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THE LONG ROAD Life-ending medications are legal in Washington, but getting them is a whole other story PAGE 24

COMMENT

FOOD

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Black Panther offers a radical, new portrait

Food and performance at Kobe Hibachi, Sushi and Bar

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en years ago, Washington voters passed the DEATH WITH DIGNITY ACT, making the state only the second in the nation (behind Oregon) to allow physicians to prescribe life-ending drugs to terminal patients. (Three other states and the District of Columbia also now allow it.) In the past decade, certain things have stayed very much the same. The involvement of doctors in ending a life, however peripherally, remains controversial. Pope Francis, for one, has called it “false compassion.” That stigma, in part, explains why the few dying patients interested in the lethal drugs often struggle to find doctors and pharmacies to help them. The issue is especially acute in rural Eastern Washington, forcing some families to go to extreme lengths, as staff reporter Samantha Wohlfeil explains in this week’s cover story, beginning on page 24. Also this week: Staff reporter Daniel Walters looks at a prominent community leader, Phil Tyler, whose past is riddled with allegations of domestic violence (page 22). — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

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IF YOU WERE ON DANCING WITH THE STARS, WHO WOULD YOU WANT YOUR PARTNER TO BE? JESSICA RIMESTAD

It would be my husband. That would be a fun thing to do together, even though I don’t think he’s a good dancer. Have you guys taken dance classes together? No, but I love to dance. I do Zumba.

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Tom Cruise, because it’d be interesting to dance with someone about my height.

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I would be interested in dancing with Drew Brees, because he’s about my height and probably equally as awkward at dancing as I am. Do you dance? I’ve done some salsa, merengue, and I’ve danced at a few quinceañeras, but not really well.

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KENDRYCK RAND My dance partner would be Serena Williams, so that she would pick me up the whole time, and I’d be in the air doing all the lifts. Do you have a background in dance? A little bit. I danced in high school. We had a dance show that was put on every year, and so junior and senior year I was part of those.

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FAMILY LAW Divorce Spousal Maintenance / Alimony Child Support Modifications Parenting Plans

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Misrepresentation From the census to gerrymandering, citizens must demand honesty and fairness if we want America to thrive BY GEORGE NETHERCUTT

T

his year, the Trump administration’s Justice Department announced plans to include on upcoming census forms the question of whether the person filling out the form is an American citizen. Some assert that the question intends to identify noncitizens for immigration purposes. Whatever the reason, it will likely add to the size of some congressional districts, while eliminating representation in others. Some recipients of the census forms will refuse to complete the forms because they detest Donald Trump. Doing so could affect the size of congressional districts, which are determined by population, not citizenship. Assuming California is a more liberal state that generally finds Mr. Trump intolerable, census recipients there may not fill out the form because of the citizenship question being posed by the Trump administration. Not completing the form is a crime. The U.S. Census Bureau mails census forms to millions of Americans. According to U.S. Code, Title 13, section 221, a fine of $100 can be levied for Americans failing to complete a census form. Meanwhile, Title 18, section 3571, provides for fines of $5,000 for failure to complete a census survey and jail time of up to five years. Usually, though, Census Bureau officials follow up before levying any fine — usually with a personal visit — to those who fail to answer. Under Article I, section 3, of the Constitution, the taking of a census occurs every 10 years. Article I, section 2, makes it clear that members of Congress are elected by the people, not American citizens, so citizenship doesn’t matter in the allocation of U.S. representatives.

F

or example, many voters in blue states have an aversion to anything President Trump supports. California has elected a Democratic governor and two U.S. Senators who are Democrats. Fourteen of 53 California U.S. representatives are Republicans, the rest are Democrats. If Californians refuse to fill out census forms by refusing to answer the citizenship question, their congressional representation could shrink, and the number of House Democrats in Congress may also shrink. Other states where the population completes the census forms may see an increase in congressional representation. States worried about future elections, especially red states, should be able to breathe easier if states like California take out their anger on President Trump by refusing to complete census forms. Doing so will only create a population shift that could affect congressional representation. If residents fill out the census forms requesting citizenship information, in spite of their animosity for Mr. Trump, the Trump administration will still get its way by obtaining citizenship information or possibly increased Republican rep-

resentation in Congress. It’s a brilliant political move, if nothing else.

A

nother issue affecting elections in Congress is gerrymandering of congressional districts, something that should be repaired, perhaps by the Supreme Court, which will likely take up the situation in the upcoming 2018 session. Gerrymandering, configuring congressional districts to advantage Republican and Democratic representatives, makes such districts uncompetitive and prone to extremism, a phenomenon too present in today’s politics where some district maps resemble Rorschach tests. Both Democratic and Republican state commissions encourage the same district configurations, oftentimes Republicans say to Democrats on the commission, and vice versa, “We’ll leave your representatives alone if you agree to leave ours alone.” Since 95 percent of all incumbents are reelected each election year, gerrymandering is a factor in the uncompetitive nature of such districts, and extremism takes root. Depending on the district, a liberal Democrat or a conservative Republican can say any outrageous statements they like and still get elected. Such districts often elect their representative in the primary election when the most extreme candidate is usually successful. Therefore, extremism in Congress can be laid at the feet of voters and gerrymandered, uncompetitive districts. To the extent that straight lines in congressional districts — not gerrymandered districts — make them more competiLETTERS tive, democSend comments to racy is better editor@inlander.com. served. If gerrymandering changes, perhaps more qualified candidates will emerge, as they seek to represent districts that are not tailor-made for extremism — places where candidates can utter outrageous statements and still get re-elected. The election process could thereby be opened up. Perhaps then we will see voters elect quality representatives known for their commitment to America, not to their extreme base. Their votes in Congress will represent their commitment to their competitive districts and not be in conflict with what’s good for America. The combination of truly competitive districts and compliance with census requirements will lead to congressional representatives who will better serve American interests and make voters proud. n


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International Women’s Day Spokane’s 2018 celebration focuses on the power of letting women’s voices be heard. The event features workshops, a resource fair and keynote speech by Sandy Williams, local activist and creator of the Black Lens newspaper. Free. Sat, March 10 from 1-5 pm. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth Ave., womansclubspokane.org (838-5667)

PI DAY WORKSHOP

Join an all-star team of local tinkerers, techies and music makers to explore the world of electronic music. Learn to make sound using Raspberry Pi, Arduino, Micro:bit and other pint-sized computers. Musical machine creators are invited to showcase it at Spark’s Pi Day Celebration on Wed, March 14. Ages 12+ (register online). $10. Sat, March 10, from 5-8 pm. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy., spark-central.org

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NO FEAR IN LOVE RACE

The seventh annual, 6-mile run to promote healthy relationships in 16-24-year-olds, and to raise awareness for domestic violence in young people. Race includes finisher prizes and drawings. $25. Sun, March 11, from 6:30-10 am. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr., nofearinloverace.org (202-657-1721) n Tell us about your event or other opportunities to get involved. Submit events at Inlander.com/getlisted or email getlisted@inlander.com.

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COMMENT | IDENTITY were disproportionately on display. We live with historical (mis)perceptions that continue to shape our present. Though we have come a long way since the days of Plessy and Brown, we still have miles to go. This arduous journey feels overwhelming when burdens of our past obscure visions of our future. However, every now and again, we are gifted moments of reprieve, when we catch a glimpse of our improvement; we marvel as our progress becomes perceptible, like when director Ryan Coogler unleashed Black Panther.

Once old narratives are unfurled, what new possibilities arise?

That Old Black Magic

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Black Panther offers a radical, new portrait, blowing up tired tropes BY INGA LAURENT

O

ne of the pictures permanently etched in my mind and on my heart is of a young boy, in a plaid jacket; he is brooding with big, brown eyes, deep in thought as he responds to a series of questions prompting him to choose between a black doll and a white doll. “Show me the doll that you would like to play with.” Show me the “nice” doll. Show me the “bad” doll. The boy, along with the majority of the children from these studies, preferred to play with and identified the white doll as good and the black one as bad. The final prompt: “Now, show me the doll that’s most like you.”

Kenneth and Mamie Phipps Clark conducted these experiments over decades, summarizing the detrimental effects of segregation. Thurgood Marshall (eventually Justice Marshall) used these findings to bolster his successful argument in Brown v. Board of Education (1954) that the Supreme Court should overturn the “separate but equal” doctrine established in Plessy v. Ferguson (1896). Though these cases are from a while back, destructive remnants of those eras remain. I was a multiracial child who chose the white doll, denying a part of myself. I too grew up learning to read myself into literature and project myself onto screens because my image was infrequently reflected. I too was forced to infer my value from limited information, mired in a world where negative attributes

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Yes, I am aware that the film is flawed and fictional, but so is To Kill a Mockingbird, and I’ve seen it referenced enough on law school essays to understand the profound impact a story can have. While we can disagree on whether this movie advances or interrupts our evolution, how sweet it is to have such substance to deliberate! This debate, reminiscent of the Renaissance, revives the spirits of Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, W.E.B. Du Bois, Frederick Douglass and Marcus Garvey, titans of thought, who clashed over similar existential arguments. Regardless of the debate, Black Panther did bestow a dynamic, vibrant, radical, new portrait. Images of Wakanda unshackled us from the rote tropes, which have so often restricted blackness to stories solely in proximity to slavery, civil rights and escaping poverty. In this new land, we were invited to imagine development uninterrupted by colonization, empowered to envision the agency within ourselves: the power to be the cause of our own joy and suffering, to serve in the role of our own heroes and villains. So, where do we go from here? Once old narratives are unfurled, what new possibilities arise? When we move one antiquated story forward, does our collective story progress? “You can’t stop us on the road to freedom, you can’t keep us ‘cause our eyes have seen,” Van Morrison tells us in the song “Tupelo Honey.” If we showed Black Panther to the boy in the photo, which doll do you suppose he would choose? What if we diversified the study? What if all our children felt comfortable enough to identify proudly with either doll? Can you imagine? Can you envision that stunning, new picture emerging, just waiting to be etched? n

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COMMENT | FROM READERS VICKI FORSLUND BORDIERI: It’s 2018 people!

Readers respond to our news article about a Spokane County employee who left her job because she found it difficult to pump breast milk (“A Power Struggle,” 3/1/18).

Readers respond to our New York Times article that says Pew Research will consider anyone born between 1981 and 1996 a millennial (3/2/18).

APRYL HILBORN: For the county believing that their handling didn’t rise “to the level of liability,” they have sure reactively implemented changes to address their accommodation issues. It’s a shame a mother had to leave her career in order for them to be compelled into adhering with federal law to eliminate barriers. It’s not OK when private sector businesses can’t comply with the law, but for the county to have not figured it out is unacceptable. ANNE JACOBSON WILLIAMSON: Simple discrimination. Good God people, this is 2018, women have been having babies for millennia, why is this such a problem? ELIZABETH LOCHTE: I had to use a conference room in 2000 which didn’t lock. I put a Post-It note on the door but people barged in anyway. AIMEE FLINN NECHANICKY: No matter the accommodations, and often they’re subpar at best to meet the requirements, it’s really hard to be a working mom who needs to pump. I opted not to both times because I knew it would reflect negatively on me. And that’s awful. We’re in 2018. Pumping doesn’t last forever, yes it’s inconvenient for the employers, but suck it up. We’ve been made to suck it up for years. Offer the space, don’t be a douche, and you’re likely to be a better employer because of it. n

AARON MACFADDEN: The only thing that we all [25-45 year olds have in common] is that we are economically underprivileged, compared to our generational forebearers. We are therefore hard to advertise to and monetize, by traditional methods. HALEY FINK: I’m 32 and I’ve never in my life had avocado toast. TARA L. SMITH: This irritates me. I’m 35, and have almost nothing in common with my 24-year-old sister. She never suffered dial up. She has always had a cell phone with texting and internet. She was 6 on 9/11 and remembers nothing. Her generation has always had harsher driving restrictions, stronger child abuse laws and less discipline. To lump people between the ages of 30-37 together with these kids is insulting and inaccurate. n

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EDUCATION

Show, Don’t Tell North Idaho schools cut through the climate debate by teaching kids to think like scientists BY WILSON CRISCIONE

S

omewhere in the process of digging down through 7 feet of snow near the top of a mountain, measuring the snowpack and jotting down numbers, Cheyenne Kiecker discovered something that, for her, felt impossible: Maybe she does like science after all. In February, Kiecker and her classmates studied the snow at Lookout Pass in North Idaho. She learned how the snow impacts the runoff into streams and rivers and lakes,

how it affects the fish and the spring foliage, how it changes the wildfire season. And she’s learned that in recent decades, the snowpack in the very spot she and her classmates dug into has trended downward. “It was really interesting to think about how the snow I was looking at impacts everything I deal with on a daily basis,” Kiecker says. “I never thought about these kinds of things.” ...continued on next page

Timberlake High School sophomores Cheyenne Kiecker and Caleb Sorensen (right) watch classmate Logan Jones mark a spot to measure snowpack. WILSON CRISCIONE PHOTO

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The field trip that brought nearly 150 Timberlake High School students up to Lookout Pass is part of a yearlong project that teaches science education in eight different North Idaho schools. It’s called “The Confluence Project,” an education model developed by University of Idaho graduate students several years ago. Today, more than 300 students in area high schools participate, learning about water-science education from the natural environment surrounding them. And in a state where some politicians have argued human-caused climate change shouldn’t be taught in schools, the project has given students the chance to discover it for themselves. “The intent of this program was to show students science,” says Jim Ekins, an educator for University of Idaho Extension who helps coordinate the project. “As they become more science literate, it’s a whole lot easier to understand the data that supports anthropogenic climate change.”

W

hen Kiecker and her classmates went up to Lookout Pass in late February, they played the part of hydrologists. With collapsible shovels, the students dug a

pit all the way down to the ground. They marked each layer of snow with wooden tongue depressors, extracted a sample from each layer and put it into a plastic bag from which they measured the volume of water. From that, they can determine the snow density. “It really piques an interest for science, to get out there and to see what they really do out in the field,” says Timberlake student Logan Jones. Instead of staring at numbers on a screen or in a textbook, the students take part in collecting the numbers. “You see the data at work, and you see the physical changes as you dig and as you look at it and feel it,” says student Max Cornell. Back in the classroom, the students compare their measurements of the snowpack with that of data collected by scientists from sites near where the students collected. When they’re done, they put together a graph with numbers from the past 30 years of snowpack data. It shows a gradual line downward, representing a slow decline in average snowpack in the month of February since the 1980s. For the month of April, that line is even steeper. This is the same trend that scientists in North


Idaho are studying. Precipitation in the Inland Northwest remains about steady, but it’s coming down as rain instead of snow, especially in fall and spring. “There is a clear trend line, and not just at Lookout Pass, but all across the West,” Ekins says. There’s been debate in the Idaho Legislature in recent years on how to teach climate change to students. Some lawmakers tried to scrub the teaching of human-caused climate change from state science standards, arguing that students should instead come to their own conclusions about global warming instead of it being dictated. Last month, however, the Legislature ended up approving science standards that included curricula on human-caused climate change. Still, according to one Yale study, fewer than half of Idaho adults think global warming is caused by human activities, despite a scientific consensus. Some lawmakers feel both sides of what they call “the debate” around global warming should be taught. But for those involved in The Confluence Project, it’s more important to teach kids how to be scientists. That way, says Ekins students understand it in a more “profound way.” “Instead of us telling the students what’s happening,” Ekins says, “The students figure this out on their own.”

“Kids really retain more information and get excited when they get outside.”

T

he Confluence Project was started in 2012 with a grant from the National Science Foundation. A group of graduate students at University of Idaho wanted to find an innovative way to teach high school kids, and they thought the kids would be engaged in the natural world around them. It is a cooperative with the Kootenai Environmental Alliance, University of Idaho, Coeur d’Alene Tribe and the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Lake Management. It’s aligned with Next Generation Science Standards and Common Core, but focuses on giving students hands-on experience in the field of watershed science. “Kids really retain more information and get excited when they get outside,” says Sharon Bosley, with Kootenai Environmental Alliance. The project culminates with a Youth Water Summit in May, where students present solutions for water resource issues of their choosing. This is Timberlake High School’s first year being involved. In addition to the snow field trip, students go on other trips to test for water quality in nearby lakes. Biology teacher Christine Sandahl says as the kids figure out what their Youth Water Summit project will be, they’ll branch out. Some students might be interested in a life form they found in a lake, others on invasive species in the water. Sandahl says she wants her students to see how water impacts everything, that they can look at the snowpack and see how it affects the ecosystem, land-use issues, water quality, everything, until it comes out of the tap. “I hope my kids get that everything is really interconnected,” Sandahl says. It not only is an effective way to teach climate science, Ekins says, but it develops critical thinking skills in students that they’ll need as they go off to college. But perhaps more importantly, Ekins hopes it leads students to seek answers to more questions. “The program is investigative in nature,” Ekins says. “We teach students to ask questions, and tell them how to find good, reliable information and data.” In other words, teaching them to be more like scientists. n wilsonc@inlander.com

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NEWS | DIGEST

ON INLANDER.COM

CUSTODY FIGHTS As last week’s cover story “Taken” (3/1/18) illustrates, the court process of determining parental custody matters can leave BIOLOGICAL PARENTS fighting for the right to their own child. In this year’s legislative session, two bills would clarify Washington state law on parental rights, but mostly follow the direction of state and federal courts on parental custody in recent decades. The first, Senate Bill 6037, would make Washington one of the first states to adopt the 2017 Uniform Parentage Act, which, in part, codifies language on what a “de facto” parent is. The second, Senate Bill 5598, would grant relatives, such as grandparents, the right to seek visitation with a child through the courts. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

FEATURING NATIONAL NEWS FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES

SFCC PRESIDENT RESIGNS Last week, Darren Pitcher resigned as acting president of Spokane Falls Community College in the middle of a SEXUAL HARASSMENT investigation. Carolyn Casey, public information officer for Community Colleges of Spokane, confirmed that the investigation was for alleged sexual harassment, but she would not reveal any other details of the investigation, including how long the investigation had been underway or how many complaints had been made about Pitcher’s behavior. Pitcher (pictured) took over as acting president in May, after former president Janet Gullickson resigned to take a job in Virginia. He had worked for Spokane Falls Community College since 2012. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

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DROPPED FROM SCHOOL Weeks after an Inlander article exposed the allegations, Bryan Dornbos, a former EWU police officer accused of sexually harassing a young woman and then landing a job as a local school resource officer, was fired. Reardan-Edwall School District Superintendent Marcus Morgan confirmed to the Inlander that the school board terminated Dornbos last week. Morgan says Dornbos was fired because the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office had not commissioned Dornbos to be a school resource officer. In January, the Inlander wrote about allegations that Dornbos made a cadet for the EWU Police Department uncomfortable. The cadet complained that Dornbos made inappropriate comments about her body, called her his “hot assistant,” told her Cheney officers were “wondering how long it would take” her to sleep with him, would ask for hugs and linger around her. (WILSON CRISCIONE)


SHIFTING ALLEGIANCES After the Parkland shooting, the long-held boundaries in public opinion seem to be shifting. Democrats are taking more risks, calling for more GUN CONTROL. Republicans are starting to publicly endorse modest measures restricting weapons. So the Inlander spoke with Democratic Sens. Patty Murray and Maria Cantwell, as well as Republican Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers and her opponent, former WSU-Spokane Chancellor Lisa Brown, about what gun control measures they’d support — and what they’d oppose. Of those four, everyone said they supported some form of improving the background-check system. No one said they supported banning all semiautomatic rifles. Only Murray came right out and said she’d support banning the AR-15, while only McMorris Rodgers opposed raising the age limit for owning a semiautomatic rifle to 21. Lisa Brown, meanwhile, pushed for the creation of a bipartisan commission to look for solutions. (DANIEL WALTERS)

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Count It! The Spokane County Board of Commissioners is likely to expand; plus, Michael Baumgartner eyes his next job OVER THEIR HEAD

In the coming years, the Spokane County BOARD OF COMMISSIONERS will likely grow from three members to five, whether the current commissioners like it or not. A bill that has passed the state House and the state Senate will increase the county commission to five members for the 2022 election. It will also change the election process so that commissioners are elected only by voters in their district, instead of by voters from all around the county. The legislation has drawn strong opposition from current Spokane County Commissioner Al French, who notes that Spokane County voters rejected a similar ballot proposal that would have expanded the commission in 2015. “It’s a lousy bill,” French says. “It ignores the will of the voters in the county and imposes the will of the legislators.” Rep. Marcus Riccelli, D-Spokane, crafted the bill, and it earned bipartisan support from other local representatives. Spokane is currently the most populous county in the state still operating under the three-commissioner

form of governance. Riccelli has said the bill would bring more direct representation for Spokane County voters. And by adding more members to the commission, it helps members avoid breaking the state’s open meetings laws. Currently, any time two county commissioners meet, it can be considered an open public meeting. French dismissed concerns about public meetings, calling it “bogus.” “It amazes me that people who have never done this job before [think they] know how to do it better than those who have,” French says. County Commissioner Mary Kuney has expressed similar concerns. But the third member, Josh Kerns, could go either way. He doesn’t like that the county will have to come up with the money to fund the change to a five-member commission, saying it’s another “unfunded mandate.” But he says it “would be handy” to be able to walk over to another commissioner’s office and bring up an idea without it having to be an open public meeting. But the change, he says, won’t change his priorities. “It doesn’t change my mind as far as the things I’m focused on,” Kerns says. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

A NUCLEAR LEGACY

Washington state will step in to provide health care to people from the MARSHALL ISLANDS and other Pacific nations who would qualify for Medicaid if the federal government didn’t prohibit them from doing so. From 1946 to 1958, the U.S. government tested more than 60 nuclear bombs in the Marshall Islands, a small Pacific island nation halfway between Japan and Hawaii, blasting craters out of the sea, rendering whole islands uninhabitable and then researching the effects of radiation on human beings. In December, the Inlander reported how, decades later,

some people from the Pacific nations are unable to get health insurance as they are prohibited from using Medicaid, despite living and working in the U.S. legally under an agreement called the Compact of Free Association (COFA). Spokane residents from the Marshall Islands questioned why they should be denied coverage, especially if they pay taxes into the same system that funds the social benefit. To close that gap, SSB 5683, which passed both chambers in the Washington State Legislature, will provide premium assistance to cover health insurance costs for COFA-member state residents who fall below 133 percent of the poverty line. “Thank god it passed,” says Rose Kabua, president of the Marshallese Community Advisory Board in Spokane. “It’s a huge thing for us. Thank you to everyone for all the support.” The group is working with Gov. Jay Inslee’s office on scheduling so they can be there when he signs the bill into law. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

SIXTH SEAT SWAP

Last week, Washington state Sen. MICHAEL BAUMGARTNER, R-Spokane, among the more quotable members of the Legislature, announced that he was not going to run for re-election to the state Senate. Instead, he aims to run for a seat much closer to home: Spokane County treasurer. Current Spokane County Treasurer Rob Chase, who already promised to stick to only two terms as treasurer, officially announced he wouldn’t run for a third. He endorsed Baumgartner. That just left the question of who was going to run for Baumgartner’s open Senate seat in the 6th District. “I had the honor of being asked to follow Michael

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State Sen. Michael Baumgartner wants to be Spokane County’s next treasurer. and fill his Senate seat,” says Washington state Rep. Jeff Holy, R-Cheney. Even before Baumgartner announced he wasn’t going to run for re-election, his would-be Democratic opponent, health care community organizer Jessa Lewis, was gearing up to run against him. Fifteen years ago, Lewis says, she used to be an Evangelical Republican. “As the result of an assault, I became a mother and was judged and blamed in the community,” says Lewis. “I ended up becoming homeless. I learned, when real life happened, why there’s a safety net.” That caused her to become a lot more progressive. She wants Washington state to pursue universal health care coverage for all. She supports two-year tuition free college. But not all of her positions are necessarily beloved on the left. She says she’s concerned about the overreach of regulations. She has a concealed-carry permit. And she’s skeptical of Washington state’s per-mile gas tax. It’s unfair, she says, “if you live in these rural districts and you have to drive 60 miles to get groceries.” (DANIEL WALTERS)

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NEWS | OLYMPIA

The Busy Season As the end of the 60-day legislative session closes in, here’s a look at three major issues in Olympia BY MITCH RYALS

STUDENT LOAN BILL OF RIGHTS

As student loan debt throughout the country continues to climb, Washington state lawmakers are looking to establish more protections from predatory loans for college students. A bill known as the Student Loan Bill of Rights passed out of the Legislature last week and is awaiting Gov. Jay Inslee’s signature. If signed into law, the bill would establish a student-loan advocate to review and address complaints filed by borrowers. The bill would also require most loan servicers

Gov. Jay Inslee to be licensed by the state and would establish rules that ensure payments are processed in a timely manner. The bill was requested by the Washington State Attorney General’s Office following a report that revealed that, in 2016, more than 800,000 Washingtonians were working to pay down collectively about $24 billion in student loans.

NET NEUTRALITY

Washington state became the first in the nation Monday to set up its own net-neutrality law after the Federal Communications Commission’s rules were repealed last December. The Obama-era FCC rules were

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designed to prevent internet service providers, such as Comcast or AT&T, from controlling what people view on the internet. Under the new law signed by Gov. Jay Inslee this week, internet providers in Washington cannot throttle internet speeds or restrict access to legal content. The new law also requires service providers to disclose information on network management practices, performance and commercial terms. “We’ve seen the power of the open internet,” Inslee says during the signing ceremony. “It allows a student in Washington to connect with researchers all around the world, or a small business to compete with

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large businesses in the global marketplace. It’s allowed the free flow of information and ideas in one of the greatest demonstrations of free speech in history.” Washington’s new law could face a legal challenge in court, as the new FCC rules prohibit states from erecting their own regulations.

PUBLIC RECORDS

Gov. Jay Inslee vetoed a bill that would have exempted the state legislators from the Public Records Act. Without a floor debate or public hearings, state lawmakers quickly approved a bill that would have kept existing records secret and made only some records public going forward, such as correspondence with lobbyists and final disciplinary reports. However, emails between legislators and constituents, as well as among legislators, would be considered private under the bill. The measure also sought to filter appeals for denials of public records requests through the committees in the House and the Senate, rather than a court. Those decisions could not be appealed to a court. The fast-track bill came after a Thurston County Superior Court judge ruled that the Legislature had for years violated the Public Records Act by exempting information local governments and state agencies regularly release. Information such as lawmakers’ emails, work calendars and complaints by staffers are considered public records, according to the ruling. Inslee’s veto last week came with an agreement between lawmakers and a cohort of media organizations involved in the Thurston County case to work together to craft a more transparent public-records law. Letters signed by 16 Senate Democrats and 40 House Democrats, who previously voted in favor of the bill, encouraged Inslee to veto it, saying they “made a mistake by failing to go through a full public hearing process on this very important legislation.” n mitchr@inlander.com

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NEWS | PEOPLE considered verbally abusive, but denies every allegation of physical abuse. Instead, in both his Inlander interview and a subsequent Facebook post, he claims persecution, arguing that these accusations are resurfacing now because of his success in the community. Even after stepping down from the NAACP last year, Tyler has remained in the public eye. When his son committed suicide in November, he spoke out about it publicly to push for solutions. He spent last weekend on a “congressional civil rights pilgrimage” to Alabama with Republican Rep. Cathy McMorris Rodgers. “It’s funny. I came off this pilgrimage where I spoke about how Dr. King, at the time of one of his heightened journeys, was being defamed with allegations of being a ‘philandering husband’ … and I come back to Spokane to this call from you,” he says over the phone to the Inlander. “Where everyone is, again, reaching out and defaming Phil.”

CHLOE

Phil Tyler, who sits on the Spokane County Human Rights Task Force, brought together local male leaders for a video (screenshot above) titled “We Will Rise,” urging men to speak out about sexual harassment and assault.

History of Violence Community leader Phil Tyler calls for men to stand up for women — but his own past is riddled with allegations of domestic violence BY DANIEL WALTERS

I

t was Phil Tyler who recruited the Spokane mayor, police chief, fire captain and county sheriff to join him in a black-and-white video, “We Will Rise,” calling for men to stand up for women who’ve been sexually assaulted or harassed. “As men,” Tyler says in the video, “we must not stay silent.” And it was Tyler, former president of the Spokane NAACP, who stood up again at a Time’s Up forum last month, calling for leaders in the community to be held accountable. “I’m here tonight as a husband, as a father, as a son and, more importantly, as a man,” Tyler said. He recounts how he felt when he heard his loved ones’ experience with assault. “I felt as powerless and hurt as the survivors did, and I couldn’t do anything about it.” These comments come as Tyler weighs a run for Spokane City Council. Yet Tyler’s application for a vacant City Council seat two years ago sparked a fervent objection from a former loved one. “He has a violent history which I know about firsthand. I lived with domestic violence from him starting

22 INLANDER MARCH 8, 2018

in 1986 as his 18-year-old wife,” Chloe Senger wrote in a 2016 email to Council President Ben Stuckart, recently obtained through a public-records request. “We divorced in 1990. I felt, at the time, it was useless to report the abuse because he was an Air Force police officer.” Senger is not the only woman who’s accused Tyler of abuse. Tyler’s two other ex-wives — Darci Tyler and then Katrina Tyler — also alleged domestic violence in court records. The records — spanning three decades of messy divorce filings, parenting-plan battles and restraining and protection orders — are crammed with ugly allegations, involving shoving, choking, hair pulling, bruises, broken glass, broken plaster and death threats. Each woman was initially reluctant to speak with the Inlander, but each eventually drew a similar picture of their ex-husband: a controlling, ill-tempered bully who was verbally and physically abusive. In a phone interview on Monday, however, Tyler, an Air Force veteran and former Spokane County Jail corrections officer, laughed at what he considered absurd accusations. He admits his words could sometimes be

Chloe Senger, Phil Tyler’s first wife, lives in a small house with a big dog, near the Monroe Street hill that becomes littered with campaign signs during election season. “I don’t want to see his name in campaign signs all over the hillside,” Chloe says, pointing out the window. “I feel like honorable people should be in office.” Even back when she was a teenager, she says she knew what Tyler was capable of. In 1985, she was at her house when he slammed her friend into a wall. “He came right at me — he bashed me into the wall,” Chloe’s former friend, Deanna Harvey, says today. Harvey says her head hit the wall so hard it knocked a crown off her tooth and broke the plaster, exposing the wood behind it. Juvenile court records show Tyler was arrested, found guilty of assault and sentenced to two months of community supervision. But back then, Chloe and her mother both rose to Tyler’s defense. “I was so stupid. You know how you are when you’re 16. ‘Oh, he’s my boyfriend, I love him,’” Chloe says. “I defended him. ... Red flag!” Still, she married him and regretted it. It was miserable. She says she made a mistake when they were assembling a lawnmower and so he kneed her LETTERS in the tailbone. She Send comments to says she could barely editor@inlander.com. move for three months. Another time, she says, he got mad and hit her with a window screen, leaving behind a big purple-yellow welt on her leg. “I never told anybody at the time. I don’t know if that’s common or what,” Chloe says. She says she didn’t even tell her mom about what happened until 2014. But in old court records, Chloe asked for a temporary restraining order when she filed for divorce, writing that Tyler would often yell at her, grab her and push her. She writes that when she moved out, “he called and started acting crazy, threatening to kill me.” “As a result of my husband’s past behavior, I take very seriously his threats to harm me,” Chloe wrote. Today, Tyler denies all the allegations. Despite the court record, he says he doesn’t even recall the assault against Deanna Harvey. Besides, that was a long time ago. “When I was a teenager, I was a teenager,” he says. “I’m 50 years old now.” But Chloe says that Tyler needs to reckon with and admit what she says happened. “You still can’t erase history,” Chloe says.


DARCI

It was 2000, in the midst of ugly divorce and custody proceedings, that Darci Tyler, Phil Tyler’s second wife, sought to put her experience to paper. “I am recording all I remember so as to show a pattern of violence with Phil toward me,” she wrote in a lengthy declaration under oath titled “Journal of events regarding Phil.” She recounts eight years of incidents, altercations and parenting conflicts. Darci declined to be quoted when the Inlander spoke with her, but said she stood by everything she said in the court record. And there’s a lot. They met in September of 1991, she writes. It was the same month, according to criminal records, that Tyler bashed down the door of an ex-girlfriend’s apartment, when she was not home, to take back his stuff. (The charges were later dropped after he paid for the damage.) A few months later, Darci wrote, Tyler grabbed her by her hair, slammed her into the dresser and pushed her down into the closet as she tried to leave. Darci claims Tyler put his foot on her stomach and told her he was going to “give her an abortion the old-fashioned way.”

was dropped, but records don’t explain why.) As for Darci’s other allegations, he scoffs and denies them. But back in 1998, the court concluded that domestic violence had occurred, barred Tyler from coming near Darci’s residence for a year except while picking up their son and ordered the two to mediation. Her parents, Richard and Jan Moseanko, declared during the case that they’d witnessed seven years of abuse inflicted against their daughter. “He desires to control every situation in her life and when he cannot succeed in doing this, he erupts using verbal abuse first, then physical abuse,” they wrote.

KATRINA

“It’s been long years of abuse, and it needs to stop,” says Katrina Tyler, Phil Tyler’s third wife. “I don’t want to see anybody else go through the pain.” During the domestic-violence protection order case with Darci, Katrina fervently defended Tyler. Now, however, Katrina wraps her fingers around her platinum-blonde locks to show how her ex-husband would allegedly grip her hair to drag her. It sometimes caused clumps of her hair to fall out, she says. “He snaps. When he snaps, he loses it,” she says. “If you could see the look on his face, and his eyes — it’s almost like he’s not even there.” The police were called twice — at least once by Tyler — during their heated arguments, but Katrina never told the police about the alleged assaults or threats. “I just didn’t feel the police were going to do anything,” she wrote. After all, as a corrections officer, he was law enforcement. They knew him. And she says that when she threatened to call the police on one occasion, he told her, “‘I know how to hurt you without leaving marks.’” (Tyler denies this.) “He has a bad temper and you will never know when it will rear its head,” she wrote in a court filing during a divorce proceeding. She also accused him of dragging her by her hair in front of the kids and of rage aided by “high testosterone and anabolic steroids.” “I have not committed any domestic violence toward Katrina,” Tyler wrote in his response. The “steroids,” he says, were actually legal prohormones. No, he hadn’t dragged her by her hair in front of her kids. Today, he accuses Katrina of being a dishonest, “bitter alcoholic,” angry over not getting more money in the divorce. He suggests she only uses the abuse allegations to deflect away from her drinking issues. But she scoffs at Tyler’s version of events. The Inlander spoke with three friends of Katrina’s. They dismiss Tyler’s characterization of his ex-wife as an alcoholic, and say they either witnessed Tyler’s violence firsthand or heard about it shortly afterward. Lynn Aman, Katrina’s former supervisor, for example, says she watched Tyler grab Katrina by her hair and slam her against her car in his driveway. “I would try to talk to her about leaving him because he’s toxic,” Aman tells the Inlander. Tyler denies these accounts, noting that Katrina’s witnesses never called the police to report anything. And Tyler has a character witness of his own. Last year, he married his fourth wife, Meg Demand. Her experience with sexual harassment is why Tyler made that #MeToo video. She says she’s seen how troubled the women accusing Tyler are, and argues her husband is the person who will come to a woman’s defense — not hurt her. “He’s never pulled me by my hair,” she says. “He’s never threatened me.”

“When he snaps, he loses it. If you could see the look on his face, and his eyes — it’s almost like he’s not even there.” Her parents write in court records that they came to pick her up — only to be greeted by Tyler calling her “dirty names” and saying she should be taken to get an abortion. Darci later miscarried. (In denying this account, Tyler says he doesn’t personally support abortion.) Still, she married him. But the fights didn’t stop, she alleges in records. In one confrontation, she writes, he ran her off the road near Fairchild Air Force Base, dragged her out of the car by her hair, broke her key to her car and left her stranded. In another, at a nightclub at Fairchild, he allegedly slammed her into a pinball machine, before getting into a big brawl, she writes. Military officers took him into custody. A fight a few days later, she says, ended with Tyler sitting on top of her, choking her and a neighbor calling the cops. Police records from 1992 say he was arrested on domestic violence and resisting arrest charges. But she says it didn’t end the abuse. Darci writes in court records that a friend picked the glass out of her hair after Tyler slammed her head into a family photo. She writes that he tried to slam her head into a cement wall, that Tyler threatened to “do an O.J.” on her and that he told her he could kill her right there and no one would find her body until morning. The next morning, Darci writes, he put flowers and balloons in her car while she was at work, and wrote “I love Darci Tyler” on her workplace window in lipstick. Finally, after an allegedly violent confrontation outside a Subway in 1998, Darci made a request for a protective order. In his response at the time, Tyler accused Darci of lying. “I feel it is Darci’s intention to damage my name/ reputation by making libeling statements,” Tyler wrote. “I haven’t and do not plan to harm Darci.” Today, he says the same thing. He acknowledges the brawl at Fairchild, saying the fight earned him an Article 15 black mark on his military record, denying him a full honorable discharge. And yes, he says, he was found guilty of resisting arrest. (The domestic violence charge

‘NOT THE GUY I KNOW’

Sitting at a table at Morty’s Tap and Grille Sunday morning, Katrina dabs her tears with a wadded up Kleenex as she watches Tyler present himself as a champion of women in his “We Will Rise” video on a smartphone. “It makes me sick to watch it,” Katrina says. She pushes the phone away before the video’s finished. “That look on his face. That’s a mean look. That means you’re in trouble.” (Darci’s description is almost identical.) She says she wishes leaders in the video, like Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich, would do a video about standing up against domestic violence. In some ways, domestic violence has become part of the recent #MeToo movement. Last month, White House staff secretary Rob Porter resigned due to domestic violence allegations from three different women. Still, at an Oscars ceremony Sunday flooded with #MeToo sentiment, Best Actor winner Gary Oldman received a standing ovation, despite allegations he beat his ex-wife with a telephone. Even with the new emphasis on taking women’s accounts seriously, Tyler’s alleged victims worry that they won’t be believed because of his charm. “You’re going to get booed by other people who think he is Mr. Wonderful,” warns Harvey, the woman he assaulted three decades ago. In 2016, Sheriff Knezovich wrote a letter strongly endorsing Tyler for the City Council slot. But back then, he says, he didn’t know about the long list of domestic violence allegations. After the Inlander met with Knezovich, the sheriff dug into police records. He was disturbed to find the 1992 domestic violence arrest — something he’d never been told about — on Tyler’s record. Knezovich has fired deputies for domestic violence before. “Today, Phil doesn’t get hired [as a sheriff’s deputy] because of this background,” Knezovich says, motioning to the arrest records. “It’s sad. We have somebody who has great potential, but has this in his background.” While Knezovich says Tyler could be controlling sometimes, he’s never known him to lose his temper. “If this is true — this is not the guy I know,” Knezovich says. For public officials, it’s tricky to know what to do about such allegations. In 2016, Chloe emailed her warning about Tyler to Council President Stuckart, while her mom warned her own city councilman, Mike Fagan. Both Chloe and her mom left an online comment alleging abuse on a 2016 Spokesman-Review story about Tyler. Chloe says she never heard back from Stuckart — though Stuckart insists he called her and was upset by what he heard. Nevertheless, while Tyler wasn’t appointed to the council, neither Stuckart nor Fagan say the abuse allegations influenced their choice. But contacted last week about the recently surfaced claims about Tyler, Stuckart wrestled with the tension between the seriousness of allegations from three different women and not letting a person’s past dictate his future. Tyler has steadfastly maintained his innocence for three decades. “I am a gentleman who, in my past relationships, was quick to raise my voice but not my hand,” he says. He’ll apologize for harsh words against women, but says he won’t apologize for things he didn’t do. In the Facebook post on Tuesday, he proclaimed that his community advocacy would not be deterred by all the allegations. But look at all the evidence, Katrina argues. “Why would people be making this up? Over 30 years?” Katrina says. “All their stories are similar. And you’re just going to flat-out say, ‘No, none of this happened, and they’re all liars?’” n danielw@inlander.com

MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 23


Most people who’ve used lethal prescriptions under Washington’s Death with Dignity Act were white, college-educated and lived in Western Washington. They ranged in age from 20 to 101; most were dying of cancer.

24 INLANDER MARCH 8, 2018


A LONG ROAD TO

DIE Life-ending medications are legal in Washington, but getting them is a whole other story

O

BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

n a cold winter morning, Phil Estes gets into the private ambulance he’s hailed for the more than two-hour journey to Spokane, all 99 pounds of the former Hanford engineer clinging to his frail 6-foot-tall frame as his gurney is secured in the vehicle. He’s taking this trip not to save his life, but to be able to end it. As weak as Estes is, this is his last resort. The 81-year-old is several years into his fight against colon cancer. He can barely sit up for five minutes at a time, let alone take care of himself. He’s in pain, it’s hard to breathe and the cancer that has riddled his body is going to kill him. So he’s done. He wants to take “the pill.” “I’ve lived a long life, a happy life,” Linda Estes recalls her dad telling her family at the time. “I want you to go on with your life, but I’ve thought it all through, and this is the best option.” But as his family would soon learn, getting a lethal dose of medication, which is legal under Washington’s Death with Dignity Act, involves much more than a single pill. And in Eastern Washington, it can mean long road-

trips to find doctors and pharmacies willing to validate a patient’s terminal illness and fill a fatal prescription. In the 10 years since voters passed the Death with Dignity Act, the vast majority of terminal patients who have opted to die under the law lived in Western Washington — more than 90 percent of cases most years — despite Eastern Washington accounting for more than 20 percent of the state population. The discrepancy between the two sides of the Cascades, experts say, is largely due to access: Even those who can cover thousands of Phil Estes dollars in out-of-pocket costs aren’t guaranteed to live in an area where a doctor or hospital system is willing to participate. In Estes’ case, Dr. David Jones had been working with him for years and was willing to learn how to sign off as the attending physician and write him a prescription. That meant Estes just needed another consulting doctor to agree ...continued on next page

MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 25


HEALTH CARE “A LONG ROAD TO DIE,” CONTINUED... he was mentally competent, deathly ill and not being coerced to get the life-ending medication. But Jones learned that participating would violate policy at Kadlec, the Tri-Cities hospital system where he works, and he feared he might lose his job. The previously secular system had recently been acquired by Providence, a Catholic health-care system that generally doesn’t allow its employees to participate under the rules of the act. So the family scrambled to find other doctors. “We called everybody we could think of,” Linda Estes recalls. “At one point my mother was carrying all the cellphones and the house extension in a bag with her, so whoever called, she could answer them.” Eventually, with assistance from End of Life Washington, a Seattle-based organization that helps people navigate end-of-life options, they got in touch with a Spokane doctor willing to sign the attending paperwork, and a local physician agreed to handle the consulting role. But the Spokane doctor wanted to diagnose Estes in person, spurring the $1,400 contracted ambulance ride from Richland to Spokane. After an exhausting day of appointments, Estes got his prescription. “I got out to the ‘cabulance,’ and I put the bag in dad’s hands,” Linda Estes says. “He grabbed that little [prescription] bag and his whole body relaxed. He’d been so afraid that at the last minute, that this decision that was his to make would be snatched from him.” Estes took the medication at home Jan. 4, 2016, fell asleep and died peacefully with his daughter holding his hand. But Linda Estes questions why it was so difficult to access something that was legal, especially when her father’s doctor was OK with the decision. “My mom and I were able to accomplish this because we had the financial means and educational resources,” she says. “What do people do who don’t have these kind of resources? It shouldn’t be this hard.” So she’s joining efforts to make the process easier for others and ensure physicians who want to sign off can do so.

TERMINAL CHOICES

Washington’s role in nationwide right-to-die efforts has a complicated history. In 1997, the U.S. Supreme Court reviewed a Washington state law that made physicianassisted suicide a felony. The court held that the law was fine, but also left the door open for states to pass laws allowing the practice if it wouldn’t violate their own constitutions. That same year, Oregon became the first in the nation to enact its Death with Dignity Act. A decade later, nearly 58 percent of Washington state voters approved their own version of the act, making Washington the second state in the country to allow the practice. Assisted suicide is still illegal under state law, but under the Death with Dignity Act, people who are already dying and meet the qualifications are not considered to be committing suicide — their underlying illnesses are listed as the cause of death on death certificates. Since then, three other states — Vermont (in 2013), Colorado (2016) and California (2016) — and the District of Columbia (2017) have also legalized it. Opponents have filed various challenges in court, but each of the laws have been allowed to move forward. Montana hasn’t passed a similar law, but the state’s Supreme Court determined in a 2009 case that nothing in Montana law prohibits physicians from participating. That means about a sixth of the U.S. population lives in a state where the process is legal, and several states are currently con-

26 INLANDER MARCH 8, 2018

Initiative 1000 Results, Election 2008

TOTAL VOTES Yes (1,715,219, 57.82%) No (1,251,255, 42.18%)

Voter support for Initiative 1000 — Washington’s Death with Dignity Act — crossed typical ideological boundaries, with counties on both sides of the Cascades approving the measure. SOURCE: OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF WASHINGTON STATE sidering similar bills. The majority of American adults believe that someone has a moral right to end their life if they are suffering great pain with no chance for improvement (62 percent), or have an incurable disease (56 percent), according to a 2013 Pew Research survey on end of life. However, only 47 percent approved of laws allowing doctors to prescribe lethal medication to terminal patients. How that process is referenced largely depends on viewpoint: Opponents typically refer to it as “physicianassisted suicide” or “euthanasia” (mercy killing), while proponents tend to use “death with dignity” or “physician aid-in-dying.” Many opponents, including large sectors of the medical field and religious organizations, consider the act a crime or immoral. Some worry there could be a slippery slope: If patients think they are a burden on their families, they may feel pressured to die sooner; or insurance companies could decide it is cheaper to pay for fatal medication than further treatment. In summer 2016, Pope Francis told medical leaders that physicianassisted suicide was “false compassion.” “Frailty, pain and infirmity are a difficult trial for everyone, including medical staff. They call for patience, for ‘suffering-with.’ Therefore, we must not give in to the functionalist temptation to apply rapid and drastic solutions, moved by false compassion or by mere criteria of efficiency or cost effectiveness,” the Catholic News Agency reported Francis saying. “The dignity of human life is at stake.” But proponents point to very specific protections written into the law. More than one physician needs to deter-

mine someone is terminally ill and not being coerced. At least one witness to the request for medication must not be related or stand to gain financially from the person’s death. There are mandatory waiting periods and the chance to rescind a request before a prescription is filled. In states where it is not legal, people sometimes take extreme measures to die on their own terms. Lacie Agidius was drinking coffee with her father in Lewiston, Idaho, when he received the worst call of his life. Her grandfather was on the other end. He’d dressed in his best Sunday suit, organized important documents and was calling to make sure someone knew where a few things were on the family farm before taking his own life. “He had told [my dad], ‘I want you to know, I don’t want to freak you out: Today is the day. I’m getting ready to walk down to the car,’” Agidius says. “He said, ‘This is not a call for help. This is absolutely what I want to do.’” After being diagnosed with prostate cancer, her grandfather chose not to treat it. For months, he’d told his family he was getting his affairs in order and planned to take things into his own hands if it came to the point where he was in too much pain and couldn’t care for himself, but they’d largely brushed him off or were in denial, Agidius says. Then came the call. In an awful shock to Agidius’ father, not only did her grandfather warn him not to call authorities, but he also said if he wasn’t successful, he wanted them to “finish the job.” A half-hour drive away, her father refused and said, “You don’t need to do this.” “The whole conversation was awful,” Agidius says.

"I may or may not use this, but it gives me peace of mind."


“That long car ride for my dad and brothers, not knowing what they were going to find, that whole experience was so traumatic.” By the time they arrived, it was too late. Agidius, who now works in hospice care in the Spokane-Coeur d’Alene area, says she wishes that life-ending meds would have been an option for her grandfather, as it would’ve made things easier on everyone to know what was coming, and would have been less frightening for him, as it would have provided certainty. She still lives in Idaho, where lawmakers made physician-assisted suicide a felony in 2011, partly in response to efforts similar to those that legalized the practice in neighboring states. “It is something that is hard for people on the Idaho side to think we wouldn’t have that option,” she says. “You plan that date, then you can have time with that person, you know it’s happening. You can say those things you want to say and not have a shocking situation.”

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PLANNING FOR THE UNKNOWN

Aside from the planning required by mandatory waiting periods, people with life-ending meds tend to plan out the process with family, and in each of the cases volunteer client adviser Jessica Rivers has worked on, they tried to say meaningful goodbyes to their loved ones. Rivers, who lives near Palouse, Washington, has been a volunteer with End of Life Washington for about four years, working with families in Pullman, Spokane and rural communities in the region. In the first case she worked, she and other End of Life volunteers arrived on the date their client selected to find his home full with family, friends and neighbors. “They had food and drink and had all been having his celebration of life that morning,” Rivers says. “It was really remarkable, because we just let them take their time and do what they needed to do.” The man, dying of aggressive cancer, gave his own eulogy, and everyone surrounded him as he lay down in bed, took the medication and talked them through how he felt before falling asleep. In the quiet, someone started singing “Amazing Grace,” and everyone cried. “It was very powerful for me, and it was very gentle and very peaceful for him,” Rivers says. For her, the choice to get involved in end-oflife care started about 20 years ago, when she cared for her mother, who was dying of pancreatic cancer. “I remember my mom looking at herself in the mirror one morning, and the cancer had just ravaged her body,” Rivers says. “She was actually, amazingly enough, OK with dying, but she wasn’t OK with the process of getting there, and I think that’s true for most of the folks I’ve been with at End of Life.” Of the 25 cases she’s been involved with through the organization, each patient died, though only six of them decided to take the medication. “The majority of them told me, ‘I may or may not use this, but it gives me peace of mind,’” Rivers says. “And one of the things I tell them on that first visit when I meet them is ‘I’m not invested at all in whether they take this or not.’” As a volunteer, she typically meets with families a few times, offering information on what the

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Jessica Rivers, an End of Life Washington volunteer. process may look like, encouraging clients to get on hospice care, and talking about death and the dying process, which is new to many people. “I think that helps reduce fear,” she says. “My little piece of advice to family members is try not to let the fear and grief interfere in the days to come that you have left with your loved one. Try to really balance that fear and grief with love and gratitude.” Rivers, who spent several years working in hospice, feels people aren’t supported enough through the end of their lives, which can be distressing. One dying man Rivers spoke to last year blurted out in front of his adult children that if he couldn’t for some reason access lethal medication under Washington’s law, he had hunting guns in his basement. “The fear and distress this caused his children was so obvious and apparent,” Rivers says. “But the reality is people who are desperate can do dramatic things, and that’s one of the reasons this law is so important. People should not have to feel desperate.”

EAST SIDE, WEST SIDE

Of the more than 1,100 people who are known to have died after getting prescriptions for lethal medication under Washington’s law from 2009 through 2016, fewer than 150 lived east of the Cascades, according to data compiled by the Washington State Department of Health. Not all of those people took the medication. About three-quarters of people who got prescriptions had cancer, while the rest were mostly people with neurodegenerative diseases such as Lou Gehrig’s disease or respiratory or heart disease. People who use the law account for only about two of every 1,000 deaths in Washington, says Sally McLaughlin, executive director of End of Life Washington. Of the more than 54,000 people who died in the state in 2015, 166 used the medication, putting the number of deaths in that category slightly above the 141 people who died from the flu the same year. ...continued on next page

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MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 27


HEALTH CARE

Artist Melinda Hannigan fought cancer for years before deciding to take life-ending medication at her home in Twisp.

PATRICK M. HANNIGAN PHOTO

“A LONG ROAD TO DIE,” CONTINUED... “It’s not like it’s a rampant number of people, but the issues with access have to do with several things,” she says. “One is access to physicians who can or are able to prescribe life-ending medications in a more conservative environment. There are a lot of physicians who don’t even want to think about administering life-ending medications.” Secondly, many doctors are not allowed to participate under the rules of their employers. Patients often have to form new relationships with doctors when they’ve got little time left. Aside from the population size accounting for part of the difference, many people east of the mountains just don’t know the law exists, says Dr. Raleigh Bowden, who lives in Twisp and works as a volunteer medical adviser with End of Life. “In my personal experience, a lot of people don’t know about the law,” Bowden says. “In fact I talked to one pharmacist [last] year who didn’t know we had a law.” Patients need both a prescribing doctor and a consulting physician, who ensures the person isn’t being coerced. To be eligible, the patient must be a Washington resident, have about six months or less to live, and

understand that there are other options, Bowden says. Ideally consulting physicians see someone in person, but in rural areas, sometimes they have to use other options like electronic communication. From Twisp, Bowden will sometimes serve in the consulting role via Skype, as that part of the process mostly involves going over a checklist with the patient. Attending doctors almost always want to see the patient in person, Bowden says, and it’s better if they’ve already had a relationship. Jones, Estes’ doctor, says it was the fact he’d known him for eight years that made him comfortable with the idea of supporting his decision. “It was the perfect situation for me to say, ‘Wow, how could I deny this?’” Jones says. “Whatever my beliefs were, I was a physician in the state of Washington where this was legal. It took the politics out of it for me until the very end when I realized I might be at risk of losing my job.” Aside from physicians, the medication itself can pose problems. End of Life Washington recommends one of two prescriptions. The first and cheapest runs about $700, but

"It took the politics out of it for me until... I realized I might be at risk of losing my job."”

28 INLANDER MARCH 8, 2018

needs to be made in a compounding pharmacy, which often isn’t available in rural areas, Bowden says. The second and most expensive option involves opening up about 100 capsules of Seconal, once regularly prescribed as a sleeping pill, and mixing the contents with juice or something the patient can drink. With only one manufacturer making the drug anymore, the price for that dosage has gone up from a few hundred dollars when Washington’s law started to more than $3,000. “If you’re poor — and I have yet to see an insurance company pay for this, though I hear some will — then the cost falls into the lap of the patient or their family,” Bowden says. “That’s a barrier if you come from a poor part of the state.” The most common reasons Washington patients told their doctors they wanted life-ending meds was because they were losing autonomy and the ability to engage in activities that make life enjoyable, with 84 percent to 100 percent of patients citing those two reasons every year from 2009 to 2016, the most recent for which state data has been released. In contrast, inadequate pain control or concern about it was cited by 25 percent to 41 percent of patients, and only 2 percent to 13 percent cited concerns about the cost of medical treatment. For many years, Pat and Melinda Hannigan lived in Seattle, where Melinda was an artist and Pat worked as a tanker pilot in Puget Sound. Melinda was hanging some of her paintings for a show in Tacoma when she had a shooting pain go through her head and half of her face became paralyzed. What they initially thought was


a stroke was actually due to a tumor, part of an aggressive cancer that would spread to other parts of her body. Hannigan tried every treatment available, but after years of radiation, chemotherapy and other therapies destroying her body, her quality of life was awful, Pat Hannigan says. She could barely swallow or speak, was put on a feeding tube for more than a year and was confined to a wheelchair. After going on hospice care in the home the couple had built in Twisp, she decided to take the medication. When it came time, Pat had to drive an hour to Omak to get the pills, which cost them about $4,400 out of pocket. Hannigan shared a final dinner with her kids and grandkids and was surrounded by family when she took the lethal dose in July of 2016. Pat Hannigan says it was the right decision for his wife and was in keeping with her choices to accept or decline treatment at every step of her illness. Still, he hasn’t spoken to many people about the experience, in part because he doesn’t want to influence others, who need to make that choice for themselves. However, he thinks those who oppose the law don’t understand what it’s like. “I hear people criticize it and I think to myself, ‘They have never been through an experience like this in their lives,’” Hannigan says. “It’s really easy for them talk based on their religious beliefs or their philosophical principles, but if you live through four years of absolute, total hell, with no hope, Death with Dignity is an awesome thing.”

NOT FOR EVERYONE

Policies about physician participation under the act vary even within the same system. For example, Providence physicians in Spokane are not allowed to participate under the rules of the act in any way, even though physicians at Swedish, a Providence-affiliated hospital in Seattle, are allowed to if they choose. “We respect the rights of patients and their care team to discuss and explore all treatment options and believe those conversations are important and confidential. As part of a discussion, requests for self-administered life-ending medication may occur, but our providers do not participate in any way in assisted suicide,” writes Liz DeRuyter, director of external communicaSamantha tions for Providence Health & Wohlfeil Services. “We provide all other covers social requested end-of-life and palliaservices, the tive care and other services to environment, patients and families.” tribes and MultiCare, the other large other issues service provider in Spokane, for the does allow its physicians to Inlander. Before joining the paper participate as attending and in February 2017, she worked consulting physicians, and they as a political reporter at the may write prescriptions. HowBellingham Herald in northwest ever, no MultiCare physicians or Washington. pharmacies can help patients fill the prescriptions, meaning they need to find another pharmacy to fill it. In her efforts to increase access, Linda Estes is working with Providence to change the policy at its Tri-Cities affiliate hospital to allow physicians to participate under the law, even if that means doing so outside of the scope of the hospital system. She’s been in contact with a Providence attorney about helping draft that policy, which is under consideration. Estes says she’s passionate about making that change because when a family member is dying, the last thing people need is additional stress around end-of-life decisions. “When you’re grieving so hard, you don’t have brain cells left to deal with this,” Estes says. “Having been through it myself, and having been put completely through the ringer, I want to make sure this is an easier process to do. Not to say it’s the right choice for everyone, it’s just our choice.” n

ABOUT THE

AUTHOR

MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 29


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WORDS

STRAIGHT AND TWO CHASERS

Author Bruce Holbert

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Spokane author Bruce Holbert on his ripping, rambunctious new novel Whiskey BY DAN NAILEN

A

s Bruce Holbert’s new novel Whiskey unfolds, its time-hopping plot and the alternating comedic and horrifying misadventures of brothers Smoker and Andre bound across the Washington scablands and North Idaho mountains while remaining rooted — much like the author — in Grand Coulee. His dad’s family helped settle the town, and his mother’s was among the many who arrived to work at the dam. And while Whiskey is anything but autobiographical, the sense of place that comes through is as vital to the

two brothers’ story as it is to Holbert’s own life. And it’s a place that would be damn near ideal if it weren’t for the pesky humans and their tendency to screw things up. “I feel like, in part, these characters are trying to erase themselves,” Holbert says of Smoker and Andre, who juggle ex-wives, a hungry bear and the long-term implications of their volatile parents throughout Whiskey. “And in the end, they manage to. No one really recognizes them. “There’s a tendency for self-annihilation in the West, and in these characters. You go and you stand and you

look at a beautiful vista, and you say, ‘Man, this is almost perfect.’ And what’s the one thing that keeps it from being perfect? That you’re here. Because that means someone else is coming, too.” Indeed, Whiskey is a novel of constant motion, a truly ripping yarn with Smoker and Andre chasing after Smoker’s young daughter — disappeared at the hands of a religious zealot — while running from their own sordid histories of violence, drinking binges and bad decisions. ...continued on next page

MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 31


CULTURE | WORDS “STRAIGHT AND TWO CHASERS,� CONTINUED... Andre is the more meditative of the two, a high school teacher trying to stay sober and keep his marriage alive, while Smoker is the impulsive rabble rouser as likely to exacerbate a problem as solve it. While they have each other’s back in their hunt for Smoker’s daughter, set in 1991, the brothers are rivals and fighters, too. They’ve been played off each other since childhood by their parents Pork and Peg, whose teen love story is told in vivid flashbacks. The jumbled timelines of Whiskey do nothing to slow its propulsive narrative; indeed, the flashbacks to mama Peg’s coming-of-age and evolution into a sexually aggressive, intimidating force to both her kids and ex-husband offer many of the book’s best passages. “At the beginning I’d written her as a male character, and about halfway through the story when she comes in, I thought, ‘Goddamn, I’m tired of writing about men like this,’ so I said, ‘OK, let’s make her a woman,’� Holbert says. “I thought she might end up more a traditional woman and come in and calm everybody else down, but instead, man, she just ripped it up. She’s the catalyst for a lot of their responses to the world, this woman who is the most dominant character of the group. The rest of them have to respond to her in a way that is more interesting than the way I was heading.�

W

ith Whiskey, Holbert could be heading into a whole new level of literary success. It sure seems to be setting up that way for the 58-year-old who won the 2015 Washington State Book Award for fiction for his last novel, The Hour of Lead. The new book is coming out from a larger publishing house, MCD Books, and he has a new agent. Holbert recently retired after three decades of teaching, most recently at Mt. Spokane High School, and lives in Nine Mile Falls with his wife, Holly. Holbert hopes he’ll have more time to get involved with the Spokane literary community that he greatly respects but feels a little distanced from due to his years teaching and living on the outskirts of town. “I had a full-time job that I took pretty seriously for 30-some years, I had kids and wanted to be involved in their lives as much as I could be,� Holbert says. “My wife, she’s put up with me this long, so I try to take care of her. She suffers from a congenital illness and sometimes that limits the things we can do. “The other thing is, I’m a misanthropic bastard. Teaching school all day long, you’ve got to be on. At least the way I did it, you have to be kind of a standup comic all day long. Then you go home and, especially if you’re writing, you just want a little air. So I don’t get out as much socially as other people do.�

“I’m kind of like the old farmers who go out and they get in their truck and say they’re going to drive and check the back 40.�

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ver coffee and an hour or so of conversation, in addition to calling himself a “misanthropic bastard,� Holbert refers to himself as a “mutant� and talks about how “I’m big, and everybody thinks I’m crazy, so nobody argues with me� in talking about selecting readings for his high school kids back when he was teaching. The humor that infuses much of his everyday conver-

sation pulses through Whiskey and might have taken hold early on when one of his relatives introduced his impressionable mind to some thought-provoking books. “I grew up in a trailer, and we moved around a lot and there weren’t many books because they were heavy,â€? Holbert says. “My grandma and grandpa, at their house, they had a bunch of old pulp noir books with the really racy covers. I tried to read them, the pictures were way more interesting than the words. My aunt Marge, though, she was a really good reader and she gave me a couple of books when I was too young to gather everything from them. I think she knew they would continue to feed me, so when I was about 10 she gave me Catch-22 and One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest. And she was right, I kept going back to them.â€? The manic energy and memorable characters in Whiskey aren’t far off from those created by Joseph Heller and Ken Kesey in those classics. Whether the MORE EVENTS ability to craft such a Visit Inlander.com for winning tale soaked complete listings of in from Holbert’s local events. precocious childhood reading or from his years studying at EWU, where he graduated in English, or earning his MFA at the Iowa Writers Workshop, who knows? What is certain is that Holbert’s been working at his craft for decades, and the results arriving now in Whiskey are pretty incredible. He figures he started writing about the brothers Smoker and Andre about 15 years ago, “just a few scattered stories, and the characters kept reappearing.â€? A couple of his grad school friends told him they wanted more, and he kept going back to the brothers in his work, and to their Grand Coulee stomping grounds. Eventually, Whiskey started coming together, the characters and the landscape pushing his writing into directions he wasn’t expecting when he started. “I’ll dive into something and just try to go where the juice is; you go where the juice is taking you. You can usually feel it, when you go there,â€? Holbert says. “I don’t have a plan, ever, because everything I plan turns out boring. I’m kind of like the old farmers who go out and they get in their truck and say they’re going to drive and check the back 40, but really they’re just driving around. “Writing is that way for me. There are certain things that compel me, but I have to discover things along the way. If I don’t, then I don’t think people reading are going to discover a lot. That’s the real joy of reading, to feel like you’re discovering stuff as the writer does.â€? n Bruce Holbert: Whiskey reading • Wed, March 14, at 7 pm • Free • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main • auntiesbooks.com • 838-0206

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CULTURE | DIGEST

GATOR SEASON Leave it to Donald Glover to make oft-troubled comedian Katt Williams look like he’s ready for some serious acting roles. In the second season premiere of Glover’s brilliant, trippy Atlanta (subtitled Robbin’ Season), Williams plays the “Alligator Man,” a slightly crazed relative of Glover’s Earn and Earn’s rapper cousin Paper Boi, and Williams is impressive in the role — all the more so considering he had to share screen time with a big ol’ gator. In a show that blends harsh realism with utterly surreal moments (remember the invisible car in Season One?), Williams’ character offers a little bit of both. New episodes of Atlanta air Thursdays on FX. (DAN NAILEN)

Just a Bun BY MITCH RYALS,

AS TOLD BY HIS BUN

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e’re standing in line for coffee when out of nowhere, I get honked. The lady behind us reached up, wrapped me up in her grubby paw and squeezed. “Your man bun is so soft,” she says to the man to whose head I’m affixed with a black elastic hair tie. “I’ve never touched one before.” An innocent compliment to most, but to me this violent assault is just another example of the indignities of my existence. I’m just a bun, after all. I didn’t choose to be tied to a man. Women gawk and stare. Sometimes they’ll shout: “Nice man bun, baby!”

THE BUZZ BIN

ON THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music arrives online and in stores March 9. To wit:  DAVID BYRNE, American Utopia. More like “David Byrne, American Treasure,” am I right?  JUDAS PRIEST, Firepower. I’m a little shocked they haven’t already used this album title.  MYLES KENNEDY, Year of the Tiger. Spokane’s own, doing the solo thing away from Slash’s Snakepit and Alter Bridge.  NATHANIEL RATELIFF AND THE NIGHT SWEATS, Tearing at the Seams. Is the title a reflection of emotional rending, or too much tour catering? (DAN NAILEN)

Men comment, too: “Your man-bun game is strong today, bro!” Other jeers have been more violent: “Cut your hair, you stinkin’ hippie!” It’s been a year since the “man bun” Ken doll was released, but I’m still triggered when I think about the onslaught of bun-shaming on Twitter: “The new ‘Man Bun’ Ken doll comes with shirt, shoes and keys to Barbie’s car that he’s driving until he ‘gets back on his feet again,’” one user quipped. “I don’t even own Mattel’s new man bun Ken Doll but he already told me the dangers of processed food and how Bernie would have beaten Trump,” another mused. Even the president of the United States, master of the combover, has officially come out against buns on men: “Man buns? Never been my thing, I must admit.” It’s a moniker that’s thrust upon me and an inescapable reminder that I’m forever defined by the human to whom I’m tied. But recently, I’ve gained some perspective. When we told our girlfriend about the coffee-shop assault, she just chuckled. Welcome to being a woman, she said, and told us of all the times she’s been referred to as a “female journalist.” Waiters call her “sweetie.” Dudes hanging out of cars feel entitled to comment on her chest. Consider all the pregnant women whose bellies get rubbed with impunity, she suggested. Suddenly, the bun-shaming and unwanted squeezing fell into context. Maybe being a man bun isn’t so bad. n

FRIDAY WITH FALLON Spokane-born, WSU-educated Kelsey Cook is making some noise in the standup comedy world, splitting her time between Los Angeles and New York, touring the country with Jim Norton and co-hosting a podcast, Self Help-less. Friday night, she’ll be rubbing elbows with Drew Barrymore when she hits The Tonight Show stage. Tune in and/ or go see Cook when she’s at the Spokane Comedy Club March 29-31. (DAN NAILEN)

CHRONICALLY DELICIOUS Each bite of a burrito from Chronic Tacos, which recently opened in downtown Spokane, packs in so much flavor that, momentarily, it wipes away all that may be troubling you that day. By the time I finally conquered the mammoth burrito, for instance, I nearly forgot that the employees wrote “Wilsooooon” on the burrito bag next to a picture of a volleyball, repeating a joke that I, and all other Wilsons in the world, have endured for 18 years. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

MINNOW BLY CAST ANNOUNCED The Sacred Lies of Minnow Bly, based on Spokane author Stephanie Oakes’ 2015 novel about a girl whose hands are cut off before escaping a religious cult, is being adapted into a Facebook streaming TV series called simply Sacred Lies. Last week, we learned that 20-year-old actress Elena Kampouris (Before I Fall, American Odyssey) will play story protagonist Minnow. Her juvie roommate, Angel, is being played by Kiana Madeira (Dark Matter), while Kevin Carroll will play a forensic psychologist who questions Minnow, and Ryan Robbins fills the role of Minnow’s father, Samuel. The show hasn’t yet set a launch date. (CHEY SCOTT)

MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 33


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BY E.J. IANNELLI lliot Leeds was dead: to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. His private plane crashed, the wreckage searched, no survivors found. And still, like Marley’s ghost, the late technology tycoon reappears one night, courtesy of the data on a couriered hard drive, to urge the living to reexamine their status quo. Only, Leeds has radically different notions about what it means to save a soul. The ontological question that threads through playwright Jeffrey Jackson’s Two Point Oh is set up in a poignant opening scene, where Leeds (Dalin Tipton), flying to his keynote at a global summit, is videoconferencing with his wife Melanie (Allison Peterson) back at home in their high-tech Silicon Valley cyber mansion. They’ve been trying for a baby, but that inherently physical act has been complicated by distance. Leeds attempts to placate her by saying that modern technology’s virtuality comes close enough to flesh-and-blood presence. Melanie, frustrated by its glitches and limitations, is unpersuaded. After her husband’s digital resurrection, grief

compels her to reconsider. Here’s a convincing likeness of Elliot, displayed à la Max Headroom on the set’s two large portrait-oriented monitors, responding in real time to Melanie’s questions, reassuring her, singing their shared song in a goofy voice. It’s no different to their video chats. Sure, Elliot might now be an elegant interplay of algorithms and subroutines; but really, how far removed is that from the elegant interplay of synapses and hormones? When Ben Robbins (Ben Dyck) is visited by the electronic specter of his former business partner, he’s surprisingly skeptical. Despite his technophilia, Robbins can’t quite accept existence being distilled into ones and zeroes: How can original thoughts emerge from a finite set of coded instructions? For a time at least, Robbins will argue that the method — well, hack might be a better term — Leeds has used to cheat death offers only the semblance of life. Meanwhile, their company’s new CEO Catherine Powell (Julie Berghammer) and TV blowhard Jerry Gold (Ron Ford) join the conversation in tangential ways. Pandering to his audi-


5 0 TH A N N I V E R S A R Y 2 0 1 8

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Ben Dyck (left) as Ben Robbins and Allison Peterson as Melanie Leeds.

JEFF FERGUSON PHOTO

ence, Gold tries to both sensationalize and make sense of Leeds’ disembodied self. Powell sees the phenomenon as both a liability and an opportunity. The concept calls for some tricky interactions. The central character never appears in the flesh, which gives the “live” actors two basic blocking choices: They can either talk to the rearmounted screens with the audience at their backs, or they can face the audience and speak into the ether with the screen behind them. In both cases, fundamental emotional connections are lost. Furthermore, there’s a certain cinematic conditioning that draws the eye to the bright, flashy screen over whatever live action is taking place before it. This might actually serve Two Point Oh by making an incidental point or two about humanity and our fraught romance with technology, but it doesn’t always make for satisfying theater. It also doesn’t help that Jackson sketches his characters’ relationships using well-worn dramatic shorthand, or that the arguments over Elliot 2.0 don’t advance beyond grad student name-checking (though, bizarrely, not Descartes), lazy zingers, CSI-style technobabble and reiterating the play’s thin Twilight Zone premise from different angles. Tipton transcends some of these shortcomings — plus his two-dimensional confines — by conveying the warmth of a loving husband mixed with the sinister overtones of HAL 9000. Peterson generally hits the sweet spot between self-assertiveness and vulnerability. But there’s no real sign of Chris Wooley’s direction in the show’s bumpy pacing and lack of polish. More refined are Matt Egan’s set and integrated lighting design, which features a wall of futuristic rounded windows and entryways outlined by color-changing LED light strips. Flanking center stage are the two screens, their AV wizardry ominously threatening to steal the show. n Two Point Oh • Through March 25 • Thu-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm • $27 • Firth J. Chew Studio at the Spokane Civic Theatre • 1020 N. Howard • spokanecivictheatre.com • 325-2507

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Diners are seated communally at Kobe’s three hibachi tables.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

JAPANESE

Dinner as a Show Guests at Kobe Hibachi, Sushi and Bar in North Spokane can watch their meal cooked in front of them at the restaurant’s hibachi grills BY CHEY SCOTT

O

n any given night, the hibachi chef’s theatrical shouts, mixed with gleeful reactions from diners of all ages, carry throughout the dining room of Kobe Hibachi, Sushi and Bar. If you’re not sitting at the recently opened Japanese restaurant’s hibachi table, where menu items are prepared fresh on the grill directly in front of diners, you may feel as if you’re missing out. The performance-based cooking sometimes includes arcing shots of sake (Japanese rice wine) from a squeeze bottle aimed directly into customers’ wide-open mouths. The lively chefs also tend to get a little carried away with their flame-wielding prowess, sometimes setting their tall chef’s hats alight (safely) at the end of the meal’s preparation. If performance-style dining at a communal table isn’t your preference, Kobe offers all of its menu items off of the grill and from the sushi bar in a separate dining

36 INLANDER MARCH 8, 2018

room. (Likewise, sushi and other non-grilled items can be ordered from the hibachi tables.) The restaurant’s sushi bar side is a little quieter, with cozy booth seating along a wall of windows, or at stools along the sushi bar. Opening in fall 2017, Kobe took over a large pagodainspired building on north Division Street formerly home to the Chinese restaurant Kaylon Garden. Kobe’s owner David Cao spent nearly 10 months renovating before opening last October. Though it retains some of the Asian-inspired decor and atmosphere, restaurant manager Sarah He says the space was pretty rundown when Kobe took ownership. “Inside is totally different. If you come in the door, on the left side is the hibachi and the right side is sushi dine-in,” He explains. “We also do lunch and have [done] a lot of investment into the grill — all of our kitchen is upgraded to fit the Japanese requirements for teppanyaki.”

Teppanyaki is a style of Japanese cooking on a flat iron griddle heated by gas, and is the type of grill used at Kobe’s dining room cook stations. (Technically speaking, a Japanese hibachi grill has an open grate design.) “At first, customers were scared because they don’t know what hibachi is,” He says. “They know teppanyaki, not hibachi. East Coast restaurants have [hibachi] a lot and that is why we call it that, not teppanyaki.” He says hibachi-style restaurants are popular in Japan, but the culinary performance element isn’t as much of a focus there as in the U.S. “It becomes a show with the meal, so that is different,” she says. “People kind of can have a show and still have very good food. It’s good for family gatherings and special events — holidays, birthdays and company meals together.” All of the food, from the fried rice to vegetables,


noodles and many different proteins, is prepared on the grill. At Kobe, each hibachi meal comes with soup, salad, veggies and a side of fried rice or noodles. He says the meals ($12.75-$36.95) are very customizable, with several meat or meat combinations to choose from, starting with the basics of chicken and beef, and a wide variety of seafood including salmon, shrimp, lobster, red snapper and scallops. For younger diners, a special kids’ menu offers smaller portions ($12.95-$15.95).

K

obe’s three hibachi chefs have worked, respectively, in similar restaurants in Las Vegas, Chicago and Spokane. They each take a uniquely personal approach when interacting with customers, He says. “Some of them like to play jokes, some like to play with fire.” The restaurant’s three hibachi tables are open for service throughout lunch and dinner (service takes a short break on weekdays between 2:30 and 4 pm), with expedited service offered at midday to cater to customers on lunch breaks. Service at the hibachi table is scheduled to begin 15 to 20 minutes after the first customer is seated there, after which diners are served first courses of soup and salad before the chef begins his work, which He says takes about 20 minutes. While hibachi-style cooking is Kobe’s focus, the restaurant offers a multi-page menu of traditional Asian cuisine, including bento boxes, tempura, teriyaki, katsu (breaded and fried meats) and udon noodle entrées.

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A cucumber roll from Kobe’s sushi bar. With a secondary focus on sushi, Kobe devotes several pages of its menu to describe its wide variety of raw and cooked rolls, including maki (rice-based rolls), temaki (a cone of nori), sashimi (single pieces of raw fish) and nigiri (raw fish atop a small mound of rice). “The sushi we have are a lot of recipes from the East Coast,” He says. “They are in touch with Japanese and Asian foods, and we have all sorts of things for beginners, sushi eaters and nonsushi eaters.” She mentions the Kobe roll ($14.50), a house special that’s made without any raw fish. Inside the outer layer of sticky rice is thinly-sliced beef with a sweet pepper rub, onion and provolone cheese, topped with eel sauce. The menu includes a variety of vegetable-filled rolls with choices such as sweet potato, avocado, cucumber and asparagus ($4.95 each). “We have a lot of levels for people so everyone can get a taste of it even if they don’t like sushi,” He says. For an equally eye-catching and flavorful roll, try the Sweetheart ($13.50): spicy tuna and sweet potato topped with tuna and red tobiko spicy mayo. n cheys@inlander.com Kobe Hibachi, Sushi and Bar • 2819 N. Division • Open MonThu 11 am-2:30 pm and 4-9:30 pm; Fri-Sat 11 am-10 pm; Sun noon-9 pm • facebook.com/kobespokane • 315-8864

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Wok Stop Newly opened Chef Lu’s Asian Bistro on Spokane’s South Hill captures the “breath of the wok” BY QUINN WELSCH

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he “breath of the wok,” or wo-qi, is a sort of magical essence that Chinese chefs aspire to capture. Literally translated, wo-qi describes the thermal radiation that emanates from a wok, the large bowl-shaped pans commonly used for cooking stir fry. The breath of the wok (or the spirit of the wok, depending on who you ask) enters the food at these high temperatures and preserves the juices and flavors of the food. But perfecting the art of wo-qi requires more than just high temperatures: It’s the test of a culinary master’s skill. This is what Chef Lu’s Asian Bistro prides itself on. Jianjun Lu, or “JJ,” as he’s known in America, is the reserved and downto-business owner of the new restaurant, now in its third month. Located in the Lincoln Heights Shopping Center, Chef Lu’s Asian Bistro is a somewhat different take on Asian cuisine. It departs from the often dimly lit and seemingly somber Asian restaurants with its bright colors, high ceilings and an enormous focal wall of pink and purple koi wallpaper, imported from China. Lu’s menu offers a variety of plates and appetizers that combine both familiarity and adventure. American favorites include the likes of General Tso’s chicken, broccoli and beef and orange chicken ($11.95-$12.95). But these items “aren’t really Chinese,” says Vinson Cai, Lu’s consultant and translator for this story. Where Chef Lu truly showcases his culinary skills is the “modern Chinese menu.” These items include the eggplant with hot garlic sauce and black mushrooms, onions and beef topped with coriander ($12.95); the “King of Tofu,” egg and tofu-like pancakes, mixed with shrimp, scallops, chicken and squid with


JJ and Monica Lu opened Chef Lu’s Asian Bistro in late 2017.

QUINN WELSCH PHOTO

vegetables ($13.95); or the “stewed sliced fish in wine sauce,” with zucchini and carrots ($13.95). These meals are more akin to what you might find in China, says Cai; they’re more authentic. The restaurant also has a Szechuan menu and a sushi menu, each of which are prepared by individually dedicated chefs, Cai says. The restaurant includes a full-service cocktail bar as well. Lu began his culinary training more than 20 years ago in Tianjin, a major port city about 80 miles south of Beijing. He moved to the U.S. about nine years ago. He and his wife, Monica, also originally from China, opened Chef Lu’s Asian Bistro after working at different Asian restaurants in Liberty Lake, Cheney and Coeur d’Alene.

old

O’ G t o P ir

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A selection of sushi menu items served at Chef Lu’s. “JJ and Monica believe that it’s time for an Inland city to have authentic Chinese restaurant,” Cai says. “What they are doing here is very common in coastal city towns, like San Francisco, Seattle.” In the kitchen, Lu demonstrates his culinary prowess at the wok. Fire bursts from the stove into the air. It’s wo-qi, Cai says, from a safe distance. Lu maintains a stoic demeanor as he maneuvers his tools under the flame. “In this business, talking doesn’t do too much. In the end you just have to try the food,” Lu says in Mandarin to Cai. n

ind T ids F

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Help Kids Better Their Future and Join Us for an Evening of Fun for a Cause! Benefiting Communities In Schools of Spokane County

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MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 39


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Washington State University Health Sciences Spokane

40 INLANDER MARCH 8, 2018

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Sixth Avenue Providence Medical Pharmacy Health Services

A prominent spot along North Hamilton Street has been reborn. The new Logan Tavern takes over the longtime home of the Bulldog Pub, then coffee shop and bar Chairs Public House, and most recently Scotty’s Doghouse pub. Now, new co-owner Nehemiah Zilar and his business partners have opened the Logan Tavern just in time for March Madness basketball. Zilar describes the place as “your basic neighborhood bar: chill vibe, good whiskey and beer options, elevated bar food you can share at an affordable price.” He and the bar’s other owners were all fans of the old Bulldog Pub (it closed in 2011 after 65 years in business and was sort of reborn inside Gonzaga University’s Hemmingson Center) and hope to capture some of that “old magic” with the new spot. Stop in for a beer and a burger at 1305 N. Hamilton, and keep up with the happenings at facebook.com/TheLoganTavern.

FIVE MILE HEIGHTS PIZZA TO CLOSE

The end of a long era is coming for a north side family favorite. Five Mile Heights Pizza, at 6409 N. Maple, is set to close at the end of April due to the retirement of its owners, Rolf and Marita Aspaas, an employee of the restaurant confirmed last week with the Inlander. Five Mile Heights Pizza, open for more than 25 years, has long been known as a popular neighborhood gathering place for families, sports teams and other community groups. Beyond its lineup of specialty pizzas, the restaurant serves sandwiches, salads,

calzones and bread-heavy appetizers. Based on a predevelopment building record on file with the city of Spokane, it appears the pizzeria’s site (listed as 6404 N. Ash) is to become a Taco Bell drive-thru.

DRINK BEER FOR THE SPOKANE RIVER

The third annual Riverkeeper Riverwalk, a pub crawl-style benefit for the Spokane Riverkeeper, is back this March. Hosted by River City Brewing and Numerica Credit Union, the awareness and fundraising effort asks beer-loving community members to visit five or more participating restaurants and order a pint of the Riverkeeper IPA. Forms to track that progress were distributed in the March 1 ENTRÉE edition of the Get the scoop on local Inlander. After food news with our weekly you order, ask Entrée newsletter. Sign up your server to at Inlander.com/newsletter. check off the box for the corresponding restaurant and then turn in the completed form to Numerica’s downtown branch by April 4. By doing so you’ll trigger a $5 donation to Spokane Riverkeeper and get a prize. This year’s Riverwalk participating restaurants are David’s Pizza, Veraci Pizza, Central Food, Tomato Street, Fast Eddie’s, Borracho, Ripples Riverside Grill, The Blackbird, Spencer’s and Steelhead Bar & Grille. Also consider volunteering at the first river cleanup of 2018 on Saturday, March 10, from 10 am-1 pm, at High Bridge Park. n


SPY NYET Red Sparrow is a well-made assemblage of all the spy movie tropes we’ve seen before BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

R

ed Sparrow is based on a novel written by a former CIA operative, so I’m forced to believe that much of what we’re shown is completely plausible. I’ll believe that the Russian government has special spy academies where students learn all kinds of sensible skills — picking locks, identifying chemical compounds, using your sexuality as a weapon. And I’ll go along with the notion that the Agency is lousy with double agents and rats, willing to dispense valuable information to the enemies at a moment’s notice. Sure, why not? What I don’t buy is Jennifer Lawrence as a Soviet ballerina-turned-superspy, complete with a shaky Russian accent, who goes from pirouetting civilian to full-on Atomic Blonde in a matter of months. It’s not for Lawrence’s lack of trying: She simply hasn’t been given a compelling character to play. Her name is Dominika Egorova, and following an onstage accident that leaves her with a broken leg and a stalled dance career, she’s approached by her uncle (Mat-

Jennifer Lawrence might have an Oscar, but she’s a bit out of her depth playing a Russian spy in the thriller Red Sparrow. thias Schoenaerts), a Russian intelligence officer, with an her to make the occasional mistake, to zig when she interesting proposition. She’s to lure a slimy politician should have zagged, which suggests she could have been into a hotel room and get her hands on his phone. In exmade into a believable, interesting character. change, her sickly mother (Joely Richardson) will receive The movie has also been directed with workmanlike a lifetime of medical care. efficiency by Francis Lawrence (no relation to Jennifer), But there’s a hiccup. The politician attacks Dominika who previously made three of the four Hunger Games and he’s murdered in front of her by a special agent. films, and he’s assembled an excellent supporting cast of Knowing she could now be an asset to the government, reliable character actors — Ciarán Hinds, Jeremy Irons, Dominika’s uncle sends her off to spy school, in a chilly, Bill Camp, Sakina Jaffrey, Douglas Hodge and Maryremote estate presided over by an icy, dispassionate Louise Parker in a scene-stealer of a cameo as a vodkaCharlotte Rampling. Dominika is a quick swilling chief of staff. RED SPARROW study, and so she’s then whisked off to But as far as its espionage plot is Rated R Budapest, where she’s tasked with cozying concerned, Red Sparrow is covering wellup to American CIA agent Nate Nash (Joel Directed by Francis Lawrence trodden territory; your average episode Edgerton) in an attempt to uncover a mole Starring Jennifer Lawrence, Joel of The Americans has more intrigue and Edgerton, Matthias Schoenaerts supplying Russian intel to the U.S. suspense. It’s a standard grab bag of Nate is instantly suspicious of Dominiblackmail, seductions, double crosses and ka’s intentions: He’s almost certain she’s investigating mistaken identities, punctuated by the requisite costume him, and tells his cohorts as much. But he begins a relachanges and hair colorings, and we try to follow along tionship with her anyway, for no other reason, I suppose, and connect all the dots in our heads before the other than she looks like Jennifer Lawrence and he looks like shoe inevitably drops. Joel Edgerton. What could possibly go wrong? Have I simply seen too many spy movies, or is it There were a few things I appreciated about Red Sparmerely lazy plotting? I’m leaning more toward the latrow. Its solemnity took me by surprise. It’s much quieter ter, but perhaps I wouldn’t have minded the belabored than standard Hollywood fare, and far more brutal: machinations of the story had the people at its center Some of its prolonged sequences of torture, particularly possessed a shred of personality or spirit. They’re merely one involving an impromptu skin graft, are disturbing. game pieces being moved around on a chess board, and And despite Dominika’s general deftness, the film allows we know exactly which square they’re going to land on. n

MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 41


FILM | SHORTS

NTERN THEAT GIC LA ER MA

OPENING FILMS

FRI, MAR 9TH - THU, MAR 15TH TICKETS: $9

THE SHAPE OF WATER (120 MIN)

FRI/SAT: 2:15, 7:00 SUN: 2:15, 5:15 TUE-THU: 3:30, 6:15

FRI-SUN: 4:45 TUE-THU: 4:00

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (130 MIN)

FRI/SAT: 5:15 SUN: 12:30 (PM) WED/THU: 5:45

LADY BIRD (88 MIN) LAST WEEKEND FRI/SAT: 7:45 SUN: 12:15 (PM) FRI-SUN: 3:00

THE HURRICANE HEIST

THOROUGHBREDS

GRINGO

THE STRANGERS: PREY AT NIGHT

A WRINKLE IN TIME

The most recent Oscar winner for Best Foreign Language Film, Sebastián Lelio’s drama stars newcomer Daniela Vega as a transgender waitress and lounge singer who falls in love with a much older man. When he dies, she finds herself shunned by his family. (NW) Rated R

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING MISSOURI (110 MIN)

I, TONYA (110 MIN)

A FANTASTIC WOMAN

LAST WEEKEND

In this action comedy, a hapless pharmaceuticals rep is sent to Mexico to deliver a cache of the company’s new weed pills, only to be kidnapped and held for ransom. David Oyelowo, Joel Edgerton and Charlize Theron star. (NW) Rated R

(509) 209-2383 • 25 W Main Ave MagicLanternOnMain.com • /MagicLanternOnMain

A group of criminals plot to rob the U.S. Treasury, hoping a looming Category 5 tropical storm will serve as the perfect distraction. The weather has other plans. We’re still not totally convinced this is a real movie. (NW) Rated PG-13

It’s been a decade since those creepy masked home invaders terrorized Liv Tyler and Scott Speedman, and they’re back to stand ominously in the shadows while menacing another family on a very unfortunate road trip. (NW) Rated R

Two rich adolescent girls rekindle a friendship and discover they might share sociopathic tendencies, especially when one of them suggests they indulge in a little homicide. Writerdirector Cory Finley’s feature debut has been likened to the pitch-black teen comedy Heathers. (NW) Rated R Ava DuVernay’s adaptation of Madeleine L’Engle’s beloved children’s book about a curious young girl who must embark on an interdimensional quest after her scientist father goes missing, her every move guided by three magical beings. (NW) Rated PG

NOW PLAYING THE 15:17 TO PARIS

Clint Eastwood directs this fictionalized account of three Americans who thwarted a terrorist attack on a train in 2015. The twist: He cast the actual men to play themselves and recreate their act of heroism. They’re not especially good actors, and the movie is only compelling in its final moments. (NW) Rated PG-13

ANNIHILATION

Alex Garland follows up 2014’s Ex Machina with another cerebral sci-fi trip that’s gripping, eerie and a bit of a head scratcher. Natalie Portman fronts a team of badass biologists who infiltrate an environmental disaster area to determine what happened to the soldiers who went missing there. (ES) Rated R

BLACK PANTHER

Marvel’s latest is set in the nation of Wakanda, where its new king T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) must face warring factions who want to usurp the throne. As directed by Ryan Coogler (Creed), it’s more serious-minded than typical superhero fare, full of nobility and purpose without sacrificing fun and charm. (ES) Rated PG-13

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME

One of the best films of the year, a swooning romance in which a 17-yearold American kid (Timothée Chalamet) spending a summer at his family’s Italian villa becomes infatuated with his dad’s slightly older research assistant (Armie Hammer). A delicate work of art and a passionate love story, simultaneously ethereal and earthy. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

DEATH WISH

The Charles Bronson exploitation classic gets a 21st-century facelift with Bruce Willis taking the reins as a father who becomes an urban vigilante after his wife and daughter are attacked. As pointless and out-of-touch as you’d expect, and Willis isn’t even trying. (NW) Rated R ...continued on next page

42 INLANDER MARCH 8, 2018

EVERY DAY

A fantastical twist on the teenage ro-

mance, with a 16-year-old girl falling in love with a being that manifests itself in a different body every 24 hours. From the YA bestseller by David Levithan. (NW) Rated PG-13

FIFTY SHADES FREED

E.L. James’ trilogy mercifully ends with the idyll of Anastasia and Christian’s married life being disrupted by her vengeful former boss and his inability to open up emotionally. As shallow and sterile as its predecessors, but with a couple car chases thrown in, because these characters are apparently action stars now. (NW) Rated R

GAME NIGHT

Robbie as the disgraced Harding and Allison Janney as her monstrous mother. (NW) Rated R

JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE

That magical board game becomes an old Atari-esque gaming console in this better-than-you’d-expect reboot, with a ragtag group of high schoolers getting sucked into a perilous video game world. Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Karen Gillan and a scene-stealing Jack Black star as the kids’ in-game avatars. (NW) Rated PG-13

LADY BIRD

An evening of board games and merlot amongst friends is interrupted by violent thugs and kidnappers. The only problem is everyone thinks it’s all a gag. The comedy gets dark, but it’s never nihilistic or mean-spirited, and the actors, particularly stars Jason Bateman and Rachel McAdams, play to their strengths. (ES) Rated R

Greta Gerwig’s first solo foray behind the camera is a funny, observant and empathetic coming-of-age story about a fiercely independent teen girl finding her true identity in post-9/11 Sacramento. Saoirse Ronan is phenomenal as the title character, as is Laurie Metcalf as the mother she’s often at odds with. A remarkably assured directorial debut. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

THE GREATEST SHOWMAN

PETER RABBIT

A lavish, Moulin Rouge-y musical fantasy inspired by the life and career of P.T. Barnum (Hugh Jackman), the circus empresario who created modern show biz as we know it. The splashy songs are co-written by Oscar-winning La La Land lyricists Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. (NW) Rated PG

HOSTILES

A racist military man (Christian Bale) is forced to transport a dying Cheyenne chief (Wes Studi) to his homeland in the 1890s. Scott Cooper’s brutal tale of frontier justice is unfortunately far more concerned with the redemption of the white man than the Native American experience. (MJ) Rated R

I, TONYA

A raucous bio-comedy about figure skater Tonya Harding, who tripleaxelled into infamy in the early ’90s. The film may be predicated on questionable morals — it wants us to laugh at its subjects, then condemns us for laughing — but it’s also centered on blistering performances by Margot

Beatrix Potter’s beloved children’s character gets the anthropomorphic, wise-cracking CGI treatment, voiced by James Corden and perpetually pestering Domhnall Gleeson’s bumbling Mr. McGregor. Sounds a bit unbearable, but, hey — it worked for the Paddington movies. (NW) Rated PG

THE POST

Steven Spielberg’s latest concerns 1970s Washington Post publisher Kay Graham (Meryl Streep) and editor Ben Bradlee (Tom Hanks) fighting for the paper’s right to publish the Pentagon Papers, which detailed the Johnson administration’s lies regarding the Vietnam War. A thrilling fact-based drama about the importance of the free press. (MJ) Rated PG-13

RED SPARROW

Jennifer Lawrence is a Russian ballerina-turned-assassin, hired to take down a CIA agent (Joel Edgerton) in possession of incriminating information on her government. A well-made but disappointingly rote grab bag of spy movie


FILM | SHORTS

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE INLANDER

NEW YORK TIMES

VARIETY

METACRITIC.COM

(LOS ANGELES)

(OUT OF 100)

ANNIHILATION

80

BLACK PANTHER

87

DEATH WISH

31

FIFTY SHADES FREED

32

GAME NIGHT

66

RED SPARROW

54

THE SHAPE OF WATER

86

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

tropes; your average episode of The Americans has more intrigue and suspense. (NW) Rated R

THE SHAPE OF WATER

With apologies to Pan’s Labyrinth, this is Guillermo del Toro’s finest film to date, a grisly adult fairy tale about a mute cleaning woman’s plans to free a captive amphibious creature from the government facility where she works. Weird, gory, eye-popping, disarmingly sweet and featuring a masterful star turn from Sally Hawkins. (SS) Rated R

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI

When her daughter is murdered, an angry mother (Frances McDormand) erects a trio of uncouth billboards calling out the local police depart-

WATCH IT AT HOME

ment, causing a stir in her tiny town. While the all-star cast delivers emotionally wrenching, award-worthy performances, writer-director Martin McDonagh’s inconsistent script occasionally veers into idiotic absurdity that undercuts the gravity of the drama. At the Magic Lantern. (SS)

WINCHESTER

California’s Winchester Mystery House seems an ideal setting for a horror film, but it’s wasted in this conventional ghost story, as is Helen Mirren as the mansion’s widowed owner. Standard PG-13 scares, with Conjuring-style specters that pop out of dark corners accompanied by musical stings on the soundtrack. (ES) Rated PG-13 n

NOW STREAMING MUTE (NETFLIX)

Duncan Jones’ sci-fi noir passion project is ugly and nihilistic and to no good purpose, the story of a voiceless Amish woodcarver (no, seriously) who scours the back alleys of a futuristic Berlin for his missing girlfriend. Alexander Skarsgard, Paul Rudd and Justin Theroux play characters of various degrees of inexplicability. (NW) Not Rated

SKIP IT

(HULU)

Mute

THE SQUARE

This surrealist Palme d’Or winner and Foreign Language Oscar nominee is a lot of things: a satire of the art world, an allegory for the cravenness of humanity, a dark comedy about a museum curator’s comeuppance. Some of it is compelling — a sequence involving a violent ape-man is a real showstopper — and some is merely baffling. (NW) Not Rated

MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 43


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or visit CDABLUESFESTIVAL.COM for details, to book rooms or purchase tickets!

& TOO FAR NORTH PRODUCTIONS

44 INLANDER MARCH 8, 2018


ROCK

Simple Songs Spokane’s Indian Goat produces classic rock ’n’ roll riffs that cut through the noise BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

W

hen it comes to rock ’n’ roll, sometimes the best approaches are the least complicated. Take Indian Goat, for instance. They’re one of Spokane’s newest rock bands, a duo producing down-and-dirty, no-bullshit rock predicated on the kind of heavy-duty riffs that don’t sound too complex but will bounce around in your head for days. They’re enough to inspire visions of vintage Black Sabbath and early-’70s Led Zeppelin. But simplicity (at least in this case) isn’t necessarily synonymous with “simplistic”: Indian Goat has found a distinct musical persona in a short amount of time, and they’re heavy and loud enough that you might be surprised to see only two dudes, guitarist/vocalist Garrett Zanol and drummer Travis Tveit, up there on the stage. “What we agreed on was we just wanna do it to have fun, and just write super-energetic music,” Zanol tells the Inlander. “And that’s a key thing. It doesn’t have to be simplistic, but that makes it a whole lot easier to not have to concentrate on gnarly time signatures and scales and keep it at the fundamental roots of rock ’n’ roll.” Zanol was previously a member of the popular Spokane band Blackwater Prophet, a ...continued on next page

Spokane rock duo Indian Goat.

ALICIA HAUFF PHOTO

MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 45


MUSIC | ROCK

CDA Arts & Culture Alliance presents

5-8 pm Friday, March 9 Hear downtown CDA ring with live music! Info at artsandculturecda.org/music-walk

PARTIALLY FUNDED BY THE CDA ARTS COMMISSION

The Zags always win when you watch the game with us. 1414 N Hamilton St. | Logan/Gonzaga 509-368-9087 | wedonthaveone.com

Indian Goat’s debut 1, which is set to get a follow-up this spring.

“SIMPLE SONGS,” CONTINUED...

MAY 27, 2018 • 8PM (509) 624-1200 • FoxTheaterSpokane.org Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

46 INLANDER MARCH 8, 2018

psych-rock trio that formed in 2011 and went on Goat records himself, a similar approach he took hiatus at the end of last year. During the down with Blackwater Prophet, setting up a makeshift time, Zanol started dreaming up a new project, studio in his basement and finding the best poswriting material that would suit just him and a sible sound through trial and error. drummer. He recorded something of a demo, “I don’t know shit about recording,” Zanol playing both guitar and drums and presented it says with a laugh, but it’s pretty clear that Indian to his pal Tveit. Goat’s musical aesthetic is very much deliberate. “We’ve been friends for close to 15 years,” Zanol says the new album, which will likely be Zanol says, “but we never played together until out in spring, has a similar feel to its predecessor, we started Indian Goat. We’d get drunk in high which you can listen to on Bandcamp. They’re school and jam in the basement, but we never both lo-fi and fuzzy, barreling through a handful tried to write anything. of tracks with breathless abandon. “He came over and listened to the album and “The first [album] sounds so blown out to was immediately like, ‘let’s me, because I maxed out a do it now.’ It’s that chemistry bunch of levels because I Indian Goat is filming a music video of not trying to force somedidn’t know what the hell I for a song on their upcoming album, thing. We’re just hanging out was doing,” Zanol says. “This and they want friends and fans to and writing music.” one has a little more control.” appear in the clip. The shoot will Whereas Blackwater While they’ve only been take place at the Senator Music Store Prophet assembled its last performing since the sum(618 N. Monroe) on Sat, March 24. record, As I Watch It Freeze, mer of 2017, Indian Goat has Filming starts at 2 pm, and an after piecemeal over the course of already amassed an impressive party performance begins at 8 pm. two years, Indian Goat has following: Zanol and Tveit cranked out two albums’ have upcoming concerts in worth of material in less Seattle, Olympia and Portland, than a year. Their first release, appropriately and they recently played a sold-out show at The titled 1, dropped last August, a 26-minute burst Bartlett with the instrumental rock quartet Deer. of sludgy, fuzzed-out rock that occasionally dips “It was humbling. It was cool to see everyone into the same dreamy psychedelia that influenced who’s into the music scene come together and Blackwater. say, ‘Let’s f---in’ pack this house,’” Zanol says. And now its follow-up, the even more appro“There was a lot of support, and a lot of good priately titled 2, has been recorded and is already people. At so many shows I go to and shows in the process of being mastered. I’m not even a part of, there’s so much support “That’s the beautiful thing about a twoin Spokane. I’m happy to be part of it, Travis piece,” Zanol says. “It’s the easiest thing in the is ecstatic to be part of it, it’s a nice city to play world. What we’re trying to write, which is very music in.” n simple two-man rock ’n’ roll. You get a riff, and then you need a verse and a chorus, then you’ve Indian Goat with Bar Talk and Donna Donna got a song.” • Sat, March 10, at 9 pm • Red Room Lounge • Zanol engineered and recorded both Indian 521 W. Sprague • $5 • 21+ • 838-7613


MUSIC | ESSAY

The Finest Form of Flattery The most unfortunate byproduct of groundbreaking musical technique? The far inferior copycats BY HOWARD HARDEE

E

mulation is the foundation of rock ’n’ roll. After all, music is a continuum, endlessly building upon what came before and influencing what comes after. But sometimes, when rock musicians add a new twist to an old formula and develop something truly groundbreaking, what comes after kind of, you know, sucks. What’s that? You belligerently demand examples? Alright, alright: Here are three rock legends who did something new and awesome for their time, inadvertently inspiring legions of mostly inept and annoying copycats. EDDIE VAN HALEN: When Van Halen’s self-titled debut album dropped in 1978, rock fans everywhere were shell shocked. How, exactly, did Eddie Van Halen rip such seemingly impossible sounds out of his guitar? The world had never heard a guitar player quite so shreddin’. Part of his secret was the two-handed tapping technique: Hammering on and pulling off notes with both hands, as opposed to the standard technique of fretting a note with one hand and picking it with the other. Another example, you shriek? Tapping in the rock context is most famously demonstrated by the second track on Van Halen’s first album: the alien-sounding, sub-two-minute demonstration of sheer technical skill, “Eruption.” It’s worth emphasizing that, no, Eddie didn’t invent tapping — string musicians have been using the technique in one form or another for centuries — but he did introduce tapping to the world of heavy metal in a creative and explosive way, inspiring an entire generation

of young musicians to lock themselves in their bedrooms and practice the shit out of their guitars. And there’s the problem. As a band, Van Halen launched the hair-metal scene of the 1980s, a period during which seemingly every band had a hard-partying, super-shredding guitarist with a perm. (Think of bands like Poison and Ratt, and retch a little.) And Van Halen’s influence wasn’t limited to that specific period of butt rock. To this day, it’s common at local metal shows to see guitarists throw in some half-baked tapping nonsense just because — players who place technicality over musicality. EDDIE VEDDER: Near the end of the ’80s, glam rock gave way to grunge. Enter Pearl Jam, the most commercially successful band of the grunge era and arguably the most popular American rock band of the 1990s. (Fun fact: Pearl Jam’s debut album Ten outsold Nirvana’s Nevermind.) Part of the band’s massive appeal was frontman Eddie Vedder’s baritone singing voice, which is somewhere between Jim Morrison and Metallica’s James Hetfield. (Which, yeah. Take it or leave it.) But here’s what the copycats really latched onto: Vedder famously exaggerates the enunciation of vowels (“baby” becomes “bah-bay”) and the ends of phrases (“again” becomes “again-ah”). These sorts of embellishments have become rock cliches, but only because damn near every alternative-rock frontman that emerged for the next 20 years seemed to

Flea of the Red Hot Chili Peppers. STEFAN BRENDING PHOTO adopt some variation of Vedder’s vocal mannerisms, often to nauseating effect. Without Vedder paving the way, most of the homogenous, grunge-influenced, mid-2000s alt-rock that dominated the airwaves probably wouldn’t have happened. Of course, it’s not Vedder’s fault that so many rock vocalists chose to copy him (and suck), and there’s no taking back the untold horrors inflicted upon millions of innocent eardrums. It’s perfectly OK to dream about a world without Creed, Staind, Seether and Nickelback, though. FLEA: Given their enormous popularity, the Red Hot Chili Peppers have been surprisingly uninfluential. Like, how many rap/rock/funk acts over the past 30 years have felt like anything more than a bro-rock blip on the radar? For being one of the biggest bands in the world, RHCP as a group doesn’t appear to have inspired many copycats, but the same can’t be said specifically of their spasmodic, insanely fit and just-plain-insane WEEKEND bassist, Flea (real name C O U N T D OW N Michael Peter Balzary). Get the scoop on this Flea’s widely weekend’s events with recognized for having our newsletter. Sign up at pioneered a new way Inlander.com/newsletter. of playing bass. Basically, he took the slap technique of Sly and the Family Stone’s Larry Graham and cranked it up to the speed of punk rock. The style is a big part of the band’s signature sound (think “Around the World” and “Higher Ground”), and it allowed Flea to create complex counter-melodies to John Frusciante’s relatively simple guitar lines. But look: From a technical standpoint, the slap-punk style is extremely difficult to master, and there’s little worse than hearing an amateur bassist’s sloppy, string-buzzing slaps cutting through a live mix. Unfortunately, Flea’s virtuosic fretwork gave an entire generation of aspiring musicians an excuse to wank off on the bass, which is never advisable — unless you’re, you know, Flea. n

MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 47


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

FOLK BRYAN JOHN APPLEBY

L

istening to Seattle singer-songwriter Bryan John Appleby’s sophomore LP, 2015’s The Narrow Valley, it’s hard not to think back to Sufjan Stevens’ once-lofty goal of producing an album inspired by the histories and culture of each of the 50 states. Stevens only got around to Illinois and Michigan, but Appleby’s album feels like a distant cousin: He has said the sounds and themes of the record are channeling the topography and ambience of the small California town where he grew up, and he’s approached that part of the West Coast with an almost cinematic grandeur. Or perhaps comparing it to a symphony is more appropriate: Awash in strings, brass and woodwinds, the album seems to be arranged into movements, bookended by an intro and outro and even breaking for an intermission in the middle. Sufjan would be proud. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Bryan John Appleby with Chris Molitor • Fri, March 9, at 8 pm • $8/advance; $10/door • All ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 03/8

J AIRWAY HEIGHTS LIBRARY, Floating Crowbar J THE BARTLETT, Covering Women with Windoe J BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BOLO’S, Monthly Blues Boogie J BOOTS BAKERY, The Song Project J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen CORBY’S BAR, Open Mic and Karaoke THE CORK & TAP, Truck Mills CRAVE, DJ Stoney Hawk CRUISERS, Open Jam Night THE GILDED UNICORN, Kori Ailene J HUMBLE BURGER, Bryan John Appleby, An American Forrest THE JACKSON ST., Songsmith Series JOHN’S ALLEY, Trevor Green J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Levi Daniel MICKDUFF’S, Open Mic w/Kevin Dorin MOON TIME, KOSH NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), PJ Destiny J THE PIN!, Young Neves POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Eric Neuhauser RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROADHOUSE, Karaoke SLICE & BISCUIT, Bluegrass Jam ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 03/9

219 LOUNGE, The Rub ARLON ROSENOFF GALLERY, Wyatt Wood J J THE BARTLETT, Bryan John Appleby (see above), Chris Molitor J BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BIGFOOT PUB, Usual Suspects

48 INLANDER MARCH 8, 2018

PUNK PENNYWISE

N

o, not the child-eating clown of Stephen King lore. This California punk quartet has been thrashing around since the late ’80s and, like its namesake, emerges every so often to remind you they can still wreak a little havoc. At their peak, Pennywise railed against authority, threw middle fingers up at the establishment and roasted phonies, and they’re still playing like it’s 1993 in more ways than one: The band’s most recent release, 2014’s Yesterdays, is something of a tribute to its origins, bringing original lead singer Jim Lindberg back into the studio and featuring rerecorded versions of songs written by founding bassist Jason Thirsk (who died in 1995). It’s a fitting way to lionize an era of music that continues to influence new artists. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Pennywise with Strung Out and Free the Jester • Sun, March 11, at 8 pm • $27.50 • All ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp. knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Sterling J BLACK LABEL BREWING CO., Nicolas Vigil BOLO’S, Mojo Box CEDAR STREET BRIDGE, Brian Jacobs CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke CRAVE, DJ Stoney Hawk CRUISERS, Karaoke with Gary CURLEY’S, Whack a Mole DRY FLY DISTILLERY, Dave McRae FARMHOUSE KITCHEN AND SILO BAR, Tom D’Orazi and Friends FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Echo Elysium FORZA COFFEE CO., Warren Frysinger FREDNECK’S, Just Plain Darin

HOLLYWOOD REVOLVER BAR, Lust for Glory, Idol Hand, The Drag, Dustfuzz IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Mike and Shanna Thompson J IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Dylan Hathaway IRON HORSE (CDA), JamShack THE JACKSON ST., Working Spliffs JOHN’S ALLEY, Trego, The Holy Broke THE LARIAT INN, Devon Wade LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil MARYHILL WINERY, Lyle Morse MAX AT MIRABEAU, 3D Band MOOSE LOUNGE, Loose Gazoonz MULLIGAN’S, The Teccas

NASHVILLE NORTH, Chance Long and the Last Chance Band NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Ryan Larsen Band NORTHERN QUEST, DJ Patrick J NYNE, Atari Ferrari, Mama Doll O’SHAYS IRISH PUB & EATERY, Arvid Lundin and Deep Roots THE OBSERVATORY, Fat Lady, Sammy Pete, Wake Up Flora PALOUSE BAR & GRILL, Bob Sletner PATIT CREEK CELLARS, Ken Davis PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Bright Moments Jazz J THE PIN!, Rings of Saturn, Nekroblikon, Allegaeon & more

RIDLER PIANO BAR, Daniel Hall, Dueling Pianos J THE ROXIE, Country Music Festival feat. Perfect Mess, the Powers, Steve Starkey Band and more J SEASONS OF CDA, Son of Brad SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT (NOAH’S), Christy Lee SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Tommy G SOUTH HILL MUSIC STUDIOS, Floating Crowbar ZOLA, Royale

Saturday, 03/10

219 LOUNGE, Andrea Harsell and Luna Roja


J J THE BARTLETT, Fake News, Boys Night, Funeral Homies, Runaway Octopus BAXTERS ON CEDAR, Steve Neff J BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BIGFOOT PUB, Usual Suspects BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Kevin BOLO’S, Mojo Box J BOOTS BAKERY, Matthew Snodgrass CEDAR STREET BRIDGE, Nathan Baker CHECKERBOARD BAR, Talus Orion, Iameye, MaadMoney Dee, Name COMMUNITY PINT, Dario Ré CRUISERS, Lust for Glory, Catalyst, Bare Bone CURLEY’S, Whack a Mole FLAME & CORK, Jacob Maxwell FREDNECK’S, Just Plain Darin GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Last Call HOLLYWOOD REVOLVER BAR, Nogunaso, The Federales, Hedonizm HOUSE OF SOUL, Nu Jack City & DJ P-Funk IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Brian Stai and Ashley Dreyer J IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Jessica Haffner IRON HORSE (CDA), JamShack THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke

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J J KNITTING FACTORY, Steel Panther, Them Evils LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Mary Chavez LONE WOLF HARLEY-DAVIDSON, Slow Cookin’ MAC DADDY’S, ’80s Rock Party w/GS3 MARYHILL WINERY, Kevin Gardner and Scott Randall MAX AT MIRABEAU, 3D Band MOOSE LOUNGE, Loose Gazoonz MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Kicho NASHVILLE NORTH, Ryan Larsen Band and DJ Tom NORTHERN QUEST, DJ Patrick PALOUSE BAR & GRILL, Bob Sletner J THE PIN!, Alterbeast, Inferi, Grindmother, Aethere, The Festering, Withheld Judgement POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Rusty Jackson J RED ROOM LOUNGE, Indian Goat (see pg 45), Bar Talk, Donna Donna RIDLER PIANO BAR, Jeff Rowe, Dueling Pianos J THE ROXIE, Country Music Festival feat. The Hankers, Devon Wade, Christy Lee and more J SEASONS OF CDA, Ron Greene J THE SHOP, Dylan Hathaway SILVER MOUNTAIN, Son of Brad (Noah’s), Dangerous Type (Mogul’s) SOUTH HILL MUSIC STUDIOS, Floating Crowbar TAB’Z ON BROADWAY, Return to Lucky Breaks feat. John B, Foreign Concept, Crave, Stitch Jones WESTWOOD BREWING CO., Eric Neuhauser ZOLA, Royale

Sunday, 03/11

DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke J THE HIVE, Yonder Mountain String Band, Old Salt Union HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, Ed Masuga IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Nick Grow J J KNITTING FACTORY, Pennywise (see facing page), Strung Out, Free the Jester LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam O’DOHERTY’S, Live Irish Music THE ROADHOUSE, Ictus CD Release J SPOKANE ARENA, The Roadshow feat. For King and Country, Matthew West, Natalie Grant & more ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 03/12

J CALYPSOS COFFEE, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic THE SNAKE PIT, Ed Masuga ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 03/13

219 LOUNGE, Karaoke with DJ Pat J THE BARTLETT, Northwest of New Orleans feat. Hot Club of Spokane, Ben Klein, Olivia Brownlee J CARUSO’S, The Powers GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tues. RAZZLE’S, Open Mic Jam RED ROOM LOUNGE, Storme RIDLER PIANO BAR, Open Mic/Jam THE ROADHOUSE, Karaoke ZOLA, Dueling Cronkites

Wednesday, 03/14

BLACK DIAMOND, Christy Lee CHECKERBOARD BAR, Underground Sounds Vol. 2 feat. Royal T EICHARDT’S, John Firshi GENO’S, Open Mic w/Travis Goulding J HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, Jessica Haffner IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Evan Denlinger THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke J KNITTING FACTORY, Red, Jacob Cade, Moretta, Dogtown 420 LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 J THE PIN!, Elektro Grave POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE, Cronkites J POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE (SOUTH HILL), Nick Grow RED ROOM LOUNGE, Blowin’ Kegs Jam Session RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROADHOUSE, Open Mic Night with Vern Vogal SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open Mic THE THIRSTY DOG, Donny Duck Entertainment Karaoke TWO SEVEN PUBLIC HOUSE, Matt Mitchell ZOLA, Whsk&Keys

Coming Up ...

J THE BARTLETT, Ragtag Romantics, March 15 J CRACKER CO. BUILDING, Super Sparkle, Blake Braley, March 16 J THE BARTLETT, John Craigie, March 21

MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-2639934 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BRAVO CONCERT HOUSE • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-457-2392 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOTEL RL BY RED LION AT THE PARK • 303 W. North River Dr. • 326-8000 HOUSE OF SOUL • 120 N. Wall • 217-1961 IRON HORSE BAR • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., CdA • 509-926-8411 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 49


MUSIC + DANCE FEELING IRISH

A weeklong party leading up to St. Patrick’s Day seems utterly reasonable, and the Rockin’ Road to Dublin show coming to the Fox Theater is a good way to get it started. The danceoriented production teams choreographer Scott Doherty (a veteran of Lord of the Dance and Riverdance) with Irish rocker Chris Smith for a show full of the high-flying action you’d expect from expert Irish dancers, soundtracked by tunes that are a little more rocking than the traditional Celtic folk you hear so much of this time of year. Throw in a flashy light show and you have a nice combo of dance, music and Irish vibes that would be great accompanied by a Guinness. — DAN NAILEN Rockin’ Road to Dublin • Sat, March 10, at 7 pm • $25-$60 • Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • foxtheaterspokane.org • 624-1200

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50 INLANDER MARCH 8, 2018

MUSIC YONDER IN IDAHO

The Yonder Mountain String Band hail from the thriving acoustic music scene of Colorado’s Front Range, and over the past 20 years have developed an insanely dedicated fanbase thanks to their combination of bluegrass licks and jam band workouts that easily get the dance floors moving when the audience members aren’t staring agape at their instrumental skills. The quintet tours like crazy, but did pause to release a new studio album in 2017 called Love. Ain’t Love. You’ll probably hear songs from that and a lot more if you make the drive for their show in Sandpoint. — DAN NAILEN Yonder Mountain String Band with Old Salt Union • Sun, March 11, at 8 pm • $25/advance; $30/door • 21+ • The Hive • 207 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • livefromthehive.com

PERFORMING ARTS DANCE CHAMPS

Whether it’s watching celebrities get out of their comfort zones and learn various choreography or Judge Len Goodman’s humorous remarks towards the contestants, people love Dancing with the Stars. The long-running series delights viewers on the small screen, but now Spokane-area residents can witness the fun in person. The show’s Light Up the Night tour features dancers from Season 25, including Lindsay Arnold, Brandon Armstrong and Sasha Ferber, with special guest stars Frankie Muniz (pictured) and Jordan Fisher. Performances will include several pieces choreographed by Emmywinning choreographer Mandy Moore. Watch performers waltz, salsa and engage in group numbers across the lit-up stage. — ALLA DROKINA Dancing With The Stars: Live! • Wed, March 14, at 7:30 pm • $45$69.50 • INB Performing Arts Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • ticketswest.com • 279-7000


WORDS STARS AND STANZAS

Be a part of something local and universal by signing up to contribute to a new poetry collection and collaboration led by Spokane’s current and past poet laureates. Sitting laureate Mark Anderson (left) and his predecessor Laura Read (right) are leading a series of poetry-writing workshops to create Starstruck, an anthology being released in April as part of the 20th annual Get Lit! Festival. First up is a field trip out to Spokane Falls Community College’s planetarium to view the inspiration behind the collection: the stars in our sky. A follow-up workshop the week after (March 20 at 7 pm) at Spark Central is required for all attendees, as is the collection’s launch and reading on April 24. Poets of all levels should consider the chance to be a part of this local project alongside other new and notable writers of our region’s deeply talented literary scene. Register to contribute online. — CHEY SCOTT Starstruck: A Poetry Book Project of Astronomical Scale • Tue, March 13, at 6 pm • $15 • SFCC Planetarium • 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. • sparkcentral.org

COMEDY POLITICALLY COMEDIC

The longtime performing troupe that puts the “‘mock’ in Democracy” is heading to Spokane to offer some needed comedic relief from the neverending barrage of America’s political climate. The Capitol Steps formed about three decades ago as a group of Senate staffers who were brave enough to satirize the very branches of government they worked for; the group still includes several congressional staffers. Expect to hear plenty of material from the group’s most recent album, Orange is the New Barack, along with jokes inspired by Trump’s latest tweet storms. The group promises a bipartisan approach to its material, which isn’t easy, “since the party in power is always funnier,” says show writer Elaina Newport. SAD! Even so, the Steps do have some songs and skits about liberal faves Bernie Sanders, Nancy Pelosi and Elizabeth Warren in their repertoire. — CHEY SCOTT The Capitol Steps • Wed, March 15, at 7:30 pm • $42-$54 • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • foxtheaterspokane.org • 624-1200

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MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 51


S S

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU DRIVERS ED I first saw you about six years ago roaming the high school halls as a sophomore like me. I was pleasantly surprised when I found out that I would get to see you more in the class we shared. Although back then the timing was never right, for either you or I, I still saw you and hoped to see more of you as the years went on. The time we were allotted together in the past was scarce but was filled with happy moments and spontaneous adventure’s that I will always cherish. Now I find myself living a life in a different state with no one but you by my side and no one but you in my most recent and fond memories. I thank you for all the loving energy you give me and the laughs that we share. I am grateful for this past year especially, our wavelengths finally aligned. I look forward to growing more in sync with you. Happy Birthday to my Sun & Stars - love, your moon

YOU SAW ME I CUT YOU OFF To the person in the grey Dodge Ram pickup that I cut off on the freeway by the Maple exit in a red Chevy Silverado with a canopy with lots of stickers. I am so sorry, I didn’t see you until it was too late! Thank you for understanding and not reacting/chasing me down.

MOONLIGHT, FEELS RIGHT I’ve been walking around on this planet for a lot of years now, under a moon that I’ve always loved to watch. Always “my moon.” But now, there is you, and slowly over the months it has become “our moon.” I don’t see you enough. I miss you. And at the strangest times, I look up, and there’s the moon. So I text you. “Moon!” And you go out and look too. Or you text, “Moin!” (ytpo) and I go out and look. Sometimes we both text at the same time, our texts crossing in the air somewhere up in the light of that moon. For a short time, we both stand under that same moon together. You chose a song for us, with the moon as its theme. So now that moon connects us--we stand under it with a line from me to moon to you, from you to moon to me. A line made of love. And moonlight. Thank you. Cheers to our moon.

common sense you expressed regarding gun safety measures. Take it a step farther and support banning the ownership of military style weapons that are specifically designed to maximize the killing of people. Thank you but I don’t need the NRA to protect me. If guns made us safe, given the proliferation of them in our country we would have no worries what-so-ever. Fact check: Hitler did not confiscate the weapons of the general German citizenry. Instead

technologies ASAP! And for the ones that refuse, they should be considered a threat to our society and loss thier 2nd admit rights! If the registered owner is unable to afford the new implications, the US tax payers buy it from them and the wepon is destroyed! Just like driving a car is a privilege, so should owning assault wepons! If people want to arm themselves for protection, buy a six shooter and or shot gun! For one to say they need a simi automatic

So now that moon connects us — we stand under it with a line from me to moon to you, from you to moon to me.

RETURNED WALLET I cannot even begin to express the gratitude!!! I dropped my wallet in the north side Walmart. I was loading my groceries, 2 year old and 4 year old and my wallet must have dropped. I called Walmart expecting the worse case, and someone had turned it in!!! If you read this and turned in a light pink wallet from the parking lot I owe you big time. You redeemed my faith in humanity. Thank you so much, you my friend are a good person!

he loosened the strict gun ownership laws imposed by the allies after WWI. He did use the gun registry to facilitate his persecution of the Jews. But gun control laws did not cause his rise to power. The mis-guided people of Germany voluntarily embraced him on a wave of populism because they believed his nationalist lies.

THANK YOU FOR STANDING UP FOR US GIRLS AT THE KNITTING FACTORY “HUGE HUGE HUGE Thank you to the man with long brown hair, a beard and tattoos who goes by “”Jake”” You’re number 1! My girls and I truly appreciate you standing up for us at the knitting factory to a creepy a** old man. Thank you thank you thank you! We were all so happy you were around us and had the courage to stand up for us when this prick was crossing the line! I know I said it a million times last night at the show but I will say it a million more times! THANK YOU!!! We need more men like you and less men like that creepy a** old man!”

POR QUE NO POLLO? When you asked me what i wanted in my tamale and enchilada i said chicken, and then i get pork in my tamale. I was disappointed. Also you served everyone else who came after us before us. Why? Why can’t you put chicken in your tamales. What’s the big deal? Probably not going here again.

SORRY NRA Cheers to the person who scolded me for comparing the NRA to ISIS and traitors. I was wrong to make those comparisons and for that I sincerely apologize. The NRA leadership should exhibit the

our arms and checking us out. The old man starts to argue with this kind man behind us and (I SH*T YOU NOT!) says, “Oh what! I’ll do what I want. If you wanna SHOOT me, I’ll shoot you first!” Security takes US away and tried to move US from our spot. They seem to not give a sh*t about this mans threat to shoot this kind man behind us. After telling our story to security, they decide to move the man and his group of “friends” TO THE VIP! Let me just say, If this old creepy a$$

JEERS

CREEPER AT CONCERT AND DUMB SECURITY, WE JUST CAN’T WIN. A HUGE jeers to a popular music venue in town!! Lets lay this scenario out for all of you readers. Three girls go to a heavy music concert, enjoying their selves and throughout the night realize a man approx. 50 years old starring at us girls..ALOT! Finally, I pipe up to this drunk a**hole. Not only does he try to argue with me but also a nice gentleman behind us who was also uncomfortable with this mans constant starring, touching

man REALLY did have a gun, he would have had perfect view to shoot us and the entire concert go-ers right there in the VIP! SO WHY.. WHY WHY WHY did he get moved to the VIP. Get your sh*t together security! you’re idiots. LINCOLN HEIGHTS SHOPPING CENTER To the people constantly flying through this parking lot...some days I’m scared I’m going to get ran over trying to get to my car! Please slow down! JEERS TO THE US GOVERNMENT LEADERS “Jeers to US government leaders and the NRA for doing nothing about assault arms after all the lives lost over the last few years! I understand that guns don’t take lives but if we have stupid people willing to use simi automatic weapons to massacre innocent citizens then we need to take actions to stop it ASAP! And to suggest to arm teachers is a sanity check for us all! I say we mandate that all wepons holding more than six bullets be implemented with human recognition that can determine if the rifle or hand gun is pointed at a person and renders the weapon useleas! I also vote to add GPS to all simi automatic weapons so they can be tracked 24/7 and records how many rounds are fired! Furthermore, all registered gun owners must have there wepons implamented with these new

ANGRY SANTANA “FAN” Floor seats at an “arena” concert usually mean people pay extra for that seat to stand and dance with the music. First off thanks for starting your rude ass coment with a compliment. yes My behind is nice, yes i know it is not a window and hard to see through. Do you really think im just going to buy floor seats to sit down while Santana plays his heart out for us? No way, if you want to sit at a concert, like a told you, go sit up in the bleacher seats or buy the front row. I do respect you for applogizing for being a creep, we shook hads all is well, but jeez man figure n

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assault wepon for protection is call for a sanity check on that person!”

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EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

THE FIG TREE BENEFIT LUNCH This year’s theme is “Including Everyone: We Need Each Other.” Speakers include Sima Thorpe of The Arc of Spokane, Hershel Zellman from Temple Beth Shalom, Christina Kamkosi of Empire Health Foundation, and James Casper of Habitat for Humanity of North Idaho. Please RSVP; event is free to attend but guests will be asked to make a contribution. In the Cataldo Hall Globe Room. March 9, 11:45 am-1 pm. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone. thefigtree.org BOWL FOR THE KIDS Form a team and support local kids served through Junior Achievement programs. March 10, 7-10 pm. Lilac Lanes, 1112 E. Magnesium Rd. lilaclanes.net/ (509-624-7114) TOAST THE TIGERS A social tradition uniting Lewis & Clark High School families, community and alumni for an evening of entertainment to raise funds for the LC Senior All-Nighter. Includes a live and silent auction. March 10, 6:3010 pm. $50. The McGinnity Room, 116 W. Pacific. bit.ly/2mSVK6Q (981-8439) HAM ON REGAL: THE WIZARD OF HOGZ A frazzled show chair drifts off to sleep while watching “The Wizard of Oz.” The next thing she knows, she’s in strange land with a famous trio escorting her down the Calendar Road, a magical path with 12 steps, each representing the months of the year. March 11 at 2 pm, March 14-17 at 7:30 pm and March 17 at 1:30 pm. Ferris High School, 3020 E. 37th Ave. bit.ly/2Hei57v NW BACHFEST CELEBRATION A Festival Finale grand celebration with Artistic Director Zuill Bailey to close Bach ‘18 with a buffet dinner from Fery’s Catering, award-winning no-host Barrister wines, pianist Matt Herskowitz’s musical treats, an inspiring Flamenco dance performance, auction items and more. March 11, 5:30-8 pm. $75. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad. nwbachfest.com PICNIC IN STYLE A picnic dinner and style show starting at 6:30 pm to benefit youth technology programs at the Whitman County Library. Includes a nohost bar. March 15, 5:30 pm. $25-$160. Colfax Library, 102 S. Maint. whitco.lib. wa.us (509-397-4366)

COMEDY

2.0PEN MIC Local comedy night hosted by Ken McComb. Thursdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The District Bar, 916 W. First. facebook.com/districtbarspokane/

GUFFAW YOURSELF!: Open mic comedy night hosted by Casey Strain; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (509-847-1234) JEFF DUNHAM The record-breaking comedy superstar brings his cast of characters on the road for his 60-city “Passively Aggressive” tour. March 9, 7-9 pm. $49.50. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanearena.com STAND-UP COMEDY Live comedy featuring established and up-and-coming local comedians. Fridays at 8 pm. No cover. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. reddragondelivery.com SAFARI The BDT’s fast-paced, shortform improv show in a game-based format relies on audience suggestions to fuel each scene. Ages 16+. Saturdays from 8-9:30 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com THE SOCIAL HOUR COMEDY SHOWCASE Featuring comics from the Northwest and beyond, and hosted by Deece Casillas. Sundays, from 8-9:30 pm. Free. The Ridler Piano Bar, 718 W. Riverside Ave. socialhourpod.com OPEN MIC A free open mic night every Wednesday, starting at 8 pm. Doors open at 7 pm. Free. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (509-318-9998) THE PUNDERGROUND: AFTER DARK The Punderground is Spokane’s only community punning competition, featuring 12 competitors. Includes punny drink specials. Signups start at 7:30, competition starts at 8. March 14, 7:3010:30 pm. Free. The Observatory, 15 S. Howard. (509-598-8933) CARLOS MENCIA At times considered controversial yet truthful, Carlos Mencia takes our stage to share his take on current events, social issues and politics. March 15, 7:30 pm. $39-$69. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com

COMMUNITY

CELEBRATING SALISH CONFERENCE The annual conference brings together speakers and learners of all Interior Salish languages in the Inland Northwest. Goals for the event are to promote new speakers of the native language, collaborate with neighboring tribal communities, and build ongoing relationships. March 7-9. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford. bit.ly/2F4Nzw8 THURSDAY EVENING SWING Weekly swing dance classes and open community dances; Thursdays from 6:45-10

pm. Includes progressive (6:45 pm) and drop-in (7:45 pm) lessons, followed by open dancing (8:30-10 pm. $8-$50. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. strictlyswingspokane.com TITANIC: THE ARTIFACT EXHIBITION This blockbuster exhibit takes visitors on a journey back in time to experience the legend of Titanic through more than 120 real artifacts recovered from the ocean floor. Through May 20; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm (Thu until 8 pm). $10-$18. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org WHAT IS MY NAME? STORIES OF TRAFFICKING SURVIVORS This collection of 10 silhouettes represents the stories of individuals who have been sexually exploited through human trafficking or who care about someone who has been exploited. March 6-8 from 11 am-2 pm and March 9 from 4-7 pm. Free. River Park Square, 808 W. Main. riverparksquare.com (747-8224) REFUGEE ISSUES TALK EWU cultural anthropologists Fred Strange and Kassahun Kebede talk about issues of refugees from a cultural and cross-cultural perspective, using some art from Ildikó Kalapács’ refugee art exhibition. March 9, 5-7 pm. Free. Object Space, 1818 1/2 E. Sprague. thebearingproject.com QUEEN OF KATWE: REAL LIFE STORY OF PHIONA & BENJAMIN Phiona Mutsei and Benjamin Mukumbya, whose lives are portrayed in the Disney movie “Queen of Katwe,” speak at the Endicott School on March 9 at 9 am and 2:30 pm, and at the St. John School at 10:50 and 11:20 a.m. The 2:30 pm and 11:20 am programs are open to the public. March 9. (509-657-3429) VINTAGE SPRING OPEN HOUSE An open house to celebrate the coming of spring, with giveaways and more. March 9, 5-9 pm. Two Women Vintage Goods, 112 S. Cedar. twowomenvintagegoods.com/ (624-4322) BEGINNING BEEKEEPING Learn the basics about how to set up a beehive and how to care for the bees. March 10, 17 and 24 from 11 am-3 pm. $35. Pizza Factory, 123 S. Broad St. wpbeekeepers. org FRUIT TREE PRUNING A three-hour workshop offering an overview of pruning techniques, with a hands-on opportunity to practice pruning apple trees at the historic orchard site. Presented by Spokane Edible Tree Project and Spirit Pruners. March 10, 9:30 am-12:30 pm. $10. Episcopal Church of the Resurrection, 15319 E. 8th. (209-2890)

Running Start

Information Night High school sophomores, juniors and their families are invited.

Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | 6:30 p.m. JFK Library Auditorium, EWU Campus, Cheney Free parking after 5 p.m. | Free refreshments Running Start provides an opportunity for academically motivated and qualified students in Washington’s public high schools to enroll in courses for free at Eastern Washington University. The program is available to high school juniors and seniors as they work towards fulfilling high school graduation requirements. For more information contact: EWU Running Start Office 509.359.6155 runningstart@ewu.edu | highschool.ewu.edu Look for us on Facebook, Twitter and Snapchat

Running Start

Thur 3/8, Inlander

KAILER YAMAMOTO

BOBBLEHEAD GIVEAWAY

SATURDAY 3/10 vs. VANCOUVER GIANTS The first 2,000 fans and all full season ticket holders will receive a Kailer Yamamoto Bobblehead courtesy of Coca-Cola. Sponsored By:

For Tickets Call 509.535.PUCK

Game Time:

7 PM

www.SPOKANECHIEFS.com

MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 53


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess WHIM CHILL FACTOR

A guy I know through mutual friends finally asked for my number, claiming he’d like to see more of me. I was elated, but he never called. After a month, I gave up hope, feeling puzzled and, honestly, kind of hurt. Why do men get your number if they’re never going to call or text? —Uncontacted Men can experience a sort of temporary amnesia in the moment, leading them to ask you for your number. Shortly afterward, their memory returns: “Oh, wait — I AMY ALKON have a girlfriend.” Or “My herpes is raging.” Or “The mob is still after me. The Canadian mob.” (They gag you and duct-tape you to a chair and say “please” and “thank you” repeatedly until you pass out.) Of course, it isn’t just men who are prone to ride the “seemed like a good idea at the time” seesaw. It’s anyone with a human brain. This asking for your number and then never actually dialing it thing appears to be an example of our brain’s two systems at work — our quick-to-react emotional system and our slower-to-come-around reasoning system, which I wrote about in a recent column, per the research of psychologist Daniel Kahneman. Again, the fast emotional system responds immediately — and automatically: “Yeah, baby! There’s a woman whose clothes I’d like to see in a pile on my bedroom rug.” Or, if the lust is for a little head-busting: “BARRRR FIGHT!” The rational system comes around later, often for a little rethink about whatever the emotional system got the person into — like when the bar brawler dude is cooling his heels in the slammer, seeing as how the collections bail bondsmen will accept as collateral do not include all the toenail clippings one has saved since 1999. In other words, it helps to view any request for your number as a moment of flattery — nothing more. Don’t expect a guy to call. In fact, expect most not to call. If they don’t call, you’ll be right. If they do, you’ll be pleasantly surprised, like getting that winning lottery scratcher that allows you to buy that Lamborghini you’ve been eyeing — the whole car, not just the logo-adorned leather key ring to attach to the keys for your 3,000-year-old Honda.

FULL MEDDLE JACKIE

I have a very good friend — a friend who shows up for me in big ways when the chips are down. However, she is very judgmental and offers her opinion on everything from how I should groom my cat to why I shouldn’t get Botox. I wouldn’t presume to tell her how to cut her hair or treat her dogs — unless she asked. Her comments often hurt my feelings. How do I gently get her to stop acting like my vet, my beautician, etc.? —Annoyed It must be tempting to ask her: “Hey, wanna come over on Thursday night? I’ll do a stir-fry, and we can watch Netflix…or you can do an hour on why my new haircut was a tragic mistake and how (for the fourth time!) the couch should be against the other wall.” Friendly advice is not always as, uh, other-serving as it’s made out to be. Communications researcher Matthew M. Martin emphasizes that “people communicate to satisfy personal needs.” He notes that previous research identified six basic “interaction motives (why people have conversations with others)”: pleasure, affection, inclusion, relaxation, control, and escape (like ditching your own problems to fixate on what a hot mess your friend is). Research by social psychologist Sonja Lyubomirsky, among others, suggests it’s in our self-interest to be helpful. Helping feels good in the moment (the “pleasure” motive). Also, the sort of happiness with staying power — the feeling that our life has meaning — comes from extending ourselves for others rather than, say, shoving ‘em out of the way and chasing happiness for ourselves (like by amassing more shoes or buying a new set of boobs). Of course, if it is the pleasure motive driving your friend, it may come from a darker place — like a desire to show off and act superior — which may dovetail with “the control motive,” which, Martin explains, “involves the need to influence others and to be viewed by others as competent.” Regardless, you don’t owe anyone your attention — not even a compulsively helpful “very good friend.” Wait until a moment when you aren’t ducking flying tips. Tell her that you love that she’s trying to look out for you but that her values aren’t necessarily your values. Accordingly, you have a new policy: No more unsolicited advice, except in emergencies. Qualifying situations call for brief, life-preserving warnings -- such as “watch out” or “duck!” -- not the longer-winded constructive tips offered in so-called “fashion emergencies”: “Have you seen yourself from behind? You’d best rethink those pants, doll.” n ©2018, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

54 INLANDER MARCH 8, 2018

EVENTS | CALENDAR PI DAY WORKSHOP Join an all-star team of local tinkerers, techies and music-makers to explore the world of electronic music. Register online; for ages 12+. March 10, 5-8 pm. $10. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkcentral.org (279-0299) INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY Spokane’s 2018 celebration focuses on the power of letting our voices be heard. Featuring powerful workshops, a resource fair, and keynote speaker Sandra Williams, accomplished activist and creator of The Black Lens newspaper. March 10, 1-5 pm. Free. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. womansclubspokane.org (509-838-5667) NO FEAR IN LOVE RACE The 7th annual 6-mile race to promote healthy relationships in 16- to 24-year-olds, and to raise awareness for domestic violence in young people. Race includes prizes and drawings. March 11, 6:30-10 am. $25. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. nofearinloverace.org (202-657-1721) CANCER AWARENESS & PREVENTION The American Cancer Society and the Spokane Regional Health District have teamed up to provide an informative presentation on the topic of cancer. March 12, 3 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley. spokanelibrary.org SPOKANE VALLEY YOUTH VOICE A gathering for all Spokane Valley high school students to lift their voices in the community, celebrate their successes, and generate ideas for their city. Includes free pizza and snacks from 5:306 pm. March 12, 6 pm. Free. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. (509-688-0300) WEST CENTRAL COMMUNITY ADVICE NIGHT If you live in the West Central neighborhood, Spark wants to hear from you about what days and hours the center should be open, and what kind of programs should it provide. Includes a free dinner and childcare. March 12, 6-7:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. (279-0299) ENVISION EAST SHERMAN STRATEGY WORKSHOP A workshop to form a vision for the type of place community members want East Sherman to become, and to share ideas for how to work towards that future. Free food and drink provided. March 13, 5:30-8 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. (208-415-0112) SAFETY PLANNING WORKSHOP Presented in partnership with Lutheran Community Services, Providence Health & Services, and Spokane C.O.P.S. For individuals who have experienced non-intimate partner domestic violence, harassment, assault, sexual assault, stalking, biased/hate crimes, vulnerable adult abuse, ID theft and fraud. March 13, 6 pm. Free. East Side Library, 524 S. Stone. (444-5331) MILLWOOD HISTORY ENTHUSIASTS Attend lively discussions of the Millwood community’s past. The local group invites all to join the discussion and bring photos, interesting items, and memories. March 14, 21 and 28 from 1-2:30 pm. Free. Argonne Library, 4322 N. Argonne Rd. (893-8250) PI{E} DAY A celebration of the most irrational of numbers: Pi, with a pun competition, pies to eat and a “cutthroat” recitation war, where people try to name as many digits of the number they can store in their brains. March 14, 6-9 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org

SPOKANE CONTRA DANCE Spokane Folklore Society’s weekly dance, with the band River City Ramblers playing and caller Ray Polhemus. No experience necessary; beginner workshop at 7:15 pm. March 14, 7:30-9:30 pm. $5/$7. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. womansclubspokane.org LILAC CITY LIVE! The “late night” talk show featuring local Spokane talent, with drinks, music and more. March’s guests include KXLY’s Kris Crocker, Summer in Siberia, artist Jessie Hynes and Austin Langley. March 15, 7-9 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main. (444-5336)

FILM

THE FEMALE BRAIN Writer-director Whitney Cummings stars in this comedy as a straight-laced neuroscientist whose research into biochemistry of the female brain is illustrated by three couples, until her own synapses start to fire when a handsome new subject joins her study. March 8-11; times vary. $5-$8. Panida Theater, 300 N. First. panida.org THE SHAPE OF WATER From master storyteller Guillermo del Toro comes this Oscar-winning, other-worldly fairy tale, set against the backdrop of Cold War era America circa 1962. Rated R. Showing March 8-11, times vary. $7. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. kenworthy.org MET LIVE IN HD: SEMIRAMIDE This masterpiece of dazzling vocal fireworks makes a rare Met appearance, its first in nearly 25 years, with Maurizio Benini on the podium. March 10 at 9:45 am and March 12 at 6:30 pm. $15=$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org AMERICAN IDEALIST: THE STORY OF SARGENT SHRIVER The story of the activist who worked to combat poverty and injustice, and nvented social initiatives that shaped an era and dared millions of young Americans to live out their ideals, such as Peace Corps, VISTA, and Head Start. March 13, 6 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main Ave. spokanelibrary.org THE SUN ALSO RISES KYRS Tuesday Night at the Magic Lantern presents: The Hemingway Series. Join us for a night with Tyrone Power, Ava Gardner and Mel Ferrer in “The Sun Also Rises.” March 13, 6:30-8:30 pm. $5. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main. (209-2383) CHINESE MOVIE NIGHT The University of Idaho Confucius Institute hosts another installment of its monthly movie night. Each film includes a brief introduction. March 14, 7 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. kenworthy.org

FOOD

CRAB FEST Feast on a variety of options including chilled fresh crab, clams casino, cod Veracruz, New Englandstyle clam chowder and more. March 8 and 22, beginning at 3 pm. $30-$35. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S. Nukwalqw. cdacasino.com (800-523-2467) GNOCCHI COOKING CLASS Executive chef Jeannie Lincoln leads a hands-on class to create the delectable pillow-like pasta. Class culminates in a family-style meal. Ages 21+. March 8, 6-9 pm. $50. Commellini Estate, 14715 N. Dartford Dr. commellini.com PERRY STREET BREWING 4TH ANNIVERSARY A two-day party with food, raffles, prizes and plenty of beer. All proceeds from a raffle benefit T.E.A.M.

Grant in the South Perry neighborhood. March 9-10. Perry Street Brewing, 1025 S. Perry St. bit.ly/2FHEaMc (279-2820) SUSHI MAKING CLASS In this 2-hour, hands-on class learn the basics of rolling your own sushi, including the importance of sushi rice and how to make rolls using proper technique. March 9, 6-8 pm. $54.40. My Fresh Basket, 1030 W. Summit Pkwy. myfreshspokane.com VITAL WINES/BROOK & BULL WINERY Taste the wines from Walla Walla winemaker Ashley Trout, who samples wines from her newest winery projects, Vital Wine and Brook and Bull. March 9, 4-7 pm. $15. Petunias Marketplace, 2010 N. Madison. (328-4257) ITALIAN SERIES: WINE TASTING To kick off March’s Italian series of classes, wine steward Drew Smith features five Italian wines for an exclusive tasting event. March 10, 2-3:30 pm. $21.76. My Fresh Basket, 1030 W. Summit Pkwy. myfreshspokane.com (558-2100) MAD HATTER TEA LUNCHEON Meet artists of the Bank Left gallery during a special luncheon event, including March’s featured artist, 21-year-old Josie Brown, of Springdale, Wash. March 10, 12-2 pm. $13. Bank Left Gallery, 100 S. Bridge St., Palouse. bankleftgallery.com (509-878-8425) SEED SAVING BASICS Learn seed saving techniques for several “easy to save” herbs, flowers, and vegetables, including tomatoes, peppers, beans, and peas. March 10, 10 am-noon. $10. Kootenai County Administration Building, 451 N. Gov’t Way. (208-446-1680) 25TH ANNIVERSARY BRUNCH Enjoy Sunday brunch at the High Mountain Buffet to celebrate 25 years of the Coeur d’Alene Casino. March 11, 18 and 25, from 7 am to 2 pm. Buffet includes carved smoked ham, slow roasted pork loin, an omelet station, soup and salad bar and more. $15-$18. CdA Casino, 37914 S. Nukwalqw. cdacasino.com SCIENCE & HISTORY OF CRAFT BEER Discover the history and science behind one of the world’s most popular beverages with local beer expert and brewer Adam Boyd. March 11, 2-3 pm. Free. Cheney Library, 610 First St. scld.org APOTHECARY PROGRAM: ELDERBERRIES These blue berries are native to our area, and make wonderful tinctures, syrups and jams. Learn why they are so crucial during flu season as you brew and drink a batch of elderberry tea. March 12, 6 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley. (444-5390) PECCHENINO WINE DINNER A four course dinner highlighting pairings (seven total) from the Pecchenino winery, with guest host and winemaker Orlando Pecchenino. Reservations required (30 seats only). March 12, 6-9 pm. $80. Santé Restaurant & Charcuterie, 404 W. Main Ave. bit.ly/2D2fzP7 TOTAL ECLIPSE OF THE TART The bar’s first-ever barrel-aged sour beer event, featuring more than 15 rare and hard-to-find sour beers from breweries including Firestone, Crux, New Belgium and more. March 12, 6-9 pm. Beerocracy, 911 W. Garland. bit.ly/2FZwswV APOTHECARY PROGRAM: ELDERBERRIES These blue berries are native to our area, and make wonderful tinctures, syrups and jams. Learn why they are so crucial during flu season as you brew and drink a batch of elderberry tea. March 13, 6 pm. Free. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry. spokanelibrary.org


FRIED CHICKEN & LOCAL BEER The monthly event from Chef Adam Hegsted features fried chicken paired with beers from a local brewery. March 14, 6-9 pm. $35. Wandering Table, 1242 W. Summit Pkwy. thewanderingtable.com ST. PADDY’S WARM-UP Prefunk your St. Paddy’s Day with a three-course dinner, Jameson Irish Whiskey and an Iron Horse Brewery seasonal release. March 14, 6-8 pm. $35. EPIC, 100 N. Hayford. northernquest.com

MUSIC

NW BACHFEST: DON QUIXOTE The Laszlo Varga arrangement for sextet of the Strauss Don Quixote features Mateusz Wolski, violin; Nick Carper, viola; Daniel Cotter, bass clarinet; Emily Browne, horn, joining Matt Herskowitz, piano, and with Zuill Bailey, cello, playing the part of the wandering, romantic dreamer, Don Quixote. March 8, 7:309:30 pm. $35 ($15/students). Hagadone Event Center, 900 S. Floating Green Dr. nwbachfest.com (326-4942) PROJECT JOY The senior entertainers group Grandpa’s Sound, performs a mix of barbershop, vocal ensemble and “favorite songs,” during an afternoon show with cookies, desserts, coffee, tea and cocoa. RSVP to Hennessey Valley Gathering Center (1315 N. Pines Rd.) at 926-2423. March 8, 1-2 pm. Free and open to the public. (926-2423) DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE: A STEAMPUNK CABARET A performance of burlesque, aerial dance, illusionists, pole performers and more “steam up the Looking Glass” with a cabaret concoction of wonderland adventures. Ages 21+. March 9-10 at 8 pm. $15-$20. Omega Event Center, 25 E. Lincoln Rd. VerticalElementsEntertainment.com EWU SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA The orchestra performs “Scotch and Rock,” a program featuring the music of Led Zeppelin and Mendelssohn’s Symphony #3 (“Scottish”). Lynne Feller-Marshall is the featured bassoon soloist. March 9, 7:30-9 pm. $3-$5/public admission. Eastern Washington University, 526 Fifth St. ewu.edu/cale/programs/music MUSIC WALK Held every second Friday of the month, January through March, beginning at 5 pm, downtown Coeur d’Alene rings with live music from talented local musicians. Free. Downtown Coeur d’Alene. artsandculturecda.org NW BACHFEST CLASSICS Pianist Matt Herskowitz performs music from Gottschalk to Gershwin and featuring Chip Phillips, clarinet, and Zuill Bailey, cello. March 9, 7:30-9:30 pm. $35 ($15 students). Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad Ave. nwbachfest.com (326-4942) ROCKIN’ ROAD TO DUBLIN Choreographer and dancer Scott Doherty (Riverdance, Lord of the Dance), teamed up with veteran Celtic rocker Chris Smith to produce and star in this display of classic Irish tunes accented by rock ‘n’ roll, dancers and a light show. March 10, 7 pm. $25-$60. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200) WEST MY FRIEND The indie-roots, chamber-fol group offers an acoustic blend of instruments and four-part harmonies. March 10, 7-9 pm. $15. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way. artisanbarn.org HARMONIES OF THE HEART, SEASONS OF THE SPIRIT Sacred Heart’s pastoral music groups (mixed and men’s choir and ensembles) share music ranging from contemporary to classical, American to international. March 11, 3-4 pm. Donations accepted. Sacred Heart Church, 219 E.

Rockwood Blvd. (747-5790) NORTHWEST BACH FESTIVAL FINALE This concert features the artistry of John Bodinger in virtuosic solo work on Bach’s original instrument, the organ, plus selections for cello and organ with Zuill Bailey, cello. March 11, 3-5 pm. $35 ($15/students). St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th. nwbachfest.com (326-4942) SPRING SOUNDS PIANO CONCERT Featuring master pianist Vytautas Smetona, who debuted in New York at Town Hall, and has been playing for 40+ years. March 11, 5:30-7 pm. $5-$15. Heartwood Center, 615 S. Oak St. sandpointconservatory.org POWER OF SONG The women of Le Donne Choir present a night of empowering vocal music, with members of the Spokane Area Youth Choirs. March 14, 7-8 pm. Free. St. Stephen’s Episcopal, 5720 S. Perry St. (448-2255) THE CAPITOL STEPS The musical political satire group makes fun of both sides of the political spectrum. March 15, 7:30 pm. $42-$54. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

INLAND NORTHWEST MOTORCYCLE SHOW & SALE The 15th annual event showcases what’s new for 2018, along with a swap meet, stunt shows and more. March 9 from 3-8 pm, March 10 from 10 am-8 pm and March 11 from 10 am-4 pm. $5-$10/weekend admission. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. (509-477-1766) SPOKANE CHIEFS Upcoming games as follows: March 10 (vs. Vancouver); March 14 (vs. Seattle), March 16 (vs. TriCity); all games start at 7:05 pm. $10+. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000) ST. PADDY’S DAY FIVE MILER Come and race at this Spokane springtime tradition, featuring a fast, flat course with awards for overall and master’s winners. March 11, 10 am-1 pm. $15. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. scc.spokane.edu

THEATER

2.0 (TWO POINT_OH) A software mogul makes headlines one last time when his private jet plunges into the Pacific. Months later, his grief-paralyzed widow discovers his greatest creation: a virtual-reality simulation of himself made before his demise. Throrugh March 25; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $27. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. spokanecivictheatre.com MEASURE FOR MEASURE Spartan Theatre is celebrating its 50th Anniversary with this dark comedy exploring the balance between power and mercy. March 1-11; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $5-$10/public. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3605) ASSASSINS THE MUSICAL This controversial musical lays bare the lives of nine individuals who assassinated (or tried to) the president. Through March 18; Fri-Sun at 7 pm. $10. Theater Arts for Children, 2114 N. Pines. (703-7335) BURNT BY THE SUN A staged production based on the screenplay by Nikita Mikhalkov and Rustam Ibragimbekov. Through March 11; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third. spokanestageleft.org CYT SPOKANE: TARZAN A local per-

formance of the story based on Disney’s animated musical adventure. March 9-10 at 7 pm, March 10-11 at 3 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com MUCH ADO ABOUT NOTHING A local performance featuring Shakespeare’s most delightful heroines, dancing wordplay, and the endearing spectacle of intellectual self-importance bested by the desire to love and be loved in return. March 9-10 and 15-17 at 7 pm; March 10 and 17 at 2 pm. $12. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway. (342-2055) THE TEMPEST Teeming with fairies, monsters, shipwrecks and magic, The Tempest is Shakespeare’s last and most mature romance. March 9-10 and 16-17 at 7:30 pm, March 11 at 2 pm and March 15 at 5 pm. $10/general. EWU, 526 Fifth St. bit.ly/2HbxyFz

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ARTS

(DE)CLUTTER Gonzaga University art professor Laura Carpenter Truitt uses shape, texture, and space to construct architectural landscapes that bleed through our physical realm into realms unknown. Through April 6; Mon-Fri from noon-5 pm. Reception March 15 from 4:30-6 pm. EWU Downtown Student Gallery, 404 2nd, Cheney. ewu. edu/downtowngallery GO FISH! A group show featuring fishthemed work by Jason Sanchez, Ken Hansen, Brad McDonald, Kevin Jester, Nicolette Demoe and Ryan Allen. March 9-April 8; Tue-Thu from 11 am-5 pm and Fri-Sat from 10 am-6 pm. Free. Blackwell Gallery, 205 Sherman, CdA. blackwellgallerycda.com POWER OF THE SKETCHBOOK: FROM CONCEPT TO CREATION The Art Spirit features three artists (Robert Grimes, Victoria Brace and Glenn Grishkoff) sharing a handful of their private sketchbooks for viewing in this special exhibition. March 9-April 7; opening reception March 9 from 5-8 pm, artist talk March 10 from 2-3 pm. Free to view. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com

WORDS

READING: HEATHER BRANSTETTER: The Wallace, Idaho-based author reads from her book “Selling Sex in the Silver Valley,” followed by a Q&A. March 8, 7 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main. bookpeopleofmoscow.com MEAGAN MACVIE & STEPHEN WALLENFELS A reading and conversation with the two young adult authors, moderated by local author Kris Dinnison. March 10, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) STARSTRUCK: A POETRY BOOK PROJECT OF ASTRONOMICAL SCALE In this two-session workshop with local poets Laura Read and Mark Anderson, participants explore the lives of stars through poetry with final work being compiled in a one-of-a-kind short-run book. Participation in both sessions (March 13 and 20) and a reading on April 24 (at Spark) is required of all participants. $15.Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org READING: BRUCE HOLBERT Whiskey, the new novel from the Spokane-area author, is a searching book about family life at its most distressed; about kinship, failure, and ultimately a dark and hard-earned grace. March 14, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com n

MARCH 10

7:00 PM

MARCH 17 AT 7PM Westminster Congregational United Church of Christ MARCH 18 AT 3PM Spokane Valley Church of the Nazarene ALBINONI - VIVALDI - MONTEVERDI - TARTINI

Lalo, Granados, Debussy and more

MAR 24 MAR 25 8:00 PM

ALEKSEY SEMENENKO VIOLIN

3:00 PM

ECKART PREU CONDUCTOR

(509) 624-1200 • FoxTheaterSpokane.org Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 55


REGULATION

Early Adopter Colorado continues to lead the way with cannabis BY TUCK CLARRY

W

hile Washington and Colorado will be forever tied together as the first states to end cannabis prohibition, the experience of legalized pot has been drastically different for the two pioneers. The initial difference appeared to be in relationship to Washington’s liberal policies versus Colorado’s more libertarian slant. Cannabis enthusiasts in the Evergreen State had to be jealous of their Coloradan counterparts’ allowance of six personal cannabis plants. But the Colorado Legislature is just now expanding its business regulations to make the state open to further growth that has already been enabled in other legalized states. Perhaps the biggest piece of legislation is House Bill 1011, Marijuana Businesses Allow Publicly Traded Owners, which enables out-of-state companies and individual financiers to have ownership interest and investments in state-licensed cannabis businesses. As more states vote for legalization, the ability to

bring investors in has become crucial for states to ensure that they are a major hub in an industry becoming more and more corporate. “I do see where the money’s flowing right now, and it’s not to Colorado,” entrepreneur and Medicine Man Technologies co-founder Andy Williams tells The Cannabist. The bill removes limiting provisions such as a 15-person cap on out-of-state ownership and prohibiting publicly traded entities from attaining a marijuana license. The move would further push the debate on federal prohibition, especially in reporting income in nonlegal states. And Colorado is looking to be ahead in terms of legal places for weed consumption. House Bill 1258 looks to offer consumption licensing for recreational businesses who already have cannabis licenses. Though the first image that may come to mind are the pot cafes in Amsterdam, the bill has far smaller goals. Establishments would be more like cannabis tasting

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56 INLANDER MARCH 8, 2018

rooms, where customers are able to vape flower and concentrates and sample single-serving products. The locations won’t be allowed to offer food or alcohol, or outside herb. “This bill will help make sure people aren’t consuming more than they should and are doing it in an environment no different than what you would see at a winery or brewery,” Colorado state Rep. Jonathan Singer said in a statement. Patrons would be limited to 3.5 grams of flower, a gram of concentrate or 10 milligrams of an infused product. This all comes after the announcement that a Denver coffee shop received the first business license that allows marijuana use by its customers. While visitors won’t be allowed to smoke inside of the business, they are still able to vape or consume edibles that they bring to the shop. The license is part of a citywide program that will have varied public businesses allow cannabis use. n


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MARCH 8, 2018 INLANDER 61


COEUR D ’ ALENE

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

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Where fans go to watch basketball during March Madness in Coeur d’Alene

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SHOP EARLY AT ALL THINGS IRISH AND GO TO CRICKETS RESTAURANT FOR GREEN BEER, CORNED BEEF & CABBAGE, CORNED BEEF RUEBEN AND THE BIGGEST SELECTION OF IRISH WHISKEY. presented by

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Gather around the games during March Madness at Tap House Unchained. Photo courtesy The Coeur d’Alene Resort

ou don’t have to be from Spokane or have attended Gonzaga University to be a fan of the Bulldogs. For basketball lovers in the Lake City, there are plenty of places to root on the Zags (or any of your favorite college basketball teams) throughout the Big Dance. With 68 teams in the running, you’ll need to keep your energy up, and downtown Coeur d’Alene is brimming with options. Tuck into TAPHOUSE UNCHAINED (210 E. Sherman) for a burger and any of 24 regional beers and ciders on tap (cdataphouse.com), or pop over to SWEET LOU’S RESTAURANT & TAP HOUSE (601 E. Front) where televisions line nearly every wall, the tap list numbers 32 and the food — ribs, burgers, bacon mac and cheese — is o-so-good (sweetlousidaho.com). COLLECTIVE KITCHEN PUBLIC HOUSE (501 E. Sherman) is a cozy spot to watch the game

but, better yet, pop next door to their 5th AVENUE FILLING STATION for a serious beer selection and the benefit of Collective Kitchen’s fabulous food menu (thefillingstationon5th.com). March Madness means a marathon of basketball watching so be kind to your behind with some of the comfiest seating downtown at CRICKETS RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR (424 E. Sherman) and discover why this classic spot has been in business for more than 30 years (cricketsoysterbar.com). Located in midtown Coeur d’Alene, as well as Hayden and Post Falls, CAPONE’S SPORTS PUB & GRILL (751 N. 4th) is where locals go for celebrations large and small. Participate in their Hop Madness (midtown location only): taste eight regional IPAs and fill out your bracket pick for the best beer and a chance to win a Kona Brewing bicycle on the day of the Final Four (caponespub.com/cda).

D ’A L E N E

Upcoming Events

COEUR D’ALENE

“Narnia the Musical”

Music Walk

The whole family will enjoy Christian Youth Theater’s version of the 1950s classic fairytale about King Aslan’s epic battle against the White Queen. Tickets $12-14; Fri at 7 pm, Sat at 3 and 7 pm; Sun at 3 pm; Salvation Army Ray & Joan Kroc Center , 1765 W Golf Course Rd.; Visit cytnorthidaho.org to purchase tickets

Look for Ethereal in E’s soulful steel drumming at Tomlinson Sotheby’s International Realty (formerly Painter’s Chair Gallery), along with more than a dozen regional musicians at downtown restaurants, shops and galleries, some of which offer complimentary refreshments. Free, 5-8 pm, Visit artsandculturecda.org for details.

THROUGH MARCH 11

MARCH 9

Marchi Gras at Silver Mountain Resort

St. Patrick’s Day Parade

Start with a balloon drop — win prizes like golf or lift tickets — proceeding towards night skiing, and closing out your Silver Mountain “Marchi Gras” adventure with live music and libations at Moguls. It’s a little bit Cajun, a little bit European and a whole lotta fun. Go to silvermt.com/Things-To-Do/ Event-Calendar for details.

Grab your green and get in on the annual Coeur d’Alene parade honoring Patrick, patron saint of Ireland. The parade starts at 4 pm so park north of downtown, haul your chairs to Sherman Avenue, then get in a Gaelic mood with a visit to All Things Irish (315 E. Sherman) or perhaps a pub that beckons to ye. Free. Visit cdadowntown.com for details or call 208-415-0116.

MARCH 10

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay. 62 INLANDER MARCH 8, 2018

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