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INSIDE APRIL 16-22, 2015 | VOL. 22, NO. 26

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COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

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WHAT’S THE HAPPIEST HOUR OF YOUR DAY? The happiest hour of my day is either 11 am when I have a lunch break, or I would say 6 pm when I’m done with school. Is there a day when those hours are the best? I mean, you can’t go wrong with Fridays!

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COMMENT | EDUCATION

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e know that the built environment matters — that it affects city life in so many ways, both bad and good. You want anomie and crime? Just build a highrise, low-income housing project. You want a more vital city life? Here in Spokane, courtesy of our Community Development Block Grant program, we have seen the positive effects of improved streetscape in Browne’s Addition and South Perry. We have seen city life improved through traffic calming measures. We also have come to understand that preserving and restoring historic buildings plays a critical role in ensuring vital city life. Most recently, we have seen proof in the restored Rogers High School. Only a decade ago, Rogers was an acknowledged disaster symbolized by its run-down Art Deco building surrounded by cheap temporary structures. Rogers had been designated as a “Failing High School.” The Seattle Times referred to it as “a dropout factory.” The school’s problems seemed insurmountable. Rogers is located in the poorest zip code in the state. Daily attendance percentage hovered in the mid-70s, while fewer than half its students graduated on schedule. “Studies show,” says Assistant Principal Brett Hale, “that if you are living below the poverty line, you are traumatized. If this is so, then 100 percent of our kids are traumatized.” Hale underscores the situation: Rogers is the surrogate daytime home to upward of 200 homeless kids. Family dysfunction is the norm, as some 60 percent of the students are not living with their biological parents. Abuse is rampant — Rogers even has a sex-trafficking problem, as a number of its female students reportedly have been dragged into this world.

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hen Spokane Public Schools looked at the building and the challenges contained within, the original plan, more or less hatched in desperation, called for completely demolishing the 1930s structure and starting over. Many of the staff and teachers agreed, and with good reason: Rooms were too small, and saving the building presented tricky design problems. Then came a surprise. Enter the Hillyard preservationists, who started the push to register the original building on the National Register of Historic Places (which happened in 2011). Soon alumni, who didn’t want to lose their local history, weighed in. Rogers was even awarded a “Failing School Grant” of some $4 million. As a result, Spokane Public Schools decided to restore and expand rather than obliterate. “Now,” recalls Hale, “the pressure was on, and we had to perform.” Teachers and staff immediately confronted the attendance problem. Hale explains how:

“We went out on the street, found them and rounded them up; it wasn’t difficult. We would look out any window and see many of them just wandering around. “We would tell them that they had a choice: either head to school or face suspension. Most,” Hale adds, “headed to school.” OK, but then what? Principal Lori Wyborney implemented lots and lots of individualized counseling. “I’ve got a counselor for every problem, you name it,” says Wyborney, who was just named Principal of the Year by the Association of Washington School Principals.

T

he built environment had an impact, too. Early on, designers made a subtle but critical change. The old school faced north, opening on Wellesley. Wyborney, whose enthusiasm for the challenges of her job is infectious, observes that this presented the students with a dismal visual experience — cars roaring by, dilapidated houses in the background. This view, she observes, may have told students that their school was a dump, so who cares anyway? It was bad for morale and self-image. To resolve the problem, the architects moved the front door, and ever since the renovations were completed in 2009, the school’s entrance faces east. “Now,” says Wyborney, “our students see trees and the hills beyond, they see a much more inviting and pleasant world. The building restoration made a difference from the first day.” Morale improved, student attendance rose to above 90 percent, and on-time graduation rates have risen above 80 percent. But change can’t be measured by statistics alone. At a school that prospective teachers once avoided, today applicants are lining up. Rogers is viewed as a school where one can make a difference; a school that, for the first time in decades, has put the word “pride” back in its vocabulary. When Rogers’ boys basketball team made it to the state tournament and needed $1,300 to send fans to Tacoma, Rogers alumni came up with $5,000. Hale tells me that he could teach elsewhere, but says, “Frankly, I think I’d be bored.” Obviously this old-new built environment won’t fix everything; the school has some truly profound problems. But along with a devoted staff, the building makes a positive statement, sending the message to students: “We are cared about.” And that has provided a strong foundation to start rebuilding upon. n


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Listening to the Land BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

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e’re getting a real Earth Day treat with Jared Diamond giving two lectures on April 23, the day after the 45th anniversary of the first Earth Day. For me, his 2005 book Collapse is the best I’ve read about ecology and the future of our life on this planet. What sticks with me is Diamond’s optimism: If we are smart about these challenges, he wrote, we can continue to thrive. Diamond’s a surprising public scientist — Harvard- and Cambridge-educated, he started out as an expert on the gall bladder, then became a noted bird watcher. Only later in life did he embrace geography as his focus, which produced the Pulitzer Prize-winning Guns, Germs and Steel, Collapse and most recently The World Until Yesterday: What Can We Learn from Traditional Societies? A Bostonian transplanted to Los Angeles, he’s folksy and engaging, à la Neil deGrasse Tyson — and he’s waded into plenty of controversy, too. Diamond’s study of Easter Island is a powerful fable of our life on Earth. As remote and alone in the Pacific as our planet in the Milky Way, Easter Islanders had a thriving little society until they started overworking their land. The most evocative passage in Collapse is Diamond wondering what the person who chopped down the last tree on Easter Island was thinking. He studied other places where people vanished. The Anasazi in the Southwest went from master road builders and astronomers to — poof! — gone. The Norse settlers in Greenland had a 450-year run that ended in ruin. By listening to the mountains, the soil, the water, Diamond relays the cautionary tales: A drought pushed the Anasazi to abandon their homes; a cultural taboo against eating fish led to the starvation of the Norse. Earth Day started on an oil-soaked beach near Santa Barbara in 1969, when Sen. Gaylord Nelson of Wisconsin was so devastated by the notorious oil spill that he put into motion the event now celebrated across the globe. That environmental disaster was not far from Diamond’s home in Los Angeles, which is now gripped by the kind of drought that has brought other societies to their knees. These painful wake-up calls have forced us to listen to the land like never before, but to manage our way through such challenges, we need action, too.  Jared Diamond will be at EWU’s Showalter Auditorium in Cheney to discuss Collapse at 1 pm on Thursday, April 23. This event is free. At 7 pm, he will lecture on The World Until Yesterday at the Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox. Tickets are $15.

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COMMENT | IDAHO

Sharia Law and Deadbeat Dads

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

When D.C. finally does something right, nine Idaho Representatives stop it BY JOHN T. REUTER

O

n Sept. 18, 2014, Congress passed a law. In these days of an ever-increasingly dysfunctional D.C., that’s news in itself — but even more significant, it was a good, bipartisan law. The Preventing Sex Trafficking and Strengthening Families Act is, for once, a law whose purpose is the same as its title. Largely, the law focuses on better reporting of sex trafficking to enable a more comprehensive approach to

combating it and protecting children. Tucked within the law is a requirement that every state’s legislature will incorporate the 2007 Hague Convention on International Recovery of Child Support and Family Maintenance — which essentially makes it easier to enforce American child support orders abroad, or put even more simply, ensures that deadbeat parents pay the money they owe their families. Deadbeat parents, though, found an ally in the Idaho legislature this year; in fact, they found nine of them. On a 9-8 vote, the Idaho House Judiciary Committee killed

SB 1067, which would have enacted the new provisions into Idaho law. The bill had previously passed the Idaho Senate unanimously and enjoyed bipartisan support in the committee. Not passing SB 1067 meant removing Idaho from the federal system and jeopardizes $200 million in childsupport payments to Idaho children. On top of that, Idaho stands to lose up to another $46 million in federal funds and will likely have to lay off more than 100 state employees. So why did nine members of the committee unite to stop Idaho children from getting child support payments? Sharia law. Perhaps that strikes you as an odd and bizarre reason to punish Idaho’s children and refuse to support an international treaty to hold deadbeat parents accountable. It might strike you that way because it is. The argument from the nine members of the committee who voted to support deadbeat parents (Republican Reps. Thomas Dayley, Lynn Luker, Shannon McMillan, Kathleen Sims, Janet Trujillo, Don Cheatham, Ryan Kerby, Ronald Nate and Heather Scott) was that passing the law could expose Idaho to the laws of other nations, including those that live under Sharia law, and eliminate due process for our citizens. There are a number of problems with this argument, but the biggest is that it is simply not true. The law explicitly protects due process for Idahoans and is about making it possible for America’s laws to be enforced on its citizens overseas, not on Americans by other nations. The fact that these arguments are not true didn’t stop Rep. Luker from sending out an editorial, through a spokesperson, reiterating them to the press and the entire Republican caucus; this led to some lawmakers offering a different perspective. My favorite came from North Idaho Republican Representative and former prosecutor Luke Malek: “Representative Luker does not speak for Idaho or me. Scuttling SB 1067 without debate was heavy-handed opportunistic theatrics at the expense of single parents and children, the most vulnerable in our society. I do not support the erratic behavior that will lead to the dismantling of our child support system, nor the implication that this mockery of a legal analysis in any way represents our Republican caucus.” The legislature has gone home for the year, but Governor Otter could call them back to fix this mess. Hopefully he will decide to do so and side with Idaho’s kids, rather than the nine Idaho legislators who chose to act like spoiled children. n John T. Reuter, a former Sandpoint Councilman, has been active in protecting Idaho’s environment, expanding LGBT rights and the Idaho GOP.

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

TONE IT DOWN ity Councilwoman Amber Waldref is mistaken if she thinks improving

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transit service is going to have “a huge economic return.” STA CEO Susan Meyer stated “there has to be an increase in revenue to continue with this level of service.” To what level is she referring? Current service or the pie in the sky she envisions? We have season’s tickets to the Spokane Civic Theatre, but we don’t expect a special bus to take us home at 10 pm. And $70+ million for the Green Line? With electric buses? Get real. It will cost more to ride them LETTERS than a regular bus. Send comments to There is no justification for the editor@inlander.com. $4.1 million annual cost of operating this exclusive route. That cost will never go away, and neither will the increase in sales tax. Plus, those electric buses would only operate on that super expensive route. Spending even $12 million so we can get federal matching funds? With an increase in sales tax? When someone buys a car or something over $10, it will make a difference. I agree with Chris Cargill — Al French is totally wrong if he thinks keeping young people in the region depends on a “thriving transit system.” Have living wage jobs will keep our graduates in the region, not buses. Let’s tone down the rhetoric and get real about improving transit. This is a low wage town, and we need buses, but not this plan. HERB POSTLEWAIT Spokane, Wash.

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Reaction to guest columnist George Nethercutt’s piece “Restore the Honesty” (4/9/15) on the need for elected officials to restore the public’s trust.

DENNIS LUNSTROTH: Bringing up the Clintons. Funny, because every time I mention Bush with regards to, say, the situations in Iraq and Afghanistan, all I hear is that is ancient history. Interesting how some people’s memories work.

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JOHN S. PARDEE: From the man who swore to only serve how many terms?

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KEITH HOLT: George is the sole conservative contributor, and whether you like him or not, he does make some valid points. To flat out disbelieve everything he says just because he has an (R) next to his name is what’s wrong with America. So please stop automatically bashing on everyone who has a different party than you.

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JOAN E. HARMAN: Problem is, when Nethercutt was in Congress, he was also part of the problem. The same is just as true of GOP elected officials today. You can’t restore trust if you think you have to lie, obstruct and hate the people of the opposite party.

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YVETTE PETERSEN BABB: People only remember what they choose to remember. Every politician has an agenda, like every voter. Our system is so out of touch, and so far away from the good of the people it is juvenile. 

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 11


12 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015


Ryan’s Last Ride Ryan Holyk’s family is still searching for answers in the bicycle accident that cost him his life BY MITCH RYALS

B

eing 15, Ryan Holyk loved Mountain Dew and Captain Crunch and dreamed of becoming a professional video game player. He was saving for a Corvette, but spent most of his time on a bicycle, riding around town with friends. It’s those moments his friends and family are remembering now. “This other time, we were outside of Rocket Bakery and [Ryan] was yelling ‘Hi!’ to cars,” Riley Baldwin recalls. “This one guy didn’t respond, so Ryan said

‘Hi!’ even louder, and the guy turned around and said ‘WHAAAT?’ Ten minutes later we were drinking Mountain Dew and eating bagels, and I looked at him and said ‘WHAAAT?’ [Ryan] laughed so hard he puked bagels and Mountain Dew all over the sidewalk.” Baldwin draws fits of laughter from eight of Ryan’s other friends and family members who have gathered at his mom and stepdad’s house to retell their favorite stories about Ryan. They’ve done this about twice a week since the 15-year-old’s death in June 2014.

“He was very difficult,” adds his mom, Carrie Thomson, “but sweet at the same time.” The story they don’t want to relive is the story of Ryan’s end. There are at least two versions of that story, and they diverge on one crucial detail that has prompted a wrongful death lawsuit against Spokane County by Ryan’s family, who wants to know what really happened on May 23, 2014. Aaron Holyk, Ryan’s dad, feels he owes it to his son to seek justice for his death. “It’s just not right,” he says.

O

ne version of the story starts on a clear May afternoon in 2014. Ryan’s family was getting ready to go camping that weekend, but Ryan wanted to stay home and hang with his friends, which was typical. There was always a group of Ryan’s friends hanging around the house, his mom recalls. Playing video games, swimming in the pool, watching TV, drinking all the milk. On this day, Ryan was with four other guys — about half of his normal crew — riding bikes around Spokane Valley near West Valley High School. The boys usually rolled in a group of seven or eight, decked out in backward snapback hats, Vans shoes and Diamond Supply Co. T-shirts. Most of them have long, shaggy hair like Ryan’s, and most have been friends since kindergarten. ...continued on next page

Carrie Thomson holding a photograph of her son Ryan Holyk at the intersection where Ryan sustained fatal injuries. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 13


NEWS | COURTS

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14 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

When the four boys got hungry, they rode to Ryan’s uncle’s house to make burritos. Ryan invited them all to spend the night, but only one, Jeremiah Martinez, was able to. After dinner, Ryan and Jeremiah decided to make one last trip to get some spare bike parts for Devon Baldwin, Riley’s twin brother, from his dad’s house a few miles away. Deputy Joe Bodman was on his way to assist a fellow officer who wasn’t responding to dispatch after a traffic stop. Driving a light blue Ford Explorer SUV, he picked up speed heading west on East Sprague Avenue. The other officer was less than a mile away. It was dark — 10:24 pm — and Bodman accelerated to about 74 mph as he approached Vista Road, according to investigators. As he approached the intersection of East Sprague and Vista — the point at which the two accounts diverge — Bodman moved from the left side of the road to the right in order to pass a pickup truck. Neither his lights nor his siren were on. Ryan and Jeremiah were riding on the sidewalk heading south on Vista. Ryan entered the crosswalk without looking, despite the Do Not Walk sign. According to witness statements, he turned his bike handlebars hard right and fell off the bike in the middle of the street. It’s not clear if he saw the oncoming SUV. According to witnesses, Bodman swerved to the right to try to avoid hitting Ryan. One witness, the man driving the truck that Bodman had just passed, said the SUV hit Ryan’s head as the vehicle veered through the crosswalk. Another witness at Charlie P’s restaurant, facing the intersection, told police that the SUV blocked the potential point of impact, but he thought the deputy ran over Ryan’s head because of the “thump thump” sound. Jeremiah’s view also was blocked by the SUV, but he told police he thought the vehicle struck Ryan’s back wheel. Bodman screeched to a stop when he passed through the intersection and alerted dispatch to what had just happened. “I just hit a pedestrian,” he said.

Twenty minutes had passed, and Riley’s brother, Devon, started to worry. He checked the Spokane News Facebook feed for accidents and saw that a cyclist was hit at East Sprague and Vista Road. He left immediately, and when he got there, Jeremiah was sitting on the sidewalk, shaking. “It’s Ryan,” he said. Ryan died from severe head trauma 10 days later.

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he other version of this incident involves a lot more math and calculations. According to the Spokane Valley Police Department and the results of at least two investigations — one by the Spokane Investigative Regional Response Team and the other by the Washington State Patrol Major Accident Investigation Team — Bodman’s police SUV never hit Ryan or his bike. Using security cameras from nearby car dealerships, investigators determined both the deputy’s speed and Ryan’s speed, and the distance between the two at the moment of alleged impact. Both investigations concluded that the vehicle came within about a foot and a half of Ryan. No damage, other than minor scratches and daily wear and tear, were found on the bike or the deputy’s SUV, and no DNA was found on the SUV. In the conclusion to the State Patrol investigation, Detective Sergeant Jerry Cooper defends the deputy’s choice to not use his siren or emergency lights: “Not using emergency equipment afforded [Bodman] maneuverability on Sprague; if he was operating in emergency mode, it would have been most prudent to be in the left lane as others are required to yield right. This could have potentially caused further delays in his arrival at 2nd and Park.” What the investigation doesn’t mention, however, is Washington state law and the County Sheriff’s Office policies on emergency lights and sirens. State law says emergency vehicles are allowed to violate traffic laws as long


Ryan Holyk with friends at Lake Coeur d’Alene (left) and on his bike. as their siren and emergency lights are on. The law also states that emergency lights and sirens do not relieve the driver of liability if something were to happen. The Sheriff’s Office policy manual says a deputy must obey all speed limits and traffic laws if not using emergency lights or the siren. Another Washington state law says all cyclists riding at night must have headlamps and tail lights visible for at least 500 feet. Bikes are also legally required to have brakes. In the 47-page State Patrol report and throughout a 57-slide Power Point presentation of the response team investigation, the fact that Ryan entered the crosswalk without stopping, the absence of a helmet and the lack of brakes, lights and reflectors were mentioned seven times, casting blame on Ryan. After the investigations, the Spokane County Prosecutor’s Office announced earlier this year that there will be no criminal charges against Bodman, and Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich said his office will now launch an investigation into whether Bodman violated policies and procedures.

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n a workbook Carrie Thomson, Ryan’s mom, received from West Valley High School after her son’s death, his answers about his future are telling. When the questionnaire asked for his abilities, he wrote “zombies and Black Ops (a video game).” Under values and priorities, he put “people, P.S.3, T.V. and bed.” “Whenever he got money, he would barely spend any of it on himself,” Riley Baldwin says. “He would always be like, ‘Let’s go down to 7-Eleven,’ and then get you whatever you want.” Ryan’s little sister, Katie, says he always had scrapes and bruises on his arms and legs, probably from biking, skateboarding or jumping off rocks into the lake on camping trips. “There was no fear in the kid,” his dad says. “He’d jump off any rock there ever was. Speed was nothing to him. He was one to worry about.” His friends estimate they’ve been riding bikes around Spokane Valley since they were 10 or 11. Although they rarely wore helmets (despite his mother’s constant prompting otherwise), both of his parents say they trusted Ryan to be safe. It’s unclear whether a helmet would have saved his life, but to recognize the anniversary of Ryan’s death, Thomson has organized a 5K on June 20 to support helmet safety awareness. She calls it Ryan’s Ramble. “He’s all I think about every day,” his dad says. His dark hair flips out from under a backward hat, similar to the way Ryan’s did. “He wasn’t just my son, he was my best friend. It just isn’t right.” n mitchr@inlander.com

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

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“Dah Ling” struts about the stage at the Bing Theater while competing in the Inland Empire Drag Championship. Held on Saturday, the event drew queens from all over the Inland Northwest. Despite their fierceness, Arianna D Spanic walked away with the $500 prize.

On Inlander.com MORE INLANDER NEWS EVERY DAY

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16 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

IDLE THREATS | Since April 1, University High School has dealt with three different BOMB THREATS. Bomb threats often result in evacuations, but how often are they associated with actual bombs? In the United States, almost never, says workplace violence consultant and former police officer Steve Albrecht. Besides the Wisconsin Sterling Hall bombing in 1970, in the U.S., bombers bomb, but don’t give warnings. Threat-makers sling bomb threats, but not real bombs. Unless a suspicious device is discovered, he recommends, businesses should generally refrain from evacuating after bomb threats. Otherwise, threat-makers get exactly what they want: chaos and disruption. (DANIEL WALTERS)

CAUGHT ON TAPE | In one of the most recent installments of police caught on video, a KENNEWICK police officer’s rant about arrest and ticket quotas went viral. Omar Abarca posted the video last week of Officer Glenn Bell yelling at him and two teens during a traffic stop for drag racing. After dancing around the issue of monthly quotas (which he at first calls “expectations”), the officer eventually admits to the quotas and then threatens to make up some charges for abetting reckless driving so he can haul their “dumb asses” to jail. (MITCH RYALS)


NEWS | BRIEFS

Idaho Against the World Idaho lawmakers weaken child-support efforts; plus, who really believes in climate change? ‘NO BASIS IN FACT’ Idaho’s legislative session finally came to a close in the early morning hours of April 11. But the next day, the legislators were already fighting again, trading strong words over the legislature’s failure to pass a CHILD SUPPORT bill. “Scuttling [the bill] without debate was heavy-handed opportunistic theatrics at the expense of single-parents and children… the most vulnerable in our society,” Idaho Republican Rep. Luke Malek wrote in an email reply to an editorial by Rep. Lynn Luker. Malek added that he does not support “the erratic behavior that will lead to the dismantling of our child support system.” Republicans on the House Judiciary, Rules and Administration committee narrowly killed the bill to bring Idaho’s rules for handling child support cases with foreign countries in line with federal standards. Some worried that international-treaty language could subject Idaho parents to rulings in foreign courts, including Islamic Sharia courts. “There’s no basis in fact for that concern,” Malek says, adding that this hasn’t been an issue in any other state. In his editorial, Luker says he and other Republicans had additional complaints, arguing that the bill and treaty

introduced serious due-process issues. He blamed the federal government for “using children as collateral to force its policies upon Idaho and its sister states.” The decision is estimated to cost Idaho at least $16.1 million in federal funding, leading the Department of Health and Welfare to announce that “the vote will make it nearly impossible for us to enforce child support like we should.” It’s left Idaho Gov. Butch Otter considering calling the legislature back to Boise for a special session. “Until we know what all the impacts are, we can’t start charting the solution,” Otter’s press secretary Jon Hanian says. “Once we have that, we’ll be able to pave a way forward.” (DANIEL WALTERS)

WE ARE BELIEVERS

Spokane adults are 2 percent more likely than the average American to believe that CLIMATE CHANGE is occurring, with 65 percent saying they believe. Of those in Spokane County who believe warming is happening, 45 percent blame human activity and 36 percent attribute it to natural changes. Three quarters of Hawaiians believe climate change is occurring, the highest in the nation. Significantly more

Washingtonians (68 percent) believe than Idahoans (58 percent). The study was conducted by Yale University researchers to help government officials better understand their constituent’s beliefs. (LAEL HENTERLY)

ROCKING THE VOTE

A coalition of 44 community groups sent a letter earlier this week to Washington lawmakers pushing them to bring the Washington VOTING RIGHTS ACT to a vote before it’s too late. The bill, which passed out of the House at the beginning of March, has been stuck in the Senate Rules Committee for more than two weeks. It would enable district-based elections and give those who feel disenfranchised by the at-large local elections in Washington a way to take legal action against cities, towns, counties, school districts and other local government in a superior court, without the high costs of a lawsuit in district court. “The [Voting Rights Act] does not mandate proportional representation or district-based elections, but instead will give local communities an equal opportunity to elect officials who represent their needs and interests, helping to make elected bodies truly representative,” their letter reads. Proponents argue that the bill will prevent costly lawsuits like the one filed by the ACLU against the City of Yakima, in which a federal judge ordered the city to conduct future city council elections using its seven geographic districts rather than an at-large system. That decision came down last February and cost the city nearly $1 million in legal fees, and the ACLU has since asked for $2.8 million to cover its own legal costs. After three years of negotiation and changes, community groups around the state and the ACLU assert that the bill is ready. If brought to a vote on the Senate floor, Doug Honig, a spokesman for the ACLU, believes it would pass. (MITCH RYALS)

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APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 17


NEWS | EDUCATION

Pencil’s down — the Smarter Balanced standardized test is given almost entirely on computers.

Don’t Test Me The Smarter Balanced standardized test has sparked a rebellion in Western Washington — and it’s spreading BY DANIEL WALTERS

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HolyNamesMusic_041615_4S_CP.tif

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18 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

t’s not uncommon to find one or two students — the rebels, the defiant, the anti-authority slackers — just flat-out refusing to take a big test. But at Garfield High School, in the middle of urban Seattle, it wasn’t just one or two. “Already, over 220 Garfield students, 55 percent of our junior class, have opted out of taking the [Smarter Balanced Assessment] which demonstrates our clear opposition to this test,” the Garfield student government said in a statement. Twenty-one states share the Smarter Balanced assessment, allowing Washington state schools to be able to be compared with schools from, say, Oregon, Idaho or Wyoming. It’s a sample of a larger movement that has spread throughout the entire country: Smallgovernment conservatives, skeptical teachers, overwhelmed students and protective parents are refusing to take Common Core-based assessments. But some educators worry that by opting out, districts are losing the ability to fully measure their students’ skills.

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rian Achenbaugh has two kids — a 10-year-old and a 13-year-old — in the East Valley school district. Neither of them took the Smarter Balanced assessment last year, when the test was just a trial run, and neither will take it this year, when it counts for real. Both years, Achenbaugh filled out an official “State Assessment Refusal Documentation Form” to make sure of that. Instead, his kids spend the testing periods reading and catching up on homework. In contrast to the noisy boycotts in Seattle, the pockets of opposition in the Spokane region have been quieter. But Achenbaugh says local opt-out numbers are growing. “It’s on a slow climb,” he says. “We are getting more and more people requested to be added to the [Spokane, WA Against Common Core] Facebook group.” The Common Core is the specific set of English and math standards that textbooks, les-

son plans and the Smarter Balanced assessments are supposed to be based on in most states. Lately, it’s become a lightning rod, a rare issue that small-government conservatives and teachers unions have united over. Critics complain the Common Core standards strip control of education from local parents and teachers, that it’s developmentally inappropriate for younger grades, and that it steals time away from other subjects like music, art and science. “If the kids are not doing well, more pressure is applied to the teachers and then to the kids,” Achenbaugh says. “It’s a vicious circle.” Now, with the introduction of the Smarter Balanced assessment, the issue of “high-stakes testing” has been sucked into the debate. The test is given to students in grades three through eight and to high school juniors. By 2019, all high school students will have to pass the tests to graduate. Achenbaugh says a neighbor’s son was left exhausted and in tears last year from the pressure. “It’s a grinder,” he says. “They’re pretty much toast by the time they’re done.” But state administrators stress how valuable the test actually is. “The Smarter Balanced tests, with their emphasis on real-world skills, are better than any standardized test our state has administered before,” Washington state Superintendent of Public Instruction Randy Dorn says in a statement. Not only that, but the state saves money by sharing costs with other states. Travis Schulhauser, Spokane Public Schools’ director of assessment and program effectiveness, says the Common Core standards are much more rigorous than previous standards, and so are the tests. He says that’s a good thing. “The bar is set very high,” Schulhauser says. “This is the level I want my own children at.”

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tudents will likely be tested on their research acumen, problem-solving skills, and their ability to compare and contrast multiple reading selections. One section of the


test even adapts — giving students easier or tougher questions — depending on their performance. When an 11th grader passes the Smarter Balanced test, Schulhauser says, it means they’re prepared for college. In fact, it means they’ll automatically be able to skip any remedial classes when they go to college — a huge deal, considering the number of Washington state students that need catchup courses freshman year. When a student refuses to take the test, the district and state are denied information on where they’re succeeding or struggling. The data becomes skewed if too many students opt out, officials worry, and districts are prevented from learning what they need to do better. Yet the Washington Education Association, which lobbied fervently against making standardized tests a part of teacher evaluations, has been opposed to high-stakes testing. Last year, it voted to support the right of parents to opt out. “These tests are being used inappropriately. These tests should not be used for a graduation,” WEA spokesman Rich Wood says. He argues that their preparation and administration sucks away countless hours from teachers. Raschelle Holland, an instructional coach at Stevens Elementary, has become one of the most vocal teachers against the new tests. The Smarter Balanced tests, even the math questions, are typically taken entirely on the computer. But Holland says that many younger students don’t have the computer experience, and may struggle simply to type. “You have an 8-year-old with undeveloped coordination, in a computer lab for [hours], typing answers,” Holland says. “There’s a lot of fears and there’s a lot of anxiety.” Not only that, but for weeks, Holland says, the library LETTERS at Stevens is closed, filled with Send comments to test takers. That’s not even editor@inlander.com. counting the time it takes to practice the test. She continues to spread the word about how to opt out, but also says she’s been instructed by the union to refrain from speaking out against the test during work hours. “A sixth grade girl in my building said to me today how she did not want to take the test but she has to or she won’t get to go to seventh grade,” she wrote on the anti-Common Core Facebook page on Monday. “I’m not allowed to say a word during contract hours. I couldn’t tell her that wasn’t true or anything.”

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ext door in Idaho, a state famous for its desire for local control and parental choice, you’d expect the opt-out movement to be thriving. It hasn’t. “There is no opt-out in the state of Idaho,” says Mike Nelson, the Coeur d’Alene school district’s director of curriculum and assessment. He explains that state law prohibits public school students from opting out of state testing. One reason: An agreement between the federal government and the state of Idaho hinges on 95 percent of Idaho students taking a state-standardized test. If too few take the test, it could cost Idaho millions. In the Madison School District in Rexburg, Idaho, Superintendent Geoffrey Thomas announced that the entire district was going to refuse to administer the Smarter Balanced test. Thomas was then pressured, receiving phone calls from the governor and the state superintendent urging him to reconsider. Facing legal hurdles, the district reversed its decision. “Even though we are changing course, we do not regret having been the only school district nationwide to have taken a principled stand on this very important issue,” Thomas says. Back in Coeur d’Alene, Nelson says five families have attempted to opt out, but the district has sought to address their concerns. One set of parents was worried about the security of the student data collected, so Nelson brought them in to explain the procedures. Another was worried that the test was dehumanizing, so he invited the family member to be a proctor to learn how the test is administered. That’s been the tactic in Spokane as well. “Most of our schools will talk face to face with the parents who want to opt out about the pros and cons. It should be a conversation,” Schulhauser says. “We can lead on it and implement it and talk to families and be supportive. Or we can hem and haw and complain.” 

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NEWS | PROSTITUTION

Outreach worker Lynn Everson worries that women who sell sex on East Sprague will simply move to out-of-the-way spots. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Signs of the Times

Can Spokane really curb the demand side of the sex trade? BY LAEL HENTERLY

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ocals don’t need a sign to know what goes on at night along East Sprague Avenue. It just has that look. The cheap motels with retro neon signs. The car dealerships. The dark and vacant sort of sidewalks that don’t invite pedestrians. This is where you go in Spokane if you’re trying to buy sex.

But the city is trying to change that: Last month, officials posted, along East Sprague between Hamilton and Fiske streets, towering signs that read “Designated Area of High Prostitution Activity. Vehicles used to further prostitution will be impounded.” Since the signs went up, the Spokane Police Depart-

ment has arrested three suspected johns and impounded two cars, all during an emphasis operation on March 18. Only one of the men paid the $500 fee and impound costs to recover his vehicle; the other man’s Honda Civic is still sitting at the tow yard. Even though there haven’t been arrests since then, police spokeswoman Monique Cotton believes the signs are working. The week following the emphasis operation, there were 11 calls for service to East Sprague. The next week there were five. Last week it was down to four. Cotton says prostitutes may even be leaving Spokane entirely. “I received a call from a reporter in Missoula, Montana, because they had an influx of prostitutes with Spokane addresses,” says Cotton. “They had three significant arrests that they mentioned, but there may be more. To us, that made us go ‘Huh?’ Missoula wanted to know

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fewer than there used to be, Everson says. In the early 1990s, she would see as many as 35 women working the area. These days, it’s down to 10. Though criminalizing the demand side of prostitution didn’t become popular until recently, some countries have been doing it for years. Sweden and Canada are the examples most frequently mentioned by sex workers’ rights activists who worry that cracking down on demands pushes prostitutes further into the shadows. When johns are the enforcement focus, women selling sex simply move to locations where clients will feel safe picking them up. Spokane City Council President Ben Stuckart acknowledges that the industry may just migrate elsewhere. If that “elsewhere” is far away, wonderful. If it is another part of Spokane, the city is prepared to address that, possibly by designating additional areas of high prostitution activity. The crackdown on prostitution is a precursor to an investment of $32 million in the neighborhood in coming years. “We’re going to invest millions of dollars in that corridor, but if you don’t take care of the prostitution, it doesn’t matter how much you spend on the infrastructure, you’re still going to have the problems,” says Stuckart. For business owners along East Sprague, the plan is working. East Spokane Business Association President Deanna Hanley says that at their meeting last Wednesday, business owners reported seeing fewer prostitutes. “We are very encouraged by it, we are very excited,” says Hanley. n laelh@inlander.com

DANCEFEST

2015

what we were doing over here.” Missoula Police Department Public Information Officer Travis Welsh says the city is not experiencing an influx of prostitutes. “We have had some cases of prostitutes from Spokane, but it’s nothing new; it goes back as long as I’ve been here,” he says. Meanwhile, advocates worry that the city’s plan could put the survival of sex workers who frequent East Sprague in an even more precarious position. “I’m always afraid when they do these enforcement efforts that it will drive people to engage in more dangerous sex work, to meet up with people in a private place,” says Erin Williams, Lutheran Community Services’ director of advocacy and prevention. “A place where health workers can’t find them, where they are not connected to resources in the same way. I’m curious to see how it will play out.” Spokane Regional Health District needle exchange coordinator Lynn Everson is one of those health workers. She does outreach work on East Sprague every Wednesday night, handing out bags filled with lube and condoms and a list of men to avoid. If the women move to an area where Everson can’t find them, they might not be able to afford condoms that week. Which doesn’t mean they won’t work; just that work will be even riskier. “Women will often work on back streets, and it is so much less safe,” says Everson. The women of East Sprague are living day to day. They don’t have savings, untapped resources or a backup plan. There are already

APRIL 25 | 10AM-5PM

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@UP993Spokane APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 21


NEWS | MARIJUANA

United Weed Stand A national labor union is working to keep medical marijuana dispensaries open so it can unionize their workers BY JAKE THOMAS

I

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22 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

saac Curtis spends most of his day driving to marijuana stores trying to make his presence known. In January, Curtis started the slow, methodical work of organizing every corner of Eastern Washington’s marijuana industry, from seedplanting to point of sale, under the auspices of the United Food & Commercial Workers Union Local 1439. He frequents pot stores both recreational and medical, talking with owners and employees about the challenges the industry faces and the benefits a union could provide. The UFCW, which represents 1.3 million workers, primarily in food production and retail, has taken the lead on unionizing employees in the growing marijuana industry through its Cannabis Workers Rising project. Most of its efforts have been centered in California, which has the nation’s largest medical marijuana market. When Washington state’s recreational pot stores opened last July, the UFCW saw another opportunity to gain a foothold in the rapidly growing industry, quickly launching efforts to organize workers. Although businesses and unions have traditionally had adversarial relationships, in Washington the relationship has been less antagonistic. With medical marijuana facing an uncertain future under an overhaul of the state’s pot laws being finalized by the legislature, the UFCW and the medical marijuana community have found common cause in trying to keep dispensaries open. Organizing Washington’s cannabis industry, says Curtis, is different from others because owners of marijuana businesses tend to be people who have run from the cops in the past, shaking their fists at authority, and are generally more receptive to union ideals. “You don’t have a lot of private equity guys,” he says of marijuana business owners. So far the union has about 15 neutrality agreements with marijuana businesses statewide, meaning that the employers won’t interfere with unionization efforts. Although the union is making inroads with both recreational and medical businesses, most of its attention has been focused on the medical side. Both houses of the legislature have passed SB 5052, which will incorporate the medical market into the tightly regulated recreational market overseen by the Washington State Liquor Control Board. Proponents of the bill say it’s needed because the medical market operates with little oversight and unscrupulous dispensaries are taking advantage of the situation, selling pot to non-patients while skirting the heavy taxes paid by recreational stores. The legislation is likely to result in dispensaries being shuttered as they are rolled into the recreational market. Both medical marijuana

Union workers could one day be planting, trimming, packaging and selling your weed. advocates and the UFCW have been aligned in pushing for an amendment to the bill that will allow responsible dispensaries that have gotten business licenses, paid taxes and tried to operate as legitimate businesses to stay open, says Kari Boiter, Washington state coordinator for medical marijuana advocacy group Americans for Safe Access. The UFCW wants dispensaries to stay open because that would mean more workers it can unionize, says Curtis. During the legislative session, the UFCW’s lobbyists successfully pushed for an amendment that would allow dispensaries to apply to stay open. Hilary Bricken, an attorney with the Canna Law Group, says that marijuana businesses have struggled with the image that they are lawbreakers. Most marijuana businesses, she says, will likely consider unionization as a way to signal to regulators that they’re following employment law. Paul Lugo, director of the Herbal Connection, says that his Spokane-based dispensary has a business license and has paid taxes, which he hopes will let him keep his doors open after the legislature reforms the state’s pot laws. He says he’s also open to allowing Curtis to unionize his employees, which he expects will further convince regulators that he’s operating a legitimate business. “If you got behind the union, the LCB would look at that and say, ‘Hey, these guys are responsible and want to take care of their employees,’” says Lugo. With the industry so young, says Curtis, the time to get organized is now, because as it gets bigger it’ll be more difficult to unionize. “[The industry] is going to have huge operations and retail chains of marijuana stores,” he says. “And that’s where our more important work is going to be done, because if you are making $9 trimming weed with no benefits, a job at McDonald’s might seem pretty good.”  jaket@inlander.com


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APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 23


April 20 -26 getlitfestival.org Readings, workshops, poetry slams and more!

Featuring Sherman Alexie Walter Kirn Tod Marshall Benjamin Percy Sharma Shields Shawn Vestal Jess Walter

With Musical Guest Cami Bradley


Featured Speakers, Panelists, Readings and Workshops For a full lineup visit getlitfestival.org WED., APRIL 22

Time: 7 p.m.

A Tiny Sense of Accomplishment: Live! Featuring Sherman Alexie and Jess Walter Venue: Lair Auditorium, Spokane Community College

FRI., APRIL 24

Time: 9:30 a.m.

Comics and Graphic Novels: Panel Discussion Venue: SFCC, building 24, room 110

Time: 9:30 a.m.

Writing the West: Panel Discussion THU., APRIL 23

Time: 10:30 a.m.

Sherman Alexie Q&A Venue: Hagan Foundation Center for the Humanities at Spokane Community College

Time: 1 p.m.

Walter Kirn Q&A Venue: Wolff Auditorium Jepson Center, Gonzaga University

Time: 7 p.m.

Into the Wilderness with Sharma Shields and Benjamin Percy Venue: Riverside Place, Commandery Room. Cost: $15 general free to students

Venue: Hagan Foundation Center for the Humanities at SCC

SAT., APRIL 25

Venue: North Idaho College, Meyers Health Sciences Bldg, room 102

Time: 7 p.m.

In Conversation with Walter Kirn and Shawn Vestal Venue: Riverside Place, Commandery Room Cost: $15 general/free to students

Time: 9 p.m.

Poetry Salon Featuring festival poets Venue: The Bartlett

SAT., APRIL 25

Time: 11:30 a.m.

12-1:30 p.m.

1:45-3 P.M.

Community reading featuring two Spokane writers + open mic Venue: Conference Theatre, Spokane Convention Center

Panel discussion featuring Asa Maria Bradley, Joanne Wylde and Rebecca Zanetti

Panel discussion featuring Meghan Nuttall Sayres, Diana Darke, Reese Erlich. Moderated by Jamie Tobias Neely.

12-1:30 p.m.

Time: 8 p.m.

Panel discussion featuring Kelly Milner Halls, Leah Sottile, Shawn Vestal, Kevin Taylor, Claire Rudolph Murphy. Moderated by Kris Dinnison.

Venue: The Bartlett Cost: $10/$12 day of show. Full line up and tickets available via thebartlettspokane.com.

A Reading Public

Time: 1 p.m.

Reading: S.M. Hulse and Bruce Holbert Venue: Conference Theatre, Spokane Convention Center

Time: 2 p.m.

Reading: Molly Giles and Melanie Rae Thon Venue: Conference Theatre, Spokane Convention Center

Time: 12 p.m.

Nuts and Bolts of Publishing: Panel Discussion

SAT., APRIL 25

Time: 3 p.m.

Blue Begonia Press Reading

Featuring Brooke Matson, Terry Martin, Kathryn Hunt Venue: Conference Theatre, Spokane Convention Center

Time: 5 p.m.

Railtown Almanac Reading Featuring Nance Van Winckel, John Whalen, Emily Gwinn. Venue: Whitworth University, Hardwick House

Romance Novels, Alpha Males, and Feminism

A Writing Life that Pays the Bills

Writing the Middle East

The Round #7 featuring Cami Bradley

1:45 - 3p.m.

Writing for Children and Young Adults

Panel discussion featuring Kris Dinnison, Mary Cronk Farrell, Kelly Milner Halls and Trent Reedy. Moderated by Sheri Boggs.

Saturday, April 25

Writing Workshops

$30 general | $20 students Registration information: getlitfestival.org/workshops

Morning session 9:30-11:30 a.m. • Characters Are People, Too with Bruce Holbert • First Impressions with Molly Giles • From Image to Poem with Yvonne Higgins Leach • Moving the Body, Writing the Mind with Renée D’Aoust

Afternoon session 3:30-5:30 p.m. • Generating New Work and Catalyzing Work-in-Progress with Melanie Rae Thon • The Weird, Wild and Wonderful Stories Around You with Leah Sottile • Poetry Workshop with Jeremy Pataky


E FIRE M O S Nursery & H Landscape Materials

NEWS | HEALTH

Plants • Soil • Bark IN STOCK Fountains & Garden Art Certified Organic Compost Roses Ed Harrich, director of Surgical Services, uses newly installed copper-alloy faucet handles in a maternity room at Pullman Regional Hospital. JACOB JONES PHOTO

Feed Your Soil, Not Your Plants! 509-434-4851 • homefireswood.com 2919 S Geiger Blvd (across from the Waste Energy) /homefiresnursery

Cleaned by Copper In the fight against hospital infections, the latest innovation isn’t high-tech — it’s copper BY LISA WAANANEN JONES

D

epending on the light, you may not even notice it. But look closely, and the handicap access buttons that open doors inside Pullman Regional Hospital shine with an unmistakably rosy hue. The handles on many drawers and cabinets show the same warmth. In bathrooms, the faucet handles patients touch are an intentionally vivid shade of copper. “It gives [hospital staff] a conversation point with the patients to say that we’re doing everything we can to decrease infections,” says Ed Harrich, director of surgical services. What makes these new copper alloy fixtures significant isn’t how they look, but what they do: Copper surfaces naturally kill the microbes that can thrive in hospitals. In an effort led by Harrich, Pullman Regional Hospital is the first institution of its size to install copper surfaces so widely in an effort to fight the spread of infections. Nosocomial infections — those acquired in a health care facility — are a costly and deadly problem at hospitals across the nation. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 1 in 25 patients nationwide has a hospitalacquired infection at any given time, with more than 700,000 patients affected per year. Officials have seen progress in the past decade as hospitals improve sanitation practices, but outbreaks remain common. On surfaces like plastic or stainless steel, microbes can linger for days or even weeks. Someone who comes into contact with an infection can spread this invisible “bioburden” to multiple

Extra P atrols O n N ow

D RIVE H I G H GET A DU I

26 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015 564_WTSC_DHGD_4V_Ad_F.indd 1

9/22/14 4:47 PM

surfaces, Harrich says, where it waits like “little booby traps” until the next guest or staff member unknowingly comes into contact. What makes copper so valuable is that it works around the clock without requiring anyone to change their behavior. “Now, it doesn’t mean we decrease our handwashing — hopefully it puts more focus on handwashing,” Harrich says. “And we still clean like we’ve always cleaned with our anti-germicidals. But now you have this little helper behind the scenes.”

T

he way copper kills microbes is complex and not yet fully understood, but documented accounts of copper as a health care tool date back to the ancient Egyptians. The ancient Greeks applied a copper powder to wounds, and many cultures have used copper vessels to hold drinking water. Modern organic farming makes use of copper sprays to fight plant diseases. At a level invisible to the human eye, copper weakens the membranes of microbes and then interferes with internal cell functions. Within a few minutes, even antibiotic-resistant bacteria like methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, known as MRSA, begin to die. Despite copper’s long history, it’s only recently been promoted for use in hospitals. In 2008, the Environmental Protection Agency registered five copper alloy products as the first proven antimicrobial metal on the market, approving the claim that these copper products “kill 99.9% of bacteria within two hours.”


Beginning the same year, a study funded by the Department of Defense and sponsored by the Copper Development Association looked at the effect of copper surfaces in intensive care units at three institutions in New York and South Carolina. First, the study identified the surfaces with the greatest presence of microbes, which turned out to be bed rails, tables, IV poles, and nurses’ stations. Next, the study compared copper-outfitted rooms to standard rooms, and followed up on the rate of nosocomial infections. Rooms with copper showed an 80 percent reduction in bioburden compared to the standard rooms, and significantly fewer patients in copper rooms developed infections. A few critics have pointed out that funding for most of the research about copper’s antimicrobial properties has come from the copper industry, but so far the results have been significant. One question is whether the distinctive appearance of copper affects the outcome by making staff and visitors more mindful of cleanliness — but on a practical level, that’s a useful effect, too. Kyle Sexton of the Copper Development Association says it’s been key to gather enough evidence to convince the medical community, which isn’t going to accept an unproven technology. Two main barriers are the cost of replacing parts, especially in large hospitals, and getting buy-in at all levels of large institutions. “There can be a lot of people you need to convince,” Sexton says. He points to Purell, which was invented in 1988 but lost money for years before hand sanitizer become widely used in health care centers. (Bottles of hand sanitizer are mounted in convenient places on the walls at Pullman Regional.) In the next few years, the Copper Development Association hopes to encourage more hospitals to embrace copper as a defense against infections, and copper surfaces could also be used in giant sports facilities, public transit and airports. A study of Atlanta airport drinking fountains retrofitted with a subtle nickel-copper alloy found that the copper reduced surface bacteria by about 80 percent. Case studies for the Copper Development Association include the Ronald McDonald House in Charleston, South Carolina, where copper railings, handles and sinks protect children with fragile immune systems. Other institutions are trying copper on a trial basis, or in limited areas like fitness centers.

A

$10,000 grant from the Copper Development Association jump-started Pullman Regional Hospital’s copper installation, and Sexton says the hospital stood out as an ideal place to showcase the technology because of the staff’s enthusiasm for the project. “We could really see the sincerity and dedication they had about patient care,” Sexton says. Initially, Harrich imagined fully outfitting the hospital’s three operating rooms. But after thinking about where the copper could have the most impact, the plan shifted to identifying the most important touchpoints throughout the hospital. There are now more than 600 touchpoints installed, which will double as all the cabinet handles are replaced. Of course, bright copper tarnishes — just think of the Statue of Liberty or an old penny. (Pennies before 1982 are mostly copper; since then, they’re mostly zinc.) The housekeepers at Pullman Regional Hospital felt that any tarnishing made it look like they weren’t doing their job, even if the copper was technically clean, so now they use Bar Keepers Friend cleanser every so often to keep the faucet handles shiny. More companies are entering the market and prices are becoming more competitive, but it’s still difficult to find copper versions of all the necessary hardware. An Idaho company called Rocky Mountain Hardware custom-made Pullman’s distinctive copper sink handles from a mold. Pullman Regional Hospital eventually aims to use copper for bed rails, patient tables and the arms of chairs. They have prototypes for light switches, and would like to replace door handles and metal push bars on doors. “This goes beyond the dollar sign,” Harrich says. “This is about doing the right thing, and that’s why we’re in this business — to take care of people.”  This article first appeared in the Inlander’s InHealth magazine.

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APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 27


NOT JUST NEWS.

amazing

stories

“ONE LOVE,” MARCH 28, 2013

28 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015


Strong Words

A guide to the best of the 17th Get Lit! Festival

! t i L t Ge

Mon.

Creative License Artists interpret two of the fest’s featured authors in Spokane storefronts BY E.J. IANNELLI

I

t looks as if someone has just stepped away from this cozy-looking antique wingback chair with pink quatrefoil upholstery. A copy of The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac by Sharma Shields rests on the seat cushion, awaiting the return of its reader. On the adjacent side table, a dainty cup of tea is softly spotlit by a reading lamp. This could easily be a view of “your grandmother’s reading parlor,” says artist Richard Vander Wende — if it weren’t for the fact that these quaint domestic furnishings are situated in a large downtown display window and surrounded by an ominous vortex of round, ash-gray logs. Vander Wende and his creative partner Kate Vita have designed this installation as part of the 2015 Get Lit! Festival, which is collaborating with the Window Dress-

For a complete schedule of the 2015 Get Lit! Festival, visit GetLitFestival.org

Sharma Shields sits in a window space inspired by her novel and designed by Richard Vander Wende and Kate Vita at 702 W. Main Ave. COURTNEY BREWER PHOTO ing program for the first time to fill vacant storefront windows, like this one at 702 W. Main with interpretations of works by two of this year’s festival authors. Ginger Ewing, who heads Window Dressing, asked Vander Wende and Vita to find a visual vignette that captured some aspect of Shields’ new book. She then asked Chelsea Hendrickson to do the same for The Dead Lands, Benjamin Percy’s post-apocalyptic literary imagining of the Lewis and Clark expedition. “We really wanted to honor the writers who were being featured in a significant way,” says Ewing, while providing a platform that would allow local artists “to shine.” She and festival director Melissa Huggins selected Shields’ novel because it’s “wrought with so much creative imagery” and Percy’s because it “would give an artist a lot to work with and sink their teeth into.” By drawing on his experience in film production design, Vander Wende co-created with Vita a scene that he thinks distills recurring themes in The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac as well as Shields’ short story collection, Favorite Monster. “For us, one of the really interesting things is this contrast between proper society and its rules and conventions, and the world of nature and its full, raw, uncensored, unedited spectrum, and the discrepancies between

Even a casual glance through the schedule of this year’s Get Lit! Festival offers ample evidence of the myriad ways literature touches our lives every day. Art shows, concerts, poetry slams, a podcast recording, a children’s theater production and workshops for working writers fill the days and nights ahead. And readings — plenty of readings, spanning genres with authors from the Inland Northwest and beyond. Festival Director Melissa Huggins finds this year’s edition noteworthy for the number of local authors involved and participating. “That’s reflective of the explosion of the writing scene over the last handful of years, ranging from the upswing of the performancepoetry scene to the emergence of Sharma Shields and Shawn Vestal as these incredible — and now more well-recognized — writers,” Huggins says. “The challenge is that every year we want it to feel new. We want exciting events that we can showcase to the community.” That means this year you’ll find the tried, true and popular — hello, Pie & Whiskey Reading — and new features like the incredible windowdressing exhibits. There is, quite literally, something for everyone. — DAN NAILEN

those two worlds. That’s what we tried to evoke in our window tableau,” he says. Hendrickson’s take on The Dead Lands spans two windows, each with a wide central pane and two narrower sides. She chose to focus on two components to evoke the novel’s bleak, end-of-days atmosphere: colors and symbols. “The far right window starts where their journey starts. It’s dry, desolate, dusty colors that then morph into white and gray. As they travel northwards, they get into barren, snowy lands in the Dakotas,” she says. “The left window continues that transition from ashy colors into the dark browns and greens and blues that taper off into blues.” Those colors are a backdrop to silhouettes of nuclear cooling towers, crows and collapsing buildings. On the opening day of this year’s Get Lit!, the authors or their proxies will step into the scenes the artists have created and read from the works that inspired them. “We thought it would be great imagery,” says Ewing, “if we placed the writer inside their installation to give the sense that they’re being enveloped by their book.” n Get Lit! Window Dressing Exhibit Walk • Mon, April 20 at 8 pm • Meet at River Park Square, 808 W. Main, Suite 251 (former home of Whiz Kids)

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 29


CULTURE | GET LIT!

Tue.

OPENS NEXT WEEK! Memory Game and Cathedral of St. John the Evangelist at the “Landmarks” exhibit.

Give and Take CORY RICHARDS

Artists, writers team up to see old places in new ways

Untamed Antarctica

CORY RICHARDS

TUESDAY, APRIL 21 7:00 PM

CLIMBERS & PHOTOGRAPHERS

Cory Richards & Mike Libecki Journey with veteran explorer Mike Libecki and photographer Cory Richards as they recount their first ascent at the bottom of the world. The pair braved furious winds, extreme cold, and fickle weather in an epic ten-day climb to the summit of Bertha’s Tower, a 2,000-foot spire in Antarctica’s remote Wohlthat Range.

Groups of 10 or more SAVE! Call 509.777.6253 -orgroups@wcebroadway.com

TicketsWest.com 800.325.SEAT 30 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

BY ELI FRANCOVICH

G

et Lit! and Spokane Arts’ collaborative exhibition during the literary festival is a community event, from start to finish. The show brought 17 local writers and visual artists together — all focusing on the theme that gives the show its name: “Landmarks.” “How do you develop a cultural identity?” says Austin Stiegemeier, Spokane Arts program manager. “A big part of (development) is commemoration of the place that we live, and the landmarks and the landmark buildings. But at the same time we wanted something that could be universal.” Get Lit! Director Melissa Huggins says each writer/artist pair interpreted the theme differently. Some, like a piece by Inlander art director Chris Bovey and writer Emily Gwinn, focused on physical Spokane landmarks, while others interpreted it personally. Huggins was impressed with the diversity of collaboration. “I think one of the most interesting things about viewing the exhibit was how the different pairs decided to join their work,” Huggins says. Some groups collaborated in a very literal way. Others approached the project abstractly, using their partner’s writing or art to influence their own creation. Either way, Stiegemeier thinks the process gave the art depth. “The nice thing about collaboration is you get new work and you get people out of their bubble,” Stiegemeier says. “As soon as you start

A Trip for All Ages

working with someone else you have a collision of ideas.” Writer Ellen Welcker and artist Lauren Campbell paired up for the exhibition. Their mixed media collage Memory Game was the product of a weeks-long collaborative process, Campbell says. “I love anything that is going to push me outside of the way I typically see the ways of creating,” says Welcker. “I think I secretly wish I was a painter, but I’m not.” The two met weekly to brainstorm. When they finally settled on their medium, they traded the art piece back and forth, each adding a bit to the collage. “‘Landmarks’ … felt challenging because neither of us are from Spokane and neither of us have been here very long,” says Welcker. The final product is something neither of them would have come up with on their own, and that’s the beauty of true collaboration, Welcker says. It pushes the artists, and gives the viewer a unique visual experience. “I think when you take two people who are artistically very different, it comes out of a very different place,” says Campbell.  “Landmarks” featured writer reading • Tue, April 21, at 6 pm • City Hall Chambers • 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • free • “Landmarks” exhibition • Through June 30 • Chase Gallery • 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • free •

Tumble into Wonderland with Book-It Repertory Theatre! This 45-minute interpretation of beloved literary classic Alice in Wonderland allows audiences of all ages to interact with the ever-grinning Cheshire Cat, the cranky Queen of Hearts, and the quizzical Alice. Follow Alice as she unknowingly chases the White Rabbit into the heart of a new world, where she must learn to journey on in spite of Wonderland’s haziness and tendency to misdirect her. Stick around after the show for a Q&A with the cast. (COURTNEY BREWER) Alice in Wonderland • Tue, April 21, at 7 pm • $10 adult ticket, free for children • The Lincoln Center, Lincoln Ballroom • 1316 N. Lincoln


CULTURE | GET LIT!

Thur.

1001 West Sprague Ave. • 509-624-1200

Valentina Lisitsa Saturday, April 18 - 8pm Sunday, April 19 - 3pm YouTube Piano Sensation performs Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini JESSIE SPACCIA ILLUSTRATION

Taken in Sufficient Quantities BY JACOB H. FRIES

I

n a way, it’s not unlike some tented church Written words, it turns out, are transformed revival in the backcountry. A place for thickwhen spoken aloud. And transformed even waisted believers and drunks to find a moment of more when slurred just a bit. Out comes new refuge and awaken their spirits with the fervent music and new meaning. Over the course of worship of words. Yes, there is something to this one-night affair, the spirit in the room rises. this strange marriage known as Pie & Whiskey, The hooting and howling bursts louder and this annual Get Lit! orgy of louder between authors. Despite homemade pie, local whiskey D I S T I L L E D theories to the contrary, booze and writers reading prose and does not make us smarter, but it A SHOT OF LIFE poems about those eponymous does make us more emotional. items. More raw. This is not a time for a reader’s quiet reflecThere is a temptation at the very end of the tion, sitting silently in awe of a god-writer’s night to keep quiet, to tell no one, lest this thing staggering genius. Here, everyone is together in you felt was yours might be taken away, diluted, the same room, no stages, just sitting in foldlost forever. Then you remember: Churches and ing chairs, lining the walls, standing wherever a temples and mosques were made so people didn’t shoulder length can be found, a slice of pie in one have to read holy books alone. Similarly, Pie & hand and a finger of whiskey in the other. Here, Whiskey was made so dessert-devouring, boozethe gods walk among us and drink straight-up swilling, semi-literate people could do those very whiskey. things together.  There’s one now. Didya hear they’re making his latest novel into a Pie & Whiskey IV • Thu, April 23, doors at 9 movie? I hear Jack Black is interested! So cool! pm • $2 (cash only) • 21+ • Woman’s Club of I love the book, but Jack Black is an assclown! Spokane • 1428 W. Ninth

Podcast With Pop

Both Sherman Alexie and Jess Walter write with such vivid humor and keen eyes for the culture around them that joining forces in 2014 to create a podcast was not only natural and comfortable, but inspired as well. The result, A Tiny Sense of Accomplishment, is a joyful experience for the listeners, always engaging and often hilarious, and includes everything from guest interviews to readings of works in progress, and sports commentary to regular digressions into ephemera well worth a trip down whatever logic wormhole they find. At Get Lit!, they’ll record an episode in front of a live audience, and conduct a Q&A session together as well. (DAN NAILEN) A Tiny Sense of Accomplishment Live! • Wed, April 22, from 7-9 pm • free, no advance ticket required • Spokane Community College Lair Auditorium • 1810 N. Greene

Wed.

this concert is sponsored by Whitworth University, the Johnston-Fix Foundation and Bill and Harriet Fix

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Young Poets Go Public Area teens and college students take over a Get Lit! stage for an interactive poetry slam sure to reveal some talented young writers in an entertaining way. EWU’s Writers in the Community hosts the competition of threeminute unfiltered pieces judged on content, originality, and performance. Registration is free, and participants are encouraged to bring a can of food to support shelters in the community. Kris Dinnison will share an excerpt from her upcoming YA novel You and Me and Him after the teen slam winners are announced. (COURTNEY BREWER) Teen and College Poetry Slams • Wed, April 22, at 6:30 pm • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com •747-2174

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APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 31


CULTURE | GET LIT!

Fri. Walter Kirn’s latest book is about the time he was duped by a guy he thought was a Rockefeller.

Harsh Truths A chat with Blood Will Out author Walter Kirn BY DAN NAILEN

W

alter Kirn has penned countless essays, memoirs and novels. It’s safe to say the strangest story he’s ever written — truth or fiction — is Blood Will Out: The True Story of a Murder, a Mystery, and a Masquerade, where he delves into his relationship with a man he knew as wealthy East Coast elitist Clark Rockefeller, who turned out to be an imposter and murderer. Shawn Vestal, who will join Kirn for a discussion at Get Lit!, shared of the book via email that he was “perhaps most struck by his penetrating examination of himself,” noting he was “fascinated by the degree of honesty/exposure in that.” We talked to Kirn about his starring role as a con man’s victim:

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INLANDER: As Clark’s background was revealed, when did you think of writing about him? KIRN: When I first met him over the phone, I knew almost instantly that he was an eccentric of singular dimension. And I was well aware in the back of my head that it might be fruitful to write about him one day … As the years went by, I completely set aside that plan. When it was revealed that he was involved with this murder, I suddenly took the brakes off … When it really landed in my psyche that he was a killer, I revisited that decision to not write about him and thought, “Walter, you idiot! You’re a writer. Your duty is to the page, to the story, and you kind of wimped out a little bit there.” Then again, there was no real story until his true identity was revealed. But once it was, I guess I made up for lost time. Was it difficult to recall moments for the book? Luckily, when you meet someone like Clark Rockefeller, you remember very clearly your interactions. Because he was like no one else I’d ever known. His nonstop zaniness and eccen-

tricity and outlandish storytelling stuck in my memory like a dart. I really had no difficulty recalling the time I spent with him. Why reveal such personal aspects about your life and family in the book? Clark Rockefeller is a liar and imposter and nothing he ever said was true. And he clouded his life as assiduously as possible. This book, in order to work, had to be about what it was in me to be vulnerable to such a person. In some ways, he can’t be known. And in some ways, as a psychopath, there’s not a lot to know, because I’m convinced these people are radically different from you and I, and are empty in a way that I think is astonishing … A con is a dance, it’s a tango between two personalities. And the personality and life I knew best was my own, so I set out to forensically reconstruct my own role in the con. My own self-deceptions, my own failures of skepticism and analytical acumen. Was it depressing to delve into your own role as a victim? It wasn’t so much depressing as it was disconcerting, disturbing. There aren’t many cases in life when we find out we’ve been wronged, and then have a chance to really minutely examine all the ways we were fooled, tricked, deceived … As I sat at that murder trial, it was a little bit like having a magic trick you’ve been fooled by patiently explained, and you see, “Oh, there’s where I looked in the wrong direction” … Because I was able to gain this awful clarity about the way I was deceived, I had a feeling of being chilled by how vulnerable I was, and I think we all are, to those who patiently, cunningly, set out to abuse our trust. n In Conversation with Walter Kirn and Shawn Vestal • Fri, April 24, at 7 pm • $15/students free • Riverside Place Commandery Room • 1110 W. Riverside


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APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 33


CULTURE | GET LIT!

How to use THIS

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Also featuring: Sushi − Bake Sale Arts & Crafts -and- Homemade Japanese rice crackers (senbei) Walk-ins Welcome! Advanced Plate Reservations: (509) 535-2687, 624-6892 or 928-9459 HIGHLAND PARK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 611 South Garfield St. Spokane, WA www.hp-spokane.org

PULL-OUT SECTION

Sat. Rebecca Zanetti

Not Just Mommy Porn

Pull down then out

Why three local romance novelists say their genre is for feminists BY LAURA JOHNSON

R

ebecca Zanetti doesn’t consider Fifty Shades of Grey a true romance novel. “That book is a small subgenre called erotica BDSM, and most romance books are nothing like that,” says the author at the Spokane Valley Barnes & Noble last week, sitting not too far from the store’s romance section, full of prominently displayed illustrations of bare backs, eight-pack abs and heaving bosoms. But that the steamy, decidedly adult novel has gotten people excited about reading books is something to be thrilled about, she says. To date, Fifty Shades has sold more than 100 million copies worldwide and helped further the popularity of romances — the country’s hottest-selling literary genre. Today, Zanetti and fellow area romance author Asa Maria Bradley have met to discuss their upcoming Get Lit! panel topic — which they’ll deliver along with author Joanna Wylde — titled “Romance Novels, Alpha Males and Feminism.” Especially in the wake of Twilight, Fifty Shades and others, recent romance novels have been hotly debated. Many deem the genre silly or even harmful (i.e., “Mommy porn”), but the three local writers contend that reading a romance novel is something a feminist would and should do. “Our characters are very strong; they’re not damsels in distress anymore, like they may have been written in the 1970s,” says Bradley, whose first novel, a Viking-themed romance, will be published in November. “Heroines do everything these days, as women’s rights continue to move forward.” Bradley considers romance fans to be among the most intelligent and well-educated readers. She says when readers comment on Goodreads.

They Got Next

com or other forums, they’re able to articulate exactly why a book — be it an Amish-themed romance featuring light kissing, or an erotic whipsand-chains-type romp — isn’t to their liking. It’s important to remember these books are just fiction. “This is definite fantasy,” says Bradley, a Spokane Falls Community College professor. “It’s about taking a normal woman and putting her in a crazy world.” “We’re not trying to change the world with these books,” adds Zanetti, who just found out that her new book, Total Surrender, hit No. 20 on the New York Times Best Seller list. “We’re just trying to offer a sense of escape.” Wylde — like Zanetti a New York Times bestselling author, wife and mother based in Coeur d’Alene — says she fails to see why women reading romances would be considered taboo. “Women being allowed to express their sexuality is a good thing, and that’s feminist,” says Wylde over the phone. “Through reading our books, women are starting to ask more questions about their bodies.” The authors all describe the Inland Northwest as a very supportive and accepting place to write romance novels. “We are not competing against each other, we’re competing against the Netflix queue and reality TV shows like The Bachelor,” Zanetti says. “So when one of us does well, we’re happy for them.” n Romance Novels, Alpha Males and Feminism • Sat, April 25, noon-1:30 pm • Free • Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd., room 205

Sun.

The Inland Northwest is home to fine MFA programs, and the Sunday afternoon showcase of talented writers from the University of Idaho, University of Montana and Eastern Washington University offers ample proof. Eleven writers working in a variety of genres and styles will read from their works and be on hand for discussions with audience members at the Barrister Winery. Children are welcome, and parents should know the writers are given no restrictions on the language or content of their readings. (DAN NAILEN) Regional MFA Reading • Sun., April 26, 2-4 pm • Free • Barrister Winery • 1213 W. Railroad Ave.

34 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

NOT a happy hour drink special

NOT a phone.

NOT a tasty appetizer

YES! A handy guide for finding Happy Hour deals!

Now you know how!

PULL-OUT & KEEP! HAPPY HOUR

GUIDE


208

Y HAPP S R U HO

HapPy hour

Guide SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER


36 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015


e v r e s e D YOU y p p a h to be We like to hit the bars early here in the Inland Northwest. Need proof? Try to call someone on their office line after 4 pm on a sunny Friday afternoon. Whoever you’re trying to reach has already departed for his or her favorite patio and a discounted cocktail. For the first time ever, the Inlander has collected a sampling of the region’s happy hour specials and compiled them for you in this handy and supremely useful guide. Armed with this pullout section (and its accompanying mobile website), you’ll never be at a loss for where to head for some early drinks. We’re also bringing you stories about craft beer, eating late at night, finding the fancy spots that offer happy hours and the skinny on some of the area’s most outrageously cheap drinks. Bottoms up, and we’ll see you out at the bar soon.

MIKE BOOKEY, SECTION EDITOR

We at the Inlander love a good deal almost as much as an after-work cocktail. So it was only a matter of time before need and inspiration collided to create DRINKSPOTTER DRINKSPOTTER,, our new Happy Hour app. Find it at Inlander.com/drinkspotter, or from your phone, simply go to Inlander.com and find the Drinkspotter button on our mobile homepage. On Drinkspotter, you’ll find the region’s best database of Happy Hour deals, listed by the nearest location. (Make sure your phone’s location setting is turned on.) Also, you can sort deals by neighborhood, category or name. Click on a location and — viola! — there’s everything you need. We recommend you save Drinkspotter for later, and in that regard, you have a couple of options. 1. Bookmark it on your phone. 2. Save a shortcut to your home screen. Also, send feedback or suggest corrections to any information via happyhour@inlander.com.. happyhour@inlander.com

CONTENTS DOWNTOWN ...........................38 SOUTH HILL ............................40 CRAFT BEER............................. 41 EAST/NORTH SPOKANE .........42 CRAZY DEALS ..........................43

TALL CANS...............................45 CHENEY/AIRWAY HEIGHTS...46 FANCY HAPPY HOURS..........47 SPOKANE VALLEY..................48 LATE NIGHT.............................49

T H E KO S M O N A U T $6 Twigs (all locations) Happy Hour: Mon.-Sun. 3 pm-6 pm; Mon.-Sun. 9 pm-11 pm

LIBERTY LAKE.....................51 CDA/POST FALLS................51 SANDPOINT.........................52 MOSCOW/PULLMAN..........52

SECTION ARTWORK: CHRIS BOVEY & JESSIE SPACCIA

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 37


L A K E PA D D L E R PA L E A L E $3.50 MickDuff’s Brewing Company Happy Hour: Mon.-Thu., Sun., 3 pm-6 pm

HapPy hours

Downtown Spokane 24 TAPS BURGERS & BREWS

825 W. Riverside, 868-5657 Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-6 pm $1 off all drinks

ANDY’S

1401 W. First Ave., 747-0304 Daily 4 pm-7 pm $1 off drinks; $1 off appetizers

ANTHONY’S AT SPOKANE FALLS

510 N. Lincoln St., 328-9009 Daily 3 pm-6:30 pm $3.50 drafts, $5.50 cocktails, $5/$7.50 wine; $5 bar burger, $7 appetizer options, $7 oyster, prawn or shrimp 6-packs

BABY BAR

827 W. First Ave., 847-1234 Mon.- Fri. 5 pm-7 pm $3 drafts, $1 off all cocktails Mon. 5 pm-2 am $3 cocktail special Tue. 5 pm-2 am $3 pints Wed. 5 pm-2 am $1 PBR

THE BACKYARD PUBLIC HOUSE

1811 W. Broadway, 822-7338 Daily 2 pm-5 pm $4 craft beer, $2 domestics, $1 off bottled beer, $1 off signature cocktails; $6 street tacos, $5 nachos Daily 10 pm-2 am $1 off draft beers, $1 off bottled beer, $1 off signature cocktails

THE BARTLETT

228 W. Sprague Ave Tue.-Fri. 4 pm-7 pm $3.50 draft beer, $4 wine; $3 butter herb popcorn

BISTANGO MARTINI LOUNGE 108 N. Post St., 624-8464 Daily 4 pm-6 pm $3 beer, $4 house wine, $5 premium wells, $6 specialty cocktails,$7 martinis; $5-7 happy hour appetizers

THE BLIND BUCK

204 N. Division St., 290-6229 Daily 5 pm-7 pm $3 house spirits, $3 house wine, $5 mules, free beer upgrades

BORRACHO TACOS & TEQUILERIA

211 N. Division St., 822-7789 Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $5 margaritas, $2 Modelos: $3 chips and queso

BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ

401 W. Riverside Ave., 321-7480 Daily 2 pm-7 pm

38 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

$2 domestic draft, $3 wells, $3 Fireball all day every day

BROOKLYN DELI & LOUNGE 122 S. Monroe St., 835-4177 Mon.-Sat. 3 pm-6 pm $3 well drinks, $1 off beer and wine

BROWNE’S TAVERN

1924 W. Pacific, 315-9934 Tue.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $1 off all drinks, $5 off bottles of wine; $1 off appetizers

CENTRAL FOOD

1335 w. Summit Pkwy, 315-8036 Mon.-Thur. 3 pm-6 pm $4 draft beer, $5 wine, $12 select bottles of wine; $3-$12 appetizers, including cheese plate, grilled asparagus, pate plate and more, $20 bottle of wine and cheese plate

CHARLEY’S GRILL & SPIRITS 801 N. Monroe St., 328-8911 Daily 4 pm-7 pm $2.75 draft beers, $2.75 well drinks, $5 martinis

CHURCHILL’S STEAKHOUSE 165 S. Post St., 474-9888 Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-6 pm $5 house wine, $5 well drinks, $3.50 domestic bottles

CLINKERDAGGER

621 W. Mallon St., 328-5965 Daily 3 pm-6 pm; Fri., Sat. 9 pm-2 am $1 off all draft beers, $4.95 Cabernet Sauvignon, Chardonnay, $5.50 specialty cocktails, $5.50 well drinks; $4.95 to $21.95 appetizers and small plates

THE DISTRICT BAR

916 W. First Ave., 244-3279 Mon.-Thur. 9 pm-2 am; Fri., Sat. 10 pm-2 am $2 off all pints, $3 off all pitchers, $2 off all bottled beer, $2 off all wine, $2.50 well drinks, $4 call liquor drinks, $2 off premium liquor drinks, $2 off craft cocktails; $4-$6 food specials

FIRE ARTISAN PIZZA

816 W. Sprague Ave., 413-1856 Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $1 canned beer, $3 draft beer, $5 wine; $6 snack-size pizza, meatballs, caprese, meat and cheese, mushrooms, bread and dip

GLOBE BAR & KITCHEN

204 N. Division, 443-4014 Daily 2 pm-6 pm $4 Blue Moon, Coors Light, Bud Light, Kokanee, $4 well drinks; $6 clams, sliders, green beans, pigs in a blanket, wings

HILLS’ RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

401 W. Main, 747-3946 Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-6 pm $1 off beer, wine and cocktails

ITALIA TRATTORIA

144 S. Cannon St., 459-6000 Tue., Wed., Thur. 5 pm-6 pm $5 well drinks, $5 house wine, $4 drafts, $2 off specialty cocktails, 10% off bottled wine

ITALIAN KITCHEN

113 N. Bernard St., 363-1210 Mon.-Fri. 3:30 pm-6 pm $2 draft beers, $3 well drinks, $4 house wine; $3 off appetizers

JONES RADIATOR

120 E. Sprague Ave., 747-6005 Mon.-Sat.4 pm-7 pm; Sun. 5 pm-12 am $1 off beers, $1 off well drinks; Half-price appetizers

LEFTBANK WINE BAR

108 N. Washington St., 315-8623 Mon.-Sat.4 pm-6pm $2 off wine, $1 off tap beers; $6 spinach and artichoke dip, $6 tapenade duo, $5 house bruschetta, $10 antipasto, $9 pizzas

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB

408 W. Sprague Ave., 499-9968 Daily 4 pm-7 pm $1 off wells, $2 domestic beers, $3 craft beers

EUROPA

LUIGI’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT

FAST EDDIE’S

MACKENZIE RIVER PIZZA CO.

125 S. Wall St., 455-4051 Mon.-Sat. 3 pm-6 pm; Mon.-Sat. 9 pm-10 pm; Sun. 11 am-10 pm $3 daily beer special, sparkling wine, $4 well drinks, house wine and 20-ounce beers, $5 specialty cocktails; $4-$9 specialty appetizers 1 W. Spokane Falls Blvd., 455-8752. Mon.- Fri. 3 pm-4 pm Power Hour: $1 domestic pints, $2 micro pints Mon.- Fri. 4 pm-7 pm; Sun. 11 am-2 am All 22-ounce draft beers are the price of 16 oz, $4 well drinks, $1 off all appetizers, other daily beer and cocktail specials

245 W. Main Ave., 624-5226 Mon.-Thur. 3 pm-6 pm $5 wine, $3 beer, $6 martinis; $4-$8 appetizers Sun. 11 am-9:30 pm $5 wine, $3 beer, $6 martinis; $4-$8 appetizers

818 W. Riverside Ave., 315-4447 Mon.-Thur. 2 pm-8 pm; Fri., Sat. 2 pm-6 pm, 8 pm-9 pm $2 well drinks, $4 you-call-it, $6 top shelf liquor, $3.50 craft pints, $1 off wine; $0.75 wings, $6$8.50 other appetizers including pretzel sliders, fried raviolis, pretzels, chili cheese fries


MARKETPLACE WINERY 39 W. Pacific Ave., 838-7815 Wed.-Sat. 5 pm-6pm Discounts on wine and flatbreads

Wed.-Sat. 9 pm-2 am $5 well drinks, $5, house wine, $4 draft beer, $7 Rain Drop martinis; $5-$12 appetizers

MELTING POT

RED DRAGON CHINESE

707 W. Main Ave., 926-8000 Daily 4 pm-6 pm $6 cocktails and martinis, $5 wine, $4 beer; $6 cheese or chocolate fondue, $5 salads, $5 Brie plates

1406 W. Third Ave., 838-6688 Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-7 pm $2.75 well drinks until 5 pm, $3.25 well drinks after 5 pm Sat., Sun. 2 pm-7 pm $3.25 well drinks

MONTEREY CAFE

RED LION BBQ

9 N. Washington St., 868-0284 Daily 4 pm-8 pm $1 off everything behind the bar, discounted special appetizers Tue. 4 pm-8 pm 1/2 off whole pizzas

NYNE

232 W. Sprague Ave., 474-1621 Tue.-Sun. 3 pm-6 pm $1 off wells, $1 off drafts, $1 off glasses of wine; $5 appetizers

O’DOHERTY’S IRISH GRILLE

525 W. Spokane Falls Blvd., 747-0322 Daily 4 pm-6 pm Half-off first drink; $1-off appetizers

126 N. Division St., 835-5466 Mon.-Fri. 11 am-6 pm $0.50 off all drinks, $1 off pitchers

RED ROOM LOUNGE

521 W. Sprague Ave., 838-7613 Mon.-Fri. 5 pm-7 pm $1 off beer, $1 off well drinks

RIPPLES RIVERSIDE GRILL AT RED LION RIVER INN

700 N. Division St., 323-2577 Daily 4 pm-6 pm $3 well drinks, $3 Coors Light, Bud Light and Deschutes River Ale; $6 appetizers

ROCK CITY GRILL

2001 W. Pacific Ave., 624-0236 Tue. 11 am-11 pm $2 drafts

808 W. Main Ave., 455-4400 Mon.-Thur., Sun. 9 pm-10 pm; Mon.-Fri. 2 pm-6 pm; Fri., Sat. 9:30 pm-11 pm; Sun. 11 am-10 pm $3 domestic drafts, $4 micro drafts, $4 house wine, $4 well drinks, $5 signature Blue Martini; appetizers ($3-$9) including Italian fries, breadsticks, flatbread, pizzas, calamari, quesadilla, lettuce wraps, Italian nachos, crab

PALM COURT GRILL

SAFARI ROOM

THE ONION

302 W. Riverside Ave., 747-3852 Mon.- Sun. 3 pm-6 pm $2 off wine, $1 off well drinks, $4 draft beers, $3 domestic beers; $2-$7 appetizers

PACIFIC AVENUE PIZZA

10 S. Post St., 789-6848 Daily 3 pm-6 pm $4 house wines and draft beers Mon. 3 pm-6 pm Martini Mondays

PEACOCK ROOM LOUNGE 10 S. Post St., 789-6848 Daily 4 pm-6 pm $4 wine, $4 20-ounce draft beer

PHO CITY

112 N. Howard St., 747-0223 Mon.-Sat. 2 pm-4 pm $1 off beer

POST STREET ALE HOUSE 1 N. Post St., 789-6900 Daily 4 pm-6 pm Half-off draft beer and house wine

RAIN LOUNGE (AT SCRATCH)

1007 W. First Ave., 456-5656 Mon., Tue. 11 am-10 pm; Wed.-Sat. 4 pm-6 pm;

111 S. Post St., 789-6800 Daily 4 pm-6 pm Half-off all drinks; Half-off flatbread

SANTÉ RESTAURANT & CHARCUTERIE

404 W. Main Ave., 315-4613 Daily 3 pm-5 pm $1 off cocktails; limited “social hour” menu featuring appetizers, soup of the day, burger and more $4-$16

SAPPHIRE LOUNGE

901 W. First Ave., 747-1041. Mon. - Sat.5 pm-7 pm; Sun. 5 pm-2 am $3 draft beers $4 premium wells, $5 house wines; $5 flatbreads

SARANAC PUBLIC HOUSE

21 W. Main Ave., 473-9455 Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm; Sat. 2 pm-5 pm; Sun. 11 am-10 pm $1 off beer, house wine and wells, $2 domestic bottles; $5 appetizers including hummus

plate, chicken quesadilla, pretzel and more

SATELLITE DINER

425 W. Sprague Ave., 624-3952 Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-8 pm $1 off beer, wine and cocktails

SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS

117 N. Howard St., 459-1190 Mon.-Sat. 3 pm-6 pm $3 bottled beer, $5 house wine; $6 bowl of soup and bread

FIND THE HAPPY HOUR NEAREST YOU.

SPENCER’S FOR STEAKS & CHOPS

322 N. Spokane Falls Ct., 7442372 Daily 4 pm-6 pm $3 Bud Lights, $4 wine, $5 well drinks, $7 well martinis; Half-off bar food

STACKS AT STEAM PLANT

159 S. Lincoln St., 777-3900 Mon.-Thur. 3 pm-6 pm $3 pints, $11 pitchers, $4 seasonal beers and stouts, $5 house wine, well drinks; Half-off appetizers Fri., Sat. 3 pm-6 pm, 10 pm-11 pm $3 pints, $11 pitchers, $4 seasonal beers and stouts, $5 house wine, well drinks Sun. 3 pm-11 pm In pub only: $3 pints, $11 pitchers, $4 seasonal beers and stouts, $5 house wine, well drinks; Half-off appetizers

STEELHEAD BAR & GRILLE

218 N. Howard St., 747-1303 Daily 3 pm-6 pm; Mon.-Thur. 9 pm-11:30 pm; Sun. 11 am-12 am $5 cocktails, $3.50 Blue Moon, Bud Light, Coors Light, Kokanee pints, $6 Blue Moon, Bud Light, Coors Light, or Kokanee schooners; $6 select appetizers

TAMARACK PUBLIC HOUSE

912 W. Sprague, 315-4846 Daily 2 pm-4 pm $5 dessert and coffee specials Daily 4 pm-6 pm $2 off focaccia pizzas, tap beer and house wine

TWIGS BISTRO

808 W. Main Ave., 232-3376 Daily 3 pm-6 pm; Daily 9 pm-11 pm $6 specialty martinis, $5-$7 wine, $3.50 Coors Light, $4 Twigs beer; $5-$7 appetizer menu

UNDERGROUND 15

15 S. Howard ST., 868-0358 Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-7 pm $1 off drafts, $1 off well drinks

Food and Drink Specials • Times • Locations

INLANDER.COM/DRINKSPOTTER APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 39


Happy Hour at The Cellar

HapPy hours

Downtown Spokane continued... VERACI PIZZA

1333 W. Summit Pkwy., 389-0029 Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-5 pm $3 draft beers, $1 off house Merlot and Pinot grigio; $1 off slices, half-off focaccia platter

The Inland ’s est Northw ONLY vice Self-Ser tem s Wine Sy

THE VIKING BAR & GRILL

HALF PIZZAS $6 MUSHROOM FLATBREAD CAPRICCIOSA PIZZA PROSCIUTTO PIZZA DOLCE PICCANTE PIZZA APPETIZER SPECIALS $6 SOCKEYE SALMON CAKES (3) BACON WRAPPED DATES (4) CRISPY BRUSSELS SPROUTS HALF POUND ANGEL WINGS CHIPS AND FISH DIP DRINK SPECIALS $5 GLASS WINE $4 DRAFTS $5 COCKTAILS/MARTINIS

317 SHERMAN | CDA

1221 N. Stevens St., 315-4547 Daily 2 pm-6 pm $1 off craft beers, $2.50 domestics, $3 well drinks; $5 appetizer menu

VOLSTEAD ACT

12 N. Post St., 869-2242 Mon.-Sat. 3 pm-7 pm $2 off seasonal specialty cocktails, $5 house wine, $4 draft beer, $5 well drinks, $3 domestic bottles Mon.-Sat. 12 am-2 am $3 drafts and domestic bottles, $4 Fireball, $5 well drinks Sun. 5 pm-2 am $3 draft and domestic beer, $4 house wine, $5 well drinks and $7 seasonal craft cocktails

THE WANDERING TABLE 1242 W. Summit Pkwy., 443-4410 Daily 3 pm-5 pm; Daily 9 pm-10:30 pm $4 house wine, $3 draft beers, $2.50 bottled beer, $5 well drinks; $1-$3 assorted appetizers

THE WAVE

525 W. First Ave., 747-2023 Tue. 5:30 pm-10 pm 25% off entire tab for all service industry workers Thur. 10 pm-2 am; Mon.-Sat. 3:30 pm-5:30 pm; Fri., Sat. 10 pm-2 am

40 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

CAMERA READY

$4 house wine, $2 off all signature drinks, $3 draught beer, $3-4 hot saki carafes; 1/2 off sushi, and other discounted menu items

WHISK

17 W. Main Daily 5 pm-7 pm $1 off beers, $5 Pendleton

WILD DAWGS

102 N. Howard St., 255-3688 Mon.-Sat.3:30 pm-6:30 pm; Sun. 10 am-5 pm $2.50 bottled beer, $3 drafts, $5 you-call-it on liquor

WILD SAGE AMERICAN BISTRO

916 W. Second Ave., 456-7575. Mon.-Thur. 4 pm-5 pm $4.50 draft beer, $4 red and white wine; $3 off all entrees and appetizers

ZOLA

22 W. Main, 624-2416 Mon.-Sat. 4 pm-7 pm; Sun. 4 pm-2 am $2 Bud Light/Coors Light pints, $4 well cocktails, $4 house wine; $6 tacos, $7 Kobe beef burger, $7 mac and cheese, $5 pork sliders, $5 fries, $8 hummus and tzatziti

Spokane, South Hill ANTHONY’S BEACH CAFE

2912 E. Palouse Hwy., 448-0668 Daily 2 pm-5 pm $5 grande draft beers,

$5 cocktails, $5 wine; $5 bar burger, $5 appetizer options, $1 shrimp shooter, prawn dog, oyster shooter

BRICK CITY PIZZA

2013 E. 29th Ave., 413-1541 Daily 3 pm-6 pm $3.50 beers, $2.50 bottles, $5 martinis; $5 12-inch pizzas, $1 off salads

FAMOUS ED’S

2911 E. 57th Ave., 290-5080 Daily 3 pm-4 pm $1 domestic pints, $2 craft pints, $2 wines, $2.75 wells drinks Daily 4 pm-6 pm; Daily 10 pm-2 am 20-ounce beers for price of 16-ouncers, $4 house wines Sat., Sun. 8 am-12 pm $2 red beers, mimosas and Bloody Marys

FLAMIN JOE’S

2620 E. 29th Ave., 241-3843 Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm; Fri.-Sun. 9 pm-11:30 pm $3 drafts, well drinks, Fireball shots, $5 Long Island ice tea, $2 Coors Light 16-ouncers, $5 24-ounce Corona and Blue Moon; $3 to $8.50 food specials

GINGER ASIAN BISTRO

1228 S. Grand Blvd., 315-5201 Tue.-Sun. 3 pm-5 pm Half-off all food and drinks

THE HOP SHOP

3803 S. Grand Blvd., 747-9700 Mon. 5 pm-11 pm $3 pints Sun. 5 pm-11 pm $1 off beer and wine


beer

Craft breweries like Perry Street Brewing host special beer nights. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

CRAFTING A

HAPPY NIGHT OUT

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or many establishments, happy hour is a chance to move vast amounts of mass-produced beers. While there’s nothing wrong with that, there are other options. The craft breweries and area bars that serve local product are no strangers to providing great deals at happy hour. No-Li Brewhouse is a pioneer of the Inland Northwest craft-brewing scene, and every night at the Gonzaga-area pub’s happy hour, they take $1 off a pint or $2 off a pitcher of their award-winning beers like the Born & Raised IPA or Mosh Pit Tart Cherry Ale. On Sundays, No-Li fans can get a growler filled for $3 off all day long. At east Spokane’s Iron Goat Brewing, a mere $10 on Tuesdays lets beer lovers fill a growler with Goatmeal Stout, Head Butt IPA or any beers available on tap. Twelve String Brewing Co. offers up $10 growler fills of its Drop D Stout, Archtop Amber and assorted other styles every Tuesday at its Spokane Valley tasting room. If you drop by on a Monday and buy a pint, Twelve String will buy you some pizza to go with it. Perry Street Brewing takes a dollar off every pint on Tuesday nights, and has $10 growler fills all day Sunday. Downtown, Steam Plant Brewing Co. offers a killer historic location and happy hour all day on Sundays, in addition to daily deals from 3 to 6 pm on Big Brick Brown Ale, Huckleberry Harvest Ale and the like. Beyond the breweries, plenty of area spots have taps dedicated to craft goodness — and great deals to go with them. At Enoteca in Post Falls, 11 taps are dedicated to craft brews, and on Monday nights, members of their Beer & Wine of the Month Club get them buy-one, get-one-free. Geno’s on Hamilton Street hosts a Keep the Pint night every Tuesday, when a different brewery offers deals, and you get to keep the glass. And the Garland District’s Bon Bon has craft brews on tap and offers $1 off all beer during its nightly happy hours, and all day Sunday. — DAN NAILEN

32 Craft Beers on Tap • Hand Crafted Cocktails Farm to Table Focused Menu • Wild Salmon & Stuffed Vegan Roast coexist in harmony at the gastropub Located in restored historic building

HAPPY HOUR 4pm - 6pm $1 off Starters $2 off Focaccia Pizzas $2 off Draft Beers 912 W. Sprague | Spokane | 509.315.4846 APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 41


HapPy hours HUGO’S ON THE HILL

FIREBALL

$3.50 The Swinging Doors Happy Hour: Mon-Fri, 3 pm-6 pm

3023 E. 28th Ave., 535-2961 Mon., Wed., Thur. 3:30 pm-6 pm; Mon., Wed., Thur. 9:30 pm-2 am; Tue. 3:30 pm-2 am; Fri. 1:30 pm-6 pm; Fri. 10:30 pm-2 am; Sat. 10:30 pm-2 am; Sun. 6 pm-2 am $3 pints, $3.50 14 Hands wine, $6 martinis; Half-off starter plates

LAGUNA CAFÉ

4304 S. Regal St., 448-0887. Daily 4 pm-6 pm Half-off select beer and wine; Half-off appetizers

THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE

1004 S. Perry St., 315-9531 Mon. - Fri. 3 pm-6 pm; Sun. 11 am-2 am $1 off craft beers, wines and spirits; Menu specials

LINDAMAN’S

1235 S. Grand Blvd., 838-3000 Mon.-Sat.3 pm-6 pm $2 beers, $5 house wine, $5 well drinks, $2 off spirits board

LUNA

5620 S. Perry St., 448-2383 Daily 4 pm-6 pm $2 off cocktails, $1 off beer, $5 wine specials; $4 sliders, $7 frites, $6 Margherita pizza, $6 pepperoni pizza, $5 cheese du jour

MACKENZIE RIVER PIZZA CO.

2910 E. 57th Ave., 315-9466 Daily 2 pm-5 pm; Mon.- Sun. 8 pm-10 pm; Daily 8 pm-10 pm $2 well drinks, $4 you-call-it, $6 top shelf liquor, $3.50 craft pints, $1 off wine; $0.75 wings, $6-$8.50 other appetizers including pretzel sliders, fried raviolis, pretzels, chili cheese fries

MAGGIE’S SOUTH HILL GRILL

2808 E. 29th Ave., 536-4745 Mon.-Thur. 3 pm-5 pm $1 off beer, $2 off wine; Halfoff appetizers

MANITO TAP HOUSE

3011 S. Grand Blvd., 279-2671 Mon.-Thur. 9 pm-11 pm; Mon.Thur. 3 pm-6 pm; Fri., Sat. 10 pm-12 am; Sun. 11 am-11 pm $1 of glasses of beer, $1 off wine, $3 pitchers, $3 bottles of wine; 25% off appetizers

MORTY’S TAP AND GRILLE

5517 S. Regal St., 443-9123 Daily 10 am-6 pm $3 draft beer, $3 Columbia Crest wine, $3 Lauders Scotch, Wisers, Skyy, Seagrams gin, Bacardi

42 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

Spokane, South Hill

PARK INN

107 W. Ninth Ave., 747-4425 Mon.-Fri. 5 pm-6pm $2.25 Domestic pints

PRESS

909 S. Grand Blvd., 747-7737 Daily 3 pm-7 pm; Daily 11 pm-2 am $1 off craft drafts, $1 off house Merlot, Cabernet, and Chardonnay, $1 off well drinks

THE SHOP

924 S. Perry St., 534-1647 Mon., Tue., Wed., Fri.-Sun. 5 pm-7 pm $3 pints, $5 wine Thur. 7 am-9 pm $3 pints all day

STUDIO K BAR & GRILL

4508 S. Regal St., 534-9317 Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-4 pm $2 domestic drafts, $3 micro drafts Daily 4 pm-7 pm $3.25 well cocktails, $2.75 domestic drafts

TWIGS BISTRO

4320 S. Regal St., 443-8000 Daily 3 pm-6 pm; 9 pm-12 am $6 specialty martinis, $5-$7 wine, $3.50 Coors Light, $4 Twigs beer; $5-$7 appetizer menu

WADDELL’S NEIGHBORHOOD PUB & GRILLE

4318 S. Regal St., 443-6500 Mon.-Fri. 2 pm-5 pm $2.75 domestic beers, $3.75 craft beers, $4 house wine

Spokane, East BUDGE BROTHERS BREWERY

continued...

beers, $5 glasses of Clover Label red or white wine; $4$13 light fare menu including shrimp and polenta, smoked salmon spread, duck confit scramble, salads and more

GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES

1414 N. Hamilton St., 368-9087 Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-6 pm; Mon.-Fri. 9 pm-12 am; Sun. 12 pm-12 am $4 drafts, $2.25 domestic bottles, $3.50 well drinks, $1 off wine; half-off pesto and cheese bread, chips and salsa, french fries, garlic fries

NO-LI BREWHOUSE

1003 E. Trent Ave., 242-2739 Daily 4 pm-6 pm $1 off pints, $2 off pitchers; $2 off appetizers

RINCON TAPATIO

1212 N. Hamilton St., 473-9583 Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $2 domestic beers, $3 Mexican beers, $5 margaritas, $6 flavored margaritas, $4 well drinks, $4 sangria; $6-$7.50 appetizers

THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE

13921 E. Trent Ave., 443-3796 Mon.-Fri. 2 pm-6 pm $1.50 domestic pints

North Spokane ACE’S CASINO

6301 N. Division St., 892-5242 Daily 4 pm-6 pm $0.50 off all drinks

AREA 51 TAPHOUSE (AT THE ONION)

2018 E. Riverside Ave., 426-3340 Wed. 4 pm-9 PM $3 pints of everything, select $5 growler fills

7522 N. Division, 482-6100 Mon.-Fri. 3pm -6pm $1 off pints, bottles and cans, daily drink specials; $2 off wine specials on Wednesdays; Half-off appetizers

CHAIRS PUBLIC HOUSE

BIRDY’S SPORTS BAR

1305 N. Hamilton St., 381-0909 Daily 3 pm-6 pm; Mon.-Thur., Sun. 9 pm-10 pm; Fri., Sat. 9 pm-12 am Half-off appetizers

CHECKERBOARD BAR

1716 E. Sprague Ave., 535-4007 Mon.-Sat. 4 pm-6 pm $5 pitchers, $1.50 PBR; discounted appetizers

CLOVER

913 E. Sharp Ave., 487-2937 Daily 3 pm-5 pm $6 cocktails, $4 draft beers, $3 12-String Brewing Co,

12908 N. Hwy. 395, 863-9572 Mon.-Fri. 1 pm-6 pm $2.75 domestic pints, $2 tall cans, $3 house wine, $3 well drinks, $4.75 signiture presses; $3.50-$8.50 appetizers

BON BON

926 W. Garland Ave., 413-1745 Mon.-Thur. 4 pm-7 pm; Sun. 4 pm-12 am $5 classic cocktails, $1 off beer and wine, $5 buffalo chicken dip, shrimp tacos, black bean sliders, stuffed mushrooms and more.


cheap

IT JUST ADDS UP… Clover’s classic cocktails + 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm daily, 10:00 pm - close Fri & Sat + our spacious patio + you & your friends _____________________________ = HAPPY HOUR

913 East Sharp Avenue, Spokane WA 99202 (509) 487-2937 cloverspokane.com

All drafts, even Pipeline Porter (above), are $2 until 9pm on Fridays at Mootsy’s.

SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

CRAZY CHEAP DRINKING W

e probably shouldn’t be telling you about these Spokane happy hour deals. They aren’t free, but they’re damn close, and it took us some time to discover them. So use this information wisely. First up, it makes sense that Mootsy’s is one of the country’s biggest sellers of PBR (owner Daniel Sanchez says they ranked No. 33 nationally in 2014); they sell it for $1 every Wednesday and Sunday from 2 pm to 2 am. In addition, there’s a $2 draft special every Friday until 9 pm. Moving on to Pacific Avenue Pizza, purveyors of the best (and only) New York-style pizza in Browne’s Addition: Beat the crowds and show up early on Tuesdays for a stellar deal of $2 drafts and $2 slices. That’s $10 for two people to share three slices and a couple of beers. At Revolver, a bar and lounge squeezed in between other college hot spots Fast Eddie’s and Borracho Tacos & Tequileria on the eastern edge of downtown, you’ll want to keep Thursdays in mind. That’s the day all domestic beer is $1, a price that makes it worth hanging out with the barely 21 and over. The servers at Famous Ed’s on the upper South Hill always know when it’s “prime time” — people start pouring into the bar. Every Monday through Friday, the family restaurant offers insane deals from 3 to 4 pm: $1 for a domestic pint, $2 for micro pints, $2 for house wine, and $2.25 for well drinks. Fridays are especially busy, so arrive early. Also boasting an hour of cheap drinking is Monterey Café. Every day, the downtown karaoke spot boasts a “power hour” from 8 to 9 pm, featuring $1 Coors Light cans, $1 Fireball shots and $3 Long Island iced teas, all of which are sure to make your singing sound even better… at least to your own ears. — LAURA JOHNSON

Happy hour everyday 3-6 / $2 Modelo Drafts / $5 Milagro Margaritas / $3 Chips & Queso

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 43


HapPy hours North Spokane continued...

BROWN DERBY TAVERN

4-6 Monday thru Friday & All Day Sunday

808 W. Garland Ave., 327-5742. Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-6 pm $0.50 off all draft beers

DAS STEIN HAUS

44 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

3022 N. Division St., 325-7443. Daily 3 pm-6 pm $1 off well drinks, $0.50 off wine and beer; Discounted appetizers

tea, $2 Coors Light 16-ounce beers, $5 24-ounce Corona and Blue Moon; $3 to $8.50 food specials

GARLAND AVENUE DRINKERY

828 W. Garland Ave., 230-2064. Daily 4 pm-6 pm $2 domestic beers, $2.50 well drinks

1812 W. Francis Ave., 326-2214. Daily 4 pm-7 pm $3 well drinks, $0.50 off draft beers, $4 house wine; $5 brat sampler, pretzel schnitzel, hot wings, 2 orders of pretzel sticks

FIVE MILE HEIGHTS PIZZA PARLOR

DOWNRIVER GRILL

331 W. Hastings Ave, 466-5354. Mon.-Sat.11 am-6 pm; Sun. 11 am-2 pm $0.50 off all drinks, $3 well drinks, $2 domestic drafts; $5.50-$6.95 appetizers

9265 N. Nevada St., 465-1880. Daily 2 pm-6 pm; Daily 9 pm-11 pm $4 well drinks, $3.75 domestics, $4.25 craft beers, $4 house wine, $5.95 icy drinks, $5.50 margaritas, $5.95 Long Island iced tea

FLAMIN’ JOE’S

LITZ’S BAR & GRILL

3315 W. Northwest Blvd., 323-1600. Tue., Wed., Thur., Sun. 3 pm-6 pm; Fri., Sat. 3 pm-5 pm $1 off draft beer, $4 No-Li Bowl and Pitcher, $4 house wine, $19 bottles of DRG Relentless Red, $6-$8 signature cocktails; $4-$9 select appetizers and slider trios

www.wedonthaveone.com | (509) 368-9087

FERRARO’S NORTH

SUGGESTIONS?

6409 N. Maple St., 328-4764. Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $2 off pitchers; Half-off appetizers

FIZZIE MULLIGANS

7015 N. Division, 465-5052 Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm; Fri. - Sun. 9 pm-11:30 pm $3 drafts, well drinks, Fireball shots, $5 Long Island ice

Is a great happy hour special missing from our list? Please tell us: happyhour@inlander.com.

HOP JACK’S

204 E. Ermina Ave., 327-7092. Mon. 11 am-2 am; Tue.-Sat. 4 pm-7 pm; Sun. 10 am-2 am $3.25 domestic drafts and bottles, $8.50 pitchers


AN ODE TO

THE TALL CAN

T

here’s a tactile gratification that comes from just holding a 16-ounce can of beer in your hand after a long day. It’s cold, dripping with perspiration and just heavy enough to let you know that there’s more beer in there than your typical aluminum vessel. The tall can (or “tallboy,” as the less gender-sensitive folks might call it) isn’t just a beer, it’s a beverage unto itself. The beer inside, however, is not fancy. Occasionally, you’ll see the craft tall can, such as Orlison Brewing Co Co.’s excellent lagers available in stores by the pint, but by and large, the tall can delivers your beer cheaply and conveniently, without an eye necessarily on quality. Our local bars know there’s a desire for this specially sized beer, so don’t fret. “I don’t know what it is, but I love tall cans. With [a 12-ouncer] I’m like, ‘Where the rest of my beer?’” says Kitty Kane, owner of nYne Bar & Bistro in downtown Spokane, which carries the holy triumvirate of PBR, Olympia and Rainier (as well as Guinness) in 16-ouncers. In the hardworking neighborhood between West Central, the Spokane County Courthouse and Kendall Yards, you can find a PBR tall can stacked inconspicuously between other bottles and cans at The Backyard Public House, where it’s just $2.50 at any hour. You can also get either PBR or Rainier at Geno’s near the Gonzaga campus. While the PBR can is the standard-bearer, our search through the bar menus of the Inland Northwest also found places serving up Rolling Rock, Busch and other lesser-than-marquee brands, so choices abound. You won’t look fancy holding one of these in your hands, but that hasn’t stopped spots with high-end culinary reputations from keeping cans on stock. You can order Rainier to accompany fabulous food at places like Ruins, Casper Fry and Durkin’s Liquor Bar without having to apologize to anyone. — MIKE BOOKEY

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 45


HapPy hours

We’ll give you a Happy Ending to a long hard day

North Spokane continued...

MACKENZIE RIVER PIZZA CO.

9225 N. Nevada St., 413-1043. Daily 2 pm-5 pm; Daily 8 pm-10 pm $2 well drinks, $4 you-call-it, $6 top shelf liquor, $3.50 craft pints, $1 off wine; $0.75 wings; $6-$8.50 other appetizers including pretzel sliders, fried raviolis, pretzels, chili cheese fries

MOEZY INN

2723 N. Monroe St., 326-7380. Daily 10 am-12 pm; Daily 7 pm-9 pm $0.25 off beers (cans, drafts or bottles)

DRY FLY

MUSTARD SEED

509-489-2112 | DRYFLYDISTILLING.COM 1003 E. TRENT # 200 | SPOKANE, WA 99202

O’DOHERTY’S IRISH GRILLE

[DRINK RESPONSIBLY]

VODKA | GIN | WHISKEY | BOURBON

4750 N. Division St., 483-1500. Mon.-Sat. 3 pm-6 pm $3 draft pints and house wines, $3.50 well drinks; $2.50 small bites (bar only) Sun. 3 pm-6 pm $2.50 small bites (entire restaurant)

10208 N. Division St., 465-3511. Daily 4 pm-6 pm Half-off first drink; $1 off appetizers

good liquor great eats

THE ONION

7522 N. Division, 482-6100. Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $1 off pints, bottles and cans, daily drink specials; $2 off wine specials on Wednesdays; Half-off appetizers

PJ’S BAR & GRILL

1717 N. Monroe St., 328-2153. Daily 3 pm-7 pm $2.50 well drinks, $2.50 16oz beers

POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE

101 E. Hastings Road, 413-1834. Mon.-Fri. 11 am-5 pm; Mon.-Fri. 9 pm-12 am; Sat. 11 am-3 pm; Sat. 9 pm-12 am; Sun. 8 am-10 pm $1 off bottled beers, draft beers, well drinks and house wines

PROSPECTORS

12611 N. Division St., 467-6177. Daily 3 pm-6 pm $5 house wine, Bloody Mary, house amber ale, margarita and Rum runner; $5 appetizer menu including sliders, fries, pizzas and more

THE SCREAMING YAK

118 W. Francis Ave., 464-3641. Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $5.55 quesadilla, cheese sticks, Korean strips, loaded cheese fries, jalapeno and artichoke dip, Daily 11 am-6 pm $3 Jack Daniels, Blue Moon, domestic drafts and bottles, $4 Jack’d Up Ice Tea, $4 Downhome Punch

THE STAR RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

1329 N. Hamilton St., 487-1530. Daily 3 pm-6 pm $0.50 off well drinks

THE SWINGING DOORS

1018 W. Francis Ave., 326-6794. Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $3.50 well drinks and house wine, $3.50 Fireball, $3.25 domestic beers, $1 off craft beers; $2 off appetizers

THAI BAMBOO

5406 N. Division St., 777-8424. Daily 3 pm-6 pm; Fri., Sat. 9 pm-10 pm $3 house wine, $4 craft pints, $3 domestics, $5 specialty drinks; $2-$7 appetizers

TOMATO STREET

6220 N. Division, 484-4500. Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-6 pm

1924 W. Pacific Ave • Browne’s Addition • Spokane • 315-9934 46 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

Free pizza, $1 off daily drink specials; half off appetizers Daily 9 pm-11 pm $1 off daily drink specials; Half-off appetizers

TONICX

6314 N. Ash St., 324-6453 Mon.-Sat.2 pm-6 pm; Sun. 11 am-2 am $1 off wells, $1 off drafts; $1 off nachos

TWIGS BISTRO

401 E. Farwell Rd., 465-8794. Daily 3 pm-6 pm; Daily 9 pm-11 pm $6 specialty martinis, $5-$7 wine, $3.50 Coors Light, $4 Twigs beer; $5-$7 appetizer menu

WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON

1914 N. Monroe St., 474-9040. Mon.-Sat. 2 pm-5 pm $1.50 Miller Lite, Coors, PBR cans, $3.50 well drinks, $4 wine; $5 for all food items Sun. 12 pm-2 am $1.50 Miller Lite, Coors, PBR cans, $3.50 well drinks, $4 wine; $5 for all food items

West Spokane, Airway Heights, Cheney BUCKHORN INN

13311 W. Sunset Hwy.,Airway Heights. 244-3991. Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $4 well drinks, beer specials; Half-off appetizers


e in for com

happy HAPPY hour HOUR

nice

4pm-6pm • wed-sat 1/2 price flatbread $1 off glasses of

Emvy and bridgepress wines

The Davenport Tower’s Safari Room is home to a famous happy hour. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

HAPPY WALLETS O

n a budget? Want to check out some of the region’s more upscale restaurants you’ve heard and read so much about, but thought you could never afford? This may be stating the obvious, but happy hour is the golden hour when it comes to fine dining, even if the menu is more restricted. In the Lake City, happy hour diners can get a sampling of Beverly’s award-winning food at the restaurant’s Lakeview Lounge, on the seventh floor of the Coeur d’Alene Resort tower. Happy hour runs daily from 4 to 6 pm, and again from 9 to 11 pm on Friday and Saturday nights. Specialty cocktails, like Beverly’s classic Idaho Huckleberry Lemon-Drop and the Salted Pear, are $3 off the regular prices of $13 each. And where else can you try escargot for $6 (regular price $12; all appetizers are half-off during happy hour)? Throw in a charcuterie or cheese board ($7 each during happy hour) for the table and everyone’s eating like a king, with a stunning view of the waterfront to boot. Tucked into an unassuming neighborhood on the upper South Hill, Luna is charming in décor and eclectic in flavor. In the warmer months, sitting on the enclosed, tent-covered patio in back is a must. There, enjoy daily happy hour from 4 to 6 pm, featuring $4 steak sliders, $6 mini pizzas and sharable frites ($7) flavored with parsley, garlic and shallots. Add a $5 glass of wine or a $2-off cocktail like the Ginger Smash, and it’ll be an evening of local eating to remember. Downtown, the Davenport Hotel Tower’s Safari Room is high-class with its animal-print upholstery, palm plants and shiny marble, but its famous happy hour specials — daily from 4 to 6 pm — are more than affordable, and equally beloved by locals and tourists. The Safari Room happy hour offers half off its popular flatbreads, a menu mainstay boasting versions like spicy shrimp, Thai chicken and mushroom fontina. Drinks from the bar — beer, wine and cocktails — are also half-price. Happy hour at Spokane Valley’s swankiest hotel bar, Max at Mirabeau, is offered daily from 3 to 6 pm, then again from 9 pm to close. While the restaurant offers half-off select appetizers as a regular special — including beef satay, a savory hummus platter and a Brie plate — each day of the week offers a rotating special. At Max, it’s not Taco Tuesday, but rather Tofu Tuesday, with $5 tofu sliders and $5 sake shots. Martini Friday means $2 off signature martinis and the traditional Wine Wednesday brings a half-price bottle night. Happy hour at any upscale restaurant that typically sells cocktails for more than $10 is an ideal time to test the waters of what may be your next special-occasion dining splurge. — CHEY SCOTT

39 west pacific • 838-7815 wed - thurs 3-7 • friday 12-9 • Saturday 12-6

LIVE MUSIC ON first FRIDAY

rised that our You’ll be surp n inners are eve d d n a s e h c n lu r drinks better than ou

Best appetizers

best happy hour

620 N. Spokane St. • Post Falls • 208.777.2102 HOURS: Sun - Thurs: 11am-10pm • Fri-Sat: 11am-11pm Go to www.whitehousegrill.com to see more.

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 47


HapPy hours West Spokane, Airway Heights, Cheney continued...

IMPULSE AT NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO

100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights 242-7000 Daily 6 pm-8 pm $3 domestic drafts, $4 well drinks, $4 house wines; $5 appetizers

NORTHERN QUEST CASINO (PROPERTY WIDE)

100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights. 242-7000 Mon. 10 am-2 am; Tue., Wed., Thur., Sun. 4 pm-6 pm $1 off well drinks, domestic drafts, house wine; $2 hot dogs in Turf Club

MASSELOW’S AT NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO

100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights 481-6020 Mon.-Sat. 4 pm-6 pm; Sun. 5 pm-9 pm 20% off appetizers

REMINGTON’S RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

8909 W. Airport Dr, 838-5211 Wed.-Sat. 4 pm-6 pm $3 drafts, $3 well drinks, $3 house wine; Second appetizer for a penny, 5-7 pm

WILD BILL’S LONGBAR

405 First St., Cheney, 235-4758 Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $0.50 off drafts, $1 off wells, $2 domestic bottles; $1 tacos on Tuesdays

ZENTROPA PIZZERIA & PUB

122 College Ave., Cheney 235-4338 Mon.-Fri. 2 pm-4 pm; Sun. 12 pm-8 pm $2 pints, $3 wine; $2 slices

Spokane Valley AMBROSIA BISTRO

9211 E. Montgomery Ave., 928-3222 Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm; Sat. 11 am-6 pm; Sun. 4 pm-6 pm $1 off beer and well drinks, $1 off wine, $2 off cocktails, $4 select wines; $3 off all starters

BLACK DIAMOND

9614 E. Sprague Ave., 891-8357 Mon.-Fri. 2 pm-6 pm $2 PBR pints, $3 select craft pints, $4 Absolut and OJ/ grapefruit; $5 portabello mushroom, flatbreads, bacon-wrapped sausage

BOLO’S

116 S. Best Rd., 891-8995 Mon.-Fri. 3:30 pm-7 pm $0.50 off domestic beers and well drinks, $1.75 drafts on Wednesdays

THE BRASS FAUCET BAR & GRILL 12525 E. Sprague Ave., 926-0293 Daily 3 pm-7 pm $2.50 domestic beers, $3.25 well drinks

CHARLIE P’S

8120 E. Sprague Ave., 928-8600 Daily 3 pm-5 pm $2 well drinks, $2.50 domestics

DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS

6412 E. Trent Ave., 535-9309. Mon.-Thur. 3 pm-6 pm; Fri. 3 pm-5 pm $3 well drinks, $2.50 domestics

DARCY’S RESTAURANT & SPIRITS

10502 E. Sprague, 891-0773. Daily 3 pm-7 pm; Daily 3 pm-7 pm $0.50 off well drinks, $0.50 off domestics; $5 food menu

DAVE’S BAR & GRILL

12124 E. Sprague, 926-9640. Mon.-Fri. 2 pm-4 pm $2.75 domestic drafts, cans and bottles, $2.75 well drinks, $2.75 wine

FLAMIN JOE’S

11618 E. Sprague Ave, 922-5052. Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm; Fri.-Sun. 9 pm-11:30 pm $3 drafts, well drinks, Fireball shots, $5 Long Island ice tea, $2 Coors Light 16-ounce beersm, $5 24-ounce Corona and Blue Moon; $3 to $8.50 food specials

GOODTYMES BAR & GRILL

9214 E. Mission Ave., 928-1070. Mon.-Fri. 5 pm-6 pm Buy 2 well drinks and domestic drafts and pay half price

HANDLEBARS

12005 E. Trent Ave., 924-3720. Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $2.50 well drinks; Half-price cheese quesadilla, chips & cheese, French fries and cheese sticks

SUGGESTIONS?

Is a great happy hour special missing from our list? Please tell us: happyhour@inlander.com.

48 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015


late

HAPPY HOUR 3PM-6PM Tuesday-Saturday 1 OFF WELLS, PINTS AND GLASSES OF WINE $ 5 APPETIZERS $

Rock City Grill offers drink and food specials aplenty during their late-night happy hour.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

BETTER LATE

THAN THIRSTY

T

he term “happy hour” is most easily traced back to the days of Prohibition, when folks would sneak into a speakeasy and soak up some early evening booze before heading out to dinner at a law-abiding restaurant. Thus, we often consider happy hour an afternoon event, but that’s proving to be some seriously outdated thinking. The late-night happy hour is a surging phenomenon, as bars hope to keep their stools occupied a bit longer with the promise of drink and food discounts. It’s hardly an isolated fad, as evidenced by the wide range of establishments getting happy later into the night. The downtown Spokane location of MacKenzie River Pizza Co. features an eye-catching postdinner happy hour (8-9 pm) offering $2 well drinks and $3.50 pints, as well as an expansive appetizer menu full of the sort of stuff that goes well with a good beer. Staying downtown and moving later into the night, there’s also Steelhead Bar & Grille (9-11:30 pm) where you can get a massive schooner of beer for just $6, as well as discounted cocktails and wine. And if you’re not sure what to eat, Rock City Grill has big and diverse food menu. If you’re on the South Hill, stop into Hugo’s on the Hill after 10:30 pm on Fridays and Saturdays (9:30 on other nights) for $3 pints, $3.50 wine and half-priced appetizers. You can get in on all that while either bowling or trying your hand at one of the card tables. Out in the Valley? Stop by Twigs Bistro (or any Twigs location in the area, actually) and get one of their renowned martinis for just $6, in addition to other specials. Staying in the martini vein, but heading east to Post Falls, The Oval Office at the White House Grill features $5.50 martinis and a robust appetizer menu. This is just the tip of the whiskey-soaked iceberg, friends. Take a look at the accompanying listings for more late-night specials and get used to the new and more flexible meaning of “happy hour.” — MIKE BOOKEY

232 W Sprague • 474-1621 • Nynebar.com •

Serving Spokane for Over 76 Years!

HAPPY HOUR MON - FRI 5pm-6pm $2.25 Domestic Pints

All of our food is special and makes you happy. Park Plaza on the South Hill ∙ W. 107 9th Ave ∙ 509-624-8111 APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 49


Wander in for Happy Hour 3pm - 5pm and 9pm - Close

$4 SELECT RED AND WHITE BY THE GLASS • $5 WELL DRINKS $3 DRAFT OF THE DAY • $2.50 BOTTLED BEER OF THE DAY

BITES DEVILED EGGS WITH MAPLE BACON FILLING | $1 EA

PEPPER CHIPS WITH HONEY CREAM CHEESE DIP | $3

NW OYSTERS WITH LEMON TOBASCO MIGONETTE | $1.50 EA

TABLE JACKS SALTED CARAMEL POPCORN, PORK BELLY, NUTS | $2.50

BLOODY MARY OYSTER SHOOTER | $2 EA

BULGOGI OR FISH TACO | $2

HapPy hours Spokane valley continued...

HOP JACK’S

14700 E. Indiana Ave., 241-3687. Daily 2 pm-6 pm; Daily 2 pm-6 pm $4 well drinks, $3.75 domestics, $4.25 craft beers, $4 house wine, $5.95 icy drinks, $5.50 margaritas, $5.95 Long Island iced tea

ICHABOD’S EAST

12116 E. Sprague Ave., 922-8801. Daily 11 am-6 pm; Daily 10 pm-11 pm $2.50 domestics, $2.50 well drinks, $3.50 Fireball, $4.50 Jagermeister, $5.50 Crown Royal

JACKSON HOLE BAR & GRILL

O’DOHERTY’S IRISH PUB & BBQ

MAMA’S THAIWAY LOUNGE

THE REF SPORTS BAR

122 S. Bowdish Rd., 926-3876. Daily 3 pm-7 pm $3.75 well drinks, $2.50 domestics

5908 E. Broadway Ave., 534-3040. Mon.-Sat. 4 pm-8 pm $2 canned beer, $3 Fireball

MAX AT MIRABEAU

1100 N. Sullivan Rd., 922-6252. Daily 3 pm-6 pm; Mon.-Thur. 9 pm-1 am; Fri., Sat. 9 pm-2 am; Sun. 9 pm-12 am Daily drink specials, $2 off signature martinis; Select appetizers $3.45-$7.45, including sliders, beef satay, Brie plate; half-off selected regular menu appetizers

11723 E. Sprague, 924-2578. Daily 4 pm-6 pm Half-off first drink; $1 off appetizers 14208 E. Sprague Ave., 315-9637. Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-6 pm $4 Fireball, $3 well drinks, $1 off pints; Two for $8 appetizers

THE ROADHOUSE

20 N. Raymond Rd., 413-1894. Daily 4 pm-7 pm $1 PBR pints, $2.50 well drinks $2 domestic bottles

TOP OF INDIA

11114 E. Sprague, 927-0500. Daily 5 pm-7 pm $2 well drinks

AT KENDALL YARDS

LOCALLY OWNED 1242 W SUMMIT PKWY • 509-443-4410 • THEWANDERINGTABLE.COM

DRG RELENTLESS RED

$19/bottle Downriver Grill Tue., Wed., Thur., Sun. 3 pm-6 pm; Fri-Sat 3pm- 5pm

50 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015


TWIGS BISTRO

14728 E. Indiana Ave., 290-5636 Daily 3 pm-6 pm; Daily 9 pm-11 pm $6 specialty martinis, $5-$7 wine, $3.50 Coors Light, $4 Twigs beer; $5-$7 appetizer menu

Coeur d’Alene/ Post Falls

VINTAGE VINES

315 MARTINIS & TAPAS

106 N. Evergreen Rd., 227-9463 Daily 3 pm-6 pm $1 off draft beer, $1 off regular glass pours, $5 rotating glass pour special, half-off capage and corkage fees

Liberty Lake BARLOWS AT LIBERTY LAKE

1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd., 924-1446 Mon.-Thur. 3 pm-6 pm $5 wine of the day, $3.50 craft pints, $4.50 22-ounce crafts, $2.50 domestic pints, $3.50 22-ounce domestics, $1 off all other drinks; $2.99-$6.99 appetizer menu, including pulled pork nachos, buffalo chicken tenders, sliders, fish tacos and more

CORKHOUSE

1400 N. Meadowwood Ln., 922-4210. Mon.-Sat. 3 pm-5 pm $2 off draft and bottled beer, well drinks and selected wines; $2 off appetizers and burger

EAU DE VIE

21718 E. Mission Ave., 926-5900. Tue.-Sat. 3:30 pm-5:30 pm $2 off glasses of wine, $2 off beer; 25% off appetizers

PALENQUE MEXICAN RESTAURANT

1102 N. Liberty Lake Rd., 928-3112. Daily 3 pm-6 pm $2 drafts (including Mexican beers), $2 well drinks

TRUE LEGENDS GRILL

1803 N. Harvard Rd., 892-3077. Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $3 domestic beers, $3.25 well drinks; $5 selected appetizers

315 Wallace Ave., 208-667-9660. Tue.-Sat. 3:15 pm-5:30 pm $2 off martinis, wines by the glass; $2 off tapas

BARDENAY RESTAURANT & DISTILLERY

1710 W. Riverstone Dr., 208-765-1540 Daily 4 pm-6 pm $4 hummus plate, $2 fries, $4 chips and salsa, $2 satays, $6 wings, $4 spinach artichoke dip

BEVERLY’S

115 S. Second St., 208-765-4000 Daily 4 pm-6pm Half-price appetizers, $3 off wine, specialty cocktails, $1 draft beer (Lakeview Lounge only)

BONSAI BISTRO

101 E. Sherman Ave., 208-765-4321 Daily 4 pm-6 pm Main Floor Only: $2 PBR pints ($3 pilsner glass), $3 Kirin pints ($3 pilsner), $3 wine of the day, $3 sake; Discounted appetizers and sushi

CAPONE’S

751 N. 4th St., 208-667-4843 Mon.-Fri. 5 pm-7 pm; Mon.-Thur. 9 pm-11 pm $0.50 off draft beers, $1 off well drinks

CAPONE’S

315 N. Ross Point Rd., 208-457-8020 Mon.-Fri. 5 pm-7 pm; Mon.-Fri. 9 pm-11 pm $0.50 off draft beers, $1 off well drinks

CAPONE’S

9520 N. Government Way, 208-762-5999 Mon.-Fri. 5 pm-7 pm; Mon.-Fri. 9 pm-11 pm $0.50 off draft beers, $1 off well drinks

THE CELLAR

317 E. Sherman Ave., 208-664-9463 Daily 4 pm-6pm 5 glasses of wine, $4 draft beers and $5 cocktails; $6 half pizzas, $6 appetizer specials

CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN

523 Sherman Ave., 208-292-4813 Mon.-Thur. 3 pm-5 pm; Mon.-

Thur. 3 pm-5 pm $1 off appetizers, $1 off drafts

CRICKETS RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR

424 E. Sherman Ave., 208-765-1990. Daily 4 pm-7 pm $1 off draft beers, 2-for-1 well drinks, $5 wine

CRUISERS

6105 W. Seltice Way, 208-773-4706 Daily 4 pm-6 pm $1 off beers, $1 off well drinks, $0.50 off shots; Weekly food specials

EL PATIO

6902 W. Seltice Way, 208-773-2611 Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-6 pm $1 off well drinks, $1 off draft beers

FEDORA PUB & GRILLE

1726 W. Kathleen Ave., 208-765-8888 Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $4 craft pints, $4 house wine; Second appetizer half off Sun. 8 am-10 pm Kids eat free

GOOD TIMES TAVERN 2828 W Seltice Way, 208-777-2694 Daily 4 pm-6 pm $0.50 off beer and wine

GRILLE FROM IPANEMA

601 Front Ave., 208-676-1122 Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-5:30 pm $7.99 includes beer, wine or juice and a skewer

HOGFISH

1920 East Sherman Ave., 208-667-1896 Daily 4 pm-7 pm $0.75-$1.00 off every drink; Food specials from the Guppy

IRON HORSE BAR

407 E. Sherman Ave., 208-667-7314 Wed., Fri. 5 pm-9 pm 2-for-1 cocktails

KELLY’S IRISH PUB

726 N. Fourth St., 208-667-1717 Mon. 4 pm-7 pm $4 Blue Moon pints, $4 Irish Death pints, $15 Irish Death pitchers Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-7 pm $2 PBR, $4.25 Harp, $4.25 IPA, $4.25 Dragon’s Breath Tue. 4 pm-7 pm $4 90 Schillings, $15 90 Schillings pitchers Thur. 4 pm-7 pm $2 PBR pints, $8 PBR pitchers Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-7pm Discounted beer options Fri. 4 pm-7 pm $4.25 20-ounce Guinness

Happy Hour at MAX Bar & Patio Daily 3PM-6PM & 9PM-CLOSE CHOICE SELECTIONS FROM OUR

HAPPY HOUR STARTERS *Available at 1/2 Price During Happy Hours

Bar & Patio Daily 3PM-6PM & 9PM-CLOSE Hummus & Chili Grilled Pita

tahini~chickpea paste, marinated red peppers, roasted garlic

Steamed Manila Clams

lemongrass, kaffir lime leaf, sweet basil, garlic, white wine

Masa Crusted Calamari

cilantro, jalapeños, chipotle garlic aioli

Ahi Tuna Seared Rare

Indian spice, wasabi soy aïoli, ponzu glaze

Flat Top Sliders

boursin cheese, garlic aïoli, roasted red pepper coulis

Chipotle & Ancho Chile Prawn Skewers

broiled, jicama~papaya slaw, mango salsa, crisp taro root – Our Happy Hour Eats Menu features over 19 items! –

HAPPY HOUR DAILY SPECIALS Sunny Sunday

$2 Off Tequila Sunrises, Sunsets & Margaritas Brunch Served 6am till 2pm 1/2 Price Select Bottle Wine

Maxed Out Monday

$3.00 Off “Max” or “Mirabeau” Named Drinks

Tap Beer Tuesday

$2 Off Selected Draft Beer

Wine About Wednesday 1/2 Price Select Bottle Wine Day

Thursday “Ladies Night”

$5 Cosmos, Lemon Drops & Mojitos

Martini Friday

$2.00 Off Signature Martinis All Day

Champagne Saturday

Brunch Served 6am - till 2pm $4 Glass Champagne, Mimosas & Kir Royales

5-Time Epicurean Delight Award

1100 N. Sullivan Rd., Spokane Valley 509.922.6252 • maxatmirabeau.com

Connect with us!

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 51


HapPy hours coeur d’alene /post falls continued...

LAKE VIEW LOUNGE

115 S. Second St., 208-765-4000. Daily 4 pm-6 pm $3 off all wine, $3 off house cocktails, $1 off draft beer; Half off appetizers

MACKENZIE RIVER PIZZA CO.

405 W. Canfield Ave., 208-772-5111 Daily 8 pm-10 pm; Daily 2 pm-5 pm $2 well drinks, $4 you-call-it, $6 top shelf liquor, $3.50 craft pints, $1 off wine; $0.75 wings, $6-$8.50 other appetizers including pretzel sliders, fried raviolis, pretzels, chili cheese fries

MOON TIME

1602 Sherman Ave., 208-667-2331 Thur. 9 pm-11 pm $1 pint night

NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE AT COEUR D’ALENE CASINO

27068 S. Highway 95, 800-523-2464 Daily 3 pm-6 pm $2.50 domestics, $3.50 craft beers, $3.50 house wine, $2.50 well drinks

O’SHAYS IRISH PUB & EATERY

313 Coeur d’Alene Lake Dr., 208-667-4666 Daily 2 pm-7 pm $2.50 domestic beer, $3.50 craft beer

O’MALLEYS SPORTS PUB & GRILL 13742 State Rt. 53, 208-687-5996 Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-6 pm Discounted beers

THE OVAL OFFICE

620 N. Spokane St., 208-777-2102 Daily 3 pm-6 pm; 9 pm-11 pm $5.50 martinis; $5.50 small plates; $7.50 Indian pizza, tacos, clams and more

PADDY’S SPORTS BAR

601 W. Appleway Ave., 208-765-0701 Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-6 pm $2.50 domestic pints, $3.50 craft pints, $10 buckets

ROCKER ROOM

216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave., 208-676-2582 Daily 4 pm-6 pm $1 off all drinks, daily drink specials

52 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

SCRATCH

501 E. Sherman Ave., 208-930-4762 Daily 2:30 pm-5:30 pm Half-off house wine, $2 Coors Light, $3 draft beer, $5 margaritas, $4 mimosas; $5-7 appetizers

SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE

209 E. Lakeside Ave., 208-664-8008 Mon.-Tue., Thur.-Sun. 3 pm-6 pm; Wed. 3 pm-9 pm $1 off specialty martinis, $5 wine, $4 well drinks, $2.50 PBR drafts, $3 Blue Moon, $4 craft beer; $2-$8 appetizers

SLAB INN

800 W. Seltice Way, 208-773-5440 Tue.-Fri. 4 pm-9 pm $2.50 well drinks, $2.50 domestic beers, $5 pitchers, $2 pounders, $2 bottles, $3.50 premium beers, rotating bartender’s specials

THAI BAMBOO

2010 N. Fourth St., 208-667-5300 Daily 3 pm-6 pm $3 wine, $3 beer bottles, $3 champagne, $4 drafts, $4 margaritas, $5 saki-tinis; $2-$7 appetizers

TITO’S ITALIAN GRILL & WINE SHOP

210 E. Sherman Ave., 208-667-2782 Daily 3 pm-6 pm $5 appetizers, $3 well drinks, $4 beers, $5 wine (In bar area only) Daily 8 pm-12 am $5 appetizers, $3 well drinks, $4 beers, $5 wine

TOMATO STREET

221 W. Appleway Ave., 208-667-5000 Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm; Sat., Sun. 11 am-10 pm $1 off draft beer, house wine and well drinks; Half-off selected appetizers

Sandpoint EICHARDT’S

212 Cedar St., 208-263-4005. Thur. 8 pm-2 am $1 pint night

MICKDUFF’S BREWING COMPANY

312 N. First Ave., 208-255-4351. Mon.-Thur., Sun. 3 pm-5:30 pm $3.50 pints, $6 appetizer menu

NEIGHBORHOOD PUB 124 S. Second Ave., 208-597-7499. Mon.-Fri. 4 pm-6 pm $1 off draft beers; Half-off appetizers

SWEET LOU’S

46624 E. Highway 200, 208-264-5999. Daily 4 pm-6 pm $3.50 craft pints, $3 domestic pints, $3.50 house wine, $2.50 well drinks, $2.50 bottled beers; $6.99 appetizer menu

SWEET LOU’S

477272 U.S. 95, 208-263-1381. Daily 4 pm-6 pm $3.50 craft pints, $3 domestic pints, $3.50 house wine, $2.50 well drinks, $2.50 bottled beers; $6.99 appetizer menu

TRINITY AT CITY BEACH 58 Bridge St., 208-255-7558. Daily 4 pm-6 pm $1 off draft beers and well drinks

Moscow/ Pullman BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB

201 S. Main St., Moscow. 208-596-0887. Daily 4 pm-7 pm 2-for-1 draft beers and house wines

THE CORNER CLUB

202 N. Main St., Moscow. 208-882-2915. Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $0.50 off wells, regular cans, premium cans, bottles, pints, and tubs Thur. 6 pm-2 am Half off well drinks, bottles, and cans for ladies Thur. 9 pm-2 am Drink wheel for guys

COUGAR COTTAGE

900 NE Colorado St., 332-1265. Daily 8 pm-9 pm $2 pints, $2 well drinks, $4 double well drinks

MY OFFICE

215 S. Grand Ave., Pullman 334-1202. Mon.-Fri. 3 pm-6 pm $2.50 well drinks, $4.50 double well drinks, $3.50 craft beers; 30% off appetizers and wings


RICO’S

200 E. Main St., Pullman 332-6566. Daily 4:30 pm-6 pm $0.50 off all drinks, $1 off pitchers; Half-price appetizers if you buy a pitcher Daily 10:30 pm-2 am $2 PBR, $3 craft beers; Halfprice select appetizers

SOUTH FORK PUBLIC HOUSE

1680 S. Grand Ave., Pullman. 332-3675. Daily 2 pm-5 pm $3 well drinks, $3 draft beer,

$3 Hogue wine; $3 off all appetizers

SPORTS PAGE TAVERN

165 N. Grand Ave., Pullman 334-6748. Mon. 11 am-12 am; Tue.-Sun. 2 pm-6 pm Discounted draft and bottled beers

STUBBLEFIELDS

600 Colorado St., 334-7900. Mon. 6 pm-2 am $2 shots, $4 double drinks; $5 Everything Burger Tue. 6 pm-2 am

$0.75 tacos, $6 Stubby refills Wed. 6 pm-2 am $3 domestic pints, $4 wings Thur. 6 pm-12 am $4 Long Island iced teas Thur. 6 pm-2 am $4 pulled pork sandwich Fri. 6 pm-12 am $4 sex on the beach Fri. 6 pm-2 am $5 Philly cheesesteak Sat. 6 pm-12 am $4 vodka Rockstars 

SUGGESTIONS?

Is a great happy hour special missing from our list? Please tell us: happyhour@inlander.com.

Come join River City Brewing & Orlison Brewing at the Saranac Public House for a great cause.

Orlison_041615_QtrPg_EW.ai HAPPY HOUR | MON & TUE ALL DAY | WED - SAT 4PM-6PM & 9PM-CLOSE WELL DRINKS $5 | HOUSE WINE $5 | DRAFT BEER $4 | RAIN DROP MARTINI $7

BRASSIERE LEBBE

$2 off Volstead Act Happy Hour: Mon. - Sat.3 pm-7 pm

1009 W. 1st Ave. (next to Scratch Restaurant) :: Spokane 509.456.5656 :: rainspokane.com

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 53


YEAH, IT’S THAT HAPPY. COME LET YOUR HAIR DOWN FOR HAPPY HOUR AT NORTHERN QUEST.

Property-wide

The Lounge at Masselow’s

SUN-THURS, 4-6PM / MON, ALL DAY

MON-SAT, 4-6PM / SUN, ALL DAY

$1 off well drinks, house wines and domestic draft beers $2 hot dogs in Turf Club

20% off appetizers

Impulse DAILY, 6-8PM $3 domestic drafts $4 well drinks and house wines $5 appetizers

54 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

La Rive Spa MON-THURS, 11AM-2PM $20 off all spa services when you mention happy hour. All services include a glass of champagne and full access to spa amenities.* * $100 purchase minimum. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Restrictions apply.


CULTURE | DIGEST

ODDITY GIANT NERD BOOKS

G

Nathan Huston, owner of Giant Nerd Books. BRYCE COLVIN PHOTO

iant Nerd Books isn’t your mom’s bookstore. Walking through the door, the rich, musty scent of the piles upon piles of books hits like a ton of bricks. But there’s something else lingering in the air — something intriguing, dark and mysterious. It’s the overwhelming sense of strangeness that creeps throughout the shop. By the front window, Happy the Alligator shows off his “award-winning smile.” Skulls line some of the shelves and a vintage embalmer sits beside the front counter, a recent addition from a random walk-in. Nathan Huston’s undeniably odd shop has made a name for itself by being the place to go when in need of something a bit peculiar. His project began when he was a boy, “back when dinosaurs walked the earth,” he says. Frequent trips to local yard sales with his father led to the formation of his impressive collection. The trading of a few old books and comics turned into the carefully calculated exchange and trade of the oddities he now

treasures and the start of Giant Nerd Books at 709 N. Monroe St. Previously located inside of Time Bomb Collectibles, Huston’s next-door storefront has been open for a few years. The usual patrons of his shop are younger, college-aged kids he says are disillusioned with mainstream bookstores. Once they enter the shop, the kids become starry-eyed. “They turn into Japanese cartoon characters,” says Huston. Giant Nerd Books isn’t just an oasis of oddities for Spokane’s hip crowd. Along with neighbors Time Bomb and Ruins, as well as downtown businesses Boo Radley’s and Atticus, Huston’s endeavors are a part of what he calls our city’s latest “Weirdo Renaissance.” Huston’s only goal for his business is to eliminate the belief that Spokane is a creative black hole. “If somebody gets the idea that, ‘Oh, I can be a weirdo and run a business and I don’t have to wear a suit and tie if I don’t want to,’ then that’s great. Mostly I just want to inspire people to stick around.” — KARA STERMER

ARTS SPOKANE ARTS GETS A BIG GRANT Last fall was the first-ever Create Spokane Arts Month, lasting through all of October. The event will be back and even better this year, in part thanks to a $10,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts just awarded to Spokane Arts. Available to applicants only by invitation, Spokane Arts received the maximum award amount from the NEA through a grant program intended to support public art engagement in underrepresented areas. Spokane Arts Executive Director Laura Becker says the funds specifically will support Arts Month’s Spokane Throw project — creative messages projected with light onto the sides of downtown buildings — and two month-long art installations.

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION BY MIKE BOOKEY

BOOK | Few authors can take genre fiction and spin it into literary gold quite like Oregon-raised Benjamin Percy. His debut novel, The Wilding, was a psychologically terrifying rehashing of Deliverance; he followed that up with Red Moon, an allegory of post-9/11 America that replaced Muslims with werewolves. Now Percy, who appears at the Get Lit! festival this week, takes us into the realms of the postapocalyptic with THE DEAD LANDS. It’s 150 years in the future and the world has been decimated by a superflu and nuclear war. When a settlement of survivors clinging to life and civility in St. Louis learns by way of a mysterious young woman that there is hope out in Oregon, a bookworm named Lewis and a road warrior of a woman named Clark take a band of explorers out West. There’s a reason both Stephen King and Jess Walter have said this is a must-read. DOCUMENTARY | With baseball season underway, might I suggest you delve into one of the weirder pieces of Northwest baseball history with THE BATTERED BASTARDS OF BASEBALL. The Netflix-produced documentary tells the story of the Portland Mavericks, an independent minor league baseball club founded by Bing Russell, who’d played the sheriff on Bonanza and who also happened to be the father of baseball player/actor Kurt Russell. After Portland’s beloved Beavers moved to Spokane and became the Indians in 1972, Russell started the Mavericks the following season, quickly populating the team with rejects, weirdos and a few guys who could actually play some serious ball. It’s a real-life Bad News Bears. TWITTER | With a new Republican declaring for the presidential race every week, it’s time you heard about @GOPTeens. No, this is not the actual social media outlet for the GOP’s youth vote, but that hasn’t stopped a few politicians from jumping on its bandwagon without getting the joke. The parody Twitter account features gems like: “#Teens: Do you #agree with #JebBush that you can’t spell #Hispanic without #Hip?” and “#Teens: If #Obama is a #GoodPerson why are there so many #photos of him on #TheGoogle dressed as #Hitler.” Come for the misuse of hashtags; stay for what turns out to be some biting satirical commentary. n

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 55


Not So Sweet The Canadian version of Smarties, which now feature natural coloring.

A food scientist weighs in on the use of artificial dyes in our food BY ARI LEVAUX

N

estlé recently announced plans to remove all artificial colors and flavors from its candy bars. The company said it was doing so in response to consumer preferences, not because there was anything dangerous about the artificial products it was using. Nestlé isn’t the only company making the switch. Hershey’s is beginning its journey in this direction as well. Luke J.W. Haffenden, the chief flavorist with Novotaste, a Montreal-based flavor solutions provider, told

56 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

me he thinks these moves are just the tip of the iceberg, especially with regard to phasing out artificial colors. “In the food industry, in the last couple of years, it has been a hot topic of discussion. You go to any of these huge conventions, and a significant portion of companies are manufacturing, selling and/or distributing natural color options,” Haffenden says. “Some of these companies are making lots of noise, because they think that it will be a marketing advantage. And some are quietly

reformulating and hoping nobody notices.” It’s part of a general trend toward moving to natural ingredients, in terms of colors, flavors and other functional ingredients, such as preservatives, he says. This change is being driven as much by consumer sentiment as it is by the increasing availability of viable natural alternatives. Only in late 2013, for example, did a naturally derived blue coloring come on the market, an extract of the bacteria spirulina. But there are also health considerations


percolating, often below the surface, and with health concerns come legal concerns. Artificial colors are of particular concern, Haffenden says. “When you have a company like Nestlé that has a worldwide initiative to remove all artificial coloring, that says something. And they aren’t just doing this for the marketing value,” Haffenden says. At home, Haffenden is picky about what kinds of food colorings his two children consume, regardless of whether they’re currently approved by government regulatory bodies. “If it’s got Blue #2, for example, I would prefer that my kids limit the consumption of this product over an extended period of time. Though generally speaking, I’m more concerned about the sugar content.” Haffenden is hardly one to fear chemicals simply because they are synthesized in a lab, or have unpronounceable names. His job involves using chemicals to manipulate the taste, texture, color, and other properties of processed foods. When it comes to safety, Haffenden evaluates these on a case-by-case basis, with an understanding of what certain chemical structures can do physiologically. With chemical structures, he says, “there tends to be relationships between activity, toxicity, odor and taste, as well as other chemical and physical properties.” He emailed me the chemical structure of Red #2, which has been banned from use as a food additive since 1976, as a suspected carcinogen. Synthesized from petroleum products, it consists largely of circular carbon chains called benzene rings, with some protruding groups of sodium sulfate. Haffenden also sent the structures of several other artificial colors that are currently approved for use, and pointed out how similar the structures of these are to the banned Red #2. “Many natural colors have degradation products that are very useful to the body,” he wrote. If a chemical that is found in nature is synthesized in a lab for use in food, he’s OK with that too. But he’s suspicious of synthesized chemicals that do not have comparable natural analogs. “As a food chemist/flavorist, I realize that there is a reality that products need to be colored properly, because a consumer’s decision making is based on multisensory cues,” he wrote. “But more and more, as a dad, I prefer to buy products with ingredients that exist in nature. Such pigments are more likely to be antioxidants.” By contrast, Haffenden referred me to the orange pigments beta-carotene, found in carrots and chili peppers, among other foods, and lycopene (found in tomatoes) as not only less troublesome, but potentially beneficial. Beta-carotene is a precursor to vitamin A, and lycopene is an antioxidant thought to help with a range of medical issues helping to ward off prostate cancer. This isn’t to say Haffenden thinks that just because something is “natural” it’s OK. But on balance, he says, there’s more to like, and less to fear, with naturally derived colorants. With the recent approval of a natural blue food coloring, food companies have one less excuse for making the switch. Not only do colors with natural analogs come with fewer unknowns and even the occasional health benefit, he said, they also can add subtle complexity to the flavor of the products they color. He points to Smarties, a Nestlé product that in his native Canada is something like what we would call M&Ms: “I love the new Smarties because the natural colors contribute a residual taste in some cases. The colors are all extracts from plants, fruits, vegetables and spices, and they add a subtle element. You’ve got that candy coating that has something there, but you can’t put your finger on it, and then you bite in and the chocolate flavor comes in. It’s a much more complex taste.” 

Red #2 has been banned from use as a food additive since 1976 as a suspected carcinogen.

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 57 Davenport_PalmCourt_021915_12V_BD.tif


FOOD | OPENING

Now O pe in CdA n the Riv in erstone Village

At The Paint Buzz you don’t need experience. Instructors will guide you through how to re-create the nights featured painting. Feeling artsy? Creativity is encouraged! There will be music, laughing, & a generous drink menu. By the end of the night, you will walk away with a masterpiece that you created! It’s so much fun!

Taste the Love Like us on

WINE TASTING WINE DINNER

Your local friend in the wine business...

Since 1995

Andrew Will Winery

Andrew Will Winery

monday, april 20th

Tuesday, april 21st

Professional Tasting with Andrew Will Winery

Taste six wines from Andrew Will Winery, paired with 3 small plates

15

$

5:30 pm - 7:30 pm Vino! Tasting room

222 s. washington st. Spokane • 509.838.1229 VinoWine.com 58 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

6:00 pm - 8:00 pm Spokane Club 1002 W Riverside

Mediterrano completes the circle of food and drink spots inside Saranac Commons BY JO MILLER

T

he warm glow of hanging lights and the soft hum of conversation beckons you off of Main Avenue and through the open garage door. Inside Saranac Commons there’s plenty of seating and four businesses to satiate your thirst and hunger. You can grab beers from Black Label Brewing Company, pastries from Common Crumb Artisan Bakery, coffee and ice cream from Caffé Affogato and Mediterranean food from the latest business to join the group, Mediterrano. Shahrokh Nikfar, who also owns Caffé Affogato, created Mediterrano to mesh with the artisan and community-oriented vibe of the Commons. He had local artists design and build elements of the wide-open exhibition kitchen, like the large table in the center and the pot rack hanging from the ceiling. “The whole idea was to create a place with an open kitchen concept, so people can see where it’s being made,” Nikfar says.


Breakfaset! in a Con (Seriously

- in a cone)

Mediterrano cook Merry Migliuri with the restaurant’s gyro. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO “We wanted you to taste the love that goes into preparing the food.” The fast-casual eatery uses largely local and organic ingredients to make dishes you would find in Middle Eastern and Mediterranean countries, where flavors like lemon, garlic and dill are commonplace. Head chef Merry Migliuri says the lemon chicken rice bowl ($10) is a colorful dish that’s both refreshing and filling. The basmati rice is steam-cooked with seasonings, finished with herbs and paired with chicken that’s roasted on the bone before being pulled off and seasoned with lemon pepper sauce. Vegetables are added, along with a dollop of tzatziki sauce for creaminess. A side salad or order of garlic fries dipped in cumin ketchup and lemon garlic aioli pairs well with the gyro ($8). A pocketless pita spread with housemade hummus and tzatziki features meat mixed with romaine, cucumbers, onions, sweet pepper rings and Lebanese pickles. Have a glass of Mediterrano’s cucumber-andcitrus water or snag a beer from Black Label to go with the lamb burger ($10), a patty of hand-formed ground lamb with garlic and onion that gets a spoonful of rosemary-infused goat cheese while on the grill, then goes between buns spread with sun-dried tomato mint jam. “We’re using Common Crumb’s buns to be a family,” Migliuri says. n Mediterrano • 19 W. Main • Open Mon-Thu, 11 am-2 pm and 4-8 pm; Fri-Sat, 11 am-2 pm and 4 pm-close • 309-3116 • Facebook: Mediterrano

Now Serving Breakfast All Day Breakfast Cone! Breakfast Burrito! & Breakfast Sandwiches!

IN KENDALL YARDS

1238 W. Summit Parkway • 321-7569 Sun-Thu 7am-9pm • Fri-Sat 7am-10pm

VisitNCIdaho_041615_4S_JP.tif

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 59


FOOD | OPENING

A LECTURE BY DR. STEFAN BRADLEY ‘96

REBELLING FOR RIGHTEOUSNESS: AFRICAN AMERICAN YOUTH ACTIVISM IN THE IVY LEAGUE, 1960-1970

How He Rolls

Longtime Coeur d’Alene sushi chef launches RawDeadFish food truck BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

r u o F

y t n e w T ING BRIEFIN N R G MO

Fresh News, Every Morning. Only on Inlander.com

60 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

!

A

s much as Travis Whiteside likes to joke around — he thought it’d be funny to open his new mobile sushi business called RawDeadFish on April Fool’s Day and serve burgers — he’s serious about the sushi truck that was decades in the making. A 1996 Lake City High School graduate, Whiteside made the circuit of Coeur d’Alene restaurants as a teenager, washing dishes before landing at Takara Japanese Cuisine & Sushi in 1997. He pestered Takara’s Ryuhei Tanaka to give him a shot as sushi chef, apprenticing for 11 years there. In 2005, Whiteside left to help open Bonsai Bistro, eventually working at several other establishments, including Fisherman’s Market, before returning to Bonsai.

20% off everyt hing in-stock

(EXCLUDING MEDIUMS. MONDAY 4/20/15 ONLY)

Customer Appreciation Sale

327-GROW(4769) 2718 North Division 509grow.com

DRINKS, SNACKS & SWAG!


The RawDeadFish truck in all its glory. Sushi ninja not included. That’s when Whiteside’s wheels really started turning. He purchased the truck in 2014. With his father Ray’s help, Whiteside added a freezer, generator, refrigerator and five sinks. Besides traditional rolls like hamachi or wallu ($5), Whiteside serves up signature rolls derived from his 16 years as sushi chef, like his Caterpillar roll with eel and cream cheese ($14). A sophisticated fryer inside the truck allows Whiteside to deep-fry the tempura shrimp inside the Dragon roll ($15) or fry the whole roll, such as the Godzilla ($6) with escolar and jalapeño. Ironically, the fryer nearly put the brakes on Whiteside’s plan to open what might be the region’s first mobile sushi service. At his mother’s urging, says Whiteside, he brought the truck — with its traffic-stopping underwater octopus

paintings, brought to life by ArtCoLab artist Jeremy Deming — to an Inland Northwest Food Network presentation called “Financing Our Local Economy with Slow Money” by Financing our Foodshed author Carol Peppe Hewitt. In the audience was Doug Fagerness, North Idaho College’s (retired) HeadStart director. Fagerness offered a loan to Whiteside on the spot, eventually upping the amount to $15,000, much of it earmarked for the necessary fire suppression system. And with that, Whiteside and RawDeadFish were on a roll.  food@inlander.com RawDeadFish Sushi • 514 Best Ave., Coeur d’Alene • Open Tue-Sat, 11 am-7:30 pm • facebook.com/rawdeadfish • 208-755-6829

Celebrate at Barlows! Check out our new seasonal menu!

Prime Rib Dinner

Every Friday & Saturday Starting at 4pm! Best in town! Come early always a sellout

Homemade Soups & Daily Specials

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK • BREAKFAST UNTIL 2PM ON SATURDAY & SUNDAY DINNER STARTS AT 4PM

1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. | 509-924-1446

Wild Alaska

SNOW CRAB

$19.95

Monday through Thursday Nights Enjoy one pound of Wild Alaska Snow Crab served with a cup of Anthony’s famous clam chowder. Anthony’s Beach Cafe • Spokane • 2912 East Palouse Hwy. Suite A Regal Plaza South Hill • (509) 448-0668 • www.anthonys.com APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 61


Opening Weekend April 17th

FOOD | UPDATE

Dinner at the bistro?! COunt me in!

#2 RURAL RESTAURANT

The new Royal Burger at 24 Taps. COURTNEY BREWER PHOTO

24 TAPS BURGERS & BREWS

825 W. Riverside | 868-5657

T

LOCATED AT KLINK’S RESORT

FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 509-235-6600

he complete vision owner Josh Blair had in mind for 24 Taps Burgers & Brews wasn’t ready in time for football season last fall, but they opened anyway, keeping the bigger picture in mind through several months serving basic stadium grub in a sparse space. After what Blair calls a “complete and total remodel,” 24 Taps relaunched during March Madness as a fully operational sports bar and dining spot, serving up “gourmet, fresh, hand-pressed burgers” made in-house, along with homemade appetizers and fresh salads.

“We wanted to do it from the beginning, but we didn’t have enough time to develop it physically and in our brains,” Blair said. “And we do everything local, from our food vendors to our beer.” The “new” version includes the Empire Club, a private room available for banquets and business meetings, as well as a game area with a shuffleboard table and a Big Lebowski mural that really ties the room together. — DAN NAILEN

IT’S A “ROLL UP YOUR SLEEVES, AND GIT ‘ER DONE” THING

‘15 Tundra Double Cab

$349mo.

for 24 months

Inland Empire Toyota Dealers

ToyotaCare covers normal factory scheduled service. Plan is 2 years or 25K miles, whichever comes first. The new vehicle cannot be part of a rental or commercial fleet, or a livery/taxi vehicle. See participating Toyota dealer for plan details. Valid only in the continental U.S. and Alaska. Roadside assistance does not include parts and fluids, except emergency fuel delivery. Lease a new 2015 Tundra Double Cab Model 8341 for $349 a month for 24 months with $3,049 due at signing, which includes first month's payment, $2050, TFS Lease Subvention Reduction, $0 security deposit and $650. Does not include, taxes, llicense, title fees, insurance and dealer charges. Closed-end lease. Total Manufacturer’s Suggested Retail Price $34610. Capitalized cost of $31926 based on down payment and dealer participation, which may vary by dealer. Payment may vary depending on model, equipment choice, and final transaction price. Lease-end purchase option is $25,265.30. Customer responsible for maintenance, excess wear and tear and $0.15 per mile over 12000 miles per year. To qualified Tier 1+ customers through Toyota Financial Services. $350 disposition fee due at lease end unless customer purchases vehicle or decides to re-finance through Toyota Financial Services. Subject to availability. See participating dealer for details. Does not include College Grad or Military Rebate.

62 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015


FOOD | SAMPLER

KID-FRIENDLY DICK’S HAMBURGERS 10 E. Third Ave. | Spokane | 747-2481 What would Spokane be without Dick’s Hamburgers? Our city would be lost, with only chain hamburger places remaining for fast-food junkies. But thankfully Dick’s low prices, as well as their comforting food, have kept people coming back to this drive-in since 1965. The menu is varied, but the items are simple. You won’t find anything too complicated on the hamburger — no bacon or ham, just condiments, pickles and cheese if you ask for it. Buy these guilty pleasures by the bagful and remember Dick’s is sticking with their old-school, cash-only approach. OLD EUROPEAN 7640 N. Division St. | Spokane 467-5987 This tasty breakfast and lunch house takes pride in their made-fromscratch goods. Whether you like your morning meal French, Scandinavian or German, Old European has you covered. They’ve also got an assortment of wraps and sandwiches, so even your pickiest little one will be happy. The popularity of this spot means there could be a wait, but don’t worry, it won’t be long.

THE ONION 302 W. Riverside Ave. | Spokane 747-3852 5522 N. Division St. | Spokane 482-6100 Hardy burgers and towers of onion rings promise to send your family home fat and happy, whether you’ve brought the gang to the original downtown location or the spot up north. Friendly, prompt service is a plus, and while the ’50s traditional roadside diner atmosphere might be a bit overwhelming for adults, the more things kids have to look at while they munch, the happier they (not to mention their parents) seem. RED ROBIN 725 W. Main Ave. | Spokane 838-5260 With tall, chocolaty malts, bottomless fries and burgers you can hardly wrap your lips around, this gourmet burger joint will satiate your cravings for a big, juicy, American burger. Though being sung to by a herd of clapping, grinning servers is probably obnoxious to an adult, what kid doesn’t want that attention, not to mention the free ice cream for their birthday? Or their “birthday,” if you catch our drift.

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THE SCOOP 1001 W. 25th Ave. | Spokane 535-7171 The Scoop is the South Hill’s perfect hideaway for great minds and families alike. The small neighborhood parlor is lined with technicolor walls and a kids corner and serves sinfully delicious ice cream on homemade waffle cones. This local ice cream parlor will turn your kids into sticky, sugar-high crazies, but it’s completely worth it. Forget parlor chains; have a tasty locally owned and made frozen treat. If you’re there for the Scoop’s excellent breakfast, you can’t go wrong with their Liege waffles. WALL STREET DINER 4428 N. Wall St. | Spokane 325-4730 A slightly more homey-feeling diner, this place has wood paneling and a relaxed feeling, making it a great place for a Sunday breakfast, brunch or lunch with your family. This diner boasts a friendly staff, cozy atmosphere and excellent breakfast and lunch foods. Expect to spend between $10 and $15 for a meal that will fill you up all day. n

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Ben Stiller and Naomi Watts star as a couple trying not to get old in While We’re Young.

No Country for Old Hipsters Noah Baumbach explores aging clumsily in While We’re Young BY SETH SOMMERFELD

I

n the American societal script, the energetic, wild freedom of youth eventually pivots to the structure and responsibility of parenthood. Noah Baumbach’s latest feature While We’re Young focuses on a couple in the purgatory between these poles, while feeling the strong magnetic pull of that youthful zeal. It splits the difference between the grumpy adulthood of Baumbach’s The Squid and the Whale and the wandering puerile essence of Frances Ha. Ben Stiller plays Josh, a serious New York documentarian who’s spent 10 years trying to put together the most obtuse documentary imaginable. He and his wife Cornelia (Naomi Watts) are the proverbial last couple to not have kids. Their best friends Fletcher (Adam Horovitz, aka Ad-Rock from the Beastie Boys) and Marina

64 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

(Maria Dizzia) just had a baby, but Josh and Cornelia tell themselves that’s not for them. They revel in the idea of freedom; they could jet off to Paris at any moment. When a 20-something aspiring documentarian named Jamie (Adam Driver) and his wife Darby (Amanda Seyfried) come to a class Josh teaches, a post-lecture chat soon evolves into the younger duo becoming Josh and Cornelia’s invigorating new best friends. While We’re Young morphs into a platonic love story between Josh and Jamie. Adrift himself, Josh channels Jamie’s boyish virility. He clearly wishes he could hit the reset button and be the guy with a cool record collection, fashionable hats and a sense of spontaneity. The lines between friend and mentor begin to blur as Jamie begins his own documentary with Josh’s help, but without the

same moral conviction. Cornelia and Darby’s relationship peripherally parallels the men, except they’re both much more likable and less essential to the plot. Unfortunately, While We’re Young’s theme never fully hits home because of the characters’ on-the-nose stereotypes. Fletcher and Marina spend most of the film as paint-by-numbers, stick-in-the-mud new parents, while Jamie and Darby are archetypical hipsters: she makes ice cream, he always tries to make only the most obscure references, they attend spiritual drug parties and despite seeming jobless, WHILE WE’RE YOUNG they somehow live in a massive New Rated R York apartment. Written and directed by Noam Baumbach Jamie exudes a sickStarring Ben Stiller, Naomi Watts, Adam ening, narcissistic Driver confidence (as do all Driver characters) that drags Josh down with it. There’s humor to be mined from Stiller’s tried-and-true flustered frustration, but two-thirds of the way into the movie, it’s hard to not find everyone contemptible. While the acting and direction is strong, While We’re Young’s characters are written just a hair beyond a grounded reality, and tend to devalue the lessons learned about accepting one’s own age. n


OPENING FILMS ABOUT ELLY

In this Iranian film, a group of friends go on a trip to the coast and then while playing near the ocean, one of the women goes missing. For the rest of this mystery from director Asghar Farhadi (who won a Best Foreign Language Film Academy Award for his 2012 film A Separation), the group wonders if the woman drowned, or went off to Tehran to be with her mother. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

CHILD 44

During the Stalin days of Russia, people didn’t want to acknowledge that something like murder could even happen. But it did, and in awful, awful ways. This film is adapted from bestselling book based on the real-life crimes of Andrei Chikatilo, the Butcher of Rostov, who killed more than 50 women and children. Here, Tom Hardy plays an agent who goes on the hunt for the killer, who is racking up a devastating kill total. (MB) Rated R

UNFRIENDED

In the same vein of I Know What You Did Last Summer, with Unfriended a group of hot teens are haunted for crimes of their past — in this case uploading a video of a drunken friend who later shoots herself because of the post. But what this film adds to the horror genre is in its telling. Through Internet videos and Skype chat sessions, we watch as the young friends are terrorized by an online presence they believe is their dead friend. (LJ) Rated R

PAUL BLART: MALL COP 2

Paul Blart (Kevin James) has been a mall security master for six years now

and it is finally time for a vacation. When he takes his daughter on a trip before sending her off to college, Blart discovers that safety never sleeps and he must protect the hotel from imminent danger. (CB) Rated PG

MONKEY KINGDOM

Disneynature’s newest documentary surrounds the life of a newborn monkey and his mother in their journey to survive in the South Asian jungles. As is its way, Disney produces an experience that is both visually enthralling and pleasantly educational. Watch as the monkey duo faces the competition of social hierarchy and everyday dangers of the Sri Lankan jungle. (CB) Rated G

TRUE STORY

Michael Finkel (Jonah Hill), a New York Times writer recently fired by the paper for having fudged facts in a prominent cover story, and Christian Longo (James Franco), a prisoner in Oregon awaiting trial for the murder of his wife and three children, are an unlikely pair. But prior to his capture in Mexico and for reasons unknown, Longo had used the alias of Michael Finkel while he was a fugitive. Now, Finkel wants to get the real story in a series of prison interviews. (MB) Rated R

WHILE WE’RE YOUNG

Ben Stiller plays Josh, a serious New York documentarian who, along with his wife Cornelia (Naomi Watts), are the proverbial last couple to not have kids. When a 20-something aspiring documentarian named Jamie (Adam Driver) and his wife Darby (Amanda Seyfried) come into their lives, both couples learn a whole lot about the lives ahead of them. (SS) Rated R

NOW PLAYING ’71

Jack O’Connell (Unbroken) is the raw, young and ultimately naive British Pvt. Gary Hook, who is sent with his squad to Belfast during the Troubles under the command of the very much in-overhis-head Lt. Armitage (Sam Reid). Almost immediately, things go horrifically awry, as a seemingly simple guarding action performed in conjunction with the local police ends up with one young soldier’s brains blown out by an IRA assassin. At Magic Lantern (MS) Rated R

AMERICAN SNIPER

American Sniper opens with Bradley Cooper’s Chris Kyle on his first tour in Fallujah, perched on a rooftop protecting the Marines clearing buildings door to door. From the moment of his first life-or-death decision, the story flashes back — to his Texas childhood, his career as a rodeo cowboy, his eventual enlistment and his courtship and marriage to his wife, Taya (Sienna Miller) — before returning to his experiences serving in Iraq. (SR) Rated R

CINDERELLA

Director Kenneth Branagh’s version of the Disney animated classic goes heavy on the back story, introducing the beloved mother (Hayley Atwell) of young Ella (Lily James) before mom’s untimely passing and Ella’s merchant father (Ben Chaplin) remarrying, ultimately leaving poor Ella with a stepmother (Cate Blanchett) and two stepsisters (Holliday Grainger and Sophie McShera) who treat her poorly as Cinderella step-family characters are wont to do. (SR) Rated PG

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DANNY COLLINS

As the titular character in Danny Collins, Al Pacino delivers his best work in a long time, but it’s contained within an utterly predictable redemption movie that only comes alive when Pacino plays one-on-one scenes with the other members of the cast. Pacino plays an over-the-hill rock star who we meet as his new greatest hits album is about to drop and then he finds out that he once missed a chance to meet John Lennon. The news sends him on an introspective journey. (MB) Rated R ...continued on next page

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APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 65


, Tue-Thu: 5:00

SHADOWS

: 4:45, Tue-Thu: 7:20

, Tue-Thu: 4:30

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ND

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The tagline of the latest installment of this vroom-vroom series is: “Vengeance hits home.” Damn, that’s some serious stuff. Jason Statham’s Deckard Shaw is out for blood to avenge the death of his brother and he’s bringing the whole gang with him, including Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Ludacris, Vin Diesel, Michelle Rodriguez and, of course, the late Paul Walker, who died in a real-life car accident before the film was finished. (MB) Rated PG-13

VARIETY

METACRITIC.COM

(LOS ANGELES)

(OUT OF 100)

Timbuktu

91

’71

83

While We’re Young

76

Furious 7

67

Danny Collins

58

Insurgent

42

Get Hard

34

FURIOUS 7

Fri/Sat: 7:30, Sun: 3:00, Tue/Thu: 6:30

TIMBUKTU Fri/Sat: 3:35, Sun: 5:00 THE HUNTING GROUND Sun: 7:00 PLANETARY Weds: 7:00

FILM | SHORTS

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

GET HARD

Senior News Analyst

C=0, M=80, Y=90, K=0

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NPR CMYK color logo for light background, uncoated stocks Use at any scale

Downsize the “®” when the using logo on oversized applications such outdoor advertising and large exhibit displays

Will Ferrell plays James, a wealthy, spoiled, selfish fellow who lives in a huge home with a beautiful fiancée but soon finds himself arrested for fraud and facing jail time. To toughen up, he hires the only black guy he knows, a square played by Kevin Hart, to show him how to “get hard” for prison. It’s not Ferrell’s (or Hart’s, for that matter) best work. (ES) Rated R

GETT: THE TRIAL OF VIVIANE AMSALEM

The film is a carefully calibrated courtroom drama about Viviane’s five-year struggle to obtain a divorce from her husband Elisha (Simon Abkarian) within the religious laws of Israel, a battle marked by the kind of tragic and absurd blend of events that can only be labeled as Kafkaesque. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

HOME

Oh is an alien who finds himself very out of place on Earth when he’s banished by his race of aliens, bent on making the planet their own by capturing all humans. Soon, he meets Tip (voiced by Rihanna) and the pair try to elude the aliens. (MB) Rated PG

INSURGENT

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In the second film of the Divergent series, Shailene Woodley returns as Tris Prior, a young woman living in a dystopian future in which people are segregated into a social caste system by personality. As part of the Divergent class, Tris finds her group heading for annihilation at the hands of the nefarious leader of the Erudite class played by Kate Winslet. (MB) Rated PG-13

IT FOLLOWS

The surprise indie hit of the spring, this inventive horror film gives us Maika Monroe as a teenage girl who loses her virginity, only to learn that in doing so she inherited a demonic follower from her boyfriend. As ghoulish beings follow her every move, she has to sleep with someone else to pass along the curse to another carrier. It’s less sexy and far creepier than it sounds. (MB) Rated R

KINGSMAN: THE SECRET SERVICE

66 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

Harry (Colin Firth), code name Galahad, recruits Eggsy (Taron Egerton), a kid from the wrong side of the London

tracks, to be a member of the Kingsmen, an ostensibly classy set of British spies. The whole film touts how the Kingsmen follow rules to keep them gentlemanly, but it eventually veers far off course into something that fully contradicts itself. (MJ) Rated R

THE LONGEST RIDE

The latest adaptation of a Nicholas Sparks novel, The Longest Ride features Scott Eastwood (son of Clint) as a cowboy who falls in love with a city girl (the awesome Britt Robertson) but then gets kicked off a bull and severely injured. Everyone wants him to quit, but he just can’t, because he just can’t. You know how these Nicholas Sparks charters are, right? (MB) Rated PG-13

McFARLAND USA

When he discovers his students’ amazing ability to run, Jim White (Kevin Costner) is determined to form a crosscountry team that would one day be state champions. Inspired by the legacy of the McFarland High School runners of 1987, McFarland USA follows White and his team from a small farming town in California on their journey against the odds. (CB) Rated PG

SEVENTH SON

This epic fantasy tale from centuries ago stars Jeff Bridges as Master Gregory, the last in a long line of supernatural warriors tasked with keeping humanity safe against evil forces led by a mean witch (Julianne Moore). For help, the master recruits a country boy born “the seventh son of a seventh son” to teach him how to battle dark magic. (DN) Rated PG-13

SONG OF THE SEA

Ben and Saoirse are left motherless, and as such, big brother Ben is tasked with babysitting his mute, 6-year-old sister while their father, Conor, shrouds his grief in his work manning the family’s lighthouse. Nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Feature, Song of the Sea follows the children as they try to get back to their father. At Magic Lantern (CS) Rated PG

TIMBUKTU

The brilliant Timbuktu comes along at a perfect moment to elucidate the diversity of Islam, and the cultural battles happening within the religion. Director

and co-screenwriter Abderrahmane Sissako does a remarkable job bringing the viewer into an utterly foreign world of sparse, sandy landscapes dotted with mud huts and tents and making us empathize with the local fisherman, cattle herders and children who suddenly have a cast of gun-toting foreigners imposing sharia law on the small village. At Magic Lantern (DN) Rated PG-13

WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS

Jemaine Clement, best known as half of Flight of the Conchords, co-wrote and co-directed this hilarious mockumentary about a group of vampires living in a mansion together. It’s like The Real World for the undead. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

WHIPLASH

Socially maladroit and painfully single-minded, Andrew (Miles Teller), a freshman at a competitive conservatory, lives only to drum. Early on, he’s tapped by an instructor named Fletcher (J.K. Simmons) to join his elite band. (KJ) Rated R

WOMAN IN GOLD

History gives Woman in Gold all the drama required of a top-notch thriller in this true story of a woman trying to reclaim the humanity torn from her family by the Nazis. Helen Mirren plays Maria Altmann, an Austrian Jew forced to flee during World War II, who is navigating the international legal system in an effort to find her family’s possessions that were stolen by Hitler’s regime — in particular a painting by Gustav Klimt, “Portrait of Adele Bloch-Bauer I.” Ryan Reynolds co-stars as Altmann’s young lawyer. (DN) Rated PG-13

THE WRECKING CREW

In the 1960s, when rock music was coming into the mainstream, a group of hard-working musicians laid down the tracks that made a whole lot of people — other than themselves — very famous. They became known as the Wrecking Crew and could be heard on records by everyone from the Beach Boys and Sonny and Cher, as well as traditional musicians like Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated PG 


FILM | REVIEW

Whitworth Women’s Choir Deborah Hansen, director Mary J. Trotter, piano

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Real Fiction

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PAUL BLART: MALL COP 2

PG Daily (3:20) (4:30) (5:20) 6:40 7:10 9:30 Sat-Sun (10:40) (12:30) (1:20) (2:30)

UNFRIENDED

BY MARJORIE BAUMGARTEN

R Daily (3:15) (5:10) 7:10 9:10 Sat-Sun (11:15) (1:15)

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PG-13 Fri-Sun (4:15) 7:00 9:45 Sat-Sun (10:50) (1:30) Mon-Thu (3:30) 6:15 9:00

wo disgraced men seek redemption through their relationship with each other. Or maybe something less lofty… perhaps the shamed congress of sinners or the mutual gratification of stroked egos. Each has a hunger to reframe his identity; their shared need creates a symbiotic attachment. The men are Michael Finkel (Jonah Hill), a New York Times writer recently fired by the paper for having fudged the identity of a key subject and other facts in a prominent cover story for the Sunday magazine, and Christian Longo (James Franco), a prisoner in Oregon awaiting trial for the murder of his wife and three children. Prior to his capture in Mexico, and for reasons unknown, Longo had used the alias of Michael Finkel while he was a fugitive. For obvious reasons, Finkel is drawn to Longo’s story, and it turns out that Finkel is the only reporter with whom Longo will speak. These events actually happened and are recounted by Finkel in his memoir True Story, which has now been fleshed out in movie form. The narrative unfolds mostly through a series of jailhouse meetings during which each man probes the other with questions, although Longo’s veracity is always in doubt. Yet they are both pariahs: Longo a child killer scorned even among the prison population, and Finkel a discredited journalist who can’t land an assignment anywhere. For a time, their relationship serves as a lifeline for each man. Questions about identity nip about the edges

THE LONGEST RIDE

of the film. “I thought you could tell me what it’s like to be me,” says Finkel during one of their initial meetings. Further questions arise from the fact that we know Franco and Hill to be friends off-screen, which colors our perceptions of them relating to each other while in character. British theater director Rupert Goold makes an assured debut as a film director with this piece, although there appear to be few distinguishing touches overall. Essentially a twohander between Franco and Hill, TRUE STORY the actors carry the Rated R overall weight of Directed by Rupert Goold Starring James Franco, Jonah Hill, the movie, except for a third-act twist Felicity Jones (probably more fiction than truth) delivered by Felicity Jones, who up until that point had been relegated to a perfunctory presence as Finkel’s supportive girlfriend. The problem with True Story is that you wish there were more of it. The philosophical questions it encourages are like the tail that wags the dog. The truth becomes something of an obfuscation, and unlike films such as Capote and Infamous, there’s not enough drama about the compulsive relationship between the writer and his felonious subject. True Story is more like watching a chess match between expert players than attending a soccer match that erupts in a crowd riot. The truth, as we’re reminded, may not always be believable. Neither is it always compelling. n

FURIOUS 7

PG-13 Daily (3:10) 6:10 8:40 9:10 Sat-Sun (12:10)

FRI, APRIL 17TH TO THURS, APRIL 23RD

HOME

PG Daily (3:00) (4:50) 6:50 8:50 Sat-Sun (10:45) (12:50)

GET HARD

Spongebob Squarepants 2: Sponge Out of Water Fri 5:00, Sat-Sun 12:30 5:00 Mon-Thurs 5:00

R Fri-Sun (4:45) 7:15 9:45 Sat-Sun (11:45) (2:15) Mon-Thu (3:45) 6:15 8:45

THE DIVERGENT SERIES: INSURGENT

PG-13 Daily (4:10) 6:40 9:15 Sat-Sun (11:10) (1:40)

CINDERELLA

PG Daily (4:00) 6:30 8:50 Sat-Sun (10:50) (1:30)

WANDERMERE

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

MONKEY KINGDOM

Chappie

Fri 7:05, Sat-Sun 2:30 7:05 Mon 7:05, Wed-Thurs 7:05

G Daily (1:00) (3:00) (4:50) 6:50 8:50 Fri-Sun (11:00)

PAUL BLART: MALL COP 2

PG Daily (12:30) (1:20) (2:30) (3:20) (4:30) (5:20) 6:40 7:20 8:40 9:20 Fri-Sun (10:40) (11:20)

UNFRIENDED

R Daily (1:15) (3:15) (5:10) 7:10 9:15 Fri-Sun (11:15)

THE WOMAN IN GOLD

PG-13 Daily (11:40) (2:00) (4:20) 6:40 9:00 9:30

The DUFF

Fri-Wed 9:35pm

THE LONGEST RIDE

PG-13 Daily (1:30) (4:15) 7:00 9:35 Fri-Sun (10:50)

FURIOUS 7

ccs

PG-13 Daily (12:10) (12:45) (3:10) (3:45) 6:10 6:45 9:10 9:40

free

PG Daily (12:20) (2:40) (4:50) 7:00 9:00

students SFCC International Film Festival

Grave of the Fireflies Tue 7:15

HOME

GET HARD

R Daily (11:45) (2:15) (4:45) 7:15 9:30

THE DIVERGENT SERIES: INSURGENT

PG-13 Daily (1:40) (4:10) 6:40 9:10 Fri-Sun (11:10)

CINDERELLA

PG Daily (1:10) (3:40) 6:20 8:45 Fri-Sun (10:50)

Spokane Film Society Thurs 9:30pm

MCFARLAND, USA

PG Daily (1:20) (3:50) 6:30 Fri-Sun (10:50)

DO YOU BELIEVE?

PG-13 Daily (12:30) (3:00)

AMERICAN SNIPER R Daily (5:30) 8:40

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 4/17/15-4/23/15

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 67


JIM CAMPBELL ILLUSTRATION

Audio Devotion Why it’s OK to like bad music BY LAURA JOHNSON 68 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

O

n the long and mostly brown drive from Spokane to Seattle or Spokane to Portland, there are essentially three kinds of stations that come in over the FM airwaves: Pop country, Top 40 and contemporary Christian. On solo trips to visit friends and family in these big, shiny cities, I’ve tuned

into them all, trying to get a grasp on why people are drawn to this music. I try to understand how people can listen to Taylor Swift attempting to “Shake it Off” or RaeLynn warble about how “God Made Girls” (not boys, apparently) and enjoy it. But I mostly strike out.


But people do like this stuff, and it’s not them with the problem, it’s me. It doesn’t make you a better person for liking obscure, indie and/or avant-garde music. In a perfect world, we’d all listen to what made us feel deeply without fear of judgment, because even the staunchest music snobs tend to have guilty musical pleasures. Richard Terzieff, owner of Spokane’s Recorded Memories record store since 1990, doesn’t quite fit the High Fidelity holierthan-thou music store owner stereotype. When it comes to his customers’ musical tastes, Terzieff does his best to cast judgments aside, bringing in everything from Britney Spears to the Everly Brothers to his Hamilton Street shop — just as long as customers refrain from making fun of his extreme devotion to KISS. “All music is my drug,” Terzieff says. “People truly loving a song and being touched by it? That’s what music should be. If people are tough enough that they don’t worry what their friends think about their music choices, then their life is a little more enjoyable.” Last year, the Spokane Arena embarked on a new campaign, asking Inland Northwest music fans which artists they most wanted to see. What came out of that is now known as the Bucket List, a guiding directory that proves the area’s taste in music is somewhat worthwhile (the top 11 acts selected include Bruce Springsteen, Foo Fighters, Metallica, Prince and Justin Timberlake). While they’re not my cup of tea, the list has aided in booking country superstar Luke Bryan (No. 2 on the list) and 1970s easy rockers the Eagles (No. 13), both of whom are coming to the Arena next month. It goes without saying that people have a deep affinity for country music in these parts. “Country is never going to go away,” says Becca Watters, marketing manager for the Spokane Public Facilities District. “Country is a big touring industry and Spokane is a country town.” Furthering this sentiment are Bucket List requests for Garth Brooks, George Strait, Kenny Chesney, Keith Urban and Tim McGraw (coming in September), along with Miranda Lambert and Blake Shelton, who already have played the Arena stage to huge audiences. While other Spokane venues have booked Neutral Milk Hotel and Death Cab for Cutie for this year, it’s hard not to feel alone in a sea of crazed cowboy-booted fans. I’ll never quite understand that music, but I also can’t properly explain my high school-aged appreciation for emo act Dashboard Confessional or crunk rappers the Ying Yang Twins. Growing up, we’re never told to find the music that inspires you; rather, it’s about what your friends or family like, or what Rolling Stone writers deem worthy. But you’ve grown up, so think for yourself. As Terzieff suggests, do some homework. Flip through a bin of vintage albums and select something new to you. Talk to your friend who likes pop country music and ask him why it moves him. Maybe you can find common ground in Johnny Cash or Patsy Cline. Chances are he likes country because it reminds him of his patriotic grandpa, dirt roads, cheap beer-fueled camping trips or something else directly tied up in memories. “One of the keys to understanding why we like a certain sort of music is that nostalgia is the most powerful force in the universe,” says Dr. Richard Strauch, professor of music at Whitworth University who has a background in musicology. “Nostalgia guides our decisions, what we eat, what we listen to and where we vacation. We want to recapture something from our past; it doesn’t matter if it’s artistically great or not.” Strauch, a trombonist with the Spokane Symphony, admits he has secret playlists on his iPod dedicated to musicians he’d rather others didn’t see. He recalls one of his old teachers explaining that it was necessary to like some “junk music,” in reference to popular tunes, but that shouldn’t be all a person listens to. “In each music genre there’s the elite saying what’s good or not; that will always be human nature,” Strauch says. “You just have to find what is true for you.”  lauraj@inlander.com

...continued on next page

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 69


MUSIC | SINGER-SONGWRITER

Hand Pounded Bells, Beautiful Patinas

If Bigfoot were still alive he’d eat here.

mesmerizing tones

Mon-Sat 10am-5:30pm 35 W. Main, Spokane 509-464-7677

“Hippy street drummers! Your stamina offends me!”

wedonthaveone.com

Funny Girl

Neko Case isn’t afraid to say what she thinks.

The times and tweets of Pacific Northwest-bred songstress Neko Case BY LAURA JOHNSON

H

er vocals run as clear as glacier water and her lyrics are as transparent as a tellall memoir, but when Neko Case isn’t singing beautifully about depressive scenarios and an often unhappy childhood, she’s absolutely hilarious. Not only in her off-the-cuff onstage banter with her longtime band members, but also via her Twitter account, which offers a peek into her in-the-moment lifestyle (as she only does interviews every couple of tours or so). Tweeting multiple times a day, these golden nuggets of 140 characters or less make you wonder what’s really going on in her mind. Here are some prime examples from this year. @NekoCase says: April 11: “Hippy street drummers! Your stamina offends me!”

HARRY

CONNICK, JR. TICKETS ON SALE NOW at ticketswest.com, by phone at 509.777.6346, and at the inb performing arts center ticket office. A

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70 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

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April 8: “Clip-on hand sanitizer is the new Buck knife.” April 5: “What this world NEEDS is a lot more of me looking at my blackheads in a hotel magnifying mirror.” March 28: “If you are ever feeling like offing yourself, just remember: there are blueberries, and we have the technology to freeze them.”

JULY 20 H

April 8: “When I want to feel young again I just eat myself sick on candy. It’s cheap.”

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March 11: “I’m sweary tonight. I need to lie down …” March 10: “#1 thing I DON’T miss about the PNW: Cedar bark chips and their microsliver splinter dust.”

Jan. 28: “If someone’s mullet is TOO crazy, are you allowed to cut it for them while they sleep?” Her zany Twitter account thoughts can easily be viewed; come Monday, you can catch the Americana singer-songwriter in the flesh for an intimate-feeling Bing Crosby Theater show. Kicking off a quick-run tour earlier this week, Case — who allegedly has a penchant for the Baby Bar and once interviewed Sherman Alexie for The Believer magazine — rolls through the Pacific Northwest first, hitting a lot of her home turf. Much has been made of the Virginia-born artist growing MORE EVENTS up in cities along Visit Inlander.com for the I-5 corridor, complete listings of from Olympia to local events. Vancouver, B.C. While Case has since moved to Chicago, then Tucson, Arizona, and now Vermont, she will always be a Pacific Northwest girl in the way the area has affected her rainy sound and grey subject matter. She’s still a member of the Vancouver, B.C., supergroup the New Pornographers. Her most recent record, the 2013 release The Worse Things Get, the Harder I Fight, the Harder I Fight, the More I Love You, is possibly her most personal and heartfelt yet. The spring tour corresponds with the rerelease of her 2006 album Fox Confessor Brings the Flood, which comes out on limited edition red vinyl for Record Store Day on Saturday. (Find out more about local Record Store Day happenings in the Events section.) n Neko Case with Rodrigo Amarante • Mon, April 20, at 8 pm • $35 • All-ages • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • TicketsWest.com • 227-7638


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APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 71


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

FESTIVAL KAZZUZAPALOUSA

T

he sun has set on the first weekend of Coachella, signaling the return of music festival season in America. Jumping on the festival bandwagon this year is KZUU 90.7 FM, Washington State University’s non-commercial radio station, with its first-ever Kazzuzapalousa in Pullman. The event includes Seattle-based headliners Chastity Belt (pictured) and Childbirth (the latter made up of members from Pony Time, Tacocat and Chastity Belt), two remarkable feminist punk bands who know how to rock the hell out of any joint they play. Other acts are Corey J. Brewer, Daniel Halligan, Youryoungbody, Blackwater Prophet, the Static Tones and Smashclub. There will be local art, and also food and booze for sale. — LAURA JOHNSON Kazzuzapalousa • Sat, April 18, 2 pm to midnight • $10 students/$12 public • All-ages • BellTower Concert House • 125 SE Spring St., Pullman • Facebook: Kazzuzapalousa Music Festival

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 04/16

J THE BARTLETT, The Brothers Comatose, Whiskey Dick Mountain J THE Big DiPPER, Kind of Like Spitting, Haunted Summer, Sea Giant BiNg CRoSBy THEATER, Zoso: The Led Zeppelin Experience BooMERS CLASSiC RoCK BAR & gRiLL, Randy Campbell acoustic show J BuCER’S CoFFEEHouSE PuB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen BuCKHoRN iNN, Spokane River Band CHECKERBoARD BAR, Reverse Order CoEuR D’ALENE CASiNo, PJ Destiny Di LuNA’S CAFE (208-263-0846), Tony Furtado J THE HoP!, The Last of Lucy, Cold Blooded, Serpentspire iRoN HoRSE BAR, Melefluent JoHN’S ALLEy, The Dodgy Mountain Men JoNES RADiAToR, Chris Pureka J LAguNA CAFé, Just Plain Darin THE LANTERN TAP HouSE, Songwriter circle with Bart Budwig, Matthew Zeltzer, Sarah Berentson J MoNARCH MouNTAiN CoFFEE (208-265-9382), Open Mic hosted by Scott Reid THE PALoMiNo CLuB, Coco Montoya RiCo’S (332-6566), Border Colleagues THE RiDLER PiANo BAR (822-7938), Steve Starkey THE RoADHouSE, Steve Starkey THE ViKiNg BAR & gRiLL, Jordan Collins ZoLA, Sonny Brookbank Band

Friday, 04/17

J THE BARTLETT, Hoot Hoots, Lavoy, Smokey Brights BEVERLy’S, Robert Vaughn J THE Big DiPPER, Wild Rabbit, Foxy Lemon, Duke Evers

72 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

ROCK ALEJANDRO ESCOVEDO/LEON RUSSELL T

wo underappreciated rockers come to Spokane this week. First is Texas legend Alejandro Escovedo (pictured), whose music has spanned an incredible array of genres — his punk band the Nuns opened for the Sex Pistols in the 1970s and his ’80s act Rank and File basically invented “roots-rock” — before landing in his sweet spot as an Americana singer/songwriter. On Friday, he’ll play acoustic with violinist Susan Voelz. Five days later, piano-pop pioneer Leon Russell headlines. After years working in the famous “Wrecking Crew” studio band and as a noteworthy producer, Russell found solo success with a gospel-soul sound. Nearly forgotten after years of inactivity, Elton John tracked him down to make an album, 2010’s The Union, and he’s been enjoying the spotlight ever since. — DAN NAILEN Alejandro Escovedo with Susan Voelz • Fri, April 17, at 9 pm • 21+ • Palomino Club • 6425 N. Lidgerwood • palominoclubspokane.com • Leon Russell • Wed, April 22, at 7:30 pm • $40-$50 • All-ages • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com

BoLo’S, Slow Burn BooMERS CLASSiC RoCK BAR & gRiLL, The Dragon BuCKHoRN iNN, Sammy Eubanks THE CELLAR, Maxie Ray Mills, Kyle Swafford CoEuR D’ALENE CASiNo, Kicho, Strictly Business CuRLEy’S, Shiner DALEy’S CHEAP SHoTS, Mojo Box EAgLE’S LoDgE (489-3030), Bobby Bremer Band FiZZiE MuLLigANS, The Cronkites HANDLEBARS, Sidemen J THE HoP!, Unconfined, Children of Atom, Homewreckrs, Heart Avail, 37 Street Signs, Just the Band iRoN HoRSE BAR, Uppercut JACKSoN STREET BAR & gRiLL (3158497), Six-Strings n’ Pearls JoHN’S ALLEy, Left Coast Country J KNiTTiNg FACToRy, Kalin and Myles

J LAguNA CAFé, Diane Copeland NASHViLLE NoRTH (208-457-9128), The Kelly Hughes Band NECTAR, Truck Mills NoRTHERN QuEST CASiNo, DJ Ramsin NyNE, DJ C-Mad J THE PALoMiNo CLuB, Alejandro Escovedo (See story above) PEND D’oREiLLE WiNERy, Ron Keiper RiCo’S, Crosscurrent THE RiDLER PiANo BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler SouLFuL SouPS & SPiRiTS, Son of Brad SWAxx, Celly Cel, Downlow, Montana Montana, Young West THE RoADHouSE, Last Chance Band uNDERgRouND 15, DJ One THE ViKiNg BAR & gRiLL, Christy Lee ZoLA, Kalida Indie Rock

Saturday, 04/18

J BELLToWER, Kazzuzapalousa Festival feat. Chastity Belt, Childbirth, Corey J. Brwer, Daniel Halligan, youryoungbody, Blackwater Prophet, Smashclub (See story above) BEVERLy’S, Robert Vaughn BLACK DiAMoND, DJ Major One BoLo’S, Slow Burn BooMERS CLASSiC RoCK BAR & gRiLL, The Dragon BuCKHoRN iNN, Sammy Eubanks THE CELLAR, Casey Ryan J CHAPS, Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston CoEuR D’ALENE CASiNo, Kicho, Can You Sing? Open Mic/Karaoke CoEuR D’ALENE CELLARS (208-6642336), Steve Simisky CuRLEy’S, Shiner EAgLE’S LoDgE, Bobby Bremer Band FiZZiE MuLLigANS, The Cronkites

gARLAND PuB & gRiLL (326-7777), Tracer gEM STATE CLuB (208-245-9916), JamShack HANDLEBARS, Sidemen THE HiVE, Zoso (Led Zeppelin tribute band) J THE HoP!, The Midnight Ghost Train, Mojave Wizard, Burning Clean, Thunder Knife, Heavy Pedal iRoN HoRSE BAR, Uppercut JoHN’S ALLEy, Left Coast Country JoNES RADiAToR, Working Spliffs J KNiTTiNg FACToRy, Too Broke To Rock feat. Like a Storm, Bridge to Grace, Invasive, Over Sea Under Stone J LAguNA CAFé, Curran Long THE LARiAT iNN, Dude Ranch LiTZ’S BAR & gRiLL, Down South J MoSCoW HEMP FEST AT EAST CiTy PARK, feat. Charcoal Squids, Galactic Tofu Farmers, Phoenix 99,


Voodoo City Radio, Bread & Circus, Endangered Species NASHVILLE NORTH, The Kelly Hughes Band NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Ramsin NORTHERN RAIL PUB (487-4269), Johnny & the Moondogs NYNE, DJ the Divine Jewels PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Owen & McCoy THE RAILROAD BAR (208-6872003), The Usual Suspects RICO’S, Crosscurrent THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler  RIVERFRONT PARK, Earth Day Celebration feat. B Radicals SWAXX, Caked Up, Dotcom, Victor Niglio, Beauflexx THE ROADHOUSE, Last Chance Band THE VIKING BAR & GRILL, Kalida ZOLA, Milonga

Sunday, 04/19

 BING CROSBY THEATER, Big Band Swings for Mike Lenke feat. Heater Villa, Kathleen Cavender, Robbin’s Rebels, Sammy Eubanks, Peter

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander. com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

Rivera and many more COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh, Bill Bozly DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church THE FLAME, Open mic/jam IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL (9268411), Evan Denlinger  KNITTING FACTORY, Blue October, Ashleigh Stone, Harvard of the South THE PALOMINO CLUB, Fury Fest feat. Element a440, A Balance of Power, Ironwood, Benign, Progenitus

Monday, 04/20

 BING CROSBY THEATER, Neko Case (See story on page 70) with Rodrigo Amarante  CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills JOHN’S ALLEY, Shawn James & the Shapeshifters UNDERGROUND 15, Open Mic ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 04/21

315 MARTINIS & TAPAS, The Rub  THE BARTLETT, Polaris, Cotillon THE BOILER ROOM (863-9213), Nick Grow FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills  THE HOP!, Ruines Ov Abbadon, Lady of the Lake, Eukaryst, Tower Seven JOHN’S ALLEY, Aaron Watson

JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Open-ness KELLY’S IRISH PUB, Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots  PINNACLE NORTHWEST, Mr. Gnome RED ROOM LOUNGE, Unplugged with Jimmy Nudge THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Kathleen Cavender Jazz SWAXX, T.A.S.T.Y with DJs Freaky Fred, Beauflexx ZOLA, The Bucket List

Wednesday, 04/22  BING CROSBY THEATER, Leon Russell (See story on facing page) THE BOAT LAUNCH RESTAURANT & LOUNGE (447-2035), Scotia Road  CHAPS, Land of Voices with Dirk Swartz EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard GARLAND AVENUE DRINKERY (3155327), Open Mic with DJ Scratch n Smith GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES (368-9087), Open Mic with T & T IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, AlgoRhythms JONES RADIATOR, Nate Greenburg LA ROSA CLUB, Robert Beadling and Friends THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Open Turntables Night with DJ Lydell LITZ’S BAR & GRILL (327-70920, Nick Grow LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 NYNE, Open Mic  PINNACLE NORTHWEST, Saffell,

Bard POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE (413-1834), Sammy Eubanks (acoustic) SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open mic SWAXX, Infected Mushroom with DaethStar, Bon Panda Breaks, BrainFunk THE ROADHOUSE, The Brown Notes ZOLA, The Bossame

Coming Up ...

BING CROSBY THEATER, Night of the Living Divas feat. Julia Keefe, Heather Villa, April 23 PINNACLE NORTHWEST, Agent Orange, In the Whale, Scatterbox, OC45, Random Noise, April 23 THE BARTLETT, Mirror Mirror, Shana Falana, Wild Pacific, April 23 THE PALOMINO CLUB, Greenfest feat. Free the Jester, Project Kings, Unconfined, April 24 KNITTING FACTORY, Nightwish, Sabaton, Delain, April 24 THE BIG DIPPER, KYRS Presents: Cursive Wires and the Bettys, April 24 THE PALOMINO CLUB, Orgy, April 25 THE BIG DIPPER, Fly Moon Royalty, Flying Spiders, April 25 JONES RADIATOR, Buzz Vineyard CD Release party, April 25 THE BARTLETT, The Round No. 7 feat. Cami Bradley, April 25 KNITTING FACTORY, Tech N9ne, Krizz Kaliko, King 810, Zuse & 3rd Leg, April 26 BABY BAR, The Gooch Palms, Death Valley Girls, 66beat, Phelgm Fatlae, Street Tang, April 27

CASH & CONCERTS WIN $100

@ 8:40am 12:40pm 3:40pm Weekdays

LISTEN FOR MORE INFORMATION

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 THE BLIND BUCK • 204 N. Division • 290-6229 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CALYPSOS • 116 E Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208665-0591 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 HANDLEBARS • 12005 E. Trent Ave.• 924-3720 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N Market St, Mead • 466-9918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR• 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO CLUB • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St • 443-5213 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 PINNACLE NORTHWEST • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 THE ROCK BAR • 13921 E. Trent Ave. • 43-3796 ROCKER ROOM • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 ROCKET MARKET • 726 E. 43rd Ave. • 343-2253 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 SWAXX • 23 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 UNDERGROUND 15 • 15 S. Howard St. • 290-2122 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 WEBSTER’S • 1914 N. Monroe St. • 474-9040 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 73


WORDS FROZEN FEATURES

This season’s National Geographic Live! series comes to a close with a behind-the-scenes look at the first-ever ascent of Bertha’s Tower, a sheer 2,000-foot peak in Antarctica. Cory Richards and Mike Libecki shared the adventure that took them across sketchy sheets of ice, battling hurricanelike winds, just to get to the base of the mountain before the climb. At the INB, the duo will showcase rare images from their trip, and tell the audience what inspired them to tackle the death-defying feat. — DAN NAILEN National Geographic Live!: Untamed Antarctica • Tue, April 21, at 7 pm • $41.50 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • inbpac.com • 279-7000

GET LISTED! Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

74 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

CLASSICAL AS SEEN ON YOUTUBE

MUSIC SPIN DOCTORS

Spokane Symphony Classics No. 9 • Sat, April 18, at 8 pm; Sun, April 19, at 3 pm • $15-$54 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

Record Store Day 2015 • Sat, April 18, times vary • Find participating stores at recordstoreday.com

Pianist Valentina Lisitsa, a Ukrainian-born North Carolina resident, takes the stage with the Spokane Symphony this weekend as it performs its ninth Classics Series concert. Having risen to fame via the powers of the Internet, Lisitsa’s YouTube channel has received nearly 88 million views; she even has been dubbed “the Justin Bieber of the classical world.” Her musical career is highly acclaimed around the globe, and she has performed at many renowned venues, including Carnegie Hall and Royal Albert Hall. — KAITLYN ANSON

If you’re a huge audiophile, you already have a list of the exclusive records, archival reissues and fun-colored rarities you’ll be going after. For everyone else, it’s time to catch up. Over the past few years, Record Store Day has been one of the biggest events of the year for independent record stores in the Inland Northwest, and this Saturday looks to be no different. Participating locations include Spokane’s 4,000 Holes and Recorded Memories and Coeur d’Alene’s The Long Ear. Awesome limited-releases include tracks from nearly any genre you ever wanted, from U2 to Monty Python. — LAURA JOHNSON


WORDS BEST OF BOTH WORLDS

Amidst life’s curve balls, do you find yourself wondering how people handled life’s problems in simpler times? Eastern Washington University’s Carper International Speaker Series — where critical analysis, controversy and cultural clashes are welcomed — continues by hosting world-renowned author and scientist Jared Diamond, who emphatically answers this question. Years of group studies and a deep love for traditional societies has equipped Diamond to intrigue audiences with his insight into all that we can learn from the past about child rearing, care for the elderly, fitness and conflict resolution. With beautifully interwoven anthropological, sociological and biological evidence in his book The World Until Yesterday, Diamond shows how combining historical societies’ victories with modern society’s struggles can give us the best of both worlds. — COURTNEY BREWER Learning from Traditional Societies with Jared Diamond • Thu, April 23, at 7 pm • $15 • Martin Woldson Theater • 1001 W. Sprague • foxtheaterspokane. com • 634-1200

COMMUNITY KEEN ON GREEN

Show your appreciation this Earth Day for being a member of the most dominant species on this planet, which has been gracious enough to let us thrive in numbers now that we’ve tapped into its resources. Spokane’s crown jewel in the heart of the city, Riverfront Park, is the ideal location to host a celebration of all things nature, including the eclectic “Procession of the Species” masked parade. Round up the kids to craft creative masks of favorite animals to wear for the annual tradition, then plan to spend the day listening to live music, catching the spray of the falls on your face and being thankful for our tiny slice of this big, green-and-blue planet. — CHEY SCOTT Earth Day Spokane 2015 • Sat, April 18, from 10 am-5 pm • Free • Riverfront Park, Gondola Meadows • earthdayspokane.org • 487-0702

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT SHS KITTEN SHOWER The Spokane Humane Society hosts an event to collect supplies to care for newborn kittens born from now through late summer, known as “kitten season.” Also includes info on fostering and volunteering. April 17, 6-8 pm. Free; donations accepted. Northeast Community Center, 4001 N. Cook. on.fb. me/1FdsIUL (487-1603) APRIL SHOWERS The Land Council’s annual fundraiser, offering dinner and live/silent auctions to support the restoration and revitalization of Inland Northwest forests, water and wildlife. April 18, 5-9 pm. $65/person; $450/ table. Northern Quest, 100 N. Hayford. tinyurl.com/khaafug (209-2407)

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THE SPOKANE AURORA NW ROTARY CLUB INVITES ALL CYCLISTS cHOcOLATE & cHAMPAGNE GALA Lutheran Community Services Northwest’s annual gala features tastings of champagne and chocolate and a gourmet dinner, with silent and live auctions. Proceeds benefit the Sexual Assault and Family Trauma Response Center. April 18, 6 pm. Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. lcsnw.org/ spokane (747-8224) HEAR ME RUN SPOKANE A 5K run benefiting the Spokane HOPE School, the region’s only early learning program for deaf and hard of hearing children. April 18, 9:30 am-noon. $30/ adults, $17.50/kids 6-12, free for kids age 5 and younger. Riverfront Park. hearmerunspokane.com (863-7097)

STARTING AT SPOKANE FALLS COMMUNITY COLLEGE • First century ride of the season • 15, 25, 50, 66, 100 miles • All levels of riders are welcome • Course is monitored • Rest stops along the course • End of ride baked potato feed with all the fixin’s for all riders to enjoy HURRY! ONLY 1 WEEK AWAY!

April 26th, 2015

There is also a tri-athlete secured bike corral for those who want to do a 5K run after the 100-mile ride.

Proceeds support Local and International Rotary Projects. Google Lilac Century Ride for more information.

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 75


W I SAW U YOU

RS RS

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU THE DREAMY AMR GUYI You come into my work place PSJCC! Your transporting patient mostly new admits for us. You give me all the info on the patient just like you should. I hardly can talk to you or even retain the info. Your eye contact makes it impossible for me to even think. You have the most amazing eyes i have ever seen. I have never been one for no words. But around you i can hardly speak. I am the one who normally helps you, brown curly hair always pulled back in ponytail. Next time you’re in if you’re single get my number, since I am too chicken to say anything. RE: MOON LADYI If this is the same person I know we connected instantly on our first glance from afar. You melted my heart as well. We chatted a little and I’d love to hear from you. Please give me a few identifying details about our meeting that only you and I know. Email me at starryeyes1238@gmail.com SAILING PAST ONE ANOTHERI Our gazes locked even though we were aboard two ships passing in the night. You were at Chaps with a couple and your glances my way lazered into my brain. You had permed dark blonde hair and a captivating smile. I was wearing a white shirt and tie. Let’s bring the ships back to the shore. See you there soon? JUNGLE MANI I saw you from across the jungle square, looking so handsome barefoot in your expedition hat. You were lovingly holding a baby who was glowing white in the sunshine. We locked eyes

and I felt the power of our connection. Do you want to go exploring with me? FLASHBACK PARTYI Apr 1st, on the south hill.I came in from the back yard, I was wearing some acid wash jeans and a saved by the bell T-shirt.You were wearing a black sweater with pink green and yellow triangles all over it. We made eye contact and laughed at each other, eventually talking about which 70’s Charlie’s angels was our favorite. We got separated on the scavenger hunt( first place was a Fresh Prince of Bel-Air action figure), and never saw you show up for the winners I’d like to see you again in more relevant pants but feel free to rock that curly side pony again I have a newly acquired Will Smith toy that I am glad to share with you SEAHAWKS FANI We have watched a couple of Seahawks games together. You are tall and look great in your jeans and work boots. I would love to grab a beer sometime, but have always been too shy to ask.

CHEERS PIZZA GENTLEMANRYI To the gentleman who knocked my pizza from the table, then offered to cover the cost: thank you. I forgot to thank you personally on the way out, but please know the gesture was genuinely appreciated. Cheers good sir. CAFFE AFFOGATOI I want to give Isaac a big shout out for such amazing customer serivce! You go above and beyond each and every time. The vibe you give this place is remarkable, you make every visit enjoyable and unique! Thank you for making the drinks extraordinary! Always a pleasure coming here and bringing friends here. Thank you! HOOYAH FOR BREEDERSI Cheers to people breeders. Your ambitious behavior of popping out babies like human salad shooters in the face of overwhelming evidence that Earth’s carrying capacity has been breeched, has given me an epiphany: no matter what I do to diminish harm to the planet, an ever increasing population renders inconsequential my puny actions. Thus, I am free to (1) quit recycling (a waste of time; just add to the mountains of garbage), (2) drive wherever I want (20 feet to the mailbox), (3) consume as if there is no tomorrow

(since there may not be), and (4) vote for the politicians pandering to corporations which help drive the environment

Heart with them. We have bed bugs in the building and you will not get rid of them because it would cost you money.

to chat customers up but not actually do her job. And the people behind the desert counter always act put out when

Please have some respect, be mindful of children playing, and slow down in residential neighborhoods!

into the ditch (as long as they deliver the goods to me). Thank you for making me see the light. DOTI My love I cannot find the words to describe how over the moon I am to be engaged to such a wonderful man. In your arms I have found all the comfort, love, and peace I have always longed for. Your sweet words touch my heart but it’s the look you get in your eyes when you say them that touches my soul. February 21st was the happiest day of my life so far, I love you in a million ways my friend, I can’t wait to be your wife. Always, Moo CHEERS TO TSA AGENTSI In the past six months I have traveled between Spokane and Seattle by plane several times. Going through security has become my favorite part of flying thanks to the TSA agents at the Spokane International Airport. They are always friendly and make an effort to connect with me and other travelers. The agents I have talked to seem to make an effort to enjoy their jobs and make travel as easy as possible for each person. Perhaps it’s my tendency to flirt with TSA agents that puts me in their good graces, but I do believe the agents in Spokane are some of the loveliest people I’ve ever met.

JEERS SSLUMLORDI You have gotten so lazy by not fixing the front door and kicking the drug dealers out. You are pathetic. A few days ago we had trash so thick that it blocked the stairs leading to the fire exit. I have found so many syringes on the stairs you could supply Sacred

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

They will spread to every apartment and downtown to the restaurant if you don't do something soon. We have graffiti every night. Why don't you just sell the building and save us the trouble? 8TH ST. SPEED RACERSI To the inconsiderate fools who speed down our gravel street on 8th between Thor and Freya day after day.... where 10 kids reside. One of these days somebody is going to get hit and killed due to your negligence. What's the big hurry anyways? Is it worth a life? Along with that fear, comes the friggin' dust. The dust which has caused breathing problems and additional health problems. Please have some respect, be mindful of children playing, and slow down in residential neighborhoods! Please and thank you to those who do slow down. Oil our road, city of Spokane!! It's a street, it shouldn't look like an alley way. Minimum standard? #taxpayer #dustbreathers DIAL DOWN THE ATTITUDEI To our favorite buffet restaurant. If you are going to advertise that you stay open until 10 P.M., please keep serving food until that time instead of starting to pull everything as soon as the dinner rush slows down. We are tired of getting the bums rush at 8:30 is there not a manager there at night? Why is this allowed? It has happened repeatedly. We pay regular price for dinner yet only get half of the service and less than half of the food options and are made to feel unwelcome by the staff. Today we went to lunch and had to have our drinks refilled by the cashier because our server was off in LaLa land. It appears that she loves

asked to make a ice cream cone. Since the employees have such a difficult time, why not let people get their own drinks and ice cream? What the heck is a "code 100" ? It makes it feel like you're hiding something. WASTE OF TIMEI So yeah we hung out and I liked you and your big sexy black truck, but you turned out to be a complete waste of my time...thanks... you are the perfect example of why I don't date, you ruined my whole day and I just wanted to have a great time with you, but I didn't so yeah thanks a lot ANOTHER POINT OF VIEWI I've been reading the Inlander for a year or so and I have an observation; at least 90% of the entries to this column are somebody criticizing somebody else, either in a restaurant or in public somewhere. The ones I really can't believe are the victims of thievery; does anyone really believe a common thief will respond to being guilt-tripped? the way, fast-food establishment, I'm one of the people you have lost as a customer your just too slow. 

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

Find out where at www.watrust.com/events

BE SEEN AT FUN EVENTS 76 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015


EVENTS | CALENDAR HUNNY BUNNY SPAGHETTI FEED & SILENT AUCTION Last fall, 4-year-old Annabelle was diagnosed with a very aggressive cancer of the sympathetic nervous system. She’ll be traveling back and forth to Seattle Children’s Hospital for a special trial treatment, and to offset medical expenses the resort hosts a benefit event. April 18, 5-7 pm. $30/adult; $15/child. CdA Resort, 115 S. Second. (800-688-5253 extension 21) MLK CENTER DINNER & AUCTION Proceeds from the benefit are to be used to provide and expand social services offered by the center to local children and their families. April 18, 5:30-7:30 pm. $40/person. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. mlkspokane. org (455-8722) POWER TO PRESERVATION Spokane Preservation Advocates’ biggest fundraising event of the year, the “SPAtacular.” Mingle with other historic preservation enthusiasts in a cocktail party atmosphere with appetizers, live/silent auction, games and live music. April 18, 6:30-11 pm. $50. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside. spokanepreservation.org (344-1065) VIVA VINO & BREW A wine and beer tasting event (ages 21+) with a full fajita dinner and no-host bar, live/silent auctions and more. Proceeds benefit the scholarship program of the Hispanic Business Professional Assoc. April 18, 6 pm. $40. Mukogawa Institute, 4000 W. Randolph Rd. hbpaspokane.net (995-2542) WOMEN & CHILDREN’S FREE RESTAURANT SPRING TEA The ninth annual spring tea fundraiser benefits the nonprofit’s in-house and outreach programs, offering a four-course tea lunch service, silent auction, vintage fashion show and more. April 18, 11:30 am-2:30 pm. $45$75. Red Lion at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. wcfrspokane.org (324-1995) TATTOOS FOR A CAUSE Participants, on a first come, first served basis can choose from a select offering of animal-related “flash” tattoos, with all proceeds supporting the Spokane Humane Society. April 19, 11 am-6 pm. $70-$100. On the Level Tattoo, 2166 N. Hamilton. spokanehumanesociety.org (443-5763) HOME CHILDCARE SCHOLARSHIP FUNDRAISER TEA The annual event raises funds to support EWU student parents. April 22, 2-4 pm. $15-$25. EWU Monroe Hall, 526 Fifth St. (359-6200)

COMEDY GUFFAW YOURSELF Open mic comedy night; every other Thursday at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. (847-1234) STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market. (483-7300) LIVE, LOCAL COMEDIANS Performing every Friday and Saturday, at 8 pm. April 17-18, Chris Molineux; April 24-25, Don Parkins & Friends. $12. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market. (483-7300) POETS UP! Poetry-themed improv comedy show using audience suggestions. Fridays in April at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) STAND-UP COMEDY Live comedy featuring established and up-and-coming local comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. No cover. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third. (838-6688) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Not rated.) Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045)

THIS, THAT OR THE OTHER Improv comedy show, third Saturday (April 18) of the month at 8 pm. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway. (342-2055) STAND UP / SHOW DOWN Live comedy, Mondays at 8 pm. Free. Sapphire Lounge, 901 W. First. (747-1041) OPEN MIC COMEDY Wednesdays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Brooklyn Deli & Lounge, 122 S. Monroe St. (835-4177)

COMMUNITY 12TH ANNUAL BULLDOG JOG Gonzaga’s Alpha Kappa Psi hosts a 5K fun run/walk to benefit Second Harvest Food Bank. April 18, 8:30 am-1 pm. $12-$15. McCarthey Athletic Center, 801 N Cincinnati. on.fb.me/1GPV2eQ BLOOMSDAY TRAINING CLINICS Sessions begin with a presentation on race training, followed by warm-up and a supported run. Route increases by a mile each week to prep for the full length of the Bloomsday course. Saturdays at 8:30 am, Through April 25. Free. SFCC, 3410 W. Ft. George Wright Dr. phc.org (533-3500) EARTH DAY SPOKANE Events include children’s activities, local vendor booths, a farmers market, live music and more. April 18, 10 am-5 pm. Free. Riverfront Park. facebook.com/earthdayspokane (487-0702) HUMAN RACE 5K A 5K charity fun run/ walk benefiting Partners in Health, an international nonprofit that delivers lifesaving health care to those who need it most in poor communities around the world. April 18, 10 am-noon. $20. Gonzaga School of Law, 721 N. Cincinnati. law.gonzaga.edu/gjil/human-race-2/ (747-3304) STCU FREE FAMILY DAY Celebrate Japanese culture on the opening day of Japan Week at the MAC, and participate in a variety of hands-on family fun activities. April 18, 11 am-3 pm. Free. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org (456-3931) GIVING TREES FAMILY BBQ Community barbecue with games, kids activities, races/contests, a potluck picnic and live music by Afro-funk band Dank Stars. April 19, 1-4:30 pm. Free. Sutton Park, 805 Washington, Cheney. on.fb.me/1FgOx0A (598-235-9240) HOLOCAUST OBSERVANCE CEREMONY The temple’s annual Yom HaShoah ceremony includes a presentation by Holocaust survivor Robert Hershkowitz, an art exhibit, candle lighting ceremony and more. April 19, 7 pm. Temple Beth Shalom, 1322 E. 30th Ave. (536-7745) CATHOLIC CHARITIES VOLUNTEER ORIENTATION Learn about the many volunteer opportunities available and how to help others in need through the local nonprofit. RSVP requested. April 21, 10 am. Catholic Charities Family Service, 12 E. Fifth. catholiccharitiesspokane.org (358-4270) TWEEN CLUB Monthly activities for kids in grades 4-6. Held on the third Tuesday of each month. Upcoming dates: April 21 and May 18, from 4-5 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8350) MOSCOW HEMP FEST The 19th annual festival hosts speakers, live music, vendors and information on a new petition to decriminalize medical marijuana and hemp cultivation. Includes a keynote address by Elvy Musikka, one of the four living federal medical marijuana patients. April 18, 10 am-7 pm. Free. East City Park, 900 E. 3rd St. (208-301-2289)

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 77


EVENTS | CALENDAR

FILM

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78 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

SPOKANE FILM SOCIETY The local group screens a film to get audiences thinking, with each month focusing on a new theme. Beer/wine and food for purchase during the show. Thursdays at 9 pm. $5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. (327-1050) WILD CANARIES Madcap murder mystery meets razor-sharp relationship comedy in this witty twist on the detective movie. April 16-18. $4-$7. Panida Theater, 300 N. First, Sandpoint. (208-255-7801) THE MASK YOU LIVE IN Screening of the 2015 Sundance Film Festival Premier film that follows boys and young men as they struggle to stay true to themselves while negotiating America’s narrow definition of masculinity. April 18, 6 pm. $8. Panida Theater, 300 N. First. sandpointmensgroup.com (208-255-7801) THE HUNTING GROUND A controversial documentary about rape on American college campuses, featuring stories of men and women who were raped at their schools and then subsequently denied justice. Followed by a post film discussions with panelists from diverse perspectives. April 19, 7 pm. $8. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main. (209-2383) ADVANCED EDITING Learn about Adobe Premier, which is free to use on all SPL public computers. April 21, 1:30 pm. Free. Hillyard Library, 4005 N. Cook St. (444-5380) GREEN FIRE Kirk and Madeline David, trained at the Aldo Leopold Foundation, present the documentary about the legendary environmentalist. April 21, 6:309 pm. Free. Community Building, 35 W. Main. inlandnwlandtrust.org (328-2939) PLANETARY A special screening of the documentary examining the fragility of our planet in celebration of Earth Day. April 22, 7:30 pm. $8. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main Ave. (209-2383)

FOOD & DRINK ONLINE TOOLS FOR HOME CHEFS Learn about the best websites and apps to help you find new recipes or organize all your old favorites. April 16, 7 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. (893-8350) ORGANIC VEGETABLE GARDENING Get all the basics on organic vegetable garden in a fast-paced class covering zones, starts, soil prep and composting. April 16, 1-2 pm. Free. Moran Prairie Library, 6004 S. Regal. (893-8340) WANDERING TABLE WINE DINNER A multi-course small plates dinner by Chef Adam Hegsted, with wine pairings. April 16, 6-9 pm. $75/person; reservations required. The Wandering Table, 1242 W. Summit Pkwy. thewanderingtable.com (443-4410) JAPANESE DINNER & CULTURAL NIGHT Watch demonstrations of flower arrangement (Ikebana), Japanese silk embroidery (Nuido), Taiko Drumming and martial arts of Kendo, Iaido and Jodo during a Japanese buffet. Reservations due by April 15. April 17, 6-8:30 pm. $20/buffet meal. Spokane Kendo Club, 829 W. Broadway. (465-5207) MIXOLOGY 101 Chef Charlie Martin teaches the proper steps of the best martini, cosmopolitan, lemon drop, negroni and other classic vodka and ginbased cocktails. April 17, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) SAKE TASTING Learn about what sake is, how it’s served, and different styles

produced. April 17, 7 pm. $20, registration requested. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) VINO WINE TASTING Sample Italian imports on April 17, from 3-6:30 pm. April 18 tasting features Lumos Wine Co. of Oregon from 2-4:30 pm. Vino!, 222 S. Washington St. (838-1229) 1ST ANNIVERSARY CIDER SPLASH The cidery celebrates the first anniversary of its tasting room opening, with $4 pours, a food truck on site and prizes. April 18, 12-9 pm. Free admission. Liberty Ciderworks, 164 S. Washington. libertycider.com HARUMATSURI JAPANESE FOOD FESTIVAL The 25th annual event is part of Japan Week Spokane, and offers dine-in or takeout orders. Serving: Chicken or vegetarian teriyaki bento box, a variety of sushi and Japanese desserts. Order online or call. April 19, 11 am-3 pm. $4-$12/dish. Spokane Buddhist Temple, 927 S. Perry St. spokanebuddhisttemple.org (534-7954) INVEG COMMUNITY POTLUCK Bring a plant-based (no animal products) dish to share, your ingredient list, and if possible, your own eating utensils. Childcare is provided at $2/child. Each month features a different presentation or cooking demo. See speaker schedule online. Third Sunday (April 19) of the month, from 5-7 pm. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. inveg.org (607-0409) TEA TIME Sherri Davey, owner of Heavenly Special Teas, shares health benefits of tea and the differences between types of tea, along with a demo on brewing looseleaf tea. April 22, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Deer Park Library, 208 Forest St. (276-2985)

MUSIC ZOSO: THE LED ZEPPELIN EXPERIENCE 20th anniversary tour show by the Led Zeppelin tribute band. April 16, 7 pm. $20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404) BEN KLEIN ELVIS TRIBUTE SHOW The Spokane-based, award-winning Elvis impersonator and musician performs. April 17, 7:30 pm. $15 at the door. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt. (868-4671) BROADWAY THROUGH THE AGES The Mountain Harmony Show Choir leads local children in a performance of show tune classics. April 17-18; dinner at 6:30 and show at 7:30. $12-$25. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy 211 off Hwy 2, Newport. (208-448-1294) PIANO BENEFIT CONCERT Chamber music concert featuring Dr. Jody Graves and other performers to raise funds for a new piano for the historic Harrington Opera House. April 18, 7 pm. Free; donations accepted. Steinway Piano Gallery, 13418 E. Nora. steinwayspokane.com (327-4266) JAZZ WORKSHOP & CONCERT Concert (6:30 pm) featuring Scott Steed, Michael Waldrop, Cameron Laplante, Kevin Woods, Brendan McMurphy and Rachel BadeMcMurphy. Workshop (free) for beginning improvisers at 5:30. April 18, 5:30-10 pm. $5-$8. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague. thebartlettspokane.com (747-2174) NORTHWEST SACRED MUSIC CHORALE 15th season concert presenting “Elijah,” Felix Mendelssohn’s classic Oratorio based on events in the life of the prophet Elijah. April 18 at 7 pm, April 19 at 3 pm. $10-$15. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. (208-446-2333) SPOKANE SYMPHONY Classics Series No. 9 “Musical Sorcery” features Ukranian-born Valentina Lisitsa, a social media darling with more than millions of views

on YouTube, performing the virtuosic Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini. April 18 at 8 pm and April 19 at 3 pm. Prices vary. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) AUDITORIUM CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES Concert by Calmus Vocal Ensemble, a German a capella vocal quintet, for the final installment of the 2014-15 chamber music series. April 21, 7:30 pm. $10-$22. University of Idaho, 709 S Deakin St. auditoriumseries.org (208-885-6111) GONZAGA JAZZ FACULTY CONCERT Featuring special guest Bobby Shrew. April 21, 8-9 pm. $5. Gonzaga Jepson Center, 502 E. Boone. gonzaga.edu/music (313-6733) SPOKANE SYMPHONY CHAMBER SOIREE The spring chamber soiree features ensembles of Symphony musicians in an intimate setting, with hors d’oeuvres and dessert by award-winning Chef Urs Moser. April 21-22 from 7:30-9:30 pm. Prices vary. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside Ave. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) GONZAGA WIND SYMPHONY The symphony performs with Square Revolution, a quartet of brass players and composers whose playlists span from pop and jazz to tango, funk, latin, and beyond. April 22, 7:30-9 pm. $5-$10. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. gonzaga.edu/music (624-1200) NIGHT OF THE LIVING DIVAS FEAT. JULIA KEEFE, HEATHER VILLA Holy Names Music Center’s annual Jazz Appreciation Month concert at the Bing Crosby Theater includes a wine/dessert reception before the concert, at 6 pm. April 23, 7 pm. $25. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (326-9516)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS SCOUT-O-RAMA Games, activities, demonstrations, climbing wall and more. Breakfast ($5) from 7-9 am and activities from 10 am-3 pm. April 18, 7 am-3 pm. $2 w/o breakfast. Kootenai County Fairgrounds, 4056 N. Government Way. northidahofair.com (208-772-2455) WILDERNESS FIRST AID COURSE Course offers a sound introduction to wilderness emergency medical training, and is ideal for individuals who take frequent trips into the backcountry or who may be called on to respond during a natural disaster. April 18-19, from 8 am-5 pm. $175. Mountain Gear Corporate, 6021 E. Mansfield. longleafmedical.com (208-274-3596) SPOKANE RIVER RUN The annual trail run through Riverside State Park offers five routes, and proceeds support the Garfield APPLE program and local nonprofits. April 19, 7:45 am. $10-$60; $200/ relay team. Riverside State Park. spokaneriverrun.com NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LIVE: UNTAMED ANTARCTICA Presentation by Cory Richards and Mike Libecki on their climb of Bertha’s Tower, a 2,000-ft. spire on the Antarctic continent. April 21, 7-9 pm. $41.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. ticketswest.com FREE STATE PARKS DAY In celebration of Washington State Parks’ 102nd birthday, residents are offered access to any state park without needing a Discover Pass. Includes access locally to Riverside and Mount Spokane State Parks. Upcoming free days in 2015: April 22, May 10, June 6, June 13, Aug. 25, Sept. 26, Nov. 11. Free. parks.wa.gov


APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 79


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess MAlice in WonderlAnd

AMY ALKON

My boyfriend has a crazy ex-wife who can’t let go. She is the meanest, most vengeful and manipulative person, initially convincing the 15-year-old son she has with my boyfriend that I’m the reason “Dad won’t come back.” (He actually divorced her after she, in a fit of rage, made a false police report about him.) She also slashed my tires and spread a rumor that my boyfriend is a child molester. I love him dearly, and we feel we’re soul mates, but his ex-wife is making it so hard to be happy. What can I do? —Besieged

Where is the very small, highly targeted zombie apocalypse when you need it? Don’t take this woman’s behavior personally. And yes, I’m serious. Assuming what you say about her is true, she seems to be one of those born bar brawlers, ever on the lookout for a reason to break a bottle over someone’s head and start the second Hundred Years’ War. If she could, she’d not only slash your tires but take a sponge bath in the Fountain of Youth so she could live long enough to slash your great-greatgrandchildren’s, too. The problem is, because she isn’t acting from anything resembling reason, there’s no reasoning with her. As personal security expert Gavin de Becker says about the irrationally persistent in his terrific book “The Gift of Fear,” “There is no straight talk for crooked people.” So, practically speaking, short of finding a home security company that sends out zombie squads by radio call, all that you, personally, can do is decide whether you find love and soulmatery worth the trade-offs in terror and tire costs. As for what your boyfriend can do, the answer, unfortunately, is “not much more”: Install video surveillance; document everything she does; and use the legal system to the extent he can (and the extent that seems prudent). The following advice — to use gratitude as a buffer against ugliness — might sound like it’s from the Little Miss Sunshine Solutions Department, but there’s actually solid science behind it. Research by social psychologist Sonja Lyubomirsky and her colleagues finds that people are meaningfully happier when they take regular stock of the things they have to be grateful for. (A caveat: This happiness-increasing effect was found only for people who did this blessings counting once a week, maybe, the researchers surmise, because doing it more often felt like a chore.) So consider getting gratitudinal once a week, maybe on Sunday night. You could even write five things down on slips of paper and put them in a “Gratitude Jar” so you have a visual reminder of how good you actually have it when things go bad. This may also help you avoid getting snippy with the irritatingly well-meaning who chirp, “What goes around comes around!” Right. If there is such a thing as karma, it seems to go after the truly heinous offenders first, like all the people who ever dropped a straw wrapper or let out a puff of tail wind in the elevator.

TWo BrokeBAck GirlS

I’m a butch lesbian with a crush on a (supposedly) straight married lady who’s very tomboyish. She has a number of lesbian friends, and I suspect her husband is in the closet. I keep telling her she’s “culturally gay” (because she dresses “soft butch” — combat boots, cords, etc. — and because of some of her attitudes), but I actually think there’s more to it than that. She insists she’s straight but seems weirdly upset by my comments. —Be Who You Are Why not just say it right out: “There’s the closet. Could you please sit in there for a half-hour and come out ready to leave your husband?” I personally find it tragic when gay people feel they have to “ungay” themselves by living straight, but respecting another person’s privacy means accepting that they get to choose which parts of their life they’ll be taking commentary on. In other words, by picketing a baker who won’t make a cake for a gay wedding, you’re exercising your free speech rights, but it’s way out of line for you to effectively picket somebody’s relationship: “We’re here! We’re queer! And guess what: So are the two of you!” And no, this isn’t justified by your creation of an updated Kinsey scale — one that measures female homosexual desire based on a woman’s choice of footwear and whether she accessorizes with a welding mask. So, instead of trying to drag this woman (by her wallet chain) out of her marriage, turn your attention to a woman who’s single and out. Respect that for your friend, Prince Charming may very well be that dude from the Disney movies, determined as you are to recast him as a soldier of fortune crossed with a lady gym teacher. n ©2015, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

80 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015

EVENTS | CALENDAR

THEATER BECKY’S NEW CAR Performance of the original comedy with serious overtones; a devious and delightful romp down the road not taken. Through April 19; ThuSat at 7:30 pm; Sun at 2 pm. $10-$12. Pullman Civic Theatre, 1220 NW Nye St. pullmancivictheatre.org (332-8406) THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK Ferris drama students present a production of Wendy Kesselman’s adaptation of the tragic story. April 16-18 and April 2224 at 7 pm. $8-$10. Ferris High School, 3020 E. 37th Ave. (354-6000) DONALD MARGULIES’ COLLECTED STORIES Collected Stories chronicles the relationship between Ruth, a celebrated author with a dry wit and a distinguished career, and her talented, bright-eyed young protégé Lisa. Through April 26; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Modern Theater Spokane, 174 S. Howard. themoderntheater.org MARY POPPINS Musical performance of the classic story about a magical nanny. April 16-19 and 22-26; Wed-Fri at 7:30 pm and Sat-Sun at 1:30 pm. $12-$20. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N Grand Ave. rtoptheatre.org (334-0750) THE MISANTHROPE The North Idaho College Theatre department presents Molière’s comedy, adapted by Timothy Mooney. April 16-18 and 23-25. Free and open to the public. Schuler Performing Arts Center at NIC, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu (208-769-3220) SHERLOCK HOLMES: CURSE OF THE SIGN OF FOUR A classic thriller adapted from a novel by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. Through April 26; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Mission Community Outreach fundraiser night April 22 ($30). $18-$25. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) EQUUS Performance of the 1974 Tony Award-winning play written by Peter Schaffer. Play contains nudity, adult situations and language. Through April 26; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third. spokanestageleft.org HAIR The Modern Theater Coeur d’Alene and Friends of the Bing present the fourth and final Tony Awardwinning Broadway musical in its series. April 17-18, at 8 pm. $25. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404) LITTLE WOMEN The story of Louisa M. Alcott’s famous novel comes to life on stage. Through April 19, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. $5-$12. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave, Newport. pendorielleplayers.org (447-9900) PLAY ON! Moscow Community Theatre performs the play about a theater group trying to put on a play despite interference from an author who keeps revising the script. April 17-18 at 7:30 pm, April 19 at 2 pm. $10-$12. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. (208-882-4127) INNOCENTS LOST: THE GRIMM TRIAL OF HANSEL & GRETEL Northwest Opera’s 2015 season opens an original tale of courtroom drama set to Humperdink’s familiar music. April 18-19 at 2 pm. $12. Bethlehem Lutheran, 2715 S. Ray St. (327-3598) SLEEPY HOLLOW: A MUSICAL TALE A musical performed by students in the Civic’s Spring 2015 Academy Intensive. April 18 at 2 pm. $5-$10. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. (325-2507) A HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL Gonzaga

University Specialized Recreation’s spring play is a series of skits and sketch comedies that take a satirical look at high school movie characters. April 19, 3-9 pm and April 20, 4-9 pm. In Cataldo Hall Globe Room. Gonzaga, 502 E. Boone Ave. (313-6937) PANDORA SCOOTER: I AM ENOUGH The LGBTQ activist and performer presents a solo show based on her own struggles as a gay woman and her attempt to commit suicide. Includes a talkback after the show. April 21, 7 pm. $5 suggested donation. Bethany Presbyterian Church, 2607 S. Ray. (593-0191) GUYS & DOLLS Performance of the romantic-comedy Broadway musical. April 23-26, times vary. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (800-325-7328) KELLY THE DESTROYER VS. THE SPRINGFIELD COBRAS Tiger drama students perform the world premiere of the musical play by Rob Hartmann and Katie Krigg. April 24-25 at 7 pm. Lewis & Clark HS, 521 W. Fourth. (354-7000)

VISUAL ARTS DISPOSE (); An interactive, computercontrolled installation by Ben Watanabe and Cable Griffith. April 14-May 20; lecture/discussion May 20, at 11:30 am. Gallery open Mon-Fri, 8:30 am3:30 pm. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3500) THINGS WITH WINGS The show’s theme is expressed through the featured works of Louise Kodis, Melissa Cole, Sigrid Morgan-Nei, Gina Corkery and others. Opening reception April 17, from 5-9 pm and April 18, from 12-5 pm. Free. Manic Moon & More, 1007 W. Augusta Ave. (413-9101) RIVER RIDGE ASSOCIATION OF FINE ARTS The local arts group meets to share ideas, demonstrations, and hear from guest speakers. April’s speaker is wildlife painter Terry Lee, who talks about his career and creates a wildlife oil paintings during the talk. April 22, 10 am-noon. Free. Spokane Art Supply, 1303 N. Monroe St. (325-0471) THE GREAT SPOKANE ART PARTY Annual fundraiser for Blueprints for Learning, which funds the Community Building Children’s Center and the Child Care Training Institute. Participating artists TBA. April 25, 7-10 pm. $55/person. Community Building, 35 W. Main. facebook.com/SpokaneArtParty

WORDS TRAVEL SERIES PRESENTS: MATTHEW KEPNES The author of “Travel the World on $50 a Day” presents as part of Auntie’s travel speakers series. April 16, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) TRAVEL SERIES PRESENTS: ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS OF TRAVEL A panel discussion about the environmental impacts of travel moderated by Gonzaga’s Dr. Gregory Gordon who’s joined by community leaders. April 17, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) DOROTHY VAN SOEST The Professor Emeritus and former dean at the University of Washington, presents her new book “Just Mercy,” a book examining the death penalty’s affects, told through the perspective of one family. April 18, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) ESTHER HIDAHL The author signs cop-

ies of her children’s book “Mr. Inky: Spider with an Attitude.” April 18, 2 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) VIETNAM WAR: 40 YEARS FROM THE FALL OF SAIGON A lecture and discussion by Professor Ky Quy Vu from DeVry University, in Georgia. Refreshments also served. Presented in both Vietnamese and English. April 19, 3-4:30 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley St. (899-5058) GET LIT! FESTIVAL The 17th annual literary festival features readings and workshops by local and regional authors, including Sherman Alexie, Jess Walter, Sharma Shields, Benjamin Percy, Rick Barot, Shawn Vestal and many others. April 20-26; locations/times vary. Most events free; others $10-$15. getlitfestival.org SPOKANE POETRY SLAM FINALS An event to determine once and for all, the top four Spokane poets of the year. These poets will be on the team representing the Lilac City at the National Poetry Slam, held each August. April 20. $5. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org PRIDE WEEK SPEAKER: ALFREDA “FREDA” LANOIX Alfreda Lanoix is determined to fearlessly speak and experience, and views the world through a multi-faceted lens of laughter and self examination as a black, lesbian mother and minister. April 21, 10 am. Free and open to the public. EWU Monroe Hall, 526 Fifth, Cheney. (359-6200) BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series, open to all readers and all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. spokanepoetryslam.org (847-1234) JARED DIAMOND: THE WORLD UNTIL YESTERDAY Diamond presents a picture of the human past as it had been for millions of years, and considers what the differences between that past and our present mean for our lives today. April 23, 7-8:30 pm. $15 (students free). Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200)

ETC. PALOUSE PATCHERS QUILT SHOW See more than 200 locally-made quilts on display. Also includes a vendor mall, quilt raffle and refreshments. April 1819, from 10 am-5 pm both days. $3-$5. Latah County Fairgrounds, 1021 Harold St. palousepatchers.org (332-6252) RAINBOW DANCE THEATRE A program featuring choreography that fuses traditions of West African dance, Haitian dance, hip hop, martial arts, and American modern dance. April 17, 7:30 pm. $14-$30; free/WSU students. Beasley Coliseum, 925 NE Fairway Rd, Pullman. festivaldance.org (335-3525) SHRINE CIRCUS The El Katif Shriners celebrate their traditional circus’ 61st year. April 17-19; Fri at 3 pm and 7 pm, Sat at 11 am, 3 pm, 7 pm and Sun at 1 pm and 5 pm. $10-$25. Spokane Valley Mall, 14700 E. Indiana. (926-3700) STARTUP WEEKEND SPOKANE Create a startup business in 54 intense hours of connecting with mentors, founders and learning to validate your idea. All meals provided. April 24-26. $99. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. bit.ly/1PddLot (533-7000) n


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he official cannabis holiday of the year falls on Monday. Four Twenty — or April 20 — started as a subculture celebration honoring all things cannabis and has since turned into a widely recognized consumer and lifestyle holiday. Spokane pot shops are celebrating with free joints, prize giveaways and discounted product. Celebrations will occur over

the four-day weekend, while supplies last. Call for exact dates and times. Among the events: 420 Friendly: $7 grams and flowers; $20 per eighth; private party featuring live music and smoking area (contact for private invitation) • 1515 S. Lewis • 844-7287 Cinder: $4 grams; $14 half-gram of wax • 7011 N. Division • 241-3091 Cinder Spokane Valley: $4 grams; $14 half-gram of wax • 1421 N. Mullan, Spokane Valley • 241-3726 Cured Cooperative: 25 percent off everything in store; barbeque and bake sale; prize giveaways • 7826 N. Market, Suite E • 808-2800 E.K. Green: $25 per eighth of an ounce; $50 per quarter; $35 concentrates per gram; $150 ounce of Pure AK and Harlequin; free joint and clones • 21 S. Thierman, Suite C, Spokane Valley • 290-6937 Green Light: $25 per eighth; $4.20 pre-rolled joints; $50 gram concentrates; discounts on various glass products and edibles • 10309 E. Trent • 309-3193

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The Green Nugget: $7.25 per gram • 1919 E. Francis • 309-2130 Happy Daze Grass: Anniversary barbeque; grand opening at 2403 E. Euclid. Spokane location features glassblowing, barbeque and specials • 18325 E. Appleway, Spokane Valley • 228-3972 Herb Nerds: $100 ounces • 12928 E. Indiana, Suite 1 • 474-1750 Herbal Connection Inc.: Prize giveaways and events • 3812 N. Monroe • 315-8459 The Peaceful Choice: Barbeque and DJ; prize raffles; extra half-gram per purchase; free pipe with purchase • 3401 N. Division • 325-7454 Sativa Sisters: Meet growers; specials on products and paraphernalia • 10525 E . Trent, Spokane Valley • 381-1502 Satori MJ: Meet the growers presentations; $20 per eighth; in-store specials • 9301 N. Division • 703-7191 Smokane: Grand opening featuring prizes and promotions • 17 N. Ralph • 536-4000 The Spot Delivery: Free CO2 dabs with delivery • 216-1115 TreeHouse Club: $10 grams; $29-$49 Farmer J’s vape cartridges • 14421 E. Trent, Spokane Valley • 413-2169 n

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BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 and Initiative 502). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington State, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor Control Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

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APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 81


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APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 83


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48. Like some poseurs, in slang 51. No Child Left Behind dept. 52. Inaugural feature 53. Part of a sch. year 54. They’re often made at print shops (they’re made in 17-, 22-, 33- and 48-Across) 61. Nile reptile 62. Upholsterer’s sample 63. Bounce back 64. Gridiron positions: Abbr. 65. Actress Milano 66. Piquancy

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Fri: 9am-6pm & Sat: 9am-3pm

Record Store Day (4-18) is Every Day @ Spokane's Home for Music RichardsRecordedMemories.com

FULL PRICE IF I DON’T

19th Annual

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BIKES • BABES • BOOZE

509-475-0005

Equal Housing Opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Law which makes it illegal to advertise any preference to, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for our real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain on discrimination call HUD free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

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Desert Jewels Nursery

Collectibles, Furniture, Bikes!

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355 nder.com 09) 444-7 la PHONE: (5BulletinBoard@In mit Parkway : IL u A S M t Ee s m 01 2 N: 1227 W IN PERSO Spokane, WA 99

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THIS ANSW WEEK’S I SAW ERS ON YOUS

“COLOR COPIES”

27. ____ soup 28. Abbr. on a Topps card 31. Way to see the world? 32. Tattle (on) 34. Bad way to go

35. “The Lion King” queen 36. Arthur Ashe Kids’ Day org. 37. Totals 38. TV actress Remini 39. Jan. 1 till now

42. “Veni, vidi, vici” speaker 43. Like Jackie Jackson, in the Jackson 5 44. Freshens the pillow 45. Cpl.’s inferior 46. “You’re mine!” 47. Dos cubed 49. Sounds from a 55-Down 50. Ones awaiting a shipment, maybe 54. Civil War side: Abbr. 55. See 49-Down 56. Set (down) 57. Candy that turns heads? 58. Swelling reducer 59. Comments accompanying shrugs 60. Souse

APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 85


Revved Up PHOTOS BY ROD JEFFERS

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he Spokane Arena last weekend hosted the inaugural running of the AMSOIL Arenacross Series and Ricky Carmichael’s Road to SuperCross show. Truckloads of dirt were brought in to the create the track, producing tight turns, daunting challenges and incredible airtime!

86 INLANDER APRIL 16, 2015


APRIL 16, 2015 INLANDER 87


Thursday, May 21st | 7 pm Reserved $55 • General $45 Purchase tickets at the casino or any TicketsWest outlet.

Worley, Idaho | 25 miles south of Coeur d’Alene | 1 800 523-2464 | CDACASINO.COM

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Inlander 04/16/2015  

Inlander 04/16/2015