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PREPARATIONS HAVE ALREADY BEGUN PAGE 18

YOUR GUIDE TO THAI

AN IN-DEPTH LOOK AT THE FOOD OF THAILAND PAGE 42

BEAUTY IS A BIT OF A BEAST

THE REMAKE WANTS TO BE ORIGINAL BUT ISN’T PAGE 46

MARCH 16-22, 2017 | THINK GLOBAL. LIVE INLAND.

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arely flashy, always full of promise and often underestimated. That’s GONZAGA BASKETBALL — but you could just as well be describing Spokane and the greater Inland Northwest. You need not be a sports fan to see that, come March, the Zags are the region’s de facto ambassadors to the world. For people who’ve never visited, the team may well be all they know of the Lilac City (besides, perhaps, Expo ’74 and someone named Rachel Dolezal). So, get to know the team — why they’re different this year and who they’ll face first in the Big Dance — and get inside the players’ heads. We’ve asked them all of your burning questions: favorite restaurant, preferred pregame music, funniest and best dressed! Coverage begins on page 20. Also this week: Food editor Chey Scott has put together a local guide to Thai cuisine (page 42), and in News (page 13), education reporter Wilson Criscione looks at how high schools are trying to prepare students for jobs in manufacturing. — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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WHAT ARE YOU MOST LOOKING FORWARD TO ABOUT SPRING?

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TAYLOR BAKER Sun. I would like the snow to go away, because I feel like this winter has lasted six months. Are you an outdoors person? I am. I hunt, fish and hike. I do a lot of things outside, so I’m ready for spring.

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BY ROBERT HEROLD S ince the end of World War II, the provision of medical care in the United States and other advanced countries has displayed three major features: first, rapid advances in the science of medicine; second, large increases in spending, both in terms of inflation-adjusted dollars per person and the fraction of national income spent on medical care; and third, rising dissatisfaction with the delivery of medical care, on the part of both consumers of medical care and physicians and other suppliers of medical care.

H

ad Republicans agreed with President Obama on nothing more than this — had the above statement served as the rational starting point for discussion and debate, today America, and the entire world for that matter, would be spared watching the GOP’s destructive display of ineptitude and hypocrisy, interwoven with deceit and demagoguery. Obama correctly stated that the United States was heading toward spending 17 percent of its gross domestic product on health care — fully 5 percentage points higher than the next industrialized country — while producing mediocre results. Coverage was terrible, and America was ranked 31st by the World Health Organization for overall health care results. Consider just one factor: In infant mortality, America ranked behind Cuba. Instead of engaging the problem, Republicans, including the likes of our own Cathy McMorris Rodgers, stalked the halls of Congress chanting, “America has the best health care system in the world.” They relied on the same mindless, self-serving, anti-science nonsense that their climate-change deniers rely on today. And now, to no one’s surprise, they are making a mess of things. According to Congressional Budget Office estimates, if the GOP health care reform proposal becomes law, up to 24 million Americans will lose coverage by 2026; the cost will go up for all but the most affluent. Economist Paul Krugman, after sorting all this out, leaves us with this simple explanation: “Republicans were lying all along, and still are.” Given all the obfuscation and denial, some very serious questions were not confronted — cost containment over time being at the top of the list. But the coverage the ACA did provide, it turns out, is highly popular — yet that’s what the Republican plan would dramatically reduce.

I

n 2010 the Democrats lost control of Congress. How did this happen? I suggest that it was because they ignored the old Tip O’Neill axiom: “All politics is local.” They lost connection with their natural constituencies. They blew off labor unions, blew off local organizing, became mired in identity politics and were being led around by a Democratic National Committee that preferred top-down campaigns. Factor in Citizens United, plus what the Supreme Court did to the Voting Rights Act, and today not only

6 INLANDER MARCH 16, 2017

are Democrats in the minority at both the state and congressional levels, they are also staring at a stacked deck. Still there’s a strong local case to be made against Trump and his acolytes. Democrats, however, haven’t made it — that is trickle-down policies have promoted inequality and failed to address the realities of a service economy. Today, our most important payrolls — upon which our small business economy depends — are Fairchild Air Force Base, the health care sector, education, and city and county government. These all are either service-sector, government or nonprofit. Our medical community is especially vulnerable, with Medicaid funding in Spokane being the foundation of many medical practices and patients’ futures. Trump and McMorris Rodgers threaten all of this with their plans to cut into that safety net. By backing this ill-conceived ACA “repeal and replace,” McMorris Rodgers is showing how terrible she is on health care — one of her district’s keystone economic elements. We already knew she was bad on the environment, on women’s rights and on public education. And judging by recent events, she obviously has zero influence over what happens to Fairchild. But the fact is that local Democrats have done a miserable job of confronting her on her record. Every challenger since 2000 has run not so much a political campaign but what, for want of a better term, might be termed a “politeness campaign.” Against all odds, Spokane has accomplished much over the past 20 or 30 years. Consider just some of the success stories: From the salvation of Browne’s Addition, to the rediscovery of South Perry, to the Fox, to the Davenport, to the old Penney’s building, to Kendall Yards, to the WSU medical school, to the Grand Hotel, to restoration of many high schools and construction of elementary schools, to the redo of Riverfront Park, to all the brewery startups. The last thing Spokane needs is for McMorris Rodgers and her party to attack such community cornerstones as Community Development Block Grant funding, public radio, public television, Planned Parenthood, early childhood development funding, public education and much more. Indeed, given their attacks on immigrants, even agriculture is threatened. As for my opening quote regarding health care problems in America? This statement wasn’t written by Barack Obama or some flaming liberal, but by that archconservative economist who advised both Ronald Reagan and Margaret Thatcher: Milton Friedman. n


DO SOMETHING!

Learn more about Spokane’s homeless this week.

Merciful March

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Spend a night experiencing what homelessness is like for Spokane residents in this 12-hour marathon fundraiser hosted by the local nonprofit Blessings Under the Bridge. The overnight event takes place under the I-90 overpass at Fourth and McClellan. Fri, March 24 from 7 pm to 7 am the next morning. $25 minimum donation per participant; additional fundraising opportunities available. For details and registration, visit butb.org.

ART SALVAGE VOLUNTEER WORK PARTY

Join the Art Salvage volunteer team to prepare art kits with all the supplies needed to make “deconstructed” notebooks. Profits from the sale of the upcycled kits supports the Seed Money Campaign to open the first creative reuse store in Spokane. RSVP via email; location to be provided. Sun, March 19 from 1-3 pm. Email katie@artsalvagespokane.com for details.

SUICIDE AWARENESS FORUM

Spokane Public Radio’s Steve Jackson moderates a discussion on suicide prevention, mental health and Washington state’s Death with Dignity Act. Also features panelists who work with a range of local organizations, including Survivors of Suicide, Frontier Behavioral Health, End of Life Washington and the Post Falls Police Department. Wed, March 22 from 6:30-8:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Spokane City Hall, Council Chambers, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (328-5729)

LGBTQ COSMIC BOWLING PARTY

Join OutSpokane for a night of Cosmic Bowling to support the events of Spokane Pride 2017 in June. Entry includes bowling shoes and ball, pizza and pitcher of beer or soda for the lane. Participants also get a $35 North Bowl gift card for future fun. Fri, March 24 from 9:15 pm to midnight. All-ages. $30/ person or $120-$150/team of 4-5. North Bowl, 125 W. Sinto. outspokane.org/ bowling n Tell us about your event or other opportunities to get involved. Submit events at Inlander.com/getlisted or email getlisted@inlander.com.

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MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | POLITICS

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Constitutional Convenience How power too often trumps principle in reading our nation’s founding document BY JOHN T. REUTER state and use it to fund bold progressive policies. We’ll be more successful than ever, and screw the people who live in states who voted for Trump. They’ll get what they deserve.” It’s an argument I am well familiar with from my days in rural grange halls. For decades, all conservatives have wanted is for the feds to leave them alone. If liberals wanted to experiment with their “wacky ideas” where they lived, then fine, but leave them out of it. But these days, conservatives in my social media feed have similarly suddenly rediscovered parts of our Constitution, specifically Article II, which spells out the powers of the Presidency. They’re loving this governing

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John T. Reuter, a former Sandpoint City Councilman, has been active in protecting the environment, expanding LGBT rights and Idaho’s Republican Party politics.

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ith the dramatic shift of power in the White House, I’ve seen many of my Democratic friends suddenly rediscover the 10th Amendment, which articulates the idea that there are certain powers that are reserved to the states or the people. Increasingly, along these lines, I see liberals arguing for a restrained federal government and reinvigorated experimentation at the state and local level. “Go ahead,” I see them writing on Facebook, “and cut federal taxes for the rich. We’ll raise it in our ‘Blue’

by executive orders, aghast that any court might dare intervene. They just won an election, and everyone just needs to respect that, by George! Sadly, I’ve been familiar with this particular hypocrisy since well before the election. Serving on Sandpoint’s city council, I was often dismayed to see the Idaho Legislature complain, on the one hand, about federal laws tying their hands and, on the other, aggressively reducing the ability of other elected officials to make decisions at the local level. Democratic officials from other cities were and are often fond of pointing this out, but they shared in the same hypocrisy. As they asked for local control in their cities, they were also happy to push for the federal government to become more muscular in handing down ultimatums to those same state legislators. Our founding document should be read the same way, regardless of who is in power. We shouldn’t selectively cheerlead for the balance of powers based on whether they help us achieve our policy ends. The Constitution, our democracy and our institutions are greater than petty politics — or at least they should be. And sometimes, despite the shifting allegations of exactly who is doing the overreaching, they are. When a Republican-appointed federal judge in Seattle halted the Trump administration’s initial ban on Muslim immigrants last month, he did so citing the same legal principles that had caused judges in Texas to block the Obama administration’s executive actions on immigration. Proving, that at least in one courtroom, the Constitution applies evenly to each administration, regardless of ideology. But of course, policies aren’t just abstract principles where consistency is necessarily the highest end. They have a concrete impact on people’s lives and, ultimately, that’s what draws many of us to engaging in politics in the first place — the opportunity to do good. My suggestion, then, is that we should consider how government really ought to work, not only when we are in power, but also when we are out of power. We need to consider that the same structures that stop us from doing what we believe to be good when we have power, stop those we disagree with from undoing perceived good when we don’t. Then we should fight for those structures. For me, this means a consistent belief in robust local government, with a federal government that primarily focuses on protecting individual rights and civil liberties. Others may find a different balance, but what’s important is that it is one you can respect — win or lose. 

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

REALLY LAW AND ORDER? he notion that prosecutor Larry Haskell’s (“Law-and-Order Larry,”

T

3/9/17) new prosecuting criteria goes against current research, and the fact he was an early Trump supporter go hand in hand. If he didn’t have a law degree, his actions and political proclivities would lead a person to believe he is not college educated, one of Trump’s minions, in a position of power, dangerous. STEVE LACOMBE Spokane Valley, Wash.

DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

Readers react to “Safe Space,” Daniel Walters’ story about the recent Spirit of America rally and its pro-Trump GOP attendees:

BRIAN BABCOCK: Their honeymoon will soon be over… health care, voting rights, tax cuts for the rich, the middle class will have to pay for everything. KIM LEHR: Can’t wait until they see how they’ve been duped as well. Should be pretty fun to watch. BURR MARTIN: The man feels anger when SNL makes fun of him, gets more upset about his daughter’s clothing line than Russian connections and bars the media from covering him, oh, but people who see through his bullcrap are the snowflakes? I don’t think that word means what you think it means. REBECCA MICHEL: Snowflakes are beautiful and unique when you look at them up close, so hearing people use that as an insult makes me smile. Trump is a pot stirrer not a peace maker. Trump supporters need to wake up. 

Readers react to “Running Scared,” Paul Dillon’s recent column about GOP leaders avoiding town halls:

MARY OOMS: Aren’t we her boss?? She supposedly works for all of us. Not who she pre-selects for her town hall. ELIZABETH PARKER: CMR’s bosses are the billionaires and millionaires in the GOP, corporations, etc. Clearly not the 73,000 Eastern Washington residents who will now lose their ACA health care coverage. FRED DEFORD: They heard us when we voted them in, to get rid of the ACA. The town hall was called for the small group of squeaky wheels to whine, but they are definitely not the majority and they do not hold the popular opinion that we want to get rid of the mandated, disastrous ACA. 

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Wyatt Eitreim (left) welds in the shop at Shadle Park High School.

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EDUCATION

A Different Track How local high schools are trying to meet the increasing demand for skilled manufacturing jobs BY WILSON CRISCIONE

U

nlike many of his peers, Wyatt Harris has never been too interested in pursuing a four-year degree at a university. Harris, wearing a camouflage New York Giants hat during his manufacturing class, says his path is simpler. He plans to graduate, spend a year or two learning his trade at the local community college, and then become a welder.

“My happy place is working with metal and being able to work with my hands,” says Harris, a junior at Shadle Park High School. More than likely, Harris will have a job waiting for him when he’s ready. There are around 500 manufacturing companies in Spokane County with 120 currently available jobs, says regional labor economist Doug Tweedy. And the number of openings in manufacturing

is projected to increase by 100 jobs every year for the next five years, he adds. Schools in Spokane have recognized this, and now they’re beginning to prepare kids to meet the demand. Automation at manufacturing facilities means employers are seeking more workers with skills beyond high school, but a four-year degree isn’t always necessary. So ...continued on next page

MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 13


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Teacher Tony Anselmo (right) gives Wyatt Harrison some pointers.

“A DIFFERENT TRACK,” CONTINUED... now, local districts like Spokane Public Schools and Central Valley School District are creating programs designed for students who, like Harris, want manufacturing jobs. The goal is to create more pathways for students to enter two-year programs or apprenticeships after high school, says Will Sarett, Spokane Public Schools director of Career & Technical Education. That, in turn, will help local manufacturing businesses struggling to find qualified employees. “When we look at what our economy needs,” Sarett says, “we’re going to be really honest to kids about making sure kids know what’s out there.”

A CHANGING INDUSTRY

The jobs in manufacturing look different than they did in the past, says Tweedy. Automation has taken over some work, he says, but mostly labor-heavy work. “Now it’s more technical — a lot more computers, a lot more robots,” he says. In Spokane, the manufacturing jobs are particularly more advanced, says Tweedy, who adds that the area has more pharmaceutical, composites and chemical manufacturing jobs that weren’t around 10 to 15 years ago. “I think manufacturing is one of those foundation industries that pays well, and that are good jobs, but sometimes kids and young adults need to become aware of the kinds of jobs in manufacturing,” he says. Some local companies are having trouble filling positions, says Cal Christen, technical training and development specialist for Wagstaff, a Spokane Valley-based manufacturer of aluminum casting equipment. “There is a great demand [in Spokane], for sure,” Christen says. Christen, who is also a machining instruc-

tor at Spokane Community College, says that Wagstaff has run into the issue of needing more skilled workers. He says the company hired two students as interns straight out of a welding class at NEWTECH Skill Center, a school in Spokane focused on technical skills. Spokane Public Schools’ Sarett points out that only about 35 percent of jobs nationally will require a bachelor’s degree by 2020, according to a 2013 study by Georgetown University, so most students don’t need a four-year degree. As for the rest of the students? “They need technical skills,” he says.

MEETING THE DEMAND

In the shop at Shadle Park High School, teacher Tony Anselmo walks around giving pointers to his students who are welding, as sparks shoot off the metal all around the room. Harris builds a brass pen. Another student is welding what will eventually be a fire pit, while another says he is making an off-road go-kart. Many of these students plan to go into an apprenticeship program after high school, if they’re not already in one now. Spokane Public Schools has a goal called “T-2-4,” which aims to give students a pathway to some sort of postsecondary education: a technical degree, a two-year degree or a four-year degree. With that in mind, the district is adding more classes that help students achieve those goals. Last week, Spokane Public Schools’ board of directors voted to add a material science class at North Central High School for students interested in agricultural manufacturing. Sarett says he would like to see the class expand to all high schools in Spokane eventually, after it kicks off in the 2017-18 school year. He says it could help meet the demand for the agricultural jobs widely available in North Idaho and Eastern Washington.


Many students, like Ben Meredith, prefer working with their hands.

WILSON CRISCIONE PHOTOS

In 2014, Shadle Park added a class taught by Anselmo that does something similar. It’s called a Boeing Core Plus class, an aerospace engineering course similar to Anselmo’s manufacturing class but geared more toward building aircraft. There are roughly a couple of dozen classes like it in the state, but Shadle is one of the only comprehensive high schools with the Boeing course. “[Boeing] is seeing a large wave of employees getting ready to retire,” Anselmo says. “They’re trying to get students to recognize that these are great careers with a living wage. They’re trying to introduce this into high schools, so that when they do get to Boeing, they have baseline skills and knowledge to move forward.” Central Valley School District has goals similar to Spokane’s T-2-4 program, says Susan Christenson, the district’s Career & Technical Education director. Starting in eighth grade, students

“They’re trying to get students to recognize that these are great careers with a living wage.” take a survey each year and do research to determine their interests and potential occupation. They are then told what education they would need to achieve those aims. Often, they realize that a four-year degree may not be necessary. Central Valley has a manufacturing technology course and a robotics technology course. Christenson says CV students often go on field trips to businesses in the area to see what jobs are out there. The district is also getting students in elementary school involved in more hands-on activities. She says a major challenge is communicating to parents that two-year and trade programs are good opportunities for students. She says that schools in the CV, West Valley, East Valley and Freeman districts have started an initiative to communicate that point. “Even a lot of people who have looked at the research, they’ll say, ‘That’s great for someone else’s kid, but my kid is getting a [bachelor’s] degree,’” Christenson says. “So somehow we need to get past that and look at what is best for kids, and what is best for the economy.” n wilsonc@inlander.com

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MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

On Inlander.com MORE INLANDER NEWS EVERY DAY

SPR’s Steve

Jackson moderates a panel of experts.

• What are signs someone wants to end their life? • How big is the problem of Suicide? In teens? Vets? • What resources are available for family & community?

Hillyard businesses have been worried about being bypassed by the North South Freeway.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

TRANSPORTATION After decades of anticipation, the NORTH SPOKANE CORRIDOR was finally getting built when it ran into a major roadblock: a 7-acre plume of leftover oil, 170 feet below ground. An old railway refueling station had left the aquifer contaminated, right in the way of the proposed freeway route. Nearby neighbors worried that an altered route would send the highway soaring above the Market Street business district, essentially dooming hopes for the revitalization of the Hillyard neighborhood. But after 18 months of work, representatives from Burlington Northern Santa Fe Railway, the Washington State Department of Ecology and the Washington State Department of Transportation sketched out a new framework. The original route will shift slightly to the west, but it won’t be too close to Market. The freeway will continue to be constructed, while the big oil spill is cleaned up just to the east. (DANIEL WALTERS)

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16 INLANDER MARCH 16, 2017

CRIMINAL JUSTICE Thanks in part to a harsh intraoffice policy put in place by Spokane County Prosecutor LARRY HASKELL, an accused thief escaped with no jail time, public defenders say. Generally, the policy says that for people with nine or more felonies on their records, prosecutors cannot agree to plea deals, except in cases where the state’s evidence is weak. In turn, the accused are told to plead guilty, or take it to trial. In at least one case, a Spokane judge dismissed felony charges halfway through a trial for lack of sufficient evidence. Had the prosecutor accepted a deal proposed by the public defender, the man in question would have returned to prison for a probation violation. (MITCH RYALS)

EDUCATION Last week, Washington lawmakers delayed what is known as a “LEVY CLIFF” that would have slashed district budgets. Currently, school districts get money in state and federal funding, called their “levy base”; most school districts in Washington can collect up to 28 percent of their levy base through local property taxes. That was supposed to drop to 24 percent next year, which would cost districts across the state millions. But as the legislature works to figure out the best way to fully fund schools this year, it provided assurance to districts that schools would not see a dramatic decrease in funding for at least another year by sending the “levy cliff” bill to Gov. Jay Inslee’s desk. Inslee is expected to sign it. (WILSON CRISCIONE)


NEWS | BRIEFS

Change at the Top Washington’s Eastern District will get a new U.S. Attorney; plus, state House overwhelmingly passes a bill revoking rapists’ parental rights ORMSBY OUT

Last week, MIKE ORMSBY stepped down from his post as U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Washington. Ormsby and numerous other top federal prosecutors resigned after the Trump administration called for 46 prosecutors appointed under the Obama administration to leave office. Ormsby was appointed by President Obama and confirmed in 2010. The move to sweep federal prosecutors’ offices of the previous administration’s appointees is not necessarily unusual for a new administration, though some past presidents have allowed holdover U.S. Attorneys to stay on until the new nominee is confirmed. Career prosecutor Joseph Harrington will serve as the Acting U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District until the Trump administration chooses a permanent replacement. Harrington, a graduate of Gonzaga Law School, has worked for the Eastern District of Washington for more than two decades. It’s unclear if Trump or U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions have a permanent replacement in mind, though at least three local jurists have expressed an interest: Spokane County Prosecutor Larry Haskell, Spokane County

District Court Judge Vance Peterson and former U.S. Attorney Bill Hyslop. Haskell is an Air Force veteran who took over the Spokane County Prosecutor’s Office in 2015. He bills himself as a tough-on-crime guy with nearly 20 years of experience in criminal prosecution. Peterson is an Army veteran with 26 years of experience as a judge. In 2010, he founded a specialized local court dedicated to helping veterans caught in legal trouble. Hyslop served as the U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District from 1991-93 as a George H.W. Bush appointee. He has practiced law in Spokane for 37 years and recently served as president of the Washington State Bar Association. (MITCH RYALS)

RIGHTS OF RAPISTS

Under current Washington law, a rape survivor who gets pregnant and decides to keep her child can be forced to CO-PARENT WITH HER RAPIST, but lawmakers are trying to change that. House Bill 1543, which passed the House 94-2, allows for parental rights to be terminated if a victim can provide clear, cogent and convincing evidence that the

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person seeking parental rights raped or sexually assaulted them, resulting in the pregnancy, rather than having to show a conviction. One of the two votes against was cast by freshman Rep. Mike Volz, R-Spokane. The bill is now before the Senate’s Law and Justice Committee, which is chaired by Sen. Mike Padden, R-Spokane Valley. Rep. Mike Volz voted against a “‘Clear and convincing bill helping victims to revoke evidence’ is the right standard of parental rights of rapists. proof for these kinds of cases,” argues Sara Ainsworth, advocacy director of Legal Voice, a progressive feminist organization that pushes for legislative changes, and Andrea Piper-Wentland, executive director of the Washington Coalition of Sexual Assault Programs. “It’s the same standard Washington state courts use in all other termination of parental rights cases. And if a rape conviction were required, the law would not protect the vast majority of rape survivors and their children,” the two write in an editorial supporting the bill. Most rape victims never report, and when they do, rape prosecutions and convictions are “notoriously low,” Ainsworth and Piper-Wentland explain. Out of every 1,000 rapes, 310 are reported to police. Of those, only 7 will lead to a felony conviction, according to statistics compiled by the Rape, Abuse and Incest National Network. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

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Clearing the Way Homeowners in northeast Washington are already preparing for wildfire season BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

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hough patches of snow still dot the ground off much of 4 Mound Road, some in that part of the Nine Mile Falls community already are preparing for wildfire season. Crews from Washington’s Department of Natural Resources worked in the rain Monday morning to thin branches and small trees near North Samek Lane, using chainsaws to cut down pines and then loading the debris into a chipper. You wouldn’t know it now, but this area was hard-hit during a wildfire known as “Firestorm� in October 1991, a fire that took out more than 100 homes in four counties in a single day. Bonnie Cobb remembers that day well. The fire came up the canyon, somehow jumped over her home, and then burned through hay bales, three outbuildings, brush and trees. “I had two babies at home, and we went and turned the cows and horses into the field and waited there, and after the fire passed we came back up,� Cobb says. They fought embers with hoses after that. They were lucky that their power was still on to pump the water — many of the fires were started

when gale-force winds knocked down power lines, and it’s common to lose power during wildfires. More than 25 years later, the house is still there (Cobb rents it out now) but the area where there used to be a thick stand of trees is now a mostly open field, with a handful of younger trees dotting the snow-covered ground. In 2006, Cobb joined the local fire department, and later helped gather neighbors to

“We saw significant increases in the numbers of large, human-started fires over time, especially in the spring.� participate as a “Firewise Community,� preparing homes and properties to make them less vulnerable to and more resilient during wildfires. Cobb had trees on her property thinned in 2013 as part of the early Firewise work. The thinning on Monday was on a neighbor’s property just across the road. The next day, Gov. Jay Inslee was scheduled to come see how the northeast Washington community is preparing


this year, and talk about how others should get ready.

FIRE STARTERS

About 85 percent of wildfires in Washington are caused by humans, according to DNR. Only about 31 percent of fires in Idaho from 1992 to 2012 were started by people, but the state also had the most burned land of all states in the lower 48 during that time period, according to a study released in late February by researchers from the University of Idaho, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, and University of Colorado-Boulder. Lightning is still responsible for burning the most land in the Pacific Northwest, but the researchers saw a rise in human-caused fires. “We saw significant increases in the numbers of large, humanstarted fires over time, especially in the spring,” project leader Bethany Bradley says in a news release about the study. “I think that’s interesting, and scary, because it suggests that as spring seasons get warmer and earlier due to climate change, human ignitions are putting us at increasing risk of some of the largest, most damaging wildfires.” The spring fire season in northeast Washington often starts after the snow finally melts and the leaves, grasses and shrubs that died off the previous fall start to dry out quickly, says Guy Gifford, a DNR spokesman for the region. Outdoor burns are largely to blame, Gifford says, especially those that don’t have an adequate fire block, like a ring of rocks or dirt around a campfire.

HOW TO PREPARE

Aside from being mindful when burning, one of the keys to preparing a home is being “ember aware,” Gifford says. Basically, if a lit match were to fall somewhere outside your home, what would catch on fire, and how might that lead to a bigger fire, putting you at risk? Is there a newspaper bin left outside next to a wooden deck? You might keep that in a different place. A straw broom next to some cardboard? Same story. Beauty bark can be a risk, as can other plants, and cedar LETTERS shake roofing can also be easier Send comments to for embers to catch on and editor@inlander.com. burn, Gifford says. DNR and local fire departments offer free assessments to help homeowners decide what their biggest issues might be and get an idea of what they might address to lower their risks, says Gifford. “They can look at a property and analyze, ‘Yeah, there is beauty bark, but is that your worst issue?’ No, maybe the other plants are,” he says. If you own forest land, you might also qualify for a DNR grant to reimburse up to half the costs of thinning the plants and slash, making it less susceptible to fires.

THE FORECAST

From a weather standpoint, Washington is looking fairly good so far for the spring fire season, says Josh Clark, a DNR meteorologist. The state has had below-average temperatures, and snowpack is at 100 percent or more of normal. “Below-average temperatures means fuels are not going to be drying out nearly as fast,” Clark says. “We will have a lot of moisture content well into early fire season.” That said, the snowpack on April 1 is really the big early indicator. “It’s kind of our first either really big red flag or sigh of relief,” he says. Because so many fires are started by people, it can be hard to guess where they’ll start, Clark says. “It really depends on fire prevention efforts, and getting folks to be very mindful when and where they’re setting fires, and how they’re tending to them.”  samanthaw@inlander.com

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N

ow the real season starts. All the Gonzaga basketball you’ve watched, read about and fretted over between their first win in early November and their most recent victory, four months later? All a mere preamble to the Big Dance — aka “March Madness,” aka the NCAA Tournament — when 68 teams go all Thunderdome, knocking each other off until just one remains standing at the end as national champion. Gonzaga has never won it all, but then again, there’s never been a Gonzaga squad quite like this year’s team of Bulldogs. West Coast Conference championships are nothing new in these parts, of course. Neither is head coach Mark Few’s way of guiding squads of likable young men

to the heights of the regular-season polls. These Zags are arguably more athletic and defensive-minded than any of their predecessors, which just might help them make their first Final Four and maybe — just maybe — bring a title trophy to Spokane, home base of the crazed and ever-growing Bulldog Nation. In the following pages, we introduce some of the players who make this year’s Zags squad different. We explore why an early tournament loss is unlikely, talk to a Northwest author who has literally written the book on Gonzaga men’s hoops — twice — and delve into why the Gonzaga women’s team deserves some of your attention this week, too, as they start their own march into the Madness. — DAN NAILEN

A fan marks the Zags’ seed in the Kennel last month. RAJAH BOSE PHOTO

MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 21


MARCH MADNESS

MAYBE THIS TIME Never mind the naysayers: Here are five reasons this Zags team could go all the way BY WILL MAUPIN AND DAN NAILEN

THE TRANSFERS

Skeptical fans often suggest that if Gonzaga played in a stronger league, the Zags wouldn’t be as nationally relevant. Their point hinges on the assertion that the talent in other leagues is far superior to what Gonzaga faces in the West Coast Conference. What they fail to recognize is that the talent in those leagues is not superior to the talent on Gonzaga’s roster, in part because the Zags have taken in some of those leagues’ most talented players. As a sophomore at the University of Washington in 2015, Nigel Williams-Goss was named to the all-Pac-12 second team. Jordan Mathews averaged double figures in scoring as a sophomore and junior at Cal. In his final season at Missouri, Johnathan Williams led the Tigers in points, rebounds and blocks. Gonzaga has poached some big-name transfers in recent years — Byron Wesley from USC in 2014-15 and Kentucky’s Kyle Wiltjer from 2014-16 — but this trio of starters is unprecedented.

THE COMEBACK

There was no real way for people outside the Gonzaga locker room and practice sessions to know how well Przemek Karnowski’s recovery from back surgery would go. The injury cost him the majority of the 2015-16 season, and even though last year’s Zags made a run to the Sweet Sixteen, the bushy-bearded center’s defensive presence and passing skills were definitely missed. The history of 7-foot-1, 300-pound dudes rebounding successfully from back injuries is not great, but Karnowski has been all he used to be this year, and then some. His leadership helped the team incorporate its transfer players and incoming freshmen with ease, and his shooting touch and movement have been better than anyone could have hoped for. This year’s Zags would have been good without big “Shem” in the mix; with him, they might just be a Final Four team.

Johnathan Williams transferred from Missouri, one of three transfers playing key roles this season. RAJAH BOSE PHOTO

22 INLANDER MARCH 16, 2017

THE NONCONFERENCE BEATDOWN

We all know the knock on the Zags from people who don’t get to see them play on a regular basis: “They don’t play anybody! Their conference is terrible!” As usual, such criticism is overblown at best, if not completely off-base. But you can look at Gonzaga’s non-WCC schedule this season and see a team that made a leap to a new level. Last season, the Zags lost to Texas A&M, Arizona and UCLA before starting conference play. This season, they went undefeated in nonconference play, beating Florida, Iowa State and Arizona — all teams that made the NCAA tourney, with high seeds — in addition to San Diego State, Washington and Tennessee, all teams from major conferences or with serious basketball pedigrees and history.

THE DEFENSE

From Dan Dickau raining threes in the early 2000s, to Adam Morrison leading the nation in scoring in 2006, through the Olynyk Clinic in 2013, Gonzaga has been a program built on great offense. But this season, the Zags have a stingy defense to match their scintillating scoring. Stat whiz Ken Pomeroy has been tracking all 351 Division I teams since 2002. Over those 15 seasons, Gonzaga’s average ranking in offensive efficiency was a respectable 21st in the nation. Defensively, the Zags came in at 57th. This year the Zags’ defense (2nd) is ranked higher than their offense (10th). Their defense isn’t just better than normal; it might just be the best in all of college basketball. Gonzaga leads the nation in margin of victory, winning games by an average of 23.4 points per game, and ranks second in field goal percentage defense (36.8 percent).

THE PRODIGY

McDonald’s All-Americans (essentially high school all-stars) tend to wind up at power conference programs. Landing them is one sign of a program’s prominence. Duke, perhaps the most prominent of all, has eight McDonald’s All-Americans on its roster this season alone. Gonzaga has had four in its history. Zach Collins is the first to come to Spokane straight from high school — Micah Downs, Kyle Wiltjer and Nigel Williams-Goss all transferred from other colleges. Collins’ commitment to the program while still at Las Vegas’ Bishop Gorman High School signaled that Gonzaga’s time as a squad of plucky, overlooked players is over. The 7-footer comes off the bench, suggesting that the McDonald’s AllAmerican isn’t even the best player at his position on Gonzaga’s roster. But landing a McDonald’s All-American is an off-the-court victory over the sport’s big names, and Collins’ contributions backing up Karnowski have been vital to this team’s success. n


MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 23


MARCH MADNESS

17

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Bracket Breakdown How likely is a trip to the Sweet 16 after two games in Salt Lake City? BY DAN NAILEN

M

uch has been made about Gonzaga returning this year to the site of the last time they were a No. 1 seed in the NCAA Tournament. Most Zags fans probably do their best to forget that 2013 trip to Salt Lake City. That season, Gonzaga was close to becoming the first-ever No. 1 seed to lose to a No. 16 seed, scuffling to a six-point win over Southern before losing their second game to Wichita State. In retrospect, that wasn’t a bad loss — Wichita State went on to the Final Four — but it was monumentally disappointing for a Zags squad that had reached No. 1 in the polls for the first time that season and won 32 games overall. This time, the path to the Sweet Sixteen and the West Regional in San Jose, California, doesn’t look quite as daunting. The Zags need to win two games to move on, starting with their 11 am tip-off against South Dakota State on Thursday, followed two days later with a showdown against the Northwestern-Vanderbilt winner. Here’s a quick look at the teams Gonzaga has to go through to get out of Utah alive:

SOUTH DAKOTA STATE THURSDAY, 11 AM, TBS

The 16th-seeded Jackrabbits are the champions of the Summit League, and that came as a surprise; the team is only 18-16 overall and went 8-8 in conference play before getting hot in the Summit League tournament. SDSU is essentially a one-man gang, and that man is sophomore forward Mike Daum. He averaged 25.3 points and 8.2 rebounds per game this season, and when they needed him most in the game to reach March Madness, he dropped 37 points and 12 boards on Omaha, his ninth double-double this season. Only one other Jackrabbit averages double figures in scoring, and the team doesn’t scare anyone from three-point territory. Basically, if the Zags can limit Daum, they shouldn’t get much of a scare from South Dakota State.

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The eighth-seeded Wildcats out of the Big Ten might just be happy to be here. They’ve already enjoyed a legendary season, becoming the first Northwestern squad to ever make the NCAA Tournament, and the final powerconference team to do so in history. So yeah, they’re pretty happy. They’re no fluke; the Wildcats have beaten tourney teams Wisconsin (in Madison), Maryland and Michigan and had close losses to Butler and Purdue. They’re an average-shooting squad that relies primarily on three players — guards Bryant McIntosh and Scottie Lindsey and forward Vic Law — for scoring. The Wildcats’ overall size could be a challenge for Gonzaga if they meet up on Saturday, but with only one player taller than 6-foot-8, and a little-used freshman at that, they have no answer for Gonzaga’s inside game led by Przemek Karnowski.

VANDERBILT

The ninth-seeded Commodores are fortunate to be in the tournament; basically, they can thank a trio of Southeastern Conference wins against four-seed Florida, the third in the conference tourney, and another victory against fiveseed Iowa State for their trip to Salt Lake City. They lost 15 games this season, and rely on the three-pointer for their success — they’ve attempted nearly 900, and make them at a 37.7 percent clip. As a comparison, Gonzaga connects on threes at a 38.2 percent rate, but only shot 631 on the season. The Zags will have to punish the smaller Commodores inside while shutting down Vandy’s outside shooters if they face off on Saturday. n


Talking (Non-)

Hoops

SILAS MELSON JUNIOR, PORTLAND What do you listen to before a game? I listen to a lot of hip-hop, a lot of rap. Drake, Future, Kodak Black. On a scale of 1 to 10, how much does Zach Collins like Logic? I would probably say about 12? He loves him a little too much. He’s a good rapper, just not my guy. Favorite place to eat off campus? Churchill’s. I only go there twice a year, but when I do go there, I feast. Guy with the best fashion sense? I would say Nigel [Williams-Goss] or Jeremy [Jones]. I think those two take it very serious. Funniest dude on the team? I would have to go with Rem [Bakamus]. — TUCK CLARRY ...continued page 28

RAJAH BOSE PHOTO

MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 25


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MARCH MADNESS

R#1DE

Talking Hoops

(Non-)

ON ZAGS!

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Who’s car DJ when you guys go somewhere? Probably Bryan Alberts. What does Bryan play? 2 Chainz. He has a vast array of artists; depends on the trip and where we’re going. Favorite place to eat off campus? I like Frank’s Diner a lot. The blueberry muffin French toast. You can get anything at Frank’s, but the blueberry muffin French toast is special.

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Funniest dude on the team? Besides me? Probably Zach Collins or Zach Norvell. The Zachs are definitely in first place. On a scale of 1 to 10, how much does Zach Collins like Logic? No, it’s more like a 1-to-1,000 scale, and it’s, like, at 1,006. We gotta tell him to chill out. Who dresses the best? Nigel [Williams-Goss] and Jeremy [Jones] are really into style. Sometimes what they wear I don’t think looks good, but they think it does. I think style is subjective. — TUCK CLARRY ...continued on next page

MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 29


MARCH MADNESS

Talking Hoops

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What’s your favorite class? Honestly, I really like my leadership classes. Getting my masters in Organizational Leadership, and my first two classes are really cool. Do you think you’re the best leader on the team? I wouldn’t say that. What do you want to do after basketball? I haven’t decided yet, but I would love to do something with fashion. What’s in? Embroidery is really big. The extra-sized, oversized fits are really in right now. — WILL MAUPIN ...continued page 32

30 INLANDER MARCH 16, 2017


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unfold.gonzaga.edu MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 31


MARCH MADNESS

Talking Hoops

(Non-)

ZACH COLLINS FRESHMAN, LAS VEGAS

What’s your favorite artist to listen to, pregame? I’m all over the place, to be honest. I’d say my go-to would probably be Drake. My favorite band if I wanna get mean and get aggressive is probably Green Day or Disturbed. I’m a big-time Green Day guy. Which guy on the team do you see becoming a head coach someday? Probably Nigel [Williams-Goss]. He’s really smart on the court, and he already knows how to lead pretty well. Nigel went with Josh [Perkins]; how do you feel about that pick? They’re both really smart, they’re both great teammates. They’re just both really good at communicating with people. Who’s the funniest guy on the team? Josh Perkins. He can do this thing with his face and make these weird noises. I could be 0-for-20 with five turnovers, have the worst game ever. If he does that, I’m in tears, it’s the funniest thing ever. — WILL MAUPIN

REM BAKAMUS SENIOR, LONGVIEW, WASHINGTON

What do you like to listen to before a game? Country music mainly. Anything Florida-Georgia Line or Sam Hunt; those two I listen to a lot. Do you guys take turns playing locker-room DJ? No, Silas is usually the DJ, playing Kodak or anything like that. I don’t really listen to his music too often. Funniest guy on the team? I gotta go with Dustin Triano. He’s not always intentionally funny, but his personality is just a funny one. I live with him, so I get a heavy dose.

GONZAGA UNIVERSITY ATHLETICS PHOTO

32 INLANDER MARCH 16, 2017

Favorite place to eat off campus? I really like Clinkerdagger, and Churchill’s. But Clinkerdagger is probably my favorite. The prime rib is the best, the rock-salted prime rib. — DAN NAILEN

RAJAH BOSE PHOTO


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GOING FOR NCAA GLORY Bud Withers wrote the book on Gonzaga hoops — twice BY TUCK CLARRY

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s the Zags gear up for another March Madness appearance, it’s an appropriate time for the Gonzaga faithful to look at the program’s path forged over the better part of two decades. Former Seattle P-I and Times sportswriter Bud Withers offers an extended retrospective of that time in his latest book, Glory Hounds. The Kennel confessional digs deeper into the personalities of those who have stayed at Gonzaga since Withers’ 2002 book BraveHearts. And as the book elaborates, while things change around them, certain things remain constant. “If 18 years is a generation, they’ve been playing high-level, NCAA Tournament-quality basketball for a generation now,” Withers says. “So I just thought it was time to dig in on the personalities and the whole phenomenon.” As Withers covered Gonzaga basketball and prodded into the inner mechanics of what makes this program unique, he found a unified approach to building and maintaining it. “I’m amazed with the continuity in the coaching staff and the athletic administration,” he says.

“Brick by brick, they’ve been able to be a more appealing option to recruits.” Withers examines major program moments and personalities not only with hindsight, but also a level of present and prospective contemplation. A chapter dedicated to the fateful decision of head coach Mark Few to turn down a job offer from an old friend at the University of Oregon is followed by a revealing profile on potential coach-in-waiting Tommy Lloyd. “If you go back to when Tommy Bud Withers was this hustling, young, aggressive assistant,” Withers says, “him connecting with Ronny Turiaf kind of started the whole European and international influx, and that has been huge for Gonzaga. You could honestly make the argument that Gonzaga is the most proficient recruiter of international talent.” In terms of this year and this team, Withers sees a lot to be hopeful for in the NCAA Tournament: “I think

overall, this team is more talented than any previous Gonzaga team.” There are several ways to build a successful team in the tournament, but defense is a great place to start. This season, the Zags do have a great defense, holding opponents to a 36.8 field goal percentage, the second lowest in Division I basketball. That should serve them well, Withers says. “They’ve had teams — let’s face it — that couldn’t stop people enough,” he says. “I think there’s a collective chip on their shoulder.” Withers sees the Zags as having many desirable components for a team looking to go on an NCAA Tournament run: “You need balance. Some people say you need three NBA-quality guys. Przemek [Karnowski] can and will play on an NBA team if he chooses to, rather than go to Europe. I think the two kids coming off of the bench in [Zach] Collins and [Killian] Tillie are NBA-quality, even though they’re freshmen. We don’t know about [Nigel] Williams-Goss, but he’s certainly a high-level college guy that you can win with.” In looking back at how the program has grown in its 19-year tournament streak, the expectations for a Jesuit school with 7,000 students in isolated Spokane seem varied. “To satisfy critics, the obvious thing is to go farther in the tournament at least once,” Withers says. “As mundane as it sounds, just to keep the thing going is a really formidable accomplishment. The idea that this school could go to 18, and now 19, straight tournaments is absurd. Sure, it would be a new frontier to get to a Final Four, but just the sustenance of what they’ve done in itself continues to be a major accomplishment.” n

MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 37


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DOWNTOWN SPOKANE 210 N Howard Ave.

Laura Stockton was just one of many Zags who delivered last-second heroics.

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LADIES (IN) FIRST Gonzaga’s women’s hoops team grew in fits and starts this season, and came together in time for the tournament BY ROBERT HEROLD

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alled “gritty” but not always “pretty” by head coach Lisa Fortier, the Gonzaga women actually struggled throughout most of the season. Their regular-season championship came down to the last home game and a tight five-point win, and success in the West Coast Conference tournament wasn’t a given as they headed to Las Vegas. Coming into the tourney, the question on fans’ minds was “Which Zag team is going to show up?” Would it be the Gonzaga team that blew out BYU by 35 points in the Kennel, or the Gonzaga team that collapsed in the fourth quarter down in Provo in their final regular-season game, turning a six-point lead into an eight-point loss? They answered this question loud and clear, routing Pacific by 32 points and San Francisco by 31. In the title game, after leading Saint Mary’s by 21 at halftime and seeing that lead cut to six points in the third quarter, they didn’t fold their tent; instead they picked themselves up and won by 11.

So how did they do this? How did they peak at just the right time? Let’s briefly review the season: Recall that Gonzaga opened WCC play with inexplicable losses to Pepperdine and Pacific. Two games into the season and the Zags, favored to win the conference, found themselves in last place. Three wins in a row got them back on track. Then came the always-tough game at Saint Mary’s — behind Jill Barta’s 33 points, they came from way behind and won by four. They would extend their winning streak to 12 games. Still, most didn’t come easy. Two weeks later at San Diego, they were staring at a third conference loss when they got a pivotal stop, giving them the ball with next to no time remaining. Laura Stockton threaded a perfect pass to a streaking Barta, whose layup went in at the buzzer. A week later was the home game against BYU, when the Zags played maybe their best game of the year, comparable to winning at Stanford in November. Two days later at Santa


Gonzaga vs. Oklahoma Gonzaga, an 11-seed, faces 6-seed Oklahoma in Seattle on Saturday, at 5:30 pm, on ESPN2.

Clara, another nail-biter — with two seconds remaining and down by one, it was Barta again, calmly sinking two free throws to seal the win. The return game with Saint Mary’s at the Kennel? Another nail-biter. This time, Stockton’s late-game heroics saved the day. Why all of the too-closefor-comfort games? Why the inconsistency? Here’s my take: While Kiara Kudron has been consistently strong all year, Elle Tinkle played her usual great defensive game and Barta would, as the coaches often say, “get her points,” until the WCC Tournament, this team was still a work in progress. Emma Wolfram, coming back from ACL surgery, worked all season to round into form. At 6-foot-5, her presence can be so intimidating that Barta no longer has to plant herself on the low block, there to face a triple team every time she touches the ball. Barta can now move around, allowing her to be more active and creative. Her tournament-record 37 points against Saint Mary’s in the WCC title game is a case in point. And let’s not overlook the development of freshman Jesse Loera; her ballhandling skills and speed are impressive. Add Chandler Smith to the mix, and Fortier knows that she can rest Stockton and not worry. All this season-long “work in progress” came together in Las Vegas. One announcer said that “this is a really, really good basketball team.” The NCAA Tournament field might soon discover just that. The Zags won big to close out the season, and it was pretty to watch. n

MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 39


Holding On ~ Letting Go — part of trilogy by playwright Bryan Harnetiaux — also tackles the issue of death like Dusk (pictured) did.

THEATER

You’re Not Alone Holding On ~ Letting Go at the Civic wants to spark a conversation about tough topics BY E.J. IANNELLI

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or all its inevitability, death can be a tough subject to broach. Rather than risk the awkwardness of such a sensitive issue, it’s not uncommon for people — even those for whom death is palpable — to skip to lighter topics, leaving the heavy stuff for another time. Unfortunately, time is something we all run out of. Playwright Bryan Harnetiaux took the opposite approach, choosing instead to address death directly through a trilogy of related but stand-alone plays: Vesta, Dusk and Holding On ~ Letting Go. With support and licensing through the Hospice Foundation of America, they’re designed to spark the end-of-life conversations that many of us find so difficult. The third of those plays, Holding On ~ Letting Go, is entering a three-week run at the Spokane Civic Theatre, where Harnetiaux has been a playwright in residence for decades. Like its companion plays, Holding On takes one

40 INLANDER MARCH 16, 2017

individual facing his or her own death — in this case, Bobby Alexander, an NCAA basketball coach with end-stage liver cancer — and then uses that central character to introduce a wider network of relationships and responses to that condition. Civic veteran Jack Delahanty is directing this production, which stars Dave Casteal (a frequent collaborator with Harnetiaux) as Bobby, A’dell Whitehead as his wife Lee, Elizabeth McAlpine as his mother, Susan Hardie as a hospice nurse, Peter Hardie as the chaplain, and Chris Jensen as a hospice social worker. Holding On, Delahanty says, “deals more particularly [than Vesta or Dusk] about when there’s a conflict, when one person in the situation is coming to some acceptance and is beginning to be at peace with the fact that he’s dying. And his wife is exactly the opposite. It really deals with that piece of denial, how that happens in a family,

and what that does to tear people apart, to put them at odds.”

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hough rarely discussed openly, situations like that are far more universal than they might seem. Delahanty himself has seen those close to him enter end-of-life care, and he’s not unique among the cast and crew in having done so. “Everything that I’ve seen, somebody’s going to be in denial, and it does strange things to the family. My experience is certainly not the same, in terms of the amount of time spent with people at this stage of their life — like the hospice workers, for example. But my own mother was in hospice for well over six months. I had a good friend who was with hospice, and I fortunately was able to be with him for a good part of his last months,” he says. “As director, my major concern is that I try to be true to the vision of the playwright, and what the playwright has brought to us in terms of characters and storyline. Certainly, when we’ve MORE EVENTS talked about ‘Would Visit Inlander.com for it be appropriate for complete listings of this or for that?’ or ‘Do local events. you think this is true to life?’ I’ve been able to talk about my experience, and so have others in the cast.” Some of that input has come from unexpected places. “We didn’t plan this way, but our stage manager happens to be a young woman who herself is a hospice social worker. And so every once in awhile, she’s been able to bring some real insight into what we’re doing


onstage. She actually, in several instances, has helped with things like ‘How do we get this patient out of the bed and into the wheelchair?’ That was a real bonus for us.” In keeping with the plays’ intent, Holding On is sponsored by Hospice of Spokane, which will have representatives participating in special discussion sessions on March 19 and 26, and April 2 and 6. These “talkbacks” will offer audience members the chance to speak with actors and experts about the play proper, to share their personal experiences and to ask questions about hospice care. “We assume that a good number of the audience will be people who have either had direct dealings with this kind of end-of-life situation — friends, family — and could really use the opportunity to have some talkback about that situation.”

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iven its thrust and themes, it might be easy to tag Holding On ~ Letting Go as grim. But Delahanty says the play has its share of “lighthearted moments” that offset some of the “tragedy of losing a man in his 50s to cancer.” “I think the playwright has done a pretty good job of entering some humor into it. One way that families and patients get through these kinds of experiences is with a sense of humor. The mother of the man who is dying — she’s not a stand-up comic or anything, but she does bring a sense of humor to the story. There are several moments when one of the social workers is working with Bobby, and there is tension between them, but it’s broken with Bobby’s sense of humor,” he says. “What we’re trying to do is not make it dark and morbid, but just more truthful about how difficult it is to deal with this part of living. This is not only a beautiful piece of theater, it’s also an important work. This is something that every single one of us is going to face at some point. It’s good to know you’re not alone.” n Holding On ~ Letting Go • March 17-April 9: Thu-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm • $27 • Firth J. Chew Studio at the Spokane Civic Theatre • spokanecivictheatre.com • 325-2507

HOLIDAY ST. PATRICK’S DAY

O’Doherty’s caps a week of celebration on Friday.

O’DOHERTY’S IRISH CELEBRATION

If your hope is to celebrate with the pomp and circumstance of swigging green beer and doing a jig, look no further than O’Doherty’s Irish Grille. The longtime Irish pub in Spokane is capping off a week-long celebration with a full day of music, dancing, beer and food. Celtic folk music begins as doors open at 10 am, and an assortment of bagpipers are set to play throughout the afternoon and evening. Also order from a menu of classics, including the ubiquitous corned beef and cabbage. The event is 21+ all day, with a $5 cover after 3 pm. Fri, March 17 from 10 am to close; O’Doherty’s Irish Grille, 525 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. facebook.com/ odohertys

GARLAND DISTRICT PUB CRAWL

If a cavalcade is more your type of celebration, join in on the first-ever Garland District St. Patrick’s Day Pub Crawl. Taking place at the numerous bars along the historic Garland Avenue strip — Bon Bon, the Garland Pub, the Brown Derby and Rick’s Ringside, among others — the crawl features

Fireball and Pabst Blue Ribbon drink specials, a T-shirt, prizes and live music at Beerocracy. The 21+ event is $5 with registration, offered at both the participating bars or online at garlandpubcrawl. brownpapertickets.com. Fri, March 17 from 7-10 pm; Garland Business District.

PILSNER RELEASE + GRANGE HALL BAKED POTATO FUNDRAISER

Wear your viridescence out in Green Bluff for two St. Patrick’s Day events this weekend. Big Barn Brewing releases their St. Patty’s Pilsner for $3/ pint, and hosts a food truck on site. The event (March 17, 5-9 pm) is $10 in advance, $12 the day of. Then check out the Green Bluff Grange’s baked potato bar fundraiser. The community event (March 17, 5:30-8 pm) offers all the toppings you could want, as well as a talent show, band and Irish dancers. Tickets are $8 for ages 14+, and $5 for kids. Big Barn Brewing, 16005 N. Applewood Ln., Mead; Green Bluff Grange, 9808 E. Greenbluff Rd., Colbert. (979-2607)

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ST. PADDY’S IN PALOUSE

The Palouse Arts Council hosts its 14th annual St. Patrick’s Day event with plenty of food and celebration. Enjoy traditional Irish music and dancing, along with soda bread and Cougar Gold cheese for snacking, and a beer and wine bar. Hearth of the Dragon wood-fired pizza will be sold in the parking lot. Cost is $5 for anyone over the age of 10. Fri, March 17 at 6 pm, Palouse Community Center, 220 E. Main St., Palouse.

IRISH WHISKEY DINNER

To enjoy some of Ireland’s finer food and beverage offerings, join Beverly’s in Coeur d’Alene for a special Irish Whiskey Dinner. The six-course meal features traditional Irish cuisine — Scotch egg, Irish stew, beef tenderloin — paired with Bushmills Irish whiskey and a pre-dinner tasting. Social hour begins at 6:30 followed by dinner. Reservations are $85 per person; call 855-379-5478. Sat, March 18 from 6:30-9:30 pm; Beverly’s, 115 S. Second, Coeur d’Alene. Menu at ow.ly/ZPAT3092PVN. — TUCK CLARRY

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

FILM If you’re unfamiliar with the work of Spanish auteur Pedro Almodóvar, his wild, candy-colored 1988 soap-opera-meetsfarce WOMEN ON THE VERGE OF A NERVOUS BREAKDOWN would make a perfect entry point. The film, out of print on home video for years, received the Criterion Collection treatment last month, and the new BluRay disc boasts a sparkling picture, striking cover art and new interviews with the director and his star and muse Carmen Maura. A good chunk of Almodóvar’s filmography is unavailable in the States, so hopefully this release sparks a rediscovery of his vibrant, singular work.

TV The FX drama series THE AMERICANS has been on the air since 2013, but it’s one of those shows that has never attracted a huge audience or much award consideration despite being universally beloved by critics. (In fact, last week’s season five opener was reportedly the lowest rated of its premiere episodes.) Much has been written about the show’s sudden political relevance — it is, after all, about two Russian spies passing as an all-American family in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. — but it’s also wickedly smart, propulsively plotted and brilliantly acted TV. The first four seasons of The Americans are available to stream on Amazon Prime, so get to bingeing.

PODCAST MISSING RICHARD SIMMONS was already being hailed as the new Serial by the time its first installment landed (it’s currently on episode 5 of 6). Hosted by former Daily Show producer Dan Taberski, the podcast is an investigation into the disappearance of the indefatigable fitness instructor, who hasn’t spoken to his closest confidants or made a public appearance in nearly three years. Whether or not you agree with the practice of turning Simmons’ plight into an episodic radio drama (complete with weekly cliffhangers), it’s impossible to deny that this is compelling listening. n

MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 41


At Phonthip’s Thai Table After running a restaurant in Bangkok for decades, Phonthip Tungkana is realizing her dream of cooking her family’s recipes for American diners BY CHEY SCOTT

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honthip Tungkana long dreamed of coming to America. One day, she decided many years ago, she would open her own restaurant in the U.S. to share the complex flavors — combinations of sweet, spicy, salty, sour and bitter — and fresh ingredients of her native Thailand. She would cook from memory the recipes passed down from her mother, who learned to cook those same dishes from Tungkana’s grandmother. Finally, decades later, the Bangkok native’s dream became reality with the opening of her tiny North Spokane restaurant, Phonthip Style Thai, in 2009. “I came to Spokane because I wanted to open a restaurant like I had in Thailand, for almost 30 years. It was very big,” Tungkana recalls, continuing, “I first came [to the U.S.] with my daughter… and I told her ‘I want to open a restaurant.’ And she said, ‘It’s OK if you want to do that,’ but she said, ‘You just come here first. You don’t understand about things in the U.S.’” So while her daughter, June, was living in Virginia and attending school, Tungkana worked at a local Thai restaurant to learn the nuances of working in an American restaurant, albeit one that was cooking the cuisine she knows so well. When Tungkana was ready to set out on her own, June encouraged her mother to start out small so she could learn the U.S. tax system, learn to speak English and learn the challenges of running a business in an unfamiliar country. “‘Try and learn first, and if you want to open a big one, you can open a big one. Start small.,’ Tungkana remembers June telling her.

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ocated in half of a small building that also houses a hair salon on the busy corner of Francis Avenue and Nevada Street, Tungkana’s diminutive restaurant is calm on a Wednesday afternoon between lunch and dinner. Most of the 10 or so tables are empty. Traffic speeds by outside as she and her all-woman staff


FOOD | THAI GUIDE — her employees are also all Thai natives — prepare for the impending dinner rush. A few late lunchers stop by, taking their pick of seating: a man waits near the door for a takeout order, while a pair of older women take their time reading through the menu and ask their server numerous questions. The two women seem like newbies to Thai cuisine, just the type that Tungkana hopes to win over with her timetested dishes, each made with care. While Tungkana’s Pad Thai is by far one of her menu’s top sellers, she proudly shares that customers also love her cashew chicken, drunken noodles, pad kee mao and Panang curry. The papaya salad (som tum), perhaps a lesser-known Thai staple, is also quite popular. When diners tell her they enjoy her food, Tungkana feels energized and empowered. “After I cook and customers say [the food] is the best in town, it makes me happy and proud. Hearing them say ‘Thank you, Phonthip, it was very excellent, very good,’ it makes me feel not tired,” she explains. Unlike many Thai restaurants, Phonthip’s menu is concise, consisting of just a few pages of items. With a small kitchen, she can’t feature more than 100 dishes, as many other Asian-fare restaurants tend to do. This choice also allows her to showcase the dishes that Americans most enjoy, as well as those she’s most proud of — all are made from scratch — like her family recipe for mango sticky rice.

Try the tom yum soup at Bangkok Thai.

Tongue Thai’d

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

A breakdown of culinary history, pronunciation, common ingredients and other facts to know about this popular Southeast Asian cuisine BY RAVEN HAYNES

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hai cuisine really hits the spot — the sprouts, lime, peanuts and more. sweet, salty, sour and spicy spot, and usually all at once in a single delicious dish. Say it like: Tome-YAHM (not your neighbor Tom, Maybe that’s why Thailand had seven dishes think of the “om” meditation noise) on CNN’s “World’s 50 Most Delicious Foods The dish: A popular, hot-and-sour boiled (Readers’ Pick)” 2011 poll, more than any other (“tom”) soup with a mix (“yum”) of herbs and country, or why it’s called the “Land of Smiles.” veggies like lemongrass, lime leaves, mushrooms, It’s hard not to smile after a bite of any Thai dish chilies and more. — be it noodle stir-fries like the classic pad Thai (#5), spicy and sour soups like tom yum (#4), curries of every color, or ITCHING TO START Say it like: Paht-SEE-you (not like the meat-, veggie- and fruit-based salads COOKING THAI FOOD expression of distaste “ew”) like som tum, the crunchy papaya The dish: A Chinese-influenced salad just shy of the top five in that AT HOME? CHECK dish of stir-fried (“pad”) broad rice poll. OUT THESE SITES noodles with soy sauce (“see ew”), While Thailand’s four regional Chinese broccoli, egg and more. cuisines — Central, Northern, South Hot Thai Kitchen ern, and Isan, or northeastern, Thai hot-thai-kitchen.com — share ingredients and dishes with  Eating Thai Food Say it like: Sohm-TAHM (again, think China, Laos, India, Vietnam and eatingthaifood.com of that “om” meditation noise) Malaysia, among others, Thai food  Thai Food Tonight The dish: A popular sour (“som”) finds its voice easily. Its use of fresh, thaifoodtonight.com salad of green papaya with chilaromatic herbs and spices separates ies, garlic, salt, sugar and more, its bright and soupy, coconut-based pounded (“tum”) in a mortar and pestle. curries from India’s thick curries, which mostly use toasted, ground dry spices. Chilies provide subtle spice or upfront heat in nearly every dish, Say it like: Lahb (think of a British person saying and lemongrass, lime, fish sauce, tamarind paste “lab” or when you “lob” a ball) and palm sugar are just some of the ingredients The dish: A salad of minced meat, fish sauce, that provide balance in this complex and tasty lime juice and toasted rice, usually eaten with a cuisine. ball of sticky rice. Sometimes the most nerve-racking part of trying a new or unfamiliar cuisine is the fear that you’ll butcher the name of a dish when ordering. Say it like: Paht-PLIK-king (don’t call your server Don’t fret; no one expects you to be a pronunciaa bad word; use a rolled “r” or an “l” sound) tion pro, but here’s how to properly say some of The dish: A spicy Thai curry with fried chilies the Thai dishes you’ll be craving soon: (“prik”).

TOM YUM

PAD SEE EW

Phonthip Style Thai is one of many local spots to enjoy authentic Thai.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

The traditional Thai dessert features a small portion of gelatinous, semi-sweet rice sprinkled with sesame seeds, fresh mango slices arranged around it. The tart and sweet fruit contrasts with the warm rice that’s also drenched in coconut milk. Tungkana is so proud of this dish that she insists on driving to the Asian market down the road to go get a better ripened mango — the one in her pantry is not quite mature — so she can make some for us to try. Next to the bright-orange fruit, the rice is tinted a pale green, colored naturally using a herb leaf, Tungkana explains. “I make better mango sticky rice than anyone in Seattle, Boston, Virginia — I think the Thai people who taste it would say, ‘Mmm… this mango sticky rice is very good!’” she says, laughing. Since her restaurant has become many locals’ go-to for Thai food in Spokane, Phonthip now dreams of expanding to a larger location in the area. “Customers come in a lot and say, ‘Phonthip, when are you going to open a new one?’ and I tell them I’m looking for a new one, too, but I don’t know when,” she says. “I’ll keep this location, too, because customers know about it and love my food. Some of them come in for the first time and then the second, and then eventually 20 times to eat my Thai!” n cheys@inlander.com Phonthip Style Thai • 1006 E. Francis • Open Mon-Sat from 11 am-8 pm • Facebook: Phonthip Style Thai Restaurant • 487-3559

SOM TUM

LARB

PAD PRIK KING

PAD THAI

Say it like: Paht-THAI (not “pad” like “fad;” with a hard emphasis on the Th in “Thai”) The dish: Probably the most well-known Thai dish, with stir-fried (“pad”) rice noodles, eggs, tamarind pulp, fish/soy sauce, chilies, bean

Also, names of meats are often at the end of dishes (like tom yum goong or pad Thai gai), so you’ll see these terms often: Kai/Gai, chicken; Goong/Kung, shrimp or prawn; Muu, pork; Pla, fish; Neua, beef; Ped/Pet, duck. n

MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 43


FOOD | THAI GUIDE

The “Spicy Old Man” (pad kra prow) is a signature dish at Sala Thai in Airway Heights.

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Five of the Region’s Top Thai Restaurants If you’re looking for an authentic Thai experience, try the following locations, as recommended to us by friends and readers SALA THAI

12914 W. Sunset Hwy., Airway Heights, salathaispokane.com, 244-4800 My girlfriend doesn’t care much for Thai food, but she wants to go back to Sala Thai. The out-of-the-way lunch and dinner spot in Airway Heights bustles as the hostess tell us she can seat us now, but it will be about a 45-minute wait for food. It’s busy tonight, but it was worth the wait. My companion suggests I order the prik king, a spicy curry dish that earns her an equally spicy look. I instead go with the Panang curry, which I’m told is the most popular curry here. The thick curry in coconut milk with veggies and your choice of meat (pork, chicken, beef or tofu) is served in a bowl with a hearty scoop of white rice on the side. The portion is not quite enough to split between two people, but enough for leftovers. I ate the whole thing. She gets the pad kee mao — another of Sala Thai’s most popular dishes. Wide rice noodles, three meats, egg and veggies stir-fried together; it would undoubtedly take more than one person to finish a single portion. For 15 years, Sala Thai has had a reputation for being sinus-clearing spicy, with levels ranging from 1 to 5. Our waitress says their level 1 is “medium;” level 3 is too much for many people to enjoy, she adds. I stick with level 1, but, as someone who likes spicy food, I wish I would have bumped up to level 2. My dining partner, who cannot handle spicy food, tries a curry-covered pepper: it’s tolerable, but she’s glad that she didn’t add spice to her dish. (MITCH RYALS)

BANGKOK THAI

1003 E. Trent; 1325 S. Grand Blvd.; 101 N. Argonne Rd. (Spokane Valley), spokanebangkokthai.com Little things like freshness and consistency are what makes a Thai spot stand out from the crowd. So it is with Bangkok Thai and its three

44 INLANDER MARCH 16, 2017

Spokane locations. Crispy veggies and bright flavors are the rule, whether you’re ordering something familiar like Pad Thai or something more adventurous like duck noodle soup. The best way to sample Bangkok’s culinary wares is at lunch, when $11.95 combo plates offer the opportunity to nibble through a nice cross-section of their offerings. You pick two of 10 dishes, and also get jasmine rice and two spring rolls; for $3 more you can add a third entrée or hot-and-sour soup. The gang daeng (red curry) is outstanding — you’ll be sopping up every last drop with the rice — and the pad preaw wan (sweet-and-sour chicken, beef or pork) boasts a nicely acidic, sweet blast from the pineapple, alongside cucumber, celery, tomato and green peppers. The pad hin ma pan (cashew chicken, beef or pork) is another strong pick. All dishes are available with spice levels between 1 and 5, and the 3 had a nice kick for this heat-lover. (DAN NAILEN)

THAI BAMBOO

5406 N. Division; 2926 E. 29th; 12722 E. Sprague Ave. (Spokane Valley); 2010 N. Fourth St. (CdA), thaibamboorestaurant.com When Inland Northwest folks think of Thai food, a spot that often comes to mind is Thai Bamboo, the popular local chain with four locations across Spokane and Coeur d’Alene. Thai Bamboo also counts itself as one of the Inlander’s Best Of Hall of Fame winners, surpassing 10 firstplace titles in the annual reader’s poll since owners Tom and Matavee Burgess launched the restaurant in 2001. Between the atmosphere — each location features decadent décor in the form of statues, tapestries and other art bought in Thailand by its owners; the twinkling ceiling at the flagship North Spokane location is an attraction by itself — and the expansive menu created by head chef Matavee, a native of southern Thailand, it’s clear why so many locals get their fill of Thai cuisine here. Beyond the always popular Pad Thai noodles — many Americans’ “gateway” to Thai food, and also Bamboo’s top-selling dish — diners

ALSO TRY THESE LOCAL SPOTS FOR TASTY THAI FOOD MAW PHIN 14819 N. Newport Hwy., Mead, 466-8424 A TASTE OF THAI 419 W. Hastings, 466-3335 THAI ON 1ST 411 W. First, 455-4288 THAI KITCHEN 621 S. Pines Rd., Spokane Valley, 926-8161 SRI PRASERT THAI BAR & GRILLE (formerly Mama’s Thaiway Lounge) 5908 E. Broadway Ave., Spokane Valley, 534-3040 THAI GARDEN 7 S. Main St., Deer Park, 276-7599 THAI GINGER 300 S. Grand Ave., Pullman, 334-0477 PHIKUN’S THAI CUISINE 1020 S. Grand Ave., Pullman, 334-1060 SECRET THAI 218 Cedar St., Sandpoint, 208-263-9960


INNOVATIVE Matavee and Tom Burgess opened the first Thai Bamboo in 2001.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

can branch out widely to experience the diverse offerings of southern Thai cuisine, which tends to be spicier and also features plenty of seafood. Next time you’re there, try ordering off Thai Bamboo’s house specialty list, which features items you’ll be hard-pressed to find versions of elsewhere. (CHEY SCOTT)

LINNIE’S THAI CUISINE

1301 W. Third, linniesthai.wordpress.com, 838-0626 Linnie’s has been around for more than 25 years, so they must be doing something right at this mom-and-pop staple in downtown Spokane. The menu has all the classics covered, like Pad Thai, tom yum soup, Panang curry, and Thai fried rice, along with some more adventurous options like squid in coconut milk, and opportunities to branch out, like trying their sweet-andsour deep-fried fish, rather than the standard sweet-and-sour chicken. However, I went with my go-to at every Thai restaurant: the heavenly massaman curry, a sweet and salty delight with coconut milk, potatoes, peanuts and onions. Linnie’s did it justice, with a sweeter and lighter take than I’ve had in the past. My companion, also a Thai food lover, went for pad kee mao, or drunken noodles, instead of her usual Pad Thai, and enjoyed it as well. We both really liked the particular kind of spice in our dishes — Linnie’s also features the 5-level spiciness scale, and our 2- and 3-level dishes both had a pleasant heat that was more at the back of the mouth (instead of the numbing, tongue-consuming, metallic heat that some restaurants go for). The portions were huge, the service was quick, and the ambience was very low-key, all the right ingredients for two satisfied and slightly sleepy diners. (RAVEN HAYNES)

INLANDERS are more than just readers. They’re everything from baristas to beer snobs, and from soccer moms to CEOs — all with ever-changing appetites for media. So we have to be more than just a paper. We’re event planners for things like our own Volume Music Festival and Inlander Restaurant Week. We’re digital geeks offering daily news coverage online, along with ways to find your favorite local events right on your smartphone.

We’re even philanthropists, supporting local charities and nonprofits every year. All the while, we remain committed to the award-winning, independent journalism you expect and deserve. It’s a big job for a hometown paper to keep innovating and changing with its readers. But we’re in this for the long haul — informing, supporting and maintaining the vibrant community we call home. And that will never change.

OUR THAI HOUSE

1415 N. Hamilton, Facebook: Our Thai House Restaurant, 487-4237 I love Thai food, by which I mean I love Pad Thai. Sometimes I’m so daring as to get Pad Thai with slightly different noodles. But here in the Inlander food section, we’re down for adventure. So at Our Thai House, I order a whole new entrée: Panang curry with chicken. The four stars of spiciness — up from my traditional three — turns out to be a perfect match for the dish. The inherent coolness of the creamy, coconutty sauce hits you first, then the heat from the spiciness hits you a second later. That’s what you want in a good sauce; multiple tastes harmonizing together. The broccoli is the downfall of a lot of dishes like these. Slightly overcooked, broccoli would become spongy and wilted. Undercooked, the crispness of the broccoli would overpower the rest of the dish. But this broccoli, swimming in the sauce along with the chicken, is perfectly cooked, teaming up perfectly with the rice, chicken and sauce. The portions are large enough, however, that one bowl of rice simply isn’t enough for the entire dish. I ask for another bowl and quickly receive it, free of charge. (DANIEL WALTERS) n

I N L A N D E R . C O M / I N N OVAT I V E

MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 45


Beast Intentions A new Beauty and the Beast can’t decide whether to aim for originality or nostalgia BY SCOTT RENSHAW

O

ver the past 25-plus years, it’s likely that I’ve one before. Familiar songs guide us through her journey watched Disney’s animated Beauty and the Beast to rescue her father (Kevin Kline) from the castle of the somewhere in the neighborhood of 75 times. prince who has been turned into a monster (Dan Stevens) There has been at least one common element to every and whose staff was transformed into crockery and one of those viewings: Without fail, the moment the first knickknacks and furniture and so forth. Mucking up the piano notes of the title song begin, my eyes fill with tears. need for Belle and the Beast to fall in love before his 21st The ballroom dance between Belle and the Beast, accombirthday, lest the curse last forever, is the egotistical Gaspanied by Angela Lansbury’s performance of a tale as ton (Luke Evans) and his manservant LeFou (Josh Gad). old as time, ranks among the greatest emotional achieveDirector Bill Condon (Dreamgirls) and screenwriters ments in the history of cinema. I’m getting a little misty Evan Spiliotopoulos (numerous direct-to-video Disney just sitting here writing about it. sequels) and Stephen Chbosky (The The new, mostly live-action Perks of Being a Wallflower) do make BEAUTY AND THE BEAST adaptation of Beauty and the Beast an effort at giving this Beauty and the Rated PG includes an analogous scene — and Beast a significantly different tone. Directed by Bill Condon I’d be lying if I didn’t admit that Part of that shift involves emphasizStarring Emma Watson, Dan Stevens, Luke Evans this one scene is 90 percent of the ing more of the backstory of both reason this new movie pissed me off. main characters and how they were Because somewhere along the line, Disney and this creshaped by losing their mothers, which at least erases ative team had a choice to make: Either they could take the weird dynamic from the original movie that saw the a chance on doing something new and inventive with prince cursed for being too shallow and selfish when he the material (the way Pete’s Dragon did last year), or they was only 11 years old. This more melancholy sensibility could cling to nostalgia for a beloved classic that they makes the casting of Watson slightly more understandcouldn’t possibly improve upon. Instead, they did both, able, but her introspective intelligence still undercuts the which effectively means they succeeded at neither. idea that the vivacious, boundlessly adventurous Belle There’s certainly no radical shift to the basic plot, brings the Beast out of his shell. Instead, they’re more which once again finds bookish Belle (Emma Watson) like two vaguely depressed souls who might kind of “get” living in a quiet French village where every day is like the one another.

That serious-minded approach — mixed with the considerably creepier quality of Mrs. Potts (Emma Thompson), Lumière (Ewan McGregor), Cogsworth (Ian McKellen) and company in CGI form — could have been an interesting, risky way to break free from the classic source. It might have been possible to think of it more like a film adaptation of the Broadway musical, rather than a live-action version of the animated film, although it’s weird that the stage version’s new songs are all ditched in favor of three brand-new (and not at all memorable) Alan Menken/Tim Rice compositions. But then we have that ballroom sequence, and that’s where the pretense falls apart. Everything about it feels stolen from the original: the color scheme of the two characters’ costumes, the choreography of their dance, Thompson’s effort to duplicate Lansbury’s iconic vocals. Even the swooping camera moves into and out of the ballroom’s chandeliers. The things that work about this movie — Evans’ preening Gaston, the bouncy choreography, a wonderfully expressive CGI design for the Beast’s face — get lost in its attempts to capitalize on a wistful romanticism that this story hasn’t earned. It’s not really a kid-friendly movie; it’s a movie that wants to be taken seriously, while abandoning almost all of the joy that made the original an actual kid-friendly movie. This ballroom sequence, like the one in the original, also made me want to weep. Just not for any of the right reasons. 


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

Continuing the trend of remaking its animated classics as live-action features, Disney’s update of its great version of Beauty and the Beast is reverential to a fault. The plot goes more or less unchanged — the bookish Belle (Emma Watson) is taken captive by the horrifying Beast (Dan Stevens), who turns out to be cuddlier than expected — though this script provides more backstory for its central characters. Still, it’s not enough to make you forget the 1991 original, which probably shouldn’t have been monkeyed with in the first place. (SR) Rated PG

THE BELKO EXPERIMENT

American office drones working for a shady corporation in Colombia are locked inside their high-rise building and forced to kill one another lest the combustible microchips implanted in their brains go kaboom. That might sound like a premise typical of the Blumhouse horror factory, but the script here is credited to James Gunn (Slither, Guardians of the Galaxy), so expect some pitch-black humor to commingle with the carnage. (NW) Rated R

MY SCIENTOLOGY MOVIE

Exposés about the Church of Scientology have become something of a subgenre unto themselves: Alex Gibney’s Going Clear was an especially damning film, and Leah Remini has turned her vocal disdain for the church into something of a second career. Now here’s a documentary that follows journalist and TV personality Louis Theroux, best known for his VICE-style shows in the UK, as he attempts to entrench himself within the ranks of the famously secretive organization. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not rated

NOW PLAYING A UNITED KINGDOM

The true story of Seretse Khama (David Oyelowo), a Botswanan prince (and later, president) who aided in securing his country’s independence while married to a woman (Rosamund Pike) who was both European and white. During the late 1940s, their marriage was initially met with resistance from both the British and South African people, though they came to be generally beloved political figures. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

BEFORE I FALL

High school’s almost over, and popular kid Samantha (Zoey Deutch) and her equally popular friends are ready to party it up. But then there’s a car accident, and Sam finds herself in a Groundhog Day scenario, reliving the day of the crash over and over again. Perhaps there’s a lesson to be learned? Based on the bestselling YA novel by Lauren Oliver. (NW) Rated PG-13

FIFTY SHADES DARKER

The second installment in the blockbuster film series inspired by E.L. James’ erotic bestsellers is another epic snooze, save for a few moments of fleeting suspense. Anastasia Steele is once again seduced by her BDSMobsessed ex, the brooding billionaire Christian Grey, and glossily photographed kinkiness abounds. Unfortunately, nothing ever feels alive in this film. Rubberneckers looking for a cheap thrill? Nothing to see here. (JK) Rated R

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THE SENSE OF AN ENDING

Based on Julian Barnes’ acclaimed novel, this romantic drama concerns a retired camera shop owner named Tony (Jim Broadbent), who unexpectedly reconnects with the former lover (Charlotte Rampling) that left him for his best friend when they were in their 20s. She’s in possession of (and won’t give up) a diary that reportedly contains personal information that should concern Tony, and its mysterious contents reawaken ghosts from his past. (NW) Rated PG-13

...

to e m a n s t i g is changin inc.

Design Events is an exposition and special events company serving the Inland NW for over 32 years. Back when we began in 1984 we were primarily known for our nifty custom themed events. But over the years WE GREW- and so did the scope of our offerings. We believe our new logo captures that growth perfectly. Remember, we’re the same great company just with a new look and more to offer!

208.765.2595 • designevents.com • sales@designevents.com FIST FIGHT

Fist Fight frustratingly fails to make worthwhile use of a cast of typically funny people. Seemingly left to their own devices (I’m assuming there was a lot of improvisation), straight man Charlie Day, seething Ice Cube and a large array of side characters played by Tracy Morgan, Dean Norris, Christina Hendricks and Kumail Nanjiani sputter their way through endless unfunny scenes until we get to the violent parking lot showdown. Jillian Bell as an inappropriate school psychologist is the only saving grace, but the most laughworthy aspect of Fist Fight is its toolate effort to teach us something about the value of teachers. (DN) Rated R

GET OUT

Written and directed by Jordan Peele, this psychological thriller tackles the same issues of race and masculinity that were regularly explored on his Comedy Central series Key and Peele. Daniel Kaluuya (Sicario) and Allison Williams (Girls) play an interracial couple who visit her family’s country estate, which he discovers has a curi ous history with its African American staff. A clever, consistently funny racial satire and horror film that mocks white liberal cluelessness and finds humor in (without dismissing) black people’s fears. (ES) Rated R

THE GREAT WALL

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Over 40 dealers, 60 display cases with fossils, crystals, and minerals. Handcrafted jewelry, lapidary supplies, demonstrations, hourly door prizes, youth activities, and more! Free Parking Tickets Good All Weekend For more info, visit: rockrollers.org

One thing you know you’re going to get from Chinese director Zhang Yimou (Hero, House of Flying Daggers) is a visual feast of bright colors ...continued on next page

MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 47


FILM | SHORTS

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NOW PLAYING and eye-popping effects. In The Great Wall, his first English-language feature, Yimou calls on Matt Damon, playing a European mercenary, to help an army of Chinese defend the wall and all of humanity against an invading legion of monstrous lizards (yes, you read that correctly). (DN) Rated PG-13

HIDDEN FIGURES

You’ve probably never heard of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson, who were pioneers in — respectively — mathematics, computer programming and engineering at NASA, without whom it’s astronauts would never have flown. The three black women helped the space agency through its first manned space flight, as documented in this historical drama. (MJ) Rated PG

JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 2

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In the first movie, ex-hitman John Wick (Keanu Reeves) came out of retirement to hunt down the lowlifes who killed his dog and beat him up in a carjacking attempt. Action movie fans rejoiced. This follow-up finds Wick again dragged from a life of leisure to help a friend face down some of the world’s deadliest assassins. More bone-crunching, blood(DN) Rated R

KEDI

For anyone who wishes that all the cat videos on YouTube were feature length, here’s an 80-minute documentary about the feral felines who roam the streets of Istanbul and have completely taken over certain parts of the city. You can view it as a fly-on-the-wall study of an urban ecosystem, as a sumptuous international travelogue or simply as a visual love letter to Istanbul’s furry inhabitants. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not rated

KONG: SKULL ISLAND

Goofy and gory in equal measure, the latest attempt to revive King Kong for 21st-century audiences is essentially a bonkers drive-in movie with an A-list cast and a blockbuster budget. The film is set in 1973, as a group of scientists, mercenaries and soldiers drop into the jungle and find themselves in the middle of a turf war between the legendary giant ape of the title and the horrifying monsters (known as “skullcrawlers”) that decimated his species. Skull Island is a lot of things at once — a war movie, a breathlessly paced chase film, a creepy-crawly creature feature, a man vs. nature parable — but it all works in its own crazy way. (MJ) Rated PG-13

LA LA LAND

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When jazz pianist Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) and aspiring actress Mia (Emma Stone) first see each other, their attraction is more than magnetic — it can bend time and space. The leads help the musical construction make sense; these two are so head over heels for

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

NEW YORK TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Moonlight

99

The Salesman

86

Get Out

83

Logan

77

The LEGO Batman Movie

75

Beauty and the Beast

66

Kong: Skull Island

62

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

each other that of course everything stops for a song-and-dance number now and again. (PC) Rated PG-13

THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE

The improbably delightful original LEGO Movie found a brilliant game plan for turning a toy into a story: combining a child’s anarchic sense of play with a savvy adult’s perspective on how goofy yet inspired that play can look from a distance. The LEGO Batman Movie adds another level of self-awareness about the entire recent history of comic-book movies, making for a wonderfully engaging mix of action spectacle and genre parody. (SR) Rated PG

LION

This multiple Oscar nominee is based on a memoir by Saroo Brierley, who was separated from his mother in Calcutta as a child, adopted by an Australian couple and later used Google Earth to locate the tiny Indian village he left behind. Although the film’s middle section drags considerably, this is an undeniably powerful true story, and Dev Patel, Nicole Kidman and 8-year-old Sunny Pawar deliver standout performances. (NW) Rated PG-13

LOGAN

The third film in the stand-alone Wolverine trilogy is by far the best of the bunch, and probably the best X-Men movie yet. Set in 2029, 25 years after the last known mutant was born, a haggard Logan (Hugh Jackman) has retreated into the desert to care for the ailing Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart). The existence of a little girl with uncanny powers soon becomes known, and Logan agrees to transport her to a faraway mutant refuge known as Eden. Bloody, bold and badass, this is one of the finest comic book movies ever made. (MJ) Rated R

MOONLIGHT

One of the most deserving Best Picture winners of recent years, Barry Jenkins’ achingly beautiful sophomore feature is the kind of subtle, introspective work that’s typically denied Oscar gold. The movie, inspired by Tarell Alvin McCraney’s autobiographical play, focuses on three distinct phases in the life of Chiron, who’s black and gay and growing up in poverty in Miami. To describe Moonlight as an examination of race, masculinity and

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

sexuality makes it sound too pat; this is a deeply moving, transportative coming-of-age story that’s absorbing from beginning to end. (NW) Rated R

THE SALESMAN

As they’re preparing to appear in a production of Death of a Salesman, a husband and wife living in Tehran are shaken following a violent assault. An observant character study that unfolds with the propulsive nature of a thriller, this recent Oscar winner for Best Foreign Language Film also functions as an insightful, sometimes harrowing portrait of life in modern-day Iran. Writer-director Asghar Farhadi (A Separation) further cements his reputation as one of the best filmmakers currently working in any country. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE SHACK

While on a camping trip, a little girl is abducted and murdered, leaving her family emotionally shattered. But don’t let that gruesome premise fool you: This is an inspirational film for Christian audiences, and pretty soon the girl’s father (Sam Worthington) is receiving cryptic messages that seem to be coming from on high. Co-starring Octavia Spencer, Radha Mitchell and Tim McGraw. (NW) Rated PG-13

SPLIT

M. Night Shyamalan’s latest mindbender stars James McAvoy as a man with 24 different personalities who kidnaps three teenage girls for some kind of violent ritual. Declarations of Shyamalan’s artistic comeback are perhaps a bit overblown: This is little more than a polished (and overlong) B-movie, anchored by McAvoy’s frighteningly untethered performance. As for the trademark Shyamalan twist ending, don’t expect one here, though maybe that’s a good thing. (NW) Rated PG-13

TABLE 19

Anna Kendrick stars as a woman who’s dumped twice — first as the maid of honor in her BFF’s wedding, and again by her boyfriend (the best man in said wedding). But she goes to the reception anyway and finds herself assigned to a table with such comic ringers as Lisa Kudrow, Craig Robinson, Stephen Merchant, June Squibb and Tony Revolori. Spoiler alert: These weirdos turn out to be unexpected founts of wisdom. (NW) Rated PG-13 


FILM | REVIEW

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KEDI (77 MIN) FR/SAT: 3:15, 7:00 SUN: 1:00, 4:45 WED/THUR: 4:30, 6:00 MY SCIENTOLOGY MOVIE (99 MIN) FRI/SAT: 8:15 SUN: 6:15 WEDS/THUR: 7:00 WEEKEND ONLY LION (115 MIN) FRI/SAT: 3:45 SUN: 2:00

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What could the Church of Scientology possibly be hiding from Louis Theroux?

Suppressive Person In My Scientology Movie, Louis Theroux digs into the shadowy religious organization and finds a camera pointing back at him BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

S

o much of what we know about the Church vocal critics, he was no doubt complicit in many of Scientology comes from the often horof Miscavige’s supposed abuses. rifying secondhand accounts of those who Rathbun was also prominently featured in have fled the organization and want to blow the Alex Gibney’s comprehensive 2015 Scientology lid off of it. That’s what makes it such a fascidocumentary Going Clear, but Theroux uses him nating subject for tell-alls: The church’s leader, as more than just a talking head. He functions David Miscavige, has been portrayed by detracas something of a technical adviser on the film, tors as abusive and his followers as hostages, guiding Theroux through some of the church’s and although a number of testimonials have more bizarre rituals. He’s also involved in the corroborated that, so many of the church’s inner movie’s oddest narrative conceit, which has workings remain mere conjecture. Theroux auditioning actors to play both MiscavAt the start of his new investigative docuige and Tom Cruise, the world’s most famous mentary My Scientology Movie, Scientologist, in a dramatic British TV journalist Louis MY SCIENTOLOGY MOVIE re-creation that will close the Theroux says he wants to film. Theroux tries to justify Not Rated approach Scientology from a Directed by John Dower these sequences by linking new angle. He’s going to dig the tenets of Scientology with Written by and starring Louis Theroux into the controversial religion the fundamentals of performfounded by sci-fi author L. ing, which is perhaps why so Ron Hubbard, but is doing so with the hope of many actors have joined its ranks. finding something positive to divulge. No such It’s an interesting idea, but the build-up luck. to that scripted scene — a Miscavige surrogate Like a British Michael Moore, Theroux assaults a roomful of “followers” while the real puts himself front and center, serving as narraRathbun looks on — feels too much like a gimtor and host of the film. (John Dower, who has mick. I sort of wish that, rather than indulging also worked for years in British TV, directed the in what feel like self-reflexive exercises, Theroux movie; Theroux gets a “presented by” credit.) was instead talking to other ex-Scientologists, He’s also channeling Moore’s style of “gotcha” who provide the film with its most damning and reporting, showing up unannounced to generally chilling material. restricted places while waving a shooting permit What Theroux and Dower do convey quite over his head. The difference here is that the orwell is the creeping paranoia that sets in once ganization he’s aiming to infiltrate soon retaliates, they start filming. Are they really being tailed by sending lackeys to photograph him and his crew that white pickup as they shoot driving footage from safe distances. in Hollywood? Is the drunk actress who stumbles If Theroux is the star of My Scientology Movie, into their hotel room connected to the church? then Marty Rathbun deserves second billing. He Is someone involved in the production leaking was Miscavige’s right-hand man for years (his information directly to Miscavige? Theroux title was “Inspector General”), abandoning the hasn’t really taught us anything that earlier expochurch in 2004 after his relationship with Miscavsés didn’t already cover, but My Scientology Movie ige deteriorated. He’s a fascinating contradiction: presents even more evidence that the church is, if Even though he’s now one of Scientology’s most nothing else, hiding something. 

THEATER

ESCANABA IN DA MOONLIGHT

AIRWAY HEIGHTS

A Comedy about Hunting & Hunting Traditions Written by Jeff Daniels Directed by Casey Duncan

March 3, 4, 10, 11, 17 18 at 7 p.m. March 5, 12 and 19 at 2 p.m.

10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444 BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

Daily (4:00) 7:15 9:30 Sat-Sun (10:45) (1:15) In 2D Daily (3:30) (4:30) 6:10 6:45 8:50 9:50 Sat-Sun (10:00) (11:15) (11:50) (12:45) (1:45) (2:20)

PG

KONG: SKULL ISLAND

Daily (4:40) 9:40 Sat-Sun (11:40) In 2D Daily (4:00) 6:30 7:10 9:00 Sat-Sun (11:00) (1:30) (2:10) PG-13

Tickets: $15 Adult $13 Student/Senior 1-877-SIXTHST (208) 752-8871

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LOGAN

R Daily (3:15) (3:50) 6:15 6:35 9:15 9:25 Sat-Sun (12:15) (1:00)

THE SHACK

PG-13 Daily (3:30) 6:20 9:00 9:30 Sat-Sun (12:45)

st

THE GREAT WALL

7EA1SON

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FIST FIGHT

R Daily 9:25

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KONG: SKULL ISLAND

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MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 49


SATURDAY, MARCH 25 | 8PM SUNDAY, MARCH 26 | 3PM BENJAMIN BEILMAN, VIOLIN ECKART PREU, CONDUCTOR Tchaikovsky... Violin Concerto Shostaikovich... Symphony No. 9 Glinka... Kamarinskaya

CLAIRE HUANGCI, PIANO Winner of the 2010 National Chopin competition ECKART PREU, CONDUCTOR

APRIL 22 • 8PM ~ APRIL 23 • 3PM Concert sponsored by Merrill O’Brien John Corigliano Frédéric Chopin Johannes Brahms

Elegy (1965) Piano Concerto No.1 Symphony No. 1

(509) 624-1200 • SpokaneSymphony.org Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

50 INLANDER MARCH 16, 2017


PSYCH/NEW WAVE

EXISTENTIAL POP Transplanted from Portland to the California desert, Josh Hodges of STRFKR found inspiration in desolation BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

J

osh Hodges, the creative force behind the band STRFKR, retreated into the California desert in early 2016 to record his latest album. He emerged several months later with Being No One, Going Nowhere, which explores heady themes of identity, solitude and meditation and yet features perhaps the poppiest, most approachable collection of songs he’s yet produced. Being No One was recorded mostly in a hilltop rental house in the Joshua Tree area of San Bernardino County, a secluded spot surrounded on all sides by acres of emptiness. It’s a 20-minute drive to the nearest grocery store. The days are oppressively hot; it cools down to about 70 degrees after the sun goes down. It’s kind of like camping, if your idea of roughing it involves having a full recording studio at your disposal.

Hodges engineered much of the album by himself (he plays live with a three-piece backing band), working on songs late into the night. Isolation has always been an integral part of Hodges’ writing process, but he’d never before worked in such a remote locale. “Knowing that no one can hear what I’m doing is kind of freeing,” Hodges says. “I’m free to make whatever mistakes and make weird noises, make a really shitty song if I want and not feel embarrassed about it. You’re immediately in touch with the desert and the desolation out there. You’re really trapped in your own world. But it’s comforting to feel small.” It’s a case of environment influencing art, though a few of the album’s tracks originated outside the walls of ...continued on next page

Josh Hodges (right) is the creative force behind STRFKR. CARA ROBBINS PHOTO


MUSIC | PSYCH/NEW WAVE

Spokane County Comprehensive Plan Update

PUBLIC WORKSHOPS March 30, 2017 5:30pm March 31, 2017 10:00am Commissioners Hearing Room 1026 Broadway Ave. Spokane, Washington Spokane County is seeking your input on an update to the County’s Comprehensive Plan. The Growth Management Act requires this review to occur every eight years to ensure that the plan reflects community values and is consistent with state planning laws. The purpose of the workshops is to provide a forum for individuals to express their concerns and desires related to the Comprehensive Plan. Requests for information or written comments should be directed to Steve Davenport, AICP, Spokane County Department of Building and Planning, 1026 W Broadway Ave., Spokane, WA 99260, (509) 447-7221. Visit our website at www. spokanecounty.org/247/ Building-Planning

Spokane County 52 INLANDER MARCH 16, 2017

Being No One, Going Nowhere, STRFKR’s fourth studio album.

“EXISTENTIAL POP,” CONTINUED... Hodges’ desert sanctuary. One is a song that was deemed “too poppy” for a band that Hodges was in while he was living in Amsterdam. Another was something that STRFKR’s longtime drummer Keil Corcoran had been toying with. Others were fleshed out from snatches of melody that had been floating around in Hodges’ head for months or years. That stop-and-start writing process isn’t uncommon for Hodges, who’s typically left with bits and pieces of unfinished songs after an album is finished. Last month, he released Vault Vol. 1, a compilation of those odds and ends offering a glimpse into how he puts songs together. “I’ve recorded a few different albums that were getting pretty far along, and then I decided they weren’t what I wanted to do with STRFKR,” Hodges says. “I have another album now I need to finish, but it could maybe be used for something else.” Although Hodges is currently based in L.A., STRFKR got its start in Portland in 2007 as a scrappy, eccentric band that quickly developed a reputation for raucous, sweaty live performances. Despite being known as a band that you’d want to see in concert, Hodges says Being No One, Going Nowhere is the first STRFKR album that he produced specifically with the band’s live shows in mind. “We can play almost the whole album live and it would translate well for dancing,” he says. “Half or more of my songs aren’t dance songs, but our reputation, at least with the live shows, is that people are going to have fun and dance.” STRFKR’s previous records combined the sounds of ’70s soft rock (think Todd Rundgren or 10cc) with early ’80s new wave, but the first half of Being No One, Going Nowhere really doubles down on glossy, often bouncy synth pop. As the album progresses, though, it becomes dreamier, more introspective and more experimental, like it’s being swallowed up by the haze of a desert oasis. Even its title, inspired by the writings of Buddhist nun Ayya Khema, proves that Hodges is still, first and foremost, a pop existentialist. “It’s this common Buddhist idea, that a lot of human suffering comes from our sense of self and the stress that comes from trying to make something of ourselves,” Hodges says. “I really like that idea. It’s more like a goal. That phrase is kind of a reminder. It’s what I want to be, more in the moment, to just be, and having that be enough.”  STRFKR with Psychic Twin • Thu, March 23 at 8 pm • Allages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory. com • 244-3279


MUSIC | ROCK

Tim Showalter is better known as Strand of Oaks.

Road Worthy Strand of Oaks’ path to sonic nirvana comes through Spokane BY DAN NAILEN

I

f you’ve only heard Strand of Oaks’ Tim Showalter, there’s a bit of visual dissonance to overcome the first time you see him. The burly, bearded, heavily tattooed Philadelphia resident looks like he’s more likely to be fronting a Motörhead tribute band or working as a bouncer at a biker bar than delivering expansive, electronically enhanced folk-rock with shockingly pretty vocals. The songs filling Strand of Oaks’ new Hard Love album and his 2014 breakthrough, HEAL, veer from delicate piano balladry to heavy riff-rockers with ease, and at various moments you’ll hear shades of Springsteen, ’80s synth-pop or reggae-fied dub. “I think my brain is an FM radio and it’s just always crawling the dial,” Showalter says from his Philly home by way of explanation. “I’m not proficient enough at

music to actually write a dub song, but I can feel what a dub song is and can play around with it.” Hard Love features a lot of playing around, as the tunes explore a mind-altering drug trip in the Australian desert (“On the Hill”), the music that inspired him (“Radio Kids”) and a sibling’s near-death experience (“Taking Acid and Talking to My Brother”). A first effort at recording was tossed out at one point — “I thought the songs deserved a little bit more. I got a little too much in my head” — and Showalter started over, this time adopting an open-door policy where friends and fellow musicians could drop by to party or shake a tambourine. The result is a nine-song set that still pushes sonic boundaries for the one-time solo folkie, while maintaining some of the loose vibe he wanted. Its brevity is a strength: Showalter says “a record should only be about

MACLAY HERIOT PHOTO

35 or 40 minutes. [The Beatles’] Revolver is, like, 32 minutes, and it feels huge.” Even better, Showalter says, the new songs were recorded in such a way that they feel road-ready from the jump. He just took his new band to Europe for a short tour, and “from the first show to the tenth show, it’s amazing how the songs are already sounding and growing. “The album itself almost feels like a live record,” Showalter says. “It’s real natural to play, the songs are already ready to be expanded. These songs lend themselves to exploration. It’s hard to play them in under 10 minutes sometimes.” Upon hearing the suggestion that this might take Strand of Oaks away from labels like “folk-rock” into “jam-band” territory, Showalter reacts enthusiastically. “I would fully embrace that title!” he says. “How many shows have you been to where you’re like, ‘Am I just listening to the record right now? The beers are cheaper at home!’ “We don’t know where the night is going to go when we play, but we want to offer up something bigger.” n Strand of Oaks with Heather McEntire • Thu, March 23 at 8 pm • $13 • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

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MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 53


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ROCK MEAT PUPPETS

T

rying to label Meat Puppets’ sound is laughable, given their constant exploration of new sonic highways over the course of 27 years. They were labeled “punk” early on, based more on their presence on pioneering L.A. punk label SST than their sound. From their inception, though, they’ve been pushing in whatever direction struck the fancy of frontmen/brothers Curt and Cris Kirkwood — psychedelia and pop-folk, stoner rock and country. They’re fully capable of monstrous, Southern-fried classic-rock riffage that would make ZZ Top proud, and time-shifting, proggy excursions that Rush fans could appreciate. Curt Kirkwood’s guitar playing is of the facemelting variety, and his brother’s bouncing bass lines serve as a perfect complement. Rather than label them, I just say that Meat Puppets are easily one of my favorite bands, ever. My expectations are high every time I see them, and I’ve never been disappointed. — DAN NAILEN Meat Puppets with the Modern Era • Mon, March 20 at 8 pm • $17/$20 day of • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

GARAGE ROCK THE COATHANGERS

Thursday, 03/16

J J THE BARTLETT, The Holy Broke, Anna Tivel, Tyler Aker BEEROCRACY, Open Mic BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Randy Campbell acoustic show BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen J CHAPS, Spare Parts COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny CRAVE, DJ Freaky Fred CRUISERS, Open Mic Jam Slam hosted by Perfect Destruction and J.W. Scattergun J J KNITTING FACTORY, Donavon Frankenreiter, Grant-Lee Phillips, Karrie O’Neill LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Dan Conrad MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Kevin Dorin J MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE, Open Mic hosted by Scott Reid J J NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Chris Botti THE OBSERVATORY, Vinyl Meltdown J THE PIN!, Acid Teeth, the Drag, Widower POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Devon Wade THE RESERVE, Liquid with DJ Dave THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, Spokane River Band J J SPOKANE ARENA, Journey, with Asia TIMBER GASTRO PUB, Bill Bozly ZOLA, Blake Braley

54 INLANDER MARCH 16, 2017

T

he Coathangers started making ferocious, flippantly comic punk songs about a decade ago, and with each new release, the Atlanta-based trio has developed beyond the loud-quiet-loud dynamics that defined their early output. Don’t get us wrong: You can still cut yourself on the sharp, satirical edges of their songs; it’s just that they’ve obviously matured as songwriters in the years since their eponymous 2007 debut. The band’s most recent album, 2016’s Nosebleed Weekend, is caustic yet playful (one track employs a squeaky toy as percussion), and last week they announced an upcoming EP called Parasite, which is reportedly a burst of post-election fury committed to tape. It’s just the kind of hard-rock catharsis we could all use in these tumultuous times. — NATHAN WEINBENDER The Coathangers with Birth Defects, Peru Resh and Fun Ladies • Tue, March 21 at 8 pm • $8/$10 day of • 21+ • The Observatory • 15 S. Howard • brownpapertickets.com

Friday, 03/17

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Larry Myer J J THE BARTLETT, St. Patrick’s Day with Folkinception, Smackout Pack BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BIGFOOT PUB, Yesterdayscake BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Nicholas Stud THE BLACKWELL LOUNGE, Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Mojo Box

J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Greg Hodapp Trio CAPONE’S, JamShack THE EMPEROR ROOM, Emperor Room Grand Opening, feat. Madchild FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Wyatt Wood IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Browne Salmon Truck JOHN’S ALLEY, Scott Pemberton Band J KNITTING FACTORY, Josh Abbott Band, Robbie Walden Band LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow MAX AT MIRABEAU, Kenny James

Miller Band MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Dodgy Mountain Men NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Patrick PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, The Powers J THE PIN!, Anomaly, the Wanderers THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler RIVELLE’S RIVER GRILL, Son of Brad THE ROADHOUSE, Charlie Butts and

the Filter Tips SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT, Just Plain Darin J J SPOKANE ARENA, Eric Church SPOKANE EAGLES LODGE, Stagecoach West ZOLA, Zach Cooper Band

Saturday, 03/18

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Pamela Benton J J THE BARTLETT, Lady Lamb, Jan Francisco


BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J J THE BIG DIPPER, KYRS Presents Marshall Poole, Wayward West, Skinny the Kid BIGFOOT PUB, Yesterdayscake BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Nicholas Stud BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Mojo Box J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Eric E. FLAME & CORK, Son of Brad GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Armed and Dangerous Band IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, John Hastings THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave LA ROSA CLUB, Open Jam LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Karrie O’Neill MAX AT MIRABEAU, Kenny James Miller Band MICKDUFF’S BREWING COMPANY, Devon Wade NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Patrick THE PALOMINO, Heroes for Ghosts with Voodoo Death Gun, Killer E’s PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, One Street Over J PEND OREILLE PLAYHOUSE, Bridges Home Celtic Concert

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POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Echo Elysium THE RESERVE, DJ Lydell THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler THE ROADHOUSE, Ryan Larsen Band THE ROCK BAR & LOUNGE, DJ Aphrodisiac SPOKANE EAGLES LODGE, Sharky and the FIns THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave ZOLA, Zach Cooper Band

Sunday, 03/19

DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open jam O’DOHERTY’S IRISH GRILLE, Live Irish Music J THE PIN!, Telepathic Station Nine, Young Planetary, Overcast (Boise), Buddha Slave, Pavel P. THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Sunday Karaoke Night J SPOKANE ARENA, Rock and Worship Roadshow feat. Steven Curtis Chapman, Francesca Battistelli and Rend Collective ZOLA, Whsk&Keys

Monday, 03/20

J J THE BARTLETT, Meat Puppets (see facing page), the Modern Era J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with

Lucas Brookbank Brown ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 03/21

THE EMPEROR ROOM, T.A.S.T.Y with DJs Freaky Fred, Beauflexx THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday MIK’S, DJ Brentano J THE OBSERVATORY, The Coathangers (see facing page), Birth Defects, Peru Resh, Fun Ladies J THE PIN!, Chelsea Grin, Ice Nine Kills, Gideon, Enterprise Earth, Moretta, 37 Street Signs THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Open Mic/ Jam Night ZOLA, Dueling Cronkites

Wednesday, 03/22

J THE BARTLETT, Rabbit Wilde GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES, Open Mic with Travis Goulding LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 NO-LI BREWHOUSE, Wyatt Wood THE PALOMINO, The Iron Maidens with Dogtown 420, Dimestore Cowboys, Supervillain J THE PIN!, Mothership, Black P*ssy RIVELLE’S RIVER GRILL, Jam Night: Truck Mills and guests THE ROADHOUSE, Open Mic with Johnny Qlueless THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave TWO SEVEN PUBLIC HOUSE, Cruxie ZOLA, Haley Young & Champagne Jam

Coming Up ...

COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Phillip Phillips, March 23 J THE BIG DIPPER, Wild Powwers, Spinning Whips, March 23 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Great White, Slaughter, March 23 J THE BARTLETT, Strand of Oaks (see facing page), March 23 J KNITTING FACTORY, STRFKR (see facing page), March 23 THE OBSERVATORY, Hollow Earth, East Sherman, Guardian, March 23 BABY BAR, Griffey, The Co Founder, Loomer, March 23 J THE BIG DIPPER, Chris Shiflett, Brian Whelan, March 24 J KNITTING FACTORY, Badfish, Quarter Monkey, March 24 THE ROADHOUSE, Hysteria: Def Leppard Tribute, March 24 J THE BIG DIPPER, Dead Meadow, March 25 J KNITTING FACTORY, Social Distortion, Jade Jackson, March 25 J THE BIG DIPPER, Horseshoes and Hand Grenades, March 26 J KNITTING FACTORY, DAN + SHAY, Jackie Lee, March 26 J THE BIG DIPPER, The Werks, B Radicals, March 28 J KNITTING FACTORY, LoCash, March 28 J THE PIN!, Carnifex, Despised Icon, Fallujah, March 29 CHECKERBOARD BAR, Impulse Control, Slow Corpse, Griffey, Runaway Octopus, March 29

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 5359309 DIAMS DEN • 412 W. Sprague • 934-3640 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE EMPEROR ROOM • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOTEL RL BY RED LION AT THE PARK • 303 W. North River Dr. • 326-8000 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N. Market St. • 466-9918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)-255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-6647901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208765-3200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 242-8907 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RESERVE • 120 N. Wall • 598-8783 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208930-0381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 55


THEATER HERE WE GO AGAIN

Admit it: You’ve had that moment where ABBA’s “Dancing Queen” comes on the radio and you cranked up the volume and sang along at the top of your lungs. (No? Is that just me?) The Swedish quartet produced some of the most irrepressibly catchy pop tunes of the ’70s, and Mamma Mia!, the jukebox musical featuring 23 of the group’s songs, further extended the group’s cultural relevance. The show has run continuously since its 1999 West End premiere, and one of the many touring companies of Mamma Mia! is returning to Spokane on a so-called “farewell” circuit. Don’t be surprised, though, if overwhelming demand eventually inspires a “comeback” tour. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Mamma Mia! • Wed-Thu, March 22-23 at 7:30 pm • $37.50$80.50 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • inbpac.com • 279-7000

COMEDY COMING ATTRACTION

In the early 2000s, stand-up comic Pablo Francisco seemed poised for superstardom. His Comedy Central special was re-run constantly, and his vocal impersonation of Don LaFontaine, the late, prolific movie trailer narrator, made him something of a viral hit in the pre-YouTube era. (His oft-repeated routine about the fake Arnold Schwarzenegger vehicle Little Tortilla Boy is still pretty damn funny.) And while the stand-up veteran never quite broke out the way some of his contemporaries did, he continues to perform and tour, and he debuts on the Spokane Comedy Club stage this week. Expect some uncanny impressions. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Pablo Francisco • Sun, March 19 at 8 pm • 21+ • $20/$27 • Spokane Comedy Club • 315 W. Sprague • spokanecomedyclub.com • 318-9998

56 INLANDER MARCH 16, 2017

COMMUNITY SCENIC SHORES

Beneath winter’s soppy snow and slushy puddles, trash and other debris collects unseen, revealing its unsightliness with spring’s big melt-off, like what’s happening right now. Help keep our city and surrounding natural spaces clean by pitching in to pick up litter along the banks of the Spokane River as part of a collaborative effort this weekend. The Spokane Riverkeeper, Numerica Credit Union and River City Brewing are teaming up to host the cleanup that coincides with the month-long Riverwalk beer fundraiser. For that endeavor, River City is donating a portion of sales from its Riverkeeper IPA to help keep the Spokane’s waters running clear. After the cleanup, join fellow volunteers at the brewery for a sudsy reward. — CHEY SCOTT Riverwalk River Clean-up • Sat, March 18 from 1:30-3:30 pm • Glover Field Park • 216 N. Cedar • facebook.com/SpokaneRiverkeeper


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OUTDOORS SPRING FORTH

Trade in those snow boots for hiking boots this weekend and hit the trails to celebrate Washington State Parks’ 104th birthday. To mark the occasion, the State Parks Commission is offering free access — meaning you don’t need a Discover Pass — to Washington’s 100-plus state parks, including those in the diverse Inland Northwest region. Get on a subalpine level at Mt. Spokane (you’ll need a Sno-Park pass for access here, however), wander along the water in Riverside State Park and bask in the magnificence of the roaring Palouse Falls at our region’s nearest three state-run parks. This Sunday marks the third of 12 total State Parks “free days” offered in 2017; the next two are set for April 15 and 22. — CHEY SCOTT Washington State Parks Free Day • Sun, March 19; daytime access only • Local access at Riverside, Palouse Falls and Mt. Spokane state parks • Details at parks.state.wa.us

MUSIC SMOOTH SOUNDS

Little did Chris Botti know when he first heard Miles Davis and became obsessed with jazz that picking up a trumpet would take him around the world, playing alongside legends of all kinds of music. Early on, he blew notes beside Frank Sinatra and Joni Mitchell, and the past two decades have found him collaborating with the likes of Sting, Paul Simon and Herbie Hancock. On his solo albums and tours, he displays the kind of dexterous musicianship that makes him valuable for other musicians to tap into, while delivering a jazz style that is plenty appealing all by itself. — DAN NAILEN Chris Botti • Thu, March 16 at 7:30 pm • $45/$55/$75 • Northern Quest Resort & Casino • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • northernquest.com

MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 57


W I SAW U YOU

RS RS

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU EY Not only did my heart flip, but I got butterflies when I spotted you several times the other night. (3-4) It did not seem right to say hello to you at the time, as I was with my date, but the lighting change you made right at the right time was just lovely! The point is I can not, and will not stop thinking about you. Call me maybe?? I SAW YOU... I saw you hit your dog. I hear you hit your girlfriend. Just because you are behind closed doors does not mean that you have gotten off without being noticed. We all do. I saw you that day. I will never forget it. That look on your dog’s face. Or how about the fact that we hear what you do to her. Hear her pleading with you to stop. Calling the police doesn’t faze you anymore. I am here. I am a survivor. I am not going to sit back and let monsters like you think they can’t be touched. I know that I am not the only one. She’s always got another bruise to explain to her friends and family. She’s always making up excuses for you. I see you. She’s always coming up with reasons that this is her fault, that she shouldn’t have angered you. I see you. She always believes that you’ll get better. I mean, you did just apologize, and you sounded ‘so sincere’. I see you. She tells herself that she deserves this, that somehow all of this is her fault. I see you. But everyone sees you for what

you really are, even when you convince someone else, even yourself, that you are this ‘flawed hurt person.’ You made the choice to strike someone else, your past has nothing to do with it. How many people hang onto the excuse, ‘My past made me do it?’ You made you do it. David Pelzer was horrendously abused yet showed nothing but love for his children and wife. Many people have grown to be wonderful parents, spouses, successful people without even raising a hand to the ones they love (or committing other acts of abuse) even after having faced abuse in their lives. Your abuse is your own fault monster, and people can see your true colours. If anything, I can. I can hear everything. To the victim: You are not alone. IN OUR DREAMS... We have seen you in our dreams. The vision isn’t clear but we know it’s you. We feel your presence so strongly. When will you become a reality? We wait patiently for that day. It was your brother who came to us in a dream one night and said, “Mom & Dad, you might have lost one son, but you will have another one. My brother doesn’t look anything like me nor does he look anything like you two. Keep your heart open. He will come to you in a way you’re not expecting; even an age that might make you hesitant to open your heart. Don’t let that stand in the way. Keep your heart open.” And so we decided we would. Where are you, our son? We wait day by day, with hope and faith, that you will be here soon. Truly, we believe you are near. Perhaps, you are drying your tears; tears because you feel you are unwanted or unloved; sorrow because you have no one and long for a family that would love you unconditionally. No matter your age; ethnicity; sexual orientation; past or scars, we will take you and love you just as you are. We’re here waiting for you with open hearts and open arms. We love you, son. Love, Mom & Dad SHADLE WALMART I saw you at Shadle Walmart, late morning of 3/11/17; between 11 and noon. You were driving a white GMC Terrain... I was with a friend sitting outside of starbucks. I had a beanie and aviators on. We exchanged ‘smiles and waves’. You spent a lot of

time preparing a pink gift. We should meet for coffee sometime! FUTURE ME Dear Future Me, You won’t recognize that you’re me until it’s too late. You should be paying attention to the details of your life that don’t feel right. Instead, you’re convincing yourself that the things you notice aren’t that big of a deal. You’ll tell yourself to stop being paranoid a few times. He has purposely

excluded you from the other parts of his life. You aren’t ever going to be a part of it. He only comes to you when he is hurt by what he can’t get from his real life. He’ll lie to you during that time, and you’ll believe him. He’ll lie extensively and lead you to believe that you have something real. His other life has no idea the reality he’s created just for you, and that’s why they pity him. It’s going to hurt like hell when you realize, but remember this: You never have to feel this way again. Nothing will ever hurt you this bad again so long as you close the door behind him and keep it closed. Best of luck. You’re in my prayers, New Me BON BON BEAUTY All my random knowledge goes out the window whenever I see you at trivia night. Hearing your voice is music to my ears. Do you know how beautiful you are? I hope so. WPD

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I wish I could have been more respectful and loving, because that is what you deserve. yow! LANDLORDS Shame on you greedy people. It’s not enough that rents are going up. But you require that we have to make 3 times the rent in order to be considered for a place. It’s not your business on how much we have over after we pay rent and utilities. The income barriers you set

I saw you hit your dog. I hear you hit your girlfriend. Just because you are behind closed doors does not mean that you have gotten off without being noticed.

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

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to give a huge cheers out to the guys that work at Aloha Island Grill on Monroe Street. I have been going in there daily for the last 3 years. The food is excellent and all of the employees provide top notch customer service. They always have a positive attitude and provide the friendliest service. I just want to thank Aloha and it’s employees for always providing excellent service 100% of the time, keep up the great work!!!

DOOR OPEN Fine young miss: I didn’t mean to cast aspersions on you, per se. I’m a “writer” and you were doing your job controlling people. I have many resources, and so do you I’m sure. I wish we could meet some time for coffee, but judging by your entourage you have little time for haughty chit chat. Cheers!

JEERS BREAKUP BY TEXT JERK JEERS to the Jerk... that would be me. My apologies to the dating site girls (yes plural) I broke up with by text. I was the fool and the jerk. I have thought of writing to you and apologizing, but the damage is already done, and in some instance, it has been a few years now... As the dust settles in my brain, I can see that I was emotionally insecure and too distracted to recognize your beauty and intelligence and individualism. You don’t deserve a fool. Please don’t define yourself by anything said in the end, because none of it was true. Happy trails to you... and though you don’t have to accept my apology, please know that in retrospect,

up are discriminatory to those who get disability checks. You are saying to the public that if you can’t afford to live in Spokane then get out of Spokane. You are the reason people are asking to raise the minimum wage. ALL LIVES MATTER To my friend who shamed me for not partaking in the Black Lives Matter march. It’s not my cause. Do you think they’d take to the streets for me? Doubtful. They’re a bunch of pampered citizens with First world problems. Why don’t you take to the streets in protest of genocide in N. Korea or Syria? That’s where the real human rights issues are being violated. 

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS C L U I N G

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W I P E D O U T

H O L D O N T O

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H O O F I A T C I E D S J O A Z Z

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E T D O A M I L S C R E E L O L D A R E D E C L A A L O A D T E S T S A T E I D E R N S S I T H H T A K E O S N O R E

N E N E E K S A D R E O F I T T A S P A P U T R S

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NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

CLAM STORM April 4TH 5TH & 6TH! We only do this twice a year so call today for reservations! (509) 326-6794

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EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

GAMBLING FOR GOOD: COMMUNITIES IN SCHOOLS The evbent includes appetizers, dinner, dessert and “funny money” for games, live auction and raffle prizes benefitting Communities In Schools of Spokane County. March 18, 5:30-8:30 pm. $75. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford. bidpal.net/cis HEARTS FOR HOMES DINNER & AUCTION The 8th annual dinner and auction generates funds to support North Idaho Habitat for Humanity’s Home Building Program and A Brush with Kindness, a home repair program. March 24, 6-9:30 pm. $45. Best Western Coeur d’Alene, 506 W. Appleway. northidahohabitat.org

COMEDY

FELIPE ESPARZA After 17 years of stand-up comedy, various TV appearances and two movies, Felipe walked away with the title prize on NBC’s “Last Comic Standing” in 2010. March 16-18 at 8 pm, March 18 at 10:30 pm. $15-$26. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com CRIME SHOW The BDT Players offer a comedic take on TV’s staple “whodun-it.” Rated for general audiences. Fridays, at 8 pm, Feb. 17-March 24. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) THE IMPROV CO-OP: NEARLY KILT YA The Co-op is back for St. Patrick’s day with a comedy show full of Irish accents, potatoes, and a kilt or two. March 18, 7 pm. Free. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway. (342-2055) SAFARI The Blue Door’s fast-paced, short-form improv show. Rated for mature audiences. Saturdays at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) LEWIS BLACK Known worldwide for his outrageously funny views on life, Black has been speaking his mind to audiences for more than 30 years. March 19, 7:30 pm. $45/$55/$75. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com PABLO FRANCISCO Pablo’s two Comedy Central specials “They Put It Out There” and “Ouch!” continue to stay on the network’s most requested list. March 19, 8 pm. $20-$27. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998)

COMMUNITY

INLAND EMPIRE SHUFFLE Strictly Swing Spokane presents a full weekend devoted to swing dancing and live music. Includes workshops and a la carte pricing. March 17-19; Fri 7-11 pm; Sat, 10 am-11 pm and Sun, 10 am-5 pm. $150/$175 for weekend pass. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. strictlyswingspokane.com SERVICE ANIMAL PUBLIC FORUM Spokane City Councilman Mike Fagan hosts a series of public forums to educate attendees on the issue of “service animals” in the city of Spokane. Currently the city of Spokane does not have a comprehensive policy regarding this matter. March 17, 6-7 pm. Free. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. bit.ly/2mouETP (323-7497) STATE OF THE COUNTY Commissioner Al French shares the progress Spokane County has made to improve the quality of services and maximize the value

of the community’s tax dollars. March 17, 7:30-9 am. $25/$55. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanecenter.com (279-7000) THIRD FRIDAY SWING DANCE Includes a beginner lesson at 7 pm with guest instructor Joel Plys. Then dance to live music from 8-10 pm by Johnny J and the Flat Foot Floogies, with Dj’d dancing from 10-11. March 17, 7-11 pm. $10/$12. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. strictlyswingspokane.com CDA CASINO ANNIVERSARY POWWOW The Casino celebrates its 24th anniversary and culture during the event; Grand Entries begin at 1 and 7 pm in the Events Center. March 18. Free. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S Hwy 95. cdacasino.com (800-523-2467) BLOOMSDAY TRAINING CLINICS Get ready for the 41st Bloomsday at free clinics from Providence and Group Health. Walk, jog or run at your own pace. Routes begin with one mile, adding one mile each week. March 18-April 29, meets Saturdays at 8:30 am. Register online. Free. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. phc.org HARDY SUCCULENTS FOR SPOKANE AREA GARDENS Master Gardner Eva Lusk shows how to take advantage of Spokane’s almost ideal growing condition for succulents. RSVP via email. March 18, 10 am. Free. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. (456-8038) WVOLC OPEN HOUSE Join center staff for a day of critters, crafts and outdoor games. March 18 and April 15, from 10 am-2 pm. $5 suggested donation. West Valley Outdoor Learning Center, 8706 E. Upriver Drive. olc.wvsd.org SPOKANE VIGIL TO PROTECT THE ACA Local labor, faith and community groups in the Hear Our Voices coalition hold a candlelight vigil in Spokane to demand that Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers vote NO on the bill to repeal the ACA. March 18, 7-8:30 pm. Free. CHAS Denny Murphy Clinic, 1001 W. Second. fusewashington.org (509-444-8200) SEED STARTING WORKSHOP Master Gardener Kathy McKeown from the University of Idaho Extension Service discusses and demonstrates techniques for seed selection, seed-starting soil mixes, flats and pots, lighting, temperature and more for transplanting and optimum growth. March 20, 6-7:30 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org KNITTING FOR SHELTER PETS The CdA Library’s Well-Knit Tale Knitting Club members are knitting/crocheting blankets for the shelter animals at the Kootenai Humane Society. Anyone is welcome to join on March 21, from 2:30-4 pm; all levels welcome. Bring your own supplies. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org SUICIDE AWARENESS FORUM SPR’s Steve Jackson moderates the discussion on suicide prevention, mental health, and Washington state’s Death with Dignity Act. March 22, 6:30-8:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Spokane City Hall, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (328-5729)

FOOD

ARGENTINIAN WINE DINNER A special wine dinner with Pablo Piccolo of Catena Wines, featuring 100-point wines from Adriana Vineyard in Argentina. 10 wines are paired with 10 small plates in a tasting-style menu featuring

clams, prawns, and lamb. March 16, 6 pm. $120/person. Inland Pacific Kitchen, 304 W. Pacific Ave. ipkspokane.com PURPLE EGYPTIAN BARLEY PROJECT The weekly series showcases a collaboration between Palouse Pint, Palouse Heritage grain farm, Bellwether and Culture Bread, highlighting beers and breads made from the landrace grain known as Egyptian Purple Barley. Thursdays, through April 7 (check Bellwether FB for start times each week). Free admission. Bellwether Brewing Co., 2019 N. Monroe. facebook.com/ bellwetherbrewing/ (280-8345) SAMPLE THE CELLAR Masselow’s staff pull out old and rare bottles from the cellar to help demonstrate the new Coravin wine dispenser. Three, 2-ounce tastes are included with each ticket, with more available to purchase. Also includes Chef Tanya’s hors d’oeuvres. March 16, 8-10 pm. $35. Masselow’s, 100 N. Hayford Rd. bit.ly/2lXtnGY GARLAND DISTRICT PUB CRAWL The inaugural St. Patrick’s Day weekend event includes stops at Rick’s Ringside, Bon Bon, Beerocracy, Brown Derby and more, with live music, drink specials, prizes and more. March 17, 7-10 pm. $5. Garland District, Spokane. garlandpubcrawl.brownpapertickets.com ST. PADDY’S PILSNER RELEASE PARTY Big Barn is releasing its new Pilsner (offered at $3/pint), with an event featuring games, serving Black & Tans, green beer, and an Irish Feast ($10$12). March 17, 5-9 pm. Free. Big Barn Brewing Co., 16004 N. Applewood Ln. bigbarnbrewing.com (710-2961) BEVERLY’S ST. PATRICK’S IRISH WHISKEY DINNER A special St. Patrick’s Day event, with Irish whiskey pairings and a special Irish-themed dinner by executive chef Jim Barrett. March 18, 6:30 pm. $85+. Beverly’s, 115 S. Second St. ow.ly/ZPAT3092PVN

MUSIC

DINNER CABARET Guests enjoy a three course, European-inspired dinner by Mangia Catering, and a three-act professional cabaret. March 17-18, from 6-9:30 pm. $55. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St, Post Falls. cdasummertheatre.com TAIKO JAPANESE DRUMMING Come play the drums at this hands-on event demonstration. Spokane Taiko is a nonprofit that seeks to build community and create awareness through the traditional music of Japan. March 18, 12-1 pm. Free. Spokane Kendo Club, 829 W. Broadway. SpokaneTaiko.com SPOKANE JAZZ ORCHESTRA The spring concert “Groove Summit” features guest musicians Brent Edstrom and Don Goodwin. March 18, 7:30 pm. $12-$26.50. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. spokanejazz.org SPOKANE BRITISH BRASS BAND The SBB joins the Saint Dominic School Girls Choir for a concert of music by American Composers. March 19, 3-5 pm. $10/ adults; free/kids, students. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (999-8717) AUDITORIUM CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES: NEW YORK POLYPHONY The 30th anniversary season of the ACMS continues with a performance by the 2-time Grammy-nominated male classical vocal quartet. March 21, 7:30 pm. $10-$22. U. of Idaho Admin Bldg, 851 Campus Dr. uidaho.edu/class/acms

ISSUE

On stands April 13th Advertise in this guide to reach families with kids and help them plan their summer now!

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Green’s Dream Can Carbon Logic change the world? A local collaboration aims to find out BY CONNOR DINNISON

M

ac Green’s brother died in his arms of a prescription opioid overdose on May 14, 2005, at the age of 22. What was supposed to ease pain from frequent kidney stones ultimately proved to be addictive and lethal, as it increasingly has for hundreds of people in Washington state who die from opioid abuse each year. And yet most of the medical community still

looks askance at cannabis, a natural medicine that is neither addictive or lethal. “You’ll challenge authority when you sense foul,” says Green, 32. Be it the notion of “medical doctors selling their soul for profit, poisoning our loved ones” or the lack of an “organically, medically driven” healing mission in the local cannabis scene, Green sees room for improve-

ment in the fledgling marijuana industry. “I rarely hear the word ‘medicine’ here,” he says. “I’d love to be a part of the change.” A collaboration with Dr. Philip Appel, founder of Ag Energy Solutions in Spokane, opened that door for Green. Appel, a fifth-generation wheat farmer from Dusty in Whitman County, has patented a process and machine that produces Carbon Logic, two products (developed in partnership with Green, a former medical cannabis grower) that blend biochar (a highly porous charcoal produced from plant matter that is used as a soil amendment in agriculture) with other beneficial nutrients and minerals. Green sees Ag Energy’s products as a godsend to not only farmers (“Save the farmer!” is Appel’s battle cry, says Green) but specifically cultivators of marijuana and, most urgently, the planet. “The earth is dying,” says Green, now co-founder of and sales director for Green’s Farm, a distributor of Ag Energy’s products. Food scarcities, rampant abuse of pesticides, unsustainable agricultural practices, global climate change; Green says that Carbon Logic is an answer — rather, the answer — to these urgent problems: “We can confidently say that Carbon Logic products are formulated with the best biochar in the world.” Green claims that it’s virtually indistinguishable from the terra preta, or “black soil,” developed by Amazonian civilizations more than two millennia ago. The benefits, it seems, are timeless. Carbon Logic biochar, produced southwest of Spokane in Sprague, has a high surfaceto-volume ratio (more surface area for water molecules and nutrients to cling to, which plants can more readily absorb, explains Green) and a unique nutritional value, thanks to its use of a wheat stock base (most biochars are wood-based). Its presence in the soil also reduces acidity levels and returns nitrogen much like the practice of field burning once did, before it was outlawed here in 1996. The takeaway? Accelerated root growth and a higher yield, naturally (Green is quick to point out that their product will soon be registered as the only natural biochar fertilizer in the world), for cannabis sativa plants. Green’s earth-conscious enthusiasm, and Appel’s (“His passion is why I am passionate about this,” says Green), was validated at last December’s Emerald Cup in Sonoma County, California, where he launched Green’s Farm (a collaboration with his parents) and witnessed firsthand the kind of cannabis community he envisions for Spokane. “They make a point to break bread together,” says Green of the locals there. Turning his thoughts to his hometown, he wonders, “How can we do it better?” n

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MARCH 16, 2017 INLANDER 63


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess PLEASER BURN

AMY ALKON

My problem is that I’ll go on one or two dates with a girl and then get the whole “I just wanna be friends.” And they really mean that. They want me to do lunch and go shopping and talk on the phone about their guy problems. How can I nicely tell these girls, “I don’t want to hurt your feelings, but no, I’m not going to be your friend — and I especially don’t want to hear about your new guy”? I guess the problem boils down to the fact that I don’t want to make a woman mad. —Frustrated

Over and over, you hear the same thing — basically, “Sorry…we have to turn down your application for CEO, but we’d love to have you as our parking attendant.” By the way, your first problem is that you’re wrong about what your problem is. It isn’t how to TELL a woman you aren’t up for the role of pet eunuch. It’s how to BE the man holding her in his arms instead of the one holding her purse while she’s exploring her options in the tampon section. Consider what the ladies tend to want — whether the ladies are hermit crabs or humans. Evolutionary biologist Robert Trivers’ theory of “parental investment” explains that in species that provide continuing care for their young after they’re born, females have evolved to go for “dominant” males. Dominance translates to being more able to “provide protection and material support” (through physical ability, as well as high social status). However, the term “dominant” is a little…uh…unrefined. Women aren’t looking to be dragged off into the sunset by some thug. Social psychologist Jerry M. Burger and one of his students, Mica Cosby, took a nuanced look at dominance and found that women overwhelmingly want a man who is “confident” and “assertive” as their ideal date or romantic partner. And though most also want a man who’s “sensitive” and “easygoing,” none — NOT ONE — of the 118 women they surveyed wanted a man who is “submissive.” Chances are, “submissive” is exactly how you’re coming off. Your pleaserboy bottom line — “I don’t want to make a woman mad” — suggests a hunger for women’s approval and probably leads you to wilt like a man-daisy to avoid even the slightest conflict. Unfortunately, that won’t get you out of the friend zone. What will is selfrespect — and the assertiveness that comes out of it: showing that you have opinions, needs, and preferences, and tough tostadas if a woman doesn’t like them. This, of course, doesn’t mean being rigidly uncompromising. However, when you do sacrifice your needs, it should be because you feel good about doing something nice — not because you’re dreaming of a day when your “Well, hellooo, gorgeous!” won’t be followed by “Thanks! And I seriously appreciate your watching Senor Fluffyface while I’m on my date.”

HOW DO I LOVE THREE?

I’m a 40-something woman, living with my 50-something male partner. Our relationship is slightly open, in that every Tuesday, we each go out separately and “do whatever with whomever.” I have lived up to my part of this, but I recently discovered that my partner has not. On Tuesdays, he stays home by himself. Beyond being irritated that he’s effectively been lying, I feel weird being the only one doing the open relationship thing. How do I get him to live up to our agreement? —Poly-Annoyed There’s no fun like mandated fun. What’s next, holding him at gunpoint and demanding that he enjoy miniature golf? Chances are, his lying and your feeling “weird” that things aren’t all even-steven in the sexual snacking domain come out of the same place — the evolution of cooperation and the sense of fairness that fostered it. Fairness comes down to how benefits or resources get divided between people — whether in a balanced or imbalanced way. We evolved to get all freaked out about imbalances — even when they’re in our favor — explain population biologist Sarah Brosnan and primatologist Frans de Waal. In fact, we are driven to equalize things “to our own detriment.” But, don’t get too misty-eyed about human moral nobility. They point out that it’s in our self-interest to take the long view — trying to avoid being perceived as unfair, which could kill the possibility of “continued cooperation” between ourselves and a partner. Understanding the likely evolutionary psychology behind your feeling upset could help you focus on why your partner is saying (a silent) “nope!” to the sex buffet. My guess? He loves you and wants you to have what you need. And he doesn’t want you to feel uncomfortable about going out and getting it — even if the only taboo things he’s doing in bed are allowing the dog on it and clipping his fingernails and letting them ricochet around the room. n ©2017, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

64 INLANDER MARCH 16, 2017

EVENTS | CALENDAR WOMEN OF THE WORLD Celebrating world folk traditions from Japan to Africa, this award-winning international a cappella quartet performs in more than 30 languages. $18/adults, $15/60+, $9/ non-WSU students and youth, free/ WSU students with ID. March 22, 7:309:30 pm. Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, Washington State University Pullman Campus. performingarts.wsu.edu

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

BIG HORN OUTDOOR ADVENTURE SHOW The annual trade show brings the outdoors in with more than 300 outfitters, guides, and sporting products. March 16-17, noon-8 pm, March 18, 10 am-8 pm and March 19, 10 am-4 pm. $10/adults; $8/military, seniors, students. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. bighornshow.com KICKING & SCREAMING WATCH PARTY The Boy Scouts Of America Inland Northwest Council host a viewing party with reality show contestant Terry L. Fossum, of Spokane. Thursdays, from 9-10 pm, through May 4. Max at Mirabeau, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. facebook. com/MAXmirabeau (924-9000) SPOKANE CHIEFS The final regular season matches are set for March 15 and 18, and the puck drops at 7:05 pm. $10-$23. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanearena.com (279-7000) FREE STATE PARK DAYS As part of the Discover Pass legislation, all Washington State Parks are open for access without an annual ($30) or one-day ($10) pass. Upcoming free days: March 19, April 15 and 22, June 3 and 10. Includes access locally to Riverside, Mt. Spokane and Palouse Falls state parks. parks.state.wa.us

THEATER

HAM ON REGAL The 54th annual variety show/revue features 250 parents of Ferris students performing in a show titled “When Pigs Fly.” March 15-18 at 7:30 pm; March 18 at 1:30 pm. $7-$9. Ferris High School, 3020 E. 37th Ave. hamonregal.org (354-6000) ONCE UPON A MATTRESS Carried on a wave of songs, this rollicking spin on the familiar classic of royal courtship and comeuppance provides for some side-splitting shenanigans. March 10-18; Thu-Sat at 7 pm; also March 18 at 3 pm. $15. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801) ADDAMS FAMILY MUSICAL A staged musical about the kooky family of cartoon infamy, performed by students of Rogers High. $6-$8. Rogers High School, 1622 E. Wellesley. (354-6551) ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND A reader’s theater production of the classic tale by Lewis Carrol. Directed by Keith Hopkins. March 17-18 and 2425; Fri at 7 pm, Sat at 2 pm. Also at 7 pm on March 25. $7. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway. (342-2055) EMMA Historian and playwright Howard Zinn dramatized the life of Emma Goldman, the anarchist, feminist, and free-spirited thinker who was exiled from the US because of her outspoken views, including her opposition to WWI. Through March 19; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third. spokanestageleft.org

ESCANABA IN DA MOONLIGHT This hunting story to beat all hunting stories spins a hilarious tale of humor, horror and heart. March 3-19; Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $13/students, seniors; $15/ adults. Sixth Street Theater, 212 Sixth St., Wallace, Idaho. sixthstreetmelodrama.com (208-752-8871) HOLDING ON - LETTING GO An honest, humorous and heartrending look at a family forced to come to terms with end-of-life. March 17-April 9, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. 25.00. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) SCOTLAND ROAD A young woman in 19th Century attire is found floating on an iceberg in the Atlantic. Upon rescue, the only word she says is “Titanic.” Could she possibly be a survivor lost at sea decades after the tragedy? March 10-26; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $12-$15. Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway Ave. igniteonbroadway.org (795-0004) STAGE TO SCREEN: ST. JOAN In the Donmar Warehouse’s new production of George Bernard Shaw’s 1923 take on the life and fiery death of Joan of Arc, the French teenager falls victim not to the British in a 15th century war but to Big Business and Wall Street. March 19, 2 pm. $9-$15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com MAMMA MIA! This smash-hit musical combines ABBA’s greatest hits, including “Dancing Queen,” “S.O.S.,” “Super Trouper,” “Take A Chance on Me” and “The Winner Takes It All,” with a tale of love, laughter and friendship. March 2223, 7:30 pm. $32.50-$72.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. wcebroadway.com

VISUAL ARTS

CHRIS BIVINS & SHELLE LINDHOLM The gallery welcomes mixed media artist Chris Bivins and encaustic artist Shelle Lindholm, both showing for the first time at the gallery this month. Through April 8; gallery open Tue-Sat, 11 am-6 pm. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com DAN MCCANN: A LOOK BACK A solo, retrospective exhibition by the mixed media artist. March 16-April 27; open Mon-Fri, 9 am-5 pm (closed during spring break, March 27-31). Opening reception March 15, at noon, in the EWU Gallery of Art. Admission is free. EWU Gallery of Art, Cheney. (359-2494) ST. PATTY’S DAY ARTIST RECEPTION: A reception for “Gaelic on Garland (et cetera)” exhibit, on display through March 21 before the gallery closes its doors. March 17, 5-7 pm. Free. Little Dog Art Gallery, 903 W. Garland. (315-7900) DROP IN & DRAW Adults and teens are invited to drop in and draw with others in a session led by artist Niah Ferlito, who provides a friendly atmosphere in which to explore artistic imaginations and the art supplies to do so. Wednesdays, from 4-5:30 pm. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkwestcentral.org

WORDS

LOVE & OUTRAGE OPEN MIC Bring your lovingly outrageous poetry, prose, rants, or even songs to the next open mic. March 16, 6:30 pm. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. bootsbakery.com (509-703-7223)

READING: EILEEN DELAHANTY PEARKES The author’s work explores the controversial history of the Columbia River Treaty and its impact on ecosystems, indigenous peoples and the agricultural communities of southeastern British Columbia. March 16, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH: DIVERSITY MONOLOGUES Spoken-word poet and actor Yazmin Monet Watkins explores the intersection of race, gender, sexuality, religion, sexual violence, identity, self-love and empowerment. March 16, 7-8:30 pm. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. whitworth.edu (777-4572) EWU VISITING WRITER: LIZ KAY The founding editor of Spark Wheel Press and the journal burntdistrict, Liz holds an MFA from the University of Nebraska, where she was the recipient of both an Academy of American Poets Prize and the Wendy Fort Foundation Prize for exemplary work in poetry. March 17, 7:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) READING: AMY SHIVELY HAWK The stepdaughter of James Shively, Hawk’s book “Six Years in the Hanoi Hilton” tells the story of her stepfather’s capture during the Vietnam War and what it was like to be held as a POW for six years. March 18, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com SASQUATCH: MAN-APE OR MYTH? Author David George Gordon explores the myth and legend of Sasquatch during eight Palouse community events for a program is sponsored by Humanities Washington. March 21: Uniontown Library, 4 pm; Pullman Library, 6 pm. March 22: St. John Library, 4 pm; Rosalia Library, 6:30 pm. March 23: Colfax Methodist Church, noon; Oakesdale Library, 4 pm; Palouse Library, 7 pm. March 24: Endicott School, 1 pm. Free and open to the public. whitco.lib.wa.us THE AGE OF THE FIGHTING SAIL A two-part lecture series by Gonzaga history professor Steve Balzarini reviewing naval warfare during the American Revolution and the Napoleonic Age. March 15 and 22, from 6:30-7:45 pm. $7. Colfax Library, 102 S. Main St. whitco.lib.wa.us BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series, open to all. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. spokanepoetryslam.org LIT SINGLES Bring in two books you feel strongly about, positively or negatively, and share them with other singles during three-minute “book dates.” March 22, 7-8 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) AN OVERVIEW OF THE MOST RECENT ICE AGE FLOODS IN THE PNW A program by Ice Age Floods Institute President Dr. Gary Ford reviewing evidence for the Ice Age floods by following them “downstream” from western Montana to the Pacific Ocean. March 22, 6:30 pm. $9 suggested donation. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org COFFEE WITH A BOOKSELLER: MELISSA OPEL Melissa from Auntie’s leads an informal discussion of upcoming books and some favorite new releases. Selected titles will be available for discount. Auntie’s provides one coffee or hot tea from Sante per attendee. March 23, 10-11 am. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) n


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‘A Light That Changed the World’ Hill Williams’ third and final book touches on a Pacific Northwest shaped by water, scientific discovery and people BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

I

didn’t know it at the time, but on the same day a copy of Hill Williams’ book Writing the Northwest: A Reporter Looks Back made it into my hands last week, his family was laying him to rest. Williams, who died at 91 on March 2, was a journalist and newspaperman in Washington for more than 50 years. He got his start in the Tri-Cities, where he grew up and his father once owned a small paper, before spending most of his career at the Seattle Times. His third and final book touches on a lifetime and more of Pacific Northwest history, painted alongside the scientific discoveries that shaped his understanding of the area. Born in Pasco in 1926, Williams grew up at a time that allowed him to traverse rapids on the Columbia River that William Clark had written about well more than a century before, and later see those same rapids buried under water by the McNary Dam. On assignment for the Tri-City Herald in 1952, he was thrilled to see part of the Oregon Trail from the air as he was on a flight to Nevada to witness an atomic bomb explosion. “It wasn’t until later, after deadlines, that I began to absorb the amazing things I’d seen in just a few days,” Williams writes in the book, released in February by WSU Press. “Peering from an airplane that sped more miles in an hour than the wagons traveled in days, I had seen traces of the Oregon Trail, relic of a massive human migration that had populated much of the continent’s western coast. “And I’d seen a light brighter than the sun, a light that changed the world forever, signaling a new era in history.”

W

Hill Williams was among the first press to witness an atomic bomb explode in mid-air at the Atomic Energy Commission’s Nevada test site in 1952.

66 INLANDER MARCH 16, 2017

illiams’ book is full of self-aware snapshots like that, giving the reader a glimpse into the many thousands of assignments he had, from riding in submarines to walking the crater of Mount St. Helens, all the while connecting past to present. As he describes the formation of the Palouse, it’s easy to imagine him driving past the same rolling hills I grew up playing in, several decades of crops separating our journeys. He has a great way of peppering in facts that even locals may not know. Take the time he went to the top of Kamiak Butte, just a few miles from Pullman, with a WSU geology professor who explained, “Where we’re standing is the western edge of the ancient North American continent.” The geologist broke open a rock and showed it

had a sandy texture inside, likely from the ocean, which at that time started near the Idaho border. New land would have filled in later as the Earth shifted. This was the then-emerging theory of plate tectonics.

H

ill started as a general assignment reporter, and later wrote almost exclusively about science, his wife Mary Lou says. She takes my call Sunday afternoon, from the Shoreline home she and Hill built together nearly 58 years ago. She and their five children heard a lot about Hill’s work through conversation at the dinner table, and as he pointed out geologic features from the car on family trips. “I think I’d have to say science was probably his first love,” she says of his writing. “But he really, really liked people too.” One person she says he talked about many times was an elder from Bikini Atoll who had been moved from the tiny islands in the middle of the Pacific, so the U.S. could test atomic bombs there in the 1940s and ’50s. Williams visited the area in the ’60s and found people still unable to return home. “He was very empathetic with the people, and you got more than just ‘These are the facts, man,’” Mary Lou says. “You got the perspective of the people there, and their longing to get back to their lands.” That applied to scientists and discoverers, too, she says. He was interested not only in their discoveries, but who they were as people. “As a person he was just totally a straight arrow,” she says. “Totally honest, totally truthful, totally dependable, on time, all the good qualities you would hope for. And very charitable and kind; he was always thinking of other people.” Mary Lou says she wishes he could have known how many young men looked up to him as a father or a sort of second father. For many years, he was a Boy Scout troop leader, and taught many how to cook, camp and explore. “When someone has lived a good life for 91 years, you can’t ask for a whole lot more than that,” she adds. “I feel so grateful we had all those years together, and he was the influence he was for our children.” n samanthaw@inlander.com Writing the Northwest: A Reporter Looks Back is available through bookstores or direct from WSU Press at 800-354-7360 or wsupress.wsu.edu.


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