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HEALTH CARE

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COMMENT | THE ECONOMY

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aniel Walters, in his Inlander article “The Incredible Shrinking Mall” (3/20/14) draws attention to a nationwide trend: Malls generally aren’t doing well, especially malls that are home to anchor stores catering to the middle class. Our own NorthTown Mall is an archetypal ’60s/’70s aging mall. Yet NorthTown is different from many malls of that era. A decade ago, when Al French served on the Spokane Plan Commission, he observed: “NorthTown is surrounded by rooftops,” meaning neighborhoods. So unlike most suburban malls, out by the freeway interchange, NorthTown could be construed to support the intent of the Spokane Comprehensive Land Use Plan and its “Centers and Corridors” strategy. Theoretically, it should continue to do all right, assuming that its middle-class clientele remains intact. But as reported in the Inlander, NorthTown is planning to shrink its overall footprint. What happened? Is it just getting too old? Is online buying killing the mall? Are kids finding other ways to spend their time? Or is it all this plus something else?

T

he Spokesman-Review’s Shawn Vestal indirectly answered the question in a recent column. He reports that poverty in Spokane, historically greater on the north side of town, has worsened over the past decade by an astounding 21 percent rise in poverty markers. What in the year 2000 represented Spokane’s middle class has become, today, the lower middle class. And what was then lower middle class has drifted downward to poverty. We refer to this as the expanding hole in the donut. Inequality has been on the rise in America for several decades. One ranking has the United States fourth worst in the entire world. Paradoxically, this has come at the same time that U.S. worker production per capita is at an all-time high; yet at the same time, national GDP growth remains under 3 percent per year. Notably, the U.S. actually looks good by comparison. Our “peer countries” are doing considerably worse: The United Kingdom: .01 percent growth in GDP; Germany: .07 percent; Canada: 1.7 percent; France is flat; Italy’s GDP is shrinking by 2.5 percent a year. Nor does it seem to matter whether conservatives or liberals are running the country. Center-right parties control governments in the UK, Germany and Canada — and it makes no difference. To get to higher numbers, you have to get outside “the West.” Iraq, for example, reports 8.4 percent growth — but a lot of good it’s doing us. So worker effort is up, yet GDP is slow or down, and to no one’s surprise unemployment reflects these numbers. All this necessarily makes

the question of wealth distribution all the more important, if for no other reason than the pie isn’t growing commensurate with employment and our quality-of-life needs. We seem to have backed into Romneyworld — where it’s right and fair that much more goes to far fewer, while many more are working harder for much less. The result? The middle class shrinks. And even if we had an expanding pie, there would be no guarantee we’d get the desired effect anyway. In today’s conservative world, “inequality” has come to be viewed as a kind of birthright — almost a moral imperative. It’s Calvinism on steroids.

I

discussed all this with John Allen, the proprietor of Spokane’s very popular wine shop, Vino! Allen had been wondering if his patrons’ buying patterns mirrored what we’re seeing in the malls. Allen has managed, through sheer energy and imagination, to successfully navigate 9/11, the recession that began in 2008 and even the arrival of Total Wine. For this new challenge, he decided to run a kind of test at his next wine tasting. He offered more high-end wine along with his usual mid-cost wines and — for the first time — more wines with a lower price point. He set his thresholds: high-end, $35 and up, with many over $65; middle from $15 to $34; and low-end at $12 and under. His report: “We sold out the high-end wines almost immediately, including bottles $65 and up. And we also sold out the low-end wines — but we sold nothing in the middle range.” There’s that donut hole again. Then the surprise: “Our gross sales from the high end and the low end netted the exact same amount of money.” But, he added: “Think about how many more low-end bottles we had to sell.” He has since reconfigured his displays and revised his inventory to reflect this discovery. If the past decade has proven nothing else, it is that neither “trickle-down economics” nor “supply-side economics” has ever worked as advertised. That “rising tides lift all boats” theory has been shown to be so much hooey. Case in point: The very day that Vestal’s article about poverty in Spokane came out, we learned that the CEO of Comcast, who had been on the job all of three months, was about to be given a $79 million bonus for closing the megasales deal with TimeWarner. That’s a rising tide, but whose boat is it lifting? 


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

The Greater Good

REPRESENTATION IN DEPUY & STRYKER HIP IMPLANT CASES

BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

PERSONAL INJURY AND MEDICAL LAWSUITS INCLUDING:

R

ich Hadley, the president and CEO of Greater Spokane Inc., will be retiring this spring, and already the finalists vying to replace him have been spotted around town. While the names of the various organizations have changed, Spokane’s been at this economic development thing for some 130 years now. But the job just keeps getting more complicated. In the old days, you could tell the CEO who might move his company to town by his suit; today he might be wearing a hoodie. While boosters used to take a coveted hire to the Spokane Club for dinner, now she’s more likely to take the job after a ride on the Centennial Trail. While everybody used to want widget-makers to land out by the interstate, smart cities are rolling out the red carpet for creative types. Spokane has made some amazing strides in the past 20 years, and Hadley and his team have been a big part of that. But the world is changing, and we are counting on GSI to, as they put it, “create something greater for the Spokane region.” According to the job posting, GSI wants their new leader to spend a year taking in all that is Spokane and the Inland Northwest; after that, they want him or her to present the board a five-year plan. I think you could spend a good chunk of that year reflecting on one basic question: What is business advocacy? Nationally, business advocacy has become a nasty game of survival of the fittest, with big-money organizations too often stepping on the needs of everyday citizens. Locally we work together better, but agreeing on the best “business friendly policies” is never easy. Case in point: We have essentially nullified the state Growth Management Act here under the guise of it being a pro-business call. But that not only contradicts the best practices of the most successful urban places here in the West, it also hurts businesses that are banking on a thriving core. Here’s another one: Poverty is a growing, nagging problem that a business advocacy group might not think they should tackle, but business cannot thrive in a struggling community. It’s everyone’s problem. I do love the name “Greater Spokane” as it gives the organization a more expansive outlook. It needs to continue to live up to that name, and GSI’s new leader should cast a wide net during that year of fact-finding — talking to the hoodies and suits for sure, but also the greenies and social servants. That way, GSI can advocate for business policies that align with improved overall community health. And that’s “something greater.” 

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COMMENT | DEVELOPMENT

Vesting Interests

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

We can be pro-development and anti-sprawl, and David Condon knows it BY LUKE BAUMGARTEN

O

n Monday, Mayor David Condon vetoed the Spokane City Council’s attempt to locally plug a big loophole in state growth management law. As is, the loophole allows developers to start building on newly designated urban land while growth management authorities decide if the expansion itself is even legal. But here’s the kicker: Even if it’s deemed illegal, the developers who have begun building get to keep building because they’re “vested.” Opinions on both sides are dug in: Critics of vesting say it isn’t the sort of growth we need. The county commissioners say they’re just taking some of the risk out of a

very risky endeavor. In this case, though, we don’t really need opinions. The facts are clear. Spokane County’s own land quantity analysis tells us that we can develop full-bore for nearly a generation — 18 years! — without expanding our urban growth area. The report, published in 2010 and amended in 2011, says your newborn will graduate high school before we come close to running out of residential land. It gets better: In that same time period, we’ll only use about 66 percent of the available commercial land and less than a third of undeveloped industrial land. Think about that. Our UGA is already a McMansion. Why are we adding rooms? If you’re tempted to respond “because of freedom,” think about the cost of that

freedom. When there’s so much open space within the growth area, placing a bunch of yawning exurbs in the alfalfa fields of north Spokane County isn’t just about catering to the market preferences of the urban outdoorsman. There are real, monetary impacts for all of us. The more water and sewer lines we run, the more we have to maintain. And if those new lines are servicing lower-density areas far from existing infrastructure, then all of our utility bills go up. But I don’t need to tell the mayor this. He said much of this himself in a letter to the county commissioners almost exactly a year ago. Along with his usual adversaries, Ben Stuckart, Jon Snyder and Amber Waldref, Condon wrote that when low-density areas are developed on the edge of towns, “existing and new taxpayers are burdened by the costs of extending and maintaining extra miles of roads, utility lines, pipes, pump stations and general urban services.” On Monday, Condon changed his tune. The mayor loves talking about making Spokane a city of choice. But being a city of choice requires making choices. If we want to attract the sort of smart, well-paid urban dweller (and his or her hip-as-hell startup) who we’re so fond of targeting, we need to start at the core and work our way out. We can make a choice, without discouraging development, to encourage it where we need it most. In areas that will deepen the tax base and relieve some financial pressure from vital services. There are amazing development opportunities within the UGA. Consider Greenstone’s Kendall Yards project: It’s growing at staggering speed, providing homes for people across the age and wage spectrum while turning a brownfield into a New Urban oasis faster than anyone thought possible. It wouldn’t be fair to expect every developer to have that kind of vision, but that’s where smart land management comes in. It helps show people where to look. n Luke Baumgarten, a creative strategist at Seven2 and former culture editor of the Inlander, is a co-founder of Terrain and the founder of Fellow Coworking. He tweets @lukebaumgarten

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

Do you think people in our community do a good job helping and showing kindness to others?

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COLE GERARD: I think it’s really hit and miss. I go to a place like the community college or even a grocery store, and more people than not seem to want to help others where they can. You go downtown where there are lots of people who really need help, and most turn their noses up at them and blame them for the situation they are in (which is true in many cases but definitely not all). I think people in this town have the desire to help others, but too many pick and choose with bad judgment who they think deserves help. STEPHEN SOAR HAMMER: We can all do better to love our neighbors. And “neighbor” includes enemies and strangers.

MARCH 27 - APRIL 2, 2014 | ‘WIDENING OUR CIRCLE OF COMPASSION’

by heidi

JESSE SWANSON: If it’s convenient, yes. We got a long way to go.

The Grand Budapest Hotel is a delight, if not too deep

Last week’s cover story, by Heidi Groover, examined the science of selflessness.

BRAD MCNAMARA: Do we do enough? No. With that said, I have seen that the majority of people I know, work with, and live in my neighborhood go out of their way to help and show kindness to others. JOEY PEKALA: It’s not only about volunteering for an organization, it’s about driving someone to the store that can’t get around themselves, or helping someone move, or fixing something around the house for someone who can’t do it themselves, or even buying a cup of lemonade at some kid’s stand just to help them make a buck. People do this kind of thing all the time and that says something, it’s important to help one another out. It’s a tough little world we live in and it makes it that much easier if we have each other’s back. MARIA GARCIA: At the end of the day, this is one of the nicest communities I have ever lived in! STEPHANIE BLAND: I always open doors for others, say “pardon me” and “thank you,” “please.” I ride the STA and often give up my seat for someone to sit. These are things that never happen to me. Especially in my fast food days, getting someone their order quickly and awesome customer service doesn’t matter. … I know there are well-mannered people out there, but it’s getting more rare! So to all you polite respectable people, thank you! AMY DOWNER: I am unemployed and have no money. I have been going to school and am looking for a job. I have had many people show me kindness which humbles me and will be forever thankful and when I am back on my feet I will pay it forward. 

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Director of Innovative Programs Jeannette Vaughn: “People are hungry for innovation.” YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

EDUCATION

Schools of Choice

Two elementary schools are using a completely different curriculum than the rest of Spokane — and that’s just the start of the district’s push for variety BY DANIEL WALTERS

I

t’s less than a mile between Balboa Elementary and Westview Elementary. They exist in the same district, under the same central administration, and feed into the same middle school. But at Balboa — and at Longfellow Elementary to the southeast — teaching is going to be different. While elementary schools in the rest of Spokane have adopted “Journeys” as their new English language arts curriculum, Balboa and Longfellow have gone in another direction.

This year, Balboa tested out a curriculum called “Core Knowledge” in the kindergarten, first and second grades. “The staff that piloted it has continually, since September, been coming in and showing me data around student learning,” Balboa Principal Heather Awbery says. “It is truly delivering deep content knowledge to kids starting in kindergarten.” Uniquely, Core Knowledge doesn’t compartmentalize subject matters like most other curricula.

“There’s not a separate social studies time. Not a separate science time. It’s all completely integrated,” Awbery says. “So, for example, I have a second-grade classroom studying westward expansion. While they’re still learning reading concepts and reading strategies, they’re learning those through specific topics related to westward expansion.” Reading instruction comes through phonics, with a hook: Beginner books are careful not to use words before students are ready to learn them, and deceptive letters — say, the “c” in the word piece — are placed in bold to let students know to slow down and carefully consider how to pronounce them. Yet at the same time, through classroom discussions, lectures, and visual aids, teachers explain deep and complicated topics to young kids — everything from cycles of nature to the War of 1812. Next year, Balboa is expanding the curriculum through the fifth grade. Longfellow is different from middle-class Balboa, but it’s using Core Knowledge next year as well. “Eighty-three percent of our students are students of ...continued on next page

APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 13


NEWS | EDUCATION “SCHOOLS OF CHOICE,” CONTINUED... poverty,” says Longfellow Principal Meghan Anderson. “By fifth grade in high poverty schools, you often see a slip in reading scores. There’s a switch, the vocabulary and the text complexity really ramps up. They don’t have background knowledge or access to the vocabulary.” She says the Core Knowledge curriculum was developed specifically for high poverty schools. At Balboa, the choice to go for Core Knowledge was unanimous, while at Longfellow it had 90 percent support. The concerns from the holdouts, Anderson says, weren’t about the curriculum itself. “It’s that we’re doing something different than the rest of the district,” Anderson says. “How will the district support this? Our district hasn’t done these options like this before. We’re breaking new ground.” The Core Knowledge curriculum is just one small entrée in a buffet of different options that Spokane Public Schools plans to offer.

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n one sense, the world of education is moving toward consistency. No Child Left Behind, state standardized tests and the Common Core standards all represent the ways in which schools across the country are becoming more and more uniform. But on a local level, Spokane Public Schools is moving in the opposite direction. Ever since Shelley Redinger became superintendent in 2012, the district’s focus has turned to offering a vast array of options. Charter schools pose the clearest example. Where districts across the state lined up to officially oppose allowing charters to exist at all, Spokane Public Schools rushed to become an authorizer: The first charter school authorized in the state, Spokane’s Pride Prep, not only got approval from the district, the district assisted the school’s creator every step of the way.

Superintendent Shelley Redinger “Options” is the catchphrase. This past fall Redinger added two new administrative positions as part of the newly created Innovative Programs department. A $525,000 grant from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation helped pay for salaries for the department and travel for staff to visit innovative schools. It also helped Spokane Public Schools join the “Portfolio School

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District Network” in January. The group of 43 like-minded districts offer each other resources and advice for how to expand options in their schools. “It’s hard to think of one-size-fits-all solutions for all kids,” says Mike DeArmond, senior research analyst with the Seattlebased Center on Reinventing Public Education, which assists the network. Instead, he says, the thinking is “less ‘How do we directly run a bunch of schools?’ and more ‘How do we oversee a system of schools that’s high-performing for all students?’” Send comments to The district hopes to roll out options — editor@inlander.com. many that have developed naturally, school by school — across all grade levels in Spokane. Madison Elementary may center on the visual and performing arts. North Central High School, which already has unmatched science offerings, is studying the idea of bringing select seventh and eighth graders into the school, sort of like Running Start for high school instead of college. Someday, there may be a dual-language school — Spanish or Mandarin, say — serving as a language immersion program for students. The district may add International Baccalaureate programs at some schools. “We’re looking at possibly K-8 models. We’re looking at maybe some different grade configurations,” says Jeannette Vaughn, Spokane Public Schools’ Director of Innovative Programs. “Again, to have different choices.” But change, even innovative change, can be risky: In the Coeur d’Alene school district, the International Baccalaureate program was eliminated after intense opposition from social con-

LETTERS

“We’re looking at possibly K-8 models. We’re looking at maybe some different grade configurations. Again, to have different choices.” servatives. Meanwhile, the East Valley School District spent years moving away from the middle school grade configuration, despite intense criticism. After more than three years, a school board election, a superintendent resignation and a board vote, East Valley has ditched the plan and is restoring traditional middle schools. And in Spokane, one relatively minor change as part of the Portfolio district strategy — the move of the Jefferson and Balboa elementary Montessori programs into one new school — already has sparked serious backlash from some parents. The district hurried to meet with frustrated parents on multiple occasions to assuage their concerns. “Only 10 percent are not actually moving to the new location,” Vaughn says. “There might have been some backlash, and there was obviously some upheaval, but once the dust settled, 90 percent of the kids are going to continue on with the program.” It hints at the political and logistical challenges to the notion of options for parents. The most obvious hurdle is transportation. Right now, transportation outside of school boundaries must be entirely parent-provided: If a parent on the South Hill wants their child to attend Balboa or Longfellow up north, they have to drive them there. Yet many parents — especially low-income ones — don’t have that option. “We believe from an equity standpoint, we really need to provide transportation, but it comes at a huge cost,” Vaughn says. It’s an issue the school board is keenly aware of, but not one they’ve come close to solving yet. For now, though, Vaughn says enthusiasm is building among teachers, administrators and parents for the new slew of options. “I think people are hungry for innovation,” Vaughn says. “People are really excited about it.”  danielw@inlander.com

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APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

PHOTO EYE LINE OF STORIES

NEED TO KNOW

The Big News of the Past Week

1.

Spokane Mayor David Condon used his veto power for the first time in his term to overturn an ordinance aimed at preventing suburban sprawl.

2.

At least 27 people have died in the massive landslide in Oso, Wash. Another 22 people are missing. Gov. Jay Inslee asked President Obama to give the area a “major disaster” declaration, which would open up federal funds for the victims of the mudslide.

3.

Jury selection for the manslaughter trial of Spokane plumber Gail Gerlach began this week. Last March, Gerlach shot and killed a man attempting to steal his SUV from his driveway.

4.

More than 7 million people signed up for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act by the March 31 deadline, slightly surpassing the Obama administration’s original enrollment target.

5.

Kristina Grundmanis, the education events coordinator at Lutheran Community Services Northwest, takes a break while installing the Clothesline Project at River Park Square on Monday. The project is meant to increase awareness of violence against women by displaying messages on T-shirts created by survivors, support groups and victim advocates. The shirts will be displayed through the end of the month.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

The day after a fatal officer-involved shooting of a suspected robber, Spokane Police Chief Frank Straub presented a 12-month progress report to the Use of Force Commission, outlining many reforms the department has made to deescalate conflicts with the public.

ON INLANDER.com What’s Creating Buzz

DIGITS

25

The number of years Oscar Ramiro Ortega-Hernandez, from Idaho Falls, will spend behind bars for firing an assault rifle at the White House three years ago.

10 million

$

FOOD: The Flying Pig on East Sprague closed over the weekend. Details and more food news on the blog. The estimated financial losses from the Oso, Wash., mudslide, according to a letter from Gov. Jay Inslee to the president, requesting federal aid.

ART: Author Jess Walter and other local artists are starting a new nonprofit to offer writing and art classes to young people. Check the blog for more.

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Condon’s Cause Mayor Condon uses the veto; plus, Governor Inslee pushes to get Hanford cleaned up RENTAL SHUTDOWNS ON HOLD

The “sharing economy” debate has arrived in Spokane. After receiving complaints about and issuing ceaseand-desist orders to people renting out their homes on websites like AIRBNB and VRBO (Vacation Rentals by Owner), the City of Spokane announced Friday that it would place a 120-day stay on such complaints. “We want to look at what other communities have done, look at best practices, evaluate what works best for our community and create positive and effective ways for dispute resolutions,” the city’s director of business and developer services, Jan Quintrall, says in a statement. The city currently has strict regulations applying to rentals, including 30-day minimum rentals for many locations and a requirement that bed-and-breakfasts be

on the local, state or national historic register. But locally and nationwide, the popularity of sites like Airbnb has grown and homeowners have taken to renting out rooms or entire houses for a few nights at a time. (A search of Airbnb and VRBO yields nearly 100 offerings in the Spokane area.) Recently, other cities have banned similar rentals or required them to pay city lodging taxes. Spokane’s problem-solving group will include citizens and representatives from code enforcement, the planning department and the city council. In the meantime, complaints about short-term rentals will still be accepted but no action will be taken. — HEIDI GROOVER

UNSHEATHING THE VETO PEN

It’s a tool Spokane mayors have rarely used in the nearly 15 years they’ve had the power. But on Monday, Mayor David Condon officially used his veto for the first time. The VETOED ORDINANCE was an attempt to close what a majority of the Spokane City Council saw as a loophole in the state’s growth management policies. Spokane County’s recent expansion of the Urban Growth area — the borders defining where dense development is allowed — had been ruled invalid by the Growth Management Hearings Board. But because of quirks in state law, some developers will able to build dense developments in the expanded area anyway, because they filled out the correct paperwork before the ruling. The ordinance was an attempt to stop that practice, by barring the city from committing to extend water and sewer services to properties in the expanded UGA before legal challenges to the expansion had been resolved. A year ago, Condon joined three councilmembers in asking the county commissioners to refrain from expanding the boundary. But this time, he was critical about how the ordinance was brought forward and passed, and found himself agreeing with some of the commissioners’ objections.

He cited “uncertainty” as the primary reason for his veto. “It is legal uncertainty. It is uncertainty from those who do economic development, it’s uncertainty, quite frankly, as I talk to those who are concerned about the environment, saying, ‘What does this exactly do, Mayor?’” Condon said. The veto, unsurprisingly, drew objections from the four councilmembers who’d voted for the ordinance. (Overriding it takes five.) “With his veto, is the mayor representing the county commissioners’ interests or the interests of the citizens of Spokane?” councilmember Snyder said in a press release. He says the council plans to start a new process to address growth-management issues. — DANIEL WALTERS

NUCLEAR REACTION

Armed with a new clean-up proposal, Gov. Jay Inslee challenged federal energy officials Monday to strengthen and accelerate its commitment to containing and treating RADIOACTIVE WASTE at the Hanford nuclear reservation, threatening legal ramifications if the Department of Energy could not meet established deadlines. The DOE also released an alternative proposal Monday. Inslee, with state Attorney General Bob Ferguson alongside, offered a new clean-up timeline that calls for all waste to be treated by 2047 at the latest. Inslee says the “viable, staged approach” provides a clear way forward for the delay-ridden treatment effort. The state and the DOE agreed to certain deadlines in a 2010 court order. State officials say the Department of Energy has two weeks to reach a new agreement on deadlines. If the impasse persists, Ferguson says the state plans to seek whatever legal options are necessary to ensure Hanford’s nuclear waste gets properly contained and treated within “our children’s lifetimes.” — JACOB JONES

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Sen. Patty Murray: “I feel very strongly that women ... should be deciding a woman’s personal health care.”

Do Corporations Have Religious Rights? U.S. Sen. Patty Murray on the latest legal challenge to the Affordable Care Act BY DEANNA PAN

S

hould corporations, like people, have religious rights? That’s the question before the U.S. Supreme Court. Last week, justices heard oral arguments in Sebelius v. Hobby Lobby Stores, Inc. and Conestoga Wood Specialties Corp. v. Sebelius. In this latest, consolidated challenge to the Affordable Care Act, the evangelical owners of the two businesses contend that the health care law’s contraceptive mandate — which requires large, for-profit employers to provide insurance packages covering birth control or pay a fine — violates their sincerely held religious beliefs. A divided verdict is expected in late June. Washington Sen. Patty Murray was in the courtroom last Tuesday, listening as attorneys

representing the Obama administration and the corporations made their cases. Murray led an effort among her Democratic colleagues in the Senate to file an amicus brief supporting the federal government’s position against Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood. For Murray, this isn’t the first time she’s had to stand up for women’s health care. “There are people who will try and take advantage of any law, any situation to try and take away a woman’s right to make her own health care decisions, and they’re using the Affordable Care Act to do that, just like they have with the budget, just as they’ve used many other pieces of legislation here to do that,” she says.

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INLANDER: You galvanized lawmakers to file an amicus brief siding with the Affordable Care Act’s contraceptive mandate. Why was it important that you show your support to the Supreme Court? MURRAY: I feel very strongly that women, not their insurance companies, not their boss, not the CEO of the company and certainly not their shareholders, should be deciding a woman’s personal health care. What’s at stake here? Well, certainly, it would mean that if you’re going to go apply for a job and you want your personal health care covered, you better check out what shareholders believe in before you apply for that job. That to me is a huge consequence. But secondarily, someone could argue that other coverage is considered religiously affiliated. Whether it’s covering immunizations or it’s covering HIV care, it is a very slippery slope to say that someone could say that their religion pre-empts a woman’s right to have her own health care coverage on a long list of things. Hobby Lobby and Conestoga Wood are arguing that the health care law violates their rights under the Religious Freedom Restoration Act of 1993. Why doesn’t the act apply to these businesses? I was here when that bill was passed; it had nothing to do with giving the rights to an employer to make health care decisions for women, and I can’t believe anyone would extend that thought today. To those of us who voted for that at that time, that was never an interpretation that we debated, discussed, offered or considered. So I do not believe that that legislation should be an excuse to not uphold the rights of women in the affordable health care law. You’ve called the Affordable Care Act “one of the most significant pieces of legislation for women in our lifetimes.” Why’s that? Before the affordable health care law passed, insurance companies legally could charge women more for their health insurance than they charged men. Before the health insurance coverage was put into place, women could be charged or denied coverage because of pre-existing conditions. Most conditions women have, whether it’s pregnancy or other issues related to their personal health care, are considered pre-existing conditions. So the insurance laws as they stood before the affordable health care [law] discriminated against women, and the health care law overturned that, so as a woman, you cannot be denied health care.  deannap@inlander.com

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The Eyeball Economy In defense of clickbait (or pandering with Macklemore and Ryan Lewis) BY SCOTT A. LEADINGHAM

T

20 INLANDER APRIL 3, 2014

o begin, a short quiz: What’s a better way to open this article? A) One man’s trash is another man’s treasure. B) One man’s trash is another man’s comeup. Answer: Who cares? We’re going with the one that obviously is better, and that’s the one invoking a lyric from Macklemore and Ryan Lewis’ hit song “Thrift Shop.” That’s right, I said Macklemore and Lewis. In fact, I’ll say it again. Macklemore and Lewis. Macklemore and Lewis. Thrift Shop. Thrift Shop. Thrift Shop. With any luck, that overuse of Macklemore and Lewis (which, again, is referencing their hit song “Thrift Shop”) will help this article rank higher in search results when people search online for “Thrift Shop” (which, ANALYSIS by the way, is a hit song by THE LEADING EDGE Macklemore and Lewis). This, in turn, will make the Inlander very happy, because more people will click on this story online, which will increase the Inlander’s web traffic, which will make the value of advertising with the Inlander increase, which means everyone will get more money (except, of course, me, whose starving-writer income won’t allow him to attend Macklemore and Ryan Lewis concerts — events at which they perform their hit

song “Thrift Shop.”) Congratulations. You now know the basic economics behind running a news and media company in the digital age. Get ready to launch your website and mobile app. And for Pete’s sake, keep the cat videos handy. Nothing drives traffic to your website like cat videos. (Or better yet, cat videos parodying Macklemore and Lewis’ “Thrift Shop,” which, yes, actually exist.) It’s easy for the general public to roll their eyes when news outlets promote and repurpose the latest “viral video.” Just watch the end of most local TV newscasts for the “lighthearted segment” of whatever trend is sweeping the Internet that week. (Remember the “Harlem Shake” craze? God help us.) Or look at the website of any news outlet — from the Spokesman-Review to KREM to CNN — and you’ll quickly find stories (er, “content”) that is anything but real news. Case in point: KREM’s photo slide show titled “Miami Beach Police release photos of Justin Bieber’s tattoos” (Dear Lord, I hope there’s a unicorn!) or the Spokesman’s Paul Turner asking a question about analog clocks under the headline “When anal is the way to go.” The Inlander also engages in such non-news promotion online with its “Cat Friday” blog. Cats are no doubt cute, but they’re hardly newsworthy, even when they’re stuck in trees. I’m not a media critic, though some people


Eastern Washington University and the Daniel and Margaret Carper Foundation present

An evening with Robert Sapolsky, PhD Thursday, April 24, 2014, 7 p.m. The Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, Spokane Join us as Robert Sapolsky makes a rare appearance in Spokane to share his intriguing experiences and research on human stress.

Which Golden Girl are you? Take the quiz! may think I play one on Twitter. It’s not unusual to find me bemoaning headlines promoted by CNN or The Weather Channel that have seemingly nothing to do with news or weather. (One recent top story from The Weather Channel: “Man Treats Snake Bite With Beer. What Happens Next Will Surprise You.”) These kinds of headlines are broadly known as “clickbait,” for obvious reasons. They’re so mind-numbingly dumb, they’re impossible to ignore. “Old-school” news outlets increasingly devote more time and space to them online. As someone who often decries the practice, I’m wary to defend it. But it’s defensible for news outlets in this age where long-term sustainability depends on collecting short-term digital dimes. Welcome to the eyeball (or “page view”) economy. For example, look at BuzzFeed, the startup news and information site perhaps known more for its silly (and easily sharable) lists and quizzes than for hard-hitting journalism (which, indeed, is very present too). The site’s “Which Golden Girl Are You?” quiz had nearly 1.6 million page views after only 10 days online. (For the record, I got Sophia. Perfect!) BuzzFeed’s very good, in-depth journalism is laudable. It’s just not profitable, especially as a web-only outlet. It needs these kinds of mindless, viral, pop-culture quizzes and other “lowbrow” content to support the high-end journalism. That’s true for BuzzFeed, and it’s true for nearly every general interest news outlet, including local ones. Advertisers pay based on eyeballs, or the “potential” for eyeballs. If there’s one thing the general population demands from media, it’s sugary, fatty, unhealthy “news.” The vegetables of hard news and investigative reporting are still secondary in the typical American’s news diet. Another reason clickbait can’t be wholly dismissed is that it’s so relative. A celebrity story may seem tawdry to some people (myself included), but others have genuine interest in Justin Bieber’s life (a sentence I know I’ll regret typing). News outlets have to give people not only what they need, but what they want. Their business models depend on it. After all, one man’s trash is another man’s ... er ... come-up. Just ask Macklemore and Ryan Lewis. It’s in some song. You can Google it.  Scott A. Leadingham is director of education for the Society of Professional Journalists and editor of its magazine, Quill.

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CannaBiz Forum

NEWS | POLICE

What does Initiative 502 mean for Spokane? When Washington voters approved Initiative 502, they launched a massive experiment. Come hear from three experts about the challenges and opportunities ahead as this marketplace takes form. Each panelist will make a presentation and then take questions from the audience.

Meet the Panelists MATT COHEN

A pioneer in the medical cannabis movement, Cohen spent more than a decade as a medical marijuana grower in California’s Mendocino County. Despite working within county and state law, Cohen’s farm was raided by armed federal agents in 2011 - an event documented by PBS’s Frontline. Cohen was also featured in Doug Fine’s 2012 book, Too High To Fail. Cohen served as the expert on production issues for the Washington State Liquor Control Board as it wrote regulations to enact I-502. Today he is the founder & CEO of TriQ Systems, a software, equipment & supply company; he is currently consulting for clients in Washington.

RANDY SIMMONS

Named the “ganja guru” by the Seattle Times for his depth of knowledge, Simmons spent 23 years in the private sector before joining the Liquor Control Board in 2002. Since last year, Simmons has been the agency’s deputy director, leading 11 different research teams as the state has grappled with creating – nearly from scratch – a regulated cannabis marketplace that is expected to reach into the hundreds of millions of dollars in annual sales.

HILARY BRICKEN

For her expertise in the emerging legal field of cannabis regulation compliance, Bricken was named “Marijuana Industry Attorney of the Year” by Dope magazine. Bricken is with the Seattle-based Canna Law Group and has helped Washington state clients navigate the murky legal issues surrounding legal cannabis, from land use disputes to intellectual property rights to tax and banking issues. She has also consulted with the Liquor Control Board on I-502 implementation.

Wednesday | April 16 | 7pm The Bing Crosby Theater 901 W. Sprague, Spokane

The CannaBiz Forum is FREE & Open to the Public For more information visit Inlander.com/cannabiz

22 INLANDER APRIL 3, 2014

Cellphone video captured the violent encounter between Corkery and Spokane police.

Video Witness

A bystander’s cellphone video contributes to “clarification” in a deadly officer-involved shooting BY JACOB JONES

S

tephen C. Corkery takes about two steps quently fired their out his front door, arms swinging lightly at weapons.” his sides with what appears to be a gun in Investigative one hand, when five Spokane Police officers fire records from the off at least 14 shots. Amid the echoing volley of Washington State gunfire, Corkery crumples to the lawn before the Patrol indicate detecfront door even has time to close. tives recovered 14 “Oh my god!” a woman cries. “Oh my god!” bullet casings from “Why would you shoot him?” someone asks five police officers’ from off screen in witness video of the shooting. weapons. Eleven Many new details have emerged in the days shells were listed since Spokane officers fatally shot Corkery on as .223-caliber rifle March 26, which may be largely due to that Stephen C. Corkery rounds commonly bystander’s cellphone video of Corkery’s final used in AR-15-style moments — footage that contradicted aspects of tactical rifles. Three the initial police accounts and likely contributed others came from .45-caliber weapons. to SPD officials issuing on Monday a clarified Search warrant records indicate Corkery was statement regarding what happened. armed with a black, CO2-propelled pellet gun. WSP investigators confirm the pellet gun was the “Through the course of an investigation,” the only weapon recovered from the home. clarification states, “as new information is made Following subsequent investigation, detecavailable and additional witnesses are intertives report they have found additional evidence viewed, it is the commitment of SPD to clarify linking Corkery to robberies at a North Monroe information originally presented, if and when a Baskin-Robbins and a tanning salon. Investigaclarification is necessary.” tors say Corkery had previously written out Investigators say detectives had linked the letters claiming responsibility for the 30-year-old Corkery to a string of crimes and apologizing to his family. A recent robberies and tracked him friend turned those notes over to detecto a home along West Grace Street. tives. As officers surrounded the small Send comments to The Spokane Police Department has house shortly after 6:30 pm, Corkery editor@inlander.com. not yet released the names of the officers reportedly came to the doorway and involved in the shooting. Detectives with spent about 10 minutes speaking the multi-agency Spokane Investigative Regional with negotiators through a screen door. He then Response Team have taken over the shooting stepped out. investigation under the lead of the WSP. While initial police reports suggested officers With the latest shooting, SIRR investigators continued to negotiate with Corkery after he have now responded to four officer-involved stepped out onto the front porch, the witness shootings in the Spokane area in the past three video shows multiple officers opening fire less months. In addition to Corkery, Spokane County than two seconds after Corkery emerges from Sheriff’s deputies also fatally shot 23-year-old the home. Officers can be heard quickly shoutJedadiah Zillmer on Feb. 11. Two other non-fatal ing “Drop it!” or “Don’t do it!” before being shootings occurred in January and early March. drowned out by gunfire. The SIRR team was also recently called to “The suspect refused to comply with the Stevens County where they will investigate a officers directives to drop the gun,” the clarified detective’s fatal shooting of an armed suspect on account states. “Officers believed the individual March 25. All five shooting investigations remain posed a threat to the safety of the community open. n and to the safety of other officers and subse-

LETTERS


NEWS | POLICE

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Changes to the Office of Police Ombudsman have officially taken effect. Now what? few days after major changes to the Office of Police Ombudsman legally took effect, significant unfinished work remains ahead. The new contract between the city and the Spokane Police Guild and an ordinance passed by the Spokane City Council earlier this year give the ombudsman more authority, but for much of the change to begin, the city must appoint the five-member commission now charged with overseeing the ombudsman. Under the new model, most of the ombudsman’s investigations will continue to happen within the department’s own Internal Affairs process. In addition, he can issue closing reports summarizing complaints and the commission can call for further investigation if the ombudsman believes the department didn’t sufficiently investigate a complaint against an officer. What remains unclear is who will make up the commission — members will be appointed by the mayor and city council — and whether the city can get members appointed and in place by August, when current ombudsman Tim Burns’ contract expires. (The ordinance says only that the commission may renew his contract or hire a new ombudsman, so the city council would have to change the law if it wants to extend his contract.) Burns and others say they’re worried that rushing the process could result in a commission that’s not diverse or skilled enough for the role it will have. “Ultimately the commission will be the pulse of the community as it relates to perception [of the police],” Burns says. “This is really going to help define public safety in the city and the region. We can’t rush to choose people to simply fill a position.” To consider specifics of who should be sought out for the commission, Mayor David

g Chewin as o c c a Tob low as

Condon told the Inlander on Monday that City Attorney Nancy Isserlis is leading a new workgroup to hash out details. The group will discuss things like whether commission members should undergo background checks and whether there should be specific “slots” to fill, like ensuring certain members have backgrounds in certain areas or represent a specific race. But when asked, both Councilman Jon Snyder, head of the council public safety committee, and Julie Schaffer from the Center for Justice, an outspoken voice for police oversight, said they’d heard nothing about such a workgroup. “I’m hopeful, but I’m still concerned that a lot goes on behind closed doors that should be public process,” Schaffer says. “This supposed stakeholder group we didn’t even know about is just another example.” The ombudsman office has been at the center of heated debate and disillusionment with the Spokane Police Department since its inception in 2008. Over the years, closed-door contract negotiations and state arbitration decisions had rendered the office nearly toothless. While this latest agreement disappointed some oversight advocates in town, others called it a workable compromise. Schaffer says her group is eager to “make the most out of what we have.” To get started, Snyder suggested opening the application process for the commission from April 1-30, but other councilmembers felt that was an unrealistic timeline. Snyder says the application window will open in the coming weeks, but he’s not sure when or how long it will be open. “Just this last week we had a critical incident,” Snyder says. “You never know when these incidents are going to happen, so you want your whole infrastructure in place.”  heidig@inlander.com

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APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 23


IT’S TIME TO

GET LIT! Each spring since 1998, Eastern Washington University has worked to condense all the literary wonder APRIL 7 - APRIL 13 of the Inland Northwest — and beyond — into a few days around Spokane. This year’s iteration of the event features a well-balanced array of writers

THURSDAY, APRIL 3 EWU ALUMNI READING

Hosted as part of the EWU Alumni Association’s Young Professionals series, this event features short readings from alumni with a wide range of writing backgrounds and careers. Featured writers: Asa Maria Bradley, Aimee R. Cervenka, Scott Eubanks, Liz Rognes and Shawn Vestal. $5$8, pre-registration requested. Ages 21+. Thu, April 3, from 5-7 pm. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 303 W. North River Dr.

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from disciplines ranging from poetry to novels to young adult fiction and travel writing. It’s OK if you’ve never heard of some of these folks. We can help you get acquainted, and maybe even help you with your spring and summer reading lists.

MONDAY, APRIL 7 STATE OF OUR LITERARY UNION: SPOKANE

Spokane Poet Laureate Thom Caraway gives a talk highlighting local events and organizations in literary arts, and how aspiring or established writers can get involved. The Spokane Public Library also hosts a “blackout” poetry activity. Free. Mon, April 7, at 4 pm. Downtown Library, 906 W. Main.

— MIKE BOOKEY, section editor

TUESDAY, APRIL 8 BEACON HILL READING SERIES

Prose and poetry reading featuring Spokane poet Dennis Held, Spokane writer Leyna Krow and Gonzaga visiting instructor Claire McQuerry. Mon, April 7, from 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Hagan Foundation Center at SCC, 1810 N. Greene, Bldg. 16.

SPOKANE SHORTIES COMING OUT PARTY

Release of the collection featuring short works by 36 Inland Northwest writers, including Jess Walter, Shann Ray, Chris Cook, Tod Marshall, Sharma Shields, Kim Barnes, Thom Caraway, Nance Van Winckel and others. Proceeds from the sale of the collection, available to purchase ($8) during the festival, benefit Get Lit!. Free to attend. Tue, April 8, from 4:30-6:30 pm. Saranac Public House, 21 W. Main.

FROM PAGE TO STAGE

Literary readings are performed and directed by local actors and directors, based on selections from Willow Springs, EWU’s literary arts magazine. This event is co-organized by the Writer and Actor Collaborative. Free. Tue, April 8, at 8 pm. The Big Dipper, 171 S. Washington.


THE RENEGADE

William T. Vollmann on love, violence and why the FBI thought he might be the Unabomber BY E.J. IANNELLI

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illiam T. Vollmann has written more than 20 books, both fiction and nonfiction, on a range of topics that include, but are nowhere near limited to, the Inuit, Noh theater, insects, prostitutes and the mujahideen. His seven-volume Rising Up and Rising Down (2003) attempted to establish a moral calculus for violence, and Riding Toward Everywhere (2008) documented his experience as a train-hopper. In a recent essay, “Life as a Terrorist,” Vollmann described reading his own heavily redacted FBI file, which indicated that he had been identified as a Unabomber suspect. INLANDER: It’s often noted that violence is a recurring theme in your work. It’s noted so often, in fact, that you might question its accuracy. Does it hold true? VOLLMANN: Violence is one of the fundamental expressions of human nature. So of course it’s a recurring theme in my work, and so is sex, so is love, and so is — a normal, let’s say — death. All these things are just human characteristics. My latest bunch of ghost stories, some of them are gruesome, a lot of them are creepy and disturbing; but as Tolstoy said in The Death of Ivan Ilyich, we all come to it in the end. Those people who say that violence is a recurring theme in my work may be right. Because, of course, I’m probably the last person to know my own obsessions. Discussing Rising Up, Rising Down, you said that violence can be beautiful. You’ve also said, using a violent simile, that “written words are like bullets that I’m shooting at death.” Do those factors

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9 TEEN POETRY SLAM

Poetry performance event for readers ages 16-18; open to individuals and teams. Wed, April 9, at 6:30 pm, registration at 6 pm. Free; canned food drive donations accepted. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague.

COLLEGE POETRY SLAM

Poetry performance event open to college students of any age; individuals and teams welcome. Wed, April 9, following the teen poetry slam. Registration at 6:30 pm. Free, canned food drive donations accepted. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague.

work together to make writing an act of violence? That would probably give writing more power than it has, unfortunately. Literature is something that speaks only to those who want to listen. There are times, maybe, when a writer can change the world in some political way, like Uncle Tom’s Cabin or The Jungle, that those books are acts of violence, that they are used by people to mobilize other people to fight this or that. But mostly I think writing is not really an action. If we trace violence to its root causes in your work, it frequently leads back to power and authority — the abuse of power, the indiscriminate exercise of authority. Would you describe yourself as anti-authoritarian? Yes, I do, and I’m very proud to say that I do. If you’ve ever read [America and Americans by John Steinbeck], he said that the average American has a very, very profound distrust of authority. And one of the most frightening things about current American society is that we are being seduced into thinking that we have to have eternal surveillance by institutions — as opposed to by people — for the sake of safety, and therefore we shouldn’t be complaining about being spied on and about our liberties being abridged. Does that have particular resonance for you, given that the FBI pegged you as a Unabomber suspect? The reality of it is that I wasn’t really a victim in this. In a way, as the saying goes, the system works, because I was never arrested, sentenced to prison, tortured, anything like that, as I might

have been in some other country. But, you know, my concerns were never about me. I was thinking about what this means for others, and as I said in my article [in Harper’s], maybe if my first name were Mohammed instead of Bill, I might not have had the good outcome that I had. On a lighter note, do you still ride the boxcars, as you documented in Riding Toward Everywhere? Every now and then, yeah. Actually, when I was in Spokane a few years ago, I was stopped in the yard and cited, and the railroad bull followed me out of there. But, yeah, maybe someday I’ll come blowing into Spokane again. Probably not this time [for the Get Lit! festival]. Of course, riding the boxcars is not necessarily a way to save money. If you get a $300 fine, for instance, it’s a lot cheaper to have ridden the Greyhound. You mentioned ghost stories at the outset. That’s a forthcoming book?

It’s called Last Stories and Other Stories. It’s coming out in July. And why ghost stories? I started thinking about death a lot after my father died. One of the nice things about a supernatural story is that you can personify some aspect of death. So some of my stories are about the legacies that people receive as a result of death, some are about attempts to cheat death, and some of them are stories about attachment in the Japanese sense. In our culture, ghosts can be sort of frightening, and in this other culture, ghosts are more appealing and sad. It’s kind of interesting to mix the two, and as I said, it’s almost an infinite subject, so why not write a book about it?  In Conversation with Anthony Doerr and William T. Vollmann • Fri, April 11, 7 pm • $15, students free with ID • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague Avenue

FRIDAY, APRIL 11

THURSDAY, APRIL 10 YOUTH POETRY SLAM

Poetry performance event for readers ages 5-12; open to individuals and teams. Thu, April 10, at 5:30 pm, registration at 5 pm. Free, canned food drive donations accepted. Kress Gallery at River Park Square, third floor, 808 W. Main.

MIDDLE SCHOOL POETRY SLAM

Poetry performance event for readers ages 13-15; open to individuals and teams. Thu, April 10, at 6:30 pm, registration at 6 pm. Free, canned food drive donations accepted. Kress Gallery at River Park Square, third floor, 808 W. Main.

3RD ANNUAL PIE AND WHISKEY READING

The popular event hosted by Sam Ligon and Katie Lebo returns, featuring festival authors reading flash fiction, nonfiction and poetry inspired by two quotes. Featuring Anthony Doerr, Adrianne Harun, Jonathan Johnson, Katie Lebo, Sam Ligon, Kate Reed, Sharma Shields, Alexandra Teague, Jess Walter and Maya Zeller. Free admission. Ages 21+. Thu, April 10, at 8:15 pm. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth.

THE AMERICAN LANDSCAPE: THE ROLE OF PLACE IN POETRY

Panel featuring poets Siobhan Scarry, Kate Lebo and Alice Derry on the topic of establishing a sense of place in poetry, moderated by Laura Read. Free. Fri, April 11, at 9:30 am. Spokane Falls Community College, Bldg. 24, Rm. 110.

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APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 25


GET LIT!

THE PEOPLE’S POET George Bilgere will make you love poetry BY LEAH SOTTILE

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here are no crystal-clear ponds, no peaceful sanctuaries where waters lap at George Bilgere’s toes, or moments when a jolt of Thoreauvian inspiration strikes him and a poem falls out of his brain. No, Bilgere finds poetry in the most mundane of places: the checkout line at the supermarket, an everyday walk across the college campus where he works. He finds poetry in the ordinary, the usual, the most normal and forgettable of moments. His ability to find art in the most regular of places has made Bilgere something of a celebrity in poetry circles, and also among people who might not ever consider reading poetry on their own — the folks who, as he says, attend his readings “under duress.”

When Bilgere reads or talks about poetry, it’s quite entertaining. He takes that ability to the airwaves on a radio show called “Wordplay,” where he and co-host John Donoghue argue and generally nerd out about poems. They’ve even been called the “Click and Clack of poetry.” We got on the phone with Bilgere to talk about finding art in the ordinary, reading aloud and frickin’ kids these days. INLANDER: I just listened to a reading of your poem “Bridal Shower,” in which you talk about being present with others in real life. As someone actively trying to unplug from the technology age, I have to say that resonated with me.

FRIDAY, APRIL 11 BEDTIME STORIES

A reprise of the 2013 Humanities Washington event, featuring an intimate conversation with local writers Sharma Shields and Shawn Vestal, moderated by Andrea Reid, co-director of the Hagan Foundation for the Humanities. Free. Fri, April 11, at 9:30 am and 10:30 am (two sessions). Hagan Foundation Center at SCC, 1810 N. Greene, Bldg. 16.

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BILGERE: I think that poem was just sort of forced into existence by pressure — the unbearable pressure of technology around us that threatens to drive sane people nuts, especially older people for whom this has all happened kind of abruptly. I teach at this university in Cleveland called John Carroll University. It’s a nice, quiet, sleepy little school in a quiet, sleepy suburb of Cleveland. I once described it as an island of serenity in a sea of serenity. I walked across the quad to have lunch one day and, I kid you not, the first 20 human beings I saw … were all staring at their phones. I made it to 20 until I saw one desperate kid who didn’t have a phone. I wanted to hug him and say ‘You’re alive!’

SATURDAY, APRIL 12 STRANGERS IN A STRANGE LAND

Fiction writing panel featuring David Abrams, Adrianne Harun and Nathan Oates, moderated by Jonathan Frey. Fri, April 11, at noon. Free. North Idaho College, Meyer Health & Sciences Bldg., Rm. 102, Coeur d’Alene.

POETRY SALON

Salons originated in 18th century France as informal gatherings centered around discussions of art, literature and philosophy. This event features readings from and discussions with featured poets Jonathan Johnson, Alice Derry, Brooke Matson, Susan Rich and Siobhan Scarry. Free. Fri, April 11, at 9 pm. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague.

WORKSHOP: RANTS, ODES AND IMAGES

Poetry writing workshop led by George Bilgere, examining techniques of contemporary poets by writing poems around a central physical image. $20/student, $30/non-student. Sat, April 12, from 9:30-11:30 am. Spokane Convention Center, Rm. 203.

MINING LANGUAGE FOR MEANING

Poetry writing workshop with Alice Derry, incorporating specific pre-selected words into a new poem. Sat, April 12, from 9:30-11:30 am. $20/student, $30/non-student. Spokane Convention Center, Rm. 202B.


You’re a poet. And you’re on the radio. Neither of those media are exactly hot right now… You’re right. Poetry, of all the literary genres, is the least popular, other than probably tax forms. And if you mention the word “radio” to my students, they don’t even know what that is. It’s a weird thing to be a poet, but I think if everybody was writing poetry I wouldn’t want to be doing it. As someone once said to me, “George, you excel at things no one gives a shit about.” That is kind of true. You take on these small, endangered species of literary forms, you feel like you’re sort of entrusted with keeping them alive. [Poetry] may not be popular, but it is the oldest literary form. It’s a good living and you get to do something you really love.

For generations, you’ve worked to get more for your doar…

But your poetry isn’t exactly traditional. There’s kind of a handful of us that are the “funny serious” poets. Here’s what happens when I give a reading somewhere: you get a bunch of people, they’re at the reading, and half of them are there under duress. Wives who have dragged their husbands. And then I will read a poem like “Bridal Shower” that is suddenly surprisingly funny, and they’re so grateful. Most people go to poetry readings like they go to church. You’re not going to like it, but you know it’s good for you. Talk a little bit about finding inspiration in the ordinary. I’m no mystical poet. I’m not a poet who directly writes about spiritual or transcendental experiences. But the exciting thing to me is discovering the poetry of the ordinary. It’s the world around you that is miraculous. I’m 62 years old and I just became the oldest first-time Dad. I have a 1-year-old, and he will sit on the carpet and look at a little piece of lint with fascination. You will put an ice cube in his hand and he will be astounded. We forget that these are the miraculous things around us. It’s the job of the poet to remind you, through a freshness of language, that the world is a really much more interesting place than what’s on your video screen. It’s not that I want everyone to go out and be a poet, but I do want to remind them about the power of language. … My students communicate more and more in little language bursts called texts. They’re a little like poetry. They’re so compressed.

With green stamps, coupons, sales and loyalty programs – you made each dollar work harder.

Have you asked them to think of their texts as poetry? I have! I asked them to take a look at the texts you got… yesterday and take the best 10 and just write them down on the page as a poem. And you get some really weird, interesting, fascinating stuff. Accidental, found poetry.  George Bilgere with Nance Van Winckel • Sun, April 13, at 11:30 am • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • $15; free for youth and students • outreach.ewu.edu/getlit • 3596447

STORYTELLING IS NEAT: LIFE IS SLOPPY

Writing workshop with author Perry Glasser, focusing on how to tell a story that is neat, compelling and lifelike, whether for fiction or memoir pieces. Sat, April 12, from 9:30-11:30 am. $20/student, $30/non-student. Spokane Convention Center, Rm. 202C.

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EVERYONE IS A WRITER

This workshop hosted by the EWU Writers Center invites those with military experience or connections to explore ways their stories can be told through various styles. Sat, April 12, from 9:30-11:30 am. Free. Spokane Convention Center, Rm. 206B.

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GET LIT!

FEAR ON THE HIGHWAY Adrianne Harun brings terror and intrigue to rural Canada with A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain BY MIKE BOOKEY

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f you’re traveling in northern British Columbia, you might see a sign that reads CAUTION. GIRLS DON’T HITCHHIKE ON THE HIGHWAY OF TEARS. KILLER ON THE LOOSE! At the sign’s bottom are pictures of women who have been either killed or gone missing on this mostly desolate stretch of road between Prince Rupert and Prince George. Estimates vary, but as many as 43 women have been lost on this highway since 1969, many of them poor aboriginal women with no transportation options other than to hitchhike. Some have accused authorities of being apathetic regarding the crimes over the years as the phenomenon gained media attention, including magazine stories and documentaries. Author Adrianne Harun, who lives in Port Townsend, Wash., is married to a Canadian, so there was an added intrigue when she first heard about it in an NPR story. Years later, after traveling in that area of British Columbia, her fascination with the Highway of Tears led her to write about the horrific phenomenon. The result is A Man Came Out of a Door in the Mountain (“When I turned in the novel, I kept waiting for them to call me back asking for the real title. They never did,” she says of the book’s title). It’s a wildly imaginative, dynamically structured novel

set among the same mountain towns the Highway of Tears snakes through. The disappearance of young aboriginal women is at the center of the novel, but it also digs deep into family issues and friendship. “The whole goal was to shed a little light on [the murders] and make this emotionally felt, and do what I wanted from there,” says Harun, calling while on a break from a hectic promotional tour after the book was released in late February. While Door in the Mountain is impactful in its depictions of violence toward women, perhaps surprisingly it’s viewed through the eyes of Leo, a teenage boy and the smartest of a listless group of friends — both boys and girls — who spend their time shooting rats at the dump and witnessing the dire circumstances suffered by some of their neighbors in their remote Canadian town. Leo lives with his mother (his absentee dad works as an engineer in the oil fields) and his Uncle Lud, who is quite ill but well enough to offer Leo a constant flow of mythic stories, including the notion that the devil has come to town to snatch away these young women. “I decided not to second-guess anything,” says Harun of her choice to make a young man the narrator. “I wasn’t going to be able to write about the Highway of Tears. There was no way I was going

SATURDAY, APRIL 12 PERFORMANCE POETRY WORKSHOP

Learn more about what performance poetry is and how to get involved in the growing, local slam poetry scene in a workshop with local poet Mark Anderson. Free. Sat, April 12, from 9:3011:30 am. Spokane Convention Center, Rm. 205.

THE READING PUBLIC

Showcase featuring three Inland Northwest writers, along with a public open-mic session. Featured writers are Mark Anderson,

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Kris Dinnison and Travis Laurence Naught. Sat, April 12, at 11:30 am. Free. Spokane Convention Center, Conference Theater.

FINDING YOUR CHARACTER’S VOICE IN YA FICTION

Young adult literature authors Jill Malone, Trent Reedy, Leslye Walton and Rachel Toor discuss how they develop believable voices for their characters. Free. Sat, April 12, from noon-1:30 pm. Spokane Convention Center, Rm. 206A.

A BRAVE NEW WORLD: FINDING YOUR PATH TO PUBLICATION IN TODAY’S MARKET

Authors Rebecca Zanetti, Danica Winters and Shoshanna Evers lead a panel on the many options for authors to publish their work, including the pros and cons of various methods. Free. Sat, April 12, from noon-1:30 pm. Spokane Convention Center, Rm. 205.

FROM SPARK TO FIRE

Authors Jack Nisbet, Nancy D. Engle, Paul Lindholdt and Mary Cronk Farrell discuss solutions to common difficulties in nonfiction writing, including narrative structure, dealing with mistakes and dead-end research. Free. Sat, April 12, from 1:45-3 pm. Spokane Convention Center, Rm. 206B.

POETS OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

Three regional poets discuss how living and writing in the Inland Northwest has influenced and impacted their writing, and re-

sources to aid other local poets. Free. Sat, April 12, from 1:45-3 pm. Spokane Convention Center, Rm. 206C.

SENSE OF PLACE AND SETTING IN FICTION

Workshop with author David Abrams on creating a believable setting without using overwrought sentiments and empty descriptions. Sat, April 12, from 3:30-5:30 pm. $20/student, $30/ non-student. Spokane Convention Center, Rm. 202A.


to co-opt the stories of the victims and their families. So, I thought, ‘OK, this is where it’s going, and Leo is such a large-hearted boy with this amazing voice.’” The novel is spooky enough to have drawn the attention of certain mystery and horror genre websites, but most of that comes from the storytelling that goes on between Lud, Leo and the rest of the characters. There’s also the eerie backdrop of these missing women, out-of-place newcomers to town and the looming smoke of a nearby — and threatening — wildfire, but it’s these yarns, often set apart in individual chapters, that get under the skin. The stories-within-stories concept came naturally for Harun, she says. “I would always tell these extravagant lies to my kids. You’re trying to get them to do something different, and so you make up these people who did what they’re doing and something awful happened,” she says of raising her two sons, both now out of college. This storytelling came before Harun’s career as a novelist. She didn’t take writing seriously until well into adulthood; before that, Harun, the daughter of a doctor, worked a string of “lowlife” jobs including overnight telephone dispatching. To this day, her husband owns and operates an auto shop in Port Townsend. Harun decided in her 30s to get an MFA in creative writing. During her time in that program she wrote much of what would become, years later, stories for her 2002 collection The King of Limbo. At work on another novel these days, she’s also answering a lot of questions about Door in the Mountain. People seem curious about how a piece of literary fiction could wind through so many genres. Some might say “horror” or “thriller” aren’t apt genre descriptions here — you’d be better off leaning toward “magical realism.” Whatever you call it, the book is unsettling at times but never loses your attention. For Harun, the spookiness is part of the book’s feminist angle. “It’s always spooky for women. There’s always these feelings of places where you shouldn’t go, and you have to have a different sense of watchfulness than what your brothers or sons might have,” she says. “This is a reality of the Highway of Tears, and that’s what I try to get across in the book. What’s scarier? That [feeling] or the devil?”  Adrianne Harun • Thu, April 10, at 7 pm • Auntie’s • 402 W. Main • Also reading at Pie & Whiskey • 8:15 pm • Woman’s Club of Spokane • 1428 W. Ninth Ave. • Both free

WRITING FOR A LIVING

Writer C.B. Bernard leads a workshop on different approaches and opportunities for writers who want to devote themselves to their craft on a full-time basis. Sat, April 12, from 3:30-5:30 pm. $20/student, $30/non-student. Spokane Convention Center, Rm. 202B.

SPEAKING PICTURES: A POETRY WORKSHOP CONCERNING VISUAL ART Creative writing and poetry workshop led by Susan Rich, us-

ing description and observation to write poems about works of art. Sat, April 12, from 3:30-5:30 pm. $20/student, $30/nonstudent. Spokane Convention Center, Rm. 202C.

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HIGH CONCEPT: WHAT IS IT, HOW TO GET IT, AND WHY IT’S NOT ENOUGH

Interactive workshop for fiction writers with author Maureen McQuerry on how to be effective when writing for mass appeal. Sat, April 12, from 3:30-5:30 pm. $20/student, $30/non-student. Spokane Convention Center, Rm. 203. Events continued on next page

APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 29


GET LIT!

SENSE OF PLACE In Alaska, C.B. Bernard found his life intersecting with the explorations of a relative a century earlier BY LISA WAANANEN

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hortly after C.B. Bernard took a job in Alaska in 1999, he found out that a distant relative had gone to explore the Arctic frontier a century earlier. It turned out that explorer, Captain Joe Bernard, was buried in a sprawling cemetery so close to Bernard’s rented home that, when he found the grave, he could look back through his window and clearly read the numbers on his alarm clock. From there, he followed the legacy of Uncle Joe — who, Bernard says, “connected with the Arctic when he was young and never let go” — through the “geographic hyperbole” of Alaska’s forests, islands and waters. Bernard says that he knew he wanted to write the story as soon as he found out about the family connection, but it took years of hunting down Arctic research spread out across the continent before the framework came together. Chasing Alaska: A Portrait of the Last Frontier Then and Now was published last May. It’s easy to draw a crowd for a book reading in, say, New England, where Bernard’s family is from — “I just say things like ‘Bears! Whales!’ and they all applaud,” he says — but Bernard was apprehensive at first about how the book would be received in the state it’s about. He knew that Alaskans can bristle if outsiders over-romanticize their state, so he tried to choose angles that would resonate with both those who consider Alaska exotic and those who consider it home. “Alaska’s such a big place,” Bernard

SUNDAY, APRIL 13 REGIONAL MFA READING Featuring graduate Master of Fine Arts students from the University of Idaho, University of Montana and Eastern Washington University. Free. Sun, April 13, from 2-4 pm, Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave.

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INLAND NORTHWEST FACULTY READING

Readings by creative writing faculty at regional colleges and universities, hosted by EWU. Featured writers: Jonathan Johnson, Polly Buckingham, Sam Ligon, Beth Cooley, Thom Caraway, Gwendolyn James, Tim Greenup, Erin Davis, Shawn Vestal and Natalie Kusz. Free. Sun, April 13, from 4:30-6:30 pm. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad. n

NORTHWEST NARRATIVES T

hose attending the readings, panels and workshops this week during Get Lit! should make sure to look for Spokane Shorties, a new collection of short works by 36 Inland Northwest-based and some once-local writers. The project, spearheaded by local freelance writer Kevin Taylor, also a former Inlander staffer, includes submissions from many featured Get Lit! authors, including Kris Dinnison, Beth Cooley, Jess Walter, Sharma Shields and Thom Caraway. Taylor was inspired to curate the collection, printed by Spokane-based Gray Dog Press, after seeing

says. “You could write a different book about that place each day and never cover it.” Bernard, who wanted to be a writer since he was a child who loved books, considers himself fortunate to have been able to write for a living ever since college. (He’s leading a Get Lit! workshop on how to make a career as a working writer.) He has more nonfiction in the works, but his next book will be a novel. Bernard chased the life of Uncle Joe, but didn’t find for himself such an intense devotion to the Arctic. From the remains he found in Alaska of Uncle Joe’s schooner, Bernard built a boat in Portland, where he now lives, and now gets out on the water — the Willamette, the Columbia, the coastal bays — as much as he can. It’s his third time living among the Northwest’s diverse, varied landscape, and here he’s found a deep connection to place. “It feels like home,” he says. “I think I’m here for the long haul.” n C.B. Bernard and Buddy Levy • Sat, April 12, from 2-3 pm • Free • Spokane Convention Center, Conference Theater, Main Floor • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. Writing for a Living with C.B. Bernard • Sat, April 12, from 3:30-5:30 pm • $30/$20 with student ID • Spokane Convention Center, Room 202B • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd.

writer Steve Almond selling his own mini-books at a past Get Lit!. “I was thinking about how everybody is always saying the Spokane writing scene is so cool, what with the world’s greatest urban density of spoken-word poets and Jess Walter and Shawn Vestal,” Taylor says. “So I thought, wouldn’t it be cool to make a mini-book of Spokane stories?” If the collection’s cover art looks familiar, it’s based on a similar poster print designed by Inlander art director Chris Bovey. Proceeds from the sale of Spokane Shorties ($8) will help fund future Get Lit! programs. After the festival it will be for sale at Atticus Coffee & Gifts and Boo Radley’s. — CHEY SCOTT


FROM MEMORY

Perry Glasser’s book of essays is so meta BY LAURA JOHNSON

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he best time for Perry Glasser to pour his thoughts out on paper is before the sun has had a chance to rise. The writer gets going at 4:30 am — when he’s just left behind the subconscious mindset of sleep. “The phone doesn’t ring then. There are no distractions,” Glasser says over the phone late one afternoon last week. “The only thing I have to do is write.” Whether he’s crafting fiction or not, the process of waking up early and writing for two hours almost daily is a constant. Saturday, he comes to Get Lit! for the first time to read from his 2012 book metamemoirs, a cycle of meta-essays — “In them, I started to write about how they were written, which is why they are meta,” he says. As Glasser, who lives in Haverhill, Mass., explains, “The ruling principle of a memoir is memory,” or how the author recalls events. Glasser says if the book were an autobiography, he would have to do research — fact-check minute details like the exact number of steps up to his childhood home. But his book isn’t all memories; it’s his opinions on broad topics as well. “I tried to expand my experiences to be representative of a larger theme, and I have the arrogance to speak for a generation of people,” says Glasser, who teaches creative and professional writing at Salem (Mass.) State University. For instance, the essay he’s considering reading at Get Lit! begins with his mother in the hospital and ends discussing his distrust of authority and how the Vietnam War affected him. Glasser, who is in the middle of writing a science fiction novel, isn’t the only Get Lit! participant with practice writing memoirs. Eastern Washington University’s MFA professor Natalie Kusz, who wrote Road Song about a near-death experience and growing up in Alaska, will emcee a Sunday evening of readings by fellow Inland Northwest faculty. Authors Paul Lindholdt and Rachel Toor also will share their memoirs at the event. These days, book retailers are saturated with memoirs written by anyone — celebrities in particular. Glasser isn’t so sure that’s the worst thing. “I think the demand has to do with how we understand the world through narratives. We want stories,” Glasser explains. “And if we’re told it’s true and real, then that piques our interest even more.”  Perry Glasser with Paul Lindholdt • Sat, April 12, at 4 pm • Free • Spokane Convention Center, Conference Theater, Main Floor • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd.

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APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 31


A L S O

A T

GET LIT! DAVID ABRAMS Butte, Mont. Abrams’ first book, Fobbit, is a farcical, fictional war story based on his experience writing patriotic press releases while deployed in Baghdad. He contributed to the 2013 anthology Fire and Forget, written by veterans and spouses, and his essays and short stories have appeared in publications including the New York Times, Esquire and Salon. (LISA WAANANEN) Appearing: Fri, April 11, at noon (panel), North Idaho College; Sat, April 12, at 1 pm (reading), Spokane Convention Center DEBORAH AMOS New York City Amos currently covers the Middle East for NPR following years of successful work on television news programs such as ABC’s World News Tonight and PBS’ Frontline. Her stories have covered topics including the rise of a market-driven economy, the condition of Iraqi refugees, and the emerging power of Turkey. (EMERA L. RILEY) Appearing: Wed, April 9, at 7 pm; Spokane Community College THOM CARAWAY Spokane Caraway is Spokane’s first poet laureate, working to bring awareness to the spoken art form in the Inland Northwest. A graduate of Eastern Washington University’s MFA program, he currently teaches at Whitworth University. Among his many accomplishments, he is editor-in-chief of the literary journal Rock & Sling. (LAURA JOHNSON) Appearing: Mon, April 7, at 4 pm, Downtown Spokane Library; Sun, April 13, at 4:30 pm (reading), Barrister Winery ALICE DERRY Port Angeles, Wash. Derry’s latest book of poems, Tremolo, was published in 2011. She taught writing and literature at the college level for more than 35 years and has published seven books of poetry. (CLARKE HUMPHREY) Appearing: Fri, April 11, at 9:30 am (panel), SFCC; Sat, April 12, from 9:30-11:30 am (workshop), Spokane Convention Center

32 INLANDER APRIL 3, 2014

CHITRA DIVAKARUNI Houston Divakaruni’s latest novel, Oleander Girl, was published in 2013 and is an Oprah’s Book Club recommendation. She is the author of many best-selling works and has served as an activist, aiding both South Asian women suffering from abuse and Indian children in their strides toward education. (ER) Appearing: Sat, April 12, at 7 pm, Bing Crosby Theater ANTHONY DOERR Boise, Idaho Doerr is one of the headlining lecturers at this year’s Get Lit! His fifth book, All the Light We Cannot See, will be published in May. He was Idaho’s writer in residence from 2007-10 and his essays have been included in a wide range of prestigious publications. (LJ) Appearing: Thu, April 10, at 8:15 pm (Pie & Whiskey), Woman’s Club of Spokane; Fri, April 11, at 7 pm (reading), Bing Crosby Theater BUDDY LEVY Moscow, Idaho Levy’s work centers around the fascinating topic of history, including his latest nonfiction project, Geronimo: Leadership Strategies of an American Warrior, examining the famous Native American leader. An associate professor of English at WSU, Levy has also co-starred in the History Channel series Decoded and has published several other nonfiction historical accounts. (CHEY SCOTT) Appearing: Sat, April 12, at 2 pm, Spokane Convention Center SAMUEL LIGON Spokane A major player in the Inland Northwest literary scene, Ligon serves as editor of the Willow Springs literary journal while working as a creative writing professor in EWU’s MFA program. He’s the author of the novel Safe in Heaven Dead and Drift and Swerve, a collection of short stories. (MIKE BOOKEY) Appearing: Thu, April 10, at 8:15 pm (host of Pie & Whiskey), Woman’s Club of Spokane; Sun, April 13, at 4:30 pm, Barrister Winery

PAUL LINDHOLDT Spokane An English professor at EWU, Lindholdt’s latest book is an ecological memoir called In Earshot of Water: Notes from the Columbia Plateau, which won a Washington State Book Award in 2012. (CH) Appearing: Sat, April 12, at 1:45 pm (panel); April 12 at 4 pm (reading), Spokane Convention Center JILL MALONE Spokane The latest of Malone’s three published novels, Giraffe People, is a coming-of-age story about a teenage girl who falls in love with her best girlfriend. Her first two award-winning books are A Field Guide to Deception and Red Audrey and the Roping. (CS) Appearing: Sat, April 12, at noon (workshop); Sat, April 12, at 3 pm (reading), Spokane Convention Center BROOKE MATSON Spokane This Gonzaga alumna and teacher’s first full-length poetry collection The Moons was published in 2012. Matson is currently Poet in Residence for RiverLit, the locally published quarterly arts magazine. (CS) Appearing: Fri, April 11, at 9 pm (poetry salon); The Bartlett NATHAN OATES Brooklyn, N.Y. Oates’ collection of short stories, The Empty House, was published in 2012 and won the Spokane Prize. He currently serves as the Director of Creative Writing at Seton Hall University. (ER) Appearing: Fri, April 11, at noon (panel), North Idaho College; Sat, April 12, from 1-2 pm (reading), Spokane Convention Center TRENT REEDY Spokane An Army National Guard veteran of the war in Afghanistan, Reedy was inspired by his experiences overseas to write the acclaimed novel Words in the Dust, a real-life inspired story about a young girl with a cleft palate struggling to adapt to a new Afghanistan. His most recent novel, Divided We Fall, was released in January and is the first in a military trilogy set in the near future. (MB) Appearing: Sat, April 12, at 2 pm (workshop), Spokane Convention Center SUSAN RICH Seattle Rich has written four books of poetry; the most recent, Cloud Pharmacy, was published in February. Her work has appeared in many anthologies, magazines and journals and she currently teaches at the college level in the Seattle area. (CH) Appearing: Sat, April 12, from 3:30-5:30 pm (workshop), Spokane Convention Center ALEX SANCHEZ Thailand/Hollywood, Fla. Sanchez’s work focuses mostly on teens dealing with their sexuality and spirituality. His most recent novel, Boyfriends with Girlfriends,

was published in April 2011. (CH) Appearing: Wed, April 9, at 7 pm, Auntie’s Bookstore SIOBHAN SCARRY Victoria, B.C. This poet released her first collection of work, Pilgrimly, in January. It features her keen observations of the American landscape, which is what she’ll be discussing during her panel appearance at Get Lit! (MB) Appearing: Fri, April 11, at 9:30 am, Spokane Falls Community College GREGORY SPATZ Spokane Spatz’s most recent publication is a collection of short stories, Half as Happy, featuring the author’s trademark character-driven, deeply insightful fiction. In 2012, Spatz released Inukshuk, a novel about a father and son who relocate to a remote northern Canadian town, where the son becomes obsessed with an illfated Arctic expedition. (MB) Appearing: Sat, April 12, at 7 pm, Bing Crosby Theater RACHEL TOOR Spokane Toor writes a bimonthly column for Running Times and is author of the forthcoming young adult novel On The Road to Find Out. She has an MFA from the University of Montana, has written three nonfiction books and is currently a professor of creative writing at EWU. (LJ) Appearing: Sat, April 12, at noon (panel); Sat, April 12, at 2 pm (reading), Spokane Convention Center NANCE VAN WINCKEL Spokane Boneland, a collection of linked and multilayered stories about a Montana family, fossils and loss, was published last year, not long after Pacific Walkers, a book of poetry about unidentified John and Jane Does found dead and an early-1900s photo album found in a secondhand store. Her forthcoming novel, Ever Yrs, is presented in a scrapbook format. (LW) Appearing: Sun, April 13, at 11:30 am, Bing Crosby Theater SHAWN VESTAL Spokane Following Godforsaken Idaho, an acclaimed debut collection of short stories, Vestal published A.K.A. Charles Abbott, a memoir about his father’s crimes, as a Kindle Single. He’s also known for writing about Spokane policy and issues in his day job as a columnist for the Spokesman-Review. (LW) Appearing: Thu, April 3, at 5 pm, Red Lion Hotel at the Park; Fri, April 11, at 9:30 and 10:30 am, Spokane Community College; Sun, April 13, at 4:30 pm, Barrister Winery LESLYE WALTON Seattle Walton’s debut young adult novel, The Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender, was published last month. She holds an MA in writing and teaches middle school in Seattle. (LJ) Appearing: Sat, April 12, at noon (panel); Sat, April 12, at 3 pm (reading), Spokane Convention Center n


Everyday Monets

Local artist and Pinot’s Palette instructor Heather Hoffstetter (above) leads a painting class. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

Creativity and socialization combine in paint-and-sip art classes, where anyone can create a masterpiece BY CHEY SCOTT

“O

K, now about three fingers in from the left side of your canvas, you’re going to make a little dot and that’s where you’ll start your tree,” the instructor says into her mic headset. At a long folding table lined with wooden easels, a trio of young women sit side-by-side in front of nearly identical, bright orange- and yellow-hued canvases, now with the beginnings of a backlit, leafless tree. “Oh wow, my tree looks really fat.” “No it doesn’t! Yours looks way better than mine!” They laugh, and one of them wonders out loud what her husband will think. There for a Thursday evening girls’ night, the women are joined by about 35 other students, all wearing identical black aprons adorned with the logo of the newly opened downtown Spokane paintand-sip franchise Pinot’s Palette, at the corner of Second Avenue and Browne Street. Art classes offered as a combined social experience and a guided expression of creativity are booming across the U.S., and the Inland Northwest is quickly catching up to the trend. Pinot’s Palette is the latest art-meets-booze ...continued on next page

APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 33


CULTURE | ART

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business (some models also offer all-ages courses) to open in the region, joining the ranks of similar locally owned ventures Tipsy Muse, Van Gogh and Merlot, and Polka Dot Pottery. And yes, most businesses in this category have alliterative or punny names; Spirited Art (East Coast), Colors & Bottles (Midwest), Corks and Canvas, Palettes and Pairings (Seattle area).

A

lthough the wine isn’t ever a requirement at any of the Inland Northwest’s paintand-sip offerings, business owners say it’s often the key to get many of their customers relaxed before beginning what may feel like a daunting task. Many of the adults signing up for these kinds of events haven’t painted since childhood — or ever. But the step-by-step instructions, from priming the blank canvas to the final touches, makes completing a painting attainable even for the least artistically inclined. “It’s really fun and amazing to see people come in who are a little apprehensive and say, ‘I’ll just drink my wine and do what you say,’ and by the end of the night you see them open up and get really excited about it,” says Jackie Casey, owner of the new Pinot’s Palette franchise. Another group at the recent Thursday night Pinot’s class are members of a casual women’s dinner club, who sought something else to do together than dine out each time they meet. That aspect — participating in an individual activity as a group — seems to be another big factor in paint-and-sip classes’ rapid rise in popularity, says Tiffany Saraceno, a local entrepreneur who owns Tipsy Muse, based in Spokane Valley, which only holds mobile classes in a variety of locations. That, paired with the Inland Northwest’s booming local brewery and winery industries,

has created a separate level of interest in the art classes, Saraceno says. Acrylic paint on canvas is the primary format of most paint-and-sip classes, but Spokane-based Polka Dot Pottery has long hosted classes in which students can decorate ceramic pieces, with the option to bring their own beverages. Because of demand, owner Kimberly Geiger recently added canvas to the mix, giving customers the option to choose the medium they’ll paint.

F

or many, the allure of paint-and-sip classes is the opportunity to participate in a different kind of social activity than, say, going out to bars, but for others it’s more about mastering or improving art techniques. When Ulysses Mireles started his now 3½-year-old mobile painting-and-wine venture Van Gogh and Merlot, his hope was to expose more people in the community to art. Hosting classes at local businesses including coffee shops, wine tasting rooms and restaurants, Mireles has doubled the number of Van Gogh and Merlot classes each year since he started. “I think a big part of the success of these paint-and-wine concepts in general is that people feel like it’s an opportunity to express themselves, and we’re giving the everyday person the tools and instruction to be able to do that and tap into their artistic side,” Mireles says. By exposing students in his classes to the process of making art, he hopes people become more likely to look at, buy and support other local artists’ work. “That creates a new level of art for the community, and from day one that has been our mission,” he says.  cheys@inlander.com


CULTURE | DIGEST

LITERATURE STATE OF OUR WORDS

FUNDRAISER FOR

Spokane Poet Laureate Thom Caraway tells us how our writers are doing. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Y

ou don’t have to look past the cover of this week’s issue to notice that a strong literary scene is happening in this region. The Get Lit! Festival alone is enough of a force in the Inland Northwest to make even those whose literary exposure doesn’t extend far past a high-school-mandated reading of To Kill a Mockingbird take notice. As we head into Get Lit! week, the book-loving (and book-writing) community is stopping to take a moment and evaluate where exactly things stand in the local literary scene. Spokane Poet Laureate Thom Caraway is set to lead a discussion about the “State of Our Literary Union.” Not unlike the way the President annually lays out how things are going in the nation, Caraway plans to

give a rundown of all the literary happenings in the recent past, outlining publications, readings, workshops and other elements that have contributed to what can only be viewed as a booming environment for writers and readers alike. Think of it as a report card. Caraway also wants to know where things are headed from here, and plans to ask that question to attendees, who will be able to brainstorm their ideas. It’s an opportunity for writers to meet their fellow word wranglers and perhaps join in on the scene. — MIKE BOOKEY State of Our Literary Union • Mon, April 7 at 4 pm • Spokane Public Library, Downtown Branch • 906 W. Main • Free

“Never been funnier”

– Boston Globe

For Your Consideration BY MIKE BOOKEY

Tickets at Ticketswest.com and 1-800-325-Seat SPORTS | We’re barely into spring, but baseball is here. The Spokane Indians are still two months from taking the field, but the college season is well underway in Spokane. GONZAGA BASEBALL opened its home slate of games last weekend after playing on the road throughout February and March. Playing in the typically tough West Coast Conference, the Zags bring some high-quality ball to the gorgeous Washington Trust Field. Tickets are just $5 for adults, giving you access to the comfy stadium seats or a spot on one of the grassy berms along each foul line. You might not know a soul on the Zags roster, but you’ll feel good being at the ballpark. Check out the schedule at gozags. com.

ALBUM | The Hold Steady have always produced a sound that makes me want to have a couple of drinks and revel in my own self-destructive ways. This ultimate bar band plays the sort of revved-up rock that encourages that sort of behavior, but the Brooklyn outfit’s latest, TEETH DREAMS, dials things back a bit. Sure, poetic frontman Craig Finn still sings of ladies and weekends that got away from him, but there’s not a single song that’s as anthemic as, say, most of 2006’s Boys and Girls in America. You’d think that would be a negative, but it’s nice to see that Finn and company aren’t a one-trick pony with only one speed. And don’t worry, it’s still good music to drink to.

TV | You’ll remember Andy Daly as the clean-cut, moronic principal from the first three seasons of Eastbound and Down, but now Daly has a new persona — Forrest MacNeil, the star of the new Comedy Central show REVIEW. As the name implies, MacNeil is a reviewer, but he’s not giving you his opinion of music or movies or even food. Rather, MacNeil reviews elements of life itself, like drug addiction, making a sex tape or going to the prom. These things almost always go horribly for MacNeil, who seems to destroy a bit of his own personal life in the process. It’s silly as hell, but you’ll be tuning in (Thursdays, 10 pm) each week or binging on the whole series before long.

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Childish Things Bill Marlowe channels his inner child as he brings Alexandre Dumas’ swashbuckling story to the Civic stage BY E.J. IANNELLI

A

36 INLANDER APRIL 3, 2014

RadioSpokane_032714_6H.tif

s a boy, Bill Marlowe would leap around his house sporting a towel for a cape, his father’s fishing cap for a cavalier hat and wielding a broomstick for a sword as he enacted his favorite scenes from Alexandre Dumas’ novel The Three Musketeers. “There were weeks of that. I terrified my mother and the cats and the dogs,” he smiles. “I was just transported by the story.” To the disappointment of his younger self, Marlowe never got to be a musketeer. Instead he would become Director of Drama at Spokane Falls Community College, a position that required less swashbuckling but offered more imaginative possibility. He also has a long history of directing at the Civic, where this season he’s been allowed to indulge his childhood fantasies by directing a stage adaptation of The Three Musketeers, with all its swordplay, romance and intrigue. Several stage adaptations of Dumas’ novel exist, among them a musical penned by a creative circle that included William Anthony McGuire and P.G. Wodehouse; but when Marlowe was in the reading and selection process, none seemed right. “I read one version of the play that had something like 38 scenes and 42 people, and it seemed operatic in size to me,” he says. The adaptation he ultimately chose was penned by Ken Ludwig, whose reworked Treasure Island played last year at the


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The Civic’s production of Three Musketeers features all the intensity of the theater’s take on Treasure Island last year. MEGHAN KIRK PHOTO Civic, and whose door-slamming farce Lend Me a Tenor ran earlier this season at Lake City Playhouse. “It was great to find a script that I thought was my kind of stuff. I liked it because there was a stronger sense of humor in the script.” The play’s humor, along with its novelistic consistency and careful departures, “grounded it in a family-oriented experience as opposed to just an adventure story.” “When I read and then reread the book, I really liked the servants, because I think they give a real flavor of what the society is like,” says Marlowe, noting that all three of the musketeers’ servants feature in this adaptation. Plus one. “Ludwig has employed a very interesting theatrical device, which is that [D’Artagnan’s] sister comes with him to Paris to go to school in a convent, and she disguises herself as a boy on the road. So it’s become a pants role for a young actress.” The Three Musketeers set is designed to be as impressive as its cast of 27 (many of whom reauditioned after their positive experience in Treasure Island) and its intricate combat scenes, choreographed by Bryan Durbin, who also plays Aramis. The two-story structure has five staircases. There will be two revolves on each side of the central set for “quick changes from interior to exterior.” On stage right is the Cardinal’s office. Stage left will transform into multiple locations. “It’s very functional,” says Marlowe. And it has to be, given the number of scene changes the story calls for. “You travel from the country to Paris, then to places around Paris, and then you’re on the road to England, then you’re at Buckingham’s estate, then you’re back in Paris, then you’re at the palace, and in the garden and behind the Luxembourg. And then you’re at the Siege of Calais and a cloistered abbey and a cathedral.” Those breathless scene changes are one factor among many that make this an entertaining all-ages show, Marlowe says: “There’s the set, there’s the costuming, this wonderful mood lighting, and then four dances and amazing swordfights. There’s a lot of spectacle, but we’re also paying attention to character development so that they’re fully rounded people and not just storybook characters.”  The Three Musketeers • April 4-19: Thu-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm • $18-$25 • Spokane Civic Theatre • 1020 N. Howard • spokanecivictheatre.com

April 7-13, 2014 Spokane, Wa alex sanchez william T. vollmann matthew zapruder David abrams chitra divakaruni anthony doerr Linda gregg

MORE INFO at getlitfestival.org most evenTs are free • Tickets for others may be purchased from ticketswest at 800.325.seat or ticketswest.com

APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 37


FIND ART and more this Friday, Venues open 5 - 8 pm

divide, oscar blues, & Avery. 5 tastings for $4. Featuring Spokane Falls artists.

ADAMS STREET AREA

RIVER CITY BREWING

BARRISTER WINERY

1213 W. RAILROAD AVE. Joanne Reeds – “A Fascination with Walks & Trails.” Music by “Lonesome” Lyle Morse. Food by Beacon Hill Bistro Buffet. 5-10pm.

KOLVA- SULLIVAN GALLERY

115 S. ADAMS ST. “TWISTED DETAILS” 17 years since Robin Dare & Robert Kraut exhibited together. Kraut refers to his artwork as “Paintskins” – textured colorful skins of paint – showing new cast & wrapped paint art. Dare collects 1950 magazines images then collages & enlarges them into detailed surreal creations.

TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY

115 S. ADAMS ST. “Look Back” Ceramic works of local art professors Mardis Nenno & Terry Gieber, April 4-30th, Reception 5-8:30pm. Fond farewell to Terry as he retires after 31 years of teaching ceramics at Gonzaga. One of his last showings with the whimsy & whit of his friend, Mardis.

CARNEGIE SQUARE ANDY’S BAR & GRILL

1401 W. 1ST AVE. Audreana Camm presents her newest series titled “nerd art, the symbolic collection.” She subtly references popular video games, shows, & movies, with symbols fans will recognize. Displayed for sale April 4-30.

ROCKET BAKERY

1325 W. 1ST AVE. Colorado brewery themed tasting. The breweries are: new planet (gluten free), great

121 S. CEDAR ST. “Liquid Art” is a one-time beer made special for each First Friday. Using a special style of keg, a Firkin, they cask-condition & ferment a special beer that’s poured that day only.

GRANDE RONDE CELLARS

906 W. 2ND AVE. (across from Steam Plant) Jami Lord, reception 5-8pm. Modern cityscape paintings. Layered acrylic paint on textured surfaces to invoke depth & spaciousness. Detail is the underlying theme: in color, composition & design. Brent Edstrom Jazz Trio, 7-9pm.

PATIT CREEK CELLARS TASTING ROOM

822 W. SPRAGUE AVE. (across from Davenport) The Global Art Project for Peace is an International Art Exchange. Participants create art in any medium, expressing global peace. Art is displayed locally in each community. An international exchange results in thousands of Peace Works sent around the world at one time, a gift of global friendship. Live Music, Sam Platts & The Kootenai Three, 7-9pm. 159 S. LINCOLN ST. Whimsical, colorful art by Debbie McCulley. Imagery includes famous Martini Frogs, Party Animals & images selected for the Utility Box Beautification Program in Coeur d’Alene. Showing her popular wine cork necklaces, bottle stoppers & glass cutting boards! Samples of Steam Plant beer!

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DOWNTOWN CORE AREA 808 W. MAIN AVE. (River Park Square, third level) Judy Minter creates contemporary art pieces by applying layers of plaster, glazes, relief & typography to wood panels, gourds & photography. Known for her attention to murals & vibrant finishes to walls & furniture throughout the Northwest.

BISTANGO

108 N. POST ST. Thrilled to have Just Plain Darin back playing at Bistango! Happy Hour 4-6, Half off all Eats menu 5-8 & Spokane’s Best Cocktails 8 years running!

BOZZI COLLECTION GALLERY

211 N. WALL ST. Natalie Stewart-Utley’s landscape art. Gorgeous impressionistic landscape paintings of local vistas. Refreshments & cheese samples.

BRICKWALL GALLERY

530 W. MAIN AVE. (Bennett Block, skywalk just east of Macy’s) “The Photogs:Redux” annual display of a group of local photographic artists.

DODSON’S JEWELERS

516 W. RIVERSIDE AVE. Soul Searching - Spokane artist Kim Powers works in abstract, using oils, fabric, & natural objects to create rich 3-D images full of layering & colors. Her father, well

known architect Bruce Walker, raised her to appreciate & integrate design, color & shape.

RIVER PARK SQUARE

808 W. MAIN AVE. 5:30-7:30pm. Kress Gallery 3rd Floor, (Behind Food Court): Ink Flow – Suminagashi. Olivia Waterman & Keiko Von Holt provide beautiful Sumi-e painting & calligraphy art. Food Court 3rd Floor: Spokane Taiko. Enjoy the primal beat & pulse of traditional Taiko drumming & music.

NECTAR TASTING ROOM

120 N. STEVEN ST. (Corner of Main & Steven) Noted wine & travel photographer Richard Duval’s new fine art series “Metal Impressions.” Stunning photographs of vineyards & some travel images, fine art enlargements on metal media as limited edition prints. Musicians Karrie O’Neill & winemaker Bob Delf of Northwest Cellars. Open until 10. Now serving food.

NUMERICA

502 W. RIVERSIDE AVE. Kirsten Stobie’s art & serving light hors d’oeuvres, wine & beer, 5:30-8pm. Voted Spokane’s best artist in the Inlander’s Best Of series.

STEELHEAD BAR & GRILLE

218 N. HOWARD ST. Gary Gardner’s series of prints was taken over the last three years in Washington, California, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Nebraska, Arkansas, & Louisiana, for an upcoming book called “Ghosts of the Road.”

EAST DOWNTOWN AREA AUNTIES BOOKSTORE

402 W. MAIN AVE. (Liberty Building) 7-8:45pm, 3 Minute Mic: Open Mic Poetry Event. Chris Cook is back to lead the ruckus! Guest poet James Hunter. Plus several Spokesman’s Limerick Contest winners! You

®

CASK CONDITIO

R 121 S. CEDA RE UA SQ IE EG RN CA

8 N. POST ST. Ron Criscione, performing an eclectic mix of contemporary acoustic guitar & vocals. Enjoy exclusive 100% estate red wines of Whitestone along with appetizers, live music & a raffle benefitting the Northwest Autism Center.

LOVE

RIDAY FIRST FNE D MOOSE

WHITESTONE WINERY TASTING ROOM

ARBOR CREST TASTING ROOM

DAVENPORT HOTEL & STEAM PLANT AREA*

STEAM PLANT

unless otherwise noted.

In April we Welcome:

NORA EGGER

{oil painter} & LESLIE AHERNS

Boo Radley’s Uncommon Gifts

{ceramic artist}

PotteryPlacePlus.com 509.327.6920

Downtown Spokane

on Howard St.

Brought to you by Downtown Spokane Partnership and Spokane Arts Commission

the rts?

A

We’ve got you covered.


April 4th! can read your own poem, someone else’s OR just support those who do.

EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS

331 W. MAIN AVE. JKay Borland shows her wonderfully vibrant paintings of snakes & bugs. JKay captures the unexpected beauty of these creatures on canvas.

HILLS’ RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

401 W. MAIN AVE. Madeline McNeill appearing 6-8pm.

LEFTBANK WINE BAR

108 N. WASHINGTON ST., SUITE 105 Whimsical, Leather Masks created by Annie Libertini & Abstract, Acrylic Paintings by Jennifer Quick. Music provided by Carey Brazil & Jay Condiotti & wines from South America. A First Friday Trifecta!

LUTHERAN COMMUNITY SERVICES NW 210 W. SPRAGUE AVE. Join us for Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Art from survivors aids understanding of their experience & empowers awareness. Discover how you can BE THE SOLUTION. Some snacks provided. LCSNW is the sexual assault & family trauma response center & houses the crime victim’s service center with 24-hr Crisis Line at 509-624-7273.

POTTERY PLACE PLUS

203 N. WASHINGTON ST. (main floor of Auntie’s) “Twice The Beauty” Nora Egger paints the peacefullness of rolling hills & the pastels of sagebrush & sand that she saw everyday growing up near the mighty Columbia River. Leslie Ahrens uses a potpourri of techniques to create raku, stoneware & porcelain fired vases, wall hangings & wall pockets. Her latest creations include sculpted masks. Meet both artists, 5-9pm.

SANTÉ RESTAURANT & CHARCUTERIE

nYne BAR & BISTRO

FIRST AVENUE AREA - WEST END*

cancer awareness & upcoming Komen Race for the Cure, get 10% off any purchase if you wear any Komen race shirt to Barili during April. Two artists from Manic Moon & More join together: Linda Malcolm brings mixed media collages & mosaics, while Gina Corkery displays watercolor & mixed media pieces.

LUXE

CALAMITY JANE’S BOUTIQUE

ROBERT KARL CELLARS

404 W. MAIN AVE. Artist Katrina Brennan featuring her Blue Man Musical in the restaurant & Buffalo Series in the Butcher Bar.

303 W. 2ND. AVE. Local photographer Jennifer DeBarros is inspired by moments lost to memory. 5-7pm with light refreshments. Her photography documents life’s grand details that can be forgotten & her masterful work captures everyday beauty to be treasured a lifetime.

1017 W. 1ST AVE. PAINTINGS, DRAWINGS, MIXED MEDIA, MUSIC Dario Ré showcasing over 30 paintings, drawings & mixed media works. Local singer-songwriter Dirk Lind, 5-7:30pm. 8pm features the indie project, Adam Price; newgrass sensation, Polecat; & a collaboration project between Dario, a singer-songwriter; Phil Pintor, regionally acclaimed violinist; & Jackson Cate from Nude Pop. 5pm–12am. All-ages, all night. Free until 8pm. Beer & wine available. $10 cover.

ECHO BOUTIQUE

176 S. HOWARD ST., SUITE A Trunk show with local silver artisan jewelry from Kris Howell of Minutia & Karen Ciaffa of Stone Circle Studio. Time to update your spring jewelry collection with styles that express your unique personality.

NORTH BANK AREA CHOCOLATE APOTHECARY

INTERPLAYERS

621 W. MALLON (FLOUR MILL) Come enjoy chocolate, cheese & wine! Tom Quinn works mostly in acrylic & oil with hard edges, intense colors, & finicky detail. Showing what’s absurd but not impossible, to take the ordinary out of context, & to turn the familiar into strange. Music by Chelsey Heidenreich.

174 S. HOWARD ST. Jon Faulks, acrylic & oil on wood in the Gellhorn Gallery. Tony Boccaccio, Amazon expedition photographs in the Street Level Gallery. Music by Karen McCormick.

LIBERTY CIDERWORKS

164 S. WASHINGTON AVE., STE. 300 Garric Simonsen’s lines on wood & encaustic panels display both deliberate & gestural expressions of line, color, shape & texture, often revealing traces of earlier process stages.

RIVERFRONT PARK

Pavilion attractions, Spokane Falls Skyride, Carrousel, Tour Train & IMAX Theatre are open for Spring Break thru April 13th. For hours & other park info, visit spokaneriverfrontpark.com

ROCKET BAKERY HOLLEY MASON

157 S. HOWARD ST. Spokane’s very own Aimee Skaer displays her beautiful canvas artwork, 4-8pm. Guitarist Jason Oakes provides an enjoyable coffeehouse acoustic set, 6-8pm.

SOUTH DOWNTOWN AREA* BARILI CELLARS

608 W. 2ND AVE. 4-9pm, enjoy current wine releases. For breast

232 W. SPRAGUE AVE. Mason Sutter is a Spokane native & can usually be found along the river or up on Mt Spokane, but never without his old minolta film camera. A collection of 35mm photographs taken in & around the Inland NW. 115 W. PACIFIC AVE., Historic Warehouse District (aka SODO) Enjoy abstract art by Donna Preston, oil on canvas with an esoteric “vibe.” Wine by the glass or bottle.

UNIVERSITY DISTRICT MARKETPLACE WINERY

39 W. PACIFIC AVE. Timeless original art created for kids. Enjoy Kari Marguerite’s sultry voice & classic award-winning wines. Original, unique & fabulous clocks. Fundraising event for CASA casaforchildren.org. Judged & displayed thru April 25th for the live & silent auction with KZZU Molly Allen as guest MC.

KIRISHIAN’S IMPORTED RUG CO.

220 E. 2ND AVE. Imported, one-of-a-kind, hand-knotted rugs from Afghanistan, Pakistan, India & Nepal. Refreshments & appetizers served 5-8:30pm. Come see & learn more about these works of “Art for the Floor.”

SARANAC ART PROJECTS

25 W. MAIN AVE. Two exhibits: Influencing future art & artists throughout the region, area faculty featured in “Fresh,” an invitational exhibition. In the smaller gallery, member artist Nancy Hathaway exhibits new work.

* Located in the Davenport District – DavenportDistrict.org AS THE LILAC BUDS START APPEARING, JAN THE TOY LADY, STARTS PLANNING HER GARDEN:

“Peas, Carrots, Zucchini... Yum!”

River Park Square (509) 456-TOYS downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org

|

Brought to you by Downtown Spokane Partnership and Spokane Arts Commission


Beyond the French Fry Poutine from No-Li Brewhouse YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

More and more restaurants are realizing the sexiness of the potato BY AMY MILLER-KREZELAK

T

here was a time not too long ago when burgers and sandwiches were accompanied by a sad, soggy pile of fried potatoes on the side, destined to be drowned in ketchup, ranch, tartar or special sauce in an effort to spark some interest in their existence. Fortunately for those of us who adore potatoes, fries are no longer just an afterthought. In recent years, chefs have stepped up their game. Rather than dumping prefab potatoes into the fryer and

40 INLANDER APRIL 3, 2014

walking away, hand-cut potatoes are showing up on menus coast-to-coast, fried to crispy perfection before being adorned in an array of spices, meats, sauces and gravies. Competition from chickpea, polenta or quinoa fries may have stirred the longing to return to the simplicity of potatoes; whatever the reason, french fries are back. No-Li Brewhouse, Casper Fry and Downriver Grill offer gussied-up versions of the usual suspects. All three dishes start with perfectly

cooked fries, but that’s where the similarities end.

POUTINE

No-Li Brewhouse The Québecois classic poutine is composed of crispy, skin-on, thick-cut fries smothered in slightly spicy beef gravy and sprinkled with cheddar cheese curds. The heat from the gravy slowly melts the curds to create a messy pile of blissful potatoes. No-Li Brewhouse’s poutine strongly resembles the


original recipe, with the addition of some welcome local flair. Here, the fries are smothered in Wrecking Ball Imperial Stout mushroom gravy, sprinkled with shredded Tillamook smoked cheddar and finished with fine bits of chive. Bite after bite, the malty tang of the stout shines through, pairing with the mushrooms to produce a robust mouthful. The smokiness of the cheddar and sweetness of the chives give the poutine dimension, making this delicious dish seem more like a hearty stew and less like a plate of fries. Bartender Brandon Secor has seen a definite rise in the popularity of poutine, claiming it is often ordered as a stand-alone meal alongside No-Li’s popular microbrews.

HERBED GARLIC FRIES

Casper Fry “Some customers say these are the best fries they’ve ever had in their life,” says bar manager Curtis Day, and we can confirm he’s not exaggerating. The presence of a fried egg on top of a mound of crispy fries invokes thoughts of breakfast and the perfect hangover cure, but this delectable combination is welcome at the dinner table. The fries also serve as late-night bar food, though Day has rarely seen anyone take down an entire plate at any time of the day without help. The presentation is almost too lovely to destroy, but slicing into the perfectly cooked over-easy egg allows the velvety yolk to slowly seep through the potato pile and combine with the sharp cheddar Mornay, a variation on traditional Béchamel. As the elements combine, the fries take on a consistency of heavenly mashed potatoes spiked with fiery bits of garlic. We were so convinced that there was a layer of mashed potatoes hidden in the middle that we kept eating and eating until they were gone. This wasn’t the first time we’ve eaten these amazing fries, and it definitely won’t be the last.

Gorgonzola fries from Downriver Grill. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

GORGONZOLA FRIES

Downriver Grill Glancing through the menu at Downriver Grill, one notes the innovative use of local and seasonal ingredients, but it’s easy to keep coming back to the words Gorgonzola cream. Having experience with the filling effects of both Gorgonzola and cream, we armed ourselves with glasses of heart-healthy cabernet and ordered the fries. With their arrival, a hush came over us. The cross-cut fries were bursting out of the bowl, gently dressed as promised with the luxurious Gorgonzola cream. A healthy sprinkling of black pepper was dusted throughout, cutting through the heavy cream sauce. We were hooked at first bite. The Gorgonzola fries are perfect as a meal or an appetizer to share, but don’t expect to order these and have room for dessert. “We call these the dessert killer fries,” says bartender Aaron Sweatt. The best part? There’s not a soggy potato in the bunch. n

APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 41


FOOD | BURGERS

Building a Better Burger Schmidty’s gives you a lot more than just meat on a bun BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

S

ometimes simpler isn’t better, especially if it means sacrificing variety or quality. With three bun types and nine burger toppings (not including specials), Schmidty’s Burgers takes the Rube Goldberg approach — “accomplishing by complex means what seemingly could be done simply.” Sure, you could go with the usual burger: plain soft bun, maybe a little melted American cheese, a choice of lettuce, tomato, etc., and dress it yourself with ketchup or mustard. Schmidty’s goes a step further. Their six-ounce patties of certified Angus beef burgers on your choice of bun — roasted red onion, Kaiser or ciabattastyle — sport such outlandish accompaniments as pineapple and banana peppers (Mrs. Schmidty, $10.69) or baby portabella mushrooms and Swiss ($10.59). The Hangover Burger features a hashbrown patty, American cheese, fried egg and Canadian bacon ($10.89) while the California burger goes both ways — chicken or beef — with guacamole, bacon and Swiss ($10.89). Of course, you can always pre-empt the morning-after ailments with something good and gooey to soak up the alcohol the night before.

Try the loaded cheese fries with bacon, green onion and sour cream or ranch ($5.99) or the bone-in drumsticks in four levels of heat ($7.49). If it’s the hair of the dog you’re needing, Schmidty’s just added beer to its menu, which is also kid-friendly with junior-sized portions of burgers, fish or chicken strips and grilled cheese ($4.89-$5.89). You get your choice of fries or onion rings with any sandwich, served hot and crisp in little baskets. As if the regular menu wasn’t enough, Schmidty’s continues to experiment with different burger combos. On the day we visited, a barbecue “Rodeo” burger with onions and barbecue sauce was featured. On St. Patrick’s Day, the Grumpy Irishman with corned beef and cabbage included Schmidty’s trademark “Grumpy” sauce, honoring the original Grumpy burger served by the parents of Denise (Hodges) Schmidt, who owns Schmidty’s with her husband Nate.  food@inlander.com Schmidty’s Burgers, 206 N. Fourth, Coeur d’Alene • Open Tue-Sat, 11 am–9 pm; Sun, 11 am-3 pm • (208) 292-4545

with Dining 1. Lucy in the Sky ool rst Ba is Th 2. I Love Clock the nd ou Ar ck Ro 3. Mind of ate St 4. New Chair r ne cli Re d Re tle 5. Lit de For Sleepin’ 6. This Bed Was Ma ather 7. Whole Lotta Le ner cli Re My g sin Lo 8. Chaise the re 9. Those We r On My Bortkholde ad He ur Yo y 10. La veseat Lo e Th In ’ llin Fa 11. Can’t Help r 12. Daybed Believe tch Girl Hu ina Ch tle Lit . 13 14. Purple Chaise

Shop Local Shop Runge

303 Spokane Ave, Cd’A • 208 664 2131 • rungefurniture.com

42 INLANDER APRIL 3, 2014


FOOD | OPENING

One-Stop Shopping La Michoacana is a Mexican market, restaurant and bakery all in one BY JO MILLER

La Michoacana still serves classics (right), but now they’ve added a Mexican bakery.

C

olorful piñatas hang from the ceiling of La Michoacana in the Spokane Valley. Chorizo, cheeses, beef and tripe fill a display case and several aisles are stocked with giant cans of jalapeño peppers, jars of pork rinds, seasonings, cans of mango juice, bags of tortillas and a whole aisle devoted to candy. “Pretty much everything you’d want to cook Mexican is here,” says Omar Garcia. Garcia’s father, Simon Garcia, opened La Michoacana Mini Market in Spokane Valley in 2001, a few years after he moved to Washington from Los Angeles. He started with just a small store, about half the size of what is there now. “At that time, nobody had a Mexican grocery store here,” says Simon. A few years after opening, customers started com-

ing in and asking for tortas, tacos and burritos. So the Garcias opened a kitchen and started a restaurant in the market. The full menu features huevos ($5.95) in various forms, sopas ($7-$14.95), tacos ($1.50-$3), tortas ($4.95) and lunch specials such as camarones diabla ($12.95), which are prawns sautéed in butter and spicy red sauce. You can sip on a Mexican beer, a Jarritos soda, horchata or a Mexican Coca-Cola, sweetened with cane sugar rather than the American version with high-fructose corn syrup. If you’re feeling particularly famished, try one of their enormous, plate-covering burritos — the kind you would only dare eat with a fork. The burritos come slathered in salsa, sprinkled with cheese, stuffed with rice, beans, lettuce, tomatoes and your choice from a lengthy

MEGHAN KIRK PHOTOS

meat list: adobada, birria, cabeza, carne asada, buche, carnitas, chorizo, lengua, pollo asado or tripa. A little more than a month ago, La Michoacana added a bakery to their business: again, customers started asking for it, says Simon. They hired a Salvadorian baker who makes a whole host of treats such as various kinds of flan, tres leches cakes, cream puffs, pastel de miel (honey cake) and cupcakes. (Orders can be placed a couple of days in advance for decorated cakes.) He also bakes Mexican sweet bread (75¢-$1) — which covers an entire wall of the market — including conchas, marranitos and orejas.  food@inlander.com La Michoacana Mini Market • 10617 E. Sprague, Spokane Valley • Open daily 9:30 am-8:30 pm • 926-8251

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O Captain! My Captain! Captain America: The Winter Soldier shakes up the Marvel universe BY SETH SOMMERFELD

R

ule number one of Captain America: from memory loss, he also must confront The Winter Soldier: Go in with a the surreality of literally being a museum blank slate. Don’t read message relic when sneaking into an exhibit on his boards or watch clips. Avoid it all. While life and trying to digest his feelings. it could’ve been another paint-by-numOn the other hand, Cap’s counterpart bers installment in the Avengers franchise, proves feeble. The Winter Soldier co-stars the movie instead fires off unexpected Scarlett Johansson as Black Widow. twists at a blistering clip that ultimately Considering she consistently delivers shifts the paradigm of Marvel’s cinematic the worst performance in every Marvel universe. It’s a blockbuster thrill ride flick in which she appears, that’s hardly best experienced with a mind clear of a good thing. Perhaps it’s her intolerance information. with being the token eye candy, but she Skirting around the basics without plays the character with a distinct lack of giving anything away: Unsurprisingly, enthusiasm. Considering how superbly Captain America (Chris Evans) is having she perfomed as a disembodied voice in trouble adjusting to the modern world Her, Johansson’s lifelessly flat delivery and current military procedures. He’s is borderline baffling (though she’s not especially irked by the lack of transparaided by clunky dialogue and misplaced ency from S.H.I.E.L.D. director Nick attempts at humor). Fury (Samuel L. Jackson). Cap feels like The action in Winter Soldier is unrea lone soldier instead lenting. As opposed to of part of an army. Not Thor’s godly powers or CAPTAIN AMERICA: wanting to alienate his Iron Man’s tech, Captain THE WINTER SOLDIER best soldier, Fury shows Rated PG-13 America must rely on Cap the organizabeing swift, efficient, and Directed by Anthony and Joe Russo tion’s biggest secret Starring Chris Evans, Scarlett Johansson visceral in hand-to-hand — Operation: Insight, combat (with some shield a fleet of helicarriers tossing). Battle scenes (flying aircraft carriers) with a Minorfeel more brutal than in prior Marvel ity Report precog-like ability to take out installments. There might be more clear, potential targets before criminal activity on-screen human casualties in the film’s takes place. When S.H.I.E.L.D. becomes first action sequence than in any previous compromised, it’s up to Cap to figure out Avengers film. who’s trying to sabotage the organizaWinter Soldier works mainly due to the tion and why. This task becomes more unforeseen plot points and exploration difficult when the titular Winter Soldier, of actual real-world issues. Even comic a superpowered assassin looking like a devotees will be shocked by some of the mashup of Bionic Commando and Shredder turns it takes. While production was unfrom Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, makes derway before Edward Snowden’s leaks, Cap his next target. the film benefits greatly from heavy NSA It might not seem like a challenge to overtones. The issue is what’s more implay the morally pure slice of Americana portant: Fear prevention or freedom? Cap that is Captain America, but it could eas(obviously) falls on freedom’s side, while ily turn cartoonish. Evans aces the role. Alexander Pierce (Robert Redford), head There’s a wide-eyed, boyish innocence of the World Security Council that overto his portrayal, but he keeps it from sees S.H.I.E.L.D., supports the former. slipping into mindless patriotic naiveté. The film ultimately centers on the idea of His personal struggles actually seem like trust. In a dangerous modern world, who human struggles. He has to cope with (if anyone) can you trust? a lack of aging due to the power-giving Captain America: The Winter Soldier takes Super Soldier serum: Not only must he a darker tone than any Avengers movie comfort the love of his life, Peggy Carter, before it, and in doing so completely now a bedridden nonagenarian suffering reshapes the future of the franchise. 

44 INLANDER APRIL 3, 2014


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER

After awakening 70 years into the future, Captain America (Chris Evans) has a lot of catching up to do. His team — sassy Black Widow (Scarlett Johansson) and loyal Falcon (Anthony Mackie) — are more than willing to lend a hand in his endeavors to re-adjust to modern life, as soon as three of them kick some major bad guy ass. This time around, the bad guy happens to be the elusive and mysterious Winter Soldier (Sebastian Stan) a former Soviet spy and Captain America’s potential undoing in a yet another action-packed, super hero flick. (ER) PG-13

PARTICLE FEVER

Directed by Mark Levinson, Particle Fever follows six scientists on the cusp of a historic discovery. Some have spent their whole careers — 30 years of research — on one claim. Together they seek to unravel the mysteries of the universe through the use the Large Hadron Collider, one of the globe’s most expensive machines which could potentially create the elusive God particle on which they have staked their careers. At Magic Lantern. (ER) Not Rated

NOW PLAYING 20 FEET FROM STARDOM

We know names like Bruce Springsteen, Sheryl Crow and Mick Jagger. Names like Merry Clayton, Darlene Love and Claudia Lennear aren’t so familiar. We know the stars, but we don’t know the backup singers. This moving documentary puts the women that have supported these stars in the spotlight. One story looks at singer Judith Hill, recent contestant on NBC’s The Voice, and her partnership with Michael Jackson. At Magic Lantern. (JR) PG-13

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE

Like its predecessor — director Zack Snyder’s 2006 adaptation of the Frank Miller graphic novel 300 — this sequel attempts to turn ancient history into a swords-and-sandals epic, only with virtually every part of its world created in digital post-production. This time around, we have Themistokles (Sullivan Stapleton) leading his band of Greek warriors against impossible odds, with the fierce general Artemesia (Eva Green) leading the massive Persian navy. He’s got a few tricks up his … well, “sleeve” isn’t the appropriate word for these resolutely bare-chested warriors, but he’s going to do his best to hold out until he can convince the other city-states to face the threat as a united Greece. (SR) Rated R.

BAD WORDS

Jason Bateman, in his directorial debut, also stars in this film about a proofreader who sets out to settle an old score by registering for a children’s spelling bee on the technicality that he never advanced past the eighth grade. As he fights to remain in the competition, he uses every foul and shockingly inappropriate trick he can think of to keep the kids at a disadvantage. Along the way, he befriends the young Chaitanya Chopra, another contestant who gloms onto the elder competitor’s deplorable ways.

CESAR CHAVEZ

Everyone has the power to change the world — at least that’s the case in inspirational social change biopics. In Cesar Chavez, a film following the life of civil rights activist and labor organizer of the same name, we see once again how one person can bring about change, especially when employing peaceful tac-

tics. Michael Pena (End of Watch) turns in a once-in-a-lifetime performance as Chavez. America Ferrera and Rosario Dawson also star. (LJ) PG-13

DIFFERENT DRUMMERS

Set in 1965 Spokane, this locally produced film tells the true story of Lyle Hatcher (who co-wrote and co-directed the film with Don Caron), who befriended a wheelchair-bound boy at his school suffering from muscular dystrophy. The film tells the story of how Hatcher, full of copious amounts of energy, tried to teach his friend to run as the two became inseparable, getting into no shortage of trouble along the way. (MB) Rated PG

DIVERGENT

The first adapted entry in Veronica Roth’s trilogy of futuristic, dystopian, angst-filled young adult novels borrows heavily from The Hunger Games, but in a low rent kind of way. When you turn 16, you choose from one of the world’s five factions, or tribes, to live in, then take up their ways. Innocent young Tris (Shailene Woodley) opts for the tough Dauntless faction, which leads her to action, romance and political intrigue (that isn’t very intriguing). (ES) Rated PG-13

THE INLANDER’S MOVIE NIGHT AT

THE BIG LEBOWSKI WED. APRIL 23 BING CROSBY THEATER $

4 MOVIE $ 4 BEER

RATED R

BEER FLOWS AT 7 PM MOVIE SHOWS AT 8 PM With an intermission for your beer drinking pleasure

GLORIA

This Spanish-language film out of Chile follows its title character, a divorced woman in her 50s who decides to get herself back out there and start having some fun. Soon, she falls hard for a new man, but when that doesn’t quite work out the way she expected, Gloria is strong enough to not let that stop the fun. This film was a massive hit on the festival circuit, with leading lady Paulina Garcia taking home best actress awards along the way. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R

GOD’S NOT DEAD

The liberal arts college — a place where many Christians find their faith shaken — but college student Josh Wheaton (Shane Harper) isn’t going to let that happen to him. When his philosophy professor says that God is dead, Wheaton sets out to prove otherwise. (LJ) PG

SERVING 4: $

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inlander.com

...continued on next page

APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 45


FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING FRI, APRIL 4TH TO THURS, APRIL 10TH

The Nut Job FRI 5:45 SAT-THURS 12:00 1:50 5:45

Ride Along FRI 7:35 SAT-THURS 3:40 7:35

THE MAGIC LANTERN FRI APRIL 4TH - THUR APRIL 10TH

PARTICLE FEVER (99 MIN-R) *opening

Fri/Sat: 3:00, 6:15, 8:15, Sun: 1:00, 5:00, 7:00 Tues/Weds: 5:30, 7:30, Thurs: 5:00

DIFFERENT DRUMMERS (108 MIN PG)

Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit FRI-THURS 9:40PM

Fri/Sat: 2:00, Sun: 3:00, Tues/Weds: 3:30

GLORIA (110 MIN-R) *last weekend! Fri/Sat: 4:15, Sun: 1:15

MOULIN ROUGE (140 MIN) Thurs: 7:00

20 FEET FROM STARDOM (90 MIN PG13)

Fri/Sat: 5:00, Sun: 5:45, Tues-Thurs: 4:00 *last week

GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL

Wes Anderson’s latest features a narrative structure in which the central story isn’t merely a flashback, but a flashback nesting in a flashback nesting inside another flashback. A woman visits a memorial for a writer; that writer (Tom Wilkinson), circa 1985, describes his encounter as a young man (Jude Law) in 1968 with Mr. Zero Moustafa (F. Murray Abraham), owner of the once-glorious Grand Budapest Hotel in the “former republic of Zubowka.” Mr. Moustafa in turn relates his experiences as young protégé (Tony Revolori) of the Grand Budapest’s veteran concierge, Monsieur Gustave (Ralph Fiennes), in 1932. Soon, Gustave learns he’s inherited a priceless painting from one of his frequent guests, but is then framed for her murder. (SR) Rated R

Despicable Me 2 MON-THURS 9:30AM

DALLAS BUYERS CLUB (115 MIN-R) Fri/Sat: 6:45, Sun: 3:30, Tues-Thurs: 5:45

MISTAKEN FOR STRANGERS (75 MIN)

Fri/Sat: 9:00, Sun: 7:30, Tues-Thurs: 8:00 *last week 25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $8 www.magiclanternspokane.com

THE LEGO MOVIE

Yeah, The Lego Movie is colorful and has a message about being creative and working together to solve problems and tells of the fight between good and (corporate) evil, but it’s also totally whacked, from its dizzily stunning visuals (Legos everywhere! Nonstop action!) and its plentiful supply of references that only adults will get. (ES) Rated PG

ERS

MISTAKEN FOR STRANG-

Tom Berninger is living in his parents house well into adulthood and doesn’t have much going for him, other than the fact that his brother, Matt Berninger, happens to be the lead singer of indie rock megastars the National. When Matt invites Tom to work on the band’s world tour, Tom brings along a camera to make a film about the National. The super-meta film goes from interviews with the band members to looking back at Tom and his struggles to make the film you’re actually watching. It’s wildly hilarious, and a very real story all at the same time. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

THE MONUMENTS MEN

George Clooney’s fifth outing as a director has him in a co-starring role, opposite a great ensemble: Matt Damon, Bill Murray, Cate Blanchett and John Goodman, among them. It’s the (mostly) true story of the men and women who took it upon themselves to save great works of art and architecture from plundering Nazis and gungho, ever-bombing Allied forces during WWII. (ES) Rated PG-13

MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN

Peabody (the voice of Ty Burrell) is a genius inventor, scientist, musician, athlete, gourmand and mixologist. Oh, and he’s a dog. I don’t know if there’s any explanation for how this is possible, and this new film never broaches it. But there is — in a move that represents how deeply nerdy a flick this is — a great deal of explanation of how a dog was allowed to adopt a boy; precedent-busting court cases were involved. What’s so perfectly plausible

SpokaneBikeSwap_032714_4S_CP.jpg

46 INLANDER APRIL 3, 2014

that it requires no explanation? Time travel. With the help of their WABAC (pronounced “way back”) machine, the duo find themselves traipsing across ancient times. (MJ) Rated PG

MUPPETS MOST WANTED

Be honest, you missed these furry creatures since the reboot of the Muppets franchise back in 2011. This time, the gang heads out on a world tour only to get caught up in a case of mistaken identity and jewel thievery while in Europe. All the loveable characters are back, even Walter (voiced by Peter Linz), and Bret McKenzie (Flight of the Conchords) once again writes a new batch of silly yet catchy songs. (LJ) PG

NOAH

You know that story about a flood from Sunday school? This is not that story. Darren Aronofsky veers this boat in a whole new direction. Introducing fallen angels called “The Watchers,” who help Noah (Russell Crowe) build the ark and fight off hoards of blood-thirsty savages are as distracting to the story telling as Jar Jar was to The Phantom Menace. Mickey Rourke’s character sneaks on the ark and shows us the evils of eating meat. Trying to figure out who this film was actually intended for, is the best part of this movie. (CB) Rated PG-13

NON-STOP

Federal Air Marshal Bill Marks (Liam Neeson) was bored with his uneventful life in the sky until one transatlantic flight from New York to London. When he begins to receive a stream of threatening text messages ordering him to have the government transfer $150 million to an offshore account, Marks realizes this won’t be an ordinary flight. With this mysterious enemy killing off passengers every 20 minutes, Marks must go to work to protect the innocent 40,000 feet in the air. (CF) PG-13

PHILOMENA

Philomena Lee, an elderly British woman, confides in her daughter that she gave birth to a son in Ireland 50 years earlier. Unwed at the time, she was forced to give him up for adoption. Martin, a former government adviser

and journalist out of a job, is looking for a story idea to bring to his editor. Together, he and Philomena investigate the life of her lost son. At Magic Lantern (KS) Rated R

ROBOCOP

Not many remakes of iconic films get it right (think Keanu Reeves in The Day the Earth Stood Still), but RoboCop is a surprising exception. The roots are still there: Good guy Detroit cop is left for dead but re-emerges, via technology, as invincible man-machine. But this film, while still quite violent, has been stripped of its brutality as well as, some will lament, its corny humor. (ES) Rated PG-13

SABOTAGE

Arnold Schwarzenegger is back in another action movie, this time as the leader of an elite group of DEA agents who go around knocking down drug cartels and then saying stuff like — and we’re not making this up — “Clean up on aisle three.” But when they decide to rob millions in cash from a cartel safe house, they become the targets and are being killed one by one as they try to keep their secret safe. (MB) Rated R

THE SINGLE MOMS CLUB

It’s another film written and directed by Tyler Perry — but don’t run away too quickly, this one does not include Perry’s alter ego, Madea. Like the film’s title suggests, the plot revolves around a group of women who are single mothers. Of course, played by the likes of Nia Long, Amy Smart, Zulay Henao and more, they’re all also gorgeous. With each other’s help, the women power through life’s obstacles. (LJ) PG-13

SON OF GOD

This film will capture audiences and take them through the journey of Jesus, portrayed here by Diogo Morgado, who also played Jesus in the History Channel’s mini series The Bible. Using captivating cinematic techniques, Son of God tells the story of this religious figure from birth to ultimate resurrection. (MB) PG-13 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Particle Fever

87

Grand Budapest Hotel

87

The Lego Movie

82

Captain America 2

69

Mistaken for Strangers

62

MR. Peabody & Sherman

60

Muppets Most Wanted

57

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT


FILM | REVIEW

Adv. Tix on Sale RIO 2

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri.(1230 120 330) 700 1000 1030 Sat.(1000 1230 120 330) 700 1000 1030 Sun.(1230 120 330) 700 1000 1030

MET OPERA: LA BOHEME (NR)

Sat.955 AM

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLIDER 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1130 245) 430 615 730 915

RUSSELL

CROWE

NOAH [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri.(1140 1250 255 350) 600 720 900 1020 Sat.(1250 255 350) 600 720 900 1020 Sun.(1140 1250 255 350) 600 720 900 1020

SAOTAGE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1210 355) 625 940

MUPPETS MOST WANTED [CC,DV] (PG) Fri.(1150 230) 645 930 Sat.(1020 1150 230) 645 930 Sun.(1150 230) 645 930

DIVERGENT [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1200 305) 635 950

Particle Fever finally explains the Large Hadron Collider in language we can understand BY PAUL SELL

P

hysics is one of the hardest concepts them, their work is the only thing that matters. to explain to those who do not already Fabiola Gianotti, who leads one of the experiappreciate it. It’s a subject filled with equaments, passionately says she never sleeps or eats. tions and abstract concepts that encompass the Another scientist, Martin Aleksa, compares it essence of life. Yet there is an element to the new to man landing on the moon and constructing documentary Particle Fever that not only cuts to the pyramids, even though he admits there is no the core of what physicists do, but immediate practical application for brings a fragment of humanity and discoveries. PARTICLE FEVER theirThese understanding to their work. physicists are in their Not Rated This is the draw of the film, own world and live by their rules. Directed by Mark Levinson which details the long process of Even when they engage in seemAt Magic Lantern bringing the Large Hadron Collider ingly mundane acts, like playing near Geneva, Switzerland, to life. ping-pong, they use them as a way It was built by more than 4,000 physicists from to discuss work. Their justification is that life will around the world whose intention is to use this forever be changed if they find the Higgs boson massive machine to find the Higgs boson particle particle, so their well-being is a small price to and explain how particles were created after the pay. This makes the physicists relatable and their Big Bang. goals and methods understandable. The film divides its time between two differParticle Fever does a wonderful job of explainent types of physicists: theorists and experimening the broad ideas of physics without going talists. The theorists came up with the idea of the overboard. The film presents two varying sides Large Hadron Collider and observe the events to a unique situation and gives the audience a from an outside perspective. They are the brains reason to care about something that could easily of the operation, but can only watch as the data come off as over its head. Combine this with comes in. beautiful cinematography of Switzerland and If there is one thing Particle Fever puts above you get a documentary that is sure to leave an all else, it is the world these physicists live in. To impression. 

Airway Heights 10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444 CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (2:50) 6:20 9:20 In 2D Daily (11:00) (12:50) (2:00) (3:50) (5:00) 6:50 9:50

NOAH

PG-13 Daily (11:40) (3:00) 6:10 9:15 Sat-Sun

NEED FOR SPEED IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1240 PM) 710 PM

NEED FOR SPEED (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(340 PM) 1005 PM

SABOTAGE

R Daily (12:10) (2:20) (4:50) 7:10 9:35

DIVERGENT

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (3:00) 6:20 9:20

MUPPETS MOST WANTED

PG Daily (10:45) (1:15) (3:45) 6:15 8:45

MR. PEABODY AND SHERMAN [CC,DV] (PG) Fri.(100 325) 630 905 Sat.(1010 100 325) 630 905 Sun.(100 325) 630 905

NEED FOR SPEED

PG-13 Daily (11:00) (4:20) 9:30

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE R Daily 7:15 9:25

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(110) 410 740 1015

MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN

PG Daily (11:30) (1:40) (4:00) 7:00 9:10

NON-STOP

Intended Publication Date(s): Friday, April 04, 2014. Saturday, April 05, 2014. Sunday, April 06, 2014. Published WA, Inlander [I_Directory_Update to Publish or Proof] 1.7" X 11" Produced: 7:00 PM ET, 4/1/2014 040114070038 Regal 865-925-9554

Big Bang

The Large Hadron Collider makes for a perfectly exciting documentary subject.

PG-13 Daily (1:30) 6:30

THE LEGO MOVIE

LEGO [CC,DV] (PG) Fri.(1220 315) 650 920 Sat.(1015 1220 315) 650 920 Sun.(1220 315) 650 920

PG Daily (12:30) (2:45) (5:00)

Wandermere

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (2:50) 6:20 9:20 In 2D Daily (11:00) (12:50) (2:00) (3:50) (5:00) 6:50 8:00 9:50

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL

Adv. Tix on Sale RIO 2

R Daily (12:15) (2:30) (4:50) 7:10 9:35

NOAH

PG-13 Daily (11:40) (12:40) (3:00) (3:40) 6:10 6:40 9:15 9:40

SABOTAGE

R Daily (12:10) (2:20) (4:50) 7:10 9:35

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLIDER 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1145 315) 645 1010

DIVERGENT

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (1:00) (3:00) (4:00) 6:20 7:00 9:20 9:50

MUPPETS MOST WANTED

PG Daily (10:45) (1:15) (3:45) 6:15 8:45

NEED FOR SPEED

CAPTAIN AMERICA: THE WINTER SOLDIER [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1130 300) 630 1000

PG-13 Daily (11:00) (1:40) (4:20) 6:50 9:30

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE R Daily 7:15 9:25

MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN

PG Daily (12:15) (2:30) (4:40) 6:50 9:00

NON-STOP

PG-13 Daily (4:35) 9:20

SON OF GOD

PG-13 Daily (1:30)

Adv. Tix on Sale RIO 2

THE LEGO MOVIE

PG Daily (12:30) (2:45) (5:00)

DIFFERENT DRUMMERS PG Daily (11:15) 7:00

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 3/4/14-4/10/14

MET OPERA: LA BOHEME (NR)

Sat.955 AM

Times For 04/04 - 04/06

APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 47 Regal_040314_4V.pdf


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48 INLANDER APRIL 3, 2014

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T

he people filtering in offer hugs and kisses to one another. Cowboy hats and boots are prevalent on these folks, who’ve come from all over the region — Coeur d’Alene, Spokane Valley, Medical Lake — all the way to Airway Heights’ Buckhorn Inn to hear their favorite traditional country act Texas Twister. Affectionately known as Storm Chasers, the fans support the band’s shows all over the region and have T-shirts to prove it. “They’re not our fans,” explains frontman Rusty Brown. “The Storm Chasers are our friends. They’re supportive of what we do. They come from a time when you went out and visited with your neighbors and danced with your wife. And that’s almost lost nowadays.” Since 2010, Texas Twister has played the kind of country music your granddaddy may have listened to. And while many of the folks here tonight have probably achieved grandparent status, that doesn’t mean they don’t like live music anymore. As soon as Brown pulls his band into the first song of the night, his lush baritone crooning over his electric bass, couples twostep on the freshly waxed dance floor.

B

Content Cowboy How country act Texas Twister became the toast of Airway Heights

CHAD RAMSEY PHOTO

BY LAURA JOHNSON

efore the show, Brown sits down at a table in the Buckhorn Inn bar, Corona in hand. His wife Annetta is at his side. Even though he always had music, about five years ago Brown had settled into a depression. It was Annetta who changed everything. One evening, on his way to getting drunk at a bar, they were introduced. He told her he wasn’t dating material. She believed him. “Man, you’re just a drunken idiot,” he told himself. He decided if he ever got the chance to speak to her again, he would. That opportunity came a month later. Cautiously, the two began to date. With her encouragement, Brown got his life together, and after a five-year relationship, they married last summer. Since the band’s inception, she’s missed only one Texas Twister show; that was only because she had pneumonia. They live in a single-wide trailer in Spokane Valley, and for the first time, Brown says he’s happy. “We’ve had so many of the same experiences in life; she’s my best friend,” Brown explains. “She is my angel, she saved me.” “You saved yourself,” she says. ...continued on next page

APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | COUNTRY “CONTENT COWBOY,” CONTINUED...

T

he Buckhorn Inn is like a second home to Texas Twister — they’ve played here every Thursday for the past four years. It’s a cabin-like bar with low ceilings, padding around the bar top and mixed drinks with names like Goose Fart, Straight Shooter and Hot Spank. It’s the sort of place Texas Twister’s honky-tonk style of country music fits well. “We’re as committed to traditional country as any punk rocker is to staying out of the mainstream,” says Brown, who grew up in Spokane. “And here we can do that.” As Brown, 48, tells it, he got his start late in life with everything, including country music. Up until his mid20s, Brown was a self-described headbanger. When his

interest changed to country music in the early 1990s, he wanted to play the new stuff, but after hearing the more traditional country (George Strait, Merle Haggard, Ray Price), he laid his Garth Brooks-wannabe ways aside. “There’s just something about that music that relates with me,” he says, pale green eyes shining. Before he could start a band, however, the man with a linebacker’s build had to overcome his shyness. Brown recalls going to see current bandmates Duane Becker on steel guitar and Brad Jeanes on drums: “I started to watch them play when I actually had hair and a figure,” he says with a laugh. Inspired, he swallowed his pride and took to the stage. For the past 20 years Brown has played in various country bands, 10 of them with Becker and Jeanes. When Texas Twister played its first gig at the Wagon Wheel Tavern in Medical Lake, Brown says he thought

it wouldn’t even last a month. But the band — including Scott Platts on guitar and occasionally Kenny Wier on fiddle and Tom Schaffer on guitar — and the audience just clicked. Today, their set list includes more than 200 songs, 32 of which are Brown originals. “In this band I’ve achieved everything I’ve wanted,” Brown says. This year, Texas Twister has gone from a bar band to recording artists with the release of its first album, Natural Disaster. “Music is a feeling,” he says. “I’m just a working man and that’s all I understand. I tried to write a CD that people like me could relate to.”  lauraj@inlander.com Texas Twister • Every Thursday at 8 pm • Free • Buckhorn Inn • 13311 W. Sunset Hwy., Airway Heights • 244-3991

The only thing missing... is you.

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50 INLANDER APRIL 3, 2014


MUSIC | PUNK

eat, drink, bowl WEDNESDAY COLLEGE NIGHT

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SUNDAY HOSPITALITY NIGHT 7P

Punk legends D.O.A. pass through Spokane on their farewell tour. KEVIN STATHAM PHOTO

Lifetime Achievement For more than 30 years, Vancouver’s D.O.A. has shown fans what it means to be punk rock

“Minute Bowling” 16 cents /min./lane (cheap!!!) Happy Hour Eat & Drink Pricing Lincoln Heights Shopping Center (Next to Trader Joes)

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A Premium Cigar Sports Lounge.

BY LEAH SOTTILE

A

lot of bands formed the early sound of hardcore punk, including Teen Idles, Minor Threat, Bad Brains and Black Flag. A band from Vancouver, B.C., called D.O.A. — a punk outfit led by a guy called Joe “Shithead” Keithley — had a hand in that sound, too. Those other bands all fell away as the years passed, but D.O.A. has been a band consistently for 36 years, writing songs about every issue that got under its skin: racism, sexism, police brutality, nuclear war, the banking industry — you name it, D.O.A. has sung about it. In early 2013, the band declared that it would launch its final tour — but even Keithley (D.O.A.’s only consistent member) says he’s not sure how long that final tour will take: “I did see the Ramones three times on their farewell tour, and that took over three years to complete,” he said over the phone last week. D.O.A. isn’t exactly standing by itself in the 30-plus-year punk rock category. Bands like Poison Idea and MDC have been around nearly as long, and Keithley says at this point, they’ve all become old friends. But D.O.A. is different in a few ways. “It’s twofold really, because D.O.A. has been around for so long … there’s a sense of nostalgia about the band. But with each album, we try to take an approach with writing lyrics about what is going on in the world currently,” he says. “D.O.A. has been seen as a progressive activist

force for doing some good things, as well as a crazy, wild punk rock band.” D.O.A.’s longstanding mantra is “TALK - ACTION = ZERO” and in recent years, Keithley has upped the ante on what that means for him personally. In addition to running a record label, writing two books and being a vocal activist, he’s made three unsuccessful runs for political office in Vancouver — something he says he hopes to pursue after this D.O.A. tour is over. Keithley says after all this time preaching from the pulpit of punk rock, he knows he can’t stop trying to take action and inspire others toward change after D.O.A. is done. “Some people ask me, ‘Joe, are you still a punk?’ And I say, ‘No, I think you gotta be 15 to 25 to be a punk. I’m long past that,’” he says. “But thinking for yourself, taking control of your life and being your own boss — those are really good principles that came out of punk and hardcore that I still adhere to, even though I’m not a punk anymore.” Punk is in his veins, he says. And that won’t ever go away. n leahs@inlander.com D.O.A. Farewell Tour with special guests Defeatist, Reason for Existence, the Revision Scheme and Astro Cobra • Fri, April 4, at 7 pm • $12 • All-ages • The Hop! • 706 N. Monroe • thehopevents.com • 328-5467

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APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 51


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCK SONS OF HUNS

W

hen Portland swept the streets and repurposed the city’s vacant buildings, it must have told the hippies and jam bands to head out of town too. In the past decade, Portland has become a haven for heavy rock bands — particularly of the Sabbath-y, sludgy variety. Sons of Huns is one of them. You’ve seen them come to Spokane before — a three-piece making thick, rattling rock that pairs perfectly with an evening of heavy drinking and headbanging — but they’ll look a little different, a little more localized: Belt of Vapor’s bass whiz/lead screamer Aaron Powell has joined the band as its touring bassist. — LEAH SOTTILE Sons of Huns with Over Sea Under Stone • Tue, April 8, at 8 pm • $8 • All-ages • The Hop! • 706 N. Monroe • thehopevents.com • 328-5467

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 04/3

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen Band J BUCKHORN INN, Texas Twister (See story on page 49) COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny J GENO’S, Elkfest 2014 Launch Party feat. Keaton Collective THE HANDLE BAR (474-0933), Open Mic/Jam Night JONES RADIATOR, Los Chingadores J KNITTING FACTORY, Craig Morgan, Chad Warrix J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, Likes Girls J MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE (208-265-9382), Open mic hosted by Scott Reid O’SHAY’S, Open mic J THE PHAT HOUSE, World Bandits J TWISP CAFE (474-9146), Chris Rieser and Jay Rawley THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB, DJ Seli WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON (474-9040), LOS

Friday, 04/4

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, Bill Bozly J BABY BAR, BOYS (See story above), Normal Babies, Moon Talk J THE BARTLETT, Hey Marseilles, Silver Torches BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BLACK DIAMOND (891-8357), Donnie Emerson & Nancy Sophia THE BLIND BUCK (290-6229), DJ Mayhem BOLO’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Johnny Qlueless BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ (3217480), Likes Girls J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Saigon County, Erik Sinclair

52 INLANDER APRIL 3, 2014

ROCK BOYS

I

t’s all about fuzz with the BOYS. Scratchy reverb from guitars and bass bleeds throughout the band’s songs, pairing perfectly with Kale Huseby’s nasally, slurred lead vocals. The Missoula-based four-piece’s music, tinged with dirty blues and California dreams, represents garage rock at its best. The band has been busy lately, releasing a live album in December and supplying two tracks to a Rubber Brother Records compilation disc in January. Having just played the Treefort Music Festival, the BOYS come through the Baby Bar on Friday with an atmospheric show that inspires dancing as well as melancholia. — LAURA JOHNSON BOYS with Normal Babies, Moon Talk • Fri, April 4, at 10 pm • Free • 21+ • Baby Bar • 827 W. First • 847-1234

BUCKHORN INN, Six-Strings n’ Pearls J CHATEAU RIVE (795-2030), Tyrone Wells CLUB 412 (624-3629), DJ Lisciare COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kicho, the Ryan Larsen Band COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR, DJ Mercury THE COUNTRY CLUB, Devon Wade Band CURLEY’S, Krashbox FEDORA PUB, Kosh FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Scorpius GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Brent Edstrom Jazz Trio J THE HOP!, D.O.A. (See story on page 51), Reason for Existence, The Revision Scheme, Defeatist, Astro Cobra IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY (208-2902280), Charley Packard IRON HORSE BAR, Bad Monkey IRV’S, DJ Prophesy JOHN’S ALLEY, Eclectic Approach

J JONES RADIATOR, Psychic Rites, Street Fever, Camp, CreepShow J KNITTING FACTORY, Asking Alexandria, August Burns Red, We Came As Romans, Crown the Empire, Born of Osiris J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Robinsong LIBRARY LOUNGE (747-3371), Big Hair Revolution J LUXE COFFEEHOUSE, Dario Ré, Polecat, Adam Price, Phil Pintor and Jackson Cate J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Dirk Swartz NECTAR TASTING ROOM (869-1572), Karrie O’Neill J NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, ABBA Mania NYNE, The Rub, DJ Divine Jewels J THE PEARL THEATER (208-6102846), Acuff and Sherfey PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, A Touch of Jazz J THE PHAT HOUSE, Ragtime Steve,

Buffalo Jones, Liz Rognes RED ROOM LOUNGE, DJ D3vin3 ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Luke Jaxon Band THE ROCK BAR AND LOUNGE (4433796), Fire and Ice J SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES (9223433), Texas Twister (See story on page 49) STIR (466-5999), Solo Flamenco Guitar TWELVE STRING BREWING COMPANY (241-3697), Maxie Ray Mills J TWISP CAFE (474-9146), Chris Rieser and Jay Rawley WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON (474-9040), Just Plain Darin ZOLA, Milonga

Saturday, 04/5

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BLACK DIAMOND (891-8357), Bill Bozly & Will Foster THE BLIND BUCK (290-6229), DJ

Daethstar BOLO’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Johnny Qlueless J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Mic Night BUCKHORN INN, Six-Strings n’ Pearls CLUB 412 (624-3629), DJ Beauflexx COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kicho, the Ryan Larsen Band COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS (208-6642336), Steven Harris Originals THE COUNTRY CLUB, Devon Wade Band CURLEY’S, Krashbox FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Scorpius GARLAND PUB AND GRILL (3267777), NativeSun J THE HOP!, Krown Royal CD Release IRON HORSE BAR, Bad Monkey IRV’S, DJ Prophesy JOHN’S ALLEY, Eclectic Approach JONES RADIATOR, Black Mountain Moan


J KNITTING FACTORY, Rebelution, Common Kings LIBRARY LOUNGE (747-3371), Big Hair Revolution NYNE, Villa Blues Trio, DJ C-Mad J PANIDA THEATER (208-263-9191), Marshall McLean Band, Mama Doll, Katie Boeck J THE PHAT HOUSE, Blain Gooding RED LION HOTEL RIVER INN, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve RED ROOM LOUNGE, DJ D3vin3 REPUBLIC BREWING CO., The Keaton Collective ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Luke Jaxon Band J TWISP CAFE (474-9146), Chris Rieser and Jay Rawley WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON (474-9040), B Radicals WHISKEY DICK’S (474-9387) , Likes Girls ZOLA, Karmas Circle

Sunday, 04/6

J THE BARTLETT, The Cave Singers, Heartwarmer

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church MOOSE LOUNGE (208-664-7901), Michael’s Music Technology Circus WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON (474-9040), Cris Lucas ZOLA, Daniel Mills

Monday, 04/7

J THE BARTLETT, Mandolin Orange, Prairie War BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ, Open Mic J CALYPSOS, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills J THE HOP!, Urban Poets, James G., Jayskii Loud, Dat Boy Rob, Treveezy, Deebo Adams, Hali’Vaye, Stephanie Keller, Imperfect Cody, Disk Jockey Epik, Young King, Lightfoot, Young Wreckless, Felony Phamily J RICO’S, Open Mic ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 04/8

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, The Rub J THE BARTLETT, Barcelona, Mackintosh Braun, Lavoy BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BORRACHO TACOS & TEQUILERIA (822-7789), DJ D3vin3 FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills J THE HOP!, Sons of Huns (See story on facing page), Belt of Vapor, Over Sea Under Stone, MautaM JOHN’S ALLEY, Open Mic Night JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Open-ness J KNITTING FACTORY, Beats Antique, Sean Hayes, Horsehead McGee LION’S LAIR (456-5678), DJs Nobe

MUSIC | VENUES

and MJ NYNE, Dan Conrad & The Urban Achievers SPLASH, Bill Bozly THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB, DJ Q ZOLA, The Bucket List

Wednesday, 04/9

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ (3217480), Reggae Night feat. DJs Tochanan, Poncho, Tara and MC Splyt J CHAPS, Land of Voices with Dirk Swartz EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop Jazz LA ROSA CLUB, Jazz Jam with the Bob Beadling Group LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3vin3 J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Chelsey Heidenreich J THE PHAT HOUSE, Open Mic RED ROOM LOUNGE, Poncho’s Soul Experience SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB, DJs Freaky Fred and MC Squared J THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, The West, Ever-So-Android, Lavoy ZOLA, The Boss of Me

Coming Up ...

JONES RADIATOR, Silver Treason, Los Chingadores, April 10 THE HOP!, The Midnight Ghost Train, April 10 JOHN’S ALLEY, Yabba Griffiths, April 11 JONES RADIATOR, Go Mangos, April 11 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Spokane Songwriters feat. Tommy Borges, Jerry Reynolds, Richard Allinger, April 11 THE HOP!, Kung Fu Vampire, April 12 JOHN’S ALLEY, Funky 2 Death, April 12 JONES RADIATOR, West Water Outlaws, Hobosexual, April 12 THE SHOP, The Tone Collaborative, April 12, 7 pm. RICK SINGER PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO, Kathy Kallick Band, April 12, 7:30 pm. CHECKERBOARD BAR, Walking Corpse Syndrome, Abode for the Dead and others, April 12 KNITTING FACTORY, Hell’s Belles, 5 Times Over, April 12 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Air Supply, April 13 KNITTING FACTORY, Cunninlynguists, J-Live, Sadistik, Nemo Achida, DJ Likes Girls, April 13 THE BARTLETT, Jenny Hval, Mark McGuire, April 14, 8 pm. THE HOP!, Prophets of Addiction, April 17 PANIDA THEATER, Maria in the Shower, April 17 KNITTING FACTORY, Micky & The Motocars, April 17 THE HOP!, Mitchy Slick, April 18 REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Marshall McLean, April 18 THE BARTLETT, John Craigie, Mama Doll, Bart Budwig, April 18

PATIO NOW OPEN 3RD PLACE BEST BEER BAR! Thursday April 3rd

LOS CHINGADORES FIRST FRIDAY April 4th ARTIST: Hollie Paris, JB King, Emily Davidson MUSIC: Psychic Rites, Street Fever, Camp & Creepshow Saturday April 5th BLACK MOUNTAIN MOAN

Come in for Happy Hour Specials

HOURS Mon-Fri 2pm-2am

Sunday FUN DAY! April 6th

HAPPY TIME PRICES ALL DAMN DAY

Monday April 7th

TRIVIA! Starts at 7pm Tuesday April 8th OPEN MIC of OPEN-NESS starts at 7:30pm Wednesday April 9th

WHISKEY WEDNESDAY & SALLY BOP JAZZ COCKTAILS & 25 CRAFT BEERS

120 E. Sprague Ave.

The Gateway Bar Between Downtown & Browne’s Addition

509.747.0304

1401 W. 1ST AVE

PURCHASE TICKETS AT: TICKETSWEST.COM

315 MARTINIS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208667-9660 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington St. • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208664-9463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 311 N. 1st Ave., Sandpoint • 208-263-6971 THE COUNTRY CLUB • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIRST STREET BAR • 122 E. First St., Deer Park • 276-2320 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROS. • 718 W. Riverside • 315-8765 THE GRAIL • 4720 E. Seltice Way, CdA • 208665-5882 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KELLY’S IRISH PUB • 726 N. Fourth St., CdA • 208-667-1717 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PACIFIC AVENUE PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 220 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RICO’S PUB • 200 E. Main, Pullman • 332-6566 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 STUDIO K• 2810 E. 29th Ave. • 534-9317 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 THE VAULT • 120 N. Wall St. • 863-9597 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 THE WAVE • 525 W. First Ave. • 747-2023 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 53


SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

DANCE IRISH SPRING

There’s a saying that Irish step dancers kick butt. Not just because the dance form is so awesome, but because the technique actually requires dancers to kick their bottoms through their movements. Next week, more than 60 members of the Kelly Irish Dancers dance group, taught in Chattaroy, Wash., will jig and reel at their annual spring recital at the Bing Crosby Theater, performing choreography by instructor Margaret Evans. The recital’s first half centers on the Irish tale of St. Brendan’s voyage; the second includes live music by local Celtic group Broken Whistle. As in years past, the familycentric show literally kicks butt. — LAURA JOHNSON Kelly Irish Dancers with Broken Whistle • Mon, April 7, and Tue, April 8, at 7 pm • $10 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • thekellyirishdancers.com • 315-4389

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

54 INLANDER APRIL 3, 2014

VISUAL ART NEW MONTH, NEW ART

THEATER SHAKESPEARE SPIN-OFF

First Friday • Fri, April 4; most events from 5-8 pm • Free • Locations throughout downtown Spokane and beyond • Complete event details and map at inlander.com/firstfriday

Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead • April 4-5, 11-12 at 7:30 pm; also Sat at 2 pm • $8-$10 • Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, WSU, Pullman • performingarts.wsu.edu • 325-7328

Now that nice weather has returned, the number of participating First Friday galleries is rising. For April’s event, a new group exhibit called “Very Carefully” opens at the Chase Gallery at City Hall, featuring pieces created in a variety of media from recycled materials to wood carvings, all displaying precise attention to detail. Then, the always interesting Kolva-Sullivan Gallery hosts work by EWU alumni Robert Kraut and Robin Dare, respectively working in “paintskins” and image collage. But that’s only brushing the surface of this month’s events. — CHEY SCOTT

It’s become popular to retell famous stories through the eyes of their minor characters — just think of the Broadway musical Wicked, telling the story of the Wicked Witch of the West before her abrupt demise at the beginning of The Wizard of Oz. Long before that, however, we had Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead, the absurdist tragicomedy that retells Shakespeare’s Hamlet from the perspective of two extremely minor characters. The WSU production of Tom Stoppard’s Tony-winning play is directed by Benjamin Gonzales and stars Jon Rice, Jared Chastain and Mary Trotter. — LISA WAANANEN


WORDS ONE YEAR, THREE MINUTES

The first anniversary of this monthly, spoken word open mic night couldn’t be more perfectly timed, on the weekend before dozens of acclaimed writers and word lovers alike converge on the Lilac City for the 16th annual Get Lit! literary arts festival. This monthly Spokane Poetry Slam “sister event,” held every first Friday, showcases some of our region’s finest spoken word artists, and serves as a kickstart for the scene’s newcomers. April’s featured “Remember the Word” poet is James Hunter, a Gonzaga English faculty member and lead singer of local band Floating Crowbar. Don’t forget though, it’s an open mic, and like the name says, you’ve got three minutes. — CHEY SCOTT

think summer

Three Minute Mic • Fri, April 4, at 7 pm • Free • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main • spokanepoetryslam.org • 838-0206

Take EWU with you | ewu.edu/summer

THEATER LOCAL FAVORITE

Back in 1993, Ellen Travolta and her husband, Jack Bannon, brought Love Letters, a Pulitzer Prize finalist play by A.R. Gurney, to the Interplayers Theatre stage in Spokane where it garnered rave reviews. They reprised that show at Interplayers in 2010 (again with much acclaim) and now the couple is bringing the production to the University of Idaho as a fundraiser for Idaho Repertory Theatre. The play features a story about a pair of long-distance friends leading very different lives who share letters over the course of 50 years. Stick around for a Q&A session with Travolta and Bannon after the show. — MIKE BOOKEY

The seed potatoes are in stock and looking good. Red, White, Blue and Fingerlings too!

Love Letters • Sat, April 5 at 7:30 pm • $10-$25 • University of Idaho, Hartung Theater • Sixth and Rayburn, Moscow • uidaho.edu.class/irt • 208-885-6465

EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

SPOKANE LION PRIDE FUNDRAISER IHOP is donating 20 percent of its proceeds to the Spokane Lion Pride blind baseball team for the team to compete in a national tournament. April 3, 4-9 pm. IHOP, 5403 E. Sprague. (568-1111) ONCE UPON A TIME Featuring fairytalethemed artwork from The Missing Piece Tattoo and Salon in a fundraiser benefiting the Children’s Miracle Network. April 4, 7 pm. Free admission. Monterey Cafe, 9 N. Washington St. (768-7247) CABARET: THE PHANTOM’S MASKED BALL 36th annual fundraiser dinner and auction to benefit the Pullman Chamber of Commerce’s operating budget, which funds community events including the National Lentil Festival, Pullman Farmers Market and

other events. April 5, 5 pm. Schweitzer Event Center (SEL), 1825 Schweitzer Dr. pullmanchamber.com (334-3565) GARDENERS’ GALA Fundraiser for the construction of Spokane Valley Partners’ Community Gardens, the second community garden in the Edgecliff neighborhood. Features a silent auction, photo booth, live gypsy swing band, dance group, and electro swing DJ. April 5, 7 pm. $7-$25. nYne, 232 W. Sprague. (927-1153 x 34) HEAL A HEART BENEFIT BANQUET Annual benefit banquet for Abuse Recovery Ministry and Services, providing support to women facing or recovering from domestic violence. April 5, 6:30 pm. Free, RSVP required. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. (484-0600)

Our 70thYear

Anniversary Sale Starts April 12

Bare Root Strawberry Plants Red, White, & Yellow Walla Walla Sweets too!

Spokane’s Local Garden Store Supplying Spokane Gardeners With Quality Products Since 1944 2422 E. Sprague Ave. 7302 N. Division St. 534-0694 484-7387 nwseed.com

APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 55


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess THE FASTIDIOUS AND THE FURIOUS

My boyfriend of nine years is extremely messy, while I prefer things tidy and clean. Cajoling, asking, and flat-out begging him for consideration and help on this hasn’t worked, nor have tactics like establishing certain areas for clutter. He contends I’m too picky about how he cleans. He says this started when we moved in together, eight years ago, and I rewashed dishes he’d washed. He says he then stopped trying to do much AMY ALKON cleaning up and hoped I’d tire of doing everything myself and learn a lesson. I was shocked and hurt by this attitude, especially since he’s otherwise a good and loving man who does many sweet things for me. Neither of us wants kids, and I love him dearly, so I’m contemplating something you’ve written about, being in a relationship but living separately. Could this possibly work after living together for so long? —Worried You just have different styles of mess management. You can’t sleep if there’s an unwashed glass in the sink. He likes to let housecleaning wait until it’s a tossup between tidying the place and trying to get away with arson. Animals get it. The bunny does not shack up with the thing that tears small furry creatures apart with its teeth. And here we humans are, all top-of-the-foodchain snobby about our ability to reason. Yet no sooner do we fall in love than we start looking to sign a lease together, bright and optimistic about the dreamy home life the neat freak will have with the guy whose idea of housecleaning is picking up a 3-year-old magazine off the floor so he’ll have a “plate” for his pizza. Because you happen to care about what we generally value — order over chaos — you made the assumption that a devotion to neatitude is The One True Path and should be as important to him as it is to you. It just isn’t. (Chances are, he doesn’t even notice the messes.) Your distress at his passive-aggressive withdrawing of effort is understandable — as is his feeling that if he can’t tidy up right, why bother tidying up at all? The thing is, people will often support their partner in goals they find meaningless or even dopey, but not when their ego is under attack — verbally or in the form of dish-rewashing. When a person realizes their partner doesn’t respect them, they tend to take one of two paths: chasing that person’s approval or retiring from seeking it. Still, in the moments you aren’t running after your boyfriend with a wheelbarrow and a broom, you love the guy and he loves you, and you seem to have something together. You do need to repair the hard feelings between you, starting by admitting that you were both expecting the impossible in trying to live together. Next, pledge to discuss things that bother each of you instead of silently seething about them — for, oh, eight years. And yes, probably the best way for you to stay together is to live apart. After years of living together, it’s easy to see this as a failure. It’s actually anything but. You’re just making your relationship love-centered by removing all the subjects that cause perpetual disagreement — like why anyone would waste time cleaning until whatever’s growing on the coffee table starts hissing at you when you reach for the remote.

BETTER SHERLOCK HOLMES AND GARDENS

I had to leave town when prospective buyers were coming to see a used water pump I was selling. My wonderful wife cheerfully agreed to sell it for me. I showed her exactly the parts that went with it. A guy bought the pump, but I saw that an extra box of parts, worth about $100, was also gone. Do I ask my wife where it went? Can I forgive her without an apology? —Annoyed Prepare to get laughed out of marriage counseling after you grumble to the therapist that what’s missing from your marriage is $100 worth of junk from the garage. Tempting as it must be to spend the weekend waterboarding your wife for answers, a wiser approach when somebody tries to do something nice for you is to reward their intentions, even when the outcome is less than ideal. Your wife’s intention — to help you by standing in for you — tells you she’s a loving partner. The outcome — an extra box of parts apparently growing legs and sneaking off into the buyer’s car — tells you she may not be the shrewdest salesperson and maybe takes too kindly a view of human nature. Sadly, all relationships come with trade-offs. You have a decision to make — whether to settle for cheery wonderfulness or dump your wife for a woman who can help you open a used-car lot or get rich swindling the elderly by telephone. n ©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

56 INLANDER APRIL 3, 2014

EVENTS | CALENDAR INLAND NW ALZHEIMERS ASSOCIATION GALA The 14th Annual Nancy Rockwell Gala and Auction is a 1950s themed event featuring dinner, live and silent auctions and dancing. April 5, 5:30 pm. $100/person. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. alz.org/inlandnorthwest (473-3390) TATTOOS FOR PETS The second annual flash tattoo event benefits the Spokane Humane Society. April 5, 12-8 pm. $50$100, cash only. Boar’s Head Tattoo, 406 W. Third. tinyurl.com/mrz9vf2 (838-7638) BULLDOG JOG 2014 The 11th annual 5K fundraiser run/walk benefits Second Harvest Food Bank and is hosted by the Gonzaga business fraternity Alpha Kappa Psi. April 6, 8:30 am. $15. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone. 2-harvest. org/bulldogjog (481-0741) SPAGHETTI DINNER BENEFIT Benefits Shon Hartley and his family. Shon is battling acute myeloid leukemia, an aggressive cancer that requires a bone marrow transplant in Seattle. April 6, 7 pm. $7$10, RSVP requested. Opportunity Presbyterian, 202 N. Pines. (922-4570)

COMEDY

GEOFF YOUNG Stand-up comedian. April 4-5 at 8 pm. $12. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market. (483-7300) OPEN MIC COMEDY Live stand-up comedy. Fridays at 8 pm. Free. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third. (838-6688) POETS UP! Local poets make up poems on the spot and Blue Door Players perform them. Fridays in April at 8 pm. $7$9. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) SHORT STACKS The BDT Players & Friends try out new material, rework ideas, and share comedic talents in stand-up, sketch, music, film and more. First Fridays of the month at 10 pm. $5. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) YOUTH/TEEN IMPROV WORKSHOPS Workshops on various aspects of improv comedy performance, including mime, storytelling, environment, character development and spontaneity. Held the first Saturday of the month from 11:30 am-2 pm. Pre-registration suggested. Ages 9-18. $25/session. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) LIVE COMEDY Live stand-up comedy shows. Sundays at 9 pm. Goodtymes, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070) ALL-AGES COMEDY OPEN MIC Held on the second and fourth Thursday of the month at 6 pm. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main. (703-7223) WHITE TIE IMPROV U of Idaho’s comedy improv troupe performs a benefit show with all proceeds supporting Paul Newman’s Hole in the Wall Gang Camps. April 11, 8 pm. $5. University of Idaho Kiva Theater, 921 Campus Dr. (208-885-7251)

COMMUNITY

CRIME PREVENTION FORUM Learn about Block Watch, current crime trends and neighbor-to-neighbor connectedness to reduce crime rates in your neighborhood. Sponsored by Spokane C.O.P.S. April 3, 6-8 pm. Free. All Saints Lutheran, 314 S. Spruce. spokan-

ecops.org (835-4572) HEART DISEASE: UNDERSTAND YOUR RISKS Presentation by Providence cardiologist Dr. Guy Katz, on what can contribute to heart disease, what to do to lower your risks and when to be concerned. Register at phc.org. In the Providence Auditorium at Sacred Heart. April 3, 6:30-8 pm. Sacred Heart Medical Center, 101 W. Eighth Ave. MEET THE EASTER BUNNY The Easter Bunny visits the atrium at RPS to meet children and their families for photos and more. April 4-19, times vary. River Park Square, 808 W. Main Ave. riverparksquare.com (509-624-3945) FAMILY DANCE & POTLUCK Event offering several types of dance, from circle, line, contra, folk and novelty dances, with live music and a live caller. Family potluck at 6:30 pm, dance at 7 pm. April 4, 6:30 pm. Free. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. (533-9955) EAST COAST SWING DANCING Dance workshop, open to beginners; offering two sessions at 10 am and 1 pm. April 5. $10-$20. Whitworth Cowles Auditorium, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (919-9162) STARTUP WEEKEND BOOTCAMP Learn to pitch your business ideas in one minute and other startup information in preparation for Spokane Startup Weekend. April 5, 1 pm. $5. Sixthman Marketing, 542 W. Cataldo. (255-5801) WSU SPOKANE HEALTH FAIR Offering screenings including blood pressure, blood glucose, cholesterol, bone density, hearing, BMI, BIA, waist circumference, grip test, as well as science experiments for kids, program showcases, food trucks, and more. April 5, 10 am. Free. WSU Riverpoint Campus, 600 N. Riverpoint Blvd. (358-7921) INTRODUCTORY SWING CLASS Dropin style vintage swing classes for Jazz Appreciation Month. For beginning to novice dancers. Mondays in April from 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Satori, 122 S. Monroe St. (919-9162) MOBIUS SPRING BREAK CAMPS Oneday and two-day camps offered, for ages 4-8. Times and costs vary, see website for camp schedule and descriptions. $20-$50. Mobius Kids, 808 W. Main. mobiusspokane.org (321-7124) FREE TAX PREP SITES Qualified professionals provide free assistance to residents earning less than $51,567 in 2013. Sites remain open until April 15. See site locations and schedules at unitedwayspokane.org. (358-3526) KHQ JOB FAIR Community job fair hosted by KHQ, Worksource and Workforce Development feat. more than 60 employers. Attendees should bring their resume and dress for a possible interview. April 9, 9 am-2 pm. Free. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln. (532-3286) “THE HOUSE I LIVE IN” SCREENING & PANEL See the award-winning documentary about the US War on Drugs, followed by a panel of local policy makers, judges and leaders. Hosted by the Spokane Regional Health District, Smart Justice Campaign, Center for Justice, NATIVE Project and others. April 10, 11:30 am-1:30 pm. Free. EWU Riverpoint Campus, 668 N. Riverpoint Blvd. tinyurl.com/kmwk52n (359-2331) COMMUNITY DANCES Community dance night featuring music by local band Variety Pak. Held the second Friday of the month from 7-10 pm. $6-$8. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac.org (535-0803)

LET FREEDOM RING GSI’s annual breakfast honoring local men and women serving in the military, featuring a keynote presentation by outgoing GSI president Rich Hadley. April 11, 7 am. $25. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. greaterspokane.org (326-8000) STARTUP WEEKEND SPOKANE Competition for entrepreneurs to pitch business ideas and collaborate with developers and designers to create a product within a 54-hour period. April 11-13. $50-$85. SIERR Building at McKinstry Station, 850 E. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokane.startupweekend.org

FILM

50 HOUR FILM SLAM KICKOFF Official kickoff of the 4th annual 50 Hour Slam film festival and competition; rules and secret criteria revealed. Filmmakers have 50 hours to complete a 3-6 minute film, with the top 15 films screened on May 3 at the Bing Crosby Theater. April 4, 6:30-7:30 pm. KSPS Public TV, 3911 S. Regal St. 50HourSlam.com (354-7724) CULTURAL AWARENESS FILM NIGHT Learn about the injustices faced by Asian Americans during the 1980s at a screening of “Vincent Who?,” with a post-film discussion hosted by GU Sociology professors. In the Foley Teleconference Center. April 4, 7 pm. Free. Gonzaga, 502 E. Boone. (313-5836) INTERNATIONAL FLY FISHING FILM FEST Short and feature-length films produced around the world that showcase the passion, lifestyle and culture of fly-fishing. Hosted by Silver Bow Fly Shop. April 4, 7 pm. $15-$18. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. flyfilmfest. com (227-7404) WRETCHES AND JABBERERS The film chronicles two middle-aged men with severe autism as they leave their Vermont homes and embark on a global quest to educate people about their disability. April 4, 7 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main, Moscow. (772-538-4404) GREEN FIRE: ALDO LEOPOLD AND A LAND ETHIC FOR OUR TIME Green Fire explores Leopold’s personal journey of observation and understanding. Post-film discussion facilitated by Kirk and Madeline David. Pre-registration requested. April 5, 2 pm. Free. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. (328-2939) OSCAR-NOMINATED ANIMATED SHORTS Screenings of the 2014 Oscarnominated short films, including animated and live-action films. April 5 and 6 at 5:30 pm (animated) and 8 pm (live action). $6-$10. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main, Moscow. kenworthy.org (208882-4127) STANDARDIZED LIES, MONEY, & CIVIL RIGHTS Film screening with a panel discussion and Q&A to follow. Hosted by Spokane, WA Against Common Core, the Washington Badass Teachers Association, and Parents Across America Spokane. April 6, 11 am. $5 suggested donation. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. (227-7404) PALESTINE FILM FESTIVAL “Out of the Shadows” examines life in Palestine through film, including screenings of “Slingshop Hip Hop” on April 9; “al Helm/Martin Luther King in Palestine” on April 16; “Miral” on April 23 and “One Family in Gaza and Children of Ibdaa,” April 30. Locations vary. $10 suggested donation; students free. SCC, 1810 N. Greene St. scc.spokane.edu (838-7870)


FOOD & DRINK

DESCHUTES BREWING PINT NIGHT Hosted beer tasting. April 3, 5 pm. Free. Enoteca, 112 E. Seltice Way, Post Falls. corkjoy.com (208-457-9885) SOUTH PERRY FARMERS MARKET The Thursday market returns for spring, open 3-6 pm through April 24. Includes 12+ local produce, meat and artisan vendors, live entertainment and more. South Perry Yoga, 915 S. Perry St. thursdaymarket.org (443-6241) EUROPEAN WINE TASTING Taste wines from esteemed wine regions in Germany, France, Italy, Austria, Spain and other European countries. April 4-5 at 7 pm, reservations required. $20, reservations requested. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com (343-2253) NO-LI BREWHOUSE TOURS See what goes on behind the scenes and how NoLi’s beer is made. Fridays at 4:30 pm. Free. No-Li Brewhouse, 1003 E. Trent Ave. nolibrewhouse.com (242-2739) VINO! WINE TASTING Fri, April 4 tasting features wine of the month club selections, from 3-6:20 pm. Sat, April 5 features Rhone varietals smackdown: Wash. vs. France, from 2-4:30 pm. $10/tasting. Vino!, 222 S. Washington. vinowine.com (838-1229) LOOSE LEAF TEA BLENDING Sample different types of tea, learn brewing techniques of loose leaf and the health benefits of herbs and spices. Pre-registration required. First Sat. of every month, 3 pm. $10/person, $15/couple. Spice Traders Mercantile, 15614 E. Sprague. spicetradersmercantile.com (315-4036) CHEESE TASTING CLASS Taste eight cheeses and learn the basics to help you shop from any cheese selection, as well as how to store cheese, its history and more. April 10, 7 pm. $20. Chocolate Apothecary, 621 W. Mallon. (324-2424)

MUSIC

BRUCE COCKBURN Concert by the longtime Canadian musician and songwriter. April 3, 8 pm. $33-$45. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater. com (227-7404) A NIGHT OF PERCUSSION The GU Percussion Ensemble and Drum Line, under the direction of Chris Grant, feat. local players Robbins’ Rebels and Michael Waldrop. In the Music Annex. April 3, 7 pm. Free. Gonzaga, 502 E. Boone. gonzaga.edu (313-6733) OAK GROVE CONCERT CHOIR The church hosts the Oak Grove Lutheran School Concert Choir, an a cappella choir of 44 high schoolers from Fargo, ND, touring the Northwest. April 3, 7 pm. Free. Central Lutheran, 512 S. Bernard. (624-9233) WATOTO CHILDREN’S CHOIR Performance by child ambassadors of millions of orphaned and vulnerable children in Africa, featuring original music, dance and elaborate costumes. April 3, at 11 am and 7 pm. Free, donations accepted. Prince of Peace, 8441 N. Indian Trail Rd. watoto.com (465-0779) ACUFF & SHERFEY BOBfest 2013 winners, Colby Acuff and Justin Sherfey are multi-instrumentalists (fiddle, guitar, mandolin, drums, harmonica) performing original music rooted in country. April 4, 7 pm. $9-$10. The Pearl Theater, 7160 Ash, Bonners Ferry. (208-610-2846) KEVIN HEKMATPANAH Guest Artist Kevin Hekmatpanah presents a cello

recital in the music building recital hall. April 4, 7:30 pm. Free. Whitworth, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-3280) BOUNDLESS VOCAL ENSEMBLE Performing “The Elusive Heart,” a new musical theater performance/choral concert. April 5 at 7 pm and April 6 at 3 pm. $10. The Pearl Theater, 7160 Ash, Bonners Ferry. thepearltheater.org (208-610-2846) KEVIN HEKMATPANAH The GU assoc. professor and cellist is joined by pianist Sheila Zilar-Gephart, performing works by Haydn, Weber, Stravinsky, Schubert, Chopin and Piatigorsky. College Hall, Rm. 331. April 5, 4 pm. Free. Gonzaga, 502 E. Boone. gonzaga.edu/music (313-6733) BLACK & WHITE DANCE Semi-formal dance featuring music by the Tuxedo Junction Big Band, hosted by the Crystal Chandeliers Ballroom Dance Club. April 6, 3-6 pm. $25-$35. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. (533-0051) SPOKANE BRASS QUINTET The quintet, comprised of five Spokane Symphony musicians, presents “Into Oblivion.” April 6, 3 pm. $5-$10. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. spokanebrassquintet.org (951-8129) KELLY IRISH DANCERS FEAT. BROKEN WHISTLE The local dance group performs its annual spring recital, “St. Brendan’s Voyage,” feat. 80 dancers and live music by local group Broken Whistle. April 7-8 at 7 pm. $10. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. thekellyirishdancers.com (315-4389) NORTHWEST GUITAR FESTIVAL Featuring performances by James Reid, Michael Partington, Mak Grgic, David Feingold and Giacomo Fiore. Events at EWU, SFCC and Holy Names Music Center. April 11-13, event times vary. $7-$12. hnmc.org (533-3500)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

BIKE MAINTENANCE BASICS Introductory class on keeping your bike running smoothly to prolong its life. April 3, 7 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. (328-9900) CDA CANOE & KAYAK CLUB Meeting topics include cold-water paddling, parking, launch permits and passes, invasive species stickers and more. April 3, 7 pm. Free and open to the public. CdA Police Station, 3818 Schreiber Way. cdacanoekayakclub.org (208-660-2752) BEGINNING BIRD WATCHING CLASSES Hosted by Friends of Turnbull and Spokane Audubon Society, classes held on Sat, April 5, May 3, June 7 and July 12, from 9-11 am. $5-$10. To register: return participant information and check to “Friends of Turnbull,” c/o D. Burt, 3312 E. Donora Ct., Spokane, WA 99223. Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge, 26010 S. Smith Rd. fws.gov/refuge/turnbull (448-0659) BLOOMSDAY TRAINING CLINICS Weekly training sessions progress in distance each week, ending with a full 7-mile run. Saturdays through April 26, at 8:30 am. Free. SFCC 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. phc.org (747-3081) FINAL FOUR LIVE Live streaming on the big screen of the NCAA Final Four games. Doors open 45 min prior to game time. Proceeds benefit the Spokane Youth Sports Assoc. and Friends of the Bing. April 5. Suggested donation of $12/adults; $7/children. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com (536-1800) COED VOLLEYBALL TOURNAMENT Fundraiser tourney for Riverday School, a K-6 nonprofit school in Spokane. Open to teams of 2 men and 2 women, with a 2-8 team double elimination bracket. April 6,

8 am-6 pm. $30/player. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo. tinyurl.com/kvxax3s (927-0602) BACKPACKING BY BIKE Find out more about this increasingly popular method of backpack travel, including how to outfit your bike and plan trips. April 10, 7 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe. rei.com/ spokane (328-9900)

THEATER

THE GREAT AMERICAN TRAILER PARK MUSICAL Musical comedy. Through April 13, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $14-$20. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. (208-667-1323) SUDS 60s musical soap opera. Through April 13, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. In the Firth J. Chew Studio Theatre. $27. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. (325-2507) WAIT UNTIL DARK Performance of the Broadway thriller. April 3-19, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm, except April 11 at 6:30 pm; also Sat. April 6 and 12 at 2 pm. $12-$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. (455-7529) NORTHWOODS UNLEASHED Fifth annual musical showcase and live entertainment during a catered dinner. April 4-5 and 11-12 at $12-$25. Circle Moon Theater, Hwy 211 off Hwy 2, Newport. (208-448-1294) ROSENCRANTZ & GUILDENSTERN ARE DEAD Tragi-comedy retelling of “Hamlet,” directed by Benjamin Gonzales. April 4-12, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, also Sat at 2 pm. $8-$10. Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, WSU Pullman. performingarts.wsu. edu (335-8522) THE THREE MUSKETEERS Adventure play, directed by William Marlowe, adapted from the novel by Alexandre Dumas. April 4-19, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. (April 3 benefits Mission Community Outreach, tickets $25; April 16 benefits Spokane Area Youth Choirs, $25) $18$25. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) UNNECESSARY FARCE Comedy/farce directed by Scott Finlayson. Through April 6, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $13-$15. Ignite Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway Ave. (795-0004) WHO’S AFRAID OF VIRGINIA WOOLF? Performance of the classic drama by Edward Albee. April 4-13, Thurs-Fri at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $12-$15. Pullman Civic Theatre, 1220 NW Nye St. pullmancivictheatre.org (332-8406) GREATER TUNA Comedy/satire presented by Sixth Street Melodrama of Wallace, Idaho. April 5, 7 pm. $15. Empire Theatre, 126 S. Crosby St., Tekoa. (284-2000) LOVE LETTERS Veteran actors Ellen Travolta and Jack Bannon perform a one-evening romantic comedy show benefitting Idaho Repertory Theatre. April 5, 7:30 pm. $10-$25. University of Idaho Hartung Theater, 709 Deakin Ave. idahorep.org (208-885-6465)

VISUAL ARTS

THE CLOTHESLINE PROJECT A visual display featuring T-shirts designed and decorated by survivors of sexual assault. Displayed through April 30 in recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Free. River Park Square, 808 W. Main. riverparksquare.com (343-5057) FIRST FRIDAY Local galleries and busi-

nesses throughout Spokane host artist receptions and events; some exhibits remain open through the month. April 4, from 5-8 pm. Full event details and descriptions at inlander.com/firstfriday. BODYPAINTING PHOTOGRAPHY Work by John Austin featuring large prints of body painting photo shoots. April 4, 6 pm. Free. Porter’s Barbershop, 614 W. Garland. portersbarbershop.com (768-3991) HERE COMES THE SUN Showcase celebrating the season of spring, featuring local artists’ work in a variety of mediums. April 6-27, opening reception April 6 from 1-3 pm. Gallery hours Thurs-Sun from 10 am-6 pm. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way, Uniontown. artisanbarn.org (229-3414) SPOKANE ART SCHOOL SPRING BREAK CLASSES Classes offered include acrylic painting with Rachel Dolezal, charcoal drawing with Jery Haworth and homemade cards with Claryn Ried. Class schedule and registration online, offered April 7-11. Spokane Art School, 809 W. Garland. spokaneartschool.net (325-3001)

WORDS

DEALING WITH THE DRAGON: CHINA’S FOREIGN POLICY Lecture by Neal Sealock, former director of Spokane International Airport and U.S. Army brigadier general for 30+ years, who spent his career developing policies regarding China for the Natl. Security Council. April 3, 7:30 pm. Free. Whitworth, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. whitworth.edu (777-3834) JOY PASSANANTE The Moscow-based author reads from and signs copies of her book “My Mother’s Lovers” and “The Art of Absence.” April 3, 7:30 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main. (208-882-2669) SISTER MARY C. BOYS LECTURE The NYC-based scholar and author presents a lecture titled “Making Meaning in the Death of Jesus: Insights New and Old.” April 3, 7 pm. Free and open to the public. Gonzaga, 502 E. Boone. (313-3572) 3 MINUTE MIC The monthly poetry open mic, held every first Friday, is celebrating its 1st anniversary, and is featuring James Hunter, along with winners of the Spokane7 Limerick Contest. Hosted by Chris Cook. April 4, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) CYNTHIA J. STILLOE HOLLENBECK The author reads from and signs copies of her recent book “Suede: A Collection of Poetry.” April 5, 6 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. (208-882-2669) AUTHOR JONATHAN COE The author signs copies of his book “Letters from Fawn Creek.” April 5, noon. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) BOOTSLAM Performance poetry competition hosted by Spokane Poetry Slam. Anyone is welcome to compete; poets have 3 min. to present original work without costumes, props, or musical accompaniment. April 6, 7:30 pm. $5. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main. (703-7223) GET LIT! The 16th annual literary arts festival features writer readings, panels, workshops and other events. This year’s featured writers include Adrianne Harun, Alex Sanchez, William T. Vollman, George Bilgere and others. Event times and locations vary, see page 24 for details. Festival events April 7-13. Prices vary. outreach.ewu.edu/getlit ICE AGE FLOODS Presentation by Gary Flood, on the wide range of floods that tore through the Pacific Northwest 18,000-13,000 years ago. April 7, 6-8 pm. $10, registration required. University of

Idaho Kootenai County Extension, 1808 N. Third St. (208-446-1680) GONZAGA ECONOMICS SYMPOSIUM 24th annual event featuring a presentation titled “From Dismal Science to Happy Science: Economics and Happiness” by Justin Wolfers, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institute. April 8, 11:45 am. $100/person. McCarthey Athletic Center, 801 N Cincinnati. (313-7036) A HISTORICAL APPROACH TO THE RUSSIAN-UKRAINIAN RELATIONSHIP The second annual “Art and Craft of History” lecture series features a lecture by Gonzaga professor Kevin O’Conner, presenting “The Cossacks Are Coming! A Historical Approach to the RussianUkrainian Relationship.” April 8, 7 pm. Free and open to the public. Jundt Art Museum, 502 E. Boone Ave. (313-6611) SPOKANE STORYTELLING LEAGUE The local group meets monthly on the second Tues from 7-8:30 pm for storytelling for both entertainment and instruction. Free. Corbin Senior Center, 827 W. Cleveland Ave. (467-5703 or 466-8672)

ETC.

SAVVY SOCIAL SECURITY PLANNING: Workshop with a financial adviser on maximizing benefits, minimizing taxes and coordinating retirement income. April 3, 7-8 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. Also at Spokane Valley Library on April 9 from 7-8 pm. (893-8350) T.W.I.N.E. Teen Writers of the Inland Empire meets on the first Thursday of the month at 4 pm to write and share their work. For grades 6+. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. teenwritersoftheinlandempire.blogspot.com ADAM SMITH BREAKFAST Hosted by the Whitworth School of Business, featuring keynote speaker Lisa Brown, WSU Spokane Chancellor. April 3, 7:30-8:30 am. Whitworth University HUB, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-3283) BUDDHIST MEDITATION CLASS Classes hosted by nuns from Sravasti Abbey Buddhist monastery in Newport, Wash. Mondays from 6:30-8 pm, through May 19. Drop-ins welcome. Free, donations accepted. Unitarian Universalist, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. sravasti.org (447-5549) BECOMING DEBT FREE Financial workshop hosted by STCU, with a light meal served. Registration required. April 8, 6 pm. Free. Hayden Library, 8385 N. Government Way. stcu.org/workshops (208-772-5612) PAUL TAYLOR 2 Dance performance choreographed by Paul Taylor, influenced by the 1940s swing era and poetry. April 6, 3 pm. $14-$30. Beasley Coliseum, 225 N. Grand, Pullman. festivaldance.org (208-883-3267) SCIENCE ON TAP Monthly, informal science talks hosted by the U. of Idaho. April’s talk is by Dr. Stacey Camp, titled “The Archaeology of Japanese Internment in Idaho.” April 8, 5:30 pm. Free. Fort Ground Grill, 705 W. River Ave, CdA. (208-699-6240) SPRING GARDENING Session for all experience levels of gardeners, offering advice and tips on spring bulbs and plants and more. April 8, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Post Falls Library, 821 N. Spokane St. (208-773-1506) INLAND NW FREETHOUGHT SOCIETY The secular social group meets on the second Sunday of the month at 2 pm. Free. Shari’s, 240 N. Sullivan Rd. infreethought.org (216-4788) n

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27. “No more takers?” 28. 1996, for Derek Jeter 29. CNN offerings 33. Wand 37. Director Kazan 38. Final Four org. 39. Wise soul 44. Pallid 46. Flavor enhancer 47. Spain’s Bay of ____ 48. Unpleasant duty 50. Dawn 51. Busts 54. Hair accessory 55. Suffix with luncheon 56. Sharon Osbourne’s husband 58. Eerie gift 59. Pooh pal 60. Twain boy 61. Lacto-____ vegetarian

APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 59


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I Saw You

You Saw Me

Cheers

Cheers

Garland Theatre To the petite blone haired woman who sat next to me at the March 12, 5:30 showing of the Hobbitt, I was sitting on your left. If you are single, let’s chat over coffee or see another movie together.

could be many random people in Spokane!

motivated me to keep running. Thanks.

Thank You Inlander! for the fix to the crossword and the pinned note on the Bulletin Board. ~Greg

Hey Bright Eyes I tell my boys there are two things that are forever, a beautiful smile and beautiful eyes. I believe you would like getting to know me and who I am, so I invite you to send me an e-mail; we can discuss and share a few things then possibly meet for coffee or appetizers if we like... its gonna be up2ubrighteyes@gmail.com

Cheers To A Perfect Woman Melissa, it’s been just over a year since your amazing love and devotion saved me. I would have never gone to the hospital without you, and I surely wouldn’t have made it through recovery without you by my side. I want to thank you for your amazing and kind heart. You are the most amazing woman I could ever hope would fall in love with me. You are funny, witty, unselfish, incredibly creative and sexy beyond belief. Thank you for putting up with me and thank you for being unlike anyone I have ever met. You are so special. I will love you forever.

2 For 2! Dr Milligan, Nurse Audrey, and the rest of the crew on the labor and delivery floor at Holy Family! You made yet another birth an incredible experience for me, my daughters, and my Fiance. Your bedside manor and efficient, consistent care were nothing less then amazing! My only wish is that I would’ve been with the clinic for the birth of my first daughter. I’m so thankful to have been induced on your shift and thank you Dr. Milligan for accepting me back as a patient!

Copper Bearded Adonis I saw you working at Java, downtown Cd’A. You were blonde and your copper beard seemed to outline your rugged jawline. Your Zelda tattoo emblazoned on your forearm, a testament to our destiny. I was the girl with brown hair and deep blue eyes. After I ordered my coffee, I sheepishly hustled away from the counter, too afraid that I might get burned by your magnificence. Maybe the next time I come to Java I’ll say something to you. Northside Total Wine Good looking gal, we chatted a couple of times at the Northside Total Wino store, but apparently you don’t work there anymore. Probably went into the lucrative snuggling business, as discussed? I also need to talk to you about that. BTW, did you ever watch Dr. Horrible? Anyway, call me. Let’s Go For A Run Sometime We saw each other in the Sacred Heart Children’s Hospital parking lot March 27 at 11:55. You - brunette with tight, black yoga pants. I had a Cougar duffell bag and was on my way into the entrance to the children’s hospital. I was on my way to play hoops or I would have said more than hello!

You Saw Me RE: Worksource I’m not bald at Worksource, however, I am admiring you from afar and can be reached at morebeatles@outlook. com. I am there at Worksource at least 3 days a week as oppossed to being there “Eight Days A Week” Re: Twice Is Nice You may want/ need to be more specific with who you’re referring to if you would actually like to see a response from them. Otherwise a description of fantastic, understanding and sexy

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Cheers Happy Anniversary To my high school sweetheart: Thank you for an amazing 17 years, three beautiful babies and memories to last a lifetime. It seems like it was just yesterday that you rode your bike over to my house to meet me for

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” the first time. I could hardly control my 14 year old emotions. I was “smitten” by you instantaneously. I am so grateful to have you in my life. In our 11 years of marriage we have accomplished so much. I am incredibly proud to call you my husband. No amount of words can express how much I love you. In times of euphoria and despair there is no one I would rather have on my side. You are my very best friend. I can’t imagine my life without you in it. Together we are powerful beyond measure. Here’s to another 11 incredible years together. I love you to the moon and back, forever and always. Xoxo boppa Thumbs Up Guy To the guy driving the white SUV past Friendship Park on 03/26/14, thank you for the thumbs up. I’m pretty sure it was for the Beer Glass shirt I was wearing, but I had just hit my halfway mark and thought I was going to die. Your thumb

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New Furry Friend Thank you to the volunteer at SCRAPS for talking to me while deciding if I wanted to get my new dog or not. You managed to talk me into bringing home a great dog! I hope you are as glad as I am that she will no longer have a scary night at the kennels. She is an absolute doll, and everyone who meets her loves her. I look forward to many wonderful years to come with my new best friend. I can’t thank you enough for your devotion! Spokane Cooks At Home Congratulations to all the people I see shopping at Costco, Wal Mart Super Centers and Winco. This means you are eating at home, which costs a fraction of going out to eat, avoiding all the angry, militant and entitlement comments I’m reading about tipping in “Jeers”, knowing how the food is cooked, handled, prepared, the amount of fat, salt going into it, etc. A little effort in the kitchen goes a long way. Keep going out to eat as a special occasion. I know the restaurant industry doesn’t want to hear this, but we all have to do what works for us, the average Spokane citizen. Not So Graceful I want to give a very heartfelt Thank You, to the man and women who so graciously came to my rescue when I fell on the corners of Nevada and Lyons, on approx. the 10th of March, by the STA bus bench. Traffic was going by and YOU so kindly came and helped me up. I had tried to take short cut, with my walker, over to gas station. I felt so humiliated and embarrassed. Thank you so very much. It’s nice to be reminded that people care when a person with a disability needs help. Forever Grateful Thank You! Just a note to thank the person who paid for my lunch at IHOP on March 24th. You know who you are.

Rocking To The Music To the guy on Argonne and Mission in a truck? On Saturday, March 29th, a little after noon...I had my music blaring and windows down to keep my son awake until we got home, you turned your hat backwards and started rocking out to my music too trying to get my son to rock out too! It was freaking awesome and cute! Thanks for the laugh and thumbs up! I was in need of that! Mootsy’s Thank you for hanging out longer, playing pool because you thought ... Just maybe, I would show up. It’s been the best five years of my life mi amore! Happy Anniversary bay-buh!

Jeers Big Woman Hater So there is a man who hates big women get over it, in the first place you probably don’t have enough to spend on any size woman! Secondly the men in Spokane don’t make enough for Bird-eating, salad-eating, bulimic Victoria secret model and just so you know Kim Kardashian is not a size 0 but can get a rich man and also her mom wouldn’t even let your sorry behind get near the front gate BIG WOMEN NEED LOVING! So get the stepping loser Irresponsible Breeders To the heartless irresponsible breeders and dumpers of pets. How heartbreaking to see the sad eyes of the abandoned cats and dogs in the shelter-dumped for ridiculous reasons as moving, having a baby, doesn’t get along with new puppy or kitten, needs more attention; or just don’t want to care for anymore. Even dumping for other pets. What a horrible thing to do to an adult or senior pet; pets owned for only a few days or weeks to their entire lives. Death (your own), going into a care facility, illness, homelessness, etc-very legitimate reasons to need a shelter rescue. Dumping is a terrible lesson to teach kids if you have them (are they destined for

“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


Jeers

Jeers

Jeers

the fire station if they don’t train quickly enough?) The selfishness is ridiculous. You deserve all the hardship you suffer. Litters will be coming due to irresponsibility and ignorance. City and county residents can get a spay/neuter voucher by buying a license at SCRAPS-please contact them. Unwanted litters are preventable. Found homes for your babies? Maybe not for long. Or others may be abandoned for them; or they will make more litters, and some will die. Spay and neuter and stop the litters. And if you can’t make a commitment for the life of the pets, please consider getting a stuffed toy which always comes trained and stays small and cute.

shouldn’t be expected to shell out extra money for everything we buy, nor be criticised if we don’t.

people. Plumbers, garbagemen, bus drivers!! Work way harder. I have been a server, I understand you have difficult people but you bring out food and refill drinks, I don’t feel I need to pay you for that. It’s your job. If you can’t make it because people who earn their money just the same doesn’t wanna give thier hard earned money to you just for a refill. Get another job! I don’t get tips, I don’t act like a little brat threatening to spit in peoples food. Grow up!

Customer Service A little distaste for very rude and unprofessional customer service at a local business. On several occasions I have experienced not only the very rude demeanor at this shop but also a very uncleanly appearance of a lady who seemingly hates her job. If you truly despise your job as much as you portray in your unprofessional handling of customers on the phone as well as in person then maybe you should seek new employment or at the very least retire. I have even tried to speak on one occasion with the manager of the shop to no avail, she had blood shot eyes and a smell of greenery on her breath of a plant that is not being grown inside the companies greenhouses. Hopefully, the owners will realize how this poor customer service accompanied by a very unprofessional manager make the business look bad as a whole. As a long time family business in the area, I hope they learn that the way the customers are treated will affect their overall long term success.

Right of Way Laws Please read the laws regarding right of ways. Drivers must yield the right of way to oncoming traffic when making a left turn at an intersection in order to avoid a collision. Regardless of who was there first. Do not flag people to turn in front of you as it is against the law for them to do so. This happens all the time with people crossing Maple and Ash from the east and west crossing streets.

RE: Tipping War I can’t tell you how tired I am of all the servers complaining about bad tipping. I have worked many minimum wage jobs in which I worked my tail off, assisted customers and cleaned up their disgusting messes, among other things. However, since they weren’t at establishments where it was customary to tip, like restaurants, all I had were my basic wages. Just be happy you get tips at all. More and more, even some fast food restaurants, are sneaking in the tip jars next to the registers. We as consumers, especially in a poor town such as Spokane,

Idiot Drivers To the idiots who don’t know how to pull onto Highway 395 with approaching traffic coming. Car #1 doesn’t have anytime to pull on, without approaching traffic slamming on their brakes. Car #2 immediately follows Car #1, since Car #1 has already screwed the approaching traffic, decreasing even further the approaching traffics time to make a safe distance between cars. Where do these people get their licenses and is this procedure even on the test you take to get your Washington States drivers license?

RE: Tipping Look, im sorry you “live” off your tips, but I work minimum wage. “Fast food” crap food. Well I hate to tell you it’s not easy. You as waiters/waitresses take orders (as do I) and get people thier drinks, and bring people thier food. Okay... well wow you must be proud. Okay, well if people could get their own drinks they would. Because then they wouldn’t have a glass full of ice with a table spoon of soda. I take orders, I deliver the food to the table, I have to be polite and courteous, I also bus tables because people leave thier trays and garbage. I also do the dishs, line trays, stock up the restaurant, do garbages. That’s more than refilling drinks, I don’t get tips, and I don’t complain about it. Get another job. I tip once in awhile but I work my rear off for my money. People just don’t give it to me for refilling their drinks. If I want a sit down restaurant and eat food from a menu not a menu board and I have enough for my total then I have enough to treat myself. I work hard. I live alone and pay all my bills myself. With my fast food job. Stop complaining there are so many more people who deserve tips over you. Like cashiers dealing with difficult stupid picky

Not Everyone Loves Your Dog To the lady at Big R on Sprague Street with the loose dog wondering the store. I was attacked as a child by a dog. So yes I am still afraid of them. I was trying to shop and your dog wouldn’t leave me alone. He/she kept following me around and tried to jump up on me. I finally had to leave the store. What am I suppose to do if you won’t control your dog? Chuck merchandise and yell at him? Think about other people! RE: Dear “Impoverished” Woman I cannot believe that you actually took time out of your pathetic life to write a jeer about the woman in front of you at the convenience store who was buying, wait for it, wait for it, “candy” “a big donut” and God forbid “energy drinks” with your hard earned tax dollars. Seriously, what is wrong with you and what gives you the right to judge what someone buys with an EBT card? Furthermore, how do you know that she doesn’t have a job? Plenty of people I know work and still get food stamps because they don’t make enough to cover rent, bills, and other expenses; let alone food for their family. I suggest that you get off your high horse, mind your own business and take up a hobby that doesn’t include shaming other people to make yourself feel better! If I want to buy soda, bubblegum, and ten bags of chips with my EBT card, that’s my right to do so and if you don’t like it well that’s just too damn bad. I work and pay taxes just like everyone else does. Sincerely, the Woman who let’s her kids go to the store and pick out snack food with her EBT card.

A I D E

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APRIL 3, 2013 INLANDER 61


Reed Jessen picks up trash on North Howard Street as a result of a Crowdswell project.

Swells of Change Crowdswell lets communities define, fund and solve the problems people want fixed most BY CHEY SCOTT

I

t started with the observations he made on his daily commute. Graffiti on a stop sign. Trash in bushes. Bus stops without benches where elderly riders stood waiting. The naked wings of the iconic Expo ’74 butterfly structure in Riverfront Park. Eric Dahl saw problems like this everywhere, and he always thought the same thing. I wish I could change that, but I don’t have time, and don’t know how to start. Now, about 18 months later, Dahl has launched a means to a solution for these lingering urges for positive change: Crowdswell. Crowdswell is based on the concept of crowdfunding, popularized by companies like Kickstarter and Indiegogo, but instead of raising money for an individual’s or startup’s project, the site serves as a hub to create awareness and support for issues that, when solved, benefit a community as a whole. Projects posted on the site are referred to as “swells.” “A swell is an exponential effect, and [Crowdswell] is set up to create exponential funding,” Dahl explains. It’s less like a fundraising hub for nonprofits than it sounds. Dahl describes it as a “marketplace for good” that lets people who see problems — like those he sees on his way to work — define them and spread awareness to others who may have the means to help fund a solution

62 INLANDER APRIL 3, 2014

and/or solve them. Swells are free to create, but Crowdswell takes a 5 percent cut from each contribution as its overhead, along with a small transaction fee. Dahl cofounded the venture with the three owners of Magner Sanborn; he was formerly the Spokane-based advertising firm’s digital director. Crowdswell’s beta version went live a few weeks ago, and already several projects have been completed. To launch the test version, Dahl and a group of promoters traveled last month to Austin’s South by Southwest arts, music and tech festival, where Crowdswell was warmly received. Since then, Dahl says that one project has been completed in Austin so far, and several other endeavors there have been created. In Spokane just last week, Crowdswell user Reed Jessen, a local patent analyst, took charge to complete a swell seeking someone to clean up garbage littering bushes downtown, along Howard between Main and Riverside. The initiative brought in a total of $51 from donors giving anywhere from $2 to $10 each. To successfully complete the project — swells are open to be completed on a first-come, first-serve basis — Jessen had to follow instructions and fulfill requirements outlined by the swell’s creator, documenting his

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

efforts with photos posted back to the page. Only after Crowdswell users and administrators could confirm he completed the task as specified was the $51 released to him. While realistically it may not have cost Jessen that much to pick up the trash along the street, the idea of letting Crowdswell users give to initiatives with unspecified contribution goals is intended to incentivize other community members with the means to step up and agree to complete a project at whatever amount they feel comfortable. Larger projects with significant costs to actually implement can set targeted dollar amounts so the community knows how much a project realistically needs before it’s viable. With those types of projects, Dahl explains that there are protections in place so a person without relevant experience can’t take on the swell. In such instances, the swell’s creator can request to be designated as the organization that also will complete the project. Examples of these larger initiatives currently posted on Crowdswell include efforts to fund the long-envisioned U-District pedestrian bridge over the railroad tracks, goaled at $200,000, and a plan by Pet Savers in Spokane Valley to acquire and equip a mobile pet spayand-neuter unit. That effort is goaled at $8,000 and has so far gained $41 in contributions. Although Crowdswell has yet to officially launch nationwide, there have been projects launched in Pullman, Seattle, Grand Rapids, Mich., Southern California, and even as far away as Australia. Dahl can’t predict how far Crowdswell may go, nor the efforts it could play a role in accomplishing. For him, it’s more about empowering people to do more in their communities, whether they use Crowdswell or not. “I think other people like me have felt that same pain and lack of power,” he says. “At the end of the day, our measure of success is ‘Do people feel more empowered?’” n


APRIL 3, 2014 INLANDER 63


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Inlander 04/03/2014