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COMMENT | EDUCATION

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Even Brigham Young University won’t allow guns on campus, but the state of Idaho may join six states that do BY ROBERT HEROLD Craig Mason

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he news that the Idaho House and Senate have both voted to permit guns on college campuses led me to check out the Gem State’s esteemed statesmen. Not surprisingly, the majority includes more than a few LDS members, many of whom had matriculated at Brigham Young University, where all students learn that the Constitution was divinely inspired. In the D.C. v. Heller case, Justice Antonin Scalia defines the meaning of our “inspired” Second Amendment. First, he dismisses the first clause: “A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free state,” and focuses on the second clause: “…the right of the people to bear arms shall not be infringed.” This clause, he asserts, extends to an individual right to bear arms beyond the right to bear arms exclusively in support of the collective effort, a well-regulated militia. Heller drives all these gun rights measures — in Utah, in Idaho, all across red-belt America. So how does the reddest of all universities, and mentor to all those Idaho and Utah legislators, handle guns on campus? The NRA can’t be pleased with Brigham Young University’s gun policy: Firearms and weapons are not permitted, concealed or not concealed, with or without a concealed weapon permit, while on properties owned or controlled by the University (including on-campus housing) without specific permission of the Chief of University Police.

T

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he word “weapons” there underscores a most overlooked point. Specifically, the Second Amendment doesn’t just protect “the right to bear guns.” It protects “the right to bear arms” — any weapon. BYU’s detailed list is fascinating: Tasers that fire a projectile; knifes with a blade longer than 3½ inches or that have more than one sharp edge; nunchakus; metal knuckles; airsoft pellet or BB guns; any firearm facsimile; clubs; night sticks; and swords. So will Idaho construe the Second Amendment as a right to keep and bear swords? I can see it now: You flunked me on the midterm because I called Darwin a fraud? En garde! Scalia fails to address any of this complexity. In his response to Justice John Paul Stevens’ scathing dissent on Heller, he as much as admits the limitations of his own argument, writing words to the effect: “Hey, give us a break, this is the first time this issue has been seriously confronted!” Appeals court judge and University of Chicago legal scholar Richard Posner isn’t about to cut Scalia any slack. He characterizes the Heller opinion as “incoherent.” As for how Scalia treats the history, Posner points out that “most professional historians reject the analysis in Scalia’s opinion.” Indeed, he all but airbrushes the militia from the case

by buying into the old saw about the militia being little more than a pick-up team of poorly armed, untrained patriots — you know, a bunch of God-fearing farmers just doing their civic duty. Not so. Kevin Phillips, in his recent book, 1775: A Good Year for Revolution, cites a study by retired General John Galvin that debunks this “mythology.” You had in 1775 Massachusetts a militia of 14,000 men, all trained, all coordinated and armed with the same weapons as the British. It was considered to be the “best trained militia in British North America.” No ragtag bunch of rebels there. And keep in mind that it was less than a year prior to the Constitutional Convention that Shays’ Rebellion began. Finally put down by the militia, state delegations all had the need for a strong militia on their minds. But you’ll hear no discussion of Shays’ Rebellion in the Heller opinion. Scalia doesn’t assert, as do our many gun toters, that the right to bear arms is unlimited. He restricts this right to self-defense in the home, and also acknowledges the serious problem of handgun violence and agrees that regulations are not only needed but necessary. But then he makes a mess of the question. What arms? He uses the phrase ”common use at the time.” What time? In 1787? Today? When? Given his “fluid” definition, as one critic put it, today you could make the case that 50-caliber armor-piercing sniper rifles are needed for selfdefense in the home. (And, in fact, this argument is already being made.)

A

s all college presidents, student groups and police chiefs will attest, guns should never be permitted on campuses; rather, they should be subject to policies such as those that BYU — a private university outside the legislature’s power — has adopted. There are only two conceivable reasons why a student would want to bring a gun onto campus: Either the person is paranoid, or they are planning to become a vigilante whenever they see the need. Both excuses offend the learning process. Either one is detrimental to open inquiry, exploration, and most important, dialogue in a supportive environment. Both are threatening. My suggestion to beleaguered colleagues? If a gun appears in your classroom, refuse to teach the class. Dismiss the students. File a hostile work environment complaint. And then get organized and challenge the accreditation of any educational institution that allows guns on campus. 

COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

Green Jobs Are Coming BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

O

ne of the many takeaways from last week’s epic cover story, “Breaking Blu,” is that even a whiff of a new job is catnip to our leaders. There are blue ribbon panels, press conferences, action plans — and, as our story detailed, even evictions. Turns out, that eagerness can be exploited. I bring this up to illustrate how puzzling our lack of action has been on the impending legal sale of cannabis. While the state of Colorado is already revising upward its tax revenue estimates from the sale of cannabis by 60 percent, and while leaders in Seattle are planning for a wave of canna-tourism, and while the implementation of Initiative 502 is certain to create thousands of jobs across the state, here in Spokane our business and political leaders need to be more engaged. (At least they haven’t zoned I-502 out of business, as has happened in most Eastern Washington counties.) Right now, state Liquor Control Board agents are touring potential facilities in Spokane County in advance of awarding licenses to operate. The Washington State Lottery is preparing a system to divvy up retail licenses. And by the end of June, officials say, the first shops should be open. Being squeamish, careful or just plain uncertain about this change is understandable — we are conditioned to think of cannabis as a scourge on society. And there will be challenges, but the reality is that even before 502 passed with 56 percent of the vote, cannabis was already one of the state’s top crops, valued at around $1 billion per year — roughly the same as apples. Think of this like the end of Prohibition; cannabis will be treated like alcohol, kept away from kids, illegal to use while driving and, over time, taken out of the hands of the drug cartels. As a bonus, it will bring in around $50 million per year to the state — an estimate many believe will get much bigger. A friend with particular insight told me that if our leaders looked closer, they might see an opportunity. Why not join with Seattle and lobby the legislature to allow a cannabis-specific tax extension for cities and/or counties? If enacted, Spokane could vote to add a few pennies onto every cannabis sale that would stay right here and serve our needs. As it is, tax revenues head back to Olympia for distribution. In 10 years, such a minor tweak could be a game-changer here; but if we wait, it will only get harder to get at that money. This is not some fake Blu-ray factory: It’s an entirely new, but very real business sector. We should at least start identifying the many opportunities it presents.  JEN SORENSON CARTOON

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MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 7

COMMENT | CREATIVITY

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

The Invisible Industry The creative economy in Spokane is bigger than anyone thought. To survive, we need to double it BY LUKE BAUMGARTEN

L

ast week, Spokane County gained almost 7,000 jobs. Like, poof! They aren’t new jobs. It’s just that the people responsible to count such things had never really bothered to count them before. That’s a lot of employment to find between the couch cushions. For a sense of scale, Greater Spokane Incorporated tells us that Fairchild employs about 2,900 people. In health care, Sacred Heart, Deaconess and the Rockwood network together employ about 5,300. GSI didn’t find these unaccounted-for jobs, though. The newish executive director of the Spokane Arts Fund, Shannon Halberstadt, did. Halberstadt had gone to GSI looking for

creative economy jobs numbers and was met with a polite shrug. So she convinced GSI, the city of Spokane and Eastern Washington University to help commission a survey of the Creative Vitality Index (CVI). The CVI rates cities based on both employment in creative fields and people’s participation in the arts. When it was complete, poof! Seven thousand jobs. Overnight, the creative economy became Spokane’s 10th largest employment sector, behind mining but ahead of transportation. We pay a surprising number of people to make art — everyone from animators to architects, flutists to filmmakers. But here’s the thing: To be competitive, that number needs to double. And I don’t just mean competitive in the arts. I mean competitive as a “City of Choice,” the sort of place where people choose to live because of its quality of life, its

cultural vibrancy and its excellent jobs. After everything was tallied — arts jobs, book and record store sales, performing arts attendance, art gallery attendance — Spokane received a CVI score of .78, 22 percent below the national average. When you compare our numbers to GSI’s benchmark cities like Seattle, Boise and Salt Lake City — our direct competitors for talent across the entire economic spectrum — things get bleak. We’re at the bottom, just below Boise and way below everyone else. But why does cultural vitality matter? In the new economy, people tend to work where they want to live, not the other way around. Madison, Wis., a city about the size of Spokane with a CVI of 1.35, has made a killing off leveraging its cultural clout to keep the smartest young minds coming out of the University of Wisconsin in town and innovating. Their graduates don’t go to Google. Google came to them in 2008, opening an office. We’re a lot like Madison. We have a great health care industry, universities, kick-ass advertising and burgeoning biotech. What we don’t have is a citywide commitment to creating a culture that keeps our smartest people here. In 2013, when Spokane was busy kicking the city’s Arts Department out of City Hall, Madison adopted a plan affirming the central place of art in sparking innovation. They know it works because Send comments to they’ve seen it work. editor@inlander.com. We need to take that same journey, fast. Here’s a little good news: An ArtsWA report published in December found that creative jobs in Spokane grew by 10 percent last year, faster than anywhere else in the state, even Seattle. If we can do that on our own, imagine what might happen if City Hall and GSI gave as much help to the creative sector as they give aerospace. n

LETTERS

Luke Baumgarten, a creative strategist at Seven2 and former culture editor of the Inlander, is a co-founder of Terrain and the founder of Fellow Coworking.

ON THE WEB

Meet the Inlander’s newest commentators. These writers will blog on Inlander.com every week and rotate once a month in the paper. (Alongside their columns will appear illustrations by local artist Caleb Walsh.) We're excited to welcome these bright new voices to the mix.

RACHEL DOLEZAL, formerly of the Human Rights Education Institute in Coeur d’Alene, is an award-winning artist and activist who teaches courses in art, Africana history and culture at area universities.

JOHN T. REUTER, a former Sandpoint City Councilman, is the executive director of Conservation Voters for Idaho. He has been active in protecting Idaho’s environment, expanding LGBT rights and the Idaho Republican Party.

TAYLOR WEECH is a Spokane writer and photographer. She hosts a weekly public affairs show, Praxis, on KYRS-FM.

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MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 9

Whitworth Theatre presents

and

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A big thank you to our sponsors, table captains, guests and volunteers for supporting this year’s Kids at Heart Lunch. Your generosity raised more than $100,000 after expenses to support Cardiac Care at Sacred Heart Children's Hospital. Based on the novel by

Jane Austen

›› Congratulations 2014 Advocates of the Year: Dr. Deb Harper, Toni Lodge, Peggy Mangiaracina, Washington Trust Bank and Dr. Betty Fry Williams.

Adapted by Jon Jory Directed by Brooke Kiener

March 7, 8, 14 & 15 at 7:30 p.m. March 9 at 2 p.m.

K I D S AT H E A R T C H A R I T Y L U N C H | P R O V I D E N C E H E A LT H C A R E F O U N D AT I O N

Cowles Auditorium, Whitworth University Info: 509.777.3707 Tickets: $8; $6 students/seniors (ages 62-plus) at www.whitworth.edu/theatretickets AMR Deanna Hildenbrand Leone & Keeble McDirmid, Mikkelsen & Secrest Sisters of Providence United Health Services Credit Union

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Register before March 27 at www.rockwoodclinic.com. Space is limited—register before March 27 to guarantee your reservation! No refunds after March 25, 2014. For those without web access, call (509) 710-0538, Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., or mail in the registration form and fee to the address at the bottom of this page. Cost is $10.

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10 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

COMMENT | FROM READERS CANDY FORTNER: This is a huge loss for many of us, who thoroughly enjoy visiting all the vendors and spending our hard earned dollars there.

Readers react to news last week that the Spokane Public Market is closing

HEATHER SNELL: Sad, it could have been so cool! Needed more vendors and somebody who could aggressively market the place. It’s a really great space. JEN LOTT: That is too bad. The pay parking stopped me from going there as much as I would have liked, but they had some good stuff. GOFF DAILY: It’s a shame it never became a big tourist draw for Spokane like Pike Place Market. … While we all drive past it I doubt the general public can name more than one business there. BRANDON BRALEY: Sounds like opportunity for those who would like to keep a public market here. I agree with the location being a hard sale. Parking was bad, and it was a bad neighborhood. Made it difficult to pack up the kid and head over there.

“I didn’t even know the place existed and I’ve lived here for years.” — JAMES GALLINA MARIAN HENNINGS: I had a difficult time getting there because of the limited times it was open and the lack of parking nearby. ASHLEY STRINE: The times we went there seemed to be a lot of prepared foods and crafts and not very many local farms represented. LEVI HANSON: Last time I went it was a dollar to park and if you bought something in the market they would validate. So, I don’t buy that as the reason for the closure. I’d say inexperienced management was the main reason.

EDITOR’S NOTE

To make space for more local writers, we’ve decided to stop publishing Andy Borowitz and Jim Hightower, who brought humor and insight to the Inlander over the years. You can still find them online at borowitzreporter.com and jimhightower.com. We’re also cutting the cartoons of Jack Ohman; you can find his work at Sacbee.com.

JIM COOPER: There is a very simple way to make the Spokane Public Market successful. Move it to the Spokane Valley and get rid of all the governmental bureaucracy of rules and permits required that stifles free enterprise. I guarantee if this could happen there would be businesses lined up to participate. MELODIE SMITH: This so sad. People never realize how good things are until they are gone. 

MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 11

The New

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Spring is in the air and creativity is blooming everywhere!

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Resident Brianna Arena, right, serves dinner to fellow residents at the Union Gospel Mission shelter.

HOMELESSNESS

‘Hope Starts Here’ Despite limited space, there’s always a vacancy at the Union Gospel Mission Crisis Shelter for Women and Children BY DEANNA PAN

S

ix women in one room. The drama. The bad attitudes. The bad language. Stolen cigarettes. “Borrowed” money. “This must be what jail’s like,” she thought. Mary Helen Bartch is 57. She’s been living at the Union Gospel Mission Crisis Shelter for Women and Children for four weeks now. Personal legal troubles brought her back from retirement in Florida. Her hair is

rust-colored and graying. Today, she’s wearing her favorite pair of Old Navy blue jeans; they’re baggy and ripped in the knees. She speaks like she’s telling a secret. “The day I walked in here, I was humbled. I cried,” she says. “I know God put me here for a reason.” This is a first for Bartch. In her past life, she was a translator for Stars and Stripes newspaper in Japan, a military wife and stay-at-home mom. In Spokane, she

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

volunteered for the Red Cross and Hope House. She was always taking care of other people. But now, for the first time, people are taking care of her. “What happened that I have to be here? What has gone so wrong? What have I done so wrong that I have to be here?” she says, choking on tears. “I have my days, but you know, I just keep doing what I got to do. The little engine that could.”

T

he shelter used to be the old Budget Saver Motel, where serial killer Robert Lee Yates would come by a couple of times a month, pay for a room in cash and hire working girls for the night. Today, the walls throughout are replete with Biblical verses and inspirational stickers, reminding women of the power of patience, perseverance and prayer. The sign above East Sprague reads “HOPE STARTS HERE” with “VACANCY” glowing in red neon letters. There are 15 rooms behind the security gate, each with six bunk beds. To deal with capacity issues, every ...continued on next page

MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 13

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Resident Mary Helen Bartch at the Union Gospel Mission. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“‘HOPE STARTS HERE’,” CONTINUED...

High school sophomores, juniors and their families are invited to attend an Information Night. http://outreach.ewu.edu/running-start.html

Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 6:30 p.m. 109 Showalter Hall, EWU Campus in Cheney Free parking after 5 p.m. Running Start provides an opportunity for juniors and seniors in Washington’s public high schools to enroll in courses at Eastern Washington University. The program offers academically motivated and qualified students the opportunity to take college courses. For more information contact: EWU Running Start Office 509.359.6155 runningstart@ewu.edu Look for us on Facebook and Twitter

night before 10 the floor of the main hall is covered with thin, nylon-covered mattresses. Homeless women are the fastest growing population among the people the Union Gospel Mission serves. The Bible-based nonprofit is currently looking for a property to build a new, larger shelter to house the women more comfortably. The crisis shelter is the only place in town that takes women and children other than the Salvation Army Family Emergency Shelter, where there’s always a waiting list for a room. Four years ago, the crisis shelter operators instituted a new policy in which they would no longer turn any woman away. Come high, come drunk, come off the streets. They will find you a mattress and pillow on which to lay your head. Their numbers doubled. “We started playing human Tetris,” shelter director Rich Shaus says. In 2010, they were taking in an average of 122 women and children a month and about

42 guests a night. A year later, those averages jumped: about 326 women and children every month and 72 people on any given night. This February alone, the shelter served more than 400 people, sleeping an average of 95 each night. Shaus expects those numbers to grow. “Sometimes it gets claustrophobic … If it wasn’t for the roommates that I have, I’d probably go nuts, honestly,” says Leah Miller, a shelter guest assistant, chuckling. Miller is 25, with big eyes, a broad smile and blue hoodie pulled over her head of thick, dark hair. This is her fifth time here, and hopefully her last. She’s more than two weeks sober and two years clean from drugs. Her addiction started when she was 21, after she watched a little red Toyota truck careen into the median on I-90 near Stateline, straight into her best friend. It was after 9 pm on May 13, 2009, and raining hard. Ally was killed on impact. After two years of using

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drugs — mushrooms, pot, meth, cocaine — she checked into the crisis shelter when her car was stolen in a drug deal gone wrong. It’s provided some respite. “I think I’ve laughed here more than I [ever] have,” Miller says.

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haus blames absent fathers for the shelter’s rise in numbers. More moms are checking in with more kids than before. “There’s an overall community crisis,” Shaus says. “More and more, the family has been degraded.” But the factors that contribute to homelessness among women are likely much broader. Jerry Jones, the executive director of the National Coalition for the Homeless, says “mental illness runs disproportionately high” in homeless single women. For women with families, housing costs are the primary drivers. “We have this catastrophic failure of our social safety net and mental health care system and other means of support to help people in crisis,” Jones says. “The services available to homeless people are woefully inadequate.” According to a UGM survey, nearly 60 percent of its guests at the women’s crisis shelter have experienced mental illness and a little less than half have struggled with addiction. About threefourths say financial problems led to their homelessness. More than 40 percent point to domestic violence.

O

n Sunday evening, Robin Crane, a grandmotherly woman in a red turtleneck and chunky knit sweater, leads a group of six woman around a circular table in the Gathering Place. She’s a volunteer from Abuse Recovery Ministry & Services, a religious-oriented counseling program for survivors of domestic violence. Tonight she’s talking about boundaries, about women who don’t set boundaries, who are used. The women around the table nod. A small, charismatic woman wearing two cardigans and a Tiffany’s bracelet dominates the conversation. Like Mary Helen Bartch, this too is a first for her. She has a bruise on her left cheek from where her son’s knuckles struck her face. When she pulls at the neck of one of her sweaters, she reveals a half-dollar-sized shiner on her chest. “Why did I allow that? I just hate myself for allowing that,” she says. This is M. That’s the first initial of her first name. She doesn’t want her son to know she’s here. Despite the marks on her body, she loves him unconditionally, her flesh, her blood. She doesn’t want to ruin him. M checked into the shelter last week. During her first few nights here, she was up all night, fueled by anger and pain she hadn’t felt for years. “I feel! I feel hurt! Before I was feeling nothing! Nothing! No hurt. Nothing. I was like a dead body just walking,” she cries, slamming her fists on the table. “Now I’m beginning to feel something. I’m not a shell. I’m alive,” she whispers. Crane looks M in the eyes, through her oval glasses, and touches her on the shoulder. “God is going to take care of you,” she says. 

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NEWS | DIGEST

NEED TO KNOW

The Big News of the Past Week

PHOTO EYE MARCH FOR HUNGER

1.

Spokane County Sheriff’s deputies shot and wounded a woman Tuesday amid a standoff with SWAT officers at a Motel 6 in Spokane Valley. The woman, wanted on a warrant in Montana, is expected to survive.

2.

Russia sparked international backlash by positioning troops in the Crimea region of Ukraine. U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry visited the capital city of Kiev with an offer of additional support.

3.

The Washington State Supreme Court last week ruled text messages should be considered private and protected from warrantless searches, tossing out two drug convictions based on improperly obtained texts.

4.

Maintenance worker Paul Inc, 52, died Friday at the downtown Nordstrom department store after suffering a severe electric shock and falling from a ladder.

5.

The Spokane Public Market along Second Avenue is scheduled to close this Friday after struggling to remain financially sustainable. Joining Saturday’s March to End Senior Hunger, 7-year-old Ian Bodey pushes Phyllis Yates through a downtown skywalk alongside Jennifer Gates, left, and Calvin Robinson, right. The march raised money for Greater Spokane Meals On Wheels and was part of a monthlong slate of events supporting the group’s work feeding homebound seniors in the region.

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OPINION: You’ll notice some new faces in this week’s commentary section. (See page 8.) Check Inlander.com for exclusive, online-only pieces from our new contributors.

Total spending, in trillions, in a proposed 2015 budget released by President Obama on Tuesday, with increased funding for education, research and public projects.

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NEWS | BRIEFS

Elections and Loopholes Don’t videotape animal abuse in Idaho — or else; plus, a “teaching moment” at Spokane Public Schools CLOSING THE LOOPHOLE?

On an ordinance Spokane City Councilman Jon Snyder says he’s “ready to vote on tomorrow,” some others are asking for more time. Snyder has introduced an ordinance that would prohibit the city from providing water or sewer service to areas the county commission adds to the URBAN GROWTH AREA until challenges to any UGA expansion have been ruled on or the period to file challenges is over. A vote on the ordinance has now been postponed for more discussion at City Hall. Because the city agrees to provide water and sewer service outside of city limits — including to about 75 percent of the area added to the Urban Growth Area and then overturned last year — some question whether it can legally refuse to provide services. “Both Jon and I are going to have to defer to our legal advice in terms of what we can and can’t do,” says Utilities Director Rick Romero, who plans to meet with Snyder next week to “iron out” the legal question. The ordinance is an attempt to address a loophole in the system: Once the county expands the UGA, developers who submit valid predevelopment applications for new projects are “vested,” meaning projects can move forward despite legal challenges to the expansion.

bani currently operates the world’s largest greek yogurt production facility in Twin Falls, Idaho. “This could cause the general public concern and conflicts with our views and values,” Ulukaya wrote in a statement. “As someone who grew up on a farm, I believe deeply that the humane treatment of animals is an ethical and moral imperative.” — DEANNA PAN

REVEALED BY PUBLIC RECORD

Supporters of those rules say it gives developers predictability. Opponents, like Snyder, say it allows unfettered development that could later be ruled illegal. “I’m sick of our citizens having to support out-of-control county growth at the cost of their services,” Snyder says. — HEIDI GROOVER

PETA BEWARE!

On Friday, with the backing of the state’s $2.5 billion dairy industry, Idaho Gov. Butch Otter signed into law a controversial “AG GAG” bill banning unauthorized audio and video recordings in agricultural operations. Now, anyone who enters an animal production facility in Idaho and surreptitiously records operations will face up to a year in jail and a $5,000 fine. The bill was introduced after Los Angeles-based advocacy group Mercy for Animals filmed a video of dairy workers abusing cows two years ago at a milk barn in Hansen, Idaho. Otter says the law ensures agricultural producers will be “secure in their property and their livelihood.” Earlier on Friday, Chobani yogurt founder Hamdi Ulukaya parted with the dairy industry and asked Otter to veto the bill, citing concerns over transparency. Cho-

It took nearly three years, but the election complaint by Spokane schools critic LAURIE ROGERS has been validated: Members of the school district have in fact violated election law. Rogers did much of the grunt-work finding the violations, submitting heaps of records — over 1,300 pages in just the first batch. In the end, the Public Disclosure Commission identified over 33 different violators who used district computers, time, facilities or resources to inappropriately campaign for school board and levy elections. The penalties levied were minimal — a fine of less than $2,000 spread across 16 employees. That’s one reason why despite the commission finding validity to Rogers’ complaint, she wrote a 6,800-word blog post Saturday taking issue with the PDC’s decision, and their dismissal of other accusations. “These findings and penalties provide little or no deterrence for leaders of other districts and agencies who wish to campaign in the same way,” Rogers wrote. “[Superintendent Shelley] Redinger takes it all in, and is being very proactive by using it as a teaching moment with all staff,” says Kevin Morrison, director of community relations, who was also fined in the complaint. “It’s going to up the amount of training we give.” — DANIEL WALTERS

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helter is shelter, no matter how small. And in the 30 brand-new homes at Olympia’s Quixote Village — named after a Paris tent city that drew inspiration from the classic Spanish novel — the shelter is pretty darn small. With interiors of only 123 square feet — not much larger than a typical office cubicle — they’re just big enough for a simple bed, small table, chair and half bathroom. But for formerly homeless residents, like 57-year-old Robert Bitner, they’re a huge upgrade. “Compared to what we had … a tent in the woods, or space on the sidewalk, it’s a definite improvement,” Bitner says. He had been living in “Camp Quixote” before the buildings were constructed, sleeping in a sleeping bag in a carport. Every three months, he’d have to move. All that chaos hastened his slide into depression. “It was like you didn’t have energy and you were too confused to do anything. My memory was going. I’d forget stuff,” Bitner says. “I couldn’t get a regular shower. It was hard to get clean clothes and food and stuff.” But today he has his own house, with curtains, carpet, a closet and a hot-water heater. He sees a counselor and receives medication. And with tenants only required to pay 30 percent of their income in rent, the Quixote Village residents — many suffering from mental illness or drug addictions — have an average bill of just $77 a month. “I feel safe,” Bitner says, “I can sit and just think and just try to figure things out without a bunch of people and a bunch of noise.” Other times he sits on the porch outside and mingles with the other residents walking past, or watches

the ducks swim in nearby ponds. This village, developed by Spokane and Bremerton nonprofit Community Frameworks, has drawn a torrent of media attention in the past few weeks, including ABC’s Diane Sawyer, MSNBC, the New York Times and Al Jazeera America. This idea of low-income micro-housing has been spreading — with similar experiments popping up in Eugene, Ore., and Fresno, Calif. “The separate space gives them the dignity and privacy to retreat when they need to,” says John Fisher, vice president of production and Spokane operations for Community Frameworks. “Living together in a community helps them to be engaged, [and gives them] friendships and purpose.” And it’s not just that. With a total cost of only about $88,000 per unit compared to the $200,000 per unit it takes to construct a traditional apartment complex, Quixote not only gave the residents more autonomy, it was cheaper than the alternatives. Fisher sees opportunity and possibility: He would like to see this model — tiny homes for needy people — replicated in Spokane.

C

reating a Quixote Village for Spokane faces major hurdles. The biggest, as always, is financial. Back in the ’90s, the national strategy for combating homelessness began to shift. Instead of wrestling with the ills of addiction, unemployment and mental illness first, agencies would focus on giving the homeless homes. Once they had a place to live, then the full force of social service agencies started tackling the other problems. Though the strategy has seen great success,

it’s meant a redirection of resources away from homeless shelters. And as the recession shook budgets, even funds for new housing were slashed. Federal community block grants contributed $700,000 to Quixote Village, says Ginger Segel, the senior housing developer for Community Frameworks, but those funds have been slashed by 22 percent since 2010. “It’s really gone under the axe,” she says. And the state Housing Trust Fund — a source Community Frameworks failed to get money from last year to build new housing for mobile home park residents located near Fairchild Air Force Base — has been cut 45 percent since 2010, she says. “We used to have a very robust Washington Housing Trust Fund. [Spokane hasn’t] had a project funded since 2011,” Fisher says. “We’re working with hardly any resources.” More problematic, many organizations want to see some funding already in place before giving grants: The less funding nonprofits have, the tougher it is for them to get more. But the low price of tiny houses means that, practically speaking, they may be the fastest option for new housing. In Spokane, low-income housing is scarce: In July 2013, the vacancy rate was less than 3 percent among Spokane Low Income Housing Consortium members. For deeply subsidized units, the vacancy rate was even lower — 1.6 percent. “We can’t build our way out of this. It’s very expensive to build,” says Cindy Algeo, the consortium’s executive director. “We want to keep building and offering more units. But that’s a fairly slow, not very responsive process. It takes usually 18 months to two years.” She sees other options, like offering housing vouchers or spreading Housing First programs throughout the community, as crucial.

PAT BENATAR•NEIL GIRALDO

I N C ON CE RT

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isher has in mind locations, even community partners, that he thinks could help build tiny houses to Spokane, but says it’s far too early to name names. “We could get some good density, fairly close to the downtown area where services are located,” Fisher says. Successes like Quixote Village, however, are hard to reproduce. Quixote Village is unique: It’s self-governed. Current residents help make the rules and vote in future tenants. “It’s a very welcoming, human community,” Segel says. The community developed gradually, beginning as a homeless encampment. For years, the tent city traveled from parking lot to parking lot, through seven different churches, winning numerous allies along the way. Spokane has had its own tent cities briefly pop up downtown. But instead of open arms from local churches, they’ve drawn a Send comments to editor@inlander.com. stern response from city officials. In 2004, under Mayor Jim West, a city ordinance banned encampments on city land. In January 2013, a group of homeless campers beneath I-90 downtown were told to pack up and leave. In Olympia, by contrast, a nonprofit named Panza, after Don Quixote’s down-to-earth squire, sprung up to mobilize aid and support for the camp. In Spokane, a new low-income housing community likely would have to deal with skeptical neighbors. A zone change to allow a 40-unit low-income housing complex, intended to go into Spokane Valley, was defeated in 2011 thanks to an unsympathetic council and a worried neighborhood. Instead of a sleepy suburbia, Quixote Village was placed inside two acres of an industrial park. But even then, their industrial park neighbors attempted to fight back legally, Segal says, arguing that the industrial noise would cause problems for the residents. Today, that concern seems silly to Bitner. “There’s less noise than there was in any of our [other] campsites,” Bitner says. Olympia had widespread community support from governments, businesses and nonprofits, and more than three years of hard work to get past those challenges. Spokane would probably need the same. “If folks feel that this makes sense, that this is a good way for people to get off the street, I think that’s what it’s going to take,” Fisher says. 

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NEWS | MENTAL HEALTH

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The crackdown at Eastern State Hospital started after Phillip Paul’s 2009 escape.

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How a bill that would loosen restrictions at state psychiatric hospitals died in committee BY DEANNA PAN

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ep. Tami Green admits she wasn’t “horrioutings, called Green’s bill “a bly disappointed” when House Bill 1458 slap in the face” to victims and died in committee last month. At least her their families. legislation got a hearing this time. “[A]nd to the people of The Democrat from Lakewood, Wash., first Eastern Washington,” he introduced the bill during last year’s legislative added in a written statement session. The measure would repeal a law forbidto the Inlander, “who, for three Rep. Tami Greem days in 2009, were stricken ding patients at state psychiatric institutions from leaving hospital grounds unless they have a court with fear, knowing that a order. The original law was passed in 2010 after criminally-insane patient had escaped during one an Eastern State Hospital patient named Phillip of these outings, and could have been lurking Paul managed to slip past hospital staff during a in their neighborhoods, near school grounds, or supervised field trip to the county fair. He was on skulking in the dark around a remote farm home. the lam for three days before authorities finally Public safety must come first and not be overcaught up with him. come by the desires of the criminally insane.” In the aftermath of Paul’s escape, lawmakers  Rep. Kevin Parker, R-Spokane, who unanimously agreed not to co-sponsored Shea’s bill, says risk public safety for patient he would not support a broad field trips. But advocates, repeal of the 2010 law, but he’d including Green, a psych be willing to “look at ways to nurse who once worked explore how we balance the at Western State Hospital, safety of the community and worry about the “unintended the severity of the crime.” For the entire series, consequences” of making “One of the largest mistakes visit Inlander.com/stateofmind. it more difficult for patients I think the legislature makes to reintegrate back into society, as detailed in a year after year is passing bills that are too wide recent Inlander investigation (“Patients and Prisonand broad in scope,” Parker says. “The legislature ers,” Feb. 13). would be more wise to proceed with caution.” “These bills take multiple-year efforts,” Green  Rep. Timm Ormsby, D-Spokane, who says. “When we have bad things happen, we supported Shea’s bill in 2010, says the law “needs sometimes overreact and it takes a while to undo to be revisited.” them.” “The legislature and the general public has Green says she’ll continue to work on the bill evolved in the last few years in our impressions between sessions. She’s looking for ways to allow of folks with mental health status, and realizing the patients at Eastern and Western to testify live regardless of where they are — in state hospitals before the Judiciary Committee, as the law curor correctional facilities — 95 percent of them are rently prohibits them from traveling to Olympia. going to be returned to the public,” Ormsby says. Had Green’s bill moved to the House floor, “We have to look at the pre-2010 legislation and would lawmakers, when faced with the consethe rules the hospitals were working on and what quences of their votes, change their minds about exists today, and use that as a starting point for patient reintegration trips? Here’s how our local making new rules and laws to make sure people lawmakers who remember Paul’s escape would have enough contact with the outside world in have voted. the meaningful way, so they’re prepared to reinte Rep. Matt Shea, R-Spokane Valley, who grate into society.” n introduced the 2010 legislation restricting patient deannap@inlander.com

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MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 21

No One is Safe BY RICK ANDERSON

Paul Allen, Felix Hernandez and even a U.S. Attorney aren’t protected from a new breed of bandits who have traded guns and getaways for malware and ATM skimmers. Is there any hope for the rest of us?

biggest armed bank robbery in American history began shortly after closing time on the evening of Feb. 10, 1997, when two men wearing trench coats, sunglasses, and FBI caps approached the door of the Seafirst Bank in Lakewood, Wash., south of Tacoma. Inside, three tellers were preparing to turn out the lights and lock the vault. Lanky 57-year-old Billy Kirkpatrick and his diminutive partner Ray Bowman, 53, had staked out the bank for most of January, taking time to blend in with the locals. As federal documents and testimony would later reveal, the Mutt and Jeff duo lived in a Kent motel, dined at the better restaurants, and attended a piano recital at the University of Washington. After weeks of casing the bank and devising a getaway route, they were excited to finally stand at the locked door, aware the vault was packed with an extraordinary amount of cash to cover an upcoming payday for soldiers from nearby Fort Lewis. The onetime Midwest shoplifters — they first paired up in the 1970s to boost disco tunes from record stores — had graduated in the 1980s to taking down U.S. banks at gunpoint. Having stolen more than $3.5 million during 26 crosscountry heists since then, the duo had earned the FBI honor of a bandit nickname: the Trench Coat Robbers. Agents had no idea who, exactly, they’d been pursuing for almost 15 years, although this would be the two bank artists’ final, and greatest, performance. Using a small prying tool, the pair flipped the lock on the door and entered with guns drawn. They ordered the women into the vault and secured their wrists with plastic ties, then quickly began stuffing money into duffel bags. Within minutes, using a metal cart to help transport the unwieldy stack of bags, they pushed through the door and loaded their stolen Jeep Cherokee with $4,461,681 in bundled cash. As the Jeep sped off into the winter darkness, it sat low in the back, toting a payload roughly equal to a NFL lineman. The Trench Coats got away clean, only to be deceived by the money itself. They took so much cash they couldn’t successfully stow it in their homes and cars. Before the year was out, Kirkpatrick would be stopped by a Nebraska state trooper for speeding seven miles an hour over the limit; during a search of his trunk, he was found to be carrying almost $2 million in a set of footlockers, some of it traceable to Lakewood. Bowman, meanwhile, would make the mistake of paying $174,000 in cash to a log-home builder, whose bank deposit caught the eye of an IRS agent. That was the germ of an investigation that eventually led to the discovery of $480,000 in cash stored by Bowman, some of it bound by a Seafirst money band. By 1999, the crooks had traded in their Trench Coats for prison jumpsuits, and were sentenced to more than 15 years.

THE

I

n stark contrast is the biggest unarmed bank robbery in Washington state history, which took place last spring, and for which no one has yet been caught or named. The victims did not know they’d been robbed until three days later. The thieves had no need for guns, disguises, duffel bags, or a getaway vehicle. No need, even, to be in the state, or on the continent, for that matter: It was a cyberheist. Whoever took down the Bank of America account of a Leavenworth hospital for $1 million last April — likely Russian and Ukrainian hackers ...continued on next page

MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 23

COV E R STO RY | T EC H

“NO ONE IS SAFE,” CONTINUED...

IN ABOUT

78

%

OF ONLINE FRAUD

I N C I D E N TS , BANKS FAILED

TO CATCH THE

ILLEGAL TRANSFER

OF FUNDS. SOURCE: 2011 BUSINESS BANKING TRUST STUDY BY GUARDIAN ANALYTICS

24 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

— merely used a computer keyboard. Electronic impulses were the extent of the intrusion it took to capture Cascade Medical Center funds and send them flying off over the Internet to 96 private bank accounts elsewhere. There, human mules — co-conspirators, likely most of them unknowingly recruited by the masterminds — cashed out the holdings, kept a bit for themselves, and sent the rest by wire overseas. That was the plan, at least. The Chelan County treasurer’s office says it has recovered about $415,000 of the heist, beating some of the mules to the stashed accounts. But the roughly $600,000 loss still ranks as Washington’s largest reported cyberheist — so far. Second to that is the October 2012 theft of $400,000 from the city of Burlington’s account at Bank of America. That hacked bundle was electronically transferred to business and personal accounts elsewhere over a two-day period. Little is publicly known about that Skagit County theft, but a spokesperson for the Secret Service in Seattle, which is probing the heist, confirms that $400,000 disappeared into cyberspace, and cautions that “a lot of these kind of investigations wind up being very lengthy.” In other words, Burlington can likely kiss its money goodbye. Those thefts, of a combined $1 million, pale in comparison to the global cyberheist of $45 million from two Middle East banks, revealed last year. Six New Yorkers were among those later arrested in the scheme, which involved mules (a “criminal flash mob,” as the tabloids put it) working in 20 countries. They withdrew $5 million on a single day a year ago December and $40 million more one day last February. “In the place of guns and masks, this cybercrime organization used laptops and the Internet,” Eastern New York U.S. Attorney Loretta Lynch said in a memorable statement. “Moving as swiftly as data over the Internet, the organization worked its way from the computer systems of international corporations to the streets of New York City, with the defendants fanning out across Manhattan to steal millions of dollars from hundreds of ATMs in a matter of hours.” Bank databases had already been hacked by the cyberthieves, who erased card withdrawal limits and created their own access codes. It’s thought to be the world’s biggest bank robbery, with everyone from Interpol to the FBI to Microsoft’s expanded Cybercrimes Center in Redmond on the trail. (Microsoft has claimed success in combating several major cybercrime operations recently — in particular, botnet or “zombie” spam and scam operations involving networks of computers tied together by malware. Microsoft estimates that as many as five million individual and network computers are corrupted and botnet-vulnerable.) Internet crime is an ever-expanding risk, and “Few things are as sober-

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Why shop at Runge Furniture? The 1983 movie WarGames, filmed in Washington state, helped to bring cyberwar to the public’s attention. ing as the daily cyber-threat briefing I receive,” says Seattle’s U.S. Attorney Jenny Durkan, one of the nation’s top cybercrime prosecutors, referring to a daily Justice Department bulletin that details successful and attempted cybercrimes around the globe. Last year, Durkan told a U.S. House Judiciary subcommittee how 10 years ago the big concern was solo hackers and spammers. Today the threat comes from organized crime, terrorists, and botnet collectives, among many others. She has also watched her Seattle office expand its prosecutorial horizons, she told Congress, now that “many of our cases involve computers and electronic evidence located in other countries. Many times the offenders are located in another country. But even U.S. criminals will use computers located in another country to hide their tracks. Often it is impossible to identify, arrest, and prosecute offenders without the assistance of foreign governments.” That’s part of the attraction of the digital underworld — the chance to pull off a caper cheaply and anonymously from afar, at considerably less risk of being discovered before making a quick getaway. Technology has democratized crime. Rather than weapons or burglary tools to gain access, a cyberthief needs only to press the “Enter” key, and he’s in.

F

or clarity, we’re talking here about cybercrime as opposed to most cyberwar. The latter generally involves commercial and governmental espionage and sabotage waged by electronic intruders, be they bedroom-bound teen hackers or sophisticated political conspirators. In a pop sense at least, cyberwar got its start in Seattle after the locally filmed 1983 movie WarGames became a hit. Though it was fiction, the film, starring Matthew Broderick as a Seattle high-school gamer and hacker who almost launches WWIII, provoked concern among lawmakers, generals, and CEOs. Its impact helped compel Congress to enact the 1986 Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, expanding electronic protections and imposing harsher criminal sentences. Seattle is now itself a player in war games, thanks to advances by locally based computer giant Cray Inc. It supplies the National Security Agency (the former employer of whistleblower and secrets thief Edward Snowden) and other government and private entities with petaflop-speed supercomputers, ones capable of a thousand ...continued on page 27

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COV E R STO RY | T EC H

Mark Smith, CEO of Sears Spokane Employees Federal Credit Union, says retailers need to increase their cyber security.

Spokane Under Attack Last year’s cyber attack on grocery wholesaler URM left many local financial institutions footing the bill BY CHEY SCOTT

I

t’s not yet 3 pm, and two alerts of security breaches at national retailers have already popped up in Mark Smith’s inbox. The CEO of the small, 800-member Sears Spokane Employees Federal Credit Union sits at his file-covered desk in a tiny office tucked inside the first floor of NorthTown’s Sears store. Scrolling through his email, Smith reads bits of the vague yet familiar details aloud. “They’re not even saying or confirming anything,” he says of the alerts. “Just saying it’s a possible intrusion that ran for five months from mid-2013 to the fourth quarter.” The report from Visa also lists card numbers for some of the credit union’s members who made purchases at the unnamed merchant during the suspected breach. “Now we have to go in and kill the card and order new ones,” Smith says, his voice flat. This “card-killing” routine has become all too familiar for Smith and financial execs across the nation in the past half year as the technological weaknesses at American retailers are exploited by cybercriminals again and again. The system’s flaws are better known after the large-scale attack at Target stores this fall, but a similar breach at Spokane-based grocery wholesaler URM, made public last November, is still being felt at financial institutions across the region, including at the Sears’ Employees Credit Union. Security experts believe these cyber attacks are only going to get worse. Partly to blame is the magnetic stripe technology used on credit cards in the U.S. — an antiquated technology that dates back to the 1960s — which is incredibly easy for cybercriminals to obtain and replicate. While Europe and other developed countries have updated the technology, America lags behind, making us top targets of cybercriminals, according to experts like Alphonse Pascual, a security analyst at the national business strategy firm Javelin. In a Feb. 16 Los Angeles Times report, Pascual says: “All the issues we’re seeing are the result of the legacy systems we have in place. This information can be stolen by anyone.”

26 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

I

t was early September when Smith started noticing suspicious purchases on his members’ accounts that later would prove to be associated with the URM breach. “We’re small enough that we can really keep an eye on the transactions,” he says. “In my opinion we probably saw the fraud before most other [banks and credit unions] did … and well before URM came out and said that there was a breach.” URM issued the first press release about the incident on Nov. 18, in which CEO Ray Sprinkle wrote that the company had begun investigating its data systems, but wasn’t yet confirming a breach had occurred. A week later on Nov. 25, three days before Thanksgiving, URM issued a release stating its payment processing system — used by a large collective of its member-owner stores across the Inland Northwest — had indeed been hacked. It took another week, until Dec. 2, for the company to set up enhanced security measures to block the attack. Although URM released a list of stores affected by the attack at the end of January — totaling 67 locations across Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana — official results of the forensic criminal investigation still haven’t been released. URM executives, including Sprinkle, are remaining tightlipped and declined to comment until the final investigative report is completed.

H

anging on the wall behind Smith’s desk, on which sits a 5-inch stack of paper-clipped records pertaining to the URM breach, a framed certificate lists his credentials as a financial fraud investigator with the Spokane Police Department. While Smith hasn’t been involved in law enforcement investigations on the URM case, his credentials give him the authority to work collaboratively with the police when they’re gathering evidence against suspected financial criminals. Although Smith had early on confirmed that some kind of breach had occurred at URM’s stores — based on members’ account activity and by talking with leaders of other Spokane-area credit unions — he says he couldn’t inform the company of his

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

suspicions because of legal liability and the credit union’s contract with Visa. “The first thing I did was contact the Secret Service just to see if they were aware of anything that was going on,” he says. Roughly 47 percent of Smith’s members were affected by the URM cyber attack. But in catching the fraud so quickly, almost all of the credit and debit cards captured during the breach were replaced by the time the incident went public in November. “We were lucky enough having gone through that that we were well-prepared by the time Target hit,” Smith says. “We took very little loss from Target.” The overall impact of the URM breach on Smith’s credit union totaled about $42,000, he says, including the cost to replace members’ cards, at about $5 each. Of that total, $32,000 in fraudulent purchases came from one card whose owners unintentionally shut off their fraud monitoring alerts after inadvertently telling Visa a $1,000 purchase made in California was legitimate — when it was actually made by a thief. A voluntary survey of credit unions in Eastern Washington, conducted by the Northwest Credit Union Association, which represents 160 credit unions in Washington and Oregon, has so far estimated the total impact of the URM breach at more than $687,500. Eleven credit unions participated in the survey, but the NWCUA declined to identify the particular institutions. From his perspective, Smith says improved and stricter security protocol for merchants of all sizes is the first step in thwarting such security breaches. He believes merchants should be held to similar standards as financial institutions when it comes to sensitive consumer information. The major card issuers are already pushing for U.S. retailers to make the switch by October 2015 to the more secure chip-and-pin card technology, also called EMV (which stands for Europay, Mastercard and Visa). It would be a costly switch for retailers to install new card-reading and payment processing technology, but the plan for the card issuers is to place fraud liability on the merchant rather than the issuer or financial institution. Even though consumers affected by a security breach like those at URM and Target do get their money back in the end, Smith says the costs to clean up situations like these fall back to consumers, whether it’s in the form of increased banking fees, interest rates or the overall costs of goods. “It’s not just a merchant problem, it’s not just a financial institution issue,” Smith says. “It’s really everybody’s issue.”  cheys@inlander.com

“NO ONE IS SAFE,” CONTINUED... trillion operations per second, instantly calculating all sorts of arcane probabilities — or reading your emails in a blink. Typically, cybercrime is the Internet robbery, burglary, or scamming of any computerized site, from major institutions to the average home. It involves cons and fraud, often using malware to infect individual computer systems. Mikael Patrick Sallnert, for example, is a Swedish cybercriminal arrested in Europe last year and brought to Seattle for prosecution. Having pled guilty, Sallnert is now doing 48 months for his role in an international ring that infected computers with scareware. Using this devious software, the ring duped nearly a million victims into believing their computers were infected, then sold them useless antivirus software to fix them, netting an estimated $70 million in the scam. Sallnert operated a credit-card service that processed about $5 million of those payments. Yet, “Most cybercrime victims are not targeted,” says cybersecurity blogger and ex-Washington Post reporter Brian Krebs, who has been tracking the Russian hackers behind the Chelan heist. “They are victims of opportunity.” Cybercrooks often succeed, he tells me, “by tricking relatively non-technologically savvy people into compromising their systems, or by taking advantage of systems that are not up to date with the latest security fixes. People need to understand that just as walking down the street in a foreign city at night drunk is likely to make you a target for pickpockets and muggers, cruising around the Internet with unpatched systems and browsers is going to get your computer compromised eventually.”

For generations, you’ve worked to get more for your doar…

T

hough we’re all potential victims, it’s the high-profile, and often wealthy, figures we hear about. That was demonstrated in two quirky local cases involving the Mariners’ Felix Hernandez and Seahawks owner Paul Allen. Both were hit by low-tech bandits, prosecutors say, relying on telephones and the web. That both are rich also made it easier for the scammers, initially at least, to escape notice. In Allen’s case, Brandon Lee Price, an AWOL Pennsylvania soldier, called up Citibank one day and impersonated the billionaire, convincing a service-center worker to change Allen’s Seattle address and telephone number on his Citibank account to Price’s address and phone, suggesting the Microsoft co-founder had moved to Pittsburgh. Price LAST WEEK also got Citibank U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder asked to send him a new Congress to create a national standard debit card with to promptly alert consumers when their Allen’s name. He information is compromised in a data then attempted breach. Also, early last month the U.S. a $15,000 WestSenate held a series of hearings on ern Union cash better protecting consumers’ financial transaction, which data. Among those who testified were didn’t go through. executives from national retailers Target Turning more pracand Neiman Marcus. (CHEY SCOTT) tical, he used the card to make an overdue loan payment. Allen, perhaps out cruising on his 400-foot yacht, never noticed. But the bank caught on, and the FBI crashed Price’s party. His attorney describes Price as undereducated and suffering from the effects of a head injury in his youth. But prosecutors say Price intended to milk America’s richest sports mogul, and even kept notebooks on how to pull it off, including a prepared script he followed when talking to the bank. According to U.S. court records, Price pled guilty to four counts of fraud in October, receiving an eight-month sentence and a requirement to pay $658 in restitution. His mother said in a letter to the court that her 30-year-old son had never been in trouble before and was remorseful to the point of tears after the FBI stormed their home. King Felix, the Cy Young Award winner whose seven-year, $175 million contract makes him the second-highest-paid pitcher in professional baseball, told federal investigators that he and his wife Sandra had no idea one of their credit cards was being drained in 2012 by the allegedly cyberscamming wife of another Mariners ...continued on next page

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player. Maria “Jackie” Peguero, married to former M’s outfielder Carlos Peguero, is facing three federal counts of wire fraud for making $180,000 in online purchases from Saks Fifth Avenue on Sandra’s card. Like soldier Price, she allegedly phoned in an address change that enabled her to use Sandra’s MasterCard online, placing 60 separate orders over a three-month period and having them shipped to her Fife apartment. (Husband Carlos, who also played for the Mariners’ Tacoma farm team last year, was traded to the Kansas City Royals in January.) Some single-day purchases topped $10,000. Seattle Secret Service Agent Ashleigh Audley, who investigated the case as part of the Electronic Crime Task Force, says Saks sales personnel in New York finally caught on when someone realized the items were not being shipped to the Hernandez home in Bellevue. Spanish-speaking Sandra Hernandez told investigators that because of her limited English, friend Jackie had helped her order goods and services as they sat together at Sandra’s home computer. But, as the Hernandezes also told investigators, only their accountant sees the credit/debit-card bills, and was unlikely to notice anything unusual about large purchases. Jackie Peguero, meanwhile, wasn’t exactly hiding her alleged buys: She posted pictures of herself on Twitter feeds and other social media showing off new duds. Agent Audley says that many of the stylish fashion shots, such as Peguero displaying a $200 silk blouse and a $1,750 Gucci handbag, match purchases made with the Hernandez card. Peguero, who has pled not guilty

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and is being represented by a public defender, may have made other purchases with the card and is likely to face additional allegations of fraud, prosecutors now say. But Peguero, through her attorney, says new information is forthcoming in her defense that “may facilitate a resolution of this matter.”

W

hat happened to the millionaire ballplayer and the billionaire bachelor could have happened on a lesser scale to any average Jane or Joe — though in this economy, they’d perhaps be more alert to spiking bank charges. The elderly and the uninformed are commonly victims of email and socialmedia cyberscams: the “advance fee lottery” trick, for example, a message saying you’ve won a large sum of money but requiring an advance fee to cover prize-delivery expenses (which can lead to ID theft as well). Fortunately, as security consultant Krebs points out, “Most cybercrime against consumers is reversible: That is, if the consumer is defrauded through their debit or credit card, they may be temporarily inconvenienced, but as long as they file a fraud claim with their bank or credit-card company, they are generally not liable for those charges.” In January, retail giant Target said as many as 100 million customers may have been affected by a massive pre-Christmas hack attack on its accounts (banks would cover any customer losses but could sue Target to recover those funds). Shortly after the heist, Krebs reported, the stolen card data was already flooding the black market, including to a popular underground store called Rescator, where

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each card was sold for anywhere from $20 to more than $100 per card. U.S. Attorney Durkan can speak to card theft not only as a prosecutor but as a victim. Mortifyingly, she admits, she was heisted by a street-level cybercrook, 43-year-old Ana M. Crisan of Renton, whose specialty was rigging walk-up and drive-up ATM machines with electronic “skimming” devices and pinhole cameras. That enabled her to obtain 237 bank account numbers and security codes throughout the West — Durkan’s among them. Before she was caught in 2012 and sentenced to four years in prison (the U.S. Attorney for Eastern Washington handled the case), Crisian managed to steal $125,000. About $1,000 of that was Durkan’s. “I, of all people, knew better,” she said. Yet who among us checks to see if their ATM is outfitted with a skimmer — a device deftly inserted into the card slot to record account numbers on a magnetic strip — or takes time to check for a tiny camera that records users punching their card security codes onto the keypad? (Thieves also use fake ATM’s — a realistic device that fits over the top of real ATM’s to record numbers and PINs — as well as skimmers that can be attached to cash registers). The experience did seem to energize Durkan for combat with digital criminals (because of her high profile as a cybercrime prosecutor, she has been targeted by other cyberfoes, including the hacker collective known as Anonymous). Today Durkan chairs or co-chairs several Justice Department cybercrime committees, and has helped draw up such federal measures as the President’s Executive Order on Cybersecurity and the Electronic Communications Privacy Act. Her office has brought charges against some prized cyberthieves and hackers, including Daniel Munteanu, a 29-year-old Romanian national awaiting sentencing in Seattle for scamming five eBay customers out of more than $120,000 last year. He was nabbed in Seattle attempting to board an international flight. Munteanu used counterfeit passports to open bank and mailbox accounts to pose as a seller of eBay merchandise — boats, cars, and farm equipment included. (He and co-conspirators pretended to be the sellers, and conned buyers into sending payments into his bank accounts — money he then quickly moved offshore). Another big-time cyberscammer, David B. Schrooten, a 22-year-old Dutch hacker known as Fortezza, received a stiff 12-year sentence in Seattle last year for trafficking in stolen creditcard numbers worldwide. In October, Charles T. Williamson, a 36-year-old California rap artist who performed under the name “Guerilla Black,” received a nine-year sentence as part of Schrooten’s crime ring. Durkan is a proponent of stiffer sentences for some Internet crimes. Last March she urged Congress to simplify some sentences and “enhance penalties in certain areas where the statutory maximums no longer reflect the severity of these crimes.” (She cited the five-year maximum imposed in cases where hackers break into databases and steal credit-card numbers, arguing they deserve more time.) She also urged lawmakers to make the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act subject to the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO), making conspiracy ...continued on next page

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Cascade Medical Center, in Leavenworth, was hit by cyberthieves in April.

“NO ONE IS SAFE,” CONTINUED... prosecutions easier. But federal prosecutors are already handing out harsh penalties when they see fit — or want to send a message. Critics cite the case of 32-year-old Barrett Brown, supposed spokesperson for that Durkan-targeting hacktivist collective Anonymous, who has spent more than a year in a Texas jail and faces up to 105 years in federal prison if he’s convicted of a litany of hacking and conspiracy charges. Another Internet activist, Aaron Swartz, 26, faced up to 35 years and a $1 million fine for wire and computer fraud after allegedly illegally downloading academic journals. When prosecutors twice rebuffed his bids for a plea bargain, the onetime Harvard fellow ended up hanging himself in his Brooklyn apartment in January 2013. A memorial for Swartz in the other Washington drew such opposites as Republican Rep. Darrell Issa and Democrat Sen. Elizabeth Warren. “Stick it to the man,” Issa, an open-Internet advocate and author of a Digital Citizens’ Bill of Rights, told the crowd, according to a Huffington Post report. “[Aaron] and I probably would have found ourselves at odds with lots of decisions, but never with the question of whether information was in fact a human right.” Eight-year and six-year terms were handed out to Seattle cyberthieves John Earl Griffin, 36, and Brad Eugene Lowe, 39, respectively, in 2012, although their crimes were a mix of on- and offline capers. They used a technique known as “wardriving,” cruising Seattle in a vehicle outfitted with a receiver to detect wireless networks. Once connected, they could electronically enter business networks and computers. They also literally broke into businesses, through doors or windows, and installed malware on computers, enabling them later to obtain codes and passwords over the web. They accessed payroll and business accounts and bought items from Amazon and eBay. Until busted by Seattle police, the twosome hacked or burglarized 50 businesses for more than $3 million in losses over a three-year period. “They were sophisticated in technology ... and livin’ large,” Durkan said. Her office was also hoping to prosecute a

30 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014 ClearChannel_babyFair_030614_8V_KE.pdf

high-profile hacker named Dmitry Olegovich Zubakha, a Russian who was detained in Cyprus last summer, suspected of botnet attacks on Amazon’s network and other e-commerce sites, disrupting customer access. Zubakha’s arrest made global headlines, and seemed to reflect the cooperative nature of international agencies in combating cybercrime. “That was a great case,” a federal official familiar with the case tells me, “with Interpol and the Cypriot government aiding in the arrest.” But a less-noticed development has left U.S. officials dismayed. Though Zubakha was thought to be ticketed for Seattle, “The Russian government had a different take on the case,” says the federal source, “and actually wound up counter-extraditing him to Russia.” Aleksey Gordon, who blogs about the Russian Mafia, writes that LETTERS Zubakha was Send comments to actually employed editor@inlander.com. “on staff” by the Kremlin, and though he’s in Russian custody now, “there is no doubt that this will not last long” and he’ll be freed. Perhaps because of the Zubakha arrest at the FBI’s request, Russia recently began warning its hackers not to travel abroad. As Wired reports, Russia has been mostly a safe haven for professional spammers, hackers, phishers, and fraudsters who attack the U.S. In September, the government issued a warning advising Russian “citizens to refrain from traveling abroad, especially to countries that have signed agreements with the U.S. on mutual extradition, if there is reasonable suspicion that U.S. law-enforcement agencies” have a case pending against them. “Practice shows that the trials of those who were actually kidnapped and taken to the United States are biased, based on shaky evidence” and are slanted against the Russians, the notice states. A fair number of Russian cybercriminals have been arrested by U.S. authorities in recent months, including alleged hacker Aleksander Panin, being held in Atlanta where he’s charged with a $5 million online bank fraud. When he

was nabbed in the Dominican Republic last summer, Russia called his extradition “vicious” and “unacceptable.” That’s sort of how they felt over in Chelan County in April — once the treasurer’s office opened that Monday morning and officials learned the public’s money had been extradited. To Russia, no less.

O

n Wednesday, April 24, five days after the Leavenworth heist and two days after it was discovered, security blogger Krebs began calling Cascade Medical Center officials to tell them who likely robbed, or burglarized, their bank account. The Russian cyberheist was carried out with the help of nearly 100 different accomplices in the United States, who were hired through work-at-home job scams run by a crime gang that has been fleecing businesses for the past five years, Krebs wanted to tell hospital officials. But nobody ever called back, he says. As he later recounted in his blog at krebsonsecurity.com, he reached out shortly after hearing of the heist because he’d spoken with two unwitting accomplices who’d helped launder more than $14,000 taken from the hospital’s accounts. One of them, 31-year-old Jesus Contreras from San Bernardino, Calif., had been out of work for more than two months when he received an email from Best Inc., a company supposedly located in Australia. A representative of the “software development firm” said he’d found Contreras’ resume on careerbuilders.com and that he seemed qualified for a work-at-home job forwarding payments to overseas software developers, keeping eight percent of any transfers. All he needed was a home computer. Contreras, desperate to find work, signed on. On April 22, Krebs recounts, “Contreras received his first (and last) task from his employer: Take the $9,180 just deposited into his account and send nearly equal parts via Western Union and Moneygram to four individuals, two located in Russia and the other pair in Ukraine. After the wire fees — which were to come out of his commission — Contreras said he had about $100 left over. ‘I’m asking myself how I fell for this because the money seemed too good to be true,’ Contreras said. ‘But we’ve got bills piling up, and my dad has hospital bills. I didn’t have much money in my account, so I figured what did I have to lose? I had no idea I would be a part of something like this.’ ” It didn’t pay off, either, at least for Contreras. Bank of America, tracking the transfers after Chelan County discovered the losses, froze Contreras’ account and those of others involved. The county treasurer’s office did not respond to our requests for comments, and the Spokane office of the FBI is still investigating the case. But county treasurer David Griffiths told the Wenatchee World last summer that $414,800 had been recouped by the bank, with another $100,000 in disputed funds that could later be recovered. The rest, roughly $500,000 to $600,000? “It’s gone,” Griffiths said. “Probably gone to Russia.” The fake company that hired Conteras and others, Krebs notes, is part of a transnational organized cybercriminal gang operating in Russia and Ukraine. “Its distinguishing feature is that it operates its own money mule recruitment division. This eliminates the middleman and increases the gang’s overall haul from any cyberheist.” The gang has several telltale signatures and has hit small to mid-sized organizations, stealing many times more than the millions taken from Chelan County, Krebs thinks. In fact, he suspects the county may have got off easy. “The bank accounts that were hacked also are used to administer 54 other junior taxing districts in the county,” he says. “My guess is this attack would have been worse, but that the fraudsters simply exhausted their supply of money mules. “Just as real-life bank robbers are restricted in what they can steal by the amount of loot that they can physically haul away from the scene of the crime,” he adds, “the crooks behind these cyberheists are limited in how much they can steal to how many money mules they can recruit to help launder the fraudulent transfers.” As Billy and Ray, the Trench Coat Robbers, might say, it still comes down to the size of your Jeep.  Send letters to editor@inlander.com. A version of this article first appeared in Seattle Weekly.

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The first is U.S. Army Nurses Frankie Lewey treating a wounded man shortly after the February 3, 1945 liberation of Santo Tomas Internment Camp in Manila, Philippines.

Hearts in the Darkness In her new book, local author Mary Cronk Farrell writes of the unsung female heroes of World War II BY LEAH SOTTILE

F

rom her earliest days as a television news reporter, Mary Cronk Farrell has always looked for the stories that will change her life. Stories of compassion, of courage. Stories that make her cry and make her heart ache. One day in 2007, she found a story in her email inbox that would change her life forever. In an message from her cousin that had sat unread for

months, the local young adult author found a story of female nurses who had survived prison camps in the South Pacific during World War II. Her cousin had written a paper about them. “I just was astounded,” she says. “And I think right away — my interest in history and my news nose — I was like, ‘Wow, I can’t believe this is true, and that everyone doesn’t know about it.’

“I had only heard horror stories of men in POW camps and how awful that was. And I was like, ‘How did they do it?’” Farrell immediately put aside the novel she had been working on and started looking into the references in her cousin’s paper — which became the basis for her just-released book Pure Grit: How American ...continued on next page

MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 33

CULTURE | BOOKS

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Major Juanita Redmond (left) pins a Purple Heart on Lieutenant Rosemary Hogan. Both women are featured in Pure Grit, the new book by Mary Cronk Farrell (top right).

“HEARTS IN THE DARKNESS,” CONTINUED... World War II Nurses Survived Battle and Prison Camp in the Pacific. She found that two books had been written about the nurses, but nothing that was written for a young audience. She contacted those books’ authors and found that relatives of two of the nurses referenced were living in the Seattle area. And she discovered the last living nurse — then in her late 90s and still living in her home in New Jersey. Farrell mailed her letters and traveled to interview her before she died last year. As she entrenched herself in research, Farrell heard story after story that horrified her — tales of bombings and mass carnage, of violence and steadfast courage. She found out that even as bombs were falling around them and bullets were flying past, these World War II nurses never wavered from their compassion. Farrell was floored by a photo she found in her research of a young Japanese soldier receiving care from American nurses. “They were in the middle of combat. … They didn’t have guns and they were nursing the enemy,” she says. “I’m not saying they loved it. They didn’t. They did not. It was hard for them — but they did it because that’s who they were. “They have this great strength, and that is combined with compassion. I think that’s rare that you find an individual who is truly strong and courageous and is also very compassionate.” Farrell says that even from her earliest days as an intern at local TV stations, she’s been drawn to real-life stories of people showing courage in the face of adversity. Again with these World War II nurses, she felt that pull — that despite how painful it was to hear their stories of loss and pain and terror, it was her duty to tell

them. “There were times like that when I just thought, ‘What in the hell am I putting myself through this for?’” she says, tearing up a little. “I’m feeling all this anguish and pain and I’m crying, and it’s making me depressed about humanity. I guess it was just that I was so inspired by these women, and I believed that their courage should be known.” She remembered a quote from one of her favorite young adult authors, Libba Bray: “Don’t be afraid to go to the dark places or toward what scares you as a writer. Put a little blood on the page — a book should cost you something to write.” The more she got to know these women who had given so much for their country, the more Farrell could feel herself becoming more confident. From beyond the grave, these nurses were healing her. “These women, they didn’t say, ‘OK, send me off to battle. I want to give three of the best years of my life to my country and practically starve to death, and never be able to have kids afterwards because my body was so ruined,’” she says. “None of them asked for that. They weren’t born, like, these courageous heroes. They forged that courage in the darkest moments of their captivity, and what that has shown me is that I have that capacity.”  Mary Cronk Farrell reads from Pure Grit: How American World War II Nurses Survived Battle and Prison Camp in the Pacific • Sat, March 8, at 2 pm • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main • Free • auntiesbooks.com • 838-0206

CULTURE | DIGEST

THEATER BARRYMORE J

ohn Barrymore’s hedonism was legendary. By age 15, he’d lost his virginity to his father’s paramour. At 16, he was expelled from prep school for visiting a brothel. Over the course of the next four decades, he was married and divorced four times, palled around with the likes of W.C. Fields and Errol Flynn, and brawled and womanized in the interstitial periods between acting and passing out. An unabashed alcoholic, he had his lines spoon-fed to him via cue cards when he reached the point where he could no longer commit them to memory. He collapsed during a radio broadcast and soon died, at age 60, from cirrhosis of the liver and complications of pneumonia. When the curtain rises on William Luce’s 1996 play, directed at Interplayers by Mary Starkey, it isn’t John Barrymore in his early 20s we encounter, but rather a late-days Barrymore who wheels in a drinks cart, reciting saucy limericks. He’s supposed to be preparing for a last-ditch theatrical revival of Richard III. But his inability to remember his lines or plug the stream of anecdotes (or indeed the jug) — despite the best efforts of his disembodied prompter, Frank (Todd Kehne) — is working against him. Patrick Treadway as Barrymore is a supporting actor playing a leading man. Intentionally or inherently, he presents us with someone less commanding than we might expect. Behind the dapper mustache, a man without his character’s natural swagger is occasionally perceptible, creating a thin gap between the actor and his performance. That makes the sad, shallow arc of Bar-

Patrick Treadway as John Barrymore.

HAMILTON STUDIOS PHOTO

rymore all the more bittersweet. What good is a character who ruefully describes himself as a “counterfeit of a man” if there’s no sincerity in the line? The real-life Barrymore said, “A man is not old until regrets take the place of dreams,” a line Luce doesn’t let go to waste. In the brief second act, Treadway’s Barrymore is sometimes obscured by his Richard III costume; but on the whole his internalization of the material — the Lionel Barrymore and W.C. Fields impressions, and the particularly moving recollections of his doting Mum Mum — combat the play’s sense of running (or stumbling) in place to depict this once-great actor’s reluctant transition into the quiet despair of regret. — E.J. IANNELLI

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Barrymore • Through March 15: Wed-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm • $28 ($22 senior/military, $12 student) • Interplayers • 174 S. Howard • 455-7529 • interplayerstheatre.org

For Your Consideration BY CHEY SCOTT

ART | Since seeing the seriously amazing LEGO Movie a few weeks ago, I’ve been reminiscing about my childhood Lego-playing days. I confess I actually purchased a new Lego set that would have put my girly child self over the edge. Being in this Lego-obsessed state of mind, I was gleeful to discover a tweet mentioning a project by British photographer Andrew Whyte called the LEGOGRAPHER. Whyte produced a single photo every day in 2013 featuring a classic yellowfaced minifig capturing his own perfect shots, appropriately decked out for any photographic occasion. The impressive, imaginative images were captured on an iPhone 4S, all from the tiny figure’s perspective. See them at longexposures.co.uk/ legography.

TECH | Who subscribes to cable these days? If you’re part of the anti-cable camp, preferring to stream via the web, get on board with Google’s CHROMECAST. This little device ($35), makes watching videos, movies and web browsing on your TV a breeze. The HDMI dongle (that’s tech lingo for a small piece of hardware that attaches to a device) plugs into your TV. Compatible apps on your phone, tablet or computer allow you to stream content onto the TV via a Wi-Fi connection to the device. Since being released last summer, only Chromecast-enabled apps can be used with it (YouTube, Netflix, Pandora, HBO Go). But now that Google has released the device’s software development kit, expect to see many more apps become compatible soon.

ACTING | It’s been dubbed the “McConaissance.” And with a shiny new Best Actor Oscar for his portrayal of homophobic AIDS patient Ron Woodroof in last year’s Dallas Buyers Club, who’s to debate that MATTHEW McCONAUGHEY is making a huge mid-career comeback? Esquire’s Stephen Marche summed up the actor’s resurgence portraying complex, raw characters when he called the curly-headed Texan “the greatest actor of his generation.” For anyone who’s missing all this McConaug-hype, make sure to see DBC and 2012’s Mud and Magic Mike, as well as the riveting, highly acclaimed HBO series True Detective. McConaughey is so spot-on as philosophical detective Rust Cohle, it’s eerie to think that he’s the same guy who had women of all ages swooning hard in all those midaught rom-coms.

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CULTURE | SPORTS

Shooting Star Former Gongaza Prep standout Tia Presley has WSU eyeing the postseason BY HOWIE STALWICK

M

ost Washington State basketball fans only know scrappy Cougars guard Tia Presley as an athlete. A fearless, hard-nosed, relentless

GREG DAVIS PHOTO

sic. Great Mu r. Good Bee a. Corn Past . ElkFest

. c Aveokane fi i c a Sp WP 1931 Addition7,3 e’s 3-19 Brown 509-36 36 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

athlete. It would be safe to say that most fans would be surprised to learn about the “other” Tia Presley. “I’m pretty girly,” Presley says, a huge grin pasted beneath mischievous brown eyes. “I like to do my hair. I like to sit at home and watch Netflix. I’ll get hooked on shows and find myself staying up until 4 in the morning with practice at 7. I’m a big online shopper, too.” WSU fans are grateful that Presley is also a big scorer. The junior, a former Gonzaga Prep standout, has scored 32 points three times in the past six games. Her 18.9 scoring average ranks sixth in the Pac-12 Conference this season and third in school history heading into Thursday’s first round of the Pac12 tournament in Seattle. “My teammates have so much trust in me to score, so they always get the ball to me in places that’s easy for me to score,” Presley says modestly. Presley is shooting the ball more often and more efficiently than just about anyone in WSU women’s basketball history. This prompts Presley to reveal another surprising fact about herself. “Mom used to have to pay me to shoot,” Presley says. Presley was referring to her grade-school days, when she first played basketball. “I remember being terrible,” she says. “So bad. I remember not wanting to go in. Like, sitting on the bench: ‘Please, don’t put me in.’” Mom’s pay plan changed all that. “Then you couldn’t stop me from shooting!” she says with a laugh. Presley shot herself to fame at Gonzaga Prep,

where she was All-Greater Spokane League four straight years and set the GSL career scoring record that still stands. All of which resulted in surprisingly few scholarship offers, and not even a hint of interest from Kelly Graves, coach of the traditionally powerful Gonzaga Bulldogs. “He just said, basically, I didn’t fit his system,” Presley says. “Which is fine. I’m happy here.” Presley, who picked WSU over Oregon State, acknowledges that recruiters had trouble judging her college potential because she often played down low as a 5-foot-7 high schooler. She remains surprisingly effective in the paint, even though the lean-bodied Presley says she’s still just 5-7½ (despite being listed at 5-9) and 145 pounds. “All the post stuff I learned in high school has actually benefited me in college,” Presley says. “I’m able to post up against smaller guards. I’m crafty inside the lane. I can get to the free-throw line, and that’s helped me.” Presley now plays her natural wing position after two injury-shortened seasons at point guard. WSU coach June Daugherty, who labels Presley “a fierce competitor,” recalls how Presley reacted when she tore the anterior cruciate ligament in her left knee last January. Quoting Presley, Daugherty said, “I will come back better than ever. I’ll come back quicker, and I’ll never wear a brace.” Presley’s sterling play has been instrumental in one of the most impressive seasons in the traditionally sordid history of WSU women’s basketball. The Cougars, bidding for their first winning season since 1995-96, are 15-15 overall (3-5 versus Top 25 teams) after finishing 9-9 in the Pac-12. A postseason berth is not out of the question. “It’s a great start to something big over here,” Presley says, “but we’re definitely not satisfied.” n Seventh-seeded Washington State (15-15) takes on 10th-seeded Oregon (15-14) in the opening round of the Pac-12 Conference tournament at KeyArena in Seattle. Thu, March 6, at 6 pm on Pac-12 Networks.

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The RED Mountain Beer Goggles Craft Beer Fest Skullcandy Music Series - Thermals @ Rafters Shred the LOVE (50% of day ticket $ goes to Boarding for Breast Cancer) Skullcandy Music Series – PICKWICK @ Rafters Freddy J & Robbie C Colourvision Tour @ Rafters

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FIND ART and more this Friday, Venues open 5 - 8 pm

ADAMS STREET AREA BARRISTER WINERY

1213 W. RAILROAD AVE. Presenting “Art from the MAC,” a selection of original artwork from the MAC’s Art@ Work program. Artists’ reception, 5pm with Beacon Hill’s Bistro Buffet from 6 -8pm. “Lonesome” Lyle Morse plays acoustic blues, 6:30-10pm.

KOLVA SULLIVAN GALLERY

115 S. ADAMS ST. Featuring paintings and drawings by artist Mike McCarthy, show title: ANOTHER YEAR OF ART-MAKING.

Featured Artist Mark Moore at Trackside Studio TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY

115 S. ADAMS ST. Trackside Studio Ceramic Art Gallery is showing work from the fall kiln firings. Work by Gina Freuen, Mark Moore and Chris Kelsey.

CARNEGIE SQUARE ANDY’S BAR & GRILL

1401 W. FIRST AVE. Featuring photographer Callie Sobosky. Callie uses alternative processes to display a piece of everyday life in the most unique way.

ROCKET BAKERY

1325 W. FIRST AVE. The best of both worlds, enjoy a night inspired by coffee and beer! We will be hosting a beer tasting as well as displaying art work from Spokane Falls Community Collage. $4 will get you 5 tastes. cheers!

TWO WOMEN VINTAGE GOODS

112 S. CEDAR ST. We have mixed-media artist Dianna Chelf for First Friday. Dianna specializes in the Pennsylvania Dutch folk art of Scherenschnitte (scissor cutting) and grain painting on shaker style boxes.

unless otherwise noted. KRESS GALLERY/RIVER PARK SQUARE

FOOD TRUCK

RALLY — Noon-8pm — on

WALL STREET (between Main & Riverside)

PARTICIPATING TRUCKS: Big Pappa’s BBQ, Bistro Box, Couple of Chefs, King of Tacos, The Jamaican Jerk Pan, Shameless Sausages

DAVENPORT HOTEL AND STEAM PLANT AREA *

work present a variety of mediums from water colors, charcoals, pottery and pastels.

AGAVE LATIN BISTRO

DOWNTOWN CORE AREA

830 W. SPRAGUE AVE. Heavenly Mysteries and The Light Orbs series by artist Audreana Camm. Audreana creates surreal abstracts with acrylic on canvas. Each work tells stories of hope and triumphs in spirituality, through out of this world imagery! Reception 6pm to midnight.

BABY BAR

827 W. FIRST AVE. Trypophobia: a collection of non representational, detailed, monochromatic pen & ink drawings.

GRANDE RONDE CELLARS

906 W. SECOND AVE. (ACROSS FROM THE STEAM PLANT) Featuring artist Denny Carman’s “Trees.” Music by Be Sharp, See Natural from 7-9pm.

PATIT CREEK CELLARS TASTING ROOM 822 W. SPRAGUE AVE. (ACROSS FROM THE DAVENPORT) The work of Jami Lord involves the layering of acrylic paint on textured surfaces to invoke depth and spaciousness. Look close! Jami Lord’s paintings are full of hidden gems. Happy Hour 5-7. Live music 7-9 with emerging pop country artist Nicole Lewis.

SAPPHIRE LOUNGE

901 W. FIRST AVE. ‘Here, Now’ brings together the latest works from abstract video artists across the Inland Northwest. Exhibiting wildly divergent styles, these artists epitomize the talent and passion present in the local video art community. Artists: Jenny Hyde, Ginelle Hustrulid, Hiromi Okumura, Anna Czoski, Jan Tenold and Jon Lepper.

STEAM PLANT

ARBOR CREST TASTING ROOM

808 W. MAIN AVE. (RIVER PARK SQUARE, THIRD LEVEL) Featuring portrait and nature photographer Nancy Crawford. Nancy’s goal is to create something uplifting and beautiful, reminding viewers what a beautiful world we live in.

AVENUE WEST GALLERY

707 W. MAIN AVE. (CRESCENT COURT SKYWALK LEVEL) Elizabeth Scott is our featured artist for March. Her exhibit titled “Sensuality of Flowers,” is alive with warm, vivid reds and pinks of oils and acrylic paints. Reception 5-8:30pm.

BISTANGO

108 N. POST ST. Great live music by Dirk Swartz with Big Hair Revolution. Happy Hour 4-6pm. Halfprice All Eats Menu. Hand-shaken cocktails and Spokane’s largest liquor selection!

BOZZI COLLECTION GALLERY

211 N. WALL ST. Featuring Richard Warrington an internationally known, diverse, and impressionistic sculptor who creates two and three-dimensional hollow form and silhouette sculptures using powder coated aluminum, stainless steel, corten steel and bronze.

BRICKWALL GALLERY

530 W. MAIN AVE. (BENNETT BLOCK) The Brickwall Gallery is continuing the Photographic Potpourri show for March. Artists include: Joe Nuess, Erik Sohner, Tony Boccaccio, Cole Thompson, Bill & Kathy Kostelec and others.

DODSON’S JEWELERS

808 W. MAIN AVE. (3RD FLOOR) Kress Gallery, 3rd Floor, River Park Square (Behind Food Court) – 5:30pm-7:30pm: Spokane Schools Arts Education! Spokane Public School students reveal their capacity for creative and critical thinking in multimedia fine art of impressive skill, imagination and beauty. Food Court 3rd Floor, River Park Square – 5:30pm-7:30pm: Musha Marimba Ensemble, directed by Heather Ward, Students from Bryant Elementary will perform Latin marimba music.

NECTAR TASTING ROOM

120 N. STEVEN ST. Nectar Tasting Room welcomes up and coming artist Hara Allison. Hara is a successful graphic artist who has a great eye for art. We also welcome Skylite Cellars to the tasting bar and the music of Darin Hilderbrand. Join us for food, wine, art, music and fun.

STEELHEAD BAR & GRILLE

218 N. HOWARD ST. Featuring work by Gary Gardner. This series of prints was taken over the last three years in Washington, California, Idaho, Utah, Wyoming, Nebraska, Arkansas, and Louisiana, for an upcoming book called “Ghosts of the Road.”

EAST DOWNTOWN AREA AUNTIES BOOKSTORE

402 W. MAIN AVE. (LIBERTY BUILDING) 3 Minute Mic: An Open Mic Poetry Event. Everyone welcome! Come read your own poem(s) or maybe just some of your favorites! Isaac Grambo will be back to host the event and Laura Read will be the guest poet during the “Remember the Word” segment. Signups start at 6:30pm.

EXPRESS EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONALS 331 W. MAIN AVE. We are very proud to showcase a diverse collection of Spokane artist, Karen Mobley’s drawings and paintings.

HILLS’ RESTAURANT & LOUNGE

401 W. MAIN AVE. Featuring a St. Patrick’s Day Warm-up! Music by The Tomson Boys from 6:30-9:30pm.

LABORATORY

301 W. MAIN AVE. Featuring Jessica Earle’s new interactive piece, ‘untitled video edit - Main Avenue’ explores notions of the inviolability of recorded data and our default acceptance of curatorial/artist authority along with the presence of digital media in our daily lives.

159 S. LINCOLN ST. 516 W. RIVERSIDE AVE. “A” is for Art: Students from kindergarten Our featured artist for March is Northwest through 8th grade will be exhibiting work abstract landscape painter Christine Kimball. instructed by resident artist Sami Perry at East Artist reception. Farms STEAM Magnet school. The students’ downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org | Brought to you by Downtown Spokane Partnership and Spokane Arts Commission

March 7th! LEFTBANK WINE BAR

108 N. WASHINGTON ST., SUITE 105 LeftBank Wine Bar is proud to host artwork by Deanna Sylte Lucas. Her ability to capture persona is a true testament to her artistry. Music will be provided by Carey Brazil & Jay Condiotti with an Italian tasting. This will be a night to remember!

POTTERY PLACE PLUS

203 N. WASHINGTON ST. (MAIN FLOOR OF AUNTIE’S) OLD IS NEW: Katie Irvin is a creator & purveyor of ethnically & whimsically inspired jewelry. All pieces are a mix of new or raw materials, trade pieces & antique salvage. Watercolorist Vicki West will display her current work “Present Past” a contemporary retrospective on life & work in the Methow Valley.

SANTÉ RESTAURANT & CHARCUTERIE

HOLLIE MASON ROCKET BAKERY

acrylic paintings. LISTEN to Rylei’s heartfelt guitar strokes and his voice to match!

RIVERFRONT PARK

The 2014 Summer Season Pass is now on sale. The pass gives you unlimited use of the Pavilion attractions, Carrousel, IMAX and much more.

FIRST AVENUE AREA - WEST END ARTEMIS SHOP

1021 W. FIRST AVE. Featuring designer Thrux Lawrence’s handbuilt, essential, and 100% AMERICAN made horween-leather goods that last generations displayed by owner Tanden Launder from Couer d’Alene. This company’s craftsmen know how to make briefs, duffles, totes, fobs and belts like they used to.

NORTH BANK AREA CHOCOLATE APOTHECARY

621 W. MALLON (FLOUR MILL) TASTE chocolate and cheese (wine pairing in the works!) while you GAZE at Melissa Cole’s vividly colored and heavily textured

KIRISHIAN’S IMPORTED RUG CO.

220 E. SECOND AVE. “Art for the Floor,” featuring new, oneof-a-kind, hand-knotted, vegetable-dyed rugs, imported from Afghanistan, Pakistan, India & Nepal. Refreshments served from 5-8:30pm. Join us and learn more about these beautiful, hand-made works of art before they’re gone.

nYne BAR & BISTRO

232 W. SPRAGUE AVE. Please join us Friday! We are featuring photographer Elena Housam for the month of March.

SOUTH DOWNTOWN AREA BARILI CELLARS

608 W. SECOND AVE. Join Barili Cellars on First Friday from 4-9pm and enjoy current wine releases and fun art. We are featuring two artists from Manic Moon & More: mixed-media artist Linda Malcolm and watercolor and mixedmedia artist Gina Corkery.

ROBERT KARL CELLARS

SARANAC ART PROJECTS

115 W. PACIFIC AVE., HISTORIC WAREHOUSE DISTRICT (AKA SODO) Join us for First Friday! You’re going to love the “pop art” style car paintings by Jamie Burton! Wine by the glass or bottle. Open until 8pm.

THE BIG DIPPER

25 W. MAIN AVE. Using sculptures and video installation Jeff Huston looks at the ritual of shaving to explore the developing masculinity of a boy who is forced to face adolescence without a father. Lisa Nappa will be collaboration on a nature-themed installation with fellow Eastern Washington University faculty members, Chrys Tyllia and Jenny Hyde.

VINO,v A WINE SHOP

171 S. WASHINGTON ST. OPEN HOUSE and oil paintings by Katherine Mandley and John DeRoulet. Come check out the Big Dipper!

404 W. MAIN AVE. Please join us for First Friday! We are featuring Katrina Brennan’s Blue Man Musical series of large acrylic paintings.

frogs. Come and see our new lighting, and try out our new menu selection. Music by Maxie Ray Mills.

157 S. HOWARD ST. Poetry reading of Poetry and Prose featuring Whitworth University students and staff. Coffee specials going from 4-9pm. Art from 4-6pm. Poetry reading starts at 7pm. Open until 9pm.

222 S. WASHINGTON ST. Water-colored pen and ink, incorporating personal stories and hidden images highlight Judy McMillan’s “Time for a Little Whimsy” show. Artist’s reception and wine tasting 5-8 pm. Wine tasting $10.

BLUSH BEAUTY BAR

1 N. BROWNE ST. “Blushing Ballerinas,” An exhibition of still photographic images by Gary Peterson inspired by music, dance and beauty. Come join us for an evening of whimsy. Live music by Luke Stuivenga (guitar) and Caroline Bickford (cello). Images available for sale will help benefit the Christian Dance Academy!

V du V WINERY

12 S. SCOTT ST. Featuring artist Melissa Lang. Melissa uses charcoal, acrylic & oil paint to create abstract paintings that reference the instability & changing dynamics of nature relating to human states of restlessness, anxiety & impermanence, as well as, the mutable process of making art itself. Enjoy Fine Art, Live Music & Hand-Crafted Wine from Five to Nine.

VINTAGE HILL CELLARS

319 W. SECOND AVE. “Kiln Kreations” by JoDee Moody will be exhibited. A local artist and teacher from the Spokane Potter’s Guild, JoDee will be showing an expression of works in clay including: wall tiles, Raku fired masks, and a variety of porcelain jewelry.

ECHO BOUTIQUE

176 S. HOWARD ST., SUITE A Join us for an artist reception welcoming Jeanie Garvey to the Spokane art community. Her colorful oil and acrylic paintings depict dreams and abstract portraiture. Also featuring illustrations by Kim Long, jewelry by Jody Steensland and many other local jewelers and artists.

UNIVERSITY DISTRICT MARKETPLACE WINERY

39 W. SECOND AVE. The talented Debbie McCully is back with her bright art you will be greeted by colorful butterflies, wild animals, and even wilder

* Located in the Davenport District – DavenportDistrict.org

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Forty Days Without

Gonzaga Law student Paige Holy is giving up alcohol for Lent.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

For Catholics, Lent is a whole lot more than just a second stab at a New Year’s resolution BY LAURA JOHNSON

P

aige Holy is like any 24-year-old secondyear law student, busy nonstop. But amid the onslaught of papers and exams at Gonzaga University School of Law she will, as she has since childhood, observe the season of Lent — all 40 days of it. An important part of the Catholic, Orthodox and Protestant liturgical calendar, Lent begins on Ash Wednesday, which arrived earlier this week, and runs until Easter. In the Catholic

40 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

tradition, that means giving something up of significance for the duration of Lent. For a lot of people, that something is a favorite food or other indulgence. This year, Holy (pronounced Holly), a Roman Catholic, has chosen to abstain from alcohol for Lent — but, she’s quick to point out, not her social life. “In the past I’ve given up sweets; I think that’s a very traditional one,” says Holy over Guinness-

battered fish and chips at O’Doherty’s Irish Grille in downtown Spokane. “I don’t anticipate giving up alcohol will be easy. If it were easy I wouldn’t have to give it up. It’s not just about giving up bad habits. It’s about letting go of things I’m attached to, focus on Jesus and prepare for Easter.” But people who aren’t Catholic, or even religious, have leaped onto the Lenten bandwagon as well, choosing to give things up as they would for a New Year’s resolution. Last year, Twitter

was awash in Lent-themed tweets, and as the website openbible. info discovered, food was the No. 1 category of things people said — in 140 characters or less — that they would give up. Father Jack Bentz, the Vocation Director for Jesuits in the Northwest and chaplain of the GU School of Law, says that’s missing the point. “Giving up something for Lent has more to do with making space for spiritual guidance,” Bentz says. As food is something people encounter daily it’s an obvious thing to give up, but according to Bentz it’s more about a routine. For instance, people who drink coffee every morning may choose to give that up, but instead of the daily ritual of brewing and sipping, they could use that time to meditate and pray. For those looking to take Lent Not only do Catholics seriously, or who just enjoy throwroutinely give up something ing back seafood, the tradition of for Lent, there’s also the restaurants serving fish on Fridays element of avoiding meat during the next 40 days is someon Fridays, opting for fish thing to bask in. Here are a few instead. places in town working to make “It’s a very old definition your next few Fridays a little more of meat. It was a common tasty than a McDonald’s Filet-Oand popular understanding Fish could ever hope to be. that only included four-footed animals that lived on the Remington’s @ Ramada • land,” says Eric Cunningham, 838-5211 an associate professor of hisEvery Friday, the fine people at tory at Gonzaga University. Remington’s prepare in-house With that definition, techclam chowder. A cup of the popunically fish and even reptiles lar menu item runs $4 and a bowl would be considered easy is $5. The restaurant also serves substitutes for meat by the ale-battered halibut and chips on church, says Cunningham, Fridays. who is Byzantine Catholic. As far as Lent trends in popuBorracho Tacos & Tequileria • lar culture are concerned, he 822-7789 says that stems from Western Fish tacos may seem like a scary culture being a Catholic concept for anyone who hasn’t culture. tried them, but they’re the best. “It’s really a hangover Every day, including Friday, the from the past,” he says. downtown restaurant serves $2 “People, Catholic or not, tilapia fish tacos for happy hour are living it up on Mardi from 4-6 pm. Various drink speGras, and then the next day, cials also are included. whether it’s diet or drinking, they’ll give something up, for Zip’s Drive-In • 328-0380 a while anyway.” (1320 N. Division), Holy recalls her family 489-3211 (725 E. Francis) giving up meat on Fridays Playing on your fast food cravings, during Lent. Growing up local favorite Zip’s is offering a in Calgary, Alberta (she has Fishwich deal through all of Lent. dual citizenship), her family It includes a combo meal for $4 or would often have fish for Fritwo sandwiches for $4. As always, day dinners, but other times never forget the tartar sauce for they would have a simple your fries. meal of bread and meat-free soup, just to feel not quite as full. “That physical hunger was representative of your spiritual hunger,” Holy says. She maintains that refraining from meat on Fridays is still a good practice, even if not all Catholics follow it. In the Byzantine Catholic church, which has Greek origins, they go a step further during Lent, choosing not to eat meat, dairy and eggs on Fridays and certain feast days. “There are actually tremendous spiritual benefits to be had by denying the satisfaction of the will,” Cunningham says of fasting. But whether or not one chooses to give something up — food or otherwise — Lent holds a far deeper meaning to Catholics than the average person with a Twitter account. “For me personally, Lent is about refocusing my priorities,” Holy says. “It’s easy in the day-to-day to be overwhelmed with life, but this is a time to put things in perspective again [and] ask myself, how am I loving others?”  lauraj@inlander.com

FISH ON FRIDAYS

MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 41

FOOD | BREWING

Belgians and Beyond Ramblin’ Road’s new taproom is a showcase for less common beer styles BY LISA WAANANEN

I

n the southern part of Belgium where saison was the drink of the farmers, the miners wanted their own beer. So local brewers made a similarly light, refreshing brew for the miners, called grisette. Dani Guthrie tells the story as she places the palest of a row of tasters on the table. It’s an accessible but obscure style not found at any other local breweries — and that’s part of the reason Ramblin’ Road Craft Brewery is making it. The brewery, which Brian and Dani Guthrie own with Dani’s brother Will Spear, focuses on Belgians but embraces a broad range of styles. The IPA is a bestseller, and plans also include barrel-aged sours and wild ales. The rye saison has won over people who were skeptical of both Belgians and darker beers. “We brew beers that we like to drink ourselves,” Brian says. “We like hoppy Northwest beers, which we’ll do, but we’re also interested in pushing the envelope with some funky Belgian styles that people are not quite as

Danielle and Brian Guthrie, owners of Ramblin’ Road brewery. accustomed to.” The brewery has been operating in the same location near the Logan neighborhood since 2012, but the taproom just opened in late January after extensive work to remodel the industrial warehouse space previously used for storage. Situated between No-Li Brewhouse and the Centennial Trail, the gray brick building features a cozy taproom space with a view of the gleaming silver equipment through broad garage-door windows. The Guthries homebrewed in Seattle, where they worked after studying at the University of Washington. But when it came time to open the brewery, they saw potential in their hometown of Spokane. “We wanted to come home and build something

MEGHAN KIRK PHOTO

here,” Brian says. “We have always thought that Spokane would have a booming, vibrant craft beer scene.” Ramblin’ Road helped organize the Inland NW Ale Trail even before the taproom opened, and in the same spirit, reserves a few taps for beers from other local breweries. They’ve turned the kitchen-less brewery into a brewpub by partnering with local food trucks like Couple of Chefs, which parks outside every Friday. Once spring arrives, Ramblin’ Road plans to extend the taproom outdoors with picnic tables, fire pits and a live music stage.  Ramblin’ Road Craft Brewery • 730 N. Columbus • Open Tue-Thu, 4-8 pm; Fri, 4-9 pm; Sat, 1-9 pm • twitter.com/RamblinRoad • 703-7906

Bob is One Choice. What’s your energy saving style? Everyone wins by saving energy. And there are great prizes too. Avista will randomly select a customer from each of the four energy saving categories (One Choice, Family Saver, Weekend Warrior and Earth Saver) to receive all of the following: • $500 ACE Hardware gift card • $200 Avista Housewarming certificate • A complimentary professional photo shoot holding your Home Energy Advisor shield to represent your category in a future Avista ad. That’s right—saving energy can make you a big star.

Find out your energy saving style and enter to win at avistautilities.com/energyadvisor. Sign up for our Home Energy Advisor by March 31, 2014.

42 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

FOOD | OPENING

Lucky You

with piquant lime and plenty of heat, which you can dial back upon request. Other soup choices are served in small side portions, including miso, crab tofu and hot & sour ($1.50-$2). The fried rice can be ordered Teppan style — with eggs, onions and green onions— or Thai style, which includes Thai chili, the all-important Thai basil, and either bell pepper or jalapeño. It’s a hearty meal for two and priced right at $7-$9. Owned by Lily and Frank Wexun, Asian Twist features the grilling style of the couple’s other restaurant, Fu-Ki Japanese Steakhouse in Post Falls. Teppan entrées from $8-$12 run the gamut from salmon, chicken or beef teriyaki to the more unusual jalapeño calamari. The menu is rounded out by a modest assortment of Thai cuisine. Curry-based dishes like gang dang and gang massaman ($9-$12) blend BY CARRIE SCOZZARO heat and sweet, while pad Thai and the pad drunken keemow are comfort food staples. he number eight is considered auspicious Expect occasional chef’s specials and the in Chinese culture, which may be good always negotiable heat level in any dish — from news to the new tenants in barely warm to blistering — which suite A8 of Coeur d’Alene’s Ironmakes ordering Thai iced tea or wood Square, who opened in time to Visit Inlander.com/newsletter Vietnamese coffee a necessity. Don’t celebrate the Chinese lunar new year expect a lot of ambiance (buddhas to sign up for our weekly (another good sign). Asian Twist, and bamboo framing the mural of a food-centric newsletter. which also serves Thai and Japanese New York street scene that remains fare, is the latest business to occupy from the bagel shop) but takeout the spot most recently filled by a bagel shop. orders are welcome and the food will have you The pan-Asian cuisine ranges from soups thanking your lucky stars.  and salads to fried rice and traditional Thai and Teppanyaki-style entrées. It’s all cooked to order, Asian Twist • 226 W. Ironwood Dr., Coeur with the typical choice of animal and vegetable d’Alene • Open Sun-Thu, 11:30 am-8 pm; proteins: beef, chicken, shrimp and tofu. The Tom Fri-Sat, 11:30-8:30 pm • facebook.com/asianYum soup ($8-$12) is a deep, fragrant bowlful twistcda • 208-215-2155

Have something to tote? We have a basket for that.

Asian Twist gives Coeur d’Alene an array of Thai, Japanese and Chinese

T

ENTRÉE

35 W. Main, Spokane 509-464-7677

I SAW YOU CHEERS & JEERS Submit your message at Inlander.com/ISawYou

225 E. 3rd Ave., Spokane, WA

Eric is a Weekend Warrior. What’s your energy saving style? Everyone wins by saving energy. And there are great prizes too. Avista will randomly select a customer from each of the four energy saving categories (One Choice, Family Saver, Weekend Warrior and Earth Saver) to receive all of the following: • $500 ACE Hardware gift card • $200 Avista Housewarming certificate • A complimentary professional photo shoot holding your Home Energy Advisor shield to represent your category in a future Avista ad. That’s right—saving energy can make you a big star.

Find out your energy saving style and enter to win at avistautilities.com/energyadvisor. Sign up for our Home Energy Advisor by March 31, 2014.

MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 43

FOOD | UPDATE

Sushi is on the menu at Ginger Asian Bistro, but the South Hill spot also serves other Asian favorites.

CHRISTIAN WILSON PHOTO

GINGER ASIAN BISTRO

1228 S. Grand Blvd. | 315-5201

I

n its fourth year in operation, this cozy South Hill restaurant is always packed, and it’s not hard to figure out why. The rolls are delicious — stuffed with fresh fish and warm vegetables and wrapped in some of the stickiest rice you’ll ever have — and the atmosphere is warm and inviting, with a well-lit dining room and a small but hip bar area. The menu boasts considerable variety, serving up rolls that look almost too good to eat, along with classic dishes like beef with broccoli and General Tso’s chicken

for a delicious fusion of Asian flavors — not just Chinese or Japanese. Prices on the menu also vary, ranging from simple hot dishes to more pricey specialty rolls that are worth every penny. You might want to skip out of work early to check out the happy hour every day from 3 to 5 pm. Your choices won’t be as expansive as usual, but there’s still a great selection of appetizers, rolls and entrées at appealing prices. — CLARKE HUMPHREY

The Johnsons are Family Savers. What’s your energy saving style? Everyone wins by saving energy. And there are great prizes too. Avista will randomly select a customer from each of the four energy saving categories (One Choice, Family Saver, Weekend Warrior and Earth Saver) to receive all of the following: • $500 ACE Hardware gift card • $200 Avista Housewarming certificate • A complimentary professional photo shoot holding your Home Energy Advisor shield to represent your category in a future Avista ad. That’s right—saving energy can make you a big star.

Find out your energy saving style and enter to win at avistautilities.com/energyadvisor. Sign up for our Home Energy Advisor by March 31, 2014.

44 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

FOOD | SAMPLER

FINE DINING CEDARS FLOATING RESTAURANT 1514 N. Marina Dr. | Coeur d’Alene 208-664-2922 This isn’t lakeside dining -- when you eat at Cedars, you’re dining on the water at the confluence of the Spokane River and Lake Coeur d’Alene. Seafood is the specialty here and the smoky, cedar-planked, wild-caught salmon is consistently good. The patio is the place to be. You can even arrive by boat and tie up at one of Cedars’ docks. DOWNRIVER GRILL 3315 W. Northwest Blvd. | 323-1600 Since its inception in 2003, Downriver Grill has gained a hard-core following of foodie regulars. Whether you want to go with comfort food (butternut squash mac & cheese gratin, $15), Italian (puttanesca, $15), gluten-free (shrimp bisque, $5) or vegan (coriander-crusted tofu, $16), there’s a little something to keep you coming back. LATAH BISTRO 4241 S. Cheney-Spokane Rd. 838-8338 Their website includes the phrase: “Nature changes daily so does our

menu.” They get all their food from farmers in or near Spokane. Led by chef Brian Hutchins, Latah is always looking to produce tasty food while maintaining respect for the environment. Join them for a truly classy meal. MASSELOW’S 100 N. Hayford Rd. | 481-6020 Masselow’s is the only Eastern Washington restaurant to have ever received AAA’s Four Diamond Award, an honor earned by stringent attention to detail. Every detail. The decor is beautiful without being stuffy or pretentious. The food is carefully (and locally) sourced. The service is unparalleled. And the complimentary fry bread is a lovely nod to our region’s rich Native American history. PEACOCK ROOM 10 S. Post St. | 455-8888 If you’re in the mood for a scotch neat, say, or a Sazerac or Ramos gin fizz, you’d want to order it in the sort of place where the bartender would nod knowingly and say, “Very good, sir.” Bartenders at the Peacock Room know a great number of classic cocktails. All the martinis are doubles, and the gorgeous stained-glass ceiling is an experience in itself. 

What movie should we see? Where is it playing? When should we go?

The answer to life’s great questions. Always in reach

Julie is an Earth Saver. What’s your energy saving style? Everyone wins by saving energy. And there are great prizes too. Avista will randomly select a customer from each of the four energy saving categories (One Choice, Family Saver, Weekend Warrior and Earth Saver) to receive all of the following: • $500 ACE Hardware gift card • $200 Avista Housewarming certificate • A complimentary professional photo shoot holding your Home Energy Advisor shield to represent your category in a future Avista ad. That’s right—saving energy can make you a big star.

Find out your energy saving style and enter to win at avistautilities.com/energyadvisor. Sign up for our Home Energy Advisor by March 31, 2014.

MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 45

War is Meh

300: Rise of the Empire makes bloody combat feel bloodless BY SCOTT RENSHAW

E

arly in 300: Rise of an Empire, a spirited Murro in Zach Snyder’s familiar style of “debate” breaks out in the middle of slowing down the action at arbitrary mothe Athenian Senate. The powerful ments and letting loose with torrents of Persian army is headed to Greece, led by the digitally rendered blood. But the blood “god-king” Xerxes (Rodrigo Santoro), and doesn’t actually resemble anything inside a Athens has little naval power to confront the human body — it looks more like strawberry Persian fleet. Should they surrender rather jam as it sweeps across the screen — and the than face destruction? Should they take the fountains that issue forth from even the most advice of the war hero Themistokles (Sulsuperficial wound make it seem as though the livan Stapleton) and try to unite the Greek combatants are less men at war than fragile city-states to preserve their freedom? The jelly donuts. The silliness of these 300 movies representatives of various factions grab one is in large part attributable to the fact that the another by the togas and hurl themselves anonymous hunks of brawling beefcake are around the Senate floor in the passion of engaged in a version of warfare that pretends their respective positions. There’s something to be gritty but feels like a game. It’s both at stake here, and these flesh-and-blood men absurdly bloody and genuinely bloodless. care enough about it to wrestle one another The notable exception comes whenever to the ground to make their point. Green is the center of attention. Playing a All things considered, I’d much rather native Greek with a traumatized past and watch 100 minutes of plenty of axes to grind, Green that furious exercise commits thoroughly to being 300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE in democracy than the baddest mofo in the room, Rated R what passes for martial ready to kiss the head she just Directed by Noam Murro adventure in 300: Rise severed. Glaring with heavily Starring Sullivan Stapleton, Eva Green, of an Empire. Like its lined eyes over cheekbones Rodrigo Santoro predecessor — director sharper than her swords, her Zack Snyder’s 2006 wardrobe a majestic display of adaptation of the Frank Miller graphic novel bondage gear with kicky skirts, she provides 300 — it attempts to turn ancient history into a burst of energy found almost nowhere else a swords-and-sandals epic, only with virtuin a story that sometimes feels like it’s half ally every part of its world created in digital flashback stories full of expository narration, postproduction. This one takes itself less half inspirational rallying cries (“We choose seriously than the original — mostly thanks to to die on our feet rather than live on our one gleefully crazy performance — but it’s still knees!”) that may have been discarded first profoundly uninteresting to anyone who isn’t drafts of King Henry V’s St. Crispin’s Day there exclusively to see a parade of impossispeech. bly chiseled male torsos. The most indelible moment in 300: Rise of The events take place largely at the exact an Empire occurs during a lull between battles, same time that Gerard Butler’s Leonidas was as Themistokles visits Artemisia’s barge for a leading his stalwart 300 Spartans against the negotiating session — which consists of throwPersians in the first movie, but on a different ing each other around the room in some of front of the same war. Themistokles leads his the angriest sex you’ll ever see. Stapleton may own men against impossible odds, with the be terminally bland throughout the rest of the fierce general Artemisia (Eva Green) leading movie, but he certainly comes to life when the massive Persian navy. He’s got a few bouncing off of Green’s mad villainy. Natutricks up his … well, “sleeve” isn’t the approrally, there’s an audience that’ll be interested priate word for these resolutely bare-chested in the movie’s Greeced-up abs and pecs, and warriors, but he’s going to do his best to hold the snippets of campy craziness. Yet it’s also out until he can convince the other city-states telling that in a story that’s supposed to be all to face the threat as a united Greece. about brutal feats of spear, sword and shield, That means plenty of ferocious hand-tothe only scenes that really register involve hand combat, rendered by director Noam policymaking turned physical. 

46 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS 300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE

Like its predecessor — director Zack Snyder’s 2006 adaptation of the Frank Miller graphic novel 300 — this sequel attempts to turn ancient history into a swords-andsandals epic, only with virtually every part of its world created in digital postproduction. This time around, we have Themistokles (Sullivan Stapleton) leading his band of Greek warriors against impossible odds, with the fierce general Artemesia (Eva Green) leading the massive Persian navy. He’s got a few tricks up his … well, “sleeve” isn’t the appropriate word for these resolutely bare-chested warriors, but he’s going to do his best to hold out until he can convince the other city-states to face the threat as a united Greece. (SR) Rated R.

MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN

Peabody (the voice of Ty Burrell) is a genius inventor, scientist, musician, athlete, gourmand and mixologist. Oh, and he’s a dog. I don’t know if there’s any explanation for how this is possible, and this new film never broaches it. But there is

— in a move that represents how deeply nerdy a flick this is — a great deal of explanation of how a dog was allowed to adopt a boy; precedent-busting court cases were involved. What’s so perfectly plausible that it requires no explanation? Time travel. With the help of their WABAC (pronounced “way back”) machine, the duo find themselves traipsing across ancient times. (MJ) Rated PG

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Hayou Miyazaki directs his newest — and last — animated masterpiece, this time detailing the real life adventures of big hearted Jiro Horikoshi (voiced by Joseph Gordon-Levitt) who desperately wants to pilot airplanes. Upon discovering that his failing vision prohibits flying, pacifist Jiro decides to design them instead, with World War II looming in the horizon. A tumultuous love affair, a peaceful dreamer, and a colorful backdrop of vivid colors all combine to make this drama a masterpiece that concludes Miyazaki’s career. (ER) PG-13

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Best Read Magazine COMMUNITY CHECK-UP

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for Women in the Inland Northwest

Always Online! Inlander.com/inhealth InHealth is read by more adult woman than any other locally produced magazine.*

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NOW PLAYING 3 DAYS TO KILL

When international spy Ethan Renner (Kevin Costner) discovers he is dying, he takes on one last mission in exchange for retirement and medical treatment. Before he can give up his high risk life and finally spend quality time with his family, he must hunt down the world’s most dangerous terrorist. (CF) Rated PG-13

AMERICAN HUSTLE

Coming off the splendid Silver Linings Playbook, director David O. Russell is back, bringing the stars of that film, Jennifer Lawrence and Bradley Cooper, along. This time, the subject matter is a little more intense: He takes us back to the glittery 1970s for a crime drama about a group of corrupt politicians living the high life in New Jersey. (MB) Rated R

AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY

With snappy, southern drawls and huge screaming fiascos, August: Osage County delves into a family feud that has been going on for years. Brought together because of a missing patriarch, three sisters (Julia Roberts, Juliette Lewis and Juli-

3 Days to Kill

anne Nicholson) are once again subjected to their vicious, pill-popping mother’s (Meryl Streep,) verbal abuse. . At Magic Lantern (ER) Rated R

DALLAS BUYERS CLUB

When Ron Woodroof’s wild lifestyle is interrupted by an HIV diagnosis, his eyes are opened to the lack of approved medications in the U.S. Only given 30 days to live, the Texan goes to Mexico and finds a world of alternative treatments. Ron teams up with a fellow spirited person living with AIDS, Rayon, to establish a “buyers club,” where others can find access to the treatments they smuggle into the U.S.. Ron may be dying, but he shows unwavering strength to fight the ignorance. At Magic Lantern (CF) R

DIFFERENT DRUMMERS

Set in 1965 Spokane, this locally produced film tells the true story of Lyle Hatcher (who co-wrote and co-directed the film with Don Caron), who befriended a wheelchair-bound boy at his school ...continued on next page

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BEER & DINNER IN THEATER!

NEBRASKA (112 MIN-R)

Fri/Sat: 1:15, Sun: 3:15, Tues-Thurs: 4:30

PHILOMENA (96 MIN PG 13) Fri/Sat: 8:00, Tues-Thurs: 2:30

ALL SHOWS ALL TIMES

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug

INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS (102 MIN- R) Fri/Sat: 5:45 *weekend only!

AUGUST: OSAGE COUNTY (126 MIN-R)

Fri 5:30 Sat-Sun 11:30, 5:30 Mon-Thurs 5:30

Fri/Sat: 3:15 *weekend only!

25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $8 www.magiclanternspokane.com

PG-13

The hunger games: catching fire Fri 8:45 Sat-Sun 2:35, 8:45 Mon-Thurs 8:45

FILM||SHORTS SHORTS FILM

NOW PLAYING suffering from muscular dystrophy. The film tells the story of how Hatcher, full of copious amounts of energy, tried to teach his friend to run as the two became inseparable, getting into no shortage of trouble along the way. At AMC only. (MB) Rated PG

FROZEN

Frozen is a princess story; Disney is doubling down on the princesses — there’s two of ’em here. But Disney is also doubling down on the hints of nascent feminism Brave hinted at, the sort of barebones feminism which accepts that girls and women might possibly want more out of life than to get married. The princesses are sisters — the elder Elsa (the voice of Idina Menzel) and the younger Anna (the voice of Kristen Bell) — and this is mostly the story of their troubled relationship because Elsa is known to turn things into ice with her magical powers. (MJ) Rated PG

INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS

PG-13

Home School Movie The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Wednesday 1:00 PG-13

924 W. GARLAND • 509.327.1050 WWW.GARLANDTHEATER.COM

Joel and Ethan Coen, following their own footsteps of filling a film with music, as they did in O Brother, Where Art Thou?, this time take on the early ’60s Greenwich Village folk scene. The title character (Oscar Isaac) is a multi-talented folkie who has no people skills and is likely ahead of his time. The people around him seem to cause nothing but crises, but the determined Llewyn sings on, against all odds. At AMC (ES) Rated R

THE LEGO MOVIE

Your #1 Wing Destination!

31

WITH MOUTH WATERING FLAVORS!

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TOUR N A ME NT M A D N E S S! WATCH THE ZAGS HERE!

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From the directing team (Chris Miller and Phil Lord) who gave us the pretty good Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs and the hip and raunchy 21 Jump Street comes a delightful surprise. Yeah, The Lego Movie is colorful and has a message about being creative and working together to solve problems and tells of the fight between good and (corporate) evil, but it’s also totally whacked, from its dizzily stunning visuals (Legos everywhere! Non-stop action!) and its plentiful supply of references that only adults will get. (ES) Rated PG

THE MONUMENTS MEN

George Clooney’s fifth outing as a director has him in a co-starring role, opposite a great ensemble: Matt Damon, Bill Murray, Cate Blanchett and John Goodman, among them. It’s the (mostly) true story of the men and women who took it upon themselves to save great works of art and architecture from plundering Nazis and gung-ho, ever-bombing Allied forces during WWII. (ES) Rated PG-13

NEBRASKA

Finding a Publishers Clearing House envelope stating that he’s won a million bucks, Woody Grant, a reckless, lonely boozer played by 77-year-old Bruce Dern, heads out from Montana to Nebraska to claim his fortune. He takes along his skeptical son (Will Forte), who’s humoring him, as Woody tells everyone he knows that he’s become a millionaire, gathering clingy new money-hungry friends along the way. At Magic Lantern (MB) R

NON-STOP

Federal Air Marshal Bill Marks (Liam Neeson) was bored with his uneventful life in

48 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

the sky until one transatlantic flight from New York to London. When he begins to receive a stream of threatening text messages ordering him to have the government transfer $150 million to an offshore account, Marks realizes this won’t be an ordinary flight. With this mysterious enemy killing off passengers every 20 minutes, Marks must go to work to protect the innocent 40,000 feet in the air. (CF) PG-13

PHILOMENA

Philomena Lee, an elderly British woman, confides in her daughter that she gave birth to a son in Ireland 50 years earlier. Unwed at the time, she was forced to give him up for adoption. Martin, a former government adviser and journalist out of a job, is looking for a story idea to bring to his editor. At a party, he hears of Philomena. Together, he and Philomena investigate the life of her lost son and find themselves exploring America looking for answers. At Magic Lantern (KS) Rated R

POMPEII

Director Paul W.S. Anderson tries to take one of history’s most well-known natural disasters into a big-screen smash and comes up a bit short. Surely, swordplay, star-crossed romance and revenge should be adequate to bide the time until Vesuvius blows its top — right? Not quite. Even with Mila Jovovich, Keifer Sutherland, Emily Browning and Game of Throne’s Kit Harington, the film drags along until the damn volcano finally does its thing. (MB) Rated PG-13

ROBOCOP

Not many remakes of iconic films get it right (think Keanu Reeves in The Day the Earth Stood Still), but RoboCop is a surprising exception. The roots are still there: Good guy Detroit cop is left for dead but re-emerges, via technology, as invincible man-machine. But this film, while still quite violent, has been stripped of its brutality as well as, some will lament, its corny humor. Instead there’s nicely done emotionalism along with edges of politics, philosophy, sociology and black satire. Lots of storytelling in the first half, plenty of action in the second. Gary Oldman and Jackie Earle Hayley give standout performances. (ES) Rated PG-13

SON OF GOD

This film will capture audiences and take them through the journey of Jesus, portrayed here by Diogo Morgado, who also played Jesus in the History Channel’s mini series The Bible. Using captivating cinematic techniques, Son of God tells the story of this religious figure from birth to ultimate resurrection. We can’t know for sure whether seeing this film will count as going to church for the week, but you can give it a try. (MB) PG-13

STALINGRAD

Director Fedor Bondarchuck’s epic dramatizes the battle that was the turning point for Russia in World War II. Six Russian soldiers fight to hold onto a strategic building against the German army, and fall irrevocably, passionately in love with a woman who has refused to flee the city. The film is a beautiful contrast between the brutality of war and the subtleness of love, as the soldiers strive to protect their homeland. Presented in 3D IMAX at AMC. (ER) Rated R

THE WIND RISES

Popular anime director Hayao Miyazaki (Howl’s Moving Castle, Spirited Away) has once again crafted a simplistically styled but good-looking film that features a meandering storyline and a running time that wears out its welcome. It’s a biopic about Jiro Horikoshi who, as a boy dreamed of flying, but as a young man ended up designing rather than piloting aircraft. The story moves in mood from horrific (a deadly earthquake) to whimsical (dream sequences in which Jiro chats with an Italian plane designer) to romantic (in a plotline that feels tacked on). Oddly, the film’s pacifist hero turns out to be the man who designed the planes that attacked Pearl Harbor. Mixed messages abound. (ES) Rated PG-13

THE WOLF OF WALL STREET

Martin Scorsese’s satirical adaptation of a memoir by Jordan Belfort (played here to the tune of an Oscar nomination by Leonardo DiCaprio), who rose from Long Island penny stock swindler to shady Wall Street power player, is so over the top that it risks becoming what it sets out to mock. Jonah Hill also received an Oscar nomination for his portrayal of Belfort’s depraved sidekick. (SS) Rated R. 

CRITICS’ SCORECARD THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

American Hustle

89

The Wind Rises

83

The Lego Movie

82

300: Rise of an Empire

61

The Monuments Men

58

Robocop

52

Pompeii

41

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

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FILM | REVIEW

MR. PEABODY AND SHERMAN [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1130 200) 425 645 910 300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (R) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1140 1220 100 220 300) 530 600 800 900 945 1030 300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE [CC,DV] (R) ★ Fri. - Sun.400 PM 700 PM MR. PEABODY AND SHERMAN 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1230 330) 715 940 NON-STOP [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(120) 410 650 1015 SON OF GOD [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1250 355) 720 955 3 DAYS TO KILL [CC] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(310 PM) 930 PM ROBOCOP [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1210 PM) 1010 PM MONUMENTS MEN [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(110) 420 705 1025 LEGO [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1200 230) 455 730 1000 RIDE ALONG [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(340 PM) 635 PM FROZEN [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1240 PM 320 PM) 12 YEARS A SLAVE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(1150 AM) 620 PM

A dog and a boy team up, travel through time.

Space-Dog Continuum Mr. Peabody & Sherman is an animated film, but it’s sophisticated BY MARYANN JOHANSON

H

Intended Publication Date(s): Friday, March 07, 2014. Saturday, March 08, 2014. Sunday, March 09, 2014. Published WA, Inlander [I_Directory_Update to Publish or Proof] 1.7" X 11" Produced: 7:00 PM ET, 3/4/2014 030414070027 Regal 865-925-9554

e’s the other bow tie-wearing time travand Sherman’s house. Sherman and Penny take a eler, predating even the original 1960s quick jaunt, and that causes some disturbances in incarnation of Doctor Who. Mr. Peabody the time streams that Peabody must repair. So off and his son Sherman first appeared in the late the three of them go again, into the distant past... 1950s on The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show. Now, Ancient Egypt and Renaissance Italy are but their own feature-length cartoon is wondertwo of the places we are whisked away to, with fully, sweetly geeky, full of charm and authentic much good-natured silliness and tons of glorioushumor. ly bad puns along the way. Peabody (the voice of Ty These are the sorts of goofy MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN yet intriguing adventures Burrell) is a genius inventor, Rated PG scientist, musician, athlete, that could well inspire kiddie Directed by Rob Minkoff gourmand and mixologist. Oh, curiosity in history and art Starring the voices of Ty Burrell, and he’s a dog. I don’t know if and science; I know this is Max Charles, Stephen Colbert there’s any explanation for how just the sort of movie that this is possible, and this new would have sent 8-year-old film never broaches it. But there me running happily to the is — in a move that represents how deeply nerdy library to find out more about the likes of King a flick this is — a great deal of explanation of how Tut and Leonardo da Vinci (whom we meet here a dog was allowed to adopt a boy; precedentin exaggerated, animated form). busting court cases were involved. We learn But the marvelous script isn’t only silly. this because poor Sherman (the voice of Max Names including Gandhi’s and Stephen HawkCharles) has gotten into a fight at school with ing’s are dropped in clever ways, and the film mean girl Penny (the voice of Ariel Winter), and even explores the concept of the uncanny valley now social services is involved. (how we get weirded out by replicas of humanWhat’s so perfectly plausible that it requires ity, as in “realistic” CGI animation, that aren’t no explanation? Time travel. Peabody’s invention quite perfect enough) without calling it such, in the WABAC (pronounced “way back”) machine a running joke concerning da Vinci’s invention gets in the way during a dinnertime make-up getof a mechanical child. There’s sophisticated stuff together with Penny and her parents at Peabody happening here. 

GRAVITY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.630 PM 920 PM

Airway Heights 10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444 300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE

R Daily (2:45) (5:00) 9:25 Sat-Sun (10:15) In 2D Daily (2:00) (4:15) 6:30 7:15 8:45 Sat-Sun (12:30)

MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN

PG Daily (4:15) 6:15 8:30 In 2D Daily (1:50) (2:30) (4:40) 6:50 9:00 Sat-Sun (10:00) (11:30) (12:15)

NON-STOP

PG-13 Daily (2:10) (4:35) 7:00 9:20 Sat-Sun (11:45)

SON OF GOD

PG-13 Daily (3:10) 6:15 9:15 Sat-Sun (11:50)

3 DAYS TO KILL

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE [CC,DV] (R) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1045 AM 130 PM) 700 PM

PG-13 Fri- (2:00) (4:30) 7:10 9:50 Mon-Thu (4:15) 6:40 9:25

POMPEII

PG-13 Daily (2:45) 7:20

THE LEGO MOVIE

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (R) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1105 1115 150 200) 415 435 445 725 735 955 1005 1015

PG Daily (2:45) (5:00) 7:15 9:25 Sat-Sun (10:15) (12:30)

MR. PEABODY AND SHERMAN [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1055 140) 420 710 1000

MONUMENTS MEN

MR. PEABODY AND SHERMAN 3D [CC,DV] (PG) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1110 155) 440 730 1010 SON OF GOD [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1130 300) 625 940 NON-STOP [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.(1210 250) 615 930 3 DAYS TO KILL [CC] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1130 AM) 920 PM MONUMENTS MEN [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1220 315) 620 920 LEGO [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1230 330) 630 930 RIDE ALONG [CC,DV] (PG-13) Fri. - Sun.(1255) 405 705 955

RIDE ALONG

PG-13 Daily (5:00) 9:30

PG-13 Daily (2:00) (4:30) 7:10 9:30 Sat-Sun (11:30)

Wandermere

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE

R Daily (2:45) (5:00) 9:25 Fri-Sun (10:15) In 2D Daily (12:30) (2:00) (4:15) 6:30 7:15 8:45 Fri-Sun (11:45)

MR. PEABODY & SHERMAN

PG Daily (4:15) 6:15 8:30 In 2D Daily (12:15) (1:50) (2:30) (4:40) 6:50 9:00 Fri-Sun (10:00) (11:30)

NON-STOP

PG-13 Daily (2:10) (4:35) 7:00 9:20 Fri-Sun (11:45)

SON OF GOD

PG-13 Daily (3:10) 6:15 9:15 Fri-Sun (11:50)

3 DAYS TO KILL

PG-13 Daily (2:00) (4:30) 7:10 9:50

THE LEGO MOVIE

PG Daily (12:30) (2:00) (2:45) (4:15) (5:00) 7:15 9:25 Fri-Sun (10:15)

DIFFERENT DRUMMERS

FROZEN [CC,DV] (PG) Fri. - Sun.(1205 PM 305 PM) 715 PM

PG Daily (1:10) (4:00) 6:40 9:15 Fri-Sun (10:45)

12 YEARS A SLAVE [CC,DV] (R) Fri. - Sun.(230 PM) 615 PM

PG-13 Daily (2:45) (5:00) 7:20 9:35 Mon-Thu (12:30)

GRAVITY IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★ Fri. - Sun.945 PM

POMPEII

ROBOCOP

PG-13 Daily (2:10) (4:35) 7:00 9:40

MONUMENTS MEN

PG-13 Daily (1:20) (3:50) 6:30 9:00 Fri-Sun (10:50)

RIDE ALONG

PG-13 Daily 6:50 9:10

Big Screen: 300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE IN REALD 3D [CC,DV] (R) ★ Fri.930 PM 300: RISE OF AN EMPIRE IN REALD 3D Fri.710 PM [CC,DV] (R) ★ Times For 03/07 - 03/09

LONE SURVIVOR R Daily 6:30 9:00

FROZEN

PG Daily (1:30) (3:50) Fri-Sun (11:10) Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 3/7/14-3/13/14

MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 49

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Local blues act Bakin’ Phat (from left: Pat Potter, Ken Danielson, Dennis Higgins and Dave Allen) fight over strips of bacon at Satellite Diner & Lounge.

Brothers in Blues

Fresh off competing at the International Blues Challenge, Bakin’ Phat continues to show Spokane what having the blues is all about BY LAURA JOHNSON

W

hen he’s on stage, it’s hard to tell what Dave Allen’s face really looks like. His fedora is pulled low, glasses shade his eyes, and when not singing into a microphone, he’s blowing a mean harmonica. But not seeing Allen’s mug adds to Bakin’ Phat’s intrigue — four middle-aged guys still playing it cool. This particular night finds the blues band tearing up a private birthday party at the Davenport Hotel. Guests are out on the hardwood dance floor, shaking it like they

mean it, suits and party dresses swaying with the heavy rhythms and intricate guitar and harmonica solos. Bakin’ Phat plays a style called “jump blues” with some West Coast swing rolled into it. The music is vivacious, infectious and for a band that’s been together for only two years, incredibly slick. And that sound is what’s catching people’s attention.

CHAD RAMSEY PHOTO

A

fter being deemed the Inland Empire Blues Society’s Best Blues Band of 2013, they were chosen to represent the region at the International Blues Challenge in Memphis, Tenn., in January. What happened there, with hundreds of world-class acts converging on the city to celebrate the art of the blues, would affect the members of Bakin’ Phat profoundly. “We’d never seen so many musicians, young and old,” recalls drummer Ken Danielson. “It was something to have that many musicians wandering up a four-block stretch of road in downtown Memphis. There was music everywhere.” As the guys tell it, that first night the band played at the competition, their set just blistered the crowd, as everyone in the packed room, including waitresses, grooved to the beat. The second night didn’t achieve quite the same vibe, and ultimately the band would not go on to the finals, but they acknowledge it was quite an achievement to even make it that far. They spent the rest of the festival connecting with other musicians and touring the ...continued on next page

MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 51

MUSIC | ROCK “BROTHERS IN BLUES” CONTINUED... historic Sun Records and Orpheum Theater, seeing where blues heroes had performed and recorded. “I want to go back tomorrow,” says bassist Pat Potter. “That Sunday when we were getting on the plane to go home, I wanted to go back to town.” The band was guitarist Dennis Higgins’ brainchild back in 2012. He brought in Allen, then Danielson and Potter. They had known of one another for years, all playing in various Spokane acts, just never at the same time. “I wanted to form a blues band that no one had ever heard,” Higgins says. “There wasn’t this style around here at all.” After a couple of personnel changes, they’ve found the winning combination — including an ability to write together almost effortlessly. After so short a time together, they have enough material to almost fill an entire 90-minute set with originals. “The chemistry has settled in so much that if any of us were to leave it wouldn’t be Bakin’ Phat anymore,” says Potter, who joined last year.

I

t’s been decades since the Blues Brothers — Dan Aykroyd and John Belushi — took America by storm on Saturday Night Live, igniting a passion and revival for blues music in the souls of young music aficionados, including some of the Bakin’ Phat men. “They were never as big as Led Zeppelin or anything, but they were a big deal,” Potter remembers. The members of Bakin’ Phat realize that

younger generations don’t know a whole lot about the blues, that it’s cast aside as easily as jazz or classical, often thought of as old people’s music. People who grow up in Memphis or Chicago are indoctrinated into the genre at birth. But in Spokane, a place that doesn’t have a blues club to speak of, it’s a lot more challenging to spark interest. “It’s traditionally not a young person’s music,” Danielson says. “You kind of come across it when you’re older, when you actually have the blues.” But when Bakin’ Phat has played shows at venues like Zola, they’ve packed the place. People dance — the band isn’t just background noise. “The younger generation, they like the blues, they just don’t know it until they hear it,” Higgins says. Back from Memphis for more than a month, the guys are letting it all sink in. There’s talk of getting a second record out by the end of the year — this time with all originals. In the meantime, it’s about continuing to play hard, spreading that mystique, growing their fan base. “We’re building this on a very steady basis. Every time we play we pick up a bunch of a new fans,” Danielson says. “We have a style that people like — we’re connecting with the people.”  Bakin’ Phat with Kenny James Miller Band • Fri, March 7, at 8 pm • $10 • Chateau Rive • 621 W. Mallon • TicketsWest.com • 795-2030

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MUSIC | ROCK

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March 6th - 12th KARAOKE W/ LIVE WIRE

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Dance your ASS off until 4am all weekend!

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frankly, shit got really bad for Qui. On the same day in 2008, Cronk suffered a stroke while, across the country, Yow was hospitalized with a collapsed lung. By the time both men finally recovered, Yow decided music was no longer for a man in his 50s and Ipecac had dropped the band from its roster. So Cronk and Christensen picked up where they left off — starting to assemble the pieces that would become this year’s release Life, Water, Living… . It’s a record that both rages and smiles — one where tracks feature both men harmonizing and singing from their hearts like sweet little songbirds, others that are balls-out burners of wailing guitars and sputtering drums. “It seems like if we were to put out another batch of really nasty, screamy stuff we’d always be relegated as ‘Not as good when David Yow was in the Now just a two-piece, Qui brings it’s strange brand of rock ‘n’ roll to Spokane Sunday. band.’ You know?” Cronk says over the phone. “Particularly with the ensemble singing and the different instrumentation, I think that’s maybe playing more to our strengths and something that’s unique.” Their strengths are paying off for them. “Several review people have BY LEAH SOTTILE said we’re a cross between the ver the course of musical history, there David Yow of the Jesus Lizard as its vocalist, to a Melvins and Frank Zappa and are people who have become greatly band that almost died. Ween. And those are three of respected and revered for being truly f--After moving from their hometown of Minmy very favorites,” Cronk says. ing weird. But by being unabashedly, unapologetneapolis to sunny L.A., guitarist Matt “I would never liken us ically weird, artists like Frank Zappa and David Cronk and drummer Paul Christensen in importance or sigBowie and Sonic Youth and Sunn O))) — all conformed Qui (pronounced “kwee”) and nificance to any of those Visit Inlander.com sidered bizarre at one point or another — changed put out a strange noise-punk record for all event listings. bands, but I certainly the expression on the face of modern rock. called Baby Kisses. That attracted the like being mentioned in One day we might be putting Qui — a reattention of Yow, who joined the the same breath.”  vered Los Angeles avant-garde rock duo — in that band full time, contributing his bizarro reptilian same category. Over the course of the past degyrations and bleats onstage, and vocals for half Qui with bitwvlf and Ian cade, the band has gone from being the project of of the songs on what would be the band’s only Miles • Sun, March 9, at 9 pm two high school friends, to a band signed to Mike Ipecac release, Love’s Miracle. • $5 • 21+ • Mootsy’s • 406 W. Patton’s respected Ipecac Records, to a band with But when shit got good for Qui is when, Sprague • 838-1570

at Irv’s 9pm-2am at Irv’s 8pm-2am at Irv’s 8pm-2am

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4340 W. Ft. Wright Drive 509-325-6383 www.uuspokane.org

Sunday Services

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MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 53

MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

INDIE SEA WOLF

S

ea Wolf’s inclusion on the Twilight: New Moon soundtrack doesn’t mean you should totally disregard their music — after all, that was back in 2009. Since then, the L.A.-based project has only gotten darker, deeper and more intoxicating. This weekend, Sea Wolf comes to us solo, rather than with a pack of musicians. Alex Brown Church began the act alone with his voice and guitar, and it’s how his melancholic indie rock sounds best. On the 2012 album, Church mostly goes it alone on the album’s instrumentation and production, showcasing him at his finest. — LAURA JOHNSON Sea Wolf (solo acoustic) with Kevin Long • Sat, March 8, at 8 pm • Sold out• All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 03/6

J BABy BAr, Nervosas, Ouija Bored J The BArTLeTT, Pickwick, Cathedral Pearls [SOLD OUT] BeverLy’S, Robert Vaughn BOOMerS CLASSiC rOCK BAr & GriLL, DJ Yasmine COeur d’ALene CASinO, PJ Destiny FedOrA PuB, CdA Charter Academy Jazz Jam The hAndLe BAr (474-0933), Open Mic/Jam Night J The hOP!, KYRS Benefit feat. Move the Earth, Amnija, Wandering I and more JOneS rAdiATOr, Los Chingadores LAGunA CAFé, Just Plain Darin LeFTBAnK Wine BAr, Nick Grow LuCKy’S iriSh PuB, Likes Girls MOnArCh MOunTAin COFFee (208265-9382), Open mic hosted by Scott Reid J MOOTSy’S, Kurly Something, Dark White Light, BIAS nyne, DJ Jeremiah Austin O’ShAy’S, Open mic The PhAT hOuSe, The Tone Collaborative, Moksha red rOOM LOunGe, Poncho’s Soul Experience J TWiSP CAFe (474-9146), Chris Rieser & Jay Rawley The vAuLT SOCiAL CLuB, DJ Seli

Friday, 03/7

BeverLy’S, Robert Vaughn BiGFOOT PuB (467-9638), Scorpius The BLACK diAMOnd (891-8357), Rand Miller The BLind BuCK (290-6229), DJ Mayhem BOLO’S, Johnny Qlueless J BOOTS BAKery & LOunGe, The Oracle’s Kitchen BOWL’z BiTez And SPiriTz (3217480), Likes Girls

54 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

ELECTRONIC ODESZA

W

atching electronic musicians onstage isn’t always interesting. Pulling at knobs and jabbing at computers, they sometimes fail to engage with spectators. The music is what must catch the audience — the beats, the ambiance. Seattle production duo Odesza has been making ear-catching music since forming back in 2012. Their songs create summer in a room, employing dreamy melodies and sun-drenched vocals — check out their new single “Sun Models” for an example. After performing at the Knitting Factory in November, the pair hits the Bartlett next week. — LAURA JOHNSON Odesza with Water Monster • Thu, March 13, at 8 pm • $10/$12 day of • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • thebartlettspokane.com • 747-2174

J ChATeAu rive (795-2030), Bakin’ Phat (See story on page 51), Kenny James Miller CheCKerBOArd BAr, Blood Party, Midnight Mine, Blame Shifter COeur d’ALene CASinO, Shiner COLdWATer CreeK Wine BAr, Larry Myer The COunTry CLuB, Redeye Logic CurLey’S, The Hitmen FedOrA PuB, Truck Mills Fizzie MuLLiGAnS, Phoenix GrAnde rOnde CeLLArS, See Sharp, Be Natural idAhO POur AuThOriTy (208-2902280), Charley Packard irOn hOrSe BAr, Whack A Mole JOhn’S ALLey, Whiskey Syndicate J JOneS rAdiATOr, Hooves, Ampersand J KniTTinG FACTOry, Cash’d Out, Acuff & Sherfey, Levi Daniel J LAGunA CAFé, Diane Copeland MAx AT MirABeAu, Jesse Weston Trio

J MezzO PAzzO Wine BAr, Andy Rumsey with Tommy Gantt MOOSe LOunGe (208-664-7901), Bad Monkey neCTAr TASTinG rOOM (869-1572), Darin Hilderbrand nyne, Dan Conrad, DJ C-Mad O’ShAy’S, Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots Pend d’OreiLLe Winery, Owen & McCoy J The PhAT hOuSe, Ragtime Steve, Angela Marie Project rOAdhOuSe COunTry rOCK BAr, Luke Jaxon Band The rOCK BAr And LOunGe (4433796), Kidd Whiskey STyr eATery (466-5999), Solo flamenco guitar J uniTAriAn univerSALiST ChurCh (325-6383), Rise Up Singing WeBSTer’S rAnCh hOuSe SALOOn (474-9040), The Usual Suspects zOLA, Sammy Eubanks

Saturday, 03/8

J The BArTLeTT, Sea Wolf (See story above), Kevin Long [SOLD OUT] BeverLy’S, Robert Vaughn BiGFOOT PuB (467-9638), Scorpius BLACK diAMOnd (891-8357), Dan Conrad The BLind BuCK (290-6229), DJ Daethstar BOLO’S, Johnny Qlueless COeur d’ALene CASinO, Shiner COeur d’ALene CeLLArS, Eric Neuhausser COLdWATer CreeK Wine BAr, Devon Wade The COunTry CLuB, Redeye Logic CurLey’S, The Hitmen J The eLK PuBLiC hOuSe (3631973), The Elk Birthday Bash feat. Lavoy FedOrA PuB, Truck Mills Fizzie MuLLiGAnS, Phoenix

J The hOP!, Thirty Three, Icarus, Boneye, Lions Beside Us irOn hOrSe BAr, Whack A Mole JOhn’S ALLey, Moonshine Mountain JOneS rAdiATOr, Big Red Barn J KniTTinG FACTOry, March Into Madness feat. Unique, Cordell Drake, Destiny, Versatial, On One, True Justice, Pest, Raw B, Ether, Jay Cope MAx AT MirABeAu, Jesse Weston Trio MiKey’S GyrOS (208-882-0780), Angel Olsen, Cian Nugent, Mise MOOSe LOunGe (208-664-7901), Bad Monkey nyne, The Divine Jewels O’ShAy’S, Living Well J The PhAT hOuSe, Rosi Marx, New Mud red LiOn hOTeL river inn, Chris Rieser & Snap the Nerve J reveL 77 (280-0518), Dave McRae rOAdhOuSe COunTry rOCK BAr, Luke Jaxon Band

ZOLA, Sammy Eubanks

Sunday, 03/9

DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church MOOSE LOUNGE (208-664-7901), Michael’s Music Technology Circus J MOOTSY’S, Qui (See story on page 53), Bitwvlf, Ian Miles ZOLA, Ron Greene

Monday, 03/10

BOWL’Z BITEZ AND SPIRITZ (3217480), Open Mic J CALYPSOS (208-665-0591), Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills J RICO’S, Open Mic

Tuesday, 03/11

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, The Rub J THE BARTLETT, Open Mic BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn CLUB 412 (624-3629), The Lion Oh My FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills JOHN’S ALLEY, Open Mic JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Open-ness

GET LISTED!

Get your event listed in the paper and online by emailing getlisted@inlander. com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date. LION’S LAIR (456-5678), DJs Nobe and MJ NYNE, Dan Conrad & the Urban Achievers J THE PHAT HOUSE, Jon Hamar Quartet SPLASH, Bill Bozly THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB, DJ Q

Wednesday, 03/12

BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J CHAPS, Land of Voices with Dirk Swartz JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop Jazz LA ROSA CLUB, Jazz Jam with the Bob Beadling Group J MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR, Evan Denlinger J THE PHAT HOUSE, Experience Jazz Project, Open Mic RED ROOM LOUNGE, Likes Girls SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic THE VAULT SOCIAL CLUB, DJs Freaky Fred and MC Squared ZOLA, The Bucket List

Coming Up ...

JONES RADIATOR, Hillfolk Noir, Gregory Rawlins, March 13 CLUB 412, Raze the City, March 13 KNITTING FACTORY, EOTO, Wax 808, Brainfunk, March 13, 7 pm. J THE BARTLETT, Odesza (See story on facing page), Water Monster, March 13 THE HOP!, Protest the Hero, Battlecross, The Safety Fire, March 14

JOHN’S ALLEY, Left Coast Country, March 14 - 15 JONES RADIATOR, Left Over Soul, March 14 NECTAR TASTING ROOM, Tommy G, March 14 KNITTING FACTORY, Revolver Hottest Chicks in Hard Rock feat. Sick Puppies, Lacuna Coil, Eyes Set to Kill, Cilver, March 14 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE, Madeline McNeill, March 14 REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Hillfolk Noir, Gregory Rawlins, March 14 THE BARTLETT, The Hoot Hoots, March 14 BABY BAR, The Finns, Sea Giant, BIAS, Team Growl, March 14 LION’S LAIR, Von Grimorog, March 14 MOOTSY’S, Cursive Wires with guests, March 14 J THE HOP!, The Sword, O’ Brother, Big Business, March 15 JONES RADIATOR, Eclectic Approach, March 15 THE PEARL THEATER, Bridges Home, March 15 J THE BARTLETT, Hollow Wood, Dova (ft. members of Franklin), March 15 THE HIVE EVENT CENTER, Dumpstaphunk, March 15 J KNITTING FACTORY, Sammy Eubanks, The Border Patrol Band, Acuff & Sherfey, March 15 MOOTSY’S, The Ballantynes, The Echolarks, BIAS, The Spirit Animals, March 15 KNITTING FACTORY, T Pain, March 16 KNITTING FACTORY, Memphis May Fire, The Word Alive, A Skylit Drive, Hands Like Houses, Beartooth, March 18 CLUB 412, Dennis is Dead, March 18 THE BARTLETT, Tango Alpha Tango, Static Tones, March 19 KNITTING FACTORY, Railroad Earth, The Deadly Gentlemen, March 19 JOHN’S ALLEY, Tango Alpha Tango, March 20 THE BARTLETT, Cataldo, Mama Doll, March 20 THE HOP!, Being As An Ocean, A Lot Like Birds, My Iron Lung, Idle Hands, This Wild Life, March 21 KNITTING FACTORY, Helldorado CD Release feat. The Nixon Rodeo, Coming Alive, Evolved, March 21, NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Chicago, March 21 THE BARTLETT, Saintseneca, Vikesh Kapoor, Cold Mountain Yeti, March 21 HUCKLEBERRY’S NATURAL MARKET, Madeline McNeill, March 22 THE BARTLETT, Marshall McLean, Scott Ryan, Jeffrey Martin, March 22 MOOTSY’S, Bearcubbin, Belt of Vapor, The Lion Oh My, Drag Like Pull, March 22 WSU COMPTON UNION BUILDING, 9th Annual Battle of the Bands WSU, March 24, 6 pm. CLUB 412, Hallowed Earth, March 24 CHECKERBOARD BAR, Diamond Plate, East of the Wall, Odyssey, Abode for the Dead, March 25

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315 MARTINIS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208667-9660 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BUCER’S • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 CARR’S CORNER • 230 S. Washington St. • 474-1731 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208664-9463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 COLDWATER CREEK WINE BAR • 311 N. 1st Ave., Sandpoint • 208-263-6971 THE COUNTRY CLUB • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIRST STREET BAR • 122 E. First St., Deer Park • 276-2320 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GIBLIANO BROS. • 718 W. Riverside • 315-8765 THE GRAIL • 4720 E. Seltice Way, CdA • 208665-5882 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208883-7662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KELLY’S IRISH PUB • 726 N. Fourth St., CdA • 208-667-1717 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 642-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MEZZO PAZZO WINE BAR • 2718 E. 57th • 863-9313 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PACIFIC AVENUE PIZZA • 2001 W. Pacific Ave. • 624-0236 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 220 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 RICO’S PUB • 200 E. Main, Pullman • 332-6566 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 STUDIO K• 2810 E. 29th Ave. • 534-9317 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 THE VAULT • 120 N. Wall St. • 863-9597 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 THE WAVE • 525 W. First Ave. • 747-2023 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 55

Zuill Bailey YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

MUSIC NOTHING TO BACH AT

After a full week and a half of events, the Northwest Bach Festival continues through Sunday. Celebrating a composer who died more than 250 years ago may seem unimportant, but after experiencing the music live, it all becomes clear why. There’s plenty of Bach left to hear, with artistic director Zuill Bailey performing solo cello works Friday and Saturday. Pianist Lara Downes plays a mix of Bach to Brubeck Saturday at Barrister Winery. The Sunday performance concludes with a brand-new Bailey and Downes collaboration CD Release Party at the Luna Garden Room. Most of these events include opportunities to drink wine and/or champagne. — LAURA JOHNSON Northwest Bach Festival • Events scheduled through Sun, March 9 • $20-$50 • Locations vary • Full schedule of events at nwbachfest.com

56 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

THEATER TWISTED CONFESSIONS

FESTIVAL TRADITION AND KNISHES

Lilac City Performing Arts Presents Tape • Thu, March 6-Sat, March 8 at 7:30 pm • $10-$15 • Stage Left Theater • 108 W. Third • facebook.com/lilaccityperformingarts

73rd Annual Kosher Dinner • Sun, March 9, from 11 am-6 pm • $9$16 • Temple Beth Shalom • 1322 E. 30th • spokanetbs.org

Spokane’s two newest theater groups — Stage Left Theater and Lilac City Performing Arts — lately have presented a lineup of productions that not only entertain, but make us think a little harder about what unfolds on stage. Lilac City’s next feature, Tape, places audiences front and center in the lives of two now-adult high school friends. One is on his way to success as a filmmaker; the other is immersed in the dark world of drugs. Things take a twist when the drug pusher gets his successful friend to admit to date-raping a girl they both dated in high school — and he’s taped the confession. — CHEY SCOTT

Spokane’s annual kosher dinner began as a celebration of Jewish tradition, but it’s since become a tradition of its own. Now in its 73rd annual year, the kosher dinner predates Temple Beth Shalom itself, which formed in the 1960s when the old Keneseth Israel building was razed to make way for I-90. The program includes music and entertainment, but it’s the food — all prepared according to kosher standards — that can’t be found in this quantity at any other time in Spokane: tender beef brisket, soft challah bread, potato knishes, spiced apples, apricot kuchen and more. — LISA WAANANEN

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

VISUAL ART SEE, TASTE, HEAR

Spokane’s monthly arts celebration seems to grow larger each month, making it seem like quite the challenge to decide what to see and where to see it. Glancing at this month’s lineup, we noticed several new venues and artists mixed in with more established participants. But First Friday isn’t just about what you see — it’s also about what you hear and taste. Aside from live music, spoken word events are happening at Auntie’s, featuring Spokane Poetry Slam’s 3-Minute Mic, and the Holley-Mason Rocket Bakery, with readings by Whitworth students and staff (7-9 pm). Between venues, treat your sense of taste to a yummy snack at the returning First Friday Food Truck Rally on Wall between Main and Riverside (noon-8 pm) featuring the Bistro Box, Jamaican Jerk Pan and other local vendors. — CHEY SCOTT

think summer Take EWU with you | ewu.edu/summer

First Friday • Fri, March 7, most events from 5-8 pm • Free • Locations vary throughout Spokane • Event details and map at Inlander.com/FirstFriday

JAZZ THE PIANO MAN

You have to love all the artistic treasures lurking below the surface here in the Inland Northwest. One of them is Brent Edstrom, a masterful jazz pianist who’s earned a reputation as one of the finest ivory-ticklers in the region. This weekend at the Bing Crosby Theater, Edstrom’s trio (featuring bassist Eugene Jablonsky and drummer Rick Westrick) teams up with the big-bang power of the Spokane Jazz Orchestra to perform his latest original composition, entitled “Gumbo.” Edstrom and company also plan to hammer out some classics from jazz piano greats like Dave Brubeck, Oscar Peterson and Marian McPartland. — MIKE BOOKEY Spokane Jazz Orchestra feat. Brent Edstrom and the Brent Edstrom Trio • Sat, March 8, at 8 pm • $24-$26.50 • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • spokanejazz.org

MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 57

EVENTS | OPEN MIC

Monday

BENEFIT

ALL PERFORMERS | CAFÉ BODEGA, 504 Oak St., Sandpoint, 6:30 pm (3rd Wed)

MUSIC | CALYPSOS COFFEE, 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA, 6 pm (all-ages) MUSIC | RICO’S, 200 E. Main St., Pullman, 8:15 pm

Thursday

Tuesday

ALL PERFORMERS | JONES RADIATOR, 120 E. Sprague, 7:30 pm MUSIC | THE BARTLETT, 228 W. Sprague, 7 pm (all-ages; weekly except when shows scheduled)

Wednesday

EVENTS | CALENDAR

MUSIC | IRON HORSE, 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA, 9 pm (1st Wed) MUSIC | SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS, 117 N. Howard MUSIC | PHAT HOUSE, 417 S. Browne, 7 pm

MUSIC | ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, 20 N. Raymond Rd., Spokane Valley (except 1st Thu of month) MUSIC | MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE, 208 N. 4th Ave., Sandpoint, 6 pm MUSIC | O’SHAY’S, 313 Coeur d’Alene Lake Dr., CdA, 7 pm COMEDY | NEATO BURRITO, 827 W. First (2nd and 4th Thu)  Visit Inlander.com/events for complete listings.

HERMANAS SPOKANE FUNDRAISER Dinner and auction to benefit the organization’s efforts to build a library in a rural Salvadoran village. March 8, 5:30 pm. $10. The Community School, 1300 W. Knox. hermanasspokane.org (570-3094) WINE, STEIN & DINE Annual fundraiser gala benefiting the Post Falls Education Foundation, featuring wine, beer and food from 85+ area wineries, breweries and restaurants, silent auctions, raffle and more. March 8, 7-10 pm. $45-$60. Greyhound Park & Event Center, 5100 Riverbend Ave, Post Falls. pfefwsd.orf (208-661-1538) GIRL SCOUT COOKIE SALES Local Girl Scouts are accepting pre-orders for cookies through March 20. Find a local Girl Scout by calling or emailing cookies@ gsewni.org or at gscookiebiz.com. $4/ box (Wash.), $4.25/box (Idaho). gsewni. org (800-827-9478) DINE OUT FOR THE SCOTCHMAN PEAKS A benefit event to support the group’s efforts to keep this area wild and protected. March 12, 3:30-6:30 pm. Little Olive, 124 S. Second, Sandpoint. littleolivefood.com (208-597-7499) FIG TREE BENEFIT The organization celebrates 30 years serving Inland Northwest by hosting a breakfast or lunch buffet followed by inspirational speakers. March 12 at 7:15 am and March 13 at 11:45 am. Free, donations accepted. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone. (535-1813) TASTE SPOKANE 2014 Wishing Star Foundation’s 8th annual fundraiser features live music, food from acclaimed area restaurants/chefs and beverages

from regional wineries and breweries. March 14, 6-10 pm. $35-$100 (VIP). Northern Quest Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. tastespokane.com (744-3411) RYPIEN FOUNDATION WINEMAKERS’ DINNER Mark Rypien, Drew Bledsoe and Washington-based winemaker Chris Figgins host a gourmet dinner prepared by Masselow’s Chef Robert Rogers, paired with Walla Walla wines. The 10th annual fundraiser supports families of children battling cancer. March 15, 6 pm. Northern Quest, 100 N. Hayford Rd. (747-2424) YOUTH CAMP FUNDRAISER EVENT Silent and live auction paired with a Mexican dinner (chicken enchiladas, Spanish rice, toasted corn & black bean salad, dessert). March 15, 4:30 pm. Dinner $10/ adults, $5/kids 10 and under. Spokane Valley United Methodist Church, 115 N. Raymond Rd. (924-7262) CANINES ON THE CATWALK Dog couture fashion show with proceeds benefiting SpokAnimal, featuring adoptable pets, no-host bar, silent auction, raffle and more. March 21, 6 pm. $30-$35. Service Station, 9315 N. Nevada St. tinyurl. com/k9f3lpv (466-1696)

COMEDY

INK BLOT Improv comedy show inspired by audience interpretations of Rorschach-style ink blots. Suitable for general audiences. Fridays at 8 pm from March 7-28. $7-$9. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre. com (747-7045) NICK THEISEN Live comedy show. March 7-8 at 8 pm. $12. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market (483-7300)

OPEN MIC COMEDY Live stand-up comedy. Fridays at 8 pm. Free. Red Dragon Chinese, 1406 W. Third Ave. reddragondelivery.com (838-6688) SHORT STACKS The BDT Players & Friends try out new material, rework ideas, and share comedic talents in stand-up, sketch, music, film and more. First Fridays of the month at 10 pm. Not suitable for all ages. $5. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) LIVE COMEDY Live stand-up comedy shows. Sundays at 9 pm. Goodtymes, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070) ALL-AGES COMEDY OPEN MIC Held on the second and fourth Thursday of the month at 6 pm. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main Ave. (703-7223) BRIAN REGAN Live comedy show. March 13, 7:30 pm. $42.50-$49.50. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000) AUGGIE SMITH Live comedy show. March 14-15 at 8 pm. $12. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. (483-7300) THE ST. PADDY’S DADDYS OF COMEDY BASH St. Patrick’s Day-themed stand-up comedy featuring four acts. March 14, 9:45 pm. $10-$12. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (714-8386) GREG KETTNER & KEN MARTIN Live comedy show. March 21-22 at 8 pm. $12. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. (483-7300)

NOT JUST NEWS.

amazing

stories

“ONE LOVE,” MARCH 28, 2013

58 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

COMMUNITY

CHASE YOUTH AWARDS Each year the Chase Youth Commission honors local outstanding youth, teens and adults making a difference. March 6, 6-8 pm. Free and open to the public. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. chaseyouthspokane.org (822-7905) SCC INTERCULTURAL WEEK Annual cultural celebration featuring social enrichment activities, presentations, performances, food and more. March 3-7, daily programs held from 9:30 am-12:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. scc.spokane.edu (533-3948) WOMEN & CHILDREN’S FREE RESTAURANT VOLUNTEERS Volunteers are needed as prep cooks, servers, dishwashers, food platers and to work various other shifts Mon-Fri. Positions are weekly or biweekly, and a food handlers card is required. Submit a volunteer application online. wcfrspokane.org (324-1995) HEALTHCARE CONFERENCE Includes breakfast, a catered lunch, three speakers and a career fair to network with local healthcare job/internship opportunities. March 7, 8 am. Students/$15, public/$50, CEU/$22. Riverpoint Campus, 600 N. Riverpoint Blvd. (951-1128) FAMILY DANCE & POTLUCK Circle, line, contra and folk dancing with a community potluck at 6:30 pm. Dancing starts at 7 pm. March 7. Free. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. (533-9955) FINDING YOUR ANCESTORS “Tall Tales, Ghost Stories and Wacky Family History” class on preserving ancestor stories. March 8, 1-3 pm. Free. Hayden Library, 8385 N. Government Way. (208-7725612)

INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY Featuring a keynote presentation by Lobna Saeed, Whitworth Fulbright scholar from Cairo, Egypt, and activist workshops hosted by local women’s groups/nonprofits. March 8, 9:30 am-12:30 pm. Free. EWU Riverpoint Campus, 668 N. Riverpoint Blvd. (359-2898) PEACE & ECONOMIC JUSTICE ACTION CONFERENCE The 5th annual conference features workshops on issues of social justice and avenues for change with three sessions, a keynote speaker, breakfast, lunch and opportunities to connect with other local activists. March 8, 8 am-5 pm. $20-$45. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. pjals. org/2014conference (838-7870) PET SCIENCE SATURDAY Mobius and SpokAnimal host a day of learning all about our four-legged best friends, with hands-on activities, adoptable pets, a vaccine and microchip clinic and more. March 8, 11 am-4 pm. $7-$10. Mobius, 811 W. Main. spokanimal.org (321-7214) SPOKANE TRAIN SHOW Realistic landscape models featuring electric trains, hosted by the River City Modelers club. March 9, 9:30 am-3:30 pm. $6/adults, kids 12 and under free. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana St. rivercitymodelers.org (991-2317) FREE TAX PREP SITES Qualified professionals provide free assistance to residents earning less than $51,567 in 2013. Sites remain open until April 15. See site locations and schedules at unitedwayspokane.org. (358-3526) WOMEN & LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE The annual conference hosted by SCC is titled “Women of Color: The Struggles and the Triumphs.” March 13, 8 am-noon. Free and open to the public. Spokane

Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. scc.spokane.edu (533-8836) ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE Annual Irish-themed parade through downtown Spokane, hosted by the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick March 15, noon. Free. Downtown Spokane. friendlysonsofstpatrick.com FREE STATE PARK DAY Wash. State Parks & Rec allows access to all state parks without needing a Discovery Pass. Includes access to Riverside State Park and Mt. Spokane State Park. Spring “free” days on March 19, April 19 and 22 and May 11. More info at parks.wa.gov INSURANCE EXCHANGE WORKSHOP Learn about the new Washington Healthfinder insurance exchange, including how to compare health plans, determine financial assistance eligibility and more. March 19 from 6-8 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne. (893-8350)

FILM

AMERICAN HUSTLE Screening of the Oscar-nominated film. March 6-9, show times vary. Rated R. $6. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main, Moscow. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) GIRL RISING Screening hosted by the YMCA of Spokane of the documentary about injustices toward girls and women in countries around the world, and how education helped them overcome obstacles. March 6, 7 pm. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. tinyurl.com/ girlrisingymca WORDS OF MY PERFECT TEACHER Benefit screening hosted by Lama Lakshey Zangpo Rinpoch, born and educated at a monastery in Eastern Tibet. Mediterranean appetizers prepared by Sharo, host of The Persia Hour on KYRS. March

6, 6:30 pm. $20 suggested donation. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main Ave. tsintamani.org (235-8063) ELTON JOHN: THE MILLION DOLLAR PIANO Screening of a concert documentary of Elton John’s residency at The Colosseum at Caesars Palace in Las Vegas. March 18 and 26 at 7 pm, Regal Cinemas Riverstone (CdA) and Northtown. fathomevents.com (800-326-3264) TRAIL RUNNING FILM FESTIVAL Fulllength and short films showcasing the challenges, beauty and community inherent in the world of trail running. Also featuring live music by The Pine Hearts. March 19, 5 pm. $10. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main Ave. magiclanternspokane.com (360-870-4875)

FOOD & DRINK

TEA BLENDING CLASS Create a blend of loose leaf tea to take home while sampling various teas and herbs. Reservations required. March 6 at 6 pm and March 8 at 3 pm. $10/person; $15/ couple. Spice Traders Mercantile, 15614 E. Sprague. spicetradersmercantile.com (315-4036) BATTLE OF THE ANDES WINE TASTING Tasting class featuring wines from Chile and Argentina, two of the largest wineproducing countries in the world. March 7-8 at 7 pm. $20, reservations requested. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com (343-2253) GLOBAL CHEF NETHERLANDS Dutch Chef Immanuel Van de Fliert in residence as part of Sodexo’s global chef program prepares a lunch featuring authentic dishes from the Netherlands. March 7,

11:30 am. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne. whitworth.edu (777-3797) NO-LI BREWHOUSE TOURS See what goes on behind the scenes and how NoLi’s beer is made. Fridays at 4:30 pm. Free. No-Li Brewhouse, 1003 E. Trent Ave. nolibrewhouse.com (242-2739) PIZZARIA PIZZA AT HOME Chef Laurie Faloon leads a class in making artisanstyle pizza at home, including the best dough methods, sauce recipes and more. Class offered March 7 and 8 from 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. incaafterdark. scc.spokane.edu (533-8141) SELKIRK ABBEY BEER DINNER Fivecourse dinner featuring beer pairings from Post Falls brewery Selkirk Abbey. March 7, 6-10 pm. $55/person. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. thelincolncenterspokane.com (327-8000) VINO! WINE TASTING Friday (March 7) tasting features wine of the month club selections from 3-6:30 pm, Saturday (March 8) features obscure varietals from around the world from 2-4:30 pm. $10$15. Vino!, 222 S. Washington St. vinowine.com (838-1229) CHICKS IN THE CITY The U of Idaho Master Gardeners hosts a presentation on raising backyard hens and the rules and regulations mandated by Kootenai County. Registration required. March 8, 1-3 pm. $10. University of Idaho Kootenai County Extension, 1808 N. Third, CdA. (208-446-1680) THE ELK 15-YEAR BIRTHDAY BASH Featuring a 3-year vertical of Deschutes Abyss kegs and music by Lavoy at 9 pm. March 8, 7 pm. The Elk Public House, 1931 W. Pacific Ave. tinyurl.com/elkbday (3631973)

MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 59

RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess WHEN HARRY MET HAIRY

AMY ALKON

My girlfriend of six months just stopped shaving her legs and armpits. I think she is so sexy — except for this. Recently, I asked her whether she’d shave again, and she snapped that shaving is time-consuming and the idea that women should remove their body hair comes from anti-feminist propaganda. I don’t know about that. I just like seeing female legs and armpits without a bunch of dark furry hair cover. Do I get to ask again? —In The Thick Of It

It’s great when your girlfriend reminds you of somebody exotic out of the movies — when that somebody is Mila Kunis or Eva Mendes, not Chewbacca. As for your girlfriend’s notion that the defurred look traces to “anti-feminist propaganda,” way back before there was Cosmo, there was Ovid, the Roman poet, advising women looking for love: “Let no rude goat find his way beneath your arms” (don’t let your underarms get stanky like a goat), “and let not your legs be rough with bristling hair.” Archeological evidence (including hair-scraping stones and an impressive set of Bronze Age tweezers) suggests that women — and often men — have been shaving, depilating, and yanking out body hair since at least 7,000 B.C. In the early 1500s, Michelangelo sculpted David (who would have been a hairy Middle Eastern dude, looking more Borat than baby’s bottom), making him look like he was too busy spending three weeks at the waxer to slay Goliath. And these days, male bodybuilders also remove their body hair, lest their admirers have to peer through the hair sweater to find the pecs and abs. You, likewise, would just like to see your girlfriend’s legs without having to send your eyeballs off on a search party through Furwood Forest. (You must look back fondly on the days when you could picture her naked without first giving her a mental bath in a vat of Nair.) Is there a double standard at play here? Sure there is — if you’d shave a Fidel Castro beard to be more attractive to her but she refuses to shave her Fidel Castro legs. Let her know that you aren’t looking to turn her into a razor slave of the patriarchy — you’re just trying to keep your sex life (and, in turn, your relationship) alive — and ask whether there’s anything you could do to be more manhunky for her. This is just what you’re supposed to do in a relationship — make that extra effort to please your partner, even if it takes, oh, five minutes every few days to run a razor over your legs and pits. She can still rebel against the patriarchy in other ways, like by going around in snarky T-shirts and blogging about how leg shaving is an obvious plot to keep women in the shower and out of the House of Representatives. The bottom line, for you and many other men, is that it’s really sexy to run your hand through a woman’s hair — just not the hair on her ankles.

DIAL ANOTHER DAY

Is it really that inappropriate to give a girl your number instead of asking for hers? I met a cool girl at the gym. We really seemed to hit it off, and I asked whether we could get a drink sometime. She said yes, and I said, “Here, I’ll give you my number.” She said, “Um, don’t you want my number?” Well, I just offered her mine because she had her phone with her and mine was in the locker room, but apparently she was offended. Really? Who cares? —Hung Up On An Issue Giving this woman your number and expecting her to call you is like the lion saying to the gazelle, “Would you mind coming over here and killing yourself, and then I’ll eat you?” For millions of years, there’s been a natural order of things and it involves men chasing women, and it hasn’t heard of Gloria Steinem and doesn’t care that your phone is in the locker room. Sure, women these days may sometimes pursue men, but when you want a woman, do you really want to walk away without her phone number and hope she’ll call — which most women won’t do? Also, chances are, expecting a woman to call you comes off a little insulting — telling her you’re interested in her, just not interested enough to lift a finger and touch it to phone buttons 10 times. In other words, the thing to do was to toddle off and get a writing implement and a scrap of paper so you could take down this woman’s number and call her, not try to rewrite male and female psychology and dating practices for your convenience: “Great meeting you! I’ll just be sitting home painting my toenails and waiting for the phone to ring.” n ©2014, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

60 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

EVENTS | CALENDAR WINEMAKER DINNER Hosted by Walla Walla-based Sleight of Hand winery’s Winemaker Trey Busch, featuring a sixcourse dinner paired with five wines. March 8, 6 pm. $100. Beverly’s, 115 S. Second, CdA. (800-688-4142) 73RD ANNUAL KOSHER DINNER Jewish cultural celebration, featuring authentic food, music, live entertainment, handmade items for sale and more. March 9, from 11 am-6 pm. $14-$16/ adults, $7-$9/children 11 and under. Temple Beth Shalom, 1322 E. 30th Ave. facebook.com/KosherDinner (747-3304) SPECIALTY DESSERTS Cooking class on European-inspired desserts, including German and Italian confections. March 9, 3-5 pm. $45/person. 315 Martinis and Tapas, 315 Wallace Ave. 315martinisandtapas.com (208-667-9660) COOKING WITH MEXICAN CHILES Chef Lynne Wiedemann leads a class on using dried chiles to make sauces, rubs and more. March 10, 6-8 pm. $45. 315 Martinis and Tapas, 315 Wallace Ave. cookwithus.com (208-667-9660) HEARTY STEWS Chef Joshua Martin leads a course on making several types of stew, and also covers the best methods for freezing and pairing other foods with slow-cooked stews. March 11, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. incaafterdark.scc.spokane.edu (533-8141) CHEESE TASTING CLASS Taste eight cheeses while learning how cheese is made; the six different types of cheese and how to identify them; storing and cheese care and more. March 14, 7 pm. $20. Chocolate Apothecary, 621 W. Mallon Ave. (324-2424) OREGON WINE TRAIL Class sampling a wide range of wines from Oregon, including sparkling wines, Pinot Gris, Blanc, Noir and more. March 14, 7 pm. $20, reservations requested. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) VINO! WINE TASTING Friday (March 14) features Sonoris Wines ($10) from 3-6:30 pm, and Saturday (March 15) features Charles Smith, Ghost of 413 and Novelty Hill, from 2-4:30 pm ($10). Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington St. vinowine.com (838-1229) GLUTEN-FREE BEER TASTING Sample several varieties of gluten-free brews. Reservations suggested. March 15, 3 pm. $10. Spice Traders Mercantile, 15614 E. Sprague. (315-4036) GRANDE RONDE GOURMET DINNER CLUB “The Roman Dinner” featuring four courses. By registration only. March 15. $25/person. Grande Ronde Cellars, 906 W. Second Ave. granderondecellars.com (455-8161)

MUSIC

NORTHWEST BACH FESTIVAL The 36th Annual classical music festival, led by new artistic director Zuill Bailey, features concerts in historic Spokane venues, renowned guest musicians, the new film classics series and other special events. Full schedule of events online, runs through March 9. $20+; some events free. nwbachfest.com (924-1132) RISE UP SINGING Kick off event for PJAL’s 5th Annual Action Conference feat. music by Jimmy Nuge, Lucas Brookbank Brown, Kaylee Cobb, Dom Felix and Bobby Kirl. Spokane word performances by Giovanni Aceves and Taylor Malone. Includes light refreshments. March 7, 6-8:30 pm. Free. Unitarian Universalist Church,

4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. pjals. org/2014conference (838-7870) CELTIC NOTS Traditional Irish music concert featuring step dancing by the Turner Sisters, hosted by the Pend Oreille Players and Ethnic Heritage Council. March 8, 7 pm. $5. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave., Newport. pendoreilleplayers.org (208-306-1181) LEON ATKINSON Concert by the internationally-acclaimed classical guitarist. March 8, 7 pm. $14-$15. The Pearl Theater, 7160 Ash St., Bonners Ferry, Idaho. thepearltheater.org (208-610-2846) PIRATES OF PENZANCE Dinner concert performance featuring a threecourse dinner and live and silent auctions, hosted by Lake City Playhouse. March 8, 7 pm. $35-$40. Faith Ministries Church, 5073 E. 16th Ave., Post Falls (208-667-1323) SPOKANE AREA YOUTH CHOIR Concert featuring music from around the world. All choirs are joined by musical guests the Franklin Elementary Marimba Ensemble. March 8, 1 pm. $5. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. SAYChoirs.org (627-7992) SPOKANE JAZZ ORCHESTRA FEAT. BRENT EDSTROM “The Piano Man” concert featuring Spokane’s Brent Edstrom, paying homage to legends of jazz piano. Also featuring Eugene Jablonsky on bass and Rick Westrick on drums, local youth musicians and the Spokane Jazz Orchestra. March 8, 8 pm. $24-$26.50. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. spokanejazz.org (435-1007) SPOKANE SYMPHONY SuperPops No. 5: “Jerome Kern Tribute with Show Boat” conducted by Morihiko Nakahara and featuring stars from the Tony award-winning musical. March 8, 8-10 pm. $26+. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) ST. PATRICK’S DAY CELEBRATION Fundraiser concert benefiting Holy Names Music Center, featuring live music by Free Whiskey and Broken Whistle. March 9, 4-9 pm. O’Doherty’s Irish Grille, 525 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. odohertyspub.com (326-9516) SFCC COMMUNITY CONCERT BAND Concert directed by music instructor Karl Mote. March 10, 7 pm. Shadle Park High School, 4327 N. Ash St. sfcc.edu CALADH NUA Traditional Irish music. March 12, 7:30 pm. $10-$20. Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, WSU Pullman. wsu. edu/performingarts (335-8522) CDA SYMPHONY Concert by the Coeur d’Alene Symphony, featuring winners of the National Young Artist’s Contest. March 14 at 7:30 pm and March 15 at 2 pm. $8-$20. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. kroccda.org (208-765-3833) BRIDGES HOME Celtic music performed by Tami and Dave Gunther. March 15, 7 pm. $10. The Pearl Theater, 7160 Ash St., Bonners Ferry, Idaho. thepearltheater.org (208-610-5907) SPOKANE SYMPHONY Classics Series 8: Enchanted by Mozart, conducted by Morihiko Nakahara, and featuring guest violinist Sayaka, Shoji. March 15 at 8 pm and March 16 at 3 pm. $15-$54. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. (624-1200)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS TRIATHLON BASICS Class on the ins and outs of triathlons, including dif-

ferent types/distances and how to get started with training. March 6, 7 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/ spokane (328-9900) WIAA HARDWOOD CLASSICS 1B & 2B State basketball competition for girls and boys 1B and 2B teams. March 6-8, game times vary. $12-$28. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanearena.com SCHWEITZER MT. VERTICAL EXPRESS 30th annual skiing benefit event for Can Do MS, a national nonprofit and provider of lifestyle empowerment programs to help families living with MS. March 7-8. $25. Schweitzer Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd. schweitzer. com (800-367-3101; ext. 1271) BEGINNING BIRD WATCHING Hosted by Friends of Turnbull and Spokane Audubon Society, classes held on Saturdays, March 8, April 5, May 3, June 7 and July 12, from 9-11 am. $5/person; $10/family, pre-registration required. Turnbull National Wildlife Refuge, 26010 S. Smith Rd., Cheney. fws.gov/ refuge/turnbull (448-0659) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS Ping-pong club meets Mon and Wed from 7-9:30 pm; Sat from 1-4 pm. $2. North Park Racquet Club, 8121 N. Division St. spokanetabletennis.com (768-1780) SPOKANE BADMINTON CLUB Meets Sun from 4:30-7 pm and Wed from 7-10 pm. $6/visit. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt St. wccc.myspokane.net (448-5694) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS CLUB Pingpong club meets Wed from 6:30-9 pm and Sun from 1:30-4 pm. $2/visit. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. sssac.org (456-3581) BACKPACK SCHOOL Registration now open for the Spokane Mountaineers’ 2014 Backpack School; deadline March 21. See website for more details. Class begins on March 28, and ends May 2426. $40. spokanemountaineers.org BACKPACKING BASICS Overview on planning, preparation and the gear needed for a backpacking trip. March 13, 7 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe. (328-9900) BLOOMSDAY TRAINING CLINICS Weekly sessions progress in distance each week, starting with 1 mile and ending with a full 7-mile run. Each session begins with an expert presentation. Water stations and first aid stations provided. Saturdays at 8:30 am, March 15-April 26. Free. SFCC, 3410 W. Ft. George Wright Dr. phc.org (747-3081) JAM 4 CANS CHARITY RAIL JAM Ski and snowboard competition to collect food and raise money for local food banks. Event includes prize giveaways, raffle, food, sledding and more. March 15, 7 pm. 15 cans of food for riders, spectators free. At Summit Northwest Ministries, 1486 West Seltice Way, Post Falls. (208-7735950) SPOKANE SHOCK Arena football game vs. the Iowa Barnstormers. March 15, 7 pm. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (242-7462)

THEATER

BARRYMORE Starring Patrick Treadway as John Barrymore in the Broadway production by William Luce. Through March 15, Wed-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm, except March 7 at 6:30 pm; also Sat. March 8 and 15 at 2 pm. $12$28. Interplayers Theatre, 174 S. Howard St. interplayerstheatre.org (455-7529)

THE BIG FIVE-OH Comedy following a newly-turned-50 man. Through March 16, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $8-$12. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway Ave. (342-2055) COMPLEAT FEMALE STAGE BEAUTY Play by Jeffrey Thatcher, about the 17th Century London theater scene, presented by the SFCC Revelers. March 6-16, ThursSat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10 suggested donation. SFCC, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3222) LILAC CITY PERFORMING ARTS PRESENTS “TAPE” The nonprofit arts group hosts its second performance, a play which examines the topic of sexual violence and individual perceptions of events. March 6-8 at 7 pm. $10-$15. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third. facebook. com/lilaccityperformingarts THE MOUSETRAP Stage adaptation of the Agatha Christie murder-mystery. Through March 16, Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $18-$25. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) NOISES OFF Comedy performed by LC Drama students. March 6-8 at 7 pm. $10. Lewis and Clark High School, 521 W. Fourth Ave. tigerdrama.com (354-7000) PAINTING CHURCHES Comedy, performed by the Jacklin Theater Troupe, directed by Heath Bingman. March 6-16, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10$15. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St., Post Falls. jacklincenter.org (208-457-8950) WIT Performance of the Pulitzer Prizewinning drama about an English professor’s self-revealing battle with terminal ovarian cancer. Through March 9, Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $11-$17. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. lakecityplayhouse.org (208-667-1323) ASYLUM Encore performance of the drama production about eight people living in an asylum. March 7, 7 pm. $8-$10. Theater Arts for Children, 2114 N. Pines, Ste. 3S. (892-5413) JOSEPH & THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT Performed by 72 local children enrolled in theater arts classes with CYT-North Idaho. Through March 9, Fri-Sat at 7 pm, Sat-Sun at 3 pm. $8-$14. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. cytnorthidaho.org (208-277-5727) MACBETH Performance of the Shakespeare tragedy by the EWU Theatre Dept. March 7-15, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. Also March 13 at 5 pm. $10. EWU, 526 Fifth St, Cheney. (359-2459) PRIDE AND PREJUDICE Performance of Jane Austen’s famous novel, directed by Brooke Kiener. March 7-15, Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm and Sun, March 9 at 2 pm. $6-$8. Whitworth Cowles Auditorium, 300 W. Hawthorne. whitworth.edu/theatretickets (777-3707) THE SURVIVOR: A HOLOCAUST PLAY Performed by the Rogers High School Theater Dept. March 7-8, 13-15 at 7 pm. $5-$7. Rogers HS, 1622 E. Wellesley. (354-6551) PEANUTS ON PARADE Featuring a collection of classic Peanuts vignettes and musical numbers, performed by 18 children from the Palouse area. March 8 at 1:30 pm and 7 pm, March 9 at 1:30 pm. $5-$8. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N. Grand, Pullman. rtoptheatre.org (334-0750) THE WEDDING SINGER: THE MUSICAL Musical comedy stage adaptation of the 80s film, performed by East Valley drama students. March 13-15 at 7 pm, also March

15 at 2 pm. $8-$10. East Valley HS, 15711 W. Wellesley Ave. (927-3200) SUDS 1960s musical soap opera. March 14-April 13, Thurs-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. In the Firth J. Chew Studio Theatre. $27. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507)

VISUAL ARTS

FIRST FRIDAY Local galleries and businesses display new artwork for the month. March 7, most artist receptions from 5-8 pm. Locations throughout Spokane. Map and event details at Inlander. com/FirstFriday FETISH OF THE MIND A series of composite photos by SFCC photography instructor Erik Sohner. Through March 28, open Mon-Fri. Free. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (533-3832) SHARON AUGUSTA & JENNIFER BOWMAN The two Island International artist are featured through March 29. Gallery hours Tues-Fri 10 am-5 pm, Sat 10 am-2 pm. Free. Pacific Flyway Gallery, 409 S. Dishman Mica Rd. pacificflywaygallery. blogspot.com (747-0812) SPRING IS SPRUNG Featuring work by local artists in all media, inspired by the spring season. Runs March 6-31, gallery open daily. Art Works, 214 N. First Ave. sandpointartworks.com (208-263-2642) BEST OF THE BASEMENT This annual show features favorites from the gallery’s basement inventory of 850+ works by more than 50 local and regional artists. March 14-April 5, opening reception March 14 from 5-8 pm. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. (208-765-6006)

WORDS

AUTHOR MAKIIA LUCIER The author signs copies of her novel “A Death-Struck Year” based on the Spanish influenza outbreak in 1918-19. March 6, 5:30-7:30 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. (208-882-2669) AUTHOR SUSAN ELAINE FLEMING Presentation by the author of the historical account of Alice Ada Wood Ellis, a pioneer midwife-nurse during the AlaskaYukon-Klondike Gold Rush Stampede. March 6, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) GROWING A GARDEN CITY Jeremy N. Smith, author of “Growing a Garden City,” presents on creating positive change through local food, farms, and gardens. March 6, 6:30 pm. Free. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. tieg.org (535-8434) 3 MINUTE MIC Monthly poetry open mic, featuring “Remember the Word” poet Laura Read, reading poetry by Elizabeth Bishop, among others. Hosted by Isaac Grambo of Spokane Poetry Slam. March 7, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) FISHNAUTS: A NASA STORY Lecture by Ed Galindo, of the University of Idaho’s Near Space engineering program. Also featuring a display of student created high-altitude scientific balloon program. March 7, 5 pm. Free and open to the public. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu (208-769-3355) AUTHOR MARY CRONK FARRELL The author discusses and reads from her new book “Pure Grit: How American World War II Nurses Survived Battle and Prison Camp in the Pacific.” March 8, 2 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206)

AUTHOR PETER STARK Stark reads from his most recent book, “Astoria: John Jacob Astor and Thomas Jefferson’s Lost Pacific Empire; a Story of Wealth, Ambition and Survival.” March 8, noon. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (359-6447) THE WORDWRIGHT’S WORKSHOP Workshops hosted by Spokane Poetry Slam, held on the second Saturday of the month and focus on writing, performance quality, and more. March 8 at 4:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. (838-0206) SPOKANE STORYTELLING LEAGUE The local group meets monthly (2nd Tuesday from 7-8:30 pm, Sept-June) for storytelling for both entertainment and instruction. Free. Corbin Senior Center, 827 W. Cleveland Ave. (467-5703 or 466-8672) AUTHOR DIANE RAPTOSH The author reads from and signs copies of her recent book “American Amnesiac.” March 12, 7:30 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. (208-882-2669) SPIRIT OF SURVIVAL “A Five Generation Story of Healing Historical Trauma” presented by Robbie Paul, a Nez Perce tribal member. March 12, 2-3:30 pm. Free. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu (208-665-5077) AUTHOR ANN PELO The teacher/educator presents from her latest book “The Goodness of Rain: Developing an Ecological Identity in Young Children.” March 13, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206)

ETC.

SPOCODE HACKATHON 24-hour programming marathon using Raspberry Pi and Arduinos micro-controllers to create automated projects. March 6 at 6 pm through March 8 at 5:30 pm. $5-$20. Spokane Entrepreneurial Center (Buchanan Building), 28 W. Third. spocode.org SPRING ARTS & CRAFTS SHOW 36th annual arts and craft vendor fair, featuring 300+ vendors. March 7-9, Fri 10 am-8 pm, Sat 10 am-6 pm, Sun 10 am-4 pm. $7 (good all weekend), kids 12 and under free. Spokane County Fair & Expo Center, 404 N. Havana. custershows.com 2014 AAF SPOKANE ADDY AWARDS The Addy Awards and Gala features drinks, appetizers and a 1920s-inspired theme. March 8, 5 pm. $45-$55. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. aafspokane.com DOWNLOADING E-BOOKS Class on downloading library books to read on a smartphone, tablet or eReader device. March 8, 2-4 pm. Free. Hillyard Library, 4005 N. Cook St. (444-5380) MOVIN’ & GROOVIN’ FAIR Screenings for glucose and cholesterol levels, in addition to local vendor booths and more. March 8, 8 am. Free. Corbin Senior Center, 827 W. Cleveland Ave. (327-1584) BABY FAIR 2014 Vendors, information and more. March 9, 11 am-4 pm. $5 admission. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanecenter.com CHAMPION AND HISTORIC TREES Master Gardener and tree expert Ed Lester presents on notable and historic trees in our region. March 11, 7 pm. Free. Inland Northwest Land Trust, 35 W. Main Ave. tinyurl.com/edlester (328-2929) TED TALK DISCUSSION Weekly discussion group on TED talks. Meets Wednesdays at 5:30 pm. Free. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main. chatham@labaratoryspokane.com n

MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 61 Interplayers_022014_4S_EW_NEW.tif

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64 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

I Saw You

I Saw You

I Saw You

Cheers

Laser Babe I saw you at laser quest and I think you’re a major babe. When you shot me with your laser it felt soooooo good. Maybe we can go play mini golf or go snowboarding and hit some trees and lose a phone. You are the prettiest squirrel in the land. You can find me at Bumpers or Wonderland Golf & Games

the 26 bus in the morning on my way to class at Whitworth. You: blonde hair girl with some blue hair in the back. You typically get on around the apartments by the Fred Meyers around 7:30 am. I am the 21 year old guy you always smile at. If you would like to get talk sometime or get a drink

Pai Gow, in the non-smoking area me playing Blackjack across the pit from you. Yes I admit I was staring at times. But you are so pretty. Our eyes meet. We look shyly away several times. Then we lock our eyes on each other and we don’t look away. We both smile. Said to myself if she is done before me, I’m going to go stop her and talk. Got distracted playing hadn’t looked for a bit. I look up and you were gone! I walked through the casino looking for you but no luck. My luck was at the blackjack table. But I would have liked to be lucky enough to talk to you. If you feel you experienced the same, lets talk. blueskies00652@yahoo.com.

it for you through the Inlander!). Feeling cared for by the people you work with is one of the hundreds of reasons why I love working for this company! Sincerely, your grateful crew member.

Tall, Dark and Hairy You: tall dark and shirt was unbuttoned with a fabulous chest of hair, sitting with a loud obnoxious group in the Maxx lounge on February 25th. Me: tall bruntette, sitting with my friend having drinks. I could tell you wanted to say something but just didn’t want to be too obvious with your work buddies? sitting right there. Wish we could have stayed longer so I could get you alone and see what else is under that shirt. Hope to see you there again. In My Dreams I see you, every night in my dreams. You’re wanted every day. I’m right here waiting, seemingly invisible to every one but you. I don’t know how tall you are or what you look like. But you have a heart that beats true for only me. A personality that can make me laugh through the tears, and a touch that makes me tremble with desire. You’re willing to kill spiders or take the trash out. Will watch movies with me or spend the night dancing. You must like children as I have two. We can discuss more. Position applying for: Husband. hubandwanted@gmail.com You Almost Killed Me. Shame. Well, I’m a bit perturbed to say the least. It’s been twice, now, that you’ve just about ended my life. The first time I was just minding my own business on the freeway when you drove by in a white Caliber. You were so freaking beautiful I forgot to breathe for a solid three minutes and was just about to pass out before I realized what was going on. The second time I was in Bakery by the Lake in CDA when I saw you reading a Bible. Not just any Bible the Amplified Bible. Lord, help me, I literally soiled myself right in the middle of the cafe, and dang it if I didn’t come THIS close to a cerebral hemmorage before I got my tasty drank. You’re irresponsibly lovely. Please disfigure your face and set your incredible dark hair on fire. Crane Man I see you every day in the steel shed at work, bouncing nimbly bimbly like from stack to stack like a graceful antelope. You spin brodies in your girl car and I long to ride with you. Your coveralls and bifocal safety glasses get me every time. Maybe I can get you sometime?

Sunset in CdA, Mid-January. I enjoyed hanging out with you, Bob the electrician, while out with my former coworkers. I know we were kind of razzing you for resembling Weird Al, but I always liked Weird Al. I’d like to show you the video clip my friend accidentally shot. Meet for coffee? Grocery Outlet On Sprague (classy, I know) March 2nd. You: ac/dc beanie, adorable daughter, lip ring. Your daughter wanted something and you said you had ice cream at home and kissed her forehead, adorable. Me: blonde next to you in line, caught a couple looks but was too flustered with you, and 2 carts of groceries to say anything. Single? Get back to me on here with an email. Growin Organic Damn! You’re a lot of fun to hang out with. Gorgeous, intelligent, unique, nerdy and a passion to teach are a few of the qualities that catch the eye. You’re knowledge about random and

TO CONNECT

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo.com” — not “j.smith@comcast.net.” interesting facts make it fun to talk to and it’s hard not to fall into the tranquility of your amazing eyes. Been having fun hangin’ with you and am interested to see where it goes. Riverpark Square You were wearing a gray shirt, I was the blond wearing far too much red, you took a chance and asked me for thirty seconds of my time, after making a very persuasive case on your behalf you asked me to take your hand if I was interested or to blink three times and I would never have to see you again, I was already running late for a prior obligation so I opted out by apologizing and saying I had to go. I wanted to thank you for taking a chance on me, it absolutely made my night, I would like to take you up on your offer of getting to know each other by “asking meaningful questions” over coffee sometime. secondchance753@yahoo.com.

Cheers Doctor Aeschliman A BIG cheers to Doctor Aeschliman and his staff! My faulty/fused dental implant was a huge pain to not only me...but you as well! I thank you for going above and beyond to help fix this catastrophe in my mouth and not charging me. I will recommend you to everyone who needs an oral surgeon! Dot! I love you my friend, you make me look forward to each new day with you in my life. I fall asleep every night looking forward to waking up and seeing you first thing in the morning. I fall in love more every day with you and our life together as a family, our boy adores you and so do I. You are our hero my love and we are so proud of you. Love always, Moo To All The Good People I made a jeer recently, but I have to remember the good people out there. Despite all of the jerks who are around us that ruin our days and makes us cynical about life, I just want to say cheers to people who are nice, respectful, and who don’t walk around with a sense of entitlement. You help with preventing the world from completely falling apart. And while it may seem that it’s not worth it, remember that paying it forward goes a long way and will be more rewarding in the long run. Thank you. The Mystery Trader Joes Window Scraper For the anonymous Trader Joes crew member who takes the time after his/her shift late at night to scrape snow off of ALL of your co-workers windows.... Triple Cheers to you my friend. After a long 8 hour shift, the last thing you want to do after midnight is be cleaning snow off your car in the freezing cold. Your kind and selfless gesture speaks volumes and does not go unnoticed. The fact that you do this while nobody is watching proves that you’re doing this out of pure kindness and not for the praise (so I will do

Happy 50th Birthday My Love! Ricky: Happy BIG 50 my handsome Prince Charming!! You are the greatest husband on earth! We have been together through thick and thin in the last 28 years! I love you more than words can say..... as our wedding song says “Always and Forever”! I am the luckiest woman in the world! I love you so much! It’s nice to know that you finally caught up with the rest of us! You rock my world! I love you! Love Lucy! So Proud Of You Again! Angela M. You always amaze me. A new job. You always work so hard and it pays off. Great job! So proud of the woman you have become. Not only beautiful, but super smart! Good luck at your new job! I Love you. MOM and Byron Very Impressed You, Kim, was a witness to a truck smashing into this poor ladies brand new car, on Mission and Green by SCC. Me, the smasher, with my son, pulled over and waited for the joys of facing up to my big mess up. Luckily no one was hurt, but what was really cool is that you stayed with the victim the entire time and made sure she was not gonna get screwed over. The situation could have easily esculated, but somehow you were able to be firm with me and tender with her and I believe your presence was amazing. It’s hard to explain but you took charge and calmed us all and took care to make sure everything was taken care of legally and proper and the thing is, you didn’t have to. Thank you. You are a special kind of person. Pay it Forward! To the lady in front of me in the drive-thru of the Shadle McDonalds on Tuesday, February 18th who purchased my meal for no other reason than to make my day. I don’t know who you are and I don’t think that you know me, but your random act of kindness completely made my otherwise lousy day one to remember! I did not get a chance to thank you, so I hope you read this and know that you have inspired me to commit the same random act upon someone else in the future. Thank you for the meal and the inspiration!

My Heroes On 3/2/14 Cheers and thank you to the two kind gentleman who helped me out on Sunday night March 2nd. I had just slid off the Maple freeway exit into the wall and you gallantly stopped by to help me. Not only Blonde With Blue Hair On The 26 Northern Quest Casino Thursday did you stop, get out, and help Bus I see you almost every day on night, February 27th. You playing “I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

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Thrift Store Cheers

Jeers

Jeers

me back up into traffic, but you followed me until we could safely stop and used your truck to pull my bent bumper out from piercing my wheel. You both helped this sobbing girl through what could’ve been a horrific ordeal. I cannot thank you enough for the kindness you showed this stranger on a dark and snowy night. From The Girl in the Pink Beanie and Green Truck

Killing NorthTown Mall Why are you trying to kill the mall? No one wants to go see spas and offices. Why did you close down local stores like Atmosphere, the flag store that raises money for wounded Vets? You even killed Arby’s. Bring back local stores!

seconds it takes you to drive by surely provided you with enough information to report this dasterdly deed. You must have overlooked the possibilty of us putting her on her runner to go to the bathroom due to our dark demeanor. Perhaps I will turn my life around and report the people walking out of the store with carts because surely they are going to steal them.

To My Husband I just wanted to let you know I love you with all my heart and would do anything for you, even go to the ends of the Earth! I know things are tough right now, but we are strong and will make it through! I know you have a long road of recovery ahead of you and I will be beside you all the way!! I love you. Love your lulu! Yoga Pants Cheers to yoga pants and the women who wear them! Thank you for making the world better. Thank You! Cheers to the nice girl and “born-in-Montana” guy who ran up that steep hill to help get our car unstuck! Thank yoou!

Jeers Sensitive driver on Montgomery Jeers to the ultra-sensitive driver who flipped me off because he couldn’t handle being passed. You were driving a maroon Ford sedan in Spokane Valley, on Montgomery around 4:40, February 26th. You were driving 30 mph in a 35 zone and I decided to pass you. That was when you started speeding up to not let me pass. Once I passed you, you flipped me off twice when I looked in the rear view mirror. You’re such a huge baby, you know that? I don’t care if you drive slow, but at least give others a chance to let them pass and get it over with, instead of being a passiveaggressive f@%# that you are. Thanks for making my day worse, asshole.

Bitter Old Man Jeers to the bitter old man outside of the Nevada Albertsons who rudely commented “If you are this lazy when you’re young, imagine how you are going to be when you’re older.” I would like to clear a few things up. First of all I had fallen in the snow 6 times that day, This is why the driver (My grandmother) parked closer to the building. It was all in attempt to keep fall number 7 from happening. If you were referring to my cart and its lack of items, and had the audacity to look closer you would have found three half racks of soda and a bag. In case if you’ve never tried it tends to be a little difficult to carry all of these items with the two hands provided. I found your comment very offensive. Didn’t your mommy ever tell you if you don’t have anything nice to say don’t say anything at all? I’m sorry to say sometime other peoples needs come before your own. Customer Service Jeers to the guy working the till every Saturday morning when I come in, with the red hair. This local vegan bakery has the most amazing food, only downfall is the jerk who works the front. I’ve heard you bully people you work with and every time I have came in, you haven’t failed to be rude and it’s not only to me, See Me! but to every customer. Work in the back and do dishes with that attitude!

RE: Spineless Crime Victims As I read your jeers I was wondering if you had ever been a victim of a crime, seen sometime committing one, or ever put your own life on the line for another person being assaulted? Because out of all those that I just mentioned, only 1 justifies you taking physical action beyond giving information/evidence to a law enforcement officer. Or using deadly force. That’s in the protection of your own life our that of another person. NOT for inanimate objects or the almighty dollar. I worked in more than one convienance (sic) store. I’ve been robbed at gunpoint (I saw the gun), and was unfortunate enough to witness a women bring stabbed to death by her ex-husband as her body blocked the only exit out of my store. Guess which one haunts me? Guess which one I would have given everything to change the outcome, my life included? You sound like you got a big set bud but I think I could lay real good odds on how many crimes you ever witnessed much less been a victim. My life is worth more than objects, that’s what insurance is for and I’d never endanger someone else because of a missed shot. You not happy with the police, become one, and see how easy it is. You wouldn’t last a week.

C A R N E

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of my family and reported us to SCRAPS for having our dog on her run line. Obviously we put her out there so that she could starve and die in the freezing cold. The 60

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MARCH 6, 2013 INLANDER 65

Inlander Abroad

Inlander onstage at Rock in Celebes music festival last December in Makassar, Indonesia.

HENDISGORGE PHOTO

In Indonesia, the word “Inlander” has a very different history and significance BY LISA WAANANEN

A

black mask covering his head to symbolize tweets written by Indonesians. anonymity, the frontman steps toward the crowd There, the word has a fraught history: During more with a red megaphone in one hand and the other than three centuries of colonial rule, it was what the forming a fist. Behind him, drums and bass pound, then Dutch called the natives of Indonesia under a system of pause. He roars lyrics written in a mix of English and discrimination similar to apartheid in South Africa. “InIndonesian. lander” still carries derogatory racial connotations — lazy, Merdeka! Independence! stupid, slow, inferior. “Inlander” is an insult. The punk rock band is called Inlander, and Indonesia is an unlikely nation, an archiits name is also a political statement. pelago of more than 17,000 islands scattered Send comments to editor@inlander.com. across the equator. Colonial rule ended after a t’s a quirk of modern life that searching brutal occupation by the Japanese during World the Internet sometimes leads to a question War II, but many Indonesians see the growing you would have never thought to ask. If you search presence of multinational corporations, foreign investfor “inlander” on Twitter, as we at the Inlander have ments and targeted marketing messages and wonder if naturally done, you find a number of stories unrelated to the nation has progressed from one form of subjugation the Inland Northwest: spambot snippets from literature; to another. a Midwestern press association; a British man restoring A phrase that comes up frequently is “mental ina 1903 canal boat named Eileen. And, most of all, many lander” — the idea that the people of Indonesia carry the

LETTERS

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66 INLANDER MARCH 6, 2014

scars of oppression as a defeating lack of self-worth. The colonizers are gone, but the people remain colonized. Uncertain. Unambitious. Inferior. But the phrase also comes as an invitation to change the story.

T

he members of the punk rock band Inlander are natives, and they chose the name as a reminder that they’re not defined by those derogatory stereotypes of the past. It’s a motivation, they wrote to me, “to voice the slogans of awareness for those who are oppressed by the legacy of the colonial system, which in fact is still entrenched in this archipelago to this day in the form of mental slavery.” In lyrics, tweets and conversations, the message is changing. Step up. Fight the system. Fight history. Create change. Acknowledge the definitions of the past, and then define yourself. n lisaw@inlander.com

M T W Th Less pain. More life. CHEY SCOTT’S

CAT FRIDAY

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MARCH 6, 2014 INLANDER 67 2/21/14 10:14 AM

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25 miles south of Coeur d’Alene at the junction of US-95 and Hwy-58


Inlander 03/06/2014