9/10 Family Movie Night: Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 9/11 Drive-In Movie Nights: The Flintstones, HUB Sports Center 9/11 Drive-In Movie Nights: Jurassic Park, HUB Sports Center (late show)

FOOD

9/1 J Pig Out in the Park, Riverfront

Park 9/3 Fall Fest, Schweitzer 9/3-17 Wine Class, Rocket Market 9/5-19 Drag Brunch, Globe Bar & Kitchen (Sundays) 9/13 Blind Beer Tasting, Idaho Pour Authority

MUSIC

9/1-17 Music at the Winery, Barrister Winery (weekly)

9/2-16 Music on Main, downtown Pullman (Thursdays)

OUTDOORS

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

9/2-16 Live DJ Nights, Globe Bar & Kitchen (Thursdays)

9/2 J Super Diamond: The Neil

Diamond Tribute Band, Coeur d’Alene Casino 9/10 Hoodoo Udu, Bridge Press Cellars 9/1 J Roger Daltrey, Northern Quest Resort & Casino 9/3 J Bully, Lightning Bug, Lucky You Lounge 9/3-5 J FarmJam Music & Camping Festival, Colville, Wash. 9/3-5 Dave Matthews Band, Gorge

9/4-18 Practical Centering: Yoga,

Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture (monthly) 9/5 Spokane Indians vs. Tri-City Dust Devils, Avista Stadium 9/9 Class and a Glass, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture 9/11-12 J Hoopfest, Downtown Spokane 9/11 Chafe 150, Sandpoint 9/12 Back to Nature Trail Run, Mt. Spokane State Park 9/18 J Spokatopia, Camp Sekani 9/18 The Basics of Orienteering (online, thefriendsofmanito.org)


Louis the Child plays the Spokane Pavilion on Sept. 15. 9/19 Scenic Half Marathon, Sandpoint 9/19 Championship Sunday at Circling

Raven, Circling Raven Golf Course

PERFORMANCE

9/8-9 J Trolls Live!, First Interstate Center for the Arts

9/4-18 Runway: Spokane’s Premier

Drag Experience, Globe Bar & Kitchen (weekly)

VISUAL ARTS

9/1-15 Justin Gibbens: Birds and Beasts, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture (through Sept. 19) 9/1-15 J American Original: The Life and Work of John James Audubon, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture (through Sept. 19) 9/1-3 What We Make: Nature as Inspiration, Northwest Museum of

Arts & Culture (through Jan. 2022)

9/1-3 Staying Home: Interior Views

from the Collection of the Jundt Art Museum, Jundt Art Museum (through Dec. 31) 9/2 Moscow First Thursday 9/3 J First Friday, Spokane 9/3 First Fridays with POAC, Pend Oreille Arts Council Gallery 9/7-11 Mirror, Mirror: The Prints of Alison

Saar, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU (through March 2022) 9/7-11 J Black Lives Matter Artist Grant Exhibition, Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU (through Dec. 18) 9/10 Second Friday Artwalk, Downtown Coeur d’Alene 9/11 Second Saturdays & Art Walk, Palouse, Wash.

9/11 Second Annual yArt Sale, Coeur

d’Alene Chamber of Commerce

WORDS

9/3 3 Minute Mic, Auntie’s Bookstore 9/14 Tuesday Gallery Talk, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture

9/16 J The Condors of the Inland

Northwest, Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture

SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 91


EVENT CONTACTS ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, arborcrest.com, 927-9463 ART ON THE GREEN, artonthegreen.org, 208-667-9346 AUNTIE’S BOOKSTORE, auntiesbooks.com, 838-0206 BAZAAR, terrainspokane.com BLAZING SADDLES BIKE RIDE, blazing100.org BONNER COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, bonnercountyfair.com BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, bridgepresscellars.com CAR D’LANE / CDA STREET FAIR, cdadowntown.com, 208-667-5986 COEUR D’ALENE ARTS COMMISSION, artsandculturecda.org COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, cdacasino.com, 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE IRONMAN, ironman.com COEUR D’ALENE RESORT, cdaresort.com, 208-765-4000 COEUR D’ALENE TRIATHLON & DUATHLON, cdatriathlon.com DAHMEN BARN, artisanbarn.org EMERGE GALLERY, emergecda.com EVENING LIGHT LAVENDER FARM, eveninglightlavender.com FESTIVAL AT SANDPOINT, festivalatsandpoint.com, 888-265-4554 FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS, firstinterstatecenter.org,

Wilco and Sleater-Kinney (pictured) play the First Interstate Center for the Arts on Aug. 5. 509-279-7000 FOX THEATER, foxtheaterspokane. com, 624-1200 GLOBE BAR & KITCHEN, globespokane.com GORGE AMPHITHEATRE, livenation.com GREEN BLUFF GROWERS, greenbluffgrowers.com HILLYARD FESTIVAL, hillyardfestival.com

Career, Education and Health Fair

HOOPFEST, spokanehoopfest.net INLAND NORTHWEST OPERA, inlandnwopera.com JACKALOPE JAMBOREE, jackalopejamboree.com JACKLIN ARTS & CULTURAL CENTER, thejacklincenter.org JORDAN SCHNITZER MUSEUM OF ART WSU, museum.wsu.edu JUNDT ART MUSEUM, gonzaga.edu/ jundt, 313-6611

KNITTING FACTORY, sp.knittingfactory.com, 244-3279 KOOTENAI COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, kcfairgrounds.com, 208-765-4969 LONG BRIDGE SWIM, longbridgeswim.org THE LONGSHOT, longshotsandpoint.com LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, luckyyou.com MEDICAL LAKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, medical-lake.org, 565-5000

Join us for the 27th Annual

Cultural Village

MIDNIGHT CENTURY, midnightcentury.com MOSCOW CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, moscowchamber.com, 208-8821800 MUSEUM OF NORTH IDAHO, museumni.org NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, northernquest.com, 242-7000

Free K-8 School Supplies

Free Kids Helmets (while supplies last)

Activities for All Ages Live Entertainment

NW Unity, Stronger Together Region’s Largest Multi-Cultural Celebration!

Senior Resource Area

Saturday, August 21st • 10am - 4pm • Riverfront Park Downtown Spokane nwunity.org 92 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

Family friendly and free to all ages.


enjoy ag exhibits, livestock competitions, carnival rides, arts & crafts exhibits, entertainment, great food, and lots of children’s activities!

Mark your calendar!

AUGUST 17th-21st, 2021 thanks to our 2021 Grant County Fair Sponsors : MOSES LAKE, WA

See more at : www.gcfairgrounds.com • follow usSUMMER on:GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 93


MORE EVENT CONTACTS

PR ESENTED BY

Spike & Dig returns Aug. 7-8.

FOOD TRUCKS. BEER GARDEN. LAKESIDE VIEWS. CELEBRITY GOLF. FIGHTING CANCER.

SATURDAY, JULY 31 “North Idaho’s Best Charity Event” Enjoy a day on the course for the Showcase celebrity golf exhibition in Coeur d’Alene. Walk alongside your favorite celebrities from sport & screen. Since inception in 2014, we have raised almost $17 million for the local fight against cancer.

Event held at the prestigious Coeur d’Alene Resort Golf Course

For more information visit:

SHOWCASEGOLF.COM 94 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

20

SPECTATOR $ TICKETS JUST

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

ONLINE

Visit our website Inlander.com/events to search the most definitive, exhaustive calendar of events for all of the Inland Northwest. Filter by date, event type, neighborhood and more.

NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS & CULTURE, northwestmuseum. org, 456-3931 PALOUSE WRITERS GUILD, palousewritersguild.org PANIDA THEATER, panida.org, 208-263-9191 PEND OREILLE ARTS COUNCIL, artinsandpoint.org PEND OREILLE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, pocfair.com PIG OUT IN THE PARK, spokanepigout.com POST FALLS FEST, postfallsidaho.org PULLMAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, pullmanchamber. com, 509-334-3565 RIVERFRONT PARK, riverfrontspokane.com ROCKET MARKET, rocketmarket. com SANDPOINT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, sandpointchamber. org SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT, schweitzer.com, 208-263-9555 SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARKS, shakespeareintheparks.org SILVER MOUNTAIN RESORT, silvermt.com SILVERWOOD THEME PARK, silverwoodthemepark.com, 208-683-3400 SPARK CENTRAL, spark-central. org, 279-0299 SPIKE & DIG, spikeanddig.com SPOKANE ARENA, spokanearena. com, 279-7000 SPOKANE ART SCHOOL, spokaneartschool.net SPOKANE ARTS, spokanearts.org SPOKANE COMEDY CLUB, spokanecomedyclub.com SPOKANE COUNTY FAIR & EXPO CENTER, spokanecounty.org, 477-1766

SPOKANE COUNTY LIBRARY DISTRICT, scld.org SPOKANE HUMANE SOCIETY, spokanehumanesociety.org SPOKANE INDIANS, spokaneindians.com, 535-2922 SPOKANE PARKS & REC, spokaneparks.org, 625-6200 SPOKANE PUBLIC LIBRARY, spokanelibrary.org SPOKANE SHOCK, thespokaneshock.com SPOKANE SYMPHONY, spokanesymphony.org, 6241200 SPOKANE TO SANDPOINT RELAY, spokanetosandpoint.com SPOKANE VALLEY PARKS & REC, spokanevalley.org SPOKANE VALLEY SUMMER THEATRE, svsummertheatre. com SPOKATOPIA OUTDOOR ADVENTURE FESTIVAL, spokatopia.com SUMMER PARKWAYS, summerparkways.com THE ART SPIRIT GALLERY, theartspiritgallery.com, 208765-6006 THE CULINARY STONE, culinarystone.com, 208-2774116 THE FRIENDS OF MANITO, thefriendsofmanito.org THEATRE ARTS CENTER AT THE LAKE, tacatthelake.com UNITY IN THE COMMUNITY, nwunity.org VINTAGE MARKET DAYS OF NORTH IDAHO, vintagemarketdays. com/market/north-idaho/ index.php WALLACE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE, wallaceidahochamber.com n


SUMMER GUIDE 2021 INLANDER 95


Summer Entertainment Series TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

Lee Greenwood

Bill Engvall

THURSDAY, AUGUST 5 7 PM | $40 & UP

THURSDAY, JULY 1ST | 7 PM FREE* CUSTOMER APPRECIATION CONCERT!

Super Diamond

TLC

THE NEIL DIAMOND TRIBUTE BAND

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 28 7 PM | $55 & UP

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 2 ND 7 PM | $10 & UP

Grits and Glamour

LORRIE MORGAN & PAM TILLIS

TH

THURSDAY, AUGUST 19 TH 7 PM | $50 & UP

TH

Mixed Martial Arts THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18 TH 7 PM | $40 & UP

*Limit of 2 free Lee Greenwood concert tickets per Coeur Rewards member, while supplies last. Must redeem offer in-person. See the Coeur Rewards booth to receive the free ticket offer or for more details. Must be age 18 or older to attend concerts. Age restriction does not apply to MMA events. Purchase tickets at cdacasino.com, the Casino Box Office, or through the CDA Casino App. Call 1 800-523-2464 for more details.

W E LC O M E H O M E .

96 INLANDER SUMMER GUIDE 2021

CASINO

|

HOTEL

|

DINING

|

SPA

|

CHAMPIONSHIP

GOLF

3 7 9 1 4 S O U T H N U K WA LQ W • W O R L E Y, I D A H O 8 3 8 76 • 1 8 0 0 - 5 2 3 - 2 4 6 4 • C D A C A S I N O . C O M


OPENING

Nod to

NOLA Vieux Carre NOLA Kitchen opens in West Central, bringing a taste of the Big Easy to Spokane BY CHEY SCOTT

O

nce diners step inside Vieux Carre NOLA Kitchen and dig into an order of crawfish hand pies, fried catfish or bacon-wrapped shrimp and grits, it’s suddenly easy to forget they’re actually 2,300 miles from New Orleans. After a complete remodel, the new West Central restaurant’s 100-year-old space evokes someplace even older, like the iconic historic structures throughout New Orleans’ famed French Quarter. Exposed brick walls contrast with a black tin ceiling and stained glass accents with faux white-washed walls covered in thematic framed artwork. Vieux Carre owner Korri McElfresh says when word first spread about the new restaurant, announced last year, she “had a lot of people say to me ‘Oh, so like Mardi Gras. Are you going to have beads?’ But no, that’s not what I’m going for. It’s so much more than that.” ...continued on next page

The bacon-wrapped shrimp and grits are a menu standout. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 19


FOOD | OPENING

Vieux Carre’s owner Korri McElfresh and Executive Chef Logan Maus.

“NOD TO NOLA,” CONTINUED... As soon as she settled on a New Orleans-inspired Creole and Cajun focus, McElfresh booked a trip to the Gulf Coast city for research and development. “I just ate my way through NOLA as much as I could, and I averaged about 10 miles a day walking,” she says. “I wanted to walk and look at all the buildings, and went to as many history outposts as I could.”

W

hile the remodel of the restaurant’s space on the first floor of a historic, Victorian-esque brick building just west of the Spokane County Courthouse was delayed by the coronavirus pandemic, McElfresh didn’t wait to begin searching for a chef to carry out her vision for Vieux Carre’s menu. “I probably interviewed 60 people all over the U.S.,” she says, before eventually connecting with chef Logan Maus. Formerly based in St. Louis, Missouri, Vieux Carre’s executive chef also has ties to NOLA, having grown up visiting grandparents who lived nearby. “That is where a lot of my Cajun and Creole influence comes from,” Maus says. “On top of that is the fact that St. Louis is the sister city to New Orleans — almost all the celebrations we do are the second best version in America, and no matter what cuisine a restaurant does, they always have a king cake, crawfish, oysters and things like that.” Maus and his fiance had already been hoping to relocate to the Pacific Northwest when all the pieces fell into place and he accepted the offer to become Vieux Carre’s chef. “It was almost as if in a weird way destiny was leading us to this place,” he says. McElfresh and Maus closely collaborated on the menu with the goal of evoking traditional New Orleans flavors and fare by leveraging the nostalgic power of food, paired with thoughtful culinary craftsmanship. “My approach to cooking has always been quite simple: A recipe is a recipe, and any good cook or chef should be able to read a recipe or take something from a happy memory or trip and turn a recipe into that memory,” Maus says. “Korri had a vision of what she wanted the place to be, so then it was simply me bringing

“Korri had a vision of what she wanted the place to be, so then it was simply me bringing things to the table and testing recipes...” She sampled crawfish and alligator and famous New Orleans-originated cocktails the Sazerac and Vieux Carre at the city’s renowned Carousel Bar & Lounge. The latter, a drink of rye whiskey, cognac and sweet vermouth, is, of course, served at McElfresh’s restaurant. McElfresh’s vision for Vieux Carre (pronounced “voo cah-ray”), which in French means “old square,” is a Northwest homage to the culture and cuisine of NOLA. “I’ve been in the food industry in Spokane for quite a while, and I love the restaurants we have here,” she says. But when branching out from her past role in management for Eat Good Group’s restaurants, she envisioned bringing something different to the region’s existing food offerings. “I wanted a little diversity, not another beet salad or flatbread or Brussels sprouts,” she says. “There are already a few places that have soul food, and French restaurants aren’t as approachable as we like them to be. So I thought maybe Spanish influences, but there are so many Spanish places. I was talking to a friend of mine, Amber Park, and she was like, ‘Korri, you just described New Orleans!’”

20 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

things to the table and testing recipes until we came to the flavors she was looking for.” Maus’ top three picks from Vieux Carre’s debut menu are the crawfish hand pies ($11), beignets ($5) and crawfish boil ($21). All of the crawfish served at the restaurant is sourced locally from the Snake River, and Maus expects weekly deliveries to continue through late August before the season ends. “Being able to get access to live crawfish in Washington and being locally sourced is so much fun,” he says. Other traditional Southern, Creole and Cajuninspired dishes from Maus and team include whipped honey cornbread ($7), red beans and rice with andouille sausage ($16), fried chicken ($22), gumbo ($9) and jambalaya ($18), and several salads like poached pear ($14) and panzanella ($12). Lunch service launched last week with several more handhelds: muffaletta ENTRÉE ($15), po’ boy ($13) Get the scoop on local and fried catfish ($13). food news with our weekly In the bar, about Entrée newsletter. Sign up a third of the cocktail at Inlander.com/newsletter. menu ($10-$14) is devoted to classic New Orleans drinks, of course including the iconic Sazerac and Vieux Carre alongside the gin rickey, hurricane, mint julep and more. “The environment and atmosphere that Korri has created is one of a very Southern nature,” Maus reflects. “That Southern charm is when you can be invited into someone’s house, and it doesn’t feel awkward — like ‘Grab yourself a drink, this is just as much your home as it is mine,’ This atmosphere was brought here.” n cheys@inlander.com Vieux Carre NOLA Kitchen • 1403 W. Broadway Ave. • Open Mon-Thu 11 am-10 pm, Fri-Sat 11 am-11 pm, Sun 3-9 pm • vieuxcarrespokane.com • 509-495-1400


Sing Street

STREAMING

MUSICAL HEIGHTS

While In the Heights heats up theaters, we recommend some underrated and overlooked screen musicals BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

W

hen a movie musical works, it can be graceful and ebullient, its energy contagious. And when a movie musical doesn’t work, it can look like a chaotic, atonal human traffic jam. By most accounts, the new big-screen adaptation of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s In the Heights is an exuberant cinematic translation of a Broadway hit, and it will no doubt satiate fans of that rarest of entertainments, the Hollywood musical. The movie, which arrives streaming on HBO Max and playing in theaters this weekend, inspired us to look back at the musical film genre as a whole, and to round up some lesser known ones that you can stream at home. Our picks range from surreal to sweet, from classic to contemporary, from punk to pop to everything in between.

THE APPLE (1980)

The year: 1980. The disco craze was on the wane and every studio was desperate to recreate the success of 1978’s Grease, and that climate produced such secretly enjoyable, big-budget boondoggles as Xanadu (Olivia Newton-John roller skates to E.L.O. hits) and Can’t Stop the Music (the Village People do the Y.M.C.A. alongside Steve Guttenberg). But the wackiest of that year’s musical lot is The Apple, conceived (probably in a fever dream) by shlock maven Menahem Golan and set in the distant future of 1994 (which still looks an awful lot like 1980).

The film takes the story of Adam and Eve, transplants it into the world of record executives and fame-hungry artists, and dresses it up in glitter and spandex. It’s a hoot and deserves more cult cred than it already has. Streaming on Tubi

BREAKIN’ 2: ELECTRIC BOOGALOO (1984)

I’d bet that more people have jokingly used “Electric Boogaloo” as a fake sequel subtitle than have actually seen its namesake, a breakdancing film that was quickly slapped together and released mere months after its predecessor. But Breakin’ 2 is, dare I say, a more polished, colorful and ambitious version of its predecessor (which is pretty good, too). This time around, a greedy land developer wants to demolish an urban community center, and so our poppin’ and lockin’ heroes have to put on a show and raise some money to save it. In between predictable plot beats are some truly fun musical numbers, including a neighborhood-wide dance-off and a scene of Michael “Boogaloo Shrimp” Chambers moonwalking on the ceiling a la Fred Astaire. Streaming on Tubi

CANNIBAL! THE MUSICAL (1993)

The last time Trey Parker and Matt Stone applied a splashy musical framework to morally questionable material, it was called The Book of Mormon and it took Broadway by storm. But they were already experimenting with that formula way back in their college days, when

they shot a silly, violent and, yes, morally questionable student film called Cannibal! The Musical in the woods around the University of Colorado. Parker and Stone were inspired by the regional folklore surrounding a real historical figure named Alferd Packer, a 19th-century gold prospector whose party became snowbound in the mountains and eventually resorted to cannibalism. The movie itself is shoddily made, no doubt, but it’ll have you singing “it’s a shpadoinkle day” forever and ever. Free on YouTube

HEAD (1968)

As the ’60s came to a close, the Monkees had grown weary of their status as a manufactured sitcom pop group, and were desperate to break free from teen idol purgatory and become a real band. So they reportedly smoked a bunch of weed with director Bob Rafelson and screenwriter Jack Nicholson (yes, that Jack Nicholson), and then Nicholson took a bunch of LSD and compiled all their wild ideas into a stream-of-consciousness satire that’s best enjoyed while imbibing your own substance of choice. The movie is a whole lot of blissed-out fun, and the soundtrack is also pretty great, with highlights like the Carole King and Gerry Goffin-penned theme tune “Porpoise Song” and Mike Nesmith’s Jefferson Airplaneesque rave-up “Circle Sky.” Hopefully we’ll hear some selections when the surviving Monkees play Spokane on ...continued on next page Sept. 10. Free on YouTube

JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 21


FILM | STREAMING

FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS

“MUSICAL HEIGHTS,” CONTINUED...

PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE (1974)

Like The Apple, Brian De Palma’s delightfully deranged Phantom of the Paradise skewers the fad-obsessed music industry of the disco era, but it’s an infinitely superior experiment. William Finley stars as an ambitious songwriter who signs his soul over to a devilish record impresario (Paul Williams, also the composer of the film’s awesome soundtrack), and who soon transforms into a deformed, masked specter that haunts the rafters of an old theater. So it’s a bit of Faust, a bit of Phantom of the Opera, and a whole lot of Brian De Palma, complete with split-screen sequences, an eye-catching color palette and several nods to Hitchcock. The movie flopped in theaters — except, oddly enough, in Winnipeg, where it was a smash — but has since developed a cult following, and the Phantom’s silver, beaked helmet even inspired Daft Punk’s costumes. Digital rental

SING STREET (2016)

The 2007 musical Once was a surprise arthouse hit, snagging an Oscar for its song “Falling Slowly” and inspiring a Tony-winning Broadway show. It’s even more of a surprise, then, that director John Carney’s two music-filled follow-up films — 2013’s Begin Again and 2016’s Sing Street — didn’t get nearly as much attention, though they’re both worth seeking out. It’s that latter title that’s the true hidden gem of Carney’s career, a scrappy working-class comedy about a group of teenage musicians in Dublin, one of whom dreams of writing a Duran Duran-approved hit single and impressing the slightly older girl who lives across the street. The movie features a glittery new wave pastiche called “Drive It Like You Stole It,” which belongs in the pantheon of great fake pop songs in movies. Streaming on Amazon Prime

STARSTRUCK (1982)

One of the progenitors of Sing Street is this unheralded (at least in America) slice-of-life from Australian director Gillian Armstrong (My Brilliant Career), about an aspiring pop singer (Jo Kennedy) who wants to break out of her bluecollar town and will do just about anything to catch the spotlight. It’s quirky and sweet and packed with regional detail — imagine if Local Hero’s Bill Forsyth made a DayGlo musical — and among its best songs are the goofy, Devoadjacent “Monkey in Me” and the irresistible “Body and Soul,” which was written by Tim Finn of Split Enz and became a radio hit in its home country. Streaming on Tubi n

IC LANTERN THEATER MAG FRIDAY, JUNE 11 - THU, JUNE 16 TH

TH

TICKETS: $9 z

NOW PLAYING:

QUEEN BEES • THE PERFECT CANDIDATE • FINAL ACCOUNT SUPER FRENCHIE • SHIVA BABY DREAM HORSE • UNDINE A QUIET PLACE PART TWO

MOVIE TIMES on SEARCHABLE by Time,

by Theater,

or Movie

RENTALS STARTING AT $99! Check website

magiclanternonmain.com 22 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Bronx-set musical hits the big screen under the direction of John Chu (Crazy Rich Asians), tracking a bodega owner’s dreams of forging a better life in a working class neighborhood full of colorful characters (and a whole lot of music). (DN) Rated PG-13

THE PERFECT CANDIDATE

A female doctor inadvertently becomes a candidate for office after being denied the ability to travel without a male guardian in this Arabic film that tackles gender politics and more. At Magic Lantern (DN) Not rated

Every Theater. Every Movie. All in one place.

PETER RABBIT 2: THE RUNAWAY

In case one dose of rabbit hijinks wasn’t enough, here comes a Peter Rabbit sequel in which the mischievous rodent finds a place beyond the garden where he’s accepted for his roguish charm. Is that enough to keep him from going home? (DN). Rated PG

QUEEN BEES

Think Mean Girls, but set in a retirement home instead of a high school. Ellen Burstyn is the newbie trying to navigate romantic pitfalls and interpersonal politics, joined by Ann-Margret, James Caan, Jane Curtin and more. At the Magic Lantern. (DN) Rated PG-13

NOW PLAYING THE CONJURING: THE DEVIL MADE ME DO IT

The latest chiller about supposed paranormal investigators Ed and Lorraine Warren, investigating a murder suspect who claims to be possessed by a demon. (NW) Rated R

CRUELLA

Disney’s puppy-skinning villainess gets her own origin story, as Emma Stone portrays the enterprising seamstress turned devilish fashionista. (NW) Rated PG-13

DEMON SLAYER THE MOVIE: MUGEN TRAIN

A feature-length follow-up to the popular anime series, which has already broken box-office records in its native Japan. (NW) Rated R

DREAM HORSE

The heartwarming true story of a Welsh bartender (Toni Collette) who breeds a championship racehorse. (NW) Rated PG

FINAL ACCOUNT

The few remaining Germans who were once children of the Nazi party open up about their pasts in this harrowing documentary. (NW) Rated PG-13

GODZILLA VS. KONG

Like Batman and Superman before them, cinema’s most famous giant ape and radioactive lizard duke it out while the world watches. Also streaming on HBO Max. (NW) Rated PG-13

MORTAL KOMBAT

The popular video game returns to the big screen, in properly gory fashion this time, with all your favorite characters delivering one fatality after another. Also streaming on HBO Max. (NW) Rated R

A QUIET PLACE PART II

for all showings and rental inquiries. 25 W Main Ave #125 • MagicLanternOnMain.com

IN THE HEIGHTS

A sequel to the hugely popular 2018 horror hit, following the original film’s family as they continue to evade mon-

sters with hypersensitive hearing. (NW) Rated PG-13

RAYA & THE LAST DRAGON

The latest Disney animated feature, a multicultural fable that follows a teenage warrior’s hunt for the titular creature. Also streaming on Disney+. (NW) Rated PG

SUPER FRENCHIE

From Spokane filmmaker Chase Ogden, a documentary about the hairraising stunts performed by BASE jumper Mathius Giraud. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

SPIRAL

The new chapter in the Saw franchise stars Chris Rock as a cop investigating a series of murders that follow the same M.O. as the crafty serial killer Jigsaw. (NW) Rated R

SPIRIT UNTAMED

A young girl befriends a rebellious horse named Spirit after moving to a small town, and must foil the bad guys’ plans to capture Spirit and his herd in this animated family flick featuring the voices of Julianne Moore and Jake Gyllenhaal. (DN) Rated PG

THOSE WHO WISH ME DEAD

From director Taylor Sheridan, a ticking-clock thriller about a teenage murder witness running from men who want him dead, if a raging forest fire doesn’t get them all first. (NW) Rated R

WHEN HITLER STOLE PINK RABBIT

A wealthy Jewish family flees 1930s Berlin as the Nazis rise to power, but they remain outsiders in their new home. At the Magic Lantern. (NW)

WRATH OF MAN

The latest thriller from Guy Ritchie stars Jason Statham as a shadowy figure who becomes the guard of an armored truck. Expect explosive action and plenty of F-bombs. (NW) Rated R n


ALBUMS

Vinyl Days

From Tom Petty to Al Green, we pick our favorite releases from this year’s first batch of Record Store Day exclusives BY DAN NAILEN AND NATHAN WEINBENDER

W

hether you started getting into vinyl during the pandemic or simply made extra room on your already-packed shelves, the 2021 edition of Record Store Day, an annual event that fills vinyl bins everywhere with exclusive limited editions, will be something of a godsend. This year’s event is being structured into two phases — the first batch of new releases will drop this weekend, on June 12, and the second on July 17. So we’ve sorted through the list of June releases and picked our favorites, the LP sets and collectors’ singles that we’ll be looking for this weekend. ...continued on next page

JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 23


MUSIC | ALBUMS “VINYL DAYS,” CONTINUED... JIM CROCE “YOU DON’T MESS AROUND WITH JIM/ OPERATOR (THAT’S NOT THE WAY IT FEELS)” EP

Killed in a 1973 plane crash just as his career was picking up steam, Jim Croce still doesn’t get enough credit as the brilliant, witty songwriter he was. I’m a huge fan of his relatively small output, and one of the Record Store Day exclusives I want for my own collection is a re-pressing of Croce’s ’72 debut single, “You Don’t Mess Around with Jim,” a bouncy story-song about a cocky pool hall bully whose bark, it turns out, is worse than his bite (later that same year, Croce would follow the same narrative formula to greater success in “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown”). Along with that single’s original B-side “Photographs and Memories,” the seven-inch also includes the Croce classics “Operator (That’s Not the Way It Feels)” and “New York’s Not My Home.” (NATHAN WEINBENDER)

ECHO AND THE BUNNYMEN LIVE IN LIVERPOOL

While I always enjoyed the songs of Ian McCulloch and Will Sergeant, it’s only in the past few years that I’ve become fanatical in my love for Echo and the Bunnymen. Something about McCulloch’s enigmatic lead vocals and Sergeant’s chiming guitars finally hit the sweet spot as I muddled into my 40s, and I’ve revisited a bunch of their albums while ruing the fact I’ve never seen the band live. Thankfully, they have several live releases, and one of the best is getting the special vinyl treatment for Record Store Day. Recorded in 2001 at the Paul McCartney co-founded Liverpool Institute for Performing Arts, Live in Liverpool includes 17 songs of shimmering pop-rock magic, including semi-hits like “Lips Like Sugar,” “The Killing Moon” and “The Cutter.” This marks the show’s debut on vinyl. (DAN NAILEN)

THE FLAMING LIPS THE SOFT BULLETIN COMPANION

1999’s The Soft Bulletin represented the Flaming Lips’ final transition from hard rock to swirling psychedelia, and many acolytes have called it the band’s magnum opus. The Soft Bulletin Companion, meanwhile, was a collection of B-sides and outtakes from those sessions, as well as alternate arrangements of tracks from their four-disc interactive art piece Zaireeka. Released as a limited edition bootleg CD more than 20 years ago and widely circulated among fans, Companion is now getting its first official physical release (albeit still in a limited-edition run), reissued as a double LP set pressed on silver-colored vinyl. (NW)

FONTAINES D.C. LIVE AT KILMAINHAM GAOL

L7 THE BEAUTY PROCESS: TRIPLE PLATINUM

I’d argue that L7 was criminally underappreciated during the band’s ’90s heyday, despite having some MTV hits and playing the main stage of Lollapalooza alongside Beastie Boys and Smashing Pumpkins. The Beauty Process: Triple Platinum was the beginning of the end of their semi-popularity, but the album is worth revisiting. All the metallic crunch of earlier records is here, along with some new pop grooves on songs like “Drama.” This is the first time the album is available on vinyl — and that vinyl is colored platinum, of course. (DN)

PEGGY LEE WORLD BROADCAST RECORDINGS 1955: VOL. 1

In 1955, vocalist Peggy Lee recorded nearly 50 jazz standards and contemporary pop hits that were provided to radio stations to play during otherwise dead airtime. Known as “transcripWEEKEND tion recordings,” they were seen C O U N T D OW N mostly as disposable time filler Get the scoop on this that wasn’t part of Lee’s official weekend’s events with discography, but thankfully our newsletter. Sign up at they’ve been preserved and Inlander.com/newsletter. are now readily available. This rare collection features a deep library of greats, from “Georgia on My Mind” to “I Only Have Eyes for You” and “That Old Black Magic,” and while they’ve been released on CD in the past, they’re now remastered for vinyl. Hopefully this first volume will lead a new generation to one of the greatest of midcentury voices. (NW)

MUDHONEY/MEAT PUPPETS “WARNING/ONE OF THESE DAYS” SPLIT SINGLE

When I was a little kid with a suitcase turntable, seven-inch singles made sense, but I haven’t bought many since. Record Store Day is a regular exception, though, as some autographed Superchunk and live Drive-By Truckers’ singles have made their way into my collection. This year, two of my favorite bands are sharing a single, with Mudhoney covering “Warning,” a tune by Aynsley Dubar Retaliation, and Meat Puppets taking their psychedelic cowpunk to “One of These Days,” a song made famous by George Jones. (DN)

TOM PETTY AND THE HEARTBREAKERS ANGEL DREAM: SONGS AND MUSIC FROM THE MOTION PICTURE SHE’S THE ONE

One of the few musical highlights of the pandemic for me was watching a live show by Fontaines D.C. as they “opened” for a screening of U2’s legendary Red Rocks concert from the early ’80s. These young Irishmen set up in an old Dublin prison last summer to record a show for Irish TV and sounded brilliant delivering songs from their two albums to date. Songs like “A Hero’s Death” from their 2020 album of the same name and “Sha Sha Sha” from their 2019 breakthrough album, Dogrel, are among the highlights of this 10-song set delivered on 180g vinyl. (DN)

When Tom Petty died in 2017, his soundtrack for Edward Burns’ little-seen 1996 rom-com She’s the One got a few mentions as a favorite sleeper in his vast catalog. That makes sense, given most of it was recorded at the same time as his massively successful Wildflowers album. This Record Store Day reissue commemorates the soundtrack’s 25th anniversary, and includes four newly included songs from those long-ago sessions, along with a new cover. If you’ve never heard She’s the One, it includes some of Petty’s bestever songs, from “Walls (Circus)” to “Change the Locks,” and a winning cover of Beck’s “Asshole.” (DN)

AL GREEN GIVE ME MORE LOVE

VARIOUS ARTISTS ABOVE THE RIM: THE SOUNDTRACK

Honestly, whose record collection couldn’t use more Al Green? This RSD collection has a similar track listing to Green’s iconic 1975 greatest hits collection — you know, the one where he’s shirtless and pointing right at you — including undeniable classics like “Let’s Stay Together,” “Tired of Being Alone” and “I’m Still in Love with You.” The big difference here is that this particular compilation features orchestral arrangements, breathing a new (and decidedly different) life into these R&B mainstays. It’s like when major artists come to town and perform their hits with the backing of the symphony, except it’s coming out of your living room speakers. (NW)

24 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

The urban drama Above the Rim, about an aspiring basketball star embroiled in his friends’ criminal enterprises, didn’t exactly burn up the box office when it was released in early 1994. Its soundtrack, on the other hand, made quite the impression, and it is now being issued on vinyl for the first time. The collection came courtesy of producing duo Suge Knight and Dr. Dre and the Interscope label, which had recently acquired the hugely successful hip-hop imprint Death Row, and it’s nearly 80 minutes of distinctly early ’90s artists — Warren G and Nate Dogg (whose signature song “Regulate” is featured here), Al B. Sure!, SWV and 2Pac, who also starred in Above the Rim. (NW) n


ART SMART SWAP

Local music institutions The Palimpsest Group (Norman Robbins and Luis Mota) and Resurrection Records are co-hosting an art market geared toward musicians and the people who love them. The TPG Market will be part gear swap, part record and merch sale, and part party, complete with a cornhole tournament if you dare to pick up the bags to face off against some of Spokane’s best artists. DJ Case will be spinning, and local artists will also be on hand to sell their wares and their fashions, so you could find yourself walking away with some new tunes, new threads, even a new band you just formed with someone you’d never met before after you realize you’re both into (insert your favorite genre here). Sounds like a pretty productive Sunday afternoon to me. — DAN NAILEN TPG Market • Sun, June 13 from noon-6 pm • Free • Resurrection Records • 1927 W. Northwest Blvd. • thepalimpsestgroup.com/eventcalendar

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

COMMUNITY SUPPORTIVE SOIREE

Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month was in May, but Spokane’s AAPI community is celebrating Heritage Day Saturday by hosting a festival for the greater community to join in and learn about the region’s AAPI history, culture and arts. Visitors will have the chance to browse vendor booths and cultural and historical displays, dine at island-style food trucks, watch martial arts demonstrations, and view an art show. There will be kids activities for the little ones, too. Considering the horrific racism the Asian American community has faced over the last year, this is an excellent opportunity to support that community in our region and meet new friends in the process. — DAN NAILEN AAPI Heritage Day • Sat, June 12 from 11 am-4 pm • Free • Centerplace Regional Event Center, West Lawn • 2426 N. Discovery Place, Spokane Valley • Facebook: AAPI Heritage Day

BENEFIT WHALE OF A SALE

It’s time for a supersized treasure hunt at the Spokane Symphony Associates’ annual fundraiser, the Upscale Sale. While the event kicked off last weekend, there’s still much to be discovered among the hundreds of donated items priced at a steal of a deal, all to support the Spokane Symphony. The mega estate-style sale is a mega-funding source for the orchestra, along with the Associates’ winter Christmas Tree Elegance. Both were canceled last year, so there’s some catching up to do. The good news: Throughout 2020, donations continued to pour in, filling eight storage units with jewelry, glassware, kitchen wares, holiday and home decor, furniture, rugs, clothing, and more. There’s so much to be found, in fact, that the sale had to move to a bigger venue, and this year takes place in the old Toys R Us store on North Division. — CHEY SCOTT Spokane Symphony Associates’ Upscale Sale • Continues June 10-12 from 9 am-6 pm • Old Toys R Us store • 6104 N. Division St. • spokanesymphonyassoc.org

JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 25


EVENTS | CALENDAR

COMMUNITY PRIDE ON PATROL

After missing out on in-person events for Pride Month 2020, this year’s Pride celebration gatherings will be a welcome sight. Presented by North Idaho Pride Alliance, Pride Night Out offers the chance to “paint the town rainbow” and celebrate Pride Month with friends by visiting several local art exhibits. Participants are encouraged to wear their Pride gear and can also buy CDA4Pride merch at the beginning of the crawl. The first stop focuses on LGBTQIA+ icons and activists. The next section features entertainment from local historian Robert Singletary and a viewing of the Museum of North Idaho’s current exhibit “Hollywood of the North,” followed by a pause to check out art at Emerge’s new location. Mingle and enjoy a bite to eat at British pub the Crown and Thistle to finish out the night. Find even more Pride Month activities at the North Idaho Pride Alliance’s website. — LILLIAN PIEL Pride Night Out: Arts & Culture Crawl • Wed, June 16 from 6-9 pm • Free • Human Rights Education Institute • 414 West Fort Grounds Drive, Coeur d’Alene • nipridealliance.com

BENEFIT

FREEFORM SIDEWALK SALE Offering discounted office chairs, desks, tables, lounge seating, ergonomic accessories, and more. A portion of proceeds benefit Spokane Humane Society; bring an item to donate and be entered to win prizes. June 11, 12-6 pm. Free. Freeform Interiors, 715 E. Sprague, Suite 40. freeforminteriors.com/sale (509-458-0411) ANIMAL POEMS: A KIDS POETRY WORKSHOP Spend an afternoon at River’s Wish Animal Sanctuary, meeting the animals and writing poems. For ages 8-11. June 13, 2 pm. $30. River’s Wish Animal Sanctuary, 11511 W. Garfield Rd. riverswishanimalsanctuary.org POOLSIDE YOGA ON THE FARM Enjoy a one-hour, all-levels outdoor yoga class overlooking beautiful Higher Ground Animal Sanctuary. Pre-registration required. Ages 7+. June 13, June 27, July 11, July 25, Aug. 8 and Aug. 22 at 9 am. $15. Higher Ground Animal Sanctuary, 16602 N. Day Mt. Spokane Rd. highergroundanimalsanctuary.org

COMEDY

COMEDY NIGHT FT. CAMERON MAZZUCA Lovable, bearded everyman Cameron Mazzuca has performed in comedy clubs and theaters across North America. June 10, 7:30 pm. $10. Ruby River Hotel, 700 N. Division St. rubyriverhotelspokane.com (326-5577) TREY KENNEDY Kennedy is a born and raised Oklahoman who found fame on the app Vine, amassing more than 2.5 million followers. June 10, 7:30 pm, June 11, 7 & 9:30 pm and June 12, 7 & 9:30 pm. $30-$40. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998) FRESH AF COMEDY TOUR In a showcase style performance, headliners from all over the country offer different perspectives and a night of laughs. June 13, 7:30 pm. $15. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998)

COMMUNITY

PERFORMANCE RIVER REVERENCE

The start of summer is the perfect time to head outside and gain a newfound appreciation for local nature, and maybe even get involved with efforts to protect it. The Global Water Dances event Art, Nature and the Voice of the River will combine dance, spoken and written word, and movement pieces from the community. The event seeks to raise awareness of the Columbia River Treaty, highlight why the return of salmon to the Upper Columbia is important, and explore the voice of our own Spokane River. Program contributors range from environmental scientists to dancers and poets. This is the first of a series of projects taking place from 2021 to 2023 enlisting art, science and nature to encourage community engagement in the management of local water sources. — LILLIAN PIEL Art, Nature and the Voice of the River • Sun, June 13 from 11 am-2 pm • Free • People’s Park Parking Lot • 2500-2834 W. Clarke Ave. • bit.ly/34M0ce0

26 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

ROOTS OF WISDOM Children and families discover the unique partnership between cutting-edge western science and traditional knowledge of indigenous peoples. Exhibition designed and produced by the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry. May 29-Sept. 5; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm. $5-$12. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org 32ND ANNUAL COW PLOP Bring the family for food trucks, games and crafts, and place your bet for the Cow Plop! Tickets to guess are $5, the grand prize is $2,000. June 12, 11 am-4 pm. Free. Trinity Catholic School, 2315 N. Cedar St. (509-327-9369) AAPI HERITAGE DAY An public cultural event highlighting Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) history, culture, and the arts, held on CenterPlace’s west lawn plaza. June 12, 11 am-4 pm. Free. CenterPlace Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. Facebook.com/SpokaneUnitedWeStand (509-688-0300) BE SMOKE READY Wildfire smoke has significantly affected outdoor and indoor air quality in recent years. Air quality specialists share information and techniques to reduce exposure to smoke particles and protect your health. June 15, 6-7 pm. Online: scld.org JUNE WHAT? WHY AFRICAN AMERI-

CANS CELEBRATE JUNETEENTH Dr. Roberta & Mr. James Wilburn discuss the importance of Juneteenth and its historical context. The presentation also shares different ways Juneteenth is celebrated around the country and a new movement to make Juneteenth a national holiday. June 15, 6:30 pm. Online: spokanelibrary.org GYRO DAYS & LEAD CREEK DERBY The annual community celebration includes barbecues, a radiothon, carnival and concessions, all capped off with the Lead Creek Derby on Saturday afternoon. Win a pot of cash if you guess correctly how long it takes a giant multicolored leather ball to bob down the river from Mullan to Wallace. Proceeds go towards local scholarships. June 1619. Wallace, Idaho. wallaceid.fun TERRAIN CREATIVE ENTERPRISE VIRTUAL PITCH PARTY Get to know the artist entrepreneurs who are about to take their fresh ideas to the streets of Spokane courtesy Terrain’s business incubator program. June 16, 6-9 pm. Free. Online: terrainspokane.com VACCINATION HAPPY HOUR Each event includes a live broadcast from 92.9 KZZU, free food from local vendors, drawings for live entertainment tickets and more. June 16, 5-7 pm. Free. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com

FILM

YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU - A TCS FILM This Pulitzer Prize winning play turned feature-length film was created within the school’s multi-purpose room, which serves as its cafeteria, gym, stage, and now a sound stage. Through June 10, 7-9 pm. $10. Shadle Park High School, 4327 N. Ash St. spokaneschools.org/shadle/site/default. asp (360-318-4732) A CALL TO LOVE: This two-hour documentary was created to effect change while bringing hope and encouragement to those in the LGBTQ+ community that have been deeply hurt by the church and its teachings. Streaming through June 27 at eventbrite.com/e/acall-to-love-registration-155739333539 MEAN GIRLS TRIVIA “Raise your hand if you have ever been personally victimized by Regina George.” June 15, 7 pm. Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com

FOOD

DOLLA JAVA DAYS BY JOE Now through June 20, locals can treat themselves to a $1 coffee via the joe coffee app multiple times a day at various joe partner shops, including Thomas Hammer Coffee, Jitterz Espresso, and Indaba. Redeem with promo code 1JAVASPOKANE. This deal is good for a coffee order up to $6. Find the app in the App Store or on Google Play. joe.coffee PARTY ON THE PATIO Monthy summer parties on the patio, co-hosted by the Inlander and Three Peaks Kitchen with live music, lots of food and drink specials, giveaways and more. Upcoming dates: June 10, July 8 and Aug. 12, from 5-8 pm. Free. Three Peaks Kitchen + Bar, 14300 W. SR Highway 2. inlander. com/PartyonthePatio (509-818-1547) STICKY SUBJECT: THE HISTORY AND CULTURE OF SUGAR Anthropologist and sweets expert Julia Harrison takes participants on a journey from ancient sugar cane plantations to modern candy factories, uncovering sugar’s economic and social significance. June

11, 6 pm. Online: humanities.org VIRTUAL WINE CLASS Rocket Market hosts weekly virtual wine classes; sign up in advance for the week’s selections to bring home and enjoy during a virtual tasting session. Fridays at 7 pm. Price varies. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com (509-343-2253) RIVERFRONT EATS The outdoor food truck series in the park happens Tuesdays, June 1-Aug. 31 from 11 am-2 pm. Each week features a new lineup of locally owned food trucks; see complete schedule at link. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.com

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

RIVERFRONT MOVES Pulse and shake in the Barre Code’s 50-minute signature class that combines barre work and isometric movements. June 10, 6-7 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. riverfrontspokane.com SPOKANE INDIANS VS. VANCOUVER CANADIANS Home series through June 12, 6:30 pm and June 13, 5:09 pm. $5-$14. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. milb.com/spokane/schedule/2021-06 (535-2922) COUPLES DATE NIGHT Tee up for date night with an option to stay the night at the resort and play again on Saturday. June 11, Aug. 6 and Aug. 20. $100. Circling Raven Golf Course, 27068 S. Highway 95. cdacasino.com PROVING GROUNDS MMA FIGHTS Watch local MMA fighters leave it all in the cage for Friday Night Fights. June 11, 7 pm. $30+. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. hubsportscenter.org SPOKANE BIKE SWAP The region’s only biking and biking equipment event featuring hundreds of new and used bikes. Consignment sign-up June 11 3-7 pm; swap June 12 10 am-4 pm. $5. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. spokanebikeswap.com STATE PARKS FREE DAY Visit Washington State Parks without a required Discover Pass ($10/day or $30/year). Includes day access locally to Riverside, Mt. Spokane and Palouse Falls State Parks. June 12, June 13, Aug. 25, Sept. 25. parks.state.wa.us/281/Parks SUMMER PARKWAYS Summer Parkways 2021 is again virtual. Participants can walk, run, bike, roller skate or scoot along the regular event route through Spokane’s Manito-Comstock neighborhood anytime between June 14-20. summerparkways.com

ARTS

THE BLACK UNIVERSE A solo exhibition featuring the work of Hazel Miller, inspired by ancient human life, Zen Buddhism and the color black. Themes include womanhood, rebirth, botany and altered states of consciousness. Through June 26; open Thu-Sat 6-8 pm. Free. Terrain Gallery, 304 W. Pacific Ave. terrainspokane.com A WALK IN THE GARDEN The New Moon Art Gallery feature the artwork and paintings of well-known PNW artist Clancie Pleasants and Mallory Battista along with gallery members and consignors work, all invoking the essence of spring, the relationship humans have with the Earth and brighter days to come. Open Thu-Sat from 12-5 pm through June 26. TFree. New Moon Art Gallery, 1326 E. Sprague, Suite B. newmoonartgallery.com (413-9101) n


TOTAL PEST MANAGEMENT PROGRAM WORRY FREE PEST CONTROL AS LOW AS $19.95 PER MONTH

to advertise:

444-SELL

MENTION THIS AD AND RECEIVE: 50% Off set up on set up on TPM 20% OFF one-time service

355 nder.com 09) 444-7 la PHONE: (5BulletinBoard@In mit Parkway E-MAIL: 1227 West Sum 1 20 N: IN PERSO Spokane, WA 99

208-714-4970 • 509-327-3700 • edenspokane.com

Specialized Home Maintenance

I buy old stereo equipment. Receivers, Amps, Tuners, Turntables, Cassette Decks, Reel-to-Reel, Speakers, etc. Call or Text: 208.691.1073

• Lawns

• Landscape Maintenance • Handyman Service

Available at more than 1,000 locations throughout the Inland Northwest.

Call Rob: 509-879-6173 #SPECIHM882CL

BUYING Estate Contents / Household Goods See abesdiscount.com or 509-939-9996

EndTheViolence_04.08.21_2HBB_JI Sweet Grass Massage Special! Hot Stone Massage, 60 min. for $50.00 or 2 for $90.00 Covid19 Compliant Pay at the time of booking. 35 W. Main (509) 209-2606 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

13 17

18

19 21 26

43. Modern, in Munich 44. “Time ____ My Side” (Rolling Stones hit) 45. Sting’s “If I Ever Lose My Faith ____” 46. Ritz rival 47. Mammal that eats while lying on its back 49. ____-E-Mart (“The Simpsons” establishment) 50. Honky-____ 51. Fix 53. Lemon or lime drinks, informally 55. Ida. neighbor 56. AirPod spot 59. Sight in a produce aisle 61. Author Chinua Achebe, by birth 63. “No ____!” (“Don’t sweat it!”) 65. 2002 Olympics host, briefly 66. Ballerina Karsavina 70. “Totally!!” 72. Mine vehicle 73. In a mellifluous way 74. Of immediate concern

75. Oozes 76. Warm and cozy Down 1. Bratty kid 2. Place to see Warhol’s “Campbell’s Soup Cans” 3. Grieg’s “____ Death” 4. Show on TV again 5. Activate 6. Food that’s twirled 7. 2009 Best New Artist Grammy winner 8. “How do you like dem apples?!” 9. ____ Tin Tin 10. “That works ____ many levels!” 11. Like Pilates instructors 12. Old Venetian rulers 15. Massage target 17. “I won’t let this happen while I’m in charge!” (or something seen four times in this puzzle’s grid)

11

12

33

44

45

57

63

64

70

37

38

43

50 53

54 61 66

55 62 67

68

69

72 74

73 75

23. Genius Bar computer 25. Brand of [circled letters] 26. “Stop, ye scurvy dogs!” 27. ____ grigio 29. Snatcher’s exclamation 31. “The Brief Wondrous Like of Oscar Wao” Pulitzer winner ____ Díaz

THIS W ANSWE EEK’S I SAW RS ON YOUS

39

46

60 65

71

36 42

52 59

58

35

24 31

49

48 51

23 30

34 41

47

20

29

40

56

10

15

22 28

27

32

ACROSS 1. What a brainy kid has 7. Visiting Europe, say 13. Pilot’s directive on takeoff 14. Hanging in there 16. 2015 World Golf Hall of Fame inductee Mark 17. Strip teaser? 18. Shocking, in a way 19. Beer named for Washington’s capital, briefly 20. Spread in a fridge 21. “Ruh-____!” (Scooby-Doo’s cry of dread) 22. Blues or Jazz, e.g. 24. Inexact no. 25. Toothpaste tube top 28. Singer with the 2006 #1 hit “So Sick” 30. Journey to Mecca 32. New Balance rival 34. Pick up, as ice cubes 36. Puts the brakes on 40. ____ serif 41. Like most standardized tests

9

14

16

25

8

76

33. Ed of “Elf” 35. Imaginary surface coinciding with the earth’s sea level 37. Cut again, as grass 38. Kind of slope for a novice skier 39. Brand of [circled letters] 42. Get into a fistfight

“WATCH”

48. Lip 52. Supermodel Bündchen 54. Pizza chain since 1956 56. Williams College athletes 57. “____ there yet?” 58. Brand of [circled letters] 60. Defeats, as a dragon 62. Brand of

[circled letters] 64. French flag couleur 67. Toppers of kings and queens 68. Sound off 69. Pretentious 71. Since January 1: Abbr.

JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 27


Government regulations, like allowing only one production facility, have hampered cannabis research for decades.

RESEARCH

One, Mississippi DEA is allowing more research of cannabis, but some silly roadblocks remain BY WILL MAUPIN

I

t’s not particularly easy to study cannabis in the United States, but one of the greatest impediments to that research is being removed. Last month the Drug Enforcement Administration announced that it had reached an important point in the process of increasing the amount of cannabis available for scientific research. The DEA issued a “memorandum of agreement” to multiple growers, essentially stating that these growers are in compliance with federal laws and regulations concerning the production of cannabis for research. Formalities are all that remain before these producers can start growing. Which is huge, because as of now there is only one grower licensed with the federal government to produce cannabis for legal scientific research: the University of Mississippi, of all places. This is an important development because cannabis

28 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

research hasn’t kept up with the pace of cannabis legalization. Government regulations, like allowing only one production facility, have hampered cannabis research for decades. Which is how in the year 2021, when roughly one-third of Americans live in a place where cannabis is legal, the scientific community still doesn’t really know all that much about cannabis compared to other drugs like alcohol or opiates. In recent years the DEA has become increasingly comfortable with expanding and opening up research on cannabis. In 2019 the agency announced its intention to triple the amount of cannabis available to scientists. It also announced plans to increase the number of growers to help facilitate that increase in production. Last month’s announcement shows that the DEA has stayed true to its word from two years ago. For the scientific community this is a huge step for-

ward, but many roadblocks remain. Due to the illegality of cannabis at the federal level, researchers are hamstrung by federal regulations. Especially researchers at institutions, like public universities, that receive federal funds. They would be risking that funding if they chose to use cannabis not grown by the government, such as cannabis purchased at a state-licensed dispensary. Which means legal research was largely contained to research conducted on or with cannabis from the University of Mississippi. That will largely still be the case, with researchers unable to conduct studies with the cannabis products Americans actually buy and consume. That said, more cannabis from more growers should lead to greater diversity in the products available to researchers. And in the end, more cannabis means more research — and more knowledge. n


JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 29


! W O N S D AN T S ON For Green Zone advertising information contact: advertising@inlander.com

PERFECT

18 RAY’S LEMONADE & $ 18 BUDDY BOY JOINT PARTY PACKS ALL JUNE LONG! $

ORDER ONLINE at SpokaneGreenleaf.com

SummerPAIR

SPECIALS EVERY DAY OF THE WEEK: SUNDAYS

20% OFF TOPICALS AND CBD PRODUCTS, 2x LOYALTY POINTS, 15% OFF FLOWER OUNCES

MONDAYS

20% OFF EDIBLES

TUESDAYS

20% OFF JOINTS

WEDNESDAY

20% OFF CONCENTRATES, VAPE CARTRIDGES, INFUSED JOINTS

THURSDAYS

20% OFF PREMIUM BRAND FLOWER

FRIDAYS

20% OFF PHAT PANDA PRODUCTS

SATURDAY

25% OFF CONCENTRATES, VAPE

9107 N Country Homes Blvd #13 509.919.3467 spokanegreenleaf.com OPEN MON-SAT 8am-11pm • SUN 8am-10pm

30 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

CARTRIDGES, INFUSED JOINTS

NOW TAKING DEBIT CARDS! WARNING: This product has intoxicating affects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. Marijuana products may be purchased or possessed only by persons 21 years of age or older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.


part y w it h us

SSPPO OK KA AN NEE 1325 1325 N N DIVISION DIVISION SPOKANE, SPOKANE, WA WA MO MOSSEESS LLA AK KEE 955 955 W W BDWY BDWY AVE AVE MOSES LAKE, MOSES LAKE, WA WA OT OTIISS O OR RC CH HAR ARDS DS 21502 21502 EE GILBERT GILBERT RD RD OTIS ORCHARDS, WA OTIS ORCHARDS, WA

A P E XCA N N A B I S . C O M

O P E N DA I LY

Warning: This product has intoxicating effects & may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, & judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults 21 years or older. Keep out of reach of children.


GREEN ZONE

SPOKANE’S O

CANNABIS RETAILER

GREEN BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

LIGHT

STAY HIGH THIS SUMMER VOTE TODAY!

10% OFF

ONLINE ORDERS

OUR DEALS

GOOGLE REVIEW

LEAFLY REVIEW

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR PRICE MATCH PROMISE* (509) 309-3193 10309 E. TRENT AVE. OPEN DAILY 8AM-11PM CURBSIDE PICKUP 8AM-8PM GREENLIGHTSPOKANE.COM THIS PRODUCT HAS INTOXICATING EFFECTS AND MAY BE HABIT-FORMING. CANNABIS CAN IMPAIR CONCENTRATION, COORDINATION, AND JUDGMENT. DO NOT OPERATE A VEHICLE OR MACHINERY UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF THIS DRUG. THERE MAY BE HEALTH RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH THE CONSUMPTION OF THIS PRODUCT. FOR USE ONLY BY ADULTS TWENTY-ONE AND OLDER. KEEP OUT OF THE REACH OF CHILDREN. ALL DISCOUNTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE. DISCOUNTS ARE FOR REGULAR-PRICED ITEMS ONLY. NO ADDITIONAL OR STACKING OF DISCOUNTS. SOME RESTRICTIONS/EXCLUSIONS MAY APPLY. ALL DISCOUNTS ARE APPLIED IN-STORE AT THE TIME OF PURCHASE. *PLEASE CONTACT OUR STORE FOR FURTHER DETAILS.

BEST RETAIL CANNABIS SHOP BEST BUDTENDER

10525 E TRENT AVE, SPOKANE VALLEY, WA 99206 MON-SAT 8AM-11PM | SUNDAYS 9AM-9PM

https://bestof.inlander.com POLLS OPEN 5/26 | POLLS CLOSE 6/13 This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

32 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021


NEW! 50% OFF

Take us to the Beach!

SELECTION

DAILY DEALS ALWAYS

20% OFF EDIBLES JUNE 12TH - 13TH

WEEKLY SPECIALS MUNCHIES MONDAY

20% OFF GLASS & KRATOM

$15 CARTRIDGES

CHECK OUT OUR WEB PAGE FOR DAILY DEALS

WAXY WEDNESDAY 20% OFF CONCENTRATES

EXCLUDES ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO PRODUCTS

20% OFF EDIBLES TANKER TUESDAY (RESTRICTIONS APPLY)

THIRSTY THURSDAY 20% OFF ALL LIQUIDS FIRE FRIDAY 20% OFF BUDTENDER PICK

SUPER SAVER SATURDAY

25% OFF CONCENTRATES (EXCLUDES CARTRIDGES)

DOUBLE DIP SUNDAY 2X ROYALTY POINTS CHECK OUT OUR SOCIAL MEDIA FOR DAILY DEALS! We are practicing social distancing — there may be a small wait. Thank you for your understanding!

NEW HOURS

SUN 10AM-11PM • MON - SAT 8AM-12AM

TOKERFRIENDLYSPOKANE.COM 1515 S. LYONS RD, AIRWAY HEIGHTS • (509) 244-8728 CHECK OUT OUR SOCIAL MEDIA FOR DAILY DEALS! Warning: This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of reach of children.

WE ARE

OPEN! During Phase 3, we will ask you practice social distancing. There may be a small wait. Thank you for your understanding. OPEN MONSUN 9AM9PM

1515 S LYONS RD.

AIRWAY HEIGHTS SUITE B

509-244-8363

RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess HATE-LOSS DIET

Last year, I broke up with the man I was engaged to and loved deeply. I’d found out he was cheating on me constantly with many different women throughout our relationship. My life has gone on, but I often think of what he did to me and feel incredible anger. I’d like to forgive him, but I’m not sure how to do that when these feelings pop up throughout my week. —Stuck

AMY ALKON It’s hard to move on emotionally when you not only have a grudge but take it everywhere with you like a cockroach on a little yarn leash. This isn’t to say you should forgive the guy. There’s this assumption that forgiving someone who’s wronged you is the healthy, constructive thing to do — and, sure, it can be. Evolutionary social psychologist Michael McCullough defines forgiveness as “an internal process of getting over your ill will for an offender.” He explains that forgiveness is “adaptive” — functional, beneficial — when there’s a valuable relationship at stake: when you’d benefit from continuing contact with the perp (and it seems unlikely they’ll be a repeat offender — harm you again in a similar way). But you aren’t looking to re-up with the guy! And you probably have zero indication he’s changed anything — aside from which woman he’s two-timing (or, uh, 22-timing, as a rough quarterly estimate). What you’re really seeking is peace of mind. Consider that anger, like forgiveness, can be functional. The anger you still have probably remains for a reason: a warning sign that you’re in danger of being cheated on again. But there’s a way to shut off that alert — and protect yourself in the future — and it’s by turning this into a learning experience. Be accountable for the part you played in what happened — not because, “Yay, blame the victim!” — but because it’s the part you can control. Did you, perhaps, want so badly to believe you’d found love that you ignored signs you’d landed a cheating creep posing as an adoring boyfriend? Being honest about what you could — and should — have done differently can become your guide for what you will do differently the next guy around. A man can give you the sense he has a moral compass, but it’s best you give it a hard look to see it isn’t cracked and dusty from constantly being dropped in other women’s bedrooms.

GLUED-IN ALLERGY

I’ve been dating a guy for three months, and I’d like us to be exclusive, but I don’t know how to go about addressing it. I’m worried that if I say I need him to commit, he’ll feel pressured and bolt. —Quandary For a man, agreeing to go exclusive is a bit like wedding vows lite, as posed to the man’s penis: “Do you swear off sex with all the other ladies forever?” Penis: “Frankly, that sounds a little grim.” Men evolved to have the hots for sexual variety — casual sex with a slew-apalooza of different partners — to a degree women do not. (An ancestral woman could get pregnant and stuck with a kid to raise after a single hookup with some rando, while the more randos Grok had sex with, the more likely he was to pass on his genes.) Feminist scholars contend that “patriarchal” culture — not evolution — leads to men’s greater preference for the sexual variety pack, but it even shows up in “gender-egalitarian” Norway. Evolutionary scientist Leif Edward Ottesen Kennair and his colleagues asked Norwegian men and women the number of sex partners they’d want over a 30-year period. Women, on average, wanted about five sex partners. Men? About 25! Still, many men eventually tire of the swipe-right hussy of the night lifestyle (which, admittedly, isn’t an option for men low on the mate-value ladder) and start feeling ready for a relationship. However, even if this guy’s open to commitment and maybe already pointed in that direction, consider the lesson from “psychological reactance,” a term coined by psychologist Jack Brehm. Our getting the sense that somebody’s trying to control us, limit our freedom, motivates us to “react”: rebel against being controlled. Give yourself a (silent) deadline so you won’t be waiting around forever, and then ask him how he sees things going forward: what he’s looking for, what works for him. The conversation itself should give him the sense that you might be headed for the door if he doesn’t boyfriend up. Wanting to be with you might motivate him to make the necessary sexual trade-off — which is ultimately a pretty big deal for a dude. Picture the Souplantation buffet, but all those stainless steel bins are filled with the same one item, and you’ll have to eat it for every meal for the rest of your life: “Welcome to the suburban gulag. Table for two?” n ©2021, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

JUNE 10, 2021 INLANDER 33


taking me to the Matchbox 20/Counting Crows concert and for always inviting me to the big float. I made it once, and it was amazing! When it came to GnR, I was a serious Mess. It wasn’t Hot it was just a Mess, which isn’t an excuse. I want to make Amends with you if I can. I hope your dreams are coming true. Four years have given me the room for a lot of self-reflection and growth. Your Flecks of Stars land on everyone you love. Just know I love you, and I think about you often. I wouldn’t take your giving gestures for granted in the future, I’m sorry that I did then. K.Fox

I SAW YOU CAR WASH I saw you at the west end car wash last weekend. You rubbing and scrubbing your black convertible. I offered to trade you for my bicycle, but you declined. You, the gorgeous blonde lady working hard to make your retirement car sparkle and shine. You need to get a headband, and let the hair down and blow in the breeze. What the hell, you worked for it, you deserve it. Would like to meet for a glass of wine sometime. Give me a buzz @ e.racer2@outlook.com

CHEERS SMILE To the man who attends the parking garage at Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital. I have had a difficult couple of weeks. Your kind smile and friendly wave as I drive past you every day has been a tremendous help to get me though this. You never know the power of a smile. Thank you, and keep up the good work. RIGHT OF WAY Here’s a shout-out to everyone who understands how the right-of-way works at the All Way Stop intersections. For those who don’t, the rule of thumb is that the vehicle on your right goes first and goes clockwise around. It does not alternate north/ south then east/west. DIDN’T REALIZE Dude, thank you for

SOUND OFF

RE: SHOULD HAVE STAYED IN CALIFORNIA If Californians want to come here, spend money to stimulate our local economy, pay sales taxes to pay for our services, and buy houses to increase our home values — then I say welcome! Bring a friend! Wait, did I say Californians? I meant all humans. Spokane is a thriving city with a six-digit population. Thriving cities grow, and they diversify. If you want to live in a small homogenous town instead, you sure can. There are dozens in the area that would love to have you. Suffice it to say, moving between states is so American that it’s even a right granted in the privileges and immunities clause of the U.S. constitution. HAPPY BIRTHDAY Now that you’re old enough to know better, we thought we should let you in on the Big Reveal.... We..Shared!! Yes! The Air Affair is no longer a secret. Come to find out your Babe has friends in common with Old Reliable!! Who knew?!?!?! We did!. We have, for some time!! Sorry, Honey-Pie, we thought it was well known by all adult parties involved that you aren’t monogamous. Dang!! Oh, “he” knows, too. Good luck with that. Have you even played “a round” with,....well,...never mind. You should be so lucky to hustle a game there, now. THANKS FOR THE COMPLIMENT! Cheers to the young woman walking into Northtown last week who complimented me on my look and my hair. You made my day! NEW HAIRDO! Cheers to Lindsay at Blades! My daughter loves her new cute short hair cut!

JEERS RE: MANITO PARK MANAGEMENT Responding to how Manito Park looks. Considering the park staff is extremely understaffed dealing with continual vandalism and storm damage, I think the park looks better than it could. Instead of griping about how it looks, consider donating some of your time to help improve it. Are you apart of the problem, or the solution? Feel free to donate to The Friends of Manito, those funds go directly to the park. STACY I don’t know who you are but don’t message my family about my health again. Its not your business so keep your nose out of it. My life, my choices period. Don’t be causing drama over absolutely nothing. You have concerns bring it to the person involved not through messenger, harassing my family “concerned” about my mental well-being and fyi maybe you shouldn’t message then block the person you write too. MERGING DRIVERS Spokane has the worst freeway drivers in the world. When these people leave home and get in the car to go somewhere they don’t have have their car hat on. They get in the car with their house hat or their phone hat on, but not their car hat. You see them scuttling along in the righthand lane blocking other folk from getting on or off the freeway. When you get on the freeway get in the MIDDLE LANE. Then you can be passed on the right or left. If you stay in the right lane you are a rolling road block, and no one can get off or on on account of YOU. So put on your car hat when you leave and THINK and DRIVE. It’s your RESPONSIBILITY!!!

OSTRICH WEATHERMEN AND WOMEN Why do our local weathercasters bury their heads in the sand about climate change? They tell us about recordbreaking heat, prolonged drought and what have become routine ruinous windstorms, but they dare not say the

years, last time I checked a map WA and Spokane are still in America. Suck it up. Instead of complaining about and blaming “Californians” for your issues, how about you ask yourself what YOU’RE doing to better your community, state or country. My guess is not a damn thing but complain about other Americans based on what geographic area, with

Thriving cities grow, and they diversify.

Double C words. One was asked directly on air about what is causing the current drought, and she said “because we didn’t get enough rain.” Really? That’s it? Last I heard, meteorology was a science. It relies on data not only to predict but explain the causes (beyond the person’s evasive toddler-worthy “answer”) of weather patterns and trends. When the inevitable range and forest fires break out this summer, we will hear how hot and dry it is without a word of explanation as to the fundamental cause of the ongoing desertification of the West. I get it that a lot of locals are Ostriches too, but it does a disservice to viewers for these “meteorologists” to avoid mentioning and explaining climate change because it might ruffle some feathers.

STA SCHEDULING The schedules for various buses do not mesh well at all! I’m fine with having to wait a bit, but it’s very irritating to get off at the plaza, only to see the bus I need to get home pull out. Sometimes this even happens when I’m right at the doors of the bus I need.

WHY ARE YOU ON THE ROAD? Jeers to the drivers with expired or missing plates. That tells me you’re not insured. Do you have a revoked license or warrant for your arrest, too? Get off the goddamn road! And SPD — do your job and start enforcing the law! I’ve noticed people are covering the Month tabs with the Year tabs. Are you too stupid to follow directions? You’re also defrauding the county and state out of much needed money to fix those potholes you complain about. Step up!

OVERREACTED Wondering why eight police cruisers show up to a possible suicide and shut the streets down. Wow, what the hell did that cost, and why so many cops? BIG waste of my tax dol-

WE’LL LIVE WHERE WE WANT Jeers to the people complaining about “Californians ruining our city/state.” As someone who grew up in LA, and then went on to serve this country for over 20

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

34 INLANDER JUNE 10, 2021

lars... for two hours shooting the breeze.

made up borders, they grew up in or a perceived political ideology. We’re here to stay, and you’re just going to have to deal with it. NOT EVERYONE IS A ‘WISHCYCLER’ Jeers to the City of Spokane for reducing recycling service to every other week. Spend some money to hire someone to do enforcement of what should be “recycled,” not “wishcycled” and you would generate a mass amount of money rather than continue to lose on the recycling program. For those of us that “recycle right,” having one bin picked up every other week now is NOT ENOUGH, even if you upgraded us to a 96-gallon cart, we are still only getting 75 percent of the previous service that we had. I am now being charged extra to have two blue bins picked up every other week rather than one bin picked up once a week. You have reduced our services and not provided any opportunity for those of us who want to continue to recycle the ability to do so without charging us extra. n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS S N O T

M O M A

A S E S

C A S I O

A V A S T

P I N O T

E P H S

A R E W E

R O L E X

R E A I R

T U R N O N

S P A G H E T T I

A S N E R R I G M I B S L Y E E T L U D E

Y O I N K S L A Y S

A D N E O L T E O N G M E Y O W I A D T C H

B O O Y A H D U K E I T O U T

R O A D I N G O N S I G O L E M E S A J C U R B N E U O M N T O N S W Y B O A M A R R E C A R G E N O A S T

K N O T S E I K O A R T Y

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


SVRGAS.COM

TM

SOMEWHERE BETWEEN WA&MT


SUMMER FIREPLACE SALE GOING ON NOW!

509 325-8800 • accentspokane.com • 1622 N Division St • Spokane, WA


GRANT COUNTY WA S H I N G T O N Just Natural Ingredients

Fishing • Hunting • Camping • Hiking Golfing • RVing • Wine Tasting Watchable Wildlife TON WASHING

ashington

ern W FREE East

nting Fishing • Hu • Hiking Camping Wildlife Watchable

ty Grant Coun mmission Tourism Co e | 2021

n Stat Washingto

WE KNOW WHERE YOU SHOULD GO!

To help you plan your family’s next vacation get your FREE copies of the Eastern Washington Travel Planner and very popular Grant County booklets; Top 35 Fishing Waters, Top 26 Trails and 12 Watchable Wildlife Units, Top 43 Campgrounds and RV Parks and Super Vacations in Grant County Coloring Book. It’s easy! You can simply download these publications at tourgrantcounty.com or just email the Grant County Tourism Commission at jtgingrich@grantcountywa.gov and they will mail them to you for FREE. Please make sure to include your complete mailing address with your request. For more information about Grant County Accommodations, RV Parks and Campgrounds:

Grant County Tourism Commission l P.O. Box 37, Ephrata, WA 98823 l tourgrantcounty.com l 800.992.6234


Cultural Tourism

Bike & Boat Tour SUNDAY, JUNE 27 TH | 9:30 AM – 4:30 PM $100 PER PERSON

Kayaking & Canoeing Tour MONDAY, JUNE 21ST 9 AM – 3 PM $60 PER PERSON

Majestic Encounter EAGLE AVIARY TOUR TUESDAY, JUNE 29TH | 8 AM – 3:30 PM $70 PER PERSON

Lifeways Workshop “MAKE YOUR OWN” FULL-SIZE PLATEAU BASKETRY (2-DAY) FRIDAY, JULY 9TH | 2 PM – 8 PM SATURDAY, JULY 10TH | 12 PM – 6 PM $160 PER PERSON

Native American Sip n Paint FRIDAY, JUNE 25TH 6 PM – 8 PM $50 PER PERSON

Experience our culture and beautiful surroundings with a summer cultural tour or workshop. Tickets sell out quickly, so book now! For more information and to view all available events, go to cdacasino.com or visit us in-person at our new Cultural Tours & Events office, located in the walkway in-between the Chinook Meadow and Spa Ssakwa’q’n.

W E LC O M E H O M E .

Lifeways Workshop “MAKE YOUR OWN” PENDLETON MOCCASINS SUNDAY, JULY 18TH | 12 PM – 6 PM $140 PER PERSON

CASINO | HOTEL | DINING | SPA | CHAMPIONSHIP GOLF 3 7 9 1 4 S O U T H N U K WA LQ W • W O R L E Y, I D A H O 8 3 8 7 6 • 1 8 0 0 - 5 2 3 - 2 4 6 4 • C D A C A S I N O . C O M

Profile for The Inlander

Inlander 06/10/2021  

Inlander 06/10/2021  

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded