Page 1

Winery Map PULLOUT

PAGE 28

MAY 11-17, 2017 | DRINK LOCAL!

page 24 AMERICAN REDOUBT

CLASSICAL

LAST WORD

PAGE 18

PAGE 31

PAGE 54

Despite Trump’s presidency, preppers predict collapse

The Spokane Symphony takes on Led Zeppelin

Righting life’s little wrongs


Preparing you for a home upgrade before the clutter takes over.

Wisdom. Vision. Passion. Strength.

Let a Watrustologist help you make your next move. Visit watrust.com/homeloans to find a loan officer.

2 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017


INSIDE VOL. 24, NO. 30 | COVER DESIGN: ALI BLACKWOOD

COMMENT NEWS COVER CULTURE

5 13 24 31

FOOD FILM MUSIC EVENTS

34 37 41 44

I SAW YOU GREEN ZONE ADVICE GODDESS LAST WORD

LIC# RRHEAA*106BW

46 48 52 54

EDITOR’S NOTE

I

n my house, we drink local. Indeed, I’m mocked if I offhandedly suggest we try a wine from Italy or California. “No,” my wife reminds me, “we only drink Washington wines.” Apparently, we’re not the only ones. The 2016 growing season yielded 270,000 tons of grapes for the state’s 900-some wineries. And, as John Allen, co-owner of Vino! A Wine Shop, tells us: “Wine has become a far more common part of people’s life in Washington. It’s part of our agriculture and our economy, and our social life.” Read more about Washington’s wines, how to taste them, how to talk about them and where you can find them locally; coverage begins on page 24. Be sure to hold onto the winery map on page 28, available just in time for this weekend’s Spring Release events, when local wineries throw open their doors to the public and share with us their latest offerings, along with music, art and food. What better way to celebrate moms than raising a glass in their honor? — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

Eat. Drink. Be Majestic. featuring wines curated from our region and beyond ...

DOWNTOWN SPOKANE • 110 S MONROE ST (509) 309-3698 • WWW.GILDEDUNICORN.COM

LOVE WINS PAGE 8

RALLY CRY PAGE 33

Schedule your cleaning today!

*RESTRICTIONS APPLY. CARPET MAX. ROOM SIZE 250 SQ.FT. CALL FOR DETAILS. EXPIRES 05/31/17.

PURE POETRY PAGE 37

CARPET CLEANING

PER ROOM

(509) 922-5326 www.zerorezspokane.com

BEATS, RHYMES AND LIFE PAGE 41

INLANDER SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO • INLANDER.COM 1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, SPOKANE, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 | EMAIL: INFO@INLANDER.COM

THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. It’s printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x213 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email justinh@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2017, Inland Publications, Inc.

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 3


INLANDER MUSIC FESTIVAL FOR ALL

2017 LINEUP

BUILT TO SPILL

CHASTITY BELT SHAWN JAMES AND THE SHAPESHIFTERS BLOSSOM LITHICS MOTOPONY SMALL MILLION NACHO PICASSO SCARLET PARKE MYKE BOGAN LIÈ CATHEDRAL PEARLS RAS KASS J GRGRY FOLKINCEPTION WEEKNITES VERSING DREAMDECAY GODDAMNEDANIMALS WOOLEN MEN WINDOE SLUG CHRIST MALL WALK

100 BANDS 9 VENUES & 1 OUTDOOR STAGE

JUNE 2-3, 2017 DOWNTOWN SPOKANE

5: Volume Marketing || Line Up/Buy Wristband: ROP: 20 S: KS

FAT LADY CHOIR BOY ECHOLARKS BELT OF VAPOR THE DAPPER DEVILS TECH TAX TRASH DOGS SUMMER IN SIBERIA NOBODIES KALAJ SIR COYLER & HIS ASTHMATIC BAND SOUL IPSUM ROT MONGER THE DIRTY MOOGS CHARLATAN MONUMENTS S1UGS MISCOMINGS

TENDER AGE UNWED SAILOR TWO MOONS ABRAHAM & THE OLD GODS HONEY BUCKET WATER MONSTER BROTHA NATURE SUPERVILLAIN CATTYWOMP PERU RESH DEER THE SOUTH HILL NAT PARK & THE TUNNELS OF LOVE ASKEVAULT LUCKY CHASE CRIMEWAVE THE HALLOWS RUNAWAY OCTOPUS LOCAL PAVLOV DARK WHITE LIGHT SUPER SPARKLE THE DANCING PLAGUE OF 1518 BALONELY FOREST LINES SCATTERBOX NARROW MINDED KORI AILENE DRY AND DUSTY VIOLET CATASTROPHE OUTERCOURSE SIX STATE BENDER LUST FOR GLORY INFRABLASTER JAN FRANCISCO MINI

VOLUME.INLANDER.COM

ON SALE NOW

$25 IN ADVANCE // $35 AT FESTIVAL

MURDERS EMPTY EYES BUFFALO JONES ZAN BLACKTRACKS BANDIT TRAIN STREET TANG SALVE THE COLOURFLIES LITTLE WOLF COLD BLOODED DARIO RÈ THE EMILYS ITCHY KITTY MAIDENHAIR POP GODDESS ATHENA DYLAN HATHAWAY DJ ZOZI DJ CASE DJ C-MAD TWIN TOWERS


COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

Michael Mahoney (x279) COPY CHIEF

DO YOU PREFER RED WINE OR WHITE WINE? GREG SHELMAN

Red wine, definitely. To me, it’s the true wine. What do you look for in a wine? Balance. I don’t try to do the über-highalcohol wines. With lower alcohol, it doesn’t overpower everything else. The bigger-alcohol wines will actually taste “hot.”

Dan Nailen (x239) Chey Scott (x225) FOOD & LISTINGS EDITOR FILM & MUSIC EDITOR

Derek Harrison (x248) ART DIRECTOR

Wilson Criscione (x282), Mitch Ryals (x237), Daniel Walters (x263), Samantha Wohlfeil (x234) STAFF WRITERS

Young Kwak PHOTOGRAPHER

Caleb Walsh

CONTRIBUTORS

Tuck Clarry INTERN

ADVERTISING SALES Kristi Gotzian (x215)

JOSH WADE

Red wine. I get more of the subtle intricacies between every glass, and I get the full bodyness of it. [It] tends to fit in more [with] what I’ve been eating as well. What do you look for in a wine? I like something a little darker and leathery; spicy, like pepper spice. I also love a wine that costs $15, but tastes like it’s worth $40.

White. I like it dry, crisp, with a little bit of fruit. What do you look for in a wine? Price. I think there’s a lot of great bottles out there that you can find for $10. I always try something different, at Nectar or at the store. Typically I like French wines.

Get the second treatment for $99

Special offers must be booked by 05/31/17. Coupons may not be used for specials

PAYMENT OPTIONS AVAILABLE

SAFE ALL S FOR TYPEKIN S!

ORANGELICIOUS GOLDEN ALE BREWED WITH VANILL A BEAN AND OR ANGE PEEL

TRY IT IN THE TAP ROOM

SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Kristina Smith (x223) MARKETING DIRECTOR

All Bikini Packages 50% OFF The Perfect Peel $189

CHRISTINA CLARK

Carolyn Padgham-Walker (x214), Emily Walden (x260)

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Lip, Chin, Front or back of neck, or underarms. Packages include 8 treatments.

Laser Hair Removal for All Skin types, Spider Vein Removal, Brown Pigment Removal, Spa Facials, Chemical Peels, Collagen Rejuvenation/Skin Tightening, Microdermabrasions, Botox, Kybella, Juvederm, Voluma, Professional Teeth Whitening

ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Autumn Adrian (x251), Mary Bookey (x216), Gail Golden (x236), Jeanne Inman (x235), Claire Price (x217), Wanda Tashoff (x222)

Pigment or Spider Vein Removal for the Face Skin Tightening for the Face, Eyes, mid face, or jaw line Laser Hair Removal for a small area

10% off any filler

ILLUSTRATOR

Amy Alkon, Mike Bookey, Adam Boyd, Celia Darrough, Tara Dowd, Carrie Scozzaro, George Nethercutt, Cara Strickland

(reg. $300-$600)

Teeth Whitening $89 (reg. $149) Spa Facial $69 (reg.$89)

DIGITAL & PROJECTS EDITOR

Nathan Weinbender (x250)

ANY OF THESE for only $149!!!

PATSY DAY

Red. Most of them are mellow and full-bodied, so comfortable in a way. Do you have a winery that you enjoy? If I had my druthers, I’d pick Townshend.

PRODUCTION & SUPPORT

BUY IT IN THE STORE REQUEST IT AT THE BAR

Wayne Hunt (x232) PRODUCTION MANAGER Alissia Blackwood Mead (x228), Derrick King (x238), Jessie Hynes (x205), Tom Stover (x265) GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Justin Hynes (x226) DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Kati Bronson (x247) EVENTS AND PROMOTIONS Camryn Barker (x242) ADVERTISING SUPPORT

DEBBIE CORRICK

Red. It used to be white, but I got burned out on white. What do you look for in a wine? Something new and different. I like Pinots usually.

OPERATIONS Dee Ann Cook (x211) BUSINESS MANAGER Kristin Wagner (x210) ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

S M A L L B ATC H HAN DCRAFTE D B E E R

INTERVIEWS BY TUCK CLARRY KENDALL YARDS, 5/5/17

1017 W 1ST AVE || ORLISONBREWING.COM 4PM-9PM TUE-THU || 2PM-CLOSE FRI-SAT

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 5


Got Scrap? Get Cash y FASTy Top Prices - Honest Weight

WE PAY FOR: Aluminum Cans & Scrap y Copper y Brass y Radiators

Insulated Copper Wire y Stainless y Gold y Silver y & much more!

COMMENT | ELECTIONS

What’s In Their Wallet? There’s too much money in politics, and only voters can reverse the trend

SEE HOW MUCH WE PAY AT:

www.actionrecycling.com

509-483-4094

* In accordance with WA state law

911 E Marietta Ave • Spokane WA

South of Foothills Dr. / East of Hamilton

FIRE. KIDS. SHARP STICKS. WHAT COULD GO WRONG? Kootenai Urgent Care HAYDEN • COEUR D’ ALENE • POST FALLS

IF YOU HAVE A LESS THAN LIFE-THREATENING CONDITION, VISIT ONE OF OUR THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS IN COEUR D’ALENE, POST FALLS OR HAYDEN.

AVERAGE WAIT TIME IS 15 MINUTES OR LESS VISITS TAKE LESS THAN AN HOUR EXPERIENCED MEDICAL PROVIDERS FAST, PROFESSIONAL AND EXTREMELY AFFORDABLE OPEN 7AM-9PM DAILY • NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED

CDA | 208.667.9110 | 700 IRONWOOD DRIVE, SUITE 120E HAYDEN | 208.772.9110 | 566 W. PRAIRIE AVE. POST FALLS | 208.777.9110 | 1300 E. MULLAN AVE., SUITE 600

W W W. K O O T E N A I U R G E N T C A R E . C O M

6 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

BY GEORGE NETHERCUTT

S

omething’s wrong with politics in 2017. Too much money is being raised for congressional elections. And all that money doesn’t guarantee quality elected officials. The latest example of excess spending is Georgia’s 6th District special election to replace Rep. Tom Price, now secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services. Democratic frontrunner Jon Ossoff, a 30-year-old former congressional aide, won 48.1 percent of the vote last month — not quite the 50 percent needed to prevent a runoff between the two top vote-getters under Georgia law. He’ll face Republican Karen Handel, who received 19.8 percent of the vote among 11 Republicans in a traditional GOP district, on June 20. Ossoff raised more than $8 million, mostly from nonresidents of the 6th District. Handel raised more than $2 million in Republican money. Money has now become almighty, as too many candidates spend their time raising campaign cash, especially incumbents — many of whom spend much of their time away from official congressional duties to fundraise. As a result, 95 percent of all incumbent representatives and senators are re-elected. Meanwhile, as more campaign money is raised and spent, citizens are getting lesser-quality candidates, who care less about effective representation and more about their re-election, all because election money is too often deemed more important than ideas or wisdom in politics.

er didn’t need to match the incumbent dollar for dollar; he only needed to raise enough to get out his message — of change and distinguishing the incumbent’s voting record from the challenger’s policy positions. Ideas, debates and public exposure were more important then than money raised, though any candidate must be able to show some public support through fundraising. In the 2016 presidential election, winning candidate Donald Trump spent less money but expended more sweat equity than his opponent,

“There was a time when personal qualities such as wisdom, local involvement and achievements played a bigger part in a voter’s trust than money raised…”

T

oday, your value in Congress is related to money raised for the party leadership. In order to remain on an important congressional committee, members are expected to raise funds for their party leadership in Congress. Too often, congressional leaders establish political action committees to raise extra, massive amounts of money for themselves that can also be given to other congressional leaders for their re-election efforts, with the understanding that congressional donors will benefit from such contributions. Or sitting members will hit up their top donors to give extra money, so that members can support other members’ candidacies. Ideally, money won’t play as big a part in congressional representation in the future as it does today. There was a time in the past when personal qualities such as wisdom, local involvement and achievements played a bigger part in a voter’s trust than money raised by a candidate. In 1994, when a sitting Speaker of the House was defeated for the first time since 1860, the winning candidate raised $750,000, compared to the Speaker’s war chest of $4.5 million. The challeng-

who seemed to take for granted the inevitability of her election. Hillary Clinton failed to visit key states to show she cared about the voters there. Trump’s election strategy saw him doing so; in the end, he surprised the experts and pollsters.

T

he likelihood is that in Georgia’s historically Republican 6th District, the candidate spending the most money may not win, despite such a strong primary election showing. A runoff will help Republicans marshal enough voters to win on June 20. Voters there will likely discover that the Democratic candidate doesn’t live in the district, has raised most of his campaign cash from outside Georgia and is taking liberal positions that don’t comport with their views. Being anti-Trump likely won’t carry the day for Jon Ossoff. Even though Georgia’s 6th District campaign appears money-driven, not idea-driven, that district’s voters may be able to start a national trend that puts campaign ideas ahead of campaign money, sparking a return to the days when the quality of candidates, their ability to craft legislative solutions to national problems, and their ability to persuade other members to ideas that are in the national interest mattered most. If so, then the polarization so evident in today’s politics may ebb, fostering a return to a time when ideas in politics and high-quality candidates were more important than the amount of campaign cash a candidate could collect. 


DO SOMETHING!

MayFest runs Friday and Saturday.

Cheney MayFest

The annual community festival in downtown Cheney features live music, craft vendors, a car show, petting zoo, kids activities, artists, a cornhole tourney and more. Free. Fri, May 12 from 7-10:30 pm; Sat, May 13 from 9 am-4 pm. More details at cheneymayfest.org

NORTH IDAHO VETERANS STAND DOWN

The 24th annual event kicks off a program created by St. Vincent de Paul to assist veterans and their families in Eastern Washington and the five Northern Idaho counties with services throughout the year. Free to active duty and military veterans and their families. Sat, May 13 from 8 am-3 pm. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way, Coeur d’Alene. stvincentdepaulcda.org (208-664-3095)

MOTHER’S DAY CARD WORKSHOP

On Qualifying iComfort® or iComfort Hybrid models with a Queen or King set price of $1,999 and above. See store for details

Get a Pivot Adjustable Frame For The Price Of The Box Spring!

Kids of all ages are invited to join Spokane Public Library staff to make Mother’s Day cards for the special women in your life. Bring your creativity; the library will supply the paper, scissors and glue. Free, offered all day on Sat, May 13 at all SPL branches. Details at spokanelibrary.org

KIDICAL MASS

Join this family-friendly community bike ride of about 3 miles, cycling on anything that rolls — all types of bikes, trailers, Xtracycles, bakfiets, tandems, folding bikes and trikes are welcome. The route winds through the Chief Garry neighborhood in East Spokane. Free. Sat, May 13 from 1-2:30 pm. Chief Garry Park, 2701 E. Sinto. Summerparkways.com  Tell us about your event or other opportunities to get involved. Submit events at Inlander.com/getlisted or email getlisted@inlander.com.

While Supplies Last! Spokane 15 E. Boone Ave. 509.326.1600

JEN SORENSON CARTOON

“Where Quality Just Costs Less”

Spokane Valley 14214 E. Sprague 509.928.2485

Sandpoint 210 Bonner Mall Way 208.255.5796

Coeur d’Alene 7224 N. Government Way 208.762.7200

Moses Lake 117 W Broadway 509.765.9766

Find us on

28th Annual Mother’s Day Tour Saturday, May 13, and Sunday, May 14, 2017 12 p.m. – 5 p.m.

$20/ticket ($15 for museum members) Tickets at northwestmuseum.org until May 12 or Museum admissions desk May 9-12 Glover Mansion or VERA Water and Power May 13, 14 Sponsored in part by Authentic Restoration Services, Inc.

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | PREJUDICE

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Love Wins Hateful graffiti rooted in ignorance and fear has no chance against love BY TARA DOWD

I

n a world of Trumpism, we must love each other and ourselves. There is literally nothing else that will change the future of our country more than those simple acts. When someone wrote words of hatred on the walls of a preschool in our city, the staff and community came together and prayed for the individual with such hate in their heart. Last week, the Salish School of Spokane, a language immersion school and preschool, was the most recent target in a stream of hate throughout our community since

$

Beef or Chicken, Refried Beans and Salsa, Mixed Onions, Black Olives, Roma Tomatoes, Zesty Taco Seasoning and WholeMilk Mozzarella on our Original Crust

Trump’s election. The first attack was against the Martin Luther King, Jr. Family Outreach Center — another preschool — in November, where perpetrators tagged the N-word next to the playground. Our community showed up and stood firm against acts of such hatred. I saw the pain and tears it caused grown men to shed. I saw it strengthen the resolve of Freda Gandy, the center’s executive director, into an unstoppable force to continue to create the kind of loving and supportive environment that the children of our community deserve. There was no doubt that such an act of hate did nothing but increase our love for each other. There have been other acts of hate — including anti-

JUST

10

MAY 19 & 20 • 9-4PM Local Vendors • Vintage Treasures • Upcycled Decor & Clothing Garden Art • Jewelry • Handcrafted Furniture • Food & Drink

Held At:

Semitic rhetoric at the Community Building that houses the Spokane NAACP, the Peace and Justice Action League of Spokane and the Center for Justice. Similar hateful rhetoric was posted at the Spokane County Democratic offices not long before that. Each time, our community has come together to stand against such bullying. Elders and cultural leaders showed up to rally at the Salish School, along with hundreds of others. As they always have, the elders shared their language in prayer, and in solidarity with the rest of the community. Most important, they shared forgiveness and love with not only the person responsible, but also the idea behind the hateful language. But as one speaker pointed out, our community can keep coming together against this hate, but it’s not enough if we don’t do something about it every day. Showing up on a Saturday to rally is great. Feeling bad about what happened and donating to any of these organizations is also very helpful. But really, those things are easy. What we really need is for people to challenge the racism and ideals ingrained in our systems and in our everyday life. The stark reality is that we need white people to step up to eradicate the systems of oppression that started with the genocide of millions of Native LETTERS Americans and slavery Send comments to of Africans, and still editor@inlander.com. continue today in our justice system, our education system, even our real estate system. All of us must actively end systemic racism. So the question is, what will it take for each of you to realize that the system gives you privileges denied people with a different skin tone or ethnic background? What will it take for you to realize that the system can and will change if you help? I ask these questions because the words spray-painted on the walls of two of our preschools hurt. The intentions behind the words hurt. But what hurts more is the systemic racism that has been allowed to thrive for more than 500 years. Don’t get me wrong: This is disheartening, but it is not paralyzing. If there is anything to be learned about the history of our country, it’s that communities of color have a way of surviving, then thriving. And that’s what we will do. And while we do it, we will show that love wins against everything. Loving each other is more powerful than any hatred. Now, if only you would believe us. n Tara Dowd, an enrolled Inupiaq Eskimo, owns a diversity consulting business and is an advocate for systemic equity.

NEED TREE SERVICE? • Free Estimates • Safe Affordable Tree Service • High Quality Pruning & Tree Removal

L ARGE

10% OFF JOBS BOOKED BEFORE MAY 15TH

Offer valid 4/24/17-5/28/17. Offer valid on Large Taco Grande pizza on Original Crust only. No substitutions. Additional charge for additional toppings. Available at participating locations. Not valid with any other offers.

CAMERA READY

8 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

5312 E Deer Park-Milan Rd, Chattaroy

CALL SCOTT AT 509-998-2771


DRIVE IT LIKE YOU WON IT. RIDING MOWER-A-DAY GIVEAWAY / MAY 1-31 Mow your heart out this May because we’re giving away 31 Husqvarna riding lawn mowers valued at $1,499 each! Stop by each day for one free entry for that night’s 7pm giveaway. Then, check back at the Camas Rewards Center or on Facebook to see if you’ve won and claim your prize by June 9. Details at northernquest.com

Northern Quest is committed to supporting responsible gaming. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call the Washington State Problem Gambling Helpline at 800.547.6133 or Camas Path at 509.789.7630.

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 9


R I A F B JO K H Q / Wo

rkS ource

, 2017 7 1 y a M , ay Wednesd– 2:00PM 11:00AM vention Center Co n Spok ane a n e Fa ll s B lv d 4 W Spok 33

ission Free adm

.c w w w.k hq

for job se

ekers!

om/jobfa

ir

The

FLAVORFUL General Mustard

The SAWDC is an equal opportunity employer and provider of employment and training services. Auxiliary aids and services are available upon request to persons with disabilities. Washington Relay Service: 711. This event is wheelchair accessible.

10 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

dine in . take out

Northtown Mall • 483-1500 • MustardSeedWeb.com


COMMENT | FROM READERS ALANA DIANE: If this happens then maybe people will realize oil is not the future, but the past. LANCELOT LEONES: Holy journalistic tripe and media sensationalism. Nothing like pandering to the left’s illogical alternate reality. GLENN BLACKMORE: FYI the plan is to let Spokane burn. All of you right-wingers, simply Google oil train spill and fire to see what DOES happen with these trains. DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

Readers react to “Boom Town” (5/4/17), our cover story about the potential disaster of an oil-train explosion in Spokane, and what activists and politicians are doing to prevent it. Readers react to “Usual Suspects” (5/4/17), our story about local Republicans jostling for position to move up the political ladder.

JOEL ROWBOTHAM: To those of you saying this is leftist garbage, look at the information and statistics. In the last 7 years there’s been 9 train derailments involving cars that carried crude and/or natural gas in the U.S. alone that have resulted in oil spills, fires and explosions. The massive increase in these incidents is because the U.S. has been trying to break its dependence upon foreign oil through fracking, tar sands, and more drilling in the U.S. This means more oil and gas is being transported in the U.S. The scary part is the rail companies couldn’t make enough of the newer and tougher model cars to carry the crude and gas fast enough to meet demand, so they were pressured into pulling older, more accidentprone models back into service. And that’s causing problems. This is a real threat to Spokane because train cars carrying crude and gas from the Midwest go right through downtown Spokane on their way to refineries in Seattle. 

NATHAN JEFFRIES: Storm is coming. ISAAC JACK JR.: All suspicious shady characters. Motives seem to be manipulation and financial gain. Good to have higher expectations than with culprits. BOB NIHILISM: This is why [Prosecutor Larry] Haskell won’t charge a mentally ill combat vet who shot at Gonzaga ball players in a drive-by. One, it challenges the NRA and Trump admin giving mentally ill vets gun rights back and it makes the VA look like crap because they didn’t serve this guy. He’s the worst kind of self-serving hack — he risks the public’s safety over his own ambitions. HASK L. ANNE: Pretty brazen comments from people who clearly have zero facts on anything going on in our county government. 

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 11


INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Cast of the Something Rotten! National Tour. © Jeremy Daniel

These shows are included in the 2017 - 2018 SEASON PACKAGE:

October 3 - 7

Nov. 30 – Dec. 3

January 24 - 28

March 22 - 25

April 26 - 29

Starring JAMIE FARR, KLINGER from TV’s M*A*S*H

October 15

November 14

BUY SEASON TICKETS 12 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

November 17

November 18

wcebroadway.com 800.843.4667

December 5 - 6

December 13

TICKETSWEST BOX OFFICE 720 W. Mallon Ave., Spokane Hours: Mon.- Fri., 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM


Ursula Heflick, who works part-time at the Carlyle, says she’s standing up for residents.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

HEALTH

UNCERTAIN FUTURE Carlyle Care Center will no longer serve the mentally ill, leaving the question: Where will they go? BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

W

hen staff and case managers at the Carlyle Care Center pulled everyone into a meeting area in late April, handed out donuts and informed residents that by Halloween the facility would no longer serve folks like them — mostly people with chronic mental illness — the reactions varied. Some residents cried, some didn’t understand what was going on, some thought it was cool and talked about how they might move out and buy a big-screen TV, says Ursula Heflick, who works a few hours a month at the facility. Others asked, “Where do I go? Where do I go?” Some were later taken to the hospital after saying they were thinking about suicide, she says. They were told the building — located downtown, at Post and Second — would transition from assisted living to some sort of supportive housing facility for people coming out of prison. Medicaid rates haven’t kept pace with the cost of providing intensive care, and the nonprofit that runs the Carlyle, Pioneer Human Services, was founded to help people transitioning from prison back into the community, so the shift would align the facility more with Pioneer’s mission, spokeswoman Hilary Young tells the Inlander. A few of the Carlyle’s current 107 residents (the facility can house up to 127) say they felt blindsided. Standing outside of the Carlyle a week after the news, drinking a can of soda, 28-year-old Victor Chatman says he was shocked when the residents learned the news. “I thought it was good news. Then they dropped a bomb on us: I have to move,” Chatman says. He’d just moved into the Carlyle a few weeks earlier, after he says he had issues in two group-home settings. Chatman says he

had a stroke when he was a baby that resulted in complications that still affect him. He expected to live at the Carlyle for a long time. “I won’t get to have my first Thanksgiving or Christmas here. I’ll miss the staff.” Another resident, who asked to go only by Anthony, says he couldn’t believe the news, or the way it was delivered. “They called us all in, they’re passing out sweets, what a joke that is,” Anthony says. “For a couple days people were so quiet, like I’ve never heard it before.” And many of the 65 staff members were upset, too. Heflick says she took the microphone after hearing what would happen. “I told them that it is unethical to take the home of these chronically mentally ill persons who do not have a voice in society,” Heflick says. “It sounds very reassuring to say that there’s a transitional plan in place, but I cannot for the life of me imagine where all these beds will come from.”

CLOSURE AFTER CLOSURE

Residents have been assured that Pioneer, the Department of Social and Health Services, the Spokane County Regional Behavioral Health Organization and Frontier Behavioral Health will help them transition to another home, looking for the right fit for each person over the next six months. ...continued on next page

“I cannot for the life of me imagine where all these beds will come from.”


NEWS | HEALTH

4 WINE TAPS, 34 BEER TAPS 150 BOTTLED BEERS & FULL BAR

BRUNCH

SATURDAY & SUNDAY 8AM - 2PM

Brenda Graham, Carlyle’s director, gives a tour of a resident’s room.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“UNCERTAIN FUTURE,” CONTINUED...

HOURS: Mon - Thurs 11am-9pm Fri 11am-10pm • Sat 8am-10pm • Sun 8am-9pm

905 N. WASHINGTON ST. | 509-381-BIRD

THE OLD BROADVIEW DAIRY TheBlackbirdSpokane.com |

@TheBlackbirdGEG

The Carlyle is the second assisted living facility to announce a closure or transition in recent months. South Hill Senior Living in the CooperGeorge Building announced early this year that it would close May 1 because Medicaid rates hadn’t kept pace with costs, and as 63 of 67 seniors there were on Medicaid, the owner couldn’t afford to keep it open, KXLY reported. On top of that, Victory House, a transitional housing program for 35 homeless veterans that’s run on the seventh floor of the Carlyle, won’t operate after Sept. 30 because the federal government is changing the way it pays for those programs, and Pioneer has decided not to bid to provide that service again, Young says. The county is working with other providers to see how many spaces there are for Carlyle residents, and what types of care would be best, which could be higher- or lower-level depending on the person, says Christine Barada, director of Spokane County community services, housing and community development. The behavioral health organization pays for 107 other similar beds in the county. “Of course, those are all pretty full, but some of them have openings,” Barada says. The county will also look to see if facilities they already work with can expand to take more people. Uncertainty over securing appropriate housing for the residents is part of why Heflick

is speaking out, even though she says she could lose her job at the Carlyle. She says she knows that other staff who feel the same way don’t have the luxury. She’s worked at the facility in some capacity since 2007, starting as a nursing aide, working up to social services manager, then leaving in 2015 to take a tenure track position at Spokane Falls Community College. She still helps train staff at the Carlyle a few hours a month. She’s created a “Save the Carlyle” Facebook page, is speaking to the media despite being warned not to, and on Monday night, she and another woman spoke to the Spokane City Council, calling on city leaders to do something about the loss of assisted-living beds at the Carlyle and the Cooper-George Building. Even if housing is found for all the residents, which Pioneer and other service organizations say they are confident will happen, Heflick says the change will rip apart “this very colorful, organic community that the Carlyle has been.” “It’s as great and functional as families are, basically, and most of these people don’t have family involved in their lives,” she says. “For whatever reason, the Carlyle works really well.”

COSTS AND BENEFITS

The Carlyle serves adults of all ages. At one time they had an 18-year-old and a 98-year-old living there at the same time, says Brenda Graham, the

Shop om for M

50 TAPS FULL BAR

GIFT CARDS Quality Moving Services for Home and Office

@MANITOTAPHOUSE

Throughout Spokane and the Inland Northwest

MANITOTAPHOUSE.COM

3011 S. GRAND BLVD. | (509) 279-2671 11AM - 10PM SUN-THURS | 11AM - MIDNIGHT FRI & SAT

14 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

BEST PUB & BEST BEER BAR

M-F 9-5:30pm Sat 10-4pm • 11806 E Sprague HG-11890

509-927-8206 • simplynorthwest.com Simply the Best


Carlyle’s director. Residents typically live two to a room, get three hot meals a day from the full-service kitchen, and have access to nursing assistants 24/7 who can help with medications and tasks like showering and reminders to do things. A nurse is at the facility seven days a week, and an advanced registered nurse practitioner comes once a week to care for people who feel less comfortable leaving to go to the doctor. Residents are usually referred in from Sacred Heart’s psychiatric unit or Eastern State Hospital. They get housekeeping daily, and their linens are cleaned at least once a week. Help with laundry is available, or residents can wash their own. There are also camping and fishing trips in the summer, a trip to Silverwood every year, talent shows and movie nights. Karaoke and bingo are very popular. One thing Heflick says she appreciates most about the Carlyle is that the staff allow the residents to be as independent as they are able to be, and are “trained to meet people where they are at.” For example, if a resident thinks they are a movie star, the staff doesn’t insist on using their given name on their door tag, but will allow the name they want to use instead, she says. “The real mission of the Carlyle is to just really make it possible for people to have a life and to have dignity, not to make money,” Heflick says. She questions that cost is a concern here. Part of her job at one point was making sure the facility brought in around $9,000 per day by keeping the beds full. She says one year she was told that amount would be lowered, to $8,650, which she met or exceeded seven of eight months she was there. The cost to stay at the Carlyle varies, depending on the level of care the residents need, but ranges from $1,430 to $3,230 per month. Annual operating expenses were $3.5 million in 2016, Young says. Spokane County’s behavioral health organization pays $56 per day for each of the roughly 50 people staying there through the county’s mental health and chemical dependency sales tax dollars, Barada says. DSHS pays $65 per day for another roughly 50 people who stay there with state help, with half of that cost covered by Medicaid, and the other half from a state general fund match, says Chris Wright, a department spokesman. “There seems to be a perception there’s a profit motive, but low-income housing and providing service-rich housing is not a profitable business,” Young says. Under the type of program the Carlyle will likely transition to, residents would be charged rent based on the surrounding market rates, and because they are more independent, the cost of staff and services will be lower, Young says. “As a nonprofit, if we’re not in business and financially sustainable, that doesn’t do anyone any good. You still have to be able to cover your costs,” she says. “It’s not that it’s more profitable, but it’s not as intensive and expensive.” n samanthaw@inlander.com

COULD IT BE SLEEP APNEA? Do you experience daytime fatigue? Memory or concentration problems? Depression? Mood swings? Recent weight gain? Snoring?

80% OF OSA PATIENTS REMAIN UNDIAGNOSED!

Thanks Mom! wedonthaveone.com

Call Spokane Sleep Apnea Dentistry for a free comprehensive consultation (509) 290-6044

SpokaneSleepApneaNetwork.com

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

On Inlander.com MORE INLANDER NEWS EVERY DAY

POLITICS Last Thursday, WSU Spokane Chancellor Lisa Brown announced that she was leaving the job, effective in August. Her next move? Though she hasn’t confirmed it explicitly, BROWN MAY RUN for the the 5th District seat occupied by Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers. “I would say that running for Congress is a possibility, but that’s a decision I’m going to make after I complete my service at WSU,” Brown told the Inlander. Brown was a Washington state senator for 16 years, representing Spokane’s 3rd Legislative District, and she was the first Democratic woman to be Senate Majority Leader. As for WSU Spokane, Daryll DeWald — currently dean of the WSU College of Arts and Sciences — will take over as chancellor. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

CITY HALL Mayor David Condon appointed former U.S. Attorney Michael Ormsby as Spokane’s new CITY ATTORNEY last week. City Council President Ben Stuckart enthusiastically endorsed Ormsby. It’s a long way from last August, when the mayor’s previous city attorney pick, Laura McAloon, withdrew her name from consideration, calling Stuckart “toxic.” Back then, Stuckart had proposed reinventing the city attorney role, putting a measure changing city attorney to an elected position on the ballot this year. That, he said then, would give the city attorney more independence by separating the position from the mayor’s office. But Stuckart has now abandoned that proposal. “I think we can set that conversation aside,” Stuckart says. “Even if we switched the form of how the city attorney is chosen, [Ormsby] would be the No. 1 person on my wish list.” (DANIEL WALTERS)

, s k n a Th t

s 71

N

SEASO

g n i n e p O Friday May 19th at 7pm Buy 1 Get 1 Free

Tickets Available Online

509-328-4886

SpokaneChildrensTheatre.org

Sat May 20th • 2pm Sun May 21st • 2pm Fri May 26th • 7pm Sat May 27th • 2pm Fri Jun 2nd • 7pm

Sat Jun 3rd • 2pm Sun Jun 4th • 2pm Fri Jun 9th • 7pm Sat Jun 10th • 2pm Sun Jun 11th • 2pm

72ND SEASON TICKETS Available Now Online at Discount Pricing

16 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

FOR OPENING A NEW OFFICE IN SPOKANE! Kendall Yards and the Inlander Welcome You! Located at 1227 W. Summit Parkway INLANDER TRAILSIDE SUITE


NEWS | BRIEFS

Raúl’s Running Fresh off his “nobody dies” comments, Labrador announces for Idaho governor; plus, if you want to run for office, it’s nearly time to file GIVE IT TO ME STRAIGHT, DOC

“I get calls almost every day asking me to run for governor,” Idaho Rep. RAÚL LABRADOR told the Inlander four years ago. Now, he finally is. He announced his run for governor on Tuesday, just a day after CNN’s Chris Cillizza chose Labrador as having had “The Worst Week in Washington” for his widely mocked comments that “nobody dies because they don’t have access to health care.” On Monday, Labrador acknowledged that his comment “wasn’t very elegant,” but emphasized that “all hospitals are required by law to treat patients in need of emergency care regardless of their ability to pay.” Conservatives have pointed to the study of the Oregon Medicaid expansion, which concluded that the benefits of health insurance had “no significant improvements in measured physical health outcomes in the first two years.” But Politifact, in its “Pants on Fire” rating regarding Labrador’s comments, cited seven different studies making the case that tens of thousands of people who lack health insurance die every year in the U.S. Meanwhile, Eastern Washington Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers penned an editorial for the Washington Post

titled, “My son has a preexisting condition. He’s one of the reasons I voted for the AHCA,” arguing that the bill would help protect her son Cole, who was born with Down syndrome. But her claim that the GOP guaranteed “that access to health coverage can’t be denied for people with preexisting conditions” sparked a wave of criticism. True, the House bill would still bar insurers from outright denying coverage for preexisting conditions. But an amendment allows states to seek waivers exempting them from certain requirements of the health care law, setting up a scenario where people with preexisting conditions could suddenly find themselves paying a lot more on the individual market for their health care if they go more than 63 days without health insurance, even taking into account the $8 billion in subsidies the bill sets aside for those with skyrocketing premiums. “People with serious health conditions would face prohibitively high premiums,” writes Matthew Fiedler, a fellow with the Center for Health Policy in the Brookings Institution’s Economic Studies Program. And that, he warns, could destroy “any meaningful guarantee that seriously ill people can access coverage.” (DANIEL WALTERS)

FILING WEEK

Candidates can officially file online to RUN FOR OFFICE starting at 9 am on Monday, May 15; they have to get those forms and fees in before 4 pm on Friday, May 19. Dozens of local offices are up this year, with most cities electing council members as well as mayors. A variety of school board positions, judges, and fire, water and cemetery district positions will be on the ballot as well.  In Spokane, the city council positions currently held by Amber Waldref (District 1), Breean Beggs (District 2), and Candace Mumm (District 3) are up.  In the 7th Legislative District, which covers parts or all of Ferry, Okanogan, Pend Oreille, Spokane and Stevens counties, the positions held by State Sen. Shelly Short, R-Addy, and Rep. Jacquelin Maycumber, RRepublic, are up for election. Short left the House early this year when she was appointed to the Senate seat that Brian Dansel left in order to take a position with the Trump administration. Maycumber, Short’s legislative assistant, was appointed to the House seat soon after.  The mayors of Cheney, Deer Park, Medical Lake, Millwood, Fairfield, Latah, Rockford and Waverly all have races to run this year. A list of all the offices up for election, specific filing fees, and more information about how to file can be found at spokanecounty.org/315/Online-Candidate-Filing. Local candidates should file with the Spokane County Elections Office, and pay their filing fee online or in person at 1033 W. Gardner Ave. State candidates should file with the Secretary of State’s office. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 17


14th Annual Annual Blooms Blooms 14th

NEWS | CULTURE

on the the Bluff Bluff on

Mother’s Day Weekend

Enjoy a scenic drive, get food at many of the farms, have a drink at one of the farms, breweries, cidery, meadery or wineries! Each farm runs independently, please visit us online for more details. It’s a great time to come see the Bluff Blooming!!

RJ Blahut, president of the Lower Valley Assembly, says, “We just want to be left alone to live our lives.”

FOR MORE INFORMATION:

greenbluffgrowers.com or gbdma2010@gmail.com

HANDCRAFTED IN SPOKANE BY REAL GUYS AND REAL HANDS, FARM TO BOTTLE

Here in the American Redoubt

WILSON CRISCIONE PHOTO

In central Washington, even after Trump’s win, ‘preppers’ foresee potential disaster and violent confrontation with the left BY WILSON CRISCIONE

O

VISIT OUR NEW TASTING ROOM! Tasting room hours Tue-Sun Noon to Close | 1003 E. Trent #200 | Spokane | 509.489.2112

Please enjoy the outdoors and our products responsibly

18 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

n Saturday afternoon, as kids play and roosters crow on a farm north of Prosser, Washington, a crowd of people are gathered in a barn, preparing for the day the “Shit Hits The Fan.” The preppers who attended the fourth annual Northwest Preparedness Expo in Prosser don’t know exactly what will cause a breakdown in public facilities and functions, a situation they call the “SHTF scenario.” It could be a natural disaster, an economic collapse, or a civil war caused by political upheaval. And they don’t know exactly when the collapse will happen. But increasingly, they see more political violence in big cities, and more of a divide between rural and urban environments. The left’s reaction to Donald Trump’s presidency, they feel, has deepened the divide, making the day they’ve been preparing for seem ever more imminent. “We don’t really care what the reason is — if there’s a breakdown, then we’re going to be able to fend for ourselves while the authorities sort it out,” says RJ Blahut, president of the Lower Valley Assembly, the group that sponsored the preparedness expo.

Here in Prosser, the mindset of the American Redoubt thrives. The American Redoubt — “Redoubt” meaning a fortress or retreat — refers to a movement of conservative Christians escaping liberal areas and finding a haven in the area east of the Cascades throughout Eastern Washington and Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. For them, it’s a God-honored territory where likeminded people gather together. “That’s kind of what the Redoubt means to me,” Blahut says. “It’s a safe area — a relatively safe area with some common ideas.” Taking the direction of leaders like Rep. Matt Shea (R-Spokane Valley), preppers in the American Redoubt are preparing to survive a disaster, and to defend themselves against what they perceive as enemies of their culture.

‘THE BREAKING POINT’

Cassie Whitlock didn’t know what to expect when she came from Oregon up to Prosser with her family to sell wood-fired forges for the expo. “We were sort of wondering when we came here: Is this going to be super radical?” Whitlock says.


Whitlock, who didn’t see many of the speakers, says it didn’t seem radical at all. For her, the expo is simply a place where people share ideas on being self-sufficient. She saw people, maybe about 150, building community. The event features vendors who came from all over the country to sell food, survival materials and ammunition. It included hands-on classes to learn about wound care, home food storage and strategies for unarmed defense, as well as a class about concealed carry options. There were talks about building a self-sufficient retreat, and a talk called “SHTF Intelligence,” in which a former military and contract intelligence analyst named Sam Culper broke down how to gather information about threats that may exist, whether related to infrastructure, power outages or local gangs. The expo was started four years ago by the Lower Valley Assembly, which describes itself as a “grassroots movement whose goal is to foster a safe, stable and free community.” It promotes self-reliance, Christianity and the U.S. Constitution in the Lower Yakima Valley. Wearing a baseball cap, sunglasses and an army-green buttonup shirt, Blahut, the LVA president, tells the Inlander that he first got involved after hearing a speech from 2012 Washington gubernatorial candidate Shahram Hadian, who is currently a pastor in Spokane Valley. “Being a Christian-based organization and a group that favors the concept of the original Constitution, we’re a group that believes words have meanings and they don’t change much over the years,” Blahut says. He opposes the federal government taking control of land, in line with the views of those who occupied the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Oregon for 41 days in a standoff with federal authorities last year. If the government wants to enforce something that is not written in the Constitution, Blahut says, then they should amend the Constitution. When he sees what’s happening in this country, specifically in cities like Berkeley, California, Portland and Seattle, he can’t help but feel that political upheaval is more likely than ever. He calls it “failure” on the part of the left to “accept and work with the results of the election,” which, in his mind, makes it even more important to prepare for some kind of catastrophe. “If anything, it’s probably shifted more from preparing for natural or economic collapse, to more of a political upheaval,” he says. Blahut would like to see a redivision of states to prevent situations like the one in Washington currently, where he claims that the ideas of liberals on the west side of the state have the sway. What King County wants, he says, King County dictates for everybody, fair or not. “I don’t really see how we, here — in Benton County, and Franklin County, and Yakima County and so forth — I don’t see how we are ever going to match up with the political views LETTERS of King County and Pierce Send comments to County and all those guys editor@inlander.com. down there on the west side,” Blahut says. “So where’s the dividing point? Where’s the breaking point? Where do you say, ‘OK, well, this just isn’t working out for the state?’”

BEAUTY It’s in our nature.

S TAY & P L AY PAC K AG E S FROM

$219

*

One Night Stay & Golf for Two

RURAL AND URBAN DIVIDE

In the “Patriot Barn,” the main stage of the expo, an American flag hangs from the ceiling to the right of the stage. Chandeliers hang above wooden chairs, and bistro lights brighten up the room. Glen Tate, giving only his pen name, tells the audience what he thought would happen in the 2016 presidential election: Hillary Clinton would win, by cheating. If that were the case, “the civil war starts the day after election day,” Tate — who declined to comment for this article — tells the crowd of roughly 50 people gathered in the barn. “In my mind, it was gameday,” Tate says. “It was gonna happen.” Thus, his talk is entitled “Hillary Did Not Win, So Should We ...continued on next page

1 800 523-2464 | CDACASINO.COM | MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 19


NEWS | CULTURE “HERE IN THE AMERICAN REDOUBT,” CONTINUED... All Just Quit Prepping Now?” The answer to that question was “no.” Trump, Tate says, bought some time before a major civil conflict, but he says it’s still imminent, and actually “should have happened years ago.” After Trump’s presidential victory, those in the American Redoubt see more political violence, and they’re preparing for more to come. For Tate, the divide between the rural and urban will still inevitably lead to a SHTF scenario.

“If we’re gonna end up using arms, it’s gonna be defensive.” OPEN HOUSE INTERSTATE 90 FOUR LAKES TO IDAHO OPERATIONAL STUDY Thursday, May 18, 2017 4 p.m. - 7 p.m. East Central Community Center Gym 500 S. Stone, Spokane

WSDOT & DKS engineers will be on hand to seek input on the recommended strategies for this segment of I-90. There is no formal presentation. Please drop in anytime during these hours. www.wsdot.wa.gov/planning/studies/ i-90-four-lakes-idaho-operational-study

For info. contact: Larry Frostad, Asst. Traffic Engineer WSDOT Eastern Region frostal@wsdot.wa.gov 509-324-6000 Accommodation requests for people with disabilities can be made by contacting WSDOT ADA at wsdotada@wsdot.wa.gov or by calling toll-free, 855-362-4ADA(4232). Persons who are deaf or hard of hearing may make a request by calling the Washington State Relay at 711.

WSDOT_OpenHouse_051117_4S_CPR.pdf

BUY ONE, GET ONE 50% OFF EVERYTHING* 509-535-1111 | 1727 E Sprague Ave, Spokane www.TinRoofFurniture.com *See store for details.

20 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

Tate wrote a book series called 299 Days that imagines the collapse of the United States. It will be a partial economic collapse and a partial political collapse, he says. He supports filling in the Redoubt with “good people” to balance out the protesters in the cities, as he told the preppers on Saturday. “I think it’s fantastic, because when we are mixed in with liberals, they have our way with us,” he says. “We need to be separated.” He told the crowd he was “heartened” to see anti-protesters fighting back against what he describes as the “bad guys,” the far-left Antifa protesters (Antifa is short for Anti-fascism) in Seattle on May Day. When he mentions “Seattle,” the crowd groans. By the end of his speech, a man in the back of the crowd has asked Tate how the right could find its own leader to fight against the “bad guys” like Antifa, to engage them and to “annihilate them” on the spot. Tate ignores the violent suggestion, saying that it’s better to have “smaller, independent teams” rather than one leader, and advises communicating better than the other side through radios. The right, he said, is “better than the other side at thinking on their own.” Blahut, when asked if he’s concerned that the preppers would take up arms against the left, rejects the idea. Rather, the people Blahut associates with are “in favor of the rule of law,” he says. They just want to be left alone. “If we’re gonna end up using arms, it’s gonna be defensive,” Blahut says. “If somebody breaks

into your house and you got a gun, you’re gonna be defensive about it, right? That’s kind of how we look at it.”

THE ‘REAL ENEMY’

For preppers in the American Redoubt, there are a number of forces to protect themselves from, according to Rep. Matt Shea. In an impassioned speech on Saturday, Shea presented a PowerPoint presentation called “The Future of Liberty: Protecting Our Christian Culture.” Shea declined an Inlander interview request, and requested that his speech not be recorded. But in front of a crowd of nearly 100 people, he identified what he called the “enemies”: communists, the Muslim Brotherhood and foreign governments. Among the “communists,” he mentioned activist organizations like the Peace and Justice Action League of Spokane, and the Council on American-Islamic Relations. He linked the media to the “communists,” since a Spokesman-Review columnist once served as a moderator for a PJALS panel discussion. He called LETTERS out the Inlander Send comments to for a correceditor@inlander.com. tion the paper made, because he was unsatisfied with the size, font and location of the correction. He said a story about Spokane County Democrats’ numerous Public Disclosure Commission violations was “one of the most underreported stories this year,” without mentioning last month’s detailed Inlander investigation of the violations. The Redoubt, “the best place in America,” Shea said, does not share the same values as Western Washington, and he said he’d continue his efforts to create a 51st state. For the audience, the message was to keep focused on the enemy, and help your neighbors. “We’re here because we know if something does happen, we can help our neighbors, love our neighbors,” he said. He ended with a call to the crowd to fight for their culture. “Are you going to fight?” Shea asked them. “Yes!” they responded. He asked a second, and a third time. And with each response, the crowd grew louder. n wilsonc@inlander.com


MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 21


Lawn & Garden LET YOUR IDEAS BLOSSOM FLORIST AND GREENHOUSE, INC.

BUY LOCAL - WE GROW OUR OWN -

8th & Perry • (509) 534-9381 libertyparkflorist.com Like Us on Facebook for Our Weekly Specials

N

ow that we’re reaching May 15th (the official last frost day in Spokane), we as gardeners feel free to do as we desire without the fear of frost killing off our plants. But there are a few that need a little extra TLC. Often we go to our favorite garden center and buy all our vegetables in one big swoop, then rush home and plant them and wait for them to grow. However, often our cucumbers, melons and pumpkins seem to die off this is for two reasons. Reason number #1, the plants are simply not adjusted to the elements outside and the night cold, so these plants need to be hardened off. If you don`t know what that means go to our website at spokaneplantfarm.com. Reason number #2, our night time temperatures in May are just too low for these plants. It’s better to wait two or so more weeks to plant these few plants outside.

As for your lawn, flower beds and pots, you can go crazy now with planting annuals, perennials, trees, shrubs, almost anything your heart desires.

Jessica Webb (Creach) - Bloom Broker Plant Farm / Creach Greenhouse

Secret Garden Greenhouse Celebrate Spring! Annuals, Perennials, Fruits & Vegetables — Family owned and Grown since 1995 —

Mother’s Day Open House

May 13th

Refreshments & Door Prizes

7717 E. 18th • 892-0407 • DAILY 9am-5pm

NWSeed_MothersDay_051117_6H_CPR.pdf

22 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017


Flowering Plants for all your Garden...

1606 S. Assembly St. 747.2101 | Visit us on

SunsetFlorist.net

OPEN MONDAY - SUNDAY

EVERYTHING ELSE IS JUST DIRT

NORTH SIDE 8721 N Fairview Rd . 467-0685

www.landscapeandgarden.com

VALLEY 19215 E Broadway . 893-3521

Appleway Florist & Greenhouse

Featuring Hanging Baskets and Beautiful Arrangements for Mom

3 off

$

Any Hanging Basket

Petunias

FULL FLAT 15 99 $

Coupon must present coupon Limit 10

Tray pack and Jumbo pack petunias only, all packs must be the same color, no mix and match

Offers expire on 5/13/17

Offers expire on 5/13/17

All Rose Bushes & Peonies 19 99

$

Offers expire on 5/13/17

4.5” Select Premium Color 10/ $2399 11006 E Sprague Ave, Spokane Valley 509-924-5050 • www.applewayflorist.com

Bacopa, Trailing Petunia, Verbena and Calibrachoa only. Must be in black pots. Must buy 10 to receive price. Offers expire on 5/13/17

14208 E 4th Ave, Spokane Valley | 509.926.9397 plant-farm.com

Mon - Fri: 8 AM - 5:30 PM • Sat: 8 AM - 3 PM

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 23


24 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017


The view of the Columbia River from Maryhill Winery. ANDREA JOHNSON PHOTO

G rape W

Spokane’s profile is on the rise, thanks in part to the burgeoning Washington wine industry BY MIKE BOOKEY

Expectations

hen John Allen first began working in the Spokane wine wines seriously, with the state boasting 14 distinct American Viticultural industry in the mid-1980s, things were different. At the Areas (AVAs) producing different ranges of grape varietals. As Allen grocery store, there might be about a quarter of an aisle of swirls a bit of Walla Walla wine, he says that it’s hard at this point to wine choices. At a restaurant, you’d be offered a white wine listed incordispute the fact that our state is a special place to make wine. rectly as a “Chamblis,” or maybe a red called a Burgundy. You might gain, Spokane is not a wine destination in the traditional even find a third option on the menu — something pink labeled “blush.” sense. There are a few wineries growing grapes around There were about 30 or 40 wineries in Washington at the time, but here, but the climate isn’t necessarily conducive to supportyou’d have to be in the know to be aware that most of them existed, ing a robust grape crop. That hasn’t stopped wineries from finding sucsays Allen. He’s recounting all of this outside the Washington Cracker cess in Spokane, including stalwarts like Arbor Crest, which has been Co. Building on a recent Sunday afternoon. Inside, you’ll find most of making wine at their scenic facility since 1984, as well as Latah Creek the evidence you’d need to realize how much wine culture has changed Wine Cellars, which dates back to 1982 and was a trailblazer in the in our region in the past three-plus decades, as a couple of hundred Washington wine industry. For a less established wine lovers taste their way through nearly 100 winemaker like Darby McKee, who co-owns different wines at the Walla Walla Wine InvitaOverbluff Cellars, located within the Washington tional. Cracker Co. Building, Spokane is a perfectly suitMembers of the discerning and educated able place to make wine. crowd at the event — a benefit for the Inland The Inland Northwest has sprouted so many “It’s actually a little bit of an advantage being Northwest Land Conservancy — ask nuanced wineries and tasting rooms over the past sevhere, because we can go where the best grapes questions of the winemakers on hand and make eral years, it could be a real challenge to visit are,” says McKee, who bought Overbluff from notes on the cards they received upon entering. them all in one week, based on your schedule. its previous owners four years ago with his wife By the end of the night, cases upon cases of wine But the annual Spring Release Wine Weekend Jovanka and business partner Mark Camp. will have been ordered for sale. organized by Visit Spokane and its partners Overbluff has worked with a number of dif“Wine has become a far more common part sort of encourages you to do just that — within ferent vineyard owners in recent years, sourcing of people’s life in Washington. It’s part of our reason, of course. More than 15 Spokane-area grapes from the Rattlesnake Hills outside of Yaagriculture and our economy, and our social life,” wineries and tasting rooms are throwing open kima and in the Walla Walla Valley. Rather than says Allen, who now co-owns Vino! A Wine their doors to the public for a special showcase being tied down to a specific plot of their own Shop, the Washington Street store he founded during Mother’s Day weekend, offering tastland, Overbluff can, for example, get grapes for with Nancy Sazama and Jennifer Haglund in ings and sales of newly released wines, along its Malbec from the cooler climates of southeast1995. Before that, Allen had poured wine at a with live music, art viewing, food, and specials ern Washington’s Blue Mountains. number of places around Spokane, including on wine. It’s a perfect way to treat Mom and At Barrister Winery, which has operated in Lindaman’s, the now-defunct Crescent departbring the family together for a memorable exSpokane since 2001, not having a vineyard of ment store and a short-lived wine shop he started cursion, as both new and established wineries its own may be precisely what has brought the with his brother in the space now occupied by host wine lovers from all around. winery — which opened a new tasting room in Mizuna restaurant. In addition to Vino!, Allen — CHEY SCOTT downtown Spokane in 2015 — its bevy of awards also works to produce wine events, like the Walla and sizable wine club. Walla Invitational. Spring Release Wine Weekend • Sat, May “It is the diversity in the vineyards that helps Today, Washington wine has become a cul13 and Sun, May 14, from noon-5 pm • Free contribute to the complexity in our wines. To ture unto itself, especially in Spokane, despite the admission • Spokane Cork District and other have our own vineyard, we would have had to city being more than 100 miles from the nearest locations; see map on page 28 • Event details locate an established vineyard to purchase,” says prominent grape-growing area. The 2016 growat visitspokane.com/cork-district Greg Lipsker, who founded the winery with ing season saw the state’s vineyards yield some fellow lawyer Michael White. The two were later 270,000 tons of grapes for Washington’s more joined by a third partner, longtime Barrister employee Tyler Walters. than 900 wineries, according to Washington State Wine, the industry “A new vineyard takes three years from planting to have a comgroup that represents all licensed wineries in the state. State schools, mercial production. As a vineyard ages, the wine produced from those including Washington State University, provide for the study and revines develops more complexity,” Lipsker says. search of wine even at the undergraduate level, while wine tourism has The Lilac City has also proved attractive to wineries that actually given a boost to places like Walla Walla and the Tri-Cities — places that do operate their own vineyards in one of the state’s prosperous growing weren’t previously thought of as tourist hot spots. ...continued on next page In turn, the rest of the wine world has come to take Washington

A

THIS WEEKEND!

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 25


WINE

How to

How to Talk

If you’re mostly used to just drinking wine with meals (or you’re new to the wine world), tasting might seem a little intimidating, but it doesn’t have to be. Krista French, certified sommelier and general manager of Midtown Bluebird in Coeur d’Alene, offered some tips on having a fruitful and fun wine-tasting experience.

It’s one thing to enjoy drinking wine, quite another to feel confident talking about it, or knowing how to communicate your preferences effectively at a restaurant or wine shop. Krista French, a certified sommelier, has some tips for the tongue-tied.

Taste Wine

About Wine

EMBRACE THE UNCONVENTIONAL

SKIP THE SCENTS

If you’re going out tasting, you’ll want to start preparing before you even shower. “Avoid wearing perfume or lotion,” says French. “I don’t even wear deodorant when I taste, unless it’s unscented. I don’t wear anything on my lips, because I don’t want to taste that or smell it.” She also recommends waiting to taste at least an hour after brushing your teeth (the toothpaste seriously compromises your palate). If you’re tasting at home, make sure you don’t use any air fresheners or scented candles.

PRACTICE YOUR PALATE

“Your palate has a lot to do with the food that you eat and the things you grew up eating,” says French. “I grew up in a little town in Northern California where blackberries grew wild. We ate them all summer long, and so a lot of times when I’m tasting, I get a lot of blackberry in the wine. It’s muscle memory to learn how to taste wine, so when you’ve practiced your muscle on a certain flavor profile your whole life, it’s easier to recall that.” To add to your mental bank of flavors, try smelling different herbs, fruits and vegetables at the grocery store. And make sure to stop and smell the roses. You might pick up some of those flavors in local wine.

TAKE IT SLOW

“I look at the wine and I smell the wine before I taste it,” French says. “Look at the color of it, smelling it, picking out the flavor profiles through your nose. Then you taste it. I always try to pull air into my mouth, and kind of almost chew on it and breathe it in.” You can give it a swirl or two to add some air, but there’s no need to overswirl.

BRING YOUR FRIENDS

“It’s fun to taste with other people so you can bounce ideas off of your friends, and pull out flavors and aromas in the wine that you might not get if you’re doing it on your own,” says French.

DRINK WITH DELIGHT

Above all, enjoy yourself. “If you’re enjoying the wine and it’s enhancing the experience that you’re having, then it’s perfect,” says French. — CARA STRICKLAND

Barrister Winery’s owners Michael White, Greg Lipsker and Tyler Walters.

“GRAPE EXPECTATIONS,” CONTINUED... regions. Spokane will also see one of the state’s bigger and more popular wineries come to town before the year is over when Maryhill Winery opens a tasting room in Kendall Yards, overlooking the Spokane River. Maryhill’s vineyards and current tasting room are located south of Goldendale on the banks of the Columbia River and host a popular concert series. But the semi-remote location isn’t necessarily ideal, says Craig Leuthold, who founded Maryhill with his wife, Vicki, in 1999. “Not a lot of people make it down to our tasting room in the lower Columbia River Gorge, and we want to introduce people to the more than 50 wines that we bottle, of which only a handful are sold in this market,” says Leuthold, adding that he and his wife own a house in Spokane and have always considered it home. When Joe Forest decided to expand his family’s Tempus Winery beyond its current Walla Walla location, he didn’t head back to his native Seattle, opting rather to open a tasting room in Spokane last month, on Post Street in the heart of downtown. Opening in a westside wine hotbed like Woodinville (home to more than 70 wineries and tasting rooms) didn’t fit with his brand, says Forest. “I really like our niche in Spokane. We make a very restrained, Old World, food-friendly, classic-styled wine that’s not screaming for attention,” says Forest. “Spokane offers a great network of winery tasting rooms organized by the Cork District, and has yet to find a saturation point.”

winery to bring a presence T Walla to Spokane. Last fall, Va Piano empus wasn’t the only Walla

opened a cozy tasting room on the bottom floor of the Historic Davenport

26 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Hotel. At least some of Spokane’s attraction for wineries lately has to do with the Cork District, the collaborative marketing and promotional effort that’s headed up by former Spokane City Council member Mike Allen, who teaches entrepreneurship at the Community Colleges of Spokane. In 2009, when Allen was still on the city council, he was looking at ways to improve tourism in Spokane and realized the sudden enormity of the Washington wine tourism industry. Spokane only had six tasting rooms in the city core at the time, but he saw an opportunity there. Now, there are 16 wineries with a presence in the Cork District. Allen says that very soon, there could be four more waiting in the wings. In time, the number could grow to 30, he says. “A lot of wine tourism has traditionally been agritourism, but we have a critical mass of tasting rooms here in Spokane that are close to outdoor opportunities, an airport and easy transportation,” says Allen, adding that the previous model of driving miles between vineyards in a rural setting has not only proven dangerous, but has also decreased in popularity among wine fans. Back at the Washington Cracker Co. Building, Vino!’s John Allen has changed tone. He’s done talking about those rocky early years of Washington’s — and Spokane’s — entrance into the world of wine. As throngs of friends he’s met through wine events over the years stop to say hello, he tells of how Washington wines have grown far beyond a novelty. “In the state of Washington,” he says, “it’s been discovered — and this in the last 30 or so years — that our ability to grow fruit equivalent to the finest fruit on the planet is almost unparalleled.” 

“Every time I taste, I’ll pull something out that doesn’t necessarily sound like you’re reading it from a wine book, but it’s what I taste,” says French. “There’s nothing wrong with saying: ‘This tastes like cherry yogurt,’ ‘This tastes like a graham cracker,’ ‘This tastes like a watermelon Jolly Rancher.’ It doesn’t have to be in snobby wine terms; it can be whatever you’re tasting in the wine.” A great starting point for any wine conversation is to talk about what you like. If you’ve had a great wine from Spain, or there’s a brand you love, talk about that. But be sure and talk about what it is about it that you love.

START WITH THESE BASIC TERMS

BODY: The wine’s body refers to the way it feels in your mouth. French suggests that you think about the difference between skim (light-bodied), 2% (medium-bodied) and whole milk (full-bodied). DRY: The opposite of sweet. A sweeter wine might be referred to as off-dry. TANNIN: “The sensation in your mouth that makes it feel dry, that makes it feel grippy,” says French. “It’s from the skins of the grapes and the seeds and stems that are in that wine, even potentially from the oak used to process it.” Often, when people say they want a dry wine, they are thinking about the tannin, rather than sweetness. The opposite of tannic is smooth. VARIETAL: This word refers to the type of grape, like Merlot or Sauvignon Blanc. Most wines in the United States list their varietals on the label so you can easily see what you’re drinking, but in some countries, the place of origin will be there instead. Red Burgundy is made from Pinot Noir grapes, for example, and Chablis from Chardonnay. If you really want to impress your friends, throw in the French word terroir (pronounced “tehr-wahr”; emphasis on the second syllable). “It means sense of place,” says French. “It’s the soil that the vines are in, the sagebrush that’s around them. You’re going to taste the area it’s from.” No matter what you say about wine, try to have fun with it. “I don’t feel like it should be an intimidating thing,” French says. “It’s your perspective on the wine. You shouldn’t be afraid to talk about it. It should be fun, and you can learn from each other even if you’re just out tasting with your friends. You can’t learn if you’re not going to talk about it. Don’t be afraid to just throw it out there.” — CARA STRICKLAND


GUIDE

TO

S P O K A N E 'S

k r o C t c i r t s i D PULL OUT AND

SAVE

SPRING

RELEASE

2017

Mother’s Day Gift Cards Now Available! Online at SpaParadiso.com Call 74-RELAX (747-3529)

1237 West Summit Parkway, Suite A | 509- 747-3529 | SpaParadiso.com

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 27


WINE SPOKANE’S TASTING ROOMS KEND

ARD ALL Y

S

W SUMMIT PKWY

N DIVISION ST

N BROWNE ST

N WASHINGTON ST

N STEVENS ST

N LINCOLN ST

N MONROE ST

W SPRAGUE AVE

N JEFFERSON ST

N MAPLE ST

W PACIFIC AVE W 2ND AVE

For Spring Release Wine Weekend, local tasting rooms are open noon to 5 pm on both Saturday and Sunday.

1. Craftsman Cellars Tasting Room 1194 W Summit Pkwy 2. Barrister Winery 1213 W Railroad Ave 3. Terra Blanca Spokane 926 W Sprague Ave 4. Va Piano in the Historic Davenport Hotel 10 S. Post St 5. Patit Creek Cellars Spokane, 822 W Sprague Ave 6. Tempus Cellars 8 N Post St Ste 8 7. Cougar Crest Estate Winery 8 N Post St Ste 6 8. Barili Cellars 608 W 2nd Ave 9. Barrister Winery Tasting Room 203 N Washington St 10. Overbluff Cellars 304 W Pacific Ave

Patio Now Open

11. Robert Karl Cellars 115 W Pacific Ave 12. Bridge Press Cellars 39 W Pacific Ave 13. Emvy Cellars 39 W Pacific Ave (facing page) 14. V du V Wines 12 S Scott St 15. Liberty Lake Wine Cellars 1018 S Garry Rd, Liberty Lake 16. Townshend Cellar 8022 E Greenbluff Rd, Colbert 17. Arbor Crest Wine Cellars 4705 N Fruit Hill Rd, Spokane 18. Nodland Cellars 11616 E Montgomery Dr Ste 69, Spokane Valley 19. Latah Creek Wine Cellars 13030 E Indiana Ave, Spokane Valley

Make money by

Making a difference. When you donate blood plasma at Octapharma Plamsa, you help in the creation of life-changing medicines, while putting a little extra money in your pocket for the things you want or need.

New Donors earn up to $250.* • Over 1,000 different wines & beers from around the world • Friendly staff with 30+ yrs of wine & beer industry knowledge • Wines by the glass and 18 rotating tap handles for growler fills & pint purchases

3319 N Argonne Rd • (509) 443-4027

28 INLANDER SPRING RELEASE 2017

510 E. Francis Ave. Spokane • octapharmaplasma.com *Earn up to $50 for first five donations • Promotions & fees may vary by location Must be 18-64 years of age & in good health • Have valid picture ID, proof of Social Security number & current residence postmarked within 30 days


LIBERTY LAKE & VALLEY N HAM ST ILTON

V DU V WINES E SPRAGUE AVE

w i n e c e l l a r s

& LIBERTY LAKE RD

S GARRY RD

S SCOTT ST

Summer Concerts

LIBERTY LAKE WINE CELLARS

at the

TOWNSHEND CELLAR E GRE

NBL

Cliff House Estate

UFF

THURSDAY CONCERTS 5:30–8:00 • $5 SUNDAY CONCERTS 5:30–Sunset • $10

E GREENBLUFF RD

E DAY MT SPOKANE RD

Come for our Spring Release and Mothers Day deals this weekend — and the Sunday Concert ($10) with Haley Young & the Champage Jam! ARBOR CREST

FRU

IT HI

E UP

RIVE

LL R

D

R DR

E INDIANA AVE

N PINES RD

NODLAND CELLARS

LATAH CREEK WINE CELLARS

SUMMER CONCERT SERIES SPONSORED BY

SAVE 20% on Concerts with a Punch Card! Find the full schedule and more at www.arborcrest.com

Ages 21+ • Cliff House Estate & Tasting Room • 4705 N Fruit Hill Rd • 509.927.9463

“What is the

definition of a good wine ? I t should start and end with a smile.”

Wine Specials: 222 S. Washington St Spokane • 509.838.1229

Vinowine.com

OUTSTANDING SELECTION OF ROSÉS’ ............$8 98 - $15 95 SEVEN FALLS CAB S. .........................................$15 95 THURSTON WOLFE P.G.V. ..................................$12 95 BELLE GLOS LAS ALTURAS PINOT NOIR .........$38 DRUMHELLER CAB S. OR CHARD .....................$13 95 GRAMERCY CELLARS LOWER EAST SYRAH ....$33

– William Sokolin

QUILCEDA CREEK CVR RED...............................$56 QUILCEDA CREEK CAB S. ..................................$185 SPRING RELEASE 2017 INLANDER 29


CELEBRATE MOTHER’S DAY CELEBRATE MOTHER’S DAY

Spring Release Spring Release Spring Release CELEBRATE MOTHER’S DAY

INE WEEKEND WW IN WWEEEE KKEENN WE INE DD

50 Chefs, 10 Events, 1 Delicious Experience. Sip, Sample & Savor at walk-around tastings, Chef Demos & Workshops, Artisan Food Purveyors, Wineries, Breweries & Craft-Drinks. Tickets start at $40. All-inclusive Pricing

SAVE THE DATES

JUNE 15th - 18th at CenterPlace Regional Event Center in Spokane Valley

Early Purchase Ticket Discounts

www.CraveNW.com

may 13th & 14th

may 13th & 14th

EVERY CORK DISTRICT WINERY OPEN 12-5PM

EVERY CORK DISTRICT WINERY OPEN 12-5PM

25+ NEW RELEASES - TASTING & WINE SPECIALS

25+ NEW RELEASES - TASTING & WINE SPECIALS

may 13th & 14th EVERY CORK DISTRICT WINERY OPEN 12-5PM corkdistrict.com

Benefitting: 2nd Harvest & Big Table 30 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

25+ NEW RELEASES - TASTING & WINE SPECIALS corkdistrict.com


The Spokane Symphony will channel Jimmy Page’s guitar wizardry.

CLASSICAL

FULLY LEDDED

Classical meets classic rock when the Spokane Symphony tackles the music of Led Zeppelin BY DAN NAILEN

T

he world will never move on from Led Zeppelin. The hard-rocking English quartet disbanded in 1980 after drummer John Bonham’s death, but for anyone who came of musical age in the years since, their music has been a constant alongside other timeless, long-gone artists like the Beatles or Bob Marley. Repackaged and rereleased albums. Documentary films. Nonstop radio play. The exceedingly rare (and constantly rumored) reunions of the surviving members. All these things, together, keep Led Zeppelin as popular now as they ever were. Friday night, the Spokane Symphony adds to the ongoing love affair when it performs Led Zeppelin’s music with a guest conductor and rock band that’s been turning classical fans on to songs like “Whole Lotta Love” and “Kashmir” for more than two decades. Brent Havens is the conductor in question, the man who in the mid-’90s came up with arrangements to take Zeppelin’s songs classical. And it wasn’t easy. “Back then a lot of the technology wasn’t there for me to transcribe these songs,” Havens says. “I transcribed from cassette decks, just going back and forth. There was no real ability to slow it down, go section by section, or hold it on a single note. With the computer systems today, transcribing the material is a lot easier.” When someone first asked Havens to work up Zep-

pelin songs for a symphony, they didn’t envision a rock band being part of it. They figured instrumental versions of the songs would be just fine. They were mistaken, and Havens let them know. “I don’t think a Zeppelin audience would want to hear a semi-Muzak version of Led Zeppelin material,” Havens says. “And the symphony folks don’t know who Led Zeppelin was. I said, ‘I think we need a killer band, a crazy good singer and wrap that with a 50- or 60-piece orchestra.’ And it blew up on us.” Havens has gone on to lead symphonies through the songs of Pink Floyd, Queen and many more bands. That might never have happened if not for Led Zeppelin, or without finding the right singer. Randy Jackson has been touring with Havens, doing symphonic Zeppelin, since 1996. He was no unknown, having enjoyed some early ’80s success with his band Zebra, which covered Zeppelin regularly during its formative years. Learning how to tackle Robert Plant’s distinctive howl has allowed Jackson to keep delivering the shrieks and growls that Zeppelin fans expect, even at a symphony show. “Instead of pushing my natural voice higher, I would take my falsetto lower and stronger,” says Jackson, who recalls buying Led Zeppelin II as a kid because he thought the album cover was cool. “That helped me to be able to

sing for a longer period of time, and I wouldn’t strain my voice so much. Eventually my falsetto voice just became as strong as my natural voice.” One of the challenges for Havens in creating the show was making sure the symphony wasn’t overwhelmed by the rockers out front. Some of Zeppelin’s songs naturally lend themselves to a symphonic approach, but he and Jackson take particular pleasure in doing songs fans might not expect, like “Black Dog” or “Since I’ve Been Loving You.” “I want to make sure the orchestra isn’t just sitting there playing whole notes,” Havens says. “I want to make them work. I want them to have as much fun as the band is going to have playing this material. They get to play all those licks, which is really cool. “The whole point of this was to draw a different audience to see the local orchestra perform. And the fact we’re talking about world-class musicians who have studied their instruments for 30-plus years, they can play anything you put in front of them. This is absolute proof.”  Spokane Symphony Performs the Music of Led Zeppelin • Fri, May 12 at 8 pm • $25-$82 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • foxtheaterspokane.com • 624-1200

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 31


CULTURE | MUSIC

Sting and Jazz? It’s not as weird a pairing as you might think. FRANK OCKENFELS PHOTO

Jazz Synchronicity Sting’s musical catalogue gets a swingin’ makeover in the Spokane Jazz Orchestra’s next concert BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

I

2nd Annual

Bites for

Bras

Sunday May 21st 3pm - 5 AT CLOVER

100% of proceeds benefiting

a br

s

ri we

th at fit.

Empo n g

w

om en

h throug

s

ticket

$35

tizers es appe includ a drink and

913 E. Sharp Spokane

Tickets: (509) 995-1295 or breastintentionsofwashington.org/events

32 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

f you were to rank the platinum-selling musicians who are as synonymous with rock and pop as they are jazz, it probably wouldn’t be a terribly long list, and Sting might not be a name that would immediately leap to mind. But the British rock star and erstwhile frontman of the Police actually has his roots in the jazz world, and the Spokane Jazz Orchestra is set to perform a brassy slate of Sting songs this weekend. “If you read anything about his development as an artist, he would cite jazz as a major influence for that,” says Don Goodwin, the orchestra’s director. “That was the first thing he learned how to do. He’d go to jam sessions with his bass and play with local jazz musicians all the time.” Those stylistic influences are pushed front and center on Sting’s 1986 live album (and in its accompanying 1985 concert film) Bring on the Night, released in the wake of the Police’s dissolution and featuring appearances from such jazz luminaries as saxophonist Branford Marsalis and pianist Kenny Kirkland. “I was as a big a Police fan as you could probably find,” Goodwin says. “When Bring on the Night came out, it just blew my mind. It really is the album that turned me into a jazz musician. That really sealed it for me in terms of what I wanted to do.” Now Goodwin and his orchestra have taken gems from Sting’s discography, both big hits and deep cuts, and given them full-blown jazz arrangements. The Police were never a traditional rock band, Goodwin points out; like Sting, drummer Stewart Copeland and guitarist Andy Summers were often playing around with reggae, swing, Latin and jazz rhythms. But the orchestra isn’t going to stick strictly to Sting: They’ll also be exploring the work of the artists who influenced him, from Cole Porter to the Beatles to Jimi Hendrix. Some songs on the evening’s program will be more or less identi-

cal to their recorded counterparts (albeit with all-brass arrangements); others will be looser interpretations, including Goodwin’s own take on “Walking in Your Footsteps,” from the smash hit Police album Synchronicity. “I really tried to stretch on that and go in different directions,” Goodwin says. “Some of the arrangements will be crystal clear, just like how you remember them, and others will be new, fresh approaches to old songs.” Officially established in 1975, the Spokane Jazz Orchestra is the country’s oldest professional community big band, and this will be their second concert of the calendar year and the fourth of their ongoing WEEKEND season. Local C O U N T D OW N singer-songGet the scoop on this writer Keleren weekend’s events with Millham will our newsletter. Sign up at be a featured Inlander.com/newsletter. vocalist, and high school students from the Spokane All-City Jazz Ensemble will perform before the concert and will join the orchestra for select songs throughout the night. In exploring these songs from an unexpected angle, Goodwin says he’s found a new appreciation for them, including those from later-period Sting records that he had previously overlooked. “It really turned me around on his newer albums,” Goodwin says. “They’re obviously produced in a more modern way, and in some cases overproduced, but there’s still that amazing songwriting.” n Spokane Jazz Orchestra: The Music of Sting and his Jazz Influences, featuring Keleren Millham • Sat, May 13 at 7:30 pm • $12 students, $24 seniors, $26.50 adults • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater. com • 227-7638


CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS

30 TAPS

CRAFT Cocktails

Shuffleboard & DARTS

Craft Beer GREAT LOCAL TIES

KILL-THE-KEG SPECIALS Every Sunday

Celebrating Tiny Triumphs

Patterson’s quirky art enchants and delights.

The arts community mobilizes for one of its own, Tiffany Patterson BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

S

ometimes the arts community is less about neighborhoods or genres than about a shared sense of purpose. So when Coeur d’Alene’s Emerge gallery emailed that unexpected health issues might mean that Spokane-based artist Tiffany Patterson would fall short of filling the gallery during her May exhibition, more than a dozen artists jumped into the breach. The sale of donated work will also help fund any gaps in Patterson’s medical coverage. (Excess funds are earmarked for an as-yet-unnamed charity.) “It kind of feels like I have had an army behind me the whole way,” says Patterson while recuperating at her West Central home. No stranger to cancer — she was the primary caregiver in her former partner’s health battles and has been undergoing treatment for polycystic ovary syndrome — Patterson says she has learned to ask for and accept help. When she learned (on her birthday) that doctors had discovered a potentially malignant growth, she was scared, of course, yet also thankful that she had such a strong support group and was, despite the diagnosis, “in a very good place” in her life. Although eager to work in her studio, a sunfilled turret tucked into the second floor of the older home she shares with her current partner, a wily cat and small flock of chickens, Patterson is unable to lift things, sit or stand for long periods. For her May exhibition, Patterson will instead include pieces from a recent exhibition called “A Place Made Home.”

Home and community is a recurring theme, says Patterson, who has spent 10 years making a living from her art, developing a trademark illustration style — saturated color, quirky animal and human characters, dreamy backgrounds — that’s appeared on Inlander pages, Global Credit Union advertisements, DOMA Coffee packaging, and countless band posters. “Building community in the arts is hugely important,” says Patterson, who has participated Tiffany Patterson in and mentored artists for Terrain, created the popular Social Sketch meetup in Spokane two years ago and more recently helped launch a similar effort in Coeur d’Alene. “I find [Tiffany] to be a very inclusive and inspirational person,” says Mariah Boyle, an artist and instructor who is donating several paintings to the Emerge exhibition. Although Boyle doesn’t know Patterson very well, she felt compelled to donate because, she says, she admires Patterson’s support for local arts. n

BANQUET ROOM AVAILABLE

154 S. Madison St. • THESTEELBARREL.COM • TUE-SUN 11AM-LATE

y a d s m o o Bl nir Results Booklet! Souve

7, 2017 MAY LET

BOOK SULTS

ON STANDS NOW!

RE

5/7/17

SUPPL

indd

_2017.

S_CVR

BLOOM

Emerge CDA: Tiffany Patterson and Friends opening reception • Fri, May 12 from 5-8 pm; on display through June 3 • 208 N. 4th St., Coeur d’Alene • emergecda.org

The only place to find published race results, coverage and photos.

EMENT

INLAN TO T H E

9:50

PM

DER

1

Publisher of the Bloomsday Results Booklet since 2004

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 33


PARTICIPATING BREWERIES

Badass Backyard Brewing (Spokane Valley) Bellwether Brewing Co. (Spokane) Big Barn Brewing Co. (Mead) Black Label Brewing Co. (Spokane) Daft Badger Brewing (Coeur d’Alene) Downdraft Brewing Co. (Post Falls) English Setter Brewing Co. (Spokane Valley) Four-Eyed Guys Brewing Co. (Spokane) Hopped Up Brewing Co. (Spokane Valley) Little Spokane Brewing Co. (Spokane) Iron Goat Brewing Co. (Spokane) Laughing Dog Brewing (Sandpoint) MickDuff’s Brewing Co. (Sandpoint) New Boundary Brewing (Cheney) No-Li Brewhouse (Spokane) Northern Ales (Kettle Falls) Orlison Brewing Co. (Spokane) Post Falls Brewing Co. (Post Falls) Paradise Creek Brewery (Pullman) Perry Street Brewing (Spokane) Quartzite Brewing Co. (Chewelah) Rants & Raves Brewery (Moscow) Republic Brewing Co. (Republic) River City Brewing Co. (Spokane) Riverport Brewing (Clarkston) Selkirk Abbey Brewing (Post Falls) Slate Creek Brewing Co. (Coeur d’Alene) Steam Plant Brewing Co. (Spokane) Top Frog Brewery (Newport) Trickster’s Brewing (Coeur d’Alene) Twelve String Brewing Co. (Spokane Valley) Waddell’s Brewpub (Spokane) Wallace Brewing Co. (Wallace) Whistle Punk Brewing (Spokane) Young Buck Brewing (Spokane) Zythum Brewing Co. (Fairfield) 238 Brewing Co. (Mead)

34 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

Ben and Christy Lukes of Perry Street Brewing are hosting several Craft Beer Week events.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Celebrating the Craft Prepare your liver; the third annual Spokane Craft Beer Week is here BY ADAM BOYD

N

ow in its third year, Spokane Craft Beer Week has become an annual highlight for craft beer enthusiasts across the Inland Northwest. Running from Monday, May 15 through Sunday, May 21, this year’s Craft Beer Week offers daily events featuring nearly 40 regional breweries and a half-dozen beer bars. From new beer releases to brewery tours, food and beer pairings to brewer meet-and-greets, the week offers something for all beer lovers. Below are some of the week’s highlights; find the complete schedule at spokanecraftbeerweek. com.

ON TAP KICKOFF PARTY

Spokane Craft Beer Week kicks off at Perry Street Brewing. Come take a tour of the brewery and grab a raffle ticket for the chance to win some beer-related prizes. PSB is donating $1 from every pint sold to the Spokane Humane Society. Mon, May 15 from 5-8 pm • Perry Street Brewing, 1025 S. Perry

VOLUME VERTICAL & FUNKY BARREL DAY

12 String is rolling out the final four versions of their Anniversary Ale, and Volumes 2 through 5 will be on tap so drinkers can taste the beers side by side in a vertical flight, or just get a pour of their favorite vintage. Some wacky barrel-aged beers are also slated for the taps. Tue, May 16 from 3-9 pm • 12 String Brewing Co., 11616 E. Montgomery Dr., Spokane Valley

CORN HOLE TOURNAMENT

To outsiders, it may just seem like a game where you attempt to toss a beanbag into a hole. But for dedicated craft beer drinkers, it might as well be an Olympic sport. Black Label Brewing is challenging anyone up for the beanbag-tossing task to come participate in their inaugural corn hole tournament. Prizes will be awarded, and $4 pints will be available to hydrate athletes and spectators alike. Wed, May 17 from 5-10 pm • Black Label Brewing Co., 19 W. Main


COLLABORATION BEER FESTIVAL

One of Craft Beer Week’s most notable aspects, the Collaboration Beer Festival solicits craft breweries from around the region to pair up for the purpose of creating a joint brew. Hosted at No-Li, this year’s festival presents a record number of beers, with more than 16 individual “collab-brews” pouring. $10 will get you five 4-ounce drink tickets; additional tickets can be purchased. Thu, May 18 from 4-7 pm • No-Li Brewhouse, 1003 E. Trent

FRIENDS OF BELLWETHER: BREWER’S SHOWDOWN

After you’ve had your fill of collaboration beers, head over to Bellwether Brewing and taste your way through yet another lineup of brews. The beers at this event were created by friends of Bellwether’s two brewer owners, including many notable names from the local homebrewing community. The lineup consists of a Kölsch, a witbier, an IPA and a quick-aged old ale. Tasters can order a $8 flight of all the beers, then vote for their favorite. The competition kicks off Thursday and runs through Saturday; the winning beer will be brewed on Bellwether’s main system. Thu, May 18 from 5-9 pm, Bellwether Brewing, 2019 N. Monroe

FRIDAY FIRK-OFF WITH FREMONT BREWING

PSB hosts Seattle’s Fremont Brewing in a celebration of all things firkin. Four experimental firkins (two from each brewery) will be tapped at 6 pm, then it’s a race to see who can kill the cask first. Prizes will be awarded to the person who blows each firkin, and there’s a rumor that a secret, small-batch offering from Fremont will also be on draft. It’s sure to be un-firk-gettable. Fri, May 19 from 6-10 pm, Perry Street Brewing, 1025 S. Perry

Iron Goat’s owners are celebrating five years of beer.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

IRON GOAT BREWING 5TH ANNIVERSARY PARTY

Celebrating five years of making craft beer in Spokane (and one year in their downtown brewpub), Iron Goat Brewing is throwing a party that features live music on the outdoor patio, special limited beer releases, a taco bar, and the brewery’s very first canned beer. A portion of the proceeds collected from the event benefit Second Harvest food bank. Sat, May 20 at 11 am, Iron Goat Brewing Co., 1302 W. Second

PINTS 4 PAWS RACE

There’s no better way to burn off some of the excessive calorie intake of Craft Beer Week than to complete a 5K. To close out the week, New Boundary Brewing is holding its second annual Pints 4 Paws run to benefit SpokAnimal. The $35 entry fee includes a 24-ounce custom stainless water bottle, snacks, and a victory hot-dog lunch. Well-behaved, vaccinated canines are welcome on the course. New Boundary also will offer $1 off growler fills until 4 pm. Sun, May 21 from 11 am-3 pm, New Boundary Brewing, 505 S. First St., Cheney 

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 35


GARDEN EXPO 2017

ELeVATE YOUR FINANCIAL

Gardening Through the Ages

Never Enough Thyme

WELL-BEING.

May 13 | 9AM - 5PM Spokane Community College Lair 1810 N. Greene St. | Spokane

OVER 200 GARDEN RELATED VENDORS Door Prizes • Seminars • Demos Great Food • Plants

Free Admission and Parking!

sponsored by

Presented by The Inland Empire Gardeners 509-535-8434 | tieg.org

S

ION T A R ST

2

ON tist DEaMturing local ar Fe

ore ka o expl Mosh t y s b p o sh IC MUS UE and funky strict i UNIQ roughout the D oor th eD ART E at Blu

OV IMPR L ing p LOoCdA- Local Shop AL Fo NNFUundraiser A D 3Rtellite Dish Sa

36 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017


Pure Poetry The latest from writer-director Terence Davies beautifully evokes the pains and pleasures of Emily Dickinson’s life and writing BY NATHAN WEINBENDER Cynthia Nixon plays Emily Dickinson and Jennifer Ehle is her sister Vinnie in Terence Davies’ beautiful biopic A Quiet Passion.

U

nlike most films about great artists, A Quiet Pasthough, are its modern sensibilities. We first meet Emily sion is about repression rather than expression. It as a teenager (played by Emma Bell, who, at one point, chronicles the lonely, unfulfilled life of the poet morphs into Nixon through remarkable optical effects), Emily Dickinson, from young adulthood to her death in as she refuses to bend to the intellectual rigidity of her 1886, and it’s fascinated with how she related to a world religious upbringing. Suffering from, as she puts it, “an that didn’t have much need for her. After all, in mid-19th acute case of evangelism,” she willingly relegates herself century Massachusetts, the idea of a woman publicly exto a life of spinsterhood with her sister Vinnie (Jennifer pressing her fears and desires, either out loud or in print, Ehle) in their family home in Amherst. was considered the ultimate impropriety. It’s not so much that Emily is protesting the notion of The film’s title most obviously refers to Dickinson’s religion (she devoted many of her poems to it), but rather predilection for poetry, much of which she wrote in secluthe fervency with which her elders employ it to justify sion or late into the night, and then only after her father their ignorance. She similarly fights back against the reluctantly granted her permission. But it could just as sexism of the era, particularly from her brother Austin easily apply to the style of writer-director Terence Davies, (Duncan Duff), who admits that he would never forgive which is (at least here) hushed and unhurried, but nonehis wife of infidelity as he carries on an affair of his own. theless imbued with terrific affection for In one of the few exchanges Emily actually and interest in its subject. A QUIET PASSION has about her own writing, she excoriates Although it’s set in drawing rooms, an older male publisher who alters her Rated PG-13 dimly lit parlors, ballrooms and opera punctuation to apparently make her meanDirected by Terence Davies house balconies (cue the fluttering fans), Starring Cynthia Nixon, Jennifer Ehle, ings clearer. “Clarity is one thing,” Emily this is no traditional period piece, and tells him, “but obviousness is quite another.” Duncan Duff, Keith Carradine a lot of that is due to Cynthia Nixon’s We tend to think of Dickinson as the fascinating, complicated interpretation of Emily Dickindeath-obsessed recluse whose massive body of work son. It’s a surprisingly physical performance, especially as went undiscovered during her lifetime, and that characshe succumbs to the kidney disease that would eventually terization is partially true. But there’s a playfulness and kill her, and it dashes many of the preconceived notions dry wit present in her verse that often gets overlooked; we may have about the poet. her morbid streak was often as playful as it was genuWhat might be most surprising about A Quiet Passion, inely mournful. This film follows suit; there’s a sense

of mischief in its withering evisceration of 1850s social mores, and its dialogue is as snappy as anything in Whit Stillman’s recent Jane Austen riff Love & Friendship. It doesn’t avoid all the pitfalls of the biopic format, however: There are perhaps a few too many scenes in which the same basic points are reiterated, and some awkward expository dialogue is shoehorned into the proceedings, particularly in an uncharacteristically hamhanded interlude involving the Civil War. Davies is one of the great humanists of contemporary cinema, and his earliest films — the semi-autobiographical domestic snapshots Distant Voices, Still Lives and The Long Day Closes — develop their own distinctive cinematic grammar, channeling the fluidity of memory and consciousness. Compared to those works, A Quiet Passion is one of Davies’ more straightforward narratives, but it still bears many of his stylistic watermarks: his liberal use of voice-over (mainly to showcase Dickinson’s poetry) and montage, his emphasis on music and lyricism, his theatrical lighting and staging. But Davies’ sometimes flowery approach doesn’t rob the film of its rawness. Dickinson once wrote about hearing a fly buzz upon dying, though her own death was certainly not as beautifully macabre as her poetry. Hers was a short life, blunt and cruel and often unfair, and A Quiet Passion accurately and painfully chronicles it. Dickinson is neither canonized nor pitied here, which is most certainly how she would have liked it. n

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 37


FILM | SHORTS

Snatched

OPENING FILMS KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD

Here’s something nobody really asked for: Yet another cinematic retelling of the Arthurian myth, this time slathered with a layer of grit and grime and starring ho-hum Charlie Hunnam as the knight of legend. And it’s directed by Guy Ritchie, so expect a whole lotta style with little to no substance. (NW) Rated PG-13

A QUIET PASSION

Emily Dickinson’s final years are examined in the latest from writer-director Terence Davies, a patiently paced, empathetic character study that avoids many of the pitfalls of traditional artist biopics. Cynthia Nixon delivers a terrific performance as the troubled but brilliant poet, who challenged the status quo and whose work wasn’t fully appreciated until after her death. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

SNATCHED

Amy Schumer and Goldie Hawn play a mother and daughter who, while on a tropical vacation together, are kidnapped by criminals. Even if this is lousy (and the lack of early reviews suggests it might be), it’ll be nice to see Hawn back on the big screen again — this is her first film role since 2002’s The Banger Sisters — in something resembling the screwball comedies she made in the late ’80s. (NW) Rated R

THE WALL

Two American soldiers (Aaron TaylorJohnson and John Cena) stationed in Iraq are sent to investigate a deadly attack. When one of the men is shot by a sniper, the other is stuck shielding himself behind a crumbling wall; a standoff develops between him and the unseen gunman. Directed by Doug Liman of The Bourne Identity and Edge of Tomorrow. (NW) Rated R

NOW PLAYING BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

Continuing the trend of remaking its animated classics as live-action features, Disney’s update of its great version of Beauty and the Beast is reverential to a fault. The plot goes more or less unchanged — the bookish Belle (Emma Watson) is taken captive by the horrifying Beast (Dan Stevens), who turns out to be cuddlier than expected — though this script provides more backstory for its central characters. Still, it’s not enough to make you forget the 1991 original, which probably shouldn’t have been monkeyed with in the first place. (SR) Rated PG

BORN IN CHINA

Another family-friendly nature documentary from Disney, this time manufacturing David Attenborough-style narratives around families of pandas, snub-nosed monkeys and snow leopards in various climes of China. Stunning footage and almost impossible levels of cuteness are in store. Narrated by John Krasinski. (NW) Rated G

THE BOSS BABY

...continued on next page

38 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

The latest from DreamWorks Animation casts Alec Baldwin as an infant who wears a business suit, talks like Jack Donaghy from 30 Rock and offers up such pearls of wisdom as “cookies

are for closers only” (because kids sure do love their Glengarry Glen Ross references). But here’s the twist: Baby Baldwin’s antics are all in the mind of his imaginative 7-year-old brother, who’s afraid the arrival of a new sibling will attract all of his parents’ attention. (NW) Rated PG

THE CASE FOR CHRIST

Investigative journalist Lee Strobel was once an avowed atheist, setting out to irrefutably prove that there is no God. But as soon as he started digging into the “evidence” of Jesus’ existence — and once his wife converted to Christianity — he began to see the light. Here’s a family-friendly, dramatized retelling of Strobel’s path to finding religion, co-starring Faye Dunaway, Robert Forster and Frankie Faison. (NW) Rated PG

THE CIRCLE

Dave Eggers’ unsettling novel about privacy and individuality in the 21st century gets a sluggish big-screen treatment. Emma Watson stars as a go-getter who lands a coveted position at a Google-esque internet company called the Circle, only to discover that its mysterious founder (Tom Hanks) values online transparency above all else, even if it means skirting the law. Once the movie arrives at its


FILM | SHORTS ending (which deviates from Eggers’ novel), you begin to wonder if it even understands its own message. (NW) Rated PG-13

COLOSSAL

Indie comedy meets addiction allegory meets monster movie in this high-concept tale, in which an alcoholic writer (Anne Hathaway) discovers that her depression has manifested itself as a Godzilla-like behemoth that’s laying waste to Seoul. That premise (if you’re willing to give it a chance at all) is just quirky enough to be intriguing, but it really falls apart in a third act that relies too heavily on wildly inconsistent characters (particularly Jason Sudeikis as a sociopathic bar owner) and a ludicrous, ham-fisted backstory. (NW) Rated R

THE DINNER

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

GET OUT

(OUT OF 100)

A QUIET PASSION (125 MIN) FRI/SAT: 5:15, 7:00 SUN: 2:15, 5:15 WED/THU: 4:00, 6:00

77

THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE (127 MIN)

Frantz

73

FRANTZ (112 MIN) *last weekend!

Colossal

70

Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2

67

The Fate of the Furious

56

The Circle

43

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

GIFTED

Oscar winners Morgan Freeman, Michael Caine and Alan Arkin take on roles originated by George Burns, Art Carney and Lee Strasberg in this remake of a 1979 comedy about old dudes who decide they’ve got nothing left to lose and rob a bank. Directed by (of all people) Zach Braff and written by Theodore Melfi, who helmed last year’s Oscar-nominated Hidden Figures. (NW) Rated PG-13

Written and directed by Jordan Peele, this psychological thriller tackles the same issues of race and masculinity that were regularly explored on his Comedy Central series Key and Peele. Daniel Kaluuya (Sicario) and Allison Williams (Girls) play an interracial couple who visit her family’s country estate, which he discovers has a curi ous history with its African American staff. A clever, consistently funny racial satire and horror film that mocks white liberal cluelessness and finds humor in (without dismissing) black people’s fears. (ES) Rated R

(LOS ANGELES)

TICKETS: $9

A Quiet Passion

THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS

A German woman grieving her fiancé’s death in WWI meets a mysterious Frenchman who claims to have been a friend of his. But not all is as it seems in this tricky character study from director François Ozon, based on the 1932 Ernst Lubitsch film Broken Lullaby. Shot mostly in lustrous black and white; in German and French with English subtitles. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

METACRITIC.COM

78

After his sister, a brilliant mathematician, commits suicide, a well-intentioned but somewhat unreliable boat mechanic (Chris Evans) becomes the guardian of her incorrigible 7-year-old daughter. He soon discovers that she, too, is a math prodigy, which is also when the little girl’s estranged grandmother (Lindsay Duncan) turns up to demand custody. Octavia Spencer and Jenny Slate round out the supporting cast. (SR) Rated PG-13

FRANTZ

VARIETY

FRI, MAY 12TH- THU, MAY 18TH

The Lost City of Z

After two teenage boys commit a shocking act of violence, their bourgeois parents meet over dinner to discuss the situation, and it quickly devolves into a brutal battle of egos. Although it’s based on a novel by Dutch writer Herman Koch, the film is also reminiscent of the Tony Award-winning French play God of Carnage, and it features some terrific actors — Richard Gere, Steve Coogan, Laura Linney and Rebecca Hall — in the central roles. (NW) Rated R

Just when the Fast and Furious crew thought they were out, they get pulled back in. The team’s eighth go-round finds them re-immersed in the criminal underworld when Dom (Vin Diesel) is seduced by a devious hacker (Charlize Theron), and it’s up to his gang — excuse us, his family — to bring him back from the dark side. F8 (“fate” — get it?) is perhaps the nadir of a seemingly endless franchise, an overstuffed, incoherent jumble of half-baked plot points and jarring tonal shifts. It’s predictably nonsensical, but it also isn’t any fun. (MJ) Rated PG-13

NEW YORK TIMES

NTERN THEAT GIC LA ER A M

GOING IN STYLE

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOL. 2

Summer movie season officially kicks off as Star-Lord and company blast back into theaters, and this brightly colored, exuberantly paced sequel turns out to be just as funny and flashy (if not quite as fresh) as its predecessor. The story this time around — as the Guardians are pursued through space, the ever-smirking ruffian Peter Quill is reunited with his swashbuckler father — is secondary to the action set pieces and the soundtrack of ’70s pop hits, but that’s just fine with us. (SS) Rated PG-13

HOW TO BE A LATIN LOVER

When his much older and much richer wife dumps him, a fading lothario (Eugenio Derbez from Instructions Not Included) is forced to move in with his sister (Salma Hayek) and her nerdy son. The odds are good that he’ll learn what really matters in life. Directed by comic actor Ken Marino and featuring Rob Lowe, Kristen Bell and Raquel Welch in supporting roles, this low-key comedy has been a sleeper hit at the box office. (NW) Rated PG-13

KEDI

For anyone who wishes that all the cat videos on YouTube were feature length, here’s an 80-minute documentary about the feral felines who roam the streets of Istanbul and have completely taken over certain parts of the city. You

WATCH IT AT HOME

www.SpokaneMovies.com

FRI-SUN: 4:30 WED/THU: 3:45 SAT/SUN: 3:15

KEDI (78 MIN) *last week! FRI/SAT: 7:30 SUN: 1:45 WED/THU: 6:15 (509) 209-2383 • 25 W Main Ave MagicLanternOnMain.com • /MagicLanternOnMain

SKIP IT

can view it as a fly-on-the-wall study of an urban ecosystem, as a sumptuous international travelogue or simply as a visual love letter to Istanbul’s furry inhabitants. At the Magic Lantern. (SD) Not rated

MA Y PR I D E B E WITH YOU...

THE LOST CITY OF Z

AIRWAY HEIGHTS

In the early 20th century, British explorer Percy Fawcett became convinced that a long-dead civilization had once existed deep within the Amazon, and his expeditions to find the place, which he nicknamed “Z,” eventually consumed him. Based on the bestselling nonfiction book by David Grann, this elegantly made, beautifully photographed and ultimately engrossing historical drama feels like it was beamed straight out of the 1950s, creaky tropes and all. It’s worth seeing, particularly on a big screen, but it’s also studious to a fault. (NW) Rated PG-13

10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444 KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD PG-13 Daily 9:20 Sat-Sun (10:30) In 2D Daily (3:50) (4:15) 6:40 9:00 Sat-Sun (1:10)

SNATCHED

R Daily (3:40) (5:40) 7:00 7:40 9:10 9:40 Sat-Sun (11:40) (1:40)

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY: VOL. 2

PG-13 Daily (5:15) 8:15 Sat-Sun (11:15) In 2D Daily (2:40) (3:15) (5:40) 6:15 8:40 9:15 Sat-Sun (10:15) (11:40) (12:15) (1:00) (2:15)

THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS

PG-13 Daily (4:10) 7:00 9:45 Sat-Sun (10:30) (1:20)

GOING IN STYLE

PG-13 Daily (4:40) 6:50 Sat-Sun (12:10) (2:30)

THE BOSS BABY

SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE

PG Daily (3:00) (5:10) 7:15 9:25 Sat-Sun (10:40) (12:50)

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

The third feature in the recent reboot of Peyo’s Belgian cartoon creation jettisons the live-action elements from the last two Smurfs movies and goes all-in on its eye-searing CGI. This time, Smurfette takes off on a mission to discover her purpose in her otherwise all-male village, stumbling upon the secrets of Smurf existence in the process. Regressive gender stereotypes ensue. (MJ) Rated PG

PG Daily (4:00) 6:45 9:30 Sat-Sun (10:45) (1:15)

WANDERMERE

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727 KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD PG-13 Daily 9:20 Fri-Sun (10:30) In 2D Daily (1:10) (3:50) 6:40 7:10 9:45

SNATCHED

R Daily (1:40) (3:40) (5:40) 6:45 7:40 9:00 9:40 Fri-Sun (11:40)

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY: VOL. 2

PG-13 Daily (5:15) 8:15 Fri-Sun (11:15) In 2D Daily (1:00) (2:15) (2:40) (4:00) (4:30) (5:40) 7:00 7:25 8:40 9:50 Fri-Sun (10:15) (11:40) 10:15 PM

THEIR FINEST

During World War II, a group of filmmakers sanctioned by the British government are assigned to develop a mostly-based-on-fact war movie that will boost the nation’s morale. Part history lesson, part romance and part behind-the-scenes comedy, this is an unabashedly old-fashioned, corny and ultimately entertaining tribute to, well, old-fashioned, corny entertainment. The stellar supporting cast includes Bill Nighy, Jeremy Irons and Richard E. Grant. (NW) Rated R

THE CIRCLE

PG-13 Daily (2:10) (4:40) 7:10 9:40

BORN IN CHINA

G Daily (12:35) (2:30) Fri-Sun (10:40)

GIFTED

PG-13 Daily (12:30) (2:45) (5:00) 7:20 9:35

THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE PG-13 Daily (1:10) (3:45) Fri-Sun (10:40)

THE FATE OF THE FURIOUS

PG-13 Daily (1:20) (4:10) 7:00 9:45 Fri-Sun (10:30)

GOING IN STYLE

PG-13 Daily (12:10) (2:30) (4:40) 6:50 9:00

THE BOSS BABY

PG Daily (12:50) (3:00) (5:10) 7:15 9:25 Fri-Sun (10:40)

THE ZOOKEEPER’S WIFE

Jessica Chastain stars as Antonina Żabiński, who, along with her husband Jan, turned her once-thriving Warsaw Zoo into a safe haven for Polish Jews during WWII. It’s a remarkable true story, most famously documented in Diane Ackerman’s bestselling book, but this adaptation looks to be another handsome Hollywood biopic that was made to win Oscars it won’t ever receive. (NW) Rated PG-13 

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

PG Daily (1:15) (4:00) 6:45 9:30 Fri-Sun (10:45)

SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE

Saturday June 10, 2017

PG Daily (12:10) Fri-Sun (11:30)

THE CASE FOR CHRIST PG Daily (1:30) (4:10)

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 5/12/17-5/18/17

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 39


“Trombone Shorty takes in a century-plus worth of sounds—ragtime and jazz and gospel and soul and R&B and hip-hop…” – New York Magazine “New Orleans’ brightest new star in a generation,” – NPR

AUGUST 13, 2017 7:30 PM

TICKETS: 509 624 1200 FoxTheaterSpokane.com

40 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017


Beats, Rhymes and Life

Washington, D.C.-based rapper Oddisee, known for his jazzy, socially conscious style, wants hip-hop to be viewed as “American literature” BY TUCK CLARRY

ANTOINE LYERS PHOTO

A

mir Mohamed el Khalifa, better known by his hip-hop moniker Oddisee, came out with an EP titled Alwasta last year. The name is rooted in the Arabic word “wasat,” which means “middleman,” an apt description for the rap veteran, who has been releasing music for 12 years. Oddisee has fought for social justice and the independence of artists in an increasingly monetized industry, and every track he’s released has featured his own instrumental production inspired by jazz and previous incarnations of the hip-hop form. His 2015 album The Good Fight, which encapsulates the positivity of black culture, tackled reallife issues and obstacles with an intelligence, humility and poise that are naturally his own. Earlier this year, he released The Iceberg, an album that maintains his gaze, though his subject matter and tone have grown darker. Oddisee, who performs at the Big Dipper on Saturday night, spoke with the Inlander about what it means to be a socially conscious musician, the state of the recording industry and hip-hop in the age of Trump. INLANDER: What has allowed you to be so prolific with your work? How do you maintain your creativity with more than 20 individual releases? I take it as a job first, and I have to go to work. My mother works as a bank teller. She goes to work every day, and rarely takes sick leave, to the point where they force her to take [time] off towards the end of the year. ... She just shows up and goes to work. My mother is the average person, and the average person isn’t commended like Cal Ripken just for showing up and doing your job every day because you’re supposed to. If I see music as my purpose, my career, I’m supposed to be prolific. This is America; you have to work. Do you believe your tone has changed lyrically between The Good Fight and The Iceberg? I think my message has, 100 percent. The tone of the record was very much about putting myself in a situation where I could be seen as a social justice warrior. ... I really had to depend heavily on the musicality of the record to ensure it was still entertaining, even though I was delivering really heavy subject matter. Do you think it’s unfair that people seem to focus on your lyrics or productions exclusively? 100 percent. It’s not even personally — my grievance is based on hip-hop as a genre. Hip-hop as a genre has been reduced

to “beats and rhymes” and not seen as songs. I have a fundamental problem with that. ... It’s time to look at this as a serious art form, as American literature. Hip-hop in particular seems to be asked to be more political. But it feels like rock artists aren’t asked to do the same. Absolutely. It was a message and music born in social commentary. I get [typecast] as “conscious” all the time, and I don’t shy away from that term, but I feel it should be expected. To say that I’m “conscious” means that someone that is a gangsta rapper, or misogynistic, isn’t conscious of what they’re doing when they’re writing it and saying it. That doesn’t mean that one form of music is conscious and another one’s not. There’s a lot of segregation in rap. Why do you think that divide exists? I don’t think it’s the fault of artists; I think it’s the fault of journalists and the terms they use to divide rappers’ music. ... Tupac can make “Dear Mama” and have “Thug Life” tattooed on his stomach because he loved his mom and wanted to make a song about his mom, but he also doesn’t love “bitches and hoes.” This is acceptable in rap music. Rap music is the hypocrisy that all of humanity is, but it accepts itself. Every politician in our country is a hypocrite at this point for leaving a clause that allows for them to have Obamacare, but wiping it out for everyone else. They are no different than gangsta rappers that write about their mother and killing people on the same album. Do you buy into this narrative that we’re going to get a wave of “better” music and “better” art because of agitation and resistance against Donald Trump? No, we’re going to get music that pertains to the climate that we’re in now, but does that necessarily make it better? That comes from a selfish standpoint of people like you and I saying that music with a message is better. Why is it better when it has social and political commentary? I don’t think Trump will make better music. I think people will make music that reflects Trump. We need to stop thinking that automatically means “better,” because there’s already shitty political rap. There’s a lot of people who rap about the system and the man, but they suck. Their beats suck, their bars suck, it’s unenjoyable. Just because you’re talking about something doesn’t mean it’s good. n Oddisee and GOOD COMPNY with Olivier St. Louis • Sat, May 13 at 8 pm • All-ages • $13/$16 at the door • The Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • bigdipperevents.com • 863-8098

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

PSYCH-ROCK THE FLAMING LIPS

I

f you don’t believe that attending a concert is a participatory event involving the exchange of energy between performer and audience, you might not want to go see the Flaming Lips. No band puts more effort into creating a mesmerizing, unforgettable performance — The lights! The glitter cannons! The dancing eyeballs! — and lead singer/cheerleader Wayne Coyne won’t put up with crowds too cool or detached to get into the psychedelic-freakout spirit. You will be asked to sing along to songs like “Do You Realize??” You will be asked to provide karate-chop sound effects to “Yoshimi Battles the Pink Robots Pt. 1.” Hell, you might be pulled on stage and asked to wear a costume or hold a spotlight. I suggest doing whatever the Flaming Lips ask, and you will be rewarded with one of the best shows of your life. — DAN NAILEN The Flaming Lips with Klangstof • Sat, May 13 at 8 pm • $38 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 05/11

219 LOUNGE, Brian Jacobs BEEROCRACY, Open Mic BELLWETHER BREWING, Brian Stai J J THE BIG DIPPER, Current Swell, Hey! Is for Horses, Cattywomp BOLO’S, Inland Empire Blues Society Monthly Blues Boogie BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Randy Campbell BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Kicho CRAVE, DJ Freaky Fred CRUISERS, Open Mic Jam Slam hosted by Perfect Destruction and J.W. Scattergun FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Karrie O’Neill THE JACKSON ST., Zaq Flanary J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin MOON TIME, Hanna Rebecca NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), JamShack THE OBSERVATORY, Vinyl Meltdown J THE PIN!, Elektro Grave POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Echo Elysium THE RESERVE, Liquid with DJ Dave THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, Spokane River Band TIMBER GASTRO PUB, Bill Bozly ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 05/12

J THE BARTLETT, Great PNW/Rainier

42 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

ROCK SUMMER CANNIBALS

“I

’m not the one you can call if you want to go home!” announces Jessica Boudreaux, Summer Cannibals’ singer/guitarist, on the band’s incendiary 2016 album Full of It. That’s because she and her bandmates in the Portland quartet are too busy touring like maniacs, melting faces coast to coast with supercharged tunes full of killer guitar hooks and joyful rock attitude. Rarely do the songs on Full of It or its two stellar predecessors eclipse the three-minute mark, and that’s a good thing at their shows: A pause to catch your breath is welcome among the chugging deluge of poppy punk that makes Summer Cannibals an incredible live band, just like fellow Northwest rockers Sleater-Kinney or the Thermals. — DAN NAILEN Summer Cannibals with Peru Resh, Itchy Kitty • Tue, May 16 at 8 pm • $8/$10 day of • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

After Party with Super Sparkle and the Smokes BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J BIG BARN BREWING CO., Kevin Brown and the Beloved Country J THE BIG DIPPER, Satsang, River City Roots Band, Brotha Nature BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Sterling BOLO’S, Vern and the Volcanoes J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Saticoy and Friends CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Cris Lucas CRUISERS, Itt’s Cuzzen CURLEY’S, Haze EAGLE’S LODGE, Honky Tonk A Go Go EICHARDT’S, Bright Moments Jazz THE EMPEROR ROOM, Dodge and

Fuski FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Just Plain Darin FREDNECK’S, Deez Nutz HOGFISH, Echo Elysium IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Chris Lynch and Meg Turner IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Jill Cohn IRON HORSE BAR, Gladhammer MOOSE LOUNGE, Yesterdayscake MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Pat Coast NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), JamShack NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, DJ Patrick PATIT CREEK CELLARS, Ken Davis In

Transit PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Brian Jacobs J THE PIN!, Wil E Haze, Mad Macks, Viva Mescal, CCB Krew, Willie B the MC THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler RIVELLE’S RIVER GRILL, Son of Brad THE ROADHOUSE, Dragonfly SILVER FOX, Usual Suspects THE THIRSTY DOG, Ghost Riders ZOLA, Chris Rieser Band

Saturday, 05/13 219 LOUNGE, Still Tipsy and the Hangovers

BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE, Jan Harrison, Doug Folkins, Barry Aiken BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J J THE BIG DIPPER, Oddisee (see page 41) and GOOD COMPNY, with Olivier St. Louis BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Nickolas Stud BOLO’S, Vern and the Volcanoes J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Dan Maher CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Cris Lucas CRUISERS, KOSH CURLEY’S, Haze FEDORA PUB, Donnie Emerson FLAME & CORK, Eric Neuhauser GUS’S CIGAR PUB, Clinton Lane Darnell


IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Truck Mills IRON HORSE BAR, Gladhammer THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke w/James   KNITTING FACTORY, The Flaming Lips (see facing page), Klangstof LA ROSA CLUB, Open Jam THE LOCAL DELI, Wyatt Wood MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Brian Jacobs and Chris Lynch MOOSE LOUNGE, Yesterdayscake MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Son of Brad NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), JamShack   NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Everclear, Vertical Horizon, Fastball (see page 44) THE OBSERVATORY, Nat Park and the Tunnels of Love, Bread Box, Lucas Brown  THE PIN!, Disciples of Dissent, Ground Zero, Odyssey, Killer E’s POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Rusty Jackson THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROADHOUSE, Christy Lee

DJs Freaky Fred, Beauflexx   KNITTING FACTORY, Fleet Foxes, Chris Cohen LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday MIK’S, DJ Brentano THE PALOMINO, Keychain, Justin Symbol, Dysfunktynal Kaos THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Open Mic/ Jam Night ZOLA, Whsk&Keys

Wednesday, 05/17  THE BIG DIPPER, Fortunate Youth, Josh Heinrichs, For Peace Band, Iya Terra BLACK DIAMOND, Echo Elysium EICHARDT’S, John Firshi  FARMIN PARK, John Firshi

GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES, Open Mic with Travis Goulding IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Gil Rivas  KNITTING FACTORY, Odesza LITZ’S BAR & GRILL, Wyatt Wood LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3  THE NEST AT KENDALL YARDS, Nick Grow  THE OBSERVATORY, Ambulanters, Flannel Math Animal, Griffey THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Live Piano RIVELLE’S RIVER GRILL, Jam Night: Truck Mills and Guests THE ROADHOUSE, Open Mic with Johnny Qlueless THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave ZOLA, Haley Young and Champagne Jam

Coming Up ...

RED ROOM LOUNGE, Tinnabulation Lineup Announcement, feat. The Fame Riot and Folkinception, May 18 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Big Red Barn, May 18  KNITTING FACTORY, Odesza, May 18  SPOKANE ARENA, Tim McGraw and Faith Hill, May 18 BABY BAR, Product Lust, Fantasy Suite, Balonely, Salve, May 18  THE BARTLETT, Kori Ailene CD Release Show, feat. Liz Rognes and Mark Ward, May 19 THE OBSERVATORY, Wake of Humanity, Crooked Cross, Guardian, May 19

Create Something Greater

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, DJ Steve Baker RUBY CHOW’S, Usual Suspects  SPOKANE CONVENTION CENTER, Just Plain Darin THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave WAGON WHEEL BAR & GRILL, Honky Tonk A Go Go ZOLA, Chris Rieser Band

Sunday, 05/14

DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church HOGFISH, A-Mac DZ IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Kori Ailene LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam O’DOHERTY’S IRISH GRILLE, Live Irish Music THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Sunday Karaoke Night THE ROADHOUSE, Nathan Chartrey ZOLA, The New Bossame

Monday, 05/15

 THE BARTLETT, Flynt Flossy and Turquoise Jeep, Friends of Mine  CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown ZOLA, Evan Dillinger

ISTIC FUTUR I ATT RE D! RAGE ENCOU Technological innovation is changing our world. From drones and self-driving cars to the beginnings of artificial intelligence, from augmented reality to storing data on DNA, the future will be far from life as we know it.

Join us for the 32nd Annual AGORA Awards as we celebrate business excellence and step into the future to explore what lies ahead.

Wednesday, June 7 3:30-6:00 PM

Spokane Convention Center Centennial Ballroom

Register today at GreaterSpokane.org/Events/2683 CATEGORY SPONSOR

TITLE SPONSOR

MEDIA SPONSOR

Tuesday, 05/16

  THE BARTLETT, Summer Cannibals (see facing page), Peru Resh, Itchy Kitty  THE BOILER ROOM, Nick Grow THE EMPEROR ROOM, T.A.S.T.Y with

POST EVENT ADVERTISING SPONSOR: Accountemps, A Robert Half Company, OfficeTeam, A Robert Half Company IN-KIND STAGE SPONSOR: LCD Exposition Services

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 DIAMS DEN • 412 W. Sprague • 934-3640 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE EMPEROR ROOM • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOTEL RL BY RED LION AT THE PARK • 303 W. North River Dr. • 326-8000 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208667-7314 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N. Market St. • 466-9918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 242-8907 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RESERVE • 120 N. Wall • 598-8783 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 43


The classic fairy tale comes to life in true Rodgers and Hammerstein fashion.

CAROL ROSEGG PHOTO

THEATER HAPPILY EVER AFTER

Although it’s been a staple of the stage since the late ’50s, Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein’s musical rendition of Cinderella actually premiered on CBS in 1957 as a vehicle for 21-year-old Julie Andrews. The broadcast set viewing records at the time, with more than 100 million people tuning in, and Andrews, who was also starring in the original production of My Fair Lady at the time, became a superstar. Rodgers and Hammerstein’s show was successfully revived on Broadway in 2013, and Carly Rae Jepsen, Fran Drescher and Sherri Shepherd have all appeared in it. The touring production of Cinderella hits the INB this week as part of the Best of Broadway series, and it promises to be a sparkling evening of entertainment for the entire family. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella • Thu, May 11 through Sun, May 14; showtimes vary • $32.50-$72.50 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls • inbpac.com • 279-700

MUSIC RETRO ROCK

Not all retro tours are created equal, and Saturday night’s show is a case in point. In headliner Everclear, you have a band with enough strong pop-rock hits (“Santa Monica,” “Everything to Everyone,” etc.) to knock out a solid set, even if they slip in new tunes that few of us know. In opener Fastball, you have a criminally underappreciated Austin band that had a couple of hits (“The Way,” “Out of My Head”); I think they’ll be the best set of the night. And in between there’s Vertical Horizon. — DAN NAILEN Everclear, Vertical Horizon and Fastball • Sat, May 13 at 7:30 pm • $45/$55/$65 • Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com • 242-7000

44 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

COMMUNITY GEAR UP

Two regional favorites come together to make us all look good, and then they throw a party to celebrate the effort — how cool is that? The Great PNW clothing company is teaming with Rainier Brewing, and to celebrate they’re hosting a free throwdown where you can scope the fresh duds, hear from bands Summer in Siberia and Deer (plus DJ sets from Twin Towers and DJ Unifest) and more. One party wasn’t enough, though, so the Bartlett will also host a free gig from The Smokes and Super Sparkle starting at 9:30 pm, where you can enjoy some Rainier specials while you rock and/or roll. — DAN NAILEN Rainier Beer/The Great PNW Clothing Release Party • Fri, May 12 from 7 pm-midnight • All-ages • Washington Cracker Co. Building • 304 W. Pacific • bit.ly/2peG4Kc


GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

OUTDOORS GREEN THUMBS

The good thing about all of this year’s spring rain is that the growing season’s start has so far been lush and plentiful, making many of us antsy to get our summer gardens started. The time to do so is finally here, so head to The Inland Empire Gardeners’ 18th annual Garden Expo and get your fill of gardening inspiration and growing tips, and find all sorts of plants to add to your collection. In between attending one of the expo’s seminars — including sessions on the local weather’s impact (11:30 am) on our harvests and a talk by garden expert Phyllis Stephens (2:30 pm) — and some casual browsing through dozens of garden-related vendors’ booths, enjoy lunch or a snack, and watch live demos on medicinal plants, setting up a rain barrel and more. — CHEY SCOTT Garden Expo 2017 • Sat, May 13 from 9 am-5 pm • Free admission and parking • Spokane Community College • 1810 N. Greene • tieg.org

COMMUNITY MOMS ROCK

The Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture’s annual Mother’s Day tour of historic landmarks takes a slightly different approach this year, focusing more on the exterior architecture of its featured structures than their insides. The 28th tour’s theme, historic native rock structures, highlights how our region’s geological history has played a major role in its architectural. A variety of the region’s most familiar rocky materials, like basalt and granite, are the focal points of all locations on this year’s driving tour, which winds across the greater Spokane area. Featured stops include the scenic grounds of Arbor Crest Winery (only open to visitors age 21+), the Glover Mansion, and the stunning Blakely Gardens in East Spokane. Pre-purchase your tickets online or in person at the MAC, and pick up your tour booklet and ticket at one of the designated check-in locations. — CHEY SCOTT

Thank you to our Cheney Mayfest 2017 sponsors

Special thanks to Cheney Middle School student, LeAnn Johnson for providing the concept art!

28th Annual Mother’s Day Weekend Tour • Sat, May 13 and Sun, May 14 from noon-5 pm • $15-$20 • Locations vary • northwestmuseum.org • 363-5355

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 45


W I SAW U YOU

RS RS

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU PULLED TENDERLOINS You: a minimalist hunk dressed in all beige with hooks to thrill. You looked as if you were ready to give an orange slapper with the wings to flit. Me: tensions drawn on the curbslibe, you made me feel like a sudsy salamander looking to slide your way... if you know what I mean. Hook that whisper in a bottle if you’d like to tame this gecko. STAR CROSSED ANGLERS I’m the red Prius owner who loves to fly fish, you’re the shadow at night that took all of my gear from me and robbed me blind on my birthday. Please return all of the items I have worked so hard to save and scrambled and searched and dig to find, fix, and curate the gear you stole from me. WHERE HAS THE REAL 1GONE I saw you and I knew we were going to end up together as a couple and than you made me think that life was so perfect with you and the other for came crashing down and you turned it to be this horrible dream that I somehow really wanna get away from. Your lies and cheating and you shall from me all the damn time I’m so sick of it and I can’t wait till I have my day to walk away from this place I can’t say I hate you but I will feel sorry because your not what you say you are you lie to your self and your just a loss cause I’m a fool for falling for you and I’m a fool for staying this long I hope you feel everything that you have made everyone else feel but a million times more because you deserve

it your now going to be just a part of my past thank you for making me see what it really is....

YOU SAW ME COMFY CHAIRS You’re right, those are comfy chairs. Almost TOO comfy to be productive. I hope you didn’t leave through the emergency exit. Putting the pieces together, I realized I’m the only person who thinks Chacos and socks are still in style. I work at WC Indaba, AND I work at WC Indaba. The second one’s design work and sketching though, I realize that was confusing. Curious if you also noticed the outdated dad hat and mustache attempt? If so, this was me. What a time to be alive, indeed. I drink coffee by myself when I work so having another person around to talk with would make that 3x better AT LEAST. We could talk about chacos — but also things like comfy chairs, shoeless key thieves and other types of open-toed footwear, too. I FELT YOUR SMILE Friday, may 5th. Shortly before 11 am. We were both getting petrol in our vehicles. I think you had a brown Honda and I a black Subaru wagon. We exchanged what seemed to me, meaningful smiles, twice in fact. I was thinking maybe if your car needs more gas Friday the 12th about 11 at the same place, maybe we will see one another again and opt for a cup of coffee at the nearby Starbucks. Your smiles made my day.

CHEERS CATHAY INN and their amazing crew M a y 3, decided to treat myself (Had a really hard week) Anyway stopped here for a bite. Ordered amazing lemon chicken to go for someone special, So me ordered the Raymond appetizer for self. Everything was prepared fresh, the service was over the top, The Absolute Best Part of All, they still serve the famous balsamic sweet n sour sauce, I know it’s old school but how I missed it so much. Lesson never mess with perfection ROLLER DERBY Cheers to Roller Derby. Cheers to a sport that remains indiscriminate towards race, gender, and religion. A sport that is more commonly referred

to by its players as “family” and a means that “saves souls.” Roller Derby continues to empower rather then bring down, and bring together people who may have once struggled to find a place that fit. — Forever in love with the eight wheeled sport of brawns and brains. CHEERS TO AZTECA DOWNTOWN I stupidly left my wallet, containing a large amount of cash ($100 bills), on the table at Azteca after the WSU Commencement

CORK!

Sildenafil, the active ingredient in Viagra® is now available at a fraction of the cost.

Generic $80 vs Viagra® $456 South Hill/Latah 509-838-0896 Liberty Lake 509-755-3333 Post Falls 208-773-2499

46 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

COLOSSAL IMPROVEMENT Thanks you to Magic Lantern and AMC downtown for

still vote for McMorris Rodgers, This is a new age, we now need to act intelligently, for goodness sake! UNRULY CHILDREN Jeers to the parents that let their kids run around and do what they want. I observed a group of unruly children their were seven kids ages about 5-11 at a park in Hillyard trashing the bathroom and Tp-ing the playground equipment I told them to stop or I would report them to the police. These unsupervised

I just want more giant monster movies, thank you for providing.

ceremony at the INB on Friday. I retrieved it on Saturday morning and all the cash was there. How easy would it have been to reach in and snag a $100 bill? Kudos and thank you to the staff at Azteca for their honesty and integrity. Me and my kids were facing a rough couple of weeks without that money. Thank you so much! MYSTERY STUPICE TOMATO PLANT Thank you to the unknown person who added a tomato plant to my small container garden this past week! We do not live in the best part of town, so I was a little leery about placing them in my front yard. I’ll make sure to take good care of it! Once again, thank you so much! BARBIE IS WAITING FOR HER KEN...... I see you everyday, not at work, but after, and I can’t get over how much I adore and care for you. From the first moment I saw you back in High School I knew that I would see you again. We lost touch for a while and then magically you got hired at the place I work at. By mere coincidence, I’m not sure, but it was pretty great! You moved on and went to work somewhere else, which was probably for the best because we were not doing real great at that time. You now work literally blocks away from me and I want so badly to tell you how I feel, I’m just not sure how to go about doing it. I think you might have feelings again for me too, but I could just

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

Feeling Bubbly? POP Your

be reading into something that’s not really there. It would be so nice to find out if you’re interested in anything more than friendship. Maybe you’ll see this and let me know. That is if you can figure out who this is or even see this post. Maybe someone you know will see this and know who I’m referring to. By the way, I love your Barbie purse planter’s on your back deck.

playing Colossal. I thought this was going to pass us by. But i was pleasantly surprised when two theaters were playing it. And yes I’m the guy who was complaining about Shin Godzilla not being played here. I just want more giant monster movies, thank you for providing. TO ALL SINGLE PARENTS After some very bad choices I went to prison for almost 5 years. As I am getting my life back together, I am helping my wife with my two young daughters and the household. It’s extremely difficult not to overstate the hard work it is, further more to go and work a full shift. It has really opened my eyes how difficult life can be for a single parent. My respects to all of you all across the board. May God bless you. Thank you to my wife Anna a thousand times over, for being a great mother and wife while I was away.

unruly brats told me it was a public park and they could do what they want and cussed at me. I guess Hillyard lives up to its reputation how sad. MONROE PROJECT Ok I agree with the person who wrote about ruining Monroe street, on Thursday April 27, I was heading downtown, they had one lane, traffic was backed up, all the way from the bottom of the hill, to the light at Indiana, people, we’re turning off Monroe to the side streets, not one news agency, or city Council person was there to see the mess, nor was the person who suggested the ruining of Monroe, but the drivers got a taste, of how it’s going to be. Maybe the businesses who oppose the mess, should file a lawsuit like the person on the South Hill about a road being paved. 

JEERS

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS

NOT SORRY For years it has been said “do not criticize”, it is unacceptable. Well, I have had it, Trump backers I find “deplorable” in every way, the 2nd group of people I find deplorable are the Spokane citizens who who put the racist (& his wife) & proven liar, in office, twice: prosecutor Larry Haskell. When will all these old Spokane farmers go away? The ones who

E D K O C H

D E N U D E

E M O T E S

Y A F O G A L E N O L I G I M A R I B A T

N I C K O F C A F A B B A C O S M E M E A S

A R A B S I D E K N O C T H A P S L A T C E B O A D A B N G R I E N T S E A S Y G I M M E L C I R O A D

S A C A D O K J O K E O N E S E I Z S E O K R B A D O E S T S S O E A I V A L E G I M D D A S A N

D C I T E S E D L A M N O P R O M P T

S T R E S S

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Special Events This Weekend At The Railroad Museum!

RAILROAD DAY SATURDAY MAY 13 10am - 5pm

Help us celebrate the driving of the final, golden, spike that joined the First Transcontinental Railroad across the United States connecting the Central Pacific Free golden spike and Union Pacific railroads on for all kids 5yrs May 10th, 1869, at Promontory and younger! Summit, Utah.

Mother's Day SUNDAY MAY 14 10am - 5pm

FREE ADMISSION for all Mothers on Mother’s Day. Join us for the fun on her special day. Free admission and a special gift for all mothers. Thank you mom!

27300 Sprinkle Road N • Reardan, WA (25 miles West of Spokane HWY 2) • 509-796-3377 • inlandnwrailmuseum.com


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

AN EVENING WITH BOB GOFF An evening with the NYT bestselling author of “Love Does,” benefiting the mission of Live Services iChoice. Includes gourmet coffee and desserts, program begins at 7 pm. May 11, 7-9 pm. $10. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com FAMILY PROMISE 20TH CELEBRATION Celebrate 20 years of helping hundreds of homeless families, who have found support and real help thanks to passionate volunteers and staff. May 11, 6-8:30 pm. $50. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. familypromiseofspokane.org BUILD ANNA’S HOMES The Anna Schindler Foundation announces the construction of two townhomes to house families from outlying areas whose children are receiving care at Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital. Proceeds from the event fund the homes’ construction. May 13, 6-10 pm. $76. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. annaschindlerfoundation.org MAD HATTER TEA PARTY Come meet the Queen of Hearts and White Rabbit and discover two life-saving programs offered by SCRAPS while you enjoy tea and treats. May 13, 1 pm. $10-$15. SCRAPS Regional Animal Shelter, 6815 E. Trent Ave. (509-477-2532) MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH The 14th annual brunch offers an all-you-can-eat buffet, with carving stations, made-toorder omelets, a dessert table, and a special gift for mom. All proceeds sup-

port Immaculate Heart’s ministry. May 14, 9 am-2 pm. $30/adults; $10/ages 6-12. Immaculate Heart Retreat Center, 6910 S. Ben Burr Rd. ihrc.net BEYOND PINK AFTERNOON OF INSPIRATION An afternoon fundraiser and lunch to educate, inspire and connect the community to thermography technology. May 17, 11 am-1:30 pm. $35. Chateau Rive, 621 W. Mallon. COMMUNITY TABLE BENEFIT DINNER An eight-course, seasonal dinner prepared by Chef Adam Hegsted. The meal will feature fresh, organic ingredients from around the region, complete with complimentary wine. Proceeds support the Inland NW Food Network. May 19, 6-9 pm. $75. The Yards Bruncheon, 1248 W. Summit Pkwy.

COMEDY

2.0PEN MIC Local comedy night hosted by Ken McComb. Thursdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The District Bar, 916 W. First Ave. facebook.com/districtbarspokane/ GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open mic comedy night hosted by Casey Strain; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (509-847-1234) STAND-UP COMEDY Live comedy featuring established and up-and-coming local comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. No cover. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. reddragondelivery.com SAFARI The Blue Door’s fast-paced, short-form improv show relies on audience suggestions to fuel each scene. Rated for mature audiences. Saturdays at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W.

Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com OPEN MIC XL Live comedy, Tuesdays at 9 pm. The Observatory, 15 S. Howard. observatoryspokane.com OPEN MIC A free open mic night every Wednesday, starting at 8 pm. Doors open at 7 pm. Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com THE DOPE SHOW A comedy showcase for which comedians joke, then toke, the joke some more. May 21 at 8 pm. $16-$22. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998)

Performance Adjudication Awards

COMMUNITY

MY FRESH BASKET JOB FAIR Bring a resume or be prepared to complete an employment application at the event. May 11, 1-4 pm and May 12, 9 am-noon. Free. Kendall Yards, Summit Parkway. PJALS POSTCARD HAPPY HOUR An opportunity for the public to communicate a short message to Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers and Senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell. Post cards will then be delivered to these elected officials. Second Thursday of the month, from 4:30-6:30 pm. Saranac Commons, 19 W. Main. (838-7870) GEARS, BEERS & ENGINEERS An open workshop session for any adults interested in designing and/or building a human-powered vehicle for the July 8 GizMotion festival. (The children’s event, “Gears, RootBeers and Engineers” follows on Saturday, May 13, at 1 pm.) May 12. Free. Gizmo-cda, 806 N. Fourth. gizmo-cda.org (208-651-6200)

N O R T H W E S T

THE FESTIVAL FOR CLASSICAL MUSICIANS & DANCERS

Young Artist Concert

Wednesday, May 17, at 7:30 at the Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

— With The Spokane Symphony —

Young Artist Ballet Winner to perform at

The Festival Highlights Concert

Friday, May 19, at 7:30

at the Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

Both Events are Free and Open to the public

Celebrate RIVER INN - SPOKANE

your Mom today and everyday! k FAIRTRADE k

SHOW YOUR MOM SOME LOVE

35 W. Main, Spokane 509-464-7677

RESERVE YOUR SPOT TODAY: 509-323-2577 May 14, 2017 | 11am - 2pm RED LION RIVER INN 700 N Division St, Spokane, WA 99202 | redlion.com/river-inn

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 47


Playing Defense A provision in the federal budget bill aims to protect the medical cannabis industry BY MIKE BOOKEY

Safe, for now.

W

e’ve written on several occasions in this column about how the future of the legal cannabis industry is in question, thanks to the Trump administration and its attorney general, Jeff Sessions, an outspoken cannabis opponent whose rhetoric on the subject has at times escalated to a Reefer Madness level. Fear that the feds might be coming after states, like ours, where cannabis is legal for medical and/or recreational purposes has been looming since Inauguration Day, but last week there was at least a little relief on the medical side. The omnibus funding bill — the one where the government might have shut down if Trump didn’t get billions of dollars for his wall (which he didn’t) — also included language that extended the Rohrabacher-Farr amendment. Since 2014, this law has prevented the Department of Justice from using federal funds to prosecute medical marijuana providers or users in states that have approved laws allowing it. Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Oregon) teamed up with Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R-California) to work on the provision, which protects medical programs in both states. California has had a medical cannabis program since 1996 while Oregon passed its program into law in 1998, the same year Washington adopted similar legislation. “Medical marijuana patients and the businesses that

$15 - Eighths

$4.50 - Edibles

$4.50 - Joints

$6 - Grams

support them now have a measure of certainty,” Blumenauer said in a statement. “But this annual challenge must end. We need permanent protections for state-legal medical marijuana programs, as well as adult-use.” It remains to be seen how Sessions’ Department of Justice approaches the issue of recreational or medical cannabis in states where it’s legal for those uses. In addition to the possibility of additional legislative restrictions, like the one included in the omnibus budget bill impeding the DOJ’s anti-cannabis efforts, the issue of how federal law enforcement would execute enforcement is also problematic. Former Drug Enforcement Agency chief of staff Jodi Avergun told Marijuana Business Daily earlier this year that the mere logistics and resources required to arrest and prosecute would be an enormous hurdle for the DOJ. Here in Washington, both Gov. Jay Inslee and Attorney General Bob Ferguson have been clear in their support for Washington cannabis laws, showing support for businesses and users alike. “I will also be very clear with AG Sessions that I will defend the will of Washington voters,” tweeted Ferguson in February. “My office will use every tool at our disposal to ensure that the federal government does not undermine Washington’s successful, unified system for regulating recreational and medical marijuana.” n

Great Weed. Better Service.

New Location 9403 E Trent Ave 605 E. Francis

HOURS: MON-SAT 8-9 SUN 9-9 WARNING: This product has intoxicating affects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

48 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

RoyalsCannabis_MayFlowers_051117_3H_GG.pdf


STOP BY AND GET YOUR MOTHER

WHAT SHE

Really Wants FOR MOTHER’S DAY 509-309-2130 1919 E Francis Ave

TOP SHELF. YOUR SHELF.

THEGREENNUGGET

Warning: This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

DAILY 8AM - 11PM CINDER NORTH 7011 North Division (509) 241-3091

WWW.CINDERSMOKE.COM

DAILY 8AM - 11PM CINDER IN THE VALLEY 1421 North Mullan Road (509) 241-3726

This product has into�icatin� e�ects and may be habit formin�. �ari�uana can impair concentration� coordination� and �ud�ment. �o not operate a �ehicle or machinery under the in�uence of this dru�. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

Cinder_FingersHoldingAJoint_051117_6H_AA.pdf

In with the new! Our remodeled shops have humidity & temperature controlled showcases. Your cannabis awaits in the best environment possible!

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 49


GREEN ZONE

SALE

Friday ONLY - Starts at 8am

$

30 EIGHTHS

5 JOINTS

$

SATURDAY SPECIAL

10309 E Trent Ave.

SHATTERDAY DISCOUNTS ON ALL 1 GRAM CONCENTRATES

9107 N. COUNTRY HOMES BLVD

MON - SAT: 9A - 10P SUN: 9A - 9P This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product.For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

SPOKANE VALLEY, WA GREENLIGHTSPOKANE.COM

509.309.3193

WARNING: This product has intoxicating affects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

$12 TOP SHELF EVERYDAY

ALL FLOWER $ 10 OR LESS ON TUESDAYS Best Prices In Town

213 E Sprague Ave • Spokane, WA • 509.315.9262 OFFERS AVAILABLE WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

Open until 11 Every night, Midnight on Friday and Saturday Nights.

thevaultcannabis.com This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with the consumption of this product. For use only by adults 21 and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

50 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a five-year sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

GREEN ZONE


Now Open Later MON- SAT 8:30 AM TO MIDNIGHT

SUNDAYS

10 AM TO 11 PM

$100 OUNCES $50 HALVES MUNCHIE MONDAY

20% OFF EDIBLES

WAXY WEDNESDAY

20% OFF CONCENTRATES

THIRSTY THURSDAY

20% OFF DRINKS FIRE FRIDAY 20% OFF BUDTENDER PICK

SUN 10A-11P MON - SAT 8:30A-12A TOKERFRIENDLYSPOKANE.COM

1515 S. LYONS RD AIRWAY HEIGHTS

(509) 244-8728 Warning: This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

EVENTS | CALENDAR MAYFEST The downtown Cheney festival features live music, craft vendors, a car show, petting zoo, kids activities, artists, a cornhole tourney and more. May 12, 7-10:30 pm; May 13, 9 am-4 pm. Free. cheneymayfest.org RAINIER BEER + THE GREAT PNW RELEASE PARTY The Great PNW has teamed up with Rainier to create a special apparel collection. Includes a merch store, beer, and live music by Summer in Siberia, Deer and DJs Unifest and Twin Towers. May 12, 7 pm. Free. Washington Cracker Co. Building, 304 W. Pacific. terrainspokane.com 28TH ANNUAL MOTHER’S DAY TOUR This year’s event offers a chance to explore how Spokane’s geological history helped shape its architectural identity through a native rock driving tour. May 13 and 14, from noon-5 pm. $15/$20. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) FAMILY FUN FAIR A parenting expo connecting families with support groups, after-school programs, summer camps, scholarships, and children’s health and emergency services in our community. Includes kids activities, a carnival, pet adoption, food trucks and more. Events also held in River Park Square, following the Junior Lilac Parade. May 13, 9:30 am-3 pm. Free. Riverfront Park. (928-9664) GARDEN EXPO 2017 The annual festival and sale features more than 250 garden-related vendors, with free parking, door prizes, seminars, demos, kids activities, photography displays, a flower show, live music, food trucks and more. May 13, 9 am-5 pm. Free. SCC, 1810 N. Greene St. tieg.org (535-8434) KIDICAL MASS A family friendly afternoon bike ride of about 3 miles cycling on anything that rolls; all types of bikes, trailers, Xtracycles, bakfiets, tandems, folding bikes, trikes are welcome. May 13, 1-2:30 pm. Free. Chief Garry Park, 2701 E. Sinto. summerparkways.com THE LANTERN FEST Revelers join together to release lanterns after sundown. Before the launch, enjoy food, live music, a stage show, familiar princesses, face painters, s’mores, balloon artists and more. May 13, 4 pm. $7-$55. Stateline Speedway, 1349 N. Beck Rd. (208-773-5019) MOTHER’S DAY CARD WORKSHOP Join the Spokane Public Library to make Mother’s Day cards for the special people in your life. Bring your creativity and we will supply the paper, scissors and glue. Offered all day at all branches. May 13. Free. spokanelibrary.org NORTH IDAHO VETERANS STAND DOWN The 24th event assists veterans and their families in Eastern Washington and the five Northern Idaho counties with services throughout the year. Free to active duty and military veterans and their families. May 13, 8 am-2 pm. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Gov’t Way. stvincentdepaulcda.org WEEKEND AT THE RAIL MUSEUM The Inland Northwest Rail Museum celebrates the driving of the golden spike that joined the first transcontinental railroad across the U.S. on May 10, 1869, at Promontory Summit, Utah. Every child under 5 who visits on May 13 gets a free golden spike. On May 14, mothers get free admission and a special thankyou gift. Open 10 am-5 pm both days. In Reardan. inlandnwrailmuseum.com WORDS ABOUT BIRDS Local writers Lisa Langelier and Laurie Klein are joined by experts from Spokane Audu-

bon Society and live birds from the West Valley Outdoor Learning Center and local falconers for an event celebrating International Migratory Bird Day. May 13, 2-4:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com 4TH ANNUAL KHQ JOB FAIR Come be a part of Spokane’s largest annual hiring event. Sponsored by KHQ, City of Spokane, and WorkSource. May 17, 11 am-2 pm. Free for job seekers. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. khq.com/jobfair (279-7000) JUNETEENTH Come join the MOSAIC for a presentation on Juneteenth. May 18, 12:30-1:30 pm. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu SPOKANE EDIBLE TREE PROJECT VOLUNTEER KICK-OFF Community members are invited to learn more about volunteer opportunities and celebrate the start of the 2017 harvest season with music, food, and beverages. May 18, 6-8 pm. Free. Saranac, 25 W. Main. spokaneedibletreeproject.org

FILM

AFTER THE STORM Dwelling on his past glory as a prize-winning author, Ryota wastes the money he makes as a private detective on gambling and can barely pay child support. (Not Rated.) May 11, 13-14, times vary. $4-$7. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org T2 TRAINSPOTTING Twenty years have gone by. Much has changed but just as much remains the same: Mark Renton returns to the only place he can ever call home. They are waiting for him: Spud, Sick Boy, and Begbie. May 11-14, times vary. $6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) THE KING & I A screening and discussion of Anna Leonowens and the history and the religions of Southeast Asia, colonialism, women’s rights, slavery and international trade. May 11, 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. Moran Prairie Library, 6004 S. Regal St. (448-0659) ROGUE ONE Watch the newest Star Wars film, and enjoy a snack, craft, and coloring pages. Rated PG-13; children under 13 must be accompanied by a parent. May 13, 2 pm. Free. Indian Trail Library, 4909 W. Barnes. (444-5331) MONDAY NIGHT MOVIES: STAND BY ME Based on Stephen King’s novella “The Body,” Rob Reiner’s 1986 bittersweet film tells the story of four friends who embark on a journey to learn more about the death of a child killed near their rural home. Includes an intro from the Inlander’s film and music editor Nathan Weinbender. May 15, 7 pm. $6-$9. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com 80’S FILM SERIES: OVERBOARD A snobbish heiress hires a carpenter to construct a closet on her yacht. She doesn’t pay him, gets an amnesia-causing injury and he tricks her into believing she’s his wife. Antics ensue. May 16, 7-9 pm. $5. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) SFCC INTERNATIONAL FILM FEST: MARGUERITE This 2015 French film loosely retells the story of a noted American Florence Foster. May 16, 7:15 pm. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com NT LIVE: ROSENCRANTZ & GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD Against the backdrop of Hamlet, two hapless minor characters take center stage. Starring

Daniel Radcliffe, Joshua McGuire, and David Haig. May 18, 7-10:30 pm. $12. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. kenworthy.org REI AT THE MOVIES: EXPEDITION ALASKA The story of a 7-day, nonstop endurance event that took place through the Alaskan wilderness in the summer of 2015. May 18, 7 pm. $10-$12. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404) SUDS & CINEMA: THIS IS SPINAL TAP The ultimate ‘rockumentory.’ Includes ice cream from Brain Freeze, beer from Trickster’s Brewing Co. and prizes/giveaways from Horizon Credit Union. Doors at 6, movie at 7 pm. May 18, 6 pm. $5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. bit. ly/2pakpmA (327-1050)

FOOD

VINO WINE TASTING Friday (May 12, 3-6:30 pm) features Coyote Canyon Winery, and Saturday (May 13, 2-4:30 pm, follows the theme “Wines for Mom.” Vino!, 222 S. Washington St. vinowine.com 7TH ANNUAL BOOZERUN The scavenger hunt pub crawl covers eight bars in eight hours. Starts at Tamarack Public House (912 W. Sprague). May 13, 5:30 pm. $20-$25. spokanepubcrawls.com MOTHER’S DAY HIGH TEA A special high tea and luncheon, including an art installation by Open Eye Antiques. May 13, 12-2 pm. $25/person. Bank Left Gallery, 100 S. Bridge St. bankleftgallery. com (509-878-8425) ART & BEER ON THE BLUFF Features eight artists, live music, food and craft beer. May 14, 12-6 pm. Free. Big Barn Brewing Co., 16004 N. Applewood Ln. facebook.com/BodaciousBerriesFruitsAndBrews (710-2962) MOTHER’S DAY BRUNCH BUFFET Celebration mothers with a buffet style brunch. Reservations recommended. May 14, 9 am-1:30 pm. $26-$42. Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan. mirabeauparkhotel.com SPOKANE CRAFT BEER WEEK The week-long celebration of craft brewing features daily events with more than 40 regional breweries, including tastings, beer releases, contests, games, live music and more. May 15-21; complete schedule at spokanecraftbeerweek.com CHEESEMAKING CLASS This class covers recipes and techniques for beginner-friendly goat cheeses: chèvre, feta, and dry-curd cottage cheese. May 18, 6-8:30 pm. $25-$30. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. inwfoodnetwork.org (208-546-9366)

MUSIC

SPOKANE SYMPHONY: THE MUSIC OF LED ZEPPELIN The Symphony performs Led Zeppelin’s music, amplified by a full rock band and accompanied by singer Randy Jackson (of Zebra). May 12, 8 pm. $25-$80. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) A SALUTE TO BROADWAY Pages of Harmony Chorus and Quartets present its annual spring a cappella show featuring the Sweet Adelines. May 13, 3-5 pm. $15/adults; $5/students. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (218-9033) SPOKANE JAZZ ORCHESTRA: MUSIC OF STING The SJO performs the music of Sting and his jazz influences; also features guest artist Keleren Millham. May

13, 7:30 pm. $12-$26.50. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404) SPRING CONTRA DANCE Spokane Folklore Society’s spring dance, with music by Floating Crowbar and Ray Polhemus calling. Beginner workshop at 6:45 pm. May 13, 7-10 pm. $8/$10. East Spokane Grange, 1621 N. Park Rd. spokanefolklore.org (747-2640) MOTHER’S DAY CONCERT IN THE PARK The North Idaho College Wind Symphony and Chambers Singers perform as a “thank you” to all moms. May 14, 2-4 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene City Park, 415 W. Mullan Rd. nic.edu/events MUSICFEST NORTHWEST YOUNG ARTIST CONCERT Young musicians on the verge of promising careers perform solo with The Spokane Symphony. May 17, 7:30 pm. Free. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

SPOKANE EMPIRE Versus the Arizona Rattlers on May 12 and June 3; the Colorado Crush on May 26. Kick-off at 7 pm. $13-$95. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000) WARRIOR CAMP MMA Live mixed martial arts fights featuring local athletes. May 12, 7 pm. $20-$30. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. hubsportscenter.org (509-927-0602) IPW MEMORIAL SHOW Inland Pro Wrestling Presents its annual “Memorial Show,” which pays tribute to the ones that have fallen before us. May 13, 7 pm. Free. The Palomino, 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. spokanepalomino.com SPOKANE FIGHT NIGHT A USA Boxing sanctioned event featuring local/ regional athletes. Doors open at 3 pm, fights at 4 pm. May 13, 4-8:30 pm. $15$25. The Emperor Room, 25 E. Lincoln Rd. bit.ly/2ptmv1M STARGAZING Spokane Astronomical Society shares how to start gazing at the stars, identify planets and constellations, and use a telescope. May 17, 7-8 pm. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. (893-8350)

THEATER

CINDERELLA Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Tony Award-winning musical, with a contemporary take on the classic tale. May 11-14, times vary. $32.50-$72.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. wcebroadway.com CLEOPATRA & THE SLAVE GIRLS OF VENUS It’s the 1960s, and a studio is producing one cheesy movie after another. When the producer decides to produce Shakespeare, unexpected events ensue. May 11-13 at 7 pm; May 13 at 2 pm. $12. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway. (342-2055) THE TAMING OF THE SHREW A performance of the much-loved comedy by William Shakespeare. Through May 21; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $27. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) BEDROOM FARCE Trevor and Susannah, whose marriage is on the rocks, inflict their miseries on their nearest and dearest. May 12-20, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm; also May 18 at 5 pm. $10. EWU, 526 Fifth St. facebook.com/ ewutheatre (359-2459)

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 51


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess DON YAWN

I’m a 40-year-old man who can’t seem to keep a relationship going for more than a year. There’s never bitter fighting or betrayal. I just gradually lose interest. I can’t blame my girlfriends — most of whom are pretty exciting people. I’m the problem, but why? And can I change? —Frustrated Ever gotten new carpeting? The first month, it’s “No shoes and no drinks whatsoever in the living room!” A few months after that: “Oh, we don’t use glasses anymore. Just AMY ALKON splash red wine around and drink right off the rug.” In the happiness research world, the psychological shift behind this is called “hedonic adaptation” — “hedonic” from the Greek word for pleasure and “adaptation” to describe how we acclimate to new stuff or situations in our lives. They rather quickly stop giving us the buzz (or bite) they did at first, and we get pitched right back to our baseline feeling of well-being (Yeahwhatevsville). Bummer, huh? But there’s an upside. Psychologists Timothy Wilson and Dan Gilbert explain that hedonic adaptation is part of our “psychological immune system,” helping us recover from all the kicks in the teeth and boys’ bathroom swirlies of life. There’s another possible bummer at work here, per your longing for less wilty love. You may be more “sensation-seeking” than most people. Research by psychologist Marvin Zuckerman, who coined the term, finds that this is a personality trait with origins in genes, as well as experience, reflected in strong cravings for novel, varied, and intense sensations and experiences. If this is driving you, basically, you want it new, you want it now, and all the better if it’s a little life-threatening. In other words, some benefits of a committed relationship, like deeply knowing another person, may end up being deeply boring to you. Still, part of your problem may be a hopeful approach — simply hoping your relationships don’t die instead of taking steps to prevent that. Research by psychologist Sonja Lyubomirsky finds that three “intentional activities” help keep hedonic adaptation from overtaking a relationship — appreciating, injecting variety, and incorporating surprise. Appreciating simply means regularly reviewing and “savoring” what’s great about your partner and what you have together. (Even better if you also express it to them). Bringing in variety and surprise means filling the relationship with “unexpected moments” and “unpredictable pleasures,” big and small. Be honest with women about your befizzlement problem. When you find one who’s up for the challenge, get cracking with her on keeping the excitement alive. Be sure to do this both in romantic day-to-day ways and, say, with the perfect romantic weekend for a guy like you — one that starts with the valet at the spa opening the trunk, removing the hood over your head, and cutting the zip ties so you can go take a sauna.

BACKUP TO THE FUTURE

Two years ago, I met this beautiful, intriguing girl. I gave her my number, but she never called. Last week, she texted out of the blue. Weird! My friend said she probably had a boyfriend until now. Do women really hoard men’s info in case their relationship tanks? —Wondering Consider the male BFF. A woman may not consciously think of hers as her backup man. But should her relationship go kaput, there he is — perfectly situated to dry her tears. Um, with his penis. There seems to be an evolutionary adaptation for people in relationships — especially women — to line up backup mates. It’s basically a form of doomsday prepping — except instead of a bunker with 700 cans of beans and three slightly dented Hellfire missiles, there are two eligible men on the shelves of a woman’s mind and the phone number of another on a crumpled ATM receipt in the back of her wallet. Evolutionary psychologists Joshua Duntley and David Buss explain that in ancestral times, even people “experiencing high relationship satisfaction would have benefited from cultivating potential replacement mates” in case their partner cheated, ditched them, died, or dropped a few rungs in mate value. A woman whose partner left or died “would have suffered a lapse in protection, mate investment, and resources for her children, much like people who transition between jobs in the modern environment sometimes suffer a lapse in insurance coverage.” Duntley and Buss note that female psychology today still has women prepping for romantic disaster like they’re living in caves and lean-tos instead of condos and McMansions. For example, in research on opposite-sex friendships, “women, but not men, prioritize economic resources and physical prowess in their opposite-sex friends, a discrepancy that mirrors sex-differences in mate preferences.” Getting back to this woman who texted you, she probably saw something in you from the start but was otherwise encumbered. So, yes, she’s likely been carrying a torch for you, but for two years, it’s been in airplane mode. n ©2017, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

52 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

EVENTS | CALENDAR BROADWAY UNBOUND An annual showcase of Whitworth’s student performers and technicians. May 12, 7:30-9 pm. $3. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. whitworth.edu CASTING FOR MURDER When Aunt Maud is murdered, actress Angela Benson inherits a fortune, and much suspicion Through May 21; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $12-$14. Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway Ave. igniteonbroadway.org (795-0004) MURDER’S IN THE HEIR The game Clue comes to life in a play. May 12-13 and 19-20 at 6:30 pm. PRIDE Prep, 811 W. Sprague. prideprepschool.org MET LIVE IN HD: DER ROSENKAVALIER See a dream cast of Renée Fleming as the Marschallin and Elīna Garanča as Octavian in Strauss’s grandest opera. May 13, 9:30 am. $15-$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org

VISUAL ARTS

DESIGN DISRUPTORS An exclusive screening of the InVision-produced documentary, hosted by EWU Visual Communication Design (VCD). The film reveals a never-before-seen perspective on the design approaches of 15+ companies, and how they’re using the power of design to disrupt billion dollar industries. May 11, 5:30-9 pm. Free, RSVP requested. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. bit.ly/EWUdesign FEATHER MY NEST A showcase of recent works by local artists, including Holly Swanson, Debbie Hughbanks, Linda Besse and Gay Waldman.

Through June 10; open house May 18, 4-7 pm. Gallery open Tue-Fri, 1- am-5 pm and Sat 10 am-2 pm. free. Spokane Gallery and Framing, 409 S. Dishman Mica Rd. (747-0812) TIFFANY PATTERSON & FRIENDS A show featuring more than 25 new pieces by local artists, with all proceeds from art sales supporting Spokane artist Tiffany Patterson’s costs relating to a recent cancer diagnosis. Reception includes live music, drinks, and more. May 12, 5-8 pm. Emerge, 208 N. Fourth. emergecda.org VICTORIA BRACE, LINDSEY MEYERS CARROLL, & CARY WEIGAND A show featuring new works by oil painter Victoria Brace, charcoal artist Lindsey Meyers Carroll, and figurative clay sculptor Cary Weigand. Opening reception May 12, 5-8 pm; artist talk May 13, 1-3 pm. Show runs daily through June 3, from 11 am-6 pm. Free. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com SECOND SATURDAY VALLEY ART TOUR Hatch Gallery exhibits the artwork of local artist Eddie Kerr. Other events include tours of Millwood Print Works and a local student art project unveiling at the Spokane Valley Library. May 13, 5-7 pm. Free. Hatch Gallery, 9612 E. Sprague. (509-768-0309)

WORDS

MOSS VOL. 2 CELEBRATION Join Moss, a journal of the Pacific Northwest, to celebrate the release of its second compendium. Hosted by Moss contributing editor Sharma Shields and featuring contributors Leyna Krow, Kate Lebo,

and Tiffany Midge. May 11, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) PIVOT: SECRETS At the second main stage event for Pivot, eight storytellers tell true stories from their own lives that revolve around secrets. May 11, 7-9 pm. Suggested donation. Washington Cracker Co. Building, 304 W. Pacific. pivotspokane.com PIE & WHISKEY & MOTHERS A reading/book signing featuring writers Kate Lebo and Sam Ligon, who founded the popular similar event for EWU’s Get Lit! Festival. May 13, 1 pm. Free. Sandpoint Library, 1407 Cedar. (208-265-9565) LISTEN TO YOUR MOTHER The 7th annual Mother’s Day show features local writers and community members sharing stories relating to motherhood. May 14, 7 pm. $18. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404) PAJAMA STORYTIME WITH LOCAL AUTHORS Local authors choose their favorite picture book to read aloud. Ages 2-5. May 16, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (279-0299) READING: MICHAEL FRY The cartoonist and writer reads from his new children’s book “How to be a Supervillain.” May 16, 6 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) TAPROOT SPEAKER SERIES: SHARMA SHIELDS The Spokane author of the novel “The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac” tells her story. May 18, 7-9 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (279-0299) n

SUMMER GUIDE Everything you need to plan the Best Summer Ever

Getaways, Concerts, Festivals, Outdoor Movies and More

ON STANDS: JUNE 15 Submit event information to our editorial team: Deadline JUNE 1ST: GetListed@Inlander.com Reserve advertising space: Deadline JUNE 8TH: Advertising@Inlander.com


355 nder.com 09) 444-7 la PHONE: (5BulletinBoard@In mit Parkway : IL u A S M t Ee s m 01 2 N: 1227 W IN PERSO Spokane, WA 99

REVERSE

Luxurious Romantic Unforgettable International award-winning lakefront lodging billionaires and royalty have stayed here. 30 min. N of Spokane from $79 see specials innatthelake.com 509.447.5772

MORTGAGE 208-762-6887

“FUNDING YOUR FUTURE” Learn more about “LOCAL” REPRESENTATIVE reverse mortgage loans NMLS 400451 Reverse Mortgage Consultant 1-866-787-0980 Toll-Free 208-762-6887 Local

10% OFF

Spiritual Supplies

ART @ ORIGIN

Specializing in Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy

FREE INFORMATION LarryWaters Waters Larry

CHECK OUT OUR CLASSES!

Idaho & Washington NMLS 531629 Must be at least 62 years of age. Wells Fargo Home Mortgage is a division of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. © 2011 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. NMLSR ID 399801. AS581479 3/11-6/11

Calling ALL painters, potters, sculptors, wood crafters and photographers!

Deep Tissue Hot Rock :: Sports Relaxation

The Friends of Manito May 13th at Garden Expo!

330 E Main IN PULLMAN 208-502-0349

ONLINE SCHEDULING

Near the southeast entrance

Dezana Aman, LMP 509.998.0255

Find tropicals, bulbs, garden art and lots of colorful containers!

Available at more than 1,000 locations throughout the Inland Northwest.

707 N Cedar Suite #4 (The Pelican Building)

ArtOfMassage¯Spokane.com MA 60016914

Info at thefriendsofmanito.org

Sun Meadow Family Nudist Resort Year Round Skinny Dipping 208-686-8686

FriendsOfManito_GardenExpo_042717_1U_CPW.pdf

Desert Jewels Nursery

Sponsored by River Ridge Fine Arts Association & Origin Church

For more information contact gina@photographic-perspectives.com

444-SELL

Largest Selection of Native Plants in Eastern WA!

914 S Monroe St.

Between Huckleberry’s & Ace

MAY 20TH • 12 NOON TO 4 PM 5115 S. Freya • www.originspokane.org

to advertise:

Get Ur Pic w/ Walk In the WildZoo sign @ Recorded Memories! Music U Crave-From Purr 2 Roar!

SEE US AT THE GARDEN EXPO!

SAFE & SECURE

PACKAGE RECEIVING

Saturday May 13th

FOR ALL YOUR INTERNET PURCHASES

BUYING Estate Contents / Household Goods See abesdiscount.com or 509-939-9996

FedEx s UPS s Amazon s Zappos FREE IN-STORE REGISTRATION

Open Fri & Sat through June • 9am to 5pm

509.838.1544

9809 E. Upriver Dr.

(509)893-3771

info@desertjewelsnursery.com desertjewelsnursery.com •

1

2

3

4

5

14

6

17

23

29

1. New York City mayor who later became a judge on “The People’s Court” 2. Completely strip 3. Gushes onstage, say 4. One-named singer who was a muse for Andy Warhol 5. Query 6. ____ Tin Tin 7. “Poke-____!” (kids’ book series) 8. Title character who “Is Back” and “At Bay” in two John Updike novels 9. “____ alive!” 10. Stud muffin 11. Diet soda introduced in 2005 12. Peter out

11

12

13

19

40

24

25

31

30 35

26 32

33

36

27

28

50

51

34 37

38

41

39 42

43

44

45

46

52

47 53

48 55

54

58 63

10

21

from Italy to Portugal DOWN

9

18

22

43. Film noir weather condition 44. Least likely to forgive 45. Actor Guinness 47. Tolkien tree creatures 48. Soaks (up) 52. Completely safe, as a proposition 55. Swell locale? 57. “Just Another Girl on the ____” (1993 movie) 58. Words from the agreeable 61. Heroic trait 63. ABBA hit song that had 6M views long before social media? 67. Puccini’s “Un bel di,” e.g. 68. 1961 Charlton Heston title role 69. Fist-bumps 70. Flutters, as eyelashes 71. Ways to go 72. One supercolony of them stretches almost 4,000 miles

8

16

20

ACROSS 1. Locale painted on the Sistine Chapel ceiling 5. Many Al Jazeera viewers 10. “For Those About to Rock” band 14. Moore of “Ghost” 15. Album half 16. “Stop procrastinating!” 17. Comedy routines that had 5K views long before social media? 20. Lacking 21. Mr. or Mrs. Right 22. Alphabet trio 23. Part of graduation attire 26. Took over 29. “For ____ jolly good fellow” 31. Baby’s crib part 34. “Gone Girl” actress Ward 35. It bought Instagram in 2012 39. Watergate monogram 40. TV catchphrase that had 4B views long before social media?

7

15

59

64

56

60

61 65

49 57

62

66

67

68

69

70

71

72

“5K”

13. Small monetary amts. 18. Louisville-based restaurant chain 19. MSNBC’s “Morning ____” 24. Happy ____ be 25. Polish brand

27. Muppet who speaks in a falsetto 28. Brown who wrote “The Da Vinci Code” 30. B-52’s home: Abbr. 32. “Were you raised in ____?!?!”

THIS W ANSWE EEK’S I SAW RS ON YOUS

33. One way to be loved 36. Law school accrediting org. 37. More than chubby 38. ____ in kangaroo 40. Modern acronym meaning “carpe diem” 41. 21, at a casino, say 42. Wino’s affliction, for short 43. One shooting the breeze? 46. Two characters in “sex, lies, and videotape” 49. One with a well-defined career? 50. Cue 51. Cause of gray hair, say 53. “Was that so hard?!” 54. Fired up 56. Batting fig. 59. Part of many a rural skyline 60. Where “you can hang out with all the boys,” in song 62. Opera set in Egypt 63. Chew the fat 64. 401(k) alternative 65. Prefix with day or night 66. Publishers’ hirees, for short

MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 53


The Avenger My journey through Spokane’s small claims court and how I almost ended up on Judge Judy BY CELIA DARROUGH

I

was sitting in the parking lot of an organic grocery store on Spokane’s South Hill, staring at a house where I thought the man who stole my $125 lived. I had already spent another $100 that day: $14 to file a small claims case, $45 for the process server to find the guy, and around $40 at the store so it didn’t seem weird that I was hanging out in the lot. Maybe it was then that I should have just let it go. I made a tattoo appointment in June of 2016. The artist was reportedly so talented he was booked out six months in advance. Dec. 2 was to be the day I finally got the Voldemortresembling tattoo on my chest covered up. But five days before my appointment, I hadn’t heard from him about the custom design he was supposed to draw. When I went to the shop, the other artists informed me “he doesn’t work here anymore.” I called him from the parking lot, and the apologetic tattooist promised to refund the cash I put down as a deposit. He wouldn’t be tattooing in Spokane for a while, he said. A text from him nine days later apologized for the fact that the check he was going to mail me might not arrive before I went on vacation. Texts to him a month later went unreturned. A phone call informed me the number was no longer in service. I commented on his Facebook page, and he deleted his profile. His wife scolded me when I messaged her, and a third message to a woman I thought was his sister turned out to be his ex-wife. She never responded. All this for $125? The shop offered to absorb the artist’s debt and book me an appointment without having to put down an additional deposit. But I was frustrated, and I didn’t want him to get away with it. This was no longer about money. It was about justice.

I

JESSIE HYNES ILLUSTRATION

54 INLANDER MAY 11, 2017

filed a police report with the Spokane Police Department, which categorized the incident as “fraud-pretense/swindle.” I sent a complaint to the Washington Department of Licensing, but was told the department has no jurisdiction over “contractual disputes.” Then I filed a small claims case. At the Broadway Center Building on Jefferson Street, I spoke to the clerks about how to move forward with my case. The onus, it turns out, was on me. To serve the papers, you have to either hire a process server, pay the sheriff’s

office, ask a disinterested third party, or send them by registered mail. All of this requires you to know where the defendant is. I found an address for him online, paid a process server, and then drove to the grocery store near his house, where I sat in the parking lot, snacking on veggie chips across the street, thinking about how he’d finally get what was coming to him. A couple of weeks later, the process server told me the house was vacant, and that it’d cost another $45 if I wanted to try a different address. Someone who replied to my Reddit post told me, “I showed up to his studio a couple months ago, only to find out that some else lives there now.” He had moved out of state. The only other step would have been to pay to hire a skip tracer, who might be able to track him down. In court on March 29, I asked Judge Gregory Tripp for a continuance. I didn’t want to give up yet — especially since I had received a letter from a producer at Judge Judy who wanted to talk to me about featuring my case on the show. Like the rest of my attempts, it turned out to be a dead end. After reading about the paid trip to Los Angeles for me and a witness, I spoke with the producer on the phone, but when I mentioned I was only suing for $125, I could feel her lose interest. She asked, “Is there anything else you can sue him for?”

L

ast week, back at the Broadway Center Building, I sat with a throng of others, waiting to speak to Judge Tripp about my case. This time, there was no point in asking for a continuance. Sitting in the creaky pew that shook every time someone readjusted, I informed the judge that I could not find the defendant and asked that the case just be dismissed. I was over it. Sometimes there is no justice. A man can take $125 from you, and you can spend your days off hiring process servers and your mornings going to court and your lunch breaks talking to Judge Judy producers on the phone, only to end up sitting in the courthouse parking lot with a pile of papers telling you that you failed. Justice, in this case, was knowing that I did everything I could. Because my case was dismissed without prejudice, I can refile if I ever do locate him. I think I’ve made peace with it. For now, that will have to do. 


Presented by

“It’s such a fine line between stupid and... clever.” -Nigel Tufnel

MOTHER’s DAY

WEEKEND! MAY 13 & 14 - Celebrate Mother’s Day at Silverwood! When a family brings Mom to the park and PURCHASES their ticket online or at the front gate, Mom gets in FREE! Plus everyone receives a special pricing of only $38.00 for general admission and $21.00 for youth/senior admission. Want to save even more? Purchase your tickets online. Not valid with any other discounts, coupons, promotions or special offers.

924 W GARLAND AVE, SPOKANE

THURSDAY, MAY 18TH $

5 ADMISSION

Advance tickets available at the box office

BEER FLOWS @ 6:00PM | PROGRAM STARTS @ 7:00PM

FREE POPCORN

FROM HORIZON

WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

GET OUT TO THE NORTHWEST’S LARGEST THEME PARK Where Your Family Will Experience,

Hair-Raising Attractions, Pint-Sized Kiddie Adventure, Gigantic Roller Coasters, Massive Water A GENERNY DAY A Slides & Award-Winning 2017 L ADMISSION SEASO N Entertainment. Just outside Coeur d’Alene

TASTE THE MOVIE FREE SAMPLES

FOR THE LOWEST TICKET PRICE ANYWHERE GO TO: on Hwy 95.

Limit

ed T ime

O ffer

SILVERWOODTHEMEPARK.COM MAY 11, 2017 INLANDER 55


FULL

GIVEAWAY

THROTTLE Memorial Day Weekend

FULL

G I V E AW

AY

THROTTLE

WIN THIS

RTS CAR O P S 6 8 A T O Y O T 7 1 20 “LIMITED” EDITION

HELL’S BELLES IN CONCERT

Saturday, May 27th • 7 pm Reserved $20

MEMORIAL DAY BINGO

$45,000 FULL THROTTLE GIVEAWAY

Monday, May 29th • 1 pm

Monday, May 29th

$1,199 Bingo with a $5,000 CDA Special.

3x points • 3 - 5 pm 7 pm • $45,000 Car and Cash Giveaway

1 800 523-2464 | CDACASINO.COM

Profile for The Inlander

Inlander 05/11/2017  

Inlander 05/11/2017