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LOVE POEM HOW ONE EMERGED 78 YEARS LATER PAGE 54

MODEST MOUSE PERMANENTLY SCARRED BY THE BAND PAGE 39 DON’T DRINK THE TAP WATER THE NEW REALITY AROUND FAIRCHILD PAGE 13

MAY 18-24, 2017 | “A PLACE BOTH WONDERFUL AND STRANGE”

R E V I V I N G

TWIN PEAKS INSPIRED BY SPOKANE AND THE WEIRDNESS OF THE NORTHWEST, RENOWNED DIRECTOR DAVID LYNCH REBOOTS HIS CULT TV SHOW BY NATHAN WEINBENDER PAGE 22


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EDITOR’S NOTE

I

t’s still a little astonishing to think that David Lynch — the avant-garde director of Blue Velvet, Mulholland Dr. and the before-its-time Twin Peaks series — has creative roots in Spokane, but so it is. Born in Missoula, Lynch spent time as a kid in the 1950s in Spokane, and the period certainly left an impression on him. It provided, in a way, the backdrop to Blue Velvet, the neo-noir mystery that earned Lynch his second Oscar nomination for Best Director. “There’s a very innocent, naive quality to life, and there’s a horror and a sickness as well,” Lynch says of the movie in the book Lynch on Lynch. “Blue Velvet is a very American movie. The look of it was inspired by my childhood in Spokane, Washington.” Don’t miss staff writer Nathan Weinbender’s deep dive into Lynch’s local connections and all things Twin Peaks-related, just in time for Sunday’s relaunch of the TV series on Showtime (page 22). Also this week: news reporter Daniel Walters digs into the troubled and expensive history of Riverfront Park’s Rotary Fountain (page 18). — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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4 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017


COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

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WHAT IS — OR WAS — YOUR FAVORITE PART OF RIVERFRONT PARK, NOW THAT RENOVATIONS ARE UNDERWAY? TIM STARK

My favorite part [is] definitely overlooking the falls. Do you think think the city should spend $1 million to improve the Rotary fountain? Nope. Honestly, I’d work on more practical park stuff, like better bike paths to get [to the park].

Chey Scott (x225) FOOD & LISTINGS EDITOR

Derek Harrison (x248) ART DIRECTOR

Wilson Criscione (x282), Mitch Ryals (x237), Daniel Walters (x263), Samantha Wohlfeil (x234) STAFF WRITERS

Young Kwak PHOTOGRAPHER

Caleb Walsh ILLUSTRATOR

CHRISTIAN HUNT

I really enjoyed how open it was, and communal, because it was kind of an environment where you could just “go forever.” Would you spend $1 million to renovate the Rotary fountain? I wouldn’t, because it’s a fountain. If I were to spend a million bucks on anything in Spokane, it would be to improve the road systems.

Amy Alkon, Mike Bookey, Connor Dinnison, Robert Herold, E.J. Iannelli, John T. Reuter, Carrie Scozzaro, Eric D. Snider, Cara Strickland CONTRIBUTORS

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It was really cool to walk through. The carrousel. It’s pretty historic, and it felt different than the rest of Spokane. Do you think the city should renovate the Rotary fountain? It feels like they just put it in, didn’t they? You could probably use that money to fix 100,000 potholes in the city.

SHANNON MANSO

I loved the strip where you could run across the bridge and go up the hill, and there were all the trees lining it. Do you think the Rotary fountain is worth the $1 million renovation? Wow, I don’t know. After Bloomsday, a lot of people were bummed because they couldn’t take pictures in front of the fountain. And kids love it.

SYLVIE BAMIS

Walking by the Convention Center and the footbridge by the red wagon. What are your thoughts on the Rotary fountain? I’m not a fan. It’s too crowded, and it smells like bleach and gets too many people wet.

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MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 5


COMMENT | LAW

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f I were on the Senate committee voting to Clinton after announcconfirm the next director of the FBI, the ing that there was no very first question I would ask the nominee basis for indicting her: He would be: “Much has been made of how highly should have announced President Trump values loyalty. With reference to his decision, turned and the position to which you have been nominated, walked away from the please provide us your understanding of what podium. Secondly, there that term means. Does it refer to personal loyalty was his dreadful handling to the president? Loyalty to your oath of office? of the late-breaking email Or loyalty to the FBI as an institution? non-story, which likely If necessary, I would ask a follow-up: “Please derailed Clinton over the answer the same question with reference to the campaign’s final few days. Fence sitters were FBI Director’s relationship with the Attorney somehow moved to vote for Trump, overlooking General. And how, exactly, would you go about everything that anyone who had followed his caresolving conflicts among these three forms of reer already knew, culminating with the obscene loyalty? “locker-room talk” episode, which spoke volumes I would remind the nominee of the “Saturday about who Trump really is as a person. Night Massacre” during the Watergate scandal — Moreover, Comey’s final testimony on the when both Attorney General Elliot matter of why he sent news of Richardson and Deputy Attorney those emails (which Clinton LETTERS General William Ruckelshaus rehadn’t even written) to the Send comments to signed rather than carry out what Republican leadership was, in editor@inlander.com. they regarded to be an illegal order a word, pathetic. Honestly, was from President Richard Nixon to the man trying out for the role fire Archibald Cox, the special prosecutor investiin the next production of Hamlet? Talk about a gating the president. “to be or not to be” moment. His testimony was So it fell to Robert Bork, the Solicitor General one long lament, in which the phrase “mildly at the time — the government’s trial lawyer — to nauseous” entered the American lexicon. make the call. Bork’s loyalty was with Nixon ll these errors in judgment, it must be first, so he went along with the president’s wishes pointed out, helped Trump, not Clinton. and fired Cox. Moreover, Trump did nothing to indicate Considering Bork’s role in this sordid episode that he had any problem with how Comey had calls to mind the life and times of the late Rex conducted the Clinton probe, other than perhaps Lee. During his four years as Solicitor General he was steamed that Comey hadn’t indicted her. under President Ronald Reagan, Lee compiled an Indeed, he embraced Comey in the days and enviable won-loss record, prevailing in 23 of the weeks after the election. 30 cases he argued before the Supreme Court. Until, that is — drum roll, please — the Lee would resign his position, in part because Russian probe. Comey wanted more money to he wasn’t being paid enough (less than $60,000 expand the investigation, and say what you will a year) to send his kids through college, but about Comey’s judgment (and I have), no one mostly due to his views regarding those quesclose to him has ever disputed his integrity. The tions of loyalty listed above. Lee, a conservative only change was the Russia probe; Comey was Mormon, viewed himself to be an officer of the getting too close to something. Maybe there’s Court, whose job it was to look out not just for only embarrassment — we know that the Rusthe interests of the administration, but for the ensians bug every room everywhere, so maybe tire nation. He resented the pressure being placed they have some dirt on Trump, as that leaked on him by the White House to take cases to the “dossier” suggested. Or maybe Trump’s debts Court that, in his mind, were unworthy. to Russian oligarchs were coming into focus. In other words, Rex Lee marched to his own Perhaps Comey was connecting the dots on how professional and personal sense of propriety. As the Russians were coordinating illegally with he famously put it, following his resignation, “I the Trump campaign to help him win the White was the Solicitor General, not the Pamphleteer House. General.” We have learned a lot over the past week or y bottom-line question to the nominee: so. We know we must learn whether the next “Will you be a Robert Bork-style FBI FBI Director is going to be another Robert Bork, Director, or will you follow Rex Lee’s or aspire to be a Rex Lee figure, so senators can sense of independence? vote accordingly. And above all, we know for This question, of course, leads us back to sure that President Trump wants all investigations former FBI Director James Comey. Personally, stopped. But by firing Comey the way he did, I think he erred badly, first by lecturing Hillary Trump has all but ensured that they won’t. n

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WITNESSES FOR THE CLIMATE

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All proceeds from this event go to the Delta Gamma Foundation and Lilac Services for the Blind, whose mission is to provide training and adaptive devices that allow vision-impaired people to live satisfying lives by restoring, maintaining or increasing their independence. Sat, May 20 from 8 am-2 pm. Cataldo Catholic School, 455 W. 18th. lilacblind.org (328-9116)  Tell us about your event or other opportunities to get involved. Submit events at Inlander.com/getlisted or email getlisted@inlander.com. F R E E LO CA L D E L I V E RY • F I N A N C I N G AVA I L A B L E • LOW P R I C E G UA R A N T E E JEN SORENSON CARTOON

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MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | POLITICS

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

The Rise of Partisanship It’s time to start destroying political Death Stars built by rabid, anti-government extremists BY JOHN T. REUTER

O

ur nation’s increasing partisanship over the past several decades hasn’t been an accident. Rather, it’s part of a long-term strategy to blow up government. Anti-government crusader Grover Norquist made this clear in interviews through the early aughts: “We are trying to change the tones in state capitals — and turn them toward bitter nastiness and partisanship.” Why would anyone want to make politics more nasty and partisan? For two reasons: First, partisanship has an

anti-government bias. Second, it’s an incredibly effective tool to build political power, especially for unpopular ideas. Let me expand on each those points. Partisanship helps destroy government by pulling people apart. Government, at its core and its best, is about people coming together to solve problems that they couldn’t solve on their own. It requires teamwork and community. Partisanship breaks down our sense of community by partitioning us into smaller, warring tribes. The focus shifts to the battles between those tribes, rather than the larger shared challenges we face. Partisanship’s capacity to build power comes from the

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tribalism that emerges. The value of potential solutions becomes increasingly separated from how they would work and what they would do, instead being judged by who is proposing the idea. This makes it easier to defeat popular ideas by having tribal leaders oppose them, and through the same method, easier to build support within a tribe for ideas that would be unpopular based on their merits alone. Armed with this knowledge, Norquist and a small band of other extremist activists have spent decades building the infrastructure across the country to spread “bitter nastiness and partisanship.” They built think tanks, political action committees, media networks, coalitions of funders and lobbying infrastructure — all aimed at dividing a nation, so that government would fail. The Republican establishment initially rejected these impulses. They weren’t against government, but rather had a different philosophy about how to make it leaner, and work more effectively and efficiently. However, as the power of partisanship to win elections and stop policies they disagreed with became increasingly apparent, Republicans eagerly jumped on board. Partisanship is a powerful force — as it grows, it requires ever more demonstrated loyalty to one’s own tribe through opposition to the other. What Republicans helped build, they no longer control. They cannot make the compromises necessary to govern. Even Norquist, whose anti-government message to dramatically cut taxes has become the core issue of unity within the new Republican government, has found that he cannot gain traction for immigration reform — a policy that he believes is key to economic growth. Meanwhile, Democrats have watched this partisan machine rise and seen the political power it is capable of generating. Their solution? Begin building their own infrastructure of think tanks, PACs and donor alliances aimed at increasing partisanship. It’s as if in Star Wars, the Rebel Alliance had witnessed the terror of the Death Star and instead of plotting how to destroy it, said, “We should build one of those, too!” The trouble with this strategy is the Death Star can only destroy planets; it can never save them. Don’t get me wrong: Democrats and their generally liberal allies could almost certainly use purposeful partisanship to regain the presidency and control of Congress. But the tactic will fail when it comes time to perform tasks beyond merely wielding power, and destroying the elements of government they dislike. Successful governing requires cooperation, and in the American form, that has to extend beyond a single political tribe if we are to pass and implement meaningful, lasting solutions to our shared struggles. It’s time to stop building Death Stars, and begin to form the alliances needed to destroy them. n

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10 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017


COMMENT | FROM READERS

POLITICS AND PERSUASION surprisingly agree with George Nethercutt about money in politics

I

(“What’s In Their Wallet?,” 5/11/17). I don’t agree with his recall of the 1994 election, wherein he unseated Tom Foley. History proved his message, which didn’t cost much to get out, was as good as Grade A fertilizer. In the end his cheap BS smelled the same as the highbrow stuff. His message was fraught with lies. Also, the notion in which politicians should regain the LETTERS art of persuasion seems quaint, as I Send comments to personally imagine today’s persuaeditor@inlander.com. sion resembles strong-arm tactics used by Goodfellas. Mixed seating in the House, strict term limits, repeal Citizens United, and return rights of corporations to that of corporations, not individuals, would be a start at getting D.C. to acting more functional. Until we have a serious reset, the status quo will probably remain. STEVE LACOMBE Spokane Valley, Wash.

The Carlyle Care Center in downtown Spokane.

Readers react to “Uncertain Future” (5/11/17), our story about the Carlyle Care Center ceasing to serve the mentally ill, and the repercussions:

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

ELIZABETH PARKER: The poor, sick and vulnerable always get walked all over and dumped on. LUANN HUNDLEY-SURYAN: They already moved the veterans from a nicer facility so people re-entering after prison had more space. Now the people at the Carlyle have to move. ELLA EL: This is an embarrassment to Spokane. Shame on the City’s Government who recently forgave $550,000 in loans and tax revenue for the developer remodeling the Ridpath, but cannot help house the mentally ill. LAURALEE WHITE: There’s nowhere for them to go! This is heartbreaking. All in the name of money. ISAAC JACK JR.: Legal abandonment by the state of Washington. Failure to protect the less fortunate. Spokane used to be known as a town with a heart. 

MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 11


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ENVIRONMENT

Don’t Drink the Water For now, the Air Force is providing water for residents near Fairchild whose wells have been contaminated, but then what? BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL Julie Dibble pumps water from a well, water that her family has been told not to consume.

T

oni Huff has already scheduled a doctor’s appointment. It’s not to check for the chemicals that Fairchild officials recently found in the drinking water of people living near the Air Force base — it’s to check for the problems those chemicals cause. “I already know I’m poisoned,” says Huff, who’s lived near the west corner of South Craig and Thorpe for about 20 years. “But the things it causes we need to test for. Like, it causes thyroid problems, cancers, things like that.” Fairchild Air Force Base officials began testing water wells last month and discovered that many had been contaminated with chemical compounds found in the firefighting foam the base used for decades. While the Air Force works on a more permanent fix, officials have notified neighbors like Huff that they could be using bottled water to cook and drink for months. For the moment, Huff is spending less time thinking about the future and more about the past 20 years she’s spent drinking potentially contaminated water. She decided to see a doctor after conducting her own research online. “I’m just sick about the whole thing,” she says. She lives in the home with her partner, Kevin Howell, and raised her now 34-year-old son there. Her three grandsons, ages 4, 10 and 16, are at the house frequently. She doesn’t know if she should let the young ones run through the sprinkler anymore. The two chemical compounds involved are perfluo-

rooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), which in addition to being used to extinguish fuel fires, have been used in consumer products, such as Teflon cookware, carpet, clothing, fabric and food packaging — things that need to be resistant to water, grease or stains — according to the Environmental Protection Agency. These types of compounds have a tendency to stick around in the environment and in the body, and people around the world have been found to have them in their systems. Studies have linked the compounds with lower birth weight and possible birth defects, increased risk for cancer, hormone changes, decreased fertility, higher cholesterol and more, but more study is needed to better understand how they might impact human health, according to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. It’s got neighbors wondering if past health issues could be related. If animals they lost to illnesses met an earlier-than-necessary demise. If they should be sharing their bottled water with their dogs, cats, chickens or livestock. Barb Collins lives on the east corner of Craig and Thorpe, where she cares for her partner and her brother. She’s worried about their health, as well as her three little Shih Tzus, which she calls her kids. “They say they’re only concerned with human health, not animals,” Collins says. “I have a problem with

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

that.” While residents are getting about a gallon of water a day per person, dropped off in two-week installments of 3- to 5-gallon jugs, they’ve been told they only need to use it for drinking and cooking. Brushing their teeth, bathing and washing dishes with their well water are all supposed to be OK, because the water isn’t likely to be ingested, according to a question-and-answer sheet the Air Force provided them. The sheet specifically says the EPA health advisory only applies to people, and since there are no current standards for animals, the residents shouldn’t use the bottled water for their livestock. Julie Dibble, whose family has lived on 15 acres off Thorpe for five generations, explains that this is a farming community, albeit not as large as it used to be. There are pigs and cows being raised for sale, as are eggs and produce. “We don’t just eat the meat, we also run businesses off it,” Dibble says. Despite the Air Force’s guidance, several residents say they are using some of the water for their dogs, cats and chickens. Others have opted just to throw the eggs away until they know more. The large animals are still on their own. A study of a small sample of eggs in a part of China near a fluorochemical industrial park found that eggs produced at home were much more contaminated with ...continued on next page

MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 13


NEWS | ENVIRONMENT

Residents are getting jugs of water, like these in Barb Collins’ home.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“DON’T DRINK THE WATER,” CONTINUED... this type of chemical than commercial eggs, with the highest levels in the egg yolks, according to an article in Environment International in January.

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Both chemical compounds have been studied for decades. In 2009, the EPA issued a shortterm health advisory, saying that drinking water should not have more than 400 parts per trillion of PFOA or 200 parts per trillion of PFOS. That number was reduced in May 2016, when the agency said there should not be more than a combined 70 parts per trillion of either. The military has tested for chemical compounds at and around different bases over the past few years, but testing at Fairchild didn’t start until this year. Some of the 17 initial wells that were found to be contaminated south of Fairchild had preliminary results (all in parts per trillion) of 226, 440, 940 and 5,700, according to residents the Inlander spoke with. The early results seem to be all over the place, Dibble says. “One neighbor’s tested at only 26. The one right next to her was nearly 4,000,” she says. The Air Force would not provide a list of the results, a high, low or a median, “out of respect for the privacy of well owners.”

The base has since tested 30 more wells, and those early results should come back this week. Dibble and other neighbors asked if a creek that runs through their properties carried the contamination their way, but the base does not plan to test the creek yet. “The creek that runs through the area of the initial ‘Phase 1’ residential well sampling has not been sampled because it is not known to be a source of drinking water for human consumption,” writes Marc Connally, Fairchild’s Air Force Civil Engineer Center on-site Remedial Project Manager. But that’s where cows drink, and children run and play in the hot summer months, Dibble says.

WHAT’S NEXT?

The base no longer has the type of firefighting foam that was used from 1970 to 2016, says Scott King, a Fairchild spokesman. “The main thing is, Fairchild is trying to be a good community partner,” King says. “We care for the folks outside the gate as well. We care about their safety and well-being.” The Air Force will provide bottled water until another solution is figured out. That could include some type of filtration system, water

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treatment, or looking to connect affected residents to municipal or public water sources. “All options are being considered for a long-term response,” Connally writes. “Treatment of the groundwater itself is a longterm remedial action that the Air Force will propose after the Remedial Investigation is complete. This is likely to be several years in the future.” Some water treatment plants use activated carbon to filter out particular chemical compounds, but it’s not clear if that would work well when scaled down for smaller, individual systems. Richard Watts, a professor of civil and environmental engineering at Washington State University, is an expert on treating contamination at the source with oxidation processes, which his lab has studied for more than 30 years. Watts, one of the first to study the process for cleanups, thinks it has the potential to work as a treatment for the chemicals. “It would not be that hard to implement,” he says. “A lot of specialty companies do this type of thing.” In 2014, his lab published a study that showed hydrogen peroxide — what you use to clean your cuts, only much more concentrated — mixed with a catalyst, Local and state officials, as well broke down most of the as officials from Fairchild, will PFOA in the water in just hold a town hall on May 23 at a few hours, removing all 6 pm in the Medical Lake High of the fluorine molecules School auditorium to present more from the chemical cominformation on the compounds pound. involved in this contamination, and “That’s important, address questions and concerns. because one of the issues you have when you have a toxic compound, and try to degrade it, is it doesn’t always degrade completely,” says Amy Teel, an associate research professor who works with Watts. “What it degrades to could be as toxic, or more toxic, than what you started out with.” Teel notes that while their results in the lab were promising, they haven’t been used in the field yet. Minerals in the soil could impact the process, and it also depends on the ability to get to the contamination. That said, the process also has the potential to save many years of cleanup time, compared to other methods, Watts says. The military is currently screening proposals for cleanup. In the meantime, residents wonder how they can plan for the life of their property. “Essentially, my property is worth zero now. It is,” Huff says. “How are they going to clean it up?” Dibble says her family had started clearing part of their land to start an orchard there, but now the future seems uncertain. “Are we still going to be here for another generation?” she wonders. “This is supposed to come to me, and then my daughter. It’s supposed to stay in the family. Our dream of what this was to be for our family is dead, we feel.” n

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Spokane’s search for a new fire chief has not been without controversy.

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FIRE Soon, Mayor David Condon will choose the next Spokane fire chief. But some local firefighters are feeling like they’ve had little influence on the FIRE CHIEF selection process so far. The union wasn’t represented on the initial screening committee, and union members have been frustrated that Fire Station 4 Capt. Andrew Bessmer was weeded out before the interview process. Despite Bessmer’s lengthy military command experience, he was screened out by the human resources department as not being qualified, possibly because he didn’t have at least five years of fire administration experience. Compounding the union’s frustration, HR’s Meghann Steinolfson sent out an email encouraging members of the fire department command staff to come to a fire chief public forum last week in order to support interim Chief Brian Schaeffer, widely perceived to be Condon’s preferred choice for chief. (DANIEL WALTERS)

ENERGY A 20-by-20-foot section of a tunnel used to store rail cars full of contaminated equipment at HANFORD caved in last week, and was discovered during a routine inspection, according to the Department of Energy. The discovery prompted an emergency alert at the site, though there was no indication of any radioactive release. Crews surveyed the site and about 3,000 employees in the area were told to take shelter. The hole was capped with 53 truckloads of soil, and plans were being made to cover the rest of the tunnel, which is one of two near the former chemical-processing Plutonium Uranium Extraction Plant, known as PUREX. Hanford is a Superfund cleanup site, the most contaminated of its kind in the country. The plutonium used in the bomb dropped on Nagasaki during World War II was made there. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

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EDUCATION Spokane Falls Community College President JANET GULLICKSON is leaving SFCC to become president of a community college in Virginia, effective July 1. Gullickson (pictured) has been SFCC president since 2012, and tells the Inlander she is leaving to be closer to her kids. “I love SFCC. I love the students, faculty and staff … but it isn’t where my kids are,” she says. Darren Pitcher, SFCC vice president, will take over as acting president of the college for a year while Community Colleges of Spokane conducts a nationwide search for its next president. “I am tremendously honored to be chosen as acting president and look forward to supporting the work of our faculty, staff and students here at [SFCC],” Pitcher says in a statement. (WILSON CRISCIONE)


NEWS | BRIEFS

Justice Denied? Murder acquittal by all-white jury sparks outrage in black community; plus, city tells Blessings to find another Bridge BACKLASH

A white man who shot a black man in the back was acquitted of murder charges in Spokane last week by an all-white, 12-person jury. EDWARD BUSHNELL told police he was riding his skateboard in East Central Spokane in July 2015 when he heard a woman scream. Bushnell approached William Poindexter and his girlfriend in an attempt to stop Poindexter from beating her. The two men got into a fight, leaving Bushnell with a bloody gash on his face. As Poindexter and the woman walked away, Bushnell pulled out a handgun and shot Poindexter in the back from about 30 feet away, killing him. The jury, in its decision to clear Bushnell of murder charges, ruled that the former Army National Guard soldier acted in selfdefense. The decision sparked outrage from some community members, who gathered last Saturday at Morning Star Baptist Church. Rev. Walter Kendricks suggested that the Department of Justice review the case. Sandy Williams, publisher of Spokane’s Black Lens paper, started a GoFundMe campaign to raise money for the trial transcript, which could cost as much as $3,000. (As of press time Tuesday, the campaign had raised $3,705 in three days.) Beyond the community meeting, online commenters have debated over the degree to which the men’s races played a role in the initial altercation and subsequent acquittal. Rob Cossey, Bushnell’s defense attorney, rejected the idea that his client’s actions were racially motivated. “Baloney,” Cossey says. “To say it was racially motivated in this case is ridiculous. I’m not saying he deserved to die, but no one is talking about [Poindexter’s] assault of that woman and his criminal record.” Williams, for her part, published an article shortly after Poindexter’s death, quoting his friends’ pleas for justice. “I want people to know that William was a good dude,” Jemell Cuthbert told Williams. “He didn’t deserve what happened to him. I want justice.” (MITCH RYALS)

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The city of Spokane wants the group BLESSINGS UNDER THE BRIDGE to move from the spot where it has provided homeless people and those in need with meals and other services every week for the past few years. The nonprofit and its volunteers provide meals, pet food, groceries, hygiene products, clothing and more Wednesday nights at 6 under the I-90 overpass at Fourth and McClellan, a space they pay the city a small amount to use. But while the events help hundreds of people every week, which the city supports, there also have been reports of aggressive behavior, loitering and litter left in the area, which the city pays crews to clean up, says Jonathan Mallahan, director of the city’s neighborhood and business services department. Complaints have come in from nearby businesses and the principal of Lewis and Clark High School that these issues last through the week, Mallahan told Spokane City Council on Monday. The city sent the nonprofit a letter on Friday, May 12, asking them to find a new spot within 120 days. Blessings met with the city Tuesday morning to talk about issues with the request to move, including the fact that their name is tied to that location, Mallahan says. “We have some things to work through to make sure the character of the special and unique services Blessings provides is preserved,” Mallahan says. The groups will meet again next week to talk about alternate sites. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

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That’s left the Park Board to consider a few possibilities: Did the fountain have inherent design flaws? Did it receive the proper maintenance? Or — and this is the explanation favored by the Parks department — are interactive fountains just that expensive?

EXPECTATION VS. REALITY

The notion of a fountain at the entrance of Riverfront Park had been pinging around since the park’s creation for Expo ’74, but it was former City Councilmember Dennis Hession, Cadagan says, who came back from a conference in 2001 having seen an interactive fountain and had the vision for creating one in Spokane. The downtown Rotary Club had already been squirreling money away for a major project, and the fountain seemed like the perfect solution. They dreamed big. Earlier versions of the Rotary Fountain website described a fountain that would emerge “from the grip of the sacred water snake of ancient Indian lore,” while another would “rest on the back of a great turtle that, according to ancient Indian legend, supports the weight of the world.” The fountain spray would be timed to lights and music, and during the winter, misters would transform its columns into ice sculptures. Bit by bit, the plan was pared back. The fountain wouldn’t have a water snake or a great turtle. It wouldn’t turn into a ice sculpture in winter. Concerns over conflict with the carrousel’s music caused designers to ditch the musical choreography of the streams.

an Cadagan III knew that the price tag for the Riverfront Park Rotary Fountain was going to be steep. After all, he helped Spokane Rotary Club 21 raise more than half of the fountain’s cost. “Man, water features are not cheap,” he says. Even before the first drop of water came out of the Rotary Fountain in 2005, it had cost the city more than anticipated. When the fountain was constructed that year, it cost $150,000 more than originally envisioned, clocking in at $1.4 million. The Rotary raised $850,000, and the city used bond dollars to pay for the rest. Consisting of five pillars topped with abstract shapes created by Spokane’s famed sculptor Harold Balazs, the fountain has become the south-side gateway to Riverfront Park, and just as much of a landmark as the big red wagon or the Looff Carrousel. But lately, it’s become a financial nightmare for the city. “I assumed the design was such that it would last for decades,” Cadagan says. “It would not have occurred to me, back in 2005, that 12 years later we’re going to have to do major renovations.” When Hydro Dramatics, a national fountain consultant firm, examined the Rotary Fountain this February, the The Parks department plans to spend nearly $1 million to restore the Rotary Fountain, verdict was ugly. replacing broken equipment and adding modern improvements. The stainless steel columns, once shiny, were stained with Construction was plagued with nasty surrust. So was the concrete. The underground prises. The moment the space for the fountain vault beneath the fountain had flooded, causreservoir was dug, river water began rushing into ing serious damage to the pumps and electrical the hole, forcing the contractor to scramble to controls. rework the design to fix the problem. “The stupid little sump pump didn’t do its But when the fountain was finally working, it job,” Cadagan says. “Five feet of water in the gave supporters a chance to chide the naysayers underground vault. Holy crap.” who wanted to spend the money used to build it Several lights didn’t work, the Hydro on homelessness or hiring cops. Dramatics report said. An access cover was so “If you were of the opinion the interactive warped, it couldn’t close properly. Some water fountain was a bad idea, take another look at jets were inoperable, while others would shoot how a frivolous waste can become a fantastically out water with a force that violated codes. grand idea,” Spokesman-Review guest columnist The solution called for a full-scale overhaul, Sandra Babcock wrote in 2006. redesigning “the entire pumping, piping, lighting, nozzles and controls” to meet newer codes, repair existing damage and avoid further problems. The The fountain’s troubles didn’t stop when the proposed cost? $950,000, more than two-thirds water started flowing. In fact, the city made a what the fountain cost to construct.

GOING HAYWIRE


mistake immediately, initially sending the wrong chemical mix through the pipes, tarnishing the steel. Just last September, the city spent $6,000 to try to clean the concrete and steel — but the underlying stain remains. Leroy Eadie, director of Spokane Parks and Recreation, says the department considers the “patina” of rust to be permanent, and says the department does not intend to try to restore the fountain to its original metal sheen. When the Rotary raised funds for the fountain’s construction, the maintenance cost wasn’t something the group was focused on. “I don’t recall that we had any estimates for what it might cost to maintain the thing,” Cadagan says. The contract with Rotary and the city placed the entire burden of maintenance on the city the moment the fountain was dedicated. Yet throughout its entire existence, the fountain has been plagued by one mishap after another. In 2009, it was shut down for two days after a major electrical malfunction caused dangerous levels of chlorine to be injected into the water. The next year, it was shut down a month early because of a leak and a faulty computer system. By the time 2013 rolled around, Parks had spent $485,000 to build a concessions and restroom plaza next to the fountain — partly to address state health code requirements that mandated bathrooms be no farther away than 100 feet from the fountain. And while the media briefing touting the $64.3 million Riverfront Park bond ballot measure in 2014 was held in front of the fountain, the measure didn’t include a dime targeted at fixing the fountain’s internal issues. “It didn’t look like we needed to make a major investment at that time,” Eadie says. But the fountain was closed for repairs during the start of July in 2015 and again for part of June in 2016. “Potentially, we could have limped it along a couple of years more,” says Eadie. But with the south side of the park being torn up for the rest of the project, it made sense to overhaul it now. The department expects that at least some of the park bond money will be used to pay for the fountain repairs, though the board tabled details for how the fountain would be funded until a later date. Eadie promises that the fountain overhaul won’t take funding from art or other projects in the bond, though it may tap into unused bond contingencies. The city doesn’t yet have an estimate for how much it will have to pay to maintain the fountain in the future, but Eadie is optimistic that the improved fountain will require less maintenance, with new systems that allow it to be monitored remotely. “Technology is on our side here,” Eadie says. “We’re going to use less water. We’re able to enhance some of the pieces. The jets will be better. Lighting will be better.” Benches will be installed around the fountain to stop cyclists from zooming through it. Crucially, a backup sump pump, outfitted with an alarm, would be installed in the fountain’s vault to prevent another expensive flooding disaster. Still, Eadie rejects the idea that the fountain was poorly designed originally. Instead, he suggests that fountains, which require moving parts to constantly churn out chemically treated water, are inherently prone to breaking down. “It’s probably like owning a dog,” says Deborah Daoust, spokeswoman for Seattle Center, which has several water features. “You pay $500 for a dog, and you [incorrectly] think that’s your big expense.” Eadie notes that the city sets aside money every year in a maintenance fund for the SkyRide gondolas, and it could do the same for the fountain. But even conservative City Councilman Mike Fagan, the liaison to the Park Board and a skeptic when it comes to spending taxpayer money, says that keeping the fountain is worth the cost. “It’s a landmark in the park, just as the vacuum goat is,” he says. “More people love the Rotary Fountain than love the goat.” n danielw@inlander.com EDITOR’S NOTE: Publisher Ted S. McGregor Jr. sits on the Spokane Park Board; per Inlander policy, he does not edit columns or news stories involving any park business.

MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 19


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MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 21


B U I L D I N G

A

MYSTERY The cult series Twin Peaks makes a much-anticipated return, 27 years after it changed the way we look at TV

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BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

aura Palmer’s body is found one morning on the bank of a Peaks, into a surreal nightmare world. river, wrapped in a plastic sheet. “This is the way America is to me,” the director explains in It’s perhaps the most iconic image in all of Twin Peaks, Chris Rodley’s invaluable book Lynch on Lynch. “There’s a very the short-lived cult series created by filmmaker David innocent, naive quality to life, and there’s a horror and a sickness Lynch and TV veteran Mark Frost: The academic all-star as well. … Blue Velvet is a very American movie. The look of it was and homecoming queen, face frozen like porcelain, hair matted inspired by my childhood in Spokane, Washington.” with clumps of sand, lips blue. She looks like a Lynch said as much to the Chicago Tribune when completely different person than the one we see Blue Velvet came out: “Lumberton is a little like SpoDavid Lynch didn’t spend a kane. It was in Spokane that I became interested beaming from behind the closing credits of nearly every episode. ton of time in Spokane, but in things other than insects and the textures inside The people of Twin Peaks, Washington, a trees. It was there that the question of what’s inside the city has haunted some sleepy logging town 5 miles south of the Canathe mind of a girl with red high-heeled shoes made of his most iconic work. dian border, are shocked by Laura’s murder. Her me crazy.” friends and boyfriend are stunned into silence. That girl in red shoes, whether she really exThe police officer delivering the news over the high school intercom isted or is merely symbolic of something intangible, has, in a weird breaks down in tears. At the funeral, Laura’s father leaps onto the way, manifested herself in all of Lynch’s film and television work. coffin as it’s being lowered into the ground. You could argue, then, that Lynch is an honorary Spokane filmmakEnter FBI agent Dale Cooper, played with an almost boyer: Because so many elements of his art, from the doo-wop music to ish enthusiasm by Yakima native Kyle MacLachlan. Although his the clothing and hairstyles to the gee-whiz dialogue, are inextricably Tibetan-inspired investigative methods are unorthodox, Cooper linked to the cultural iconography of the era when he lived here, is able to follow the cryptic clues of the town’s strangest residents one gets the sense that Lynch has been forever stuck in Spokane (“The owls are not what they seem,” for instance) to successfully during the waning years of the Truman administration. uncover a hotbed of marital infidelity, evil doppelgängers, demonic Blue Velvet contains another morbid glimpse into Lynch’s childpossessions and alternate dimensions. hood. There’s a scene in which actress Isabella Rossellini, playing Twin Peaks was a lot of things at once — a small-town soap an abused nightclub singer, stumbles naked through a suburban opera, a police procedural, a dark domestic comedy, a disorienting neighborhood, as people gather on their lawns to gawk. It’s one supernatural thriller — but it was predicated on a single, powerful of the most infamous moments in a film that’s lousy with them; question: Who killed Laura Palmer? the critic Roger Ebert was so disturbed and sickened by it that, in That was the mystery that initially drew in audiences. It would his one-star review of the film, he accused Lynch of degrading and also eventually be the show’s undoing. abusing the actress. And yet that image of Rossellini was apparently yanked right avid Lynch’s decision to set and film Twin Peaks in Washingout of Lynch’s own memory. He would later describe it in an ton wasn’t a random one. In fact, he has roots here. interview with Ebert: “When I was little, my brother and I were He was born in Missoula, Montana, in 1946, the eldest outdoors late one night, and we saw a naked woman come walkof three children. His mother was an English tutor and his father ing down the street toward us in a dazed state, crying. I have never was a USDA research scientist, a job that sent the family ping-pongforgotten that moment.” ing around the country when Lynch was a child. That’s how they Did that incident, which obviously haunted Lynch, happen in ended up in Sandpoint and then in Spokane, and although Lynch Spokane, and is it the reason he regards the city with such a morbid only lived here for a short while in the early ’50s (the family later fascination? Lynch hasn’t said as much, but Spokane certainly moved to Boise, and then to Virginia, where Lynch attended high rubbed off on Lynch in a way that makes it inseparable from his school), that time clearly made an impact on him. work. Consider his 1986 film Blue Velvet, which follows a formula that lthough David Lynch left Spokane decades ago, Spokane he’d expand upon in Twin Peaks. It’s set in a small (fictional) town has never quite gotten over him. called Lumberton, an eerily cheery suburb of white picket fences, Ask enough locals at your favorite watering hole, and perfectly manicured lawns and American flags. But that wholeyou’ll eventually get one of them to tell you that Lynch once drank someness is merely a disguise for the decay and perversion lurking beneath its surface, and Blue Velvet soon descends, much like Twin ...continued on page 24

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Kyle MacLachlan returns as Agent Dale Cooper.

MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 23


TWIN PEAKS “BUILDING A MYSTERY,” CONTINUED... Pabst Blue Ribbon on this very stool. I’ve heard many times over that the Swamp, the dearly departed tavern on the outskirts of Browne’s Addition, was once a favorite hangout of Lynch’s, a bit of local lore that even I have dispensed to disbelieving friends over beers. Some stories I’ve been told maintain that Lynch based several Blue Velvet characters on Swamp regulars. The “David Lynch Drank Here” distinction has also been bestowed upon the pint-sized Baby Bar, and the Stranger further propagated the assertion in its recent piece about “Spokane’s remarkable literary landmarks.” These claims have naturally weaved their way into Spokane’s cultural DNA, even though evidence of Lynch having ever stepped foot inside either place is, as far as I can tell, totally circumstantial. I’d like to think it’s true, but it could just as easily be the kind of made-up factoid that develops through an elaborate game of Drunken Telephone. (Somebody prove me wrong.) But whether or not Lynch has ever slumped over the Baby Bar’s counter, his presence still haunts the place. Walking into it is a bit like entering one of Lynch’s most famous creations — Twin Peaks’ Red Room, a purgatory-like dimension where Dale Cooper has a run-in with Laura Palmer’s ghost. About four years ago, local artist Dan Anderson first decorated the small, windowless room with Lynchian flair. A cluster of branches was arranged around the entrance. A black-and-white chevron pattern was stenciled on the floor. A silver mannequin posed in the corner, and an expressionistic painting of Laura Palmer’s father Leland adorned the bar’s far wall. Crimson curtains were hung everywhere. The mannequin is gone now, and the paint on the floor has long been scuffed off. But the curtains are still hung, and one branch still juts out above the jukebox. Perched on it are a couple of stuffed owls, and next to them is an alien holding an owl mask. The owls, it appears, are not what they seem.

W

atching Twin Peaks today, it’s sort of surprising that it was (however briefly) a mainstream cultural phenomenon. What’s even crazier is that it aired on ABC, a network that, despite experimenting with dramas like thirtysomething and China Beach, was then mostly known for its squeaky-clean sitcoms. The pilot of Twin Peaks aired on April 8, 1990, and drew more than 34 million viewers, which is (to put that statistic into a modern perspective) the same number of people who tuned in for last year’s Oscar telecast. The conceit of exploring a single mystery over the course of a lengthy series wasn’t new when Lynch and Frost did it (consider The Fugitive, which Twin Peaks references in the form of a one-armed man), but they were among the first artists to successfully bring cinematic flair and deliberate abstraction to the small screen. The show’s narrative and stylistic influence on other series — The X-Files, Lost, True Detective, The Killing, Hannibal — has been catalogued many times over, though few showrunners have ever quite pulled off the tricky blend of dreaminess, paranormal horror and bizarre humor that defines Twin Peaks’ first 16 episodes. Episodes 17 through 30 — well, that’s a different story. When they conceived of Twin Peaks, Frost and Lynch’s goal was to withhold the identity of Laura Palmer’s murderer for as long as possible. The idea

24 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017

was to have the investigation gradually fade into the background, while the town’s quirky tertiary characters elbowed their way to the forefront. ABC executives weren’t happy with that: How could you set up a mystery and then refuse to pay it off? Laura’s killer is revealed a third of the way through the second season, which is also (not coincidentally) when the general quality of the show plummets. Lynch, having become disillusioned by the network’s interference, reportedly distanced himself from the series (though he still appears occasionally as Cooper’s nearly deaf supervisor Gordon Cole), and a rotating roster of directors, including Diane Keaton and James Foley, took over. Like Days of Our Lives on speed, the second season of Twin Peaks really goes into subplot overload, and many of those storylines are woefully misguided. Lucy, the police station secretary, is unsure who fathered her unborn baby. Nadine, the eyepatchsporting wife of the town’s sole gas station attendant, awakes from a coma both believing she’s a teenager and possessing inexplicable super strength; this inspires sequences in which she tries out for the high school cheerleading squad. David Duchovny pops up as Cooper’s former partner, now a woman. A love interest for Cooper, played by Heather Graham, is also introduced. There’s a beauty competition, some shady real estate deals and a millionaire who’s convinced he’s a reincarnated Civil War general. And it all feels so forced. The later episodes don’t possess the genuine weirdness that the earlier ones do; it’s too much of a put-on, like a kid playing dress-up in adult clothes. The series finale, directed by Lynch, represents a descent back into full-on serialism, deliberately ending the show with even more questions that it would presumably never answer. (A 1992 feature spin-off, titled Fire Walk with Me, further obfuscated the series’ mythology.) Twin Peaks was effectively canceled in June 1991, but its status as an occasionally brilliant, oft-mistreated auteur project has never faded. Had Twin Peaks premiered today, either on a premium cable network or through a streaming service, would Lynch and Frost’s vision have played out as they had planned? Would they have been able to deliver a show that sustained its greatness through to the end? Or was it always destined to be a cult item that would entrance as many people as it would alienate? TV content is more vibrant and visionary than ever, and on Sunday night (9 pm on Showtime), Twin Peaks returns to a fertile television landscape that it no doubt influenced. Lynch has been tight-lipped about the mysteries contained within the 18 new episodes, but if they’re anything like the show at its best, those mysteries will never really be solved. And maybe that’s how it should be. n

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Nathan Weinbender is the film and music editor for the Inlander. He previously wrote entertainment and culture stories for the Spokesman-Review and is a cohost of the weekly Spokane Public Radio show Movies 101. He’s been a David Lynch fan ever since renting Mulholland Dr. from Blockbuster and watching it three times in a single day. Reach him at nathanw@inlander.com or 509-325-0634, ext. 250.

A GUIDE TO THE ORIGINAL TWIN PEAKS CHARACTERS BY NATHAN WEINBENDER DALE COOPER (played by Kyle MacLachlan): The quirky FBI agent leading the show’s central murder investigation. Although his methods are unorthodox, he’s quickly revealed as a brilliantly intuitive detective. Interests include Tibetan mysticism, voice-activated tape recorders, coffee and cherry pie. HARRY S. TRUMAN (played by Michael Ontkean): Twin Peaks’ sheriff, and the down-to-earth yin to Cooper’s eccentric yang. Although seemingly straight-laced, he’s carrying on an affair with Josie Packard, the owner of the local lumber mill. LAURA PALMER (played by Sheryl Lee): Her murder sets the story in motion. An all-star student and homecoming queen, it’s discovered that she was carrying on a double life that involved drugs and prostitution. The appearance of her look-alike cousin Maddy inspires further confusion. LELAND PALMER (played by Ray Wise): Laura’s father, a local attorney, who has a public breakdown following his daughter’s death. His hair turns white, seemingly from the trauma, and he becomes known for breaking into song wherever he goes. DONNA HAYWARD (played by Lara Flynn Boyle): Laura’s best friend, and one of the few locals who were aware of Laura’s dark side. She becomes obsessed with tracking down the killer, often putting herself in danger. JAMES HURLEY (played by James Marshall): Laura’s boyfriend at the time of her death. Moody and introspective (and often on a motorcycle), he later falls in love with Donna as they investigate Laura’s murder together.


BENJAMIN HORNE (played by Richard Beymer): The richest man in Twin Peaks. He owns the Great Northern Hotel, where much of the series’ action is set, and the local department store, and he secretly operates One Eyed Jacks, a clandestine casino and brothel over the Canadian border.

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AUDREY HORNE (played by Sherilyn Fenn): Benjamin’s daughter, and a friend of Laura’s. She becomes smitten with Agent Cooper and infiltrates One Eyed Jacks (unaware that her father owns it) to help with the investigation. CATHERINE MARTELL (played by Piper Laurie): Her family has run the town’s sawmill for generations, though ownership has been passed to her sister-in-law, Josie. She plots to burn down the mill with her lover, Benjamin Horne; she later fakes her own disappearance and re-emerges disguised as a Japanese businessman. DR. LAWRENCE JACOBY (played by Russ Tamblyn): Laura’s kooky psychiatrist, with whom she had a close friendship. He possesses audio recordings of Laura describing her bizarre dreams, which later become crucial to the investigation. BOB (played by Frank Silva): First seen in a vision by Laura’s grieving mother Sarah, BOB is an evil spirit residing in an alternate dimension known as the Black Lodge. He feeds off murder and mayhem and possesses various people in the town. THE ONE-ARMED MAN (played by Al Strobel): A traveling shoe salesman who’s initially a suspect in Laura’s murder. He’s the host body for a demon called MIKE, who was previously in a murderous pact with BOB. THE MAN FROM ANOTHER PLACE (played by Michael J. Anderson): A dancing, backwards-speaking dwarf in a red suit. He appears to Cooper (alongside Laura Palmer) in a dream, the first suggestion that Twin Peaks is some kind of supernatural portal. THE GIANT (played by Carel Struycken): Another strange character in Cooper’s visions, a very tall man who wears a bow tie, performs magic and provides useful (if cryptic) information. Perhaps his most famous clue: “The owls are not what they seem.” THE LOG LADY (played by Catherine E. Coulson): One of the town’s stranger denizens, and yet another figure who dispenses clues that aid in the investigation. She’s typically seen clutching a log that she claims was a key witness to Laura’s murder. 

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MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 25


TWIN PEAKS

The real Twin Peaks: Visiting these locations is like stepping into the series’ wonderful, strange world.

A TWIN PEAKS ROAD TRIP BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

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art of the appeal of Twin Peaks — and much of its enduring mystique — comes from its colorful, distinctive Pacific Northwest settings. A lot of the series’ interiors were shot on Hollywood soundstages, but exteriors, especially in the early episodes, were filmed in such quaint, picturesque Washington towns as North Bend, Snoqualmie and Fall City. The enduring popularity of Twin Peaks means those towns are still visited by series enthusiasts — I stopped at a few last February during a road trip to the Oregon coast — and it’s somewhat surreal to inhabit locations that seem so otherworldly on TV. Here are five you should check out if you find yourself on the other side of the state.

TWEDE’S CAFE, 137 W. NORTH BEND WAY, NORTH BEND

Situated on an otherwise nondescript corner, this greasy spoon, known as the Double R Diner on the show, serves as a meeting place for many Twin Peaks residents. A fire ravaged the building in 2000, but you would never know that now: It still looks like it did back in 1990, wood paneling and all. The hallway leading to the bathrooms is covered in Twin Peaks memorabilia, including framed photos of series co-creator David Lynch and the actors

filming there. Order one of nearly 40 different burger varieties, knock back a damn fine cup of coffee and have some “Twin Peaks Cherry Pie,” which is $4.99 a slice.

REINIG BRIDGE, SE REINIG RD., SNOQUALMIE

Snoqualmie is just three miles away from North Bend, and there’s a lot to see there. Once used to transport lumber, this bridge is seen in the pilot episode as Laura’s friend Ronette, who escaped from the killer’s clutches, stumbles down the nearby railroad tracks. It’s now a pedestrian bridge crossing over the Snoqualmie River, and visitors have scrawled the distinctive Twin Peaks symbol on many of the steel girders. The site of the Twin Peaks sign, seen on the show’s title card, is also nearby, though the sign itself has long since been removed.

THE SALISH LODGE ON SNOQUALMIE FALLS, 6501 RAILROAD AVE., SNOQUALMIE

If you’d never seen Snoqualmie Falls in person, you might think that its appearance on Twin Peaks was some kind of special effect. The stand-in for the exterior of the Great Northern Hotel, seen in just about every episode, the lodge offers an amazing view both inside and out. Its interiors, however, were not used for the show.

DAVID LYNCH: THE ART LIFE It seems like particularly good timing that a documentary about David Lynch should open at the Magic Lantern on the same weekend that Twin Peaks returns to television. Subtitled The Art Life, the movie basically functions as a supplement to Lynch’s filmography: Although it shows no actual footage from his features (we do see clips from his early, bizarre short films), it nonetheless helps contextualize some of the peculiarities of his distinct cinematic worldview. The doc focuses primarily on Lynch’s career as a visual artist, which began before he ever stepped behind

26 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017

SNOQUALMIE FALLS LUMBER COMPANY, 396TH DR. SE, SNOQUALMIE

The belching smokestacks of the Packard Sawmill appear in the show’s opening credits sequence, but most of the Snoqualmie Falls Lumber Company has since been torn down (one of those stacks is still standing and is visible from the road). The building that doubled as the sheriff’s department, one of the most prominent locations in Twin Peaks, is right across the street; it’s now a school where you can learn to drive race cars.

KIANA LODGE, 14976 SANDY HOOK RD. NE, POULSBO

This stop’s a bit out of the way — it’s on the Kitsap Peninsula, a two-hour drive from Snoqualmie and North Bend — but a number of pivotal Twin Peaks places are here. The Kiana Lodge was actually used for two different locations: as the lobby of the Great Northern Hotel (with its distinctive Native American wall decorations) and the exterior of the Blue Pine Lodge, where the Martell family resides. And just a few feet away is the place where Laura Palmer’s body was first discovered on the beach. For a more comprehensive guide to finding shooting locations, consult intwinpeaks.com. n

a camera. In what is essentially a run-on monologue, Lynch talks, mostly in voice-over, about his parents and his childhood, how art distracted him from teenage delinquency, his frequent collaborators, and the outcasts and weirdos who most certainly inspired some of his characters. As he speaks, we watch him producing art in his L.A. studio, all the while puffing intently on a cigarette. It’s hard to imagine The Art Life appealing to anyone who isn’t already familiar with Lynch’s movies (it chronicles the director’s life up to the making of his 1977

feature debut Eraserhead), but it should be of interest to anyone who’s puzzled over Mulholland Dr. and wondered, “What kind of person thinks up this stuff?” This documentary confirms the one thing we’ve all suspected about Lynch: He is, indeed, a deeply strange man with weird hang-ups. No surprises there. — NATHAN WEINBENDER David Lynch: The Art Life opens at the Magic Lantern Theatre on Friday. See magiclanternonmain.com for showtimes.


NOT ENOUGH DRUGS What happens when you watch Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me without watching the series first BY DAN NAILEN

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allucinations. Sex. Violence. Incestuous fathers, off-kilter lounge singers and dwarves speaking in tongues. In filmmaker David Lynch’s skilled hands and warped mind, these elements are just par for the course, and often the beginning of entrancing, intriguing movies. When you watch Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me, the 1992 feature film that arrived after the series was canceled, you get all of those Lynchian tropes and then some. But if you haven’t watched the show and you try to make sense of the movie — as I did — well, there aren’t enough drugs on Earth to get you on the same wavelength as the director or the story. I know what you’re thinking. How could I expect to understand the Twin Peaks movie if I never watched the Twin Peaks TV show? A fair point. But I didn’t go into the movie expecting to hate it. In fact, I was hopeful that it would inspire me to finally hunker down and plow through the series that has long been one of my TVviewing white whales. That didn’t happen. First, a little backstory. I was a big Lynch fan when

Twin Peaks debuted, thanks mostly to Blue Velvet. I was a freshman film major (short-lived) working at a movie theater, and the night Twin Peaks aired happened to be a night I always had to work. This was the pre-DVR age, and having a VCR for recording favorite shows was a luxury for people who didn’t live in a 10’ by 10’ shared dorm room. So, I missed the Twin Peaks series in real time, and by the time the series came out on VHS tape in 1993, the cost was prohibitive. Besides, my Lynch fandom had been satisfied by the brilliant Wild at Heart, released just a few months after the TV show debuted, so I didn’t really feel like I was missing out on my share of twisted murder mysteries full of nonsensical tangents, quirky characters and surreal set pieces. As time went on, I kept seeing most of Lynch’s movies, but never bothered going back to Twin Peaks even when it became easily available. And now the experience of watching Twin Peaks: Fire Walk with Me might just turn me off for good. Like anyone who’s alive and pop-culturally aware, I knew about certain aspects of the show without ever

David Bowie turns out to be just as confused as we are. seeing it — pie and coffee, Agent Cooper, Laura Palmer is the dead girl, etc., etc. The movie didn’t really make any of those shards of knowledge more clear, but there sure was a hell of a lot of Laura Palmer (the movie recounts her last days before her murder), doing tons of cocaine and turning tricks in pursuit of even more cocaine. There wasn’t much Agent Cooper, but it was fun to see the cameos and bit parts that Lynch lined up. For most of the screening I was exclaiming, “Hey, there’s David Bowie!” or “I love Harry Dean Stanton!” or “It’s the lady from the Seinfeld marblerye episode!” Those were the fun parts. The rest was two hours of incoherent nonsense and a lot of actress Sheryl Lee (Laura Palmer) screaming. That part of the movie is something I could totally understand. n

MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 27


CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

COMEDY

High Times The Dope Show challenges comedians’ ability to stay funny while stoned BY DAN NAILEN

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wayne Cullen takes the stage for the second time tonight at the Spokane Comedy Club with his hands full of candy and a small tub of popcorn. He giggles a little between jokes and seems to lose his train of thought here and there. The New York-based comedian is definitely not as smooth as he was about an hour earlier, when he won over the audience of nearly 150 with jokes about being the only white guy under the age of 50 named Dwayne, and comparing getting back

28 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017

together with an ex-girlfriend to “getting back into Limp Bizkit.” In between his trips to the microphone, Cullen and the four other comedians for the monthly Dope Show at Spokane Comedy Club have partaken in a bit of marijuana. The challenge for all is to maintain their composure for a second set performed stoned after doing their first sets sober. For some, the difference is negligible. Show opener

Levi Manis has such an off-kilter style even when sober that it’s hard to tell much difference in his series of Steven Wright-style one-liners like “I live my life the way I was born — by accident and behind Arby’s.” But for Cullen, who doesn’t typically use marijuana, there’s no question he’s a different comic for his second, stoned set than his first. Still funny — “You cannot club a rat to death and make it look casual” — but clearly affected. “Any time I’m up on the show with people who


smoke weed regularly, they’re just high, while I get panic attacks,” Cullen says a week later about the Dope Show experience. “I had a panic attack once in Amsterdam, and I’ll still get flashbacks to that. I had like five or 10 minutes [in Spokane] when I thought, ‘Oh no’ and my heart was palpitating. I didn’t know if I could do it. It’s weird, because for the people who smoke weed, they don’t feel the same way. But for me, it’s a bit of a roller coaster.”

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hat roller coaster is by design, according to comedian Tyler Smith, who created the Dope Show back in January 2016. The self-described “pretty big stoner” likes to put together shows mixing avid pot smokers and non-users, giving the audiences a wide range of reactions to the comedians’ midshow indulgence. Smith tours the Dope Show through several clubs in the Northwest monthly, and says the Spokane Sundays regularly draw in the 100-to-150 range.

“Any time I’m up on the show with people who smoke weed regularly, they’re just high, while I get panic attacks.” At late April’s show, Smith opens with a few minutes of his own jokes about working at a medical marijuana dispensary before telling the crowd how the show works. Four comedians, sober through the day, will do short sets, then go get high and return to the stage, with nary a pause in the action. “There are no guarantees for the second set,” Smith says with a giggle, then asks the audience to refrain from any heckling of the comedians because “it’s scary up here, and then you throw drugs in the mix.” “Some of them smoke weed like me, every day,” Smith says. “And some of them only smoke when I pay them.” Smith books different comics for each month’s run of Dope Show gigs, so the audience is constantly being introduced to new comics. On occasion, as happened in April in Spokane with Gabriel Rutledge, the weekend’s regular headliner will stick around and join the Sunday smoke-out. Because pot affects everyone differently, even experienced users, every Dope Show set is different. The teetering dance between hilarious and disaster is something Smith loves. As an audience member, it’s fun to watch, too. “We have a shorter set for the second half because some people, when they get really baked, they get really rambling and keep talking. And not necessarily funny,” Smith says. “For some other people, the silence between punch lines is so deafening, and when you’re standing there waiting for people to laugh, you’re thinking, ‘How long have I been telling this joke? Are they still on board?’ “You can get lost, and there’s real paranoia that you’re not telling the joke right. And then we have some people who just have giggle attacks, and those can be the most fun.”

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or Cullen, the stress of a potential panic attack subsided in time for him to deliver a solid second set, even if there were more giggles between jokes than his sober first one. And all those candy bars he brought on stage were there for a reason beyond the munchies — even though getting stoned ended up killing the joke. “The green room in Spokane has an apothecary table full of candy bars, and I discovered it after I got high,” Cullen says with a laugh. “I think my plan was to take a bite of each one [during the set], but I didn’t remember to do it.” n The Dope Show • Sun, May 21 at 8 pm • 21+ • $14.20 • Spokane Comedy Club • 315 W. Sprague • spokanecomedyclub. com • 318-9998

MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 29


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FROM LEFT: Daniel McKeever, Jhon Goodwin, Tami Knoell and Grady O’Shea in Kiss Me, Kate.

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SPOKANE AT THE PARK

30 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017

BY E.J. IANNELLI

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n his first official production as the Spokane Civic Theatre’s new resident music director, Henry McNulty is working alongside director Melody Deatherage and choreographer Heidy Cartwright on Cole Porter’s Kiss Me, Kate. Not unlike Noises Off, the show that immediately preceded it on the Civic’s main stage, Porter’s 1948 musical (with a book by Samuel and Bella Spewack) revolves around a nested play — in this case, Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew — and all the zany backstage drama in which its cast is embroiled. “I am coming to this as a Cole Porter fan,” McNulty says. “I think he is easily among the strongest composer-lyricists in the history of American musical theater, and also in American popular song. The sheer number of standards that he wrote is mind-boggling on its own, and it’s impressive the number of them that are unexpectedly in Kiss Me, Kate.” Thanks to earworms like “Too Darn Hot,” “Tom, Dick or Harry” and “Brush Up Your Shakespeare,” McNulty describes it not only as Porter’s “best-known” musical along with Anything Goes (1934) but a “shining example of his work, because it’s his first integrated musical in which the songs are part of the story, rather than being a collection of songs around which a story is loosely written.” That story and its show-within-a-show conceit “gave [Porter] the opportunity as composer and lyricist to create something really unique,” McNulty says. “Part of what makes the score so engaging is that the audience and the actors are both going back and forth between these worlds — not only within the story but within the score as well. “It creates a lot of interest and diversity that you wouldn’t normally get in other shows from this era,” he says, broadly referring to works such

as Oklahoma!, Annie Get Your Gun and Carousel. McNulty cites the instrumental “Pavane” in the second act as an example of some of the more sophisticated, challenging music. “It alternates between measures of 6/4 and 5/4 and then will throw in a surprise 4/4 bar, so that the next time we’re back to the 6/4, it feels exciting and unexpected. That happens a lot in Kiss Me, Kate. It really keeps you on your toes as a performer and as a listener.” And, it turns out, as a choreographer. McNulty explains that Cartwright “has had to dip into a number of styles herself to match the musical content.” The “courtly” dance of the “Pavane,” for example, plays out in stark contrast to “sultry, jazzy” act two opener “Too Darn Hot.” “The dancers have the same experience with the music as they do as singers,” he says. “There’s a complete physical shift at times, depending on whether they’re in the show within a show or the ‘real’ world of the play.” Along with the 12-member orchestra “to capture the full sound of the score” and the onstage chemistry between “phenomenal leads” Daniel McKeever (as Fred Graham/Petruchio) and Tami Knoell (as Lilli Vanessi/Katharine), the show’s carefully put-together choreography is going to be a big draw, McNulty predicts. “We have some amazing acrobatic performers who are really going to do some surprising things that you don’t expect to see on the community [theater] level — really impressive, strong, technical dancing along with flips and tricks and set-piece moments. It will be a very compelling and memorable experience.” n Kiss Me, Kate • May 19-June 11 • Thu-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm • $24-$32 • Spokane Civic Theatre • 1020 N. Howard • spokanecivictheatre. com • 325-2507


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Home for the summer? Stay on track with summer classes at EWU! ewu.edu/summer | Cheney | Spokane | Online TRAILER Maybe you, like me, are fairly ignorant about World War II history, particularly from any perspective other than the American one. Maybe you, like me, don’t really care about Harry Styles’ acting career, but love pretty much anything Kenneth Branagh does. Maybe you, like me, are willing to give director Christopher Nolan (The Dark Knight, Inception) the benefit of the doubt even if you have an aversion to overblown, overlong historical dramas. The second trailer for war drama DUNKIRK is a beauty, and has me eagerly awaiting its July 21 release. Do yourself a favor and Google it. 

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BOOK

Washington’s Finest A look inside one of the state’s most acclaimed — and far-flung — fine dining locales BY CARA STRICKLAND 32 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017

f you drive two hours north of Seattle and hop onto a ferry, you’ll arrive at Lummi Island, home of the Willows Inn. While the guest rooms are cozy, most people are there for the food. In 2011, the New York Times named this restaurant one of 10 worth an entire plane ride. In 2015, Head Chef Blaine Wetzel was named Best Chef Northwest by the James Beard Foundation. Everything on the menu has been sourced hyperlocally. Wetzel, whose previous position was as a chef de partie at the highly acclaimed noma in Copenhagen (the subject of its own documentary), draws upon the bounty of the Pacific Northwest to create deceptively simple, elegant food — geoduck kebabs, prawn toast and seaweed, yellowfoot mushrooms and sunflower roots — which he serves to small groups of diners. Reservations must be made far in advance, and it’s a significant financial investment. Willows’ tasting menu is $195 per person; if you want wine pairings, it’s an extra $90. Just before Chef Wetzel came on the scene, food and travel writer Joe Ray was attending a wedding at the Willows Inn. He fell into conversation with then-owner Riley Starks, who shared the news of the incoming chef. Although Ray was living in Europe at the time, he stuck around Seattle and became the first journalist on the spot when Wetzel arrived. “He was just starting the kitchen; he was trying to figure out how to rearrange things to make it work, and getting a sense of what the island was like,” recalls Ray. “We went to some of his purveyors, we saw how some of the stuff worked, and then I got to spend the end of the day in the dining room having a meal. Having been in Europe — I had been to noma where he came from, I’d lived in France and wrote about food for 10 years — I could see: there’s nothing like this within 500 miles.” Every time Ray was in Seattle, he’d visit the Willows, continuing to write about it. After a couple of years he suggested a book collaboration, which eventually became Sea and Smoke: Flavors from the Untamed Pacific Northwest, ENTRÉE published in the fall of Get the scoop on local 2015. food news with our weekly It quickly became clear Entrée newsletter. Sign up that such a project would at Inlander.com/newsletter. involve significant time on Lummi. Ray moved to the island for a year just to work on it. He worked in the kitchen and on the farm to get the recipes for the book just right, and wrote several essays intended to illuminate just how much work goes into a dinner at the Willows. “The first half of the book is me telling stories about working in the kitchen, about how they catch these fish, about how they have a little farm just for the restaurant,” says Ray. “There’s so much that goes into making a restaurant that’s this good and this once-in-a-lifetime-y.” He sees the book as a peek behind the curtain: “It’s almost a way to answer the question: why are these places so incredible?” The second half of the book includes the recipes from Ray’s year at the Willows, with commentary from Chef Wetzel. While the dishes might be challenging for the average home cook to attempt, Ray made certain that they were all accurate. The recipes and essays are accompanied by vivid photography of the food and the island. “A book is a way to take a snapshot of the place and show what it’s like there,” says Ray. “Whether it’s with the recipes, whether it’s what Blaine wrote, whether it’s what we worked on together, whether it’s what I wrote — I would hope that it conveys that sense of place the way the food does.”  Sea and Smoke: Flavors from the Untamed Pacific Northwest is available at Auntie’s Bookstore; 402 W. Main, or online at auntiesbooks.com.


FOOD | OPENING

Kitchen Confidence A new North Idaho business promotes healthy cooking and skill building for budding young chefs BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

T

hey may need to stand on tiptoes or use two hands to push the spoon through thick cookie batter, but the KinderCooks students at the newly opened Young Chefs Academy make up for their small size with big enthusiasm. Finley Dupree, for example, is a 5-year-old ponytailed pixie who loves to cook, says mom Kim Dupree, who owns the Blue Plate Cafe in nearby Hayden and cooks with Finley at home. “She’s with her peers,” says Kim, who enrolled Finley in classes six weeks ago to provide structure and social time with like-minded 4-to-6-yearolds. Finley has gained confidence from the classes and by recreating recipes at home for her family. An added bonus, says Kim, is that Finley has become less finicky in her eating: “She has to at least try everything she’s cooked.” Young students are divided into age groups (Kinder, 4-6; Junior, 7-11; Senior, 12-17), paying from $20 to $25 per hour for weekly classes, or $69 to $79 monthly. Special programs include Joey Garcia teaches a class. CARRIE SCOZZARO PHOTO private party sessions and a “master chef” class starting this fall, as well as an upcoming fundraiser to benefit kids with cancer. This summer, Young Chefs offers a series of themed, weekly summer day camps called Camp Can-I-Cook. Weekly class menus are thematic. Reminiscent of Sesame Street, the Kinder class we visited made lemon squares and lemonade. Older kids, meanwhile, are learning about regional Italian cooking, including pici all’aglione (an eggless noodle) and prosciutto e melon from Central Italy. Fun is important at Young Chefs Academy, a chain founded in 2003 by motivated parent Julie Burleson and based in Texas, with 20 locations in the U.S. and one in Canada. The new Hayden location is the first in the Northwest. Franchisees Amber and Joey Garcia’s 10-year-old daughter previously tried YCA classes in California and liked them. “Young Chefs Academy is all about teaching kids the joy and value of cooking in a fun and positive atmosphere,” says Amber Garcia. “With the popularity of all the cooking shows on TV, being a chef and learning how to cook is ‘cool.’ To be a mentor and see our students’ excitement for cooking is rewarding beyond measure.” n Young Chefs Academy • 293 W. Prairie Shopping Center, Hayden, Idaho • Hours vary based on class offerings • coeurdaleneid.youngchefsacademy.com • 208-772-6807

MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 33


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Space Oddity Director Ridley Scott’s third foray into the Alien universe is hardly a resurrection BY ERIC D. SNIDER

T

o watch the Alien prequels — Prometheus planet, a desolate, Earth-like place that’s (2012) and now Alien: Covenant — is probably quite colorful when it’s not being to marvel at the changes in astronaut photographed in steel-gray tones. (The future, hiring practices that must have been impleas usual, is desaturated.) The dead captain’s mented between the earlier chapters and the widow, Daniels (Katherine Waterston), argues later ones. with the new captain about what they should The characters in Ridley Scott’s 1979 do; fans of the Alien franchise will not be original, set in 2124, are competent spacefarsurprised when the correct opinion turns out ers who encounter difficult situations. But the to be the woman’s. Other crew members, people in Prometheus (set in 2093), and even mostly interchangeable, include Karine (Carmore so in Covenant (set in 2104), are clumsy men Ejogo), Upworth (Callie Hernandez), dumbasses who slip in puddles of blood, fire Ricks (Jussie Smollett), Lope (Demián Bechir) their weapons haphazardly, lean face-first into and Faris (Amy Seimetz). Danny McBride unknown organisms, ignore obvious warning plays a pilot named Tennessee, the closest signs, violate safety protocols, and are easily thing to comic relief that the drab film has to deceived by robots. Whatever reforms were offer. made at the Weyland Corporation in the first I’ll let you discover how this is connected two decades of the 22nd century resulted in to the events of Prometheus, which ended much smarter (and, I must say, more chariswith that movie’s surviving female (Noomi matic) employees. Rapace) and David the polite British android The new film, set a decade after Prometheus commandeering an alien ship in search of life. and again directed by Scott, begins aboard Logic suggests that the character who cannot the colonization ship Covenant die is more likely to be in this as it makes its way across part of the story than the one ALIEN: COVENANT who can, so expect the two the universe to a habitable Rated R planet designated Origae-6. Michael Fassbenders to have Directed by Ridley Scott In cryogenic sleep are 2,000 differing views on a robot’s Starring Michael Fassbender, Katherine colonists and 15 crew memplace in society. You may also Waterston, Billy Crudup, Danny McBride bers, while Walter (Michael enjoy the moment when DaFassbender), a cyborg of vid plays a tune on the flute; the same design as David in Prometheus but it’s the musical score from Prometheus, which I upgraded to an American accent and a more guess he saw somehow. opinionated personality, tends to the ship’s Frustratingly, the screenplay (credited to needs. A malfunction causes the crew to wake The Aviator writer John Logan and newcomer up seven years early, except for the captain, Dante Harper) has intriguing ideas that are who burns alive in his pod and is jettisoned swallowed up in the formulaic rehashing of into space. past Alien imagery. For every five minutes of So! We’re off to a good start. The new philosophical conversation about the origins captain, Oram (Billy Crudup), is prickly of life, there are 15 minutes of morons poking and weak, uncertain of his authority. It is at alien things, being infected by them and mentioned two or three times that he’s a man giving birth to CGI monsters that burst from of faith, but that fact never becomes relevant their rib cages. Tense moments are rare and (one assumes there are deleted scenes). mild. No characters are exceptional. We’ve Investigating a rogue transmission, Oram seen all of this before, and even if we hadn’t, and company find a planet near their current Scott keeps telegraphing what’s going to haplocation that seems to be even better for pen next, so that almost none of the things colonization than Origae-6. Wouldn’t hurt to that surprise the characters are surprises to send a landing party down there, see where us. the signal is coming from, check things out, This would be a disappointment as a get eaten by aliens, etc. stand-alone sci-fi horror film. As an entry in Most of the film, then, is set on this the Alien franchise, it’s almost an insult. 

In space, no one can hear you yawn.

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36 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017

Set a decade after Prometheus, this latest Alien adventure finds a crew of scientists sent to populate an Earthlike planet that is — surprise, surprise — inhabited by those chest-bursting, face-hugging creatures we’ve come to know and love. Although it’s directed by Ridley Scott, who jump-started the franchise in 1979, the film is, like its most recent predecessor, filled with questionable character motivations and intriguing ideas that the screenplay simply drops. (ES) Rated R

At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: THE LONG HAUL

The fourth feature adaptation of Jeff Kinney’s popular book series finds title wimpy kid Greg and his family embarking on a predictably disastrous road trip that involves a piglet, a runaway minivan and a video game convention. Mom and Dad are played this time by Alicia Silverstone and Tom Everett Scott, which should make us all feel super old. (NW) Rated PG

CHUCK

EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING

DAVID LYNCH: THE ART LIFE

NORMAN

You’re no doubt familiar with bigscreen boxer Rocky Balboa, but did you know he’s based on a real guy? Liev Schreiber plays scrappy New Jersey fighter Chuck Wepner, who inspired Sylvester Stallone’s iconic role after he unexpectedly lasted 15 rounds against Muhammad Ali in 1975, and who fell on hard times after his boxing career flatlined. Naomi Watts, Elisabeth Moss, Jim Gaffigan and Ron Perlman co-star. (NW) Rated R

Just in time for that Twin Peaks revival (see our cover story), this documentary sits down with the cult series’ cocreator David Lynch to primarily examine his long career as a visual artist. Beginning with Lynch’s nomadic childhood and wrapping up as he’s making his 1977 film Eraserhead, the film is an intriguing look into the mind of a singular storyteller, even if it’s probably only of interest to Lynch completists.

Maddie (Amandla Stenberg, The Hunger Games) is an 18-year-old girl with an autoimmune disease, trapped inside a hermetically sealed suburban fortress. When a cute, adventurous boy (Nick Robinson, Jurassic World) moves in next door, she discovers she’s willing to risk her well-being to explore the outside world with him. The latest in a line of post-Fault in Our Stars teen romances based on YA novels, this one from a bestseller by Nicola Yoon. (NW) Rated PG-13 Richard Gere has received some sterling reviews as the unassuming and enigmatic Norman Oppenheimer, a self-proclaimed “fixer” who networks and glad-hands his way through the upper crust of New York City. When one of his prospects becomes the Prime Minister of Israel, Norman soon finds himself in the middle of a political scandal even he can’t sweet-talk his way out of. (NW) Rated R

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BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

Continuing the trend of remaking its animated classics as live-action features, Disney’s update of its great version of Beauty and the Beast is reverential to a fault. The plot goes more or less unchanged — the bookish Belle (Emma Watson) is taken captive by the horrifying Beast (Dan Stevens), who turns out to be cuddlier than expected — though this script provides more backstory for its central characters. Still, it’s not enough to make you forget the 1991 original, which probably shouldn’t have been monkeyed with in the first place. (SR) Rated PG

BORN IN CHINA

Another family-friendly nature documentary from Disney, this time manufacturing David Attenborough-style narratives around families of pandas, snub-nosed monkeys and snow leopards in various climes of China. Stunning footage and almost impossible levels of cuteness are in store. Narrated by John Krasinski. (NW) Rated G

THE BOSS BABY

The latest from DreamWorks Animation casts Alec Baldwin as an infant who wears a business suit, talks like Jack Donaghy from 30 Rock and offers


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After his sister, a brilliant mathematician, commits suicide, a well-intentioned but somewhat unreliable boat mechanic (Chris Evans) becomes the guardian of her incorrigible 7-year-old daughter. He soon discovers that she, too, is a math prodigy, which is also when the little girl’s estranged grandmother (Lindsay Duncan) turns up to demand custody. Octavia Spencer and Jenny Slate round out the supporting cast. (SR) Rated PG-13

GOING IN STYLE

Oscar winners Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine and Alan Arkin take on roles originated by George Burns, Art Carney and Lee Strasberg in this remake of a 1979 comedy about old dudes who decide they’ve got nothing left to lose and rob a bank. Directed by (of all people) Zach Braff and written by

Summer movie season officially kicks off as Star-Lord and company blast back into theaters, and this brightly colored, exuberantly paced sequel turns out to be just as funny and flashy (if not quite as fresh) as its predecessor. The story this time around — as the Guardians are pursued through space, the ever-smirking ruffian Peter Quill is reunited with his swashbuckler father — is secondary to the action set pieces and the soundtrack of ’70s pop hits, but that’s just fine with us. (SS) Rated PG-13

HOW TO BE A LATIN LOVER

When his much older and much richer wife dumps him, a fading lothario (Eugenio Derbez from Instructions Not Included) is forced to move in with his sister (Salma Hayek) and her nerdy son. The odds are good that he’ll learn what really matters in life. Directed by comic actor Ken Marino and featuring Rob Lowe, Kristen Bell and Raquel Welch in supporting roles, this low-key comedy has been a sleeper hit at the box office. (NW) Rated PG-13

KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD

Here’s something nobody really asked for: Yet another cinematic retelling of the Arthurian myth, this time slathered with a layer of grit and grime and starring ho-hum Charlie Hunnam as the knight of legend. And it’s directed by Guy Ritchie, so expect a whole lotta style with little to no substance. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE LOST CITY OF Z

In the early 20th century, British explorer Percy Fawcett became convinced that a long-dead civilization had once existed deep within the Amazon, and his expeditions to find the place, which he nicknamed “Z,” eventually consumed him. Based on the bestselling nonfiction book by David Grann, this elegantly made, beautifully photographed and ultimately engrossing historical drama feels like it was beamed straight out of the 1950s, creaky tropes and all. It’s worth seeing, particularly on a big screen, but it’s also studious to a fault. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

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Emily Dickinson’s final years are examined in the latest from writer-director Terence Davies, a patiently paced, empathetic character study that avoids many of the pitfalls of traditional artist biopics. Cynthia Nixon delivers a terrific performance as the troubled but brilliant poet, who challenged the status quo and whose work wasn’t fully appreciated until after her death. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE

The third feature in the recent reboot of Peyo’s Belgian cartoon creation jettisons the live-action elements from the last two Smurfs movies and goes all-in on its eye-searing CGI. This time, Smurfette takes off on a mission to discover her purpose in her otherwise all-male village, stumbling upon the secrets of Smurf existence. Regressive gender stereotypes ensue. (MJ) Rated PG

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THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS

Written and directed by Jordan Peele, this psychological thriller tackles the same issues of race and masculinity that were regularly explored on his Comedy Central series Key and Peele. Daniel Kaluuya (Sicario) and Allison Williams (Girls) play an interracial couple who visit her family’s country estate, which he discovers has a curi ous history with its African American staff. A clever, consistently funny racial satire and horror film that mocks white liberal cluelessness and finds humor in (without dismissing) black people’s fears. (ES) Rated R

METACRITIC.COM

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Theodore Melfi, who helmed last year’s Oscar-nominated Hidden Figures. (NW) Rated PG-13

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The Lost City of Z

Dave Eggers’ unsettling novel about privacy and individuality in the 21st century gets a sluggish big-screen treatment. Emma Watson stars as a gogetter who lands a coveted position at a Google-esque internet company called the Circle, only to discover that its mysterious founder (Tom Hanks) values online transparency above all else, even if it means skirting the law. Once the movie arrives at its ending (which deviates from Eggers’ novel), you begin to wonder if it even understands its own message. (NW) Rated PG-13

Just when the Fast and Furious crew thought they were out, they get pulled back in. The team’s eighth go-round finds them re-immersed in the criminal underworld when Dom (Vin Diesel) is seduced by a devious hacker (Charlize Theron), and it’s up to his gang — excuse us, his family — to bring him back from the dark side. F8 (“fate” — get it?) is perhaps the nadir of a seemingly endless franchise, an overstuffed, incoherent jumble of halfbaked plot points and jarring tonal shifts. It’s predictably nonsensical, but it also isn’t any fun. (MJ) Rated PG-13

NEW YORK TIMES

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up such pearls of wisdom as “cookies are for closers only” (because kids sure do love their Glengarry Glen Ross references). But here’s the twist: Baby Baldwin’s antics are all in the mind of his imaginative 7-year-old brother, who’s afraid the arrival of a new sibling will attract all of his parents’ attention. (NW) Rated PG

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Amy Schumer and Goldie Hawn play a mother and daughter who, while on a tropical vacation together, are kidnapped by criminals. Even if this is lousy (and the lack of early reviews suggests it might be), it’ll be nice to see Hawn back on the big screen again — this is her first film role since 2002’s The Banger Sisters — in something resembling the screwball comedies she made in the late ’80s. (NW) Rated R

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Two American soldiers (Aaron TaylorJohnson and John Cena) stationed in Iraq are sent to investigate a deadly attack. When one of the men is shot by a sniper, the other is stuck shielding himself behind a crumbling wall; a standoff develops between him and the unseen gunman. Directed by Doug Liman of The Bourne Identity and Edge of Tomorrow. (NW) Rated R

THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE

Jessica Chastain stars as Antonina Żabiński, who, along with her husband Jan, turned her once-thriving Warsaw Zoo into a safe haven for Polish Jews during WWII. It’s a remarkable true story, most famously documented in Diane Ackerman’s bestselling book, but this adaptation looks to be another handsome Hollywood biopic that was made to win Oscars it won’t ever receive. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13 

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38 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017


THE GOOD TIMES ARE KILLING ME The night Modest Mouse sent me down the wrong road BY JACOB H. FRIES

I

’ve been scarred by Modest Mouse — and not in soda (low on calories, high on drunkenness). a psychological, PTSD, I need a therapy dog and This particular night he’s texting a new prospect prayer sort of way (that would actually be who’s partying with her friends in a bar way sad), but in a midnight run to the ER, sitting up north (might as well be Canada) called Modest Mouse’s in plastic chairs, putting pressure on a wound, Tuesday night show at Fizzie Mulligans. Ben wants us to go there, waiting to get stitched up way (which is less sad and with me being sober, he wants me to the Knitting Factory and kind of funny). drive. is sold out, but we It started, as these things do, with an illI agree to be his designated driver on one couldn’t let their visit advised trip to North Spokane in search of a condition: I get to play my music, as loud as I go unnoticed. girl. want, on the long car ride north. It’s the night before Thanksgiving, which — if you love your family, then you probably don’t know crank up Modest Mouse as I slide behind the wheel — is when people get loaded before having to spend of Ben’s Subaru. I start with the track “Other People’s concentrated time with relatives. My buddy Ben has been Lives” off of their 2000 album Building Nothing Out of doing just that when I meet up with him in downtown Something. It’s one of my favorite songs — frontman Isaac Spokane. This is years ago, and Ben and I had bonded Brock is in usual form: lisping, mumbling, screaming — over our broken hearts, soothing them with vodka and ...continued on next page

I

Isaac Brock and Modest Mouse. BEN MOON PHOTO


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MUSIC | ESSAY “THE GOOD TIMES ARE KILLING ME,” CONTINUED... and the song’s refrain fits our sad sack state of affairs: “Other people’s lives seem more interesting because they ain’t mine.” It’s also a song that, if you ever needed to clear a room, will rapidly send people for the exits: The 7-minute-long opus devolves into screeching guitars set, seemingly, to the rhythm of a fire alarm (“waah, waah”), with ear-piercing drums crashing over the top. In the right mood, pumped to full volume, the song blocks out all other sound and fury in the world and is simply spectacular. The music of noise, I earnestly explain to people holding their ears. Sounds like beached whales screaming for help, Ben says from the passenger seat. Or maybe they’re just screwing each other! Ben thinks himself funny and reaches to skip to the next track. I protest. No way! This is our deal. I’m the D.D. and the DJ. Sure, I could have chosen something else from Modest Mouse’s deep catalog. I’ve known the Issaquah, Washington, band since I was a college kid in Chicago, back in the mid-’90s, and I can recall the first time I saw them perform, in a mostly empty Schubas Tavern in the Windy City. There I was, a kid from Greenacres, Washington, among the 20-some people mesmerized by Brock’s ripping rendition of “Doin’ the Cockroach.” For many years after that — before their commercial, radiofriendly hits made them a household name — I felt they were my band, my secret to share with friends; from my second-story apartment during college, I pointed my speakers out the window, toward the street, whenever I blasted “Talking Shit About a Pretty Sunset” from their ’96 album This is a Long Drive for Someone with Nothing to Think About. But on this particular long drive to Fizzie Mulligans, I have one thing to think about: My friend Ben is an asshole. He’s insisting now that we change the music. Admittedly, I may have picked “Other People’s Lives” as sort of a punishment for him — I really don’t want to shuttle him to see a girl who may or may not be interested in our current brand of stupid — but that’s not the point, and it does nothing to quell my anger. I’m as red-faced as Brock in the song “Shit Luck,” shouting, “This plane is definitely crashing!” I want to turn the car around. I don’t. I wish I did.

W

e arrive at Fizzie Mulligans to find it at capacity, with a line at the door. Ben texts the girl to let her know we’re outside. She couldn’t care less. I want to go home, or at least get a beer, but I’m stuck here, the night before Thanksgiving, in the cold, pissed at my best friend, sober. Behind me, a guy approaches, and rather than get in line, he hops the chest-high wrought iron fence surrounding the bar’s outdoor patio and proceeds inside. A second guy follows. Regulars, I assume. I decide to leave Ben in line and pole vault the fence as well. I take a step or two for momentum and after swinging my legs over, I realize my hand has slid over something razor-sharp. I clench my fist tight as I snake through the bar, to the bathroom, where I run my hand under water. A 2-inch-long gash opens like a flower, gushing blood, and with wadded brown-paper towels, I ball my hand and head to the bartender. Time for a beer. I call Ben, who’s still stranded in line. I’m almost to the door, he insists. Just wait! I stand frozen for a moment in the middle of the bar, my hand clenched in a bloody fist, and loud and happy people buzz by me in a swirl of cheap beer and sweat. I can’t imagine then what will later become of me: the wife, the mortgage, adulthood, fatherhood, the faded scars of youth and the fact that I’d still be listening to Modest Mouse 20 years after I saw them in that empty bar in Chicago. No, all that would dawn on me later. Right now, as I leave Fizzie Mulligans and find Ben marooned outside, I tell him about a different revelation: I need to go to the hospital! n

AllianceforCancerCare_FightingCancerTogether_051817_9U_WT.pdf

40 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017


MUSIC | SINGER-SONGWRITER

Bear with Her

MAY 19 & 20 • 9-4PM Local Vendors • Vintage Treasures • Upcycled Decor & Clothing Garden Art • Jewelry • Handcrafted Furniture • Food & Drink

Kori Ailene brings her ballads of heartache and disenchantment to the Bartlett

Held At:

BY CONNOR DINNISON

“I

’m just sick of hearing my goddamn voice,” Kori Ailene says with a sardonic laugh. The local singer-songwriter, in the throes of promoting her first full-length record Bear with Me, admits she isn’t entirely comfortable in the role of “artist” — the self-mythologizing of social media, the limelight, her presumed eccentricity. And yet for years, she barely made a strum. In 2009, Ailene (born Kori Henderson; Ailene is her middle name) set sail for Hawaii and, though she had just recorded an EP of songs in the bedroom studio of Bartlett co-owner Karli Ingersoll, promptly buried her musical ambitions. “I was just having fun. Not that songwriting is not fun, but you know,” she clarifies with a chuckle. Still, the itch returned with Ailene’s return to the Lilac City in 2012. “I just had songs kind of popping back into my head again,” she says, then pauses. “I had a couple epiphanies, I guess you could say.” Ailene, 29, realized the time was right to turn her songwriting, which amounted to “fiddling around here and there,” into an actual discipline. She hit the live music circuit, playing hourslong sets of covers at bars and breweries where, she claims, “no one is paying attention.” But Ailene’s hard work proved fruitful in solitude, too, when she began crafting an oeuvre of original songs. She was not wanting for raw material. The onset of rheumatoid arthritis, which makes the very act of playing painful, and the dissolution of her marriage presented Ailene with a deep well of inspiration, albeit the gloomy kind. “It takes me a long time to work through things,” she says, “so I have a feeling there will be more songs about [the divorce] on my next record, to be honest.” Bear with Me captures that more indirectly. Recorded with producer Jay Condiotti (the two met at the downtown wine bar LeftBank, where she works and he occasionally performs) at his local J Bones Music studio, the album showcases the emotional weariness of Ailene’s lyrics, a frank acceptance of events through a prism of wry observation and self-deprecation. “I’m going to appointments / I’m hurting on the job / No money in the bank / My wine is in a box,” she sings on “My Sister’s House” over an unadorned acoustic guitar. Bear with Me is studded with such stark and vulnerable admis-

sions that fit the record’s über-minimalist palette: Ailene’s naked voice and folkie finger-picking nimbly spans twee (“Today”) to alt-country (“Whimsy & Wine,” which, per her Facebook page, is about “being really, really goddamn tired”). Although the 10-song set is rife with her own experiences, Ailene hopes the record is relatable and universal, and it’s not hard to hear lines like “let’s not bare our souls” as both a stinging personal rebuke and a witty commentary on an intimacy-phobic culture. It’s a method in the tradition of some of her earliest influences, whom she calls “old-timey singer-songwriters” with a penchant for careful composition, storytelling and poetry.

Spokane singer-songwriter Kori Ailene.

5312 E Deer Park-Milan Rd, Chattaroy

We’ve appointed an independent investigator to look into why our food tastes so good. 1931 W. Pacific Ave. 363-1973 • wedonthaveone.com

APRIL EGLY PHOTO

For Ailene, a self-taught musician who humbly shuns the artist’s cult of personality, it’s not surprising that it’s all about the song. “Performing can be fun,” Ailene says, “but the goal for me, if I continue to pursue this music business, would be to become a songwriter for other artists.” Before she moves behind the scenes or flees to Nashville, however, she’ll be celebrating the release of her new record (now streaming) with a performance at the Bartlett, accompanied by local axeman Lucas Brown. Beyond that, Ailene is mum, revealing that a future career in music is still something of a “latent” dream, obscured by all the possibilities of youth. “Don’t ask me what my plan is,” she sings over the closing chords of Bear with Me. “I just don’t want to grow old.” n Kori Ailene with Liz Rognes and Mark Ward • Fri, May 19 at 8 pm • $5/$8 at the door • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

HIP-HOP T.S THE SOLUTION

T

.S the Solution has been grooming himself into something akin to the Spokane version of Dr. Dre, gathering a collective of Pacific Northwest rappers, producers, engineers and visual artists under the umbrella of his independent record label Panoramic Dreams. That name is illustrative of the group’s primary goal — to assemble artists from different backgrounds and allow them to accommodate their aspirations for hip-hop stardom — and you can see a handful of Panoramic Dreams artists, headlined by the Solution (real name Devonte Pearson), at the Bartlett on Saturday night. The local rap scene doesn’t often get the credit it deserves, but this showcase should prove that it’s undoubtedly thriving. — NATHAN WEINBENDER T.S the Solution with All Star Opera, Lou Era, ExZac Change & Matisse, Wanderers • Sat, May 20 at 9 pm • All-ages • $8 • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

 = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW  = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 05/18

 BABY BAR, Product Lust, Fantasy Suite, Balonely, Salve BARRISTER WINERY, MOWTown Downtown Dance Party, feat. Nu Jack City BEEROCRACY, Open Mic BONNER COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, Lost in the ‘50s: Rock ‘n’ Roll Heaven BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Randy Campbell BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project  BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Harmony Clayton CRAVE, DJ Freaky Fred CRUISERS, Open Mic Jam Slam FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Kicho THE JACKSON ST., Wyatt Wood JOHN’S ALLEY, Who Got Next? HipHop Showcase  KNITTING FACTORY, Odesza THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Big Red Barn LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Evan Denlinger  MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE, Open Mic hosted by Scott Reid NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), PJ Destiny THE OBSERVATORY, Vinyl Meltdown POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Bill Bozly  RED ROOM LOUNGE, Tinnabulation Lineup Announcement, feat. The Fame Riot and Folkinception THE RESERVE, Liquid with DJ Dave THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler

42 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017

PUNK THE CORNER GIRLS

T

he standard stock image representing punk rock is an angry white dude, like Henry Rollins or Ian MacKaye, screaming into a microphone about the ills of society. The Corner Girls are aiming to change that. The self-described “pastel punk” trio from Denver has committed itself to dismantling the patriarchy through one burst of feedback at a time, and, according to their Facebook profile, they’re approaching the genre by ditching “violence and masculinity for unapologetically feminine music.” And if their super lo-fi Bandcamp demo is any indication, their songs are as angry as they are enlightening. — NATHAN WEINBENDER The Corner Girls with Funeral Homies • Tue, May 23 at 9 pm • 21+ • Baby Bar • 827 W. 1st • 847-1234

THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, Spokane River Band   SPOKANE ARENA, Tim McGraw and Faith Hill TIMBER GASTRO PUB, Echo Elysium ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 05/19

  THE BARTLETT, Kori Ailene CD Release Show (see page 41), feat. Liz Rognes and Mark Ward BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BIGFOOT PUB, Usual Suspects BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Sterling BOLO’S, Slow Burn  BONNER COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, Shirley Alston Reeves of The Shirelles, The Crests BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Kosta la Vista CHECKERBOARD BAR, Lust for Glory,

Idol Hands CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Kicho CLEARWATER RIVER CASINO, Zapp CURLEY’S, Chris Rieser and the Nerve THE EMPEROR ROOM, Aphrodite with Stitch Jones, Azon, Akoma FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Nate Ostrander GEM STATE CLUB, JamShack HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, Stella Jones IRON GOAT BREWING CO., You Knew Me When IRON HORSE BAR, Dangerous Type KOOTENAI RIVER BREWING CO., Truck Mills LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Devon Wade MOOSE LOUNGE, Cary Fly Band MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Bill Bozly NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with

Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Dragonfly NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, DJ Patrick NYNE, StepBrothers, DJ JG THE OBSERVATORY, Wake of Humanity, Crooked Cross, Guardian THE PALOMINO, Jacob Vanknowe with Prelude to a Pistol, Dive Bomber, Chaotic Shadows, Burning Clean, Tufnel  THE PIN!, Sweet Rebel D, Jamison Sampson, Luke Stuivenga and Carolyn Drake, Elizabeth Galis THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler RIPPLES RIVERSIDE GRILL, Yesterdayscake RIVELLE’S RIVER GRILL, Wyatt Wood

SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Son of Brad THE SNAKE PIT, Celtic Music feat. Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, The Dapper Devils SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES, Honky Tonk A Go Go STIX, Gladhammer STUDIO 107, A Night of Celtic Fusion ZOLA, Tell the Boys

Saturday, 05/20

  BABY BAR, The Colourflies, Keeper Keeper, Fake News BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE, Son of Brad   THE BARTLETT, T.S the Solution (see above), All Star Opera, Lou Era, ExZac Change & Matisse, Wanderers


BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn   THE BIG DIPPER, Voltalux CD Release, Captains and Cadets, Nurse Ratchett BIGFOOT PUB, Usual Suspects BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Nickolas Stud BOLO’S, Slow Burn  BONNER COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, The Righteous Brothers BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Kosta la Vista CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Kicho CRUISERS, Echo Elysium CURLEY’S, Chris Rieser and the Nerve  DAHMEN BARN, Dan Maher DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Perfect Strangers FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Hannah Rebecca FLAME & CORK, Kyle Swaffard GARLAND PUB & GRILL, The Working Spliffs GEM STATE CLUB, JamShack HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, The Rising Tide

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 HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET, Tommy G  IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Nick Grow, Fun Ladies, Fat Lady, Buffalo Jones, Don and Thomas Thomsen IRON HORSE BAR, Dangerous Type THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke w/James  KNITTING FACTORY, Free the Jester, The Nixon Rodeo, Light Up the Sky, Of Truth LA ROSA CLUB, Open Jam MOOSE LOUNGE, Cary Fly Band MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Wyatt Wood NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Dragonfly NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, DJ Patrick NORTHERN RAIL PUB, Jesse Quandt, Heather Burnside, Gil Rivas NYNE, DJ C-Mad THE OBSERVATORY, Supervillain, Dark White Light, The Wilderness OLD ICE HOUSE PIZZERIA & BAKERY, Truck Mills  THE PIN!, Itt’s Cuzzen POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Echo Elysium THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos RIPPLES RIVERSIDE GRILL, Yesterdayscake THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, DJ Steve Baker SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Ron Greene STIX, My Own Worst Enemy

THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave ZOLA, Tell the Boys

Sunday, 05/21

CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Kyle Swaffard DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Back Road Toad LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam O’DOHERTY’S IRISH GRILLE, Live Irish Music THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Sunday Karaoke Night ZOLA, The Bossame

Monday, 05/22

 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown ZOLA, Evan Dillinger

Tuesday, 05/23

 BABY BAR, The Corner Girls (see facing page), Funeral Homies  THE BARTLETT, Open Mic CHECKERBOARD BAR, All Hail the Yeti, Invidia, Broken Rail, Helldorado, Sins and Sinners, Dirtbag THE EMPEROR ROOM, T.A.S.T.Y with DJs Freaky Fred, Beauflexx   KNITTING FACTORY, Modest Mouse (see page 39) LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday

MIK’S, DJ Brentano THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Open Mic/ Jam Night ZOLA, Whsk&Keys

Wednesday, 05/24  THE BARTLETT, Edison, Sea Giant GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES, Open Mic with Travis Goulding IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Just Plain Darin JOHN’S ALLEY, Clyde & the Milltailers, Bridge City Sinners, Derek Blake LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Karrie O’Neill LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 MOOSE LOUNGE, Gabriel Lee Greene  THE PIN!, Cryptic Wisdom, Slim Rick, Yung JG, The Kid, and more POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE, Nick Grow THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Live Piano RIVELLE’S RIVER GRILL, Jam Night: Truck Mills and guests THE ROADHOUSE, Open Mic with Johnny Qlueless THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave ZOLA, The Bossame

Coming Up ...

 GORGE AMPHITHEATER, Sasquatch! Music Festival, May 26-28  KNITTING FACTORY, NGHTMRE, Beauflexx, May 26  THE BARTLETT, Sir Richard Bishop, Robert Mills, May 26  THE BIG DIPPER, Songsmith Festival, feat. Sammy Eubanks, May 26 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Hell’s Belles, May 27  KNITTING FACTORY, T.I., May 27

NORTHWEST

MUSEUM

ARTS + CULTURE

presents:

150+ regional artists PRINT MEDIA SPONSOR

coeur d’alene park in browne’s addition

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MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 DIAMS DEN • 412 W. Sprague • 934-3640 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE EMPEROR ROOM • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOTEL RL BY RED LION AT THE PARK • 303 W. North River Dr. • 326-8000 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208667-7314 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N. Market St. • 466-9918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 242-8907 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RESERVE • 120 N. Wall • 598-8783 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 43


Test your computer savvy at Spokane Code in the Dark.

CODY SCHROEDER PHOTO

TECH NIGHT OF THE NERDS

Computers are the present, and the future. And as such, coding is fast shedding its “nerdy” career label for a much more cool and hip image. (After all, being smart and innovative never goes out of style.) And whether or not you know the difference between CSS and HTML, or Python and C#, that’s OK. Everyone — noob or pro — is invited to Friday’s locally organized developer competition and party, Code in the Dark. With food, drink, live DJs, black lights and plenty of glow gear, attendees are welcome to compete, or just watch and cheer on their coder friends. Ten contestants at a time will go headto-head in a race to the coding finish line, with the audience voting for the night’s ultimate “Champion of Code.” — CHEY SCOTT Code in the Dark Spokane • Fri, May 19 from 6-11:30 pm • Free • Ages 18+ • Montvale Event Center • 1017 W. First • codeinthedarkspokane.com

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44 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017

COMMUNITY LIFE LEMONS

They say “when life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” But what do you do after you make the lemonade? The Greater Spokane Valley Chamber of Commerce is joining in Lemonade Day, an experience-oriented learning program that teaches kids about business. The program sets out to teach students “how to set a goal, develop a product, create a business plan, develop a marketing strategy, work the plan and achieve their dreams” through a day of running their very own small lemonade business. Nearly 50 businesses and organizations are supporting the program through sponsorships and volunteers, and by providing locations for the pop-up stands. Online registration for youth participants, mentors and volunteers is encouraged leading up to the event. — TUCK CLARRY Lemonade Day • Sat, May 20 from 9 am-5 pm • Spokane Valley, locations vary • greaterspokanevalley.lemonadeday.org • 924-4994

FILM ART OF THE LIVING DEAD

Who among us hasn’t watched an episode of Z Nation and wondered what it would be like to play a zombie on the screen? Now you can find out: The shot-in-Spokane Syfy series is about to film its fourth season, and auditions for a fresh batch of undead ghouls will be held at the Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture, which reportedly will serve as a location in future episodes. (You must be 18 and older to audition, and you must fill out a registration form available on the “Z Nation Zombie Auditions” Facebook page.) And even if zombie-dom isn’t your calling, the MAC opens a Z Nationrelated exhibit on June 10, highlighting the local and regional artists who bring the show to bloody life. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Z Nation Zombie Auditions • Sat, May 20 and Sun, May 21 • Free • Ages 18+ (must pre-register) • The MAC • 2316 W. First • Facebook.com/ZNationZombieAuditions


FILM NONE MORE BLACK

When it comes to quotable movies, This Is Spinal Tap ranks right up there with Star Wars and Monty Python and the Holy Grail. How many times have you heard someone say “It goes to eleven?” Probably too many. What never gets old is watching the actual movie, a pioneering “mockumentary” classic chock-full of laugh-out-loud moments, even from the small characters orbiting the namesake “band” at the story’s center. For Suds and Cinema, you’ll get the movie on the big screen, of course, along with beer from Trickster’s Brewing Co. and free samples of Brain Freeze ice cream. — DAN NAILEN

FIND YOUR HAPPY PLACE

Suds and Cinema: This Is Spinal Tap • Thu, May 18 at 6 pm • $5 • Garland Theater • 924 W. Garland • garlandtheater.com • 327-1050

INDOOR CLIMBING

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COMMUNITY NIGHT LIGHTS

Right on cue, the lilacs around the Inland Northwest are bursting with sweet-smelling blooms in all shades of violet, lavender and creamy white. The culmination of the weeklong Spokane Lilac Festival happens Saturday night with a favorite community event, the 79th annual Torchlight Parade. As many as 300 floats and group entries from across the region will cruise the streets of downtown Spokane, including cavalcades of retired and active duty servicemen and servicewomen, local dignitaries, area high school marching bands and much more. Prime viewing locations along the sidewalks of the parade route fill up quickly, so pack up your lawn chairs, blankets and some snacks for a fun, family-friendly night on the town. — CHEY SCOTT 79th Armed Forces Torchlight Parade • Sat, May 20 at 7:45 pm • Free • Downtown Spokane

MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 45


W I SAW U YOU

RS RS

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU PURPLE LORRAINE MAKES ME SMILE When I pass the the Daiquiri Factory, I remember you in my minds eye. You were soo excited to see the Daiquiri Factory opening, that you got us a commemorative copy of the menu. It makes me smile to remember the new drink names you were going to suggest for their menu - my favorite was the The “Purple Lorraine”. Let’s meet and talk about the good times =) Miss you “Beast Mode” #Q-Laid. BEARDED PLANNED PARENTHOOD BADASS ON BLOOMSDAY! My sister and I admired your pink planned parenthood tee before the race and then I cheered, two miles later, as you flaunted your shirt at the anti-abortion kooks. Wanted to give you hi-fives for 1. your pink tee, 2. your activism and 3. your dexterous backwards running. Hope you had a great race, you sure made mine! A ROSE WITHOUT A THORN Rose from Hill’s: You stopped me as I got off the 44 bus at Sprague & Stevens late on Friday night 4-28 & poured out your heart to a complete stranger. You were in a lot of pain & I have been thinking about you ever since. I hope you’re OK now, but I’d like to be your friend & help make your life better. Please contact me, if only to let me know that you’re

doing OK. Maybe I could be the person who changes everything for you. SNEAKY PEEKY We shared some fun glances at breakfast. You were the stunning long haired brunette in workout/ yoga gear sitting with your friend in the booth. Had to leave when you were away from the table. FANCY, FORGETFUL You: “L.” - polite, friendly, blonde. Me: “J.” - hat, beard and working. I helped you measure your truck bed, but you didn’t come back to pick up your furniture. ( ‘ should have got your number.) I want to take you for a coffee. Come back and get what’s yours.

I SAW YOU MOUSTACHIOED? To the Dad-Hat Mustached One: I don’t think I saw you that day at Indaba. I don’t think you saw me either. While I share your affinity for the sock-Chaco combo, I remember that day as being quite warm. Too warm for my Kirkland signature woolen socks. And next to man buns, I rank mustache-attempts as my second favorite masculine feature. I wouldn’t have missed it. Weeks of waiting and a veil of Inlander ink have left you amorphous in my mind. And still...The possibility of open-toed footwear discussions beckons like a hinkypunk in a swamp. What do we do?

CHEERS BIG THANKS FOR HELP AT SON VOLT SHOW Thanks to everyone who pitched in following my collapse at the Son Volt show: to the man who helped me to my feet and out of the crowd; to the friends who left the show to make sure I was OK; and to those who drove me home. Thanks to the Bartlett staff for their concern and, finally, a big thankyou to the doctor who followed me out, realized I was dehydrated, and stuck around to make sure I drank enough water to get back on my feet. Thanks all; your kindness will not be forgotten.

TO A WONDERFUL COUPLE. THE CAT’S OUT OF THE BAG... about the wonderful email you sent to the Camas Club team members who work the desk. Wow! A friend of ours, whom you let read it first, shared the kind thing you did and your kind words. We both know neither one of you likes high accolades but this couldn’t go unnoticed. You two have hearts of gold. All my years in the business, I don’t remember one single incident in which two guests took the time and initiative to let the representatives know how much they are appreciated. You are one of a kind! Thank you for doing this. Some of the younger generation needs to hear words like yours. With so many employed there, I am sure your letter will be an encour-

CITY COUNCIL FOR ADDING TO GLOBAL WARMING Spokane city council ignores the wishes of the people because they know better what’s best for us. By adding a bottle neck on Monroe the Spokane city council will increase CO2 and contribute to global warming

ridiculous and it makes me sick every time...this is not the time or place for that. NOBODY WANTS YOU THERE so JEERS TO YOU angry protestors!!! And P.S. I am truly sorry about flipping you off repeatedly, I’ll work on it if I see you again. TRASHHANDLER Jeers to the people in the courthouse area who keep donating to the panhandler on Broadway who litters the sidewalk with cigarette butts and garbage. Quit giving him money! He’ll go away. Problem solved. DON’T SHUT DOWN THE CARLYLE CARE CENTER! Pioneer human services, why would you buy the Carlyle

The possibility of open-toed footwear discussions beckons like a hinkypunk in a swamp.

agement and inspiration to them as well as to the rest of the team. So often, as you stated, people like this team are underappreciated and go unrecognized in a job that is often busy, difficult and stressful. Thank you to you two for taking notice! I am sure the Camas Club team will appreciate all your kind words. I know I certainly would. A KIND SOUL AT MARY LOU’S MILK BOTTLE... You are a kind man, and when you heard my daughter’s and nephew’s 3 year old voices, your eyes lit up. We spoke briefly about fatherhood, and you told me a little bit about your own kids when they were small. When you left, you wished us a good day, and moreover, you made my day with your kind gesture of buying our lunch in secret. I genuinely want to thank you for your generosity and kind nature. I wish you the best. SOULFUL APPRECIATION OF ANOTH-

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

46 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017

ER! I would like to take a moment to express the most sincere, heartfelt gratitude to you! Thank you so very much for everything! For being the ray of hope in an other wise cruel world. Your thirst for justice and witty and clever antics are very much appreciated and we’ll received. You are a soul worth knowing and respecting! Thank you!

GW HUNTERS, POST FALLS We are an older couple who were enjoying a lovely dinner when the waitress informed us that our dinners were paid for by someone anonymous. That was an extraordinary experience! Thank you so much to the awesome, generous mystery person. You absolutely made our day!

JEERS BLOOMSDAY HATERS Every year my family and I look forward to the annual Bloomsday run! We go all out for it and truly love this event!! However their is one thing that we cannot stomach during the race...those awful baby signs held by angry screaming protestors. Don’t you know this is a family event!? The last thing anyone wants to talk about with their kids is bloody babies, and why you are all yelling at us (as we rush our children by!!) it’s absolutely

hotel from the city of Spokane and then tell everyone to move out by October?? All of your projects in Seattle are doing great, why would you come to Spokane and ruin people’s lives and not be able to run the Carlyle care center and make the employee payroll? These residents have no family and no where to go! Pioneer human services have failed! So sorry to all the great staff at the Carlyle Care Center. 

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS A R I G A T O

T O N O P U R P C O U S D E

C O F F E E B E A N S

O D O R E S L S T E R S T

B B I G M I S A W T R Y S

L A I T

M A N E R O R E E N A C T S

I R I A K I N T O S H O K I N I M E N G S E O S A N D N I R A P E R A W C K B E I R V T A E A N N

M O W G L I L E M A A N N I I A T A L L

R E L I E V E R

A C T I V E L Y

H O S I E R Y

A F L C I O

L I E D T O

C T S C A N

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

ASSISTANTS UPSCALE YARD SALE The local group’s annual sale features gently-used furniture, decor, women’s and children’s clothing and more; proceeds support local nonprofits. May 19, 8 am-4 pm and May 20, 8 am-noon. At 715 E. 25th, Spokane. COMMUNITY TABLE DINNER An eightcourse seasonal meal prepared by Chef Adam Hegsted. Proceeds support the Inland NW Food Network. May 19, 6-9 pm. $75. The Yards Bruncheon, 1248 W. Summit Pkwy. inwfoodnetwork.org LILAC SERVICES FOR THE BLIND RUMMAGE SALE All proceeds from the event help provide training and adaptive devices that aid vision impaired people. May 20, 8 am-2 pm. Cataldo Catholic School, 455 W. 18th. lilacblind.org SK BALL The annual barn dance features a barbecue dinner, drinks, live music, line dance lessons and more. Proceeds benefit Spokane’s Ronald McDonald House. May 20, 6-11:30 pm. $85. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. rmhcinlandnw.org BITES FOR BRAS A cocktail and small bites event prepared by Chef Travis Dickinson. Proceeds benefit the local nonprofit which provides bras to women in need. May 21, 3-5 pm. $35. Clover, 913 E. Sharp. (995-1295)

Lately. May 18 at 8 pm, May 19-20 at 7:30 and 10:30 pm. $15-$27. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com IMPROV COMEDY NIGHT A night of improv comedy, wine and beer with Lilac City Improv troupe. Ages 21+. May 19, 7-9 pm. $20. Nectar Catering & Events, 120 N. Stevens. nectartastingroom.com SAFARI The Blue Door’s fast-paced, short-form improv show. Rated for mature audiences. Saturdays at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) THE DOPE SHOW A comedy showcase for which comedians joke, then toke, the joke some more. May 21 at 8 pm. $16-$22. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com COMEDY SHOWCASE A monthly event featuring four comics competing for “Best Set.” May 22, 8-10 pm. No cover. The Buzz Coffeehouse, Bar & Lounge, 501 S. Thor. (340-3099) DITCH KIDS BREAKUP SHOW Featuring comedy from Greg Beachler, Missy Narrance, Aaron Morgan Weer and Mika Lahman. May 23, 8 pm. The Observatory, 15 S. Howard. bit.ly/2qoiPl0 RYAN DAVIS The comedian’s internet show has generated more than 100 million views. May 25, 8 pm. $25. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998)

COMEDY

COMMUNITY

JOHN CAPARULO A live show by the comedian perhaps best known as the under-dressed everyman on Chelsea

BIKE EVERYWHERE SPOKANE Spokane’s annual Bike to Work Week runs May 15-19, with a variety of community

events, including Bike Everywhere Day (May 19, from 5-7 pm. See site for complete schedule/details: spokanebikes.org. SPOKANE EDIBLE TREE PROJECT VOLUNTEER KICK-OFF Learn more about volunteer opportunities and celebrate the start of the 2017 harvest season with music, food, and beverages. May 18, 6-8 pm. Free. Saranac Rooftop, 25 W. Main. spokaneedibletreeproject.org CODE IN THE DARK A coding competition and party with a live DJ, a full-host bar and more. See link for details. May 19, 6-11 pm. Free. Ella’s Theater, 1017 W. First. codeinthedarkspokane.com MAY YOU BE BLESSED BARN SALE Shop for vintage/antique items, yard art, jewelry and more. May 19 and 20, 10 am-4 pm. Past Blessings Farm, 8521 N. Orchard Prairie. pastblessingsfarm.com MOMS CLUB OF NORTH SPOKANE OPEN HOUSE Includes a canned food drive, along with a raffle and more. Let the kids play and check out Moms Club. May 19, 10 am-noon. Free. Dwight Merkel Sports Complex, 5701 N. Assembly. bit.ly/2pTgbjF WITNESSES FOR THE CLIMATE Experts speak to the need to defend our right to a healthy climate and that nonviolent direct action is necessary to stop coal and oil trains. May 19, 7-8:30 pm. Free. Community Building, 35 W. Main. directactionspokane.org 79TH ARMED FORCES TORCHLIGHT PARADE The evening parade through downtown Spokane features more than 300mentries, including floats, military groups, marching bands and more. May 20, 7:45 pm. spokanelilacfestival.org

DADS & DUDES NIGHT An evening for fathers and sons to spend quality time together with a variety of sports. May 20, 6-9 pm. $10/pair, $3/additional dudes. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. hubsportscenter.org LEMONADE DAY Businesses around Spokane Valley host kids for this strategic youth entrepreneurship program. May 20. greaterspokanevalley.lemonadeday.org NORTHWEST SPRING FEST The family event includes a livestock show, pony rides, carnival rides, monster trucks, live music and more. May 20-21, 10 am-4 pm. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Gov’t Way. northidahofair.com SPOKANE URBAN AG NETWORK SPRING FLING Learn about local food availability at an event with a petting zoo, live music, urban farming demos and more. May 20, 10 am-2 pm. Free. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th. (838-4277) STRAWBERRY FESTIVAL VINTAGE MARKET A market of antique/vintage goods, local arts & crafts, food and more. May 20, 10 am-5 pm. Free admission. Moran Prairie Grange, 6006 S. Palouse Hwy. bit.ly/2qOeZ6f READING: WEST CENTRAL DIAL-ASTORY PROJECT Hear anonymous stories by Spokane residents read by actors from the Civic Theatre. This event kicks off the West Central Dial-A-Story Project, a collaborative community project designed to share real stories about the West Central neighborhood. May 23, 7-9 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (279-0299)

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MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 47


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess TALE OF WHOA

A dear friend who’s also a co-worker just went through a breakup with her girlfriend, and she’s devastated. I don’t know what to tell her. I’ve tried everything: You dodged a bullet; it’s a blessing in disguise; you’re better off without her; you should get back out there. Everything I say seems to be wrong, and she gets angry. She’s crying and isolating a lot, and I want to help, but I don’t know how. —Clueless

AMY ALKON

Clearly, your heart’s in the right place. However, you might send your mouth on a several-week vacation to a no-talking retreat. Consider that we don’t say to people who are grieving over someone who’s died, “C’mon, think positive! One less person you have to call! And didn’t he live kinda far out of town? Be glad you don’t have to make that schlep anymore!” It helps to bear in mind the theory that evolutionary psychologist and psychiatrist Randolph Nesse has about sadness (and its goth sister, depression): These emotions — like all emotions — have functions. For example, being sad (like about a breakup) leads us to reflect on where we may have gone wrong — and possibly gain insights that will keep us from making return visits to Boohooville. Also, note that not all emotions advertise — that is, have visible outward signs announcing to those around us how we’re feeling. Take envy. When your boss gives your rival the promotion you wanted, there’s no specific facial expression that conveys your longing for a well-targeted meteorite to take her out “Wizard of Oz”-style. However, Nesse suggests that one of the possible evolutionary reasons for the very visible signs of sadness may be to signal to others that we need care — a message that gets sent loud and clear when one is sobbing into the shoulder of the bewildered Office Depot delivery guy. Being mindful that sadness has a job to do should help you stop pressing your friend to see the “good” in “goodbye.” Probably, the kindest thing you can do is to try to be comfortable with her discomfort and just be there for her. Hand her a Kleenex and listen instead of attempting to drag her kicking and screaming to closure: “It’s 10 a.m. Aren’t you overdue for a round of cartwheels?”

FAILURE TO LUNCH

I’m not ready for a relationship now, so I’m having a friends-with-benefits thing with this guy. He typically takes me out to eat before we hook up. However, a couple of times, he had someplace to be right afterward, so he didn’t take me out to eat first. It really bothered me, and I’m not sure why. I know it’s just sex; we’re not dating. But I felt super-disrespected and almost cried later in the evening. I guess I felt used, which is weird because we’re really “using” each other. —Puzzled To a guy, “just sex” is enough. You don’t have to tell him he’s pretty and take him to Yogurtland. Although intellectually, “just sex” is enough for you, too, the problem is your emotions. They might just seem like a sort of wallpaper to add oomph to your mental den, but evolutionary psychologists Leda Cosmides and John Tooby explain that emotions are actually evolved motivational programs. They guide our behavior in the present according to what solved problems that recurred in our ancestral environment. Many of the threats and opportunities they help us manage are universal to male and female humans, thanks to, say, how a hungry bear isn’t all that picky about which sex its double humanburger comes in. However, in the let’s-get-it-on-osphere, there’s only one sex that gets pregnant and stuck with a kid to feed. So women, but not men, evolved to look for signs of a sex partner’s ability and willingness to “invest.” Even today, when that investment isn’t there, female emotions are all “Ahem, missy!” — making you feel bad: hurt, disrespected, used. Wanting to feel better is what motivates you to take corrective action. As anthropologist John Marshall Townsend observed about female subjects from his research: “Even when women voluntarily engaged in casual sex and expressed extremely permissive attitudes, their emotions urged them to test and evaluate investment, detect shirking and false advertising, and remedy deficiencies in investment.” And no, you can’t just plead your case to your emotions with “But I’m using birth control!” Your emotions are running on very old software (predating even those early ‘90s AOL floppies), so as far as they’re concerned, there’s no such thing as sex without possible mommyhood. In other words, if you’re going to make casual sex work for you, you need to see that it works for your emotions. Basically, your body is your temple, and prospective worshippers need to sacrifice a goat to the goddess — or, at the very least, buy the lady a hamburger. n ©2017, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

48 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017

EVENTS | CALENDAR FAKE NEWS MEDIA SALON The Northwest Alliance for Responsible Media hosts an opportunity to come together as a community and discuss how media affects us. May 24, 5:30-7 pm. Free. Community-Minded Television, 104 W. Third. (313-3578) SPOKANE CONTRA DANCE Spokane Folklore Society’s weekly dance, with Out of the Wood playing and caller Nora Scott. Beginner workshop at 7:15 pm. May 24, 7:30-9:30 pm. $5/$7. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. womansclubspokane.org

FILM

REI AT THE MOVIES: EXPEDITION ALASKA This film tells the story of a 7-day, non-stop endurance event that took place through the Alaskan wilderness in the summer of 2015. Presented by the Inland NW Council Boy Scouts. May 18, 7 pm. $10-$12. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404) SUDS & CINEMA: THIS IS SPINAL TAP Includes ice cream from Brain Freeze, beer from Trickster’s Brewing Co. and prizes/giveaways from Horizon Credit Union. Doors at 6, movie at 7 pm. May 18, 6 pm. $5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. bit.ly/2pakpmA EMBRACE: THE MOVIE The Bonner County Human Task Force co-sponsors a screening of this film about body image. May 20, 2-4 pm. Free. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org Z NATION ZOMBIE AUDITIONS The locally-filmed Syfy series is holding auditions open to zombie wannabes; individuals with a passion for acting must be 18 or older, and must fill out a form at the linked address. May 20-21. The MAC, 2316 W. First. form.jotform. com/71198568399174 (456-3931) ROSENCRANTZ & GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD Daniel Radcliffe, Joshua McGuire and David Haig star in Tom Stoppard’s brilliantly funny comedy, broadcast live from The Old Vic theatre. May 21, 2-4 pm. $7-15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. friendsofthebing.org TWELFTH NIGHT Tamsin Greig, star of “Episodes”, transforms Malvolio, the uptight steward of the noblewoman Olivia’s household, into lovelorn housekeeper Malvolia, hopelessly pining for her mistress. May 21, 2-4 pm. $7-$15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. friendsofthebing.org

FOOD

SPOKANE CRAFT BEER WEEK The week-long celebration of craft brewing features daily events with more than 40 regional breweries, including tastings, releases, contests, games, live music and more. Through May 21; complete schedule at spokanecraftbeerweek.com. BLIND WINE TASTING Featuring May’s “Winery of the Month,” Mercer Estate Winery. May 19, 7-9 pm. $20. Nectar Catering & Events, 120 N. Stevens. nectartastingroom.com FLOWER FUSION Celebrate the thaw of winter with a four-course dinner featuring local Washington wine, locally-sourced ingredients, live music, and more. May 21, 4:30-7:30 pm. $55/ adults; $25/12 and under. Mont Lamm Events, 7501 Enoch Rd. (276-7636) MUSHROOM FORAGING & IDENTIFICATION An presentation about foraging for mushrooms and identifying

them. May 22, 6:30 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St. (444-5331) MERCER WINEMAKER DINNER Join acclaimed winemaker Jessica Munnell for a culinary experience featuring Mercer Estates. May 24, 6-8 pm. $60. Nectar Catering and Events, 120 N. Stevens St. nectartastingroom.com (290-5182)

MUSIC

AMERICAN FINGERSTYLE Solo guitarists Peter Janson and Steve Davison, perform in concert. May 19, 7:30-9:30 pm. $20. Prichard Art Gallery, 414 S. Main St., Moscow. (208-885-3586) CRESCENDO SPRING CONCERT The chorus celebrates music from around the world in its final concert of the season. May 19, 7-8 pm. $5/person or $20/ family. St. Stephen’s Episcopal, 5720 S. Perry. crescendocommunitychorus.org MUSICFEST NW HIGHLIGHTS Hear and see some of the best instrumental, vocal and dance performances from Musicfest weeklong festival. May 19, 7:30 pm. Free. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200) WE SING AS ONE The Spokane Area Youth Choirs’ final concert of its 30th season. May 19, 7-8 pm. $6-$10. Westminster Congregational UCC, 411 S. Washington. (624-7992) COWBOY POETRY & WESTERN MUSIC A spring show by the Palouse Country Cowboys Poetry Association, featuring poetry performances and live Western music. May 21, 2 pm. $10. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org CDA SUMMER THEATRE ANNIVERSARY CRUISE Enjoy an evening of history, trivia, anecdotes, drinks, entertainment, and good company. May 25, 6-9 pm. $25. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. cdasummertheatre.com

SPORTS

MAY MANIA PICKLEBALL TOURNEY Includes a round robin format, with six teams in each pool; eight games guaranteed. May 19-20, 9 am-5 pm. $25; plus $5/event. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo. hubsportscenter.org NORTHWEST MOTOCROSS SERIES Come watch rounds 5 and 6 of the racing series. The event is family-friendly and includes opportunities to meet Supercross racers. May 20-21, 10 am-5 pm. $25/both days, $15/day. Airway Motocross Park, 12402 W. Sprague. pacificracingmx.com MAP & COMPASS BASICS Learn basic navigation skills using map and compass to find your way. Sessions at 9 am and noon; women’s only session from 2:30-4:30 pm. May 21. $40-$60. Riverside State Park Bowl & Pitcher, 4427 N. Aubrey L. White Pkwy. rei.com/spokane BEARS IN THE BACKCOUNTRY If you’ve ever looked suspiciously over your shoulder in the back country, wondering if a bear is on your trail join officers from the Washington Dept. of Fish & Wildlife for this class. May 25, 6-7 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St.

THEATER

BEDROOM FARCE Trevor and Susannah, whose marriage is on the rocks, inflict their miseries on their nearest and dearest: three couples whose own relationships are tenuous at best. Through

May 20, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm; also May 18 at 5 pm. $10. Eastern Washington University, 526 Fifth St. facebook.com/ewutheatre (359-2459) THE TAMING OF THE SHREW A performance of the much-loved comedy by William Shakespeare. Through May 21; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $27. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com CASTING FOR MURDER When Aunt Maud is murdered, actress Angela Benson inherits a fortune, and much suspicion. Through May 21; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $12-$14. Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway. igniteonbroadway.org CYT NORTH IDAHO: SNOW WHITE & THE PRINCE 73 students perform a clever retelling of the classic fairy tale. May 19-28; Fri-Sat at 7 pm; Sat-Sun at 3 pm. $9-$15. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cytni.org (208-762-9373) KISS ME, KATE Combine Cole Porter’s music and lyrics with Shakespeare’s The Taming of the Shrew to get one of Broadway’s most endearing shows. May 19-June 11, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $24-$32. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. (325-2507) MCMANUS IN LOVE A performance of this one-man comedy by nationally-renowned humor writer Patrick F. McManus. May 19-20 at 7:30 pm. $20. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 236 S. Union Ave. pendoreilleplayers.org MURDER’S IN THE HEIR The game Clue comes to life in a play. May 19-20 at 6:30 pm. PRIDE Prep, 811 W. Sprague. prideprepschool.org THE ARSONISTS A play by Max Frisch that paints a darkly comedic picture of modern human complacency in the face of terrorism. May 25-June 4; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Spartan Theater at SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu/resources/ SpartanTheatre.aspx (533-3592)

VISUAL ARTS

FEATHER MY NEST A showcase of recent works by local artists that feature a variety of spring-inspired subjects. Through June 10; open house May 18, 4-7 pm. Gallery open Tue-Fri, 1- am-5 pm and Sat 10 am-2 pm. free. Spokane Gallery and Framing, 409 S. Dishman Mica. pacificflywaygallery.blogspot.com ART @ ORIGIN Members of River Ridge Association of Fine Arts host an art fair with demonstrations, plein aire painting, and hands on activities. May 20, 12-4 pm. Free. Origin Church, 5115 S. Freya St. originspokane.org BLOOMIN’ AT THE MOON GARDEN SHOW A special showcase of art and painted flowers to bring the outdoors in. Featuring Betty Bradley and more than a dozen local artisans. May 20, 3-7 pm. Free. New Moon Art Gallery, 1326 E. Sprague. newmoonartgallery.com KALISPEL INDIANS CULTURE An exhibit looking into the historical and cultural way of life of the Kalispel Tribe, curated by Jane Fritz and Gary Weisz, and sponsored by the Idaho Mythweaver. May 20, 10 am-1 pm. Free. At the Priest Lake Library. SFCC FINE ARTS GALLERY PRINT SALE Browse faculty and students’ original art prints, including limited edition series. All prints at or under $20; cash or check only. Funds raised support the SFCC Fine Arts Scholarship


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

Fund. May 22, 11:30 am-3:30 pm and May 23-24, from 8:30 am-3:30 pm. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu CHAISE LONGUE EWU’s annual BFA Senior Exhibition features the work of graduating seniors, in a variety of media and styles. May 25-June 8; opening reception May 25, 6-8 pm; gallery hours Mon-Fri, 9 am-5 pm. Free. EWU Cheney, 526 Fifth St. ewu.edu/cale/programs/art/gallery

WORDS

LOVE & OUTRAGE OPEN MIC Bring your poetry, prose, songs, rants, questions, conversation, outrage, and love to the next Love & Outrage Open Mic. May 18, 6 pm. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. bootsbakery.com (509-703-7223) TAPROOT SPEAKER SERIES: SHARMA SHIELDS The Spokaneauthor of the novel “The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac” tells her story. May 18, 7-9 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. (279-0299) RHYME POETRY WITH TOMMI AROLA Come and enjoy beautiful, funny and even some critical poems from the local poet’s new poetry book “Rhyme Ain’t a Crime.” May 20, noon. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St. spokanelibrary.org SPOKANE POETRY SLAM FEAT. STEPHEN MEADS May’s featured guest has been a fixture in the regional and national slam community for 10+ years. May 22, 7-11 pm. $5. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org (747-2174) CRAZY POLITICS WSU political science professor Cornell Clayton explores how American politics has become an arena for suspicious and angry minds. May 23, 6 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry St. spokanelibrary.org (444-5331) BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series, open to all readers and all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. spokanepoetryslam.org READING: J. ROBERT LENNON, LEYNA KROW, SHAWN VESTAL:J. Robert Lennon reads from his new book “Broken River” with local authors Lenya Krow and Shawn Vestal. May 24, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (509-838-0206) CONNECTING WRITERS WITH HOLLYWOOD A writer’s conference for any stage of the author’s career. Novelists and screenwriters alike are encourage to attend for an opportunity to pitch in person to producers, agents and literary managers. May 25-27. $195. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. cwwh2016.com AN EVENING WITH CHUCK PALAHNIUK The Northwest author speaks and signs books; special book discounts are offered by Auntie’s. May 25, 7 pm. $25. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. bit.ly/2qo72Dk NORTHWEST MILESTONES The role of the military in Idaho, from the Lewis & Clark Expedition to the Farragut Naval Training Station, is the next subject for the local history series. May 25, 7 pm. Free. CdA Library, 702 E. Front. cdalibrary.org n

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MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 49


First cannabis, now hemp?

Hardy Fiber Washington could become a leader in industrial hemp production BY MIKE BOOKEY

O

ne of the many tangential effects caused by cannabis prohibition was the decline of our nation’s industrial hemp industry. There was a time when hemp was grown significantly throughout the United States, used for making everything from clothing to rope to paper. Its history goes back far beyond that, having been found in the clothing of the ancient Mesopo-

tamians dating back to 8,000 BC. But as the War on Drugs ramped up throughout the 20th century, industrial hemp because an innocent victim of sorts. The Controlled Substances Act of 1970 made all cannabis plants, regardless of strain, cultivation techniques or intended uses, illegal. That made hemp illegal to grow, even if the plant has negligible amounts of tetra-

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50 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017

hydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive compound in cannabis. It didn’t prevent the import of industrial hemp, however, and the U.S. brings in about $600 million of the versatile fiber, primarily from China and Canada, according to the Congressional Research Service. This is changing in Washington state, however, after a bill — co-sponsored by far-right Spokane Valley Republican Rep. Matt Shea — was signed into law last month. The law took industrial hemp off the state’s list of controlled substances, opening the door for industrial hemp cultivation in our state. Washington joins seven other states that allow some form of commercial industrial hemp programs. Many other states have authorized research into industrial hemp. As farmers prepare for the first large-scale cultivation of industrial hemp in Washington in close to a century, a group is gathering in Moses Lake on May 24 to discuss how the return of the crop might play out. The Washington Hemp Industries Association, along with other industry groups, is holding a one-day summit at the Best Western in Moses Lake, featuring industry advocates, farming experts and representatives from the state’s Department of Agriculture. The aim of the event is to provide guidance to those looking to enter the fledgling industry. The day includes a hemp planting demonstration, as well as lectures on topics such as scientific research, history and a rundown of the legal issues surrounding industrial hemp. Organizers also hope to dispel myths and misinformation about hemp. To register for the event, visit letsfarmhemp.com. n


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Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a fiveyear sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.


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MAY 18, 2017 INLANDER 53


BOOKENDS When I found a love poem handwritten in 1939 in the front of a Ralph Waldo Emerson book, I tried to find out all I could about its author BY DANIEL WALTERS

T

he poem took thousands of miles, three generations and 78 years to get to me. It took a flood to expose it, an inch and a half of water soaking the carpet in my grandma and grandpa’s basement on Five Mile Prairie. She finds it in the room with the old National Geographic issues: An old edition of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Essays and Representative Men. Grandma knows I like literature, so she gifts me the copy. The book has a soft blue cover, thin yellowed pages, and no copyright date. But it’s what’s written on the first page that grabs me. It’s a handwritten love poem, dated March 18, 1939. And as the poem progresses, it becomes less about attraction and more about the ability of love to transcend time and age. Here’s how it ends: And deeper than all that is seen or heard Time has not power to injure what you are. Weep not for youth when it has ceased to be, But now that all the years can never mar The loveliness that you reveal to me It’s signed “Elof Theodore Olson,” and dedicated to “My Pet — Dawn in the ‘Blue.’” It’s a thrilling find, a sort

54 INLANDER MAY 18, 2017

of time capsule of emotion. It’s like eavesdropping on a romantic confession from nearly eight decades ago. But I want to know more. I want to know who Elof Theodore Olson is. I Google his name, call librarians and look up obituaries. I bike over to the Spokane Public Library, log onto Ancestry.com and begin poring through troves of documents — marriage records, death records, property records, military enlistment records, probate filings, state and federal censuses. In 1939, there are at least two Elof Theodore Olsons alive in America. One is born in Sweden, moves to America, gets married, and spends 60 years living in Geneva, Illinois. He’s 85 in 1960, when he’s hit by a drunk driver and dies. But there’s one more Elof Theodore Olson; he was born in New York. Normally, it would be impossible to tell which Elof Theodore Olson had written the poem. But with the Emerson book, I have his signature.

I

t’s June 5, 1918. The Elof from New York is 21 and thin, with light brown hair and blue eyes. He’s a clerk at A.E. Outerbridge Co., the shipping agency that Mark Twain once used to charter a ship to Bermuda. When he has to sign up for the draft, Elof does so

with a flourish, continuing the line from the final “n” to underline his name. He does the same thing with the “y” in “you” in “The loveliness that you reveal to me” in the poem written 21 years later. The “O” in Olson and the “E” in Elof are nearly identical. It’s got to be the same guy. Gradually, I’m able to piece together snapshots of Elof’s life. It’s 1899. Elof is 2 when his mother, a 25-yearold Swedish immigrant named Ida, marries Charles Zakesio Petersen at a Lutheran church in Brooklyn. Petersen is a machinist, and he’s an immigrant too, from Norway. His first wife has just died in childbirth a few months earlier. It’s 1910. Elof is 12. He’s living in a newly constructed house on 12th Avenue in Brooklyn with nine other people, and his stepdad has been unemployed for nine months. It’s 1915. Elof is 18. His stepdad has found work as a pipefitter, but Elof goes in a different direction. He has a job at the public library. The sort of place, perhaps, where you develop a love for literature, for poetry, for the classics. It’s 1930. Elof is 33, and he’s still unmarried. He’s working as a bookkeeper at an auto supply company. It’s March 18, 1939. Elof is 41. “Chamberlain Denounces Hitler,” the New York Times reports that day. “Hitler is cheered by Vienna as hero.” It’s the day he writes his love poem. Here, the trail goes cold. From all indications on Ancestry.com, Elof’s branch of the family tree ends with his death in October 1965. There are no marriage records, no records of any children. Who his “Dawn in the ‘Blue’” was, or what happened to her, remains unanswered. We do know this: In red and blue ink, a few other phrases are underlined in the Emerson essays themselves. They look to be more recent. One underlined phrase in particular stands out: “The only thing grief has taught me, is to know how shallow it is.” The annotations carry their own arc: A profession of undying love; then, flip through the pages and find a bitter expression of loss. But the story doesn’t quite end there.

I

t’s 2017. Alison Apple is a 58-year-old pharmacist living in Memphis, Tennessee. She’s spent quite a bit of time on Ancestry.com, too. “Once I start going on it, it’s an all-consuming thing,” Apple says. “I just like the investigative piece of it.” She’s dug into the life of her grandfather, a World War I veteran named Charles Augustus Petersen. At one time, he was an accountant for an advertising firm. She has a framed print of a 1935 Camel cigarette ad featuring a testimonial of her grinning grandpa holding a cigarette between his fingers, enthusing that “Camels do not frazzle my nerves or upset my condition.” Apple’s grandpa was Elof’s half-brother. They lived together in the house on 12th Avenue in Brooklyn. Somehow, the Emerson book ends up in the library of a farmhouse in Warrensburg, Missouri. When my grandpa and grandma leave Missouri in 1967, they take the Emerson book with them. A half-century later I’m given the book, find the inscription, and hunt down Apple by finding her sister on Facebook. I spend a half-hour chatting with Apple by phone about her family, her memories and her passion for discovering her own history. When we’re done talking, I send a cellphone pic of the poem over to Apple, bringing it all full circle. Because here’s the epigraph: Love dies. So do the men who profess it. But the words themselves, the grand pronouncements we write, can survive for centuries. And all the years can never mar the loveliness they reveal. n danielw@inlander.com


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