Issuu on Google+

CANNABIS

The next hurdle: Finding pot labs PAGE 15

MUSIC

Elkfest’s highly anticipated lineup PAGE 49

JUNE 5-11, 2014 | INK STAINS NEVER GO OUT OF STYLE

Summer fashio

Designing n

women FIVE LOCAL DE MAKING WAVESSIPGNERS a by laura john

son

ge 20


“Excellence

in spine ” surgery.

#1 in Washington, 2 years in a row. phc.org

PROVIDENCE HEALTH CARE: SACRED HEART MEDICAL CENTER | SACRED HEART CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL | HOLY FAMILY HOSPITAL | PROVIDENCE CLINICS

Atrial Fibrillation - New Therapies r tions and Curative Options 27

Tuesday, June 10, 6:30 – 7:30 7:30 p.m. Providence Auditorium, 20 West Ninth Avenue Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center Campus Presented by Michael Kwasman, MD Providence Spokane Cardiology

2 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

FREE!

Register at phc.org or call 509.474.3202


INSIDE

How long has it been? We can help with

Window Treatments • Counter Tops • Hardwood Floors Tile • Carpet • Area Rugs • Wallpaper

JUNE 5-11, 2014 | VOL. 21, NO. 33

COMMENT NEWS COVER STORY CULTURE FOOD FILM

5 13 20 31 38 44

MUSIC EVENTS INHEALTH BULLETIN BOARD I SAW YOU LAST WORD

Plus a full service drapery/fabric department for custom

49 54 58 59 60 62

ON THE COVER | MODEL ERIN NEEL; YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

bed spreads, pillows, upholstery & more.

Shop Local with

509.534.5064 | wallflwr@aimcomm.com | M-F 9a-5:30p Sat 10a-3p 2820 E. 30th Ave | Spokane, WA | www.wallflowerdesigns.com

The perfect lawn-chair beer...

EDUCATION

With federal dollars, Rogers High School sent its graduation rate soaring — but with its grant ending, what happens next?

Look for 22oz bombers of our fresh & crisp Expo Series Summer Seasonal,

NOBLE HOP EXTRA PALE ALE

PAGE 13 /nolibrewhouse

1003 E. Trent Ave. | 509.242.2739 | NoLiBrewhouse.com

FILM

Tom Cruise lives the same day again and again in the stunning Edge of Tomorrow

Looking for the Perfect Tenant for Your Rental Home?

PAGE 44

LET US HELP YOUR PROPERTY is OUR PRIORITY!

INLANDER THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

www.MadisonSpokane.com

509.465.9052 | Info@MadisonSpokane.com

1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, SPOKANE, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 | EMAIL: INFO@INLANDER.COM Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, RSS and at Inlander.com

THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. Printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x213 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email trevorr@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2014, Inland Publications, Inc.

SPOK ANE | EA S TERN WA SHINGTON | NORTH IDAHO

Show Some Skin This Summer!

45

$

(a $25 savings)

65

$

(a $25 savings)

70

$

(a $25 savings)

MICRODERMABRASION Eliminates dead dull skin, and surface imperfections coupled with a Papaya enzyme mask to purify and TREATMENT WITH A PAPAYA ENZYME MASK regenerate the skin. NEOSTRATA® GLYCOLIC PEEL WITH BOOSTER

A mild chemical peel used for the treatment of minor wrinkles, pigmentary variations, and acne. Neostrata® Boosters address specific problem areas. They are used with peels to boost their efficacy.

Includes the benefits of a Dermasweep™ DERMAFACIAL WITH STRAWBERRY Particle free microdermabrasion along with a ENZYME MASK relaxing facial experience.

INLAND EMPIRE DERMATOLOGY, PS 312 N Mullan Rd | Spokane Valley | (509)921-7884 | inlandempiredermatology.com

Specials Good thru 8/29/14

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 3


4 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014


COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

Mike Bookey (x279)

CULTURE EDITOR

WHAT INSPIRED YOUR OUTFIT TODAY? ALEXA YMER

Goodwill and thrift stores. I actually found these overalls at Goodwill one day, and they really rocked my world. This bandanna is also my mom’s from the ’80s. I just go with what makes me feel good.

ary! s r e iv n n A r a e Y 0 1 UR TOTAL SALE!

NAL 10% OFF YO

TAKE AN ADDITIO

SPECIALS EXTENDED 2 MORE WEEKS!:

Full Face $599

(reg. $1,200)

Underarms $199 (reg. Bikini Line $249 (reg.

600)

$

600)

$

Brazilian Bikini

599 (reg. 1,200) 50% OFF all other $

$

Laser Packages!

Professional Teeth Whitening $89 (reg. 149)

Chris Bovey (x248) ART DIRECTOR

$

Lisa Waananen (x239) WEB EDITOR

All packages include 8 treatments. Special offers must be booked by 06/30/14. Coupons may not be used for specials.

Laura Johnson (x250) MUSIC EDITOR

Visit us on Facebook for more information!

Chey Scott (x225) LISTINGS EDITOR Michael Mahoney COPY EDITOR

Heidi Groover (x249) Jacob Jones (x237), Deanna Pan (x282), Daniel Walters (x263) STAFF WRITERS

Young Kwak

PHOTOGRAPHER

Caleb Walsh

ILLUSTRATOR

Amy Alkon, Luke Baumgarten, Robert Herold, E.J. Iannelli, Amy Miller-Krezelak, Jo Miller, Leah Sottile CONTRIBUTORS

Madison Bennett, Jenna Mulligan, Alejandro Pallares, Emera L. Riley, Matt Weigand INTERNS

MEGHAN MONTELIBANO

Well, today it is hot and I wanted to be comfortable, so you can’t really go wrong with a high-waisted skirt. Where do you find fashion inspiration? I follow a lot of fashion blogs and I’m on LOOKBOOK and Pinterest a lot.

ADVERTISING Kristi Gotzian (x215)

ADVERTISING SALES MANAGER

Bruce Deming (x217), Carolyn Padgham-Walker (x214), Emily Walden (x260)

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Autumn Adrian (x251), Bonnie Amstutz (x212), Gail Golden (x236), Janet Pier (x235), Raevyn West (x222) ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Kristina Elverum (x223)

DORAN WILLIAMS

Honestly, I don’t know. I’m from down South, so I wore something I would wear down there like the pastel shorts and the fedora. Where do you find fashion inspiration? I make it up as I go. I like matching up a lot of different patterns and colors.

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING

Rebecca Rison (x216)

CHECK OUT WHAT’S HAPPENING

THIS WEEK AT THE LANTERN! 7th June 6th + -off Party! Summer Kick

th - 10PM es Fri June -6Cl aire & Him Live MUSIC

th - 10pm Sat June-7BA RT BUDWIG

ADVERTISING COORDINATOR

Brynn Schauer (x247) EVENTS COORDINATOR

LIVE MUSIC

Gilbert Sandoval (x242) ADVERTISING ASSISTANT

MEETS Lantern Running Club EVERY TUESDAY at 6pm

OPERATIONS Dee Ann Cook (x211) BUSINESS MANAGER Kristin Wagner (x210) ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE Denise Brewer (x213) OPERATIONS ASSISTANT Trevor Rendall (x226) DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

PRODUCTION Wayne Hunt (x232) PRODUCTION MANAGER Alissia Blackwood Mead (x228), Derrick King (x238), Jessie Spaccia (x205), Tom Stover (x265) GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

HANNAH RUSSELL

I went with the hippie style. It’s fitting for a music festival. Where do you find fashion inspiration? I draw a lot of inspiration from art and local culture.

INTERVIEWS BY MADISON BENNETT 5/30/14, VOLUME, THE INLANDER’S MUSIC FESTIVAL

ct SPOKANE’S Perry Distri A Quaint Tap House in Cocktails, wine, and pub food. rs, bee ft Specializing in cra LANTERN

make new ONES! Where friends meet &

ane 1004 S. PerRy St. Spok 509.315.9531 lanterntaphouse.com

TAP H USE O

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 5


COMMENT | SUPREME COURT

The Warren Way

Our hermetically sealed Supreme Court justices may be incapable of delivering laws that unite us behind progress BY ROBERT HEROLD

S

If your cat is hyperthyroid, call us for better treatment options 509.535.MEOW(6369) | Mon-Fri 8AM-5:30PM Sat 9AM-Noon 1017 South Perry, Spokane, WA • www.CATSMEOWSPOKANE.com

CA$H REWARD TOP PRICE$

PAID!

E. 911 Marietta (East of Hamilton)

Mon-Fri 8-5 • Sat 8-4

Aluminum Stainless Steel Brass Copper Gold Silver

483-4094

www.actionrecycling.com

50 beers on tap & 70 in bottles Best Beer Bar!

3011 South Grand Blvd | Spokane, WA | manitotaphouse.com Sun-Thur 11a-11p | Fri-Sat 11a-2a

6 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

ixty years ago, on May 17, 1954, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down its decision in the case of Oliver Brown vs. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. Newly seated Chief Justice Earl Warren, a genial politician from California, had managed to persuade a fractious group of justices to overturn the 1896 decision in the case of Plessy v. Ferguson, which had made “separate but equal” the law of the land — a decision that led to a half-century of school segregation. How the Court has changed. The present “original meaning” majority of five views the Court’s challenge as giving the Constitution its “true meaning.” Their role, they believe, is to “find the law.” To the contrary, the Warren court agreed with the writer of the statement: “The possibility implied by these comforting phrases (true meaning and find the law) does not exist. … History can be of considerable help, but it tells us much too little about the specific intentions of the men who framed, adopted and ratified the great clauses. The record is incomplete, the men involved often had vague or even conflicting intentions, and no one … could have foreseen the disputes that the changing social conditions and outlooks would bring before the court.” Oh yes, and the writer? None other than Robert Bork, who wrote this in 1968, just before he discovered “original intent,” which he dumped in favor of “original meaning,” which the John Roberts majority has transformed into a kind of judicial Holy Grail.

C

onsider, also, the differences in background and experience: Two of the Warren justices didn’t have law degrees. They simply passed the bar and began practicing. None were Ivy League undergraduates, and most came from modest means. William O. Douglas, a Whitman College graduate, traveled to Columbia Law School by tending sheep on a train. In comparison, today’s majority has lived hermetically sealed lives — from law school, to corporate corridors or the Justice Department and onto a Court of Appeals. The Warren Court featured a former U.S. Senator, a former state legislator, a Nuremberg trial prosecutor, an ACLU founder, a former big city mayor and Warren himself, a three-term governor. The current majority calls to mind Texas legend Sam Rayburn’s line about President Kennedy’s so-called best and brightest advisers: “I wish one of them had been elected dog catcher or something.” Elected three times to lead the nation’s most populous state, Earl Warren’s frame of reference, writes Richard Kluger in his monumental work, Simple Justice, had little to do with the disputes over the theoretical application of, say, judicial restraint or anything like today’s “original mean-

ing.” Instead, Warren’s frame of reference came from the “back rooms of police stations, the pressing needs of pensioners, the thirst of arid valleys, the health of bodies and the minds of people.” Warren understood that he had before him a landmark case. Very early on in the deliberations, he realized he already had a 5-4 majority to overturn Plessy. (Chief Justice Roberts would have just called for the vote.) But Warren saw the need for the maximum moral standing: The nation needed a unanimous decision, uncluttered by concurring opinions. Warren needed the Court to speak as one voice. So, ever the politician, Warren held no quick vote. Instead, he gave his colleagues time to discuss, reflect, consider, compromise and even write. They debated the possible political effects of overturning Plessy, considered the unintended consequences, and sought out ways to mitigate both. Can you seriously imagine Justice Antonin Scalia taking the time to reflect on how his Heller decision might affect the country? Did he intend to empower the gun lobby? I doubt it, but that has been the outcome, which could have been predicted and avoided. Did Justice Anthony Kennedy intend for his contrived and arbitrarily expanded Citizens United opinion to bring about an even more “bought and paid for” Congress? His naïveté was breathtaking. Then, of course, there was his “corporations are people” bit of off-the-cuffness. Another old “dog catcher,” former Montana Gov. Brian Schweitzer, came up with the response that will be long remembered: “I’ll believe that corporations are people when I see Texas execute one.”

I

n the end, Warren boiled the question down to its barest essentials — to the fundamental principles at stake. To Warren, original meaning and intent were so much sophistry. “Segregation,” Warren had told his new colleagues, “could be justified only by belief in the inferiority of the Negro; any [justice] who wished to perpetuate the practice ought in candor be willing to acknowledge as much.” After deliberating for an extended period of time, the Court rallied around Warren’s non-hermetically sealed argument for “simple justice.” They gave him — and the nation — the unanimous decision he worked so hard to bring about. There could be no “equal” if there was “separate.” Brown v. Board of Education became the new law of the land in 1954; today, it’s a model for lawmaking we’d do well to follow. n


BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

W

e seem to be stripping our language down to its basics in recent years — in texting, a single letter or numeral can stand in for a word; emotions are articulated via little smiley faces. Our communication is getting more brusque, too; anything can be said in 140 characters or less, according to the rules of the Twitterverse. In our politics, it has become even more boiled down: A single letter can make or break a candidate, often regardless of any personal qualifications or ability. For example, the puzzling political careers of Spokane County Prosecutor Steve Tucker and State Representative Matt Shea only have one explanation, and that is the little “R” that appears next to their name on the ballot whenever they stand for office. It works both ways, too. In Arizona’s heavily Hispanic and Democratic 7th Congressional District, perennial election loser Scott Fistler, a Republican, has decided to switch parties — not because he has changed his views, but because he wants to get that little “D” by his name on yard signs and the ballot. (Fistler took it a tad further, in fact, and also had his name legally changed to “Cesar Chavez.”) Have we become so lazy that our vote can be won by a single keystroke? For those few of us who actually bother to vote, that seems to be the case. (Voter turnout in Kootenai County for last month’s primary election was an embarrassing 22 percent of registered voters.) Here in Spokane County, Bonnie Mager registered to run for a county commissioner seat as an independent, even though she served her previous term as a Democrat. Perhaps that “I” will be enough to overcome Al French’s “R.” (There is a “D” in the race, too, smart justice advocate Mary Lou Johnson.) Never mind that there are actual issues to debate, like growth and economic development; we’ll all be watching to see if Mager is able to put the “I” in WIN. If so, could we see more candidates take that nonpartisan path? That, Mager told KPBX, is her intention — to curb the power of party affiliation and see the county commissioners become nonpartisan officials. If voters refuse to learn about the people who want to lead us, we are complicit in the dumbing down of our democracy. Both political parties thrive on the power of the single letter — in many districts, kingmakers could successfully run a potted plant as long as it had the correct stamp of party approval. That gives the parties all the power, leaving less and less for the citizens.  JEN SORENSON CARTOON

Everything you need for Spring Planting HI

FLORIST AND GREENHOUSE, INC.

NK LO C AL •

AL

SHOP LOC

8th & Perry • (509) 534-9381

L • LI V E LOCA

Quite a Character

•T

COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

We’re quick When you’re sick

Kootenai Urgent Care Hayden • Coeur d’ alene • Post falls

AverAge wAit time is 15 minutes or less visits tAke less thAn An hour experienced physiciAns And nurse prActitioners fAst, professionAl And extremely AffordAble Open 7am-9pm Daily • nO appOintment neeDeD If you have a less than lIfe-threatenIng condItIon, vIsIt one of our three convenIent locatIons In coeur d’alene, Post falls or hayden.

WWW.KOOTENAIURGENTCARE.COM

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | THE ARTS enough support. Or sustained support. Clubs can’t stay open. So if we get so stoked for big events — in both music and visual arts — why do we still feel like we’re living through the continual rise and fall of the music scene? And why is our visual art patronage among the lowest in the nation? It’s in the 37th percentile, guys. That’s embarrassing. At the panel, Leah Sottile, Inlander writer and Volume producer, said music scenes need tons of fans who will go to any show, no matter what: “We have about 10 of those people in ours.” In our food scene, there are hundreds of those people. They’re the reason Wisconsinburger was packed out the moment they opened, and why, just weeks later, Nudo experienced the same, leading Nudo owner Josh Hissong to immediately lease out the old Wojo Works space for a new burger concept. Our tribe of foodies are the reason Adam Hegsted was able to open two restauCALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION rants just feet from each other in Kendall Yards only a few months apart. But hey! Our art scene has hundreds of people who turn out on First Friday, too. The difference there is that, rather than engaging artists by buying art, the majority of First Friday-goers just skulk around skimming the Costco cheese plates and drinking table wine by the Solo cupful. They’re patronizing the arts, but not supporting them. It’s an important distinction. It doesn’t take a genius to understand We are a town that has learned how to why one scene is thriving, one is a decadesget stoked, and that’s very, very important. old roller coaster, and the third is absolutely Sheer stoke helped Terrain balloon in the dumps. from nothing to hosting more There’s never one simple soluthan 5,500 people in less than four Send comments to tion to the problems of complex years. (Disclosure: I’m a founder editor@inlander.com. ecosystems, but there’s one thing of that event.) It helped Elkfest we can all immediately do to help become a monolith that other make more weekends feel like summer events plan around. And Volume. Volume weekend. Damn. We should feel proud of ourselves. If you love something, show up as often We showed our best self last weekend. as you possibly can — bring a friend — and But sometimes we don’t show up at all. then shell out. n Earlier on Saturday, at the State of the Music Scene panel discussion, everyone Luke Baumgarten, a creative strategist at seemed to lament the lack of a steady, buildSeven2 and former culture editor of the ing force in the scene. Whatever enthusiasm Inlander, is a co-founder of Terrain and we create seems to dissipate. There’s not the founder of Fellow Coworking.

A Tale of Three Scenes

People were stoked at Volume, the Inlander’s music festival — but getting stoked simply isn’t enough BY LUKE BAUMGARTEN

S

pokane knows how to party. We know how to get excited and then turn out in droves. Volume, the Inlander’s two-day music festival, was a master class in how to show up, and a brochure-worthy moment for Visit Spokane to advertise our town to young, cool people. On Saturday, an organizer told me a Volume band that had recently moved to Seattle from the Bay Area was wondering if they should have caught a connecting flight east. “They’re actually thinking about moving here from Seattle,” he told me.

ON INLANDER.COM

“When does it become politically correct to address the connections between racism, sexism and violence in the white community?”

— RACHEL DOLEZAL

“Congress may be dysfunctional right now, but hope and history lead us to believe it will return to a working body someday.” — MARY LOU REED

LETTERS

“What I hope the #YesAllWomen campaign can continue to show men is how commonplace many of Elliot Rodger’s remarks really were.” — TAYLOR WEECH

REPRESENTATION IN DEPUY & STRYKER HIP IMPLANT CASES PERSONAL INJURY AND MEDICAL LAWSUITS INCLUDING: DePuy & Stryker (Hip Implant Cases) AndroGel claims

Richard E. Lewis ATTORNEY AT LAW

2208 W. 2ND AVE. SPOKANE | 509-413-1278 | RICHARDLEWISLAW.COM

8 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

HUGE BLOWOUT SALE JUNE 5th - 20th

 JEWELRY

GALORE!  10-50% OFF STOREWIDE!  309 W. 2nd • Open Mon-Sat 10-6 • 509.838.4590


JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 9


An “owie” isn’t convenient. But we are.

Urgent care. For you.

When you have a medical need that requires immediate care, we’re here

Argonne: 2713 Argonne Road Downtown: 400 E. 5th Avenue Liberty Lake: 1431 N. Liberty Lake Road, Suite B North: 9001 N. Country Homes Boulevard South Hill: 3016 E. 57th, Suite 24 Valley: 14408 E. Sprague Avenue

for you with extended evening and weekend hours. You can count on our experienced medical team for everything from sprains and cuts to earaches and the flu. We accept most major insurance plans. Walk-ins welcome. Choose Rockwood for your urgent care needs.

Hours: Weekdays, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Weekends, 8 a.m.- 4 p.m.

10 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014 76593_ROCK_Urgent_9_83x11c.indd 1

4/30/14 2:25 PM


COMMENT | FROM READERS

What do you think will happen now that Seattle approved a $15 minimum wage?

DUSTIN MATTHEWS: I’ll be movin’ to Seattle to flip burgers and ask customers if they want to add fries. CHARLES GREER: It will quickly become the most expensive city to visit in the country. The money doesn’t grow on trees, it has to come from somewhere. ALEXA LOHMEYER: I think companies will cut workers and hours, or raise prices. The fast food industry was built to be fast and cheap, not to be a career-maker for people who didn’t want to further themselves with education/experience in a particular field. Those jobs should be a motivation to do better in life, not to stay where you are. EARL VERNON: Fast food industry was built on tax subsidies because their workers have to go on public assistance to survive. Let the corporations pay their own way. … Factor in inflation the minimum wage should be $18.80 an hour. They asked for too little. JEREMY SEATON: Everyone will be making more money, companies will charge more money, people will spend more money. People will be exactly where we are now. Nothing will happen except bigger math. DOUG NICOL: I think a bunch of people will make $15 an hour. For three hours a day. NICOLE LIVINGSTON: I think we are going to see the dollar menu change to the five-dollar menu. JOEL OSBORNE: Wait, won’t these folks then have more money to spend? Won’t it be pumped directly back into the local economy? Huh?!? That sounds pretty good. MELISSA DOBEAS: People will almost be able to afford to live in Seattle. … “The cost of living will go up!” No, it’s already “up,” that’s why this raise needs to happen. CHUCK LAIL: It screws the blue collar guy or poor office drones making $18 to $24 per hour ’cause now they’re gonna have to cover the inflation, and better hope they change some laws for restaurants or it could cause a run on closures. JORDAN BALLINGER: A few workers may get raises but the least skilled workers will be forcibly unemployed. Unless they increase their marketability they won’t ever work or get that first job. 

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 11


EVERYTHING ELSE

IS JUST DIRT. SERVING SPOKANE SINCE 1942 SPECIALIZING IN LANDSCAPE MATERIALS FOR HOME AND COMMERCIAL LANDSCAPES

NORTH SIDE 8721 N Fairview Rd 467-0685

NORTH IDAHO Ponderay Garden Center 208-255-4200

VALLEY 19215 E Broadway 893-3521

landscapeandgarden.com

#1 Best Read Local Magazine

for Women in the Inland Northwest

INHealth

InHealth is read by more adult

Get your copy at hospitals, medical offices & select Inlander rack locations.

• FREE D NORTHWEST G IN THE INLAN HEALTHY LIVIN

e of

on le is

4

n Missio e Tutt

therin

Dr. Ka

ls on

loca

a

to

l a e H PAGE 15

rs Birth Fea for Baby Prepping

27

4 J U N E-J U LY, 2 0 1

g Teas Tantaliazin Healthy Brew Creating

THE INLANDER SUPPLEMENT TO

36

Always Online!

5/28/14 12:19 PM

CVR.indd 1

On the New

Inlander.com

Local stories on topics important to you: parenting, health trends, super foods and much more!

/InHealthNW 12 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

For Advertising Information please contact sales@inlander.com, phone ext. 215

women than any other locally produced magazine.* *The 2013 Media Audit

On Stands Now


I

t’s lunchtime, but Bailey Hicks, a Rogers High School freshman in a baggy San Diego Chargers sweatshirt, isn’t in the cafeteria. Instead, he’s in a classroom, thumbing through Romeo and Juliet as an intervention specialist helps him translate passages from iambic pentameter into modern English. There’s just over a week of school left, but Hicks has been fighting to get his grades up in Biology and English. His goal isn’t just to avoid summer school, it’s to eventually go to college. “I want to go to Whitworth,” Hicks says. “My family believes that I couldn’t go there, and I want to prove them wrong.” At one time at Rogers, kids like Hicks may have fallen through the cracks. But in the fall of 2011, everything changed. Today, the school day runs 30 minutes longer. The extra halfhour became a mandatory third-period study hall called “ROW time” (Responsibility, Ownership, Willingness). Students finish homework, retake tests and get one-onone tutoring. On top of that, intervention teachers use the school’s data dashboard to find students with missing assignments and summon them to an extended ROW classroom to work through lunch. The students around Hicks are hammering away at math retakes, persuasive essays, world history assignments, dialectical journals and papers on Antigone and To Kill a Mockingbird. Rogers’ $3.7 million federally funded grant made this possible. It’s allowed Rogers to extend its school year by two days, and given the school more administrators, counselors and specialists. The goal of the 2011 School Improvement Grant was ambiSend comments to tious: Take a school where only editor@inlander.com. half of the students graduated, and somehow bring that rate all the way up to 85 percent. “At the time, we were one of the bottom 5 percent schools in the state of Washington,” Rogers Principal Lori Wyborney says. “Totally failing.” Today, fights are down, Fs are down and attendance is up. More students are taking Advanced Placement classes, while math standardized test scores have soared. Thanks to a literacy program, three times as many books are being checked out from the Rogers library. The graduation rate? Eighty-six percent, on par with high schools in much more affluent neighborhoods. Yet the grant’s initial three-year term ends in only a few days. Spokane Public Schools’ preliminary budget sends $280,000 toward Rogers to keep the extra half hour of class time and a few teacher-administrators, but Rogers stands to lose its two-day head start and several staff positions. There’s $1.3 million to $1.7 million left in the state’s pool — funds that Rogers can apply for in order to get a one-year extension — but they’ll be competing with up to nine other schools. Wyborney isn’t worried, though: The school and the district are looking ahead, not only to raise test scores and graduation rates even higher, but to help kids long before they even step foot in Rogers’ halls. “Our goal is to be in the 90s,” Wyborney says of graduation rates. “We’re not there yet, but we’ll get there.”

LETTERS

EDUCATION

The Great Rogers Experiment

With the help of millions of federal dollars, Rogers High School sent its graduation rate soaring — but with its grant ending, what happens next? BY DANIEL WALTERS Rogers High School teacher George Roth assists sophomore Taylour Freeland with her social studies assignment during “ROW time,” a 30-minute study hall made possibly by a $3.7 million federal grant. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

BUY-IN

Intervention specialist Barb Silvey understands where her students come from. She’s lived there. She graduated from Rogers nearly 40 years ago, and like many she teaches, grew up in economically depressed Hillyard. She knows all about poverty, eviction and family strife. “My mom was an alcoholic with a capital A,” Silvey says. Of Spokane’s high schools, Rogers has the highest rate of low-income students — three out of every four ...continued on next page

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 13


NEWS | EDUCATION “THE GREAT ROGERS EXPERIMENT,” CONTINUED... qualify for free or reduced lunch — special education students, and students without English as a primary language. The impact on education is profound. “When we say, ‘Go home and do your homework,’ sometimes there aren’t any light bulbs [at home],” Silvey says. As a 30-year veteran of Rogers, she’s seen countless experiments to fix the school: pooling high-risk students into the same classrooms, grouping kids by career path, even dividing the school into separate, smaller schools. But she says none of it worked. When Wyborney became principal in 2010, everything changed. “She’s pretty magical,” Silvey says. “She has galvanized the staff, to all get on the dang boat and go in the same direction.” Silvey says Wyborney had a no-nonsense style that told teachers she had their backs. Graduation rates took off even before Rogers got the grant. Some of that can be attributed to improved accounting and transfer tracking mea-

“They’re not just numbers, now. They’re kids. And they’re not just any kids. They’re our kids.”

FREE Teeth Whitening

($300 value)

AND

Certificate 100 Gift

$

– Toward Future Services –

509.624.4311 Sedation ... entistry Dwith 2806Patient S. Grand Blvd.X-rays • Spokane, WA purchase of New Exam, & Cleaning www.grandesmilesdentistry.com call today! 14 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

sures at the state and district level, but Silvey also credits Wyborney’s refusal regarding any doubts from teachers about whether their students could succeed. This is the last week of school for seniors, Silvey says, and counselors and teachers are still pushing for seniors with five Fs to find a way to graduate. “They’re not just numbers, now. They’re kids,” Silvey says. “And they’re not just any kids. They’re our kids.” They can tell. Junior Robert Rucker, like plenty of his peers, dismisses ROW time, saying kids waste it chatting and texting. But he knows his teachers care about him and support him. “Everybody has the same goals for each individual student: to graduate on time,” Rucker says. “They’re not going to give up on you.” Rogers continues to experiment: Special ed students have been moved to mainstream classes, and out-of-school suspensions have increasingly been traded for in-school suspensions. Suspensions are down 40 percent this year, and the school has partnered with Youth For Christ to give suspended students a place to go. For all the changes, investment and inspiration, one important measure has barely budged: reading and writing standardized test pass rates hover, stubbornly, in the 70th percentile. “You don’t survive in the world without [reading and writing],” Wyborney says. “You can’t even drive a damn car without that.” That’s the next focus. Inspired by the runaway success of Brockton High School in Massachusetts, Rogers plans to infuse reading and writing into nearly every subject next year. In trigonometry class, for example, students

Principal Lori Wyborney is proud of how far Rogers has come, but believes considerable work remains. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO may write essays about mathematicians from the 1600s. Yet any literacy efforts start with a handicap: Some Rogers freshmen enter reading at a thirdor fourth-grade level. Academic failure, in other words, starts far upstream, at the elementary and middle school tributaries that feed into Rogers. “I think the answer to the ninth grade actually lies in the seventh grade,” Wyborney says.

STARTING IN THE MIDDLE

Just a few blocks away from Rogers, city leaders and district administrators gathered in the Garry Middle School library last month for an announcement: Eight local businesses and foundations had pooled $400,000 to fund the Hillyard Youth Collaborative, made up of Spokane Public Schools, Gonzaga University, Washington State University, Communities in Schools, and the Boys and Girls Club of Spokane County. The group aims to find the 200 Garry and Shaw seventh-graders most in danger of never graduating and give them tailor-made interventions. Even in middle school, students flash warning signs — a few days missed at school, an F in a single class — that they’ll someday drop out. “I think we’ve been waiting too long [to intervene],” Superintendent Shelley Redinger says. With the help of this grant, a case manager at the school could identify a student at Shaw, for example, with a serious attendance problem. “We know that mentorship has an impact on attendance,” says John Traynor, a Gonzaga education professor and co-author of the grant. “That student could be lined up with a Gonzaga mentor. That Gonzaga student could be checking in with that [Shaw] student, to determine, ‘Are you going to school? What’s keeping you from school?’” That mentor, he says, could connect the kid with the afterschool or weekend Boys and Girls Club program, and keep in touch with her when she enters high school. At the elementary schools that feed into Shaw and Garry, teachers already are talking about getting involved as well. To Wyborney, that’s the ultimate secret for schools: Early on, learn about students and their families, pile on support and keep at it for the next 12 years. “We can keep putting gum in the dam,” Wyborney says. “But we need to stop the water.” n danielw@inlander.com


NEWS | MARIJUANA

Pot Labs The next hurdle: finding labs to test all that pot BY HEIDI GROOVER

W

hen customers line up for Washington’s new marijuana market this summer, they’ll find products, from bud to brownies, labeled with weights and safety warnings. Behind the counter, a whole other set of information will be available to them: independent lab results spelling out each product’s potency and whether it may have any remnants of pesticides or bacteria like E. coli and salmonella. The state will require all growers and processors to submit samples for testing before they’re allowed to sell to stores. (Colorado is slowly phasing in similar rules, beginning mandatory testing of edibles last month.) With about 50 growers and processors operating in the state and less than a month until the first stores may be licensed, the race is on to certify these third-party labs. Marijuana testing labs have already been analyzing products for medical marijuana growers in some parts of Washington, but they’ll be subject to a whole new set of rules to serve the recreational market. The Washington State Liquor Control Board’s regulations spell out education requirements for lab directors and prohibit them from having a financial stake in growers or processors. A team from Pasco’s Columbia Basin College will verify their methods and equipment. “More testing facilities are a good thing,” says LCB spokesman Mikhail Carpenter, so the state will enforce no limit on how many labs can operate. “It’s another facet of this business.” Last week, Seattle-based lab Analytical 360 became the first to be state-certified to test cannabis for the recreational market. It’s another illustration of the west side’s dominance in the marijuana industry. As Analytical 360 and other labs have built businesses testing medical marijuana, there hasn’t been a similar lab in Eastern Washington. Since it’s illegal to ship marijuana through the Send comments to federal mail system, that has forced medical editor@inlander.com. growers and lab technicians to drive samples back and forth across the state. Soon, the drive may get a little shorter. This month, Analytical 360 will begin testing samples at a second lab location in Yakima. The location is a paradox: Both the city and county of Yakima have banned recreational marijuana grows and stores, but it’s also the “agricultural mecca of Washington state,” says Analytical 360 founder Ed Stremlow, who thinks that means it’ll play a big role in the future of the marijuana industry. In the beginning, most marijuana grows are likely to remain indoors, a technique that allows for more precision in growing but is more expensive than growing outside. As cannabis is normalized, Stremlow sees a future where outdoor grows become more common, and central and Eastern Washington could become the industry’s new epicenter. “There’s one thing that Eastern Washington has an advantage of and that’s sunlight, so we see a paradigm shift over the years to Eastern Washington opening up more and more to cannabis cultivation,” Stremlow says. “We want to be right where we think that’s going to be at.” Inside Analytical 360, lab technicians start with a visual assessment of the pot sample, looking for size and development. Then they run the sample through a battery of tests, analyzing potency and checking for moisture content, bacteria and chemicals left over from processing. The company then posts the results online. It’s all part of an effort to give customers peace of mind about what they’re getting for their money and their needs. “We have this boutique market in Washington,” he says. “You see at it at Pike Place Market and you see it in marijuana, too. … [Testing] has created a very competitive market. People take what they do very seriously here, and everyone wants to be the best.”  heidig@inlander.com

LETTERS

YOUR LUCK JUST DOUBLED. IT’S DOUBLE Q CASH. USE YOUR CAMAS CARD WHEN PLAYING YOUR FAVORITE SLOTS AS USUAL. EVERY COUPLE OF MINUTES, WE’LL RANDOMLY GIVE ONE LUCKY PLAYER $5 TO $500 ON THE HOUSE.

400 DAILY WINNERS. WIN $5 TO $500. SEE CAMAS CLUB FOR DETAILS.

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

PHOTO EYE EYES ON THE SKY

The Big News of the Past Week

1.

After nearly five years in captivity, U.S. Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl of Hailey, Idaho, was freed by the Taliban in exchange for the release of five detainees from the Guantanamo Bay detention camp.

2.

The Seattle City Council unanimously approved a $15 local minimum wage — the highest in the nation — which will gradually phase in over the next three to seven years.

3.

Lawyers for former Spokane police officer Karl Thompson argued for a retrial in federal appellate court on Monday. Thompson is serving a four-year prison sentence for his role in the 2006 beating death of Otto Zehm.

4.

A miner was killed in an accident at the Sunshine Mine near Kellogg, Idaho, on Monday. The mine is currently in the process of reopening for silver production.

5.

Officials believe six missing Mount Rainier climbers fell more than 3,000 feet to their deaths in the worst disaster on the mountain in nearly 33 years.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

George Laplace points to passing U.S. Air Force Thunderbirds Air Demonstration Squadron F-16s as his 8-year-old daughter, Celeste, watches. SkyFest returned to Fairchild Air Force Base last weekend after a four-year absence due to budget cuts, and thousands turned out to see aircraft including a B-1B bomber and V-22 Osprey and demonstrations by the Army’s Golden Knights and the Air Force’s Thunderbirds. Find more photos at Inlander.com.

DIGITS

5

The number of days a teenager will spend in jail after pleading guilty to assaulting a man outside the Steam Plant restaurant in January. The victim, Bruce Palmer, called the sentence “a miscarriage of justice.”

300,000

$

The legal fees attorneys are asking Spokane Superior Court to pay for Gail Gerlach’s defense. In April, Gerlach was found not guilty of fatally shooting a man attempting to steal his car.

Friday July 4th 2014 at 10:00 am

5k Pennant Run 1k Kids Run Little Sluggers Dash Sign-Up Today

Presented By M E X I C A N

16 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

R E S T A U R A N T S

PEPSI_H1_2C_NB

PANTONE 2945

PANTONE 185

ON INLANDER.com What’s Creating Buzz

PHOTOS: Visit the blog for even more photos from Volume (see page 62) and from SkyFest at Fairchild Air Force Base. NEWS: Read the 2012 report about delays at Spokane’s VA hospital and hear from a hospital official about its progress toward addressing those concerns. SUMMER CAMPS: Find our massive list of local kids’ camps, including new additions since the issue came out, at inlander.com/summercamps.

benefiting

Home Plate!


NEWS | BRIEFS

Feed the Kids Spokane considers free lunch for everyone; plus, the U.S. House changes its tune on cannabis SUPPORT THE SOLDIERS

As Veterans Affairs weathers national outrage over treatment delays, the MANN-GRANDSTAFF VA MEDICAL CENTER in Spokane has faced renewed scrutiny over 2012 findings on waiting periods and “adverse” care outcomes. VA officials say the Spokane center has addressed those issues and adheres to national guidelines. Investigators with the VA Office of Inspector General reviewed local care practices in 2012, examining records and interviewing VA staff. They found routine confusion or miscommunication led to improper delay or cancellation of some specialized consultation services. “Delays in care did result in the adverse patient outcome of increased or unrelieved pain or an exacerbation of symptoms,” the report found in seven of 15 cases reviewed. Spokane VA spokesman Bret Bowers recently addressed the findings via email, explaining the center strives to operate based on national guidelines for timely patient care within 30 days. Officials also updated policies and training following the 2012 findings. Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki resigned Friday amid national outcry over veteran deaths tied to care delays. Inspector General investigators mentioned the 2012 Spokane findings in a report released last week on

significant scheduling manipulations at the VA hospital in Phoenix. The director of the Arizona facility previously oversaw the Spokane VA center from 2008 to 2010. — JACOB JONES

A FREE LUNCH

Learning isn’t easy when your stomach is rumbling. That’s why the federally funded National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program exists to give free or reduced-price school lunches and breakfasts to kids from low-income families. But since free lunch is associated with poverty, it can carry a stigma. “I know a lot of kids that don’t even eat at lunch because of that,” says Danny Postlewait, a student sitting at a cafeteria table at Rogers High School. There may be a solution. This fall, the “Community Eligibility Provision” of the HEALTHY, HUNGERFREE KIDS ACT goes into effect in Washington state, making it easier for schools to offer free meals to every student regardless of income. About 4,000 schools nationwide already use it, and Spokane Public Schools is considering joining them. Any school with at least 62.5 percent of its students identified as “low-income” will have its meal program

completely compensated with federal funds. Spokane Public Schools plans to consider allowing schools with 50 percent or higher low-income students to be a part of the CEP group. The district predicts quicker serving times, shorter lunch lines, less paperwork and, most importantly, fewer students who go hungry. But there’s a catch. Poverty rates, gathered from meal applications from parents who want free or reduced lunches for their kids, are currently used for a slew of grants, federal funds and scholarships. CEP doesn’t allow schools to continue taking meal applications.Instead, Spokane Public Schools has designed a “Family Economic Survey” to gather that information. The question, however, is how many parents will complete those surveys if lunch is already free. — DANIEL WALTERS

PROTECTING POT?

In a historic move last week, the Republican-dominated U.S. House of Representatives voted to prevent the federal government from interfering with state MEDICAL MARIJUANA markets. The move was an amendment to a bill funding several federal agencies, including the Department of Justice, and must still be approved by the Senate and signed by President Barack Obama. Washington is one of more than 20 states with legal medical marijuana and one of two with legal recreational pot. The state’s six Democratic representatives and one Republican — Doc Hastings, who represents a strip of central Washington that includes Yakima — supported the amendment. Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers (R) and both of Idaho’s representatives voted no. In his closing remarks, California Republican Dana Rohrabacher, who introduced the amendment, told the House, “State governments have recognized that a doctor has a right to treat his patient any way he sees fit.” — HEIDI GROOVER

888.201.1037 JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 17


NEWS | POLICE

A Fresh Look The family of a man killed by police makes the first request for an independent review BY JACOB JONES

S

plintered bullet holes still riddle the front of the Nine Mile Falls house where Lorinda Fernandez’s son died last year in a volley of police gunfire. Justin Cairns, a troubled 21-year-old with a love of family and an admitted meth addiction, had fled to the rural home in the early darkness of May 16, 2013, when Spokane Police officers crept up, tactical rifles at the ready. “He was a very kindhearted kid and always put other people before himself,” Fernandez says. “Very involved with outdoor things. He loved to snowboard and tube and motorcycle ride, a very fun person to be around.” Investigators had sought Cairns in connection with a fatal shooting from earlier in the morning, the killing of 33-year-old Cyrus Jones. Witnesses reported seeing Cairns’ truck strike Jones and speed away into the night. Officers traced the vehicle registration to a home 14 miles outside the city. SPD officers first spotted Cairns in the backyard of his grandparents’ house on West Charles Road shortly before 2 am. Police reports say he appeared confused and

What will you build?

ran around the front of the house, where three officers confronted him with tactical rifles and ordered him to the ground. Within moments, officers opened fire. Records show at least five .223 rounds struck Cairns while others drilled into the home, shattering glass and perforating bedroom walls. Cairns, unarmed save a cellphone, died at the scene while his younger brother watched from a nearby window. In the nearly 13 months since the shooting, the Spokane County Prosecutor’s Office has cleared officers of criminal wrongdoing, but the family still struggles with painful questions. Fernandez has now taken those concerns to the Office of the Police Ombudsman, filing the first request for an independent investigation under the newly established police oversight authority of Proposition 1. “Our hopes with this is to get answers of what happened,” she says, “and … to hopefully prevent things like this from happening in the future.”

F

ollowing the long, contentious effort to implement Prop. 1, the Cairns case will serve as the first test of the new ombudsman investigative process. The family does not seek to impose legal liability or officer discipline, but asks for an independent assessment of the event and any policy recommendations for improving SPD guidelines on the use of deadly force. “We are especially concerned,” the request states, “that yet another unarmed person with mental health/ substance abuse issues that was known to the police was shot and killed.” With the help of attorney Breean Beggs, the Cairns family has outlined specific questions for the ombudsman’s investigation, asking for “more probable than

not” conclusions. They ask for a clarification regarding whether officers had legal authority to enter the property, and if Cairns likely made any threatening gestures toward officers. Maybe the biggest question, Beggs notes, is whether officers can use deadly force when a suspect appears to be reaching for something, but he or she has not yet displayed any weapon. “It’s important to hear from an independent observer,” Beggs says. “What are the policies and procedures that would prevent a death in the future?” Spokane Police Ombudsman Tim Burns says he agrees the case poses many important questions. He confirms he has accepted the request, and plans to move forward on preliminary legal consultations while he waits for the police department to finalize its administrative review of the incident. “The requestors will have answers to questions that clearly aren’t traditionally addressed by a criminal review or an administrative Justin Cairns review,” Burns says. “To me, this is a very important component of what the [ombudsman’s] office exists for, frankly.” A second request has since been filed by the family of 40-year-old Danny Jones, who was fatally shot by Spokane Police outside the Salvation Army shelter last August. His family’s attorney, Mark Harris, explains that

BETH EARNED BETH EARNED HER HER

degree degree

IN OUR EVENING IN OUR EVENING PROGRAM. PROGRAM.

When Beth Vercic-Scott THEN EARNEDwanted A to add a new chapter to

PROMOTION. THEN EARNED A

her career, she enrolled in Whitworth’s evening program to earn

PROMOTION.

her B.A. Beth in Organizational When Vercic-ScottManagement. wanted to add a new chapter to her enrolled in Whitworth’s program to earn “I career, wouldn’tshe be in my current position as evening a physician her B.A. Organizational “I wouldn’t be in recruiter atin Rockwood Health Management. Systems without my

VOLUNTEER

TODAY! Check out why we build & why you should too. Sign up at:

Habitat-Spokane.org

509.534.2552

my current position as a physician recruiter at Rockwood Whitworth bachelor’s degree,” Beth says. With a Health Systems without my Whitworth bachelor’s degree,” convenient evening schedule that let her continue to Beth says. With a convenient evening schedule that let her work during the day, it was a perfect way for Beth to continue to work during the day, it was a perfect way take next it your the time next to step? forthe Beth to step. take Is the next time step.toIstake it your Contact us today. take the next step? Contact us today. Hear Beth’s story at whitworth.edu/evening

Apply now. Visit whitworth.edu/evening or call 509.777.3222.

18 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

Beth Vercic-Scott


the request raises similar questions regarding the proper use of force and also asks for potential policy recommendations. Burns says he hopes to launch formal investigations by August. Between now and then, he plans to coordinate the staffing and funding necessary to conduct the investigations. He says he expects strong support from city officials, but acknowledges his office will be working through “uncharted territory.” “[But] I don’t think we could have had two better requests,” Burns notes. “Not only are they fair, but they’re reasonable. … We have an obligation and we will call them the way we see them based on the investigation.”

B

oth Burns and Beggs expressed frustrations with the long process to review high-profile police shootings. More than a year later, families and officers often still face questions and inquiries into what happened. It holds up lives, and for the ombudsman, it holds up how quickly he may launch new independent investigations. The call for independent police oversight goes back years, more recently rooted in the death of Otto Zehm in 2006. Advocates have fought hard for this new investigative process, and Beggs says he looks forward to seeing the results, even if he does not always agree with the final findings. “The day [Burns] actually starts the investigation,” Beggs says, “that will be a huge milestone — that will be a milestone seven years in the making.” While the family has replaced shattered windows, the bullet holes have lingered as a painful daily reminder. Cairns’ mother says the family marked one year since his death with a picnic by his graveside. Fernandez still attends counseling as she tries to cope with her son’s absence. “What I’ve noticed since he’s been gone is he was the glue at a lot of family functions,” she says. “He just brought people together.”  jacobj@inlander.com

EVERYBODY NEEDS ONE!

BRING YOUR POKER FACE Open Daily 10 am

Daily Tournament 11 am

A flat surface for transporting all those things you don’t want to spill! Perfect for gifts for any occasion!

Evening Tournaments Sunday - Thursday 6:30 pm

Bring this ad in for 20% OFF! “The Passenger Seat Companion”

“Innovations for Your Convenience!”

• Creates a flat surface & keeps your cargo level • Contoured to fit your passenger seat • Available in 7 colors • Custom colors & features available upon request This number works now!

DarinHouseEnt.com • 509.279.2585

Worley, Idaho | 1 800 523-2464 CDACASINO.COM

1028 W. Rosewood #100-C Spokane WA

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 19


Summer fashion as imagined by f ive distinctive Spokane clothing designers stories By Laura Johnson photos by young kwak

A place under the sun The basement: It’s the perfect out-of-theway retreat where leftover sewing material — bits of cloth, needles, pins and unfinished work — can spill out without much notice. While the five local designers featured in this issue represent a broad spectrum of the current scene (yes, there is a scene), all of them, it turns out, create their work in basements. Darkness may be where their creativity emerges, but light can be seen in all of their clothes. Some of the designers use recycled fabrics or upcycle jeans, but for the most part, all of these designs are original works. Over the next pages, these very wearable clothes step out into the brightness of day, welcoming summer.

20 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014


Clothing and accessories (except rings) by Timbre Wolf Models from left: Ashley Hiatt, Emily Erickson, Alaska Mauve

the scientist Timbre Wolf has a mind for numbers and an eye for clean lines When you’re in Timbre Wolf’s home basement office space, chances are you’re going to touch something she’s made. “That chair you’re sitting in, I reupholstered that,” Wolf points to a burgundy armchair in her parents’ Spokane house. She’s constantly working with her hands antiquing furniture, crafting jewelry, sewing clothes and school bags and crocheting multihued knit hats. She’s always working out math problems, too; an intricate equation is scrawled out on a whiteboard on the wall behind her as she shows her designs. A junior physics major at Eastern Washington University, her knack for precision with numbers translates well into creating masterful clothes. Her zippers, pleats, darts, waistlines and hems are immaculate — all without ever using a sewing pattern. Before Wolf was tall enough to reach a lab room table, she wanted to be a scientist, but when a middle school friend saw her doodling clothing designs in a notebook, she was encouraged to actually make them. Already equipped with sewing and crocheting skills her grandma taught her, she began just making clothes for herself. As others became interested in her products, she realized she could turn it into a business, starting Timbre Wolf Designs a few years ago. Especially inspired by Japanese culture and British fashion magazines, Wolf says she wants her clothes to be cutesy and loose. “I don’t want to make clothes that can only be worn on a special occasion,” she says. “I want my customers to wear these things on a daily basis, for them to be functional.” Scanning through her roster of ready-towear items, there are many cotton, gauzy, flowing fabrics, most of which come from Jo-Ann Fabrics or consignment finds. Along with those are skirts made with moon and space prints. Wolf, who has a DNA strand tattoo on one arm and planets inked on the other, says she wants to bridge the gap between geek and chic with her clothing and accessories, which she’s proved showing her funky designs at various fashion shows in town. As of late, Wolf hasn’t had as much time to make clothes as she’d like (although she did sell out her inventory of crocheted hats during the winter months). When summer break hits, she plans to get back into making a couple of items a week. “The fashion business is a lot harder to break into than science,” Wolf says. “But if I can do both, that would be ideal.” 

ONLINE

See a behind-thescenes video of the fashion shoot and more photos at Inlander.com.

WHERE TO BUY facebook.com/Timbrewolfdesigns etsy.com/shop/TimbreWolfDesigns

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 21


Clothing (all but jean shorts) and jewelry by Gianna Morrill Models, clockwise from bottom left: Reiley Weyand, Amber Logsdon, Bethanie Bushnell


the dreamer Gianna Morrill says Spokane has more fashion imagination than it lets on

With her Kuriio label, Gianna Morril makes fashion for weird people; she unabashedly admits that. “In my experience, I’m not normal,” says Morrill on a sunny day in the basement studio of her home last month. “I have purple hair and tattoos and piercings, and the people who flock towards my clothing are the alternative crowd.” But that’s changing. Especially since she’s no longer making her signature fairy dress as much as she once did. “Those dresses are my first love,” she says. When she started out, Morrill, now 23, only made short dresses decorated with dozens of frilly fabric pieces layered around the bottom of the skirt — something Tinkerbell might wear. Although they sold well, Morrill says the style became too expected of her; she wasn’t growing as a designer. She still has clients who will come to her specifically for fairy dresses, but these days she’s focusing on more simple clothing that isn’t so over the top. Morrill began on the sewing machine at 16, and by the tail end of high school, she started the Kuriio label with the tag line “Uncommon ideas.” For a while she even decided to do fashion full time. But when it got to the point last year where she was creating just to sell, she knew it was time for a break. In just the past month, she’s gotten back into designing. From the beginning, she’s always created with used fabrics. “Fabric is expensive, and there’s an element of recycling and reusing what’s already been made that I really like,” Morrill says. “When I get it secondhand, it drives down the cost of my designs and makes them more one of a kind.” That free-spirited vibe is still apparent in her new apparel and jewelry. She says that her clothing isn’t something people would wear to work — instead, they’re items to show off at the park or a music festival. “My idea is simple lines, but rough around the edge,” Morrill says. “I don’t want a piece to look like it came from the store.” 

Your numbers to better health or more hours of sleep or more fruits & vegetables hours or less recreational screen time hour or more of physical activity sugary drinks, more water & low fat milk

Made possible with funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

stepupandgo.org

WHERE TO BUY facebook.com/kuriio etsy.com/shop/Kuriio Instagram: username Kuriio

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 23


Clothing and accessories (cuffs, necklaces and hat) by Lynne Blackwood Models from left: Sarah Buchanan, Brynne Gadbury, Gigi Spott

Photo by Young Kwak Clothing and accessories (except rings) by Timbre Wolf Models are Alaska Mauve (White dress), Emily Erickson (lace shorts), Ashley Hiatt (blue dress).


the romantic Lynne Blackwood creates that Bohemian chic look for all ages Lace, lace and more lace. Lynne Blackwood wore lace long before Kate Middleton married Prince William in a trendsetting lace-sleeved dress. But it wasn’t until her own wedding two years ago that the idea to make clothes out of the delicate material was born. It was her second wedding, and she found buying a dress, as a woman over 50, impossible. “Just try to find something to get married in that doesn’t look like it’s made for an 18-year-old or the mother of the bride,” says Blackwood, sitting inside the Glamarita boutique where her work is sold. Living in Sandpoint, she discovered some old lace tablecloths at a secondhand store and promptly brought them home. She loved the look of the fabric so much, she didn’t just sew one dress, instead making three. After moving to Spokane, she couldn’t stop. “My sensibility has always been bohemian romantic; it’s always spoken to me,” Blackwood says of her designs. “If Betsey Johnson and Stevie Nicks had a baby, it would be me.” The inspiration for Blackwood’s loose, summery, hippie-vibe clothes comes to her as if in a vision. “I go out and I buy materials from wherever, and I put ’em in my sewing room and I don’t do anything with them until — this will sound hokey as hell — a picture of the finished garment will come to my head,” says the shorted-haired platinum blonde. “So in my head I have this tablecloth, and then all of a sudden a picture comes, and I go downstairs and make it.” If she tries to make something just because she has some downtime, it never turns out well. Instead, she just waits for the motivation to come. Now a commercial interior designer, she’s been crafting clothes all of her life, first learning from her mother, then taking sewing class in junior high. Later as a theater major at Washington State University, she learned how to make costumes for shows. That skill would supplement her income when acting work was hard to come by. These days she’s always out at thrift stores or consignment shops searching for lacy fabrics to take back to her home basement workshop. “Let’s just say I don’t go to the grocery store unless there’s a Goodwill between home and there,” she says.  WHERE TO BUY Glamarita Clothing & Designs, 911½ W. Garland facebook.com/BlackwoodArt

19th Annual

NOV. 8-9, 2014

8 STAGES AND OVER 100 PREFORMERS!

MUSICIANS, DANCERS, STORYTELLERS, CRAFTERS NEEDED

For the 19th Annual Fall Folk Festival November 8-9, 2014 | Spokane Community College

Applications Now Available Online

spokanefolkfestival.org Due July 1 Participants

should reflect the mission of the festival and the Folklore Society -- to promote a broader community awareness of cultural and folk traditions.

(509)-828-3686

R ELY O N O U R E XPERTS TO G E T IT DO N E RI G HT We ’ ve g o t i n d u s t r y l e a d i n g ex p e r i e n c e a n d q u a l i t y h o m e f u r n i s h i n g s to b a c k u s .

ONLINE

See a behind-thescenes video of the fashion shoot and more photos at Inlander.com.

1 7 2 7 E S P R AG U E AV E S P O K A N E , WA T. 5 0 9 . 5 3 5 . 1 1 1 1

w w w.T h e H a n l e y C o l l e c t i o n . c o m

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 25 Tinroof_050614_4S_CP.pdf


Clothing by Ronnie Ryno Accessories from Glamarita Clothing & Designs Hair by Douglas McCoy for House of Pop at Urbanna Makeup by Rachel Nalley Models, clockwise from bottom left: Brynn Gadbury, Julia Fox, Erin Neel


think summer

the veteran Ronnie Ryno of Glamarita may be the Spokane fashion scene’s No. 1 cheerleader

WHERE TO BUY Glamarita Clothing & Designs, 911½ W. Garland, Glamarita.com

Get started early | ewu.edu/summer

Sunday, June 8th

Fathers Day Sale

The Turing Test: Allan Turing & GBLTQ Equality

25% OFF

Rev. Dr. Todd Eklof, Minister

All Merchandise

Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane

4340 W. Ft. Wright Drive 509-325-6383 www.uuspokane.org

Hats, flasks, glassware, clothing & one more thing. present coupon at time of purchase. does not include alcohol. expires 6/15/2014

Sunday Services

Religious Ed & Childcare

9:15 & 11am

[drink responsibly]

If there’s one name in Spokane fashion that you’re familiar with, it’s probably Ronnie Ryno with Glamarita. She runs the yearly Runway Renegades fashion show at the Garland Block Party and owns the Glamarita boutique, also on Garland. Her purses, dresses and belts made from old ties caught the attention of the public when they first came out, but there’s a lot more to her work than that. She comes from a family of creative types, yet up until about eight years ago, Ryno was positive that artistic talent had missed her entirely. Ever the clothes hoarder, Ryno became curious about what went into making garments, deconstructing items and elaborating on them in her home basement. She soon sold her designs on eBay, then Etsy. Business grew, as did the amount of space she took up in the basement. When she realized there was no place in town selling mainly locally made clothes, her husband told her to take action. “He told me to stop complaining, and that’s when I opened the shop,” Ryno recalls with a smile. The three-year-old boutique started in a tiny Garland location and moved about a year and half ago to a more spacious spot eight doors down. “We’ve changed a lot over the last three years,” explains Ryno, whose shop is made up of about 95 percent local designers’ work. “We’ve incorporated a ready-to-wear line recently. We’re working on selling more separates.” Although the place has been established for a few years, it hasn’t been easy to keep the lights on. “It’s been rough because we are such a quirky niche business, and Spokane is still pretty conservative in many ways,” says Ryno, who uses bold prints and silhouettes in her designs. Local fashion is what Ryno is most passionate about. She’s gone back to teaching at a youth center during much of the week to make it all work, leaving her shop manager to run the store. She says there is a population of people here who want to express themselves and support local. “I get so giddy when I’m out at dinner and see someone wearing either my work or something from the store,” Ryno says. “I know exactly what it took to make that look, and it makes me so happy.” 

COME VISIT OUR DISTILLERY AND TASTING ROOM!

LOCALLY OWNED | LOCALLY MADE | LOCAL INGREDIENTS

1003 E. Trent #200 | SPOKANE | 509.489.2112

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 27


Photo by Young Kwak Clothing and accessories Clothing and accessories by Alyssah Perez, (except rings) by Timbre exceptWolf black stripe dress by Angelana Perez Models are AlaskaHair Mauve and makeup by Stephanie Goldsmith (White dress), Emilyfrom Erickson Models, left: Savana Fredericks, Laura Feasline, (lace shorts), Ashley Hiatt Maeloni Ogle (blue dress).


the jet-setter

Six Trends for Summer

By Laura Johnson

LACE

Alyssah Perez wants to prove one can live in Spokane and work in high fashion

In and out of style since the late 16th century, lace is certainly breathable, but not always the most comfortable fabric. Who better to ask about the trend than lace fanatic Lynne Blackwood. “Both of my grandmothers crocheted it,” she says. “Lace is very nostalgic for me and I’m glad to see it’s back in.” (Blue Pepper shorts from Tangerine Boutique, 1019 W. First, 413-2169, owned by Patricia O’Callaghan)

Down in the shadowy depths of the Red Room Lounge’s basement, Alyssah Perez conducts business for her clothing and jewelry label Eco Chic Designs. Bins of glittering jewelry and fabrics line the shelves next to the restaurant’s cache of wine bottles. Dresses of black leather, lace and sparkly, stretchy material hang from a moveable rack nearby. But from this space (her boyfriend Craig Larsen owns the joint), Perez is able to sell her salvaged-item jewelry pieces to more than 30 businesses around the country. With everything that she’s accomplished thus far, it’s hard to believe the self-taught seamstress stepped into the world of clothing for the first time just last year. Since her first runway show in August, the designer has participated in a small show at New York Fashion Week (eight days featuring nearly 300 runway shows, not just the main Mercedes-Benz Fashion Week at Lincoln Center) in September. She thought that was her only shot, but then she booked NYFW in February; Los Angeles Fashion Week came one month later. But Perez, 26, insists this didn’t all fall into her lap. She’s constantly applying for designer casting calls and runway shows across the country. “I’ve failed just as much as I’ve succeeded,” says Perez, who utilizes about 50 percent used fabrics in her designs. “I never thought any of this was possible either.” Also creating under the Eco Chic Designs label is Perez’s younger sister Angelana, who helps sew the clothes and works on the business side of things. As Ubiquitous for Eco Chic, she showed at the recent Strut Fashion Show at the Davenport Hotel put on by Alyssah. “We always tease each other we’re going to be like Mary-Kate and Ashley Olsen designing clothes together, even though we aren’t twins at all,” says Angelana with a laugh. After running her first fashion show, Alyssah says she plans to focus on designing more casualwear that would be easy to replicate. Once again this fall, Alyssah is hoping for another showing at NYFW, this time at a larger venue. She likes the idea of jet-setting to big cities, but still calling Spokane home. “Life is like a videogame: You want to level up,” she says. “I want to grow as a person and a designer. I want to constantly be moving forward, and I think I can do that from here.”  WHERE TO BUY Clothing is only available online at ecochicdesignsllc.com; jewelry is available in the area at Lolo Boutique, Fringe & Fray, Tangerine Boutique, Tiffany Blue Boutiques, Sunny Buns Tanning Salon and more.

METALLICS

Similar to the mirror-ball sequin trend a couple of years back, plating yourself in gold, silver and bronze clothing and accessories is the new way to stand out when you walk into a room. “Metallics are better than some of the other options out there,” says Gianna Morrill. “It’s a way of having sparkle without being flashy.” (Gentle Fawn Kiss dress from Artemis Boutique, 1021 W. First., 7470332, owned by Stacy Kraby)

FLORAL PRINT

Back when Blossom and D.J. Tanner were the cat’s pajamas for the TV-watching preteen set, big floral prints were all the rage. Now the print design is a little less over the top, but the idea remains the same. “I’m OK with florals as long as the print is not too big or gaudy,” says Timbre Wolf. “I don’t like when floral print clothes look like curtains. But I like florals, and I use a lot of them in my designs.” (Vintage dress from Veda Lux, 1106 S. Perry, 475-1674, owned by Summer Hightower)

CROP TOPS

“I’m not a fan of the crop top,” says Alyssah Perez. “It doesn’t work for everyone.” That sentiment couldn’t be more true. Yet with this incarnation of the trend, the crop top is usually paired with high-waisted bottoms, rather than the butt crack-showing jeans of the early-2000s Britney Spears era. (All Style half-tee at Jema Lane Boutique, 613 S. Pines Rd., Spokane Valley, 321-2330, owned by Jani Davis)

FRINGE

The early ’90s also was big into fringe, but to update the trend, it’s no longer paired with shoulder pads. “I love ruffles and embellishments, so I love fringe,” says Ronnie Ryno. “I never subscribe to the school of less is more. I say, ‘More is more.’” (Classic fringe vest at Calamity Jane’s, 303 W. Second, 747-5077, owned by Roxanne and Sam Grimm)

CIRCLE SKIRT

MADISON BENNETT PHOTOS

Perfectly matching the crop top is the full circle skirt — not the one from the sock hops of the 1950s, but the classic, sophisticated skirts of old Hollywood. “I adore the circle skirt; it’s very Audrey Hepburn,” Blackwood says. “That look started in the 1940s, and it’s never really gone out.” (Pristine skirt at Swank Boutique, 4727 N. Division, 468-1839, owned by Jody Mallonee) Madison Bennett contributed to this story.

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 29


TREATtoYJune OURSELF Specials or dad

SEASONS PEDICURE

$40

RECEIVE A 30 MINUTE BODY POLISH $60 ADD A SPRAY TAN FOR ONLY $5 Help Dad Relax... 60 MIN MASSAGE OF CHOICE 60 MIN MEN’S FACIAL $125

Book appointment today! 1 855 232-2772

1 8 0 0 5 2 3 - 2 4 6 4 | CDAC A S I N O . COM |

/ CDAC A S I N O R E S O RT

25 miles south of Coeur d’Alene at the junction of US-95 and Hwy-58

ARE YOU PREPARED FOR GRAD SCHOOL? 30 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

EW U I S O F F E R I N G A N A FFORDAB LE G R E T E ST P R E PA R ATI O N CO UR SE. W EEK E N D S AT E W U’ S R IVERP OI NT CAMP US, D OW N TOW N S P O K A N E, J UNE 2 1, 2 8; J ULY 12 , 19. FOR MORE INFO, CALL 509.828.1232


Painting in Public

Ellen Picken (top) and Erin Mielcarek (bottom) begin work on their mural on Wall Street.

The Spokane Mural Project is underway, and you’re welcome to watch them come to life BY MIKE BOOKEY

E

rin Mielcarek and Ellen Picken get a lot of visitors while they work. Most just want to know what the two are doing at the Wall Street underpass in downtown Spokane. This summer, they’ll be giving the same answer to all of those curious passerby — they’re painting a mural. Mielcarek and Picken are one of four teams selected by the Spokane Arts Fund to paint murals on the walls of four selected underpasses in the downtown area. Many of these spots were home to murals that had fallen victim to time and the elements and needed something fresh, at least in the view of the nonprofit arts organization that receives funding from the city, Visit Spokane and other entities. By the end of August, the teams are to have completed their pieces, but on this first Monday of June,

Mielcarek and Picken have yet to put any paint on the walls. They’re sitting on scaffolding, sketching a massive grid on the wall as the first step of their conceptual mural, a brightly colored collection of lines meant to represent the trains that pass overhead. “It represents the sound and energy of the train as it goes from city to city,” says Mielcarek, 33, who met Picken, 34, when the two were in an art show together at the Chase Gallery last fall. Other than the time Picken painted a forest on one whole wall of her bedroom at age 12, this is the first time either artist has created a full-sized mural. For beginners, they’re hardly easing into it. Their ambitious plans include vibrant paintings on both sides of the underpass, as well as the pillars. The goal is to brighten the stretch of Wall Street that’s currently anything but.

MATT WEIGAND PHOTOS

Picken, originally from Spokane, has traveled around the world. Along the way, she’s seen the impact of public art in places like Berlin. “In cities I’ve been to where the city doesn’t fund the arts, people will still fill these open spaces with good or bad art,” she says. “It can make a neighborhood better. That [Spokane Arts] is funding this makes me feel like there’s a large part of the population that supports us and wants art here.”

S

pokane is hardly the only city to invest in its walls. The Seattle Mural Project is set to begin work on four selected spaces after recently closing an online voting process. In Tacoma, the city’s mural project has now completed more than 20 paintings and has repeatedly touted the murals as an example of how to deter tagging and graffiti. Studies have shown that vandals are much less likely to paint on a wall that already features a mural, and murals can cover up whatever half-assed spray-painting was there before. “Taggers or graffiti artists aren’t going to tag a detailed design,” says Shannon Halberstadt, executive director of Spokane Arts. But she’s quick to remind that this isn’t just a crime determent. “What’s even more valuable is that they really brighten spaces and allow for an unexpected art moment for the passerby, and a great way to reflect our culture ...continued on next page

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 31


CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS “PAINTING IN PUBLIC,” CONTINUED... through art,” she says. The Spokane Mural Project provides artists with all the supplies and paint (much of which is donated by supporters like Miller Paint), as well as a stipend of between $1,500 and $1,700, depending on the location. In addition to the Wall Street underpass, murals also are underway at underpasses at Maple Street, where Todd Benson is at work, and Cedar Street, where you’ll find Eric-Alain Parker and Lisa Soranaka painting a piece focused on the city’s love of the lilac. At Howard Street, the Spokane Urban Mural Artist Collaboration, including artists Tiffany Patterson and Send comments to Jason Corcoran, aims to cre- editor@inlander.com. ate something that includes some inspiration from kids who submitted pieces with their interpretation of “Near Nature, Near Perfect.” SUMAC plans to begin painting in late July. Halberstadt also sees the program as a way for the public to see the community’s artists at work. Those folks continually asking Mielcarek and Picken what they’re doing? That’s all part of the job. “It’s very rare that you get to see that process out in the open like that. We encourage people to walk by and check it out. They’re all friendly,” says Halberstadt, who says the selection committee made it clear to applicants that interacting with the public was a requirement for the project.

LETTERS

A

ll of the murals will be created by Spokane artists and are Spokane-centric in their themes. For Parker and Soranaka, artists who met while in graduate school at Washington State University, that meant getting up close and personal with the lilac. Very up close. Parker says the piece, located at Cedar Street at the edge of Browne’s Addition, encompassing both sides of the street and the pillars holding up the train trestle above, is meant to zoom in on a lilac and see everything going on beyond the reach of the naked eye. “Our approach was to defamiliarize something,” he says. “We want people to see drama that would be microscopic. We’ll have aphids chasing ladybugs, bees, hummingbirds — it’s all small-scale stuff that’s blown up.” Parker graduated from Lewis and Clark High School before heading to Whitman College, then WSU. He’s home for the summer, but will head to Fairbanks, Alaska, after he completes the mural to continue work on a creative writing MFA. For now, he’s devoted to giving his hometown something it’ll see for years to come. If you have ideas or opinions about what he and Soranaka are up to, by all means let him know, he says. “The call made it clear that Spokane Arts was looking for something the community could relate to,” says Parker. “So we’ll be getting the audience’s opinion as this thing unfurls.” 

Interplayers_052914_4S_EW.pdf

32 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

InlandImaging_060514_8H_EW.pdf


CULTURE | DIGEST

THEATER BLITHE SPIRIT A

s research for his next novel, the author Charles Condomine (Scott Finlayson) and his wife Ruth (Ingrid Schwalbe) have invited their friends the Bradmans (Carl Vincent, Anne Selcoe) and the oddball medium Madame Arcati (Lulu Stafford) to their house for a séance. Instead of being a bit of harmless amusement, the ritual opens the door for the ghost of Charles’ mischievous first wife, Elvira (Nancy Gasper), to enter from the spirit world. Unseen by all but her former husband, the phantom Elvira taunts him and Ruth to the breaking point. She also has an ulterior motive, which ultimately injures the constantly flustered housemaid Edith (Jessica Rempel) and forms the basis for the second and third acts. This leaves it to the increasingly wearied Charles and flighty Madame Arcati to ensure that any lingering spirit gets a swift return to the astral plane. Noël Coward’s “improbable farce” from 1941 is full of quotable Wildean quips, and despite its enduring reputation as a classic comedy it explores the nastier side of romantic jealousy without ever getting mired in solemnity. Its casual treatment of marital infidelity seems downright bold considering its era. What haunts Blithe Spirit in general is its length. The running time easily clocks the better part of three hours, making its umpteenth fusillade of upper-crust insults more like a private indulgence than a dramatic necessity. This leads to moments when the center cannot hold in this production directed by Karen Brathovde. The tautness sags, the excess action muddles the dialogue, and the full-cast scenes get wobbly. Some of this stands

June 10 - 7pm There’s trouble on the homefront in Blithe Spirit. a good chance of remedying itself as the show continues its run; some could have been preempted by judiciously snipping lines, theatrical rights allowing. Finlayson is persuasive as Charles, but he begins and ends his sentences with a groan right from the outset, leaving him nowhere to go but higher in pitch as his exasperation grows. Both he and Schwalbe, who hits Ruth’s single note solidly throughout, affect convincing accents. Stafford’s Arcati sounds more Welsh; intentional or not, it suits her character well. Mark Lanterman and Paul Wiersma’s set not only evokes Condomine’s upperclass living room beautifully, it’s also functional enough to perform the work of invisible hands. — E.J. IANNELLI

Nashville-based pop/rap featuring Spokane's Kayla Erb dnkofficial.com and Chicago's David Davis

JULY 9 - 7:30PM

Blithe Spirit • Through June 15; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm; Sun at 2 pm • $13-15 • Ignite! Community Theatre • 10814 E. Broadway, Spokane Valley • ignitetheatre.org

For Your Consideration

CAJUN DANCE MUSIC

BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

JULY 10 - 7:30PM

Save 20% - All 4 Shows just $72 now at ticketswest.com

BOOK | Sometimes a book comes out that flies a bit under the radar, then takes off. Sometimes by the time it hits paperback, it’s just getting started. That seems to be the case with THE BOYS IN THE BOAT, just out in paperback and still in the Amazon Top 100. Seattle author Daniel James Brown has mixed in some compelling elements— Hitler’s creepy 1936 Olympics, the Great Depression and a cast of bona fide rowing legends. For locals, it’s even better, as the book documents the University of Washington’s epic 1936 crew team. You’ll catch a glimpse of life here during those tough years, along with insight to the intense, elegant sport of rowing. Daniel James Brown will read at Auntie’s at 1 pm on Sunday, June 8. Call 838-0206 for info.

CD | Every time Coldplay comes out with a new record, I’m kind of underwhelmed. Then, a few months later I’ll hear a snippet of a song somewhere, which prompts me to try the CD again, and suddenly I’m loving it. That happened with “Yes” on Viva la Vida and “Charlie Brown” on Mylo Xyloto. So of course I’m lukewarm on GHOST STORIES. Sounds more like a Chris Martin solo record, as it’s hard to hear much of the band in there. Coldplay lyrics always make me feel like Martin is going for Lead Therapist as much as Lead Singer, and this time it sounds even more personal — perhaps Gwyneth-inspired. It does finish nicely with “Oceans” and the arena-ready “A Sky Full of Stars,” but getting there made me sleepy. Maybe I need to wait a couple of months before I hit “play” again.

MUSICIAN | The man behind the sound of the summer of 2014 is looking to be DAN AUERBACH. Not only are his Black Keys out with Turn Blue, a follow-up to El Camino, but his producer’s touch is everywhere, too. You may not remember, but Auerbach won the Producer of the Year Grammy for El Camino. (I loved that they put a crappy, old, wood-paneled minivan on the cover — that’s all you need to know about the Akron, Ohio-based Black Keys.) Now Auerbach has Ray LaMontagne sounding better than ever on his hippie-ish Supernova. (Check out LaMontagne at the Festival at Sandpoint in August.) And later this month, Lana Del Rey’s new CD Ultraviolence drops — yet another Auerbach production. I don’t totally get Del Rey, but he’s got her sound down, too — raw and ethereal.

Tickets at Ticketswest.com and 1-800-325-Seat

JUNE 28 & 29

HOOPFEST NEEDS YOU!

Join us in celebrating 25 years of teamwork by volunteering to be a Court Monitor, and score some cool Nike gear, too!

225 E. 3rd Ave., Spokane, WA

www.spokanehoopfest.net 509.624.2414 chad@spokanehoopfest.net

Hoopfest_041014_1U_KE.pdf JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 33


CULTURE | THEATER

1001 West Sprague Ave. • 509-624-1200

BUY SYMPHONY 2014-15 SEASON TICKETS NOW AND SAVE! 50% OFF CLASSICS SERIES FOR NEW SUBSCRIBERS MATT WEIGAND PHOTO

The Dancing Director Director Jillian Kehne is looking at an upcoming production of Guys and Dolls with a choreographer’s eye BY E.J. IANNELLI

J

P IN K M A R T IN S E LL S O U T I

Subscribe to either SuperPops or Take5 to guarantee

PINK MARTINI

“CLASSY, CHARMING, SEXY, ELEGANT, SOPHISTICATED, TAKE YOUR PICK TO DESCRIBE THE GLOBE-TROTTING ECLECTIC MIX THAT IS PINK MARTINI.” -THE SUN

CHOICES INCLUDE: • 10 Classics Concerts • 6 SuperPops Concerts • Nutcracker & More!

Call 509-624-1200

or visit spokanesymphony.org to SUBSCRIBE TODAY! SPOKANESYMPHONY.ORG MARTINWOLDSONTHEATER.COM 34 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

illian Kehne is pulling double duty in the upcoming production of Guys and Dolls at Lake City Playhouse. Not only is she directing this lighthearted musical about gamblers, cons and soul-savers, she’s also choreographing. “It’s interesting to switch back and forth between [concentrating on] the clean, succinct footwork, and then switching over and paying attention to the character,” says Kehne. Kehne has done this only once before. That was last season’s production of Little Drummer Boy, also at Lake City, which she admits was “definitely not as heavy of a dance show.” Fortunately, she’s had great mentorship. In the past she’s worked closely with popular regional director Troy Nickerson, most notably on Rent, and she’s been able to solicit his advice as she polishes her directorial chops. “He’s been a big example of how to be a good director and how to let your actors play. Sometimes it’s very easy to go into a scene as a director and you have this picture in your head of what you want,” says Kehne. “And then you dictate it, but it’s not natural. It’s not coming from your actor. I don’t want to have my hands too much on these people, to the point where it’s me forming them.” Nor is Nickerson her only counsel. Kehne, a real-estate processor who’s married to area actor Todd Kehne (K2, It’s a Wonderful Life), knows many people in the local theater community she can tap for input. “All of my other theater friends are going to come in and take notes and be another set of eyes,” she says. “When you only have one pair of eyes to look at all of [the cast], it’s interesting. It’s interesting, sometimes lonely, and ultimately very rewarding.” For this production, Kehne’s work is made a little lighter by the cast. Comedic stalwart Lance Babbitt will play Nicely-Nicely Johnson, Briane Green is cast in the “fun, neurotic role” of Miss Adelaide, and recurring Lake City actor Brendan Brady will be playing a “younger version” of Sky Masterson.

“Opposite him as Sarah Brown is Caryssa Gilmore,” says Kehne. “This is her first community theater show. She has a great voice, clear tone, and she and Brendan have really nice chemistry together.” Glenn Bentley, relatively new to the local theater scene, will be in the role of Nathan Detroit, famously played by Frank Sinatra in the 1955 film version. At the more experienced end of the spectrum is 85-year-old baritone Woody Hurst (as Arvide Abernathy), who performed on Broadway in shows like The Unsinkable Molly Brown during the 1950s and ‘60s. The youngest member of the Guys and Dolls cast is 70 years Hurst’s junior. “It’s a fun show and a great example of community theater,” says Kehne, “because it’s such a wide range — a lot of really novice people learning from the experienced people.” In keeping with what seems to be an accidental trend in recent shows on community theater stages, the set is, as Kehne puts it, a “minimal, kind of black box” production that will make the most of the theater’s stage when shuffling between the show’s New York City and Havana settings. “They just installed a new lighting dimmer system,” says Kehne. “I’m thrilled to see what they’re going to be able do with the lighting design ... to change the mood, change the scene.” The rest of Guys and Dolls promises to be traditional, he says, focusing on the upbeat fun of Latin dancing and memorable tunes like “Luck Be a Lady” and “Sit Down, You’re Rockin’ the Boat” with musical direction by Zack Baker. “This show is one of my all-time favorites,” says Kehne. “I have a lot of respect for the genre, I love that era, so I personally wanted to keep that classic feel. It’s not something you want to mess with.”  Guys and Dolls • June 6 to 28; Thu-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm • $13.75-$19.75 • Lake City Playhouse • 1320 E. Garden Ave., Coeur d’Alene • lakecityplayhouse.org • (208) 6671323


Celebrating 23 Years Saturday, June 14, 2014 of Pride Pride Parade & Rainbow Festival

SAT Official Pride Brunch

FRI Be a part of it.

Pride week events

WED TUES

FRI The partnership of Coeur D’Alene Center for Gender & Sexual Diversity, PFLAG Coeur D’Alene, North Idaho College Gender & Sexuality Alliance with The Human Rights Education Institute

The LGBT Pride Exhibit

18th Annual Lake CDA Pride Cruise 2:00pm-4:00pm $20/$25 day of Boarding Time 1:00pm The boat takes off promptly at 2pm Do not be late!

Mik’s CDA Pridelandia After-Cruise Party

4:00pm till? Mik’s 406 N 4th St, CDA Opening Reception DJ Jason Friday, June 6 21+ ID required 5:00pm-7:00pm Human Rights Rocky Horror Education Institute Picture Show 414 W Mullan Rd (R) Coeur d'Alene, ID Midnight $5 at the door Exhibit runs Garland Theater through June 30 924 W Garland National Pride Let’s do the time Month warp again!!!! Bottomless popcorn

Le Cabaret

8:00pm No cover Irv's Bar Tony Awards 6:30pm-8:30pm 412 Sprague Ave Featuring Le Gurlz 6:00pm $10 the sexiest ladies 6:30 Red Carpet Unitarian in Spokane 7:00 Live show Universalist performing a 8:00 Live broadcast Church of Spokane variety of cabaret VIP $25.00 4340 W Ft George style numbers General Admission Wright Drive Proceeds going to $20.00 Evening of music Odyssey Youth Center nYne Bar & Bistro and song with 232 W Sprague Ave Mistress of INBA Pride Walk the Red Ceremonies Networking Carpet, Watch the Carla Louise! Tony's on the big Luncheon Guests include 11:30am-1:00pm screen and enjoy Pamela Benton, DoubleTree by Hilton production Abbey Crawford & Spokane City Center numbers from a joyfully gathered, 322 N Spokane Falls some of soul soothing Court Spokane's best women's chorus! Pride luncheon, Tim entertainers And much more Connor is writing A benefit for Proceeds going to OutSpokane and “Tell” the story of Spokane Aids Network Odyssey Youth Center Major Margie Witt

SUN

SAT

An Evening Odyssey

Nova Kaine Presents:

Events are subject to cancellation or change.

The Unitarian Universalist Church of Spokane

THURS

Nova Kaine & Absolute Vodka present

Spokane PFLAG’s

6th Annual Red Dress Party

Fourth Annual Comedy Night!

9:00am-Noon $8 Adults $5 Children nYne Bar & Bistro 232 W Sprague Ave Kids welcome

7:00pm-2:00am $15 VIP $10 General 9:00pm VIP Reception 7pm $10 in advance General $12 at the door Admission 7:30pm nYne Bar & Bistro Show at 8pm 232 W Sprague Ave Club 412 Hilarious Comedy 412 W Sprague Ave Hosted by Red Dresses are Michael Jepson: greatly encouraged Special appearance as there will be by the Imperial prizes for the Best Sovereign Court of Red Dress in each Spokane featuring category Men's, Nova Kaine Women's, and Couture Music provided by DJ Prophesy This is a 21+ event A fundraiser for SAN

SPOKANE PRIDE 2014 Spokane’s 23rd Annual LGBTQA Pride Parade

Noon 11:00am Staging Downtown Spokane New Staging area! New Parade route!

2014 Rainbow Festival Out, Loud, & Proud Noon-5:30pm Gondola Meadows Riverfront Park Corner of Post St & Spokane Falls Blv Hosted by Abbey Crawford; performances by Beverly McClellan, Bella Corbu, Angela Marie Project and Spokane Aerial

Official Pride After-Party

7:00pm nYne Bar & Bistro 232 W Sprague Ave Performance by Beverly McClellan Go to OutSpokane.org for the most up-to-date information.

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 35


FIND ART

and more this Friday, June 6th!

Venues open 5 - 8 pm

WEST DOWNTOWN AREA MAC, NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS AND CULTURE

2316 W FIRST AVE Mike Ross and Darcy Lee Saxon. Enjoy Bluesy Rock & Spanish Guitar solos by Mike Ross. Featuring a painting demonstration by artist Darcy Lee Saxton. Watch a painter in action, see how a painting comes together & ask questions!

CARNEGIE SQUARE RIVER CITY BREWING

121 S CEDAR ST Featuring Liquid Art Series. “Liquid Art” is a one-time beer created for each First Friday. Using a special style of keg, a Firkin, beer makers cask-condition and ferment a special beer that is poured one day only.

TWO WOMEN VINTAGE GOODS

112 S CEDAR ST Featuring Dianna Chelf. Dianna is an accomplished artist in the art of sherenshnitte, or scissor cutting. She created beautiful cuttings from paper and paints them with watercolors. She also "grain paints" Shaker style boxes and picture frames.

ADAMS STREET AREA BARRISTER WINERY

1213 W RAILROAD AVE It’s time for Bart Fest! Presenting the whimsical works of Bart Degraaf. Artists' reception at 5pm with Beacon Hill's Bistro Buffet from 6 to 8pm. "Lonesome" Lyle Morse plays acoustic blues from 6:30 to 10pm. Call 509.465.3591 to reserve a table.

KOLVA-SULLIVAN GALLERY

115 S ADAMS ST, SUITE A Jon Swanstrom. Mixed media sculpture and oil on canvas artist Jon Swanstrom is a Spokane based musician, filmmaker and visual artist. He specializes in creating with society's refuse, currently combining vintage elements with paint, paper, metal and wood. Swanstrom's inspiration is rooted in bold 1960's and '70s pop art. He finds infinite beauty in wear and tear.

unless otherwise noted.

DAVENPORT HOTEL AND STEAM PLANT AREA

with the inner dimensional music of Sound Travel, 7-9pm.

BARILI CELLARS

STEAM PLANT

608 W SECOND AVE Artist Sheri Mackelvie. Featuring a unique mix of works, Sheri uses a variety of mediums and styles, preferring watercolor and acrylic for painting and portraits in graphite and colored pencil. 4 to 9pm.

GRANDE RONDE CELLARS

906 W SECOND AVE Featuring Annie Libertini. Libertini’s work depicts Masks and their Animal Spirits. Artist reception 5 to 8pm. With music by Carolyn Cruso, named "Best Instrumental CD of 2013" by Indie Acoustic Project, 7 to 9pm.

SAPPHIRE LOUNGE

901 W FIRST AVE Lauren Lippens is an aspiring singer & piano player with a passion for classic jazz. Singing in the style of Ella, Billie & Louis she brings new life to the classic songs & styling of the 1930’s & 40’s.

WHITESTONE WINERY TASTING ROOM 8 N POST ST Charisa Faith performs before leaving for California to record her album. Ordinary Instagram photos inspired Audreana Camm's latest realism series. Titled "The hands and feet of Spokane," the collection reaches out to the viewers by capturing simple moments in stunning acrylic paintings.

PATIT CREEK CELLARS

822 W SPRAGUE AVE Connie Janney. Let your imagination marvel at the fantastique work by Connie Janney in her new exhibition, “Cosmic Connection,” featuring some of her newest large paintings of the universe. Happy Hour with the artist 5-7pm. Live entertainment

TRANSITIONS' WOMEN'S HEARTH

920 W SECOND AVE Women of the Women’s Hearth. Explore art through the four elements: earth, air, water, and fire through “Elements of Change.” This unique art show features a different room for each element and is a chance to see the transformative power of art for Spokane’s homeless and low-income women. Craft show and bake sale on site.

DOWNTOWN CORE AREA CLASSIC CAR SHOW

WALL ST AND SPOKANE FALLS BLVD Before heading out to the Festival of Speed, catch a glimpse of amazing classic cars and Porches when they are on display on Spokane Falls and Wall Street during First Friday from 4:15 to 7pm. Presented by SOVREN.

RIVER PARK SQUARE KRESS GALLERY

808 W MAIN, THIRD FLOOR BEHIND THE FOOD COURT First Night Rising Stars. 5:30 to 7:30pm: “Through the Eye of a Lens”. Angles, shapes and color and everything in between provided by SCC photography students.

RIVER PARK SQUARE

NORDSTROM CORRIDOR 808 W MAIN, FIRST FLOOR First Night Spokane and Polka Dot Pottery.

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS

RIVER PARK SQUARE TASTING ROOM 808 W MAIN, THIRD FLOOR Connie Stout, mosaic artist. Stout views cutting, shaping glass and mosaic tile and covering a substrate as painting with glass, only much more tactile.

AVENUE WEST GALLERY

707 W MAIN, CRESCENT COURT LEVEL Darrell Sullens. "Travels With A paintbrush" Oil paintings depicting the southwestern United States. Reception 5-8:30pm. Weekly Gallery hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11am-5pm.

BRICKWALL PHOTOGRAPHIC GALLERY 530 W MAIN, SKYWALK EAST OF MACY'S Seattle photographer J. Mark Griffith. Titled "Aerial Artistry," Mark presents a unique view of the world as seen from above.

BISTANGO

108 N POST ST Karrie O'Neill. Featuring the acoustic sounds of the talented Dirk Swartz. Happy Hour 4-6, with Spokane's best martinis and hand crafted cocktails.

BOZZI GALLERY

221 N WALL ST, STE 221 Steven A. Scroggins. “A Breath of Fresh Air: New works," by internationally collected local artist Steven A. Scroggins. This show features his monumental scale florals and a sprinkling of assemblage pieces. Scroggins confirms once again his artistic depth by his diverse oeuvre.

DODSON’S JEWELERS

516 W RIVERSIDE AVE Near Perfect, Near Nature: John James Audubon’s World.

Blue Moon® Summer Honey Wheat Grilled Chicken Wings with Honey Ale Glaze

TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY

INGREDIENTS

SERVES: 5 | PREP TIME: 15 min | COOK TIME: 35 min | DIFFICULTY: Easy

12 Chicken Wings

INSTRUCTIONS

1 Bottle Blue Moon® Summer Honey Wheat

Soak the chicken wings in a bowl with half the bottle of Summer Honey Wheat, 1 tbsp. of honey and a squeeze of orange juice. Combine the rest of the beer, hot sauce, honey, orange peel, pepper & salt into a sauce pan and simmer for 20-30 min. Take wings out of liquid, and place onto a well-oiled grill. Over medium heat, cook wings for approximately 10-12 min. Once finished, remove from heat and place into saucepan, coating the wings with glaze.

¼ Cup of Clover Honey

115 S ADAMS ST Woodfired Works by Gina Freuen. “Shake and Pour,” June 6 – 30. Featuring handmade, woodfired rattles and teapots by Gina Freuen, fired at the annual, invitational Santatsugama kiln firing in Seabeck, WA. Reception: June 6, 5 to 8:30pm and June 7, noon to 4pm. downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org

159 S LINCOLN ST Steve Merryman, Marilyn Meyer, Daris Judd, Philip Dhillon, Annie Libertini and more. Celebrate “Furrst Friday” with adoptable animals for you to meet and pet. Natural pet treats from Kritter Kookies and an appearance from Canines vs Cancer. Crafts for children and adults. 4-8pm.

Bring the little ones to this fun and interactive painting class. Two sessions only! Ages 10 and older. $10 fee. 5:30-7:30pm

2 Tbsp hot sauce (any hot sauce will do - add more if you like it spicy) Orange Peel 1 Tsp. white pepper Salt to taste

|

Brought to you by Downtown Spokane and Spokane Arts


A unique opportunity to view a selection of rare 1st edition Audubon prints, this exhibition benefits The Audubon Society, Ducks Unlimited and the Inland Northwest Land Trust. Over 25 prints from Audubon’s Birds of North America are on display (and not for sale) through June 21st at Dodson’s Jewelers.

SANTE RESTAURANT & CHARCUTERIE

NECTAR TASTING ROOM

POTTERY PLACE PLUS

120 N STEVENS ST Nectar welcomes musician Darin Hilderbrand, winery Skylite Cellars & artist Katrina Brennan. Katrina’s paintings are expressive and conceptual, with bold colors and flowing lines. Her sculptures are often metaphorical, representing tall figures that allude to both Western and Eastern culture. Open until 10pm artist reception starts at 5:30. Now serving food. Call 509.869.1572 for reservations.

NUMERICA

502 W RIVERSIDE AVE Nick Schaffert and River City Brewing. Numerica will host the official launch of “Spokane Riverkeeper IPA,” brewed by River City Brewing, sponsored by the credit union and benfitting Spokane Riverkeeper. Photography by Nick Schaffert will also be showcased.

STEELHEAD BAR & GRILLE

218 N HOWARD ST Gary Gardner. Featuring a series of prints taken over the last three years in Washington, California, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Nebraska, Arkansas, and Louisiana, for an upcoming book called “Ghosts Of the Road.”

EAST DOWNTOWN AREA EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS

331 W MAIN AVE John R. Rogers High School AP Photography Students. Photographs produced by the talented students in this year’s Rogers High School Advanced Placement Digital Photography/2‐D Studio Art program.

AUNTIE'S BOOKSTORE

402 W MAIN AVE 3 Minute Mic: An Open Mic Poetry Event. A very friendly and accepting crowd to read your poetry to, just read a favorite poem, or come and support those who do! Chris Cook will host and featuring guest reader, Kris Dinnison with "Remember the Word". 6:30pm sign-up, 7pm start.

404 W MAIN AVE Artist Christina Deubel in the Restaurant and Jeffrey Loyd in the Butcher Bar. Featuring large dynamic paintings bursting with color. Celebrating Bubbles Week with Treveri Cellars. Sparkling wines paired with small plates. 203 N WASHINGTON ST “Double Vision” with artists Mike Busby and Barbara Field. Both guests this month specialize in 2 dimensional media. Many of Mike's photographs are surreal, and allow you to look beyond convention. Barbara's paintings show her perspective on everyday objects, places and people.

HERBAL ESSENCE CAFE

115 N WASHINGTON ST Artist Tom Norton. Paintings, drawings, water colors, pastels & pencils.

LEFTBANK WINE BAR

108 N WASHINGTON ST Photography by Jenny Lange. Lange’s colorful, local wildflower photography on canvas and graffiti art from Valencia, Spain pairs perfectly with MonteScarlatto Estate Winery from Red Mountain. Wines shown will be Rose, Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Malbec, with a treat thrown in at the end. Live music provided by the awe inspiring Carey Brazil and the One Night Stand Band, Jay Condiotti, playing covers spanning the decades as well as originals to hum along with. Tastings from 5 to 9pm, with live music from 7 to 11pm.

SOUTH DOWNTOWN AREA INTERPLAYERS

174 S HOWARD ST Eric Rau and Henry Von Roessler Eric exhibits his lifelong passion for the outdoors and art by exploring the relationship between people and the environment around us. While well known for his off beat painting of cowboys and their habitat Henry turned to reminiscent painting of old streets, shops, houses, buildings, and boats, painting from memory and imagination. 5:30-7:30pm.

ROCKET BAKERY HOLLEY MASON

157 S HOWARD ST A night of music by Daniel Hall, acoustic solo artist playing folk and light rock music from 6 to 8pm. Enjoy the music while viewing local artists

who will display their canvas artwork from 4 to 6pm! Coffee specials will start at 4pm.

LIBERTY CIDERWORKS

164 S WASHINGTON ST, STE. 300 Dan McCann has been working and exhibiting fine art for more than 25 years. His work uses found materials to create an ordered visual impact, establishing, as he puts it: “An arbitrary order.”

VINO! WINESHOP

222 S WASHINGTON ST Ilse Tan. Paintings, drawings and tapestries from around the world and back, by East German native Ilse Tan. Artist’s reception and wine tasting from 5-8 p.m. The show runs through July 1.

MARKETPLACE WINERY

39 W PACIFIC AVE Musician Rob Bryceson & artist Brian McDaniel. Home to both EMVY & Bridgepress Cellars, join us on the patio for First Friday & enjoy our award winning wines, great food & fun with friends!

ROBERT KARL CELLARS

115 W PACIFIC AVE PJay Mcconnell. Fun bright colors play on the canvas of works by talented artist, Pjay Mcconnell. Wine by the glass or bottle. Open until 8pm.

NYNE BAR & BISTRO

232 W SPRAGUE AVE Rosanne Franciosi is a local artist and resident of Olympia. She has shown her work at New Moon Café, Café Vita, Gravity Beer Market, The Washington Center, and many of the Olympia arts walks.

PINOT'S PALETTE

32 W SECOND AVE Showcasing Pinot’s Palette Artists: Ali Blackwood, Andriel Scharff, Ashley Moss, Caine Van de Water, and Heather Hofstetter. Come check out the studio and sip on some local wine. Mini self-guided paintings are optional for $10 and are offered on a first-come, first-served basis.

VINTAGE HILL CELLARS

319 W SECOND AVE Michelle Inman, a Spokane native, looks to capture the essence of the Pacific Northwest through a wide variety of photographic interludes. She suspends emotions and memories in a patented blend of mainstream and abstract art. Join for the artist's reception from 5 to 8pm. Cheers!

UNIVERSITY DISTRICT THE COMMUNITY BUILDING

35 W MAIN AVE Rachel Nichols. Local artist, Rachel Nichols has been painting for most of her life. Rachel is inspired by nature, freedom, and the vibrancy of life experienced through wanderings in the Northwest and beyond. The collection is a series of watercolor, mixed media & acrylic paintings & illustrations.

SARANAC ART PROJECTS

25 W MAIN AVE Bernadette Vielbig and Otis Bardwell. “You Can’t Look Back,” is a pairing of two original & independent artists working within historical context while seeking imagery & forms.

V DU V WINES

12 S SCOTT ST Caren Furbeyre with music by Crushpad. Original and fresh paintings from Spokane's own Caren Furbeyre and an eclectic mix of music from house band, Crushpad.

NORTH BANK AREA PROJECT 2:24

626 N MONROE ST Oregon transplant, Jasen Hansen, has won numerous awards for his acrylic painting as well as fine woodwork and bronze sculpture. EWU design student, Hannah Pierce, shows her photography. Project 2:24 is both an active art gallery and quality tattoo studio. Grand opening event June 2 to 7, half-price tattoos and complimentary custom design and consultation.

THE NEST IN KENDALL YARDS

1335 W SUMMIT PKWY Musician Nick Grow. Join us at The Nest in Kendall Yards for art, music, light fare and beverages. Indoor/outdoor.

THE WANDERING TABLE

1242 W SUMMIT PKWY Featuring Kay O'Rourke. In the past 20 years, Kay’s focus has been concentrated throughout the northwest, including Helena, Montana’s Holter Museum of Art, Seattle’s Seafirst Gallery, Gonzaga University, and Spokane’s Museum of Arts and Culture.

Downtown business who would like to be included in future First Friday events, please contact info@downtownspokane.net

Enjoy Copper River Salmon from the Best! Anthony’s is a three-time winner of the Alaska Airlines Copper Chef Cook Off. Join us now for special prices on fresh Copper River salmon, Monday thru Thursday nights starting at $21.95. downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org

|

AT S P O K A N E FA L L S ◆

510 N. Lincoln St. • 509-328-9009 Visit our website for seasonal availability www.anthonys.com Brought to you by Downtown Spokane and Spokane Arts


L

… And Eat it Too Examining the current state of the wedding cake as wedding season hits its stride BY AMY MILLER-KREZELAK An almond poppy seed cake by Happy Cake Co. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

38 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

ong ago, newlyweds were celebrated with a crumbling of wheat atop their heads, symbolizing fertility, bountiful harvest and good luck. The Victorians introduced wedding cake as a lavish symbol of those same virtues. Thankfully, the cake stuck; we no longer crumble wheat on the heads of newlyweds. My short engagement meant I spent just a brief moment as a fiancée and an even briefer moment in search of a wedding cake. My laissez-faire attitude toward my own cake notwithstanding, I jumped at the chance to attend a cleverly themed bridal shower: a cake-tasting event intended to help bride-to-be Charlotte Boutz select her wedding cake. “I wanted to have an activity that would help people get to know each other, and I needed to pick cake flavors,” says Boutz. On the recommendation of her wedding venue, Beacon Hill, Boutz chose Happy Cake Co. for the big day. She was impressed by the variety of cake flavors and knew she would get exactly what she wanted. Boutz’s approach reflects a common trend you’ll see this wedding season. Gone are the days of a lonely, plastic-looking cake sitting in the corner waiting to be trotted out, presented and forgotten. Wedding cakes have become more personal, a true reflection of the couple themselves. “A lot of people are doing rustic, less pretentious weddings,” says Happy Cake owner Diana Tesdal. “People are choosing something closer to their heart.” Tesdal crafts cakes with a designer’s eye. They range from elegant and multitiered to simple, sweet and playful, and she’s inspired by the ideas that couples bring to her at the first tasting meeting. “I’ve been baking for about 30 years,” says Tesdal. “I love sitting down with the bride and designing her own cake. We love the custom part of it. We like to be challenged. We don’t balk at anything.” Tesdal’s baking skills are impressive. Her lemon cake, layered with Key lime filling, is light and uplifting, a perfect finish to a substantial meal. Her popular tuxedo cake is a masterpiece of layers; chocolate and vanilla cake alternate with raspberry filling, offering a little something for everyone. Her fillings are enticing, her cakes have a perfect crumble and her fondant frosting is so light it melts in your mouth. Mika Maloney, the brainchild behind Batch Bakeshop, approaches baking with a similar awareness


of form and function when she crafts her wedding cakes and sweets. Maloney has developed her baking style with a keen eye for the rustic and romantic. Though her career began as a wholesale baker for local small businesses, Maloney finds wedding cakes to be a welcome addition to her routine. “Doing wholesale, I didn’t have a lot of interaction with people, and I realized I got to interact in a celebration, a time of indulgence. Partly because I didn’t have a portfolio, the people who started coming to me had the more rustic flair,” says Maloney. Maloney credits her relationship with local, seasonal offerings for her inspiration. “I’m influenced by flavor and what I see and buy at the farmers’ markets. I read a lot of cookbooks. I look at wedding magazines and blogs, but I try and look at the bigger food trends,” explains Maloney. “I like the line of savory and sweet. People respond well to that.” Maloney’s reputation for pairing flavors and offering beguiling combinations is well deserved. Her spicy ginger syrup cake is tempered by an impossibly rich vanilla buttercream. Her maceratedberries layer cake, adorned with just a touch of frosting and sliced almonds, is epically decadent and totally unpretentious.

Post Street Ale House.

Good Food. Cold Beer.

Best Ever Cheeseburger $9.50 Bride-to-be Charlotte Boutz, right, serves Happy Cake Co.’s Tuxedo Cake with raspberry filling to Karen Fitzpatrick during a bridal shower. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO Recently, both bakers have seen great changes in the appearance of wedding cakes. Cakes are smaller. Frosting is textured into ruffles, ribbons or stucco. Colors range from metallic to handpainted designs. Flowers are shaped from fondant or plucked from gardens. Couples choose compelling flavors based on the season in which they are wed. Fruit fillings, light frosting or no frosting at all are popular for summer weddings; winter weddings see a move toward rich, opulent chocolates paired with mocha or caramel fillings. So which cake will Boutz choose for the big day? Whatever the choice, it’s sure to reflect who she is and how she and her partner see themselves as a couple. And it will be undeniably delicious. n food@inlander.com Happy Cake Co. • 1312 N. Mullan Rd., Spokane Valley • 924-8455 • happycakeco.com; Batch Bakeshop • 827 W. First • 413-3759 • batch-bakeshop.com

26 beers on Tap Best Food in Town 7 Hi-Def TVS Happy Hour 4-6 pm Daily

poststreetalehouse.com 509 789 6900 JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 39


FOOD | OPENING 37 Years Of Extensive Successful Experience

T E T CLEAN RAN SALE

THIS WEE KEND - JU CE EVENT WE’VE N E 6, 7, & 8 S L A S PRICES HED UP TO 75% OF F

!

GUITAR S & EF,FDERUMS, AMP CTS PE DALSS

GIVEAW AYS ALL FRO WEEKE

– ALL O G UITARS

:

M WARWIMARSHALNLD , & BLAC CK, K STAR

N SALE

CLEARA

NCE AM

!–

PS:

DRUMS

:

JOIN SATURUDS THIS FREE RAY FOR OUR

SATURDE-STRING AY (LIM IT ONE RE STRING P E

R CUSTOM

ER)

NORTH DIVISION 8014 N. Division, Spokane, WA (509) 487-8888

40 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

Selkirk Pizza has a sleek interior and an innovative ordering system. MEGHAN KIRK PHOTO

Quick Swap

Fat Daddy’s in Wandermere is reborn as Selkirk Pizza BY CHEY SCOTT

F

ans of Fat Daddy’s Pizza at the Wandermere Mall in North Spokane shouldn’t be disappointed that the longstanding restaurant was recently replaced by Selkirk Pizza & Tap House. Selkirk’s owners are more or less the same, and so is a large portion of the menu’s familyfriendly American food. The most noticeable changes are a complete décor revamp and a new food ordering system that lets patrons stopping in for a quick bite enter and pay for their order at a kiosk before sitting down. Liz Nelson owns Selkirk with her husband Curt Nelson and their business partner Todd Phelps, through their company Nelson Phelps Hospitality. She says Fat Daddy’s was previously owned solely by Phelps, but he’d been looking to make some changes to its business model, so the Nelsons teamed up with him to reintroduce it as Selkirk. Together, the couple and Phelps also own downtown’s Steelhead Bar & Grille, Morty’s Tap & Grille on the South Hill and the Fieldhouse Pizza & Pub near Joe Albi Stadium. Phelps also separately owns the Screaming Yak on West Francis Avenue. “We didn’t want to change it so much we’d lose the clientele that Todd had already built, but we knew we wanted to follow the format of Fieldhouse, making it more conducive to teams and families,” says Liz Nelson.

That’s the main reason behind the addition of a self-service ordering system, she adds, which streamlines dining. By placing their orders and paying for their food at the hostess stand when they walk in, patrons don’t need to wait for a server to box up food or bring the check. Servers do, however, check on customers throughout their stay. Selkirk also offers full-service dining in the bar, as well as in the family seating area for customers who don’t want to self-order. The trio’s experience owning and operating several established local restaurants is apparent, from the plush booths and concise menu presentation to rustic wood repurposed in its décor — the work of local architectural designer/fabricator Robert Sevilla Naudon. His work is also seen, most notably, in Steelhead’s bar. Selkirk’s menu focuses on specialty pizza — like the Columbia, featuring an Alfredo sauce base with bacon, chicken, tomatoes and veggies ($12-$21). Other highlights are an all-you-caneat salad bar ($7; $5 with a pizza), sandwiches ($9-$10), pastas ($10-$12) and calzones ($10-$12). Though many menu items from Fat Daddy’s remained through the transition, most have been renamed. n Selkirk Pizza & Tap House • 12424 N. Division • Open daily, from 11 am-midnight • 464-3644 • facebook.com/selkirkpizza


FOOD | OPENING

The First Meal Egg It On lets you experience breakfast, not just eat it BY JO MILLER

M

aybe when you’re out shopping, a café catches your eye and you stop in for lunch, or on your way home from a day out, you drive by a grill and decide to order dinner. But to dine out for breakfast, you have to pull your drowsy head out of bed. “Breakfast is still a destination,” says Rick Leukert, the CEO and operating partner of Egg It On, a new breakfast restaurant in Spokane Valley serving massive portions of sweet, savory and egg-filled dishes. When you decide to go out for breakfast, he says, you get up with that intent and it’s your primary reason for leaving the house. The focus at Egg it On is clearly on the first meal of the day, and the space has a wake-up-it’ll-be-a-good-day feel, with quirky black-and-white egg photography, a nostalgic tile wall and bright blues and yellows in between. The space previously housed Hooters, but that restaurant’s two out-of-state owners decided to close it and open this eatery in May using a completely different concept. Leukert says Hooters didn’t seem like a good fit for the community and thought something more family-friendly would better suit the demographic. Next door, the Owl Club Casino, owned by the same partners, recently closed briefly for construction and reopened with a new name. The owners plan to open another restaurant — this one focused on burgers and craft beer — in the same complex in mid-June. You’ll also be able to order from the Egg It On menu starting at 10 pm. Urban-farm fusion is the theme running through Egg It On’s menu. Leukert describes it as “big, hearty meals for hardworking people” made with local ingredients, mixed with urban fare featuring well-known products. Their Crunch Berry French Toast ($10), for example, has thick slices of brioche bread crusted with Captain Crunch cereal, topped with fresh berries, a drizzle of raspberry sauce and scoop of pecan butter. On the savory side, you can get items like sausage pot pie ($10), biscuits and gravy topped with eggs ($10) and sage-fried chicken benedict ($13). Drink your dose of morning vitamins with fresh-squeezed vegetable and fruit juices ($4) or breakfaststyle cocktails and mimosas.  Egg It On • 16208 E. Indiana • Mon-Sun, 7 am-2 pm • eggiton. com • 924-9464

Twist Checking– created to help you save money! Discounts on shopping, dining, entertainment and travel.

Retailers listed are not sponsors of this program or offer. Participating retailers are subject to change at any time and without notice.

BaZing gets you savings from local and national retailers, with offers changing all the time.

watrust.com/Twist

#BeINC BeINCREDIBLE JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 41


FOOD | UPDATE

NON-SMOKING BAR

A PREMIUM CIGAR LOUNGE

Think of us for Father’s Day Gift Cards • Premium Cigar Specials • Accessories NEW VARIETIES WEEKLY OF MICRO DRAFT BEERS & WINE HAPPY HOUR 4PM-6PM MONDAY - SUNDAY

• Free Wine & Beer Tastings • Savory & Simple Food Menu • Growlers Filled • 14 HD Flat Screen TV’s

HORSESHOE PITS COMING SOON!

LOW IDAHO PRICES

CARTONasS as Low

ON FUEL & TOBACCO!

$28.49

WALK-IN HUMIDOR!

PADRON, ROCKY PATEL, GURKHA, LaPALINA, ROOM 101 & MORE

SUN - THUR 5:30 -11 • FRI & SAT 5:30 -12:00 AM

PM

AM

AM

7200 W. Seltice Way (I-90 Exit 299, next to Cabela’s)

(208) 777-7778 • (877)390-5778 www.StateLinePlaza.com

42 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

THE HOP SHOP

Twin sisters Emily Redington and Mel Wood recently bought the Hop Shop. MATT WEIGAND PHOTO

3803 S. Grand Blvd. | 747-9700

F

or four years, brothers Glen and Andy Gardner ran the Hop Shop on the South Hill, but at the beginning of May, they sold the craft beer bar to twin sisters Mel Wood and Emily Redington. “We thought it’d be an awesome transition from two brothers to two sisters,” says Wood, who had been a regular at the Hop Shop for two years. The sisters don’t plan to change the bar’s simple offerings: beer and wine. Local and regional brews will

continue to rotate through the 11 taps, but Wood says they want to increase the presence of food trucks, so customers can have some grub with their drinks. The only visible change patrons or passersby might notice is the signage. Wood, a graphic designer for 12 years, created a new logo picturing a pint instead of a hops cluster, so there’s no mistaking the neighborhood gathering place for a beer-making supply store. — JO MILLER


FOOD | SAMPLER

DESTINATION DINING THE BOATHOUSE BAR & GRILL 3799 E. Hayden Lake Rd. | Hayden (208) 772-5057 Who wants to cook after a day of leisure on the lake? That’s where the Boathouse comes in, with its bird’seye view of the Hayden Marina. The best seat in the house is on the deck. Drop in for appetizers, like the stuffed Brie and roasted garlic, or linger over a plate of their popular fish tacos while you watch the sunset on the lake.

HYDRA STEAKHOUSE 115 Lake St. | Sandpoint (208) 263-7123 You’d be hard-pressed to find many other eateries that have been alive and kicking in Sandpoint since 1975. One of those is the Hydra, which continues to produce reliably priced, tastily cooked steaks, including their well-known baseball-cut top sirloin, which comes in both 8- and 16-ounce sizes. If beef isn’t your game, the Hydra also has a full seafood menu in addition to pasta, sandwiches and other options.

HILL’S RESORT 4777 W. Lakeshore Rd. | Priest Lake (208) 443-2551 Housed in a rustic yet upscale lodge overlooking Luby Bay on Priest Lake, Hill’s Resort’s restaurant boasts a menu of Northwest standards, including steaks and their signature baby back pork ribs, in addition to creative seafood options you can choose from while sipping on a specialty cocktail from the bar. When you wake up in the morning, you might as well come back to Hill’s — their breakfast, available on their recently enlarged deck, is just as good as dinner.

KLINK’S ON THE LAKE 18617 W. Williams Lake Rd. | Cheney 235-2391 On the banks of Williams Lake, 15 miles southwest of Cheney, Klink’s prepares pan-fried oyster specials on Tuesdays, serves up a breakfast buffet on Saturdays and Sundays, and offers new dishes like shrimp and grits — large white shrimp sautéed in lobster-tomato broth ($15). All of the restaurant’s sauces and dressings are made in-house, and their meat and fish are never frozen. The sirloin-brisket burgers, coupled with happy hour and a sunset, make this a worthy destination.

LOVITT 149 Hwy. 395 S. | Colville 684-5444 Overlooking the Colville Valley and the farms that supply the fresh strawberries for its desserts, Lovitt uses only local and seasonal foods — even in the greenest towns, that’s a hard menu to find. Its offerings change with the crop yield, but vegetarian and vegan options abound, and all pair well with the view of a sunset from the homey back porch. TRINITY AT CITY BEACH 58 Bridge St. | Sandpoint (208) 255-7558 Trinity’s patio is practically on City Beach, offering picturesque views of Lake Pend Oreille. No room outdoors? No worries. The entire back wall is made of glass, allowing a view from any seat. The menu, featuring choices like steamed mussels, filet mignon and portobello mushroom ravioli, is complemented by the extensive wine list. 

ENTRÉE

Get the scoop on the local food scene with our Entrée newsletter. Visit Inlander.com/newsletter to sign up.

Artisan Breads & European Pastries Made from scratch daily!

Croissants · Cinnamon Rolls Bear Claws · Espresso & Lattes Wide Assortment of Breads Sandwiches & Daily Soups

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 43


Groundhog War

Cage, knowing nothing about battle, having had no training, is indeed thrown into the front, where he is killed. That’s right: Tom Cruise is killed in the first act. Then he wakes up, is sent back to that beach battle, is killed again, then wakes up. This goes on for a bit, and it’s impossible not to make a Groundhog Day connection as Cage relives the same day over and over. Even though the time-loop business is brought up again and again as the driving force in the film’s plot, this is no Groundhog Day. Whenever Cage relives the beach scene, he does it as a better soldier, having figured out Normandy and D-Day, because things splinter off quickly how to fire and reload his weapons, with the knowledge into very different tangents. of what’s going to happen to him and those around him. There are lessons to be learned here: When you’re He can sidestep where a alien might be attacking, or push in the armed forces, don’t cross your superior officers. away someone about to be crushed by a falling aircraft. Cruise’s Major Cage has the cushy job of working in One of the reasons the film works so well is that it U.S. Army Media Relations, doing PR work rather than makes up a set of rules pertaining fighting. But when General Brigham to the plot’s logic, then ignores (Brendan Gleeson) assigns him to head up EDGE OF TOMORROW them and makes up different a movie crew at the front line of a big atRated PG-13 rules. Another reason is the way tack they’re mounting against the Mimics, Directed by Doug Liman it manages to blend its PG-13and Cage balks, then downright refuses to Starring Tom Cruise, Emily Blunt, Bill Paxton style violence with humor, some take part in anything that could get him of it courtesy of dialogue or body hurt ... well, that’s when he finds himself language, some from its approach to fast-paced, repetitive knocked out, later realizing he’s been demoted to private, editing. labeled a coward in front of his fellow soldiers, and is on The best thing about the film is Tom Cruise. He’s his way to the front lines, not with a camera crew, but convincing in every mood he plays, every reaction he with guns attached to his exo-suit. He doesn’t even know gives, and there are plenty of both to go around. Cocky, how to turn off the safety. frightened, funny, he plays them all well, and his big nose Here’s where the film is flawed by a small glitch, one is an amazing thing to see in 3-D.  that goes away and will quickly be forgotten. Private

Tom Cruise lives the same day again and again in the stunning Edge of Tomorrow BY ED SYMKUS

T

om Cruise sure likes his science fiction. Since first dabbling with it in Vanilla Sky (2001), he’s gone on to star in Minority Report, War of the Worlds and Oblivion. His newest, Edge of Tomorrow, adapted from All You Need Is Kill, the 2009 English-language novel by Japanese writer Hiroshi Sakurazaka, is full-fledged, spectacular science fiction. An alien race of Mimics — scary, fast-moving, multitentacled creatures — has invaded Earth, and over a five-year period, has taken over most of Europe, bloodily mowing down anyone who gets in their path. An international military has come up with the United Defense Force, an elite group of specially trained soldiers who are outfitted in exoskeleton body armor, with massive guns attached. The film also is an example of full-fledged, spectacular warfare, with fighting men and women jumping out of aircraft onto a beach in France, where they are slaughtered by enemy forces who know they’re coming. Beach, France, slaughter ... that’s about the only nod toward

44 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

Emily Blunt and Tom Cruise live the same gruesome day over and over again.


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS EDGE OF TOMORROW

Tom Cruise has picked his science-fiction films wisely (Minority Report) and less so (Oblivion). But he made the right choice on this full-blown action movie about an attack on Earth by creepy, bloodthirsty aliens, and the war waged on them by our international military. It’s also a trapped-in-a-time-loop story, similar to Groundhog Day (but more violent and funnier) in which Cruise is an unwilling soldier who keeps getting killed in battle, then waking up to fight again, knowing what’s to come. It’s a little murky in plotting, but big on excitement, with a terrific performance by Cruise. (ES) Rated PG-13

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS

The girl has cancer, the boy is in remission from cancer; this story can only end badly. As far as teenage cancer love stories go, John Green’s recent young adult novel of the same name isn’t half bad — not nearly as sappy as A Walk to

RETURNING

FADING GIGOLO

New York bookstore owner Murray (Woody Allen) and quiet florist Fioravante (John Turturro) team up as an oddly matched pimp/gigolo duo in this film, written and directed by Turturro. The lonely, cash-strapped pair decide to try making money offering sex to lonely, older (albeit gorgeous) women, played by Sharon Stone, Sofia Vergara and Vanessa Paradis. Somehow it works. In the end, though, this film sets out to be just what it is and nothing more: an awkward attempt at a rom-com in which Allen plays a goofy old man pimping out Turturro. At Magic Lantern (CS) Rated R

NOW PLAYING THE AMAZING SPIDER MAN 2

The new version of Spider Man returns with even more baddies for our favorite former nerd to battle. Balancing both romance with his girlfriend, Gwen (Emma Stone), as well as the everyday troubles of being amazing, Peter Parker (Andrew Garfield) has a lot on his plate. The birth of a new villain, Electro (Jamie Foxx) who seems to be stronger than our wayward hero, brings a new revelation. (ER) PG-13

BELLE

Dido Elizabeth Belle (Gugu MbathaRaw) has always lived her life between two worlds. The illegitimate child of Admiral Sir John Lindsay (Matthew Goode), Belle is of a higher rank than the servants, but cannot eat with her own family because of her mixed-race status. Strangled by class systems and prejudice, Belle begins to find her voice only when she falls in love with a man who wants to change the world for the better, but does not have the rank her family requires. (ER) Rated PG

BLENDED

In a movie together again, Adam Sandler and Drew Barrymore (Team Sandlermore, if you will) head to Africa. They play Jim and Lauren, a couple who endure an awful blind date, then somehow end up at the same resort half a world away. Both have kids, which makes things even crazier, right? When Lauren starts falling for these motherless kids, she’s in danger of falling for the whole package. Directed by frequent Sandler collaborator Frank Coraci (The Wedding Singer, The Waterboy), Blended is full of the sort of silliness Sandler has been taking to the bank with the Grown Ups franchise. (MB) Rated PG-13

BRICK MANSIONS

Paul Walker, in one of his last roles he

THE INLANDER’S MOVIE NIGHT AT

Remember. With Shailene Woodley (The Descendants, Divergent) as the lead for this film adaption, many lovesick teenage girls and their boyfriends will show up for this one. (LJ) Rated PG-13

played before dying in a car wreck last year, plays Damien, a Detroit cop whose father, also a cop, was killed by a notorious drug lord. Now, this cop is going into one of the city’s worst neighborhoods to try to ferret out this bad dude and get a little payback for dear ol’ Dad. (MB) Rated PG-13

CHEF

Nothing is terribly surprising in Chef’s plot, but its up-to-date narrative ingredients of a food truck, Twitter and the Internet add a freshness to the overall product that blends nicely with its heart and soul. It’s been more than a decade since Jon Favreau, who directs, writes and stars, has imbued a film with this kind of warmth. As the lead, Favreau plays a chef who once was at the top of the nation’s culinary scene, but is now frustrated in his role as a chef for an insufferable owner (Dustin Hoffman). So the chef sets out on his own, opening a food truck with friends and family. (MB) Rated R

DRAFT DAY

Director Ivan Reitman (who did, among many other things, Ghostbusters) brings us a relatively accurate depiction of the NFL draft and all the backroom shenanigans. Kevin Costner stars as the GM of the Cleveland Browns who, on the eve of the draft, has seen both his personal life and his career wander onto shaky ground. Now, he has to decide whether to take a heralded quarterback as the first pick. (MB) Rated PG-13

FED UP

The issue of obesity has been a muchtalked-about problem in our society for a couple decades now, but it seems like none of the solutions have really stuck. This documentary, narrated by ...continued on next page

NAPOLEON DYNAMITE THUR. JUNE 12 RATED PG

BING CROSBY THEATER $

4 MOVIE $ 4 DRAFTS $ 3 CANS With an intermission for your beer drinking pleasure

BEER FLOWS AT 6 PM MOVIE SHOWS AT 7 PM STRIKE A POSE IN THE NAPOLEON THEMED PHOTOBOOTH!

FAT TIRE BIKE

AFTER PARTY AT

GIVEAWAY

FEATURING:

FAT TIRE SPECIALS, GOSH-DARN QUESADILLAS, TOTS AND MORE!

RAFFLE TICKET WITH EVERY ADMISSION EXTRA TICKET FOR THOSE WHO BIKE IN

4 DRAFTS: SUMMER HELLES, TRIP SERIES: OYSTER STOUT $ 3 CANS: FAT TIRE, RANGER IPA, SNAPSHOT WHEAT

$

& SHIFT PALE LAGER

BIKE-IN MOVIE!

SECURE PARKING FOR YOUR BIKE ACROSS THE STREET FROM THE BING! B • I • C • Y • C • L • E • S

inlander.com

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 45


WEEK OF JUNE 6TH THRU JUNE 12TH

THE MAGIC LANTERN FRI JUNE 6TH - THUR JUNE 12TH

2

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL (100 MIN -R)

$ 50

Fri/Sat: 4:00, 8:30, Sun: 2:00, 6:15, *opening! Tues-Thurs: 8:00 FADING GIGILO (90 MIN -R) *opening! Fri/Sat: 7:00, Sun: 3:30, Tues-Thurs: 6:45

WEDNESDAYS

5

$ 00

THE LUNCHBOX (105 MIN- PG)

ALL SHOWS ALL TIMES

Fri/Sat: 6:15, Sun: 4:00, Tues-Thurs: 6:00

FED UP (94 MIN PG)

Fri/Sat: 5:00, Sun: 1:30, Tues-Thurs: 5:00 LOCKE (80 MIN -R) *last week Fri/Sat: 8:45, Sun: 7:00, Tues-Thurs: 8:30

The Lego Movie Fri 5:00 Sat-Sun 12:00 5:00 Mon-Thurs 5:00

FINDING VIVIAN MAIER (82 MIN) *last week Fri/Sat: 3:30, Sun: 5:15, Tues-Thurs: 4:30 UNDER THE SKIN (108 MIN) *last day Sun: 8:30 25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $8 www.magiclanternspokane.com

Divergent PG-13

Fri 7:10, Sat-Sun 2:10 7:10 Mon-Thurs 7:10

The Grand Budapest Hotel Fri-Thurs 9:55pm

The Rocky Horror Picture Show Sat Midnight

Home School Movie Divergent | Wed 2:30

924 W. GARLAND • 509.327.1050 WWW.GARLANDTHEATER.COM

Spokane Public Radio is there for you when you need news

& information.

Are YOU there for Spokane

Public Radio? Make a difference.

Make a financial pledge TODAY.

FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING news legend Katie Couric, points the finger for this epidemic at sugar and the people who put it in our kids’ food. The film takes to task everyone from presidential administrations, the FDA and, most poignantly, the mega corporations who produce the vast majority of our country’s foods. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated PG

FINDING VIVIAN MAIER

Finding Vivian Maier recounts the discovery by John Maloof (who co-directed this documentary with Charlie Siskel) of a reclusive photographer’s tens of thousands of mysterious photographs and the filmmakers ensuing quest to discover the artist’s identity. All evidence suggests Maier, who died in 2009, was very private; conjecture suggests she was in some way mentally ill. At Magic Lantern (LW) Not Rated

GODZILLA

Without even attempting to capture the spirit of the sometimes grim, sometimes goofy series of Japanese Godzilla films that ran from 1954-2004, this second Hollywood attempt at a movie about the big, gray lizard with radioactive breath is convoluted in its story lines and plodding in its presentation. The supposed monstrous star of the film is in a supporting role, overshadowed by lots of scientific babble and two other monsters called Mutos who are more interested in making Muto babies than knocking down buildings. Of course, real estate goes down when Godzilla finally goes up against them. But that good stuff is too little and comes far too late. (ES) Rated PG-13

GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL

Wes Anderson’s latest features a narrative structure in which the central story isn’t merely a flashback, but a flashback nesting in a flashback nesting inside another flashback. A woman visits a memorial for a writer; that writer (Tom Wilkinson), circa 1985, describes his encounter as a young man (Jude Law) in 1968 with Mr. Zero Moustafa (F. Murray Abraham), owner of the once-glorious Grand Budapest Hotel in the “former republic of Zubowka.” Mr. Moustafa in turn relates his experiences as young protégé (Tony Revolori) of the Grand Budapest’s veteran concierge, Monsieur Gustave (Ralph Fiennes), in 1932. Soon, Gustave learns he’s inherited a priceless painting from one of his frequent guests, but is then framed for her murder. At Magic Lantern (SR) Rated R

JODOROWSKY’S DUNE

Become a Member, Renew or make an Extra Gift TODAY to make it happen! Call 1-800-328-5729 or visit www.SpokanePublicRadio.org 46 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

Alejandro Jodorowsky envisioned Orson Welles, Mick Jagger and Salvador Dali as some of the cast in his pageto-screen epic Dune. But it never happened. The cult filmmaker’s dreams to create one of the biggest sci-fi films in history, based on Frank Herbert’s novel, crumbled apart after years of work. But in its wake, Dune’s death planted seeds for what are now genre classics, like Star Wars and Alien. Director Frank Pavich’s documentary on the film — the most ahead-of-its-time movie ever, some say — tells the story of what Dune could have been. (CS) Rated PG-13

LOCKE

Tom Hardy plays Ivan Locke, a family man and construction foreman battling a cold as he drives alone on an at-first mysterious mission. We’re tasked to piece together the source of conflict between Locke and a series of callers (heard but never seen), ranging from his boss to his wife to a hospital in London. But kick out the legs of the plot engine — where Locke is going and why — and what sticks is its stirring portrait of a detail-oriented man trying to stay true to his self-defined code of honor. Locke also delivers a couple of soliloquies to his dead dad. (KJ) Rated R

THE LUNCHBOX

In this Mumbai romance, the famously efficient lunch delivery system, Dabbawalas, makes a mistake and causes a grieving widower and a lonely and unhappy housewife to find each other. This causes the two to eventually develop a relationship when they send each other notes through their shared lunchbox. At Magic Lantern (PS)

MALEFICENT

As one of the most terrifying and iconic Disney villains, Maleficent (Angelina Jolie) has had many questions surrounding the origins of her background. This newly re-imagined flick seeks to explain exactly how the fallen fairy became so evil, and why she chose to act out against innocent Princess Aurora (Elle Fanning). As cursed child becomes young woman, Maleficent must make drastic decisions to save her kingdom of the Moors, even if it hurts her in the process. (ER) PG

MILLION DOLLAR ARM

Between its underdog story, charming characters and light (but consistent) humor, Million Dollar Arm has got universal appeal. Jon Hamm stars as reallife sports agent JB Bernstein, who’s desperate for an outside-the-box idea after striking out with American pro athletes. Bernstein gets the idea to go

to India to find young cricket bowlers to convert into baseball pitchers, and soon finds himself as a fish out of water (SS) Rated PG

A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST

In this modern western comedy, a timid sheep farmer, Albert Stark (Seth McFarlane), is dumped by his girlfriend (Amanda Seyfried) after shying away from a gunfight. Soon after, he becomes enamored with the beautiful new woman that arrives in town (Charlize Theron). They spark a romance and she helps him develop his courage. It is not until her husband, an outlaw, arrives for revenge that Albert is inspired to truly test his newfound courage. The film is produced and co-written by Seth McFarlane. (MB) Rated R

NEIGHBORS

This film casts Seth Rogen in a comfortable role as a genial pot-smoker, and a wonderfully wild Rose Byrne in a comfortable role where she’s allowed to speak with her own Australian accent, as Mac and Kelly are forced to contend with the Delta Psi fraternity buying the suburban house next door to theirs. OK premise, awful result. (SR) Rated R

X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST

In the latest installment of this Marvel franchise, we open on a nasty future: dark, post-apocalyptic skies and ruined cities left in the wake of the ongoing genocide of mutants and humans by robot Sentinels. The sci-fi Judgment Day has come and the Terminators aren’t even bothering to imprison survivors in the Matrix. Professor Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart) has a plan to stop the Sentinel war decades in the past, before it even begins. There will be time travel and everything is gonna get fixed. Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Hugh Jackman, Peter Dinklage, Ian McKellan and Michael Fassbender. (MJ) Rated PG-13 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES) ANGELES) (LOS

Locke Locke Neighbors Neighbors

(OUT (OUT OF OF 100) 100)

82 77 75 74

Finding Finding Vivian Vivian Maier Maier X-MEN: Days Days of...Past of...Past X-MEN:

68 56

Chef Chef Million Dollar Dollar Arm Arm Million Malefi Maleficent cent

DON’T DON’T MISS MISS IT IT

METACRITIC.COM METACRITIC.COM

55 WORTH WORTH $10 $10

WATCH WATCH IT IT AT AT HOME HOME

SKIP SKIP IT IT


FILM | EVENT

Adv. Tix on Sale HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2 EDGE OF TOMORROW [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sat.(1200 300) 710 1000 Sun.(1200 300) 600 840 TEAM HOT WHEELS: THE ORIGIN OF AWESOME EVENT (NR) Sat. - Sun.1100 AM EDGE OF TOMORROW IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(100 355) 640 920 THE FAULT IN OUR STARS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sat.(1130 1230 230 330) 630 730 930 1030 Sun.(1130 1230 230 330) 630 830 930 MALEFICENT (PG) ★ Fri. - Sat.(1140 220 345) 450 720 900 950 Sun.(1140 220 345) 500 800 850 A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(110 350) 700 955 Sun.(110 350) 630 910 MALEFICENT IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sat.(1240 PM) 620 PM Sun.(1240 PM) 615 PM BLENDED [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri.(1250 PM) 740 PM Sat.740 PM Sun.(335 PM) 645 PM X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sat.(1220 PM 320 PM) 705 PM Sun.(1220 PM 320 PM) 620 PM X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sat.1010 PM Sun.915 PM

He will not share his tots with you.

Time Travel

GODZILLA IN 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sat.(1210 PM) 940 PM Sun.(1210 PM) 900 PM GODZILLA [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sat.(310 PM) 650 PM Sun.(310 PM) 605 PM NEIGHBORS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sat.(120) 410 750 1015 Sun.(120) 410 700 925 AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #2 [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sat.(335 PM) 1020 PM Sun.930 PM

Napoleon Dynamite hasn’t aged; it’s just stayed weird

HEAVEN IS FOR REAL [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sat.(1150 240) 610 910 Sun.(1150 240) 520 810

BY MIKE BOOKEY

EDGE OF TOMORROW

PG-13 Daily 9:10 Sat-Sun (11:10) (1:50) In 2D Daily (2:20) (4:10) 6:40 7:20 9:45 Sat-Sun (11:50)

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS

PG-13 Daily (3:50) (4:50) 6:30 9:20 Sat-Sun (10:40) (1:10)

MALEFICENT

PG Daily 9:10 In 2D Daily (2:20) (4:40) 6:50 Sat-Sun (10:45) (12:00)

mer pants and that Deb goes door to door selling glamour shots and handmade trinkets, but it also adds to a bizarre sense of desperation the Hesses wove into this story. These poor people are so out of touch that they’re not just holding onto outdated styles and technology, they’re holding onto the worst of that period’s tackiness in the hopes that things will get better. And things are not great for Napoleon. His parents are mysteriously absent. His brother appears to be suffering from some sort of behavioral disorder. His schoolmates exist only to taunt him. There’s a lot of talk about time in this movie, too. Uncle Rico wants to go back to 1982 to fulfill dreams of football stardom and hot-tubbing with his soulmate. They actually procure a time machine online (because you bought things online in 2004), which does nothing but damage their nards. It’s like all these characters want to go anywhere but the present, because it doesn’t matter to them that this present makes for a hilarious movie. It just goes to show that you can’t escape the present, no matter how many magic crystals you have. You can’t go back in time. But you can sure as hell dress like it. n Intended Publication Date(s): Friday, June 06, 2014. Saturday, June 07, 2014. Sunday, June 08, 2014. Published WA, Inlander [I_Directory_Update to Publish or Proof] 1.7" X 11" Produced: 7:00 PM ET, 6/3/2014 060314070041 Regal 865-925-9554

T

here’s this weird thing about Napoleon Dynamite. Well, there’s a lot of weird things about it, but if you watch it these days, as you should with us at our next Suds and Cinema event, it doesn’t feel as dated as a decade-old flick should. This is because the quirky indie film, which was shot for a mere $400,000 but improbably has raked in more than 100 times that much in theaters alone, never really existed in time to begin with. It was set in Preston, an actual town in rural southern Idaho that, at least in the mind of writers Jared and Jerusha Hess, was a place that existed outside of time. It was a place where Napoleon and his brother Kip could live in a painfully sheltered environment that allowed aspirations of becoming cage fighters, wolverine hunters or seducers of chat-room babes to be accepted as reality. You’ll hear people argue about that Napoleon Dynamite is an “eighties movie.” These are the people who refer to anything vaguely neon or hair-sprayed as “eighties,” when in fact they’re probably talking about stuff from 1994. But I digress. The film is decidedly not set in the 1980s, as we see during the opening credits, when Napoleon shows off his 2003-2004 Preston High School ID card. It’s a contemporary film, which makes everything from Napoleon’s top-loading VCR to his moon boots all the more ridiculous. This can all be damn confusing at times, even on repeat viewings, but it’s what makes the movie. It’s hilarious that Napoleon wears Ham-

Airway Heights 10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444

Suds & Cinema: Napoleon Dynamite • Thu, June 12 • Doors/bars open at 6 pm, movie at 7 pm • $4 • Bike-in movie with free bike parking • Featuring beer from New Belgium Brewing Company • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague

Adv. Tix on Sale HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2 THE FAULT IN OUR STARS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1230 1250 330 355) 645 715 950 1010 EDGE OF TOMORROW [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1215 315) 630 930 EDGE OF TOMORROW IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1245 345) 700 945 MALEFICENT (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1145 1205 245 300) 625 705 935 A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(100) 405 730 1020 MALEFICENT IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.1000 PM BLENDED [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1220 325) 640 940 X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1200 PM 340 PM) 655 PM

A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST

R Daily (4:50) 7:15 9:45 Sat-Sun (11:40) (2:15)

X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST

PG-13 Daily (4:00) 7:00 9:50 Sat-Sun (1:00)

BLENDED

PG-13 Daily (4:40) 7:15 9:35 Sat-Sun (11:30) (2:10)

GODZILLA

PG-13 Daily (4:20) 7:10 9:40 Sat-Sun (11:00) (1:40)

NEIGHBORS

R Daily (3:00) (5:15) 7:30 9:45 Sat-Sun (12:45)

MILLION DOLLAR ARM

PG Daily (4:15) 6:45 9:30 Sat-Sun (10:45) (1:30)

Wandermere

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

EDGE OF TOMORROW

PG-13 Daily (4:10) 9:10 Fri-Sun (11:10) In 2D Daily (11:50) (1:50) (2:20) (4:50) 6:40 7:20 9:45

THE FAULT IN OUR STARS

PG-13 Daily (1:10) (1:50) (3:50) (4:30) 6:30 7:00 9:20 9:45 Fri-Sun (10:40) (11:20)

MALEFICENT

X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.915 PM

PG Daily (4:00) 8:30 Fri-Sun (11:30) In 2D Daily (12:00) (1:50) (2:20) (4:40) 6:15 6:50 9:10 Fri-Sun (10:45)

GODZILLA [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1210 310) 615 920

R Daily (11:40) (2:15) (4:50) 7:15 9:45

NEIGHBORS [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1215 235) 650 1000

A MILLION WAYS TO DIE IN THE WEST X-MEN: DAYS OF FUTURE PAST

PG-13 Daily 9:50 In 2D Daily (1:00) (4:00) 7:00 Fri-Sun (10:20)

BLENDED

AMAZING SPIDER-MAN #2 [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(305 PM) 935 PM

PG-13 Daily (2:10) (4:40) 7:10 9:35 Fri-Sun (11:30)

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1130 AM) 630 PM

PG-13 Daily (1:40) (4:20) 7:10 9:35 Fri-Sun (11:00)

GODZILLA

MILLION DOLLAR ARM

PG Daily (1:30) (4:15) 6:45 9:30 Fri-Sun (10:45)

NEIGHBORS

R Daily (12:45) (3:00) (5:15) 7:30 9:45

THE AMAZING SPIDER-MAN 2

Adv. Tix on Sale HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 2

PG-13 Daily (12:15) (3:15) 6:15 9:15

RIO 2

TEAM HOT WHEELS: THE ORIGIN OF AWESOME EVENT (NR) Sat. - Sun.1100 AM Big Screen: THE FAULT IN OUR STARS [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri.(330 PM) 700 PM Sat.700 PM Times For 06/06 - 06/08

G Daily (11:45) (2:00) (4:15)

THE OTHER WOMAN PG-13 Daily 6:40 9:00

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 6/6/14-6/12/14

Regal_060514_4V_RR.pdf

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 47


June 5th- June 11th

THUR 6/5

412 W. Sprague Ave. 509.747.2302

Spokane’s Party Starter!

DANCE YOUR ASS OFF ALL WEEKEND LONG 6/6

FRI

$

$3 WELLS ALL WEEKEND!

3 FIREBALL FRIDAY DJ

Beauflexx

6/11

WED

6/10

TUES

6/9

MON

6/8

SUN

6/7

SAT

POWER HOUR

10:30-12AM Any drink - 6! • • • Beer Pong & Pool! • • • $

Seaside Church

3:00PM

LIVE MUSIC Tonight! TEQUILA TUESDAY

$4 Margaritas Pick ANY shot of tequila - $6!

Live Music!

WHISKEY WEDNESDAY $4 Jack Daniel’s

HONEY BLACK

Live Music!

JUNE 13

6TH ANNUAL

RedDress PARTY 2014

BENEFITTING THE SPOKANE AIDS NETWORK

48 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014


Current Swell

A Decade Strong Ivan & Alyosha

Scenes from last year’s Elkfest.

Time to gear up for yet another music festival, with one of Elkfest’s most anticipated lineups ever

P

erhaps you’re all festivaled out. You went to Sasquatch! over Memorial Day weekend and then to Volume last weekend. Your head hurts. You have no voice left. You have no idea what day it is. That’s fine, but it’s not a valid excuse to miss out on Elkfest, which takes over Browne’s Addition beginning Friday. Now in its 10th year, the festival brings a fresh mix of regional and local acts to the block party. You’ll want to familiarize yourself with all of the talent before heading out to the free event. — LAURA JOHNSON

FRIDAY

FOLKINCEPTION, 4 PM

With their original blend of folky Americana and a hint of bluegrass, Spokane act Folkinception is only capable of putting on an exciting show. Their six members include three who play cello, fiddle, and rockin’ guitar, and their harmonies are both melodic and fun to dance to. (EMERA RILEY)

JULIA MASSEY & THE FIVE FINGER DISCOUNT, 6 PM Seattle native Julia Massey frequently describes her style as “children’s songs for adults.” Her tunes are playful, and backed up by a sick bassist and a killer drumbeat. They’re very easy to get lost in — Alice-down-the-rabbithole kind of lost. (ER)

CODY BEEBE & THE CROOKS, 7:30 PM

Cody Beebe may not smoke five packs of cigarettes a day, but his gravelly voice gives every indication that could be the case. Fronting his Seattle-based Americana act, his distinctive vocals pair well with the five-piece’s rootsy rock. (LJ) ...continued on next page

James Pants

Minus the Bear

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | FESTIVAL “A DECADE STRONG,” CONTINUED...

CURRENT SWELL, 9 PM SUNDAY jUNE 8 MArTiN WOlDSON THEATEr AT THE FOx

1001 W. Sprague ave · Spokane, Wa 7:30pm ShoW · all ageS TickeTS aT TickeTSWeST charge harge By phone 800-325-S 800-325-SeaT

NOTE CHANGE OF DATE all tickets honored

gregg

allman

Coming to us all the way from Victoria, B.C., Current Swell’s Friday-closing set will feel like a summer breeze wafting through Browne’s Addition — their music is practically tropical, but don’t think “Bob Marley.” The group’s new album Ulysses delves into more blues-rock territory than previous efforts, even if the reggae/folk influences are still there. Gaining prominence after a YouTube video went viral in 2009, the band has since released two more albums and played at the 2010 Winter Olympics. They’ll want to make you sway back and forth, wishing for the sand between your toes and a cold drink in your hand. (LJ)

SATURDAY THE LION OH MY, 2 PM

For all the Lion Oh My fans out there, their Elkfest performance will be one of their last to include lead vocalist and lyricist David Arnold before he moves on to another project. Come out and experience the vocal gymnastics of one of Spokane’s most dynamic singers. (LJ)

& ANTSY MCClAiN THUrSDAY jUlY 24 BiNG CrOSBY THEATEr

901 WeST Sprague ave · Spokane, Wa 7:30pm ShoW · all ageS TickeTS aT TickeTSWeST charge By phone 800-325-SeaT TickeTS alSo aT Bing croSBy TheaTre Box office, The Spokane arena Box office & The opera houSe Box office

Anjelah Johnson an evening of ST STand up comedy WiTh

SATUrDAY SEpTEMBEr 13 MArTiN WOlDSON THEATEr AT THE FOx 1001 W. Sprague ave · Spokane, Wa 7:30pm ShoW · all ageS TickeTS aT TickeTSWeST charge By phone 800-325-SeaT

SSSSNAKE, 8 PM

This act is basically just a dude named Noah Tabakin and his iPhone, which he loads with funky, jazzy hip-hop backing tracks. Then he unleashes soulful rhymes upon unsuspecting audiences. Sometimes the Chicago artist has backup dancers, too. Oh, and he takes off most of his clothes. (MIKE BOOKEY)

JAMES PANTS, 9 PM

James Pants is a true Spokanite. Although he lives in Cologne, Germany (where he works as a studio engineer), he’s still playing that quirky, odd mix of music that made him such a hit DJ right here in his hometown. His use of retro R&B and soul samples, paired with all sorts of bells and whistles, makes for a strangely danceable sound. This month, Pants (aka James Singleton) returns home for a tour of Washington, playing Spokane and later Seattle. He hasn’t released a new album since 2011’s self-titled disc, so expect all of the songs you know and love, and hopefully some new ones too. (LJ)

SUNDAY

LAVOY, 3:30 PM

WAX 808 AND TRAVIS HURLEY, 2 PM

HOLLOW WOOD, 5 PM

REAL LIFE ROCKAZ, 4 PM

If you want to walk away from a show with songs still in your head, this pop-rock act is the one for you. They all live in the same house, and they’re all married (not to each other). This gives their music a closeness and connection that’s hard to master — it’s 100 percent catchy. (LJ) Boise’s Hollow Wood uses many of the elements a lot of indie folk rock acts use these days — group chants, harmonies, traditional instrumentations — but that doesn’t mean the six-piece’s music isn’t entertaining. Onstage, there’s much to feast your eyes and ears on. (LJ)

TANGO ALPHA TANGO, 6:30 PM

Rock ‘n’ roll is one of those precious gifts from the music gods above. These days, it seems hard to find a band that still actually rocks. Portland’s Tango Alpha Tango may have a heavily affected blues sound, but the fuzzy guitar solos and electrifying bass throughout will make you believe in rock once more. (LJ)

Wax 808 isn’t just another DJ set, although Wax 808 is very much a DJ, and a good one at that. Here, he’s joined by Travis Hurley, a drummer who provides a fresh element by adding a live component to this danceable, sometimes spooky electronic sound. (MB) This venerable Spokane act has long been a stalwart of local summer music festivals, with their reggae-meets-hip-hop-meets-rock sound providing a nice complement to a sunny day and a cool beverage. Known to bounce between genres, the Rockaz are quick to show off influences from around the world, including some West African vibe. (MB)

SCOTT PEMBERTON, 6 PM

Scott Pemberton (and his fabulous facial hair) knows his way around a guitar. The Portland virtuoso has made a name for himself on the Northwest touring circuit with his ability to shred his way through anything from dirty blues to rock

FOUNDING MEMBER OF THE BLACK CROWES

THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING OUR LOCAL MUSIC SCENE

Share your Volume experience with us for a chance to win an event T-shirt!

Send to: Volume@inlander.com

July 16, 2014 • 8pm Riverside Event Center (Masonic Hall) 1108 W. Riverside Ave, Spokane $20 GA Advance $22 Door • blueskyproductionsnw.com

50 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014


Spokane Transit invites you to

 Join us in honoring our Veterans and Military  Scott Pemberton and funk. Pemberton is lucky to be playing any music: He was in a horrible bicycle accident a few years back, but bounced back and strapped on his guitar, returning to the craft with a revived zeal that comes through in his outsized stage presence. (MB)

IVAN & ALYOSHA, 7:30 PM

Over the past half-decade, Seattle’s Ivan and Alyosha have become a beloved act here, where they’ve played to adoring crowds as of late. The band is fronted by Tim Wilson and Ryan Carbary (the name comes from characters in Dostoevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov), both of whom contribute lush harmonies to their folky rock blend. If you haven’t heard their album All the Times We Had, released last year, get on it. (MB)

MINUS THE BEAR, 9 PM

You probably first heard about this Seattle act from a friend who plays music and was smitten by Minus the Bear’s technical precision and inventive approach to prog-influenced indie rock. They might attract the music geeks among us, but MtB’s melodic tendencies make them perfectly accessible to even casual listeners. This summer, the band is touring in celebration of the 10th anniversary of their 2004 EP They Make Beer Commercials Like This, a release that defined the band to many of their hard-core fans. MtB is playing select shows this month where they’ll play the record in its entirety. That’s not on the slate for Elkfest, but there’s a good chance we’ll hear some of that material. (MB) n Elkfest with Minus the Bear, James Pants, Current Swell and more • June 6, 4-10 pm; June 7-8, 2-10 pm • Free • All-ages • Outside Elk Public House • 1931 W. Pacific • wedonthaveone. com/the-elk/elkfest • 363-1973

Breakfast • Lunch • Dinner In Downtown’s newest neighborhood, Kendall Yards

eatCENTRALFOOD.com

NWSeedPet_060514_4H_BD.pdf

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 51


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

POP NEON TREES T

ROCK HOOVES T

his four-piece doesn’t look Mormon; they sport offkilter, rock-star haircuts and wear brightly patterned outfits rather than white shirts and black ties. But they all grew up in the church, and still adhere to many of its principles, like not imbibing in alcohol and drugs. They’ve found radio success with hits like “Animal” and “Everybody Talks.” Though half of their members originally are from Southern California, the pop/new wave group has settled in the blissful Mormon haven of Provo, Utah. With their new album Pop Psychology, the band lets a few more swear words slip and talks about lead singer Tyler Glenn coming out as gay. Not as LDS as you’d think. — LAURA JOHNSON

o listen to Hooves is to be hit with a tsunami of sound that will rattle and shake your very marrow. But their music isn’t just about being as loud as possible. Instead, the experimental doomgaze sound incorporates darkness and light through each song, creating a sense of wonder in every room they play. The progressive instrumental four-piece, a 2013 Inlander Band to Watch, is out with a new batch of songs on Valley of the Craftsmen. The cassette version already has been released; on Saturday the band lets the album version loose. — LAURA JOHNSON Hooves record release show with Prizehog and Space Movies • Sat, June 7, at 8 pm • $5 • All-ages • The Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • facebook.com/BigDipperEvents • 863-8098

Neon Trees with Smallpools, Nightmare and the Cat • Tue, June 10, at 8 pm • $23 • Allages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279 J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 06/5

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Performers on the Patio feat. Nicole Lewis Trio J THE BARTLETT, Golden Youth, Cardboard Kids, Runaway Symphony BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen THE CELLAR, Kosh COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny CURLEY’S, 3 Piece Suit FEDORA PUB, CdA Charter Academy Jazz Jam THE FLAME (534-9121), DJ Wesone THE HANDLE BAR, Open Mic/Jam Night JJ’S GRILL AND BREWHOUSE (4674267), Johnny & the Moondogs JOHN’S ALLEY, Brother’s Gow JONES RADIATOR, Los Chingadores J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, The Song Project with Particlehead J THE SHOP, Mike Ross UNDERGROUND 15, Death by Pirates THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB, DJ Seli ZOLA, Troubadour

Friday, 06/6

J BABY BAR, Elkfest After Party feat. James Pants, Stone Tobey J THE BARTLETT, Star Anna, Heather

52 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

Reid, Cedar & Boyer BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J BING CROSBY THEATER, dnk LIVE THE BLIND BUCK, DJ Mayhem BOLO’S, Dragonfly BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Emeris BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Likes Girls J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Garrett & David CARLIN BAY RESORT, Whack A Mole THE CELLAR, Pat Coast Band COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, YESTERDAYSCAKE CONKLING MARINA, 4 on the Floor CURLEY’S, Phoenix J THE ELK PUBLIC HOUSE, Elkfest (See story on page 49) feat. Folkinception, Julia Massey & The Five Finger Discount, Cody Beebe & The Crooks, Current Swell FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Shiner THE FLAME (534-9121), DJ Big Mike J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Summer Jam 2014 feat. Ice Cube, E-40, Bone Thugs-N-Harmony, DJ Quik, Too Short GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Carolyn Cruso J THE HOP!, The Convalescence, Lecherous Nocturne, Goodnight Irene, Xingaia and more IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY (208-2902280), Charley Packard IRON HORSE BAR, The Cronkites

JOHN’S ALLEY, Brother’s Gow J JONES RADIATOR, Opski Chan, Blvck Ceiling, Bloody Gloves, Creepshow LAGUNA CAFÉ, Pamela Benton THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE (315-9531), Claire and Himes, Bart Budwig LIBRARY LOUNGE, Big Hair Revolution J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Starlite Motel MI CASA (443-3420), Mateo Deran NECTAR TASTING ROOM (869-1572), Just Plain Darin J NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS & CULTURE (456-3931), Mike Ross NYNE, Cris Lucas, The Rub, DJ C-Mad J PARK BENCH CAFE (456-4349), Matt Russell RED ROOM LOUNGE, DJ D3vin3 ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Luke Jaxon J SAVAGE LAND PIZZA (924-3876), School’s Out feat. Helicopter Showdown with DJs Beauflexx, Gunnar Swager, Eddie P and more SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES (922-3433), Texas Twister ZOLA, Karma’s Circle

Saturday, 06/7

J THE BARTLETT, Pillar Point, Teen Blonde, Clusterf**k?!? BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Hooves Record Release Party (See story above) with Prizehog, Space Movies

BLACKWELL GALLERY (208-699-2116), Mateo Deran THE BLIND BUCK, DJ Daethstar BOLO’S, Dragonfly BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Emeris J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Dan Maher J CALYPSOS, Jeff Samson CARLIN BAY RESORT, Whack A Mole THE CELLAR, Pat Coast Band J CHECKERBOARD BAR, Metal Fights Cancer Benefit Show feat. The Convalescence, Goodnight Irene, Boneye and more COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, YESTERDAYSCAKE COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS (208-6642336), Truck Mills COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR, Carolyn Cruso CONKLING MARINA, 4 on the Floor CURLEY’S, Phoenix DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Sidetrack J THE ELK PUBLIC HOUSE, Elkfest (See story on page 49) feat. The Lion Oh My, Lavoy, Hollow Wood, Tango Alpha Tango, Ssssnake, James Pants FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Shiner THE FLAME, DJ Mark Thomas GATEWAY MARINA AND RESORT, Chairmen of Rock GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Summer Jam 2014 feat. Chris Brown, Rick Ross, B.O.B., Big Sean, Kid Ink, Big K.R.I.T.

J THE HOP!, The Meatmen, Deadones USA, Sonic Death Ray IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Scott Reid J IRON GOAT BREWING CO. (208290-2280), Iron Goat Brewing Anniversary feat. Floating Crowbar, Fun Ladies, Go Man Gos, Mama Doll, Folkinception IRON HORSE BAR, The Cronkites JOHN’S ALLEY, Klozd Sirkut JONES RADIATOR, Ray Tarantino J KNITTING FACTORY, Floater THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE (315-9531), DJ Lydell LIBRARY LOUNGE, Big Hair Revolution J MOOTSY’S, Losing Skin, Cold Blooded, Nailbastard NYNE, The Divine Jewels RED ROOM LOUNGE, DJ D3vin3 ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Luke Jaxon ROCKET MARKET, Darin Hilderbrand J THE SHOP, Lyle Morse J UNDERGROUND 15, Eyes Like Time Machines, Free the Jester WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON, The Usual Suspects ZOLA, Karma’s Circle

Sunday, 06/8

J ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Concerts on the Cliff feat. Bakin’ Phat J THE BIG DIPPER, Blind Willies THE CELLAR, Traveling Keys Dueling Piano Show


COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny, Kosh CONKLING MARINA, PJ Destiny CURLEY’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church  THE ELK PUBLIC HOUSE, Elkfest (See story on page 49) feat. Wax 808 with Travis Hurley, Real Life Rockaz, Scott Pemberton, Ivan & Alyosha, Minus the Bear  THE HOP!, Gemini Syndrome, Eyes Set To Kill, Exotype, Evolved JONES RADIATOR, The Nehemiah Show REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Chuck Mead and His Grassy Knoll Boys ZOLA, Son of Brad

Monday, 06/9

BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Open Mic  CALYPSOS, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills  THE HOP!, Big Business, American Sharks, Raised by Wolves, The Static Tones ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 06/10

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, The Rub  THE BARTLETT, Open Mic BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BORRACHO TACOS & TEQUILERIA (8227789), DJ D3VIN3 THE CELLAR, Eric Neuhausser CHECKERBOARD BAR, 6th Annual Get Money Stop Hatin Tour feat. Jess J, Young West, 7Upper

FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills  JOHN’S ALLEY, Blueprint/Count Bass, D/Dj Rare Groove JONES RADIATOR, Green River Blues Band, Darin Caine, Hellhound  KNITTING FACTORY, Neon Trees (See story on facing page), Smallpools, Nightmare & The Cat ROCKET MARKET, Tanner Azzinnaro SPLASH, Bill Bozly THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB, DJ Q ZOLA, The Bucket List

Wednesday, 06/11 BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Reggae Night feat. DJs Tochanan, Poncho, Tara and MC Splyt THE CELLAR, Pat Coast EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop Jazz LA ROSA CLUB, Jazz Jam with the Bob Beadling Group LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3  THE PHAT HOUSE, T Mike’s Open Mic THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB, DJs Freaky Fred and MC Squared ZOLA, The Boss of Me

Coming Up ...

THE BARTLETT, Tomten, Inland Empire, June 12 JONES RADIATOR, Summer In Siberia, Sea Giant, Von the Baptist, Team Growl, June 13 KNITTING FACTORY, Lil Jon, Mayhem, DJ Miraj, June 13

MUSIC | VENUES

JUNE 14th 3RD PLACE BEST BEER BAR! Thursday June 5th LOS CHINGADORES First Friday June 6th ARTIST: RAGE CITY ART SHOW

Chris Spriggs, Topski Chan & Noryan Ross music: Bloody Gloves/DJ Creepshow

Saturday June 7th RAY TARANTINO Sunday FUN DAY June 8th

THE FUNNEST OF THE DAYS WITH HAPPY TIME PRICING ALL DAMN DAY! Monday June 9th

TRIVIA! Starts at 7pm Tuesday June 10th

THE OFFICIAL UNOFFICIAL

Gay Pride

Party

E TENT! UNDER TH S

HOW 2 DRAG S F & LOTS O

PR I DE!!

GREEN RIVER BLUES BAND Darin Caine & the Hellhound Wednesday June 11th WHISKEY WEDNESDAY & SALLY BOP JAZZ COCKTAILS & 25 CRAFT BEERS

120 E. Sprague Ave.

“Like us” on Facebook for updates & upcoming events!

415 W. Sprague Ave.

509.624.4450

315 MARTINIS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-6679660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 808 W Main Ave. • 747-3903 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 THE BLIND BUCK • 204 N. Division S. • 290-6229 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 BUCER’S • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CARLIN BAY RESORT • 14691 Idaho 97, Harrison, • 208-689-3295 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 20 W. Jerry Ln., Worley • 208-263-6971 CONKLING MARINA • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 208-686-1151 THE COUNTRY CLUB • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HANDLE BAR • 12005 E. Trent Ave., Spokane Valley • 474-0933 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LIBRARY LOUNGE • 110 E. 4th Ave. •747-3371 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 456-5678 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PACIFIC AVENUE PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 220 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 THE ROCK BAR • 13921 E. Trent Ave. • 43-3796 ROCKET MARKET • 726 E. 43rd Ave. • 343-2253 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 UNDERGROUND 15 • 15 S. Howard St. • 290-2122 THE VAULT • 120 N. Wall St. • 863-9597 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 53


Actors Chris Bastible and Susan Hardie at the Spokane Civic Theatre.

SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

THEATER THE PLAY’S THE THING

There are two professions most parents tell their children never to pursue: poet and playwright. The Civic’s Playwrights’ Forum Festival not only proves that lovers of the creative arts are still writing great works, but that not listening to your parents never stopped being cool. Before its hiatus in 2008, the festival had 25 consecutive years of Northwest originality under its belt. This year, the event is being revitalized and features five original plays by writers from Washington and Oregon, as well as a piece from the Civic’s playwright-in-residence, Bryan Patrick Harnetiaux. — EMERA L. RILEY 26th Playwrights’ Forum Festival • Fri, June 6 and Sat, June 7, at 7:30 pm • $5/student; $8/military; $10/general • Spokane Civic Theatre • 1020 N. Howard • spokanecivictheatre.com • 325-2507

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

54 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

COMEDY FIRST LADY OF FUNNY

FILM STARRY NIGHT MOVIES

Lily Tomlin • Sun, June 8, at 7:30 pm • $35-$99.50 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • foxtheaterspokane.com • 624-1200

Outdoor Movies at Riverfront Park • Wed, June 11, at 7 pm • $5; ages 5 and under free • Riverfront Park Lilac Bowl • epicap.com/ spokane-outdoor-movies

America has been laughing along with Lily Tomlin for 45 years — ever since she burst onto the set of Laugh-In. More seasoned fans probably remember her best from her Edith Ann character. Younger audiences have come up with her as a mainstay of both television and film comedies, most recently as Kenny Powers’ ass-kicking mom in Eastbound and Down. But she’s always been best on the stage, which is how you’ll see her when she comes to perform stand-up to what’s sure to be a multigenerational crowd at The Fox. — MIKE BOOKEY

Grab a blanket, grab some snacks, and grab your friends — and maybe even your dog — because PEMCO’s outdoor movie series is returning for a second year, kicking off next Wednesday. With family-friendly classics (The Goonies) and newer hits (Frozen, Up, Pitch Perfect) showing every Wednesday from now until mid-July, make plans to go. Get there early to stake out a prime spot and enjoy pre-show movie trivia, local food-truck grub and live performances by Spokane Aerial Performance Arts. The new-ish Spokane summer tradition begins with a showing of Ferris Bueller’s Day Off. — MADISON BENNETT


CULTURE FARM TREASURES

The rustic-chic, vintage, salvaged decorating trend isn’t going anywhere soon — just look to local trend weather vane the Farm Chicks Antique Show, now in its 12th year and still growing. Women (mostly) flock from all over the U.S. and even farther to sell and purchase handmade, antique and repurposed items from more than 300-plus vendors. Each one is personally selected by Farm Chicks founder Serena Thompson, a Spokane homemaker extraordinaire, author and contributing editor to Country Living Magazine. Past years’ showgoers know that Farm Chicks is more than a shopping event. It’s a visual delight to see all the displays and a social experience unlike many others, in which thousands meander through a maze of booths, wagons and shopping carts in tow, all on the hunt for that one perfect find. — CHEY SCOTT The Farm Chicks Antique Show • Sat, June 7, from 9 am-6 pm; Sun, June 8, from 9 am-4 pm • $8/day, $15/weekend • Spokane County Fair & Expo Center • 404 N. Havana • thefarmchicks.com

BEER NOT-SO-TERRIBLE TWOS

It’s hard to believe it’s only been two years since Iron Goat Brewing opened its doors. At the same time, how did two years fly by so quickly? The local craft beer scene has grown up a lot in that time, so much so that a day of music and limited-release kegs is practically a weekly occurrence. But Iron Goat is marking the occasion with an especially large party and 16 beers on tap, including several of its barrel-aged offerings that drew long lines at last fall’s Inland NW Craft Beer Festival. The all-afternoon music lineup includes Mama Doll, Folkinception and more. Admission includes a commemorative glass mug, and a portion of proceeds goes to 2nd Harvest Food Bank. — LISA WAANANEN Iron Goat Brewing Anniversary Party • Sat, June 7, from noon to 10 pm • $5 • Iron Goat Brewing Co. • 2204 E. Mallon • facebook.com/irongoatbrewing • 474-0722

MOVIE SCHEDULE

WEDNESDAYS SEATING OPENS @ 7 PM

JUNE 11 Ferris Bueller’s

Day Off JUNE 18 frozen _______________________ JUNE 25 The Hunger Games: Catching Fire _______________________

$ 5 • Live Acts • Trivia • fun movies start at dusk

_______________________

________________________

SP O K A N E A ER IA L P ER F O R M A N C E A RTS FO O D TRUCKS

M O V IE T R IV IA DOG F R IEN D LY

________________________

JULY 2 Up _______________________ The Lilac Bowl

@

Riverfront g Parkh

JULY 9 pitch perfect _______________________ JULY 16 the Goonies

_______________________

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 55


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess ARE WE HAVING FUND YET?

I’m a single mother with a 12-year-old son. Four years ago, when my boyfriend fell in love with me, he would buy me clothes and jewelry. He also promised to build a house for my son and me to live in. (We can’t live with him, because he repairs motorcycles from home and it’s loud day and night.) Well, he is building the house but now says it’s for his mother — a woman living perfectly fine on her monthly Social Security checks. I work six AMY ALKON days a week and still have trouble making ends meet, despite my boyfriend’s giving me $400 to $500 a month. He keeps making promises that get me excited and make me want to stick around, like that he’ll take me to Hawaii one day. I love him, but I fantasize about having a boyfriend I could live with so he could help me with the rent and bills. —Conflicted We all dream of finding that special someone to pay the cable bill. There’s looking for love, and there’s looking for some man to take over where Daddy left off on your allowance. You do say you love this guy — well, somewhere in there, between all the grumbling over money, clothes, jewelry, trips, and elderly moms getting houses. Compare your kind of love with my favorite definition, by sci-fi writer Robert Heinlein: “Love is that condition in which the happiness of another person is essential to your own.” This implies a level of effort — beyond waiting around, frowning, with your hand out, for that other person to slap a handful of $100s into it. The truth is, money actually can buy happiness, because the possibility of having real love starts with not having to choose boyfriends according to which provides the best financial aid package. Monetary independence would also allow you to have higher standards for a partner than you can now. Though no man (SET ITAL) owes (END ITAL) you a home or a trip to Hawaii (are you dating a man or a game show?), promises should mean something. You wouldn’t have to stick around to see which promise your boyfriend breaks next if you could go to the ATM and get a stack of your own money (instead of what the ATM probably spits out now — increasingly rude receipts: “Cash? Are you nuts, lady? You’re more overdrawn than Greece”). Consider taking steps to become independent, like living a more “European” existence. (Europeans seem content with far smaller living spaces, fewer appliances, and not living life as a mad dash to get the next shiny new whatever.) You could get a roommate or move in with one — perhaps some other single mom whose values you seem to share. And you could figure out and work on ways to improve your earning power. It won’t be easy street, but it should eventually prove far more satisfying than sitting around feeling cheated out of a house and resenting some old lady (already living the high life on her Social Security checks!) for not reusing more of her teabags.

JERK STOPPAGE

What’s with a man who fathered three children with three different women but never married any of them? He always cheats on girlfriends and then just moves on to the next. Sadly, I was the most recent. By the time I learned how he operates, I was very much in love with him. I told him he’ll end up a sad old man with no one to care for him, but he still won’t work on our problems; he just left and is now with some new woman. When does he pay the piper? —Still In Love With Him And Hating That Unfortunately, “paying the piper” is just a metaphor, out of a folk tale about a town with a rat infestation and a mayor who tried to stiff the medieval cousin of the Orkin Man. As for your rat problem, the state may make this guy pay child support, but they can’t make him come back and talk about his feelings. You say you love the guy. But you don’t. You love who he pretended to be, like in one of those movies where Mr. Wonderful’s face finally falls off, revealing the creepy space alien underneath. You’ve now seen the creep. Focus on that, and use it to avoid being fooled again. Even the cleverest deceiver will have little truths that leak out — behaviors that don’t match their words. We’re prone to focus on the good things about a person, but it’s essential to also look for the bad. It’s the bad stuff that leaves you filled with longing — for your boyfriend to be thrown in somebody’s trunk, tried for crimes against womankind, and sentenced to spend the rest of his life being belittled on national TV by Dr. Phil. n ©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

56 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

FIRE ON THE RUNWAY Local firefighters and models take to the runway in an annual fundraiser for the Red Cross, including a live auction, hors d’oeuvres and champagne. June 6, 7-11:45 pm. $50-$75. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln. redcross.org/runway (321-6055) ARTISANS GOLF TOURNAMENT Third annual tournament with all funds raised supporting services for individual job development, employment support and opportunities for local persons with disabilities. June 7, 8:30 am. $89. Esmeralda Golf Course, 3933 E. Courtland. theartisans.org (325-4489) BRAIN CANCER BENEFIT A fundraiser bowling event benefiting Radel Miller, to help his family with medical bills and expenses. June 7, 2-6 pm. $30/person, $150/team of 5. River City Lanes, 965 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls. (208-660-2197) FRIENDS OF MANITO PLANT SALE One of two annual plant sales to support the Friends of Manito’s improvements and projects in the park. June 7, membersonly sale 8-9 am; public sale from 9 am-4 pm. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. thefriendsofmanito.org (456-8038) HEAR ME RUN! 5K A timed race/walk along the Spokane River, benefiting Spokane HOPE School, the area’s only listening and spoken-language preschool for the deaf and hard of hearing. June 7, 9:30 am. $15-$30. Riverfront Park. hearmerunspokane.com (863-7097) DAD’S NIGHT OUT Silent auction to benefit the yet-to-open small business Bright Futures Academy LLC. June 8, 5-8 pm. English Setter Brewing, 15310 E. Marietta Ave. englishsetterbrewing. com (499-9703) AN EVENING ODYSSEY Benefit for Odyssey, Spokane’s only LGBTQ Youth Center, featuring Mistress of Ceremonies Carla Louise and performances by Pamela Benton, cabaret singer Abbey Crawford and more. June 10, 7 pm. $10/advance, $12/door. Unitarian Universalist, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. uuspokane.org (325-6283)

COMEDY

MEN ARE FROM MARS, WOMEN ARE FROM VENUS A lighthearted theatrical comedy based on the NYT bestselling book by John Gray, and starring Peter Story. June 5, 7:30 pm. $20-$40. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7638) COMEDY NIGHT AT THE INN Featuring comedians Dave Waite from the “Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon” and Jamie Lissow from the “Tonight Show with Jay Leno.” June 6 and 7, from 7-10 pm. $15. Best Western Coeur d’Alene, 506 W. Appleway Ave. (208-765-3200) EXPEDITION A fast-paced improvised comedy show, rated for all ages. Fridays all summer, June 6-Aug. 29, at 8 pm (no show July 4). $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) OPEN MIC COMEDY NIGHT Fridays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Brooklyn Deli & Lounge, 122 S. Monroe. (835-4177) SHORT STACKS June’s event is an improvised talk-show format featuring the BDT Players & Friends. June 6 at 10 pm. $5. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) CAGE MATCH A team vs. team local comedy championship event, voted on by the audience. Saturdays, June 7, 14, 21

and 28 (finals), at 9 pm. $7, reservations recommended. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com GEORGE LOPEZ Performance by the award-winning, stand-up comedian and television actor. June 8; two shows offered, at 5 pm and 8 pm. $55-$75. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (481-6700) LILY TOMLIN Stand-up show by the Grammy, Tony and Emmy awardwinning comedian and actress. June 8, 7:30 pm. $35-$65. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.org (624-1200) LIBERTY LAKE COMEDY IMPROV TROUPE Open auditions for the new comedy group, open to ages 18+ and no experience needed. June 4 and June 11 at 7 pm. Free. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway. (342-2055)

COMMUNITY

ROSALIA BATTLE DAYS Annual community celebration with a Friday night rodeo and talent show. Saturday starts with a community breakfast, fun run, vendors, parade (11 am), car show, art show, rodeo events and more. June 6-8, see website for details. Free. Rosalia, Wash. rosaliabattledays.com CELEBRATE WOMEN’S POLITICAL INDEPENDENCE Spokane Feminist Forum celebrates the passage of women getting the vote and women’s political independence with a panel discussion on women and politics in Spokane. Refreshments are to be served. June 7, 2-3:30 pm. Free. Community Building, 35 W. Main. tinyurl.com/nmelgzx (279-0348) CPR DEMO DAY “Hands only” CPR lessons are offered by Spokane County Fire District 9 at its annual Demo Day and Wellness Fair. June 7, 10 am-2 pm. Free. Fire Station No. 92, 3801 E. Farwell Rd. (466-4602) EVERY WOMAN CAN YARD SALE 5th annual event benefiting Inland Imaging’s Every Woman Can foundation, which helps women in the Spokane area receive an annual screening mammogram. June 7, 6 am-2 pm. Private residence at 4115 E. 37th Ave. everywomancan.org FREE STATE PARK DAY Washington State Parks and Rec allows visitors access to all state parks without a Discovery Pass. Includes access to Riverside and Mt. Spokane State Parks. Upcoming “free” days include June 7-8 and 14, Aug. 25, Sept. 27. discoverpass. wa.gov. (800-833-6388) GREAT STRIDES WALK A 3K walk/run along the Spokane River, benefiting the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. June 7, 10:30 am. Jundt Art Museum, 502 E. Boone. cff.org/great_strides (208-660-9038) HOMETOWN TEAMS A traveling Smithsonian exhibit exploring how sports teams shaped America, alongside a local exhibit about sports in the Silver Valley. On display June 7-July 19. Grand opening on June 7 (6 pm) features a talk by sports cartoonist Steve Moore. Museum open daily from 9 am-5 pm. Northern Pacific Depot Railroad Museum, 219 Sixth, Wallace, Idaho. npdepot.org (208-752-0111) JUNE BUG FUN RUN The annual fun run/walk offers 3- or 5-mile courses along the Spokane River. Proceeds benefit Lutheran Community Services Northwest. June 7, 9 am. $20-$25. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. lcsnw.org (343-5020)

SPOKANE VALLEY LIBRARY BOOK SALE Used library book sale fundraiser; preview sale ($10 donation) Fri, June 6 from 3-5 pm. June 7, 9 am-3 pm. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. (893-8400)

FESTIVAL

RIVERSTONE STREET FAIR Coeur d’Alene’s Riverstone Village hosts a weekly outdoor market and street fair, hosting 200+ vendors of arts and crafts, food, live music, a farmers market and more. Thursdays from 4-9 pm, June 5-Aug. 28. Free. riverstonestreetfair. com (703-9345) REARDAN MULE DAYS The annual community festival now in its 110th year includes a parade, arts and crafts show, food vendors, live entertainment, the Reardan Library book sale, horse and mule poker ride, beer garden and much more. June 7. Free. Reardan, Wash. reardanmuledays.net (796-4850) THE FARM CHICKS ANTIQUE SHOW The annual curated show, created by Spokane’s Serena Thompson, features more than 300 vendors from around the U.S. offering vintage items, home decor, handmade goods, and more. June 7 from 9 am-6 pm and June 8 from 9 am-4 pm. $8/day; $15/weekend. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. thefarmchicks.com/ antiques-show (954-1692) SPOKANE FESTIVAL OF SPEED Vintage car race featuring 100+ sports cars, sedans, formula cars and more, hosted by the Society of Vintage Racing Enthusiasts. Proceeds benefit the Parkinson’s Resource Center of Spokane. June 7-8. Spokane County Raceway, 750 N. Hayford Rd. spokanefestivalofspeed. com (220-4655) COW PLOP & STREET CARNIVAL 24th annual community street carnival with slides, obstacle course, games, arts/crafts, and more; games are priced 25 cents-$1. June 7, 11 am-4 pm. Free to attend. Trinity Catholic School, 1306 W. Montgomery. trinityspokane.com (327-9369)

FILM

EVERYDAY ESCAPES: FILMS OF THE DEPRESSION Dale Soden, Whitworth professor of history, hosts screenings of popular films during the Great Depression, which served as an escape for Americans. Event is part of the Hope In Hard Times exhibit. June 5 at 6:30 pm, North Spokane branch; also June 11 at 6:30 pm at the Spokane Valley branch. Free. scld.org/hope-in-hardtimes (893-8350) SAVING PRIVATE RYAN A special showing of the film in remembrance of D-Day, June 6, 1944. June 6, 2 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St. spokanelibrary.org (444-5331) ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW Midnight showing of the cult classic film, featuring the Absolute Pleasure shadow cast, prop bags and the virgin ceremony. June 7, midnight. $5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. garlandtheater.com (327-1050) SATURDAY MARKET CARTOONS The Kenworthy and the Moscow Farmers Market hosts classic cartoons every Saturday morning from 9 am-noon, June through September. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. (208-882-4127) TEAM HOT WHEELS: ORIGIN OF AWESOME Animated feature film about Hot Wheels cars and the


characters who drive them. June 7 and 8 at 11 am. Regal Cinemas Riverstone (CdA) and Regal Cinemas Northtown, 4750 N. Division. fathomevents.com LIVING DANGEROUSLY Monday night screenings of the Showtime documentary series on the current and intensifying effects of climate change on Americans. Mon, through June 16 at 7 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. (208-883-0910) FERRIS BUELLER’S DAY OFF Outdoor showing on the big screen, with prefilm performance by Spokane Aerial Performance Arts, movie trivia and local food trucks. June 11, 7-11 pm. $5. Riverfront Park. (625-6601)

FOOD & DRINK

VINO WINE TASTING Fri, June 6, from 3-6:30 pm, highlight’s Vino’s Wine of the Month Club selections. Sat, June 7 features Obelisco Estate Wines, from 2-4:30 pm. $10-$15/tasting. Vino!, 222 S. Washington. (838-1229) HARD CIDER HOE DOWN Free hard cider tasting featuring a selection from of Finn River Ciders, of Chimacum, Wash. June 7, 11 am-3 pm. Free. Spice Traders Mercantile, 15614 E. Sprague. spicetradersmercantile.com (315-4036) IRON GOAT ANNIVERSARY PARTY The local brewery celebrates its 2nd anniversary with live, local music, the release of several barrel-aged beers, food trucks and commemorative mugs. June 7, 12-10 pm. $5. Iron Goat Brewing Co., 2204 E. Mallon. (701-8244) WINE TASTING CLASS ‘Mediterranean Romance’ exploring Rosés wines with Mediterranean snacks. June 7, 1:30 pm. $30. Vino!, 222 S. Washington. (838-1229)

MUSIC

EWU SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Concert featuring concerto winners performing the First Symphony by Brahms. June 5, 7:30-9 pm. $5; EWU students free. EWU Showalter Hall, Cheney. tinyurl.com/ l3p5vsh (359-2241) FRIVOLITY, FUN & FANCY Northwoods Performing Arts presents an evening of eclectic choral music from around the world, directed by Mark D. Caldwell. June 6-7, 10 and 13-14. Dinner and show $25; show only $10-$12. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy 211 off Hwy 2, Newport. (208-448-1294) SPOKANE ACCORDION ENSEMBLE Americana concert led by guest conductor Beverly Fess, from Calgary, Alberta. June 7, 7-9 pm. $10 suggested donation. Trinity Lutheran Church, 812 N. Fifth St. (208-610-8426) WASHINGTON IDAHO SYMPHONY “Science, Symphony and Sweets” is a interactive learning experience for kids to learn about classical music and more. June 7, 5-7 pm. $12/adults, $8/kids. Palouse Discovery Science Center, 950 NE Nelson, Pullman. (332-6869) LOVE/HATE A recital by Ann Benson, messo soprano; Eric Moe, trumpet; and Mac Merchant, piano. June 8, 2-3:30 pm. Donations accepted. Central Lutheran Church, 512 S. Bernard. (624-9233) SHAPE NOTE A-CAPPELLA GROUP The local singing group meets monthly on the second Sunday, from 1:30-4 pm. Good Samaritan Society, 17121 E. 8th. (924-9480) SFCC SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Under the direction of Shelley Rotz, the orchestra performs “The Turkish March” and other pieces. June 9, 7 pm. $5/

adults, $2/students, seniors. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3500) CHORO DAS 3 Concert by the Brazilian instrumental group of three sisters and their father, performing a form of urban jazz native to Brazil. Also offering a workshop ($35) and private lessons ($100). June 11, 7:30 pm. $20. Rick Singer Photography Studio, 415 1/2 W. Main. ricksingerphotography.com (838-3333)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

WARM UP MT. SPOKANE Kick off the season of trail building and riding at Mt. Spokane with beer, cider and the Spokane premier of Anthill Films “Not Bad,” with 6 local vendors pouring. Proceeds benefit the Evergreen East Trail. June 6. $6/flight, $3/pints. (Trail work day June 7 (10 am), trail ride day June 8.) Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd. evergreeneast.org HOOPFIRST TOURNAMENT A preHoopfest 3-on-3 basketball tournament, for youth entering grades 4-12. June 7, 9 am-6 pm. $95/team. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo. (927-0602) ILLER CREEK TRAIL WORK PARTY A volunteer work party for National Trails Day to maintain and prevent erosion on a section of trail that runs along the east ridge of Iller Creek. June 7, 8:30 am-4 pm. Iller Creek Conservation Area, East Holman Rd. & Rockcrest Lane. tinyurl. com/l7xu75c (921-8928) SPOKANE CLUB JUNIOR TRIATHLON Spokane’s youth are encouraged to participate in a small distance triathlon with a post-race buffet and prizes for the top two finishers. June 7, 8:30-11 am. $25/person or $45/team. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside. spokaneclub. org/events (459-4571 x 501) BAY TRAIL FUN RUN The 2nd annual 5 or 10K trail run/walk along the Pend d’Oreille Bay Trail in Sandpoint, with proceeds benefiting the preservation and enhancement of the trail. June 8, 9 am. $25-$30. pobtrail.org SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS Ping-pong club meets Mon and Wed, from 6-9 pm, now at the HUB in Liberty Lake. $3/visit. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo. spokanetabletennis.com (768-1780)

THEATER

GYPSY Comedy/musical based on the memoirs of Gypsy Rose Lee, directed by Troy Nickerson. Through June 15, ThursSat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $22-$30. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. (325-2507) MOON OVER BUFFALO A classic, backstage farce, performed by SFCC drama students. Through June 8, Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10 suggested donation; students free. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3778) 26TH PLAYWRIGHTS FORUM The 2014 event features six Pacific Northwest playwrights’ work. June 6-7 at 7:30 pm. $5-$10. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. spokanecivictheatre.com BLITHE SPIRIT The classic Noel Coward comedy shows what happens when our pasts come back to haunt us. Through June 15, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $13-$15. Ignite Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway. ignitetheatre.org GUYS & DOLLS Performance of the classic musical comedy. June 6-28, Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $14-$20. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden. lakecity-

playhouse.org (208-667-1323)

VISUAL ARTS

FIRST FRIDAY Local galleries and businesses display new artwork for the month of June. Locations throughout downtown Spokane and beyond. Event map and descriptions at Inlander.com/ FirstFriday. COEUR D’ALENE ARTWALK Monthly art showcase throughout downtown galleries and businesses. Second Friday of the month from 5-8 pm. Free. Downtown Coeur d’Alene, Sherman Ave. artsincda.org (208-292-1629)

WORDS

3-MINUTE MIC Monthly poetry open mic event held in conjunction with First Friday, hosted by Spokane Poetry Slam’s Chris Cook. May’s “Remember the Word” guest is local writer Kris Dinnison. Open to all who want to read up to three minutes worth of poetry, their own or someone else’s. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. spokanepoetryslam.org DEREK MUNSON The award-winning author celebrates Father’s Day and the release of his new children’s book, “Bad Dad,” with a book reading and signing June 7, 2 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) CLAIRE RUDOLF MURPHY The author reads from, signs and answers questions about her children’s book “My Country ‘Tis of Thee,” about the historical origins of the patriotic song, illustrated by Caldecott winner Bryan Collier. June 7, 4 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com DANIEL JAMES BROWN The author of the bestseller “The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics” reads from and signs copies of his work. June 8, 1 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) CAROLE SIMON-SMOLINSKI The author signs copies of “Timothy Nolan’s Idaho,” a scholarly accounts of adventures and events in and around Lewiston from Gold Rush to Statehood. June 8, 1-3 pm. Free. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way, Uniontown. (229-3414) CREATIVE FICTION FOR EMERGING WRITERS A four-part series on creative writing, focusing on writing prompts and critiques/discussions in an encouraging atmosphere. Meets June 11, 25 and July 9, 23, at 6 pm. Free. Hayden Library, 8385 N. Government Way. (208-772-5612)

It’s a Good Day To Be A Dad.

FREE Bundtlet when you purchase a bundtlet Spokane 2525 E. 29th Ave. Ste. 1B (509) 535-4864

Expires 7/30/14. Limit one offer per guest. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Redeemable only at the bakery listed.Must be claimed in-store during normal business hours. No cash value.

NothingBundtCakes_060514_4S_BA.pdf

ETC.

SHARE SPACE OPEN HOUSE Summer kickoff event at Share Space Spokane, hosted by GSI. June 5, 4-7 pm. Steam Plant Square, 159 S. Lincoln. greaterspokane.org (624-1393) COSPLAY FASHION SHOW & NEON NYAN PARTY KuroNekoCon, Spokane’s anime convention, hosts a night of Cosplay fashion, dancing and prizes. June 7, 6:30-9:45 pm. $5. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. KuroNekoCon.com DANCE THE WORLD The Silver Spurs Youth Folk Dancers present heritage dances from Japan, the U.S., Mexico, Germany, France and more in the group’s 67th spring concert. June 8, 2 pm. $10/family of five, $3/person, free/ kids 5 and under. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (533-9966) n

Ad designed by students at Mt. Spokane High School

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 57


Health in the

509.951.4663 Lic #MA60231848

Massage Associates • 708 N. Argonne #8B

TO ADVERTISE IN THIS SPECIAL HEALTH SECTION: (509) 444-7355 or Sales@Inlander.com PUSH YOUR ATHLETIC PERFORMANCE

Massage by First 3 Crysta Massages $35 Crysta Hyatt by appointment only

Your local resource for beauty, fitness, and total well being.

Need to Unwind?

TO THE EDGE

AMY HILLE INSTRUCTOR Improve core, flexibility, prevent injury

Debbie Bales Spokane/CdA 541-398-2211

THEPILATESLIFE 509-838-0545

Debbieb1.zealforlife.com

Measles Bounce Back

thePilatesLife.com

Specializing in Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy Deep Tissue :: Hot Rock :: Sports :: Relaxation Online Scheduling :: Located Near Huckleberry’s

Tango

Health

Statistics show that cases of measles TIP OF THE WEEK are at a 20-year high in the United States, with 288 cases reported so far this year. Nearly all have been found in unvaccinated people who had contracted the disease outside the country. The CDC reminds Americans that timely vaccination is the best way to prevent measles; infants and young children are at the highest risk of getting a serious case, which can require hospitalization.

DANCING 360-550-5106 122 S. Monroe Downtown Spokane

Satori

(Centers for Disease Control)

GIVE BLOOD SAVE LIVES

Dezana Aman, LMP

509.998.0255 ArtOfMassage-Spokane.com

MA 60016914

Is your life controlled by drugs or alcohol? Take charge of your life. Call 1-800-939-CARE today.

INBCSAVES.ORG

1(800)423-0151

BEST MEDICAL CONSULTATION Psychic Readings Mentoring

• D.O.T. Physicals • Sports Physicals • Weight Loss • Alternative Herbal Medical Treatment Options

Coaching

CALL TODAy TO SeT uP yOur APPOinTMenT WiTH Our CLiniC.

Counseling

509-467-1990 bmcmmj.com 411 W. Hastings • Spokane, WA

58 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

INHealth

OFFERING SERVICES FOR:

HEALTH

ttle

ine Tu

G Y LIVIN

is

NLAND IN THE I

4

ls on

NORTHW

Want More?

EE EST • FR

a

loca

n to

of one

io Miss

Heal ther

Dr. Ka

15 PAGE

th FeforarsBaby Birppi ng Pre

JUNE-JU

27

g Teasw Tantalgizin a Healthy Bre Creatin

36

SUPPLEME

LY, 2 0 1 4

For more in-depth health coverage, grab a FREE copy of InHealth magazine at your favorite Inlander rack or medical office!

ER E INLAND NT TO TH

On Stands Now!

Courtney Spear, LMP Licensed Therapeutic Massage

Pain Relief • Stress Management • Pregnancy

509.953.4149

NEW CLIENT SPECIAL $45 One Hour Massage Must reference special

spokanewellnessmassage.com License# MA00010161


FRIENDS OF MANITO

355 nder.com 09) 444-7 la PHONE: (5BulletinBoard@In mit Parkway : IL u A S E-M e s t m 01 2 N: 1227 W IN PERSO Spokane, WA 99 Christian Science Healing Theodora Sallee, Practitioner 509-481-8585

Fun Run Parade Vendors Kids Bounce & Water Activities Entertainment Poker Ride Basketball- 3 on 3 BBQ Luncheon Beer Garden And More!

Spring Clean Up means get rid of your old Junk Car! 509-455-6666

Sun Meadow Family Nudist Resort Year Round Skinny Dipping (208) 686-8686

Adopt Me!

Reardan, thWA Sat, June 7 for Reardan Mule Days!

SCRAPS, 2521 N. Flora. (509) 477-2532 spokanecounty.org/animal

SCAN THIS

VisitLincolnCountyWashington.com HOT LOCAL GUYS

Browse & Reply FREE! 206-877-0877, use code 2658

BROUGHT TO YOU BY

ONE CUP AT A TIME

Commissions, draws!

&

COMMITTED TO SUPPORTING OUR LOCAL ANIMAL SHELTERS

Lawn & Garden • Pets • Fish • Ponds • Gifts

THE MAGIC MYSTICAL TOUR PRESENTS: Near Death Experiences (NDE’s) Hosted by Nancy Newman Friday, June 13th COST: $13.00 Moran Prairie Library 6:30pm-8:30pm For more info: call Mavis at (509) 924-6204 or go to www.themagicmysticaltour.com

Exciting new product for the convenience of drivers; all we need is someone to go out and sell it for us! Hiring immediately! 509.279.2585 10AM-2PM

This cute critter needs a home!

CeCe 3204 was brought in found, but her owner is missing and we are now looking for a new home for her. Make sure you always update your license and microchip information on your animals. Up to date information is the best way for you and your furry friend to be reunited.

Head on down to

for more info go to:

Energy Device Free Demo June 9th 6-7pm N.Spokane Library 509-262-4685 ascensionmerkaba.com

SPRING

PLANT SALE Manito Park • East of Gaiser Conservatory June 7 | 9am - 4pm • Over 450 plant varieties TheFriendsOfManito.org

BUYING Estate contents / household goods. See abesdiscount.com or 509-939-9996

REVERSE

MORTGAGE SENIORS LEARN ABOUT RETIREMENT CASH FLOW LOCAL REPRESENTATIVE FREE INFORMATION

208-762-6887 Larry Waters NMLS ID 400451

701 N. MONROE SPOKANE, WA Gregory's Custom Home Cleaning Lic/Ins. 509-842-0786 GregorysCleaning.com

www.nwseed.com

ART  ANTIQUES  CRAFTS FOOD  MUSIC  JEWELRY MULTI VENDORS

Family Fun - Come Shop!  Covered if it rains 

FOR INFO: 208-556-1500 Daily Lunch Specials

10-2 Tues-Fri, VFW Post 51, 300 W Mission, Spokane

NMLS1079636

QUEEN & KING USED BED SETS

2422 E. Sprague 534-0694 • 7302 N. Division 484-7387

Fri Presale 1-6  Sat 8-7  Sun 10-3

157 W. Hayden Ave Ste 104 | Hayden, ID 83835

SAVE 10%

Spokan Locally e’s Own Pet Sto ed r Since 1 e 944

in Wallace, ID

June 7th & 8th

Bring in your adoption papers from SCRAPS, Spokanimal or the Humane Society and receive EVERY 15% OFF on food andWEDNESDAY supplies for your new pet. Must be within 30 days of pet adoption.

Street Fair

Excellent condition, hotel replacements. $75-$95. 509-623-9727 or 509-999-6024

GREAT TENANTS WANTED Rental Homes & Duplexes $650/mo to $2,500/mo

Hauling, Scrub & Tree Trimming, weed wacking,Lawns Firebreaks 509-999-1545

PHOTO TOURS AT: MadisonSpokane.com P: 509.465.9052

ACROSS 1. Jackpot 11. Fish and chips fish 14. Question after a public shellacking 15. ____ con leche 16. Like a broken record 17. “American ____” 18. Inc., abroad 19. Part of USNA: Abbr. 20. Stuck in ____ 21. Pointed to 25. Some South Africans 26. ____ Plaines, Ill. 27. Itemized bill: Abbr. 29. Stanford QB drafted #1 in 1983 32. Throng 34. Jesus, for one 37. Minister’s moniker 38. Lethal snake 39. Bauxite, e.g. 40. Paraguayan author Augusto

____ Bastos 41. As a joke, he submitted to his editor “Big X, little x, XXX. Someday, kiddies, you will learn about SEX” 42. Fuel for piston-engine aircraft 44. “Positively Entertaining” cable channel 45. Suffix with fiend 46. Ethnomusicologist Alan 50. “Seinfeld” episode in which Elaine says “I’m never eating here again” 56. Sacha Baron Cohen character 57. 12/31, e.g. 58. Imitate 59. Yard pest 60. Steps up ... or what’s featured in this puzzle’s three areas of circles 64. Newspaper section

65. Request to a cabby 66. They may be dirt: Abbr. 67. Help to prepare dinner, say DOWN 1. “____ X” (2003 Lisa Kudrow comedy) 2. “There’s ____ every crowd!” 3. Used a Smith Corona 4. Garden shed item 5. Dr. for the neck up 6. Isabella and Maria Luisa, e.g. 7. Allow to attack 8. Antipasto tidbit 9. “seaQuest ____” (1990s series) 10. Wide shoe spec 11. Inner circle 12. “Flags ____ Fathers” (2006 film) 13. Shoulder muscles, for short 15. “Ta-ta!”

“STAIRCASES”

22. Civil rights advocate ____ B. Wells 23. 1970s Dodgers All-Star Ron 24. Some gowns on Oscar night 25. Hanes alternative 28. “Straight Outta Compton” rap group

29. Go wrong 30. Barack Obama’s sign 31. State since 1863: Abbr. 32. Dracula, for one 33. NFL ball carriers

34. Treadmill setting 35. Disco ____ 36. “Rushmore” director THIS W Anderson A NSWE EEK’S 38. Jobs’ job, once I SAW RS ON 41. Local news hour YOUS 42. Pac-12 team, for short 43. Kind of tape 45. Portugal’s peninsula 46. Kardashian spouse ____ Odom 47. Psalm starter 48. Jackson of the Modern Jazz Quartet and others 49. Years and years 51. Gets better 52. Things released from Pandora’s box 53. Swiss city on the Rhine 54. Lincoln Center offering 55. Acted like a sycophant 60. Wharf locale: Abbr. 61. Yours, in Italy 62. Brain and spinal cord: Abbr. 63. Inventor’s cry

JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 59


5 TIME WINNKEARNSE BEST OF SPO FEATURING

IT’S FREE

Geddy Anderson Zach Anderson Jonathan Tylor Jake Sifford

1. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers, Jeers). 2. Provide basic info about you: name, address, phone. 3. Email it to ISawYou@inlander.com by 3 pm Monday.

509.921.9000

9110 E. SPRAGUE

NOW OFFERING NAILS

20 30 DAYS

$

FOR

UNLIMITED IN GETAWAY EXP: 06/30/14

Come check us out!

ONLY

25

$

509.483.7359

(20 Min Bed)

FULL SET

OF NAILS EXP: 06/30/14

1225 E. Francis, Spokane :: TropicalTanSpokane.com

I Saw You

I Saw You

Cheers

Cheers

Sears JD Strong, I don’t know if you remember me from when we worked together at Computer Business Solutions, but I saw you at Sears on Memorial Day and I wanted to say hi. You commented on how my daughter would eventually wear out and come down as I was standing at the bottom waiting for her to turn around and come down the escalator. I was wearing a pink hooded sweatshirt and black jeans, trying to not get angry with my stubborn child at the mall. If you remember me and would like to get together for coffee or lunch some time send me a quick email to crysangel25@gmail.com, Crystal

was, I was too focused on how beautiful you were. Hope to hear from you soon.

about you is out of my control. Life is not the same without you, my heart is not the same without you. I would give anything to have a night like we had when we saw fireworks, to go back to the start of our love story. I don’t have anything witty or funny to say. Just that I love and miss you so very much. I would do anything to get a second chance at love with you...

heroes. After adding gas and finally getting it going, we headed toward home. Up the back road toward Airway Heights. Half way up the hill past entrance to national park the bug stalled and died and wouldn’t start again. After many hours of trying to figure out the problem, get a hold of help, we finally had help on the way. In the four hours us two girls were stranded not one person stopped to offer aid. Boo people. Aaron who drove his truck across Spokane picked up Thad and came to our rescue all on empty gas tank. Those men towed the beast to our home in Airway Heights, our fourth and fifth heroes, expecting nothing. My daughter gave them $20.00 for gas, her food money for the week and we wished we could do more. These people are true heroes, with helping from the goodness of their hearts. Thank you isn’t enough. All of us should follow your example the world would be a utopia if we did. From feeling like a smashed bug.

Starbucks I saw you at the Starbucks on the South Hill. Your name is Allison, my name is Thomas. I come in every week, and every time I come in I have the most amazing time talking to you. You make me so happy!!! Then during the remaining part of the week I just can’t wait to come see you again. When I get closer to your stop I get all excited and with butterflies in my tummy all at the same time. For the last several months I have been trying to muster the courage to ask you out but I haven’t been able to do so. So Allison will you go out with me? Shari’s Cutie It was on a Sunday about 8:30 at the Shari’s on Monroe. You ordered a peach pie and were with an incredibly handsome man. You are one of the most beautiful girls I have ever seen and I just want to let you know, that anyone that is with you is one of the luckiest people on earth.

airchildAFB_SkyFestThanks_060514_2HBB_CP.pdf HUD HOMES Skyfest_second-Inlander-ad_2Unite_29May14.indd 1

5/29/2014 9:50:45 AM

Save Thousands $$$

Emerson Area Home

Lidgerwood Area

$92,000

$108,000

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND VIDEOS:

FOR MORE INFORMATION AND VIDEOS:

4bd - 2bath - Hardwood Flrs Text LBR28741 to 878787

3bed - 1 bath

Winco I saw you at Winco on May 20th around 8:30 pm in the deli aisle. We almost bumped carts and we exchanged a few words, but I didn’t get a chance to ask if you were single and if so if I could get your number. You were wearing a tank top and shorts with tattoos on both arms. I’m sorry I don’t remember what color your shirt

Flying On I-90 To the two charming, young ladies we saw racing down the interstate, in their white Mazda Protege. You two were singing and dancing, while we were peddle to the metal trying to keep pace. We exchanged smiles for waves as we soared off into the sunset in our Nissan Infiniti. Maybe sometime we could cross paths and join you in your song and dance. Email us at I90sunsetdriving@gmail.com Driving pearl white Escalade. Blue eyes, black hair strong arms. Oh how I would like to take a long ride

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

You Saw Me NorthTown Mall You saw me at the NorthTown Mall Starbucks, punching numbers into my calculator “like a cat bereft of fine motor skills.” I’m that mysterious girl with the avocado tattoo. I’m flattered by your articulate description of me and I’m curious to know more about you...

Cheers Your Mom The moment I saw you at the brunch, I got butterflies. I felt a feeling that I hadn’t felt in a long, long time. I remember what you were wearing, I remember what you smelled like, and I remember how good it felt to be in your space. From that day until the Swamp, I couldn’t get you out of my mind.. I still can’t. I try to not think about you, I try to not feel the insane amount of love that I feel for you... this is out of my control. How I feel

Osborn Denture Clinic Thank you so much for the wonderful new dentures for my mother-in-law. She has had such bad experiences in the past (she has Medicaid) and was very nervous about how she would be treated. Everyone in your office were so kind to her, explained everything and treated her like a Queen. Hello Batman Thinking of you today. Much enjoy your calls. Hope you can visit the batcave sometime soon. Your batgirl awaits. Love you Batman! Dear Dave Guy We have been spending our weekends together for a while now and I know it’s just a physical thing but I feel a real connection with you. I’m sharing my feelings ‘cause I really like you more than the physical thing. I don’t want to scare off by my feelings I want more than just your body who knows maybe further down the road it will turn into something more. Sincerely Miss Smiles Heroism Still Alive In Spokane My daughter and I went to the Lincoln Center yesterday for the Target job fair. Her 1973 bug had issues. We thought it was out of gas, I called a friend, Dadra, who is my first hero, to bring us gas. While waiting at the center’s parking lot two younger gentlemen got out of their car and asked if I needed a jump or if they could help. I don’t know there names but thank you for your concern, you’re good people. My second and third

Growth Your generosity and passion for enjoying life are what made me fall in love with you 5 years ago and they’re still the things I enjoy most about you. Watching you grow into the woman you’ve become today,

Be Cheerful! ...get free sweets Submit your Cheers at inlander.com/sweet and be entered to win:1 Dozen “Cheers” Cupcake s Courtesy of Celebrations Bakery Winners drawn bi-weekly at random. Must be 18 or older to enter.

Text LBR33980 to 878787

FREE HUD Buyer WORKSHOP Come Learn How to Purchase These Great Homes Limited Seating, Reserve Today!

ROOSEVELT APARTMENTS

Historic Bldg, walk Downtown, Across from park, hrdwd flrs, Mahog woodwork, French drs, Storage locker & Gar parking. Cats welcome! 2 BR $800-$835, 1BR w $640-$685, City or Park views. 747-1414

LEE APARTMENTS Browne's Addition 2 Blks from Cd'A Park/Art Museum, Quiet Ngbrhd, groomed front/back yrds,clean,well maint/managed 1940's bldg. Gar/parking/strg avail.,lndry rm onsite,cats ok! 1br $500-550,Studio $485 747-1414

Northeast Apts

1 bd $450, 2 bd $550,w/storage unit & carport.Call Jane 483-3542

sales@inlander.com

For a FREE Photo List Contact 509.927.7733

John Stirling | 509.879.3551 Windermere Real Estate | Cornerstone

60 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014

Equal Housing Opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Law which makes it illegal to advertise any preference to, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for our real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain on discrimination call HUD free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


2618 E 1ST AVE

Located in central Spokane, convenient to all amenities, this very clean & nicely done duplex/rental income property and/or owner occupied property provides 2 Bdrm/1 Bth per upper & lower unit (2 units). This property can serve as a great mother-in-law and/or multi-family setup. The upper unit (owner occupied) has a wood-burning fireplace, tiled bthrm, newer flooring, & stainless steel appliances. The lower unit (renter occupied) has newer carpet & paint. Both units have laundry hookups, mostly vinyl windows, but some wood windows, vinyl siding, fully fenced yard, alley access w/ample parking, & a storage shed.

Cheers

Cheers

and watching you grow into the amazing woman you’re on your way to becoming is so inspiring to me. You’re an amazing woman and I’m so happy that I get to spend each day living my life with you. Love jj

Good Samaritan May 20th, about 5:45 pm. I was sitting in my car on the corner of Sprague and Pines, waiting for the light to turn green. On the bus stop bench, to the right of my car, sat “the bag lady” — as many people in the Valley know her. She holds animated conversations with no one and always dresses in a puffy heavy coat, even though it may be 80 degrees outside. In the white car to my left, were 2 African American male 20 somethings, skull caps on, loud music pounding the intersection. I was shocked when one of the dudes got out of his car in the middle of the intersection, walked around my car, over to the bag lady and handed her a quart of Gatorade. It almost made me start to cry. I don’t care what other people say about Spokane... I love living here and the good people that make up this town. Thanks for making my day, guys in the white car.

Cheers To My Beautiful Brown Eyed Birthday Girl! I just want to take the time to say thank you for being born Melissa. I adore everything about you and could not imagine my life without you as my best friend and love. Your presence in my life has made me the happiest man alive and I am constantly amazed by your brilliance and sweetness. You make 34 look amazing, baby. The Elk “I’m no hipster, but I know a good thing when I see it and I’m seeing aluminum. Beer is better in cans; it’s crisper, colder, and looks more fitting in my casted hand while I hold a smoke in my good hand. Also worth mentioning, I’ve never cracked a tooth drinking from a can. Happy 44th to my Handsome Lil Devil! Not a day goes by that I don’t thank my lucky stars that I met such an amazing man, you’re the bestest ever!I hope your bday is as greaaaat as you are. Biiig smooches from your Sweetie

Jeers Learn To Drive EWU! Jeers to the consistently rude drivers at the intersection on Betz and Michael P. Anderson Hwy in Cheney. The outer left turn lane is for buses and trucks with trailers. It’s not for pretending you’re racing the Indy 500 as you pass on the right. You make me wish my car had a missle

’S THIS WEEK! ANSWERS

STAIRCASES

Jeers launcher.

www.2618East1stAvenue.com

1-800-720-6008 EXT 2739

509-868-9181

Internet Tough Guy Shame on the people who complain about a company on the actual company’s social media page. This is a form of bullying by sharing your problem with the world. If you had a problem contact them directly. If they can’t fix your problem, then most likely you are just whining over something stupid. To The Unprofessional VA I have had surgery bumped 3 times, each time I call for info I get told “we will call you back by tomorrow with the info,” weeks go by without a reply. At one point I was praising your healthcare while being told just wait they will screw it up. Now I see why y’all are in the news and the butt of jokes. Because you put yourselves there. The VA ain’t healthcare. Its just bureaucrat bs RE: Not A Maid To Female Shoppers Get Over Yourself. People like you in the retail environment are a serious pisser to deal with. I have worked retail over half my life and in that time I have done it all and put up with it all. However in case your manager and or supervisor forgot to inform you it’s your g damn job. The company you work for, like most companies in the retail world, pays employees to see to the needs of their customers. YES that includes picking up the random pallet loads of crap they change their minds on, cleaning up fitting rooms and keeping the sales floor neat and tidy. How rude some people are, truly rude, making you do your job that you’re PAID to do, how dare they! I wonder how they sleep at night. If you think your job is just so outrageous that you need to complain anonymously to the public maybe you should focus more of effort on finding a new job instead of bitching. RE: Looking For I witnessed the accident at the Library on May 9th. Were you the lady driving the blue SUV, or were you driving the white car that backed into her?

An email for food lovers

Sign up at inlander.com/newsletter

Have an event? GET LISTED! Submit your event details for listings in the print & online editions of the Inlander.

• Community • Film • Food & Drink

• Music • Sports • Theater

• Visual Arts • Words • Etc.

Deadline is one week prior to publication Inlander.com/GetListed

JUNE 5, 2013 INLANDER 61


Turning Up Volume Thousands turn out for the Inlander’s two-day music festival PHOTOS BY YOUNG KWAK, JOE KONEK and MATT WEIGAND

M

usic. Community. Downtown. The Inlander has been putting on Volume in one form or another for five years now, and we’re proud of how it’s grown, and also what it seeks to do: Building community through music and art, supporting local businesses, contributing to the cultural vibrancy of the Inland Northwest. Its mission is at the heart of what we strive to do as an independent, family-owned media company, and we’re grateful to everyone who’s rallied around Volume. This past weekend we found ourselves again awestruck by the result: amazing music, packed venues, fans of every age racing back and forth, trying to take it all in. If you missed out (we’re sad for you) or if you want to relive it, check out these photos, plus a ton more and a video at Inlander.com. See ya next year! 

ONLINE

Find a video of Volume at Inlander.com.

62 INLANDER JUNE 5, 2014


M T W Th

Thursday Nights From 4 to 9 pm All Summer

CHEY SCOTT’S

CAT FRIDAY

Cats, cats, cats. Only on Inlander.com

www.riverstonestreetfair.com JUNE 5, 2014 INLANDER 63


Comedians

ROB SCHNEIDER & JON LOVITZ Thursday, June 12 • 7 pm th

Reserved • $45 General • $35

For mature audiences only. Purchase tickets at the casino or any TicketsWest outlet.

1 8 0 0 5 2 3 - 2 4 6 4 | CDAC A S I N O . COM |

/ CDAC A S I N O R E S O RT

25 miles south of Coeur d’Alene at the junction of US-95 and Hwy-58


Inlander 06/05/2014