Page 1

MATH WARS LOCAL SCHOOLS JOIN THE FIGHT PAGE 13

STAGE AND SCREEN HANNIBAL BURESS COMES TO TOWN PAGE 37

ROASTING OVER AN OPEN FIRE

KENDALL YARDS’ NEWEST RESTAURANT PAGE 44

MAY 10-16, 2018 | PROST!

Craft Beer Week Spokane's Wineries Spring-Inspired Cocktails The region'’s best happy hours ... and more! 

page 22

SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER


Helping equip families in Spokane with the resources they need to thrive. Wisdom. Vision. Passion. Strength.

For the 10th year in a row, Washington Trust Bank is partnering with KREM Cares for the Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery Diaper Drive. You can make a monetary donation at any of our Spokane or North Idaho branches from May 8 until May 31.

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INSIDE VOL. 25, NO. 27 | COVER ILLUSTRATION: CRAIG WINZER

COMMENT 5 NEWS 13 COVER STORY 22

CULTURE 37 FOOD 44 FILM 48

MUSIC 53 EVENTS 58 GREEN ZONE 60

EDITOR’S NOTE

W

e don’t need an actual reason to drink. The fact it’s a Tuesday usually will suffice. On average, Americans over age 18 consume about 700 drinks a year — a little under two per day. But if you did want a special occasion, you’ll find several in our DRINK LOCAL section (beginning on page 22). For starters? Your mom. Spokane’s wineries welcome the public on Mother’s Day weekend with special releases, food pairings and live entertainment; we’ve put together a keepsake map (page 29) for the occasion. Next week, then, is all about beer, with Spokane Craft Beer Week. Prefer cocktails? We have spring-inspired suggestions. Love a good deal? We have the region’s best happy hours. And finally, we examine the research on different types of booze and consider the timeless question: Are you a Hemingway or a Mary Poppins? — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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RUSSIAN SOUL PAGE 42

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COMMENT | ELECTION 2018

Integrity Check Republican candidates in this election cycle have a tricky tightrope to walk

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resident Donald Trump’s style has jeopardized the House of Representatives’ Republican majority in Congress this year. Members of Congress are forced to choose between Trump — how he acts and all he stands for — and their own political instincts. The dilemma is real, and members of the House must realize that integrity is important to any candidate. Those elected officials who stand with President Trump are willing to overlook shortcomings they wouldn’t otherwise stand for if given a free choice. Despite his bluntness, intransigence and personal foibles (Stormy Daniels, for example), Trump as president wields tremendous power — enough to force officeholders and voters to be either “with him or against him.” Granted, he’s accomplished some impressive policy victories for some voters, endearing him to some public officials but making enemies of others. Tax relief, border protection and a successful Supreme Court nomination have convinced some that he’s “not that bad” on policy matters. They’re right, but at what cost to public service? Most Americans would never stand to vote for crudeness in office, but a president already in office changes voters and officeholders — especially those who support the president’s policies, if not his style.

integrity are called to take a stand, either for or against President Trump’s style and policies. While doing so could have political consequences (a lost election), not doing so calls into question a candidate’s personal integrity. In today’s culture, integrity in office may be in short supply, but public opinion generally favors elected officials who stand on principle, not political expediency. If candidates explain fully to voters a position taken, voters will examine that position closely and vote ac-

“Public opinion favors elected officials who stand on principle.”

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o what fine line must officeholders and Republicans seeking high office in 2018 walk? It’s a tough call because alienating a sitting president who commands the respect of at least 40 percent of voters can be political suicide. There are few Republican members of Congress who can win election without that 40 percent, unless one is unopposed, a phenomenon infrequent in Congressional elections. So candidates must choose between accepting support from a crude, largely unpopular, egomaniacal president, or being resistant and not caring whether he or his supporters are supportive or not. The latter is dangerous and is largely reserved for Democrats since they have an uphill fight to retake the House of Representatives. Much depends on how the United States operates this year under Trump’s leadership. A war with North Korea or Syria/Iran/Russia, or a firing of respected Robert Mueller could tip the scales against Trump in favor of his opponents. It’s likely that Trump will realize the downside of such actions and avoid them to save his political skin, but he also may be so emboldened as to be more forceful, if any looked like they might result in victory. In any event, he’ll certainly gauge the political climate before acting precipitously. So what should elected officials do: Stand up for or against the duly-elected president? Though challenges to any incumbent president are politically difficult, candidates of

cordingly. Those candidates who conspicuously waffle, trying to satisfy both camps, will be found out and properly vilified.

T

he Trump presidency may remain an aberration, born of an election where crudeness and promises made to many middle-income voters fed up with Washington, D.C., politicians, were just enough to prevail over another self-serving candidate. Nevertheless, political integrity is a necessary trait for most voters. Even without a serious challenger in 2020 to Trump, which may result in his renomination and re-election, voters will support candidate integrity most often. Trump will likely garner fewer votes in 2020, particularly if women and millennials vote, than he did in his stunning 2016 victory. Even though directness and crude comments vanquished his opponents in 2016, replications of those tactics by subsequent candidates have not been successful. While some have been elected by tying themselves closely to Trump and his stated policy goals, most others have been unsuccessful — like Roy Moore in Alabama and Ed Gillespie in Virginia. These examples illustrate the president’s ability to mobilize his base for himself, but candidates who seek to mirror Trump have been less successful. This is a feature of the power of any sitting president, but it also shows that presidential power doesn’t always translate into election victory for other candidates. Presidential leadership often inures to the benefit of the president, showing that crudeness in office, no matter the underlying policy benefits, is largely anathema to other candidates. In the end, integrity prevails. n


25 YEARS OF INLANDER

Harold Balazs was the subject of an Inlander profile in 1995.

available now at

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

THE YEAR THAT WAS… 1995

BATMAN FOREVER gave us “less plot and more feelings,” TOY STORY warmed even the most hardened hearts and BRAVEHEART won Best Picture. (The Inlander gave the film mixed reviews.) O.J. SIMPSON was acquitted, MICHAEL JORDAN came out of retirement (and went on to win three more consecutive NBA Finals championships) and Billboard Magazine’s No. 1 single in ’95 was “Gangsta’s Paradise” by Coolio.

THE INTERNET IS A THING

We devoted an entire cover story to “The Ever-Expanding World of the INTERNET.” The package featured a deep dive into the “World Wide Web’s” awesome potential to instantly connect people half a world away as well as cautionary tales of the “Dark Side of the Internet.” Kids’ access to porn, online directories for prostitutes and raunchy poems, such as “THE CASTRATION OF SAM MCGOO” (which was printed in part) were just some of the darker elements discussed.

SPOKANE SYMPHONY’S FIRST 50 YEARS

In September 1995, the Spokane Symphony celebrated its 50th season opener. Our coverage looked back on the previous seasons, musicians and conductors, including the first performance of what was then called Our ‘95 Fall Arts issue the SPOKANE PHILHARMONIC in the COVER DESIGN: REBECCA KING Masonic Temple in 1945. Evelyn Ayer, a violinist who joined the orchestra in 1946 until her retirement in 1984, said she hadn’t even considered getting paid to play. “We were just so thrilled it was happening in Spokane,” she said.

FALL ARTS

The arts scene was poppin’ back in ’95. Our preview featured upcoming performances by Boyz II Men, Merle Haggard and Al Stewart and “neohippies PHISH” (whose show in October sold out). The season also featured the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus, several nights of JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT, the Hip Cats Blues Festival and Dracula, the ballet.

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In a sprawling expose on one of Spokane’s funkiest neighborhoods, we talked to RAIN WOLF, who was living in a U-Haul trailer while her Peaceful Valley home was being restored. We profiled EWU professor JOHN BUCHANAN, aka the “Indiana Jones of the Inland Northwest,” who hacked through jungles and climbed through caves in Central America in search of a Mayan burial room. We heard from SONJA ANDERSON, packing a Colt .38, who was convinced her phone call with the Inlander was bugged by the government and was one of the women who lived near the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. Eight years prior, the government admitted radiation had leaked into the air, water and soil, and Anderson was trying to get it shut down. Finally, we profiled the HAROLD BALAZS, in the May 31 issue, who had been creating art for nearly half a century at that point and had no intention of stopping. (MITCH RYALS)

Enter the world of Titanic Real objects. Real stories.

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MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | RELATIONSHIPS commenting on our connection. When I was away, my mind started drifting to thoughts of you — like whether you could access your tiger blanket. Occasionally, I received videos. You would delight me with performances of the most mundanely fascinating feats. After work, you would meet me at the door, do that cute, tail-wagging dance, and bring me straight to my knees, melting me into a puddle on the floor beside you, as I abandoned all that I carried. If I moved a millimeter toward the couch, you were right on my heels, bounding up before I even had a chance to settle in and “assume the position.” You stretched and squirmed your way into my legs, the crook that I swear was designed just to hold you. I knew I had passed the point of no return when I wondered aloud whether doggy laser-tag vests existed.

Is love learning to internalize our greatest capacity... of acceptance?

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Must (Learn to) Love Dogs Becoming a better companion BY INGA LAURENT

M

y Dearest Fern Mayo: If we’re being honest, I never really considered myself much of “a dog person.” I had this belief that taking care of one would require more energy than I wanted to expend; fearing the weight of your happiness resting solely on me. Knowing that I would bear responsibility for so much care made me view this would-be-relationship as a codependent one — scratch that — as an entirely dependent one to avoid. Also, you are smelly. For these reasons, I imagined cats as more aligned with my interests. Sure, they can be

a bit smug — often cold, coy and elusive — but they are fairly self-reliant and so for most of my life, this is what I felt most comfortable chasing. Until you. I’ll admit, I noticed you right away. Your rotund, white belly supported by tiny, furry frame atop baby pink paws — a perfect color match to your petite, protruding and lopsided tongue. Denying your adorableness was futile. So at first I acknowledged, but kept a “safe” distance, just a few awkward rubs that lacked any real commitment. As I departed, I was easily able to leave thoughts of you behind. Then you literally moved into my life, and before I even recognized it within myself, people were

Fern, I’m not sure whether we possess similar types of comprehension, but I do hope you grasp the ways you’ve managed to shift my life. I was convinced that I knew what I wanted and needed. I was wrong. Because of you, I see the world differently. Where I hardly paid attention prior, I now notice pups everywhere. I reach out where I surely would have remained distant before. Recently, you moved out of my home and into one of your own. My friends, sensing my sadness, encouraged me to adopt, but I hesitated. Though I would be excited to have a new one in my life, I still worry that I am not quite home enough. Is that what love is, Fernie? Putting aside our own desire because ultimately it might not match up with someone else’s best interest? Is it stomaching smells that once repulsed, and tolerating (or even coming to enjoy) the responsibilities of reliance? Does love unfold in awareness, in the recognition that we can be different than originally envisioned? Does it derive from an understanding that caring deeply can cause us to change? Is love learning to internalize our greatest capacity, that of acceptance? In finally being willing to receive the sweetest kind of tenderness in existence and desiring to give it all back in return? Fern, maybe love is simply embracing the questions without that gnawing need for any answers, save one — you. Forever, Your Inga n Inga N. Laurent is a local legal educator and a Fulbright scholar. She is deeply curious about the world and its constructs and delights in uncovering common points of connection that unite our shared but unique human experiences.

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SEASON TICKETS INCLUDE:

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

R.I.P. Elkfest

Readers respond to the cancellation of Elkfest in Browne’s Addition in 2018 (5/7/18):

DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

KATE POGUE RAU: People. If you insist on total peace and quiet, move to the country or a subdivision. If you choose to live in a mixed-use neighborhood (like those surrounding the Elk and the Rocket Market, for example) you’re going to have to live with some traffic noise, trucks delivering supplies and, god forbid, the sound of humans enjoying themselves on a warm summer night. STEVE ALBURTY: Spokane has to make some serious efforts to keep younger people from dumping this hayseed town. Kill events like Elkfest and you might as well just hand out golf carts and walkers to those who remain. Spokane: the City Where Ideas Come to Die. ASHLEY BUCKNER: This is so depressing. These local gatherings are such a big part of Spokane. Hopefully these laws don’t shut down a bunch of our community events!

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CLAIRE COLLINS THOMPSON: Did we not learn anything from the movie Footloose?! n

Readers respond to the Inlander story “How Border Patrol Sweeps are Complicating Spokane’s Plans to Launch a Social Services Center” (5/3/18):

SALYNN WILLIAMS: I don’t want Spokane to be a place where some of our neighbors are afraid to go near a bus terminal. And I do want to see centralized services for our most vulnerable. Fix this, please.

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CRYSTAL WINDISHAR: The people who are OK with it are white. I know I will never have to have someone come to me and assume I am illegal because I’m white. This is profiling people of color and don’t come at me with the Russian example bulls-t. I wish someone would come at me and ask my status because I don’t believe I will answer. GABRIELA JABLONSKI: Such a violation of human rights. Just because I look like I could be illegal I am asked for proof of legal status. That is racial profiling and if it happens to me I will see ICE in court. n

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 11


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EDUCATION

THE MATH PROBLEM Fourth- and fifth-grade teacher Beth O’Regan tries to get her students to think like mathematicians.

With a new district-wide math curriculum, Spokane Public Schools strives for a middle ground in the math wars BY WILSON CRISCIONE

I

n teacher Beth O’Regan’s Franklin Elementary classroom, learning how to multiply and divide fractions isn’t as simple as memorizing the answer to the equation. Rather, O’Regan asks her kids to understand the question. “Good mathematicians really understand the heart of the work,” O’Regan tells her students, who all sit together on the floor under a projection screen. The problem, in this case, is one-half divided by four. Some think it might be eight. Many of the fourth- and fifth-graders think it’s one-eighth (which is correct). O’Regan doesn’t tell them either way. Instead, the students turn to the person sitting next to them and discuss a word problem representing the equation. Eventually, the class lands on one: You have half of a pie, and you split it into four. How much pie will each person get? It’s an example of the new way kids will learn math

in Spokane Public Schools. From kindergarten until 10th grade, the district is rolling out new math curriculum aligned with federal Common Core standards, representing a major shift in how Spokane students will learn math. Instead of teachers showing kids how to solve a problem, kids will be encouraged to use their own thinking. Instead of memorizing formulas, students will strive to understand them. “The curriculum we were using was, ‘I’m going to show you how to do it and you’re going to practice it,” O’Regan says. “Now, it’s: ‘Let’s teach them to have conversations that will allow them to make sense of something.’” It’s Spokane’s latest move in the so-called “math wars” facing educators across the country. As math scores stagnate nationally, schools’ attempts to reform math with conceptual, exploratory teaching has been met with opposition from parents, who were taught typically to memorize the skills and formulas to solve problems. With this new curriculum, Spokane hopes it can do both.

A

cross the courtyard from O’Regan’s classroom at Franklin, Ellen Nessen’s second-graders imagine ants eating granola bars. There’s one granola bar and three ants, Nessen tells the class. Each ant gets an equal part of the granola bar. What do you call those parts?

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

The second-graders knowingly gasp, shooting their arms into the air in anticipation. “Thirds,” one student says. The exercise continues for fourths and other fractions. It’s a representation of the Common Core standard that the second-graders understand that a fraction is dividing a whole into equal parts. The Bridges in Mathematics curriculum adopted by Spokane Public Schools follows that standard. For Nessen, it’s important that the students understand what fractions are before doing procedures. “It’s that issue of helping them make meaning from a model,” Nessen says. “Having context, instead of just being taught to memorize procedures.” The Bridges in Mathematics curriculum was implemented for kindergarten through second grade this school year in Spokane Public Schools. Next year, the new curriculum will hit grades three through five, with different curricula simultaneously going into grades six through 10. O’Regan’s class served as the pilot for the new curriculum in fifth grade this year. With all of it, the district hopes to strike a balance in the contentious debate between skills-based learning and conceptual understanding of mathematics. “Our hope is to have a program that’s both,” says Matthew Henshaw, director of elementary curriculum for Spokane Public Schools. “We want something that helps support skills, and also is comprehensive in help...continued on next page

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 13


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are naturally better at math, while students who struggle with memorization feel like they’ll never be as good at math. It doesn’t have to be that way, Newton says. “You’re not born with or without a math brain,” Newton says. It’s about changing the way kids think about math, says Tricia Gessele, coordinator for elementary math in Spokane Public Schools. “It’s very common to hear people say, ‘I’m not a math person.’ But you never hear someone say, ‘I’m not a reading person.’” Gessele says. “One of our big goals is to shift that culture.”

T

hink back to the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s — when parents nowadays were in school learning math. The demand for jobs requiring proficiency in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) was nowhere close to the demand for those jobs now. “We need more of those students to take those jobs on,” Henshaw says. And colleges don’t just want people who can calculate equations in their head — calculators can do that, too. “They want thinkers,” Henshaw says. “If I’m

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ing students understand the math itself and the conceptual understanding, so they can retain the knowledge.” For example, the learning about fractions doesn’t stop once students understand that dividing a whole into three equal parts represents thirds. The students are then asked to put that knowledge into practice. They’re tasked with solving a series of problems on fractions using their new understanding. That was the biggest problem with the curriculum used from the late 1990s until a few years ago, Henshaw says. It taught students in a more conceptual way, but it lacked the skillsbased practice. Then, a few years ago the district switched to a different curriculum to follow Common Core standards. But there were problems with that too: It had teachers directing students how to do math, instead of guiding students to a better understanding, says Kim Newton, a teacher at Grant Elementary who was part of the district’s curriculum adoption committee. Teaching only skills creates gaps among a classroom, Newton says. Under the traditional method, students naturally good at memorization

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an engineer or computer scientist, I have to problem solve and have that full package.” Jackie Coomes, a math professor at Eastern Washington University, agrees. She points out that the goal of Common Core was to make students more college ready. She says it’s important that students can think through a problem by themselves or with a team; that they become “interdependent and independent learners.” “That’s more important than what they have memorized,” Coomes says. Coomes says she wants her students to be fluent with the facts. They should know basic formulas and equations. But they should also have strategies to figure out the answer if they don’t know right away. Coomes recently led a three-year project training teachers and aspiring teachers on Common Core. The goal, she says, was to improve the teaching of math so it’s “more coherent.” It’s gotten results: The students who were taught by those Spokane-area teachers achieved higher marks than other students in the state. Finding a middle ground in the math wars is critical, she says. Teachers shouldn’t always refuse to tell students the answer to a problem, she says. They need to use their best judgment on when that’s appropriate. “That’s why teachers need really good instructional strategies,” she says. “Most students really like math more when it makes sense.” Still, some students are bound to struggle more than others. Spokane schools have been training teachers to recognize that in their students. Since 2012, the district conducted a program to train teachers to become “Math Recovery Intervention Specialists” and learn how to intervene when a student is struggling in math. Years later, however, the schools that implemented the program did not show gains in math scores compared to other schools. It’s an example of the difficulty in teaching math. The Math Recovery program was research-based, Gessele says. Teachers who have been trained in Math Recovery have loved it. But it LETTERS hasn’t been proven to work for Send comments to kids in Spokane. editor@inlander.com. “I don’t think we can say any one thing is making or breaking the system,” Gessele says. Coomes says there’s a common “implementation dip” when new curriculum arrives in schools. It takes a few years for students to see results. Teachers need time to learn it, too. For teachers O’Regan and Nessen, however, the proof the curriculum works can be found in the classroom, where all of the students are actively engaging with the lesson. Every kid feels like they can do math, and they work together to solve a problem, to ask the right question. “If they don’t know how to question or clarify,” O’Regan says, “then kids won’t move forward.” n wilsonc@inlander.com

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NEWS | DIGEST

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GIVE ’EM A BREAK In hospitals across the country, a majority of NURSES work 12-hour shifts. But do consecutive 12-hour shifts actually impair a nurse’s work with patients and increase fatigue? That’s the question that a team led by Lois James (pictured), a researcher at the Washington State University College of Nursing, is trying to answer with a $1 million federally funded study on nurses’ work shifts. She’s hypothesizing that consecutive 12-hour nursing shifts lead to poorer performance, that the 12-hour night shifts impair nurses even more and that it could put nurses at a greater risk while driving to and from work. If she’s wrong, that’s still important information, James tells the Inlander. “No matter what we find we’ll be providing valuable information,” James says. “There’s not a chance of this experiment failing.” (WILSON CRISCIONE)

16 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

FEATURING NATIONAL NEWS FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES

THE GOAT IS THE G.O.A.T. Yes, yes, the city wants you to know that the meticulously crafted LOOFF CARROUSEL, the 109-year-old Spokane landmark in Riverfront Park, has been completely restored and placed in a glass rotunda and is scheduled to open this Saturday. Yes, a gorgeous boardwalk has been added around the Carrousel’s facility allowing you to get down directly into the water. But don’t let that distract you from the far more important news: The Garbage-Eating Goat is back and ready to eat all the garbage you can feed it. So come to Riverfront Park for the Carrousel, but stay for the Garbage-Eating Goat. (DANIEL WALTERS)

OH, THANK HEAVEN Parents who owe child support in Washington and want to pay cash now have another option for turning in their payment: 7-Eleven. The state has partnered with vendor PayNearMe to accept cash for CHILD SUPPORT payments at the convenience stores because, well, they’re convenient. While parents can already pay in cash at Department of Social and Health Services offices, their work and travel schedules might not line up with those hours, whereas most 7-Eleven locations are open late or 24 hours a day, every day of the week. To make payments at the stores, parents will need to set up an account through PayNearMe and either bring in a printed barcode or show their barcode on a smartphone when paying. There is also a $1.99 transaction fee. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)


SLAUGHTERED ELK For months, ELKFEST founder Marshall Powell has been locked in conflict with the city of Spokane, trying to ensure the 13-year-old music festival had a way to continue. First, he called the City Council to intervene on his behalf after running into difficulty with the city’s fire marshal. Then, he appealed a determination that the event would have to pay $4,500 for additional police presence. On Tuesday, a determination from the city’s hearing examiner upheld the city’s decision to charge for police. But by then, Powell had already decided to end the festival’s run. During the debate over the event’s future he became aware that many neighbors, residents and businesses were seriously unhappy over the future of the event. He also worried about a state law that appeared to require permission from nearby residents before putting on a music festival. While the hearing examiner concluded that the city’s local laws took precedence over the state law, it didn’t matter: Elkfest, for now and likely in the future, is dead. (DANIEL WALTERS)

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Camp Crackdown

Is there a way to crack down on homeless camping without criminalizing HOMELESSNESS? That’s what Spokane Councilwoman Lori Kinnear is hoping she achieved with a new city ordinance, intending to replace the city’s controversial transient shelter ordinance. It sets forth a variety of new rules on parks, public shorelines and other city properties. Defacing trees, starting fires, littering or camping on public property is explicitly prohibited, with camping punishable by a misdemeanor. But two crucial pieces were put into place to address concerns that the ordinance was criminalizing homelessness: First, the prohibition on camping would not be enforced if the shelters were full. And second, it would direct misdemeanor offenders toward the city’s Community Court, where they could get the services they need to deal with their homelessness. “This new ordinance is an example of positive criminal justice reform,” Kinnear said on Monday. “This is not a punitive ordinance, but rather, directing people to services.” Councilman Breean Beggs, who’s long been a champion of “smart justice” policies, also endorsed the ordinance. He says it’s an improvement over the previous

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transient shelter ordinance, which was too hard to enforce and too punitive. Those violating the old ordinance could be arrested and sent to jail. But while the ordinance passed, it wasn’t unanimous. The city’s newest council member, Kate Burke, voted against it. “There’s a section of our community who can’t access community court,” said Burke, noting that those with sex offenses were ineligible for the program. She also noted that some members of the gay, bisexual and transgender communities don’t feel comfortable staying at shelters even with available space. “I think this is premature,” Burke said. “I think this has spawned a really good conversation, but we can do better here in Spokane.” (DANIEL WALTERS)

WSU BLUES

An internal audit of Washington State University ATHLETICS has found that the department not only inflated ticket sales in 2016 but that the department as a whole has issues with mismanagement and lack of accountability. The audit findings, presented to the WSU Board of Regents, recently revealed that “the environment within athletics … did not LETTERS support a culture of Send comments to compliance or fiscal editor@inlander.com. responsibility.” The audit was intended to investigate complimentary tickets given out for a home game against the University of Arizona in November 2016. The compliance office in the athletics department was not told about who got free tickets. One employee, the audit found, gave away four premium club seats for the Arizona game to “cultivate donors,” but

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the department couldn’t say who received those tickets. Those issues could violate NCAA rules, the audit found. But the auditors discovered other problems within the department, including that the school was inflating ticket sales for home football games. For an Apple Cup game, for example, WSU reported a sellout with nearly 33,000 in attendance, when the scanned attendance was actually around 27,000. The athletics department, however, has noted that it released the attendance numbers as “sold” tickets, not just attendance. The university’s athletics department, headed now by Athletic Director Pat Chun, responded to the recommendations of the audit, promising that changes would be made if they haven’t been already. (WILSON CRISCIONE)


JUDGE APPROVED

For more than a year, JOSEPH HARRINGTON has filled in as the “acting” and “interim” U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of Washington. Last week, Harrington was officially appointed as Eastern Washington’s top federal prosecutor after President Donald Trump failed to submit a nomination. Instead, Harrington was appointed by U.S. District Court judges. He will have the job unless Trump submits a nominee and that person is confirmed by the Senate. “I look forward to continuing to work with the outstanding, dedicated assistant U.S. attorneys and staff in this office,” Harrington says in a statement. Harrington began working in the U.S. attorney’s office in 1990, holding various positions until March 2017, when Trump called for the resignations of 46 top federal prosecutors appointed under the Obama administration, including former U.S. Attorney Mike Ormsby, who is now Spokane’s city attorney. “I think Joe is an excellent person to serve in that role,” Ormsby says. “He’s a competent professional, a very good lawyer and he knows the office and the job very well.” In January, with no nomination from Trump, Attorney General Jeff Sessions appointed Harrington as “interim” U.S. attorney. That status was good for 120 days, after which time the appointment rested with the District Court judges. When Trump initially called for Ormsby’s resignation, at least three local jurists raised their hand for the job: Spokane County Prosecutor Larry Haskell, Spokane County District Court Judge Vance Peterson and former U.S. Attorney Bill Hyslop. During his 28-year career, Harrington has helped prosecute former Spokane Police Officer Karl Thompson, who used excessive force and lied to investigators in the death of a mentally disabled janitor, Otto Zehm. Harrington was also involved in the case against Kevin Harpham, a white-supremacist, who in 2011 planted a bomb along the parade route for the Martin Luther King Jr. Day Unity March. (MITCH RYALS)

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NEWS | IDAHO

Heir of the Labrador

Fulcher, meanwhile, accuses Malek of being a pawn of Obama. And Leroy? He largely demurs. “I’m not interested in going retro on what we wouldacoulda-shoulda,” Leroy says. He prefers to focus on how Obamacare can be undone and a free-market state-bystate system can be put in its place.

WHO’S THE PUREST OF THEM ALL?

Who’s the most pure, principled and pragmatic Republican running for Congress in Idaho’s District 1? BY DANIEL WALTERS

I

f anyone knows that an Idaho primary can bring surprises, it’s Republican Rep. Raúl Labrador. During the Tea Party wave in 2010, the former immigration attorney surprised observers by crushing his well-funded, establishment-supported Republican opponent. So eight years later, with Labrador vacating the seat to run for governor, anything can happen. Yes, Labrador endorsed Russ Fulcher, the former state Senate majority leader who tried unsuccessfully to defeat Gov. Butch Otter in a Republican primary two years ago. But Labrador’s endorsement didn’t exactly clear the field. Six other candidates, including conservative author Michael Snyder, state Rep. Christy Perry, retired U.S. Army Lt. Alex Gallegos and fellow Army veteran Nick Henderson flooded into the race. Yet judging by campaign contributions, Fulcher and former Idaho Lt. Gov. David Leroy are the clear frontrunners, with Coeur d’Alene Rep. Luke Malek trailing behind in third. The Inlander interviewed all three at length.

WHO ARE THESE GUYS?

Fulcher — a former Micron executive with a square jaw and a Mitt Romney haircut — seeks to largely continue Labrador’s ideological priorities, though not necessarily his tone. His endorsements are full of far-right leaders like Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, Spokane Valley Rep. Matt Shea and Idaho state Reps. Heather Scott and Vito Barbieri. Leroy, with a deep voice and white hair, strikes the pose of elder statesman, in both senses of the word. The 70-year-old’s also served as Idaho attorney general, acting governor and United States nuclear waste negotiator. He ran for governor in 1986 (and lost) and ran for Congress in 1994 (and also lost.) Malek, a bald former prosecutor with a Pacific Northwest bro beard, stresses his credentials as a health care policy wonk. He has the support of former Idaho Sen. Larry Craig, the Professional Firefighters of Idaho, the Fraternal Order of Police and more than a dozen of his fellow state legislators.

WILL THEY JOIN THE FREEDOM CAUCUS?

Labrador’s legacy will be defined in part by his role in co-founding the Freedom Caucus, the group of about 40 far-right representatives who helped stymie the Republican establishment legislation, forced Speaker of the House John Boehner’s resignation and inspired Trump to blame the Freedom Caucus for the failure of an Obamacare repeal bill, tweeting “we must fight them, & Dems, in 2018!” Along with Labrador, Freedom Caucus leaders Jim Jordan and Mark Meadows have endorsed Fulcher. And in some cases, Fulcher might even be more hardline than Labrador — he questions Labrador’s choice to vote for

20 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

FROM LEFT: Russ Fulcher, David Leroy and Luke Malek. Boehner as speaker in 2015. But Fulcher says he wants to wait to see how the caucus might impact his ability to get things done in Congress before signing up. Malek, by contrast, blasts the caucus for being ineffective. “Tell me what the Freedom Caucus has done for the cause of freedom, rather than shoot down every conservative idea that comes as an actual solution?” Malek says. Leroy also says he wouldn’t rush to join the Freedom Caucus: He’d prefer to create a caucus of representatives from small states, or an “Idaho caucus” with his fellow Idaho delegates — noting his strong relationship with figures like Idaho District 2 Rep. Mike Simpson. That, in itself, makes Leroy distinct from Labrador, who called Simpson, a “bully,” a liar and a compromiser.

HOW SHOULD IDAHO HAVE REACTED TO OBAMACARE?

It was 2013 when then-Sen. Majority Leader Russ Fulcher took to the floor of the Idaho Senate, and warned against what he saw as a near-fatal mistake: Idaho’s decision to build its own health care marketplace to handle Obamacare rather than defaulting to the federal government like most conservative states. “I’m just one little state senator, in one little state, trying to do anything I can to keep the strings from the federal puppeteer to being attached to my body and the body of those I serve,” Fulcher says. “We have nothing to gain. We have much to lose.” And he didn’t stop there: Incensed by Idaho Gov. Butch Otter’s support for the exchanges, he launched a challenge — with Labrador’s endorsement — against the sitting governor during the 2014 primary. “Part of my party has never forgiven for me for that,” Fulcher says. Malek, by contrast, helped lead the charge in the Idaho House to adopt the state-based exchanges. Nothing to gain? Over time, Malek points out, Idaho’s already saved residents with health care on the exchanges $22 million compared with states using the federally operated marketplace. Idaho has more choices, more insurers in the marketplace and lower premiums than many other Republican states, Malek says. Fulcher, however, has argued that Idaho should have concentrated on seeking to create its own private health care alternative instead of putting effort into improving Obamacare. But Malek says that he’s the one who’s been actually trying to improve health care — whether by funding local crisis centers or pushing for federal waivers that attempted to improve the private insurance rates by letting Idaho provide Medicaid to some of the highest-cost patients. And he argues Fulcher and his allies have been the ones sabotaging those efforts.

In a way, this race is a throwback to the days of the Tea Party — all but declared dead nationally. These days, the Republican Party doesn’t talk much about deficits and the danger of spending. But Fulcher and Leroy still do. They stick to the Tea Party position: Confident that cutting taxes won’t hurt the deficit, but arguing that increases in spending — like the recent omnibus budget bill — risk doing serious damage, both to the country and the Republican brand. But Malek says he would have voted for the bill. His brother is serving in Afghanistan, and he says he wouldn’t want to risk leaving the military “high and dry.” It’s a risky position to take. Malek knows that, in the western district of Idaho, the scent of moderation can smell like loss. Even Fulcher gets attacked from the right, with candidate Michael Snyder seizing upon Fulcher’s donations to more moderate Idaho Republicans like Lt. Gov. Brad Little, Sen. Shawn Keough and former Idaho Superintendent Tom Luna. Despite an A rating from the National Rifle Association, Malek is a frequent target of attacks from groups on the right, with comparatively dismal rankings from the influential Idaho Freedom Foundation and the national American Conservative Union. Today, he shrugs off those attacks. “I’m not going to play those paint-by-number games,” Malek says. “I’m still going to do my research. I don’t give a damn at the end of the day what the ranking system says.” There’s a bit of irony here: This is a race obsessed with both debating who aligns closer to Republican orthodoxy and debating who can align themselves closer with Trump, who won his own primary in part by thumbing his nose at Republican orthodoxy. “On some of the issues I’m the only one who does support the president,” Malek says. Malek, like Trump, would have reluctantly voted for the omnibus spending bill and supports reexamining the legality of bump stocks. And in his willingness to take controversial stances, Malek also compares himself to another Idaho figure: Raúl Labrador. “He and I are both fiercely independent people,” Malek says. “Nobody tells Labrador what to do.” After all, if there’s any card you can play that can beat conservative purity in Idaho, it’s independence. Lack of independence is an attack that Fulcher levels against Leroy. “I believe David is going to be more ‘go-along, getalong,’” Fulcher says. “That was his mindset when he served here.” And lack of independence is an attack that Malek and Leroy level against Fulcher, noting that the anti-tax group Club for Growth had poured nearly $640,000 into getting him elected. To them, that looks a lot like, well, strings from a puppeteer. “He, unfortunately, now is in danger of becoming the congressman for the Club for Growth,” Leroy says about Fulcher. “This is a time when you need someone who is pure in principle and pragmatic in action.” So who’s the purest, most principled and most pragmatic? Considering there are seven candidates in a primary often dogged by low turnout, that far-reaching assessment will likely be made by a relatively tiny number of voters. n danielw@inlander.com


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All Things Beer Our guide to the fourth annual Spokane Craft Beer Week

T

BY DEREK HARRISON

he fourth annual Spokane Craft Beer Week is almost upon us. It’s a time of the year to celebrate local beer, and in doing so, really push our livers to the limit. Inspired by the Brewers Association’s American Craft Beer Week, brothers Matt and Clete Hanson brought the weeklong tribute to our region in 2015. From May 14-20, there’s nearly 100 local beer-related events happening at restaurants, bars and breweries throughout the city. Here are seven events we recommend:

Kickoff Party at Perry Street Brewing

Monday, May 14 at 5 pm | 1025 S. Perry The week begins with the annual party at Perry Street Brewing. The event will feature guest taps from Badass Backyard Brewing, No-Li Brewhouse, Big Barn Brewing Co. and Steam Plant Brewing. One dollar of every pint sold will go to T.E.A.M. Grant, a parent-teacher group supporting Grant Elementary.

CollabFest at Bellwether Brewing

Tuesday, May 15 at 4 pm | 2019 N. Monroe Perhaps the main attraction of Craft Beer Week, this year’s collaboration festival moves to Bellwether and celebrates the opening of its backyard patio. Multiple collaborative beers from various local brewers will debut at the festival — including a strawberry hefeweizen by Orlison Brewing Co. and Whistle Punk, as well as a brett saison by Iron Goat, and the folks from Good Brews podcast and Community Pint. For $10, you get four drink tickets and a commemorative tasting glass.

Off-Flavor Training at Badass Backyard Brewing

Wednesday, May 16 at 12 pm | 1415 N. Argonne, Spokane Valley The Spokane Valley brewery is going to host an “offflavor training.” Six different common off-flavors found in beer will be tasted at the class — lightstruck, dimethyl sulfides (DMS), diacetyl, trans-2-Nonenal, infection and ...continued on next page

A flight of beers at Iron Goat Brewing. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 23


THE HAZE CRAZE

M

ore and more beers are popping up around town with the descriptors “hazy” or “New England style.” These are pale ales or IPAs that pour as a cloudy, orange color. They boast strong citrus notes without the upfront bitterness of a standard IPA and are becoming quite popular nationwide. To create hazy IPAs, brewers are changing up the traditional brewing process. According to Matt Hanson, Whistle Punk Brewing owner and head brewer, the style is the result of a combination of late-addition hops, different yeast profiles, flaked oats and other speciality grains. “You’re showcasing hop flavors and aromas and not just hop bitterness,” Hanson says. Hanson explains high-protein grains like flaked oats gives the beer a “pillowy mouthfeel.” Many regional breweries have picked up on the trend and are adding the style to core lineups. Locally, you can turn to Whistle Punk’s Coast-to-Coast IPA, Perry Street Brewing’s New England Style IPA and recently Ten Pin Brewing’s Gutterball Hazy Pale Ale, among others. — DEREK HARRISON

“ALL THINGS BEER,” CONTINUED... acetaldehyde. While it’s geared for people interested in the Certified Cicerone program, it’s an opportunity for any craft beer enthusiasts to enhance their tasting knowledge.

Three Beer Releases at the Steel Barrel Taproom

Friday, May 18 at 5 pm | 154 S. Madison Three unique beers will be released at the Steel Barrel. The brewery incubator and taproom is home to Young Buck Brewing, Little Spokane Brewing Company and TT’s Old Iron Brewery. Young Buck will be releasing its first batch of From the Woods, a barrelaged sour. Little Spokane is tapping Cuddle Puddle, a barrel-aged strong ale. And to top it off, all three breweries collaborated to brew a Belgian tripel, which will also be tapped during the event.

2nd Annual Firk-Off with Fremont Brewing at Perry Street Brewing

Friday, May 18 at 5 pm | 1025 S. Perry Perry Street is bringing back the event they started last year with Seattle’s Fremont Brewing. Both breweries will be releasing two experimental beers poured from firkins — a small keg used for cask conditioning. The beers will be available as taster flights or pints, and the last person to get a pour from each firkin will win a prize from Perry Street and Fremont. There will also be a surprise

small-batch release from Fremont available on regular draft during the event.

OTHER BEER WEEK HAPPENINGS

Iron Goat Brewing now offers crowlers to-go. Head over to the taproom on Tuesday, May 15, for $2 off crowlers (the equivalent of two pints) all day. Millwood Brewing is joining the festivities by offering specials to various groups each day of the week. You’ll have a chance to contribute to beer funds for beer service industry workers, first responders, charitable organizations, teachers and coaches, military members and the Millwood community. Hopped Up is releasing multiple beers throughout the week. Visit the taproom for some interesting creations like the Bloody Mary Pickled Jalapeno Ale and Bananas Foster Imperial Stout. Check out spokanecraftbeerweek. com for a complete list of events.

Grubbin' Food Truck Festival at Mac Daddy's

Saturday, May 19 at 11 am | 415 W. Hastings Mac Daddy’s Pub and Grill is hosting the fourth annual Grubbin’ with the Greater Spokane Food Truck Association. Tickets are $25 and allow you to sample food from all 18 participating trucks. From the Compass Breakfast Wagon to the Jamaican Jerk Pan, the event features a diverse range of food options. This year’s festival is joining Craft Beer Week with a beer garden featuring No-Li, Iron Goat and One Tree Hard Cider. For a full list of participants and to purchase tickets, head to grubbinspokane.com.

Music on the Lawn at Big Barn Brewing Co.

Sunday, May 20 at 2 pm | 16004 N. Applewood, Mead To wind down the week, grab your friends and head out to Big Barn Brewing Co. in Green Bluff. The venue will host live music by Matt Mitchell, and Mac Daddy’s Gourmet Grub will be on site serving its mac-andcheese creations. You’ll find Big Barn’s staple beers on tap, as well as its collaboration brew with Newport’s Top Frog Brewing — an American wheat ale with lemon and basil. n

3X WINERY OF THE YEAR NEW TASTING ROOM NEW HOURS: SUN - THURS 12PM -8PM FRI - SAT 12PM - 9PM

2-FOR-1 TASTINGS FOR THE CORK DISTRICT’S SPRING RELEASE WEEKEND MAY 11-13

1303 W SUMMIT PARKWAY, SUITE 100 SPOKANE, WA 99201 VISIT MARYHILLWINERY.C OM 24 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018


MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 25


corkdistrict.com

Crafted with

pride

Inspired by the adventurous lifestyle of North Idaho.

Spring Break As temperatures warm, sample some of these refreshing seasonal cocktails in Spokane BY DAN NAILEN

W

hen the weather warms, my appetite often turns to things like margaritas or gin and tonics — drinks I typically eschew over the winter. Those are easy enough to make at home, so I hit a few Spokane spots in search of fresh spring sippers better left to the professionals. Here are a few worth your while:

Watermelon Man, $9

Fri 4pm-9pm • Sat 2pm-9pm (208) 480-1048 • NorthIdahoCider.com 11100 N Airport Rd, Bays 5&6 • Hayden, ID 83835

26 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

Cochinito Taqueria, 10 N. Post, facebook.com/cochinitotaqueria In the times I’ve chatted with Kristy White for drink-related articles, I’ve inevitably learned something new. This time, I learned the phrase “shrub,” a concoction savvy mixologists like White make out of drinking vinegar infused with a variety of fruit juices, herbs and spices to use as the base of some wicked libations. The Watermelon Man cocktail is a White invention that

came out of playing with a watermelon-based shrub at a house party. The version available at Cochinito uses freshly muddled watermelon, lime juice, simple syrup, apple cider vinegar, mint and tequila, served up with chili-lime salt on the rim of the glass. If you can drink one and not immediately hanker for another, you’re a better person than I am.

Peychaud's Aperitivo, Pompelmo San Pellegrino & Prosecco $9

Ruins, 825 N. Monroe, facebook.com/ruins.spokane The wise tippler who visits Ruins knows to take suggestions from the diminutive restaurant’s resident mixologist Crystal Bertholic. When I asked for something “spring-y” on a recent visit, she pointed me toward this simple, low-alcohol wonder that was pleasingly bitter, thanks to the Peychaud’s and grapefruit soda, as well as utterly


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refreshing thanks to the prosecco’s infusion of bubbles. Reddish pink and delicious, this drink was tied to Ruins’ Italian menu, but if you’re nice I bet you can get it almost any time.

MAY 13

12–8pm

Concert @ 5:30! Martini Bros: Elvis Tribute Show

Yuztopia, $11

Volstead Act, 12 N. Post, volsteadactspokane.com This refreshing little drink came out of a staff brainstorming session designed to come up with a new warm-weather cocktail menu for the months ahead. Assistant manager Hannah Butcher concocted this flavorful drink that balances a lot of different aspects, finding sweet harmony — but not too sweet. “I’m not a big sweet fan, so I’m not going to make like a huckleberry sour,” Butcher says. This drink is an international affair, combining Kronan Swedish punsch (a sweet and spicy Nordic liqueur), Joto Yuzu sake (Joto is the brand, yuzu is a Japanese fruit bringing a citrus vibe), vodka and some local Skidmore Alchemy rhubarb bitters to elicit a fresh, delicious spring cocktail.

at the

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May 13: Martini Bros | Elvis Tribute Show May 20: Ron Greene Band | Soul-Rock May 27: Spare Parts | Pop/Rock

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Apparent Sour, $7

Logan Tavern, 1305 N. Hamilton, facebook.com/thelogantavern When Nehemiah Zilar and his partners opened up the relatively new Logan Tavern adjacent to the Gonzaga campus a couple months back, he knew he’d have to come up with some cocktails that would appeal to budget-conscious college kids as well as folks looking for a quality drink, cost be damned. The cocktail menu hits that sweet spot, offering standards like an Old Fashioned for a few bucks less than a downtown cocktail lounge might. When I asked for a spring-y drink, the Apparent Sour leapt to the top of the list. The aperol, an Italian liquor, brings hints of orange and rhubarb to the party and boasts an orange-pink hue when mixed with elderflower liqueur and lime juice. It’s a little sweet, a little sour and a lot tasty. n

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 27


Wine Myths Debunked Five things you might have wrong about wine, from screw caps to how old your wine should be BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

F

or casual wine drinkers, it’s enough to wade through the aisles of whites, reds and price tags without adding the complexity of supposed wine rules and taboos. The Inlander hit up John Allen, co-owner of Vino! wine shop in downtown Spokane, to explain and dispel some of the common myths about wine so you can avoid the pitfalls and spend more time enjoying your next sip.

OLDER IS BETTER

This is a common misconception, Allen says. The vast majority of wine is really meant to be enjoyed within the first few years of being bottled, which is good news for the average consumer. “Most people age their wine on the way home,” Allen says. Other than a very small percentage of fine wines, which might last 20 years (or, rarely, even longer), Allen says most reds are meant to be enjoyed within six to seven years of their vintage — the year on the bottle — and for whites it’s four or five years. Wines do change over time, though. At first, they usually express fruity flavors — think peaches, apples, plums, cherries, he says. After a few years in the bottle, other flavors can come out, like dried fruits, spices, even coffee. “They take on nuances and different flavors that are only the result of age,” Allen says. “So aging a wine can be good, but only up to a certain degree for the bulk of wine that’s made and purchased.”

WHITE IS BEST RIGHT OUT OF THE FRIDGE Most wine is more refreshing if it’s below room temperature, Allen says. For reds, that’s at about 60-65 degrees, and for whites, it’s cooler. But while most people chill their whites in a refrigerator, which sits around 40 degrees, that’s too cold to allow the aromatics to release and bring out the full flavor of the wine. So Allen suggests taking your whites out of the fridge and leaving them on the counter or table without a sleeve for a half hour before serving.

GREAT WINE IS EXPENSIVE

Vino! co-owner John Allen

28 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

QUINN WELSCH PHOTO

Yes and no. When more care is put into winemaking, of course there’s going to be extra cost, Allen says. If grape selection is more stringent, there’s specialty equipment like barrels for aging, and marketing costs add up, the winemaker is going to charge more to recoup their costs. “There are reasons really good wines cost more money — it’s not a bad association,” he

says. “But it doesn’t mean you’re going to like the wine just because it’s more expensive.” Along those lines, there are major advantages to living in Washington. “West Coast USA is swimming in good quality wine because we can grow fruit in ways that are more difficult in almost every other part of the country,” Allen says. “In Washington, we’re making wines that score among critics equivalent to some of the finest and most expensive wines in the world for less than half the price those other ones are being sold for.” One of the priciest wines in Washington that runs about $175 a bottle, Allen says, is made from the same grapes that in Bordeaux, France, go into a $1,500 bottle.

SCREW CAPS MEAN CHEAP WINE

Wrong! Believe it or not, screw caps actually keep wine better than cork. Decades ago, a lot of bottom-shelf bulk wine was sealed with screw caps. But as wine making really took off in regions like the Pacific Northwest, New Zealand and South America, good cork became harder to find, Allen says, and low-quality corks started ruining significant portions of batches. To fix that problem, a variety of resin-cork composites, plastics and other closures started coming on the market. To test which was the best for preserving the original characteristics of the wine, Hogue Cellars, based in Prosser, Washington, did multiple years-long studies of different closures, bottling batches of the same wines with different options and taking samples at regular intervals. The results? “Screw caps were deemed to be the best,” Allen says.

ALWAYS PAIR FISH WITH WHITE

If you have a food you like and a wine you like, Allen says, who’s to argue? But there is something to be said for fairly fail-safe pairings. Typically white wines, often more citrusy in their acidity, pair great with fish, Allen says. However, a fatty fish can pair well with red wine, Allen says. Tannins, the compounds in red wine that add some texture and can make your mouth pucker when you taste it, are attracted to protein. Without food, that means they go straight for your tongue and mouth, Allen says, but with meat, cheese or a fatty fish, they can sort of get distracted and let you enjoy some of the other aromas and flavors of the wine. “One of the classics especially in this part of the world is to have a salmon and a red wine called pinot noir,” he says. n


SPRING RELEASE 2018

GUIDE TO SPOKANE'S CORK DISTRICT KEND

ARD ALL Y

1. Maryhill Winery 1303 W. Summit Pkwy.

S

W SUMMIT PKWY

2. Craftsman Cellars Tasting Room 1194 W. Summit Pkwy.

CUT OUT AND

SAVE! N DIVISION ST

N BROWNE ST

6. Va Piano in the Historic Davenport Hotel 10 S. Post St.

S POST ST

S JEFFERSON ST

S MAPLE ST

W PACIFIC AVE W 2ND AVE

T

aken a tour of Spokane’s Cork District lately? If not, this Mother’s Day weekend is one of the best times to do so, as it’s host to one of the city’s three annual wine release weekends. The three-day event includes special tastings, more than 30 individual wine releases, food pairings and live entertainment at participating tasting rooms and wineries spread across downtown, Spokane’s officially designated Cork District. Throughout the weekend, these tasting rooms host guests daily from noon to 5

7. Tempus Cellars 8 N. Post St. Ste. 8 8. Cougar Crest Estate Winery 8 N. Post St. Ste. 6 9. Barili Cellars 608 W. Second Ave.

For Spring Release Wine Weekend, local tasting rooms are open noon to 5 pm on both Saturday and Sunday.

WINE TIME

4. Helix Wines 824 W. Sprague Ave. 5. Terra Blanca Spokane 926 W. Sprague Ave.

N WASHINGTON ST

N STEVENS ST 

N HOWARD ST

N WALL ST

N LINCOLN ST

N MONROE ST 

W SPRAGUE AVE

3. Barrister Winery 1213 W. Railroad Ave.

10. Barrister Winery Tasting Room 203 N. Washington St. 11. Overbluff Cellars 304 W. Pacific Ave.

pm, though many of the venues continue operating into the late evening. In addition to the downtown wineries, Spring Release Weekend includes a few outlying winery “pockets” in Spokane Valley, Liberty Lake, Green Bluff and on the South Hill. — CHEY SCOTT

12. Robert Karl Cellars 115 W. Pacific Ave. 13. Bridge Press Cellars 39 W. Pacific Ave.

Spring Release Weekend • Fri, May 11, through Sun, May 13, daily from noon-5 pm • Details at facebook.com/corkdistrict

FLIP OVER FOR TASTING ROOMS ON SPOKANE'S SOUTH HILL AND IN THE SPOKANE VALLEY AND LIBERTY LAKE

Wine Bar & Tasting Room 210 Sherman Avenue, Ste 161 • CdA • 208 819-1296 • castawaycellars.com

Catering and private parties available MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 29


rose` release party may 11-13th

expressive faithfully crafted wines 6011 e 32nd ave

friday 3-7p | sat/sun 1-6p winescapewine.com

14. Winescape 6011 E. 32nd Ave. 15. V du V Wines 12 S. Scott St. 16. Townshend Cellar 8022 E. Greenbluff Rd., Colbert 17. Liberty Lake Wine Cellars 23110 E. Knox Ave., Liberty Lake 18. Arbor Crest Wine Cellars 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd., Spokane 19. Nodland Cellars 11616 E. Montgomery Dr. Ste. 69, Spokane Valley 20. Latah Creek Wine Cellars 13030 E. Indiana Ave., Spokane Valley

EAST SPOKANE

SOUTH HILL

V DU V WINES E SPRAGUE AVE

ST ILTON

E 31ST AVE

N HAM

E 29TH AVE

S FANCHER RD

GRAND REOPENING AT

SPOKANE-AREA TASTING ROOMS CONTINUED

S SCOTT ST

WINESCAPE

GREEN BLUFF TOWNSHEND CELLAR EN GRE

B LU

E GREENBLUFF RD

LIBERTY LAKE E KNOX

AVE

LIBERTY LAKE WINE CELLARS AVE AY W E PPL EA

SPOKANE VALLEY

.25M

GRAND REOPENING & NEW WINE RELEASE WEEKEND CELEBRATION!

Bill Bozly : Friday, May 11th from 12-10 pmBill Bozly & Sean Owsley : Saturday, May 12th from 12-6 pmSara Brown Duo : Sunday, May 13th from 12-5 pm

NEW WINE RELEASE! $5 TASTING FEE

ARBOR CREST

FRU

IT HI

E UP

RIVE

LL R

D

R DR

39 W. PACIFIC AVENUE (CORNER OF PACIFIC AND BROWN)509.838.7815 | BRIDGEPRESSCELLARS.COM 30 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

E INDIANA AVE

N PINES RD

NODLAND CELLARS

LATAH CREEK WINE CELLARS

FF


A Deal Near You The Inland Northwest's best happy hour specials

S

ometimes, democracy works. Based on votes cast in our annual readers poll, Best Of the Inland Northwest, we’ve assembled this storied list of toogood-to-pass-up happy-hour specials across the region. Find these deals, and hundreds more, when you use the Inlander’s Drinkspotter web app (Inlander.com/drinkspotter); be sure to turn on your phone’s location services and you can find all the deals nearest you.

TWIG BISTRO AND MARTINI BAR

2018 Best Happy Hour winner 808 W. Main Ave.; 4320 S. Regal St.; 401 E. Farwell Rd.; 14728 E. Indiana Ave., Spokane Valley Daily, 3-6 pm and 9 pm-close $2 off signature martinis, $1 off all glass wine, $1 off draft beer, $4 house wine, $6-$8 appetizer menu

SAFARI ROOM

2018’s 2nd Place finisher 111 S. Post St. Daily, 4-6 pm Half off drinks

ZOLA

2018’s 3rd Place finisher 22 W. Main Ave. Mon-Sat, 4-7 pm; All day Sun $4 red and white wine, $2 draft Coors Light and draft Bud light. $3 select draft Craft Beer, $4 well cocktails

BEVERLY'S LAKEVIEW LOUNGE

2018 North Idaho’s Best Happy Hour 115 S. Second St., Coeur d’Alene Daily, 4:30-6 pm $2 off glass wine, $1 off premium well drinks, $5.50-$7 food specials

1898 PUBLIC HOUSE

2010 W. Waikiki Rd. Mon-Fri, 4-6 pm; Sat-Sun, 2-6 pm $2 off any signature drink, $2 off draft beer, $2 off wine, $2-$9 appetizer menu

BON BON

926 W. Garland Ave. Mon-Thu, 4-7 pm; Fri-Sat, 10 pm-close; all day Sun $1 off all beer and wine, $3 off following cocktails: Life’s a Beach, BBC, Old Fashioned, Dancing Queen, Kentucky Sparkler and Tequila Me

BLACKBIRD

905 N. Washington St. Mon-Fri, 3-6 pm Half off craft beer, $5 cocktail menu, $5 wine, $3 bacon fat popcorn

CLINKERDAGGERS

621 W. Mallon Ave. Daily, 3-6 pm; Fri-Sat, 9 pm-close $1 off draft beers, $5.95 well drinks, $4.95 Happy Hour

Red blend/chardonnay, $5.95 cocktail menu, $5.95-$21.95 food menu

DAVID'S PIZZA

803 W. Mallon Ave. Mon-Fri, 2:30-5 pm Half off all food and drinks — bar only

GILDED UNICORN

110 S. Monroe St. Daily, Open-6 pm, 10 pm-close $3 12 oz bottle beer, $4.50 16 oz bottle beer, $3 food menu

HOP JACK'S

9265 N. Nevada St.; 14700 E. Indiana Ave. #1182 Daily, 2-6 pm, 9 pm-close $4.95 well drinks, $4.75 domestic beers, $5.25 craft beers, $5 house wine, $1 off all other Northwest glass wine, $6.75-$7.25 cocktail menu

LUNA RESTAURANT AND CATERING

5620 S. Perry St. Daily, 3-6 pm; Fri 11 am-10 pm $2 off cocktails, $1 off beer, $10-$12 cocktail menu, $5-$15 appetizer menu

OVAL OFFICE

620 N. Spokane St., Post Falls Daily, 3-6 pm, 9-11 pm $5.50 martinis, $5.50 appetizers

POOLE'S PUBLIC HOUSE

5620 S. Regal Ave. #1; 101 E. Hastings Rd. Mon-Sat, 4-6 pm, all day Sun Half off all alcohol, daily specials

ROCK CITY GRILL

2911 E. 57th Ave. Daily, 2-6 PM $6 martinis, $3.50 glass wine, $3.50 micro and well drinks, $3 Bud Light and Coors Light, $5-$7 appetizer menu

SARANAC PUBLIC HOUSE

21 W. Main Ave. Daily, 3-6 pm $1 off well drinks $1 off draft beer, $1 off house wine, $5-$7 appetizer menu

SEASONS OF COEUR D'ALENE

209 E. Lakeside Ave., Coeur d’Alene Mon-Sat, 3-6 pm; Wed, 3-7 pm; all day Sun $5 bartenders martinis, $4 micro drafts, $5 house wine, $5 well drink, $1 off martinis, $3 soft pork taco, $4 caesar side salad, $6 jalapeno tumblers, $7 blue crab, kobe beef and pulled pork sliders

THE WAVE ISLAND SPORTS GRILL AND SUSHI BAR

525 W. First Ave. Mon-Sat, 3:30-5:30 pm; Thu, 10 pm-close; Fri-Sat, 10-12 pm $3 draft beer, $ 4 well drink, $5 glass wine, happy hour food menu — COMPILED BY ERIC SCHUCHT Own a business with a happy hour? Tell us about your current specials using the form found at Inlander.com/ submitdeals. The information you provide will help power our happy-hour finder, Drinkspotter (Inlander. com/drinkspotter). Cheers!

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 31


Café Cereza

EBCs signature drink that helped them place Top 3 in America’s Best Coffee House. Double shot Ethiopia espresso, black cherry reduction, rosemary lemon thyme simple syrup, on ice, topped with vanilla bean cream. Available at the new Café in Downtown Coeur D’Alene and Sandpoint.

SANDPOINT ROASTERY 524 Church St • 208.265.5553 CAFE 504 E Sherman, CdA • 208.930.4065 evansbrotherscoffee.com

Northern Exposure Recent awards elevate profile of North Idaho's Up North Distillery BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

I

t’s called hard alcohol, but when the owners of Up North Distillery clean the still, the aroma that emanates from the doorway is soft and sweet, like grandma’s apple pie fresh from the oven. That might be enough to lure locals, but there’s more than just alcohol production going on at Up North, which owners Randy Mann and his wife Hilary created three years ago in an industrial park north of Interstate 90 near State Line. Armed with a liquor license from the get-go, they recently added a separate retail space. Up North is one of a handful of distilleries where thirsty customers can see the product being made, have a signature cocktail and then grab a bottle to go. Many of their bottles have earned awards for the first-time distillers, six of them from the 2018 American Distilling Institute competition. In addition to Gold Medal and Best Of awards in the

32 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

specialty spirits category for their honey spirits, Up North took home three bronzes (for the Barrel Reserve Honey Spirits, Big Kid Cider Apple Brandy and Apple Brandy) and a silver (for their 3 Year Barrel-Aged Apple Brandy). To date, they’re also one of only eight distilleries in the Gem State. Why? Well, the rules for distilleries are complex, including how and where spirits may be sampled, sipped and sold. A properly licensed brewer can tap their own keg and fill a glass or growler, for example, while a distillery cannot, unless they prove their agility navigating the legislative maze of regulation in a still-evolving craft-distilling industry. In Idaho, distillers must buy their own alcohol back from the state but cannot sell it on-site unless they have a separate business and retail location. Moreover, to sell hard alcohol for on-site consumption, one must have the all-important and sometimes hard-to-obtain liquor license. “It sounds convoluted, but it’s a great sys-


THINK LOCAL

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Julietta Tasting rant Room & Restau

ite Check our webs or call us at for more details 208.276.3342

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TASTING ROOM & EVENT VENUE

215 South Main Street • Moscow, ID 208-301-5125

ColtersCreek.com

Up North Distillery • 846 N Boulder Ct., Post Falls • Open Mon 4-9 pm, Tues-Thurs 2-9 pm, Fri 2-10 pm, Sat noon-8 pm, Sun noon-10 pm • upnorthdistillery.com • 208-773-4445

Local Craft Spirits Vodka • Gin • Whiskey • Flavored Products

Floral Laurel

tem,” says Randy Mann, who likens Idaho’s approach to neighbors like Montana, Oregon and Utah, all alcohol-control states. Another distinction: Up North is one of six distilleries nationwide that create honey-based spirits, and their honey, like their apples, is all sourced locally with great attention to detail. “To be a true craft distillery, you have to be small-batch,” says Hilary, “and you have to make it yourself.” Some distilleries purchase spirits and bottle them under their own name, says Hilary. The Manns, though, put the work in themselves, taking classes — look for Randy’s framed, Moonshine University diploma on the wall — and doing the heavy lifting required of expanding their offerings. To help them expedite their latest venture — adding bourbon and whiskey to the mix — they’ve installed three gleaming metal silos outside their Post Falls facility (eliminating actual heavy lifting, jokes Randy). “It’s way easier to pump grain out of a silo than to sling 50-pound bags over your shoulder,” says Randy, an Avista lineman. Both he and Hilary, a school counselor, work full-time jobs in addition to running the distillery. Supporting local businesses has been another hallmark since they started, says Hilary. That includes buying equipment from a Hayden manufacturer and featuring other regional alcohol producers on their menu. So one could sit outside in warmer weather — Up North hosts live music and food trucks in the summer — and enjoy a range of Northwest beverages, from a hearty IPA, a flight of moonshine, a glass of red wine or a signature Up North cocktail like the Bootleg Mojito. Remember, though, this is a 21-and-over business only. n

Iced Matcha on the beach

CARRIE SCOZARRO PHOTO

iced black tea with lemonade

Up North is becoming a competition favorite.

MIKE BEISER PHOTOGRAPHY

Open Thursday - Saturday 11-5 / Or by appointment 509-998-0440 / 3950 3rd Ave., Loon Lake, WA Tours •Tasting • Gift Shop

2LoonsDistillery.com

901 N 4th St • CDA • 208.755.5385 • GAIWANTEAHOUSE.COM

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 33


May Tastings at Vino!! FRIDAY Tastings

SATURDAY Tastings

• 5/11 Wines of Australia • 5/18 South African Wines • 5/25 Palencia / Monarcha Wines • 6/1 FIRST FRIDAY! With New Art + June Wine of the Month Club Selection

• 5/12 Mother’s Day Favorites • 5/19 Wines To be Determined • 5/26 CLOSED for Memorial Day Weekend • 6/2 Santa Julia Wines of Argentina

“Duckhorn Vineyards”

MONDAY June 14 PROFESSIONAL TASTING - at Vino! TUESDAY June 15 SMALL PLATES TASTING - at The Spokane Club

Tasting Room Opens Friday 3pM-6:30pM SATURDAY 2pM-4:30pM Your local friend in the wine business... SINCE 1995 222 S. Washington St, Spokane 509.838.1229 vinowine.com

10410 N Division St. • Spokane

509-466-8434 PHOTOS BY:

34 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

@SpokaneEats

Drunks Vary

Pick your poison.

CRAIG WINZER ILLUSTRATION

Different kinds of alcohol (probably) don't make you different kinds of drunk, but there are different kinds of drunks BY MITCH RYALS

T

equila makes me crazy. Whiskey makes me ornery. And I hate gin for many reasons, but mostly because it makes me gloomy. These dictums are well known among the well lubricated. They distill into the notion that different alcoholic drinks can affect our emotions differently. But they’re wrong — probably. Just ask a biologist. Alcohol is alcohol and it will have the same effects on the body no matter the spirit that contains it. A relatively sparse amount of science backs this up. For example, research from 1970 using human subjects on the different effects of bourbon and vodka found “no consistent differences in behavior” between the two liquors. In 1984, researchers injected rats with cognac, tequila, vodka, scotch and straight ethanol, but observed no differences in their behavior (though, discerning whether one rat is pissed and another is tequila-crazy seems difficult). It’s more likely that certain moods are associated with different types of drinks because of how and where those drinks are consumed. Shooting tequila during a bachelorette party, for example, is an entirely different evening than nursing a gin and tonic all night. And pounding rum and Cokes (which contain more sugar) will play out differently than sipping whiskey. Still, the perception lives on. A 2017 study published in BMJ found that drinking liquor, wine or beer can elicit different emotions. The study analyzed self-reported emotions of nearly 30,000 people from 21 different countries. Researchers found that spirits are most often associated with aggression. Nearly 60 percent of people also said liquor makes them feel confident, energetic and sexy. Red wine was most likely to make people feel both tired and sexy. And when

people drink beer (the least sexy drink), nearly half said they felt relaxed. The research also suggests that setting (your couch versus the bar), the time of day, drinking habits and culture can also play a role. But forget the type of drink for a moment, and let’s consider the type of drunk. Science and journalism have an answer here, too. In a 2015 study of college students’ drunk personalities, researchers at the University of MissouriColumbia came up with four drunk archetypes. Our interviews with bartenders at a local dive, a nightclub, a bougie wine bar and a beer bar mostly supported the study’s categories. Hemingways: named after the esteemed author who is said to have claimed that he could “drink hells any amount of whiskey without getting drunk.” These are the drinkers who can keep their cool (or at least appear to) after six shots while the rest of us are on the floor. Mary Poppins: named after the affable nanny. These drunks’ friendly and agreeable nature is amplified after they’ve had a few, but they’re not likely to get into much trouble. Mr. Hydes: named after Dr. Jekyll’s sinister alter ego. These drunks are more hostile, less responsible. These are the blackout drunks. They’re mean-mugging everyone. Maybe they’ll get arrested. Nutty Professors: named for the shy university professor who’s transformed into an extroverted party animal. These folks break out of their shell after a few drinks. Maybe they’re louder, friendlier and more touchy feely, but it’s all love. n mitchr@inlander.com


An App For That Technology can be your friend at every stage of a night spent drinking BY SARAH MUNDS

The Pregame My Cocktail Bar

Input the alcohol on your shelf (plus some ingredients in your fridge) and this jazzy little app will concoct a curated list of drinks you can make with what you own. Save favorites. Browse all recipes. Input your own questionable creations! A true step up from opening 50 internet tabs, peering through drink recipes with meaningless names and trying to figure out if you have the ingredients for a cocktail that probably tastes like trash. “What do you mean I need a can of Pringles, grenadine and a pickle to make a Horny West Virginian Bull?”

While You're Out

AlcoDroid Alcohol Tracker

Log drinks. Read BAC estimate. Avoid DUI. Total how much money you’ve spent on drinks if you’re into using self-shame as a motivator. Feeling particularly masochistic? Record your drinking habits over time to associate a numerical value with that drinking problem you definitely don’t have. A practical hint from my night out using this app: If you have some favorite weird drink along the lines of “my Uncle Tom calls this the rip-your-aunt’s-pants-off-vodkamargarita-wine-bomb,” do yourself a favor and add that drink as a preset while you’re sober.

Maybe While You're In the Uber Going Home? Drink Cocktail Simulator

The concept — a “cool” animation app that fills your phone screen with a simulation of a refreshing cocktail. You can then take a “drink” of your phone (and revel in the splendor of the modern age) as your phone full of liquid tilts and sloshes! Who needs real alcohol now? I have no idea what human being would be motivated to download this, but apparently 10 million people are in on a secret that I’m not understanding. A one star reviews complains “FAKE YOU CAN’T DRINK IT AND IT SAYS REAL SIM,” so don’t be fooled here. But another review gives us a peek into this app’s true intent: “I say to my friends ‘I’m really thirsty’ then they are like ‘do you want me to get you a drink?’ then I’m like ‘nah I got one right here’ and then they’re like ‘...’.”

The Hangover

Drink Water Aquarium

Reminds you to drink water by filling a cute virtual aquarium every time you hydrate. The peppy dancing fish mock your pounding headache, waves of nausea and looming miasma of regret. Usefulness in regards to a hangover should be obvious. n

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COMEDY

Handsome and Rambling Hannibal Buress’ comedy takes him to Spokane both on stage and on the big screen BY DAN NAILEN

H

annibal Buress’ comedy career has progressed in fits and starts that seem common in stand-up. Years of grinding out appearances at open mics and small clubs after getting his start in college led him to eventually head to New York, where one appearance on Jimmy Fallon’s latenight show led the still relatively raw Buress to a writing gig for Saturday Night Live, and then 30 Rock. Dreamy, right? Except he only got one sketch on SNL, and he quit 30 Rock after six months after struggling to meld his voice with a roomful of writers. “It was weird for me,” Buress says of those high-profile gigs back in 2009 and 2010. “I’m sure there’s other stand-ups who’ve had the same experience, but with different results. There have been a lot of stand-ups who wrote for those shows, with varying levels of success. It was just something different for me.” Despite the seeming setback, Buress’ career has only blossomed in the years since, including a headlining tour that stops in Spokane Friday. His comedic approach is full of observances on everything from dating to video games to hip-hop, delivered in a laconic Southern-tinged drawl despite his Chicago roots. That voice has led to a steady run of voice appearances on animated shows like BoJack Horseman, Lucas Bros. Moving Co. and Bob’s Burgers, while his laid-back onscreen personality led to years as the co-host (and co-writer and producer) of the surreal buffoonery of The Eric Andre Show as well as a popular role as Lincoln on Broad City. ...continued on next page

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Hannibal Buress headlines the Knitting Factory on Friday. KELLEN NORDSTROM PHOTO

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 37


CULTURE | COMEDY “HANDSOME AND RAMBLING,” CONTINUED... While racking up TV credits and, increasingly, feature film roles, Buress never stopped doing stand-up. He’s released five comedy albums since 2010, and tours between TV and movie gigs as often as possible. His current jaunt takes him into the Inland Northwest for the first time, and the show here is at the Knitting Factory, a place better known for rock shows than stand-up, but that’s nothing new for Buress. “Nobody’s about to start playing bass guitar in the middle of my set or anything,” Buress says of his rockclub gigs. “It’s fun. There is usually a different kind of energy, maybe because the people are used to seeing music shows, so they connect it with a livelier time.” Buress brings along a DJ to spin tunes before his set; Tony Trimm is the co-host of Buress’s Handsome Rambler podcast, and “he has songs and different weird YouTube videos and stuff going on” at the shows. Nearly four years after Buress’ now-famous show where his allusion to Bill Cosby as a rapist sparked renewed research and eventual conviction of the old “family-friendly” comedian for sexual assault, Buress’ live shows remain unpredictable, and they’re a little more rare thanks to his burgeoning film career. (Questions about Cosby were put off-limits by Buress’s publicist before our interview.) On June 15, Buress hits the big screen in the Spokane-set comedy Tag (actually filmed in Atlanta). While he’s had roles in several movies already, mostly small roles in things like The Disaster Artist and Baywatch, Tag “is my biggest role,” Buress says. “My most time on camera. I’m in the movie pretty much throughout.” Buress co-stars alongside Jon Hamm, Ed Helms, Jeremy Renner and Jake Johnson as a group of buddies

Buress, far right, is one of the stars in the Spokane-inspired movie Tag. who continue a teen game of tag throughout their adult lives. Spending months on set was a whole new experience for the comedian, and when he was able to take off to do stand-up at the FYF festival during filming, “I remember being very excited to do that gig.” There’s a lot of downtime on a movie set. “Sometimes it’s boring, sometimes it’s really fun, sometimes everybody’s standing around cracking jokes,” Buress says. “That’s just what making a movie for a long time is. You have a day off, or you show up and shoot one thing and leave. Now I’ve learned that in the future if I do that type of long shoot again, I’m going to do my best to set up as much like home as I can. Just because it can get a bit dicey — three months in a place can be a long time.” The future is pretty wide open for Buress. He’s doing voice work for the sequel of The Secret Life of Pets for a 2019 release, and there’s one more season of Broad City

Dream Fishing the Little Spokane by Jeffrey Dunn A debut abstract novel ponders the intersection of nature, history, and writing. “These short pieces, which turn away from one another and back again like bends in the river itself, accumulate in readers’ minds to form a picture not just of a place, but of a certain mindset: melancholic, irreverent, and untamed.”

“A Brautigan-esque ramble through a river’s history.”

- Kirkus Reviews

Hannibal Buress • Fri, May 11 at 7 pm • $32.50$40 • All ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

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ISBN # 978-0-9993339-0-7 • JeffreyDunnSpokane.com

38 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

to come. Asked if writing or starring in a TV remake ala Will & Grace or Roseanne might interest him, Buress demurred while allowing he’d gladly watch new versions of Animaniacs or Living Single. More realistic, perhaps, is an idea he has for “some type of sports show, or sports gambling show.” “My ambition is pretty accessible, and a reasonable thing I want to do, it just needs to be done is, I want to do a show where it’s just me and my buddies competing with each other in Vegas, gambling on different things,” Buress says. “Like The League, but real money.” With the hot streak Buress has enjoyed for the better part of a decade, I wouldn’t bet against that show becoming a hit. n

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CULTURE | DIGEST

Kick the Cannes

LIVE AND LEARN The Moondoggies played the Bartlett over the weekend, and their tunes — a blend of Neil Young-ish guitar workouts and Beach Boys harmonies — were stellar. Early on, frontman Kevin Murphy introduced the band as being from Everett and mentioned how nice it was that a Spokane audience knows where that is, while a Dallas audience doesn’t. Then he added that Everett was, “you know, the hometown of Kenny Loggins.” No, I did NOT know Mr. “Footloose,” Mr. “Danger Zone,” was an Everett native. (DAN NAILEN)

CASE CLOSED When true crime author Michelle McNamara died suddenly in 2016, she left behind an unfinished manuscript and a terrifying cold case. Her book I’ll Be Gone in the Dark, released posthumously in February, documents the decade-long spree of an unknown rapist and murderer who terrorized California throughout the 1970s and ’80s. McNamara connected the dots of his rampage and dubbed him the Golden State Killer and her writing renewed contemporary interest in the crimes. Sacramento Police recently arrested a suspect: 72-year-old Joseph James DeAngelo, a former cop. McNamara’s husband, the comedian Patton Oswalt, tweeted: “Goodnight, Michelle… You aimed a light and helped catch a monster.” (NATHAN WEINBENDER)

ON THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music arrives online and in stores May 11. To wit: ARCTIC MONKEYS, Tranquility Base Hotel & Casino. The British band has been gone for five long years. I, for one, welcome the return of the Monkeys business. BRENT COBB, Providence Canyon. Nephew of Nashville producer Dave Cobb and a leading new voice among cool country, Cobb hits Spokane Arena with Chris Stapleton this summer. LA LUZ, Floating Features. The Seattle doo-wop-meetssurf sisters are back with a new one. (DAN NAILEN)

R

BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

ight now on the French Riviera, the Cannes Film Festival is in full swing. It’s the most prestigious of international movie events, and big names — Asghar Farhadi, Spike Lee, Jean-Luc Godard — are competing for the Palme d’Or, the festival’s highest honor. But one of the juggernauts of modern film production is noticeably absent from the roster: Netflix. Cannes recently decreed movies released exclusively through streaming platforms could still play, but would be ineligible for the Palme. Because they’re not seen on a big screen, they argued, they’re not really films. In retaliation, Netflix pulled its features from Cannes, resulting in much huffing and puffing. Who’s the bad guy here — the digital giant changing how we consume media, or the old guard clinging to a celluloid past? Let’s examine the main arguments on both sides: Netflix is funding the work of great filmmakers! Sure, they’ve bankrolled crappy Adam Sandler comedies even he forgot existed, but Netflix’s upcoming releases include work by Alfonso Cuarón and Martin Scorsese, and films comparatively-sized studios would never finance. They’ve also got distribution rights to

THE BUZZ BIN

SEASON OF SCI-FI We’re in a golden age of sci-fi and fantasy cinema/TV; three shows airing new seasons continue to solidify this designation: WESTWORLD (HBO, Sun at 9 pm) Get on board with this mind-melting drama — Season Two is bringing us back to the robot-filled theme park where an AI revolution is underway. LEGION (FX, Tue at 10 pm) The second season of this psychological drama about X-Men mutants is trippy as hell thanks to more diverging timelines and plenty of creative cinematography and sets. THE EXPANSE (Syfy, Wed at 9 pm) In Season Three of this space opera about conflict in our solar system, rogue heroes and a dangerous biological weapon make for plenty of action and political scheming. (CHEY SCOTT)

Orson Welles’ The Other Side of the Wind, a long-unfinished holy grail of cinema. BUT... Netflix is also burying the work of great filmmakers! Some argue that indie films are more widely seen if they’re on a platform people are already paying for. Because Netflix doesn’t release its numbers, that’s merely conjecture. What’s difficult to dispute, though, is that Netflix doesn’t really promote content beyond its high-profile series. Its library has grown so rapidly and indiscriminately that many ambitious new features disappear into the algorithm. Watching movies at home is great now! Yeah, theaters now have leather recliners and menus resembling actual food, but sometimes leaving the house is a pain in the ass. Besides, high-end home entertainment systems offer crisp sound and picture, the window between theatrical release and digital availability is shrinking, and staying in means you don’t have to put on pants. BUT... The theatrical experience is sacrosanct! If the theatrical distribution model goes extinct, will the very act of filmgoing follow? Consider: Would less people have ventured to see Avengers: Infinity War on the big screen if Marvel had made it simultaneously available online? Definitely. The hypothetical shuttering of theaters might elicit a shrug from casual moviegoers, but seeing films with an audience is as old as the artform itself, and it should at least be an option for those who want it. So who’s in the wrong: Netflix or Cannes? Impossible to say, really, but this fight isn’t doing the real victim — the art of the cinema — any good. n

THE DEAD CELLS RHYTHM Dead Cells is a hard game. When it kills you, it kills you permanently. If you’re lucky, you got far enough to unlock new weapons or upgrade your powers for the next futile attempt. All of which would make it an obnoxious slog if it weren’t for the simple fact that the rhythm of the platforming combat is so fun. A good action game feels like an improvised guitar solo at a jam session, and few games capture that feeling like Dead Cells. Whether you’re diving five floors to set the ground on fire, rolling behind an enemy to backstab them, or tossing out ice grenades and sawblades, violence has never felt so musical. (DANIEL WALTERS)

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 39


PPlaicntuare-Perfect Hard at Play CULTURE | COMEDY

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GUIDE

Spokane comedian Phillip Kopczynski’s album-recording show at the Big Dipper is the ultimate DIY affair

ehind the bright lights and glamor of show business there are, of course, myriad people working behind the scenes to make what happens on stage look great, and easy. When you’re talking about independent artists, though, the people hustling to do all the legwork of promotion and production are typically the same people who are on stage at show time. That’s certainly the case for Spokane comedian Phillip Kopczynski, who is recording an album Saturday at the Big Dipper. Not only is the 37-year-old headlining, obviously, but he also found the venue, booked his friend and mentor Harry J. Riley to open, hired models to serve as ushers and planned to have local recording studio Amplified Wax mix his album, post-recording. And all that effort to make sure the show comes off does nothing to help him actually hone his act for the stage, so he spent the weekends leading up to recording night bouncing between gigs in Tacoma, Richland, McMinnville, Oregon, and Fort Wayne, Indiana. “The only opportunities you have are the ones you create for yourself,” Kopczynski says over coffee at his Dishman Hills-area home. “Club gigs cancel all the time, other gigs cancel all the time. Stuff comes up and goes away, but if you’re producing your own show, you’re controlling it. I just feel like if you’re going to be an artist of any kind, you just need to make your own projects.” That’s a lesson Kopczynski learned early on, before he started doing stand-up, when he was a theater major at Whitman College in Walla Walla. It was there he realized that only the “weirdlooking or exceptionally talented” actors could rely simply on auditions — most people had to start their own theater troupes, write their own plays or produce their own shows to do the work they wanted to do. Kopczynski headed west after college and wrote for some small newspapers before returning to the Spokane area and going to work for his family’s facilities-management business, a move that allowed him to start his own family with his wife,

Spokane’s Phillip Kopczynski


“The only opportunities you have are the ones you create for yourself.” take care of his sister with Down syndrome and delve back into improv and community theater. In the fall of 2013 he tried stand-up for the first time “and immediately started going up like five times a week” at places like Neato Burrito, Uncle D’s Comedy Underground and Chan’s Dragon Inn. He hasn’t really let up since, although the list of places he goes up on stage has expanded well beyond Spokane through road trips he juggles with his day job. “There are a lot of opportunities within a 300-mile radius, more than you think,” Kopczynski says. “There’s wineries, breweries, a lot of that kind of stuff. I’ll go over to Seattle a lot just to stay fresh. I’ll take a Seattle gig and people say, ‘It’s not worth it, you’ll lose money,’ but I’m exposed to a new audience, and it’s a different demographic. I just want to see if my material is funny in front of a different audience.” While he does shows at places far from home, Kopczynski’s job and family life likely will keep him in Spokane full time. Even so, he wants to continue to build his fan base and connect with fellow comedians and maybe, eventually, become part of what he calls “a small middle class of stand-up (comedians) out there who tour the country and never live in New York or LA.” “A lot of comedy clubs will pay big money (to established comics), but they can’t afford to do that every week because it’s a risk, so they kind of fill in with these working comics,” Kopczynksi says. “It takes a while to build the material, because if you’re not famous, man, you better be making people laugh. Your funniness better overshadow your lack of fame.” Recording an album — one he’s already titled Hillbilly Glamorous — is a way for Kopczynski to capture the material he likes right now and have a new means to share his comedy online to binge-craving comedy fans. It’s also a way to preserve this point in time in his comedy development, as some jokes will inevitably be retired as he continues writing new material geared more toward long, funny narratives than rat-a-tat jokes. “My thing is, a comedian should be writing, creating and putting stuff out there, and if enough people find me and like it, they go and consume it,” Kopcynski says. “Maybe you capture lightning in a bottle, but that’s also just how you build a fan base.” n Phillip Kopczynski Live Comedy Album Recording • Sat, May 12 at 7:30 pm • $15 • All ages • Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • phillipkop.brownpapertickets.com • phillipkopcomedy.com

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 41


CULTURE | CLASSICAL

Russian Soul S The heart and soul of Russia are on display in the Spokane Symphony’s final Classics concert BY E.J. IANNELLI

Moscow-born pianist Natasha Paremski plays Spokane this weekend.

ergei Rachmaninoff composed a total of four piano concertos, the first three each spaced about a decade apart. Of these, two have gradually percolated to the top of the classical canon: the improvisational and technically daunting Third, a favorite of the composer himself, and the arresting, evocative Second, which later entered popular culture through — to give just one example of many — 1955’s The Seven Year Itch. In Billy Wilder’s film, it’s the piece Tom Ewell’s character daydreams of using to seduce Marilyn Monroe, though she in fact prefers Chopsticks to “good ol’ Rachmaninoff.” The relative popularity of those two piano concertos has tended to overshadow Rachmaninoff’s First, written when he was just a teenage student at the Moscow Conservatory. Young Sergei was upbeat and optimistic at the

ANDREA JOYNT PHOTO

time, still a few years away from the critical catastrophe of his Symphony No. 1, an event that plunged him into a prolonged depression from which his well-received Second Piano Concerto would eventually help him emerge. Moscow-born pianist Natasha Paremski is performing the composer’s Piano Concerto No. 1 as part of the Spokane Symphony’s Heart of Russia concert, the 10th and final in this season’s Classics series. She says that the distance separating the Rachmaninoff’s First Piano Concerto from his Second should be measured in life experience, not years. “To me, they’re like night and day,” she says. “They came at two very different times in the composer’s life. With the second, he was on a very different journey in his life as a person and as a composer. The first concerto ... was basically an assignment, and the assignment was

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that you were to model it after a similar form, meaning another piano concerto. In Rachmaninoff’s case, this was [Edvard] Grieg.” The resulting work was “pure innocence and joy,” Paremski says, with “elements of jazz” in the opening riffs of the second movement. In the second concerto, by contrast, “there’s a cloud, there are scars, there’s turmoil.” The two consecutive concertos might be worlds apart, but that doesn’t mean that the first can be written off as an interesting piece of juvenilia. Although Rachmaninoff was personally compelled to revise it in 1917, Paremski says that the composer’s “harmonic voice” and “insane gift for melodic writing” is already apparent in this early work. “Can you think of any 18-year-old who could write melodies like that now? We feel like we’re so advanced, but could anyone even sit down and write [a melody] that’s so original? And then on top of that, you take this very specific Rachmaninoff harmonic language that he’s already starting to realize and play around with. You can tell that this is an extremely advanced pianist writing fairly virtuosic stuff. It’s not ‘Rach 3,’ but it’s more than Grieg.” Along with the Piano Concerto No. 1, the symphony will be performing Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 1 in G minor (Winter Dreams) and Mikhail Glinka’s Kamarinskaya, named for a traditional Russian folk dance that begins slowly and increases in tempo. The all-Russian program is a “sure thing” for audiences, Paremski says, because of the singular qualities of that country’s music. “If you were to make the distinction, German music is a little bit more restrained, even in its Romanticism — save for the chaos of Schumann, and certainly Brahms can be extremely lush. But if you’re looking at Beethoven, you’re looking at a bit more reserve. And with French [music], it’s always mysteriously sensual and impressionistic,” she says. “With Russian music especially, there is a big emphasis on melody, because in its nature it’s a very melodic culture. If you look at all the folk singing and folk songs, they’re very melodic.” So when musical compositions like the Kamarinskaya or the final movement of Tchaikovsky’s First Symphony draw inspiration from those folk elements, alluring melodies are almost bound to be swept up in the net. But melodies aren’t the only incidental catch. There’s an inextricable sense of place and cultural identity, too. In Paremski’s view, that makes Heart of Russia a particularly apt title for the concert. “If you look at Rachmaninoff’s history, he emigrated [to America] fairly early on and then at one point just never went back, and he was very melancholy about that,” says Paremski, herself a Russian emigrant. “We all have things that we hold close to our heart. His music is the representation of the melancholy of the Russian soul.” n

HEALTH PROFESSIONS

Classics 10: Heart of Russia • Sat, May 12, at 8 pm and Sun, May 13, at 3 pm • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • $17-$60 • spokanesymphony.org

AND CAREER FAIR Connect with health care employers about job opportunities in our area.

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May 18 10 a.m -3 p.m. North Idaho College MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 43


Park Lodge chef and owner Philip Stanton.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

OPENING

FIRE AND SMOKE At Park Lodge in Spokane’s Kendall Yards, chef Philip Stanton showcases his appreciation for simple techniques and ingredients in unexpected ways BY CHEY SCOTT

C

hef Philip Stanton is taking food back to the basics. He’s starting with fire. The chef and owner of the newly opened Park Lodge on the western end of Spokane’s Kendall Yards development has created a seasonal-driven eatery focused on wood-fire cooking techniques to develop complex, yet familiar, flavors that come from fresh ingredients, the smoke and the wood itself. Openly visible to diners from many vantage points in the airy dining room and bar is how this process comes to form: a large wood-burning hearth fitted with a wide metal grate that’s lowered and raised using two large crank wheels. The rustic method is the focal point of Stanton’s vision for Park Lodge. “The first time I saw this grill was at Ox [Restaurant] in Portland,” the chef says. “The chefs there got the [James Beard] Best Chef Northwest Award, and I had a great meal there. I wanted to build the restaurant around that.” Stanton and his culinary team use the applewoodburning hearth to grill meat and some vegetables over an

44 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

open flame. Small brick nooks placed along one side of the hearth also allow for indirect cooking. “I love cooking with real fire — not even the coals, but the wood in its raw state,” Stanton explains. “As it breaks down, there are so many flavors that happen. When you’re just cooking with a gas grill, there is no real flavor development. “I think back to the times people were building fires in the corner of their castles and sticking meat on it — going back to that, and presenting it in a new, clean atmosphere and keeping up-to-date with modern techniques.” The Park Lodge kitchen hearth was custom built by a company out of Washington D.C., and as far as Stanton knows, his is one of only a few restaurants in the area currently using this type of wood-fired grill for most of its preparations. “I never got to cook over fire in a professional setting,” he notes. “I’ve always loved grilling and being around fire. … When you’re cooking with a pulldown grill, that is where the most delicious meals have come from in my life.”

B

eyond the flavors imparted by an open flame, Stanton has a deep reverence for cooking with regional, in-season ingredients. “People go to the store and think a tomato is a tomato — but dishes are affected by sugar, freshness and if it’s in season and grown in proper environments and temperatures,” he explains. “I just buy the produce and stock the kitchen and come up with the menu off that.” With that in mind, diners can expect to see frequent menu changes, chef’s specials and other decisions that highlight what Stanton is able to procure locally. He specifically mentions a leek farmer in Deer Park who he only knows by first name. Also expect that some items on Park Lodge’s refined menu — currently focused on what Stanton describes as “locally inspired American comfort food” with a Mediterranean influence — will showcase unusual presentations for familiar dishes. Take the opening menu’s chili (no longer available one recent evening, less than a week after the restaurant’s first day), made from slow-cooked, ancho chili-braised


short ribs wrapped in a casing of fat and served atop a bed of white bean ragout. (If it’s hard to picture this plating, head to the restaurant’s Instagram, @parklodgespokane, and scroll back.) “So it’s chili — it’s beans and meat cooked in a chili sauce, but I’m transforming it and making it my own, and doing something that reflects my experience with cooking,” Stanton says. Beyond the chef’s takes on traditional surf, turf and plantbased entrees — roast duck breast ($27), prime New York strip steak ($38), potato-crusted halibut ($34), beef tenderloin ($44/$60) a seven-vegetable tagine ($21) and more — the Park Lodge burger ($16) with onion bacon jam, gruyere, green peppercorn aioli and arugula, will also appeal to traditionalists’ eyes and stomachs. “It’ll feel familiar and taste familiar, but look like something special and different,” Stanton explains of the restaurant’s more creative offerings. “But some stuff… the steaks look like steak and fries, but cooked over a wood fire.”

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tanton, 32, got his culinary start like many do; at the bottom of the heap, washing dishes at a Denny’s in Pullman. “I jumped into the kitchen because it seemed like it was fun,” he recalls. “I learned how to take it and turn it into something where you’re a professional, and it’s not just something you’re doing for fun — you’re learning a craft and applying yourself to finding a perfect end result of something.” Early on in his career, Stanton worked at many esteemed restaurants in San Francisco (La Folie), Portland (Bluehour, Castagna) and Paris (Le Relais Louis XIII) after graduating from the California Culinary Academy. For the past three years, after moving back home to Spokane from Portland with his wife, Helen, Stanton was sous chef at Italia Trattoria in Browne’s Addition.

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Park Lodge’s menu features many familiar dishes, like steamed Manila clams. “There is a lot of talent in Portland, but they don’t have a sustainable restaurant scene,” he notes. “I think Spokane has a good market for fine dining. We’ve traditionally been a city that’s a little more into fast-casual type food and pub food, and I think people are starting to want to go back to having a nice dinner with fresh veggies and meat, and not a ton of processed product.” Park Lodge is currently only open for dinner, starting with an abbreviated happy hour menu from 4-5 pm. The restaurant, across the street from Kendall Yards’ Olmsted Green Park, overlooks the Centennial Trail and the Spokane River gorge. Stanton worked with Kendall Yards’ developer Greenstone to secure the space, a building that Park Lodge shares with a forthcoming location of Indaba Coffee Roasters and the new Hello Sugar doughnut shop. Seating on a large patio overlooking the river isn’t open yet. Stanton plans to also build a fire pit in one corner that he hopes can also function as a rotisserie during special events. “Being out next to the park and overlooking the bluff, it felt more like it was a centerpiece of an area to still grow, but also how I feel the restaurant should be for me and my career,” he notes. “This is my centerplace to grow and develop.” n cheys@inlander.com

APY= Annual Percentage Yield. Early withdrawal penalties apply. Fees may reduce earnings on accounts. Membership requirements and fees may apply. Rates subject to change without notice. *Rate shown is available for a limited time only and includes 0.25% APY bump for members who establish direct deposit to a Horizon Credit Union checking account. 15 month special without bump = 2.32% APY. 26 month special without bump = 2.78% APY. **Rate shown is available for a limited time only. Federally insured by NCUA.

Park Lodge • 411 N. Nettleton St. • Open Mon-Thu 4-9 pm, Fri-Sun 4-10 pm • parklodgerestaurant.com • 340-9347

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 45


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FOOD | POP-UP

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46 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

E

very family has a celebration food. For Brunchkin’s signature æbleskiver pancakes. ERICK DOXEY PHOTO Jordan Ripley, that dish is æbleskiver hood for counter brunch service from 9 am-2 pancakes, a Danish tradition. pm. Ripley’s great grandmother brought the The Ripleys met Batch owner Mika Maloney family’s recipe to the U.S. decades ago, and now at a local event they helped cater last year, when the puffy pancake is a centerpiece of the menu she invited them them to cook out of Batch’s for Ripley and his wife Charlotte’s new pop-up kitchen. restaurant, Brunchkin. “Mika has been a huge driving force of this,” “I grew up eating those,” Jordan recalls, both Jordan says. “She floated the idea of us doing for special occasions and just because. “When I pop-up out of there, and that was appealing” went off to college, I would make them for roomBeyond Brunchkin’s signature æbleskivers, mates I had at the time.” the simple menu features dishes with bold flaAfter graduating from the University of vors, like the bright and zesty “Forbidden Rice” Texas at Austin, he pondered opening an bowl ($10), with black rice, preserved lemon, æbleskiver-focused food truck in the warm city horseradish cashew cheese, avocado, sorrel known for its food cart culture. Instead, he found pesto, pickled carrots, turmeric poached eggs and himself working at an ad agency, where he met microgreens. Charlotte. “I always like brunch to be a lighter meal Just shy of one year ago, the now-married and not such a heavy feast,” Charlotte explains, couple moved from Austin to Spokane to be closadding that the menu features other elements er to Charlotte’s family in Leavenworth, and to of “light Scandinavian influseek better quality of life. The ence from Jordan’s side of the idea to open an eatery showcasfamily.” ing the Ripley family æbleskiver EAT BRUNCHKIN On that end is the potato recipe came with them, too. Sundays, from 9 am-2 pm rösti ($10), a hashbrown-like “For a long time we kicked Batch Bakeshop, 2023 W. Dean Ave. fried potato fritter, topped with around an idea of taking feta cream, onion jam, an egg brunches we loved to do with Tuesdays, from 3-7 pm and fresh greens. Also listed friends and family and turning Fairwood Farmers Market, in the menu’s savory section is it into a food truck or a small 319 W. Hastings Rd. a smoked salmon quiche ($7) restaurant,” Jordan says. “And with a potato crust. Charlotte is a much better cook Thursdays, from 3-7 pm On the sweeter side of the than I am.” Perry Street Thursday Market, menu, along with the æbleskivBefore heading to Spo924 S. Perry ers, is a granola bowl ($7) kane, Charlotte also worked as with maple cardamom yogurt pastry chef at an Austin bakery. More details at thebrunchkin.com. and rhubarb strawberry jam. Because she has celiac disease, Charlotte also showcases her all of Brunckin’s food is made popular lavender caramel brownies ($4) and gluten-free. rotating, featured desserts that include vegan “If something is not as good or better bechocolate cupcakes, flourless donuts and almond cause it’s gluten-free, we won’t do it,” she says. lemon cake. The Ripleys started out slow, selling just their After this first year as a weekly pop-up in the æbleskivers at last season’s Fairwood Farmers diminutive Batch Bakeshop space, which seats Market in Mead on Tuesdays. They’ll continue about 20, the Ripleys hope they’ll have enough setting up shop there this season, and also at local interest to consider opening a permanent the Perry Street Thursday Market, serving up storefront and bakery. æbleskivers with homemade jams, flavored “We want to keep it small, but also have a whipped cream and other dipping sauces. good focus on a small menu with good ingrediEach Sunday through this fall, the couple is ents and high quality,” Jordan says. n also taking Brunchkin to the kitchen of Batch cheys@inlander.com Bakeshop in Spokane’s West Central neighbor-


FOOD | PIZZA

ENTER TO WIN 4 TICKETS TO:

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R O F N E T S I L Boombox Pizza is all about that ’90s throwback.

Cowabunga, Dude

HECTOR AIZON PHOTO

Owner of Borracho and Fast Eddie’s opens a new ’90s-themed pizza joint on downtown Spokane’s bar strip BY MITCH RYALS

B

ritney Spears and Biggie Smalls watch dutifully over the bar where slices of pizza left over from lunchtime slowly spin like records on a turntable. A wall mosaic of old speaker boxes frames the restroom doors at Boombox Pizza, the newest addition to the block of bars at Division Street and Main Avenue sometimes referred to as the “Bromuda Triangle.” A pair of open garage doors let chatter and the smell of pizza waft into the street. The new joint is sandwiched between Borracho Tacos & Tequileria and Fast Eddie’s, in a space where Revolver bar used to be. This now makes a near monopoly on the block’s west side for business owner Jeremy Tangen. “When the old Revolver spot came up for sale, it just made sense to control this whole block,” says Jason Martinez, operations manager for the group that owns the two adjacent bars. “We realized there’s a lack of pizza options for lunchtime and dinnertime diners over on this side of town. We already do burgers and sandwiches at Eddie’s and tacos at Borracho, so we wanted to do something different.” The place is completely decked out in 1990s music gear. Aside from the wall of speakers (Martinez says they purchased the entire collection from two people they found on Craigslist), old school boomboxes sit atop the door and cassette tapes are plastered to pillars in the middle of the room.

The New York-style pizzas are also named with ’90s nostalgia in mind, such as “Saved by the Bell Pepper,” “Rage Against the Supreme” and “Baby Got Back.” The most popular so far, Martinez says, is the “Ice Ice Baby,” topped with mozzarella, garlic white sauce, chicken, bacon, tomato and onion. Full pies are 16 inches ($13-$23), with the option for a 12-inch that’s gluten free, or $3 single slices. Boombox also serves wings, salads and breadsticks. The Flaming Lips wings are super spicy, Martinez says, but other than that, the fare is nothing fancy. “It’s meant to be good and cheap,” he says. Weekly on Tuesday, Friday and Saturday, Boombox hosts karaoke from 9 to midnight, and on Thursday its specials are $1 Bud Lights, $2 Rainier tall boys and $2 Capri Sun shots, for which bartenders actually take a syringe and inject vodka into a Capri Sun juice pouch. Daily from 4-5 pm is “Power Hour,” offering $2 slices, Rainiers and Bud Light drafts. “We like the simpler times back in the ’90s,” Martinez says. “It seems things have gotten expensive and fancy just to go get some pizza and beers, but it’s not gonna be that at Boombox.” n mitchr@inlander.com Boombox Pizza • 221 N. Division • Open daily from 11 am-2 am • facebook.com/boomboxspokane • 315-4369

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DARK HORSE A runaway teenager and his stallion encounter harsh landscapes in Lean on Pete, a harrowing drama of the American West BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

T

he world of Lean on Pete is untethered from modCharley help him out and tag along to a back country ern convenience and technology, its characters horse race in Wenatchee, where he wins only because so removed from the way most of us live that he’s doping his horses. they’ve essentially become physical extensions of their One of them is a skittish and timid steed called Lean own environment. There’s a moment near the end of the on Pete, who captures Charley’s attention. Perhaps he film when someone pulls out an iPhone, and it comes as relates to the stoicism of the animals; maybe he sees a shock, because although the film is set in current day, it himself in the plight of a large creature crammed into doesn’t seem to be. closed quarters. Del keeps saying that he’ll probably It is, then, a deliberately timeless story, and it’s imend up sending Pete off to some place in Mexico, and bued with the same kind of sadness that guided the work although Charley doesn’t know exactly what that place of Steinbeck or Faulkner. It’s also, like those authors’ is, he is sure that Pete won’t come back from it. After his most famous fiction, a look at the often unforgiving father suffers an accident, Charley steals Del’s truck and nature of the American landscape, and of the young men the horse trailer with Pete still in it and drives off to… who are lost within it and grasping for ballast. well, where is he going exactly? There’s talk of an aunt in Based on a novel by Willy Vlautin, Lean on Pete opens Wyoming, but Charley doesn’t know if she’ll want him in Portland, but beyond the city limits we normally see when he arrives, or if she even still lives there. on screen. It’s a place of trailer parks and one-room housAnd when the truck eventually runs out of gas — and es, of people who have little and are barely scraping by. when siphoning fuel from other trucks is no longer an It’s where a 15-year-old named Charley (Charlie Plumoption — Charley gets out and walks through the deserts mer, last seen as the rich, abducted teenager in Ridley of the Pacific Northwest, Pete trailing behind him. Scott’s All the Money in the World) has recently moved from So it’s a road movie, a tale of two runaways and Spokane with his single father (Travis Fimmel), who’s a boy-and-his-horse story, and it seems like it might going through a series of short-term girlfriends. develop into a dreamy allegory not unlike 1979’s classic Charley doesn’t talk much and doesn’t seem to have any friends, but he’s obviously LEAN ON PETE attuned to his surroundings, his big, searchRated R ing eyes always communicating great curiosDirected by Andrew Haigh ity. Intrigued by a race track near his house, Starring Charlie Plummer, Steve he wanders through the stables and meets Buscemi, Chloë Sevigny, Steve Zahn a rancher named Del (Steve Buscemi), who buys horses on the cheap, runs them into the At the Magic Lantern ground and resells them. Del agrees to let

48 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

The Black Stallion. But Lean on Pete reveals itself to be much darker and more harrowing than it initially appears, a growing stormfront that finally breaks in a single devastating moment. The movie was written and directed by British filmmaker Andrew Haigh, whose previous features — Weekend (2011), about two gay men getting to know each other after a one-night stand, and 45 Years (2015), about a discovery that disturbs a long-married couple’s tranquility — carried the weight of feelings left unspoken. Rather than give his characters pages of dialogue, Haigh prefers to let entire stories play out across their faces; it’s a relief, then, that Plummer’s central performance is so good and so expressive, a subtle and moving portrait of adolescent trauma. Haigh is basically a tourist in the American West: He’s fascinated by vast expanses painted by sunsets, highways stretching off into nothingness, crusty diners populated by half-asleep regulars. And yet he manages to capture it through the eyes of the farm workers, squatters, homeless teenagers and veterans who inhabit these places, and with it their sense of displacement and abandonment. As much as the film is about the inexplicable bond between a kid and an animal, Lean on Pete is most potently a study of the brutality of life on the fringes, and of the physical and mental toll of isolation. It’s an emotionally taxing movie, and if there is a glimmer of hope at the end, it takes some serious sacrifice to get there. We see people practicing empathy and kindness, but we see just as much craven and senseless behavior. Sometimes, Haigh seems to be arguing, it’s the only way to survive. n


FILM | SHORTS

Life of the Party

OPENING FILMS BREAKING IN

While visiting her late father’s hightech home, a woman (Gabrielle Union) is ambushed by a crack team of burglars. She’s trapped outside the house and her two kids inside, and she’s going to fight back. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE ENDLESS

Two brothers (played by directors Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead) reintroduce themselves into a cult they escaped years earlier, only to dis-

cover the compound may be the site of unexplainable phenomena. Fans of heady sci-fi should find plenty of chew on. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

LIFE OF THE PARTY

Melissa McCarthy is a divorced housewife who re-enrolls in college alongside her daughter and finds a new lease on life. If you ever wanted to go to frat parties with your mom, this movie’s for you. (NW) Rated PG-13

NOW PLAYING AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR

This epic franchise crossover event assembles just about every character from the Marvel Cinematic Universe to stop supervillain Thanos from decimating half the world’s population. There are plenty of solid geek-out moments, but most of the film’s boldest moves will no doubt be undone in the next installment. (JB) Rated PG-13

BAD SAMARITAN

A petty criminal discovers his latest mark (David Tennant) is a kidnapping psychopath, who’ll stop at nothing to keep his true identity a secret. So ridiculous and outlandish that it’s almost kind of fun. Almost. (NW) Rated R

you: This is a sweet, if oddly structured, comedy, buoyed by a delightful and diverse cast. (MJ) Rated R

I CAN ONLY IMAGINE

A faith-based drama about Bart Millard, the frontman of Christian rock group MercyMe, who escaped his abusive childhood through music. The title is lifted from the band’s signature song. (NW) Rated PG

I FEEL PRETTY

BLACK PANTHER

Amy Schumer plays an insecure woman who suffers a head injury in an exercise class, only to wake up with the poise and confidence of a supermodel. She mostly carries this low-key comedy, even as the script follows the most obvious narrative routes. (NW) Rated PG-13

BLOCKERS

Wes Anderson’s second stop-motion feature is set in a world where all canines have been exiled to an island of garbage and centers on a young pilot searching for his own lost dog. Far from a traditional kids’ movie, it’s a treat for both film geeks and animal lovers, and as visually inventive as you’d expect from Anderson. (JS) Rated PG-13

Marvel’s latest is set in the nation of Wakanda, where its new king T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) must face warring factions who want to usurp the throne. As directed by Ryan Coogler (Creed), it’s more serious-minded than typical superhero fare, full of nobility and purpose without sacrificing fun and charm. (ES) Rated PG-13 A trio of helicopter parents discover their teenage daughters have made a pact to lose their virginity on prom night, and they’re determined to thwart it. Don’t let the premise fool

ISLE OF DOGS

LEAN ON PETE

A solitary 15-year-old kid develops an unlikely connection with a skittish ...continued on next page

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 49


NTERN THEAT GIC LA ER MA FRI, MAY 11TH - THU, MAY 17TH TICKETS: $9

LEAN ON PETE (120 MIN)

FRI/SAT: 6:00 SUN: 1:45 MON-THURS: 4:00

THE ENDLESS (112 MIN)

FRI/SAT: 6:30 SUN: 2:30 MON-THURS: 6:30

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FRI-SUN: 4:00 TUES-THURS: 6:15

THE LEISURE SEEKER (110 MIN) FRI-THURS: 4:30

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FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING

racehorse, traveling with it across the deserts of the interior Pacific Northwest. It’s not as sweet as it sounds: This is a taxing journey through the American West and an examination of the brutality of poverty. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

THE LEISURE SEEKER

Helen Mirren nabbed a Golden Globe nomination for this wistful comedy, playing a woman who takes her Alzheimer’s-afflicted husband (Donald Sutherland) on an RV trip to Ernest Hemingway’s Key West. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

OVERBOARD

The 1987 Kurt Russell-Goldie Hawn comedy gets a gender-flipped remake, as a rich jerk (Eugenio Derbez) suffers amnesia and is made to believe he’s married to the poor single mother (Anna Faris) he once mistreated. (NW) Rated PG-13

Sweets By Sarah K was the winner of our

People’s Choice Award at The Chocolate & Champagne Gala

A QUIET PLACE

In this brilliant post-apocalyptic thriller, a mother and father (real-life couple Emily Blunt and John Krasinski, who also directed) must protect their children from monsters that are attracted only to sound. A smart reinvention of a genre we thought had been exhausted, and a truly audacious major studio horror film. (MJ) Rated PG-13

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

NEW YORK VARIETY (LOS ANGELES) TIMES

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

AVENGERS: INFINITY WAR

68

BAD SAMARITAN

45

I FEEL PRETTY

47

LEAN ON PETE

80

A QUIET PLACE

82

RAMPAGE

45

TULLY

76

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

womanhood in the 21st century, playing a new mother who develops an unexpected bond with the young woman she’s hired as a nanny. Directed by Jason Reitman and written by Diablo Cody, both of Juno fame. (MJ) Rated R

A WRINKLE IN TIME

Ava DuVernay translates Madeleine L’Engle’s beloved children’s book to the big screen, and the results are charmingly idealistic yet dramatically adrift. Storm Reid plays a curious young girl who embarks on an interdimensional quest to find her missing scientist fa-

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

ther, her every move guided by Oprah. (NW) Rated PG

YOU WERE NEVER REALLY HERE

Joaquin Phoenix is a shell-shocked veteran-turned-killer assigned to track down a senator’s young daughter, who’s been sold into prostitution. An unusually shallow tone poem from the great director Lynne Ramsay, which maintains her sense of fluid visual poetry while merely paying lip service to its themes of vengeance and trauma. (NW) Rated R n

RAMPAGE

sweetsbysarahk.com 509 844 2483 Thank you Sweets By Sarah K for your support of the gala and Lutheran Community Services Northwest.

That old arcade game about buildingsmashing monsters is now a movie, starring Dwayne Johnson as a scientist who must stop a trio of geneticallyaltered super-creatures from leveling all the world’s cityscapes. Barring a few fun action moments near the end, it’s not nearly deranged enough to be memorable. (NW) Rated PG-13

READY PLAYER ONE

Steven Spielberg’s adaptation of the bestselling novel is shiny escapism and nothing more, a Saturday morning cartoon on a blockbuster budget. In the future, a teen orphan searches for a hidden fortune in a virtual reality world with a corrupt tech CEO on his tail. (NW) Rated PG-13

SUPER TROOPERS 2

The long-delayed sequel to the 2001 cult comedy reunites those mischievous Vermont state troopers, this time going tête-à-tête with mounties on the U.S.-Canada border. All the tired jokes from the original are recycled, but with the added stink of middle-aged desperation. (NW) Rated R

TRUTH OR DARE

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50 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

A round of the classic schoolyard game turns sour when the college kids playing realize that anyone who doesn’t follow the rules meets a grisly end. Idiotic and amateurish. (NW) Rated PG-13

TULLY

Charlize Theron stars in this deeply, intimately sympathetic dramedy about

NOW STREAMING 78/52 (HULU)

The title of this documentary refers to the number of shots and edits that compose the infamous shower scene in Alfred Hitchcock’s Psycho, which is here analyzed and picked apart by various editors and historians. Enlightening and interesting, even if it’ll only be of interest to cineastes and Hitchcock completists. (NW) Not Rated

FACES PLACES (NETFLIX)

78/52

Iconic filmmaker Agnes Varda and street artist JR travel the French countryside, taking portraits of the people they encounter and plastering the blown-up photos to the sides of buildings. Part art piece and part documentary, this is simply one of the best nonfiction films of recent years, a vibrant, funny and moving celebration of, well, faces and places. (NW) Rated PG


FILM | REVIEW

Killing Time

Not even a TARDIS could save David Tennant from the aggressive stupidity of Bad Samaritan.

The thriller Bad Samaritan is so dumb it’s almost entertaining BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

I

f you were casting the role of a murderous psychopath who’s got hidden torture rooms in his ultramodern house and an isolated cabin surrounded by filled-in graves, I don’t know if David Tennant would be high up on your list of candidates. I can buy him as a centuries-old, shape-shifting time lord, but a devious, merciless and physically powerful serial killer? I don’t think so. Yet here he is playing a kidnapper and murderer in Bad Samaritan, which is cruddy and stupid from its title on down, and way beneath his talents. It’s not for Tennant’s lack of trying, though: He contorts his face, bugs out his eyes, and swings unpredictably from come-hither whispers to staccato shouting. It’s a big, sometimes campy, performance, but in a movie that doesn’t warrant the effort. He’s not the movie’s protagonist, however. That would be Sean Falco (Robert Sheehan), a 20-something Irish immigrant living in Portland and who’s often in trouble with the law. He’s an amateur photographer —

the movie establishes early on that he’s adept at Photoshop, which (honest to god) becomes a crucial plot point later on — but he refuses to take the corporate photography job that his stepfather could land him. He’s got artistic standards, man. He works instead as a valet outside a fancy Italian restaurant, which is a front for a tiny criminal ring: When someone drops off their car, he and a friend use the GPS systems to lead them back to the driver’s house, which they then rob. One night, Sean picks the wrong house. It, of course, belongs to Tennant, a Maserati-driving jerk with the extravagant name of Cale Erendreich. Sean breaks in, only to discover Erendreich’s got a woman (Kerry Condon) chained up in his office and a room full of bloody power tools in the garage. He goes to the police, but Erendreich is always one step ahead, and he then spends every waking moment ruining Sean’s life. He’s a real devious mind, that Erendreich. He has supposedly eluded capture for years (his methods remain unknown, but we get the sense that he’s moved around

a lot and killed a lot of women), and yet he’s remarkably cavalier. At one point, he plans to inject Sean with a syringe full of neon green liquid, which he wields right outside a heavily-monitored federal building. (He doesn’t end up using it, and we never see or hear about the syringe again). He uses burner phones and then tosses them right out the car window. (Nobody in eco-friendly Portland has noticed this?) He even tries to run a dude over in downtown and in BAD SAMARITAN broad daylight. He also suffers from Rated R an Equus-level obsession Directed by Dean Devlin with horses, no doubt Starring David Tennant, stemming from a childRobert Sheehan, Kerry Condon hood trauma involving a gun and a stallion (which we see in a hilariously incompetent opening sequence). He’s got porcelain horse heads all over his walls; even his desktop background is a horse. Think this will somehow pay off in the end? Bad Samaritan is very, very silly and yet it takes itself very, very seriously, with the plot of a rejected Stieg Larsson manuscript and the production values of a hacky Law and Order spinoff. It was directed by Dean Devlin, who spent years as a producer for schlockmeister Roland Emmerich (Stargate, Independence Day) before making his directorial debut with last year’s colossally stupid Geostorm. It seems he has a future making D-grade thrillers that you might one day half-watch on HBO when you’re too hungover to change the channel. n

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 51


Classical virtuoso meets late night comedy. Ever wonder…does the hat make the man? How can you create the sound of speed? Enjoy these and other random thoughts as they come to life through music, comedy and film.

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52 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

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ELECTRONIC

Signature Sound Tycho’s Scott Hansen can’t help sounding like himself BY HOWARD HARDEE

S

cott Hansen finds it impossible to compose a song without leaving his fingerprints all over it. It doesn’t matter if he uses new instruments and effects, plays in a different style, or reroutes all of the signal pathways. It all ends up sounding like Tycho. “I think the process I use is going to shape pretty much any sound that comes in the front end,” he says. “At the end of the day, if I’m in control of the process, it’s going to end up sounding like it’s in this specific space. I think that’s true for any producer, and that’s what I think is cool about producing: The process becomes the instrument. The songs are all being written by the process, in a way.” Indeed, Hansen is most intrigued by the mysterious ways songs develop on their own. For example, when he’s building instrumental tracks layer by layer, unintend-

It’s all about process for Tycho’s Scott Hansen, who brings his heady electronica to the Knitting Factory next week. ed tone colors and chords usually emerge from the mix. “I’ll listen back to my songs and think, ‘That’s an interesting chord progression,’ but I never played it. I stacked these three tracks and put a ton of reverb on one, and the reverb blended into another track and created a chord, or whatever,” he says. For Hansen, that sort of unpredictability is exciting: “If a person thinks of it, then it’s predictable, but if you didn’t think of it and it just kind of happened out of the process, I think that’s more interesting.” Tycho is Hansen’s solo project, but he fills out the sound with a full band in the live setting and incorporates audiovisual elements that create a dazzling overall experience. The project is known for chilled-out, down-tempo and atmospheric soundscapes, which have inspired a string of excellent soft electronic albums: Dive (2011),

LAUREN CREW PHOTO

Awake (2014) and Epoch (2016). Dive, especially, is considered a genre classic. Hansen started making demos for the album in 2004 — well before he made music for a living — and slowly chipped away at the project for several years, working on the side as he pursued a career in graphic design. “It’s kind of unfair to compare that to my other records, because it’s kind of a compilation of all the best ideas I had over a very long period in my life,” he says. “Awake and Epoch were under various constraints — you have to put out records to tour, you have to keep creating content. Those records, from the first note played to the final product, took nine to 10 months, tops. There are definitely moments now where it’s like, man, I’d really like to spend that much time on a couple of songs.” ...continued on next page

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 53


MUSIC “SIGNATURE SOUND,” CONTINUED... Now that he’s a professional, Hansen’s working routine involves making beats late at night. He’ll start messing around with a guitar or keyboard, waiting to hear a phrase he can build around, and adhering to a backward philosophy when it comes to the roles of the two instruments. “The guitar on my records is sampled and replayed, and with guitar I’ll make it sound more robotic,” he says. “I like to keep the synths loose, because synths are what you kind of expect to sound robotic. I guess I try to invert that relationship.” Over the countless hours at the production console, he’s picked up some tricks that streamline the process. In the past, he would shoot for a lo-fi sound by soaking every element of the song with tons of reverb and delay. But he discovered that that’s much too messy when he’s mixing 20 tracks. “Later, I realized you only need to take a couple of tracks and make them warm and dirty,” he says, “and then the whole song will still have that feeling, and it’s a lot easier to put the mix together.” Though he’s very much an electronic artist, Hansen’s inclination to work with lo-fi textures is a product of listening to classic rock ’n’ roll — namely the Beatles and Led Zeppelin. In an effort to recreate the warmth of those bands’ recordings, he likes to cut off the high end of the mix to produce a sort of wobbly vibrato. “It’s almost like everything sounds like it went through a tape machine,” he says. “Growing up when I did, I got used to records sounding a certain way, and that was with tape machines and consoles and old synthesizers that didn’t stay in tune. Overdubbing, tape edits — that’s what a record sounds like.” n Tycho with Emmit Fenn • Thu, May 17 at 8 pm • $25 • All ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

54 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018


MUSIC | TRIBUTE

Magical Mystery Tours

Creedence Clearwater Revival during happier times. What would happen if there really was a revival?

We imagine our own fantasy rock tribute bands, inspired by the upcoming Reunion Beatles show BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

I

t seems there’s a Beatles tribute act for each of the eight days in a week. There are the groups that focus on the band’s early years of mop tops and matching suits, and the ones that dig into the kaleidoscopic experimentation of the Sgt. Pepper’s era. And then there are the entire career retrospectives, requiring multiple costume changes and stylistic shifts. But the Reunion Beatles Fantasy Tour is a different beast entirely, and it’s driven by an unusual and intriguing conceit. It presents an alternate timeline wherein all four Beatles are still alive and are playing together again, something that never happened after the band’s fractious 1969 split, and it mixes Fab Four classics with hits from their respective solo careers. So we decided to explore the same hypothetical scenario with other now-defunct bands, skipping over the obvious ones (Led Zeppelin with a resurrected John Bonham, or Brian Jones-era Rolling Stones). Here are a few imaginary tribute acts we came up with.

THE BAND

What if The Last Waltz wasn’t actually the last? The Band, who long backed Bob Dylan before branching out on their own, were the subject of Martin Scorsese’s genredefining 1978 concert film, which documented the final live performance of its most famous, Robbie Robertsonled lineup. It features all the Band’s best songs, including “The Weight” and “The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down,” which still elicit shivers. OUR FANTASY REUNION IDEA: A beat-by-

beat recreation of The Last Waltz, featuring a murderer’s row of great ’70s musicians — Neil Young, Van Morrison, Joni Mitchell, Emmylou Harris, Dylan himself and, uh, Neil Diamond. It all ends with the entire company crowding the stage for a rendition of “I Shall Be Released,” and it’d be stunning.

CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVIVAL

Like the Beatles, CCR burned fast and bright, had a hell of a lot of hits and developed a sound that’s distinctly, uniquely theirs. Problem is, personal acrimony and legal issues drove a wedge between its surviving members long ago. In one corner, frontman John Fogerty; in the other, bassist Stu Cook and drummer Doug “Cosmo” Clifford, who founded the touring “tribute” act Creedence Clearwater Revisited. Each side hates the other. Fogerty even refused to play with his old bandmates when CCR was inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1993. OUR FANTASY REUNION IDEA: OK, so that’s a lot of backstory, but it’s important. Here, the three surviving members are forced to get back together for financial reasons, so there’s an edge of contempt and disdain lurking beneath all that rock-solid musicianship. A bad moon rising indeed, and an entertainingly unpredictable one.

THE FUGEES

What do you do after recording a musical masterwork? In the case of the Fugees, whose 1996 LP The Score is one of the greatest rap records ever, you throw in the towel. The trio of Wyclef Jean, Lauryn Hill and Pras

have played together a few times since their commercial peak (see the concert doc Dave Chappelle’s Block Party), but Hill’s personal and legal problems seem to have stymied a full-on reunion. “You will have a better chance of seeing Osama bin Laden and Bush in Starbucks having a latte,” Pras once said, “before there will be a Fugees reunion.” OUR FANTASY REUNION IDEA: In this alternate universe, Wyclef never tried running for president of Haiti, Hill is on her third or fourth critically-acclaimed solo record — her only studio album is 1998’s The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill, another masterpiece — and Pras gets along with both of them. Hip-hop heaven.

FLEETWOOD MAC

There’s always gotta be drama with the Mac. It actually seems to fuel them: When they made their defining album, 1977’s Rumours, its members were famously breaking up and screwing around with MORE EVENTS each other. Forty years Visit Inlander.com for later, they’re still up to complete listings of their old tricks. They local events. recently recorded an album, released as Lindsey Buckingham/Christine McVie, sans iconic frontwoman Stevie Nicks, and made headlines when legendary guitarist Buckingham had quit the band. Or maybe he was fired. It’s hard to tell. OUR FANTASY REUNION IDEA: Fleetwood Mac started life as a blues band fronted by guitarist Peter Green, and they went through nearly a decade of lineup changes and stylistic about-faces before Buckingham and Nicks propelled the band to pop superstardom. A “reunion” show should cover the band’s whole catalogue, from blues to AM pop, with members quitting right there on stage ala Spinal Tap. They could then have a change of heart and return just in time for the encore. n The Reunion Beatles Fantasy Tribute • Fri, May 11 at 8 pm • $22-$45 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638 • Sat, May 12 at 7:30 pm • $26 • Panida Theater • 300 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • panida.org • 208-263-9191

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 55


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

SOFT ROCK AMBROSIA

I

t was sometime in the late ’80s or early ’90s when it became uncool to enjoy bands like Ambrosia, as hair-metal machismo and grungy aloofness crowded the earnest, sensitive souls of the ’70s off the airwaves. But within the last few years, something shifted, and the influence of AM pop and soft rock has been permeating indie music, with Mac DeMarco, Ariel Pink and Foxygen unapologetically riffing on the grooves of the past. Ambrosia’s biggest hits were slow jams like “Biggest Part of Me” and “How Much I Feel,” and while they function as time capsules, their funky basslines, falsetto crooning and sax solos have come back around to sounding contemporary again. It makes you wanna lounge on a shag carpet with a snifter of brandy. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Ambrosia with Peter Beckett of Player • Sun, May 13 at 7 pm • $15-$25 • Coeur d’Alene Casino • 37914 S. Nukwalqw St., Worley • cdacasino.com • 800-523-2464

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 05/10

ARBOR CREST, Maxie Ray Mills J THE BARTLETT, Lights Off Dance Off J BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOLO’S, Monthly Blues Boogie J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen CORBY’S BAR, Open Mic and Karaoke THE CORK & TAP, Truck Mills CRAVE, DJ Stoney Hawk CRUISERS, Thunder Thursday DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Bobby Patterson Band J GILDED UNICORN, Dave McRae THE JACKSON ST., Songsmith Series J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Chris Molitor J THE LOCAL DELI, Keanu & Joey MOON TIME, Monarch Mountain Band NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), PJ Destiny POST FALLS BREWING, Ron Greene RED ROOM LOUNGE, Thready Thursday with 2NUTZ, Jellyfyst, The Naturalystics, Joel.Gorman, Storme REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Jason Hawk Harris RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROADHOUSE, Karaoke THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, Jam Series SLICE & BISCUIT, Bluegrass Jam THE VIKING, American Pinup, Elephant Gun Riot WHISK, Bill & Bogue’s Excellent Adventure ZOLA, The JAK Trio

Friday, 05/11

219 LOUNGE, Kevin Dorin (5 pm), Double Down (9 pm)

56 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

ROCK FIELD REPORT

F

ield Report bandleader Christopher Porterfield writes some of the most searing lyrics I’ve heard in a while, delivering them in songs whose beauty belies the emotional devastation contained inside. The band’s 2014 album Marigolden was a wonderful collection, and Porterfield’s songwriting has only grown sharper in the years since. The band’s latest, Summertime Songs, is anything but thematically sunny, full of characters at harsh romantic ends and drinking too much. But arriving at songs as winning as “Never Look Back” and as — gasp! — hopeful as “Healing Machine,” you’ll quickly find yourself entranced by Field Report’s approach. The band opened for Joe Pug in a Spokane a few years back, and their live show was worthy. — DAN NAILEN Field Report with Sontalk • Sun, May 13 at 8 pm • $12 • All ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

J J THE BARTLETT, Joshua James, Jason Hawk Harris J BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, GS3 J J BING CROSBY THEATER, The Reunion Beatles (see page 55) BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Sterling BLACK LABEL BREWING CO., Dylan Hathaway BOLO’S, Mojo Box J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, Sons of Rainier, Ripe Mangos, Misty Mountain Pony Club J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, My Girl, My Whiskey & Me BULL HEAD, Bobby Patterson Band CEDAR COFFEE, Dario Ré CEDAR STREET BRIDGE, Brian Jacobs CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke CRAVE, DJ Stoney Hawk

CRUISERS, Karaoke with Gary CURLEY’S, Dragonfly FARMHOUSE KITCHEN AND SILO BAR, Tom D’Orazi and Friends J FORZA COFFEE (G.U.), Lucas McIntyre J FORZA COFFEE (VALLEY), Jenna & Caleb Johansen J HUMBLE BURGER, The Hookers, Happy Foam Roller, Andy Cigarettes IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Ben Olson and Cadie Archer J IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Just Plain Darin IRON HORSE (CDA), JamShack J JACKLIN ARTS & CULTURAL CENTER, Friends of Guitar Hour Presents David Tanenbaum THE JACKSON ST., Tufnel

JOHN’S ALLEY, Trego J LAGUNA CAFÉ, The Renaldos LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil MARYHILL WINERY, Ken Davis MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Ron Greene with Tod Hornby & Alex Rima MOOSE LOUNGE, Whiskey Rebellion MULLIGAN’S, Truck Mills NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Royale NORTHERN QUEST, DJ Patrick J THE OBSERVATORY, Lavoy Album Release with Cathedral Pearls, Bandit Train OLD MILL BAR & GRILL, Dave McRae OMEGA EVENT CENTER, Wooli, Silly Calves, AyZiM, K$, B-sinn B2B Static, Blackout, Lunova

PALOUSE BAR AND GRILL, Kicho PATIT CREEK CELLARS, Ken Davis in Transit PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Son of Brad THE PIN!, Area 51, Beauflexx, Wolfpack, Slik Vik, Vitamin V, DJ Fysh, B2B, Dirty Ders PRIME TYME BAR & GRILL, David Wolff RED LION HOTEL RIVER INN, Gladhammer RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROADHOUSE, Motorbreath: Metallica Tribute SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Joshua Belliardo SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES, Stagecoach West ZOLA, Loose Gazoonz


Saturday, 05/12

219 LOUNGE, Trego J BABY BAR, DogHeart, Fun Ladies, Boys Night BARLOWS, Jimi Finn J J THE BARTLETT, The Family Crest, Goodnight Texas BEEROCRACY, Brian Stai J BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Kevin BOLO’S, Mojo Box J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Dan Maher CEDAR STREET BRIDGE, Jake Robin CHECKERBOARD BAR, Voodoo Death Gun, Jacob Vanknowe, Twelve Gauge Saints and more CURLEY’S, Dragonfly FLAME & CORK, Kyle Swaffard GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Slow Cookin’ HOUSE OF SOUL, Nu Jack City J HUCKLEBERRY’S, Pamela B. IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, John Firshi IRON HORSE (CDA), JamShack THE JACKSON ST., Rockin’ for Mom J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Diane Copeland LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Mary Chavez MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Mostly Harmless

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MIDTOWN PUB, Christy Lee MOOSE LOUNGE, Whiskey Rebellion MULLIGAN’S, The Cole Show NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Royale NORTHERN QUEST, DJ Patrick J THE OBSERVATORY, Tents, Summer in Siberia, Mini Murders PALOUSE BAR AND GRILL, Kicho J J PANIDA THEATER, The Reunion Beatles (see page 55) J PAULSEN HOUSE, Kevin Eaton & Karson Chrispens Jazz Quintet POST FALLS BREWING, Robby French QUARTZITE BREWING CO., Dylan Hathaway RED LION HOTEL RIVER INN, Gladhammer RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES, Sharky and the Fins T’S LOUNGE, Scot Kellogg & Jimmy Nuge WESTWOOD BREWING, Ron Greene ZOLA, Loose Gazoonz

Sunday, 05/13

ARBOR CREST, Martini Brothers J J THE BARTLETT, Field Report (see facing page), SONTALK J THE BLACKBIRD, Champagne Sunday BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Rusty and Ginger J COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Ambrosia (see facing page), Peter Beckett DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night

GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Chad Bramlet LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), JamShack O’DOHERTY’S, Live Irish Music J PAULSEN HOUSE, Kevin Eaton & Karson Chrispens Jazz Quintet ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 05/14

J J THE BARTLETT, Prof THE BULL HEAD, Ron Greene J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills J HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, King Ropes RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 05/15

219 LOUNGE, Karaoke with DJ Pat BABY BAR, Palberta, Peru Resh, Slugs J CRUISERS, The Black Donnellys GARLAND DRINKERY, Joshua Belliardo GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke J J KNITTING FACTORY, The Glitch Mob, Elohim, Anomalie LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tue. RAZZLE’S, Open Mic Jam RED ROOM LOUNGE, Storme RIDLER PIANO BAR, Open Mic/Jam THE ROADHOUSE, Karaoke SPIKE’S, Jimmy Nuge ZOLA, B.O.A.T.S.

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Wednesday, 05/16

219 LOUNGE, Truck Mills, Jared Johnston J THE BARTLETT, Dario Ré, Tyler Alai CHECKERBOARD BAR, Separating the Seas, Within Sight, Insubordinary CRUISERS, Open Jam Night GENO’S, Open Mic w/Travis Goulding IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Clint Darnell THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE, Cronkites RED ROOM LOUNGE, Skyzoo with Landon Wordswell, Eman Jones, LaLion, Saint Laurant, Brotha Nature RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROADHOUSE, Open Mic THE THIRSTY DOG, Karaoke J TORTILLA UNION, Wyatt Wood ZOLA, Whsk&Keys

Coming Up ...

J J KNITTING FACTORY, Tycho (see page 53), Emmit Fenn, May 17 J THE BARTLETT, Tyrone Wells, Gabe Dixon, May 18 J THE BIG DIPPER, Dodgy Mountain Men, B Radicals, Icky Business, May 18 J THE BARTLETT, Moorea Masa & the Mood, Raquel Rodriguez, May 19 J THE BIG DIPPER, Cascade Crescendo, Trego, May 19 J BING CROSBY THEATER, Andrew McMahon in the Wilderness, May 20

MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-2639934 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BRAVO CONCERT HOUSE • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-457-2392 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOLLYWOOD REVOLVER BAR • 4720 Ferrel, CdA • 208-274-0486 HOTEL RL BY RED LION AT THE PARK • 303 W. North River Dr. • 326-8000 HOUSE OF SOUL • 120 N. Wall • 217-1961 IRON HORSE BAR • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., CdA • 509-926-8411 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 57


VISUAL ARTS BISCUIT TRIP

Robby Martin, who paints under the name Biscuit Street Preacher, describes his new “Grits & Gravy” show as a new collection of “ferocious urban paintings,” and I’d believe him if I were you. The North Idaho transplant from Las Vegas creates large-scale acrylic works full of images ranging from industrial locales to somewhat random objects from his youth, old record players and refrigerators. His visual commentaries are striking, colorful things that draw you into a whole new world with each piece. Consider his show opening this weekend an invitation to visit several of them at once. — DAN NAILEN Biscuit Street Preacher: “Grits & Gravy” • Opening party Fri, May 11 from 5-10 pm; exhibit continues Thu-Sat, noon-4 pm, through June 2 • Emerge • 208 N. Fourth St., Coeur d’Alene • emergecda.org

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58 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

COMEDY KILLER LAUGHS

THEATER LOT OF LIVIN’

Kyle Kinane • Thu, May 10 at 8 pm • $15/$22 • Fri, May 11 at 8 pm; Sat, May 12 at 7 and 9:30 pm • $22/$30 • 21+ • Spokane Comedy Club • 315 W. Sprague • spokanecomedyclub.com • 318-9998

Bye Bye Birdie • May 11-27; Thu-Fri at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $23$25 • Lake City Playhouse • 320 E. Garden Ave., Coeur d’Alene • lakecityplayhouse.org • 208-676-7529

On Kyle Kinane’s half-hour performance on Netflix series The Standups, the road warrior comedian’s extended riff on the reemergence of the KKK is a brilliant blend of social commentary and great jokes, the kind of thing that makes Kinane a naturally appealing comic for any George Carlin fans: “They’re despicable, but I’ll say this, their laundry game is on point. You can’t argue with that. They keep their whites white … I wear a white T-shirt in my own apartment and 20 minutes later I look like I got in a fight with a guy trying to fix a motorcycle.” You have four chances to see him this weekend, and you should take advantage. — DAN NAILEN

Bye Bye Birdie follows the story of rock ’n’ roll superstar Conrad Birdie, who visits the people of Sweet Apple, Ohio, before being drafted into the Army in 1958. The whole town is swept up in the frenzy of the rockstar’s arrival, and everyone wants to see which lucky girl will be the recipient of Birdie’s goodbye kiss. The musical’s original Broadway run won four Tony awards in 1961 including Best Musical. Coincidentally, Lake City Playhouse was established the same year. The classic stage musical has since been adopted into two films and is set to be recreated next year as a live television performance on NBC. — ERIC SCHUCHT


www.kootenaicountyonecall.com

www.ieucc811.org

COMMUNITY WALK THROUGH HISTORY

This year’s Mother’s Day weekend historic homes tour hosted by the Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture takes place in a picturesque pocket of the lower South Hill surrounding St. John’s Cathedral. Private homes on display this year, built from 1909 to 1935, include several contributing to the Rockwood Historic District. Homes range from classic Craftsman bungalows to the Tudor Revival style. Guests will also have an opportunity to tour the cathedral, built in the 1920s and considered still to be one of the best examples of classic Gothic architecture in the U.S. Though the tour is offered both Saturday and Sunday, the cathedral is only open on Sunday, from 2-4 pm, with guided tours at 2:15 and 3:15 pm. Tickets can be purchased in advance at the MAC, or the day of on the front lawn of the Paulsen House (245 E. 13th Ave.). — CHEY SCOTT

1/2 mile to Latah Shopping Plaza

EagleRidgeWA.com

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Sasquatch: Man-Ape or Myth? • Sat, May 12 at 11 am • North Spokane Library • 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. • Sat, May 12 at 3 pm • Spokane Valley Library • 12004 E. Main • humanities.org

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Do you believe in Bigfoot? Whether you do, don’t, or are on the fence about the cryptid’s actual existence, an upcoming talk and community discussion hosted by Humanities Washington explores the purported science and stories behind the Pacific Northwest legend. Seattle author David George Gordon not only presents and critically evaluates data on Bigfoot, but also asks audience members to share their stories and ask probing questions. Gordon is the author of The Sasquatch Seeker’s Field Manual, which examines both supporting and refuting evidence on the creature’s existence. “I encourage people to follow the basic tenets of science while gathering credible data to further our understanding of the Sasquatch,” Gordon writes on his website. In addition to two Spokane talks, Gordon also appears at libraries in Cheney (May 13) and Colville (May 14). — CHEY SCOTT

652 W. Basalt Ridge 3 Bed, 2 Bath, 5 Car Garage 2017 sq. ft. Rancher Crawl $509,950

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29th Annual Mother’s Day Tour • Sat, May 12 and Sun, May 13 from noon-4 pm • $15/MAC members; $20/non-members • Spokane’s lower South Hill • northwestmuseum.org

AVAILABLE NEW HOMES

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Newland Communities is the largest private developer of planned residential and urban mixed-use communities in the United States from coast-to-coast. Together with our partner, North America Sekisui House, LLC, we believe it is our responsibility to create enduring, healthier communities for people to live life in ways that matter most to them. www.newlandcommunities.com and www.nashcommunities.com

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 59


W I SAW YOU

S S

CHEERS JEERS

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I SAW YOU DIESEL Miss you freckles. Have you heard about the guy who drowned at Palouse Falls where our names are written?

CHEERS MY ITALIAN SUGAR Seems like only yesterday that I saw someone wrote about me in the Inlander. A couple months later, on our second date, I discovered it was you who wrote it! (then you wrote again for our One Month dating) Now, here we are, going to celebrate four years marriage this Oct, and our son turning two in August. But we have so much more than a house payment together. We have a connection I have been searching for, like parts of a puzzle. You make me laugh when I don’t want to, feel safe and loved. I only hope and try to make you feel as awesome as you make me feel. Thank you for all you do, and sharing your smile with me everyday. Love you to the Stars and Back. Your Cosmic Girl FARM BOY From outdoor summer movie to Q&A’s to days painting and planting trees together in backyard.

You have brought so much happiness into my life. I love seeing the joy and laughter you bring to the boys’ lives. Your determination and watching you grow inspires me. Never give up! ~Buttercup BLOOMSDAY COMMITTEE For so long the seniors @ Cathedral Plaza dreaded Bloomsday because of the “metal” band music perched on the corner of Riverside & Jefferson. We asked for a change & the Bloomsday Committee obliged, they gave us a great sounding rock & roll band. Thanks! HEALING HEART There isn’t a day that I don’t somehow turn to you for strength. I know that must be a burden - shouldering my load and your own. Your empathic nature makes it something that is almost effortless but I see the pain you burden. I am sorry to cause you any difficulty and I only want to you to know that every day with you makes my life better, easier, safer and happier. You are the healing heart I never knew I needed and always wanted - you are the compassionate, dedicated leader and best friend that I searched for my whole life. I don’t know what I would do without you. I appreciate you, in everything you do and say and I love you deeper with every moment. HAPPY BIRTHDAY Happy Birthday to my baby sister, Emy! I love you so much and I am so soo very proud of you - you are so talented, strong, intelligent and beautiful. <3 Sisi [INSERT ROCKY DANCE GIF] “Sean. CONGRATULATIONS ON GRADUATING (x2)! So very proud of you! Can’t wait to see what types of successes your future holds. Cheers to your next adventure! PS: I’m trying to sneakily write this as you’re next to me, being

I find it interesting that you chose to drive right up behind me and then honk as you sped past in your white SUV.

extra cautious not to have any grammatical or spelling mistakes.”

JEERS I WASN’T “ON MY PHONE” Jeers to the jerk that commented that I should be off my phone and engaging whilst out to dinner with my daughter. I get it: Damned kids and their phones! It’s an old gripe. But had you so much as glanced at the phone I was tapping, you’d notice that it was asking what symptoms I was experiencing. You probably didn’t notice the slight bulge from my blouse - I have taken care to hide it. That bulge is a heart monitor. When I press a button, it sends a signal to the very phone you scoffed at. I then tap in what symptoms I’m experiencing so that my cardiologist can evaluate it at a later time. That is what I was doing - tapping in my symptoms. I wasn’t ignoring my daughter, as you so contemptuously said. I was paying attention, albeit briefly, to my health. Dear sir, the next time you sneer in superiority at someone on their phone, why don’t you take just a millisecond to evaluate the circumstances? Have the day karma feels you are entitled to. WORST RADIO STATION EVER When I heard that a new radio station was coming to Spokane I was excited. I was getting so tired of the mind numbing, auto-tuned drivel that came out of the

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

other radio stations here and I was ready to hear something at least a little different. Well... it’s been a disappointment. Sure, you play a couple songs that are different. Every once in a while I find myself enjoying a song or two played on your station, only to be let down. You guys play the same ten songs over and over and over and over... If I have to hear that damn Rise Against song one more time on both my drive to work and my drive home I might rip my car stereo directly out of the dash of my car. And don’t even get me started on how often you play that one Portugal. The Man song, you know the one that the top 40 stations have been blasting since last June? There is nothing new or different about you, you are just another annoying station that can only seem to play the same soul sucking gibberish that every other Spokane radio station plays with occasional Nirvana song mixed in and then dare to call your station new and different. HONKING MOTORIST To the honking motorist on East Sprague Wednesday May 2 after 5 pm. Me, the cyclist in the right lane. I find it interesting that you chose to drive right up behind me and then honk as you sped past in your white SUV. The left lane was entirely clear, I was not impeding your ability to go by. In case you didn’t know, it is illegal for me as a cyclist to ride on the sidewalk. The section of East

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NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Sunday, May 13 9:00 am - 1:00 pm

ADULTS: $35.97 | SENIORS: $31.17 CHILDREN 5-12 $21.58, 4 & UNDER Complimentary

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INDIVIDUALS AND GROUPS WELCOME

60 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

R B A E C E C L T R T H U I R A Y N I O N L L I P D O S E I V E N E E U P L E O O Z E A R M F A

Day er'�Ballroom M�hGrand Brunch

RAIN or SHINE Bring Weather Appropriate attire

844-724-5743 • Mon-Fri 6am-5pm

Sprague doesn’t have a bike lane. It is called ‘sharing the road’. Do not paint all cyclists with the same brush. I am a considerate cyclist. I do not take up the entire lane and use hand signals at all times, stop at lights and four-way stops. I will not paint people in vehicles with the same brush and think they are like you. Most people do not put me in danger when I am cycling but it only takes one person like you cause another bicycle fatality in Spokane. Please consider your actions the next time you see a cyclist in your lane. We own homes and pay taxes. I choose to ride my bicycle - I don’t have to, I have a car and a motorcycle. I do it for my health and the joy it brings me. n

(12yr+)

12 CHILD

$

(11 and Younger)

Start off mom’s special day with our Mother’s Day brunch. Highlights include Snow Crab Legs, Honey & Black Pepper Oven Roasted Salmon and Baron of Beef with Au Jus.

Reservations recommended: 509-922-6252 Pricing is per guest and subject to a service charge of 15% and state sales tax of 8.8%. 100% of the service fee is distributed to the Mother’s Day Brunch Buffet Team

1100 N. Sullivan Rd. Spokane Valley | www.mirabeauparkhotel.com


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

GLOW FOR HUNGER A 1-mile kids run to benefit Northwest Harvest, with a preparty, food truck vendors and more. May 11. Joe Albi Stadium, Wellesley Ave. and Assembly. nsplit.com/glowforhunger-2/ NOT FORGOTTEN The event hosted by World Relief features performances by the Neema Youth Refugee Choir, Pilgrim Slavic Orchestra, and St. John’s Cathedral Choir. Noor, a Rohingya refugee who resettled in Spokane, also share about fleeing persecution in Myanmar and resettling in Spokane. Includes a post-concert silent auction with dessert. May 11, 6 pm. $20 suggested donation. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. bit.ly/2K6W2kO BUTTERFLY RELEASE FOR LUPUS AWARENESS In recognition of May ass Lupus Awareness Month, the second annual butterfly release is held in memory of those lost to Lupus, and to honor those still fighting. May 12, 11 am-2 pm. $3-$5 suggested donation. Mirabeau Park Meadows, 13500 Mirabeau Pkwy. (425336-2309) TRADITIONAL ENGLISH TEA An event benefiting the historic Moore-Turner Heritage Gardens, featuring a catered English tea with luncheon fare. Seatings at 11 am and 2 pm with garden tours to follow. May 12. $25-$30. Moore-Turner Heritage Gardens, 507 W. Seventh Ave. heritagegardens.org (838-9186) SPOKANE LILAC FESTIVAL GALA This event honors out-of-town dignitaries from other festivals and military dignitaries, with entertainment by EWU Jazz Ensemble, with keynote presentations

by the Parade Grand Marshal, Brig Gen. Rhonda Cornum, United States Army. May 18, 5:30-6:30 & 6:30 pm. $75/person. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. spokanelilacfestival.org (535-4554)

COMEDY

2.0PEN MIC Local comedy night hosted by Ken McComb. Thursdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The District Bar, 916 W. First Ave. facebook.com/districtbarspokane/ GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open mic comedy night hosted by Casey Strain; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (509-847-1234) YOU NEED A HERO Each week audience suggestions inspire a new superhero who (hopefully) saves the day. Fridays at 8 pm, through June 1. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) PHILLIP KOPCZYNSKI ALBUM RECORDING The Spokane comedian records his album “Hillbilly Glamorous.” Harry J Riley opens, with special guest Reggie Whitehead. May 12, 7:30-10 pm. $15. The Big Dipper, 171 S. Washington St. bit.ly/2FuruGW SAFARI The BDT’s fast-paced, shortform improv show in a game-based format relies on audience suggestions to fuel each scene. Ages 16+. Saturdays from 8-9:30 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com WELLRED COMEDY TOUR Stand-up comedy and writing partners Trae Crowder (The Liberal Redneck), Drew Morgan and Corey Ryan Forrester have been touring nationally to sold out clubs and theatres in support of their best-

selling book, “Liberal Redneck Manifesto: Draggin Dixie Outta the Dark.” May 12, 8 pm. $36. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com THE SOCIAL HOUR COMEDY SHOWCASE Featuring comics from the Northwest and beyond, and hosted by Deece Casillas. Sundays, from 8-9:30 pm. Free. The Ridler Piano Bar, 718 W. Riverside Ave. socialhourpod.com (509-822-7938) OPEN MIC: A free open mic night every Wednesday, starting at 8 pm. Doors open at 7 pm. Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com

COMMUNITY

MAIL CALL This Smithsonian Traveling Exhibit explores the history of America’s military postal system and examines how, even in today’s era of instant communication, troops overseas continue to treasure mail delivered from home. May 9-July 15; open Wed-Sat 11 am-4 pm. $4$6 admission. Spokane Valley Heritage Museum, 12114 E. Sprague Ave. valleyheritagecenter.org (922-4570) THURSDAY EVENING SWING Weekly swing dance classes and open community dances; Thursdays from 6:45-10 pm. Includes progressive (6:45 pm) and dropin (7:45 pm) lessons, followed by open dancing (8:30-10 pm. $8-$50. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. strictlyswingspokane.com (509-838-5667) TITANIC: THE ARTIFACT EXHIBITION This blockbuster exhibit takes visitors on a journey back in time to experience the legend of Titanic through more than 120 real artifactsThrough May 20; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm (Thu until 8 pm). $18/adults,

$16/seniors, $10/ages 6-17, $13/college students w/ID. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) 2018 GSI ECONOMIC UPDATE An event to share the latest news about the local and national economy, with a presentation by Steve Scranton, Senior Vice President, Chief Investment Officer and Economist for Washington Trust Bank. May 11, 7:30-9 am. $35-$55. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. greaterspokane.org/events/2893/ CHENEY MAYFEST The sixth annual springtime celebration in historic downtown Cheney includes a street dance with the Kelly Hughes Band, car show, corn hole tournament, petting zoo, art alley, street vendors and more. Complete schedule online. May 11 ,7-10 pm and May 12, 10 am-5 pm. cheneymayfest.org DROP IN & RPG If you’ve ever been curious about role-playing games, join us to experience this unique form of gameplaying, and build a shared narrative using cooperative problem solving, exploration, imagination, and rich social interaction. Ages 5-105. Held on the second and fourth Friday of the month, from 4-7 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkwestcentral.org SOUTH HILL SUPER SAMPLE SALE Twice yearly, a group of Northwest fashion reps offer their apparel sample to the public at prices 50-80 percent off retail. May 11 from 9 am-7 pm and May 12 from 9 am-6 pm. Free admission. Moran Prairie Grange, 6006 S. Palouse Hwy. southhillsupersamplesale.com 29TH ANNUAL MOTHER’S DAY TOUR The theme for this year’s tour is “The

Cathedral Neighborhood,” featuring the historic area of Spokane’s South Hill surrounding the iconic St. John’s Cathedral, one of the few examples in the United States of classic Gothic architecture. The tour offers an eclectic blend of architectural styles and buildings. May 12 and 13 from noon-4 pm. $20. northwestmuseum.org (363-5324) FRIENDS OF THE CHENEY LIBRARY BOOK SALE Proceeds support various library programs, activities, and services. Hosted by the Friends of the Spokane County Library District. May 12, 9 am-2 pm. Free. Cheney Library, 610 First St. scldfriends.org/events/ (893-8280) GARDEN EXPO 2018 The annual event features more than 250 garden-related vendors, along with door prizes, seminars, demos, kids’ activities, a flower show, live music, food vendors and more. May 12, 9 am-5 pm. Free. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene. tieg.org GHOST NIGHT PSYCHIC READINGS & SPIRITUALISM A night of spiritual readings with Spokane psychic medium Candess Campbell and host ghostologist Chet Caskey at the haunted Corbin Art Center. Includes refreshments, beer and wine. Ages 21+. May 12 and June 9, from 6:30-8:30 pm. $22. Corbin Art Center, 507 W. 7th. spokaneparks.org (363-5418) INDIA AT A GLANCE This presentation by Sreedharani Nandagopal includes a brief overview of India, followed by a performance of classical South Indian dancing. May 12, 3 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org (509444-5390)

Drags and Drinks A sweet & Salty Fundraiser Saturday, May 19, 4 p.m.

Top Frog Brewery, 221 Vista Drive, Newport (8 miles outside town)

Benefitting ‘festivities in the park’ Rodeo weekend, NewPort City Park Tickets: $25 each or two for $40 local Watch our ock the ‘Models’ R lk a tw ca

$30 at the Door (includes ‘sweet & Salty’ delights, plus one beer/wine) 21 and over

Limited number of tickets 509-710-9379; 509-671-6333

MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 61


EVENTS | CALENDAR KIDICAL MASS — CHIEF GARRY Join a family-friendly afternoon bike ride of about 3 miles, cycling on anything that rolls. Presented by Summer Parkways & Christ the King Church. May 12, 1-3 pm. Free. Chief Garry Park, 2701 E. Sinto. summerparkways.com LOOFF CARROUSEL GRAND OPENING Celebrate the grand reopening of the carousel in its new venue, with live entertainment and more. Rides are $2 each. May 12, 1-7 pm. Free. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard. (625-6601) MOTHER’S DAY COMMUNITY BRUNCH The Women & Children’s Free Restaurant of Spokane hosts a free brunch, sponsored by Horizon Credit Union, Asuris Northwest Health, Molina Healthcare, and Numerica Credit Union. May 12, 10:30 am-12:30 pm. Free. North Central High School, 1600 N. Howard St. wcfrspokane.org NORTH IDAHO VETERANS STAND DOWN The 25th annual event assists veterans and their families in Eastern Washington and the five Northern Idaho counties. DD214, Military or VA ID required for admittance. May 12, 8 am-1 pm. DD214, Military or VA ID. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. (208-664-3095) SPOKANE FOLKLORE SOCIETY SPRING DANCE The May dance features the band Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots with callers Emily Faulkner, Nora Scott and Nancy Staub. Includes a dessert potluck break. May 12, 7-10 pm. $8/$10. East Spokane Grange, 1621 N. Park Rd. (598-9111) MOTHER’S DAY FLEA MARKET PARTY Spend time shopping with mom, the market also includes bounce houses, snacks, crafts and more. May 13, 10 am-6 pm. GreenAcres Vendor Mall, 16814 E. Sprague Ave. bit.ly/2JhzxZV TRADITIONAL CHINESE FOLK DANCING A presentation by performers from the Spokane Chinese Association. This program is one of many Spokane Public Library events celebrating Asian American & Pacific Islander Heritage Month. May 13, 3 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry. (444-5331) COMMUNICATING ACROSS DIFFERENCE Palouse ProActive invites community members to learn how to productively discuss differences of opinion with facilitator Anna Plemons. May 14, 7-8:30 pm. Free. Unitarian Universalist Church of the Palouse, 420 E. Second St. palouseproactive.org NEPAL: A JOURNEY BACK 2000 YEARS A journey through Nepal, en route to Everest, with slides focusing on the people and life among the sherpas. Also includes many artifacts on display. Presented by Fred Stahl, world traveler. May 14, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley Ave. spokanelibrary.org (520-227-1758) EWU STUDENT RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM Students, faculty and staff from various disciplines present their innovative, dynamic research and creative work to the university and general public. May 15-16. Free. Eastern Washington University, 526 Fifth St. facebook.com/EWUSymposium SPOKANE CONTRA DANCE Spokane Folklore Society’s weekly dance, with the band All in Good Time playing and caller Ray Polhemus. Beginner workshop at 7:15 pm. May 16, 7:30-9:30 pm. $5-$7. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. womansclubspokane.org

62 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

DROP IN & CODE: Explore the world of coding using game-based lessons on Code.org and Scratch. For kids (grades 3+) and adults. Meets the third Friday of the month, from 5-6:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org/events/drop-incode (279-0299) MILLIANA SPRING FLING JEWELRY SALE The Spokane-based jewelry house hosts a sale of its locally-handmade sample pieces at up to 70 percent off retail prices. Ten percent of sales benefit Daybreak Youth Services Spokane; customers can bring donations of items such as beauty products, swimsuits and clothing to benefit the center’s teen girls. May 17, 12-7 pm. 905 W. Riverside, Ste. 608. millianna.com

Lawn& Garden

FILM

FULL DRAW FILM TOUR The festival’s primary goal is to unite bowhunters, fuel outdoorsman and create excitement for all those passionate about archery. May 11, 7-9 pm. $10-$17. Panida Theater, 300 N. First. (208-255-7801) INTERNATIONAL FILM SERIES: LOVELESS Zhenya and Boris are going through a vicious divorce marked by resentment, frustration and recriminations. Already embarking on new lives, each with a new partner, they are impatient to start again, to turn the page – even if it means threatening to abandon their 12-year-old son Alyosha. May 15, 7 pm. $5. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org LOVE SIMON: Everyone deserves a great love story, but for 17-year-old Simon Spier it’s a little more complicated: he’s yet to tell anyone he’s gay, and doesn’t actually know the identity of the anonymous classmate he’s fallen for online. May 17-20; times vary. $3-$7. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127)

FOOD

CIDER SPLASH 4 Celebrate Liberty’s 4th anniversary with all-day $4 pours, food from Skewers food truck and live music by Brandon Humphreys. May 12, 3-9 pm. Liberty Ciderworks, 164 S. Washington St. bit.ly/2IoDZJx MOTHER’S DAY CHAMPAGNE BRUNCH The 15th annual event includes an all-you-can-eat buffet with carving stations, made-to-order omelets, a dessert table, and a special gift for mom. Optional 8 am mass and service. May 13, 9 am-2 pm. $10-$30. Immaculate Heart Retreat Center, 6910 S. Ben Burr Rd. ihrc.net (448-1224) MOTHER’S DAY TEA PARTY Share an hour of conversation and treats with the important women in your life over tea service. May 13 at 1:30 and 3:30 pm. $23.75. My Fresh Basket, 1030 W. Summit Pkwy. bit.ly/2qT0YT8 (558-2100) GALETTE CULINARY CLASS Known as galettes in France and crostatas in Italy, these versatile rustic tarts can be made with savory or sweet ingredients and eaten at any time of the day. May 14, 5:30-7 pm. $45. Kitchen Engine, 621 W. Mallon Ave. thekitchenengine.com BAR NONE DESSERT CLASS This class teaches how to make five different incredible dessert bars. Led by Eva Roberts of Just American Desserts. May 15, 6-8 pm. $37. My Fresh Basket, 1030 W. Summit Pkwy. (558-2100)

NWSeedPet_MothersDaySale_051018_6H_CPR.pdf


Planting the Perfect Pots

I

t`s almost Mother’s Day so it`s time to start thinking about planting your containers. While you can buy a premade container sometimes you just want to put them together yourself or pick those perfect plants. Here is a few tips for making a great looking container.

Mother’� Day Event

#1 Know your light conditions. If you have shade in the afternoon, you want to make sure you are using shade plants like coleus, begonias and impatiens. #2 Use the Thriller, Filler, Spiller method Thriller- is a single height used to be the focal point of your container. This is often placed in the middle but if your planter is going against a wall you can plant this in the back of the container. A Thriller example is purple fountain grass or Dracaena Spikes Filler- this is middle height plants, they are shorter than the Thriller but they do not trail. You may choose to use just one Filler or you may choose to use a few different fillers depending on the size of your container. An example of a Filler is Zinnas, Marigolds, Dahlias or Osteospermum.

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Spiller- This is the layer of plants that trail over the pot. Some people use just one spiller; however I prefer to use two. When I select a spiller I usually try to use a flowering spiller like bacopa, or lobularia and then I like to add a foliage spiller like Ivy or Creeping Jenny #3 Try something fun and different I`ve use Wandering Jews and spider plants before in my containers or if you have a large pot use a shrub for your Thriller this year. Jessica Webb (Creach) - Bloom Broker

valid thru may 5/16/18

Plant Farm / Creach Greenhouse

14208 E 4th Ave, Spokane Valley | 509.926.9397 | plant-farm.com

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1606 S. Assembly St. 747.2101 | Visit us on

SunsetFlorist.net MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 63


A

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+21 and over. This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

64 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

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BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

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RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess ENDSHIP RING

AMY ALKON

I was roommates with a girl five years ago. I was a spoiled brat for many years, but I’ve worked very hard to change. She, on the other hand, is still supported by her father, has no job or interests, and just wants to get married. Whenever she calls, she wants advice on the same boy drama. I just don’t have the time or patience for this anymore. I tried not responding to her, but she keeps calling and texting, “I need to come over right now!” —Drama-Weary

“I need to come over right now!” What are you, a day spa for her emotions crossed with the Burger King drive-thru? It’s easy to confuse the chunk of time a friend has been in your life with reason for them to continue being there. It helps to unpack the mystique about how friendships form. Social science research finds that a major driver of friendship is similarity — shared values and attitudes, for example. But demographic similarity is part of it, too — like both being 30-year-old single female zoo workers who went to a crappy college. And though we want to believe we carefully choose the friends in our lives, personality psychologist Mitja Back and his colleagues are among the researchers who’ve found that “mere proximity” seems to play a big role in who our friends are. This means, for example, living in the apartment next door, working in the same department, or, in Back’s study, being randomly assigned to “neighboring seats” in a college class. In other words, you probably became friends with this woman because she was sleeping in the next room, not because you conducted a nationwide search for the best possible buddy for you. Now’s the time to choose whether she stays in your life — and you don’t do that by hoping she’ll hear your vigorous eye-rolling over the phone and take the hint. Breaking up with a friend — if that’s what you want to do — should work like breaking up with a romantic partner. Don’t just wordlessly cut off contact; that’s cruel — and likely to backfire. Tell her that you need to end the friendship, explaining the problem in broad terms: You’ve “grown apart” or you’re “in different places” in your lives. Even if she presses you, keep it kind by keeping it vague. The point is telling her it’s over, not informing her that she’s got all the emotional depth of a goldfish and then ducking out forever via call waiting: “Sorry — gotta go. Important robocall from Rachel from Card Services on the other line!”

TO THE BITTER FRIEND

After six years of hard work, I’m starting to have some success in my career. Disturbingly, my best friend seems envious. I’ll tell her some exciting news, and she’ll barely respond. I understand that she’s trying to break through while working a menial job, but my other friends are really supportive and happy for me. She claims she is, too, but her behavior says otherwise. It really hurts my feelings. —Disappointed We often do crazy things simply to keep up with our peers who are doing those things — not, say, because we were bored on a Saturday afternoon and had a little brainstorm: “I know! I’ll pay some total stranger $55 to spread molten wax on my labia and rip out all my pubic hair!” We evolved to be creatures of “social comparison” — judging how well we’re doing personally and professionally by how we stack up to others. As I often explain, our emotions are not just for mental decoration; they’re motivational tools. When we’re lagging behind our peers, envy often rises up — as it seems to be in your friend. Envy is mistakenly assumed to be ugly and shameful, but evolutionary social psychologist Bram Buunk and his colleagues explain that the feelbad we get from envy pushes us to get on the stick and narrow the “status gap” between ourselves and others. Understanding the underpinnings of envy can help you have compassion for your friend, which might help you avoid taking it personally when she fails to celebrate your achievements by pulling out confetti and a kazoo. Try to accept that she probably can’t express the excitement you’d like her to because every success you rack up sneers, “Hey, loser! How come she’s up there and you’re down here?” If you do tell her about some win, consider pairing the news with mention of the years of grubby work and daily failures that went into it. This might help her view the success you’ve achieved as something attainable — as opposed to some magical gift: “OMG, I was just sitting on my porch drinking a beer, when my boss called and said, ‘You often cut work and smoke a lot of pot. Let’s give you the VP job.’” n ©2018, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

68 INLANDER MAY 10, 2018

EVENTS | CALENDAR FALAFEL COOKING CLASS Learn how to make this Middle Eastern tradition, a deep-fried ball, doughnut or patty made from ground chickpeas, fava beans, or both. May 16, 6-9 pm. $35. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org (509-229-3414)

MUSIC

PIANO MASTER CLASS WITH NATASHA PAREMSKI The public is invited to observe a master class as Spokane Symphony guest pianist Natasha Paremski gives tips and advice to four local piano students who have auditioned for this rare opportunity to learn from a master. May 11, 3-5 pm. Free. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org THE REUNION BEATLES FANTASY TRIBUTE TOUR A tribute band that reimagines a Beatles reunion concert featuring both the band’s songs and its members’ solo projects. May 11, 8-9:30 pm. $20+. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (Also May 12 in Sandpoint) reunionbeatles.com/thereunion-beatles SPOKANE SYMPHONY: THE HEART OF RUSSIA The final classics concert of the Spokane Symphony’s 72nd season features guest artist pianist Natasha Paremski. The program includes Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 1, Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 1, “Winterdreams,” and Mikhail Glinka’s ‘Kamarinskaya,” the first orchestral work based entirely on Russian folk music. May 12 at 8 pm and May 13 at 3 pm. $17$60. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) WE BELIEVE IN ONE GOD: A HYMN FESTIVAL A concert featuring renowned organist Bruce Neswick and the First Presbyterian Chancel Choir. May 12, 4-5:30 pm. Free. First Presbyterian, 318 S. Cedar. spokanefpc.org MOTHER’S DAY CONCERT FEAT. BELLACRISTO HANDBELL CHOIR The new community handbell choir presents a concert of Disney and movie tunes, folk songs, hymns, and more. May 13, 4-5 pm. Free; donations accepted. Audubon Park United Methodist Church, 3908 N. Driscoll Blvd. (466-0901) MOTHER’S DAY CONCERT IN THE PARK The annual concert features an eclectic mix of musical works by the NIC Wind Symphony and Chamber Singers. May 13, 2 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene City Park, 415 W. Mullan Rd. (208-769-3424) MICHAEL JACKSON TRIBUTE SHOW The show starring impersonator Danny Dash Andrews honors the life and legacy of The King of Pop. May 14, 8 pm. $28-$58. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) LILAC CITY’S GOT TALENT SHOW Talent from any high school in Spokane County is showcased, with half of ticket proceeds supporting The Washington State Fallen Heroes Project. May 15, 6:30 pm. $5-$10. Ferris High School, 3020 E. 37th Ave. spokanelilacfestival. org/lilac-citys-got-talent/ (535-4554)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

FULL DRAW FILM TOUR Full Draw shares the passion and pursuit of bowhunting and outdoor films. May 10, 7 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com

SPRING HORSE TRIALS See many different breeds of horses at this threeday event, or during warm-ups before the show starts. May 10-13. Spokane Sport Horse Farm, 10710 S. Sherman Rd., Spokane. spokanesporthorse.com DADS & DUDES NIGHT An event is about fathers and sons spending quality time together, having fun, deepening relationship and making positive memories. May 12, 6-9 pm. $15. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. hubsportscenter.org (927-0602) TRIATHLON CONFERENCE An event featuring keynote speakers who are decorated athletes or experienced professionals in the world of sport and triathlon. Ages 15+. May 12, 8 am-1 pm. $40. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org (208-667-1865) FREE ROLLER SKATING LESSONS Learn to roller skate with members of Lilac City Roller Derby. Class size limited to 15 skaters per lesson. Sessions on May 13 and 19-20; times vary. Riverfront Park, 705 N. Howard St. bit.ly/2KnQBi6

THEATER

GOD OF CARNAGE Set in modern-day Brooklyn, this play features two sets of parents discussing a playground incident between their sons. As the night progresses, the conversation shifts from polite exchanges to heated words as relationships explode. May 10-12 at 8 pm. $12-$20. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N. Grand. rtoptheatre.org MISALLIANCE Shaw’s sharp comedy cleverly examines themes of passivity, propriety and political non-involvement in Victorian England. April 27-May 20; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $14-$27. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. spokanecivictheatre.com YOU’RE A GOOD MAN, CHARLIE BROWN A fresh approach to the 1967 classic, based on the beloved comic strip by Charles Schultz. May 10-12 at 7 pm, May 12 at 2 pm. $14. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway Ave.. libertylaketheatre.com BROADWAY UNBOUND A taste of Broadway, showcasing Whitworth’s student actors, musicians and dancers. May 11, 7:30 pm. $3. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-3707) BYE BYE BIRDIE Recently drafted rock and roll superstar Conrad Birdie comes to give one lucky American teenage girl a goodbye kiss before he’s inducted into the Army. May 11-27; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $23-$25. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. facebook.com/lakecityplayhouse/ CLYBOURNE PARK Winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize and the 2012 Tony Award for Best Play, this play explodes in two outrageous acts set fifty years apart. May 11-12 and 18-19 at 7:30 pm, May 17 at 5 pm and May 20 at 2 pm. $10. EWU, 526 Fifth St. ewu.edu THE SPELL OF SLEEPING BEAUTY Heritage Arts Academy presents a play based upon the story by Jakob and Wilhelm Grimm. May 11-12 at pm, May 12 at 2 pm. $6-$8. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127)

ARTS

HOW TO GROW ROSES An exhibition showcasing the art of 13 EWU BA and BFA Studio Art majors. Work represents the dynamic range of creativity and

technical expertise within the studio art program at EWU. Through May 12; MonFri noon-5 pm. Closing reception May 10, 4:30-6 pm. EWU Downtown Student Gallery, 404 Second St. facebook. com/ewudowntownstudentgallery/ GRITS & GRAVY A new collection of paintings by the local artist known as “Biscuit Street Preacher.” May 11, 5-10 pm. Emerge, 208 N. Fourth, CdA. emergecda.org (208-818-3342) SECOND FRIDAY ARTWALK Coeur d’Alene’s monthly celebration of local art, with local galleries around downtown hosting artist receptions, live music and original art. Second Friday of the month, from 5-8 pm. Free. artsandculturecda.org/artwalk (208-415-0116) SPONTANEOUS, LYRICAL AND SOMETIMES LOOPY A showcase of new works by ceramist Sam Scott, sculptor Richard Swanson and oil painter William Turner, all regional artists. May 11-June 2; Tue-Sat from 9 am-6 pm. Reception May 11 from 5-8 pm. Free to view. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com GONZAGA SENIOR ART EXHIBIT Celebrate the work of Gonzaga’s 2018 senior art class. The exhibit features Danielle Forrest, Elizabeth Harrison, Lindsey Johnstone, Laura Marck, Nicole Marie Wallace, and Camille Walther. Opens April 13, 5-8 pm. Artist talk May 12, 10 am-noon. Free. Richmond Gallery, 228 W. Sprague. laboratoryspokane.com SPOKANE VALLEY ARTS COUNCIL AUCTION & SHOWCASE The annual arts gala includes a silent and live auction of nearly 100 works of art from prominent local and national artists. May 12, 12-6:30 pm. $60. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. spokanevalleyarts.org

WORDS

EWU VISITING WRITER SERIES: LAURA KASISCHKE The novelist and poet is the recipient of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Poetry, 2012. She has published nine novels, three of which have been made into feature films — The Life Before Her Eyes, Suspicious River, White Bird in a Blizzard — and eight books of poetry, most recently Space, in Chains. May 11, 7:30-8:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org LISTEN TO YOUR MOTHER 2018 A live performance featuring local writers sharing true stories of motherhood. May 13, 7 pm. $23. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series, open to all readers and all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org (847-1234) LITERARY NIGHT FEAT. CRAB CREEK REVIEW & SCABLANDS BOOKS Join us for a night of reading performances from writers featured in Crab Creek Review & Scabland’s Books’ Lilac City Fairy Tales Vol IV: Towers and Dungeons. Books available for purchase. May 17, 7-8:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central. org n

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Coeur d’Alene Offers Plenty of Ways to Celebrate Mother’s Day

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t’s May and that means one of the most important celebrations of the year: Mother’s Day on Sunday, May 13. We’ve got something for every special gal in your life: aunt, sister, cousin, daughter, gramma, Mom, wife or even a female friend. Surprise her with a beautiful hanging FLOWER BASKET, proceeds to benefit North Idaho AIDS Coalition, available May 10-11 ($35; 208-665.1448). Or paint your own flowers! Mom will love the time you spend creating a keepsake together at PINOT’S PALETTE. Visit their website for dates and painting options, including “Mimosas with Mom” on May 13 from 1-3pm ($35, plus beverages; pinotspalette.com, 208-930-4763). Why wait until Mother’s Day to spend a relaxing day downtown? Grab a cup of coffee and a spot along Sixth and Sherman for DOG D’ALENE (who says they’re “man’s best friend”?!), a parade of pooches and other canine antics on Saturday, May 12, from 10 am-3pm (free; cdadowntown.com, 208-415-0116). Take in a few galleries like CISCO’S (ciscosgallery.com, 208-769-7575) or ART SPIRIT GALLERY, which is hosting an artist’s talk from noon-1 pm on Saturday (free; visit theartspiritgallery.com).

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Stroll into the Resort Plaza Shops for a complimentary glass of champagne and sweet treats during CUPCAKES & COCKTAILS, 11 am-3 pm (cdaresort. com, call 208-765-4000). Everyone likes to eat, so treat Mom to SUNDAY BRUNCH at the Coeur d’Alene Resort with an all-you-care-to-eat buffet at either Dockside or Beverly’s, or a 90-minute brunch CRUISE (cdaresort. com, 855-703-4648). Have lunch at CEDAR’S FLOATING RESTAURANT (cedarsfloatingrestaurant.com, 208664-2922) or TITO’S ITALIAN GRILL & WINE SHOP (titoscda.com, 208667-2782). For dinner, reserve your lakeside view at TONY’S ON THE LAKE (tonysonthelake.com, 208-667-9885) for an authentic Italian meal. Pack a lunch and a blanket for the Mother’s Day CONCERT IN THE PARK, from 2-4 pm at the City Park bandshell, courtesy of North Idaho College’s Wind Symphony and the Chambers Singers. Free. Or maybe mom would like a SPA DAY of pampering. Make an appointment at ZiSpa (zispas.com, 208-765-9400), the Coeur d’Alene Resort and Hotel (cdaresort.com/discover/spa, 855703-4648) or the Coeur d’Alene Casino


and Resort (cdacasino.com, 855-232-2772). Speaking of the casino, if Mom is feeling sporty, check out the casino’s special MOTHER’S DAY TEE GOLF & BRUNCH package, including brunch and 18 holes of golf ($80, cdacasino.com, 800-523-2465). But wait, there’s more. Specials include Mother’s Day discounts as the spa, a four-course meal at Sweetgrass Café and — for the first 1,000 moms on-site — a carnation and automatic 500-point bump in player’s points (facebook.com/events/ 277533689094867).

C O E U R

D ’A L E N E

Upcoming Events Bye Bye Birdie MAY 11-27

This classic American musical tells the story of the people of Sweet Apple, Ohio. When recently drafted, rock ’n’ roll superstar Conrad Birdie comes to give one lucky American teenage girl a goodbye kiss before he is inducted into the Army. With the whole town caught up in the frenzy of Conrad’s visit, parents complain, girls swoon, boys fret and no one is left the same. Tickets $23-25; Friday, 7:30 pm; Saturday-Sunday 2 pm and 7:30 pm; Lake City Playhouse.

Art Walk MAY 11

Local and nationally acclaimed artists are on display all throughout downtown Coeur d’Alene during Art Walk, held the second Friday each month. Enjoy artists’ receptions, appetizers, wine and exceptional art as you move among 20 different galleries and shops. Free; visit artsandculturecda.org/artwalk for a map.

Ambrosia

HIT THE WATER IN A NEW REGAL! STARTING AT JUST $289

MAY 13

/MONTH*

Southern California rockers Ambrosia with special guest Peter Beckett of Player will take the stage at Coeur d’Alene Casino on Mother’s Day. The rock group, known for hits “How Much I Feel” and “Biggest Part of Me,” hit it big in the ‘70s with five Top 40 singles and is set to release a new album this year. Tickets $15; 7 pm; Coeur d’Alene Casino

For more events, things to do & places to stay, go to VisitCDA.org

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(866) 525.3232 HAGADONEMARINE.COM *10% down, plus tax & license, OAC

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MAY 10, 2018 INLANDER 71


Entertainment JOHN KAY & STEPPENWOLF Event Center | 7 pm Tickets from $35 An innovator on Rock’s rugged side. John Kay and Steppenwolf brought us rock staples like “Born to be Wild” and “Magic Carpet Ride”, now they bring their distinctive sound to the event center to prove that Rock never softens.

THURSDAY, MAY 24TH

THURSDAY, JUNE 21ST

FRIDAY, JULY 20TH

THURSDAY, AUGUST 30TH

CEDRIC “THE ENTERTAINER”

TRACE ADKINS

THE FAB FOUR

Event Center | 7 pm Tickets from $35

Event Center | 7 pm Tickets from $35

Event Center | 7 pm Tickets from $25

Cedric’s universal appeal, versatility, and tremendous career successes spanning television, live performances, and film have solidified his standing as one of the premier entertainers in the world.

Trace Adkins’ trademark baritone has powered countless hits to the top of the charts. The three-time GRAMMY-nominated member of the Grand Ole Opry will be stopping by on July 20th for the How Did We Get Here Tour!

With uncanny, note-for-note live renditions of Beatles’ classics such as “Can’t Buy Me Love,” “Yesterday,” “A Day In The Life,” “Twist And Shout,” “Here Comes The Sun,” and “Hey Jude”, the Fab Four will make you think you are watching the real thing.

A L L R E S E RV E D S E AT I N G | P U R C H A S E T I C K E T S AT C A S I N O O R A N Y T I C K E T S W E S T O U T L E T Hotel & ticket packages available call 1 800 523-2464 for details.

1 800 523-2464 | CDACASINO.COM | Worley, Idaho | 25 miles south of Coeur d’Alene

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