Page 1

TURNING 100 THE LOCAL NAACP HAS A BIRTHDAY PAGE 33

SPOKANE’S SMELL SPOILER: IT’S NOT OF LILACS PAGE 37

‘POLITICAL PRESSURE’

BEHIND THE SCENES OF THE RIDPATH PROJECT PAGE 13

APRIL 4-10, 2019 | VISIT VOLUME.INLANDER.COM

MAKING the SCENE The music business is a boys club. That’s not the case in Spokane PAGE 22


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INSIDE CURVES VOL. 26, NO. 25 | COVER PHOTO: ALICIA HAUFF

COMMENT 5 13 NEWS COVER STORY 22 MILLER CANE 31

CULTURE FOOD FILM MUSIC

33 38 44 48

EVENTS I SAW YOU ADVICE GODDESS GREEN ZONE

52 54 56 58

EDITOR’S NOTE

A

group of badass women are driving the LOCAL MUSIC scene — running downtown venues, booking bands, managing and promoting artists, operating soundboards and tearing it up onstage. To be clear, the music business has historically been dude-dominated, making what’s happening in Spokane all the more remarkable. To these local leaders, it has nothing to do with gender, and everything to do with building up our creative community — the artists and the fans who support them. Still, the impacts are being felt in big and small ways. “Representation is important,” Karli Ingersoll, a club owner and musician, tells us. “That’s such a cliche thing to say, but it’s so true. … It took me a long time before I ever found out about women who played guitar.” Don’t miss our coverage of these power players beginning on page 22. — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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INLANDER SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO • INLANDER.COM 1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, SPOKANE, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 | EMAIL: INFO@INLANDER.COM THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. It’s printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x210 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email justinh@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2019, Inland Publications, Inc.

APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 3


4 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019


COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com)

WHO’S YOUR FAVORITE FEMALE MUSICIAN?

PUBLISHER

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

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AVERI HELLMAN Probably Adele, because her voice is amazing. I listen to her when I’m hanging around the house, cleaning, driving or anything. She also made my middle name cool because my middle name’s Adele. Now, people tell me they love my middle name.

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One of my favorites is Judy Collins. I love her. She’s a ’70s hippie type, and that’s where I’m from. She picks songs that have something to say, not just ‘doo-dah-doo-dah.’ She has a real throaty voice, so it really gives you a sense that she means what she’s saying.

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Ariana Grande, because my daughter loves her so much, and kinda looks like her. She’s been to every single one of her concerts. My daughter watched Ariana when she was on TV, and she really liked her singing too. I have to go with what my daughter likes.

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I love so many. I do like Olivia Newton-John, but she’s not my favorite. There’s a Christian singer that I love, Francesca Battistelli. I love how strong her spirituality is. She sings “The Breakup Song.” It’s about fear, and I relate to it. She’s a beautiful person. Now if you say group, it’s a toss-up between the Beatles and MercyMe.

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The view from the top is worth the climb BY AILEEN KEOWN VAUX

W

hen I turned 21, I celebrated by climbing an active volcano in Chile. This is not a humble brag. I was out of my element, a foreign student profoundly homesick and scared of heights. A friend at the apartment complex where I lived convinced me we needed to get out of Santiago and go on vacation. As an impressionable kid, I said, “Sure. Sign me up.” I did not equate climbing a 9,000-foot-high volcano with rest and relaxation, however. My

rigorous climbing preparation up to that point included drinking gin and tonics in dancehalls and an occasional jog around my neighborhood while chased by feral dogs. I was fit in the way that most 21-yearolds are fit: by youth and accident. But when my travel friend suggested we climb a volcano, again,

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SAY WHAT?

DO SOMETHING!

“Anytime we say ‘no’ to anybody, we assume that it’s going to go to the mayor. Because it almost always does.”

PANEL: The Washington Poor People’s Campaign Truth & Poverty Tour stops for an event, “Community Conversation: Supporting Student-Centered Movements,” co-sponsored by Spokane NAACP, Gonzaga Black Student Union, Every Student Counts Alliance and the EWU Jewish Club. It includes a social justice-focused panel discussion from students, activists and grassroots leaders. Sat, April 6 from 4-5:30 pm. Free. WSU Health Sciences Spokane, Room 110Z, 310 N. Riverpoint Blvd. wapoorpeoplescampaign.org

Spokane Fire Marshal Megan Phillips, who says she felt pressured to sign off on a development project, even though it wasn’t ready. Read that story on page 13.


I didn’t think twice and simply said yes. We boarded a van at our hostel that would deliver us and 10 other tourists to Villarrica. We were instructed, while signing up for the tour, to bring comfortable shoes and chocolate bars. There was a current of nervous energy in the van as people talked in the early hours, but the chatter turned silent when we approached the base of the volcano. The boulder field where we exited the van was dotted with rocks the size of small cars, and our guides told us this would be the easy part, before we hit the sheer snow and ice packs closer to the summit.

Humans don’t have wings so why would we want to willingly leave the Earth? The guides taught us how to attach crampons to our shoes and promised us frequent breaks to eat our chocolate while we adjusted to the altitude. I took none of this as a warning sign that our ascent was perhaps intended for people who were more practiced in the art of alpining. I reassured myself that no one would willingly put paying strangers in physical danger despite watching James Cameron’s Titanic several times as a teenager. So I ate my chocolate and said nothing when the guides stopped the tour group to lash us all together with climbing ropes. The tourists and I took each step, on a 45-degree pitch, along narrow trails broken through the snow. I suddenly realized that if one of us slipped, we would all go skittering down the volcano together. We were about a thousand feet from the sulfurous rim when the clouds cleared and the line stopped ostensibly for us to LETTERS take a moment to appreciate Send comments to the view. I didn’t trust myself to editor@inlander.com. look up from my shoelaces. For as long as I could remember I feared heights, detesting that feeling of my stomach dropping out of my body on a roller coaster, or if I’m being honest, a steep incline while driving in a car. Humans don’t have wings so why would we want to willingly leave the Earth? I kept my eyes firmly on the ground when next to my foot I saw a small bird on its side, encased in ice like Han Solo in carbonite. The shock of seeing this perfectly preserved bird in such a barren place compelled me to look up to the sky for evidence of more birds, which is how I tricked myself into taking in the expanse of land around the volcano, a panorama of blue lakes and lush green trees. I was stunned by its beauty and instantly my fear of heights melted away. Fear doesn’t kill a person, it turns out. I learned near the summit of Villarrica that fear is an emotion one sometimes has to pay for the price of newfound perspective. n Aileen Keown Vaux is an essayist and poet whose chapbook Consolation Prize was published by Scablands Books in 2018.

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FROM THE VAULT JAN. 17, 2013: Staff reporter Jacob Jones explored why Americans — including mass murderers — love the AR-15 assault rifle. Experts at the time estimated that more than 3.5 million of them were in circulation. “Developed amid the deadly chaos of Vietnam and once outlawed under a federal assault weapons ban, the AR-15 teeters at the center of the emotionally charged gun debate,” Jones wrote.

january 17-23, 2012 | send letters to editor@inlander.com

weapon of choice mass murderers. the AR-15. So do Americans love assault rifle for our favorite What comes next by Jacob Jones |

page 20

inside

GOP’S NEW STAR: IdAhO’S RAUL LABRAdOR 13 | WOMEN ANd GEEK CULTURE 29 | WAShINGTON’S BEERS UNITE

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APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | NEWSMAKERS

Q&A MEG WINCHESTER Visit Spokane’s new CEO wants to tell a story of Spokane that showcases a city on the rise BY JOSH KELETY

D

epending on who you ask, Spokane’s reputation swings from vibrant and alive to bleak and downtrodden. But Visit Spokane, the region’s premier tourism promotion nonprofit, has been working to universalize the former opinion, highlighting everything that makes the Lilac City so appealing for the people who live here. (The accessible outdoor recreation and the local craft beer scene are some frequently noted local jewels.) And Meg Winchester, a Southern California native and the organization’s new CEO who started in January after leading the Galveston Island Convention and Visitors Bureau for over a decade, aims to double down on that mission. This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity. INLANDER: What drew you to Spokane? WINCHESTER: I had a recruiter call me and she said that I’d be absolutely perfect for this job. I was fortunate enough to be picked for a round of interviews and I came for 24 hours. I just felt really good about it and it’s just such a lovely destination. Everyone here is so warm and it’s a genuine warm. People are excited about living here and being here. The culinary scene is amazing here. There’s such a diversity of it and there’s just some amazing restaurants here. The symphony here is doing amazing things. For me, it’s fabulous that we don’t just have one area. We’ve got the Valley with their great parks and Liberty Lake and Airway Heights with the casinos. That just gives us so much more of a robust offering. For us, that’s a dream come true, because it gives us such more to promote. How does your experience in Galveston translate to Spokane? Galveston kind of had a not a very good image. [But] the city has grown up a lot. Spokane has that, too. A lot of people don’t know anything about it or remember it as it was 20 years ago. I think that’s probably the similarity.

What’s your vision for Visit Spokane under your leadership? One big focus for us is the Convention Center in downtown Spokane and working on citywide conventions. Our marketing team was able to work with Public Relations Society of America and their travel writers division and to bring LETTERS that conference Send comments to here in June of editor@inlander.com. 2020. That’s just a home run for us. It’s going to bring top-rated travel writers to our destination. People are really looking for experiential travel. They love to get out into neighborhoods and go somewhere different. That plays very much into what we have. There’s all kinds of opportunities for people to get out and experience everything and not just things in the downtown core. There’s lots of smaller, community events that people are really interested in. We’re trying to get that information out. We’re always promoting all the different events that are going on [such as] Bloomsday, Hoopfest. Why should we even care about attracting tourists? Don’t they just clog the sidewalks? I think a lot of people don’t realize that tourism is many times the reason that we can have these types of restaurants or these wineries, because they’re able to help support their businesses through the residents that come through. They may not be able to survive without that tourism base. It keeps people working and it keeps people in business and it keeps our economy thriving. What’s your favorite restaurant, bar and coffee shop in Spokane? Wild Sage was amazing. I had an amazing dinner there. I loved the Safari Room. And Atticus [Coffee] is great. n

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ou don’t have to choose between helping the planet and helping your pocketbook. Here are a few ways to protect the environment while you save some green. Plant a tree on the south side of your house. The shade it provides will lower cooling costs, said Chelsea Updegrove, development director at the Lands Council. Trees also provide habitat for birds and other critters, absorb carbon dioxide, and reduce storm water runoff, which can carry toxins to rivers and lakes. Get smart about heating. Technology can help you turn down the heat when you’re not home. Smart thermostats learn your routines, so you don’t have to do the programming, said Chris Drake, the energy efficiency manager at Avista. The energy company offers rebates on many models, reducing your upfront cost. Other ways to reduce heating (or cooling) bills: find and plug drafts; open the drapes in winter to let sunlight in (or close them in summer to keep heat out); and use ceiling fans to equalize the temperature in a room (run your fan clockwise in the winter to redistribute heat from the ceiling). Turn it off. The light as you leave a room, of course, but other things, too. Like the TV no one’s watching or the printer no one’s using. Smart power strips automatically turn off electronics to save energy. Increase efficiency. When it’s time to replace something in your house, whether it’s the furnace or a light bulb, look for a more efficient model to cut energy use and costs. If you haven’t switched to LED bulbs, it’s time. Check for rebates to help defray the cost. Use glass or ceramic baking dishes. That allows you to turn down the oven about 25 degrees, according to Avista. Also: Resist the urge to keep opening the oven to check on dinner. Each time you open the door, you can lose about 20 percent of the heat.

Cut back on watering. Many people overwater their lawns, Updegrove said, which can strain the region’s aquifer. Many also use too much fertilizer, and the excess gets washed away. That’s money down the drain, and the chemicals can travel to rivers and lakes and harm aquatic life, Updegrove said. Shop secondhand. Whether you need clothes, baking dishes, or art supplies, often you can find what you need at thrift shops, vintages stores, or garage sales. Buying used items costs you less and keeps them out of the waste stream. Borrow. The Spokane Public Library and Spokane County Library District have items like sewing machines, GPS units, and energy efficiency kits to check out. Your friends have stuff, too, like the tool you need to finish a repair. Just make sure to reciprocate. Your friends, and the planet, will thank you.

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

SUMMER’S GETTING HOTTER CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Readers respond to a column by George Nethercutt about former Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz’s potential independent run in the 2020 election (“Man in the Middle,” 3/28/19):

FRANK GABBARD: Shultz running is just a Republican trick to divide the vote so Trump has a chance in 2020, so of course Nethercutt thinks it’s great. Don’t be fooled by it.

Readers respond to a story about allowing homeless people inside City Hall as long as they don’t disturb anyone (“The Direction of Downtown,” 3/28/19):

BRIAN BUCK: Deriding the homeless and downtrodden is one of our national pastimes. The internet begat Facebook. Facebook begat pages like “Spokane Tweaker Blast” where people take pictures of any pre-2000s RV they encounter and post it with derision and malice whether they know the truth or not. I couldn’t stand STB and dumped it because it was a group focused solely on dehumanizing anyone driving around in an older RV.

TERRY PARKER: So according to George the only downside of Trump as a candidate was his inexperience? That tells you loads about the Republican Party today. KEVIN SHIELDS: He’s not wrong! I will be very surprised if he runs! Surprised at the levels of narcissistic delusion certain rich dudes possess. JASON LONG: Schultz is public enemy number one in all of Washington state. KIRSTIN HAHN: Not a fan. Anyone who thinks that that bitter of a coffee is worth that much money along with a three-buck frozen lemon loaf is not for me. n

JOSEPH SAMPSON: OK so I’ll be the first to challenge anyone further commenting on this post that City Hall won’t look like a warming shelter. Who’s betting me on this? Any takers? DARCY HILDEBRAND: As far as I am concerned, the homeless can stay in City Hall and downtown. I would prefer that to them being in my neighborhood parks. Likewise, I would prefer the criminals stay downtown as well rather than do business in my neighborhood. n

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12 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019


DEVELOPMENT

The Heat of ‘Political Pressure’ How a fire marshal and a building inspector were swept up into the politically charged Ridpath development imbroglio BY DANIEL WALTERS

I

t was a snowy, foggy afternoon in the waning days of 2017 — the last Friday before New Year’s Eve — when then-Assistant Spokane Fire Marshal Megan Phillips arrived at the Ridpath building. Hundreds of thousands of dollars were riding on what she had to say. Investors were eager to begin benefitting from the downtown project’s historic tax credits. So they put in deadlines in their agreement with the developer: If the Ridpath didn’t get a temporary certificate of occupancy for enough apartment units by the end of 2017, the developer, Wells and Company, would have to pay considerable financial penalties.

But as Phillips walked through the halls of the old hotel, she says the renovations weren’t even close. On the third floor alone, there were plumbing leaks, exposed electrical wires and capped sprinkler heads. Big electrical cords snaked through the hallways. Exit doors were padlocked. The sinks didn’t work. Neither did the heat. Some apartments were missing doors, cabinets, flooring and running water. Ultimately, Phillips’ report tallied more than 50 deficiencies with the project, stretching across four pages. Her assessment was later confirmed by three other Spokane fire marshals. The Ridpath missed its deadline, and it would be months before it met the Fire Department’s standards. Today, the Ridpath is humming along. Renters have moved in. But a recent examination of public records, obtained by the Inlander, shows just how messy the fallout over Phillips’ inspection became. The result-

ing turmoil struck at the ongoing debate over how accommodating regulators should be toward influential developers. For starters, the records show that a city building inspector had signed off on the electrical and plumbing portions for the Ridpath’s temporary certificate of occupancy — even though those portions weren’t remotely completed. “I was flabbergasted,” Phillips says. Not only that, but the records show that building inspector told his superior he’d signed off on the certificate because of “political pressure.” Yet, ultimately, it wasn’t the building inspector who was subjected to a formal investigation. Phillips was.

‘A RICH GUY’

Everyone had a stake in the Ridpath’s success. Vacant for nearly a decade, the former hotel had become an empty husk, a blight on downtown Spokane. ...continued on next page

Today, the Ridpath is up and running and waiting for its final, official, certificate of occupancy to be approved. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 13


NEWS | DEVELOPMENT “THE HEAT OF ‘POLITICAL PRESSURE’,” CONTINUED... So in April of 2017, the Spokane City Council placed a bet on developer Ron Wells’ plans to turn the Ridpath into apartments, providing $1.75 million in financing for the project. It wasn’t a surprise that, after the Ridpath failed its fire inspection at the end of 2017, Wells reached out to City Council President Ben Stuckart, an urbanist who shared Wells’ passion for a denser, taller downtown. Wells complained about Phillips, the inspector, in particular. Wells’ architect, Ron Wendle, wasn’t at the inspection himself. But after talking to several workers who were, Wendle penned a second-hand summary. It claimed that Phillips had expressed a “moral objection” to putting “her name to a document just for a tax break for a rich guy,” and cited Ron Wells by name. Wells sent the summary to Stuckart, and Stuckart forwarded it to Fire Chief Brian Schaeffer and Chief Financial Officer Gavin Cooley. “If you read toward the end, this is unacceptable,” Stuckart wrote. A few weeks later, Stuckart sent another email to Schaeffer, then-Assistant Fire Chief Trisha Wolford and the city administrator, asking the trio of city leaders whether they’d looked into the allegations of “an employee making disparaging remarks about rich people.” Not getting the certificate in 2017, he wrote, “will cost the project $500,000.” So a month after Phillips’ Ridpath assessment, Kris Becker, director of development services, asked Wolford and then-Fire Marshal Mike Miller to stay behind after a development meeting. Wolford has a reputation for taking copious notes, and this meeting was no exception. At that meeting, her notes say, Becker revealed that one of her building inspectors had incorrectly signed off on the Ridpath certificate, citing “political pressure.” But the bulk of the meeting focused on the allegations against Phillips. Becker, the director of development services, wanted to meet individually with each of Wolford’s fire inspectors for “fact-finding” and to establish a timeline. To Wolford, it was an odd request, one she considered outside Becker’s purview. And then, according to Wolford’s notes and recollection, Becker floated an even more unusual idea: She asked whether the Fire Department would be open to backdating an approved temporary certificate of occupancy for the Ridpath to December 29, 2017. “Why would you even ask that?” Wolford recalls wondering. “How do you believe that that is an option?” She says Becker raised a hypothetical: What if a fire inspector was trying to sabotage Ron Wells? What if Phillips made up things on her inspection that weren’t true? But as Wolford understood it, backdating the certificate was a crime. (Today, a Spring Valley, New York, building inspector is facing up to four years in prison, partially for backdating a certificate of occupancy.) Wolford, a former fire marshal herself, says she was concerned that a city official would alter the document over her objection. “I was hot,” Wolford says. “I thought they were going to go behind my back and that they would change it.” Three times, according to her notes, Wolford stressed that there was no way they would backdate the certificate. Becker assured her that she wouldn’t approve the certificate without the Fire Department’s signature. “Whatever the hell’s going on here, it’s not going on in my department,” Wolford says.

WHO INSPECTS THE INSPECTORS?

With the possibility of an official citizen complaint loom-

14 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

City Council President Ben Stuckart has been publicly critical of regulators like city fire marshals and the Spokane Regional Clean Air Agency for their impact on significant projects. DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO ing, Wolford launched an internal Fire Department investigation into Phillips’ alleged comments. Phillips denied ever saying anything insulting about Wells. “To me, I took it as an underhanded way of trying to compromise my character,” Phillips says. One worker who was present at the inspection spoke with the Inlander on the condition of anonymity. He backs

those of the Ridpath developers in the past two years. Last year, Stuckart spoke with the Inlander about a litany of frustrations he had with Phillips’ fire marshal rulings, including issues regarding the Ridpath, Elkfest and the fire pits around the ice ribbon in Riverfront Park. Stuckart argued the issue was a “people problem,” not a “code problem,” stressing that fire marshalls should stop looking at things so black and white. Wells didn’t respond to an Inlander request for comment last week. But in an interview last year, Wells maintained Phillips had insulted him. “A fire official shouldn’t be going around saying that shit and get away with it,” Wells said. “And she did.” He decried “cantankerous, disagreeable” fire inspectors who interpreted the code like “fundamentalist evangelicals,” and argued “the Fire Department needs to be dramatically overhauled.” Both Phillips and Fire Chief Schaeffer say the department does what it can to find creative solutions to ease conflict with developers. But ultimately, they note, the fire code is the law. “Under great pressure we stood our ground, doing what was right,” Phillips says about the Ridpath. “Because our job is to preserve life and safety.”

“The person who did the right thing is dragged through the mud. The person who did the wrong thing, their name is somehow protected.” up Phillips’ account, noting the building wasn’t even close to being ready during her inspection. He says Wells and Company wanted to get the temporary certificate approved anyway, with the understanding that nobody would move in until the work had actually been completed, but Phillips said she couldn’t morally do that. Once a certificate is granted, Phillips says, nothing can stop a developer from moving people in. The Fire Department’s internal investigation didn’t find any evidence that Phillips had insulted Wells. Yet the investigation underscored how conscious the Fire Department was about the political climate around the Ridpath. Hours before the inspection, the report noted, Phillips briefed the department’s deputy chief of operations because she “knew it might get political.” It shows Deputy Fire Marshal Nathan Mulkey scrambling to try to figure if a tax credits deadline applied directly to the Ridpath. In an email, he noted to his boss that if there was no deadline, they’d be under “less pressure to bend on code requirements.” Mulkey says that pressure was coming from Wells’ company, not from City Hall. And that’s not unusual. Fire marshals expect blowback. “Anytime we say ‘no’ to anybody, we assume that it’s going to go to the mayor,” Phillips says. “Because it almost always does.” After all, Phillips has stepped on more toes than just

THE MYSTERY INSPECTOR

As for the building inspector who claimed that political pressure had caused him to inappropriately sign off on a powerful developer? Ultimately, Becker determined, after talking to him and her employees, that there actually hadn’t been direct political pressure put on him. Becker declined multiple Inlander interview requests, but city spokeswoman Marlene Feist says the building inspector “was counseled that life and safety always come first.” Yet, there was no formal investigation. No notes were taken. Feist says there’s no written documentation of the conversations — everything was strictly verbal. Feist refuses to even name the identity of the inspector.


But to Phillips, the inconsistency between their two cases is absurd. “The person who did the right thing is dragged through the mud,” she says. “The person who did the wrong thing, their name is somehow protected.” Some of that may come down to Becker’s management philosophy. Public records show that, in the aftermath of a bruising 2016 external investigation into her management practices, Becker had expressed wariness of both independent investigations and the fact that their conclusions, however inaccurate, can “sit in the city’s files like a ticking time bomb and be subject to public records requests forever.” Chief Financial Officer Gavin Cooley says there was, indeed, pressure surrounding the Ridpath project. After all, Mayor David Condon’s administration prides itself on its ability to pierce through bureaucracy. So with a vital project like the Ridpath, they pushed to make inspectors available to help meet deadlines. And that included brainstorming solutions, even if that meant briefly raising the possibility of backdating documents. “The pressure is to get to ‘yes’ when we can, when it’s appropriate,” Cooley says. “Is there pressure to inappropriately abrogate public health and safety? Hell no.” Cooley says he’s certain that Becker would never do anything unethical and didn’t in regard to the Ridpath. Still, as Phillips points out, the departments under Becker have a built in-tension: They’re charged with both paving the way for developments but also erecting obstacles when they’re breaking codes. “The feeling, for a lot of years, is that there’s a lot of pressure over there to sign things off, maybe a little bit prematurely,’” Phillips says. “A lot of times we’ll be the lone voice in the wilderness, saying, ‘Yeah, we have to put a stop to this.’ We might be the only people standing firm.”

PROMOTIONS AND INDICTMENTS

Few careers appeared to have suffered as a result of the Ridpath drama. Phillips was promoted to fire marshal. Wolford left the city of Spokane to become the fire chief in Maryland. A city reorganization expanded Becker’s oversight to also include the parking and code enforcement departments. And when Stuckart announced he was running for mayor last April, Wells was a member of the audience. But, to be clear, that was before Wells was indicted for an insurance fraud scheme, unconnected to the Ridpath, in December. Wells is no longer affiliated with the Ridpath, though Stuckart’s campaign website still reads “I am proud to have the support of business leaders such as Ron Wells.” And lately, Stuckart’s made headlines for a different fight with a regulator over a different downtown project. Last month, the Spokesman-Review reported that Stuckart had accused the Spokane Regional Clean Air Agency of overreach for the fines and delays they imposed upon the long-troubled Otis building rehab. Stuckart stresses that he’s always followed the chain of command with these complaints: He doesn’t talk to individual employees about his concerns; he talks to their superiors. LETTERS Yet, if Stuckart becomes Send comments to mayor, he becomes those editor@inlander.com. employees’ ultimate superior. Meanwhile, Stuckart says he’s considering a policy change: Take the fire marshals away from the Fire Department headquarters and stick them in City Hall to improve communications. “I think they should be more integrated in with the Building Department officials so there is some congruity,” Stuckart says. Bad idea, Phillips says. She argues the physical distance makes the Fire Department a refuge away from the epicenter of politics and drama inside city corridors. “I think staying here allows us to avoid a lot of the pressure that is there at City Hall,” Phillips says. “It keeps us from being influenced.” n danielw@inlander.com

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APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

ON INLANDER.COM

EVERY BLOOM HAS ITS DAY “What’s the craziest thing that ever happened to you on the Bloomsday road race? What’s the story you keep telling your friends and family year after year? Email a brief summary of your WILDEST BLOOMSDAY EXPERIENCE to danielw@inlander.com. Make sure to include your phone number so we can include the best stories in our upcoming issue. Don’t worry if you’re not a star distance runner. We’re looking for a wide variety of Bloomsday stories, of all ages, genders, ability levels and costume choices. (DANIEL WALTERS)

16 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

FEATURING NATIONAL NEWS FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES

MISSING SUPPORT The number of kids in Washington state considering suicide and feeling depressed continues to rise. Among high school seniors, 41 percent had “depressive feelings,” and 22 percent said they considered attempting suicide, according to the state’s HEALTHY YOUTH SURVEY administered every two years. And 15 percent of high school seniors said they had no adults to turn to when feeling sad or hopeless. It continues an upward trend this decade among students — in 2010, 28 percent of seniors reported depressive feelings and 14 said they considered taking their own life. And it has led to calls for more mental health support in schools and in the larger community. “Our students need more support at school,” says Washington Superintendent of Public Instruction Chris Reykdal. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

DEDICATED WILDFIRE FUNDS Washington could create a dedicated fund to prevent and fight wildfires if lawmakers approve legislation introduced last week by the state Department of Natural Resources and Senate Democrats. Senate Bill 5996 would create a new Wildfire Prevention and Suppression Account and bring in an estimated $62.5 MILLION each year by raising an existing fee on property and casualty insurance from 2 percent to 2.52 percent. That increase amounts to about $5 for every $1,000 paid in premium costs, according to DNR. In 2018, the state faced more wildfires than ever, and already this year DNR has responded to 50 wildfires, despite the fact the agency doesn’t even typically start training for the year until April. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)


BACKYARD EMBEZZLEMENT A longtime employee in the Spokane County RISK MANAGEMENT Department stole over $1.3 million in public funds over the span of a decade by forging fake liability claims, according to a recently released report from the Washington State Auditor. The findings allege that the employee — who was fired last May prior to the auditor’s investigation for an unrelated reason — created claims made payable to at least 45 people including individuals related to her, as well as supporting documents. (Two recipients of checks from the false claims interviewed by investigators said that they kept $100 to $300 of each payment and gave the rest to the technician.) At a March 28 press conference, Steve Bartel, director of Risk Management, took responsibility for the lack of oversight, and promised internal procedural reforms. The Spokane Police Department is currently investigating the fraud. (JOSH KELETY)

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APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 17


NEWS | BRIEFS

‘Spokane Solutions’ A former TV anchor announces her campaign for Spokane mayor

R

ight there, on the baby blue section of her campaign sign, was the slogan of NADINE WOODWARD’s long-anticipated mayoral campaign: “Spokane Solutions.” For nearly three decades, Woodward had reported on the problems of the city for local TV news stations. In that time, Woodward says, she got a “close-up view of the real challenges before us.” Flanked by the Riverfront Park pavilion and the clock tower, Woodward offered up a familiar checklist of goals for the city. Spokane needs less property crime, chronic homelessness and drug addiction, she argued, and more vibrant neighborhoods and thriving businesses. When it comes to solving these challenges, she says, Spokane needed to move away from “second-hand ideas copied from somewhere else.” “We are not California,” Woodward says. “We are not Seattle. We are Spokane and we’re proud of it.” Instead, Woodward says, Spokane needs to come together to develop Spokane solutions. But when asked

BOISE CAMPING BILL APPEAL REJECTED

Yep, Nadine Woodward is running for mayor.

DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

to identify any specific Spokane solutions she was proposing, Woodward repeatedly declined to name anything specific. “I have no solutions to propose right now,” Woodward says, “because they’re not mine. And we’re going to work together to bring people to come up with Spokane solutions.” Instead, Woodward is offering less of a platform as much as a philosophy. She wants to be a nonpartisan consensus builder who rejects “bickering,” “political posturing” and “grandstanding.” Woodward did say she was opposed to the City Council’s decision to ban Border Patrol from the Intermodal Center and argued that opening up City Hall to the public, including the homeless, all day was a mistake. But even in regard to homelessness, Woodward declined to get specific. “I’m not going to come here and tell everybody what I’m going to do,” Woodward says. “I’m going to involve people. We’re going to come up with answers together.” (DANIEL WALTERS)

After a panel of the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals judges ruled last September that Boise laws banning outdoor sleeping are unconstitutional if there are no SHELTER options available, the court has struck down an appeal of the verdict from city officials. Six Boise residents who were cited for sleeping outside sued the city back in 2009, arguing that the measure violated the Eighth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution which prohibits cruel and unusual punishment. (The plaintiffs sought damages and an injunction on enforcement of the laws.) Last September, the Ninth Circuit Court agreed, prompting an appeal from the city of Boise. Boise officials have not determined whether to appeal the September ruling to the U.S. Supreme Court, a city spokesperson tells the Idaho Statesman. In Spokane, the rejection of the appeal maintains the current legal parameters for the city’s own laws restricting public camping and sleeping. Currently, while municipal code bans camping in public spaces, under the sit-lie ordinance, law enforcement is only allowed to cite people sleeping in public downtown if there are open shelter beds available. But city officials, who opened several overnight “warming centers” during the winter months, are planning to close some of these facilities by the end of April. Shelters at Salem Lutheran and Westminster are among those slated to close April 30, according to a March 27 press release. Spokane City Councilman Breean Begs tells the Inlander that the closures could make it difficult for the city to enforce the sit-lie ordinance while not running afoul of the Ninth Circuit Court’s ruling.

a l a G

MAY 10, 2019 DAVENPORT GRAND REGISTER TODAY CCEASTERNWA.ORG/GALA

18 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019


“People thought these warming centers were just about temperature and it wasn’t about that. It was about sleeping space because if there’s no sleeping space, under the Boise decision, you can’t enforce those kinds of laws,” Beggs says. “My fear is that people will be sleeping again under the viaducts downtown and in the parks and along the river and we won’t be able to do anything about it.” (JOSH KELETY)

TEXT FOR HELP

People who’ve experienced a sexual assault now have more ways to access help from an advocate as Lutheran Community Services Northwest now offers texting via its sexual assault crisis line. The agency’s SEXUAL ASSAULT HOTLINE is available 24/7 for phone calls at 624-7273, and now survivors can opt to text that number during business hours, 8 am to 5 pm Monday through Thursday, and 8:30 am to 3 pm on Friday. “It was really about wanting to make services as accessible as possible to survivors and their support people,” says Ligeia DeVleming, Lutheran’s director of victim advocacy and education. “We noticed that it was sometimes easier to not pick up the phone and call, but to have that option of texting or taking a different way to get the answers that they need.” Lutheran hopes to be able to expand those texting services to nights and weekends as well, but to do so will take more financial support to pay for the licenses required for the texting service and to provide cell phones to the volunteer victim advocates who already answer calls in off hours, DeVleming says. April is also Sexual Assault Awareness month, and Lutheran plans to put on several events for survivors and supporters. Among those, the agency will host a chalk walk outside its building at 210 W. Sprague on April 9 for people to write messages of support to survivors, and then on Tuesday, April 23, Ben & Jerry’s at River Park Square will offer a benefit for Lutheran from 6 pm to 8 pm, DeVleming says. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

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APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 19


NEWS | IDAHO ballot initiative process,” Mayville says. Mayville says that, if Senate Bill 1159 had been in effect when his organization was pushing to get Prop 2 on the ballot, it likely would have killed their efforts. “I personally would never have thought it was possible to do it in the first place,” he says. “Our team would not have launched the Medicaid expansion campaign to begin with.”

L

Idaho lawmakers are contemplating legislation to make citizen-generated initiatives harder to get on the ballot.

Who Gets to Make the Laws?

A controversial proposal working its way through the Idaho Legislature would all but end grassroots ballot initiatives, critics argue BY JOSH KELETY

A

fter over 60 percent of Idaho voters approved Proposition 2, a ballot initiative that expands Medicaid coverage to thousands across the state, lawmakers in Boise are pushing legislation that would make it harder to put initiatives before voters. And it’s gaining steam. The original proposal was cleared by the House and Senate, and now, after substantial public backlash, lawmakers are pushing a slightly amended version. But critics still argue that the continued effort to make it harder to put measures on the ballot amounts to nothing less than a subversion of democracy and the state Constitution, which codifies the ballot initiative process. “Some of these legislators prefer to monopolize law-making power because they think they are the only ones who are qualified to make laws,” Luke Mayville, co-founder of Reclaim Idaho, the group that originally pushed Prop 2, tells the Inlander. “Lobbyists and special interests groups want to concentrate power in the Legislature because they know it’s far easier to sway 105 legislators than it is to sway hundreds of thousands of voters.” They’re also calling on Republican Gov. Brad Little to veto the proposal if it gets to his desk. Little’s press secretary declined to comment on the governor’s position

20 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

on the “pending legislation.” Back in March, Sen. C. Scott Grow (R-Eagle), proposed Senate Bill 1159, which would speed up the timeline for gathering signatures to put an initiative before voters. Currently, initiative backers are required to obtain signatures from 6 percent of voters in 18 legislative districts within the 18 months before a given election. Senate Bill 1159, however, would ramp that requirement up to gathering support from 10 percent of voters in 32 districts 180 days. Grow has argued that the changes are intended to increase rural voters’ influence on ballot initiatives and ensure that the state is governed as a republic rather than a direct democracy. “Running a state government by voter initiative defeats the basic fundamental premise of the Constitution,” Grow recently told the Inlander. “We elect representatives and we trust them with the responsibility.” But critics, like Mayville, say it’s just a cover for lawmakers and special interests who don’t want to cede power to voters. “The proponents of these bills are claiming that they want to increase the participation of rural voters. The fact is that they are going to cut all Idaho citizens out of their

ast year, the Medicaid expansion initiative qualified for the ballot in 21 districts. But under Grow’s legislation, the measure would have passed muster in just 10 districts, 22 short of the new standard under his bill, according to the Idaho Statesman. After heated debate, Senate Bill 1159 passed the state Senate by one vote, before getting kicked over to the House of Representatives. Lawmakers in that chamber passed it as well as an alternative version, House Bill 296. This measure reduces the new initiative qualification standards slightly by requiring signatures from 10 percent of voters in roughly 24 districts within nine months of an election. Mayville says the amended House bill is just as bad as the original Senate version: “[It’s] tantamount to saying ‘here’s a 40-foot wall, we’re challenging you to jump over that,’” he says. “And then when we respond and say ‘that’s impossible,’ they come back and say ‘OK, now we’ve compromised. Here’s a 30 foot wall.’” Gov. Brad Little has not taken a public Both proposals go back position on the pending legislation. over to the Senate. If both are passed, they both go to Gov. Brad Little’s desk. If the alternate doesn’t pass the Senate, then only the original proposal, Senate Bill 1159, will go before the governor, per the Idaho Statesman. Marissa Morrison, a spokeswoman for Little, declined to comment on either of the bills or the governor’s thoughts on potentially vetoing the controversial proposals. “We, as is policy, do not issue statements on pending legislation during this deliberative process,” Morrison tells the Inlander. “He has no public comment on this time.” His office has received significant constituent correspondence regarding the legislation — the vast majority of which opposes the bills, Morrison says. As of March 29, the governor had received 1,379 phone calls and 1,123 emails and letters regarding the proposals. Of the roughly 2,500 messages that the office has received, just nine supported the measure. “There is close to zero support in the public for these bills,” Mayville says. He went on to call on Gov. Little to veto the legislation. “Little campaigned on a promise of restoring trust in Idaho government,” he says. “This a perfect opportunity for him to honor his campaign promise and veto these bills.” n joshk@inlander.com


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22 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019


RUN THIS TOWN When you look around Spokane’s nightlife, you see a lot of women doing a lot of work to make our scene a vibrant one, in numbers you just don’t find in most cities. Women own and co-own most of the clubs in town. They promote shows, manage artists, take pictures, run sound, perform as solo artists and lead bands, and educate the next

generation of aspiring musicians. We talked to more than a dozen women who make the Spokane music scene what it is in 2019 — and there are many more out there, too. In the following pages they tell us what makes Spokane’s scene different, and what having women in charge means for local music fans. — DAN NAILEN, Arts & Culture editor

STRENGTH in NUMBERS

FACING PAGE (from left): Club owners Beth McRae, Patty Tully, Kitty Kane, Karli Ingersoll and Dawson Hoerner.

PHOTOS BY ALICIA HAUFF

Most of Spokane’s downtown music venues are owned and operated by women. We talk to them about why that’s a big deal BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

T

he music business is a boys club. It has always been that way. That’s no secret. But Spokane is bucking that trend, at least in one significant regard: Most of the city’s downtown music venues are owned and operated by women. Look at all-ages music venues like the Pin, the Big Dipper and the Bartlett. And then consider clubs and bars that regularly host live music, including Berserk, nYne and Baby Bar. They all have women at their helms, or as co-owners. They’re also all within walking distance of one another. This is surprising, especially for a city the size of Spokane with relatively few venues. Compare those numbers to Austin, Texas, one of America’s most vibrant music hubs: A 2015 study determined that fewer than 30 percent of the city’s nearly 200 music venues were owned by women. Yet none of the owners of those Spokane venues say they’d really even noticed this before. That’s just the way it is. Karli Ingersoll, co-owner of the Bartlett and the soon-to-open Lucky You Lounge, says it’s simply what Spokane is used to. When she was working her way up in the local scene as a solo musician, she was a regular performer at the now-defunct Empyrean Coffeehouse, which was owned by sisters Chrisy and Michelle Riddle. Camaraderie has driven Spokane’s scene for as long as Ingersoll has been a part of it; in bigger cities, it’s far more cutthroat, she says. “In local scenes, it just doesn’t happen,” Ingersoll says. “People are trying really hard to make it through, so there’s a sense of ‘there’s not enough space for all of us.’ But in Spokane, no one’s fighting for space. You’re all making music and doing whatever you want. So I wonder if it’s a result of years of that.”

I

ngersoll and her husband, Caleb, opened the Bartlett in late 2013, and the Big Dipper, a long-time concert space that had been closed for several years,

reopened under the ownership of husband-and-wife team Dan and Dawson Hoerner in 2014. Late last year, Chelsey Heidenreich, a local booker and musician, took over as owner of the Pin, which specializes in metal, hardrock, drag and hip-hop shows. For all of them, ownership is a multi-tiered position. It’s not merely about deciding which bands play your room: It involves fielding emails from PR folks and musicians, updating multiple social media accounts, designing posters and flyers and managing staff. Some owners bartend or work the door, depending on the night. Women have always been involved in Spokane’s music scene, dating back to the DIY and punk scenes of the 1980s, but usually they were the fans. Beth McRae, one of the four owners of downtown bar Berserk, was a regular in the scene, and she remembers an all-women punk quartet called Clever Hag. Other than that, it was a lot of men calling the shots. “I didn’t think about it, but it was all male-driven,” she says, “and that’s why one band in particular sticks out to me, because it was all women.” And that’s still the case: Most of the artists, both local and touring, who play these venues are men. Kitty Kane, owner of nYne Bar, says it’s sometimes a struggle to find female DJs to perform on weekends. Hoerner says she does her best to consciously add local female artists to bills that are mostly male. “There are a lot more male bands than female bands. I don’t know why, but it just still is very true,” Hoerner says. “I don’t want to have to consciously try and add a woman. I want it just to be natural. And I think it will. I think it is getting more like that.” Ingersoll says that she’s conscious of the gender imbalance, and she’s working to combat it. “I only have so much room on our calendar for allmale, all-white bands,” Ingersoll says. “It’s time for me to fill the calendar with other things.” In March, her band Super Sparkle performed as part of Belltown Bash, a Seattle music festival that was organized by women and made up of female-fronted

bands. It was a rare scenario, playing on a bill that was mostly women, and Ingersoll says the ambiance of the event impacted her performance in ways she hadn’t really considered before. “It just felt so safe,” Ingersoll says. “Honestly, I don’t think about it enough. I usually try to put it out of my mind because I don’t want to waste my mental energy. I don’t know any man that would [organize an all-women festival], because they don’t have to.” But there’s still the business of trying to puncture the notion that an all-female band, or a group fronted by a woman, is some kind of novelty. Patty Tully, According to Women in Music, a owner of Baby nonprofit that promotes gender Bar and vocalist equality in the industry, only 15 for the Spokane percent of record labels are owned by band Fun Ladies, women, and just 6 percent of North says it was someAmerican music producers are women. thing she heard Fewer than 25 percent of the top 600 all the time when Billboard-charting songs between 2012 she was the bar’s and 2017 were performed by women, primary music and only 12 percent of those songs booker. were written by women, according to “When they a 2018 study by University of Southern say ‘an all-female California professor Stacy L. Smith. Ramones cover band,’ I think, ‘I don’t give a f--- if you’re all female.’ If you’re good, you’re good,” she says. Ingersoll agrees: “We want to be taken seriously because of our music, and not because [being a woman] is a selling point,” she says.

T

here’s been talk lately about music venues as “safe spaces,” with bookers refusing to bring artists with histories of sexual abuse into their venues, and making it a priority to protect vulnerable concertgoers, especially when alcohol is involved. ...continued on next page

APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 23


LOCAL MUSIC “STRENGTH IN NUMBERS,” CONTINUED... nYne, which is located right next door to the Bartlett, hosts live bands, karaoke and DJs, and owner Kitty Kane says she has “zero tolerance for intolerance.” “We’re here for this community to come in and have a good time, to be like their home away from home,” she says. “We want people to come and feel safe. And that’s always been our primary concern, that you have a good time. But you can feel like you can be yourself and no one’s going to judge you.” When Heidenreich took ownership of the Pin late last year, she says she made safety a primary concern. The venue had been embroiled in controversies surrounding the booking of several bands with questionable histories, and Heidenreich says she’s paying careful attention to the artists who take her stage. She also brought in an entirely new staff of bouncers and bartenders. “[Safety is] our No. 1 priority, because everything else

Chelsey Heidenreich bought the Pin last year.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

can get worked out and fall into place. But if it’s not safe, anything can happen,” she says. “And people aren’t going to come back and feel comfortable.” In talking with these venue owners, another trend becomes increasingly clear: When the talent on a stage is more diverse, a more diverse audience comes to see them. “I think it’s the same with anything,” Kane says. “The more diversity that we’re presenting, the more diversity is going to come in.” That mostly happens when owners are making equal representation a priority. And if you consider that local arts scenes are so often cyclical, it suggests that women see other women performing and decide to perform themselves. “Representation is important,” Ingersoll says. “That’s such a cliche thing to say, but it’s so true. … It took me a long time before I ever found out about women who played guitar.” She also points out that the performers signing up for the Bartlett’s monthly open mic nights are primarily young women. “The hard work that women have done to get more in the spotlight has led to those 13 and 14-year-olds being like, ‘I can play guitar,’” she says. “The more bookings they’re going to get, the more [bands are] going to get seen,” Heidenreich says. “And I think that with enough owners and people behind bands like that, that are wanting to get out there, that’ll happen.” “[The more] women that are on stage, the more younger people might think, ‘That looks fun. I can do that. I want to do that,’” Hoerner says. “I think that’s true, especially at smaller venues where artists would be walking around afterwards totally accessible.” n

24 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

LIZ ROGNES Musician/co-founder of Girls Rock Lab

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iz Rognes had always been both a musician and a creative writer, and when her grad school prospects in music composition weren’t coming together, she threw caution to the wind and moved to Spokane from Minnesota for EWU’s writing program. That was 10 years ago, and she quickly realized “I couldn’t not write songs. I couldn’t not perform,” and Rognes starting playing open mics at the Empyrean and other long-gone Spokane venues. She also toured the region as a solo artist — often literally by herself — and was always relieved on the too-rare occasions she ran into women in prominent positions at the clubs she played. “I’ve had so many experiences with sexism and creepy men in clubs,” Rognes says. “I think if there’s a woman club owner or booker, or a woman running sound, they’re aware of your experiences as a woman performer. I don’t want to make any huge generalizations about gender, but I do think it’s different.” Considering the landscape of Spokane clubs in 2019 versus 2009, Rognes has the sense that there’s more stability today. “When I first moved here, it seemed like every time I would fall in love with a venue, it would close,” she says. There are also a lot more women owning clubs and promoting shows than there used to be, and that’s nothing but encouraging. “It’s important to see women doing those jobs because it shows all of us it’s possible for women to be in positions of authority in the music scene,” Rognes says. For the past five years, Rognes has been working to show young women, girls and nonbinary kids that the barriers between them and participating in music at all levels are there to be knocked down. She

co-founded the Girls Rock Lab in 2014 along with a pack of Spokane musicians and supporters, inspired by the Rock ’n’ Roll Camp for Girls movement. “A bunch of musicians all got together at Atticus and talked about how we could do it,” Rognes says. “It was a very DIY operation. Everyone brought their own instruments, we shared gear, we just made it happen.” The Girls Rock Lab was a hit from the start, with registration filling up fast that first year. Now operated through the local nonprofit Spark Central with an assist from Spokane Public Library, the lab functions two weeks each summer, and offers some valuable lessons to its students from a wide range of local musicians. Each week of the lab, 15 to 20 young preteen and teenage young women form bands, learn instruments and songs, and ultimately perform a show at week’s end, typically on a local venue stage like the Bartlett, and often alongside bands led by their Girls Rock Lab teachers. “There are so many barriers to participating in music, and I mean that in terms of music in a local rock scene, folk, jazz, classical, kind of across the board,” Rognes says. “At a young age, girls aren’t necessarily encouraged to play loud instruments, drums or amplified instruments. We wanted to create a space where girls can come and be loud and make music and be creative and be empowered and be taken seriously. “It’s not just about music, either. It’s about empowering girls, about inviting them and showing them that they are valued and giving them a place where their voices are heard. Then they get to see women from the community working to put this camp on, and I think that’s huge.” (DAN NAILEN)


RYKER BEARD Manager/promoter

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alk to Ryker Beard for a while, and you quickly learn that artist management is a lot more than making sure a musician is fed, clothed and on stage on time. The 28-year-old Spokane native considers her job part teacher, part promotor and part cultural disruptor, working to open the eyes of artists to the power they have in the music business, and opening the ears of the Powers That Be to new sounds and styles bubbling up from outside the mainstream. “What I’m trying to do is change the mentality of people,” Beard says. “That is the biggest thing that I do and I think that’s one of the largest misconceptions of what I do. I change people’s mentality about the industry.” Beard has managed several hip-hop artists, most recently Spokane favorite Jango, and she considers hip-hop the “most underserved niche in our region.” But her path to the music business started with a singer/songwriter she was dating who moved to Arizona, leading Ryker to follow. “I just started to play roles to help her music progress,” Beard says, “and as I continued down that path, I realized the roles I was playing fell under a title, and that title was ‘management.’” Beard came home to Spokane after that relationship ended and started putting her newfound skills to work. She found a mentor who greatly expanded her music-biz vocabulary, started companies so she could produce shows and market artists in addition to managing them, and went

to work trying to make Eastern Washington a new hotbed of hip-hop. It hasn’t been easy. It’s hard to get local artists like Jango spins on commercial radio no matter how many streams his music gets on Spotify or SoundCloud. And even though Carolina Panthers quarterback Cam Newton used a Jango tune on one of his personal branding videos, getting Gonzaga representatives to listen to local hip-hop for potential use in the Kennel has been a struggle. “I’m trying to fill the lifestyle niche that we are missing in Spokane, that missing [hip-hop] culture,” Beard says. “Why are we missing that culture? Because we’re not feeding the culture. Why aren’t we feeding the culture? Because we’re afraid of it.” Not that Beard is going to give up on what she sees as the region’s inevitable hip-hop dominance, even if it takes constant tough conversations and nonstop hustle. That’s something she’s used to. “I’m a different species, maybe a different example,” Beard says. “Because I have been out as gay since I was like 18, it forces you to already have hard conversations and deal with certain situations … [and] being African-American means I had to face a lot of things early. “It doesn’t matter who I am, who they are. If I have a goal, I’m going to get that goal. If I need to change my angle, and my perspective, let’s do that. I’m a chess player. So how are we going to accomplish this?” (DAN NAILEN)

APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 25


LOCAL MUSIC

PRETTY GOOD…

FROM LEFT: Cameron Smith, Lindsay Johnston and Ashley Pyle

for a

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GIRL

ast fall, Lindsay Johnston bought a rig large enough to tour with, quit her job as a bartender, and set out to make a go of being a full-time musician. She knew it wouldn’t be easy, and she’ll tell you the rock-star lifestyle is far from the glitz and glory most imagine. Really far from it. “There was one night that we were at the bar that we were playing at, and most of the time they’ll give you a food tab, but they didn’t for that night,” Johnston says. “So I’m like, ‘Can I get some hot water?’ and I’m eating instant oatmeal, sitting at the bar, and eating frozen vegetables. It’s not glamorous, but I’m learning that I can be OK with next to nothing.” Without a steady paycheck to ensure things like rent payments, she’s been couch surfing with family and friends in Spokane and the Tri-Cities, and she frequently stays at her partner’s place. She’s travelled to shows all over Washington, as well

26 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

Spokane’s powerhouse female musicians say what really matters is how you play BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

as several spots in Oregon and some in California. Not every place even comes with the certainty that she as a solo artist — Vanna Oh! — or her band — Vanna Oh & the Any’s (called that because she’ll play with anybody) — will get paid by the venue. On top of the normal challenges of starting out as a touring artist, she’s trying to make it as a female vocalist and lead guitarist, something she’s been reminded is still unique in some corners of the music world. Take the time Johnston put on a show in Portland with her previous rock duo, Donna Donna, and a dude who was digging the show shouted up at them. “The guy was like, ‘Pretty good! For girls!’” Johnston says. Sure, she could just get pissed off, but Johnston says she also recognizes there’s some truth in the idea that there aren’t as many “women who are really digging into the electric guitar.” In fact, part of what inspired Johnston to pick up electric guitar when she was 25 was seeing a lack of role

models. Now 30, she feels she still has plenty of room for improvement, but she also wants to see the music world get to the point where that man’s comment is irrelevant. “There’s something built into our culture that makes us think, ‘Wow, yeah, we’re never gonna be as good.’ Or, ‘This isn’t for women, this isn’t for people that look like me,’” Johnston says. “But the part of his comment that’s like, ‘Pretty good for girls,’ that’s the challenge. Let’s make that not true.”

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verall, Johnston and other women in Spokane’s music scene say sexism hasn’t been an issue in what’s been a fairly open, accepting community for decades. Cameron Smith is a social worker by day, and a drummer with local bands Silver Treason and Fun Ladies by night. She’s been involved in Spokane’s music scene since she started playing in a punk band in high school in the mid-’80s and says it’s always been inclusive. ...continued on next page


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LOCAL MUSIC “PRETTY GOOD… FOR A GIRL,” CONTINUED... “I didn’t feel like there were any barriers to women being involved in the scene,” Smith says. “It always felt very respectful of women to me. The musicians in particular.” She’s partly troubled by the idea of talking about “women in music” or “women in rock” because it kind of places those musicians in a subcategory of sorts. “And I don’t think it should be a subcategory, because no one ever talks about men in the scene in the same context,” Smith says. “I think women should be graded on their own merits as musicians the same way that men are. It should just be standard.” Still, she’s not gonna pretend that over the years she’s never heard comments like “you’re good for a girl” or received what came across as backhanded compliments, no matter the person’s actual intent. “I’ll admit, I may have developed a style of hitting harder to compensate for that,” Smith says. “I definitely wanted to hold my own with whomever.” Over the years, she has. The list of bands she’s been in is massive, including, but not limited to: Neurotic Jesuits (high school), Big Feeling (circa 1990), Frenchie (kind of a supergroup in the indie-punk scene), and after taking a break after having a baby, she came back to join the Cruddlers, then Quitters Inc., then Burns Like Hellfire, which lasted several years, and now she’s in her current bands. The openness in Spokane has enabled musicians like 23-year-old Ashley Pyle, who would describe herself as shy, to not just find a place playing at open mics, but to make connections that opened doors to recording opportunities. “I’ve never been the going-out type. … I wasn’t the concert-goer,” Pyle says. “But now I walk into the Riddler on open mic nights and I have to just plan into my night that I will make a round of going and saying ‘Hi’ to everybody.”

MELLIE PRICE Brand manager/music sponsor

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hen you go to a local music festival, send your daughter to Spokane’s rock summer camp or even listen to a local band’s music when you’re on hold after calling Global Credit Union, there’s a good chance Mellie Price had a hand in what you’re experiencing. As Global’s brand manager, Price has pushed the organization’s support of Spokane’s music and art scenes in a big way. The 36-year-old Spokane native says that supporting the cultural life of the city — while maybe an offshoot of banking — is vital to Global’s brand. “We focus on emerging artists and helping build the culture and helping those who are out in the thick of it, creating culture in our community. That’s what’s important to us, to show support and to create those community events around cultural events, and music is so important to that,” Price says. Price says inspiration for pushing Global into supporting local music came from recalling during her college years at Western Washington University how Death Cab for Cutie would play free shows regularly in Bellingham. Having a vibrant music scene, and supporting the people making it happen now a decade later in her hometown, “that’s special to me.” Price credits friends like Terrain’s Luke Baumgar-

“I think women should be graded on their own merits as musicians the same way that men are.” Like Johnston and Smith, Pyle says she’s felt nothing but welcomed into Spokane’s scene. Through the friends she made at the Red Room, Soulful Soups and more, Pyle met Jeff and Doug Bell of Hammock Cave Studios, who offered to record her music. Pyle recently dropped her first CD, the AP EP, and after having some bad experiences with other people who’d offered to record her stuff, she says she couldn’t be happier. “I had tried to record a couple of other times with other people and just got completely screwed over,” Pyle says. “And then Doug was like, ‘I want to record this song for free.’ So I’m like, ‘OK…’ But then we did, and he put together a rough version and it was fantastic!” Each of them say their best advice to anyone looking to get involved is to get out to shows, start making connections, and don’t be afraid to just try things out. “I think the community’s awesome, there’s just so much to learn here,” Johnston says, noting one of the best pieces of advice she got was that everyone messes up sometimes, but to just keep playing. “At some point you just have to accept that mistakes are part of it and once you do, if you commit to, ‘I’m gonna screw this up 100 times this year,’ if that’s your goal … then you are never gonna be scared again.” n

28 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

ten and Ginger Ewing, and Patrick Kendrick, leading the Inlander’s Volume Music Festival, with giving her a “crash course” in the cool things happening in the community that Global could support with sponsorships. Among the events Global’s sponsored at Price’s encouragement: Volume for several years, the music at the Perry Street Fair and the Girls Rock Lab that encourages young women to pursue their interest in music. They sponsor the music at the Spark Central Salon, the nonprofit’s annual fundraiser. And when Lucky You Lounge opens in May, Price says Global will sponsor a year of free shows in the venue’s basement as well as sponsoring a quarterly event on the main stage. The fact that women are involved as event organizers, club owners and artists in events Global supports at Price’s behest isn’t just good business in her mind. It’s good parenting, too. “We have these amazing sparks of people who are going out and making things happen,” Price says. “I have a 9-year-old daughter, and she’s pretty ballsy for a 9-year-old, and for her to be surrounded by people who just do what they are passionate about and love and makes it happen, that’s amazing for our community, and for my child to see.” (DAN NAILEN)


JENNY ANNE MANNAN J

enny Anne Mannan has her hands in a lot of Spokane music, from organizing the monthly Northwest of Nashville hootenannies at the Bartlett to performing in bands like An Dochas and Prairie War. Mannan — 38, and currently focused on recording a solo album this spring — grew up in the music business, touring with her family’s bluegrass band the Bullas before moving to Nashville in 1998 with her brother Luke. She spent years playing and recording in that music-industry town, and toured with bluegrass and country bands as well before moving back to Spokane nearly five years ago. Mannan finds the music scene in Spokane since she returned to be remarkably open and collaborative, particularly compared to Nashville. “What I love about Spokane is that everyone has to be really scrappy in order to piece it together, whether they’re full-time artists or promoters,” Mannan says. “So everybody relies on each other more, and then I think there’s more a place at the table for everyone.” And the more places there are for women at

that table, all the better. In her career, Mannan always found the bluegrass community to be open for women promoting and booking events like the Telluride Bluegrass Festival, whereas in country music, women are working more “in charge of the hospitality, but not necessary [as] the decision makers.” Like other genres, most clubs Mannan played with country or bluegrass bands have been owned or run by men, but on the occasions a woman is running a venue, it’s a welcome change. “There’s just a lot of things that are implied when someone is a club owner and unfortunately, there can be situations where promoters or club owners are — I hate to use the word sleazy — but yeah, that can happen, so there may be just guardedness [from artists]. Not mistrust exactly, but just being guarded,” Mannan says. “As a female performer going into a club owned by a woman, you’re a little more relaxed as a performer. There’s just a feeling of, ‘I know this is a person who cares about music and that that’s primarily the focus.’” (DAN NAILEN)

A RARE LOOK:

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APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 29


LOCAL MUSIC

PAM MEYER Sound engineer

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or Pam Meyer, life behind a soundboard came late, but came naturally. She’d started taking classes at Spokane Falls Community College to improve her chops as a musician, but when class forced her to work in the school’s recording studio, “it was an instant love affair,” Meyer says. “I was in love with the whole process. I took that class twice, I loved it so much.” That was in the early ’90s, and Meyer parlayed her new skills into a long-running gig at an old Spokane jazz haunt, freelance jobs with outdoor concerts, and then landed a job teaching in SFCC’s then-new audio engineering program in 2006. Two years later, she became the Fox Theater’s house sound engineer, where she works keeping the Spokane Symphony and visiting acts sounding pristine. It’s a rarity to see a woman behind the soundboard whether you’re talking about clubs or large venues like the Fox, a point Meyer illustrates with what she sees as a teacher. The audio-engineering program at SFCC starts with about 40 students each year. At the end of the program’s two years, maybe 15 to 20 of those students graduate, and of those graduates, maybe two or three are women typically, Meyer says. And she can only think of three of those female graduates who actually got a job in

CHRIS WOOLEY PHOTO

the industry and stayed in it. The 64-year-old Meyer attributes that lack of female representation as a natural extension of the lack of technological education for women growing up, and credits her time in the military as helping her learn the kind of “knobs and buttons” skills required when working sound. It’s also an incredibly competitive field, with not a lot of jobs to go around. She remembers hearing comments early in her career in what she calls “a man’s world; this

business is male,” that made her double down on her efforts to showcase her skills. “When I got started and was younger, there were a lot of snide remarks, I’ll put it that way,” Meyer says. “And I’d just smile and nod, put my head down and get the job done. My goal always was like, ‘F--- you, I’m just going to do the best job you’ve ever had done for you and make you, at the end of the night, come to me and say that was fantastic.’” (DAN NAILEN)

ALICIA HAUFF Photographer

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DEREK HARRISON PHOTO

30 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

or Alicia Hauff, music photography in her teen years was simply a means for the Spokane native to get into shows without having to pay the cover charge. Now, as a 31-year-old mother of two, it’s made her a high-profile figure in the local scene despite her diminutive stature, shooting local bands’ publicity images and shows at basically every local venue for nationally touring groups and Spokane artists. Hauff had largely given up music photography by her late teens, but she later developed a more traditional (and ongoing) photography business shooting portraits, weddings and high school seniors. Then a few years ago she watched the Dirty Heads’ videographer do his thing at a concert in Montana, and the seed was planted to crank up her rock photography again. “I watched him most of the time versus, you know, the show, and I thought, ‘Man, he’s killing it. I want to be doing that, like, right now. I don’t want to be on this side of the barricade, I want to be working and experiencing it that way,’” Hauff recalls. Having been out of the local scene for so long, it took Hauff a while to meet

people and network, but once folks started seeing her skills behind the lens, she quickly became an in-demand photographer. Now, just three years after getting back in the game, the challenge is juggling music shoots at night, traditional shoots by day, road trips or flights to shoot for nationally touring acts, and of course “normal life” with those two kids. “I am constantly on the move, going nonstop, and I do the business portion all by myself,” Hauff says. “I don’t have any assistants or anything. So I do struggle with the demand.” As she’s traveled more to do photos in Portland, Seattle or California, Hauff’s noticed an increasing number of women next to her in the photo pit, and elsewhere. “Women are really coming up in the concert photography [business] on a lot of these big tours,” Hauff says, noting that there are still occasional old dudes who try to push her around, but less than the old days. “And as I’ve gotten into this, there’s so many women in the music industry as far as tour managers, production managers, people like that are running the show. It’s interesting, and kind of cool to see.” (DAN NAILEN)


PREVIOUSLY...

Miller Cane learned from his sister in Spokane that a man was in town looking for him. Miller couldn’t be sure if it was Connor or Heffner — either way, it was bad news — and he decided that he and Carleen needed to get out of Washington state. They headed for the Pendleton Roundup in Oregon, joined by Miller’s friend, Avery, a former Black Panther. Miller has been on the run with 8-yearold Carleen, trying to keep her away from Connor, her estranged father, while her mother is stuck in jail. Before this, Miller had been traveling across America, conning the survivors of mass shootings, including a man named Heffner, who’s come unhinged with rage and grief.

CHAPTER 6, PART 1

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hey made it to the Roundup in time for the Grand Entry, in time for Miller and Avery to get a beer and Carleen to get pizza and pretzels and ice cream and licorice, the stands a sea of cowboy hats and feed caps on the men, most of the women bare headed, everyone wearing sunglasses, and after the first riders — flag bearers — rode into the stadium bearing American and Canadian and Tribal flags, and after the anthem was sung, all those cowboy hats and feed caps held over hearts went back onto heads, the announcer’s voice booming that he was pleased to present the queen and her royal court. “The queen?” Carleen said. “And her royal court,” Miller said. “Entering from the east,” the announcer said, “Princess Delia Flynn!”

ABOUT THIS PROJECT

Miller Cane: A True and Exact History, a new novel by Samuel Ligon, is being published for the first time in the pages of the Inlander. The latest installments of the book will always appear in print first, then on the web the following Wednesday MADE POSSIBLE BY and then on Spokane Public Radio, which is broadcasting audio versions of each installment. Visit MillerCane.Inlander.com for more details.

“Oh!” Carleen said. Into the arena charged a princess, glorious in her white cowgirl hat and pink fuzzy chaps flapping, waving to the crowd like mad, and before she was halfway across the field, another princess was introduced, from the west entrance, then another from the east, and another from the west, all of them riding and waving, the spindly lower legs of their horses a blur of pink wrapping, the same pink as their chaps, until the queen herself was introduced. “Oh!” Carleen said again, as the queen charged into the arena, jumping over a low bumper on the far side of the track and barreling across the grass infield, then over another low bumper and onto the track itself, cowgirl princesses flying behind her, the crowd cheering, flag bearers riding hell bent for leather behind the royal entourage, music booming. “Let ’er buck!” the announcer said, and the crowd shouted, “Let ’er buck,” and then the president of the Roundup was introduced, charging onto the dirt track amongst the swirl of riders, the theme from Bonanza blaring, the announcer shouting, “The wild and wooly West is alive, folks! You’ve got to say it with me now — Let ’er buck!” and everyone shouted it again, Carleen loudest, a bucking bronco erupting from one of the chutes, its rider a ragdoll flopping, but holding on. “The bucking horse of the year,” the announcer reported, and again the crowd went wild, as did the horse and rider bucking around the grass infield. Three blackshirted, black-hatted, sunglass-wearing, alpaca-chapped rodeo authorities surrounded the bronc, herding it, one of the animal-handling cops pulling the rider onto his own horse, the other two leading the bucking horse off the field. A second saddle bronc rider burst from a shoot, flipping and flopping and bucking and broncing, until he too was surrounded by the alpaca-chapped animal

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authorities. “This is definitely better than baseball,” Avery said. Why wasn’t everyone doing this all the time? “Let ’er buck,” Carleen yelled as the Indian relay started, each rider racing bareback around the track, sliding off his first horse while still in motion and jumping onto the next, then around again and onto another, a horse and human frenzy. “It’s amazing!” Carleen said. “It is,” Miller said. “Mom wouldn’t like it,” Carleen said. “I think you’re right,” Miller said. “But I like it,” Carleen said, until a cowboy launched himself from a galloping horse onto a charging steer, taking the animal down by its horns and twisting him by his head into the dirt. They got another beer. They got popcorn and popsicles and nachos and French fries. Back at their seats, the bull riding was much better than the steer wrestling, as far as Carleen was concerned, because the bulls always won. “I didn’t know cowboys were this real,” she said. “I didn’t either,” Miller said. Their names were Boudreaux and Tristan and Tanner and Chance. And the barrel-racing cowgirls were Tillar and Chandra and Raelin and Kai. Carleen gripped Miller’s hand. “Why does she have to whip him,” she said. “To make him go faster,” Miller said. “I thought that’s why she kicked him,” Carleen said. “I don’t think it hurts him,” Miller said. “I think it’s just to remind him.” “She really loves him,” Carleen said. “Look how she pets him.” “And how she leans in to talk to him.” “If it is a him.” ...continued on next page

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MILLER CANE: A TRUE AND EXACT HISTORY  Chapter 6, Part 1 continued... “It is,” Miller said. “Let ’er buck,” Carleen said, and after the barrel racing they headed toward the teepees in the Tribal Village, hundreds of them, Carleen transfixed by a girl in a beaded dress, shells jingling from strings down her chest and back. “Do you have to be an Indian to wear that?” Carleen whispered to Miller. “I think so,” Miller said. “But there are other things you can wear,” and Carleen said, “Like what?” and Miller said, “Lots of things.” They followed the girl to a grassy area where drummers were singing and driving the dancers. They watched and listened and when it was over they walked out of the Roundup toward Avery’s car. “I could probably wear a cowgirl hat,” Carleen said. “Sure you could,” Miller said. They had one more day of rodeo, plus the pageant tomorrow night, Happy Canyon, which Miller was dreading, a Buffalo Bill Wild West show celebrating — something. “If a French dude can name his wine Cayuse,” Avery said, “you can wear a cowgirl hat.” And to Miller: “You ever been to that tasting room?” Miller shook his head. “I went a couple years ago,” Avery said, “all these stupid ass names for the wine — Widowmaker, Bionic Frog, stuff like that. The vineyard’s only a few miles from the Mission, on what used to be Cayuse land, but there’s no mention of what happened, the winemaker a wine duke from France come to wrest holy juice from the rocky Western soil. It’s about the struggle of the vines, they tell you, the biodynamic farming methods, all this bullshit. I

said to the woman there, I said, ‘Who names these wines anyway?’ and she said ‘Christophe himself probably’ — that’s the wine duke — and I said, ‘Well, I got an idea for some names: how about a Massacre white? Or maybe an Execution red?’ which I thought was pretty goddamn funny — I mean, really — but she didn’t laugh.” Miller didn’t either. “I don’t get it,” Carleen said. “That’s ’cause it’s not funny,” Avery said. They drove in silence for a while, toward Shelly’s house in La Grande, where they’d left the motorhome that morning. “Laura Ingalls Wilder wasn’t a cowgirl,” Carleen said, “because she was a pioneer.” “That’s true,” Avery said. “And a farmer,” Miller said. “But she loved horses,” Carleen said. “And she was a writer, too,” Miller said. “People can be lots of things,” Avery said. “I could wear a bonnet,” Carleen said. “Sure you could,” Miller said. “Do you think I could go back to school now?” Carleen said. It was the second week of September and she hadn’t asked for days. She wanted a normal life — of course she did. Maybe he’d settle them someplace safe, enroll her in school ’til Lizzie got out. “But right now we’re working on our history book,” Miller said. “Which is like school,” Avery said, “traveling and seeing stuff.” Carleen didn’t say anything. Avery said, “Did I tell you Shelly’s niece is coming

for dinner?” Miller could study third grade curriculum and start teaching her, so that when she did start up again — January say, or sooner even — she wouldn’t be behind. Not that she’d be behind, as smart as she was. “Bella’s her name,” Avery said. “I want to go to school,” Carleen said. “I know you do,” Miller said. “We’ll figure it out.” “When?” Carleen said. “Soon,” Miller said, but he didn’t know when — or where. “She might have a horse,” Avery said. Somewhere far away. “Really? Carleen said. “Or a steer or a donkey or a bull — ” “Okay, cat man,” Carleen said. Avery laughed. “I think I’m going to Katmandu,” he said. Carleen laughed too. Miller didn’t know how he’d enroll her if she wasn’t his kid. They’d have to make up a story — lies on top of lies. Or maybe he’d just say she was his kid, and who could say otherwise? Maybe another day of rodeo was just what they needed, even if did include a lying Wild West show. At least there’d be cowgirls and princesses and clowns and broncos and cowboys and Indians and hot dogs. Avery was right. The rodeo was better than baseball. n

MILLER CANE CONTINUES IN NEXT WEEK’S INLANDER

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32 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019


COMMUNITY

CENTURY OF

Spokane NAACP still has plenty to fight for. SPOKANE NAACP PHOTO

CIVIL RIGHTS As Spokane’s NAACP chapter turns 100 years old, it’s still fighting for progress BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

I

n the mid-1960s, when Alice Moore was about 30, she moved to Spokane with her then-husband and four young children and got a job at Kaiser, one of the few companies that had a good reputation for hiring black residents. After divorcing her husband, Moore says she moved around a few times, and despite her luck at work, she always found it a challenge to secure a place to rent, even in neighborhoods that were less than ideal. When she finally found the house she still lives in today, Moore says the landlord was willing to rent to her, but she could tell his wife didn’t want to. “But Mr. Wilson, he didn’t care,” Moore says. “The neighborhood — I didn’t realize this — I find out later, [a neighbor] said they went up and down the street saying I was going to be renting here, and did they want me here? And of course, no, they didn’t, but it didn’t work. Mr.

Wilson rented the house to me.” She knows some black residents still struggle to find rentals. Even now, Moore says, some will send a white friend to look at a listing first, but when it comes time to sign the lease and it turns out the potential tenant is black, some landlords will claim someone else already signed. Fighting racism and discrimination like that is one of the reasons Moore joined the Spokane chapter of the NAACP when she moved to town all those years ago, and why she hopes younger people will join the organization to keep the cause going. This year marks one century since members of Spokane’s historically black churches gathered to form a local chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). With the chapter being officially recognized by April 1919, current organiz-

ers plan to celebrate the 100th birthday this month and throughout the year. Among the early leaders were Rev. Emmett B. Reed of Calvary Baptist Church, Rev. T.F. Jones of Bethel A.M.E. Church, and Frank A. Stokes, a businessman and member of Bethel A.M.E. who later became a longtime president of the chapter. Over the years, the chapter’s members would fight “against lynching and mob violence as well as discrimination and segregation in education, transportation, housing and voting,” Dwayne Mack writes in his book, Black Spokane: The Civil Rights Struggle in the Inland Northwest. “Some blacks in Spokane joined the organization because they believed that the racial oppression they experienced in their city was minuscule compared to the problems that blacks faced in other parts of the na...continued on next page

APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 33


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CULTURE | COMMUNITY “CENTURY OF CIVIL RIGHTS,� CONTINUED... tion,� Mack writes. “As a result, members of the Spokane NAACP focused on assisting all black Americans struggling against racial injustice across the United States.� But to be sure, there were still fights to be had in the Inland Northwest. Through the 1940s and later, the Spokane chapter called out segregation and unfair treatment of black soldiers nearby, and fought widespread discrimination as black people in Spokane were denied service at hotels, restaurants, stores, barbershops, salons, employment agencies and more, Mack writes. Some stores wouldn’t cater to black customers at all, while others wouldn’t let black customers try on clothing or shoes before purchasing them, for fear white customers wouldn’t want to buy those items. Even celebrities were denied lodging and meal service, meaning the likes of Louis Armstrong, Cab Calloway and Duke Ellington had to be lodged by Spokane’s black community when they came to perform, because hotels wouldn’t have them, Mack writes. Housing discrimination was rampant, though sometimes hard to prove. Often, landlords and realtors would say other tenants or buyers had come in just before a potential black tenant, rather than admit they just didn’t want to rent or sell to them.

standing of how things occurred, but with plans to move forward.� For Sandy Williams, a longtime civil rights activist and founder of the Black Lens newspaper, a similar tactic is necessary if Spokane is going to address other long-standing issues she’s seen come up time and time again. She remembers working toward improvements in the education system when the chapter was led by V. Anne Smith, and says it’s frustrating to see the same conversations still happening. Black students are disproportionately disciplined, suspended, expelled and arrested, Williams says. While efforts have been made to fix things time and time again, the systemic racism

A

s the Spokane NAACP gets ready to celebrate its centennial, many of the issues members fought to address the last 100 years remain at the forefront of the group’s work. Disparities in housing, education and the criminal justice system all remain problems. “If there’s anything that really kind of stands out to me, it’s that we’re cycling back to some of the same issues we’ve been fighting the whole time,� says Kurtis Robinson, current president of the Spokane chapter. Robinson joined the Spokane NAACP in 2016, and after becoming president in 2017, had a quick learning curve to take over a chapter that’s had a tough time shaking the 2015 controversy surrounding former president Rachel Dolezal. Dolezal, now named Nkechi Amare Diallo, was respected by many members for her civil rights work, but in 2015, it was revealed that she’d lied about her background, and her story sparked international debate about the appropriateness of a white woman identifying and presenting herself as black. Understandably, there was something of a rift in the local chapter afterwards, with some supporting her and others distancing themselves from the group. “It was very hurtful, for our people and our organization,� Robinson says. “When you’re dealing with traumatized populations, that perception of disingenuousness can be very offputting and very hurtful.� But Robinson says that as with many harms that’ve been done to people of color, it’s important to understand the issue, but also move forward. “You need to absolutely incorporate how you got there, the dynamics of the harm, but you don’t want to pitch your tent there,� he says. “You want to be able to have an in-depth under-

34 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019 SpokaneArtsFund_Saturate_040419_8V_WT.pdf

Kurtis Robinson, Spokane NAACP president isn’t going away, she says, suggesting maybe it’s time to ask why that is. “Spokane is so invested in the perception that it’s good and that it’s not racist, you know, there’s just so much investment in that, and people get so wounded at the concept that there’s actually racism here,â€? Williams says. “So it’s like you’re willing to do only so much, because if you go past this line, then you have to actually address the system. Anything up to that line means, ‘We’re really good people doing something,’ but past that means the system is really screwed up and we need to do something about it, and we’re not willing to go there.â€? Robinson is hopeful that the Spokane NAACP is ready to come together with other community organizations to address those systemic issues in governmental bodies, the criminal justice system, the school system, and private industry. Restorative accountability is key, he says. “These dynamics can be very embedded in our community, for quite a sustained period of time,â€? Robinson says. “The only way to move forward is in a restorative fashion.â€? n Spokane NAACP Centennial Celebration • April 15 • 6 pm • Free • Calvary Baptist Church • 203 E. Third


CULTURE | DIGEST

LOUISIANA’S DISAPPEARING COAST Elizabeth Kolbert’s deep dive for the New Yorker on how the Louisiana coastline is literally disappearing — allegedly at a rate of a “football field’s worth of land every hour and a half” — is as bleak as it is convincing. The culprits are rising sea levels and a lack of new sediment deposits from the heavily engineered Mississippi River. Through extensive reporting, historical research and candid writing, the reader is walked through the history of peoples’ various attempts to live with (or control) the Mississippi, and how engineers are now devising a massive new project to save coastal Louisiana. The piece’s final sentences are a stab in the heart about our relationship with nature: “If there is to be an answer to the problem of control, it’s going to be more control.” Read Kolbert’s piece at newyorker.com. (JOSH KELETY)

5 Hulu (Sorta) Hits

I

BY BILL FROST

’m a Spotify Premium subscriber because I don’t want ads interrupting my stream of the 16 new Oh Sees albums. Thanks to my exorbitant Inlander salary, it’s a small luxury I can easily afford. Please clap. In March, Spotify added a Premium perk: a free Hulu subscription. It’s the basic ad-supported version of Hulu, but so what? There’s plenty of cool shows on the streaming service, including originals like The Handmaid’s Tale (the feel-good hit of the Trumpy the Clown era). Here are five lesser-hyped Hulu series: SHRILL (Season 1) Saturday Night Live’s Aidy Bryant stars as Annie, an insecure, full-figured young woman toiling away at a Portland newspaper; the death of print is the least of her problems. Fed up with everyone trying to “fix” her, Annie decides to stop apologizing and just be herself — the results are as human as they are funny. Shrill is short, sweet and one of the best comedies of 2019.

THE BUZZ BIN HARD SUN (Season 1) In British import Hard Sun, London detectives Hicks (Jim Sturgess) and Renko (Agyness Deyn) stumble upon government evidence that Earth will suffer a solar extinction event in five years — I know; I wish it were sooner, too. Despite the sci-fi twist, Hard Sun is a gritty Brit cop drama that’s deeper than it seems. And waaay violent. GONE-ZAGA EXITS No one roots harder for Gonzaga than the Inlander staff. The proof is in how many of our NCAA tournament brackets blew up when the Zags lost. We’re also bummed to miss out on potential Spokesman-Review stories from the Final Four in Minneapolis. We imagine they were planning some great stuff after deep dives at previous Zags’ tourney stops, like “Disneyland is fun!” and “In-N-Out Burger makes burgers!” Sadly, we’ll never get to see the S-R’s stories from the Twin Cities. We can only dream about what might have been…  “Minneapolis Has Skywalks, But They Don’t Have

Spokane’s Own Celebrity Chef Chad White Making Lobster Rolls in Theirs!”  “I’m Proud to Say I’ve (Stayed in a City Where the Paper) Won a Pulitzer Prize.”  “Visiting the Mall of America: This Should Really Be Another Disneyland.”  “Minnesota’s Charles Schulz: Why We’ll Never Stop Running Peanuts Even Though He Died 19 Years Ago.”  “Meet the First Name in Minnesota Music: Semisonic.”  “15 Wikipedia Facts About Minneapolis” (Spoiler: It’s the third largest economic center in the Midwest.) (INLANDER STAFF)

YOUR NEXT STOP… It’s only been a couple weeks since Us hit theaters, and Jordan Peele already has another project ready for your eyeballs. His reboot of the classic anthology series The Twilight Zone has been released through CBS’ All Access streaming service, with two installments dropping on April Fool’s Day. The series’ first episode, about a stand-up comedian (Kumail Nanjiani) whose routines can erase their subjects from existence, is now available free on YouTube as of early this week, but might not be there for long. (NATHAN WEINBENDER)

THE BORDER LINES We frequently divide the world of fiction into your “literary” writers and “genre” writers. But Don Winslow, who recently released The Border, the conclusion to his trilogy about the drug war, manages to straddle that, uh, border. At times, Winslow has a Raymond Chandler-esque flair for the cynical epigram. “It’s the dirty secret of the war on drugs,” he writes. “Every time an addict sticks a needle into his arm, everyone makes money. We’re all investors. We’re all the cartel.” (DANIEL WALTERS)

FUTURE MAN (Seasons 1-2) An average janitor (Josh Hutcherson) who’s an aboveaverage video-gamer is recruited by future warriors to save the world — turns out the game he just beat was a recruitment tool (rejoice, e-nerds). Imagine Back to the Future if Seth Rogan and Evan Goldberg (the producers) applied their sick, stoned imaginations to it, or Ready Player One if it didn’t suck. SHUT EYE (Seasons 1-2) On the medium note: Charlie (Jeffrey Donovan) is a “fortune teller” conman desperate to escape Los Angeles’s gypsy mafia and start his own racket — but then his clairvoyant visions become real, inspiring him to give up the grifter life. Naturally, his mob boss (Isabella Rossellini) doesn’t see eye-to-third-eye with him. Odd that Shut Eye couldn’t predict its own cancellation. DIFFICULT PEOPLE (Seasons 1-3) What’s your tolerance level for Billy Eichner? You might reconsider after checking out Difficult People, wherein he and Julie Klausner play self-absorbed New Yorkers who hate everything and everyone but each other. The pair’s comic interplay sings like an off-Broadway production they’d adore, but also wouldn’t cross town to see. n

THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music arrives online and in stores April 5. To wit: KHALID, Free Spirit. The R&B-leaning pop star just booked his first arena tour, including a date in Spokane July 9. PRIESTS, The Seduction of Kansas. The title track on this D.C. band’s latest is some killer ear candy. SARA BAREILLES, Amidst the Chaos. Bareilles is back with her first non-Broadway album in six years.

Visit billfrost.tv for more trenchant television coverage.

APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 35


CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS

A Colorful Collection Saturate highlights Spokane’s under-recognized artists of color

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ach spring, Spokane Arts coordinates a special feature for First Friday to spotlight the region’s many artists of color. That showcase kicks off April 5, with most exhibitions remaining on display throughout the month. In addition to visual art, Saturate includes performances and curatorial projects led by people of color. Highlights include an exhibit at the Chase Gallery featuring art by six artists of color across a variety of mediums. The Spokane Print Fest also joins the roster, along with art at several branches of the Spokane Public Library. Information below is listed alphabetically by venue, and all designated Saturate events are noted with J. Most receptions take place Friday, April 5, from 5-8 pm, unless otherwise noted. Find additional details at firstfridayspokane.org and spokanearts.org/saturate. (CHEY SCOTT) J AVENUE WEST GALLERY, 907 W. Boone Japanese-style paper dolls and origami by Patti Reiko Osebold. Paintings by Christine Owens also displayed. BARRISTER WINERY, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. Art by Valerie Lindberg with music by Spare Parts. BARILI CELLARS, 608 W. Second Landscapes by Ricco DiStefano. BEN JOYCE STUDIOS, 806 W. Third Art by the local “painter of place.” BISTANGO, 108 N. Post Music by Robert Riggs from 4-10 pm. BON BON, 926 W. Garland Art by Caitlin Keogh. BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS,

36 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

39 W. Pacific Music by the Sara Brown Band from 4-10 pm. J CHASE GALLERY, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. The Saturate group show features art by Jeff Ferguson, Jiemei Lin, Brandon Johnson, Antonio Romero, Geetha Alagirisamy and Azzah Sultan. Reception April 5 from 4-7 pm. J CLAY CONNECTION, 714 E. Sprague Sculpture by James McLeod in From the Abundance of the Heart do the Hands Create. Reception April 5 from 5-8 pm. CRAFTSMAN CELLARS, 1194 W. Summit Pkwy. Art by Sandy Aronson. Reception 2-8 pm.

FROM LEFT: Amylou Lagaras at the South Hill Library, PORTAL at Saranac Art Projects and Jiemei Lin at Chase Gallery. J EAST SIDE LIBRARY, 524 S. Stone St. Art by Shantell R. Jackson. EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS, 331 W. Main Watercolors by Janie Edwards. J DOWNTOWN SPOKANE LIBRARY, 906 W. Main Art by Tim Gonzalez, Chadchom Chezkhun and Frances Grace Mortel is displayed through the month on the third floor. The library also showcases Grace June’s Survive photography project and hosts a song craft event with local musician Lindsay Johnston (Donna Donna, Vanna Oh!). FIRST AVENUE COFFEE, 1011 W. First Paintings by Eric Rau and Anna Rau. J INDIAN TRAIL LIBRARY, 4909 W. Barnes Rd. Art by Geetha Alagirisamy on display through the month. IRON GOAT BREWING CO., 1302 W. Second Oil paintings by Conrad Bagley in A Show of Fabric. J INLAND NORTHWEST WOMEN’S SHOW, 404 N. Havana Shades of Me, an annual showcase of art by brown artists in the Inland Northwest. April 6-7 (show entry $7). KOLVA-SULLIVAN GALLERY, 115 S. Adams Measurements of Experimentations features mixed media art by Robert Kraut. J KRESS GALLERY, 808 W. Main, third floor Traditional Japanese calligraphy and sumi-e art by Keiko Von Holt. Reception April 5, 5-8 pm. LEFTBANK WINE BAR, 108 N. Washington Art by Travis Chapman and music by Kori Ailene.

LIBERTY CIDERWORKS, 164 S. Washington Art by Cherise Stutzman. Reception 4-9 pm. J MARMOT ART SPACE, 1202 W. Summit Pkwy. Art by Ric Gendron from his Santa Fe residency. MARYHILL WINERY, 1303 W. Summit Pkwy. Photography by Ira Gardner. J NEW MOON ART GALLERY, 1326 E. Sprague Woodwork by Antonio Fletcher in Blowin’ in the Wind. Reception 12-6 pm. J NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS & CULTURE, 2316 W. First As Grandmother Taught: Women, Tradition and Plateau Art celebrates art of the indigenous cultures of the Columbia River Plateau. POTTERY PLACE PLUS, 203 N. Washington Paintings by Sharon Ronning and pastels by T. Kurtz. Reception 5:30-9 pm. RESURRECTION RECORDS, 1927 W. Northwest Blvd. The Keyboard Cat Tribute Show, featuring art by Charlie Schmidt and local artists. Reception 6-9 pm. RIVER CITY BREWING, 121 S. Cedar St. The First Friday garage party (4-10 pm) features art by Caitlin Keogh and music by Whisk&Keys. ROBERT KARL CELLARS, 115 W. Pacific New art from members of Bear Creek Mercantile. J SARANAC ART PROJECTS, 25 W. Main PORTAL by the Portal Collective features site-specific installations. Also on display is Krista Brand’s Into Pieces. J SHADLE LIBRARY, 2111 W. Wellesley Acrylic paintings by Vicky Trujillo-

Malmo, on display through the month. J SOUTH HILL LIBRARY, 3324 S. Perry Art by Amylou Lagaras, on display through the month. J SPARK CENTRAL, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. The Diverse Voices Writing Group supports adult and teen writers of all backgrounds. Meets April 4 at 5:30 pm. SPOKANE ART SCHOOL, 811 W. Garland Integration by Jamie N. Nadherny (aka Lou Lou Pink). STEELHEAD BAR & GRILLE, 218 N. Howard Acrylics and oil paintings by Ellen Blaschke. J TERRAIN, 304 W. Pacific The Spokane Print Fest celebrates all things printmaking, with demos, work for sale from local artists and the debut of the new printmaking exhibition, Tangible Gestures. Festival April 5 from 5-11 pm. Workshop ($50) April 6 from 10 am-noon. TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY, 115 S. Adams Form and Function features ceramics by Amanda Bury and Cozette Phillips. VINO! A WINE SHOP, 222 S. Washington Art by Sami Perry and Yevgeniy Ampleyev. Reception and wine tasting 3-6:30 pm. WILLIAM GRANT GALLERY & FRAMING, 1188 W. Summit Pkwy. Salted copper wall art by Anthony Gallaher. WONDER SPOKANE, 821 W. Mallon A spring pop-up for AS2, the Art Spirit Gallery of Coeur d’Alene’s new satellite gallery. Reception 5-9 pm. n


CULTURE | SCENTS

Ooh, That Smell What, exactly, should a Spokane-scented candle smell like? BY LAREIGN WARD

I

’ve been spending way too much time lately trying to get a big ol’ whiff of Spokane. This bizarre impulse comes from social media, home to all of humanity’s most unsettling urges. See, I’ve seen ads for candles that are supposed to smell like Spokane. And that made me realize I’m not sure what, if any, signature smell Spokane has. Right now, it smells like pollen getting ready to bloom. This is not great for my sinuses, but it’s an improvement over when I first saw the Spokane candle advertised in the dead of winter. At that point, I couldn’t smell much of anything, which lined up nicely with my inability to feel much of anything. The ad must have been going around, because a few weeks later, a friend from grad school posted a photo of the picture on Instagram, minus any description. He asked his friends to “tell me what this scent is.” Since he knows a lot of writers, he got some descriptions that were almost poetic. One friend mentioned the smell of beer and popcorn at the dearly departed Swamp Tavern. Another referred to “old books” in her answer. And then there was me. I typed, “Does Seasonal Affective Disorder have a smell?” But let me be fair to the candle company (that I will not name, because they clearly have enough of an ad budget). Depression is not a scent people look for in $30 candles. If someone with $30 wants to be depressed, they’ll buy vodka like a normal person. The actual product description is much more optimistic: “Herbs and honeysuckle reminiscent of Centennial Trail hikes through the sunny side of the state. Home of 3-on-3 basketball. Notes of carnation to celebrate fathers around the world.” There’s a base note of powdery musk. I think that’s supposed to represent dads, or maybe I missed out on the Hoopfest tradition of dousing yourself in baby powder before each game. I’m sure all those things smell fine. But they don’t

This product is completely, frighteningly real. smell like Spokane to me. I tried to ask a few nonInstagram friends what, exactly, a candle claiming to represent the city should smell like. A bunch of people mentioned lilacs for the Lilac City. One friend looked a little lost before spitting out, “People’s vapes?” The more I think about it, the more I think it’s good that there’s no universally recognized smell that makes you think of Spokane. No one is rushing to bottle up the Tacoma Aroma. And I’m from a small Southern town, one where the most distinctive smells come from either a paper mill or a chicken truck on the freeway. But on the third hand, the candles this company sells aren’t designed for people who live here. They’re designed for people who leave and want a reminder of home, even if it’s mass-produced and not terribly specific. When I leave town, what scents are going to stir up memories of Spokane? I’m a freelancer without a proper office, which means I often work in coffee shops and arrive home with the smell of espresso beans on my clothes. Then there’s weed. I know the candle description mentions “herbs,” but I don’t think they meant that kind. I have never smelled as much weed as I have in Spokane. That’s not saying much, considering I grew up Texas.

Yet weed in Spokane is like barbecue in Texas: the smoky odor is always in the air, and you can usually find a friend who will either offer you some or say, “Hey, you know what sounds good right now?” I’m not a smoker, but I find the routine comforting. Not every scent is reassuring. I’ve been here since 2013, and I barely remember the first wildfire seasons. This might be recency bias, but now it feels like I’m choking on the air every August. Pollen is bad, but I can at least take decongestants. In late summer, there’s nothing I or anyone else can do to get the particulate matter out of the air. Thinking through all this made me realize I should leave the candle-making to the experts. Coffee is a decent candle scent, but weed is not, and, well, candles already smell like fire by default. I’m not sure how much longer I’ll have a Spokane address. But when I leave, I won’t need a candle. The memories of smells good and bad will be vivid enough. They’ll have to be, because I’m not letting my cats near an open flame. n Lareign Ward’s work has appeared in Electric Literature, The Southeast Review, The Mary Sue and elsewhere. You can find her on Twitter @lareignw

JOIN TEAM INLANDER! Events & Promotions Support The Inlander is looking for an enthusiastic person to join our events team. This entry-level position assists in outbound promotions, as well as our ever-expanding roster of fun local events like Inlander Restaurant Week, Volume Music Festival, Suds and Cinema, and Inlander Winter Party. You must be organized, efficient, thrive on a team, have strong communication skills, and be able to manage multiple tasks and deadlines at once. This position requires a flexible schedule for some evening and weekend work. Join our team in Kendall Yards as we keep working to make the Inland Northwest cooler all the time!

Please send your resume and cover letter to HR@Inlander.com NO PHONE CALLS OR WALK-INS PLEASE

APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 37


RURAL EATS

Priest River Provisions Spring’s thaw encourages an exploration of this North Idaho town’s diverse food scene BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

W

e can know a place through its food. In Priest to the influence of Italian immigrants working for the River, it’s a mish-mash of longtime favorites railroad — there’s still a neighborhood in town called the and relative newcomers, many of whom Italian Settlement. The food honors the Riveras’ tradiembody the pioneer spirit that founded this North Idaho tions, with dishes like their coffee and ancho-rubbed flat timber town in the late 1800s. Next time you’re passing iron steak with sweet potato ribbons and Southwestern through on the way to the lake, or looking for a short day black bean, corn and quinoa salad ($18). trip, keep this Gem State jewel in mind. “I really like this dish,” says David. “I believe that it For THE SETTLEMENT KITCHEN + CRAFT highlights our Southwestern roots.” TAVERN’S (5634 Highway 2) owners David and Dana The menu overall is an eclectic mix of American fare, Rivera, opening a business in Priest River was at the from several taco varieties, to fresh organic salads and nexus of necessity and serendipity. The couple was lookmac and cheese to burgers, including the plant-based ing to trade their fast-paced Impossible Burger. life in the Phoenix area for Southwestern and Tex-Mex MORE PRIEST RIVER EATS something more sustainable fare is also available at MI Burger Express, 5579 Highway 2 where they could be debt-free, PUEBLO (5436 Highway 2), Mangy Moose Café, 3604 Highway 2 raise their children and still with dishes like chicken mole Ranch Club Golf Course & Restaurant, 4555 Highway 2 feel like part of a community, enchiladas ($9.75). Owner Yoni Infinity Café, 5770 Highway 2 says David. They purchased Solis, formerly of El Salvador, Millie’s Bar & Grill, 28441 Highway 57 property across the state line has three additional locations Falls Inn, 8700 Highway 57 near Newport, eventually in Bonners Ferry and Spirit resettled there and looked for Lake, Idaho, and neighboring a way to parlay David’s love Newport. of wine and 20 years in the food industry. Another local favorite is AJ’S CAFE (536 High St.), In 2018, the Rivera’s transformed a shuttered Priest which Wendy Malnar and her husband Rick opened in River restaurant into the Settlement, which pays tribute 2008. The place highlights the town’s railroad, logging

38 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

and rural roots in its decor with horse tack and vintage signs, while the menu is downhome diner all the way, serving up hearty breakfast (try the chicken fried steak), lunch and old-fashioned pie.

L

ike many of the mining and timber towns in North Idaho, Priest River was built on the backs of people whose dreams were large enough to carry them through hard times. Early settler Charles Beardmore built one of the town’s first commercial buildings in 1922, housing a theater and apartments. The place eventually fell into disrepair, but was revived in 2009 by Beardmore’s great-grandson Brian Runberg, a Seattlebased architect. Runberg’s renovations of the Beardmore block, as it’s known, included adding the BEARDMORE BISTRO WINE BAR & TAPHOUSE (119 Main St). In addition to small plates and craft beverages in a restored 1920s barroom, the bistro does a popular two-for-$20 dinner special on Tuesdays ranging from puff pastry chicken to spaghetti and meatballs. Another family name as integral to the town’s history as Beardmore is Henry Keyser, whose late-1890s home was relocated from its original rural site to downtown Priest River and now serves as both the Chamber of


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More than meets the culinary eye in Priest River, Idaho.

CARRIE SCOZZARO PHOTOS

Commerce offices and a historical museum. In 1978, Keyser’s descendants opened the VILLAGE KITCHEN (at 911 Highway 2, formerly called Keyser’s Village Kitchen). All-day breakfast is its claim to fame, as is their large, screened-in outdoor seating area. Like the Village Kitchen, the RUSTY ROOSTER (45 S. McKinley St.) covers the gamut, from breakfast and lunch to weekend dinners. Its specialty is Southern-inspired dishes, so look for items like fried okra ($5) and house-smoked meats — try the brisket ($11.50) or Cuban with house-smoked pork and capicola ham, salami and Swiss cheese ($9.75) — as well as south-of-theborder accents like the Southern pizza with chorizo and jalapeno ($9.95). Pizza was on Shawna Prummer’s mind when she opened one of Priest River’s newest establishments last spring, RIVER CITY TAP HOUSE (6151 Highway 2). Its logo, a Boston terrier, is a nod to Prummer’s dog Bubba. “We do a sourdough crust with flour I bring in from Italy,” says Prummer, who sources most ingredients from Sandpoint’s Winter Ridge Natural Foods, which she owns with husband Gregg. Try the Fun-Gi pizza ($15), topped with seasonal mushrooms, garlic alfredo sauce, artichoke, mozzarella, caramelized onions and fresh rosemary. River City Tap House’s menu leans toward health-conscious pub fare, with grass-fed beef, organic veggies and all made-fromscratch items. Gluten-free dishes are no problem. The Prummers opened Winter Ridge in 1997 when their son was diagnosed with celiac disease, offering gluten-free beer and items like their popular fish and chips ($15) prepared in a dedicated gluten-free fryer. The new pub is located in the former home of King’s Bar and Grill, near the junction of Highway 57 and Highway 2, which sends travelers north towards Priest Lake, west to Newport or east to Sandpoint. Painted orange in a nod to Priest River’s Lamanna High School with an otherwise uninviting exterior, the Tap House serves as a reward for travelers with an adventurous culinary spirit. n food@inlander.com

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APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 39


FOOD | OPENING

Sweet Strides

Hurrah! Donut Parade’s classic treats are back.

ERICK DOXEY PHOTO

Local landmark Donut Parade opens under new ownership after a two-year hiatus BY CHEY SCOTT

I

t’s less than a half-hour from closing, but still a steady stream of customers parade through the front door of an iconic East Spokane donut shop to sate their appetites for something sweet. Donuts in the pastry case this late in the day have recently been a rarity. “The community response has been amazing — overwhelming in a good way,” says Nathan Peabody, who owns the shop with wife Christa. “We ran out of donuts for the first 10 days of business even though we kept making more and more and more.” The locally beloved Donut Parade, first founded in 1968 by Darrell and Kathy Jones, closed to much disappointment in December 2016 when the shop’s second owners, the Reno family, at the time blamed slow sales compounded by a car accident that badly damaged its

front entrance. The Peabodys began pursuing plans to reopen the shop shortly after, eventually signing a lease and beginning renovations last December. One of their main goals in reviving the business is to create an opportunity for local youth to gain job skills and workplace experience. On the day of Donut Parade’s highly anticipated official reopening on March 13, a line of eager customers wrapped around the building and down the block. That day’s supply of donuts was gone within 45 minutes. “It seems like every other person has a story about this place,” notes Christa Peabody. “It’s very unusual to get ‘thank you’ for opening a business, but a lot of people say that. That has been the most surprising thing to us, but it seems to mean a lot to a lot of people.” The Peabodys were able to connect with the family

of Donut Parade’s late founder Darrell Jones, learning about the shop’s history and what they could about the original owner’s recipes, which weren’t recorded but that the couple has tried to replicate as best they can. “Now on top of our original goal of having a place for youth to learn job skills is to try and keep it true to what it has always been,” Nathan says. Those familiar with the shop’s past iterations should notice the Peabodys’ improvements to the space, including new paint, flooring and restroom overhauls, but also their commitment to keep some of the shop’s original fixtures. The display cases and a bartop with stools remain, as do the vinyl-covered booths. They’ve also left intact an old, faded window painting of two cartoon donuts skipping hand-in-hand on the front window, but added a new mural on the inside wall near the door by local artist Chris Bovey. The donuts themselves are a pared-down collection of classics: old fashioneds, maple bars, cake donuts, apple fritters, cream and jelly-filled donuts, chocolate flavored, plain glazed, powdered sugared, and versions topped with frosting and sprinkles. Individually priced between $1 and $2.50, donuts can, of course, also be ordered by the dozen, either in a pre-assorted box ($12) or by customers’ choice; the latter option is priced individually by donut with a 15 percent discount on the total. A dozen maple bars are $15. Beverage choices are drip coffee from nearby Arctos Coffee & Roasting Co., tea, milk and juice. The Peabodys hope to add lunch items in the future, starting with simple fare like hotdogs, chili dogs and bagel sandwiches. Daily specials are also starting to appear on the menu, like the Sloppy Dez ($3.50), a buttermilk donut topped with warm sausage gravy. On a recent Wednesday after the shop has closed for the day, plenty of donuts remain, though not for long. A volunteer stops by to pick up some of these leftovers to drop off at Spokane fire stations, and maybe also at the Spokane Police Department. Other days, the Peabodys are donating the leftovers to various local nonprofits that feed people, Nathan notes. To help meet demand for specific donut varieties on a given day, Donut Parade recently started accepting preorders, allowing customers to place orders the night before for pickup the following day. Preorders can be made by phone, in person or through the shop’s Facebook page. “The goal is not to sell out because we’d like to have a selection,” Nathan continues. “I’m pretty happy with that today, everyone who comes in gets what they want.” n cheys@inlander.com Donut Parade • 2152 N. Hamilton • Open Mon-Sat 6 am-2 pm • facebook.com/donutparadespokane • 473-9870

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FOOD | TO GO BOX

CdA Wine & Food Fest Approaches Plus, help a Spokane family open a traditional Argentinian empanada restaurant BY CHEY SCOTT

A

The second Coeur d’Alene Food & Wine Festival presents a dazzling array of delicious events.

CDA RESORT PHOTO

rtists, authors and foodies unite for the Coeur d’Alene Food and Wine Festival, happening April 11-14 at the Coeur d’Alene Resort. The secondyear festival celebrating all things food and wine this year features a special showcase of art by some familiar names: Ben Joyce, Melissa Cole and Jesse Pierpoint. They’ll be highlighted during the Artist Den & Idaho Wine Tasting event on Saturday, April 13, from 1-6 pm; tickets are $10 to the public, or free to festival passholders. Literature, meanwhile, joins the schedule lineup in the form of a “sip and signing” with New York Times bestselling author Debbie Macomber on Sunday, April 14, at 10 am; tickets are $40. Other highlights of the three-day event

are two Friday evening cruises on the lake pairing wine tastings and light appetizers with beautiful water views. Guests can also purchase tickets to a couple of Saturday wine-tasting classes with experts or the winemakers themselves. Wine-pairing luncheons and dinners — a few of which are already sold out — fill the schedule Saturday afternoon and evening. That day also concludes with downtown Coeur d’Alene’s annual Wine Walk, for which $20 admission gets attendees six wine tastings. Tasting packages offering access to most Food & Wine Festival events (guests choose one lunch service and class on Saturday) are $409 per person. Find a complete schedule, tickets and other details at cdafoodandwinefest.com.

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SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

3/22/19 4:43 PM

April/May edition on Inlander stands now 42 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019


SUSTAINING LOCAL SENIORS

Low-income senior citizens can apply to receive a $40 voucher to purchase fresh fruits and veggies at designated farmers markets in Spokane County this upcoming season. The Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program is coordinated by Catholic Charities Spokane Food for All and Aging and Long-Term Care of Eastern Washington, and was created to improve the nutrition of low-income seniors, age 60 or above. To be eligible, applicants must be able to show their income is below 185 percent of the federal poverty level, and apply before May 31. A total of $71,000 in vouchers are to be distributed this year via a lottery system. For more information on this program and to apply, visit altcew.org or cceasternwa.org/foodforall, or call 459-6163.

EMPANADAS RESTAURANT OPENING SOON

A local family has launched a Kickstarter campaign to help make their dream come true, to serve fresh, hot, traditional Argentinian empanadas from their home country to residents of the Inland Northwest. The Alvarez family plans to open Tarascon Empanadas by early summer in a space shared with Mr. Wok restaurant (9222 N. Newport Hwy.) in North Spokane. Empanadas are savory pastries filled with minced beef, chicken, ham and cheese, veggies or other ingredients. The Alvarezes say this will be the first restaurant in the greater Spokane area to serve traditional empanadas, which vary in flavor and ingredients across regions of Argentina. The crowdfunding campaign for a total of $3,000 will help them purchase a few needed pieces of equipment for the kitchen where they’ll be making several varieties of scratch-made empanadas using local ingredients. Pledges to Tarascon (Argentinian slang for “big bite”) can be made on Kickstarter through April 30. Find it under “Argentinian Empanadas in Spokane,” or this short link: kck.st/2Cq43Q5. More about the family and the restaurant is at tarasconempanadas.com. n

Big MAN of cda

A Womanless Beauty Pageant

A benefit for Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre

Saturday, April 13 7:00 pm show (6:00 cocktail hour) The Eagles Ballroom 209 Sherman Ave

$25 per person Cheer on your favorite local man and say hello to hilarious at this Monty Python inspired event where men strut their stuff! Who will WIN THE CROWN? You decide...

208.660.2958 cdasummertheatre.com APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 43


Minor League Hero Shazam! is a scattered superhero attempt from DC BY JOSH BELL

T

he superhero formerly known as Captain Marvel (not to be confused with the Captain Marvel from Marvel Comics, whose own movie, starring Brie Larson, is currently in theaters) is a wish-fulfillment fantasy for the target audience of kids and teens who were the main consumers of comic books when the character debuted in 1940. It’s been decades since comic books and superheroes were considered something “just for kids,” but Captain Marvel remains tied to his kidfocused origin. That makes the new Shazam! a bit of an awkward fit for a modern superhero action movie. The hero’s origin remains pretty much the same: 14-year-old orphan Billy Batson (Asher Angel) is granted the ability to transform into a fully adult superhero (played by Zachary Levi) by uttering the word “Shazam,” after he’s chosen by an ancient wizard (Djimon Hounsou) who dubs him pure of heart. Billy remains an immature teenager on the inside, though, and he spends much of his time goofing around with his new powers while the evil Dr. Sivana (Mark Strong) plots his downfall from afar. Although it’s paced like a typically bloated largescale blockbuster (Billy doesn’t actually transform into a superhero until 40 minutes into the movie), Shazam! feels more like an overgrown Saturday morning cartoon, especially in the dynamic between Billy and fellow foster kid Freddy Freeman (Jack Dylan Grazer), a snarky superhero fanboy who’s both fascinated by and jealous of his friend’s newfound powers. Freddy is more annoying than endearing, and his relationship with Billy encourages the brattiest behavior from both of them. It’s mildly amusing to see a bulkedup Levi in a bright red superhero costume binge on junk food and get flustered around his foster family, but the movie’s one joke gets old quickly, and what’s left is a slow, underwhelming superhero story, along with some equally slow family drama. Produced on a lower budget than other DC superhero movies, Shazam! occasionally looks somewhat threadbare, and the action sequences are more basic than the cataclysmic confrontations of previous DC movies (although this doesn’t prevent the final battle from dragging on interminably). At the same time, the film is full of references to other DC movie superheroes, a remnant of the time when the company was attempting to build a cinematic universe to rival Marvel’s. It’s another instance of Shazam!’s confused identity, of trying to cover its bases both as a franchise building block and as a standalone narrative. The tone is similarly fractured, shifting from cheesy, kid-friendly jokes and life lessons to dark, violent material from Sivana, as if the two modes of DC films are battling it out within Henry Gayden’s screenplay.

44 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

Instead of bridging the gap between grim, gritty DC movies like Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice and Suicide Squad and the brighter, more upbeat DC successes Wonder Woman and Aquaman, Shazam! lurches clumsily from one to the other, never settling on a satisfying approach. It could be the superhero version of Big (there’s even a nod to the Tom Hanks comedy’s iconic giant-piano scene), but it can’t get away from the needless angst and turmoil. Levi is the perfect choice to play an oversized kid, at least, and he’s a lot more fun to watch than the actual kid actors. Strong, who already played an antagonist in one failed DC superhero movie (2011’s ill-fated Green Lantern), brings as much menace as he can to Sivana, but the villain always feels like an afterthought. It’s only at the end of the movie, when the major players are all in place for future stories, that Shazam! seems like it has real potential. Maybe the sequel can achieve a more effective balance. n

SHAZAM!

Rated PG-13 Directed by David F. Sandberg Starring Zachary Levi, Djimon Hounsou, Mark Strong


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The Aftermath

OPENING FILMS THE AFTERMATH

Keira Knightley stars as the wife of a British colonel who carries on an affair with a German widower (Alexander Skarsgard) in the years following WWII. (NW) Rated R

ASH IS PUREST WHITE

From master filmmaker Jia Zhangke, a romantic crime saga about a gangster and his moll drifting apart amidst China’s shifting socioeconomic climates. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

THE BEST OF ENEMIES

Based on the true story of the civil rights activist and the Klansman who sparred over racial integration in 1970s North Carolina. Taraji P. Henson and Sam Rockwell star. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE MUSTANG

A violent convict is placed into a program where prisoners rehab horses, and he bonds with a wild, unbroken stallion. (NW) Rated R

PET SEMATARY

Stephen King’s novel returns to the big screen with its chilling Monkey’s Pawstyle scenario involving a graveyard that brings dead things back to life…

for a price. (NW) Rated R

THE PUBLIC

JOIN US AT THE

An all-star cast drives this story of a rift between Cincinnati cops and the homeless population that turns a library into shelter during a cold snap. Directed by Emilio Estevez. (NW) Rated PG-13

SHAZAM!

DC’s latest attempt at levity finds a scrawny kid inhabiting the body of a muscular superhero. It’s torn between the studio’s dour and goofier sensibilities, making it a curious thing, indeed. (JB) Rated PG-13

TRANSIT

Director Christian Pentzold returns to his pet themes of mistaken identity during wartime, as a man fleeing Nazis meets the wife of the dead man he’s impersonating. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

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WOMAN AT WAR

An Icelandic environmental activist stages a one-woman crusade against the country’s aluminum industry, becoming a folk hero in the process. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not Rated

APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 45


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FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING ALITA: BATTLE ANGEL

A junked cyborg is rebuilt by a futuristic scientist, discovering she was once an all-powerful warrior from Mars. It looks nifty, but James Cameron’s script is as clunky as can be expected. (NW) Rated PG-13

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

THE BEACH BUM

Harmony Korine’s latest stars Matthew McConaughey as a stoner named Moondog, who’s working on the great American novel. Snoop Dogg, Jimmy Buffet and Martin Lawrence have supporting roles. (NW) Rated R

CAPTAIN MARVEL

The 21st Marvel feature goes back to the ’90s, introducing a superhuman fighter pilot (Brie Larson) who’s torn between warring factions of Earth and space. Hardly revolutionary, but fun, nostalgic and empowering. (SS) Rated PG-13

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

ALITA: BATTLE ANGEL

54

CAPTAIN MARVEL

65

DUMBO

52

GLORIA BELL

80

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON 3

72

US

81

WONDER PARK

46

APOLLO 11

Right on the heels of First Man comes this acclaimed documentary about the 1969 NASA mission that landed on the moon. Demands to be seen on a big screen. (NW) Rated G

NEW YORK TIMES

DON’T MISS IT

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touchables, with Bryan Cranston as a paralyzed millionaire and Kevin Hart as the troubled man who becomes his caretaker. It thinks it’s a feel-good drama, but it’s actually manipulative trash. (ES) Rated PG-13

US

A family is menaced by violent duplicates of themselves in Jordan Peele’s

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

much-anticipated follow-up to Get Out, and it’s another deeply unnerving and brilliantly realized thriller. (MJ) Rated R

WONDER PARK

An animated fiasco from Nickelodeon about an animal-friendly theme park that springs from the imagination of a little girl. Despite its title, it has a severe lack of wonder. (JB) Rated PG n

DUMBO

Tim Burton’s live-action reimagining of the animated Disney classic is pretty pointless and lifeless, a fable about a sweet flying elephant that never takes off. (SS) Rated PG

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DINNER, DRINKS, MAGIC

Haley Lu Richardson and Cole Sprouse are hospitalized teenagers with cystic fibrosis who fall in love without being able to touch one another. (NW) Rated PG-13

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Sebastian Lilio helms an English-language remake of his own 2013 Chilean film about a 50-year-old divorcee navigating the singles’ nightclub scene. A showcase for Julianne Moore’s luminous performance. At the Magic Lantern. (JB) Rated R

HOTEL MUMBAI

A harrowing dramatization of a 2008 terror attack on an Indian hotel, centered on the staff and guests held hostage. Dev Patel and Armie Hammer star. (NW) Rated R

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON: THE HIDDEN WORLD

The third entry in the hit DreamWorks franchise finds Hiccup and Toothless up against a hunter that wants to eradicate all dragons. Even for fans, this one’s a bit disappointing. (MJ) Rated PG

UNPLANNED

A faith-based feature about a Planned Parenthood employee who becomes an anti-abortion activist. From the writer of the God’s Not Dead series. (NW) Rated R

THE UPSIDE

A remake of the French hit The In-

NOW STREAMING COLD WAR (AMAZON PRIME)

A pianist and a singer fall in love in post-WWII Poland, and are separated and reunited many times over the course of a decade. A haunting portrait of a broken relationship and of a country in turmoil, shot in luminous black and white and told mostly through musical performances. (NW) Rated R


FILM | LOCAL SCREENINGS

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Personal Histories Gonzaga professor Matt McCormick’s documentaries explore the strange side of American culture BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

M

att McCormick’s documentaries tend to view recent American history through the prism of personal history, films inspired by old photos and family anecdotes passed down through the generations. It’s a trajectory that began when the filmmaker and current Gonzaga University professor was still working in the advertising industry. In 2001, he directed a documentary short called The Subconscious Art of Graffiti Removal, a sort of tonguein-cheek visual dissertation about the destruction of urban art. It was programmed at Sundance and screened at the Museum of Modern Art and, as McCormick describes it, “kind of went viral” in the days before YouTube. This led to more commercial work, collaborations with artists like Calvin Johnson and Miranda July, and gigs directing music videos for the Shins, Sleater-Kinney and Broken Bells. He also made the 2008 narrative feature Some Days Are Better Than Others, which starred SleaterKinney’s Carrie Brownstein and the Shins’ James Mercer. He began teaching film at Portland State University, and now he’s an assistant professor at Gonzaga, instructing students on the basics of narrative and documentary filmmaking and working on building a more comprehensive film program at the university. Next week, McCormick will be screening two of his recent nonfiction features at the Magic Lantern Theater, and he’ll be on hand to answer questions after both films. Showing on Tuesday night is 2012’s The Great Northwest, which was inspired by a scrapbook that McCormick found in a thrift store, a meticulously detailed photographic document of a road trip embarked upon by four women in 1958.

The Great Northwest, which screens at the Magic Lantern on April 9. “They piled into an old Chevy and drove from Seattle, came through Spokane, went to Idaho, Montana, Yellowstone National Park and up to Glacier [National Park],” McCormick says. “They then drove down into Oregon, did the entire Oregon coast, and then back up to Seattle. So they were on the road for over a month, drove over 3,000 miles. “They took photographs, they collected receipts, brochures, postcards, any kind of paper ephemera that they could find. And then at the end of the trip, they put it together in this beautiful scrapbook.” Because they left behind such a thorough itinerary, McCormick decided to recreate their trip, visiting the sites they did and seeing how the landscape has changed in the decades since. The Great Northwest will be paired with The Subconscious Art of Graffiti Removal, the film that got McCormick’s career rolling in the first place. The next night’s feature is 2017’s Buzz One Four, which McCormick describes as being about “the night my grandfather nearly blew up the Eastern Seaboard.” It starts like this: McCormick’s grandfather was an Air Force pilot, flying B-52 bombers in a military mission called Operation Chrome Dome. In 1964, his fleet hit a storm and the tail of the plane he was flying snapped off, knocking him into the side of a mountain near Washington, D.C. Oh, and it was carrying a dozen nuclear bombs. “It was a story I obviously grew up with,” McCormick says. “And I just kind of forgot about it. A few years ago, I was reminded of it, and I Googled it and realized, wow, this was actually a really big deal. “It changed significant things with these airplanes. The B-52 was a plane that Boeing was making, and it turned out the tails of these planes were tearing off all the time. So it’s not too different from what Boeing is experiencing right now.” Preceding Buzz One Four is the short Future So Bright, an experimental documentary about abandoned industrial spaces in the Northwest. Right now McCormick says he’s working on a short inspired by the urban legend about a Russian drilling project that supposedly discovered the underworld. Until that’s completed, this program will serve as something of an introduction to his work, and as another step toward expanding Spokane’s still-evolving film community. “In a lot of ways, this is sort of my, ‘Hey, Spokane, let’s hang out,’” he says. n The Great Northwest • Tue, April 9 at 7 pm • Buzz One Four • Wed, April 10 at 7 pm • $8 • Magic Lantern Theater • 25 W. Main • magiclanternonmain.com • 209-2383

Jayce Ogren, Guest Conductor István Várdai, Cello Jayce Ogren MUSIC DIRECTOR FINALIST

Barber — Essay No.2 for Orchestra Prokofiev — Symphony Concerto Mussorgsky (Arr. Ravel) — Pictures at an Exhibition

APRIL 13 8PM APRIL 14 3PM Virtuoso cellist István Várdai will dazzle with Prokofiev’s breathtaking Symphony Concerto. Sponsored by: Russell & Deborah Lee

Eckart Preu, conductor • Nebojša Jovan Živković, percussion

SATURDAY

MAY 4 8PM

SUNDAY

MAY 5 3PM

Boulogne: Overture to L’amant anonyme Živković: Concerto of the Mad Queen Strauss: Alpine Symphony Featuring Alpine Symphony, the ultimate tone poem by Richard Strauss.

Nebojša Jovan Živković performs his Concerto of the Mad Queen

M ARTIN WOLDSO N THE ATER AT THE FOX TICKETS | 509.624.1200 | SpokaneSymphony.org

APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 47


COMMUNITY

The Vanishing Banner When D.O.A.’s backdrop went M.I.A.: The incredible case of Spokane punk rockers solving a Canada band’s cold case BY QUINN WELSCH

J

Joe Keithley poses with the fabled D.O.A. backdrop.

48 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

oe Keithley and his longtime punk band D.O.A. have been hitting places like the Pin in downtown Spokane since the ’80s. Keithley had just finished a gig at the venue the night of June 16, 2018, when half of the band left to go stay with some friends down the road. But longtime band leader Keithley and D.O.A.’s roadie stayed behind at a local hotel. Before calling it a night, Keithley went to their van in the hotel’s parking lot and noticed something was off. It took him a second to realize what he was looking at. He saw that the back window on the van’s double door had been smashed. Worse, about $6,000 worth of stuff, including merchandise, a snare drum and some personal items, had been stolen. Worst of all, the band’s legendary backdrop, a 20foot wide black banner that reads “D.O.A.” in stark white letters, had also been stolen.


“I yelled for our roadie. He came running around — you can imagine the expletives that came out of our mouths,” Keithley recalls from his home in Burnaby, British Columbia. Nine months later, Keithley and Co.’s luck changed. Someone had “found” the backdrop and they would return it… for a fee.

T

he morning after the theft, D.O.A. started putting their feelers out in the local music community. They wanted their stuff back, but most importantly, they wanted the backdrop. It had no real value to anyone else, Keithley says, and they wouldn’t be able to ransom it off for a lot of money. In Keithley’s own words: “You didn’t steal the backdrop off the Rolling Stones.”

“We figured what was gone was gone,” Keithley says. And then he got a Facebook message saying, “Hey, I might have your backdrop.” The banner was hand-stitched in a sewing circle in 1985, he says. At one point, it was sold to a club in San Jose, California, when the band thought they were breaking up. But that never happened, and the band managed to buy it back. “It had been with us ever since,” Keithley says. In Spokane, Dusty O’Brien was hit pretty hard by the news: A touring band that he grew up listening to — one that he idolized — had possessions stolen while visiting his town, and his band Wasted Breath had opened for D.O.A. at the Pin the night of the theft. A couple days after the show, O’Brien and Keithley put out a call on social media to be on the lookout for the items. Every major news outlet in Spokane followed suit. D.O.A. was looking on Craigslist and making calls to local pawn shops, too, but “it was silence.” In hindsight, all of the media coverage probably scared the thieves away, Keithley says. “We figured what was gone was gone,” he says. And then he got a Facebook message saying, “Hey, I might have your backdrop.”

T

he messenger never claimed to have stolen the banner herself. But, O’Brien says, she claimed to have it in a storage shed. Her boyfriend was in trouble and they needed money, he recalls from the conversation. Keithley forwarded O’Brien the money, and he drove out to meet her with a couple of friends in early March. “She expected me to just FUN FACT: Since his hand over $500,” O’Brien says. last visit to Spokane, Joe He didn’t think they owed “Shithead” Keithley was her anything, so there was goelected to the Burnaby City ing to be some haggling. EvenCouncil as a Green Party tually, they agreed on $200. candidate on Oct. 20, 2018. Without making eye contact, she showed him the backdrop, stuffed in a trash bag. They unfurled it in the parking lot just to make sure they weren’t being duped. He reported her phone number and license plate to authorities, but they haven’t heard anything since, O’Brien says.

“L

ife goes on,” says Keithley. At 62 years old, he isn’t holding a grudge. When he talks to the Inlander, he’s travelling to support the local Muslim community in Burnaby after a terrorist attack at a mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand. He says the band will come back to Spokane. He’s just glad to be reunited with an important piece of the band’s history. “The local punk-rock scene here is family. It’s a network of friends. It’s nice to know somebody has your back in Spokane,” O’Brien says. “What’s the saying? ‘If someone falls down in the mosh pit, you pick the f---er up.’” n

APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCK WALKING PAPERS

J

eff Angell is something of a Seattle institution, having started and fronted bands like the Post Stardom Depression and the Missionary Position. He founded Walking Papers a few years back with Missionary Position keyboardist Benjamin Anderson and a couple recognizable Northwest figures — Guns N’ Roses bassist Duff McKagan and Screaming Trees drummer Barrett Martin. Walking Papers is back on the road again sans McKagan and Martin, but amongst its current lineup is Spokane’s own Dan Spalding. The band’s sophomore album, aptly titled WP2, is a sinewy collection of meat-and-potatoes alt-rock, channeling arena-packers as diverse as U2 and Queens of the Stone Age. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Walking Papers with Indian Goat • Fri, April 5 at 8 pm • $10 • All ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Friday, 04/5

12 TRIBES RESORT CASINO, Radio 80 219 LOUNGE, High Trees and Ammunition A&P’S BAR AND GRILL, DJ Skwish ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Ryan Larsen & Chris Blair J BABY BAR, Lavoy, Laminates, Atari Ferrari J J THE BARTLETT, Walking Papers (see above), Indian Goat THE BIG DOG BAR & GRILL, DJ Dave J J BING CROSBY THEATER, Taylor Dayne: 30th Anniversary Tour with Emily Rose BOLO’S, Chop Shop BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Sara Brown Trio J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Colby Acuff THE BULL HEAD, Last Chance Band CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke COSMIC COWBOY GRILL, Bill Bozly CRUISERS, Karaoke with Gary CURLEY’S, My Own Worst Enemy J DOWNTOWN SPOKANE LIBRARY, First Friday Song Craft with Vanna Oh! EICHARDT’S, Ron Kieper Jazz Trio J FORZA COFFEE CO. (VALLEY), Pat & Scott Jazz HONEY EATERY AND SOCIAL CLUB, The DIGaddie HOP MOUNTAIN TAPROOM AND GRILL, Joey Anderson IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Bright Moments Jazz IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Jamison Sampson THE JACKSON ST., The Working Spliffs JOHN’S ALLEY, Naughty Pine LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Kori Ailene

50 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

REGGAE STEEL PULSE

F

or more than 40 years, Steel Pulse has proudly owned up to its title as the UK’s most fiercely political reggae band. The grooves and melodies are as warm and welcoming as anything Bob Marley put out, but the lyrical themes defining their decadeslong career have leaned into the unfairness of the modern world. Steel Pulse’s lineup has changed countless times since the ’70s, but original frontman David Hinds and longtime keyboardist Selwyn Brown are still there, and they’re still challenging the same injustices as they did on their debut single “Ku Klux Klan.” The more things change, the more they stay the same. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Steel Pulse • Sat, April 6 at 8 pm • $25 • All ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279 LIBERTY LAKE WINE CELLARS, Robby French J MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, The Fab Four: The Ultimate Tribute MARYHILL WINERY, Daniel Hall MATCHWOOD BREWING CO., Matt Mitchell MAX AT MIRABEAU, 3D Band MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Devon Wade MOOSE LOUNGE, Mojo Box MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Alejandro Vargas NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom O’SHAYS IRISH PUB & EATERY, Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots ONE WORLD CAFE, Alex Lardie Jazz J OUTLAW BBQ & CATERING MARKET, Songsmith Series PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Sadie and Desiree PEND OREILLE PLAYHOUSE, Open Mic

THE PIN, Bwix, Rotti Adms, Anthemusiq, Tylor Rose THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler J RIVER CITY BREWING, Whisk&Keys THE ROXIE, Karaoke with Tom SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Son of Brad SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Nick Grow SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES, Stagecoach West ZOLA, Rewind

Saturday, 04/6

12 TRIBES RESORT CASINO, Road Dawgs 219 LOUNGE, Naughty Pine A&P’S BAR AND GRILL, DJ Skwish ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Nick Grow

J THE BARTLETT, Kuinka, Mark Ward BEEROCRACY, Vanna Oh! J J BING CROSBY THEATER, Hagfest NW: Merle Haggard Tribute Show BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, The Meghan Sullivan Band J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Eric E and the Royal Blues CHECKERBOARD BAR, Three Sixty COSMIC COWBOY GRILL, Echo Elysium CRUISERS, Dangerous Type CURLEY’S, My Own Worst Enemy GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Into the Drift HAPPY TRAILS TO BREWS, Matt Mitchell THE HIVE, Hive Jam Night HOGFISH, Bobby Patterson Band IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Justin Lantrip IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Eric Kegley THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke

JOHN’S ALLEY, Jay Statham & The Tokie Show KELLY’S RESTAURANT & LOUNGE, Alisha & the Loose Change Band J J KNITTING FACTORY, Steel Pulse (see above) LATAH COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS, Hemp Fest feat. The Maple Bars, Traffic Jam, The Lunar Clan and more LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Phil Lamb MARYHILL WINERY, Pamela Benton MAX AT MIRABEAU, 3D Band MOOSE LOUNGE, Mojo Box MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Krista Hojem NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Dustin Drennen THE PIN, Dustycloud with Macfie B2B Grant Ekdahl, Carbon 12, GREM?, Salleymane


POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Son of Brad RED ROOM LOUNGE, All Things Blue, Cate, Ray Badness REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Reverend Justin Hylton THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT, The Cole Show SPOKANE TRIBE CASINO, Kori Ailene SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES, Stagecoach West STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, Karaoke WESTERN DANCE CENTER, Bluegrass Showcase feat. Western Reunion, Deep Roots, Poor Boys Delight WESTWOOD BREWING CO., Eric Neuhausser ZOLA, Rewind

Sunday, 04/7

DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Rev. Yo’s VooDoo Church of Blues Jam J EMERGE, Hobo Hangout, Ambersmoke, The Emilys GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke HOGFISH, Open Mic

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Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam MARYHILL WINERY, Lyle Morse PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Piano Sunday with Bob Beadling THE ROXIE, Hillyard Billys STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, Karaoke ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 04/8

THE BULL HEAD, Songsmith Series J CALYPSOS COFFEE ROASTERS, Open Mic CHECKERBOARD BAR, Songsmith Series feat. Bret Allen CRAVE, DJ Dave EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 04/9

219 LOUNGE, Karaoke with DJ Pat J J THE BARTLETT, The Hot Club of Spokane Show feat. Sarah Berentson & Olivia Brownlee BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke CRAVE, DJ Dave GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke JOHN’S ALLEY, The Last Revel LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday LITZ’S BAR & GRILL, The ShuffleDawgs Blues Power Happy Hour J THE PIN, D Sloan, AU, Joshua Belliardo, YoungMaj1c, C-Major, Raya Improper, MellyMac RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL, Open Mic Jam

MUSIC | VENUES

THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Country Swing Dancing THE ROXIE, Open Mic/Jam SWEET LOU’S RESTAURANT AND TAP HOUSE, Devon Wade THE VIKING, Songsmith Series ZOLA, Desperate 8s

Wednesday, 04/10

J THE BARTLETT, The Last Revel J BLACK DIAMOND, Songsmith Series feat. Jody Piper CRAVE, DJ Dave CRUISERS, Open Jam Night Hosted by The Jam Band ETSI BRAVO, VitaminV with DJ Grape Vinyl, ROBMON & Anton Radke GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES, Open Mic with Host Travis Goulding J HUMBLE BURGER, Tomb Toad, Meddling, Okay Okay IRON HORSE (COEUR D’ALENE), Open Jam THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Mike Wagoner LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LITZ’S BAR & GRILL, Nick Grow J THE LOCAL DELI, Devon Wade LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 MILLWOOD BREWING COMPANY, Kori Ailene J THE PIN, Rise & Grind Tour with WIL E HAZE, CCB Krew, Chris Cameron J RED DRAGON CHINESE, Tommy G RED ROOM LOUNGE, Blowin’ Kegs Jam Session THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open Mic ZOLA, Cruxie

Coming Up ...

J NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, Great White & Vixen, April 11 J THE BARTLETT, Delhi 2 Dublin, Kung Fu Vinyl, April 12 J THE BIG DIPPER, AJJ, Antarctigo Vespucci, Lisa Prank, April 12 J JACKLIN ARTS & CULTURAL CENTER, Friends of the Guitar Hour feat. Chaconne Klaverenga, April 12 NASHVILLE NORTH, Ashley McBryde with Jeremy McComb & Luke Jaxon, April 12 J THE BARTLETT, Tony Furtado, Stephanie Schneiderman, April 13 THE PIN, Afroman with Diz Dean, Bendi, Cheto, Manwitnoname, TenSpeed Pile-Up, April 13 J FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS, Hozier, April 14 J KNITTING FACTORY, Bethel Music, April 14 J MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX, Dan + Shay, April 16 J THE BARTLETT, Blac Rabbit, April 17 J KNITTING FACTORY, Shoreline Mafia, April 17

Thursday, May 16 First Interstate Center for the Arts Spokane, WA

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219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-2639934 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens • 714-9512 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-457-2392 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOUSE OF SOUL • 25 E. Lincoln • 598-8783 IRON HORSE BAR • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., CdA • 509-926-8411 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy, Ste. 100 • 443-3832 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 51


PERFORMANCE HERE & NOWHERE ELSE

Traditional Chinese dance accompanied by bright colored costumes, illuminating backgrounds and a live orchestra: Shen Yun presents an spiritual insight into ancient China’s history. As the troupe is known to include its disapproving sentiments of China’s current communist regime through its performances, this show cannot be staged in its performers’ home country. The group, established in 2006, practices Falun Gong, a spiritual discipline banned in China. Shen Yun continues celebrating this piece of China’s spiritual and artistic culture that artists in the past have tried to preserve. Make sure to get dressed up for this performance, as the event is business attire or evening wear. — ARCELIA MARTIN Shen Yun • Tue, April 9 and Wed, April 10 at 7:30 pm • $82$152 • First Interstate Center for the Arts • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • inbpac.com • 279-7000

52 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

MUSIC TAYLOR-MADE

COMMUNITY NEED FOR SEEDS

Taylor Dayne 30th Anniversary Tour • Fri, April 5 at 8 pm • $45.50-$65 • All ages • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638

Spokane’s Seedy Saturday • Sat, April 6 from 10 am-3 pm • Swap is free; class is $10 • WSU Spokane County Extension • 222 N. Havana • extension.wsu.edu/spokane • 477-2173

Maybe you don’t hear her spoken about as often as Madonna or Janet Jackson, but Taylor Dayne was one of the stars that made ’80s pop so great. She scored big hits with synth-dance jams like “Tell It to My Heart,” “Don’t Rush Me” and “Prove Your Love,” and topped the Billboard charts with the Diane Warren-penned ballad “Love Will Lead You Back.” Although she hasn’t produced much new material in the decades since, those songs have held up as glossy, catchy gems. Dayne is back on the road celebrating the 30th anniversary of her debut album, with a show that is sure to feature all those monster singles. If you want to relive the glory days of 1989, look no further. — NATHAN WEINBENDER

Though it still looks pretty dreary and grey outside, real spring weather and green regrowth will be here before too long, which means it’s time to start planning your garden for 2019’s growing season. Local experts with Spokane’s WSU Extension office and the Spokane Community Garden Association are teaming up to offer a day of expert insight with a class on seed starting (10 am-noon; $10) to get your veggies and other plants ready early. The class is followed by a community seed swap and sale, which also hosts seed vendors from around the region selling unusual and common varietals, including heirloom and local varieties not found in the average seed catalog or big box garden store. — CHEY SCOTT


REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN PL AY

No matter your age, height or skill level, grab your shoes, ball, friends and family, and come join 250,000 other Hoopfesters in the Best Basketball Weekend on Earth.

Register at spokanehoopfest.net

COMEDY WHAMMY!

Comedian David Koechner is one of those guys you might not know by name, but you’ve seen him in, oh, about a thousand different things through the years since he moved from Chicago’s Second City comedy group to Saturday Night Live and eventually to an insanely packed acting career. Fans of The Office will know him as obnoxious traveling salesman Todd Packer. Anchorman zealots love him as sexist sports dude Champ Kind. My personal favorite role of his was SNL character Fagan, an obsequious superfan of then-Weekend Update anchor Norm McDonald. Between all the acting gigs, Koechner kept doing stand-up comedy and making his own comedy shorts for a YouTube channel called “Full On Koechner” (well worth a visit). He’ll hit Spokane for four shows next week. — DAN NAILEN David Koechner • Thu-Fri, April 11-12 at 7:30 pm; Sat, April 13 at 7:30 and 10 pm • $15-$30 • 21+ • Spokane Comedy Club • 315 W. Sprague • spokanecomedyclub.com • 318-9998

SPOKANE

JUNE 29 & 30, 2019

NEXT GENERATION MEDICINE: THE INVISIBLE WOUNDS OF WAR ARTS PRINT PARTY

Screen prints and other print techniques are some of the most accessible forms of art, and many of us have at least a few framed pieces on the walls of our homes. The inaugural Spokane Print Fest celebrates this tangible and traditional art form with a festival, gallery exhibit and a series of workshops to learn a thing or two about the process. The Friday evening festival kicks it off with an intro to printmaking’s varied processes, including the ubiquitous screenprint, along with stamping, intaglio and carving. Local university art clubs and artists will also sell their prints, and the new show Tangible Gestures opens (April 5-27) in the Terrain Gallery, featuring art by 35 local and national printmakers. A series of workshops ($50 each) begin the following day, continuing each Saturday in April. The Spokane Print Fest is a partnership between Terrain and Spokane printmaker Reinaldo Gil Zambrano. — CHEY SCOTT

Tuesday, Apr. 9, 2019 Doors open 6 p.m., Lecture: 6:30 to 8 p.m. The Hemmingson Center, Gonzaga University Campus, Spokane, WA Admission is free. Register at uwmedicine.org/nextgenmed PRESENTED BY

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

Spokane Print Fest • Fri, April 5 from 5-11 pm • Free • All ages • Terrain • 304 W. Pacific • Facebook: Spokane Print Fest • bit.ly/SpokanePrintFest

APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 53 UWSchoolofMedicine_NextGenerationMedicine_040419_6H_CPR.pdf


W I SAW YOU

S S

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU BLACK OUTBACK Saw you at Towners getting gas on Ash. You came over and startled me and then said how beautiful my black Outback looked. Yours was dirty from the winter. I wanted to say not half as beautiful as you, but was too taken aback by your friendliness. After gas, I was heading for coffee. Care to join me sometime? KINDNESS ON THE CORNER I saw you at 7-11 on Saturday, picking up two pizzas and grabbing treats with your friends. You held the door for others and managed to carry your food out successfully. I admire you and your kindness.

CHEERS PASSPORT LINE Cheers to the wonderful people who let me cut the passport line at the Garland Street Post Office on March 16. I almost fainted when after waiting in line for 2 1/2 hours all of you cheered and clapped me to the front of the line! What a memorable event! Thank you to the Greeting Card

Man with his sweet wife and young son who alerted the post office staff to my “photo only” cause. Instead of impatience, he chatted amiably in line while selecting greeting cards he’d send to his wife and friends — thinking of others not himself. Thank you to the Mother of the Year who stood in line for her 16 year-old-daughter, delighting in sharing cellphone photos of the eclipse rather than complaining about a Saturday morning spent in line at the post office rather than Starbucks. Thank you to all the people who were ahead of me. Thank you Garland Street Post Office for working so hard to try to accommodate so many Saturday customers. I learned a lesson in patience and kindness. CHEERS AND JEERS FOR BROWNE’S ADDITION Yeah! Browne’s Addition neighbors getting out and enjoying the start of Spring. Boo! Dog owners who aren’t doing the right thing and picking up after their dogs. It’s gross and it’s bad for the environment and the river. Be respectful of your neighbors and your neighborhood. PRINT MEDIA LIVES! Cheers to the ‘What the Heck’ Jeers of March 21. It elicited no fewer than four published (and hark! who knows how many unpublished) indignations. We are glad to know that trolling is alive and well in print media. Here we thought it required social media to win an election! All we need is a well placed Jeers. Ergo...cheers! STRANGERS AT MAGIC LANTERN Cheers to the the couple who helped me during a medical emergency in the theater during the evening of Saturday, March 16th. Your quick response and genuine compassion while waiting for

help to arrive meant the world to me. My apologies to all who had their evening of cat videos interrupted. I’m alive and well and grateful. Kathe GREAT SERVICE I wanted to send a huge THANK YOU to all of the Zip’s locations! 7 years and you have never made my order wrong! Your staff is

always fast and friendly! I appreciate what you do in our community! BIRTHDAY CREW Thank you to Sarah, Doug, Sean and the double Daniels for making my “last birthday party” one to remember. It was nice to have the time out as an adult and to be able to enjoy thing I love with the people I love. GOO GOO DOLLS I love remembering when you played that Goo Goo Dolls song for me — and those lyrics, just like our odyssey, will always be unforgettable: “I twist my fate just to feel you, and you, You turn me toward the light, and you’re one with me, will you run with me?” Hey the GGD are playing No-Q on June 9th! It’s Spring again, reminding me how I miss you, and how we fell “Accidentally In Love...” And when the birds around you do magical, wondrous things, it’s Spirit’s way of reminding you of me... and “If you’re a bird, I’m a bird...”

Got Scrap? Get Cash y FASTy Top Prices - Honest Weight

WE PAY FOR: Aluminum Cans & Scrap y Copper y Brass y Radiators

Insulated Copper Wire y Stainless y Gold y Silver y & much more!

SEE HOW MUCH WE PAY AT:

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* In accordance with WA state law

54 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

911 E Marietta Ave • Spokane WA

South of Foothills Dr. / East of Hamilton

JEERS TO US Whether or not you believe climate change is real, we’ve got a real problem Spokane. Some friends and I visited the river last week and we were shocked to see the amount of garbage all around us.

manager at a local Burger King. On 3/25 a group of middle school band students came in after doing a concert. They ordered food and after they ordered you told them it would be a 20 minute wait when they explained their bus was leaving before that and asked for their money back. Not only did they not get their food you wouldn’t even

Here we thought it required social media to win an election! All we need is a well placed Jeers.

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

www.actionrecycling.com

JEERS

We have all your spring cleaning needs, beer and food. 1931 W. Pacific Ave. 363-1973 • wedonthaveone.com

It doesn’t take much to make a huge difference. Let’s try to make our city a cleaner and more beautiful place. I invite you to please consider taking your own reusable bags to the grocery store. Separate your trash from your recycling, carry a reusable water bottle, and take your reusable coffee cup when you go to Starbucks (and save some money while you’re at it too). And for the love of god please stop throwing trash out of your windows while you’re driving. RE: JEERS TO VOTERS To the person worried about age for the three presidential candidates listed, why does this matter? If you you are worried about age, then you probably don’t know much on each of their policies. Biden and Trump aren’t very good on policy (despite them saying they are). We need someone who is actually Progressive BURGER KING SHAME Shame on a

refund their money. The poor night manager has had to try and clean up your mess by offering food vouchers. The school and or band director offered to reimburse the students. I hope if you have kids nobody treats them the way you did to this group. POKE ME I wonder how many antivaxxers have tattoos? n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS P A S S E

U S A I N

B R A C

R O T H

B L O O D D R I V E

D T I E M N E

R B I S

A P E U X S E A D Z S E Z X E P I E T R T

S H A Q

S I T U

A L M A

F J Y S O I T H A N I T S S M P L L O O V D E

Y S E R T M A Z N E R W A D E P I C

P E T A

A Z I Z

P R A I R I E

S R I A P O P Z Z Y

D I R T

F S L E O N E

T R I P L E P L A Y

U M N O

P A C T

L E O N I

T R Y O N

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

13TH ANNUAL HUMAN RACE Gonzaga Journal of International Law presents this 10K and 5K charity fun run/walk benefiting the American Cancer Society. This race is held yearly in honor of Kristina Glover, founder of the race, who lost her battle with cancer in her last year of law school in 2008. April 6, 9:30 am-noon. $15-$25. Gonzaga University School of Law, 721 N. Cincinnati St. bit.ly/2COtjzS (747-3304) CORAZON NIA A NIA dance jam to support education for women and children in Guatemala. Snacks are provided. Includes an opportunity to purchase beautiful corazon scarves. April 6, 10 am-noon. $5-$20 suggested donation. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. womansclubspokane.org NAOMI RED CARPET GALA MASQUERADE The annual gala supports the nonprofit’s mission to aid local women in poverty and includes live music, live auctions, performances, a dessert auction and more. April 6, 5:30 pm. $75/person; $130/couple. Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan. naomicommunity.org KITTEN SHOWER The Humane Society of the Palouse is throwing a baby shower to support the kittens born this year under its care. Please bring an item from our wish list or a make a $5 donation (kids under 12 free). April 7, 1-4 pm. $5 or donated item. 1912 Center, 412 E. Third, Moscow. humanesocietyofthepalouse.org/events (208-883-1166) UGM GATHERING Join the Union Gos-

pel Mission, civic leaders, downtown businesspeople and service providers together in search of effective compassion. Includes lunch and dinner seatings, with some complimentary lunch seats available. April 11, 12-1 & 6:30-8 pm. $20. Double Tree Hotel, 322 N. Spokane Falls Ct. uniongospelmission. org/gathering (535-8510) MAC GALA: VISIONS OF VENICE The 2019 gala celebration features Italian cuisine and wines, followed by live music and dancing. Sponsor a table of 10 for $1,500. April 12, 6:30 pm. $150/person. Historic Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. northwestmuseum.org (363-5357) RIVER CITY PAGEANT A benefit for Spokane Parks Foundation that encourages participants to collect swimsuits for the “Make A Splash” program and raise funds for Spokane County park renovations while also offering opportunities to show poise in a gown or suit, fun fashion modeling in a Spokane Pride-themed outfit, public speaking and more. April 12 from 3-9 pm and April 13 from 8 am-7 pm. Ruby River Hotel, 700 N. Division. rivercitypageant. com (971-373-2000)

COMEDY

2.0PEN MIC Local comedy night hosted by Ken McComb. Thursdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The District Bar, 916 W. First Ave. facebook.com/districtbarspokane/ GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open mic comedy night hosted by Casey Strain; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (847-1234)

LATE LAUGHS An improvised comedy show featuring a mix of experiments in improv, duos, teams, sketch and more. First and last Friday of the month at 9:30 pm. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com THE SOCIAL HOUR AFTER DARK The show combines stand-up, sketch comedy, improv, interviews, music and more, hosted by Deece Casillas. April 5, 10-11:30 pm. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998) STAND-UP COMEDY Live comedy featuring established and up-and-coming local comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. No cover. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. reddragondelivery.com AFTER DARK A mature-rated version of the Blue Door’s monthly, Friday show; on the first and last Saturday of the month, at 10 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) THE SOCIAL HOUR COMEDY SHOWCASE Featuring comics from the Northwest and beyond, hosted by Deece Casillas. Sundays, from 8-9:30 pm. Free. The Ridler Piano Bar, 718 W. Riverside. socialhourpod.com (822-7938) MONDAY NIGHT COMEDY Hosted by Jared Chastain, with local acts followed by open mic. Mondays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Etsi Bravo, 215 E. Main, PUllman. etsibravo.com (715-1037) DAVID KOECHNER The actor, writer and producer is best known for roles as Todd Packer on The Office and Champ Kind from Anchorman. April 11-13 at 7:30 pm, April 13 at 10 pm. $15-$30. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (318-9998)

THE WHITWORTH CHOIR Marc A. Hafsø, director Emma Thackston, piano

MAKE WE

A VARIED PROGRAM OF SACRED AND SECULAR WORKS INCLUDING THE MUSIC OF:

FISSINGER, MARTINI, NYSTEDT, FOSS, HAFSØ, CHATMAN, RUNESTAD AND DOVE

Sunday, April 7, 2019 | 3 p.m.

Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox ADMISSION: $7 REGULAR, $5 SENIORS (62-plus), ALL STUDENTS FREE WITH SCHOOL I.D. TICKETS: foxtheaterspokane.org or 509.624.1200

For more information, please contact the Whitworth Music Office at 509.777.3280 or music@whitworth.edu.

Have an event? GET

LISTED!

Submit your event details for listings in the print & online editions of the Inlander.

Inlander.com/GetListed Deadline is one week prior to publication

APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 55


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess THE LITTER MERMAID

I’m not the best housekeeper or the tidiest person. I’ve got papers everywhere, dishes in the sink, clothes on the floor, and an unmade bed. I have a very long-haired cat who leaves fur everywhere. I joke to men that “fighting entropy is a losing battle,” but I’m starting to wonder whether my messy place is keeping me single. Obviously, if somebody’s coming over, I’ll make an attempt to clean up. But it occurred to me that maybe AMY ALKON men see my place and think either I’m lax in my own personal hygiene (I’m not) or I’d be a bad girlfriend/wife. –Sloberella When a guy you’re dating wants to buy you something, it shouldn’t be a vacuum. That said, there’s being dirty (that is, unclean) and there’s being untidy, and they’re two different things. In research looking at relationship deal breakers by evolutionary psychologist Peter K. Jonason and his colleagues, 63 percent of men named a “disheveled or unclean appearance” as the single biggest turnoff in a potential partner. However, it’s important to note that this measure was about personal hygiene, and you apparently don’t have mossy teeth or BO that sets off CDC scanners. As for your apartment, the real problem comes if the place crosses over from cluttered to disgusting. To understand why, consider the apparent function of getting grossed out. Evolutionary psychologist Joshua Tybur explains that disgust seems to have evolved to help us avoid pathogens – and the providers of their ground and air transportation, like boogers, vomit, dead bodies, and co-workers who like to celebrate “take your flu to work!” day. In light of this, priority areas to address would be the bathroom (especially the throne) and the kitchen. Also important would be policing the cat hair and rounding up any encrusted plates or week-old chow mein containers still loitering on surfaces. Regarding whether you should also be spending more time tidying up – that is, organizing mere clutter – living life can be seen as a series of decisions you need to make about trade-offs. Economists explain this in terms of “opportunity costs” – the benefits you have to sacrifice when you choose one option (one way to spend your time, energy, or money) over another. For you, for example, time you spend tidying up is time you aren’t spending going out and meeting men (or just lying on the couch smoking a doob and watching the Apple TV screen-saver images floating by). Now, maybe TV ’n’ toke time sounds frivolous. However, time spent relaxing isn’t unimportant. If you work like a beaten dog, your body and mind are likely to take note and hammer you into taking a pause – through illness or depression. To decide the level of cleaning and tidying you need to do, ask yourself how much of a luxury and how much of a necessity a boyfriend is to you. Depending on your answer – because even just clutter could put some guys off – you might decide that it’s worth it to you to begin a daily cleaning routine, simply by picking up or wiping up 10 things every morning before you start your workday. This advice is inspired by psychologist Karl Weick’s insight into the motivational power of “small wins.” Consider that being faced with massive, seemingly insurmountable problems – like “end world hunger,” “get the Israelis to hug it out with the Palestinians,” and, in your case, “keep the apartment spotless” – breeds dread in us (“aversive feelings,” in psychologist-speak) and drains our motivation. However, you could probably be kind of “yeah, okay” about doing 10 small tasks. (Some of these might be as minor as “pick up the sock that’s spent the week vacationing on the living room floor.”) Recasting the need to clean as a small set of daily tasks would yank away its power for dread production. In fact, chances are, through the “small win” of completing your daily 10, you’d end up feeling you accomplished something – which other research finds seems to have motivating effects throughout the day. Finally, there is another factor to consider: truth in cleanliness. If you’re likely to fall back into your old ways (at least somewhat), your home should not be so spotless and organized that you appeal to the wrong guy ­– the sort who measures so his decorative geode is in its rightful position on the coffee table. Should you attract a guy like that, it’d be best to confess to your sloberella-hood and give him time to see (and decide whether he can stomach) the real you. However, with guys with more moderate standards, by doing your daily 10, you should hit the mark -- giving them the impression that you’re holding off on sex because you’re done with hookups, not because you probably haven’t washed your sheets since mid-2016. n ©2018, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

56 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

EVENTS | CALENDAR ROY ZIMMERMAN: RIZE UP Zimmerman’s signature blend of heart and hilarity has never been more necessary. RiZe Up is 90 minutes of original songs, and a funny and forceful affirmation of peace and social justice. April 12, 7:3010 pm. $22 or pay what you can. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. uuspokane.org COMEDY SHOWCASE The Monday night showcase lets the audience help pick the “Best Set” of the night from among four local comedians. Third Monday of the month, from 8-9:30 pm. No cover; two-item min. purchase. The Buzz Pizzeria, Bar and Lounge, 501 S Thor St. thebuzzspokane.com

COMMUNITY

5TH INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON HATE STUDIES This year’s theme is “Building Peace through Kindness, Dialogue, and Forgiveness.” Events include live performances, presentations, documentary screenings and more. April 2-4; see complete schedule online. $25-$50. Gonzaga University Hemmingson Center, 702 E. Desmet Ave. bit.ly/2J5X3Og (313-3665) BECOME DEBT FREE Assess your current finances and learn how to use tools that make debt-free living possible. Registration required at stcu.org/workshops. April 4, 6-7 pm. Free. Airway Heights Library, 1213 S. Lundstrom St. stcu.org/workshops (893-8250) GIRLS GO CYBERSTART Through a series of digital puzzles and challenges, this free interactive event introduces students to the field of cybersecurity. There’s a global shortage of cybersecurity professionals, in particular, female professionals; by the year 2022, a projected two million jobs will be left unfulfilled in this critical field. Open to grades 9-12. April 4, 3:45-5:45 pm. Free. Gizmo-Cda, 1000 W. Garden Ave., Hedlund Building, Suite 142. gizmo-cda.org (208-651-6200) LATE NIGHT NERF BATTLE When the library closes, let the Nerf battle begin! We supply the Nerf toys and rounds and snacks. Grades 3–5. Registration and signed permission form are required. April 4, 7-9 pm. Free. Cheney Library, 610 First St. scld.org (509-893-8280) FAMILY DANCE AND POTLUCK Learn easy circle, line, folk dances and contras at this monthly event. No experience or partner needed. All dances taught by Susan Dankovich, with live music by Whirl’d Peas. First Friday of the month from 6:30-8 pm. Donations accepted. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. stjohns-cathedral.org (533-9955) FLAG SALUTE A salute of the American flag and the (yellow) Vietnam heritage/freedom Flag at the entrance of Spokane City Hall entrance in honor of Vietnamese Heritage Day on April 6, and to honor Vietnam Veterans. April 5, 11 am. Free. Spokane City Hall, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (509-899-5058) INLAND NORTHWEST COMMUNITY GARDENS: SPRING SPEAKER MEETING + POTLUCK Guest speakers Thom and Torie Foote present “Creating the Small Permaculture Market Garden Farm.” Become a member of the club for a reduced rate of $8, and stay for the members-only seed swap, resource tables, silent auction and potluck. April 5, 6 pm. WSU Spokane County Extension, 222 N. Havana St. incgincommunitygardens.org (477-2193)

LATE NIGHT NERF BATTLE When the library closes, let the Nerf battle begin! We supply the Nerf toys and rounds and snacks. Grades 3-5. Registration and signed permission form are required. April 5, 7-9 pm. Free. Moran Prairie Library, 6004 S. Regal St. scld. (893-8340) MASTER GARDENERS: CHENEY PLANT CLINIC & INFORMATION BOOTH Local Master Gardeners can help with a wide variety of horticulture issues, including plant selection, installation, maintenance, pest identification and much more. For information about preparing a sample for pest identification, contact Master Gardeners at 509477-2181 or mastergardener@spokanecounty.org. April 5 and 19; May 3 and 17 from 1-5 pm. Free. Cheney Library, 610 First St. scld.org (477-2181) 10TH ANNUAL COMMUNITY MULTICULTURAL FAIRE This event celebrates cultures from around our community through authentic ethnic food, music, artifacts and crafts. Food and drinks are available for purchase. Lakes Middle School, 930 N. 15th St., Coeur d’Alene April 6, 10 am-2 pm. Free. (208-6590192) 23RD ANNUAL MOSCOW HEMP FEST A full day of information with speakers, music, arts and craft booths, food and more. Learn about hemp legislation and a new cannabis petition for Idaho. April 6, 10 am-7 pm. Free. East City Park, 900 E. Third St. moscowhempfest.com (208-883-4779) COMMUNITY CONVERSATION: SUPPORTING STUDENT-CENTERED MOVEMENTS The Washington Poor People’s Campaign Truth & Poverty Tour stops for an event co-sponsored by Spokane NAACP, Gonzaga Black Student Union, Every Student Counts Alliance and the EWU Jewish Club. Includes a social justice-focused panel discussion from students, activists and grassroots leaders. Light refreshments provided. April 6, 4-5:30 pm. Free and open to the public. WSU Health Sciences Spokane, 412 E. Spokane Falls Blvd. wapoorpeoplescampaign.org EASTERN WASHINGTON GENEALOGY SOCIETY OF SPOKANE The local chapter hosts a seminar with genealogy expert Sunny Morton, a popular lecturer for the global genealogy community who shares research strategies and inspiration with audiences worldwide via podcast and blog. April 6, 8:30 am-3 pm. $40. Prince of Peace, 8441 N. Indian Trail Rd. ewgsi.org (465-0779) HOLISTIC FESTIVAL The festival offers an introduction to a variety of healthy lifestyle practices through free, 25-min. lectures and 50 booths filled with organic/natural products, remedies, body care and pain relief. Also meet practitioners such as chiropractors, acupuncturists, massage therapists and more. April 6, 10 am-6 pm. $6. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. (468-9001) INLAND NORTHWEST WOMEN’S SHOW The annual show includes a bubbly bar, blood drive, community art project, vendors, speakers, entertainment and more. Hosted by the local nonprofit Every Woman Can. April 6 from 9 am-6 pm and April 7 from 10 am-3 pm. $7 (cash only). Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. bit.ly/2Unx4WT (477-1766) MAKE YOUR LAWN LOOK SHARP WHILE YOU SAVE MONEY Want to

save the planet by saving money? SpokaneScape is a City of Spokane program that offers a rebate to your utility bill for replacing your turf with water smart plants and mulch. Find out how in this session from the city. April 6, 3:30 pm. Free. Indian Trail Library, 4909 W. Barnes Rd. bit.ly/2CQYgTU SPOKANE’S SEEDY SATURDAY Learn how to grow all kinds of seeds for planting later in the spring in a class ($10-noon; 10 am). Then check out the seed swap (12-3 pm) with vendors from around the region selling and trading seeds they’ve harvested, including heritage and local varieties. April 6, 10 am-3 pm. WSU Spokane County Extension, 222 N. Havana. extension.wsu. edu/spokane (477-2173) VIETNAMESE HERITAGE DAY An event to commemorate Vietnam’s founding fathers and 5,000-year-old ancient civilization with music, food, art/history exhibition, slideshows, speeches, gifts, cultural performances, traditional opéra, and to honor Vietnam Veterans. April 6, 1-4 pm. Free. Genesis Event Center, 9315 N. Nevada St. freevietnews.com/audio (899-5058) BUDDHHIST OPEN HOUSE Come tour the largest and oldest Buddhist temple in Spokane. Minister assistants are available to answer questions about Japanese Shin Buddhist practices. April 7, 11 am-3 pm. Free. Spokane Buddhist Temple, 927 S. Perry St. SpokaneBuddhistTemple.org (509-534-7954) NATIVE POLLINATORS WORKSHOP Master Gardeners Eva Lusk and Tim Kohlhauff teach how to attract native pollinators to your fruit tree or garden. Proceeds benefit Spokane Edible Tree Project. April 7, 1-2:30 pm. $12. Niche Coworking, 25 W. Main Ave. spokanedibletreeproject.org (209-2890) SHARING THE DHARMA DAY The day’s schedule includes a guided meditation, vegetarian potluck lunch, and facilitated discussion on the day’s topic. The program is offered freely, and donations as well as food offerings for the resident nuns and monks are welcomed. Venerable Sangye Khadro, American Buddhist nun and author of the book How to Meditate, is the featured speaker. April 7, 9:45 am-3 pm. By donation. Sravasti Abbey, 692 Country Lane Rd. sravastiabbey.org (447-5549) SUNDAY FUNDAY AT RIVERFRONT Play a sidewalk game, board games or get creative with crafts from Tomato Street Downtown in the Looff Carrousel. Sundays from 1-3 pm through May 26. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. (509-625-6600) MAGICAL MONDAYS Cecil’s Magic has been thrilling audiences in the Northwest for over 25 years with his unique style of magic. Come see him every Monday, March-May, from 3:304:30 pm. At the Looff Carrousel. Free. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. bit. ly/2UfOIfe (625-6600) SCIENCE CAFE: THE GUT & THE BRAIN Are there connections between your gut microbes and neurodevelopment, anxiety and depression, or autoimmune disorders of the brain? Come explore this new field of biology with EWU’s Dr. Javier Ochoa-Reparaz. April 9, 6:30-8 pm. Free. Bene’s, 24 W. First, Cheney. bit.ly/2YIOXPd (359-7401) SFCC COFFEE TALK An educational opportunity for students to assist each other by providing insightful information on a particular subject matter. A


facilitator starts and guides the conversation, but it’s a time for the students to be heard by students through teachable moments. April 9, 25 and May 2 from 11:30 am-12:30 pm. Free. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. sfcc.spokane. edu/For-Our-Students/Student-Resources/Mosaic UNACCOMPANIED REFUGEE MINORS INFORMATION NIGHT A session for anyone interested in becoming a foster family for refugee youth. LCSNW is looking for families who want to provide a loving and caring environment for these refugee youth coming to the U.S. Second Tuesday of the month, 5:30-7:30 pm. Free. Lutheran Community Services, 210 W. Sprague. lcsnw.org DOLORES: REBEL, ACTIVIST, FEMINIST The WA Legislature declared March 18 as Dolores Huerta Day in the U.S. Join MOSAIC for the second airing of Dolores. The Mexican-American social activist is responsible for the “Si, Se Puede” movement, bringing awareness to sexual assault and harassment happening to migrant/immigrant workers, and political movement partner of Cesar Chavez. April 10, 1:30-3:30 pm. Free. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. sfcc.spokane.edu/ForOur-Students/Student-Resources/Mosaic PREVENT FRAUD & IDENTITY THEFT Learn how to protect your hard-earned money from predators and scams. Registration required at stcu.org/workshops. April 10, 6-7 pm. Free. Argonne Library, 4322 N. Argonne Rd. stcu.org/workshops BRIDGING THE GAP A free dinner from the Panhandle Health District to support parents who’d like to become more comfortable speaking to their kids about puberty and sexual health. April 11, 6-8:30 pm. Free, registration required. Best Western CodA, 506 W. Appleway Ave. btg2019freetickets.eventbrite.com

FILM

APOLLO 11 A documentary film about the Apollo 11 mission to land on the moon led by Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin and Michael Collins, featuring never before seen archival footage, and crisp 70mm large-format film of one of humanity’s greatest accomplishments. April 4-7; times vary. $5-$8. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801) SCREENING: INTO THE ARCTIC Each Thursday and Saturday at 1 pm and 2:30 pm, the MAC screens this 47-minute film telling the compelling story of artist Cory Trepanier’s first leg of his multi-year quest to explore and paint the dramatic wilderness of the Canadian Arctic. Weekly through May 11. $5-$10/admission. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org SGT. STUBBY: AN AMERICAN HERO An animated feature film about the true story of a stray dog which joins his new master on the WWI battlefield. For his valorous actions, Sgt. Stubby is still recognized as the most decorated dog in American history. PG. April 5-6, times vary. $5-$8. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org HOWL’S MOVING CASTLE 15TH ANNIVERSARY Sophie, a quiet girl working in a hat shop, finds her life thrown into turmoil when she is literally swept off her feet by a handsome but mysterious wizard named Howl. April 7 at 12:55 pm (dubbed); April 8 at 7 pm (subtitled) and April 10 at 7 pm (dubbed). $13. At Regal Cinemas Northtown and CdA; AMC River Park Square. fathomevents.com THE GREAT NORTHWEST / BUZZ ONE FOUR Award-winning filmmaker, new to Spokane, Matt McCormick screens two

of his films: “The Great Northwest,” a 2012 documentary (April 9), and his 2017 documentary “Buzz One Four” (April 10). Both start at 7 pm and are preceded by short films also directed by McCormick. $8. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main. magiclanternonmain.com (209-2383) CHINESE MOVIE NIGHT During the 201819 academic year, films follow the theme of “History of Chinese Cinema.” Starting with the 1930s and leading up to modern times, join us to watch the evolution of Chinese cinema culture! April 10, 7 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org/calendar (208-882-4127)

FOOD

THE CHEESIEST! Learn with Davenport chef Eric Nelson in this tasteful course that covers a variety of cheese styles, soft, hard, aged, and blue cheeses. Discover how to integrate these cheeses in deserts, entrees, and wine pairing. April 4, 6-8 pm. $59. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. campusce.net/ spokane/course/course.aspx?catId=31 KID’S SPRING BREAK COOKING CAMP Kids learn how to cook healthy recipes featuring each food group, improve their knife skills, kitchen safety and cleanliness, and more. April 1-4; 2-4 pm. $100. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. secondharvestkitchen.org FRIDAY NIGHT FLIGHTS Featuring family-friendly trivia from Bent Trivia and beer flights from local breweries. Participants receive half-off rides on the SkyRide. Meet at the Numerica Skate Ribbon & SkyRide patio from 5-8 pm every Friday, March-May. $5 flights. Riverfront Park, 507 N. Howard St. bit.ly/2HKsdsS RCB GARAGE PARTY An event celebrating live music, local food and RCB beer with music by Whisk&Keys and art by Caitlin Keogh. April 5, 4-10 pm. Free. River City Brewing, 121 S. Cedar. rivercityred. blogspot.com (263-7983) BOMBASTIC + RADIO BREWING COLLAB BREW & PARTY Learn more about these two North Idaho breweries and enjoy $2 pints of Radio beer on tap, with Bombastic bottles available for purchase. April 6, 2-7 pm. 11100 N. Airport Rd, Coeur d’Alene. bit.ly/2FrrglL SIP AND SAMPLE The market’s weekly afternoon tasting, featuring 1-2 wines and something to munch on. Saturdays from noon-4 pm. Petunias Marketplace, 2010 N. Madison St. petuniasmarket.com SIP OF BEVERLY’S An introductory wine class and tasting event with Beverly’s Sommelier Trevor Treller. First Saturday of the month, at 3 pm. $25. Beverly’s, 115 S. Second St. beverlyscda.com IRON GOAT + COCHINITO BEER DINNER A six-course Latin-inspired dinner by Cochinito chef Travis Dickinson, with beer pairings from Iron Goat. Reservations required. April 7, 6 pm. $69. Cochinito Taqueria, 10 N. Post. facebook.com/ cochinitotaqueria (509-474-9618) MIMOSA SUNDAY BRUNCH SERIES A buffet brunch to pair with a mimosa bar offering a variety of choices. Service on Sundays at 9 am and 10:30 am, April 7-May 26. $20. Nectar Catering and Events, 120 N. Stevens St. nectarcateringandevents.com (290-5182) TERIYAKI FEST Enjoy traditional recipes for chicken or tofu teriyaki dinners ($15), along with various sushi, snacks and Japanese desserts ($5-$6). Dine-in or takeout available; pre order online. April 7, 11 am-3 pm. Spokane Buddhist Temple, 927 S. Perry. SpokaneBuddhistTemple.org REAL COOKING WITH REAL FOOD Join Main Market and Recipe for Self for a se-

ries of cooking and nutrition classes on whole foods cooking and finding optimal health in the kitchen and the market. Upcoming classes: April 9 and 23, May 7 and 21, from 6-7 pm. $18/class. Main Market Co-Op, 44 W. Main. mainmarket.coop CIDER & SAVASANA A 60-minute alllevels guided yoga class inside Twilight Cider Works’ repurposed greenhouse on Greenbluff. Join us after class for a free tasting or glass of cider. Ages 21+. Preregistration required. April 11 from 6-7:30 pm. $20. Twilight Cider Works, 18102 N. Day Mt. Spokane Rd. yogajoynorth.com FRIED CHICKEN INCA’s chef requested this class to share secrets and great sides to complement the evening’s entree. April 11, 6-8 pm. $59. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. bit. ly/2CRWMc7 (279-6030)

MUSIC

BEATS, RHYMES, & LIFE: A CONTEXT PROJECT HIP HOP INCUBATOR Hip hop enthusiasts and artists alike are invited to participate in monthly workshops on the first Thursday of the month from 5-6:30 pm through May 2. Free. Emerge, 208 N. Fourth St. bit.ly/2XrKArs (208-818-3342) THE FAB FOUR: BEATLES TRIBUTE The world-renowned group’s performances include three costume changes representing every era of the Beatles’ career. April 5, 8 pm. $35-$63. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com HAGFEST NORTHWEST The Inland Northwest Country Music Association brings its Merle Haggard tribute show to Spokane featuring 12 of the most popular artists from the region. April 6, 8-10 pm. $10-$25. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7638) SING VIENNA! Chorale Coeur d’Alene’s next concert offers music conjuring up 19th century Vienna in all its ambiance and glory. The 70+ member Chorale is accompanied by piano, organ and chamber orchestra as it presents pieces by Mozart, Schubert, Brahms, Strauss and a medley from Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “The Sound of Music.” April 6, 2-3:30 pm. $10$20. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. ChoraleCdA.com (208-446-2333) WEDNESDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE The Spokane Folklore Society’s weekly dance with the band Red Herring and caller Nora Scott. This is a community event, all are welcome. Beginner classes at 7:15, dance at 7:30. April 10, 7:30-9:30 pm. $5/$7. Women’s Club, 1428 W. Ninth Ave. myspokanefolklore@gmail.com

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

COMMUNITY DODGEBALL TOURNAMENT Join North Idaho College and the Human Rights Institute for an afternoon of games to celebrate the International Day of Sports for Peace with a community Dodgeball tournament. Includes concessions, kids’ activities, vendors and more. April 5, 5-8 pm. Free. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. bit. ly/2uayupe (208-769-3316) BEGINNING BIRD WATCHING CLASS A class and outing to learn basics about bird watching followed by a walk at the Refuge to see and identify what we can. Families with children 8+ welcome. April 6, May 4 and June 1 from 8:45-11:30 am. $3/car entrance. Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge, 26010 S. Smith Rd. fotnwr. org/activities.html (235-4723) EVERGREEN EAST SPRING KICKOFF PARTY & PREMIER A night offering liba-

tions, craft beer and wine, a silent auction and much more. Also includes the premiere of the mountain biking film “Reverence - A Journey into Fear.” April 7, 5-8 pm. $15. Washington Cracker Building, 304 W. Pacific. evergreeneast.org INTRO TO OUTDOOR CLIMBING CLASS Learn the basics of going from indoor to outdoor climbing with the Bower Climbing Coalition. Also hear about BCC’s efforts in the climbing community, learn about local climbing areas near Spokane and more. April 11, 6-7:30 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. REI.com/spokane

THEATER

THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME Autistic teen Christopher is exceptionally intelligent but ill-equipped to interpret everyday life. When he falls under suspicion for killing his neighbor’s dog, he sets out to identify the true culprit. Through April 14; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $29-$27. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) PLAYHOUSE NW ACTING SCHOOL: PLAYDATE Each class starts with warmup exercises that branch out to Meisner basic foundation work, improvisation, and cold reading skills. Ages 12+. April 4, 6:30-9:30 pm. $30. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway Ave. bit.ly/2FK7vXT (206-919-7407) A BRIGHT ROOM CALLED DAY This play by Tony Kushner epitomizes the struggle against inaction, apathy, and fragmentation. Through April 14; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org MOBY DICK: A MUSICAL An original production workshop of the captivating story embedded in our culture; even those who have not read it are familiar with the tale of Ahab’s obsession. April 5-6 at 7:30 pm. $15. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. spokanecivictheatre.com MOSCOW COMMUNITY THEATRE: DIE, MOMMIE, DIE! A comic melodrama that evokes the 1960s “grande guignol” films that featured stars such as Bette Davis, Joan Crawford and Lana Turner. April 5-14; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10-$15. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. moscowcommunitytheatre.org SHEN YUN Experience a lost culture through the art of classical Chinese dance and performing arts through a blend of colorful costuming, high-tech backdrops and live orchestra. April 9-10 at 7:30 pm. April 9 and April 10. $82-$152. First Interstate Center for the Arts, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (509-279-7000) THESE SHINING LIVES The story of working women in the 1920s and 30s, and how their employer knowingly compromised their health. April 11-13 and April 18-20 at 7:30 pm. Free. Schuler Performing Arts Center, 1000 W. Garden Ave. (208-769-3220)

ARTS

LUMINOUS: DALE CHIHULY & THE STUDIO GLASS MOVEMENT Partnering with Tacoma’s Museum of Glass and Portlandbased collector George Stroemple, the MAC presents its first all-glass art exhibition. Thirty-three international artists working in glass, including Dale Chihuly, are featured. Through June 23; Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm. $5-$10. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org SPOKANE OBSERVANCE OF THE HOLOCAUST: STUDENT ART EXHIBIT The Spokane Community Observance of the Holocaust committee displays art by middle and high school students com-

peting in its annual contest. This year’s theme is “Speaking Up for the Other.” Through April 15, Mon-Fri from 8 am-6 pm. Free. Gonzaga School of Law, 721 N. Cincinnati St. (747-3304) FIRST FRIDAY Art galleries and businesses across downtown Spokane and beyond host receptions to showcase new displays of art. April 5, from 5-8 pm. Details at firstfridayspokane.org. INTEGRATION: JAMIE N. NADHERNY, AKA LOU LOU PINK The multi-disciplinary artist works primarily in sculpture, installation and performance art to investigate work, labor and action, values and ethics, public vs. private, torment and release, violence and tenderness, and craftsmanship. April 5-May 31; Mon-Fri from 10 am-4 pm. Reception April 5 from 5-8 pm. Free. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland Ave. spokaneartschool.net SPOKANE PRINT FEST Artist Reinaldo GIl Zambrano, in partnership with Terrain, presents the first-annual event celebrating all things printmaking, including: printmaking techniques, live artist demos, and work for sale from printmakers across the region. April 5, 5-11 pm. Free. Terrain, 304 W. Pacific. bit.ly/2SPmQtz

WORDS

READING: JAMEL BRINKLEY The Whitworth English Dept. hosts a reading from the author of “A Lucky Man: Stories,” a finalist for the National Book Award in Fiction. In the Robinson Teaching Theatre. April 4, 6-7:30 pm. Free. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne. (777-3253) 3 MINUTE MIC’S 6TH ANNIVERSARY Auntie’s first Friday poetry open mic celebrates its 6th anniversary. Open mic readers can share up to 3 minutes’ worth of poetry. Free. April 5, 8-9 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (509-838-0206) READING: ASIA MCCLAIN For fans of the Serial podcast and HBO’s “The Case Against Adnan Syen,” Serial alibi and Spokane resident Asia McClain speaks and signs copies of her book. April 5, 7-8 pm. Free. The Gathering House, 733 W. Garland. gatheringhouse.org (747-2818) THE HUMAN CHORUS: BOOK RELEASE & READING Join Spark Central and Power 2 The Poetry for a performance of teen voices. North Central students read from their anthology “The Human Chorus.” Poetry students of Bethany Montgomery also perform. April 9, 7:30-8:30 pm. Free. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. bit.ly/2YDSvCy (279-0299) BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic series, open to all readers and all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. spokanepoetryslam.org NORTHERN VS. VALLEY GRAND SLAM Top placing poets from are high schools compete. Sponsored by the Friends of the Spokane County Library District, Deer Park, Otis Orchards and Spokane Valley libraries. April 10, 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. Gonzaga Hemmingson Center, 702 E. Desmet Ave. scld.org THE OTHER SIDE OF MADNESS: A READING WITH EMALEE GILLIS Emalee Gillis reads from her inspirational memoir “The Other Side of Madness: Adventures on the Path to Living Well with a Mental Illness.” Over the past 30 years, Emalee has learned strategies that allow her to live a full life with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Her strategies are so innovative that she was asked to do a TEDx Talk which will be available online in March. April 10, 7:30-8:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central. org (279-0299) n

APRIL 4, 2019 INLANDER 57


CBD

‘The Entourage Effect’

CBD by itself is creating a health revolution, and now some are adding THC as they look for even better results BY TUCK CLARRY

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58 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

e’re past the tipping point with cannabidiol (CBD). Even prior to its inclusion in the Farm Bill, CBD has been accepted as a health and lifestyle supplement — and ultimately what might lead to marijuana legalization nationwide. ...continued on page 60


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“THE ENTOURAGE EFFECT,” CONTINUED... And while CBD can be either hemp-based or cannabis-based, those differences are being exploited by those still fighting legalization. Project CBD, a nonprofit supporting science-based education on CBD, says the No. 1 misconception in the debate is that THC, from cannabis, can only be recreational, not medicinal. “The drug warrior’s strategic retreat,” writes Project CBD’s Martin A Lee, is to “give ground on CBD while continuing to demonize THC. Diehard marijuana prohibitionists are exploiting the good news about CBD to further stigmatize high-THC cannabis.”

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Project CBD Founder Martin A. Lee But that may be scaring people away from combining CBD with THC to potentially get even greater relief for their ailments. While some people only feel comfortable with hemp-based CBD, and many are fine with cannabis-based CBD, more and more are looking to combine CBD with THC. Studies have shown that when looking at the positive effects of CBD or THC on cancer cell lines or neuropathic pain — two major health issues that CBD is championed as an aid for — they work significantly better as a tandem than by themselves. This approach falls under the approach of “whole plant medicine” and the “entourage effect.” It’s believed by many health experts in the cannabis and CBD field that in pinpointing the kind of plant with the proper THC and CBD levels and terpene notes, a patient can expect a more robust treatment against their ailments. Considering the way that THC and CBD attach to brain receptors so similarly, a THCplus-CBD product could do wonders in pain management. Many of those looking for CBD-only products may be afraid of side-effects of THC-included products, but it’s worth noting that CBD lessens the high one gets from THC. Still, it’s a personal preference, and consumers need to find their sweet spot through some trial and error. But in Washington state, we’re lucky enough to have access to a wide range of options, including local budtenders who are properly trained on finding the right choices for newcomers who already are feeling the benefits of CBD. n

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APRIL 4, 2018 INLANDER 61


Easter

Brunch

At Current Kitchen + Bar Located in templin’s resort

Sunday, April 21 st 10 am - 3pm Reservations required

More than Half Full

Second annual Food and Wine Festival is a feast for all your senses

S

ometimes more is better, like at the second annual COEUR D’ALENE FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL, April 12-14. The weekend kicks off Friday with three events: an evening dinner cruise with J. Lohr winery ($51.50); a wine tasting social with complimentary hors d’oeuvres and a cocktail competition ($59), and a dress-to-impress wine dinner at Beverly’s featuring Doubleback Winery ($225). On Saturday, salute the sunrise with mimosas and a breakfast bar, then settle in for morning yoga or join a guided nature hike of nearby Tubbs Hill ($49). Enhance your wine-tasting knowledge with afternoon activities, including two wine tasting panels ($35), followed by either a tasting session with Walla Walla winemaker Gilles Nicault of Long Shadows or cocktail class ($35).

414 E 1st Ave | Post Falls, Id | (208) 773-1611 C O E U R

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

COEUR D ’ ALENE

Saturday offers four wine tasting luncheon options ($69) in four separate and equally lovely locations: Coeur d’Alene Cellars at Cedars Floating Restaurant, Barrister Winery at Beverly’s, Amavi Cellars at the Resort, or Townshend Cellars at the Floating Green

Restaurant. Art lovers will appreciate a new artist den and Idaho wine tasting event sponsored by the Idaho Wine Commission which pairs Idaho wine with regional artists ($10). Spend a casual afternoon on a self-guided wine walk through downtown Coeur d’Alene ($20/eight pours). Conclude your evening with one of four wine pairing dinners, each one featuring a Walla Walla vintner in an intimate setting with exclusive access to the winemaker ($175). Start Sunday with brunch at Dockside Restaurant (prices vary), followed by a sip and signing with special guest author, Debbie Macomber ($40 single/$60 couple). Later that afternoon, enjoy a range of regional wines as you watch local chef Chad White demonstrate the culinary artistry that helped earn him a spot on Bravo TV’s Top Chef ($49). Of course the resort has festival packages, with overnight accommodations and the opportunity to customize your weekend experience (starting at $219).

D ’A L E N E

Upcoming Events

COEUR D’ALENE

Community Dodgeball Tournament APRIL 5

Join North Idaho College and the Human Rights Institute for an afternoon of games to celebrate the International Day of Sports for Peace with a community dodgeball tournament. Includes concessions, kids’ activities, vendors and more. Open to teams of six. 5-8 pm: North

Brew Party

ArtWalk

Learn more about these North Idaho breweries, Bombastic and Radio Brewing, and enjoy $2 pints of Radio beer on tap, with Bombastic bottles for sale as well.

Every second Friday from April through December, stroll through beautiful downtown Coeur d’Alene and enjoy the many galleries representing locally and nationally acclaimed artists. Visit supporting galleries, shops, restaurants and businesses for this free, family friendly event. 5-8 pm. Go to visitcda.org

APRIL 6

2-7 pm, 11100 N. Airport Rd.

APRIL 12

to download a map.

Idaho College.

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay. 62 INLANDER APRIL 4, 2019

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2 0 8 .415.0116 ALSO AVAILABLE: WINE DINNERS AND CRUISES, AND SPECIAL ROOM PACKAGES FROM CDA RESORT

TICKETS, TASTING INFO & ROOM PACKAGES AT CDA DOWNTOWN.COM SPONSORED BY THE COEUR D’ALENE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

AUGUST APRIL24, 4, 2019 2017 INLANDER 63


LIVE ENTERTAINMENT

COLE SWINDELL Friday, May 3rd | 7 pm Event Center

Purchase tickets online, at the Casino Box Office, or any TicketsWest outlet. Tickets start at $70. Hotel & ticket packages available. Call 1 800 523-2464 or visit the front desk for details.

O U R R E N O VAT E D E V E N T C E N T E R F E AT U R E S : New seating, with world-class sound and lighting. It is transformed into one of the best concert venues in the region where you can hear your favorite artists in an intimate setting and where every seat is a premium seat.

TICKETS:

CDACASINO.COM

1 800 523-2464 | CDACASINO.COM |    Worley, Idaho | 25 miles south of Coeur d’Alene

Profile for The Inlander

Inlander 04/04/2019  

Inlander 04/04/2019