Page 1

FILM

Finally, a female-led flick in the Marvel Universe PAGE 36

OPINION

Idaho’s militia types invade the mainstream PAGE 6

MARCH 7-13, 2019 | GOD BLESS THE FREE PRESS!

Clash Clerics of the

PAGE 22

How two Catholic leaders with Spokane ties are shaping the fight BY DANIEL WALTERS


A FUTURE YOU IS TEXTING.

SHE WANTS TO TALK ABOUT RETIREMENT. Tips and articles at BeFinanciallyAwesome.com Be Financially AwesomeTM


INSIDE VOL. 26, NO. 21 | COVER DESIGN: DEREK HARRISON

COMMENT 5 13 NEWS COVER STORY 22 MILLER CANE 27

CULTURE FOOD FILM MUSIC

29 33 36 41

EVENTS 44 I SAW YOU 46 ADVICE GODDESS 48 GREEN ZONE 50

BEFORE

TRY SCULPTING WITHOUT SURGERY.

AFTER

Contour jowls, tighten wrinkles and smooth skin with ProfoundTM, the exciting, non-surgical face lift. This energy-penetrating treatment has earned nearly 100% patient satisfaction nationwide.

EDITOR’S NOTE

T

he CATHOLIC CHURCH is in crisis. On that point alone, most can agree. The turmoil has a lot to do with the sex-abuse scandals that gave name to last year’s so-called Summer of Shame, but in many ways, it goes further and deeper than that. Unresolved are fundamental questions about the causes and solutions to the problems dividing the church. In large part, two camps are competing to define the church’s path ahead: On the one side, there are the liberal-leaning clergymen who envision a more inclusive, modern ministry, represented by Spokane’s former bishop, Blase Cupich, a key ally of Pope Francis. On the other side stand conservative Catholics who fear the church has veered too far from its traditional moral underpinnings, represented by Spokane’s current bishop, Thomas Daly. You need not be Catholic to find the story relevant, for it’s about many things — sex and abortion, cloisters and closets, love and forgiveness, wolves and sheep. Don’t miss staff writer Daniel Walters’ in-depth report beginning on page 22. — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

WHEN KIDS REFUSE HELP PAGE 13

JOIN US FOR

HOUSE-MADE BBQ

WARMING COCKTAILS

3-5PM

477227 Highway 95 N • Ponderay, ID 208 255-2603 • farmhousekitchenandsilobar.com

WITH FRESH EYES PAGE 32

NEW HOMES FROM THE $200s SPOKANE VALLEY | CHENEY | NORTH IDAHO *Prices subject to change without notice. | WA CCB HAYDEHL937BH | ID RCE 29144

DISHING ON THE BIZ PAGE 33

‘BLANK THE BLANK’ BANDS PAGE 41

INLANDER SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO • INLANDER.COM 1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, SPOKANE, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 | EMAIL: INFO@INLANDER.COM THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. It’s printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x210 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email justinh@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2019, Inland Publications, Inc.

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 3


4 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

Anthonys_SunsetsDinners_030719_10H_Ji.pdf


COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com)

IF YOU WERE TO START A BAND, WHAT WOULD ITS NAME BE?

GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

Dan Nailen (x239) MANAGING EDITOR/ARTS & CULTURE

Probably something from the ’60s, like Groovy Tunes or something like that. That would be cute. What would your outfits be? Oh, ’60s stuff, probably bell-bottom jeans and flower shirts.

ALL LASER HAIR REMOVAL

Quinn Welsch (x279) COPY EDITOR

Wilson Criscione (x282), Josh Kelety (x237), Daniel Walters (x263), Samantha Wohlfeil (x234) STAFF WRITERS

Packages include 8 treatments

SPIDER VEINS or pigment removal for the face $179 (reg. $399) (includes follow up treatment)

LEG VEINS $299 (reg. $599) (includes follow up) SPA FACIAL with chemical peel or microdermabrasion $109 and receive a FREE Teeth Whitening (value $149)

Nathan Weinbender (x250)

ART DIRECTOR

UNDERARMS $159 (reg. $600) 50% OFF All other laser hair removal packages

FOOD & LISTINGS EDITOR

Derek Harrison (x248)

Purchase PRP with micro-needling and injections $799 (reg. $900) and receive a FREE aftercare kit (value $160)

CAROL MITCHELL

Chey Scott (x225)

FILM & MUSIC EDITOR

MICRO-NEEDLING Buy 3 get one Free $689 (reg. $919)

BIKINI PACKAGES starting at $179

PUBLISHER

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224)

Tax Return Special

MARLA TOLLIVER

THE PERFECT PEEL $189

I’m Native American so I would probably name it Makah Strong. That’s the tribe I’m from. What kind of music would you play? It would probably be a variety of almost a cultural R&B.

ENT PAYM NS OPTIOBLE A AVAIL

Young Kwak PHOTOGRAPHER

Caleb Walsh

Laser Hair Removal for All Skin types, Spider Vein Removal, Brown Pigment Removal, Spa Facials, Chemical Peels, Kybella Injection, Collagen Rejuvenation/Skin Tightening, Microdermabrasions, Botox, Juvederm, Voluma, Professional Teeth Whitening, PRP and Micro-needling

ILLUSTRATOR

Amy Alkon, Bill Frost, Zach Hagadone, E.J. Iannelli, Samuel Ligon, Ben Salmon, Carrie Scozzaro, Seth Sommerfeld CONTRIBUTORS

Arcelia Martin INTERN

BRAD BELL The Fisherman. Why the Fisherman? That’s our mascot back home for high school; Ilwaco, back on the coast.

ADVERTISING SALES Kristi Gotzian (x215) ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Carolyn Padgham-Walker (x214), Emily Walden (x260) SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Autumn Adrian (x251), Mary Bookey (x216), Jeanne Inman (x235), Claire Price (x217), Wanda Tashoff (x222) ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Kristina Smith (x223) MARKETING DIRECTOR

PRODUCTION & SUPPORT

SPENCER MURPHY I’d probably try to do something similar to ’80s pop music. I feel like there are good band names with that. The one that comes to mind is Chumbawamba.

Hey! I think I see Spring Coming! no really... I think it’s coming

Wayne Hunt (x232) PRODUCTION MANAGER Ali Blackwood (x228) CREATIVE LEAD

NATE THOMSON

Derrick King (x238), Tom Stover (x265) SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Justin Hynes (x226) DISTRIBUTION MANAGER

Camille Awbrey (x212), Andrea Lorentz (x242) ADVERTISING SUPPORT

OPERATIONS Dee Ann Cook (x211) BUSINESS MANAGER Kristin Wagner (x210) ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

Bright City Magic. Why? Because that’s my band’s name. What kind of music do you play? Alternative rock and classic rock. How long have you been a band? I’m a solo artist… I’ve had that name since 2009, so 10 years.

INTERVIEWS BY ARCELIA MARTIN 2/28/19, RIVER PARK SQUARE

SOUTH HILL 1230 S. Grand • 309-3830 BRAINFREEZECREAMERY.COM

IN KENDALL YARDS 1238 W. Summit Parkway • 321-7569 MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 5


COMMENT | IDAHO

FAMILY LAW Divorce Spousal Maintenance / Alimony Child Support Modifications Parenting Plans AUTO INJURY • CIVIL LITIGATION

Craig Mason

W. 1707 BROADWAY, SPOKANE, WA | 509443-3681

March 4-5-6, 2016 | Spokane Fair & Expo Center | Spokane, WA

March 8-9-10, 2019 42nd Annual Spring

I ♥ Militias

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

The kooks conquer Idaho BY ZACH HAGADONE

W OVER 300 NORTHWEST ARTISANS FINE ART | HAND CRAFT | SPECIALTY FOODS

Spokane Fair & Expo Center Friday

404 N Havana Street Spokane, WA | FREE PARKING

10AM —8PM Saturday 10AM —6PM Sunday 10AM —4PM

$

CusterShows.com

5

[BREAKFAST] Breakfast served every Saturday and Sunday from 9am-2pm Catering • Banquet room • groups welcome daily happy hour • karaoke • pull tabs

1812 W. Francis Avenue • Spokane • 509.326.2214

6 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

hen the German army destroyed the town hall of Péronne, France, in 1916, a handful of the Kaiser’s troops erected a placard on its ruined walls bearing the phrase, “Nicht ärgern, nur wundern!” (“Don’t be angry, just be amazed!”) That phrase ran through my head as I watched the waves of indignation roiling around Idaho Lt. Gov. Janice McGeachin’s recent Statehouse photo-op with members of the Three Percenters, a militia group involved with the 2014 Bundy ranch standoff in Nevada and Bundy-inspired armed takeover of the Malheur Wildlife Refuge in 2016. Here were people with little love for town halls standing shoulder-to-shoulder with the second-highest executive official in Idaho government. In the Capitol, no less. The longer I looked at it, I went from “don’t

be angry, just be amazed” to “don’t even be amazed.” The offending image, which started making headlines on March 1, features two grim-faced men in orange prison-style jumpers flashing the “OK” hand signal with McGeachin smiling in the middle, her hands curled in the shape of a heart. The men were at the Idaho Statehouse to advocate for the release of Todd Engel, who is serving 14 years in prison for taking part in the Bundy ranch standoff, which drew anti-government activists and militia members from across the country in an armed confrontation with federal law enforcement officers. McGeachin, on her now-deleted

SAY WHAT?

DO SOMETHING!

“I feel like you really have to work almost double than the boys in the kitchen to feel like you’re even doing the same amount.”

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS MEETING: This program on climate change focuses on how it’s affecting us locally, as well as what local efforts are being made to reduce greenhouse gas accumulation, and what individuals can do. Featured speakers are Brian Henning, a Gonzaga professor; along with Lori Kinnear, a city councilwoman, talking about city efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and Kara Odegard of the Climates Impact Research Consortium, Spokane. Tue, March 12 at 11:15 am. Free. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 2404 N. Hamilton. lwvspokane.org (448-6217)

Lynette Pfluger, former pastry chef at Common Crumb bakery currently working at Spokane-based Spiceologist. She and other industry insiders dish on being a woman in the male-dominated restaurant business; see that story on page 33.


Facebook post accompanying the photo, wrote, “Sending love to Todd Engel from the Idaho Capitol.” Condemnation for the recently elected lieutenant governor focused on allegations of racism that many saw implied by the hand signals displayed by the unidentified, jump-suited men. There is a rich corpus of online speculation about the significance of the “OK” symbol, with some arguing it represents “white power” in a not-so-subtle dog whistle meant to signal support for other white supremacists. In the context of the McGeachin photo,

“It illustrates how deeply antigovernment, militia-inspired kooks have penetrated Idaho politics.” others argue the gesture with its three outstretched fingers represents the Three Percenters, whose name refers to the supposed 3 percent of colonists who actively resisted the British during the Revolutionary War. (Historians have frequently debunked this myth, pointing out that the 3 percent figure, amounting to about 80,000 people, is based on post-war pension lists, some of which were compiled in the early 1800s. The more accurate figure is 100,000 serving in the Continental Army and another 100,000 in the various colonial militias. A more interesting number, however, is the 20,000 enslaved black soldiers who joined the British army to fight against their patriot masters, making the Revolution the biggest slave rebellion in our history.) All that said, I’m not going to wring my hands over these guys’ hands, other than to point out that if their gesture wasn’t racist, then it was stupid. What I find particularly noxious about this whole situation is that it illustrates how deeply anti-government, militia-inspired kooks have penetrated mainstream Idaho politics. It’s ironic that Gov. Brad Little is a gentleman-rancherstyle politician, more in tune with ag industry boardrooms than the Bundy barricades. It’s hard to imagine a similar scene playing out in the Capitol when he was lieutenant governor. But anyone who’s watched McGeachin over the past few years knows how ready she is to legitimize the menagerie of weirdos who think they live in some place called the American Redoubt — a fever dream of transplanted nationalist burn-outs and millenarian John Birchers. Look no further than her own campaign website for a torturous hour-long video interview with the so-called Redoubt “News” (look for the Aer Lingus poster in the background — isn’t that literally white flight?) and a picture of her grinning alongside Ammon Bundy at a gun rally in Boise last summer. “His words were truly inspiring,” she wrote. Again, don’t be amazed. This has been the trajectory of Idaho politics since at least 2008: From “Esto Perpetua” to “I ♥ Militias.” n

YOU KNOW YOU WANT OUR

HAVE IT DELIVERED!

BAHN MI

New Locatio n 1198 E SUMMIT PKWY | KENDALL YARDS

ST. PATRICK'S DAY SALE

UP TO 50% OFF ENTIRE PURCHASE!

Draw a coin to show y o Pot O' Q ur o Discoun ld t

Don’t be a Qowl! DELIVERY PRICES

CDA & VICINITY FREE DELIVERY | SPOKANE/ VALLEY $35 | SANDPOINT $35 | SILVER VALLEY $35

303 Spokane Ave, Cd’A • 208 664-2131 rungefurniture.com

Zach Hagadone is a former co-publisher/owner of the Sandpoint Reader, former editor of Boise Weekly and current grad student at Washington State University.

FROM THE VAULT MARCH 6 — 12, 2008  FREE

MARCH 6, 2008: We profiled Spokanite May Arkwright Hutton, whose efforts led to the successful vote in 1910 to extend to women in Washington the right to vote. Ten years later, in 1920, the 19th Amendment to the Constitution was ratified, giving women the vote in every state. HOW SPOKANE’S

MLED AY HUTTON WASHINGTON WOMEN

TO THE BALLOT BOX

PAGE 16

COMMENTARY Honoring Spokane’s green legacy 6

NEWS Mary Verner’s first 100 days as mayor 11

NIGHTLIFE More hotspots in Bar Guide Part II 38

LUMINOUS: DALE CHIHULY AND THE STUDIO GLASS MOVEMENT

NOW UNTIL JUNE 23

northwestmuseum.org

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 7

Co


COMMENT | NEWSMAKERS

Q&A TESSA HULLS Time and again, she was told: Women aren’t supposed to travel alone. Boy, did she prove them wrong! BY JACOB H. FRIES

I

n a different time, 34-year-old Tessa Hulls might simply be described as a Renaissance woman, but these days, it takes a lot of slashes to fully capture what she does and who she is. Most basically, you could call her an artist/writer/adventurer, but you’d be leaving out long-distance bike rider/ painter/illustrator/comic/performer/lecturer. That last one — lecturer — is what brings her to mind at the moment; she’s on tour with Humanities Washington, giving a talk on early 20th century female adventurers, and she’s stopping in Spokane later this month. We talked with her recently about her formative bike ride across America as well as her next adventure. (She’s going into the woods this spring for a writing residency where she’ll spend months alone in a cabin working on a book.) Our interview has been lightly edited for space and clarity.

thinking that that wasn’t true, but bringing in these historical narratives as backup to say that. So what kind of began as a passionate frustration of research for myself has now become a really big part of what I do professionally. How well does adventuring pay? How do you pull this nomadic existence off? So there’s a couple of ways that that balances. I work as a chef as my travel job. So I take cooking contracts all over the world and that’s part of how I’m able to get paid to go explore places. So, I spent a number of seasons working at a wilderness lodge in Denali National Park, but the last couple of years, I’ve just been all-in on my creative life. … I have pretty low overhead. How have your solo adventures shaped your views on love and marriage? That’s a tricky one. I am really drawn to Rilke’s Letters to a Young Poet, with the idea that love is protecting someone else’s solitude. So I think my notion of love definitely contains a lot of solitude. As for dating with the lifestyle that I have? That’s an openended question that I don’t have a good answer to.

INLANDER: What compelled you to ride 5,000 miles from Southern California to Maine? HULLS: I was really curious about my own country. Growing up on the West Coast — in Northern California — I was so used to hearing people speak disparagingly about the South, but nobody had ever been there. So I was really curious to see this swath of the country that I hadn’t experienced before and I figured the best way to do that was at about 12 miles an hour. I was on the road for four months, and I only paid for a place to stay once because people just kept adopting me and bringing me in. So it was really this incredible experience of understanding what America meant to me, and it really made me fall in love with my own country. Did that form the basis from which you developed this talk on solo women travellers? Yeah, definitely. Even though the people that I met were incredibly generous and open, my day wasn’t complete if somebody didn’t tell me that a woman couldn’t travel alone. So that was what gave me the seed to explore this line of questioning,

XLNY

What do you say to women who self-impose limits on their adventures for fear of their own safety? Well, I think a lot of that is just a byproduct of growing up in a culture where women are told from such an early age to think about where they are and aren’t safe. I think it’s an organic transition to hear about what other women have done to enacting that in their own life. And I just encourage women to examine where their fear is coming from and to test limits. n

Tessa Hulls calls Port Townsend home: “That’s where my bookshelf is.” RIE SAWADA PHOTO

WHY CAN’T I STAY ASLEEP?

®

Home bake a scratch-made pizza in just 15 minutes.

gasping or breathing interruptions? INSOMNIA IS A COMMON CONSEQUENCE OF SLEEP APNEA

9

$

To learn more about testing & treatment options, call us for a FREE CONSULTATION

SpokaneSleepApneaDentistry.com

XLNY Giant Pepperoni & Sausage Limited time offer. Available only on New York Style crust in the X-Large size. X-Large is served on a Family Size tray. No substitutions or additional toppings. Available at participating locations. Not valid with any other offers.

17-3123 PRNT-XLNY9

Look for businesses with...

Did you know that most middle-of-thenight awakenings are caused by airway obstructive events such as snoring,

GO BIG & GO HOME!

ANY XLNY PIZZA

Tessa Hulls’ talk, “She Traveled Solo: Strong Women in the Early 20th Century” • Free • Sat, March 23 at 7:30 pm • Spark Central • 1214 W. Summit Pkwy.

©2018 Papa Murphy’s International LLC

8 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019 PapaMurphy_GoBig_092718_2H_CPW.pdf

Diplomate, Am Board of Dental Sleep Medicine

(509) 290-6044

...and find The

inside.


MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 9


You’re so money. financial educ ation presented by stcu.

Do you need an ‘RFID-blocking’ vest? For fashion reasons, maybe. For security reasons, no.

C

ontactless credit cards are coming, making it super simple to pay in stores: You’ll hold your card near a payment terminal, which will pick up data transmitted by radio waves. But with new technology come new fears about ways people can steal our information ― along with offers of products like special wallets and credit card sleeves promising protection against “radio frequency ID” theft. Before you start stocking up on RFID-blocking accessories, consider whether they’re worth it. What is RFID? With radio frequency identification, a small chip in your card transmits the account information over radio waves to a reader. The transaction is “contactless.”

As for the wallets, credit card sleeves, and even vests and jeans promising to protect your contactless card: “In my mind, they’re a waste of money,” Palmer said.

The U.S. will see a gradual shift to contactless cards in the next three to five years, said Russell Palmer, STCU’s card services manager. In Europe, the switch is mandated by 2020.

While, yes, they could protect you from that one fraudulent charge, most financial institutions will cover your losses, he said. And wrapping your card in aluminum foil offers just as much protection as the fancy sleeves.

While some may the bemoan change, Palmer says there’s nothing to fear. “I’m excited for it,” he said. “Most will find it to be an added convenience over what’s in their wallet now.” Do you need special protection for your card?

If you’re shopping for a new wallet and the one you like has RFID protection, go for it. “But I wouldn’t pay an extra dollar for it,” Palmer said. How do you protect your credit card information?

In short, no. For starters, you probably don't have an RFID chip yet. If you do, there's security built into the technology, including “tokenization,” which means the information the card transmits changes with each use. In theory, a fraudster could read your card's information without your knowledge. But if they did, they’d only be able to use it once. And that’s only if you didn't use your card first. For a thief, it’s a lot of effort for very little or no return, Palmer said.

Contactless cards will be safer to use, Palmer said. They’ll also make transactions go faster. But using credit cards in person has already gotten safer. Since chip technology was introduced, the biggest area of credit card fraud has shifted to transactions in which the card isn’t physically present, such as online purchases. So watch your statements. If there’s a fraudulent charge, contact your financial institution immediately. And only use your card ― online and in person ― at places you trust.

Check out more practical financial tips at stcumoney.org. paid advertisement

10 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019


COMMENT | FROM READERS

SUMMER’S GETTING HOTTER Gov. Jay Inslee has thrown in his hat in the ring.

Readers respond to a New York Times article on Inlander.com about Washington Gov. Jay Inslee’s plan to run for president in 2020:

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

BRAD KING: The good thing is he won’t be our next governor. KATHY STOESER LUND: Wouldn’t it be fun if he won all the caucuses but our superdelegates vote for someone else? JACK ETI YAK: Climate change and the environment are his signature issues? While promoting a coalburning smelter in Newport on a non-industrial rural landscape of mountains, lakes, rivers and forests enjoyed by many of us on the scenic highways of the Selkirk Loop? That environment? PAT LOW: Looks like he’ll be a good stand-in for Al Gore in the not-todistant future.

Readers respond to a story about Washington Attorney General Bob Ferguson’s claim that the Border Patrol sweeps at Spokane’s Greyhound station might violate the Constitution:

TRENT REEDY: Well, Washington is violating federal laws against marijuana. Sheriffs are violating the state’s anti-freedom laws. Everybody’s making up the laws as they go now. MIKE NODER: It is not true that federal government trumps state governments. The powers of the federal government are specific and enumerated, all other powers lie with the states and the people. See Ninth and Tenth amendments. National security and immigration lie within the authority and just powers of the federal government. PATRICK TERRILL: Why doesn’t the AG just ask a judge to issue arrest warrants for ICE agents who violate the constitutional rights of Greyhound customers? WHITTEMOORE CHAD: What about the illegals violating the law by being here? That’s where we’re at now, huh? Pick and choose which laws to abide by depending on your political beliefs. n

JUST ADDED!

TOBY KEITH AUG 6 STYX WITH LOVERBOY AUG 22 OLD DOMINION SEP 15

TRAIN & THE GOO GOO DOLLS JUN 9 JUDAS PRIEST JUN 19  MICHAEL FRANTI & SPEARHEAD AND ZIGGY MARLEY JUN 23 BRETT ELDREDGE WITH EASTON CORBIN JUN 27 STEVE MARTIN & MARTIN SHORT JUL 21 MICHAEL MCDONALD & CHAKA KHAN JUL 23 TRAVIS TRITT & THE CHARLIE DANIELS BAND AUG 13 WITH LOVE AND THEFT

“WEIRD AL” YANKOVIC AUG 18 STEVE MILLER BAND & MARTY STUART AUG 28 JEFF DUNHAM SEP 7 We’re not done yet more summer shows to come!

TICKETS & MORE INFO AT NORTHERNQUEST.COM 877.871.6772 | SPOKANE, WA

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 11


HEAR The

FUN!

Listen Weekdays

Dave, Ken & Molly 6-10am Listen

On the Air or ANYWHERE on the new

MA END Y S 5 TH

ZZU APP!

SEASON PASS SALE s s a P n o s a e S 0 Buy a 2019/2 his season ft get the rest o

! E E R F

LOCATED IN THE COLVILLE NATIONAL FOREST

ski49n.com

509-935-6649

EVENTS Fat Bike Day XC - Mar. 3  5th Grade Passport Family Weekend - Mar. 9-10   Paw & Pole - Mar. 9   Bavarian Race - Mar. 16   Hawaiian Dayz - Mar. 23   Oysterfest - Mar. 30   Spring Break - Apr. 1-7 12 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019


MENTAL HEALTH

‘Gap in the System’ Why Washington parents are fighting to change a law allowing teens to refuse mental health treatment BY WILSON CRISCIONE

E

very time Sherry Miller tried to get her son into treatment, he refused. Miller wonders how things could have been different if he hadn’t. Last year, Miller suspected her son was experiencing mental health issues beyond normal teenage rebellion. He was running away from home, threatening to hurt himself, even threatening to hurt her. In response, Miller says she did everything she could to help. Eventually, she called police to the home several times. At one point she took him to the hospital to try to get him involuntarily committed. But nothing worked. And because her son was older than 12, Miller couldn’t force him to get mental health treatment if he didn’t want to. “We were just stuck in this land of chaos and turmoil and trauma and heartbreak, and I just couldn’t get him help,” Miller says. It’s a struggle many parents in Washington face. Once kids turn 13, teenagers have consent to seek mental health treatment on their own, without parental permission. But that also means they can refuse it even when parents are concerned for their child’s safety. And parents like Miller say it’s a barrier to accessing mental health treatment that kids may need. “There’s this huge gap in the system right now, and it’s destroying families,” says Miller, who lives in Spokane Valley. Miller, unable to get treatment for her son, sent the 15-year-old to live with relatives because she fears he will harm her if he stays at home. (Attempts to reach those relatives were unsuccessful.) Other parents have experienced tragedy after kids refused treatment. State Sen. Judy Warnick (R-Moses Lake) says the issue hit home for her last summer, when two kids in her community committed suicide. It’s why she co-sponsored a bill this legislative session that would allow parents to initiate outpatient treatment for teen ...continued on next page children.

Sherry Miller hopes her story will inspire state lawmakers to let parents get mental health treatment for their kids. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 13


KPBX KIDS’ CONCERTS

CeltiC DanCe Party Free! r F u n gf oe s ! a all

with

Floating Crowbar Saturday, March 9, 1 p.m.

Riverside Place Auditorium 1110 W Riverside Ave, Spokane

NEWS | MENTAL HEALTH “‘GAP IN THE SYSTEM’,” CONTINUED... “This is such a small step — it really is — for parents to get help for their adolescents,” Warnick says.

UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES

Parents have been asking lawmakers for the right to initiate teenage mental health treatment for years. Rep. Noel Frame (D-Seattle) says the issue first came onto her radar in 2017. Then, a parent named Peggy Dolane, who ran into roadblocks when trying to get her children into behavioral health treatment, drew Frame’s attention to the issue. “She was trying to change the age of consent and was not getting any traction,” Frame recalls. “She was completely frustrated.” Washington’s age of consent for mental health was first crafted in a 1985, with the idea that it would allow kids to seek care on their own without parents knowing. Homeless or abused kids estranged from their parents benefit from this freedom. Across the country, state laws vary. In Oregon, the age of consent for mental health and substance use is 14. In Idaho, parents or guardians typically have control to admit children into treatment. Dolane received pushback from Democrats when she began advocating to change the age of consent. Democrats feel strongly that teens should have control over their own health care decisions overall, including in the context of reproductive health, Frame says. “When the solution was, ‘change the age of consent,’ there wasn’t much of a conversation to have,” Frame says. But when the approach focused more on allowing parents and kids to initiate treatment, there was more traction. It didn’t have to be mutually exclusive. There is currently a “parent-initiated treatment” process already on the books, which does pave the way for a parent to involuntarily commit a kid to inpatient treatment. But providers have been less than enthusiastic in allowing it, and it doesn’t include outpatient treatment. That law was put in place in 1998, but it was almost never used until 2011, when another law called for more transparency on the process from

providers. “It had been in place for a while and everyone was really uncomfortable with it,” says Kathy Brewer, a manager at Seattle Children’s Hospital. “Everyone was saying, ‘Gosh, are we really supposed to do this?’” Seattle Children’s has embraced the parentinitiated process in recent years, but other providers in Washington have not. Miller, for example, says she got her son into a local hospital when her son threatened her, but they released him

“It’s really perplexing when I still hear about other hospitals not accepting parent-initiated treatment.”

Feet will fly and winter spirits will soar at this all-ages Celtic Dance Party. Event Donors: Harvard Park Children’s Learning Center North, Numerica Credit Union, and Rocket Bakery

ane City Hall

SPR Forum Confronting Homelessness Presented by Spokane Public Radio & City Cable 5

Wednesday, March 20 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. ~ FREE

Spokane City Council Chambers Hosted by SPR’s Steve Jackson

A panel of regional experts will discuss the current state of homelessness in the Inland Northwest, as well as future initiatives. Bring your questions for our panelists.

Panelists & more information at SpokanePublicRadio.org Event Donors: Journal of Business, Numerica Credit Union, and Providence Health and Services

after less than 24 hours and without doing any kind of mental health exam. That kind of story remains common in Washington, Brewer says. “It’s really perplexing when I still hear about other hospitals not accepting parent-initiated treatment,” Brewer says. “There’s really no reason they can’t.” With involuntary commitment and parentinitiated treatment being viable only in limited circumstances, there are little to no options for parents like Miller and Dolane. That’s why Dolane started advocating for change. Since then, she’s met hundreds of parents throughout the state with similar stories. Sometimes those stories end with kids taking their own life. “Suicidal children are so desperately wanting to leave this life that parents are unable to get them help,” Dolane says. Last year, the state Legislature charged an advisory group with reviewing the parent-initiated treatment process and coming back with recommendations. The group met dozens of times in the last year, with stakeholders from all sides giving input. Youth advocates wanted to preserve the rights of children to prevent allowing parents from involuntarily forcing kids into treatment for things that have little to do with mental health. The group came up with a compromise: Keep the age of consent for mental health and drug treatment at 13 — meaning they can seek care without parental consent — but parents can also get outpatient treatment for those youth.

THURS 3/7, Inlander

FAN APPRECIATION NIGHT

For Tickets Call 509.535.PUCK

14 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

BUCK NIGHT & BOBBLEHEAD GIVEAWAY

FRIDAY 3/8 vs. VANCOUVER GIANTS

SATURDAY 3/9 vs. VICTORIA ROYALS

Come for the chance to win great prizes all night long courtesy of Jack In The Box. Plus jersey off the back auction between periods.

First 2,000 fans receive a Spokane Chiefs bobblehead figurine. Plus $1 hot dogs and Coca-Cola products all night long.

Sponsored By:

Sponsored By:

www.SPOKANECHIEFS.com

Game Times:

7 PM


“It’s really threading the needle between giving kids the ability to still access care when parents are not supportive and giving parents access when they are trying to help their struggling children,” Dolane says. Both Sen. Warnick and Rep. Frame introduced bills in their respective chambers that would change the law. Dolane feels optimistic. “We have a lot of legislators, Democrats and Republicans, all pulling in the same directions and willing to set aside bias and try to figure out what is in the best interest of our children and how to solve problems together,” Dolane says. While both bills are still in committee, Frame says she thinks it can get through this year. Frame says, finally, all the stakeholders are on the same page. “I think we’re in really great shape,” Frame says. “I really do.”

SPARKING CHANGE

If the state law were different, Miller doesn’t know what would have changed with her son. She doesn’t know if forcing him to go to counseling, which he had before he turned 13, would have helped. But at least it could have given her some answers, she says. “I don’t know that they could have said definitively that this is going on,” she says. “But at least I would know that box is checked.” Brewer, with Seattle Children’s Hospital, says it’s still beneficial to have both a parent and minor on board for treatment. She has seen teens unmotivated to get better if they’re forced into it. “I think it does create a challenge for a provider,” Brewer says. “There [should] be a component of wanting to get better.” The bills in the Legislature go a bit beyond allowing parents to initiate outpatient treatment. It also allows providers to disclose mental health information about a teen to a parent, but only in certain circumstances when providers believe that it won’t be detrimental to the kid. And it protects providers from liability if information is disclosed. That’s why Rep. Frame isn’t worried that providers won’t participate, like what happened with the LETTERS original parent-initiated treatSend comments to ment process that passed in the editor@inlander.com. ’90s. “I’m not worried because we’ve addressed this specifically, we’ve left options in providers’ hands,” Frame says. Miller says she didn’t know how hard it was to get kids mental health treatment until she dealt with it herself. Now, she hopes stories like hers can change it and let other parents know they’re not alone. “It’s something that needs to happen in the state of Washington. They have to understand this huge gap that they’ve left for parents,” Miller says. “We need to be able to get our kids help.” n wilsonc@inlander.com

$70,000 PUNCH & PAY GIVEAWAY

ENTER DAILY MAR 1-28 We're calling 25 winners every Thursday to punch out squares on our prize board for cash and prize payouts up to $5,000! Details at northernquest.com

E DON’T FEEL LIK EATING OUT?OU! OY LET US BRING IT T

SPOKANE VALLEY NORTHPOINTE 15705 E Broadway Ave 9602 N Newport Hwy (509) 928-9810 (509) 467-0288 CATERING ORDERS:

(509) 499-9519

NORA 1839 N Ruby (509) 328-1019 ONLINE ORDERING:

COEUR D’ALENE 1423 W Appleway (208) 292-4801

NORTHERNQUEST.COM

|

877.871.6772

|

SPOKANE, WA

sweetoburrito.com

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST

ON INLANDER.COM

SEX ED BILL PASSES SENATE The Washington state Senate passed a bill last week that would require comprehensive sexual health education in every school district and in every grade, including kindergarten. The bill now moves on to the House. Spokane Public Schools is already in the process of overhauling its sex education. But the bill would have little impact on Spokane Public Schools, says district spokesman Brian Coddington. “We believe our CURRENT CURRICULUM meets the intent of the proposed legislation,” Coddington tells the Inlander. Rather, the bill is more about creating consistency across all districts in the state when it comes to sex ed. Superintendent of Public Instruction Chris Reykdal has said the bill would help combat “some of the ignorance out there by trying to put a comprehensive education in front of kids.” (WILSON CRISCIONE)

FEATURING NATIONAL NEWS FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES

CROWDED WARMING CENTERS As temperatures at night continue to get down to single digits, Spokane’s network of warming centers is quickly reaching capacity. “Certainly with the weather change in February, it’s put a lot of pressure on the shelters,” says Mike Shaw, executive director of the Guardians Foundation, which runs the warming centers in the city. “Basically all the shelters are at 100 PERCENT CAPACITY within a half hour of opening up.” The center at Salem Lutheran Church originally had capacity for 60 adult men and women, according to the city. But this week around 100 people typically stayed there each night, Shaw says. The center on Ermina Avenue, managed by the Salvation Army, already doubled its capacity in January and saw roughly 120 people stay there per night this week. “It just gets more and more crowded,” he says. (WILSON CRISCIONE)

CLEAN POWER On March 1, the state Senate passed a bill that would have Washington get 100 percent of its electricity from clean resources by 2045; the bill now passes to the House. It would have the state get off coal by 2025, get most of the way to clean power by 2030, and then be fully implemented by 2045. Several conservative leaders voiced concerns about the policy’s potential effects on UTILITY BILLS and the pocketbooks of low-income families, but proponents on the left argued that’s unlikely if recent policy changes are any indication. In 2006, Washington voters passed another sweeping energy policy called Initiative 937, which critics worried would astronomically increase utility bills. But since then, the numbers show it didn’t. The current legislation also caps utility increases that are caused by the policy to 2 percent per year. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

COME IN + BLAST OFF SINCE 1992, WE HAVE LOVED SERVING OUR COMMUNITY DAILY, SCRATCH-MADE SWEET AND SAVORY TREATS AND NOW OUR OWN INHOUSE ROASTED COFFEE, ASTROROAST.

Argonne: 3315 N Argonne rd Garland: 903 W Garland South: 1301 W 14th Ave First & Cedar: 1325 W 1st Ave Holley-Mason: 157 S Howard St Wall St: 207 N Wall St Space Station: 3101 N Argonne Rd

16 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

ARGONNE: 3315 N ARGONNE RD GARLAND: 903 W GARLAND SOUTH: 1301 W 14TH AVE FIRST & CEDAR: 1325 W 1ST AVE HOLLEY-MASON: 157 S HOWARD ST WALL ST: 207 N WALL ST SPACE STATION: 3101 N ARGONNE RD

ROCKETSPOKANE.COM | @THEROCKETBAKERY | 509-927-2340


PRETRIAL AND FREE On any given day, roughly 4,700 defendants held in jails across Washington state are eligible for RELEASE before their cases get resolved, according to a new report from the state Auditor’s Office. (The report, which was released on Feb. 28, examined the potential impact of expanding pretrial service alternatives to using money bail bonds to ensure that defendants come to court and don’t commit new crimes while released.) The analysis also found that releasing those inmates and providing them with pretrial services — such as electronic home monitoring or court date reminders — could result in large cost savings for taxpayers: between $6 and $12 million annually. Additionally, the report’s authors pointed to Spokane and Yakima counties as evidence that the bail system doesn’t guarantee public safety, noting that defendants released into pretrial services in those jurisdictions reoffended at lower rates than those freed on bail. (JOSH KELETY)

YOU’RE GOOD WITH MONEY. BE GREAT WITH BONUS CHECKING. Get 2% APY* and round up to savings with Bonus Checking. Learn more at numericacu.com/bonuschecking

FRIDAY, March 8th • 5-9pm

*Here’s the legal stuff: Qualifiers to earn interest on Bonus Checking include any combination of 12 transactions of $5 or more on your Bonus Checking account debit card or Numerica credit card under the same member account (excluding transactions at ATMs) and eStatements with a valid email address. APY=Annual Percentage Yield. 2% APY applies to the first $25,000. Balances over $25,000 earn 0.05% APY. If the account requirements are not met, the rate will be 0.00% APY. No minimum balance required to earn APY. Rates may change after account opening. $25 deposit required to open the account. Requirements are calculated for each calendar month. Fees may reduce earnings. APY accurate as of 03/01/19.

Federally insured by NCUA.

2012 E Sprague Ave, Spokane MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 17


NEWS | BRIEFS

Contents Under Pressure Olympia weighs regulations on oil trains

large shipments of extremely flammable fuel run through the heart of our state, starting with my community in Spokane,” announced Sen. Andy Billig (D-Spokane), prime sponsor of the legislation. “People and their safety must come first. Experts know that highly flammable Bakken oil poses greater risk and it’s time to take meaningful action to reduce the threat of a serious catastrophe.” North Dakota currently requires Bakken crude be shipped at no more than 13.7 psi, but trains with oil at a lower pressure have still derailed and sparked an explosion. The 2016 oil train derailment and fire in Mosier, Oregon, involved crude oil at 9.2 psi, the Oregonian reported at the time. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

GOOGLE CAN’T QUIT

Last summer, Google publicly declared that it would no longer sell political ads that targeted Washington state elections after Attorney General Bob Ferguson filed a lawsuit against GOOGLE AND FACEBOOK, alleging that they violated campaign finance law in the process of selling ads. Now, a new report from the Stranger shows that

TAKING AWAY INITIATIVES

Last fall, the voters of Idaho did what the Idaho Legis-

WELCOME TO

FR

M

POSTMODERN JUKEBOX

A

O

N

S ID A R A 10 C Y LE AM H 1

I

n what could be considered an end-run around federal rules governing RAIL SAFETY, Washington could require that crude oil stored in or unloaded from rail cars in the state be at a vapor pressure less than 9 pounds per square inch. Effectively, that means Senate Bill 5579, passed by the Senate 27-20 on Monday, would regulate the pressure of Bakken region crude oil transported on trains, many of which enter the state through Spokane and spread across the region every day. Proponents say the bill was drafted because federal regulators have stalled on drafting national limits on vapor pressure. Because federal rules generally supercede states’ abilities to regulate railroads, the state would instead regulate the pressure at facilities that offload the crude, such as refineries. The bill doesn’t require rail cars be checked for pressure when entering the state or traveling, and would implement a fee of up to $2,500 per day, per rail car, for violations at the loading/unloading sites. “This bill [is] about safety — the safety for the workers who unload Bakken crude oil at their endpoint in Washington state, and for the safety for everyone along the route by which it travels from North Dakota. These

Pressure in oil cars would be measured at loading/unloading sites.

Google has not only continued to sell political ads in Washington state, but the tech giant also sold a $6,500 ad deal to Spokane’s “Yes for Public Safety” campaign that successfully pushed the Proposition 1 policy and fire services property tax levy during the Feb. 12 special election. (The levy passed by roughly 60 percent.) Brandon Bacon, a Spokane firefighter who ran the campaign to pass the levy, tells the Stranger that he wasn’t aware that Google had banned local political ads, and reportedly sought a plan that would enable their ads to be seen over a million times on Spokane computers. “We wanted to target our voters within the city and let them know why public safety is important to them,” Bacon says. “We wanted to reach out to them through any means we could.” Representatives from Google and the attorney general’s office did not respond to the Inlander’s requests for comment. This isn’t the first time that Google has sold political ads after announcing its stated “ban” on such business. In total, the company has sold almost $20,000 since last summer, according to reporting from the Stranger. A Google spokesperson told the paper in January that, despite the continued sales, the ban remains in effect and that the company removes ads that violate this new policy. The development also comes after Facebook and Google settled the lawsuit filed last summer by the attorney general for over $450,000. The filing alleged that the two companies broke state laws by failing to disclose information regarding their political ad sales in Washington. (JOSH KELETY)

2019 WORLD TOUR SEPTEMBER 12

MARCH 14 • 7:30PM

FIRST INTERSTATE CENTER FOR THE ARTS

T I C K E T S W E S T. C O M

8 0 0 . 3 2 5 . S E AT

Featuring classics from Meddle, The Dark Side of The Moon, Wish You Were Here, Animals, The Wall and more....

M ARTIN WOLDSO N THE ATER AT THE FOX TICKETS | 509.624.1200 | FoxTheaterSpokane.org

18 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019


lature repeatedly refused to do: They overwhelmingly approved Medicaid expansion. But now, the Idaho Legislature is looking at making it much HARDER FOR IDAHO VOTERS to bring such initiatives to the ballot — and not for the first time. In 2012, Idaho voters voted to topple three Idaho education reform laws. Back then, signature gatherers only had to gather signatures from 6 percent of registered voters in the state. But in 2013, the Legislature upped the standard: Voters now also need to gather signatures from 6 percent of the registered voters in at least 18 of Idaho’s 35 legislative districts. And now, Idaho Sen. C. Scott Grow (R-Eagle) wants to make that even more difficult. According to the Idaho Press, if his bill passes, initiatives would require 10 percent of registered voters in 32 of the 35 legislative districts to get on the ballot — and would only have a third of the time to gather signatures. Initiatives would also need to include a fiscal note and a funding source. Luke Mayville, co-founder of the effort to launch the Medicaid expansion initiative, calls it a “direct assault on the constitutional right of Idahoans to initiate laws.” He argues the bill would have likely made the Medicaid expansion campaign impossible. “It is very likely that if this bill passes, the only kind of campaign that would have a chance to initiate a law would be a campaign with millions of dollars,” Mayville says. Grow, however, claims his bill has nothing to do with Medicaid expansion. Instead, he says he’s trying to encourage a “grassroots process” and ensure that rural counties have more of a say in the initiative process. He also says he has a preference for governing as a republic — rather than through direct democracy. “Running a state government by voter initiative defeats the basic fundamental premise of the Constitution,” Grow says. “We elect representatives and we trust them with the responsibility.” (DANIEL WALTERS)

Don’t pay Don’t pay Don’t pay to file your to file your to file your taxes.* taxes.* taxes.* *No really, it’s free.

*No really, it’s it’s free.free. *No really, Get tips on filing for free at: MyFreeTaxes.com Get tips on filing for free Get tips on filing for at: free at: MyFreeTaxes.com

MyFreeTaxes.com

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 19


NEWS | COURTS jail,” Judge Moreno says. “The whole idea of this is to really get people, including the court, to think about cases earlier rather than later.” But public defenders argue that their concerns don’t stem from a reluctance to get their act together and adjust to new rules, but rather, from the fact that they are already overworked and are trying to manage at-capacity caseloads. “We’re all working with a full caseload,” says Tom Krzyminski, director of the County Public Defender’s Office. “There really isn’t a lot of room in there for sitting around doing nothing. Everyone’s working.”

C

Tom Krzyminski, director of the County Public Defender’s Office: “There really isn’t a lot of room in there for sitting around doing nothing. Everyone’s working.”

The Conveyor Belt of Justice

Spokane County Superior Court judges want felony cases to move faster, but public defenders say that the new expectations go too far BY JOSH KELETY

T

he goal is admirable: Decrease the number of people languishing behind bars while their cases plod through the criminal justice system. But the speed at which Spokane County Superior Court judges want felony cases to move is unrealistic, say some county public defenders, and the new demands could be detrimental to their ability to provide effective counsel to defendants. “We’re not supposed to by like Lucy and Ethel in the chocolate factory,” says Matt Harget, deputy director at the Spokane County Public Defender’s Office. “You can’t just speed up the conveyor belt and expect things to be fine.” The new policy calls for 75 percent of felony cases to be resolved within six months of filing, 90 percent within nine months of filing, and 100 percent within 18 months. Additionally, the new standards indicate that judges will only grant continuances — essentially, requests for postponing court proceedings — in limited circumstances, such as a sudden medical emergency of a defendant, attorney or witness. “Continuances of court dates are huge for us. It’s very inefficient,” says Spokane Superior Court Judge Maryann Moreno. “What the policy is designed to do is not allow folks to have expectations that they can just come into court and say, ‘Well, we’re not ready.’” The effort stems from a report compiled by the National Center for State Courts, brought in last year to review Spokane County Superior Court’s case processing practices.

20 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

According to the report, in 2017, 61 percent of felony cases in Spokane County were resolved within four months, while 82 percent were completed within nine months. The report also found that, during April 2018, the vast majority of cases on pretrial dockets were postponed due to continuances, while a review of cases on trial dockets between January and April 2018 found that 37 percent were “continued” upon the request of attorneys. (Additionally, the majority of inmates in the Spokane County detention facilities have yet to be convicted, meaning that they are part of this population of pre-trial defendants, according to county data.)

aseload standards set by the state Supreme Court dictate that public defenders work no more than 150 felony cases per year. But even those limitations have been stretched to the max: At several points last year, Krzyminski stopped assigning felony cases to his attorneys because the number of cases filed by prosecutors exceeded what his office could take on under the existing standards. Judge Moreno says that the bench acknowledges the issue of at-capacity caseloads among county public defenders, but that the responsibility for addressing that issue lies with county leadership. “If you don’t have enough attorneys to handle cases, you need to go to the Board of County Commissioners and request more positions,” Judge Moreno LETTERS says. “You can’t just Send comments to come into court and editor@inlander.com. say, ‘I’m sorry we’re overworked.’” Krzyminski says that he asked county commissioners for four additional attorneys during the 2019 budgeting process, but only received continued funding for two who were hired last summer on a temporary basis. Harget says that accelerated time standards could incentivize plea bargaining in cases that should go to trial. “You could have innocent people who are feeling forced into plea bargains,” he says. “You could have the state feeling pressured to plea cases that shouldn’t be plea bargained.” “My concern is having the opportunity to review all the evidence, have meaningful discussions with your client about the evidence, and then have the opportunity to weigh options and discuss those with your client,” he says. Additionally, defense attorneys need continuances to give time for investigations and unforeseen circumstances in cases, such as public defenders getting reassigned and delayed evidence, Krzyminski and Harget argue. “It’s unrealistic to think that people won’t need continuances,” Harget says. “There are cases that are going to be more complicated where discovery is coming in over a couple of months, DNA evidence, rape kits.” Spokane County Prosecutor Larry Haskell somewhat agrees with public defenders on the issue of lab work. He notes in an email to the Inlander that the workloads at state crime labs impact wait times for critical forensic work. “Asking for shortened time for lab results could prove problematic,” he writes, referring to the new policy. Moreno argues that the new policies accommodate for those types of situations. She points to a rule in the new policy that allows judges to grant continuances in situations where facts arise late in court proceedings that would cause “undue hardship or miscarriage of justice” in the outcome of the case. n

“There are cases that are going to be more complicated where discovery is coming in over a couple of months, DNA evidence, rape kits.” These findings stand in stark contrast to advisory time standards adopted by state Board for Judicial Administration, which call for 90 percent of cases to be concluded within four months and 100 percent within nine months. The National Center for State Courts, meanwhile, maintains that resolving 75 percent of felony cases within three months and 98 percent within 12 months is a “model standard.” “We wanted to have some impact on pending cases which could impact the number of people sitting in the


SLAM DUNK SWEEPSTAKES $9K

SLAM DUNK INTO YOUR SHARE OF $9,000 CASH!

MARCH 3, 10, 17, 24 & 31 | 3PM & 6PM Every Sunday, 4 winners will go head-to-head against an opponent and draw for points. The highest score will advance to the next round for a shot at $1,000 CASH!

LIVE AT THREE PEAKS MARCH SCHEDULE

SATURDAYS | 8PM – 12AM

March 2: Donnie & Sophia Emerson March 9: Gil Rivas March 16: Solemn Two March 23: Solemn Two March 30: Nick Grow

GAME DAY SPECIALS AT THREE PEAKS KITCHEN + BAR

EVERY COLLEGE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT GAME 11AM – CLOSE Stop in to catch all the college hoops mania and enjoy our food and drink specials! $8 Bud Light pitchers $3 Beer specials $2 Slider menu Learn more at SpokaneTribeCasino.com

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 21


The Sacred Split In the battle over the Catholic Church’s soul, Spokane’s current and former bishops fight on different sides By Daniel Walters

T

he so-called Summer of Shame had set the stage for November’s meeting of U.S. bishops. There was a lot to answer for. In July, Cardinal Theodore McCarrick had become the highest-ranking Catholic leader ever to resign in a sex-abuse scandal in the United States. In August, a grand jury report charged that over 1,000 children had been victimized by more than 300 priests across the state of Pennsylvania. So by November, when nearly 200 Catholic leaders — including Spokane’s bishop, Thomas Daly, and his predecessor, Blase Cupich — gathered for the annual meeting of the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops, the pressure to directly address the scandals was intense. Outside the Baltimore conference hall, a dozen protesters waved signs with demands like “Reform” and “Repent Resign.” But as soon as the conference began, the bishops learned that the Vatican had barred them from holding votes on two proposals until after a February summit on sex abuse. Even before the announcement of the Vatican’s dictate concluded, Cardinal Cupich was at the microphone to address the group. In just six years, Cupich had risen from the bishop of Rapid City, South Dakota, to the bishop of Spokane, to archbishop of Chicago. Today, he’s a cardinal and one of the highest-profile champions of Pope Francis’s vision for a more inclusive church. “It is clear that the Holy See is taking seriously the abuse crisis,” Cupich proclaimed. He argued the delay would put even more focus on such an important issue, and he called for the bishops to reconvene immediately after the February summit. But to Spokane’s current bishop, Thomas Daly, the delay made it look like they didn’t care. For the first time in his seven years of attending this conference of church leaders, Daly addressed the body from the floor. Glancing at notes on a scrap of yellow paper, he argued that his parishioners in Spokane were demanding to know why so many church leaders had failed to act on what they knew about McCarrick. Maybe they themselves were “compromised,” he speculated. Maybe it was because they were “ambitious clerics on the ecclesiastical escalator” who didn’t want to jeopardize their careers. And maybe, he suggested, some church leaders had conceded too much moral ground. “Did this come to be because we have certain bishops who don’t see anything wrong with consensual sex between adults?” Daly says. It was a clear illustration of how the seismic sex-abuse scandal had blown existing fault lines in the Catholic Church — over things like gay rights, divorce and abortionsupporting politicians — into a broad chasm. And even as Cupich and Daly have both called for

22 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

civility and healing, they’ve landed on opposite sides of that fissure: Liberal Catholics, who want a more modern church, celebrate Cupich. But to conservative and traditionalist Catholics, Cupich is a villain, and it’s Bishop Daly — who recently told abortion-defending politicians they shouldn’t take Communion — who represents what the church should be. The division is the worst Daly has ever seen. “I believe the church is divided,” Daly says, “because we have people who want to compromise — and I’m talking about bishops — fundamental principles of morality that the church has remained very clear and steadfast on.”

THE AMERICAN FRANCIS

It was an NPR story that first drew Jeremiah Johnson, then a manager of Chairs Coffee in Spokane, to the Catholic Church. It was 2013, and Pope Francis was responding to a question about gay priests in the Vatican. “If someone is gay and he searches for the Lord and has good will, who am I to judge?” Francis told reporters. It seemed like a marked contrast with his predecessor, Pope Benedict, who had once condemned homosexuality as an “intrinsic moral evil.” “Benedict never had that welcoming vibe,” Johnson says. “I didn’t feel, as a gay person, welcome.” Francis was a different kind of pope: He traded the glitziness of the position — the flashy car, the big hat, the swanky apartment — for the image of the “people’s pope,” a man who washed the feet of women and Muslims, who preached against unfettered capitalism as eagerly as Pope John Paul II had attacked communism. The Catholic doctrine on sex, to put it mildly, clashes radically with modern culture: It condemns not only gay marriage and abortion, but premarital sex, pornography and divorce. Contraception is “intrinsically evil,” masturbation is “gravely disordered” and artificial insemination is “gravely immoral.” For decades, an internal debate has simmered inside the church: Does the Catholic Church need to loosen up to survive? Just six months after replacing Benedict, Pope Francis criticized the church for being “obsessed” with issues like homosexuality and abortion, warning that if it didn’t find a better balance, the entire edifice would “fall like a house of cards.” And while traditional Catholics stressed that church teachings hadn’t changed, gays who were drawn to Catholicism noticed. When Johnson took his Rite of Christian Initiation classes before being baptized, he says three out of the four people in his class were gay. He recalls a nun telling him that some in the Catholic Church may be fearful of gay people, but here, in the Spokane diocese, he didn’t have to worry. They weren’t afraid. After all, Spokane’s bishop at the time, Blase Cupich, had long been singing from the same hymnbook as Francis. ...continued on page 24

“Did this come to be because we have certain bishops who don’t see anything wrong with consensual sex between adults?” — SPOKANE BISHOP THOMAS DALY

The Cathedral of Our Lady of Lourdes silhouetted against a Spokane sunset. Under Bishops Daly and Cupich, the Diocese of Spokane has had to climb back from the bankruptcy and abuse scandals that defined the tenure of their predecessor, Bishop William Skylstad. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO


MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 23


R E LIGION “THE SACRED SPLIT,” CONTINUED... Like Francis, Cupich wasn’t exactly a champion of gay rights. In 2012, he argued against gay marriage in a formal debate with then-Spokane City Councilman Jon Snyder. But at the same time Cupich had characterized the pro-gay marriage side as being motivated by compassion, courage and a desire for equality. He condemned bullying, hatred and violence. For Johnson, that was enough. “I know that I’m safe to come to a place where that I can find community and call home,” Johnson says. When Francis appointed Cupich the archbishop of Chicago in September 2014, Catholic journalist John Allen Jr., speculated that he could be the “American Pope Francis,” noting that “the success or failure of the Francis revolution on these shores will rest to some extent on Cupich’s shoulders.” “He’s a powerful voice in the Catholic Church today. He is blunt, thoughtful and no-nonsense,” says Father James Martin, a Jesuit author of Building A Bridge, a book about repairing the rift between the Catholic Church and gays and lesbians. “He’s been very welcoming to the LGBT community.” Martin’s book made him a target of hard-right, antigay Catholic groups with names like “Church Militant,” and several of Martin’s scheduled appearances were canceled. But Cupich rose to his defense and invited Martin to give a talk in Chicago, despite a small group of protesters who stood outside holding signs like “Fr. Martin’s bridge to sin offends God.” “I definitely had a fix on [Cupich] as one of the most liberal theologically in the American hierarchy,” Philip Lawler, editor of the conservative Catholic World News, tells the Inlander. Lawler says that under Cupich, Chicago’s “more conservative priests feel like they’re under fire.” Last year, Cupich told a Chicago priest to abandon his plans to burn a rainbow flag. And after the priest did it anyway, Cupich had the priest temporarily removed from the parish, citing concern for the “welfare” of the priest and his congregation. Though the archdiocese

Blase Cupich, in 2012, while serving as Spokane’s bishop. He’s now the archbishop of Chicago. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

24 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

claimed his removal was not directly connected to the burning, conservatives were furious. Cupich had developed a similar reputation during his time in Spokane. In 2011, shortly after his installation here, news leaked out that Cupich was discouraging priests and seminarians from joining protests outside of abortion clinics. Yes, the Catholic Church was opposed to abortion in all circumstances, but in this “toxic and polarizing” political environment, Cupich argued that decisions were made around the “kitchen table” rather than outside of clinics. “It caused a chilling effect for the seminarians, for the people who were praying,” says Colleen Fetz, an usher at Spokane’s Cathedral of Our Lady of Lourdes. “When [Cupich] came in, the diocese basically stopped interacting with the pro-life people. They just cut them off.” In a 2012 interview with the Inlander, Cupich said his aim was to “defuse hot wires” on issues like abortion. But after Cupich left, the bishop replacing him — Thomas Daly — had other ideas.

COMPROMISE, NEVER

For 15 years, Lili Navarrete had been attending Mass at St. Peter’s Catholic Church in Spokane. That stopped about nine months ago. Navarrete is Catholic — but she supports abortion rights. She works as a program coordinator at Planned Parenthood, and as she walks into the office many days, she sees her fellow Catholics praying the “Rosary For the Unborn,” holding signs and protesting her place of work. In fact, she says, back in June, one of the women who goes to her church walked into an open house at Planned Parenthood and began berating her in Spanish. “I know your family. I know you go to church. What you’re doing is a sin,” Navarrete remembers the woman telling her. “No eres una Católica de verdad.” Translation: You’re not a real Catholic. A recent bulletin at Our Lady of Lourdes encouraged attending 40 Days for Life, an annual mobilization of anti-abortion protests, as a “Lenten offering.” It also announced plans to hold a baby “shower” for unborn children at risk of abortion. “Since Daly took office, I think he’s just riling up people to be more anti-abortion,” Navarrete says. Sporting a Martin Sheen haircut and a pectoral cross hanging from his neck, Bishop Thomas Daly speaks with a pressing enthusiasm as he flits between pop culture jokes, impassioned laments on the state of the church, and miniature dissertations on Catholic history. Daly grew up in San Francisco, one of the biggest staging grounds for the gay rights movement. But the city didn’t make him a liberal. If anything, it did the opposite. “I am shaped by coming from San Francisco, and seeing a once-Catholic city hijacked,” Daly says. “I came from a place where I saw a shift, and increasingly, a city become so secularized and hostile to the church.” He’s conservative, both politically and theologically. In his first press conference in Spokane, in March 2015, he unfurled his brand: “Compassion always,” he says, frequently. “Compromise never.”

So, on the one hand, he rebuffs gory anti-abortion signs, rude protesters and discourages priests from exclusively delivering condemnatory “shotgun blast” homilies. But he doesn’t mince words. In January, New York’s Catholic governor signed a bill allowing abortions in the third-trimester to protect the health of the mother. Conservative Catholics across the county called for the church to sanction the governor. On Feb. 1, Daly wrote a letter proclaiming that “allowing murder of children up to the moment of birth is evil” and that local Catholic politicians “who obstinately persevere in their public support for abortion should not receive Communion without first being reconciled to Christ and the Church.” “God alone is the author of life and for the civil government to sanction the willful murder of children is unacceptable,” Daly wrote. “For a Catholic political leader to do so is scandalous.” The announcement rocketed across the Catholic press. The conservative National Catholic Register celebrated the letter with an article, “Spokane’s Plain-Spoken Shepherd Makes Waves.” It had thrust Daly into intertwined Catholic fights over Communion and politics, and it again landed him on the opposite side as Cupich. “We cannot politicize the Communion rail,” Cupich told CBS Chicago in 2014. “I just don’t think that works in the long run.”

“The success or failure of the Francis revolution on these shores will rest to some extent on Cupich’s shoulders.” Communion has become one of the most contentious fights inside the church during Pope Francis’s tenure. The sacrament, where Catholics believe bread and wine becomes the blood and body of Christ, has traditionally been reserved for baptized Catholics without any unabsolved grave sin. It wasn’t just pro-abortion politicians barred from Communion. It was divorced and remarried couples. But then, in 2016, Pope Francis released a document titled, “The Joy of Love,” which appeared to open up the door to Communion for some remarried couples. Cupich celebrated the document as “revolutionary” and a “paradigm shift,” a move away from one-size-fits-all legalism and paternalism and toward something more complex and dependent on context. Compared to Daly, Cupich’s Catholicism can appear less handcuffed to the rigid constraints of traditional church doctrine and more guided by the nuances of the heart. According to the Catholic Herald, Cupich argued that a person’s conscience, the voice of God, might support them “living at some distance from the Church’s understanding of the ideal.” It mirrors the way Cupich talks about abortion. He condemns it. But he typically ties it other issues: Abortion is wrong, he argues, but so is racism. So is capital punishment. So is a broken immigration system or letting children go without health care. “You could read an awful lot of Blase Cupich sermons without finding anything that would make a Democratic Party functionary the least bit uncomfortable,” New York Times conservative columnist Ross Douthat writes in his book on Pope Francis. As conservative as the Catholic Church could be on certain social issues, it was dramatically liberal on


Pope Francis tapped Blase Cupich to help organize last month’s international summit on the Protection of Minors in the Church. issues like health care, the environment and poverty. The church is as politically divided as the country: A Pew survey found that in the 2018 House of Representative elections, 50 percent of Catholics voted for Democrats, while 49 percent voted for Republicans. “In many ways, Catholics are more liberal than the most liberal Democrats and more conservative the most conservative Republican,” Martin says. Daly sees a hierarchy of issues: The church cares about the environment, he says, but fighting against euthanasia represents a much more pressing priority than plastic bags. On immigration, he’s nuanced. On the one hand, he put out a statement condemning Trump’s family-separation policy. Yet Daly also says he told the Washington State Catholic Conference of Bishops that the idea that “we can open the border and let everyone come” is naive. As for abortion, which most Americans think should be legal in the case of rape or incest? “There are never moral arguments to justify abortion,” Daly says. “They’re just not there.” Where Cupich has been known to get involved in politics — lobbying lawmakers, for instance, for tax credits for donors to private schools — Daly constantly warns against the church getting too cozy with politicians. “There’s always a price to pay,” Daly says. “You never win. Politicians will use you.” Daly says he doesn’t want government money for schools. Government money comes with strings. It limits what you can talk about and which stands you can take. He says a situation where a person in a same-sex marriage wanted to be in a leadership role of a Catholic charity or school would “pose a challenge.” (It’s unclear whether Daly’s views have impacted the operation of Spokane Catholic Charities; CEO Rob McCann, who’d effusively praised Cupich in 2014, declined to comment on Daly.) Where some bishops have been accused of blurring the lines of what is allowed and what is forbidden, Daly insists on drawing them. In a 2015 podcast, he cites Carlo Maria Viganò, the Vatican’s ambassador to the United States, who’d been present at Daly’s installation.

“Never allow humility and kindness to be mistaken as weakness, when one is leading as a shepherd,” he recalls Viganò saying. “You’re going to have to make tough decisions. They’re not going to be popular.” Viganò practiced what he preached. In August, he released a letter that took every single controversial issue facing the Catholic Church and combined them into a single bombshell.

RABBIT HOLES

Viganò’s 7,000-word-long letter, simply titled “Testimony,” came less than two weeks after the Pennsylvania grand jury report; in it, he accuses major figures in Catholic leadership — including the pope — of being complicit in covering up McCarrick’s crimes. Viganò declares in the letter that he had personally warned Francis about McCarrick’s abuses back in 2013, but that the pope had ignored his warning and instead allowed “the wolves to continue to tear apart the sheep of Christ’s flock.” In a line Viganò bolded and underlined, he calls for the pope himself to resign. That would have been explosive by itself, even if the letter hadn’t been an anti-gay, fire-and-brimstone fusillade against other church leaders, demanding that “the homosexual networks present in the Church must be eradicated.” Viganò dedicates a chunk of his screed to Cupich. He suggests that McCarrick aided Cupich’s swift rise to archbishop. He accuses Cupich of being “blinded by his pro-gay ideology,” of “ostentatious arrogance” and “insolence” for dismissing what Viganò sees as the role of homosexuality in the abuse crisis. It ignited a wave of debate across the Catholic Church. Was Viganò a brave truth-teller, launching much-needed jeremiads against corrupt leaders? Or was he cynical operator, hijacking the horror of a sex-abuse scandal as an implement to punish political foes? In Spokane, Daly echoed calls from other bishops to investigate the details of Viganò’s letter. “I’ve always respected Viganò tremendously,” Daly says. He says he knows that some claims of the Viganò’s

CATHOLIC CHURCH IN ENGLAND AND WALES PHOTO

letter are true, and he argues that Viganò’s critics have focused too much on attacking the messenger. “They never addressed what he said. They just tried to destroy him personally,” he says. “I find that very troubling.” Cupich, however, did respond. He took issue with the order of events in Viganò’s timeline and claimed ignorance over whether McCarrick had a role in his appointment. Cupich pointed to a report compiled by John Jay College, an exhausting investigation into 60 years of sexabuse claims, that found that abusers weren’t statistically any more likely to be gay than straight. The issue was access, not sexuality. The debate highlighted the sharp differences in the Catholic Church over the diagnosis — and the treatment — of the church’s abuse crisis. To those like Cupich and Martin, the crucial factor wasn’t sexuality so much as “clericalism” — the elevation of priests and bishops over their parishioners. “The cleric is believed and the victim is not. That’s at the heart of it. It’s privilege and power,” Martin, the Jesuit author, explains. “It’s a cultural thing that needs to be rooted out.” But in a video for the diocese filmed in front of a dark blue background, Daly passionately disputes that clericalism was the driving factor. “There is truly a diabolical nature to this crisis,” Daly said. “This is not clericalism. It is a crisis — an immoral crisis.” Daly agrees with Viganò that there’s a “a gay component” to the abuse crisis. “It’s a greater issue of men who have not faithfully lived their vows,” Daly says, “but you can’t ignore the majority of the victims happen to be young men.” And, to a degree, Daly agrees with the theory summarized by gay French journalist Frédéric Martel in his recent innuendo-packed tell-all Closet of the Vatican: The closet drives the cover-up. Even under Pope Francis, church doctrine says men with “deep-seated homosexual tendencies” should avoid becoming priests. Priests are less willing to blow the whistle on abusers if they, ...continued on next page

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 25


R E LIGION “THE SACRED SPLIT,” CONTINUED... themselves, have secrets they don’t want exposed, Martel argues. But instead of agreeing with those calling on priests to be more open about their sexuality, Daly calls for the priests to double-down on their vows — and for the church to take violations of those vows more seriously. “We have to uncover hidden sins and purify the church from clerical abuse and degeneracy,” he said in his video statement. In an August interview with NBC Chicago, meanwhile, Cupich agreed that there should be an investigation into McCarrick. But he also said it would be inappropriate for Francis to try to respond to every accusation in Viganò’s letter. “The pope has a bigger agenda,” Cupich said. “He’s gotta get on with other things, of talking about the environment and protecting migrants and carrying on the Spokane Bishop Thomas Daly argues that “the attitude of certain bishops and beyond has been arrogance. … work of the church. We’re not going to go down a rabbit It’s not listening to faith-filled people who say, ‘we want to know the truth.’” DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO hole on this.” promising that the coverup would never happen again — A rabbit hole? “That’s an unconscionable risk to take with people’s lives.” was now-disgraced abuser Cardinal McCarrick. To conservative Catholics, it looked like Cupich The Chicago archdiocese did not respond to multiple “I, and everyone else, has to be held accountable,” cared more about carbon footprints than corrupt carphone calls and emails asking whether Cupich should Cupich responded. Yet in his keynote speech at the dinals. National Review’s Michael Brendan Dougherty have shared what he knew about Cardinal Bea House conference, Cupich said he recognized how badly the tweeted that Cupich’s statement was “beyond parody” with the public. Catholic Church policies, however, credibility of the bishops had been damaged. while the American Spectator’s George Neumayr joked that generally discourage diocesan bishops from interfering “They simply can’t comprehend how we as bishops “it was cobbled together by a team of Onion writers.” too much in the affairs of separately governed religious are often blinded to sex abuse,” Cupich said. Cupich responded by ordering priests in every parish orders like the Jesuits. Daly, however, says that when it Indeed, even the most devout Catholic parishioners in Chicago to read a statement accusing the NBC report comes to abuse, those policies need to change. have been left reeling by the Summer of Shame. Fetz, the of being deceptively edited. Some refused. It took nearly “The people are asking us, in light of this: Is it up to usher at Our Lady of Lourdes in Spokane, says her son is a month for Cupich to offer a full apology for his comthe responsibility of the bishop of the diocese to hold the studying to be a priest, a Franciscan friar. ments. religious orders accountable to public decla“It’s excruciating at times for him,” Fetz says. “At one “It pains me deeply to think that ration?” Daly says. “Did the church have a LETTERS point he just said, ‘I’m kind of ticked at God for calling my poor choice of words may have responsibility? Now, I think, we do.” Send comments to me at this time.’” added to the suffering of victimIn the meantime, right-wing groups editor@inlander.com. She says she’s seen the anger from loyal parishioners. survivors,” Cupich wrote in the Chicago like Church Militant and Complicit Clergy She’s heard them talk about withholding donations. She Tribune, citing his record of listening to are using the Bea House scandal to call for doesn’t think that’s the answer. victims and publicly exposing predator priests. Cupich’s resignation. One group, the Roman Catholic “The truth is, if we are practicing Catholics, this is In his interview with NBC, however, Cupich had Faithful, is brandishing the story as it travels from city to our shame, too,” Fetz says. “We’re part of a screwed-up also argued much of the current conflict was political. city, seeking dirt on Cupich’s past. The group’s president, family.” He dismissed talk of a Catholic civil war as the work Stephen Brady, has already been to Rapid City. He’s Daly continues to argue that loosening the church’s of a small group of insurgents who didn’t like Francis’s already reserved a conference room, he says, for March standards for morality represents a “recipe for disaster.” critiques of capitalism and the death penalty or his 30 in Spokane. As he gives homilies attacking abortion, however, he acdefense of the environment, the poor and migrants. And “It’s not an act of charity to allow one’s cardinal to knowledges that the church’s moral authority to condemn maybe, he suggested, they were just plain racist: “Quite run headlong into hell,” Brady says. “We predict we’ll it has been devastated by “wolves in sheep’s clothing.” frankly, they also don’t like him because he’s a Latino have him out of there, all by legal means… by the end of The solution? Reformation, Daly says. A return to and that he is bringing Latino culture into the life of the the year.” holiness. Parishioners demanding and driving change. church,” Cupich said. And a lot of prayer and fasting. Last December, the right-wing forces aligned against None of this controversy has prevented Cupich from Toward the end of an evening service at Our Lady of Cupich got more ammunition: Journalists from Reveal being elevated as a leading voice on the abuse crisis in Lourdes in February, Father Darrin Connall reads anonyand the Northwest News Network reported that, until the Catholic Church. The pope tapped Cupich to help mous prayers from parishioners. There are prayers for 2016, numerous priests credibly accused of abusing organize last month’s international summit on the Protechelp, for arm and neck pain, for cerebral palsy, for one women, girls and boys in isolated Native villages had tion of Minors in the Church. parishioner’s son to stop playing video games all night. been quietly warehoused at the Cardinal Bea House on The summit lasted four days, featured videotaped But others echo the same prayers that have been the Gonzaga University campus. testimony of sex abuse victims and ended with the pope offered up in cathedrals for decades, prayers about In a statement, the Spokane diocese announced it condemning abuse as the “manifestation of brazen, agthe church itself, prayers that still have yet to be fully shared the “concern of those who are angry and sadgressive and destructive evil.” answered. dened” that the Jesuits placed the credibly accused priests The summit didn’t dig into the debate over gay “A thorough cleansing and renewal of our Catholic at the facility without informing the Gonzaga community. priests, release any secret files from the Vatican, or codify Church,” Connall says, reading one prayer. And then he The diocese also revealed what Cupich knew: Cupich any new policies. reads another, calling “for all division in this diocese to be had learned in 2011 that the Cardinal Bea House was Still, Cupich, with the pope watching, laid out a propurged.” n home to at least seven credibly accused priests on “safety posal to give top-ranking bishops like himself the power plans.” But he didn’t tell the public. to investigate abuse claims against top church officials, When Daly took over, he says, he wasn’t informed. with the assistance of lay people, instead of waiting for To David Clohessy, former director of the Survivors ABOUT THE AUTHOR the Vatican to step in. Daly has also called for including Network of those Abused by Priests, Cupich made a seriDaniel Walters has been writing for the Inlander lay people — law enforcement officers in particular — in ous mistake. since 2008. In that time, he’s written about the abuse investigations. “I don’t know, frankly, how Cupich sleeps at night, alt-right, his evangelical parents’ rejection of But the church has made promises of reform before. knowing that there were seven priests who were deemed Donald Trump and a local monastery’s fight with At the summit, a CNN reporter stood up and said she’d so dangerous they couldn’t work in parishes, and were a developer. He can be reached at 509-325-0634 been there at a similar summit in 2002. But back then, put around unsuspecting teenagers and vulnerable young ext. 263 or via email at danielw@inlander.com. she pointed out, the reassuring face — the one who was adults. All of whom were not warned,” Clohessy says.

WEAKENED AND WOUNDED

26 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019


PREVIOUSLY...

Miller Cane and Carleen, a “Little House on the Prairie”loving 8-year-old, have been traveling together across the smoke-filled West in Miller’s motorhome. Miller is crafting short biographies of historical figures for a high school textbook, and he’s considering a profile of Narcissa Whitman, one of the first white women to cross the Rockies, who was later killed in the Whitman massacre. Miller’s been taking care of Carleen while her mother sits in jail for shooting and injuring her estranged husband. They’re currently visiting Miller’s old buddy Avery, who used to be a “Panther” (as in, a Black Panther), and now Carleen is trying her hand at writing as well. Oh, and Miller suspects Carleen has stolen a lock of Narcissa’s hair from the library they visited.

CHAPTER 5, PART 4 CARLEEN’S NOTEBOOK

Monday night later in bed. Even if he wasn’t a cat he could of been. He didn’t look like a cat even though birds or people sometimes do but he still might have been one. MEEEOOOWWW he said MEEEOOOOOOOWWWWW. Narcissa talks to her mother in her letters and journal. You mustn’t worry Mother she says. Miller says I can talk to my mother too or I can draw cats or whatever I want and it can be a secret or doesn’t have to be. You mustn’t worry Mother. We’re marching forward with the blessing of the lord. Mr. Cane brought in a buffalo this afternoon. How it relishes! Miller read from the journal how this relishes and that relishes all the food she loves.

ABOUT THIS PROJECT

Miller Cane: A True and Exact History, a new novel by Samuel Ligon, is being published for the first time in the pages of the Inlander. The latest installments of the book will always appear in print first, then on the web the following Wednesday MADE POSSIBLE BY and then on Spokane Public Radio, which is broadcasting audio versions of each installment. Visit MillerCane.Inlander.com for more details.

And the lord. Miller says I should write Narcissa’s story for the children he’s writing for. The book he got me is filled with drawings and maps. She’s different than what he said she’d be which was mean and selfish. But you can’t ever tell. Like with Laura. She was bad but not all the time. Or maybe she was. I don’t think so but Mother does. You mustn’t worry about Laura Mother. Miller knows what happened is the worst thing you could do in a library. But not as bad as wanting an Indian baby. That’s why the little house is wrong. But it still relishes. Narcissa wanted to go home but couldn’t. The Lord has taken our child she wrote. Oh, the Indians the Indians! Mom said it was fine to talk to her in the notebook but we must also talk on the phone everyday even if I don’t want to talk and neither does she. Not always. I haven’t touched it yet except outside the plastic. Miller said we think things that if we said them out loud they would make us seem bad like Laura and the Indian baby. But she did say it out loud. Because she’s real he said. We can forgive her he said But not Narcissa I said. Sure we can he said why not? He’s got an old book called Stories of Great Americans for Little Americans. You would hate it Mother how the Indians are always wicked and cruel. As do I. I can write any story he said but it must be as true as I can make it. They won’t say what she did my mother. They use the forked tongue of the white man. No my mother says you’re not allowed to say that. I asked Miller if we could go to church and he said

Only at local participating Sprint Locations. See stores for details.

MILLER CANE CONTINUES IN NEXT WEEK’S INLANDER

20

Unlimited $ 5 lines for

why would we and I said why wouldn’t we. I will tell the children about its pale silkiness. It doesn’t seem old but I mustn’t touch it much. Narcissa had a beautiful voice. Everyone loved her. She said everyone who sees me compliments me as being the best able to endure the journey over the mountains. Of course its not right to take something that’s not yours. So long as I have buffalo meat I do not wish anything else she wrote. But later she said she could scarcely eat it IT APPEARS SO FILTHY she said. It had stopped relishing. Shes not as good as Laura, even with the Indian baby. Maybe nobody is. It can be your own private words Miller said. But now the words are here and not private. PUT THIS BOOK DOWN MILLER. ITS NONE OF YOUR BUSINESS. The hair does not appear to have blood on it but I have not smelled it because I have not taken it out of its plastic. I could give it back and it would be like no one had ever done anything. Isn’t that so Mother? Catherine Sager said Narcissa was the prettiest woman anyone had ever seen. Catherine came on the trail with her sisters and brothers. Her Mother and Father died one after the other. They were said to be very bad children Narcissa wrote. I can tell when Waffles is going to be bad by the way he looks at me. Mom says animals can’t be bad. But Mother have you ever seen a man turn into a cat and back again as I have? It relishes. n

PER MONTH PER LINE

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 27


MONDAY

Rick Steves’ Europe Travel Special MON.

7 pm

28 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

www.ksps.org/rick


Spokane was part of the nationwide protests inspired by Teresa Shook in 2017.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

WORDS

TAKING THE LEAD Women’s March founder Teresa Shook shares her unlikely path to political activism as she visits Spokane BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

T

he Washington Post has called her “the woman who started the Women’s March with a Facebook post,” yet nearly three years after she pressed “send” on her computer, Teresa Shook still gets asked how it happened. The short answer involves a sequence of dates and times. The longer one explores how a self-avowed apolitical grandmother living in Hawaii helped ignite a smoldering discontent that has yet to quench itself. At Gonzaga University’s upcoming Women Lead Spokane conference, Shook will talk about her role in the pivotal political moment, and more.

BLAME IT ON TIME ZONES

Shook was at home in Hawaii, six hours behind Washington, D.C., when the 2016 presidential election results came in. While much of the country slept, Shook ruminated on the results, which for many was a gut punch. “I want the leader to be someone who is strong and will do what they say and is inclusive and acknowledging diversity, and [says], ‘Yes, we have issues with immigra-

tion but we can solve them,’ and does it without bullying people, or lying or having divisive rhetoric,” says Shook, who adds that, for her, character trumps party affiliation. Since a friend had signed her up for Pantsuit Nation, a Facebook page created to rally Hillary Clinton supporters, Shook went there to find like-minded people. And she wrote what was in her heart: “We have to march.” Shook conversed and commiserated, receiving some pushback. “Finally one woman said, ‘I’m in,’” says Shook, “and then I went and created an event and then it was that event that went viral.”

NUMBERS MATTER

National Mall photographs and other data suggest that around 470,000 people participated in the Jan. 21, 2017, Women’s March on Washington, as it has come to be known, the largest protest since the Vietnam War. Millions more Americans marched in cities and towns nationwide that day. Shook is no longer affiliated with the ongoing national entity, Women’s March, Inc., that came out of

that initial march, yet is both supportive of and in awe of local efforts. “I’m supported as sort of the mother of the movement except by that [Women’s March,] Inc.,” says Shook, who on Nov. 19, 2018, called on the group’s four co-chairs to step down because of what she describes as anti-Semitic, anti-LBGTQIA and racist rhetoric. Things got ugly as the foursome — Bob Bland, Carmen Perez-Jordan, Linda Sarsour, Tamika D. Mallory — fired back, especially through social media. Looking back, she says, the conflict may have been unavoidable. “We were grassroots … trying to pull off the impossible in two-and-a-half months,” she says. “So no one’s digging in too deep about anything. And honestly there was no consensus about who’s being appointed. Those four co-chairs appointed themselves.”

LEARNING FROM LIFE EXPERIENCES

Shook has moved on from Women’s March, Inc., one of many examples from her life in which she’s turned negative experiences around. ...continued on next page

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 29


CULTURE | WORDS

March 21 Gesa Carousel of Dreams 6:30 p.m. 2901-F Southridge Blvd., Kennewick, WA 99338

Visit gesa.com for details!

Teresa Shook will discuss the Women’s March and more in Spokane.

Saturday, March 16th OPEN at 7am

1:30pm Shea Tea Folkin Irish Band 7pm Angus Scott Pipe Band 8pm DJ C-Mad

SUSAN SLADE PHOTO

“TAKING THE LEAD,” CONTINUED... Growing up in Greenfield, Indiana, under challenging circumstances — a hypercritical mother, a father who had difficulty controlling his temper — Shook found role models in teachers, who recognized her abilities and encouraged her to pursue college. Shook cleaned houses and worked as a secretary to make ends meet as a single mother while attending college. After earning her law degree, she set up practice in Indianapolis, determined to be of service to others. “My community [growing up] had a moral compass,” she says, “and that taught me how to live my life and help others.” After the unexpected death of her younger sister, Shook moved to Santa Cruz, California, practicing law and experiencing a new set of social justice issues. She volunteered with the homeless, assisted migrant farm workers and youth impacted by violence and drafted an ordinance to create self-help legal centers for underserved populations. “I have been really shaped by all my life experiences, including the bad stuff, and it’s made me strong and tough and not back down from the challenges,” Shook says. One of those challenges included a rare eye disease, which necessitated her retirement from practicing law. When medical advancements restored some of her vision, Shook chose instead to focus on education and has taught in many countries: Guatemala, Bali, China, Saipan, Gabon. “I think I have a very global perspective,” Shook says.

LOOKING TO THE FUTURE

818 W. Sprague Ave. 509-290-5763

9602 N. Newport Hwy. 509-467-0292

Open Daily | Full Bar • www.nudoramen.com

30 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

Shook’s perspective has also been shaped by family — she is grandmother to four girls — and the opportunity to engage with younger generations. “I think one of the most exciting things [that] has come about in the last two years is for me to be a mentor and be involved with youth.” Although she laid low during the 2018 Women’s March anniversary, Shook, who was reeling from a death in the family at the time, says she is appreciative of other people’s efforts to stay informed, engaged and advocating for improvement in whatever capacity they can. “I hope [people] realize that they can do anything they want and that they can be of service in small ways.” And Shook is notably optimistic about the future. “If Hillary had been elected,” she says, “we would be going on our merry way asleep. As hard and painful as this is, it woke us up and we needed for that to happen.” n Women Lead Spokane • Wed, March 13 from 8 am-5 pm • $165 • Hemmingson Center at Gonzaga University • bit.ly/2HghmGn • 313-3579


CULTURE | DIGEST

Five Comics-Based Streaming TV Series CONTENTMENT IN CULTIST SIMULATOR Cultist Simulator, a strange single-player card game, tasks you with creating your own murderous and sinister cult. You can lose in the usual ways — run out of money, run out of health, or get sent to prison. But you can also lose if you rack up too many dread cards. So how do you remove dread? “Contentment” of course. (“I’m happy, I think,” the card reads.) If you’re lucky, you can find a contentment card by painting or wandering down a moonlit street. Or you could find it in your dreams, aided by a tincture of opium. But here’s the rub: Contentment only lasts 30 seconds, and then it’s gone. Dread lasts a lot longer. The card’s description is almost profound: “Contentment defends against Dread; but Contentment doesn’t last.” Man, ain’t that the truth. (DANIEL WALTERS)

B

BY BILL FROST

ack in my day, comic book stories stayed on comic book pages. Yes, there were Batman movies — the best still being 1997’s Batman & Robin — but superheroes were mostly relegated to print. A liveaction Hulk could-damn-not be done. I’m still right on that, but the rest of the Marvel, DC, and other comic-brand universes are now inescapable. Here are five comics-based TV series ranging from “Hey, I’ve heard of that!” to “Huh?” status to stream while you’re waiting for Captain Marvel, Avengers: Endgame, and Aquaman v. Magic Mike: Dawn of Thrust-Us. DEADLY CLASS (Season 1 on Syfy.com) Based on the Image Comics series, Deadly Class is an ’80s-set action-snarker about a secret academy that trains good-looking teens to kill elegantly — “Harry Potter Assassin School” will do. Deadly Class is smart enough to go toe-to-knife-tipped-toe with Syfy cousin The Magicians, but with a gonzo-goth edge all its own and a killer Reagan-era soundtrack.

THE BUZZ BIN BLADE: THE SERIES (Season 1 on CW Seed) The original 1998 Blade was the first “real” Marvel movie, wiping away the foul/fowl aftertaste of ’80s bomb Howard the Duck. To replace vampire hunter Wesley Snipes, 2006’s Blade: The Series cast Onyx rapper Sticky Fingaz and cranked out 13 solid-to-superb episodes before cancelation. Netflix’s gritty Daredevil and Luke Cage owe this Blade.

THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music arrives online and in stores March 8. To wit: MEAT PUPPETS, Dusty Notes. There might be other good releases this week, but I’ll be listening to nothing except the latest from these psychedelic cow-punks. PATTY GRIFFIN, Patty Griffin. Master of myriad Americana styles, always worth a listen. THE COATHANGERS, The Devil You Know. The punk trio just rolled through town. VARIOUS ARTISTS, Joni 75: A Birthday Celebration. Recording of a Joni Mitchell tribute concert full of heavyweights, from Brandi Carlile to Los Lobos to Emmylou Harris. (DAN NAILEN)

BACK TO JONESTOWN It’s been an entire year since I last heard from Daryl Cooper on the Martyrmade Podcast, and the wait has been worth it. His newest series, dubbed “God’s Socialist,” delves into the saga of Jim Jones and the Jonestown Massacre. The series, released March 3, promises to discuss American religion, radical leftism, the black power movements of the ’60s and ’70s, domestic spying, even Charles Manson. Each of these subjects could stand on its own, but Cooper has a way of tying things together in a deeper — oftentimes disturbing — way. (QUINN WELSCH)

WHAT FIRE HYDRANT? Parking in some parts of Spokane can be daunting on the best of days. Add snow and, well, it gets ugly. So much so that one fed-up Spokanite has started an Instagram account dedicated to “documenting the ridiculous parking in Spokane’s South Perry District since 2019.” Give it a look-see: @parking_of_south_perry. (DAN NAILEN)

THE GIFTED (Seasons 1-2 on Hulu) A network TV take on X-Men finally arrived in 2017 with Fox’s The Gifted, which focuses on younger mutants struggling to control their powers and a normie society that’s determined to snuff them out. The Gifted only dabbles in action and flash, focusing more on characters like Polaris (Emma Dumont) who get little play in the X-Men screen universe. LEGION (Seasons 1-2 on Hulu) Showrunner Noah Hawley (Fargo, the TV version) took an already-surreal Marvel Comics X-Men series about the psychologically damaged mutant son of Charles Xavier and turned it into a Pink Floyd acid trip of a show. Somehow, it’s the most intimate and heartbreaking corner of X-World. Legion is the ultimate cure for superhero burnout. NIGHT MAN (Seasons 1-2 on Roku Channel) No, not the enemy of the Day Man from It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia; this Night Man is a Malibu Comics character who got his own series that lasted for two years in the ’90s. Jazz saxophonist Johnny Domino (Matt McColm) is struck by lightning and suddenly has the power to “hear” evil — like Daredevil, but with shitty musical taste. So bad it’s… still bad. n

SLIPPERY DENIALS Drilled is a true-crime podcast about what some consider the greatest villainy of all: the crucial role oil companies played in cultivating climate change denialism. With its (sometimes over-the-top) foreboding soundtrack and investigative edge, host Amy Westervelt walks listeners through how oil companies went from funding research on climate change and alternative energy in the 1970s to later waging a sophisticated, massive denial campaign. Even if you’ve kept up with recent revelations about how long oil companies have known about climate change and its catastrophic effects (while simultaneously waging a public relations war against climate science), you’ll find new knowledge, such as how industry strategists planted pro-oil educational materials in public schools and tied protestant religious identity to fossil fuel usage. (JOSH KELETY)

Visit billfrost.tv for more trenchant television coverage.

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 31


CULTURE | CLASSICAL

CULTURE | POETRY

Classical Dating Game

With Fresh Eyes Spokane poet Thom Caraway discusses his new book, What the Sky Lacks BY ARCELIA MARTIN

I

Meet Rei Hotoda, one of the Spokane Symphony candidates for next music director BY E.J. IANNELLI

D

uring the 2018-19 Spokane Symphony season, five candidates vying to take over for Eckart Preu as music director will lead shows at the Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox. As they do, we’ll be asking them a few questions to get to know them a little better. Next up is Rei Hotoda, the only woman among the finalists and the music director of the Fresno Philharmonic, who will take the baton for this weekend’s program, “Classics 7: Korngold and Shostakovich,” which includes works from Erich Korngold, Dmitri Shostakovich and Aaron Jay Kernis. INLANDER: More than once you’ve pulled double duty, conducting an orchestra while simultaneously performing as a piano soloist. Is it difficult to hold the baton in your toes? HOTODA: I’ve never really tried that one before, but it would add a very unique element to conducting from the piano. I usually lead the orchestra with my entire body while my hands are otherwise on the keyboard. I can definitely see Mozart using a baton with his feet, though, now that you say this. It’s no secret that female composers and conductors have traditionally been underrepresented in classical music. To redress this balance, female classical musicians should: a) Disguise themselves for years as white, middle-aged men, waiting for an opportune moment to reveal their true selves in spectacular fashion to the astonished gasps of the audience. b) Launch a “Symphony Grrrl” countercultural movement with a punkified Clara Schumann as its icon. c) Stage a nationwide show of solidarity and refuse to perform or patronize classical music until Marin Alsop is the rule rather than the exception. d) Other: ______________ D. Other. It’s a secret and if I tell you, we will have to wipe your memory. But, all joking aside, I feel very strongly that me and my other fantastic female colleagues (who are all superheroes in my book) across all disciplines and career paths are addressing this and are having an impact. Your repertoire spans Beethoven to Shostakovich. If you had to choose one of those two as your dinner guest (assuming, for the sake of conjecture, the absence of any conversational barriers), who would it be and why? That’s a hard one. I have so many questions for both of them. However, the foodie in me would focus a lot of attention on who I could introduce to what cu-

32 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

Rei Hotoda, candidate to lead Spokane Symphony. linary delights. I would probably take Beethoven to my favorite Thai place and [have] a beer. Shostakovich for sushi and sake. But if I had to choose one as a dinner guest, I would probably go with Beethoven. I think he was probably quite a character and [would] appreciate my cooking. Your guiltiest pleasure? You know those moments when you have the guilty pleasure of playing a game and winning when you know your opponent struggles? Right now, I am completely addicted to beating my husband at backgammon. And, for the record, out of 100 games, I’ve won 99 of them. This has given me moments of sinister guilty pleasure much to his extreme dismay. If you weren’t involved in music professionally, you’d be doing: I would be a world-famous cardiologist and philanthropist. I would work on the team that is developing the artificial heart and the proceeds from our success would go to creating a foundation that would support many artistic endeavors, including the commissioning of new works, development of theater projects, and exposure and education to the arts for all. Because the arts are the soul of humanity and community is its heart, I want access to the arts in all communities. Your elevator pitch on why everyone should come see the “Korngold and Shostakovich” concert: This concert will be like binge watching an intense Netflix or Hulu series. You just can’t stop watching even though it is 2 am and you have to get up for work the next morning. The Aaron Jay Kernis work, “Musica Celestis,” will be the pilot opener, the moment your curiosity is piqued. Next, the Korngold Violin Concerto will pull you in as you get to know the characters more intimately as the romance of the characters unfolds. The cliffhanger will be the Shostakovich Symphony No. 8, that will shake you to your very core, emotionally you’ll be dying to see how it all comes to a close. Seriously, this concert is one that should be on your top 10 to watch list! n Spokane Symphony “Classics 7: Korngold and Shostakovich” • Sat, March 9 at 8 pm and Sun, March 10 at 3 pm • $19-$60 • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

t’s not just through side view mirrors that objects are closer than they appear. In poet Thom Caraway’s new book What the Sky Lacks, stories of the landscapes in North Dakota and Spokane share one cover and are closer in theme and scope than they first appeared to Caraway. He just needed a fresh eye to see it. The first half of the book is written about North Dakota, where Caraway lived for four years while earning his Ph.D. The second half is set in the Lilac City, where the former Spokane poet laureate was raised and now again calls home. “The thing about North Dakota is it’s big. And so, the poems there I think feel bigger, less contained because there’s just all sky and flat land,” Caraway says. “And then Spokane, if you just look around, you see the hills as a bowl around town, so it feels a lot more contained. The Spokane poems in some ways feel smaller.” Thom Caraway The poems feature stories about his wife, his children and Spokane’s West Central neighborhood, topics he feels connected to now, whereas his life in North Dakota is starting to fade and become more mythological, as 11 years have passed. “The manuscript itself is kind of a weirdo,” Caraway says. “In that it was two books really, a North Dakota book and then a Spokane book. And I kind of only meant to publish the North Dakota book, but it was a little bit light page-count-wise and we wanted it to be a little bigger.” So Jeffrey Dodd, an editor, professor at Gonzaga and friend, suggested they combine the North Dakota and Spokane collections together. Caraway was hesitant. But Dodd put the poems together into a manuscript, edited them and made Caraway write a new poem. Now Caraway sees how they do, in fact, work together. “They’re all about settling in,” Caraway says. “Learning how to be present in a space, so they have a larger thematic sense of cohesion.” What Caraway hopes readers grasp from his book is that there is more than meets the eye. “When I got to North Dakota, I looked at it in a very mean-spirited way,” Caraway said. “Like ‘What is this place? It’s gross, it’s flat, ugly, there’s no mountains, there’s no trees, it’s flatter than this table.’ But when you look a little closer, you see it’s not, really. There’s a lot of nuance and a lot of subtleties, there’s a lot of beauty that you didn’t expect.” Paying closer attention to the smaller details of the places we go is what Caraway hopes readers start doing. “To look at anything they think they understand, and be able to see it kind of freshly, to see it for what is actually there, rather than what they think is there — that’d be great if people could do that,” he says. I think we’d all be better off that way.” n What the Sky Lacks book launch • Mon, March 11 at 7 pm • Free • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174


Local culinary leaders: Erin Fasbender, Kate Hansen, Amanda Perkins and Lynette Pflueger. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

INDUSTRY

IN HER PLACE

Six local women on sexism, success and overcoming gender barriers in the culinary profession BY CHEY SCOTT

N

aomi Boutz gets this a lot: “We’d like to thank the owner. Who owns this place anyway?” “I am the owner,” she’ll reply, smiling to the inquiring patrons at her Coeur d’Alene restaurant, Vine & Olive Wine Bar and Eatery. “No way!” Boutz says they’ll often exclaim. “But you do have a partner, right?” As the sole proprietor of Vine & Olive, opened in 2017, Boutz’s is the only name on the business license. She’s happily married, but the European-inspired restaurant is entirely hers, and has been since the beginning, when her husband encouraged her to pursue her dream to open a wine bar. Boutz doesn’t blame customers for these queries, which she believes aren’t meant to be rude. Even so, as Vine & Olive’s popularity grew, she started responding a little more firmly to the disbelief. “I would get asked half a dozen times a week when it first opened,” she recalls. “It’s frustrating, because everyone else I worked for in the restaurant industry has not been asked that question so many times.” Boutz’s past employers were both male. One explanation for why some diners may be hesitant to accept that a woman, married or single, could own a successful restaurant business on her own is because, statistically, so few actually do.

National figures paint a picture of predominantly male ownership and leadership in professional kitchens. While women make up more than half of all positions in food service, the breakdown of female-identifying workers in leadership is much lower. It’s estimated that around 33 percent of restaurants are majority-owned by women and 19 percent of all chefs are women, yet only 7 percent are head chefs. The gender wage-gap in food service jobs is also wide; women earn about 28 percent less. The reasons are complex. Established female chefs and restaurant owners, in interviews and editorials, point to several: a lack of mentorship, sexism and sexual harassment, difficulty securing capital or investors, a lack of paid family leave. Less recognition of women chefs/ owners by media and award-granting organizations have also been blamed. These trends and associated behaviors towards women in food are reflected locally. The Inlander spoke with several local women, including Vine & Olive’s owner, an experienced bartender and a rising line cook. Some of the women we reached out to didn’t want to comment for fear of backlash, while others expressed concern about sharing certain details or naming past employers. The majority haven’t experienced the worst behaviors that male-dominated kitchens were accused of enabling in the wake of the #MeToo movement. But they repeatedly

shared this sentiment: Women in food feel they need to work twice as hard as their male counterparts just to prove themselves capable. “There is a stigma that you, as a woman, are not able to do as much,” says Lynette Pflueger, former pastry chef at Common Crumb bakery currently working at Spokane-based Spiceologist. “I personally have felt that I always had to overcompensate a lot. I would show up earlier and stay later than everyone else,” Pflueger adds. “I feel like you really have to work almost double than the boys in the kitchen to feel like you’re even doing the same amount.”

E

rin Fasbender has seen and heard it all over more than 15 years tending bars in Spokane. She’s currently lead bartender at Hogwash Whiskey Den, a tamer atmosphere than some past stints. Throughout her career, though, it’s mostly customers who’ve disrespected or harassed her in ways she believes her male counterparts never face. “I can remember older men would call me ‘little girl,’” Fasbender recalls. “Oh god, all the comments, hotel keys left, numbers written down and ‘how bad do you want this tip?’ And a lot of walking by and groping in a busy bar. It was fairly common.” ...continued on next page

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 33


The Best Tacos & BurritoS start with the

FOOD | INDUSTRY

BEST TORTILLAS Current Kitchen executive chef Molly Patrick feels empowered to be part of the industry’s female head chef minority.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“IN HER PLACE,” CONTINUED...

De Leon Foods

926-5009 • 15530 E Sprague | 483-3033 • 102 E. Francis

OPEN MON-SAT 11AM-9PM • SUN 11AM -6PM 822-7907 • 10208 N. Division | 382-5540 • 2718 E. 57th Coming Soon U DISTRICT 1801 N Hamilton

34 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

Men could get aggressive if she cut them off, calling her a bitch or a slut or worse. In her early career, Fasbender viewed such scenarios as simply part of the job. Now, the petite cancer survivor is not afraid to stand up for herself when things get dicey. It helps that her current employer and colleagues have zero tolerance for harassment. “Not all customers are bad. Ninety-nine percent are great people, and [bartending] was something I was good at,” Fasbender explains. “Why I do it now is that I have a passion for cocktails, and where I work allows so much creativity.” Hogwash is owned by local restaurateurs Kate and Jeremy Hansen, credited by past and current employees alike for fostering a safe and respectful workplace. Amanda Perkins, a 19-year-old line cook at the Hansens’ Sante (soon to become Smoke & Mirrors Saloon), currently is the only female cook in all of the couple’s five area restaurants, and she says she’s lucky she hasn’t experienced anything worse than “locker room humor” at times. “I haven’t had anyone make me feel uncomfortable, but maybe some people underestimating me,” Perkins admits. Before starting in a professional kitchen right out of high school, Perkins recalls her family warning her of the conditions she may face, evidence that the industry’s reputation for harsh working conditions and poor treatment of women permeates beyond itself. “I was expecting to come into this super hard, vulgar, male-dominated thing,” she says. “I definitely feel like I’m an outlier. [My colleagues] are respectful.” Respect and professionalism have been important ideals to the Hansens since opening Sante, says Kate. “It all starts at the top, and with Jeremy and I, we never really subscribed to that seedy trashtalk culture,” she says. “We have always wanted to have the type of culture where employees look toward challenging themselves more than anything.”

Even though Kate and Jeremy own each of their restaurants together as full and equal partners, the industry’s glaring gender imbalance often trickles down to Kate’s day-to-day interactions. The most common occurrence relating to her dual roles as wife and business partner is being overlooked by others as only “Jeremy’s wife,” versus a full partner who’s responsible for making business decisions. “It does bother me, but I try and let my work speak for itself, and I know at the end of the day I shouldn’t expect people to know how our business is structured,” Kate notes. “I would like for them not to be so quick assuming that ‘wife’ is the only role of the female.”

I

t’s not all gloom and stolen glory in the perceived “boys’ club” of professional kitchens. Molly Patrick, executive chef at the newly rebranded Current Kitchen at Red Lion Templin’s Hotel on the River in Post Falls, finds empowerment in being part of the industry’s low percentage of female kitchen leaders. “When I first started cooking, my very first chef was a woman,” she recalls. “I never thought about it, and then as I moved around, I realized it was a rarity, but I always feel really cool about it.” Like her counterparts, Patrick has had her own share of challenges, from unwanted groping and snide comments to raising three kids while working late hours. She, too, has felt pressure to prove herself twice over to be seen as competent and equal to male peers, and still gets excited to see a woman’s name on an application for a spot in the kitchen. At the same time, Patrick has never felt her gender alone should define her success, nor her struggles, in the culinary profession. “I’ve never walked around and said ‘I didn’t get that opportunity because I’m a woman.’ I feel like I’ve created my career and I’ve worked really hard,” she notes. “You could say the whole industry is a boys’ club, and maybe it is, but don’t let it stop you.” n cheys@inlander.com


FOOD | TO GO BOX

Thanks for

An Apple Cider a Day

VOTing

Coeur d’Alene Cider Co. opens new tasting room; Chad White’s lobster bar debuts and more

T

hey’ve been the apple of many eyes since bursting onto the scene in 2017, with thirsty cider lovers wondering where they could try Coeur d’Alene Cider Company’s hard apple ciders. Back then, the answer was pop-up and other events, like the North Idaho Ales for the Trails summer fundraiser, Kootenai County Farmers Market, or the occasional guest spots at local breweries and eateries. Now the answer is 1327 E. Sherman Ave., Tuesday through Saturday, where Coeur d’Alene Cider Co. recently opened its tasting room. The spot features up to 13 Pacific Northwest ciders, three of which are from its own ciderhouse, says owner Jill Morrison. Those three are the Winter Berry, with cranberry and pomegranate; Morty’s BlackberryLemon — at 6.9 percent alcohol-by-volume, this one packs a punch; or Boombox, with a slightly lemony finish. In addition to cider, the taproom rotates three local beers, offers wine by the glass and serves a themed small plates menu; currently featured is pimento cheese with artisan crackers, a whipped garlic-infused cheese spread served with Sweetwater Bakery focaccia, and spicy jalapeño chips with cheese. Follow at facebook. com/cdacider for specials and live music lineups. (CARRIE SCOZZARO)

HIGH TIDE LOBSTER BAR OPENS

Spokane chef Chad White didn’t waste any time between an announcement in late January and the soft opening just a month later for his newest culinary venture: a New England-inspired lobster bar in the heart of downtown. Kicking things off last week, High Tide Lobster Bar’s special focus is fresh Maine lobster rolls ($16) served with tarragon mayo on buttery, toasted rolls with a

Coeur d’Alene Cider Co. owner Jill Morrison.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

side of fresh lemon. The quick-service counter is located on the second level of 502 W. Riverside Ave. in the downtown Skywalk system. The concise menu also includes surf and turf, short rib and veggie-friendly mushroom rolls, along with a New England-style clam chowder and wedge salad. High Tide is open Monday through Friday, 11 am to 6 pm. Follow on social media @hightidelobster. (CHEY SCOTT)

FLATSTICK PUB COMING TO SPOKANE

Downtown Spokane is getting a new nightspot later this year. Flatstick Pub is moving into a large street-level space inside the newly renovated M Building at 612 W. Main, and is projected to open in late summer or early fall. Flatstick Pub is a casual beer-bar-meets-indoor-mini-golf course, with three existing locations in the Seattle area. Founded in 2014, Flatstick Pub is owned by Spokane natives and brothers Sam and Andy Largent. In addition to a nine-hole mini golf course, Flatstick is known for its original golf-themed bar games like “Duffleboard.” Spokane’s iteration of Flatstick Pub is set to feature upwards of 30 taps pouring only products from regional, independently owned beer and cider makers, along with wine. Its pub food menu is being developed by renowned Seattle restaurant group Ethan Stowell Restaurants, which also collaborated on the food offerings at Flatstick’s South Lake Union location. The pub is billed as being dog friendly and will be open to minors daily until 7 pm. (CHEY SCOTT)

Get the results

in the March 21

Inlander

To advertise in this issue

contact advertising@inlander.com 509.325.0634 ext. 215

Area Catholics and Concerned Citizens

Our organization is seeking information on the political actions, the spiritual direction, and the troubling issues concerning the past Spokane Diocese administration of Catholic prelate Blase Cardinal Cupich, currently of Chicago. Roman Catholic Faithful (RCF) is holding a meeting in Spokane on 3/30. We will be

addressing Cardinal Cupich’s past behavior, asking if he can truly be Catholic if he: • Gives Holy Communion at the Requiem Mass of Cardinal George to the mayor and the governor neither of whom are Catholic • Locks traditionalist parishioners out of their church during the Easter Vigil in an attempt to force them to attend the Novus Ordo Mass • Suggests that he would have no

problem giving Holy Communion to homosexuals living in a “committed” relationship as well as divorced and remarried Catholics who have not first obtained a valid annulments • Persecutes an orthodox pastor simply for wanting to destroy a pro-homosexual flag, which was once used in that sanctuary for a Mass celebrated by the late Cardinal Bernardin in support of the homosexualist agenda

If you would like additional information on the abuses of power exerted by one of the most powerful prelates in the Catholic Church in America, or if you have more information to add to our investigation, join us on Saturday, 3/30/19 from 5-10pm at the: Centennial Hotel 303 W. North River Dr. Spokane, WA 99201 Visit www.rcf.org for more

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 35


Oh Captain, My Captain Captain Marvel finally adds a female-led film to the Marvel Cinematic Universe — and a good one at that BY SETH SOMMERFELD

C

aptain Marvel is the Marvel Cinematic Universe equivalent of a female-fronted alt-rock act from the ’90s with crossover appeal. Think: No Doubt. It’s a loud, aggressive blast, with a sense of playful wit and softened edges that appeal to the mainstream while still being casually feminist. Technically a prequel to all the other MCU movies (it’s set in 1995), Captain Marvel begins as a story of Vers (Brie Larson), a part of the elite Kree military unit Starforce. While she’s super strong and capable of creating powerful energy blasts through her fists, she’s troubled by unexplainable visions of Earth that she doesn’t believe to be her own memories. After being captured on a Starforce mission by the Kree’s enemy, the CAPTAIN MARVEL shapeshifting alien Rated PG-13 race known as the Directed by Anna Boden, Ryan Fleck Skrull, she escapes Starring Brie Larson, Samuel L. Jackson, and crash lands on Ben Mendelsohn, Jude Law Earth. There she runs into a familiar young(er) S.H.I.E.L.D. agent, Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson with CGI age reduction). The pair must then try to stop the Skrull from acquiring an Earthly developed lightspeed technology which could give them destructive power, all while Vers tries to piece together the holes in her memory. Despite being mostly Earth-based, Captain Marvel feels the closest Marvel peer to Guardians of the Galaxy, in terms of being an intergalactic action movie based around strong character bonds. (There are even some shared characters between the two movies.) Captain Marvel can’t

avoid the burden of origin storytelling — something that the MCU’s best recent films (Spider-Man: Homecoming and Thor: Ragnarok) were free of, allowing them to be truly playful romps — but it still finds levity between moments of my-past-is-so-complicated-and-unknown. The dynamic between Vers and Fury borders on buddy-cop territory in a positive way. And while their amusing banter draws some laughs, the comedic element gets upped even further with the addition of another character later in the film. If that last sentence seems incredibly vague, it should be noted that Captain Marvel might pack in more plot surprises than any Marvel film, which only adds to the excitement and engagement. The action scenes deliver, whether an elevated train chase or space battle, but it’s the acting that’s actually Captain Marvel’s strength. In the MCU realm of supersized personalities, Larson manages to never make her character feel over-the-top. Her Oscarwinning chops allow her to find the balance between being confused/unsure and confident/resilient, which is needed to make Captain Marvel resonate. Essentially doubling as Fury’s origin story, the movie has more for Jackson to sink his teeth into. And when the always-stellar Ben

Mendlesohn joins the fray (again, can’t exactly say how), his charm becomes an instant highlight. While it’s not like the Oscars are going to come calling, each character has moments of subtle detail, the type that often get washed out in comic book movies. Some of the performance credit can probably be tied to the writing/directing team of Anna Boden and Ryan Fleck, who were previously best known for getting the most out of their actors in performance-driven indie dramas, including Half Nelson and Mississippi Grind. Boden and Fleck also make the most out of the 1995 setting. There’s plenty of obvious-but-still-amusing fun to be had with period piece jokes about old computers and defunct chain stores, but there’s also great details for fans of pop culture nostalgia, like posters advertising PJ Harvey’s album Rid of Me or Vers rocking a Nine Inch Nails T-shirt as part of her blending-in-with-Earthlings look. It aces the period piece aesthetic for the era. A special nod should be given to the music supervisor who wrangled together an all-star ’90s soundtrack that’s on-the-nose in a good way, with a fitting emphasis on female rockers like Garbage, Hole and, of course, No Doubt. It’s rather insane that it took the Marvel Cinematic Universe till movie 21 to get a female-led feature, but at least they made it a good one (even the can’t-get-anything-right DC Extended Universe got that one right with Wonder Woman). But after the overlong wait, Captain Marvel delivers by focusing on its strengths. It may not be revolutionary, but there’s nothing wrong with being a fun, nostalgic and empowering cosmic adventure. n


FILM | SHORTS

‘I WILL HAVE POETRY IN MY LIFE. AND ADVENTURE. AND LOVE. LOVE ABOVE ALL.’ SPARTAN THEATRE & BIGFOOT DRAMA present BY TOM STOPPARD, MARC NORMAN, AND LEE HALL MUSIC BY PADDY CUNNEEN DIRECTED BY ASHLEY DEMOVILLE

3410 W FT GEORGE WRIGHT DR

February 28, March 1- 3 & 7-10, 2019

Thurs- Sat, 7:30 pm • Sunday, 2 pm • SFCC, SPARTAN THEATRE • Bldg 5

PURCHASE TICKETS ONLINE: www.sfcc.spokane.edu/drama

SFCC Spartan Theatre

General Adm — $10 • SFCC Students — FREE! • Discounts for students, employees, seniors, & military! Community Colleges of Spokane provides equal opportunity in education and employment.

Ferris PTG presents their 56th Ham on Regal Show:

Everybody Knows

OPENING FILMS CAPTAIN MARVEL

The 21st Marvel feature goes back to the ’90s, introducing a superhuman fighter pilot (Brie Larson) who’s torn between warring factions of Earth and space. Hardly revolutionary, but fun, nostalgic and empowering. (SS) Rated PG-13

EVERYBODY KNOWS

The latest drama from master filmmaker Asghar Farhadi finds family secrets being exposed after a woman returns to her hometown for a funeral. Penelope Cruz and Javier Bardem star. (NW) Rated R

NOW PLAYING ALITA: BATTLE ANGEL

A junked cyborg is rebuilt by a futuristic scientist, discovering she was once an all-powerful warrior from Mars. It looks nifty, but James Cameron’s script is as clunky as can be expected. (NW) Rated PG-13

APOLLO 11

Right on the heels of First Man comes this acclaimed documentary about the 1969 NASA mission that landed on the moon. Demands to be seen on a big screen. (NW) Rated G

AQUAMAN

The half-man, half-fish superhero gets his own vehicle, in which he inherits the Atlantean throne and fights with his evil brother. It’s got some crazy visuals and hammy performances but still manages to be kind of a slog. (JB) Rated PG-13

COLD PURSUIT

Murder! Revenge! Snowplows! Liam Neeson is a snow removal specialist who goes after the drug dealers that killed his son. Based on a 2014 Norwegian film. (DN) Rated R

COLD WAR

A pianist and a singer fall in love in post-WWII Poland, and are separated and reunited many times over the course of a decade. A haunting portrait

of a broken relationship and of a country in turmoil. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

THE FAVOURITE

In 18th-century England, two women jockey for a position of power within the coterie of an ailing Queen Anne. A lacerating, cutthroat dark comedy with great performances from Olivia Colman, Rachel Weisz and Emma Stone. (SS) Rated R

FIGHTING WITH MY FAMILY

The true story behind the career of wrestler Paige, who left a British bluecollar town to become a WWE star. It hits every inspirational sports movie beat you can imagine, but it gets by on sheer charm. (MJ) Rated PG-13

FREE SOLO

A documentary following climber Alex Honnold’s attempt to successfully ascend Yosemite’s El Capitan rock formation sans rope and safety harness. Not for acrophobes, especially in its stunning final minutes. (NW) Rated PG-13

GLASS

M. Night Shyamalan continues his Unbreakable saga, with the indestructible Bruce Willis returning to fight supervillains Samuel L. Jackson and James ...continued on next page

Ferris Auditorium, 37th & Regal Sunday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

2:00 pm $9.00

7:30 pm $9.00

7:30 pm $9.00

7:30 pm $9.00

1:30 pm 7:30 pm $9.00

March 10 March 13 March 14 March 15 March 16

Tickets are available at hamonregal.org, Round Table Pizza, 2nd Look Books, Rosauers on 29th, the Ferris Business Office and from any Ham on Regal cast member.

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 37 Ferris_HamonRegal_030719_9U_WH.pdf


NTERN THEAT GIC LA ER MA FRI, MARCH 8TH – THURS, MAR 14TH TICKETS: $9

IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK (117 MIN) FRI-SUN: 5:10, MON-THU: 4:00

COLD WAR (82 MIN) FRI/SAT: 3:00, SUN: 12:45

LAST WEEKEND

THE FAVOURITE (113 MIN) FRI/SAT: 7:00, SUN: 2:30, TUE-THU: 6:00 FREE SOLO (97 MIN) FRI/SAT: 7:25, SUN: 3:10, MON-THU: 6:15 ROMA (135 MIN) LAST WEEK FRI/SAT: 2:40, SUN: 12:40, MON-THU: 3:30 VICE (137 MIN) FRI-SUN: 4:40

WEEKEND ONLY

25 W Main Ave #125 • MagicLanternOnMain.com

FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING McAvoy. It’s got some intriguing ideas, but the payoff is meager. (NW) Rated PG-13

GREEN BOOK

A white driver (Viggo Mortensen) ferries a black jazz pianist (Mahershala Ali) through the American South in the 1960s. Its racial politics are undoubtedly simplistic, but its central performances more than make up for it. At the Magic Lantern. (MJ) Rated PG-13

GRETA

Isabelle Huppert chews up scenery as a deranged woman who entraps Chloë Grace Moretz in a sick game of wits. Yes, it’s stupid, but it’s also lurid, campy fun. (NW) Rated R

HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON: THE HIDDEN WORLD

The third entry in the hit DreamWorks franchise finds Hiccup and Toothless up against a hunter that wants to eradicate all dragons. Even for fans, this one’s a bit disappointing. (MJ) Rated PG

We care. Planned Parenthood is a leading provider of high-quality, affordable health care for everyone, and scheduling couldn’t be easier. Schedule online at ppgwni.org, or call 866.904.7721

Birth Control

IF BEALE STREET COULD TALK

Barry Jenkins’ follow-up to Moonlight is a tender adaptation of James Baldwin’s novel, a drama about a young couple separated by imprisonment as they prepare to welcome a baby. At the Magic Lantern. (JB) Rated R

ers. A brilliant and funny animated feature that looks and feels like a comic book come to life. (SS) Rated PG

THEY SHALL NOT GROW OLD

Peter Jackson’s documentary about British troops in WWI, featuring colorized and CGI-augmented footage from a century ago, is more of a museum piece than a film. Still, it’s an often moving monument. (MJ) Rated R

THE UPSIDE

A remake of the French hit The In-

touchables, with Bryan Cranston as a paralyzed millionaire and Kevin Hart as the troubled man who becomes his caretaker. It thinks it’s a feel-good drama, but it’s actually manipulative trash. (ES) Rated PG-13

WHAT MEN WANT

Sports agent Taraji P. Henson gains the ability to hear the thoughts of the men, and uses it to her professional advantage. Like the 2000 comedy that inspired it, this squanders a clever premise with lazy farce. (NW) Rated R n

ISN’T IT ROMANTIC

Rebel Wilson is an unlucky-in-love architect who hits her head and finds herself stuck inside a rom-com. A good idea that doesn’t sustain itself, even at just 80 minutes. (NW) Rated PG-13

THE LEGO MOVIE 2: THE SECOND PART

In this sequel to the 2014 hit, Bricksburg is attacked by exploding Duplo toys and Batman is entrapped by a shapeshifting queen. It might not have the novelty of the original, but it’s still entertaining. (NW) Rated PG

A MADEA FAMILY FUNERAL STD Testing

Treatment

We offer quality health care, backed by medical experts and over 100 years of research in reproductive care.

The 11th (and apparently final) film to feature Tyler Perry’s slap-happy matriarch finds her arranging an unexpected funeral. There’ll be casket jokes aplenty. (NW) Rated PG-13

ROMA

The best film of 2018 is finally hitting the big screen in Spokane, and it’s worth a trip to the theater. Alfonso Cuarón’s black-and-white epic is sweeping yet intimate, a powerful study of class divide in 1970s Mexico. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

RUN THE RACE

A faith-based drama about teen brothers — one a football MVP, the other a track star — trying to escape their hometown and their drunkard father. (NW) Rated PG

NOW STREAMING

SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE

Truth really is stranger than fiction in Tim Wardle’s documentary, which follows the unusual and often harrowing saga of triplets who find one another nearly two decades after being separated at birth. A moving, thought-provoking, well-told human interest story. (NW) Rated PG-13

Spider-Men from various dimensions converge in the world of a teen web slinger, and they help him find his pow-

PlannedParenthood_WeCare_022819_3V_CPW.pdf

38 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

THREE IDENTICAL STRANGERS (HULU)


FILM | TAKE TWO

Neil Jordan’s art-trash shocker Greta is a showcase for Isabelle Huppert as the world’s most genteel psychopath.

Piano Lessons Can Be Murder

Isabelle Huppert makes a symphony out of a single note in the lurid, stupid-fun stalker thriller Greta

SPOKANE STRING QUARTET

BY NATHAN WEINBENDER

I

f the movies have taught us anything, it’s that She stalks Frances, she stalks Erica, she stands selflessness can get you killed. Altruism is the outside buildings for what seems like hours, murderous psychopath’s bread and butter, and later walks into the fancy restaurant where and that’s certainly the case with Greta (Isabelle Frances works, demands a Chablis right this instant Huppert), who likes to leave behind fancy handand starts overturning tables. And it gets more bags on the New York City subways and wait violent from there. for a vulnerable young woman to find them and In standard thriller fashion, the flies in return them to their rightful owner. Greta’s web are almost contractually obligated And once the women become ingratiated to make one stupid decision after another. Tell toward Greta… well, let’s just say they won’t like me this: If a psychotic Isabelle Huppert was what’s hidden behind her piano. following you all over the city, would you enter Greta has all the trappings of a film that was your apartment without turning the lights on, and written years ago, from the sheer analog nature leave the door wide open? And not only is Greta of its title character’s ruse to the inexplicable a Machiavellian madwoman, but she’s seemingly landline phone in its millennial heroblessed with omnipotence ine’s spacious loft apartment. I could be and superhuman strength, GRETA wrong, but it wouldn’t surprise me if the Rated R which allows her to be in all dust was blown off a screenplay from the right places at the most Directed by Neil Jordan 1993 and retrofitted to include Facebook Starring Isabelle Huppert, Chloë convenient times. and text messaging. Anyone who’s seen That’s part of the fun, Grace Moretz, Maika Monroe a handful of those Hand That Rocks the I guess, and Huppert is Cradle-era killer-next-door movies has definitely in on the joke. She been through all this before. wields syringes with an almost sensual ecstasy, But you know who clearly hasn’t seen any of dances daintily around her living room before cathose movies? Greta’s latest obsession, a doe-eyed sually shooting someone in the head, and cleans big-city transplant named Frances (Chloë Grace up a giant pool of blood with all the exasperation Moretz), who brings back one of Greta’s many of someone who’s just spilled a little cocktail “lost” purses and accepts the offer to come inside sauce on the linoleum. She could play this part and have a cup of tea. Frances finds that Greta’s in a catatonic state — this isn’t even the first time amiable French charm fills the void left by her she’s been cast as a perverse piano teacher — but mother’s recent death, while Frances becomes a she really digs into it with demented glee. surrogate for Greta’s own faraway daughter. Greta was directed and co-written by Neil Their casual friendship deepens, and soon Jordan, who has made as many classy, twisty, they’re having regular dinners and taking walks thought-provoking thrillers (The Crying Game, through the park, much to the bafflement of Mona Lisa) as he has B-movies with artsy veneers Frances’ sassy roommate Erica (Maika Monroe), (In Dreams, The Brave One), and this one is more in who fluently speaks the kind of faux-hip dialogue the latter camp (pun very much intended). It’s a that could only have been written by a middlepretty goofy film, and if you think about its interaged man. nal logic for more than, oh, a nanosecond, it falls Erica is right to be suspicious, of course, and apart completely. But it’s not exactly unenjoyable, once Frances starts to get the hint that Greta has and it sometimes works in a trashy, airport-novel some kind of ulterior motive, she stops returnsort of way. Have a couple glasses of Chablis and ing her phone calls. But Greta won’t be ignored: enjoy the dumb ride. n

3 P.M. SUNDAY, MARCH 17 BING CROSBY THEATER MUSIC OF FANNY AND FELIX MENDELSSOHN AND BELA BARTOK ALL SEATS GENERAL ADMISSION $20 ADULTS • $16 SENIORS • $12 STUDENTS

Tickets at the door, (800) 325-SEAT or

www.spokanestringquartet.org

FIND YOUR HAPPY PLACE

Search Happy Hour Specials, Times and Locations INLANDER.COM/DRINKSPOTTER

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 39


CDA Arts & Culture Alliance presents

5-8 pm Friday, March 8

It may look like I’m listening to you but in my head I’m thinking about eating at Geno’s.

Downtown Coeur d’Alene rings with live musical performances!

1414 N Hamilton St. | Logan/Gonzaga 509-368-9087 | wedonthaveone.com artsandculturecda.org

Chamber

Soirée A variety of baroque, classical and contemporary music selections introduced on stage by each ensemble.

7:30 PM

HISTORIC DAVENPORT

Gallery & Table Seating Available

March 26-27 Jayce Ogren, Guest Conductor István Várdai, Cello Jayce Ogren MUSIC DIRECTOR FINALIST

Samuel Barber — Essay No.2 for Orchestra Sergei Prokofiev — Symphony Concerto Modest Mussorgsky (Arr. Maurice Ravel) — Pictures at an Exhibition

APRIL 13 8PM APRIL 14 3PM Virtuoso cellist István Várdai will dazzle with Prokofiev’s breathtaking Symphony Concerto. Then enjoy Mussorgsky’s audience favorite Pictures at an Exhibition.

Sponsored by: Russell & Deborah Lee

M ARTIN WOLDSO N THE ATER AT THE FOX TICKETS | 509.624.1200 | SpokaneSymphony.org

40 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019


ESSAY

Young the Giant, performing at the Knitting Factory on Friday, are amongst the bands we rank in this article about articles.

Music the Article Ranking the recent wave of “Blank the Blank” bands BY BEN SALMON

T

he first thing — and sometimes, the best thing — many bands do is pick a name. In fact, some say picking a name is the best part of being in a band. Once you have a cool name that looks good on a T-shirt and a telephone pole, you have to get around to the hard stuff, like writing songs, rehearsing, booking gigs and beefing with other bands on social media. The bummer is that naming a band is harder now than ever before, primarily because most of the good band names have been claimed. So instead of the Kinks and the Rolling Stones, we have Soccer Mommy and Viagra Boys. Search-engine optimization is wreaking havoc on modern band names, too, which is why you could see Alvvays opening for Chvrches someday. (And if you can, you should. Both of those bands are excellent.) Still, there is no excuse for the worst recent trend in band names, which we’ll call the new wave of “the” bands. Unlike past waves, however — like the Smiths or the Strokes — these youngsters are putting the word “the” in the middle of their name. The results are occasionally decent, but more often they’re awkward and/or confusing. Band-naming trends aren’t new, of course. Over the past couple decades, indie-rock has been overrun by “wolf” and “deer” bands: Wolf Parade, Wolf Alice, Wolf People, Deerhunter, Deerhoof, Deer Tick and so on. The Strokes spearheaded a surge of “the ____” garage-rock bands in the early 2000s, with Hives, Vines and Killers filling in the blank, among others. In the ’70s and ’80s,

dudes just named their hair metal bands after themselves: Winger, Dokken, Nelson, Van Halen, etc. And back in the ’60s, all the good bands started with the letter B, like the Beatles, the Band, the Beach Boys, the Byrds and Bink Bloyd. All of those are actually pretty cool as compared to this Band the Name situation. With a couple of these acts coming through Spokane the Town this week, we’ve decided to rank them according to a very scientific set of criteria determined during an intensive research sesh at Neato the Burrito. (Note: Bands that predate this trend, such as Pedro the Lion and At the Drive-In, are excluded.) 9. WALK THE MOON And after you’re done walking it, please stay there. 8. JUKEBOX THE GHOST Sounds like Puff Daddy used a reality show to build a band to compete with Ben Folds Five. 7. FOSTER THE PEOPLE Remember that “Pumped Up Kicks” song? Your mom probably does. This L.A. band is like a “Xerox of a Xerox of MGMT” Spotify playlist came to life. 6. HORSE THE BAND Imagine someone trying to buy a Band of Horses album and accidentally grabbing this chiptune-meets-metalcore band instead.

WESLEY YENCOPY PHOTO

5. YOUNG THE GIANT This SoCal pop-rock band shares a lot of the same sonic qualities as its contemporaries on this list, but began to separate itself on its 2018 album Mirror Master. Catch ’em Friday at the Knitting Factory! 4. CAGE THE ELEPHANT Crunchy, bluesy and (kinda) cool, these spiffy dressers are surely the most successful band ever to call both Bowling Green, Kentucky, and London home. For this list, off-brand Black Keys is better than, like, off-brand Bastille. 3. PORTUGAL. THE MAN These lovable Portlanders came out of nowhere to win a Grammy with their 2017 mega-hit “Feel It Still,” and by nowhere we mean “their deep and delightful discography full of strangely kaleidoscopic rock.” They live about as far from pop chart vapidity as you can imagine. 2. AND THE KIDS This Massachusetts combo’s off-kilter pop-rock is built on punk-rock underpinnings and highlighted by frontwoman Hannah Mohan’s powerful voice. When they visit the Bartlett on Wednesday, they’ll presumably offer up a heaping helping of the endlessly hummable tunes on new album When This Life Is Over. 1. JEFF THE BROTHERHOOD There are two brothers in this Nashville band, but their names are Jake and Jamin … not Jeff. Whoever Jeff is, he should be proud of his namesake band, which boasts one of the most consistently adventurous catalogs in the world of underground punk/garage/psych-rock. n Young the Giant with Sure Sure • Friday, March 8 at 8 pm • Sold out • All ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279 And the Kids with Cardioid • Wed, March 13 at 8 pm • $10-$12 • All ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

FOLK MANDOLIN ORANGE

A

ndrew Marlin and Emily Frantz, better known as Mandolin Orange, are married in more ways than one: They’re a couple in real life, yes, but their voices meld in a way that suggests they were always meant to be together. The duo just released their sixth studio album, Tides of a Teardrop, which straddles the line between neo-folk and old-school country and finds primary songwriter Marlin channeling his grief following his mother’s death when he was a teenager. He and Frantz became parents themselves while working on the record, so that sense of mourning is diffused by a glimmer of optimism. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Mandolin Orange with Mapache • Sun, March 10 at 8 pm • $20 • All ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 03/7

A&P’S BAR & GRILL, Open Mic BERSERK, Vinyl Meltdown J THE BIG DIPPER, Dirty Revival, Soultree THE BIG DOG BAR & GRILL, DJ Dave J BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, The Song Project BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Downtown Jam J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen THE CORK & TAP, Truck Mills CRUISERS, Open Jam Night FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Country Dance THE GILDED UNICORN, Kori Ailene J HOUSE OF SOUL, Kind of Blue THE JACKSON ST., Zaq Flanary and the Songsmith Series J LAGUNA CAFÉ, Just Plain Darin MATCHWOOD BREWING CO., Birds of Play MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Kerry Leigh J MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE, Open Mic Hosted by Scott Reid MOON TIME, Larry Myer O’SHAYS IRISH PUB & EATERY, O’Pen Mic Thursdays POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Bill Bozly RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL, Songsmith Series feat. Ian Nixon RED ROOM LOUNGE, I Want BNGRZ! feat. Kid Kaotic THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler THE ROXIE, Music Challenge ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 03/8

12 TRIBES RESORT CASINO, Radio 80 219 LOUNGE, Brown Salmon Truck A&P’S BAR & GRILL, DJ Skwish ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Larry Myer

42 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

ROCK UMPHREY’S McGEE

T

he guys in Umphrey’s McGee started the band in the late ’90s when they were Notre Dame students, and their early output has the smartass wit you’d expect from 20-somethings. After all, they called their debut album Greatest Hits Vol. III, and recorded it in the back of a Napa Auto Parts. They’ve obviously moved on to bigger things, but they’ve maintained that puckish sense of humor: In 2018, they released the companion albums It’s Not Us and It’s You. They’ve also developed a fanbase that gravitates toward jam bands and roots rock, and they’re known for their genrebending covers and high-energy live releases. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Umphrey’s McGee • Sun, March 10 at 7 pm • $35-$50 • 21+ • The Hive • 207 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • livefromthehive.com

J THE BARTLETT, SISTERS, Huntertones THE BIG DOG BAR & GRILL, DJ Dave BOLO’S, Kosta la Vista BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Devon Wade THE BULL HEAD, Alisha & The LCB CHECKERBOARD BAR, Twisted Insane, Jrod the Problem, SugaShane, Savage Watson and more THE COEUR D’ALENE RESORT, JamShack CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke COSMIC COWBOY GRILL, Sam Leyde CRUISERS, Karaoke with Gary HONEY EATERY AND SOCIAL CLUB, Vanna Oh! J HOP MOUNTAIN TAPROOM AND GRILL, Just Plain Darin HOUSE OF SOUL, Nu Jack City: Motown Soul Revue HUNGA DUNGA BREWING CO., Birds of Play IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Mike and Shanna Thompson

IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Nick Grow J J KNITTING FACTORY, Young the Giant (see page 41), Sure Sure [SOLD OUT] LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil MARYHILL WINERY SPOKANE, Jessica Haffner MATCHWOOD BREWING CO., Big Phatty and the Inhalers MAX AT MIRABEAU, 3D Band MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Ron Greene Trio MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Wyatt Wood NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom O’SHAYS IRISH PUB & EATERY, Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots J OUTLAW BBQ & CATERING MARKET, Songsmith Series PACIFIC PIZZA, Nic Vigil, DJ Lydell PATIT CREEK CELLARS, Ken Davis In Transit PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Larry Mooney

J THE PIN, Charlie Farley with Eric Patton, HJ Lally, The Hankers, Joey Anderson REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Matt Mitchell THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler THE ROXIE, Karaoke with Tom SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT (NOAH’S), Son of Brad ZOLA, Loose Gazoonz

Saturday, 03/9

12 TRIBES RESORT CASINO, Jokers Run 219 LOUNGE, The Brendan Kelty Trio A&P’S BAR & GRILL, DJ Exodus ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS, Mark Holt J J THE BARTLETT, Mama Doll, Mikey & Jen BOLO’S, Kosta la Vista BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Jan Harrison Blues Experience

CLEARWATER RIVER CASINO, Pablo Cruise, Firefall & Orleans COSMIC COWBOY GRILL, Dan Conrad CRUISERS, Sciandra’s Game EICHARDT’S, Larry Myer HONEY EATERY AND SOCIAL CLUB, Dawna Stafford HOUSE OF SOUL, Nu Jack City: Motown Soul Revue J HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET, Mike McCafferty HUMBLE ABODE BREWING, Nick Grow IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, John Firshi IRON GOAT BREWING CO., Vanna Oh! THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke KNITTING FACTORY, Kung Fu Vinyl, Dirty Savage, Savvy Rae, L3fty, Lilac City Dynamics, Rod Mac N Dime City, The Zodeak, Cordell Drake, TR3EZY, On One LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Jay Condiotti J THE LOCAL DELI, Ally Burke MARYHILL WINERY SPOKANE, Spare Parts Duo


GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

Sunday, 03/10

DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Rev. Yo’s VooDoo Church of Blues Jam GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke J THE HIVE, Umphrey’s McGee (see facing page) IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Ray Vasquez J J KNITTING FACTORY, Mandolin Orange (see facing page), Mapache LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam MARYHILL WINERY SPOKANE, Kari Marguerite MATCHWOOD BREWING CO., Ken Mayginnes PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Piano Sunday with Annie Welle THE ROXIE, Hillyard Billys J SOUTH HILL GRILL, Just Plain Darin STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, Karaoke ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 03/11

THE BULL HEAD, Songsmith Series J CALYPSOS COFFEE ROASTERS, Open Mic CHECKERBOARD BAR, Songsmith Series feat. Joey Anderson CRAVE, DJ Dave EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills HOUSE OF SOUL, Karaoke Unlimited RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic with Lucas Brookbank Brown ZOLA, Perfect Mess

Tuesday, 03/12

219 LOUNGE, Karaoke with DJ Pat J THE BARTLETT, Will Jordan BOOMBOX PIZZA, Karaoke CRAVE, DJ Dave GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke HOUSE OF SOUL, Karaoke Unlimited LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tuesday LITZ’S BAR & GRILL, The ShuffleDawgs Blues Power Happy Hour THE OBSERVATORY, Alterbeast, Continuum, Withheld Judgement RAZZLE’S BAR & GRILL, Open Mic Jam THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Country Swing Dancing THE ROXIE, Open Mic/Jam SWEET LOU’S RESTAURANT AND TAP HOUSE, Ron Greene THE VIKING, Songsmith Series ZOLA, Desperate 8s

Wednesday, 03/13

219 LOUNGE, Truck Mills & Ali Thomas J J THE BARTLETT, And the Kids, Cardioid CRAVE, DJ Dave CRUISERS, Open Jam Night Hosted by The Jam Band DI LUNA’S CAFE, Terry Robb GENO’S TRADITIONAL FOOD & ALES, Open Mic with Host Travis Goulding HOUSE OF SOUL, Karaoke Unlimited IRON HORSE (COEUR D’ALENE), Open Jam IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Devon Wade

THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LITZ’S BAR & GRILL, Nick Grow J THE LOCAL DELI, Devon Wade LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 MAX AT MIRABEAU, Dawna Stafford MILLWOOD BREWING COMPANY, Kori Ailene J RED DRAGON CHINESE, Tommy G RED ROOM LOUNGE, Blowin’ Kegs Jam Session THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, Open Mic ZOLA, Cruxie

Coming Up ...

J THE BARTLETT, RIPE, The Brook and the Bluff, March 14 J KNITTING FACTORY, The Glorious Sons, JJ Wilde, Dogtown 420, Invasive, Sins & Sinners, March 14 J THE BARTLETT, Runaway Octopus, Ray Badness, March 15 J THE BIG DIPPER, Wasted Breath, Double Bird, Bad Motivator, March 15 J THE BARTLETT, Trego, Smackout Pack, March 16 BABY BAR, And And And, Help, Aan, March 19 J THE BIG DIPPER, Fell from the Ship, March 20 J BING CROSBY THEATER, Asleep at the Wheel, March 20 J KNITTING FACTORY, Citizen Cope, David Ramirez, March 20

Upcoming Events MAR

17

MAR

22

MAR

29

MAR

30 APR

6

APR

27

ST. PATRICK’S DAY PASTRY DECORATING CLASS

My Fresh Basket: 1:00pm - 2:00pm or 2:30pm - 3:30pm / Tickets: $25 - $30

EROTIC CITY “PRINCE TRIBUTE BAND”

House of Soul: 8:30pm / Tickets: $32 Open Seating / $50 VIP Meet & Greet w/ Reserved Floor Seating

GOODWILL GALA - LIGHT UP THE NIGHT

Northern Quest Resort and Casino: 6:00pm - 10:00pm / Tickets: $54

NORTHWEST PET EXPO

Spokane County Fairgrounds & Expo Center: 10:00am - 6:00pm Adult Tickets (13+): $7 in advance / $10 at door – Kids Tickets (5-12): $3 in advance / $5 at door Kids 4 and younger: FREE

LETHAL LUAU MURDER MYSTERY DINNER - FUNDRAISER FOR SAFE PASSAGE Coeur d’Alene Eagles Lodge: 4:30pm / Tickets: $40

WINEMAKERS DINNER - FUNDRAISER FOR COMMUNITY CANCER FUND Northern Quest Resort and Casino: 5:30pm -10:00pm / Tickets: $206 - $506

APR

6

Mirabeau Park Hotel / 6pm-10pm Tickets start at : $75

BUY YOUR TICKETS ONLINE AT NORTHWESTTICKETS.COM

Plan Your Next PlanE XYour NCE ! PERIENext EXPERIENCE!

MAX AT MIRABEAU, 3D Band MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, The Wow Wows MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, Johnny Allen Johnson III NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom PACIFIC PIZZA, DJ Orange PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Dustin Drennen THE PIN, Moonboy with Slik Vik, Dj F3LON ,Wheez, Dj Funk, PEWPEWSPLOAD POST FALLS BREWING COMPANY, Pat Coast THE RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos feat. Christan Raxter & Steve Ridler J SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, Just Plain Darin SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT (NOAH’S), Robby French SPOKANE EAGLES LODGE, Sweet Memories STORMIN’ NORMAN’S SHIPFACED SALOON, Karaoke WESTWOOD BREWING CO., Son of Brad ZOLA, Loose Gazoonz

MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-2639934 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. BERSERK • 125 S. Stevens • 714-9512 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-457-2392 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOUSE OF SOUL • 25 E. Lincoln • 598-8783 IRON HORSE BAR • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., CdA • 509-926-8411 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MARYHILL WINERY • 1303 W. Summit Pkwy, Ste. 100 • 443-3832 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 381-5489 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 43


COMEDY DRAGON TALES

If you’re into hilariously awkward men dressed in dinosaur onesies who perform magic tricks with a chihuahua sidekick named Mr. Piffles, then Piff the Magic Dragon may just be the man for you. Crowning himself the loser of America’s Got Talent, Piff the Magic Dragon (real name John van der Put) is returning to Spokane this month. The dragon-dog duo is accompanied on their Lucky Dragon tour by Jade Simone, a Las Vegas showgirl, and Francis the Squire, aka “Eunuch in a Tunic.” This witty comedy-magic show is sure to crack a laugh, and has done so all over the world. Piff has opened for Mumford & Sons and has performed on renowned stages at the Radio City Music Hall, Shakespeare’s Globe, the Sydney Opera House and more. — ARCELIA MARTIN Piff the Magic Dragon — The Lucky Dragon Tour 2019 • Thu, March 14 at 8 pm • $37.50 • The Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

44 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

MUSIC TIME MACHINE

COMMUNITY GIRL POWER

Postmodern Jukebox: Welcome to the Twenties • Thu, March 14 at 7:30 pm • $43-$108 • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • foxtheaterspokane.org • 624-1200

International Women’s Day Celebration • Sat, March 9 from 1-5 pm • Free • All ages • Spokane Community College • 1810 N. Greene St. • ywcaspokane.org • 533-7082

Postmodern Jukebox creator Scott Bradlee has always loved the classics. Growing up, other kids would listen to the latest ’90s pop songs, but Bradlee would spend hours listening to Motown and jazz vinyls. He created Postmodern Jukebox to unite talented artists who also wanted to bring the past back to the mainstream music scene. Postmodern Jukebox consists of nearly a hundred musicians and singers that Bradlee scouts to continue his musical revival, helping transform Tove Lo’s “Habits” into a swingy jazz number and Britney Spears’ “Toxic” into a trumpet-heavy hit straight out of a 1930s jazz club. The beloved musical time machine plays today’s top hits the old fashioned way when they come to the Fox this month. — ARCELIA MARTIN

For International Women’s Day 2019, YWCA Spokane has gathered some of the community’s most inspiring female leaders for an afternoon of empowerment, networking, activism and personal reflection on the theme of “Balance for Better: Creative, Cultural and Community Healing.” Keynote presenter Idella King, an activist for missing and murdered indigenous women, kicks off the celebration at 1 pm. The remainder of the afternoon event offers three workshops, including a session with Power 2 the Poetry founder Bethany Montgomery. Other presenters are facilitating programs on self-care and the importance of developing compassion for one’s self. Guests are encouraged to pre-register online as space for each workshop is limited. — CHEY SCOTT


COMMUNITY THOUGHT EXERCISE

A new annual series is soon kicking off at the Spokane Public Library, in partnership with Eastern Washington University and Inland Northwest Public Philosophy, a coalition of local philosophy students and educators. Billed as “an after-hours community event to share and celebrate philosophy and ideas through public lectures, literary readings and discussions,” the inaugural event kicks off with a keynote from Spokane author Jess Walter. Sessions throughout the three-hour evening program include presentations about homelessness from Spokane advocate Ryan Oelrich, as well as open discussion with EWU philosophy students, a panel with the Center for Justice and more. — CHEY SCOTT Public Philosophy Night • Fri, March 8 from 7-10 pm • Free • Spokane Public Library, downtown branch • 906 W. Main • spokanelibrary.org • 444-5300

WORDS ADDICTION ADMISSIONS

It’s one thing when an author gets a spot for a reading at Auntie’s, but it’s another when her fan base books the gig and flies her out themselves. Such is the case with Amy Dresner, author of My Fair Junkie, subtitled “a memoir of getting dirty and staying clean.” Dresner’s 2017 debut novel details her story of addiction, going from an upper-class college kid with a rich father in Beverly Hills, to “dabbling in meth,” to a two-year stint in the big house. Dresner’s book is described as “darkly funny” and “unfortunately completely true.” “I’m just a former junkie who wrote a book,” she says. — QUINN WELSCH Amy Dresner: My Fair Junkie • Thu, March 14 at 8:30 pm • Free • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main • auntiesbooks.com • 838-0206

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 45


W I SAW YOU

S S

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU BUTTERMILK MA To the man I saw drinking a pint of buttermilk in the north WinCo Saturday night. I can’t stop thinking about you. I have to know if I saw what I think I saw. YOU SAW AND DIDN’T CARE It is that I’m being forced to move to an unsuitable apartment, of course, but more importantly it is because I’m being treated unlike all other tenants on floors above me. During renovations in this building all tenants above me are moving back into their renovated apartments. After volunteering as a foster grandparent for 12 years under the administration of this charity, but not asking to be treated with any more consideration than anyone else, I am not allowed to go back to the renovated apartment I have payed rent for, for the last 13 years. I watched happily as Kendall Yards was built and have watched the beautiful fireworks from my north facing balcony over these years. I have friends in this building who had tears in their eyes when I told them that I had to move. Helping the homeless as much as this particular charity has is commendable but would a truly compassionate entity treat an

83 year old this unfairly? So, without transportation nor a friend who has a car, I have 2 months to find a lovely place for myself. To all my fellow “I Saw You” readers, please wish me luck.

CHEERS IHOP GENEROUS STRANGERS It was my son’s birthday and he said he wanted to go to IHOP for dinner. My children were unusually well behaved that evening, as they tend to be a bit rambunctious at restaurants. Our waiter repeatedly kept coming back to our table to check on us and chat with my kiddos. You were sitting at the next booth over, and right after you left our waiter came by asking us if their was anything else we needed, I asked him for the check and he informed me that not only had you purchased our dinner, but had also paid for sundaes if we were so inclined. I realized our waiter kept checking on us to see when you had left so he could inform me the bill had been paid in full. Thank you for your kindness, it’s nice to know their are still generous people out their willing to pay it forward. BTW, we did get the sundaes and my children were very pleased. I WILL ALWAYS LOVE YOU I love you Mr. B. We now know you were protecting us. Forever and For Always, your Kitten. OH HOW I LOVE THEE Let me count the ways. Alicebamboosly, you and Ryguy are my everything! I love you both so much. I am so proud of how far you’ve made it in school already baby! May 5 Alissa will be graduating with bachelors in social work!!! I am so proud of you baby! You’re going to do great things in this world. I love you more than you’ll ever know! THANK YOU You have been my superhero this week. You have helped with weekly stressors, little kid parties,

grabbing soup and helping and caring for me while I try to beat this illness. You are patient, prioritizing and kind. You remember the little things even focus on me when distracted by your

Top Prices - Honest Weight

WE PAY FOR: Aluminum Cans & Scrap y Copper y Brass y Radiators

Insulated Copper Wire y Stainless y Gold y Silver y & much more!

I WAS A SELF-RIGHTEOUS BULLY Dear Ferris mom driving a light colored minivan, leaving Ferris about 3:30 pm approximately 10 days ago, going south on Regal Street. You performed

To the man I saw drinking a pint of buttermilk in the north WinCo Saturday night. I can’t stop thinking about you.

own struggles and wishes. I would not be able to do this without you. I love you. BIRTHDAY WISH CAME TRUE Even if I saw you picking up those sequin slippers and bathbomb, the attempt to surprise and spoil our little wasn’t lost on me. Thank you for helping me make her day so very special from sushi to icecream to singing in the car. We love you. SNOW ANGEL I want to THANK the amazing gentleman that saved me as my car was stuck in the lower parking lot of St. Stephen’s Church off Hatch Road. He jumped out of his truck, had all the ropes and tools necessary to have me out of that snow bank, in a flash. Thanks for being so thoughtful. TO THE HANDSOME COUPLE Dressed to the nines in their Zegna suits. I was at a conference at Northern Quest and got to talking with these two young businessmen after I mentioned how much I loved all things Italian. They asked if I was going to the Masselow’s upcoming event. When I told them I believed in paying cash for everything and that wasn’t within my means, they said they were impressed and decided

SOUND OFF 1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

Got Scrap? Get Cash y FASTy

to pay for me and let me sit with them. Wow. I have always heard and read about people receiving such gifts but I never realized or thought I would ever be the recipient of such generosity.

Thank you! So looking forward to the event and spending time with you two wonderful young gentlemen! - The lady in the red Zac Posen gown (I was impressed when one of you knew the designer I was wearing)

JEERS MONEY TREE ONLOOKERS To the two different sets of people who took up multiple parking spaces at Money Tree on Division on 03/01, one couple in a white Dodge Magnum and one guy in a silver SUV. You were both parked terribly and then you sat and watched from your cars as someone with nowhere to park got in someone else’s way and got in a fight with him as he demanded she move. Rather than move yourselves as you were blatantly parked in multiple spots, you just sat there and watched! You are human garbage and should be ashamed of yourselves, karma is coming for you and I hope it’s gnarly because you people are DISGUSTING. If you would have been decent enough to be considerate of other people in the first place, nothing would have happened. That poor girl got totally bitched out on your behalf and you know it. COWARDS.

a move on the road that scared me, but after things were fine, I behaved like the Driving God, deciding I had a right to judge you and teach you a lesson. I only really had the right to mind my own business, but instead, I followed you, honked my horn and flashed my lights. Once you stopped your van, I called you a very, very mean, third grade name, just because you were younger and much smaller than I. I was bullying you and being very nasty and I am ashamed at how I treated you. I apologize for what I said and how I acted; you did not deserve it and your friend didn’t deserve to have to hear it. You seemed like happy, engaged moms and I’m sincerely sorry for ruining an otherwise lovely day. I am so sincerely sorry. n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS E M O J I S O N A R P I E R S M U P E N N R E R E A D P H I L M I I S M P E Y T L A M P A U L M C O N M E L O P N I A W A D E R E D Y O

B R O D Y

C A R O M

C I G N A

E D S E A N

S H U O L S H A O N S O N O N N I O A S N E Y

R E C K E L O I L O N M A C C A R T A S O U G H T P E O P E O F G O O D E L G O R

SEE HOW MUCH WE PAY AT:

509-483-4094

* In accordance with WA state law

46 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

911 E Marietta Ave • Spokane WA

South of Foothills Dr. / East of Hamilton

O N E A L

A F N G T S

L E U T E S

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

The MAC’s 2nd Annual

St. Patrick’s Bleeping Bad Blarney Bash Friday, March 15, 2019 7 pm – 10 pm Cost: $20

www.actionrecycling.com

H E I G L

Live Irish music from Keilidh Shillelagh Costumed dancers No host beer and Irish fare Best dressed contest And more! Get your tickets at northwestmuseum.org


IGNITE! GALA & AUCTION This event supports Riverpoint Academy (RA), an innovative, award-winning, projectbased STEM+Entrepreneurial high school in the Mead School District. March 9, 6-9 pm. $50/person; $90/ couple. Northern Quest Resort, 100 N. Hayford. IgniteRA2019.eventbrite.com MATT’S PLACE FOUNDATION PUB CRAWL An event benefiting local families living with ALS, with 15 participating pubs, specials on drinks and food, live music by Colby Acuff and the Saddle Tramps and more. March 9, 3-8 pm. $25. CdA Resort Plaza Shops, 210 Sherman. mattsplacefoundation.com SWEETHEARTS’ BALL The 7th annual ball supports Camp Journey, a Ross Point oncology camp for children diagnosed with cancer. The event consists of a three-course meal, live music, dancing and a live auction. March 9, 5 pm-midnight. $200/couple. The Coeur d’Alene Resort, 115 S. Second. sweetheartsball.com (208-661-2324) BACHFEST FINALE CELEBRATION Featuring dinner by Fery’s Catering, nohost Barrister wines and a performance by t riplerammy winner Zuill Bailey, cello, with pianist Greg Presley. March 10, 5:30-8 pm. $60. Barrister Winery, 1213 W. Railroad. nwbahfest.com DINE GLOBAL, PARTNER LOCAL A world dining experience featuring appetizers and dinner prepared by a refugee from Syria, a Ukrainian dessert and live Latin music. The dinner supports Global Neighborhood’s mission of employing, empowering and educating former refugees in Spokane. March 10, 5:30-7:30 pm. $50 [SOLD OUT]. Central Food, 1335 W. Summit Pkwy. globalneighborhood.org (208-627-9661) WAFFLES4WHEELS Participating restaurants offer a special dish (or dishes), from which a portion of sales is donated directly to MOW Spokane. March 10-16. See link for complete list of restaurants in Cheney, Spokane and Spokane Valley. waffles4wheels.com THE PEARL PROJECT An experiential, contemplative and interactive learning event weaving together the elements of sacred text, art and ritual. Series meets on Mondays (7-8:30 pm) from March 11-April 1. $10/event, $30/all four. West Central Episcopal Mission, 1832 W. Dean. (208-446-6015) THE FIG TREE BREAKFAST Guests attend for no charge, but are invited to donate to support The Fig Tree. March 13, 7-8:30 am. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone Ave. (328-4220) ST. PATRICK’S DAY FAMILY NIGHT: VOLUNTEERING & TREATS! Spend an evening with the family while supporting Second Harvest. First, participate in a food sort, then head to the Kitchen to decorate shamrock cookies, make Irish soda bread, and ride the smoothie bike. Light snacks provided. March 14, 5:308 pm. $15. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front. secondharvestkitchen.org

COMEDY

2.0PEN MIC Local comedy night hosted by Ken McComb. Thursdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The District Bar, 916 W. First Ave. facebook.com/districtbarspokane/ MONICA NEVI Monica has opened for Ari Shaffir, Erik Griffin, Sarah Colonna and Nick Swardson among many other

big names. The Seattle native is also co-host of the HugLife Podcast. March 7 and 8 at 7:30 pm. $8-$22. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998) CRIME SHOW Audience suggestions add twists and turns to an all-improvised comedic take on the TV whodunit. Rated for general audiences. Fridays at 7:30 pm through March 22. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com DANIEL SLOSS After the success of his 2 hour-long Netflix specials comes this new live show from Scotland’s awardwinning comedy star. March 9, 7 & 9:30 pm. $25-$35. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. (318-9998) SAFARI The BDT’s version of “Whose Line,” a fast-paced short-form improv show. Saturdays at 7:30 pm through March 30. $8. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com BILL ENGVALL From improv to acting to Dancing with the Stars and even a game show host, this Blue Collar Comedy Tour alumnus has done it all. March 10 at 5 and 8 pm. $39-$69. Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com THE SOCIAL HOUR COMEDY SHOWCASE Featuring comics from the Northwest and beyond, hosted by Deece Casillas. Sundays from 8-9:30 pm. Free. The Ridler Piano Bar, 718 W. Riverside. socialhourpod.com (822-7938) PIFF THE MAGIC DRAGON The star of NBC’s America’s Got Talent and Penn & Teller: Fool Us is something like Larry David in a dragon suit, performing jawdropping magic tricks. March 14, 8 pm. $34.50-$36. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com

COMMUNITY

DR. SEUSS CELEBRATION In honor of America’s most famous reading teacher, the library hosts storytime, crafts, and games. All ages. March 7, 4-5 pm. Free. Airway Heights Library, 1213 S. Lundstrom St. scld.org (509-893-8250) MAKE YOUR OWN PODCAST The third of three Podcasting 101 sessions covers how to get your podcast listed in major directories, creating an online presence, building fan communities, and tracking success. March 7, 7-8:30 pm. $0-$10. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (279-0299) PUBLIC PHILOSOPHY NIGHT This after-hours community event shares and celebrates philosophy and ideas through public lectures, literary readings, discussions and screenings. March 8, 7-10 pm. Free. Spokane Public Library, 906 W. Main. spokanelibrary.org RIGHTFULLY HERS: AMERICAN WOMEN AND THE VOTE Commemorating the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment, this National Archives display explores the sometimes complex history of the amendment’s ratification, women’s voting rights before and after ratification, and the 19th amendment’s impact today. March 8-May 8. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8350) A VERY VINTAGE SPRING OPEN HOUSE The local vintage decor shop is transformed from winter into a springtime oasis. First 20 customers receive a gift bag. March 8, 5-9 pm. Free. Two Women Vintage Goods, 2012 E. Sprague. twowomenvintagegoods.com

CDA COIN CLUB COIN & STAMP SHOW An event featuring 15+ vendors displaying U.S. coins, world coins, tokens, stamps, currency and more. Free appraisals. March 9, 9 am-5 pm and March 10, 9 am-3 pm. $2; ages 16 and under free. Hampton Inn & Suites, 1500 W. Riverstone Dr. (208-651-5590) ENGLISH COUNTRY DANCE The Spokane Folklore Society presents a special dance event, with music by the Prestwold Players and calling by Mitchell Frey. No experience necessary. Potluck snack at the break. Contact myspokanefolklore@gmail.com for more info. March 9, 7-10 pm. $8/$10. East Spokane Grange, 1621 N. Park Rd. (747-2640) INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY SPOKANE 2019 The community celebrates with activities including a keynote speaker, workshops and food. Keynote speaker Idella King presents “Community Healing Through Female Indigenous Ideologies.” March 9, 1-5 pm. Free. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. bit.ly/2IBcXzV LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS MEETING This program on climate change focuses on how climate change is affecting us locally, as well as what local efforts are being made to reduce minimize greenhouse gas accumulation and what individuals can do. March 12, 11:15 am-1 pm. Free. St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 2404 N. Hamilton. lwvspokane. org/calendar.html (448-6271) 6TH ANNUAL DAY OF DIALOGUE Paulette Jordan presents her life story in “Stumbling Blocks to Stepping Stones.” Light lunch provided. In the Edminster Student Union Building. March 13, 12-1:30 pm. Free. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu ADULTING FOR TEENS: FINANCIAL KNOW-HOW Whether you’re looking for your first apartment or about to go off to college, there are many life skills to help you succeed and reduce stress. Ages 16-19. March 13, 4-5 pm. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley. (444-5300) SHOWING UP FOR RACIAL JUSTICE Join PJALS and members of the community to continue work fighting white supremacy, supporting racial justice organizing led by people of color, and deepening our understanding of race locally. Meets second and fourth Thursday of the month, 5:30-7 pm. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. pjals.org TO ERR IS HUMAN: A PATIENT SAFETY DOCUMENTARY Through interviews with leaders in healthcare, footage of real-world efforts leading to safer care, and one family’s compelling journey from tragedy to triumph, this documentary provides a unique look at our healthcare system’s ongoing fight against preventable harm. March 14, 6 pm. $15/general; free/students. EWU Riverpoint Campus, 668 N. Riverpoint Blvd. wshef0314.eventbrite.com

SPEAKER SERIES

BRYAN SMITH

BENEFIT

MIKE MCKAY

EVENTS | CALENDAR

FILM

SCREENING: INTO THE ARCTIC Each Thursday and Saturday at 1 pm and 2:30 pm, the museum screens this 47-minute film telling the compelling story of artist Cory Trepanier’s first leg of his multi-year quest to explore and paint the dramatic wilderness of the Canadian Arctic. Weekly through May 11. $5-$10/admission. Northwest Museum of Arts & Culture, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org

PRESENTED BY

IN PARTNERSHIP WITH

WESTCOAST ENTERTAINMENT

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 47


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess A HARD YUK STORY

I’m a 34-year-old struggling comic. My girlfriend is a 29-year-old children’s therapist. We’ve been together for a year. She wants to move in with me, wants me to meet her parents – adult relationship stuff that I don’t feel ready for now. I love her, but I live in a studio without a kitchen. I don’t even have a car. As a man, I want to be a “provider” for the woman in my life. She doesn’t want to wait. –Don’t Wanna Lose Her

AMY ALKON

On the upside, you aren’t without savings. There’s that jar with all the change that you take to the Coinstar twice a year. Your reluctance to be all “let’s move in together and start a life over my hot plate” probably comes out of how (according to cross-cultural research by David Buss and other evolutionary psychologists) women seem to have evolved to seek men with the ability to acquire resources – that is, to “provide.” Men coevolved to expect this – and feel they need to rise to the occasion in order to get (and retain) the ladies. In other words, you, as a man, are psychologically driven to feel unsettled when, in terms of sheer earning power, you’re just this side of living in your car. This might lead you to wonder why, if you’re so wigged out about being broke, your girlfriend’s evolved psychology seems to be all “yeah, whatever.” Well, there was no such thing as “wealth” in ancestral times, so cues to the ability to acquire resources seem to point to mate quality. As I’ve written before, a woman’s seeing ambition, entrepreneurial thinking, and high intelligence in a guy who isn’t exactly raking in the bucks with a crop harvester may ring enough of her psychological bells to make him a choice. A woman who isn’t yet in “let’s make babies!” mode might also be more open-minded than realistic. Think about the life you want, and ask your girlfriend to think about the future she wants, and then put your wants together (along with the timetable for each) and see how well they fit. Sure, comedy is a career that can eventually pay off Seinfeldanormously, but for many, it never goes beyond driving around to do $50 sets in suburban Yuk-Yuk Huts. If it’s “babies or bust!” for her, consider how willing you’d be to trade your comedy dream for a dad job – the boringly stable kind with a reasonable weekly paycheck. Unfortunately, actual money tends to go over better at the kids’ dentist than a pair of free tickets to The Chuckle Castle plus a garbage bag of recyclables and a pledge to come back with more every day until mid-2024.

A SCAR IS BORN

My guy friend said my problem with men is that I keep forgetting who I am. According to him, I’m smart, beautiful, accomplished, funny, and super-cool but the moment I like a guy, I act weirdly needy and turn guys off. How do I change this? –Clingy In presenting yourself to others, you’re like the world’s worst used-car salesman: “Fantastic deathtrap for the price! Just the thing to strand you on a desert highway and leave you crawling on your hands and knees over rocky, snake-infested terrain!” Unfortunately, self-loathing is only stylish for about 20 minutes – and only if you are a newly-Goth 13-year-old. Also unfortunate is a big long-standing error in psychology, overvaluing talking and undervaluing action as the way to change our default behavior – meaning the way we typically (and pretty much automatically) react. Granted, recognizing where you’re going wrong and how you could behave less counterproductively isn’t unimportant or useless. But research by clinical psychologist Stefan G. Hofmann and his colleagues suggests that taking action alone – without talk therapy – leads to dramatic shifts in thinking, including significantly diminishing “negative self-perception” and other counterproductive beliefs. As for your tendency to go all needypants around a guy you like, ask yourself why you do this. Not the underlying reason but why you let your emotions drive your behavior. People don’t think to ask themselves that, but as I write in “Unf*ckology: A Field Guide to Living with Guts and Confidence” – my sciencebased book on how action is the key to emotional and behavioral transformation – “your feelings are not the boss of you.” In short, it isn’t how you feel that matters; it’s what you do. When you’re around a guy you like, act in a way that serves your interests -like a person with self-respect, which is to say, one who has no problem walking away. (Be whiny to your friends, if necessary.) After all, deep down, you know you could get a man to stay with you forever – that’s what basement wall chains and bucket toilets are for. n ©2018, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

48 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

EVENTS | CALENDAR SHOPLIFTERS Winner of the Palme D’Or at the Cannes Film Festival, and nominated for best foreign film Oscar, Shoplifters is about a family of small-time crooks whose world is turned upside down when they take in a troubled young girl. Japanese with English subs. Rated R. March 7-10; times vary. $6-$8. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org

FOOD

WINE TASTING Taste Oregon’s Amity Vineyards and Christopher Michael Wines. Includes cheese and crackers. March 8, 3-6:30 pm. $10. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington. vinowine.com WINE TASTING A tasting of Spanish wines. Includes cheese and crackers. March 9, 3-6:30 pm. $10. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington. vinowine.com DUNHAM CELLARS WINE DINNER A coursed dinner with wine pairings from the award-winning Walla Walla winery. March 10, 4 pm. $80. 315 Martinis & Tapas, 315 Wallace Ave., CdA. 315martinisandtapas.com (208-667-9660) SAY CHEESE FEST SPOKANE A social event that celebrates all things cheese, with samples of mac & cheese, cheese pizza, grilled cheese, hard/soft cheeses and more! March 10, 12-4 pm. $20-$65. bit.ly/2B5D76U (773-828-9282) TACOS & TEQUILA PARTY Clay Roberts of La Palina Cigars is a guest for this fiesta featuring three hand-picked cigars, a tequila flight, build-your-own taco bar and giveaways. March 13, 6-9 pm. $35. Legends of Fire, 100 N. Hayford Rd. northernquest.com (481-2093)

PERFECTLY COOKED STEAK Whether it’s for two people or 20, learn tricks to perfect doneness every time. Both classic and modern techniques are used including sous vide. March 14, 6-8 pm. $59. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. campusce.net/spokane/ category/category.aspx

MUSIC

BEATS, RHYMES, & LIFE: A CONTEXT PROJECT HIP HOP INCUBATOR Join performance poet/hip hop artist Devin Sommer (Camden Scholars) in cultivating a dynamic and vibrant hip hop culture in the greater Coeur d’Alene area. Monthly workshops on the first Thursday of the month from 5-6:30 pm through May 2. Free. Emerge, 208 N. Fourth St. bit.ly/2XrKArs (208-818-3342) NORTHWEST BACHFEST: B-A-C-H PRISM FROM ART OF THE FUGUE Art of The Fugue has 15 canons and four fugues, all based on a single musical idea, and are a reflection of meticulous craftsmanship and brilliant technique in counterpoint. The B-A-C-H Prism program is interspersed with short waves of light by 20th-century composers, which bounce off the prism cast by Bach in his final and enduring work, one of combined simplicity and complexity with the Richter String Ensemble. $15/$35. March 7 at 7 pm, Hagadone Event Center, CdA. Also March 8 at 7 pm, Barrister Winery, Spokane. nwbachfest.com COEUR D’ALENE SYMPHONY YOUNG ARTISTS CONCERT Each “Young Artist” winner performs with the Symphony to include a program of Rachmoninoff,

Donizetti, Saint-Saens, Strauss, Bellini, Puccini, Lalo, Beethoven and Brahms. March 8 at 7:30 pm and March 9 at 2 pm. $10-$20. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cdasymphony.org SECOND FRIDAY MUSIC WALK Downtown Coeur d’Alene rings with live musical performances from local favorites. Visit supporting restaurants, shops, businesses and galleries. March 8 from 5-8 pm. Free. Downtown Coeur d’Alene, Sherman Ave. artsandculturecda.org DILWORTH CHORAL FESTIVAL CONCERT The Crescendo Community Chorus welcomes Sandra Thorntonm who shares her wealth of experience with the Chorus and local middle schoolers. The day’s activities culminate in a community concert. March 9, 4:30-5:30 pm. $5. Shadle Park High School, 4327 N. Ash. crescendocommunitychorus.org (714-0555) KPBX KIDS’ CONCERT Feet fly and winter spirits soar as Floating Crowbar performs for this Celtic dance party with an exhibition by members of the MSD Irish Dance Academy. March 9, 1-2 pm. Free. Riverside Place, 1108 W. Riverside. spokanepublicradio.org (328-5729) SPOKANE SYMPHONY CLASSICS 7: KORNGOLD & SHOSTAKOVICH Featuring music director finalist Rei Hotoda and guest violinist Angelo Xiang Yu. March 9 at 8 pm and March 10 at 3 pm. $19-$60. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com TERRY ROBB IN CONCERT Hailed as one of the top acoustic blues guitarists of our time, Robb has garnered praise of worldwide audiences in his prolific music career spanning four decades. The

REGISTRATION OPENS MARCH 8TH! PL AY

No matter your age, height or skill level, grab your shoes, ball, friends and family, and come join 250,000 other Hoopfesters in the Best Basketball Weekend on Earth.

Register at spokanehoopfest.net

SPOKANE

JUNE 29 & 30, 2019


award-winning fingerstyle guitar virtuoso incorporates music from the Mississippi Delta, ragtime, country, swing, and jazz. Dinner is served before the concert. March 13, 7:30-9:30 pm. $12/$15. Di Luna’s Cafe, 207 Cedar St. dilunas.com POSTMODERN JUKEBOX: WELCOME TO THE TWENTIES 2.0 A revival of the style and craftsmanship that typified the music of past generations. March 14, 7:30 pm. $43-$108. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

LILAC CITY ROLLER DERBY A double header featuring home teams the SASS taking on Beet City Rollers and the YETIS taking on Electric City Roller Girls. March 9, 5:30 pm. $10. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. lilaccityrollerderby.com PERMACULTURE DESIGN Learn about this method of landscape planning that can be applied to a home garden, farm, city block or entire village. March 9, 9 am-3:30 pm. $40. Spokane Conservation District, 210 N. Havana. sccd.org SPOKANE NORDIC CHALLENGE LOPPET Loppet is the Scandinavian term for a long-distance cross country ski event that can be either recreational or competitive. Courses for the timed race include a 20, 30 and 50K loop. March 10. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanenordic.org SPOKANE BICYCLE CLUB GENERAL MEETING Jane Schelly gives a photo presentation of her Italian hike and bike trip. March 11, 6:30-8 pm. Free. Mountain Gear Corporate Offices, 6021 E. Mansfield Ave. spokanebicycleclub.org (954-6788)

WILDLIFE ON THE PALOUSE This meeting of the series “Science on the Palouse” focuses upon the various wildlife found on the Palouse, their behaviors and habitats. March 11, 6 pm. Free. Colfax Library, 102 S. Main St. whitco.lib.wa.us

THEATER

DISNEY’S NEWSIES THE MUSICAL Inspired by the “Newsboy Strike of 1899,” this fictionalized story explores themes of social injustice and exploitative labor. March 7-8 at 7 pm; March 9 at 2 pm. $8$10. Lewis and Clark High School, 521 W. Fourth Ave. tigerdrama.com THE FLICK In a run-down movie theater, three underpaid employees tend to one of the last 35 mm film projectors in the state. Their tiny battles and not-sotiny heartbreaks play out in the empty aisles, becoming more gripping than the second-run movies on screen. Through March 24; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $14-$27. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com PRESENT LAUGHTER A light-hearted comedy classic about a self-obsessed actor in the midst of a mid-life crisis. March 7-9 at 7:30 pm; March and 10 at 2 pm. $5-$15/public; free/UI students. Hartung Theater, 875 Perimeter Dr. uitheatre.com SEUSSICAL JR. Favorite Dr. Seuss characters come to life in this delightful Seussian gumbo of musical styles, from Latin to pop, swing to gospel, and R&B to funk. March 7-23; Thu-Sat at 7 pm, Sat at 2 pm. $16. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway. bit.ly/2E6Y2cn SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE Penniless and indebted to two producers, struggling young playwright William Shakespeare is tormented by writer’s block until he

meets the beautiful Viola de Lesseps. Through March 10; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. spokanefalls.edu/drama CYT SPOKANE: ALADDIN JR. Based on the 1992 film and the 2014 Broadway show about the “diamond in the rough” street rat who learns that his true worth lies deep within. March 8-9 at 7 pm. March 9-10 at 3 pm. $12-$16. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404) GOOD NEIGHBORS The third full-length play produced by Pend Oreille Players as a part of its New Works Program. Through March 10; Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sun at 3 pm. $10-$12. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 236 S. Union. pendoreilleplayers.org HECUBA A contemporary retelling of an ancient tale of war, women, and tragedy. Through March 10; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org THE SEAGULL On a 19th-century Russian lakeside estate, the magic of summer evokes passion in three generations of self-doubting artists. March 8-9 and 15-16 at 7:30 pm, March 10 at 2 pm and March 14 at 5 pm. $10. Eastern Washington University, 526 Fifth St. bit.ly/2H1fpxa WHITWORTH THEATRE: ALMOST, MAINE With a delicate blend of humor and heart, realism and absurdity, Almost, Maine asks us to consider the wonder of love. March 8-9 and 15-16 at 7:30 pm, March 10 at 2 pm. $12-$15. Whitworth Cowles Auditorium, 300 W. Hawthorne Ave. whitworth.edu/theatre/ (777-3707)

sity of Oregon, exhibits his art. Hickman is a founder of Blue Sky Gallery in Portland, and has been active in photography for more than 50 years. Through March 22; Mon-Thu 10 am-4 pm; Fri 10 am-2:30 pm. Reception March 13. Free. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu LUMINOUS: DALE CHIHULY & THE STUDIO GLASS MOVEMENT Partnering with Tacoma’s Museum of Glass and Portlandbased collector George Stroemple, the MAC presents its first all-glass art exhibition. Thirty-three international artists working in glass, including Dale Chihuly, are featured. Through June 23; Tue-Sun from 10 am-5 pm. $5-$10. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. northwestmuseum.org HUSH: KRISTY KUN + DALE LIVEZY + GABRIEL KULKA + SUSAN MATTSON An exhibition featuring ceramist Susan Mattson and landscape painter Dale Livesey both of Helena, Montana; sculptor Gabriel Kulka of Bozeman, Montana, and fiber artist Kristy Kun of Portland. March 8-April 6; opening March 8 from 5-8 pm; open Wed-Sun 11 am-6 pm. Free. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com (208-765-6006) ROGER RALSTON: FIELD RESEARCH The EWU Gallery of Art presents an exhibition of watercolors, drawings and mixed media works by the Spokane artist. March 13-April 25; Mon-Fri 9 am-5 pm. Reception March 13 at noon. EWU Gallery of Art, 140 Art Building, Cheney. ewu.edu/cale/programs/art/gallery

ARTS

SPOKANE POETRY SHOWCASE All three of Spokane’s Poets Laureate read fresh, original poetry: Thom Caraway, Laura Read and current Laureate Mark Anderson. March 10, 7-9 pm. Free. Uni-

CIPHERS Craig Hickman, photographer and emeritus art professor at the Univer-

WORDS

tarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. uuspokane.org POETRY AT THE PODIUM Hear Seth Marlin, a Spokane-based fiction writer and slam poet, read for the monthly event before the Spokane City Council Meeting. March 11, 6 pm. Free. Spokane City Hall, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. bit. ly/2EGv422 (509-755-2489) THE CONTINUING CASE OF SPOKANE GARRY In 1917, William S. Lewis wrote the first biography of Chief Garry, influential in settling Spokane. One focus of this book was the dispossession of Garry from the land he occupied and farmed since about 1864. Dr. David Beine presents current findings about the recently disputed location of this land and offer some intriguing stories of the various characters involved in this historic land dispute. March 12, 6-8 pm. Free. Great Northern University, 611 E. Indiana Ave. greatnorthernu.org (509-284-7100) NORTHWEST PASSAGES: SHARMA SHIELDS & NANCY PEARL The Spokesman-Review’s book club hosts Spokane author Sharma Shields in conversation about her latest novel, The Cassandra, with Nancy Pearl, a best-selling author, TV host and librarian. March 13, 7 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com USING ART TO SOLVE CRIME Meet Carrie Stuart Parks and learn about her career as a forensic artist and novelist at this new forum presenting authors and ideas in a casual environment. Parks is an award-winning artist, writer, speaker, and law enforcement instructor. March 13, 5:30 pm. $10, reservations required. Southside Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac.org (509-535-0803) n

REAL. FUNNY.

LIVE & LOCAL

The JAY & KEVIN Show: Making Spokane laugh for 24 years!

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 49


NEWS

Comply or Die Lawmakers say the LCB is unfairly targeting marijuana businesses BY QUINN WELSCH

I

t’s almost as if the legalization of marijuana in Washington state didn’t really change perceptions among some people. At least that’s the gist of a Feb. 13 letter sent to Gov. Jay Inslee from a bipartisan group of lawmakers (including Ritzville Republican Sen. Mark Schoesler). Specifically, the letter took aim at Russ Hauge, a board member reappointed to the Liquor and Cannabis Board by the governor for a six-year term beginning on Jan. 28. The letter accused Hauge of dishonesty and of contributing to a “toxic culture” at the LCB that targets marijuana businesses that operate legally and asked Inslee to rescind his appointment. “The ethos at the LCB does not yet effectively separate taxpaying license-holders who have thrown open the doors to their businesses, their personal finances and more, from criminals skulking in dark alleys who sell to kids from the back of a van,” the letter says. “Washington needs LCB leaders who embrace the distinction.” The letter coincides with an aggressive 2019 legisla-

50 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

tive agenda from the marijuana lobby that’s aimed at leveling the playing field for the industry, both financially and in compliance enforcement. From the beginning, marijuana businesses have faced higher scrutiny, and oftentimes harsher penalties, than their counterparts in the liquor industry, though both fall under the same jurisdiction under the LCB. But the attitude among LCB enforcement officers has been more antagonistic, the letter from lawmakers states. Hauge Hauge, the letter argues, has appeared to resist the changes in the legal marketplace. As a former prosecutor in Kitsap County, the letter suggested he was more interested in being right, “proving guilt” and hurting businesses. “Here is an instance where we definitely know we can do better,” the lawmakers say of Hauge. “The LCB has cultivated a culture of enforcement that centers around violations and license removals as if it was a full

jurisdiction law enforcement agency closing down drug cartels.” New proposals in the Legislature are seeking to reform the LCB’s compliance structure in a way that could benefit businesses, according to Washington CannaBusiness Association (WACA) spokesman Aaron Pickus. This was one of the first issues WACA brought up in preparation for the 2019 legislative session. In one instance highlighted by WACA, a marijuana production facility in Snohomish County was in danger of closing for too many LCB violations. In a KIRO-TV news report, the owners of Rolling Farms said the violations were for minor things, like a few plants (out of thousands) left untagged. Pickus says businesses have faced similar issues across the state over the years. Some have even called enforcement officers themselves for clarification on rules, only to get dinged by another infranction, he says. “Now that we are four years in, this is a legal market,” he says. “It shouldn’t be treated as an illicit activity.” n


n division

golden corral

weile ave

rhoades ave

n division

flamin’ joe’s

Excludes King’s Court specials and items already on sale

francis ave

7115 N DIVISION

ROYALSCANNABIS.COM 509.808.2098

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

OTIS ORCHARDS

21502 E GILBERT RD OTIS ORCHARDS, WA

SPOKANE

1325 N DIVISION SPOKANE, WA

BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

TAX RETURN SPECIAL MARCH 8TH THRU 16TH

20% OFF

KUSH BROS, NORTHWEST NECTAR, DRIFTBOAT, KUDU, FREDDY’S FUEGO

10309 E TRENT AVE. SPOKANE VALLEY, WA

GREENLIGHTSPOKANE.COM 509.309.3193 8AM TO 11PM EVERYDAY

WARNING: This product has intoxicating affects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. Marijuana products may be purchased or possessed only by persons 21 years of age or older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

MOSES LAKE

955 W BDWY AVE MOSES LAKE, WA

Warning: This product has intoxicating effects & may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, & judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults 21 years or older. Keep out of reach of children.

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 51


GREEN ZONE

WEEKEND SALE

MAR 7TH - MAR 10TH

20% OFF

ANY REGULAR PRICED GRAM OF FLOWER MUNCHIES MONDAY Extra Patrols O n N ow

20% OFF EDIBLES TANKER TUESDAY

$15 CARTRIDGES

D RIVE H IGH GET A DUI

WAXY WEDNESDAY

20% OFF

CONCENTRATES & CARTRIDGES

TrafficSafetyComm_Filler_1U.pdf 564_WTSC_DHGD_2V_Ad_F.indd 1

9/22/14 4:48 PM

THIRSTY THURSDAY 20% OFF ALL DRINKS

FIRE FRIDAY 20% OFF

BUDTENDER PICK

SUPER SAVER SATURDAY

25% OFF

CONCENTRATES (EXCLUDES CARTRIDGES)

DOUBLE DIP SUNDAY 2X ROYALTY POINTS

NEW HOURS!

SUN 10AM-11PM • MON SAT 8:30AM-12AM TOKERFRIENDLYSPOKANE.COM

1515 S. LYONS RD AIRWAY HEIGHTS

(509) 244-8728 Warning: This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of reach of children.

52 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019


REVERSE

355 nder.com 09) 444-7 la PHONE: (5BulletinBoard@In mit Parkway E-MAIL: 1227 West Sum 1 20 N: IN PERSO Spokane, WA 99

to advertise:

444-SELL

ENTRY LEVEL IN HOME CAREGIVER

MORTGAGE

THE ART OF SOAPMAKING

BENEFICIAL IN-HOME CARE, INC - SPOKANE, WA Full-time, Part-time

208-762-6887

QUALIFICATIONS:

• High school graduate or GED equivalent • Minimum 18 years of age reverse mortgage loans “LOCAL” REPRESENTATIVE • Pass WATCH and DSHS background checks FREE INFORMATION • Current and valid driver’s license OR state ID Larry Waters Larry Waters • Current and valid proof of ability to work in the United States NMLS 400451 Reverse Mortgage Consultant • Current CPR certification at hire OR within 30 days of hire 1-866-787-0980 Toll-Free 208-762-6887 Local • In-home care or facility care experience preferred, but not required • Ability to communicate and follow directions Idaho & Washington NMLS 531629 • Two references before hire date – reference letters will be accepted Must be at least 62 years of age. • Current Washington state NAC/NAR/HCA credential and up to date Wells Fargo Home Mortgage is a division of Wellseducation Fargo continuing OR ability and willingness to go through Bank, N.A. © 2011 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights training process to gain an HCA credential reserved. NMLSR ID 399801. AS581479 3/11-6/11

“RECLAIM YOURabout RETIREMENT” Learn more

MARCH 26 & 27, 6-8PM

509.466.7223 GREENCASTLESOAP.COM 466-7223 | 203 N. STONE | SPOKANE

NEED HELP ESCAPING DOMESTIC VIOLENCE?

BENEFITS:

• Fully paid Home Care Aide school tuition • Hourly pay for training time once completed • Work while you complete your training • $1.00/hour shift differential for weekend shifts worked • Full medical and dental benefits when you work 20 hours or more per week • 401k benefits package after 1yr/1,000 hours worked • Excellent office support • Paid vacation/sick days: 1 hour for every 30 worked To Apply: bihc.biz/employment/

24-hour Idaho hotline: 208.664.9303 safepassageid.org

ALZHEIMER’S & DEMENTIA Exploring Your Options

Wed, March 20 •10am to Noon

Refreshments & Snacks $100 Gift Card Drawing

FAIRWOOD ASSISTED LIVING & MEMORY CARE Assisted Living Building • Activity Room 312 W Hastings Rd, Entrance Three

GUEST SPEAKER Riley Knutson

Health Care Administrator

Sponsored by

Complimentary Tours

Helpful Resource Information

A secured setting offering R.S.V.P. ONLY 509467-2365 • Workshop is FREE •peace Spaceofis mind Limited! men meet for Where real gay se & reply for ow Br n! fu uncensored 6.6631 free. 18+ 206.57

BUYING Estate Contents / Household Goods See abesdiscount.com or 509-939-9996

Jonesin for CDs-We have your fix+ 1000s*Records*Tapes*CDs*Posters Recorded Memories1902 Hamilton. 1

2

3

4

5

6

14

7

8

9

10

15

17

22

47. On the ____ (fleeing) 48. Ocean liners? 49. He sang “Penny Lane” and “Blackbird” during his 2018 Carpool Karaoke with James Corden 55. “My treat!” 56. Not worth ____ 57. Chop (off) 58. 1954 Gregory Peck film ... or this puzzle’s theme 65. Suffix with cannon or block 66. Wowed by, after “in” 67. Leave home 68. Bloody, say 69. Swiss air lines? 70. Second family of the 1990s Down 1. Mind reader’s skill, for short 2. “You couldn’t possibly mean

me!?” 3. ____ Direction (boy band) 4. Unsettle 5. Org. that investigated Al Capone 6. Adrien of “The Pianist” 7. Ricochet 8. Big name in health plans 9. Tikkanen who won five Stanley Cups 10. Remote area? 11. NFL coach with a perfect 17-0 record in 1972 12. Katherine of “Knocked Up” 13. 7’1” Shaquille 18. “Salvator ____” (Leonardo da Vinci work that sold for $450 million in 2017) 21. “That’s terrible!” 22. Prettify 23. ____ sauce (sushi condiment) 24. Setting for part of “Forrest

27

23

THIS W ANSWE EEK’S I SAW RS ON YOUS

19

24

25

26

29

28 31

35

36 40

41

42

32

33

43

34

44

47 50

13

21

30

49

12

16

18 20

ACROSS 1. Funny face? 6. Secretly included, in a way 11. “Dexter” channel, in TV listings 14. It might pick up a big fish 15. Up 16. Rooster’s mate 17. His show replaced Larry King Live on CNN 19. Something a driver may “hang” 20. Thick Japanese noodle 21. 1970s Olympic gymnastics star Korbut 22. “A League of Their Own” director 27. Like favorite books, often 29. Long, long time 30. 2012 World Golf Hall of Fame inductee 35. Suffix with sex 36. “Black gold” 37. Klutz 40. #1 pick in the 1998 NFL draft

11

45

46

60

61

37

38

39

62

63

64

48

51

52

55

53

54

56 59

57

58

65

66

67

68

69

70

“PM”

Gump,” for short 25. Prot. or Cath. 26. Plea at sea 27. New York engineering sch. 28. Sounds of indifference

NON GMO Heritage Berkshire Pork available. $2.95pp Call 509.939.1805

31. Dove’s sound 32. Kith’s partner 33. Word with Dutch or American 34. Clamorous 38. “____-Man and the Wasp” (2018

movie) 39. They’re worth half of TDs 41. Vogue rival 42. Sweet potato 43. Starz alternative 44. Start to malfunction 45. Part of NGO 46. When doubled, a 2010s dance craze 49. ____ vortex (winter weather phenomenon) 50. Jumper cable connection 51. Worked from home? 52. Behind bars 53. “... old woman who lived in ____” 54. “HAHAHA!,” in texts 58. “I vote no” 59. ____ Jima 60. It may be beaten and eaten 61. “Hollywood Squares” win 62. “____ qué?” 63. Coach Tyronn ___ whose Cleveland Cavaliers went to the NBA finals in 2016, ‘17 and ‘18 64. Ewoks or Jawas, in brief

MARCH 7, 2019 INLANDER 53


COEUR D ’ ALENE

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

Your Everyday Getaway Escape to Coeur d’Alene this week and find live music, boat cruises, ski hills, hundreds of shops... and that’s on Wednesday! Check out our online calendar and plan your Tuesday or Wednesday or any day! There’s always something fun going on. coeurdalene.org

Girls Getaway Make memories with your BFFs in Coeur d’Alene

L

eave it to Southern Living Magazine to offer scientific proof of what gals already know: getting away with girlfriends is good for you! Coeur d’Alene has your staycation staples: spas, super restaurants, sweet deals on rooms, and lots of places to make memories with your BFFs. If pampering is on the list, check out the Coeur d’Alene Resort, for SPA AND STAY specials like the SPAtacular you can share with a friend. Nearby are LATHER SALON & SPA and POLISHED, which offers a light meal and adult beverages — mimosas, anyone? — with their spa specials. Zip into ZI SPA at Riverstone for specials like the 50-minute $99 and if the B in BFF stands for “boy,” they have great deals for guys, too. After taking such good care of your skin, hair and nails, you’ll want to nourish the rest of your body with a bite to eat. C O E U R

At Riverstone, try VINE AND OLIVE or BARDENAY, where festive groups are always welcome. Downtown, you’ll want to fuel up at FINE BREWED COFFEE or BAKERY BY THE LAKE, have lunch at DOCKSIDE RESTAURANT or meet for cocktails and small plates at SEASONS, where Wednesday is ladies night. Since you’re downtown, you might as well do a little browsing amongst the many unique shops, such GRACE AND JOY or MARMALADE clothing shops, MIX IT UP home décor, ANGEL GALLERY OF FINE ART & ANTIQUES, and LUCKY MONKEY for unusual jewelry and locally designed T-shirts to commemorate your day out. And if you’re still stuck on spas, consider the COEUR D’ALENE CASINO where you can spa, snack and play all in one location.

D ’A L E N E

Upcoming Events

COEUR D’ALENE

Music Walk

Marchi Gras

Pub Crawl

Downtown Coeur d’Alene comes alive every second Friday with the sweet sounds of live music all throughout the city’s core. Free; 5-8 pm; for a map of

Let the good times roll at Silver Mountain during Marchi Gras. The party starts at 3 pm with $15 night skiing lift tickets and a balloon drop at the Mountain House loaded with prizes like cash, lift tickets and waterpark passes. Live music at Moguls caps the evening. $15; 3-9 pm;

There couldn’t be an easier or funner way to raise money for local families battling ALS than joining the Matt’s Place Foundation Fourth Annual Pub Crawl. Purchase tickets ($25) online and then pick them up at the Resort Plaza Shops.

MARCH 8

locations, go to visitcda.org.

MARCH 9

Silver Mountain Resort.

MARCH 9

3-9 pm; downtown Coeur d’Alene. More details at visitcda.org.

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay. 54 INLANDER MARCH 7, 2019

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


SATURDAY, APRIL 13 • 3-8 PM ONLINE TICK ETS A R E JUST

20

$

Includes 8 wine tasting tickets and a keepsake wine glass. Come meet the Northwest’s best winemakers and 45+ different wines.

2 0 8 .415.0116 ALSO AVAILABLE: WINE DINNERS AND CRUISES, AND SPECIAL ROOM PACKAGES FROM CDA RESORT

TICKETS, TASTING INFO & ROOM PACKAGES AT CDA DOWNTOWN.COM

SPONSORED BY THE COEUR D’ALENE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

AUGUST MARCH24, 7, 2019 2017 INLANDER 55


Profile for The Inlander

Inlander 03/07/2019  

Inlander 03/07/2019