Inlander 05/26/2022

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MAY 26-JUNE 1, 2022 | NATIONAL ISSUES. LOCAL PERSPECTIVES

SCHOOLS

Safety concerns for students and teachers PAGE 10

MOVIES

Bob’s Burgers hits the big screen

PAGE 33

With Roe threatened, the fight’s far from over — and the fallout’s just beginning BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

The Bans Off Our Bodies rally in Spokane on May 14


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INSIDE VOL. 29, NO. 33 | COVER PHOTO: YOUNG KWAK

COMMENT NEWS COVER STORY CULTURE

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nyone who’s paid any attention to political debates about the country’s legal system has undoubtedly heard a lot of lip service from conservatives about keeping “activist judges” at bay and pushing “strict constitutionalists” into the court system at every level. But it’s the conservative diehards on the U.S. Supreme Court who appear poised to overturn 50 years of precedent on ABORTION LEGALITY (and a woman’s right to bodily autonomy in the process). The abortion debate’s been hot for decades, and Justice Samuel Alito’s leaked draft just cranked it up. Reporter Samantha Wohlfeil, recently a firstprize winner in Washington’s Society of Professional Journalists’ Northwest Excellence in Journalism awards, digs into what the abandoning of Roe v. Wade would mean to the Inland Northwest in this week’s cover story (page 16). Also this week, reporter Nate Sanford looks into the security of local schools after increasing reports of student-on-student violence (page 10), we review the new Top Gun sequel (page 32) and get ready to welcome Bob Dylan to Spokane (page 34). — DAN NAILEN, editor

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WHAT MUSIC ARTIST DO YOU WANT TO SEE COME TO SPOKANE? JUAN RUIZ

Arcade Fire. Why? Just one of my favorite bands and they just came out with a new album.

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EWU’s future: Will the new president restore the diversity programs that were once a vibrant calling card of the university? BY DEIRDRE ALMEIDA AND JUDY ROHRER

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e are the directors of the American Indian Studies and the Gender, Women’s & Sexuality Studies (GWSS) programs at Eastern Washington University. We are reeling at the latest racist mass shootings and all of the current attacks on bodily autonomy — from the slew of legislation criminalizing lifesaving support for trans kids to the banning of reproductive health care. We also recognize that the United States just hit the grim milestone of over 1 million COVID deaths, with Black, Indigenous and people of color disproportionately represented in that number. And there’s the new report out of Deb Haaland’s Department of Interior identifying more Native American boarding schools and burial sites than previously recognized by the settler state. So, we ask again, and always, whose lives matter? These are issues we learn about, and grapple with, in our classes and programming. We analyze, as related phenomena, the fact that the U.S. is a global leader in COVID deaths, mass shootings, and ongoing colonial violence. We counter the misinformation and recruitment that leads too many young men to, in the words of Political Research Associates, “commit acts of political violence, motivated by White nationalism and misogyny.” We provide curricula that lead to stronger graduation rates. We raise up the cultures, resilience and knowledge of our diverse communities and nations. In these difficult times, we are working to support those most impacted

at EWU, and in our region. For example, we have recently featured programming with local activists and artists based in justice and healing. We are writing here because we wish we could be doing more. The reality is all four of the diversity programs at Eastern (Africana, American Indian, Chicanx and GWSS) are overstretched and understaffed. In the last two years, under conditions of administrative churn and institutional crisis, GWSS has had its foundation of faculty and staff eroded by attrition and austerity. In fact, GWSS used to have a full professor who is a leading scholar in reproductive justice. We sorely need her expertise now, but she left in 2021. American Indian Studies has never had a permanent faculty member other than the director in its 50-plus years of existence.

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ack in spring 2020, our late President Mary Cullinan eliminated the Office of Diversity & Inclusion, terminated the contract for our vice president for diversity and inclusion, Dr. Shari Clarke, and pushed to consolidate the four diversity programs. Students and community members rallied and forced her to reverse her decision. Faculty then voted no confidence in Cullinan, and she resigned the presidency in June 2020. We’ve struggled under a series of interim presidents, provosts and deans ever since. Once the temporary wokeness of the summer of 2020 wore off, they threw the institution into a down-


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EWU students and community members discuss immigration during an Activist in Residence workshop led by local organizer Lili Navarrete. FRANCES GRACE MORTEL PHOTO ward spiral chasing neoliberal austerity measures nearly to the point of no return. Administrators keep telling those of us in the diversity programs that we aren’t earning our keep (at the same time, athletics got a pass). Apparently, we don’t measure up on the scales of “student credit hours” or “full-time equivalency” or declared majors/minors. We keep saying those metrics weren’t designed for us, but that we are nonetheless incredibly valuable to the institution. Again, this is the question of mattering. The fact that EWU has four autonomous diversity programs makes the university unique and could be an incredible selling point. Employers want college graduates who have an understanding of our increasingly diverse society and global markets. We have been making these arguments, but it’s like beating our heads against a brick wall. Administration has moved from simply tying the purse strings and disallowing us from hiring permanent faculty and staff to actively trying to take away what little power and autonomy we have. Our futures are on the line, too, as we’ve both been informed our directorships of our respective programs will be terminated next month and in two years, respectively.

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e are hopeful that incoming President Shari McMahan will right the ship. The thing is, that can’t happen unless we as a community let her know what we want, what we value, what matters to us. Specifically, we need to communicate what future we see for Eastern. It’s a future where American Indian Studies not only has a director, but finally has at least one other tenured/tenure track faculty member. It’s a future where Chicanx and Africana Studies have tenured directors. It’s a future where gender diverse, trans, pregnant, parenting, women and queer students (and their allies) have adequate faculty and staff to develop the classes and programming that center them and their experiences. We encourage you to join us in communicating this vision to Dr. McMahan. n Dr. Deirdre Almeida has served as the director of the American Indian Studies program at Eastern Washington University since 2001. Dr. Judy Rohrer has served as the director of the Gender, Women’s & Sexuality Studies program at Eastern Washington University since 2018. You can find a petition to save the diversity programs at https://bit.ly/3snLYfF.

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MAY 26, 2022 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | FROM READERS

The Mild Riders zip through West Central Spokane.

Readers respond to our feature “Scoot On Over” (May 19, 2022), in which Chey Scott introduced the Mild Riders, a “scooter gang” rolling on the streets of Spokane.

CAT CARREL: What happened to the Minions?

IKE OKOLI: I wanna join

RICK HASTINGS: Originals tired of leading, fresh energies didn’t arrive in time. Good to see Mild Riders though!

ROY ALAN: Sounds like the reason for the uptick in crime around the city ; )

JOHN WHITE: OMG, the Vespa & Lambretta posse.

CLYDE HERRINGTON: “Mild Bunch” was taken?

NANCY STRONGIN: I really loved my scooter, but I have back issues and finally had to sell it some years back.

MARLA NUNBERG: Well, not the first scooter club in Spokane and hopefully not the last. The Minions Scooter Club was the last one, but was not even the first one. There are still Minions out there, just not active now.

KEVIN SMITH: Born to be mild. Gotta love the spirit on two wheels and enjoying our beautiful area in the Inland Empire. Right on, ride on, to infinity…

TOM SANDERSON: This feels like a real life version of a Fine Young Cannibals video. n

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EDUCATION

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Hallway fights, threats and an ongoing FBI inquiry into school safety — are the kids OK? BY NATE SANFORD

10 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

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t’s the first lunch period at Lewis and Clark High School, and a riotous mob of more than 75 students is thundering through the hallways. A few appear to be chasing after a specific student; many are just along for the ride or recording videos on their phones. It’s May 5, shortly after 11 am. Someone from the school calls the police and tells them students are coming into the office and threatening staff. She sounds worried. You can hear the chaos in the background of the 911 recording. The caller appears to tell someone in the school office to let the district’s downtown offices know that 911 has been called. A brief pause, and then the caller says, “Yeah, when a mob of kids come in this office and start threatening us, I’m absolutely calling the police.” Ten minutes later, police receive a call from someone else saying that things have stabilized and police are no longer needed. A campus security officer calls a few moments later and says police actually are needed. Cops arrive, and the situation eventually calms down. Two female students are charged with criminal mischief riot and harassment/threat to harm. At a school board meeting a week later, Matt Tully-Ruppert,


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Lewis and Clark High School had a chaotic hallway scene this month.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

a Lewis and Clark math teacher, gives an impassioned statement criticizing the school board for their lack of action in the face of repeated safety concerns over the past school year. He accuses administrators of ignoring complaints to make the district’s data look better. “We’ve been begging at our school easily since October for things to change,” Tully-Ruppert says, directly addressing superintendent Adam Swinyard. “Because it just seems like… are we just waiting for disaster? Is that the point?”

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he incident at Lewis and Clark comes on the heels of a contentious back-and-forth between Spokane Police Chief Craig Meidl and Spokane Public Schools that reignited a broader debate over student safety and the role of law enforcement in the schools. The whole thing was triggered by a letter Meidl sent in March that accused the district of discouraging staff from reporting violence and other safety issues to police — violating their legal obligation as mandatory reporters. The district denied this. The FBI launched an inquiry shortly after. ...continued on next page

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NEWS | EDUCATION “SCHOOLYARD BRAWL,” CONTINUED... Both Spokane police and Spokane Public Schools tell the Inlander that they’re avoiding commenting on the issue until the FBI inquiry has concluded. The FBI didn’t respond to questions but has previously indicated that it does not confirm or deny the existence of ongoing investigations. One Lewis and Clark teacher, who asked not to be named because they are concerned about retribution, told the Inlander they were recently interviewed by the FBI as part of the inquiry into the matter. The teacher says there’s been a noticeable increase in safety issues over the past year, especially when it comes to kids using hard drugs — not just weed and vaporizers — in bathrooms. City Councilman Michael Cathcart says concerns about school safety first came to his attention around November. He says both school personnel and police officers have come to his office to share their concerns about the way the district was interacting with law enforcement. Cathcart says he feels like the schools are doing everything in their power to keep information away from parents. He says he thinks the district is motivated by a “clear bias” against police. Cathcart traces the issue back to the decision to remove campus resource officers from the schools two years ago. The resource officers were not technically police but did have a commission with the police department and authority to arrest students and conduct investigations.

That type of punishment can impact a student’s ability to graduate and directly contributes to the school-to-prison pipeline, Ancona-Shepard says.

T

he new safety policy was celebrated by many in progressive circles, but some in the law enforcement community warned that it could make schools less safe. Ancona-Shepard pushes back on the idea that the removal of resource officers led to recent safety issues. The pandemic had a devastating impact on the mental health of children, she says. There’s ample evidence to suggest that an uptick in violent and aggressive behavior in students is occurring at a national level — even in districts that didn’t get rid of their resource officers. In a March survey by the American Psychological Association, one-third of teachers reported experiencing at least one instance of verbal and/ or threatening violence from students during the pandemic. Ancona-Shepard also wonders where Meidl is getting the idea that teachers are being told not to report violent incidents. As a Spokane substitute teacher, she was required to do mandatory reporting training. If a violent incident occurred in her classroom, she says she would absolutely feel comfortable reporting it to law enforcement. “I’m very supportive of restorative practices and working on all levels without getting agencies involved with families,” Ancona-Shepard says, “but I’m always going to step in for a kid and put them first.” While police are occasionally needed, Ancona-Shepard says, minor misbehavior — like vandalizing a bathroom because of a TikTok challenge — is best handled by the school. City Councilman Zack Zappone, who works parttime as a teacher at North Central High School, has also seen a rise in behavioral issues and pandemic-related trauma in students this year. He says he was surprised by the fight at Lewis and Clark but still thinks restorative justice is a good policy direction for the district. “We don’t want to exclude [students] from society when they have a behavior issue,” Zappone says. “We want to help kids come back into the community.” Zappone also notes that staffing shortages have made it especially difficult for teachers to deal with student misbehavior. At North Central, a mental health therapist position has gone unfilled since the start of the school year. Shortly after the mob incident, Lewis and Clark told parents the school would spend two weeks “reteaching expectations to students,” with a specific focus on hallway behavior, loitering in bathrooms and respectful interactions with adults. One student, interviewed anonymously by KREM 2, told the news station that she only joined the crowd because she saw people running down the hallway. Her first thought was that someone was shooting up the school. n

“We don’t want to exclude [students] from society when they have a behavior issue. We want to help kids come back into the community.” The presence of those quasi-cops in schools was controversial, especially after a 2019 incident when a resource officer at Ferris High School — whose history of excessive force allegations as a Spokane County sheriff’s deputy was later reported by the Inlander — pinned a Black student by his neck, causing the student to reportedly say “I can’t breathe.” Advocates like Julie Ancona-Shepard argue that resource officers reinforced an atmosphere of surveillance and discipline that disproportionally affected students of color and students with disabilities. Ancona-Shepard has served on various Spokane school district committees and task forces and was heavily involved in efforts to implement new safety policies. In 2020, the school district replaced resource officers with campus safety specialists, who lacked police commission and the authority to arrest students. The move was part of a larger push by the Spokane Public Schools toward equity and restorative justice. The school district also updated its policies to focus on nonpunitive restorative practices, mental health support and evidence-based behavioral interventions. The main goal of the policy shift was to lower the number of kids who were being expelled or prosecuted for misdemeanor offenses in school.

12 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

Additional reporting by Daniel Walters


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NEWS | SOCIAL SERVICES

Numbers Matter Census undercount threatens federal food and health programs on reservations BY CARLY GRAF/KAISER HEALTH NEWS

T

he 2020 census missed nearly 1 of every 17 Native Americans who live on reservations, an undercount that could very well lead to insufficient federal funding for essential health, nutrition, and social programs in remote communities with high poverty rates and scarce access to services. The census counted 9.7 million people who identified as a Native American or an Alaska Native in 2020 — alone or in combination with another race or ethnicity — compared with 5.2 million in 2010. But the Indigenous population on the nation’s approximately 325 reserva-

14 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

Wellpinit is the main town on the roughly 160,000-acre Spokane Indian Reservation. tions was undercounted by nearly 6%, according to a demographic analysis of the census’s accuracy. Indigenous people on reservations have a history of being undercounted — nearly 5% were missed in 2010, according to the analysis. At least 1 in 5 Native Americans live on reservations, according to previous census data. More detailed Native American population data from the 2020 census will be released over the next year. The census numbers help determine how much money is allocated to various programs on reservations such as health care, social services, education, and infrastructure. For example, on the Blackfeet reservation in northwestern Montana, the co-chairperson of a food pantry whose funding is partially dependent upon census counts is worried the undercount will make it more difficult after this year for all the families who need the free meals to access them. The food pantry — operated by an organization called FAST Blackfeet, which stands for Food Access and Sustainability Team — serves about 400 households a week, said Danielle Antelope. The 2020 census puts the Blackfeet reservation’s population at 9,900, which Antelope said “is not reflecting our numbers to reality.” Thirty-seven percent of people on the Blackfeet reservation lived below the poverty line from 2014 to 2018, compared with a 13% statewide average, according to periodic American Community Survey estimates. “I see the problem in the undercounting of the census being related to the representation of the need,” Antelope said.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Antelope said she has seen firsthand what it means when people living on reservations slip through the cracks. Her mom was a bus driver who made too much money to be eligible for income-based federal food assistance programs, but not nearly enough to adequately feed her kids. The family depended on processed foods from the frozen aisle. Where produce is expensive or hard to find, cheap packaged meals are often the only option. “As we know now, those cheap foods relate to health disparities,” Antelope said. “And those health disparities are high in communities of color and tribal communities.”

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ensus miscounts are not limited to Native Americans on reservations. Black (3%) and Hispanic (5%) people living in the U.S. also were undercounted. Meanwhile, White people were overcounted (2%). Among U.S. states, Montana has the fourth-largest share of Indigenous residents, at 6%, and Native Americans are the state’s second-largest racial or ethnic group, after people who identify as white. The percentage ticks up to 9% when it includes people who identify as “American Indian and Alaska Native alone or in combination” with another race or ethnicity. Most Indigenous residents live on one of Montana’s seven reservations or in a nearby town or county. The Indian Health Service, the federal agency obliged to provide medical care to most of the country’s Native residents, receives funding partly based on the


census. Nationwide in 2019, the most recent year for which data is available, IHS spent $4,078 per person, according to agency data. By comparison, Medicaid, the federal health insurance program for people with low incomes and certain disabilities, spent more than twice that rate, $8,436. A memo by the U.S. Government Accountability Office noted that the usefulness of per capita comparisons is limited because the federal programs vary widely. Health gaps were visible during the pandemic. In Montana, the leading cause of death for Indigenous people in 2020 was COVID, largely because of other conditions people had, such as respiratory illness, obesity, and diabetes. Heart disease was the second leading cause of death. More accurate census counts would lead to “more funding support from the federal government and even the state government,” said Leonard Smith, CEO of the Billings-based Native American Development Corp., a nonprofit that provides technical assistance and financial services to small businesses. “I think it makes people realize there’s a much larger Native population than what’s being reported, and so it becomes a higher priority. It’s all about the numbers,” Smith said. A more accurate count could also help improve infrastructure and housing on reservations.

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“When a census undercounts a Native community, it has a direct and long-reaching impact on the resources that the community receives.”

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Federal housing assistance remains inaccessible to many households on tribal reservations. Research points to a strong relationship between housing and better health outcomes. A 2020 study published in the journal BMC Public Health concluded that almost 70% of people who obtained secure, stable housing reported “significantly better” health situations nine to 12 months later, compared with when they were experiencing housing insecurity. According to a 2017 report from the National Congress of American Indians, more than 15% of homes in areas on or near Native reservations were considered overcrowded — which means there was more than one person per room, including living rooms, kitchens, bedrooms, and enclosed porches — compared with 2% of homes among other populations. Although about a quarter of households had incomes below 50% of the federal poverty line, the report said, only about 12% received federal housing assistance. Census data is used to determine funding for housing and community development grants. “When a census undercounts a Native community, it has a direct and long-reaching impact on the resources that the community receives — things like schools and parks, health care facilities, and roads,” said Michael Campbell, deputy director of the Native American Rights Fund in Boulder, Colorado. The impact of the undercount on funding transcends budgets and social programs. It creates the feeling among Indigenous people that their presence in this country matters less than that of others, leading to both political disenfranchisement and personal harm, tribal members said. “Because for so many years we have gotten used to not being counted, we don’t hold that aspiration for our government to create space for us now,” Antelope said. “When we have accurate numbers that reflect our community, our voice is heard, and we can get services and funding that better reflects our community.” n KHN (Kaiser Health News) is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism about health issues. Together with Policy Analysis and Polling, KHN is one of the three major operating programs at KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation). KFF is an endowed nonprofit organization providing information on health issues to the nation.

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MAY 26, 2022 INLANDER 15


The Bans Off Our Bodies rally in Spokane on May 14 was one of many across the country. ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

16 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022


A

BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

Washington state prepares for an influx of patients if abortion regulation is handed over to the states

MY BODY, STATE’S CHOICE? bortion-rights supporters gather in downtown Spokane roughly 24 hours after Politico posts a leaked draft of a U.S. Supreme Court majority opinion showing the court is poised to overturn Roe v. Wade. With nearly 50 years of precedent enshrining the right to safe, legal abortion now at risk, the crowd of about 100 people assembles outside the Thomas S. Foley U.S. Courthouse in the rapidly planned rally May 3. Speakers from Planned Parenthood of Greater Washington and North Idaho, as well as supporters from other organizations, lead the crowd in chants, sharing their concerns and intent to continue fighting for reproductive autonomy. “No back alleys in the night!” the crowd chants. “For safe choices, we will fight!” Later, a young girl leads the crowd. “My body!” she shouts. “My choice!” the crowd responds. One woman holds a sign that says, “We are not ovary-acting.” She’s dressed as a handmaid from Margaret Atwood’s 1985 novel The Handmaid’s Tale, which depicts a dystopian future America where a cultish Christian society forcibly impregnates the few remaining women who haven’t been sterilized by environmental pollution. In the book, husbands rule over all, not allowing their infertile wives, who hold a higher place in society than handmaids, to read. The wives participate in the ritual rape of the “handmaids” whose children they will later steal and raise as their own. Wearing a long red cape and a mask meant to symbolize being silenced, the woman asks to be identified as the characters in the book are: “of” the men who control them. In this case, she refers to the conservative Supreme Court justices poised to overturn the 1973 ruling. “I’m OfSamuel, I’m OfBrett, I’m OfClarence, I’m OfJesse, who is the husband of Amy Coney Barrett,” the woman, a Spokane mother of three, tells the Inlander. “I’m Of whoever has decided that this is the time they’re going to strip away our rights.” Like others at the rally, she worries about women in rural

communities, people of color and those who are marginalized, for whom overturning Roe could mean the complete loss of abortion access. She recognizes privilege and the fact that wealthier women and White women will likely continue to have access, even if it means flying or driving to another state or country. If the court overturns Roe in the way that Justice Samuel Alito suggests in the 98-page leaked draft, some at the rally ask, what could be next on the chopping block? The right to access contraception? The right to marry someone of the same gender? These decisions were also rooted in arguments around a right to privacy that was interpreted from the Constitution’s liberty guarantees and its amendments. “What’s next is they’re coming for LGBTQ rights. They’re coming for our right to love who we want. They’re coming for our right to live the way we want,” OfSamuel tells the Inlander. “Six years ago, when we had the Women’s March, people were like, ‘Oh, calm down. Don’t worry, this is never gonna be overturned. No one needs to worry about Roe v. Wade, that’s safe.’ Well, we were not overreacting, and this is exactly what happened.”

WHY ROE IS IN JEOPARDY

The current case in question, Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health, asked the highest court in the land to weigh whether Mississippi’s restrictions on abortions after 15 weeks (which is before viability outside of the womb) should be allowed to stand, or if it should be struck down for violating the standards set by Roe and the 1992 case Planned Parenthood v. Casey, which reaffirmed the right to an abortion and reinterpreted the earlier ruling. The Supreme Court isn’t expected to release its official ruling in Dobbs until June or July. Until then, Roe remains the law of the land and access to safe and legal abortion remains a federal right. Roe and Casey held that states cannot restrict abortions before a fetus is viable outside the womb, which with modern medicine is somewhere around 23 or 24 weeks. ...continued on next page

MAY 26, 2022 INLANDER 17


“What we’re witnessing is the system falling apart,” says Planned Parenthood’s Paul Dillon.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“MY BODY, STATE’S CHOICE?,” CONTINUED... Children born that early are considered very premature (a normal pregnancy lasts around 37 to 40 weeks), and they must spend months in intensive care units to allow their organs to fully develop. At 22 weeks, a Stanford study looking at births from 2013 to 2018 found that 28 percent survived. At 23 weeks, the same study found a 55 percent survival rate. The Guinness World Record for the most premature baby to survive was awarded last year to a baby born in 2020 at 21 weeks old. A majority including at least five of the court’s nine justices appears ready to not only uphold the 15-week ban as legal, but also completely overturn Roe. Politico’s source reported that after oral arguments in December, four other justices joined Alito in supporting the majority opinion he was then assigned to draft, including Clarence Thomas, Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh and Amy Coney Barrett.

racial marriage and relationships are legal, overruling the precedent of Pace v. Alabama (1882). The Supreme Court has also had leaks before. One prominent example of when the majority thinking was leaked? The final decision in Roe v. Wade, which Time published in its weekly magazine hours before the decision was officially released. In his majority draft for Dobbs, Alito does not pull punches, saying that “Roe was egregiously wrong from the start. Its reasoning was exceptionally weak and the decision has had damaging consequences.” Alito questions the history of abortion laws cited in Roe and tears at the constitutional interpretations finding “unenumerated” rights to privacy and/or the freedom to make “intimate and personal choices” that are “central to personal dignity and autonomy” somewhere within the 14th Amendment’s mention of liberty. He also cites antiabortion groups’ arguments that times have changed, with maternity leave being guaranteed in “many cases,” a growing acceptance of unmarried pregnancy and “safe haven” laws that allow people to anonymously drop their baby off at places like fire stations if they can’t care for them. In his tear down of the Roe reasoning, Alito seems to be calling his predecessors on the court “constitutional morons,” says Mary Pat Treuthart, a law professor at Gonzaga who spoke on her own behalf and not that of the university. “By saying somebody got this wrong, ‘egregiously wrong’ at an earlier point,” Treuthart says, “you’re basically saying that your predecessors on the court were constitutionally, interpretively inept. You know, that’s a strong statement.” Treuthart, who went to law school just a few years after Roe was decided, says that, surprisingly, she doesn’t remember the case coming up in class, as it didn’t seem

“If the court overturns Roe in the way Justice Samuel Alito suggests in the leaked draft, some ask, what could be next on the chopping block?” While the Supreme Court typically shows reverence for prior decisions, it has overturned precedent before, sometimes in very significant ways. Famously, in Brown v. Board of Education (1954), the Supreme Court reversed the 1896 ruling in Plessy v. Ferguson that had found segregation to be legal. In Lawrence v. Texas (2003) the court found laws against sodomy illegal, overturning the previous decision in Bowers v. Hardwick (1986). The case Loving v. Virginia (1967) held that inter-

18 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

particularly controversial at the time. The vote on Roe was 7 to 2, with Justices Harry Blackmun (appointed by President Richard Nixon), Warren Burger (another Nixon appointee), William Douglas (an FDR appointee), William Brennan (an Eisenhower appointee), Potter Stewart (an Eisenhower appointee), Thurgood Marshall (an LBJ appointee), and Lewis Powell (another Nixon appointee) all signing onto the majority. Treuthart does recall some discussion about whether the right to abortion was securely rooted in a right to privacy, which is not explicitly laid out in the Constitution or its amendments. She says some people wondered whether the right to abortion should have been rooted in gender, specifically arguing it would be discriminatory against women (modern language would also likely include transgender individuals who may become pregnant) to deny that right. While some issues such as race discrimination require a higher level of scrutiny from the court when considering cases, health and medical decisions such as abortion only require an “intermediary” level of scrutiny from the courts. Alito’s draft argues that if a right is not explicitly spelled out in the Constitution or its amendments, it needs to be “deeply rooted in the nation’s history and tradition.” Alito cites the thinking of people such as Matthew Hale, an English judge who, in a mid-1600s case, sentenced two women to death for being “witches,” and is largely credited with the long-standing legal concept that women couldn’t be raped by their husbands. Alito specifically cites Hale’s writings that said “post-quickening” abortion was illegal and considered murder if the woman died. “Quickening” is the time when a woman first feels a fetus move inside the womb, around 16 to 18 weeks. But only looking at the nation’s history or the explicit text of the Constitution would leave many rights affecting, say, people of color, women and LGBTQ people out.


TUESDAY

BY THE NUMBERS The Guttmacher Institute, which focuses on abortion data gathering, provides the following:

“Let’s imagine that history and tradition has operated in a discriminatory fashion, which we know it has,” Treuthart says. Alito acknowledges there are unenumerated rights, but appears to say those decisions should be left to state lawmakers as the best representation of the will of the people, she says. “If we had a pure legislative process, maybe more people such as myself would get on board with that,” Treuthart says. “But now, state legislative decision making … it’s beholden to special interest group pluralism.”

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CURRENT STATE OF ACCESS In 2014, 59 percent of abortions were obtained by people who’d already given birth at least once

In 2014, 51 percent of abortion patients said they were using contraception the month they became pregnant

In 2016, more than 65 percent of abortions happened before eight weeks of pregnancy, with more than 88 percent happening before 12 weeks and more than 94 percent happening before 15 weeks

Abortion rates have declined steadily since the 1980s, with the rate as of 2017 (13.5 abortions per 1,000 women aged 15 to 44) holding lower than the year Roe was decided (16.3 per 1,000)

As of preliminary 2020 data, more than half of abortions are now medication abortions (which were first approved by the FDA for use in 2000)

If abortion regulation falls to the states, the Supreme Court’s decision could have immediate implications, with some states losing access and others working to bolster theirs. By popular vote, Washington state passed the right to abortion in 1970 in response to multiple tragic deaths of young women who sought illegal and unsafe abortions. Now, the state ensures access to abortion before viability, and extra protections have been passed to ensure that women who miscarry cannot face criminal charges for the loss of their pregnancy. In Idaho, lawmakers have worked to restrict abortion and passed a so-called “trigger ban” in 2020, so that 30 days after Roe is overturned, providing an abortion will become a felony punishable by at least two years in prison. The law has exceptions for cases where an abortion saves the life of the mother, and for cases of rape or incest that have been reported to law enforcement. This March, Idaho also passed a Texas-style ban on abortion after a fetal heartbeat is detected (around six weeks). A crowd-enforcement mechanism in the law allows relatives of the “preborn child” to sue and seek $20,000 in fines from someone who provides an abortion after that cutoff. The measure was temporarily blocked by Idaho’s Supreme Court in April due to legal challenges. North Idaho already lacks abortion providers, so Planned Parenthood clinics in Spokane Valley and Pullman already see that 43 percent of their abortion patients come from Idaho, says Paul Dillon, vice president of public affairs for the local Planned Parenthood affiliate. Planned Parenthood is the only health center that provides surgical abortions in Eastern Washington, says Sarah Dixit, public affairs manager for the affiliate. Dixit adds that part of the struggle whenever abortion restriction makes it into the news cycle is keeping patients informed about access, as it’s easy to get confused. “We got a ton of questions from folks asking if people can still get care,” Dixit says of the days after the Dobbs draft leaked. “We want people to know abortion is still legal in all 50 states, and this draft isn’t finalized yet.” Local health systems differ in their stance on their providers offering abortion. Providence does not “offer procedures in which the purpose is to terminate a pregnancy,” as the Catholic hospital system’s belief is “that every life is sacred,” according to parts of an emailed statement sent to the Inlander. MultiCare, meanwhile, a not-for-profit, nonreligious hospital system, allows its providers to “offer abortion services and referrals at their discretion,” but the providers are not required to do so, according to an emailed statement sent to the Inlander. In response to the draft, MultiCare’s CEO Bill Robertson issued a statement reading, “Everyone should have full access to the health care services they need, including reproductive medicine. We believe that the decision to have an abortion — whether that be an in-person surgical procedure or an oral medication prescription — should be one made by the pregnant individual and their provider. ...continued on next page

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MAY 26, 2022 INLANDER 19


“MY BODY, STATE’S CHOICE?,” CONTINUED...

It’s important to understand the links between anti-abortion activism and extremism, says Sarah Dixit of Planned Parenthood. ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

20 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

This is not a new position for MultiCare, but one that we have been committed to for decades as a communitybased, secular, not-for-profit health system.” The overturning of Roe and subsequent trigger ban in Idaho are expected to drive up patient demand for abortion in Washington and Oregon. The Guttmacher Institute, a research organization that supports abortion rights, predicts up to a 385 percent increase in women whose closest abortion provider will be in Washington state once Roe is overturned and many states totally ban abortion. Idaho is one of 26 states Guttmacher expects to ban abortion upon the decision. Other states have set aside funding in anticipation of helping meet a higher demand for abortion access. This spring, for example, Oregon earmarked $15 million to help cover the costs of abortion for those coming from out of state.

ANTI-ABORTION GROUPS ENCOURAGED

Alito notes in his draft that Roe has only further divided the country in recent decades. Pew Research shows that 61 percent of U.S. adults think abortion should be legal in all or most circumstances, while 37 percent think abortion should be illegal in all or most circumstances. The only faith group where more people surveyed believed that abortion should be illegal in all or most cases was White evangelical Christians. Most Catholics, Black protestants, White protestants and those who were not religiously affiliated supported the right to abortion. Other faith groups in the March 2022 survey, such as Muslims, Jews, Buddhists and Hindus, did not represent large enough samples to be statistically significant. Anti-abortion activists were quick to applaud the leaked draft, feeling that at least one battle in their fight to protect unborn life had finally been won. Evangelical Pastor Ken Peters, who founded The Church at Planned Parenthood (TCAPP) in Spokane and has since moved his family to Tennessee to spread the efforts of TCAPP, tells the Inlander that learning of the news was “epic.” He says his wife was moved to tears. They were at a worship service led by Tennessee Pastor Greg Locke when word of the draft came through. “He made the announcement right there in the middle of his sermon,” Peters tells the Inlander. “I ran up on the platform, and we hugged and high-fived and hooped and hollered for quite a while. The congregation went nuts, cheering and praising God.” While he doesn’t believe the decision will end abortion, since states like Washington will still offer it, Peters says the decision did feel significant. “It’s a moment that is probably one of the greatest nights of my life,” Peters says. “I’m a pastor’s kid and my parents fought this battle with Roe v. Wade for 50 years approximately now. … It seemed like it would be impossible for Roe to ever be overturned.” Peters believes and preaches that abortion is murder and is never acceptable, even in cases of rape or incest. “I think the rapist ought to get the death penalty and whatever punishment can or may befall him, I pray that it happens,” Peters says. “It’s just a horrible thing. But I don’t think we should murder the innocent because of somebody else’s sin.” Rather than expand government assistance or programs to ensure support for those who can’t afford unplanned children, Peters says he has faith that Christian families, such as people in the church communities he participates in, will be able to step in and adopt children. As the name suggests, TCAPP’s main goal is to hold religious gatherings outside Planned Parenthood clinics, where congregants often sing, yell and chant near what

A BRIEF HISTORY OF ROE Jane Roe, later revealed to be Norma McCorvey, was a woman living in Texas when she became pregnant for the third time in 1970. McCorvey had already had two unwanted pregnancies, with the children given up for adoption, and she wanted to obtain an abortion, but the procedure was illegal in Texas. The lawyer she talked to put her in touch with the attorneys who would take her case to the Supreme Court. As the legal process lasts far longer than pregnancy, McCorvey ultimately gave birth to the third child, who was again put up for adoption. An article in The Atlantic in September revealed the child to be Shelley Lynn Thornton, who was raised by a woman named Ruth in Texas and later moved to Washington state.


they view as the “gates of hell.” Peters’ group used to meet regularly outside of the Spokane Planned Parenthood clinic, often getting so loud that the clinic’s providers and clients felt the demonstrations interfered with their services. In a lawsuit against TCAPP, Peters, former Washington state Rep. Matt Shea (a far right figure who briefly led services with the group), and others, Planned Parenthood’s local affiliate prevailed in getting an injunction against the demonstrations, which violate a Washington law against interfering with the operations of health facilities. As recently as March, judges held that a permanent injunction on the church could stand. The Catholic Church, meanwhile, has long stood against abortion. Bishop Thomas Daly, who presides over the Spokane Diocese, was also gathered with others of faith when he learned of the leaked draft, but the reaction was far more muted. Daly tells the Inlander that he and a group of Catholic priests were gathered for a retreat when the word of the draft started coming in on Monday, May 2, but the news didn’t change their plans or become a major topic of conversation. Daly says he was somewhat wary of the leaked draft, as the leak itself seemed to be yet another indication of growing divisiveness in the country. “Of course, the Catholic Church is clear on life issues,” Daly tells the Inlander, “but [the leaked decision] just seemed to me just another expression of extreme behavior.” Daly, who has been vocally against abortion and has called for denying communion to local politicians whose actions support access to abortion, appreciates the direction of the opinion. At the same time, he says he recognizes that allowing states to decide won’t likely change the situation in Spokane. “Washington is one of those states that has by popular vote allowed for abortion,” Daly says. “I’ve never used that reality to discourage me because I think it’s the Catholic Church’s position … that life is sacred from conception to natural death.” The question then, he says, is how to show the sanctity of life to people, and how to show care for the mother who wants to keep a child, or may be poor, or the child was conceived outside of marriage. In Washington state, Catholic churches offer a program called PREPARES Pregnancy and Parenting Support, which was started in Spokane, Daly says. The program helps people, regardless of their faith, from pregnancy until the child’s fifth birthday, connecting them with community volunteers who offer parenting classes, basic needs such as diapers and clothes, support groups, and more.

“The criticism is the Catholic Church only cares about a mother when she is pregnant and once that child’s born we don’t care about it, and that’s not true,” Daly says. “I believe that PREPARES is a really clear example that we do care about that mom and that dad and that child during that period of time. So it’s just not, ‘Let’s be pro-life and that’s it.’”

REACTION AND CONCERNS

The first week of May, local Planned Parenthood staff were getting ready to meet about a Washington Post article outlining the next goals of the anti-abortion movement, which include winning back conservative control in Congress and passing a federal six-week abortion ban, Planned Parenthood spokesman Dillon says. “That news ended up falling under the radar given what was happening that evening with the national leak of Alito’s draft,” Dillon says. Ultimately, those groups hope to ban abortion completely in every state and shut down Planned Parenthood, Dillon says. The court’s apparent intention to overturn Roe goes against the majority of Americans who support access to safe, legal abortion, he says, adding that our political system is often able to be ruled by the minority.

“It’s the Catholic Church’s position that life is sacred from conception to natural death.”

Spokane Bishop Thomas Daly. DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

“That does not actually reflect the beliefs of how people really feel in this country,” Dillon says. “And what we’re witnessing is the system falling apart.” Planned Parenthood’s Dixit says that American democracy is now on watch as this move may embolden those in the anti-abortion movement, who are sometimes linked with more extreme groups. Strong connections, Dillon and Dixit say, can be drawn to White supremacist groups, those who spout the “great replacement” conspiracy theory that most recently inspired a mass shooter in Buffalo, participation in the Jan. 6 insurrection, and other troubling views. “There’s a ton of overlap when you look at different movements,” Dixit says. While some may think someone who is anti-abortion deserves a “pass” for being passionate about that single issue, Dixit says it is important to recognize the links with extremism. Pastor Locke, who was giving the sermon when Pastor Peters learned of the draft opinion, was in the news this last week as the IRS has been asked to investigate his preaching as political activity that shouldn’t be tax exempt. That request apparently came after he told congregants they can’t vote Democrat, calling Democrats “baby-butcherin’” “God-denying demons.” During the same sermon, video shows that Locke also told his congregation “you ain’t seen a insurrection yet” in reference to Jan. 6, 2021. Peters, whose church group was barred from meeting outside of Spokane’s Planned Parenthood clinic, says he was upset that Rolling Stone in January linked his antiabortion rhetoric with

a Knoxville Planned Parenthood that was burned down in an arson after he moved to the area and started growing a similar TCAPP congregation. Peters denied involvement and tells the Inlander he doesn’t promote violence. When asked whether his choices to call abortion murder, and to say murderers deserve the death penalty, might translate to someone as a call to action, Peters tells the Inlander he can’t change his rhetoric simply because he’s “afraid of the idiots.” “There’s always some people that are one fry short of a Happy Meal, and, you know, you hope that they don’t misunderstand,” Peters says. “We’re here to worship and pray, and we don’t endorse or OK any sort of violence ever. We’re here to save life, not endanger it.” But Dillon says you can’t separate the violent rhetoric from how it fuels violent acts. “They desperately try to portray themselves as either a worship service or just a protest when, if you look at their social media videos, the speeches, it paints a very different picture,” Dillon says, pointing to a social media video outside the burned clinic, in which Peters’ group can be heard laughing about the incident.

WHAT NEXT?

Collette Oliver-Soleil, manager of Planned Parenthood’s Pullman health center, says patients are already starting to come to the center confused about whether and how they can access abortion. Some are asking for long-term birth control such as an IUD in case access to the contraceptive pill is put at risk, she says. Others have heard of plans to pass a six-week abortion ban in Washington, D.C., and misinterpreted that as meaning Washington state. Others still have asked whether Planned Parenthood’s period-tracking app sells their information to third parties. Unlike some other period trackers out there, no, it doesn’t, she says. Interestingly, there’s already been something of a “wave” effect at the Eastern Washington clinics during the time periods when Idaho has worked to restrict abortion, Oliver-Soleil says. For example, after Idaho passed its trigger ban in 2020, the larger health clinics in Kennewick and Spokane saw an influx of patients, so the smaller clinics like Pullman, which only offers medication abortion (in addition to a slew of other health services), saw patients who might normally have been seen at the larger clinic closest to them. “While we were expecting to see more Idaho patients ourselves, we ended up seeing more Washington residents,” she says. That could similarly be the case with the overturning of Roe. As someone who started her adult life as an antiabortion activist and who formerly worked as a doula, Oliver-Soleil says her viewpoint changed over time to support access to abortion. At times, she says she wishes she could show those who protest outside her health center the compassionate care her staff provides. “I would tell them, ‘Abortion is not the big, terrible, evil thing that you think it is,’” Oliver-Soleil says. In general, Oliver-Soleil says she’d like to see less stigma around abortion health care, regardless of someone’s situation. “[For] a lot of people, the only stories they’re hearing are these heartstring stories,” she says. “But a lot of times it’s just a normal medical procedure.” Take, for example, the patient who came in a few weeks ago and said, “I accidentally got pregnant, and I would like to not be anymore,” she says. “That pretty much sums it up,” Oliver-Soleil says. “Those other stories are super important and valid, but there’s validity across the spectrum.” ...continued on next page

MAY 26, 2022 INLANDER 21


“MY BODY, STATE’S CHOICE?,” CONTINUED... Still, some of the rarer stories do highlight the very real threat to women’s lives should they not be able to access abortion when they need to. During a May 14 rally in Riverfront Park, English professor Elisabeth Keifer-Kraus shares her such story, saying she grew up in an anti-abortion family and did all the things she was expected to do. She waited until marriage to have sex with her husband, had a college education and a good job, and intentionally got pregnant in hopes of trying to start a family. Unfortunately, Keifer-Kraus says, two of her four pregnancies ended with her needing to opt for a safe, legal, late-term abortion. In one case, she says she found herself looking at an ultrasound of twin boys whose brains had filled with fluid, who had no stomachs, whose growth had stopped, and who would not survive outside the womb.

a bucket under her hospital bed to catch all the blood, KeiferKraus says her doctor told her if she went home, she wouldn’t make it back. Keifer-Kraus tells the crowd that if she were in another state without abortion access, she could have died bleeding out in her car trying to get across state lines to have the abortion that saved her life. She later expands on that idea to the Inlander, sharing that while she often hears that wealthy and White women will most likely maintain access to abortion no matter where they live, in cases where women are miscarrying or have an unexpected pregnancy complication like the ones she had, the distance could still be too far to save them. “For me, you know it was a pretty emergent situation, I had probably about an hour to make a decision,” Keifer-Kraus says. “If I were in a state like Mississippi that will have a flat ban with no exceptions, it would not have mattered if I had the money to get on a flight and go to another state. I wouldn’t have had the time.” While she recognizes that her experiences were outliers, Keifer-Kraus says she also recognizes that the procedures that saved her life save lives every day. She sees value in open conversation with people who disagree about abortion access and feels passionate about addressing the myriad issues that lead to someone getting an abortion, such as poverty, domestic violence, rape, incest, lack of housing, lack of food security, and “the million other valid reasons women seek abortion.” “I think that the best way to understand what’s really happening is to start having conversations with those of us who’ve lived it, and really listen,” Keifer-Kraus says. “Not because we’re going to change your viewpoint, but because we may be able to provoke a little compassion. That’s what this conversation, more than anything, lacks on both sides.” n

“I think the best way to understand what’s really happening is to start having conversations with those of us who’ve lived it, and really listen.” “So I chose, as was my right and obligation, health care that kept my body from looming infection and allowed my sons to pass in peace,” Keifer-Kraus tells the crowd. “I chose the best that I could in a terrible situation.” She also shares the story of another pregnancy, during which she suffered a placental tear and started hemorrhaging. With

22 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Samantha Wohlfeil covers the environment, rural communities and cultural issues for the Inlander. Since joining the paper in 2017, she’s covered sensitive investigations on health care topics such as accessing lethal medication, the once deceptive practices of crisis pregnancy centers in the area, health care workers’ response to the deadly Delta COVID wave and more.


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MAY 26, 2022 INLANDER 23


SKATING

OLYMPIC SPIRIT

The world’s elite skaters discuss the joys and challenges of pursuing perfection on ice

Q

Ice dancers Kaitlin Hawayek and Jean-Luc Baker make the seemingly impossible look incredibly graceful. U.S. FIGURE SKATING PHOTOS

24 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

BY MELISSA HUGGINS

uadruple jumps. Dazzling spins. Perfect synchronization. One skater flinging another through the air, who manages to land gracefully on a thin blade moving across a sheet of ice. Most can only imagine the difficulty of elite figure skating: launching in the air to spin three or four full revolutions before gravity pulls you down, then landing on one leg. Now picture doing it at full speed amid a packed routine of spins, leaps and choreographed dance set to music. Ice dancer Kaitlin Hawayek says the combination of elite athleticism and performance art is what makes figure skating unique. “It’s why people are so intrigued by the sport,” she says. “It’s not just an adrenaline rush; skaters also connect with the audience on a core emotional level.” Hawayek, along with ice-dancing partner Jean-Luc Baker, will perform in Spokane Friday, May 27, as part of Stars on Ice, alongside skating luminaries who include fellow Olympians Nathan Chen, Mariah Bell and Jason Brown. The event is a “showcase of the top skaters in the U.S.,” Bell explains,


where skaters perform routines from the Olympics alongside new ones. It’s an opportunity for skaters to let loose and be more playful than regular competition allows, and a chance for audiences to see Olympians up close and in person. For Jean-Luc Baker, who hails from Edmonds, the stops in Spokane and Seattle are a homecoming of sorts. He’s one of a select few Washingtonians ever to reach the Olympic level in figure skating. “It’s such an honor,” Baker says. “And Stars on Ice is one reason why I am where I am today,” he adds, explaining that as a child skater he had the opportunity to perform in one of the tour’s stops in Seattle. “That was huge for my trajectory.”

THE JOURNEY

Competing in Beijing was Jason Brown’s second time as an Olympian, after winning a bronze medal in the team event in Sochi. But after the 2014 Olympics, he struggled with imposter syndrome, fearing he didn’t truly deserve the title of Olympian unless he could make it back a second time. “I lost a lot of the joy of skating because I was so hyperfocused on that,” Brown says. “I constantly felt like I wasn’t doing well enough.” In 2018, Brown was first alternate for the U.S. team for the PyeongChang Winter Games in South Korea, just missing a guaranteed spot. “There was a piece of me that kind of broke,” he says. “I felt irrelevant… I got lost in that mental place of thinking about everything I lacked.” Amid an explosion of quad jumps in the sport (an element he has landed in competition but not as often), he worried whether his type of skating — a balance between precision, athleticism and performance — was being devalued. Eventually, he was able to work through the self-doubt. “I so respected everybody who was pushing the boundaries technically, and finally I thought, ‘Why don’t I respect myself for pushing it forward artistically?’ I just started to do that. Did I still come into the rink every single day to work on my technical difficulty? Absolutely. But I wasn’t harping on myself the way I was in the past. Soon I could feel myself maturing, feel my skating getting stronger and better, and that kept my fire going.” Brown, who notes he has seen a sports psychologist since he was 10, is a firm believer in the importance of mental health. “I cannot express enough how important it is for people to be open about it,” he says. His teammates echo the sentiment, acknowledging the intense isolation of training and competing during the pandemic.

Hawayek appreciates that mental health is becoming less taboo to talk about. Bell also feels glad for the conversation. “It seems like for a while it wasn’t really spoken about, but then people like Simone Biles led the way,” Bell says. “It’s so inspiring that she came forward and talked about her experience in Tokyo. It was brave. When people like her do that, it helps others do it as well.” “So often in sports, we’re focused on what we need to get done to perform at our best, but when the pandemic hit, there was a real time of vulnerability where people realized those around them were having the same feelings and experiences,” Brown says. “It’s something that everybody deals with in some way or another, and athletes are no different,” Bell adds. “Whatever you might be feeling or struggling with, you’re not alone.”

SNEAK PEEK

“What’s unique about Stars is that we have group numbers, so you’ll see us all perform together, which you would never see in a competition,” Bell explains. The playful atmosphere also lends itself to skaters doing tricks they wouldn’t do in competition, such as Nathan Chen busting out backflips. Brown is set to perform two solo skates, the first being his wildly successful short program, set to Nina Simone’s “Sinnerman” and choreographed by Rohene Ward. “To be honest it’s been a dream come true getting to perform that on tour, because it was really designed to be performed in front of a crowd,” Brown says. “Every time I’m in starting pose I’m bubbling over with excitement.” Baker says he and Hawayek have missed being able to interact with fans. “We see you and we hear you, always,” Baker says. “We feel your energy, and we love it. Be loud! The louder you are, the more energy we’ll reciprocate.” n Stars on Ice • Fri, May 27 at 7:30 pm • $32$142 • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • spokanearena.com • 509-279-7000

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SINCE THE OLYMPICS Nathan Chen and Mariah Bell (pictured) were recently honored with awards from the Professional Skaters Association. For the second year in a row, Bell won the Sonja Henie Award, honoring a skater who embodies both excellence and positivity. Henie was a three-time Olympic champion and 10-time world champion skater from Norway. “Even more important than how I do in skating is the person that I am,” Bell says. “I’m really grateful people can see that in me; it means a lot. Hopefully I can be someone the younger girls look up to, or at least be a great teammate for them. I’m so lucky to be in a position where I can do that.”

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MAY 26, 2022 INLANDER 25


CULTURE | DIGEST

THE BUZZ BIN

Stick up your thumb if you really hope people forget you made a Mummy movie.

NO CASE TOO BIG, NO CASE TOO SMALL Does the prospect of I Think You Should Leave’s Tim Robinson voicing Ugly Sonic — the Sonic the Hedgehog who appeared in one trailer with his horrific human teeth before the internet revolted — sound like wonderful comedic fodder? Then CHIP N’ DALE: RESCUE RANGERS is the movie for you. In this Who Framed Roger Rabbit-esque world where cartoons and humans live side by side, the the titular chipmunks from the late ’80s Disney show (voiced by John Mulaney and Andy Sanberg — actors who played roles in said show) are forced to solve a real case to save one of their co-star buddies from back in the day. It’s a smorgasbord of cartoon pop culture references with a The Lonely Island sensibility that’s great for kids despite having way more jokes for 30- and 40-somethings. (SETH SOMMERFELD)

THE NEED FOR SPEED Returning to original childhood aerial thrills Tom Cruise delivered in the original Top Gun

I

BY DAN NAILEN

n 1986 I was a 14-year-old who’d only lived on Air Force bases my entire life, yet I’d never given a second’s thought to becoming a pilot until Top Gun arrived in theaters that May. Tom Cruise was at his coolest as fighter pilot Maverick, and he and his buddies like Iceman, Goose and Mustang made serving in the military not only look patriotic and exciting, but damn fun. My Air Force major dad was appalled, but just because the Top Gun pilots were Navy guys. Any concerns he had about my actually becoming a pilot were squashed by the fact I require glasses, and as an adolescent had an attention span roughly the length of a Duran Duran video. I’m sure when Ferris Bueller’s Day Off came out less than a month later, I was more interested in being a friendly rascal with no responsibilities than fighting Soviet fighter planes over the ocean. It’s difficult to relay just how big a phenomenon Top Gun was that summer to anyone who didn’t experience it firsthand. The hype was massive, particularly for a movie that wasn’t part of a franchise at the time like Star Wars or Indiana Jones. It was a relatively straightforward action movie, but one delivered with an MTV-ready soundtrack and hyper-stylish look courtesy of director Tony Scott’s predilection for California sunsets, neon-lit love scenes and still-impressive flying stunts. And the soundtrack was packed with hits, going nine-times-platinum on the strength of hits like Kenny Loggins’ “Danger Zone” and Berlin’s Oscar-winning “Take My Breath Away.” As Top Gun arrived, Tom Cruise had yet to become a massive star, but he was certainly on his way thanks to his 1983 starring roles in Risky Business and the un-

26 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

derappreciated high school jock jam All The Right Moves (co-starring Spokane’s own Craig T. Nelson at his most dickish!). The Hollywood A-listers among his peers at the time were the Brat Pack gang, and it’s hard to imagine the likes of Andrew McCarthy, Rob Lowe or Judd Nelson having the assortment of qualities required of a character like Top Gun’s Maverick. What are those qualities, exactly? Having recently rewatched Top Gun for the first time in decades, I can tell you a big part of it was having a shit-eating grin to go with an all-American macho vibe. Maverick’s a smartass to his superiors and flying rivals, but a great guy to have around when you need to take your shirt off for a homoerotic volleyball scene set to a terrible Kenny Loggins soundtrack tune (no, not “Danger Zone,” but the lesser “Playing With The Boys”). The role also required Cruise keeping a straight face while serenading his prospective lover in a bar with “You’ve Lost That Lovin’ Feeling.” That’s not easy to do, and sadly I know that from personal experience. Cheesy as much of Top Gun is watching it in 2022, the flight scenes are still thrilling. That’s the one thing that gives me hope for a sequel that it’s hard to believe anyone was asking for some 36 years later. But taking in Top Gun: Maverick (see our review page 32) also entails forgetting what’s become of Tom Cruise since the original. Forgetting his leadership in the shady Scientology cult. Forgetting his Oprah couch freakout and Today Show anti-psychiatry rants. Forgetting The Mummy, and Rock of Ages, and Days of Thunder. For a dose of the adrenaline that fueled my summer as a 14-year-old, though, I might just try to forget all that for a couple of hours. n

SPRING TURNS Perhaps you’ve noticed, this spring has been unusually cold, and decently wet, too. And while I’ve complained some, no doubt when it’s 100 degrees in a couple weeks I’ll yearn for the damp days of May. Know who’s not complaining at all? SILVER MOUNTAIN RESORT, which is staying open for Memorial Day weekend runs for skiers and snowboarders. The mountain will have two chairs and its moving carpet open from 8 am-2:30 pm Saturday through Monday, and if you have a lift ticket for this season or next year, you’re in. Otherwise, it’s $49 ($43 for kids) at the ticket window. (DAN NAILEN) THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Noteworthy new music arriving in stores and online May 27: STARS, FROM CAPELTON HILL. The interplay between Torquil Campbell and Amy Millan’s voices has long provided an emotional punch to the Montreal indie-pop band’s songs, and From Capelton Hill sounds as though it might be the group’s most contemplative LP to date. DEF LEPPARD, DIAMOND STAR HALOS. Considering the band’s longevity of loud arena rocking, Def Leppard might be Deaf Leppard pretty soon, but kudos to the rockers for keeping it going with pretty much the same lineup since 1982. LIAM GALLAGHER, C’MON YOU KNOW. While the Gallagher brothers going solo saps us of the delightfully messy Oasis familial drama, it probably results in more solid Britpop records actually getting released. (SETH SOMMERFELD)


CULTURE | THEATER

Death Coach

FROM LEFT: John Preston Crocker III as Hector MacQueen, Bryce Clifton as Detective Hercule Poirot and Hannah Slusser as Countess Andrenyi.

Intrigue, romance, laughs — the Civic’s regional premiere of Murder on the Orient Express aims to have it all BY E.J. IANNELLI

A

gatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express has been adapted to TV, radio, film and even computer games since it was first published in 1934, but it took more than 80 years for an official version to reach the stage. With the blessing of the author’s estate, American playwright Ken Ludwig, best known for farces like Lend Me a Tenor, was responsible for turning one of Christie’s most well-known works of detective fiction into a script for live theater in 2017. Ludwig’s long-awaited adaptation of Orient Express gets its regional premiere this weekend on the Spokane Civic Theatre’s main stage. This production is directed by Heather McHenry-Kroetch, who admits she has a special fondness for Christie’s murder mysteries. “I’ve been reading Agatha Christie since I was very young,” she says. “It’s a little bit cozy, a little bit glamorous, there’s a little intrigue. And by cozy, I mean that you know there’s going to be a solution, which is why we read mystery novels like this.” Set largely on a single coach during the golden age of train travel, Orient Express features a cast of high-society characters with secret identities and potentially sinister motives. That naturally lends itself to the very qualities — coziness, glamor, intrigue — that McHenry-Kroetch wants this play to embody. Ludwig, however, added a further dimension to his script. “There’s comedy throughout. There are jokes, and I mean three-beat jokes, which is interesting, because I

do direct comedies often, and sometimes dark comedies, and this isn’t either of those. But there’s built-in humor. Which is great, because I like an audience to laugh.” That’s led to what McHenry-Kroetch describes as a “tightrope” as she works to balance the classic Christie qualities with the more overt humor Ludwig’s introduced. “I even have a dramaturge — a good friend of mine who loves Agatha Christie and is a quasi-expert on her — because I want it to be recognizable to the audience who have read Christie. I want that feeling for them, but I also want it to be accessible to people who don’t,” McHenryKroetch says. A dramaturge is, generally speaking, someone who’s responsible for interpreting scripts and providing the director and actors with valuable background information and context.

L

udwig’s tonal changes aside, one immutable constant is Hercule Poirot. As in dozens of Christie’s novels and short stories, the solution to the titular murder rests on this fastidious Belgian sleuth. His keen observations and logical mind are pivotal in untangling knotty motives or backing killers into a corner, leaving them with no option but to confess. Amid a cast of 11 that includes Doug Jacobs as railway executive Monsieur Bouc, Samuel Schneider as shady Samuel Ratchett, Hannah Slusser as the captivating Countess Andrenyi and Wendy Carroll as the obnoxious divorcée Helen Hubbard, Bryce Clifton stars as Poirot. The role brings the actor back to the Civic’s main stage after his recent appearance in The Play That Goes Wrong. Clifton is very aware that Poirot has become synonymous with on-screen portrayals by actors like Peter Ustinov and David Suchet. “Coming into this, I had seen the Kenneth Branagh films and was actually a big fan of the David Suchet and BBC series. When the pandemic broke out, my father and I binged that entire series over the course of a month or two. It was kind of a nice bonding moment,” Clifton says. Suchet, in his eyes, best “embodies the energy and

COURTESY SPOKANE CIVIC THEATRE

the quirks and the mind of this iconic character.” Clifton looked to his example for the mannerisms and “physicality” that makes Poirot such a memorable, all-too-human figure — one that even Christie herself grew to dislike. But he also wanted to make the part his own. “You never want to be impersonating,” he says. “I would like to think I’m bringing a little bit more of a chummy Poirot. He’s looking to be friends with everyone in this show — not as cold and distancing or as hard and calculated.” Clifton’s Poirot is to some extent left feeling “betrayed” by the outcome rather than simply stating it as a series of events that his little gray cells have just unraveled. The setting of Orient Express isn’t exactly conducive to friendships, either. The tight space of the rail car has the guests almost on top of one another. At the same time, those confines are essential to the plot. They create important dynamics, such as Poirot’s interactions with offputting characters like Ratchett and Hubbard. “The scene where we investigate the body has been a wonderful challenge. It’s three of us — Bouc, myself and the countess — examining the body and all the clues that have been placed in this tiny compartment,” Clifton says. “And so we’re just dancing around each other the whole time, constantly slipping in and out while making sure that the audience can see us at all times. “As an actor, you’re used to having the whole stage to work with. We’re doing everything on a postage stamp.” “It’s a different kind of set than the audience is used to seeing on the main stage,” says McHenry-Kroetch. “Where the set is on the stage, watching the train, all of that gives it a more cinematic quality, which is in line with how this adaptation was written. That era of train travel is romantic, and when something terrible happens in a setting like that, already there’s interest. That’s what we’re trying to recapture.” n Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express • May 27-June 19; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $35 • Spokane Civic Theatre • 1020 N. Howard St. • spokanecivictheatre.com • 509-325-2507

MAY 26, 2022 INLANDER 27


CHEF CHATS:

Alex Szambelan leads South Perry Lantern’s culinary team. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

Alex Szambelan South Perry Lantern executive chef Alex Szambelan says the culinary industry was a continual beacon along his career path

L

ike many eventual chefs, South Perry Lantern executive chef Alex Szambelan got his start in the culinary industry as a teenager washing dishes. One day, when a snowstorm prevented staff from arriving for a catering gig in his hometown of Colfax, Szambelan took control of both the dining room and kitchen, cobbling together a big spread that stunned the chef when he finally arrived. Szambelan was 14, but already seemed to have a knack for running things. After high school, Szambelan pursued hospitality business management at Washington State University, yet struggled with the program, so he switched to criminal justice and political science. Again, however, he ended up in a culinary role, this time with WSU Catering while eking out a general studies degree. After WSU, Szambelan entered Spokane Community College’s Inland Northwest Culinary Academy, where he excelled. While a student, Szambelan was also hired as an overnight baker for the Davenport Hotels, and pitched in at other kitchen stations there. His strong work ethic and focus paid off, and he was made lead garde-manger in charge of cold foods. After graduation, Szambelan moved to Colorado to take a junior sous chef job at The Broadmoor Hotel, a luxury resort with 17 distinct food venues. His tenure

28 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

BY CARRIE SCOZZARO there was cut short by COVID-19 in early 2020, so an overworked, burned-out Szambelan returned to Spokane, ready to forgo a culinary career if it meant a better worklife balance. As it turned out, the industry still wanted him. Even though he was applying for anything but cooking jobs, a friend recommended Szambelan send in his résumé to Jeremy Tangen, who had bought and was remodeling the space formerly known as The Lantern. In July 2021 Szambelan took the reins of the revamped space with a menu that balances comfort foods, classics and pan-ethnic cuisine. INLANDER: When did you know you wanted to become a chef? SZAMBELAN: WSU doesn’t contract out their food service like most places, so I got hired to work for their catering company while I was in school. And I just haven’t found anything that I enjoyed studying in school as much as I did going into work [in culinary] every day. Who is one chef you look up to? For how little I cooked when I grew up, my parents are still amazed that I do this. Apparently my greatgrandfather was cook for a lumber camp or something

like that back in the day. So again, that must be where it came from. But I would say probably the one person who had pushed me the most in this direction would be Greg Blanchard, who is the chef at the catering company I worked for at WSU. Favorite kitchen gadget? The multitool I carry that’s got the screwdriver, pliers… a Leatherman. It’s like, I need a screwdriver almost every other day. And I’ve always been a handy person. I like doing my own maintenance. And I like fixing my own things at home. But you know what, you need to open a bottle — you got it. If you need a knife to just… you’ve got it. What’s your favorite thing to eat from your own menu? OK, I really, really like ramen, and I spent a lot of time getting this one right. We do a tonkatsu-style, so it’s overnight boiled, like a 12-hour boil. We use beef instead of pork, but I get in, you know, 50 pounds of beef bones every week, roast them off, blanche them in water, and then they boil. We’re talking mushrooms and roasted onions overnight, and then we season it with a classic season paste in the bottom and then put the stock over that.


Favorite guilty pleasure? Truthfully, the worst thing that I probably eat at night way too often is McDonald’s. It comes down to what’s open when I work into the morning or really late at night. Either that or [a quesadilla] from Taco Bell. That’s one thing that I’ve found with most chefs that I’ve worked with is we all barely cook at home and just grab crap food on the way, or you microwave a pizza or get a sandwich out of the deli at Safeway.

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One place you’d travel to just for the food? New York, but also France. I like classic French. Charcuterie! Name one restaurant in the Inland Northwest you return to over and over again. My favorite place when I was living here before Colorado was Ruins [when it was on Monroe Street]. I mean, if I could afford to, I’d probably go to Gander [and Ryegrass] a lot more often.

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What is the hardest thing about your job? Staying staffed right now, because I’d never had to worry about it before. Jeremy hired me, and now suddenly I have to control for labor and food costs and all that kind of stuff. How would you describe the regional food scene? It’s surprising Spokane was, and still kind of is, such a meat-and-potatoes town. Like, everybody just wants a burger or pot roast. But it has expanded so much from that. And it’s surprising to see this undercurrent of foodies here that you just didn’t see until these restaurants started to pop up. And then it was like, ‘Oh, we can do crazy stuff now, because there’s the market here for it.’ n

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30 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

Beer School

No-Li Brewhouse’s John Bryant.

DEREK HARRISON PHOTO

EWU debuts new brewing certificate in collab with No-Li Brewhouse; plus, lake season is here and new breakfast options BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

T

here’s no doubt that craft brewing in Eastern Washington is a thing, with more than 60 breweries throughout the Inland Northwest and more bubbling up with regularity. Up until recently, however, educational opportunities to learn the trade have been limited to on-the-job training via the “school of hard knocks” or a program some miles away including at Central Washington University. A new certificate program at Eastern Washington University ought to help improve the flow of brewmeisters and others interested in the craft beer industry. The 15-credit program — now accepting students for fall 2022 enrollment — was the brainchild of EWU’s Chris Cindric, a senior lecturer for the Department of Wellness and Movement Sciences who teaches a class called Craft Beer Evaluation and Service at EWU, and NO-LI BREWHOUSE owner John Bryant. The two met when Cindric was preparing for his beerforward podcast, Wheat, Wheat, Don’t Tell Me!, and invited Bryant to speak to his students. No-Li generously donated $10,000 to help kickstart the new Craft Beer Industry Professional Certificate program during EWU’s recent annual Giving Day. Find details about the course offerings at ewu.edu/chsph.

BREAKFAST IS BACK

Masselow’s Steakhouse, until recently a dinneronly venue inside Northern Quest Resort & Casino, relaunched its breakfast menu this month with hearty classics like chicken and waffles ($23), eggs benedict ($23), and corned beef hash and eggs ($24). For the lighter appetite, try local Snoqualmie Falls brand oatmeal ($10/cup, $12/ bowl) or the huckleberry hand pie ($9). Breakfast is served weekdays from 7-11 am, and weekends from 7 am-noon. If you’re more interested in breakfast for dinner, plan on attending Masselow’s “pajama party”

on Thursday, May 26. Dress in your favorite PJs and enjoy an evening of morning-type foods plus live entertainment from 5-9 pm. Visit northernquest.com/dining-bars/restaurants/masselows.

LAKE SEASON RETURNS

The lakeside views at The Coeur d’Alene Resort are amazing year-round, but the resort’s TERRACE ROOFTOP LOUNGE is only open seasonally, so check your weather app before planning to visit the downtown spot, open daily from 3-9 pm. The lounge overlooks the marina with a view southward across the lake and a great vantage point for Coeur d’Alene sunsets. The lounge’s modest menu includes select bottled beer, red and white wines, and specialty cocktails like the Halley’s Comet ($13) with 44 North Nectarine, St. Germaine, muddled cucumber, and both lemon and cranberry juice. For light bites, try smoky beef sliders ($13) with caramelized onion-bacon jam, ahi crudo ($18), or an artisan flatbread ($14) like the fig with feta cheese. To get to the rooftop lounge, go to Dockside Restaurant and take the north tower elevator to the second floor. Visit cdaresort.com/dining. For another seasonal lakeside spot, head north of Coeur d’Alene to Beyond Hope Resort on Lake Pend Oreille for PEARL’S ON THE LAKE (1267 Peninsula Rd., Hope). Brought to you by Pack River Store owners Alex and Brittany Jacobson, Pearl’s offers fine-dining food for lunch, served from 11 am-3 pm, with dishes like portabella mushroom fritters ($15), vegetarian Thai yellow curry over rice ($21, add protein $4$7) and kale Caesar salad ($12). Visit facebook. com/pearlsonthelake. n To-Go Box is the Inlander’s regular dining news column, offering tasty tidbits and updates on the region’s food and drink scene. Send tips and updates to food@inlander.com.


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REVIEW

TOM CRUISE TESTED,

UNCLE SAM APPROVED Top Gun: Maverick tones down the sexual tension while amping up the military propaganda

I

n 1990, Tom Cruise gave an interview to Playboy magazine promoting Born on the Fourth of July, his anti-war film from Oliver Stone that seemed to quite literally fly in the face of his 1986 box office hit, Top Gun. Telling the story of a group of elite Navy pilots, the lasting legacy of Top Gun is as a thinly disguised military recruitment advertisement. (Oh, and for having lots of sweaty men hanging out.) When asked if he saw any tension between these two works, Cruise said that Top Gun “was not supposed to be reality” and to make a sequel “would have been irresponsible.” Flash forward 36 years, and we now have the sequel Cruise said he wouldn’t make — Top Gun: Maverick. Setting itself about the same amount of time later, the story picks up with a less youthful Cruise as Pete “Maverick” Mitchell, who still has a twinkle in his eye and, you guessed it, a need for speed. He has seemed to avoid any opportunities for advancement, instead opting to stay in place and spend his days fixing up an old plane while testing out the newest technology the military has to offer. That is until he is called back to the Top Gun program to train the next generation of pilots for an intentionally vague yet dangerous mission. While prepar-

BY CHASE HUTCHINSON ing, he’ll reunite with an old flame in Jennifer Connelly’s Penny, play football on the beach, and do a whole bunch of daring fighter pilot stunts. He’ll also come face-to-face with Miles Teller’s Bradley “Rooster” Bradshaw, the son of Maverick’s old flight officer/best friend Goose, who tragically died in a training accident in the first film. This is the grounding emotional conflict of the highflying story as Maverick will have to reckon with his past failures that led to his friend dying and try to avoid a repeat this go-around. He still is a loose cannon who the top brass have been essentially coerced into bringing back by his rival-turned-pal-turned-admiral, Tom “Iceman” Kazansky. This is all part of a trite story, ostensibly about growing up, that is set against the backdrop of airborne fighter pilot spectacle, which is what will be the real draw. That spectacle is quite something to behold, blowing the stunts of the first film out of the water. As the planes fly around and perform incredible maneuvers you can feel the G-force in every single frame. It all is quite amazing as a technical achievement. However, there are moments where its tone becomes more akin to a videogame than a tense cinematic depiction of war. When compared to the masterful yet restrained air sequences in a film like Dunkirk, Top Gun: Maverick feels more like a child smash-

ing planes together and zooming them around the sky. If a more cheesy sensibility is what you are looking for, then you’ll likely enjoy the hell out of this film. If you are looking for something a bit more to grasp on to, then you’ll find what would be largely empty pageantry even if it didn’t also play as even more of a propaganda film than its predecessor. When you learn the details of the mission and what it entails, it is impossible not to see how it becomes an extreme endorsement of the military might of the good ol’ USA. The fact that the enemy is kept comically ambiguous, with dialogue fading into background noise when any details are mentioned, might exist to soften this explict nationalistic feeling. Unfortunately, it ends up doing the opposite as it makes it clear that this enemy can be anyone and justifies force against whoever fits the bill. It is a drag to take a silly film like Top Gun: Maverick this seriously, though it leaves little choice when it becomes so blatant in its jingoism. A legacy sequel like this needn’t have so fully embraced the cry for war as most of the aspects that work best in the film have nothing to do with that. Instead, it leans into its own worst impulses, leaving a lingering sense of gloom that dampens the whole highflying experience. n

Top Gun: Maverick

Rated PG-13 Directed by Joseph Kosinski Starring Tom Cruise, Jennifer Connelly, Miles Teller

Despite dazzling stunts, Top Gun: Maverick takes a nosedive.

32 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022


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Tasty Leftovers

Hijinks, thy name is the Belcher children.

The Bob’s Burgers Movie provides a pleasant but familiar extension of the animated TV show BY JOSH BELL

I

t’s tough to find something new to explore Linda try to find new ways to bring in customers in a show that has run for 12 seasons and and avoid financial ruin. counting, so The Bob’s Burgers Movie never That allows the movie to alternate between quite transcends its status as an addendum to the two main plot threads, while the kids all get series, playing on the well-established character their own subplots, too. Tina is working up the beats and running jokes. There’s a pleasant familcourage to ask her longstanding crush to be iarity to the movie even if you’ve never watched her “summer boyfriend.” Gene is trying to get the Fox animated program, and both dedicated attention for his latest weird musical project. And fans and newcomers can have a good time taking Louise, the youngest, is determined to prove that in the Belcher family’s latest misadventures. It’s she’s not a “baby.” They’re all simple character little more than a 100-minute episode of Bob’s arcs with satisfying resolutions, although they Burgers, but that makes it 100 minutes of goofy, rehash familiar themes that have been explored giddy fun. in numerous TV episodes already. The movie The basic setup for Bob’s Burgers is easy to presents itself as an expansive story, but it will fit grasp: Bob Belcher (voiced by H. Jon Benjamin) seamlessly between seasons of the show without is the owner and chef of the titular restaurant, actually changing anything. located in a seaside town somewhere vaguely in There’s an upgrade to the visual style, with the eastern United States. He lives in an apartmore dimensions to the animation while keeping ment above the restaurant with his family: wife the same overall look, and that helps set the Linda (John Roberts), son Gene movie apart. Series (Eugene Mirman), and daughters creator Loren The Bob’s Burgers Movie Tina (Dan Mintz) and Louise (Kristen Bouchard, who Rated PG-13 Schaal). That’s really all you need to co-writes the film Directed by Loren Bouchard and Bernard Derriman know to enjoy the movie, which finds with Nora Smith Starring H. Jon Benjamin, John Roberts, Dan Mintz the Belchers caught up in a murder and co-directs mystery while working to save their it with Bernard restaurant from bank foreclosure. Those sound Derriman, also throws in a few musical numbers, like high stakes, but they’re treated with the same although not enough for the movie to qualify casual good humor as any of the show’s hunas a full-on musical. These voice actors are not dreds of storylines over the years. singers, but there’s charm in the way they commit The trouble starts when a sinkhole opens to the songs, and it would have been appealing up right in front of the restaurant, preventto see the movie completely embrace the musical ing customers from accessing the entrance at format, like Bouchard did with his underrated a time when the Belchers have only a week Apple TV+ series Central Park. to make an overdue payment on a bank loan. Everyone involved in creating The Bob’s The Belchers hope for a quick resolution to the Burgers Movie is a seasoned pro, so the experience problem, which is complicated by the discovery is never less than entertaining, even if it doesn’t of a skeleton at the bottom of the hole. That leave much of a lasting impression. The main leads to a murder investigation pointing directly takeaway is an interest in watching more Bob’s at the Belchers’ rich, eccentric landlord Calvin Burgers, whether for the first time or the hunFischoeder (Kevin Kline). The Belcher kids, who dredth. That speaks to the energy and affection believe that Mr. Fischoeder is innocent, appoint still left in the concept, both for the movie and themselves amateur detectives, while Bob and for the TV seasons to come. n

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MAY 26, 2022 INLANDER 33


FOLK

Tangled Up in Bob Pondering an age-old question: Is Bob Dylan terrible in concert? BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

A

s long as I’ve been a Bob Dylan fan, I’ve been wanting to see him in concert. And as long as Bob Dylan has been performing live, people have been complaining about seeing him in concert. I’ve already got my tickets for the folk legend’s May 28 tour opener in Spokane, but I keep hearing the same refrains from people who have seen him in the past. For every person who has told me they saw a Bob Dylan concert and it was just the worst, I’ve had another say, “You know, he’s a lot better live than most people say.” These are fans who worship at the altar of Dylan, and yet they can’t agree. This is nothing new. When Dylan went electric in the mid’60s, purists heard the barreling rock ’n’ roll of “Subterranean Homesick Blues” and branded him the Judas Iscariot of folk, and some fans (especially those in the U.K.) booed him in concert. When his newfound Christian faith wormed its way into his early ’80s output, Dylan found yet another way to alienate diehards: A Spokesman-Review write-up of Dylan’s Inland Northwest concert stop in 1980, with a set that leaned heavily toward gospel, describes disgruntled audience members walking out of the venue halfway through the show. And in the 21st century, he’s still ruffling feathers. The L.A. Times wrote about a 2012 Hollywood Bowl concert that had elicited divisive audience responses, saying that “there’s one thing Bob Dylan fans will never agree on: whether his concerts over the last decade are terrible, excellent or just plain weird.” I wanted to explore this strange phenomenon, and so I reached out to a few local music writers past and present — the people who get paid to have opinions about live music — to get their thoughts on Dylan’s live persona. The Spokesman-Review’s Carolyn Lamberson has seen Dylan just once, when his 1987 co-headlining tour with the Grateful Dead stopped in Eugene, Oregon. Of all the concerts she’s seen, both personally and professionally, she says this particular show remains a low point. “I went for the experience, but I remember being so bored by the Dylan set,” Lamberson says. “He was intentionally doing stuff that not a lot of people were familiar with. … There was nothing as an audience member for me to get really engaged with. I really wasn’t able to pay much attention to him because he’s just not a charismatic presence.” “He was not a performer that grabbed me and made me want to watch and listen. It was like bizarre background noise.”

34 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

10 ESSENTIAL DYLAN SONGS Blowin’ in the Wind Don’t Think Twice, It’s Alright Subterranean Homesick Blues It’s Alright, Ma (I’m Only Bleeding) Like a Rolling Stone Desolation Row Visions of Johanna Stuck Inside of Mobile with the Memphis Blues Again Tangled Up in Blue Hurricane


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im Kershner, a former arts editor for the Spokesman-Review, reviewed Dylan when he performed at Pullman’s Beasley Coliseum in 2000. “​​Bob Dylan seems to do just about everything wrong,” the review begins. “He alters the melodies of his beloved old songs, he mumbles his way through his famous lyrics, he plays guitar just about the way he plays harmonica, which is to say erratically, and his adenoidal voice has become alarmingly similar to that of Tiny Tim’s.” (Kershner also shares with me a line that he recalls hearing over the years that mostly sums up his feelings about many a Dylan concert: “[He] performed many of my favorite songs, but I’m not exactly sure which ones.”) That 2000 review isn’t all negative, though: Despite any misgivings about the actual performance, Kershner called the show “a huge, happy, memorable celebration” and called Dylan “one of a kind, like Woody Guthrie or Louis Armstrong, or to go even farther afield, the Grand Canyon.” Dan Nailen, the editor of this very paper, didn’t become a serious Dylan fan until the musician’s late-’90s/early 2000s renaissance, when albums like Time Out of Mind and Love & Theft brought Dylan a new wave of critical appraisal. Nailen has since seen him eight or nine times, and he has come to appreciate the acquired taste that is late-period Dylan’s craggy, old-timer voice and the stable of talented musicians that back him in concert. “A casual fan might wish he had played ‘Subterranean Homesick Blues,’ except he doesn’t have the voice to do that anymore,” Nailen says. “He’s playing the old songs and completely pulling them apart and putting them back together, and they’re virtually unrecognizable — in terms of the music and the lyrics — to what you’re expecting.” “That’s a bummer [for a fan] if you think that’s not what’s going to happen.” Don Adair, a longtime freelance music writer for the Spokesman-Review, has seen Dylan at least a dozen times over the years. He even tried to see him at the Spokane Coliseum during Dylan’s 1966 world tour (though Dylan was a last-minute no-show), and saw him in the ’70s when Dylan was still performing with the Band. Adair says that some Dylan shows are noticeably better than others — he’s also seen his share of walkouts over the years — but he appreciates the unexpected artistry Dylan brings to his live shows, even if it isn’t to everybody’s taste. “I just truly appreciate the fact that this guy has found a way to continue on and make himself so relevant,” Adair says. “He always comes up with new and interesting arrangements.” The most common complaints Adair hears about Dylan’s stage demeanor — that his voice is shot, that he deconstructs his classic songs too much, that he doesn’t have any banter WEEKEND with the audience, that he C O U N T D OW N rarely (if ever) picks up a guitar Get the scoop on this anymore — aren’t entirely unweekend’s events with justified, he realizes. But Adair our newsletter. Sign up at says that walking into a current Inlander.com/newsletter. day Dylan show requires a recalibration of your most basic expectations: If you’re going in hopes of sitting through the straightforward greatest-hits retrospective, you’re simply not going to get it. Besides, a musician who’s been on a self-professed Never Ending Tour for nearly 35 years has to find new ways to keep audiences on their toes. “There are a million reasons people can find to be unhappy. For me, it’s just a matter of accepting the fact that he’s an artist who’s going to continue to change,” Adair says. “I believe he’ll be onstage until they can’t prop him up longer. And then they’ll just put him in a chair.” n Bob Dylan • Sat, May 28 at 8 pm • Sold out • All ages • First Interstate Center for the Arts • 334 W. Spokane Falls • firstinterstatecenter.org • 509-279-7000

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MAY 26, 2022 INLANDER 35


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

LOCAL AMERICANA THE RODEO

O

ne of the highlights of the recent LuckyFest Northwest was getting a chance to saddle up and see a set from The Rodeo. The new local band fronted by Spokane stalwarts Marshall McLean and Adam Miller (The Horse Thieves). The group calls their sound “untamed Americana,” which mixes the singers’ contrasting easy-going vocal styles, classic Americana songwriting and just a dash of mature indie rock swagger. While it maybe shouldn’t be a surprise considering the veteran musicians in the quartet (which also includes bassist Claire Fieberg and Caleb Ingersoll on drums), the Rodeo sounds incredibly tight and locked in for a new band. Since the group only has one official show under its belt, this week seems like a great time for your first the Rodeo. — SETH SOMMERFELD The Rodeo, Matt Mitchell Music Co., Windoe • Fri, May 27 at 8 pm • $12 • 21+ • Lucky You Lounge • 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. • luckyyoulounge.com • 509-474-0511

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 05/26

JAZZ CHRIS BOTTI

I

t takes a special kind of talent to turn an instrument most familiar for its role as part of an ensemble into a musical tool capable of being out front in the spotlight. Chris Botti has done just that with his trumpet, creating a globe-trotting career out of his way with blending jazz and pop music into instrumental music that manages to satisfy both hardcore jazz heads and the folks who love hearing him lend his chops to poppier fare. He’s been tapped by the likes of Sting, Joni Mitchell, Paul Simon and more for collaborations, but as a solo headliner — as he’ll be when he swings through Spokane — you can expect an evening full of Botti and his band delving into his two decades of original compositions that made his albums like Italia and Impressions jazz chart-toppers. — DAN NAILEN

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Ron Greene J THE BIG DIPPER, Pound BOLO’S BAR & GRILL, Jonathan Tibbetts THE MASON JAR, Ali Pomeroy MOOSE LOUNGE, Last Chance Band POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Sam Leyde J QQ SUSHI & KITCHEN, Just Plain Darin STEAM PLANT RESTAURANT & BREW PUB, Okay Honey ZOLA, Desperate8s

Friday, 05/27

BACKWOODS WHISKEY BAR, John Pitcher BOLO’S BAR & GRILL, Karma’s Circle CHINOOK CRAFTED BY ADAM HEGSTED, Carli Osika CURLEY’S, Haze GEM STATE CLUB, JamShack IRON HORSE CDA, Heather King Band LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Imagine Collective J LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, The Rodeo, Matt Mitchell Music Co., Windoe MOOSE LOUNGE, Rock Candy NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE, Groove Nation OLD MILL BAR AND GRILL, Ed Shaw OSPREY RESTAURANT & BAR, Son of Brad J PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Zach Simms SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES, Stagecoach West ZOLA, Justyn Priest Band

Saturday, 05/28

BACKWOODS WHISKEY BAR, John Pitcher

36 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

Chris Botti • Sat, May 28 at 8 pm • $40-$75 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague Ave. • foxtheaterspokane.org • 509-624-1200 THE BEE’S KNEES WHISKEY BAR, Kosh J THE BIG DIPPER, Guerilla Warfare, Promise Breaker Dirtnap, Thirty Seven BOLO’S BAR & GRILL, Karma’s Circle CHINOOK CRAFTED BY ADAM HEGSTED, Carli Osika CURLEY’S, Haze DRY FLY DISTILLING, James Wolff J J FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Bob Dylan GEM STATE CLUB, JamShack J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Illenium IRON HORSE CDA, Heather King Band J KNITTING FACTORY, Snow Tha Product

J LAKE CITY CENTER, Rusty Jackson’s 70’s Show LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Zaeshaun Haze, 2GLOCK, Pastlife Kenny, Chuck Vibes, The Boy Beerus LUCKY YOU LOUNGE, Songwriters in the Round J J THE FOX, Chris Botti MOOSE LOUNGE, Rock Candy NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE, Groove Nation ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, Rhythmic Collective PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Justin Lantrip & Matt Donahue POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Ron Greene SILVER FOX, Dangerous Type

J SNOW EATER BREWING CO., Just Plain Darin WHISKEY GLASSES BAR & GRILL, The Black Jack Band ZOLA, Blake Braley

Sunday, 05/29

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Spare Parts J CRAFT & GATHER, Music on the Lawn: Kyle Richard feat. Fizi CURLEY’S, HOODOO UDU J GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Illenium IRON HORSE CDA, The Happiness ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, Rhythmic Collective J SOUTH HILL GRILL, Just Plain Darin

Monday, 05/30

J ONE SHOT CHARLIE’S, Gil Rivas

Tuesday, 05/31

J GARLAND DISTRICT, Just Plain Darin SULLIVAN SCOREBOARD, Rhythmic Collective Duo ZOLA, Lucas Brown & Friends

Wednesday, 06/1 J KENDALL YARDS, Christopher Anderson, Jason Evans, Dawna Stafford, Olivia Vika STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, Steve Starkey


MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208263-5673 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 509-847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 509-924-1446 BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens St. • 509-315-5101 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 509863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 509-467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague Ave. • 509891-8357 BOLO’S BAR & GRILL • 116 S. Best Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-891-8995 BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR • 18219 E. Appleway Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-368-9847 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main St., Moscow • 208-596-0887 THE BULL HEAD • 10211 S. Electric St., Four Lakes • 509-838-9717 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw, Worley • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-292-4813 CRAVE • 401 W. Riverside Ave. • 509-321-7480 CRUISERS BAR & GRILL • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-446-7154 CURLEY’S HAUSER JUNCTION • 26433 W. Hwy. 53, Post Falls • 208-773-5816 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • 509-279-7000 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-6241200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-4572392 HONEY EATERY & SOCIAL CLUB • 317 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-930-1514 IRON GOAT BREWING • 1302 W. Second Ave. • 509-474-0722 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman, Coeur d’Alene • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-926-8411 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 509244-3279 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington St. • 509-315-8623 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 509-456-5678 LUCKY YOU LOUNGE • 1801 W. Sunset Blvd. • 509-474-0511 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 509747-2605 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy. • 509-443-3832 THE MASON JAR • 101 F St., Cheney • 509-359-8052 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd., Spokane Valley • 509-922-6252 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-838-1570 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 877-871-6772 NYNE BAR & BISTRO • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 509-474-1621 PACIFIC PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 509-443-5467 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 POST FALLS BREWING CO. • 112 N. Spokane St., Post Falls • 208-773-7301 RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL • 10325 N. Government Way, Hayden • 208-635-5874 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 509838-7613 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside Ave. • 509-822-7938 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave., Coeur d’Alene • 208-664-8008 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 509-459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon Ave. • 509-2797000 STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON • 12303 E. Trent Ave., Spokane Valley • 509-862-4852 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 509-624-2416

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Sign up now at Inlander.com/newsletters MAY 26, 2022 INLANDER 37


VISUAL ARTS FARMWORKER FOCUS

Depression-era photographer Dorothea Lange, made famous by her black-and-white “migrant mother” photo of a Dust Bowl refugee, also visited the Yakima Valley. In 1939, Lange documented the lives of the rural poor, among them agricultural workers. Nearly 30 years later, photographer Irwin Nash followed her path, finding similar scenes of rural poverty but also a thriving, mostly Chicano culture. And whereas Lange never returned to the Yakima Valley, Nash did — every year for 11 years. He not only documented a decade of day-to-day life there, but also the emergence of the United Farm Workers union to combat worker exploitation. Forty of Nash’s 9,400 photographs are displayed for this exhibition, offering a rare and heartfelt glimpse into the history of our Central Washington neighbors. — CARRIE SCOZZARO Our Stories, Our Lives: Irwin Nash Photographs of Yakima Valley Migrant Labor • Through Dec. 10; Tue-Fri from 1-4 pm, Sat from 10 am-4 pm • Free • Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU • 1535 N.E. Wilson Rd., Pullman • museum.wsu.edu

38 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

THEATER MAGIC AND WIT GALORE

THEATER TOMORROW, TOMORROW!

Roald Dahl’s Matilda the Musical • Fri, May 27-Sun, June 5; show times vary • $14-$18 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • cytspokane.org • 509-487-6540

Annie • Through May 29; Thu-Sat at 7 pm, Sat at 3 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $13-$15 • TAC at the Lake • 22910 E. Appleway Ave., Liberty Lake • tacatthelake.com

The beloved children’s novel Matilda comes vibrantly to life on stage in Christian Youth Theater (CYT) Spokane’s production of Roald Dahl’s Matilda the Musical. CYT is the largest children’s theater arts program in the country, allowing students from age 4 to 18 to engage in an artistic and friendly learning environment in a setting that emphasizes Christian values. The Tony Award-winning show, originally adapted by the Royal Shakespeare Company, follows Matilda, a 5-year-old girl who possesses telekinetic abilities and is something of a genius. She shares a difficult relationship with her parents, but finds solace in her friendship with adored teacher Miss Honey. The beauties of childhood imagination and mischief take center stage in this production. — LAUREN RODDIS

The feel-good, comic-strip-turned-musical Annie has come to life on stage at TAC on the Lake this month. Many are familiar with the classic tale of little orphan Annie who, with the help of other girls in her orphanage, escapes to New York City in search of adventure and a family of her own. She makes friends along the way, including President Herbert Hoover, and learns that the world isn’t exactly what she’d dreamt it would be. TAC at the Lake combines theater newcomers and the expertise of theater veterans to produce shows focused on providing learning opportunities for all, so catch a performance, as well as an earworm, of songs like “Tomorrow” and “Easy Street,” and discover that it isn’t such a hard-knock life after all. — MADISON PEARSON


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SIDEWALK COMEDY EAT PRAY FART

Best known for his roles as a loveable agoraphobic, Dance Dance Revolution champion or unsavory troublemaker on roller skates, Nick Swardson’s performances in The Benchwarmers, Grandma’s Boy and Comedy Central’s Reno 911! have enshrined him as one of comedy’s most irreverent, boisterous, flatulent superstars. He’s a staple at Adam Sandler’s Happy Madison Productions, where he’s acted, produced and written for movies including Grown Ups and I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry. His first stand-up tour, “Seriously Who Farted,” sprayed the audience with uncensored, delightfully middle school-ish bathroom jokes. Whether it’s reenacting an attack from a psycho housecat, imagining the world’s first brain freeze, or trying to take belligerently drunk friends through a drive-through, Swardson’s unashamed act is sure to leave the club less mature, less uptight and a little less selfconscious. — ELIZA BILLINGHAM Nick Swardson • Thu, May 26-Sun, May 29 at 7:30 pm, also May 27-28 at 10:30 pm • $40-$55 • Ages 18+ (10:30 pm shows 21+) • Spokane Comedy Club • 315 W. Sprague Ave. • spokanecomedyclub.com • 509-318-9998

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select gowns | dresses | casualwear | bras & more Surge Coffee on site Saturday morning!

3131 N. Division St. Spokane | 509-324-6612 | Mon-Fri 10am-5pm Sat 10am-4pm

MAC ARTFEST JUNE 3, 4 & 5

The 37th Annual ArtFest is a three-day celebration of art and fine craft and an Inland Northwest tradition for the entire family.

MUSIC CLASSICAL COMMUNITY

Looking for a way to enjoy classical music from a small group of talented musicians? At the Spokane Symphony’s fourth and final installment of its recent “Out & About” concert series, you can get just that. The performances take place in a relaxed atmosphere where guests can enjoy 45 minutes of music and learn about the history of the pieces they hear. Orchestra members Jason Moody, Nicholas Carper and Louise Butler are performing Beethoven’s Trio in G Major, while Amanda Howard-Philips, Xu Duo, Jeannette Wee-Yang and Helen Byrne perform Borodin’s String Quartet No. 2 in D major. It’s a great opportunity to join others in the community and dip your toe into the world of classical music without spending a penny. — SUMMER SANDSTROM

75 juried regional artists Painting, sculpture, photography, ceramics, jewelry and more Live music Food trucks and beer garden

artfestspokane.com Support provided by

Spokane Symphony Out & About Concert Series • Fri, May 27 at 6:30 pm • Free • The Carl Maxey Center • 3116 E. Fifth Ave. • spokanesymphony.org • 509-624-1200

MAY 26, 2022 INLANDER 39


FREE DONUT WON MY HEART Ginormous THANKS and gratitude to the beautiful woman that gave me a free Krispy Kreme and large slushee just because you couldn’t take my $10 bill! Krispy Kreme on Sullivan has the best people, and I love them all forever.

YOU SAW ME THANK YOU FOR PAYING Thank you to the gentleman who paid for my Reuben sammy at O’Doherty’s Irish Grille the other week! Another gentleman paid on St. Party’s Day!

CHEERS THE SUCCESSFUL RETURN OF GARDEN EXPO Thank you Spokane for supporting The Inland Empire Gardeners’ Garden Expo at Spokane Community College. It was a long two-year wait but what a crowd we got when we came back. All parking lots were full before the show even opened at 9am. We warn our 239 vendors that people tend to come early like at a garage sale. Truly a labor of love brought to you by a local non profit organization. Somehow we survived the wacky weather this year. We are extremely thankful to SCC, TIEG (The Inland Empire Gardeners) volunteers, vendors and our amazing customers. It was so nice to see the full garden carts, cute kids and dogs. It is definitely a garden festival with food, espresso, music, garden railroad display, seminars & demos. Thanks again for supporting Garden Expo. If you have pictures of our event please send them to TIEG.org. Save the date for next year’s Garden Expo May 13th 2023. Thanks to The Inlander too for always support us.

VRAIMENT COOL! = REALLY COOL IN FRENCH Inlander! Poutine article was très délicieux! I am a Canadian expatriate living in Spokane for 17 years. Don’t tell Donald Trump! I have found good traditional poutine hard to find. Your article is sure to expand my belly and shrink my wallet... but not too much! Though I am an anglophone from Vancouver, BC, I LOVE this wonderful dish from Quebec that is best made with curds that are so fresh, they squeak when chewed! Should anyone be foolish enough to disagree, please know that I am armed with snowballs and somewhat terse words. Merci beaucoup! CHEERS TO THE STCU/BEST OF BROADWAY Cheers to the STCU/Best of Broadway for again offering “Student Rush” tickets for the show “Hamilton”! Thank you for providing a way for so many students and their parents to see this wonderful show. BABY DADDIES & PARTY OF WHO CONTRIBUTORS Both of you have said what I’m sometimes at a loss of saying. I appreciate smart people. SAVED FROM FINANCIAL NIGHTMARE I was working at the Lilac Festival merchandise trailer and a gentleman brought me a wallet he found on the sidewalk. I had just been talking to a very nice couple from Seattle who were in the area scouting for colleges for their son and had never been to Spokane. In that conversation I learned they were also attending Hamilton — a key piece of information that proved to be the saving puzzle piece. I took the wallet over to the officers at Lost and Found, and when they opened it looking for an ID, lo and behold it was the same couple! I quickly went over to the TicketsWest office open prior to the show, explained the situation, with the officer present and they were able to track down their contact info. In five minutes I had them on the

phone. They were so relieved and grateful because his wallet had numerous credit cards, money and IDs, a financial disaster in the making for a first-time visitor to Spokane. We met, took a picture, and they invited me to their home in Seattle! This all started because of one honest man who turned in a lost wallet intact. Sir,

child is not with you, or if you don’t really need to use it, please do not use the space! My disability makes it extremely exhausting to walk. Too much activity equals I can’t get out of bed to use the bathroom. It means bedpans and urinals. So...to the Karen soccer mom in the workout outfit, obviously fully capable in

read my instructions and then followed the digital signs on the route also. I wish others would have done the same. I didn’t see a lot of “fine and friendly.” I saw a lot of “I’m walking. Stumble around me.” WHERE ART THOU... ADVICE GODDESS?? Inlander Advice Goddess — Oh, how I miss

Poutine article was très délicieux!

please know what you did was an example for all and thank you. BTW, they made the show on time :) Think about all the positive comments this family will share about Spokane and its generosity — a little kindness and honesty is what makes the world a better place for all.

JEERS THE LOONIES HAVE LANDED In case anyone is still wondering whether lunatics have taken over the asylum once known as the United States, the answer is YES. Before the bodies of the 13 murder victims in Buffalo were cold, the cockroach conspiracy “theorists” crawled onto their anti-social media platforms to claim that the shooter, a paranoid boy in body armor, another example of fragile masculinity run amok, was set up to do the deed by the “federal government.” It’s not just the usual suspects —Neanderthal men — spouting this nonsense any more. Rightwing politicians and the reliably ridiculous Tucker Carlson-type pundits are spewing the same lie, and the alt-right QAnon creeps lap it up. Nothing can shock the conscience of the unconscious. We are doomed. HANDICAPPED FRAUDS I am newly disabled. And I am shocked at how many people abuse the blue placard. If your grandma is not in the car, or your disabled

SOUND OFF

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

the white car full of kids at the post office on the South Hill two weeks ago... I will be thinking of you. LITTLE TO CHEER ABOUT It’s small comfort to know that Idaho is not yet entirely controlled by worshippers of The Donald. Take a look at the electoral map showing where Janice McTrumpy won big. Kootenai and Bonner and Boundary Counties are clearly under the thumb of thugs. In the olden days Northern Idaho was wistfully described as a beautiful “state of mind” (compared to the “mindless state” down south). Now sane people in Coeur d’Alene and Sandpoint and Bonners Ferry must avert their eyes and keep their mouths shut or risk confrontation with a Janicejuiced Jackboot who’s most certainly armed. We are surrounded by unhinged ugliness. THE THOUGHTS OF CHAIRMAN VIPER Realizing that it’s possible for the human mind to hold vastly contradictory ideas, I’m nonetheless thoroughly befuddled by Mr. Birdsong’s notion that he can protect children and stooge for Trump at the same time. RE: BLOOMSDAY CHEERS AND JEERS Jeers to me and you. You’re right. I forgot the “rules” of walk on the right, run on the left (AFTER the “race”). That’s totally on me. But, this was my first time running. When I did so, I did follow the “rules.” I

you! Will you come back, or are you gone forever? Will someone attempt to replace you? Were you too raw and jagged for the sensitive souls of Spokane, Washington? I’ve been missing your weekly quick and candid reads; they’re humble, entertaining and filled with humility. Thank you, and I hope to see your words again some day. [EDITOR’S NOTE: The “Advice Goddess,” Amy Alkon, retired from writing her column a couple months ago.] n

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NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Friday May 27th - 6:35PM

Honoring the men and women of our Armed Forces, veterans, and support organizations. Fireworks show after the game. Presented by:

Games Through Sunday 5/29 40 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

O L S E N

S A O K I N G U N A R N G L E G K I T K I N G A T T I T E O F

Fireworks Night vs.

M I L L I

FREE PARKING


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

BOWL FOR KIDS’ SAKE This campaign is a critical source of funding for Big Brothers Big Sisters, a national leader in mentoring programs for at-risk youth. All funds directly to support BBBS mentoring programs for at-risk children in the community. Go online or text 50155 to BFKSINW22 through June 30. By donation. nwbigs.org BATTLE OF THE BANDS LIP-SYNC BATTLE FUNDRAISER Daybreak Youth Services hosts this fundraiser with Spokane individuals and businesses competing to raise funds in support of youth in the community with mental health needs, and Daybreak’s newest program which helps sextrafficked youth. May 26, 6-11 pm. $50. Knitting Factory, 919 W. Sprague Ave. daybreakyouthservices.org MOWTOWN DOWNTOWN Live music from Nu Jack City, hor d’oeuvres, beer, wine and live/silent auctions. All donations help provide hot, nutritious meals to home-bound seniors. May 26, 6:30-10 pm. $100. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. mowspokane.org ONLINE AUCTION: ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI PARISH Hundreds of items up for auction include gift certificates, cakes, quilts, collectibles, car washes, new mattress and more. Auction from May 25-June 5. 32auctions.com/ StFrancis (509-939-4333) THINNING THE VEIL Contemporary artist Leela Francis is this months featured artist. 30% of proceeds of artwork sales is donated to the UN Ukraine refugee fund. May 1228, Wed-Sat from 11 am-5 pm. New Moon Art Gallery, 1326 E. Sprague. manicmoonandmore.com INNOVATION HS ANNUAL FASHION SHOW & ART EXHIBITION Activities include digital music/media presentation, a visual arts gallery, several booths with concessions, plants, school merch and more. All proceeds benefit Innovation High School. May 27, 6-8 pm. $5. Innovation High School, 811 E. Sprague Ave. innovationspokane.org BITES & BLUES FESTIVAL Support University High School’s music department, eat food by TT’S BBQ, purchase goods from vendors and listen to live jazz music. May 31, 5-8 pm. $20. University High School, 12320 E. 32nd Ave. uhighmusic.com LIGHT UP THE NIGHT Light A Lamp provides gift baskets to the vulnerable in our community to help lift people up in dark times. This event includes a silent auction and live music. June 3, 5-9:30 pm. By donation. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. lightalamp.org 2BU YOUTH RANCH MANE EVENT SPRING FUNDRAISER Learn about the work and mission of 2BU Youth Ranch while raising money to help local youth. The event features a no-host bar, live, silent and dessert auctions and a 50/50 raffle. June 4, 5-9 pm. $20-$75. Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. 2buyouthranch.org (509-922-1981) MAKE TIME FOR KIDS CLOCK AUCTION & FUNDRAISER The event features one-of-a-kind clocks designed by local artists, designers and community members, along with other items to be auctioned off. June 4, 6-9 pm. $30-$225. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. (509-638-3557)

COMEDY

NICK SWARDSON Swardson is best known for his recurring role as Terry Bernadino in the comedy series Reno 911!, for his work with Adam Sandler’s Happy Madison Productions and for his own personal sketch comedy series ,Nick Swardson’s Pretend Time. May 26, 7:30 pm, May 27-29, 7:30 & 10:30 pm. $40-$55. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com BLUE DOORS & DRAGONS Improvised comedy celebrating table-top RPGs and inspired by a roll of the dice. Fridays at 7:30 pm through May 27. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (509-747-7045) SAFARI The Blue Door’s version of “Whose Line,” a fast-paced improv show with a few twists and turns. Saturdays at 7:30 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com NEW TALENT TUESDAYS Watch comedians work out new jokes together. Tuesdays at 7 pm (doors at 6 pm). Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com JON DORE Dore is best known for being a former correspondent for Canadian Idol. His show, The Jon Dore Television Show, appears on the Comedy Network. June 2, 7:30 pm, June 3-4 at 7:30 & 10:30 pm $15-$30. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com DRINK N’ DEBATE COMEDY The comedy showcase features two teams of comedians facing off in competition. June 3, 8-9:30 pm. $12-$15. Black Diamond, 9614 E. Sprague Ave. blackdiamondspokane.com

COMMUNITY

COME FEED THE BISON A tour of Win-Tur Bison Farm includes the farm history, a brief talk on bison and a Q&A session. Meet, greet and hand-feed the bison. May 27-Sept. 2, Fri and Sat from 12:30-1:30 pm. Call to reserve. $7. WinTur Bison Farm, 4742 W. Highway 231. winturbisonfarm.com (509-258-6717) M.A.D. CO LAB STUDIOS ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY PARTY Celebrate M.A.D. Co Lab Studios and Celestial Beans being in business for one year with a live DJ, a children’s painting and drawing station and multiple raffle prizes. May 28, 5-10 pm. Free. Mad Co Labs Studios, 3038 E. Trent Ave. madcolabstudios.com (509-638-6392) SPOKANE GARRY: A HISTORICAL EXPEDITION Dr. David Beine, Dean of the College of Global Engagement at Great Northern University, guides an expedition to historical sites around the region related to Spokane Garry. May 28, 9 am-1 pm. $50. Great Northern University, 611 E. Indiana Ave. dbeine. regfox.com/spokane-garry-tours SUMMER DANCE The dance starts with a waltz lesson and is followed by general dancing, refreshments, door prizes and fun. Dancers of all skill levels welcome. May 28, 7-10 pm. $5-$9. Ponderay Events Center, 401 Bonner Mall Way. (208-699-0421) PEND OREILLE ADVENTURE Spend the day mixing history, nature and more into a leisurely, fun trip. June 1, 9 am-5 pm. $80-$85. Southside Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. southsidescc. org (509-535-0803)

PANDEMIC DOGS & SEPARATION ANXIETY SCRAPS trainer Kevin Vanhook shares tips on how to soothe your dog when transitioning from working remotely to returning to the office and other reasons your pet might have separation anxiety. Registration required. June 2, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8350) 1ST ANNUAL LOCALMOTION CAR SHOW The event features live music, food vendors, , raffles, prizes and more. June 4, 11 am-7 pm. Free. LocalMotion Hydraulics & Accessories, 3038 E. Trent Ave. (509-960-0178) COMMUNITY BLOCK PARTY A summer kick-off event including cultural food, music, immigrant-owned businesses and local organizations. June 4, 10 am-2 pm. Free. North Monroe Business District, North Monroe Street. facebook. com/NMBDspokane (509-309-8404) LILAC CITY COMICON This year’s event features over 200+ exhibitor booths to browse, buy comics and related products as well as special guests and panels. See website for full schedule. June 4, 10 am-6 pm and June 5, 10 am-4 pm. $5-$32. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. lilaccitycon.com (279-7000) THE FRIENDS OF MANITO SPRING PLANT SALE The annual spring plant sale includes a wide selection of perennials, house plants and handmade home and garden decor items. June 4, 8 am-3 pm. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. thefriendsofmanito.org FIRE 9 ANNUAL DEMO DAY & WELLNESS FAIR This family-oriented event features live fire and rescue demos, over 50 local organizations with displays and info, a chance to learn hands-only CPR, and get your picture with Smokey Bear and Otto from the Spokane Indians. June 5, 10 am-2 pm. Free. Fire Station No. 92, 3801 E. Farwell Rd. scfd9.org (509-466-4602) PANDEMIC DOGS & SEPARATION ANXIETY SCRAPS trainer Kevin Vanhook shares tips on how to soothe your dog when transitioning from working remotely to returning to the office and other reasons your pet might have separation anxiety. Registration required. June 7, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Airway Heights Library, 1213 S. Lundstrom St. scld.org (893-8250) CATALYST BUILDING RECEPTION The reception features engaging and interactive sessions with EWU faculty and students, as well as guided tours. Cocktail reception to follow. June 9, 1-6 pm. Free. Catalyst Building, 601 E. Riverside Ave. catalystspokane.com TAROT: AN EXPLORATION INTO EMPOWERMENT WITH ASHLI PERIDOT A two-part course to practical application of the tarot. June 10 June 17 at 6 pm. $32.49-$58.74. Hierophant Meadery, 16602 N. Day Mt. Spokane Rd. hierophantmeadery.com CAMP GIFFORD 100TH ANNIVERSARY Join in the festivities: rides, games, entertainment, food and more. June 11, 10 am-6 pm. Free. Camp Gifford, 3846 N. Deer Lake Rd. campgifford.org FELTS FIELD NEIGHBOR DAY Get a close-up of vintage and commercial aircraft, explore community exhibits and displays, and enjoy demonstration flights from vintage aircraft. June 11, 9 am-3 pm. Free. Felts Field, 6105 E. Rutter Rd. facebook.com/Felts-FieldSpokane-SFF (509-455-6455)

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Visit our newly redesigned showroom and gallery with over 1,000 pieces available today.

1524 NORTHWEST BLVD. COEUR D’ALENE 208 676-1645 yourgoldsmith@gmail.com

MAY 26, 2022 INLANDER 41


EVENTS | CALENDAR

FILM

DREAMWORKS ANIMATION: THE EXHIBITION From the makers of Shrek, Madagascar, Kung Fu Panda, How to Train Your Dragon and Trolls, comes this exhibition celebrating over 25 years of DreamWorks Animation. Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm (third Thu until 9 pm) through Sept. 11. $15-$20. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org PNW FILM MAKER SHOWCASE Featuring live music by Craig McQuain and 11 assorted short films. May 26, 7-11 pm. Free. Auto Vue Drive-In Theater, 444 Auto View Rd., Colville. facebook.com/Auto-Vue-Drive-InTheatre-120740527937813/ TOTALLY TUBULAR TUESDAYS The Garland’s cult favorite film series. See complete schedule and pre-buy tickets online. Tuesdays at 7:10 pm. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com (509-327-1050) MONTANA FISHING FILM FESTIVAL Anglers from all walks of life, fishing close to their own backyards in freshwater destinations, share films from their fishing adventures. June 1, 7-9 pm. $16. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main Ave. mtfishingfilmfest.com (509-209-2383) WALK WITH ME This LGBTQIA+ film follows the emotional journey of a young mother who leaves her husband to find her footing in the world. As she finds her way, she stumbles into unexpected love with another woman. All proceeds benefit Spokane Pride. June 5, 6 pm. $12. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main Ave. magiclanternonmain.com

FOOD & DRINK

DOUBLEBACK WINE DINNER This year’s dinner features six courses crafted by Beverly’s Executive Chef Jim Barrett, paired with Drew Bledsoe’s awardwinning Double Back wines from Walla Walla. May 26, 6-9 pm. $195. Beverly’s, 115 S. Second St. beverlyscda.com ROCKET WINE CLASS Rocket Market hosts weekly wine classes; sign up in advance for the week’s selections. Fridays at 7 pm. Price varies. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket. com (509-343-2253) MEMORIAL WEEKEND WINE RELEASE & BARREL TASTING A complimentary tasting of China Bend’s lates wine releases, including samples from wines still aging in the barrel, with hors d’oeuvres by Victory and live music by The Fire Bottle Brothers Band. May 28-30 from 12-5 pm. Free. China Bend Winery, 3751 Vineyard Way, Kettle Falls. chinabend.com (509-732-6123) YAYA BREWING BEER LUNCH Gander and Ryegrass’ monthly coursed pairing lunch in partnership YaYa, featuring four to five beers paired with unique courses. May 28, 11 am-2:45 pm. $85. Gander & Ryegrass, 404 W. Main Ave. ganderandryegrass.com (509-315-4613) ALL YOU CAN EAT PANCAKE BREAKFAST Breakfast with eggs, sausage, OJ and pancakes. Cash or check only. May 29, 8-11 am. $3.50-$8. Green Bluff Grange, 9809 Green Bluff Rd. greenbluffgrowers.com (509-979-2607) SUMMER DECK PARTY Learn to prepare appetizers like salata avocado, antipasto kabobs, shrimp and cucumber canapes, grilled zucchini, ricotta roulades, stuffed

42 INLANDER MAY 26, 2022

jalapeños and fresh strawberry salsa. Substitutions to accommodate dietary restrictions are available. June 2, 5-7 pm. $69. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. campusce.net/spokane/ course/course.aspx?c=1186 CAMP MOSCOWANNA A summercamp-themed block party featuring activities for all ages and vendors serving beer, wine, and food. June 4, 4-8 pm. $27. Moscow. moscowchamber.com/event/ camp-moscowanna (208-882-1800) DINNER WITH AN ARTIST: REINALDO GIL ZAMBRANO & ADAM HEGSTED Dinner and an opportunity to see Reinaldo’s art and the flavors he grew up with in Venezuela, combined with Chef Hegsted’s cooking and techniques from around the world. Each course is paired with wines from South and Central America, plus a special coffee blend from Venezuela. June 4, 6-9 pm. $125. Emerge, 119 N. Second St. emergecda.com ITALIAN COOKING CLASS Make gnocchi, roasted zucchini and a chocolate torte. This class takes place over Zoom. June 4, 3-5 pm. $55. Wren Pierson Community Center, 615 Fourth St. cityofcheney.org (509-489-9250) DRY FLY DISTILLERY TOUR & TASTING A guided tour of the distillery and tastings of Dry Fly liquors of your choice as well as a taco/fajita bar. Co-hosted by Spokane Preservation Advocates. June 6, 6-8:30 pm. $60. Dry Fly Distilling, 1021 W. Riverside Ave. spokanepreservation. org (509-489-2112)

MUSIC

ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE The EWU Music Program presents a concert by students, faculty and alums featuring music from Beethoven to the Beatles. Everything from soloists to chamber music to jazz combos along with orchestra, wind ensemble and choirs is highlighted in a wide array of works under the theme “all you need is love.” May 26, 7:30 pm. $13$23. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague Ave. foxtheaterspokane. org (509-624-1200) SPOKANE SYMPHONY OUT & ABOUT CONCERT SERIES A 45-minute concert of light classical music from small groups of two to five Spokane Symphony Musicians. May 27, 6:30 pm. Free. Carl Maxey Center, 3116 E. Fifth Ave. spokanesymphony.org (509-795-1964) WEDNESDAY EVENING CONTRA DANCE Join the Spokane Folklore Society each Wednesday for contra dancing. All dances are taught and walked through, then called to live music. Events feature a different band and caller each week. Come early for a lesson. Proof of Covid-19 vaccination required. Wednesdays from 7:30-9:30 pm. $7/ members; $10/general (18 and under free). Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. womansclubspokane.org GRAND OPENING OF LITTLE CARNEGIE CONCERT HALL Music Conservatory of Sandpoint faculty and students, joined by local performing artists, present the premiere public performance of Little Carnegie. The evening’s feature presentation showcases a wide variety of Spanish classical music. June 3, 7 pm. $55. Music Conservatory of Sandpoint, 110 Main St. sandpointconservatory.org

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

RIVERFRONT MOVES: CORE FOUR COLLECTIVE Held in partnership with local health and fitness businesses and Providence Health Care, this free fitness series offers exercise classes for all ages and fitness levels. May 26-June 16, Thu from 6-7 pm. Free. Pavilion at Riverfront, 574 N. Howard St. my.spokanecity.org SPOKANE INDIANS VS. EVERETT AQUASOX Promo events during the six-game series include Jersey Off the Back Night (May 26), Armed Forces Appreciation Night and Fireworks Night (May 27), $10,000 Grand Slam Night (May 28) and Dollars in Your Dog Day (May 29). May 26-27, 6:35 pm, May 28, 5:09 pm and May 29, 1:05 pm. $8-$22. Avista Stadium, 602 N. Havana St. milb. com/spokane (535-2922) STARS ON ICE After missing two seasons due to the pandemic, the 2022 Stars on Ice tour presents the best of the U.S. Figure Skating team, including members who competed in the Beijing 2022 Winter Olympics. May 27, 7:30 pm. $32$142. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000) SPOKANE FESTIVAL OF SPEED The fest brings together iconic and pristine vintage sports cars and high-powered ground pounders, along with worldfamous and historic formula cars from the glory days of American and European road racing. June 3-5, see site for full schedule. June 3-5. $20. Spokane County Raceway, 750 N. Hayford Rd. spokanefestivalofspeed.org GIRLS ON THE RUN CELEBRATORY 5K This after-school program is designed to allow every girl to recognize her inner strength. Throughout the season, girls make new friends, build confidence and celebrate all that makes them unique. The program combines training for a 5K with an interactive curriculum. June 4, 9 am. $20. Hart Field, 3508 S. Grand Blvd. gotrspokane.org/5K (920-474-6875)

THEATER

ANNIE Little orphan Annie charms everyone’s hearts in 1930s New York City. She is determined to find the parents who abandoned her years ago on the doorstep of a New York City Orphanage that is run by the cruel, embittered Miss Hannigan. Thu-Sun through May 29; . $13-$15. TAC at the Lake, 22910 E. Appleway Ave. tacatthelake.com THE LIFESPAN OF A FACT Fresh out of college, Jim Fingal’s job is to fact-check articles for one of the best magazines in the country. His boss has given him a big assignment: to apply his skill to a groundbreaking piece by author John D’Agata. Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm through May 29. $10-$20. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com AGATHA CHRISTIE’S MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS Just after midnight, a snowdrift stops the Orient Express in its tracks. The luxurious train is surprisingly full for the time of the year, but by the morning it is one passenger fewer. May 27-June 19, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10-$35. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre. com (509-325-2507) ALICE IN WONDERLAND Lewis Carroll’s unflappable young heroine Alice takes a tumble down an enchanted rabbit hole to an off-kilter world of mock turtles, dancing flora, punctual rabbits and mad tea parties. Fri at 7 pm, Sat-Sun at 2 pm through June 5. $12-$16. Spokane

Children’s Theatre, 2727 N. Madelia. spokanechildrenstheatre.org/Home/ EventDetails/59 (509-328-4886) CYT NORTH IDAHO: JOSEPH & THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT A timeless Old Testament tale, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat is set to a multitude of musical genres, spanning from country-western and calypso to bubble-gum pop and rock and roll. Fri-Sun through May 29, show times vary. $14-$18. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cytnorthidaho.org CYT SPOKANE: MATILDA THE MUSICAL Inspired by the twisted genius of Roald Dahl, Matilda The Musical from the Royal Shakespeare Company revels in the anarchy of childhood, the power of imagination and the inspiring story of a girl who dreams of a better life. May 27-June 5, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sat-Sun at 3 pm. $14-$18. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. cytspokane.org EXIT PURSUED BY A BEAR Nan has decided to teach her husband, Kyle, a lesson. With the help of her friend, she tapes Kyle to a chair and forces him to watch as they reenact scenes from their painful past. Through this night of emotional trials and ridiculous theatrics, Nan and Kyle are both freed from their past in this smart, dark revenge comedy. May 27-29, Fri-Sat at 7 pm and Sun at 3 pm. $12-$16. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. cadeprophet.org (208-290-7685) SWEET DELILAH SWIM CLUB Five Southern women, whose friendships began many years ago on their college swim team, set aside a long weekend every August to recharge those relationships. May 27-29, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $15-$30. Chewelah Center for the Arts, 405 N. Third St. our.show/ chewelah/delilah (509-936-9333) JT: TARFUFFE REIMAGINED Moliere’s Tarfuffe reimagined to be set in Texas. June 2-5, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Pay what you can. Spartan Theater at SFCC, 3410 W. Whistalks Way. sfcc. spokane.edu/drama PASS OVER This poignant play tells the story of two young Black men dreaming of a better tomorrow in a world of police violence. June 3-19, Thu-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $15-$25. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. StageLeftTheater.org MET LIVE IN HD: HAMLET The Kenworthy’s annual series of MET Live in HD operas. Hamlet features tenor Allan Clayton, soprano Brenda Rae, mezzosoprano Sarah Connolly, baritone Rod Gilfry and bass John Tomlinson. June 4, 9:55 am and June 6, 6 pm. $15-$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy. org (208-882-4127)

VISUAL ARTS

OUR STORIES, OUR LIVES: IRWIN NASH PHOTOGRAPHS OF YAKIMA VALLEY MIGRANT LABOR The bounty and diversity of Washington’s agriculture is possible because of the labor of agricultural workers. In 1967, Irwin Nash visited the Yakima Valley to take photographs for a piece on valley agriculture. He returned each season until 1976 to document the lives of these workers, creating more than 9,400 images. Tue-Fri 1-4 pm, Sat 10 am-4 pm through Dec. 10. Free. Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art WSU, 1535 NE Wilson Rd. museum.wsu.edu (509-335-1910) INLAND AT EMERGE Abstract artist

Andrew Parker and fine art photographer Julie Robertson present new works. Tue-Sat from 10 am-6 pm through June 4. Free. Emerge, 119 N. Second St. emergecda.com (208-930-1876) NAOMI TAYLOR & JERRY JONES Exhibits in the Libey Gallery by Colfax photographer Naomi Taylor and former Colfax resident and painter Jerry Jones. Open Mon-Fri from 10 am-6 pm and Fri from 1-5 pm through May 31. Free. The Bettie Steiger Center, 102 S. Main St. whitco.lib.wa.us NOAH RIEDEL, PATRICK SILER, HELEN PARSONS, CHRIS RICCARDO AND MICHAEL HORSWILL May’s showcase features the ceramics of Noah Riedel, the paintings of Pat Siler, the textile work of Helen Parsons, the sculptural work of Chris Riccardo and the constructions of Michael Horswill. May 7-28, daily from 11 am-6 pm. Wed.-11 am-6 pm through May 28. Free. The Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com RECLAIMED NATURE ART SHOW Brooklyn Art shows her collection, “Reclaimed Nature.” May 21-28, daily from 12-4 pm. Meet and greet every Sat from 12-4 pm. Free. First Avenue Coffee, 1017 W. First Ave. firstavenuecoffee.com COLORS OF THE WEST: THE ART SPIRIT GALLERY & CHALICE BREWING: This exhibit features artists Shelle Lindholme and Ryan Molenkamp. The continued partnership between gallery and brewery is a great way to enjoy the crafts of multiple artisans simultaneously. June 1-Aug. 5, daily from 11 am-6 pm. Free. The Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com (208-765-6006) MAC ARTFEST A three-day celebration of art and fine craft featuring 75 regional artists, live music, food and a beer garden. June 3-5. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. artfestspokane.com (509-456-3931) REMEMBERANCE Dick Ibach was mentor and beloved art teacher to many Spokane artists. “Remembrance” serves to honor Ibach’s legacy by displaying a collection of his paintings. June 3, 5-10 pm. Free. New Moon Art Gallery, 1326 E. Sprague. newmoonartgallery.com (509-413-9101)

WORDS

DUKES DO IT BETTER BY BETHANY BENNETT Celebrate the third installment of Bethany Bennett’s Misfits of Mayfair series, Dukes Do It Better. May 31, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (509-838-0206) BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm; sign-ups at 6 pm. 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. bit.ly/2ZAbugD MARK ANDERSON: ELEVATING YOUR LANGUAGE THROUGH BREVITY Learn to read and write poetry with generative exercises, share and get constructive feedback. Students will depart with a rough draft to take home and expand on having explored the topic of poetry. Every third Wednesday from 6-7:30 pm. $25. Emerge, 119 N. Second St. emergecda.com (208-930-1876) HABITAT FOR EVERYONE: A FEW EASY TECHNIQUES Ken Bevis, Stewardship Wildlife Biologist with the Washington Department of Natural Resources, discusses how to curate your lawn’s landscape to encourage a thriving wildlife ecosystem. June 2, 4-6 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. tieg.org n


What’s in a name? A lot, it turns out.

COURTS

Delta-8 and the Ninth Circuit Federal court rules affirming legality of controversial cannabinoid BY WILL MAUPIN

O

ne of the more whiplash-inducing stories from the world of cannabis the past few years just went through another dramatic turn. Delta-8 THC, like the hemp plants from which it is derived, is legal at the federal level, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals ruled last week. ...continued on page 46

MAY 26, 2022 INLANDER 43


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NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a five-year sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

“DELTA-8 AND THE NINTH CIRCUIT,” CONTINUED... Delta-8 THC is an isomer of delta-9 THC, the chemical compound commonly known simply as THC. Delta-8 and delta-9 have the same chemical formula, though slightly different chemical structures. This gives the two similar psychoactive effects. Which is to say delta-8, like delta-9, can get you high, and that’s why delta-8 has made it all the way to the 9th Circuit. “Granting the preliminary injunction, the District Court held that the 2018 Agricultural Improvement Act (the “Farm Act”) legalized the company’s delta-8 THC products,” the 9th Circuit panel said in its 3-0 summary opinion.

Delta-8 has existed in something of a gray area since the passing of the 2018 Farm Act, which defined and legalized hemp. The 9th Circuit agreed with the District Court’s ruling, affirming the legality of delta-8 THC. Delta-8 has existed in something of a gray area since the passing of the 2018 Farm Act, which defined and legalized hemp. The definition considered cannabis with less than 0.3 percent delta-9 THC to be hemp, and legal, with any cannabis containing higher concentrations of delta-9 considered to be illegal marijuana. The Farm Act was intended to legalize industrial hemp and nonintoxicating compounds such as CBD, without legalizing cannabis that can produce intoxicating effects. However, the act’s definition of hemp specifically mentioned delta-9, and not other chemicals like delta-8. That created a loophole that allowed an intoxicating chemical like delta-8 to be produced from legally grown hemp. Ambitious entrepreneurs jumped in, seeing an opportunity to bring intoxicating hemp products into states where intoxicating cannabis remains illegal. In April 2021, the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board issued a statement seeking to clarify the issue within the state. The LCB stated that delta-8, and similar intoxicating chemicals that can be derived from hemp, were illegal within the state. Legal developments, like the 9th Circuit ruling, mean the LCB’s original statement will likely have to be reconsidered. For the past two years, delta-8 has bounced back and forth between legality and illegality, depending on who you ask. Last week, the 9th Circuit said it was legal. Now, the LCB is turning to ask the public about delta-8, by hosting a panel discussion on May 31 that will be open to the public. A link to the virtual meeting is available on the LCB website, lcb.wa.gov. n

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