Page 1

SPACE CAMP!

A LOCAL GIRL IS GETTING A SECOND SHOT PAGE 54

MEET YOUR BREWER

THE MAN BEHIND LITTLE SPOKANE BREWING PAGE 31

KING OF THE BLOCKBUSTERS

KONG: SKULL ISLAND: AN EXCITING REBOOT PAGE 37

HASKELL

MARCH 9-15, 2017 | AMERICA’S BEST READ URBAN WEEKLY

THE ART OF THE NO DEAL

How the Spokane prosecutor’s refusal to negotiate is impacting local justice PAGE 20

BY MITCH RYALS


Understanding that it’s about more than finding a house; it’s about building a life.

Wisdom. Vision. Passion. Strength.

Find a home loan* that fits your needs. Visit watrust.com/homeloans. *Subject to credit approval.

2 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017


INSIDE VOL. 24, NO. 21 | COVER DESIGN: DEREK HARRISON

COMMENT NEWS COVER STORY CULTURE

5 13 20 27

FOOD FILM MUSIC EVENTS

31 34 39 44

I SAW YOU 46 GREEN ZONE 48 BULLETIN BOARD 53 LAST WORD 54

EDITOR’S NOTE

C

ounty prosecutors like Spokane’s LARRY HASKELL are increasingly coming under scrutiny for their role in the mass incarceration of Americans. The U.S. locks up more people than any nation on Earth — more than 2 million at last count. The exploding prison population has been driven, experts say, by “tough on crime” policies that use jailing as a cure-all while ignoring alternatives that might be more effective and cost less. There has been widespread, bipartisan support for “smart justice” reforms, but many believe those ideas are D.O.A. during a Trump presidency. It’s perhaps not surprising, then, that defense attorneys and judges are calling out some of Haskell’s hard-line policies that have, among other things, limited treatment options for some clearly drug-addicted chronic offenders. These critics tell our reporter Mitch Ryals that they’re especially concerned now that Haskell is eyeing another job — U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Washington — where he could take on issues like immigration, LGBT rights and Washington state’s legal marijuana market. To be sure, Haskell has been open to some local reform efforts, including community supervision for property crime offenders. But he’s unapologetic about being “tough on crime” and sees new opportunities under Trump, telling us, “I look forward for him to follow through and deliver what he’s told the American people he would do.” — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

BEFORE

UNDO

YOUR TATTOO.

AFTER

Erase that unwanted tattoo. Let our experts make it disappear using gentle laser precision.

Spokane

Coeur d’Alene

509-209-2171 208-676-8346 advancedaestheticsmd.com

LIVE LIFE HERE SPIRIT OF AMERICA PAGE 13

FROM THE MOUNTAINTOP PAGE 27

Hayden Homes has been building affordable, award-winning homes for nearly 30 years, and is proud to be building throughout the Inland Northwest, with prices starting in the upper-$100s. Visit us online at hayden-homes.com to find the community and homeplan that best fits your needs.

Hayden Homes, LLC

CRISIS OF FAITH PAGE 34

CCB# WA-HAYDEHL937BH ID-RCE-29144

SISTER ACT PAGE 39

INLANDER SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO • INLANDER.COM 1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, SPOKANE, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 | EMAIL: INFO@INLANDER.COM

THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. Printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x213 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email justinh@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2017, Inland Publications, Inc.

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 3


BidOnSpokane.com Bid on over

$70,000

worth of Products & Services.

Purchase items up to 80% OFF regular retail prices.

Golf with Friends

Family Fun

Set of Braces

Elegant Dinner

Auction takes place Tuesday, March 7th to Tuesday, March 14th. Go to www.bidonspokane.com and Bid NOW!

4 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

Getaway

Auction Items included from:

Artisan Portrait Audrey's Boutique Avondale Golf City of Spokane Golf Clark's Diamond Jewelers Clean Customs Carpet Cleaning Clinkerdagger Restaurant Dover Bay Resort DaBell Orthodontics Eagle Ridge Short Course Fairways Golf Course Five Mile Pizza Floor Covering International The Grooming Studio Hi 5 Orthodontics Idaho/Washington Fence The Melting Pot Mode Wax Studio Patriot Automotive Pinot's Palette - Cd'A Runge Furniture Sunny Buns Triple Play White's Boots


COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE MOVIE MONSTER?

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

Michael Mahoney

LISA ANSELMO Vampires. Why? I’ve got four kids, so we love watching movies like Hotel Transylvania.

COPY CHIEF

Dan Nailen (x239) DIGITAL & PROJECTS EDITOR

FILM & MUSIC EDITOR

Derek Harrison (x248) EDITORIAL DESIGNER

Wilson Criscione (x282), Mitch Ryals (x237), Daniel Walters (x262), Samantha Wohlfeil (x234)

We will be offering MICRONEEDLING mid March

LASER HAIR REMOVAL Underarms $129 (reg $600) Bikini Packages starting at $199 Lower Legs $649 (reg $1400) Full Face $649 (reg $1400) Pigment or spider vein removal for the face $139 (reg $399)

ALL OTHER LASER PACKAGES 50% off (Excludes specials)

Facials starting at $45 Dermaplaning, Chemical peels, Microdermabrasion or Spa Facials

Teeth Whitening $79 (reg $149)

Chey Scott (x225) FOOD & LISTINGS EDITOR Nathan Weinbender (x250)

Be hair FREE for Summer 2017

Ask Ab Our Othout Serviceser

*All offers expire 03/31/2017*

SUSAN ASHE None! I avoid those kinds of movies, I don’t really like them; I’m more into thrillers. Besides, my monster’s in the White House.

ENT PAYM NS OPTIOBLE A AVAIL

STAFF WRITERS

Young Kwak PHOTOGRAPHER

Caleb Walsh ILLUSTRATOR

Amy Alkon, Adam Boyd, Connor Dinnison, Tara Dowd, E.J. Iannelli, MaryAnn Johanson, George Nethercutt, Ben Salmon CONTRIBUTORS

Tuck Clarry, Raven Haynes INTERNS

ADVERTISING SALES Kristi Gotzian (x215) ADVERTISING DIRECTOR

Laser Hair Removal for All Skin types, Spider Vein Removal, Brown Pigment Removal, Spa Facials, Chemical Peels, Collagen Rejuvenation/Skin Tightening, Microdermabrasions, Botox, Kybella, Juvederm, Voluma, Professional Teeth Whitening

JASMINE DANDRIDGE King Kong. Why? I like him because they underestimate him, he’s actually really sweet. They thought he’d kill the girl, but he doesn’t.

Carolyn Padgham-Walker (x214), Emily Walden (x260) SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Autumn Adrian (x251), Mary Bookey (x216), Gail Golden (x236), Jeanne Inman (x235), Claire Price (x217), Wanda Tashoff (x222) ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Kristina Smith (x223) MARKETING DIRECTOR

PRODUCTION & SUPPORT

DON HARMS The aliens from Alien. Why? Because they’re badass! You have to blow them up [to kill them], they’re tough.

Wayne Hunt (x232) PRODUCTION MANAGER Alissia Blackwood Mead (x228), Derrick King (x238), Jessie Hynes (x205), Tom Stover (x265) GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Justin Hynes (x226) DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Kati Bronson (x247) EVENTS AND PROMOTIONS

Camryn Barker (x242) ADVERTISING SUPPORT

SHYAN DAY Ghosts, like from found footage movies. Why? You could be sleeping and they could be choking you or something, that’s so scary. BEST ICE CREAM

OPERATIONS Dee Ann Cook (x211) BUSINESS MANAGER Kristin Wagner (x210) ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

INTERVIEWS BY RAVEN HAYNES 2ND & DIVISION STARBUCKS, 03/07/17

BEST ICE CREAM

BEST ICE CREAM

SOUTH HILL 1230 S. Grand • 309-3830

IN KENDALL YARDS 1238 W. Summit Parkway • 321-7569 MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 5


COMMENT | POLITICS

Listen to Gram Gram

FAMILY LAW • Divorce • Spousal Maintenance / Alimony • Child Support Modifications • Parenting Plans

President Trump needs to start delivering some solutions soon, or his supporters in Congress may abandon him

AUTO INJURY • CIVIL LITIGATION

BY GEORGE NETHERCUTT Craig Mason

W. 1707 BROADWAY, SPOKANE, WA | 509443-3681

I

Medical Dental Pharmacy Pediatrics Pregnancy Care 12 locations | 444.8200 | chas.org

CHAS_AcceptingPatients_030917_4S_AA.pdf Got Scrap? Get Cash FAST y

y

Top Prices - Honest Weight

WE PAY FOR: Aluminum Cans & Scrap y Copper y Brass y Radiators

Insulated Copper Wire y Stainless y Gold y Silver y & much more!

SEE HOW MUCH WE PAY AT:

www.actionrecycling.com

509-483-4094

* In accordance with WA state law

6 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

I

n the hilarious words of actor Steve Martin, as scam artist Freddy Benson in the movie Dirty Rotten Scoundrels: “As my Gram Gram [his grandmother] used to say, ‘It’s better to be truthful and good than to not!’” It’s time for President Trump to follow Gram Gram’s advice. Perhaps Donald Trump didn’t expect to be president. If not, that may explain why his administration is slow to form, despite his assertions to the contrary. He can rightly criticize Democrats for slow-walking his nominees, but they’re not totally at fault. The Trump administration, including its transition teams, hasn’t named essential government officials. White House offices are mostly empty. Critical government positions are unfilled. His first obligation is not his own reputation, but meeting the requirements of a ruling majority. He should not deny Cabinet officials the freedom to staff their agencies with like-minded subordinates. President Trump may soon discover that such solid potential officials either won’t accept appointments or will avoid government service rather than manage Trump loyalists they don’t know. In the meantime, opposition mobilizes. Being “good” in this case means standing up a responsible administration to lead America forward.

911 E Marietta Ave • Spokane WA

South of Foothills Dr. / East of Hamilton

f Donald Trump follows Gram Gram’s advice, it would be good if he could acknowledge the disruption in United States-Mexico relations resulting from his campaign rhetoric — that Mexico pay for the wall, along with the more extreme pronouncements of his immigration policy. Mexico remains a prominent U.S. trading partner. Press Secretary Sean Spicer recently declared that U.S.-Mexico relations are “great.” They aren’t. Tensions with our southern neighbor were proven by the cool reception that secretaries Rex Tillerson and John Kelly recently received in Mexico. Trump should swallow some of his pride and acknowledge what most Americans realize — that most things in government aren’t as “great” as he pretends they are. This kind of honesty would help defend against criticism. Progressive Democratic opponents will always criticize, but that doesn’t make their criticisms valid. In the public’s eyes, doing so makes them seem small and petty. How they’re opposing Trump is also not good, but they are gaining the upper hand. Trump’s recent appearance before CPAC, the Conservative Political Action Committee, received much media attention, including interviews with White House insiders Steve Bannon and Reince Priebus, insisting that they’re good friends. Trying to reassure America is important, but Trump should recognize it’s not necessarily “us against them,” it’s “all for one and one for

all.” It’s time for Trump to act presidential, as he did in his recent speech before Congress. His rants against the media and calls for conservatives-only support only divide America further. While they may satisfy Trump supporters, they repel all others. CPAC participants don’t represent the majority of Americans. That’s why Trump’s “style” could pave the way for a Republican demise in 2018. Town Hall events showcasing protesters amid legitimate citizens objecting to health care developments, among other issues, signal real danger for Republicans — especially Trump Republicans. It may reflect less citizen support for the president’s many pronouncements and more support for traditional government, such as rapidly filling governmental positions with sensible public servants. Trump is already starting to see objections to his “style” in the House and Senate, as members see danger in getting too close to his narrow pronouncements and developments. Some polls suggest that many Americans believe our country is on the “wrong track” under Trump. Disruptive Town Hall meetings — whether legitimately or not — are evidence thereof. Congressional Republicans should face their constituents in person to justify their policy positions, no matter how uncomfortable it may make them. They should not hide behind call-in Town Hall gatherings.

B

eing “truthful and good” also means meeting public expectations. Republicans have had years to formulate a replacement for Obamacare, yet they struggle to come up with a publicly acceptable alternative. Former Speaker John Boehner was probably truthful when he recently opined that repealing and replacing Obamacare is easier said than done. Given all the public promises made about health care, Republicans must now deliver. An unyielding public won’t stand for less. Health care is too important. Trump’s border tax pronouncements are also quite complicated and could backfire on him. Congressional Republicans also have legitimate objections to some parts of his tax policy. And immigration reform will take legislative finesse. His criticisms of “establishment” elected officials in his inaugural address may have spoken to those who elected him, but they may haunt him now that he most needs “establishment” support from Congress. Freddy Benson, as brilliantly portrayed by Steve Martin, was a charlatan. America cannot afford to have one in the White House. n


DO SOMETHING!

Spring Specials

89 Simple Extractions $ 400 Off Our Signature $

BEFORE

AFTER

On-site dental lab! Dentures the same day as extractions.

Pi{e} Day A celebration of the most exciting number: Pi. Enter a pie-making contest, or generously volunteer your pie-tasting services. Compete in a Pi recitation war and cheer on the Indie 3.14 race featuring Raspberry Pi-fueled race cars. Free. All-ages. Tue, March 14 from 7-9 pm. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkwestcentral.org (279-0299)

Denture Plate

Expires March 31. Call for details. Not all offers can be combined.

509.838.2836 9506 N. Newport Hwy, Suite B Spokane, WA 99218

Dr. Robert L. Johnson www.DDSspokane.com

ST. PATRICK'S DAY SALE NOW THROUGH MARCH 19TH

Pot o' Gold discounts up to 50% off entire purchase!

WILD REFUGE FUNDRAISER DINNER & AUCTION

Since 1997, Friends of Turnbull has been a major sponsor of the environmental education program, outreach activities, habitat restoration and other projects at Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge outside of Cheney. $45/person. Sat, March 11 at 5:30 pm. fotnwr.org/auction (629-1826)

SEED SWAP

Participants can bring seeds to swap with others and take home new varieties, and learn about seed saving and about the seed-sharing program at the library (truetoseedcda.org). You don’t need seeds to swap in order to participate. (This event has been rescheduled from Feb. 4.) Free. Sat, March 11 at 1 pm. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. (208-769-2315)

WOMEN LEAD SPOKANE

The one-day conference is designed to educate and empower women both personally and professionally through interactive presentations, skill-building workshops and networking. Wed, March 15 from 8 am-3 pm. $149/person. Gonzaga University Hemmingson Center, 702 E. Desmet. bit.ly/2mc0QdJ n Tell us about your event or other opportunities to get involved. Submit events at Inlander.com/getlisted or email getlisted@inlander.com.

See what a lucky pl ace Runge will be When green all arou nd is the color you’ll se e Our prices will slash You’ll save lots of ca Come join the shen sh anigans, no malarkey!

DELIVERY PRICES

CDA & VICINITY FREE DELIVERY | SPOKANE/ VALLEY $35 | SANDPOINT $35 | SILVER VALLEY $35 JEN SORENSON CARTOON

303 Spokane Ave, Cd’A • 208 664-2131 rungefurniture.com

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | IDENTITY in Spokane, and you are still hoarding an identity and spirit that doesn’t belong to you. It’s morally reprehensible and spiritually corrupt. And here we are again, while civil rights, the environment, the educational system and so much more are facing unprecedented attacks. You come along with your fake tanning, your manufactured hair and your boldface lying. You announce that you are almost homeless because you have applied to hundreds of jobs and — big shocker — no one wants to hire you. And oh, by the way, your book comes out in a couple of weeks, and you’re

You come along with your fake tanning, your manufactured hair and your boldface lying...

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

A Letter to Rachel Dolezal You are a thief, unworthy of Spokane BY TARA DOWD

O

h, Rachel. Spokane can always count on you to highlight how much work we have to do as a community. Every time you insert yourself into the limelight, you yank off the bandage covering the wound and scars of so much racial discord, oppression and pain in Spokane. People online are defending you because they perceive you as a victim of vitriolic hate and judgment. They say that everyone deserves to be seen as human and be forgiven for their mistakes. But you are not a victim. You

are not innocent in the creation of your current situation. You are, in fact, the cause of your own circumstances. And let’s be clear, you haven’t made a mistake. You are a thief. You are a con artist. You in no way just made a mistake — because a mistake implies a single event, which doesn’t apply here. But characterizations of your behavior as “making a mistake, we must forgive her” are par for the course for white privilege. As much as it might shock you, that doesn’t make it OK. It also doesn’t address the fact that almost two years later, you haven’t changed your behavior, you haven’t asked for forgiveness, you haven’t made amends to anyone

racking up the stolen goods manifest with a new, legal African name. Many people are also calling for compassion for you, because clearly you have problems. And they’re right to call for compassion for those who have real issues. But you, Ms. Dolezal, do not get to steal or lie without social consequences. Those defending you also claim that you did so much to advance race relations in Spokane. This is so laughable. Literally, people of color who have been working on these issues in Spokane for decades think you are hilarious. We always ask, “What has Rachel done?” Like, really? What policies did she change to help eliminate disproportionality in our education systems, our justice systems, our child protective services? None of us can think of any, except instances in which you set us back. Think of the Police Ombudsman Commission. Sure, you crowdsourced your NAACP presidency and momentarily increased membership in that organization, but that’s pretty much it. And while you’ve been fishing for a publisher and writing your memoir, there are real women of color doing real work in Spokane. Every time you derail the conversation for your personal gain, those women walk the Earth with heads held high, hearts strong, and their beautiful black and brown skin shining in the sun. You, on the other hand, are a hijacker unworthy of your new name and the attention you receive for your thievery. So girl, just bye.  Tara Dowd, an enrolled Inupiaq Eskimo, owns a diversity consulting business and is an advocate for systemic equity.

st

7EA1SON S

ONE DELITE-FUL DEAL On Two of Your Favorite Gourmet Delite® Pizzas

8

Fri Mar 10 • 7pm Fri Mar 17 • 7pm Sat Mar 11 • 2pm Sat Mar 18 • 2pm Sun Mar 12 • 2pm Sun Mar 19 • 2pm

JUST

$

each

Get tickets early before they sell out!

LARGE

Chicken Bacon Artichoke Pizza —

Now with More Bacon —

Herb Chicken Mediterranean Pizza —

Now with More Chicken —

Offer valid 2/20/17-3/26/17. Offer valid on large Original or Thin Crust only. No substitutions. Additional charge for additional toppings. Available at participating locations. Not valid with any other offers. 25246-INLAND-CBAHCM8

8 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

©2017 Papa Murphy’s International LLC

CALL OR BUY ONLINE

2727 N. MADELIA ST • 509-328-4886

SPOKANECHILDRENSTHEATRE.ORG

CEVICHE & BEER & BEER & CEVICHE. 154 S. MADISON ST. • THESTEELBARREL.COM


MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 9


ALL NEW SHOW WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29 - 7:30 PM INB PERFORMING ARTS CENTER • wcebroadway.com

COUNTRY CARAVAN

POWERED BY

April 28 - 30, 2017

Never miss an issue All of our issues, online, all the time, in a tablet-friendly format.

Always in reach

10 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017


COMMENT | FROM READERS

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

FALSE NARRATIVE? see that Paul Dillon (“Running Scared,” 3/2/17) has adopted the language

I

of the “Indivisible Team,” a liberal group whose primary goal is to resist the Trump agenda rather than find ways to work together as a nation. Their video, Town Hall Resistance Guide, explains: “If they refuse to hold a town hall, hold your own and invite them... And let the local media know that your member of Congress did not have the courage to show up and face them.” Consistent with these directions, Paul Dillon and some other liberals continue to promote the false narrative that the reason that Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers and other Republicans are avoiding town halls is because “Republican leaders are cowards.” They don’t want to get LETTERS “called out.” I wonder if Mr. Dillon Send comments to even believes these ridiculous stateeditor@inlander.com. ments. Undoubtedly the current unwillingness to hold town halls is the rude, obnoxious, disruptive behavior of some of the attendees — booing, yelling, name calling, interrupting the speaker whether it’s the elected official or an audience member that is saying something they oppose. Such town halls are not productive. Yet Mr. Dillon states that “these are real people who … want to have a civil dialogue.” Really? Consequently, Congresswoman McMorris Rodgers and other elected officials are choosing to communicate with their constituents in other ways — Facebook, telephone town halls, meetings with small groups where people are genuinely interested in sharing their disagreements, frustrations and ideas for change in a constructive, non-combative manner instead of just using the time to yell, vent and create unproductive havoc. While we certainly have many different philosophies, we also have many common goals but different ideas in how to reach them. Those who are really interested in finding unifying solutions will be willing to engage in civil discussions.

THU, MAR 16 / 7:30PM LEWIS BLACK / Mar 19

GRETCHEN McDEVITT Spokane, Wash.

Readers respond to our new weekly feature “Do Something!” which outlines opportunities to get involved with the community:

CHRIS BOTTI GREAT WHITE & SLAUGHTER / Mar 23

AMANDA DAMON TONG: I love seeing things like this on social media. I would have never known about the Red Cross Volunteer Fair.

LOVERBOY & SURVIVOR / Apr 15 KIM RUSSO - THE HAPPY MEDIUM / Apr 18 CHIPPENDALES / Apr 28 TERRY FATOR / May 5

ELIZABETH PARKER: Now this is a great community journalism idea. Volunteer ops! Tell us about your event or other opportunities to get involved. Submit events at Inlander.com/ getlisted or email getlisted@ inlander.com.

CORRECTION: A column last week (“Running Scared” by Paul Dillon) incorrectly reported that 5th District Congresswoman Cathy McMorris Rodgers referred to recipients of Medicaid expansion as “deadbeats” during a recent “Coffee With Cathy” event. The description was repeated to Dillon by multiple attendees, but their recollections were inaccurate.

More shows and tickets at NORTHERNQUEST.COM

8 7 7. 8 7 1 . 6 7 7 2 | S P O K A N E , WA

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 11


COMEDY BITS BY THE BLUE DOOR THEATRE

Car Rental % 10 ff! O PROMO CODE INL10

Thrifty features a wide selection of rental vehicles as Special Promotion Discounted Rental Rates.

If you love the cars we rent, you’ll love the cars we sell! PROMO CODE INL250 for a $250 discount Stop by and see one of our friendly car salesmen today! Car sales available at the Spokane and Coeur d’Alene locations.

Book your vehicle at ThriftySpokane.com or call one of our rental locations:

Spokane Int'l Airport • 509-838-8223 Spokane Valley • 8022 E. Sprague • 509-924-9111 North Spokane • 6418 N. Wall • 509-482-7716 Coeur d’Alene • 1503 N. 4th • 208-765-2277 Sandpoint, ID • 31466 Hwy 200 • 208-755-7909 Bernie’s Detail Shop • 8014 E. Sprague • 509-892-2080

12 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017


On Saturday, supporters of President Donald Trump gathered across the country — including in Spokane Valley — to celebrate the president’s agenda.

DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

POLITICS

SAFE SPACE

At the Spirit of America rally, Republicans set aside their internal divisions to bask in the glow of the nascent Trump presidency — but for how long? BY DANIEL WALTERS

T

rump supporters don’t have to whisper anymore. At least, not here, not at the pro-Trump Spirit of America rally on Saturday in Spokane Valley. There’s not a liberal, pink-hatted protester in sight. The hats here are all red and white and want to Make America Great Again. Here, “Deplorables” is a badge of honor. Plenty of those in the crowd have spent years warning that this country was inches away from the economic, political and cultural “abyss.” And though there are still warnings here — of liberal forces who want to cause mayhem or violence in their obsession to stop President Donald Trump — now the doomsaying has shifted to an exuberant optimism. As Northwest Grassroots activist Cecily Wright emcees the event, she sketches the Trump campaign as a tale of a scrappy underdog coming from behind to defy the odds. She remembers a time when many of the people

in the local party avidly opposed Trump in favor of his rival, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz. “It seemed like at that point the world was against Donald Trump!” Wright says. “And now it just makes the Trump presidency and victory so much better.” Today, local Republicans say they’re more united than ever. At least temporarily, Trump’s election has allowed the local GOP to paper over their internal conflicts and follow the new leader.

LAW AND ORDER

“Please help me welcome Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich to the stage!” Wright says to an applauding crowd. “I want you to learn! I want you to learn what it means for the law enforcement community to have a ‘law and order’ president in the White House.” Knezovich wasn’t exactly a Trump fan. He voted for Ohio Gov. John Kasich in the primary. As late as last

September, he described the election as “the worst case scenario” and said he was “torn in my own mind about a lot of this.” But today, with a cardboard cutout of Donald J. Trump propped up behind him, Knezovich sets all that aside. “He tapped into the ‘Spirit of America,’” Knezovich says. “He tapped into the fact we’re losing and bleeding our industries.” Knezovich condemns former President Obama’s anticoal policies. Four generations of his family mined coal. “I’m watching their way of life being destroyed by nonsense,” he says. The sheriff also taps his own heritage to praise legal immigration — and contrast it with illegal immigration. “What’s the first word in the two words we’re dealing with? It’s called illegal,” Knezovich says. The crowd erupts ...continued on next page

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 13


NEWS | POLITICS

150 BOTTLED BEERS, 34 BEER TAPS 4 WINE TAPS & CRAFT COCKTAILS

Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich hasn’t historically been a Trump fan, but at the Spirit of America rally, he made new waves of controversy by blaming Obama for dead cops. DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

“SAFE SPACE,” CONTINUED... HOURS: Mon - Thurs 11am-9pm Fri 11am-10pm • Sat 8am-10pm • Sun 8am-9pm

905 N. WASHINGTON ST. | 509-392-4000

THE OLD BROADVIEW DAIRY TheBlackbirdSpokane.com |

50 TAPS FULL BAR

@TheBlackbirdGEG

GIFT CARDS

@MANITOTAPHOUSE MANITOTAPHOUSE.COM

3011 S. GRAND BLVD. | (509) 279-2671 11AM - 10PM SUN-THURS | 11AM - MIDNIGHT FRI & SAT

14 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

7

BEST PUB

in a standing ovation. “Until Congress changes this word, we do our jobs!’” He points to the recent spike in high-profile cop killings. The statistics may say that more cops died each year in the 1970s and ’80s, but he argues that this is different. “Never in the history of my industry have we been hunted and assassinated,” Knezovich says. At one time, he placed the blame for these killings not only on the radicals of the left, but the radicals of the right who spread fear about police militarization. He’s accused Wright and other local Republicans of spreading lies and propaganda about him and his deputies — urging the public to blame them if anything happened to his deputies. But not today. Today he points his finger at one target. “I blame Barack Obama!” The crowd goes wild. He says that Obama could have united this nation. Instead, he believes that, because of Obama’s quick-on-thetrigger criticism of law enforcement, the former president took us “back 50 years.” Two years ago, Wright blamed Knezovich for lumping her and her allies in with white supremacists, Nazis, and other extremists. At this rally, she offers nothing but praise for Knezovich. “We are a lucky county, don’t you think?” Wright says. Spokane County Prosecutor Larry Haskell, by contrast, was a Trump supporter before it was cool. Even for this crowd. He walks up to the Law and Order theme. He puts on a star-spangled USA baseball cap he got at the Trump inauguration. “Today, it’s funny, you can actually get some looks from people because you wear an item that advertises the United States of America,” Haskell says. “But that’s changing.” Haskell launches into a paean to Trump, military service, the rule of law and nationalism. “Patriotism is what motivated me to first listen to Donald Trump,” Haskell says. He says that Trump reached out to every American during the campaign. He says that Trump’s going to create jobs, simplify the tax

code, stand by law enforcement, and fight illegal immigration in order “to make American citizenship valuable again.” “Resist the resistors!” Haskell proclaims to the crowd, “Use every ounce of strength that you have to help the president make America great again!” The chants follow: “USA! USA! USA!”

POLITICALLY INCORRECT WITH MIKE FAGAN

At work, Spokane City Councilman Mike Fagan is hopelessly outnumbered. He’s the sole conservative on the council. But here? These are his people. They applaud. They laugh at his jokes. Fagan urges the crowd to support reversing a rule mandating that public buildings allow transgender individuals to use bathrooms of their choice. “If anybody needs to be convinced that this is a policy we need to repeal in Washington state, I’ll be more than happy to follow you into the bathroom and see how you feel about that,” Fagan says. The crowd chuckles. Political correctness, after all, was one of the many things that Trump vanquished. That’s evident here too. You can get your photo taken in front of a makeshift, oversized “basket of deplorables” — a riff on Hillary Clinton’s controversial remarks about half of Trump supporters. One attendee wears a T-shirt mocking the iconic Obama HOPE poster; it features Bill Clinton and says “RAPE.” Fagan slings one-liners back and forth with Spokane City Council candidate Tim Benn. “Let’s bring a photograph up here, to let the folks know who it is that Tim is going to be running against,” Fagan says. A giant picture of 28-year-old city council candidate Kate Burke standing beside former president Bill Clinton is projected against the wall. “You know, I first looked at that picture, and the first thing that came to mind is, ‘Hey, where’s Bill’s hand?’” A shriek of laughter erupts from the crowd. “Unlike my adversary there, I’m over 20,” Benn quips. “I lived in the district 17 years, I didn’t just move in last year.”


Fagan’s fellow councilmember, Breean Beggs, gets roasted as well in service of their preferred candidate, Tony Kiepe. They project an old Inlander cover with Beggs’ headshot 20 feet high onto the wall. “He’s a nice guy,” Fagan says. “Mr. Beggs, though, is catering to special interest groups.” He slams Beggs’ flirtation with a sugary beverage tax, a sidewalk levy, and his “unconstitutional” efforts to regulate oil trains. “It’s about ready to get really, really interesting in the city of Spokane,” Fagan says.

HAIRLINE FRACTURES

Yet even amid the apparent unity at rallies like these nationally, there’s a sense of the strain in the Republican Party, a strain that may once again crack into fissures as Congress considers politically dicey questions like immigration and health care. Clint Didier is a rancher from Eltopia in Franklin County who almost beat fellow Republican Dan Newhouse in Washington’s 4th Congressional District election in November 2014 before being routed by Newhouse in last year’s rematch. On Saturday, he starts his speech with a bit of Braveheart-style spectacle. He screams “FREEDOM!” as he plunges a sword down into a bucket. Didier paints Republican politicians in Congress as weaklings who “quibbled” and “buckled” even as patriots like him gave them majorities. But now, he says, the patriots handed them Trump, a true warrior.

“If anybody needs to be convinced... I’ll be more than happy to follow you into the bathroom and see how you feel about that.” “If they don’t stand now, I call ’em cowards!” Didier says. And now, he points to the fact that Republican politicians, despite previous Obamacare repeal bills being vetoed more than 60 times by the former president, still haven’t put a new repeal bill on Trump’s desk. “Y’know, I predicted the Democrats would stall, undermine, delay and destroy. But we have the majorities!” Didier says. “Ronald Reagan said, ‘When you can’t make them see the light, make them feel the heat.’” The crowd whoops and cheers. Yet it highlights the danger for Republicans ahead, as rhetoric meets the harsh light of reality. The health care bill proposed Monday by House Republicans was savaged by both the left and the right. And for Republicans like Knezovich — condemned by local Democrats for his comments regarding Obama — there’s still the sense that intraparty conflict has simply been put on pause at the Spirit of America rally, instead of being erased entirely. Spokane Valley Rep. Matt Shea, Knezovich’s longtime local nemesis, wasn’t at the Spirit of America event. Knezovich says he was told that Shea wouldn’t show if the sheriff did. “[Then] I wouldn’t miss it for the world,” Knezovich recalls replying. Knezovich assures the Inlander that he hasn’t become a fullfledged Trump supporter, despite his positive comments at the rally. He’s still worried about Trump’s divisive rhetoric. “I still have some concerns,” Knezovich says. “But I’m going to give this president the same opportunity as the last president, who I didn’t vote for, to be successful.” Like more than a few Republicans, Knezovich says he voted for Trump because he just couldn’t bring himself to vote for Hillary Clinton. Now, he’s waiting to see if he made the right choice, or if Trump will disappoint him as thoroughly as Obama did. “I held my nose,” Knezovich says, “and I hoped that this turns out well.” n danielw@inlander.com

PLAY BALL OR JUST HAVE A BALL. HOPS & HOOPS BRACKET PARTY MONDAY, MAR 13 / 6PM Widmer draft specials, PIG game and giveaways in EPIC. Fill out a bracket and you might win a free-standing hoop! Contests 21+.

ST. PADDY’S WHISKEY DINNER WEDNESDAY, MAR 15 / 6PM Get in the spirit with an Irish-inspired three-course dinner paired with Jameson cocktails and Guinness beer. Tickets $40, on sale in EPIC.

SAMPLE THE CELLAR THURSDAY, MAR 16 / 8-10PM Drop in to The Lounge at Masselow’s to sample old and rare vintages from Dominus, Penfolds and others. $35 includes three 2oz pours and hors d’oeuvres.

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

Make money by

Making a difference. When you donate blood plasma at Octapharma Plamsa, you help in the creation of life-changing medicines, while putting a little extra money in your pocket for the things you want or need.

On Inlander.com MORE INLANDER NEWS EVERY DAY

New Donors earn up to $250.*

510 E. Francis Ave. Spokane • octapharmaplasma.com *Earn up to $50 for ďŹ rst ďŹ ve donations • Promotions & fees may vary by location Must be 18-64 years of age & in good health • Have valid picture ID, proof of Social Security number & current residence postmarked within 30 days

Budg a DREAM TEAM

Spokane’s Public Works & Utilities Division Director Scott Simmons

Join us for our Job Fair! Thursday, March 23 | 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Kootenai’s Health Resource Center on our Coeur d’Alene campus w w w w w w w w w

Tuition assistance for continued education Kootenai Kids day care Magnet designation Competitive salaries Employer-paid health insurance premiums for full-time employees Robust and incentive-driven wellness program Voted “Best Place to Work� in Modern Healthcare magazine Family-friendly community Relocation packages available

To speak to a recruiter and learn more about job opportunities call (208) 625-4620 or visit us online at kh.org/careers Follow us at KootenaiHealthCareers

2003 Kootenai Health Way | Coeur d’Alene, ID 83814

16 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

STREETS The city of Spokane has steadfastly refused to say why it removed longtime Street Director Mark Serbousek and his second-in-command, Andy Schenk, from their leadership roles in February. The Inlander’s latest RECORDS REQUEST, however, sheds light on the serious dissatisfaction that the Condon administration had with the streets department. The undated, unsigned notes, compiled by Public Works & Utilities Division Director Scott Simmons, say that the streets department continually got negative feedback for being “obstructionists.� The notes list “missing elements in streets� that include “leadership/employee engagement,� “operational excellence,� a “customer service mindset� and a “safety mindset.� (DANIEL WALTERS)

YOUTH Currently, as the Inlander recently wrote about, Washington state does not have a law that automatically appoints LEGAL COUNSEL FOR CHILDREN who have been removed from their home and placed in the foster care system. There was a bill that would have changed that, but that bill doesn’t look like it will pass the state Legislature this year. Substitute House Bill 1251, which would have guaranteed legal representation for all abused and neglected children over the age of 2, failed to make it out of committee, meaning it is likely dead. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

POLICE Just days before the start of trial in the wrongful death lawsuit involving 15-yearold RYAN HOLYK, the Spokane Valley boy’s family reached a tentative settlement agreement with Spokane County. The agreement, in theory, is for $1 million. Holyk was killed in May 2014, hit on his bicycle by a deputy’s speeding SUV. During a press conference announcing the deal, Spokane County Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich praised law enforcement’s investigation into the accident. Mike Maurer, the family’s attorney, rebuked Knezovich’s statements, saying that “Sheriff Knezovich has attempted to distort the truth and mislead the public about Ryan’s death and the police investigation from the start, and it’s clear he will do so to the very end.� (MITCH RYALS)


NEWS | BRIEFS

Port of Spokane? House passes legislation that could make new district a reality; plus, a SPD cop is disciplined in connection with rape investigation PORT IN ANY STORM

Spokane could get a countywide PORT DISTRICT before 2020 if legislation passed through the state House succeeds in the Senate. Port districts can levy taxes to help with economic development, and often operate harbors, airports and/or industrial parks. They are governed by an elected port commission. Under previous Washington state law, to start a port district, which can be countywide or cover only parts of a county, voters had to approve its creation and vote for people to serve on the newly formed port commission during the same election. Spokane tried that in the 1980s, but the result was voting three people into an office that voters, on the same ballot, rejected creating. The new bill would allow county voters to create the district first, then vote in port commissioners during the next election. Taxes couldn’t be levied by the port until the commissioners are in office. House Bill 1347 passed 81 to 16, with one excused, on March 3, and has been referred to the Senate’s Local Government committee. It was sponsored by Spokane-area Reps. Marcus Riccelli and Timm Ormsby, both Democrats, and Jeff Holy, a Republican. Spokane County is the only county actively pursuing the legislation, according to a bill summary, although six counties could benefit from it. The rule change would expire in 2020, going back to what was in place before. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

GO ZAGS!

You + Gonzaga + Sequel Checking

12 3456 0 9 8 7 6 D E B IT 1234 5 1234

12/18 DOG L L U B E SPIK

BROKEN BLUE LINE

Spokane Police Sgt. JOHN GATELY will serve four weeks of unpaid suspension for tipping off a fellow officer who was being investigated for raping a female officer while she was drunk. “Your involvement in this incident has brought great embarrassment and discredit to the Spokane Police Department,” SPD Chief Craig Meidl writes in a letter to Gately. “This is not the type of behavior I will tolerate from any of our employees.” Meidl determined that Gately violated SPD policy, a decision that goes against a department review panel’s conclusions. In October 2015, SPD Sgt. Gordon Ennis allegedly sexually assaulted a fellow officer after she passed out at a raucous house party. In the following days, Gately called Ennis multiple times and told him confidential information about the investigation before he was arrested or charged. During one conversation, Gately told Ennis that Spokane County Sheriff’s detectives were seeking a search warrant. Ennis asked what detectives were looking for, and Gately answered “probably your DNA.” Immediately following that call, Ennis lawyered up, and when detectives went to serve the warrant, they found that Ennis’ fingernails had been freshly clipped. Meidl’s decision not to fire Gately, he explains, is due to Gately’s 30 years experience as an officer, and the fact that the situation was mishandled by his superiors. Specifically, Lt. Joe Walker, a member of the panel who reviewed this incident, writes that then-Assistant Chief Selby Smith and then-Chief Rick Dobrow are to blame. “This incident should have been handled as if it were confidential, but there were too many emails and phone calls as well as input from City Hall administration to consider this a confidential incident,” Walker writes. “AC Smith and Chief Dobrow failed as leaders of the Spokane Police Department to handle this incident appropriately.” (MITCH RYALS)

• Go Zags design • ATM fees refunded* • Earn 1.35% APY on your first $25,000 • No monthly fee • No minimum balance

Get your unbeatable combination, EXCLUSIVELY from Numerica. numericacu.com • 800.433.1837 Here’s the legal stuff. *Up to $25 per month if requirements are met. APY= Annual Percentage Yield. APY is accurate as of 2/1/17 and subject to change. 1.35% APY applies to the first $25,000 in account. The APY on balances of $25,000.01 and above is .05% APY. Rates may change after account is opened. Monthly requirements to earn rewards rate include any combination of 12 debit card transactions on your Sequel account or credit card transactions under the same member account (excluding transactions at ATMs), one Better Online Banking login per month, e-Statements with a valid email address, and one electronic withdrawal, deposit, or transfer of at least $100 each month (excludes transfers to/ from Numerica shares or loans). If the account requirements are not met, the rate will be .00% APY and ATM surcharge and Numerica foreign ATM fees will not be refunded. Requirements are calculated for each calendar month. Fees may reduce earnings on account. There is a $25 minimum opening deposit required for this account and a $20 membership fee for new members. Federally insured by NCUA. SCGZ17

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 17


NEWS | ENVIRONMENT

SATURDAY, MARCH 25 | 8PM SUNDAY, MARCH 26 | 3PM

Rock and a Hard Place

BENJAMIN BEILMAN, VIOLIN ECKART PREU, CONDUCTOR Tchaikovsky... Violin Concerto Shostaikovich... Symphony No. 9 Glinka... Kamarinskaya

BNSF will remove coal deposits in some spots along the Columbia River after the Spokane Riverkeeper and other environmental groups settled a suit BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

A

CLAIRE HUANGCI, PIANO Winner of the 2010 National Chopin competition ECKART PREU, CONDUCTOR

APRIL 22 • 8PM ~ APRIL 23 • 3PM Concert sponsored by Merrill O’Brien John Corigliano Frédéric Chopin Johannes Brahms

Elegy (1965) Piano Concerto No.1 Symphony No. 1

(509) 624-1200 • SpokaneSymphony.org Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

JAN, THE TOY LADY, NOTICES THAT SPRING IS LESS THAN TWO WEEKS AWAY: usly? Serio eady u alr o y ’t n are e v s Ha n’s h he lio had t is year? th

River Park Square (509) 456-TOYS 18 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

few years back, volunteers working with the Spokane Riverkeeper walked under railroad bridges and trestles in Spokane, searching for coal that might have fallen from passing trains. They found chunks of the black substance in different places over the course of several months, including next to Hangman Creek (also known as Latah Creek), says Jerry White, Jr., the current Spokane Riverkeeper. In his office, White has a small Ziploc bag with a handful of pieces of coal that the label says were found west of Latah Creek on March 9, 2014. But the small amounts found in Spokane were nothing compared to what people found along the Columbia River Gorge, White says: “It’s clear that when you get into the Columbia Gorge, that’s where the wind really kicks up.” For years, environmental advocacy groups voiced concerns over coal and coal dust blowing off of trains traveling from the Powder River Basin in Montana and Wyoming to terminals in Vancouver, British Columbia. Their worry? That coal is contaminating rivers and waterways along the rail route through the heart of Washington state with mercury, arsenic and other toxins. So in 2013, a coalition of groups — including Spokane Riverkeeper, the Sierra Club, Puget Soundkeeper Alliance and the Natural Resources Defense Council — sued BNSF Railway, alleging that the freight railroad network had violated the Clean Water Act. The case went to trial for a week last November, when scientists testified that coal particles come off of every coal rail car in transit, and eyewitnesses told stories of being pelted by coal from trains passing along waterways, according to a statement from the environmental groups.

Soon after, the parties announced that they would settle. With the settlement, filed in court on Friday, March 3, BNSF denies any violations of the Clean Water Act, but also agrees to “remove significant accumulations of coal and/or petcoke materials in areas on or adjacent to BNSF’s rightof-way” at several locations along the Columbia River. The company also will study whether covering coal cars would be a viable option. “Really, it is a huge win in terms of getting the industry to look at covering these cars in the long term,” White says, “and then picking up these significant accumulations of coal in the Columbia basin.”

T

he cleanup sites include Horsethief Lake, the Drano Lake rail bridge and parking area, the White Salmon River and its confluence with the Columbia, the confluence of Rock Creek and the Columbia, and a causeway near Murdock, Washington. Though the cleanups don’t include areas close to Spokane, the gateway to the state for trains coming from the Powder River Basin, the settlement is part of “a larger push in a direction to address the impacts of the coal industry on our world in a very big-picture way,” White says. “We understood that if we settled, and negotiated with the industry, that we were going to get closer to real, realistic fixes.” BNSF also agreed to pay $1 million to the Rose Foundation to fund projects that will improve water quality or habitat in Washington and the Columbia River. It’s not clear yet if any of that money will be used for projects in Spokane, White says. BNSF, meanwhile, sees the settlement as a


BNSF will study whether covering cars can keep coal and dust from blowing off trains. win that “reflects the truth that these sweeping allegations were simply unfounded.” “It’s important to point out they sued us for $4.6 trillion; that’s trillion with a ‘t,’” says Courtney Wallace, a BNSF spokeswoman. “The settlement is $1 million.” BNSF has studied coal dust for more than a decade, Wallace says. After the company had two derailments in the Powder River Basin, it appeared that coal dust was affecting the stability of track structure and integrity of the company’s rail lines there. So BNSF required its customers to spray all coal cars with a “topper agent” to prevent dust, and load the cars in a “bread loaf” shape before they leave the basin, which greatly reduced issues with coal leaving the cars, Wallace says. Then, two years ago, BNSF added a “respray” station in Pasco, to spray the coal and petcoke (petroleum coke) cars again, midway through their journey. “We were asked if we would do that, it wasn’t a requirement,” Wallace says. “We spent about $26 million, so now all coal cars going through Pasco go through there.” The vast majority of the roughly three to five coal trains per day that BNSF hauls through Washington state pass through Pasco on their way to Westshore Terminals in B.C., Wallace says. Some coal is also hauled to a coal-fired power plant in Centralia. “We do take this very seriously, and continue to study options to make sure we are addressing coal and petcoke in the best way possible,” says Wallace. “We want to make sure anything we’re moving, including coal, including grain, is moved safely and efficiently, and this is not something we take lightly.”

GOURMET It’s in our nature.

T

hough BNSF is required to study covers for the coal cars, the decision on whether or not to use them will be datadriven, Wallace says. “As far as I know right now, there are no commercially available covers,” says Wallace. “One of the important things to remember is the settlement agreement doesn’t require a particular outcome for the car covers.” Still, BNSF is figuring out prototypes, working with vendors, and plans to put together a protocol to look at their safety and viability, she says. With the settlement, the environmental groups also agreed not to sue BNSF over the issue again for the next five years. LETTERS “The judge didn’t rule Send comments to there were any violations of the editor@inlander.com. Clean Water Act,” Wallace says. “We deny any violations of that. We want to make sure coal stays in the cars.” As for the coal the company will be cleaning up as part of the settlement, Wallace says that if there was coal found, “I don’t know how long it was there. Coal also used to be a source for locomotives for years and years.”  samanthaw@inlander.com

RESTAURANT Friday and Saturday | 5 - 9:30 pm LOUNGE Friday and Saturday | 4 pm - close

1 800 523-2464 | CDACASINO.COM | MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 19


Law-and-Order

LARRY How ‘smart’ is Larry Haskell’s brand of justice? BY MITCH RYALS

20 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017


L

arry Haskell doesn’t negotiate with chronic criminals. As Spokane County’s top prosecutor, he prefers a mathematical approach based on the crime, not the person — a practice that critics have characterized as “vending machine justice.” Haskell’s refusal to negotiate, judges and defense attorneys say, is resulting in lengthy and expensive prison sentences, as prosecutors often ignore an individual’s circumstances (including drug addiction or mental illness) and treat people like numbers on a page. People like Franklin Scruggs. Scruggs is a 47-year-old homeless drug addict. Last September, he’s standing in front of Judge Maryann Moreno after cops found meth in his pocket. Citing Scruggs’ long record of drug and property crimes, Deputy Prosecutor Patrick Johnson asks the judge to lock him up for the maximum time that state law allows: 24 months. Scruggs’ attorney protests. He’s a nonviolent drug addict, and he needs treatment, not prison, she tells the judge. But under one of Haskell’s internal rules known as the “9+ policy,” prosecutors won’t consider treatment options for Scruggs because of the 11 felonies on his record, noting the fact that treatment previously failed to work for him. Judge Moreno talks with Scruggs from the bench before making her ruling. He tells her about his almost two-decade fight with addiction, his success in previous treatment, his probation in Idaho (from another drug charge) and his nearly 2-year-old daughter. Moreno tells the man she hears a version of his story all the time. An addicted, mentally ill or otherwise impoverished individual gets trapped in a cycle of “status crimes.” ...continued on next page

The Spokane County Courthouse, where Larry Haskell has instituted new “tough-on-crime” policies. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO


CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Spokane Judge Maryann Moreno does not approve of Haskell’s philosophy toward chronic offenders.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“LAW-AND-ORDER LARRY,” CONTINUED...

22 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

PEN 5 • O D K

S A WEE

TUES - SAT 10AM - 5PM S A WEE

Shop The Tin Roof’s Clearance Center! 1702 E RIVERSIDE AVE, SPOKANE Give us a call at 509-535-4122

AY

PEN 5 • O D

discounts & hours

H

askell’s 9+ policy went into effect in January 2016. It says that for chronic offenders with nine or more felonies, deputy prosecutors won’t consider any plea deals; in turn, they will ask for the maximum jail time and cannot offer therapeutic courts, such as drug court or the local mental health court, without

K

New! styles

takes away some discretion from deputy prosecutors, but says that those “guidelines” ensure equal treatment under the law. “It cuts both ways,” he says. “It’s not only to make sure somebody doesn’t go too easy … but it’s also to prevent people from going the other way, and saying ‘No deals.’ The goal is to treat people similarly.” As for the job with the feds? Haskell, an early supporter of Trump, confirms that he applied, but has yet to hear back. “I look forward for him to follow through and deliver what he’s told the American people he would do,” Haskell says of Trump.

AY

From the bench, she condemns Haskell’s policy and gives Scruggs the lowest possible sentence: one year. “My policy and my procedure has always been to treat a person as a person, with dignity and respect, not as a ‘Number 12,’” she says. “So that’s about all I can offer you, sir.” Attorneys, judges and “smart justice” advocates criticize Haskell for pursuing prison time over other options that are proven to more effectively reduce recidivism, and in some cases save money. Now they are speaking out against Haskell with greater urgency because they believe that he’s in line to become the region’s top federal prosecutor, working in concert with the Trump administration on what they view as outdated or regressive policies. “Would Larry be the federal prosecutor who starts going after marijuana crimes on a federal level, here?” Spokane County Public Defender Tom Krzyminski asks. “I think he would.” For his part, Haskell acknowledges that his policy

approval from Haskell himself or his second in command. “We’re not asleep at the wheel,” says Johnson, the deputy prosecutor on Scruggs’ case. “We’re looking at people who commit the most crime, and trying to do something about it. Is a one-size-fits-all policy going to leave out some people who are good candidates for some kind of other resolution? Maybe. I hope not. There is a safety valve on this where if you get cases like that, you can send them up top for review.” But when considering whether someone should qualify for alternative courts — such as drug court, which considers a person’s addiction issues — prosecutors weigh previous failed attempts at treatment. “I believe the community is better served by them not committing more crimes … creating more victims and doing their treatment in [prison],” Haskell says. Even critics of the 9+ policy, like Moreno, concede that it has an upside: It closes a loophole known as the “free crime doctrine.”


Say that a repeat offender gets arrested and is released before trial. In the meantime, he commits a slew of burglaries. He knows that because these sentences are typically served at the same time, his punishment won’t get any worse, no matter how many more people he steals from. Now, the policy holds criminals accountable for each new crime. But it still comes at a cost. “When you have these overarching policies that say we’re going to prosecute you to the max, it doesn’t make for smart justice, if you ask me,” Moreno tells the Inlander. “It doesn’t save the community from this individual who gets out the same way they went in or worse, and then here we are again. We can lock all these people up and spend 150 bucks a day, but I don’t think we’re getting enough bang for our buck here.” Krzyminski, the public defender, shares a similar view of Haskell’s approach. “Their focus is on certain things, which I believe is to lock people up. That’s going to be the end result. The weird thing, though, is we have this MacArthur grant, which says we should be trying something new and different and reducing Franklin Scruggs the jail population.” Last year, Spokane County was one of 40 cites awarded money from the nonprofit MacArthur Foundation. The $1.74 million will be used to reduce the jail population. The grant is a part of the larger “Safety and Justice Challenge” dedicated to reducing over-incarceration in America. “For me, an unintended consequence [of Haskell’s approach] could be that someone charged with a violent offense, but who doesn’t have the criminal history, is getting a deal because the prosecutors are spending other resources on these 9-pluses,” Krzyminski says. “I think things like that can happen.”

W

hen Scruggs’ public defender tried to get him into the drug court last year, he was denied by prosecutors because he had too many felonies and had previously failed at treatment. However, defense attorneys say, it’s people like Scruggs who should be given priority for drug court. Research into Spokane’s drug court released in December specifically examined the impact of Haskell’s policy. The results indicate that the very people restricted from drug court because of the policy are those who stand to benefit most. Those with long criminal records who go through drug court are less likely to reoffend than those processed through the traditional court system. “This new criteria that Larry implemented had good intentions, but it goes against the standard drug court research,” says Zachary Hamilton, WSU criminal justice professor and principal investigator for the 2016 study. “Drug court is most effective for high-risk individuals. If you’re denying people because of the 9+ criteria from entering drug court, you’re actually increasing their likelihood of failure.” ...continued on next page

Here for good.

“Today I will protect our future by digging into the past.” STCU MEMBER

Lexie, archeological conservationist (509) 326.1954 | (208) 619.4000 | (800) 858.3750 | stcu.org/hereforgood

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 23


CRIMINAL JUSTICE

More than halfway through his first term as Spokane’s elected prosecutor, Larry Haskell has applied to take over as the top federal prosecutor in Eastern Washington.

DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

“LAW-AND-ORDER LARRY,” CONTINUED... Haskell says he’s not persuaded by the WSU study. “I can’t emphasize enough that I firmly believe that drug treatment needs to happen early,” Haskell says. “It is better for them, they will have less obstacles to overcome, the addiction won’t be as deep-seated in the chemicals in their brain. That’s when I want to get ’em. It’s better for everybody when they get it done early.” He adds that a supervisor must also approve treatment for offenders with between five and eight felonies. Sandra Altshuler, Spokane County’s drug court coordinator, says that perspective contradicts the vast body of research on drug courts nationwide. “The research shows that drug courts are most effective for people with addiction that is deep-seated,” she says. “There’s a tremendous amount of research that shows addiction as an insidious disease that’s difficult to treat, and people average nine treatment stays before they’re successful. Having them do it early is less effective.” Indeed, the number of people who participated in drug court dropped by more than 44 percent in 2015 under Haskell, compared to the previous year. The program is now operating at less than half capacity. “In a community this size, with rates of addiction and the issues of behavioral health that we see in the criminal justice population, there’s no reason that court shouldn’t be full and have a waiting list,” says Spokane Regional Criminal Justice Administrator Jacqueline van Wormer.

24 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

The alternative court provides much more intense supervision than traditional probation and measures success differently, Altshuler says. “We sanction [offenders] for lying and deception, but not for someone coming forward and saying, ‘I relapsed last weekend,’” she says. “That just means they need more treatment, and that’s why we’re here. The overall goal for drug court is for them to change their entire life.” Scruggs tells the Inlander he wanted to participate in drug court, had prosecutors given him the chance. After nearly a year behind bars, he was released from prison in October 2016 and is serving probation. He takes drug tests and goes to outpatient treatment twice a week. But he’s been through this before. In 2013, he says, he completed inpatient drug treatment, but it didn’t stick. He’s optimistic that the treatment will work this time. It has to, he says, so he can have a relationship with his young daughter. “As the first year is always the hardest, I do have my work cut out for me,” he writes in a personal note to the judge. “I will not be that deadbeat dad like so many before me. I want my daughter to say and be proud of the fact that I’m her dad.”

H

askell’s 9+ policy is not the only area where his philosophy is drawing the ire of judges, advocates and defense attorneys.  Juvenile Justice: In November 2015, the

Inlander published a report detailing changes to how prosecutors approach juvenile crime under Haskell: The number of charges filed against kids increased. “Alternative case resolutions” — where attorneys construct solutions without a conviction — were no longer an option. And in some cases, prosecutors insisted on bringing charges LETTERS despite victims’ wishes. Send comments to Together, these changes editor@inlander.com. indicated a “get tough” mentality, defense attorneys say, while sacrificing efforts to keep kids out of the system. Back then, Haskell denied that his office was moving away from a rehabilitative bent for juvenile offenders. “We’re here to protect community safety and due process,” he said. “Accountability is very important, but rehabilitation is not a statutory requirement.” Technically, Haskell was right. The word “rehabilitation” was not a part of the Juvenile Justice Act until state lawmakers added it in 2016. The change brings Washington state in line with research and case law on juvenile crime. “These sort of get-tough policies for adolescents are contrary to everything we know in the evidence that works in juvenile justice,” says van Wormer, the Spokane Regional Criminal Justice Administrator, who has studied juvenile justice extensively.


Since the change to state law, public defenders in Spokane say that not much has changed. “Once Larry took over, he basically started treating juveniles as adults,” says Krzyminski, the public defender. “There’s no difference in the prosecution of a juvenile than an adult.” Juvenile Public Defender Krista Elliott says that prosecutors still don’t consider rehabilitation when weighing criminal charges. “There are so many things that Haskell is not doing even when prosecutorial organizations and his peers are fol-

“‘Unguided missiles’ is just a slogan like ‘Make America Great Again.’ It means nothing.” lowing these guidelines,” she says. Haskell defends his office’s strategy, saying state law requires that rehabilitation be considered when a juvenile is sentenced, not when they’re first charged with a crime. “You know the old pipeline to prison?” Haskell says. “We’re trying to change that perception where it’s really a pipeline to services, and the reason is, if we don’t charge them, they can’t qualify.” u Driving Under the Influence: Last July, Haskell announced a hard line on drinking and driving. “A DUI is an unguided missile that is one interchange away from a direct hit,” he told reporters during a press conference explaining the new policy. For repeat DUI offenders, prosecutors are no longer offering a reduction to a lesser charge, and to some that makes sense. But the policy also bars a plea deal if the driver’s blood alcohol content was .121 or higher, or if the driver refuses the breath test, even for first-time offenders. “‘Unguided missiles’ is just a slogan like ‘Make America Great Again,’” says Spokane attorney David Miller. “It means nothing.” Miller says a prosecutor’s job is to evaluate each case based on individual circumstances, not by a policy. Deputy Prosecutor Rachel Sterett, who supervises attorneys handling DUI cases, says the office came up with the new policy after comparing practices in Spokane to other counties throughout the state. She says Spokane had been more lenient than some neighboring counties.

T

he United States locks up more people — as many as 2.3 million by some counts — than any nation on Earth, with most individuals behind bars in state prisons and local jails. Mass incarceration in America skyrocketed in the 1980s and ’90s. The cause of such an explosion, traditional thinking says, can be attributed to the War on Drugs and harsh sentences for drug and repeat offenders. While those policies certainly deserve some of the blame, that’s not the whole story. Fordham University law professor and economist John Pfaff points to the daily decisions of local prosecutors, such as Haskell. In his new book Locked In: The True Cases of Mass Incarceration and How to Achieve Real Reform, Pfaff suggests that the spike in prison populations, particularly in state prisons, which hold the majority of offend-

ers, is largely due to an increase in felony charges filed in the 1990s and 2000s, despite decreasing violent and property crime rates overall. “In the end, the probability that a prosecutor would file felony charges against an arrestee basically doubled, and that change pushed prison populations up even as crime dropped,” Pfaff writes. In the two years that Haskell has been Spokane County’s top law enforcement officer, criminal filings have increased by about 6 percent for adults and 15 percent for juveniles compared to the two years before Haskell was elected. Although Spokane’s property crime rate remains higher than state and national rates, property crime in Spokane has been trending down since 2013. To his credit, Haskell has jumped on board with many reforms called for in A Blueprint for Reform, a 2013 report with suggestions to improve the criminal justice system in Spokane County. For instance, rather than charging all people criminally for driving on a suspended license, prosecutors usually give them an opportunity to reinstate their license in lieu of charges. He’s also signed onto all of the reforms being supported by the MacArthur Foundation, and is leading the charge on a program to steer first-time felony offenders out of the system. Haskell is also pushing a bill in the state legislature that would restore community supervision for certain property crime offenders as a pilot program in Spokane. Supervision for ABOUT THE AUTHOR property offendMitch Ryals covers criminal ers in Washington justice for the Inlander. was eliminated He has previously written due to budget cuts about confidential informants, bounty hunters in 2003 and 2009. and the police ombudsman. The goal, Haskell Ryals comes to Spokane says, is to reduce from St. Louis and attended the number of the University of Missourireoffenders. Columbia. Reach him at In the end, mitchr@inlander.com or 509-325-0634 ext. 237. Haskell says he’s open to second chances for firsttimers, but for repeat offenders, he balances different interests — justice, public safety, the “reasonable” execution of the law. “Reasonable is like beauty,” he says. “It’s in the eye of the beholder. If you’re a defense lawyer, it’s never reasonable enough. If you’re some prosecutors, it’s never hard enough. So you try to strike a balance that fits with the community’s public safety interest.” It’s a law-and-order philosophy that he would exercise as a federal prosecutor, pursuing hardline approaches to marijuana, immigration and the Second Amendment — priorities of President Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions. On Monday, as Trump issued a revised travel ban barring refugees and other travelers from predominantly Muslim nations, Haskell was encouraged by the direction in which America is heading: “I think we got a federal law on the books about deportation, and I think it should be followed unless it’s changed.” 

THEATER

ESCANABA IN DA MOONLIGHT

A Comedy about Hunting & Hunting Traditions Written by Jeff Daniels Directed by Casey Duncan

March 3, 4, 10, 11, 17 18 at 7 p.m. March 5, 12 and 19 at 2 p.m. Tickets: $15 Adult $13 Student/Senior 1-877-SIXTHST (208) 752-8871

sixthstreetmelodrama.com

Running Start

Information Night High school sophomores, juniors and their families are invited.

Wednesday, March 15, 2017 | 6:30 p.m. Patterson Hall Room 126, EWU Campus, Cheney Free parking after 5 p.m. Running Start provides an opportunity for academically motivated and qualified students in Washington’s public high schools to enroll in courses for free at Eastern Washington University. The program is available to high school juniors and seniors as they work towards fulfilling high school graduation requirements and general university requirements. For more information contact: EWU Running Start Office 509.359.6155 runningstart@ewu.edu | highschool.ewu.edu Look for us on Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat

Running Start MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 25


Alumni Benefit Concert

featuring

Hailey Hyde

Julia Keefe

Tasha Kootnz

Mackenzie Trail Ross

Join us Saturday, March 11th at 7:00pm for an evening of music as The Dragon Divas, five former SGS students, perform a variety of music including jazz and popular songs. A reception follows the concert, when eight Saint George’s seniors will present individual exhibits of their IB artwork. Admission is free - donations are encouraged. All proceeds support Saint George’s. Please RSVP at www.sgsalumniconcert.eventbrite.com 2929 W Waikiki Rd., Spokane WA 99208

26 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

Veronica Jensen


Artist Biscuit Street Preacher’s sensibilities are being transformed by his move to North Idaho. ROBBY MARTIN PHOTO

HEED (AND SEE) HIS WORDS Contemporary artist Biscuit Street Preacher brings his vibrant work, and family, to North Idaho BY DAN NAILEN

T

he move from urban center to rural outpost — from constant noise to omnipresent silence, from go-go rat race to near-solitude — can mess with a person’s mind, even when the move is made by choice. For Robby Martin, who paints under the nom de plume Biscuit Street Preacher, trading in a fully plugged-in life in Las Vegas for a self-built cabin and art studio in the wilderness of North Idaho’s Cocolalla was well worth it. But it didn’t come without some stresses on him, his

wife and his in-laws, who also live on the remote land. They had to trade in their desert-cruising cars for a truck and a Subaru, along with chains to navigate the Forest Service road to their property. They had to adjust their formerly wired lifestyle away from constant social media surveillance and get used to spotty-at-best Wi-Fi, and trade in staring at a 60-inch TV for staring at a fire pit. And they had to figure out how to sleep without the din of Vegas’ 24-hour ...continued on next page

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 27


CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS

CLOCKWISE: “Fame and Kitty’s Crinkle balls,” “Hi Fidelity,” “Bomb Shelter,” “A Fortune Tellers Dollars,” “Bust One Wins.”

“HEED (AND SEE), HIS WORDS” CONTINUED... action outside their window. “We actually had to get a fan to get a little white noise going because it was so quiet at night,” Martin says over coffee at Einstein Bros. Bagels, one of his regular must-stops when he makes his way down the mountain to Spokane for art supplies and a little urban culture. As he quickly notes, despite the dramatic move, “We still enjoy the city. We’re city folk.” That much is clear in the colorful paintings that Martin creates in his Biscuit Street Preacher guise, largescale acrylic works full of images ranging from industrial locales to somewhat random objects from his youth, old record players and refrigerators. Within the paintings — some of which are part of “Arts and Letters,” a new Emerge CDA group show opening Friday that’s dedicated to artists who use text and numbers in their works — one might find grocery lists, love notes to Martin’s wife, album covers or signs in foreign languages. The other artists featured in “Arts and Letters” are Megan Atwood Cherry, Jen Erickson, Otis Bardwell, Bevie LaBrie, Hanna Kuhns, Carrie Scozzaro and Kelly Burton.

M

artin and his family have spent much of their three years so far in North Idaho building their living quarters and a barn that houses his art

28 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

studio, as well as “just trying to figure out how to live in the woods.” During that time, Biscuit Street Preacher paintings were still being brokered by galleries in Las Vegas and Los Angeles, but Martin is now intent on making the Inland Northwest his home base. The first step came last summer when he organized a show at Sandpoint’s Evans Brothers Coffee called the Royal Gypsy Takeover. His work was featured along with the work of other visual artists, as well as food trucks and fire dancers. It went over well enough that they’ll be doing it again this year, and Biscuit Street Preacher paintings will adorn the Liberty Building gallery in Spokane this summer. In Spokane’s blossoming downtown scene and old architecture ready for new life, Martin sees the potential for a thriving contemporary art scene to go along with the familiar landscapes that dot many gallery walls. It’s perhaps a little reminiscent of his early days in Las Vegas, when chill little coffee shops and quirky garage bands were the rule, instead of celebrity chefs’ restaurants and big-money DJs. The evolution of his former home into a gigantic city with a lot of crime made Martin and his wife wake up one day and think, “What the hell are we doing?” “I don’t want to bash it too much because as you

look at my artwork, you see the color and the influence that Las Vegas gave me,” Martin says. “Las Vegas gave me everything I’ve got. It gave me my wife, it gave me my mentality, it gave me my art career. I’ll always be from there. But it was time for something new and adventurous, maybe get a little closer to nature and find out a little about what it means to be a human being.” Now that he’s able to focus on his work rather than mere survival in the wilds of North Idaho, Martin can already see new influences seeping into his paintings, even new colors — green, in particular — that rarely made appearances in his older work. “I’ve noticed I’m trying to paint trees, and I actually have to think about it,” Martin says. “I’ve put a couple of trees in my paintings, which I’ve actually never done before. “My paintings generally tell a story. Even my name, Biscuit Street Preacher, I would coin it as a storyteller/ Tom Waits/gypsy/Gogol Bordello-type thing. All my paintings have little stories, and I’ve got new stories to tell now.” n Emerge CDA: Arts and Letters opening reception • Fri, March 10, from 5-8 pm; on display through April 7 • 208 N. 4th St., Coeur d’Alene • emergecda.org


CULTURE | DIGEST

POETRY FUNDS FOR FITZ

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION BY TUCK CLARRY

ALBUM In an era of postmodern musings and existential dread, Washington, D.C.’s Priests and their first full-length album, NOTHING FEELS NATURAL, seems as timely and necessary as ever. The album plays as an expansion of their punk sensibilities with the inclusion of ambient and jazz-inspired soundscaping. Priests graduate to a new level of self-actualization as they find authenticity in performative strokes rather than the stripped-down punk bravado they often leaned on in the past. Impassioned shouts brought on by neoliberal anxiety and malaise are still found in frenetic pace songs like “Appropriate,” “Pink White House” and “Puff.” The band’s more cerebral trepidations, though, are better served in the album’s quieter, syncopated moments.

F

itz Fitzpatrick, an emerging poet in Spokane’s writing scene, is heading to the Women of the World Poetry Slam in Dallas later this month. But first, she’s hosting a fundraiser this Thursday, alongside Charlie Milo and Jaclyn Archer, to help offset travel and related costs. Fitzpatrick hosts a weekly poetry open mic at Spokane’s Neato Burrito and may be familiar to regular Inlander readers; her writing was selected among hundreds of submissions for our Poetry Issue in December. — JACOB H. FRIES Fitz Fitzpatrick at the Queer Poetry Fundraiser • Thu, March 9 at 8 pm • $5 • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

BOOK Throughout his hallowed career as a short fiction author, George Saunders has found a way to combine humanity’s empathy with a wit and humor that also acknowledges its absurdity. His first novel, LINCOLN IN THE BARDO, tries to capture these two qualities in a retelling of Abraham Lincoln’s visits to the crypt of his deceased 11-year-old son. Saunders couples historical fiction with Tibetan Buddhism’s “limbo” called the Bardo, along with scenes of a grieving Lincoln and ghosts of the ongoing Civil War. These ghouls hold court over the human condition and grief in what often reads as monologues of a manic. For his first venture into the world of novel-length fiction, Saunders is able to uncover life’s tragic truths in both the macro and micro of society. TV Pete Holmes’ CRASHING (Sundays at 7:30 pm, HBO) is as honest as a stand-up’s TV show about real-life comedy can get. Inspired by his tumultuous and abrupt divorce, Peter (played by Holmes) is a struggling open mic-er who finds himself no longer grounded in a relationship and with nothing else but his comedy. The show is full of notable comedian cameos, and the first episode centers on the career and life advice of habitual screw-up Artie Lange. Crashing works as a love letter to the misery of bombing, and the weary art of just trying to make it as a professional funny person. It deftly hits on all the cavernous lows that inspire some of the greatest storytellers in comedy, and the system that molds them. 

Fitz Fitzpatrick needs a little help from friends. TAY SANDERS PHOTO Thur 3/9, Inlander

NUMERICA ICE MACHINE

For Tickets Call 509.535.PUCK

RED LION RIVER INN

PIGGY BANK GIVEAWAY

BUCK NIGHT & CHEERSTIX GIVEAWAY

FRIDAY 3/10 vs. PORTLAND WINTERHAWKS

SATURDAY 3/11 vs. PRINCE GEORGE COUGARS

The first 2,000 fans and all full 36 game season ticket holders will receive an Ice Machine Piggy Bank courtesy of Numerica Credit Union.

$1 hot dogs and Coca-Cola products all night long plus the first 5,000 fans will receive Cheerstix.

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

www.SPOKANECHIEFS.com

Game Times:

7 PM MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 29


CULTURE | THEATER REVIEW

OPEN EARLY 9AM

FOR COLLEGE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT

MARCH 16-19th OVER 50 BIG SCREEN TV’s

SPOKANE NORTHTOWN // 509.484.7062 SPOKANE VALLEY // 509.891.0289 COEUR D’ ALENE // 208.667.0042 MOSCOW // 208.882.7630 NCAA® and March Madness® are trademarks of the National Collegiate athletic Association. ©2017 Buffalo Wild Wings, Inc. BWW2016-5955

JOIN THE INLANDER TEAM

The Inlander is currently seeking a professional individual to fulfill the entry-level, full-time Advertising Facilitator/Support Position. This position will be tracking ad fulfillment and assisting managers with ongoing projects. Must be able to work with online tools (email, spreadsheets, shared documents), have strong communication skills, and be able to work with a large sales team, handling multiple deadlines and projects. This is an ideal job for a highly organized “systems person” who wants to be part of a growing media business. If you feel you have the right qualifications and are excited to work for us, then please send your resumé with a cover letter to hr@inlander.com. No phone calls or walk-ins please.

30 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

FROM LEFT: Eli Drushella as Alceste, Jacque Swanson as Jennifer and Jennifer Tindall as Ellen in Misanthrope.

MILTON HARPER PHOTO

A Modern Misanthrope Molière’s timeless 350-year-old satire gets a 21st-century interpretation at SFCC BY E.J. IANNELLI

F

irst written to satirize the hypocrisy and absurd social conventions of France under Louis XIV, Molière’s The Misanthrope has lost little of its bite over the past 350 years. Wherever people gather, it seems, they will create hierarchies and circles of power and influence, artificial structures they must then negotiate with varying degrees of conformity, fawning and self-serving insincerity. It doesn’t matter whether they’re in the court of the Sun King, the White House of Donald Trump or an office boardroom closer to home. That agelessness gives the play a certain adaptability, a quality that playwright Martin Crimp spotted back in 1996 and turned to his own purposes. His since-updated version, now in a short run at Spokane Falls Community College directed by Josephine Keefe, is close enough to Molière’s original that it still bears the same title, but it’s been transported to present-day London, had its script heavily reworked to incorporate both highbrow and contemporary pop-cultural references, and seen its dramatis personæ renamed and reassigned. Alceste remains at the center of things, only now he’s pining for Hollywood actress Jennifer (formerly the courtly flirt Célimène), indignant theater critic Covington (nobleman and poetaster Oronte) and counseled by John (Philinte). As an homage to the original, Crimp’s version works. The transplant to London and the media/showbiz milieu allows him to make passing digs at overhyped artists and smarmy politicians while also engaging in lighthearted (but gimmicky) meta-theatrical moments, such as the period costume party in the final act. Despite revamping the dialogue, he’s retained the couplet scheme found in Molière’s original as well as the oft-performed Richard Wilbur translation.

Though not always graceful, Crimp’s rhymes are at least consistently amusing. On the whole, the young cast of this production has a tendency to speed through lines, transforming what should be swift, snappy dialogue into a torrent. That lack of enunciation robs some of the witticisms of their punch; but to be fair, all but one of the actors have the challenge of affecting English accents, and unusually passable ones at that. Eli Drushella is a temperamental Alceste who overinterprets some of the rashness written into his role. That has the effect of making Alceste a less sympathetic figure than he ought to be — provided you subscribe to the idea that the “misanthrope” should be the one talking the most sense, difficult as he finds it to practice what he preaches where Jennifer is concerned. Jacque Swanson’s Jennifer is confident, sharp-tongued and suitably self-obsessed. As the only “American” among the group, Swanson maintains a steadier, more natural delivery, but some of the rhymes get de-emphasized as a result. Both Dennis Burgess (as Julian) and Rebecca Craven (Marcia) are noteworthy for their sharply defined supporting characters. An abstract backdrop of overlapping picture frames, maids and butlers who carry out prop changes to lightly choreographed dance routines, and an incidental soundtrack that includes Neutral Milk Hotel and The Postal Service round out this entertaining, modern Misanthrope. What it loses in universality it gains in topicality.  The Misanthrope • Through March 12: ThuSat, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm • $10 • Spartan Theatre at Spokane Falls Community College • 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. • spokanefalls.edu/drama • 533-3592


Joe Potter got hooked on craft beer while studying at WSU, seeking out alternatives to the town’s ubiquitous macro-lagers.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

MEET YOUR BREWER

Little Spokane Brewing’s Joe Potter Spokane’s downtown brewery incubator helped this one-man operation get its start BY ADAM BOYD

W

hen it comes to brewing beer, Joe Potter is a one-man show. In addition to being the sole owner and head brewer of Little Spokane Brewing Company, Potter also works as a bartender at the Steel Barrel Taproom in downtown Spokane’s west end, where most days he’s found serving pints of his own brew to thirsty patrons. Little Spokane Brewing opened as part of Spokane’s Incubator Brewery in the summer of 2016. Housed in the historic Luminaria building at 154 S. Madison, Potter shares a brewery space with Young Buck Brewing and the soon-to-open TT’s Old Iron Brewery. The breweries within the Incubator share a 7-barrel (roughly 240 gallon) brewing system, with each brewery having its own dedicated fermenter and brite tank. (Zona Blanca shares the building as well.) One of only a few in the country, the Incubator aims

to allow new breweries like Little Spokane grow their brand while keeping startup costs low through the shared brewing space and equipment. Potter says there are other perks to the co-brewing environment. “Working with another brewer in the same brewery and facing the same challenges I do, we end up helping each other out,” he says. “We bounce ideas off of each other.” Once the beer is ready to be served, it finds a place among the 25 beer taps in the adjacent Steel Barrel Taproom. Potter’s brewing roots began, like so many others, as an avid craft beer drinker. While attending Washington State University in the early 2000s, he found himself searching for alternatives to the college town’s ubiquitous macro-lagers. “I was always looking for better beers. I remember

when Stone’s Imperial Stout came out,” he recalls. “It was the first Imperial Stout I had ever had, and I was like, ‘Wow… so that’s what a beer can taste like.’” This craft beer awakening led him to soon pursue homebrewing, which presented its own challenges. “I remember someone got me a homebrew kit for Christmas. So I brewed it and the beer came out terrible. But with my personality, I asked ‘What went wrong?’” Potter’s curiosity about making beer at home spurred him to join the local Inland Brewers Unite (IBU) homebrew club in 2009, and he soon found himself elected president of the organization. It was also there that he met fellow brewer Cameron Johnson, now the owner of Young Buck Brewing, and real-estate developer Chris Batten. Several conversations (and brews) later, Potter left his office job to partner with Johnson and Batten as ...continued on next page

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 31


FOOD | BEER

FOOD | UPDATE

“LITTLE SPOKANE BREWING’S JOE POTTER,” CONTINUED... part of the Incubator project. And thus, Little Spokane to get a feel for the beer-drinking climate of Spokane, Brewing Company was born. Potter also isn’t afraid to try new things. “I had spent a lot of time “I’ve been thinking about doing hiking around the Little Spokane some oak-aging of my beers. I also River,” Potter recalls when asked plan on using my Galaxy Pale recipe about the genesis of his brewery’s as a model to play with; use different A quick Q&A with Little Spokane name. “I wanted something that yeast, different hops, or maybe difBrewing’s Joe Potter was local to Spokane, and I liked ferent processes, and just see what I the imagery of the river.” can do with that,” he says. INLANDER: What’s your favorite Little Spokane’s beers and Find Little Spokane pouring at beer to brew? brand reflect that imagery. The beer joints like Manito Tap House A stout. It’s a very flexible style… Indian Painted Rocks Red Ale is and The Blackbird. Currently, the and when you’re doughing in, it named after the historic landmark brewery has four brews on tap at the smells amazing. near the river, and Sun Child IPA Steel Barrel: Sun Child IPA (7.1% is a reference to Spokane’s Salish alcohol by volume, 77 International What’s your favorite beer to meaning, “children of the sun.” Bittering Units), Dark & Lovely drink? Even though the region’s craft Oatmeal Stout (6.2% ABV, 55 As much as I hate to be cliché, beer scene remains in the midst IBU), Galaxy Pale Ale (5.5% ABV, hoppy pales and IPAs. Bale of a major boom, running a small 40 IBU), and the Backbone ESB Breaker Brewing’s Field 41 Pale is brewery in Spokane isn’t without (5.5% ABV, 38 IBU). There’s even a a go-to beer for me. its challenges, Potter says. chance that the guy who brewed the “Selling beer is hard work. pint you order is the same guy handWhen you aren’t brewing/drinkThere are limited places your ing it to you across the bar. n ing beer, what are you up to? beer can be put on tap, and even I’d like to think I’m musically if your beer is good, there’s a ABOUT THE AUTHOR: Adam inclined, so I like to sit around lot of great beer out there. It’s Boyd is an award-winning homeand play guitar or trumpet. Or not a given to be a craft brewery brewer, assistant brewer at Iron just getting out and enjoying the anymore.” Goat Brewing, and host of “Good outdoors. Yet Potter is appreciative of Brews” on KYRS Community the places that have chosen to put Radio. If there is something in his beer on tap, and he’s received this world that interests him more positive feedback from local pub owners and drinkers than beer, he has yet to find it; Boyd spends his alike. As a new brewer on the scene who’s still trying non-beer time sleeping… and dreaming of beer.

SHORT POURS

Menu classics include a pulled pork sandwich.

CARRIE SCOZZARO PHOTO

S W E E T LO U ’ S R E S TA U R A N T & TA P H O U S E 601 E. Front Ave. | Coeur d’Alene 208-667-1170

S

weet Lou’s Restaurant and Tap House is a bit of a homecoming for Coeur d’Alene native Meggie Foust, who started the original Sweet Lou’s with husband Chad in Hope, Idaho, five years ago, soon followed by a Ponderay location. “It’s an honor to come back to Coeur d’Alene and have the opportunity to serve our dishes to family and friends,” says Meggie Foust. The menu at both locations (they closed the Hope restaurant to focus on Coeur d’Alene) features comfort-oriented American classics like the certified Angus beef Western Burger, piled high with pulled pork, fried onions and jack cheese ($12), or bacon mac and cheese ($12). Watch the game on any of 17 televisions with a beverage — nearly half the beers on tap are local — and an appetizer, like housebattered onion rings ($7). Occupying the Grille From Ipanema’s former spot (the Brazilian eatery recently relocated to the Riverstone development), Sweet Lou’s offers a scenic view of McEuen Park and Lake Coeur d’Alene, especially in warmer weather when outdoor accommodations expand to around 80 seats. — CARRIE SCOZZARO

ISSUE

On stands April 13th Advertise in this guide to reach families with kids and help them plan their summer now!

RESERVE YOUR SPACE BY APRIL 6 ADVERTISING@INLANDER.COM 509-325-0634 ext. 215

Submit your Camp information to our editorial dept. by Thursday, March 30th • GetListed@inlander.com

32 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017


FOOD | RESTAURANTS

Comings and Goings A rundown of recent changes to the local dining scene, including the closure of a favorite tavern and the re-emergence of another BY CHEY SCOTT

E

ven as we celebrate the continued growth of the Inland Northwest’s dining and nightlife culture, sometimes we’re forced to bid farewell to places we wish we didn’t have to. Places like the Swamp Tavern, which saw its last weekend late last month, quietly closing after decades in business. The Browne’s Addition-adjacent pub had long been host to community bike rides, warm summer nights on the back patio, live music and more. Another casualty came with the recent shuttering of Mediterrano, the Mediterranean eatery inside the Saranac Commons indoor market. Opening in spring 2015 and offering gyros, rice bowls, salads, housemade hummus and other Greek-inspired fare, it officially closed in early February. Owner Shahrokh Nikfar, who ENTRÉE also operates Caffé Get the scoop on local Affogato inside the food news with our weekly Commons, posted Entrée newsletter. Sign up on Mediterrano’s at Inlander.com/newsletter. Facebook page that he has plans to sell the business, and that its closure doesn’t affect the Caffé. He mentioned road construction, harsh winter weather and the personal stresses of running both businesses, while also working as a community activist and making time for his family, as reasons for the closure. Citing the recent Washington state minimum wage increase and “soft sales,” owners of the local Irish pub O’Doherty’s closed their North Spokane location in midJanuary. O’Doherty’s flagship downtown restaurant and its Spokane Valley location remain open. Also on the North Side, Tonicx bar across from the

Mediterrano inside the Saranac Commons permanently closed last month. Five Mile Shopping Center marked its final days after 10 years of business. Connecting location Ash St. Tacos is also part of the closure, but owners say on Facebook that another restaurant/bar is already planning to move into the newly vacated spot. A third North Spokane dining spot that recently closed didn’t leave sushi lovers high and dry for long. Yuzen Japanese Restaurant — frequently lauded by local chefs as one of the area’s best places for sushi — on North Division near the NorthTown Mall closed in late January after five years of business. Yuzen’s space has since been filled by the new Aji BBQ and Sushi. In Coeur d’Alene, neighborhood coffee spot Java on Sherman just closed its doors, a move that comes three years after it moved four blocks from its original Sherman Avenue location. Java was a Coeur d’Alene mainstay for more than two decades, and loyal customers can still visit the Java Hayden location in the Prairie Shopping Center. The White Box Cafe & Bakery on North Division has also closed after an impressive 15-year run. Owners indicated in a Facebook post that they may decide to offer online-only orders or sell their baked goods at local farmers markets, but have yet to announce anything about those potential plans.

T

hough patrons of these local businesses are understandingly sad to see them depart, there’s plenty of food newness arriving to the region, or on its way. Opening last month in downtown Spokane, Urban

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Nirvana is a new specialty tea and coffee shop at 108 N. Washington. If you’re a devotee of the popular Panera Bread chain — known for removing food with artificial ingredients from its menu — you’ll be glad to hear a new outlet just opened in North Spokane, at 6650 N. Division (near Lowe’s). This is third Inland Northwest store for the chain, joining a list that also includes Spokane Valley and Hayden, Idaho. While we’ve covered several food-business debuts in recent issues of the Inlander (find these stories online at Inlander.com/food), there are several notable launches we’re keeping an eye on, including the pending reopening of local landmark The Viking sometime later this month. The longtime hangout near the Spokane Arena is under new ownership of the Talotti family, local restaurateurs who also own the Red Lion Barbecue, Pacific Avenue Pizza and Whisk bar. As of January, Coeur d’Alene is now home to the Texas-style barbecue chain Dickey’s Barbecue Pit. The Hanley Avenue spot is now its second regional location, joining one in far North Spokane at Wandermere that opened back in 2013. We’re also keeping an eye out for a coming downtown location of the local chain Sushi Sakai, set to take over the corner spot in the Lincoln Building most recently occupied by MacKenzie River Pizza Co. Later this spring or summer, the former Jones Radiator bar spot on East Sprague comes back to life with the debut of Community Pint, a tap house and bottle shop operated by local homebrewer TJ Wallin. n

Slice and Grind FEATURING:

Organic Amish Meats and Cheeses Hot Sandwiches and Soup, Espresso Bar 2103 E DIAMOND • SPOKANE

509-315-5373

SLICEANDGRINDINC.COM WE ACCEPT EBT

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 33


Rachel Perrell Fosket and Michael Draper play a couple at odds with one another’s religious beliefs in Emily.

A Crisis of Faith Religion is questioned and a marriage is tested in Emily, directed and produced by Whitworth grads BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

A

s Emily opens, a married couple is preparing dinner in the small kitchen of their apartment. They sit and eat mostly in silence, idle small talk disguising an obvious, unspoken tension between them. A few nights later, after the weekly Bible study they host, the husband, Nathan (Michael Draper), drops a bombshell on his wife, Emily (Rachael Perrell Fosket): He’s realized he might not believe in God. He says he feels guilted into Christianity — it was his parents’ religion, not his own — and it’s starting to eat away at his conscience. “If I wasn’t a Christian, you never would have married me,” he tells his wife, and even she knows he’s probably right. Nathan, a copywriter and aspiring novelist, moves into a co-worker’s place. Emily, who works in a neighborhood coffee shop, clings to her faith, praying that her husband will experience some kind of epiphany. The film looks on as they dance around the subjects of divorce and reconciliation, and as every discussion of religion devolves into an explosive argument. Ryan Graves, who wrote and directed Emily, is aware that his film’s basic premise makes it sound like one of those horrible, simple-minded Kirk Cameron vehicles in which the heroes are unblinkered believers and agnosticism is always punished in the end. “Those movies don’t get at faith with enough honesty,” Graves says. “I think they have an agenda they’re

34 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

trying to push, and I don’t think that’s the best way to go about it. It reduces the conflict to black or white.”

E

mily isn’t a Christian movie per se, at least not in the sense that modern audiences understand the term “Christian movie.” It’s really the story of a couple struggling to stay connected; the fact that faith is their stumbling block is almost incidental. “I always intended to make it about their relationship and not religion,” Graves says, citing the influence of Ingmar Bergman and the Polish master Krzysztof Kies´lowski, who explored Christianity in both intellectual and emotional terms. “I think religion is a fascinating conflict unto itself.” Emily was filmed in Graves’ current home of Portland in just 18 days and with a budget of $20,000. (Graves later raised $7,000 through Indiegogo to finance postproduction costs.) It was mostly shot in Graves’ apartment — “My wife was coming home every night to a film crew,” he says — and in local businesses that lent out their spaces on the cheap. Its story is somewhat rooted in autobiography. Graves was raised in Sammamish in a Christian family, and he found himself wandering from the faith while he was attending Whitworth University as an English major. Graves discovered cinema around the same time, enrolling in a film class taught by beloved Whitworth professor

Leonard Oakland. “We’d get coffee once a week and he’d edit my film reviews and assign me DVDs from the Whitworth library. We’d just talk about movies,” Graves recalls. “That was the greatest intro to film that any student could have. I still have his copy of On the Waterfront.”

G

raves’ transition from film fanatic to filmmaker was a swift one. He and his friend Kelly McCrillis, Emily’s producer, entered their first short in the annual campus film festival bearing Oakland’s name, and it took second place. Graves’ follow-up, a short titled I Wonder, later took first. A few years later, Emily, Graves’ debut feature, made its premiere out of competition at the 2016 Leonard Oakland Film Festival. “[Whitworth] did a good number on me, because I go back and visit every year,” Graves says, adding that his sister-in-law is now a junior there. “It’s been kind of a legacy for my family. Whitworth has been the constant, and Spokane was a no-brainer when we were booking the film.” A handful of Graves’ film professors from Whitworth will headline discussions following screenings of Emily at the Magic Lantern this weekend. That seems appropriate, because not only is it a film about discussion, but it sends you out of the theater wanting to talk about it. Although Graves never takes sides in the central conflict and leaves the future of Nathan and Emily’s marriage mostly ambiguous, he’s found that viewers, both religious and not, have approached the film from many different angles. “Some say they’re doomed. Some say they’re going to work it out,” he says. “For me, this is just their first crisis, and I think they’re realizing that marriage is worth the struggle.” n Emily at the Magic Lantern Theater: Fri-Thu, March 10-16. Director Ryan Graves, producer Kelly McCrillis and Whitworth professors Casey Andrews, Fred Johnson and Leonard Oakland will be present for post-screening discussions March 10 and 11.


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS EMILY

Nathan and Emily are happily married and devoted Christians, until he realizes he may not actually believe in God. Will they stay together despite their differences, or will Nathan’s lack of faith push them apart? Filmed in Portland, this intimate, low-budget drama has little in common with the Christian-themed films you typically see in multiplexes, depicting its central spiritual crisis with empathy and complexity. Directed by Ryan Graves and produced by Kelly McCrillis, both Whitworth University graduates. At the Magic Lantern, March 10-16. (NW) Not rated

KEDI

For anyone who wishes that all the cat videos on YouTube were feature length, here’s an 80-minute documentary about the feral felines who roam the streets of Istanbul and have completely taken over certain parts of the city. You can view it as a fly-on-the-

wall study of an urban ecosystem, as a sumptuous international travelogue or simply as a visual love letter to Istanbul’s furry inhabitants. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Not rated

KONG: SKULL ISLAND

Goofy and gory in equal measure, the latest attempt to revive King Kong for 21st-century audiences is essentially a bonkers drive-in movie with an A-list cast and a blockbuster budget. The film is set in 1973, as a group of scientists, mercenaries and soldiers drop into the jungle and find themselves in the middle of a turf war between the legendary giant ape of the title and the horrifying monsters (known as “skullcrawlers”) that decimated his species. Skull Island is a lot of things at once — a war movie, a breathlessly paced chase film, a creepy-crawly creature feature, a man vs. nature parable — but it all works in its own crazy way. (MJ) Rated PG-13

NOW PLAYING A DOG’S PURPOSE

Things didn’t start out great for this “feel good” comedy/drama about golden retriever Bailey (voiced by Josh Gad) who is reborn again and again as another dog after the end of his previous life. The day before its L.A. premiere (which was subsequently canceled), footage surfaced showing one of the canine cast members in apparent distress during a scene; an investigation into the incident is ongoing. So let that influence your decision to see this film, also starring Dennis Quaid, if you will. (CS) Rated PG

A UNITED KINGDOM

The true story of Seretse Khama (David Oyelowo), a Botswanan prince (and later, president) who aided in securing his country’s independence while married to a woman (Rosamund Pike) who was both European and white. During the late 1940s, their marriage was initially met with resistance from both the British and South African people, though they came to be generally beloved political figures. (NW) Rated PG-13

BEFORE I FALL

High school’s almost over, and popular kid Samantha (Zoey Deutch) and her equally popular friends are ready to party it up. But then there’s a car accident, and Sam finds herself in a Groundhog Day scenario, reliving the day of the crash over and over again. Perhaps there’s a lesson to be learned? Based on the bestselling YA novel by Lauren Oliver. (NW) Rated PG-13

FIFTY SHADES DARKER

The second installment in the blockbuster film series inspired by E.L. James’ erotic bestsellers is another

epic snooze, save for a few moments of fleeting suspense. Anastasia Steele is once again seduced by her BDSMobsessed ex, the brooding billionaire Christian Grey, and glossily photographed kinkiness abounds. Unfortunately, nothing ever feels alive in this film. Rubberneckers looking for a cheap thrill? Nothing to see here. (JK) Rated R

FIST FIGHT

Fist Fight frustratingly fails to make worthwhile use of a cast of typically funny people. Seemingly left to their own devices (I’m assuming there was a lot of improvisation), straight man Charlie Day, seething Ice Cube and a large array of side characters played by Tracy Morgan, Dean Norris, Christina Hendricks and Kumail Nanjiani sputter their way through endless unfunny scenes until we get to the violent parking lot showdown. Jillian Bell as an inappropriate school psychologist is the only saving grace, but the most laughworthy aspect of Fist Fight is its toolate effort to teach us something about the value of teachers. (DN) Rated R

GET OUT

Written and directed by Jordan Peele, this psychological thriller tackles the same issues of race and masculinity that were regularly explored on his Comedy Central series Key and Peele. Daniel Kaluuya (Sicario) and Allison Williams (Girls) play an interracial couple who visit her family’s country estate, which he discovers has a curi ous history with its African American staff. A clever, consistently funny racial satire and horror film that mocks white liberal cluelessness and finds humor in (without dismissing) black people’s fears. (ES) Rated R ...continued on next page

F O T S E B L A U N TH AN 24 W N D AN OLL L N I THE DER’S P REA

THANKS FOR VOTING!

PICK UP THE RESULTS ISSUE ON MARCH 23RD ADVERTISE IN THE RESULTS ISSUE! advertising@inlander.com MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 35


FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

HIDDEN FIGURES

You’ve probably never heard of Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughan and Mary Jackson, who were pioneers in — respectively — mathematics, computer programming and engineering at NASA, without whom it’s astronauts would never have flown. The three black women helped the space agency through its first manned space flight, as documented in this historical drama. (MJ) Rated PG

JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 2

In the first movie, ex-hitman John Wick (Keanu Reeves) comes out of retirement to hunt down the lowlifes who killed his dog and beat him up in a carjacking attempt, and action movie fans rejoiced. The follow-up finds Wick again dragged from a life of leisure to help a friend face down some of the world’s deadliest assassins. (DN) Rated R

LA LA LAND

When jazz pianist Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) and aspiring actress Mia (Emma Stone) first see each other, their attraction is more than magnetic — it can bend time and space. The leads help the musical construction make sense; these two are so head over heels for each other that of course everything stops for a song-and-dance number now and again. (PC) Rated PG-13

THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE

The improbably delightful original LEGO Movie found a brilliant game plan for turning a toy into a story: combining a child’s anarchic sense of play with a savvy adult’s perspective on how goofy yet inspired that play can look from a distance. The LEGO Batman Movie adds another level of self-awareness about the entire recent history of comic-book movies, making for a wonderfully engaging mix of action spectacle and genre parody. (SR) Rated PG

LION

This multiple Oscar nominee is based on a memoir by Saroo Brierley, who was separated from his mother in Calcutta as a child, adopted by an Australian couple and later used Google Earth to locate the tiny Indian village he left behind. Although the film’s middle section drags considerably, this is an undeniably powerful true

36 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

Moonlight

99

La La Land

93

The Salesman

86

Get Out

83

Logan

77

The LEGO Batman Movie

75

Hidden Figures

74

THE GREAT WALL

One thing you know you’re going to get from Chinese director Zhang Yimou (Hero, House of Flying Daggers) is a visual feast of bright colors and eyepopping effects. In The Great Wall, his first English-language feature, Yimou calls on Matt Damon, playing a European mercenary, to help an army of Chinese defend the wall and all of humanity against an invading legion of monstrous lizards (yes, you read that correctly). (DN) Rated PG-13

NEW YORK TIMES

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

story, and Dev Patel, Nicole Kidman and 8-year-old Sunny Pawar deliver standout performances. (NW) Rated PG-13

LOGAN

This third film in the stand-alone Wolverine trilogy is by far the best of the bunch and probably the best X-Men movie yet. Set in 2029, 25 years after the last known mutant was born, a haggard Logan (Hugh Jackman) has retreated into the desert to care for the ailing Charles Xavier (Patrick Stewart). The existence of a little girl with uncanny powers soon becomes known, and Logan agrees to transport her to a faraway mutant refuge known as Eden. Bloody, bold and badass, this is one of the finest comic book movies ever made. (MJ) Rated R

MOONLIGHT

One of the most deserving Best Picture winners of recent years, Barry Jenkins’ achingly beautiful sophomore feature is the kind of subtle, introspective work that’s typically denied Oscar gold. The movie, inspired by Tarell Alvin McCraney’s autobiographical play, focuses on three distinct phases in the life of Chiron, who’s black and gay and growing up in poverty in Miami. To describe Moonlight as an examination of race, masculinity and sexuality makes it sound too pat; this is a deeply moving, transportative coming-of-age story that’s absorbing from beginning to end. (NW) Rated R

ROCK DOG

In this animated feature, a beaniewearing, floppy-haired Tibetan Mastiff named Bodi leaves his peaceful mountain village to chase musical stardom in the big city. Featuring the voices of Luke Wilson, J.K. Simmons, Lewis Black, Matt Dillon and Sam Elliott, who plays a character called (so help us) Fleetwood Yak. (NW) Rated PG

ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY

Set before A New Hope, Rogue One follows Jyn Erso (Felicity Jones), the daughter of Galen Erso (Mads Mikkelsen). When Rebel intelligence soldier Cassian Andor (Diego Luna) rescues Jyn from prison, she becomes part of the mission to to stop the construction of the new project that her father was forced to design — the Death Star. A worthy pre-

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

quel that’s darker and more violent than earlier installments. (SS) Rated PG-13

THE SALESMAN

As they’re preparing to appear in a production of Death of a Salesman, a husband and wife living in Tehran are shaken following a violent assault. An observant character study that unfolds with the propulsive nature of a thriller, this recent Oscar winner for Best Foreign Language Film also functions as an insightful, sometimes harrowing portrait of life in modern-day Iran. Writerdirector Asghar Farhadi (A Separation) further cements his reputation as one of the best filmmakers currently working in any country. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE SHACK

While on a camping trip, a little girl is abducted and murdered, leaving her family emotionally shattered. But don’t let that gruesome premise fool you: This is an inspirational film for Christian audiences, and pretty soon the girl’s father (Sam Worthington) is receiving cryptic messages that seem to be coming from on high. Co-starring Octavia Spencer, Radha Mitchell and Tim McGraw. (NW) Rated PG-13

SPLIT

M. Night Shyamalan’s latest mindbender stars James McAvoy as a man with 24 different personalities who kidnaps three teenage girls for some kind of violent ritual. Declarations of Shyamalan’s artistic comeback are perhaps a bit overblown: This is little more than a polished (and overlong) B-movie, anchored by McAvoy’s frighteningly untethered performance. As for the trademark Shyamalan twist ending, don’t expect one here, though maybe that’s a good thing. (NW) Rated PG-13

TABLE 19

Anna Kendrick stars as a woman who’s dumped twice — first as the maid of honor in her BFF’s wedding, and again by her boyfriend (the best man in said wedding). But she goes to the reception anyway and finds herself assigned to a table with such comic ringers as Lisa Kudrow, Craig Robinson, Stephen Merchant, June Squibb and Tony Revolori. Spoiler alert: These weirdos turn out to be unexpected founts of wisdom. (NW) Rated PG-13 


FILM | REVIEW

NTERN THEAT GIC LA ER A M FRI, MARCH 10TH- THURS, MAR 16TH TICKETS: $9

EMILY (80 MIN)

FRI/SAT: 8:00 SUN: 6:00 TUES-THURS: 6:30

www.SpokaneMovies.com

KEDI (78 MIN)

FRI/SAT: 3:45, 6:15 SUN: 1:30, 4:15 TUES-THURS: 4:45, 6:45 THE SALESMAN (115 MIN) FRI/SAT: 5:15 SUN: 3:00 TUES-THURS: 4:30 MOONLIGHT (106 MIN) WEEKEND ONLY FRI/SAT: 4:15 SUN: 2:15 WEEKEND ONLY LION (115 MIN) FRI/SAT: 2:00 SUN: 12:00pm

(509) 209-2383 • 25 W Main Ave MagicLanternOnMain.com • /MagicLanternOnMain

This probably isn’t the relaxing island getaway they were hoping for.

King of the Blockbusters Kong: Skull Island is a surprisingly solid reboot, as exciting as it is knowingly goofy BY MARYANN JOHANSON

W

hat’s the big surprise of Kong: Skull has ironic fun with a running motif about how Island? No, it’s not a secret sequel to war can make a man see enemies everywhere Peter Jackson’s 2005 King Kong, and (including in a giant ape that was just minding no, it’s not a sequel to 2014’s Godzilla, though the his own business until humans started dropping two share a universe. No, the big surprise — not bombs on him), there’s also a man-versus-nature a spoiler — is that Kong: Skull Island is actually a thing running alongside it: Mess with nature, and prequel to Godzilla. nature will mess right back, ferociously. After a brief introductory sequence set in It’s like Jurassic Park with a lot less wonder 1944, the action jumps to 1973 and stays there, and a helluva lot more horror. Oh, the gruesome, which lends a delicious retro analog vibe to the intense ickiness here! This movie really pushes goings-on. A good reason to set this tale in 1973: the boundaries of a PG-13 rating — or maybe It allows for mysterious Skull Island, hidden by a it only feels that way when you’re watching in perpetual storm, to recently have 3-D IMAX and it feels like the been discovered in the South Pajungle bug slime and the gore KONG: cific by the first Earth-mapping sat- SKULL ISLAND and the monster vomit is all ellites. Scientist Bill Randa (John over you. This is a rare instance Rated PG-13 Goodman) finally gets permission Directed by Jordan Vogt-Roberts of 3-D being put to actual use to take his team on a mission to onscreen, rather than just serving Starring Tom Hiddleston, Samuel L. the island; he has a pretty good as an excuse to hike ticket prices: Jackson, Brie Larson, John C. Reilly, idea what’s there via his top-secret John Goodman There is real depth in the jungle, government project, Monarch real dizziness to be found looking (referenced in Godzilla), which is documenting down from a high cliff. the existence of “massive unidentified terrestrial All the horror and the black comedy and the organisms.” (It’s like an X-Files for monsters.) monster battles and the homages to a slew of So off they go, accompanied by “tracker” other films — it all works, even crammed in like James Conrad (Tom Hiddleston), photojournalthis, thanks in large part to the terrific cast taking ist Mason Weaver (Brie Larson) and an escort it just seriously enough. Reilly steals the show of U.S. military personnel who are about to be as the lost-in-time pilot, but Hiddleston, in his demobilized from Vietnam. Once on the island, first true action role, is a close second, plausibly they meet Hank Marlow (John C. Reilly), who rougher and tougher than we’ve seen him before. was shot down over the island in 1944 (that’s Larson’s role could be meatier, but she is not a the opening sequence) and has been stuck there damsel in distress, and she is not there for Kong since. to inexplicably fall in love with. (In fact, the most Boiled down to its bonkers essence, Skull offensive Kong tropes have been excised, though Island is a Vietnam War movie with monsters. they are alluded to.) (Kong is far from the only one.) There’s even the One or two groans are a necessary response war-addicted, possibly insane Lt. Col. Preston to an obvious choice or two on the soundtrack of Packard (Samuel L. Jackson), who is quite upset mostly awesome ’70s rock tunes, but that’s not about the whole not-winning-in-Vietnam thing, much to complain about when so much could going full Ahab and fixating on Kong as a “war” have gone badly wrong here. After Peter Jackhe can win. (He might be underestimating the son’s Kong, I would have said that we didn’t need capabilities of his squad.) So while Skull Island another reboot. But I’m glad we got this one. 

Our food doesn’t suck. 1414 N Hamilton St. | Logan/Gonzaga 509-368-9087 | wedonthaveone.com

AIRWAY HEIGHTS

10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444 KONG: SKULL ISLAND

Daily (4:40) 9:40 Sat-Sun (11:40) In 2D Daily (4:00) 6:30 7:10 9:00 Sat-Sun (11:00) (1:30) (2:10) PG-13

LOGAN

R Daily (3:15) (4:00) 6:15 7:00 9:15 9:50 Sat-Sun (10:00) (12:15) (1:00)

THE SHACK

PG-13 Daily (3:30) 6:20 9:00 Sat-Sun (11:50)

BEFORE I FALL

PG-13 Daily (4:50) 7:10 9:20 Sat-Sun (12:15) (2:30)

FIST FIGHT

R Daily (3:20) (5:20) 7:25 9:30 Sat-Sun (1:20)

THE GREAT WALL

PG-13 Daily (5:00) 7:10 9:25 Sat-Sun (12:20) (2:45)

THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE PG Daily (4:50) 7:00 9:15 Sat-Sun (12:30) (2:40)

JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 2 R Daily (4:00) 6:40 9:20 Sat-Sun (1:20)

WANDERMERE

Quality Moving Services for Home and Office Throughout Spokane and the Inland Northwest

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727 KONG: SKULL ISLAND

Daily (4:40) 9:40 Fri-Sun (11:40) In 2D Daily (1:30) (2:10) (4:00) 6:30 7:10 9:00 Fri-Sun (11:00) PG-13

LOGAN

R Daily (12:15) (1:00) (3:15) (4:00) 6:15 7:00 9:15 9:50 Fri-Sun (10:00)

THE SHACK

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (3:30) 6:20 9:00

HG-11890

BEFORE I FALL

PG-13 Daily (12:15) (2:30) (4:50) 7:10 9:20

MOVIE TIMES

GET OUT

R Daily (12:30) (2:40) (5:00) 7:20 9:35

ROCK DOG

PG Daily (11:50) (2:00)

THE GREAT WALL

PG-13 Daily (12:20) (2:45) (5:00) 7:10 9:25

THE LEGO BATMAN MOVIE

on

PG Daily (12:15) (2:30) (4:45) 7:00 9:15

FIFTY SHADES DARKER

SEARCHABLE by Time,

by Theater,

or Movie

Every Theater Every Movie All in one place

R Daily 6:30 9:15

JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 2 R Daily (4:00) 6:50 9:30

A DOG’S PURPOSE

PG Daily (2:10) (4:20)

LA LA LAND SING-A-LONG PG-13 Daily (1:15) 6:40

LA LA LAND

PG-13 Daily (3:50) 9:20

SPLIT

PG-13 Daily (2:00) (4:30) 7:00 9:25

HIDDEN FIGURES

PG Daily (12:30) (3:20) 6:10 8:50

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 3/10/17-3/16/17

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 37


Ham on Regal Players present their 54th annual show:

Sunday

Wednesday

Thursday

2:00pm matinee $7.00

7:30pm $9.00

7:30pm $9.00

March 12

March 15

March 16

Friday

Saturday

7:30pm $9.00

1:30pm matinee $7.00 7:30pm $9.00

March 17

March 18

Ferris Auditorium, 37th & Regal Tickets available at: Round Table Pizza, 2nd Look Books, Rosauers on 29th, The Ferris Business OďŹƒce and from any Ham on Regal Cast Member

hamonregal.org 38 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017


Perfect Harmony The singing sisters of Portland’s Joseph return to Spokane BY BEN SALMON

T

he band Joseph is a literal sister act, the kind that often gets its start at a church, or sitting around the kitchen, or in the back of the station wagon on the road to some vacation destination. The kind rooted in DNA and honed over decades of singing together. But Joseph’s pitch-perfect sibling harmonies didn’t come together quite that naturally. According to Meegan Closner, her older sister Natalie was always the big personality in the household. “Al and I were pretty quiet,” she says in a telephone interview. “Nat was the singer in the family. She’d come home from college and our dad would always be like, ‘Nat, sing us the new songs you’re writing.’ And she’d sing them.” The “Al” Meegan’s talking about is her twin sister

Allison, who jumps in to acknowledge the twins’ secret ambition back then. “Meegan and I would always be in the background,” she says. “We’d harmonize to Nat’s songs, and I think both of us secretly were like, ‘Oh my gosh, maybe someday she’ll ask us to sing with her.’” That day came a few years ago, after Natalie spent some time on the road trying to make a life as a solo singer-songwriter. But something didn’t feel quite right, and though they hadn’t spent a lifetime learning how to blend their voices, Natalie reached out to her sisters. “I had to convince them,” she says. “I had to show them the vision very subtly because I knew that if I said, ‘Hey, you’re gonna spend your life on the road and never being home,’ they wouldn’t have necessarily ...continued on next page

The Closner sisters, known collectively as Joseph. EBRU YILDIZ PHOTO

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 39


MUSIC | FOLK-POP

Joseph’s latest album represents a leap forward for the Portland trio.

EBRU YILDIZ PHOTO

“PERFECT HARMONY,” CONTINUED... been up for that.” She was right. The new trio — named Joseph after their grandfather Jo, who lived in Joseph, Oregon — was a bit wobbly at first. Meegan says now that she had no real aspirations to be a singer, and Allison admits to flaking on some early gigs. But the sisters just “kept saying yes” to opportunities, Allison says, and Joseph quickly steadied itself. The band started writing songs together and building a fanbase by touring regionally, playing house shows and pizza parlors in addition to traditional concert venues. In 2014, they self-released their debut album Native Dreamer Kin, a stark collection of songs that proved the Closners not only could sing, but that they also had a sharp ear for compelling folk-pop melodies. Which is, no doubt, at least one of the reasons that ATO Records came calling. The powerful indie label co-founded by Dave Matthews put out Joseph’s sophomore effort, I’m Alone, No You’re Not, late last summer. Produced by Mike Mogis (Bright Eyes, First Aid Kit), the album is a gigantic leap forward from Native Dreamer Kin. It’s poppier and more percussive, packed with sumptuous arrangements and hi-fi production choices. And the Closners’ songs hold up under the microscope. “Canyon” is a fearless opener, its dramatic chorus set against big, booming drums. The soaring “Planets” highlights the band’s connection to European folk traditions. And “I Don’t Mind” is an elegant song of devotion that finds the sisters squeezing every drop of emotion from their honeyed harmonies. Elsewhere, “Blood & Tears” is slyly funky, a sort of acoustic disco that positions Joseph as the Haim of the verdant Pacific Northwest. “SOS (Overboard)” is slick and soulful roots-dancepop. And “White Flag” is a simmering shout-along anthem with an epic chorus that’s just aching to echo down a street full of resistance marchers. I’m Alone, No You’re Not earned positive reviews and Joseph graduated from playing pizza parlors to theaters and large concert halls in a matter of months. Rather than try to balance real jobs with a burgeoning music career, the sisters decided to commit to Joseph full time. “We have amazing parents who said, ‘Hey, so often people don’t really get to shoot for their dreams because they work a job to pay the rent,’” Allison says. “They offered to let us put all our stuff at their house so we could just go for it.” Just going for it leads this week to Spokane, where Joseph is more than comfortable. Natalie’s husband is from here, and she made strong connections in the local music scene while living in town a year or so ago. “Spokane has given us so much already,” she says. “People have come to the shows with their whole selves. They’ve believed in us from the start, and because of that we consider it one of our hometowns.” n Joseph with Windoe • Wed, March 15 at 8 pm • $18.50 • Allages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory. com • 244-3279

40 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017


MUSIC | SINGER-SONGWRITER

Shelby Earl returns to the Bartlett, armed with a new album and backing band. GENEVIEVE PIERSON PHOTO

Making Herself a Name Seattle’s Shelby Earl expands her sound on a “celebratory” new album BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

S

helby Earl didn’t write her first song until she was 28. She’d always had the desire to be a singer, she says, standing on her bed as a kid and employing a broomstick as an imaginary microphone. But she admits now that the idea of writing and performing her own material was a concept she didn’t immediately grasp. She’s a self-described “late bloomer.” Now 40, the Seattle-based musician recently completed The Man Who Made Himself a Name, her third fulllength album of original material. It’s slated for release on March 10, the same day Earl performs at the Bartlett. Earl was born in Spokane, but she’s spent most of

her life on the other side of the state. She started playing in bands while attending the University of Washington and worked in the recording industry — first as a booker at the Experience Music Project, later in the promotional arm of a Seattle label — before branching out as a solo artist, releasing her first album, Burn the Boats, in 2011. The follow-up record, 2013’s Swift Arrows, put Earl’s affection for Phil Spector-style pop production front and center, though it still prominently featured as many mostly acoustic and mostly autobiographical songs as her debut. “Yeah, that record was venting,” Earl admits. “There

was some anger, there was some cleansing. It’s all there. This new one is much more joyous and celebratory and observant.” Earl says she started work on The Man Who Made Himself a Name two years ago, expecting to write mostly in acoustic ballad mode. But 30 seconds into this new album, it’s apparent that Earl is leading us off in a new direction. That’s not to WEEKEND say that the Shelby Earl C O U N T D OW N of those earlier albums Get the scoop on this has totally vanished; weekend’s events with it’s just that her sonic our newsletter. Sign up at palette is noticeably Inlander.com/newsletter. more expansive and experimental this time. “James” channels the grandeur of Florence and the Machine; “Not Afraid to Die” is buoyed by poppy synthesizers; “The Vapors” slinks along on surfy guitar riffs. “And I’m already writing all these songs for a next project,” Earl says, “which feel really different yet again.” That obvious tonal shift can be partly attributed, Earl says, to the Seattle-based session musicians who played on the record and filled out her songs. They’ll also be backing her during Friday night’s Bartlett show, which marks Earl’s return to Spokane after last performing at Bartfest in 2014. “So many people have said, ‘Whoa, what did you do? What did you change?’” Earl says of this latest batch of songs. “These guys really brought a new thing.” What also separates The Man Who Made Himself a Name from its two predecessors is its narrative point of view. Many of the album’s tracks resemble observant character sketches, particularly the title song, which Earl describes as “a bridge between the earlier record and this new vibe.” Earl sings of a man who’s artistically fulfilled but is otherwise drifting: “His pockets are heavy with keys to the cities / He keeps to remember / The faces he leaves.” Those lyrics refer to Tom Brosseau, a singer-songwriter Earl once toured with — “He literally has the key to his hometown [Grand Forks, North Dakota] in his shirt pocket at all times,” she explains — and others were inspired by people she knows, anecdotes she’s heard, stories she’s simply made up. But just because she’s writing in the third person doesn’t mean she’s not present in the songs. “There’s this idea that someone leaves a lasting mark, whether it’s on the world or another person, or on me. An emotional mark, if you will,” Earl says. “I didn’t really realize it until we got the songs put together.” n Shelby Earl with Planes on Paper • Fri, March 10, at 8 pm • $8/$10 day of • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

GRAND OPENING R ENT 40+ D IFFE N D ED LE B D AN H TEAS PR EM IU M

509.315.4590 • URBVANA.COM 108 N Washington St Suite 100 • Spokane Legion Building • Entrance is on Riverside

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ARENA ROCK JOURNEY

S

omewhere in the world right now, a group of drunk bros is performing an off-key rendition of Journey’s signature power ballad “Don’t Stop Believin’” in a karaoke bar, and the entire place is singing right along. It’s an inevitability. Despite peaking in mainstream popularity somewhere around 1985 (and despite missing its most iconic lead singer since 1998), Journey has had a remarkably long shelf life as a headlining act on the nostalgia circuit. Unlike most long-running rock acts, however, Journey’s current lineup mostly features guys who joined the band’s ranks back in the ’70s. And while Steve Perry is still MIA, frontman Arnel Pineda sounds eerily like him. — NATHAN WEINBENDER

TRAVIS SHINN PHOTO

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 03/9

BEEROCRACY, Open Mic BOLO’S, Inland Empire Blues Society Monthly Blues Boogie BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Randy Campbell acoustic show J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen J CHAPS, Spare Parts COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, PJ Destiny CRAVE, DJ Freaky Fred CRUISERS, Open Mic Jam Slam hosted by Perfect Destruction and J.W. Scattergun FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Kicho J KNITTING FACTORY, Adelitas Way, Letters From The Fire, The Black Moods, Manafest, Alive In Barcelona LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Lucas Brown OBJECT SPACE, Bad Luck, Errant Soundbath, Ellingson THE OBSERVATORY, Vinyl Meltdown POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Pamela Benton THE RESERVE, Liquid with DJ Dave J THE PIN!, He Is Legend, Strange Faces, the Hallows, Wayward West, Ghost Heart TIMBER GASTRO PUB, Ron Greene ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 03/10

219 LOUNGE, Harold’s IGA ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Dan Conrad J J THE BARTLETT, Shelby Earl (see story on page 41), Planes on Paper BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn THE BIG DIPPER, Spring-a-ling feat. The Rub, One Louder, Sweet Rebel D BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Sterling

42 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

METAL RED FANG

Journey and Asia • Thu, March 16 at 7:30 pm • $29.50-$95 • All-ages • Spokane Arena • 720 W. Mallon • spokanearena.com

T

here’s always been something beautifully off about Portland’s Red Fang. The quartet delivers all the crushing riffs any headbanger could want, but they do it with tongue firmly in cheek. They’ve spent the past decade or so touring with hard-rock brethren like Mastodon and the Melvins, and a listen to their most recent album, Only Ghosts, offers proof that Red Fang is anything but metalby-numbers. Working with producer Ross Robinson (the Cure, At the Drive-In), Red Fang created a batch of songs full of hooks appealing to even non-rivetheads. With Aaron Beam and Bryan Giles sharing vocals, the quartet has an expansive sound many metal crews can only dream about, and their comedy-leaning videos are works of art in themselves, adding some genuine laughs between mosh-pit-worthy sonic excursions. — DAN NAILEN

JAMES REXROAD PHOTO

BOLO’S, My Own Worst Enemy BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Crybaby COEUR D’ALENE CASINO (CHINOOK LOUNGE), Kicho COEUR D’ALENE CASINO (NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE),Yesterdayscake CRUISERS, Kosta la Vista CURLEY’S, Chris Rieser and the Nerve FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Ray Vasquez IRON HORSE BAR, The Cronkites JOHN’S ALLEY, Deschamp J KNITTING FACTORY, Datsik: Ninja Nation 2017 Tour feat. Crizzly, Virtual Riot LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil MAX AT MIRABEAU, Steve Livingston and Triple Shot MOOSE LOUNGE, Slow Burn

MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Frank Moore NASHVILLE NORTH, Jeremy McComb, the Luke Jaxon Band NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Patrick NYNE, DJ JG O’SHAYS IRISH PUB & EATERY, Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots PATIT CREEK CELLARS, Ken Davis In Transit PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Brian Jacobs RED LION HOTEL RIVER INN, The Pat Barclay Trio THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler RIVELLE’S RIVER GRILL, Pat Coast

Red Fang with Six State Bender and Snakes/ Sermons • Wed, March 15 at 8 pm • $20 • All-ages • The Pin! • 412 W. Sprague • thepinevents.com • 368-4077

SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT, KOSH J THE PIN!, Sam Lachow, with Dave B THE ROADHOUSE, Atomic Jive TIMBER GASTRO PUB, Son of Brad T’S LOUNGE, Jimmy Nuge, Gary Cook UP NORTH DISTILLERY, Just Plain Darin VICTORY SPORTS HALL, Wyatt Wood ZOLA, Eric Rice Band

Saturday, 03/11

ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Craig Catlett and Truck Mills BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, KYRS Spring Fund Drive Wrap-Up Party feat. Loomer, South Hill, Griffey BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Sterling

BOLO’S, My Own Worst Enemy BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL, Crybaby J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Jon and Rand J CLEARWATER RIVER CASINO, The Spinners COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kicho CRUISERS, Thunderknife, Thunderhound, Rusted Hand, Incidia CURLEY’S, Chris Rieser and the Nerve J DAHMEN BARN, Moses Willey FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Donnie Emerson FLAME & CORK, Ron Greene IRON HORSE BAR, The Cronkites THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave LA ROSA CLUB, Open Jam LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Chuck Dunlop


LITZ’S BAR & GRILL, Keilidh Shillelagh and the ElektroKelts THE LOCAL DELI, Wyatt Wood MAX AT MIRABEAU, Steve Livingston and Triple Shot MOOSE LOUNGE, Slow Burn MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, The Alkis NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, DJ Patrick NYNE, DJ Joey Roxville, Shae Tea Folkin Irish Band, DJ C-Mad THE OBSERVATORY, The Shae Tea Folkin Irish Band J THE PALOMINO, Bluegrass in the City feat. Brown’s Mountain Boys, Lucas Brookbank Brown, No Going Back Band POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Eric Neuhauser RED LION HOTEL RIVER INN, The Pat Barclay Trio THE RESERVE, Pitch-a-Tent Party, feat. December in Red, Death by Pirates, London Get Down, Cobrahawk, Heroes for Ghosts, the Adarna THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler

GET LISTED! Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT, Dimestore Prophets SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Son of Brad J THE PIN!, WRVTH, name, Rot Monger, Infrablaster, Honey Badger THE ROADHOUSE, Bobby Bremer Band THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave ZOLA, Eric Rice Band

Sunday, 03/12

DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open jam NASHVILLE NORTH, Whiskey Myers O’DOHERTY’S, Live Irish Music THE OBSERVATORY, The Dodgy Mountain Men, Matt Mitchell THE PALOMINO, Nogunaso with Rusted Hand, Method of Conflict ZOLA, Whsk&Key

Monday, 03/13

J CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown J THE PIN!, Adlib, L3FTY, SpaceCamp, Treveezy, CCB Crew, Rez 4 Life, Traverse, Savvy Rae ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 03/14

BRAVO SWAXX CONCERT HOUSE, T.A.S.T.Y with DJs Freaky Fred, Beauflexx

THE JACKSON ST., DJ Dave LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Open mic night MIK’S, DJ Brentano J THE OBSERVATORY, Local Pavlov Tape release show with Toner, Blue Smiley THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Open Mic/ Jam Night ZOLA, Dueling Cronkites

Wednesday, 03/15

GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES, Open Mic with Host Travis Goulding J J KNITTING FACTORY, Joseph (see story on page 39), Windoe LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 J THE OBSERVATORY, Dry and Dusty Album Release, with Jenny Anne Mannan and Ripe Mangos RIVELLE’S RIVER GRILL, Jam Night: Truck Mills and guests J J THE PIN!, Red Fang (see facing page), Six State Bender, Snakes/Sermons THE ROADHOUSE, Open mic with Johnny Qlueless THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ Dave ZOLA, Champagne Jam

Coming Up ...

J KNITTING FACTORY, Donavon Frankenreiter, Grant-Lee Phillips, March 16 J THE PIN!, Acid Teeth, the Drag,

Widower, March 16 J NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Chris Botti, March 16 J SPOKANE ARENA, Journey (see facing page) and Asia, March 16 J THE BARTLETT, The Holy Broke, Anna Tivel, Tyler Aker, March 16 J THE BARTLETT, Folkinception, Smackout Pack, March 17 J KNITTING FACTORY, Josh Abbott Band, Robbie Walden Band, March 17 J SPOKANE ARENA, Eric Church, March 17 J THE PIN!, Anomaly feat. Elijah Heaps, Nikolai Rya, Lou Era, Young Easty, March 17 THE PALOMINO, Heroes for Ghosts, Voodoo Death Gun, Killer E’s, March 18 J THE BIG DIPPER, Marshall Poole, Wayward West, Skinny the Kid, March 18 J THE BARTLETT, Lady Lamb, Jan Francisco, March 18 J SPOKANE ARENA, Steven Curtis Chapman, Francesca Battistelli, Rend Collective, March 19 J THE PIN!, Telepathic Station Nine, March 19 J THE BARTLETT, Meat Puppets, the Modern Era, March 20 THE OBSERVATORY, The Coathangers, Birth Defects, Peru Resh, Fun Ladies, March 21 THE PALOMINO, The Iron Maidens, March 22 J THE BARTLETT, Rabbit Wilde, March 22

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BRAVO SWAXX CONCERT HOUSE • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 5359309 DIAMS DEN • 412 W. Sprague • 934-3640 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOTEL RL BY RED LION AT THE PARK • 303 W. North River Dr. • 326-8000 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 THE LARIAT • 11820 N. Market St. • 466-9918 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)-255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-6647901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208765-3200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St. • 242-8907 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RESERVE • 120 N. Wall • 598-8783 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208930-0381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 43


The perfect pairing: music and beer.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

CLASSICAL SIPS AND SOUNDS

You know who loved beer? Beethoven. Know who also loves beer? Most of Spokane, given our amazing craft beer community. That makes the Spokane Symphony’s “Beethoven & Brews” night a natural combo in my book. No-Li is brewing a special beer for a preshow beer garden, and Shameless Sausages will also be on hand serving up brats and the like to sate your preshow hunger. Then the Symphony will deliver a slate of Beethoven’s greatest works, with a side of comedy courtesy of the Blue Door Theatre, to make this anything but the typical night at the Fox. — DAN NAILEN Symphony Special: Beethoven & Brews • Fri, March 10 at 6 (beer garden) and 7:30 pm (music) • $18-$43 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

BEER B-DAY BASH

For those who frequent the neighborhood brewery and food spot, it may surprise you to hear that Perry Street Brewing has already been in business for three years, serving up tasty brews to beer lovers from near and far. Celebrate this milestone all weekend with beer specials, live music, food and a raffle benefiting Grant Elementary’s T.E.A.M. program. The brewery is also hosting a separate “PSB Golden Growler” raffle; one winner will take home the prize offering — a free pint and growler fill every week for a year. Look for more details to come on special beer releases and more on Perry Street’s Facebook page. — TUCKER CLARRY Perry Street Brewing 3rd Anniversary Party • Fri, March 10 from 4-11 pm; Sat, March 11 from 11:30 am-11:30 pm • Perry Street Brewing Co. • 1025 S. Perry • bit.ly/2mQbG8h

44 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

COMMUNITY BEING GREEN

This Saturday, downtown Spokane will be awash in a sea of green, from T-shirts and Mardi Gras beads to beer, as the annual Irish Drinking Team pub crawl takes over the bars the same day as the city’s 39th annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade, the latter of which is organized by the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick nonprofit. Whether you’re looking for a family-friendly option (the parade; find a route map online), or for like-minded, beer-loving party people who may or may not have any Irish heritage connections (and who are ready to start tipping back a few at 7 am, when the crawl starts at nYne Bar), these two community celebrations are sure to each offer a lively and festive atmosphere. — CHEY SCOTT Irish Drinking Team Pub Crawl + St. Patrick’s Day Parade • Sat, March 11; crawl ($20+) starts at 7 am, parade at noon • Downtown Spokane • Details at theirishdrinkingteam.com and friendlysonsofstpatrick.com


GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

BENEFIT HAM IT UP

Now in its 54th year, Ferris High School’s annual Ham on Regal fundraiser gives students a chance to laugh at adults without getting hauled into the principal’s office. Parents and teachers are the creative force behind the show: They write the comic sketches, choreograph the musical numbers, design the sets and play all the roles, and the goal is to look as ridiculous as possible. That shouldn’t be hard to do with this year’s theme, “When Pigs Fly,” which spoofs cable TV and transplants famous Saturday Night Live characters into other popular programs. Proceeds from ticket sales benefit Ferris academic programs and athletics. (Bonus: the Inlander’s own Ted and Anne McGregor are part of the cast this year, so keep your eyes peeled.) — NATHAN WEINBENDER Ham on Regal • Sun, March 12 at 2 pm; Sat, March 18 at 1:30 pm • $7 • Wed-Sat, March 15-18 at 7:30 pm • $9 • Ferris High School • 3020 E. 37th • hamonregal.org

12: NW Premier Promotions, LLC || SHG Show 12V: Events: 12 V: CP

THEATER KIDS’ CLASSIC

Do you remember the book sitting open in your lap when all those letters and words clicked together in your brain and, all of a sudden, you were reading? For generations, that seminal moment may have been thanks to the 1961 classic Go, Dog. Go! by P.D. Eastman, the picture book chronicling the adventures of automobile-savvy pups who zip around via car, scooter and other mobile means. This weekend, Whitworth University students bring the dogs’ story to life in an all-ages show to delight both young and old. This musical retelling of Go, Dog. Go! was originally created for the Seattle Children’s Theatre in 2003 and has since introduced countless young minds to the world of live theater, in addition to the magic of reading. — CHEY SCOTT Whitworth University Presents: Go, Dog. Go! • Fri-Sun: March 10-11 at 6 pm; March 11-12 at 2 pm • $10/ages 2-11; $12/ages 12-18 and 62+; $15/adults • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 45


W I SAW U YOU

RS RS

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU PI’D Eric, with a “C”. Tall. Red coat. Beard. Lovely. Intelligent. Born in Tucson and lived in Colorado Springs. Tell me what smells so good in Ojai. 13finches@gmail. com. RESPONSE TO DEAR NEW ME RESPONSES To Re: Dear New Me: Nope. To writer of Dear Former Me: Glad that helped. A woman told me awhile back her experience with him. She told me about the others he’d been with. So I finally had evidence he couldn’t gaslight his way out of. He had to admit the truth. It feels so good to be free again! It’s also freeing to know this happens to a lot of people, and they bounce back. So that’s my note to everyone who’s been through this. Not those defending them. Take care, and get the support you need. There are trustworthy people. Just take the steps you need to do what’s right for you. RE: DEAR NEW ME ET AL. Spokane, I’ve got my bowl of popcorn. I’m engaged with your show. I have something to say, in my wise-ass retired age as a married woman with experience in these matters, with grown adult children and grandchildren, as a New Yorker, who is very frank. IF someone defends the man, they are making “Dear New Me’s” point for her. That’s just what she was saying was happening. You’re proving her right. Nice. Smooth. I’m thinking that’s not what you wanted to do. Gaslighting is serious. I saw it happen

to one of my daughters. She is one smart woman, independent as hell, just the way we raised her. I’m damn proud of her. It’s not okay assuming the woman is gullible, naive or not a good judge of character, shows little knowledge of gaslighting. It can happen to anyone. It concerns my old ears, that these days, “you need to be more independent and strong and a good judge of character” sounds like it is the new “Your skirt was too short so your were asking for it” which is never okay, not now, not ever. Gaslighting is a psychological assault. The trauma from it takes a good deal of time to recover from. So the last thing I’m going to do as a woman is tell another woman because she had these experiences she’s naive, gullible, or a bad judge of character. I would assume, if anything, she rejected him finding out he was gaslighting. Because people who gaslight keep those they gaslight around for a long time. It’s often linked with narcissism. Narcissistic people are often surrounded by a lot of so-called friends. Those people who are just part of their entourage. Seems like she did help at least one person judging from the Dear Former Me Comment. My heart goes out to all those out there. RE: YOU OBVIOUSLY AREN’T THAT GOOD AT READING PEOPLE “You obviously aren’t that good at reading people / are really naive / or really gullible.” That’s the kind of thing users and cruel people say to cover their tracks. Save it, mate. A user lecturing anyone about love, independence, friendship, or being “strong” is comedy gold. Sounds to me like she rejected him after figuring out his bs and she now knows there are much better fish in the sea. Good for her. ROCKING HORSE BEAUTY I saw you standing at the top of the stairs, beautiful in all white, your auburn curls framing your smile. Breathless, with my heart pounding, not nervous so much as knowing. Knowing I was the luckiest man in the world. Knowing my life was going to be better forever. Knowing I didn’t deserve you. Yet, there you were walking down the stairs of the Rocking Horse Inn to join me in this crazy adventure. That was 13 years ago. I still don’t deserve you. I’m still the luckiest man alive. And you still make my heart pound, breathless. Happy Anniversary my Love! I’m so grateful we’re on this crazy

adventure together, and I can’t wait to see where the rest of life takes us!

CHEERS AUTO REPAIR SUPERHERO Thank you to Rob at Rob’s Automotive Repair & Exhaust for being a true hero in the auto repair industry. Car repairs are never convenient

vehicles in these areas, but the bigger problem is many of these new 2 hour parking meters are in terrible neighborhoods with terrible or no alley lighting, and a lot of homeless and street people milling about. I don’t appreciate having to move my car every two hours, or plugging a meter every two hours next to a pile of homeless waste. I don’t get out of work until 5:30, after dark. Our employer sent

Good vibes all around that place. If you see a karma rainbow in the sky, it will probably be over that shop.

and always too expensive. I took my car to Rob’s last week for a second opinion. I left with a fixed car at 1/2 the cost of my first bid, honesty about what really needed fixing, and relief that I wasn’t being taken advantage of because I’m female. Good vibes all around that place. If you see a karma rainbow in the sky, it will probably be over that shop. Thank you sincerely from a grateful customer. WHY I BUY LOCAL Big time cheers to Ziggy’s in north Spokane. Upon ordering a replacement window and screen, and having subsequent order delayed due to an error, I was an unhappy customer and made them aware of such. Two employees in particular, both named Dan, proceeded to go way above and beyond to fix the issue and earn my absolute praise and satisfaction. I have been giving my business to Ziggy’s since the ‘80s and will continue to do so in the future. The professionalism and service I can always count on is the reason I choose to “shop local” at Ziggy’s instead of the other, bigger building supply chains. Also, a side-note cheers to River City Windows for supplying me with the snap bead necessary to finish the job at “no cost”. These two businesses rock and deserve your patronage. CRANKIN’ GOOD JOB Cheers to local company Sounds on Wheels for doing

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

46 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

everything right! I had been contemplating having some things added to my car, wasn’t excited about going through “the hassle”. Walked into Sounds on Wheels, told them exactly what I needed; keyless entry, trunk popper, new head unit. They didn’t try and upsell me, they quoted me the price I ended up paying, the next day I dropped the car off at 11:30 and it was done by 3. Everything works beautifully.

They even ejected the c.d. out of my old player and left it in the new one so it would not be lost forever. Great job guys! I will be back..

JEERS TOWNHALL MEETING Michael Baumgartner’s town hall meeting was attended by around 50 citizens many of whom wanted to ask questions. It is unfortunate that two women monopolized the event. One a teacher from Cheney who represented the union and the other who felt anyone owning a house with a market value of $28,000 should pay 7% capitol gains should they try and sell... need I say more. Neither wished to surrender the ‘stage’. Their pontificating ignored others wishing to ask a question of their representative. Ladies, I came to hear my representative not you. You may speak but not monopolize that is respectful. CITY MONEY GRABBING AGAIN Jeers to the City of Spokane for even more money grabbing by changing many parking meters outside of the downtown retail core to 2 hour parking to appease your big tax payer businesses (some of these 2 hr. meters aren’t even on the SAME BLOCK as these businesses which is non-sensical). Your meter maids really love targeting

out emails to the female staff telling us we had to start parking in Diamond Lots, and then use the buddy-system to walk out to our cars at night. Thank you so much City of Spokane for putting your citizens in harm’s way so that your big cat businesses will be happy with 2 hr parking meters that aren’t even on the same block as the business and are mostly used by folks who have to work in these NON-RETAIL areas. We’re not shopping. We’re working. We’re in meetings. We’re in crappy Spokane neighborhoods because of gentrification and are now being forced to find male escorts or buddies to walk us to our vehicles several blocks away in the dark. It’s wrong. It’s irresponsible. And it shows the commitment the City of Spokane has to the safety of its citizens. 

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS S O R G H U M

G O P F F T

R O A N O K E

E R O D E R

T H R O W R U G O S P R E Y

A S E C C I G P E N N O R G O D U S G A

N O S H O W

A L P I N E

O A R U E T O O L A E I G L

D I N E D P A L E A R S C A I A N S T E A K I R S A L A N A K E I P E N S G I T N G S S E L A R E

E N I D G E M F A A M I E V E H R A O D S I E T

F A D E I N

S H O R T I

E L I C I T S

S K E T C H Y

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

DINE OUT TO FEED SPOKANE As part of March’s National Nutrition Month, the Greater Spokane Dietetic Association helps to raise operating funds for the local nonprofit food rescue agency. A percentage of your meal at participating restaurants is donated to Feed Spokane to help fight hunger in our area. (See link for restaurant list.) Donations collected from March 1-31. feedspokane.com (324-2939) PINTS FOR PUPPIES Proceeds from a raffle and a portion of growler sales during the event support the efforts of local animal rescue nonprofit Rescue4All. March 9, 6-9 pm. Steady Flow Growler House, 328 N. Sullivan Rd., Ste. 8. bit.ly/2mfHOVF (509-598-8297) RYPIEN FOUNDATION WINEMAKERS’ DINNER The five-course gourmet dinner paired with Washington wines also includes silent/live auctions, with all proceeds supporting the Foundation’s work to aid families battling childhood cancer. March 11, 5:30 pm. Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. rypienfoundation.org (509-242-7000) WILD REFUGE FUNDRAISER DINNER & AUCTION Since 1997, Friends of Turnbull has been a major sponsor of the environmental education program, outreach activities, habitat restoration and other projects at Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge. March 11, 5:30 pm. $45. Wren Pierson Community Center, 615 Fourth St, Cheney. fotnwr.org THE FIG TREE BENEFIT BREAKFAST “Beyond the News: Creating Communi-

ty” is this year’s theme, with a speaker line-up of local community leaders, including Dia Maurer, Rusty Nelson, Dean Lynch and Freda Gandy. In the Cataldo Hall Globe Room. March 15, 7:30-8:30 am. Free; donations accepted. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone. (535-1813)

COMEDY

GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open mic comedy night hosted by Casey Strain; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (847-1234) JOSH WOLF See the bestselling author, TV writer and standup performer. March 9-11 at 8 pm, March 11 at 10:30 pm. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com CRIME SHOW The BDT Players offer a comedic take on TV’s staple “whodun-it.” Rated for general audiences. Fridays, at 8 pm, through March 24. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) IMPROV AUDITIONS Try out for Spokane’s newest improv comedy event. Monthly shows are to be held at Stage Left Theater starting April 27. Auditions at Red Mammoth Studio, 2214 E. Riverside. March 11, 2-5 pm. Free. (714-0307) MICROBIOGRAPHY V Entrepreneurs Annie Grieve (Salon Illuminate) and Mark Camp (The Cracker Bldg. and Overbluff Cellars) tell stories from their real lives, then the Freedom Association (Mara Baldwin, Mark Robbins, Pat Thomas) improvise scenes inspired by the stories. Ages 17+. March 11, 8 pm. $12. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague. bit.

ly/2lkYhUV SAFARI The Blue Door’s fast-paced, short-form improv show relies on audience suggestions to fuel each scene. Rated for mature audiences. Saturdays at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com JOHNNY BEEHNER With a background in improvisational theater including training at Chicago’s Second City, and LA’s Upright Citizens Brigade, Johnny brings his unique style to the stage. March 12, 8 pm. $10-$16. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub-com (318-9998) OPEN MIC XL Live comedy, Tuesdays at 9 pm. The Observatory, 15 S. Howard. observatoryspokane.com (598-8933) SPOKANE COMEDY MIXTAPE LIVE RECORDING Spokomedy hosts this live recording event, featuring performances by Tony Russell, Deece Casillas, Phillip Kopczynski, Jessica Watson, Lucas Prahm and others. March 15, 8 pm. $10. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague Ave. thebartlettspokane.com

COMMUNITY

MAMMOTHS & MASTODONS: TITANS OF THE ICE AGE The highly-interactive touring exhibit from the Field Museum in Chicago features hands-on activities, hundreds of fossil specimens from around the world, full-size models of Ice Age megafauna, and more. Through May 7; open Tue-Sat, 10 am-5 pm (to 8 pm on Wed; half-price on Tue). $10-$15. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org

Senior Empowerment Community Fair Wed., March 15 10:00am - 2:00pm 3202 E. 44th Ave Community Building Spokane, WA 99223 Seniors 55+ in Spokane are welcome to attend this FREE event • 27 Community Service Vendor Booths • 2nd Harvest Food Distribution • FREE Information and Gifts • Door Prizes • Black-Out BINGO for Grand Prize Drawing

st uide thwest a f k rea hour g Nor b , i n i n g h a p p y I n l a n d th ! d A and or the 5 2 f l pri A s d n a t on s

Guide Happy Hour A Dining & nd Northwest For The Inla

FREE | 2016 SUPPLEME

Edition

Ribeye Steak

S , PASTA & SPIRIT CHINOOK STEAK d'Alene Casino at the Coeur

INLANDER NT TO THE 4/14/16

dd 1

U_CNTS_2016.in

THEMEN

1:19 PM

Reserve your space by March 31st advertising@inlander.com MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 47


Attorney General Jeff Sessions is no fan of cannabis, but will he actually do something?

Dazed and Confused Trickle-down fearmongering unsettles the states BY CONNOR DINNISON

H

B 1937. HB 1212. HB 2021. HB 1099. HB 1416. EHB 1857. SB 5264. SB 5284. SSB 5284. The list goes on. Dozens of cannabis-concerned House and Senate bills in various states of consideration and passage have been introduced by Washington state legislators on both sides of the aisle so far this year. With subtitles like “Con-

cerning buffer zones with respect to siting state-licensed marijuana businesses and entities near reservations of federally recognized tribes” and “Concerning inspections of licensed marijuana processors’ equipment and facilities,” it’s clear the government is working to massage local marijuana laws into a sustainable and regulated system, not write them out of existence.

SPECIALS

Follow the rainbow to your favorite Pot of Gold. We have options you’ll love!

Welcome to the Top!

apexcannabis.com

Warning: This product has intoxicating effects & may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, & judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults 21 years & older. Keep out of reach of children.

48 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

But that’s exactly what Attorney General Jeff Sessions is now threatening to do at the federal level. As White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer said in late February, referring to the legalization movement in states across the country, “the last thing we should be doing is encouraging people.” When asked about cannabis’ illicit status as a Schedule I controlled substance, he dropped the bombshell revelation that has since sent states into a tizzy: “There is still a federal law that we need to abide by […] I do believe you’ll see greater enforcement of it.” Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson and Governor Jay Inslee quickly fired back in a letter to Sessions, citing “significant initial success” in designing and implementing a “rigorous regulatory” system. Oregon lawmakers have even proposed a law requiring marijuana businesses to destroy their customers’ personal information, often stored on computers for future marketing purposes, within 48 hours should the Department of Justice make them criminals with the stroke of a pen. But the asterisk accompanying the potential crackdown reveals a distinction in the new administration between medical and recreational marijuana. Last week Spicer acknowledged “a specific carve-out … for medical marijuana.” More than half of the states have legalized it, and even Sessions, who High Times has dubbed “truthchallenged,” is most concerned about recreational cannabis “being sold at every corner grocery store.” The twist in states like Washington and Colorado is that the two markets are essentially integrated as one (Washington’s were folded together last July to snuff out a “gray market” of unlicensed dispensaries), which should only confuse matters further if DEA agents suddenly decide to darken the doorways of area businesses. John Hudak of the Brookings Institution told Bloomberg, “There are dramatic regulatory differences [between medical and recreational marijuana markets] from state to state. The comments from [Spicer’s] podium were overly simplistic.” Far from crying uncle, states are insisting on their right to govern with the “reserved powers” afforded them by the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. But given the new climate of uncertainty, even political leaders in Olympia are starting to hedge their bets. As Ferguson and Inslee admit in their letter, “If our approach is successful, other states and the federal government may choose to emulate it. If it proves a failure, despite current good signs, our state may retreat.” n

$

5

$

starting at

13 & $20

13

$

2 grams $ all indoor bud

greenhand 509.919.3470 • 9am-10pm EVERYDAY 2424 N. Monroe St • Spokane WA

15

Infused Pre Roll

10

$

EDIBLES

10% off

15% off 5 off

$

full gm

Warning: This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.


$ $

15 eighths

20 oil grams

$

55 half ozs

605 E. Francis

HOURS: MON-SAT 8-9 SUN 9-9 WARNING: This product has intoxicating affects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

SUNDAY SPECIAL

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE 2 GRAMS FOR $20

HALF GRAM OILS 10

$

IN-DA-COUCH SUNDAY!

FULL GRAM OIL

ALL INDICA STRAINS ON SALE!

20

9107 N. COUNTRY HOMES BLVD

CARTS

MON - SAT: 9A - 10P SUN: 9A - 9P

$

STARTING AT 21 FOR HALF & $ 35 FOR A FULL

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product.For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

$

EDIBLES

STARTING AT $3.50

FLOWER

AS LOW AS $ 6 FOR A GRAM & $ 28 FOR AN EIGHTH *WHILE SUPPLIES LAST*

TreehouseClub_OneStopShop_030917_6H_AA.tif

NEW LOWER PRICES

ON ALL OF SPOKANE’S

FAVORITE PRODUCTS

SUN 10A-9P MON - THUR 9A-11P FRI & SAT 9A-12A TOKERFRIENDLYSPOKANE.COM

1515 S. LYONS RD AIRWAY HEIGHTS

(509) 244-8728 Warning: This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

10309 E Trent Ave.

SPOKANE VALLEY, WA GREENLIGHTSPOKANE.COM

509.309.3193

WARNING: This product has intoxicating affects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 49


GREEN ZONE

for our Sign up rogram Loyalty Pe up to Sav ! to 15%

Check in D for Spec aily ials!

NOW OPEN

2829 N Market I corner of Market and Cleveland I 315.8223 HOURS: 9:00 am until 10:00pm I 7 days a week

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children

MaryJanes_NowOpen_030917_3H_MB.pdf REAC

1 8 6 ,0

H

00 *

EAST WA S H E R N ING READ TON ERS

CALL 325-0634 xt. 215 EMAIL sales@Inlander.com

BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

*2016 Media Audit

RoyalsCannabis_MakeEveryDayDOPE_030917_3H_GG_NEW.pdf Now open at 9a m

You’ll always hit the jackpot !

20% OFF EDIBLES 509-309-2130 1919 E Francis Ave

THEGREENNUGGET

Warning: This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

50 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017


EVENTS | CALENDAR

$12 TOP SHELF EVERYDAY

ALL FLOWER $ 10 OR LESS ON TUESDAYS Best Prices In Town

213 E Sprague Ave • Spokane, WA • 509.315.9262 OFFERS AVAILABLE WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

Open until 11 Every night, Midnight on Friday and Saturday Nights.

thevaultcannabis.com This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with the consumption of this product. For use only by adults 21 and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

Marijuana use increases the risk of lower grades and dropping out of school. Talk with your kids. GET THE FACTS at

learnaboutmarijuanawa.org

PJALS POSTCARD HAPPY HOUR An opportunity for the public to communicate a short message to Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers and Senators Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell. Post cards are then delivered to these elected officials. On the second Thursday of the month (March 9), from 4:30-6:30 pm. Saranac Commons, 19 W. Main. (838-7870) HGTV DESIGN STAR JENNIFER BERTRAND The Spokane Home Builders Association welcomes HGTV Design Star Jennifer Bertrand as the featured speaker at the Spokane Home & Garden Show. Jennifer presents on March 10 and 11. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanehomeshows.com SPRING HAS SPRUNG BARN SALE Find rocking chairs, desks, vanities, dressers, home decor of all types, signs, primitives, linens and more. March 1011, from 10 am to 4 pm. Free admission. Past Blessings Farm, 8521 N. Orchard Prairie. pastblessingsfarm.com 3RD DISTRICT LEGISLATORS TOWN HALL An opportunity to speak in person with WA 3rd District legislators Sen. Andy Billig, Rep. Timm Ormsby and Rep. Marcus Riccelli about issues important to Spokane and your community. March 11, 9:30-11:30 am. Free. Washington Cracker Co. Building, 304 W. Pacific. (360-786-7535) RASPBERRY PI RACE CAR HACKATHON Team up with a pro to build a racecar fueled by Raspberry Pi, a credit card-sized computer. Show off your invention at Pi Day on March 14, and race it against other teams’ cars. March 11, 10 am-noon. $10. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org SEED SWAP Participants can bring seeds to swap and take home new varieties, learn about seed saving, and learn about the seed-sharing program at the library, truetoseedcda.org. You don’t need seeds to swap to participate. (Event rescheduled from Feb. 4.) March 11, 1 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. inwfoodnetwork.org/seed-swap (208-769-2315) SPOKANE ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE The 39th annual community parade, organized by the nonprofit Friendly Sons of St. Patrick. Route through downtown Spokane. March 11, noon. Free. Downtown Spokane. friendlysonsofstpatrick.com SENSING THE WORLD WITH ARDUINOS Learning how sensors connect the Arduino circuit board to the outside world in this session about using using Arduino power to bring your projects to life. Meets Mondays, March 13-April 3, from 6-8:30 pm. $50/$47.50. Gizmocda, 806 N. Fourth St. gizmo-cda.org PI DAY Celebrate the never-ending number of Pi with a recitation contest, pie making contest, free pizza, games and Raspberry Pi demos. March 14, 5-7 pm. Free. Gizmo-cda, 806 N. Fourth St. gizmo-cda.org (208-651-6200) PI{E} DAY A celebration of the most exciting number: Pi. Enter a pie-making contest, or generously volunteer your pie-tasting services. Compete in a Pi recitation war and cheer on the Indie 3.14 race featuring Raspberry Pi-fueled race cars. March 14, 7-9 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkcentral.org (279-0299) CAREER & TECHNICAL EDUCATION LADIES NIGHT North Idaho College invites women to learn more about career opportunities in traditionally male-

dominated fields during an event at the Parker Technical Education Center (7064 W. Lancaster Rd.). March 15, 7:30 pm. Free. (208-769-3448) NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LIVE: POINT OF NO RETURN Mountaineer Hilaree O’Neill shares her story of leading a team of elite climbers on a grueling attempt to climb a remote peak in Myanmar. March 15, 7 pm. $29.50-$39.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. wcebroadway.com SENIOR EMPOWERMENT COMMUNITY FAIR Seniors 55+ are invited to visit 27 community service vendor booths, pick up food from Second Harvest, enter to win prizes and more. March 15, 10 am-2 pm. Free. Clare View Seniors, 3202 E. 44th Ave. spokanehousingventures.org (252-6500) SPOKANE CONTRA DANCE Spokane Folklore Society’s weekly dance, with the Jam Band playing and caller Nora Scott. No experience needed for this community dance. Beginner workshop at 7:15 pm. March 15, 7:30-9:30 pm. $5/$7. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. womansclubspokane.org WOMEN LEAD SPOKANE The one-day conference is designed to educate and empower women both personally and professionally through interactive presentations, skill-building workshops and networking. March 15, 8 am-3 pm. $149. Gonzaga University Hemmingson Center, 702 E. Desmet. bit.ly/2mc0QdJ

FILM

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA An uncle is obliged to return home to care for his nephew after his brother dies. Unknowing he is to be the guardian and struggles with the decision. March 10-12, times vary. $6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. Kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) WATER RESOURCE ASSOCIATION FILM FEST The student group screens two films about water issues in recognition of World Water Day. In the Lair Auditorium, Bldg. 6. March 10, 2:30-7:45 pm. Free. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene. (533-7000) GET ON THE BUS FOR FILM DAY Hop on a bus for a ride to Olympia to rally with other local film industry supporters for the Washington Filmworks Legislative Day. March 13, bus departs at 2 am, and will return that night. Sign up at spokanefilmproject.com DISABILITY AWARENESS FILM FEST The festival hosts screenings of a different film each month, see website for titles and descriptions. March 15 and April 19, at noon. Free. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. bit. ly/1SiBHKi (208-665-4520)

FOOD & DRINK

PURPLE EGYPTIAN BARLEY PROJECT The weekly series showcases a collaboration between Palouse Pint, Palouse Heritage grain farm, Bellwether and Culture Bread, highlighting beers and breads made from the landrace grain known as Egyptian Purple Barley. Thursdays, through April 7 (check Bellwether FB for start times each week). Free admission. Bellwether Brewing Co., 2019 N. Monroe. facebook.com/ bellwetherbrewing/ (280-8345) PERRY STREET BREWING 3RD ANNIVERSARY The brewery celebrates three years in business with special releases, live music, raffles and more. March 10,

4-11 pm and March 11, 11:30 am-11:30 pm. Perry Street Brewing, 1025 S. Perry St. bit.ly/2mQbG8h (279-2820) SPOKANE-NISHINOMIYA SISTER CITY SOCIETY DINNER The annual dinner offers traditional Japanese food and talks by last year’s Spokane-based exchange students about their home stay experiences in Japan. March 10, 5:30-8:30 pm. $20. Mukogawa Institute, 4000 W. Randolph Rd. bit. ly/2lvuBY5 (509-487-1080) IRISH DRINKING TEAM PUB CRAWL Join the Irish Drinking Team on St. Patty’s Parade Day for its 12th annual all-day pub crawl filled with prizes, giveaways, and shenanigans. March 11, 7-1 am. $20-$30. nYne, 232 W. Sprague Ave. theirishdrinkingteam.com ST. PATRICK’S DAY PUB CRAWL (CDA) The inaugural “Pint O’ Gold” pub crawl begins after the parade inside the Resort Plaza Shops, and includes live music and entertainment. March 11, 4:30-11 pm. $15. Downtown Coeur d’Alene. (208-415-0116) PI DAY POP UP Batch Bakeshop (now only open for classes and special events) teams up with Annie’s Artisan Creamery for a special pop-up shop celebrating Pi Day, offering pie, ice cream, tarts, coffee and tea. March 14, 12-4 pm. Batch Bakeshop, 2023 W. Dean. batch-bakeshop.com (413-3759) CRIMSON WINE GROUP DINNER A six course dinner by Chef Travis Dickinson, paired with eight wines from the Western U.S. March 15, 6:30 pm. $95. Clover, 913 E. Sharp Ave. cloverspokane.com COOKING FOR KIDS: MARCH MADNESS Join the Kitchen at Second Harvest for St. Patrick’s Day fun. Start by making two lucky loaves of Leprechaun bread, and end by blending up a Shamrock Shake on the smoothie bike. March 16, 4-5:30 pm and March 18, 12-2 pm. $20. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. secondharvestkitchen.org

MUSIC

SPOKANE SYMPHONY: BEETHOVEN & BREWS A concert highlighting the composer’s hits, with a special $3 beer from No-Li, including the “Beethoven Golden Ale.” Program includes comedy by the Blue Door Theatre and the Spokane Civic Theatre’s Lenny Bart as Beethoven. March 10, 6 pm. $13.50-$43. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org WE SING TO CELEBRATE A concert celebrating the 30th season of the Spokane Area Youth Choirs. March 10, 7-8 pm. $6-$10. Westminster Congregational UCC, 411 S. Washington. (6247992) SFCC MUSIC CONCERT SERIES The winter quarter music series features the orchestra + world drumming (March 13), the choir (March 14) and the jazz ensemble (March 15). $2-$5. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3720) NIC WINTER CHORAL CONCERT Featuring the North Idaho College Cardinal Chorale and Chamber Singers. March 14, 7:30-9:30 pm. Free. Schuler Performing Arts Center at NIC, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu/events (208-769-7764) LINEAGE Join the ladies of Le Donne Choir for an evening of uplifting choral music. March 15, 7-8 pm. Free. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 5720 S. Perry St. (624-7992)

MARCH 9, 2017 INLANDER 51


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess BORN JESTERDAY

I’m a 27-year-old guy, and I’m not very funny. I know women like a guy with a sense of humor, so I was interested in these “Flirt Cards” with funny messages that I saw on Kickstarter. You write your number on the back and give the card to a woman you’d like to meet. Good idea or bad for breaking the ice? —Single Dude Using a pre-printed card to hit on the ladies makes a powerful statement: “I’m looking for a kind woman to nurse me back to masculinity.” Asking a woman out isn’t just a way to get a date; it’s a form of display. Consider that women look for men to show courage. (The courage to unwrap a pack of cards doesn’t count.) And mutely handing a woman some other guy’s humor on a card is actually worse than using no humor at all — save for extenuating circumstances, like if it were the Middle Ages and you’d had your tongue cut out for unseemly behavior with the earl’s livestock (again). Consider evolutionary psychologist Geoffrey Miller’s “mating mind” hypothesis — the notion that “our minds evolved not just as survival machines, but as courtship machines.” Miller explains that the mind acts as a “fitness indicator” — a sort of advertising agency for a person’s genetic quality (among other things). Humor is a reliable (hard-to-fake) sign of genetic quality — reflecting high intelligence, creative problem-solving ability, and a lack of mutations that would handicap brain function. But it isn’t just any old humor that women find attractive. Any guy can memorize a joke. Accordingly, in a study of the pickup lines men use on women, psychologists Christopher Bale and Rory Morrison “distinguish wit (spontaneous jokes that fit the context exactly, are genuinely funny, and require intelligence) from mere humor (the pre-planned jokes and one-liners which … do not demonstrate intelligence).” Anthropologist Gil Greengross, who studies humor and laughter from an evolutionary perspective, suggests that even a guy who’s lame at humor should at least take a run at being funny: “The risk of not even trying to make women laugh may result in losing a mating opportunity.” I disagree -- though only in part. If you’re unfunny, trying to force the funny is like bragging, “Hey! I’m low in social intelligence!” However, you shouldn’t let being unfunny stop you from hitting on a woman. What you can do is be spontaneously and courageously genuine. Just put yourself out there and say hello to her and acknowledge and even laugh at any awkwardness on your part. This isn’t to say you should give up entirely on using pre-printed notes. Save them for special occasions — those when your message to a woman is something like “Stay calm and put all the money in the bag.”

AMY ALKON

MEET JOE BLACKLIST

My girlfriend’s father is a famous actor, and I’m on my way up. I worry that if things go wrong in our relationship, he could put a big kibosh on my career. I guess because of this, I find myself putting up with more stuff than I might normally. I wonder whether our relationship will suffer because of my secret worries about her dad. —Marked Man There’s doing the right thing, and then there’s doing the right thing for the right reasons. Ideally, you refrain from shoplifting because it’s wrong to steal, not because they show videos of shoplifters on the news sometimes and your nose always looks so big on security camera footage. It turns out that there are two fundamental motivations for all life-forms — from microbes to men. They are “approach” (going toward good, helpful, survival-promoting things) and “avoidance” (moving away from bad, dangerous, deadly things). Research by social psychologist Shelly Gable suggests that romantic relationships are happier when they’re driven by approach rather than avoidance motives. So, say your girlfriend asks that you put food-encrusted plates in the dishwasher instead of leaving them out for the archeologists to find. An approach motivation means doing as she asks because you’re striving for a positive outcome — like making her feel loved — instead of trying to avoid a negative one, like having your fate in showbiz patterned after that first guy in a horror movie who gets curious about the weird growling in the basement. The research suggests that you can happy up your relationship by reframing why you do things — shifting to an “I just wanna make her happy” motivation. To do that, set aside your career fears and just try to be fair — to both of you. The relationship may fizzle out. Even so, if you don’t do anything horrible to Daddy’s little girl, there’ll be no reason for him to see to it that you look back on a lifetime of iconic roles — like “White Guy With Umbrella” and “Bystander #5.” n ©2017, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

52 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

EVENTS | CALENDAR

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

KICKING & SCREAMING WATCH PARTY The Boy Scouts Of America Inland Northwest Council host a viewing party with reality show contestant Terry L. Fossum, of Spokane. Thursdays, from 9-10 pm, through May 4. Max at Mirabeau, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. (924-9000) PROVING GROUNDS Amateur mixed martial arts fighters from all over the Northwest come to compete. March 10, 7-11 pm. $20/$30. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo. warriorcampfitness. com/events (754-444-CAGE) SPOKANE CHIEFS The final regular season matches are set for March 10, 11, 15 and 18, and the puck drops at 7:05 pm. $10-$23. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanearena.com (279-7000) CABELA’S GREAT OUTDOOR DAYS Join Cabela’s for doorbusters, food, events and more. March 11-12. Free. Cabela’s, 101 N. Cabela Way. cabelas.com/ postfalls (208-777-6326) CABIN FEVER GARDENING SYMPOSIUM A day-long gardening symposium offering CE credits, workshops on garden design, soil biology and more. Hosted by the Master Gardener Foundation of Spokane County. March 11, 8:30 am-4 pm. $75. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. mgfsc.org (509-688-0300) JAM 4 CANS Come watch or grab your boards and compete for the chance to win $500 for first place. The event supports local food banks; entry is 10 cans per rider; helmets required. March 11, 6:30-8 pm. Free. Summit Northwest Ministries, 1486 W. Seltice Way. summitnorthwest.org/events/ (995-7232)

THEATER

AVENUE Q This award-winning, laughout-loud musical tells the timeless story of a recent college grad who moves into a shabby New York apartment all the way out on Avenue Q. Through March 11; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm; March 9 at 2 pm. $10. EWU Cheney, 526 Fifth. (359-6390) THE MISANTHROPE This 17th Century verse comedy explores human relationships and the hypocrisy of the aristocracy. Through March 12; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Spartan Theater at SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3592) NT LIVE: SAINT JOAN Gemma Arterton is Joan of Arc in this production broadcast live from the Donmar Warehouse. Bernard Shaw’s classic play follows the life and trial of a young country girl who declares a bloody mission to drive the English from France. March 9, 7 pm. $12. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) ONE ACT PLAY FEST The first ever event showcases short plays written by members of the community. Through March 11; Thu-Sat at 7 pm; also Sat at 2 pm. $12. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway. (342-2055) PARALLEL LIVES The audience is whisked through the outrageous universe of men and women struggling through the common rituals of modern life. Through March 12; Thu-Fri, 7:30 pm and Sun, 2 pm. $21-27. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. lakecityplayhouse.org (208-676-7529)

EMMA Historian/playwright Howard Zinn dramatized the life of Emma Goldman, the anarchist, feminist, and freespirited thinker who was exiled from the US because of her outspoken views. Through March 19; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org ESCANABA IN DA MOONLIGHT A tale of humor, horror and heart as the leading character goes to any lengths to remove himself from the wrong end of the family record book. Through March 19; Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $13-$15. Sixth Street Theater, 212 Sixth St. sixthstreetmelodrama.com (208-752-8871) LIVING THROUGH THE FIRE Coeur d’Alene Summer Theatre’s “CST on the Road” program brings art and education to elementary schools in the Northwest, with professional actors performing the musical about the Big Burn of 1910. March 10-11, at 7 pm. $20. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. cdasummertheatre.com ONCE UPON A MATTRESS A rollicking spin on the familiar classic of royal courtship and comeuppance. March 10-18; Thu-Sat at 7 pm; also March 18 at 3 pm. $15. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801) SCOTLAND ROAD A young woman in 19th Century attire is found floating on an iceberg in the Atlantic. Upon rescue, the only word she says is “Titanic.” March 10-26; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $12-$15. Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway. (795-0004) GO, DOG. GO! An adaptation of the beloved children’s book by PD Eastman. March 10, 6 pm; March 11, 2 and 6 pm; March 12, 2 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com HAM ON REGAL The 54th annual variety show/revue features 250 parents of Ferris students performing in “When Pigs Fly.” March 12, at 2 pm; March 15-18 at 7:30 pm; March 18 at 1:30 pm. $7-$9. Ferris High School, 3020 E. 37th Ave. hamonregal.org

VISUAL ARTS

ARTIST TALK: SAM WHITE The local artist presents on the Hotel RL Living Stage. March 10, 7 pm. Free. Hotel RL by Red Lion at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. redlion.com/park-spokane CHRIS BIVINS & SHELLE LINDHOLM The gallery welcomes mixed media artist Chris Bivins and encaustic artist Shelle Lindholm, both showing for the first time at the gallery this month. March 10-April 8; opening reception March 10, 5-8 pm; artist talk/demo March 11, 1 pm. Gallery open Tue-Sat, 11 am-6 pm. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com ZENTANGLE WITH KATIE FREY An easy-to-learn, relaxing and meditative workshop, using simple shapes combined with organic and geometric designs. March 11, 3-5 pm. $10 cash. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (509-838-0206) ARTIST TALK: DENNY CARMAN The local artist gives a demonstration on the Hotel RL Living Stage. March 15, 6 pm. Hotel RL by Red Lion at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. (509-326-8000) DAN MCCANN: A LOOK BACK A solo exhibition by the mixed media artist. March 16-April 27; open Mon-Fri, 9 am-5 pm (closed during spring break, March 27-31). Reception March 15, at

noon. EWU Gallery of Art, 140 Art Building, Cheney campus. (359-2494)

WORDS

EWU VISTING WRITER SERIES: MEGAN KRUSE The Olympia-based author’s debut novel “Call Me Home,” was released from Hawthorne Books in March 2015. March 9, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (509-838-0206) HOLOCAUST SURVIVOR SPEECH Dr. Jacob Eisenbach is a 93 year old holocaust survivor from Poland who emigrated to the U.S. in 1950; hear him talk about his life while in the grip of Hitler’s Third Reich for 5 years, and how hatred, discrimination and intolerance led directly to the Jewish holocaust. March 9, 7-9 pm. $15; $500/VIP. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (990-7878) TAPROOT SPEAKER SERIES: JERRY WHITE Jerry White tells the story of how he came to be Spokane’s Riverkeeper, dedicated to keeping the Spokane River heathy and clean. March 9, 7-9 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org QUEER POETRY FUNDRAISER Proceeds will help send Spokane poet Fitz, known by many as the host of Neato Burrito’s Broken Mic, to the Women of the World Poetry Slam. Also features readings by Charlie Milo and Jaclyn Archer. March 9, 8 pm. $5. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague. thebartlettspokane.com DIANE RAPTOSH POETRY WORKSHOP A three-day session with the Idaho poet on how to find poems in the news. March 10-12; Fri 5-8 pm, Sat 10 am-4 pm, Sun 10 am-1 pm. $50. Lost Horse Press, 105 Lost Horse Ln. osthorsepress.org (208-255-4410) AUTHOR KATE POITEVIN The Spokane author talks about her YA fantasy “Saving Tir Gaeltacht: The Unexpected Summer Adventure” and signs copies of her book. March 11, 12-1 pm. Free. Little Dog Art Gallery, 903 W. Garland. (315-7900) FRIENDS OF ST. PATTI LIMERICK FEST The inaugural event benefits Meals on Wheels of Spokane, and features 24 poets competing in a five-round tourney of themed limericks. March 11, 7-10 pm. $5. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. bootsbakery.com (509-703-7223) LITFUSE @10 ANTHOLOGY BOOK RELEASE Join Tod Marshall, Nance Van Winckel, Kathryn Smith, and other guests for poetry in celebration of 10 years of the LiTFUSE Poets’ Workshop. March 11. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. litfuse.us (838-0206) SPOKANE POETRY SLAM FEAT. SPILLIOUS With the Meat Puppets playing the Bartlett on the third Monday, Spokane Poetry Slam is moved to March 13. March 13, 7-11 pm. $5. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague. spokanepoetryslam.org THE AGE OF THE FIGHTING SAIL A two-part lecture series presented by Gonzaga history professor Steve Balzarini, and reviewing naval warfare during the American Revolution and the Napoleonic Age. March 15 and 22, from 6:307:45 pm. $7. Colfax Library, 102 S. Main St. whitco.lib.wa.us (509-397-4366) BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series, open to all readers and all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org (509-847-1234) n


Where real gay men me uncensored fun! Brows et for e & reply free. 18+ 206-576-6631 for

Psychic Readings 355 nder.com 09) 444-7 la PHONE: (5BulletinBoard@In mit Parkway : IL u A S M t Ee s m 01 2 N: 1227 W IN PERSO Spokane, WA 99

MAKE MONEY BY MAKING A DIFFERENCE Donate at Octapharma Plasma today! 510 E. Francis Ave. in Spokane. 509-484-7001 *Must be 18-64 years old w/valid ID, proof of social security # & current residence postmarked within 30 days. More info at octapharmaplasma.com NEW DONORS earn up to $250 for the first 5 donations!

Mentoring Coaching Counseling

LOOK FOR THE

THIS AIN’T YER

Specializing in Ashiatsu Oriental Bar Therapy

Deep Tissue Hot Rock :: Sports Relaxation

Learn to play the modern way

GRANDMA’S CARD GAME!

B R ID G ES

ONLINE SCHEDULING

LESSON

GET YOUR INLANDER INSIDE

e & Advanced

Dezana Aman, LMP 509.998.0255

Beginning, Intermediat

STARTING APRIL 3RD

Call Brenda Simpson 509-926-6973

707 N Cedar Suite #4 (The Pelican Building)

to register

tories Cures Po Recorded Mem ank tunes Cd/Cs Cr holes that is! h Daily 483-4753 es Vinyl Baked Fr

ArtOfMassage¯Spokane.com

Valley, Northside & South Hill

MA 60016914 CENTRAL CHIROPRACTIC & MASSAGE

bridgewebs.com/spokane

WELCOMES

Dr. Greg Hager

we want you to find happiness.

As we welcome Dr. Greg we are offering an introductory offer of

Sun Meadow Family Nudist Resort Year Round Skinny Dipping 208-686-8686

Find the Happy Hour Nearest You.

INLANDER.COM/DRINKSPOTTER

MORTGAGE

20 W. Central Ave. 509-484-7578

Learn more about “LOCAL” REPRESENTATIVE reverse mortgage loans

1

ACROSS 1. Miss at a bullfight?: Abbr. 5. Literature Nobelist ____ Gordimer 11. Fluffy trio? 14. ____ and aahs 15. Friend since high school, say 16. “Uh-uh” 17. Atypical 18. Her 2009 song “3” is the shortest-titled #1 hit in Billboard history 19. Words before “You may kiss the bride” 20. Food whose name means “lumps” 22. Freeloader 24. “In what way?” 25. Region of ancient Greece 28. Give off, as vibes 29. Chernobyl’s locale: Abbr. 30. Pop singer with a fragrance line

444-SELL

2

3

4

61. Jargons 64. Like some Keats works 65. Doctor’s charge 66. Dr. Seuss’s surname 67. Jedi foes 68. Attempt 69. Shining brightly 70. Crafty e-tailer DOWN 1. Sweet plant often used to make molasses 2. Colony founded in 1587 only to be “lost” three years later 3. Small floor covering 4. “Hold on ____!” 5. Godot, in “Waiting for Godot” 6. Like Swiss mountains 7. ‘50s White House inits. 8. Beer variety, familiarly

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

24

25

22 26

30

29

called Harajuku Lovers 33. “Beam ____, Scotty!” 35. Director Kurosawa 36. Deli offering traditionally studded with white peppercorns 41. Like some stockings or smudgeproof mascara 42. Cusps 45. TV actor whose Twitter bio reads “Some know me as Mr. Sulu from Star Trek” 51. Cousin of a moose 52. Approximately 53. Uncorks 54. Hurry, old-style 55. Hall & Oates, e.g. 58. Alimentary canal, for short ... or a description of a stretch seen in 20-, 30-, 36- and 45-Across 60. ‘40s White House inits.

to advertise:

bookmark for instant access!

33 36

37

38

55

56

57

60

61

65

66

68

69

39

41 45

46

27

28 31

35

34

47 53

52

62

9. Dealer buster 10. Queen in “Frozen” 11. It’s hard to understand 12. Appear gradually, on film 13. Clinton has one but Biden does not

63

23

32

REVERSE

35 for your FIRST VISIT $

(includes exam and treatment)

LOTION, LIP BALM AND HEALING SALVE CLASS March 23 6-8pm $55 GreenCastle Soap & Supply 203 N Stone Spokane 509-466-7223

BUYING Estate Contents/ Household Goods See abesdiscount.com or 509-939-9996

12

13

208-762-6887

“IT’S ABOUT TIME” FREE INFORMATION LarryWaters Waters Larry

NMLS IDMortgage 400451 Consultant Reverse 1-866-787-0980 Toll-Free 208-762-6887 Local

Idaho & Washington NMLS 531629 Must be at least 62 years of age. Wells Fargo Home Mortgage is a division of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. © 2011 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. NMLSR ID 399801. AS581479 3/11-6/11

THIS W ANSWE EEK’S I SAW RS ON YOUS

You Get Enough” 32. Geological span 40 34. 1914 Booth Tarkington novel 37. Seasonal beverage 42 43 44 38. Mined metal 51 48 49 50 39. VW or BMW 40. “This is the last straw!” 54 43. Draws out 58 59 44. Potentially dangerous 45. Die 64 46. Water or wind, e.g. 67 47. Fish-eating raptor 48. Traditional frat party 70 49. Isolate, in a way “GI TRACT” 50. Suffix with real or surreal 56. Org. that provides handicaps 21. Short smoke? 57. Cassini dubbed Jackie Kennedy’s “Secretary 23. Slander of Style” 26. Quickly 59. Valentine’s Day flower 27. “May I ____ favor?” 62. Be bedridden 31. Michael Jackson’s “Don’t Stop ____ 63. Org. of concern to Edward Snowden

MARCH 9, 2016 INLANDER 53


Grace Kim (center) at the mission training.

Launching Point A Spokane Valley high school student wants to shatter stereotypes on her journey to space BY WILSON CRISCIONE

G

race Kim has never believed in gender stereotypes. She’s never believed that girls should like pink and boys should like blue, or that girls should like flowers and boys should like trucks. But in her mission to someday go to space, she hopes to dispel a different stereotype: That girls can’t succeed in science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) careers. Kim, an 18-year-old Central Valley High School senior, is in her second stint at space camp, otherwise known as the Honeywell Leadership Challenge Academy at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. This year, she was chosen one of eight ambassadors from around the world to lead the camp, which consists of more than 300 students from 45 countries and 27 states. “There’s both those stereotypes of ‘Girls can’t do math, girls aren’t engineers, that’s a guy thing,’” Kim says. “But now that I look back on these experiences, I think this program has helped me grow into my career of

54 INLANDER MARCH 9, 2017

interest, and I’m excited for what’s to come.” Kim wants to study either bioengineering or aerospace engineering in college, in hopes of one day becoming an astronaut. She’s taking classes at Spokane Falls Community College in the Running Start program, and she’s considering the University of Washington or some other four-year university in the fall. “I think a lot of students know that they are capable of achieving what they want, given the opportunities,” Kim says. “But growing up as a Korean-American, I see these stereotypes that sometimes we don’t exactly pinpoint or say out loud, but I think they’re hidden, and this is why I am back as an ambassador — I want to be a representative for the ladies.”

I

t’s not typical that a student is chosen for the Honeywell Academy more than once. The Academy is exclusive to sons or daughters of Honeywell employees, but with hundreds of thousands of employees in the world, it’s still a competitive application process requiring

HONEYWELL PHOTO

multiple essays and a letter of recommendation. The program is two weeks long, and students are able to simulate astronaut training and shuttle missions, meet NASA scientists, engineers and former astronauts, and build rockets. This year, because Kim is an ambassador, she participated in an underwater astronaut training session. She and the other ambassadors entered a giant tank that simulates what it’s like to experience zero gravity and not be able to breath through your nose. They all were trained with hand signals used by scuba divers, and they had to coordinate to successfully launch rockets. “My favorite part was launching the rockets,” Kim says. Her other favorite part about camp? Making friends who are from different countries. “Every day I’m learning new things about other students around the world, and we learn from each other and work together with our differences, and I think that’s a valuable and unforgettable experience,” says Kim. Space camp, she says, is much different than school back at home in Spokane. She says it’s hard to visualize how she will use what she learns in a textbook in a career, but space camp allows her to see that played out in real life. She’s also able to meet professionals in her desired career. She isn’t only learning STEM curriculum, but also how to be a better leader and work with a team. Kim says she wasn’t always interested in space, because she wasn’t sure that as a girl growing up in Washington, she would conquer the obstacles facing women. “But here I am, coming back as an ambassador, looking into becoming an astronaut,” she says. n


UPCOMING

E ve n t s ! CosmiC Binglow Friday, March 10th

10:30 pm • Event Center

$20,000 CraCk safe giveaway

the

Friday, March 17th 3x points • 8 am - noon

4 - 6 pm • $2,750 Giveaway 7 pm • $17,250 Giveaway 3x points • 8 pm - midnight

anniversary Powwow Saturday, March 18th 1 pm and 7 pm 24th anniversary Party Thursday, March 23rd Free Cake • 2 - 4 pm PhilliP PhilliPs Thursday, March 23rd 7 pm | R $60 • G $50

S TAY & P L AY PAC K AG E S

CELEBRATE It’s in our nature.

1 800 523-2464 | CDACASINO.COM | Worley, ID

$35,000 retro Bingo Saturday, March 25th $60,000 CraCk the safe giveaway Friday, March 31st 3x points • 8 am - noon

4 - 6 pm • $10,000 Giveaway 7 pm • $50,000 Giveaway 3x points • 8 pm - midnight

Profile for The Inlander

Inlander 03/09/2017  

Inlander 03/09/2017