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For three wrongfully convicted Spokane Valley men, the fight for justice isn’t over PAGE 13

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I would say a cowboy movie, because of all the mountains and the ranges. Yeah, I’d do a cowboy movie. And who would play your main character? My main character would be… you know who’d make a good Western person? I’d go Will Smith.

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It could be, like, a crime-based movie, and they find a dead body in the Spokane River. Or a film that’s covering organic chemistry students who are making drugs and they murdered someone who was going to expose them. What would your working title be? “Benzene and Sadness.”

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Since it’s been really foggy recently, what’s coming to mind is one of those super scary horror movies. With the fog, down by the river, walking down and around. I can just see… you know how they did the movie Prom for high school? This could be a college horror movie. I can just see a bunch of college students walking in the fog and getting into some scary business.

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n 1965, the Sierra Club sued to stop a ski development in California’s Sequoia National Forest, arguing that Walt Disney Enterprises’ proposed resort would constitute an injury to Mineral King Valley. In 1972, the Supreme Court rejected the club’s reasoning, unwilling to accept that natural objects had standing to sue in court. Instead, the court urged the Sierra Club to amend its complaint to show how the club’s members, rather than the valley, would be injured. The club did so, and the ski resort was stopped. However, one justice, William O. Douglas, was persuaded by the Sierra Club’s original reasoning. His passionate dissent in Sierra Club v. Morton marks a pivotal point in environmental legal battles, one that still shapes advocacy today. Douglas’ views were inspired by his own experiences in the wild. He grew up in Yakima, Washington, hiking the foothills and peaks of the Cascade Range, and sang the praises of nature throughout his life. “When one stands on Darling Mountain, he is not remote and apart from the wilderness; he is an intimate part of it,” he wrote in a typical passage from his memoir, Of Men and Mountains. An intellectually restless man who wrote and traveled extensively, Douglas published five environmental books between 1960 and 1967. One of them, A Wilderness Bill of Rights, argued for a “Bill of Rights to protect those whose spiritual values extend to the rivers and lakes, the valleys and the ridges, and who find life in a mechanized society worth living only because those splendid resources are not despoiled.”

I

n his dissent in the Sierra Club lawsuit, Douglas advocated for a federal rule that would allow for litigation “in the name of the inanimate object about to be despoiled, defaced, or invaded by roads and bulldozers and where injury is the subject of public outrage.” Douglas recommended accepting nature’s rights as a lasting way to shield wild places and processes from the ever-accelerating threats they faced. His passionate plea didn’t persuade his practical-minded judicial brethren, even if fellow dissenter Justice Harry Blackmun called it “eloquent.” Yet Douglas’ opinion influenced and inspired environmentalists at the time and has ever since. Roderick Nash, in his history of environmental ethics, The Rights of Nature, said that Douglas had “located the conceptual door to the rights of nature.” In the years since, environmental groups have been able to sue on behalf of nature by demonstrating group members’ legitimate interest in conservation issues or in places like Mineral King, a concept called associational standing. But despite Douglas’ efforts, nature still finds itself marginalized in courtrooms. The courts themselves have never fully embraced the idea of nature’s standing, but they’ve

come close. This has been particularly true for endangered species like the marbled murrelet, the northern spotted owl and the coho salmon — all of which found themselves in court cases as co-plaintiffs alongside humans. Nature has yet to stand alone in court, however. The debate about nature’s standing becomes a broader philosophical debate about law and what it can and can’t, or should or shouldn’t, do. Law is not intended to transform levels of consciousness or morality; it is a pragmatic discipline. As a practical matter, extending standing to natural objects may simply be unnecessary. As a moral matter, however, the failure to acknowledge nature’s rights frustrates legal and environmental activists and surely would have disappointed (though not surprised) Douglas. Today, global climate change, biodiversity losses and habitat fragmentation are creating unprecedented social and ecological problems. Environmental crises require serious changes in governance and legal systems, and arguably in morality. When organizations such as the Earth Law Center work to “advance legal rights for ecosystems to exist, thrive and evolve,” or when Ecuador declares in its 2008 Constitution that nature “has the right to integral respect for its existence and for the maintenance and regeneration of its life cycles, structure, functions and evolutionary processes,” they are paying homage to Douglas.

T

oward the end of his dissent, Douglas noted that well-meaning advocates often flock to the environmental issue du jour, an understandable tendency but one that cannot sustain environmental protection over the long run. “That is why these environmental issues should be tendered by the inanimate object itself,” he wrote. “Then there will be assurances that all of the forms of life which it represents will stand before the court — the pileated woodpecker as well as the coyote and bear, the lemmings as well as the trout in the streams. Those inarticulate members of the ecological group cannot speak. But those people who have so frequented the place as to know its values and wonders will be able to speak for the entire ecological community.” Douglas’ day may still come. In the meantime, though, we humans, or at least our organizations, will have to serve as acceptable stand-ins. n Adam Sowards is an environmental historian at the University of Idaho. He is the author of The Environmental Justice: William O. Douglas and American Conservation. A version of this column was first published by High Country News (hcn.org).


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

The 30,000-Foot View

E LANTERN! TH AT G IN EN PP HA ’S AT WH T OU K CHEC Tuesday

BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

H

ow do you describe Spokane to someone who’s never visited? We’ve got Hoopfest, you might say. It’s not a Seattle suburb, you might clarify; we have, you know, actual sunshine. The quick overview is the goal of the special section devoted to our Lilac City that will be in the seat pockets of all Alaska and Horizon planes this month. As a local, it’s always fun to gauge how our city would look to a fellow American — even if they are being held captive until their plane lands. To start with, the section inside Alaska Beyond looks great — after all, Inlander photography, courtesy of our staff photographer Young Kwak, is featured throughout. The publishers tapped local journalists, too. Of course there are those amenities we’ve long been proud of — the Spokane Symphony, Manito Park. But something different shines through — Spokane has lots of new things to talk about. We’re not just treading water. The package introduces frequent fliers to, among other things, Huntington Park, the Cork District, “Spokane Style” beer, the new stretch of the Centennial Trail through Kendall Yards, recent additions to the dining scene like Clover, Ruins and Durkin’s, along with events like Terrain and Spokefest. Local leaders in culture and business are interviewed as well, talking about how we are capitalizing on local institutions and homegrown ingenuity. The people who stayed, instead of being lured to shiny Seattle or Portland, are reaping the rewards of making something of Spokane. Others who came, saw the possibilities and put down roots have brought fresh vitality, too — people like Walt Worthy, who came in 1967 and never left, or Don Kardong, who first came to Spokane to work as a counselor at Camp Reed, or Lisa Brown, who came to visit friends in the 1980s and decided to make it her home. “Spokane’s current generation of leaders,” Brown told Alaska Beyond, “focuses more than before on emphasizing Spokane’s inherent strengths rather than imitating some other place.” Then there are those who have seen — and helped guide — all these changes for their entire lives, like Scott Morris, Avista’s CEO, who was born and raised here. There’s Phil Haugen, general manager of Northern Quest Resort & Casino, who grew up on the Northside and recalls riding his bike over to NorthTown when traffic was light and it was an open-air shopping center. Jess Walter built his celebrated writing career in Spokane. “I’m inspired and defined,” he says, “by the place where I grew up.” Spokane is looking pretty good from 30,000 feet — even better when you take a closer look. n

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COMMENT | DEVELOPMENT

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

Chasing Whales

Let’s focus less on courting big companies and focus more on nurturing big ideas BY LUKE BAUMGARTEN

O

h, hey guys! Did you hear we might possibly be getting an Anthropologie in Spokane?! Oh, and Urban Outfitters, too? Word is, that’s why River Park Square wants to annex 17 feet of Wall Street! These rumors have been passing mouth-to-ear since early fall, but now that they’ve made their way to social media, well, the Facebooks are atwitter with people thinking they’ve gone to heaven and others worrying we’re heading for national retailer hell. The reaction is feverish, but chasing whales is nothing new. For at least a year, the big property players in town Make money by

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have been trying to carve out the big swaths of space national retailers want. And for years before that, Greater Spokane Incorporated courted home-run relocations of big companies, to massively mixed results. Things have begun to change at GSI; they recently hired an entrepreneurship program director to focus on building a local ecosystem for homegrown ideas. It’s a step in the right direction, but it means Spokane is only beginning to catch up to where other cities already are. The city of Tacoma and the Tacoma-Pierce County Chamber of Commerce have run a joint program called Spaceworks to incubate local creative entrepreneurship since 2010. It’s structurally simple — teaching creative people basic business skills and offering six months free

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rent — but has been crazy successful, creating more businesses and jobs than any of the chamber’s other ventures over the same period, according to project staffers. Spaceworks is just one of dozens of similar programs worldwide where local communities recognize the massive development potential of nurturing homegrown creativity. Notice I said “nurturing,” not “bankrolling.” Great ideas rarely require massive amounts of cash to start up. What they do need is space and time to grow. Leases are one of the biggest start-up costs for any business. Taking that cost away, at least for a little while, gives an idea and its business owner tremendous breathing room. One of the smartest dudes on this subject is an Aussie named Marcus Westbury, who returned in 2008 to the bombed-out central district of his hometown — a very Spokane-like place called Newcastle — after a rockstar-ish career as a festival director. Walking around Newcastle and finding more than 100 vacant storefronts, Westbury had an epiphany. “Cities are designed for people with capital,” he said in a now-famous 2013 speech. “They’re designed for that top 10 percent of people who have the money to do stuff.” He wondered: “What happens if you allow 60 percent, 80 percent, 100 percent of people to start things?” The answer, for Newcastle, was complete transformation. Westbury created a structure of simple agreements where property owners gave their spaces over to creative people trying new ideas for free, as long as there wasn’t a better offer on the table. Change came quickly. In 2011, citing Westbury’s work, Lonely Planet named Newcastle a Top 10 world city for its vibrant cultural scene. By 2013, retail vacancies in Newcastle had dropped 50 percent citywide and 90 percent in the places Westbury’s nonprofit worked most intensely. Those neighborhoods, having been filled with interesting, creative exhibitions, projects and businesses, became magnets for development. The point is this: There’s a natural human inclination to swing for the fences, and while it’s totally OK for our big property owners and our chamber to try to hit home runs, we can’t let that be our whole game plan, partially because home runs — whether in big retail, big development or big business — are painfully slow in coming. “Deferring the future and waiting for the big stuff to happen at the expense of supporting all the little stuff you can do now,” Westbury concludes, “to me, is a fundamental mistake.” And one of the biggest ways we get cities wrong. n

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FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 9


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COMMENT | FROM READERS

MEAN STREETS? just read Robert Herold’s article (“Mean Streets,” 1/29/15) and find it

I

rather bewildering that the city’s response is that the “law is the law.” Drive over to Kendall Yards and look at all the cars parked in the 90-minute parking zone along the street between Monroe and Cedar. Most of them are there all day. When I mentioned how difficult it is to find a parking spot on the street, the manager of one of the restaurants told me that the city isn’t enforcing the ordinance and that is where he and his employees park LETTERS to avoid paying in the lots. Send comments to Another example is 17th Avenue editor@inlander.com. in the area of Franklin Elementary. The school district spent a considerable sum a few years ago to upgrade the intersection and posted “no parking between 8 am and 5 pm on school days.” These signs are ignored by the public on a daily basis, making it hazardous for both pedestrians — i.e., school children — and drivers trying to drive down the street. No parking enforcement there, either. Go figure. CARLOS LANDA Spokane, Wash.

Reaction to a blog post (1/31/15) reporting that a building permit has been issued for an Anthropologie retail store at Mobius Science Center’s West Main address.

JORDAN GARDNER: 90 percent of downtown shopping is for women. How about more men’s apparel? KAYLA JACKSON: Super sad that all these comments are about the gain of another overpriced clothing store and not the loss of a children’s museum. ’Merica! SHELLEY BARTHOLOMEWVASILJ: It’s not “lost.” It’s moving to a more affordable (and probably better) building. ALICIA MARIE: Anthropologie is eye-rollingly self important and absurdly overpriced. I’ll stick to Ross and TJ Maxx for home decor, thanks. CORINA TRIPON: Super disappointed by all the negative comments! This is a great addition to our downtown commerce. Mobius is moving into a cool new location. Anthropologie will add to our growing art culture, their window displays are unique to each store. Let’s show businesses we are welcoming in Spokane and hopefully the bums will stop dominating our downtown! AIMEE FLINN NECHANICKY: Another overpriced, overhyped retail store I’ll never visit. DREW POTVIN: Wow, all the negative comments… first, Mobius is not going away… and more jobs and income for Spokane and its people. If you don’t like it, don’t go there. Very simple. 

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Untold Damages For three wrongfully convicted Spokane Valley men, the fight for justice isn’t over BY DEANNA PAN

P

FROM LEFT: Robert Larson, Paul Statler and Tyler Gassman are fighting for damages under Washington’s Wrongful Conviction Compensation Act. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

aul Statler wants his four years, seven months and 10 days back. That’s how long he spent behind bars, in a cramped, concrete cell, for a crime he says he didn’t commit. When a Spokane judge tossed out his sentence three years ago, Statler emerged from prison a different person, reeling with anxiety, fearful of crowds and unable to get a job. “Sad to say, I have a hard time trusting authority figures now. Everytime I go out, I wonder if I’m going to end up in a situation where I’m arrested or attacked by a cop or a crooked detective,” he says now. “I’m still trying to recover from that.” ...continued on next page

FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 13


NEWS | CRIMINAL JUSTICE

“UNTOLD DAMAGES,” CONTINUED...

14 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

Six years ago, a jury found Statler, his cousin Robert Larson and an old high school friend, Tyler Gassman, guilty of robbing a couple of drug dealers in April 2008, despite their pleas of innocence. The case against them was built on the state’s only witness, a 17-year-old jailhouse informant named Matthew Dunham, who after having been arrested for armed robbery, testified that the three men helped him commit a string of drug-related robberies in Spokane Valley. In exchange for his testimony, Dunham received an exceptionally lenient sentence of 19 months in juvenile detention. Meanwhile, Statler, Larson and Gassman were sentenced to decades in prison. Statler received the longest sentence: 41 years. In December 2012, a judge, considering new evidence and criticizing the men’s defense, tossed out their convictions, ordered a new trial and released them back to their tearful families. The following July, the state dropped all charges. Last week, the three men were back inside Spokane County Superior Court, in the same room in which they were convicted six years ago. This time, they were sitting behind the plaintiffs’ counsel table. The three men are suing the state for damages, together totaling more than half a million dollars, under Washington’s Wrongful Conviction Compensation Act. This is the first time since the law was passed in 2013 that a case like this has proceeded to trial. Judge John Cooney is expected to issue a ruling in a month. To win, they needed to show Judge Cooney, with clear and convincing evidence, they are “actually innocent,” as the statute states, of the

crimes they were originally charged with — a higher standard than in traditional civil cases. “It’s challenging from the get-go because you’re representing innocent parties that have been unfairly and wrongfully convicted for something they didn’t do,” says their attorney Mack Mayo. “And on top of that you have a higher burden of proof and you have to prove a negative.” In trial, attorneys for the state argued that without DNA evidence, Statler, Larson and Gassman could not meet that “extraordinarily high” burden. “This is not the type of case that the Wrongful Conviction Compensation Act was meant to address,” Assistant Attorney General Richard Weber told the judge. “Reversal or vacation of the underlying conviction is not sufficient.”

L

ast year, the state conceded wrongful conviction claims to three men — Michael Washington in Snohomish County for $11,242; Brandon Olebar in King County for $546,690; and James Anderson in Pierce County, whose final judgment has not yet been entered. A summary judgment also was granted in favor of another plaintiff, Ryan Allen in Thurston County, who was awarded $94,339 from the state. Thirty states, the District of Columbia and the federal government award damages or fixed payments to exonerees. Under Washington’s statute, people who were wrongfully convicted can file a claim for compensation against the state in Superior Court. They’re eligible for $50,000 for every year they spent incarcerated. The law


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Tyler Gassman speaking from prison in 2010. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO also provides in-state college tuition waivers for claimants and their children, in addition to reimbursing attorneys’ fees and other court-related expenses. For their four-plus years behind bars, Statler, Larson and Gassman are each suing for approximately $225,000. The case, Statler said this week at the downtown office of the Scott Law Group, isn’t about the money: “It’s about accountability. We just want to move on with our lives.” Since his release from prison, Statler, now 28, was diagnosed with post-traumatic disorder. A burly man with a husky voice and a long blond braid running down his back, Statler hopes that if he wins the money, he can seek counseling, go to college to study psychology and focus on his writing career. He’s even published a self-help book, The Boss’s Philosophy, on exceeding your limits and finding success. Most of all, he wants to support his newborn baby Mathias. “It would be amazing,” he says, “if I could more comfortably raise my son.” Meanwhile, Paul’s father, Duane Statler, is working with Sen. Mike Padden, R-Spokane Valley, and Rep. Marcus Riccelli, D-Spokane, to pass new legislation to force prosecutors to corroborate jailhouse informant testimony in court. Jailhouse informants, or “snitches,” are notoriously unreliable, prompting more than a dozen states to enact laws keeping jailhouse testimony out of courtrooms. A 2004 study by Northwestern University found that criminal informants are the leading cause of wrongful convictions in capital cases, accounting for nearly 46 percent of overturned sentences nationwide. Padden and Riccelli’s companion bills would force Washington state law to conform with federal standards regarding the use of informant and accomplice testimony in criminal proceedings. “As far as the damage it did to my family, it’s still not over. It’s still not over. The hardship that this placed on my family is life-changing,” Duane Statler says, shaking his head. “I just can’t believe they’re even fighting.” n deannap@inlander.com

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FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST ON INLANDER.COM

PHOTO EYE ELATED, THEN DEFLATED

More Inlander news every day

FROM SCIENCE TO ANTHROPOLOGIE

Ever since people learned that the Mobius Science Center was being evicted by the Cowles Company for a major retailer, speculation spread that the spot would become either an Urban Outfitters or an Anthropologie. Last week, a permit was issued for tenant improvements (TI) in the space in order to do demolition work for a job called “TI for ANTHROPOLOGIE.” The high-end women’s clothing retailer, owned by the same company as Urban Outfitters, has locations worldwide — and soon, the permit suggests, it will have one in Spokane. (DANIEL WALTERS)

PRIVATE EYE YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

The scene inside the Bing Crosby Theater where Seahawks fans gathered on Sunday for Super Bowl XLIX. Sadly, they’d watch their team lose 28-24 to the New England Patriots.

POLITICS

“Given the arc of the work we’ve done in Spokane, I think we’re on the trajectory to win.” Brad Read, president of the board of Envision Spokane, talking in the Spokesman-Review about the prospect of the group’s Community Bill of Rights triumphing the third time it faces voters. A state appellate court last Thursday overturned a 2013 decision that had removed the ordinance from the general election ballot.

A bill introduced in the Washington State Legislature would make the state’s public records law less public. The proposed changes, from a trio of Western Washington Democrats, are designed to accommodate the concerns of state law enforcement agencies using POLICE BODY CAMERAS. Under current law, agencies have been swamped with blanket requests for footage from the cameras. The bill would no longer allow blanket requests and the public would only be able to request the footage under specific circumstances. It’s also intended to address privacy concerns raised from some sensitive footage from body cameras being posted to the Internet. The Spokane Police Department has been reluctant to move forward with its own body camera program until the state’s public record law has been altered. (JAKE THOMAS)

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16 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015


NEWS | BRIEFS

charity. The larger goal, he says, of the 8th Man should be about encouraging people to get involved with local government. To that end, he plans to have both blue and red shirts to reflects the wearer’s political leanings. He says most municipal governments in Washington have seven-member city councils, so the idea could spread. — JAKE THOMAS

Hedging Bets

UNLUCKY MACHINES

The Coeur d’Alene Tribe cancels the Julyamsh Powwow; plus, here comes the 8th Man movement COMMUNITY RESPONSE

Monday’s Spokane City Council meeting was supposed to be short and simple: Members of the city’s legislative body would hear from a few regulars during public comment, pass a few mundane ordinances and resolutions and everyone would go home early. But instead, Monday’s meeting turned into an outpouring of outrage after reports of an ATTACK outside Boot’s Bakery and Lounge in downtown Spokane. Jacina Carla Scamahorn, a homeless transgender woman, says she was sitting outside the bakery when two men emerged from a nearby bar and berated her before physically assaulting her. When police showed up, she says, they made disparaging remarks about her being transgender. The suspects fled on foot and Scamahorn was transported to a hospital, according to police. After hearing about the assault, Blaine Stum, legislative assistant to Councilman Jon Snyder and chair of the city’s Human Rights Commission, started rallying people for Monday’s meeting. Some who spoke during the public comment period raised concerns about the reported behavior of police toward Scamahorn. Others raised concerns that similar assaults aren’t reported. The attack is currently being investigated by the

Spokane Police Department, which has released photos of the suspects. Anyone with information is encouraged to call Crime Check at 456-2233. — JAKE THOMAS

CITY COUNCIL’S BIGGEST ANTI-FAN

Riffing off the “12th Man” concept — that a football team’s fans are its 12th member — a new movement has sprung up in Spokane calling itself the “8TH MAN.” According to its Facebook page, which had 712 likes as of press time, the group was sparked by SpokesmanReview columnist Doug Clark, who wrote about the idea after attending a heated city council meeting. The Facebook page identifies the 8th Man as the taxpayer of Spokane and “NOT City Council’s biggest fan.” Much of its content is largely in tune with the anti-tax Tea Party movement and derides progressive Council President Ben Stuckart. At Monday’s city council meeting, a few people were spotted wearing 8th Man T-shirts. Conservative-leaning Councilman Mike Fagan plans to trademark the idea and begin selling T-shirts with the aim of breaking even and generating some money for

This summer’s Julyamsh Powwow — the largest outdoor powwow in the Northwest — has been canceled. The reason: a dispute over gambling machines between the Coeur d’Alene Tribe and Post Falls’ GREYHOUND PARK AND EVENT CENTER, which was to host the powwow. The cancellation represents more fallout over the slot/ horse-race hybrid machines in Idaho. Intended to help bolster the dying horse racing industry, the machines ostensibly allow bettors to wager on historical horse races. Legislators and Idaho’s tribes didn’t raise much skepticism when they were approved in 2013. But after the machines began showing up at tracks — heavy on slot-style spinning cherries and animated treasure chests and light on horse racing — the Coeur d’Alene Tribe felt duped and started looking to host their powwow elsewhere. “We haven’t found anything yet,” says Coeur d’Alene Tribe spokeswoman Heather Keen. “Without having a location, we made the difficult decision to cancel it.” Furthermore, Idaho State Racing Commission director Frank Lamb, the regulator who championed what the machines could do for the Idaho horse racing industry in 2013, abruptly retired last Friday. Last Wednesday, the Idaho Statesman revealed Lamb was simultaneously being paid to lobby for a track in Wyoming, while serving as racing commission director in Idaho. — DANIEL WALTERS

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FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 17


NEWS | EDUCATION

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entral Valley School District is crammed. It’s been like this for years, ever since Liberty Lake exploded. In the past few years, house after house has sprung up in the empty patches between Liberty Lake and Spokane, driving the population higher and higher. The district has grown by 1,700 students in the past decade, far exceeding its capacity, and that’s just the beginning. “We expect over the next five years to add another 900 students,” Central Valley Superintendent Ben Small says, motioning at the district map on the wall of his office. “For us, this election is about the future.” Voters throughout the county have received ballots, due Feb. 10, asking them to approve bonds or levies in their local districts, including Central Valley, Spokane, Cheney and West Valley. In Central Valley’s case, passing the bond would mean renovations and expansions of five elementary schools and one middle school, construction of a new elementary school and numerous other rehabs and security upgrades. Renewing the levy would continue to fund more than a fifth of the operating budget, paying for things like technology, textbooks, security, sports, and music and art classes. The problem? Spokane Valley is where school bonds go to die. Levies are easy, requiring only a majority of voters to pass. But bonds? They require a 60 percent approval. The Central Valley School District hasn’t passed a bond since 1998 (the year Titanic won Best Picture at the Oscars), when voters funded two brand-new high schools. Unlike every other district in the region, Central Valley faces a familiar antagonist.

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18 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

Sitting in the lobby of the Mirabeau Park Hotel, Duane Alton has an old pocket calculator, a legal pad and a copy of the bright yellow fliers he’s been sending throughout Central Valley. At 78, Alton has a gray-haired Alan Alda look. These days, the former owner of Alton’s Tires, famous for its “neighbors helping neighbors” radio ad jingle, is retired. He smiles as he talks softly about why he’s fought so many bonds and levies over so many years. He doesn’t seize upon any of the hot topics of education — nothing about Common Core, standardized tests, math instruction, class

Duane Alton: Still fighting against school bonds and levies. DANIEL WALTERS PHOTO

size, teacher evaluations, charter schools or any specific bond construction proposal. To him, the problem is philosophical. “There’s something inherently wrong about [voters] getting together and ganging up on their neighbors to take their money,” Alton says. He believes that schools should survive purely on what they get from the state and he’s raised more than $13,000 to defeat Central Valley’s bond and levy. That’s less than a sixth of what Central Valley’s supporters have raised, but it’s still a credible threat. In 2002, he was blamed for defeating a Mead School District technology bond. He’s been blanketing districts in Spokane County with advertisements ever since, often crusading against bond and levy measures in tiny districts like Great Northern and Reardan-Edwall, or in districts hundreds of miles away, like the Battle Ground School District in southwest Washington. But this time, he says, his sights are set only on Central Valley. After all, this is where he lives. “This is the local one to me,” Alton says.

HOW TO PASS A BOND

Spokane Valley City Councilman Chuck Hafner, meanwhile, knows firsthand what a levy failure can mean. He was principal at Mead High School in the early ’70s when a levy failure stripped away everything but the barest essentials. “They didn’t have athletics, they didn’t have art, they didn’t have music,” Hafner says. He knows the deep conservatism of Spokane Valley just as keenly. Before getting elected, Hafner helped a slew of economically conservative allies take over the Valley council. Yet as a former


TH

assistant superintendent for the Central Valley School District, he knows that passing both a bond and levy is possible. It’s just a matter of selling it clearly and convincingly. “Most people, if they don’t know exactly how they feel about it, they’re going to vote no,” Hafner says. “It comes down to showing exactly what the needs are.” At Central Valley, that’s the plan. At one time, administrators would have simply held town halls to get feedback in designing their bond and heard from just a handful of people. This time, however, they used a web tool called Thoughtexchange, gathering more than 4,000 comments from nearly 2,000 participants. “It’s the anti-survey,” Small says. “We’re asking open-ended questions, and people are telling us what they think.” From these responses, they asked voters to rank their priorities. Three stood out. “Safer schools, deal with the capacity issues, and don’t raise our tax rate,” Small says. “Those three things are reflected in our bond.” The upcoming expiration of the 1998 bond gives the district the room to do all of that without a tax increase. Central Valley stressed that fact in a fourpage mailer stuffed with pie charts, bar graphs and FAQs. “Our mailer is eyecatching because it’s informational. It’s factual,” SPOKANE PUBLIC SCHOOLS Small says. “It tells the Bond highlights: Would replace story of the need.” Linwood Elementary and Salk Middle Alton’s Day-Glo yelSchool, add classrooms to Lewis and low fliers, covered in giant Clark High School, and build a new Comic Sans letters, big cafeteria and commons area at North dollar figures and dramatic Central High School. claims of new taxes, are Levy highlights: 22 percent of the eye-catching in a differoperating budget, including electives, ent way. “QUESTION: school counselors, buses and afterWhere will you get the $$$ school sports. to pay for these exorbiWill it raise taxes? No. tant ‘NEW’ TAXES??” the mailer reads. “From MEAD SCHOOL DISTRICT YOUR Grocery Budget??, Bond highlights: Upgrade Midway Clothing Budget??, or and Shiloh Hills Elementary Schools, Transportation Budget??” replace Northwood Middle School, and Alton waves aside the build new track-and-field facilities at fact that taxes wouldn’t Mead and Mt. Spokane High Schools. increase if the measures Levy highlights: About 23 percent of pass. the operating budget, helping to pay “I don’t know if it’s an for buses, counselors, athletics and increase or not. I just know activities. that it’s new,” he says. “I Will it raise taxes? Yes. The bond will know they use semantics, add about $156 extra per year on a saying, ‘Well, it’s a replace$200,000 house. ment tax.’” Central Valley’s bond COEUR D’ALENE PUBLIC SCHOOLS and levy’s maximum (election on March 10) annual cost to property Levy highlights: Additional levy dolowners is just over $1,100 lars will help reduce class sizes and for a $200,000 house. But buy new textbooks. Alton’s flier claims the cost Will it raise taxes? Yes, by about $31 is “$9,976.” He’s multiplied extra per year on a $200,000 house. the figure over the entire life of the 20-year bond and three-year levy — without telling voters they’re looking at a multiyear figure. To Small, the cost is simple — what property owners are paying now — and the need is obvious. “Some of our schools don’t have windows. Chester Elementary School does not have windows to the outside,” Small says. “We know that the classroom environment has an impact on learning... Let’s renovate that school, bring it to today’s standards and expand it, because we know we’re growing.”  danielw@inlander.com

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NEWS | CITY HALL

Jan Quintrall, Spokane’s embattled division director of Business and Development services, resigned after criticisms of her fine dining at an upscale club.

Chewed Out A Spokane city councilwoman wants to change how City Hall staffers eat on the public dime BY JAKE THOMAS

S

alted cashews ordered from Amazon. com. Cases of bottled water. CheezIt snack crackers. A dinner at P.F. Chang’s. Lots of Jimmy John’s sandwiches and a fancy meal out at the upscale Spokane Club. This is a sampling of the nearly $2,000 worth of food that planning department staff ate while conducting official business and charged to the city last year. It may be a small amount of money when compared to the overall budget of city government, but the way city employees are being fed has attracted particular scrutiny recently, with Jan Quintrall, division director of Business and Developer Services, resigning after it was revealed she had several lavish meals at the Spokane Club with staff that she charged to taxpayers. Meals like this have spurred one member of city council to introduce an ordinance meant to place tighter controls on how much city employees can charge the public for food, which she says has gotten out of hand. “I’ve worked for three mayors and I’ve never seen this happen,” says Councilwoman Karen Stratton. “This is the first time it’s

20 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

come up as frequently as I can remember.” Stratton’s ordinance, which is still being revised, would set a per diem rate, or a daily allowed expense for necessities, on what city employees can charge for meals related to city business. The details of how that rate would pencil out are being worked out, but members of the city council are already subject to a per diem when traveling on city business. The rate is set depending on how expensive the city is that they’re traveling to. For instance, a city councilmember could charge the city $29 for dinner while lobbying for an issue in Washington, D.C., but only $22 if they were in Lewiston, Idaho, says Council President Ben Stuckart. If they go over that amount, it’s on them. It’s not uncommon for employers, both private and public, to pick up the tabs for workers who have to stay late or sit through a long meeting. But Stratton says that some members of Mayor David Condon’s administration have taken it too far. n November, Quintrall spent $400 on lunch and coffee at the Spokane Club, an organization known for its relatively affluent membership, for a team-building

I

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

exercise. In April, she billed the city $168.44 for a “Street Strategy Leadership Group lunch” at the Spokane Club. Later in August, Quintrall spent another $180.71 at the Spokane Club for a meeting with a “neighborhood plan group” where she and six others dined on tuna tartare, Kobe steak, goat cheese ravioli and other fine foods. City spokesman Brian Coddington says that because Quintrall’s meals were directly related to city business, she committed no wrongdoing. “They followed policy,” he says. He also points out that the $400 lunch at the Spokane Club included three gallons of coffee and one gallon of hot water for tea to be used throughout the day. According to Coddington, the administration does not have plans to change any policies on spending money on meals. Under the current policy, employees can be reimbursed for “meals incurred in the necessary discharge of the employee’s official duties,” including all-day meetings and while traveling. Meals at meetings that are primarily social are not eligible for reimbursement under the policy; nor is alcohol. Stratton says she’s not sure how widespread it is for city employees to charge meals to the city, but she she suspects that the division of Business and Developer Services, which routinely interacts with private businesses, is particularly troublesome. She says that many in the Condon administration have a private-sector mentality that makes them comfortable with spending money on food in the course of business. “This isn’t a private business, and you can’t run a department like a private busi-


ness,” she says. Stuckart adds that it might make sense for city employees to conduct business at the Spokane Club because it has private meeting space, but they should adhere to a per diem rate. “So you probably shouldn’t be having tuna tartare or steak tartare,” says Stuckart, referencing one of the controversial meal choices Quintrall charged to the city. “You should be having a sandwich.” Stuckart says that the council will order pizza before meetings, but they pay for it out of their own pockets. If someone in the office has a birthday, he says, they pool money for the cake.

Less pain. More life.

O

ne of the problems Quintrall had with Scott Chesney, the planning director she drew controversy for firing, was the regular staff lunches he charged to the city. When it was revealed that Quintrall spent more than $400 on coffee and food at the Spokane Club, she was criticized for being hypocritical. Records obtained by the Inlander show that the city’s planning department, which Chesney headed, regularly used public money to pay for meals and snacks. During 2014, the planning department ordered Jimmy John’s sandwiches 10 times. They also ate meals at Chairs Public House and Great Harvest Bread Co. during a bus tour involving the city’s comprehensive plan that included both city staff and outsiders. In April, another $80 meal for four people at the Spokane Club was charged to the city for a planning and development retreat. There also are plenty of snacks and bottled water for meetings. Coddington says any controversy involving Quintrall and her spending habits should be considered closed because she has resigned. “But in one sense, nothing has changed,” he says. “We are cognizant of spending money wisely, whether it be a street, a park or a lunch meeting. It’s a good reminder that we need to check and doublecheck our expenditures,” he adds.  jaket@inlander.com

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FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 21 12/23/14 10:50 AM


E LI F IS

After 16 years, the Spokane International Film Festival undoubtedly finds it harder to top its previous lineup, but organizers have done it again with an outstanding slate of features, documentaries, shorts and animated films. After previewing most of 2015’s selections, the festival’s theme emerges — an introspective look into the myriad ways humans deal with the tragedies, challenges and desires we encounter in life. Even more, these films examine how we begin to heal from these experiences. We hope you laugh, cry and reflect as much as we did. — CHEY SCOTT, section editor

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VIVIR ES FÁCIL CON LOS OJOS CORRADOS (LIVING IS EASY WITH EYES CLOSED)

Thu, Feb. 5, at 7 pm; AMC, 108 minutes This brilliant twist on a road movie is Spain’s official entry for Best Foreign Language Film at the 2015 Academy Awards, and with good reason. The script is full of humor and heart, and the film is full of excellent performances, from the largest role to the smallest, as well as stirring music and some majestic Spanish scenery. Vivir es fácil con los ojos corrados has already won Goya Awards (Spain’s version of the Oscars) for Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best New Actress, Best Screenplay and Best Original Score. A dedicated teacher named Antonio in 1966 Spain uses Beatles lyrics to teach his students English, and when he hears that John Lennon is in the country filming a movie, he hops into his car to try and meet the star and get some explanation for lyrics that he can relay to his young charges. On the drive, Antonio picks up a young pregnant woman, Belén, hitching her way to a meeting with her mother, as well as a 16-year-old boy named Juanjo who is running away from an abusive father. The trio quickly forms an ad hoc family; Antonio’s passion for life and learning buoys the young car mates’ spirits as they find themselves in a remote, gritty beach town, hot on the Beatle’s trail. Musicians Pat Metheny and Charlie Haden construct a brilliant soundtrack to the trio’s adventures, and Javier Cámera as Antonio and Natalia de Molina as the pregnant Belén easily pull the audience into their burgeoning relationship, and into a film that leaves audiences full of joy at its passion for never-ending possibilities. (DAN NAILEN)

THE WOUND AND THE GIFT

Sat, Feb. 7, at 11:30 am; Magic Lantern, 80 minutes Never in the history of human civilization has our species’ relationship with the countless other living inhabitants of this world been more complex. American/Japanese filmmaker Linda Hoaglund compels audiences of her moving documentary to question the vast differences between humans

who devote their entire existence to saving and protecting animals that are so savagely neglected and abused by others. Weaving the narratives of several animal rescue groups and individuals into a Japanese fable about a peasant who saves a crane wounded by a hunter’s arrow, The Wound and the Gift takes viewers around the world on an emotional and philosophical quest. The film introduces a remote Colorado wolf-dog sanctuary that provides permanent homes to the artificially created canid hybrid. In another remote area of the state, Hoaglund introduces a man whose 700-acre property houses 300 exotic animals that have relearned to trust humans after surviving horrific treatment. In the film’s trailer, sanctuary owner Pat Craig greets a rumbling tiger named Simon who casually lumbers over to be petted by his master and protector. “Saving one animal may not change the world, but surely for that animal, the world has changed forever,” Craig notes. Director Hoaglund is scheduled to attend the screening. (CHEY SCOTT)

BEST OF THE NORTHWEST

Fri, Feb. 6, at 5:30 pm; Bing Crosby Theater, 76 minutes Those hip to the local filmmaking scene should recognize a few names in this collection of short films made in the region. Some of the films were finalists in last year’s 50 Hour Slam, but others will debut publicly at the festival. Look for work from Rajah Bose, Ian Ebright, Lyle Pisio, Kendra Ann Sherrill, Adam Boyd, Jeff Rutherford, Dave Kotlan, Tom Meisfjord, Austin Stiegemeier (pictured) and Sean Finley. (MIKE BOOKEY)

finds herself desperate to get to Seattle at any cost. Bruce Greenwood plays a recently widowed, solitude-seeking hiker who Mackenzie follows like a shadow after stumbling into his room at a lodge in the woods. The unlikely bond formed by surviving in the mountainous Alaskan terrain proves to be the key to each of them moving forward. In spite of its gut-wrenching introduction, this film is not about trauma, but healing. Two sojourners seeking to heal from their traumatic pasts explore the Alaskan wilderness. WildLike is an enthralling contrast of the sick realities of life and the hope of learning to trust again. (CB)

THE VANQUISHING OF THE WITCH BABA YAGA

Sat, Feb. 7, at noon and Thu, Feb. 12, at 6:45 pm; Magic Lantern, 73 minutes In an eerie, foreboding mix of children’s storybook animation and raw, anthropological footage of modern-day Eastern Europe, The Vanquishing of the Witch Baba Yaga examines the metamorphosis of fear in the troubled region. Interspersed between the retelling of a Slavic folk tale about Baba Yaga, a cannibal witch living deep in the forest, director Jessica Oreck compares contemporary worries with the memories of past fears in Eastern European society. No longer do its people fear the unknown quiet of the forest, but worse fates — war, famine, destruction, corruption. Through shaky camera angles, a jarring soundtrack and raw, unnarrated footage of high-rise tenement buildings, streetscapes, churchgoers and rural farmers, Oreck shows how Baba Yaga’s myth has, over generations, become a simpler story about how the forest and nature can also protect us from humanity’s worst. Oreck’s most recent project, Aatsinki, was screened at SpIFF last year. (CS)

WHERE GOD LIKES TO BE

Sat, Feb. 7, at 4:30 pm; Bing Crosby Theater, 72 minutes Tucked away deep in Big Sky country, there is a world often missed by those who are not looking. The Blackfeet Indian reservation is home to a kindhearted people who ask very little of the world around them. This beautiful film reveals the paralytic nature of stereotypes and debunks the archaic idea of what it means to be Native

American, revealing that identity surpasses ethnicity or upbringing, but is intrinsically tied to history. The breathtaking nature shots and steady narrative mirror the slow rhythm by which the Blackfeet live their lives. Get a glimpse of what life is like for three young people struggling between the choice of maintaining their traditions at the risk of isolation and poverty, or leaving all they know behind in order to seek new opportunities. The film’s subject Andrea Running Wolf is scheduled to attend. (COURTNEY BREWER)

WILDLIKE

Sat, Feb. 7, at 7 pm; Bing Crosby Theater, 104 minutes Mackenzie is running. Running from her father’s death. Running from an uncle who can’t keep his hands to himself. Running from shame. When her unstable mother sends her to Alaska for the summer to live with her uncle (whose name is never revealed) after losing her father the previous year, Mackenzie’s future looks bleak. A few days of monosyllabic conversations and cordial outings create the illusion that perhaps she will achieve some normalcy after all. This illusion is shattered when her uncle makes his way into her bed, driving her to the conclusion that her only option is to run away. With her uncle constantly closing in on her, Mackenzie

FLORE

Sun, Feb. 8, at 11:30 am; Magic Lantern, 92 minutes Both an indictment of our prescription drug culture and a profound message of hope for anyone on a journey of recovery of any kind, director Jean-Albert Lièvre’s documentary chronicles his mother Flore’s battle against Alzheimer’s disease with a touching sense of reverence. Initially housed in a medical facility under the crushing weight of a drugged stupor, Lièvre moves his mother to a breathtaking estate in Corsica. The move proves reinvigorating, as Flore begins to show signs of improvement. This screening will be hosted by Frederic Dugenet, lecturer in World Languages and Cultures at Whitworth University. (TRACE WILLIAM COWEN) ...continued on next page

FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 23


Spiff

The Dam Keeper

ANIMATION SHOWCASE THE LAST SEASON

Sun, Feb. 8, at 2 pm; Magic Lantern, 78 minutes At first glance, it appears the documentary The Last Season is about two men who hunt for mushrooms in central Oregon, a plot that could put many to sleep. In reality, it’s about adopted family, the nightmares brought on by the Vietnam War and the perils of getting old. The story follows gruff Vietnam veteran Roger Higgins, 75, and strong-willed Cambodian refugee Kouy Loch, 46, who have much more in common than just a love for tracking the elusive matsutake mushroom, prized for its spicy, aromatic odor. The pair form a striking bond because of their many similarities (i.e., experiences of war); they absolutely understand each other. The film is told over the course of one mushroom hunting season, which may very well be Higgins’ last. Bring a box of tissues to this one, but expect to laugh out loud too (Higgins’ rapport with his wife is downright hilarious). (LAURA JOHNSON)

Sat, Feb. 7, at 2 pm and Tue, Feb. 10, at 6:45 pm; Magic Lantern, 95 minutes This year, SpIFF’s animation showcase features work from Canada, Ireland, Hungary, the Netherlands and the U.S. From the playfully abstract to the slyly confrontational, 2015’s selections again prove the dual power of brevity and animation. BUS STORY, directed by Tali, chronicles the devolution of idealism between a bus driver and her boss named Killer. CODA, an Oscar-shortlisted entry and 42nd Annie Awards nominee, is the latest short film from the Ireland-based And Maps And Plans studio team of Alan and Shane Holly. Perhaps best known for their art direction on Ice Age, Ratatouille and Toy Story 3, directors Robert Kondo and Dice Tsutsumi bring a young pig to the big screen (with narration by Lars Mikkelsen of the BBC’s Sherlock) in THE DAM KEEPER. Set to the music of Tchaikovsky, Marie-Josée Saint-Pierre’s FLOCONS celebrates the life and career of animator and director Norman McLaren by building a story around animation tests taken from the production of the 1957 classic A Chairy Tale. ME AND MY MOULTON, another Oscarshortlisted entry, focuses on the tension created between two sisters and their architect parents in the wake of a bicycle request. Janet Perlman, known by many for her Oscar-nominated 1981 film The Tender Tale of Cinderella Penguin, tackles digital reliance by way of a paranoid dog with high cholesterol and a penchant for origami and ice cream in MONSIEUR PUG. Canadian duo Nicola Lemay and Janice Nadeau simultaneously tackle the consequences of war and the power of friendship with NO FISH WHERE TO GO. (TWC)

ADIEU AU LANGAGE (GOODBYE TO LANGUAGE)

THE TALE OF THE PRINCESS KAGUYA

Sun, Feb. 8, at 4 pm; AMC, 2 hours and 17 minutes Those unfamiliar with Princess Kaguya, the leading lady of Japan’s oldest and most famous folk tale, should know first that the sweeping, emotional story doesn’t have a sugar-coated ending. You may cry more than once throughout the visually breathtaking, hand-drawn animated film. But don’t let the hint of sadness keep you from meeting the magical Princess in this Academy Award-nominated film (for best animated feature) from legendary Japanese filmmaker Isao Takahata, a co-founder of Japan’s Studio Ghibli, known for the animated classics My Neighbor Totoro, Spirited Away and The Wind Rises. From a simply artistic standpoint, the soft, pastel-hued watercolor and colored pencilesque animation is a refreshing break from the computer animation we’ve come to expect. With an emphasis on showcasing the natural beauty of the Japanese countryside — Kaguya’s beloved home — in spring and summer, the attention to detail in each frame is astounding. Bees buzz around brightly blooming flowers, grass waves in the breeze and inchworms creep up plant stems.

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The film doesn’t stray from its folk-tale origins, also known as The Tale of the Bamboo Cutter. One day, Kaguya’s adoptive father, Taketori no Okina, is working in his bamboo fields when he discovers a glowing shoot that springs from the earth, opening to reveal a tiny human princess. Okina takes the sprite back to his wife, Ona, and they raise her as their own. The tiny baby girl grows as fast as a bamboo shoot, earning her the nickname Little Bamboo. One day, Okina discovers treasures — gold and fine silks — inside a bamboo stalk in the forest, and decides it’s a sign that his daughter is meant to become a noble princess. The remainder of the story follows Kaguya’s struggles to adapt to a life of privilege she has no desire for, including the greedy male suitors who fall over their feet to win her affections. (CS)

Sun, Feb. 8, at 6:45 pm; AMC, 70 minutes Those unfamiliar with Jean-Luc Godard’s work should go into this film knowing that the iconic French-Swiss director has an infatuation with innovation and the abstract. From the beginning of the film, it’s clear the plotline of Adieu au langage will take a back seat to its cinematic techniques in Godard’s first 3-D production. The film follows two sets of couples, each consisting of a single man and a married woman. Although the couples experience incredibly similar moments that clearly mirror one another, they’re separated into two individual story lines, titled “1 Nature” and “2 Metaphor.” The film switches between these two story lines, making sure to showcase similar events the couples experience back-to-back. The plot is further tied together by one character who exists in both of the seemingly parallel universes — Godard’s dog, Roxy. Though the respective couples’ separate stories are captivating, the film’s highlight is Godard’s intricate and unique, albeit slightly confusing, cinematic choices. (KAITLYN ANSON)

KUMIKO, THE TREASURE HUNTER

Mon, Feb. 9, at 6:30 pm; Magic Lantern, 105 minutes Loosely based on the media-perpetuated urban legend surrounding the death of Takako Konishi, this David Zellner-directed fable is a bona fide

revelation. At once a loving homage to the often intimate relationships we share with our favorite films (in this case, the Coen Brothers classic Fargo) and a daring exploration of the dangers of obsession, Kumiko weeps with joy, thanks to Rinko Kikuchi’s magnetic performance. Previously nominated for an Oscar for her role in Birdman director Alejandro González Iñárritu’s 2006 film Babel, Kikuchi brilliantly reconciles the character’s often disparate worlds. The story alone is fascinating, as we see a woman who comes to believe that the buried money in Fargo is actually hidden somewhere in the U.S. and goes searching for it. (TWC)


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INTERNATIONAL SHORTS

Carry On

Sun, Feb. 8, at 2 pm and Mon, Feb. 9, at 6:45 pm; Magic Lantern, 87 minutes Hosted by Adam Boyd, SpIFF’s assistant director and visiting professor of film at EWU, this year’s selection of international shorts makes the cross-continental journey from joyous bluegrass — Brad Pattullo’s stop-motion celebration of Southern eccentricity in INDIAN ATE THE WOODCHUCK — to an interrupted suicide attempt in veteran UK commercial director Pete Riski’s confrontational HERE WITH ME. Further along the journey, viewers also face the intimidating rite of passage at the heart of Javier Macipe’s OS MENINOS DO RIO. Elsewhere, China makes an unquestionably strong showing with Yatao Li’s CARRY ON, chronicling the brutal withdrawal of Japanese forces during WWII through the eyes of a protective Chinese patriarch. Spain tackles climate change by imagining a futuristic Antarctica in Bruno Zacarías and Macgregor’s SIMILO, while simultaneously managing the bravery necessary to merge two seemingly disparate genres — thriller and rom-com — in the Roberto Goñi triumph EL HOMBRE EQUIVOCADO. (TWC)

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SONG FROM THE FOREST

Tue, Feb. 10, at 6:30 pm; Magic Lantern, 98 minutes German director Michael Obert found a remarkable subject for his first film when he met American Louis Sarno, a man who became so obsessed with some mysterious sounds he once heard on the radio that he dedicated his life to following the music. The journey took him all the way to the Central African Republic’s dwindling rainforest to live among a tribe of pygmies called the Bayaka. Sarno became a fully accepted member of the tribe, staying in Africa for decades save the occasional trip back home to New York City, even marrying and having a son, Samedi. Song from the Forest visits Sarno in Africa and shows his life among the natives, as well as delving into the music that combines tribal members singing and shouting alongside the sounds of wind in the trees, bubbling water and native wildlife. Obert’s interviews with members of the Bayaka about this white man who insinuated himself into their lives are priceless and revealing. (DN) ...continued on page 27

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Spiff Fortunate Turn

A well-placed sign leads to a winning look at community — and a combine demolition derby BY DAN NAILEN

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26 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

he movie that eventually became Dryland would never have happened if Portland filmmakers Sue Arbuthnot and Richard Wilhelm had flown to Coeur d’Alene on a long-ago trip instead of driving. Cruising Highway 395 toward Ritzville, they saw a “colorful, quirky” sign beckoning people to Lind’s Combine Demolition Derby and Rodeo. “It was irresistible,” Arbuthnot recalls. “We didn’t know what it meant, but it said drop in, so we did.” That decision would lead them to spend more than a decade visiting Lind, getting to know the town’s people and their stories. Yes, they learned about the famous combine demo derby, where drivers crash souped-up tractors into each other; it’s Lind’s most significant civic fundraiser, drawing tourists to what Arbuthnot calls “sort of a barn-raising feat of self-reliance.” In researching what they thought would be a 10-minute short film about an unusual extreme sport, they uncovered the story of two thenteenage best friends — Josh Knodel and Matt Miller — for whom the derby was the culmination of adolescent dreams, and whose families are representative of the trials of modern farming. The filmmakers met the boys the first time they visited, at a derby organizing meeting, and ended up tracking their lives for the next 10 years. “We sat down with them, literally within an hour we were filming,” Arbuthnot says. “We were so fortunate to meet these two young men. They epitomized the sense of attachment to place, the sense of history. They both had an equally strong passion to stay on their family farms and carry the legacy forward.” Dryland explores both boys’ efforts to follow their fathers’ derby successes, showing their efforts to fire up their combine named “JAWS” year after year as a parallel to the farming community’s devotion to a way of life constantly challenged by market prices, weather whims and

the growth of factory farming. As the filmmakers returned to Lind for derby after derby, and tracked both boys through their high school graduations and other life-altering events, the way the farmers keep their eye on the long view seeped into the way they worked on their film. “That is exactly what we learned from the farmers,” Arbuthnot said. “An attitude or approach to life that seems to be a good way, whether it’s a documentary or farming. It was important for us to have a long view for what their lives were like, and because it was more accurate to the pacing and tempo of a life in agriculture. You don’t just look at a crop one year, or a weather pattern, or a fire. There can be lots of serious events that can hold you back, but it’s certainly a long-term venture.” The approach paid off for Arbuthnot and Wilhelm. Dryland is an inviting look at a lifestyle that is not known by many Americans, and is threatened by extinction despite the best efforts of families like Josh’s and Matt’s. There is stunning photography of Washington’s wheat country, and an original score by Mark Orton, who did the music for the film Nebraska. Eight of the cast members will be on hand at the SpIFF screening, and Spokane will be one of the few urban screenings of the movie to date. Arbuthnot relishes bringing the people of Lind to city audiences, on screen and in person, as a way to bring different types of people together to find solutions to the challenges of modern agriculture. “Film has an opportunity to be the catalyst in those discussions,” Arbuthnot says. “It’s a gift for us to be able to do that.”  dann@inlander.com Fri, Feb. 6, at 8 pm; Bing Crosby Theater, 61 minutes • Filmmakers Sue Arbuthnot and Richard Wilhelm and eight cast members are scheduled to attend.


COME TO MY VOICE

WALKING UNDER WATER

Wed, Feb. 11, at 6:30 pm; Magic Lantern, 105 minutes Come to My Voice brilliantly brings to SpIFF a multigenerational tale that Americans will be able to relate to, yet are unlikely to have experienced. Director Huseyin Karabey’s film focuses on a Kurdish village under constant harassment from their government. The story focuses even more narrowly on two women living in the village: Jiyan, a young girl wise beyond her years, and Berfe, her grandmother. The plot jolts into action when the army enters the community demanding that all weapons be turned over; when none are, all the men in town are arrested. This includes Temo, Jiyan’s father and Berfe’s son. Berfe and Jiyan band together, trying to hash out a plan that will satisfy the army and get Temo back home. The film presents a touching story of familial connection, sorrowfully stained with immense political unrest. (KA)

Wed, Feb. 11, at 6:45 pm; Magic Lantern, 76 minutes This documentary from director Eliza Kubarska delves into the culture of Borneo by immersing the viewer in the increasingly difficult lives of the Badjao, sea nomads facing opposition from the growing fishing and diving resort industries. Kubarska follows Sari, a young man embarking on his very first fishing trip with his uncle Alexan — a trip that serves not only as a rite of passage for young Sari, but a glimpse of the daunting reality facing an entire community. (TWC) ...continued on page 29

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FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 27


Spiff Rolling Back Time A Northwest filmmaker couldn’t get competitive log-rolling off his mind, so he made a film about it BY CHEY SCOTT

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he four women had a lot in common. Besides being from the same small Idaho town, they were petite, lightning-fast and fearless. Most of all, they were fiercely determined. Those traits, paired with unwavering encouragement and support from their coach, are what made Bette Ellis, Barbara Peterka, Cindy Cook and Penni McCall top-notch competitive log rollers. Between the four of them, they brought home 11 log-rolling world championship titles over 14 years between 1958 and 1972. “Roleo queens,” people called them. But even if there was a perfect storm of coaching, location, timing and determination, how did they do it? And why? David Jones, a Bend, Oregon-based filmmaker, couldn’t shake his curiosity after learning about Lewiston’s unlikely title as the unofficial “log-rolling capital of the world.” Long before the reign of the Lewiston roleo queens featured in Jones’ debut documentary Queens of the Roleo, one of two regionally made, feature-length films at this year’s Spokane International Film Festival, log-rolling was a pastime for lumber towns. The fastest and most efficient way to transport felled trees to the mill was down a river into a holding pond. For fun, sometimes the men would pair up and each take to an end of a floating log. Then, walking and eventually running to get the log turning in the water, they’d compete to see who could stay on the longest.

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resh out of college in the late 1970s and working as a television news reporter in the Idaho mill town, Jones didn’t make it to Lewiston in time to see the champion women in action. He’d heard about competitive log-rolling before from a friend, but thanks to his wife — a Lewiston native

28 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

who had a better recall of the sport’s golden years — Jones’ fire was reignited a few years ago. “I thought, ‘That’s really impressive,’” Jones says. “I’d lived [in Lewiston] for a while, and wondered why I didn’t know about this when I lived there. I had to learn more about the story.” Diving into research on the champion “birlers” — the term for log-rolling athletes — Jones tracked down Bette, Barbara, Cindy and Penni, as well as their coach Roy Bartlett, a lifelong resident of Lewiston. Bartlett worked as a “pond monkey” — the nickname for the men tasked with the crucial and dangerous job of shepherding logs at the end of the drives — for the Potlatch Corp. mill in Lewiston, and was an impressive birler himself. “I did a blind call and just called him before I was even prepared to say anything, and Roy answered,” Jones recalls. A couple of weeks later, Jones found himself sitting across from Bartlett inside the 87-year-old’s modest Lewiston home. “The dining room table was piled with scrapbooks and trophies and pictures, and I thought, ‘Oh, this was the story.’” As each of the four women champions reveal in the interview-style documentary, it was because of Bartlett’s passion for log-rolling that any of them ever went far in the obscure sport, practiced far less today than during their rise to success. “I hope that people can appreciate a sport that, at least in this region, no longer exists like it once did, and that it was a huge part of the fabric of our culture for a long, long time,” Jones says.  Fri, Feb. 6, at 8 pm; Bing Crosby Theater, 49 minutes • Filmmaker David Jones and subjects Bette Ellis, Roy Bartlett, Barbara Peterka and Cindy Cook are scheduled to attend.


QUE CARAMBA ES LA VIDA

Thu, Feb. 12, at 6:30 pm; Magic Lantern, 88 minutes Director Doris Dörrie takes to the plazas, alleys and community centers of Mexico City to introduce viewers to several generations of women struggling to crack the male-dominated world of mariachi music. The film, like the music performed throughout, is an inspiring, colorful sampling of a vibrant folk culture. But it comes with a serious undercurrent of heartbreak and darkness; Dörrie showcases a single mother responsible for supporting both her daughter and her own mother by singing late into the night in hopes of being tossed a few pesos by strangers. Many of the singers and musicians talk about dealing with macho and disrespectful drunk and drugged-up men as just a matter of a normal night as a mariacha, and the toll of job insecurity and emotional abuse comes through loud and clear. You can hear the sadness in the songs’ lyrics about death, love and poverty. But it’s not all gloom and doom, as the performers’ dedication to the artistry of the traditional folk songs is remarkable. Dörrie tracks down the first all-woman mariachi band, formed in 1958 and still performing, and those women praise the music’s ability to transform them from their everyday lives: “When I’m playing, I remember being young,” one says. (DN)

MISS HILL: MAKING DANCE MATTER

Fri, Feb. 13, at 5:30 pm; Bing Crosby Theater, 84 minutes Dance as an art form is an obvious reality to us now, but at the turn of the 20th century, many people deemed it a sin, and most thought it a form of exercise… for women. Martha Hill changed all of that, according to the new documentary Miss Hill: Making Dance Matter. As the first director of dance at the Juilliard School (from 1951 to 1985), Hill was instrumental in changing Americans’ perspective on modern dance. Her story is told over the course of 90 years, using archival footage of her dancers and personal interviews where she delves into her life history. (LJ) ...continued on next page

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FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 29


Spiff

THE LIGHTER SIDE OF CRIME

Eddy & Coby

Sun, Feb. 8, at noon and Sat, Feb. 14, at 2 pm; Magic Lantern, 89 minutes Sweden and the Netherlands come together in a farcical storm of armed robbery and seedy blackmail with a special pairing of films for SpIFF’s “The Lighter Side of Crime” mini-program. Pairing John Hellberg’s cashgrab mini epic Mousse with Jeroen Annokkee’s chainsaw-assisted mob romp Eddy & Coby, this double feature provides ample opportunity to find the potential humor in lawlessness. (TWC)

Spokane Tribal College 3rd Annual Dinner & Auction

Native Horseman at the Spokane River, c. 1910. / Photo by Edward Curtis

This event will feature a cultural sharing of dancers, visual artists, live music, and fine dining. There will be a silent open auction.

Saturday February 7th, 2015

Red Lion Inn at the Park - Grand Ballroom

Doors: 5pm / Auction: 6pm / Dinner: 7pm Tables of 8: $400 / Individual Tickets: $60 For more info contact:

Randy Ramos - 509.326.1700 or 509.218.7278

30 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

CHARLIE’S COUNTRY

Fri, Feb. 13, at 8 pm; Bing Crosby Theater, 108 minutes The Australian outback, aka the bush, is wide and miraculous; it’s also nearly impossible to survive in alone. But in the Australian drama Charlie’s Country, one poor aboriginal man, who feels out of place in a small community increasingly forced to follow “whitefella” laws, heads out into the wilderness to get back to his roots. Caught in a torrential rainstorm, he soon finds himself on the brink of death in a hospital. This film is slow-moving and heartbreaking, giving us a deeper look into the racism that still exists in our world. David Gulpilil won Best Actor at last year’s Cannes Film Festival for his role as Charlie. (LJ)

A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT

Sat, Feb. 14, at midnight; Garland Theater, 99 minutes Perhaps you thought that vampire-themed films were over with. You thought wrong. In director Ana Lily Amirpour’s Iranian vampire western (the first of its kind), horror lurks in the form of a lonesome “young” female vampire who stalks the citizens of Bad City — specifically, men who treat women cruelly. The film’s characters live in a space surrounded by old artifacts like record players, leather jackets and vintage cars, as well as more ominous things like rusty heroin spoons and an endless desert of oil wells. This film, shot in crisp black and white, is confident and cool, infinitely better than any contrived Bella/ Edward love story. (LJ)


EVAPORATING BORDERS

Sat, Feb. 14, at 11:30 am; Magic Lantern, 73 minutes What happens when you can no longer go home? For filmmaker Iva Radivojevic, this conundrum is all too real. In a time where populations are ever-fluctuating and migrating, the idea of borders — both physical and social — is being redefined. By paralleling a migrant’s journey and the universal journey of self-discovery, Radivojevic portrays “what it means to have a hybrid existence in which one is always searching for an identity.” This visual essay allows audiences to experience the effect of cultural oppression in a world where cultures are intertwined more than ever. By obliterating traditional views of selfhood, the narrator provokes the audience to disassociate culturally constructed paradigms, and how we interact with those we come in contact with. (CB)

THREE WINDOWS AND A HANGING

Sat, Feb. 14, at 2 pm; Magic Lantern, 94 minutes This film is as far from flashy as it gets. No special effects, no gimmicks, no pizazz. And that’s exactly what allows it to leave viewers both emotionally appalled and utterly speechless. Three Windows and a Hanging can only be described as a film of great, horrendous injustice, and an examination of how injustice of that sort has a way of manifesting itself in people as either immense bravery or astounding, cowardly weakness. In a traditional Balkan village where the hierarchy dictates that old men are superior to young men, young men are wiser than kids, and no woman should dare claim to know anything, rebuilding a community after a catastrophic period of war is anything but simple. The subtitled film follows a variety of characters; the most notable is Lushe, the town schoolteacher. Audiences immediately find out that Lushe was raped by soldiers during the war, an experience so horrid and unjust that she finds herself telling her story to an international journalist. When the mayor discovers this, he chooses to shun Lushe and her son. The film addresses hierarchal and gender inequality injustices in the most powerful way imaginable, through the eyes of those experiencing it and those who allow it to continue. (KA)

BELLE AND SEBASTIAN (BELLE ET SEBASTIEN)

Sat. Feb. 14, at 4:30 pm; AMC, 104 minutes No, this is not a film about the indie-pop darlings who share this name. Actually, that band took its name from the children’s book from which this French film was adapted. This new take on the beloved French story is a gorgeously shot film that uses the breathtaking vistas of the French Alps to add some levity to a serious piece of history. Sebastian is a young boy living with his grandfather (he says his mom went off to America) in a mountain village in Nazi-occupied France who watches as members of his village escape over the mountains and into Switzerland. We hear about a “beast” that’s been killing the village’s sheep, but that doesn’t stop Sebastian from wandering in the hills until he eventually finds the beast, actually a wayward dog that he names Belle. This beautiful film from director Nicolas Vanier is a story of friendship and doing the right thing that kids will dig, but older folks can appreciate for its historical value. (MB) n

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FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 31


PRESENTS

RESTAURANT WEEK

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February 20 - March 1, 2015 Menus now online, make your reservations early! InlanderRestaurantWeek.com #INRestWeek

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s t r r u A to

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VISUAL ARTS TOUR Friday, Feb. 6 beginning at 5 pm. For a complete listings of all the Visual Arts Tour locations, visit Inlander.com.

Some highlights from the weekend’s Visual Arts Tour Every six months, we watch as the typical First Friday art walk gets a shot in the arm to become the Visual Arts Tour, which brings creative expression to the galleries, restaurants and other spots in downtown Spokane and beyond. The February edition is a mixed bag of familiar names, as well as up-andcoming artists displaying work that runs the gamut in terms of style and media.  Find details about all participating venues and various artist receptions at Inlander.com.

BARRISTER WINERY

1213 W. Railroad If you’re a visual arts fan in the Inland Northwest, you should know about the ART SPIRIT GALLERY in Coeur d’Alene. But if you want to save yourself a drive and see why Art Spirit is held in such high regard, you can get a sampling of its artists during the Visual Arts Tour, when they fill the walls of Barrister Winery. You’ll find the work of Harold Balazs, Victoria Brace, George Carlson, Wayne Chabre, Morse Clary, Peter Cox, Mary Dee Dodge, Allen Dodge, Catherine Earle, Mary Farrell, Del Gish, Elaine Green, Robert Grimes, Michael Horswill, Jerri Lisk, Mel McCuddin, Kay O’Rourke and Cary Weigand. Grab a glass of wine and visit with the artists at the opening

reception on Friday, Feb. 6, from 5 to 10 pm. (MIKE BOOKEY)

CHASE GALLERY

808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. This student collective exhibit EXPLORATIONS XIV allows the community to experience visual art in a multitude of genres by some of the leading art students in the area. The display includes collections from Gonzaga students Claire Marie Kane, Rebecca Padilla and Claire Hart, as well as Whitworth students Lauren Pangborn, Christa Prentiss and Alec Moore. They are joined by Greg Haste, Jessica Earle and Ashley Vaughn from EWU, Makayla Miracle and Paulina Broadhurst from SFCC and Cody Magee and Margaret Ann Boyd from

NIC. The gallery’s kickoff reception will be Feb. 6 from 5-8 pm; the exhibit is open to the public until March 30. (COURTNEY BREWER)

KENDALL YARDS

1206 W. Summit Pkwy. More gallery space in Spokane? We’ll take it. A gallery in the burgeoning Kendall Yards development debuts on Feb. 6 with a show from MELISSA COLE, a Spokane artist known for her vibrant acrylic paintings, many of which depict animals. Cole, a trained zoologist, knows a thing or two about animals, having traveled the world with her wildlife photographer husband and written more than 30 natural history books for children. (MB) ...continued on page 35

FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 33


CULTURE | DISTILLED

anti-valentine's day performance

one night only 2/12/2015 experience this original hitchcock film as never before with a live symphony orchestra performing the soundrack JESSIE SPACCIA ILLUSTRATION

The Men Who Drink in Bars Alone BY MIKE BOOKEY

K

eep your eyes straight ahead. If there’s a game on, watch it with vague interest. If there’s no game, gaze at the highlights or let your eyes pace with the news ticker. In the absence of a television, just look at your drink or pretend to read the newspaper someone left on the bar. Speak when spoken to. Or speak when something happens in the game worth commenting on. If none of the other patrons — similarly staring straight ahead, similarly keeping one hand on their drinks — say anything back, keep your damn mouth shut. No one wants to talk to you. And they don’t D I S T I L L E D have to. These are the A SHOT OF LIFE Rules for Drinking Alone in a Bar, and they are universal. I was obeying the rules, an IPA in hand as I tried to kill a couple of opening band sets at the show down the street. It was October and the National League Championship Series was on the NASA-sized monitor mounted above the bar. I stared at the game without prejudice and the other guys did the same. “You pulling for the Giants?” I asked to the man closest, although really anyone could have answered. He said he didn’t care because he was from Seattle, here on business, and his club’s season was already done. I shared his grief. And then we sat in silence and stared at ads for trucks

at martin woldson theater at the fox

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and prescription medicine targeted at Men Who Drink Alone in Bars. Time was being killed, as was my pint. I ordered a local IPA. The guy broke the silence. He asked if that was a Spokane beer and I said it was and guided him down the tap line. Orlison does lagers, Tricksters is new, but catching on, and watch out for that imperial IPA from Iron Goat. One is a treat, but two will turn your face numb. Discussions about drinking itself are also acceptable under the Rules. I shut up long enough for him to ask if I’m from Spokane. I live here, but I’m from Seattle, just like him. North of Seattle, really. He said he’s from the north end, too, naming the specific town. That’s my town, too. He volunteered his specific neighborhood, and I said that’s my childhood neighborhood. I asked if he knew my folks and he called my dad by name and said they met at the homeowners association meeting, which seemed an apt place to meet neighbors. He remembered my name from when I played football in that town and asked why, on this particular night, I was a Man Drinking Alone in a Bar 300 miles from where I grew up. I told him as concisely as I could. We talked about things you don’t expect to talk about so far from home. Then he bought me a beer, because he was a dad who knew my dad, and buying a friend’s son a beer is just one of the rules. 

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CULTURE | VISUAL ARTS TOUR

1001 West Sprague Ave. • 509-624-1200

TCHAIKOVSKY

with violinist Benjamin Beilman

“musical artistry and impeccable technique” -The Seattle Times

SAT. FEB. 7 - 8pm SUN. FEB. 8 - 3pm

sponsored by Mary Jewett Gaiser Endowment Fund

Anna Czoski’s “Home is Where the Heart Is” on display at Laboratory.

THE CLASSIC FILM ON SCREEN WITH LIVE MUSIC BY THE SPOKANE SYMPHONY STUDENTS

$15

ALFRED HITCHCOCK’S

The landscape photography of Frank Knapp.

LABORATORY

301 W. Main ANNA CZOSKI is a local digital designer and animator whose work is the most recent interactive exhibit to take over the always engaging space at Laboratory. Czoski’s show “Home is Where the Heart Is” takes on big ideas like exploration and the notion of “home” with a storefront projection display that was inspired by the Voyager I spacecraft (the one carrying the “golden record” including, among other things, directions to Earth from anywhere in the universe), which recently left our solar system on its way into deep space. “I wanted to juxtapose the Voyager diagram with an interactive symbol that pointed to every passerby’s center, making the simple analogy that our heart anchors us,” says Czoski. “No matter where we are, or attachments we make in this world, the heart keeps the tethers taut to our connections, while balancing at our center.” (MB)  Find details about other stops on the Visual Arts Tour at Inlander.com.

Lisa Nappa’s water-inspired sculpture.

LIBERTY CIDERWORKS

164 S. Washington, Suite 300 This Visual Arts Tour doesn’t skimp on excellent photography, as evidenced by FRANK KNAPP’s show at Liberty Ciderworks, the newish local cidery on Washington Street. The photographer specializes in landscapes, with most of his pieces in black and white. Knapp, who didn’t begin shooting photos until the unexpected death of his wife in 2008, has since amassed a portfolio of scenic shots from all over the Northwest. (MB)

SARANAC ART PROJECTS

25 W. Main The art at this exhibit by LISA NAPPA AND MARGOT CASSTEVENS is all about water. That’s typically the subject of Nappa’s work, whether it’s a ceramic piece or digital project, but now she’s joined by another favorite local artist in Casstevens, showing her stop-action film that focuses on movement. Meet the artists at a reception on Feb. 6 from 5-8 pm, and perhaps wax poetic about the confluence of water and art. (MB) 

FEBRUARY 12

Beethoven & Schubert

Featuring Amanda Howard-Phillips & Mateusz Wolski on Arvo Pärt’s Tabula Rasa: Ludus

Sat. Feb. 28 - 8pm Sun. March 1 - 3pm this concert is sponsored by Maxine Kopczynski

.................

SPOKANESYMPHONY.ORG MARTINWOLDSONTHEATER.COM

.................

FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 35


CULTURE | DIGEST

THEATER REASONS TO BE PRETTY I

t’s understood that a Neil LaBute play titled Reasons to Be Pretty will provide anything but. Over his two-decadeplus career, the playwright and former Spokanite, most widely known for In the Company of Men and Your Friends & Neighbors, has fixated on our baser aspects, particularly as they come to bear in ostensibly close or romantic relationships. His characters are insecure, petty, arrogant, naive, deceitful, vain, callous, self-deluding, ineffectual; these flaws are weapons with the power to wound, intentionally or indiscriminately. And so it is here. Greg (Ryan Shore; recently in Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde at Civic) and Steph (Molly Tage; Never the Sinner) immediately take the stage in a profanity-laden lover’s quarrel. It concerns a careless remark to his pal and co-worker Kent (Nich Witham; The Glass Menagerie), whose wife, Carly (Jennie Oliver), overheard and quickly relayed it to Steph. Greg’s offense — unforgivable in both women’s eyes — is to have said that Steph’s face was “regular” compared to the new girl at the depot where three of them work. Shore plays a schlubby, perpetually contrite Greg as a fine counterpoint to Witham’s Kent, whose sculpted pecs and hair belie (or bespeak) a swaggering, egocentric driver of events to which Greg must react. As Steph, Tage’s voice was slightly attenuated on opening night, reducing some of the force she needs to browbeat Greg, but her hurt and anger are still palpable. Oliver, a newcomer to this stage, negotiates the challenges of her role well as she transitions into a sympathetic figure. Photos of the chic and glamorous are posted all over the ash-gray set of this production, taut and charged under Dawn Taylor Reinhardt’s direction. Intended as a reminder of the metric of beauty at the back of the characters’ minds, these photos aren’t necessary, and they distract from more subtle visual cues embedded in props and costumes. Like the script’s monologues

Jennie Oliver and Ryan Shore in Reasons to be Pretty. DAN BAUMER PHOTO or its books/covers motif, there’s a risk of losing something vital when putting too fine a point on any one idea of the many that make this such a raw and captivating play. — E.J. IANNELLI Reasons to Be Pretty • Through Feb. 15: Thu-Sat, 7:30 pm; Sun, 2 pm • $19-$25 • The Modern Theater Spokane • 174 S. Howard • 455-PLAY • themoderntheater.org

LITERATURE DIGITS

55 Years

That’s the time that will have passed between the publications of Harper Lee’s two books. Lee has never released another novel after winning the Pulitzer prize for her 1960 classic To Kill a Mockingbird, but announced this week that a sequel to the book is set to hit shelves in July. Entitled Go Set a Watchman, the new novel features Scout as a grown woman returning to Alabama from New York and was actually written before To Kill a Mockingbird. “I am humbled and amazed that this will now be published after all these years,” Lee said in a statement.

FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION BY DAN NAILEN

ALBUM | There aren’t many bands willing to mess with a successful sonic formula 15 years and seven albums into their career, but Indiana-based Murder by Death does just that on its new, aptly named BIG DARK LOVE. The band forged its identity in rootsy indie rock, bar-band mayhem and sprawling, dark ballads, and while those elements still peek through, on Big Dark Love they meet horn-driven fanfares, glitchy synth flourishes and orchestral mind-blowers that would make the Flaming Lips proud. VIDEO | There was a time when Saturday Night Live’s musical guests drew from artists as edgy as the comedy delivered by the Not Ready for Prime Time Players. While SNL has been lapped by numerous outlets delivering comedy skewering the Powers That Be (hello, Daily Show and John Oliver), the show has also hit a rut the past several years in its choice of musical guests, throwing up one-hit wonders instead of artists of substance. This season, that trend has seen two notable exceptions, first with Prince, and more recently with D’ANGELO killing a performance of “The Charade” from his new Black Messiah album on Jan. 31 as his band wore “I Can’t Breathe” and “Black Lives Matter” T-shirts. YouTube it, Hulu it, do what you need to do to see an R&B king in top form. BOOK | Nick Hornby is oh-so-British, but past books like High Fidelity and About A Boy have found audiences in America thanks to his knack for humor and ability to create characters who are easy to get behind. I find myself eagerly awaiting each new release, including this week’s FUNNY GIRL, which is both a period piece about swinging ’60s London and a nice skewering of pop stardom through the character of Sophie Straw, a smalltown girl who becomes the country’s comedy sweetheart, only to see her career shift along with the country’s tastes. Expect the Americanized version to come along soon. 

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CULTURE | BASKETBALL

Byron Wesley (here with fellow senior Kevin Pangos) has proven a valuable addition to this year’s wildly talented Zag team.

Welcomed Newcomer After transferring to Gonzaga for his senior season, Byron Wesley is fitting right in BY HOWIE STALWICK

T

he second-ranked Gonzaga Bulldogs have proven they can hang with the big boys of college basketball on the court, but it’s not always easy for the Zags to succeed off the court. Lest we forget, Gonzaga is a smaller college with a somewhat undersized arena located in a fairly isolated city. Obviously, recruiting can be challenging. And yet when USC’s leading scorer and rebounder decided to sell his wares to the highest bidder — well, the most attractive bidder — after last season, Gonzaga trumped everyone. Essentially, the Bulldogs convinced Byron Wesley to trade near-Hollywood for near-Hillyard. Wesley invited coaches from Gonzaga and four other schools to come to his family’s Rancho Cucamonga, California, home to meet with him, his parents and Keith Howard, his former AAU coach. “It was quite the show,” Gonzaga coach Mark Few recalled. “They invited everybody in in one day. It was crazy. We each got an hour. It was a unique way to do it. You kind of had to cut through all the stuff, just get down to the nuts and bolts.”

Gonzaga’s competition consisted of Indiana, Oklahoma State, Baylor and Pittsburgh. Few and GU assistant coach Donny Daniels had to bring their “A” games. “I want to say when Donny and I pulled up, (Pittsburgh’s) Jamie Dixon was coming out,” Few says. “When we came out, (Baylor’s) Scott Drew was pulling up in a limo. After him, I think, was (Indiana’s) Tom Crean.” Wesley cut the list of finalists to Oklahoma State, Pittsburgh and Gonzaga. The senior WEEKEND guard planned visits to C O U N T D OW N all three schools, but Get the scoop on this after making his way weekend’s events with our to Oklahoma State and newsletter. Visit Inlander. then Gonzaga, Wesley com/newsletter to sign up. decided there was no need to look elsewhere. “Gonzaga is usually one of the top basketball teams on the West Coast, one of the winningest schools [in the nation],” Wesley points out. “Coach Few is one of the best coaches in the country, if not the best.

RYAN SULLIVAN PHOTO

“When I came on my visit, the guys were really welcoming, which I know can be tough for most teams — to have a guy coming up for one year.” If anyone figured to be bitter about Wesley’s arrival, it was Kyle Dranginis. A redshirt junior, Dranginis’ playing time figured to be — and has been — cut the most due to Wesley’s presence. “It’s awesome that he can just come in here right away and be productive. I’m all for it,” Dranginis says. “I’ve always been about winning, you know? Throughout my whole career, I’ve been on winning teams, so I understand what it takes. He’s done a great job for us.” After averaging 17.8 points and 6.4 rebounds per game at USC last season, Wesley — who did not have to sit out a year after transferring because he graduated from USC last summer — is averaging 10.5 points and 5.0 rebounds as Gonzaga’s starting “3” guard. He plays fewer minutes and shoots less than at USC due to Gonzaga’s superior depth and talent, but he’s not complaining. “It’s everything I wanted,” Wesley says. “I think it’s got to be better than I expected.” Wesley says he left USC because he grew frustrated with the losing and did not believe he received enough recognition for his strong play. Wesley says USC will “always have a special place in my heart,” and the same can be said about Gonzaga. “The people in Spokane are great,” Wesley says. “The fans here are phenomenal.” n Gonzaga (22-1) puts its 15-game winning streak on the line Thursday, Feb. 5, at Santa Clara (8 pm, ESPN2/ESPNU) and Saturday, Feb. 7, at San Francisco (8:30 pm, ESPN2).

FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 37


The Volstead Act provides free popcorn and your choice of seasonings. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

By the Handful We investigate complimentary bar popcorn for its finest qualities

T

his popcorn is free, and when food is free you can’t exactly be picky. But we figured it was important to finally determine which complimentary bar or restaurant popcorn offerings are better than just a substance to soak up a boozed-up belly. So our team of refined-palate reporters hit the mean streets of Spokane ranking popcorn on a specific set of criteria, based on saltiness, freshness, butter coverage and flavorings. (Note: While we hit many, we couldn’t try every place that offers free popcorn.) For decades, bars in particular have served up free snacks hoping to keep patrons thirsty. Washington state liquor laws, however, do not require venues with tavern (beer and wine only) and nightclub liquor licenses to serve food, so offering bottomless popcorn is just a cherry on top for hungry drinkers. Popcorn isn’t inherently terrible for you; it even offers a boost of fiber. It’s when you pour on salt, butter and other flavorings that the nutrition value goes out the window. But if you’re anything like us — we won’t name names, but some Inlander staffers could (and do) eat popcorn for dinner — and you’re in the mood for the stuff, you may actually choose a business based on the amazingness of its popcorn product. We’re here to help. (LAURA JOHNSON)

38 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

BON BON

926 W. Garland

This popcorn is the same stuff you can order from the Garland Theater’s concessions stand (where you pay $7 for bottomless quantities), so clearly, it’s fresh. Multiple popcorn flavors are located next to the condiments stand, but the Garland’s popcorn doesn’t need anything to add to its existing tastiness. Sitting and sipping our fancy cocktails in the compact establishment, the bartenders came around with a brown paper bag to fill our napkinlined bowl. Each time we grabbed a handful of popcorn we got a mix of buttery, fluffy, crunchy goodness. It was never burnt and there were a low number of unpopped kernels at the bottom of the bowl. Really, this stuff is basically perfect. (CHEY SCOTT) Best feature: Perfection

CASEY’S PLACE

13817 E. Sprague, Spokane Valley Only open for lunch from 10 am to 3 pm, there’s no chance you’ll eat day-old popcorn kernels at this Spokane Valley gem — there simply isn’t time. While there last week, the popper, serving up an aesthetically pleasing mix of crisp white and mouthwatering, buttery yellow popcorn, never seemed to drop lower than half full. While the popcorn’s butter distribution was a touchdown, the salt was slightly more excessive than I prefer. I expected the school-busyellow pieces to have the heaviest punch, but it was generally the white pieces that seemed to be hiding salt grains in every crevice. All in all, the saltiness was not extreme enough to negate the deliciousness. (KAITLYN ANSON) Best feature: Scrumptious sandwiches with your popcorn.

THE HUB TAVERN 2926 N. Monroe

The Hub Tavern is one of the oldest watering holes in Spokane. When you sit down at the homeyfeeling business, the bartender brings you about two cups worth of freshly made popcorn (they’re making about four batches a day) in a little red basket. Last week, it was slightly burned, but I’ve had many batches that were not. The salt level is a little high and there’s no butter or extra flavor selections to speak of. But this yellowish-colored, good-quality popcorn does the bare minimum in terms of serving as a satisfying snack. And it does make you thirstier, which is the point, I reckon. (DAN NAILEN) Best feature: It’s fresh, and you don’t have to scoop your own popcorn.


THE SWAMP TAVERN 1904 W. Fifth

Under the blue-and-green twinkle lights affixed to the Swamp Tavern’s ceiling, thirsty folks can play pool or even Uno while watching their local teams on an array of large TVs. Free popcorn enhances this experience. The popcorn — this particular batch was made at 3 pm, just two hours before I arrived — further blows your mind because of the do-ityourself topping options. I tried Parmesan cheese, lemon herb and onion powder. Other flavors included white pepper, garlic salt and Johnny’s seasoning salt. By itself, the popcorn’s salt level was fine; I prefer more butter than anything else, which wasn’t a priority here. Yet the myriad options kept me wanting more. (LJ) Best feature: Incredible flavor selection.

VIKING BAR AND GRILL 1221 N. Stevens

You wouldn’t necessarily expect it, but the Viking keeps animal lovers in mind when popping multiple batches of popcorn every day. Their butter topping is actually a vegan butter substitute. The restaurant/bar, known for its eclectic décor and clientele, offers popcorn to everyone from lunch patrons to latenight music lovers. Their complimentary popcorn is served in a medium-sized wooden bowl. While not strikingly yellow, the popcorn is certainly quite presentable. The salt on each kernel provides just enough bite without overpowering your choice of spirits. (TRACE WILLIAM COWEN) Best feature: You can eat vegan-buttered popcorn while listening to local live music.

VOLSTEAD ACT

HAPPY HOUR 4-6 PM DAILY

12 N. Post

Last week at this downtown cocktail bar, I unknowingly sampled the buffalo wing seasoning (one of four additional flavors to choose from). While it was delicious, I developed a spice-induced smoker’s cough for the remainder of the evening. I soldiered on, and after sampling some untainted popcorn was able to rate it properly. The salt and the buttery taste were definitely there, but did not overpower any added flavoring. No teeth were injured during the sampling of this popcorn, and no minds were blown by a miraculously melt-in-your-mouth quality either… but a swanky joint with free popcorn is a “yes” in my book. (COURTNEY BREWER) Best feature: The optional buffalo wing seasoning.

BALLOT BREAKDOWN Most salt The Hub and Casey’s Place tied for most salt, according to our reviewers, although neither were overpowering enough to be deemed inedible. Least butter The Hub, as there’s no butter on it, according to our reviewer. Lightest, yet still well-bodied Bon Bon serves their movie popcorn. There’s really no beating that.

Most flavor options The Swamp offered up more than seven different options to pour over your popcorn. You can essentially make it taste any way you want.

Beer sampler paddle

Freshest popcorn Each bar and restaurant popped multiple batches per day. No matter where you go, it’s going to be fresh. Most nutritious None of the above. Most likely to be tried again All judges said they would eat their particular popcorn again.

509 789 6900 • poststreetalehouse.com 1 North Post Street., Downtown Spokane

FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 39


Grizzlies, Piranhas & Man-Eating Pigs

JOEL SARTORE

FOOD | MOBILE

JOEL SARTORE

WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHER

Joel Sartore National Geographic photographer Joel Sartore shares a lively, intimate, and humorous look at what could be the best - and worst - job in the world as he plays expedition leader, psychologist, medic, accountant, and coach, as well as photographer.

TICKETS ON-SALE

TicketsWest.com 800.325.SEAT 40 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

Flavor Quest Adventures in Deliciousness brings homemade flavors to food truck cuisine

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 24 7:00 PM

Groups of 10 or more SAVE! Call 509.777.6253 -orgroups@wcebroadway.com

DJ Megow, owner of Adventures in Deliciousness in Coeur d’Alene. SARAH WURTZ PHOTO

NOW!

BY JO MILLER

H

e swivels from task to task in the narrow aisle of his food truck, placing the patty on the grill and beer-battered onions rings in the fryer, slathering the toasted bun with barbecue sauce, setting the bacon to sizzle and spurting the melting cheese and meat with liquid smoke. DJ Megow is cooking up his BBQ Bliss Burger — a juicy and carefully assembled pile of the abovementioned ingredients — inside Adventures in Deliciousness, the food truck he launched in November. Ever since he was 14, Megow wanted to own a restaurant. First he worked at an ice cream parlor, then in various restaurants over the following decades. But it wasn’t until last year that the 61-year-old made his dream a reality. “I’ve always wanted a restaurant,” says Megow. “Now I have a mobile restaurant.” The truck, parked on a gravel lot next to Lloyd’s Tire and Automotive on Government Way in Coeur d’Alene, stands out with a splash of bright yellow and a blown-up photo of Megow’s Rapture Classic Bacon Cheeseburger. It and the BBQ Bliss form the foundation of the five-burger menu. Each burger ($6-$10) is fresh-ground and hand-formed Angus chuck, cooked to your

choice of rare, medium or well, seasoned with DJ’s Secret Gourmet Salted Seasoning, which he invented during one of his jobs at a prime rib restaurant. Megow makes all of his own seasonings and sauces from scratch. The Chorizo and Egg Delight Burger features his own chorizo spice and chipotle mayo paired with American cheese, tomato, a fried egg and onions caramelized in organic maple syrup and Jim Beam. DJ’s Honey Bleu Dressing is the highlight of the Umami Supreme Bacon Bleu Burger, stacked with lettuce, tomato, bacon, a disc of bleu cheese and the caramelized onions. You’ll find his Honey Bleu Dressing paired with one other menu item: Mac’n Cheese Bacon Balls. Dunk these deliciously dense beasts (3 for $5) of deep-fried, six-cheese shell mac wrapped in bacon in the dressing, or into a cup of DJ’s Spicy Asian Soul Sauce. To bulk up your meal even more, add a small order of fries ($1), onion rings or extra-large seasoned fries ($3) to your burger.  Adventures in Deliciousness • 3025 N. Government Way, Coeur d’Alene • Mon-Fri, 11 am-5:30 pm; some Saturdays • Facebook: Adventures in Deliciousness • 208-755-3446


FOOD | OPENING

Pride in Workmanship Dueling Irons in Post Falls features handcrafted classics BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

D

on’t be surprised to see chef Thomas Didra come out from behind the stove with a screwdriver in hand. “Either I was going to open up my own ‘do everything’ shop or find a restaurant to buy,” says Didra, a self-described handyman whose Dueling Irons restaurant honors both cooking competitions (à la Iron Chef) and his longstanding interest in gunsmithing. Didra grew up in central ENTRÉE Washington, eventually relocatGet the scoop on the local ing to Seattle where he worked food scene with our Entrée in fine dining and attended newsletter. Visit Inlander. Seattle Art Institute’s Culinary com/newsletter to sign up. Arts program. He got tired of city life, he says, so he returned home and worked at various mom-and-pop places, absorbing everything he could about the food industry. “It’s nice to be in those smaller places, focused on preparing the things they are doing properly,” he says. A second stint in Seattle resulted in running a sports pub, honing recipes he’d eventually employ at Dueling Irons. The menu is Didra’s twist on classic comfort food. He does his own corned beef, for example, for a Reuben with housemade Thousand Island

($9.75) and a breakfast scramble ($9.25). The house-roasted turkey is covered with melted Swiss cheese and avocado on focaccia bread with cranberry spread ($9.75). And the slow-braised pork is featured in a sandwich ($8.50) and breakfast burrito ($9.25). After researching similar restaurants, Didra developed the 8-ounce sirloin and brisket burger, which he seasons and handpresses. It’s served on a bun from local Sweetwater Bakery with choice hand-cut fries, red potato salad or green salad with house dressing. Look for weekly specials featuring regional cuisine every month, such as Texas (chorizo quesadilla) or Pennsylvania (an oatmeal bake). With its hearty fare, family-friendly diner appeal — there’s also a senior breakfast and lunch menu — Dueling Irons offers a refreshing, well-crafted alternative to diner-like chain restaurants. Whether it’s working the barrel of a gun, tending to a construction project or building great meals from scratch, says Didra, “I pride myself on the work I do.” n

Dinner Starts at 4pm eatCENTRALFOOD.com

Dueling Irons • 1780 E. Schneidmiller Ave., Post Falls • Open Sun, 7 am-2 pm; Mon-Sat, 6 am-2 pm • facebook.com/duelingironsID • 208-262-9716

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FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 41


2 Year Anniversary Party!

FOOD | SAMPLER

BURGERS BOOMERS CLASSIC ROCK BAR & GRILL 16208 E. Indiana, Spokane Valley| 755-7486 Two things about Boomers Classic Rock Bar & Grill that you need to forget: it’s in a shopping center strip mall surrounded by grassy, empty lots; its next-door neighbor is an unrelated dive bar by the name of the Cum Inn. Once you’ve forgotten this, you’re free to enjoy the kind of place where bands play classic rock every weekend and the burgers are juicy and full-textured. The best seller is the Frankenstein, a burger decked out in fried Spam, fried egg, deepfried onion, chipotle brown gravy and (says the menu) an ambulance.

FEBRUARY 7TH // 5-9PM MUSIC, FOOD AND SOME SPECIAL STUFF FROM THE BREWHOUSE! 121 S. CEDAR • OPEN 3PM DAILY

HOP JACK’S 9265 N. Nevada | 465-1880 The Washington state chain bills itself as a “neighborhood gathering place,” and this location near the North Division Y appeals to local families, college students and tired shoppers who just couldn’t get out of Home Depot in time to cook dinner. The burgers are the big draw; there are 14 varieties to choose from. Try the jalapeño burger, which

comes fully loaded with jalapeño peppers, pepper jack and bacon. But the hook is the drink menu, with fruity martinis served in glasses made of ice and 34-degree tap beer. The first Tuesday of every month is “New Tap Tuesday,” when the restaurant features a new regional brewery.

the Bogart smothered in chili and cheese. The 6-inch tall Gosman, invented by a regular customer, is two patties, each topped with pepper jack and bacon, jalapeño, onion rings, buffalo sauce, a fried egg and bleu cheese dressing.

POST STREET ALE HOUSE 1 N. Post | 789-6900 Post Street’s prime downtown Spokane location, across from the Davenport Hotel, draws a mix of businessmen, concertgoers, sports fans and college kids. If you go, try the burger, which pairs well with the house sauce. Feeling more adventurous? Go for the fried pickle, a sweet, deep-fried morsel that can be enjoyed with one of their 26 beers.

THE RUSTY MOOSE 9105 W. Hwy. 2 | 747-5579 It may only be five minutes west of downtown Spokane, but the ambience of the Rusty Moose makes you feel like you’re in a cozy mountain resort. The restaurant serves up 16 types of burgers, as well as sandwiches, wraps and seasonally served fresh fish. You can leave with a full belly, but don’t leave empty-handed: Rusty’s sells three exclusive varieties of spices, as well as glassware, coffee and signature wine.

PENNY’S PIT PUB & LOUNGE 14319 Hwy. 53 | Rathdrum, Idaho 208-687-2052 Penny’s Pit Pub & Lounge operates out of what was once a video store sandwiched between a car wash, laundromat, Dashco convenience store and gas station. Penny’s serves salads, wings and similar grub, plus burgers named for screen icons: John Wayne with pepper jack, the Classic Marilyn cheeseburger,

WADDELL’S PUB & GRILL 4318 S. Regal | 443-6500 This South Hill sports-bar stalwart does everything well, from the 30 beers on tap to the slate of well-executed pub grub. It does everything you’d expect, and one thing you might not. Waddell’s — we’re not kidding — is the keeper of what, in our experience, is the absolute biggest non-food-competition burger in the area. n

Shaping Healthcare Education. Building a World-Class Medical School for Spokane. Over 40 years ago, the University of Washington School of Medicine pioneered a communitybased approach to medical education. Today, it is ranked the #1 primary care medical school in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. They also rank it #1 in the nation for teaching rural medicine and family medicine. The school is #2 in the nation for NIH research funding, providing our students with greater access to critical information. And it’s ranked as the #3 medical school in the world according to the 2014 Academic Ranking of World Universities. The University of Washington School of Medicine brought this world-class medical school to Spokane in 2008. We realized a goal of building a world-class health sciences hub to educate future generations of physicians and to fuel Spokane’s economic development. Why? The region continues to grow, and with it the need for more physicians. But we cannot do it alone. We need the continued support of the Spokane community and our legislature in order to expand the University of Washington School of Medicine to meet this need. Thank you for continuing to support these efforts. Our partnership is the future of medical education.

uw.edu/spokanemedschool 42 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015


FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 43


The Wachowskis return to form with Jupiter Ascending BY ED SYMKUS

O

K, so it’s the beginning of February. A little early to start thinking about my Top 10 list for the films of 2015. But now that I’ve seen Jupiter Ascending, there’s no doubt it’s going to be on that list. Written and directed by Andy and Lana Wachowski, it’s the follow-up to the amazing and challenging Cloud Atlas, and while that film took some dips into the realms of science fiction, this one jumps into full-blown sci-fi and never looks back. Mila Kunis plays Jupiter, a Russian immigrant in Chicago where she and her mom clean homes and live with an extended family. Jupiter is unhappy with her dull life, until the day she’s inexplicably attacked by a bunch of creepy little alien creatures and then rescued by the hunky, Spock-eared Caine (Channing Tatum), who swoops down in his anti-gravity boots to bring her to another world, where he’s to deliver her to a waiting member of royalty. She is, though she doesn’t know it, the “Queen of the Universe,” or something like that. Anyone who’s seen the Wachowskis’ Matrix trilogy knows this ain’t gonna be a simple joyride. Viewers will need to pay attention to follow everything, but this romp is worth it. Caine is mostly human, but he’s been spliced with some wolf DNA, which gives him extra abilities. He’s

44 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

paperwork before she can become queen, she goes also a disgraced soldier who has lost his wings (you through some hellishness in a DMV-like office on can see the scars when he’s shirtless, and he’s shirtless another world, where a disgruntled civil servant is a lot), which is why he needs the anti-gravity boots bogged down in blank forms. Not only is the scene to fly. Jupiter is a Recurrence, a human with the exact reminiscent of the bureaucratic morass of Terry gene pattern of a recently deceased Queen of the UniGilliam’s Brazil, it’s actually Gilliam playing the civil verse, which is why the former queen’s offspring want servant. to meet her. But at its epic heart, Jupiter Ascending is an action The film is about comparisons and contrasts movie. Just after Jupiter is first rescued by Caine, she’s between families. Jupiter is a Bolotnikov. There’s some involved in an astounding chase along the streets, warm and funny time spent with that boisterous group under the water, and through the skies of Chicago, around a crowded Chicago dinner table. The late courtesy of those anti-gravity boots. Later, during the queen’s adult kids are the Abrasax family — Balem (Ednonstop action of the last 20 mindie Redmayne), Titus (Douglas JUPITER ASCENDING utes, the Wachowskis don’t just Booth), and Kalique (Tuppence Rated PG-13 pull out all the stops, they keep Middleton). Kalique is vain, Titus is a slick playboy, and Balem Written and directed by Andy and Lana Wachowski on making up new ones, then pull those out, too. is just plain evil. They’re at each Starring Mila Kunis, Channing Tatum, Sean Bean, Eddie Redmayne, Douglas Booth Among the script’s suggesother’s throats, and they don’t tions: There are many inhabited just want to meet Jupiter. They planets out there, the birthplace of the human race was want to kill her, so she can’t ascend to queendom. It’s a not Earth, bees are genetically designed to recognize good thing Caine keeps taking his shirt off and saving royalty, and the choice of the most important things in her. the universe comes down to family, profit, immortalThe details of the story get more down, dirty, and ity, love, or anti-gravity boots. There’s so much going grim than just killing one woman. Yet the Wachowskis on in this movie, it demands a second viewing. That’s prove that they can also comfortably slip into goofy cool. I’m going again next week.  mode. When Jupiter is told she must fill out certain


FILM | SHORTS

the people decide “ Let who will wear the crown...” Michael Cera stars in David Cross’ Hits, screening only on Feb. 12 at the Magic Lantern.

OPENING FILMS HITS

Comic David Cross got this film’s distribution underway via a Kickstarter campaign and now he’s debuting his indie comedy in theaters with another unorthodox approach — letting you pay whatever you want for one night only. Hits, written and directed by Cross, is about a small-town guy (Matt Walsh) who makes a scene at a city council meeting and a clip of that scene goes viral. The media descends on the town, much to the chagrin of the sudden star’s daughter (Meredith Hagner), who thinks she should be the star of the family. At Magic Lantern, Thu, Feb. 12 at 9 pm (MB) Not Rated

JUPITER ASCENDING

The Wachowskis are back after the fabulous but monetarily disastrous Cloud Atlas, but this time just sticking with science fiction elements, and they go at it full throttle. Mila Kunis is an unhappy drudge on Earth, who is brought to a distant planet where members of royalty there believe she is the Queen of the Universe. But she’s more a damsel in distress, regularly saved by super tracker and former soldier Channing Tatum, who wears and uses a cool pair of anti-gravity boots. (ES) Rated PG-13

SEVENTH SON

This epic fantasy tale from centuries ago stars Jeff Bridges as Master Greg-

ory, the last in a long line of supernatural warriors tasked with keeping humanity safe against evil forces led by a mean witch (Julianne Moore). For help, the master recruits a country boy born “the seventh son of a seventh son” to teach him how to battle dark magic threatening the land — and potentially score an attractive young good witch in the process. (DN) Rated PG-13

THE SPONGEBOB MOVIE: SPONGE OUT OF WATER

When the sacred Crabby Patty recipe is stolen by a villainous pirate (Antonio Banderas), Spongebob Squarepants leaves behind the only world he has ever known. With the help of his friends Patrick, Mr. Krabbs, Sandy and Squidward, Spongebob journeys through our world and becomes the hero of Bikini Bottom. (CB) Rated PG

TWO DAYS, ONE NIGHT

Working mother of two Sandra Bye (Marion Cotillard) finds that her fate is in the balance after a “show of hands” vote at her workplace. While she was on medical leave during a season of depression, her colleagues overwhelmingly voted in favor of significant bonuses in return for her dismissal. She has one weekend to convince each employee to give up their bonuses so that she might keep her job in this French film. (CB) Rated PG-13

NOW PLAYING AMERICAN SNIPER

American Sniper opens with Bradley Cooper’s Chris Kyle on his first tour in Fallujah, perched on a rooftop protecting the Marines clearing buildings door to door. From the moment of his first life-or-death decision, the story flashes back — to his Texas childhood, his career as a rodeo cowboy, his eventual enlistment and his courtship and marriage to his wife, Taya (Sienna Miller) — before returning to his experiences serving in Iraq. (SR) Rated R

BIRDMAN

After good work in lots of small supporting roles over the past couple of decades, Michael Keaton gets back to work as a former franchise movie star now trying to make a comeback on the

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Broadway stage, but finding obstacles everywhere, many of them in his own head. (ES) Rated R

BLACK OR WHITE

Kevin Costner gives another great performance as a heavy-drinking lawyer who loses his wife and must deal with raising the 7-year-old granddaughter (Jillian Estell) who’s been living with them since their daughter died in childbirth, and her drug-addled father vanished. But the little girl’s pushy grandmother (Octavia Spencer) thinks she should come and live with the black side of the mixed family. Strong writing, direction, acting and a gutsy ending. (ES) Rated PG-13 ...continued on next page

RESULTS ISSUE on stands March 19th

FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 45


FILM | SHORTS

FRI, FEBRUARY 6TH TO THURS, FEBRUARY 12TH

Annie

FRI-TUES 5:00 WED 1:00 5:00 THURS 5:00

Penguins of Madagascar SAT 3:00 SUN 12:30 HUNGER GAMES:

Mockingjay Pt 1

FRI-SAT 7:30 SUN 2:30 7:30 MON 7:30 TUES 10:00PM WED-THURS 7:30

Mortdecai FRI-MON 10:00PM

WED-THURS 10:00PM

Doctor recommended, Mother approved. 1414 N Hamilton St. | Logan/Gonzaga 509-368-9087 | wedonthaveone.com

THE MAGIC LANTERN FRI FEB 6TH - THUR FEB 12TH

2015 OSCAR NOMINATED SHORT FILMS: ANIMATION (78 MIN- PG)

Fri: 2:30, 6:30 Sat: 4:30 Sun: 4:30, 7:00 Mon-Thu: 4:30

LIVE ACTION (122 MIN PG-13)

Fri: 2:45 Sat/Sun: 8:15 Mon-Wed: 2:15

CAKE (102 MIN- R) *Opening!

Fri: 4:15, 8:15 Sat/Sun: 6:15 Mon-Thu: 4:00

BOYHOOD (160 MIN) *Oscar Nominee Weekend Only!

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7. MIDNIGHT

Fri/Sat: 7:30

THE HOMESMAN (117 MIN) *last week! Fri/Sat: 5:05 Sun: 4:45 Mon-Wed: 1:45 HITS *one night only! Thu: 9:00

Moulin Rouge

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 7. MIDNIGHT TUES 7:25

25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $8 www.magiclanternspokane.com

VOTE BRAIN FREEZE

NOW PLAYING BOY NEXT DOOR

There’s really only one word to describe this film: creepy. It is a psychological thriller, though, and one that takes obsession with another person to a really messed up level. High school teacher Claire (Jennifer Lopez) is recently divorced and lonely, but things start really getting out of hand for her after an impulsive (and regretted) one-nightstand with her hunky young neighbor (Ryan Guzman). (CS) Rated R

BOYHOOD

Richard Linklater’s film, shot over the course of 12 years, is a true masterwork and eschews the big-bang theory of dramatics in favor of the million-andone little things that accumulate daily and help shape who we are, and who we will become. (MB) Rated R

THE HOMESMAN

Tommy Lee Jones, Hilary Swank and Meryl Streep star in this film that offers a glimpse into the challenges faced in the early American West. When three women become mentally unstable due to their trying pioneer lifestyles, the hardened Mary Bee Cuddy — played by Swank— sets out to deliver them to safety in Iowa. (KG) Rated R

THE IMITATION GAME

During World War II, the Germans used a machine called an Enigma that created what were thought to be unbreakable codes for top-secret military communications. British mathematician Alan Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch) was hired by Allied forces to decipher the machine’s codes and help win the war. (MB) Rated PG-13

INTO THE WOODS

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46 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

The song-filled new telling of familiar Grimm fairy tales is a terrific piece of work, with wonderful performances, outstanding production design and snappy writing. But this film, based on the Broadway musical, is also extremely dark, featuring themes of deception, greed, infertility, and even a taste of lasciviousness. (ES) Rated PG

THE LOFT

Vincent Stevens (Karl Urban) and his four friends have it all: wealth, success, beautiful wives and even more beautiful mistresses. When the five rent a loft to conceal their dirty little secrets, it seemed that their lives couldn’t get more idyllic. Tables quickly turn when a strange woman’s corpse is discovered handcuffed to the bed. Accusations fly and paranoia brews as they suspect that one of the five must be involved. (CB) Rated R

A MOST VIOLENT YEAR

It’s 1981 and New York City is in the midst of its most deadly and all-around violent period ever. Abel Morales (Oscar Isaac) is an immigrant who has found success with a heating oil company, but

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is attracting the attention of organized crime. It doesn’t help that Morales’ wife (Jessica Chastain) is from a mafia family and knows how to play dirty. None of this bodes well for Morales, especially when the district attorney comes sniffing around. (MB) Rated R

MORTDECAI

Is there any role Johnny Depp can’t (or won’t) play? The actor’s latest gig playing Charlie Mortdecai — the same character from the 1970s English novel series that’s more recently garnered “cult” status — places Depp in the role of a cheeky and debonair British art dealer tasked with recovering a stolen painting. Joined by his man-servant Jock (Paul Bettany), Mortdecai seduces and charms his way through just about any predicament in this comedic romp. (CS) Rated R

PADDINGTON

Paddington the bear winds up in London in search of an old friend after a family tragedy in his native Peru. He soon finds a loving family to take him in, but is quick to cause a series of calamities in the home of the friendly Londoners, who name him Paddington. (MB) Rated PG

PROJECT ALMANAC

When David (Johnny Weston) finds blueprints for a time machine in his garage, he and his friends are determined to make the most of it. As their manipulation of the past results in plane crashes, riots and natural disasters, the teens discover that they must go back to the beginning if they have any hope of undoing the ripple effect. (CB) Rated PG-13

SELMA

Selma could have been just an inspirational drama about a pivotal historical moment, and it could have been just a portrait of King’s efforts at promoting civil rights. But director Ava DuVernay and her team are interested in doing something much less common, something that echoes the similar success of 2012’s Lincoln. (SR) Rated PG-13

STRANGE MAGIC

Shakespeare will never cease to infiltrate our popular culture, as evidenced by George Lucas’ new animated project, Strange Magic. The film, inspired by A Midsummer Night’s Dream, features trolls, elves,

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

goblins and other mythical creatures battling, with hilarious consequences, over a magic potion. Features voices of Kristin Chenoweth, Maya Rudolph, Evan Rachel Wood and more. (MB) Rated PG

THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING

Inspired by Jane Wilde Hawking’s memoir about her life with former husband Stephen Hawking, the brilliant theoretical physicist (A Brief History of Time) diagnosed with motor neuron disease at age 21, the film’s heart beats with a romantic optimism, even when each of them finds new soulmates and their union ends. (SD) Rated PG-13

UNBROKEN

The story of Louis Zamperini (Jack O’Connell), a bombardier during World War II who, as a young man, was a medal-winning athlete at the 1936 Olympics, but was stranded for more than a month on a raft after his plane goes down only to be captured by the Japanese. (SR) Rated PG-13

WHIPLASH

Socially maladroit and painfully single-minded, Andrew (Miles Teller), a freshman at a competitive conservatory, lives only to drum. Early on, he’s tapped by an instructor named Fletcher (J.K. Simmons) to join his elite competition band. (KJ) Rated R

THE WEDDING RINGER

Hollywood tests America’s love of Kevin Hart by giving him the role of Jimmy, proprietor of Best Man, Inc., a company providing groomsmen to loser dudes with no friends — in this case Doug (Josh Gad). Naturally, Jimmy and Doug become fast friends in the process of lying to Doug’s wifeto-be (Kaley Cuoco-Sweeting). (DN) Rated R

WILD

Reese Witherspoon stars as Cheryl Strayed, the woman who walked the length of the Pacific Crest Trail and lived to write a hit book (upon which this film is based) about it. Directed by Jean-Marc Vallee (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild follows Strayed as she deals with her mother’s death and her crippling addiction issues by heading into the wilderness alone. (MB) Rated R 


FILM | REVIEW

SpIFF Opening Night Gala

Friday, February 6 The Bing Crosby Theatre

Filmmakers in Attendance. Meet & Greet at 7:30pm

Show starts at 8 pm.

Tickets $10 / $5 for students.

Followed by the SpIFF Opening Party!

AIRWAY HEIGHTS

10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444

THE SPONGEBOB MOVIE: SPONGE OUT OF WATER

PG Daily (2:45) 7:00 Sat-Sun (10:30) In 2D (4:00) (4:50) 8:50 Sat-Sun (11:00) (12:40) (1:15)

JUPITER ASCENDING

PG-13 Daily (4:30) Sat-Sun (11:00) In 2D Daily 7:10 9:40 Sat-Sun (1:45)

SEVENTH SON

Wrung Out

Spongebob might want to stick to the small screen.

Creativity dries up in The SpongeBob Movie: Sponge Out of Water BY SETH SOMMERFELD

I

imagine this is how the idea for The SpongeBob mercials or trailers would suggest, the majority Movie: Sponge Out of Water came about. of the time is spent in traditionally animated 2-D Studio executive: “The SpongeBob like any other SpongeBob cartoon. By the time SquarePants Movie (2004) came out before the 3-D SpongeBob and his cronies enter the real world, craze, leaving money on the table. Make a new the story has dragged on so long that it lacks any one. Throw in some CGI stuff so that can be in thrill. 3-D. Also, I need the script in Sponge Out of Water is insult20 minutes.” ingly bad and almost entirely THE SPONGEBOB In said (presumably devoid of humor. Here’s the MOVIE: SPONGE OUT OF WATER hastily whipped up) script, movie’s main joke: SpongeBob Rated PG a pirate narrator (Antonio and his antagonist Plankton Banderas) reads a tale of how Directed by Paul Tibbitt must reluctantly work together. Starring the voices of Antonio Banderas, SpongeBob must retrieve the But since Plankton is mildly Frankie Muniz, Clancy Brown secret recipe for the Krabby evil, he’s not familiar with the Patty, the burger at his fastword team and pronounces it food job, which has mysteriously disappeared. “tea-em.” That’s it. That’s the main joke that the Because of the lack of the burger, his hometown movie returns to again and again and again. It’d of Bikini Bottom transforms instantly from bubtake a real SpongeBob superfan to find this film bly undersea city to a Road Warrior apocalypse hilarious. I know that the audience packed with (complete with leather). In order to complete the children that I watched it with weren’t uproaritask, he enlists the help of the usual SpongeBob ously laughing, and they’re the easiest target crew: Patrick, Squidward, Sandy, Mr. Krabs and demographic. Plankton. There’s just no purpose for Sponge Out of The movie succumbs to the same problem Water to exist. It doesn’t even have a strong many TV-to-film adaptations battle, namely, that takeaway message for kids to learn. Perhaps it’s it just feels like a normal episode of the show supposed to be teamwork (or, ahem, tea-emwork stretched thin to fill the longer time. Things pick — was it more funny this time?), but the film up when CGI versions of the characters enter makes no commitment to that idea. Or any idea, the third dimension, but despite what any comfor that matter. 

PG-13 Daily (4:45) 9:10 Sat-Sun (12:30) In 2D Daily (2:40) 6:45 Sat-Sun (10:40)

Queens of the Roleo

a small Idaho Four girls from g rolling World lo en ev El . town in a 14-year s ip sh Champion monkey. nd period. One po ry. sto r ei th This is

AMERICAN SNIPER

R Daily (4:15) 6:20 7:00 9:00 9:45 Sat-Sun (10:45) (1:30)

PROJECT ALMANAC

PG-13 Daily (4:20) 6:40 9:10 Sat-Sun (11:30) (1:50)

THE BOY NEXT DOOR

R Daily (5:10) 7:20 9:40 Sat-Sun (2:50)

PADDINGTON

PG Daily (2:40) (4:40) 6:40 8:45 Sat-Sun (10:40) (12:40)

THE WEDDING RINGER

R Daily (5:00) 7:15 9:30 Sat-Sun (2:45)

THE IMITATION GAME

PG-13 Daily (4:50) 7:10 9:35 Sat-Sun (2:30)

WANDERMERE

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

AMERICAN SNIPER

R Daily (1:30) (4:15) 6:20 7:00 9:00 9:45 Fri-Sun (10:45)

THE SPONGEBOB MOVIE: SPONGE OUT OF WATER

PG Daily (2:30) 6:30 8:30 Sat-Sun (10:30) In 2D (12:30) (1:00) (3:00) (4:30) (5:00) 6:50 8:50 Fri-Sun (11:00)

JUPITER ASCENDING

Daily (4:30) 9:40 Sat-Sun (11:00) In 2D Daily (1:45) 7:10

PG-13 PG-13

SEVENTH SON

Daily (12:30) (5:00) 9:30 In 2D Daily (2:45) 7:20

PROJECT ALMANAC

PG-13 Daily (1:50) (4:20) 6:40 9:10 Fri-Sun (11:30)

THE LOFT

R Daily (5:00) 9:30

Dryland

Filmed over a de cade and set in farmland of the Inland Northwest, Sue Ar buthnot and Richard Wilhelm ’s film documents an an nual combine destruction derby while probing a threatened way of life.

BLACK OR WHITE

PG-13 Daily (1:20) (3:50) 6:30 9:10 Fri-Sun (10:50)

STRANGE MAGIC

PG Daily (11:40) (2:00) (4:10)

THE BOY NEXT DOOR

R Daily (5:00) 9:45 Fri, Mon-Thu (12:00)

PADDINGTON

PG Daily (12:40) (2:40) (4:40) 6:40 8:45 Fri-Sun (10:40)

THE WEDDING RINGER

R Daily (2:45) 7:15 Mon-Fri (12:30)

THE IMITATION GAME

PG-13 Daily (1:45) (4:15) 6:50 9:35 Fri-Sun (11:15)

UNBROKEN

PG-13 Daily (2:20) 7:00

INTO THE WOODS

PG Daily (5:15) Fri, Mon-Thu (12:15)

For more info, visit

SpIFF

spokanefilmfestival.org

THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF FIVE ARMIES PG-13 Daily (2:40) 8:15

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: SECRET OF THE TOMB PG Daily (2:40) 7:10 Fri, Mon-Thu (12:10)

TAKEN 3

PG-13 Daily (4:50) 9:20 Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 2/6/15-2/12/15

FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 47


SleaterKinney 101

Your guide to the most anticipated music reunion of the year BY DAN NAILEN

W

elcome, class. Take your seats and please pay attention as we go through the syllabus for our crash course in Sleater-Kinney. Headphones are acceptable as you read. The Portland-by-way-of-Olympia punk trio of Corin Tucker, Carrie Brownstein and Janet Weiss is undergoing a much-hyped return after a nine-year hiatus. They released an incendiary new album, No Cities to Love, in January. And on Sunday, they’ll play their first full concert since 2006, right here in Spokane.

COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES

The purpose of this course is to introduce the unfamiliar, and remind older fans, of the powerful work of Sleater-Kinney — hailed by legendary rock scribe Greil Marcus as “America’s best rock band” before their break. Their return this year has been met with massive media adulation, including NPR and the New York Times profiles, rave reviews for No Cities to Love, performances on David Letterman and Conan O’Brien’s late-night shows and an excellent 90-minute interview with Broad City’s Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer. We’ll explore how a band born of the riot-grrrl movement, when Tucker and Brownstein were Evergreen State College students, evolved into an elite rock machine capable of mesmerizing critics and fans alike, despite and/or because of politically charged lyrics and being an all-female band in an utterly sexist field like rock ’n’ roll.

PREREQUISITES

A passing familiarity with punk and indie rock will help immensely for newcomers to Sleater-Kinney’s sound. While the interwoven guitars and vocals of Tucker and Brownstein, combined with Weiss’ powerful percussion (and lack of any bass guitar), make for an utterly different sound among modern rock bands, in their music you can hear the influence of bands like British art-rockers Wire, fellow Northwest lady punks Bikini Kill and Bratmobile, and musicians who love blending noisy instrumentation with pop hooks, a’la Sonic Youth. Students might also want to look into the individual members’ pre-Sleater-Kinney bands — Tucker’s Heavens to Betsy, Brownstein’s Excuse 17 and Weiss’ Quasi — for some understanding of how individual members inform the band’s sound.

REQUIRED COURSE MATERIALS Sleater-Kinney plays their first show in nearly 10 years at the Knitting Factory Sunday. The show sold out in minutes, ma king it one of fastest-selling events ever for the venue.

48 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

Three of the band’s eight albums stand out as necessary listens, and they are your homework: Dig Me Out (1997) is the band’s third release and first with Weiss on board. Her arrival marked the rise of Sleater-Kinney as a band that needed to be heard. It is the springboard for all that follow. Best songs: “One More Hour,” “Turn It On,” “Little Babies.”


One Beat (2002) captures a band whose members are maturing personally just as the country comes to grips with 9/11. A prime example is “Far Away,” as Tucker reflects on watching the towers fall on TV as her newborn baby sleeps nearby. Best songs: “Oh!,” “Step Aside,” “Combat Rock.” No Cities to Love (2015) is not just a new set of songs thrown out to the world so Sleater-Kinney can hit the road and play the old “hits.” The 10 songs blaze by in just more than a half-hour, and are as urgent and moving as anything the trio released before the hiatus. Best songs: “Price Tag,” “Surface Envy,” “Bury Our Friends.”

SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS

Each member released music during the band’s break, working with other musicians. The Corin Tucker Band’s Kill My Blues album, released in 2012, is excellent. Brownstein and Weiss also teamed up in a supergroup of sorts, Wild Flag, along with Ex Hex’s Mary Timony and the Minders’ Rebecca Cole; the band’s self-titled album was one of the best of 2011.

FIELD TRIP

Intimate knowledge of Sleater-Kinney is best gleaned by seeing the band live. On stage is where they truly shine. Tucker’s vocal power is stunning, and Brownstein’s pliable voice (complete with faux-British accent!) is a perfect counterpoint as she harmonizes or trades lines with her fellow frontwoman. Brownstein also is a joyful presence, full of Townshend-style windmills and excited jumps as she plays. Likewise, Weiss’ intricate playing on the drums and skill as a third vocalist truly shine in concert. Consider a Sleater-Kinney show a must-see to successfully navigate this course.

GRADING

In the spirit of the freewheeling school where Sleater-Kinney got started, no final grades will be issued. The only “test” is attendance at one of the band’s shows (that is, if you can find tickets).

AUTOMATIC DEDUCTIONS

Anyone who yells “Put a bird on it!” at a gig because they love Brownstein on Portlandia will be subjected to exaggerated eye rolls from nearby crowd members.

YOUR INSTRUCTOR

I don’t have a Ph.D. in Sleater-Kinney, but I’m a longtime student in the field. I’ve driven 6,146 miles to see five Sleater-Kinney shows, including the last before their hiatus on Aug. 12, 2006 in Portland.n Sleater-Kinney and Lizzo • Sun, Feb. 8, at 8 pm • Sold out • Allages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory. com • 244-3279 ...continued on next page

FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 49


MUSIC | ROCK

nn ive

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Prepare for Bullets or Balloons’ CD release party to get sweaty and loud.

Miles Apart

From their corners of the universe, Bullets or Balloons converge to play raucous, intelligent punk rock BY LAURA JOHNSON

C

ory Mason-Phipps is sprinkling salt into his bandmate’s last sips of ice water. “I was waiting until you noticed,” Mason-Phipps says with a mischievous smile after Aaron Anderberg balks. These guys haven’t seen each other since Bullets or Balloons’ most recent Spokane show in December when they “meet up” — Mason-Phipps and Anderberg in person and Chris Henderson (aka Papa Bear, who is 10 years older than the others) via speakerphone — at O’Doherty’s in Spokane Valley last weekend. Yet this morning, squished into a booth with bits of toast and egg lingering on their breakfast plates and an iPhone in the middle of the table, it’s like they haven’t skipped a beat. “We don’t have to see each other that much to make this work,” says Mason-Phipps, who admits he can act like a pre-teen trapped in a 26-year-old’s body. “That’s the beauty of this band.” The band formed in Spokane Valley three years ago after each previously worked the local scene for nearly a decade with Mistress and the Misters, Cyrus Fell Down and Richard Dryfish. They’ve since spread out to Coeur d’Alene (Anderberg) and Olympia (Henderson). This makes regular practices somewhat of a challenge. But the band is a huge priority for the trio, who often take weekends off from their full-time jobs to gig. Saturday night, they release their sophomore album, Lifestyle Toxins, recorded at Nieman Sound in Spokane, kicking off a Northwest tour at the

Big Dipper. “When we get together we get so much more done,” Anderberg says. “More than other bands I’ve been in that practiced twice a week.” When they’re in the same physical space, Bullets or Balloons crafts a sound that teeters between garage, punk and math rock. Henderson mightily hollers out fierce vocals, Anderberg expertly picks and prods his bass and MasonPhipps keeps it all together, beating the hell out of his drum kit. It’s music, written together, that finds purpose in stop-and-go rhythms and scuzzy yet intricate harmonies. No song ever scratches the three-minute mark. Their lyrics, artfully crafted by Henderson and sometimes parodied by Mason-Phipps on band road trips, touch on the absurdities of the American way — like the song “Shuffle,” which includes the line: “Ask not what you can do for your country / Ask what your country is doing to you.” But never taking themselves too seriously, they also have an older song titled “Aaron’s Ass.” “These are the best musicians I’ve found anywhere,” Henderson says from the phone, while his friends shrug it off. “It helps that we like each other.” n lauraj@inlander.com Bullets or Balloons CD release party with Blackwater Prophet and the Bight • Sat, Feb. 7, at 8 pm • $8/$10 day of • All-ages • Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • bigdipperevents.com • 863-8098


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FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 51


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

ELECTRONIC ODESZA

T

here’s no hotter electronic music act in the state of Washington than Odesza, and with good reason: The Seattle duo of Harrison Mills and Clayton Knight doesn’t craft the type of aggressively cheesy dubstep or gratingly repetitive trap that’s been a hallmark of the recent EDM boom. Odesza isn’t about building tension before letting the beat drop, but gently caressing the listener in a warm sonic blanket. The sunny and melodic chillwave sound found on 2012’s Summer’s Gone and last year’s In Return almost seems like a therapeutically relaxing alternative to the Skrillexes of the world. As a result, Odesza’s live shows (which now sell out on a regular basis) carry an air of jubilant celebration; it truly feels like a blissful dance party, rather than merely a throng of sweaty bodies piled on top of one another, throbbing to the same beats over and over. — SETH SOMMERFELD Odesza with Little People and Big Wild • Thu, Feb. 12, at 8 pm • Sold out • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 224-3279

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 02/05

J The Big DiPPeR, Turkuaz BOOMeRS CLASSiC ROCK BAR & gRiLL, Randy Campbell acoustic show J BuCeR’S COFFeehOuSe PuB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen BuCKhORn inn, Spokane River Band CheCKeRBOARD BAR, Lost Dogma COeuR D’ALene CASinO, PJ Destiny The hAnDLe BAR, Saint John and the Revelations J The hOP!, Karma to Burn, Sierra, Mojave Wizard JOhn’S ALLey, DJ DarkBlood J LAgunA CAFé, Just Plain Darin LeFTBAnK Wine BAR, Nick Grow J Luxe COFFeehOuSe, Particlehead O’ShAy’S, Open mic ReD ROOM LOunge, Left Over Soul ROADhOuSe COunTRy ROCK BAR, Luke Jaxon The ViKing BAR AnD gRiLL, Tommy G ZOLA, Phil Lamb Band

Friday, 02/06

BeVeRLy’S, Robert Vaughn J The Big DiPPeR, KYRS Benefit feat. Wild Rabbit, Brown’s Mountain Boys BigFOOT PuB, Scorpius BLACK DiAMOnD, DJ Major One BOLO’S, Uppercut BOOMeRS CLASSiC ROCK BAR & gRiLL, Dragonfly BOWL’Z BiTeZ AnD SPiRiTZ, Likes Girls The CeLLAR, Dog House Boys J ChATeAu RiVe, Adrian Legg COeuR D’ALene CASinO, Donnie Emerson & Nancy Sophia CuRLey’S, Shiner eAgLe’S LODge (489-3030), The Bobby Bremer Band FeDORA PuB, Kicho

52 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

ROCK PETER RIVERA

S

pokane is a long way from Motown, but that suits Peter Rivera just fine. As the original lead singer and drummer for Motown blues rock band Rare Earth, Rivera scored three Top 10 hits in the early 1970s: “Get Ready,” “I Just Want to Celebrate” and “(I Know) I’m Losing You.” But things soon came crashing down in the typical fashion of the time — a cocktail of copious drug use and record label strife. These days the rhythm of Spokane fits Rivera better than the fast-paced rock ’n’ roll lifestyle. Even after all these years, he still remains ever sharp and productive. While his sound has matured and mellowed somewhat with age, he thankfully hasn’t lost touch with his funky side. Rivera and his band head to Chateau Rive at the Flour Mill to celebrate the arrival of his new album It Is What It Is with a Spokane CD release show. — SETH SOMMERFELD Peter Rivera • Sat, Feb. 7, at 8 pm • $10 • All-ages • Chateau Rive • 621 W. Mallon • chateaurive.com • 795-2030

FiZZie MuLLigAnS, Crybaby gRAnDe ROnDe CeLLARS, Barry Aiken and North Point J heARTWOOD CenTeR (208-2638699), Bridges Home CD Release Show iROn hORSe BAR, Chris Rieser and Snap the Nerve JOhn’S ALLey, Lost Dogma JOneS RADiATOR, Dionbox, Jordan Collins LeFTBAnK Wine BAR, Carey Brazil MAx AT MiRABeAu, Ticking Time Bomb The MeMBeRS LOunge (703-7115), DJ Selone and DJ Eaze MOOSe LOunge, Karma’s Circle neCTAR TASTing ROOM, Dan Conrad nORTheRn QueST CASinO, Foghat, DJ Ramsin, DJ Freaky Fred nORThWeST MuSeuM OF ARTS & CuLTuRe (456-3931), Mike Ross PenD D’OReiLLe WineRy, Ruff Shod

PenD OReiLLe PLAyhOuSe (4479900), Open Mic J ReVeL 77 (280-0518), BBBBandits, Stucco, Vibration ROADhOuSe COunTRy ROCK BAR, Olson Brothers The ViKing BAR AnD gRiLL, Saint John and the Revelations ZOLA, The Village

Saturday, 02/07

J The BARTLeTT, Kris Orlowski, Hollow Wood, Runaway Symphony BeVeRLy’S, Robert Vaughn J The Big DiPPeR, Bullets or Balloons CD release party (See story on page 50), Blackwater Prophet, the Bight BigFOOT PuB, Scorpius BLACK DiAMOnD, DJ Jimmy Warren BOLO’S, Uppercut BOOMeRS CLASSiC ROCK BAR & gRiLL, Dragonfly

J BOOTS BAKeRy & LOunge, Feral Anthem BOWL’Z BiTeZ AnD SPiRiTZ, Likes Girls The CeLLAR, Dog House Boys J ChAPS, Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston J ChATeAu RiVe, Peter Rivera album release show (See story above) CheCKeRBOARD BAR, Armed & Dangerous, Tommy G COeuR D’ALene CASinO, Donnie Emerson & Nancy Sophia COeuR D’ALene CeLLARS (208-6642336), Eric Neuhausser CuRLey’S, Shiner eAgLe’S LODge, The Bobby Bremer Band FiZZie MuLLigAnS, Crybaby gARLAnD PuB AnD gRiLL (3267777), Tracer geRMAn AMeRiCAn hALL (7470004), Fasching (German Mardi

Gras) Costume Party feat. the Kraut Stompers, the Garden Gnome Trio, DJ Crash The hAnDLe BAR, The Usual Suspects J The hOP!, Overdue, Heart Avail, Wicked Obsession, Damnit Jim, Lust for Glory J huCKLeBeRRy’S nATuRAL MARKeT (624-1349), Madeline McNeill iROn hORSe BAR, Chris Rieser and Snap the Nerve JOhn’S ALLey, Brother Gow J KniTTing FACTORy, The Best of Spokane feat. B Radicals, Rylei Franks, Quarter Monkey and more The LARiAT, Widow’s Creek LeFTBAnK Wine BAR, Karrie O’Neill MAx AT MiRABeAu, Ticking Time Bomb MOOSe LOunge (208-664-7901), Karma’s Circle nORTheRn QueST CASinO, DJ Ramsin, DJ Freaky Fred, DJ Patrick


ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, American Bonfire  THE SHOP, Tommy G SWAXX (703-7474), Q Dot THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Boat Race Weekend, Tumble Down Badger, Jason McKinney WILLOW SPRINGS (235-4420), SixStrings n’ Pearls ZOLA, Milonga

Sunday, 02/08

 THE BIG DIPPER, Matt Bacnis, Sarah Cameron Band THE CELLAR, Pat Coast COEUR D’ALENE CASINO, Kosh, Kicho

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander. com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church  THE HOP!, Hopeless Jack and the Handsome Devil, North Fork, Random Noise, Spirit Animal  KNITTING FACTORY, [SOLD OUT] Sleater-Kinney (See story on page 48), Lizzo

Monday, 02/09

 THE BIG DIPPER, The Bob Curnow Big Band  CALYPSOS, Open Mic

EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills  RICO’S, Open Mic UNDERGROUND 15, Open Mic ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 02/10

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, The Rub  THE BARTLETT, Wild Child, Desert Noises  THE BIG DIPPER, Otep, Terror Universal, Thira, Thirion X CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN (208-292-4813), Kosh FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Open-ness  KNITTING FACTORY, Hellyeah, Devour the Day, Like a Storm REPUBLIC BREWING CO., Portland Cello Project ZOLA, The Bucket List

Wednesday, 02/11  THE BARTLETT, Elliot Brood, Cathedral Pearls, Feral Anthem  CHAPS, Land of Voices with Dirk Swartz EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard GARLAND AVENUE DRINKERY (3155327), Open Mic with DJ Scratch n Smith GENO’S (368-9087), Open Mic with T&T JOHN’S ALLEY, Grant Farm JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop Jazz LA ROSA CLUB, Robert Beadling and Friends

THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Open Turntables Night with DJ Lydell LITZ’S (327-7092), Nick Grow LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 RED ROOM LOUNGE, Lucas Brown local night ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Spokane Dan and the Blues Blazers SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic ZOLA, The Bossame

Coming Up ...

THE HIVE, Pimps of Joytime, Feb. 12 CHATEAU RIVE, Wylie & the Wild West, Feb. 12 SPOKANE ARENA, Miranda Lambert with Justin Moore, Raelynn, Jukebox Mafia, Feb. 12 THE BARTLETT, The Lil’ Smokies, Folkinception, Feb. 12 THE BIG DIPPER, Sea Giant, Wild Pacific, Sean Thomas, K.O.S.H., Feb. 12  KNITTING FACTORY, [SOLD OUT], Odesza (See story on facing page), Little People Feb. 12 THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Griffey, Feb. 13 THE BIG DIPPER, Locksaw Cartel, Feb. 13 PINNACLE NORTHWEST, Felix Martin, Barishi, Stinking Lizaveta, Dyse, Feb. 13 THE BARTLETT, Portland Cello Project, Feb. 13-14 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Nicole Lewis Band, Feb. 13 JOHN’S ALLEY, The Lil’ Smokies,

Feb. 13 UNDERGROUND 15, Divides, Death By Pirates, Feb. 14 THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Big Mumbo Blues Band, Feb. 14 KNITTING FACTORY, Miss May I, August Burns Red, Northlane, Fit For A King, Erra, Feb. 14 THE BIG DIPPER, Carolyn Wonderland, Feb. 14 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Bill Medley of the Righteous Brothers, Christopher Cross, Feb. 14 BING CROSBY THEATER, [SOLD OUT] Lucinda Williams with the Kenneth Brian Band, Feb. 14 THE PALOMINO CLUB, Big Smo, Feb. 14 KNITTING FACTORY, Cancer Relief Benefit feat. Too Slim and the Taildraggers, Big Mumbo Blues Band, Smash hit Carnival, Nicole Lewis Band, the Sidemen, Bryan Warhall & Triple Trouble, Feb. 15 THE BIG DIPPER, Isreal Nash, Feb. 15 JOHN’S ALLEY, Joe Hertler & the Rainbow Seekers, Feb. 17 THE BARTLETT, Textbeak, K. Clifton, Bitwvlf, Saleswagon, Feb. 18 THE PALOMINO CLUB, [SOLD OUT] Granger Smith feat. Earl Dibbles Jr., Feb. 19 RED ROOM LOUNGE, Corina Coirna and the Muses, Feb. 20 THE BARTLETT, The Round No. 5 feat. Tyler Aker, Cold Mt Yeti and Ruth Henrickson, poet Devin Devine and visual artist Jesse Pierpoint, Feb. 20

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MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 THE BLIND BUCK • 204 N. Division • 290-6229 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HANDLE BAR • 12005 E. Trent Ave.• 474-0933 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 456-5678 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 624-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NECTAR• 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO CLUB • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St • 443-5213 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 THE ROCK BAR • 13921 E. Trent Ave. • 43-3796 ROCKER ROOM • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 ROCKET MARKET • 726 E. 43rd Ave. • 343-2253 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 UNDERGROUND 15 • 15 S. Howard St. • 290-2122 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON • 1914 N. Monroe St. • 474-9040 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 53


THEATER PIRATES TAKE THE BING

The Bing kicks off its new Stage to Screen film series with Robert Louis Stevenson’s classic murder-money-mutiny tale Treasure Island. This new adaptation from controversial Frozen (no, not that Frozen) playwright Bryony Lavery is broadcast from London’s National Theatre and features all the piratecentric mayhem we’d expect. Presented by the nonprofit theater booster Friends of the Bing, the four-part Stage to Screen series aims to make top-tier live theatre more accessible to Spokane residents by bringing these faraway classics to the Bing’s screen at a fair price. Watch for upcoming screenings of Of Mice and Men, Great Expectations and Caesar and Cleopatra later this spring. — TRACE WILLIAM COWEN Stage to Screen Film Series: Treasure Island • Sun, Feb. 8, at 2 pm • $15 ($5 student) • Bing Crosby Theater • 901 W. Sprague • bingcrosbytheater.com • 227-7638

SPORTS BELLES ON WHEELS

If you’re feeling post-Super Bowl withdrawal and need a new outlet for your sports addiction, make your way to the Lilac City Roller Girls’ ninth season kickoff bout and discover a new favorite pastime. If you’re new to the roller derby scene, this is the perfect time to become a fan by supporting these fierce female athletes. The night begins with the Lilac City Pixies’ bout. Then cheer on the Lilac City Roller Girls as they battle it out with Overbeaters Anonymous. — COURTNEY BREWER Lilac City Roller Girls season opener • Sat, Feb. 7, at 5:30 pm • $8/$10 • Spokane Convention Center • 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. • ticketswest.com

54 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

WORDS CREATIVITY UNITES

More and more these days, our region’s creative minds are inclined to get together and showcase their talents as a collaborative force, rather than at events focused on just one mode of expression. Enter Anthology, RiverLit’s annual showcase of poetry, prose, music and comedy. The slate of performers on deck this weekend reads like a who’s who of Spokane’s top creative minds. Most intriguing, perhaps, is a bad poetry contest hosted by the Lilac City’s poet laureate, Thom Caraway. RiverLit also plans to announces its writer, poet and artist in residence for 2015. — CHEY SCOTT Anthology • Fri, Feb. 6, at 7 pm • $10 • All-ages • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • riverlit.com


4 SHOWS

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Email getlisted@inlander.com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

ON ONE NIGHT

PROFESSIONAL WORKSHOPS

WITH ARTISTS

STUDENT PERFORMANCES

AND MORE!

FEB. 26, 2015

WORDS READ WITH US

Community reading programs are no stranger to the Inland Northwest. Spokane is Reading takes place every fall, and another read-together initiative is happening right now thanks to the Spokane County Library District. The Big Read, a program of the National Endowment of the Arts, serves to encourage broad participation in reading by getting a city to read a specific book. Spokane’s chosen book is Jack London’s epic classic The Call of the Wild. Throughout the month, the community can dig even deeper into the American writer’s life and his works through book discussions, cinema, panels, music and activities. The program kicks off Sunday with an educational performance on London’s life. — CHEY SCOTT The Big Read: An Evening with Jack London • Sun, Feb. 8, at 6 pm • Free • CenterPlace Event Center • 2426 N. Discovery Pl., Spokane Valley • scld.org • 688-0300

Meschiya Lake

Bria Skonberg

& The Little Big Horns & The All-Star Quartet

Thursday

ARTISTS

The Airmen of Note

Holly Hofmann w/

Mike Wofford & Flutology

Visit www.uidaho.edu/jazzfest For Ticket Info: (208) 885-7212

INSIDE THE NEW INHEALTH MAGAZINE

Finding Balance Mixing Wellness with Work 10 ways to boost your confidence OUTDOORS MUSH!

For lovers of the outdoors, the Inland Empire Sled Dog Association hosts an unusual sporting experience this weekend. This year’s 46th annual Priest Lake Sled Dog Races may be the best collection of races yet, with mushers and dogs from all over the Northwest competing in sprint, distance, middistance, and skijoring (aka dog-pulled skiing) categories for championship titles. If you make it up to the picturesque race setting on Saturday, catch the dedicated and inevitably adorable Pee Wee mushers (ages 4-8) as they take their turn on the trail. It’s a great event to haul the whole family to, and with such a variety of races to see, there’s bound to be an exhilarating moment for everyone. — KAITLYN ANSON Priest Lake Sled Dog Races • Sat, Feb. 7, at 8:30 am; Sun, Feb. 8, at 8 am • $2/person or $5/car • Ravin Ranch Rd. and Hwy. 57, Priest Lake, Idaho • iesda.org • 509-863-7620

Wellness Power Of essential oils

On stands now! Available online at inhealthnw.com Get your copy at medical offices, fitness centers, and select Inlander rack locations

FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 55


RELATIONSHIPS

Advice Goddess RAnt’S tomb

AMY ALKON

I’m a woman in my early 20s. I do fine getting dates, but only first dates. And no, I’m not having sex with guys on the first date, but I still never hear from them again. I ran into one of these guys at a party and begged him to tell me what had gone wrong. He said, “You’re kind of intense.” I asked him to explain, and he said, “You do a lot of talking.” I do talk a lot, but I’m informed and opinionated. Do I really have to be some mute little woman to get second dates? —Man Repellant

On a date, you should merely be splashing your personality around, tempted as you may be to hold a guy down and try to drown him in it. This isn’t to say you have to be “some mute little woman” to get a second date. Consider that there’s a middle ground between channeling Nancy Grace and playing a shy geisha hiding behind her fan. And sorry, but being “informed” and “opinionated” does not give you a pass to turn a date into a re-education camp with wine and entrees. In fact, this sort of conversational takeover is like a toupee; it usually ends up calling attention to whatever it was supposed to cover up (selfworth issues, nervousness, or maybe a need to push people away, despite putting yourself out there like you want a relationship). To see more of these guys than their exhaust as they drive away forever, be mindful of the purpose of a date: getting to know somebody, not getting to know how they look listening to you. As for all this information you’re excited to impart, ironically, the way you get somebody interested in listening to you is by showing interest in them. You do that by listening to them — really listening (from the gut, not just nodding while waiting for them to take a breath so you can shoehorn in your next point). Being willing to share the conversational space isn’t a sign you’re some empty dress of a woman; quite the contrary. It’s what secure people do — connecting with others instead of pepper-spraying them with words. Try an experiment on your next few dates. Say as little as possible about yourself all evening. Answer questions about yourself when asked, but focus on asking your date about who he is and what he thinks. Chances are, you’ll have a much better time and maybe get asked on some second and third dates. Wonderful things can happen when you give a man the sense that there’s a real reason for him to be there — as opposed to the idea that he could have stayed home and, in his place, sent a giant ear.

MERCHANT OF VROOM

Four or five months ago, I had an amazing dinner date with this guy. I ended up sleeping with him afterward, and he disappeared. Out of the blue, he contacted me, wanting to take me to dinner. How do I know he won’t pull the same jerko Houdini move? —Suspicious When you’re on a first date and you’d like there to be a second date, it’s okay to leave a little lipstick on the rim of the glass. Your face should not end up smeared across the guy’s pillow. Sure, there are couples who had sex on (or even before) the first date and have spent the next 67.3 years living happily ever after. But if you’re a woman wanting a relationship, be mindful that sex on the first date is a risky strategy. As researcher Anne Campbell dryly put it, “Women’s mate value is perceived to be low if they are willing to agree to low-cost sex” (as in, casual sex). A man will probably take it if he can get it — but he’s likely to, as they say, “sex it and exit.” As for this guy, he’s already shown you that he IS someone who pulls “jerko Houdini” moves, with not so much as a texted “thx 4 putting out!!” the last time. If despite that, you agree to see him again, what prevents him from disappearing after sex is your ending the evening with your clothes on instead of on his bedroom rug. Unfortunately, the heat of the moment tends not to be home to Spock-like rationality and reserve. To guide how soon you’ll get naked, go into a date with your ultimate goal in mind — whether you have what anthropologists call a “long-term mating strategy” or whether you aren’t so much looking for Mr. Right as you are Mr. Right Next To You At The Bar. n ©2015, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

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EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

MEALS ON WHEELS CINN-A-GRAM FUNDRAISER Meals on Wheels Spokane’s annual Valentine’s Day fundraiser, with fresh cinnamon roll gift baskets delivered on Feb. 12. Each purchase funds hot meals for five local seniors. Order by Feb. 9 to ensure delivery. $30. mowspokane.org (232-0864) PUBLIC INTEREST LAW PROJECT AUCTION An 1920s-themed fundraiser gala, including GPILP’s 26th silent/live auction. Includes dinner and a reception. Proceeds fund Gonzaga Law Students who work unpaid summer internships with organizations serving clients with historically unmet legal needs. Feb. 6, 6-11 pm. $25-$30. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone. law.gonzaga.edu (328-4220) DISHMAN HILLS CONSERVANCY CELEBRATION The DHC hosts a dinner, silent auction and overview of 2014 accomplishments, outstanding volunteer work and new lands and trails to explore. Feb. 6, 5:30-9 pm. $22-$25. Women’s Club, 1428 W. 9th. dishmanhills.org/event-1797694 (999-5100) SPOKANE TRIBAL COLLEGE DINNER & AUCTION An event featuring cultural presentations of dancers, visual artists, live music and fine dining, with proceeds benefiting the Spokane Tribal College. Includes a silent and live auction. Feb. 7, 5-8 pm. $60/person. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. spokanetribalcollege.org/ events (326-1700 or 218-7278) GO RED FOR WOMEN LUNCHEON The American Heart Association’s annual awareness campaign and auction, featuring health screenings, an expo, auction, fashion show and keynote presentation by Olympic Gold Medalist Ariana Kukors. Feb. 11, 9:30 am. $125/person. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanegoredluncheon.ahaevents.org PUPPY LOVE Spokane Humane Society’s annual Valentine’s Day-themed fundraiser includes a silent auction and a flight of five Washington wines, with appetizers. Feb. 11. $10-$15. Nectar Tasting Room, 120 N. Stevens. spokanehumanesociety.org (467-5253 x 212) SPOKANE VALLEY PARTNERS’ BENEFIT CONCERT Ninth annual benefit concert, titled “From the Heart,” featuring local professional and amateur singers and dancers. $10/adults; $5/age 12 and under; $30/family. (+$2 at the door.) Feb. 13, 7-9 pm. St. Joseph’s Parish, 4521 N. Arden Rd. (926-7133) A TASTE OF HOPE The ISAAC Foundation’s 8th annual benefit event features samplings of wines, brews, spirits, chocolates and specialty foods, while raising money to fund therapy grants for local children diagnosed with autism. Feb. 13. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln. theisaacfoundation.org

COMEDY

GABRIEL IGLESIAS The nationallyrecognized comedian performs as part of his “Unity Through Laughter Tour.” Feb. 5, 8 pm. $35-$65. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000) STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. bluznews.com (483-7300)

IMPROV LAB The Blue Door players try out new material on stage, monthly on the first Friday (Feb. 6), at 10 pm. Not rated. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. bluedoortheatre.com SAFARI Short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Not rated.) Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland. (747-7045) SCHOOL OF IMPROVISED COMEDY Teen classes ($25) are offered the first Saturday of the month, from 11:30 am-2 pm. Ages 11-18. Adult classes available throughout the year; see site for more info. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) LIVE COMEDY Live stand-up comedy shows. Sundays at 9 pm. Goodtymes, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070) OPEN MIC COMEDY Wednesdays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Brooklyn Deli & Lounge, 122 S. Monroe. (835-4177)

COMMUNITY

FREE TAX PREPARATION IRS-certified volunteers are available to assist those who earn less than $52,427 in preparing and e-filing their taxes at eight locations throughout Spokane County. Sites remain open through April 15; times and locations vary. unitedwayspokane. org (353-4851) NAT’L REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES PUBLIC MEETING A community meeting to provide park users, stakeholders, and the general public information about the Spokane Parks and City/County Historic Landmarks Commission’s new Multiple Property Submission process. Feb. 5, 6 pm. Free and open to the public. Finch Arboretum, W. 3404 Woodlawn Blvd. (363-5462) FAMILY DANCE & POTLUCK A family contra dance, with all steps called and taught by Susan Dankovich, with live music by the Family Dance Band. Potluck begins at 6:30 pm, dance at 7 pm. Feb. 6, 6:30 pm. Donations accepted. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. (533-9955) TAKE & GIVE SEED LIBRARY: The branch hosts its seed library kick-off, seed swap and a seed propagation class with Master Gardener Steve Nokes. Feb. 7, from 10:30 am-noon. Events centered to come include vegetable gardening, composing and seed to harvest workshops, on Feb. 14, 21, 28 and March 3. See site for more details. free. Otis Orchards Library, 22324 E. Wellesley Ave. scld.org (893-8390) ORGANIZE YOUR FINANCES STCU experts share how to develop an efficient bill-pay system, records to keep and for how long, what to keep handy in case of disaster, and where to go for help. Light dinner provided. Feb. 10, 6:307:30 pm. Free, RSVP requested. Moran Prairie Library, 6004 S. Regal. stcu.org/ workshops (344-2202) SPOKANE FOLKLORE CONTRA DANCE Weekly Wednesday community dance, with Arvid Lundin and Deep Roots playing; Larry Simmons calling. No partner needed; fun for all ages. Beginner workshop at 7:15 pm. Feb. 11, 7:309:30 pm. $5-$7. Spokane Women’s Club, 1428 W. Ninth. spokanefolklore. org (747-2640) MISSION AVE. PROJECT MEETING The community is invited to review updated plans and discuss landscaping options for a project on Mission Ave. from Flora to Barker Rds. Feb. 11, 5:30 pm. Free. Greenacres Christian Church, 18010 E. Mission Ave. (720-5001)

PROTECT YOUR CREDIT SCORE STCU experts show how a credit score is determined, how to earn and maintain a healthy credit score, and where to go for help. Light lunch provided. Feb. 11, 12-1 pm. Free, RSVP requested. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry. stcu.org/ workshops (344-2202) WHO DONE IT? Was it really Professor Plum in the library with the candlestick? Or could it be Miss Scarlet in the kitchen with the rope? Put your detective skills to the test and find out how Mr. Body met his end in a life-size game of Clue. Feb. 11, 4 pm. Free. Spokane Valley Library, 12004 E. Main. (893-8400) CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM IN SPOKANE Panelists with Smart Justice Spokane discuss alternatives to mass incarceration. Smart Justice Spokane calls for racial equity, non-arrest and non-jail solutions, culturally appropriate mental health and chemical dependency treatment, restructuring the system and providing employment solutions. Feb. 12, 3:30 pm. Free and open to the public. EWU Monroe Hall, 526 Fifth St, Cheney. (359-6200) MILLENNIAL MEETUP: YOGA NIGHT An evening of healthy-living talks, snacks and a yoga session. Beginners and experts welcome, bring a mat if you have one. Millennial night is for adults in their 20s and 30s. Feb. 12, 7-8:30 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. (208-769-2315) VALENTINE’S CONTRA DANCE Featuring live music by Arvid Lundin & Deep Roots, with Emily Faulkner calling. Beginners lesson at 7 pm. Dances held every second Friday through July. Feb. 13, 7-10 pm. $5 suggested donation. Sandpoint Community Hall, 204 S. First Ave. cityofsandpoint.com (208-263-6751) DOG PEOPLE BLOOD DRIVE The third annual community event lets pet owners and their dogs both donate blood to help save lives in the community. Dogs are screened to see if they’re eligible to become donors; humans donate to the INBC. Eligible dogs must be: over 60 lbs; 1-6 years old; happy and healthy. Feb. 14, 1-5 pm. Free. Lincoln Heights Veterinary Clinic, 2829 E. 27th Ave. lhvetclinic.com (535-3551)

FESTIVAL

DARWIN ON THE PALOUSE A free annual event to celebrate humanity, science and rational thought. This year’s guest speakers: Dr. Karen James and Steve Olson. Join the “Bipedal Bash,” the Darwin on the Palouse afterparty at One World Cafe in downtown Moscow. Feb. 7, 6:30-9 pm. Free. University of Idaho Admin Building, 851 Campus Dr. darwinonthepalouse.org (208-301-3478) FASCHING COSTUME PARTY A German Mardi Gras celebration, with food, dancing, a costume contest and more. Also featuring the Kraut Stompers, the Garden Gnome Trio and DJ Crash. Feb. 7, 7-11 pm. $12. German American Hall, 25 W. Third. (891-0538)

FILM

SPOKANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL SpIFF kicks off on Feb. 5 with the showing of “Living is Easy (with Eyes Closed),” at AMC River Park Square, followed by the SpIFF Opening Reception. Festival events continue through Feb. 14. Varies. spokanefilmfestival.org (720-7743) SLAVERY BY ANOTHER NAME Gonza-


ga’s Unity Multicultural Education Center and Black Student Union host a screening of the film based on the Pulitzer Prizewinning book by Douglas Blackmon, with a post-film discussion. Feb. 6, 7 pm. Free and open to the public. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone. unityhouse@gonzaga. edu (313-5836) SPOKANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL GALA The opening gala includes two film screenings, “Queens of the Roleo” and “Dryland,” with the opening party to follow. Feb. 6, 7 pm-midnight. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. spokanefilmfestival.org (720-7743) LEONARD A. OAKLAND FILM FESTIVAL The 7th annual festival showcases an independent film (2/7; Bing Crosby Theater) in partnership with SpIFF, a documentary (2/21), and an international film (3/7). Late-night offerings are two popular films from the 1980s. Free. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. whitworth.edu/oaklandfestival (777-4605) ROCKY HORROR ROMANCE A special midnight showing of the campy cult classic, featuring the Absolute Pleasure shadow cast, Virgin Ceremony and prop bags. Feb. 7, midnight. $5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. (327-1050) ENGAGING CONVERSATIONS MOVIE NIGHT A weekly event to discuss societal, political and/or spiritual issues. This week includes a screening of “Syriana,” a film is based on the ever growing peak oil crises and its inner workings. Feb. 8, 7-10 pm. Free. Liberty Park Methodist Church, 1526 E. 11th. tinyurl.com/lhx29ra (503-910-0475) TOTALLY TUBULAR TUESDAYS The Garland’s classic old-school movie series,

every Tuesday at 7 pm. See website for schedule of upcoming films. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland Ave. garlandtheater.com (509-327-1050) HITS One-night screening of David Cross’ new dark comedy. Pay-what-you-can entry. Feb. 12, 9 pm. Magic Lantern Theatre, 25 W. Main. magiclanternspokane.com (209-2383) VALENTINE MOVIE WITH WINE An evening of chocolate and wine during a screening of the film “Chocolat” (rated PG-13). Adults only. Feb. 12, 6:30 pm. Free. Pilgrim’s Natural Market, 1316 N. Fourth, CdA. (208-676-9730) GIRL ON A BICYCLE Paolo, an Italian who drives a Paris tour bus, has just proposed to his true love, the German stewardess, Greta, when the young French beauty, Cécile pulls up beside his bus on her bicycle... much drama ensues. Feb. 13-14, times vary. $5-$7. Panida Theater, 300 N. First, Sandpoint. (208-255-7801) THE SNOW LESS TRAVELED Nine films from the Winter Wildlands Alliance’s Backcountry Film Festival come to CdA for one night only. Feb. 13, 7-9 pm. $7. Coeur d’Alene Eagles, 209 Sherman Ave. (208-265-9565)

FOOD & DRINK

GLUTEN-FREE BAKING CLASS Rachel Carlyle Edington, owner of Gluten Free Mama Kitchen, teaches how to make gluten-free whoopie pies and more. Feb. 5, 6:30-8 pm. $10, reservations required. Pilgrim’s Natural Market, 1316 N. Fourth St. (208-676-9730) MAKE IT SWEET Master how to consistently create moist cakes, then learn the

art of butter cream icing, borders and fondant. Feb. 5, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) GLOBAL BUBBLY Sample champagne from France, Prosecco from Italy plus, Methode Champenios bubbly from Washington State, California, Australia and beyond Feb. 6, 7 pm. $20, registration requested. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) SWEETHEART BREAKFAST A classic breakfast of french toast, waffles, biscuits and gravy, eggs and ham. Feb. 8, 8-11 am. $3-$6. Green Bluff Grange, 9809 Green Bluff Rd. (979-2607) KNOW YOUR FARMER, KNOW YOUR FOOD Meet local farmers/ranchers and learn about their work and the benefits of eating locally grown food. Program includes a light supper. Sponsored by the Inland Northwest Food Network. Feb. 10, 5:30-7:30 pm. Free; pre-registration required. University of Idaho Kootenai County Extension, 1808 N. Third, CdA. InFarmU.org (503-307-4505) APRES SKI PARTY The Inlander, Alaskan Brewing Co. and Wintersport host a ski party offering giveaways, food/beer specials, the shotski and free hot waxes for your skis and boards. Feb. 13, 5-9 pm. Free. Selkirk Pizza & Tap House, 12424 N. Division. tinyurl.com/lm4yw6w (464-3644) THE CHOCOLATE AFFAIR A chocolate competition and tasting event, with sampling hosted at local businesses in downtown Coeur d’Alene. Open to professional and home chocolate makers. Feb. 13, 5-8 pm. $10/person; $15/couple. Downtown CdA. cdadowntown.com (208-415-0116) MEDITERRANEAN SMALL PLATES Chef

Laurie Faloon teaches a class on classic tapas, meze and antipasti influenced by the Mediterranean palate. Feb. 13, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene. (533-8141) RED WINE & CHOCOLATE Red wines paired with selections from the Rocket’s gourmet chocolate offerings. Feb. 13 and 14, at 7 pm. $30, registration requested. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd. rocketmarket.com (343-2253) VALENTINE’S RESTAURANT NIGHT The Commellini Estate hosts its annual Valentine’s Day dinner night ($45/person), its most popular of the year. Reservations available from 5-9 pm. Also includes early and late-night happy hours, from 3-5 pm and 9-11 pm. Commellini Estate, 14715 N. Dartford Dr. commellini.com (466-0667) VALENTINE’S EVE DINNER Ninth annual multi-course dinner the night before Valentine’s Day. Each course paired with a wine selected by Vino! owner John Allen. Feb. 13, 6:30 pm. $75/person; reservations required. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside. spokaneclub.org (838-1229) VINO & CHOCOLATE GALA Wine and chocolates are served at an art reception. Reservations requested by Feb. 11. Feb. 13, 6-9 pm. $10. Avenue West Gallery, 707 W. Main Ave. (838-4999) COOKING CLASSES AT GREENBRIAR Class topics include edible gifts, creole/ cajun cooking, asian food, hearty dinners, Latin food, soups and more. Classes on Feb. 14, 28, March 7, 14, 21, 28, and April 4, 11, 18 from 11 am-1:30 pm. $45. Greenbriar Inn, 315 Wallace Ave, CdA. greenbriarcatering.com (208-667-9660) COOKING DEMO WITH J.L. FIELDS J.L.

Fields samples recipes from her new cookbook, “Vegan Pressure Cooking” and also signs copies and chats with customers. Feb. 14, 1-3 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) AFTER-DINNER VALENTINE’S DRINKS Enoteca offers cheese and cupcakes matched with wine flights, and other drink specials. Feb. 14, 6 pm-midnight. Prices vary. Enoteca, 112 E. Seltice Way, Ste. C, Post Falls. (208-457-9885) FOUNDRY VINYARDS WINE DINNER Multi-course wine dinner featuring a menu of smoked trout crostini, pork chops, cheese pasta terrine and more. Feb. 15, 4-7 pm. $60 plus gratuity/tax. 315 Martinis and Tapas, 315 Wallace Ave., CdA. (208-667-9660)

MUSIC

JESSE COOK Concert by the renowned Flamenco guitarist. Feb. 5, 8 pm. $45$55. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) CLARINETIST & COMPOSER JAMES FALZONE A recital by the multi-faceted clarinetist/composer, an acclaimed member of Chicago’s jazz and creative improvised music scene, a veteran contemporary music lecturer and clinician. Feb. 6, 8 pm. Free and open to the public. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. whitworth.edu (777-3280) RANI ARBO & DAISY MAYHEM Known for their infectious energy, virtuoso playing and warm stage presence, Rani Arbo & daisy mayhem draw from the deep well of American roots music. Feb. 6, 7:30 pm. $8-$16. Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, WSU Pullman Campus. (335-8522)

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EVENTS | CALENDAR SPOKANE SYMPHONY MASTER CLASSES A one-on-one opportunity for local music students to learn from Symphony guest violinist Benjamin Beilman. Open for audience enjoyment. Feb. 6, 3-5 pm. Free. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) SPOKANE SYMPHONY CLASSICS NO. 6 “Tchaikovsky” features guest violinist Benjamin Beilman and guest Conductor Robert Moody, for the concert program of Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 4. Feb. 7 at 8 pm and Feb. 8 at 3 pm. Prices vary. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) FERRIS JAZZ NIGHT Concert featuring the jazz ensembles from Ferris High School, rated as one of the top programs in the region. Feb. 9, 7 pm. Free. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) AN EVENING WITH JUDY COLLINS The Grammy-award winning singer-songwriter in concert, accompanied by her pianist. Feb. 11, 7:30 pm. $37-$67 (VIP). Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) JAY OLLERO DINNER CONCERT A seated concert paired with food from The Black Cypress. Ticket price includes food; 18+ event. Feb. 12, 5:30-8 pm. $60. BellTower, 125 SE Spring St., Pullman. facebook.com/TheBellTower (334-4195) “PYSCHO” WITH THE SPOKANE SYMPHONY The Spokane Symphony’s new Assistant Conductor, Jorge Luis Uzcategui, makes his debut leading the Orchestra in Bernard Herrmann’s iconic score as live accompaniment to Alfred Hitchcock’s gripping film, “Psycho.” Feb. 12, 7:30 pm. $28-$49. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200) CANADIAN BRASS The Grammy-winning brass ensemble performs in concert. Feb. 13, 8 pm. $35. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000) LOVE ME TENDER: ELVIS TRIBUTE DINNER SHOW A dinner concert featuring Elvis Tribute artist Brad Mitchell. Dinner menu includes bistro steak and shrimp and dessert. Feb. 13, 5:30 pm. $25-$49. Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. mirabeauparkhotel.com (924-9000) VALENTINE’S DESSERT BALL & SOCIAL Second annual fundraiser for the Northwest Christian Schools’ Band Dept. Ticket includes desserts, coffee and performances by the Tuxedo Junction Big Band and the NWC Jazz Band. Adult only, formal/semi-formal, non-alcoholic fundraiser. Feb. 13, 6-10 pm. $25. Service Station, 9315 N. Nevada St. (292-6700 x 224) WHITWORTH GOSPEL EXPLOSION Whitworth’s gospel choir performs alongside local churches’ during the annual gathering. Choirs in attendance include groups from Jesus is the Answer, Morning Star Baptist, and Holy Temple. Feb. 13, 7 pm. Free. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. (777-4345) LUCINDA WILLIAMS Rock/folk/blues/ country concert featuring the acclaimed songwriter and performer, joined by the Kenneth Brian Band. Feb. 14, 8 pm. $39$49. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) MET LIVE: TCHAIKOVSKY’S IOLANTA/ BARTOK’S BLUEBEARD’S CASTLE Soprano Anna Netrebko takes on another Tchaikovsky heroine in the first opera of this intriguing double bill, consisting of an enchanting fairy tale (Iolanta) fol-

58 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

lowed by an erotic psychological thriller (Duke Bluebeard’s Castle). Live simulcast runs 3 hrs. 40 min. Feb. 14, 9:30 am. $15$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St, Moscow. kenworthy.org/Met (208-882-4127) SWEETIE PIE BANQUET A catered dinner for two, live music, entertainment and more. Feb. 14, 6:30 pm. $50/person. Pend Oreille Playhouse, 240 N. Union Ave, Newport. pendorielleplayers.org (447-9900)

SPORTS & OUTDOORS

SNOWSHOE CAMP SEKANI Explore this old Boy Scout camp that was once a jamboree meeting point for many troops. Headlamps, walking poles, snowshoes, instruction and tasty hot chocolate provided. Feb. 6, 6-7:30 pm. $10. Camp Sekani, 67070 E. Upriver Dr. (625-6200) SPOKANE BRAVES HOCKEY Hockey matches; kids are free with each paid adult. $5/adults; $4/seniors and students with ID. Includes a beer garden, chucka-puck and music. Feb. 6. Eagles Ice-ARena, 6321 N. Addison. spokanebraves. com (489-9295) BATTLE OF WASHINGTON Spokane Anarchy Wrestling and North West Pro Stars face off in a live sporting event. Doors open at 5:30 pm. Feb. 7, 6 pm. Free. Swaxx, 25 E. Lincoln Rd. (703-7474) LILAC CITY ROLLER GIRLS SEASON OPENER The local women’s league kicks off its 9th season, with its “Hella Heartbreak” match, featuring the junior team, the Pixies, at 5:30 pm and the adult team at 7 pm. Feb. 7, 5:30-9 pm. $8/$10. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. tinyurl.com/plb36aq PRIEST LAKE SLED DOG RACES The 46th running of the races, with teams from around the Northwest competing. On the air strip across from the Priest Lake Ranger Station, affords spectators a fine view both of teams leaving/arriving back at the start area. Feb. 7-8, from 8:30 am-2 pm. $2/person; $5/car. Priest Lake, n/a. iesda.org (509-863-7620) WINTER RECREATION CLASSES North Idaho College at Sandpoint offers three, one-day, winter recreation classes: Animal Tracking and Sign Interpretation (Feb. 7); and Winter Birds of Prey (March 14). Sandpoint, Idaho. nic.edu/wtc (208769-3333) LANGLAUF CROSS-COUNTRY SKI RACE The 37th annual Spokane Langlauf is the Inland Empire’s oldest and most prestigious cross country ski race and the largest in the Pacific NW, attracting nearly 400 skiers. Feb. 8, 11 am-3 pm. $25. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanelanglauf.org SPOKANE BADMINTON CLUB Meets Sun, from 4:30-7 pm and Wed, from 7-10 pm. $8/visit. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt. (869-9229) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS CLUB Pingpong club meets Wed from 6:30-9 pm and Sun from 1:30-4:30 pm. $2/visit. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th. sites.google.com/site/spokanetabletennisclub/home (535-0803) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS Ping-pong club meets Mon and Wed, from 6-9 pm. $3/visit. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo Ave. spokanetabletennis.com KING OF THE CAGE “Short Fuse” mixed martial arts event featuring the KOTC Women’s Straweight title fight, Danielle Taylor vs. Glena Avila. Doors open at 6 pm. Feb. 12, 7 pm. Coeur d’Alene Casino,

37914 S Hwy 95. kingofthecage.com MT. SPOKANE NORDIC CUP The Mt. Spokane Nordic Cup is a Junior National Qualifier and U-14 Championship for teens ages 14-19. The cross-country ski race is held at the Mt. Spokane CrossCountry Ski Park. $20-$55. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanenordic.org (322-5082) SNOWSHOEING FOR BEGINNERS A local snowshoeing enthusiast shares all you need to know to start snowshoeing on the right foot, including necessary equipment, how to pack, and where to go locally. Event held as part of SCLD’s “The Big Read” program. Locations/ times vary; Feb. 14, 18, 22 and 26. Free. Spokane County Libraries, n/a. scld.org HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS A follow-up to the Globetrotters’ biggest tour ever last year. Feb. 17, 7 pm. $23-$98. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena. com (279-7000)

THEATER

DISNEY’S MULAN JR. Travel back in time to ancient China with Cataldo Catholic School Drama Program. Feb. 5-6, at 7 pm. $6.50. Ferris High School, 3020 E. 37th Ave. (624-8759) ORPHANS A psychological story of two orphaned brothers surviving in their rundown North Philadelphia row house. Through Feb. 22; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. In the Firth J. Chew Studio Theatre. $22. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre. com (325-2507) REASONS TO BE PRETTY Performance of the Neil Labute drama questioning the American obsession with beauty. Through Feb. 15; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $19-$25. The Modern Theater Spokane, 174 S. Howard. themoderntheater.org (509-455-7529) THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS Comedy farce, directed by Patrick Treadway. Through Feb. 8; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $18-$25. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. (325-2507) STATIONARY/STATIONERY Performance of a play by MFA candidate Vinecia Coleman. Feb. 4-7 at 7:30 pm, Feb. 8 at 2 pm. $10/public, free/students with ID. The Forge Theater, 404 Sweet Ave, Moscow. (208-885-2558) JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR This musical dramatizes the final days in the life of Jesus, presented with a fresh take using hip-hop style dance. Rated PG-13. Feb. 6-7; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $15. Gonzaga University Magnuson Theatre, 502 E. Boone. gonzaga.edu/theatrearts/ ourproductions (313-6553) THE TURN OF THE SCREW A Victorian psychological ghost story based by the novel by Henry James, adapted for the stage by Jeffrey Hatcher. Performed by Khouri Potts and Christopher Lamb. Feb. 6-8; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org (838-9727) STAGE TO SCREEN: TREASURE ISLAND Robert Louis Stevenson’s story of murder, money and mutiny is brought to life in a new stage adaptation by Bryony Lavery, broadcast live from the National Theatre. Feb. 8, 2 pm. $15. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) THE MUSIC OF WEST SIDE STORY Featuring favorites like “Tonight,” “Somewhere” and “One Hand, One Heart” alongside more of Leonard Berstein’s music. Starring: Jenny Shotwell, Kasey

Nusbickel, Jadd Davis, Cody Bray and other CST performers. Feb. 15, 7-9 pm. $25. CdA Summer Theatre, 4951 N. Building Center Dr. cdasummertheatre.com (208-660-2958)

VISUAL ARTS

COUCH POTATO A viewer-participant art installation featuring art videos and films beginning from the ‘60’s and ‘70’s, to contemporary artists working today. Through Feb. 6, open Mon-Fri, from 8:30 am-3:30 pm. Some films may not be suitable for all audiences. Free and open to the public. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. sfccfinearts.org/gallery (533-3710) FIRST FRIDAY Galleries and local businesses host receptions for artists showcasing work through the month. Feb. 6, most events from 5-8 pm. Free. Locations vary; for event details visit inlander.com/ firstfriday EXPLORATIONS XIV: STUDENT INVITATIONAL A group exhibition featuring the work of art department students, nominated by faculty at area colleges including: Whitworth, Gonzaga, EWU, SFCC and NIC. Reception Feb. 6, from 5-8 pm. Artworks available for sale. Show runs Jan. 6-March 31. Gallery hours: Mon-Fri, from 8 am-5 pm. Free admission. Chase Gallery, 808 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanearts.org/chase.aspx (509-625-6081) FOR THE BIRDS Laurel Macdonald and Andrew Sewell team up with an exhibit of endangered and regional birds. Feb. 5-22, gallery open Thur-Sun, from 10 am-4 pm. Reception Feb. 8, from 1-4 pm. Free admission. Dahmen Barn, 419 N. Park Way, Uniontown. artisanbarn.org (509-229-3414) HAROLD BALAZS: OLD & NEW A collection of the longtime, renowned Northwest artist’s work, including two-dozen newly created works alongside past favorites. Through Feb. 7. Gallery open Tues-Sat, from 11 am-6 pm. Free admission. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave. theartspiritgallery.com (208-765-6006) PLAYING IN THE MUD Clay exploration for kids, including hand-building with some wheel experience. Through Feb. 19, Thursdays from 4-5:30 pm. $45. Gizmocda, 806 N. Fourth St, CdA. gizmo-cda. org (208-651-6200) RIC GENDRON: RATTLEBONE An exhibition curated by Ben Mitchell, surveying the contemporary paintings by Ric Gendron, a member of the confederated tribes of the Colville Reservation. The largest exhibition ever assembled of the artist’s work, Rattlebone is supplemented with cultural and contemporary objects from the artist’s family. Through April 2; gallery open Mon-Sat, from 10 am-4 pm. Free. Jundt Art Museum, 200 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga.edu/jundt TWO BY TWO A small-scale ceramic sculpture biennial exhibition, featuring the work of 12 artists from across the U.S. and Canada. Exhibit runs through March 13; gallery open Mon-Fri, from 9 am-5 pm. In the EWU Gallery of Art, Bldg. 140, Cheney campus. Free. Eastern Washington University, 526 Fifth St. ewu.edu/ cale/programs/art/gallery (359-2494) SWEET LITTLE THINGS Handmade Valentine’s-themed cards, dolls, gift bags, boxes and artwork by local artists Chemyn Kodis, Louise Kodis, Toni Plastino, Gay Waldman and Wendy Zupan. Feb. 6, from 4-9 pm, and Feb. 7, from 10 am-4 pm. Wendy Zupan Designs, 2704 S. Stone. waldmanphotos.com (953-9831) MANDALA EXPERIENCE River Ridge

Assoc. of Fine Art hosts a workshop to create mandalas. Learn more about the art and history of mandalas. Supplies provided. Feb. 7, 2:30-5 pm. By donation. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (509-838-0206) KATHERINE SULLIVAN: FORCE DRIFT “Force Drift” brings together paintings from the artist’s “Docile Bodies” series with new works that reflect on the cyclical nature of torture and violence, on the sexual aspect inherent in much violence, and on the dialectical nature of the relationship that binds an authority figure and its subject. Feb. 10-April 3, reception Feb. 10, from 5-6 pm. Artist lecture Feb. 10, at 6 pm. Gallery open Mon-Sat (closed March 21-29). Mon.-Sat.. through April 3. Bryan Oliver Gallery at Whitworth, 300 W. Hawthorne Ave. (777-3258) STRAIGHT FROM THE HEART Local artist, writer and yoga master Diane Sherman blends art and spirituality in her February show. Feb. 17-March 13. Manic Moon & More, 1007 W. Augusta Ave. manicmoonandmore.com (413-9101)

WORDS

POETRY OUT LOUD REGIONAL FINALS The National Endowment for the Arts’ Poetry recital competition hosted locally by EWU’s Get Lit! program. Students from area high schools compete to advance to the state finals in Tacoma in March. Feb. 5, 8 pm. Free and open to the public. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague Ave. thebartlettspokane.com WSU VISITING WRITER SERIES: DINAH LENNEY The author and actress reads from her works at the Museum of Art/ WSU. Lenney is the senior nonfiction editor for the prominent Los Angeles Review of Books. Feb. 5, 5-7 pm. Free. Museum of Art/WSU, Wilson Road, Pullman. go.wsu. edu/visitingwriters (335-6812) 3 MINUTE MIC The monthly event returns at a new time for Feb/March: 6 pm. February’s event features reader Justin Snider for the “Remember the Word” showcase. Open mic readers have up to 3 min. to present; content not censored. Feb. 6, 6-7:30 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) ANTHOLOGY A “variety show of words,” presented by RiverLit. Stories, poems, music, and comedy overlap in a night of unbridled word-slinging. RiverLit also announces its 2015 writer, poet, and artist in residence. Feb. 6, 7-9 pm. $10. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague Ave. riverlit. com/anthology (264-3604) AN EVENING WITH JACK LONDON As part of the Spokane County Libraries “The Big Read Program, focusing on “The Call of the Wild,” actor and scholar Michael Oakes tells the greatest story Jack London ever wrote; his own life. Feb. 6, 8 pm. Free. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place Dr. scld. org (688-0300) EWU VISITING WRITERS SERIES: WILLIAM WRIGHT & ANDREA SCARPINO A reading, Q&A and book signing with poets William Wright and Andrea Scarpino. Presented by the Inland Northwest Center for Writers MFA Program at EWU and Get Lit! Programs. Feb. 6, 8-10 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) HARRY POTTER BOOK NIGHT A night celebrating the beloved series, with costume contests, games, crafts and snacks, with a movie screening at 7:30 pm. Feb. 6, 6 pm. Free; registration requested. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. cdalibrary.org (208-769-2315)


WSU VISITING WRITER SERIES: MARCIA PARLOW Marcia Parlow, managing editor of the New England Review, leads a roundtable called “The Business of Publishing in Print, Web, and Beyond” in the WSU Honors College Lounge. Panelists include Jordan Durham of Fugue, Stephanie Lenox of Blood Orange Review and Scott Slovic of ISLE. Feb. 6, 12-2 pm. Free. WSU Pullman campus. go.wsu.edu/ visitingwriters (335-6812) SATURDAY SIGNING & READINGS Local author Jean Flanigen signs copies of her historical novel “Hannah, the Lighthouse Keeper,” from 1-3 pm. Janene Loucks, of Spokane, also shares the first book of her debut trilogy, “Two Minutes,” at 7 pm. Feb. 7. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206)

BLACK WOMEN’S STRENGTH, RESILIENCE AND DEDICATION Conversations with a panel of three generations of Spokane Black women moderated by Fetlewoyni Gebreziabher. Feb. 10, 3-5 pm. Free and open to the public. EWU Monroe Hall, 526 Fifth, Cheney. (359-6200) SHAWN VESTAL The local writer and S-R columnist reads from his book “Godforsaken Idaho,” winner of the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize and longlisted for the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing. Feb. 10, 6:30 pm. Free. Shadle Library, 2111 W. Wellesley St. (444-5390) BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s weekly open mic reading series, open to all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. spokanepoetryslam.org

Love the

DAVID ARMSTRONG The winner of the 2013 Leapfrog Fiction Contest, reads from and signs his book, “Going Anywhere.” Feb. 11, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) WOLVES IN THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST An informational event to spark a civil discussion on the reintroduction of the wolf into the natural environment, and the issues that have arisen as a result. Sponsored by Humanities Washington, held in conjunction with the SCLD program, “The Big Read,” featuring “The Call of the Wild.” Feb. 12, 7 pm. Free. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone. (328-4220) TRENT REEDY BOOK LAUNCH The National Guard veteran and nationallyacclaimed author introduces the second, “Burning Nation,” the second book in his

trilogy. Feb. 13, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206)

ETC.

MURDER VICTIM’S FAMILIES FOR RECONCILIATION Speaker Pat McCoy serves on the Board of Murder Victims’ Families for Reconciliation (MVFR), an organization of members who have lost loved ones to violence. Pat’s sister, Kathy, was murdered in Spokane in 1974. Pat shares his story and perspective on ending the death penalty. Feb. 5. Unitarian Universalist Church, 4340 W. Fort George Wright Dr. uuspokane.org (838-7870) BIRDS IN YOUR BACKYARD Feb. is National Bird Feeding Month, and the Spokane Audubon Society shares info on

backyard birds, and how to feed and provide the right habitat for them. Feb. 6, 4 pm. Free. East Side Library, 524 S. Stone St. (444-5375) MONSTER JAM 2015 Monster truck show. Feb. 6-8, times vary. $20-$40. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon. spokanearena.com LILAC CITY STARZ Competitive cheereading and dance competition. Feb. 7, 11:30 am. Free-$15. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. (279-7000) 2015 GSI HEALTH CARE FORUM Local health care leaders hosts a panel discussion on reducing business costs, increasing employee wellness and more. Feb. 11, 7:30-9:30 am. $25-$30. Davenport Hotel, 10 S. Post St. (800-899-1482) 

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Toke and Tone Marijuana produces “runner’s high,” potentially benefiting workouts BY JORDY BYRD

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t’s time for a status update. February marks the second month into the New Year. How are your resolutions to lose weight — yet remain high — coming? Are you reaching for healthier snacks while binge munching? Have you removed yourself from the hotbox that is your bedroom and gotten some exercise? We didn’t think so. But green intervention may be just what you need. In December, the Green Zone reported on a study that found avid marijuana users had significantly smaller waists and lower body mass index compared to participants who have never used.

Pot users also had higher levels of good cholesterol. Marijuana also might help your workout routine. Research indicates that when pot is used as a supplement, athletes are able to exercise longer and harder, but with less bodily and mental stress, thanks to a THC-induced “runner’s high.” Marijuana’s anti-inflammatory effects also can reduce soreness in joints and muscles. While much of the research is extrapolated from medicinal pain studies or is anecdotal, exercise scientists like those at the Human Performance Lab at the University of Colorado are delving into the topic. Spokane dispensaries haven’t seen an uptick in athletic clientele. Most laughed at the notion that their regular customers were toking up to tone up — but admitted anything was possible. THE FACTS: When marijuana is ingested, chemical compounds known as cannabinoids bind with receptors in the body that regulate mood, pain, memory and appetite. When we work out, our bodies produce endocannabinoids — naturally occurring forms of THC. These endocannabinoids and endorphins create the “runner’s high” — an intense feeling or boost of energy experienced during prolonged strenuous exercise. Consuming pot essentially puts you in this euphoric state before your body naturally begins generating the chemical. The THC-induced euphoria will get you out the door and moving hopefully long enough for your body’s natural endorphins to kick in. Anti-inflammatory benefits and general pain relief will allow you to get out of bed the next day without hating yourself and do it all over again. Before you begin a pot-fueled workout routine, take caution. A body of research also indicates that marijuana slows reaction time and inhibits basic motor skills — dangerous side effects while heavy weight training or running in congested areas. Marijuana can also increase your heart rate by 20 percent or more for up to three hours after smoking, which increases the risk of heart attack in older athletes. n

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36. Kaplan course, briefly 38. Frozen food brand 40. Going downhill fast, perhaps 41. Like Iran’s Ahmadinejad 42. Bad traits for conductors 44. Achromatic 45. Lennon’s in-laws 46. Egypt’s Sadat 48. Four-time Pro Bowl player Chris 49. Sent with a click 51. Urban grid 52. 1990 Best Supporting Actor winner 56. Some Monopoly properties: Abbr. 58. More under the weather 59. Li’l Bucket offerer 61. Deli bread 65. Soccer star Lionel with three European Golden Shoe awards 66. Suffix with human

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37. Biol. class topic 39. Baseball scoreboard letters 43. Have between meals, say 44. “2001” computer 47. Nintendo product that was the subject of a study published in the Journal of Physical Activity and Health 49. Creepy 50. BBC time-traveling series 52. Iwo ____ 53. Designer Cassini 54. Snow queen in Disney’s “Frozen” 55. Irritant 57. Former home of the Mets 60. Alternatives to downloads 62. Tinnitus treater: Abbr. 63. Exist 64. “____ the season!”

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64 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

I Saw You

You Saw Me

Cheers

Cheers

Unholy Missed Opportunity The Holy Broke album release show, you reddish brown hair bundled up looking like you were waiting for someone, I was on a date. We said hi in passing but it felt like we both wanted to say more. I see you around town every once in a while, you’re a barista and we’ve talked tattoos. If you think there’s more to be said get ahold of me.

I had a huge crushed on you for a while. Long story short, I’ve always thought you’re attractive and I appreciate how encouraging and kind you have been. I often can’t seem to get a word in edgewise when I bump into you, but I would love to get to know you more and express to you that I think you’re awesome.

in it, I finally made today be the day I followed through. So without further procrastination here is a Cheers to you: the indescribably wonderful and beautifully human sister who showed me how to live life and to take it by the horns without being afraid of getting gored. Thanks for being my artistic muse, big sis, friend, role model, and lovingly indulging personal supplier of the BEST pumpkin cheesecake that this world has ever known! I know it is not “easy as pie” to make and that it is a labor of love when you do make it for me sis. In thanks and appreciation of, and to you, I metaphorically raise my wine glass and propose the following toast: Three cheers to our sisterhood may it last to the end of our lives. Cheers to having wine and good times with one another and everyone we love, to your pumpkin cheesecake, and to taking life by the horns! And here’s a cheers to you Jessica, I love you sis!!!

place was Woodrow Wilson Elementary School. You went by Andy back then. Even if you never see this, I’d like to raise a cheer to simpler times, to passing real notes and palling around on the playground. Wherever you are, I wish you all the best in life and in love.

Weekend Plans It is Friday right now and I just left the office you work for. I was there for business, but I couldn’t help looking at you. You are an African American beauty and was at the front desk because the normal receptionist was at lunch. I had to wait while things were figured out and I asked you what you had planed for the weekend. You said that the only plans you had were to sleep in till nine and then have your hair up and stay in your pjs cause you had the house to yourself. Although I agreed that was a great plan, I really did want to see if maybe you might have wanted to make plans, but I couldn’t cause my job has a rule against asking other people to make plans, like that cause it can lose relations with the businesses. So I had to walk away. Hopefully you see this and respond I’ll be hoping to talk to you more. Email is weekendtalk@gmail.com I Keep Seeing You I saw you after taking a midterm test at EWU in Williamson Hall last quarter. It was a stressful and disheartening test, but you encouraged me and brightened my day. You didn’t remember who I was, but still recognized me. You were impressed by how well I remembered you. I remembered you so well because several years ago you and I went to SFCC and I had convinced myself that you stole my water bottle with the “USMC” label on it; plus

Cheers A Big Cheers I want to send a big cheer and a thank you to the folks who drive on east Mission where it intersects east Upriver Drive by Avista. At busy times cars are backed up to the bridge and two lanes of traffic are stopped waiting for the light on Perry. It’s

TO C O N N E C T

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo. com” — not “j.smith@ comcast.net.” happened several times to me and I have seen it happen to other drivers. The drivers heading west will stop and wave us on to Upriver Drive. I have tried to wave to them to show my appreciation of their courtesy, but I am not sure they see it. It’s dark and sometimes stormy and my eyes are on the road and moving so the drivers behind me can get thru too! So this is a big thank you to these drivers. They all need a commendation! Cheers To Old People You are not a burden! Your knowledge is so valuable.You remind us of strong family values. You remind us to work hard at our trade. Most of all you teach us to Love! Here’s To Taking Life By The Horns (or Cheers to you sistah!) After many years of reading The Inlander and vowing I’d write something

Hit and Run To the universe (and the person who slid into my Chevy Hatchback on January 4th while it was parked out in front of my house on Baldwin by Moody Bible). I wanted a new car, I needed a new car, I just didn’t know how to get a new car. So, while you, universe (and morally depraved person that didn’t leave a note) helped me with this conundrum in the most roundabout way, I appreciate you! I love my new Subaru, I love my gap insurance for covering the cost of the loan after the totaling amount, and I love you, universe (and terrible driver with no moral code). I hope karma finds you well. Cheers To First Crushes Long before Facebook or smart phones, my six-year-old self had a huge crush on your spiky brown hair and killer smile. The time was 1988-1989. The

8th Floor Sacred Heart Nurses I was on the 8th floor of Sacred Heart for back surgery just a few days ago and I think I was in heaven because I experienced a group of nurses that are so exceptionally skilled and compassionate in their work that I came home with the warm fuzzies. There is Katie with her pretty smile and her gentle ways, then Stephanie with her knowledge and compassion, a pretty nurse named Mailee who is filled with energy and smiles and then a warm hearted Tammy. These ladies excell as good listeners, having warmth/ compassion, respect for their patients, upbeat personalities, thier medical skills and thier loyality to whom they take care of. You ladies are the best set of women I’ve ever known and I Janice thank you from the bottom of my heart for the love I felt from you. Sacred Heart’s 8th floor back surgery wing is where anyone with back problems should most assuredly make this the place to stay. Smiles & love, JC McDonalds and Super Bowl Some of the things I look forward to on Super Bowl Sunday, is watching my team, and the commercials. I especially like the ones that tug at your heart. Budweiser always comes through, but McDonald’s was a surprise. And what a surprise it was when, Monday, February 2nd, at the McDonald’s on Market, my family received a free meal, “Pay With Love” - my son was asked to tell his dad what he loved about him. Thank you McDonald’s.

“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


Jeers

Jeers

Dear Humanity Get off your high horse and your podiums. Cease and desist all actions fore or against anyone and everything. We have no inalienable rights to anything. We are a blight on this plant. Altruism does not exist. I can prove that all actions are selfish, that love is a mass delusion. I challenge all to prove me wrong. Logic, reasoning, and deduction are all you need to prove this one Truth.

There is still a lot to love in our wonderful weekly; amazing and newsworthy articles. You are overshadowing these pieces with your constant narcissism. I’m over it, move to one of your utopian cities you snivel about so frequently and give me back my Inlander.

RE: Obamacare Oxymoron This is in response to whoever wrote the jeer comparing Obama’s America to Hitler’s Germany because they “force us to have health insurance” here. In a shorter amount of time than Obama has been president for, the Nazis managed to attack most of the European nations, murdered over a million children in the gas chambers and destroyed more than one fifth of Russia. I’m curious as to what kind of person it was who made such an offensive and quite frankly insane comparison. Whiny Millenials I am not one to spread negativity, however, I have held back long enough. My beloved Inlander has been taken over by whiny millenials. You know who you are; fussing about how awful it is to live in Spokane, posting your intentional ‘arrest’ video for social justice on Facebook and calling yourself an activist.

Jeers

“sketchy” people. It’s a crowd that knows how to pronounce wine varieties correctly. It’s a crowd that votes in elections and never puts recyclingworthy items into the garbage. So WHY THE HELL is there so much dogpoop on the ground? As long as you stay on the path you’re pretty safe. Entitled To the dark haired, But head off into the rough to 30-ish woman who stomped get a ball that your dog missed into Rite-Aid on or around and it’s a fecal minefield! 1/23. You came in to return a defective item you purchased RE: Dangerous Guns Today an hour earlier. I know this I swung my front door wide because you proclaimed It open and placed a few loudly. You marched up to 8-balls of cocaine right in my the counter and interrupted doorway. I left a rolled up 20 the cashier as he was helping dollar bill and a mirror beside a customer and immediately it and left it alone and went “explained” (spewed) your about my business. Yada, problem. He offered to call yada, yada, when I checked a supervisor to help you and later they were right where I you declined and demanded left them, they hadn’t moved he help you. You disrupted themselves outside. They the whole “customers in certainly hadn’t killed anyone. line” process. And then had They hadn’t even lined up the nerve to “allow” me to neatly on the mirror. Well you go next. Your S.O. looked so can imagine my surprise, with embarrassed. You are not all the media hype about how entitled to demand service dangerous drugs are and how above others! That poor they kill people. Of course, cashier was so stunned I felt we all know that drugs kill sorry for him. Did your parents people...happens every day. Same with guns. But if I were teach you no manners? to apply your rationale, drugs Dog Park Poop Leavers should be legalized because Whenever I hit any of the they’re perfectly innocent... dog parks around Spokane, I it’s the people that are bad. typically see the same type of Now I’m not absolutely antidog owners. They are well- gun, but I’m also not a fan of dressed, intelligent-looking corny anecdotes that prey on and obviously good dog- the ignorant by making feeble parents to bring their doggy points. What’s worse is that for a romp. I never see any this specific story has gotten its mileage, and it’s obvious that the “author” copied and pasted it into an email and sent it in to the Inlander in lieu of proffering any insight of their own. If you were looking to make a cogent argument you should try harder next time.

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FEBRUARY 5, 2013 INLANDER 65


CHRIS BOVEY PHOTOS

Life Lessons What should we bring to a career fair? How about Chapstick and T-shirts? BY CHRIS BOVEY

T

he point of going to a kid’s career fair is obvious: to try to bestow some words of wisdom to the next generation and make children aware of the many career options out there. At a recent career fair at Spokane’s Logan Elementary, several media outlets had tables. There was KPBX’s Paige Browning, who let kids listen to their voice through a microphone. There were folks from KXLY talking about broadcast journalism and how the camera works. And from the Inlander, there was me, the art director, and Mike Bookey, our culture editor. We were prepared to talk about how a newspaper actually gets made and what makes for a good cover image while the kids colored a cover of their own. Did we ready kids for a life of hardhitting journalism? Doubt it. But the prize wheel to give away free Inlander swag — T-shirts and Chapstick — made us the biggest hit in the gymnasium. 

66 INLANDER FEBRUARY 5, 2015

A selection of students coloring covers


FIND ART

and more this Friday, February 6th! Venues open 5 - 8 pm unless otherwise noted.

ANDY’S BAR & GRILL 1401 W FIRST AVE

Thomas Lightfoot Food Specials, Drink Specials, Visual Art

AUNTIE’S BOOKSTORE 402 W MAIN AVE, 6PM

3 Minute Mic! Performance Art

AVENUE WEST GALLERY

707 W MAIN AVE, SKYWALK LEVEL, 5 TO 8:30PM

Pat Schilling Food Specials, Visual Art

BARILI CELLARS

608 W SECOND AVE, 4 - 9PM

Anthony Gallaher Drink Specials, Visual Art

ECHO BOUTIQUE

PATIT CREEK CELLARS

TAMARACK PUBLIC HOUSE

Darcy Lee Saxton, Visual Art Food Specials

Nate O’Neill and Chris McCray, Angela Marie Project Food Specials, Drink Specials, Live Music, Visual Art

Brewmaster, Terry Hackler of 12 Strings Brewery and Chef Dani Briceno of Tamarack, Food Specials, Drink Specials

176 S HOWARD ST, SUITE A

EXPRESS

331 W MAIN AVE

Hara Allison, Visual Art

808 W MAIN AVE, SECOND FLOOR, 6 - 9PM

Barry Aiken and North Point (Jazz) Food Specials, Drink Specials, Live Music, Visual Art

POTTERY PLACE PLUS

906 W SECOND AVE, 7 - 9PM

HERBAL ESSENCE CAFE 115 N WASHINGTON ST

Conrad Bagley, Visual Art Food Specials, Drink Specials

KENDALL YARDS

1206 W SUMMIT PKWY

Melissa Cole, Visual Art

Harold Balazs, Victoria Brace, George Carlson, Wayne Chabre, Morse Clary, Peter Cox, Mary Dee Dodge, Allen Dodge, Catherine Earle, Mary Farrell, Del Gish, Elaine Green, Robert Grimes, Michael Horswill, Jerri Lisk, Mel McCuddin, Kay O’Rourke & Cary Weigand Food Specials, Drink Specials, Live Music, Visual Art

115 S ADAMS ST

CHASE GALLERY- CITY HALL 808 W SPOKANE FALLS BLVD

Group Exhibit, Visual Art Featuring the work of students nominated by faculty at area colleges including: Whitworth University, Gonzaga University, Eastern Washington University, Spokane Falls Community College, and North Idaho College. The artwork on display ranges in media from painting, drawing, printmaking, ceramics, mixed media, sculpture, installation and video.

CHOCOLATE APOTHECARY 621 W MALLON AVE

Live music and featured artist Food Specials, Drink Specials, Live Music, Visual Art

COMMUNITY BUILDING LOBBY INLAND NORTHWEST LAND TRUST 35 W MAIN AVE

Spokane Watercolor Society - Membership Show, Visual Art

DODSON’S JEWELERS

516 W RIVERSIDE AVE, 5 - 9PM

Kay Cullen Richardson, Visual Art

*EAST SPRAGUE ART GALLERY 1812 E SPRAGUE AVE

Creativity in diverse media by more than 20 artists, Visual Art

POLKA DOT POTTERY

GR CELLARS

BARRISTER WINERY

1213 W RAILROAD AVE, 5 - 10PM

822 W SPRAGUE AVE, 7 - 9PM

KOLVA-SULLIVAN GALLERY Megan Martens-Haworth, Visual Art

LABORATORY

301 W MAIN AVE, SUNSET - SUNRISE

Anna Czoski, Visual Art

LEFTBANK WINE BAR

108 N WASHINGTON, STE 105, 7 - 10PM

Carey Brazil, Visual Art Food Specials, Drink Specials, Live Music

LIBERTY CIDERWORKS

164 S WASHINGTON ST, STE 300, 4 - 9PM

Frank Knapp, Visual Art Drink Specials

LIBERTY GALLERY 402 W MAIN AVE

Dennis Smith, Jeff rey Loyd, Steve Scroggins, Christina Deubel Food Specials, Drink Specials, Live Music, Visual Art, Performance Art

MAC NORTHWEST MUSEUM OF ARTS & CULTURE 2316 W FIRST AVE, 5 - 8PM

Artist demonstrations by Felisa Carranza, Neicy Frey and Annette Aiko Horiuchi Food Specials, Drink Specials, Live Music, Visual Art

MARKETPLACE WINERY

39 W PACIFIC AVE, 5:30 - 9PM

ISAAC Foundation Faces of Hope by Ashley Potter, Visual Art Food Specials, Drink Specials, Live Music

NECTAR TASTING ROOM

120 N STEVENS ST, OPEN UNTIL 10PM

Jacqueline Brewer, Visual Art Food Specials, Drink Specials, Live Music

*OBJECT SPACE

1818 E SPRAGUE AVE

Jared Anderson, Visual Art

912 W SPRAGUE AVE, 4PM - CLOSE

THE BRICKWALL PHOTOGRAPHIC GALLERY

Kimberly Geiger, Visual Art

530 W MAIN AVE/SKYWALK IN THE BENNETT BLOCK, 4 - 8:30 PM

203 N WASHINGTON ST, ADJACENT TO AUNTIE’S BOOKSTORE, 5 - 9 PM

THE MISSING PIECE TATTOO

Ara Lyman-Gregg & Kathleen Miles Visual Art

RIVER CITY BREWING 121 S CEDAR ST, 3 - 9PM

Bill and Kathy Kostelec, Visual Art

410 W SPRAGUE AVE, ALL MONTH LONG.

Michael Eldred, Visual Art Food Specials

TINBENDER CRAFT DISTILLERY

Liquid Art Series From the Mind’s of Moose and Todd Drink Specials

32 W SECOND AVE SUITE 400

808 W MAIN AVE, 5:30 - 7:30PM

115 S ADAMS ST, FRIDAY, FEB. 6: 5 - 8PM. SATURDAY, FEB. 7: NOON - 4PM

RIVER PARK SQUARE - FIRST NIGHT RISING STARS Sacajawea’s Jazz Band I, Chamber Orchestra and Show Choir, Live Music

ROBERT KARL CELLARS 115 W PACIFIC AVE

Andriel Scharff, Visual Art Drink Specials

TRACKSIDE STUDIO CERAMIC ART GALLERY

Chris Kelsey, Mark Moore & Gina Freuen Visual Art

URBANNA NATURAL SPA.SALON & WINE

Debbie McCulley, Visual Art Drink Specials

168 S DIVISION ST, 5 - 7PM

404 W MAIN AVE

V DU V WINES

SARANAC ART PROJECTS

Becky Gromlich, Visual Art Drink Specials, Live Music

SANTE RESTAURANT & CHARCUTERIE Joel Stehr, Visual Art Food Specials, Drink Specials 25 W MAIN AVE

Lisa Nappa and Margot Casstevens Visual Art Local artists explore our relationship with water. Nappa’s ceramic work presents a visual symbology exploring the reflection, refraction and movement of water. Her work is light, clean and has an elegant simplicity. Casstevens’ work explores movement and weightlessness through stop action.

SATELLITE DINER AND LOUNGE

425 W SPRAGUE AVE, ALL MONTH LONG

LauraLee White, Steven A Scroggins, Chelsea Lee, Melinda Rombokas Melvin, and Audreana Camm Food Specials, Drink Specials, Live Music, Visual Art, Performance Art

STEAM PLANT

159 S LINCOLN ST

Larry Ellingson & Dan McCann Food Specials, Drink Specials, Visual Art

STEELHEAD BAR & GRILLE

218 N HOWARD ST, 11AM TO CLOSE

Emily Travis, Visual Art Food Specials, Drink Specials

downtownspokane.org | spokanearts.org | Brought to you by Downtown Spokane and Spokane Arts

Josh Hansen, Visual Art Drink Specials,

12 S SCOTT ST, 5 - 9:30PM

VINTAGE HILL CELLARS 319 W SECOND AVE

Eve Foster, music and social dancing with Spokane Tango Drink Specials, Live Music, Visual Art

* WENDY ZUPAN STUDIO

2704 S STONE ST, FRIDAY: 4 - 9PM AND SATURDAY: 10AM - 4PM

Chemyn Kodis, Louise Kodis, Toni Plastino, Gay Waldman & Wendy Zupan, Visual Art

WHITESTONE WINERY

8 N POST ST, 6:30 - 8:30PM

Abbey Crawford, Live Music

WINDOW DRESSING 1011 W FIRST AVE

Mika Maloney, Stephanie Arieno, Desire McGinn, Erica Schmautz, Visual Art 701 W MAIN AVE, 5PM - MIDNIGHT

Shamar Brown and Cinthia Galan Visual Art 702 W MAIN AVE

Garric Simonsen and Carl Richardson Visual Art

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FEBRUARY 5, 2015 INLANDER 67


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