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t’s New Year’s Eve. You’re the proprietor of Cassano’s, an Italian grocery store that has operated in Spokane since 1922. The business has been struggling — not the least of its difficulties being back-to-back street projects, one of which disrupted business for more than four months. Three hours earlier, you closed the store. Your spacious parking lot is completely empty. You have a handicapped parking space outside the back door. Your wife arrives to deliver some merchandise. She parks in the darkened handicapped access area and walks in to get you. The two of you then walk back out to unload the merchandise. There stands a city official — a parking enforcer. She is writing you a ticket for $450 — a ticket for parking in your access area. On New Year’s Eve. At exactly 6:08 pm. First the obvious question: Why is a traffic enforcement functionary out patrolling neighborhood businesses on New Year’s Eve? Cassano’s is on Mission Avenue, east of Avista headquarters. And second, why does she fixate on an empty parking lot serving an obviously closed neighborhood store? And why would a ticket for parking in a handicapped zone — at any time — cost the offender $450? Most speeding tickets don’t cost that much. Welcome to parking enforcement, Spokane style.

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ayor David Condon’s parking enforcement operation gets even more bizarre. On Dec. 26, the day after Christmas, a woman arrives at the same back door; she is clearly handicapped, a double amputee in fact. Her driver is dropping her off at the rear door of the store. As several people were helping her out, this same parking enforcement officer shows up and issues another of those $450 tickets — while the helping hands are standing there watching. A week into the New Year, the bread man shows up to make his routine delivery. He parks at the back door at about 9:30 am, in that same access space. He begins to unload — a task that will take him only a few minutes. Up comes this same official, and out comes her pen. Another $450 fine. At this time, upward of 50 spaces sat empty. Whatever happened to the wise old basketball rule of “no harm, no foul”? The Spokesman-Review picks up the story. There are several exchanges between District 1 councilmembers Mike Fagan and Amber Waldref and Mayor Condon’s traffic enforcement czar, David Steele. The upshot: Steele informs Councilman Fagan that “while the circumstances surrounding the first two citations were debatable… we would request they be dismissed by

the courts.” Debatable? After 6 pm on New Year’s Eve in an otherwise empty parking lot, behind a store that had been closed for three hours! A double amputee!!! Debatable? Steele then went on to reassert his authority: No way will he back down on the bread guy. (Oh, by the way, Cassano’s owner and longtime Spokane businessman Carl Naccarato told me that he hasn’t had a bread truck by since — and adds that neighboring businesses have complained of similar treatment. I thought Republican mayors were supposed to be business-friendly?)

W

hat strikes me is the utter absence of outrage shown by either Fagan or Waldref. Councilman Fagan expresses his concerns; he does do that, and Waldref does send the message to Steele that she wants to know why this “particular business is of such great interest to the parking folks,” but neither response rises above the level of routine. They should be concerned. Small businesses like Cassano’s are the lifeblood of our city. Draconian parking enforcement is perhaps the quickest way to create an unfriendly aura around a business. Spokane has done some good things on the parking front downtown in recent years — credit card-reading meters, plugging parkers’ expired meters during the holidays. But adding some common sense on the enforcement front all over town would be nice, too. Steele defends the actions of his workers by invoking a version of the old “the Devil made me do it “ excuse. It’s the federal government that makes us do these things. I had never read the Americans With Disabilities Act before, and for sure it’s the kind of legislation that gives liberals a sometimes much-deserved bad name; it’s an act that reeks of political correctness and endless unnecessary details, some the antithesis of good urban design. For example, technically Naccarato is out of compliance because he doesn’t have the requisite number of handicapped spaces, given how many parking spaces he has — regardless of the fact that his lot never fills up. And this brings me to the subject of discretion. All police work (including parking enforcement) requires that the police exercise discretion. Who hasn’t been pulled over for speeding and not, at one time or another, driven off with a warning ticket? That’s discretion. And in this picture, that’s what’s missing. n


COMMENT | PUBLISHER’S NOTE

The First Seahawk BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

S

ometime in the 19th century, on the soggy, green coast of Vancouver Island, an artist sat down with some fresh cedar. She (or he, nobody really knows) crafted a beautiful mask to be used in the potlatch — the traditional dance festival of the Kwakawaka’wakw people. Our native artist had no idea, but that piece would go on to inspire millions. Fast forward to 1975, when Seattle was awarded a new NFL franchise and team leaders needed a mascot. Fans offered up ideas, including the Silver Sasquatches, the Clam Diggers, the Kelpers, the Sawdust Eaters — even the Green State Geoducks. They went with “Seahawks.” When the time came to design a proper logo, one committee member recalled a mask he had seen in the 1950 book Art of the Northwest Coast Indians. With a few tweaks, our Seattle Seahawk was hatched. In 1792, the Kwakawaka’wakw encountered Capt. George Vancouver, then, like most tribes, were decimated by disease brought by the traders and settlers. In the late 19th HUDSON MUSEUM PHOTO century, the potlatch was banned by missionaries. So it’s possible that the creation of our original Seahawk was a subversive act — an act of staying true to your team, er, tribe. Whites of the era were known to help themselves to native possessions, and the mask was on display by 1910 at one of the Harvey House hotels that dotted the West. Collector Max Ernst “owned” it when it was featured in the book; his collection is now at the University of Maine’s Hudson Museum. The Kwakawaka’wakw have been on the rebound, with about 5,500 members working to save their language and restore traditions like the potlatch. Now their handiwork has come closer to home; through July 27, you can see the original Seahawk at the Burke Museum in Seattle. During the potlatch festival, dancers would wear masks as a way to tell tribal tales. This particular mask cleverly hides a man’s head inside; the dancer would open the mask at the perfect moment and reveal the human face. Historians say it recalls a legend about a fierce bird of prey that swoops down to earth and takes human form. Doesn’t that sound just a bit like a certain football team that’s playing in a certain game Sunday? Anyhow, awesome choice, original Seahawk committee: You celebrated our First Nations and created a timeless icon as profound as it is ferocious. You see the beak on that thing? No Patriot’s gonna want any part of that.  JEN SORENSON CARTOON

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COMMENT | GUEST EDITORIAL

Moving Forward

CALEB WALSH ILLUSTRATION

The process of self-examination and change inside the Spokane Police Department BY FRANK STRAUB

T

his is a challenging time as communities across the nation question the relationship they have with their police departments. It is a time for community, political and police leaders to pause, reflect and define what community-police relationships should look like as we continue to confront the threats of terrorism and crime, as well as the realities of poverty, unemployment, mental illness, chemical dependency, homelessness and other socioeconomic issues. I believe that Spokane, challenged by the death of Otto Zehm, began the process of examining the community-police relationship several years ago. In January 2012, Mayor Condon established the Use of

Force Commission. The commission engaged our community, subject matter experts and the police department in a constructive dialogue that identified 26 areas for improvement. The Spokane Police Department embraced these recommendations and are committed to their full implementation. In late 2012, the mayor and I asked the U.S. Department of Justice to assess our use-of-force policies, processes and practices. The DOJ report, issued at the end of 2014, made 42 recommendations to further improve our operations, strengthen community-police relations, reduce crime and improve the quality of life in our neighborhoods. The DOJ assessment determined that from 2010 through 2013, only “one-tenth of one percent (.1%) of all citizen contacts with the police resulted in use of force by officers.” The report concluded that “police officers

in the SPD do not routinely and deliberately engage in excessive use of force or deadly force, and CNA (DOJ’s contractor) did not find a pattern of biased application of use of force.” The DOJ’s findings demonstrate the tremendous impact the Use of Force Commission has had on the SPD, as well as the department’s commitment to reengineering our policing practices. Ninety-five percent of the department’s commissioned officers have completed 40 hours of Crisis Intervention Training. Our 40-hour basic CIT program is equivalent to, or exceeds, the advanced level of instruction offered by most police departments nationwide. Crisis intervention training, as well as significantly improved in-service training, have not only saved the lives of persons in mental health crisis, but have also contributed to less force being used by our police officers. After extensive research and discussions with experts from across the country, SPD initiated our body camera program. During the three-month pilot, we met with more than 160 community groups in Spokane to discuss the program and solicit input. As we move out of the pilot phase, and expand the number of body cameras deployed, we will continue to solicit community input. As the body camera program expands, we must recognize that privacy concerns and Washington’s public records laws could significantly affect our program. In 2014, preliminary numbers show SPD reduced serious crime by more than 10 percent, violent crime by more than 17 percent and property crime by more than 13 percent. These double digit reductions in crime, the most significant reductions in more than five years, are a result of the tireless efforts of our officers and civilian personnel. Using data, we are identifying chronic offenders, their activities and the areas of the city in which they are most active. Armed with this information, our precinct captains are using innovative prevention and enforcement strategies to keep our neighborhoods safe. Spokane should be proud of its police department. Our officers and civilian staff have been, and continue to be, engaged in the process of self-examination, change and continuous improvement. We moved quickly to implement the Use of Force Commission’s recommendations and we will implement the DOJ’s recommendations with the same level of commitment. In 2015, our precinct captains, in collaboration with neighborhood residents and businesses, will continue to drive down crime. We will expand our youth, domestic violence, crisis intervention and chronic offender programs. Most importantly, we will continue to engage all members of our community, as we work together to define the community-police relationship in Spokane and the issues that challenge our city.  Frank Straub is the Spokane police chief.

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COMMENT | FROM READERS

SAY ‘YES’ FOR THE KIDS am writing to encourage voters to vote “yes” for the renewal of the

I

bond and levy measures for Spokane Public Schools. These measures are critically important in providing Spokane’s children with the appropriate materials, environments and programs necessary for a sound education. By voting yes on these two measures, voters will be ensuring that Spokane’s children continue to have opportunities to participate in programs such as music, art, drama, debate and athletics. Additionally, these measures work towards reducing class sizes, upgrading buildings, maintaining LETTERS transportation services and providing Send comments to technology and classroom materials. editor@inlander.com. Safety will be also be a focal point for the bond funds, and schools will receive security cameras, single-point entry programs, door card access points and fire alarms. Spokane’s economy will also benefit tremendously from these initiatives. A considerable $300 million will be funneled into the local economy, translating into jobs and stimulus for our community and businesses. Perhaps the most important point of note is that these measures will not create new taxes and are simply renewals of the current bond and levy. I strongly encourage voters to make the aforementioned benefits a reality by voting “yes” on Feb. 10.

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BRIE EDWARDS: One of the best pieces of writing in the Inlander. Well done. CHRISTINA BENAVIDES: I would like to better understand how SPD is supposed to know who to question, when to question and what happens after someone has been questioned. SHANUS MAXIMUS: Was there ever a problem with the police asking and acting on a contact’s immigration status? I feel this is a paper mache dragon created for slaying. I do know the border patrol was/has shadowed the local police, but beyond that, I never heard of it as being a problem. JESSE QUINTANA: The fear of becoming a minority comes from those who mistreat the minorities. 

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When a Horse Isn’t a Horse New gambling machines have helped keep Idaho’s horse and dog racing industries limping along — but those machines are now in jeopardy BY DANIEL WALTERS

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ear tracts of vacant Post Falls outlet malls, three cherries — synonymous with slot machines ever since slots gave out fruitflavored chewing gum a century ago — line up in a row on the Greyhound Park and Event Center video billboard. “New games are here!” it proclaims. “Winners play here!” It’s been nearly 20 years since the last greyhound raced at Greyhound Park. These days, the predominant sound at the facility isn’t the barking of dogs or the cheering of fans. It’s the chattering of gaming machines. “It’s time to make your dreams come true and live a life of pleasure!” the Deep Sea Treasure machine sings to a reggae beat. “Don’t stay behind; it’s time to find your deep sea treasure!” Hit a few buttons, and the columns of treasure chests, pufferfish and minnows start spinning. There are 35 gaming machines at Greyhound Park, with names like “Cruisin’ For Cash,” “Yukon Willie’s Gold Rush!” and “Wild West Willie’s Bonus Spin!” They look like slot machines, spin like slot machines, beep and whir and shell out big winnings like slot machines. But in Idaho, outside of Indian casinos, slots are illegal. Wagering on horse and dog races isn’t. Thus, the result of each wager on these “instantracing machines” is tied to a past horse race. Once the hearts, sevens, guitars, mining picks, gold nuggets, Egyptian scarabs or fuzzy dice stop spinning, a tiny video, barely as tall as business card, plays a few blurry seconds of horses passing a finish line. From Oaklawn Park in Arkansas to Kentucky Downs, these “instant racing machines” are sup-

posed to be the salvation of the dying horse racing and dog racing industries. But in state after state, they’ve become the subject of lawsuit and controversy. In just the past month, Idaho’s Indian tribes have objected, the Post Falls Police Department has launched an investigation, and Idaho legislators passed a bill out of committee to once again make the machines illegal.

DOG-RACE-DOG WORLD

As Greyhound Park patron Bob Burnell talks, every so often he hits the button on the “Get Your Kicks On” instant-racing machine. He barely glances at the results. “This is all luck,” Burnell says. “Probably should switch machines. This machine’s just toying with me.” He’d rather be betting on dog races. He’s been coming here since 1992, back when greyhounds ran around the track out back. He’d scrutinize their stats and watch whether they cowered around other dogs. Two decades later, he still remembers one of the dog’s names — Gladys Bullseye — in the Greyhound Park race where he won $25,000. “I paid my house off,” he says. The final days of Greyhound Park’s dog races were ugly ones. “It was called the ‘End

of the Line’ track,” recalls Gin McKean, founder of Greyhound Rescue of Idaho. “There was a lot of really bad abuse.” Trainers witnessed dogs being drugged, beaten, executed, placed in diesel-soaked cramped crates and electrocuted on a “Tijuana hot plate” for being too slow. In one single weekend, a 1995 SpokesmanReview story described, seven dogs fell, breaking their legs on the track. Thanks in part to efforts from McKean, Idaho banned dog racing in 1996. Today dog racing is nearly dead, with only a handful of tracks left nationwide. Horse racing is alive, but limping. Blame the rise of casino-style gambling or the loss of public appetite for a sport marred by corruption, drugging and dead, beaten horses. In Idaho, the introduction of the state lottery in 1988 accelerated the decline. But remarkably, Greyhound Park has survived. Today, bingo games are held there. The facility, with its huge footprint, has been repurposed as an ...continued on next page

The difference between playing slots and betting on horses may sound obvious — but it’s not at Greyhound Park in Post Falls. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 13


NEWS | BUSINESS

After the cherries spin, a horse race snippet plays on the screen below. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“WHEN A HORSE ISN’T A HORSE,” CONTINUED... event center, used for flea markets, gun shows and an upcoming Valentine’s Day ball. But racing remains the primary focus. On a Saturday morning, most of the Greyhound Park patrons are watching “simulcasts” — live television broadcasts — of traditional horse and dog racing on a vast array of ancient TVs and modern computer monitors. Simulcasting still carries controversy. “Greyhound simulcasting is just a prop to keep dog racing alive,” McKean says. “That means some dogs, somewhere, are running and dying.” Complicating matters further, in the past few years, conglomerates controlling the big-name horse-racing tracks have dramatically increased their simulcast fees. A few years ago, Greyhound Park stopped paying the steep fees to broadcast races from some of those tracks. “This place used to have 80 to 100 people” in the evenings, longtime horse racing fan Ed Howe says. “As soon as they lost what they could carry — now they’re all out at the casinos.”

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That’s left instant-racing machines as one of the few remaining solid sources of revenue: Far from being worried about their impact, Idaho’s racing regulatory body is one of their biggest champions. “I can tell you since the inception of this in Arkansas, it has turned things around for Oaklawn Park,” Frank Lamb, executive director of the Idaho State Racing Commission, testified in 2013. “It is amazing, the transformation. I believe it can do the same thing here.” Today, the Arkansas Times reports, casino gambling at Oaklawn has exploded, with traditional horse and dog racing now making up only a tiny sliver of its revenue. With some of the revenue used to support live horse racing, Lamb says the machines are keeping the sport alive in southern Idaho. “Small tracks [are getting] $6,000 a day,” he says. Last year, instant-racing machines made more than twice as much revenue for tracks as simulcasting. In 2013, Lamb argued that the only important difference between the machines and classic horse-race wagering is that you’d


be “wagering on a previously run horse race.” “You get to know what the best trainer in the race is… what the jockey’s winning percentage is,” he said. And after your bet, Lamb explained, “you can watch the whole race or just the last 100 yards.” Even the tribes didn’t object. But that was until they saw the machines that were installed. “The fact of the matter is, this was a classic bait-and-switch,” says Helo Hancock, the Coeur d’Alene Tribe’s legislative director. “We all got duped.” All that information on horses and jockeys? On most of the machines at Greyhound Park, it’s nested deep within layers of screens and buttons: Finding the stats requires pressing the “Help” button, the “Handicap” button, the “Page Down” button, the “Handicap Next Race” button and then — only after confirming a bet — a button that offers up a few pie charts with the horse’s statistics on them. The charts last for five seconds, barely enough time to read the numbers, before permanently disappearing and being replaced by the words “Good Luck!” Rep. Vito Barbieri doesn’t want to make the machines illegal, but he objects to how tough it is to view the horse-racing data. “I get it. Everyone wants more revenue. The faster you press that button, the faster [they get that revenue],” Barbieri says. “I just think that handicap information should be more available.” It’s not Greyhound Park’s fault, explains Julie Hart, execuLETTERS tive director of Idaho Wins, a Send comments to nonprofit organization dedieditor@inlander.com. cated to promoting horse racing in the state. The machines have changed since 2013. “In Idaho, when the legislation was passed, it was only the second generation [of machines] that was available for anyone to look at,” explains Hart. The machines with horse racing information obscured — the only ones currently available — are of the third generation. Despite multiple attempts to reach him, Douglas Okuniewicz, manager at Greyhound Park, did not return phone calls. But in an earlier Coeur d’Alene Press story, he redirected the focus toward tribal gaming: “If anyone is being duped, it is all of us that are being subjected to the fiction of calling a slot machine a tribal video gaming device,” he said. Okuniewicz knows such machines well; he’s been filing patents concerning slot-machine technology since 1997. This issue is particularly irritating for the Coeur d’Alene Tribe: In 1998, it considered buying the park and turning it into a casino facility, but Governor Phil Batt nixed the proposal. This month, the Coeur d’Alene, Kootenai, Shoshone-Bannock and Shoshone-Paiute tribes sent a letter to Governor Butch Otter, calling the betting machines illegal under Idaho law. (The Coeur d’Alene Tribe is locked in its own battle with the state over whether tribal casinos are legally allowed to offer poker.) Much of the legal debate is definitional. For example, do the machines count as horse-race-style “parimutuel betting,” which pits bettors against each other instead of against the house? On one hand, unlike a typical slot machine, 89 percent of the money wagered goes into a multistate pool that rewards winning bettors. Yet unlike actual horse racing, bettors aren’t betting on the same race, and the odds don’t change as bets stream in. The argument may not ultimately matter. Last Friday, after testimony from a Coeur d’Alene Tribe lobbyist, the Idaho Senate State Affairs committee introduced a bill that would repeal the 2013 statute making the machines legal. “Let’s repeal what we did, and start afresh,” Rep. Luke Malek of Coeur d’Alene suggests. “I’m leaning towards saying let’s have a full conversation about gambling.” Lotteries, slots, horses, dogs, poker — everything. Hart, however, worries that if the instant-racing machines disappear, horse racing will as well. “We’re not asking for a handout or stimulus package” to save horse racing, she says. “We’re doing it the good old-fashioned way, free market capitalism.” n danielw@inlander.com

JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 15


NEWS | DIGEST ON INLANDER.COM More Inlander news every day

PHOTO EYE IT TAKES A VILLAGE

BLOWN AWAY

Spokane Councilman JON SNYDER (pictured) has introduced an ordinance meant to address a problem that has accompanied the growing acceptance of marijuana use: people blowing stuff up while making a potent pot extract. Some marijuana users will pack the drug tightly into a glass tube or PVC pipe, pour butane through it and heat the mixture until it turns into a powerful smokable concentrate. But because butane is highly flammable, people have caused explosions while making the oil. (JAKE THOMAS)

YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

Volunteer David Ewing sorts food at Second Harvest in Spokane on Saturday during an event for At The Core, an organization that distributes weekend meals and snacks to about 2,600 local children.

DRUGS

“Everybody at the elected level ... is saying, ‘Drugs are not a big issue anymore,’ until you get that phone call from the neighborhood asking what about that drug house down the street.” Sheriff Ozzie Knezovich, in the Spokesman-Review, concerned about whether the loss of federal funding and the dip in revenue from drug seizures would prevent the Spokane Regional Drug Task Force from operating.

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Two weeks ago, we ran a story about Mark Overland (pictured), a former patient at EASTERN STATE HOSPITAL who was adjudicated not guilty by reason of insanity in 2000. He committed suicide in August, less than a month after leaving the hospital to live in the community. We initially heard about Overland’s story through a letter from a long-time Eastern patient named Patrick Clark. “I’ve been here 36 years and never have I witnessed such a hopeless set of circumstances all poised to actually impede the level of true recovery,” Clark writes. “Our great friend who took his life speaks volumes for the current bankrupt condition of the mental health system in the state.” Read the rest of Clark’s poignant letter about the conditions at Eastern State Hospital at Inlander.com. (DEANNA PAN)

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NEWS | BRIEFS

‘The Time Has Come’ Idaho considers protections for sexual orientation; plus, a new Spokane City Council candidate emerges IDAHO CONSIDERS THE WORDS

Last year, more than 100 protesters were arrested for refusing to leave the Idaho state capitol until a hearing was held to consider adding the words “sexual orientation” and “gender identity” to the list of classes protected by the Idaho Human Rights Act. This week, those protesters got their wish. Idaho legislators began to consider a bill that would “ADD THE WORDS.” More than 600 people signed up to speak on topics ranging from bathrooms to bakeries to the Bible. Some warned that the bill would cause Idaho businesses to suffer like Arlene’s Flowers, a Richland, Washington, flower shop that was sued by the state of Washington for refusing to provide flowers for a gay wedding. Lobbyist Bill Roden was a co-sponsor of the original Human Rights Act back when he was a 22-year-old Ada County senator. Now in his 80s, he testified in favor of the bill. “The time has come,” Roden says. Because of a judicial ruling in October, gay marriage is already legal in Idaho. And 10 cities, including Sandpoint, Coeur d’Alene and Boise, have already added the words to their local ordinances. Pocatello voters rejected a similar ordinance by a slim margin last fall. — DANIEL WALTERS

KINNEAR RUNNING

Lori Kinnear, legislative assistant to Councilwoman Amber Waldref, tells the Inlander that she’s filed paperwork to run for SPOKANE CITY COUNCIL in District 2. The position is currently held by Mike Allen, who hasn’t announced if he’ll run for re-election later this year. Downtown business owner and perennial candidate John Waite has already throw his hat in the ring. Kinnear has served as a legislative assistant for the past six years, working on legislation that encompasses dangerous dogs, economic development, human trafficking and other issues. “I’ve learned a lot and I think it’s time to apply what I’ve learned,” says Kinnear, who also wants to work with her boss as more of an equal. Kinnear says that she is particularly proud of recent work done by city council on development incentives meant to avoid urban sprawl as well as a neighborhood notification system that apprises residents of cell tower construction and other development. Kinnear says that she’ll likely have to cut back on her hours as a legislative assistant as the campaign picks up, but she says she has no intention of resigning at this point and has the blessing of Waldref. Kinnear, who previously lived in Seattle, has worked

as a newspaper reporter, an ad copywriter, a small business owner and for TINCAN, a defunct nonprofit that helped people access technology. — JAKE THOMAS

A CLOSER LOOK

After meeting with patients adjudicated NOT GUILTY BY REASON OF INSANITY (NGRI) and hearing their stories, state Rep. Timm Ormsby, D-Spokane, has introduced legislation to repeal a 2010 law effectively forbidding these patients from leaving state hospitals. A hearing on the bill is scheduled for this week. The original law was passed in 2010 after an Eastern State Hospital patient named Phillip Paul escaped from a supervised field trip to the county fair. Drafted by Spokane Valley state Rep. Matt Shea, the law bans patient outings and reintegration trips into the community. Patients now require a court-order to even walk on hospital grounds. Ormsby, who initially supported the 2010 legislation, says his views changed after he and other area lawmakers visited Eastern last summer to meet with NGRI patients. “I felt there were compelling stories we witnessed from the patients,” he says. “We are compelled by statute and by case law: [Treatment is] not punitive. It’s supposed to be therapeutic.” The bill was originally introduced by former state Rep. Tami Green, D-Lakewood, two years ago. It had its first hearing last year, but it failed to move out of the House Judiciary committee. Ormsby believes the legislation will gain more traction this year as lawmakers grapple with Washington’s severe shortage of mental health beds at state facilities. — DEANNA PAN

JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 17


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W

hen the Spokane City Council decided to direct three-quarters of a million dollars to a pilot program that equipped officers with body cameras, Council President Ben Stuckart pointed out that the cameras had been unanimously endorsed by the council, as well as by city administration and a commission charged with examining the use of force by Spokane police. “I think they’re a huge step forward,” Stuckart said before the council voted unanimously to fund the program. Putting cameras on police officers has been hailed — by activists, lawyers, even President Obama — as a way to bring an unparalleled level of accountability and civility to policing. Locally, a U.S. Department of Justice review of the SPD praised the department for launching an initial body camera project. But Washington state’s relatively broad public records law is complicating efforts to put

more body cameras on local police officers, and officials say Spokane’s nascent body camera program could also be slowed unless something is changed. The Washington Association of Sheriffs and Police Chiefs is hoping to convince lawmakers to revamp the state’s public records law to no longer allow voluminous requests of footage, while also preventing sensitive situations captured on camera from ending up on the Internet. Advocates, however, worry that such restrictions would undermine the whole point of having body cameras: transparency. “The bill is very one-sided, and it’s focused on this one problem in a pretty aggressive way,” says Jared Friend from the Washington chapter of the American Civil Liberties Union. Washington State Attorney General Bob Ferguson issued an opinion last year finding that police body camera footage is subject to the state’s public records law. The law exempts things like


Social Security numbers, juveniles and information related to sex crimes, but otherwise, under the AG’s opinion, agencies have to fork over requested video. According to Friend, the draft bill would require requests for body camera footage to go through a judge, which he says is unduly cumbersome. The ACLU has its own concerns about the cameras — specifically when officers are required to turn them on, and the potential for the devices to be used for dragnet surveillance — but Friend says the bill doesn’t address those concerns.

“What we’ve seen in these broad requests is that people are getting massive amounts of audio and video data and are posting it on YouTube.” Rep. Drew Hansen, a Bainbridge Island Democrat who is working on drafting the bill on behalf of the association, says that under the legislation, someone seeking to disclose body camera footage would have to demonstrate that the public interest in disclosing a video outweighs privacy concerns. For instance, he says, a video of a high-profile police shooting would likely meet this criteria. Individuals, under the bill, could request footage of any police interaction they were involved with, he says. The legislation has been drafted to address large requests of footage. One individual living in Western Washington, sometimes referred to as the “anonymous requester,” has requested all of the footage of every agency with a body camera program in the state. Spokane Police Chief Frank Straub says that’s a problem. “What we’ve seen in these broad requests is that people are getting massive amounts of audio and video data and are posting it on YouTube,” he says. “And we are exposing people who, in some cases, are ill or are in a difficult situation, and now it will be out there for their rest of their lives.” Straub says he hasn’t seen the latest draft of the legislation and couldn’t comment specifically on it. He recently told the city’s Public Safety Committee that the department was going to be “be very slow and methodical on amping up the rollout” of body cameras until the legislature takes some action on them. He told the committee that the bill has a “50-50” chance of passing. If it doesn’t pass, he said, “that’s going to cause us to go back to council, and ultimately to the community, on where we want to go with this.” Rick Eichstaedt, executive director of the nonprofit Center for Justice, says that body cameras can be a useful police accountability tool, and he wants to see more of them. Updating state law while putting the devices on more officers can be concurrent efforts, he says. “I don’t necessarily think we need to wait for the public records change to occur,” he says. A smattering of communities throughout Washington, ranging from small towns to Seattle, are either testing out body cameras or have fully implemented them. In Liberty Lake, all 10 officers are equipped with body cameras, says Police Chief Brian Asmus. He says that his department also received a request for all of the department’s body camera footage. The department told the requester that it would take two years for a clerk to make sure that none of the video footage contains any juveniles or anything related to sexual offenses, which are exempt under state public records law. Poulsbo, a small town in Western Washington, has reacted to large requests by considering suspending its body camera program. In Spokane, 25 officers now voluntarily wear the cameras. Straub says that while the department will keep an eye on what comes out of the legislature, he plans to roll out cameras slowly either way. “There’s no reason to go fast,” he says.  jaket@inlander.com

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NEWS | OLYMPIA

‘Competitive Streak’ Why Rep. Marcus Riccelli is one of the busiest young lawmakers in Olympia BY DEANNA PAN

S

tate Rep. Marcus Riccelli has a cold, or at least he sounds like it. When he calls the Inlander on his drive back home from Olympia, he admits he’s a little “clogged up.” Chalk it up to some well-earned exhaustion. Riccelli is a Democrat representing Spokane’s South and North sides and downtown core, and less than three weeks into his second term, he has already dropped 13 policy bills — more than any other Spokane-based lawmaker. “It’s tough because there are a lot of mouths to feed here,” says Rep. Timm Ormsby of Riccelli, his 3rd District colleague. “He’s got a good competitive streak, which bodes well for our folks back home, the people in the 3rd District. You have to really want to get stuff done here that they need. Otherwise it might fall off.” Six of Riccelli’s bills currently have hearings scheduled for this week. Those include: u House Bill 1559, which would revise a 1917 statute currently giving the University of Washington exclusive rights to teach medical education. More than 60 co-sponsors have signed on. Riccelli has been working closely with Sen. Michael Baumgartner, R-Spokane,

who’s sponsoring the companion bill, to lay the groundwork for Washington State University to establish its own medical school in Spokane. u House Bill 1448, known as “Sheena’s Law,” which would allow law enforcement officers responding to threats or attempts of suicide to notify mental health professionals who can make involuntary treatment determinations. The bill was inspired by the death of Sheena Henderson, who was killed by her estranged husband, Chris Henderson, on July 8 last year at Rockwood Cancer Treatment Center before he turned the gun on himself. A day earlier, sheriff’s deputies questioned Chris Henderson after a co-worker overheard him talking about ending his life. Deputies, however, determined he wasn’t a serious threat. Riccelli, along with 3rd District lawmaker Sen. Andy Billig, has been consulting with Sheena’s family over the past six months to draft legislation aimed at preventing similar tragedies. u House Bill 1365, a bill requiring universal autism and developmental delay screenings for all children covered by Washington’s Medicaid program, and House Bill 1285, a measure mandating that hospitals screen for

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Rep. Marcus Riccelli critical congenital heart disease in newborns, as recommended by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. In his first term, Riccelli sponsored successful legislation to reduce delay times for families waiting for newborn screening-test results. Like many of Riccelli’s


legislative priorities, the bill was inspired by his family: Thirty days after his daughter, Bryn, was born at Providence Sacred Heart in July 2013, the Riccellis were told that an abnormality appeared on her screening results and she would have to be retested. Luckily, it turned out she was fine. Riccelli has also introduced measures to prohibit employers from misclassifying employees as independent contractors; keep criminal informant testimony out of the courts; and fund school kitchen equipment for preparing healthier meals. As a new lawmaker and father, Riccelli says he naturally “gravitated” toward health care policy. For the second time, LETTERS he was appointed vice chair Send comments to for the House Health Care editor@inlander.com. and Wellness Committee, a role that puts him in an influential position to promote his agenda. “You want the best for your kids and that translates to kids in our whole community,” he explains. “It just gives me a unique perspective, as a younger parent, than other legislators.” The 36-year-old lawmaker (and co-founder of the under-40 legislative caucus) was born and raised in Spokane. He attended Mead High School, graduated from Gonzaga University and received his Master of Public Administration from the University of Washington. Before running for office, Riccelli got his start in politics working for U.S. Senator Maria Cantwell and later, former Washington State Senate Majority Leader Lisa Brown. “It’s fun and gratifying to see Marcus being so effective as a relatively new legislator, but it’s not surprising,” says Brown, now chancellor of WSU Spokane. “He definitely understands that you’ve got to reach out and connect with people to move legislation forward, and he’s shown that he’s very energetic and good at doing that.”  deannap@inlander.com

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k a o e f P

ink

Will the tattoo boom ever slow down? By Dan Nailen he squirming snake fills Beth Hill’s abdomen, stretching up her ribs through a skull, pulling around her sides and diving below her waist. As she moves or stretches, so does the reptile breathing on her skin. It’s a complex and colorful piece that inspires games of “can you find the bellybutton?” with her kids. When she completes the tattoo this spring, adding the snake’s head to her chest and wrapping its body over a shoulder and down her arm, the 34-year-old South Hill mother of two will have spent upward of 30 hours in the artist’s chair on this single work. It’s dramatically more complex than the tattoos Hill first got as a Post Falls teenager, a ritual she guesses she shared with half her graduating class. She started early — 16, thanks to her apprehensive mother’s permission — with a salamander design from the shop’s wall pressed into her back by “a one-legged, Harley-Davidson-riding, cigarette-smoking, foulmouthed” artist. She went back for what she jokingly refers to her as “masterpiece,” a tribal tramp stamp, followed shortly thereafter with another “classic,” the Japanese word for “naughty” etched on her chest. Even though those teenage tats hold some aesthetic regret, Hill still recalls how great she felt when

T

22 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015

she walked out of the shop, newly inked. “Instantly, once I had it, I loved it,” Hill says. “I loved the idea of being able to add to your body to make it something different, a walking piece of art. It was still a rite of passage in Post Falls. You were definitely grown up when you got a tattoo.” Hill is not alone. As she’s grown from a curious teen with a few small tattoos into an adult with ever-moreintricate artwork spreading across her body, so has the acceptance and celebration of tattoos across the Inland Northwest and the rest of the country, to the point where one in five American adults now say they have some permanent artwork adorning their body. The ink explosion is especially evident in Washington state, where the number of licensed tattoo artists has spiked nearly 400 percent — from 388 in 2010 to 1,443 in 2014. “It used to be you could talk to somebody with tattoos because you had something in common with them,” says local tattoo artist Walt Dailey. “Now, everybody has tattoos.” ...continued on next page


Beth Hill’s belly tattoo has required 25 hours in the artist’s chair — and there’s still work to be done. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 23


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“PEAK OF INK,” CONTINUED...

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Turn on your TV or surf the Internet and you’ll witness a glowing gallery of body art. Watch a basketball game and you’ll witness a cavalcade of images on the players’ arms, legs, chests, necks and faces. Fire up YouTube, and tattoos formerly reserved for metal bands and punks now serve as “edgy” adornments on the most saccharine of mainstream pop stars, from Selena Gomez to Justin Bieber to the One Direction lads. Oscar winners, reality stars, politicians, TV chefs — tattoos are everywhere, and on seemingly everyone, in 2015. Those celebrities, in turn, inspire our friends and neighbors to line up for the most permanent of fashion choices. Asked why so many people in 2015 are sitting down for the decidedly annoying and painful experience of having a small needle repeatedly jabbed into their skin,

Dailey of Spokane’s Tiger Tattoo quotes The Silence of the Lambs’ Hannibal Lecter. “How do we begin to covet, Clarice?” asks the gruff and gray 65-year-old Dailey with a smirk. He’s one of the longest-working local artists, with nearly 40 years of tattooing in Spokane behind him, and his former apprentices dot other shops in the area. “It’s all about the TV. We see and we covet. ‘I see that, I want it. I want to be like that guy. I want to be like that girl.’” Dr. Nina Jablonski says mankind has a historic tendency to decorate its skin. The Penn State University anthropology professor and author of Skin: A Natural History believes we’re living in the peak of tattoo popularity. The tattooed and famous, she says, have a lot to do with it. “A lot of popular movie stars and sports figures have visible tattoos, and these are sort of sexy figures who people want to emulate,” Jablonski says. “People are always seeking


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SkiandRideProgram.com Tattoo Artist Duffy Moon, left, and Walt Dailey of Tiger Tattoo. Dailey says of tattoos: “We see and we covet.” YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS examples close by, or status symbols, to legitimize their own yearning to have something like this.” Aaron Cheney’s teenage fandom of Mötley Crüe inspired the 32-year-old Spokane kitchen supervisor to get his first ink — a homemade Crüe tattoo — back in high school; now he sports ornate “sleeves” covering his arms. And one of 42-yearold Spokane native Heather Upshaw’s first tattoos was a KISS logo on her ankle. “I guess I grew up with music in my life,” Upshaw says of her teenage trips to the tattoo shop. “You see all the musicians and a lot of them have tattoos.” Celeb worship might be a prime factor, but people have been tattooing themselves for far too long and in far too many different cultures for it to be the sole factor in why we’re seeing so much ink. Jablonski notes that tattoos “have been one of the most important modes of human self-expression for thousands of years, and we find it in virtually every group,” including the Paleolithic era in Japan, the mummies of ancient Egypt, and among various tribal communities across dynastic China, Northern Europe and the Polynesian Islands. In 1991, the preserved body of “Otzi the Iceman,” estimated to have died around 3300 B.C., was found in the Alps between Italy and ...continued on next page

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INTERNS WANTED THE INLANDER IS HIRING spring 2015 interns to contribute to the paper’s News and Culture sections. Eligible applicants must be currently enrolled in a college degree program, and available for 10-15 hours a week. TO APPLY Send your resume, cover letter and three writing samples to intern@inlander.com. * Interns must provide own fedora and press badge. Positions are unpaid.

JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 25


Beth Swilling, owner of Mom’s Custom Tattoo and Body Piercing in Spokane, is part of a new breed of fine artists now working in the industry. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO

“PEAK OF INK,” CONTINUED... Austria with more than 50 tattoos on it. You might have seen images of Otzi on the red carpet — Brad Pitt has a tattoo of the 5,300-year-old on his inner left forearm.

REACHING the peak

Jablonski’s idea that we’re living in an era of “peak tattoo” is borne out by the numbers, across the country and closer to home. A 2012 Harris Poll shows that 21 percent of American adults say they have a tattoo, up from 14 percent in 2008. And far from being reserved for the young and impulsive, the same survey shows middle-aged adults have more tattoos than those barely legal. Thirty-eight percent of adults 30 to 39 have a tattoo, along with 27 percent of adults 40 to 49. Only 22 percent of adults 18 to 24 responded in the affirmative. Spokane artist Duffy Moon, 55, has worked alongside Dailey at Tiger Tattoo for the past 18 years and has been getting tattooed by Dailey for 30. He recalls when Spokane only had three tattoo shops in the ’70s and ’80s, and it was the early-to-mid-’90s before more started opening across Spokane. “It just amazes me how many shops can stay supported in this town,” Moon says. The local tattoo scene has grown exponentially since that time of three shops. According to the Washington State Department of Licensing, Spokane County had 42 licensed tattoo shops in 2014, the third-most of any county in the state. (Idaho doesn’t require licenses for individual artists and has no special classification of

26 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015

years, people have used tattoos as a means to “signify business licenses that would indicate how many artists membership in a group or belief system.” It might be a and shops operate in the Gem State, but a cursory shamrock for someone proud to be Irish, a swastika for search for tattoo shops in and around Coeur d’Alene, someone in the White Power movement, or a bulldog Post Falls and Sandpoint turns up about a dozen, a to show you’re a fan of the Zags. number nearly equaled in the Moscow-Lewiston area.) Maegan Cantu, a 29-year-old Spokane resident The prevalence of tattoos around the Inland Northsporting a half-arm “Raptor Jesus” inspired west is obvious to the artists competing by a 4chan meme, was introduced to for business, to the customers tasked with tattoos through that groupthink dynamic finding someone for their work, and to when she was growing up in Orange anyone who sees all manner of ink on County. their doctors, personal trainers and — in “Everyone has tattoos, everyone has part thanks to Starbucks’ recent change in piercings. It was skate culture, it was surf its tattoo policy — baristas. culture, punk culture, goth culture,” Cantu It’s a whole different world than when says. “If you’re any subculture, you want most tattoos were left to bikers or military a way to differentiate yourselves from the men. Mary Kosut, associate professor ‘normal’ people.” at the State University of New York at For Blake Ellert, a 24-year-old veteran Purchase, wrote about the increasing Maegan Cantu’s “Raptor of the war in Afghanistan, joining the acceptance of tattoos in a 2013 article Jesus” stays covered at service gave him the perfect excuse to get for Cultural Sociology, noting that in 1962, work. YOUNG KWAK PHOTO some of the tattoos he always knew he tattooing was illegal or tightly restricted in wanted. He required “sort of traditional 32 states. ones tied to a culture, because those aren’t going to go “By 1968, 47 major U.S. cities had enacted ordiout of style,” and he spent his leave time in Spokane nances prohibiting tattoos” altogether. Now, Kosut making appointments to add a massive ocean scene of writes, “tattoo has undergone a process of being burning ships on his back, birds on his chest — swalcleaned up (literally and symbolically), authenticated, lows representing each 5,000 miles spent on his navy and ultimately valued.” ship — as well as anchors, hearts and others representing the 3rd Battalion, 8th Marines he sailed with out of Anthropologist Jablonski notes that for thousands of Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.

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Blake Ellert, a 24-year-old veteran of the war in Afghanistan: “ I think to some degree, you have this vision of how you should be in your head.” YOUNG KWAK PHOTO “There are a lot of reasons to get tattoos, and I think to some degree, you have this vision of how you should be in your head,” says Ellert, who is studying at Spokane Falls Community College to eventually work with fellow veterans as a clinical psychologist. “I had that ‘I want to get these kind of tattoos and look like this, because that’s awesome! That’s the kind of person I want to be. I want to look like the full sailor guy.’” Shann Ray Ferch, a clinical psychologist, author and Gonzaga prof, attributes tattoos’ modern popularity to people’s desire to push back against authoritarianism and a white patriarchal culture that labeled any outsider a “renegade.” “It makes sense if you look at that part of history — industrialization, the Great Depression, World War I, World War II. There was a concept of severity binding the world,” Ferch says. “Then, coming out of that, you get the civil rights movement, Vietnam, free love. By then we’re seeing, ‘Let’s individually decide what we want to do.’”

PERSONAL, EMPOWERING

That sense of tattoos as a cultural indicator of rebellion is probably history at this point, given how common they’ve become, and how few restrictions there are to their public display. Among people under 40 who have grown up during the boom, tattoos are considered “somewhat mundane and nothing warranting much comment,” Jablonski says. But they still represent that old antiauthority spirit in some families and social contexts, she adds, and she talks to plenty of students who get their first tattoo and “feel a sense of tremendous exhilaration and excitement, and want to share it and talk about it.” “It may have lost its shock value as a societal phenomenon, but it still has a tremendous impact on individuals and what they are saying about themselves when they get tattooed,” she says. For Hill, the skull and snake covering her abdomen aren’t about rebellion, but she admits those first tattoos back in Post Falls as a high schooler were probably inspired by “just youth, and that I could.” The skull and snake on her stomach, the tattoo she’s spent dozens of hours sitting for, has more to it. A few years ago, Hill battled cervical cancer, followed almost immediately by cancer in her kidneys, the disease forcing three abdominal surgeries that left her scarred — literally and emotionally. “I just wanted to look in a mirror and not see the scars,” Hill says. “I wanted to see something beautiful. I know the scars are under there, and after what I went through, I just wanted to see something happy and beautiful and colorful instead.” Unless Hill wears clothes meant to showcase her work, you’d never know she’s a tattoo junkie. If you were to see her walking across campus at SFCC, where’s she’s studying to eventually teach English Lit to college kids, Hill would look like exactly how she describes herself, a “pretty normal 34-year-old female. A mom.” ...continued on next page

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“PEAK OF INK,” CONTINUED...

JOBS AND BACKLASH

As commonplace as tattoos have become, not everyone is sold. In most of corporate America, you’re not going to find CEOs showing off their full sleeves at board meetings. Two business professors at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi recently published research showing that many businesses discriminate against employees with tattoos, and the courts have ruled that discrimination isn’t illegal because tattoos are considered “alterable characteristics,” not viewed as “speech or expression” under the First Amendment. Hill knows she’ll most likely have to cover her tattoos when she’s standing in front of a college classroom. Cantu has to keep her Raptor Jesus covered as a matter of company policy when she’s working at her job as a chocolatier at Spokandy. Outside the workplace, there’s also still some stigmatizing of the tattooed masses. In the Harris Poll, questions put to the non-tattooed respondents were telling. Forty-five percent said tattoos make people less attractive, and 39 percent say they make people less “sexy.” Twenty-seven percent say people with tattoos are “less intelligent,” 25 percent consider them “less healthy” and “less spiritual.” Harsh stuff. Worse still for people still holding onto the idea that getting a tattoo gives them some outlaw cool is the news that fully half of non-tattooed Americans don’t think tattoos are at all “rebellious.” Friend and family attitudes, too, can keep some tattoo enthusiasts covered up in public. One retired couple of tattoo lovers in their 60s and living in a Spokane retirement community demurred at having their photo or names revealed because of concerns about how some of their retired friends and neighbors might treat them when they found out — not to mention the expected disappointment from the woman’s 98-year-old father living in the same community.

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INKED UP FOREVER?

There’s little reason to think that the tattoo boom in Spokane and elsewhere will abate any time soon. If anything, it just seems to be picking up steam as artists and their clients find ever-morecreative ways to illustrate skin. The old-school “street shops” like Tiger Tattoo are still going strong, doing traditional work that never goes out of style. And there’s been an infusion of fine artists into the field, people like Beth Swilling at Mom’s Custom Tattoo & Body Piercing. She got into tattooing in her late 30s after realizing the techniques she learned at art school could apply to working on people’s bodies as well as canvas. Now 53, Swilling went from a small one-room studio on the Northside into a new, bigger space at Kendall Yards nearly two years ago. “There’s a utilitarian foundation, and that’s how tattooing started,” Swilling says. “Now you’re seeing this evolution of artist types and it’s really going crazy. People aren’t just seeing them on their neighbors, they’re seeing them on Reddit and TV, and they say, ‘Oh my God, is that really a tattoo? They can do that?’” Jablonski, the anthropologist, can see it going even a step further, into something “more exciting” like implants of tiny LED lights under the skin, lighting up with bright colors. “I think tattoos are going to continue for a long, long time,” Jablonski says. “People do want to express themselves through their skin. It’s the first thing people look at, so they want to be able to show their creativity and express themselves somehow in this way. “You can do that through body paint or cosmetics, but tattoos offer a level of permanence, of significance. They tend to have a deeper meaning.” n dann@inlander.com

28 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015

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B oth

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Iconic photos, like this 1945 image of the V-J Day celebration in Times Square, are part of the Corbis collection and included in WSU’s new exhibit.

An exhibit at WSU examines why we take photographs BY SARAH MUNDS

V

ivian Maier was cantankerous and maybe a little hard to deal with, discretely capturing images of her neighbors, public markets and busy sidewalks. Privately hoarding thousands of smiling faces, jovial children, bustling shoppers — images of Americana that could never have seen a dark room. Images that wouldn’t have been included in the Washington State University

Museum of Art’s current exhibition, Through the Lens: An American Century — Corbis and Vivian Maier, a show that juxtaposes the personal and very public aspects of photography. “She had no intention to show or use this work. She was photographing because she was purely responding to her environment, responding to that decisive moment,” says Ryan Hardesty, the museum’s curator of art and

exhibitions. These decisive moments were indefinitely tucked away in a storage container, but in 2007, trunks at a thrift auction were opened to find Maier’s collection of film, photos and images, immediately dispersed to hundreds of printed and published outlets. The discovery inspired a 2014 documentary about Maier’s peculiar life and ...continued on next page

JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 31


CULTURE | DISTILLED

CULTURE | PHOTOGRAPHY “BOTH SIDES OF THE LENS,” CONTINUED...

JESSIE SPACCIA ILLUSTRATION

Protection Against the World BY JACOB H. FRIES

L

ike an old drunk who’s forgotten his address, the flask can’t stand up without leaning on something. There’s a fatal wobble even on a flat surface. Years ago, its stainless steel was dimpled one night when, in the middle of a mosh pit, a man fell flat on his ass, and the prized flask in his back pocket was personalized with a deep butt print. It’s been suggested that he replace it, but it’s only become more precious to the man. It was a gift from his kid brother. The man can’t remember the occasion; at the time, he was living in the putrid cesspool that is Florida,

DISTILLED A SHOT OF LIFE

and one day a brown box arrived at his tangerine-colored cottage. In the center of the polished steel is an engraving: “The East is making you soft.” The man recognized the quote immediately. He and his kid brother had watched the movie A River Runs Through It to the point of memorization. It’s about two brothers, one a newspaperman, the other a professor, who, despite their differences, find common ground while fishing the river of their childhood. The man and

his kid brother had also grown up on a river, in Spokane Valley, swimming and fishing until they moved apart as adults: the man to newspaper jobs, the kid brother to the Army and Iraq. The kid brother wasn’t a writer, at least not as far as the man knew. Yet there was a letter explaining the quote, which in the movie is delivered by one brother goading the other. “I smile when I think of you getting pissed at this flask for accusing you of being weak, yet forgiving it right away because it is a gift from me. There seems to be some delightful truth that rises to the surface when I think of you loving and hating something at the same time — it’s very Jacob. “Outside of the engraving, I hope that you enjoy having a flask and that you carry it with you always. I have a feeling it will save your life. … Placed in your jacket’s inside pocket, it could stop a bullet.” In reality, flasks don’t protect the hearts of heroes, but rather help someone blunt the awfulness of life: awkward dinner parties, shopping at phosphorescently lit megamarts, birthdays and funerals. And in the case of the man, felled by sweaty beasts late one night, a flask saved his ass the full weight of the fall. 

unlikely celebrity that has been nominated for an Academy Award (see below). The question remains, though, as to why Maier shot so many photos that she never shared. Hardesty admits that historians and curators don’t know if Maier would have wanted her work publicized. Was it introspection, a type of therapy to find a niche in a world she wanted desperately to fit into? “Perhaps that activity was in some way her means of making a connection with the world around her,” says Hardesty. Contrast this with nearly 100 of the most defining and recognizable photographs in the Corbis exhibition, images that have become a sort of “stock photo gallery” of our culture. That iconic photograph of the Twin Towers on September 11th. Marilyn Monroe on the set of The Seven Year Itch. The raising of the American flag at Iwo Jima. Muhammad Ali and Martin Luther King. “These images represent a collective consciousness, a sort of collective visual history. Even if we didn’t live during these eras or these events, these photos still provide us access to delve into and consider the time and significance,” says Hardesty of Corbis, a Seattle-based photo licensing company founded by Bill Gates in 1989. That contrast is what brings the two radically different exhibitions together, explains Zach Mazur, curator of education and collections. A woman’s personal musings on the world around her — a deeply personal, almost cryptic experience — versus the common visual tongue that binds a society together, something millions of people share, is the juxtaposition at the center of

Vivian Maier’s images were known to capture unexpected beauty. the exhibit. This conversation of personal versus public also raises the question of what street photography is evolving into. That’s where the student portion of the exhibition begins its commentary. A handful of student work has been gathered from many of the cities in which Maier lived (as well as Pullman), displaying the ways that street photography has changed over the decades. “It’s not just an observation anymore,” says Mazur, mentioning a student artist who questions the impact of oversexualization of young girls through her work. “Now, let’s take context and add it to this style of photography.”  Through the Lens: An American Century — Corbis and Vivian Maier • Washington State University Museum of Art • Exhibition runs through April 3

VIVIAN ON SCREEN ivian Maier’s posthumous rise to celebrity isn’t limited to her work appearing in exhibits like this one at WSU.

V

Last year, the release of Finding Vivian Maier made her work some of the most talked-about photography out there. Now, Finding Vivian Maier has been nominated for a Best Documentary Oscar and looks to be in serious contention for the award. While audiences have flocked to the film because of the mystery surrounding a woman who lived quietly as a nanny in Chicago, all the while amassing a collection of thousands upon thousands of photographs, the story of how the film came to be is equally impressive. Its co-director, John Maloof, was in real estate in Chicago and trying to locate historical photos of a neighborhood when he came across Maier’s negatives. His interest became almost an obsession, leading to the film, which was able to piece together her life and some theories as to why she took so many photos, all of which remained secret. As part of the exhibit, WSU is screening Finding Vivian Maier on Thursday, Feb. 12, at 7 pm in the CUB Auditorium. An introduction to the film from art historian Marianne Kinkel will take place in the Museum of Art at 6 pm. — SARAH MUNDS

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CULTURE | DIGEST

RADIO HAPPY BIRTHDAY, SPR

T

Spokane Public Radio’s future home, a historic firehouse on North Monroe.

he original KPBX (91.1 FM) was born in the basement of a South Hill home, where it operated throughout much of the 1970s, slowly growing and embedding itself in the Spokane community along the way. But the actual date of birth of Spokane Public Radio is Jan. 20, 1980, when KPBX became a National Public Radio member station. Thus, last week marked the 35th birthday for SPR, which now has three stations throughout the region putting locally produced and nationally syndicated programs on the air. For 35 years, the stations have operated out of the second floor of the Hoban Building on North Monroe Street, but that will change by this summer, when the organization moves closer to downtown. SPR celebrated its 35th birthday with a pledge drive that brought in about $170,000 in donations from listeners, all of which will go toward the new building. Renovations are already underway at the historic fire station (included on both national and local registries) at 1229

North Monroe, which will give SPR about 11,000 square feet of space, more than double what they currently work with. It will also feature other amenities, like a performance space for musicians. The current location was originally intended for five employees; SPR now has 15 full-time and 17 part-time employees. “We’ve been bursting at the seams for quite some time,” says SPR General Manager Cary Boyce. SPR’s three stations cover 20,000 square miles of the Inland Northwest, and Boyce says the stations plan to increase their programming to better service their listenership. Achieving such goals means continuing with SPR’s fundraising efforts, some of which could place your name on part of their new building’s tiles and bricks. Perhaps most enticing is the opportunity to have one of the original fireman’s poles in the old station named after you. Two are already spoken for, but there’s one remaining. — MIKE BOOKEY

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WEB | If you cook any food and use this thing called the Internet, you will soon swoon over YUMMLY, if you haven’t already. It’s been dubbed the Google of Food, and for good reason. Its customized features get smarter the more you use them. It allows you to scan and discover new recipes in an endless stream à la Pinterest, but also personalizes results according to likes and dislikes, diets and allergies. Want to eat like a caveman or perhaps like a small bird? No problem. You can even find what recipes are popular in your area. MOBILE | Speaking of bad-ass websites, the INLANDER has just launched a new mobile site. (Visit Inlander.com on your phone and it should automatically redirect you; bookmark it, and it’ll save a shortcut on your home screen.) The new interface still prioritizes our powerful search functions — allowing you to find local events, movie times, restaurants and more — and of course it displays our best and newest content. But you’ll also find helpful shortcuts to slideshows of our awardwinning photography as well as contests where you can win free stuff. We’re still beta-testing the site, so please send feedback to editor@inlander.com. BOOK | Want to read more books, but don’t have the attention span for The Goldfinch? We can relate. We’re reading THE BEST AMERICAN SHORT STORIES 2014, a curated collection of short fiction from the best outlets, including the New Yorker, the Paris Review, McSweeney’s and Granata. Guest editor and novelist Jennifer Egan has created an anthology heavy enough to feel important — with stories about anxiety, betrayal and love — with enough whimsy to keep a reader going. Favorite story: Lauren Groff’s “At the Round Earth’s Imagined Corners.” n

PRESCHOOL - 8TH GRADE | OPEN HOUSE Tuesday, February 10th, 5 - 7 PM • Visit teachers and classrooms • PRESCHOOL CLASSES FOR 2.5 - 5 YEARS: Half or full day options KINDERGARTEN: Half or full day K-8 features small class sizes with WA State Certified Teachers 401 E 30th Ave • 509.838.8139 • southsidechristianschool.org

JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 33


The Ultimate Comeback

PETE CARROLL vs. BILL BELICHICK

SUPER BOWL XLIX

Notes from a season with the Seahawks BY MIKE BOOKEY

T

he collective 12th Man found itself torn between excitement and that familiar you-just-jinxed-it feeling when sports talk guys, bar denizens and overly friendly neighbors speculated that the Seahawks had the tools for a repeat Super Bowl victory. Somehow, they’re now one step away from making that happen, but it took a comeback from an early season spent on the ropes, one that was capped by the comeback of all comebacks. In case you forgot, here’s how the Hawks ended up in Phoenix.

Seattle Seahawks vs. New England Patriots Sunday, Feb. 1, 3:30 pm, NBC-TV University of Phoenix Stadium, Glendale, Arizona

63

Age

1

Super Bowl wins

62 3 (2 more as an asst)

83-61, 8-4 postseason Career head coaching record 211-109, 21-9 postseason 1.13 million Pancakes or waffles

Twitter followers Favorite food

0 None; subsists solely on anger

Times caught cheating

Once, maybe twice

A suave track suit

Preferred game-day apparel

A dirty sweatshirt

Paddleboarding

Favorite hobby

0

Frowning

Week 1: Playing in the season’s first game, the Seahawks embarrass the Packers in Seattle, 36-16. Sports radio all but guarantees the Hawks will dominate from here on out. Lynch runs for 110 yards and two touchdowns, but doesn’t brag about it in the media.

Week 2: Playing in meltyour-cleats temperatures in San Diego, the Seahawks lose in awful fashion. Must have been the heat, we’re told.

Week 3: Widespread loss of faith is salvaged when Russell Wilson leads an overtime drive to beat the Broncos in a rematch of the Super Bowl.

Weeks 4-6: Coming off a bye week and then a win against the Professional Football Team of Washington, D.C., the Seahawks meet DeMarco Murray and the goddamn Dallas Cowboys and get beat up in a 30-23 win in Seattle where such things are not meant to happen.

Week 7: They trade Percy Harvin. Yes, he of the $67 million contract and frequent injuries and Super Bowl heroics. No one seems to care that he’s gone except for Lynch, who tries to stage a boycott by refusing to board the bus to the airport en route to St. Louis. Speaking of St. Louis, the Seahawks lose to the St… Louis… Rams? Now 3-3, Seattle looks far removed from its destiny. Some bandwagon fans neatly and symbolically fold up their Wilson jerseys.

Weeks 8-10: While fans might be nervous, Pete Carroll just pops in other stick of gum and engineers an ugly 13-9 victory at Carolina and a closer-thanneeded win over Oakland. Then Eli Manning comes to CenturyLink and cries his way through a 38-17 loss that sees the Hawks’ ground game come back to life, thanks to some healthy linemen and some extra Carroll-led yoga sessions at practice.

Week 12: Funny what a win can do, eh? Especially a 19-3 crushing of the alleged best team in football, which is the Arizona Cardinals at this point in the season. Lynch talks to the media after the game, answering every question simply with “yeah.” Most fans agree with him.

Week 13: It’s Thanksgiving evening and you can probably feel the last helping of mashed potatoes gyrating in your belly as you celebrate Richard Sherman intercepting his second Colin Kaepernick pass. Sherman tops things off by eating a turkey leg with Wilson on the 49ers’ midfield logo. Maybe it’s the bottle of holiday cheer you’ve been sucking on, but things seem to be on the right track.

Weeks 14-16: Getting in the Seahawks’ way will get you killed. Just ask Chip Kelly’s Philadelphia Eagles, blown up by Bobby Wagner and Seattle’s suddenly rejuvenated defense, or the 49ers, who suffer a second beating in three weeks. Or the entire state of Arizona, embarrassed into hiding after Lynch, who missed the first quarter with an upset tummy, bulldozed half a dozen defenders in the best run of the NFL season. “I appreciate your concern for my stomach,” he tells reporters.

Week 17: They said the Hawks were done, but they win that sixth-straight game against St. Louis. Home-field advantage, a No. 1 seed, a week to rest up… this is sounding familiar.

NFC Divisional Playoffs: Kam Chancellor jumps over the Carolina blocker lined up opposite him. Then he does it again. Sure, they make the field goal, but the damage is done. The Panthers are unnerved, probably why Cam Newton tosses a pick to Chancellor, who takes it 90 yards for a touchdown, leaving those fire-streak things from Back to the Future on the field.

NFC Championship: The Packers are up 16-0 at halftime. Maybe we should just switch it over to whatever rom-com TNT is airing and start the grieving process, so as not to witness the slow and ugly death of our hopes and dreams. Oh, but wait... A touchdown pass on a fake field goal from the Canadian holder to a 300-pound reserve offensive lineman? And then a huge drive? How about a successful onside kick? Marshawn Lynch begins forcing Packers to renounce their manhood with one run after another, and then a touchdown? A Hail Mary two-point conversion? A won coin toss in overtime? A bullet to Jermaine Kearse from the man who’d thrown four interceptions? Sure, why not? Let’s go to Phoenix, people. 

34 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015

Week 11: It’s a Sunday in mid-November and the Seahawks are in Kansas City. They lose and fall to 6-4. It looks like they’ll need to win two games against Arizona and two more against San Francisco to win the division. The only “easy” game left on the schedule is a season finale with St. Louis, and they’ve already lost to the Rams. Ugh.

There are lots of options for watching the Super Bowl, starting with every bar in the region. Both the Bing (901 W. Sprague, 534-5805) and the Garland (924 W. Garland, 327-1050) will show it on their really big screens.


America’s Game, Warts and All BY TED S. McGREGOR JR.

O

nce upon a time, it was just a game. You could play anywhere — out in the street dodging cars or just flicking little paper footballs across history class. Then came the money — like, really, really big money — and football got… well, more complicated. The players are always fun to watch, but the NFL itself seems, more and more, to be cast as the villain. Still, with 184 million of us expected to tune in on Sunday, it’s clear we’re obsessed. How else do you explain a week spent dissecting the proper inflation of a game ball?

D

espite the players’ amazing stories (human Ken doll Tom Brady passed over by the other 31 NFL teams during the draft, Richard Sherman’s path from Compton to Stanford to Seattle) and cool nicknames (“Gronk,” “Beast Mode”), it’s getting harder to look past the sins of the league that employs them. Greed is taking its toll. To start with, the $9 billion-a-year business we know as the NFL is… a tax-exempt nonprofit? (Thanks, Congress!) That’s just the tip of the iceberg. All season, the league has dealt with questions about its wishy-washy domestic violence policy after star Ray Rice punched out his wife. Many domestic violence activists are still asking the owners to fire NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell, who is paid $44 million a year to take exactly this kind of flak. Then there are the devastating aftereffects of head injuries, what the league is doing about preventing them and how they are repaying retired players who still suffer. People as diverse as legendary coach Mike Ditka and noted contrarian Malcolm Gladwell are troubled by the sport’s brutal toll. “Can you point to another industry in America,” Gladwell once wrote, “which, in the course of doing business, maims a third of its employees?” Taxpayers (that’s all of us who won’t be attending Sunday’s $6,000-a-seat game) aren’t immune from the exploitation either, as owners look to the public trough for new stadiums that can extract maximum profits. If you don’t vote for the stadium, you know what happens — your beloved [fill in team mascot here] will have no choice but to leave town. This shakedown targets the taxpayers’ soft spot, where our sports obsession leads to poor financial decisions. Down in Glendale, Arizona, citizens owe about $40 million a year in debt service for the University of Phoenix Stadium where the Super Bowl will be played. But of course they get a

ton of economic impact from the game, right? “I totally believe we will lose money on [the Super Bowl],” Glendale Mayor Jerry Weiers told ESPN. The NFL also demanded that 10,000 Arizonans volunteer to help stage their little nonprofit event. It’s gotten so bad, NFL teams are even cracking down on cheerleaders. Last fall, several squads filed suit against their teams for paying below-minimum wages. The Oakland Raiders settled; the Buffalo Bills, however, summarily fired their Jills. One of the Jills told the New York Times she was paid $420 for 800 hours of work during the 2013 season — after she was forced to buy her own $650 uniform. The Bills were recently purchased by Terry Pegula, a billionaire who made his money in fracking; rumor has it he’ll be hitting up Buffalo taxpayers for a new stadium soon.

T

o be fair, the NFL is attempting to address these tough issues. There are new tackling techniques being taught to kids, public awareness campaigns about domestic violence and big settlements with injured former players. Some say it’s nothing more than an image makeover, but these are positive steps. I’m willing to give the league some credit for trying. But as long as Roger Goodell keeps impersonating Mr. Burns from The Simpsons, it may be hard for the league to turn the page. Still, I can’t wait for kickoff. You’ve got the two cities that bookend I-90 — the two best coaches, the two best (and most interesting) teams, two of the very best quarterbacks. It’s a dream matchup. These Seahawks are special — they do it their way. Richard Sherman calls out Roger Goodell by name. Pete Carroll relies on yoga and all that California hippie stuff to keep his players going. And during games, in contrast to Bill Belichick, who often seems to be undergoing a mid-game colonoscopy, Coach Carroll hugs anything that moves. Then there’s owner Paul Allen, who did get public help on the stadium but has returned the favor by creating a unique populist fan phenomenon that sends Beastquakes out across the Pacific Northwest, easily felt all the way over here in Spokane. The Seahawks are a blue-and-green antidote to a lot of what’s wrong with the NFL. To them, football’s still a game. They don’t play for Roger Goodell; they play for each other. And they play for all of us, the mighty, mighty 12s. As Russell Wilson would say: Go Hawks! n

Tickets at Ticketswest.com and 1-800-325-Seat JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 35


F

Drink On

How one liquor store survives on creativity — and a great Bloody Mary recipe BY AMY MILLER-KREZELAK

Bloody Marys made with infused liquors at Eggers South Hill Liquor. YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS

36 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015

ront and center of Egger’s South Hill Liquor is the Pallet Table. It hosts small runs of innovative liquors, such as fresh cut grass vodka and gin distilled from Washington-grown apples. The walls are lined with liquors of all types, from the familiar to the rare: Italian aperitif Aperol, Portland’s House Spirits Coffee Liqueur and Woodinville Whiskey Co. share shelf space with local darlings 44° North and Dry Fly. Carolyn Seim manages the store, which was a state-run liquor store for more than 30 years before it was sold to Diane Egger, of the Egger’s Better Meats family, who had worked for the previous owner for 16 years. Seim is also no stranger to the liquor business. She managed a staterun store for 17 years and possesses a deep knowledge of classics, while at the same time appreciating new selections and craft cocktail trends. While some independent liquor stores have struggled in the wake of the shift in liquor laws, Seim has remained relevant with a fine collection of foreign and domestic liquors, with an eye toward local and regional distilleries. It also helps that she’s kind enough to share recipes for her cocktails, including one hell of a Bloody Mary. “We carry some things that the larger chains don’t. We have the largest selection of scotch on the South Hill. We have the best selection of vermouth you can find,” says Seim. The variety doesn’t stop at liquor. Mixers abound — from tomato juice and margarita mix to tonic and ginger beer — for all varieties of cocktail. Trendy Underberg, a popular German digestive, leads the way for a healthy selection of bitters including Fee Brothers, Scrappy’s, Sun Liquor and Angostura. Blue cheese-stuffed olives, pickled okra and maraschino cherries round out the plentiful garnish options. Seim has been the driving force behind rebranding the shop’s image. Perhaps her most significant creation: a tasting bar. Every Thursday and Friday from 4 to 6 pm, Seim mixes cocktails for patrons to taste and consider. Cocktails range from the fan favorite Moscow Mule, a blend of rum, ginger beer and lime, to the more potent Manhattan, a sophisticated combination of bourbon, sweet vermouth and bitters. “A taste is worth a thousand words. Sometimes people walk right past really interesting things to buy their brand,” she says, “If we can open a bottle and let them try something new, they’ll probably buy it. Even if someone doesn’t like the cocktail I’m making, they can try something else.” Seim’s personal favorite, the Bloody Mary, is perhaps too ambitious for the tasting bar, but neverthe-


less is a favorite. Seim shares her well-honed tips for the bloody bar you might be planning for your Super Bowl party.

EXPERIMENT WITH SPIRITS

The beauty of a Bloody Mary bar is giving guests the opportunity to experiment. Vodka in all flavors — chili pepper, bacon, Sriracha and cucumber — make an excellent base, as does tequila. Simple lagers or pilsners make refreshing red beers, as do Mexican micheladas. Or do as Seim does and infuse your own aquavit, the traditional Scandinavian liquor known for its intense herbal and aromatic flavors, ahead of time. “It’s very easy to make your own aquavit. Three days is enough to infuse. If you leave it much longer, it can get bitter or too hot,” says Seim.

OTHER THAN SALTING YOUR RIM, SKIP THE DRY SPICES

“If you take tomato juice and try to add celery salt and Worcestershire, all of the dry stuff sits on the top and doesn’t really soak into the tomato juice well. I just take the lid off of my Bloody Mary mixer, throw in some Demitri’s (Bloody Mary seasoning) and then shake it up. Demitri’s is less salty, too,” says Seim.

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DON’T SKIMP ON THE GARNISHES

Seim’s Bloody Marys are less a cocktail and more a meal, and that’s just fine. Celery, bell pepper, cucumber, pepperoncini, jalapeño, pickled asparagus, shrimp, pepperoni sticks and smoked oysters all have a place in a Bloody Mary.  Egger’s South Hill Liquor • 5611 S. Perry • Cocktail tasting 4-6 pm on Thursdays and Fridays • facebook.com/eggerssouthhillliquoor • 448-8084

Manager Carolyn Seim

CAROLYN’S PERFECT BLOODY MARY 1 ounce tequila Splash aquavit Splash Sriracha-flavored vodka Splash bacon-flavored vodka Dash Pickapeppa sauce 2 ounces Ballast Point mix 2 ounces Zing Zang mix 2 ounces V-8 with a dash of Demitri’s 3 dashes celery bitters Rim a tall glass with Old Bay seasoning. Fill with ice. Mix ingredients in a shaker and pour over the prepped glass. Garnish with pickled green beans, baby dill pickles, celery stalks and a slice of bacon.

Thai Chicken Flatbread

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JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 37


FOOD | BEER

Clear Skies Ahead Downdraft Brewing is a testimony to friendship, cooperation and perseverance BY CARRIE SCOZZARO

T

he clichés are too obvious to resist. After more than a year’s delay, Downdraft Brewery’s founding members have “weathered the storm.” And when a suitable Spokane Valley location couldn’t be found, they discovered a “silver lining” in Post Falls, Idaho. “The city bent over backward to help us get our doors open,” says Aimee Brayman, who along with her husband Nick, and friends Andrea and Nolan Garrett, own Downdraft Brewing. The name, she explains, is a reflection of the unique — and unpredictable — Pacific Northwest weather. “Downdraft was actually a name for an Amber Ale that we were developing, but the longer we looked at it, the more we loved the double entendre of ‘Downdraft’ as a weather-related term [a large, downward gust of wind] and ‘Downdraft’ with the connotation of draft beer.” Their beer names are similarly witty, ranging from lightly fruity, piney Seltice SMaSH to chocolatey, malty Exit 5 Brown Ale, both roadway references. Dry-hopped Anonymous Amber is a nod to brain drain that can occur (such as when working two jobs). Downdraft’s owners all work day jobs — Nick and the Garretts in information technology, while Aimee writes curriculum for a private school — but the brewery idea has been in the works for years. “Nick and Nolan were avid beer enthusiasts for a long time,” says Aimee. The couples visited breweries and tried out home brew kits, she says. “We bottle conditioned, made lots of messes, made

some good beer, made some bad beer.” Even though they’ve barely opened, they’re already planning for expansion. Additional beers are offered through the “red tap,” a rotating selection of experiments, such as the currently popular Winds of Change IPA. Try a taster tray ($7) — five 3-ounce pours of any five of their seven taps — in their contemporary tasting room with its granite bar, gray walls and steel accents, including Andrea’s DIY light fixtures. Enjoy a pint ($4.75) or a growler ($12) to take home and be on the lookout for Downdraft blowing into some of your favorite establishments around town.  Downdraft Brewing • 418 W. Seltice Way, Suite A, Post Falls • Open Tue-Thu, 4 pm-close; Fri, 4-10 pm; Sat, 1-10 pm • downdraftbrewing.com • 208-262-4233

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38 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015


FOOD | UPDATE

PRESENTS

RESTAURANT WEEK

A Big Train chai tea from Chairs. COURTNEY BREWER PHOTO

CHAIRS PUBLIC HOUSE

1305 N. Hamilton | 381-0909

T

he Chairs brand has grown from an intimate coffee shop to a versatile modern pub in a transformation that spanned two locations over the past four years. After the recent remodel, Chairs Public House near the Gonzaga campus is back with a cozy-industrial ambience, more local beer and liquor options, and a larger entrée menu. New chef Paul Taylor has added options such as ahi tuna and steak, but still maintains Chairs’ signature options, including its beloved avocado fries. Dining rooms are more spacious and inviting than ever, but if you can’t stay, the updated entry allows you to order to-go with ease. Check out more than 30 local beer options, including harder-to-find brews like the Roast House Stout from Orlison. In addition to the expanded menu, Chairs also features a new coffee bar and spruced-up bathrooms. — COURTNEY BREWER

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JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 39


Tough Issues

Kevin Costner and Jillian Estell in Black or White. split a long time ago to hide under the blanket of a crack haze. Still, she gets her lawyer brother Jeremiah (Anthony Mackie) to take the case. It’s no-nonsense Jeremiah who accuses Elliot of having “a problem with black people,” an allegation that’s simply not applicable to the affable Elliot, especially when he makes an appearance at Rowena’s happily crowded home and is seen to be popular with everyone... except Rowena, who spreads the unwarranted idea that Elliot wants to keep Eloise “away from black people.” Plot not thick enough? OK, Elliot’s got a drinking problem, one that he’s always trying to hide with little blasts of Binaca in his mouth to cover up the smell of alcohol. Tensions rise, angers flare, a shared hatred who’s been living with him and his wife since the death between Elliot and Reggie is apparent. of their daughter in childbirth. Yet despite what seems like a lot of heavy-handedA good script — about how grandpa, without ness, this is a movie about love, and what people will do grandma to help, will rise to the occasion of dealing with to protect people who they love. Via the talents of Octathe innocent little girl — could have been fashioned out via Spencer and Mpho Koaho (from the TV series Falling of just that circumstance. But Binder goes for a lot more Skies) as Eloise’s private tutor Duvan, than just the pulling of heartstrings. He BLACK OR WHITE there’s also a dose of offbeat humor — she gives us a boatload of fresh, interesting can’t control her outrageous outbursts, characters, then spins a constantly evolv- Rated PG-13 Written and directed by Mike Binder even when the story eventually moves to ing story line around them. a courtroom, and he’s just a funny guy. Eloise comes from a mixed marriage Starring Kevin Costner, Octavia Spencer, Jillian Estell While newcomer Estell keeps the cute little — Elliot’s daughter and Reggie (André girl business nicely balanced, the film is Holland), the son of Rowena (Octavia outstanding mostly because of Costner’s excellent perforSpencer), a well-to-do black woman who lives across mance. His Elliot can be seen as someone who’s almost town, and has never exactly gotten along with Elliot. as flawed as the crackhead Reggie, but while Reggie is a Let the plot thicken! Rowena, an outspoken and full-fledged loser, Elliot is a man with a heart bigger than stubborn woman, has decided that after all this time, his personal demons. Even more credit goes to Binder, there’s plenty of room for Eloise at her place, and brings who fashioned a surprising, gutsy, and ultimately crowdup the idea of joint custody. She thinks the girl should pleasing ending. n have her real daddy back. But that would be Reggie, who

Kevin Costner and Octavia Spencer provide a thoughtful meditation on race in Black or White BY ED SYMKUS

O

riginally titled Black and White, then changed, with no explanation, to Black or White, this second teaming of writer-director Mike Binder and star Kevin Costner (their first was the overlooked 2005 dramady The Upside of Anger) gives us both men wearing their “game on” shoes. It also features a story made timely by the unfortunate overabundance of racially charged headlines these days. But Black or White has nothing to do with white cops and black victims. It’s about racially mixed families, and how words and actions can turn harmony into discord, how misunderstandings can lead to tarnished relationships. Yet the film also shows, through a strong, inventive and tight script, how, as Paul McCartney once wrote, “We can work it out.” It begins on a terribly sad note, with the awful news that hotshot lawyer Elliot Anderson’s (Costner) wife has been killed in a car accident. Devastated, he returns to his now much emptier home to face his housekeeper Rosita and cute 7-year-old granddaughter Eloise (Jillian Estell),

40 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015


FILM | SHORTS

Project Almanac

OPENING FILMS BLACK OR WHITE

Kevin Costner gives another great performance as a heavy-drinking lawyer who loses his wife and must deal with raising the 7-year-old granddaughter (Jillian Estell) who’s been living with them since their daughter died in childbirth, and her drug-addled father vanished. But the little girl’s pushy grandmother (Octavia Spencer) thinks she should come and live with the black side of the mixed family. Strong writing, direction, acting and a gutsy ending. (ES) Rated PG-13

THE LOFT

Vincent Stevens (Karl Urban) and his four friends have it all: wealth, success, beautiful wives and even more beautiful mistresses. When the five rent a loft to conceal their dirty little secrets, it seemed that their lives couldn’t get more idyllic. Tables quickly turn when a strange woman’s corpse is discovered handcuffed to the bed. Accusations fly and paranoia brews as they suspect that one of the five must be involved. (CB) Rated R

A MOST VIOLENT YEAR

It’s 1981 and New York City is in the midst of its most deadly and allaround violent period ever. Abel Morales (Oscar Isaac) is an immigrant who has found success with a heating oil company, but is attracting the attention of organized crime. It doesn’t help that Morales’ wife (Jessica Chastain) is from a mafia family and knows how to play dirty. None of this bodes well for Morales, especially when the district attorney comes sniffing around. (MB) Rated R

PROJECT ALMANAC

When David (Johnny Weston) finds blueprints for a time machine in his garage, he and his friends are determined to make the most of it. As their manipulation of the past results in plane crashes, riots and natural disasters, the teens discover that they must go back to the beginning if they have any hope of undoing the ripple effect. (CB) Rated PG-13

NOW PLAYING AMERICAN SNIPER

American Sniper opens with Bradley Cooper’s Chris Kyle on his first tour in Fallujah, perched on a rooftop protecting the Marines clearing buildings door to door. From the moment of his first life-or-death decision, the story flashes back — to his Texas childhood, his career as a rodeo cowboy, his eventual enlistment and his courtship and marriage to his wife, Taya (Sienna Miller) — before returning to his experiences serving in Iraq. (SR) Rated R

THE BABADOOK

Jennifer Kent makes a stunningly assured feature filmmaking debut with this unnerving thriller about a single mom, Amelia, who’s exhausted due to the sleeplessness of near-7-year-old Samuel, who fears monsters that he believes to be hiding in closets and under the bed. Things escalate when Mister Babadook, an ominous children’s pop-up book, mysteriously appears in Samuel’s bedroom. At Magic Lantern (MB) Not Rated

BIRDMAN

After good work in lots of small supporting roles over the past couple of decades, Michael Keaton gets back to work as a former franchise movie star now trying to make a comeback on the Broadway stage, but finding obstacles everywhere, many of them in his own head. (ES) Rated R

BOY NEXT DOOR

There’s really only one word to describe this film: creepy. It is a psychological thriller, though, and one that takes obsession with another person to a really messed up level. High school teacher Claire (Jennifer Lopez) is recently divorced and lonely, but things start really getting out of hand for her after an impulsive (and regretted) one-night-stand with her hunky young neighbor (Ryan Guzman). (CS) Rated R

BOYHOOD

Richard Linklater’s film, shot over the course of 12 years, is a true masterwork and eschews the big-bang theory of dramatics in favor of the million-andone little things that accumulate daily and help shape who we are, and who we will become. (MB) Rated R

CITIZENFOUR

An intimate look at Edward Snowden’s life in the days just before his spooky treasure trove of NSA secrets went public thanks to Glenn Greenwald and Laura Poitras, the latter of whom directed this film. Citizenfour takes place almost exclusively in Snowden’s Hong Kong hotel room. At Magic Lantern (MS) Rated R

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JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 41


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5

$

LIVE ACTION (117 MIN - PG 13)

Fri/Sat: 3:00, 7:00 Tue-Thu: 5:00 THE HOMESMAN (117 MIN) *last week! Fri/Sat: 5:45 Tue-Thu: 3:45

BOTTOMLESS POPCORN!

ALL SHOWS ALL TIMES

BOYHOOD (160 MIN) *Academy Award Nominee! Fri/Sat: 8:05 Tue-Thu: 6:00

Annie

THE BABADOOK (91 MIN) *last weekend!

Fri 5:00, Sat 12:30 5:00 Sun 12:00, Mon-Thurs 5:00

Fri/Sat: 9:15

CITIZENFOUR (111 MIN) *Academy Award Nominee! Fri/Sat: 3:30

KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON (81 MIN)

*weekend only!

Fri/Sat: 1:45 25 W Main Ave • 509-209-2383 • All Shows $8 www.magiclanternspokane.com

Penguins of Madagascar Fri 7:30 Sat 3:00 7:30 Sun-Mon 7:30 Wed-Thurs 7:30

February 1st, 2015

Moral Bipolarity:

St. Vincent

Fri-Mon 9:30pm Tues 9:40pm Wed-Thurs 9:30pm

The Continuum between Good & Evil Rev. Dr. Todd Eklof, UUSC Minister

Unitarian Universalist

Fargo

Tues 7:30

Church of Spokane

4340 W. Ft. Wright Drive

509-325-6383 | uuspokane.org

Sunday Services / Religious Ed & Childcare

9:15 & 11am

924 W. GARLAND • 509.327.1050 WWW.GARLANDTHEATER.COM

Spokane Tribal College 3rd Annual Dinner & Auction

FILM | SHORTS

NOW PLAYING

This event will feature a cultural sharing of dancers, visual artists, live music, and fine dining. There will be a silent open auction.

Saturday February 7th, 2015

Red Lion Inn at the Park - Grand Ballroom

Doors: 5pm / Auction: 6pm / Dinner: 7pm Tables of 8: $400 / Individual Tickets: $60 For more info contact:

Randy Ramos - 509.326.1700 or 509.218.7278

42 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015

THE NEW YORK INLANDER TIMES

FORCE MAJEURE

A sly satire of masculinity as well as an engaging family drama, Force Majeure follows a Swedish family that travels to the (gorgeously shot) French Alps for a ski vacation that is brutally disrupted by an avalanche that turns a relaxing lunch into a disaster — particularly for family patriarch Tomas. At Magic Lantern (DN) Rated R

THE HOMESMAN

Tommy Lee Jones, Hilary Swank and Meryl Streep star in this film that offers a glimpse into the challenges faced in the early American West. When three women become mentally unstable due to their trying pioneer lifestyles, the hardened Mary Bee Cuddy — played by Swank— sets out to deliver them to safety in Iowa. (KG) Rated R

THE IMITATION GAME

During World War II, the Germans used a machine called an Enigma that created what were thought to be unbreakable codes for top-secret military communications. British mathematician Alan Turing (Benedict Cumberbatch) was hired by Allied forces to decipher the machine’s codes and help win the war. (MB) Rated PG-13

87

Foxcatcher

81

Into the Woods

70

The Homesman

68

Unbroken

60

Black or White

58 WORTH $10

of a cheeky and debonair British art dealer tasked with recovering a stolen painting. Joined by his man-servant Jock (Paul Bettany), Mortdecai seduces and charms his way through just about any predicament in this comedic romp. (CS) Rated R

PADDINGTON

Paddington the bear winds up in London in search of an old friend after a family tragedy in his native Peru. He soon finds a loving family to take him in, but is quick to cause a series of calamities in the home of the friendly Londoners, who name him Paddington. (MB) Rated PG

THE PRINCIPLE

For a long, long while, people on Earth just assumed that their planet was located at the center of the universe. We gave up that idea long ago, but a documentary team is wondering aloud “What if we are at the center of it all?” They interviewed leading scientists, which became controversial because the filmmakers didn’t disclose the hypothesis at the center of the film. So basically, a conspiracy theorist conned a bunch of very smart people into promoting his idea. (MB) Rated PG

SELMA

KEEP ON KEEPIN’ ON

STRANGE MAGIC

Is there any role Johnny Depp can’t (or won’t) play? The actor’s latest gig playing Charlie Mortdecai — the same character from the 1970s English novel series that’s more recently garnered “cult” status — places Depp in the role

Shakespeare will never cease to infiltrate our popular culture, as evidenced by George Lucas’ new animated project, Strange Magic. The film, inspired by A Midsummer Night’s Dream, features trolls, elves, goblins and other mythical creatures battling, with hilarious consequences, over a magic potion. Features voices of Kristin Chenoweth, Maya Rudolph, Evan Rachel Wood and more. (MB) Rated PG

TAKEN 3

(OUT OF 100)

The Babadook

Selma could have been just an inspirational drama about a pivotal historical moment, and it could have been just a portrait of King’s efforts at promoting civil rights. But director Ava DuVernay and her team are interested in doing something much less common, something that echoes the similar success of 2012’s Lincoln. (SR) Rated PG-13

MORTDECAI

METACRITIC.COM

89

The song-filled new telling of familiar Grimm fairy tales is a terrific piece of work, with wonderful performances, outstanding production design and snappy writing. But this film, based on the Broadway musical, is also extremely dark, featuring themes of deception, greed, infertility, and even a taste of lasciviousness. (ES) Rated PG Clark Terry made his mark on the jazz world as one of the genre’s most skilled trumpeters and later went into teaching music. When he began to lose his sight from illness, he became closer with one of his students, Justin Kauflin, a blind piano prodigy. This documentary follows the two over the course of four years. At Magic Lantern (MB) Rated R

VARIETY

(LOS ANGELES)

Birdman

DON’T MISS IT

FOXCATCHER

In this real-life story Steve Carell plays wacko John E. du Pont, the wealthy heir to a family fortune who coaches — in the loosest sense of the term — the Foxcatcher wrestling team he believes will somehow elevate America’s standing in the world. Channing Tatum and Mark Ruffalo play Olympic wrestlers caught up in du Pont’s world, with deadly results. (SD) Rated R

INTO THE WOODS

Native Horseman at the Spokane River, c. 1910. / Photo by Edward Curtis

CRITICS’ SCORECARD

Liam Neeson is quite the ass-kicker, never more so than in the role of exspy Bryan Mills. In the first two editions of what we can only hope will

WATCH IT AT HOME

SKIP IT

end as just a trilogy, Mills saved his daughter Kim and ex-wife Lenore. In Taken 3, Lenore has been murdered, Bryan’s been framed, and he has to open a can on the real killers to clear his name. (DN) Rated PG-13

THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING

Inspired by Jane Wilde Hawking’s memoir about her life with former husband Stephen Hawking, the brilliant theoretical physicist (A Brief History of Time) diagnosed with motor neuron disease at age 21, the film’s heart beats with a romantic optimism, even when each of them finds new soulmates and their union ends. (SD) Rated PG-13

UNBROKEN

The story of Louis Zamperini (Jack O’Connell), a bombardier during World War II who, as a young man, was a medal-winning athlete at the 1936 Olympics, but was stranded for more than a month on a raft after his plane goes down only to be captured by the Japanese. (SR) Rated PG-13

WHIPLASH

Socially maladroit and painfully single-minded, Andrew (Miles Teller), a freshman at a competitive conservatory, lives only to drum. Early on, he’s tapped by an instructor named Fletcher (J.K. Simmons) to join his elite competition band. (KJ) Rated R

THE WEDDING RINGER

Hollywood tests America’s love of Kevin Hart by giving him the role of Jimmy, proprietor of Best Man, Inc., a company providing groomsmen to loser dudes with no friends — in this case Doug (Josh Gad). Naturally, Jimmy and Doug become fast friends in the process of lying to Doug’s wifeto-be (Kaley Cuoco-Sweeting). (DN) Rated R

WILD

Reese Witherspoon stars as Cheryl Strayed, the woman who walked the length of the Pacific Crest Trail and lived to write a hit book (upon which this film is based) about it. Directed by Jean-Marc Vallee (Dallas Buyers Club), Wild follows Strayed as she deals with her mother’s death and her crippling addiction issues by heading into the wilderness alone. (MB) Rated R 


FILM | REVIEW

SpIFF Saturday February 7

Wildlike Bing Cro

sby Thea

7 PM

ter

Tickets $10 / $5 for students.

Presented in Partnership with the

Leonard Oakland Film Festival Me and My Moulton is nominated for an Academy Award.

Short Takes

AMERICAN SNIPER

R Daily (4:15) 6:15 7:00 9:10 9:45 Sat-Sun (10:45) (1:30) (2:10)

PROJECT ALMANAC

PG-13 Daily (4:20) 6:40 9:10 Sat-Sun (11:30) (1:50)

MORTDECAI

R Daily 7:20 9:35

Masterful storytelling happens in a hurry for the Oscar-nominated short films

G

ANIMATED PROGRAM

As part of the 77-minute Animated Program, there are four additional films — Sweet Cocoon, Footprints, Duet and Bus Story — screening with this year’s five nominees for Best Short FilmAnimated.

THE NOMINEES:

My and My Moulton (14 minutes): Three Norwegian sisters survive life with their artistic parents. Feast (6 minutes): A man’s relationship history told through the food he drops for his adopted puppy. The Bigger Picture (7 minutes): Two brothers juggle the tension of dealing with an aging mother. A Single Life (2 minutes): A turntable and vinyl record give a woman time-traveling abilities.

STRANGE MAGIC

PG Daily (4:10) 7:00 Sat-Sun (11:40) (2:00)

THE BOY NEXT DOOR

R Daily (5:10) 7:20 9:40 Sat-Sun (12:20) (2:50)

PADDINGTON

PG Daily (3:00) (5:00) 6:50 8:45 Sat-Sun (11:00) (1:00)

THE WEDDING RINGER

BY DAN NAILEN iven how brief attention spans are these days, one would think short films would be enjoying a boom in popularity and a much higher profile. As it is, shorts remain largely unseen except among the most die-hard of film geeks. One exception comes this time of year, every year, when the Oscar nominees for short film are packaged together and sent to theaters across the country, offering casual viewers an opportunity to see the best of the past year back-to-back, all in one seating.

AIRWAY HEIGHTS

10117 W State Rt 2 • 509-232-0444

R Daily (5:00) 7:15 9:30 Sat-Sun (2:45)

THE IMITATION GAME

The Dam Keeper (18 minutes): A bullied pig is in charge of tending a town’s dam, or risking the town’s demise.

LIVE ACTION

The films in this year’s Best Short Film-Live Action category are a wide-ranging batch produced mainly in Europe, as well as Israel and Tibet. The Live Action program runs 117 minutes.

THE NOMINEES:

Parvaneh (25 minutes): An Afghan refugee creates an unusual relationship with a Swiss street kid as she tries to wire money to her family. Boogaloo and Graham (14 minutes): Two young boys are given two baby chicks to raise as a test from their father. Aya (39 minutes): An airport meeting between an arriving passenger and his assigned driver takes a mysterious turn. The Phone Call (21 minutes): A woman working at a crisis phone line takes a call from a suicidal older man. Butter Lamp (15 minutes): A photographer and his assistant travel to shoot in a remote Tibetan village.  dann@inlander.com 2015 Oscar Shorts • Opening Fri, Jan. 30 • Magic Lantern Theatre • 25 W. Main • magiclanternspokane.com • 209-2383

PG-13 Daily (4:15) 6:50 9:35 Sat-Sun (11:15) (1:45)

TAKEN 3

PG-13 Daily (4:40) 7:00 9:20 Sat-Sun (11:50) (2:20)

INTO THE WOODS

PG Daily (3:20) (5:10) 9:15

WANDERMERE

12622 N Division • 509-232-7727

AMERICAN SNIPER

R Daily (1:30) (2:15) (4:15) 6:15 7:00 9:15 9:45 Fri-Sun (10:45)

PROJECT ALMANAC

PG-13 Daily (1:50) (4:20) 6:40 9:10 Fri-Sun (11:30)

THE LOFT

R Daily (2:30) (4:50) 7:15 9:40 Fri, Mon-Thu (12:15)

BLACK OR WHITE

PG-13 Daily (1:20) (3:50) 6:30 9:10 Fri-Sun (10:50)

MORTDECAI

R Daily (5:00) 7:20 9:35

STRANGE MAGIC

PG Daily (11:40) (2:00) (4:10) 7:00

THE BOY NEXT DOOR

R Daily (12:20) (2:50) (5:10) 7:20 9:40

PADDINGTON

PG Daily (1:00) (3:00) (5:00) 6:50 8:45 Fri-Sun (11:00)

THE WEDDING RINGER

R Daily (2:45) (5:00) 7:15 9:30 Fri, Mon-Thu (12:30)

THE IMITATION GAME

PG-13 Daily (1:45) (4:15) 6:50 9:35 Fri-Sun (11:15)

TAKEN 3

PG-13 Daily (11:50) (2:20) (4:40) 7:00 9:20

UNBROKEN

PG-13 Daily (3:30) 6:30 9:30 Fri, Mon-Thu (12:30)

INTO THE WOODS

PG Daily (1:10) 6:40 9:25 Fri-Sun (10:40)

THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF FIVE ARMIES PG-13 Daily (3:50) 9:15

NIGHT AT THE MUSEUM: SECRET OF THE TOMB PG Daily (12:10) (2:20) (4:00)

Showtimes in ( ) are at bargain price. Special Attraction — No Passes Showtimes Effective 1/30/15-2/5/15

Wildlike

With her mother in recovery, a troubled but daring teenage girl is sent to Alaska to live with her uncle. When that relationship turns bad, the girl is forced to run and finds herself lost in the Alaska wilderness. A chance meeting with a lone backpacker, an older man with issues of his own, leads to a partnership that proves beneficial to both.

Sponsored by STCU. nd Hosted by Leonard Oakla ty rsi ive Un h ort of Whitw een Filmmaker Frank Hall Gr is scheduled to attend

SpIFF Spokane International Film Festival www.spokanefilm.org

For more info, visit spokanefilmfestival.org JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 43


W

One Becomes Tw o The Hop! continues on while Pinnacle Northwest, the new downtown all-ages music venue, opens up BY LAURA JOHNSON

e’re standing on the dark stage of the soon-to-be-open Pinnacle Northwest, surveying a tiered room that’s experienced its fair share of rattling bass beats, grinding dance moves and powerhouse rock shows. “We may be getting rid of that,” owner Thomas “TC” Chavez says, pointing to a smooth, silver-colored dance pole near the front of the stage. “We’re adding another layer of flooring on top of this, but this setup is sound.” The Hop! owner is giving the rundown on his new downtown facility, the former Club 412 space on Sprague that recently closed after not renewing its lease. Planning to open “the Pin” next month while still keeping The Hop! on North Monroe, Chavez says he wants to make his new place the sort of all-ages music club where people also stop in, grab a sandwich and catch a game during the afternoon. Currently, the freezing building — Chavez hasn’t yet found the thermostat — is a work in progress. The smell of sweaty, booze-fueled weekends still lingers here. Moving boxes and restaurant accessories are stacked haphazardly, along with a wooden baseball bat named Hercules (“just in case,” Chavez says), in the downstairs bar area formerly known as Shots. Upstairs, the dingy afternoon sky flows through lofty windows, illuminating rock rubble and broken glass sprinkled across the dark floors. Apart from the women’s bathroom and the large and smaller stage areas, which are essentially done, there’s necessary deep cleaning and fresh painting to complete before the venue can open. Yet Chavez, 54, is fairly confident he’ll have the place ready for the Felix Martin show scheduled for Feb. 13. That is, if anyone will insure him.

T

he date is seared into his brain: September 8, 2013. It was his daughter’s birthday, and he had gotten back from dinner with her on the night tragedy struck in The Hop!’s parking lot. Around midnight, a man was shot and killed, and in those seconds, when Chavez wasn’t there, everything changed. “That phone call from my son was the most surreal of my life,” Chavez remembers. “It was such a horrible thing that I wish never happened.” Chavez says there was a drop in clientele those first weeks after the incident, but he wasn’t going to give up. “I knew that time was the answer,” he says, sitting on a dusty, tan couch in the green room adjacent to the Pin’s stage. “Eventually, people would move on to something else.” But when there’s a homicide on your property, no matter who’s at fault, insurance companies don’t want to cover you. Chavez had originally planned to shutter The Hop! before opening the Pin, but insurers were more receptive if he kept both. So for at least the next year, along

44 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015


Owner Thomas “TC” Chavez shows off the Pin’s soon-tobe-open eating and small stage areas YOUNG KWAK PHOTOS with the help of his sons Tommy and Matthew, Chavez is running two businesses.

C

havez, a retired Navy recruiter originally from Los Angeles, opened the punk haven Cretin Hop on Howard Street in 2008, mainly as a place for his then-teenage sons (currently in the local punk three-piece Reason For Existence) to play. Three years later he moved the business to the Monroe location, dropping a business partner and part of the name. “Logic doesn’t always play a part in my decisions. I’m an emotional beast,” Chavez says purposefully. “Running a music venue certainly defies logic. This was never my dream or anything, but I do like the challenge.” Since then, The Hop! has been a bastion for local, just-starting-out talent, offering them a place to play. Chavez also books many touring metal and punk shows that wouldn’t necessarily find space at other local stages. Surviving this business now for seven years, Chavez knows what the Spokane music scene can handle. And that’s why he says he can make the Pin work in the mid-sized space where other music clubs, like Casbah and A Club, have failed. “If I book it smart, we’re going to be OK,” Chavez says. “I am rolling the dice coming over here, but the idea of coming downtown intrigued me.” While shows at The Hop! will still include all genres, the Pin will cater some to an older crowd — expect select shows to be 18+ — as well as to the usual metal and punk lovers. “It’s us. We’ve always been who we are, a family-run business,” Chavez says. “The flavor will remain the same between the venues.” n Pinnacle Northwest • 412 W. Sprague • thepinevents.com • 368-4077

...continued on next page

JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 45


Cancellations Cost Businesses

MUSIC | METAL

20% in Revenue Every Year

Until Now

Learn More

rebooked.com

Past Masters

Young Canadian rockers take us back to metal’s roots.

Skull Fist brings classic heavy metal into the 21st century BY BEN SALMON

D

RyleiFranks_012915_4S_GG.tif

46 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015

eath metal. Black metal. Grindcore and glam. Tech-death. Death-doom. Stonersludge. Metalcore. Over the past few decades, what once was called heavy metal has splintered into dozens of subgenres, many built around extreme vocals or playing styles. So it’s no surprise that the classic metal sound of the ’70s and ’80s — speedy riffs, skyscraping falsettos, twin guitar solos and arena-ready choruses — seems like a lost art, or at best a relic of the past. Here then is Skull Fist, a quartet of young Toronto rockers on their first major tour across the United States. A call into their tour van is like a peek into heavy metal’s colorful past. The band’s name came about as a result of “a drunken accident,” guitarist Jonny Nesta says just before breaking into laughter. “(Frontman) Zach (Slaughter) was trying to say ‘skeleton hand’ but he said ‘skull fist.’ It seemed to work out pretty well.” A year ago, Skull Fist released its second album, Chasing the Dream, and the band has been picking up both solid reviews (“captures a long-forgotten era with a sense of verve and joy,” wrote Decibel magazine) and steam ever since. “We all felt (Chasing the Dream) was a pretty strong follow-up to (2011’s) Head of the Pack, but none of us really had huge expectations going into it,” Nesta says. “We didn’t think we’d be able to do all the shit we did when Head of the Pack

came out and go all the places we did. I’ve been kind of blown away from the start.” Certainly, some of Skull Fist’s appeal is rooted in nostalgia, at least for older metalheads. But the band also deserves credit for taking a bygone style and updating it not only with killer melodies, but also a sense of restraint. From Slaughter’s sensational vocals to the rhythm section’s steady throb, Skull Fist treats traditional metal with tremendous respect. Which is likely why comparisons to ’80smetal parody band Steel Panther have stopped in the past couple of years, according to Nesta. “I think people are fully catching on to what we’re doing,” he says. It’s also just awesome to watch a band have fun, and Skull Fist has no shortage of that, even in the course of a sometimes sparsely attended maiden voyage through America. “We really enjoy what we do a lot and we’re all pretty happy people and it comes out when we’re at shows ’n shit. It’s what we love doing,” Nesta says. “We played a gig a few days ago that was literally three people in a shack. It was still fun, though.” n Skull Fist with Mercy Brown, Knight of Tears and Over Sea Under Stone • Fri, Jan. 30, at 7:30 pm • $7 • All-ages • The Hop! • 706 N. Monroe • thehopevents.com • 328-5467


PRESENTED

BY

KEYBOARDS! ALL KEYBOARDS, DIGITAL PIANOS, SYNTHS

10% OFF THIS WEEKS DEAL

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RD ALL IN STOCK KEYSBOA STANDS, BENCHE OFFERS EXPIRE 2/5/15 & ACCESSORIES

VINYL THURS WITH JAMES

AMERICAN IDOL CONTESTANT

LOVEY JAMES

LATE SHOW 9pm | No Cover 21+ Only

SCOTTIE FEIDER OF PINE LEAGUE

FRIDAY JAN 30TH

Buffalo Jones SATURDAY JAN 31ST

So Pitted // 66 Beat Loomer // Phlem Fatale SUNDAY FEB 1ST

NERD NIGHT with Nehemiah and Happy Time Prices all day. MONDAY FEB 2ND

Trivia! Smarty Pants TUESDAY FEB 3RD

SAt 1/31

Whiskey Wednesday and Sally Bop Jazz

120 E. Sprague Ave.

DO YOUR DUTY DRINK LOCAL

PRESENTED BY

8pm | FREE STICKY TOAST

THuRs 2/5

7pm | $10 adv TURKUAZ / BANDIT TRAIN

FrI 2/6

7pm | $8 adv

KYRS BENEFIT FEATURING

The Northwest’s FIRST Nashville Honkytonk

THIS WEEKEND! RISING STAR

COmInG UP Sat 2/7

7pm | $8

BULLETS OR BALLOONS CD RELEASE BLACKWATER PROPHET / THE BIGHT

LUKE JAXON 

WILD RABBIT

at 9pm

Doors @ 6pm Dance Lessons @ 7pm

7pm | $16 adv

TuEs 2/10 OTEP

Open Mic of Open-Ness WEDNESDAY FEB 4TH

HAYDEN 7719 Government Way, Coeur d’Alene, ID 83835 (208) 762-8888

PAWN1.COM

FrI 1/30 EARLY SHOW 5:30pm | $10 THURSDAY JAN 29TH

NORTH DIVISION 8014 N. Division, Spokane, WA 99208 (509) 487-8888

bringing you auth enti c BBQ inside “the Ville”

SaT 2/14

7:30pm | $13 CAROLYN WONDERLAND

171 s. wAsHiNgToN sT 624-4319 bIgDiPpErEvEnTs.cOm

 No cover before 8 and never a cover for active military.

208-457-9128 6361 W. Seltice Way, Post Falls, ID

NORTH DIVISION 8014 N. Division Spokane, WA 99208 (509) 487-8888

HAYDEN 7719 Government Way Coeur d’Alene, ID 83835 (208) 762-8888

JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 47


MUSIC | SOUND ADVICE

POWER FUNK TURKUAZ

W

hat you need to know about this Brooklyn nine (or more)-piece: They will bring the funk with a ferocity you probably haven’t felt in your bones for too long. This powerhouse unit features ample horns, backup singers who’ve devoted some attention to choreography, a bass player who lays down the law and a vibe that seems almost cynic-proof when it comes to moving the dance floor. If you want some of that old-school funk, Turkuaz can provide, with precision and timing, but they’ve got a fresh feel that keeps them from sounding dated. That’s a win-win. — MIKE BOOKEY Turkuaz • Thu, Feb. 5, at 7 pm • $10/$15 door • All-ages • The Big Dipper • 171 S. Washington • bigdipperevents.com • Also playing John’s Alley, Wed, Feb. 4

J = THE INLANDER RECOMMENDS THIS SHOW J = ALL AGES SHOW

Thursday, 01/29

219 LounGe (208-263-9934), “Pray for snow” party feat. Mac Lloyd BooMerS CLASSiC roCK BAr & GriLL, Randy Campbell acoustic show J BuCer’S CoFFeehouSe PuB, Open Jazz Jam with Erik Bowen BuCKhorn inn, Spokane River Band Coeur D’ALene CASino, PJ Destiny J The hoP!, Skies Burn Black, Deviance, Jedediah the Pilot, Keep In Check, Ghost Parade, the Body Rampant, A Cryptic Ending, AeVum, the Drag John’S ALLey, DJ DarkBlood J KniTTinG FACTory, Trigger Hippy, Gatorloops J LAGunA CAFé, Just Plain Darin LeFTBAnK Wine BAr, Nick Grow J Luxe CoFFeehouSe, Particlehead o’ShAy’S, Open mic reD rooM LounGe, Left Over Soul roADhouSe CounTry roCK BAr, Steve Starkey J SPoKAne ArenA, Eric Church with Halestorm The ViKinG BAr AnD GriLL, Casey Rogers & One Man Trainwreck ZoLA, The Phil Lamb Band

Friday, 01/30

219 LounGe, DJ Cakemix J The BArTLeTT, The FInns, Dem Empire BeVerLy’S, Robert Vaughn J The BiG DiPPer, Early show: Lovey James (of American Idol), Late show: Scottie Feider BoLo’S, Dragonfly BooMerS CLASSiC roCK BAr & GriLL, Rampage BoWL’Z BiTeZ AnD SPiriTZ, Likes Girls J BuCer’S CoFFeehouSe PuB, Eclectic Collection with Michado

48 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015

BLUES-HOP G. LOVE & SPECIAL SAUCE P

ractice now. Sway back and forth slowly and smoothly. This is the best way to move to G. Love & Special Sauce’s version of bluesy, folky jams laced with hip-hop. They’ve been doing it this way for more than 20 years, when the trio first crafted their sound back in Philadelphia. After a six-year break, the original lineup has reunited to write and tour behind the 2014 album Sugar, the band’s first record in nearly a decade. G. Love (aka Garrett Dutton) has experimented with solo work, but it’s nothing quite as magical as when the original three are together again. — LAURA JOHNSON G. Love & Special Sauce with Matt Costa • Sat, Jan. 31, at 8 pm • $22.50 • All-ages • Knitting Factory • 919 W. Sprague • sp.knittingfactory.com • 244-3279

Mijiga BuCKhorn inn, The Continuum The CeLLAr, Pat Coast Coeur D’ALene CASino, Ron Greene, Last Chance Band CurLey’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE DALey’S CheAP ShoTS, Triple Shot DArCy’S reSTAurAnT & SPiriTS (891-0773), The Smok’n Wheels Di LunA’S CAFe (208-263-0846), Beth Pederson & Bruce Bishop FeDorA PuB, Carli Osika FiZZie MuLLiGAnS, The Cronkites The hAnDLe BAr, The Usual Suspects J The hoP!, Skull Fist (See story on page 46), Knight of Tears, Mercy Brown, Over Sea Under Stone iDAho Pour AuThoriTy (208-5977096), Bright Moments Jazz Group iron horSe BAr, JamShack John’S ALLey, The Working Poor J JoneS rADiATor, Buffalo Jones, Liz Rognes

J LAGunA CAFé, Diane Copeland LeFTBAnK Wine BAr, Phil Lamb MAx AT MirABeAu, Mojo Box The MeMBerS LounGe (703-7115), DJ Selone and DJ Eaze neCTAr TASTinG rooM, Truck Mills norThern QueST CASino, DJ Ramsin, DJ Freaky Fred nyne, DJ The Divine Jewels PenD D’oreiLLe Winery, Ron Keiper Trio J reD rooM LounGe, Nappy Roots roADhouSe CounTry roCK BAr, Ryan Larson Band SWAxx (703-7474), Party Favor, Meaux Green, DJ Fresh Direct The ViKinG BAr AnD GriLL, Stepbrothers ZoLA, Uppercut

Saturday, 01/31

219 LounGe, DJ Cakemix J The BArTLeTT, Mimicking Birds

BeVerLy’S, Robert Vaughn J The BiG DiPPer, Sticky Toast with friends BoLo’S, Dragonfly BooMerS CLASSiC roCK BAr & GriLL, Rampage BoWL’Z BiTeZ AnD SPiriTZ, Likes Girls J BuCer’S CoFFeehouSe PuB, Dan Maher BuCKhorn inn, The Continuum The CeLLAr, Pat Coast J ChAPS, Just Plain Darin with Tyler Coulston Coeur D’ALene CASino, Ron Greene, Last Chance Band Coeur D’ALene CeLLArS, Ron Criscione CurLey’S, YESTERDAYSCAKE enGLiSh SeTTer BreWinG (4133663), Keith J. Milligan FiZZie MuLLiGAnS, The Cronkites FreDneCK’S (291-3880), In Transit

J The hoP!, Framework, Blame Shifter, Soblivios, Ironwood, Children of Atom, 37 Street Signs iron horSe BAr, JamShack John’S ALLey, CowBoy Justice Band J JoneS rADiATor, So Pitted, Loomer, 66Beat, Phlegm Fatale J KniTTinG FACTory, G. Love & Special Sauce (See story above) with Matt Costa The LAriAT (466-9918), Six-Strings n’ Pearls and open mic LeFTBAnK Wine BAr, Evan Michael MAx AT MirABeAu, Mojo Box norThern QueST CASino, DJ Ramsin, DJ Freaky Fred, DJ Patrick nyne, DJ C-Mad one 14 BAr & GriLL (299-6114), Bobby Bremer Band PenD D’oreiLLe Winery, The Powell Brothers rePuBLiC BreWinG Co., Centaur Midwife


ROADHOUSE COUNTRY ROCK BAR, Ryan Larson Band SWAXX, Crooked I, Wildcard, Illest Uminati, Demon Assassin, Serious MAK, DJ JT Washington THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, New Mud WILLOW SPRINGS (235-4420), The Usual Suspects ZOLA, Uppercut

 THE BARTLETT, Open Mic CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN (208-292-4813), Kosh FEDORA PUB, Tuesday Night Jam with Truck Mills JONES RADIATOR, Open Mic of Open-ness RED ROOM LOUNGE, Unplugged with Jimmy Nudge ZOLA, The Bucket List

Sunday, 02/01

Wednesday, 02/04

THE CELLAR, Pat Coast DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS, Jam Night with VooDoo Church

Monday, 02/02

 BING CROSBY THEATER, Eclectic Guitars: Eric Johnson & Mike Stern

GET LISTED!

Email getlisted@inlander. com to get your event listed in the paper and online. We need the details one week prior to our publication date.

 CALYPSOS (208-665-0591), Open Mic CHECKERBOARD BAR, Lost Dogma EICHARDT’S, Monday Night Jam with Truck Mills  RICO’S (332-6566), Open Mic UNDERGROUND 15, Open Mic ZOLA, Nate Ostrander Trio

Tuesday, 02/03

315 MARTINIS AND TAPAS, The Rub

 THE BARTLETT, Happiness (feat. memebers of Deer Tick), Von the Baptist, Fun Ladies  CHAPS, Land of Voices with Dirk Swartz CRAFTED TAP HOUSE + KITCHEN, Echo Elysium EICHARDT’S, Charley Packard FIZZIE MULLIGANS, Kicho GARLAND AVENUE DRINKERY (3155327), Open Mic with DJ Scratch n Smith GENO’S (368-9087), Open Mic with T&T IRON HORSE BAR & GRILL, Open mic  JOHN’S ALLEY, Turkuaz (See story on facing page) JONES RADIATOR, Sally Bop Jazz LA ROSA CLUB, Robert Beadling and Friends THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE, Open Turntables Night with DJ Lydell LUCKY’S IRISH PUB, DJ D3VIN3 RED ROOM LOUNGE, Lucas Brown Local Night SOULFUL SOUPS AND SPIRITS, Open mic

ZOLA, The Bossame

Coming Up ...

BING CROSBY THEATER, Jesse Cook, Feb. 5 THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Chelsey Heidenreich, Feb. 5  THE BIG DIPPER, Turkuaz (See story on facing page), Feb. 5 THE HOP!, Karma to Burn, Sierra, Mojave Wizard, Feb. 5 THE BIG DIPPER, KYRS Benefit feat. Wild Rabbit, Brown’s Mountain Boys, Feb. 6 HEARTWOOD CENTER, Bridges Home CD Release Show, Feb. 6 REVEL 77, BBBBandits, Stucco, Vibration, Feb. 6 CHATEAU RIVE, Adrian Legg, Feb. 6 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Foghat, Feb. 6 THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Boat Race Weekend, Tumble Down Badger, Feb. 7 THE BIG DIPPER, Bullets or Balloons CD release party, Blackwater Prophet, Feb. 7 KNITTING FACTORY, The Best of Spokane feat. B Radicals, Rylei Franks and more, Feb. 7 CHATEAU RIVE, Peter Rivera album release party, Feb. 7 JOHN’S ALLEY, Brother Gow, Feb. 7 THE BIG DIPPER, Matt Bacnis, Sarah Cameron Band, Feb. 8 KNITTING FACTORY, Sleater-Kinney, Lizzo, Feb. 8 THE BIG DIPPER, The Bob Curnow Big Band, Feb. 9

THE BIG DIPPER, Otep, Terror Universal, Thira, Thirion X, Feb. 10 THE BARTLETT, Wild Child, Desert Noises, Feb. 10 KNITTING FACTORY, Hellyeah, Devour the Day, Like a Storm, Feb. 10 THE BARTLETT, Elliot Brood, Cathedral Pearls, Feral Anthem, Feb. 11 JOHN’S ALLEY, Grant Farm, Feb. 11 CHATEAU RIVE, Wylie & the Wild West, Feb. 12, 7:30 pm. SPOKANE ARENA, Miranda Lambert with Justin Moore, Raelynn, Jukebox Mafia, Feb. 12 THE BARTLETT, The Lil’ Smokies, Folkinception, Feb. 12 THE BIG DIPPER, Sea Giant, Wild Pacific, Sean Thomas, K.O.S.H., Feb. 12 KNITTING FACTORY, Odesza, Little People, Feb. 12 THE BARTLETT, Portland Cello Project, Feb. 13-14 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS, Nicole Lewis, Feb. 13 UNDERGROUND 15, Divides, Feb. 14 THE VIKING BAR AND GRILL, Big Mumbo Blues Band, Feb. 14 KNITTING FACTORY, Miss May I, August Burns Red, Northlane, Fit For A King, Erra, Feb. 14 THE BIG DIPPER, Carolyn Wonderland, Feb. 14 NORTHERN QUEST CASINO, Bill Medley of the Righteous Brothers, Christopher Cross, Feb. 14 BING CROSBY THEATER, Lucinda Williams with the Kenneth Brian Band, Feb. 14

SEAHAWK TALK The Pete Carroll Show MONDAY’S @ 9am

WEEKDAYS 7AM-10AM ON 1510 KGA SPOKANE

S TR E A MI NG 24/ 7 AT 1510KG A. COM @ lo c k e rroomkga

1510 KGA

MUSIC | VENUES 315 MARTINIS & TAPAS • 315 E. Wallace, CdA • 208-667-9660 ARBOR CREST WINE CELLARS • 4705 N. Fruit Hill Rd. • 927-9463 BABY BAR • 827 W. First Ave. • 847-1234 THE BARTLETT • 228 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2174 BEVERLY’S • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE BIG DIPPER • 171 S. Washington St. • 863-8098 BIGFOOT PUB • 9115 N. Division St. • 467-9638 BING CROSBY THEATER • 901 W. Sprague Ave. • 227-7638 BLACK DIAMOND • 9614 E. Sprague • 891-8357 THE BLIND BUCK • 204 N. Division • 290-6229 BOLO’S• 116 S. Best Rd. • 891-8995 BOOMERS • 18219 E. Appleway Ave. • 755-7486 BOOTS BAKERY & LOUNGE • 24 W. Main Ave. • 703-7223 BOWL’Z BITEZ & SPIRITZ• 401 W. Riverside Suite 101. • 321-7480 BUCER’S COFFEEHOUSE PUB • 201 S. Main, Moscow • 208-882-5216 BUCKHORN INN • 13311 Sunset Hwy.• 244-3991 THE CELLAR • 317 E. Sherman, CdA • 208-6649463 CHAPS • 4237 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 624-4182 CHATEAU RIVE • 621 W. Mallon Ave. • 795-2030 CHECKERBOARD BAR • 1716 E. Sprague • 535-4007 COEUR D’ALENE CASINO • 37914 S. Nukwalqw Rd., Worley • 800-523-2464 CURLEY’S • 26433 W. Hwy. 53 • 208-773-5816 DALEY’S CHEAP SHOTS • 6412 E. Trent • 535-9309 EICHARDT’S • 212 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208263-4005 FEDORA PUB • 1726 W. Kathleen, CdA • 208765-8888 FIZZIE MULLIGANS • 331 W. Hastings Rd. • 466-5354 THE FLAME • 2401 E. Sprague Ave. • 534-9121 FOX THEATER • 1001 W. Sprague • 624-1200 GRANDE RONDE CELLARS • 906 W. 2nd • 455-8161 THE HANDLE BAR • 12005 E. Trent Ave.• 474-0933 THE HOP! • 706 N. Monroe St. • 368-4077 IRON HORSE • 407 E. Sherman Ave., CdA • 208-667-7314 IRV’S BAR • 415 W. Sprague Ave. • 624-4450 JOHN’S ALLEY • 114 E. 6th, Moscow • 208-8837662 JONES RADIATOR • 120 E. Sprague • 747-6005 KNITTING FACTORY • 911 W. Sprague Ave. • 244-3279 LAGUNA CAFÉ • 4302 S. Regal St. • 448-0887 THE LANTERN TAP HOUSE • 1004 S. Perry St. • 315-9531 LA ROSA CLUB • 105 S. First Ave., Sandpoint • 208-255-2100 LATAH BISTRO • 4241 Cheney-Spokane Rd. • 838-8338 LEFTBANK WINE BAR • 108 N. Washington • 315-8623 LION’S LAIR • 205 W. Riverside Ave. • 456-5678 LUCKY’S IRISH PUB • 408 W. Sprague Ave. • 747-2605 LUXE COFFEEHOUSE • 1017 W. First Ave. • 624-5514 MAX AT MIRABEAU • 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. • 924-9000 MOOTSY’S • 406 W. Sprague • 838-1570 MOSCOW FOOD CO-OP • 121 E. Fifth St. • 208882-8537 NECTAR• 120 N. Stevens St. • 869-1572 NORTHERN QUEST • 100 N. Hayford • 242-7000 NYNE • 232 W. Sprague Ave. • 474-1621 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 O’SHAY’S • 313 E. CdA Lake Dr. • 208-667-4666 THE PALOMINO CLUB • 6425 N. Lidgerwood St • 443-5213 PEND D’OREILLE WINERY • 301 Cedar St., Sandpoint • 208-265-8545 THE PHAT HOUSE • 417 S. Browne • 443-4103 PJ’S BAR & GRILL • 1717 N. Monroe St. • 328-2153 RED LION RIVER INN • 700 N. Division St. • 326-5577 RED ROOM LOUNGE • 521 W. Sprague Ave. • 838-7613 REPUBLIC BREWING • 26 Clark Ave. • 775-2700 THE ROADHOUSE • 20 N. Raymond • 413-1894 THE ROCK BAR • 13921 E. Trent Ave. • 43-3796 ROCKER ROOM • 216 E. Coeur d’Alene Ave. • 208-676-2582 ROCKET MARKET • 726 E. 43rd Ave. • 343-2253 SEASONS OF COEUR D’ALENE • 209 E. Lakeside Ave. • 208-664-8008 THE SHOP • 924 S. Perry St. • 534-1647 SOULFUL SOUPS & SPIRITS • 117 N. Howard St. • 459-1190 SPOKANE ARENA • 720 W. Mallon • 279-7000 SPLASH • 115 S. 2nd St., CdA • 208-765-4000 THE SWAMP • 1904 W. Fifth Ave. • 458-2337 UNDERGROUND 15 • 15 S. Howard St. • 290-2122 THE VIKING • 1221 N. Stevens St. • 315-4547 WEBSTER’S RANCH HOUSE SALOON • 1914 N. Monroe St. • 474-9040 ZOLA • 22 W. Main Ave. • 624-2416

JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 49


CLASSICAL CELEBRATE CINEMA

With the Spokane International Film Festival (SpIFF) on the horizon, Spokanites can’t get movies off the brain. Take a break from your average Saturday night at the movies by celebrating the art of film and music with the Spokane Symphony’s Movie Music Spectacular. In collaboration with SpIFF, Spokane’s design community has crafted a collection of posters portraying upcoming films from the festival, as well as blockbuster scores performed that evening. The Posterize exhibit is only on display during the Saturday concert, so don’t miss it. Next, the symphony brings heart-wrenching and nail-biting scenes from Star Wars, Breakfast at Tiffany’s and 007 to life with sound. With solos from Mateusz Wolski and Abbey Crawford, let yourself be whisked to Anatevka, The Shire, and galaxies far, far away. — COURTNEY BREWER Spokane Symphony SuperPops No. 4: Movie Music Spectacular and SpIFF Posterize exhibit • Sat, Jan. 31, at 8 pm • $28-$62 • Martin Woldson Theater at the Fox • 1001 W. Sprague • spokanesymphony. org • 624-1200

50 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015


THEATER DESPERATELY SEEKING FATHER

Orphans may have made headlines in 2013, with Shia LaBeouf’s departure from a Broadway revival of the iconic play following a series of disagreements with Alec Baldwin, but the Lyle Kessler classic has never really exited the mainstream conversation. Marianne McLaughlin, the director behind recent Civic productions of The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas and The Producers, is breathing even newer life into the dynamic story of two brothers, Treat and Phillip, embroiled in a kidnapping-fueled search for a father figure. This local incarnation continues the Orphans legacy of confronting the often complicated father-son dynamic with a decidedly balanced blend of machismo and introspection. — TRACE WILLIAM COWEN

“A FOOD DRIVE EVENT”

ON SALE FRIDAY AT 10AM

Orphans • Jan. 30-Feb. 22; Thu-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm • $22 • Spokane Civic Theatre • 1020 N. Howard • spokanecivictheatre.com • 325-2507

MARTIN WOLDSON THEATER AT THE FOX

SATURDAY • MARCH 14

TICKETS: MARTINWOLDSONTHEATER.COM, THE FOX BOX OFFICE, 509.624.1200, OR TICKETSWEST. W W W . W I D E S P R E A D P A N I C . C O M

WORDS A DECADE OF VERSE

4 DAYS OF INCREDIBLE

The Inland Northwest’s brightest young poetry performers come together for one night to showcase their rhyming and recitation skills, with the hopes of going all the way in the National Endowment of the Arts’ 10th annual Poetry Out Loud competition. Hosted by EWU’s Get Lit! programs, the regional final hosts student poets from a dozen area high schools, but only two poets can move on to the state finals in Tacoma in March. Our region has proven its poetry prowess in the past, with Mead High School graduate Langston Ward (pictured) winning the national competition in 2013. — CHEY SCOTT

WORKSHOPS

CONCERTS STUDENT PERFORMANCES

AND MORE!

Poetry Out Loud regional finals • Thu, Feb. 5, at 8 pm • Free • The Bartlett • 228 W. Sprague • poetryoutloud.org; poetryoutloud509@gmail.com

BEGINS FEB. 25

THEATER 60 SECONDS FLAT

Just how much plot and emotion can be crammed into 60 seconds? That’s the challenge facing writers, directors and actors involved in the second annual Fast & Furious play festival at Stage Left Theater. The two-night festival showcases 40 one-minute plays by some of the region’s top talent, performed in a staged reading format by more than two dozen local actors. Spearheaded by Stage Left’s playwright-in-residence Sandra Hosking, Fast & Furious runs the gamut from Macbeth spoofs to first dates and creepy dolls. — CHEY SCOTT Fast & Furious II • Fri, Jan. 30 and Sat, Jan. 31, at 7:30 pm • $10 • Stage Left Theater • 108 W. Third • spokanestageleft.org • 838-9727

Grace Kelly

WEDNESDAY

ARTISTS

Jeff Coffin

Stefon Harris Visit www.uidaho.edu/jazzfest For Ticket Info: (208) 885-7212

JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 51


EVENTS | CALENDAR

BENEFIT

JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR PREVIEW Preview night performance by the Gonzaga Theatre Arts Department, benefiting Our Place Community Ministries. Jan. 29, 6 pm. $25. Gonzaga University Magnuson Theatre, 502 E. Boone Ave. ourplacespokane.org (326-7267) LIFE SERVICES’ PEACOCK MASQUERADE A semi-formal event, benefiting the programs of Life Services. Includes dining, dancing, a silent auction and more. Ages 18+. Jan. 31, 7 pm. $20. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. redlion.rdln.com (755-0776) MEALS ON WHEELS CINN-A-GRAM FUNDRAISER Meals on Wheels Spokane’s annual Valentine’s Day fundraiser, with fresh cinnamon roll gift baskets delivered on Feb. 12. Each purchase funds hot meals for five local seniors. Order by Feb. 9 to ensure delivery. $30. mowspokane.org (232-0864) SOUPER BOWL OF CARING A benefit for Feed Cheney, collecting donations at eight local churches on Super Bowl Sunday. Feed Cheney provides a hot meal, musical entertainment and groceries for approximately 130 people on the last Monday of every month at Wren Pierson Community Center. Feb. 1. (324-1659) PUBLIC INTEREST LAW PROJECT AUCTION An 1920s-themed fundraiser gala and GPILP’s 26th silent/live auction. Includes dinner and a reception. Proceeds fund Gonzaga Law Students who work at unpaid summer internships with organizations serving clients with historically unmet legal needs. Feb. 6, 6-11 pm. $25$30. Gonzaga University, 502 E. Boone. (328-4220) DISHMAN HILLS CONSERVANCY CELEBRATION The DHC hosts a dinner, silent auction and overview of 2014 accomplishments, outstanding volunteer work and new lands and trails to explore. Feb. 6, 5:30-9 pm. $22-$25. Spokane Women’s Club, 1428 W. Ninth Ave. dishmanhills.org (999-5100) SPOKANE TRIBAL COLLEGE DINNER & AUCTION An event featuring cultural presentations of dancers, visual artists, live music and fine dining, with proceeds benefiting the Spokane Tribal College. Includes a silent and live auction. Feb. 7, 5-8 pm. $60/person. Red Lion Hotel at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. spokanetribalcollege.org/events (326-1700 or 218-7278) GO RED FOR WOMEN LUNCHEON The American Heart Association’s annual awareness campaign and auction, featuring health screenings, an expo, auction, fashion show and keynote presentation by Olympic Gold Medalist Ariana Kukors. Feb. 11, 9:30 am. $125/person. Spokane Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. spokanegoredluncheon.ahaevents.org PUPPY LOVE Spokane Humane Society’s annual Valentine’s Day-themed fundraiser includes a silent auction and a flight of five Washington wines, with appetizers. Feb. 11. $10-$15. Nectar Tasting Room, 120 N. Stevens. spokanehumanesociety. org (467-5253 x 212) SPOKANE VALLEY PARTNERS’ BENEFIT CONCERT Ninth annual benefit concert, titled “From the Heart,” featuring local professional and amateur singers and dancers. $10/adults; $5/age 12 and under; $30/family. $2 additional at the door. Feb. 13, 7-9 pm. St. Joseph’s Parish, 4521 N. Arden Rd. stjoeparish.org (926-7133) A TASTE OF HOPE The ISAAC Foundation’s 8th annual benefit event features

52 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015

samplings of wines, brews, spirits, chocolates and specialty foods, while raising money to fund therapy grants for local children diagnosed with autism. Feb. 13. Lincoln Center, 1316 N. Lincoln St. theisaacfoundation.org (327-8000)

COMEDY

STAND-UP COMEDY OPEN MIC Local comedians; see weekly schedule online. Thursdays at 8 pm. Free. Uncle D’s Comedy Underground, 2721 N. Market St. bluznews.com (483-7300) AFTER DARK A adult-rated version of the Blue Door’s monthly, Friday show; last Friday of the month, at 10 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) CHOOSE TO LOSE A live comedy-improv show, using audience suggestions. Fridays in January, at 8 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. (747-7045) SAFARI Fast-paced short-form improv games based on audience suggestions. (Not rated.) Saturdays at 9 pm. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) LIVE COMEDY Live stand-up comedy shows. Sundays at 9 pm. Goodtymes, 9214 E. Mission Ave. (928-1070) OPEN MIC COMEDY: Wednesdays at 8 pm. Ages 21+. Free. Brooklyn Deli & Lounge, 122 S. Monroe. brooklyndelispokane.com (835-4177) GABRIEL IGLESIAS The nationally-recognized comedian performs as part of his “Unity Through Laughter Tour.” Feb. 5, 8 pm. $35-$65. INB Performing Arts Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. inbpac.com (279-7000) IMPROV LAB The Blue Door players try out new material on stage, monthly on the first Friday, at 10 pm. Not rated. $7. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045) SCHOOL OF IMPROVISED COMEDY Teen classes ($25) are offered the first Saturday of the month, from 11:30 am-2 pm. Ages 11-18. Adult classes available throughout the year; see site for more info. Blue Door Theatre, 815 W. Garland Ave. bluedoortheatre.com (747-7045)

COMMUNITY

KNOW YOUR FARMER, KNOW YOUR FOOD The city of Moscow and University of Idaho Extension host a panel discussion on the social and economic reach farmers have in their communities. Meet farmers from the Moscow Farmers Market and hear their stories. Jan. 29, 6-8 pm. Free. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main St. kenworthy.org (208-882-4127) SECOND HARVEST FOOD SORTING Join other volunteers to sort and pack produce and other bulk food items for delivery to local emergency food outlets. Ages 14+. Shift dates and times vary, sign up at inland.volunteerhub.com/events. Second Harvest Food Bank, 1234 E. Front Ave. 2-harvest.org (252-6267) SPOKANE VALLEY COMMUNITY VISIONING A community meeting to help guide future growth and development in Spokane Valley as part of the update to the City’s Comprehensive Plan. Jan. 28 at 6 pm and Jan. 29 at 7:30 am. CenterPlace Regional Event Center, 2426 N. Discovery Place. spokanevalley.org (720-5335) 15TH ANNUAL MID WINTER DANCE A Girl Scout-hosted event open to the community, with a country/cowboy theme. Includes a photo booth, DJ, refresh-

ments, door prizes and giveaways. Jan. 30, 6-9 pm. $12-$20/couple. Mead High School, 302 W. Hastings Rd. tinyurl.com/ lu9b6be (939-2281) GEM OF THE VALLEY AWARDS An event honoring the Harry E. Nelson Citizen of the Year, chosen by a committee of past recipients. Winners also announced recognizing member businesses, individuals and organizations that serve our community with excellence. No-host bar starts at 5:30, followed by dinner, awards and an auction. Jan. 31, 5:30-9:30 pm. $55/person. Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. tinyurl.com/lm2jxrb (924-4994) PUPPY BOWL 2015 A pet adoption event featuring adoptable puppies from the Spokane Humane Society, in a Super Bowl-themed event. Jan. 31, 10 am. Free admission. The Yuppy Puppy, 9511 N. Newport Hwy. spokanehumanesociety. org (467-8221) SUPER BIRD OPEN HOUSE Meet live birds of prey, learn about the Great Backyard Bird Count and how to participate, make a bird feeder, and play bird-themed games. Jan. 31, 10 am-2 pm. $5 suggested donation. West Valley Outdoor Learning Center, 8706 E. Upriver Drive. olc.wvsd.org (509-340-1028) FREE TAX PREPARATION IRS-certified volunteers are available to assist those who earn less than $52,427 in preparing and e-filing their taxes at eight locations throughout Spokane County. Sites remain open through April 15; times and locations vary. unitedwayspokane.org (353-4851) BUDGETING 101 WORKSHOP STCU experts share how to make a budgeting plan that’s simple, reasonable, and effective. Light meal provided. Feb. 3, 6-7 pm. Free, RSVP requested. Indian Trail Library, 4909 W. Barnes Rd. stcu.org/ workshops (344-2202) LOVING KIDS INTO CHANGE Communities in Schools of Spokane County’s community breakfast, with a presentation by Principal Lori Wyborney of John R. Rogers HS. Feb. 4, 7:30 am. Free, registration required. Red Lion at the Park, 201 W. North River Dr. (413-1436) SPOKANE FOLKLORE CONTRA DANCE Weekly, Wednesday night community dance with Crooked Kilt playing, Morna Leonard calling. No partner needed, beginner workshop at 7:15 pm. Feb. 4, 7:30-9:30 pm. $5-$7. Woman’s Club of Spokane, 1428 W. Ninth. spokanefolklore. org (747-2640) NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES PUBLIC MEETING A community meeting to provide local park users, stakeholders, and the general public information about the Spokane Parks and City/County Historic Landmarks Commission’s new Multiple Property Submission process. Feb. 5, 6 pm. Free and open to the public. Finch Arboretum, W. 3404 Woodlawn Blvd. experiencespokane. com/parks (363-5462) FAMILY DANCE & POTLUCK A family contra dance, with all steps called and taught, and live music by the Family Dance Band. Potluck begins at 6:30 pm, dance at 7 pm. Feb. 6, 6:30 pm. Donations accepted. St. John’s Cathedral, 127 E. 12th Ave. (533-9955) TAKE & GIVE SEED LIBRARY The branch hosts its seed library kick-off, seed swap and a seed propagation class with Master Gardener Steve Nokes. Feb. 7, from 10:30 am-noon. Events to come include vegetable gardening, composing and seed to harvest workshops, on Feb. 14, 21, 28 and March 3. See site for more details. free. Otis Orchards Library, 22324 E. Wellesley Ave. scld.org (893-8390)

ORGANIZE YOUR FINANCES STCU experts share how to develop an efficient bill-paying system, which records to keep and for how long, what to keep handy in case of disaster, and where to go for help. Light dinner provided. Feb. 10, 6:30-7:30 pm. Free, RSVP requested. Moran Prairie Library, 6004 S. Regal. stcu.org/workshops (344-2202) MISSION AVENUE PROJECT MEETING The community is invited to review updated plans and discuss landscaping options for a project on Mission Ave. from Flora to Barker Rds. Feb. 11, 5:30 pm. Free. Greenacres Christian Church, 18010 E. Mission Ave. (720-5001) PROTECT YOUR CREDIT SCORE STCU experts show how a credit score is determined, how to earn and maintain a healthy credit score, and where to go for help. Light lunch provided. Feb. 11, 12-1 pm. Free, RSVP requested. South Hill Library, 3324 S. Perry. stcu.org/workshops MILLENNIAL MEETUP: YOGA NIGHT An evening of healthy-living talks, snacks and a yoga session. Beginners and experts welcome, bring a mat if you have one. Millennial night is for adults in their 20s and 30s. Feb. 12, 7-8:30 pm. Free. Coeur d’Alene Public Library, 702 E. Front Ave. (208-769-2315) DOG PEOPLE BLOOD DRIVE The third annual community event lets pet owners and their dogs both donate blood to help save lives in the community. Dogs are screened to see if they’re eligible to become donors; humans donate to the INBC. Eligible dogs must be: over 60 lbs; 1-6 years old; happy and healthy. Feb. 14, 1-5 pm. Free. Lincoln Heights Veterinary Clinic, 2829 E. 27th. lhvetclinic.com (5353551)

Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. flyfilmtour. com (227-7638) TOTALLY TUBULAR TUESDAYS The Garland’s classic old-school movie series, every Tuesday at 7 pm. See website for schedule of upcoming films. $2.50. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. garlandtheater.com (327-1050) SPOKANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL (SPIFF) SpIFF kicks off on Feb. 5 with the showing of “Living is Easy (with Eyes Closed),” at AMC River Park Square, followed by the SpIFF Opening Reception. Festival events continue through Feb. 15. Varies. spokanefilmfestival.org SPOKANE INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL GALA The opening gala includes two film screenings, “Queens of the Roleo” and “Dryland,” with the opening party to follow. Feb. 6, 7 pm-midnight. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. spokanefilmfestival.org (720-7743) ROCKY HORROR ROMANCE A special midnight showing of the campy cult classic, featuring the Absolute Pleasure shadow cast, Virgin Ceremony and prop bags. Feb. 7, midnight. $5. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. garlandtheater.com LEONARD A. OAKLAND FILM FESTIVAL The 6th annual festival occurs over three Saturdays in February. Featured films include a recent American indie film, a documentary and an international film. Each is followed by a late night Spokane-made film. Feb. 8, Mud; Feb. 15, Feet From Stardom; Feb. 22, The Band’s Visit. All start at 7 pm. Free and open to the public. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. tinyurl.com/LAOFest (777-1000)

FESTIVAL

THE ART OF ARTISAN BREAD BAKING Create your own artisan breads, featuring baguettes and focaccia with fresh roasted vegetables. Jan. 29, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene St. (533-8141) NO-LI BREWHOUSE TOURS See what goes on behind the scenes and how NoLi’s beer is made. Fridays at 4:30 pm. Free. No-Li Brewhouse, 1003 E. Trent Ave. nolibrewhouse.com (242-2739) VINO WINE TASTING Fri, Jan. 30 showcases wine from California’s Renwood Winery, from 3- 6:30 pm. Sat, Jan. 31 features K Vintners and Charles Smith Wines, from 2-4:30 pm. Wines also available by-the-glass. Tastings include cheese and crackers. $10/tasting. Vino!, 222 S. Washington. (838-1229)

DARWIN ON THE PALOUSE A free annual event to celebrate humanity, science and rational thought, sponsored by the American Humanist Association, Humanists of the Palouse and the University of Idaho Women’s Center. Join the “Bipedal Bash,” the Darwin on the Palouse afterparty at One World Cafe in downtown Moscow. Feb. 7, 6:30-9 pm. Free. University of Idaho Admin. Bldg, 851 Campus Dr. darwinonthepalouse.org (208-301-3478) FASCHING COSTUME PARTY A German Mardi Gras celebration, with food, dancing, a costume contest and more. Also featuring the Kraut Stompers, the Garden Gnome Trio and DJ Crash. Feb. 7, 7-11 pm. $12. German American Hall, 25 W. Third Ave. (891-0538)

FILM

BACKCOUNTRY FILM FESTIVAL The 10th annual Winter Wildlands Alliance film fest screens nine films; proceeds benefit the Inland Northwest Backcountry Alliance. Jan. 29, 7 pm. $12. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) OSCAR-NOMINATED SHORT FILMS Screenings of 2015 Oscar-nominated animated, live action and documentary short films. Jan. 29-31, show times and screening schedule varies. $9.50/any two screenings. Panida Theater, 300 N. First Ave. panida.org (208-255-7801) THE FLY FISHING FILM TOUR A preeminent exhibition of fly fishing cinema, featuring 11 films from around the world. Discount tickets ($13) available at Silverbow Fly Shop, Swede’s Fly Shop, Castaway Fly fishing and Northwest Outfitters. Feb. 3, 7-9:30 pm. $15. Bing Crosby

FOOD & DRINK

WASHINGTON STATE WINE EXPO Explore a range of wines and wine varietals from several of Washington State’s best vineyard designations. Jan. 30, 7 pm. $20, registration requested. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd. rocketmarket.com (343-2253) MAKE IT SWEET Master how to consistently create moist cakes, then learn the art of butter cream icing, borders and fondant flowers. Feb. 5, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene. (533-8141) GLOBAL BUBBLY Sample champagne from France, Prosecco from Italy plus, Methode Champenios bubbly from Washington State, California, Australia and beyond Feb. 6, 7 pm. $20, registration requested. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. (343-2253) THE CHOCOLATE AFFAIR A chocolate competition and tasting event, with sampling hosted at local businesses in downtown Coeur d’Alene. Open to professional and home chocolate makers. Feb. 13, 5-8


EVENTS | CALENDAR pm. $10/person; $15/couple. Downtown CdA. cdadowntown.com (208-415-0116) MEDITERRANEAN SMALL PLATES Chef Laurie Faloon teaches a class on classic tapas, meze and antipasti influenced by the Mediterranean palate. Feb. 13, 6-8 pm. $49. Inland Northwest Culinary Academy (INCA), 1810 N. Greene. (533-8141) RED WINE & CHOCOLATE Red wines paired with the Rocket’s in-house gourmet chocolate selection. Offered Feb. 13 and 14, at 7 pm. $30, registration requested. Rocket Market, 726 E. 43rd Ave. rocketmarket.com (509-343-2253) VALENTINE’S RESTAURANT NIGHT The Commellini Estate is taking reservations for its annual Valentine’s Day dinner night ($45/person), its most popular of the year. Reservations available from 5-9 pm. Also includes early and late-night happy hours, from 3-5 pm and 9-11 pm. Commellini Estate, 14715 N. Dartford Dr. commellini.com (466-0667) VALENTINE’S EVE DINNER Ninth annual multi-course dinner the night before Valentine’s Day; each course is paired with a wine selected by Vino! owner John Allen. Feb. 13, 6:30 pm. $75/person; reservations required. Spokane Club, 1002 W. Riverside. spokaneclub.org (838-1229) VINO & CHOCOLATE GALA Wine and chocolates are served at an art reception. Reservations requested by Feb. 11. Feb. 13, 6-9 pm. $10. Avenue West Gallery, 707 W. Main Ave. Suite B11. avenuewestgallery.org (838-4999) AFTER-DINNER VALENTINE’S DRINKS Enoteca offers cheese and cupcakes matched with wine flights, and other drink specials. Feb. 14, 6 pm-midnight. Prices vary. Enoteca, 112 E. Seltice Way,

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MUSIC

AUDITORIUM CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES The award-wining Jupiter Quartet is in residence on the Palouse in late January, teaching children and youth from local schools and performing classic works for string quartet by Beethoven, Haydn, and arrangements of works of J.S. Bach by Mozart. Jan. 29, 7:30 pm. $10-$22. University of Idaho, 709 S. Deakin. (208-885-6111) ERIC CHURCH WITH HALESTORM One of the Spokane Arena’s 20th Anniversary “Bucket List” shows. Jan. 29, 7:30 pm. $27/$47/$67. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com BROKEN WHISTLE Album release concert for the local, traditional Celtic music band, featuring a performance by the Kelly Irish Dancers. Jan. 31, 7 pm. $17. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) MET LIVE: OFFENBACH’S LES CONTES D’HOFFMANN The magnetic tenor Vittorio Grigolo takes on the tortured poet and unwitting adventurer of the title of Offenbach’s operatic masterpiece, in the Met’s kaleidoscopic production. Live simulcast approx. 3 hrs. 45 min. Jan. 31, 9:55 am. $15-$20. The Kenworthy, 508 S. Main. kenworthy.org/met (208-882-4127) SPOKANE SYMPHONY SUPERPOPS NO. 4 “Movie Music Spectacular,” featuring classic film music from “Gone With the Wind,” “Star Wars,” “Harry Potter” and many more. Jan. 31, 8 pm. Prices vary. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200)

CLOVER’S JAZZ BRUNCH Clover hosts jazz brunch on the first Sunday of the month (through May 2015) featuring a rotation of classic, local jazz duos. Clover, 913 E. Sharp. spokanejazzscene.com (487-2937) ECLECTIC GUITARS: ERIC JOHNSON & MIKE STERN Contemporary/jazz guitar concert. Feb. 2, 7:30 pm. $27-$37. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) JESSE COOK Concert by the renowned Flamenco guitarist. Feb. 5, 8 pm. $45$55. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) CLARINETIST & COMPOSER JAMES FALZONE A recital by the multi-faceted clarinetist/composer, an acclaimed member of Chicago’s jazz and creative improvised music scene, a veteran contemporary music lecturer and clinician. Feb. 6, 8 pm. Free and open to the public. Whitworth University, 300 W. Hawthorne Rd. whitworth.edu (777-3280) RANI ARBO & DAISY MAYHEM Known for their infectious energy, virtuoso playing and warm stage presence, Rani Arbo & daisy mayhem draw from the deep well of American roots music. Feb. 6, 7:30 pm. $8-$16. Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, WSU, Pullman. performingarts.wsu.edu SPOKANE SYMPHONY MASTER CLASS A one-on-one opportunity for local music students to learn from Symphony guest violinist Benjamin Beilman, open for audience enjoyment. Feb. 6, 3-5 pm. Free. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org SPOKANE SYMPHONY CLASSICS NO. 6 Featuring guest violinist Benjamin Beilman and guest Conductor Robert Moody,

for the concert program of Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 4. Feb. 7 at 8 pm and Feb. 8 at 3 pm. Prices vary. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. spokanesymphony.org (624-1200) FERRIS JAZZ NIGHT Concert featuring the jazz ensembles from Ferris High School, consistently rated as one of the top programs in the region. Feb. 9, 7 pm. Free. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) AN EVENING WITH JUDY COLLINS The Grammy-award winning singer-songwriter in concert, accompanied by her pianist. Feb. 11, 7:30 pm. $37-$67 (VIP). Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague Ave. bingcrosbytheater.com (227-7404) JAY OLLERO DINNER CONCERT A seated concert paired with food from The Black Cypress. Ticket price includes food; 18+ event. Feb. 12, 5:30-8 pm. $60. BellTower, 125 SE Spring St., Pullman. facebook.com/TheBellTower (334-4195) “PYSCHO” WITH THE SPOKANE SYMPHONY The Spokane Symphony’s new Assistant Conductor, Jorge Luis Uzcategui, makes his debut leading the Orchestra in Bernard Herrmann’s iconic score as live accompaniment to Alfred Hitchcock’s most gripping film, “Psycho.” Feb. 12, 7:30 pm. $28-$49. Martin Woldson Theater at The Fox, 1001 W. Sprague. foxtheaterspokane.com (624-1200) LOVE ME TENDER: ELVIS TRIBUTE DINNER SHOW A dinner concert featuring Elvis Tribute artist Brad Mitchell. Dinner menu includes bistro steak and shrimp and dessert. Feb. 13, 5:30 pm. $25-$49. Mirabeau Park Hotel, 1100 N. Sullivan Rd. (924-9000 or 220-8375) VALENTINE’S DESSERT BALL AND SO-

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SPORTS & OUTDOORS

FITNESS MONITOR BASICS REI’s technical experts share tips and knowledge about fitness technology components, including their use and functionality in your exercise and fitness routine. Jan. 29, 7-8:30 pm. Free. REI, 1125 N. Monroe St. rei.com/spokane (328-9900) SPOKANE CHIEFS Hockey match vs. the Victoria Royals. Jan. 30, 7:05 pm. $10$23. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave. spokanearena.com (279-7000) NACHTSPEKTAKEL Mountain Gear hosts its third annual night tour by headlamp to Mt. Spokane’s Vista Hut for snacks and drinks, followed by a ski down the mountain under the lights. Jan. 31, 5 pm. Mt. Spokane Ski & Snowboard Park, 29500 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. tinyurl.com/mgkwkss (238-2220) 10TH ANNUAL SOUPER BOWL Spend the day skiing and snowshoeing while supporting the Women and Children’s Free Restaurant. Highlights include the the “Great SouperBowl Sasquatch Search” and poker snowshoe and ski events. Feb. 1, 8:30 am-1 pm. $35 suggested donation. Selkirk Lodge, N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. souperbowlspokane.org

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EVENTS | CALENDAR THE BIG GAME AT THE BING Snacks, beer and wine available for purchase with a simulcast of the game on the Bing’s 30-foot screen. Donations accepted at the door to benefit Friends of the Bing. Feb. 1, 3:30-7 pm. Free. Bing Crosby Theater, 901 W. Sprague. friendsofthebing.org (534-5805) BIG GAME AT THE GARLAND A complimentary screening for supporters of the Garland, with concessions and drinks for purchase. Feb. 1, 1 pm. Free. Garland Theater, 924 W. Garland. (327-1050) SPOKANE BADMINTON CLUB Meets Sun from 4:30-7 pm and Wed from 7-10 pm. $6/visit. West Central Community Center, 1603 N. Belt. (448-5694) SPOKANE BRAVES HOCKEY Hockey

matches; kids are free with each paid adult. $5/adults; $4/seniors and students with ID. Includes a beer garden, chuck-apuck and music. Games on Feb. 1 and 6. Eagles Ice-A-Rena, 6321 N. Addison St. spokanebraves.com (489-9295) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS CLUB Pingpong club meets Wed from 6:30-9 pm and Sun from 1:30-4:30 pm. $2/visit. Southside Senior & Community Center, 3151 E. 27th Ave. (535-0803) SPOKANE TABLE TENNIS Ping-pong club meets Mon and Wed, from 6-9 pm. $3/visit. HUB Sports Center, 19619 E. Cataldo. (768-1780) SPOKANE CHIEFS Hockey match vs. the Everett Silvertips. Feb. 3, 7:05 pm. $10$23. Spokane Arena, 720 W. Mallon Ave.

spokanearena.com (279-7000) SNOWSHOE CAMP SEKANI Explore this old Boy Scout camp that was once a jamboree meeting point for many troops. Headlamps, walking poles, snowshoes, instruction and tasty hot chocolate provided. Feb. 6, 6-7:30 pm. $10. Camp Sekani, 67070 E. Upriver Dr. (625-6200) BATTLE OF WASHINGTON Spokane Anarchy Wrestling and North West Pro Stars face off in a live sporting event. Doors open at 5:30 pm. Feb. 7, 6 pm. Free. Swaxx, 25 E. Lincoln Rd. (703-7474) LILAC CITY ROLLER GIRLS SEASON OPENER The local women’s league kicks off its 9th season, with the “Hella Heartbreak” match, featuring the junior team, the Pixies, at 5:30 pm and the adult team

at 7 pm. Feb. 7, 5:30-9 pm. $8/$10. Convention Center, 334 W. Spokane Falls Blvd. tinyurl.com/plb36aq (279-7000) PRIEST LAKE SLED DOG RACES The 46th running of the races, with teams from around the Northwest competing. On the air strip across from the Priest Lake Ranger Station, offering spectators a view of teams leaving/arriving back at the start area. Feb. 7-8, from 8:30 am-2 pm. $2/person; $5/car. Priest Lake, Idaho. iesda.org (863-7620) WINTER RECREATION CLASSES North Idaho College at Sandpoint offers oneday, winter recreation classes: Animal Tracking and Sign Interpretation (Feb. 7); and Winter Birds of Prey (March 14). Sandpoint. nic.edu/wtc (208-769-3333)

LANGLAUF CROSS-COUNTRY SKI RACE The 37th annual Spokane Langlauf is the Inland Empire’s oldest and most prestigious cross country ski race and the largest in the Pacific NW, attracting nearly 400 skiers. Feb. 8, 11 am-3 pm. $25. Mt. Spokane State Park, 26107 N. Mt. Spokane Park Dr. spokanelanglauf.org (509-238-2220)

THEATER

THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS Comedy farce, directed by Patrick Treadway. Through Feb. 8; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $18-$25. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre. com (325-2507)

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EVENTS | CALENDAR THE EFFECTS OF GAMMA RAYS ON MAN-IN-THE-MOON MARIGOLDS Performance of the Pulitzer Prizewinning drama by Paul Zindel. Through Feb. 1; Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $10-$14. Ignite Community Theatre, 10814 E. Broadway Ave. igniteonbroadway.org (795-0004) FAST & FURIOUS Stage Left’s second annual staged reading of super-short plays, featuring 40-50 new, one-minute comedies and dramas written by local and national playwrights. Jan. 3031, at 7:30 pm. $10. Stage Left Theater, 108 W. Third Ave. spokanestageleft.org JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR The musical dramatizing the final days in the life of Jesus, presented with a fresh take using hip-hop style dance. Rated PG13. Jan. 30-Feb. 1 and Feb. 6-7. Fri-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $15. Gonzaga University Magnuson Theatre, 502 E. Boone Ave. gonzaga.edu/theatrearts/ ourproductions (313-6553) A MIDWINTER NIGHT’S GALA Benefiting WSU Performing Arts, gala begins with a social hour, silent auction and hearty hors d’oeuvres. Following is a 7:30 pm performance of “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare (Abridged),” presented by Moscow Art Theatre (Too). Jan. 30, 6:30 pm. $30. Jones Theatre at Daggy Hall, WSU, Pullman Campus. performingarts.wsu. edu (335-7447) MISSOULA CHILDREN’S THEATRE: BLACKBEARD THE PIRATE Local children perform in a production led by the MCT, prepared in less than a week. Jan. 30 at 7 pm and Jan. 31 at 2 pm. $5. Cutter Theatre, 302 Park St. cutter@potc. net (509-446-4108) ORPHANS A psychological story of two orphaned brothers surviving in their rundown North Philadelphia row house. Jan. 30-Feb. 22; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. In the Firth J. Chew Studio Theatre. $22. Spokane Civic Theatre, 1020 N. Howard St. spokanecivictheatre.com (325-2507) REASONS TO BE PRETTY Performance of the Neil Labute drama questioning the American obsession with beauty. Jan. 30-Feb. 15; Thur-Sat at 7:30 pm, Sun at 2 pm. $19-$25. The Modern Theater Spokane, 174 S. Howard. themoderntheater.org (509-455-7529)

VISUAL ARTS

COUCH POTATO A viewer-participant art installation featuring art videos and films beginning from the ‘60’s and ‘70’s, to contemporary artists working today. Through Feb. 6, open Mon-Fri, from 8:30 am-3:30 pm. Free and open to the public. Spokane Falls Community College, 3410 W. Fort George Wright Dr. sfccfinearts.org/gallery (533-3710) HAROLD BALAZS: OLD & NEW A collection of the longtime, renowned Northwest artist’s work, including twodozen newly created works alongside past favorites. Through Feb. 7; gallery open Tues-Sat, from 11 am-6 pm. Free admission. Art Spirit Gallery, 415 Sherman Ave, CdA. theartspiritgallery.com RIC GENDRON: RATTLEBONE An exhibition surveying the contemporary paintings by Ric Gendron, a member of the confederated tribes of the Colville Reservation. The largest exhibition ever assembled of the artist’s work, Rattlebone is supplemented with cultural and contemporary objects from the artist’s family. Jan. 23-April 2. Gallery open Mon-Sat, from 10 am-4 pm. Free. Jundt

Art Museum, 200 E. Desmet Ave. gonzaga.edu/jundt (313-6843) THROUGH THE LENS: AN AMERICAN CENTURY — CORBIS & VIVIAN MAIER An exhibit exploring the personal and public uses of photography, featuring some of the most famous images in history, the Corbis Collection, and the most private, the work of Vivian Maier. Through April 3. Gallery open Mon-Sat, hours vary. Receptions Jan. 22 at 6 pm, featuring a talk by photography professor Dennis DeHart, and Feb. 12, at 6 pm, featuring a screening of the film “Finding Vivian Maier” in the CUB, at 7 pm. Free admission. Museum of Art/WSU, Wilson Rd. museum.wsu.edu (335-1910) TWO BY TWO A small-scale ceramic sculpture biennial exhibition, featuring the work of 12 artists from across the U.S. and Canada. Opening reception Jan. 28, at noon. Exhibit runs through March 13; gallery open Mon-Fri, from 9 am-5 pm. In the EWU Gallery of Art, Bldg. 140, Cheney campus. Free. ewu.edu/cale/ programs/art/gallery (359-2494)

WORDS

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN FEMINIST RESEARCH Associate professor Pete Porter discusses Blackfish (2013), and how filmmaker Gabriela Cowperthwaite exposes the indifference of SeaWorld toward the suffering of captive animals and how this led to preventable harms toward humans. Jan. 29, noon. Free and open to the public. EWU Monroe Hall, 526 Fifth St. (-359-6200) I DID THE TIME Hear the real-life experiences of “I Did The Time” leaders and other supporters of Smart Justice Spokane, from addiction, mental illness, and the collateral consequences of conviction records to glimmers of hope for reforming the system. Jan. 29, 3:30 pm. Free and open to the public. EWU Monroe Hall, 526 Fifth St. (359-6200) POET TERRY MARTIN The former Spokane poet reads from her highly-anticipated new collection of poetry, “The Light You Find.” Jan. 29, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. auntiesbooks.com (838-0206) CAROL PEPPE HEWITT Reading/presentation by the author of “Financing our Foodshed: Growing Local Food with Slow Money.” Jan. 30, 7-8:30 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main. (208-882-2669) STRINGTOWN PRESS READING Multiple authors featured in the collection are on site reading and discussing their work, including Terry Martin, Sandee Meade, Jeff Dunn, Jeff Gerhardstein, Sam Mills, Maya Jewell Zeller, and featured author, Steve Cleveland. Jan. 30, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. stringtownpress.org (838-0206) WINTERY POETRY WORKSHOP/ READING FEAT. THOMAS ASLIN A poetry workshop on methodologies Seattle poet Thomas Aslin has found useful in his own writing. Aslin also reads, and hosts an open mic for students of the workshop. Jan. 30-31. Readings free and open to the public. $50 suggested donation. Sandpoint Library, 1407 Cedar St. (208-255-4410) AUTHOR KSENIA ANSKE A favorite at comic cons, including SpoCon, Anske’s science fiction writing has caught the attention of many in our community and beyond. Jan. 31, 7 pm. Free. Auntie’s, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) STEVE CLEVELAND & POLLY BUCK-

RELATIONSHIPS

INGHAM Reading featuring two writers from StringTown, the indie northwest journal and press. Jan. 31, 4-6 pm. Free. BookPeople of Moscow, 521 S. Main St. stringtownpress.org (208-882-2669) BOOTSLAM Competitive performance poetry, open to writers and fans of all ages and skill levels. Poets have three minutes per to present their work, which is judged by five audience members. Feb. 1, 7-10 pm. $5. Boots Bakery & Lounge, 24 W. Main. spokanepoetryslam.org BROKEN MIC Spokane Poetry Slam’s longest-running, weekly open mic reading series, open to all readers and all-ages. Wednesdays at 6:30 pm. Free. Neato Burrito, 827 W. First. spokanepoetryslam.org (847-1234) EXCAVATING INJUSTICE “The Archaeology of a World War II Japanese Internment Camp in North Idaho” presented by Stacey Camp, an archaeologist from the University of Idaho studying the Kooskia Internment Camp site in North Idaho. Feb. 4, 6:30 pm. Free and open to the public. The MAC, 2316 W. First. northwestmuseum.org (315-5705) POETRY OUT LOUD REGIONAL FINALS The National Endowment for the Arts’ Poetry recital competition hosted locally by EWU’s Get Lit! program. Students from area high schools compete to advance to the state finals in Tacoma in March. Feb. 5, 8 pm. Free and open to the public. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague Ave. thebartlettspokane.com ANTHOLOGY A “variety show of words,” presented by RiverLit. Stories, poems, music, and comedy overlap in a night of unbridled word-slinging. RiverLit also announces its 2015 writer, poet, and artist in residence. Feb. 6, 7-9 pm. $10. The Bartlett, 228 W. Sprague Ave. riverlit.com/anthology (264-3604) EWU VISITING WRITERS SERIES A reading, Q&A and book signing with poets William Wright and Andrea Scarpino. Presented by the Inland Northwest Center for Writers MFA Program at EWU and Get Lit! Programs. Feb. 6, 8-10 pm. Free. Auntie’s Bookstore, 402 W. Main Ave. (838-0206) HARRY POTTER BOOK NIGHT A night celebrating the beloved series, with costume contests, games, crafts and snacks, with a movie screening at 7:30 pm. Feb. 6, 6 pm. Free; registration requested. CdA Public Library, 702 E. Front. cdalibrary.org (208-769-2315)

ETC.

COAL TRAINS & CLIMATE CHANGE Learn more about this issue and how ICL has been working to address the safety and environmental concerns associated with increased rail traffic. Jan. 29, 5-8 pm. Free. MickDuff’s Beer Hall, 220 Cedar, Sandpoint. (208-265-9565) PAC CON PALOUSE A pop culture convention featuring industry celebrities and notables, comic/graphic artists, a costume contest, vendors, panels and more. Jan. 31, 10 am-5 pm. $5-$20. Schweitzer Event Center (SEL), 1825 Schweitzer Dr. pacific-conventions.com SPOKANE MOVES TO AMEND THE CONSTITUTION The local activist group meets on the first Tuesdays (Feb. 3) of the month. at 6:30 pm. All are welcome. Donations accepted. Liberty Park Methodist Church, 1526 E. 11th. s-m-a-c. org (844-1776) n

Advice Goddess PlAyinG With MiSMAtcheS

I like this woman I’ve been seeing, but she’s really in love with me. I’ve been clear that I’m not ready to get more serious and that I’m really never going to be up for that with her. She’s chosen to stick around, but her best friend called me crying, saying I’m breaking her heart. (Yikes!) Is it wrong to stay with somebody whose feelings are much stronger than yours? —Troubled

AMY ALKON

She sees the two of you getting old together. You see the two of you getting together for sex on Friday. The French make this sort of mismatch sound sexy and fabulous, calling what she’s feeling “la douleur exquise” — the “exquisite pain” of wanting somebody you can’t have. But look under the hood and you’ll see an ugly stew of hormones and the psychological gotchas called cognitive biases — unconscious errors in reasoning — leading to an acute case of adult-onset puppy love. Some would argue that this woman is worshipping at your altar of her own free will (laying if not crops and a goat at your feet, then undying love, Doritos, and beer). The truth is, a cognitive bias called the “sunk cost fallacy” probably has a good bit to do with her sticking around. This describes our tendency to be irrational “investors” — deciding whether we’ll continue putting time, energy, and/or money into something based on what we’ve already put in. This is dumb, because our initial investment is gone, and throwing in more whatever won’t change that. The rational approach would be basing our decision on what kind of payoff we’re likely to see down the road. Unfortunately, though we humans have a reasoning department built into our brain, cognitive biases can keep it a plastic-wrapped no-go zone, much like my late grandma’s living room couch. Love is not always 50/50, but it also shouldn’t be, oh, 90/10. Eventually, if you have a conscience, taking advantage of her futile hopes will prey on you (if it hasn’t already). And sooner or later, she’s likely to resent and maybe even hate you for sticking around to never give her what she wants — instead providing the dating version of “Hey, we don’t sell what you need at this store, but please hang out here till we go out of business.”

SeiSMic MAtterS

I have a wonderful new boyfriend, but I’ve been avoiding sleeping over at his place because I snore. Not cute ladylike snores but loud, bed-shaking ones. I’m not overweight. (In fact, I’m in really great shape from CrossFit.) I don’t have sleep apnea. And snore strips and bite guards are useless. (This is something I’ll eventually need surgery for.) I’m afraid my boyfriend won’t be so attracted to me once he hears my “night noises.” —Stressing A guy will generally appreciate a woman who’s kind of a wild thing in bed — just not when he jolts awake to call Animal Control to show up with nets and a tranquilizer gun. Luckily, it doesn’t have to get to that point — if you and he can think a little differently about doing your sleeping in separate beds, which is supposedly the province of couples who last had sex when FDR was in office. It’s actually that of couples looking to wake up rested instead of exhausted. Though romantic partners insisted to sleep researcher James Horne that they sleep best when they share a bed, the squiggly line of his sleep-monitoring gizmo said otherwise, suggesting that separate beds make for a far less interrupted night’s rest. (This is especially true for anyone with a partner who cage-fights in her dreams, wakes up frequently to sleep-drive to Home Depot, or snores like an asthmatic wolverine.) Because that which does not kill us can still scare us awake — and because big scary facts tend to shrink to a more manageable size when revealed in advance — you should tell the guy about your snoring instead of letting him find out. And because we judge things by comparison, let him think the worst — if only for a moment. Say, “There’s something I have to tell you…” He’ll wonder, “Oh, no…do I need to go to the clinic?” He should be relieved when you reveal that you “breathe loudly” in your sleep — that is, in a way that announces you’re still alive…to neighbors two doors down. Next, present the solution: doing the fun stuff together in the same bed but slumbering separately. If the guy’s got any smarts, he’ll put this in perspective. The good news: You have an ass like a 22-year-old stripper. The bad news: You snore like a drunken hobo on a bench. (Can’t win ‘em all!) n ©2015, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. • Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon, 171 Pier Ave, #280, Santa Monica, CA 90405 or email AdviceAmy@aol.com (www.advicegoddess.com)

JANUARY 29, 2015 INLANDER 57


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THIS

ACROSS 1. Kettle sound 5. Kindle competitor 9. TV courtroom drama, 1986-94 14. Eyebrow shape 15. Sea eagle 16. Capri, per esempio 17. Last name in “Star Wars” 18. Winetaster’s asset 19. Three-star rank: Abbr. 20. Winners of Super Bowls XXXII and XXXIII 22. Stewart in the “Wordplay” crossword documentary 23. Frank topper 24. Cry 26. World Series winners in 2010 & 2012 27. With 46-Across, #61 on the American Film Institute’s list of best movie quotes of all time ... and a hint to this puzzle’s theme

32. Frank admission 33. Corpulent 34. Neither’s partner 37. Literary character who says “God bless us every one!” 39. Destroyer in 2000 headlines 42. In need of a lift 43. “___ the ramparts we watched ...” 45. Removed, as from office 46. See 27-Across 49. The only playable six-letter word ending in “mt,” according to the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary 52. Make content 53. Dahl who created Willy Wonka 54. Certain Halloween costumes, for short 55. First word of “Citizen Kane” and #17 on AFI’s list of best movie

quotes of all time 60. Aquarium growth 61. “The Night of the Hunter” star Robert 63. Boss of “The Dukes of Hazzard” 64. “Twilight” protagonist 65. Run before Q 66. Ancient sorcerer 67. “Golf Begins at Forty” author Sam 68. Hankerings 69. Good name for a Dalmatian DOWN 1. Company that makes Scrabble 2. Fe, chemically 3. Org. represented at 1963’s March on Washington 4. “Git!” 5. Country with Sherpas 6. “#1 Brand for Teething Pain Relief”

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13. List in a wish list 21. Worry about 25. Missy ____ with the 2002 hit “Work It” 26. Started to melt, say 27. They’re taken in high sch.

W

28. Adidas alternative ANSW EEK’S 29. In the distance, poetically I S ERS ON AW Y 30. Rte. 66, e.g. OUS 31. Fraternity T 34. ____ to self 35. Pulitzer-winning author Robert ____ Butler 36. TV’s Foxx 38. Encountered 40. More certain 41. Show featuring the LVPD 44. “Goosebumps” series author 46. “I’m not listening ...” 47. “Oh no! My parents caught me!” 48. Singer Sheena 49. In dribs and ____ 50. 1997 N.L. Rookie of the Year Scott ____ 51. Birdie beater 54. Oscar : film :: ____ : TV 56. Units of electrical resistance 57. Ivory, e.g. 58. Brand in the frozen food section 59. Spending plan 62. Easy dupes

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60 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015

I Saw You

I Saw You

I Saw You

Cheers

River City It was Tuesday evening 1/20/15 at the downtown brewery. You were standing at the end of the bar where my friend and I were enjoying our drinks while I was getting a growler fill. We struck up a conversation about Ellensburg and Roslyn. It was a true breath of fresh air running into someone who, even though a stranger, is kind, handsome, talkative, and likes good beer. Sometimes it is the fleeting moments, chance meetings, the person who you will most likely never cross paths with again, that make life fun and exciting. You brought a smile to me face. Thank you for coming in for a beer when you did.

would ever have the chance to take you on a date. In college I finally got my chance, we went on that date and hit it off. It seemed like a match made in heaven. Over time we slowly grew apart and eventually decided to part ways. I saw you at the Gonzaga game the other night and all the emotions came back, butterflies included! Fate has always kept us within an arms reach of each other and I can’t help but think it is doing it again. I’m not sure when my next chance will be or if I will have one but if fate is on our side i’ll be ready and I hope you will too!

know it was you. I will say you had black slacks and tall boots. I had a white baseball cap and a black leather jacket. If you could spare some time for coffee or maybe a drink, or maybe just a few emails to start, please reply to isawyouinstateline@hotmail. com and tell me something about our encounter so I know it’s you.

my mother more and more every day. Words can not express how much I love you and how proud I am to be your daughter. Thank you for all you do and thank you for being my very best friend.

Cute Girl, Artfully Crafted I Saw You at Costco, Sunday, January 18th at 2 o’clock. You: wearing colorful layers with white tassels underneath, warm moccasin slippers, your hair color vibrant, your blue eyes lucid and alive, asked me where to find things for craftmaking. As I gave you a not-so-great answer, you kinda hid faintly under your scarf. You were smiling. And a chord struck deeply in my heart. A beautiful moment I loved intrinsically. But also pretended not to notice... And we went our separate ways. I didn’t know if I should feel foolish or not. That fleeting moment is still with me, feels like an opportunity missed perfectly, a chance to meet someone who is special. Someone unique …Beautiful. I hope you see this. Would love to hit a gallery together sometime. Moonlady Hey Moonlady, now every time I see the moon I think of you and smile. Beautiful Brunette I saw you in middle school years ago and had a crush on you, I ran into you a few years later in high school and wondered if I

TO C O N N E C T

Put a non-identifying email address in your message, like “petals327@yahoo. com” — not “j.smith@ comcast.net.” Trader Joe’s You started by putting a bag on your head and ended by complimenting my mustache. In between there was something about Friday’s requiring immature behavior and the quality of TJ’s burrito’s. I walked away thoroughly charmed and spent the rest of the weekend thinking about those freckles and green eyes. State Line Twice in 5 minutes. First of all, you are the most beautiful, most gorgeous woman I’ve ever seen. I saw you in State Line on Saturday, January 24th, at 12:05 pm outside of a business. We were about 15 feet apart. Our eyes met and we exchanged smiles. About 5 minutes later we met again, in a store across the street. I was in line and you were just leaving. I said hello! We meet again! And you smiled, laughed, and said something simple but I clearly remember it. (Hope you do too.) I could describe you and your vehicle to a T. But if I did, everyone would

Cheers Stranded I want to express my appreciation to both the Washington State Patrol trooper and the tow truck driver that helped me out as I was stuck on the side of the road in the middle of the night. I was feeling very helpless at the time and the two of you made my night a little less miserable. Your hard work probably goes unnoticed quite frequently, but not this time! THANK YOU! Spokane Valley Little Caesars Thank you to the owner and co-workers at the Argonne Little Caesars for believing in the Violence Against Women Act! I needed a little help from you guys last month and the owner was extremely helpful, kind, and prompt. He even called back to check up on me and the situation. THANK YOU! Another Year I look forward every week to reading the “good” paper. I like the “Jeers”. I am a 75 year old reader. My Mom I just wanted to let you know how inspiring it is to me that you are able to quit the nicotine addiction you have struggled with for the last 30 plus years. You not only inspire me to better myself but remind me of how proud I am to be your daughter. You wake up every day and look forward to going to your job where you are an amazing and caring advocate to others who need little guidance in there life. I am so lucky that I turn into

Hospice House Sheryl, Robin, and everyone at Hospice House; CNAs, nurses, social workers, cooks, cleaners, doctors, and volunteers. You are more wonderful than words can express. For all that pass through your doors... thank you. You took care of someone I had the privilege of knowing, whose family entrusted you with his care. You welcomed him, respected and comforted him. You gave his children a safe place to say goodbye and to know how precious they were to him. You offered his family a depth of understanding that eased the agony of their profound loss. Your support held them in balance as the center of their world slipped away... carried home like wind through the trees, like stars in the sky. Naomi You are such an amazing woman. I feel like this could possibly be the start to something truly awesome... xoxoxo Come Celebrate Loralee Barks is taking her apron off for the last time! She was your friendly waitress at The Shack from 1981 - 2003. She’s continued serving at Rosauers since 2004! Celebrate & honor “Lori” Friday at 3:15 PM, 9414 N Division! Ryan & Richard love you!

Jeers Jeers to the Flu for Taking Him Too Soon I would like to write a big jeers to the flu for taking “Cheddar” Chad Rattray from us all too soon! He passed away the morning of January 20th, 2015 from complications of the flu, an all too cruel way to go for someone who

“I Saw You” is for adults 18 or older. The Inlander reserves the right to edit or reject any advertisement at any time at its sole discretion and assumes no responsibility for the content.


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Jeers dedicated their life to working hard to better themselves. Chad was outside of the Bank of America building downtown come rain or shine, he stood in bitter temperatures, freezing rain, and mounting snow selling hot dogs to pay for his education. And he was the nicest guy you could think of, a smile for everyone customer or not. Then just when his dreams are coming true and he gets a job with a “real paycheck and insurance” as he put it, a little over a month later the flu cruelly takes his life. Jeers to you flu. We will miss you Chad! Hit and Run To the dark, long haired man in the white SUV who backed straight into the parked teal Subaru Outback in the parking lot behind Steelhead on January 16th around 6:45 pm. You didn’t even try to turn your wheels coming out of the parking space and backed right into the Subaru, hitting it so hard it bounced off the Audi station wagon parked directly behind it. I saw you get out and look at the front of the Subaru and drive away. The blonde in your passenger seat did nothing either. I inspected the damage and there was a huge dent on the front of the car, driver’s side. I did not see that you left a note with your insurance information for the owner. Sorry, Subaru, I didn’t get the license plate as this person got out of there too fast. Maybe

Jeers

Jeers

there is a security camera that you aware that people can witnessed the event. purchase a gun in a city or state that has lax gun control RE: Seahawk Haters OK, lets laws and actually take that be real, yes the Seahawks got gun to one of the cities you lucky. I’m not a Seahawk or mentioned? Given the freedom Green Bay fan but that was a of movement we enjoy, there lucky, everything falling into is effectively no relationship place ending. If they were so between local gun control skilled, they would not have to laws and the ability to obtain come from behind for one, a a gun. The tired argument fake field goal is a 50/50 odds that strict gun control laws are play, and onside kick there was ineffective is correct unless no skill involved, the player and until strict gun control from the other team fumbled laws are implemented at the the ball, not because you were federal level. I won’t bother skilled, because he was clumsy to respond to your snarky (and you got lucky enough to comments about the inability recover it). Scoring 14 points of your gun to kill anyone on in the last 5 minutes is rare, its own other than to ask if covering 70 yards in two you actually thought up this passes only happened because cleverness on your own or did Green Bay tried to play man to some five year old help out? man, people who have played football know what coverage RE: Dangerous Guns Wow! should have been played by That was quite a stunning the Packers and he never display of Neo Con “logic”. would have caught the ball. I Now that everything in think you’re getting skill mixed this country has become up with a little luck and a very bi-partisan then it’s only fair good team, Seattle is a good to show that the liberals will team and any good team you not be outdone by stupidity. give a chance to will put you So.. without further ado.. I away if you give them enough now present: Five “Clever” breaks. If they had so much Neo Conservative Examples skill as you are trying to say, of Things to do With a 30.06 they never would have trailed. Remington. #5. Makes Good skill, I mean luck in the a handy jack handle. #4. Superbowl, lol. Really “kicks ass” on your liberal brother in laws measly RE: Dangerous Guns To the .22 long. #3. Always bring man with the lazy gun. You along on that first date. (to mentioned the high murder make a good impression). #2. rate in 4 cities that have Blasting one off every time strict gun control laws. Are your team scores a touchdown at the big game. And the #1 “clever” thing to do with a 30.06 (drums please): Leaving it unattended with an open box of shells in a shopping cart at Yokes to see if anyone notices... Thank you but I already have plenty spoons. LOL Rasputin.

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Actually: The Movie Factual-accuracy nitpickers may miss the larger point of movies, but they serve an important purpose BY DANIEL WALTERS

T

here’s one word defining this year’s Oscar conversation: “Actually.” Sure, numerous critics tell us, Selma was a bracing, inspiring depiction of the courage of civil rights leaders in the lead-up to the march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama. But actually President Lyndon Baines Johnson was a close ally, not a dismissive skeptic of Martin Luther King, Jr. during that period. Just so you know. With half of the Best Picture nominees based on true stories, quibbling is inevitable. Actually, Chris Kyle didn’t join the military because he saw American deaths on the news and Alan Turing wasn’t actually quite as cold or as closeted as he appears in The Imitation Game, and Stephen Hawking actually was diagnosed with ALS before he started dating Jane Wilde. Past Best Picture contenders get scrutinized too. Actually, Mark Zuckerberg didn’t invent Facebook because of a breakup with his girlfriend. Actually, Sandra Bullock’s hair wouldn’t look like that in space. And for that matter, William Wallace didn’t actually wear a kilt, and the embassy staff members didn’t actually escape Iran with military vehicles chasing their plane, and torture didn’t actually help us catch Bin Laden. It’s a constant source of tension between lovers of facts and lovers of art. On one side you have New York Times columnist Maureen Dowd, who fretted that Selma’s portrayal of LBJ wasn’t just inaccurate, it was hazardous. “Artful falsehood is more dangerous than artless falsehood, because fewer people see through it,” Dowd wrote. Plenty have noted the absurdity, after watching a

62 INLANDER JANUARY 29, 2015

movie almost entirely about black civil rights leaders risking their lives to oppose injustice, of obsessing over whether the old white guy — then the most powerful man in the world — was given a fair shake. And they’re right: LBJ’s defenders distract from the movie’s more central and important themes. Before the debate over Selma, the Washington Post’s Alyssa Rosenberg tackled the spate of fact-checking pieces generally. “History and nonfiction are constrained by what is true and what we can reasonably ascertain,” she wrote. “It is fiction’s liberty and fiction’s responsibility to take us further.” Yet it’s precisely those nitpickers who give historical fiction that liberty. In nonfiction, truth is paramount: When Michael Moore and Morgan Spurlock flatten timelines and leave out important facts in documentaries, it’s a huge problem. Pure fiction, by contrast, lives or dies on theme, not facts. Despite the Internet videos that rattle off plot holes, The Dark Knight wasn’t any less powerful because of the logistical unlikelihood of the Joker smuggling explosives under a hospital. But based-on-a-true-story stories rest in an uneasy gulf in between. There’s a saying that translations from one language to another can be beautiful or faithful, but not both. The same is true when translating historical facts into historical fiction. A true story, with all its lumps, rarely fits nicely into the rising action-climax-denouement structure of a two-hour film, so filmmakers change the story. That’s not to say that every diversion from the his-

Factual inaccuracies may not make Selma, American Sniper and The Imitation Game worse films, but they’re still worth considering. torical record makes for a better movie: Selma is strongest amid the streets, diners and churches of Alabama and weakest inside the Oval Office. An LBJ as cautious pragmatist would have been more convincing than an LBJ suddenly moving from dismissing civil rights legislation to championing it. But ultimately, successful movies are impressionistic portraits, not photographs. They aim to capture hue, lighting, tone and theme, rather than every pixel. It’s when you step back from them, and squint, that they should be communicating something true and profound. Dowd has a point: We often learn the most through fiction. Few will sit through a history course on Martin Luther King, Jr. or read a thick biography of LBJ, but they will pay money to watch an incredibly well-filmed, well-acted movie. Misconceptions portrayed in fiction risk congealing into conventional wisdom. But Dowd’s fretting overlooks how columns like hers prevent that from happening. Movies don’t exist in a vacuum — they exist alongside their criticism. Fans of Selma are likely to both watch the movie and read the criticism, learning far more about MLK and LBJ than they ever would have before. The best historical fiction whets our appetite for historical fact. As soon as the credits roll, we power up our smartphones and start searching for answers: What was the deal with the priest who was killed by those racists in Selma? What did John Lewis end up doing in Congress? Did George Wallace ever get a little less evil? Did the FBI seriously harass King that directly? And that’s where the parade of actually’s serves a useful purpose: Not just as a counterpoint to artistic license, but as an extension of that license. Filmmakers have the freedom to tell an amazing story that illuminates a larger truth, in part because they know that journalists and historians will help correct the record and tell the rest of the story. Yes, the nitpickers and fact-checkers often miss the forest for the trees. But they play useful roles as lumberjacks, chopping down rot and clearing out underbrush, allowing the rest of us to more clearly see the true shape of things.  danielw@inlander.com


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