Page 1

FEBRUARY 15-21, 2018 | FIGHT FOR TRUTH

FIGHTS RIOTS &

The BIGGEST and WEIRDEST brawls in local history PAGE 20

S NOWLANDER 28 MARDI GRAS COMES TO CdA 31 MARVEL’S BLACK PANTHER 34


sure

a drive

Luxury suv still be

fi n a nc i al ly

awesome You get to choose your financial priorities, so yes—that luxury SUV can certainly be one. When you’re ready, we’ve got local bankers ready to help make it happen. BeFinanciallyAwesome.com

Be Financially AwesomeTM

2 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018


INSIDE VOL. 25, NO. 17 | COVER ILLUSTRATION: DERRICK KING

COMMENT 5 NEWS 13 COVER STORY 20

CULTURE 27 SNOWLANDER 28 FOOD 31

FILM MUSIC EVENTS

34 39 44

EDITOR’S NOTE

I

f it makes you feel any better, we civilized people have been beating the bejesus out of one another for a long, long time. It’s not new (even if it seems as though the world today is uniquely defined by conflict and opposition). Throughout our history, people often had good, defensible reasons to riot — say, an outrageous injustice, or a ban on beer — but other times, it simply boiled down to two knuckleheads with a penchant for fisticuffs. In either case, it was a rich vein of Inland Northwest history to mine for this week’s cover section, FIGHTS & RIOTS, beginning on page 20. Also this week, education reporter Wilson Criscione has this bit of news: After one semester, nearly a quarter of Spokane high school freshmen aren’t on track to graduate. Find out what the district is doing about it (page 13). — JACOB H. FRIES, Editor

NOW OPEN 909 W 1 Ave. Ste. A st

509.443.4215

LIVING IN THE DARK PAGE 8

A UNIFIED IDAHO PAGE 18

Your carpets are the largest filter in your home. Your carpets catch everything. Dirt, debris, and dust from your heating system all get trapped deep down in your carpets. Maximize your home’s cleanliness with a carpet & air duct cleaning by Zerorez®.

a carpet cleaning offer for you:

*Up to 250 sq. ft. per area. Minimums apply. Call for details. Exp. 2/28/18.

TACO TIME PAGE 33

  

AN ALT-FOLK MASHUP PAGE 42

INLANDER SPOKANE • EASTERN WASHINGTON • NORTH IDAHO • INLANDER.COM 1227 WEST SUMMIT PARKWAY, SPOKANE, WA 99201 PHONE: 509-325-0634 | EMAIL: INFO@INLANDER.COM

THE INLANDER is a locally owned, independent newspaper founded on Oct. 20, 1993. It’s printed on newsprint that is at least 50 percent recycled; please recycle THE INLANDER after you’re done with it. One copy free per person per week; extra copies are $1 each (call x226). For ADVERTISING information, email advertising@inlander.com. To have a SUBSCRIPTION mailed to you, call x213 ($50 per year). To find one of our more than 1,000 NEWSRACKS where you can pick up a paper free every Thursday, call x226 or email justinh@inlander.com. THE INLANDER is a member of the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. All contents of this newspaper are protected by United States copyright law. © 2018, Inland Publications, Inc.

SOUTH HILL 1230 S. Grand Ave

IN KENDALL YARDS 1238 W. Summit Parkway • 321-7569 FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 3


25 YEARS of...

4 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018


COMMENT STAFF DIRECTORY PHONE: 509-325-0634 Ted S. McGregor Jr. (tedm@inlander.com) PUBLISHER

J. Jeremy McGregor (x224) GENERAL MANAGER

EDITORIAL Jacob H. Fries (x261) EDITOR

WHO IS YOUR FAVORITE SUPERHERO? KEVIN KELLY

Spawn is my favorite superhero, because Todd McFarlane went to Eastern Washington University, and he’s the creator of Spawn, so that’s rad. He’s a demon, but he’s a good guy.

FULL FACE ............$646 (reg.$900)

FOOD & LISTINGS EDITOR

(Includes 4 treatments)

Nathan Weinbender (x250) Derek Harrison (x248) ART DIRECTOR

Wilson Criscione (x282), Mitch Ryals (x237), Daniel Walters (x263), Samantha Wohlfeil (x234) STAFF WRITERS

Young Kwak PHOTOGRAPHER

CALL AND ASK ABOUT PRP

CHRIS MILLER

(Platelet Rich Plasma)

STRAWBERRY CHOCOLATE SPA FACIALS WITH HAND PARAFFIN DIP ......... $79 (reg.$99) TEETH WHITENING ......... $79 (reg.$149) ALL INJECTABLES 10% OFF

MICRO-NEEDLING

Chey Scott (x225)

GIFT CARDS AVAILAB LE

LASER HAIR REMOVAL LIP .............................. $129 (reg.$400) CHIN .......................... $149 (reg.$500) UNDERARMS, BIKINI LINE, HAPPY TRAIL, FRONT OR BACK OF NECK ......$169 (reg.$600) LOWER LEGS ........ $749 (reg.$1600) UPPER LEGS .......... $829 (reg.$1800) (Includes all 8 treatments)

Dan Nailen (x239) ARTS & CULTURE EDITOR

FILM & MUSIC EDITOR

Make your lips kissable

FIRST TIME CLIENTS SAVE 15% OFF BOTOX BRING A FRIEND, IF BOTH INJECT SAVE 20% OFF(excludes Latisse®)

Superman, because he’s invincible. He shoots lightning bolts out of his eyes. That’s convenient. Do you have a favorite Superman movie? I like the comic books better than the movies.

ENT PAYM NS OPTIOBLE A AVAIL

Caleb Walsh ILLUSTRATOR

Amy Alkon, Tuck Clarry, Jen Forsyth, Howard Hardee, Robert Herold, Bob Legasa, Meg Maclean, John T. Reuter, Carrie Scozzaro, Eric D. Snider

Laser Hair Removal for All Skin types, Spider Vein Removal, Brown Pigment Removal, Spa Facials, Chemical Peels, Kybella Injection, Collagen Rejuvenation/Skin Tightening, Microdermabrasions, Botox, Juvederm, Voluma, Professional Teeth Whitening, PRP and Micro-needling

MARY KLEIN

CONTRIBUTORS

Alla Drokina INTERN

Wonder Woman. She kicks butt, and she looks amazing while she does it.

ADVERTISING SALES Kristi Gotzian (x215) ADVERTISING DIRECTOR Carolyn Padgham-Walker (x214), Emily Walden (x260) SENIOR ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Autumn Adrian (x251), Mary Bookey (x216), Jeanne Inman (x235), Susan Mendenhall (x241), Claire Price (x217), Wanda Tashoff (x222) ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES

Kristina Smith (x223) MARKETING DIRECTOR

Emily Guidinger Hunt (x247) EVENTS & PROMOTIONS

SABRINA PIMMS My favorite superhero is Ant-Man. He’s not really popular, and I like that because not a lot of people are popular. I love to give him recognition for his noble powers of shrinking and having very extreme fighting scenes with Thomas the Train.

PRODUCTION & SUPPORT Wayne Hunt (x232) PRODUCTION MANAGER Alissia Blackwood Mead (x228), Derrick King (x238), Jessie Hynes (x205), Tom Stover (x265) GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Justin Hynes (x226) DISTRIBUTION MANAGER Andrea Tobar (x242), Sarah Wellenbrock (x212) ADVERTISING SUPPORT

ROMAN MAKALOV The Flash because you get from A to B quickly. And if you could have any superpower what would it be? The ability to go back in time, so I could fix my mistakes.

7:30pm

MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX

OPERATIONS Dee Ann Cook (x211) BUSINESS MANAGER Kristin Wagner (x210) ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

MAY 7, 2018 TICKETS:

INTERVIEWS BY ALLA DROKINA 2/7/2018, DOWNTOWN

509 624 1200 or FOXTHEATERSPOKANE.ORG

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 5


Got Scrap? Get Cash y FASTy Top Prices - Honest Weight

WE PAY FOR: Aluminum Cans & Scrap y Copper y Brass y Radiators

Insulated Copper Wire y Stainless y Gold y Silver y & much more!

COMMENT | THE PRESIDENCY

McCarthy’s Ghost Donald Trump’s political playbook can be traced back to one of nastiest men in American history, Roy Cohn

SEE HOW MUCH WE PAY AT:

www.actionrecycling.com

509-483-4094

* In accordance with WA state law

911 E Marietta Ave • Spokane WA

South of Foothills Dr. / East of Hamilton

WE SEE RIGHT THROUGH YOU Kootenai Urgent Care HAYDEN • COEUR D’ ALENE • POST FALLS

IF YOU HAVE A LESS THAN LIFE-THREATENING CONDITION, VISIT ONE OF OUR THREE CONVENIENT LOCATIONS IN COEUR D’ALENE, POST FALLS OR HAYDEN.

SAVE TIME WHEN YOU GET IN LINE ONLINE EXPERIENCED MEDICAL PROVIDERS FAST, PROFESSIONAL AND EXTREMELY AFFORDABLE OPEN 7AM-9PM DAILY NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED

CDA | 208.667.9110 | 700 IRONWOOD DRIVE, SUITE 120E HAYDEN | 208.772.9110 | 566 W. PRAIRIE AVE. POST FALLS | 208.777.9110 | 1300 E. MULLAN AVE., SUITE 600

WWW.KOOTENAIURGENTCARE.COM

6 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

BY ROBERT HEROLD

O

n the day the stock market dropped almost 1,200 points, what was President Trump doing? He was in Ohio berating Democrats for not applauding his State of the Union speech — in fact, accusing them of treason for exercising their right of freedom of expression. And the beat goes on. You suffer in silence through the latest wave of hyperbole, you try to ignore the ridiculous tweets, you get by the smokescreens and you deal with the national embarrassment of it all. But still, you know that you can’t avoid the spectacle of Donald Trump — the most crude, vulgar and unqualified person ever to be elected president. This is a man who sold himself as the great businessman, but he has gone bankrupt six times. He’s a man who ran a phony “university” and paid $26 million just to avoid going to trial on fraud charges. And he’s a man who doesn’t respect the law, nor the public servants sworn to uphold it — a man who more than abides racists, and apparently admires the Ku Klux Klan.

B

y a couple of votes last year, provided by the very Republicans who shortly before had publicly denounced him, Trump got his tax bill, which the CBO estimates will add a couple of trillion to the national debt without producing anywhere near the growth promised — all the while greatly increasing inequality. Apparently this is Trump’s idea of “Making America Great Again.” In the LETTERS meantime, Send comments to Trump’s band editor@inlander.com. of brownshirt Gauleiters wannabes are out and about demanding so see papers — on trains, buses, you name it, no one is safe. More “Making America Great Again,” Trump style. While all this is going on, he continues to berate and threaten to fire more public servants who aren’t sufficiently loyal to him. Every American needs to know that public servants properly view loyalty to extend to their oaths of office and to the Constitution, not to the occupant of the White House. Trump doesn’t care. But as special counsel Robert Mueller’s noose tightens, Trump channels his inner Roy Cohn, who was Joe McCarthy’s chief henchman, and later a close friend and mentor to Donald Trump. Cohn taught Trump to fight back, to never concede — even when he is wrong. Just recently, a frustrated Donald Trump was heard to utter, “Where is my Roy Cohn?” Cohn led McCarthy’s attack on Department of State in the 1950s, in particular against the Southeast Asia desk. He used homosexuality as a reason to deny security clearances. Their

phony justification was that gay analysts could be subject to blackmail. They also charged that these professionals were soft on communism. Republicans even called Secretary of State Dean Acheson “The Red Dean” when Acheson was among the hardest of the ’50s hardliners; he recommended that Kennedy bomb and invade Cuba. None of this mattered to McCarthy and Cohn. (By the way, Cohn died of AIDS in 1986; he was gay like the men he persecuted.) Cohn and McCarthy weakened national intelligence at a critical time. We got into the Vietnam quagmire in no small measure because the very career professionals who understood anti-colonialism and who understood that this so-called “domino theory” was just so much nonsense. McCarthy and Cohn had driven many of these careful statesmen out. Today, we are in danger of history repeating itself.

E

xcept for a few ideologues, members of the Republican-dominated Congress really do know and agree that Russia, no doubt with Putin holding the reins, made every effort to steer the election to Trump, who calls this “fake news.” But Russian tampering was real. For Mueller none of this is about partisan politics, it’s all about national security. Republicans who know what’s going on could put a stop to all of Trump’s diversions and obfuscations. Recently, a number of Republican members of Congress “expressed hope” that the Mueller investigation will proceed. That’s not enough. The national interest requires that they “demand,” not just express “hope” that the Mueller investigation continues. A strong case could be made that any attempt by Trump to fire Mueller or his firewall, Rod Rosenstein, amounts to obstruction of justice. But will Republicans go this far to save the day? The truth of the matter is that today’s GOP is in desperate need of the kinds of independent leaders they had during the Watergate crisis. They need some Howard Bakers, some Barry Goldwaters, some Lowell Weickers. Alas, I’m not holding my breath. I would leave them all with a question: Do they really want to look themselves in the mirror 10 years from now and realize they continued to support Trump only to keep their jobs? Put another way: Is showing loyalty to him at the expense of their oaths of office and of the Constitution what they had in mind when they went into public service? We shall soon see. n


DO SOMETHING!

PRESIDENTS HOLIDAY SALE!

Just Eat It: Film Screening & Discussion

A documentary screening presented by Spokane Edible Tree Project and the Master Gardener Foundation of Spokane County. After the film, community members are invited to attend a panel discussion with local organizations working to address food waste and hunger. $5. Tue, Feb. 20 at 7 pm. Community Building, 35 W. Main. (209-2890)

YEAR OF THE DOG ADOPTION DAY

Chinese New Year, observed on Feb. 16, names 2018 as the “Year of the Dog.” In celebration of man’s best friend, Coeur d’Alene Casino is hosting a pet adoption day and fundraiser in support of Kootenai Humane Society. Several dogs and cats will be available. Donations accepted. Sat, Feb. 17 from noon-4 pm. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S. Nukwalqw, Worley, Idaho. cdacasino.com

SPOKANE LGBT SENIORS MEETING

Winslow Queen Sleigh Bed With Storage Drawers In Footboard

If you identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender and consider yourself a “senior,” please join others for this initial meeting. Free; please RSVP to NancyTavery@comcast.net. Sat, Feb. 17 at 10 am. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. (325-6283)

HOT ! BUY

PUNK ROCK YOGA

Was $749

A beginning vinyasa flow yoga with live DJs spinning punk rock favorites. Different music cultivates different energies, come see how this powerful music transforms your practice. $15; pre-registration required. Sat, Feb. 17 from 7-8 pm. Browne’s Addition Wellness Center, 2013 W. Fourth. (280-6195) n

Also Available King Size

Was $599

NOW $499

walkersfurniture.com

Tell us about your event or other opportunities to get involved. Submit events at Inlander.com/getlisted or email getlisted@inlander.com.

i

NOW $399

walkersmattress.com

7503 N. Division 509.489.1300

Find us on

JEN SORENSON CARTOON

Spokane 15 E. Boone Ave. 509.326.1600

Spokane Valley 14214 E. Sprague 509.928.2485

HOT BUY!

Coeur d’Alene 7224 N. Government Way 208.762.7200

Sandpoint 210 Bonner Mall Way 208. 255.5796

Moses Lake 117 W Broadway 509-765-9766

Presented by

Enter the world of Titanic. Meet Titanic Underwater Researcher P.H. Nargeolet Thurs, Feb 22 6:30 pm northwestmuseum.org

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 7


COMMENT | IDAHO

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Living in the Dark Idaho Republicans vote to keep the lights off BY JOHN T. REUTER

R

epublican State Rep. Tom Loertscher is no fan of political transparency or accountability to the public. But even he can recognize the need to act in the face of increasing public pressure and national trends. A ballot initiative proposed in 2016 nearly strengthened Idaho’s campaign finance and lobbying laws. The proposed measure would have reduced the maximum political contribution, prohibited companies doing over $250,000 of business with the state from donating to state politicians at all, and added teeth to Idaho’s current disclosure requirements, among other reforms. It barely failed to make the ballot, due to new oner-

ous requirements for signature gathering — requirements that Loertscher and other legislators put in place after the last time Idaho voters overruled them at the ballot box, repealing the deeply unpopular “Luna Laws.” Perhaps even more glaringly, Idaho is one of only two states — Michigan is the other — that fail to require financial disclosures from candidates for elected office. So seeing the writing on the wall, Loertscher proposed his own financial disclosure law late last month. As he told the House State Affairs Committee, which he chairs, “Financial disclosure of elected officials is in your future, because this will happen at some point. The point of this legislation and the way this is written is to make this the least intrusive way I can think of for us to accomplish that.” Read “least intrusive” as “least transparent.”

Winter Adventures in Coeur d’Alene Turn to the Inside Back Cover to see what’s happening

The bill would have required all candidates for statewide, legislative, county or city office to annually disclose their sources of income, primary employer and job title, any entities they owned, any positions they held on boards, any stocks or bonds of which they owned more than $5,000 of, and any entity that paid them more than $5,000 in the last year. It would also require the disclosure of their spouse’s name, occupation and employer. It was filled with loopholes, including a lack of any method of verification. But at least it did something. I suspect that combination was what allowed it to gain unanimous bipartisan support from a legislative interim committee. However, despite being only a half-hearted effort at transparency that was literally designed to be the least Loertscher could think to do, it still went too far for every other Republican on the committee. They voted it down from even receiving a print hearing, which would have allowed for amendments and is a standard courtesy given to lawmakers, especially a committee’s chair. Legislators provided a lot of excuses for why they didn’t want to even discuss legislation regarding them having to reveal potential financial conflicts of interest. But it all boiled down to this: While this legislation might help voters, it could hurt lawmakers, and ultimately, voters should just trust them. Perhaps most ironic of those opposing the measure was North Idaho’s Heather Scott. She made news last year complaining of a conspiracy against her, and of hidden corruption among legislative leaders, and she lodged scandalous, unsubstantiated claims about other women legislators. Yet when faced with the opportunity to increase the sunlight on all legislators, she voted no. In my experience, the people who most often trade in conspiracy theories frequently have the most to hide. It’s unimaginable to them that the rest of the world isn’t filled with the same repugnant, slimy, manipulative scheming that takes place between their own two ears. Ultimately, when these conspiracists have an opportunity to bring in sunlight that will reveal everyone’s potential faults, including their own, they vote no. Because they know for certain they have something to hide and can’t be completely sure about everyone else. In Heather Scott’s case, she’s already defended white nationalists on Facebook, proudly displayed the confederate flag in a local parade, voted to allow deadbeat dads to get away with failing to pay child support, and tried to deny same-sex couples equal rights when filing their taxes. What the heck is she still hiding that’s worse than all that? n John T. Reuter, a former Sandpoint City Councilman, has been active in protecting the environment, expanding LGBT rights and Idaho’s GOP politics.

10% OFF

(MUST BE BOOKED IN FEB.)

ALL TREE SERVICE NEED TREE SERVICE? • Free Estimates • Safe Affordable Tree Service • High Quality Pruning & Tree Removal

visitCDA.org

8 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

509-998-2771


$1,800-A-DAY CABIN FEVER GIVEAWAY FREE DAILY ENTRY FEB 1-28 Sick of being cooped up this winter? We think cash may just be the cure. Every day this February, you could take home $1,800! Get one free entry daily for that night’s 7pm giveaway. Then, check back at the Camas Rewards Center or on Facebook to see if you’ve won.

Details at northernquest.com

Northern Quest is committed to supporting responsible gaming. If you or someone you know has a gambling problem, please call the Washington State Problem Gambling Helpline at 800.547.6133 or Camas Path at 509.789.7630.

NORTHERNQUEST.COM

|

877.871.6772

|

SPOKANE, WA

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 9


D LIVING O& O W IR FA STED ASSI AGE RETIREMENT VILL

40th Annual

THURSDAY, FEB 22, 2018 10:00AM - 2:00PM

FREE Workshops for Seniors!

SEE

• FREE HEALTH INFO & GIVEAWAYS • Over 30 Healthcare Exhibitors • Free Blood Pressure Checks • $125 Gift Basket Drawing

HUNDREDS OF PRODUCTS AND SERVICES!

DISCOVER

WORKSHOP I

10:10am-11:00am “Digesting What We Eat”

THE LATEST TRENDS!

GET

EXPERT ADVICE FROM THE PROS!

ENJOY

THE FEATURE LANDSCAPE DISPLAYS!

– Heather Welsh, R.N., Interim Health Care of Spokane, Inc.

WORKSHOP II

FEB. 22-23-24-25

Understanding your knee pain and how to relieve it. – Jared Allred, M.D., Orthopaedic Surgeon

S P O K A N E FA I R & E X P O C E N T E R

2 FOR1

ADMISSION

DAY

800

$

TWO ADMISSIONS FOR THE PRICE OF ONE ON

CASH ONLY

KIDS 12 & UNDER FREE PARKING IS FREE

THURSDAY ONLY!

PRESENTED BY

WORKSHOP III

12:10am-1:00pm “Stress of Caring and Warning Signs”

HOURS

Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun.

– Dawn Larson, Program Manager

12pm-8pm 12pm-8pm 10am-7pm 10am-5pm

WORKSHOP IV

1:10pm-2:00pm “When to Contact Emergency Services and Support”

– Brandy Tarala, Business Development

Village Garden Mall Administration Bldg Entrance One - 312 W. Hastings Rd. North Spokane (West off Hwy 395) 509-467-2365

CUSTERSHOWS.COM

2018 NEW

DODGE DURANGO SRT AWD IN STOCK NOW!

8ALL WHEEL DRIVE 86.4 L V8 8475 HP 88,700 LBS TOWING

2019 NEW DODGE RAM 1500

AVAILABLE FOR ORDER!

JEEP WRANGLER IN STOCK NOW!

7700

E.

8RECEIVER HITCH 8UCONNECT WITH BLUETOOTH 8BREMBO 6 PISTON BRAKES

84 WHEEL DRIVE 85.7L V8 HEMI 8395 HP 812,750 LBS TOWING

2018 NEW

10 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

11:10am-Noon

“Knee Arthritis”

8OFF ROAD READY 84X4 83.6 L V6 8285 HP

812 INCH TOUCHSCREEN 84 CORNER AIR SUSPENSION 8REMOTE START SYSTEM 8RAM’S MOST SPACIOUS CAB

83,500 LBS TOWING 8STATE OF THE ART TECH 833 INCH TIRES 8ALL NEW EXTERIOR & INTERIOR

WWW.DISHMANDODGE.COM

SPRAGUE SPOKANE VALLEY • 5 0 9 . 9 2 4 . 3 2 5 0


COMMENT | FROM READERS

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

GARTH BRINGS US TOGETHER didn’t have an email contact to thank Inga Laurent for her interesting

I

article (“For A Moment, All Was Right,” 2/8/18), but wanted to pass on my congratulations for an interesting read. Her comment, “We need to do a better job of trying to understand one another; if we fail to be open to finding ways of fitting together, we will surely miss an essential part of this American story,” is such a true statement in times that feel incredibly divisive. I often feel that 80 percent of us would get along fine if the 10 percent on the far fringe of either side of the political spectrum would keep their mouths LETTERS shut. Send comments to Thank you for the Inlander and editor@inlander.com. the enjoyment I get from reading it.

CELTIC WOMAN

HOMECOMING TOUR

May 30 & 31 / 7:30pm QUEENSRŸCHE / Mar 1 CARLOS MENCIA / Mar 15

GORDON HESTER Spokane, Wash.

COMMODORES / Mar 28

C’MON GEORGE eorge Nethercutt has never let the truth stand in the way of a good

G

rationale (“Not Trump Not Enough,” 2/8/18). The 34 or so (to date) Republicans resigning Congress are not doing so because they “are disgusted with the national political scene.” They are doing so because there is no way in hell they will be re-elected. Time to take the pension and bail. … The Blue Wave is coming and “Term Limits” George knows it. His warnings that the Democrats should reward the “dignity” of Trump is both outright laughable and vile. BOB THOMPSON Spokane, Wash.

Readers respond to “Life in Limbo” [2/8/18], our Green Zone story about how uncertainty about cannabis laws is keeping some doctors from prescribing medical marijuana:

ON SALE FEB 17

BLUE ÖYSTER CULT / Apr 11 DEE SNIDER & QUIET RIOT / Apr 21 THE CHARLIE DANIELS BAND / Apr 29 JAY LENO / May 5 More shows and tickets at NORTHERNQUEST.COM

KELLY ZIMMERMAN: No kickbacks writing those prescriptions. BRENDA J. WATKINS: I haven’t seen it. Every time I go in for a check up, they want to push meds on me. It really sucks. ALEX SHAFFER: Proven science, malpractice insurance, pseudoscience, sketchy dosage amounts, and the fact that it’s illegal on a federal level might be influencing that. n

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 11


BECU OWN IT.

Detria T. Spokane Member-owner

In 1935, 18 Boeing employees started a credit union believing banking on each other beat banking at a bank. 82 years later, our member-owners still enjoy better rates and fewer fees. Live or work in Washington? You’re eligible. Join us.

Federally insured by NCUA

Find us downtown, in the Valley, and at our new location in North Spokane. 12 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018


To stay on track for graduation, Dominick Tibbets, 14, attends North Central’s ninth-grade intervention room after school.

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

EDUCATION

No Room For Failure With high School freshman already failing new graduation requirements, will Spokane Public Schools have to reimagine its schedule? BY WILSON CRISCIONE

D

ominick Tibbets started as a freshman at North Central High School in September with one goal in mind. “I want to be the first out of my blood-related family to graduate,” Tibbets says. After struggling in middle school, high school represented a fresh start for Tibbets. Yet just two months into his first semester in high school, he was told he was in danger of failing two classes. And then he learned something else: If he failed just one class, his dream of earning a diploma would be in jeopardy. “I was stressed out, because high school is a big thing for me,” Tibbets says. Since 2014, Spokane Public Schools has delayed a rule that says high school students must earn 24 credits to graduate, which was set by the Washington State Board of Education. But for the class of 2021, the requirement is now upon them: Current freshmen must take six class periods every single day for all four years of high school. To earn 24 credits, they must pass every single one. Already, after just one semester in high school,

freshman are failing to do that. Nearly a quarter of high school freshman in Spokane Public Schools failed at least one class, according to data the district provided the Inlander. That’s a total of 491 students who are at risk of not earning a diploma after less than five months of high school. It’s left Spokane Public Schools with a difficult decision: Either change the entire school schedule to fit more classes in a year, as other districts across the state have done in response to the 24-credit requirement; or keep the schedule the same, making more of an effort to provide support to students like Dominick before they fail a course. So far, the district has chosen the latter. Some education officials, however, see the 24-credit requirement as a chance for education reform, an opportunity for high schools to ditch the old schedule and the embedded system it comes with for something better. Scott Seaman, director of high school programs for the Association of Washington High School Principals, urges districts like Spokane to seize it. “We see this as an opportunity for high schools across the state to reimagine themselves,” Seaman says.

A

s soon as Dominick was told by a North Central counselor that he was failing two classes, and what that could mean, he knew he had to reverse course. The counselor recommended that he take an after-school class, the ninth-grade intervention room. “I was like, ‘I’m on board, I can do that,’” Dominick says. Spending time there after school on Monday through Thursdays, Dominick was able to get his grades up. This semester, even before he took any test, he went to the homework center after school, knowing it’s the best way to stay on track. This is the strategy that North Central and the other high schools in Spokane have taken in addressing the 24-credit requirement. First, schools use an early-warning system to identify struggling students. Then, they rush to provide opportunities for that student to succeed. There are homework centers, intervention rooms and counselors. For high school students, research has shown that ninth grade can be a make-or-break year. So schools in ...continued on next page

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 13


, r e e B c i Ep d o o F t a e r G 50 TAPS

FULL BAR

GIFT CARDS

NEWS | EDUCATION “NO ROOM FOR FAILURE,” CONTINUED... Spokane do everything they can to prevent that, says Wendy Bromley, North Central’s assistant principal. Even if a student does fail a course, then there are online credit retrieval opportunities, or summer school. They’re the very same tools that Spokane used to steadily improve its graduation rate this decade, which is now over 85 percent. It’s partly why, Bromley says, she isn’t worried about the 24-credit requirement. Spokane schools already offered these tools. Administrators knew this mandate was coming. “Our practice has not changed, because we’ve been prepared for it for so long,” Bromley says. However, that doesn’t mean the district isn’t watching the number of freshman failures closely, says Shawn Jordan, SPS director of secondary programs. Last year, Jordan says the district created a task force to address the 24-credit requirement. The top priority that came out of it, he says, was providing more money for tutoring and homework centers in high schools. If a large number of students fail? Then the district could look to change the schedule. “That’s been one of the things we’ve been discussing,” Jordan says. “That could be a decision we make.” It could be a seven-period day, either with an extended school day or with less time in each

class. Another strategy, he says, is keeping the same basic schedule but adding more courses before or after school. There are drawbacks, Jordan says. Contracts with staff would need to be renegotiated, possibly a tall task for such a large district. And if a student is struggling with six classes, Jordan wonders, would adding another really help? It’s possible, he says, that students could

“We have to rethink education. So many people are stuck in what they do.”

BEST BEER BAR & PUB FOOD

@MANITOTAPHOUSE 3011 S. GRAND BLVD. | (509) 279-2671 MANITOTAPHOUSE.COM 11AM - 10PM SUN-THURS | 11AM - MIDNIGHT FRI & SAT

simply meet the stricter graduation requirements at similar rates to now. “For some, raising the bar is going to cause some of them to raise with the bar,” Jordan says.

TAKING IT ‘HEAD ON’

When the 24-credit requirement was passed in 2014, many districts applied for a waiver allowing them to delay its implementation. But Kelso School District, south of Olympia, went a different direction. “I said, ‘I don’t want want to apply for a waiver,’” says John Gummel, Kelso High School principal. “Let’s take this head on.”

FRESH INGREDIENTS Stronger than ever! We’re growing even stronger, as we start the year in Coeur D’Alene, Idaho!

905 N. WASHINGTON ST. | 509-381-BIRD

THE OLD BROADVIEW DAIRY TheBlackbirdSpokane.com |

14 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

@TheBlackbirdGEG

We’re hiring local talent to become Customer Service / Technical Support Representatives for the #1 Satellite TV provider in the US!

Apply today! IDCareers@spicrm.com 833-CRM-JOBS (276-5627) careers.spicrm.com/cda-jobs


At the time, the high school was built on a traditional semester system. By the 2015-16 school year, the school transitioned into a trimester system, with five periods a day, and three trimesters per school year. “We had to basically rewrite every class we offered here,” Gummel says. “It was a lot of work.” A lot of work, sure, but completely worth it, he says. While more curriculum in core classes like math is covered in a shorter period of time, students have more time to devote to it because there are only five classes. If they fail a class, they can take it next trimester. And it opened up new courses that lets students pursue more interests. If there’s a drawback, Gummel says, there are too many options. Typical year-round programs, like music, have a harder time convincing students to take a full year instead of quitting after two trimesters. Gummel says he is helping Renton School District with a similar transition. In his view, if educators care about kids, reinventing the schedule is the way to go. “We have to rethink education,” Gummel says. “So many people are stuck in what they do.” Seaman, with the Association of Washington High School Principals, understands why there’s some reluctance for larger districts like Seattle or Spokane to make a similar switch. It’s expensive, and the semester system is deeply embedded. But he says he “cringes” when he hears about schools saying they’ll provide more credit options before and after school for struggling students. Often, those struggling students are the ones who can’t access those options. Seaman says systems should change, not only to accommodate the students who aren’t making it, but to make it better for everyone. “I really believe that this is a chance to change the system for all kids.” n wilsonc@inlander.com

THE ONLY THINGS SMOKING ARE THE JACKPOTS. Our newly renovated smoke-free gaming room is open. Come enjoy all the latest slot titles, a brand-new poker room, and a full-service bar with bar-top gaming – all in a beautiful nonsmoking environment.

NORTHERNQUEST.COM 877.871.6772 | SPOKANE, WA

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 15


NEWS | BRIEFS

Victim and Offender Olympia takes on sexting by kids; plus, neglected kids in Idaho often go to court without an advocate WE HAVE SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

PRACTICE SAFE SEXTING

A 17-year-old Spokane County boy texted a photo of his penis to an adult woman in 2013. The boy, who had been diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome and lived at home with his parents, was then convicted of a felony-level child pornography charge and required to register as a sex offender, according to records. That made him both perpetrator and victim in the same case. The conviction was upheld last year in a 6-3 decision by the Washington State Supreme Court. The majority reasoned in part that the law is intended to eradicate CHILD PORNOGRAPHY everywhere — including “sexting” between teenagers, but added: “If the legislature intended to exclude children, it could do so by amending the statute.” Now, a bill that would essentially exempt teenage sexting from the state’s child pornography laws has passed out of the Senate and awaits a hearing in the House. “If an adult was to send a picture of himself

412 W Hay cra ft Ave., Coeur d 'Alene 208.277.00 0 0 | c o s m i c c o w b o y . c om

VOTED ONE OF THE BEST FOR OVER 10 YEARS!!

1018 W. FRANCIS AVE • 509.326.6794

16 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

“We have these laws and then technology progresses and it takes 10 years to catch up.” Elliott says she’s currently involved in a case that’s been put on hold while the legislature considers the bill. If the bill passes, the pending charges would be amended, Elliott says. However, it’s unlikely the changes will apply retroactively to the 17-year-old’s case. “It really stinks,” she says. “It’s great that his case propelled some action, even if it’s like five years later, but he’s not necessarily going to reap the benefits. He still has to register.” (MITCH RYALS)

WITHOUT A VOICE

Though IDAHO requires representation for children involved in protective services cases, some kids don’t receive representation at all, according to a report by the state’s Office of Performance Evaluation. According to Idaho’s Child Protective Act, children 11 years and younger in Idaho are supposed to be appointed an advocate, known as a guardian ad litem, in cases where the court decides if a child is removed from their parents’ home due to abuse or neglect. If the child is 12 or older, they’re given a public defender to represent their wishes. (Washington, by contrast, has no law requiring that abused or neglected children have an attorney in such cases.) But in a sample of more than 200 kids in protective services cases, nearly one-third were not served by either, according to the report. When that happens, kids are less likely to find a permanent home or Spokane County public defender Krista Elliott YOUNG KWAK PHOTO have their voice heard in court. “Gaps exist in Idaho’s system of in that fashion to an adult female, it would not be representation for children and youth,” the report a registerable sex offense,” says Spokane County states. public defender Krista Elliott, who handled the Ideally, the report says, public defenders 17-year-old’s charge in Spokane County. “So the and guardians ad litem could work together for law was punishing juveniles more harshly for the best representation of kids. While the public behavior that was in fact juvenile behavior.” defender counsels for a child’s expressed wishes, The proposed changes would apply to kids the guardian ad litem represents the child’s best between 13 and 17. Basically, any teenager who interest in court. creates, shares or publishes (on social media, “Collaboration between these groups is esfor example) sexually explicit images of another sential to improve the quality of representation,” teenager, or of themselves, cannot be charged the report says. under the state’s felony child porn laws. HowAdditionally, the report found that there’s no ever, a kid who shares or publishes those images state agency overseeing how many children go can still be charged with a misdemeanor under without representation. another statute. For example, Elliott says, in a The Office of Performance Evaluation common situation, a boyfriend and girlfriend presented the report to Idaho’s Joint Legislashare intimate photos with each other, break up, tive Oversight Committee last week. The OPE and then one of them shares the photo with othrecommended that the legislature “facilitate a ers. That’s still a potential crime, but would no coordinated, collaborative effort to bring together longer be a felony-level, registerable sex offense relevant stakeholders to help strengthen repreunder this bill. sentation for children and youth.” (WILSON “Every kid has a cell phone,” Elliott says. CRISCIONE)


NEWS | DIGEST

ON INLANDER.COM FEATURING NATIONAL NEWS FROM THE NEW YORK TIMES

FOOD AND FIRE The two bills we told you about earlier this year, which would ban or restrict the same CHEMICALS that contaminated water near Fairchild Air Force Base, have passed through their respective chambers in the Washington State Legislature. If they pass through the second, the bills would be the first of their kind in the nation. As approved now, the legislation would ban per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in paper food packaging starting as soon as 2022, and restrict the manufacture and sale of firefighting foam with those chemicals starting in 2020, except where federal law requires that specific foam, such as at airports. The bill relating to firefighting materials was scheduled for a hearing in the House Thursday morning. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

TEACHING ‘BOTH SIDES’ Despite the Idaho Department of Education’s effort to carefully craft education standards on climate change over the last year, lawmakers in the state’s House Education Committee remain skeptical of teaching students that human-caused GLOBAL WARMING exists. Last week, the House Education Committee approved a set of climate standards with some discussion of climate change, but they rejected supporting content dealing with climate change and human impact on the environment, as well as a section on nonrenewable sources of energy. The state’s Senate Education Committee will have its own say in the standards. But if they’re approved as they were in the House, says Glenn Branch, deputy director of the National Center for Science Education, it “would be a problem for teachers.” (WILSON CRISCIONE)

More Miles More Smiles No auto payments for 90 days*

• Extra $$$ in your pocket for 90 days • Reduce stress with our easy application process • Gain peace of mind with flexible terms to meet your needs

Visit your favorite branch or ring us at 800.433.1837

SCARY — HERE’S WHAT TO WATCH OUT FOR Spokane TV stations KHQ and KXLY are rivals. They’re owned by different companies. They compete for scoops and ratings. But both post a steady stream of identical Facebook posts, with headlines like: “This Healthy 20-Year-Old Mom Of 2 Died From Fast-Acting Flu” and “Why People Are Calling This Animal ‘The Most Beautiful Horse In The World.’” Yet none of those stories actually link to KXLY or KHQ’s websites. Instead, it sends viewers to “SIMPLEMOST,” a service that funnels particularly clickable content to Facebook pages of TV stations throughout the country. The strategy may seem strange, until you take into account the way the Facebook algorithm increasingly rewards “engagement.” We dig into the issue more on Inlander. com. (DANIEL WALTERS)

*Here’s the legal stuff. Offer good January 1, 2018 – February 28, 2018. Must apply by February 28, 2018. Not available for business loans or the refinance of an existing Numerica Credit Union loan. Subject to credit approval. The interest will continue to accrue during the 90 day no payment period, if applicable. Other terms and conditions may apply. NPA18

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 17


NEWS | ELECTION 2018

JORGE LUIS UZCÁTEGUI, CONDUCTOR Paulette Jordan hopes to unite Idaho as governor, drawing on her rural background.

Steep Canyon Rangers are modern bluegrass music’s hard-charging innovators, earning a Grammy for Best Bluegrass Album in 2013. Enjoy selections from their 2018 new album, Out in the Open.

SPONSORED BY

‘Live and Die by Idaho’ It’s been almost 30 years since Idaho elected a Democratic governor; can Paulette Jordan change that? BY SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL

P

(509) 624-1200 • SpokaneSymphony.org Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

JAN, THE TOY LADY, THINKS OLYMPICS, A LONG WEEKEND, AND PUZZLES GO WELL TOGETHER:

USA! USA! USA!

River Park Square (509) 456-TOYS 18 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

aulette Jordan would be the first Democrat to govern Idaho since 1995, the first woman ever to hold the state’s highest elected office, and the first Native American governor in the country. But while she knows the possibility of shattering glass ceilings is important, and she’s proud to have the chance to make history, she says her motivation goes beyond that. “It’s not about men, about women,” Jordan says. “It’s about bringing back the good leadership that we need in this state, that we’ve been missing for too long.” At a time when national politics seem to be drawing deeper divisions between those on the left and right, Jordan says she wants to focus less on labels and more on making sure everyone feels heard. Especially those who don’t feel the government works for them anymore. Jordan, 38, grew up in rural North Idaho, mostly living in the countryside and small places like De Smet and Plummer, the largest town on the Coeur d’Alene reservation. For generations, relatives on both sides of the businesswoman’s family, from the Coeur d’Alene and Confederated Colville tribes, have been involved in ranching and agriculture, and they still own farmland. She went to Gonzaga Prep, commuting back and forth from Plummer at first, then went on to University of Washington. Returning to the Coeur d’Alene reservation, she quickly got involved in leadership and served on Tribal Council from 2009 to 2012. That year, she mounted a campaign for Idaho’s District 5 House Seat A, serving Benewah and Latah counties, and lost to Republican Cindy Agidius. But in 2014, she ousted the incumbent, and then kept her seat in the 2016 election. While Jordan knows her name isn’t as well

known as, say, Republican Congressman Raúl Labrador, who is vying for the Republican gubernatorial nomination, she pointed out to women’s marchers in January that she has more elected experience than President Trump, and plans to put all Idahoans first. “I will live and die by Idaho, because I was born and raised by Idaho,” she tells the Sandpoint rally, in a speech posted in full to Facebook. “We’re not just going to win by one party. This is the unification of our entire state. A unified Idaho.” On Feb. 9, Jordan named St. Maries City Councilwoman Margie Gannon as her substitute to fulfill the rest of session so she can focus fulltime on running for governor without leaving her constituents in the dust. Earlier that day, Jordan took time to speak by phone with the Inlander about the issues facing Idaho as she prepares for the May 15 Primary Election, where she’ll face Democratic opponent A.J. Balukoff, a Boise School District board member who faced current Gov. Butch Otter in the 2014 election. INLANDER: As the only Democratic representative north of Boise, you’ve gotten a sense of what it’s like to work within the Republican-controlled government. What real chance do you think you stand as a Democrat running in Idaho? JORDAN: I think that the population of Idaho is changing. They certainly want a different set of leaders, and ultimately a different governor who will serve them and listen to their voice. Right now there are a lot of voices being left out. When we put our politics before the people, it hurts everybody. For me, being more progressive and living in rural Idaho, I don’t focus on politics whatsoever. I don’t focus on the two-


YEAR OF THE YEAR OF THE

DOG G party system. I focus on how I was raised, and the values, and having the integrity of upholding those values.

What do you think are the top three issues Idaho will need to address over the next four years? I would say, by far, education. That would be at the very top, because it has been at the bottom for far too long. Health care: we are at the bottom of health care in the nation when it comes to offices to doctors, or pediatricians and behavioral health. These are issues at the top for many people, especially when it comes to access for people. And, I would say Main Street revival. Every single city in the state of Idaho, if each town is starting to build community, that has impacts on education, local businesses, and building up our commerce and our economy.

You mentioned that your older son plans to attend Gonzaga Prep. How do you plan to show constituents that you are dedicated to improving Idaho education when your son is going to school out of state? Every parent has a right to choose which school their children go to. I’m very fortunate to have a choice. My parents gave me the same choice and I chose to go to a private school. My son, I gave him that same option: He could stay in Idaho or go on to a school in Spokane. I fully support him. ... Not everybody has that ability to choose. That’s why I fully support education reform in this state. What does that reform look like? We have extreme polarization between rural and urban schools like the Boise School District, which is doing very well. They have all the resources and support. You don’t see that same situation in the rural school districts, which are really suffering. They’re relying on supplemental bonds and levies to make ends meet every year, because they’re not being adequately funded. When you have discrepancies like that, you’re looking at a loss in teachers. We’re increasing class sizes, they’re doing more with less, and taking out of their own pocket to provide resources, and even dealing with behavioral health issues.

DOG

D O G & C AT A D O P T I O N DAY

EHT F

Saturday, Feb. 17 12 noon - 4 pm Adoptions | 9 am - 11 pm Donations

We are proud to have as our special guests several dogs and cats available for adoption through Kootenai Humane Society. Winter is a difficult time for local pet shelters. Make a $5 (or more) cash or check donation at the Coeur Rewards booth and receive $5 EPC. Maximum one redemption. All proceeds collected will go to the Kootenai Humane Society.

What are your thoughts on the Idaho House Education Committee’s choice to remove language relating human activity to climate change from education standards? I think it’s unfortunate that we are not wanting to be at the forefront of technology and science. In fact, tech companies are building here, especially in southern Idaho. Yet here we are, we’re challenging science and taking out certain standards that should be taught in school books.

What needs to be done to address the Medicaid gap in Idaho? Do you agree with the stopgap the state has proposed? I think we have an opportunity, and if we didn’t have such a politically driven government, it would be to expand Medicaid in our state. Right now, people are trying to find ways to go around it and creating controversy. I don’t see the purpose of it all other than taking political positions. Medicaid expansion should have already happened in this state. Do you support any gun limitations, such as preventing the sale of bump stocks or limiting magazine size? I certainly support the Second Amendment and gun ownership. But I want people to know when it comes down to ownership, as my parents and great-grandparents believed, it all comes down to responsibility. I believe that people should be trained and certified. Certainly bump stocks have been an issue because of the Vegas shooting. I was actually there in Vegas at the time of the shooting. Witnessing how many people were shot in such a short amount of time was horrifying. It’s incredible to see the impacts of these adjustments to guns and how that can really be devastating to a community. I was just actually down the street when that occurred, I had just had dinner, then that happened like three hotels down. That really opens your mind to why it’s necessary to have restrictions for certain things such as bump stocks. n

1 800 523-2464 | CDACASINO.COM |

Worley, Idaho

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 19


! T H G I F ! T H G I F ! FIGHT G

enerally, we in the Inland Northwest handle our disagreements more or less civilly. We debate the issues, hold elections and leave nasty internet comments. But other times? Other times we roll up our sleeves and beat the hell out of somebody. Or we break windows, overturn milk trucks and set absolutely everything on fire. But generally we only do that when we’ve got a good reason. Like when Washington State University bans alcohol. Or when a musical festival falls apart. Or when a newspaper misspells a name. Or when it’s 1892, and “Cucumber Pete” himself just walks into a new Sandpoint dance hall. 20 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

We’ve put together some of the biggest — and weirdest — instances of brawls and riots in the history of the Inland Northwest. A Spokesman-Review reporter pops a politician on the floor of the Olympia legislature. A newspaper publisher, wielding iron typesetting tools, beats up city founders armed with pistols. Miners decide to negotiate their salaries using the rhetorical power of 4,000 pounds of dynamite. An incredibly rich elderly real-estate developer socks an attorney. And if you don’t like it? Then we’ll settle things the old-fashioned way. After school. By the flagpole. Be there. Unless you’re chicken. — DANIEL WALTERS, section editor

FIGHTS & RIOTS begins on page 22.


$

sh. a c 0 0 0 100, ays.

hare s l l i w + 400 ill win sunny getaw 10 w

PLAY TO WIN: Receive one entry for every 25 points earned on your Sun Club card through February 22.

TEXT TO WIN A SUNNY GETAWAY: Pick up your text-to-win card at the Sun Club window each week.

DRAWINGS EVERY THURSDAY THROUGH FEBRUARY 22, WITH 400+ CASH AND PRIZE WINNERS GUARANTEED!

Join the Sun Club Today.

SpokaneTribeCasino.com

Where fun always wins.

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 21


FIGHTS & RIOTS

1858 TRIBES TELL

STEPTOE TO STEP OFF! OVERCONFIDENT COMMANDER RETREATS IN DEAD OF NIGHT AS TRIBES CLAIM VICTORY NEAR SNAKE RIVER!

I

n the days leading up to the May 17, them canoes, some Palouse Indians rode 1858, battle, Colonel Edward Steptoe ahead to warn other tribes and prepare for had driven a train of pack mules and war. young soldiers on horseback across the Father Joset, a Catholic missionary Snake River and through territory he working with the Coeur d’Alene tribe, saw knew had been promised to tribes in the the preparations and tried to warn Steptoe area of what is now Eastern Washington. of the mounting battle, and facilitate talks, They were going north to look into but it was too late. claims that Palouse tribe members had In the hills near present day Rosalia, the killed two miners near Fort men were met by hundreds of fighters Colvile, owned by the furfrom the Spokane, Coeur d’Alene, trading giant Hudson’s Yakama, Walla Walla and Bay Company. other surrounding tribes. Steptoe had The Battle of Toassumed that the hotonimme was on. relatively friendly For more than 10 relations with hours the sides fired the Spokane at one another. The and Coeur howitzers were d’Alene would fairly useless and hold. many of the tribes’ He was fighters had the very wrong. benefit of newer By the guns with longer time Steptoe range than the left Fort outdated models Walla Walla carried by Stepto look for toe’s men. There the killers, was little ammunithey and other tion, maybe 40 tribes around bullets per man, the Inland and Steptoe had told Northwest were the men to leave their fed up, as hissabers back at the fort. toric documents and By nightfall, weary Col. Edward Steptoe newspaper accounts and without water, Stepkept by the Spokane toe’s men gathered on a hill, Public Library show. encircling their wounded and Three years had passed gear with their animals. With a break since they’d signed treaties, feeling forced to in the fighting, Steptoe made the call to concede more than they’d ever wanted, but escape. at least, they thought, securing land of their Leaving their fires burning, the men own. But miners heading north to look for buried the howitzers, and rode away, leaving gold were continuing to illegally cross their several of their wounded for dead along the territories. way. The Nez Perce helped them cross the So when Steptoe passed through, the Snake River to safety, and they returned to tribes weren’t pleased, and they didn’t Fort Walla Walla in defeat. believe his story. It was a major victory for the tribes, The men were way off the road to and led to Steptoe’s embarrassment for the Colville if that’s where they were headed, remainder of his military career. But it also and they were hauling howitzer cannons set up the next deadly chapter of history, as with them. Col. George Wright took over command at After the group crossed the Snake River Walla Walla and prepared Army forces to with help from some Nez Perce, who lent strike back. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

22 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

1892 PETE’S PUNCHES PRODUCE PISTOLS! S andpoint is known for its beautiful mountain views and its charming downtown filled with quaint storefronts. It’s a tourist’s dream. But at the tail end of the 19th century, Sandpoint was famous for its lawlessness, and for the rough-andtumble nature of its residents. The construction of railroads through the Pacific Northwest brought all sorts of disreputable rabble-rousers to town, causing a boom in shady saloons and gambling parlors. The site of one of the town’s wildest brawls, a dance hall called the Seattle Mug, opened its doors in Sandpoint in Feb. 17, 1892. About 300 or so people attended the hall’s maiden night, and per newspaper accounts at the time, they included “railroaders, cowpunchers and minings men.” Despite the rowdiness of the hall’s clientele, the evening seemed to be going smoothly. Enter a troublemaker known as “Cucumber Pete,” which isn’t exactly an intimidating moniker for a guy who turned out to be a violent reveller.

Pete started a fight (over what and with whom, it’s unknown) that soon developed into a full-blown melee throughout the hall. He was shot in the chest by a guy known as “Wylockie Ned,” and three other people (including two “dissolute females” who may have worked in the hall) were also shot. One of them died; Cucumber Pete, it seems, survived. The authorities quickly descended upon the Seattle Mug. “Twenty-five of the worst characters in the northwest are now penned up in a stockade and guarded by deputy sheriffs,” wire reports read. So who exactly was this prickly Cucumber Pete, and what possessed him to spark violence that night? His real identity seems to have been lost to history, but he wasn’t the only colorfully nicknamed troublemaker to eat lead in that very dance hall: Just a month later, a man known as “Steamboat Tommy” was shot dead by the Seattle Mug’s manager after he attacked someone with an iron bar. (NATHAN WEINBENDER)

1899 LAST STOP FOR THE

DYNAMITE EXPRESS! F

irst, the miners seized a train in Burke, Idaho. It was April 29, 1899, and for a decade miners in the Coeur d’Alene mining district had battled to unionize all of its mines so workers could get better pay. But the Bunker Hill Mining Company at Wardner, Idaho, resisted. Its superintendent, Albert Burch, had recently fired 17 workers and refused to recognize the Western Federation of Miners union. So the union members, fearing the precedent Burch might be setting, took action. They took the train in Burke at gunpoint. More men climbed aboard at the next stop, and more again at the next. They kept going, loading on 80 wooden boxes, each containing 50 pounds of dynamite. They picked up 200 more miners in Wallace. By the time they got to the site of the Bunker Hill mine and mill, they

had a thousand men, many wearing masks and carrying guns. Workers of the Bunker Hill mine fled, though at least one was shot to death by the union members. The union members lit the dynamite. The entire Bunker Hill mine and mill exploded. The union members boarded the train, now dubbed the “Dynamite Express,” and went back home. It was not something authorities took lightly. The U.S. Army was called in, and “mass arrests” started on May 4. In the end, 1,000 people were indiscriminately arrested and thrown into a makeshift prison called the “bullpen,” according to excerpts from a book written in 1998 by journalist and author J. Anthony Lukas. The state auditor, Bartlett Sinclair, developed a permit system, endorsed by the U.S. Army, that prevented mines from hiring union members. (WILSON CRISCIONE)


FIGHTS & RIOTS

1882 CANTANKEROUS COOK

FENDS OFF EXPLOSIVE CANNON! N SPOKANE FOUNDER DEMANDS RETRACTION REQUEST — AT GUNPOINT!

ewspaper editor Francis Cook stares down the barrel of two revolvers on the second floor of the Spokan Times offices. Cook’s armed only with an iron typesetting tool. Cook’s wife, with her infant nearby, pleads for her husband’s life. Sign a retraction, or die, his assailants tell him. All this over the spelling of a name. Maybe the sensible thing to do would have been to sign the paper. Don’t bring printing tools to a gunfight, the old saying goes. But even by the standards of the Spokane frontier, Francis Cook is a stubborn man. And Cook hates few men more than Anthony Cannon, a banker and developer, who, along with real-estate magnate James Glover, launched a rival newspaper — the Spokane Chronicle. The newspapers lob Anthony Cannon insults and invective at each other. But the feud may have just remained at a simmer had Cook not misspelled Cannon’s name “McCannon.” Cannon sees this as as a grave insult, storms over to That’s when Cannon, whose found his pistol again, Cook’s office with his son-in-law, Branscomb Bennett, aims at Cook. Cook slings an object across the room at and both men point their guns at Cook. Cannon, and Cannon’s shot goes wide, the bullet blastBut just when it looks like Bennett’s about to fire, ing through the stovepipe and ricocheting to the ceiling. Cook springs into action, snatching up a second iron Chaos follows. The fight devolves into a frenzied printer tool, and knocks the pistols out of one man’s melee, spraying blood and scattering type everywhere. hands — and then the other’s. Bennett scrambles to When the combatants spill out into street, Cannon once retrieve his gun, only to receive a blow from Cook. again tells Cook he’s going to kill him. But not then.

1909 PRESSMAN PUMMELS POL!

A

journalist generally isn’t supposed to insert himself into the story. More specifically, a journalist isn’t supposed to insert his fists into the story by way of a politician’s face. But so it was with the literal fistfight between Spokesman-Review journalist Joe Smith and Washington state Rep. James McArthur, from Spokane’s 6th district. “Smith swung and hit the legislator on the jaw, sending him to the floor,” the Tacoma Times detailed in their article, “Fist Fights on Legislative Floor.” Spokesman-Review reporter Jim Camden elaborated on the context nearly a century later: With alcohol prohibition the big cultural lightning rod, much of the debate in 1909 centered

There are too many witnesses. Cannon and Bennett stumble away with major head wounds. As for Cook? Well, Cook’s just tired. Fighting off two men with guns will do that to you. At least, that’s the version Cook wrote in his newspaper. Other accounts make Cook look a little bit less like Jackie Chan and more like an asshole. Like say, the version in the Chronicle. In that version, Cook threatens the two men before they draw their pistols. And then he hits them when their guard is down, beating the hell out of them. Cannon only fires in self-defense. Cook begs with Cannon not to kill him, promising he’d retract anything he’d ever written about him, and the merciful Cannon lets him live. Francis Cook So which one is true? “Who knows what actually happened,” says Doris Woodard, the 90-yearold author of The Indomitable Francis Cook. “I can’t help but feel that Francis Cook exaggerated. … I’m sure there were rights and wrongs on both sides.” Both Bennett and Cannon were arrested on charges of attempted murder. But the grand jury refused to indict them. The lead juror? Cannon’s ally James Glover. “A GRAND FARCE,” thunders the Spokan Times in reaction. (DANIEL WALTERS)

on the ‘local option’ — whether cities and counties would be allowed to vote to ban alcohol Joe Smith within their boundaries. The Spokesman-Review, back then, was a big fan of banning alcohol — while McArthur, a druggist, was a bit more skeptical on the issue.

Tensions boiled over when, during a local option debate in the state legislature, McArthur accused Smith of misrepresenting him, and tried to grab at papers Smith had in his hand. That’s when Smith swung, laying out McArthur. But then Smith made a crucial mistake. He came back for his hat. That’s when McArthur pounced, according to the Tacoma Times, evening “up matters by giving the newspaper man a black eye before the sergeant-at-arms restored order.” We’re more civilized, today, of course. Journalists generally don’t punch politicians, and with the margin of error of U.S. Sen. Greg Gianforte, politicians usually don’t punch journalists. (DANIEL WALTERS)

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 23


FIGHTS & RIOTS

1938 HITLER HATERS

THROW PUNCHES

AT POLICE!

ANTI-FASCISM PROTEST TURNS VIOLENT

L Wobbly propaganda

1917 LABOR PAIN

ON THE TRAIN!

WOBBLY LEADER ARRESTED AFTER GREAT NORTHERN TRAIN BRAWL!

A

midst the backdrop of World War I, and as great swaths of the West were burning, more than two dozen firefighters boarded a train to take them far from Western Montana’s then-fiery landscape. But before Great Northern passenger train No. 3 arrived in Spokane, a wild fight broke out in one of the cars. Whatever had caused the ensuing “drunken brawl” was considered, however, less crucial to authorities at the time than the affiliations of at least one of the men involved, a fellow named Eugene Delvoye. Delvoye openly told arresting military authorities of his active involvement with the International Workers of the World, also known as the Wobblies. Threats of violence on behalf of the “Wobblies” — a union of unskilled workers who often employed disorderly tactics when voicing demands for better working conditions, hours and treatment of the working class — were not unheard of in the decade surrounding this particular event. Eight years earlier, in 1909, a Wobbly-led free speech battle dramatically unfolded in Spokane’s streets and jails, led by the fiery young Elizabeth Gurley Flynn. Just weeks before this Great Northern train brawl, the Wobblies threatened massive labor strikes in industries across Washington state, including agri-

24 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

culture and lumber, prompting a short-term military occupation of Spokane and a declaration of martial law from the state’s governor. Card-carrying I.W.W. workers were subsequently rounded up and jailed. So when a confessed Wobbly organizer was arrested in a train brawl, authorities were naturally suspicious. While most of the 27 arrested men were released days later for claiming that they were merely spectators, Delvoye was thrown into the Spokane County Jail. There, he then exercised his First Amendment right to openly curse Old Glory in front of other imprisoned I.W.W. members. Considered a vile scandal, this detail was dramatically reported by the Spokane Daily Chronicle as an indication of Delvoye’s “vicious disposition.” The specific spark of the train brawl remains less clear in accounts of the incident, though it was reported that a Great Northern special agent expressly ordered to provide security aboard the train had his “special sheriff’s star” revoked for participating in and encouraging the fight. The agent became intoxicated along with the group of firefighters, and allegedly pulled his gun on another deputy sheriff asked to board the train in Libby, Montana, by railway officials who were, perhaps justly so, wary of trouble from the firefighters. (CHEY SCOTT)

ong before a bunch of angry white dudes went marching with tiki torches in Virginia, the Silver Legion of America, better known as the Silver Shirts, incited a (considerably less) violent brawl when it brought white supremacy to Spokane. With a name and ideology cribbed from Hitler’s so-called “Brownshirt” paramilitary organization, the fascist movement was founded in 1933 by journalist and short-story author William Dudley Pelley, who also worked briefly as a Hollywood screenwriter. (Two of his scripts were made into films starring his friend Lon Chaney.) The end of Pelley’s short movie career coincided with the start of the Great Depression, when he became passionate about right-wing, anti-Communist politics. Three years after starting the Silver Shirts, Pelley launched a presidential campaign as a member of the fringe “Christian Party.” He ran on the platform that America would prosper under his anti-minority dictatorship, a position so obviously incendiary that only one state even allowed Pelley’s name to appear on the ballot: Washington, where he received more than 1,500 votes. It’s obvious, then, that Pelley’s group and its racist rhetoric had amassed a small but devoted following in the Inland Northwest in the years leading up to World War II. In fact, the Silver Shirts had a small administration office in downtown Spokane, and regularly disseminated pro-Nazi literature throughout the city. Their gatherings always prompted protests, with the opposition shouting rallying chants of “We don’t want fascism! We don’t want Silver Shirts!” and “This is Spokane, not Berlin!” On July 18, 1938, as Hitler’s power was intensifying in Germany, Pelley sent Thompson Roy Dudley Pelley Zachary, the movement’s national organizer, to Spokane to make a speech. Some 700 residents, a considerably larger crowd than the 200 or so folks who had come to hear Zachary, congregated outside the venue (which was, according to a 2008 blog post by Jim Kershner, called “Red Men Hall” — yikes) to voice their opposition to the Silver Shirts’ presence in Spokane. When local police attempted to clear the sidewalks of the anti-Silver Shirt protesters, a fight broke out before Zachary had even taken the stage. Eleven protesters — seven men and four women, some of them avowed Communists — were arrested and jailed, and Zachary’s speech went on uninterrupted. (“When we eliminate Communism and Jews from the United States, it will not be with the ballot, but with guns, wading in blood,” he’s quoted as preaching.) The arrested protesters were soon released, and all charges were dropped. Pelley, however, wasn’t so lucky: The Silver Shirts had dissolved by the end of 1941, and he served 8 years in prison on sedition charges. (NATHAN WEINBENDER)


FIGHTS & RIOTS

1946 RIOT! OR RUCKUS? MILITARY MUTINY FOLLOWS MONTHS OF RACE-BASED TENSION

“R

IOT BY HUNDREDS OF NEGROS QUELLED AT SEVEN MILE CAMP” was the headline emblazoned across the tippy top of an Oct. 5, 1946, edition of the Spokane Daily Chronicle. The story under the boldface headline said military and civilian police were called to “a riot by hundreds of Negro aviation engineers,” where at least seven shots were fired. Specifics were sparse, though the commanding officer of Geiger Field military base, Col. Eric Dougan, assured the public that the incident was under control come morning. But the final edition of the Chronicle from that same day walks back the early report, reducing the incident to an “outburst,” involving only 20-25 soldiers. According to the evening edition, “a score of Negro aviation engineers at Seven Mile camp early today raided the arms room at the camp, put on a brief display of gun play and then fled into the hills near the base.” No one was hurt, the paper reported. Both editions reported that the “ruckus” at the military camp was incited by the arrest of four African American soldiers outside a downtown cafe the previous evening. One of the soldiers, apparently drunk, got into a scuffle with a black military policeman. Three other African American soldiers came to the aid of their intoxi-

cated friend, and “disarmed the M.P., took his gun and reportedly said ‘let’s get the other boys out,’” the Chronicle reported. “As in most white communities, the episode created extensive panic in Spokane, reflecting the fragile nature of race relations,” Dwayne A. Mack writes in his 2014 book, Black Spokane: Civil Rights Struggle in the Inland Northwest. Omitted from the daily accounts in the fall of 1946 was deeper context of racial tension simmering on the military base. On July 17, more than 7,000 soldiers gathered to watch a Golden Gloves boxing match between a white fighter and a black fighter, who reportedly forfeited the match. The crowd erupted with disputes over the legitimacy of the victory. By 10:30 that evening, Pvt. Samuel E. Hicks, a black soldier, was found unconscious on the shoulder of a base road 100 yards from the boxing venue, the Chronicle reported. He was later pronounced dead of the “blow of a blunt instrument above his right ear,” and the military investigation “failed to find a murder suspect,” Mack writes.

1961-1964 BOATS, BOOZE AND

BLOOD IN THE STREETS! W

ere they actually riots, or merely overzealous cops cracking down on drunken summertime shenanigans? More than four decades after the heyday of the Diamond Cup hydroplane races in Coeur d’Alene devolved into flying tear gas, fire hoses trained on teenagers and multiple arrests, that question remains. What is clear is that the nighttime scene following the Diamond Cup races in the 1960s got a little testy. Former Coeur d’Alene City Council member Dave Walker recalled the action in a highly entertaining 2010 blog post aiming to separate the “hydroplane riots” facts from fiction (theoldkoot.blogspot.com), and the Coeur d’Alene Press newspaper did the same in a 2013 story headlined “Riots: Setting The Record Straight.” From all accounts, people — particularly visitors in town for the boat races — loved to party in Sherman Avenue’s many bars on those

summer nights. In 1961, police were surprised when the partying got a little out of hand. Some fights and broken windows downtown led to fire hoses, tear gas, even “some National Guard muscle,” according to the Press. The police were ready in 1962 when word of a disturbance came in. Police blocked off a chunk of Sherman and got the 500 or so party people to move on. The next year, police used similar tactics to disperse about 1,000 folks raging on the same stretch of Sherman. In 1964, the “disturbance” shrank and one Spokane teen was charged with inciting a riot from among “the 300-400 young people who tried to start something,” the Press reported. The 1965 hydroplane races were blessedly riot-free, and no one reportedly started something in the festival’s ensuing years. (DAN NAILEN)

In another event on July 29, four African American soldiers — two men and two women — were arrested after police were called to a “disturbance” at a downtown Spokane house where they rented rooms from an African American citizen. At that time, hotels often refused to rent rooms to black people. The secretary of the Spokane’s chapter of the NAACP authored a report about the arrests: A Spokane police detective reportedly dumped cold water on the black female soldiers and ordered them to get dressed while he watched. The women were then held in the county jail for two weeks and were not allowed visitors, phone calls, mail or legal representation. The U.S. military was still officially segregated by race — this was two years before President Harry Truman signed an executive order integrating the armed forces. “Despite blacks bravely serving their country, white Spokane barely changed its racial attitude toward its increasing population of black Americans during that period,” Mack writes. “When black soldiers ventured into the city, they were quickly confronted by law enforcement.” (MITCH RYALS)

1976 NOR’WESTER FESTIVAL GETS LIT! T

hink of it like 2017’s Fyre Festival debacle, but in State Line, Idaho, and with actual fire. The three-day “Nor’Wester ’76” festival was supposed to feature headliners like Bachman-Turner-Overdrive and Blue Oyster Cult. But everything started going wrong from the beginning. The festival was in debt. The first night’s opening had been delayed for five hours because of lack of payment. Bachman-Turner-Overdrive refused to fly in from Vancouver, B.C., after learning they probably wouldn’t get paid. And when a big piece of equipment fell off a forklift and onto a crew member — breaking his leg — the sound and light crew called it quits, deciding to pack up. And that sparked a riot. While only a fraction of the crowd of nearly 7,000 rioted, others cheered them on. Five concessions stands burned, and thousands of pounds of beef and 600 cases of beer were looted. Propane and diesel trucks blew up, sending gouts of flame shooting 50 feet into the air. Rioters pushed a dairy truck over the grandstands, and then set it on fire. Cars and motorcycles tore recklessly through the infield. A huge crane backstage was toppled and set ablaze. Six people were hospitalized — though one merely from a drug overdose. The eight-foot-high plywood fence was burned and looted. “The speedway literally looked like a battlefield during the height of the riot,” Spokesman-Review reporter Les Blumenthal wrote. Security could have stopped the riot — but the security hadn’t been paid either. They left a half-hour before the chaos started. “I don’t think we’ll be having any more of these in this part of Idaho,” Kootenai County Sheriff Thor Fladwed told the Review. (DANIEL WALTERS)

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 25


FIGHTS & RIOTS

1998 FEAR OF NO BEER! WSU STUDENTS FIGHT FOR THE RIGHT TO PARTY

C Evel Knievel

1989 TRIUMPH

OF EVEL! I

t’s a Monday night in downtown Spokane, and Evel Knievel is just minding his own business with some female company at the Ridpath Hotel. Suddenly, Clarence “Cip” Paulsen bursts through the door, sees Knievel with his exgirlfriend, and then beats the crap out of the 56-year-old stuntman. He only relents when Knievel pulls a gun. Knievel, who once tried to jump the Snake River Canyon on a rocket-powered motorcycle (and failed), later claims this fight scared him “half to death.” He sues the hotel for millions, claiming the hotel clerk wrongly gave his key out. But, if you ask Paulsen, who now owns a legal marijuana grow operation in Spokane, that’s not how it went down at all. “I just laughed. I mean, are you kidding me?” Paulsen says of hearing Knievel’s claims. “The guy was a showman. He was a scammer.” As Paulsen tells it, the two buddies had been drinking for hours across the street. Knievel told the front desk to give Paulsen his room key and asked Paulsen to come wake him up from a nap later. When he went up to the room, Paulsen found Knievel with his buddy’s girlfriend. She worried Paulsen would rat them out, and Evel told him to get out. That’s it. No punches. No gun. No fight. In fact, Paulsen says, they met up later at the Baby Bar to drink more. The case, he says, was a sham. “Evel wanted me to lie for him, and I wouldn’t lie for him,” Paulsen says. But by the time the case went to court in 1995, Paulsen had been caught and put in jail for taking part in a major cocaine ring in Spokane. Neither seemed like a reliable storyteller. Still, the late Knievel was awarded about $51,000 from the hotel, for an invasion of privacy. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

26 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

hris Tennant will never forget the night of the Washington State University riot. He’ll never forget the screams of hundreds of college kids surrounding him, or the rocks they threw in fury. He’ll never forget how the flames from the fires they set to Greek Row reflected in their eyes. That night, just after midnight May 3, 1998, he and other Pullman Police Department officers were surrounded by rioters attacking with anything they could get their hands on. Tennant got hit with a cast-iron pot. He thought his leg was broken, and he feared for his life. He saw one person nearby smash an officer’s leg with a manhole cover. When the officer made it to a patrol car, somebody else threw a cement brick at the car, shattering the back window. “And all for what?” asks Tennant. It wasn’t a protest of war, or societal injustice. The Washington State University riot in 1998 centered around one thing: the right to drink beer. Tensions between WSU students, the school and local police were heightened that year, due to a WSU ban on on-campus and fraternity drinking, part of a nationwide crackdown on alcohol in colleges. And around 12:30 am May 3, 1998, officers got a call that a person had been hit by a car in the middle of Greek Row. When police arrived, no injured pedestrian was found. But, as it was the weekend, there was a keg party nearby. Apparently, as Tennant recalls, the partygoers thought police were there to shut it down. And on that night, they weren’t about to let that happen. They threw rocks and beer cans at police. Police promptly called for backup, but it only emboldened the partiers. They threw garbage and portable toilets into the street and lit them on fire. The number of rioters grew to about 200, with hundreds more looking on. By 2 am, police decided they needed to take more serious action to stop it. They called for dozens of Whitman County officers, 18 state troopers and officers from Moscow, Idaho and Latah County. They tried to use tear gas to disperse the crowd, but it backfired, only fueling the crowd even more.

2015 SLAP

SUIT!

P

Tennant says they would have been justified in using lethal force, but they held back. They didn’t want anything like the Kent State shootings. “At the end of the day, even though we were dealing with a mob, they were all college kids,” Tennant says. Luckily, everybody came out alive. Four students and 23 officers were treated for injuries. Police and WSU investigations resulted in a few students being expelled, and 19 convicted of a crime, mostly misdemeanors. Pullman officers left the department. Officers across the state got more training on how to handle riots. And today, alcohol is still prohibited in many places on campus, permitted only in some cases where students are of legal age and in the privacy of their own room. But most importantly, Tennant says, after the riot came a new emphasis for police on communicating with students. Pullman police created a program that had officers get to know students on College Hill. “The idea,” Tennant says, “is it’s a lot harder to beat up on friends than strangers.” (WILSON CRISCIONE)

rivileges enjoyed by white men of wealth are innumerable. Undoubtedly, one benefit of being one of the richest men in Spokane is that, for the most part, physical altercations are beneath you. Just take that shit to court. To his credit, that’s exactly what local developer Harlan Douglass did when he sued an insurance company over its alleged failure to disclose information about a property he’d purchased. At least that’s what he did at first. But when the 78-year-old got off the witness stand in April 2015, he got into a heated discussion with a lawyer for the other side during a recess. Outside the courtroom, the attorney, Warren Robin-

son, put his hand on Douglass’ shoulder and apologized that they weren’t able to settle the issue out of court, according to court documents. Douglass then slapped Robinson’s left ear as the man turned to leave, sending the attorney recoiling in shock, court documents say. Douglass then grabbed Robinson’s wrist and shoved him against the wall, documents state. The developer, who did not return messages seeking comment, was arrested and booked into jail, where he reportedly spent the night, according to news reports. The attack, which Douglass later pleaded guilty to, was considered a felony because it happened in a courtroom hallway. (MITCH RYALS) n


The founders of Power 2 the Poetry (from left: Lynn’Marie White, Bethany Montgomery and AJ McKinney) take advantage of every open mic they can find. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

POETRY

POWER UP

A new grassroots spoken-word poetry movement aims to give voice to the voiceless in Spokane

Y

ou wanna see? She’ll show you right here, right now. In a crowded downtown coffee shop, on the sidewalk outside City Hall, in a shoe store or the basement of a club, Bethany Montgomery is always anxious to perform. The 22-year-old recent Eastern Washington University grad quit her day job and, along with two co-founders, is working full time on building a movement focused on using spoken-word poetry to raise awareness of minority issues and elevate minority voices in Spokane. “Our motto is express, expose, ignite,” Montgomery says. “We’re expressing our truths, we’re exposing people to issues they weren’t aware of, and we’re igniting people with our words to go out into the community and do something about the injustices of underrepresented demographics.” Since January, Montgomery, AJ McKinney and Lynn’Marie White have been performing at any open mic, talent show or event that they can find. Each of them speaks from a different perspective — Montgomery, for example, is black and queer — but all agree that Spokane’s poetry scene is missing black voices. “There wasn’t anybody who looked like me to represent me. I don’t want to take nothing away from Spokane’s poetry community,” Montgomery clarifies. “We’re just adding and bringing a different dynamic to it.” They call themselves Power 2 the Poetry. Hang out in downtown Spokane for long enough, and you’re likely to

BY MITCH RYALS see the trio perform. They’re also hosting a poetry event at the downtown public library Feb. 20 from 6 to 7:30, as well as a poetry slam at Auntie’s Bookstore Feb. 28 at 7.

T

he low roar of the party upstairs seeps into the basement of the House of Soul, where Montgomery, McKinney and White tell about their own experiences and how they came together. Later this evening, each will perform upstairs for those who’ve gathered at the downtown club to celebrate the three-year anniversary of the Black Lens — Spokane’s African American newspaper. McKinney, 26, and Montgomery met as students at EWU. He’d come from Texas after traveling around the country with his godfather, he says. “From Seattle to California to Texas to Baltimore, Maryland and Philadelphia, Florida, New York City and D.C.,” McKinney says. “I’ve been all over the country, and that’s what started encouraging me to speak up more.” He says he first started writing poetry around 16 years old to impress a girl. The relationship didn’t work out, but McKinney stuck with the art as an outlet. Then, during a visit to a college campus in Federal Way, he stepped on stage for an open mic for the first time. “I recited a poem right there,” he says. “I just made it up. That’s my thing. Anyone can give me a topic, and I’ll do a poem right there on the spot.”

Montgomery came to Cheney from Tacoma on a scholarship to play basketball, which she says took up most of her time until a health condition forced her into early retirement. With a nudge from McKinney, she revived a lost interest in poetry. “It was always just for me, it was my escape, it was what I used to heal,” she says, adding that when she and McKinney began talking seriously about a movement, she had a briefcase full of old poems she’d written but only showed a few people. “I would only ever share them with my mom, and then I started sharing them with my girlfriend, and she was like ‘People need to hear you.’” Starting in December of last year, the two began talking more seriously about elevating their passion from casual hobby to a public movement. Then, almost by almost pure chance, they met the third member — White. This past New Year’s Eve, McKinney got into a breakdance battle at the Red Room Lounge. He faced off against White. Today, the two dispute who actually won, but afterward they started talking. “He started spittin’ poetry to me,” White says. “I don’t remember exactly what he said, but it flowed pretty well, and he knew what he was talking about.” White mentioned to McKinney that she’s been writ...continued on next page

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 27


CULTURE | POETRY

How to use

“POWER UP,” CONTINUED...

THIS

ing poetry and short stories since she was a kid living in Detroit. “I was born and raised in the ghetto, lived in a trap house for most of my life until I moved here,” White says. “I was always a writer, and that was my escape from reality when I lived in Michigan.” Finally, she gave in to McKinney and Montgomery’s pleas to perform. The softest spoken of the three, White draws from her childhood experience helping to raise her siblings and her brother’s murder in Detroit as inspiration for her poetry. To this day, she says, she doesn’t know who killed her brother. “There was a witness,” she says, “But the witness disappeared. My brother’s case was never fought for, so nobody knows the real story.” While Montgomery has devoted her full attention to building up Power 2 the Poetry’s brand, White is currently finishing her final quarter at Spokane Falls Community College, she says, and working. McKinney, too, has a day job as a security guard. But in their free time, they’re either rehearsing or performing.

M

ontgomery goes last. After an introduction from Sandy Williams, publisher and editor of the Black Lens, McKinney and White deliver their performances to those gathered for the newspaper’s anniversary party. “I came across some young people,” Williams says from the stage. “One of the things I’ve wanted for many years was to have a connection with the younger generation. I’ve been at this for a while, and I’m ready to pass the torch. So I’m excited that there’s some young folk, who are showing up, who are some powerful people.” McKinney, who goes by AJ the Wordsmith, asks the crowd to shout out topics: “Police! Unity! Village! Black Lives Matter!” voices from the crowd yell.

White is up next. She interlaces her spoken word slam with a song. The piece is called “23 at War,” about the struggle of growing up in violence and poverty. “Born and raised in Detroit city where shots are poppin’ off and the end results are never pretty,” she says. “Another body we’ve got to bury, another friend and this shit’s scary.” Then Montgomery grabs the mic, her long braids dangle past her shoulders, and she launches into a fiery piece about Black Lives Matter. “Yes we do understand that all lives matter, too, but there are still too many people confused,” she says on stage, her fist raised in the air. “Because black men, women and children are being killed in the streets, murdered in cold blood by the crooked police. So you see, too many do not understand MORE EVENTS what this thing, black lives matter, Visit Inlander.com for means.” complete listings of Since that performance, the local events. trio has delivered slams in front of the Spokane City Council and took first place in the EWU talent show. Their Facebook page is packed with videos of impromptu gigs. Next, they’re hoping to form relationships with Spokane’s chapter of the NAACP, the school district and the police department, Montgomery says. “We want to come into schools and do workshops, let them have performances and let them know that they matter, and their voices matter,” she says. “We’re a movement promoting freedom of expression and providing a platform for the underrepresented demographic.” n Power 2 The Poetry Black History Month Open Mic • Tue, Feb. 20 at 6 pm • Spokane Downtown Public Library 3rd Floor Stage • 906 W. Main Ave. • power2thepoetry.com

We’ve Remodeled!

PULL-OUT SECTION

Pull down then out

NOT a snowboard. NOT ski poles.

magazine is now

YES a resource you keep and share with friends.

From fun with fat-tire bikes to the migration to downtown living, and from this year’s hottest paint colors to fresh, Ethiopian recipes, you’ll find it all in the first edition of Inlander Health & Home!

Now you know how!

28 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

On stands now!

PULL-OUT & KEEP! SNOWLANDER

2018


FEBRUARY 2018 SUPPLEMENT TO THE INLANDER

SHRED

FEBRUARY 2018 SNOWLANDER 1


Stay&Play PACKAGES

• 1 Night Lodging • Lift Ticket • Indoor Waterpark Access for duration of stay 1 hour east of Spokane

KELLOGG, IDAHO

SilverMt.com | 855.810.5061

TONIGHT! FEBRUARY 15TH THE GARLAND THEATER

$

5 ADMISSION | DOORS AT 7:00 | MOVIE AT 8:00

FREE POPCORN WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

The perfect Valentine’s date — this time with WINE! 2 SNOWLANDER FEBRUARY 2018

COURTESY OF

MARYHILL WINEMAKERS RED AND VIOGNIER

FREE PIZZA! WHILE SUPPLIES LAST

COURTESY OF


EDITOR’S NOTE THERE’S STILL TIME TO ENJOY SNOW-COVERED MOUNTAINS F

or skiing and snowboarding, this really can be the best time of the season. The base is typically great and with every passing storm the coverage just gets better and better. For those who don’t want to deal with the elements down low in the valleys, the snowline has remained primarily above town elevation, leaving a much simpler way of living day-to-day life. Now, as we move into the spring season, ski days get longer, the presence of bluebird spring skiing days become more prevalent and each mountain is offering events galore to entice viewers and spectators to come to their mountains. The ease of this season continues with improving mountain pass and highway conditions — all making spring storm chasing a little more enticing.

WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SNOWLANDERNW

SNOWLANDER.COM MOUNTAIN PEOPLE

4

GETAWAY

6

EVENTS

10

LAST RUN

14

COVER PHOTO BY

BOB LEGASA

A good reminder this time of year is snowline. I wrote about this in a blog a couple of seasons ago. How important it is to see the snowline when living in the valleys. It seems like doomsday when waking up every morning to pouring rain. Check your webcams, social media outlets and watch the local news. Skiing has been great — even with Mother Nature’s mood swings. With the great coverage, the mountains have an incredible way of “healing” easily after a “mixedprecip” event. Don’t believe it? Then head to the mountains and find out for yourself. Sure, I know we all love watching the Winter Olympics, but wouldn’t you rather be on the mountain yourself, cutting some new tracks down the hill? Cheers to a strong finish to an already epic season! — Jen Forsyth Snowlander Editor jen@snowlander.com

night skiing

l a i c e p s

WED-THUR

S R E N N I D 2 S T 2 TICKE

40

ONLY

$

Night ski special valid Wednesdays and Thursdays 4pm - 9pm

M T S P O K A N E .CO M JUST 28 MILES FROM DOWNTOWN SPOKANE! FEBRUARY 2018 SNOWLANDER 3


MOUNTAIN PEOPLE

T.J. Sneva’s company builds around 1,000 pairs of skis and snow skates a year.

CHRISTIAN WILSON PHOTO

THE MAN BEHIND THE NAME From skis to race cars, T.J. Sneva stays in the fast lane

M

any people are familiar with the name — as a ski manufacturer, race car driver, born and raised Spokane local. The man behind the name is T.J.

Sneva. Born in Spokane 41 years ago, he started skiing at age 3 at 49 Degrees North with his family, and it was over from there. As Sneva explains, “I went with my uncle and cousin and immediately fell in love with skiing.” Over the years, he skied mainly at 49 but did venture over to Schweitzer on occasion. After graduation from high school, he describes, “I didn’t have a college plan and there was year-round skiing at Mt. Hood so I moved there.” Over the course of his tenure in Oregon, he groomed at Ski Bowl, one of the several resorts located under Oregon’s iconic volcano. It was during his time in western Oregon that the idea of making skis would start to come to fruition. It was all based on the twin-tip technology that snowboarders were enjoying. Sneva had heard a rumor that a snowboard manufacturer was going to implement this same concept but in skis. That is what he was anxiously hoping for, anyway. After waiting, he finally called the company he had heard the rumor about and they denied it. It was then that he started working on making skis. Fast forward to where he and his grandfather built their own ski press, the first pair of Sneva skis were born and the original twin-tip ski was introduced to the world. “We found the solution to the problem,” Sneva says.

4 SNOWLANDER FEBRUARY 2018

BY JEN FORSYTH

The problem being the transition from flat-tailed skis to a twin-tip ski. That was in 1994 and has been going ever since. There was a small hiatus from the forward momentum of being a full-time ski manufacturer when he moved to Indiana to follow in his family’s path of race car driving.

“I have skied so many places. And every time I go somewhere, I think about how spoiled we are back at home.” While he still skied in the winter and made skis out of Speedway, Indiana, his focus shifted seasonally — building skis in the winter and spending all his time on the track in the summer. He grew up around racing cars so this was a logical step in his life’s journey. His younger years were spent travelling to races in his family’s motorhome. “My entire family raced cars,” he says. “My grandfather, his five boys including my dad, and my Uncle Tom won Indy in 1983.” His stint in the Midwest lasted about five years and

upon his return to the Inland Northwest, he threw himself back into his manufacturing business and all the great reasons why we live in the Northwest. His favorite aspects of the Inland Northwest? “Mountains, skiing,” he says. “We are spoiled. We have five mountains within an hour.” He adds, “I have skied so many places. And every time I go somewhere, I think about how spoiled we are back at home.” In addition to keeping crazy busy with this manufacturing business which now includes skis and snow skates, Sneva has recently gotten back into race car driving. He can often be found at the Stateline racetrack as well as travelling throughout the Northwest and Canada in the skiing off-season. Over the years, he has raced all sorts of cars and as Sneva reports, “I’d drive anything they would let me get behind.” It was the year when he moved back to Spokane that he met his now-wife, Lauren, coincidentally at the Two Seven Public House on the 27th of the month. They have a 3-year old daughter aptly named Winter who recently bagged the accomplishment of skiing from the top to bottom at 49 Degrees North following in her dad’s footsteps of a passionate skier. “It wasn’t the skiing that made me nervous,” Sneva says. “It was the chairlift ride, thinking she would want to get off before we got to the top.” T.J. and Lauren are excited to be growing their family as well as their business with another little girl on the way. n


Photo by Henry Georgi

DEEP S N OW. DEEP S AV I N G S .

BOOK BY FEB. 28, 2018. BLACKOUT DATES & OTHER RESTRICTIONS APPLY.

Meet the People Who Shaped the Inland Northwest

ONCE

A YEAR

CLEARANCE

S AV E

pants & coats sale

30%

TO

(WHILE SUPPLIES LAST)

50%

OFF!

JACKETS SNOWPANTS Inlander Histories Volume 1 & 2

On Sale Now

Inlander.com/books

30

% OFF

50

% OFF

SALE ENDS FEB 25TH

4505 N Division St • 509-325-1620 FEBRUARY 2018 SNOWLANDER 5 SportsOutlet_PresidentsSale_021518_10H_EW.pdf


GETAWAY

TEEN SPIRIT Big cats, big powder and bigger air STORY AND PHOTOS BY BOB LEGASA

O

ver the course of 30-plus years as a professional skier, you meet a few skiers who possess an incredible talent. Some of these skiers come into their own in their mid- to late-20s and others at a very early age. A friend of mine, pro skier Matt Reardon, who lives in Squaw Valley, California, called me up one day last winter and said, “You really need to check this 14-year-old Karsten Hart out. This kid shreds on skis and I know he’s someone you need to get on our TV show.” When Matt makes a suggestion like that, you go with it and check it out. I asked Matt to send some photos or video of Karsten. I barely put down the phone and my email was blowing up as Matt was sending me incredible photos and video of this 14-year-old throwing huge backflips and skiing legendary runs at Squaw Valley. The big Backies were impressive but what really caught my attention was Karsten’s descent down Squaw Valley’s Eagles Nest, a 60-plus-degree slope of granite covered by snow. Eagle’s Nest will make even the most seasoned pro pucker. With this prodding by Matt, I agreed that I needed to get

6 SNOWLANDER FEBRUARY 2018

Karsten on video. I made a phone call to my friend, Paula Gual, owner of Big Red Cats. Big Red Cats is a catskiing operation based out of Red Mountain Resort near Rossland, British Columbia, which is only a two and half hour drive from Spokane. Big Red is one of the few backcountry operations that will take young, accomplished skiers and boarders into the backcountry to experience the legendary Kootenay powder. After getting the March date and venue locked down, I got the wheels turning and put together a group of three other teen ski racers who knew how to arc a ski. We had Karsten Hart from Squaw Valley, California, Schweitzer Mountain Resort Alpine Racing team members Morgan Wohllaib and Parker Overby, and Sun Valley’s Axel Hattrup, the son of ’80s ski-film star Mike Hattrup. Throughout the winter these kids spend endless hours training on hard, icy snow, chasing gates, readying themselves for weekly USSA Ski Races, which are held at resorts across the western United States. This trip to BRC was a chance for them to unwind and free ski after a long season of ski racing. ...continued on page 8


LEASE A NEW 2018

484

$

Enclave

PER MONTH

(36 month lease)

With $2,000 Down $39,995 MSRP

Base monthly rental excludes tax, title, license and acq fee.

Come see the All New 2018 Buick Enclave

LEASE A NEW 2018

299

$

Terrain

PER MONTH

(36 month lease)

With $1,000 Down $24,995 MSRP

Base monthly rental excludes tax, title, license and acq fee.

Come see the All New 2018 GMC Terrain

Come in for Special Auto Show Pricing through February 28, 2018

BUICK GMC

Price is after any applicable rebates and does not include tax, license and doc fee.

21502 E. George Gee Ave. • 509.927.1000 Thur 2/15, Inlander

BUCK NIGHT SATURDAY 2/17 vs. TRI-CITY AMERICANS $1 hotdogs and Coca-Cola products all night long. Game Time:

Sponsored By:

For Tickets Call 509.535.PUCK

7 PM

L RY R I VAM E GA

www.SPOKANECHIEFS.com

FEBRUARY 2018 SNOWLANDER 7


GETAWAY

Father and son — Mike and Axel Hattrup — enjoy a rare opportunity to ski together.

“TEEN SPIRIT,” CONTINUED...

N

ot to be left out of the fun, the kids’ fathers also accompanied us. They told their spouses they were only coming along as “chaperones,” just to make sure their kids stayed in line. Right! The date was March 7 and we met at the BRC base at the bottom of Red Mountain, where we signed waivers and were given our backcountry emergency gear like a shovel, probe and transceiver. From there it was just a short drive to the base of the mountain, where BRC has its backcountry ski tenure. After a transceiver and avalanche-rescue training orientation, we loaded up the cat and headed up. The intensity on the kids’ faces as we unloaded gear above Bay Window, a nice wide-open ski run, was priceless — excitement and nervousness all in one package. After lead guide and owner of Big Red Cats Kieren Gaul directed the skiers to where we were going to be skiing, he pushed off and skied down through the cutback positioning himself on a nice, high vantage point where he radioed up to the tail guide and gave his blessing to send the kids one at a time every 30 seconds. That nervous look quickly disappeared as each kid pushed off through the knee-deep powder. It didn’t take more than a few turns and these kids were back in their Happy Place, letting their skis do the work. Throughout the morning we ventured into handful of some of Big Red Cats 500 named ski runs on 8 different mountains, spanning over 19,300 skiable acres. The wide variety in the terrain kept us wanting more, from glade skiing to wide-open cut blocks and even a few small rock bands and chutes. You could see the kids’ confidence grow more and more after each run as they became more comfortable skiing the deep stuff. We found that snow really seemed to collect in the trees where it had that light, feathery feel as you skied through it. This was certainly a big change from the hard, icy race courses they’ve been skiing on all season. Morgan loved this: “The trees were so much fun, there was such good snow in there. You just have to pick your line between the trees.”

8 SNOWLANDER FEBRUARY 2018

Young Guns Karsten and Axel were seeking out every little feature and hit they could find, catching air into that bottomless powder. Karsten described it like this: “When you jump and land in that soft snow, it’s like jumping into heaven.” The dads were also taking advantage of their socalled chaperone position and blasting the steeps and trees like they were 14 years old. This trip also turned into a great bonding experience as the kids don’t get to ski with their dads as much as they used to because of their training, travel and ski-racing schedules. As Parker ONLINE bigredcatskiing.com mentions: “Skiing with my dad was definitely a cool experience. We got to room together and hang out. It was cool seeing him ski like this, hucking cliffs and stuff.” Axel Hattrup, who growing up watched his dad in numerous Greg Stump ski videos like Blizzard of Awes, was able to witness Mike in his element. As Axel said, “Catskiing with my dad was fun. I got to see a whole other side of him skiing powder and everything, I even saw him do a helicopter.”

O

n one of our numerous tree runs, we came upon the perfect jump setup which immediately caught the kids’ attention. They wanted to hit the jump a few times so the dads packed out the in-run and after about 10 minutes of prepping the kids were ready to fly. First off Axel and Karsten threw big 360s to the bottom. Next up Parker Overby stepped up to the plate and sent it huge, throwing a Shifty, which is where you fly through the air in a racer tuck and you twist your skis to the side. The Big Air game was on now and these boys couldn’t hike back up the hill fast enough. After a couple more jumps, you could see Morgan Wohllaib pacing nervously at the top of the in-run as she really wanted to jump but hadn’t done much jumping before. With a little pep talk from her father, Alex Wohllaib,

Morgan was skiing down the in-run and flying through the air nailing her first big air attempt with a huge Spread Eagle. Morgan wasn’t gonna let the boys have all the fun: “I definitely felt like I pushed myself and tested my limits after being around these younger kids that can do some pretty cool stuff.” The kids were feeding off of each other’s energy so both Axel and Karsten felt it was time to seize this perfect opportunity and try Double Backflips. Both boys hiked up 20 feet higher from where they were starting for their single backflips. They felt this would be enough speed to go higher and farther to pull off one more flip. First off was Karsten, who landed a hair short. Watching Karstens first jump, Axel stepped up another 10 feet and skated down the in-run and off the jump — one, two flips, and he sees the landing but catches a tip right at the end. Both these kids gave it one more go and both were so, so close to skiing it out. Axel was definitely full of energy after the attempts: “It was kinda scary having to tuck again and then trying to pick out a landing but being able to try new tricks out in the powder, being able to fall and not get hurt, yeah, that was fun” After about an hour jump session, it was time to gather up our stuff and head back down to the cat to try and bang out two more runs before we were done for the day. By now the kids’ stoke level was pegging at 10 as we made our way over to a run called Sunset, which is 2,000 vertical feet of open glades and steeps which funnels you down through a huge, wide open cutblock to finish. Parker Overby recalls: “Yeah, having fun is what it’s all about and sometimes training and competing can get a little stressful but doing stuff like this is really fun and relaxing. This is super fun” Don’t be surprised if you see these kids in ski magazines or on TV over the next few years — they’re the real deal! What Karsten liked most about this trip: “I love skiing with people I don’t have to wait for, I’m not really a waiting guy.” n


Delicious

IS ON THE MENU What are you having2?

FEBRUARY 22 - MARCH 3

Menus available online Pick up the Event Guide in next week’s Inlander •

InlanderRestaurantWeek.com

#InlanderRW

Benefiting

FEBRUARY 2018 SNOWLANDER 9


WINTER EVENTS FEBRUARY LADIES DAY This all-day program includes a lift ticket and rental, continental breakfast and three hours of personalized instruction from female instructors, followed by lunch and video analysis. Offered Feb. 9 and March 2, from 9 am-3 pm. $89. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220) LOOKOUT FREE SKI SCHOOL PROGRAM Kids can learn how to ski or snowboard, or hone their skills, with options for beginner, intermediate and advance levels. Ages 6-17. Free. Saturdays starting at 10 am, through March 10. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) DOWNHILL DIVAS The mountain’s ski and snowboard program for women is taught by its top female ski/snowboard instructors, who create a welcoming learning environment for all. Fridays from 1-3 pm, through March. $45/session. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) SANDPOINT WINTER CARNIVAL The annual winter festival kicks off with the Parade of Lights (Feb. 16) through downtown Sandpoint, and continues with daily events, including live music, fireworks, a pub crawl, and much more. The festival concludes with the K9 Keg Pull, on Sun, Feb. 25. Events from Feb. 16-25. Events in and around Sandpoint, including Schweitzer Mountain Resort. Details and complete schedule at sandpointwintercarnival.com PRESIDENT’S DAY WEEKEND The long weekend at Schweitzer is packed with family activities, including twilight skiing, snowshoeing, tubing, live music in Taps, kids’ activities, a fireworks show and parade on Sunday night and more. Feb. 16-18. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com NIGHT SKIING AT 49 The mountain is illuminated after sunset for four nights this season, with runs open on the upper and lower mountain. Each evening also serves as a canned food drive, with discounted ($5) lift tickets offered to those who donate three or more cans of food ($15 without). Feb. 17 from 4-8 pm. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. ski49n.com (509-9356649)

10 SNOWLANDER FEBRUARY 2018

MT. SPOKANE SNOWSHOE TOUR Learn the basics of this winter activity during a guided hike on the mountain’s trails. Fee includes equipment, guide, trail fees, guides and transportation. $29/person (ages 13-17 are $25 with participating adult). Offered Feb. 17 and 19; and March 17 from 10 am-2 pm. Departs from Yokes Foods, 14202 N. Market. Register at spokaneparks.org WOMEN’S 49 DEGREES SNOWSHOE TOUR Tour the trails with a guide who offers tips on how to have better control on your snowshoes in a non-competitive atmosphere geared toward women. Includes lunch in a yurt, trail pass and all equipment. $39/person (ages 15+). Feb. 17 and March 10, from 10 am-1 pm. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. Register at spokaneparks.org CROSS COUNTRY SKI LESSONS Learn the basics of this outdoor winter activity with the Spokane Nordic Ski Association’s certified instructors. Fee includes skis, boots, poles, fees, instruction and transportation. $45/person (ages 13-17 are $37 with participating adult). Feb. 17 and 24 from 9 am-3 pm. Departs from Yokes Foods, 14202 N. Market. Register at spokaneparks.org CROSS COUNTRY SKIING AT DEER CREEK Explore this little known pass of the scenic Kettle Range. Fee includes transportation, instruction, equipment and ski area fees. Sun, Feb. 18 from 8 am-6 pm. $45/person (ages 18+). Departs from Wandermere Rite Aid, 12312 N. Division. Register at spokaneparks.org YOUR TURNS! LADIES EVENT Spend the day developing your skills with Lisa Densmore Ballard, former U.S. Ski Team member, current Master Racer and 2017 Super G Champion, during this exclusive women’s event that includes breakfast, lunch, equipment, instruction and an apres party. Wed, Feb. 21 from 9 am-4 pm. $139/ person, plus $20 lift ticket. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220) SECOND ANNUAL BANKED SLALOM A timed competition at Swedes Folly. Feb. 24 from 11 am-2 pm. $15 for competitors. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220)

Celebrate the remaining days of snow during the Sandpoint Winter Carnival Feb. 16-25. SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT PHOTO MOONLIGHT CROSS COUNTRY SKI TOUR & DINNER An evening tour across Mt. Spokane State Park followed by dinner from Greenbluff Fresh Catering Co. Snowshoeing experience is recommended; a discount offered for using your own equipment. $53/person. Feb. 24 from 6-9 pm. Meets at Mt. Spokane State Park, Selkirk Lodge Nordic Area. Register at spokaneparks.org MOONLIGHT SNOWSHOE HIKE & DINNER Explore the moonlit trails of Mt. Spokane and return to the Selkirk Lodge for a warm dinner from Greenbluff Fresh Catering Co. Fee includes guide, equipment and meal. ($5 discount for

using your own equipment; Sno-Park and Discover Pass required). $53/person (ages 18+). Feb. 24 from 6-9 pm. Mt. Spokane State Park, Selkirk Lodge. Register at spokaneparks.org RACE LIKE AN OLYMPIAN Try your hand at alpine skiing like the pros during this head-to-head format race series on a dual slalom course. Feb. 24 from 1-2:30 pm. Free; lift ticket required. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208744-1301) SHE JUMPS AT SCHWEITZER The national campaign She Jumps unites women as they support and mentor each other in the outdoor

sports world. This retro-themed event at Schweitzer benefits the nonprofit’s programs for women and youth. Sun, Feb. 25 from 8:30 am-5 pm. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com UP, DOWN, ROUND & ROUND This late season event includes fat bike, telemark, splitboard and and AT events, with prizes for the top three finishers in each category, male and female. Sun, Feb. 25 starting at 8:30 am. (event coincides with military, firefighter, EMT and nurses appreciation day). Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301)


SNEVA SKIS DEMO DAY Reps from Spokane-based Sneva Manufacturing are onsite to offer demos of their latest skis. Sun, Feb. 25 from 9 am-2 pm. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com FAT TIRE BIKE DAY Come try out these special bikes with oversized tires made for pedaling through the snow, with demos, rentals and more. Sun, Feb. 25. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. Register at spokaneparks.org KPND SKI & BOARD PARTY A party with KPND radio, Wallace Brewing and Mt. Spokane in Foggy Bottom Lounge. Wed, Feb. 28 from 5-8 pm. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220)

MARCH DEMO DAYS Check out new gear from snowsport manufacturers and take it out for a test run before you invest. Fri, March 2 (Arbor Snowboards); Sun, March 4 (Sego Skis Co.) and Sat, March 17 (Meier Skis). See website for details and times. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220)

Ski and Stay in Whitefish, MT! WHAT IS THE WHITE GLOVE EXPERIENCE? Let us take care of you this ski season. Stay with us and you will receive:

Complimentary Shuttle to Downtown Whitefish Complimentary Hot Breakfast Outdoor Hot Tub and Outdoor Heated Pool Complimentary Transportation to Whitefish Mountain Resort

Rocky Mountain Lodge 6510 Hwy 93 South, Whitefish, MT 59937 Phone: (800) 862-2569 rockymtnlodge.com Each Best Western® branded hotel is independently owned and operated.

Complimentary Ski Van Service to/from the Mountain Slope Packs Lift Tickets for Purchase at Front Desk S’mores Kits & Fire Pits Boot Dryers Available Indoor/Outdoor Heater Pool & Hot Tub The Den: Lounge with Pool Table, Shuffleboard & an 80 inch TV Hot Cocoa, Cookies & More!

920 Spokane Avenue, Whitefish, MT 59937 (877) 342-0751 | ThePineLodge.com

NM We’re

SO MUCH DEEPER than just THE POWDER

MOONLIGHT SNOWSHOE HIKE Activity Center staff lead a guided, 3-mile hike through the old growth forests with the moon to light the way. At the end of the hike, enjoy warm food and drinks in Gourmandie. $40/person (preregistration required). Ages 13+. March 2 from 4-8 pm. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com MEGA DEMO DAY More than 15 ski and snowboard manufacturers and brands are on site, offering more than 400 skis and snowboards from the 2018-19 season lineup for guests to take on test runs. All proceeds from event tickets benefit the Panhandle Alliance for Education. Sat, March 3 from 7 am-3 pm. $40+, pre-registration suggested. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com ...continued on next page

VISITSANDPOINT.COM Sandpoint is the kind of place to really find yourself. Of course, there’s plenty of deep powder skiing at Schweitzer Mountain. But when it’s aprés ski time, there is so much more: Amazing entertainment, award-winning breweries and wineries, art galleries, live music and performing arts and outstanding culinary choices. Go deep this winter, to Sandpoint, Idaho.

You should be

HERE

Get visitor information at 800-800-2106 www.VisitSandpoint.com

FEBRUARY 2018 SNOWLANDER 11


WINTER EVENTS BOYD HILL SNOWSKATE SORTANATURAL BANKED SLALOM The fourth annual snowskate (a binding-free skateboard for the snow) contest hosted by the Coeur d’Alenebased Boyd Hill, in the Rolling Thunder Natural Terrain Park. Sat, March 3 at 10 am. $30. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301)

tricks. $35-$40 (lift ticket required). Sat, March 3 from 9 am-3:30 pm. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com

HEADLAMP SNOWSHOE HIKE A nighttime hike through the quiet, snowy forests of Mt. Spokane. Fee includes guides, equipment and transportation. $21/person (ages 15+). March 3, from 6-9 pm. Departs from Yokes Foods, 14202 N. Market. Register at spokaneparks.org

SKY HOUSE MOONLIGHT DINNER Start off the evening with a ride to the summit on the quad chairlift, followed by a special Spanish-themed, seven-course dinner from Chef Jordan Hansen, featuring wine pairings. After dinner, take a snow cat ride back down the mountain. $200/person; reservations required. Sat, March 3 from 5:30-8:30 pm. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com

PAWS AND POLE A fun outing in the snow on skis or snowshoes and with your canine best pal in tow. Sat, March 3 (details TBA). 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. Register at spokaneparks.org

RETRO DAY Bust out your straight skis and retro one pieces for this annual theme day at Mt. Spokane. Sat, March 10. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220)

SMOKING ACES ANTE UP SLOPESTYLE The tour returns to Schweitzer for the third year in a row, offering competitive divisions for all ages and skill levels to throw down their best

MARCHI GRAS Celebrate with a prize-loaded balloon drop, a New Orleans-inspired menu, night skiing, live music and a special Nachtspektakel trek to the Mountain House for a buffet-style meal and beer

February 16-25

($30). Sat, March 10. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (208-344-2675) STOMP GAMES Skiers and snowboarders of all ages are invited to compete in this banked slalom event with divisions for all skill levels. All racers get two runs, with the fastest counting for their final time. March 10-11. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com SNOWSHOE & WINE TASTING Enjoy a day exploring the trails of Mt. Spokane followed by a wine tasting at Townshend Winery on Green Bluff. Equipment, guides and transportation included. $37/person. Sun, March 11 from 10 am-3:30 pm. Departs from Yokes Foods, 14202 N. Market. Register at spokaneparks.org HAWAIIAN DAYS The annual end-of-season celebration includes the pond skim, a barbecue on the lodge deck, music, raffles benefiting the 49 Ski Patrol and more. Sat, March 17. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. Register at spokaneparks.org

2018

CONCERT AT THE PANIDA: PETTY FEVER (TOM PETTY TRIBUTE) – FEB. 16 WEIRD WONDERFUL WINTER PARADE OF LIGHTS: 5:30PM DOWNTOWN SANDPOINT – FEB. 16 AFTER PARADE PARTY IN THE STREET: AT PEND D’OREILLE WINERY – FEB. 16 MICKDUFF’S BEERHALL 4TH ANNUAL WINTER CARNIVAL CORNHOLE CLASSIC: FEB. 17 LAUGHING DOG BEER PAIRING DINNER AT JALAPENO’S: DINNER BEGINS AT 6:30PM – FEB. 20 KPND SKI PARTY: AT TRINITY AT CITY BEACH – FEB. 21 DINE OUT FOR A CAUSE – TRINITY AT CITY BEACH: FEB. 22 BENEFITTING BONNER COUNTY FOOD BANK 4:30P TO CLOSE WEIRD WONDERFUL WINTER PUB CRAWL: FEB. 24 CONCERT AT THE HIVE: DIRTY REVIVAL – FEB. 24 EICHARDTS K-9 KEG PULL: AT THE GRANARY – FEB. 25

Pond skim to the end of the season during Hawaiian Days at 49. ST. PATTY’S DAY PARTY Activities on the mountain include a crazy costume contest, a kids’ scavenger hunt and 10 Barrel Brewfest Party. Sat, March 17. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) VERTICAL EXPRESS FOR MS The day-long community skiing fundraiser benefits research and treat-

ment of MS through the nonprofit Can Do Multiple Sclerosis. Events include the Amateur Ski Race, a paintball shooting, fat bike competitions, prizes, live/silent auction, a themed party and more. Sign up your team online at mscando.org/schweitzer. Sat, March 17 from 9 am-3:30 pm. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com

OUR 45th YEAR

SNOWSHOE HIKES, KIDS CRAFTS & CAMPFIRE – FEB. 18 “LET IT GLOW!” NIGHT PARADE AND FIREWORKS – FEB. 18 SCHWEITZER FINAL STARLIGHT PARTY “007” THEME – FEB. 23

LIVE MUSIC EVERY NIGHT ALL OVER SANDPOINT

for more event information:

visitsandpoint.com

OR sandpointwintercarnival.com 12 SNOWLANDER FEBRUARY 2018

49 DEGREES NORTH PHOTO


SKI & SNOWBOARD INSTRUCTOR TRAINING The mountain offers two days of free training and evaluation taught by certified clinicians, covering technique, how to teach others and more. Successful candidates will be invited to join Lookout’s Snowsports School. March 17-18. Free. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) KREM FREE2SKI CANNED FOOD DRIVE Donate eight or more cans of food to benefit Second Harvest and get a free lift ticket. Sun, March 18 from 9 am-4 pm. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220) FAMILY FUN DAY It’s also Military Ski Free Day; activities on the mountain include a kids obstacle course on the Bunny Hill, with race gates to slalom around and other features to cruise though. Sat, March 24 from 9 am-4 pm. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. mtspokane.com (238-2220)

OYSTERFEST The annual seafood buffet returns to the mountain. Details TBA. Sat, March 24. 49 Degrees North, 3311 Flowery Trail Rd., Chewelah. Register at spokaneparks.org 24 HOURS OF SCHWEITZER This year’s event includes a new race format, with a 2,400-foot elevation change top-to-bottom giant slalom race from the Sky House to Outback lodge. Sat, March 24 from 7:30 am to 7:30 am on Sun, March 25. More details at 24hoursforhank.org. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com SPRING FLING LUAU The end-of-season celebration includes the cardboard box derby, pond skim and kids activities, along with the beach party-themed luau. Sat, March 31. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) SPRING CARNIVAL Kick off spring break with a pond skim, costume contest and more (details TBA). Sat, March 31. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (208344-2675)

APRIL EASTER AT SILVER The day starts with an Easter Service, brunch and egg hunt on the mountain. Activities continue in the Silver Rapids Waterpark. Sun, April 1. Silver Mountain Resort, 610 Bunker Ave., Kellogg, Idaho. silvermt.com (208-344-2675) SCHPRING FINALE This end-of-season celebration includes the cardboard box derby, pond skim and much more. April 7-8, details TBA. Schweitzer Mountain Resort, 10000 Schweitzer Mountain Rd., Sandpoint, Idaho. schweitzer.com DRINK OUR BARRELS DRY PARTY Help Lookout close out another successful season by doing your duty to empty three freshlytapped barrels of beer. Includes prize drawings, swag giveaways and more. Sun, April 8. Lookout Pass, I-90 Exit 0 at Mullan, Idaho. skilookout.com (208-744-1301) n

A brand new affordable community along the Spokane River NOW LEASING: 2 & 3 bedrooms starting at

765

$

(888) 851-4739

2865 W. Elliott Drive • Spokane, WA 99224

SKI & BOARD PARTIES 2017/2018

Dec 27 Capone’s Pub & Grill 751 N. 4th St., Coeur d’Alene, ID (208) 667-4843 Jan 24 O’Malley’s Sports Pub and Grill 13742 W. Hwy 53, Rathdrum, Id. (208) 687 5996 -ANDLaughing Dog Brewing 805 Schweitzer Plaza Dr. Ponderay, Id. 83852 Jan 31 Foggy Bottom Lounge Mt Spokane, Wa. (509) 238 2220 Feb 14 Capone’s Pub and Grill 315 Ross Point Road, Post Falls, Id. (208) 457-8020

Feb 21 O’Malley’s Sports Pub and Grill 13742 W. Hwy 53, Rathdrum, Id. (208) 687 5996 -ANDTrinity at City Beach 58 Bridge St., Sandpoint Id. 83864 Feb 28 Foggy Bottom Lounge Mt Spokane, Wa. (509) 238 2220 Mar 7 Capone’s Pub and Grill 9520 N. Gov’t Way, Hayden Id. (208) 667-4843 Mar 14 O’Malley’s Sports Pub and Grill 13742 W. Hwy 53, Rathdrum, Id. (208) 687 5996

KPNDradio.com

FEBRUARY 2018 SNOWLANDER 13


LAST RUN

The clock is ticking before spring’s big melt.

DEREK HARRISON PHOTO ILLUSTRATION

THE LAST RUNS OF THE SEASON Bluebird days and goggle tans: Enjoy winter while it lasts

T

his time of the ski season is bittersweet. Coverage is just getting to the point where you can let the skis or snowboard let loose without worry about what might be underneath, but then the sporadic warm and sunny day rears its beautiful head and has us dreaming of flips flops, shorts and carefree lake days. But before those days have a chance to come in a frequent fruition, we still have the most lively part of the season with bluebird days, some that come with a fresh blanket of 6 to 8 inches of snow, goggle tans, spring skiing and plenty of reasons to pull out those retro skis and one pieces to celebrate the season as it starts to come to a close. With every passing high-elevation snow storm, there is promise of elongating the season, but then we are brought back to reality with

14 SNOWLANDER FEBRUARY 2018

BY JEN FORSYTH

50-degree days and the budding of flowers in the yard. The end of the season brings the final bell and the realization that it is time for the next season. While it is sad saying goodbye to winter friends, there are many positives for the transition. The days are getting longer, the temperatures are getting warmer, our lawns are turning green, flowers are blooming, lake levels are rising and the summer activities that disperse outdoor enthusiasts into the mountains, onto the lakes and down rivers are in full swing within moments of the closing bell. As outdoor enthusiasts in the Inland Northwest, this is the best part of living here. The transition of each and every season gives us more appreciation for the season ahead. n


FEBRUARY 2018 SNOWLANDER 15


16 SNOWLANDER FEBRUARY 2018


CULTURE | DIGEST

Confederate is now in limbo. BASEMENT TAPES There aren’t a lot of concerts where the artist introduction is accompanied by a request that the audience not get too loud lest they wake the baby. That’s the fun of a house concert, though, and I hit a good one in a South Hill basement over the weekend. Kevin Carr, a Spokane transplant and editor of BehindTheSetlist.com, hosted Portland “gloom-folk” band The Holy Dark for a showcase of singer-songwriter John Miller’s stirring songs, delivered with power and emotion to about 20 folks — all while Carr’s 8-month-old slept upstairs with the help of a white-noise machine. Check out Miller’s music at Facebook.com/TheHolyDarkBand. (DAN NAILEN)

Watch First, Opine Later

A

BY DANIEL WALTERS

tremendous amount of digital ink last year was spilled about a TV show that hadn’t aired a single episode. Or started filming. Or casted a single actor or written a single episode. And ultimately, that TV show probably won’t be created after all. But there sure was a hell of a lot written about the announcement that Game of Thrones’ showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss would be creating a TV show called Confederate, about what might have happened had the South successfully seceded from the Union during the Civil War. “There Are So Many Things Wrong With HBO’s Confederate Idea,” said an article at website The Mary

THE BUZZ BIN

ON THIS WEEK’S PLAYLIST Some noteworthy new music arrives online and in stores Feb. 16. To wit:  BRANDI CARLILE, By The Way, I Forgive You. Washington’s native folkie fave, back with new tunes.  SHANNON AND THE CLAMS, Onion. Another retro-cool set of garage rock that both swings and stings.  I’M WITH HER. See You Around. A folkie supergroup with Sara Watkins, Sarah Jarosz and Aoife O’Donovan release their debut.  SUPERCHUNK, What A Time To Be Alive. The indie-rock heroes’ latest comes after a five-year gap. That sound you hear is me screaming, “Hell, yeah!” (DAN NAILEN)

Sue. “Why HBO’s Confederate Series Will Inevitably End Up Condoning Racism,” a Newsweek piece proclaimed. Much of the criticism was so quick to lambast the idea of two white TV writers running a show about slavery that their pieces didn’t find time to mention the two black TV writers, Nichelle Tremble Spellman and Malcolm Spellman, partnering with Weiss and Benioff on the project. But recently we learned all that discussion may have been irrelevant. Last week brought a new spate of news: Weiss and Benioff would be writing and producing a standalone Star Wars series, putting the status of Confederate in limbo. The debacle is just another example of how we frontload our conversations about TV and movies, often to the detriment of genuine insight. Everyone knows you’re not supposed to judge a book by its cover. Yet we spend a whole lot of time obsessing over unseen movies and television episodes. The reviews that accompany the actual release of the movie often function as a punctuation marks to months of hype and speculation, effectively ending the conversation instead of beginning it. That’s one reason why Oscar season is refreshing. Look at how much more nuanced the debate about the flawed racial politics of Three Billboards Outside Ebbing Missouri has been than the off-the-cuff debate over Confederate. Awards season is the one time a year that we put the cycle of hyping or fretting about coming attractions on pause, and spend more time talking about the movies we’ve actually seen. And then, inevitably, we hit play and get back to writing articles like “Star Wars: Game of Thrones writers worst thing for the galaxy?” n

CHASIN’ FRESHIES If you’re feeling bummed about the mild snow hitting our local mountains, don’t hang up the skis yet. I just returned from a weekend at Montana’s Whitefish Mountain Resort and was welcomed with plenty of fresh powder. A five-hour drive for a few runs is worth it when you’re struck with nostalgia from last season’s epic snowfall. Grab your gear, gather your crew and hit the road — there’s plenty of powder days left. And remember to pack warm, it’s definitely still winter up north. (DEREK HARRISON)

GET DOWN IN BROWNE’S It’s hard to beat pizza and beer, but Pac Ave Pizza is now bringing even more to the table with pizza, beer and beats. Every Saturday night you’ll find live music in one form or another, and once a month they’re turning it into a full-on free dance party with the brand new Get Down in Browne’s local DJ showcase. Find more on upcoming features at the Unifest CO. and Pacific Avenue Pizza Facebook pages. (SAMANTHA WOHLFEIL)

TAKE THE THRONE The Spokane-based creators of Dice Throne, a tabletop game that saw massive success last year on Kickstarter, this week launched a campaign for a “Season Two” game expansion. Quick to learn but tactically multifaceted, Dice Throne borrows basic mechanics from classics like the dice roller Yahtzee and even the play phases of Magic: the Gathering for gameplay centered around unique heroes’ abilities. Game developers Nate Chatellier and Manny Trembley introduced six new character classes this week: tactician, huntress, gunslinger, samurai, cursed pirate and artificer. Each can be played with the base game, or separately. The campaign runs through March 9. (CHEY SCOTT)

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 29


CULTURE | MEDIA

Making a Movement Exploring how savvy politicians and complicit media fueled Trump and the Tea Party BY DAN NAILEN

W

World Champion Irish dancer Scott Doherty, of Riverdance and Lord of the Dance teams up with Celtic rocker Chris Smith for a breathtaking show.

MARCH 10 7:00 PM

(509) 624-1200 • FoxTheaterSpokane.org Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

Exclusive food news & a calendar of culinary events Delivered to your inbox every Thursday Subscribe at: inlander.com/newsletter

30 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

hen Donald Trump was elected president in 2016, he exposed serious gaps in political professionals’ and pundits’ knowledge about America’s mood, despite years of building frustration and growing antiWashington, D.C., sentiment. The voices filling right-wing radio and Tea Party rallies turned into votes for Trump, enough to win a reality TV star and salesmen the presidency. Much of America is still in shock. Khadijah White, a journalism and media studies professor at Rutgers University, was not as surprised at Trump’s win than most, as she’s spent the last several years working on a book about the Tea Party’s rise and the mainstream media’s complicity in turning what started as essentially a publicity stunt into a real political movement. “The media has become more fixated with brands and branding, so it makes them more vulnerable to getting caught up in covering a specific type of story if the right kind of political strategist and right kind of political marketers put it out there,” says White, who is visiting Gonzaga Feb. 21 for a public discussion on “Race, News and Right-Wing Populism: The Tea Party and the Media.” “The Tea Party is a really well-done narrative that gets launched and then gets supported through online, cable news and radio news outlets,” she says. “Even when the Tea Party rallies had like 20 or 30 people show up in a major city, they’d still get national coverage.” White worked as a journalist for PBS’s NOW program and as an intern in Barack Obama’s White House, and started studying the Tea Party movement nearly at its inception with CNBC host Rick Santelli’s 2009 “tea party speech” and Fox News’ push to promote Tea Party rallies to the point the channel took out full-page newspaper ads chastising outlets like CNN and MSNBC for ignoring this new “movement.” White says that while Tea Party supporters claimed it was economically driven, that wasn’t necessarily so. “There is this focus on characteristics like race and gender to market stories and get them circulated,” she says. “In part, the Tea Party is really marketable and sellable story because it’s seen as the conservative response to the first black president.” White was years into work on a book about the Tea Party and the media when Trump’s election came along and “kind of fulfilled all the

Khadijah White is speaking at Gonzaga on Feb. 21 things in the book that to me, I was like, ‘This is going to blow people’s minds, it’s really insightful!’” she says with a laugh. She’s since reworked the book to consider Trump’s rise in the context of what she’d discovered about the Tea Party; Branding Right Wing Activism: The News Media and the Tea Party will be published in August on Oxford University Press. Trump, White says, embodies her belief that “if one can market themselves as a political brand, you can succeed in becoming part of the national zeitgeist and dominate the news.” With newsrooms decimated by shrinking budgets and layoffs, they’re less able to do true investigative work, and often resort to merely reporting on Trump’s latest Twitter rant because those stories garner the news outlet desperately needed traffic — and because many outlets are incapable of doing more. Trump, of course, benefits most from personality-driven media coverage since he’s more about the Trump brand than actual policies, White says. “For him, being president is about cultivating an audience and a fanbase,” White says. “A successful presidency doesn’t necessarily mean winning a second term. If he leaves now and launches Trump TV and gets 40 percent of America that supports him to follow him, then he’s very successful.” We’ll all have to stay tuned to see if that happens. n Khadijah White: Race, News and Right Wing Populism: The Tea Party and the Media • Wed, Feb. 21 at 6 pm • Free • Hemmingson Auditorium, Gonzaga University, 702 E. Desmet Ave.


CELEBRATION

French Connection The Krewe d’Alene benefit promotes authentic Mardi Gras traditions through culture and cuisine BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

M

Southern flavors meld in Seasons of Coeur d’Alene’s crawfish étouffée. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

ardi Gras is so much more than boobs, beads and bourbon, says Kathy Beechler, a Coeur d’Alene Arts and Culture Alliance board member helping organize the nonprofit’s annual Mardi Gras Krewe d’Alene fundraiser. “It’s much more family-friendly than people think,” says Beechler, who was born and raised in New Orleans and serves as cultural advisor of sorts for the event, now in its third year. Although alcohol will be available for purchase at the Feb. 17 event in the Coeur d’Alene Resort Plaza Shops, and costumes are encouraged, Krewe d’Alene is more about New Orleans culture, including its music, arts and cuisine. In addition to live music by Twisted Biscuit and Gumbo Jazz Trio, and a carnival-like atmosphere inside the Plaza Shops, Krewe d’Alene features a display of memorabilia and historical pieces in partnership with the Human Rights Education Institute based in the Lake City. Then there’s the New Orleans-inspired food being prepared by seven participating restaurants: Angelo’s Ristorante, Castaway Cellars, Moondollars Bistro, Moon Time, Republic Kitchen + Taphouse, Seasons of Coeur d’Alene and Sweet Lou’s. Some of the culinary competition participants, like Moon Time, already serve Cajun-style items on their menu (although Moon Time’s 74th Street Gumbo is inspired by an ale house in another great city, Seattle). But will they, as Emeril used to say, “kick it up a notch?” for Krewe d’Alene, or bring something else entirely? Only a handful of restaurants agreed to talk about their intended menus for Krewe d’Alene since they’re all in the running for judge’s and people’s choice awards. Seasons of Coeur d’Alene won last year’s people’s choice award for its rock shrimp cakes with sweet corn macque choux, a Creole and Native American dish. This year, Seasons’ head chef Scott Miller is serving up his take on crawfish étouffée. ...continued on next page

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 31


FOOD | CELEBRATION “FRENCH CONNECTION,” CONTINUED...

F

ood is central to Mardi Gras traditions, explains New Orleans native Beechler, who remembers everyone in the family dressing similarly for Mardi Gras parades, as butterflies, clowns or characters from The Sound of Music. They’d picnic together on St. Charles Avenue, and kids would perch on ladders for trinkets thrown by parade krewes. Dating to the mid-1850s, krewe is the name given to social organizations that put on various dances, suppers, parties and parades throughout the Mardi Gras season, which actually starts on Jan. 6 and is known by such names as Three Kings Day, Twelfth Night of Christmas and the Epiphany for observant Christians. Translated from French, mardi gras means Fat Tuesday, when many Christians consume rich food (and maybe some libations) in preparation for Lent, a six-week period of prayer and fasting lasting from Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday. Worldwide variations of Mardi Gras include Carnival and Fasching, or Fastnacht. “Some of my favorite New Orleans dishes are barbecue shrimp… cooked in a buttery garlic sauce with special spices, shrimp rémoulade, crawfish étouffée, turtle soup and gumbo, red beans and rice,” recalls Beechler, whose father also served on a krewe and allowed her to serve as a “queen” of the court when she was 18. Beechler has been a major catalyst in growing Krewe d’Alene. She relocated to Coeur d’Alene with her three children in 1992 and worked for local attorney Scott Reed (best known for saving Tubbs Hill). Upon retiring, Beechler started volunteering at several organizations, including Kootenai Health where she is a baby “cuddler.” At the Arts and Culture Alliance, she and Executive Director Ali Shute resurrected and re-envisioned a prior

New Orleans native Kathy Beechler helped envision Krewe d’Alene. Mardi Gras event formerly put on by St. Vincent de Paul’s Art on the Edge program. The first Krewe d’Alene happened in 2016.

W

hile the intent of Krew d’Alene is to be an allencompassing celebration of the cultural and traditional elements of Mardi Gras, the local culinary competition featuring authentically prepared Cajun and Creole food is one of its major highlights. Gabe Cruz, currently head chef at Mount Spokane Ski & Snowboard Resort, remembers cooking for several of those past “pre-Krewe” fundraisers for Art on the Edge, during which he parlayed his prior experience working with chef Jan Birnbaum, an associate of famed

Louisiana native and celebrity chef Paul Prudhomme. “Jan taught me what he called ‘bottom of the pot cooking,’” says Cruz, describing a technique of layering flavors, beginning with butter, for caramelization, and peanut oil, for the high smoke point. Then the “holy trinity” of onions, celery and green bell pepper are added, says Cruz, whose first restaurant startup in North Idaho was Sandpoint’s Café Trinity, which featured Cajun-style cooking, and is now known as Trinity at City Beach.  Once the spice has released its essence, Cruz says the “fond” builds up on the bottom of the pot. “You know, the crispy little bits of love that get stuck to the bottom of any good sauté,” he adds. Tomato, wine, brandy or a similar acid is added to release flavors, followed by protein such as duck, pork, sausage or shrimp. Any broth added is slow-cooked, a hallmark of Southern cuisine. “Whether it’s music on the streets of N’awlins or fixins’ in the pot, it must come together in layers to excite the senses,” says Cruz. “I can’t explain the spiritual feeling that goes into Southern cooking; it’s one you have to experience to understand.” The dish that reminds Beechler most of Mardi Gras is jambalaya. “It is a rice dish with a lot of meat, seafood, vegetables, seasonings, etc., thrown in one big pot for one great meal,” which can be personalized however you want, she says. “It reminds me of Mardi Gras because it is like when our different cultures come together to make one big happy celebration.” n Mardi Gras Krewe d’Alene • Sat, Feb. 17 from 5:30-10 pm • $40/person • Coeur d’Alene Resort Plaza Shops • 115 S. Second St. • artsandculturecda.org

Well equipped to promptly restore power after an outage. Get to know us at myavista.com

32 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018


FOOD | DINING

Life is better with friends.

Taco Time Chef Travis Dickinson’s new street taco spot Cochinito Taqueria is set to open by the end of February BY CHEY SCOTT

L

atin flavors are coming to the heart of downtown Spokane. Spokane chef Travis Dickinson, formerly the executive chef of fine-dining mainstay Clover, plans to open his first restaurant as a proprietor and chef by the end of this month. Cochinito Taqueria sits on a busy corner at Riverside and Post — the former home of Niko’s — and will offer walk-up counter ordering for its fast-casual concept with a menu featuring a variety of street tacos, small plates, sides and taco bowls. The dishes and flavors at Cochinito will be traditionally Latinbased, Dickinson says, but with a fine-dining approach to preparation and ingredient quality, and sometimes a Northwest twist. Travis Dickinson “We’ll still be doing fun and exciting things, but figuring out how to use use the tortilla as a vehicle instead of a $40 plate,” he explains. “We don’t want to set too many limits. Some things I have to do the traditional way, but others we get license to play with, and seasonality is going to be huge as we hit spring and summer.” The Cochinito chef’s passion for traditional Latin and Latin-fusion cooking began while working in the kitchens of several Portland-area restaurants alongside a dominantly Hispanic staff. “Even though these were Northwest-based restaurants, the crew meals were Latin in origin, and whoever would be leading those was Mexican or Guatemalan or Honduran,” he recalls. “I grew to love the food and the flavors: acid driven, spices and big, bold flavors.” The chef’s ties to Latin cuisine grew even deeper when he met his Mexico-born wife, Karina.

D

ickinson lists off a few of the proteins he’s featuring on Cochinito’s tacos, which all begin with house-made corn tortillas: pork cheek carnitas, poached octopus, braised lamb birria, a 20-hour, sous-vide cooked tri-tip carne asada and even buttermilk-battered fried chicken. Tacos will range in price from $3.50 to $4.75 each, complemented by soups and salads at $6$8, and starters that range from house-made tortilla chips with salsa and sikil pak ($4), a creamy pumpkin seed dip, to composed plates, like sopes ($12): thick fried corn cakes topped with a spiced duck confit, mole poblano, candied pepitas, cotija cheese and avocado. Vegetarians (and vegans,

Fried chicken tacos and elote are featured on Cochinito’s menu. depending on the dish) are well-treated at Cochinito, with dishes like the Brussels sprout and wild mushroom quesadilla ($8) or the elote bowl ($7) of grilled corn, cumin and smoked paprika crema topped with scallions, jalapeno and pickled onions. Partnering with Dickinson on the project is Justin Curtis, former front-of-house manager at Clover, and a third investor. Since just days after Dickinson began working at Clover in the fall of 2014, he and Curtis began discussing future dreams to open their own spots. “The more we ran through the plan and got to know each other, we thought we can make a go of this,” Dickinson recalls. “As far as leaving [Clover], when we got to a point when we had a lease signed and knew what we were doing, we were transparent and stuck around to take care of them through the end of it.” As they set out to pursue becoming local business owners, Dickinson and Curtis left Clover in good hands, having both trained and closely worked with their successors, chef Cody Geurin and manager Steve Marriott. In keeping with Cochinito’s casual, approachable vibe, customers who enter the restaurant can immediately grab a menu and a drink to start sipping as they ponder their many options. A focal point of the restaurant’s colorful and rusticinfused space, along with a huge Dia de los Muertos mural on the back wall, is a massive wood cooler from the 1920s that houses self-serve beverages. With no formal table service, customers order and pay at Cochinito’s main counter, which also serves as its full-service bar. Beyond a variety of canned and draft beers, wine and nonalcoholic sodas, the restaurant serves house-made horchata, and a variety of Latin-inspired cocktails: margaritas, daiquiris, sangria and more. Cochinito’s cocktail program, led by Curtis, aspires to be on par with the variety, creativity and attention to detail as what he established at Clover. Bellwether Brewing Co. has also partnered to brew a special Mexican-style amber lager only served on tap at Cochinito. n cheys@inlander.com Cochinito Taqueria • 10 N. Post St. • Open Mon-Sat, hours TBA • Facebook.com/ cochinitotaqueria • 474-9618

Call 509-563-7457 today to learn more! Experience independent retirement living in a community where neighbors become friends!

Harvard Park

Independent Retirement Living

1616 E 30th Avenue Spokane, WA 99203 harvard-park.com ©2018 HARVEST MANAGEMENT SUB LLC, HOLIDAY AL MANAGEMENT SUB LLC, HOLIDAY AL NIC MANAGEMENT LLC.

The Inlander’s Top 5 events for the weekend - delivered to your inbox every Friday

SIGN UP AT INLANDER.COM/NEWSLETTER

Promote your event! advertising@inlander.com

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 33


King of the Universe Marvel’s Black Panther expands the studio’s world with an entertaining entry that’s weightier than its predecessors BY ERIC D. SNIDER

B

lack Panther is a bold entry in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, not just because there are hardly any white people in it but because there’s almost nothing connecting it to the other films. Apart from the obligatory Stan Lee cameo and a reference to the events of Captain America: Civil War, you wouldn’t know this was a Marvel movie at all: No portals in the sky, no metropolises leveled, no mentions of Thanos or his stupid Infinity Stones. It’s the closest thing to a standalone entry we’ve had since this franchise started, which is refreshing by itself. Even better? It’s pretty good, full of nobility and purpose without sacrificing fun and charm. Directed by Ryan Coogler (Fruitvale Station, Creed) from a screenplay he wrote with Joe Robert Cole, Black Panther is more serious-minded than its glib predecessors, steeped in African lore and spectacle, with traditional costumes, dancing and mysticism folded seamlessly into a story centered around the fictional nation of Wakanda. Like Pixar’s Coco, it stealthily introduces American audiences to foreign cultures while delivering new heroes who cross national and ethnic boundaries — a painless expansion of our horizons that also happens to kick butt. Wakanda’s new king is T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman), who by virtue of his office is also the Black Panther, a mighty figure with superhuman strength and agility courtesy of a sacred herb, and a high-tech suit courtesy of his delightfully insubordinate genius sister, Shuri (Letitia Wright), whose inevitable meeting with Tony Stark we cannot wait to see. Wakanda presents a facade of a simple third-world nation, but it’s actually a technologically advanced society powered by vibranium,

34 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

the strongest substance in the Marvel Cinematic Universe, a mountain of which sits in the heart of Wakanda. T’Challa intends to continue his country’s tradition of isolationism, protecting itself by keeping others out and by not revealing its power to the world. But there are Wakandans who disagree with this tactic. Chief among them is Erik, nicknamed Killmonger (Michael B. Jordan), who grew up in the United States and has seen firsthand how “people who look like us” are oppressed, their communities ruined BLACK PANTHER by drugs, their men Rated PG-13 disproportionately Directed by Ryan Coogler incarcerated. Wakanda Starring Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira has the weapons technology to support a worldwide uprising of black people, but T’Challa insists that the Wakandan way is never to fight unless absolutely necessary. It’s the old Professor X/Magneto debate, repurposed for something with weightier, more fraught implications than the treatment of mutants. As you can see, we don’t need the Avengers here: This is a local dispute to be handled internally. Coogler populates Wakanda with fierce, interesting characters who help us understand the details of this new society we’ve been dropped into without resorting to boring exposition. T’Challa’s ex-girlfriend, Nakia (Lupita Nyong’o), is a trusted adviser. The fearsome General Okoye (Danai Gurira) leads an army of bald female soldiers and is, by herself, utterly terrifying. The regal queen mother (Angela Bassett), a passionate elder states-

man (Forest Whitaker), an old friend (Daniel Kaluuya), and a rival tribal leader (Winston Duke) all figure prominently, as do a CIA agent (Martin Freeman with a bad American accent) and an insane one-armed arms dealer (Andy Serkis). Also, there are war rhinos. War rhinos! Structurally, there’s nothing about the film that’s unusual, except within the comic book genre. It isn’t an origin story explaining how Black Panther got his powers (or even what his powers are, really). It doesn’t seem to be setting up plot threads for sequels (until the post-credits scene, which doesn’t count because the movie’s over by then, man). It’s so far removed from the usual superhero tropes — thwarted bank robberies, media fame, secret identities, etc. — that viewers who had their hearts set on the regular formula will be disappointed if they don’t recalibrate to Coogler’s rhythm. Our hero’s powers are inseparably connected to his nation’s history and customs in a way that no other superhero can claim — not even Captain America, who was made in a lab as a propaganda tool and, despite his name, isn’t inherently American, not in the way T’Challa is inherently Wakandan. All of that makes Black Panther different. What makes it good is the collaborative sincerity, the sense that the large cast of black actors has worked in solidarity to produce something inspiring for their community while having a blast playing within the boundaries of the Marvel world, creating characters with the potential to interact in interesting ways with the ones we already know. It’s not just that there’s finally a superhero with African roots. It’s that the whole thing is done with dignity, un-patronizingly, a slam-bang action adventure that also fills a need. n


FILM | SHORTS

OPENING FILMS BLACK PANTHER

Marvel’s latest is set in the nation of Wakanda, where its new king T’Challa (Chadwick Boseman) must face warring factions who want to usurp the throne. As directed by Ryan Coogler (Creed), it’s more serious-minded than typical superhero fare, full of nobility and purpose without sacrificing fun and charm. (ES) Rated PG-13

EARLY MAN

The newest feature from Aardman Animation, the British studio behind Wallace & Gromit and Chicken Run, is a slapstick comedy about soccer-playing cavemen. The voice cast includes Tom Hiddleston, Eddie Redmayne and Maisie Williams. (NW) Rated PG

FILM STARS DON’T DIE IN LIVERPOOL

Annette Bening embodies silver screen icon Gloria Grahame in this fact-based drama, which focuses on the ailing movie star’s unusual relationship with a young British actor (Jamie Bell) as she’s dying of cancer in the late 1970s. (NW) Rated R

SAMSON

The last time the biblical tale of the strongman and the woman who steals his power was made into a film, it was directed by Cecil B. DeMille. This time, it’s been made by Pure Flix, the Christian studio behind the God’s Not Dead movies. Hardly an upgrade. (NW) Rated PG-13

NOW PLAYING 12 STRONG

A true story about the first Special Forces who were deployed to Afghanistan in the weeks following 9/11 and witnessed the escalation of the war in the Middle East. Chris Hemsworth, Michael Shannon and Michael Peña star. (NW) Rated R

THE 15:17 TO PARIS

Clint Eastwood’s latest bit of rah-rah American patriotism is a fictionalized account of three U.S. soldiers who thwarted a terrorist attack on a Parisbound train in 2015. The twist here: The director has cast the actual men to play themselves and recreate their act of heroism. (NW) Rated PG-13

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME

One of the best films of the year, a swooning romance in which a 17-yearold American kid (Timothée Chalamet) spending a summer at his family’s Italian villa becomes infatuated with his dad’s slightly older research assistant (Armie Hammer). A delicate work of art and a passionate love story, simultaneously ethereal and earthy. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

DARKEST HOUR

Gary Oldman is unrecognizable under pounds of makeup and prosthetics as British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, who’s settling into his first term right as Hitler’s power intensifies. If Oldman doesn’t take home the Oscar for this one, it won’t have been for lack of trying. (ES) Rated PG-13

FIFTY SHADES FREED

E.L. James’ trilogy mercifully ends with the idyll of Anastasia and Christian’s married life being disrupted by her vengeful former boss and his inability to open up emotionally. As shallow and sterile as its predecessors, but with a couple car chases thrown in, because these characters are apparently action stars now. (NW) Rated R

FOREVER MY GIRL

In what’s sure to be the best Nicholas

Sparks story Nicholas Sparks didn’t actually write, a hunky country star returns to his small hometown only to discover he has a daughter with the woman he left at the altar. (NW) Rated PG

THE GREATEST SHOWMAN

A lavish, Moulin Rouge-y musical fantasy inspired by the life and career of P.T. Barnum (Hugh Jackman), the circus empresario who created modern show biz as we know it. The splashy songs are co-written by Oscarwinning La La Land lyricists Benj Pasek and Justin Paul. (NW) Rated PG

HOSTILES

A racist military man (Christian Bale) is forced to transport a dying Cheyenne chief (Wes Studi) to his homeland in the 1890s. Scott Cooper’s brutal tale of frontier justice is unfortunately far more concerned with the redemption of the white man than the Native American experience. (MJ) Rated R

I, TONYA

A raucous bio-comedy about figure skater Tonya Harding, who tripleaxelled into infamy in the early ’90s. The film may be predicated on questionable morals — it wants us to laugh at its subjects, then condemns us for laughing — but it’s also centered on blistering performances by Margot Robbie as the disgraced Harding and Allison Janney as her monstrous mother. (NW) Rated R

JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE

That magical board game becomes an old Atari-esque gaming console in this better-than-you’d-expect reboot, with a ragtag group of high schoolers getting sucked into a perilous video game world. Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Karen Gillan and a scene-stealing Jack Black star as the kids’ in-game avatars. (NW) Rated PG-13

LADY BIRD

Greta Gerwig’s first solo foray behind ...continued on next page

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 35


NTERN THEAT GIC LA ER MA FRI, FEB 16TH - THU, FEB 22ND TICKETS: $9 I, TONYA (112 MIN) FRI/SAT: 4:30 SUN: 2:45 MON/TUE/THU: 5:30 THE SHAPE OF WATER (120 MIN)

FRI/SAT: 2:00 SUN: 12:15

WEEKEND ONLY

CALL ME BY YOUR NAME (130 MIN)

FRI: 7:00 SAT: 1:00, 7:00 SUN-THU: 5:00

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING MISSOURI (110 MIN) FRI/SAT: 3:30, 5:45 SUN: 1:15, 3:30 MON-THU: 3:15

LADY BIRD (88 MIN) FRI/SAT: 8:00 SUN: 5:45 MON-THU: 3:00 (509) 209-2383 • 25 W Main Ave MagicLanternOnMain.com • /MagicLanternOnMain

FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING CRITICS’ SCORECARD the camera is a funny, observant and empathetic coming-of-age story about a fiercely independent teen girl finding her true identity in post-9/11 Sacramento. Saoirse Ronan is phenomenal as the title character, as is Laurie Metcalf as the mother she’s often at odds with. A remarkably assured directorial debut. At the Magic Lantern. (NW) Rated R

MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE

Yes, they’re still making Maze Runner movies, and in this third and final installment, our generic post-apocalyptic hero and his friends must escape yet another trap-filled labyrinth. Or something. (NW) Rated PG-13

PETER RABBIT

“Your Hometown Professionals”

Quality Moving Services for Home and Office Throughout Spokane and the Inland Northwest

For more info 509-455-8211 www.spokanemovers.com HG-11890

MOVIE TIMES on

Beatrix Potter’s beloved children’s character gets the anthropomorphic, wise-cracking CGI treatment, voiced by James Corden and perpetually pestering Domhnall Gleeson’s bumbling Mr. McGregor. Sounds a bit unbearable, but, hey — it worked for the Paddington movies. (NW) Rated PG

THE INLANDER

NEW YORK TIMES

VARIETY

METACRITIC.COM (OUT OF 100)

(LOS ANGELES)

FIFTY SHADES FREED

32

I, TONYA

77

MAZE RUNNER: THE DEATH CURE

51

PHANTOM THREAD

90

THE POST

83

THE SHAPE OF WATER

86

WINCHESTER

28

DON’T MISS IT

WORTH $10

erects a trio of uncouth billboards calling out the local police department, causing a stir in her tiny town. While the all-star cast delivers emotionally wrenching, award-worthy performances, writer-director Martin McDonagh’s inconsistent script occasionally veers into idiotic absurdity that undercuts the gravity of the drama. At the Magic Lantern. (SS)

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

WINCHESTER

California’s Winchester Mystery House seems an ideal setting for a horror film, but it’s wasted in this conventional ghost story, as is Helen Mirren as the mansion’s widowed owner. Standard PG-13 scares, with Conjuring-style specters that pop out of dark corners accompanied by musical stings on the soundtrack. (ES) Rated PG-13 n

PHANTOM THREAD

Writer-director Paul Thomas Anderson explores the world of 1950s fashion, with Daniel Day-Lewis in his (supposedly) final screen role as a high-end dress designer whose relationship with a much younger woman (Vicky Krieps) becomes fraught. Not exactly what you think it’s going to be, a sly dark comedy sewn inside a stunningly beautiful costume drama. (NW) Rated R

THE POST

Steven Spielberg’s latest concerns 1970s Washington Post publisher Kay Graham (Meryl Streep) and editor Ben Bradlee (Tom Hanks) fighting for the paper’s right to publish the Pentagon Papers, which detailed the Johnson administration’s lies regarding the Vietnam War. A thrilling fact-based drama about the importance of the free press. (MJ) Rated PG-13

THE SHAPE OF WATER

With apologies to Pan’s Labyrinth, this is Guillermo del Toro’s finest film to date, a grisly adult fairy tale about a mute cleaning woman’s plans to free a captive amphibious creature from the government facility where she works. Weird, gory, eye-popping, disarmingly sweet and featuring a masterful star turn from Sally Hawkins. (SS) Rated R

STAR WARS: THE LAST JEDI

Searchable by Movie, by Theater, or Time

As the evil First Order tightens its grip on the galaxy, Jedi-in-training Rey and her fellow Resistance fighters team up for a last-ditch attempt at victory. The most anticipated blockbuster of the year seems to be dividing audiences, but love it or hate it, we should all be happy that the Star Wars universe still sparks fiery imaginative passion. (SS) Rated PG-13

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI

When her daughter is murdered, an angry mother (Frances McDormand)

36 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

NOW STREAMING

GOOD TIME (AMAZON PRIME)

Robert Pattinson stars as an opportunistic criminal who orchestrates an impromptu bank robbery that gets his learning-disabled brother sent to prison. He then spends a particularly harrowing evening trying to drum up the bail money. Jumpy and hyper-stylized, a hedonistic run-allnight thriller with an unpredictable central performance. (NW) Rated R

LUCKY (HULU)

The final star vehicle for the great Harry Dean Stanton is a subtly quirky study of the daily routines of a 90-something Navy veteran facing down his twilight years in a

Good Time

small desert town. Funny and touching, and with a stacked supporting cast that includes Ed Begley Jr., Tom Skerritt and David Lynch. (NW) Not Rated

WONDER WOMAN (HBO GO)

Last summer’s smash hit does justice to one of DC’s most beloved heroes, with Gal Gadot announcing herself as a major new star as the Amazon princess who saves the life of an American spy (Chris Pine) and finds herself on the front lines of the first World War. Bright, funny, exciting and — perhaps most importantly — empowering. (NW) Rated PG-13


FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 37


Media Partner

With his stint on“Saturday Night Live� anchoring Weekend Update, Dennis Miller became a household name. A comedian, actor and NY Times best seller author, his brand of political and social satire has been enjoyed for decades.

April 6 8PM

38 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018


SINGER-SONGWRITER

MUSIC BY OSMOSIS Nashville troubadour Mat Kearney absorbs the sounds of artists he admires BY HOWARD HARDEE

S Mat Kearney says it’s a matter of time before he returns to the West.

inger-songwriter Mat Kearney left the Pacific Northwest for Nashville nearly 20 years ago. Then a budding musician, he was drawn by the prospect of rubbing shoulders with some of world’s greatest living songwriters, but he was a raw product. After all, he was trying to make it as a professional musician very shortly after picking up a guitar for the first time in college. “When you start out, you’re just a kid throwing words out there,” he says. “I had my own sort of style that was unique just because I didn’t know any better.” In 2006, Kearney released his major-label debut album, Nothing Left to Lose, and he’s since penned several high-charting singles on the pop, adult contemporary and Christian music charts. (He says he isn’t a Christian musician, but “a songwriter who is Christian.”) Over the years, his penchant for hummable melodies has landed his songs on dozens of TV shows, from 30 Rock to Grey’s Anatomy. Now a platinum-selling artist, Kearney says his musical progression is partly a product of working with and learning from musicians he admires. As a recent example, he’d been meaning to collaborate with Judah Akers of the Nashville-based alternative Americana band Judah and the Lion (who are set to play the Knitting Factory the night before Kearney), and they happened to bump into each other in a hotel on the road. ...continued on next page

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 39


MUSIC | SINGER-SONGWRITER “MUSIC BY OSMOSIS,” CONTINUED... “We walked to get coffee and talked about what we believe in, what we love, our philosophies on life,” Kearney says. “We came back and wrote a song in a sitting, and it’s one of those songs I like a little more every time I play it.” It’s called “Kings and Queens,” and it’s one of four singles released off Kearney’s forthcoming new album, CRAZYTALK. The song’s centerpiece is an uplifting, electro-pop chorus on which Kearney sings, “Richer than Solomon with you by my side / We’ll be kings and queens in our own mind.” Kearney caught up with the Inlander in between rehearsals for a two-month tour, which kicks off in Spokane. He says playing in the Northwest always feels like a homecoming. “I’m a sixth generation Northwesterner,” he says. “My family came to Oregon in a covered wagon. It’s deep in my blood. There’s nothing like the Northwest air, the mountains and the ocean. Every summer, WEEKEND I get closer and closer C O U N T D OW N to moving back to the Get the scoop on this West Coast. It’s only a weekend’s events with matter of time.” our newsletter. Sign up at Kearney is still Inlander.com/newsletter. in Nashville for now, still trying to absorb as much knowledge about songcraft as he can. But he admits his own musical sensibilities are far more polished these days. “You develop your sense of how melodies counterplay each other,” he says. “If one is coming on the beat, the next one should come before the beat. You start using

Mat Kearney performs in Spokane on Monday. certain kinds of chords that create tension with other kinds of chords, and you know how to release the tension during the chorus. You start learning all these little tricks and why certain songs work.” Though he’s best known for his chilled out, coffeeshop style, Kearney has periodically strayed across genre boundaries throughout his career, dabbling with reggae, gospel and soul influences and laying down the occasion-

al white-boy rap. (See 2004’s “Undeniable.”) On his new album, he explores electronic, dance-friendly music, but he took somewhat of a backward approach. In the world of modern dance music, it’s common for a DJ to produce a track and seek out a feature singer; Kearney did the opposite, and recruited electronic producer AFSHeeN to add a touch to his recently released single “Better Than I Used to Be.” “I was like, ‘I’ll be the singer and you can feature on my song,’” he says. “That’s kind of how we hacked the thing, the modern thing artists are doing in pop right now. We stumbled on this sound that was fresh, but also feels totally organic to me. And that’s what we were trying to do.” Indeed, AFSHeeN provides a beat-forward backdrop and glossy synthesizer hooks while Kearney does his usual singer-songwriter thing. It’s a smooth combination that sounds destined for Top 40 radio. The song’s electronic sheen is fairly representational of the style Kearney adopted for CRAZYTALK as a whole, he says: “I was listening to a lot of chill house and tropical house stuff, and then I started chasing that sound — fewer instruments, synth bass, real guitars. As I was doing that, I was like, ‘Why don’t I just work with these artists I really look up to?’” And, really, rubbing shoulders with such artists may be the most influential aspect of his experience in Nashville. “I’ve learned what about me is unique and special,” he says, “and I’ve learned what needs to be challenged by other songwriters.” n Mat Kearney with Andrew Belle and Filous • Mon, Feb. 19 at 8 pm • $28 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

The total monthly cost of your electric service is 33% lower than the national average. Get to know us at myavista.com

40 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018


MUSIC | FOLK-ROCK

Birthing Beats Fronted by two pregnant members, Spokane’s Atlas Hugged aims to create a friendly community among its listeners BY MEG MACLEAN

W

hen Beyoncé performed at the Grammys last year, five months pregnant with twins, it garnered global attention. But women pursuing their musical career while pregnant is not a new concept in the music industry: Celine Dion, Victoria Beckham, Björk and rapper M.I.A. have all continued to perform despite the potential limitations of a pregnancy. Now Spokane has its own addition to that list: Atlas Hugged, a quartet born and bred in the Lilac City. The band is headed by Drew Blincow, currently six and a half months pregnant, alongside drummer and former Montessori teacher Heather Blondin, who is eight months pregnant. The group, which formed in 2016, is set to drop their first studio album, Ultrasound, at Friday’s Community Building show. Both women are expecting spring births. “We are a truly sexy band,” Blincow says, smiling. The 10-track album is slated to have an accompanying graphic novel, which Blincow says should be finished soon after the album release. Blincow, a skilled artist and face painter, is the illustrator for the storyline. The graphic novel is set in the future and features a snake named Atlas. In this dreamscape, Atlas is watching television, which, in this world, is how everyone communicates and envisions the planet. “In a way, we already sort of do that,” Blincow says. The track “Hypnotize” creates an audio experience that enhances the world Blincow has created in the graphic novel. With a Johnny Cash-like boom-chicka-boom beat paired with a psychedelic mixture of guitar and bass lines, the lyrical descriptions coincide with the book’s futuristic story. Blincow plans to release the multi-part graphic novel with future additions coinciding with other projects, and there is currently another album in planning stages. Ultrasound also showcases the group’s ability to highlight complex social issues, featuring two slam poetry-style tracks titled “Men” and “Women.” Both tracks create a unity among genders that emphasizes the need for both masculinity and femininity. Blincow says that these tracks are especially relevant now. “I’ve seen how it relaxes men into feeling okay about being themselves,” Blincow says. “I feel like that is one of the most important things that we can do to heal the planet … When people are perpetrating violence, it’s because they’re hurting the most … So how do we start to undo that?” Ultrasound also includes tracks that are inspired by childhood. Blondin’s first daughter’s favorite song currently is “Friends,” which uses an incrementally sped-up beat to create an energetic and carefree track.

“We always have to have a song for bedtime, and that’s the one for right now,” Blondin says, laughing. “I’m sick of it.” As parents and soon-to-be parents, the members of Atlas Hugged have tried to make togetherness a priority for their message to the public. Guitarist Bradford Little says that fostering a sense of community is important, but having kids added a new dimension to the meaning of “responsibility.” “When you have kids, there’s this weird dichotomy where you feel like you need to do something more responsible,” Little says. “When really, there is nothing we have to do, except … build community and love each other.”

, Vienna CITY DREAMS OF

WITH

Feb 24

AHN TRIO

8:00 PM

Feb 25 3:00 PM

ANGELLA AHN, VIOLIN MARIA AHN, CELLO AZUSA HOKUGO, PIANO ECKART PREU, CONDUCTOR BACH • "AIR ON THE G STRING" HUMMEL • EIGHT VARIATIONS ON “DU LIEBER AUGUSTIN” O’CONNOR • TRIPLE CONCERTO “MARCH OF THE GYPSY FIDDLER” SCHUBERT • SYMPHONY NO. 9, “THE GREAT”

Sponsored by:

MAR 24 8:00 PM

MAR 25 3:00 PM

ALEKSEY SEMENENKO VIOLIN

ECKART PREU CONDUCTOR

Emmanuel Chabrier España

Edouard Lalo

Symphonie Espagnole

Enrique Granados

Danzas Espagnolas No. 4 and 5

Claude Debussy

Images pour orchestra No. 2: Ibéria

Spokane’s Atlas Hugged Bassist Matt Loi, who works in radio fulltime at iHeartMedia, echoed that sentiment, saying the sense of community within the band runs deep. “This is the first sense of real community that I’ve ever had. … I haven’t been able to find it in any other social group of any kind,” Loi says. The band agrees that music, beyond being mere entertainment, can be used as an incredible tool for empowering their audience. “People are coming to your show on their free time, spending money to be not only entertained, but it’s our job to empower people, to make them feel like they can do something creative to heal, dance a little bit, or be themselves,” Blincow says. Blondin agreed with a wide grin. “We’re gonna help the world with that,” she says. “By raising good kids with good music.” n

(509) 624-1200 • SpokaneSymphony.org Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox

Have an event? GET

LISTED!

Submit your event details for listings in the print & online editions of the Inlander.

Inlander.com/GetListed Deadline is one week prior to publication

Atlas Hugged Album Release with Dario Ré • Fri, Feb. 16 at 7 pm • Free • All-ages • Community Building • 35 W Main • atlashuggedmusic.com •

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 41


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ALT-FOLK JUDAH & THE LION

T

he first thing that crosses your mind when listening to Judah and the Lion is how the hell you’d even begin describe their sound. Each new track seems to contradict the one that came before it, but that’s by design: The title of their most recent LP, Folk Hop n’ Roll, seems to confirm it. You’ll hear a distinct banjo or mandolin hook paired with the anthemic sing-along choruses of contemporary folk-pop, but it’s often run through a white-boy hip-hop filter, and the band’s latest single “Going to Mars (!)” continues to double down on their recent electro-pop dabblings. That blend can come across as a little goofy, but it’s catchy and good natured, and they result in the kind of songs that could become irresistible when you’re in the middle of a crowd that knows every word. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Judah and the Lion with Colony House and Tall Heights • Sun, Feb. 18 at 7 pm • $23 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 02/15

J J THE BARTLETT, Songwriter Showcase with Natalie Schepman BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, The South Hill, Chris Molitor, The Lunar Year J BOOTS BAKERY, The Song Project J BUCER’S, Open Jazz Jam CORBY’S BAR, Open Mic and Karaoke THE CORK & TAP, Truck Mills CRAVE, DJ Stoney Hawk CRUISERS, Open Jam Night HOUSE OF SOUL, Take 2 THE JACKSON ST., Songsmith Series JOHN’S ALLEY, Zach Deputy THE LOCAL DELI, KOSH J MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE, Open Mic Hosted by Scott Reid NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), PJ Destiny THE OBSERVATORY, Vinyl Meltdown PANIDA THEATER, Randy McAllister and the Scrappiest Band in the Motherland RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROADHOUSE, Karaoke THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ WesOne ZOLA, Blake Braley

Friday, 02/16

219 LOUNGE, Harold’s IGA ARBOR CREST, Sara Brown J BABY BAR, Karate Chad, Moonchyld, Hobo Hangout BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn J THE BIG DIPPER, Five Alarm Funk BIGFOOT PUB, David Wolff Project BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Sterling BLACK LABEL BREWING CO., Angela Marie Project BOLO’S, Chris Rieser and the Nerve BOOMERS, No Rules BRIDGE PRESS CELLARS, Ron Greene

42 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

ALT-COUNTRY SLIM CESSNA’S AUTO CLUB

L

ike a Southern preacher on a bender, Slim Cessna is the sort of frontman who knows how to prosthelytize the blasphemous. His eponymous band, Slim Cessna’s Auto Club, delivers sly, cynical slabs of American gothic, imbued with the fire-and-brimstone intensity of a band like Swans. The Denver-based group treats roots music like a religion unto itself: Consider their 2016 album The Commandments According to SCAC, which outlines the band’s own version of the Decalogue, or their pseudo-reworking of Woody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land,” which turns that folk standard into a teeth-gnashing call to arms. Regardless of your current denomination, you should consider converting to the Church of Cessna, where weekly communion is nothin’ but a shot of whiskey. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Slim Cessna’s Auto Club with Silver Treason and George Cessna • Fri, Feb. 16 at 9 pm • $7 • 21+ • The Observatory • 15 S. Howard • observatoryspokane.com • 598-8933 and Jessica Haffner J BUCER’S, Colby Acuff CEDAR STREET BRIDGE, Josh Hedlund CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Bob Sletner J J COMMUNITY BUILDING, Atlas Hugged Album Release (see page 41) with Dario Ré CORBY’S BAR, Karaoke CRAVE, DJ Stoney Hawk CRUISERS, Karaoke with Gary CURLEY’S, Mojo Box DRY FLY DISTILLERY, Dave McRae and Chad O. Moore FARMHOUSE KITCHEN AND SILO BAR, Tom D’Orazi and Friends FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Bill Bozly

J HOLY NAMES MUSIC CENTER, Paul Grove J HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, Jonathan Nicholson J HOUSE OF CARDS, Pamela Jean HOUSE OF SOUL, Atomic Jive IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, Bright Moments Jazz J IRON GOAT, Just Plain Darin THE JACKSON ST., Sovereign Citizen and the Non Prophets JOHN’S ALLEY, Brad Parsons Band J KNITTING FACTORY, Datsik, Space Jesus, Riot Ten, Wooli LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Nick Grow MAX AT MIRABEAU, 3D Band MICKDUFF’S BEER HALL, Devon Wade

MOOSE LOUNGE, FM MULLIGAN’S BAR & GRILLE, KOSH NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night NORTHERN QUEST, DJ Patrick O’SHAYS, Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots J THE OBSERVATORY, Slim Cessna’s Auto Club (see above), Silver Treason, George Cessna PALOUSE BAR & GRILL, Wyatt Wood PEND D’OREILLE WINERY, Michael and Shanna J THE PIN!, Loud Crew, Young Prophet, Lyfe, Ryatt and more RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos RIPPLES RIVERSIDE GRILL, NightShift THE ROADHOUSE, The Veer Union, Xaon, Veio, Ragbone

SILVER MOUNTAIN SKI RESORT, Christy Lee J SOUTH HILL MUSIC STUDIOS, Fancee That! SPOKANE VALLEY EAGLES, Honky Tonk A Go-Go THE THIRSTY DOG, DJ WesOne and DJ Big Mike: I Love the ‘90s ZOLA, DragonFly

Saturday, 02/17

219 LOUNGE, The Beat Diggers ARBOR CREST, Bill Bozly J BABY BAR, Cover Show feat. Fake News & Balonely (6 pm, all-ages), The Dead Channels, DustFuzzzz, Crusty Mustard (9 pm, 21+)


J THE BARTLETT, Folkinception, Dario Ré BEVERLY’S, Robert Vaughn BIGFOOT PUB, David Wolff Project BING CROSBY THEATER, Petty Fever BLACK DIAMOND, DJ Kevin BLACK LABEL BREWING CO., Brook Gannon Trio BOLO’S, Chris Rieser and the Nerve BOOMERS, No Rules J BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB, Upstairs Strangers CEDAR STREET BRIDGE, Oak Street Connection CHINOOK STEAK, PASTA AND SPIRITS (CDA CASINO), Bob Sletner COMMUNITY PINT, Nick Grow CRUISERS, Rusted Hand, Hedonizm, Incidia, Nogunaso CURLEY’S, Mojo Box J FEDORA PUB & GRILLE, Just Plain Darin FLAME & CORK, Christy Lee GARLAND PUB, Usual Suspects J HOTEL RL AT THE PARK, Aaron Cerutti, Ron Greene HOUSE OF SOUL, Nu Jack City & DJ P-Funk IDAHO POUR AUTHORITY, John Firshi THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

JOHN’S ALLEY, Free the Jester, Unconfined J J KNITTING FACTORY, Anthrax, Killswitch Engage, Havok LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Chuck Dunlop MAX AT MIRABEAU, 3D Band MICKDUFF’S, The Other White Meat MIDTOWN PUB, David Reed MOOSE LOUNGE, FM MULLIGAN’S, Truck Mills NASHVILLE NORTH, Ladies Night with Luke Jaxon and DJ Tom NORTHERN QUEST RESORT & CASINO, DJ Patrick PALOUSE BAR AND GRILL, Wyatt Wood J THE PIN!, DJ Mikoto Chan, Domino, Maddox, Radikill POST FALLS BREWING, Devon Wade J RED ROOM LOUNGE, Hawthorne Roots, Kaylee Goins, Lucas Brookbank Brown RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos RIPPLES RIVERSIDE GRILL, NightShift SCHWEITZER MOUNTAIN RESORT, The Cole Show SILVER MOUNTAIN, Son of Brad THIRSTY DOG, DJ WesOne & DJ Big Mike WESTWOOD BREWING CO., Andy Rumsey ZOLA, DragonFly

Sunday, 02/18

BEEROCRACY, Gleewood CURLEY’S, Usual Suspects DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Ray Vasquez

J CALYPSOS COFFEE, Open Mic EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills J J KNITTING FACTORY, Mat Kearney (see page 39), Andrew Belle, Filous RED ROOM LOUNGE, Open Mic ZOLA, Evan Dillinger

IRON HORSE (VALLEY), Scott Randall and Kevin Gardner THE JACKSON ST., Karaoke J J KNITTING FACTORY, Matisyahu LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Carey Brazil LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 J MOOTSY’S, Convictions, Minority Whip, Askevault, Stiff Fish J THE OBSERVATORY, Boat Race Weekend, Von the Baptist, The Body Rampant POOLE’S PUBLIC HOUSE, Cronkites RED ROOM LOUNGE, Blowin’ Kegs Jam Session RIDLER PIANO BAR, Dueling Pianos THE ROADHOUSE, Open Mic Night J SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, KOSH THIRSTY DOG, Karaoke TWO SEVEN PUBLIC HOUSE, Matt Mitchell ZOLA, Whsk&Keys

Tuesday, 02/20

Coming Up ...

J J KNITTING FACTORY, Judah and the Lion (see facing page), Colony House, Tall Heights LINGER LONGER LOUNGE, Open Jam NIGHTHAWK LOUNGE (CDA CASINO), Keanu and Joey O’DOHERTY’S, Live Irish Music J THE PIN!, Unity J SPOKANE ARENA, TobyMac, Danny Gokey, Mandisa, Ryan Stevenson, Finding Favour ZOLA, Lazy Love

Monday, 02/19

219 LOUNGE, Karaoke with DJ Pat 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS, Perfect Mess GARLAND PUB & GRILL, Karaoke JOHN’S ALLEY, The Jauntee LEFTBANK WINE BAR, Turntable Tues. RAZZLE’S, Open Mic Jam RED ROOM LOUNGE, Tuesday Takeover with Storme RIDLER PIANO BAR, Open Mic/Jam THE ROADHOUSE, Karaoke ZOLA, Dueling Cronkites

Wednesday, 02/21 219 LOUNGE, Truck Mills GENO’S, Open Mic

5 0 TH A N N I V E R S A R Y 2 0 1 8

The Legends of Soul

APRIL 3

7:30 PM

SERGIO MENDES Three-time Grammy® Award winner brings his signature mix of Brazilian Bossa Nova, Samba, and pop that has spaned five decades.

JUNE 12 7:30 PM

MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX • CALL 509-624-1200 OR FOXTHEATERSPOKANE.ORG

J COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Herman’s Hermits, Feb. 22 J THE BARTLETT, DEER, Indian Goat, Feb. 23 BABY BAR, The Woolen Men, The Out of Loves, Pit, Feb. 24 J THE BARTLETT, Pearl Charles, Acid Tongue, Feb. 24 J BING CROSBY THEATER, Jim Brickman, Feb. 24 J THE BIG DIPPER, The Magic Beans, Yak Attack, Icky Business, Feb. 25 J THE BARTLETT, The Travelin’ McCourys, Feb. 28

MUSIC | VENUES 219 LOUNGE • 219 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-2639934 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 BARLOWS • 1428 N. Liberty Lake Rd. • 924-1446 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEEROCRACY • 911 W. Garland Ave. THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 BOLO’S • 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BRAVO CONCERT HOUSE • 25 E. Lincoln Rd. • 703-7474 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUZZ COFFEEHOUSE • 501 S. Thor • 340-3099 CALYPSOS COFFEE & CREAMERY • 116 E. Lakeside Ave., CdA • 208-665-0591 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague Ave. • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley, Idaho • 800-523-2464 COEUR D’ALENE CELLARS • 3890 N. Schreiber Way, CdA • 208-664-2336 CRAFTED TAP HOUSE • 523 Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-292-4813 CRAVE• 401 W. Riverside • 321-7480 CRUISERS • 6105 W Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208773-4706 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S PUB • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-263-4005 THE FEDORA • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208-7658888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings • 466-5354 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 THE HIVE • 207 N. First, Sandpoint • 208-457-2392 HOGFISH • 1920 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-667-1896 HOTEL RL BY RED LION AT THE PARK • 303 W. North River Dr. • 326-8000 HOUSE OF SOUL • 120 N. Wall • 217-1961 IRON HORSE BAR • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL • 11105 E. Sprague Ave., CdA • 509-926-8411 JACKSON ST. BAR & GRILL • 2436 N. Astor St. • 315-8497 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. Sixth St., Moscow • 208883-7662 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 2013 E. 29th Ave. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague • 747-2605 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan • 924-9000 MICKDUFF’S • 312 N. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208)255-4351 MONARCH MOUNTAIN COFFEE • 208 N 4th Ave, Sandpoint • 208-265-9382 MOOSE LOUNGE • 401 E. Sherman • 208-664-7901 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MULLIGAN’S • 506 Appleway Ave., CdA • 208- 7653200 ext. 310 NASHVILLE NORTH • 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls • 208-457-9128 NECTAR CATERING & EVENTS • 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST RESORT • 100 N. Hayford Rd., Airway Heights • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE OBSERVATORY • 15 S. Howard • 598-8933 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PIN! • 412 W. Sprague • 368-4077 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE RIDLER PIANO BAR • 718 W. Riverside • 822-7938 RIVELLE’S • 2360 N Old Mill Loop, CdA • 208-9300381 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 THE THIRSTY DOG • 3027 E. Liberty Ave. • 487-3000 TIMBER GASTRO PUB •1610 E Schneidmiller, Post Falls • 208-262-9593 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 43


FILM DATES & GRAPES

Calling all wine snobs! On Thursday, the Inlander is getting romantic at the Garland Theater, pairing a screening of the Tina Fey-Steve Carell comedy Date Night with some delicious local wines. It’s what we call Sips and Cinema — it’s a lot like our regular Suds and Cinema, but we’re swapping out the hops for grapes this time. Horizon Credit Union sponsors the event (and provides free popcorn), and Maryhill Winery pours some of their finest blends. You can win prizes, too: Either a date-night package including Spokane Symphony tickets and a $100 gift certificate to Bonefish Grill, or a couple of the Garland annual passes. Doors open at 7 pm, and the movie starts an hour later. — NATHAN WEINBENDER Sips & Cinema: Date Night • Thu, Feb. 15 at 8 pm • $5; buy in advance at the Garland box office • All-ages • Garland Theater • 924 W. Garland • garlandtheater.com • 327-2509

GET LISTED!

Submit events online at Inlander.com/getlisted or email relevant details to getlisted@inlander.com. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

44 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

COMMUNITY EVERYTHING ZEN

MUSIC NONE CAUGHT IN A MOSH

Intro to Buddhism • Sat, Feb. 17 at 9 am • $50, $25/students • Hotel RL at The Park • 303 W. North River Dr. • spokanebuddhisttemple.org • 534-7954

Anthrax with Killswitch Engage, Havok • Sat, Feb. 17 at 7:30 pm • $35/$37 day of • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

The 71st Northwest Buddhist Convention is meeting in Spokane this weekend, hosted by the Spokane Buddhist Temple for three days of workshops and meetings that will draw 300 or so practicing Buddhists from throughout the Pacific Northwest and Canada to the Lilac City. A major part of the action, though, is an invitation for the public and those curious about Buddhism to take part in an Introduction to Buddhism program led by Rev. Kodo Umezu, bishop of the Buddhist Churches of America, and Rev. Henry Toryo Adams, the keynote speaker at the convention. If you’ve ever been curious what a Buddhist service is like, or wanted to learn about the faith/ philosophy, the three-hour introduction could be just the ticket. — DAN NAILEN

Anthrax is one of the Big Four of thrash-metal, coming to prominence in the ’80s alongside Metallica, Megadeth and Slayer thanks to rapid-fire riffs, punky attitude that made the hair-metal bands of the era look ridiculous, and live shows that inevitably turned into swirling, sweaty masses of bodies slamming into each other and flying through the air. Anthrax always had a sense of humor the other Big Four bands lacked, and that made me a lifelong fan. The fact they’re still cranking out rock-solid albums (2016’s For All Kings was a killer) and touring like crazy makes it easy to keep loving them. The current KillThrax tour pairs them with political headbangers Killswitch Engage. — DAN NAILEN


MOVIE PREMIER & FUNDR AISER

WORDS WOMB WARS

Sometimes, dystopian fiction feels so close to our reality, or the direction humanity’s future is headed, that it profoundly scares me. The anxiety overwhelms and I want to stop reading, but I can’t. This is the general feeling I suspect is common among many readers of Portland-based author Leni Zumas’ new novel Red Clocks, released last month. Set in our world during a time that feels like “now,” Red Clocks imagines an America in which abortion and in-vitro fertilization are both illegal. Adoptions are federally overseen, and only legal for two-parent heterosexual households. Canada has even put up a “Pink Wall” to stop women suspected of fleeing the country for abortion services. Red Clocks’ premise — a Handmaid’s Tale for the 21st century — is not only ultra relevant; Zumas’ novel is riveting in its prose and relatable characters. To celebrate the book’s recent launch, Zumas stops by Auntie’s for a reading and conversation with fellow author (and former Portland resident) Alexis Smith. — CHEY SCOTT Leni Zumas: Red Clocks • Thu, Feb. 15 at 7 pm • Free • Auntie’s Bookstore • 402 W. Main • auntiesbooks.com • 838-0206

SATURDAY, MARCH 3, 2018

6PM – SOCIAL WITH RICH LANDERS AS MC 7PM – DINNER AND PREMIER BEGINS Hosted by the Kalispel Tribe at Northern Quest Resort & Casino Airway Heights, WA 99001 • Meet the movie producer and production team • Fundraising auction to follow premier • Purchase tickets online at www.kalispeltribe.com/caribou • All proceeds will go to caribou recovery efforts and maternal pen operations

To learn more about the Caribou cause visit www.kalispeltribe.com/caribou

CLASSICAL FAR, FAR AWAY

One of the Spokane Symphony’s most popular concert series is back for another go-around, showcasing the music of one of the most beloved franchises of all time: Star Wars. Again led by resident conductor and unabashed sci-fi and fantasy nerd Morihiko Nakahara, he and the Symphony will delight fans of all ages with famously familiar tunes from eight of the nine total films in the Star Wars canon (all but one with a score by the incomparable John Williams) including pieces from one of the newest, Rogue One: A Star Wars Story. Make sure to come early for photo ops with local cosplayers, Mos Eisley Cantina-themed drink specials and other family-friendly revelry. Costumes are definitely welcome; there will be a contest with prizes. — CHEY SCOTT The Music of Star Wars: The Symphony Awakens • Sat, Feb. 17 at 2 pm and 8 pm • $24-$100/adults; $19-$75/ages 12 and under • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony.org • 624-1200

Mind, Body, Spirit Holistic Fair Presents:

“Opportunity for Healing” Saturday, February 24th, 10am-5pm Free event - Free parking

40 Vendors • Information & Demonstrations • 9 Dynamic Speakers UNITY SPIRITUAL CENTER on the South Hill 29th and Bernard, Spokane, WA 99203

Please visit us on Facebook

/MindBodySpiritHolisticFairs

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 45


W I SAW YOU

S S

CHEERS JEERS

&

I SAW YOU LADY LOOKER You were the one with the dark brown hair and those beautiful blue eyes. I think your name was Susie.I caught staring at me a few times just smiling that beautiful smile. Maybe we can get a coffee sometime. My gmail is Peanutbutterunicorn21@gmail.com MONROE ST. HOTTIE Last Monday I saw you taking the trash out of your Monroe St. apartment building near Charlie’s. You: tall, bearded + bald, broad-shouldered wearing a VCU basketball sweatshirt. As you walked past and said ‘hello,’ your voice was deep and smooth I almost had to stop and ask you out on the spot, but I was too mesmerized. Let’s catch a pint and a basketball game soon? PS: talking out the trash looks good on you. LETS HAVE COFFEE I saw you at Caruso’s the Saturday before Christmas, Very Attractive Lady, you had a sandwich and a Blue Moon beer, you were there with your daughter, as you were leaving you stopped and turned around and waived back at me, I wish I would have went outside and talked to you !! If you are interested please respond PIZZA WOMAN You: attractive blond woman in a blue coat out with a group of friends (and having a great time) on February 10 at Fire Pizza. Me: red baseball hat waiting for a pizza to go. Interested in sharing a pie?

CHEERS TO NORTHERN QUEST RESORT AND CASINO For hiring the best team member ever! Camas Club Representative Jacob. From the very first moment he assisted us, we have had nothing but the most superlative customer service from him. He has continously treated us with courtesy, dignity and respect. No matter how difficult or busy the day, he is always there to assist us with a warm smile and friendly greeting. This young man has a great eye for detail. Had it not been for him, we would have never known anything about our comp dollars or point play. We were very delighted when we heard that he was a 2017 Kali Award Honoree; something of which he was very deserving. There are many reasons we return to NQ time and again but above all, this young man is #1 on that list. ABSOLUTELY NUMBER ONE. So thanks, NQ, for hiring an amazing team member! Thank you, Jacob, for your commitment to Kalispel Hospitality and always making us feel special! Because of YOU, we will ALWAYS remain loyal to NQ.

HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY MY MOUNTAIN MAN My Mountain Man you have proved to be a VALENTINE KEEPER. We’re both in our 70’s and life began for us last April 2018 with a passionate love we both had never known could ever exist. My love has continued to grow this past year with each word you speak, each touch you make, and each truth you unfold. Our surnames,

ping on my way home regularly. Little do you know that I am respected by my colleagues, friends and acquaintances. Little do you know that I am energetic and work very hard at my job, to spite that I have also been fighting Graves disease for over a year which made me quite ill. I am proud to say, that I have gained 15 pounds since my diagnosis, but I am still quite thin. My

It might help if you two morons weren’t stoned out of your minds.

Mountain Man and Moonlight Madness, tells not only the world but most importantly us that a story of true love between ourselves will last to the moon and back to earth, in a rhapsody of unspoken rapture. You are my everything forever more. Cheers to us and our love infinity.

HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY I hope your day is filled with lots of heartfelt good wishes and chocolate covered kisses. Tay! Sogni d’oro sweetie.

HEY HEY DJ I knew I was dancing with the devil the entire time. He doesn’t scare me. Making amends isn’t all it’s cracked up to be, alas, I forgive you.

EXTRAORDINARY INSTRUCTOR So glad 3 years ago I went to the wrong class and met you. So many FUN adventures we have had outside my comfort zone. Don’t know what I would do without you. I am off to scout NOLA for our next adventure!

I LOVE YOU DEARLY I absolutely adore you. All I want for you is to be happy again, and to see your smile again. Whatever it takes for you to be happy, just do it. Don’t worry about time, money, or what anyone else says or thinks. Just follow your bliss and love yourself. You are a wonderful human being and you have already accomplished so much good in this world, there is still time and hope for you. Just be you and don’t worry about “keeping up with the jonses.” Let love, grace, peace, and light flow into your heart like a river to heal you and rejoice in the fact that you are Gods’ beautiful masterpiece.

HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY ... 12 YEARS LATER! “To the man who single-handedly saved me from the purgatory that is the online personals...” I toast to you once again... and can’t look at pink champagne without thinking of you... Twelve long years have passed since our odyssey of love, travel, music, movies and poetry -- and making love, that last time, in the forest... I miss you every day, I will always be in love with you, and pray that someday we can speak again ... and I can tell you “I’m sorry...” Remember the tanzanites we saw in the jewelry store? Remember our birthdays are three weeks apart? Remember talking on the phone every day? I haven’t fallen for anyone else, all these years -- I’m still in love with you...!

about what is going on in people’s minds can/may help others struggling with the same issues. How many times has the feedback from the general public been positive when someone known has an issue in their life that seems insurmountable been made public--think Betty Ford. Now substance abuse clinics abound--before Mrs. Ford? Not so much! The point of knowing why

JEERS “HOW INCREDIBLY SAD” “IS WRONG”--IS WRONG Mental health in any age group is important for a community to keep as healthy as possible. Any of us over the teenage years can remember the angst that most of us had at times during our youth (and even now). The more information

the young man at WSU took his life wasn’t a salacious interest but factual! The more knowledge the better to bring the public into line with the need. And clearly there IS a need locally here in Spokane. In the not long past I understand there have been 5 (or more?) youth commit suicide. That means it’s past time to get on with sincere programs--ones that Don’t have stigmas attached! The suicide rates in the military, as an example, are horrific! Recently THAT has finally gained real traction as a prioritytrying to help WITHOUT the stigma or loss of rank possibilities. Knowledge is a powerful tool. Blindly going at it without knowing what the issues are doesn’t make sense. Would the 5 youth be alive if information that concerns local age groups have helped them? There is information out there and it can be consistent. But knowing what happens locally seems reasonable. Otherwise it is repeating the same sadness and That IS incredibly Sad! ASSUME NOTHING Jeers to the man behind me in the early morning hours at 5mile Zip Trip... It didn’t dawn on me until after I left the store that the snarky comment you made about “people being on drugs” was directed toward me. Had I caught it right when you said it, I could’ve defended myself right then. Lucky for you however, due to my naivety, your words went over the top of my head. Little did you know that I just got off work. I stop at that store after work for odds and ends like a newspaper for my hubs, vitamin water and sometimes treats for my kids, hubs and me. I have gotten to know the night clerks by stop-

BIG DUH Jeers to the big red car @ N-Town 2-10-18 2:30 ish PM. I WAS IN THE CROSS WALK!!! You almost hit me. It might help if you two morons weren’t stoned out of your minds. It was the middle of the day and I’m freakin’ HUGE as in fat. How could you not see me. The best part was when your passenger laughed (ITS NOT FUNNY!!!). I saw he had a pipe of sorts pot or crack? VZ n

THIS WEEK'S ANSWERS G A S T R O

A C T O U T

S L O P E S

F L T E X D A V S R I M B U P R E G A Y

SOUND OFF

1. Visit Inlander.com/isawyou by 3 pm Monday. 2. Pick a category (I Saw You, You Saw Me, Cheers or Jeers). 3. Provide basic info: your name and email (so we know you’re real). 4. To connect via I Saw You, provide a non-identifying email to be included with your submission — like “petals327@yahoo.com,” not “j.smith@comcast.net.”

C hili F eed & Sale

D E F L A H I I R R T A E N R S A O M Y O S

E N S E N A C T Y P I E O T W O C O I N A N G E T E S

C I G S

M Y F O O T

G A L W A Y

R O Y A L E

NOTE: I Saw You/Cheers & Jeers is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any posting at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.

CDA Resort Plaza Shops 210 E Sherman Ave $40 advance/$45 at the door ROYALLY SPONSORED BY

46 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

P I A F I S T O S H O O I D B A I E X T E A L O V E R S O P L A S E A L W K E I E R F L O H I S E T

Saturday February 17

Corbin Senior Ctr.

SpokanePottersGuild.org

P U P U P A T H Y O A S Y P T A T T Y S L Y

5:30 to 10 pm

11am-3pm Sat. Feb. 24th

at the

hands tremble at times. I suffered severe myopathy, vision loss, bone density loss and hepatic issues. It is possible (not yet confirmed) that my heart is enlarged due to the Grave’s. I experience irregular heart rhythms and atrial fibrillation. My appearance has made me self concious because of the nature of the comments I hear by shallow individuals like yourself. That being said, next time you see someone thin from now on, maybe practice empathy and kindness. Keep the rude comments to yourself... You should hope karma doesn’t decide to kick your condescending, hot-shot, millenial ass for your nasty comments. Your arrogance is disgusting.

ARTSANDCULTURECDA.ORG/MARDIGRAS

Coeur d’Alene Resort | KPND | Inlander Avondale Dental Group | Hanna & Associates Idaho Central Credit Union Specialty Tree Services

Vote with your mouth. 1414 N Hamilton St. | Logan/Gonzaga 509-368-9087 | wedonthaveone.com


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

HEART FOR THE ARTS The annual gala benefiting the Liberty Lake Community Theatre includes drinks, food, a performance and a silent auction. Feb. 17, 6 pm. $35/person; $60/couple. Liberty Lake Community Theatre, 22910 E. Appleway Ave. libertylaketheatre.com MARDI GRAS KREWE D’ALENE Feel as if you are strolling the streets of the French Quarter and sample New Orleans-style fare in a competition between 8 local restaurants. Event also includes a recreation of the oldest pub in the U.S., live music, street entertainment, an arts auction and more. In the CdA Resort Plaza Shops. Feb. 17, 5:3010 pm. $40. artsandculturecda.org SPOKANE BELLYFEST Enjoy a day of music, dance, workshops, and vendors featuring cultures from around the world at this event hosted by Cultures’ Dance Arts. Local nonprofit Spokane Women’s Farms is the beneficiary of the evening hafla. Feb. 17, 9 am-9 pm. $10-$90. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt. culturesdance.com YEAR OF THE DOG ADOPTION DAY Chinese New Year proclaims 2018 he “Year of the Dog.” In celebration, Coeur d’Alene Casino hosts a pet adoption day and fundraiser in support of Kootenai Humane Society. Several dogs and cats will be available from noon-4 pm. Donations accepted. Feb. 17, 9 am11 pm. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S. Nukwalqw. cdacasino.com GO RED FOR WOMEN LUNCHEON Join the American Heart Association/ American Stroke Association for the annual luncheon to raise awareness of funds for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases, which take the life of about one woman every 80 seconds. Feb. 21, 10:30 am-1 pm. $125. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. SpokaneGoRedLuncheon.heart.org A WALK THROUGH POVERTY This 30 minute documentary explores poverty in Spokane through stories and portraits. Proceeds from the event benefit Cup of Cool Water, a local nonprofit serving youth experiencing homelessness. Discussion and Q&A to follow. Feb. 21, 6-7 pm. $10 suggested donation. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main Ave. walkthroughpoverty.com HOUSING FOUNDATION BRIGHT NIGHT OF HOPE GraceSon Housing Foundation is a Christian-focused provider of housing for homeless teenage

mothers and their children. This annual event helps empowers and equip teen mothers in Spokane through life skills, resources, and more. Feb. 23, 6-10 pm. $75. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (309-7155) TASTE OF LIFE Hospice of Spokane’s signature event features local wines, premium microbrews, ciders, gourmet food, and live music. Guests have the chance to talk to winemakers and brewers, sample unique food pairings, and browse the silent auction. Feb. 23, 5:30-8:30 pm. $75. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside. hospiceofspokane.org CINDERALLA TEA & FASHION SHOW The benefit for Because There Is Hope, a local nonprofit providing free housing for cancer patients who have to travel to Spokane for treatment. Includes a fashion show, raffles, silent/live auction and more. Feb. 24, 10:30 am-1 pm. $40. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (279-7000)

COMEDY

2.0PEN MIC Local comedy night hosted by Ken McComb. Thursdays, from 8-10 pm. Free. The District Bar, 916 W. First Ave. facebook.com/districtbarspokane/ DEBRA DIGIOVANNI The award-winning Canadian comic competed on Last Comic Standing and is also an accomplished voice performer. Feb. 14-16 at 8 pm; Feb. 17 at 7 and 9:30 pm. $10-$22. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com GUFFAW YOURSELF! Open mic comedy night hosted by Casey Strain; Thursdays at 10 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. (509-847-1234) COMEDY NIGHT Mark Morris comedy presents Nick Theisen and headliner, Rockford’s very own Philip Kopczynski. Feb. 16, 8-9:30 pm. Harvest Moon Restaurant, 20 S. First St. (509-291-4313) HOG WILD NIGHT OF COMEDY Mark Morris comedy presents Nick Theisen and headliner Phillip Kopczynski, along with special guests. Feb. 17, 9-11 pm. Hogfish, 1920 East Sherman. facebook. com/hogfishbarcda (208-667-1896) SAFARI The BDT’s fast-paced, shortform improv show in a game-based format relies on audience suggestions to fuel each scene. Ages 16+. Saturdays from 8-9:30 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com MICHAEL GLATZMAIER EXPERIENCE The comedian, musician and Improviser takes suggestions from the audience

and creates improvised songs on the spot. Feb. 18, 7 pm. $8-$14. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com (509-318-9998) A NIGHT OF COMEDY Mark Morris comedy presents Nick Theisen, opening for headliner Phillip Kopczynski. Feb. 18, 8-9:30 pm. $3. Eagle’s Pub, 414 First St., Cheney. (509-235-6294) THE SOCIAL HOUR COMEDY SHOWCASE Featuring comics from the Northwest and beyond, hosted by Deece Casillas. Sundays, 8-9:30 pm. Free. The Ridler Piano Bar, 718 W. Riverside. socialhourpod.com COMEDY SHOWCASE The Monday night showcase lets the audience help pick the “Best Set” of the night from among four local comedians. Third Monday of the month, 8-9:30 pm. No cover; 2-item min. purchase. The Buzz Pizzeria, Bar and Lounge, 501 S Thor St. thebuzzspokane.com QUINN DAHLE Fresh off a development deal with 20th Century Fox, Quinn has appeared on The Tonight Show, Showtime, Comedy Central, Lopez Tonight and Carson Daly. Feb. 22-23 at 8 pm and Feb. 24 at 7 and 9:30 pm. $8-$22. Spokane Comedy Club, 315 W. Sprague. spokanecomedyclub.com

COMMUNITY

LILAC CITY LIVE! A new monthly “late-night” talk show featuring local Spokane talent; February’s show features local author Kris Dinnison, the band Folkinception and Alayna Becker and Nick Lewis. Includes a no-host bar serving beers from No-Li (opens at 7). Feb. 15, 7 pm. Free. Downtown Spokane Library, 906 W. Main. bit.ly/2BIV5yS TITANIC: THE ARTIFACT EXHIBITION This blockbuster exhibit takes visitors on a journey back in time to experience the legend of Titanic through more than 120 real artifacts all recovered from the ocean floor. The objects, along with room re-creations and personal stories, offer haunting, emotional connections to lives abruptly ended or forever altered. Through May 20; Tue-Sun 10 am-5 pm (Thu until 8 pm). $10-$18. The MAC, 2316 W. First Ave. (456-3931) UNICORN CODING ACADEMY: INTRO TO CODING In each two-hour session, attendees learn coding basics through a comprehensive curriculum in web development. Feb. 15, 22 and March 1, from 6-8:30 pm. Free. Startup Spokane Central, 610 W. Second. unicorncode. org (842-6142)

NOW ENROLLING IN CLINICAL RESEARCH STUDIES

5 0 9 - 3 4 3 - 3710 324 S SHERMAN ST, SPOKANE, WA PREMIERCLINIC ALRESEARCH.COM PREMIER CLINICAL RESEARCH IS CURRENTLY RUNNING RESEARCH STUDIES IN THE AREAS OF DERMATOLOGY, RESPIRATORY AND INFECTIOUS DISEASE.

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 47


A

HEALTH

‘A Better Place’

Even the World Anti-Doping Agency has warmed to CBDs BY TUCK CLARRY Olympic gold medalist Ross Rebagliati

Specializing in Indoor, Hand-trimmed Flower Amazing Concentrates & Edibles Priced Right Every Day

s the world gathers around its TV sets to watch the Olympics, we get to see the final product of a grueling regimen and journey that the games’ athletes endured to make the globe’s biggest stage. For the few minutes they’re on screen, viewers may not understand the pain and toll participants’ bodies take for a chance to bring home a medal. Or that the athletes can now self-medicate with cannabidiol (CBD). Thanks to the World Anti-Doping Agency’s (WADA) decision in September of last year, CBD is no longer a prohibited substance as of this year. However, the international agency still prohibits THC for tested athletes. Theoretically, CBD users could still test positive, but it would take irregularly large dosages for a positive result. The alternative medicine for inflammation and pain relief is now available to members of over 660 sports organizations. It’s a move that will not only help athletes, but also help reshape the narrative on the merits of marijuana internationally. The International Olympic Committee (IOC) originally banned marijuana and other social drugs after the 1998 Winter Games when Canadian snowboarder and gold medal winner Ross Rebagliati tested positive for THC. The IOC tried to strip Rebagliati of his medal, but the Court of Arbitration for Sport ruled that the committee had no finite marijuana-testing provisions. And while CBD is now permitted, don’t expect many — if any — competitors to make a statement on their usage. First, cannabis is illegal in South Korea. And while WADA has warmed up to CBD, athletes’ sponsors most likely haven’t. But there are athletes outside of the Olympics coming out in support for medical marijuana. Prior to the Super Bowl, former NFL running back Willis McGahee spoke at the NFL and Marijuana conference in Miami, showing his support and raising awareness. Bennet Omalu, who discovered the brain trauma known as CTE and its lasting effects on athletes, was the keynote speaker for the conference, which discussed football players’ health and how the league’s stance on brain trauma and alternative medicine has put them in danger. McGahee joins NFL offensive lineman Eugene Monroe and MMA fighter Nate Diaz as vocal advocates for medical marijuana use for ailing athletes. Diaz, an athlete tested by WADA, made waves when he used a vape pen with CBD oil immediately after his 2016 fight versus Conor McGregor. “It helps with the healing process and inflammation,” Diaz told the assembled media after the match. “It’ll make your life a better place.” n

Explore

AMAZING PRODUCTS & PRICES FOR EVERYONE! Featuring

Exclusive Growers!

1403 N. Division St., Ste. A Spokane, WA 99202 Hours: Mon-Sat 9am-10pm; Sun 10am-8pm

+21 and over. This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

48 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

509.919.3398 GreenStarCan.com


order online and

DtoAyou SH r STASH

DRIVE HIGH GET A DUI

BE AWARE: Marijuana is legal for adults 21 and older under Washington State law (e.g., RCW 69.50, RCW 69.51A, HB0001 Initiative 502 and Senate Bill 5052). State law does not preempt federal law; possessing, using, distributing and selling marijuana remains illegal under federal law. In Washington state, consuming marijuana in public, driving while under the influence of marijuana and transporting marijuana across state lines are all illegal. Marijuana has intoxicating effects; there may be health risks associated with its consumption, and it may be habit-forming. It can also impair concentration, coordination and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. Keep out of reach of children. For more information, consult the Washington State Liquor and Cannabis Board at www.liq.wa.gov.

Reserve online and avoid the wait. Visit RoyalsCannabis.com/OrderOnline today!

PRESIDENT’S DAY SALE MONDAY 2/19

2.75 PRE ROLLS • $25 PREMIUM EIGHTHS $ 60 OUNCES • $20 TOPICALS $ 10 CONCENTRATES

$

7115 n division

509.808.2098

royalscannabis.com

This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination, and judgment. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. For use only by adults twenty-one and older. Keep out of the reach of children.

9am - 10pm • 7 days a week • 2829 N. Market • corner of Market & Cleveland 509.315.8223 | WARNING: This product has intoxicating affects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 49


GREEN ZONE FRIDAY FEBRUARY 16TH

20% OFF ALL

DRIFTBOAT PRODUCTS

Reach

186,000 Eastern Washington Readers INLANDER’S GREEN ZONE GREEN ZONE QUARTERLY MAGAZINE

10309 E Trent Ave.

SPOKANE VALLEY, WA GREENLIGHTSPOKANE.COM

509.309.3193

8AM TO 11PM EVERYDAY To Advertise Contact: 509.325.0634 ext. 215, advertising@inlander.com

*2016 Media Audit

WARNING: This product has intoxicating affects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. Marijuana products may be purchased or possessed only by persons 21 years of age or older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

NOTE TO READERS Be aware of the differences in the law between Idaho and Washington. It is illegal to possess, sell or transport cannabis in the State of Idaho. Possessing up to an ounce is a misdemeanor and can get you a year in jail and up to a $1,000 fine; more than three ounces is a felony that can carry a fiveyear sentence and fine of up to $10,000. Transporting marijuana across state lines, like from Washington into Idaho, is a felony under federal law.

50 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018


EVENTS | CALENDAR

MUNCHIE MONDAY

20% OFF EDIBLES

TANKER TUESDAY

$15 CARTRIDGES

(SOME RESTRICTIONS MAY APPLY)

WAXY WEDNESDAY

20% OFF CONCENTRATES THIRSTY THURSDAY

20% OFF ALL DRINKS FIRE FRIDAY

20% OFF BUDTENDER PICK

SUN 10A-11P MON- SAT 8:30A-12A TOKERFRIENDLYSPOKANE.COM

1515 S. LYONS RD AIRWAY HEIGHTS

(509) 244-8728 Warning: This product has intoxicating effects and may be habit forming. Smoking is hazardous to your health. There may be health risks associated with consumption of this product. Should not be used by women that are pregnant or breast feeding. For USE only by adults 21 and older. Marijuana can impair concentration, coordination and judgement. Do not operate a vehicle or machinery under the influence of this drug.

THIRD FRIDAY SWING DANCE A night of open swing dancing, for all styles, featuring music by two live bands. Includes a beginner lesson at 7 pm, followed by general dancing from 8-11 pm. Feb. 16, 7-11 pm. $10/$15. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. strictlyswingspokane.com BEGINNER HONEY BEEKEEPING An introduction to the basics of beekeeping, covering topics of European Honey beekeeping, including general biology, equipment, hive building, honey extraction at home and commercially, pests, diseases, tools of the trade, pesticides, and nectar sources. Ages 12+. Feb. 17, 9 am-12:30 pm. $25-$30. Kootenai County Admin Building, 451 N. Government Way. uidaho.edu/extension/county/ kootenai/garden DROP IN & SCIENCE FOR KIDS Spark’s resident mad scientist shares experiments from the gross to the glorious, inspiring a sense of wonder. Held on the third Saturday of the month, from 3-5 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. spark-central.org (279-0299) LET’S GET PRUNING Learn the basics of when, how and why with local expert Tim Kolhauff, WSU Urban Horticulture Coordinator. Feb. 17, 10-11 am. Free. Manito Park, 1800 S. Grand Blvd. thefriendsofmanito.org (456-8038) PICKIN’ POST FALLS VINTAGE SHOW & ARTISAN MARKET An event by Past Blessings Farm, featuring curated vendors from the Western U.S. offering vintage, antique, artisan handcrafts, signs, jewelry, rustic, reclaimed, repurposed and more. (Kids 12 and under free; free parking on site.) Feb. 17 from 9 am-6 pm and Feb. 18 from 10 am-4 pm. $7/ weekend admission. Greyhound Park & Event Center, 5100 Riverbend. pastblessingsfarm.com (800-828-4880) PUNK ROCK YOGA A beginning vinyasa flow yoga with live DJs spinning punk rock favorites. Different music cultivates different energies, come see how this powerful music transforms your practice. Pre-registration required. Feb. 17, 7-8 pm. $15. Browne’s Addition Wellness Center, 2013 W. Fourth Ave. brownesadditionwellnesscenter.com SPOKANE LGBT SENIORS MEETING If you identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender and consider yourself a “senior,” please join us for our initial meeting. Please RSVP to NancyTavery@ comcast.net. Feb. 17, 10 am. Free. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. uuspokane.org JUST EAT IT: FILM SCREENING AND PANEL DISCUSSION A documentary screening presented by Spokane Edible Tree Project and the Master Gardener Foundation of Spokane County. After the film, community members are invited to attend a panel discussion with local organizations working to address food waste and hunger Feb. 20, 7-9 pm. $5. Community Building, 35 W. Main Ave. spokaneedibletreeproject.org SPOKANE CONTRA DANCE Spokane Folklore Society’s weekly dance, with the band Crooked Kilt playing and caller Karen Wilson-Bell. No experience necessary; beginner workshop at 7:15 pm. Feb. 21, 7:30-9:30 pm. $5-$7. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. womansclubspokane.org (598-9111) DROP IN & CODE Explore the world of coding using game-based lessons on Code.org and Scratch. For kids (grades 3+) and adults. Meets the last Friday of the month, from 4-5:30 pm. Free. Spark

Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. sparkcentral.org/events/drop-in-code PEACE & JUSTICE ACTION CONFERENCE The ninth annual two-day conference hosted by PJALS Spokane offers an opening reception with local musicians and spoken word artists (Feb. 23 from 6-8:30 pm) followed by a day (Feb. 24 from 9 am-5 pm) of workshop sessions, keynote speakers and opportunities to connect with likeminded locals. $15$55. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. pjals.org RANDOM FANDOM TRIVIA NIGHTS: DISNEY, PIXAR, & DREAMWORKS Adult trivia nights take on the biggest realms of fandom at the Spokane Valley Library. Bring your knowledge and your own eats (or have food delivered!). Cosplayers welcome. Feb. 23, 6:30-8:30 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. (893-8400) SIDEWALK ASTRONOMY Local astronomical club members set up their personal telescopes (weather permitting) to view the first quarter moon. On the south side of Franklin Park in North Spokane. Feb. 23, 6-9 pm. Free. Franklin Park, 302 W. Queen Ave. spokaneastronomy.org (509-328-2402) HOMEBUYER EDUCATION SEMINAR: In this free seminar, explore all of the major aspects of the home-buying process in an unbiased format with SNAP Spokane instructors certified by the Washington State Housing Finance Commission. SNAP is a HUD-approved housing counseling agency. Registration required; email to Kevin Dunning at Dunning@SNAPWA.org or call 3193032. Offered Jan. 27 and Feb. 24 from 9 am-2 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. (893-8350) INPG SEED SWAP A community seed swap, with optional tables ($10) for participants to display their goods. Only pure, GMO-free and untreated seeds accepted; heirloom and organic seeds desired. Includes a meeting with Spokane Permaculture. Feb. 24, 10 am-2 pm. Free. Community Building, 35 W. Main. inlandnorthwestpermaculture.com

FILM

INTERNATIONAL FILM SERIES: THE OTHER SIDE OF HOPE This wry, melancholic comedy from Aki Kaurismäki — a clear-eyed response to the current refugee crisis — follows two people searching for a place to call home. Feb. 20, 7 pm. $5. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) FOOD FOR THOUGHT FILM SERIES The next film in the series is “The Condor’s Shadow,” a story of endangered species recovery, profiling the ongoing work of reestablishing the iconic California condor in Southern California. Before the film begins, Nez Perce conservation biologist David Moen gives a short talk about the project and the Condor and its habitat. Feb. 21, 7 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org INTERNATIONAL CAT DAY: KEDI A documentary about the thousands of cats who have roamed the metropolis of Istanbul freely for thousands of years, wandering in and out of people’s lives. One dollar from each ticket sold benefits the Humane Society of The Palouse. Feb. 22, 7 pm. $3-$7. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. kenworthy.org SPIRIT GAME: PRIDE OF A NATION A special film event hosted by the Spokane Lacrosse community. Feb. 22, 6

pm. $5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. bit.ly/2sqhE7J (509-327-1050) THE POST This based-on-history film tells of a cover-up that spanned four U.S. Presidents and pushed the country’s first female newspaper publisher and a hard-driving editor to join an unprecedented battle between the press and the government. Feb. 23-25, times vary. $3-$7. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org

FOOD

SCOTCH & CIGARS Select a flight of whiskey, scotch or bourbon paired with a recommended cigar during an event on the outdoor patio. Thursdays, from 6-10 pm. $15-$25. Prohibition Gastropub, 1914 N. Monroe. (474-9040) SIPS & CINEMA: DATE NIGHT A Valentine’s Day-themed installment of the Inlander’s beer+movie series, this time with wine from Maryhill Winery, featuring the Viognier or Winemaker’s Red, and free popcorn (while supplies last) courtesy of Horizon Credit Union. Movie starts at 8 pm, doors open at 7. Feb. 15, 8 pm. $5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. bit.ly/2nwiKcr THE SEASONAL KITCHEN Inland Northwest Food Network’s monthly, hands-on classes are designed to teach participants how to cook delicious, nutritious, locally grown seasonal foods. Pre-registration required. Sessions on the third Thursday of the month, from 6-8:30 pm. See link for registration and class themes. $25-$30/session. Jacklin Arts & Cultural Center, 405 N. William St. inwfoodnetwork.org VALENTINES DATE NIGHT COOKING CLASS Executive Chef Jeannie Lincoln shares how to create delectable pillow-like gnocchi during a hands-on class, culminating in a family-style meal inside the historic venue. Ages 21+. Offered Feb. 14-15 from 6-9 pm. 50$. Commellini Estate, 14715 N. Dartford Dr. commellini.com (466-0667) TASTE SPOKANE The annual event benefits the Wishing Star Foundation and features sample-sized portions and products from some of the region’s most acclaimed restaurants, regional wineries, breweries, and dessert purveyors. Feb. 16. $60/person ($100/VIP). Northern Quest Resort & Casino, 100 N. Hayford Rd. tastespokane.com VINO WINE TASTING Friday (Feb. 16) features the wine tasting showdown Rhone vs. Washington, from 3-6:30 pm. Saturday (Feb. 17) features a tasting of classical wines of Spain, from 2-4:30 pm. Vino! A Wine Shop, 222 S. Washington. vinowine.com (838-1229) CHOCOLATOLOGY Angel York and Darin Wick have partnered up to bring vegan chocolate recipes to the world with their book “Chocolatology: Chocolate’s Fantastical Lore, Bittersweet History, & Delicious (Vegan) Recipes.” Feb. 17, 7 pm. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com NEIGHBORHOOD COFFEE TASTING Enjoy live jazz with local band Tasty, and sample Evans Bros. line up of coffee offerings as you learn about the process behind sourcing, roasting, and preparing high calibre coffees from around the world. Feb. 17, from 10 am-1 pm, through May 26. Evans Brothers Coffee Roasters, 504 E. Sherman. (208-930-4065) SUPPER CLUB: WINES OF CRETE Enjoy exotic wines and cuisine of the Island of

Crete. The dinner includes six courses paired with seven premium wines, with a guest presentation by Steven Brown of Lyrarakis Winery. Feb. 17 at 5:30 pm and Feb. 18 at 4:30 pm. $60 (+tax, gratuity). Petunias Marketplace, 2010 N. Madison. petuniasmarket.com BEEF SHORT RIBS & KEY LIME PIE Chef Mark teaches how to cook the meat while keeping it moist. Also learn how to create a sauce from the braising juices. Feb. 18, 2-3:30 pm. $55. Kitchen Engine, 621 W. Mallon. thekitchenengine.com CREATE A FREEZER MEAL PLAN In this class by Meegan Ware, learn the easy way to plan for a week, two weeks, or up to a month in advance for meals. Includes recipes for freezer meals and healthy shortcut tips. Feb. 18, 1-2 pm. Free. Cheney Library, 610 First St. scld. org (893-8280) INVEG POTLUCK Join the local group for a community potluck on the third Sunday of each month, offering delicious food and time to connect with others. After each potluck is a featured guest speaker on topics such as sprouting, nutrition, animal rights, cooking, and more. Please bring a plant-based dish to share (no honey, eggs, meat or dairy). Free. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. inveg.org (542-7829) SWEET & SAVORY GALETTES Known as Galettes in France and Crostatas in Italy, these versatile rustic tarts can be made with savory or sweet ingredients and eaten any time of the day. Feb. 19, 5:30-7 pm. $45. Kitchen Engine, 621 W. Mallon. thekitchenengine.com CREATE A FREEZER MEAL PLAN In this class by Meegan Ware, learn the easy way to plan for a week, two weeks, or up to a month in advance for meals. Includes recipes for freezer meals and healthy shortcut tips. Feb. 20, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free. Airway Heights Library, 1213 S. Lundstrom St. scld.org (893-8250) WINE TASTING 101 Spend the evening with My Fresh Basket Wine Steward Drew Smith learning wine basics, including the proper way to taste wine, what makes different foods pair well with different wines and more. Guests taste five wines with light snacks. Feb. 20, 5:30-7 pm. $20. My Fresh Basket, 1030 W. Summit Pkwy. bit.ly/2rQXymH ENCHILADAS & CHILAQUILES Learn Chef Vira’s family recipes, paired with Mexican rice and refried beans. Feb. 21, 5-7 pm. $39. Kitchen Engine, 621 W. Mallon Ave. thekitchenengine.com COOKING CLASS: INDIAN STYLE CURRY A session demonstrating how to prepare three aromatic curries: coconut vegetable korma, butter chicken and red lentil dal, as well as hands-on making of Garam Masala, an iconic spice blend used throughout India. Feb. 22, 5:30-8 pm. $30. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front. (252-6249) CRAB FEST The extensive seafood buffet feature dishes like chilled crab, clams, cod Veracruz, steamed Alaskan snow crab, New England style clam chowder and more. Feb. 22 from 3-9 pm. $30-$35. Coeur d’Alene Casino, 37914 S. Nukwalqw. cdacasino.com SCIENCE & HISTORY OF CRAFT BEER Discover the history and science behind one of the world’s most popular beverages with Adam Boyd, Iron Goat brewer, radio host and homebrewer. Feb. 22, 7-8 pm. Free. North Spokane Library, 44 E. Hawthorne Rd. scld.org (893-8350)

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 51


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess DR. STRANGERLOVE

I’m a 33-year-old woman. Though I don’t want a boyfriend right now, I have a strong sex drive and don’t want to go without sex. I’ve tried the hookup apps, but besides finding sleeping with strangers sexually unsatisfying, I’m always a little surprised at how emotionally empty I end up feeling. (It’s not like I want any of these guys to be a boyfriend.) —Hungry

AMY ALKON

It’s possible for a woman to have an orgasm from hookup sex — just as it’s possible to spot a white rhino grazing on a roadway median in suburban Detroit. The reality is, hookups tend to work best if you are a man or a trailer. Research by sociologist Elizabeth A. Armstrong and her colleagues finds that for women, hookup sex is particularly problematic in the orgasm-dispensing department. In first-time hookups, women they surveyed reported orgasms only 11 percent of the time — compared with 67 percent of the time from sex in a relationship. However, the more times a woman had slept with her current hookup partner the more likely she was to finish with screams of ecstasy — and not the ones that stand in for “You ‘bout done yet?” As for why you feel crappy after your latest Captain Hookup shinnies down the drainpipe, I’ve written before about how female emotions seem to have evolved to act as an alarm system against deficient male “investment.” They push women to crave emotional connection after sex — even when they went into it wanting nothing more than a little sexercise with some himbo. Pop the hood on the brain and you’ll see support for this notion. An analysis of findings from 24 brain imaging studies led psychiatrist Timm Poeppl and his colleagues to conclude that “sexual stimulation seems to activate key regions for emotional attachment and pair bonding more consistently in women than in men.” So, it isn’t exactly bizarre that you, as a woman, find hooking up with a stranger about as emotionally and sexually satisfying as a fist bump. This doesn’t mean you have to rush a boyfriend into your life to have sex. You can eliminate some of the problems of hookup sex by finding a regular sex-quaintance — ideally, a guy friend who’s sweet and attractive but who falls steeply short of the qualifications you have for a romantic partner. (That way, you’ll be less likely to let any “activated” brain regions vault you into a relationship.) This is somebody you can gradually show around your body and train in the magic trick it takes for you to have an orgasm — as opposed to some single-serving Romeo who approaches your body like a burglar in a pitch-black china shop. And, finally, having at least friendly affection for somebody you sleep with should mean that sex leaves you feeling, if not loved, well, less like a rental car somebody just dropped off. “Note to person checking in this vehicle: Makes weird noises when cornering.”

CHAMPAGNE AND SUFFERING

I’m a 30-year-old gay guy. I was laid off, and I’m freelancing crazy hours to try to pay my rent and bills. My best friend’s birthday was this past weekend, and I did what I could timewise (and put a modest gift on my credit card), but he’s totally bent out of shape because he feels like I neglected him. He equates the attention you pay to his birthday with how much you care, which is so ridiculous. —Feeling Bad What kind of friend are you that you couldn’t, say, sell a kidney on the black market and buy the guy a proper gift? Yes, it seems you prioritized frivolities such as paying rent and keeping the lights on without needing to rig a treadmill for your dog to chase a piece of bacon on a string. Of course, putting your financial survival first doesn’t mean you’re a bad friend. The, uh, brat of honor probably just sees it that way because of what psychologists call “attribution bias.” This describes how we tend to be charitable in explaining our own errors and failings — excusing them as situational (the result of something that’s happened to us) — while attributing others’ to the sort of people they are (compassionless, birthday-hating monsters). Have a sit-down with your friend and explain that you care deeply about him. (Review your history of showing this.) Emphasize that it was a lack of time and funding, not a lack of feeling, that kept you from, say, renting a sufficiently mansionesque bouncy house or hiring David Blaine to make balloon animals on his special day. Apply compassion. Recognize that there’s probably some woundyplace in him that makes him this way, basically expecting his birthday to be treated like some major national holiday. Okay, maybe the guy’s first name is Martin. Chances are, the two that follow aren’t “Luther” and “King.” n ©2018, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

52 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

EVENTS | CALENDAR

MUSIC

DAVID SÁNCHEZ PRESENTS CARIB SFCC Jazz is pleased to present Latin Grammy Award winner David Sánchez. The world-renowned jazz saxophonist from Puerto Rico performs with his own band featuring Edward Simon, piano; Ricky Rodrizguez, bass; E.J. Strickland, drums; Jhan Lee Aponte, percussion. Feb. 15, 7 pm. $10. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. bit.ly/2DuERd3 (533-3569) FLAMENCO FUEGO A performance featuring singer and recording artist Jesus Montoya of Seville, Spain and dancer Adriana Maresma Fois of Jerez, Spain. They join award-winning guitarist Joaquin Gallegos, local favorite Nic Vigil of Milonga and dancers from Spokane and Seattle. Feb. 15, 7:30-9 pm. $25/$30. Gonzaga Magnuson Theatre, 502 E. Boone. (313-6553) PETTY FEVER A concert by the multiaward winning full production tribute to Tom Petty & The Heartbreakers, featuring guitarist/vocalist Frank Murray. Feb. 16, 8-10 pm. $20-$30. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org INLAND NW BLUEGRASS MUSIC ASSOCIATION MUSIC SHOWCASE Live bluegrass and related forms of acoustic music performed by local and regional bands. Third Saturday of the month. $5-$7. Trent Elementary School, 3303 N. Pines Rd. spokanebluegrass.org THE MUSIC OF STAR WARS Conductor Morihiko Nakahara leads two shows featuring John Williams’ selections from the Star Wars film scores, including “The Force Awakens” and “Rogue One.” Pre-concert activities 90 minutes before each concert at The Fox. Feb. 17 at 2 and 8 pm. $25-$50/adults $19-$37/ kids 12 and under. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) DINNER AND A SHOW Featuring a performance of selections from the Great American Songbook by Casey Wilkinson and Sharon Daggett and a special dinner and drink menu for $10. Feb. 18, 6-9 pm. The Roadhouse, 20 N. Raymond Rd. spokaneroadhouse.com SPOKANE STRING QUARTET A program of works inspired by love performed by the String Quartet, which increases by two members for this concert, with cellist John Marshall and violist Julia Salerno. The program features Brahms’ Sextet in G Major, Op. 36, and Verklärte Nacht by Arnold Schoenberg. Feb. 18, 3 pm. $12-$20. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. (227-7404)

SPORTS

3A/4A BOYS & GIRLS DISTRICT BASKETBALL Watch some of Eastern Washington’s best high school basketball teams battle it out for their trip to the State in this all new regional tournament. Top teams from the Greater Spokane League (GSL) as well as Mid Columbia Conference (MCC) have a rare opportunity to play under the bright lights of the Spokane Arena. Feb. 15-16 $7-$9. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000) SPOKANE CHIEFS Upcoming regular season home games are Feb. 17 (vs. Tri City), Feb. 20 (vs. Everett), Feb. 23 (vs. Prince George) and Feb. 24 (vs. Kootenay). All games start at 7:05 pm. $10-$35/game. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanearena.com (279-7000)

THEATER

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING EARNEST A whimsical romantic comedy and a sharp-witted satire of Victorian society, set in London and the English countryside during the late 19th century. Feb. 15-17 at 7 pm. $6-$8. Lake City High School, 6101 N. Ramsey Rd. bit.ly/2GmEIH5 (208-769-0769) LEGALLY BLONDE, THE MUSICAL A local production of the award-winning Broadway musical based on the 2001 film. Feb. 15-25; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 1:30 pm. $12-$20. Regional Theatre of the Palouse, 122 N. Grand Ave. rtoptheatre.org (334-0750) SWEET CHARITY: A MUSICAL A production exploring the turbulent love life of Charity Hope Valentine, a hopelessly romantic but comically unfortunate dance hall hostess in NYC. Feb. 14-17 at 7:30 pm; Feb. 17-18 at 2 pm. $15-$21. Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd. aspirecda.com/Home/EventDetails/6 DON’T DRESS FOR DINNER While Bernard’s wife is away, he plans a romantic weekend with his mistress. An evening of hilarious confusion ensues as everyone improvises at breakneck speed. Through Feb. 25; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm and Sun at 2 pm. $12-$15. Ignite! Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway. igniteonbroadway.org SONGS FOR A NEW WORLD The Civic presents Tony Award-winning composer and lyricist Jason Robert Brown’s first musical in a new, fully realized production. Feb. 16-March 4; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $15-$32. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) STEEL MAGNOLIAS The classic story explores the bond between six southern women living in northern Louisiana as they discuss topics both deep and superficial. Feb. 16-March 4; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20-$22. Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave. facebook.com/lakecityplayhouse/ BURNT BY THE SUN A staged production by Peter Flannery, based on the screenplay by Nikita Mikhalkov and Rustam Ibragimbekov. Feb. 23-March 11; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $20. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third. spokanestageleft.org (838-9727) VDAY SPOKANE 2018: THE VAGINA MONOLOGUES This year marks the 20th anniversary of VDAY, a global activist movement to end violence against women and girls. Spokane joins the global effort with a three-day event including live music, silent auction, wine, baked goods, and a reading of the monologues. Proceeds benefit the YWCA of Spokane. Feb. 23-24 at 7:30 pm and Feb. 25 at 5 pm. Performance at 165 S. Howard. $15. bit.ly/2DFnpm6

VISUAL ARTS

SILENCE IS NOT AN OPTION This NIC Faculty Art Exhibit features a variety of original works created by faculty, including Donna Bain, Otis Bardwell, Megan Cherry, Priscilla Cooper, Jen Erickson, Michael Horswill and Jessica Raetzke. Feb. 13-March 23; open MonThu from 10 am-4 pm and Fri from 10 am-2:30 pm. Free. North Idaho College, 1000 W. Garden Ave. nic.edu TEN YEARS OF TERRAIN In honor of Terrain’s 10th Anniversary, this gallery show looks back at noteworthy pieces/

performance from past Terrain events. Representing at least one piece from every year and featuring the work of 33 different artists, join us as we replay some of the most memorable moments of the past decade. Open Thu-Sat from 5-7 pm through March 23. Free. Terrain, 304 W. Pacific Ave. bit.ly/2DNzuXo FACING THE INFERNO: THE WILDFIRE PHOTOGRAPHY OF KARI GREER Greer, a former firefighter, specializes in wildland fire photography and editorial photojournalism. Her work examines heighted fire activity across the West. Alongside Greer’s images is the exhibit “Lookouts in Fire Detection” by C. Rod Bacon. Feb. 16-April 14, open Tue-Sat 10 am-8 pm and Sun, 10 am-6 pm. 14. Free. Prichard Art Gallery, 414 S. Main St. (208-885-3586) BREATH STROKES WITH DEANNA CAMP Create your own artistic energy on paper or canvas using gentle yoga practice and mediation as your foundation. Feb. 24 from 10 am-2 pm. $40. Spokane Art School, 811 W. Garland. spokaneartschool.net (509-325-1500.)

WORDS

POETS DORIANNE LAUX & JOE MILLAR Laux, winner of the National Book Award, and Millar, a recipient of both a Guggenheim and National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships, both from North Carolina State University, read selections from their work. Feb. 15 at 9:30 am (Hagan Center.) Free. Spokane Community College, 1810 N. Greene St. scc.spokane.edu (533-7079) READING: LENI ZUMAS The Portlandbased author is in conversation with Alexis Smith for her new title “Red Clocks,” noted by Library Journal as “the Handmaid’s Tale for the new millennium.” Feb. 15, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com VISITING WRITERS SERIES: KRYS LEE The MFA at EWU and Get Lit! Programs present a reading with the author of the short story collection “Drifting House” and the recent debut novel “How I Became a North Korean.” Feb. 16, 7:308:30 pm. Free. Spark Central, 1214 W. Summit Pkwy. getlitfestival.org READING: MEGAN MACVIE & MARY CLEARMAN BLEW Blew, an awardwinning author and editor of 13 books, was Macvie’s mentor at the U of Idaho. Macvie’s debut young adult novel “The Ocean in My Ears” has been named one of Kirkus’s best young adult books of 2017. Feb. 17, 7 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main. bookpeopleofmoscow.com POWER 2 THE POETRY OPEN MIC The local poetry group hosts an open mic in honor of Black History Month. The public is welcome to share their poetry. Also includes readings by local poets. Feb. 20, 6-7:30 pm. Spokane Library, 906 W. Main. bit.ly/2EZMczC BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series, open to all. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First Ave. spokanepoetryslam.org NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LIVE! BERTIE GREGORY - A WILD LIFE This British photographer/filmmaker has a knack for finding the wild wherever he goes, from leopards in Mumbai to peregrine falcons in his home town. Feb. 21, 7-9 pm. $30. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. wcebroadway.com (800-325-7328) n


NOTICE OF PENDING CUSTODY ACTION

Hey Dezana what is ur availability this week? I'm desperate.

355 nder.com 09) 444-7 la PHONE: (5BulletinBoard@In mit Parkway E-MAIL: 1227 West Sum 1 20 N: IN PERSO Spokane, WA 99

Action: Petition for Custody under Article Six of the New York State Family Court Act Parties: Petitioners: Robert J. Lynch, Kathy Lynch Respondents: Daniel J. Lynch, Melissa K. Swiger-Mendez Jurisdiction/Venue: Cortland County Family Court, Cortland County, State of New York

Wednesday 1pm, Thursday 10am & 4...

Relief Sought: Petition seeking an order of custody and placement of subject child to Petitioners Return Date: March 27, 2018 at 11:00 AM, Courthouse, 46 Greenbush Street, Cortland, NY 13045

Friday, Sat & Sun have Openings as well

F.C.A. §§ 617; CPLR 315, 316 FAMILY COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF CORTLAND In the Matter of a Custody/Visitation Proceeding

Wednesday at 1 pm plz!!

Mentoring Coaching Counseling

Thank u!!! LIC#2015 815 N MONROE ST SPOKANE, WA 99201

Dezana Aman, LMT

ArtOfMassage¯Spokane.com

D FAIRWOO 22, 2018 THURSDAY, FEB

MA 60016914

to advertise:

444-SELL

10AM - 2PM

REVERSE

FREE Workshops for Seniors!

MORTGAGE

• FREE HEALTH INFO & GIVEAWAYS • Over 30 Healthcare Exhibitors • Free Blood Pressure Checks • $125 Gift Basket Drawing

SUMMONS (Publication)

Sun Meadow Family Nudist Resort Year Round Skinny Dipping 208.686.8686

208-762-6887

1

2

NMLS 400451 Reverse Mortgage Consultant 1-866-787-0980 Toll-Free 208-762-6887 Local

3

Idaho & Washington NMLS 531629 Must be at least 62 years of age. Wells5Fargo6 Home is a division 4 7 Mortgage 8 9 10of Wells 11 Fargo 12 Bank, N.A. © 2011 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. 3/11-6/11 15 NMLSR ID 399801. AS581479 16 18

20

21

23

24

31

32

38

26

27 33

29

30

47

48

49

34

40

42

41

43 45

46

51

50

52

54 58

28

36

39

44

59

BUYING Estate Co ntents / Househ See abesd old Goods iscount.co m or 509-939-9 996

19

35 37

13

22 25

Laurie Case, Clerk of Court

TO THE ABOVE-NAMED RESPONDENT: The foregoing summons is served upon you by publication pursuant to an Order of the Hon. Julie A. Campbell of the Family Court, Cortland County, dated 11/15/17 and filed with the petition and other papers in the Office of the Clerk of the Family Court, Cortland County.

FREE INFORMATION LarryWaters Waters Larry

17

DOWN 1. What the “G” in GI tract stands for 2. Misbehave 3. Hit the ____ 4. ____ platter 5. Detectives, for short 6. Suffix with sheep or hawk 7. Yours, in Paris

Dated: January 17, 2018

Learn more about “LOCAL” REPRESENTATIVE reverse mortgage loans

14

54. George who played Sulu on “Star Trek” 56. “Back to the Future” family name 58. 1988 Best Play Tony winner inspired by Puccini 63. #29 of 50 64. Hunts, with “on” 65. #17 of 50 66. Aim 67. With festiveness 68. You might give them props 69. Eye affliction

On your failure to appear as herein directed, a warrant may be issued for your arrest.

“HAVE YOU CONSIDERED?”

Village Garden Mall Administration Bldg • 509-467-2365 Entrance One - 312 W. Hastings Rd. • North Spokane (West off Hwy 395)

briefly 32. One who shouldn’t be driving 34. Sacagawea dollar, e.g. 35. Saintly glow 36. Where buffalo roam 37. Epithet for Middle America made by New Yorkers and Los Angelenos ... or four literal occurrences in this puzzle 42. #28 of 50 43. Store sign that might be flipped at 9 a.m. 44. ____ Jones’ locker 45. Modern surgical tools 47. Store head: Abbr. 50. ____ Lanka 51. Chum 52. 2008 Pulitzer-winning novel “The Brief Wondrous Like of Oscar ____” 53. ____ Ming, 2016 NBA Hall of Fame inductee

9908 V-00540-17 V-00607-17

A petition under Article 6 of the Family Court Act having been filed with this Court requesting the following relief: Custody; YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear before this Court on Date/Time: March 27, 2018 at 11:00 AM Purpose: Continuation Part: JAC Floor/Room: Floor 2/Room Check with Deputies , Room 205 Presiding: Hon. Julie A. Campbell Location: Courthouse 46 Greenbush St. Cortland, NY 13045-2725 to answer the petition and to be dealt with in accordance with Article 6 of the Family Court Act.

509.998.0255 • 707 N Cedar Suite #4 (The Pelican Building)

RETIREMENT VILL AGE & ASSISTED LIVING

Where real gay men meet for uncensored fun! Browse & reply for free. 18+ 206.576.6631

File #: Docket #:

IN THE NAME OF THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK: To: Melissa K. Swiger Mendez 10580 Mountain View Avenue Apt. 580L Redlands, CA 92373

1000s Records LP/45s 1000s Tapes CDs Memorabilia/T’s Blu-Ray/DVD! 1902 Hamilton Recorded Memories

ACROSS 1. [OMG!] 5. Cotillard won Best Actress for playing her 9. Not too quick on the uptake 14. Org. fighting anti-Muslim discrimination 15. That ____ say 16. Pass 17. “Enough already!” 18. Pennsylvania Dutch treat 20. Refresh, as a cup of coffee 22. #43 of 50 23. ____ the day 24. Org. that ranked “To Kill a Mockingbird” as the #1 legal movie of all time 27. Super Bowl whose pregame show honored the Apollo astronauts 28. Points awarded for a safety at the Super Bowl 31. Rare occurrences at Super Bowls,

Robert J. Lynch Kathy Lynch Petitioners, - against Daniel C. Lynch Melissa K. Swiger Mendez Respondents

Ok, see you then

Psychic Readings

GF30 12/1997

53

55

60

56 61

62

57 63

64

65

66

67

68

69

“FLY OVER”

8. Zagat’s reader, informally 9. Indira Gandhi International Airport site 10. Greek war goddess 11. Be out for a bit? 12. ____-fi

13. When the French toast? 19. ____ to middling 21. Feeling of pity 25. Wally’s bro, on ‘50s-’60s TV 26. What car wheels turn on 28. Firm (up), as muscles

29. Halloween supplies 30. “That’s ____ I haven’t heard!” THIS W 33. Spanish bulls ANSWE EEK’S 34. Panther or puma I SAW RS ON 36. Unfortunate price to pay YOUS 37. Phobia 38. 66, in old Rome 39. “Whoopee!” 40. Discharge, as from a volcano 41. Mega- times a million 42. Scores by RBs and WRs 45. Okeechobee, e.g. 46. Oldsmobile models sold from 1999 to 2004 47. “Yeah, r-i-i-ight!” 48. Irish county or port 49. “Casino ____” (First Bond book) 51. “I Fall To Pieces” singer Cline 54. “bye 4 now” 55. “____ hollers, let ...” 57. Smokes 58. High fig. for a hybrid car 59. Maidenform product 60. 180 61. Put a match to 62. Hails from Rocky Balboa

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 53


things to do & places to stay.

Join the Krewe

Photos: Diane Higdem

COEUR D ’ ALENE

visitcda.org for more events,

Mardi Gras “Krewe d’Alene” features New Orleansthemed music, food and fun

G

rab your beads and gussy up for a grand evening of Mardi Gras merriment at the RESORT PLAZA SHOPS, Saturday, February 17 from 5:30-10 pm. No beads? No problem! Get them and other party favors to wear on-site as you visit COEUR D’ALENE ARTS 7 CULTURE ASSOCIATION’S version of the famous New Orleans “French Quarter” replete with art, entertainment, and food. Sample Big Easy eats from seven different local chefs competing for judge’s and people’s choice: ANGELO’S RISTORANTE, CASTAWAY CELLARS, MOONDOLLARS BISTRO, MOON TIME, REPUBLIC KITCHEN + TAPHOUSE, SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE, SWEET LOU’S. Stop by LAFITTE’S BLACKSMITH SHOP BAR for an adult beverage — remember to pick up your gold-lettered commemorative bar glass — for something to sip as you stroll around. Bring your camera for plenty of photo ops, including the recreation of a New

C O E U R

D ’A L E N E

Upcoming Events

COEUR D’ALENE

visitcda.org for more events, things to do & places to stay.

54 INLANDER FEBRUARY 15, 2018

Steel Magnolias FEB 16 - MARCH 4

One of the most well-known and beloved American dramas opens at Lake City Playhouse this month. Steel Magnolias explores the bond between six Southern women as they cope with the mundane to heartwrenching loss. Tickets $20$22; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm; Lake City Playhouse, 1320 E. Garden Ave.

Orleans courtyard for selfies. Everywhere you look is something to do or be amazed by: stilt walkers, hula hoopers, a fortune teller, magician, and juggler, and live music by Twisted Biscuit and Gumbo Jazz Trio. For the first time ever in the Lake City, welcome Le Gurlz drag queen show, starring Nova Kaine and friends. Check out the henna tattoo artist, the caricaturist and the artists doing live paintings! Bid on artist-crafted masks and other items in the silent auction, proceeds of which benefit Arts & Culture Alliance. Tickets $40, ages 21-andover please, artsandculturecda.org/ mardigras/ So, as they say in New Orleans, laissez les bon temps rouler — let the good times roll! Of course, if good times turn into great times, you may want to stay overnight. Check the COEUR D’ALENE RESORT for stay packages, starting from $169 (contact cdaresort.com).

Sweet Charity: A Musical

The Importance of Being Earnest

Inlander Restaurant Week

Based on the hysterical book by Neil Simon, this musical production explores the turbulent love life of Charity Hope Valentine, a hopelessly romantic but comically unfortunate dance hall hostess in New York City. Tickets $15-$21; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm; Kroc Center, 1765 W. Golf Course Rd.

Lake City High School presents Oscar Wilde’s sharp-witted satire of Victorian society during the 19th century. Visit the Troupe De Wolfe Facebook page for details regarding a high tea in honor closing night of the play. Tickets $8; 7 pm; Lake City High School, 6101 N. Ramsey Rd.

You have another week before a record number of North Idaho restaurants offer their three-course meals for either $21 or $31, but the time to get your reservations is now. Look for event guides at all participating restaurants and all Numerica Credit Union branches or search by price, cuisine, and neighborhood at InlanderRestaurantWeek.com.

FEBRUARY 14-18

FEBRUARY 15-17

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

FEB 22 - MARCH 3


it’s coming …

INLANDER R E S TA U R A N T W E E K

Our Chefs have been working hard on mouthwatering and unique menus for the upcoming Inlander Restaurant Week. Join us at one of our outstanding and award-winning restaurants.

FEBRUARY 22 – MARCH 3

Flavors of Coeur d’Alene Package starting at $199*

Includes accomodations and $100 dining credit.

*Plus taxes, per night.

MAKE IT A WEEK TO REMEMBER AND TRY THEM ALL!

208.765.4000 cdaresort.com SPONSORED BY THE COEUR D’ALENE CONVENTION & VISITORS BUREAU

FEBRUARY 15, 2018 INLANDER 55


Inlander 02/15/2018  
Inlander 02/15/2018